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Sample records for radio-resistant bacteria prediction

  1. The role of depressed metabolism in increased radio resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musacchia, X. J.

    1972-01-01

    Studies are presented of the physiology of depressed metabolism, radio-resistance in depressed metabolic states, comparative aspects of depressed metabolism, and gastrointestinal responses to ionizing radiation. Specific data cover helium-cold induced hypothermia in white rats and hamsters, and radiation responses and intestinal absorption in the gerbil.

  2. Model to predict aerial dispersal of bacteria during environmental release.

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, G R

    1989-01-01

    Risk assessment for genetically engineered bacteria sprayed onto crops includes determination of off-site dispersal and deposition. The ability to predict microbial dispersal patterns is essential to characterize the uncertainty (risk) associated with environmental release of recombinant organisms. Toward this end, a particle dispersal model was developed to predict recovery of bacteria on fallout plates at various distances and directions about a test site. The microcomputer simulation incorporates particle size distribution, wind speed and direction, turbulence, evaporation, sedimentation, and mortality, with a time step of 0.5 s. The model was tested against data reported from three field applications of nonrecombinant bacteria and two applications of recombinant bacteria. Simulated dispersal of 10(5) particles was compared with reported deposition measurements. The model may be useful in defining appropriate populations of organisms for release, methods of release or application, characteristics of a release site that influence containment or dispersal, and in developing an appropriate sampling methodology for monitoring the dispersal of organisms such as genetically engineered bacteria. PMID:2604402

  3. Computational prediction of regulatory, premature transcription termination in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Millman, Adi; Dar, Daniel; Shamir, Maya; Sorek, Rotem

    2017-01-01

    A common strategy for regulation of gene expression in bacteria is conditional transcription termination. This strategy is frequently employed by 5′UTR cis-acting RNA elements (riboregulators), including riboswitches and attenuators. Such riboregulators can assume two mutually exclusive RNA structures, one of which forms a transcriptional terminator and results in premature termination, and the other forms an antiterminator that allows read-through into the coding sequence to produce a full-length mRNA. We developed a machine-learning based approach, which, given a 5′UTR of a gene, predicts whether it can form the two alternative structures typical to riboregulators employing conditional termination. Using a large positive training set of riboregulators derived from 89 human microbiome bacteria, we show high specificity and sensitivity for our classifier. We further show that our approach allows the discovery of previously unidentified riboregulators, as exemplified by the detection of new LeuA leaders and T-boxes in Streptococci. Finally, we developed PASIFIC (www.weizmann.ac.il/molgen/Sorek/PASIFIC/), an online web-server that, given a user-provided 5′UTR sequence, predicts whether this sequence can adopt two alternative structures conforming with the conditional termination paradigm. This webserver is expected to assist in the identification of new riboswitches and attenuators in the bacterial pan-genome. PMID:27574119

  4. Prediction of molecular mimicry candidates in human pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Doxey, Andrew C; McConkey, Brendan J

    2013-08-15

    Molecular mimicry of host proteins is a common strategy adopted by bacterial pathogens to interfere with and exploit host processes. Despite the availability of pathogen genomes, few studies have attempted to predict virulence-associated mimicry relationships directly from genomic sequences. Here, we analyzed the proteomes of 62 pathogenic and 66 non-pathogenic bacterial species, and screened for the top pathogen-specific or pathogen-enriched sequence similarities to human proteins. The screen identified approximately 100 potential mimicry relationships including well-characterized examples among the top-scoring hits (e.g., RalF, internalin, yopH, and others), with about 1/3 of predicted relationships supported by existing literature. Examination of homology to virulence factors, statistically enriched functions, and comparison with literature indicated that the detected mimics target key host structures (e.g., extracellular matrix, ECM) and pathways (e.g., cell adhesion, lipid metabolism, and immune signaling). The top-scoring and most widespread mimicry pattern detected among pathogens consisted of elevated sequence similarities to ECM proteins including collagens and leucine-rich repeat proteins. Unexpectedly, analysis of the pathogen counterparts of these proteins revealed that they have evolved independently in different species of bacterial pathogens from separate repeat amplifications. Thus, our analysis provides evidence for two classes of mimics: complex proteins such as enzymes that have been acquired by eukaryote-to-pathogen horizontal transfer, and simpler repeat proteins that have independently evolved to mimic the host ECM. Ultimately, computational detection of pathogen-specific and pathogen-enriched similarities to host proteins provides insights into potentially novel mimicry-mediated virulence mechanisms of pathogenic bacteria.

  5. Prediction of molecular mimicry candidates in human pathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Doxey, Andrew C; McConkey, Brendan J

    2013-01-01

    Molecular mimicry of host proteins is a common strategy adopted by bacterial pathogens to interfere with and exploit host processes. Despite the availability of pathogen genomes, few studies have attempted to predict virulence-associated mimicry relationships directly from genomic sequences. Here, we analyzed the proteomes of 62 pathogenic and 66 non-pathogenic bacterial species, and screened for the top pathogen-specific or pathogen-enriched sequence similarities to human proteins. The screen identified approximately 100 potential mimicry relationships including well-characterized examples among the top-scoring hits (e.g., RalF, internalin, yopH, and others), with about 1/3 of predicted relationships supported by existing literature. Examination of homology to virulence factors, statistically enriched functions, and comparison with literature indicated that the detected mimics target key host structures (e.g., extracellular matrix, ECM) and pathways (e.g., cell adhesion, lipid metabolism, and immune signaling). The top-scoring and most widespread mimicry pattern detected among pathogens consisted of elevated sequence similarities to ECM proteins including collagens and leucine-rich repeat proteins. Unexpectedly, analysis of the pathogen counterparts of these proteins revealed that they have evolved independently in different species of bacterial pathogens from separate repeat amplifications. Thus, our analysis provides evidence for two classes of mimics: complex proteins such as enzymes that have been acquired by eukaryote-to-pathogen horizontal transfer, and simpler repeat proteins that have independently evolved to mimic the host ECM. Ultimately, computational detection of pathogen-specific and pathogen-enriched similarities to host proteins provides insights into potentially novel mimicry-mediated virulence mechanisms of pathogenic bacteria. PMID:23715053

  6. Isolation and analysis of UV and radio-resistant bacteria from Chernobyl.

    PubMed

    Zavilgelsky, G B; Abilev, S K; Sukhodolets, V V; Ahmad, S I

    1998-05-15

    The accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power station in 1986 led to the dispersal of large amounts of a variety of radioactive materials, most importantly uranium, plutonium, 137Cs, 131I and 90Sr, over very large distances estimated to reach as far as Sweden, Norway, Turkey and possibly the USA. As a consequence, the soil on which the radioactive materials fell was contaminated and the degree of contamination varied with distance from the station, the direction and strength of the wind and the amount of atmospheric scavenging by rainfall at that time. Some of the radioactive materials have left a significant impact on mankind in the form of chromosomal aberrations including trisomy, various forms of cancers and death, whilst others are still in the ground where they will remain for a prolonged period to continue to exert their effects. Likewise, microbes living in the soil and exposed to radioactive materials may have been affected in a number of ways; some perished, and others survived due to the acquisition of advantageous mutation. Six years after the accident, soil samples contaminated with different levels of radioactivity were obtained from five regions within a 30 km radius of the nuclear power plant. From these soil samples spore-forming bacilli were isolated, quantified, identified and tested for resistance to X-rays, UVC and 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO). As a control, spore-forming bacilli were obtained from 'Zeleny mys' (an area 50 km south-east of the power station and emitting basal levels of radioactivity). A mutant of Escherichia coli hyper-resistant to a variety of DNA-damaging agents and its parent strain were also included in the study. Analysis of results reveals that a proportion of isolates of the same species from near the power station and the E. coli mutant SA236 were more resistant to X-rays, UVC and 4NQO compared with isolates from the control site and the E. coli parent strain, KL14, respectively.

  7. Predicting Fecal Indicator Bacteria Concentrations in the South Fork Broad River Watershed Using Virtual Beach

    EPA Science Inventory

    Virtual Beach (VB) is a decision support tool that constructs site-specific statistical models to predict fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) at recreational beaches. Although primarily designed for making decisions regarding beach closures or issuance of swimming advisories based on...

  8. Pivotal role for skin transendothelial radio-resistant anti-inflammatory macrophages in tissue repair

    PubMed Central

    Barreiro, Olga; Cibrian, Danay; Clemente, Cristina; Alvarez, David; Moreno, Vanessa; Valiente, Íñigo; Bernad, Antonio; Vestweber, Dietmar; Arroyo, Alicia G; Martín, Pilar; von Andrian, Ulrich H; Sánchez Madrid, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Heterogeneity and functional specialization among skin-resident macrophages are incompletely understood. In this study, we describe a novel subset of murine dermal perivascular macrophages that extend protrusions across the endothelial junctions in steady-state and capture blood-borne macromolecules. Unlike other skin-resident macrophages that are reconstituted by bone marrow-derived progenitors after a genotoxic insult, these cells are replenished by an extramedullary radio-resistant and UV-sensitive Bmi1+ progenitor. Furthermore, they possess a distinctive anti-inflammatory transcriptional profile, which cannot be polarized under inflammatory conditions, and are involved in repair and remodeling functions for which other skin-resident macrophages appear dispensable. Based on all their properties, we define these macrophages as Skin Transendothelial Radio-resistant Anti-inflammatory Macrophages (STREAM) and postulate that their preservation is important for skin homeostasis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15251.001 PMID:27304075

  9. Sensitization of radio-resistant prostate cancer cells with a unique cytolethal distending toxin

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Chih-Ho; Chang, Chia-Shuo; Liu, Hsin-Ho; Tsai, Yuh-Shyan; Hsu, Feng-Ming; Yu, Yung-Luen; Lai, Cheng-Kuo; Gandee, Leah; Pong, Rey-Chen; Hsu, Heng-Wei; Yu, Lan; Saha, Debabrata; Hsieh, Jer-Tsong

    2014-01-01

    Cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) produced by Campylobacter jejuni is a genotoxin that induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in mammalian cells. Recent studies have demonstrated that prostate cancer (PCa) cells can acquire radio-resistance when DOC-2/DAB2 interactive protein (DAB2IP) is downregulated. In this study, we showed that CDT could induce cell death in DAB2IP-deficient PCa cells. A combination of CDT and radiotherapy significantly elicited cell death in DAB2IP-deficient PCa cells by inhibiting the repair of ionizing radiation (IR)-induced DNA double-strand break (DSB) during G2/M arrest, which is triggered by ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-dependent DNA damage checkpoint responses. We also found that CDT administration significantly increased the efficacy of radiotherapy in a xenograft mouse model. These results indicate that CDT can be a potent therapeutic agent for radio-resistant PCa. PMID:25015118

  10. Genotyping Oral Commensal Bacteria to Predict Social Contact and Structure

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Amelia D.; Riley, Lee W.

    2016-01-01

    Social network structure is a fundamental determinant of human health, from infectious to chronic diseases. However, quantitative and unbiased approaches to measuring social network structure are lacking. We hypothesized that genetic relatedness of oral commensal bacteria could be used to infer social contact between humans, just as genetic relatedness of pathogens can be used to determine transmission chains of pathogens. We used a traditional, questionnaire survey-based method to characterize the contact network of the School of Public Health at a large research university. We then collected saliva from a subset of individuals to analyze their oral microflora using a modified deep sequencing multilocus sequence typing (MLST) procedure. We examined micro-evolutionary changes in the S. viridans group to uncover transmission patterns reflecting social network structure. We amplified seven housekeeping gene loci from the Streptococcus viridans group, a group of ubiquitous commensal bacteria, and sequenced the PCR products using next-generation sequencing. By comparing the generated S. viridans reads between pairs of individuals, we reconstructed the social network of the sampled individuals and compared it to the network derived from the questionnaire survey-based method. The genetic relatedness significantly (p-value < 0.001) correlated with social distance in the questionnaire-based network, and the reconstructed network closely matched the network derived from the questionnaire survey-based method. Oral commensal bacterial are thus likely transmitted through routine physical contact or shared environment. Their genetic relatedness can be used to represent a combination of social contact and shared physical space, therefore reconstructing networks of contact. This study provides the first step in developing a method to measure direct social contact based on commensal organism genotyping, potentially capable of unmasking hidden social networks that contribute to

  11. Predicting Chemical Environments of Bacteria from Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Silke; Sourjik, Victor; Endres, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Sensory systems have evolved to respond to input stimuli of certain statistical properties, and to reliably transmit this information through biochemical pathways. Hence, for an experimentally well-characterized sensory system, one ought to be able to extract valuable information about the statistics of the stimuli. Based on dose-response curves from in vivo fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments of the bacterial chemotaxis sensory system, we predict the chemical gradients chemotactic Escherichia coli cells typically encounter in their natural environment. To predict average gradients cells experience, we revaluate the phenomenological Weber's law and its generalizations to the Weber-Fechner law and fold-change detection. To obtain full distributions of gradients we use information theory and simulations, considering limitations of information transmission from both cell-external and internal noise. We identify broad distributions of exponential gradients, which lead to log-normal stimuli and maximal drift velocity. Our results thus provide a first step towards deciphering the chemical nature of complex, experimentally inaccessible cellular microenvironments, such as the human intestine. PMID:25340783

  12. Sensitivity and specificity of subgingival bacteria in predicting preterm birth- a pilot cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Khalid S; El Tantawi, Maha M.; Alagl, Adel S; Alnimr, Amani M; Haseeb, Yasmeen A

    2016-01-01

    Objective Preterm birth (PTB) increases the risk of adverse outcomes for new born infants. Subgingival bacteria are implicated in causing PTB. The aim of the present study was to assess the accuracy of some subgingival gram positive and gram negative bacteria detected by routine lab procedures in predicting PTB. Methodology Pregnant Saudi women (n= 170) visiting King Fahad hospital, Dammam, Saudi Arabia, were included in a pilot cohort study. Plaque was collected in the 2nd trimester and screened for subgingival anaerobes using Vitek2. Pregnancy outcome (preterm/full term birth) was assessed at delivery. Sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative likelihood ratios were calculated for the identified bacteria to predict PTB. Results Data about time of delivery was available for 94 subjects and 22 (23.4%) had PTB. Three gram negative and 4 gram positive subgingival bacteria had sensitivity ≥ 95% with two of each having negative likelihood ratios ≤0.10. Three gram positive bacteria had specificity > 95% with only one having positive likelihood ratio >2. Conclusion Subgingival bacteria identified using readily available lab techniques in the plaque of pregnant Saudi women in their 2nd trimester have useful potential to rule out PTB. PMID:27833518

  13. ERK/p38 MAPK inhibition reduces radio-resistance to a pulsed proton beam in breast cancer stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Myung-Hwan; Park, Jeong Chan

    2015-10-01

    Recent studies have identified highly tumorigenic cells with stem cell-like characteristics, termed cancer stem cells (CSCs) in human cancers. CSCs are resistant to conventional radiotherapy and chemotherapy owing to their high DNA repair ability and oncogene overexpression. However, the mechanisms regulating CSC radio-resistance, particularly proton beam resistance, remain unclear. We isolated CSCs from the breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, which expressed the characteristic breast CSC membrane protein markers CD44+/CD24-/ low , and irradiated the CSCs with pulsed proton beams. We confirmed that CSCs were resistant to pulsed proton beams and showed that treatment with p38 and ERK inhibitors reduced CSC radio-resistance. Based on these results, BCSC radio-resistance can be reduced during proton beam therapy by co-treatment with ERK1/2 or p38 inhibitors, a novel approach to breast cancer therapy.

  14. Benefit of Carbon Ion Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Radio-resistant Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Kamada, Tadashi; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Yanagi, Tsuyoshi; Imai, Reiko; Mizoe, Jun-etsu; Miyamoto, Tadaaki; Kato, Hirotoshi; Yamada, Shigeru; Kato, Shingo; Yoshikawa, Kyousan; Kandatsu, Susumu

    2003-08-26

    The Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) is the world's first heavy ion accelerator complex dedicated to medical use in a hospital environment. Heavy ions have superior depth-dose distribution and greater cell-killing ability. In June 1994, clinical research for the treatment of cancer was begun using carbon ions generated by HIMAC. Until August 2002, a total of 1,297 patients were enrolled in clinical trials. Most of the patients had locally advanced and/or medically inoperable tumors. Tumors radio-resistant and/or located near critical organs were also included. The clinical trials revealed that carbon ion radiotherapy provided definite local control and offered a survival advantage without unacceptable morbidity in a variety of tumors that were hard to cure by other modalities.

  15. New features of the cell wall of the radio-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Farci, Domenica; Bowler, Matthew W; Kirkpatrick, Joanna; McSweeney, Sean; Tramontano, Enzo; Piano, Dario

    2014-07-01

    We have analyzed the cell wall of the radio-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. Unexpectedly, the bacterial envelope appears to be organized in different complexes of high molecular weight. Each complex is composed of several proteins, most of which are coded by genes of unknown function and the majority are constituents of the inner/outer membrane system. One of the most abundant complexes is constituted by the gene DR_0774. This protein is a type of secretin which is a known subunit of the homo-oligomeric channel that represents the main bulk of the type IV piliation family. Finally, a minor component of the pink envelope consists of several inner-membrane proteins. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  16. A jungle in there: bacteria in belly buttons are highly diverse, but predictable.

    PubMed

    Hulcr, Jiri; Latimer, Andrew M; Henley, Jessica B; Rountree, Nina R; Fierer, Noah; Lucky, Andrea; Lowman, Margaret D; Dunn, Robert R

    2012-01-01

    The belly button is one of the habitats closest to us, and yet it remains relatively unexplored. We analyzed bacteria and arachaea from the belly buttons of humans from two different populations sampled within a nation-wide citizen science project. We examined bacterial and archaeal phylotypes present and their diversity using multiplex pyrosequencing of 16S rDNA libraries. We then tested the oligarchy hypothesis borrowed from tropical macroecology, namely that the frequency of phylotypes in one sample of humans predicts its frequency in another independent sample. We also tested the predictions that frequent phylotypes (the oligarchs) tend to be common when present, and tend to be more phylogenetically clustered than rare phylotypes. Once rarefied to four hundred reads per sample, bacterial communities from belly buttons proved to be at least as diverse as communities known from other skin studies (on average 67 bacterial phylotypes per belly button). However, the belly button communities were strongly dominated by a few taxa: only 6 phylotypes occurred on >80% humans. While these frequent bacterial phylotypes (the archaea were all rare) are a tiny part of the total diversity of bacteria in human navels (<0.3% of phylotypes), they constitute a major portion of individual reads (~1/3), and are predictable among independent samples of humans, in terms of both the occurrence and evolutionary relatedness (more closely related than randomly drawn equal sets of phylotypes). Thus, the hypothesis that "oligarchs" dominate diverse assemblages appears to be supported by human-associated bacteria. Although it remains difficult to predict which species of bacteria might be found on a particular human, predicting which species are most frequent (or rare) seems more straightforward, at least for those species living in belly buttons.

  17. A Jungle in There: Bacteria in Belly Buttons are Highly Diverse, but Predictable

    PubMed Central

    Hulcr, Jiri; Latimer, Andrew M.; Henley, Jessica B.; Rountree, Nina R.; Fierer, Noah; Lucky, Andrea; Lowman, Margaret D.; Dunn, Robert R.

    2012-01-01

    The belly button is one of the habitats closest to us, and yet it remains relatively unexplored. We analyzed bacteria and arachaea from the belly buttons of humans from two different populations sampled within a nation-wide citizen science project. We examined bacterial and archaeal phylotypes present and their diversity using multiplex pyrosequencing of 16S rDNA libraries. We then tested the oligarchy hypothesis borrowed from tropical macroecology, namely that the frequency of phylotypes in one sample of humans predicts its frequency in another independent sample. We also tested the predictions that frequent phylotypes (the oligarchs) tend to be common when present, and tend to be more phylogenetically clustered than rare phylotypes. Once rarefied to four hundred reads per sample, bacterial communities from belly buttons proved to be at least as diverse as communities known from other skin studies (on average 67 bacterial phylotypes per belly button). However, the belly button communities were strongly dominated by a few taxa: only 6 phylotypes occurred on >80% humans. While these frequent bacterial phylotypes (the archaea were all rare) are a tiny part of the total diversity of bacteria in human navels (<0.3% of phylotypes), they constitute a major portion of individual reads (∼1/3), and are predictable among independent samples of humans, in terms of both the occurrence and evolutionary relatedness (more closely related than randomly drawn equal sets of phylotypes). Thus, the hypothesis that “oligarchs” dominate diverse assemblages appears to be supported by human-associated bacteria. Although it remains difficult to predict which species of bacteria might be found on a particular human, predicting which species are most frequent (or rare) seems more straightforward, at least for those species living in belly buttons. PMID:23144827

  18. Challenges in risk assessment and predictive microbiology of foodborne spore-forming bacteria.

    PubMed

    Augustin, Jean-Christophe

    2011-04-01

    Mathematical description of the behavior of bacterial foodborne pathogens and concepts of risk assessment were first applied to spore-forming bacteria and specially to Clostridium botulinum with numerous works dealing with spores heat destruction to ensure the safety of canned foods or with their germination and growth probability in foods. This paper discusses two aspects which appear specific to pathogenic sporeformers in comparison to vegetative microorganisms, that is, firstly, the extreme intra-species biodiversity of spore-forming bacteria and its consequences for risk assessment and, secondly, the modeling of spore germination and outgrowth processes. The intra-species biodiversity of spore-forming bacteria has a great impact on hazard identification, exposure assessment and hazard characterization leading thus to an extremely variable individual poisoning risk for consumers. The germination and outgrowth processes were shown independent at the single cell level and although numerous studies were performed to study the effect of spores treatments and growth conditions on these two events, the mathematical modeling and the prediction of these processes is still challenging today. The difficulties to accurately assess the biodiversity and the germination and outgrowth processes of spore-forming bacteria lead to a substantial uncertainty in risk estimates related to the exposure to these microorganisms. Nevertheless, significant progress have been made these last years improving the relevance of quantitative risk assessments for spore-forming bacteria and decreasing the risk uncertainty. Despite these difficulties, risk assessment still constitutes a valuable tool to justify the implementation of management options.

  19. Predicting relative toxicity of metal ions to bacteria (Microtox{reg_sign}) using ion characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    McCloskey, J.T.; Newman, M.C.; Clark, S.B.

    1995-12-31

    The use of predictive effects models with metals has received little attention in toxicology. The purpose of this study was to predict the relative toxicity of individual metal ions and metal mixtures using ion characteristics. The concentration of metal resulting in a 50% reduction in light output (EC50) in marine bacteria (Vibrio fischeri) was determined for several metals using the Microtox{reg_sign} Toxicity Analyzer. Trends in metal toxicity were predicted by combining metal speciation calculations with empirical models based on metal ion characteristics. These trends were consistent for nine divalent metals (Ca{prime} Cd, Cu, Hg, Mg, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn) whether the media mimicked salt water (NaC, medium) or freshwater (NaNO{sub 3} medium). When expanding the study to include an additional 14 mono-, di-, and trivalent metal ions, ion characteristics were still useful for predicting the relative toxicity of metal ions to bacteria. The prediction of nonadditive toxic effects using metal mixtures was also possible based on ion characteristics. Overall, models based on ion characteristics show much promise for predicting the relative toxicity of metal ions using the Microtox{reg_sign} assay.

  20. Testing for aerobic heterotrophic bacteria allows no prediction of contamination with potentially pathogenic bacteria in the output water of dental chair units

    PubMed Central

    Bristela, Margit; Skolka, Astrid; Schmid-Schwap, Martina; Piehslinger, Eva; Indra, Alexander; Wewalka, Günther; Stauffer, Fritz

    2012-01-01

    Background: Currently, to our knowledge, quality of output water of dental chair units is not covered by specific regulations in the European Union, and national recommendations are heterogeneous. In Germany, water used in dental chair units must follow drinking water quality. In the United States of America, testing for aerobic heterotrophic bacteria is recommended. The present study was performed to evaluate whether the counts of aerobic heterotrophic bacteria correlate with the presence of potentially pathogenic bacteria such as Legionella spp. or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Methods: 71 samples were collected from 26 dental chair units with integrated disinfection device and 31 samples from 15 outlets of the water distribution pipework within the department were examined. Samples were tested for aerobic heterotrophic bacteria at 35°C and 22°C using different culture media and for Legionella spp. and for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Additionally, strains of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 were typed with monoclonal antibodies and representative samples of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 were typed by sequence based typing. Results: Our results showed a correlation between different agars for aerobic heterotrophic bacteria but no correlation for the count of aerobic heterotrophic bacteria and the presence of Legionella spp. or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Conclusion: Testing for aerobic heterotrophic bacteria in output water or water distribution pipework within the departments alone is without any value for predicting whether the water is contaminated with potentially pathogenic bacteria like Legionella spp. or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PMID:22558046

  1. Modelling and predicting the simultaneous growth of Escherichia coli and lactic acid bacteria in milk.

    PubMed

    Ačai, P; Valík, L'; Medved'ová, A; Rosskopf, F

    2016-09-01

    Modelling and predicting the simultaneous competitive growth of Escherichia coli and starter culture of lactic acid bacteria (Fresco 1010, Chr. Hansen, Hørsholm, Denmark) was studied in milk at different temperatures and Fresco inoculum concentrations. The lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were able to induce an early stationary state in E. coli The developed model described and tested the growth inhibition of E. coli (with initial inoculum concentration 10(3) CFU/mL) when LAB have reached maximum density in different conditions of temperature (ranging from 12 ℃ to 30 ℃) and for various inoculum sizes of LAB (ranging from approximately 10(3) to 10(7) CFU/mL). The prediction ability of the microbial competition model (the Baranyi and Roberts model coupled with the Gimenez and Dalgaard model) was first performed only with parameters estimated from individual growth of E. coli and the LAB and then with the introduced competition coefficients evaluated from co-culture growth of E. coli and LAB in milk. Both the results and their statistical indices showed that the model with incorporated average values of competition coefficients improved the prediction of E. coli behaviour in co-culture with LAB.

  2. Predictive Factors of Spontaneous Bacterial Peritonitis Caused by Gram-Positive Bacteria in Patients With Cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Ho; Jeon, Yong Duk; Jung, In Young; Ahn, Mi Young; Ahn, Hea Won; Ahn, Jin Young; Ku, Nam Su; Han, Sang Hoon; Choi, Jun Yong; Ahn, Sang Hoon; Song, Young Goo; Han, Kwang Hyub; Kim, June Myung

    2016-04-01

    Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) in patients with cirrhosis is typically caused by gram-negative bacteria. However, the number of SBP cases due to gram-positive bacteria is steadily increasing. To date, little is known about the predictive factors involved in SBP infections.We performed a retrospective cohort study of patients (>18 years) with SBP due to gram-positive and -negative bacteria who were enrolled from January 2006 to December 2013 at Severance Hospital in Seoul, Korea where the incidences of hepatitis B virus associated chronic liver disease, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma are high. Only the 1st SBP episode for each patient within the study period was included in our analysis.We identified 77 patients with cirrhosis and SBP. Of these, 27 patients (35%) had gram-positive bacterial infections and 50 patients (65%) had gram-negative bacterial infections. Our univariate analysis revealed that an early stage of cirrhosis (P = 0.004), lower creatinine level (P = 0.011), lower Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score (P = 0.001), lower Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score (P = 0.005), and use of systemic antibiotics within 30 days before SBP diagnosis (P = 0.03) were significantly associated with gram-positive bacterial infections. Our multivariate analysis indicated that the use of systemic antibiotics within 30 days before SBP diagnosis (odds ratio, 3.94; 95% CI, 1.11-13.96; P = 0.033) and a lower SOFA score (odds ratio, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.37-0.86; P = 0.007) were independent predictive factors of SBP caused by gram-positive bacterial infections in patients with cirrhosis. However, we did not observe a statistically significant difference in the 28-day mortality between the gram-positive and -negative bacterial infection groups (40.7% vs 46.0%, respectively; P = 0.407).In this study, the incidence rate of SBP caused by gram-positive bacteria in patients with cirrhosis was similar to the rates reported

  3. Computational prediction of type III and IV secreted effectors in Gram-negative bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, Jason E.; Corrigan, Abigail L.; Peterson, Elena S.; Oehmen, Christopher S.; Niemann, George; Cambronne, Eric; Sharp, Danna; Adkins, Joshua N.; Samudrala, Ram; Heffron, Fred

    2011-01-01

    In this review, we provide an overview of the methods employed by four recent papers that described novel methods for computational prediction of secreted effectors from type III and IV secretion systems in Gram-negative bacteria. The results of the studies in terms of performance at accurately predicting secreted effectors and similarities found between secretion signals that may reflect biologically relevant features for recognition. We discuss the web-based tools for secreted effector prediction described in these studies and announce the availability of our tool, the SIEVEserver (http://www.biopilot.org). Finally, we assess the accuracy of the three type III effector prediction methods on a small set of proteins not known prior to the development of these tools that we have recently discovered and validated using both experimental and computational approaches. Our comparison shows that all methods use similar approaches and, in general arrive at similar conclusions. We discuss the possibility of an order-dependent motif in the secretion signal, which was a point of disagreement in the studies. Our results show that there may be classes of effectors in which the signal has a loosely defined motif, and others in which secretion is dependent only on compositional biases. Computational prediction of secreted effectors from protein sequences represents an important step toward better understanding the interaction between pathogens and hosts.

  4. International Space Station Bacteria Filter Element Post-Flight Testing and Service Life Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, J. L.; von Jouanne, R. G.; Turner, E. H.

    2003-01-01

    The International Space Station uses high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters to remove particulate matter from the cabin atmosphere. Known as Bacteria Filter Elements (BFEs), there are 13 elements deployed on board the ISS's U.S. Segment. The pre-flight service life prediction of 1 year for the BFEs is based upon performance engineering analysis of data collected during developmental testing that used a synthetic dust challenge. While this challenge is considered reasonable and conservative from a design perspective, an understanding of the actual filter loading is required to best manage the critical ISS Program resources. Thus testing was conducted on BFEs returned from the ISS to refine the service life prediction. Results from this testing and implications to ISS resource management are discussed. Recommendations for realizing significant savings to the ISS Program are presented.

  5. Use of predictive models and rapid methods to nowcast bacteria levels at coastal beaches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Francy, D.S.

    2009-01-01

    The need for rapid assessments of recreational water quality to better protect public health is well accepted throughout the research and regulatory communities. Rapid analytical methods, such as quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and immunomagnetic separation/adenosine triphosphate (ATP) analysis, are being tested but are not yet ready for widespread use. Another solution is the use of predictive models, wherein variable(s) that are easily and quickly measured are surrogates for concentrations of fecal-indicator bacteria. Rainfall-based alerts, the simplest type of model, have been used by several communities for a number of years. Deterministic models use mathematical representations of the processes that affect bacteria concentrations; this type of model is being used for beach-closure decisions at one location in the USA. Multivariable statistical models are being developed and tested in many areas of the USA; however, they are only used in three areas of the Great Lakes to aid in notifications of beach advisories or closings. These "operational" statistical models can result in more accurate assessments of recreational water quality than use of the previous day's Escherichia coli (E. coli) concentration as determined by traditional culture methods. The Ohio Nowcast, at Huntington Beach, Bay Village, Ohio, is described in this paper as an example of an operational statistical model. Because predictive modeling is a dynamic process, water-resource managers continue to collect additional data to improve the predictive ability of the nowcast and expand the nowcast to other Ohio beaches and a recreational river. Although predictive models have been shown to work well at some beaches and are becoming more widely accepted, implementation in many areas is limited by funding, lack of coordinated technical leadership, and lack of supporting epidemiological data. ?? 2009 AEHMS.

  6. Microbial radio-resistance of Salmonella Typhimurium in egg increases due to repetitive irradiation with electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesfai, Adiam T.; Beamer, Sarah K.; Matak, Kristen E.; Jaczynski, Jacek

    2011-04-01

    Ionizing radiation improves food safety. However, foodborne pathogens develop increased resistance in response to sub-lethal stresses such as heat, pH, antibiotics, etc. Therefore, it is hypothesized that foodborne pathogens may develop increased radio-resistance to electron beam (e-beam) radiation. The objective was to determine if D10-value for Salmonella Typhimurium in de-shelled raw egg (egg white and yolk mixed together) increases due to repetitive processing with e-beam at sub-lethal doses. Survivors were enumerated on non-selective (TSA) and selective (XLD) media. Survivors from the highest dose were isolated and used in subsequent e-beam cycle. This process was repeated four times for a total of five e-beam cycles. D10-values for S. Typhimurium enumerated on TSA and XLD following each e-beam cycle were calculated as inverse reciprocal of the slope of survivor curves. D10-values for the ATCC strain were 0.59±0.031 and 0.46±0.022 kGy on TSA and XLD, respectively. However, following the fifth e-beam cycle, the respective D10-values increased (P<0.05) to 0.69±0.026 and 0.61±0.029 kGy, respectively. S. Typhimurium showed a trend (P>0.05) to develop radio-resistance faster on selective media, likely due to facilitated selection of radio-resistant cells within microbial population following each e-beam cycle. For all five e-beam cycles, S. Typhimurium had higher (P<0.05) D10-values on non-selective media, indicating that sub-lethal injury followed by cellular repair and recovery are important for radio-resistance and inactivation of this microorganism. This study demonstrated that e-beam efficiently inactivates S. Typhimurium in raw egg; however, similar to other inactivation techniques and factors affecting microbial growth, S. Typhimurium develops increased radio-resistance if repetitively processed with e-beam at sub-lethal doses.

  7. Resource Islands Predict the Distribution of Heterotrophic Bacteria in Chihuahuan Desert Soils

    PubMed Central

    Herman, R. P.; Provencio, K. R.; Herrera-Matos, J.; Torrez, R. J.

    1995-01-01

    The resource island hypothesis predicts that soil resources such as nitrogen, phosphorus, and water will be distributed evenly in grasslands but have a patchy distribution focused around plants in shrublands. This hypothesis predicts that microorganism numbers will follow resources and be (i) evenly distributed in grasslands, (ii) concentrated around individual plants in shrublands, and (iii) higher where resources are higher when comparing the same vegetation type. This study enumerated total heterotrophic bacteria and a subset of these, the nitrogen-efficient guild (NEG), in three shrublands (playa fringe mesquite, tar bush, and creosote) and two grasslands (playa and bajada). Both heterotrophs and NEG members followed the distribution pattern predicted by the resource island hypothesis. There were no significant differences in heterotroph or NEG numbers comparing at-plant and interplant samples for both the playa and bajada grasslands. Furthermore, populations were generally higher in nutrient-rich playa grasslands than nutrient-poor bajada grasslands. In contrast, both heterotroph and NEG numbers were higher at shrubs than between shrubs in all three shrub sites. These results suggest that resource abundance in resource islands predicts the distribution of heterotrophic bacterial numbers in desert soils. PMID:16535022

  8. Composition and predicted functional ecology of mussel-associated bacteria in Indonesian marine lakes.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Daniel F R; Becking, Leontine E; Polónia, Ana R M; Freitas, Rossana M; Gomes, Newton C M

    2015-03-01

    In the present study, we sampled bacterial communities associated with mussels inhabiting two distinct coastal marine ecosystems in Kalimantan, Indonesia, namely, marine lakes and coastal mangroves. We used 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing and predicted metagenomic analysis to compare microbial composition and function. Marine lakes are small landlocked bodies of seawater isolated to varying degrees from the open sea environment. They contain numerous endemic taxa and represent natural laboratories of speciation. Our primary goals were to (1) use BLAST search to identify closely related organisms to dominant bacterial OTUs in our mussel dataset and (2) to compare bacterial communities and enrichment in the predicted bacterial metagenome among lakes. Our sequencing effort yielded 3553 OTUs belonging to 44 phyla, 99 classes and 121 orders. Mussels in the largest marine lake (Kakaban) and the coastal mangrove habitat were dominated by bacteria belonging to the phylum Proteobacteria whereas smaller lakes, located on the island of Maratua, were dominated by bacteria belonging to the phyla Firmicutes and Tenericutes. The single most abundant OTU overall was assigned to the genus Mycoplasma. There were several significant differences among locations with respect to metabolic pathways. These included enrichment of xenobiotic biodegradation pathways in the largest marine lake and coastal mangrove. These locations were also the most enriched with respect to nitrogen metabolism. The presence of genes related to isoquinoline alkaloids, polyketides, hydrolases, mono and dioxygenases in the predicted analysis of functional pathways is an indication that the bacterial communities of Brachidontes mussels may be potentially important sources of new marine medicines and enzymes of industrial interest. Future work should focus on measuring how mussel microbial communities influence nutrient dynamics within the marine lake environment and isolating microbes with potential biotechnological

  9. Prediction of acid lactic-bacteria growth in turkey ham processed by high hydrostatic pressure

    PubMed Central

    Mathias, S.P.; Rosenthal, A.; Gaspar, A.; Aragão, G.M.F.; Slongo-Marcusi, A.

    2013-01-01

    High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) has been investigated and industrially applied to extend shelf life of meat-based products. Traditional ham packaged under microaerophilic conditions may sometimes present high lactic acid bacteria population during refrigerated storage, which limits shelf life due to development of unpleasant odor and greenish and sticky appearance. This study aimed at evaluating the shelf life of turkey ham pressurized at 400 MPa for 15 min and stored at 4, 8 and 12 °C, in comparison to the non pressurized product. The lactic acid bacteria population up to 107 CFU/g of product was set as the criteria to determine the limiting shelf life According to such parameter the pressurized sample achieved a commercial viability within 75 days when stored at 4 °C while the control lasted only 45 days. Predictive microbiology using Gompertz and Baranyi and Roberts models fitted well both for the pressurized and control samples. The results indicated that the high hydrostatic pressure treatment greatly increased the turkey ham commercial viability in comparison to the usual length, by slowing down the growth of microorganisms in the product. PMID:24159279

  10. Why are some microbes more ubiquitous than others? Predicting the habitat breadth of soil bacteria.

    PubMed

    Barberán, Albert; Ramirez, Kelly S; Leff, Jonathan W; Bradford, Mark A; Wall, Diana H; Fierer, Noah

    2014-07-01

    Identifying the traits that determine spatial distributions can be challenging when studying organisms, like bacteria, for which phenotypic information is limited or non-existent. However, genomic data provide another means to infer traits and determine the ecological attributes that account for differences in distributions. We determined the spatial distributions of ~124 000 soil bacterial taxa across a 3.41 km(2) area to determine whether we could use phylogeny and/or genomic traits to explain differences in habitat breadth. We found that occupancy was strongly correlated with environmental range; taxa that were more ubiquitous were found across a broader range of soil conditions. Across the ~500 taxa for which genomic information was available, genomic traits were more useful than phylogeny alone in explaining the variation in habitat breadth; bacteria with larger genomes and more metabolic versatility were more likely to have larger environmental and geographical distributions. Just as trait-based approaches have proven to be so useful for understanding the distributions of animals and plants, we demonstrate that we can use genomic information to infer microbial traits that are difficult to measure directly and build trait-based predictions of the biogeographical patterns exhibited by microbes.

  11. ROS/Autophagy/Nrf2 Pathway Mediated Low-Dose Radiation Induced Radio-Resistance in Human Lung Adenocarcinoma A549 Cell.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ni; Wu, Lijun; Yuan, Hang; Wang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) can induce radio-resistance to following high dose radiation in various mammalian cells. The protective role of LDIR has been thought to be associated with the overall outcomes of cancer radiotherapy. NF-E2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor that plays pivotal roles in maintaining cellular oxidative equilibrium. Since oxidative stress has been indicated to be a mediator of LDIR induced radio-resistance, the role of Nrf2 in this process was investigated in this research. Our results showed that in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cell, 5cGy alpha particle induced radio-resistance to following 75cGy alpha particle radiation. The expression level of Nrf2 and its target Heme Oxygenase-1(HO-1) increased after 5cGy radiation. Both the shRNA of Nrf2 and the chemical inhibitor of HO-1 suppressed the induced radio-resistance, indicating the involvement of Nrf2 antioxidant pathway in this process. Further, we found 5cGy radiation stimulated autophagy process in A549. Inhibition of the autophagy process resulted in suppression of the radio-resistance and the induced expression of Nrf2 and HO-1. ROS scavenger N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) blocked the autophagy process induced by 5cGy alpha particle, the upregulation of Nrf2 and HO-1, as well as the induced radio-resistance. In conclusion, ROS elevation caused by LDIR promoted Autophagy/Nrf2-HO-1 and conferred radio-resistance in A549.

  12. ROS/Autophagy/Nrf2 Pathway Mediated Low-Dose Radiation Induced Radio-Resistance in Human Lung Adenocarcinoma A549 Cell

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ni; Wu, Lijun; Yuan, Hang; Wang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) can induce radio-resistance to following high dose radiation in various mammalian cells. The protective role of LDIR has been thought to be associated with the overall outcomes of cancer radiotherapy. NF-E2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor that plays pivotal roles in maintaining cellular oxidative equilibrium. Since oxidative stress has been indicated to be a mediator of LDIR induced radio-resistance, the role of Nrf2 in this process was investigated in this research. Our results showed that in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cell, 5cGy alpha particle induced radio-resistance to following 75cGy alpha particle radiation. The expression level of Nrf2 and its target Heme Oxygenase-1(HO-1) increased after 5cGy radiation. Both the shRNA of Nrf2 and the chemical inhibitor of HO-1 suppressed the induced radio-resistance, indicating the involvement of Nrf2 antioxidant pathway in this process. Further, we found 5cGy radiation stimulated autophagy process in A549. Inhibition of the autophagy process resulted in suppression of the radio-resistance and the induced expression of Nrf2 and HO-1. ROS scavenger N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) blocked the autophagy process induced by 5cGy alpha particle, the upregulation of Nrf2 and HO-1, as well as the induced radio-resistance. In conclusion, ROS elevation caused by LDIR promoted Autophagy/Nrf2-HO-1 and conferred radio-resistance in A549. PMID:26078725

  13. ClubSub-P: Cluster-Based Subcellular Localization Prediction for Gram-Negative Bacteria and Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Paramasivam, Nagarajan; Linke, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    The subcellular localization (SCL) of proteins provides important clues to their function in a cell. In our efforts to predict useful vaccine targets against Gram-negative bacteria, we noticed that misannotated start codons frequently lead to wrongly assigned SCLs. This and other problems in SCL prediction, such as the relatively high false-positive and false-negative rates of some tools, can be avoided by applying multiple prediction tools to groups of homologous proteins. Here we present ClubSub-P, an online database that combines existing SCL prediction tools into a consensus pipeline from more than 600 proteomes of fully sequenced microorganisms. On top of the consensus prediction at the level of single sequences, the tool uses clusters of homologous proteins from Gram-negative bacteria and from Archaea to eliminate false-positive and false-negative predictions. ClubSub-P can assign the SCL of proteins from Gram-negative bacteria and Archaea with high precision. The database is searchable, and can easily be expanded using either new bacterial genomes or new prediction tools as they become available. This will further improve the performance of the SCL prediction, as well as the detection of misannotated start codons and other annotation errors. ClubSub-P is available online at http://toolkit.tuebingen.mpg.de/clubsubp/ PMID:22073040

  14. Dynamical Model of Drug Accumulation in Bacteria: Sensitivity Analysis and Experimentally Testable Predictions

    PubMed Central

    Vesselinova, Neda; Wall, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    We present a dynamical model of drug accumulation in bacteria. The model captures key features in experimental time courses on ofloxacin accumulation: initial uptake; two-phase response; and long-term acclimation. In combination with experimental data, the model provides estimates of import and export rates in each phase, the time of entry into the second phase, and the decrease of internal drug during acclimation. Global sensitivity analysis, local sensitivity analysis, and Bayesian sensitivity analysis of the model provide information about the robustness of these estimates, and about the relative importance of different parameters in determining the features of the accumulation time courses in three different bacterial species: Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The results lead to experimentally testable predictions of the effects of membrane permeability, drug efflux and trapping (e.g., by DNA binding) on drug accumulation. A key prediction is that a sudden increase in ofloxacin accumulation in both E. coli and S. aureus is accompanied by a decrease in membrane permeability. PMID:27824914

  15. Including Sediment-Associated Bacteria Resuspension and Settling in SWAT Predictions of Microbial Water Quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Streambed sediments have been shown to serve as environmental reservoirs for bacteria, including pathogenic strains. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) has been augmented with bacteria subroutine in 2005. Bacteria die-off is the only in-stream process considered in the current SWAT. The purpo...

  16. Concentrations of antibiotics predicted to select for resistant bacteria: Proposed limits for environmental regulation.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson-Palme, Johan; Larsson, D G Joakim

    2016-01-01

    There are concerns that selection pressure from antibiotics in the environment may accelerate the evolution and dissemination of antibiotic-resistant pathogens. Nevertheless, there is currently no regulatory system that takes such risks into account. In part, this is due to limited knowledge of environmental concentrations that might exert selection for resistant bacteria. To experimentally determine minimal selective concentrations in complex microbial ecosystems for all antibiotics would involve considerable effort. In this work, our aim was to estimate upper boundaries for selective concentrations for all common antibiotics, based on the assumption that selective concentrations a priori need to be lower than those completely inhibiting growth. Data on Minimal Inhibitory Concentrations (MICs) were obtained for 111 antibiotics from the public EUCAST database. The 1% lowest observed MICs were identified, and to compensate for limited species coverage, predicted lowest MICs adjusted for the number of tested species were extrapolated through modeling. Predicted No Effect Concentrations (PNECs) for resistance selection were then assessed using an assessment factor of 10 to account for differences between MICs and minimal selective concentrations. The resulting PNECs ranged from 8 ng/L to 64 μg/L. Furthermore, the link between taxonomic similarity between species and lowest MIC was weak. This work provides estimated upper boundaries for selective concentrations (lowest MICs) and PNECs for resistance selection for all common antibiotics. In most cases, PNECs for selection of resistance were below available PNECs for ecotoxicological effects. The generated PNECs can guide implementation of compound-specific emission limits that take into account risks for resistance promotion.

  17. Temperature dependences of growth rates and carrying capacities of marine bacteria depart from metabolic theoretical predictions.

    PubMed

    Huete-Stauffer, Tamara Megan; Arandia-Gorostidi, Nestor; Díaz-Pérez, Laura; Morán, Xosé Anxelu G

    2015-10-01

    Using the metabolic theory of ecology (MTE) framework, we evaluated over a whole annual cycle the monthly responses to temperature of the growth rates (μ) and carrying capacities (K) of heterotrophic bacterioplankton at a temperate coastal site. We used experimental incubations spanning 6ºC with bacterial physiological groups identified by flow cytometry according to membrane integrity (live), nucleic acid content (HNA and LNA) and respiratory activity (CTC+). The temperature dependence of μ at the exponential phase of growth was summarized by the activation energy (E), which was variable (-0.52 to 0.72 eV) but followed a seasonal pattern, only reaching the hypothesized value for aerobic heterotrophs of 0.65 eV during the spring bloom for the most active bacterial groups (live, HNA, CTC+). K (i.e. maximum experimental abundance) peaked at 4 × 10(6) cells mL(-1) and generally covaried with μ but, contrary to MTE predictions, it did not decrease consistently with temperature. In the case of live cells, the responses of μ and K to temperature were positively correlated and related to seasonal changes in substrate availability, indicating that the responses of bacteria to warming are far from homogeneous and poorly explained by MTE at our site.

  18. Phylogenomic Analysis and Predicted Physiological Role of the Proton-Translocating NADH:Quinone Oxidoreductase (Complex I) Across Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Spero, Melanie A.; Aylward, Frank O.; Currie, Cameron R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The proton-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (complex I) is a multisubunit integral membrane enzyme found in the respiratory chains of both bacteria and eukaryotic organelles. Although much research has focused on the enzyme’s central role in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, comparatively little is known about its role in the diverse energetic lifestyles of different bacteria. Here, we used a phylogenomic approach to better understand the distribution of complex I across bacteria, the evolution of this enzyme, and its potential roles in shaping the physiology of different bacterial groups. By surveying 970 representative bacterial genomes, we predict complex I to be present in ~50% of bacteria. While this includes bacteria with a wide range of energetic schemes, the presence of complex I is associated with specific lifestyles, including aerobic respiration and specific types of phototrophy (bacteria with only a type II reaction center). A phylogeny of bacterial complex I revealed five main clades of enzymes whose evolution is largely congruent with the evolution of the bacterial groups that encode complex I. A notable exception includes the gammaproteobacteria, whose members encode one of two distantly related complex I enzymes predicted to participate in different types of respiratory chains (aerobic versus anaerobic). Comparative genomic analyses suggest a broad role for complex I in reoxidizing NADH produced from various catabolic reactions, including the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and fatty acid beta-oxidation. Together, these findings suggest diverse roles for complex I across bacteria and highlight the importance of this enzyme in shaping diverse physiologies across the bacterial domain. PMID:25873378

  19. USING HYDROGRAPHIC DATA AND THE EPA VIRTUAL BEACH MODEL TO TEST PREDICTIONS OF BEACH BACTERIA CONCENTRATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A modeling study of 2006 Huntington Beach (Lake Erie) beach bacteria concentrations indicates multi-variable linear regression (MLR) can effectively estimate bacteria concentrations compared to the persistence model. Our use of the Virtual Beach (VB) model affirms that fact. VB i...

  20. Maximum entropy principle for predicting response to multiple-drug exposure in bacteria and human cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Kevin; Nishida, Satoshi; Sontag, Eduardo; Cluzel, Philippe

    2012-02-01

    Drugs are commonly used in combinations larger than two for treating infectious disease. However, it is generally impossible to infer the net effect of a multi-drug combination on cell growth directly from the effects of individual drugs. We combined experiments with maximum entropy methods to develop a mechanism-independent framework for calculating the response of both bacteria and human cancer cells to a large variety of drug combinations comprised of anti-microbial or anti-cancer drugs. We experimentally show that the cellular responses to drug pairs are sufficient to infer the effects of larger drug combinations in gram negative bacteria, Escherichia coli, gram positive bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus, and also human breast cancer and melanoma cell lines. Remarkably, the accurate predictions of this framework suggest that the multi-drug response obeys statistical rather than chemical laws for combinations larger than two. Consequently, these findings offer a new strategy for the rational design of therapies using large drug combinations.

  1. Comparison of Clinical Prediction Models for Resistant Bacteria in Community-onset Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Self, Wesley H.; Wunderink, Richard G.; Williams, Derek J.; Barrett, Tyler W.; Baughman, Adrienne H.; Grijalva, Carlos G.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Six recently published algorithms classify pneumonia patients presenting from the community into high- and low-risk groups for resistant bacteria. Our objective was to compare performance of these algorithms for identifying patients infected with bacteria resistant to traditional community-acquired pneumonia antibiotics. Methods This was a retrospective study of consecutive adult patients diagnosed with pneumonia in an emergency department and subsequently hospitalized. Each patient was classified as high- or low-risk for resistant bacteria according to the following algorithms: original health care-associated pneumonia (HCAP) criteria, Summit criteria, Brito and Niederman strategy, Shorr model, Aliberti model, and Shindo model. The reference for comparison was detection of resistant bacteria, defined as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus or gram-negative bacteria resistant to ceftriaxone or levofloxacin. Results Six hundred fourteen patients were studied, including 36 (5.9%) with resistant bacteria. The HCAP criteria classified 304 (49.5%) patients as high-risk, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.63 (95% CI = 0.54 to 0.72), sensitivity of 0.69 (95% CI = 0.52 to 0.83), and specificity of 0.52 (95% CI = 0.48 to 0.56). None of the other algorithms improved both sensitivity and specificity, or significantly improved the AUC. Compared to the HCAP criteria, the Shorr and Aliberti models classified more patients as high-risk, resulting in higher sensitivity and lower specificity. The Shindo model classified fewer patients as high-risk, with lower sensitivity and higher specificity. Conclusions All algorithms for identification of resistant bacteria included in this study had suboptimal performance to guide antibiotic selection. New strategies for selecting empirical antibiotics for community-onset pneumonia are necessary. PMID:25996620

  2. INTRODUCTION TO A COMBINED MULTIPLE LINEAR REGRESSION AND ARMA MODELING APPROACH FOR BEACH BACTERIA PREDICTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to the complexity of the processes contributing to beach bacteria concentrations, many researchers rely on statistical modeling, among which multiple linear regression (MLR) modeling is most widely used. Despite its ease of use and interpretation, there may be time dependence...

  3. Calculations of Light Scattering Measurements Predicting Sensitivity of Depolarization to Shape Changes of Spores and Bacteria

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    either spores or bacteria. 44 LITERATURE CITED 1. Grund, C.J; Brilliant, N.; Bjork, C.; Craig, T. Eyesafe, Multi-function Coherent Doppler Lidar for...an aerosol containing biological particles. This is of interest both for lidar backscatter and for point measurements where samples of the aerosol are... laser light. Each of the added spheres was tangent to the center sphere but did not overlap it. The scattering calculated for the cluster of seven

  4. Composition of symbiotic bacteria predicts survival in Panamanian golden frogs infected with a lethal fungus

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Matthew H.; Walke, Jenifer B.; Cikanek, Shawna; Savage, Anna E.; Mattheus, Nichole; Santiago, Celina N.; Minbiole, Kevin P. C.; Harris, Reid N.; Belden, Lisa K.; Gratwicke, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Symbiotic microbes can dramatically impact host health and fitness, and recent research in a diversity of systems suggests that different symbiont community structures may result in distinct outcomes for the host. In amphibians, some symbiotic skin bacteria produce metabolites that inhibit the growth of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), a cutaneous fungal pathogen that has caused many amphibian population declines and extinctions. Treatment with beneficial bacteria (probiotics) prevents Bd infection in some amphibian species and creates optimism for conservation of species that are highly susceptible to chytridiomycosis, the disease caused by Bd. In a laboratory experiment, we used Bd-inhibitory bacteria from Bd-tolerant Panamanian amphibians in a probiotic development trial with Panamanian golden frogs, Atelopus zeteki, a species currently surviving only in captive assurance colonies. Approximately 30% of infected golden frogs survived Bd exposure by either clearing infection or maintaining low Bd loads, but this was not associated with probiotic treatment. Survival was instead related to initial composition of the skin bacterial community and metabolites present on the skin. These results suggest a strong link between the structure of these symbiotic microbial communities and amphibian host health in the face of Bd exposure and also suggest a new approach for developing amphibian probiotics. PMID:25788591

  5. Composition of symbiotic bacteria predicts survival in Panamanian golden frogs infected with a lethal fungus.

    PubMed

    Becker, Matthew H; Walke, Jenifer B; Cikanek, Shawna; Savage, Anna E; Mattheus, Nichole; Santiago, Celina N; Minbiole, Kevin P C; Harris, Reid N; Belden, Lisa K; Gratwicke, Brian

    2015-04-22

    Symbiotic microbes can dramatically impact host health and fitness, and recent research in a diversity of systems suggests that different symbiont community structures may result in distinct outcomes for the host. In amphibians, some symbiotic skin bacteria produce metabolites that inhibit the growth of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), a cutaneous fungal pathogen that has caused many amphibian population declines and extinctions. Treatment with beneficial bacteria (probiotics) prevents Bd infection in some amphibian species and creates optimism for conservation of species that are highly susceptible to chytridiomycosis, the disease caused by Bd. In a laboratory experiment, we used Bd-inhibitory bacteria from Bd-tolerant Panamanian amphibians in a probiotic development trial with Panamanian golden frogs, Atelopus zeteki, a species currently surviving only in captive assurance colonies. Approximately 30% of infected golden frogs survived Bd exposure by either clearing infection or maintaining low Bd loads, but this was not associated with probiotic treatment. Survival was instead related to initial composition of the skin bacterial community and metabolites present on the skin. These results suggest a strong link between the structure of these symbiotic microbial communities and amphibian host health in the face of Bd exposure and also suggest a new approach for developing amphibian probiotics.

  6. Predictable communities of soil bacteria in relation to nutrient concentration and successional stage in a laboratory culture experiment.

    PubMed

    Song, Woojin; Kim, Mincheol; Tripathi, Binu M; Kim, Hyoki; Adams, Jonathan M

    2016-06-01

    It is difficult to understand the processes that structure immensely complex bacterial communities in the soil environment, necessitating a simplifying experimental approach. Here, we set up a microcosm culturing experiment with soil bacteria, at a range of nutrient concentrations, and compared these over time to understand the relationship between soil bacterial community structure and time/nutrient concentration. DNA from each replicate was analysed using HiSeq2000 Illumina sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. We found that each nutrient treatment, and each time point during the experiment, produces characteristic bacterial communities that occur predictably between replicates. It is clear that within the context of this experiment, many soil bacteria have distinct niches from one another, in terms of both nutrient concentration, and successional time point since a resource first became available. This fine niche differentiation may in part help to explain the coexistence of a diversity of bacteria in soils. In this experiment, we show that the unimodal relationship between nutrient concentration/time and species diversity often reported in communities of larger organisms is also evident in microbial communities.

  7. Genome-wide protein localization prediction strategies for gram negative bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Romine, Margaret F.

    2011-06-15

    Genome-wide prediction of protein subcellular localization is an important type of evidence used for inferring protein function. While a variety of computational tools have been developed for this purpose, errors in the gene models and use of protein sorting signals that are not recognized by the more commonly accepted tools can diminish the accuracy of their output. As part of an effort to manually curate the annotations of 19 strains of Shewanella, numerous insights were gained regarding the use of computational tools and proteomics data to predict protein localization. Identification of the suite of secretion systems present in each strain at the start of the process made it possible to tailor-fit the subsequent localization prediction strategies to each strain for improved accuracy. Comparisons of the computational predictions among orthologous proteins revealed inconsistencies in the computational outputs, which could often be resolved by adjusting the gene models or ortholog group memberships. While proteomic data was useful for verifying start site predictions and post-translational proteolytic cleavage, care was needed to distinguish cellular versus sample processing-mediated cleavage events. Searches for lipoprotein signal peptides revealed that neither TatP nor LipoP are designed for identification of lipoprotein substrates of the twin arginine translocation system and that the +2 rule for lipoprotein sorting does not apply to this Genus. Analysis of the relationships between domain occurrence and protein localization prediction enabled identification of numerous location-informative domains which could then be used to refine or increase confidence in location predictions. This collective knowledge was used to develop a general strategy for predicting protein localization that could be adapted to other organisms.

  8. Genome-wide protein localization prediction strategies for gram negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Genome-wide prediction of protein subcellular localization is an important type of evidence used for inferring protein function. While a variety of computational tools have been developed for this purpose, errors in the gene models and use of protein sorting signals that are not recognized by the more commonly accepted tools can diminish the accuracy of their output. Results As part of an effort to manually curate the annotations of 19 strains of Shewanella, numerous insights were gained regarding the use of computational tools and proteomics data to predict protein localization. Identification of the suite of secretion systems present in each strain at the start of the process made it possible to tailor-fit the subsequent localization prediction strategies to each strain for improved accuracy. Comparisons of the computational predictions among orthologous proteins revealed inconsistencies in the computational outputs, which could often be resolved by adjusting the gene models or ortholog group memberships. While proteomic data was useful for verifying start site predictions and post-translational proteolytic cleavage, care was needed to distinguish cellular versus sample processing-mediated cleavage events. Searches for lipoprotein signal peptides revealed that neither TatP nor LipoP are designed for identification of lipoprotein substrates of the twin arginine translocation system and that the +2 rule for lipoprotein sorting does not apply to this Genus. Analysis of the relationships between domain occurrence and protein localization prediction enabled identification of numerous location-informative domains which could then be used to refine or increase confidence in location predictions. This collective knowledge was used to develop a general strategy for predicting protein localization that could be adapted to other organisms. Conclusion Improved localization prediction accuracy is not simply a matter of developing better computational algorithms. It

  9. Predicting conserved essential genes in bacteria: in silico identification of putative drug targets.

    PubMed

    Duffield, Melanie; Cooper, Ian; McAlister, Erin; Bayliss, Marc; Ford, Donna; Oyston, Petra

    2010-12-01

    Many genes have been listed as putatively essential for bacterial viability in the Database of Essential Genomes (DEG), although few have been experimentally validated. By prioritising targets according to the criteria suggested by the Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR) Targets database, we have developed a modified down-selection tool to identify essential genes conserved across diverse genera. Using this approach we identified 52 proteins conserved to 7 or more of the 14 genomes in DEG. We confirmed the validity of the down-selection by attempting to make mutants of 8 of these targets in a model organism, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, which is not closely related to any of the bacteria in DEG. Mutants were recovered for only one of the 8 targets, suggesting that the other 7 were essential in Y. pseudotuberculosis, an impressive success rate compared to other approaches of identification for such targets. Identification of essential proteins common in diverse bacterial genera can then be used to facilitate the selection of effective targets for novel broad-spectrum antibiotics.

  10. Application of empirical predictive modeling using conventional and alternative fecal indicator bacteria in eastern North Carolina waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gonzalez, Raul; Conn, Kathleen E.; Crosswell, Joey; Noble, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    Coastal and estuarine waters are the site of intense anthropogenic influence with concomitant use for recreation and seafood harvesting. Therefore, coastal and estuarine water quality has a direct impact on human health. In eastern North Carolina (NC) there are over 240 recreational and 1025 shellfish harvesting water quality monitoring sites that are regularly assessed. Because of the large number of sites, sampling frequency is often only on a weekly basis. This frequency, along with an 18–24 h incubation time for fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) enumeration via culture-based methods, reduces the efficiency of the public notification process. In states like NC where beach monitoring resources are limited but historical data are plentiful, predictive models may offer an improvement for monitoring and notification by providing real-time FIB estimates. In this study, water samples were collected during 12 dry (n = 88) and 13 wet (n = 66) weather events at up to 10 sites. Statistical predictive models for Escherichiacoli (EC), enterococci (ENT), and members of the Bacteroidales group were created and subsequently validated. Our results showed that models for EC and ENT (adjusted R2 were 0.61 and 0.64, respectively) incorporated a range of antecedent rainfall, climate, and environmental variables. The most important variables for EC and ENT models were 5-day antecedent rainfall, dissolved oxygen, and salinity. These models successfully predicted FIB levels over a wide range of conditions with a 3% (EC model) and 9% (ENT model) overall error rate for recreational threshold values and a 0% (EC model) overall error rate for shellfish threshold values. Though modeling of members of the Bacteroidales group had less predictive ability (adjusted R2 were 0.56 and 0.53 for fecal Bacteroides spp. and human Bacteroides spp., respectively), the modeling approach and testing provided information on Bacteroidales ecology. This is the first example of a set of successful statistical

  11. Adaptive immunity increases the pace and predictability of evolutionary change in commensal gut bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Barroso-Batista, João; Demengeot, Jocelyne; Gordo, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Co-evolution between the mammalian immune system and the gut microbiota is believed to have shaped the microbiota's astonishing diversity. Here we test the corollary hypothesis that the adaptive immune system, directly or indirectly, influences the evolution of commensal species. We compare the evolution of Escherichia coli upon colonization of the gut of wild-type and Rag2−/− mice, which lack lymphocytes. We show that bacterial adaptation is slower in immune-compromised animals, a phenomenon explained by differences in the action of natural selection within each host. Emerging mutations exhibit strong beneficial effects in healthy hosts but substantial antagonistic pleiotropy in immune-deficient mice. This feature is due to changes in the composition of the gut microbiota, which differs according to the immune status of the host. Our results indicate that the adaptive immune system influences the tempo and predictability of E. coli adaptation to the mouse gut. PMID:26615893

  12. Using Bacteria to Determine Protein Kinase Specificity and Predict Target Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Lubner, Joshua M.; Church, George M.; Husson, Robert N.; Schwartz, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The identification of protein kinase targets remains a significant bottleneck for our understanding of signal transduction in normal and diseased cellular states. Kinases recognize their substrates in part through sequence motifs on substrate proteins, which, to date, have most effectively been elucidated using combinatorial peptide library approaches. Here, we present and demonstrate the ProPeL method for easy and accurate discovery of kinase specificity motifs through the use of native bacterial proteomes that serve as in vivo libraries for thousands of simultaneous phosphorylation reactions. Using recombinant kinases expressed in E. coli followed by mass spectrometry, the approach accurately recapitulated the well-established motif preferences of human basophilic (Protein Kinase A) and acidophilic (Casein Kinase II) kinases. These motifs, derived for PKA and CK II using only bacterial sequence data, were then further validated by utilizing them in conjunction with the scan-x software program to computationally predict known human phosphorylation sites with high confidence. PMID:23300758

  13. Predictive model for the growth of spoilage bacteria on modified atmosphere packaged Atlantic salmon produced in Australia.

    PubMed

    Powell, S M; Ratkowsky, D A; Tamplin, M L

    2015-05-01

    Most existing models for the spoilage of modified atmosphere packed Atlantic salmon are based on the growth of the spoilage organism Photobacterium phosphoreum. However, there is evidence that this organism is not the specific spoilage organism on salmon produced and packaged in Australia. We developed a predictive model for the growth of bacteria in Australian-produced Atlantic salmon stored under modified atmosphere conditions (30-98% carbon dioxide in nitrogen) at refrigeration temperatures (0-10 °C). As expected, both higher levels of carbon dioxide and lower temperatures decreased the observed growth rates of the total population. A Bělehrádek-type model for growth rate fitted the data best with an acceptably low root mean square error. At low temperatures (∼0 °C) the growth rates in this study were similar to those predicted by other models but at higher temperatures (∼10 °C) the growth rates were significantly lower in the current study.

  14. Prediction of Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Gram-Negative Bacteria Causing Bloodstream Infections.

    PubMed

    Dan, Seejil; Shah, Ansal; Justo, Julie Ann; Bookstaver, P Brandon; Kohn, Joseph; Albrecht, Helmut; Al-Hasan, Majdi N

    2016-04-01

    Increasing rates of fluoroquinolone resistance (FQ-R) have limited empirical treatment options for Gram-negative infections, particularly in patients with severe beta-lactam allergy. This case-control study aims to develop a clinical risk score to predict the probability of FQ-R in Gram-negative bloodstream isolates. Adult patients with Gram-negative bloodstream infections (BSI) hospitalized at Palmetto Health System in Columbia, South Carolina, from 2010 to 2013 were identified. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify independent risk factors for FQ-R. Point allocation in the fluoroquinolone resistance score (FQRS) was based on regression coefficients. Model discrimination was assessed by the area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Among 824 patients with Gram-negative BSI, 143 (17%) had BSI due to fluoroquinolone-nonsusceptible Gram-negative bacilli. Independent risk factors for FQ-R and point allocation in FQRS included male sex (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.97; 95% confidence intervals [CI], 1.36 to 2.98; 1 point), diabetes mellitus (aOR, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.03 to 2.28; 1 point), residence at a skilled nursing facility (aOR, 2.28; 95% CI, 1.42 to 3.63; 2 points), outpatient procedure within 30 days (aOR, 3.68; 95% CI, 1.96 to 6.78; 3 points), prior fluoroquinolone use within 90 days (aOR, 7.87; 95% CI, 4.53 to 13.74; 5 points), or prior fluoroquinolone use within 91 to 180 days of BSI (aOR, 2.77; 95% CI, 1.17 to 6.16; 3 points). The AUC for both final logistic regression and FQRS models was 0.73. Patients with an FQRS of 0, 3, 5, or 8 had predicted probabilities of FQ-R of 6%, 22%, 39%, or 69%, respectively. The estimation of patient-specific risk of antimicrobial resistance using FQRS may improve empirical antimicrobial therapy and fluoroquinolone utilization in Gram-negative BSI.

  15. Prediction of Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Gram-Negative Bacteria Causing Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Dan, Seejil; Shah, Ansal; Justo, Julie Ann; Bookstaver, P. Brandon; Kohn, Joseph; Albrecht, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Increasing rates of fluoroquinolone resistance (FQ-R) have limited empirical treatment options for Gram-negative infections, particularly in patients with severe beta-lactam allergy. This case-control study aims to develop a clinical risk score to predict the probability of FQ-R in Gram-negative bloodstream isolates. Adult patients with Gram-negative bloodstream infections (BSI) hospitalized at Palmetto Health System in Columbia, South Carolina, from 2010 to 2013 were identified. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify independent risk factors for FQ-R. Point allocation in the fluoroquinolone resistance score (FQRS) was based on regression coefficients. Model discrimination was assessed by the area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Among 824 patients with Gram-negative BSI, 143 (17%) had BSI due to fluoroquinolone-nonsusceptible Gram-negative bacilli. Independent risk factors for FQ-R and point allocation in FQRS included male sex (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.97; 95% confidence intervals [CI], 1.36 to 2.98; 1 point), diabetes mellitus (aOR, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.03 to 2.28; 1 point), residence at a skilled nursing facility (aOR, 2.28; 95% CI, 1.42 to 3.63; 2 points), outpatient procedure within 30 days (aOR, 3.68; 95% CI, 1.96 to 6.78; 3 points), prior fluoroquinolone use within 90 days (aOR, 7.87; 95% CI, 4.53 to 13.74; 5 points), or prior fluoroquinolone use within 91 to 180 days of BSI (aOR, 2.77; 95% CI, 1.17 to 6.16; 3 points). The AUC for both final logistic regression and FQRS models was 0.73. Patients with an FQRS of 0, 3, 5, or 8 had predicted probabilities of FQ-R of 6%, 22%, 39%, or 69%, respectively. The estimation of patient-specific risk of antimicrobial resistance using FQRS may improve empirical antimicrobial therapy and fluoroquinolone utilization in Gram-negative BSI. PMID:26833166

  16. Monitoring and predicting the fecal indicator bacteria concentrations from agricultural, mixed land use and urban stormwater runoff.

    PubMed

    Paule-Mercado, M A; Ventura, J S; Memon, S A; Jahng, D; Kang, J-H; Lee, C-H

    2016-04-15

    While the urban runoff are increasingly being studied as a source of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB), less is known about the occurrence of FIB in watershed with mixed land use and ongoing land use and land cover (LULC) change. In this study, Escherichia coli (EC) and fecal streptococcus (FS) were monitored from 2012 to 2013 in agricultural, mixed and urban LULC and analyzed according to the most probable number (MPN). Pearson correlation was used to determine the relationship between FIB and environmental parameters (physicochemical and hydrometeorological). Multiple linear regressions (MLR) were used to identify the significant parameters that affect the FIB concentrations and to predict the response of FIB in LULC change. Overall, the FIB concentrations were higher in urban LULC (EC=3.33-7.39; FS=3.30-7.36log10MPN/100mL) possibly because of runoff from commercial market and 100% impervious cover (IC). Also, during early-summer season; this reflects a greater persistence and growth rate of FIB in a warmer environment. During intra-event, however, the FIB concentrations varied according to site condition. Anthropogenic activities and IC influenced the correlation between the FIB concentrations and environmental parameters. Stormwater temperature (TEMP), turbidity, and TSS positively correlated with the FIB concentrations (p>0.01), since IC increased, implying an accumulation of bacterial sources in urban activities. TEMP, BOD5, turbidity, TSS, and antecedent dry days (ADD) were the most significant explanatory variables for FIB as determined in MLR, possibly because they promoted the FIB growth and survival. The model confirmed the FIB concentrations: EC (R(2)=0.71-0.85; NSE=0.72-0.86) and FS (R(2)=0.65-0.83; NSE=0.66-0.84) are predicted to increase due to urbanization. Therefore, these findings will help in stormwater monitoring strategies, designing the best management practice for FIB removal and as input data for stormwater models.

  17. Characterization and Detection of a Widely Distributed Gene Cluster That Predicts Anaerobic Choline Utilization by Human Gut Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-del Campo, Ana; Bodea, Smaranda; Hamer, Hilary A.; Marks, Jonathan A.; Haiser, Henry J.; Turnbaugh, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying the human gut microbiota’s effects on health and disease has been complicated by difficulties in linking metabolic functions associated with the gut community as a whole to individual microorganisms and activities. Anaerobic microbial choline metabolism, a disease-associated metabolic pathway, exemplifies this challenge, as the specific human gut microorganisms responsible for this transformation have not yet been clearly identified. In this study, we established the link between a bacterial gene cluster, the choline utilization (cut) cluster, and anaerobic choline metabolism in human gut isolates by combining transcriptional, biochemical, bioinformatic, and cultivation-based approaches. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis and in vitro biochemical characterization of two cut gene products linked the entire cluster to growth on choline and supported a model for this pathway. Analyses of sequenced bacterial genomes revealed that the cut cluster is present in many human gut bacteria, is predictive of choline utilization in sequenced isolates, and is widely but discontinuously distributed across multiple bacterial phyla. Given that bacterial phylogeny is a poor marker for choline utilization, we were prompted to develop a degenerate PCR-based method for detecting the key functional gene choline TMA-lyase (cutC) in genomic and metagenomic DNA. Using this tool, we found that new choline-metabolizing gut isolates universally possessed cutC. We also demonstrated that this gene is widespread in stool metagenomic data sets. Overall, this work represents a crucial step toward understanding anaerobic choline metabolism in the human gut microbiota and underscores the importance of examining this microbial community from a function-oriented perspective. PMID:25873372

  18. Activation of mitochondrial promoter P{sub H}-binding protein in a radio-resistant Chinese hamster cell strain associated with Bcl-2

    SciTech Connect

    Roychoudhury, Paromita; Ghosh, Utpal . E-mail: keyachaudhuri@yahoo.com

    2006-11-17

    The cellular response to ionizing radiation is mediated by a complex interaction of number of proteins involving different pathways. Previously, we have shown that up regulation of mitochondrial genes ND1, ND4, and COX1 transcribed from the heavy strand promoter (P{sub H}) has been increased in a radio-resistant cell strain designated as M5 in comparison with the parental Chinese hamster V79 cells. These genes are also up regulated in Chinese hamster V79 cells VB13 that express exogenous human Bcl2. In the present study, the expression of the gene ND6 that is expressed from the light strand promoter (P{sub L}) was found to be similar in both the cell lines, as determined by RT-PCR. To test the possibility that this differential expression of mitochondrial genes under these two promoters was mediated by differences in proteins' affinity to interact with these promoters, we have carried out electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) using mitochondrial cell extracts from these two cell lines. Our result of these experiments revealed that two different proteins formed complex with the synthetic promoters and higher amount of protein from M5 cell extracts interacted with the P{sub H} promoter in comparison to that observed with cell extracts from Chinese hamster V79 cells. The promoter-specific differential binding of proteins was also observed in VB13. These results showed that differential mitochondrial gene expression observed earlier in the radio-resistant M5 cells was due to enhanced interaction proteins with the promoters P{sub H} and mediated by the expression of Bcl2.

  19. Inter- and intra-cellular mechanism of NF-kB-dependent survival advantage and clonal expansion of radio-resistant cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui; Aravindan, Natarajan; Xu, Ji; Natarajan, Mohan

    2017-02-01

    Understanding the underlying mechanism by which cancer cells acquire resistance to radiation and favorably selected for its clonal expansion will provide molecular insight into tumor recurrence at the treatment site. In the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms prompted in MCF-7 breast cancer cells in response to clinical radiation and the associated coordination of intra- and inter-cellular signaling that orchestrate radio-resistance and tumor relapse/recurrence. Our findings showed that 2 or 10Gy of (137)Cs γ-rays at a dose rate of 1.03Gy/min trigger the activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), its DNA-binding activity and recycles its own transcription. NF-κB DNA-binding kinetic analysis demonstrated both sustained and dual phase NF-κB activation with radiation. Gene manipulation approach revealed that radiation triggered NF-κB-mediated TNF-α transcriptional activity. TNF-α blocking approach confirmed that the de novo synthesis and secretion of TNF-α serves as a pre-requisite for the second phase of NF-κB activation and sustained maintenance. Radiation-associated NF-κB-dependent secretion of TNF-α from irradiated cells, in parallel, activates NF-κB in the non-targeted un-irradiated bystander cells. Together, these findings demonstrated that radiation-triggered NF-κB-dependent TNFα secretion is critical for self-sustenance of NF-κB (through autocrine positive feedback signaling) and for coordinating bystander response (through inter-cellular paracrine mechanism) after radiation exposure. Further, the data suggest that this self-sustained NF-κB in the irradiated cells determines radio-resistance, survival advantage and clonal expansion of the tumor cells at the treatment site. Parallel maintenance of NF-ΚB-TNF-α-NF-κB feedback-cycle in the un-irradiated non-targeted bystander cells initiates supportive mechanism for the promotion and progression of surviving tumor cells. Intervening this molecular pathway would help us to

  20. Anaerobic bacteria

    MedlinePlus

    Anaerobic bacteria are bacteria that do not live or grow when oxygen is present. In humans, these bacteria ... Goldstein EJ. Diseases caused by non-spore forming anaerobic bacteria. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil ...

  1. AhlD, an N-acylhomoserine lactonase in Arthrobacter sp., and predicted homologues in other bacteria.

    PubMed

    Park, Sun-Yang; Lee, Sang Jun; Oh, Tae-Kwang; Oh, Jong-Won; Koo, Bon-Tag; Yum, Do-Young; Lee, Jung-Kee

    2003-06-01

    Quorum sensing is a signalling mechanism that controls diverse biological functions, including virulence, via N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) signal molecules in Gram-negative bacteria. With the aim of isolating strains or enzymes capable of blocking quorum sensing by inactivating AHL, bacteria were screened for AHL degradation by their ability to utilize N-3-oxohexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (OHHL) as the sole carbon source. Among four isolates, strain IBN110, identified as Arthrobacter sp., was found to grow rapidly on OHHL, and to degrade various AHLs with different lengths and acyl side-chain substitutions. Co-culture of Arthrobacter sp. IBN110 and the plant pathogen Erwinia carotovora significantly reduced both the AHL amount and pectate lyase activity in co-culture medium, suggesting the possibility of applying Arthrobacter sp. IBN110 in the control of AHL-producing pathogenic bacteria. The ahlD gene from Arthrobacter sp. IBN110 encoding the enzyme catalysing AHL degradation was cloned, and found to encode a protein of 273 amino acids. A mass spectrometry analysis showed that AhlD probably hydrolyses the lactone ring of N-3-hexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone, indicating that AhlD is an N-acylhomoserine lactonase (AHLase). A comparison of AhlD with other known AHL-degrading enzymes, Bacillus sp. 240B1 AiiA, a Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kyushuensis AiiA homologue and Agrobacterium tumefaciens AttM, revealed 25, 26 and 21 % overall identities, respectively, in the deduced amino acid sequences. Although these identities were relatively low, the HXDH approximately H approximately D motif was conserved in all the AHLases, suggesting that this motif is essential for AHLase activity. From a genome database search based on the conserved motif, putative AhlD-like lactonase genes were found in several other bacteria, and AHL-degrading activities were observed in Klebsiella pneumoniae and Bacillus stearothermophilus. Furthermore, it was verified that ahlK, an ahlD homologue

  2. Predicting the Concentration of Verotoxin-Producing Escherichia coli Bacteria during Processing and Storage of Fermented Raw-Meat Sausages

    PubMed Central

    Quinto, E. J.; Arinder, P.; Axelsson, L.; Heir, E.; Holck, A.; Lindqvist, R.; Lindblad, M.; Andreou, P.; Lauzon, H. L.; Marteinsson, V. Þ.

    2014-01-01

    A model to predict the population density of verotoxigenic Escherichia coli (VTEC) throughout the elaboration and storage of fermented raw-meat sausages (FRMS) was developed. Probabilistic and kinetic measurement data sets collected from publicly available resources were completed with new measurements when required and used to quantify the dependence of VTEC growth and inactivation on the temperature, pH, water activity (aw), and concentration of lactic acid. Predictions were compared with observations in VTEC-contaminated FRMS manufactured in a pilot plant. Slight differences in the reduction of VTEC were predicted according to the fermentation temperature, 24 or 34°C, with greater inactivation at the highest temperature. The greatest reduction was observed during storage at high temperatures. A population decrease greater than 6 decimal logarithmic units was observed after 66 days of storage at 25°C, while a reduction of only ca. 1 logarithmic unit was detected at 12°C. The performance of our model and other modeling approaches was evaluated throughout the processing of dry and semidry FRMS. The greatest inactivation of VTEC was predicted in dry FRMS with long drying periods, while the smallest reduction was predicted in semidry FMRS with short drying periods. The model is implemented in a computing tool, E. coli SafeFerment (EcSF), freely available from http://www.ifr.ac.uk/safety/EcoliSafeFerment. EcSF integrates growth, probability of growth, and thermal and nonthermal inactivation models to predict the VTEC concentration throughout FRMS manufacturing and storage under constant or fluctuating environmental conditions. PMID:24561587

  3. Predicting the concentration of verotoxin-producing Escherichia coli bacteria during processing and storage of fermented raw-meat sausages.

    PubMed

    Quinto, E J; Arinder, P; Axelsson, L; Heir, E; Holck, A; Lindqvist, R; Lindblad, M; Andreou, P; Lauzon, H L; Marteinsson, V Þ; Pin, C

    2014-05-01

    A model to predict the population density of verotoxigenic Escherichia coli (VTEC) throughout the elaboration and storage of fermented raw-meat sausages (FRMS) was developed. Probabilistic and kinetic measurement data sets collected from publicly available resources were completed with new measurements when required and used to quantify the dependence of VTEC growth and inactivation on the temperature, pH, water activity (aw), and concentration of lactic acid. Predictions were compared with observations in VTEC-contaminated FRMS manufactured in a pilot plant. Slight differences in the reduction of VTEC were predicted according to the fermentation temperature, 24 or 34°C, with greater inactivation at the highest temperature. The greatest reduction was observed during storage at high temperatures. A population decrease greater than 6 decimal logarithmic units was observed after 66 days of storage at 25°C, while a reduction of only ca. 1 logarithmic unit was detected at 12°C. The performance of our model and other modeling approaches was evaluated throughout the processing of dry and semidry FRMS. The greatest inactivation of VTEC was predicted in dry FRMS with long drying periods, while the smallest reduction was predicted in semidry FMRS with short drying periods. The model is implemented in a computing tool, E. coli SafeFerment (EcSF), freely available from http://www.ifr.ac.uk/safety/EcoliSafeFerment. EcSF integrates growth, probability of growth, and thermal and nonthermal inactivation models to predict the VTEC concentration throughout FRMS manufacturing and storage under constant or fluctuating environmental conditions.

  4. Impact of TiO₂ and ZnO nanoparticles at predicted environmentally relevant concentrations on ammonia-oxidizing bacteria cultures under ammonia oxidation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhuanxi; Qiu, Zhaozheng; Chen, Zheng; Du Laing, Gijs; Liu, Aifen; Yan, Changzhou

    2015-02-01

    Increased application of titanium dioxide and zinc oxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2 and nano-ZnO) raises concerns related to their environmental impacts. The effects that such nanoparticles have on environmental processes and the bacteria that carry them out are largely unknown. In this study, ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) enrichment cultures, grown from surface sediments taken from an estuary wetland in Fujian Province, China, were spiked with nano-TiO2 and nano-ZnO (with an average size of 32 and 43 nm, respectively) at predicted environmentally relevant concentrations (≤2 mg L(-1)) to determine their impacts on ammonia oxidation and the mechanisms involved. Results showed that higher nano-TiO2 concentrations significantly inhibited ammonia oxidation in enrichment cultures. It is noteworthy that the average ammonia oxidation rate was significantly correlated to the Shannon index, the Simpson's index, and AOB abundance. This suggested that ammonia oxidation inhibition primarily resulted from a reduction of AOB biodiversity and abundance. However, AOB biodiversity and abundance as well as the average ammonia oxidation rate were not inhibited by nano-ZnO at predicted environmentally relevant concentrations. Accordingly, an insignificant correlation was established between biodiversity and abundance of the AOB amoA gene and the average ammonia oxidation rate under nano-ZnO treatments. AOB present in samples belonged to the β-Proteobacteria class with an affinity close to Nitrosospira and Nitrosomonas genera. This suggested that identified impacts of nano-TiO2 and nano-ZnO on ammonia oxidation processes can be extrapolated to some extent to natural aquatic environments. Complex impacts on AOB may result from different nanomaterials present in aquatic environments at various ambient conditions. Further investigation on how and to what extent different nanomaterials influence AOB diversity and abundance and their subsequent ammonia oxidation processes is therefore

  5. Predicting late-onset sepsis by routine neonatal screening for colonisation by gram-negative bacteria in neonates at intensive care units: a protocol for a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Harder, Thomas; Seidel, Juliane; Eckmanns, Tim; Weiss, Bettina; Haller, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Hospitals conduct extensive screening procedures to assess colonisation of the body surface of neonates by gram-negative bacteria to avoid complications like late-onset sepsis. However, the benefits of these procedures are controversially discussed. Until now, no systematic review has investigated the value of routine screening for colonisation by gram-negative bacteria in neonates for late-onset sepsis prediction. Methods and analysis We will conduct a systematic review, considering studies of any design that include infants up to an age of 12 months. We will search MEDLINE and EMBASE (inception to 2016), reference lists and grey literature. Screening of titles, abstracts and full texts will be conducted by two independent reviewers. We will extract data on study characteristics and study results. Risk of bias will be assessed using Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS-2) and Quality in Prognosis Studies (QUIPS) tools. Subgroup analyses are planned according to characteristics of studies, participants, index tests and outcome. For quantitative data synthesis on prognostic accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of screening to detect late-onset sepsis will be calculated. If sufficient data are available, we will calculate summary estimates using hierarchical summary receiver operating characteristics and bivariate models. Applying a risk factor approach, pooled summary estimates will be calculated as relative risk or OR, using fixed-effects and random-effects models. I-squared will be used to assess heterogeneity. All calculations will be performed in Stata V14.1 (College Station, Texas, USA). The results will be used to calculate positive and negative predictive value and number needed to be screened to prevent one case of sepsis. Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) will be used to assess certainty in the evidence. The protocol follows the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and

  6. Magnetic Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Jane Bray; Nelson, Jim

    1992-01-01

    Describes the history of Richard Blakemore's discovery of magnetotaxic organisms. Discusses possible reasons why the magnetic response in bacteria developed. Proposes research experiments integrating biology and physics in which students investigate problems using cultures of magnetotaxic organisms. (MDH)

  7. Methanotrophic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, R S; Hanson, T E

    1996-01-01

    Methane-utilizing bacteria (methanotrophs) are a diverse group of gram-negative bacteria that are related to other members of the Proteobacteria. These bacteria are classified into three groups based on the pathways used for assimilation of formaldehyde, the major source of cell carbon, and other physiological and morphological features. The type I and type X methanotrophs are found within the gamma subdivision of the Proteobacteria and employ the ribulose monophosphate pathway for formaldehyde assimilation, whereas type II methanotrophs, which employ the serine pathway for formaldehyde assimilation, form a coherent cluster within the beta subdivision of the Proteobacteria. Methanotrophic bacteria are ubiquitous. The growth of type II bacteria appears to be favored in environments that contain relatively high levels of methane, low levels of dissolved oxygen, and limiting concentrations of combined nitrogen and/or copper. Type I methanotrophs appear to be dominant in environments in which methane is limiting and combined nitrogen and copper levels are relatively high. These bacteria serve as biofilters for the oxidation of methane produced in anaerobic environments, and when oxygen is present in soils, atmospheric methane is oxidized. Their activities in nature are greatly influenced by agricultural practices and other human activities. Recent evidence indicates that naturally occurring, uncultured methanotrophs represent new genera. Methanotrophs that are capable of oxidizing methane at atmospheric levels exhibit methane oxidation kinetics different from those of methanotrophs available in pure cultures. A limited number of methanotrophs have the genetic capacity to synthesize a soluble methane monooxygenase which catalyzes the rapid oxidation of environmental pollutants including trichloroethylene. PMID:8801441

  8. Bacteria Counter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Science Applications, Inc.'s ATP Photometer makes a rapid and accurate count of the bacteria in a body fluid sample. Instrument provides information on the presence and quantity of bacteria by measuring the amount of light emitted by the reaction between two substances. Substances are ATP adenosine triphosphate and luciferase. The reactants are applied to a human body sample and the ATP Photometer observes the intensity of the light emitted displaying its findings in a numerical output. Total time lapse is usually less than 10 minutes, which represents a significant time savings in comparison of other techniques. Other applications are measuring organisms in fresh and ocean waters, determining bacterial contamination of foodstuffs, biological process control in the beverage industry, and in assay of activated sewage sludge.

  9. Classification of Antibiotic Resistance Patterns of Indicator Bacteria by Discriminant Analysis: Use in Predicting the Source of Fecal Contamination in Subtropical Waters

    PubMed Central

    Harwood, Valerie J.; Whitlock, John; Withington, Victoria

    2000-01-01

    The antibiotic resistance patterns of fecal streptococci and fecal coliforms isolated from domestic wastewater and animal feces were determined using a battery of antibiotics (amoxicillin, ampicillin, cephalothin, chlortetracycline, oxytetracycline, tetracycline, erythromycin, streptomycin, and vancomycin) at four concentrations each. The sources of animal feces included wild birds, cattle, chickens, dogs, pigs, and raccoons. Antibiotic resistance patterns of fecal streptococci and fecal coliforms from known sources were grouped into two separate databases, and discriminant analysis of these patterns was used to establish the relationship between the antibiotic resistance patterns and the bacterial source. The fecal streptococcus and fecal coliform databases classified isolates from known sources with similar accuracies. The average rate of correct classification for the fecal streptococcus database was 62.3%, and that for the fecal coliform database was 63.9%. The sources of fecal streptococci and fecal coliforms isolated from surface waters were identified by discriminant analysis of their antibiotic resistance patterns. Both databases identified the source of indicator bacteria isolated from surface waters directly impacted by septic tank discharges as human. At sample sites selected for relatively low anthropogenic impact, the dominant sources of indicator bacteria were identified as various animals. The antibiotic resistance analysis technique promises to be a useful tool in assessing sources of fecal contamination in subtropical waters, such as those in Florida. PMID:10966379

  10. Predictive models for the effect of storage temperature on Vibrio parahaemolyticus viability and counts of total viable bacteria in Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas).

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Piquer, Judith; Bowman, John P; Ross, Tom; Tamplin, Mark L

    2011-12-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is an indigenous bacterium of marine environments. It accumulates in oysters and may reach levels that cause human illness when postharvest temperatures are not properly controlled and oysters are consumed raw or undercooked. Predictive models were produced by injecting Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) with a cocktail of V. parahaemolyticus strains, measuring viability rates at storage temperatures from 3.6 to 30.4°C, and fitting the data to a model to obtain parameter estimates. The models were evaluated with Pacific and Sydney Rock oysters (Saccostrea glomerata) containing natural populations of V. parahaemolyticus. V. parahaemolyticus viability was measured by direct plating samples on thiosulfate-citrate-bile salts-sucrose (TCBS) agar for injected oysters and by most probable number (MPN)-PCR for oysters containing natural populations. In parallel, total viable bacterial counts (TVC) were measured by direct plating on marine agar. Growth/inactivation rates for V. parahaemolyticus were -0.006, -0.004, -0.005, -0.003, 0.030, 0.075, 0.095, and 0.282 log₁₀ CFU/h at 3.6, 6.2, 9.6, 12.6, 18.4, 20.0, 25.7, and 30.4°C, respectively. The growth rates for TVC were 0.015, 0.023, 0.016, 0.048, 0.055, 0.071, 0.133, and 0.135 log₁₀ CFU/h at 3.6, 6.2, 9.3, 14.9, 18.4, 20.0, 25.7, and 30.4°C, respectively. Square root and Arrhenius-type secondary models were generated for V. parahaemolyticus growth and inactivation kinetic data, respectively. A square root model was produced for TVC growth. Evaluation studies showed that predictive growth for V. parahaemolyticus and TVC were "fail safe." The models can assist oyster companies and regulators in implementing management strategies to minimize V. parahaemolyticus risk and enhancing product quality in supply chains.

  11. Sampling bacteria with a laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarzwälder, Kordula; Rutschmann, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Water quality is a topic of high interest and it's getting more and more important due to climate change and the implementation of European Water Framework Directive (WFD). One point of interest here is the inflow of bacteria into a river caused by combined sewer overflows which lead untreated wastewater including bacteria directly into a river. These bacteria remain in the river for a certain time, they settle down and can be remobilised again. In our study we want to investigate these processes of sedimentation and resuspension and use the results for the development of a software module coupled with the software Flow3D. Thereby we should be able to simulate and therefore predict the water quality influenced by combined sewer overflows. Hence we need to get information about the bacteria transport and fate. We need to know about the size of the bacteria or of the bacteria clumps and the size of the particles the bacteria are attached to. The agglomerates lead to different characteristics and velocities of settlement. The timespan during this bacteria can be detected in the bulk phase depends on many factors like the intensity of UV light, turbidity of the water, the temperature of the water, if there are grazers and a lot more. The size, density and composition of the agglomerates is just a part of all these influencing factors, but it is extremely difficult to differ between the other effects if we have no information about the simple sedimentation in default of these basic information. However we have a big problem getting the data. The chaining between bacteria or bacteria and particles is not too strong, so filtering the water to get a sieving curve may destroy these connections. We did some experiments similar to PIV (particle image velocimetry) measurements and evaluated the pictures with a macro written for the software ImageJ. Doing so we were able to get the concentration of bacteria in the water and collect information about the size of the bacteria. We

  12. Back To Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura C.

    1997-01-01

    Explores new research about bacteria. Discusses bacterial genomes, archaea, unusual environments, evolution, pathogens, bacterial movement, biofilms, bacteria in the body, and a bacterial obsession. Contains 29 references. (JRH)

  13. Cultivation of bacteria with ecological capsules in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiura, K.; Hashimoto, H.; Ishikawa, Y.; Kawasaki, Y.; Kobayashi, K.; Seki, K.; Koike, J.; Saito, T.

    1999-01-01

    A hermetically materially-closed aquatic microcosm containing bacteria, algae, and invertebrates was developed as a tool for determining the changes of ecological systems in space. The species composition was maintained for more than 365 days. The microcosm could be readily replicated. The results obtained from the simulation models indicated that there is a self-regulation homeostasis in coupling of production and consumption, which make the microcosm remarkably stable, and that the transfer of metabolites by diffusion is one of the important factors determining the behavior of the system. The microcosms were continuously irradiated using a 60 Co source. After 80 days, no elimination of organisms was found at any of the three irradiation levels (0.015, 0.55 and 3.0 mGy/day). The number of radio-resistance bacteria mutants was not increased in the microcosm at three irradiation levels. We proposed to research whether this microcosm is self-sustainable in space. When an aquatic ecosystem comes under stress due to the micro-gravity and enhanced radiation environment in space, whether the ecosystem is self-sustainable is not known. An aquatic ecosystem shows what happens as a result of the self-organizational processes of selection and adaptation. A microcosm is a useful tool for understanding such processes. We have proposed researching whether a microcosm is self-sustainable in space. The benefits of this project will be: (1) To acquire data for design of a Controlled Ecological Life Support System, (2) Possibility of microbial mutation in a space station. We report that a hermetically materially-closed microcosm, which could be a useful tool for determining changes of ecological processes in space, was developed, and that the effects of microgravity and enhanced radiation on the hermetically materially-closed microcosm were estimated through measurements on the Earth and simulation models.

  14. Bacteria isolated from amoebae/bacteria consortium

    DOEpatents

    Tyndall, R.L.

    1995-05-30

    New protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. Consortia and bacteria isolated therefrom are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. Consortia, bacteria isolated therefrom, and dispersants isolated therefrom are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  15. Bacteria isolated from amoebae/bacteria consortium

    DOEpatents

    Tyndall, Richard L.

    1995-01-01

    New protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. Consortia and bacteria isolated therefrom are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. Consortia, bacteria isolated therefrom, and dispersants isolated therefrom are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  16. Bacteria Inactivation During Lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Sol Quintero, María; Mora, Ulises; Gutiérrez, Jorge; Mues, Enrique; Castaño, Eduardo; Fernández, Francisco; Loske, Achim M.

    2006-09-01

    The influence of extracorporeal and intracorporeal lithotripsy on the viability of bacteria contained inside artificial kidney stones was investigated in vitro. Two different bacteria were exposed to the action of one extracorporeal shock wave generator and four intracorporeal lithotripters.

  17. Light scattering by marine heterotrophic bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulloa, Osvaldo; Sathyendranath, Shubha; Platt, Trevor; Quinones, Renato A.

    1992-01-01

    Mie theory is applied to estimate scattering by polydispersions of marine heterotrophic bacteria, and a simple expression is derived for the bacterial scattering coefficient. The error incurred in deriving bacterial optical properties by use of the van de Hulst approximations is computed. The scattering properties of natural bacterial assemblages in three marine environments, Georges Bank, Northeast Channel, and Sargasso Sea, are assessed by applying Mie theory to field data on bacterial size and abundance. Results are used to examine the potential contribution of bacteria to the scattering properties of seawater. The utility of using pigment data to predict the magnitude of scattering by bacteria is discussed.

  18. Pathogenic bacteria and timing of laying

    PubMed Central

    Møller, Anders Pape; Soler, Juan J; Nielsen, Jan Tøttrup; Galván, Ismael

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria constitute a serious threat to viability of many organisms. Because growth of most bacteria is favored by humid and warm environmental conditions, earlier reproducers in seasonal environments should suffer less from the negative consequences of pathogenic bacteria. These relationships, and the effects on reproductive success, should be particularly prominent in predators because they are frequently exposed to pathogenic microorganisms from sick prey. Here, we presented and tested this hypothesis by sampling bacteria on adult and nestling goshawks Accipiter gentilis. We predicted that early breeders and their offspring should have fewer bacteria than those reproducing later during the breeding season. Adult goshawks with a high abundance of Staphylococcus on their beak and claws were easier to capture and their laying date was delayed. Moreover, goshawks that laid their eggs later had offspring with more Staphylococcus on their beaks and claws. The strength of the association between laying date and bacterial density of nestlings was stronger during the warm spring of 2013, when nestlings suffered from a higher abundance of pathogenic bacteria. Hatching failure and fledging failure were more common in nests with a higher abundance of Staphylococcus independently of the number of years occupied, laying date, and age of the female nest owner. These findings imply that timing of reproduction may be under the influence of pathogenic bacteria. Because early breeding goshawks produce more recruits than later breeders, our results suggest a role for pathogenic bacteria in the optimal timing of reproduction. PMID:25937910

  19. Genomics of Probiotic Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Flaherty, Sarah; Goh, Yong Jun; Klaenhammer, Todd R.

    Probiotic bacteria from the Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species belong to the Firmicutes and the Actinobacteria phylum, respectively. Lactobacilli are members of the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) group, a broadly defined family of microorganisms that ferment various hexoses into primarily lactic acid. Lactobacilli are typically low G + C gram-positive species which are phylogenetically diverse, with over 100 species documented to date. Bifidobacteria are heterofermentative, high G + C content bacteria with about 30 species of bifidobacteria described to date.

  20. Modeling heterotrophic bacteria in plumbing system of drinking water.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Shakhawat; Al-Zahrani, Muhammad

    2014-06-01

    This study investigated occurrences of heterotrophic (HPC) bacteria and developed predictive models for HPC bacteria in plumbing pipes (PP) and hot water tanks (HWT) of two houses in Dhahran (Saudi Arabia). Heterotrophic bacteria in PP and HWT were observed to be 2.4 to 5.3 and 0.4 to 5.9 times the HPC bacteria in water distribution system (WDS), respectively. Three linear, one nonlinear, and one neural network models were investigated to predict HPC bacteria in PP and HWT. Significant factors for bacteria regrowth in PP and HWT were identified through numerical and graphical techniques. The R2 values of the models varied between 0.57 and 0.96, indicating moderate to excellent predictive ability for HPC bacteria in PP and HWT. The models were found to be statistically significant, which were also validated using additional data. These models can be used to predict HPC bacteria regrowth from WDS to PP and HWT, and could help to predict exposure and risks.

  1. Bleach vs. Bacteria

    MedlinePlus

    ... Inside Life Science > Bleach vs. Bacteria Inside Life Science View All Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Bleach vs. Bacteria By Sharon Reynolds ... For Proteins, Form Shapes Function This Inside Life Science article also appears on LiveScience . Learn about related ...

  2. Some bacteria are beneficial!

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMahon, Peter B.

    1995-01-01

    Most people would agree that bacteria usually spell trouble where the quality of drinking water is con cerned. However, recent studies conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) under the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) program have shown that some bacteria can improve the quality of water.

  3. Bacteria turn tiny gears

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    Swarms of bacteria turn two 380-micron long gears, opening the possibility of building hybrid biological machines at the microscopic scale. Read more at Wired: http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2009/12/bacterial-micro-machine/#more-15684 or Scientific American: http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=brownian-motion-bacteria

  4. Inactivation of biofilm bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    LeChevallier, M W; Cawthon, C D; Lee, R G

    1988-01-01

    The current project was developed to examine inactivation of biofilm bacteria and to characterize the interaction of biocides with pipe surfaces. Unattached bacteria were quite susceptible to the variety of disinfectants tested. Viable bacterial counts were reduced 99% by exposure to 0.08 mg of hypochlorous acid (pH 7.0) per liter (1 to 2 degrees C) for 1 min. For monochloramine, 94 mg/liter was required to kill 99% of the bacteria within 1 min. These results were consistent with those found by other investigators. Biofilm bacteria grown on the surfaces of granular activated carbon particles, metal coupons, or glass microscope slides were 150 to more than 3,000 times more resistant to hypochlorous acid (free chlorine, pH 7.0) than were unattached cells. In contrast, resistance of biofilm bacteria to monochloramine disinfection ranged from 2- to 100-fold more than that of unattached cells. The results suggested that, relative to inactivation of unattached bacteria, monochloramine was better able to penetrate and kill biofilm bacteria than free chlorine. For free chlorine, the data indicated that transport of the disinfectant into the biofilm was a major rate-limiting factor. Because of this phenomenon, increasing the level of free chlorine did not increase disinfection efficiency. Experiments where equal weights of disinfectants were used suggested that the greater penetrating power of monochloramine compensated for its limited disinfection activity. These studies showed that monochloramine was as effective as free chlorine for inactivation of biofilm bacteria. The research provides important insights into strategies for control of biofilm bacteria. Images PMID:2849380

  5. Antibiotics from predatory bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Korp, Juliane; Vela Gurovic, María S

    2016-01-01

    Summary Bacteria, which prey on other microorganisms, are commonly found in the environment. While some of these organisms act as solitary hunters, others band together in large consortia before they attack their prey. Anecdotal reports suggest that bacteria practicing such a wolfpack strategy utilize antibiotics as predatory weapons. Consistent with this hypothesis, genome sequencing revealed that these micropredators possess impressive capacities for natural product biosynthesis. Here, we will present the results from recent chemical investigations of this bacterial group, compare the biosynthetic potential with that of non-predatory bacteria and discuss the link between predation and secondary metabolism. PMID:27340451

  6. Indicator For Pseudomonas Bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margalit, Ruth

    1990-01-01

    Characteristic protein extracted and detected. Natural protein marker found in Pseudomonas bacteria. Azurin, protein containing copper readily extracted, purified, and used to prepare antibodies. Possible to develop simple, fast, and accurate test for marker carried out in doctor's office.

  7. Lipopolysaccharides in diazotrophic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Serrato, Rodrigo V

    2014-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) is a process in which the atmospheric nitrogen (N2) is transformed into ammonia (NH3) by a select group of nitrogen-fixing organisms, or diazotrophic bacteria. In order to furnish the biologically useful nitrogen to plants, these bacteria must be in constant molecular communication with their host plants. Some of these molecular plant-microbe interactions are very specific, resulting in a symbiotic relationship between the diazotroph and the host. Others are found between associative diazotrophs and plants, resulting in plant infection and colonization of internal tissues. Independent of the type of ecological interaction, glycans, and glycoconjugates produced by these bacteria play an important role in the molecular communication prior and during colonization. Even though exopolysaccharides (EPS) and lipochitooligosaccharides (LCO) produced by diazotrophic bacteria and released onto the environment have their importance in the microbe-plant interaction, it is the lipopolysaccharides (LPS), anchored on the external membrane of these bacteria, that mediates the direct contact of the diazotroph with the host cells. These molecules are extremely variable among the several species of nitrogen fixing-bacteria, and there are evidences of the mechanisms of infection being closely related to their structure.

  8. Aerobic Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Yurkov, Vladimir V.; Beatty, J. Thomas

    1998-01-01

    The aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria are a relatively recently discovered bacterial group. Although taxonomically and phylogenetically heterogeneous, these bacteria share the following distinguishing features: the presence of bacteriochlorophyll a incorporated into reaction center and light-harvesting complexes, low levels of the photosynthetic unit in cells, an abundance of carotenoids, a strong inhibition by light of bacteriochlorophyll synthesis, and the inability to grow photosynthetically under anaerobic conditions. Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria are classified in two marine (Erythrobacter and Roseobacter) and six freshwater (Acidiphilium, Erythromicrobium, Erythromonas, Porphyrobacter, Roseococcus, and Sandaracinobacter) genera, which phylogenetically belong to the α-1, α-3, and α-4 subclasses of the class Proteobacteria. Despite this phylogenetic information, the evolution and ancestry of their photosynthetic properties are unclear. We discuss several current proposals for the evolutionary origin of aerobic phototrophic bacteria. The closest phylogenetic relatives of aerobic phototrophic bacteria include facultatively anaerobic purple nonsulfur phototrophic bacteria. Since these two bacterial groups share many properties, yet have significant differences, we compare and contrast their physiology, with an emphasis on morphology and photosynthetic and other metabolic processes. PMID:9729607

  9. The fecal bacteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sadowsky, Michael J.; Whitman, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    The Fecal Bacteria offers a balanced, integrated discussion of fecal bacteria and their presence and ecology in the intestinal tract of mammals, in the environment, and in the food supply. This volume covers their use in examining and assessing water quality in order to offer protection from illnesses related to swimming in or ingesting contaminated water, in addition to discussing their use in engineering considerations of water quality, modeling, monitoring, and regulations. Fecal bacteria are additionally used as indicators of contamination of ready-to-eat foods and fresh produce. The intestinal environment, the microbial community structure of the gut microbiota, and the physiology and genomics of this broad group of microorganisms are explored in the book. With contributions from an internationally recognized group of experts, the book integrates medicine, public health, environmental, and microbiological topics in order to provide a unique, holistic understanding of fecal bacteria. Moreover, it shows how the latest basic science and applied research findings are helping to solve problems and develop effective management strategies. For example, readers will discover how the latest tools and molecular approaches have led to our current understanding of fecal bacteria and enabled us to improve human health and water quality. The Fecal Bacteria is recommended for microbiologists, clinicians, animal scientists, engineers, environmental scientists, food safety experts, water quality managers, and students. It will help them better understand fecal bacteria and use their knowledge to protect human and environmental health. They can also apply many of the techniques and molecular tools discussed in this book to the study of a broad range of microorganisms in a variety of habitats.

  10. The intrinsic resistance of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Gang, Zhang; Jie, Feng

    2016-10-20

    Antibiotic resistance is often considered to be a trait acquired by previously susceptible bacteria, on the basis of which can be attributed to the horizontal acquisition of new genes or the occurrence of spontaneous mutation. In addition to acquired resistance, bacteria have a trait of intrinsic resistance to different classes of antibiotics. An intrinsic resistance gene is involved in intrinsic resistance, and its presence in bacterial strains is independent of previous antibiotic exposure and is not caused by horizontal gene transfer. Recently, interest in intrinsic resistance genes has increased, because these gene products not only may provide attractive therapeutic targets for development of novel drugs that rejuvenate the activity of existing antibiotics, and but also might predict future emergence of resistant pathogens if they become mobilized. In the present review, we summarize the conventional examples of intrinsic resistance, including the impermeability of cellular envelopes, the activity of multidrug efflux pumps or lack of drug targets. We also demonstrate that transferases and enzymes involved in basic bacterial metabolic processes confer intrinsic resistance in Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus. We present as well information on the cryptic intrinsic resistance genes that do not confer resistance to their native hosts but are capable of conferring resistance when their expression levels are increased and the activation of the cryptic genes. Finally, we discuss that intrinsic genes could be the origin of acquired resistance, especially in the genus Acinetobacter.

  11. Ice-Nucleating Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obata, Hitoshi

    Since the discovery of ice-nucleating bacteria in 1974 by Maki et al., a large number of studies on the biological characteristics, ice-nucleating substance, ice nucleation gene and frost damage etc. of the bacteria have been carried out. Ice-nucleating bacteria can cause the freezing of water at relatively warm temperature (-2.3°C). Tween 20 was good substrates for ice-nucleating activity of Pseudomonas fluorescens KUIN-1. Major fatty acids of Isolate (Pseudomonas fluorescens) W-11 grown at 30°C were palmitic, cis-9-hexadecenoic and cis-11-octadecenoic which amounted to 90% of the total fatty acids. Sequence analysis shows that an ice nucleation gene from Pseudomonas fluorescens is related to the gene of Pseudomonas syringae.

  12. Sterol Synthesis in Diverse Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jeremy H.; Yin, Xinchi; Welander, Paula V.

    2016-01-01

    Sterols are essential components of eukaryotic cells whose biosynthesis and function has been studied extensively. Sterols are also recognized as the diagenetic precursors of steranes preserved in sedimentary rocks where they can function as geological proxies for eukaryotic organisms and/or aerobic metabolisms and environments. However, production of these lipids is not restricted to the eukaryotic domain as a few bacterial species also synthesize sterols. Phylogenomic studies have identified genes encoding homologs of sterol biosynthesis proteins in the genomes of several additional species, indicating that sterol production may be more widespread in the bacterial domain than previously thought. Although the occurrence of sterol synthesis genes in a genome indicates the potential for sterol production, it provides neither conclusive evidence of sterol synthesis nor information about the composition and abundance of basic and modified sterols that are actually being produced. Here, we coupled bioinformatics with lipid analyses to investigate the scope of bacterial sterol production. We identified oxidosqualene cyclase (Osc), which catalyzes the initial cyclization of oxidosqualene to the basic sterol structure, in 34 bacterial genomes from five phyla (Bacteroidetes, Cyanobacteria, Planctomycetes, Proteobacteria, and Verrucomicrobia) and in 176 metagenomes. Our data indicate that bacterial sterol synthesis likely occurs in diverse organisms and environments and also provides evidence that there are as yet uncultured groups of bacterial sterol producers. Phylogenetic analysis of bacterial and eukaryotic Osc sequences confirmed a complex evolutionary history of sterol synthesis in this domain. Finally, we characterized the lipids produced by Osc-containing bacteria and found that we could generally predict the ability to synthesize sterols. However, predicting the final modified sterol based on our current knowledge of sterol synthesis was difficult. Some bacteria

  13. Modelling the fate and transport of faecal bacteria in estuarine and coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Gao, Guanghai; Falconer, Roger A; Lin, Binliang

    2015-11-15

    This paper details a numerical model developed to predict the fate and transport of faecal bacteria in receiving surface waters. The model was first validated by comparing model predicted faecal bacteria concentrations with available field measurements. The model simulations agreed well with the observation data. After calibration, the model was applied to investigate the effects of different parameters, including: tidal processes, river discharges from the upstream boundaries and bacteria inputs from the upstream boundaries, wastewater treatment works (WwTWs), rivers and combined sewer overflows (CSO), on the concentrations of faecal bacteria in the Ribble Estuary. The results revealed that the tide and upstream boundary bacteria inputs were the primary factors controlling the distribution of faecal bacteria. The bacteria inputs from the WwTWs in the model domain were generally found not to have a significant impact on distribution of faecal bacteria in the estuary.

  14. Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longenecker, Nevin E.; Oppenheimer, Dan

    1982-01-01

    A study conducted by high school advanced bacteriology students appears to confirm the hypothesis that the incremental administration of antibiotics on several species of bacteria (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermis, Bacillus sublitus, Bacillus megaterium) will allow for the development of antibiotic-resistant strains. (PEB)

  15. Bacteria-surface interactions.

    PubMed

    Tuson, Hannah H; Weibel, Douglas B

    2013-05-14

    The interaction of bacteria with surfaces has important implications in a range of areas, including bioenergy, biofouling, biofilm formation, and the infection of plants and animals. Many of the interactions of bacteria with surfaces produce changes in the expression of genes that influence cell morphology and behavior, including genes essential for motility and surface attachment. Despite the attention that these phenotypes have garnered, the bacterial systems used for sensing and responding to surfaces are still not well understood. An understanding of these mechanisms will guide the development of new classes of materials that inhibit and promote cell growth, and complement studies of the physiology of bacteria in contact with surfaces. Recent studies from a range of fields in science and engineering are poised to guide future investigations in this area. This review summarizes recent studies on bacteria-surface interactions, discusses mechanisms of surface sensing and consequences of cell attachment, provides an overview of surfaces that have been used in bacterial studies, and highlights unanswered questions in this field.

  16. PATHOGENICITY OF BIOFILM BACTERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is a paucity of information concerning any link between the microorganisms commonly found in biofilms of drinking water systems and their impacts on human health. For bacteria, culture-based techniques detect only a limited number of the total microorganisms associated wit...

  17. Monoclonal antibodies against bacteria.

    PubMed

    Macario, A J; Conway de Macario, E

    1988-01-01

    Highlights are presented of most recent work in which monoclonal antibodies have been instrumental in the study of bacteria and their products. Topics summarized pertain to human and veterinary medicines, dentistry, phytopathology, ichthyology, and bacterial ecophysiology, differentiation, evolution and methanogenic biotechnology.

  18. Enteric bacteria mandibular osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Scolozzi, Paolo; Lombardi, Tommaso; Edney, Timothy; Jaques, Bertrand

    2005-06-01

    Osteomyelitis of the mandible is a relatively rare inflammatory disease that usually stems from the odontogenic polymicrobial flora of the oral cavity. We are reporting 2 unusual cases of mandibular osteomyelitis resulting from enteric bacteria infection. In one patient, abundant clinical evidence suggested a diagnosis of a chronic factitious disease, whereas in the second patient no obvious etiology was found.

  19. Bacteria-surface interactions

    PubMed Central

    Tuson, Hannah H.; Weibel, Douglas B.

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of bacteria with surfaces has important implications in a range of areas, including bioenergy, biofouling, biofilm formation, and the infection of plants and animals. Many of the interactions of bacteria with surfaces produce changes in the expression of genes that influence cell morphology and behavior, including genes essential for motility and surface attachment. Despite the attention that these phenotypes have garnered, the bacterial systems used for sensing and responding to surfaces are still not well understood. An understanding of these mechanisms will guide the development of new classes of materials that inhibit and promote cell growth, and complement studies of the physiology of bacteria in contact with surfaces. Recent studies from a range of fields in science and engineering are poised to guide future investigations in this area. This review summarizes recent studies on bacteria-surface interactions, discusses mechanisms of surface sensing and consequences of cell attachment, provides an overview of surfaces that have been used in bacterial studies, and highlights unanswered questions in this field. PMID:23930134

  20. Reanimation of Ancient Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Vreeland, Russell H.

    2009-01-09

    Recent highly publicized experiments conducted on salt crystals taken from the Permian Salado Formation in Southeastern New Mexico have shown that some ancient crystals contain viable microorganisms trapped within fluid inclusions. Stringent geological and microbiological selection criteria were used to select crystals and conduct all sampling. This talk will focus on how each of these lines of data support the conclusion that such isolated bacteria are as old as the rock in which they are trapped. In this case, the isolated microbes are salt tolerant bacilli that grow best in media containing 8% NaCl, and respond to concentrated brines by forming spores. One of the organisms is phylogenetically related to several bacilli, but does have several unique characteristics. This talk will trace the interdisciplinary data and procedures supporting these discoveries, and describe the various isolated bacteria.

  1. Reanimation of Ancient Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Vreeland, Russell H.

    2002-01-09

    Recent highly publicized experiments conducted on salt crystals taken from the Permian Salado Formation in Southeastern New Mexico have shown that some ancient crystals contain viable microorganisms trapped within fluid inclusions. Stringent geological and microbiological selection criteria were used to select crystals and conduct all sampling. This talk will focus on how each of these lines of data support the conclusion that such isolated bacteria are as old as the rock in which they are trapped. In this case, the isolated microbes are salt tolerant bacilli that grow best in media containing 8% NaCl, and respond to concentrated brines by forming spores. One of the organisms is phylogenetically related to several bacilli, but does have several unique characteristics. This talk will trace the interdisciplinary data and procedures supporting these discoveries, and describe the various isolated bacteria.

  2. Manufacture of Probiotic Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, J. A.; Ross, R. P.; Fitzgerald, G. F.; Stanton, C.

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been used for many years as natural biopreservatives in fermented foods. A small group of LAB are also believed to have beneficial health effects on the host, so called probiotic bacteria. Probiotics have emerged from the niche industry from Asia into European and American markets. Functional foods are one of the fastest growing markets today, with estimated growth to 20 billion dollars worldwide by 2010 (GIA, 2008). The increasing demand for probiotics and the new food markets where probiotics are introduced, challenges the industry to produce high quantities of probiotic cultures in a viable and stable form. Dried concentrated probiotic cultures are the most convenient form for incorporation into functional foods, given the ease of storage, handling and transport, especially for shelf-stable functional products. This chapter will discuss various aspects of the challenges associated with the manufacturing of probiotic cultures.

  3. Computation by Bacteria

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-03

    inversion symmetry and time reversal symmetry by dissipat - ing energy , and breaking both these symmetries allows ratcheting. The ability of...durations. All of these devices take advantage of the conversion of chemical energy into propulsion that occurs within bacteria. These devices break spatial...micromachines relying on energy that microorganisms would dissipate “anyway” even in the absence of ratchet structures suggests that researchers could

  4. Escherichia coli bacteria density in relation to turbidity, streamflow characteristics, and season in the Chattahoochee River near Atlanta, Georgia, October 2000 through September 2008—Description, statistical analysis, and predictive modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Regression analyses show that E. coli density in samples was strongly related to turbidity, streamflow characteristics, and season at both sites. The regression equation chosen for the Norcross data showed that 78 percent of the variability in E. coli density (in log base 10 units) was explained by the variability in turbidity values (in log base 10 units), streamflow event (dry-weather flow or stormflow), season (cool or warm), and an interaction term that is the cross product of streamflow event and turbidity. The regression equation chosen for the Atlanta data showed that 76 percent of the variability in E. coli density (in log base 10 units) was explained by the variability in turbidity values (in log base 10 units), water temperature, streamflow event, and an interaction term that is the cross product of streamflow event and turbidity. Residual analysis and model confirmation using new data indicated the regression equations selected at both sites predicted E. coli density within the 90 percent prediction intervals of the equations and could be used to predict E. coli density in real time at both sites.

  5. Biocide tolerance in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ortega Morente, Elena; Fernández-Fuentes, Miguel Angel; Grande Burgos, Maria José; Abriouel, Hikmate; Pérez Pulido, Rubén; Gálvez, Antonio

    2013-03-01

    Biocides have been employed for centuries, so today a wide range of compounds showing different levels of antimicrobial activity have become available. At the present time, understanding the mechanisms of action of biocides has also become an important issue with the emergence of bacterial tolerance to biocides and the suggestion that biocide and antibiotic resistance in bacteria might be linked. While most of the mechanisms providing antibiotic resistance are agent specific, providing resistance to a single antimicrobial or class of antimicrobial, there are currently numerous examples of efflux systems that accommodate and, thus, provide tolerance to a broad range of structurally unrelated antimicrobials, both antibiotics and biocides. If biocide tolerance becomes increasingly common and it is linked to antibiotic resistance, not only resistant (even multi-resistant) bacteria could be passed along the food chain, but also there are resistance determinants that can spread and lead to the emergence of new resistant microorganisms, which can only be detected and monitored when the building blocks of resistance traits are understood on the molecular level. This review summarizes the main advances reached in understanding the mechanism of action of biocides, the mechanisms of bacterial resistance to both biocides and antibiotics, and the incidence of biocide tolerance in bacteria of concern to human health and the food industry.

  6. How honey kills bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kwakman, Paulus H S; te Velde, Anje A; de Boer, Leonie; Speijer, Dave; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M J E; Zaat, Sebastian A J

    2010-07-01

    With the rise in prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, honey is increasingly valued for its antibacterial activity. To characterize all bactericidal factors in a medical-grade honey, we used a novel approach of successive neutralization of individual honey bactericidal factors. All bacteria tested, including Bacillus subtilis, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producing Escherichia coli, ciprofloxacin-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium, were killed by 10-20% (v/v) honey, whereas > or = 40% (v/v) of a honey-equivalent sugar solution was required for similar activity. Honey accumulated up to 5.62 +/- 0.54 mM H(2)O(2) and contained 0.25 +/- 0.01 mM methylglyoxal (MGO). After enzymatic neutralization of these two compounds, honey retained substantial activity. Using B. subtilis for activity-guided isolation of the additional antimicrobial factors, we discovered bee defensin-1 in honey. After combined neutralization of H(2)O(2), MGO, and bee defensin-1, 20% honey had only minimal activity left, and subsequent adjustment of the pH of this honey from 3.3 to 7.0 reduced the activity to that of sugar alone. Activity against all other bacteria tested depended on sugar, H(2)O(2), MGO, and bee defensin-1. Thus, we fully characterized the antibacterial activity of medical-grade honey.

  7. Denitrification by extremely halophilic bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, L. I.; Tomlinson, G. A.

    1985-01-01

    Extremely halophilic bacteria were isolated from widely separated sites by anaerobic enrichment in the presence of nitrate. The anaerobic growth of several of these isolates was accompanied by the production of nitrite, nitrous oxide, and dinitrogen. These results are a direct confirmation of the existence of extremely halophilic denitrifying bacteria, and suggest that such bacteria may be common inhabitants of hypersaline environments.

  8. Living bacteria in silica gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassif, Nadine; Bouvet, Odile; Noelle Rager, Marie; Roux, Cécile; Coradin, Thibaud; Livage, Jacques

    2002-09-01

    The encapsulation of enzymes within silica gels has been extensively studied during the past decade for the design of biosensors and bioreactors. Yeast spores and bacteria have also been recently immobilized within silica gels where they retain their enzymatic activity, but the problem of the long-term viability of whole cells in an inorganic matrix has never been fully addressed. It is a real challenge for the development of sol-gel processes. Generic tests have been performed to check the viability of Escherichia coli bacteria in silica gels. Surprisingly, more bacteria remain culturable in the gel than in an aqueous suspension. The metabolic activity of the bacteria towards glycolysis decreases slowly, but half of the bacteria are still viable after one month. When confined within a mineral environment, bacteria do not form colonies. The exchange of chemical signals between isolated bacteria rather than aggregates can then be studied, a point that could be very important for 'quorum sensing'.

  9. Phage-bacteria infection networks: From nestedness to modularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Cesar O.; Valverde, Sergi; Weitz, Joshua S.

    2013-03-01

    Bacteriophages (viruses that infect bacteria) are the most abundant biological life-forms on Earth. However, very little is known regarding the structure of phage-bacteria infections. In a recent study we re-evaluated 38 prior studies and demonstrated that phage-bacteria infection networks tend to be statistically nested in small scale communities (Flores et al 2011). Nestedness is consistent with a hierarchy of infection and resistance within phages and bacteria, respectively. However, we predicted that at large scales, phage-bacteria infection networks should be typified by a modular structure. We evaluate and confirm this hypothesis using the most extensive study of phage-bacteria infections (Moebus and Nattkemper 1981). In this study, cross-infections were evaluated between 215 marine phages and 286 marine bacteria. We develop a novel multi-scale network analysis and find that the Moebus and Nattkemper (1981) study, is highly modular (at the whole network scale), yet also exhibits nestedness and modularity at the within-module scale. We examine the role of geography in driving these modular patterns and find evidence that phage-bacteria interactions can exhibit strong similarity despite large distances between sites. CFG acknowledges the support of CONACyT Foundation. JSW holds a Career Award at the Scientific Interface from the Burroughs Wellcome Fund and acknowledges the support of the James S. McDonnell Foundation

  10. Bacteria in solitary confinement.

    PubMed

    Mullineaux, Conrad W

    2015-02-15

    Even in clonal bacterial cultures, individual bacteria can show substantial stochastic variation, leading to pitfalls in the interpretation of data derived from millions of cells in a culture. In this issue of the Journal of Bacteriology, as part of their study on osmoadaptation in a cyanobacterium, Nanatani et al. describe employing an ingenious microfluidic device that gently cages individual cells (J Bacteriol 197:676-687, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JB.02276-14). The device is a welcome addition to the toolkit available to probe the responses of individual cells to environmental cues.

  11. Surface layers of bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Beveridge, T J; Graham, L L

    1991-01-01

    Since bacteria are so small, microscopy has traditionally been used to study them as individual cells. To this end, electron microscopy has been a most powerful tool for studying bacterial surfaces; the viewing of macromolecular arrangements of some surfaces is now possible. This review compares older conventional electron-microscopic methods with new cryotechniques currently available and the results each has produced. Emphasis is not placed on the methodology but, rather, on the importance of the results in terms of our perception of the makeup and function of bacterial surfaces and their interaction with the surrounding environment. Images PMID:1723487

  12. Comparative genomics of green sulfur bacteria.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Colin; Ussery, David W; Tümmler, Burkhard

    2010-06-01

    Eleven completely sequenced Chlorobi genomes were compared in oligonucleotide usage, gene contents, and synteny. The green sulfur bacteria (GSB) are equipped with a core genome that sustains their anoxygenic phototrophic lifestyle by photosynthesis, sulfur oxidation, and CO(2) fixation. Whole-genome gene family and single gene sequence comparisons yielded similar phylogenetic trees of the sequenced chromosomes indicating a concerted vertical evolution of large gene sets. Chromosomal synteny of genes is not preserved in the phylum Chlorobi. The accessory genome is characterized by anomalous oligonucleotide usage and endows the strains with individual features for transport, secretion, cell wall, extracellular constituents, and a few elements of the biosynthetic apparatus. Giant genes are a peculiar feature of the genera Chlorobium and Prosthecochloris. The predicted proteins have a huge molecular weight of 10(6), and are probably instrumental for the bacteria to generate their own intimate (micro)environment.

  13. Chemical communication in bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suravajhala, Srinivasa Sandeep; Saini, Deepak; Nott, Prabhu

    Luminescence in Vibrio fischeri is a model for quorum-sensing-gene-regulation in bacteria. We study luminescence response of V. fischeri to both internal and external cues at the single cell and population level. Experiments with ES114, a wild-type strain, and ainS mutant show that luminescence induction in cultures is not always proportional to cell-density and there is always a basal level of luminescence. At any given concentration of the exogenously added signals, C6-HSL and C8-HSL, luminescence per cell reaches a maximum during the exponential phase and decreases thereafter. We hypothesize that (1) C6-HSL production and LuxR activity are not proportional to cell-density, and (2) there is a shift in equilibrium from C6-HSL to C8-HSL during the later stages of growth of the culture. RT-PCR analysis of luxI and luxR shows that the expression of these genes is maximum corresponding to the highest level of luminescence. The shift in equilibrium is shown by studying competitive binding of C6-HSL and C8-HSL to LuxR. We argue that luminescence is a unicellular behaviour, and an intensive property like per cell luminescence is more important than gross luminescence of the population in understanding response of bacteria to chemical signalling. Funding from the Department of Science and Technology, India is acknowledged.

  14. Functional amyloids in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Romero, Diego; Kolter, Roberto

    2014-06-01

    The term amyloidosis is used to refer to a family of pathologies altering the homeostasis of human organs. Despite having a name that alludes to starch content, the amyloid accumulations are made up of proteins that polymerize as long and rigid fibers. Amyloid proteins vary widely with respect to their amino acid sequences but they share similarities in their quaternary structure; the amyloid fibers are enriched in β-sheets arranged perpendicular to the axis of the fiber. This structural feature provides great robustness, remarkable stability, and insolubility. In addition, amyloid proteins specifically stain with certain dyes such as Congo red and thioflavin-T. The aggregation into amyloid fibers, however, it is not restricted to pathogenic processes, rather it seems to be widely distributed among proteins and polypeptides. Amyloid fibers are present in insects, fungi and bacteria, and they are important in maintaining the homeostasis of the organism. Such findings have motivated the use of the term "functional amyloid" to differentiate these amyloid proteins from their toxic siblings. This review focuses on systems that have evolved in bacteria that control the expression and assembly of amyloid proteins on cell surfaces, such that the robustness of amyloid proteins are used towards a beneficial end.

  15. Molecular Determinants of Radio Resistance in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    their p53 gene status for all 11 exons and all patients are wild -type for p53. Immunohistochemistry for p53, p21, TUNNEL, Bax, Bcl-2, BRCAI/2/Rad51/DNA...M, Stratford 1, Bristow RG, Iwakawa M, Imai T, Zingde S, Anscher M, Bourhis J, Begg A, Haustermans K, Bentzen S and Hendry J. Molecular Markers...6, SP 111.2:2005. (Senior Responsible Author) 22. Hendry JH, Bristow RG, West CM, Begg A, McKay M, Baumann and IAEA Consultant Group. "Molecular

  16. The role of depressed metabolism in increased radio-resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musacchia, X. J.

    1975-01-01

    The results of experiments on hamsters and rats to determine physiological responses to various temperature conditions are presented. The experimental methods described are considered to be applicable to future mammalian experiments in space. Renal function was examined in the golden hamster as a function of body temperature. Hamsters were also acclimated to heat and metabolic rates, body temperature, skin temperature, cardiac distribution and whole body hematocrits were measured. In addition, the effects of heat stress on the intestinal transport of sugars in the hamster and rat were studied. The biological effects of prolonged space flight and methods of simulating weightlessness are also discussed.

  17. Molecular Determinants of Radio Resistance in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-01

    malignant prostate cell lines, the mRNA and protein levels of the HR-related Rad51, XRCC3 , Rad52, Rad54 genes were elevated -2-5 fold in comparison to normal...Antisense riboprobes (RAD50, MREll, RAD52, RAD54, RAD51, XRCC2, XRCC3 , RAD51B, RAD51C, RAD51D, L32 and GAPDH from DBSR1 set; ATM, NBS1, XRCC2, XRCC3 ...suggested by the supplier and included: Rad51, RPA, ot-tubulin (Oncogene Research Products, Inc.), Rad50, Nbsl(p95), XRCC3 , Rad5lC, Rad5lD (Novus

  18. Characterization and Structure Prediction of Partial Length Protein Sequences of pcoA, pcoR and chrB Genes from Heavy Metal Resistant Bacteria from the Klip River, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Chihomvu, Patience; Stegmann, Peter; Pillay, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The Klip River has suffered from severe anthropogenic effects from industrial activities such as mining. Long-term exposure to heavy metal pollution has led to the development of heavy metal resistant strains of Pseudomonas sp. KR23, Lysinibacillus sp. KR25, and E. coli KR29. The objectives of this study were to characterize the genetics of copper and chromate resistance of the isolates. Copper and chromate resistance determinants were cloned and sequenced. Open reading frames (ORFs) related to the genes CopA and CopR were identified in E. coli KR29, PcoA in Lysinibacillus sp. KR25 and none related to chromate resistance were detected. The 3D-models predicted by I-TASSER disclose that the PcoA proteins consist of β-sheets, which form a part of the cupredoxin domain of the CopA copper resistance family of genes. The model for PcoR_29 revealed the presence of a helix turn helix; this forms part of a DNA binding protein, which is part of a heavy metal transcriptional regulator. The bacterial strains were cured using ethidium bromide. The genes encoding for heavy metal resistance and antibiotic resistance were found to be located on the chromosome for both Pseudomonas sp. (KR23) and E. coli (KR29). For Lysinibacillus (KR25) the heavy metal resistance determinants are suspected to be located on a mobile genetic element, which was not detected using gel electrophoresis. PMID:25837632

  19. Biotechnology of Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik

    Anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria are a diverse collection of organisms that are defined by their ability to grow using energy from light without evolving oxygen. The dominant groups are purple sulfur bacteria, purple nonsulfur bacteria, green sulfur bacteria, and green and red filamentous anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria. They represent several bacterial phyla but they all have bacteriochlorophylls and carotenoids and photochemical reaction centers which generate ATP and cellular reductants used for CO2 fixation. They typically have an anaerobic lifestyle in the light, although some grow aerobically in the dark. Some of them oxidize inorganic sulfur compounds for light-dependent CO2 fixation; this ability can be exploited for photobiological removal of hydrogen sulfide from wastewater and biogas. The anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria also perform bioremediation of recalcitrant dyes, pesticides, and heavy metals under anaerobic conditions. Finally, these organisms may be useful for overexpression of membrane proteins and photobiological production of H2 and other valuable compounds.

  20. Kin Recognition in Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wall, Daniel

    2016-09-08

    The ability of bacteria to recognize kin provides a means to form social groups. In turn these groups can lead to cooperative behaviors that surpass the ability of the individual. Kin recognition involves specific biochemical interactions between a receptor(s) and an identification molecule(s). Recognition specificity, ensuring that nonkin are excluded and kin are included, is critical and depends on the number of loci and polymorphisms involved. After recognition and biochemical perception, the common ensuing cooperative behaviors include biofilm formation, quorum responses, development, and swarming motility. Although kin recognition is a fundamental mechanism through which cells might interact, microbiologists are only beginning to explore the topic. This review considers both molecular and theoretical aspects of bacterial kin recognition. Consideration is also given to bacterial diversity, genetic relatedness, kin selection theory, and mechanisms of recognition.

  1. Acoustofluidic bacteria separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sixing; Ma, Fen; Bachman, Hunter; Cameron, Craig E.; Zeng, Xiangqun; Huang, Tony Jun

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial separation from human blood samples can help with the identification of pathogenic bacteria for sepsis diagnosis. In this work, we report an acoustofluidic device for label-free bacterial separation from human blood samples. In particular, we exploit the acoustic radiation force generated from a tilted-angle standing surface acoustic wave (taSSAW) field to separate Escherichia coli from human blood cells based on their size difference. Flow cytometry analysis of the E. coli separated from red blood cells shows a purity of more than 96%. Moreover, the label-free electrochemical detection of the separated E. coli displays reduced non-specific signals due to the removal of blood cells. Our acoustofluidic bacterial separation platform has advantages such as label-free separation, high biocompatibility, flexibility, low cost, miniaturization, automation, and ease of in-line integration. The platform can be incorporated with an on-chip sensor to realize a point-of-care sepsis diagnostic device.

  2. Phosphonate utilization by bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Cook, A M; Daughton, C G; Alexander, M

    1978-01-01

    Bacteria able to use at least one of 13 ionic alkylphosphonates of O-alkyl or O,O-dialkyl alkylphosphonates as phosphorus sources were isolated from sewage and soil. Four of these isolates used 2-aminoethylphosphonic acid (AEP) as a sole carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus source. None of the other phosphonates served as a carbon source for the organisms. One isolate, identified as Pseudomonas putida, grew with AEP as its sole carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus source and released nearly all of the organic phosphorus as orthophosphate and 72% of the AEP nitrogen as ammonium. This is the first demonstration of utilization of a phosphonoalkyl moiety as a sole carbon source. Cell-free extracts of P. putida contained an inducible enzyme system that required pyruvate and pyridoxal phosphate to release orthophosphate from AEP; acetaldehyde was tentatively identified as a second product. Phosphite inhibited the enzyme system. PMID:618850

  3. Topological Defects in a Living Nematic Ensnare Swimming Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genkin, Mikhail M.; Sokolov, Andrey; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.; Aranson, Igor S.

    2017-01-01

    Active matter exemplified by suspensions of motile bacteria or synthetic self-propelled particles exhibits a remarkable propensity to self-organization and collective motion. The local input of energy and simple particle interactions often lead to complex emergent behavior manifested by the formation of macroscopic vortices and coherent structures with long-range order. A realization of an active system has been conceived by combining swimming bacteria and a lyotropic liquid crystal. Here, by coupling the well-established and validated model of nematic liquid crystals with the bacterial dynamics, we develop a computational model describing intricate properties of such a living nematic. In faithful agreement with the experiment, the model reproduces the onset of periodic undulation of the director and consequent proliferation of topological defects with the increase in bacterial concentration. It yields a testable prediction on the accumulation of bacteria in the cores of +1 /2 topological defects and depletion of bacteria in the cores of -1 /2 defects. Our dedicated experiment on motile bacteria suspended in a freestanding liquid crystalline film fully confirms this prediction. Our findings suggest novel approaches for trapping and transport of bacteria and synthetic swimmers in anisotropic liquids and extend a scope of tools to control and manipulate microscopic objects in active matter.

  4. Airborne bacteria in the atmosphere: Presence, purpose, and potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smets, Wenke; Moretti, Serena; Denys, Siegfried; Lebeer, Sarah

    2016-08-01

    Numerous recent studies have highlighted that the types of bacteria present in the atmosphere often show predictable patterns across space and time. These patterns can be driven by differences in bacterial sources of the atmosphere and a wide range of environmental factors, including UV intensity, precipitation events, and humidity. The abundance of certain bacterial taxa is of interest, not only for their ability to mediate a range of chemical and physical processes in the atmosphere, such as cloud formation and ice nucleation, but also for their implications -both beneficial and detrimental-for human health. Consequently, the widespread importance of airborne bacteria has stimulated the search for their applicability. Improving air quality, modelling the dispersal of airborne bacteria (e.g. pathogens) and biotechnological purposes are already being explored. Nevertheless, many technological challenges still need to be overcome to fully understand the roles of airborne bacteria in our health and global ecosystems.

  5. Vibrio bacteria in raw oysters: managing risks to human health.

    PubMed

    Froelich, Brett A; Noble, Rachel T

    2016-03-05

    The human-pathogenic marine bacteria Vibrio vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus are strongly correlated with water temperature, with concentrations increasing as waters warm seasonally. Both of these bacteria can be concentrated in filter-feeding shellfish, especially oysters. Because oysters are often consumed raw, this exposes people to large doses of potentially harmful bacteria. Various models are used to predict the abundance of these bacteria in oysters, which guide shellfish harvest policy meant to reduce human health risk. Vibrio abundance and behaviour varies from site to site, suggesting that location-specific studies are needed to establish targeted risk reduction strategies. Moreover, virulence potential, rather than simple abundance, should be also be included in future modeling efforts.

  6. Vibrio bacteria in raw oysters: managing risks to human health

    PubMed Central

    Froelich, Brett A.; Noble, Rachel T.

    2016-01-01

    The human-pathogenic marine bacteria Vibrio vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus are strongly correlated with water temperature, with concentrations increasing as waters warm seasonally. Both of these bacteria can be concentrated in filter-feeding shellfish, especially oysters. Because oysters are often consumed raw, this exposes people to large doses of potentially harmful bacteria. Various models are used to predict the abundance of these bacteria in oysters, which guide shellfish harvest policy meant to reduce human health risk. Vibrio abundance and behaviour varies from site to site, suggesting that location-specific studies are needed to establish targeted risk reduction strategies. Moreover, virulence potential, rather than simple abundance, should be also be included in future modeling efforts. PMID:26880841

  7. Swimming bacteria in liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Andrey; Zhou, Shuang; Aranson, Igor; Lavrentovich, Oleg

    2014-03-01

    Dynamics of swimming bacteria can be very complex due to the interaction between the bacteria and the fluid, especially when the suspending fluid is non-Newtonian. Placement of swimming bacteria in lyotropic liquid crystal produces a new class of active materials by combining features of two seemingly incompatible constituents: self-propelled live bacteria and ordered liquid crystals. Here we present fundamentally new phenomena caused by the coupling between direction of bacterial swimming, bacteria-triggered flows and director orientations. Locomotion of bacteria may locally reduce the degree of order in liquid crystal or even trigger nematic-isotropic phase transition. Microscopic flows generated by bacterial flagella disturb director orientation. Emerged birefringence patterns allow direct optical observation and quantitative characterization of flagella dynamics. At high concentration of bacteria we observed the emergence of self-organized periodic texture caused by bacteria swimming. Our work sheds new light on self-organization in hybrid bio-mechanical systems and can lead to valuable biomedical applications. Was supported by the US DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Science and Engineering, under the Contract No. DE AC02-06CH11357.

  8. Dissemination of 6S RNA among Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Wehner, Stefanie; Damm, Katrin; Hartmann, Roland K; Marz, Manja

    2014-01-01

    6S RNA is a highly abundant small non-coding RNA widely spread among diverse bacterial groups. By competing with DNA promoters for binding to RNA polymerase (RNAP), the RNA regulates transcription on a global scale. RNAP produces small product RNAs derived from 6S RNA as template, which rearranges the 6S RNA structure leading to dissociation of 6S RNA:RNAP complexes. Although 6S RNA has been experimentally analysed in detail for some species, such as Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, and was computationally predicted in many diverse bacteria, a complete and up-to-date overview of the distribution among all bacteria is missing. In this study we searched with new methods for 6S RNA genes in all currently available bacterial genomes. We ended up with a set of 1,750 6S RNA genes, of which 1,367 are novel and bona fide, distributed among 1,610 bacteria, and had a few tentative candidates among the remaining 510 assembled bacterial genomes accessible. We were able to confirm two tentative candidates by Northern blot analysis. We extended 6S RNA genes of the Flavobacteriia significantly in length compared to the present Rfam entry. We describe multiple homologs of 6S RNAs (including split 6S RNA genes) and performed a detailed synteny analysis. PMID:25483037

  9. [Pseudomonas genus bacteria on weeds].

    PubMed

    Gvozdiak, R I; Iakovleva, L M; Pasichnik, L A; Shcherbina, T N; Ogorodnik, L E

    2005-01-01

    It has been shown in the work that the weeds (couch-grass and ryegrass) may be affected by bacterial diseases in natural conditions, Pseudomonas genus bacteria being their agents. The isolated bacteria are highly-aggressive in respect of the host-plant and a wide range of cultivated plants: wheat, rye, oats, barley, apple-tree and pear-tree. In contrast to highly aggressive bacteria isolated from the affected weeds, bacteria-epi phytes isolated from formally healthy plants (common amaranth, orache, flat-leaved spurge, field sow thistle, matricary, common coltsfoot, narrow-leaved vetch) and identified as P. syringae pv. coronafaciens, were characterized by weak aggression. A wide range of ecological niches of bacteria evidently promote their revival and distribution everywhere in nature.

  10. Sociomicrobiology and pathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, Joao B.

    2015-01-01

    The study of microbial pathogenesis has been primarily a reductionist science since Koch's principles. Reductionist approaches are essential to identify the causal agents of infectious disease, their molecular mechanisms of action and potential drug targets, and much of medicine's success in the treatment of infectious disease comes from this approach. But many bacterial caused diseases cannot be explained by focusing on a single bacterium. Many aspects of bacterial pathogenesis will benefit from a more holistic approach that takes into account social interaction within bacteria of the same species and between different species in consortia such as the human microbiome. I discuss recent advances in the emerging discipline of sociomicrobiology and how it provides a framework to dissect microbial interactions in single and multispecies communities without compromising mechanistic detail. The study of bacterial pathogenesis can benefit greatly from incorporating concepts from other disciplines such as social evolution theory and microbial ecology where communities, their interactions with hosts and with the environment play key roles. PMID:27337482

  11. Tetrachloroethene-dehalogenating bacteria.

    PubMed

    Damborský, J

    1999-01-01

    Tetrachloroethene is a frequent groundwater contaminant often persisting in the subsurface environments. It is recalcitrant under aerobic conditions because it is in a highly oxidized state and is not readily susceptible to oxidation. Nevertheless, at least 15 organisms from different metabolic groups, viz. halorespirators (9), acetogens (2), methanogens (3) and facultative anaerobes (2), that are able to metabolize tetrachloroethene have been isolated as axenic cultures to-date. Some of these organisms couple dehalo-genation to energy conservation and utilize tetrachloroethene as the only source of energy while others dehalogenate tetrachloroethene fortuitously. Halorespiring organisms (halorespirators) utilize halogenated organic compounds as electron acceptors in an anaerobic respiratory process. Different organisms exhibit differences in the final products of tetrachloroethene dehalogenation, some strains convert tetrachloroethene to trichloroethene only, while others also carry out consecutive dehalogenation to dichloroethenes and vinyl chloride. Thus far, only a single organism, 'Dehalococcoides ethenogenes' strain 195, has been isolated which dechlorinates tetrachloroethene all the way down to ethylene. The majority of tetrachloroethene-dehalogenating organisms have been isolated only in the past few years and several of them, i.e., Dehalobacter restrictus, Desulfitobacterium dehalogenans, 'Dehalococcoides ethenogenes', 'Dehalospirillum multivorans', Desulfuromonas chloroethenica, and Desulfomonile tiedjei, are representatives of new taxonomic groups. This contribution summarizes the available information regarding the axenic cultures of the tetrachloroethene-dehalogenating bacteria. The present knowledge about the isolation of these organisms, their physiological characteristics, morphology, taxonomy and their ability to dechlorinate tetrachloroethene is presented to facilitate a comprehensive comparison.

  12. Marine bacteria exhibit a bipolar distribution.

    PubMed

    Sul, Woo Jun; Oliver, Thomas A; Ducklow, Hugh W; Amaral-Zettler, Linda A; Sogin, Mitchell L

    2013-02-05

    The microbial cosmopolitan dispersion hypothesis often invoked to explain distribution patterns driven by high connectivity of oceanographic water masses and widespread dispersal ability has never been rigorously tested. By using a global marine bacterial dataset and iterative matrix randomization simulation, we show that marine bacteria exhibit a significantly greater dispersal limitation than predicted by our null model using the "everything is everywhere" tenet with no dispersal limitation scenario. Specifically, marine bacteria displayed bipolar distributions (i.e., species occurring exclusively at both poles and nowhere else) significantly less often than in the null model. Furthermore, we observed fewer taxa present in both hemispheres but more taxa present only in a single hemisphere than expected under the null model. Each of these trends diverged further from the null expectation as the compared habitats became more geographically distant but more environmentally similar. Our meta-analysis supported a latitudinal gradient in bacterial diversity with higher richness at lower latitudes, but decreased richness toward the poles. Bacteria in the tropics also demonstrated narrower latitudinal ranges at lower latitudes and relatively larger ranges in higher latitudes, conforming to the controversial macroecological pattern of the "Rapoport rule." Collectively, our findings suggest that bacteria follow biogeographic patterns more typical of macroscopic organisms, and that dispersal limitation, not just environmental selection, likely plays an important role. Distributions of microbes that deliver critical ecosystem services, particularly those in polar regions, may be vulnerable to the same impacts that environmental stressors, climate warming, and degradation in habitat quality are having on biodiversity in animal and plant species.

  13. Multiphase Modelling of Bacteria Removal in a CSO Stream

    EPA Science Inventory

    Indicator bacteria are an important determinant of water quality in many water resources management situations. They are also one of the more complex phenomena to model and predict. Sources abound, the populations are dynamic and influenced by many factors, and mobility through...

  14. Surface Complexation Modelling in Metal-Mineral-Bacteria Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, K. J.; Fein, J. B.

    2002-12-01

    The reactive surfaces of bacteria and minerals can determine the fate, transport, and bioavailability of aqueous heavy metal cations. Geochemical models are instrumental in accurately accounting for the partitioning of the metals between mineral surfaces and bacteria cell walls. Previous research has shown that surface complexation modelling (SCM) is accurate in two-component systems (metal:mineral and metal:bacteria); however, the ability of SCMs to account for metal distribution in mixed metal-mineral-bacteria systems has not been tested. In this study, we measure aqueous Cd distributions in water-bacteria-mineral systems, and compare these observations with predicted distributions based on a surface complexation modelling approach. We measured Cd adsorption in 2- and 3-component batch adsorption experiments. In the 2-component experiments, we measured the extent of adsorption of 10 ppm aqueous Cd onto either a bacterial or hydrous ferric oxide sorbent. The metal:bacteria experiments contained 1 g/L (wet wt.) of B. subtilis, and were conducted as a function of pH; the metal:mineral experiments were conducted as a function of both pH and HFO content. Two types of 3-component Cd adsorption experiments were also conducted in which both mineral powder and bacteria were present as sorbents: 1) one in which the HFO was physically but not chemically isolated from the system using sealed dialysis tubing, and 2) others where the HFO, Cd and B. subtilis were all in physical contact. The dialysis tubing approach enabled the direct determination of the concentration of Cd on each sorbing surface, after separation and acidification of each sorbent. The experiments indicate that both bacteria and mineral surfaces can dominate adsorption in the system, depending on pH and bacteria:mineral ratio. The stability constants, determined using the data from the 2-component systems, along with those for other surface and aqueous species in the systems, were used with FITEQL to

  15. Interactions between Diatoms and Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Shady A.; Parker, Micaela S.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Diatoms and bacteria have cooccurred in common habitats for hundreds of millions of years, thus fostering specific associations and interactions with global biogeochemical consequences. Diatoms are responsible for one-fifth of the photosynthesis on Earth, while bacteria remineralize a large portion of this fixed carbon in the oceans. Through their coexistence, diatoms and bacteria cycle nutrients between oxidized and reduced states, impacting bioavailability and ultimately feeding higher trophic levels. Here we present an overview of how diatoms and bacteria interact and the implications of these interactions. We emphasize that heterotrophic bacteria in the oceans that are consistently associated with diatoms are confined to two phyla. These consistent bacterial associations result from encounter mechanisms that occur within a microscale environment surrounding a diatom cell. We review signaling mechanisms that occur in this microenvironment to pave the way for specific interactions. Finally, we discuss known interactions between diatoms and bacteria and exciting new directions and research opportunities in this field. Throughout the review, we emphasize new technological advances that will help in the discovery of new interactions. Deciphering the languages of diatoms and bacteria and how they interact will inform our understanding of the role these organisms have in shaping the ocean and how these interactions may change in future oceans. PMID:22933565

  16. Bacteria detection by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Karo, Oliver; Wahl, Alexandra; Nicol, Sven-Boris; Brachert, Julia; Lambrecht, Bernd; Spengler, Hans-Peter; Nauwelaers, Frans; Schmidt, Michael; Schneider, Christian K; Müller, Thomas H; Montag, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Since bacterial infection of the recipient has become the most frequent infection risk in transfusion medicine, suitable methods for bacteria detection in blood components are of great interest. Platelet concentrates are currently the focus of attention, as they are stored under temperature conditions, which enable the multiplication of most bacteria species contaminating blood donations. Rapid methods for bacteria detection allow testing immediately before transfusion in a bed-side like manner. This approach would overcome the sampling error observed in early sampling combined with culturing of bacteria and would, at least, prevent the transfusion of highly contaminated blood components leading to acute septic shock or even death of the patient. Flow cytometry has been demonstrated to be a rapid and feasible approach for detection of bacteria in platelet concentrates. The general aim of the current study was to develop protocols for the application of this technique under routine conditions. The effect of improved test reagents on practicability and sensitivity of the method is evaluated. Furthermore, the implementation of fluorescent absolute count beads as an internal standard is demonstrated. A simplified pre-incubation procedure has been undertaken to diminish the detection limit in a pragmatic manner. Additionally, the application of bacteria detection by flow cytometry as a culture method is shown, i.e., transfer of samples from platelet concentrates into a satellite bag, incubation of the latter at 37 degrees C, and measuring the contaminating bacteria in a flow cytometer.

  17. Interactions between diatoms and bacteria.

    PubMed

    Amin, Shady A; Parker, Micaela S; Armbrust, E Virginia

    2012-09-01

    Diatoms and bacteria have cooccurred in common habitats for hundreds of millions of years, thus fostering specific associations and interactions with global biogeochemical consequences. Diatoms are responsible for one-fifth of the photosynthesis on Earth, while bacteria remineralize a large portion of this fixed carbon in the oceans. Through their coexistence, diatoms and bacteria cycle nutrients between oxidized and reduced states, impacting bioavailability and ultimately feeding higher trophic levels. Here we present an overview of how diatoms and bacteria interact and the implications of these interactions. We emphasize that heterotrophic bacteria in the oceans that are consistently associated with diatoms are confined to two phyla. These consistent bacterial associations result from encounter mechanisms that occur within a microscale environment surrounding a diatom cell. We review signaling mechanisms that occur in this microenvironment to pave the way for specific interactions. Finally, we discuss known interactions between diatoms and bacteria and exciting new directions and research opportunities in this field. Throughout the review, we emphasize new technological advances that will help in the discovery of new interactions. Deciphering the languages of diatoms and bacteria and how they interact will inform our understanding of the role these organisms have in shaping the ocean and how these interactions may change in future oceans.

  18. Motility of Electric Cable Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Damgaard, Lars Riis; Holm, Simon Agner; Schramm, Andreas; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cable bacteria are filamentous bacteria that electrically couple sulfide oxidation and oxygen reduction at centimeter distances, and observations in sediment environments have suggested that they are motile. By time-lapse microscopy, we found that cable bacteria used gliding motility on surfaces with a highly variable speed of 0.5 ± 0.3 μm s−1 (mean ± standard deviation) and time between reversals of 155 ± 108 s. They frequently moved forward in loops, and formation of twisted loops revealed helical rotation of the filaments. Cable bacteria responded to chemical gradients in their environment, and around the oxic-anoxic interface, they curled and piled up, with straight parts connecting back to the source of sulfide. Thus, it appears that motility serves the cable bacteria in establishing and keeping optimal connections between their distant electron donor and acceptors in a dynamic sediment environment. IMPORTANCE This study reports on the motility of cable bacteria, capable of transmitting electrons over centimeter distances. It gives us a new insight into their behavior in sediments and explains previously puzzling findings. Cable bacteria greatly influence their environment, and this article adds significantly to the body of knowledge about this organism. PMID:27084019

  19. Cytokinesis in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Errington, Jeffery; Daniel, Richard A.; Scheffers, Dirk-Jan

    2003-01-01

    Work on two diverse rod-shaped bacteria, Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, has defined a set of about 10 conserved proteins that are important for cell division in a wide range of eubacteria. These proteins are directed to the division site by the combination of two negative regulatory systems. Nucleoid occlusion is a poorly understood mechanism whereby the nucleoid prevents division in the cylindrical part of the cell, until chromosome segregation has occurred near midcell. The Min proteins prevent division in the nucleoid-free spaces near the cell poles in a manner that is beginning to be understood in cytological and biochemical terms. The hierarchy whereby the essential division proteins assemble at the midcell division site has been worked out for both E. coli and B. subtilis. They can be divided into essentially three classes depending on their position in the hierarchy and, to a certain extent, their subcellular localization. FtsZ is a cytosolic tubulin-like protein that polymerizes into an oligomeric structure that forms the initial ring at midcell. FtsA is another cytosolic protein that is related to actin, but its precise function is unclear. The cytoplasmic proteins are linked to the membrane by putative membrane anchor proteins, such as ZipA of E. coli and possibly EzrA of B. subtilis, which have a single membrane span but a cytoplasmic C-terminal domain. The remaining proteins are either integral membrane proteins or transmembrane proteins with their major domains outside the cell. The functions of most of these proteins are unclear with the exception of at least one penicillin-binding protein, which catalyzes a key step in cell wall synthesis in the division septum. PMID:12626683

  20. Motility enhancement of bacteria actuated microstructures using selective bacteria adhesion.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Jun; Bae, Hyeoni; Kim, Joonhwuy; Lim, Byungjik; Park, Jongoh; Park, Sukho

    2010-07-07

    Microrobots developed by the technological advances are useful for application in various fields. Nevertheless, they have limitations with respect to their actuator and motility. Our experiments aim to determine whether a bioactuator using the flagellated bacteria Serratia marcescens would enhance the motility of microrobots. In this study, we investigate that the flagellated bacteria Serratia marcescens could be utilized as actuators for SU-8 microstructures by bovine serum albumin-selective patterning. Firstly, we analyze the adherence of the bacteria to the SU-8 micro cube by selective patterning using 5% BSA. The results show that number of attached-bacteria in the uncoated side of the selectively- coated micro cube with BSA increased by 200% compared with that in all sides of the non treated micro cube. Secondly, the selectively BSA coated micro cube had 210% higher motility than the uncoated micro cube. The results revealed that the bacteria patterned to a specific site using 5% BSA significantly increase the motility of the bacteria actuated microstructure.

  1. SOME STATISTICAL ISSUES RELATED TO MULTIPLE LINEAR REGRESSION MODELING OF BEACH BACTERIA CONCENTRATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    As a fast and effective technique, the multiple linear regression (MLR) method has been widely used in modeling and prediction of beach bacteria concentrations. Among previous works on this subject, however, several issues were insufficiently or inconsistently addressed. Those is...

  2. Caenorhabditis elegans responses to bacteria from its natural habitats

    PubMed Central

    Rowedder, Holli; Braendle, Christian; Félix, Marie-Anne; Ruvkun, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Most Caenorhabditis elegans studies have used laboratory Escherichia coli as diet and microbial environment. Here we characterize bacteria of C. elegans' natural habitats of rotting fruits and vegetation to provide greater context for its physiological responses. By the use of 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA)-based sequencing, we identified a large variety of bacteria in C. elegans habitats, with phyla Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, and Actinobacteria being most abundant. From laboratory assays using isolated natural bacteria, C. elegans is able to forage on most bacteria (robust growth on ∼80% of >550 isolates), although ∼20% also impaired growth and arrested and/or stressed animals. Bacterial community composition can predict wild C. elegans population states in both rotting apples and reconstructed microbiomes: alpha-Proteobacteria-rich communities promote proliferation, whereas Bacteroidetes or pathogens correlate with nonproliferating dauers. Combinatorial mixtures of detrimental and beneficial bacteria indicate that bacterial influence is not simply nutritional. Together, these studies provide a foundation for interrogating how bacteria naturally influence C. elegans physiology. PMID:27317746

  3. Clinical microbiology of coryneform bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Funke, G; von Graevenitz, A; Clarridge, J E; Bernard, K A

    1997-01-01

    Coryneform bacteria are aerobically growing, asporogenous, non-partially-acid-fast, gram-positive rods of irregular morphology. Within the last few years, there has been a massive increase in the number of publications related to all aspects of their clinical microbiology. Clinical microbiologists are often confronted with making identifications within this heterogeneous group as well as with considerations of the clinical significance of such isolates. This review provides comprehensive information on the identification of coryneform bacteria and outlines recent changes in taxonomy. The following genera are covered: Corynebacterium, Turicella, Arthrobacter, Brevibacterium, Dermabacter. Propionibacterium, Rothia, Exiguobacterium, Oerskovia, Cellulomonas, Sanguibacter, Microbacterium, Aureobacterium, "Corynebacterium aquaticum," Arcanobacterium, and Actinomyces. Case reports claiming disease associations of coryneform bacteria are critically reviewed. Minimal microbiological requirements for publications on disease associations of coryneform bacteria are proposed. PMID:8993861

  4. Biopreservation by lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Stiles, M E

    1996-10-01

    Biopreservation refers to extended storage life and enhanced safety of foods using the natural microflora and (or) their antibacterial products. Lactic acid bacteria have a major potential for use in biopreservation because they are safe to consume and during storage they naturally dominate the microflora of many foods. In milk, brined vegetables, many cereal products and meats with added carbohydrate, the growth of lactic acid bacteria produces a new food product. In raw meats and fish that are chill stored under vacuum or in an environment with elevated carbon dioxide concentration, the lactic acid bacteria become the dominant population and preserve the meat with a "hidden' fermentation. The same applies to processed meats provided that the lactic acid bacteria survive the heat treatment or they are inoculated onto the product after heat treatment. This paper reviews the current status and potential for controlled biopreservation of foods.

  5. Environmental sources of fecal bacteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.; Ishii, Satoshi; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Whitman, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    This chapter provides a review of the research on environmental occurrences of faecal indicator bacteria in a variety of terrestrial and aquatic habitats under different geographic and climatic conditions, and discusses how these external sources may affect surface water quality.

  6. The Mechanical World of Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Persat, Alexandre; Nadell, Carey D.; Kim, Minyoung Kevin; Ingremeau, Francois; Siryaporn, Albert; Drescher, Knut; Wingreen, Ned S.; Bassler, Bonnie L.; Gitai, Zemer; Stone, Howard A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary In the wild, bacteria are predominantly associated with surfaces as opposed to existing as free-swimming, isolated organisms. They are thus subject to surface-specific mechanics including hydrodynamic forces, adhesive forces, the rheology of their surroundings and transport rules that define their encounters with nutrients and signaling molecules. Here, we highlight the effects of mechanics on bacterial behaviors on surfaces at multiple length scales, from single bacteria to the development of multicellular bacterial communities such as biofilms. PMID:26000479

  7. [Nosocomial bacteria: profiles of resistance].

    PubMed

    Sow, A I

    2005-01-01

    Nosocomial infections may be parasitic, mycosal or viral, but bacterial infections are more frequent. They are transmitted by hands or by oral route. This paper describes the main bacteria responsive of nosocomial infections, dominated by Staphylococcus, enterobacteria and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The author relates natural and savage profiles of these bacterias, characterized by multiresistance due to large use of antibiotics. Knowledge of natural resistance and verification of aquired resistance permit to well lead probabilist antibiotherapy.

  8. Bioreporter bacteria for landmine detection

    SciTech Connect

    Burlage, R.S.; Youngblood, T.; Lamothe, D.

    1998-04-01

    Landmines (and other UXO) gradually leak explosive chemicals into the soil at significant concentrations. Bacteria, which have adapted to scavenge low concentrations of nutrients, can detect these explosive chemicals. Uptake of these chemicals results in the triggering of specific bacterial genes. The authors have created genetically recombinant bioreporter bacteria that detect small concentrations of energetic chemicals. These bacteria are genetically engineered to produce a bioluminescent signal when they contact specific explosives. A gene for a brightly fluorescent compound can be substituted for increased sensitivity. By finding the fluorescent bacteria, you find the landmine. Detection might be accomplished using stand-off illumination of the minefield and GPS technology, which would result in greatly reduced risk to the deminers. Bioreporter technology has been proven at the laboratory scale, and will be tested under field conditions in the near future. They have created a bacterial strain that detects sub-micromolar concentrations of o- and p-nitrotoluene. Related bacterial strains were produced using standard laboratory protocols, and bioreporters of dinitrotoluene and trinitrotoluene were produced, screening for activity with the explosive compounds. Response time is dependent on the growth rate of the bacteria. Although frill signal production may require several hours, the bacteria can be applied over vast areas and scanned quickly, producing an equivalent detection speed that is very fast. This technology may be applicable to other needs, such as locating buried explosives at military and ordnance/explosive manufacturing facilities.

  9. Filtrating forms of soil bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van'kova, A. A.; Ivanov, P. I.; Emtsev, V. T.

    2013-03-01

    Filtrating (ultramicroscopic) forms (FF) of bacteria were studied in a soddy-podzolic soil and the root zone of alfalfa plants as part of populations of the most widespread physiological groups of soil bacteria. FF were obtained by filtering soil solutions through membrane filters with a pore diameter of 0.22 μm. It was established that the greater part of the bacteria in the soil and in the root zone of the plants has an ultramicroscopic size: the average diameter of the cells is 0.3 μm, and their length is 0.6 μm, which is significantly less than the cell size of banal bacteria. The number of FF varies within a wide range depending on the physicochemical conditions of the habitat. The FF number's dynamics in the soil is of a seasonal nature; i.e., the number of bacteria found increases in the summer and fall and decreases in the winter-spring period. In the rhizosphere of the alfalfa, over the vegetation period, the number of FF and their fraction in the total mass of the bacteria increase. A reverse tendency is observed in the rhizoplane. The morphological particularities (identified by an electron microscopy) and the nature of the FF indicate their physiological activity.

  10. Isolation and Identification of Concrete Environment Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwan, J. M.; Anneza, L. H.; Othman, N.; Husnul, T.; Alshalif, A. F.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the isolation and molecular method for bacteria identification through PCR and DNA sequencing. Identification of the bacteria species is required in order to fully utilize the bacterium capability for precipitation of calcium carbonate in concrete. This process is to enable the addition of suitable catalyst according to the bacterium enzymatic pathway that is known through the bacteria species used. The objective of this study is to isolate, enriched and identify the bacteria species. The bacteria in this study was isolated from fresh urine and acid mine drainage water, Kota Tinggi, Johor. Enrichment of the isolated bacteria was conducted to ensure the bacteria survivability in concrete. The identification of bacteria species was done through polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and rRDNA sequencing. The isolation and enrichment of the bacteria was done successfully. Whereas, the results for bacteria identification showed that the isolated bacteria strains are Bacillus sp and Enterococus faecalis.

  11. DLVO, hydrophobic, capillary and hydrodynamic forces acting on bacteria at solid-air-water interfaces: Their relative impact on bacteria deposition mechanisms in unsaturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Bai, Hongjuan; Cochet, Nelly; Pauss, André; Lamy, Edvina

    2017-02-01

    Experimental and modeling studies were performed to investigate bacteria deposition behavior in unsaturated porous media. The coupled effect of different forces, acting on bacteria at solid-air-water interfaces and their relative importance on bacteria deposition mechanisms was explored by calculating Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) and non-DLVO interactions such as hydrophobic, capillary and hydrodynamic forces. Negatively charged non-motile bacteria and quartz sands were used in packed column experiments. The breakthrough curves and retention profiles of bacteria were simulated using the modified Mobile-IMmobile (MIM) model, to identify physico-chemical attachment or physical straining mechanisms involved in bacteria retention. These results indicated that both mechanisms might occur in both sand. However, the attachment was found to be a reversible process, because attachment coefficients were similar to those of detachment. DLVO calculations supported these results: the primary minimum did not exist, suggesting no permanent retention of bacteria to solid-water and air-water interfaces. Calculated hydrodynamic and resisting torques predicted that bacteria detachment in the secondary minimum might occur. The capillary potential energy was greater than DLVO, hydrophobic and hydrodynamic potential energies, suggesting that film straining by capillary forces might largely govern bacteria deposition under unsaturated conditions.

  12. Microgravity effects on magnetotactic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, James E.

    1998-01-01

    An unusual group of iron bacteria has recently been discovered which form inclusion bodies containing a form of iron oxide known as magnetite (ferrosoferric oxide, Fe3O4.) The inclusions are of a nano-particle size, are encased within a protein envelope, and are called magnetosomes. Magnetosomes are arranged adjacent to one another and parallel to the long axis of the cell such that cells appear to contain an electron-dense string of beads. The bacteria containing magnetosomes exhibit metal reductase activity, an activity critical to element recycling in nature, and the inclusions are a means for the organism to sequester reduced iron atoms and thereby keep iron reduction stoichiometry favorable. The magnetosomes also allow the bacteria to display magnetotaxis, which is movement in response to a magnetic field, such as the north or south magnetic poles. It is presumed that the bacteria use the alignment to the earth's magnetic field to orient themselves downward towards sediments where the habitat is favorable to their growth and metabolism. The comparatively few species of these bacteria isolated in the northern and southern hemispheres respond to magnetic north and south respectively, or alternatively respond only to the magnetic pole of the hemisphere from which they were isolated. This apparent dichotomy in response to magnetism could mean that the organisms are not responding to magnetism, per se, but instead are using the magnetosomes to respond to gravity. To resolve if magnetosomes respond to gravity in addition to magnetism we have used Magnetospirillum magnetotacticum, a well-studied magnetotactic bacterium isolated in the northern hemisphere, to examine magnetotactic behavior in the absence of gravity. Experiments to compare the orientation of Magnetospirillum magnetotacticum to north- or south-pole magnets were conducted in normal gravity and in the microgravity environments aboard the Space Shuttle and Space Station MIR. In each of the microgravity

  13. Quantification of Spore-forming Bacteria Carried by Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Ying; Cholakian, Tanya; Gao, Wenming; Osman, Shariff; Barengoltz, Jack

    2006-01-01

    In order to establish a biological contamination transport model for predicting the cross contamination risk during spacecraft assembly and upon landing on Mars, it is important to understand the relationship between spore-forming bacteria and their carrier particles. We conducted air and surface sampling in indoor, outdoor, and cleanroom environments to determine the ratio of spore forming bacteria to their dust particle carriers of different sizes. The number of spore forming bacteria was determined from various size groups of particles in a given environment. Our data also confirms the existence of multiple spores on a single particle and spore clumps. This study will help in developing a better bio-contamination transport model, which in turn will help in determining forward contamination risks for future missions.

  14. The Role of Bacteria in Iron Biomineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konhauser, K. O.

    2012-04-01

    Bacteria contribute significantly to the development of extremely fine-grained iron mineral precipitates, including oxyhydroxides, carbonates, silicates, phosphates, and sulphides. They influence biomineralization in two significant ways. First, bacteria possess a negative surface charge at pH values characteristic of most natural environments, and in doing so, will become reactive towards metal cations. Once bound, those cations react with more ions, potentially leading to mineral precipitation if a state of supersaturation is achieved. Second, during metabolism, the bacterium affects the redox and saturation states of the fluids around the living cells. In this regard, the microenvironment surrounding each cell can be quite different from the bulk aqueous environment, and as a result, mineral phases form that would not normally be predicted from the geochemistry of the bulk fluid. The impact that iron biomineralization has on elemental cycling in aqueous and sedimentary environments cannot be overstated because many major elemental cycles are strongly linked to iron biomineralizing processes. Although individual 'biomineral' grains are micrometer in scale, if one adds the total amount of biomineralizing biomass, it is not difficult to imagine how they can be significant in partitioning metals from the hydrosphere into the sedimentary system. Indeed, the extensive record of banded iron formation (BIF), from 3.8 to 0.5 billion years ago, testifies to the enormous magnitude of ferric iron sequestration into the sediments throughout much of Earth's history.

  15. Chemical signature of magnetotactic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Amor, Matthieu; Busigny, Vincent; Durand-Dubief, Mickaël; Tharaud, Mickaël; Ona-Nguema, Georges; Gélabert, Alexandre; Alphandéry, Edouard; Menguy, Nicolas; Benedetti, Marc F; Chebbi, Imène; Guyot, François

    2015-02-10

    There are longstanding and ongoing controversies about the abiotic or biological origin of nanocrystals of magnetite. On Earth, magnetotactic bacteria perform biomineralization of intracellular magnetite nanoparticles under a controlled pathway. These bacteria are ubiquitous in modern natural environments. However, their identification in ancient geological material remains challenging. Together with physical and mineralogical properties, the chemical composition of magnetite was proposed as a promising tracer for bacterial magnetofossil identification, but this had never been explored quantitatively and systematically for many trace elements. Here, we determine the incorporation of 34 trace elements in magnetite in both cases of abiotic aqueous precipitation and of production by the magnetotactic bacterium Magnetospirillum magneticum strain AMB-1. We show that, in biomagnetite, most elements are at least 100 times less concentrated than in abiotic magnetite and we provide a quantitative pattern of this depletion. Furthermore, we propose a previously unidentified method based on strontium and calcium incorporation to identify magnetite produced by magnetotactic bacteria in the geological record.

  16. Commensal bacteria and cutaneous immunity.

    PubMed

    Nakamizo, Satoshi; Egawa, Gyohei; Honda, Tetsuya; Nakajima, Saeko; Belkaid, Yasmine; Kabashima, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    The skin is the human body's largest organ and is home to a diverse and complex variety of innate and adaptive immune functions that protect against pathogenic invasion. Recent studies have demonstrated that cutaneous commensal bacteria modulated the host immune system. For example, Staphylococcus epidermidis, a skin commensal bacterium, has been demonstrated to induce cutaneous interferon (IFN)-γ- and interleukin (IL)-17A-producing T cells. In addition, cutaneous microbiota changes occur in the chronic inflammatory skin disorders, such as atopic dermatitis, and may influence the activity of skin diseases. In this article, we will review the recent findings related to the interactions of the commensal bacteria with skin homeostasis and discuss the role of the dysbiosis of these bacteria in the pathogenesis of skin diseases.

  17. Genetic transfer in acidophilic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Roberto, F.F.; Glenn, A.W.; Bulmer, D.; Ward, T.E.

    1990-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the use of microorganisms to recover metals from ores, as well as to remove sulfur from coal. These so-called bioleaching processes are mediated by a number of bacteria. The best-studied of these organisms are acidophiles including Thiobacillus and Acidiphilium species. Our laboratory has focused on developing genetic strategies to allow the manipulation of acidophilic bacteria to improve and augment their utility in large scale operations. We have recently been successful in employing conjugation for interbacterial transfer of genetic information, as well as in directly transforming Acidiphilium by use of electroporation. We are now testing the properties of IncPl, IncW and IncQ plasmid vectors in Acidiphilium to determine their relative usefulness in routine manipulation of acidophiles and transfer between organisms. This study also allows us to determine the natural ability of these bacteria to transfer genetic material amongst themselves in their particular environment. 21 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Methylotrophic bacteria in sustainable agriculture.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manish; Tomar, Rajesh Singh; Lade, Harshad; Paul, Diby

    2016-07-01

    Excessive use of chemical fertilizers to increase production from available land has resulted in deterioration of soil quality. To prevent further soil deterioration, the use of methylotrophic bacteria that have the ability to colonize different habitats, including soil, sediment, water, and both epiphytes and endophytes as host plants, has been suggested for sustainable agriculture. Methylotrophic bacteria are known to play a significant role in the biogeochemical cycle in soil ecosystems, ultimately fortifying plants and sustaining agriculture. Methylotrophs also improve air quality by using volatile organic compounds such as dichloromethane, formaldehyde, methanol, and formic acid. Additionally, methylotrophs are involved in phosphorous, nitrogen, and carbon cycling and can help reduce global warming. In this review, different aspects of the interaction between methylotrophs and host plants are discussed, including the role of methylotrophs in phosphorus acquisition, nitrogen fixation, phytohormone production, iron chelation, and plant growth promotion, and co-inoculation of these bacteria as biofertilizers for viable agriculture practices.

  19. Predicting reaerosolization

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, William Brent; Omberg, Kristin M

    2010-11-29

    Outdoor studies of the environmental persistence of bacteria have led to many interesting results. It turns out that the initial deposition of bacteria is not the end of the story. We examined both the ongoing daily deposition and aerosolization of bacteria for two weeks following an initial deposition event. Differences between samples collected in a clearing and those collected beneath a forest canopy were also examined. There were two important results: first, bacteria were still moving about in significant quantities after two weeks, though the local environment where they were most prevalent appeared to shift over time; second, we were able to develop a simple mathematical model that could fairly accurately estimate the average daily airborne concentration of bacteria over the duration of the experiment using readily available environmental information. The implication is that deposition patterns are very likely to shift over an extended period of time following a release, possibly quite significantly, but there is hope that we may be able to estimate these changes fairly accurately.

  20. Evolution of filamentous bacteria during urban wastewater treatment by MBR.

    PubMed

    Parada-Albarracín, J A; Marin, E; Pérez, J I; Moreno, B; Gómez, M A

    2012-01-01

    Evolution of filamentous bacteria in two full-scale experimental MBR systems (microfiltration and ultrafiltration) was studied during two years. Sludge Retention Time (SRT) and Hydraulic Retention Time (HRT) were modified and acted as variables, together with temperature and variation in loading. With SRT values between 20 and 35 d and HRT between 31 and 40 h, both MBR systems presented a high density of filamentous bacteria, according to the Filamentous Index (FI) and Simplified Technique of Filamentous Count (STFC). Highest density was achieved when contaminant loads were high and temperature was low. However, the elevated presence of filamentous bacteria did not affect the quality of effluent or the permeability of the membranes. Nocardioform bacteria showed a high degree of adaptation to the characteristics of the system. Predominance of Nocardioforms gave rise to isolated episodes of massive growth at temperatures between 15 and 20°C, which in turn caused episodes of intense foaming whose most significant consequence was a loss in biomass, leading to a slight increase in transmembrane pressure. In the light of these results, FI and STFC should not be considered as suitable tools for predicting operational problems deriving from filamentous bacteria in MBR systems, which could be prevented through identification.

  1. Characterization of bioluminescent derivatives of assimilable organic carbon test bacteria.

    PubMed

    Haddix, Pryce L; Shaw, Nancy J; LeChevallier, Mark W

    2004-02-01

    The assimilable organic carbon (AOC) test is a standardized measure of the bacterial growth potential of treated water. We describe the design and initial development of an AOC assay that uses bioluminescent derivatives of AOC test bacteria. Our assay is based on the observation that bioluminescence peaks at full cell yield just prior to the onset of the stationary phase during growth in a water sample. Pseudomonas fluorescens P-17 and Spirillum sp. strain NOX bacteria were mutagenized with luxCDABE operon fusion and inducible transposons and were selected on minimal medium. Independent mutants were screened for high luminescence activity and predicted AOC assay sensitivity. All mutants tested were able to grow in tap water under AOC assay conditions. Strains P-17 I5 (with p-aminosalicylate inducer) and NOX I3 were chosen for use in the bioluminescence AOC test. Peak bioluminescence and plate count AOC were linearly related for both test bacteria, though data suggest that the P-17 bioluminescence assay requires more consistent luminescence monitoring. Bioluminescence results were obtained 2 or 3 days postinoculation, compared with 5 days for the ATP luminescence AOC assay and 8 days for the plate count assay. Plate count AOC assay results for nonmutant and bioluminescent bacteria from 36 water samples showed insignificant differences, indicating that the luminescent bacteria retained a full range of AOC measurement capability. This bioluminescence method is amenable to automation with a microplate format with programmable reagent injection.

  2. Chemotaxis toward phytoplankton drives organic matter partitioning among marine bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Smriga, Steven; Fernandez, Vicente I.; Mitchell, James G.; Stocker, Roman

    2016-01-01

    The microenvironment surrounding individual phytoplankton cells is often rich in dissolved organic matter (DOM), which can attract bacteria by chemotaxis. These “phycospheres” may be prominent sources of resource heterogeneity in the ocean, affecting the growth of bacterial populations and the fate of DOM. However, these effects remain poorly quantified due to a lack of quantitative ecological frameworks. Here, we used video microscopy to dissect with unprecedented resolution the chemotactic accumulation of marine bacteria around individual Chaetoceros affinis diatoms undergoing lysis. The observed spatiotemporal distribution of bacteria was used in a resource utilization model to map the conditions under which competition between different bacterial groups favors chemotaxis. The model predicts that chemotactic, copiotrophic populations outcompete nonmotile, oligotrophic populations during diatom blooms and bloom collapse conditions, resulting in an increase in the ratio of motile to nonmotile cells and in the succession of populations. Partitioning of DOM between the two populations is strongly dependent on the overall concentration of bacteria and the diffusivity of different DOM substances, and within each population, the growth benefit from phycospheres is experienced by only a small fraction of cells. By informing a DOM utilization model with highly resolved behavioral data, the hybrid approach used here represents a new path toward the elusive goal of predicting the consequences of microscale interactions in the ocean. PMID:26802122

  3. Hydrodynamic entrapment of bacteria swimming near a solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacché, Davide; Ishikawa, Takuji; Yamaguchi, Takami

    2010-11-01

    The near-surface motility of bacteria is important in the initial formation of biofilms and in many biomedical applications. The swimming motion of Escherichia coli near a solid surface is investigated both numerically and experimentally. A boundary element method is used to predict the hydrodynamic entrapment of E. coli bacteria, their trajectories, and the minimum separation of the cell from the surface. The numerical results show the existence of a stable swimming distance from the boundary that depends only on the shape of the cell body and the flagellum. The experimental validation of the numerical approach allows one to use the numerical method as a predictive tool to estimate with reasonable accuracy the near-wall motility of swimming bacteria of known geometry. The analysis of the numerical database demonstrated the existence of a correlation between the radius of curvature of the near-wall circular trajectory and the separation gap. Such correlation allows an indirect estimation of either of the two quantities by a direct measure of the other without prior knowledge of the cell geometry. This result may prove extremely important in those biomedical and technical applications in which the near-wall behavior of bacteria is of fundamental importance.

  4. Chemotaxis toward phytoplankton drives organic matter partitioning among marine bacteria.

    PubMed

    Smriga, Steven; Fernandez, Vicente I; Mitchell, James G; Stocker, Roman

    2016-02-09

    The microenvironment surrounding individual phytoplankton cells is often rich in dissolved organic matter (DOM), which can attract bacteria by chemotaxis. These "phycospheres" may be prominent sources of resource heterogeneity in the ocean, affecting the growth of bacterial populations and the fate of DOM. However, these effects remain poorly quantified due to a lack of quantitative ecological frameworks. Here, we used video microscopy to dissect with unprecedented resolution the chemotactic accumulation of marine bacteria around individual Chaetoceros affinis diatoms undergoing lysis. The observed spatiotemporal distribution of bacteria was used in a resource utilization model to map the conditions under which competition between different bacterial groups favors chemotaxis. The model predicts that chemotactic, copiotrophic populations outcompete nonmotile, oligotrophic populations during diatom blooms and bloom collapse conditions, resulting in an increase in the ratio of motile to nonmotile cells and in the succession of populations. Partitioning of DOM between the two populations is strongly dependent on the overall concentration of bacteria and the diffusivity of different DOM substances, and within each population, the growth benefit from phycospheres is experienced by only a small fraction of cells. By informing a DOM utilization model with highly resolved behavioral data, the hybrid approach used here represents a new path toward the elusive goal of predicting the consequences of microscale interactions in the ocean.

  5. Raman spectroscopy of oral bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Andrew J.; Zhu, Qingyuan; Quivey, Robert G.

    2003-10-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been employed to measure the varying concentrations of two oral bacteria in simple mixtures. Evaporated droplets of centrifuged mixtures of Streptococcus sanguis and Streptococcus mutans were analyzed via Raman microspectroscopy. The concentration of s. sanguis was determined based upon the measured Raman spectrum, using partial least squares cross-validation, with an r2 value of 0.98.

  6. Hydrocarbon degradation by antarctic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Cavanagh, J.A.E.; Nichols, P.D.; McMeekin, T.A.; Franzmann, P.D.

    1996-12-31

    Bacterial cultures obtained from sediment samples collected during a trial oil spill experiment conducted at Airport beach, Eastern Antarctica were selectively enriched for n-alkane-degrading and phenanthrenedegrading bacteria. Samples were collected from a control site and sites treated with different hydrocarbon mixtures - Special Antarctic blend (SAB), BP-Visco and orange roughy oils. One set of replicate sites was also treated with water from Organic Lake which had previously been shown to contain hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria. No viable bacteria were obtained from samples collected from sites treated with orange roughy oil. Extensive degradation of n-alkanes by enrichment cultures obtained from sites treated with SAB and BP-Visco occurred at both 25{degrees}C and 10{degrees}C. Extensive degradation of phenanthrene also occurred in enrichment cultures from these sites grown at 25{degrees}C. Concurrent increases of polar lipid in these cultures were also observed. The presence of 1,4-naphthaquinone and 1-naphthol during the growth of the cultures on phenanthrene is unusual and warrants further investigation of the mechanism of phenanthrene-degradation by these Antarctic bacteria.

  7. Antibacterial susceptibility of plaque bacteria.

    PubMed

    Newman, M G; Hulem, C; Colgate, J; Anselmo, C

    1979-07-01

    Selected anaerobic, capnophilic and facultative bacteria isolated from patients with various forms of periodontal health and disease were tested for their susceptibility to antibiotics and antimicrobial agents. Specific bactericidal and minimum inhibitory concentrations were compared to disc zone diameters, thereby generating new standards for the potential selection of antimicrobial agents.

  8. Manipulating Genetic Material in Bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Lisa Crawford, a graduate research assistant from the University of Toledo, works with Laurel Karr of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in the molecular biology laboratory. They are donducting genetic manipulation of bacteria and yeast for the production of large amount of desired protein. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  9. Functional genomics of intracellular bacteria.

    PubMed

    de Barsy, Marie; Greub, Gilbert

    2013-07-01

    During the genomic era, a large amount of whole-genome sequences accumulated, which identified many hypothetical proteins of unknown function. Rapidly, functional genomics, which is the research domain that assign a function to a given gene product, has thus been developed. Functional genomics of intracellular pathogenic bacteria exhibit specific peculiarities due to the fastidious growth of most of these intracellular micro-organisms, due to the close interaction with the host cell, due to the risk of contamination of experiments with host cell proteins and, for some strict intracellular bacteria such as Chlamydia, due to the absence of simple genetic system to manipulate the bacterial genome. To identify virulence factors of intracellular pathogenic bacteria, functional genomics often rely on bioinformatic analyses compared with model organisms such as Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. The use of heterologous expression is another common approach. Given the intracellular lifestyle and the many effectors that are used by the intracellular bacteria to corrupt host cell functions, functional genomics is also often targeting the identification of new effectors such as those of the T4SS of Brucella and Legionella.

  10. Role of Bacteria in Oncogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Alicia H.; Parsonnet, Julie

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Although scientific knowledge in viral oncology has exploded in the 20th century, the role of bacteria as mediators of oncogenesis has been less well elucidated. Understanding bacterial carcinogenesis has become increasingly important as a possible means of cancer prevention. This review summarizes clinical, epidemiological, and experimental evidence as well as possible mechanisms of bacterial induction of or protection from malignancy. PMID:20930075

  11. Climate prediction and predictability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Myles

    2010-05-01

    Climate prediction is generally accepted to be one of the grand challenges of the Geophysical Sciences. What is less widely acknowledged is that fundamental issues have yet to be resolved concerning the nature of the challenge, even after decades of research in this area. How do we verify or falsify a probabilistic forecast of a singular event such as anthropogenic warming over the 21st century? How do we determine the information content of a climate forecast? What does it mean for a modelling system to be "good enough" to forecast a particular variable? How will we know when models and forecasting systems are "good enough" to provide detailed forecasts of weather at specific locations or, for example, the risks associated with global geo-engineering schemes. This talk will provide an overview of these questions in the light of recent developments in multi-decade climate forecasting, drawing on concepts from information theory, machine learning and statistics. I will draw extensively but not exclusively from the experience of the climateprediction.net project, running multiple versions of climate models on personal computers.

  12. Killer Pigments in Bacteria: An Ecological Nightmare.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benathen, Isaiah A.; Saccardi, Marion

    2000-01-01

    Describes an alternative to teaching ecology by using bacteria to test competitor survival. Students observe a time-dependent selective killing of other unrelated bacteria by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. (SAH)

  13. Certain Bacteria May Affect Preterm Birth Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163401.html Certain Bacteria May Affect Preterm Birth Risk Bad 'bugs' tied ... Feb. 3, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Certain types of bacteria in a pregnant woman's cervix and vagina can ...

  14. Genetics of Lactic Acid Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagorec, Monique; Anba-Mondoloni, Jamila; Coq, Anne-Marie Crutz-Le; Champomier-Vergès, Marie-Christine

    Many meat (or fish) products, obtained by the fermentation of meat originating from various animals by the flora that naturally contaminates it, are part of the human diet since millenaries. Historically, the use of bacteria as starters for the fermentation of meat, to produce dry sausages, was thus performed empirically through the endogenous micro-biota, then, by a volunteer addition of starters, often performed by back-slopping, without knowing precisely the microbial species involved. It is only since about 50 years that well defined bacterial cultures have been used as starters for the fermentation of dry sausages. Nowadays, the indigenous micro-biota of fermented meat products is well identified, and the literature is rich of reports on the identification of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) present in many traditional fermented products from various geographical origin, obtained without the addition of commercial starters (See Talon, Leroy, & Lebert, 2007, and references therein).

  15. Swimming bacteria power microscopic gears.

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, A.; Apodaca, M. M.; Grzybowski, B. A.; Aranson, I. S.; Materials Science Division; Princeton Univ.; Northwestern Univ.

    2010-01-19

    Whereas the laws of thermodynamics prohibit extraction of useful work from the Brownian motion of particles in equilibrium, these motions can be 'rectified' under nonequilibrium conditions, for example, in the presence of asymmetric geometrical obstacles. Here, we describe a class of systems in which aerobic bacteria Bacillus subtilis moving randomly in a fluid film power submillimeter gears and primitive systems of gears decorated with asymmetric teeth. The directional rotation is observed only in the regime of collective bacterial swimming and the gears angular velocities depend on and can be controlled by the amount of oxygen available to the bacteria. The ability to harness and control the power of collective motions appears an important requirement for further development of mechanical systems driven by microorganisms.

  16. Swimming bacteria power microscopic gears

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, Andrey; Apodaca, Mario M.; Grzybowski, Bartosz A.; Aranson, Igor S.

    2010-01-19

    Whereas the laws of thermodynamics prohibit extraction of useful work from the Brownian motion of particles in equilibrium, these motions can be “rectified” under nonequilibrium conditions, for example, in the presence of asymmetric geometrical obstacles. Here, we describe a class of systems in which aerobic bacteria Bacillus subtilis moving randomly in a fluid film power submillimeter gears and primitive systems of gears decorated with asymmetric teeth. The directional rotation is observed only in the regime of collective bacterial swimming and the gears’ angular velocities depend on and can be controlled by the amount of oxygen available to the bacteria. The ability to harness and control the power of collective motions appears an important requirement for further development of mechanical systems driven by microorganisms.

  17. Swimming bacteria power microscopic gears.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, Andrey; Apodaca, Mario M; Grzybowski, Bartosz A; Aranson, Igor S

    2010-01-19

    Whereas the laws of thermodynamics prohibit extraction of useful work from the Brownian motion of particles in equilibrium, these motions can be "rectified" under nonequilibrium conditions, for example, in the presence of asymmetric geometrical obstacles. Here, we describe a class of systems in which aerobic bacteria Bacillus subtilis moving randomly in a fluid film power submillimeter gears and primitive systems of gears decorated with asymmetric teeth. The directional rotation is observed only in the regime of collective bacterial swimming and the gears' angular velocities depend on and can be controlled by the amount of oxygen available to the bacteria. The ability to harness and control the power of collective motions appears an important requirement for further development of mechanical systems driven by microorganisms.

  18. Swimming bacteria power microscopic gears

    PubMed Central

    Sokolov, Andrey; Apodaca, Mario M.; Grzybowski, Bartosz A.; Aranson, Igor S.

    2010-01-01

    Whereas the laws of thermodynamics prohibit extraction of useful work from the Brownian motion of particles in equilibrium, these motions can be “rectified” under nonequilibrium conditions, for example, in the presence of asymmetric geometrical obstacles. Here, we describe a class of systems in which aerobic bacteria Bacillus subtilis moving randomly in a fluid film power submillimeter gears and primitive systems of gears decorated with asymmetric teeth. The directional rotation is observed only in the regime of collective bacterial swimming and the gears’ angular velocities depend on and can be controlled by the amount of oxygen available to the bacteria. The ability to harness and control the power of collective motions appears an important requirement for further development of mechanical systems driven by microorganisms. PMID:20080560

  19. Re-engineering bacteria for ethanol production

    DOEpatents

    Yomano, Lorraine P; York, Sean W; Zhou, Shengde; Shanmugam, Keelnatham; Ingram, Lonnie O

    2014-05-06

    The invention provides recombinant bacteria, which comprise a full complement of heterologous ethanol production genes. Expression of the full complement of heterologous ethanol production genes causes the recombinant bacteria to produce ethanol as the primary fermentation product when grown in mineral salts medium, without the addition of complex nutrients. Methods for producing the recombinant bacteria and methods for producing ethanol using the recombinant bacteria are also disclosed.

  20. Bacteria turn a tiny gear

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    Thousands of tiny Bacillus subtillis bacteria turn a single gear, just 380 microns across. (A human hair is about 100 microns across.) The method could be used to create micro-machines. Argonne National Laboratory scientist Igor Aronson pioneered this technique. Read more at the New York Times: http://ow.ly/ODfI or at Argonne: http://ow.ly/ODfa Video courtesy Igor Aronson.

  1. Anaerobic bacteria from hypersaline environments.

    PubMed Central

    Ollivier, B; Caumette, P; Garcia, J L; Mah, R A

    1994-01-01

    Strictly anaerobic halophiles, namely fermentative, sulfate-reducing, homoacetogenic, phototrophic, and methanogenic bacteria are involved in the oxidation of organic carbon in hypersaline environments. To date, six anaerobic fermentative genera, containing nine species, have been described. Two of them are homoacetogens. Six species belong to the family Haloanaerobiaceae, as indicated by their unique 16S rRNA oligonucleotide sequences. Desulfohalobium retbaense and Desulfovibrio halophilus represent the only two moderately halophilic sulfate reducers so far reported. Among anoxygenic phototrophic anaerobes, a few purple bacteria with optimal growth at salinities between 6 and 11% NaCl have been isolated from hypersaline habitats. They belong to the genera Rhodospirillum, Chromatium, Thiocapsa, and Ectothiorhodospira. The commonest organisms isolated so far are Chromatium salexigens, Thiocapsa halophila, and Rhodospirillum salinarum. Extremely halophilic purple bacteria have most commonly been isolated from alkaline brines and require about 20 to 25% NaCl for optimal growth. They belong to the family Ectothiorodhospiraceae. Their osmoregulation involves synthesis or uptake of compatible solutes such as glycine-betaine that accumulate in their cytoplasm. The existence of methanogens in hypersaline environments is related to the presence of noncompetitive substrates such as methylamines, which originate mainly from the breakdown of osmoregulatory amines. Methanogenesis probably does not contribute to the mineralization of carbohydrates at NaCl concentrations higher than 15%. Above this concentration, sulfate reduction is probably the main way to oxidize H2 (although at rates too low to use up all the H2 formed) and occupies a terminal function kn the degradation of carbohydrates. Three genera and five species of halophilic methylotrophic methanogens have been reported. A bloom of phototrophic bacteria in the marine salterns of Salins-de-Giraud, located on the

  2. Bacteria, fungi and protozoa paper

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Bacteria and fungi in source and treated drinking waterThis dataset is associated with the following publication:King , D., S. Pfaller , M. Donohue , S. Vesper , E. Villegas , M. Ware , S. Glassmeyer , M. Vogal, E. Furlong, and D. Kolpin. Microbial pathogens in source and treated waters from drinking water treatment plants in the United States and implications for human health. SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT. Elsevier BV, AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS, 562: 987–995, (2016).

  3. Earthquake prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turcotte, Donald L.

    1991-01-01

    The state of the art in earthquake prediction is discussed. Short-term prediction based on seismic precursors, changes in the ratio of compressional velocity to shear velocity, tilt and strain precursors, electromagnetic precursors, hydrologic phenomena, chemical monitors, and animal behavior is examined. Seismic hazard assessment is addressed, and the applications of dynamical systems to earthquake prediction are discussed.

  4. Bacteria under simulated Martian conditions.

    PubMed

    Young, R S; Deal, P H; Bell, J; Allen, J L

    1964-01-01

    The behavior of organisms in simulated Martian conditions is of great importance to exobiology for two reasons: (1) Because of the extreme environment of Mars, the likelihood of contamination of the planet by earth organisms is considered slight by some scientists. To date, there has been little evidence to contradict this supposition. Such evidence is presented. (2) The selection and adaptation of earth bacteria to Martian conditions is potentially significant in understanding Martian life, if it exists, and may be helpful in designing life-detection techniques and devices. Of course, simulation attempts, based on current knowledge of the Mars environment, may be far from the actual conditions, and extrapolations made from such situations of no real significance. However, generalizations can be made and cautious interpretation of the results of those experiments seems well worth reporting. A new technique for simulation of known parameters of the Martian environment is discussed along with possible biological implications. The response of bacteria to such simulation is demonstrated in terms of survival and growth, showing that certain bacteria will not only survive, but grow during simulated Martian freeze-thaw cycling if water is present. Ways are demonstrated in which water can be present on Mars although not detectable with current technology. Plans for future experimentation are discussed.

  5. Chemical signature of magnetotactic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Amor, Matthieu; Busigny, Vincent; Durand-Dubief, Mickaël; Tharaud, Mickaël; Ona-Nguema, Georges; Gélabert, Alexandre; Alphandéry, Edouard; Menguy, Nicolas; Benedetti, Marc F.; Chebbi, Imène; Guyot, François

    2015-01-01

    There are longstanding and ongoing controversies about the abiotic or biological origin of nanocrystals of magnetite. On Earth, magnetotactic bacteria perform biomineralization of intracellular magnetite nanoparticles under a controlled pathway. These bacteria are ubiquitous in modern natural environments. However, their identification in ancient geological material remains challenging. Together with physical and mineralogical properties, the chemical composition of magnetite was proposed as a promising tracer for bacterial magnetofossil identification, but this had never been explored quantitatively and systematically for many trace elements. Here, we determine the incorporation of 34 trace elements in magnetite in both cases of abiotic aqueous precipitation and of production by the magnetotactic bacterium Magnetospirillum magneticum strain AMB-1. We show that, in biomagnetite, most elements are at least 100 times less concentrated than in abiotic magnetite and we provide a quantitative pattern of this depletion. Furthermore, we propose a previously unidentified method based on strontium and calcium incorporation to identify magnetite produced by magnetotactic bacteria in the geological record. PMID:25624469

  6. Simple chamber facilitates chemiluminescent detection of bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marts, E. C.; Wilkins, J. R.

    1970-01-01

    Test chamber enables rapid estimation of bacteria in a test sample through the reaction of luminol and an oxidant with the cytochrome C portion of certain species of bacteria. Intensity of the light emitted in the reaction is a function of the specific bacteria in the test sample.

  7. Laser-Based Identification of Pathogenic Bacteria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rehse, Steven J.

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria are ubiquitous in our world. From our homes, to our work environment, to our own bodies, bacteria are the omnipresent although often unobserved companions to human life. Physicists are typically untroubled professionally by the presence of these bacteria, as their study usually falls safely outside the realm of our typical domain. In the…

  8. Differential staining of bacteria: acid fast stain.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Jackie; Moyes, Rita B; Breakwell, Donald P

    2009-11-01

    Acid-fastness is an uncommon characteristic shared by the genera Mycobacterium (Section 10A) and Nocardia. Because of this feature, this stain is extremely helpful in identification of these bacteria. Although Gram positive, acid-fast bacteria do not take the crystal violet into the wall well, appearing very light purple rather than the deep purple of normal Gram-positive bacteria.

  9. Predator vs aliens: bacteria interactions with Acanthamoeba.

    PubMed

    Khan, Naveed Ahmed; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah

    2014-06-01

    By interactions with other microbes, free-living amoebae play a significant role in microbiology, environmental biology, physiology, cellular interactions, ecology and evolution. Here, we discuss astonishing interactions of bacteria and amoebae, in the light of evolution and functional aspects impacting human health. In favourable environmental conditions, the interaction of Acanthamoeba with non-virulent bacteria results in lysis of the bacteria. However, the interaction with weak-virulent bacteria results in a symbiotic relationship or amoebal lysis may occur. The microbial survival of amoebae in harsh environments, ability to interact with bacteria, and their ability to aid transmission to susceptible hosts is of great concern to human, animal and ecosystem health.

  10. [Bacteria ecology in planting-culturing system].

    PubMed

    Huang, Fenglian; Xia, Beicheng; Dai, Xin; Chen, Guizhu

    2004-06-01

    Planting-culturing system in inter-tidal zone is a new type eco-culturing model. The survey on bacteria biomass and water quality in the designed planting-culturing system in inter-tidal zone showed that the mangrove planted in the system improved water quality and made water quality to II-III type, better than the IV and V type in the control pond. Designed ponds made heterotrophic bacteria, vibrio, phosphorus bacteria and enzyme-producing bacteria populations 1-2 order lower than the control pond without mongrove planting. Correlation analyses with CORREL software showed that the biomass of these bacteria was positively related with the nitrogen and phosphorus contents in water of the system, and the correlation coefficient for heterogeneous bacteria and vibrio was up to 0.9205. Heterotrophic bacteria and vibrio could be used as the water-quality monitoring organisms.

  11. The population dynamics of bacteria in physically structured habitats and the adaptive virtue of random motility.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yan; Wang, Xiaolin; Liu, Jingfang; Nememan, Ilya; Singh, Amoolya H; Weiss, Howie; Levin, Bruce R

    2011-03-08

    Why is motility so common in bacteria? An obvious answer to this ecological and evolutionary question is that in almost all habitats, bacteria need to go someplace and particularly in the direction of food. Although the machinery required for motility and chemotaxis (acquiring and processing the information needed to direct movement toward nutrients) are functionally coupled in contemporary bacteria, they are coded for by different sets of genes. Moreover, information that resources are more abundant elsewhere in a habitat would be of no value to a bacterium unless it already had the means to get there. Thus, motility must have evolved before chemotaxis, and bacteria with flagella and other machinery for propulsion in random directions must have an advantage over bacteria relegated to moving at the whim of external forces alone. However, what are the selection pressures responsible for the evolution and maintenance of undirected motility in bacteria? Here we use a combination of mathematical modeling and experiments with Escherichia coli to generate and test a parsimonious and ecologically general hypothesis for the existence of undirected motility in bacteria: it enables bacteria to move away from each other and thereby obtain greater individual shares of resources in physically structured environments. The results of our experiments not only support this hypothesis, but are quantitatively and qualitatively consistent with the predictions of our model.

  12. Effect of predatory bacteria on the gut bacterial microbiota in rats

    PubMed Central

    Shatzkes, Kenneth; Tang, Chi; Singleton, Eric; Shukla, Sean; Zuena, Michael; Gupta, Shilpi; Dharani, Sonal; Rinaggio, Joseph; Connell, Nancy D.; Kadouri, Daniel E.

    2017-01-01

    Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus and Micavibrio aeruginosavorus are Gram-negative proteobacteria that are obligate predators of other Gram-negative bacteria and are considered potential alternatives to antibiotics. Most studies focusing on predatory bacteria have been performed in vitro, thus the effect of predatory bacteria on a live host, including the impact on the ecology of the native microbiota, has yet to be fully examined. In this study, intrarectal inoculations of Sprague-Dawley rats with predatory bacteria were performed. Additionally, feces were collected for seven days post-inoculation to determine the effect on gut bacterial diversity. Rat colonic tissue exhibited no abnormal histopathological effects due to predatory bacteria. A modest increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines was measured in the colons of rats inoculated with predatory bacteria by 24 and 48 hours, with all but IL-13 returning to baseline by seven days. V4 16S rRNA gene sequencing of fecal DNA demonstrated minimal shifts in taxonomic representation over the week due to predatory bacteria. Changes in bacterial populations due to exposure to B. bacteriovorus are predicted to contribute to health, however, an overgrowth of Prevotella was observed due to exposure to M. aeruginosavorus. This study further addresses safety concerns associated with the potential use of predatory bacteria to treat infections. PMID:28262674

  13. Temporal and Spatial Variation of Soil Bacteria Richness, Composition, and Function in a Neotropical Rainforest

    PubMed Central

    Kivlin, Stephanie N; Hawkes, Christine V

    2016-01-01

    The high diversity of tree species has traditionally been considered an important controller of belowground processes in tropical rainforests. However, soil water availability and resources are also primary regulators of soil bacteria in many ecosystems. Separating the effects of these biotic and abiotic factors in the tropics is challenging because of their high spatial and temporal heterogeneity. To determine the drivers of tropical soil bacteria, we examined tree species effects using experimental tree monocultures and secondary forests at La Selva Biological Station in Costa Rica. A randomized block design captured spatial variation and we sampled at four dates across two years to assess temporal variation. We measured bacteria richness, phylogenetic diversity, community composition, biomass, and functional potential. All bacteria parameters varied significantly across dates. In addition, bacteria richness and phylogenetic diversity were affected by the interaction of vegetation type and date, whereas bacteria community composition was affected by the interaction of vegetation type and block. Shifts in bacteria community richness and composition were unrelated to shifts in enzyme function, suggesting physiological overlap among taxa. Based on the observed temporal and spatial heterogeneity, our understanding of tropical soil bacteria will benefit from additional work to determine the optimal temporal and spatial scales for sampling. Understanding spatial and temporal variation will facilitate prediction of how tropical soil microbes will respond to future environmental change. PMID:27391450

  14. Effect of predatory bacteria on the gut bacterial microbiota in rats.

    PubMed

    Shatzkes, Kenneth; Tang, Chi; Singleton, Eric; Shukla, Sean; Zuena, Michael; Gupta, Shilpi; Dharani, Sonal; Rinaggio, Joseph; Connell, Nancy D; Kadouri, Daniel E

    2017-03-06

    Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus and Micavibrio aeruginosavorus are Gram-negative proteobacteria that are obligate predators of other Gram-negative bacteria and are considered potential alternatives to antibiotics. Most studies focusing on predatory bacteria have been performed in vitro, thus the effect of predatory bacteria on a live host, including the impact on the ecology of the native microbiota, has yet to be fully examined. In this study, intrarectal inoculations of Sprague-Dawley rats with predatory bacteria were performed. Additionally, feces were collected for seven days post-inoculation to determine the effect on gut bacterial diversity. Rat colonic tissue exhibited no abnormal histopathological effects due to predatory bacteria. A modest increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines was measured in the colons of rats inoculated with predatory bacteria by 24 and 48 hours, with all but IL-13 returning to baseline by seven days. V4 16S rRNA gene sequencing of fecal DNA demonstrated minimal shifts in taxonomic representation over the week due to predatory bacteria. Changes in bacterial populations due to exposure to B. bacteriovorus are predicted to contribute to health, however, an overgrowth of Prevotella was observed due to exposure to M. aeruginosavorus. This study further addresses safety concerns associated with the potential use of predatory bacteria to treat infections.

  15. [Pathogenic bacteria in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Mariani-Kurkdjian, P; Bingen, E

    2003-09-01

    Since the CF gene identification in 1989 and despite the improvement of our knowledge in the physiopathology of the disease, bronchopulmonary infection determines the vital prognosis. Following Staphylococcus aureus infection, patients are colonized or colonized by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, greatly involved in the pulmonary deterioration. Other bacteria may be involved Burkholderia cepacia, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Alcaligenes sp. Intensive antibiotic treatment of primocolonisation helps to prevent or delay chronic colonisation. Chronic colonization needs a rational long term antibiotic strategy to prevent the occurrence of multiresistant germs; antibiotic cures are performed every 3 or 4 months before pulmonary exacerbation symptoms.

  16. Bacteria detection instrument and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renner, W.; Fealey, R. D. (Inventor)

    1972-01-01

    A method and apparatus for screening a sample fluid for bacterial presence are disclosed wherein the fluid sample is mixed with culture media of sufficient quantity to permit bacterial growth in order to obtain a test solution. The concentration of oxygen dissolved in the test solution is then monitored using the potential difference between a reference electrode and a noble metal electrode which are in contact with the test solution. The change in oxygen concentration which occurs during a period of time as indicated by the electrode potential difference is compared with a detection criterion which exceeds the change which would occur absent bacteria.

  17. Bacteria and vampirism in cinema.

    PubMed

    Castel, O; Bourry, A; Thévenot, S; Burucoa, C

    2013-09-01

    A vampire is a non-dead and non-alive chimerical creature, which, according to various folklores and popular superstitions, feeds on blood of the living to draw vital force. Vampires do not reproduce by copulation, but by bite. Vampirism is thus similar to a contagious disease contracted by intravascular inoculation with a suspected microbial origin. In several vampire films, two real bacteria were staged, better integrated than others in popular imagination: Yersinia pestis and Treponema pallidum. Bacillus vampiris was created for science-fiction. These films are attempts to better define humans through one of their greatest fears: infectious disease.

  18. Computational modeling of the quorum-sensing network in bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenley, Andrew; Banik, Suman; Kulkarni, Rahul

    2007-03-01

    Certain species of bacteria are able produce and sense the concentration of small molecules called autodinducers in order to coordinate gene regulation in response to population density, a process known as ``quorum-sensing''. The resulting regulation of gene expression involves both transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulators. In particular, the species of bacteria in the Vibrio genus use small RNAs to regulate the master protein controlling the quorum-sensing response (luminescence, biofilm formation, virulence...). We model the network of interactions using a modular approach which provides a quantitative understanding of how signal transduction occurs. The parameters of the input-module are fit to current experimental results allowing for testable predictions to be made for future experiments. The results of our analysis offer a revised perspective on quorum-sensing based regulation.

  19. Characterization of cells and bacteria by photophoretic velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmbrecht, Clemens; Niessner, Reinhard; Haisch, Christoph

    2008-02-01

    The migration induced by intensive light is termed photophoresis. We could show that the evaluation of light-induced velocities of microparticles, bacteria and cells suspended in water is valuable for the prediction of their intrinsic properties. Two different laser setups were evaluated for photophoretic migration, a He-Ne laser (P = 45 mW, λ = 633 nm) and a diode-pumped cw-Nd:YAG (P = 1.1 W, λ = 532 nm). When analyzing the migration behavior of particles, we find significant differences depending on both, geometrical size and refractive index. We describe migration of PS particles of different size as well as with different refractive index but same diameter, SiO II and melamine resin. The potential for the separation of biological matter is shown as velocity distributions of heat killed bacteria of Escherichia coli, Salmonella enteritidis, and baker's yeast is reported.

  20. DMTB: the magnetotactic bacteria database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Y.; Lin, W.

    2012-12-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are of interest in biogeomagnetism, rock magnetism, microbiology, biomineralization, and advanced magnetic materials because of their ability to synthesize highly ordered intracellular nano-sized magnetic minerals, magnetite or greigite. Great strides for MTB studies have been made in the past few decades. More than 600 articles concerning MTB have been published. These rapidly growing data are stimulating cross disciplinary studies in such field as biogeomagnetism. We have compiled the first online database for MTB, i.e., Database of Magnestotactic Bacteria (DMTB, http://database.biomnsl.com). It contains useful information of 16S rRNA gene sequences, oligonucleotides, and magnetic properties of MTB, and corresponding ecological metadata of sampling sites. The 16S rRNA gene sequences are collected from the GenBank database, while all other data are collected from the scientific literature. Rock magnetic properties for both uncultivated and cultivated MTB species are also included. In the DMTB database, data are accessible through four main interfaces: Site Sort, Phylo Sort, Oligonucleotides, and Magnetic Properties. References in each entry serve as links to specific pages within public databases. The online comprehensive DMTB will provide a very useful data resource for researchers from various disciplines, e.g., microbiology, rock magnetism and paleomagnetism, biogeomagnetism, magnetic material sciences and others.

  1. Money and transmission of bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Money is one of the most frequently passed items in the world. The aim of this study was to ascertain the survival status of bacteria including Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Vancomycin- Resistant Enterococci (VRE) on banknotes from different countries and the transmission of bacteria to people who come in contact with the banknotes. The survival rate was highest for the Romanian Leu yielding all three microorganisms used after both three and six hours of drying. Furthermore, the Leu was the only banknote to yield VRE after one day of drying. Other currencies either enabled the survival of Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamases (ESBL) and VRE (e.g. Euro), but not of MRSA, or the other way round (e.g. US Dollar). While a variety of factors such as community hygiene levels, people’s behaviour, and antimicrobial resistance rates at community level obviously have influence on the transmission of resistant microorganisms, the type of banknote-paper may be an additional variable to consider. PMID:23985137

  2. Graphing Predictions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connery, Keely Flynn

    2007-01-01

    Graphing predictions is especially important in classes where relationships between variables need to be explored and derived. In this article, the author describes how his students sketch the graphs of their predictions before they begin their investigations on two laboratory activities: Distance Versus Time Cart Race Lab and Resistance; and…

  3. Source specific fecal bacteria modeling using soil and water assessment tool model.

    PubMed

    Parajuli, Prem B; Mankin, Kyle R; Barnes, Philip L

    2009-01-01

    Fecal bacteria can contaminate water and result in illness or death. It is often difficult to accurately determine sources of fecal bacteria contamination, but bacteria source tracking can help identify non-point sources of fecal bacteria such as livestock, humans and wildlife. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) microbial sub-model 2005 was used to evaluate source-specific fecal bacteria using three years (2004-2006) of observed modified deterministic probability of bacteria source tracking data, as well as measure hydrologic and water quality data. This study modeled source-specific bacteria using a model previously calibrated for flow, sediment and total fecal coliform bacteria (FCB) concentration. The SWAT model was calibrated at the Rock Creek sub-watershed, validated at the Deer Creek sub-watershed, and verified at the Auburn sub-watershed and then at the entire Upper Wakarusa watershed for predicting daily flow, sediment, nutrients, total fecal bacteria, and source-specific fecal bacteria. Watershed characteristics for livestock, humans, and wildlife fecal bacterial sources were first modeled together then with three separate sources and combinations of source-specific FCB concentration: livestock and human, livestock and wildlife and human and wildlife. Model results indicated both coefficient of determination (R(2)) and Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency Index (E) parameters ranging from 0.52 to 0.84 for daily flow and 0.50-0.87 for sediment (good to very good agreement); 0.14-0.85 for total phosphorus (poor to very good agreement); -3.55 to 0.79 for total nitrogen (unsatisfactory to very good agreement) and -2.2 to 0.52 for total fecal bacteria (unsatisfactory to good agreement). Model results generally determined decreased agreement for each single source of bacteria (R(2) and E range from -5.03 to 0.39), potentially due to bacteria source tracking (BST) uncertainty and spatial variability. This study contributes to new knowledge in bacteria modeling and

  4. Diet-dependent effects of gut bacteria on their insect host: the symbiosis of Erwinia sp. and western flower thrips.

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Egbert J.; Jacobs, Gerrit; Sabelis, Maurice W.; Menken, Steph B. J.; Breeuwer, Johannes A. J.

    2004-01-01

    Studies on bacteria in the gut of insect species are numerous, but their focus is hardly ever on the impact on host performance. We showed earlier that Erwinia bacteria occur in the gut of western flower thrips, most probably acquired during feeding. Here, we investigate whether thrips gain a net benefit or pay a net cost because of these gut bacteria. On a diet of cucumber leaves, the time to maturity is shorter and the oviposition rate is higher in thrips with bacteria than in thrips without (aposymbionts). When fed on cucumber leaves and pollen, aposymbionts develop faster and lay more eggs. So Erwinia bacteria benefit or parasitize their thrips hosts depending on the diet, which is in accordance with theoretical predictions for fitness of organisms engaged in symbiotic interactions. Possibly, the transmission of gut bacteria has not become strictly vertical because of this diet-dependent fitness variability. PMID:15475338

  5. Diversity, distribution and sources of bacteria in residential kitchens

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Gilberto E.; Bates, Scott T.; Caporaso, J. Gregory; Lauber, Christian L.; Leff, Jonathan W.; Knight, Rob; Fierer, Noah

    2016-01-01

    Summary Bacteria readily colonize kitchen surfaces, and the exchange of microbes between humans and the kitchen environment can impact human health. However, we have a limited understanding of the overall diversity of these communities, how they differ across surfaces, and sources of bacteria to kitchen surfaces. Here we used high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene to explore biogeographical patterns of bacteria across >80 surfaces within the kitchens of each of four households. In total, 34 bacterial and two archaeal phyla were identified, with most sequences belonging to the Actinobacteria, Bacteriodetes, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria. Genera known to contain common food-borne pathogens were low in abundance but broadly distributed throughout the kitchens, with different taxa exhibiting distinct distribution patterns. The most diverse communities were associated with infrequently cleaned surfaces such as fans above stoves, refrigerator/freezer door seals, and floors. In contrast, the least diverse communities were observed in and around sinks, which were dominated by biofilm-forming gram-negative lineages. Community composition was influenced by conditions on individual surfaces, usage patterns, and dispersal from source environments. Human skin was the primary source of bacteria across all kitchen surfaces, with contributions from food and faucet water dominating in a few specific locations. This study demonstrates that diverse bacterial communities are widely distributed in residential kitchens and that the composition of these communities is often predictable. These results also illustrate the ease with which human- and food-associated bacteria can be transferred in residential settings to kitchen surfaces. PMID:23171378

  6. Therapeutic potential of bacteria against solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Hatzikirou, Haralampos; Lopez Alfonso, Juan Carlos; Leschner, Sara; Weiss, Siegfried; Meyer-Hermann, Michael

    2017-02-15

    Intentional bacterial infections can produce efficacious anti-tumor responses in mice, rats, dogs and humans. However, low overall success rates and intense side-effects prevent such approaches from being employed clinically. In this work, we titered bacteria and/or the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α in a set of established murine models of cancer. To interpret the experiments conducted, we considered and calibrated a tumor-effector cell recruitment model under the influence of functional tumor-associated vasculature. In this model, bacterial infections and TNF-α enhanced immune activity and altered vascularization in the tumor bed. Information to predict bacterial therapy outcomes was provided by pre-treatment tumor size and the underlying immune recruitment dynamics. Notably, increasing bacterial loads did not necessarily produce better long-term tumor control, suggesting that tumor sizes affected optimal bacterial loads. Short-term treatment responses were favored by high concentrations of effector cells post-injection, such as induced by higher bacterial loads, but in the longer term did not correlate with an effective restoration of immune surveillance. Overall, our findings suggested that a combination of intermediate bacterial loads with low levels TNF-α administration could enable more favorable outcomes elicited by bacterial infections in tumor-bearing subjects.

  7. Sporulation in Bacteria: Beyond the Standard Model.

    PubMed

    Hutchison, Elizabeth A; Miller, David A; Angert, Esther R

    2014-10-01

    Endospore formation follows a complex, highly regulated developmental pathway that occurs in a broad range of Firmicutes. Although Bacillus subtilis has served as a powerful model system to study the morphological, biochemical, and genetic determinants of sporulation, fundamental aspects of the program remain mysterious for other genera. For example, it is entirely unknown how most lineages within the Firmicutes regulate entry into sporulation. Additionally, little is known about how the sporulation pathway has evolved novel spore forms and reproductive schemes. Here, we describe endospore and internal offspring development in diverse Firmicutes and outline progress in characterizing these programs. Moreover, comparative genomics studies are identifying highly conserved sporulation genes, and predictions of sporulation potential in new isolates and uncultured bacteria can be made from these data. One surprising outcome of these comparative studies is that core regulatory and some structural aspects of the program appear to be universally conserved. This suggests that a robust and sophisticated developmental framework was already in place in the last common ancestor of all extant Firmicutes that produce internal offspring or endospores. The study of sporulation in model systems beyond B. subtilis will continue to provide key information on the flexibility of the program and provide insights into how changes in this developmental course may confer advantages to cells in diverse environments.

  8. Characterizing relationships among fecal indicator bacteria ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Bed sediments of streams and rivers may store high concentrations of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) and pathogens. Due to resuspension events, these contaminants can be mobilized into the water column and affect overall water quality. Other bacterial indicators such as microbial source tracking (MST) markers, developed to determine potential sources of fecal contamination, can also be resuspended from bed sediments. The primary objective of this study was to predict occurrence of waterborne pathogens in water and streambed sediments using a simple statistical model that includes traditionally measured FIB, environmental parameters and source allocation, using MST markers as predictor variables. Synoptic sampling events were conducted during baseflow conditions downstream from agricultural (AG), forested (FORS), and wastewater pollution control plant (WPCP) land uses. Concentrations of FIB and MST markers were measured in water and sediments, along with occurrences of the enteric pathogens Campylobacter, Listeria and Salmonella, and the virulence gene that carries Shiga toxin, stx2. Pathogens were detected in water more often than in underlying sediments. Shiga toxin was significantly related to land use, with concentrations of the ruminant marker selected as an independent variable that could correctly classify 76% and 64% of observed Shiga toxin occurrences in water and sediment, respectively. FIB concentrations and water quality parameters were also selected a

  9. Commensal bacteria mediated defenses against pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Abt, Michael C.; Pamer, Eric G.

    2014-01-01

    Commensal bacterial communities residing within the intestinal lumen of mammals have evolved to flourish in this microenvironment. To preserve this niche, commensal bacteria act with the host to prevent colonization by invasive pathogens that induce inflammation and disrupt the intestinal niche commensal bacteria rely upon. Thus, it is mutually beneficial to the host and commensal bacteria to inhibit a pathogen's ability to establish an infection. Commensal bacteria express factors that support colonization, maximize nutrient uptake, and produce metabolites that confer a survival advantage over pathogens. Further, commensal bacteria stimulate the host's immune defenses and drive tonic expression of anti-microbial factors. In combination, these mechanisms preserve the niche for commensal bacteria and assist the host in preventing infection. PMID:24727150

  10. Serological studies on chloridazon-degrading bacteria.

    PubMed

    Layh, G; Böhm, R; Eberspächer, J; Lingens, F

    1983-01-01

    Agglutination tests and immunofluorescence tests with antisera against four strains of chloridazon-degrading bacteria revealed the serological uniformity of a group of 22 chloridazon-degrading bacterial strains. No serological relationship could be found between chloridazon-degrading bacteria and representatives of other Gram-negative bacteria. This was demonstrated by agglutination tests, including testing of the antiserum against Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, and by immunofluorescence tests, including testing of the sera against Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter strains. The tests were performed with 31 representatives of different Gram-negative bacteria, and with 22 strains of chloridazon-degrading bacteria as antigens. Differences in the extent of agglutination reactions and antibody titres among chloridazon-degrading bacterial strains together with cross-adsorption xperiments, suggest a rough classification of chloridazon-degrading bacteria into two subgroups. On the basis of immunofluorescence data, a linkage-map was worked out to represent serological relationships in the group of chloridazon-degrading strains.

  11. Evaluation of bacteria-facilitated cadmium transport in gravel columns using the HYDRUS colloid-facilitated solute transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Liping; Å Imå¯Nek, Jirka

    2006-12-01

    The colloid-facilitated solute transport model, based on HYDRUS-1D, was evaluated using the column experimental data of Pang et al. (2005) for cadmium (Cd) transport facilitated by B. subtilis spores or E. coli in saturated coarse alluvial gravels. We simulated Cd transport involving convection, dispersion, kinetic adsorption/desorption to/from the aquifer media and to/from mobile/immobile bacteria, and kinetic attachment/detachment of the bacteria to/from the aquifer media. To reduce the number of parameters to be optimized, we independently estimated Cd sorption/desorption rates to mobile bacteria from a batch study. The model described the collected experimental data reasonably well. Extensive sensitivity analysis to various reaction parameters was carried out to obtain an understanding of the relative importance of individual model parameters on model predictions. Our modeling results suggest that the rates of Cd sorption or desorption differ not only between different bacterial species but also between unattached and deposited bacteria. The results of the sensitivity analysis indicated that the Cd sorption rate to unattached bacteria had a significantly greater impact on the model results than its sorption rate to deposited bacteria. For the experimental system investigated here, model results were most sensitive to parameters describing interactions between Cd-aquifer media, bacteria-aquifer media, and Cd-mobile bacteria, and they were less sensitive to interactions between Cd-immobile bacteria and desorption rate from mobile bacteria.

  12. Lactic acid bacteria as probiotics.

    PubMed

    Ljungh, Asa; Wadström, Torkel

    2006-09-01

    A number of Lactobacillus species, Bifidobacterium sp, Saccharomyces boulardii, and some other microbes have been proposed as and are used as probiotic strains, i.e. live microorganisms as food supplement in order to benefit health. The health claims range from rather vague as regulation of bowel activity and increasing of well-being to more specific, such as exerting antagonistic effect on the gastroenteric pathogens Clostridium difficile, Campylobacter jejuni, Helicobacter pylori and rotavirus, neutralising food mutagens produced in colon, shifting the immune response towards a Th2 response, and thereby alleviating allergic reactions, and lowering serum cholesterol (Tannock, 2002). Unfortunately, most publications are case reports, uncontrolled studies in humans, or reports of animal or in vitro studies. Whether or not the probiotic strains employed shall be of human origin is a matter of debate but this is not a matter of concern, as long as the strains can be shown to survive the transport in the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract and to colonise the human large intestine. This includes survival in the stressful environment of the stomach - acidic pH and bile - with induction of new genes encoding a number of stress proteins. Since the availability of antioxidants decreases rostrally in the GI tract production of antioxidants by colonic bacteria provides a beneficial effect in scavenging free radicals. LAB strains commonly produce antimicrobial substance(s) with activity against the homologous strain, but LAB strains also often produce microbicidal substances with effect against gastric and intestinal pathogens and other microbes, or compete for cell surface and mucin binding sites. This could be the mechanism behind reports that some probiotic strains inhibit or decrease translocation of bacteria from the gut to the liver. A protective effect against cancer development can be ascribed to binding of mutagens by intestinal bacteria, reduction of the enzymes beta

  13. Transformation of gram positive bacteria by sonoporation

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Yunfeng; Li, Yongchao

    2014-03-11

    The present invention provides a sonoporation-based method that can be universally applied for delivery of compounds into Gram positive bacteria. Gram positive bacteria which can be transformed by sonoporation include, for example, Bacillus, Streptococcus, Acetobacterium, and Clostridium. Compounds which can be delivered into Gram positive bacteria via sonoporation include nucleic acids (DNA or RNA), proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, viruses, small organic and inorganic molecules, and nano-particles.

  14. Time to recognise that mitochondria are bacteria?

    PubMed

    Pallen, Mark J

    2011-02-01

    The scientific community is comfortable with recognising mitochondria as organelles that happen to be descendants of bacteria. Here, I playfully explore the arguments for and against a phylogenetic fundamentalism that states that mitochondria are bacteria and should be given their own taxonomic family, the Mitochondriaceae. I also explore the consequences of recognizing mitochondria as bacteria for our understanding of the systemic response to trauma and for the prospects of creating transgenic mitochondria.

  15. Bioenergetics of photoheterotrophic bacteria in the oceans.

    PubMed

    Kirchman, David L; Hanson, Thomas E

    2013-04-01

    Photoheterotrophic microbes, such as proteorhodopsin (PR)-based phototrophic (PRP) and aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic (AAP) bacteria, are well known to be abundant in the oceans, potentially playing unique roles in biogeochemical cycles. However, the contribution of phototrophy to the energy requirements of these bacteria has not been quantitatively examined to date. To better understand the implications of photoheterophy in the oceans, we calculated energy benefits and costs of phototrophy and compared net benefits with maintenance costs. Benefits depend on the number of photosynthetic units (PSUs), absorption cross-section area of each PSU as function of wavelength, the in situ light quality, and the energy yield per absorbed photon. For costs we considered the energy required for the synthesis of pigments, amino acids and proteins in each PSU. Our calculations indicate that AAP bacteria harvest more light energy than do PRP bacteria, but the costs of phototrophy are much higher for AAP bacteria. Still, the net energy gained by AAP bacteria is often sufficient to meet maintenance costs, while that is not the case for PRP bacteria except with high light intensities and large numbers of proteorhodopsin molecules per cell. The low costs and simplicity of PR-based phototrophy explain the high abundance of proteorhodopsin genes in the oceans. However, even for AAP bacteria, the net energy yield of phototrophy is apparently too low to influence the distribution of photoheterotrophic bacteria among various marine systems.

  16. Survival of soil bacteria during prolonged desiccation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, M.; Alexander, M.

    1973-01-01

    A determination was made of the kinds and numbers of bacteria surviving when two soils were maintained in the laboratory under dry conditions for more than half a year. Certain non-spore-forming bacteria were found to survive in the dry condition for long periods. A higher percentage of drought-tolerant than drought-sensitive bacteria was able to grow at low water activities. When they were grown in media with high salt concentrations, bacteria generally became more tolerant of prolonged drought and they persisted longer. The percent of cells in a bacterial population that remained viable when exposed to drought stress varied with the stage of growth.

  17. Spectroscopic diagnostics for bacteria in biologic sample

    DOEpatents

    El-Sayed, Mostafa A.; El-Sayed, Ivan H.

    2002-01-01

    A method to analyze and diagnose specific bacteria in a biologic sample using spectroscopy is disclosed. The method includes obtaining the spectra of a biologic sample of a non-infected patient for use as a reference, subtracting the reference from the spectra of an infected sample, and comparing the fingerprint regions of the resulting differential spectrum with reference spectra of bacteria in saline. Using this diagnostic technique, specific bacteria can be identified sooner and without culturing, bacteria-specific antibiotics can be prescribed sooner, resulting in decreased likelihood of antibiotic resistance and an overall reduction of medical costs.

  18. Cell Size Regulation in Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amir, Ariel

    2014-05-01

    Various bacteria such as the canonical gram negative Escherichia coli or the well-studied gram positive Bacillus subtilis divide symmetrically after they approximately double their volume. Their size at division is not constant, but is typically distributed over a narrow range. Here, we propose an analytically tractable model for cell size control, and calculate the cell size and interdivision time distributions, as well as the correlations between these variables. We suggest ways of extracting the model parameters from experimental data, and show that existing data for E. coli supports partial size control, and a particular explanation: a cell attempts to add a constant volume from the time of initiation of DNA replication to the next initiation event. This hypothesis accounts for the experimentally observed correlations between mother and daughter cells as well as the exponential dependence of size on growth rate.

  19. Mitochondria: a target for bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lobet, Elodie; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Arnould, Thierry

    2015-04-01

    Eukaryotic cells developed strategies to detect and eradicate infections. The innate immune system, which is the first line of defence against invading pathogens, relies on the recognition of molecular patterns conserved among pathogens. Pathogen associated molecular pattern binding to pattern recognition receptor triggers the activation of several signalling pathways leading to the establishment of a pro-inflammatory state required to control the infection. In addition, pathogens evolved to subvert those responses (with passive and active strategies) allowing their entry and persistence in the host cells and tissues. Indeed, several bacteria actively manipulate immune system or interfere with the cell fate for their own benefit. One can imagine that bacterial effectors can potentially manipulate every single organelle in the cell. However, the multiple functions fulfilled by mitochondria especially their involvement in the regulation of innate immune response, make mitochondria a target of choice for bacterial pathogens as they are not only a key component of the central metabolism through ATP production and synthesis of various biomolecules but they also take part to cell signalling through ROS production and control of calcium homeostasis as well as the control of cell survival/programmed cell death. Furthermore, considering that mitochondria derived from an ancestral bacterial endosymbiosis, it is not surprising that a special connection does exist between this organelle and bacteria. In this review, we will discuss different mitochondrial functions that are affected during bacterial infection as well as different strategies developed by bacterial pathogens to subvert functions related to calcium homeostasis, maintenance of redox status and mitochondrial morphology.

  20. Phosphatidic Acid Synthesis in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jiangwei; Rock, Charles O.

    2012-01-01

    Membrane phospholipid synthesis is a vital facet of bacterial physiology. Although the spectrum of phospholipid headgroup structures produced by bacteria is large, the key precursor to all of these molecules is phosphatidic acid (PtdOH). Glycerol-3-phosphate derived from the glycolysis via glycerol-phosphate synthase is the universal source for the glycerol backbone of PtdOH. There are two distinct families of enzymes responsible for the acylation of the 1-position of glycerol-3-phosphate. The PlsB acyltransferase was discovered in Escherichia coli, and homologs are present in many eukaryotes. This protein family primarily uses acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) endproducts of fatty acid synthesis as acyl donors, but may also use acyl-CoA derived from exogenous fatty acids. The second protein family, PlsY, is more widely distributed in bacteria and utilizes the unique acyl donor, acyl-phosphate, which is produced from acyl-ACP by the enzyme PlsX. The acylation of the 2-position is carried out by members of the PlsC protein family. All PlsCs use acyl-ACP as the acyl donor, although the PlsCs of the γ-proteobacteria also may use acyl-CoA. Phospholipid headgroups are precursors in the biosynthesis of other membrane-associated molecules and the diacylglycerol product of these reactions is converted to PtdOH by one of two distinct families of lipid kinases. The central importance of the de novo and recycling pathways to PtdOH in cell physiology suggest these enzymes are suitable targets for the development of antibacterial therapeutics in Gram-positive pathogens. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Phospholipids and Phospholipid Metabolism. PMID:22981714

  1. Reduced efficiency of magnetotaxis in magnetotactic coccoid bacteria in higher than geomagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yongxin; Lin, Wei; Li, Jinhua; Wu, Wenfang; Tian, Lanxiang; Deng, Chenglong; Liu, Qingsong; Zhu, Rixiang; Winklhofer, Michael; Petersen, Nikolai

    2009-08-19

    Magnetotactic bacteria are microorganisms that orient and migrate along magnetic field lines. The classical model of polar magnetotaxis predicts that the field-parallel migration velocity of magnetotactic bacteria increases monotonically with the strength of an applied magnetic field. We here test this model experimentally on magnetotactic coccoid bacteria that swim along helical trajectories. It turns out that the contribution of the field-parallel migration velocity decreases with increasing field strength from 0.1 to 1.5 mT. This unexpected observation can be explained and reproduced in a mathematical model under the assumption that the magnetosome chain is inclined with respect to the flagellar propulsion axis. The magnetic disadvantage, however, becomes apparent only in stronger than geomagnetic fields, which suggests that magnetotaxis is optimized under geomagnetic field conditions. It is therefore not beneficial for these bacteria to increase their intracellular magnetic dipole moment beyond the value needed to overcome Brownian motion in geomagnetic field conditions.

  2. PREDICTIVE MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, R.M. )

    1986-12-01

    PREDICTIVE MODELS is a collection of five models - CFPM, CO2PM, ICPM, PFPM, and SFPM - used in the 1982-1984 National Petroleum Council study of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) potential. Each pertains to a specific EOR process designed to squeeze additional oil from aging or spent oil fields. The processes are: 1) chemical flooding, where soap-like surfactants are injected into the reservoir to wash out the oil; 2) carbon dioxide miscible flooding, where carbon dioxide mixes with the lighter hydrocarbons making the oil easier to displace; 3) in-situ combustion, which uses the heat from burning some of the underground oil to thin the product; 4) polymer flooding, where thick, cohesive material is pumped into a reservoir to push the oil through the underground rock; and 5) steamflood, where pressurized steam is injected underground to thin the oil. CFPM, the Chemical Flood Predictive Model, models micellar (surfactant)-polymer floods in reservoirs, which have been previously waterflooded to residual oil saturation. Thus, only true tertiary floods are considered. An option allows a rough estimate of oil recovery by caustic or caustic-polymer processes. CO2PM, the Carbon Dioxide miscible flooding Predictive Model, is applicable to both secondary (mobile oil) and tertiary (residual oil) floods, and to either continuous CO2 injection or water-alternating gas processes. ICPM, the In-situ Combustion Predictive Model, computes the recovery and profitability of an in-situ combustion project from generalized performance predictive algorithms. PFPM, the Polymer Flood Predictive Model, is switch-selectable for either polymer or waterflooding, and an option allows the calculation of the incremental oil recovery and economics of polymer relative to waterflooding. SFPM, the Steamflood Predictive Model, is applicable to the steam drive process, but not to cyclic steam injection (steam soak) processes.

  3. Problems in the cultivation of cervical bacteria.

    PubMed

    Brown, E R; Keith, L G; Rosen, G F

    1985-03-01

    Multiple variations in the types, species and prevalence of cervical bacteria are described in the literature. A review of the literature was undertaken to determine the effect of delay on the ability to identify bacteria. Experiments were initiated to elaborate on those observations. The rate of organism isolation was related to the delay in transport to the laboratory.

  4. Method of dispersing a hydrocarbon using bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Tyndall, R.L.

    1996-09-24

    A new protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. The isolated consortia and bacteria are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. The isolated consortia, bacteria, and dispersants are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  5. Method of dispersing a hydrocarbon using bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Tyndall, Richard L.

    1996-01-01

    New protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. Consortia and bacteria isolated therefrom are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. Consortia, bacteria isolated therefrom, and dispersants isolated therefrom are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  6. Revisiting the cape cod bacteria injection experiment using a stochastic modeling approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maxwell, R.M.; Welty, C.; Harvey, R.W.

    2007-01-01

    Bromide and resting-cell bacteria tracer tests conducted in a sandy aquifer at the U.S. Geological Survey Cape Cod site in 1987 were reinterpreted using a three-dimensional stochastic approach. Bacteria transport was coupled to colloid filtration theory through functional dependence of local-scale colloid transport parameters upon hydraulic conductivity and seepage velocity in a stochastic advection - dispersion/attachment - detachment model. Geostatistical information on the hydraulic conductivity (K) field that was unavailable at the time of the original test was utilized as input. Using geostatistical parameters, a groundwater flow and particle-tracking model of conservative solute transport was calibrated to the bromide-tracer breakthrough data. An optimization routine was employed over 100 realizations to adjust the mean and variance ofthe natural-logarithm of hydraulic conductivity (InK) field to achieve best fit of a simulated, average bromide breakthrough curve. A stochastic particle-tracking model for the bacteria was run without adjustments to the local-scale colloid transport parameters. Good predictions of mean bacteria breakthrough were achieved using several approaches for modeling components of the system. Simulations incorporating the recent Tufenkji and Elimelech (Environ. Sci. Technol. 2004, 38, 529-536) correlation equation for estimating single collector efficiency were compared to those using the older Rajagopalan and Tien (AIChE J. 1976, 22, 523-533) model. Both appeared to work equally well at predicting mean bacteria breakthrough using a constant mean bacteria diameter for this set of field conditions. Simulations using a distribution of bacterial cell diameters available from original field notes yielded a slight improvement in the model and data agreement compared to simulations using an average bacterial diameter. The stochastic approach based on estimates of local-scale parameters for the bacteria-transport process reasonably captured

  7. Growth of saprotrophic fungi and bacteria in soil.

    PubMed

    Rousk, Johannes; Bååth, Erland

    2011-10-01

    Bacterial and fungal growth rate measurements are sensitive variables to detect changes in environmental conditions. However, while considerable progress has been made in methods to assess the species composition and biomass of fungi and bacteria, information about growth rates remains surprisingly rudimentary. We review the recent history of approaches to assess bacterial and fungal growth rates, leading up to current methods, especially focusing on leucine/thymidine incorporation to estimate bacterial growth and acetate incorporation into ergosterol to estimate fungal growth. We present the underlying assumptions for these methods, compare estimates of turnover times for fungi and bacteria based on them, and discuss issues, including for example elusive conversion factors. We review what the application of fungal and bacterial growth rate methods has revealed regarding the influence of the environmental factors of temperature, moisture (including drying/rewetting), pH, as well as the influence of substrate additions, the presence of plants and toxins. We highlight experiments exploring the competitive and facilitative interaction between bacteria and fungi enabled using growth rate methods. Finally, we predict that growth methods will be an important complement to molecular approaches to elucidate fungal and bacterial ecology, and we identify methodological concerns and how they should be addressed.

  8. HYDROCARBON-DEGRADING BACTERIA AND SURFACTANT ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Brigmon, R; Topher Berry, T; Grazyna A. Plaza, G; jacek Wypych, j

    2006-08-15

    Fate of benzene ethylbenzene toluene xylenes (BTEX) compounds through biodegradation was investigated using two different bacteria, Ralstonia picketti (BP-20) and Alcaligenes piechaudii (CZOR L-1B). These bacteria were isolated from extremely polluted petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soils. PCR and Fatty Acid Methyl Ester (FAME) were used to identify the isolates. Biodegradation was measured using each organism individually and in combination. Both bacteria were shown to degrade each of the BTEX compounds. Alcaligenes piechaudii biodegraded BTEXs more efficiently while mixed with BP-20 and individually. Biosurfactant production was observed by culture techniques. In addition 3-hydroxy fatty acids, important in biosurfactant production, was observed by FAME analysis. In the all experiments toluene and m+p- xylenes were better growth substrates for both bacteria than the other BTEX compounds. In addition, the test results indicate that the bacteria could contribute to bioremediation of aromatic hydrocarbons (BTEX) pollution increase biodegradation through the action by biosurfactants.

  9. Chemotactic selection of pollutant degrading soil bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Hazen, T.C.

    1991-03-04

    A method is described for identifying soil microbial strains which may be bacterial degraders of pollutants. This method includes: Placing a concentration of a pollutant in a substantially closed container; placing the container in a sample of soil for a period of time ranging from one minute to several hours; retrieving the container and collecting its contents; microscopically determining the identity of the bacteria present. Different concentrations of the pollutant can be used to determine which bacteria respond to each concentration. The method can be used for characterizing a polluted site or for looking for naturally occurring biological degraders of the pollutant. Then bacteria identified as degraders of the pollutant and as chemotactically attracted to the pollutant are used to innoculate contaminated soil. To enhance the effect of the bacteria on the pollutant, nutrients are cyclicly provided to the bacteria then withheld to alternately build up the size of the bacterial colony or community and then allow it to degrade the pollutant.

  10. Antibiotic resistance in probiotic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Gueimonde, Miguel; Sánchez, Borja; G. de los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara; Margolles, Abelardo

    2013-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host. The main probiotic bacteria are strains belonging to the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, although other representatives, such as Bacillus or Escherichia coli strains, have also been used. Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium are two common inhabitants of the human intestinal microbiota. Also, some species are used in food fermentation processes as starters, or as adjunct cultures in the food industry. With some exceptions, antibiotic resistance in these beneficial microbes does not constitute a safety concern in itself, when mutations or intrinsic resistance mechanisms are responsible for the resistance phenotype. In fact, some probiotic strains with intrinsic antibiotic resistance could be useful for restoring the gut microbiota after antibiotic treatment. However, specific antibiotic resistance determinants carried on mobile genetic elements, such as tetracycline resistance genes, are often detected in the typical probiotic genera, and constitute a reservoir of resistance for potential food or gut pathogens, thus representing a serious safety issue. PMID:23882264

  11. Mycelial bacteria of saline soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvyagintsev, D. G.; Zenova, G. M.; Oborotov, G. V.

    2008-10-01

    The actinomycetal complexes of saline soils comprise the representatives of the Streptomyces and Micromonospora genera, the number of which are hundreds and thousands of CFU/g soil. Complexes of mycelial bacteria in saline soils are poorer in terms of number (by 1-3 orders of magnitude) and taxonomic composition than the complexes of the zonal soil types. A specific feature of the actinomycetal complexes of saline soils is the predominance of halophilic, alkaliphilic, and haloalkaliphilic streptomycetes that well grow at pH 8-9 and concentrations of NaCl close to 5%. Actinomycetes in saline soils grow actively, and the length of their mycelium reaches 140 m in 1 gram of soil. The haloalkaliphilic streptomycetes grow fast and inhibit the formation of spores at pH 9 and high concentrations of salts (Na2SO4 and MgCl2, 5%) as compared to their behavior on a neutral medium with a salt concentration of 0.02%. They are characterized by the maximal radial growth rate of colonies on an alkaline medium with 5% NaCl.

  12. Cell Size Control in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Chien, An-Chun; Hill, Norbert S.; Levin, Petra Anne

    2012-01-01

    Like eukaryotes, bacteria must coordinate division with growth to ensure cells are the appropriate size for a given environmental condition or developmental fate. As single-celled organisms, nutrient availability is one of the strongest influences on bacterial cell size. Classic physiological experiments conducted over four decades ago first demonstrated that cell size is directly correlated with nutrient source and growth rate in the Gram-negative bacterium Salmonella typhimurium. This observation subsequently served as the basis for studies revealing a role for cell size in cell cycle progression in a closely related organism, Escherichia coli. More recently, the development of powerful genetic, molecular, and imaging tools has allowed us to identify and characterize the nutrient-dependent pathway responsible for coordinating cell division and cell size with growth rate in the Gram-positive model organism B. subtilis. Here, we discuss the role of cell size in bacterial growth and development and propose a broadly applicable model for cell size control in this important and highly divergent domain of life. PMID:22575476

  13. Tape Cassette Bacteria Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing of an automatic bacteria detection system with a zero-g capability and based on the filter-capsule approach is described. This system is intended for monitoring the sterility of regenerated water in a spacecraft. The principle of detection is based on measuring the increase in chemiluminescence produced by the action of bacterial porphyrins (i.e., catalase, cytochromes, etc.) on a luminol-hydrogen peroxide mixture. Since viable as well as nonviable organisms initiate this luminescence, viable organisms are detected by comparing the signal of an incubated water sample with an unincubated control. Higher signals for the former indicate the presence of viable organisms. System features include disposable sealed sterile capsules, each containing a filter membrane, for processing discrete water samples and a tape transport for moving these capsules through a processing sequence which involves sample concentration, nutrient addition, incubation, a 4 Molar Urea wash and reaction with luminol-hydrogen peroxide in front of a photomultiplier tube. Liquids are introduced by means of a syringe needle which pierces a rubber septum contained in the wall of the capsule. Detection thresholds obtained with this unit towards E. coli and S. marcescens assuming a 400 ml water sample are indicated.

  14. Comparative cytotoxicity of periodontal bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, R.H.; Hammond, B.F.

    1988-11-01

    The direct cytotoxicity of sonic extracts (SE) from nine periodontal bacteria for human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) was compared. Equivalent dosages (in terms of protein concentration) of SE were used to challenge HGF cultures. The cytotoxic potential of each SE was assessed by its ability to (1) inhibit HGF proliferation, as measured by direct cell counts; (2) inhibit 3H-thymidine incorporation in HGF cultures; or (3) cause morphological alterations of the cells in challenged cultures. The highest concentration (500 micrograms SE protein/ml) of any of the SEs used to challenge the cells was found to be markedly inhibitory to the HGFs by all three of the criteria of cytotoxicity. At the lowest dosage tested (50 micrograms SE protein/ml); only SE from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Bacteroides gingivalis, and Fusobacterium nucleatum caused a significant effect (greater than 90% inhibition or overt morphological abnormalities) in the HGFs as determined by any of the criteria employed. SE from Capnocytophaga sputigena, Eikenella corrodens, or Wolinella recta also inhibited cell proliferation and thymidine incorporation at this dosage; however, the degree of inhibition (5-50%) was consistently, clearly less than that of the first group of three organisms named above. The SE of the three other organisms tested (Actinomyces odontolyticus, Bacteroides intermedius, and Streptococcus sanguis) had little or no effect (0-10% inhibition) at this concentration. The data suggest that the outcome of the interaction between bacterial components and normal resident cells of the periodontium is, at least in part, a function of the bacterial species.

  15. Successful Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierrehumbert, R.

    2012-12-01

    In an observational science, it is not possible to test hypotheses through controlled laboratory experiments. One can test parts of the system in the lab (as is done routinely with infrared spectroscopy of greenhouse gases), but the collective behavior cannot be tested experimentally because a star or planet cannot be brought into the lab; it must, instead, itself be the lab. In the case of anthropogenic global warming, this is all too literally true, and the experiment would be quite exciting if it weren't for the unsettling fact that we and all our descendents for the forseeable future will have to continue making our home in the lab. There are nonetheless many routes though which the validity of a theory of the collective behavior can be determined. A convincing explanation must not be a"just-so" story, but must make additional predictions that can be verified against observations that were not originally used in formulating the theory. The field of Earth and planetary climate has racked up an impressive number of such predictions. I will also admit as "predictions" statements about things that happened in the past, provided that observations or proxies pinning down the past climate state were not available at the time the prediction was made. The basic prediction that burning of fossil fuels would lead to an increase of atmospheric CO2, and that this would in turn alter the Earth's energy balance so as to cause tropospheric warming, is one of the great successes of climate science. It began in the lineage of Fourier, Tyndall and Arrhenius, and was largely complete with the the radiative-convective modeling work of Manabe in the 1960's -- all well before the expected warming had progressed far enough to be observable. Similarly, long before the increase in atmospheric CO2 could be detected, Bolin formulated a carbon cycle model and used it to predict atmospheric CO2 out to the year 2000; the actual values come in at the high end of his predicted range, for

  16. Quantification of spatial distribution and spread of bacteria in soil at microscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juyal, Archana; Eickhorst, Thilo; Falconer, Ruth; Baveye, Philippe; Otten, Wilfred

    2015-04-01

    Soil bacteria play an essential role in functioning of ecosystems and maintaining of biogeochemical cycles. Soil is a complex heterogeneous environment comprising of highly variable and dynamic micro-habitats that have significant impacts on the growth and activity of resident microbiota including bacteria and fungi. Bacteria occupy a very small portion of available pore space in soil which demonstrates that their spatial arrangement in soil has a huge impact on the contact to their target and on the way they interact to carry out their functions. Due to limitation of techniques, there is scant information on spatial distribution of indigenous or introduced bacteria at microhabitat scale. There is a need to understand the interaction between soil structure and microorganisms including fungi for ecosystem-level processes such as carbon sequestration and improving the predictive models for soil management. In this work, a combination of techniques was used including X-ray CT to characterize the soil structure and in-situ detection via fluorescence microscopy to visualize and quantify bacteria in soil thin sections. Pseudomonas fluorescens bacteria were introduced in sterilized soil of aggregate size 1-2 mm and packed at bulk-densities 1.3 g cm-3 and 1.5 g cm-3. A subset of samples was fixed with paraformaldehyde and subsequently impregnated with resin. DAPI and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) were used to visualize bacteria in thin sections of soil cores by epifluorescence microscopy to enumerate spatial distribution of bacteria in soil. The pore geometry of soil was quantified after X-ray microtomography scanning. The distribution of bacteria introduced locally reduced significantly (P

  17. Responses, applications, and analysis of microgravity effects on bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoit, Michael Robert

    ) to evaluate changes in extracellular fluid density on convective mass transport. From the theoretical analysis results, I predicted convective and diffusive transport regimes for bacteria grown under microgravity, 1 g, and hyper-gravity conditions. Finally, using a numerical model, I successfully simulated an experimentally observed phenomenon of buoyancy-driven convection created by cellular metabolism.

  18. Global phenotypic characterization of bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bochner, Barry R

    2009-01-01

    The measure of the quality of a systems biology model is how well it can reproduce and predict the behaviors of a biological system such as a microbial cell. In recent years, these models have been built up in layers, and each layer has been growing in sophistication and accuracy in parallel with a global data set to challenge and validate the models in predicting the content or activities of genes (genomics), proteins (proteomics), metabolites (metabolomics), and ultimately cell phenotypes (phenomics). This review focuses on the latter, the phenotypes of microbial cells. The development of Phenotype MicroArrays, which attempt to give a global view of cellular phenotypes, is described. In addition to their use in fleshing out and validating systems biology models, there are many other uses of this global phenotyping technology in basic and applied microbiology research, which are also described. PMID:19054113

  19. Antimicrobial drug resistance: "Prediction is very difficult, especially about the future".

    PubMed

    Courvalin, Patrice

    2005-10-01

    Evolution of bacteria towards resistance to antimicrobial drugs, including multidrug resistance, is unavoidable because it represents a particular aspect of the general evolution of bacteria that is unstoppable. Therefore, the only means of dealing with this situation is to delay the emergence and subsequent dissemination of resistant bacteria or resistance genes. Resistance to antimicrobial drugs in bacteria can result from mutations in housekeeping structural or regulatory genes. Alternatively, resistance can result from the horizontal acquisition of foreign genetic information. The 2 phenomena are not mutually exclusive and can be associated in the emergence and more efficient spread of resistance. This review discusses the predictable future of the relationship between antimicrobial drugs and bacteria.

  20. Genetics of lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis in enteric bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Schnaitman, C A; Klena, J D

    1993-01-01

    From a historical perspective, the study of both the biochemistry and the genetics of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) synthesis began with the enteric bacteria. These organisms have again come to the forefront as the blocks of genes involved in LPS synthesis have been sequenced and analyzed. A number of new and unanticipated genes were found in these clusters, indicating a complexity of the biochemical pathways which was not predicted from the older studies. One of the most dramatic areas of LPS research has been the elucidation of the lipid A biosynthetic pathway. Four of the genes in this pathway have now been identified and sequenced, and three of them are located in a complex operon which also contains genes involved in DNA and phospholipid synthesis. The rfa gene cluster, which contains many of the genes for LPS core synthesis, includes at least 17 genes. One of the remarkable findings in this cluster is a group of several genes which appear to be involved in the synthesis of alternate rough core species which are modified so that they cannot be acceptors for O-specific polysaccharides. The rfb gene clusters which encode O-antigen synthesis have been sequenced from a number of serotypes and exhibit the genetic polymorphism anticipated on the basis of the chemical complexity of the O antigens. These clusters appear to have originated by the exchange of blocks of genes among ancestral organisms. Among the large number of LPS genes which have now been sequenced from these rfa and rfb clusters, there are none which encode proteins that appear to be secreted across the cytoplasmic membrane and surprisingly few which encode integral membrane proteins or proteins with extensive hydrophobic domains. These data, together with sequence comparison and complementation experiments across strain and species lines, suggest that the LPS biosynthetic enzymes may be organized into clusters on the inner surface of the cytoplasmic membrane which are organized around a few key membrane

  1. Potential role of bacteria packaging by protozoa in the persistence and transmission of pathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Denoncourt, Alix M.; Paquet, Valérie E.; Charette, Steve J.

    2014-01-01

    Many pathogenic bacteria live in close association with protozoa. These unicellular eukaryotic microorganisms are ubiquitous in various environments. A number of protozoa such as amoebae and ciliates ingest pathogenic bacteria, package them usually in membrane structures, and then release them into the environment. Packaged bacteria are more resistant to various stresses and are more apt to survive than free bacteria. New evidence indicates that protozoa and not bacteria control the packaging process. It is possible that packaging is more common than suspected and may play a major role in the persistence and transmission of pathogenic bacteria. To confirm the role of packaging in the propagation of infections, it is vital that the molecular mechanisms governing the packaging of bacteria by protozoa be identified as well as elements related to the ecology of this process in order to determine whether packaging acts as a Trojan Horse. PMID:24904553

  2. Potential role of bacteria packaging by protozoa in the persistence and transmission of pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Denoncourt, Alix M; Paquet, Valérie E; Charette, Steve J

    2014-01-01

    Many pathogenic bacteria live in close association with protozoa. These unicellular eukaryotic microorganisms are ubiquitous in various environments. A number of protozoa such as amoebae and ciliates ingest pathogenic bacteria, package them usually in membrane structures, and then release them into the environment. Packaged bacteria are more resistant to various stresses and are more apt to survive than free bacteria. New evidence indicates that protozoa and not bacteria control the packaging process. It is possible that packaging is more common than suspected and may play a major role in the persistence and transmission of pathogenic bacteria. To confirm the role of packaging in the propagation of infections, it is vital that the molecular mechanisms governing the packaging of bacteria by protozoa be identified as well as elements related to the ecology of this process in order to determine whether packaging acts as a Trojan Horse.

  3. Temporal Synchronization Analysis for Improving Regression Modeling of Fecal Indicator Bacteria Levels

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multiple linear regression models are often used to predict levels of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) in recreational swimming waters based on independent variables (IVs) such as meteorologic, hydrodynamic, and water-quality measures. The IVs used for these analyses are traditiona...

  4. International Space Station Bacteria Filter Element Service Life Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, J. L.

    2005-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) uses high-efficiency particulate air filters to remove particulate matter from the cabin atmosphere. Known as bacteria filter elements (BFEs), there are 13 elements deployed on board the ISS's U.S. segment in the flight 4R assembly level. The preflight service life prediction of 1 yr for the BFEs is based upon engineering analysis of data collected during developmental testing that used a synthetic dust challenge. While this challenge is considered reasonable and conservative from a design perspective, an understanding of the actual filter loading is required to best manage the critical ISS program resources. Testing was conducted on BFEs returned from the ISS to refine the service life prediction. Results from this testing and implications to ISS resource management are provided.

  5. ENSO predictability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Sarah Michelle

    The overarching goal of this work is to explore seasonal El Nino -- Southern Oscillation (ENSO) predictability. More specifically, this work investigates how intrinsic variability affects ENSO predictability using a state-of-the-art climate model. Topics related to the effects of systematic model errors and external forcing are not included in this study. Intrinsic variability encompasses a hierarchy of temporal and spatial scales, from high frequency small-scale noise-driven processes including coupled instabilities to low frequency large-scale deterministic climate modes. The former exemplifies what can be considered intrinsic "noise" in the climate system that hinders predictability by promoting rapid error growth whereas the latter often provides the slow thermal ocean inertia that supplies the coupled ENSO system with predictability. These two ends of the spectrum essentially provide the lower and upper bounds of ENSO predictability that can be attributed to internal variability. The effects of noise-driven coupled instabilities on sea surface temperature (SST) predictability in the ENSO region is quantified by utilizing a novel coupled model methodology paired with an ensemble approach. The experimental design allows for rapid growth of intrinsic perturbations that are not prescribed. Several cases exhibit sufficiently rapid growth to produce ENSO-like final states that do not require a previous ENSO event, large-scale wind trigger, or subsurface heat content precursor. Results challenge conventional ENSO theory that considers the subsurface precursor as a necessary condition for ENSO. Noise-driven SST error growth exhibits strong seasonality and dependence on the initialization month. A dynamical analysis reveals that much of the error growth behavior is linked to the seasonal strength of the Bjerknes feedback in the model, indicating that the noise-induced perturbations grow via an ENSO-like mechanism. The daily error fields reveal that persistent

  6. Dropout Prediction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Jonathan; And Others

    Secondary school students who drop out of school are put at great social and economic disadvantage. If potential dropouts can be identified early, prevention may be possible. To construct a prediction model which, through readily available school information, will aid in the identification of students likely to drop out, schools in the Austin,…

  7. Transport capabilities of eleven gram-positive bacteria: comparative genomic analyses.

    PubMed

    Lorca, Graciela L; Barabote, Ravi D; Zlotopolski, Vladimir; Tran, Can; Winnen, Brit; Hvorup, Rikki N; Stonestrom, Aaron J; Nguyen, Elizabeth; Huang, Li-Wen; Kim, David S; Saier, Milton H

    2007-06-01

    The genomes of eleven Gram-positive bacteria that are important for human health and the food industry, nine low G+C lactic acid bacteria and two high G+C Gram-positive organisms, were analyzed for their complement of genes encoding transport proteins. Thirteen to 18% of their genes encode transport proteins, larger percentages than observed for most other bacteria. All of these bacteria possess channel proteins, some of which probably function to relieve osmotic stress. Amino acid uptake systems predominate over sugar and peptide cation symporters, and of the sugar uptake porters, those specific for oligosaccharides and glycosides often outnumber those for free sugars. About 10% of the total transport proteins are constituents of putative multidrug efflux pumps with Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS)-type pumps (55%) being more prevalent than ATP-binding cassette (ABC)-type pumps (33%), which, however, usually greatly outnumber all other types. An exception to this generalization is Streptococcus thermophilus with 54% of its drug efflux pumps belonging to the ABC superfamily and 23% belonging each to the Multidrug/Oligosaccharide/Polysaccharide (MOP) superfamily and the MFS. These bacteria also display peptide efflux pumps that may function in intercellular signalling, and macromolecular efflux pumps, many of predictable specificities. Most of the bacteria analyzed have no pmf-coupled or transmembrane flow electron carriers. The one exception is Brevibacterium linens, which in addition to these carriers, also has transporters of several families not represented in the other ten bacteria examined. Comparisons with the genomes of organisms from other bacterial kingdoms revealed that lactic acid bacteria possess distinctive proportions of recognized transporter types (e.g., more porters specific for glycosides than reducing sugars). Some homologues of transporters identified had previously been identified only in Gram-negative bacteria or in eukaryotes. Our studies

  8. Transport Capabilities of Eleven Gram-positive Bacteria: Comparative Genomic Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Lorca, Graciela L.; Barabote, Ravi D.; Zlotopolski, Vladimir; Tran, Can; Winnen, Brit; Hvorup, Rikki N.; Stonestrom, Aaron J.; Nguyen, Elizabeth; Huang, Li-Wen; Kim, David S.; Saier, Milton H.

    2007-01-01

    The genomes of eleven Gram-positive bacteria that are important for human health and the food industry, nine low G+C lactic acid bacteria and two high G+C Gram-positive organisms, were analyzed for their complement of genes encoding transport proteins. Thirteen to eighteen percent of their genes encode transport proteins, larger percentages than observed for most other bacteria. All of these bacteria possess channel proteins, some of which probably function to relieve osmotic stress. Amino acid uptake systems predominate over sugar and peptide cation symporters, and of the sugar uptake porters, those specific for oligosaccharides and glycosides often outnumber those for free sugars. About 10% of the total transport proteins are constituents of putative multidrug efflux pumps with Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS)-type pumps (55%) being more prevalent than ATP-binding cassette (ABC)-type pumps (33%), which, however, usually greatly outnumber all other types. An exception to this generalization is Streptococcus thermophilus with 54% of its drug efflux pumps belonging to the ABC superfamily and 23% belonging each to the Multidrug/Oligosaccharide/Polysaccharide (MOP) superfamily and the MFS. These bacteria also display peptide efflux pumps that may function in intercellular signalling, and macromolecular efflux pumps, many of predictable specificities. Most of the bacteria analyzed have no pmf-coupled or transmembrane flow electron carriers. The one exception is Brevibacterium linens, which in addition to these carriers, also has transporters of several families not represented in the other ten bacteria examined. Comparisons with the genomes of organisms from other bacterial kingdoms revealed that lactic acid bacteria possess distinctive proportions of recognized transporter types (e.g., more porters specific for glycosides than reducing sugars). Some homologues of transporters identified had previously been identified only in Gram-negative bacteria or in eukaryotes

  9. Decreased bacteria density on nanostructured polyurethane.

    PubMed

    Yao, Chang; Webster, Thomas J; Hedrick, Matthew

    2014-06-01

    As is well known, medical device infections are a growing clinical problem with no clear solution due to previous failed attempts of using antibiotics to decrease bacteria functions for which bacteria quickly develop a resistance toward. Because of their altered surface energetics, the objective of the present in vitro study was to create nanoscale surface features on polyurethane (PU) by soaking PU films in HNO3 and to determine bacteria (specifically, S. epidermidis, E. coli, and P. mirabilis) colony forming units after 1 h. Such bacteria frequently infect numerous medical devices. Results provided the first evidence that without using antibiotics, S. epidermidis density decreased by 5 and 13 times, E. coli density decreased by 6 and 20 times, and P. mirabilis density decreased by 8 and 35 times compared to conventional PU and a tissue engineering control small intestine submucosa (SIS), respectively. Material characterization studies revealed significantly greater nanoscale roughness and hydrophobicity for the HNO3-treated nanostructured PU compared to conventional PU (albeit, still hydrophilic) which may provide a rationale for the observed decreased bacteria responses. In addition, significantly greater amounts of fibronectin adsorption from serum were measured on nanorough compared conventional PU which may explain the decreased bacteria growth. In summary, this study provides significant promise for the use of nanostructured PU to decrease bacteria functions without the use of antibiotics, clearly addressing the wide spread problem of increased medical device infections observed today.

  10. In Vivo Bioluminescence Imaging of Intratumoral Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Cronin, Michelle; Akin, Ali R; Francis, Kevin P; Tangney, Mark

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes the use of whole-body bioluminescent imaging (BLI) for the study of bacterial trafficking in live mice, with an emphasis on the use of bacteria in therapy of cancer. Bacteria present an attractive class of vector for cancer therapy, possessing a natural ability to grow preferentially within tumors following systemic administration. Bacteria engineered to express the lux gene cassette permit BLI detection of the bacteria and tumor sites concurrently. The location and levels of bacteria within tumors over time can be readily examined, visualized in two or three dimensions. The method is applicable to a wide range of bacterial species and tumor xenograft types. This article describes the protocol for analysis of bioluminescent bacteria within subcutaneous tumor-bearing mice. This powerful, and inexpensive, real-time imaging strategy represents an ideal method for the study of bacteria in vivo in the context of cancer research. This protocol outlines the procedure for studying lux-tagged Escherichia coli and Bifidobacterium breve in mice, demonstrating the spatial and temporal readout from 2D and 3D BLI achievable with whole-body in vivo luminescence imaging.

  11. Suppression of resistance to flow in suspensions of bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Hector; Gachelin, Jérémie; Douarche, Carine; Clément, Eric; Auradou, Harold

    2014-11-01

    It is usually believed that the influence of small amounts of bacteria on the rheological properties of a fluid is negligible. However, recent theoretical studies predict that the activity results in a decrease of the viscosity at values lower than the suspending fluid viscosity. We present experimental measurements of the viscosity of suspensions of Escherichia coli (volume fractions ϕ<1%) in a simple Couette flow over a broad range of shear rates. For shear rates larger than 1.5 s-1, the viscosity is constant and slightly above the viscosity of the suspending fluid. This behavior is similar to the one expected for non-active particles. For lower shear rates the fluid exhibits a non-Newtonian behavior: the viscosity decreases and finally reaches a second Newtonian plateau for shear rates below 0.1 s-1. For ϕ <0.6%, the decrease is proportional to the bacteria concentration, as predicted by the theories, suggesting that it is a result of the energy input of each individual microswimmer. For ϕ >0.6%, we evidence for the first time the existence of a super-lubrication regime where the viscous resistance to shear vanishes. We will demonstrate that this regime holds up over a large window of concentration.

  12. R-body-producing bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Pond, F R; Gibson, I; Lalucat, J; Quackenbush, R L

    1989-01-01

    Until 10 years ago, R bodies were known only as diagnostic features by which endosymbionts of paramecia were identified as kappa particles. They were thought to be limited to the cytoplasm of two species in the Paramecium aurelia species complex. Now, R bodies have been found in free-living bacteria and other Paramecium species. The organisms now known to form R bodies include the cytoplasmic kappa endosymbionts of P. biaurelia and P. tetraurelia, the macronuclear kappa endosymbionts of P. caudatum, Pseudomonas avenae (a free-living plant pathogen), Pseudomonas taeniospiralis (a hydrogen-oxidizing soil microorganism), Rhodospirillum centenum (a photosynthetic bacterium), and a soil bacterium, EPS-5028, which is probably a pseudomonad. R bodies themselves fall into five distinct groups, distinguished by size, the morphology of the R-body ribbons, and the unrolling behavior of wound R bodies. In recent years, the inherent difficulties in studying the organization and assembly of R bodies by the obligate endosymbiont kappa, have been alleviated by cloning and expressing genetic determinants for these R bodies (type 51) in Escherichia coli. Type 51 R-body synthesis requires three low-molecular-mass polypeptides. One of these is modified posttranslationally, giving rise to 12 polypeptide species, which are the major structural subunits of the R body. R bodies are encoded in kappa species by extrachromosomal elements. Type 51 R bodies, produced in Caedibacter taeniospiralis, are encoded by a plasmid, whereas bacteriophage genomes probably control R-body synthesis in other kappa species. However, there is no evidence that either bacteriophages or plasmids are present in P. avenae or P. taeniospiralis. No sequence homology was detected between type 51 R-body-encoding DNA and DNA from any R-body-producing species, except C. varicaedens 1038. The evolutionary relatedness of different types of R bodies remains unknown. Images PMID:2651865

  13. Magnetotactic Bacteria from Extreme Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Lefère, Christopher T.

    2013-03-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) represent a diverse collection of motile prokaryotes that biomineralize intracellular, membrane-bounded, tens-of-nanometer-sized crystals of a magnetic mineral called magnetosomes. Magnetosome minerals consist of either magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4) and cause cells to align along the Earth's geomagnetic field lines as they swim, a trait called magnetotaxis. MTB are known to mainly inhabit the oxic-anoxic interface (OAI) in water columns or sediments of aquatic habitats and it is currently thought that magnetosomes function as a means of making chemotaxis more efficient in locating and maintaining an optimal position for growth and survival at the OAI. Known cultured and uncultured MTB are phylogenetically associated with the Alpha-, Gamma- and Deltaproteobacteria classes of the phylum Proteobacteria, the Nitrospirae phylum and the candidate division OP3, part of the Planctomycetes-Verrucomicrobia-Chlamydiae (PVC) bacterial superphylum. MTB are generally thought to be ubiquitous in aquatic environments as they are cosmopolitan in distribution and have been found in every continent although for years MTB were thought to be restricted to habitats with pH values near neutral and at ambient temperature. Recently, however, moderate thermophilic and alkaliphilic MTB have been described including: an uncultured, moderately thermophilic magnetotactic bacterium present in hot springs in northern Nevada with a probable upper growth limit of about 63 °C; and several strains of obligately alkaliphilic MTB isolated in pure culture from different aquatic habitats in California, including the hypersaline, extremely alkaline Mono Lake, with an optimal growth pH of >9.0.

  14. Viewing marine bacteria, their activity and response to environmental drivers from orbit: satellite remote sensing of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Grimes, D Jay; Ford, Tim E; Colwell, Rita R; Baker-Austin, Craig; Martinez-Urtaza, Jaime; Subramaniam, Ajit; Capone, Douglas G

    2014-04-01

    Satellite-based remote sensing of marine microorganisms has become a useful tool in predicting human health risks associated with these microscopic targets. Early applications were focused on harmful algal blooms, but more recently methods have been developed to interrogate the ocean for bacteria. As satellite-based sensors have become more sophisticated and our ability to interpret information derived from these sensors has advanced, we have progressed from merely making fascinating pictures from space to developing process models with predictive capability. Our understanding of the role of marine microorganisms in primary production and global elemental cycles has been vastly improved as has our ability to use the combination of remote sensing data and models to provide early warning systems for disease outbreaks. This manuscript will discuss current approaches to monitoring cyanobacteria and vibrios, their activity and response to environmental drivers, and will also suggest future directions.

  15. The passage of bacteria through surgical drapes.

    PubMed Central

    Blom, A.; Estela, C.; Bowker, K.; MacGowan, A.; Hardy, J. R.

    2000-01-01

    The passage of bacteria through surgical drapes is a potential cause of wound infection. Previous studies have shown that liquids and human albumin penetrate certain types of drapes. We studied the passage of bacteria through seven different types of surgical drape and an operating tray. Bacteria easily penetrated all the woven re-usable fabrics within 30 min. The disposable non-woven drapes proved to be impermeable, as did the operating tray. We recommend the use of non-woven disposable drapes or woven drapes with an impermeable operating tray in all surgical cases. PMID:11103158

  16. Threats and opportunities of plant pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tarkowski, Petr; Vereecke, Danny

    2014-01-01

    Plant pathogenic bacteria can have devastating effects on plant productivity and yield. Nevertheless, because these often soil-dwelling bacteria have evolved to interact with eukaryotes, they generally exhibit a strong adaptivity, a versatile metabolism, and ingenious mechanisms tailored to modify the development of their hosts. Consequently, besides being a threat for agricultural practices, phytopathogens may also represent opportunities for plant production or be useful for specific biotechnological applications. Here, we illustrate this idea by reviewing the pathogenic strategies and the (potential) uses of five very different (hemi)biotrophic plant pathogenic bacteria: Agrobacterium tumefaciens, A. rhizogenes, Rhodococcus fascians, scab-inducing Streptomyces spp., and Pseudomonas syringae.

  17. Windshear Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Windshear microbursts and extreme air turbulence caused by sudden intense changes in wind direction or speed are difficult to detect and thus dangerous to air traffic. They have been positively identified as the cause of 28 aviation accidents that claimed 491 lives. Many groups are investigating ways to detect and predict windshear. The Federal Aviation Consulting Services, Ltd. (FACS) is applying artificial intelligence to windshear prediction. FACS' artificial intelligence based airline dispatcher program is intended as a backup not a replacement for human dispatcher. It would incorporate the same data that a human would request to make a decision and then draw a conclusion using the same rules of logic as the human expert.

  18. [Significance of bacteria detection with filter paper method on diagnosis of diabetic foot wound infection].

    PubMed

    Zou, X H; Zhu, Y P; Ren, G Q; Li, G C; Zhang, J; Zou, L J; Feng, Z B; Li, B H

    2017-02-20

    Objective: To evaluate the significance of bacteria detection with filter paper method on diagnosis of diabetic foot wound infection. Methods: Eighteen patients with diabetic foot ulcer conforming to the study criteria were hospitalized in Liyuan Hospital Affiliated to Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology from July 2014 to July 2015. Diabetic foot ulcer wounds were classified according to the University of Texas diabetic foot classification (hereinafter referred to as Texas grade) system, and general condition of patients with wounds in different Texas grade was compared. Exudate and tissue of wounds were obtained, and filter paper method and biopsy method were adopted to detect the bacteria of wounds of patients respectively. Filter paper method was regarded as the evaluation method, and biopsy method was regarded as the control method. The relevance, difference, and consistency of the detection results of two methods were tested. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of filter paper method in bacteria detection were calculated. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was drawn based on the specificity and sensitivity of filter paper method in bacteria detection of 18 patients to predict the detection effect of the method. Data were processed with one-way analysis of variance and Fisher's exact test. In patients tested positive for bacteria by biopsy method, the correlation between bacteria number detected by biopsy method and that by filter paper method was analyzed with Pearson correlation analysis. Results: (1) There were no statistically significant differences among patients with wounds in Texas grade 1, 2, and 3 in age, duration of diabetes, duration of wound, wound area, ankle brachial index, glycosylated hemoglobin, fasting blood sugar, blood platelet count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, aspartate aminotransferase, serum creatinine, and

  19. Substratum interfacial energetic effects on the attachment of marine bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ista, Linnea Kathryn

    attachment of bacteria to a substratum. We use VCG to model DeltaGadh and interfacial tensions as they relate to model bacterial attachment on SAMs that accumulate cells to different degrees. Even with the more complex interactions measured by VCG, surface energy of the attachment substratum alone was insufficient to predict attachment. VCG was then employed to model attachment of C. marina to a series of SAMs varying systematically in the number of ethylene glycol residues present in the molecule; an identical series has been previously shown to vary dramatically in the number of cells attached as a function of ethylene glycols present. Our results indicate that while VCG adequately models the interfacial tension between water and ethylene glycol SAMs in a manner that predicts bacterial attachment, DeltaGadh as calculated by VCG neither qualitatively nor quantitatively reflects the attachment data. The VCG model, thus, fails to capture specific information regarding the interactions between the attaching bacteria, water, and the SAM. We show that while hydrogen-bond accepting interactions are very well captured by this model, the ability for SAMs and bacteria to donate hydrogen bonds is not adequately described as the VCG model is currently applied. We also describe ways in which VCG fails to capture two specific biological aspects that may be important in bacterial attachment to surfaces:1.) specific interactions between molecules on the surface and bacteria and 2.) bacterial cell surface heterogeneities that may be important in differential attachment to different substrata.

  20. A single-cell sequencing approach to the classification of large, vacuolated sulfur bacteria.

    PubMed

    Salman, Verena; Amann, Rudolf; Girnth, Anne-Christin; Polerecky, Lubos; Bailey, Jake V; Høgslund, Signe; Jessen, Gerdhard; Pantoja, Silvio; Schulz-Vogt, Heide N

    2011-06-01

    The colorless, large sulfur bacteria are well known because of their intriguing appearance, size and abundance in sulfidic settings. Since their discovery in 1803 these bacteria have been classified according to their conspicuous morphology. However, in microbiology the use of morphological criteria alone to predict phylogenetic relatedness has frequently proven to be misleading. Recent sequencing of a number of 16S rRNA genes of large sulfur bacteria revealed frequent inconsistencies between the morphologically determined taxonomy of genera and the genetically derived classification. Nevertheless, newly described bacteria were classified based on their morphological properties, leading to polyphyletic taxa. We performed sequencing of 16S rRNA genes and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions, together with detailed morphological analysis of hand-picked individuals of novel non-filamentous as well as known filamentous large sulfur bacteria, including the hitherto only partially sequenced species Thiomargarita namibiensis, Thioploca araucae and Thioploca chileae. Based on 128 nearly full-length 16S rRNA-ITS sequences, we propose the retention of the family Beggiatoaceae for the genera closely related to Beggiatoa, as opposed to the recently suggested fusion of all colorless sulfur bacteria into one family, the Thiotrichaceae. Furthermore, we propose the addition of nine Candidatus species along with seven new Candidatus genera to the family Beggiatoaceae. The extended family Beggiatoaceae thus remains monophyletic and is phylogenetically clearly separated from other related families.

  1. Bacteria Are Omnipresent on Phanerochaete chrysosporium Burdsall

    PubMed Central

    Seigle-Murandi, F.; Guiraud, P.; Croize, J.; Falsen, E.; Eriksson, K. L.

    1996-01-01

    Bacteria have been isolated from 10 different strains of Phanerochaete chrysosporium, a white rot fungus which degrades lignocellulosic materials. The investigations showed that one or more bacterial species were always associated with the fungus. Various attempts to eliminate the bacteria on the fungus were unsuccessful. Three different bacterial species were isolated and identified. One of these was Agrobacterium radiobacter, while another may represent a new taxon close to the genus Burkholderia. A third strain remains unidentified but is most probably a member of rRNA superfamily IV or the Woese (alpha) group. Besides P. chrysosporium, 23 other white rot fungi and 9 brown rot fungi were also investigated. None of these was associated with bacteria. The physiological significance of the association between the fungus and the bacteria remains to be elucidated. PMID:16535357

  2. Isolation and characterization of fenamiphos degrading bacteria.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, J Alfonso; Kurtz, Andreas; Sikora, Richard A; Schouten, Alexander

    2010-11-01

    The biological factors responsible for the microbial breakdown of the organophosphorus nematicide fenamiphos were investigated. Microorganisms responsible for the enhanced degradation of fenamiphos were isolated from soil that had a long application history of this nematicide. Bacteria proved to be the most important group of microbes responsible for the fenamiphos biodegradation process. Seventeen bacterial isolates utilized the pure active ingredient fenamiphos as a carbon source. Sixteen isolates rapidly degraded the active ingredient in Nemacur 5GR. Most of the fenamiphos degrading bacteria were Microbacterium species, although Sinorhizobium, Brevundimonas, Ralstonia and Cupriavidus were also identified. This array of gram positive and gram negative fenamiphos degrading bacteria appeared to be pesticide-specific, since cross-degradation toward fosthiazate, another organophosphorus pesticide used for nematode control, did not occur. It was established that the phylogenetical relationship among nematicide degrading bacteria is closer than that to non-degrading isolates.

  3. Physiological assessment of bacteria using fluorochromes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFeters, G. A.; Yu, F. P.; Pyle, B. H.; Stewart, P. S.

    1995-01-01

    This minireview focuses on the application of fluorogenic compounds in the detection of bacteria with particular emphasis on the assessment of physiological activity using epifluorescence microscopy. Microbiological applications of several related methods will also be reviewed.

  4. Protection of probiotic bacteria in synbiotic matrices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Probiotics, like Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus reuteri, Bifidobacterium breve, Bifidobacterium longum, when encapsulated with prebiotic fibers such as fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS), inulin (I) and pectic-oligosaccharides (POS), formed a synbiotic matrix system that protected the bacteria ...

  5. Comparative genomics of the lactic acid bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Makarova, K.; Slesarev, A.; Wolf, Y.; Sorokin, A.; Mirkin, B.; Koonin, E.; Pavlov, A.; Pavlova, N.; Karamychev, V.; Polouchine, N.; Shakhova, V.; Grigoriev, I.; Lou, Y.; Rokhsar, D.; Lucas, S.; Huang, K.; Goodstein, D. M.; Hawkins, T.; Plengvidhya, V.; Welker, D.; Hughes, J.; Goh, Y.; Benson, A.; Baldwin, K.; Lee, J. -H.; Diaz-Muniz, I.; Dosti, B.; Smeianov, V; Wechter, W.; Barabote, R.; Lorca, G.; Altermann, E.; Barrangou, R.; Ganesan, B.; Xie, Y.; Rawsthorne, H.; Tamir, D.; Parker, C.; Breidt, F.; Broadbent, J.; Hutkins, R.; O'Sullivan, D.; Steele, J.; Unlu, G.; Saier, M.; Klaenhammer, T.; Richardson, P.; Kozyavkin, S.; Weimer, B.; Mills, D.

    2006-06-01

    Lactic acid-producing bacteria are associated with various plant and animal niches and play a key role in the production of fermented foods and beverages. We report nine genome sequences representing the phylogenetic and functional diversity of these bacteria. The small genomes of lactic acid bacteria encode a broad repertoire of transporters for efficient carbon and nitrogen acquisition from the nutritionally rich environments they inhabit and reflect a limited range of biosynthetic capabilities that indicate both prototrophic and auxotrophic strains. Phylogenetic analyses, comparison of gene content across the group, and reconstruction of ancestral gene sets indicate a combination of extensive gene loss and key gene acquisitions via horizontal gene transfer during the coevolution of lactic acid bacteria with their habitats.

  6. Ecology: Electrical Cable Bacteria Save Marine Life.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2016-01-11

    Animals at the bottom of the sea survive oxygen depletion surprisingly often, and a new study identifies cable bacteria in the sediment as the saviors. The bacterial electrical activity creates an iron 'carpet', trapping toxic hydrogen sulfide.

  7. Methods for dispersing hydrocarbons using autoclaved bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Tyndall, R.L.

    1996-11-26

    A method of dispersing a hydrocarbon includes the following steps: providing a bacterium selected from the following group: ATCC 85527, ATCC 75529, and ATCC 55638, a mutant of any one of these bacteria possessing all the identifying characteristics of any one of these bacteria, and mixtures; autoclaving the bacterium to derive a dispersant solution; and contacting the dispersant solution with a hydrocarbon to disperse the hydrocarbon. Moreover, a method for preparing a dispersant solution includes the following steps: providing a bacterium selected from the following group: ATCC 75527, ATCC 75529, and ATCC 55638, a mutant of any one of these bacteria possessing all the identifying characteristics of any one of these bacteria, and mixtures; and autoclaving the bacterium to derive a dispersant solution.

  8. Methods for dispersing hydrocarbons using autoclaved bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Tyndall, Richard L.

    1996-01-01

    A method of dispersing a hydrocarbon includes the steps: providing a bacterium selected from the following group: ATCC 85527, ATCC 75529, and ATCC 55638, a mutant of any one of these bacteria possessing all the identifying characteristics of any one of these bacteria, and mixtures thereof; autoclaving the bacterium to derive a dispersant solution therefrom; and contacting the dispersant solution with a hydrocarbon to disperse the hydrocarbon. Moreover, a method for preparing a dispersant solution includes the following steps: providing a bacterium selected from the following group: ATCC 75527, ATCC 75529, and ATCC 55638, a mutant of any one of these bacteria possessing all the identifying characteristics of any one of these bacteria, and mixtures thereof; and autoclaving the bacterium to derive a dispersant solution therefrom.

  9. Distribution of phytopathogenic bacteria in infested seeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Populations of phytopathogenic bacteria representing five host-pathogen combinations were assessed to determine if there was a mathematical relationship common across seedborne bacterial diseases. Bacterial populations were estimated from naturally-infested seeds of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), peppe...

  10. Adhesion and biofilm formation on polystyrene by drinking water-isolated bacteria.

    PubMed

    Simões, Lúcia Chaves; Simões, Manuel; Vieira, Maria João

    2010-10-01

    This study was performed in order to characterize the relationship between adhesion and biofilm formation abilities of drinking water-isolated bacteria (Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Burkholderia cepacia, Methylobacterium sp., Mycobacterium mucogenicum, Sphingomonas capsulata and Staphylococcus sp.). Adhesion was assessed by two distinct methods: thermodynamic prediction of adhesion potential by quantifying hydrophobicity and the free energy of adhesion; and by microtiter plate assays. Biofilms were developed in microtiter plates for 24, 48 and 72 h. Polystyrene (PS) was used as adhesion substratum. The tested bacteria had negative surface charge and were hydrophilic. PS had negative surface charge and was hydrophobic. The free energy of adhesion between the bacteria and PS was > 0 mJ/m(2) (thermodynamic unfavorable adhesion). The thermodynamic approach was inappropriate for modelling adhesion of the tested drinking water bacteria, underestimating adhesion to PS. Only three (B. cepacia, Sph. capsulata and Staphylococcus sp.) of the six bacteria were non-adherent to PS. A. calcoaceticus, Methylobacterium sp. and M. mucogenicum were weakly adherent. This adhesion ability was correlated with the biofilm formation ability when comparing with the results of 24 h aged biofilms. Methylobacterium sp. and M. mucogenicum formed large biofilm amounts, regardless the biofilm age. Given time, all the bacteria formed biofilms; even those non-adherents produced large amounts of matured (72 h aged) biofilms. The overall results indicate that initial adhesion did not predict the ability of the tested drinking water-isolated bacteria to form a mature biofilm, suggesting that other events such as phenotypic and genetic switching during biofilm development and the production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), may play a significant role on biofilm formation and differentiation. This understanding of the relationship between adhesion and biofilm formation is important for

  11. [Teichoic acids from lactic acid bacteria].

    PubMed

    Livins'ka, O P; Harmasheva, I L; Kovalenko, N K

    2012-01-01

    The current view of the structural diversity of teichoic acids and their involvement in the biological activity of lactobacilli has been reviewed. The mechanisms of effects of probiotic lactic acid bacteria, in particular adhesive and immunostimulating functions have been described. The prospects of the use of structure data of teichoic acid in the assessment of intraspecific diversity of lactic acid bacteria have been also reflected.

  12. Fuel from Bacteria: Bioconversion of Carbon Dioxide to Biofuels by Facultatively Autotrophic Hydrogen Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    2010-07-01

    Electrofuels Project: Ohio State is genetically modifying bacteria to efficiently convert carbon dioxide directly into butanol, an alcohol that can be used directly as a fuel blend or converted to a hydrocarbon, which closely resembles a gasoline. Bacteria are typically capable of producing a certain amount of butanol before it becomes too toxic for the bacteria to survive. Ohio State is engineering a new strain of the bacteria that could produce up to 50% more butanol before it becomes too toxic for the bacteria to survive. Finding a way to produce more butanol more efficiently would significantly cut down on biofuel production costs and help make butanol cost competitive with gasoline. Ohio State is also engineering large tanks, or bioreactors, to grow the biofuel-producing bacteria in, and they are developing ways to efficiently recover biofuel from the tanks.

  13. How methylglyoxal kills bacteria: An ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Rabie, Erika; Serem, June Cheptoo; Oberholzer, Hester Magdalena; Gaspar, Anabella Regina Marques; Bester, Megan Jean

    2016-01-01

    Antibacterial activity of honey is due to the presence of methylglyoxal (MGO), H2O2, bee defensin as well as polyphenols. High MGO levels in manuka honey are the main source of antibacterial activity. Manuka honey has been reported to reduce the swarming and swimming motility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa due to de-flagellation. Due to the complexity of honey it is unknown if this effect is directly due to MGO. In this ultrastructural investigation the effects of MGO on the morphology of bacteria and specifically the structure of fimbriae and flagella were investigated. MGO effectively inhibited Gram positive (Bacillus subtilis; MIC 0.8 mM and Staphylococcus aureus; MIC 1.2 mM) and Gram negative (P. aeruginosa; MIC 1.0 mM and Escherichia coli; MIC 1.2 mM) bacteria growth. The ultrastructural effects of 0.5, 1.0 and 2 mM MGO on B. substilis and E. coli morphology was then evaluated. At 0.5 mM MGO, bacteria structure was unaltered. For both bacteria at 1 mM MGO fewer fimbriae were present and the flagella were less or absent. Identified structures appeared stunted and fragile. At 2 mM MGO fimbriae and flagella were absent while the bacteria were rounded with shrinkage and loss of membrane integrity. Antibacterial MGO causes alterations in the structure of bacterial fimbriae and flagella which would limit bacteria adherence and motility.

  14. The association between bacteria and urinary stones

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Alan J.

    2017-01-01

    Urinary stone disease (USD) is an increasing clinical problem in both children and adults. One in ten individuals will experience a urinary stone, yet the mechanisms responsible for urinary stones remain largely unknown. Bacteria have long been recognized to contribute to struvite urinary stones; however, the role of bacteria in the development of the more common calcium oxalate (CaOx) and calcium phosphate (CaPhos) stones has not been extensively investigated. However, several findings do indicate a possible association between urinary stones and bacteria, including the high rate of urinary tract infections (UTI) in urinary stone patients and multiple case series of culture-positive urinary stones, including stones composed of CaOx or CaPhos. New technology, such as next generation sequencing, may be used to lend additional insight regarding the association between urinary stones and bacteria. In 2015, we published the initial bacterial sequencing results from five urinary stones, from which we sequenced multiple types of bacterial DNA. Whether these bacteria are causal, disease modifying or passively present remains to be determined. However, initial exploration of underlying mechanisms for this association indicate that bacteria aggregate selectively to crystals, that their presence is associated with increased clumping of crystals, and that they stimulate incorporation of proteins into the stone matrix. PMID:28217697

  15. Tyramine and phenylethylamine biosynthesis by food bacteria.

    PubMed

    Marcobal, Angela; De las Rivas, Blanca; Landete, José María; Tabera, Laura; Muñoz, Rosario

    2012-01-01

    Tyramine poisoning is caused by the ingestion of food containing high levels of tyramine, a biogenic amine. Any foods containing free tyrosine are subject to tyramine formation if poor sanitation and low quality foods are used or if the food is subject to temperature abuse or extended storage time. Tyramine is generated by decarboxylation of the tyrosine through tyrosine decarboxylase (TDC) enzymes derived from the bacteria present in the food. Bacterial TDC have been only unequivocally identified and characterized in Gram-positive bacteria, especially in lactic acid bacteria. Pyridoxal phosphate (PLP)-dependent TDC encoding genes (tyrDC) appeared flanked by a similar genetic organization in several species of lactic acid bacteria, suggesting a common origin by a single mobile genetic element. Bacterial TDC are also able to decarboxylate phenylalanine to produce phenylethylamine (PEA), another biogenic amine. The molecular knowledge of the genes involved in tyramine production has led to the development of molecular methods for the detection of bacteria able to produce tyramine and PEA. These rapid and simple methods could be used for the analysis of the ability to form tyramine by bacteria in order to evaluate the potential risk of tyramine biosynthesis in food products.

  16. GIPSy: Genomic island prediction software.

    PubMed

    Soares, Siomar C; Geyik, Hakan; Ramos, Rommel T J; de Sá, Pablo H C G; Barbosa, Eudes G V; Baumbach, Jan; Figueiredo, Henrique C P; Miyoshi, Anderson; Tauch, Andreas; Silva, Artur; Azevedo, Vasco

    2016-08-20

    Bacteria are highly diverse organisms that are able to adapt to a broad range of environments and hosts due to their high genomic plasticity. Horizontal gene transfer plays a pivotal role in this genome plasticity and in evolution by leaps through the incorporation of large blocks of genome sequences, ordinarily known as genomic islands (GEIs). GEIs may harbor genes encoding virulence, metabolism, antibiotic resistance and symbiosis-related functions, namely pathogenicity islands (PAIs), metabolic islands (MIs), resistance islands (RIs) and symbiotic islands (SIs). Although many software for the prediction of GEIs exist, they only focus on PAI prediction and present other limitations, such as complicated installation and inconvenient user interfaces. Here, we present GIPSy, the genomic island prediction software, a standalone and user-friendly software for the prediction of GEIs, built on our previously developed pathogenicity island prediction software (PIPS). We also present four application cases in which we crosslink data from literature to PAIs, MIs, RIs and SIs predicted by GIPSy. Briefly, GIPSy correctly predicted the following previously described GEIs: 13 PAIs larger than 30kb in Escherichia coli CFT073; 1 MI for Burkholderia pseudomallei K96243, which seems to be a miscellaneous island; 1 RI of Acinetobacter baumannii AYE, named AbaR1; and, 1 SI of Mesorhizobium loti MAFF303099 presenting a mosaic structure. GIPSy is the first life-style-specific genomic island prediction software to perform analyses of PAIs, MIs, RIs and SIs, opening a door for a better understanding of bacterial genome plasticity and the adaptation to new traits.

  17. Discovery of a new family of relaxases in Firmicutes bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Praveen K.; Hao, Jian An; Luque-Ortega, Juan Roman; Wu, Ling J.; Boer, D. Roeland

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a serious global problem. Antibiotic resistance genes (ARG), which are widespread in environmental bacteria, can be transferred to pathogenic bacteria via horizontal gene transfer (HGT). Gut microbiomes are especially apt for the emergence and dissemination of ARG. Conjugation is the HGT route that is predominantly responsible for the spread of ARG. Little is known about conjugative elements of Gram-positive bacteria, including those of the phylum Firmicutes, which are abundantly present in gut microbiomes. A critical step in the conjugation process is the relaxase-mediated site- and strand-specific nick in the oriT region of the conjugative element. This generates a single-stranded DNA molecule that is transferred from the donor to the recipient cell via a connecting channel. Here we identified and characterized the relaxosome components oriT and the relaxase of the conjugative plasmid pLS20 of the Firmicute Bacillus subtilis. We show that the relaxase gene, named relLS20, is essential for conjugation, that it can function in trans and provide evidence that Tyr26 constitutes the active site residue. In vivo and in vitro analyses revealed that the oriT is located far upstream of the relaxase gene and that the nick site within oriT is located on the template strand of the conjugation genes. Surprisingly, the RelLS20 shows very limited similarity to known relaxases. However, more than 800 genes to which no function had been attributed so far are predicted to encode proteins showing significant similarity to RelLS20. Interestingly, these putative relaxases are encoded almost exclusively in Firmicutes bacteria. Thus, RelLS20 constitutes the prototype of a new family of relaxases. The identification of this novel relaxase family will have an important impact in different aspects of future research in the field of HGT in Gram-positive bacteria in general, and specifically in the phylum of Firmicutes, and in gut microbiome research. PMID:28207825

  18. Bacteria associated with deep, alkaline, anaerobic groundwaters in Southeast Washington.

    PubMed

    Stevens, T O; McKinley, J P; Fredrickson, J K

    1993-01-01

    The microbial diversity in two deep, confined aquifers, the Grande Ronde (1270 m) and the Priest Rapids (316 m), Hanford Reservation, Washington, USA, was investigated by sampling from artesian wells. These basaltic aquifers were alkaline (pH 8.5 to 10.5) and anaerobic (Eh -200 to -450 mV). The wells were allowed to free-flow until pH and Eh stabilized, then the microflora was sampled with water filtration and flow-through sandtrap methods. Direct microscopic counts showed 7.6 × 10(5) and 3.6 × 10(3) bacteria ml(-1) in water from the Grande Ronde and Priest Rapids aquifers, respectively. The sand filter method yielded 5.7 × 10(8) and 1.1 × 10(5) cells g(-1) wet weight of sand. The numbers of bacteria did not decrease as increasing volumes of water were flushed out. The heterotrophic diversity of these bacterial populations was assessed using enrichments for 20 functional groups. These groups were defined by their ability to grow in a matrix of five different electron acceptors (O2, Fe(III), NO3 (-), SO4 (2-), HCO3 (-)) and four groups of electron donors (fermentation products, monomers, polymers, aromatics) in a mineral salts medium at pH 9.5. Growth was assessed by protein production. Culture media were subsequently analyzed to determine substrate utilization patterns. Substrate utilization patterns proved to be more reliable indicators of the presence of a particular physiological group than was protein production. The sand-trap method obtained a greater diversity of bacteria than did water filtration, presumably by enriching the proportion of normally sessile bacteria relative to planktonic bacteria. Substrate utilization patterns were different for microflora from the two aquifers and corresponded to their different geochemistries. Activities in the filtered water enrichments more closely matched those predicted by aquifer geochemistry than did the sand-trap enrichments. The greatest activities were found in Fe(III)-reducing enrichments from both wells, SO4

  19. Patterned and Specific Attachment of Bacteria on Biohybrid Bacteria-Driven Microswimmers.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ajay Vikram; Sitti, Metin

    2016-09-01

    A surface patterning technique and a specific and strong biotin-streptavidin bonding of bacteria on patterned surfaces are proposed to fabricate Janus particles that are propelled by the attached bacteria. Bacteria-driven Janus microswimmers with diameters larger than 3 μm show enhanced mean propulsion speed. Such microswimmers could be used for future applications such as targeted drug delivery and environmental remediation.

  20. The first demonstration of the existence of reverse transcriptases in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Inouye, Masayori

    2017-01-15

    It has been long thought that reverse transcriptases are unique to the eukaryotes. However, through our research on a peculiar single stranded DNA called msDNA in Myxococcus xanthus, it was predicted that its synthesis requires reverse transcriptases. Subsequently, Lim and Maas as well as our group demonstrated the existence of reverse transcriptases for the production of msDNA. In this review, I describe how the discovery of msDNA led to the discovery of reverse transcriptases in bacteria and discuss the evolutionary significance of the discovery of revise transcriptases in bacteria.

  1. Horizontal DNA transfer from bacteria to eukaryotes and a lesson from experimental transfers.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Katsunori; Moriguchi, Kazuki; Yamamoto, Shinji

    2015-12-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is widespread among bacteria and plays a key role in genome dynamics. HGT is much less common in eukaryotes, but is being reported with increasing frequency in eukaryotes. The mechanism as to how eukaryotes acquired genes from distantly related organisms remains obscure yet. This paper cites examples of bacteria-derived genes found in eukaryotic organisms, and then describes experimental DNA transports to eukaryotes by bacterial type 4 secretion systems in optimized conditions. The mechanisms of the latter are efficient, quite reproducible in vitro and predictable, and thereby would provide insight into natural HGT and to the development of new research tools.

  2. Theoretical predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasseur, G.; Boville, B. A.; Bruhl, C.; Caldwell, M.; Connell, Peter S.; Derudder, A.; Douglas, A.; Dyominov, I.; Fisher, D.; Frederick, J. F.

    1990-01-01

    In order to understand the impact of man made chemicals on the atmospheric ozone layer, it is essential to develop models that can perform long term predictions of future ozone changes. An advantage of using two dimensional models is that they can be used to predict latitudinal and seasonal changes in ozone. The formulation and recent improvements are described in 2-D models, which are used herein, along with the three dimensional models that are currently being developed to better simulate transport of chemically active trace gases, especially in polar regions. The range in 2-D model calculations is described. Selected fields calculated by these models are compared with observations. A number of scenarios have been defined, which encompass possible emission rates of different halocarbons. Because of the large uncertainties in the rates for heterogeneous processes, the calculated responses of the models include only the effects of homogeneous chemistry. One important distinction among the models is their ability to account for temperature feedbacks on the calculated ozone changes.

  3. Predicting fertility.

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Abha; Bhattacharya, Siladitya; Johnson, Neil P

    2008-06-01

    Various predictors of fertility have been described, suggesting that none are ideal. The literature on tests of ovarian reserve is largely limited to women undergoing in vitro fertilization, and is reliant on the use of surrogate markers, such as cycle cancellation and number of oocytes retrieved, as reference standards. Currently available prediction models are far from ideal; most are applicable only to subfertile women seeking assisted reproduction, and lack external validation. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses of predictors of fertility are limited by their heterogeneity in terms of the population sampled, predictors tested and reference standards used. There is an urgent need for consensus in the design of these studies, definition of abnormal tests, and, above all, a need to use robust outcomes such as live birth as the reference standard. There are no reliable predictors of fertility that can guide women as to how long childbearing can be deferred.

  4. Role of rhomboid proteases in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Rather, Philip

    2013-12-01

    The first member of the rhomboid family of intramembrane serine proteases in bacteria was discovered almost 20years ago. It is now known that rhomboid proteins are widely distributed in bacteria, with some bacteria containing multiple rhomboids. At the present time, only a single rhomboid-dependent function in bacteria has been identified, which is the cleavage of TatA in Providencia stuartii. Mutational analysis has shown that loss of the GlpG rhomboid in Escherichia coli alters cefotaxime resistance, loss of the YqgP (GluP) rhomboid in Bacillus subtilis alters cell division and glucose uptake, and loss of the MSMEG_5036 and MSMEG_4904 genes in Mycobacterium smegmatis results in altered colony morphology, biofilm formation and antibiotic susceptibilities. However, the cellular substrates for these proteins have not been identified. In addition, analysis of the rhombosortases, together with their possible Gly-Gly CTERM substrates, may shed new light on the role of these proteases in bacteria. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Intramembrane Proteases.

  5. Modulation of immune homeostasis by commensal bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Ivaylo I; Littman, Dan R

    2011-02-01

    Intestinal bacteria form a resident community that has co-evolved with the mammalian host. In addition to playing important roles in digestion and harvesting energy, commensal bacteria are crucial for the proper functioning of mucosal immune defenses. Most of these functions have been attributed to the presence of large numbers of 'innocuous' resident bacteria that dilute or occupy niches for intestinal pathogens or induce innate immune responses that sequester bacteria in the lumen, thus quenching excessive activation of the mucosal immune system. However it has recently become obvious that commensal bacteria are not simply beneficial bystanders, but are important modulators of intestinal immune homeostasis and that the composition of the microbiota is a major factor in pre-determining the type and robustness of mucosal immune responses. Here we review specific examples of individual members of the microbiota that modify innate and adaptive immune responses, and we focus on potential mechanisms by which such species-specific signals are generated and transmitted to the host immune system.

  6. Surface plasmon resonance immunosensor for bacteria detection.

    PubMed

    Baccar, H; Mejri, M B; Hafaiedh, I; Ktari, T; Aouni, M; Abdelghani, A

    2010-07-15

    This work describes an approach for the development of two bacteria biosensors based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique. The first biosensor was based on functionalized gold substrate and the second one on immobilized gold nanoparticles. For the first biosensor, the gold substrate was functionalized with acid-thiol using the self-assembled monolayer technique, while the second one was functionalized with gold nanoparticles immobilized on modified gold substrate. A polyclonal anti-Escherichia coli antibody was immobilized for specific (E. coli) and non-specific (Lactobacillus) bacteria detection. Detection limit with a good reproducibility of 10(4) and 10(3) cfu mL(-1) of E. coli bacteria has been obtained for the first biosensor and for the second one respectively. A refractive index variation below 5x10(-3) due to bacteria adsorption is able to be detected. The refractive index of the multilayer structure and of the E. coli bacteria layer was estimated with a modeling software.

  7. Chemotactic selection of pollutant degrading soil bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Hazen, Terry C.

    1994-01-01

    A method for identifying soil microbial strains which may be bacterial degraders of pollutants comprising the steps of placing a concentration of a pollutant in a substantially closed container, placing the container in a sample of soil for a period of time ranging from one minute to several hours, retrieving the container, collecting the contents of the container, and microscopically determining the identity of the bacteria present. Different concentrations of the pollutant can be used to determine which bacteria respond to each concentration. The method can be used for characterizing a polluted site or for looking for naturally occurring biological degraders of the pollutant. Then bacteria identified as degraders of the pollutant and as chemotactically attracted to the pollutant are used to inoculate contaminated soil. To enhance the effect of the bacteria on the pollutant, nutrients are cyclicly provided to the bacteria then withheld to alternately build up the size of the bacterial colony or community and then allow it to degrade the pollutant.

  8. Single bacteria identification by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Strola, Samy Andrea; Baritaux, Jean-Charles; Schultz, Emmanuelle; Simon, Anne Catherine; Allier, Cédric; Espagnon, Isabelle; Jary, Dorothée; Dinten, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    We report on rapid identification of single bacteria using a low-cost, compact, Raman spectroscope. We demonstrate that a 60-s procedure is sufficient to acquire a comprehensive Raman spectrum in the range of 600 to 3300 cm⁻¹. This time includes localization of small bacteria aggregates, alignment on a single individual, and spontaneous Raman scattering signal collection. Fast localization of small bacteria aggregates, typically composed of less than a dozen individuals, is achieved by lensfree imaging over a large field of view of 24 mm². The lensfree image also allows precise alignment of a single bacteria with the probing beam without the need for a standard microscope. Raman scattered light from a 34-mW continuous laser at 532 nm was fed to a customized spectrometer (prototype Tornado Spectral Systems). Owing to the high light throughput of this spectrometer, integration times as low as 10 s were found acceptable. We have recorded a total of 1200 spectra over seven bacterial species. Using this database and an optimized preprocessing, classification rates of ~90% were obtained. The speed and sensitivity of our Raman spectrometer pave the way for high-throughput and nondestructive real-time bacteria identification assays. This compact and low-cost technology can benefit biomedical, clinical diagnostic, and environmental applications.

  9. Single bacteria identification by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strola, Samy Andrea; Baritaux, Jean-Charles; Schultz, Emmanuelle; Simon, Anne Catherine; Allier, Cédric; Espagnon, Isabelle; Jary, Dorothée; Dinten, Jean-Marc

    2014-11-01

    We report on rapid identification of single bacteria using a low-cost, compact, Raman spectroscope. We demonstrate that a 60-s procedure is sufficient to acquire a comprehensive Raman spectrum in the range of 600 to 3300. This time includes localization of small bacteria aggregates, alignment on a single individual, and spontaneous Raman scattering signal collection. Fast localization of small bacteria aggregates, typically composed of less than a dozen individuals, is achieved by lensfree imaging over a large field of view of 24. The lensfree image also allows precise alignment of a single bacteria with the probing beam without the need for a standard microscope. Raman scattered light from a 34-mW continuous laser at 532 nm was fed to a customized spectrometer (prototype Tornado Spectral Systems). Owing to the high light throughput of this spectrometer, integration times as low as 10 s were found acceptable. We have recorded a total of 1200 spectra over seven bacterial species. Using this database and an optimized preprocessing, classification rates of ˜90% were obtained. The speed and sensitivity of our Raman spectrometer pave the way for high-throughput and nondestructive real-time bacteria identification assays. This compact and low-cost technology can benefit biomedical, clinical diagnostic, and environmental applications.

  10. Method of Detecting Coliform Bacteria and Escherichia Coli Bacteria from Reflected Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, Robert (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of detecting coliform bacteria in water from reflected light and a method of detecting Eschericha Coli bacteria in water from reflected light, and also includes devices for the measurement, calculation and transmission of data relating to that method.

  11. [Role of lactic acid bacteria in the spread of antibiotic resistant bacteria among healthy persons].

    PubMed

    Zigangirova, N A; Tokarskaia, E A; Narodnitskiĭ, B S; Gintsburg, A L; Tugel'ian, V A

    2006-01-01

    The wide use of antibiotics in livestock raising has contributed to the selection and accumulation of representatives of commensal microflora, as well as pathogenic bacteria, colonizing livestock and poultry. For this reason the problem of the possible transfer of antibiotic-resistance genes along the chain from bacteria, autochthonous for agricultural animals, to bacteria used for the production of foodstuffs, which are incorporated into normal microflora and may thus participate in the exchange of these genes with bacteria, enteropathogenic for humans, is a highly important task of medical microbiology. The article deals with the review of experimental data, indicative the possibility of the appearance of antibiotic-resistant pathogenic bacteria due to the transfer of antibiotic-resistance genes via alimentary chains.

  12. Studies on ultrasmall bacteria in relation to the presence of bacteria in the stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshammari, Fawaz; Wainwright, Milton; Alabri, Khalid; Alharbi, Sulamain A.

    2011-04-01

    Recent studies confirm that bacteria exist in the stratosphere. It is generally assumed that these bacteria are exiting from Earth, although it is possible that some are incoming from space. Most stratospheric bacterial isolates belong to the spore-forming genus Bacillus, although non-spore formers have also been isolated. Theoretically, the smaller a bacterium is, the more likely it is to be carried from Earth to the stratosphere. Ultrasmall bacteria have been frequently isolated from Earth environments, but not yet from the stratosphere. This is an anomalous situation, since we would expect such small bacteria to be over represented in the stratosphere-microflora. Here, we show that ultrasmall bacteria are present in the environment on Earth (i.e. in seawater and rainwater) and discuss the paradox of why they have not been isolated from the stratosphere.

  13. Iterative Polyketide Biosynthesis by Modular Polyketide Synthases in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haotong; Du, Liangcheng

    2015-01-01

    Modular polyketide synthases (type I PKSs) in bacteria are responsible for synthesizing a significant percentage of bioactive natural products. This group of synthases has a characteristic modular organization, and each module within a PKS carries out one cycle of polyketide chain elongation; thus each module is “non-iterative” in function. It was possible to predict the basic structure of a polyketide product from the module organization of the PKSs, since there generally existed a co-linearity between the number of modules and the number of chain elongations. However, more and more bacterial modular PKSs fail to conform to the “canonical rules”, and a particularly noteworthy group of non-canonical PKSs is the bacterial iterative type I PKSs. This review covers recent examples of iteratively-used modular PKSs in bacteria. These non-canonical PKSs give rise to a large array of natural products with impressive structural diversity. The molecular mechanism behind the iterations is often unclear, presenting a new challenge to the rational engineering of these PKSs with the goal of generating new natural products. Structural elucidation of these synthase complexes and better understanding of potential PKS-PKS interactions as well as PKS-substrate recognition may provide new prospects and inspirations for the discovery and engineering of new bioactive polyketides. PMID:26549236

  14. Machine Reading for Extraction of Bacteria and Habitat Taxonomies

    PubMed Central

    Kordjamshidi, Parisa; Massa, Wouter; Provoost, Thomas; Moens, Marie-Francine

    2015-01-01

    There is a vast amount of scientific literature available from various resources such as the internet. Automating the extraction of knowledge from these resources is very helpful for biologists to easily access this information. This paper presents a system to extract the bacteria and their habitats, as well as the relations between them. We investigate to what extent current techniques are suited for this task and test a variety of models in this regard. We detect entities in a biological text and map the habitats into a given taxonomy. Our model uses a linear chain Conditional Random Field (CRF). For the prediction of relations between the entities, a model based on logistic regression is built. Designing a system upon these techniques, we explore several improvements for both the generation and selection of good candidates. One contribution to this lies in the extended exibility of our ontology mapper that uses an advanced boundary detection and assigns the taxonomy elements to the detected habitats. Furthermore, we discover value in the combination of several distinct candidate generation rules. Using these techniques, we show results that are significantly improving upon the state of art for the BioNLP Bacteria Biotopes task. PMID:27077141

  15. Equilibrium temperature in a clump of bacteria heated in fluid.

    PubMed Central

    Davey, K R

    1990-01-01

    A theoretical model was developed and used to estimate quantitatively the "worst case", i.e., the longest, time to reach equilibrium temperature in the center of a clump of bacteria heated in fluid. For clumps with 10 to 10(6) cells heated in vapor, such as dry and moist air, and liquid fluids such as purees and juices, predictions show that temperature equilibrium will occur with sterilization temperatures up to 130 degrees C in under 0.02 s. Model development highlighted that the controlling influence on time for heating up the clump is the surface convection thermal resistance and that the internal conduction resistance of the clump mass is negligible by comparison. The time for a clump to reach equilibrium sterilization temperature was therefore decreased with relative turbulence (velocity) of the heating fluid, such as occurs in many process operations. These results confirm widely held suppositions that the heat-up time of bacteria in vapor or liquid is not significant with usual sterilization times. PMID:2306095

  16. Bacteria in Ostreococcus tauri cultures – friends, foes or hitchhikers?

    PubMed Central

    Abby, Sophie S.; Touchon, Marie; De Jode, Aurelien; Grimsley, Nigel; Piganeau, Gwenael

    2014-01-01

    Marine phytoplankton produce half of the oxygen we breathe and their astounding diversity is just starting to be unraveled. Many microbial phytoplankton are thought to be phototrophic, depending solely on inorganic sources of carbon and minerals for growth rather than preying on other planktonic cells. However, there is increasing evidence that symbiotic associations, to a large extent with bacteria, are required for vitamin or nutrient uptake for many eukaryotic microalgae. Here, we use in silico approaches to look for putative symbiotic interactions by analysing the gene content of microbial communities associated with 13 different Ostreococcus tauri (Chlorophyta, Mamilleophyceae) cultures sampled from the Mediterranean Sea. While we find evidence for bacteria in all cultures, there is no ubiquitous bacterial group, and the most prevalent group, Flavobacteria, is present in 10 out of 13 cultures. Among seven of the microbiomes, we detected genes predicted to encode type 3 secretion systems (T3SS, in 6/7 microbiomes) and/or putative type 6 secretion systems (T6SS, in 4/7 microbiomes). Phylogenetic analyses show that the corresponding genes are closely related to genes of systems identified in bacterial-plant interactions, suggesting that these T3SS might be involved in cell-to-cell interactions with O. tauri. PMID:25426102

  17. Biogeography and habitat modelling of high-alpine bacteria.

    PubMed

    King, Andrew J; Freeman, Kristen R; McCormick, Katherine F; Lynch, Ryan C; Lozupone, Catherine; Knight, Rob; Schmidt, Steven K

    2010-08-10

    Soil microorganisms dominate terrestrial biogeochemical cycles; however, we know very little about their spatial distribution and how changes in the distributions of specific groups of microbes translate into landscape and global patterns of biogeochemical processes. In this paper, we use a nested sampling scheme at scales ranging from 2 to 2,000 m to show that bacteria have significant spatial autocorrelation in community composition up to a distance of 240 m, and that this pattern is driven by changes in the relative abundance of specific bacterial clades across the landscape. Analysis of clade habitat distribution models and spatial co-correlation maps identified soil pH, plant abundance and snow depth as major variables structuring bacterial communities across this landscape, and revealed an unexpected and important oligotrophic niche for the Rhodospirillales in soil. Furthermore, our global analysis of high-elevation soils from the Andes, Rockies, Himalayas and Alaskan range shows that habitat distribution models for bacteria have a strong predictive power across the entire globe.

  18. Revisiting the Cape Cod Bacteria Injection Experiment Using a Stochastic Modeling Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, R M; Welty, C; Harvey, R W

    2006-11-22

    Bromide and resting-cell bacteria tracer tests carried out in a sand and gravel aquifer at the USGS Cape Cod site in 1987 were reinterpreted using a three-dimensional stochastic approach and Lagrangian particle tracking numerical methods. Bacteria transport was strongly coupled to colloid filtration through functional dependence of local-scale colloid transport parameters on hydraulic conductivity and seepage velocity in a stochastic advection-dispersion/attachment-detachment model. Information on geostatistical characterization of the hydraulic conductivity (K) field from a nearby plot was utilized as input that was unavailable when the original analysis was carried out. A finite difference model for groundwater flow and a particle-tracking model of conservative solute transport was calibrated to the bromide-tracer breakthrough data using the aforementioned geostatistical parameters. An optimization routine was utilized to adjust the mean and variance of the lnK field over 100 realizations such that a best fit of a simulated, average bromide breakthrough curve is achieved. Once the optimal bromide fit was accomplished (based on adjusting the lnK statistical parameters in unconditional simulations), a stochastic particle-tracking model for the bacteria was run without adjustments to the local-scale colloid transport parameters. Good predictions of the mean bacteria breakthrough data were achieved using several approaches for modeling components of the system. Simulations incorporating the recent Tufenkji and Elimelech [1] equation for estimating single collector efficiency were compared to those using the Rajagopalan and Tien [2] model. Both appeared to work equally well at predicting mean bacteria breakthrough using a constant mean bacteria diameter for this set of field conditions, with the Rajagopalan and Tien model yielding approximately a 30% lower peak concentration and less tailing than the Tufenkji and Elimelech formulation. Simulations using a distribution

  19. Using Fluorescent Viruses for Detecting Bacteria in Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabacco, Mary Beth; Qian, Xiaohua; Russo, Jaimie A.

    2009-01-01

    A method of detecting water-borne pathogenic bacteria is based partly on established molecular-recognition and fluorescent-labeling concepts, according to which bacteria of a species of interest are labeled with fluorescent reporter molecules and the bacteria can then be detected by fluorescence spectroscopy. The novelty of the present method lies in the use of bacteriophages (viruses that infect bacteria) to deliver the fluorescent reporter molecules to the bacteria of the species of interest.

  20. Bacteria-phage interactions in natural environments.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Muñoz, Samuel L; Koskella, Britt

    2014-01-01

    Phages are considered the most abundant and diverse biological entities on Earth and are notable not only for their sheer abundance, but also for their influence on bacterial hosts. In nature, bacteria-phage relationships are complex and have far-reaching consequences beyond particular pairwise interactions, influencing everything from bacterial virulence to eukaryotic fitness to the carbon cycle. In this review, we examine bacteria and phage distributions in nature first by highlighting biogeographic patterns and nonhost environmental influences on phage distribution, then by considering the ways in which phages and bacteria interact, emphasizing phage life cycles, bacterial responses to phage infection, and the complex patterns of phage host specificity. Finally, we discuss phage impacts on bacterial abundance, genetics, and physiology, and further aim to clarify distinctions between current theoretical models and point out areas in need of future research.

  1. Mortality of fecal bacteria in seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Lara, J.; Menon, P.; Servais, P.; Billen, G. )

    1991-03-01

    The authors propose a method for determining the mortality rate for allochthonous bacteria released in aquatic environments without interference due to the loss of culturability in specific culture media. This method consists of following the disappearance of radioactivity from the trichloracetic acid-insoluble fraction in water samples to which ({sup 3}H)thymidine-prelabeled allochthonous bacteria have been added. In coastal seawater, they found that the actual rate of disappearance of fecal bacteria was 1 order of magnitude lower than the rate of loss of culturability on specific media. Minor adaptation of the procedure may facilitate assessment of the effect of protozoan grazing and bacteriophage lysis on the overall bacterial mortality rate.

  2. Molecular Evolution of Threonine Dehydratase in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xuefei; Li, Ye; Wang, Xiaoyuan

    2013-01-01

    Threonine dehydratase converts L-threonine to 2-ketobutyrate. Several threonine dehydratases exist in bacteria, but their origins and evolutionary pathway are unknown. Here we analyzed all the available threonine dehydratases in bacteria and proposed an evolutionary pathway leading to the genes encoding three different threonine dehydratases CTD, BTD1 and BTD2. The ancestral threonine dehydratase might contain only a catalytic domain, but one or two ACT-like subdomains were fused during the evolution, resulting BTD1 and BTD2, respectively. Horizontal gene transfer, gene fusion, gene duplication, and gene deletion may occur during the evolution of this enzyme. The results are important for understanding the functions of various threonine dehydratases found in bacteria. PMID:24324624

  3. Interactions among sulfide-oxidizing bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poplawski, R.

    1985-01-01

    The responses of different phototrophic bacteria in a competitive experimental system are studied, one in which primary factors such as H2S or light limited photometabolism. Two different types of bacteria shared one limited source of sulfide under specific conditions of light. The selection of a purple and a green sulfur bacteria and the cyanobacterium was based on their physiological similarity and also on the fact that they occur together in microbial mats. They all share anoxygenic photosynthesis, and are thus probably part of an evolutionary continuum of phototrophic organisms that runs from, strictly anaerobic physiology to the ability of some cyanobacteria to shift between anoxygenic bacterial style photosynthesis and the oxygenic kind typical of eukaryotes.

  4. Inorganic nanoparticles engineered to attack bacteria.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kristen P; Wang, Lei; Benicewicz, Brian C; Decho, Alan W

    2015-11-07

    Antibiotics were once the golden bullet to constrain infectious bacteria. However, the rapid and continuing emergence of antibiotic resistance (AR) among infectious microbial pathogens has questioned the future utility of antibiotics. This dilemma has recently fueled the marriage of the disparate fields of nanochemistry and antibiotics. Nanoparticles and other types of nanomaterials have been extensively developed for drug delivery to eukaryotic cells. However, bacteria have very different cellular architectures than eukaryotic cells. This review addresses the chemistry of nanoparticle-based antibiotic carriers, and how their technical capabilities are now being re-engineered to attack, kill, but also non-lethally manipulate the physiologies of bacteria. This review also discusses the surface functionalization of inorganic nanoparticles with small ligand molecules, polymers, and charged moieties to achieve drug loading and controllable release.

  5. Whole genome plasticity in pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Dobrindt, U; Hacker, J

    2001-10-01

    The exploitation of bacterial genome sequences has so far provided a wealth of new general information about the genetic diversity of bacteria, such as that of many pathogens. Comparative genomics uncovered many genome variations in closely related bacteria and revealed basic principles involved in bacterial diversification, improving our knowledge of the evolution of bacterial pathogens. A correlation between metabolic versatility and genome size has become evident. The degenerated life styles of obligate intracellular pathogens correlate with significantly reduced genome sizes, a phenomenon that has been termed "evolution by reduction". These mechanisms can permanently alter bacterial genotypes and result in adaptation to their environment by genome optimization. In this review, we summarize the recent results of genome-wide approaches to studying the genetic diversity of pathogenic bacteria that indicate that the acquisition of DNA and the loss of genetic information are two important mechanisms that contribute to strain-specific differences in genome content.

  6. Copper tolerance and virulence in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ladomersky, Erik; Petris, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Copper (Cu) is an essential trace element for all aerobic organisms. It functions as a cofactor in enzymes that catalyze a wide variety of redox reactions due to its ability to cycle between two oxidation states, Cu(I) and Cu(II). This same redox property of copper has the potential to cause toxicity if copper homeostasis is not maintained. Studies suggest that the toxic properties of copper are harnessed by the innate immune system of the host to kill bacteria. To counter such defenses, bacteria rely on copper tolerance genes for virulence within the host. These discoveries suggest bacterial copper intoxication is a component of host nutritional immunity, thus expanding our knowledge of the roles of copper in biology. This review summarizes our current understanding of copper tolerance in bacteria, and the extent to which these pathways contribute to bacterial virulence within the host. PMID:25652326

  7. Encapsulation of probiotic bacteria in biopolymeric system.

    PubMed

    Huq, Tanzina; Khan, Avik; Khan, Ruhul A; Riedl, Bernard; Lacroix, Monique

    2013-01-01

    Encapsulation of probiotic bacteria is generally used to enhance the viability during processing, and also for the target delivery in gastrointestinal tract. Probiotics are used with the fermented dairy products, pharmaceutical products, and health supplements. They play a great role in maintaining human health. The survival of these bacteria in the human gastrointestinal system is questionable. In order to protect the viability of the probiotic bacteria, several types of biopolymers such as alginate, chitosan, gelatin, whey protein isolate, cellulose derivatives are used for encapsulation and several methods of encapsulation such as spray drying, extrusion, emulsion have been reported. This review focuses on the method of encapsulation and the use of different biopolymeric system for encapsulation of probiotics.

  8. Monitoring of environmental pollutants by bioluminescent bacteria.

    PubMed

    Girotti, Stefano; Ferri, Elida Nora; Fumo, Maria Grazia; Maiolini, Elisabetta

    2008-02-04

    This review deals with the applications of bioluminescent bacteria to the environmental analyses, published during the years 2000-2007. The ecotoxicological assessment, by bioassays, of the environmental risks and the luminescent approaches are reported. The review includes a brief introduction to the characteristics and applications of bioassays, a description of the characteristics and applications of natural bioluminescent bacteria (BLB), and a collection of the main applications to organic and inorganic pollutants. The light-emitting genetically modified bacteria applications, as well as the bioluminescent immobilized systems and biosensors are outlined. Considerations about commercially available BLB and BLB catalogues are also reported. Most of the environmental applications, here mentioned, of luminescent organisms are on wastewater, seawater, surface and ground water, tap water, soil and sediments, air. Comparison to other bioindicators and bioassay has been also made. Various tables have been inserted, to make easier to take a rapid glance at all possible references concerning the topic of specific interest.

  9. [Bacteriocins produced by lactic acid bacteria].

    PubMed

    Bilková, Andrea; Sepova, Hana Kinová; Bilka, Frantisek; Balázová, Andrea

    2011-04-01

    Lactic acid bacteria comprise several genera of gram-positive bacteria that are known for the production of structurally different antimicrobial substances. Among them, bacteriocins are nowadays in the centre of scientific interest. Bacteriocins, proteinaceous antimicrobial substances, are produced ribosomally and have usually a narrow spectrum of bacterial growth inhibition. According to their structure and the target of their activity, they are divided into four classes, although there are some suggestions for a renewed classification. The most interesting and usable class are lantibiotics. They comprise the most widely commercially used and well examined bacteriocin, nisin. The non-pathogenic character of lactic acid bacteria is advantageous for using their bacteriocins in food preservation as well as in feed supplements or in veterinary medicine.

  10. Transition Metals and Virulence in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Lauren D.; Skaar, Eric P.

    2016-01-01

    Transition metals are required trace elements for all forms of life. Due to their unique inorganic and redox properties, transition metals serve as cofactors for enzymes and other proteins. In bacterial pathogenesis, the vertebrate host represents a rich source of nutrient metals, and bacteria have evolved diverse metal acquisition strategies. Host metal homeostasis changes dramatically in response to bacterial infections, including production of metal sequestering proteins and the bombardment of bacteria with toxic levels of metals. Presumably, in response, bacteria have evolved systems to subvert metal sequestration and toxicity. The coevolution of hosts and their bacterial pathogens in the battle for metals has uncovered emerging paradigms in social microbiology, rapid evolution, host specificity, and metal homeostasis across domains. This review focuses on recent advances and open questions in our understanding of the complex role of transition metals at the host-pathogen interface. PMID:27617971

  11. Copper tolerance and virulence in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ladomersky, Erik; Petris, Michael J

    2015-06-01

    Copper (Cu) is an essential trace element for all aerobic organisms. It functions as a cofactor in enzymes that catalyze a wide variety of redox reactions due to its ability to cycle between two oxidation states, Cu(I) and Cu(II). This same redox property of copper has the potential to cause toxicity if copper homeostasis is not maintained. Studies suggest that the toxic properties of copper are harnessed by the innate immune system of the host to kill bacteria. To counter such defenses, bacteria rely on copper tolerance genes for virulence within the host. These discoveries suggest bacterial copper intoxication is a component of host nutritional immunity, thus expanding our knowledge of the roles of copper in biology. This review summarizes our current understanding of copper tolerance in bacteria, and the extent to which these pathways contribute to bacterial virulence within the host.

  12. ["Quorum sensing" or social behavior of bacteria].

    PubMed

    Gintsburg, A L; Il'ina, T S; Romanova, Iu M

    2003-01-01

    The review deals with the data of literature on the role of the "quorum sensing" (QS) system ensuring the social behavior of bacteria in the regulation of virulence genes. The mechanisms of the action of these systems in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, as well as the influence of acyl-homoserine lactones, one of the components of the QS system, on the immune response of the infected host are discussed. In addition, in this review the data of literature on the existence of bacteria in the form of biofilms are presented. The methods of the identification of biofilms, the methods of their experimental preparation and the role of the QS system in the process of their formation are considered.

  13. Quorum sensing in plant-associated bacteria.

    PubMed

    Loh, John; Pierson, Elizabeth A; Pierson, Leland S; Stacey, Gary; Chatterjee, Arun

    2002-08-01

    N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-mediated quorum sensing by bacteria regulates traits that are involved in symbiotic, pathogenic and surface-associated relationships between microbial populations and their plant hosts. Recent advances demonstrate deviations from the classic LuxR/LuxI paradigm, which was first developed in Vibrio. For example, LuxR homologs can repress as well as activate gene expression, and non-AHL signals and signal mimics can affect the expression of genes that are controlled by quorum sensing. Many bacteria utilize multiple quorum-sensing systems, and these may be modulated via post-transcriptional and other global regulatory mechanisms. Microbes inhabiting plant surfaces also produce and respond to a diverse mixture of AHL signals. The production of AHL mimics by plants and the identification of AHL degradative pathways suggest that bacteria and plants utilize this method of bacterial communication as a key control point for influencing the outcome of their interactions.

  14. Study examines sulfate-reducing bacteria activity

    SciTech Connect

    McElhiney, J.E.; Hardy, J.A.; Rizk, T.Y.; Stott, J.F.D.; Eden, R.D.

    1996-12-09

    Low-sulfate seawater injection can reduce the potential of an oil reservoir turning sour because of sulfate-reducing bacteria. Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) convert sulfate ions in seawater used in waterflooding into sulfide with the concomitant oxidation of a carbon source. A recent study at Capcis investigated the efficiency of SRB under various conditions of sulfate limitation. This study was conducted in a flowing bioreactor at 2,000 psia with different temperature zones (mesophilic 35 C and thermophilic 60--80 C). The study mixed microfloral populations derived from real North Sea-produced fluids, and included an active population of marine methanogenic bacteria present to provide competition for the available carbon sources. In general, results showed that SRB continue to convert sulfate to sulfide in stoichiometric quantities without regard to absolute concentrations. The paper discusses the results and recommends nanofiltration of seawater for ``sweet`` reservoirs.

  15. Quorum sensing and swarming migration in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Ruth; Vanderleyden, Jos; Michiels, Jan

    2004-06-01

    Bacterial cells can produce and sense signal molecules, allowing the whole population to initiate a concerted action once a critical concentration (corresponding to a particular population density) of the signal has been reached, a phenomenon known as quorum sensing. One of the possible quorum sensing-regulated phenotypes is swarming, a flagella-driven movement of differentiated swarmer cells (hyperflagellated, elongated, multinucleated) by which bacteria can spread as a biofilm over a surface. The glycolipid or lipopeptide biosurfactants thereby produced function as wetting agent by reducing the surface tension. Quorum sensing systems are almost always integrated into other regulatory circuits. This effectively expands the range of environmental signals that influence target gene expression beyond population density. In this review, we first discuss the regulation of AHL-mediated surface migration and the involvement of other low-molecular-mass signal molecules (such as the furanosyl borate diester AI-2) in biosurfactant production of different bacteria. In addition, population density-dependent regulation of swarmer cell differentiation is reviewed. Also, several examples of interspecies signalling are reported. Different signal molecules either produced by bacteria (such as other AHLs and diketopiperazines) or excreted by plants (such as furanones, plant signal mimics) might influence the quorum sensing-regulated swarming behaviour in bacteria different from the producer. On the other hand, specific bacteria can reduce the local available concentration of signal molecules produced by others. In the last part, the role and regulation of a surface-associated movement in biofilm formation is discussed. Here we also describe how quorum sensing may disperse existing biofilms and control the interaction between bacteria and higher organisms (such as the Rhizobium-bean symbiosis).

  16. Sulfur metabolism in phototrophic sulfur bacteria.

    PubMed

    Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Dahl, Christiane

    2009-01-01

    Phototrophic sulfur bacteria are characterized by oxidizing various inorganic sulfur compounds for use as electron donors in carbon dioxide fixation during anoxygenic photosynthetic growth. These bacteria are divided into the purple sulfur bacteria (PSB) and the green sulfur bacteria (GSB). They utilize various combinations of sulfide, elemental sulfur, and thiosulfate and sometimes also ferrous iron and hydrogen as electron donors. This review focuses on the dissimilatory and assimilatory metabolism of inorganic sulfur compounds in these bacteria and also briefly discusses these metabolisms in other types of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria. The biochemistry and genetics of sulfur compound oxidation in PSB and GSB are described in detail. A variety of enzymes catalyzing sulfur oxidation reactions have been isolated from GSB and PSB (especially Allochromatium vinosum, a representative of the Chromatiaceae), and many are well characterized also on a molecular genetic level. Complete genome sequence data are currently available for 10 strains of GSB and for one strain of PSB. We present here a genome-based survey of the distribution and phylogenies of genes involved in oxidation of sulfur compounds in these strains. It is evident from biochemical and genetic analyses that the dissimilatory sulfur metabolism of these organisms is very complex and incompletely understood. This metabolism is modular in the sense that individual steps in the metabolism may be performed by different enzymes in different organisms. Despite the distant evolutionary relationship between GSB and PSB, their photosynthetic nature and their dependency on oxidation of sulfur compounds resulted in similar ecological roles in the sulfur cycle as important anaerobic oxidizers of sulfur compounds.

  17. Gastric spiral bacteria in small felids.

    PubMed

    Kinsel, M J; Kovarik, P; Murnane, R D

    1998-06-01

    Nine small cats, including one bobcat (Felis rufus), one Pallas cat (F. manul), one Canada lynx (F. lynx canadensis), two fishing cats (F. viverrina), two margays (F. wiedii), and two sand cats (F. margarita), necropsied between June 1995 and March 1997 had large numbers of gastric spiral bacteria, whereas five large cats, including one African lion (Panthera leo), two snow leopards (P. uncia), one Siberian tiger (P. tigris altaica), and one jaguar (P. onca), necropsied during the same period had none. All of the spiral organisms from the nine small cats were histologically and ultrastructurally similar. Histologically, the spiral bacteria were 5-14 microm long with five to nine coils per organism and were located both extracellularly within gastric glands and surface mucus, and intracellularly in parietal cells. Spiral bacteria in gastric mucosal scrapings from the Canada lynx, one fishing cat, and the two sand cats were gram negative and had corkscrewlike to tumbling motility when viewed with phase contrast microscopy. The bacteria were 0.5-0.7 microm wide, with a periodicity of 0.65-1.1 microm in all cats. Bipolar sheathed flagella were occasionally observed, and no periplasmic fibrils were seen. The bacteria were extracellular in parietal cell canaliculi and intracellular within parietal cells. Culture of mucosal scrapings from the Canada lynx and sand cats was unsuccessful. Based on morphology, motility, and cellular tropism, the bacteria were probably Helicobacter-like organisms. Although the two margays had moderate lymphoplasmacytic gastritis, the other cats lacked or had only mild gastric lymphoid infiltrates, suggesting that these organisms are either commensals or opportunistic pathogens.

  18. Modeling Facilitated Contaminant Transport by Mobile Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corapcioglu, M. Yavuz; Kim, Seunghyun

    1995-01-01

    Introduction of exogenous biocolloids such as genetically engineered bacteria in a bioremediation operation can enhance the transport of contaminants in groundwater by reducing the retardation effects. Because of their colloidal size and favorable surface conditions, bacteria are efficient contaminant carriers. In cases where contaminants have a low mobility in porous media because of their high partition with solid matrix, facilitated contaminant transport by mobile bacteria can create high contaminant fluxes. When metabolically active mobile bacteria are present in a subsurface environment, the system can be treated as consisting of three phases: water phase, bacterial phase, and stationary solid matrix phase. In this work a mathematical model based on mass balance equations is developed to describe the facilitated transport and fate of a contaminant and bacteria in a porous medium. Bacterial partition between the bulk solution and the stationary solid matrix and contaminant partition among three phases are represented by expressions in terms of measurable quantities. Solutions were obtained to provide estimates of contaminant and bacterial concentrations. A dimensional analysis of the transport model was utilized to estimate model parameters from the experimental data and to assess the effect of several parameters on model behavior. The model results matched favorably with experimental data of Jenkins and Lion (1993). The presence of mobile bacteria enhances the contaminant transport. However, bacterial consumption of the contaminant, which serves as a bacterial nutrient, can attenuate the contaminant mobility. The work presented in this paper is the first three-phase model to include the effects of substrate metabolism on the fate of groundwater contaminants.

  19. Ser/Thr phosphorylation as a regulatory mechanism in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Dworkin, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    This review will discuss some recent work describing the role of Ser/Thr phosphorylation as a post-translational mechanism of regulation in bacteria. I will discuss the interaction between bacterial eukaryotic-like Ser/Thr kinases (eSTKs) and two-component systems as well as hints as to physiological function of eSTKs and their cognate eukaryotic-like phosphatases (eSTPs). In particular, I will highlight the role of eSTKs and eSTPs in the regulation of peptidoglycan metabolism and protein synthesis. In addition, I will discuss how data from phosphoproteomic surveys suggest that Ser/Thr phosphorylation plays a much more significant physiological role than would be predicted simply based on in vivo and in vitro analyses of individual kinases.

  20. Rapid determination of the presence of enteric bacteria in water.

    PubMed

    Kenard, R P; Valentine, R S

    1974-03-01

    A rapid and sensitive method is described for the detection of bacteria in water and various other natural substrates by the isolation of specific bacteriophage. By the addition of large numbers of the organism in question to the sample, the presence of virulent bacteriophage can be demonstrated in as little as 6 to 8 h. Fecal coliform, total coliform, and total coliphage counts were determined for over 150 water samples from several geographical areas over a period of 2 years. Computer analysis of the data shows a high degree of correlation between fecal coliforms and the coliphage present in the samples. With a high correlation coefficient between fecal coliform and coliphage counts, predictions of the fecal coliforms may be made by enumeration of the phage.

  1. Climate change alters ecological strategies of soil bacteria.

    PubMed

    Evans, Sarah E; Wallenstein, Matthew D

    2014-02-01

    The timing and magnitude of rainfall events are expected to change in future decades, resulting in longer drought periods and larger rainfall events. Although microbial community composition and function are both sensitive to changes in rainfall, it is unclear whether this is because taxa adopt strategies that maximise fitness under new regimes. We assessed whether bacteria exhibited phylogenetically conserved ecological strategies in response to drying-rewetting, and whether these strategies were altered by historical exposure to experimentally intensified rainfall patterns. By clustering relative abundance patterns, we identified three discrete ecological strategies and found that tolerance to drying-rewetting increased with exposure to intensified rainfall patterns. Changes in strategy were primarily due to changes in community composition, but also to strategy shifts within taxa. These moisture regime-selected ecological strategies may be predictable from disturbance history, and are likely to be linked to traits that influence the functional potential of microbial communities.

  2. Life with compass: diversity and biogeography of magnetotactic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Wei; Bazylinski, Dennis A; Xiao, Tian; Wu, Long-Fei; Pan, Yongxin

    2013-11-12

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are unique in their ability to synthesize intracellular nano-sized minerals of magnetite and/or greigite magnetosomes for magnetic orientation. Thus, they provide an excellent model system to investigate mechanisms of biomineralization. MTB play important roles in bulk sedimentary magnetism and have numerous versatile applications in paleoenvironmental reconstructions, and biotechnological and biomedical fields. Significant progress has been made in recent years in describing the composition of MTB communities and distribution through innovative cultivation-dependent and -independent techniques. In this review, the most recent contributions to the field of diversity and biogeography of MTB are summarized and reviewed. Emphasis is on the novel insights into various factors/processes potentially affecting MTB community distribution. An understanding of the present-day biogeography of MTB, and the ruling parameters of their spatial distribution, will eventually help us predict MTB community shifts with environmental changes and assess their roles in global iron cycling.

  3. Understanding protein glycosylation pathways in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Debowski, Aleksandra W; Liao, Tingting; Tang, Hong; Nilsson, Hans-Olof; Marshall, Barry J; Stubbs, Keith A; Benghezal, Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Through advances in analytical methods to detect glycoproteins and to determine glycan structures, there have been increasing reports of protein glycosylation in bacteria. In this review, we summarize the known pathways for bacterial protein glycosylation: lipid carrier-mediated 'en bloc' glycosylation; and cytoplasmic stepwise protein glycosylation. The exploitation of bacterial protein glycosylation systems, especially the 'mix and match' of three independent but similar pathways (oligosaccharyltransferase-mediated protein glycosylation, lipopolysaccharide and peptidoglycan biosynthesis) in Gram-negative bacteria for glycoengineering recombinant glycoproteins is also discussed.

  4. Pervasive transcription: detecting functional RNAs in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lybecker, Meghan; Bilusic, Ivana; Raghavan, Rahul

    2014-01-01

    Pervasive, or genome-wide, transcription has been reported in all domains of life. In bacteria, most pervasive transcription occurs antisense to protein-coding transcripts, although recently a new class of pervasive RNAs was identified that originates from within annotated genes. Initially considered to be non-functional transcriptional noise, pervasive transcription is increasingly being recognized as important in regulating gene expression. The function of pervasive transcription is an extensively debated question in the field of transcriptomics and regulatory RNA biology. Here, we highlight the most recent contributions addressing the purpose of pervasive transcription in bacteria and discuss their implications.

  5. Amplification of signaling events in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Dahlquist, Frederick W

    2002-05-14

    Bacteria respond to extremely shallow chemical gradients by modifying their motility in a process called chemotaxis. This chemotactic response is characterized by high sensitivity to small concentration differences, which extends over a large range of concentrations. This combination of high signal gain and large dynamic range results from both a memory of past events and the ability to amplify small differences in signal between the memory and the current environment. Dahlquist describes the signaling mechanism used by bacteria to regulate the flagellar motor and the places in this pathway where signal amplification may occur.

  6. Protein glycosylation in bacteria: sweeter than ever.

    PubMed

    Nothaft, Harald; Szymanski, Christine M

    2010-11-01

    Investigations into bacterial protein glycosylation continue to progress rapidly. It is now established that bacteria possess both N-linked and O-linked glycosylation pathways that display many commonalities with their eukaryotic and archaeal counterparts as well as some unexpected variations. In bacteria, protein glycosylation is not restricted to pathogens but also exists in commensal organisms such as certain Bacteroides species, and both the N-linked and O-linked glycosylation pathways can modify multiple proteins. Improving our understanding of the intricacies of bacterial protein glycosylation systems should lead to new opportunities to manipulate these pathways in order to engineer glycoproteins with potential value as novel vaccines.

  7. Beer spoilage bacteria and hop resistance.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Kanta; Konings, Wil N

    2003-12-31

    For brewing industry, beer spoilage bacteria have been problematic for centuries. They include some lactic acid bacteria such as Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus lindneri and Pediococcus damnosus, and some Gram-negative bacteria such as Pectinatus cerevisiiphilus, Pectinatus frisingensis and Megasphaera cerevisiae. They can spoil beer by turbidity, acidity and the production of unfavorable smell such as diacetyl or hydrogen sulfide. For the microbiological control, many advanced biotechnological techniques such as immunoassay and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) have been applied in place of the conventional and time-consuming method of incubation on culture media. Subsequently, a method is needed to determine whether the detected bacterium is capable of growing in beer or not. In lactic acid bacteria, hop resistance is crucial for their ability to grow in beer. Hop compounds, mainly iso-alpha-acids in beer, have antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria. They act as ionophores which dissipate the pH gradient across the cytoplasmic membrane and reduce the proton motive force (pmf). Consequently, the pmf-dependent nutrient uptake is hampered, resulting in cell death. The hop-resistance mechanisms in lactic acid bacteria have been investigated. HorA was found to excrete hop compounds in an ATP-dependent manner from the cell membrane to outer medium. Additionally, increased proton pumping by the membrane bound H(+)-ATPase contributes to hop resistance. To energize such ATP-dependent transporters hop-resistant cells contain larger ATP pools than hop-sensitive cells. Furthermore, a pmf-dependent hop transporter was recently presented. Understanding the hop-resistance mechanisms has enabled the development of rapid methods to discriminate beer spoilage strains from nonspoilers. The horA-PCR method has been applied for bacterial control in breweries. Also, a discrimination method was developed based on ATP pool measurement in lactobacillus cells. However

  8. Tooth brushing inhibits oral bacteria in dogs.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Hayashi, Kotaro; Kijima, Saku; Nonaka, Chie; Yamazoe, Kazuaki

    2015-10-01

    In this study, scaling, polishing and daily tooth brushing were performed in 20 beagle dogs, and the number of oral bacteria was determined using a bacterial counter. The dogs were randomized into the scaling (S), scaling + polishing (SP), scaling + tooth daily brushing (SB) and scaling + polishing + tooth daily brushing (SPB) groups. Samples were collected from the buccal surface of the maxillary fourth premolars of the dogs immediately after scaling and every week thereafter from weeks 1 to 8. Throughout the study, the number of bacteria was significantly lower in the SB and SPB groups compared with the S group. The findings suggest that daily tooth brushing inhibited oral bacterial growth in the dogs.

  9. Dynamic Clustering in Suspension of Motile Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hepeng; Chen, Xiao; Yang, Xiang; Yang, Mingcheng

    2015-03-01

    Bacteria suspension exhibits a wide range of collective phenomena arising from interactions between individual cells. Here we investigate dynamic clusters of motile bacteria near an air-liquid interface. Cell in a cluster orient its flagella perpendicular to the interface and generate attractive radial fluid flow that leads to cluster formation. Rotating cell also creates tangential forces on neighbors that sets clusters into counter-clockwise rotation. We construct a numerical model of self-propelled particles that interact via pair-wise forces extracted from hydrodynamic calculations; such a model reproduces many properties of observed cluster dynamics.

  10. Bacteriophage biosensors for antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sorokulova, Irina; Olsen, Eric; Vodyanoy, Vitaly

    2014-03-01

    An increasing number of disease-causing bacteria are resistant to one or more anti-bacterial drugs utilized for therapy. Early and speedy detection of these pathogens is therefore very important. Traditional pathogen detection techniques, that include microbiological and biochemical assays are long and labor-intensive, while antibody or DNA-based methods require substantial sample preparation and purification. Biosensors based on bacteriophages have demonstrated remarkable potential to surmount these restrictions and to offer rapid, efficient and sensitive detection technique for antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

  11. Fatty acid composition of selected prosthecate bacteria.

    PubMed

    Carter, R N; Schmidt, J M

    1976-10-11

    The cellular fatty acid composition of 14 strains of Caulobacter speices and types, two species of Prosthecomicrobium, and two species of Asticcacaulis was determined by gas-liquid chromatography. In most of these bacteria, the major fatty acids were octadecenoic acid (C18:1), hexadecenoic acid (C16:1) and hexadecanoic acid (C16:0). Some cyclopropane and branched chain fatty acids were detected in addition to the straight chained acids. Hydroxytetradecanoic acid was an important component of P.enhydrum but significant amounts of hydroxy acids were not detected in other prosthecate bacteria examined.

  12. Differential staining of bacteria: gram stain.

    PubMed

    Moyes, Rita B; Reynolds, Jackie; Breakwell, Donald P

    2009-11-01

    In 1884, Hans Christian Gram, a Danish doctor, developed a differential staining technique that is still the cornerstone of bacterial identification and taxonomic division. This multistep, sequential staining protocol separates bacteria into four groups based on cell morphology and cell wall structure: Gram-positive cocci, Gram-negative cocci, Gram-positive rods, and Gram-negative rods. The Gram stain is useful for assessing bacterial contamination of tissue culture samples or for examining the Gram stain status and morphological features of bacteria isolated from mixed or isolated bacterial cultures.

  13. Degradation of monomethylhydrazine by two soil bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Ou, L.T.

    1988-12-01

    It has been reported that three heterotrophic soil bacteria had the capacity to degrade hydrazine. One of these organisms, Achromobacter sp., degraded hydrazine to N/sub 2/ gas. Furthermore, it was reported that monomethylhydrazine (MMH) in Arredondo fine sand was mineralized to CO/sub 2/, and that such degradation is microbial. However, microorganisms that degrade MMH have not been reported. MMH and hydrazine are chemically similar to one another. Therefore, this study was initiated to test the capacity of the two hydrazine-degrading bacteria, Achromobacter sp. and Pseudomonas sp., to degrade MMH.

  14. [Quorum sensing in bacteria and yeast].

    PubMed

    March Rosselló, Gabriel Alberto; Eiros Bouza, José María

    2013-10-19

    Bacterial sets are complex dynamic systems, which interact with each other and through the interaction, bacteria coexist, collaborate, compete and share information in a coordinated manner. A way of bacterial communication is quorum sensing. Through this mechanism the bacteria can recognize its concentration in a given environment and they can decide the time at which the expression of a particular set of genes should be started for developing a specific and simultaneous response. The result of these interconnections raises properties that cannot be explained from a single isolated bacterial cell.

  15. Bacteria Provide Cleanup of Oil Spills, Wastewater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Through Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts with Marshall Space Flight Center, Micro-Bac International Inc., of Round Rock, Texas, developed a phototrophic cell for water purification in space. Inside the cell: millions of photosynthetic bacteria. Micro-Bac proceeded to commercialize the bacterial formulation it developed for the SBIR project. The formulation is now used for the remediation of wastewater systems and waste from livestock farms and food manufacturers. Strains of the SBIR-derived bacteria also feature in microbial solutions that treat environmentally damaging oil spills, such as that resulting from the catastrophic 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil rig explosion in the Gulf of Mexico.

  16. Functional Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea

    SciTech Connect

    Blow, M. J.; Deutschbauer, A. M.; Hoover, C. A.; Lamson, J.; Lamson, J.; Price, M. N.; Waters, J.; Wetmore, K. M.; Bristow, J.; Arkin, A. P.

    2013-03-20

    Bacteria and Archaea exhibit a huge diversity of metabolic capabilities with fundamental importance in the environment, and potential applications in biotechnology. However, the genetic bases of these capabilities remain unclear due largely to an absence of technologies that link DNA sequence to molecular function. To address this challenge, we are developing a pipeline for high throughput annotation of gene function using mutagenesis, growth assays and DNA sequencing. By applying this pipeline to annotate gene function in 50 diverse microbes we hope to discover thousands of new gene functions and produce a proof of principle `Functional Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea?.

  17. Instabilities in the Swimming of Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Emily; Lauga, Eric

    2016-11-01

    Peritrichously flagellated bacteria, such as E. coli and B. subtillis, have flagella randomly distributed over their body. These flagella rotate to generate a pushing force that causes the cell to swim body first. For changes in direction these flagella return to their randomly distributed state where the flagella point in many different directions. The main observed state of swimming peritrichously flagellated bacteria however is one where all their flagella gathered or bundled at one end of the body. In this work we address this problem from the point of view of fluid-structure interactions and show theoretically and numerically how the conformation of flagella depends on the mechanics of the cell.

  18. Cadmium uptake and resistance among selected bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, B.E.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine the relationship between Cd resistance and Cd uptake by lake sediment bacteria. For the Gram positive and gram negative sediment bacteria that were tested, the relationship between resistance and Cd uptake varied and was dependent on the isolate under consideration. Results of this study indicated that bacterial communities in lake sediments may influence the concentration and availability of Cd in sediments and the water column. In addition, results of this study did not support the theory that the genes encoding for Cd resistance are usually carried on antibiotic resistance plasmids.

  19. A bioinformatic approach to understanding antibiotic resistance in intracellular bacteria through whole genome analysis.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Silpak; Raoult, Didier; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2008-09-01

    Intracellular bacteria survive within eukaryotic host cells and are difficult to kill with certain antibiotics. As a result, antibiotic resistance in intracellular bacteria is becoming commonplace in healthcare institutions. Owing to the lack of methods available for transforming these bacteria, we evaluated the mechanisms of resistance using molecular methods and in silico genome analysis. The objective of this review was to understand the molecular mechanisms of antibiotic resistance through in silico comparisons of the genomes of obligate and facultative intracellular bacteria. The available data on in vitro mutants reported for intracellular bacteria were also reviewed. These genomic data were analysed to find natural mutations in known target genes involved in antibiotic resistance and to look for the presence or absence of different resistance determinants. Our analysis revealed the presence of tetracycline resistance protein (Tet) in Bartonella quintana, Francisella tularensis and Brucella ovis; moreover, most of the Francisella strains possessed the blaA gene, AmpG protein and metallo-beta-lactamase family protein. The presence or absence of folP (dihydropteroate synthase) and folA (dihydrofolate reductase) genes in the genome could explain natural resistance to co-trimoxazole. Finally, multiple genes encoding different efflux pumps were studied. This in silico approach was an effective method for understanding the mechanisms of antibiotic resistance in intracellular bacteria. The whole genome sequence analysis will help to predict several important phenotypic characteristics, in particular resistance to different antibiotics. In the future, stable mutants should be obtained through transformation methods in order to demonstrate experimentally the determinants of resistance in intracellular bacteria.

  20. Engineering nanostructured porous SiO2 surfaces for bacteria detection via "direct cell capture".

    PubMed

    Massad-Ivanir, Naama; Shtenberg, Giorgi; Tzur, Adi; Krepker, Maksym A; Segal, Ester

    2011-05-01

    An optical label-free biosensing platform for bacteria detection ( Escherichia coli K12 as a model system) based on nanostructured oxidized porous silicon (PSiO(2)) is introduced. The biosensor is designed to directly capture the target bacteria cells on its surface with no prior sample processing (such as cell lysis). The optical reflectivity spectrum of the PSiO(2) nanostructure displays Fabry-Pérot fringes characteristic of thin-film interference, enabling direct, real-time observation of bacteria attachment within minutes. The PSiO(2) optical nanostructure is synthesized and used as the optical transducer element. The porous surface is conjugated with specific monoclonal antibodies (immunoglobulin G's) to provide the active component of the biosensor. The immobilization of the antibodies onto the biosensor system is confirmed by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, fluorescent labeling experiments, and refractive interferometric Fourier transform spectroscopy. We show that the immobilized antibodies maintain their immunoactivity and specificity when attached to the sensor surface. Exposure of these nanostructures to the target bacteria results in "direct cell capture" onto the biosensor surface. These specific binding events induce predictable changes in the thin-film optical interference spectrum of the biosensor. Our preliminary studies demonstrate the applicability of these biosensors for the detection of low bacterial concentrations. The current detection limit of E. coli K12 bacteria is 10(4) cells/mL within several minutes.

  1. Elevated temperature increases carbon and nitrogen fluxes between phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria through physical attachment.

    PubMed

    Arandia-Gorostidi, Nestor; Weber, Peter K; Alonso-Sáez, Laura; Morán, Xosé Anxelu G; Mayali, Xavier

    2017-03-01

    Quantifying the contribution of marine microorganisms to carbon and nitrogen cycles and their response to predicted ocean warming is one of the main challenges of microbial oceanography. Here we present a single-cell NanoSIMS isotope analysis to quantify C and N uptake by free-living and attached phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria, and their response to short-term experimental warming of 4 °C. Elevated temperature increased total C fixation by over 50%, a small but significant fraction of which was transferred to heterotrophs within 12 h. Cell-to-cell attachment doubled the secondary C uptake by heterotrophic bacteria and increased secondary N incorporation by autotrophs by 68%. Warming also increased the abundance of phytoplankton with attached heterotrophs by 80%, and promoted C transfer from phytoplankton to bacteria by 17% and N transfer from bacteria to phytoplankton by 50%. Our results indicate that phytoplankton-bacteria attachment provides an ecological advantage for nutrient incorporation, suggesting a mutualistic relationship that appears to be enhanced by temperature increases.

  2. Dispersal network structure and infection mechanism shape diversity in a coevolutionary bacteria-phage system.

    PubMed

    Sieber, Michael; Robb, Matthew; Forde, Samantha E; Gudelj, Ivana

    2014-03-01

    Resource availability, dispersal and infection genetics all have the potential to fundamentally alter the coevolutionary dynamics of bacteria-bacteriophage interactions. However, it remains unclear how these factors synergise to shape diversity within bacterial populations. We used a combination of laboratory experiments and mathematical modeling to test how the structure of a dispersal network affects host phenotypic diversity in a coevolving bacteria-phage system in communities of differential resource input. Unidirectional dispersal of bacteria and phage from high to low resources consistently increased host diversity compared with a no dispersal regime. Bidirectional dispersal, on the other hand, led to a marked decrease in host diversity. Our mathematical model predicted these opposing outcomes when we incorporated modified gene-for-gene infection genetics. To further test how host diversity depended on the genetic underpinnings of the bacteria-phage interaction, we expanded our mathematical model to include different infection mechanisms. We found that the direction of dispersal had very little impact on bacterial diversity when the bacteria-phage interaction was mediated by matching alleles, gene-for-gene or related infection mechanisms. Our experimental and theoretical results demonstrate that the effects of dispersal on diversity in coevolving host-parasite systems depend on an intricate interplay of the structure of the underlying dispersal network and the specifics of the host-parasite interaction.

  3. Oxidative Stress Parameters in Saliva and Its Association with Periodontal Disease and Types of Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Almerich-Silla, Jose Manuel; Montiel-Company, Jose María; Pastor, Sara; Serrano, Felipe; Puig-Silla, Miriam; Dasí, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To determine the association between oxidative stress parameters with periodontal disease, bleeding, and the presence of different periodontal bacteria. Methods. A cross-sectional study in a sample of eighty-six patients, divided into three groups depending on their periodontal status. Thirty-three with chronic periodontitis, sixteen with gingivitis, and thirty-seven with periodontal healthy as control. Oxidative stress biomarkers (8-OHdG and MDA), total antioxidant capacity (TAOC), and the activity of two antioxidant enzymes (GPx and SOD) were determined in saliva. Subgingival plaque samples were obtained from the deepest periodontal pocket and PCR was used to determine the presence of the 6 fimA genotypes of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola. Results. Periodontal disease was found to be associated with increased oxidative stress parameter levels. These levels rose according to the number and type of different periodontal bacteria found in the periodontal pockets. The presence of different types of periodontal bacteria is predictive independent variables in linear regresion models of oxidative stress parameters as dependent variable, above all 8-OHdG. Conclusions. Oxidative stress parameter levels are correlated with the presence of different types of bacteria. Determination of these levels and periodontal bacteria could be a potent tool for controlling periodontal disease development. PMID:26494938

  4. Modelling the effect of lactic acid bacteria from starter- and aroma culture on growth of Listeria monocytogenes in cottage cheese.

    PubMed

    Østergaard, Nina Bjerre; Eklöw, Annelie; Dalgaard, Paw

    2014-10-01

    Four mathematical models were developed and validated for simultaneous growth of mesophilic lactic acid bacteria from added cultures and Listeria monocytogenes, during chilled storage of cottage cheese with fresh- or cultured cream dressing. The mathematical models include the effect of temperature, pH, NaCl, lactic- and sorbic acid and the interaction between these environmental factors. Growth models were developed by combining new and existing cardinal parameter values. Subsequently, the reference growth rate parameters (μref at 25°C) were fitted to a total of 52 growth rates from cottage cheese to improve model performance. The inhibiting effect of mesophilic lactic acid bacteria from added cultures on growth of L. monocytogenes was efficiently modelled using the Jameson approach. The new models appropriately predicted the maximum population density of L. monocytogenes in cottage cheese. The developed models were successfully validated by using 25 growth rates for L. monocytogenes, 17 growth rates for lactic acid bacteria and a total of 26 growth curves for simultaneous growth of L. monocytogenes and lactic acid bacteria in cottage cheese. These data were used in combination with bias- and accuracy factors and with the concept of acceptable simulation zone. Evaluation of predicted growth rates of L. monocytogenes in cottage cheese with fresh- or cultured cream dressing resulted in bias-factors (Bf) of 1.07-1.10 with corresponding accuracy factor (Af) values of 1.11 to 1.22. Lactic acid bacteria from added starter culture were on average predicted to grow 16% faster than observed (Bf of 1.16 and Af of 1.32) and growth of the diacetyl producing aroma culture was on average predicted 9% slower than observed (Bf of 0.91 and Af of 1.17). The acceptable simulation zone method showed the new models to successfully predict maximum population density of L. monocytogenes when growing together with lactic acid bacteria in cottage cheese. 11 of 13 simulations of L

  5. Toward development of an autonomous network of bacteria-based delivery systems (BacteriaBots): spatiotemporally high-throughput characterization of bacterial quorum-sensing response.

    PubMed

    Sahari, Ali; Traore, Mahama A; Stevens, Ann M; Scharf, Birgit E; Behkam, Bahareh

    2014-12-02

    Characterization of bacterial innate and engineered cooperative behavior, regulated through chemical signaling in a process known as quorum sensing, is critical to development of a myriad of bacteria-enabled systems including biohybrid drug delivery systems and biohybrid mobile sensor networks. Here, we demonstrate, for the first time, that microfluidic diffusive mixers can be used for spatiotemporally high-throughput characterization of bacterial quorum-sensing response. Using this batch characterization method, the quorum-sensing response in Escherichia coli MG1655, transformed with a truncated lux operon from Vibrio fischeri, in the presence of 1-100 nM exogenous acyl-homoserine lactone molecules has been quantified. This method provides a rapid and facile tool for high-throughput characterization of the quorum-sensing response of genetically modified bacteria in the presence of a wide concentration range of signaling molecules with a precision of ±0.5 nM. Furthermore, the quorum-sensing response of BacteriaBots has been characterized to determine if the results obtained from a large bacterial population can serve as a robust predictive tool for the small bacterial population attached to each BacteriaBot.

  6. Influence of the Biliary System on Biliary Bacteria Revealed by Bacterial Communities of the Human Biliary and Upper Digestive Tracts.

    PubMed

    Ye, Fuqiang; Shen, Hongzhang; Li, Zhen; Meng, Fei; Li, Lei; Yang, Jianfeng; Chen, Ying; Bo, Xiaochen; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Ni, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Biliary bacteria have been implicated in gallstone pathogenesis, though a clear understanding of their composition and source is lacking. Moreover, the effects of the biliary environment, which is known to be generally hostile to most bacteria, on biliary bacteria are unclear. Here, we investigated the bacterial communities of the biliary tract, duodenum, stomach, and oral cavity from six gallstone patients by using 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing. We found that all observed biliary bacteria were detectable in the upper digestive tract. The biliary microbiota had a comparatively higher similarity with the duodenal microbiota, versus those of the other regions, but with a reduced diversity. Although the majority of identified bacteria were greatly diminished in bile samples, three Enterobacteriaceae genera (Escherichia, Klebsiella, and an unclassified genus) and Pyramidobacter were abundant in bile. Predictive functional analysis indicated enhanced abilities of environmental information processing and cell motility of biliary bacteria. Our study provides evidence for the potential source of biliary bacteria, and illustrates the influence of the biliary system on biliary bacterial communities.

  7. Growth rates and rRNA content of four marine bacteria in pure cultures and in the Delaware estuary.

    PubMed

    Lankiewicz, Thomas S; Cottrell, Matthew T; Kirchman, David L

    2016-04-01

    Interpretation of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) to 16S rRNA gene ratios (rRNA:rDNA) is based on a limited number of studies with rapidly growing copiotrophic bacteria. The most abundant bacteria in the ocean are oligotrophs, which probably grow more slowly than those bacteria whose rRNA:rDNA versus growth rate relationships are known. To examine whether rRNA:rDNA varies differently in oligotrophic marine bacteria than in copiotrophic bacteria, we used quantitative PCR and reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR to measure rRNA:rDNA in two marine copiotrophs and in two marine oligotrophs, including Candidatus Pelagibacter ubique HTCC1062, a coastal isolate of SAR11, the most abundant bacterial clade in the ocean. The rRNA:rDNA ratios for the two copiotrophs were similar to those expected on the basis of an analysis of previously studied copiotrophic bacteria, while the ratios for the two oligotrophs were substantially lower than predicted even given their slow growth rates. The rRNA:rDNA ratios determined along a transect in the Delaware estuary suggested that SAR11 bacteria grow at rates close to the growth rate in culture, while rates of the two copiotrophs were far below those observed in laboratory cultures. Our results have implications for interpreting rRNA:rDNA from natural communities, understanding growth strategies and comparing regulatory mechanisms in copiotrophs and oligotrophs.

  8. Physical model of the immune response of bacteria against bacteriophage through the adaptive CRISPR-Cas immune system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Pu; Niestemski, Liang Ren; Barrick, Jeffrey E.; Deem, Michael W.

    2013-04-01

    Bacteria and archaea have evolved an adaptive, heritable immune system that recognizes and protects against viruses or plasmids. This system, known as the CRISPR-Cas system, allows the host to recognize and incorporate short foreign DNA or RNA sequences, called ‘spacers’ into its CRISPR system. Spacers in the CRISPR system provide a record of the history of bacteria and phage coevolution. We use a physical model to study the dynamics of this coevolution as it evolves stochastically over time. We focus on the impact of mutation and recombination on bacteria and phage evolution and evasion. We discuss the effect of different spacer deletion mechanisms on the coevolutionary dynamics. We make predictions about bacteria and phage population growth, spacer diversity within the CRISPR locus, and spacer protection against the phage population.

  9. Transport of free and particulate-associated bacteria in karst

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mahler, B.J.; Personne, J.-C.; Lods, G.F.; Drogue, C.

    2000-01-01

    high bacterial concentrations found in both wells, despite the difference in hydraulic conductivity, demonstrates the difficulty of predicting vulnerability of individual wells to bacterial contamination in karst. The extreme temporal variability in bacterial concentrations underscores the importance of event-based monitoring of the bacterial quality of public water supplies in karst. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.Karst aquifers, because of their unique hydrogeologic characteristics, are extremely susceptible to contamination by pathogens. Here we present the results of an investigation of contamination of a karst aquifer by fecal indicator bacteria. Two wells intercepting zones with contrasting effective hydraulic conductivities, as determined by pump test, were monitored both during the dry season and in response to a rain event. Samples were also collected from the adjacent ephemeral surface stream, which is known to be impacted by an upstream wastewater treatment plant after rainfall. Whole water and suspended sediment samples were analyzed for fecal coliforms and enterococci. During the dry season, pumping over a 2-day period resulted in increases in concentrations of fecal coliforms to greater than 10,000 CFU/100 ml in the high-conductivity well; enterococci and total suspended solids also increased, to a lesser degree. Toward the end of the pumping period, as much as 50% of the fecal coliforms were associated with suspended sediment. Irrigation of an up-gradient pine plantation with primary-treated wastewater is the probable source of the bacterial contamination. Sampling after a rain event revealed the strong influence of water quality of the adjacent Terrieu Creek on the ground water. Bacterial concentrations in the wells showed a rapid response to increased concentrations in the surface water, with fecal coliform concentrations in ground water ultimately reaching 60,000 CFU/100 ml. Up to 100% of the bacteria in the ground water was associated with suspended

  10. Jumping Genes: The Transposable DNAs of Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Claire M.; Berg, Douglas E.

    1984-01-01

    Transposons are transposable elements that carry genes for antibiotic resistance. Provides background information on the structure and organization of these "jumping genes" in bacteria. Also describes the use of transposons in tagging genes and lists pertinent references and resource materials. (DH)

  11. Oligonucleotide recombination in gram negative bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report describes several key aspects of a novel form of RecA-independent homologous recombination. We found that synthetic single stranded DNA oligonucleotides (oligos) introduced into bacteria by transformation can site-specifically recombine with bacterial chromosomes in the absence of any a...

  12. Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria: There is Hope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Offner, Susan

    1998-01-01

    Argues that reduction in the use of antibiotics would enable antibiotic-sensitive bacteria to flourish. Presents an activity designed to show students how a small, seemingly unimportant difference in doubling time can, over a period of time, make an enormous difference in population size. (DDR)

  13. Platinum electrodes for electrochemical detection of bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    Bacteria is detected electro-chemically by measuring evolution of hydrogen in test system with platinum and reference electrode. Using system, electrodes of platinum are used to detect and enumerate varieties of gram-positive and gram-negative organisms compared in different media.

  14. INTERACTIONS OF INTRODUCED BACTERIA AND AQUATIC INVERTEBRATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bacteria enter into stream environments from a variety of sources and interact in varying ways with other biota. There were three basic objectives for this project: 1) to examine the effect of different types of macroinvertebrates on bacterial survival and distribution, 2) to com...

  15. Network models of phage-bacteria coevolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosvall, Martin; Dodd, Ian B.; Krishna, Sandeep; Sneppen, Kim

    2006-12-01

    Bacteria and their bacteriophages are the most abundant, widespread, and diverse groups of biological entities on the planet. In an attempt to understand how the interactions between bacteria, virulent phages, and temperate phages might affect the diversity of these groups, we developed a stochastic network model for examining the coevolution of these ecologies. In our approach, nodes represent whole species or strains of bacteria or phages, rather than individuals, with “speciation” and extinction modeled by duplication and removal of nodes. Phage-bacteria links represent host-parasite relationships and temperate-virulent phage links denote prophage-encoded resistance. The effect of horizontal transfer of genetic information between strains was also included in the dynamical rules. The observed networks evolved in a highly dynamic fashion but the ecosystems were prone to collapse (one or more entire groups going extinct). Diversity could be stably maintained in the model only if the probability of speciation was independent of the diversity. Such an effect could be achieved in real ecosystems if the speciation rate is primarily set by the availability of ecological niches.

  16. Magnetic properties of heterotrophic bacteria (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkhovceva, Nadezda V.; Glebova, Irina N.; Romanuk, Anatoly V.

    1994-05-01

    The magnetic properties (magnetic susceptibility and saturation magnetization) of six species of heterotrophic bacteria were studied: alcaligenes faecalis 81, arthrobacter globiformis BKM 685, bacillus cereus 8, leptothrix pseudo-ochracea D-405, proteus vulgaris 14, and seliberia stellata. It has been shown that the magnetic properties of bacteria depend on (1) the peculiarity of the micro-organism (species-specific and connected with cultivation conditions); (2) the source of the iron in the media. Most of the bacteria are diamagnetic in media with a minimum of iron (χ∞=-7.2-0.3×10-6 sm3/g). The spore forming species (bacillus cereus) has increased diamagnetism. Usually the bacteria are paramagnetic in iron-containing media because they concentrate into Fe compounds. The paramagnetism of the iron-concentrating species (anthrobacter globiformis -χpar=2.4×10-6, leptothrix pseudo-ochtracea χpar=11.0×10-6 and seliberia stellata χpar=3.2×10-6 sm3/g) depends, in general, on magnetically ordered compounds. Iron compounds not accumulated by proteus vulgaris and these species are always diamagnetic .

  17. Endocarditis Due to Rare and Fastidious Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Brouqui, P.; Raoult, D.

    2001-01-01

    The etiologic diagnosis of infective endocarditis is easily made in the presence of continuous bacteremia with gram-positive cocci. However, the blood culture may contain a bacterium rarely associated with endocarditis, such as Lactobacillus spp., Klebsiella spp., or nontoxigenic Corynebacterium, Salmonella, Gemella, Campylobacter, Aeromonas, Yersinia, Nocardia, Pasteurella, Listeria, or Erysipelothrix spp., that requires further investigation to establish the relationship with endocarditis, or the blood culture may be uninformative despite a supportive clinical evaluation. In the latter case, the etiologic agents are either fastidious extracellular or intracellular bacteria. Fastidious extracellular bacteria such as Abiotrophia, HACEK group bacteria, Clostridium, Brucella, Legionella, Mycobacterium, and Bartonella spp. need supplemented media, prolonged incubation time, and special culture conditions. Intracellular bacteria such as Coxiella burnetii cannot be isolated routinely. The two most prevalent etiologic agents of culture-negative endocarditis are C. burnetti and Bartonella spp. Their diagnosis is usually carried out serologically. A systemic pathologic examination of excised heart valves including periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining and molecular methods has allowed the identification of Whipple's bacillus endocarditis. Pathologic examination of the valve using special staining, such as Warthin-Starry, Gimenez, and PAS, and broad-spectrum PCR should be performed systematically when no etiologic diagnosis is evident through routine laboratory evaluation. PMID:11148009

  18. Regulating alternative lifestyles in entomopathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Jason M; Kontnik, Renee; Clardy, Jon

    2010-01-12

    Bacteria belonging to the genera Photorhabdus and Xenorhabdus participate in a trilateral symbiosis in which they enable their nematode hosts to parasitize insect larvae. The bacteria switch from persisting peacefully in a nematode's digestive tract to a lifestyle in which pathways to produce insecticidal toxins, degrading enzymes to digest the insect for consumption, and antibiotics to ward off bacterial and fungal competitors are activated. This study addresses three questions: (1) What molecular signal triggers antibiotic production in the bacteria? (2) What small molecules are regulated by the signal? And (3), how do the bacteria recognize the signal? Differential metabolomic profiling in Photorhabdus luminescens TT01 and Xenorhabdus nematophila revealed that L-proline in the insect's hemolymph initiates a metabolic shift. Small molecules known to be crucial for virulence and antibiosis in addition to previously unknown metabolites are dramatically upregulated by L-proline, linking the recognition of host environment to bacterial metabolic regulation. To identify the L-proline-induced signaling pathway, we deleted the proline transporters putP and proU in P. luminescens TT01. Studies of these strains support a model in which acquisition of L-proline both regulates the metabolic shift and maintains the bacterial proton motive force that ultimately regulates the downstream bacterial pathways affecting virulence and antibiotic production.

  19. Carbohydrate Metabolism in Bifidobacteria: Human Symbiotic Bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bifidobacterium ssp. constitute up to 90% of microbial gut flora in the infant colon, but considerably less in adults. Carbohydrate metabolism in these bacteria is highly unusual. Data from four Bifidobacterium genomes indicates genes missing from glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and the TCA cycle, in...

  20. Automated detection of bacteria in urine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleig, A. J.; Picciolo, G. L.; Chappelle, E. W.; Kelbaugh, B. N.

    1972-01-01

    A method for detecting the presence of bacteria in urine was developed which utilizes the bioluminescent reaction of adenosine triphosphate with luciferin and luciferase derived from the tails of fireflies. The method was derived from work on extraterrestrial life detection. A device was developed which completely automates the assay process.

  1. Measurement of Hydrocarbon Transport in Bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydrocarbon uptake by bacteria has not been extensively studied, and strong evidence for active transport of hydrocarbons is lacking. The volatile nature of hydrocarbons, their hydrophobicity, and their relatively low aqueous solubilities can complicate transport assays. Here we present a detailed...

  2. Automatic bio-sample bacteria detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Colburn, M.; Kelbaugh, B. N.; Picciolo, G. L.

    1971-01-01

    Electromechanical device analyzes urine specimens in 15 minutes and processes one sample per minute. Instrument utilizes bioluminescent reaction between luciferase-luciferin mixture and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to determine number of bacteria present in the sample. Device has potential application to analysis of other body fluids.

  3. Self-engineering capabilities of bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Levine, Herbert

    2005-01-01

    Under natural growth conditions, bacteria can utilize intricate communication capabilities (e.g. quorum-sensing, chemotactic signalling and plasmid exchange) to cooperatively form (self-organize) complex colonies with elevated adaptability—the colonial pattern is collectively engineered according to the encountered environmental conditions. Bacteria do not genetically store all the information required for creating all possible patterns. Instead, additional information is cooperatively generated as required for the colonial self-organization to proceed. We describe how complex colonial forms (patterns) emerge through the communication-based singular interplay between individual bacteria and the colony. Each bacterium is, by itself, a biotic autonomous system with its own internal cellular informatics capabilities (storage, processing and assessment of information). These afford the cell plasticity to select its response to biochemical messages it receives, including self-alteration and the broadcasting of messages to initiate alterations in other bacteria. Hence, new features can collectively emerge during self-organization from the intracellular level to the whole colony. The cells thus assume newly co-generated traits and abilities that are not explicitly stored in the genetic information of the individuals. PMID:16849231

  4. Why engineering lactic acid bacteria for biobutanol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Gram-positive Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are considered attractive biocatalysts for biomass to biofuels for several reasons. They have GRAS (Generally Recognized As Safe) status that are acceptable in food, feed, and medical applications. LAB are fermentative: selected strains are capable of f...

  5. (Transport of subsurface bacteria in porous media)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This report describes studies undertaken to better understand basic microbiology of deep underground regions with special reference to Savannah River Plant. The studies related herein describe studies to enhance sampling methods of deep aquifers and soil columns, to develop equipment to better understand the migration of bacteria in deep soils, and to improve methods to culturing and maintaining deep isolates.

  6. [Transport of subsurface bacteria in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    This report describes studies undertaken to better understand basic microbiology of deep underground regions with special reference to Savannah River Plant. The studies related herein describe studies to enhance sampling methods of deep aquifers and soil columns, to develop equipment to better understand the migration of bacteria in deep soils, and to improve methods to culturing and maintaining deep isolates.

  7. ACETOGENIC BACTERIA ASSOCIATED WITH SEAGRASS ROOTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Seagrasses are adapted to being rooted in reduced, anoxic sediments with high rates of sulfate reduction. During the day, an oxygen gradient is generated around the roots, becoming anoxic at night. Thus, obligate anaerobic bacteria in the rhizosphere have to tolerate elevated oxy...

  8. Heterotrophic bacteria in drinking water distribution system: a review.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Shakhawat

    2012-10-01

    The microbiological quality of drinking water in municipal water distribution systems (WDS) depends on several factors. Free residual chlorine and/or chloramines are typically used to minimize bacterial recontamination and/or regrowth in WDS. Despite such preventive measures, regrowth of heterotrophic (HPC) and opportunistic bacteria in bulk water and biofilms has yet to be controlled completely. No approach has shown complete success in eliminating biofilms or HPC bacteria from bulk water and pipe surfaces. Biofilms can provide shelter for pathogenic bacteria and protect these bacteria from disinfectants. Some HPC bacteria may be associated with aesthetic and non-life threatening diseases. Research to date has achieved important success in understanding occurrence and regrowth of bacteria in bulk water and biofilms in WDS. To achieve comprehensive understanding and to provide efficient control against bacteria regrowth, future research on bacteria regrowth dynamics and their implications is warranted. In this study, a review was performed on the literature published in this area. The findings and limitations of these papers are summarized. Occurrences of bacteria in WDS, factors affecting bacteria regrowth in bulk water and biofilms, bacteria control strategies, sources of nutrients, human health risks from bacterial exposure, modelling of bacteria regrowth and methods of bacteria sampling and detection and quantification are investigated. Advances to date are noted, and future research needs are identified. Finally, research directions are proposed to effectively control HPC and opportunistic bacteria in bulk water and biofilms in WDS.

  9. Flagellated bacteria trace out a parabolic arc under low shear condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Yongtae; Hashmi, Sara; Walker, Sharon; Hill, Jane

    2010-03-01

    The measurement and prediction of bacterial transport of bacteria in aquatic systems is of fundamental importance to a variety of fields such as groundwater bioremediation ascending urinary tract infection. The motility of pathogenic bacteria is, however, often missing when considering pathogen translocation prediction. Previously, we reported that flagellated E. coli can translate upstream under low shear flow conditions (Hill et al., 2007). The upstream swimming of flagellated microorganisms depends on hydrodynamic interaction between cell body and surrounding fluid flow. In this study, we use a breathable microfluidic device to image swimming E. coli and P. aeruginosa at a glass surface under low shear flow condition. We find the dominant experimental variables that lead to upstream swimming are: fluid shear, bacterium velocity, and bacterium length. We will present data showing that the sum of forces and torques acting on a bacterium lead to them tracing out a parabolic arc as they turn into the flow to swim upstream.

  10. [Methanotrophic bacteria of acid sphagnum bogs].

    PubMed

    Dedysh, S N

    2002-01-01

    Acid sphagnum bogs cover a considerable part of the territory of Russia and are an important natural source of biogenic methane, which is formed in their anaerobic layers. A considerable portion of this methane is consumed in the aerobic part of the bog profile by acidophilic methanotrophic bacteria, which comprise the methane filter of sphagnum bogs and decrease CH4 emission to the atmosphere. For a long time, these bacteria escaped isolation, which became possible only after the elucidation of the optimal conditions of their functioning in situ: pH 4.5 to 5.5; temperature, from 15 to 20 degrees C; and low salt concentration in the solution. Reproduction of these conditions and rejection of earlier used media with a high content of biogenic elements allowed methanotrophic bacteria of two new genera and species--Methylocella palustris and Methylocapsa acidophila--to be isolated from the peat of sphagnum bogs of the northern part of European Russia and West Siberia. These bacteria are well adapted to the conditions in cold, acid, oligotrophic sphagnum bogs. They grow in a pH range of 4.2-7.5 with an optimum at 5.0-5.5, prefer moderate temperatures (15-25 degrees C) and media with a low content of mineral salts (200-500 mg/l), and are capable of active nitrogen fixation. Design of fluorescently labeled 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes for the detection of Methylocella palustris and Methylocapsa acidophila and their application to the analysis of sphagnum peat samples showed that these bacteria represent dominant populations of methanotrophs with a density of 10(5)-10(6) cells/g peat. In addition to Methylocella and Methylocapsa populations, one more abundant population of methanotrophs was revealed (10(6) cells/g peat), which were phylogenetically close to the genus Methylocystis.

  11. Nutrient transport by ruminal bacteria: a review.

    PubMed

    Martin, S A

    1994-11-01

    Fermentation pathways have been elucidated for predominant ruminal bacteria, but information is limited concerning the specific transport mechanisms used by these microorganisms for C, energy, and N sources. In addition, it is possible that changes in ruminal environmental conditions could affect transport activity. Five carrier-mediated soluble nutrient transport mechanisms have been identified in bacteria: 1) facilitated diffusion, 2) shock sensitive systems, 3) proton symport, 4) Na+ symport, and the 5) phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system (PEP-PTS). Several regulatory mechanisms are also involved at the cell membrane to coordinate utilization of different sugars. Recent research has shown that predominant ruminal bacteria are capable of transporting soluble nutrients by several of the mechanisms outlined above. Megasphaera elsdenii, Selenomonas ruminantium, and Streptococcus bovis transport glucose by the PEP-PTS, and S. ruminantium and S. bovis also possess PEP-PTS activity for disaccharides. Glucose PTS activity in S. bovis was highest at a growth pH of 5.0, low glucose concentrations, and a dilution rate of .10 h-1. The cellulolytic ruminal bacterium Fibrobacter succinogenes uses a Na+ symport mechanism for glucose transport that is sensitive to low extracellular pH and ionophores. Sodium also stimulated cellobiose transport by F. succinogenes, and there is evidence for a proton symport in the transport of both arabinose and xylose by S. ruminantium. A chemical gradient of Na+ seems to play an important role in AA transport in several ruminal bacteria. Studying nutrient transport mechanisms in ruminal bacteria will lead to a better understanding of the ruminal fermentation.

  12. Antibacterial activity of silver-killed bacteria: the "zombies" effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakshlak, Racheli Ben-Knaz; Pedahzur, Rami; Avnir, David

    2015-04-01

    We report a previously unrecognized mechanism for the prolonged action of biocidal agents, which we denote as the zombies effect: biocidally-killed bacteria are capable of killing living bacteria. The concept is demonstrated by first killing Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 with silver nitrate and then challenging, with the dead bacteria, a viable culture of the same bacterium: Efficient antibacterial activity of the killed bacteria is observed. A mechanism is suggested in terms of the action of the dead bacteria as a reservoir of silver, which, due to Le-Chatelier's principle, is re-targeted to the living bacteria. Langmuirian behavior, as well as deviations from it, support the proposed mechanism.

  13. Antibacterial activity of silver-killed bacteria: the "zombies" effect.

    PubMed

    Wakshlak, Racheli Ben-Knaz; Pedahzur, Rami; Avnir, David

    2015-04-23

    We report a previously unrecognized mechanism for the prolonged action of biocidal agents, which we denote as the zombies effect: biocidally-killed bacteria are capable of killing living bacteria. The concept is demonstrated by first killing Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 with silver nitrate and then challenging, with the dead bacteria, a viable culture of the same bacterium: Efficient antibacterial activity of the killed bacteria is observed. A mechanism is suggested in terms of the action of the dead bacteria as a reservoir of silver, which, due to Le-Chatelier's principle, is re-targeted to the living bacteria. Langmuirian behavior, as well as deviations from it, support the proposed mechanism.

  14. Observation of polyphosphate granules in cable bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, T.; Nielsen, L. P.; Risgaard-Petersen, N.

    2015-12-01

    Cable bacteria are long filamentous bacteria that capable for long distance electron transport: transporting electrons derived from oxidizing sulfide in anoxic layers, to oxygen at the sediment surface, over a distance of centimeters. Cable bacteria are found in many types of freshwater and marine sediment all over the world, with density of approximately thousands of kilometers per square meter. These long filaments are composed by individual cells closely related to Desulfobulbaceae, connected with a shared outer membrane inside which the strings structure are presumed to be highly conductive. The observed doubling time of cells within the filament is about 20 min, which is among the shortest compare to other bacteria. In these cable cells, we constantly observed polyphosphate granules (poly-P), regardless of cell dimension and shape. This is very interesting since it has long been recognized that the microbial polyP content is low during rapid growth and increases under unfavorable conditions, for example, increasing sulfide concentration and anoxia resulted in a decomposition of poly-P in Beggiatoa. Here, we investigated marine cable bacteria from Netherland and Aarhus Bay, focusing on the poly-P dynamics under various redox conditions. In poly-P stained cells, typically there are two big poly-P granules locate at each polar. In dividing cells, however, the morphology of poly-P changed to six small granules precisely arranged to two row. Moreover, the cells seem be able to continuously divide more than one time without elongation step. These varied poly-P morphologies demonstrate that poly-P is closely related to the cell growth and cell division, by an unknown mechanism. Individual cable filaments were picked up and were exposed to different redox conditions; our primary data indicated the cable cells could suffer anoxic condition better than oxic condition. We also detected decomposition of poly-P under anoxia. These results call for an in-depth examination

  15. Phylogenetic conservation of substrate use specialization in leaf litter bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Peña, Jeniffer; Allison, Steven D.; Martiny, Jennifer B. H.

    2017-01-01

    Environmental change will influence the ecosystem processes regulated by microbial communities, including leaf litter decomposition. To assess how microbial communities and their functioning might respond to increases in temperature, we quantified the distribution of traits related to carbon substrate utilization and temperature sensitivity in leaf litter bacteria isolated from a natural grassland ecosystem in Southern California. The isolates varied substantially in their carbon substrate use, as well as their response to temperature change. To better predict the functioning and responses in natural communities, we also examined if the functional and response traits were phylogenetically patterned or correlated with one another. We found that the distribution of functional traits displayed a phylogenetic pattern, but the sensitivity of the traits to changes in temperature did not. We also did not detect any correlations between carbon substrate use and sensitivity to changes in temperature. Together, these results suggest that information about microbial composition may provide insights to predicting ecosystem function under one temperature, but that these relationships may not hold under new temperature conditions. PMID:28358894

  16. Phylogenetic conservation of substrate use specialization in leaf litter bacteria.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Kristin L; Peña, Jeniffer; Allison, Steven D; Martiny, Jennifer B H

    2017-01-01

    Environmental change will influence the ecosystem processes regulated by microbial communities, including leaf litter decomposition. To assess how microbial communities and their functioning might respond to increases in temperature, we quantified the distribution of traits related to carbon substrate utilization and temperature sensitivity in leaf litter bacteria isolated from a natural grassland ecosystem in Southern California. The isolates varied substantially in their carbon substrate use, as well as their response to temperature change. To better predict the functioning and responses in natural communities, we also examined if the functional and response traits were phylogenetically patterned or correlated with one another. We found that the distribution of functional traits displayed a phylogenetic pattern, but the sensitivity of the traits to changes in temperature did not. We also did not detect any correlations between carbon substrate use and sensitivity to changes in temperature. Together, these results suggest that information about microbial composition may provide insights to predicting ecosystem function under one temperature, but that these relationships may not hold under new temperature conditions.

  17. Partial least squares for efficient models of fecal indicator bacteria on Great Lakes beaches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brooks, Wesley R.; Fienen, Michael N.; Corsi, Steven R.

    2013-01-01

    At public beaches, it is now common to mitigate the impact of water-borne pathogens by posting a swimmer's advisory when the concentration of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) exceeds an action threshold. Since culturing the bacteria delays public notification when dangerous conditions exist, regression models are sometimes used to predict the FIB concentration based on readily-available environmental measurements. It is hard to know which environmental parameters are relevant to predicting FIB concentration, and the parameters are usually correlated, which can hurt the predictive power of a regression model. Here the method of partial least squares (PLS) is introduced to automate the regression modeling process. Model selection is reduced to the process of setting a tuning parameter to control the decision threshold that separates predicted exceedances of the standard from predicted non-exceedances. The method is validated by application to four Great Lakes beaches during the summer of 2010. Performance of the PLS models compares favorably to that of the existing state-of-the-art regression models at these four sites.

  18. OCCURRENCE OF HETEROTROPHIC BACTERIA WITH VIRULENCE CHARACTERISTICS IN POTABLE WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Treated potable water contains a variety of heterotrophic bacteria that survive current treatment processes. There is evidence that these bacteria are not hazardous to the healthy population, however, the possibility exists that some of them may be opportunistic pathogens capabl...

  19. Rapid detection of bacteria in foods and biological fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fealey, R. D.; Renner, W.

    1973-01-01

    Simple and inexpensive apparatus, called "redox monitoring cell," rapidly detects presence of bacteria. Bacteria is detected by measuring drop in oxygen content in test solution. Apparatus consists of vial with two specially designed electrodes connected to sensitive voltmeter.

  20. Study Ties Inflammation, Gut Bacteria to Type 1 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_163143.html Study Ties Inflammation, Gut Bacteria to Type 1 Diabetes However, it's not yet ... Italian study finds. Those changes include different gut bacteria and inflammation in the small intestine. The differences ...

  1. Gut Bacteria May Link Diet, Colon Cancer, Study Says

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163274.html Gut Bacteria May Link Diet, Colon Cancer, Study Says High- ... link appears to be a type of intestinal bacteria, the Boston research team said. Specifically, they looked ...

  2. MICROBIOLOGICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF BACTERIA INHABITING A WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM SIMULATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The impact of chlorination and chloramination treatments on heterotrophic bacteria (HB) and ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) inhabiting a water distribution system simulator was investigated. Notable changes in bacterial densities were observed during this monitoring study. For e...

  3. THE ECOLOGY OF BACTERIA IN THE ALFRESCO ATMOSPHERE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This MiniReview is concerned with the sources,flux and the spacial and temporal distributions of culturable airborne bacteria; how meteorological conditions modulate these distributions; and how death, culture media, and experimental devices relate to measuring airborne bacteria....

  4. Effect of Essential Oils on Pathogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Nazzaro, Filomena; Fratianni, Florinda; De Martino, Laura; Coppola, Raffaele; De Feo, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    The increasing resistance of microorganisms to conventional chemicals and drugs is a serious and evident worldwide problem that has prompted research into the identification of new biocides with broad activity. Plants and their derivatives, such as essential oils, are often used in folk medicine. In nature, essential oils play an important role in the protection of plants. Essential oils contain a wide variety of secondary metabolites that are capable of inhibiting or slowing the growth of bacteria, yeasts and moulds. Essential oils and their components have activity against a variety of targets, particularly the membrane and cytoplasm, and in some cases, they completely change the morphology of the cells. This brief review describes the activity of essential oils against pathogenic bacteria. PMID:24287491

  5. Sulfate-reducing bacteria: Microbiology and physiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peck, H. D.

    1985-01-01

    The sulfate reducing bacteria, the first nonphotosynthetic anaerobic bacteria demonstrated to contain c type cytochromes, perform electron transfer coupled to phosphorylation. A new bioenergetic scheme for the formation of a proton gradient for growth of Desulfovibrio on organic substrates and sulfate involving vectors electron transfer and consistent with the cellular localization of enzymes and electron transfer components was proposed. Hydrogen is produced in the cytoplasm from organic substrates and, as a permease molecule diffuses rapidly across the cytoplasmic membrane, it is oxidized to protons and electrons by the periplasmic hydrogenase. The electrons only are transferred across the cytoplasmic membrane to the cytoplasm where they are used to reduce sulfate to sulfide. The protons are used for transport or to drive a reversible ATPOSE. The net effect is the transfer of protons across the cytoplasmic membrane with the intervention of a proton pump. This type of H2 cycling is relevant to the bioenergetics of other types of anaerobic microorganisms.

  6. VIABILITY OF COLIFORM BACTERIA IN ANTARCTIC SOIL.

    PubMed

    BOYD, W L; BOYD, J W

    1963-05-01

    Boyd, William L. (Ohio State University, Columbus) and Josephine W. Boyd. Viability of coliform bacteria in antarctic soil. J. Bacteriol. 85:1121-1123. 1963.-The distribution of coliform bacteria in soils of Ross Island and the nearby mainland was studied. None was found in almost all of the samples collected, including some from the Adelie penguin rookeries at Cape Royds and Cape Crozier and in soil at the McMurdo Base which had been recently contaminated by human sewage. Samples of pony manure left from previous expeditions were also negative, with one exception where Escherichia coli were present. Studies carried out with two freshly isolated human strains of E. coli and the isolate from pony manure showed that the death rate was extremely rapid, although the animal strain was much more resistant to the various factors of the environment causing death.

  7. Targeted delivery of colloids by swimming bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koumakis, N.; Lepore, A.; Maggi, C.; di Leonardo, R.

    2013-10-01

    The possibility of exploiting motile microorganisms as tiny propellers represents a fascinating strategy for the transport of colloidal cargoes. However, delivery on target sites usually requires external control fields to steer propellers and trigger cargo release. The need for a constant feedback mechanism prevents the design of compact devices where biopropellers could perform their tasks autonomously. Here we show that properly designed three-dimensional (3D) microstructures can define accumulation areas where bacteria spontaneously and efficiently store colloidal beads. The process is stochastic in nature and results from the rectifying action of an asymmetric energy landscape over the fluctuating forces arising from collisions with swimming bacteria. As a result, the concentration of colloids over target areas can be strongly increased or depleted according to the topography of the underlying structures. Besides the significance to technological applications, our experiments pose some important questions regarding the structure of stationary probability distributions in non-equilibrium systems.

  8. Biotechnological potential of Clostridium butyricum bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Szymanowska-Powałowska, Daria; Orczyk, Dorota; Leja, Katarzyna

    2014-01-01

    In response to demand from industry for microorganisms with auspicious biotechnological potential, a worldwide interest has developed in bacteria and fungi isolation. Microorganisms of interesting metabolic properties include non-pathogenic bacteria of the genus Clostridium, particularly C. acetobutylicum, C. butyricum and C. pasteurianum. A well-known property of C. butyricum is their ability to produce butyric acid, as well as effectively convert glycerol to 1,3-propanediol (38.2 g/L). A conversion rate of 0.66 mol 1,3-propanediol/mol of glycerol has been obtained. Results of the studies described in the present paper broaden our knowledge of characteristic features of C. butyricum specific isolates in terms of their phylogenetic affiliation, fermentation capacity and antibacterial properties. PMID:25477923

  9. Tooth brushing inhibits oral bacteria in dogs

    PubMed Central

    WATANABE, Kazuhiro; HAYASHI, Kotaro; KIJIMA, Saku; NONAKA, Chie; YAMAZOE, Kazuaki

    2015-01-01

    In this study, scaling, polishing and daily tooth brushing were performed in 20 beagle dogs, and the number of oral bacteria was determined using a bacterial counter. The dogs were randomized into the scaling (S), scaling + polishing (SP), scaling + tooth daily brushing (SB) and scaling + polishing + tooth daily brushing (SPB) groups. Samples were collected from the buccal surface of the maxillary fourth premolars of the dogs immediately after scaling and every week thereafter from weeks 1 to 8. Throughout the study, the number of bacteria was significantly lower in the SB and SPB groups compared with the S group. The findings suggest that daily tooth brushing inhibited oral bacterial growth in the dogs. PMID:25994486

  10. Specialized cell surface structures in cellulolytic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lamed, R; Naimark, J; Morgenstern, E; Bayer, E A

    1987-08-01

    The cell surface topology of various gram-negative and -positive, anaerobic and aerobic, mesophilic and thermophilic, cellulolytic and noncellulolytic bacteria was investigated by scanning electron microscopic visualization using cationized ferritin. Characteristic protuberant structures were observed on cells of all cellulolytic strains. These structures appeared to be directly related to the previously described exocellular cellulase-containing polycellulosomes of Clostridium thermocellum YS (E. A. Bayer and R. Lamed, J. Bacteriol. 167:828-836, 1986). Immunochemical evidence and lectin-binding studies suggested a further correlation on the molecular level among cellulolytic bacteria. The results indicate that such cell surface cellulase-containing structures may be of general consequence to the bacterial interaction with and degradation of cellulose.

  11. Specialized cell surface structures in cellulolytic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Lamed, R; Naimark, J; Morgenstern, E; Bayer, E A

    1987-01-01

    The cell surface topology of various gram-negative and -positive, anaerobic and aerobic, mesophilic and thermophilic, cellulolytic and noncellulolytic bacteria was investigated by scanning electron microscopic visualization using cationized ferritin. Characteristic protuberant structures were observed on cells of all cellulolytic strains. These structures appeared to be directly related to the previously described exocellular cellulase-containing polycellulosomes of Clostridium thermocellum YS (E. A. Bayer and R. Lamed, J. Bacteriol. 167:828-836, 1986). Immunochemical evidence and lectin-binding studies suggested a further correlation on the molecular level among cellulolytic bacteria. The results indicate that such cell surface cellulase-containing structures may be of general consequence to the bacterial interaction with and degradation of cellulose. Images PMID:3301817

  12. Scanning electron microscopy of bacteria Tetrasphaera duodecadis.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, E; Enríquez, L; Sánchez, A; Ovalle, M; Olivas, A

    2014-01-01

    This study reports the characterization of the Tetrasphaera duodecadis bacteria and the techniques used therein. In order to evaluate the morphological characteristics of the T. duodecadis bacteria scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used throughout its different growth stages. These microorganisms were grown in vitamin B12 broths with 1% tryptone, 0.2% yeast extract, and 0.1% glucose. The turbidimetric method was employed for the determination of bacterial concentration and growth curve. The SEM results show small agglomerates of 0.8 ± 0.05 µm during the lag phase, and rod-like shapes during the exponential phase with similar shapes in the stationary phase.

  13. [Synthesis of reserve polyhydroxyalkanoates by luminescent bacteria].

    PubMed

    Boiandin, A N; Kalacheva, G S; Rodicheva, E K; Volova, T G

    2008-01-01

    The ability of marine luminescent bacteria to synthesize polyesters of hydroxycarboxylic acids (polyhydroxyalkanoates, PHA) as reserve macromolecules was studied. Twenty strains from the collection of the luminescent bacteria CCIBSO (WDSM839) of the Institute of Biophysics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, assigned to different taxa (Photobacterium leiognathi, Ph. phosphoreum, Vibrio harveyi, and V. fischeri) were analyzed. The most productive strains were identified, and the conditions ensuring high polymer yields in batch culture (40-70% of the cell dry mass weight) were determined. The capacity of synthesizing two- and three-component polymers containing hydroxybutyric acid as the main monomer and hydroxyvaleric and hydroxyhexanoic acids was revealed in Ph. leiognathi and V. harveyi strains. The results allow luminescent microorganisms to be regarded as new producers of multicomponent polyhydroxyalkanoates.

  14. Bacteria slingshot more on soft surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rongrong; Ni, Lei; Jin, Zhenyu; Li, Jiahong; Jin, Fan

    2014-11-01

    Adaptive responses greatly improve the competitive capacities of bacteria in diverse environments. Here, we investigate whether bacteria can adapt to a microenvironment with distinctive softness by examining the type-IV pili (TFP)-mediated motility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa cells on brush-like surfaces that are grafted with a layer of thermally sensitive polymer chains, where the softness of the brush-layer is tunable by applying a small temperature change (from 30 to 37 °C). We report that P. aeruginosa cells slingshot more on soft surfaces at a shear-thinning condition, which greatly facilitates their surface crawling by means of reducing energy dissipation. This adaptive response suggests that P. aeruginosa cells may be able to sense the local viscoelasticity and then deploy TFP to adapt to their physical surroundings.

  15. Bioluminescent imaging of bacteria during mouse infection.

    PubMed

    Warawa, Jonathan M; Lawrenz, Matthew B

    2014-01-01

    Diagnostic imaging is a powerful tool that has recently been applied towards the study of infectious diseases. Optical imaging of bioluminescently labeled bacteria in infected animals allows for real-time analysis of bacterial proliferation and dissemination during infection without sacrificing the animal. Imaging also allows for tracking of disease progression in an individual subject over time, has the potential to reveal previously overlooked sites of infection, and reduces the number of research animals used in pathogenesis studies. Here, we describe the use of a deep-cooled CCD camera imager to record light emitted from bacteria during infection. We also describe the process of correlating bioluminescence to bacterial numbers by ex vivo imaging of necropsied tissues. Together these techniques can be used to estimate bacterial burdens in host tissues both in vivo and ex vivo using bioluminescent imaging.

  16. Intracellular cytoskeletal elements and cytoskeletons in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Madkour, Mohamed H F; Mayer, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Within a short period of time after the discovery of bacterial cytoskletons, major progress had been made in areas such as general spatial layout of cytoskeletons, their involvement in a variety of cellfunctions (shape control, cell division, chromosome segregation, cell motility). This progress was achieved by application of advanced investigation techniques. Homologs of eukaryotic actin, tubulin, and intermediate filaments were found in bacteria; cytoskeletal proteins not closely or not at all related to any of these major cytoskeletal proteins were discovered in a number of bacteria such as Mycoplasmas, Spiroplasmas, Spirochetes, Treponema, Caulobacter. A structural role for bacterial elongation factor Tu was indicated. On the basis of this new thinking, new approaches in biotechnology and new drugs are on the way.

  17. Predacious bacteria, Bdellovibrio with potential for biocontrol.

    PubMed

    Markelova, Natalia Y

    2010-11-01

    Bacteria of the genus of Bdellovibrio are highly motile Gram-negative predators of other Gram-negative bacteria causing lysis of their prey. Here we report results of studies on the interactions of Bdellovibrio with species of Alcaligenes, Campylobacter, Erwinia, Escherichia, Helicobacter, Pseudomonas, Legionella, and Shigella in agar lower, liquid media and cells attached to a surface. Helicobacter pylori was studied employing both actively growing and viable but nonculturable (VBNC) cells. The majority of the bacterial strains tested were found to be susceptible to Bdellovibrio. A significant observation was that Bdellovibrio attacked both actively growing and VBNC H. pylori, that phenomenon has never been reported. The results indicate that bdellovibrios have potential as biocontrol agents.

  18. Have sex or not? Lessons from bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lodé, T

    2012-01-01

    Sex is one of the greatest puzzles in evolutionary biology. A true meiotic process occurs only in eukaryotes, while in bacteria, gene transcription is fragmentary, so asexual reproduction in this case really means clonal reproduction. Sex could stem from a signal that leads to increased reproductive output of all interacting individuals and could be understood as a secondary consequence of primitive metabolic reactions. Meiotic sex evolved in proto-eukaryotes to solve a problem that bacteria did not have, namely a large amount of DNA material, occurring in an archaic step of proto-cell formation and genetic exchanges. Rather than providing selective advantages through reproduction, sex could be thought of as a series of separate events which combines step-by-step some very weak benefits of recombination, meiosis, gametogenesis and syngamy.

  19. Probiotic bacteria induce a 'glow of health'.

    PubMed

    Levkovich, Tatiana; Poutahidis, Theofilos; Smillie, Christopher; Varian, Bernard J; Ibrahim, Yassin M; Lakritz, Jessica R; Alm, Eric J; Erdman, Susan E

    2013-01-01

    Radiant skin and hair are universally recognized as indications of good health. However, this 'glow of health' display remains poorly understood. We found that feeding of probiotic bacteria to aged mice induced integumentary changes mimicking peak health and reproductive fitness characteristic of much younger animals. Eating probiotic yogurt triggered epithelial follicular anagen-phase shift with sebocytogenesis resulting in thick lustrous fur due to a bacteria-triggered interleukin-10-dependent mechanism. Aged male animals eating probiotics exhibited increased subcuticular folliculogenesis, when compared with matched controls, yielding luxuriant fur only in probiotic-fed subjects. Female animals displayed probiotic-induced hyperacidity coinciding with shinier hair, a feature that also aligns with fertility in human females. Together these data provide insights into mammalian evolution and novel strategies for integumentary health.

  20. Cell surface characteristics enable encrustation-free survival of neutrophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, G.; Chan, C. S.

    2011-12-01

    Microbial growth in mineralizing environments depends on the cells' ability to evade surface precipitation. Cell-mineral interactions may be required for metabolism, but if unmoderated, cells could become encrusted, which would limit diffusion of nutrients and waste across cell walls. A combination of cell surface charge and hydrophobicity could enable the survival of microbes in such environments by inhibiting mineral attachment. To investigate this mechanism, we characterized the surfaces of two neutrophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB): Mariprofundus ferrooxydans, a Zetaproteobacterium from Fe(II)-rich submarine hydrothermal vents and a Betaproteobacterium Gallionellales strain R-1, recently isolated from a ferrous groundwater seep. Both bacteria produce iron oxyhydroxides, yet successfully escape surface encrustation while inhabiting milieu where iron minerals are also produced by abiotic processes. SEM-EDX and TEM-EELS analyses of cultured bacteria revealed no iron on the cell surfaces. Zeta potential measurements showed that these bacteria have very small negative surface charge (0 to -4 mV) over a pH range of 4-9, indicating near-neutrally charged surfaces. Water contact angle measurements and thermodynamic calculations demonstrate that both bacteria and abiotically-formed Fe oxhydroxides are hydrophilic. Extended-DLVO calculations showed that hydrophilic repulsion between cells and minerals dominates over electrostatic and Lifshitz-van der Waals interactions. This leads to overall repulsion between microbes and minerals, thus preventing surface encrustation. Low surface charge and hydrophilicity (determined by microbial adhesion to hydrocarbon assay) were common features for both live and azide-inhibited cells, which shows that surface characteristics do not depend on active metabolism. It is remarkable that these two phylogenetically-distant bacteria from different environments employ similar adaptations to prevent surface mineralization. Our results

  1. The population and evolutionary dynamics of phage and bacteria with CRISPR-mediated immunity.

    PubMed

    Levin, Bruce R; Moineau, Sylvain; Bushman, Mary; Barrangou, Rodolphe

    2013-01-01

    Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR), together with associated genes (cas), form the CRISPR-cas adaptive immune system, which can provide resistance to viruses and plasmids in bacteria and archaea. Here, we use mathematical models, population dynamic experiments, and DNA sequence analyses to investigate the host-phage interactions in a model CRISPR-cas system, Streptococcus thermophilus DGCC7710 and its virulent phage 2972. At the molecular level, the bacteriophage-immune mutant bacteria (BIMs) and CRISPR-escape mutant phage (CEMs) obtained in this study are consistent with those anticipated from an iterative model of this adaptive immune system: resistance by the addition of novel spacers and phage evasion of resistance by mutation in matching sequences or flanking motifs. While CRISPR BIMs were readily isolated and CEMs generated at high rates (frequencies in excess of 10(-6)), our population studies indicate that there is more to the dynamics of phage-host interactions and the establishment of a BIM-CEM arms race than predicted from existing assumptions about phage infection and CRISPR-cas immunity. Among the unanticipated observations are: (i) the invasion of phage into populations of BIMs resistant by the acquisition of one (but not two) spacers, (ii) the survival of sensitive bacteria despite the presence of high densities of phage, and (iii) the maintenance of phage-limited communities due to the failure of even two-spacer BIMs to become established in populations with wild-type bacteria and phage. We attribute (i) to incomplete resistance of single-spacer BIMs. Based on the results of additional modeling and experiments, we postulate that (ii) and (iii) can be attributed to the phage infection-associated production of enzymes or other compounds that induce phenotypic phage resistance in sensitive bacteria and kill resistant BIMs. We present evidence in support of these hypotheses and discuss the implications of these results

  2. Bacteria fate and transport in a river - simulating the processes in a flume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarzwälder, Kordula; Walters, Eve; Rutschmann, Peter

    2014-05-01

    The water quality in rivers is influenced inter alia by the inlet of untreated wastewater due to combined sewer overflows. Such processes of water quality degradation are a problem even in Europe and even nowadays. This wastewater is a mixture of organic and inorganic material e.g. bacteria which can be found as freely suspended or agglomerated to sediment in the water phase of a river. To make a prediction of water quality we have to know details about the transport of these bacteria in this bulk phase, about the sorption and desorption rates, the sedimentation and the remobilization of the bacteria. We investigated the sedimentation and remobilisation processes of E. coli and Enterococci in a flume mimicking an oligotrophic river. The flume is a large-scale flume in the outside area of our lab (Oskar von Miller Institute) to make sure that the influence of different important factors for inactivation e.g. UV-light or grazers can be taken into account. In addition there we are able to use a flume, which is not downscaled but simulates a slice of a river. So we can minimize some scaling problems, which could occur combining a scaled flume and the bacteria which can't be scaled. We also use natural water coming directly from a natural river. We also had natural soil so realistic grain size. Hence it is possible to simulate realistic effects of the turbidity on inactivation and the sedimentation due to the higher probability of the bacteria to get attached to inorganic material of suspended bed load. It is also possible to get realistic biofilm on the stones, which influences the remobilisation processes and rates of settled bacteria back into the bulk phase. The results of our experiments are now used for a module in the 3D software Flow3D to simulate the effects of a point source inlet of raw wastewater on the water quality.

  3. The Effect of Inorganic Particles on Metabolism by Marine Bacteria.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    106 xii 1. INTRODUCTION This dissertation concerns heterotrophic marine bacteria and the manner in which inorganic solid surfaces can affect their...hope of contributing to an understanding of why bacteria attach to inorganic surfaces in seawater. Heterotrophic bacteria are those which derive their...of cellular material and generation of energy (Stanier et al., 1976). The metabolic activity and growth of heterotrophic marine bacteria are, by

  4. Isolating DNA from Gram-Negative Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Green, Michael R; Sambrook, Joseph

    2017-01-03

    The isolation of DNA from bacteria, described in this protocol, relies upon the use of sodium dodecyl sulfate and proteinase K to lyse the cells. High-molecular-weight DNA is then sheared (to reduce its viscosity and make it more manageable), extracted with phenol:chloroform, and precipitated with isopropanol. DNA isolated according to this procedure ranges from 30 to 80 kb in length.

  5. Raman activity in synchronously dividing bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Layne, S.P.

    1985-01-01

    Using a spectrometer equipped with an optical-multichannel analyzer as the detector (OMA), we have observed the Stokes laser-Raman spectra of metabolically active Escherichia coli and Bacillus megaterium from 100 - 2100 cm/sup -1/. After lengthy investigation, no Raman lines attributable to the metabolic process nor the cells themselves were found. Previous Raman spectra of active bacteria cannot be used to support nonlinear theories in biology. 34 refs., 9 figs.

  6. Evidence for metabolic activity of airborne bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatigny, M. A.; Wolochow, H.

    1974-01-01

    Aerosols of the bacterium Serratia marcescens, and of uniformly labeled C-14 glucose were produced simultaneously and mixed in tubing leading to an aerosol chamber. During a subsequent period of about 5 hrs, carbon dioxide was produced metabolically within the chamber, and labeled material incorporated within the suspended particles first increased then decreased. This constitutes the first direct evidence of microbial metabolism of bacteria suspended in the air.

  7. Macrophage defense mechanisms against intracellular bacteria.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Günter; Schaible, Ulrich E

    2015-03-01

    Macrophages and neutrophils play a decisive role in host responses to intracellular bacteria including the agent of tuberculosis (TB), Mycobacterium tuberculosis as they represent the forefront of innate immune defense against bacterial invaders. At the same time, these phagocytes are also primary targets of intracellular bacteria to be abused as host cells. Their efficacy to contain and eliminate intracellular M. tuberculosis decides whether a patient initially becomes infected or not. However, when the infection becomes chronic or even latent (as in the case of TB) despite development of specific immune activation, phagocytes have also important effector functions. Macrophages have evolved a myriad of defense strategies to combat infection with intracellular bacteria such as M. tuberculosis. These include induction of toxic anti-microbial effectors such as nitric oxide and reactive oxygen intermediates, the stimulation of microbe intoxication mechanisms via acidification or metal accumulation in the phagolysosome, the restriction of the microbe's access to essential nutrients such as iron, fatty acids, or amino acids, the production of anti-microbial peptides and cytokines, along with induction of autophagy and efferocytosis to eliminate the pathogen. On the other hand, M. tuberculosis, as a prime example of a well-adapted facultative intracellular bacterium, has learned during evolution to counter-balance the host's immune defense strategies to secure survival or multiplication within this otherwise hostile environment. This review provides an overview of innate immune defense of macrophages directed against intracellular bacteria with a focus on M. tuberculosis. Gaining more insights and knowledge into this complex network of host-pathogen interaction will identify novel target sites of intervention to successfully clear infection at a time of rapidly emerging multi-resistance of M. tuberculosis against conventional antibiotics.

  8. Method of detecting and counting bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Picciolo, G. L.; Chappelle, E. W. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An improved method is provided for determining bacterial levels, especially in samples of aqueous physiological fluids. The method depends on the quantitative determination of bacterial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in the presence of nonbacterial ATP. The bacterial ATP is released by cell rupture and is measured by an enzymatic bioluminescent assay. A concentration technique is included to make the method more sensitive. It is particularly useful where the fluid to be measured contains an unknown or low bacteria count.

  9. [Phylogenetic analysis of bacteria of extreme ecosystems].

    PubMed

    Romanovskaia, V A; Parfenova, V V; Bel'kova, N L; Sukhanova, E V; Gladka, G V; Tashireva, A A

    2014-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of aerobic chemoorganotrophic bacteria of the two extreme regions (Dead Sea and West Antarctic) was performed on the basis of the nucleotide sequences of the 16S rRNA gene. Thermotolerant and halotolerant spore-forming bacteria 7t1 and 7t3 of terrestrial ecosystems Dead Sea identified as Bacillus licheniformis and B. subtilis subsp. subtilis, respectively. Taking into account remote location of thermotolerant strain 6t1 from closely related strains in the cluster Staphylococcus, 6t1 strain can be regarded as Staphylococcus sp. In terrestrial ecosystems, Galindez Island (Antarctic) detected taxonomically diverse psychrotolerant bacteria. From ornithogenic soil were isolated Micrococcus luteus O-1 and Microbacterium trichothecenolyticum O-3. Strains 4r5, 5r5 and 40r5, isolated from grass and lichens, can be referred to the genus Frondihabitans. These strains are taxonomically and ecologically isolated and on the tree diagram form the joint cluster with three isolates Frondihabitans sp., isolated from the lichen Austrian Alps, and psychrotolerant associated with plants F. cladoniiphilus CafT13(T). Isolates from black lichen in the different stationary observation points on the south side of a vertical cliff identified as: Rhodococcus fascians 181n3, Sporosarcina aquimarina O-7, Staphylococcus sp. 0-10. From orange biofilm of fouling on top of the vertical cliff isolated Arthrobacter sp. 28r5g1, from the moss-- Serratia sp. 6r1g. According to the results, Frondihabitans strains most frequently encountered among chemoorganotrophic aerobic bacteria in the Antarctic phytocenoses.

  10. Bacteria that glide with helical tracks

    PubMed Central

    Nan, Beiyan; McBride, Mark J.; Chen, Jing; Zusman, David R.; Oster, George

    2014-01-01

    Many bacteria glide smoothly on surfaces, but with no discernable propulsive organelles on their surface. Recent experiments with Myxococcus xanthus and Flavobacterium johnsoniae show that both distantly related bacterial species glide utilizing proteins that move in helical tracks, albeit with significantly different motility mechanisms. Both species utilize proton motive force for movement. However, the motors that power gliding in M. xanthus have been identified, while the F. johnsoniae motors remain to be discovered. PMID:24556443

  11. Isolation of lightning-competent soil bacteria.

    PubMed

    Cérémonie, Hélène; Buret, François; Simonet, Pascal; Vogel, Timothy M

    2004-10-01

    Artificial transformation is typically performed in the laboratory by using either a chemical (CaCl(2)) or an electrical (electroporation) method. However, laboratory-scale lightning has been shown recently to electrotransform Escherichia coli strain DH10B in soil. In this paper, we report on the isolation of two "lightning-competent" soil bacteria after direct electroporation of the Nycodenz bacterial ring extracted from prairie soil in the presence of the pBHCRec plasmid (Tc(r), Sp(r), Sm(r)). The electrotransformability of the isolated bacteria was measured both in vitro (by electroporation cuvette) and in situ (by lightning in soil microcosm) and then compared to those of E. coli DH10B and Pseudomonas fluorescens C7R12. The electrotransformation frequencies measured reached 10(-3) to 10(-4) by electroporation and 10(-4) to 10(-5) by simulated lightning, while no transformation was observed in the absence of electrical current. Two of the isolated lightning-competent soil bacteria were identified as Pseudomonas sp. strains.

  12. Rotating bacteria aggregate into active crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petroff, Alexander; Wu, Xiao-Lun; Libchaber, Albert

    2014-11-01

    The dynamics of many microbial ecosystems are determined not only by the response of individual bacteria to their chemical and physical environments but also the dynamics that emerge from interactions between cells. Here we investigate the collective dynamics displayed by communities of Thiovulum majus, one of the fastest known bacteria. We observe that when these bacteria swim close to a microscope cover slip, the cells spontaneously aggregate into a visually-striking two-dimensional hexagonal lattice of rotating cells. Each cell in an aggregate rotates its flagella, exerting a force that pushes the cell into the cover slip and a torque that causes the cell to rotate. As cells rotate against their neighbors, they exert forces and torques on the aggregate that cause the crystal to move and cells to hop to new positions in the lattice. We show how these dynamics arises from hydrodynamic and surface forces between cells. We derive the equations of motion for an aggregate, show that this model reproduces many aspects of the observed dynamics, and discuss the stability of these and similar active crystals. Finally, we discuss the ecological significance of this behavior to understand how the ability to aggregate into these communities may have evolved.

  13. Rotating Bacteria Aggregate into Active Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petroff, A. P.; Wu, X. L.; Libchaber, A.

    2014-12-01

    The dynamics of many microbial ecosystems are determined not only by the response of individual bacteria to their chemical and physical environments but also the dynamics that emerge from interactions between cells. Here we investigate collective dynamics displayed by communities of Thiovulum majus, one of the fastest known bacteria. We observe that when these bacteria swim close to a microscope cover slip, the cells spontaneously aggregate into a visually-striking, two-dimensional hexagonal lattice of rotating cells. Each cell in an aggregate rotates its flagella, exerting a force that pushes the cell into the cover slip and a torque that causes the cell to rotate. As cells rotate against their neighbors, they exert forces and torques on the aggregate that cause the crystal to move and cells to hop to new positions in the lattice. We show how these dynamics arise from hydrodynamic and surface forces between cells. We derive the equations of motion for an aggregate, show that this model reproduces many aspects of the observed dynamics, and discuss the stability of these and similar active crystals. Finally, we discuss the ecological significance of this behavior to understand how the ability to aggregate into these communities may have evolved.

  14. Transfer of DNA from Bacteria to Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Historically, the members of the Agrobacterium genus have been considered the only bacterial species naturally able to transfer and integrate DNA into the genomes of their eukaryotic hosts. Yet, increasing evidence suggests that this ability to genetically transform eukaryotic host cells might be more widespread in the bacterial world. Indeed, analyses of accumulating genomic data reveal cases of horizontal gene transfer from bacteria to eukaryotes and suggest that it represents a significant force in adaptive evolution of eukaryotic species. Specifically, recent reports indicate that bacteria other than Agrobacterium, such as Bartonella henselae (a zoonotic pathogen), Rhizobium etli (a plant-symbiotic bacterium related to Agrobacterium), or even Escherichia coli, have the ability to genetically transform their host cells under laboratory conditions. This DNA transfer relies on type IV secretion systems (T4SSs), the molecular machines that transport macromolecules during conjugative plasmid transfer and also during transport of proteins and/or DNA to the eukaryotic recipient cells. In this review article, we explore the extent of possible transfer of genetic information from bacteria to eukaryotic cells as well as the evolutionary implications and potential applications of this transfer. PMID:27406565

  15. Precision genome engineering in lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    van Pijkeren, Jan Peter; Britton, Robert A

    2014-08-29

    Innovative new genome engineering technologies for manipulating chromosomes have appeared in the last decade. One of these technologies, recombination mediated genetic engineering (recombineering) allows for precision DNA engineering of chromosomes and plasmids in Escherichia coli. Single-stranded DNA recombineering (SSDR) allows for the generation of subtle mutations without the need for selection and without leaving behind any foreign DNA. In this review we discuss the application of SSDR technology in lactic acid bacteria, with an emphasis on key factors that were critical to move this technology from E. coli into Lactobacillus reuteri and Lactococcus lactis. We also provide a blueprint for how to proceed if one is attempting to establish SSDR technology in a lactic acid bacterium. The emergence of CRISPR-Cas technology in genome engineering and its potential application to enhancing SSDR in lactic acid bacteria is discussed. The ability to perform precision genome engineering in medically and industrially important lactic acid bacteria will allow for the genetic improvement of strains without compromising safety.

  16. Hemagglutinating activity in phytopathogenic bacteria surface compounds.

    PubMed

    Serra, M T; Castresana, M C; Tejerina, G

    1987-01-01

    Extracellular components of plant pathogenic bacteria were obtained from their culture medium as well as from the whole cells by using NaCl 1 M, pH 6.0; 20% sucrose dissolved in 0.03 M Tris buffer, pH 8.0; or 0.05 M Na2EDTA. All the extracts from Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora, Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola, Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli, Pseudomonas solanacearum, and Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica, were assayed for hemagglutinating activity on sheep, rabbit and chicken red blood cells (RBCs). The only active extracts were those obtained by NaCl treatment. They agglutinated sheep and rabbit erythrocytes. Extracts from E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica gave rise to the high agglutination titer on rabbit RBCs. These extracts had the lowest polysaccharide/protein ratio. E. carotovora subsp. carotovora extracts showed only a low titer (18.5 units). The agglutinating activity present in NaCl extracts of the bacteria tested was inhibited by different carbohydrates to various extent. Extracts from E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica appeared to be the most sensitive ones while those of E. carotovora subsp. carotovora least sensitive to the presence of sugar. It is suggested that hemagglutinins observed in plant pathogenic bacteria and those in plant host are similar and that both may, in some way, be involved in the plant-parasite relationship.

  17. Precision genome engineering in lactic acid bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Innovative new genome engineering technologies for manipulating chromosomes have appeared in the last decade. One of these technologies, recombination mediated genetic engineering (recombineering) allows for precision DNA engineering of chromosomes and plasmids in Escherichia coli. Single-stranded DNA recombineering (SSDR) allows for the generation of subtle mutations without the need for selection and without leaving behind any foreign DNA. In this review we discuss the application of SSDR technology in lactic acid bacteria, with an emphasis on key factors that were critical to move this technology from E. coli into Lactobacillus reuteri and Lactococcus lactis. We also provide a blueprint for how to proceed if one is attempting to establish SSDR technology in a lactic acid bacterium. The emergence of CRISPR-Cas technology in genome engineering and its potential application to enhancing SSDR in lactic acid bacteria is discussed. The ability to perform precision genome engineering in medically and industrially important lactic acid bacteria will allow for the genetic improvement of strains without compromising safety. PMID:25185700

  18. Bacteria dispersion in microchanel containing random obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creppy, Adama; Auradou, Harold; Douarche, Carine; D'Angelo, Veronica; Nguyen, Jacky; Fluide Automatique Et Systemes Thermiques Collaboration; Laboratoire de Physique Du Solide Collaboration; Groupo de Medios Porosos, Fiuba Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    Dispersion of particles in porous media is a classical problem well studied where physical laws are well established and show good agreement with experimental observations. Recently, contrary to what is thought, observations revealed that self-propelled particles under flow, orient their swimming, what is designated by the term of rheotaxis. But less is known about what happen for self-propelled particles under flow in presence of obstacles. For this purpose, we developed a specific experimental setup in order to show the coupling of bacteria E. Coli RP437 strain swimming with the presence of obstacles in the dispersion process. We chose to develop a micro-fluidic device of rectangular section of 0 . 05 μm2 containing obstacles of different sizes(10 - 150 μm) when a bacteria size is about 1 μm . Thanks to the transparency of the flow we can track hundreds of trajectories of bacteria, the analysis of which revealed that their swimming influences the dispersion when the flow velocity is of the order of their swimming velocity (10 μm / s). Agence Nationale de la Recherche.

  19. Bacteria-powered battery on paper.

    PubMed

    Fraiwan, Arwa; Choi, Seokheun

    2014-12-21

    Paper-based devices have recently emerged as simple and low-cost paradigms for fluid manipulation and analytical/clinical testing. However, there are significant challenges in developing paper-based devices at the system level, which contain integrated paper-based power sources. Here, we report a microfabricated paper-based bacteria-powered battery that is capable of generating power from microbial metabolism. The battery on paper showed a very short start-up time relative to conventional microbial fuel cells (MFCs); paper substrates eliminated the time traditional MFCs required to accumulate and acclimate bacteria on the anode. Only four batteries connected in series provided desired values of current and potential to power an LED for more than 30 minutes. The battery featured (i) a low-cost paper-based proton exchange membrane directly patterned on commercially available parchment paper and (ii) paper reservoirs for holding the anolyte and the catholyte for an extended period of time. Based on this concept, we also demonstrate the use of paper-based test platforms for the rapid characterization of electricity-generating bacteria. This paper-based microbial screening tool does not require external pumps/tubings and represents the most rapid test platform (<50 min) compared with the time needed by using traditional screening tools (up to 103 days) and even recently proposed MEMS arrays (< 2 days).

  20. Lineage-dependent ecological coherence in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Koeppel, Alexander F; Wu, Martin

    2012-09-01

    Bacteria comprise an essential element of all ecosystems, including those present on and within the human body. Understanding bacterial diversity therefore offers enormous scientific and medical benefit, but significant questions remain regarding how best to characterize that diversity and organize it into biologically meaningful units. Bacterial communities are routinely characterized based on the relative abundances of taxa at the genus or even the phylum level, but the ecological coherence of these high-level taxonomic units is uncertain. Using human microbiota from the skin and gut as our model systems, we tested the ecological coherence of bacteria by investigating the habitat associations of bacteria at all levels of the taxonomic hierarchy. We observed four distinct taxonomic patterns of habitat association, reflecting different levels of ecological coherence among taxa. Our results support the hypothesis that deep-branch bacterial clades could be ecologically coherent and suggest that the phylogenetic depth of ecological coherence varies among the bacterial lineages and is an important factor to consider in studies of human microbiome associations.

  1. Antimicrobial Peptides Targeting Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Malanovic, Nermina; Lohner, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have remarkably different structures as well as biological activity profiles, whereupon most of these peptides are supposed to kill bacteria via membrane damage. In order to understand their molecular mechanism and target cell specificity for Gram-positive bacteria, it is essential to consider the architecture of their cell envelopes. Before AMPs can interact with the cytoplasmic membrane of Gram-positive bacteria, they have to traverse the cell wall composed of wall- and lipoteichoic acids and peptidoglycan. While interaction of AMPs with peptidoglycan might rather facilitate penetration, interaction with anionic teichoic acids may act as either a trap for AMPs or a ladder for a route to the cytoplasmic membrane. Interaction with the cytoplasmic membrane frequently leads to lipid segregation affecting membrane domain organization, which affects membrane permeability, inhibits cell division processes or leads to delocalization of essential peripheral membrane proteins. Further, precursors of cell wall components, especially the highly conserved lipid II, are directly targeted by AMPs. Thereby, the peptides do not inhibit peptidoglycan synthesis via binding to proteins like common antibiotics, but form a complex with the precursor molecule, which in addition can promote pore formation and membrane disruption. Thus, the multifaceted mode of actions will make AMPs superior to antibiotics that act only on one specific target. PMID:27657092

  2. Diversity and ecology of oxalotrophic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hervé, Vincent; Junier, Thomas; Bindschedler, Saskia; Verrecchia, Eric; Junier, Pilar

    2016-02-01

    Oxalate is present in environments as diverse as soils or gastrointestinal tracts. This organic acid can be found as free acid or forming metal salts (e.g. calcium, magnesium). Oxalotrophy, the ability to use oxalate as carbon and energy sources, is mainly the result of bacterial catabolism, which can be either aerobic or anaerobic. Although some oxalotrophic bacterial strains are commonly used as probiotics, little is known about the diversity and ecology of this functional group. This review aims at exploring the taxonomic distribution and the phylogenetic diversity of oxalotrophic bacteria across biomes. In silico analyses were conducted using the two key enzymes involved in oxalotrophy: formyl-coenzyme A (CoA) transferase (EC 2.8.3.16) and oxalyl-CoA decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.8), encoded by the frc and oxc genes, respectively. Our analyses revealed that oxalate-degrading bacteria are restricted to three phyla, namely Actinobacteria, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria and originated from terrestrial, aquatic and clinical environments. Diversity analyses at the protein level suggest that total Oxc diversity is more constrained than Frc diversity and that bacterial oxalotrophic diversity is not yet fully described. Finally, the contribution of oxalotrophic bacteria to ecosystem functioning as well as to the carbon cycle is discussed.

  3. Ancient bacteria show evidence of DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Sarah Stewart; Hebsgaard, Martin B.; Christensen, Torben R.; Mastepanov, Mikhail; Nielsen, Rasmus; Munch, Kasper; Brand, Tina; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Zuber, Maria T.; Bunce, Michael; Rønn, Regin; Gilichinsky, David; Froese, Duane; Willerslev, Eske

    2007-01-01

    Recent claims of cultivable ancient bacteria within sealed environments highlight our limited understanding of the mechanisms behind long-term cell survival. It remains unclear how dormancy, a favored explanation for extended cellular persistence, can cope with spontaneous genomic decay over geological timescales. There has been no direct evidence in ancient microbes for the most likely mechanism, active DNA repair, or for the metabolic activity necessary to sustain it. In this paper, we couple PCR and enzymatic treatment of DNA with direct respiration measurements to investigate long-term survival of bacteria sealed in frozen conditions for up to one million years. Our results show evidence of bacterial survival in samples up to half a million years in age, making this the oldest independently authenticated DNA to date obtained from viable cells. Additionally, we find strong evidence that this long-term survival is closely tied to cellular metabolic activity and DNA repair that over time proves to be superior to dormancy as a mechanism in sustaining bacteria viability. PMID:17728401

  4. Bacteria associated with Amblyomma cajennense tick eggs

    PubMed Central

    Machado-Ferreira, Erik; Vizzoni, Vinicius Figueiredo; Piesman, Joseph; Gazeta, Gilberto Salles; Soares, Carlos Augusto Gomes

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Ticks represent a large group of pathogen vectors that blood feed on a diversity of hosts. In the Americas, the Ixodidae ticks Amblyomma cajennense are responsible for severe impact on livestock and public health. In the present work, we present the isolation and molecular identification of a group of culturable bacteria associated with A. cajennense eggs from females sampled in distinct geographical sites in southeastern Brazil. Additional comparative analysis of the culturable bacteria from Anocentor nitens, Rhipicephalus sanguineus and Ixodes scapularis tick eggs were also performed. 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses identified 17 different bacterial types identified as Serratia marcescens, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Enterobacter spp., Micrococcus luteus, Ochrobactrum anthropi, Bacillus cereus and Staphylococcus spp., distributed in 12 phylogroups. Staphylococcus spp., especially S. sciuri, was the most prevalent bacteria associated with A. cajennense eggs, occurring in 65% of the samples and also frequently observed infecting A. nitens eggs. S. maltophilia, S. marcescens and B. cereus occurred infecting eggs derived from specific sampling sites, but in all cases rising almost as pure cultures from infected A. cajennense eggs. The potential role of these bacterial associations is discussed and they possibly represent new targets for biological control strategies of ticks and tick borne diseases. PMID:26537602

  5. Fitness effects of mutations in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Gordo, Isabel; Perfeito, Lilia; Sousa, Ana

    2011-01-01

    Mutation is the primary source of variation in any organism. Without it, natural selection cannot operate and organisms cannot adapt to novel environments. Mutation is also generally a source of defect: many mutations are not neutral but cause fitness decreases in the organisms where they arise. In bacteria, another important source of variation is horizontal gene transfer. This source of variation can also cause beneficial or deleterious effects. Determining the distribution of fitness effects of mutations in different environments and genetic backgrounds is an active research field. In bacteria, knowledge of these distributions is key for understanding important traits. For example, for determining the dynamics of microorganisms with a high genomic mutation rate (mutators), and for understanding the evolution of antibiotic resistance, and the emergence of pathogenic traits. All of these characteristics are extremely relevant for human health both at the individual and population levels. Experimental evolution has been a valuable tool to address these questions. Here, we review some of the important findings of mutation effects in bacteria revealed through laboratory experiments.

  6. Hydrodynamic tracer diffusion in suspensions of swimming bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasyap, T. V.; Koch, Donald L.; Wu, Mingming

    2014-08-01

    We present theoretical predictions, simulations, and experimental measurements of the diffusion of passive, Brownian tracer particles in the bulk of three-dimensional suspensions of swimming bacteria performing run-tumble random walks. In the theory, we derive an explicit expression for the "hydrodynamic" tracer diffusivity that results from the fluid disturbances created by a slender-body model of bacteria by ensemble averaging the mass conservation equation of the tracer over the space of tracer-bacterium interactions which are assumed to be binary. The theory assumes that the orientations of the bacterium before and after a tumble are uncorrelated and the fluid velocity disturbance created by the bacterium is small compared to its swimming speed. The dependence of the non-dimensional hydrodynamic diffusivity widetilde{D_h} obtained by scaling the dimensional hydrodynamic diffusivity by nL3UsL on the persistence in bacterial swimming and the Brownian diffusivity of the tracer are studied in detail through two nondimensional parameters—a Peclet number Pe = UsL/D which is the ratio of the time scale of bacterial swimming to the tracer diffusion time scale and a non-dimensional persistence time τ* = Usτ/L obtained by scaling the dimensional bacterial persistence time by the time that a bacterium takes to swim over a distance equal to its length. Here, n, Us, τ, and L are the concentration, swimming speed, tumbling time, and the overall length of the bacteria, respectively, and D is the Brownian diffusivity of the tracer. widetilde{D_h} is found to be a monotonically increasing function of τ* and a non-monotonic function of Pe with a Pe1/2 scaling in the Pe ≪ 1 limit, an intermediate peak and a constant value in the Pe ≫ 1 limit for the typical case of wild-type bacteria with τ* = O(1). In the simulation study we compute the bacterial contribution to the tracer diffusivity from explicit numerical simulations of binary tracer-bacterium interactions to

  7. Antibiotics and gene transfer in swine gut bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mammalian gastrointestinal (GI) tract hosts a diverse collection bacteria, most of which are beneficial for host health. This bacterial community also supports a community of viruses that infect bacteria (called bacteriophages or phages). Phages transfer genes between bacteria, and phage-media...

  8. Mutations and Misconceptions: The Isolation and Study of Mutant Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corner, Thomas R.

    1992-01-01

    Describes simple, inexpensive activities for teaching students about mutants and mutations in bacteria. Explains how to isolate bacteria from soil and leaves and how to grow bacteria on agar or in broth. Describes how to construct a gradient plate for finding the minimum inhibitory concentration of a substance and how to use this set up to find…

  9. Satellite Water Impurity Marker (SWIM) for predicting seasonal cholera outbreaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jutla, A. S.; Akanda, A. S.; Islam, S.

    2011-12-01

    Prediction of outbreaks of cholera, a deadly water related disease, remains elusive. Since coastal brackish water provides a natural ecological niche for cholera bacteria and because a powerful evidence of new biotypes is emerging, it is highly unlikely that cholera will be fully eradicated. Therefore, it is necessary to develop cholera prediction model with several months' of lead time. Satellite based estimates of chlorophyll, a surrogate for phytoplankton abundance, has been associated with proliferation of cholera bacteria. However, survival of cholera bacteria in a variety of coastal ecological environment put constraints on predictive abilities of chlorophyll algorithm since it only measures greenness in coastal waters. Here, we propose a new remote sensing reflectance based statistical index: Satellite Water Impurity Marker, or SWIM. This statistical index estimates impurity levels in the coastal waters and is based on the variability observed in the difference between the blue (412nm) and green (555nm) wavelengths in coastal waters. The developed index is bounded between clear and impure water and shows the ability to predict cholera outbreaks in the Bengal Delta with a predicted r2 of 78% with two months lead time. We anticipate that a predictive system based on SWIM will provide essential lead time allowing effective intervention and mitigation strategies to be developed for other cholera endemic regions of the world.

  10. Patterns and sources of fecal coliform bacteria in three streams in Virginia, 1999-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hyer, Kenneth; Moyer, Douglas

    2003-01-01

    (maximum observed concentration of 290,000 colonies/100 milliliters (col/100mL) could occur along the entire length of each stream, and that the samples collected at the downstream monitoring station of each stream were generally representative of the entire upstream reach. Seasonal patterns were observed in the base-flow fecal coliform concentrations of all streams; concentrations were typically highest in the summer and lowest in the winter. Fecal coliform concentrations were lowest during periods of base flow (typically 200?2,000 col/100mL) and increased by 3?4 orders of magnitude during storm events (as high as 700,000 col/100mL). Multiple linear regression models were developed to predict fecal coliform concentrations as a function of streamflow and other water-quality parameters. The source tracking technique provided identification of bacteria contributions from diverse sources that included (but were not limited to) humans, cattle, poultry, horses, dogs, cats, geese, ducks, raccoons, and deer. Seasonal patterns were observed in the contributions of cattle and poultry sources. There were relations between the identified sources of fecal coliform bacteria and the land-use practices within each watershed. There were only minor differences in the distribution of bacteria sources between low-flow periods and high-flow periods. A coupled approach that utilized both a large available source library and a smaller, location-specific source library provided the most success in identifying the unknown E. coli isolates. BST data should provide valuable support and guidance for producing more defendable and scientifically rigorous watershed models. Incorporation of these bacteria-source data into watershed management strategies also should result in the selection of more efficient source-reduction scenarios for improving water quality.

  11. Luminometric Label Array for Counting and Differentiation of Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Högmander, Milla; Paul, Catherine J; Chan, Sandy; Hokkanen, Elina; Eskonen, Ville; Pahikkala, Tapio; Pihlasalo, Sari

    2017-03-07

    Methods for simple and fast detection and differentiation of bacterial species are required, for instance, in medicine, water quality monitoring, and the food industry. Here, we have developed a novel label array method for the counting and differentiation of bacterial species. This method is based on the nonspecific interactions of multiple unstable lanthanide chelates and selected chemicals within the sample leading to a luminescence signal profile that is unique to the bacterial species. It is simple, cost-effective, and/or user-friendly compared to many existing methods, such as plate counts on selective media, automatic (hemocytometer-based) cell counters, flow cytometry, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods for identification. The performance of the method was demonstrated with nine single strains of bacteria in pure culture. The limit of detection for counting was below 1000 bacteria per mL, with an average coefficient of variation of 10% achieved with the developed label array. A predictive model was trained with the measured luminescence signals and its ability to differentiate all tested bacterial species from each other, including members of the same genus Bacillus licheniformis and Bacillus subtilis, was confirmed via leave-one-out cross-validation. The suitability of the method for analysis of mixtures of bacterial species was shown with ternary mixtures of Bacillus licheniformis, Escherichia coli JM109, and Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC PTA 4659. The potential future application of the method could be monitoring for contamination in pure cultures; analysis of mixed bacterial cultures, where examining one species in the presence of another could inform industrial microbial processes; and the analysis of bacterial biofilms, where nonspecific methods based on physical and chemical characteristics are required instead of methods specific to individual bacterial species.

  12. Bioluminescent bacteria as indicators of chemical contamination of coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Frischer, M E; Danforth, J M; Foy, T F; Juraske, R

    2005-01-01

    The ratio of bioluminescent to total bacteria (bioluminescent ratio, BLR) as an indicator of a variety of types of anthropogenic contamination of estuarine ecosystems was evaluated through a series of laboratory and field studies. Laboratory studies indicated that the BLR of natural bacterioplankton communities was proportionally reduced in the presence of a number of contaminants including diesel fuel and saltmarsh sediments co-contaminated with mercury and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Bioluminescent ratio inhibition was observed after short-term exposure to a contaminant suggesting a physiological rather than a population response of native microbial communities. Simulated eutrophication did not suppress the BLR. Field observations of the BLR were conducted weekly for a 2-yr period in the Skidaway River estuary, Georgia, USA. These observations revealed considerable seasonal variability associated with the BLR. Bioluminescent ratios were highest during the summer (25 +/- 15%), lower in the fall (6 +/- 5%) and spring (3 +/- 2%), and near zero during the winter. Although the BLR was not significantly correlated to salinity at a single site (Skidaway River estuary), the BLR was significantly correlated with salinity when sites within the same estuary system were compared (r2 = 0.93). Variation in BLR was not correlated to standard bacteriological indicators of water quality including total and fecal coliform bacteria. Comparison of the BLR from impacted and pristine estuarine sites during the fall suggested that anthropogenically impacted sites exhibited lower BLR than predicted from salinity versus BLR relationships developed in pristine systems. These observations suggest that the BLR could be used as a simple and reliable initial indicator of chemical contamination of estuarine systems resulting from human activity.

  13. Comparative genomics of phages and prophages in lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Desiere, Frank; Lucchini, Sacha; Canchaya, Carlos; Ventura, Marco; Brüssow, Harald

    2002-08-01

    Comparative phage genomics has become possible due to the availability of more than 100 complete phage genome sequences and the development of powerful bioinformatics tools. This technology, profiting from classical molecular-biology knowledge, has opened avenues of research for topics, which were difficult to address in the past. Now, it is possible to retrace part of the evolutionary history of phage modules by comparative genomics. The diagnosis of relatedness is hereby not uniquely based on sequence similarity alone, but includes topological considerations of genome organization. Detailed transcription maps have allowed in silico predictions of genome organization to be verified and refined. This comparative knowledge is providing the basis for a new taxonomic classification concept for bacteriophages infecting low G + C-content Gram-positive bacteria based on the genetic organization of the structural gene module. An Sfi21-like and an Sfi11-like genus of Siphoviridae is proposed. The gene maps of many phages show remarkable synteny in their structural genes defining a lambda super-group within Siphoviridae. A hierarchy of relatedness within the lambda super-group suggests elements of vertical evolution in Siphoviridae. Tailed phages are the result of both vertical and horizontal evolution and are thus fascinating objects for the study of molecular evolution. Prophage sequences integrated into the genomes of their bacterial host present theoretical challenges for evolutionary biologists. Prophages represent up to 10% of the genome in some LAB. In pathogenic streptococci prophages confer genes of selective value for the lysogenic cell. The lysogenic conversion genes are located between the lysin gene and the right phage attachment site. Non-attributed genes were found at the same genome position of prophages from lactic streptococci. These genes belong to the few prophage genes transcribed in the lysogen. Prophages from dairy bacteria might therefore also

  14. Bacteria-Targeting Nanoparticles for Managing Infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radovic-Moreno, Aleksandar Filip

    Bacterial infections continue to be a significant concern particularly in healthcare settings and in the developing world. Current challenges include the increasing spread of drug resistant (DR) organisms, the side effects of antibiotic therapy, the negative consequences of clearing the commensal bacterial flora, and difficulties in developing prophylactic vaccines. This thesis was an investigation of the potential of a class of polymeric nanoparticles (NP) to contribute to the management of bacterial infections. More specifically, steps were taken towards using these NPs (1) to achieve greater spatiotemporal control over drug therapy by more targeted antibiotic delivery to bacteria, and (2) to develop a prophylactic vaccine formulation against the common bacterial sexually transmitted disease (STD) caused by Chlamydia trachomatis. In the first part, we synthesized polymeric NPs containing poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-block-poly(L-histidine)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLGA-PLH-PEG). We show that these NPs are able to bind to bacteria under model acidic infection conditions and are able to encapsulate and deliver vancomycin to inhibit the growth of Staphylococcus aureus bacteria in vitro. Further work showed that the PLGA-PLH-PEG-based NPs demonstrated the potential for competition for binding bacteria at a site of infection from soluble protein and model phagocytic and tissue-resident cells in a NP composition dependent manner. The NPs demonstrated low toxicity in vitro, were well tolerated by mice in vivo, and circulated in the blood on timescales comparable to control PLGA-PEG NPs. In the second part, we used PLGA-PLH-PEG-based NPs to design a prophylactic vaccine against the obligate intracellular bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis, the most common cause of bacterial STD in the world. Currently, no vaccines against this pathogen are approved for use in humans. We first formulated NPs encapsulating the TLR7 agonist R848 conjugated to poly(lactic acid) (R848-PLA

  15. Phylogenetic distribution of translational GTPases in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Margus, Tõnu; Remm, Maido; Tenson, Tanel

    2007-01-01

    Background Translational GTPases are a family of proteins in which GTPase activity is stimulated by the large ribosomal subunit. Conserved sequence features allow members of this family to be identified. Results To achieve accurate protein identification and grouping we have developed a method combining searches with Hidden Markov Model profiles and tree based grouping. We found all the genes for translational GTPases in 191 fully sequenced bacterial genomes. The protein sequences were grouped into nine subfamilies. Analysis of the results shows that three translational GTPases, the translation factors EF-Tu, EF-G and IF2, are present in all organisms examined. In addition, several copies of the genes encoding EF-Tu and EF-G are present in some genomes. In the case of multiple genes for EF-Tu, the gene copies are nearly identical; in the case of multiple EF-G genes, the gene copies have been considerably diverged. The fourth translational GTPase, LepA, the function of which is currently unknown, is also nearly universally conserved in bacteria, being absent from only one organism out of the 191 analyzed. The translation regulator, TypA, is also present in most of the organisms examined, being absent only from bacteria with small genomes. Surprisingly, some of the well studied translational GTPases are present only in a very small number of bacteria. The translation termination factor RF3 is absent from many groups of bacteria with both small and large genomes. The specialized translation factor for selenocysteine incorporation – SelB – was found in only 39 organisms. Similarly, the tetracycline resistance proteins (Tet) are present only in a small number of species. Proteins of the CysN/NodQ subfamily have acquired functions in sulfur metabolism and production of signaling molecules. The genes coding for CysN/NodQ proteins were found in 74 genomes. This protein subfamily is not confined to Proteobacteria, as suggested previously but present also in many other

  16. Interaction of ambient conditions and fecal coliform bacteria in southern Lake Michigan beach waters: Monitoring program implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitman, Richard L.; Nevers, Meredith Becker; Gerovac, Paul J.

    1999-01-01

    Excessive fecal coliform bacteria in public swimming waters can potentially threaten visitor health. Fecal coliform bacteria (1984-1989) and Escherichia coli (1990-1995) density were monitored weekly at the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore beaches for 12 summers, and park officials closed swimming areas when fecal coliform density exceeded the state water quality criteria (400 CFU fecal coliforms/ 100 ml; 235 CFU E. coli/100 ml water). Due to a 24-hour incubation in the fecal coliform and E. coli assays, beaches were closed the day after collection of high fecal coliform. Our analysis suggests that it is not possible to predict one day's fecal coliform count based on the previous day's results in waters taken from southern Lake Michigan beaches. Dispersal and deposition of bacteria were not uniform among sites or across time apparently due to interactions among environmental variables including rainfall, wind direction, water temperature, and bacteria source. Rainfall combined with northwest winds increased bacteria concentrations. Escherichia coli followed a seasonal trend with similar fluctuations in density among beaches. We suggest that the current beach monitoring protocol is inadequate for predicting fecal coliform density at the time of beach closure, and, subsequently, its use for ensuring visitor safety remains questionable.

  17. Bacteria-Mineral Interactions on the Surfaces of Metal-Resistant Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Malkin, A J

    2010-03-24

    The extraordinary ability of indigenous microorganisms, like metal-resistant bacteria, for biotransformation of toxic compounds is of considerable interest for the emerging area of environmental bioremediation. However, the underlying mechanisms by which metal-resistant bacteria transform toxic compounds are currently unknown and await elucidation. The project's objective was to study stress-induced responses of metal-resistant bacteria to environmental changes and chemical stimulants. This project involved a multi-institutional collaboration of our LLNL group with the group of Dr. H.-Y. Holman (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory). In this project, we have utilized metal-resistant bacteria Arthrobacter oxydans as a model bacterial system. We have utilized atomic force microscopy (AFM) to visualize for the first time at the nanometer scale formation of stress-induced structures on bacterial surfaces in response to Cr (VI) exposure. We have demonstrated that structure, assembly, and composition of these stress-induced structures are dependent on Cr (VI) concentrations. Our AFM observations of the appearance and development of stress-induced layers on the surfaces of Arthrobacter oxydans bacteria exposed to Cr (VI) were confirmed by Dr. Holman's biochemical, electron microscopy, and synchrotron infrared spectromicroscopy studies. In general, in vitro imaging of live microbial and cellular systems represents one of the most challenging issues in application of AFM. Various approaches for immobilization of bacteria on the substrate for in vitro imaging were tested in this project. Imaging of live bacteria was achieved, however further optimization of experimental methods are needed for high-resolution visualization of the cellular environmental structural dynamics by AFM. This project enhanced the current insight into molecular architecture, structural and environmental variability of bacterial systems. The project partially funded research for two book chapters (1

  18. The gut microbiota of insecticide-resistant insects houses insecticide-degrading bacteria: A potential source for biotechnological exploitation.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Luis Gustavo de; Moraes, Luiz Alberto Beraldo de; Trigo, José Roberto; Omoto, Celso; Cônsoli, Fernando Luis

    2017-01-01

    The exploration of new niches for microorganisms capable of degrading recalcitrant molecules is still required. We hypothesized the gut microbiota associated with insect-resistant lines carry pesticide degrading bacteria, and predicted they carry bacteria selected to degrade pesticides they were resistant to. We isolated and accessed the pesticide-degrading capacity of gut bacteria from the gut of fifth instars of Spodoptera frugiperda strains resistant to lambda-cyhalothrin, deltamethrin, chlorpyrifos ethyl, spinosad and lufenuron, using insecticide-selective media. Sixteen isolates belonging to 10 phylotypes were obtained, from which four were also associated with the susceptible strain. However, growth of gut bacteria associated with larvae from the susceptible strain was not obtained in any of the insecticide-based selective media tested. Growth of isolates was affected by the concentration of insecticides in the media, and all grew well up to 40 μg/ml. The insecticide-degrading capacity of selected isolates was assessed by GC or LC-MS/MS analyses. In conclusion, resistant strains of S. frugiperda are an excellent reservoir of insecticide-degrading bacteria with bioremediation potential. Moreover, gut-associated bacteria are subjected to the selection pressure imposed by insecticides on their hosts and may influence the metabolization of pesticides in insects.

  19. The gut microbiota of insecticide-resistant insects houses insecticide-degrading bacteria: A potential source for biotechnological exploitation

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Luis Gustavo; de Moraes, Luiz Alberto Beraldo; Trigo, José Roberto; Omoto, Celso

    2017-01-01

    The exploration of new niches for microorganisms capable of degrading recalcitrant molecules is still required. We hypothesized the gut microbiota associated with insect-resistant lines carry pesticide degrading bacteria, and predicted they carry bacteria selected to degrade pesticides they were resistant to. We isolated and accessed the pesticide-degrading capacity of gut bacteria from the gut of fifth instars of Spodoptera frugiperda strains resistant to lambda-cyhalothrin, deltamethrin, chlorpyrifos ethyl, spinosad and lufenuron, using insecticide-selective media. Sixteen isolates belonging to 10 phylotypes were obtained, from which four were also associated with the susceptible strain. However, growth of gut bacteria associated with larvae from the susceptible strain was not obtained in any of the insecticide-based selective media tested. Growth of isolates was affected by the concentration of insecticides in the media, and all grew well up to 40 μg/ml. The insecticide-degrading capacity of selected isolates was assessed by GC or LC-MS/MS analyses. In conclusion, resistant strains of S. frugiperda are an excellent reservoir of insecticide-degrading bacteria with bioremediation potential. Moreover, gut-associated bacteria are subjected to the selection pressure imposed by insecticides on their hosts and may influence the metabolization of pesticides in insects. PMID:28358907

  20. A study to estimate the fate and transport of bacteria in river water from birds nesting under a bridge.

    PubMed

    Nayamatullah, M M M; Bin-Shafique, S; Sharif, H O

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the effect of input parameters, such as the number of bridge-dwelling birds, decay rate of the bacteria, flow at the river, water temperature, and settling velocity, a parametric study was conducted using a water quality model developed with QUAL2Kw. The reach of the bacterial-impaired section from the direct droppings of bridge-nesting birds at the Guadalupe River near Kerrville, Texas was estimated using the model. The concentration of Escherichia coli bacteria were measured upstream, below the bridge, and downstream of the river for one-and-a-half years. The decay rate of the indicator bacteria in the river water was estimated from the model using measured data, and was found to be 6.5/day. The study suggests that the number of bridge-dwelling birds, the decay rate, and flow at the river have the highest impact on the fate and transport of bacteria. The water temperature moderately affects the fate and transport of bacteria, whereas, the settling velocity of bacteria did not show any significant effect. Once the decay rates are estimated, the reach of the impaired section was predicted from the model using the average flow of the channel. Since the decay rate does not vary significantly in the ambient environment at this location, the length of the impaired section primarily depends on flow.

  1. Isolation of fucosyltransferase-producing bacteria from marine environments.

    PubMed

    Kajiwara, Hitomi; Toda, Munetoyo; Mine, Toshiki; Nakada, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Takeshi

    2012-01-01

    Fucose-containing oligosaccharides on the cell surface of some pathogenic bacteria are thought to be important for host-microbe interactions and to play a major role in the pathogenicity of bacterial pathogens. Here, we screened marine bacteria for glycosyltransferases using two methods: a one-pot glycosyltransferase assay method and a lectin-staining method. Using this approach, we isolated marine bacteria with fucosyltransferase activity. There have been no previous reports of marine bacteria producing fucosyltransferase. This paper thus represents the first report of fucosyltransferase-producing marine bacteria.

  2. Carotenoid biosynthesis in extremophilic Deinococcus-Thermus bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tian, Bing; Hua, Yuejin

    2010-11-01

    Bacteria from the phylum Deinococcus-Thermus are known for their resistance to extreme stresses including radiation, oxidation, desiccation and high temperature. Cultured Deinococcus-Thermus bacteria are usually red or yellow pigmented because of their ability to synthesize carotenoids. Unique carotenoids found in these bacteria include deinoxanthin from Deinococcus radiodurans and thermozeaxanthins from Thermus thermophilus. Investigations of carotenogenesis will help to understand cellular stress resistance of Deinococcus-Thermus bacteria. Here, we discuss the recent progress toward identifying carotenoids, carotenoid biosynthetic enzymes and pathways in some species of Deinococcus-Thermus extremophiles. In addition, we also discuss the roles of carotenoids in these extreme bacteria.

  3. Gill bacteria enable a novel digestive strategy in a wood-feeding mollusk.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Roberta M; Fung, Jennifer M; Sharp, Koty H; Benner, Jack S; McClung, Colleen; Cushing, Shelley; Lamkin, Elizabeth R; Fomenkov, Alexey I; Henrissat, Bernard; Londer, Yuri Y; Scholz, Matthew B; Posfai, Janos; Malfatti, Stephanie; Tringe, Susannah G; Woyke, Tanja; Malmstrom, Rex R; Coleman-Derr, Devin; Altamia, Marvin A; Dedrick, Sandra; Kaluziak, Stefan T; Haygood, Margo G; Distel, Daniel L

    2014-11-25

    Bacteria play many important roles in animal digestive systems, including the provision of enzymes critical to digestion. Typically, complex communities of bacteria reside in the gut lumen in direct contact with the ingested materials they help to digest. Here, we demonstrate a previously undescribed digestive strategy in the wood-eating marine bivalve Bankia setacea, wherein digestive bacteria are housed in a location remote from the gut. These bivalves, commonly known as shipworms, lack a resident microbiota in the gut compartment where wood is digested but harbor endosymbiotic bacteria within specialized cells in their gills. We show that this comparatively simple bacterial community produces wood-degrading enzymes that are selectively translocated from gill to gut. These enzymes, which include just a small subset of the predicted wood-degrading enzymes encoded in the endosymbiont genomes, accumulate in the gut to the near exclusion of other endosymbiont-made proteins. This strategy of remote enzyme production provides the shipworm with a mechanism to capture liberated sugars from wood without competition from an endogenous gut microbiota. Because only those proteins required for wood digestion are translocated to the gut, this newly described system reveals which of many possible enzymes and enzyme combinations are minimally required for wood degradation. Thus, although it has historically had negative impacts on human welfare, the shipworm digestive process now has the potential to have a positive impact on industries that convert wood and other plant biomass to renewable fuels, fine chemicals, food, feeds, textiles, and paper products.

  4. Gill bacteria enable a novel digestive strategy in a wood-feeding mollusk

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Roberta M.; Fung, Jennifer M.; Sharp, Koty H.; Benner, Jack S.; McClung, Colleen; Cushing, Shelley; Lamkin, Elizabeth R.; Fomenkov, Alexey I.; Henrissat, Bernard; Londer, Yuri Y.; Scholz, Matthew B.; Posfai, Janos; Malfatti, Stephanie; Tringe, Susannah G.; Woyke, Tanja; Malmstrom, Rex R.; Coleman-Derr, Devin; Altamia, Marvin A.; Dedrick, Sandra; Kaluziak, Stefan T.; Haygood, Margo G.; Distel, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria play many important roles in animal digestive systems, including the provision of enzymes critical to digestion. Typically, complex communities of bacteria reside in the gut lumen in direct contact with the ingested materials they help to digest. Here, we demonstrate a previously undescribed digestive strategy in the wood-eating marine bivalve Bankia setacea, wherein digestive bacteria are housed in a location remote from the gut. These bivalves, commonly known as shipworms, lack a resident microbiota in the gut compartment where wood is digested but harbor endosymbiotic bacteria within specialized cells in their gills. We show that this comparatively simple bacterial community produces wood-degrading enzymes that are selectively translocated from gill to gut. These enzymes, which include just a small subset of the predicted wood-degrading enzymes encoded in the endosymbiont genomes, accumulate in the gut to the near exclusion of other endosymbiont-made proteins. This strategy of remote enzyme production provides the shipworm with a mechanism to capture liberated sugars from wood without competition from an endogenous gut microbiota. Because only those proteins required for wood digestion are translocated to the gut, this newly described system reveals which of many possible enzymes and enzyme combinations are minimally required for wood degradation. Thus, although it has historically had negative impacts on human welfare, the shipworm digestive process now has the potential to have a positive impact on industries that convert wood and other plant biomass to renewable fuels, fine chemicals, food, feeds, textiles, and paper products. PMID:25385629

  5. Conflicting selection alters the trajectory of molecular evolution in a tripartite bacteria-plasmid-phage interaction.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Ellie; Hall, James J P; Paterson, Steve; Spiers, Andrew J; Brockhurst, Michael A

    2017-03-01

    Bacteria engage in a complex network of ecological interactions, which includes mobile genetic elements (MGEs) such as phages and plasmids. These elements play a key role in microbial communities as vectors of horizontal gene transfer but can also be important sources of selection for their bacterial hosts. In natural communities bacteria are likely to encounter multiple MGEs simultaneously and conflicting selection among MGEs could alter the bacterial evolutionary response to each MGE. Here we test the effect of interactions with multiple MGEs on bacterial molecular evolution in the tripartite interaction between the bacterium, Pseudomonas fluorescens, the lytic bacteriophage SBW25φ2 and conjugative plasmid, pQBR103, using genome sequencing of experimentally evolved bacteria. We show that, individually, both plasmids and phages impose selection leading to bacterial evolutionary responses that are distinct from bacterial populations evolving without MGEs, but that together, plasmids and phages impose conflicting selection on bacteria, constraining the evolutionary responses observed in pairwise interactions. Our findings highlight the likely difficulties of predicting evolutionary responses to multiple selective pressures from the observed evolutionary responses to each selective pressure alone. Understanding evolution in complex microbial communities comprising many species and MGEs will require that we go beyond studies of pairwise interactions. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. A galectin from shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei is involved in immune recognition and bacteria phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Hou, Fujun; Liu, Yongjie; He, Shulin; Wang, Xianzong; Mao, Aitao; Liu, Zhigang; Sun, Chengbo; Liu, Xiaolin

    2015-06-01

    Galectins are conserved family members with β-galactosides affinity that play multiple functions in embryogenesis, development and regulation of innate and adaptive immunity. However, little functional studies were reported in crustaceans. Here, a shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei galectin (LvGal) cDNA was identified with an open reading frame of 1017 bp, which encodes a putative protein of 338 amino acids. A carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) and several amino acids residues involved in dimerization were found in LvGal. LvGal mRNA was mainly expressed in gills and hemocytes and upregulated post Vibrio anguillarum challenge. Recombinant LvGal (rLvGal) was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and the purified rLvGal could strongly bind G(-) bacteria V. anguillarum and G(+) bacteria Micrococcus lysodeikticus. Besides, rLvGal exhibited strong activity to agglutinate V. anguillarum and weak activity to agglutinate M. lysodeikticus but no obvious antibacterial activity was found with selected bacteria. In addition, in vivo experiments showed rLvGal could promote phagocytosis of bacteria by hemocytes. Thus, through these collective data we predicted LvGal is involved in immune recognition and functions as a potential pattern recognition receptor.

  7. Survival of hydrogen sulfide oxidizing bacteria on corroded concrete surfaces of sewer systems.

    PubMed

    Jensen, H S; Nielsen, A H; Hvitved-Jacobsen, T; Vollertsen, J

    2008-01-01

    The activity of hydrogen sulfide oxidizing bacteria within corroded concrete from a sewer manhole was investigated. The bacteria were exposed to hydrogen sulfide starvation for up till 18 months, upon which their hydrogen sulfide oxidizing activity was measured. It was tested whether the observed reduction in biological activity was caused by a biological lag phase or by decay of the bacteria. The results showed that the bacterial activity declined with approximately 40% pr. month during the first two months of hydrogen sulfide starvation. After 2-3 months of starvation, the activity stabilized. Even after 6 months of starvation, exposure to hydrogen sulfide for 6 hours a day on three successive days could restore the bacteriological activity to about 80% of the initial activity. After 12 months of starvation, the activity could, however, not be restored, and after 18 months the biological activity approached zero. The long-term survival aspect of concrete corroding bacteria has implications for predicting hydrogen sulfide corrosion in sewer systems subject to irregular hydrogen sulfide loadings, e.g. as they occur in temperate climates where hydrogen sulfide often is a summer-problem only.

  8. Method efficiency and signal quantification of bacteria for a groundwater transport experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Burlage, R.S.; Palumbo, A.V.; McCarthy, J.

    1995-04-01

    Bacterial transport is a key process in delivery of microbes to contaminated sites for bioremediation of chemicals. However, relatively little is known about the geochemical and hydrologic factors controlling the mobility of bacteria and viruses within subsurface systems. Laboratory-scale column studies have provided useful information (Harvey et al, 1989, 1993). However, successful application to in situ remediation will require that one identify and understand properties relevant to transport in aquifers. Only through field experiments can one evaluate the scales of physical and chemical heterogeneity in natural aquifers that affect the transport of microbiota in ways not predicted from experiments conducted at the laboratory-scale. Bacterial transport field experiments cannot be replicated as can column experiments. Rigorous testing of experimental hypotheses will require comparisons of the mobility of multiple strains with contrasting transport properties under identical field conditions. Consequently, a technique is needed to permit the transport of multiple strains of bacteria to be monitored simultaneously in a single field experiment. Molecular techniques can also detect very low levels of injected bacteria. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has been used successfully for the detection of microorganisms. This paper explores the use of PCR for identifying and enumerating the arrival of several individual strains of bacteria at monitoring wells downgradient of an experimental tracer injection well.

  9. Sources of bacteria in outdoor air across cities in the midwestern United States.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Robert M; Sullivan, Amy P; Costello, Elizabeth K; Collett, Jeff L; Knight, Rob; Fierer, Noah

    2011-09-01

    Bacteria are abundant in the atmosphere, where they often represent a major portion of the organic aerosols. Potential pathogens of plants and livestock are commonly dispersed through the atmosphere, and airborne bacteria can have important effects on human health as pathogens or triggers of allergic asthma and seasonal allergies. Despite their importance, the diversity and biogeography of airborne microorganisms remain poorly understood. We used high-throughput pyrosequencing to analyze bacterial communities present in the aerosol fraction containing fine particulate matter of ≤2.5 μm from 96 near-surface atmospheric samples collected from cities throughout the midwestern United States and found that the communities are surprisingly diverse and strongly affected by the season. We also directly compared the airborne communities to those found in hundreds of samples representing potential source environments. We show that, in addition to the more predictable sources (soils and leaf surfaces), fecal material, most likely dog feces, often represents an unexpected source of bacteria in the atmosphere at more urbanized locations during the winter. Airborne bacteria are clearly an important, but understudied, component of air quality that needs to be better integrated into efforts to measure and model pollutants in the atmosphere.

  10. Making detailed predictions makes (some) predictions worse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Theresa F.

    In this paper, we investigate whether making detailed predictions about an event makes other predictions worse. Across 19 experiments, 10,895 participants, and 415,960 predictions about 724 professional sports games, we find that people who made detailed predictions about sporting events (e.g., how many hits each baseball team would get) made worse predictions about more general outcomes (e.g., which team would win). We rule out that this effect is caused by inattention or fatigue, thinking too hard, or a differential reliance on holistic information about the teams. Instead, we find that thinking about game-relevant details before predicting winning teams causes people to give less weight to predictive information, presumably because predicting details makes information that is relatively useless for predicting the winning team more readily accessible in memory and therefore incorporated into forecasts. Furthermore, we show that this differential use of information can be used to predict what kinds of games will and will not be susceptible to the negative effect of making detailed predictions.

  11. Population of Nitrifying Bacteria and Nitrification in Ammonium Saturated Clinoptilolite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGilloway, R. L.; Weaver, R. W.; Ming, Douglas W.; Gruener, J.

    1999-01-01

    As humans begin to spend longer periods of time in space, plants will be incorporated into life support systems. Ammonium saturated clinoptilolite is one plant growth substrate but a balance between ammonium and nitrate is needed. A laboratory study was conducted to determine effects of nitrifying bacteria on ammonium concentrations and kinetics of nitrification. Columns containing clinoptilolite substrate amended with nitrifying bacteria obtained from soil enrichment were analyzed weekly for a 90 day period. The enrichment culture initially contained 1 x 10(exp 5) ammonium oxidizing bacteria and 1 x 10(exp 2) nitrite oxidizing bacteria per gram of substrate. Populations of ammonium oxidizing bacteria increased to 1 x 10(exp 6) and nitrite oxidizing bacteria increased to 1 x 10(exp 3) per gram of substrate. The nitrification rate was approximately 0.25mg NO3(-)-N/kg.hr. Experiments were also conducted to enumerate nitrifying bacteria in a clinoptilolite substrate used to grow wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Seventy days following the initial inoculation with an unknown number of commercial nitrifying bacteria, 1 x 10(exp 5) ammonium oxidizing bacteria per gram of substrate were present. The number of nitrite oxidizing bacteria was between 1 x 10(exp 3) to 10(exp 4) per gram of substrate as measured by the most probable number method. Nitrification rates were approximately 0.20mg NO3(-)-N/kg.hr. Clinoptilolite readily exchanged sufficient concentrations of ammonium to support nitrifying bacteria and they survived well in this medium.

  12. Probiotic bacteria: selective enumeration and survival in dairy foods.

    PubMed

    Shah, N P

    2000-04-01

    A number of health benefits have been claimed for probiotic bacteria such as Lactobacillus acidophilus, Bifidobacterium spp., and Lactobacillus casei. Because of the potential health benefits, these organisms are increasingly incorporated into dairy foods. However, studies have shown low viability of probiotics in market preparations. In order to assess viability of probiotic bacteria, it is important to have a working method for selective enumeration of these probiotic bacteria. Viability of probiotic bacteria is important in order to provide health benefits. Viability of probiotic bacteria can be improved by appropriate selection of acid and bile resistant strains, use of oxygen impermeable containers, two-step fermentation, micro-encapsulation, stress adaptation, incorporation of micronutrients such as peptides and amino acids and by sonication of yogurt bacteria. This review will cover selective enumeration and survival of probiotic bacteria in dairy foods.

  13. Geochemistry and Mixing Drive the Spatial Distribution of Free-Living Archaea and Bacteria in Yellowstone Lake

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Jinjun; Clingenpeel, Scott; Dow, Charles L.; McDermott, Timothy R.; Macur, Richard E.; Inskeep, William P.; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    2016-01-01

    Yellowstone Lake, the largest subalpine lake in the United States, harbors great novelty and diversity of Bacteria and Archaea. Size-fractionated water samples (0.1–0.8, 0.8–3.0, and 3.0–20 μm) were collected from surface photic zone, deep mixing zone, and vent fluids at different locations in the lake by using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV). Quantification with real-time PCR indicated that Bacteria dominated free-living microorganisms with Bacteria/Archaea ratios ranging from 4037:1 (surface water) to 25:1 (vent water). Microbial population structures (both Bacteria and Archaea) were assessed using 454-FLX sequencing with a total of 662,302 pyrosequencing reads for V1 and V2 regions of 16S rRNA genes. Non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) analyses indicated that strong spatial distribution patterns existed from surface to deep vents for free-living Archaea and Bacteria in the lake. Along with pH, major vent-associated geochemical constituents including CH4, CO2, H2, DIC (dissolved inorganic carbon), DOC (dissolved organic carbon), SO42-, O2 and metals were likely the major drivers for microbial population structures, however, mixing events occurring in the lake also impacted the distribution patterns. Distinct Bacteria and Archaea were present among size fractions, and bigger size fractions included particle-associated microbes (> 3 μm) and contained higher predicted operational taxonomic unit richness and microbial diversities (genus level) than free-living ones (<0.8 μm). Our study represents the first attempt at addressing the spatial distribution of Bacteria and Archaea in Yellowstone Lake, and our results highlight the variable contribution of Archaea and Bacteria to the hydrogeochemical-relevant metabolism of hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur. PMID:26973602

  14. Geochemistry and Mixing Drive the Spatial Distribution of Free-Living Archaea and Bacteria in Yellowstone Lake.

    PubMed

    Kan, Jinjun; Clingenpeel, Scott; Dow, Charles L; McDermott, Timothy R; Macur, Richard E; Inskeep, William P; Nealson, Kenneth H

    2016-01-01

    Yellowstone Lake, the largest subalpine lake in the United States, harbors great novelty and diversity of Bacteria and Archaea. Size-fractionated water samples (0.1-0.8, 0.8-3.0, and 3.0-20 μm) were collected from surface photic zone, deep mixing zone, and vent fluids at different locations in the lake by using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV). Quantification with real-time PCR indicated that Bacteria dominated free-living microorganisms with Bacteria/Archaea ratios ranging from 4037:1 (surface water) to 25:1 (vent water). Microbial population structures (both Bacteria and Archaea) were assessed using 454-FLX sequencing with a total of 662,302 pyrosequencing reads for V1 and V2 regions of 16S rRNA genes. Non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) analyses indicated that strong spatial distribution patterns existed from surface to deep vents for free-living Archaea and Bacteria in the lake. Along with pH, major vent-associated geochemical constituents including CH4, CO2, H2, DIC (dissolved inorganic carbon), DOC (dissolved organic carbon), SO4 (2-), O2 and metals were likely the major drivers for microbial population structures, however, mixing events occurring in the lake also impacted the distribution patterns. Distinct Bacteria and Archaea were present among size fractions, and bigger size fractions included particle-associated microbes (> 3 μm) and contained higher predicted operational taxonomic unit richness and microbial diversities (genus level) than free-living ones (<0.8 μm). Our study represents the first attempt at addressing the spatial distribution of Bacteria and Archaea in Yellowstone Lake, and our results highlight the variable contribution of Archaea and Bacteria to the hydrogeochemical-relevant metabolism of hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur.

  15. Distribution of bacteria in inhalable particles and its implications for health risks in kindergarten children in Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Wenjing; Chai, Yemao; Lin, Huiying; So, Winnie W. M.; Ho, K. W. K.; Tsui, A. K. Y.; Wong, R. K. S.

    2016-03-01

    Health risks in children caused by bacteria in indoor environments have attracted much attention in recent years. There are many harmful bacteria, and children have greater health risks than adults in the same environment. To investigate the association between children's health risks and the distribution and concentration of bacteria in particulate matter smaller than 2.5 μm in indoor and outdoor air at three kindergartens in Hong Kong, quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to determine the concentration of bacteria, and the terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism method targeting 16S ribosomal RNA genes was used to predict the phylogenetic airborne bacterial community structures. The bacterial concentrations indoors were higher than those outdoors in the three kindergartens, but no obvious differences were found (P > 0.05). Statistical analysis showed that the different schools had significantly different concentrations (P < 0.05). The abundance of bacteria in schools downtown (in Kowloon) was the greatest, reaching 3.3 × 103 to 4.95 × 104 cells per m3. However, the results showed no significant differences between the microbial populations obtained indoors and those obtained outdoors. The dominant genera were very similar among the six samples. Our results suggest that the majority of the inhalable bacteria were harmless to humans. Only a small fraction of microbial pathogens were identified, and their relative abundance appeared to increase as the concentration of particulate matter pollution increased. Analysis of these bacteria can give important clues regarding the exposure of kindergarten children to bacteria in indoor and outdoor air.

  16. Comparison of fecal indicators with pathogenic bacteria and rotavirus in groundwater

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Andrew S.; Layton, Alice C.; Mailloux, Brian J; Culligan, Patricia J.; Williams, Daniel E.; Smartt, Abby E.; Sayler, Gary S.; Feighery, John; McKay, Larry; Knappett, Peter S.K.; Alexandrova, Ekaterina; Arbit, Talia; Emch, Michael; Escamilla, Veronica; Ahmed, Kazi Matin; Alam, Md. Jahangir; Streatfield, P. Kim; Yunus, Mohammad; van Geen, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater is routinely analyzed for fecal indicators but direct comparisons of fecal indicators to the presence of bacterial and viral pathogens are rare. This study was conducted in rural Bangladesh where the human population density is high, sanitation is poor, and groundwater pumped from shallow tubewells is often contaminated with fecal bacteria. Five indicator microorganisms (E. coli, total coliform, F+RNA coliphage, Bacteroides and human-associated Bacteroides) and various environmental parameters were compared to the direct detection of waterborne pathogens by quantitative PCR in groundwater pumped from 50 tubewells. Rotavirus was detected in groundwater filtrate from the largest proportion of tubewells (40%), followed by Shigella (10%), Vibrio (10%), and pathogenic E. coli (8%). Spearman rank correlations and sensitivity-specificity calculations indicate that some, but not all, combinations of indicators and environmental parameters can predict the presence of pathogens. Culture-dependent fecal indicator bacteria measured on a single date did not predict total bacterial pathogens, but annually averaged monthly measurements of culturable E. coli did improve prediction for total bacterial pathogens. A qPCR-based E. coli assay was the best indicator for the bacterial pathogens. F+RNA coliphage were neither correlated nor sufficiently sensitive towards rotavirus, but were predictive of bacterial pathogens. Since groundwater cannot be excluded as a significant source of diarrheal disease in Bangladesh and neighboring countries with similar characteristics, the need to develop more effective methods for screening tubewells with respect to microbial contamination is necessary. PMID:22705866

  17. Evaluation of the Rapidec Carba NP Test Kit for Detection of Carbapenemase-Producing Gram-Negative Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Garg, Atul; Garg, Jaya; Upadhyay, G C; Agarwal, Anurag; Bhattacharjee, Amitabha

    2015-12-01

    Recently, bioMérieux, France, introduced the Rapidec Carba NP test kit for rapid detection of carbapenemase-producing Gram-negative bacteria. This kit was evaluated in this study, and we report sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of 92.6%, 96.2%, 95.83%, and 92.6%, respectively. The test was easy to perform and interpret and relatively inexpensive ($5/Rs 300 per test) and provides a practical solution for early detection of carbapenemase-producing, multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria.

  18. Clay-Bacteria Systems and Biofilm Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, J.; Alimova, A.; Katz, A.; Steiner, N.; Rudolph, E.; Gottlieb, P.

    2007-12-01

    Soil clots and the aerosol transport of bacteria and spores are promoted by the formation of biofilms (bacteria cells in an extracellular polymeric matrix). Biofilms protect microorganisms by promoting adhesion to both organic and inorganic surfaces. Time series experiments on bacteria-clay suspensions demonstrate that biofilm growth is catalyzed by the presence of hectorite in minimal growth media for the studied species: Gram negatives (Pseudomonas syringae and Escherichia coli,) and Gram positives (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis). Soil organisms (P. syringae, B. subtilis) and organisms found in the human population (E. coli, S. aureus) are both used to demonstrate the general applicability of clay involvement. Fluorescent images of the biofilms are acquired by staining with propidium iodide, a component of the BacLightTM Live/Dead bacterial viability staining kit (Molecular Probes, Eugene, OR). The evolving polysaccharide-rich biofilm reacts with the clay interlayer site causing a complex substitution of the two-water hectorite interlayer with polysaccharide. The result is often a three-peak composite of the (001) x-ray diffraction maxima resulting from polysaccharide-expanded clays and an organic-driven contraction of a subset of the clays in the reaction medium. X-ray diffractograms reveal that the expanded set creates a broad maximum with clay subsets at 1.84 nm and 1.41 nm interlayer spacings as approximated by a least squares double Lorentzian fit, and a smaller shoulder at larger 2q, deriving from a contraction of the interlayer spacing. Washing with chlorox removes organic material from the contracted clay and creates a 1-water hectorite single peak in place of the double peak. The clay response can be used as an indirect indicator of biofilm in an environmental system.

  19. Freeing Water from Viruses and Bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Four years ago, Argonide Corporation, a company focused on the research, production, and marketing of specialty nano materials, was seeking to develop applications for its NanoCeram[R] fibers. Only 2 nanometers in diameter, these nano aluminum oxide fibers possessed unusual bio-adhesive properties. When formulated into a filter material, the electropositive fibers attracted and retained electro-negative particles such as bacteria and viruses in water-based solutions. This technology caught the interest of NASA as a possible solution for improved water filtration in space cabins. NASA's Johnson Space Center awarded Sanford, Florida-based Argonide a Phase I Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract to determine the feasibility of using the company's filter for purifying recycled space cabin water. Since viruses and bacteria can be carried aboard space cabins by space crews, the ability to detect and remove these harmful substances is a concern for NASA. The Space Agency also desired an improved filter to polish the effluent from condensed and waste water, producing potable drinking water. During its Phase I partnership with NASA, Argonide developed a laboratory-size filter capable of removing greater than 99.9999 percent of bacteria and viruses from water at flow rates more than 200 times faster than virus-rated membranes that remove particles by sieving. Since the new filter s pore size is rather large compared to other membranes, it is also less susceptible to clogging by small particles. In September 2002, Argonide began a Phase II SBIR project with Johnson to develop a full-size cartridge capable of serving a full space crew. This effort, which is still ongoing, enabled the company to demonstrate that its filter media is an efficient absorbent for DNA and RNA.

  20. Close Encounters of Lymphoid Cells and Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Adalia, Aranzazu; Veiga, Esteban

    2016-01-01

    During infections, the first reaction of the host against microbial pathogens is carried out by innate immune cells, which recognize conserved structures on pathogens, called pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Afterward, some of these innate cells can phagocytose and destroy the pathogens, secreting cytokines that would modulate the immune response to the challenge. This rapid response is normally followed by the adaptive immunity, more specific and essential for a complete pathogen clearance in many cases. Some innate immune cells, usually named antigen-presenting cells, such as macrophages or dendritic cells, are able to process internalized invaders and present their antigens to lymphocytes, triggering the adaptive immune response. Nevertheless, the traditional boundary of separated roles between innate and adaptive immunity has been blurred by several studies, showing that very specialized populations of lymphocytes (cells of the adaptive immunity) behave similarly to cells of the innate immunity. These “innate-like” lymphocytes include γδ T cells, invariant NKT cells, B-1 cells, mucosal-associated invariant T cells, marginal zone B cells, and innate response activator cells, and together with the newly described innate lymphoid cells are able to rapidly respond to bacterial infections. Strikingly, our recent data suggest that conventional CD4+ T cells, the paradigm of cells of the adaptive immunity, also present innate-like behavior, capturing bacteria in a process called transinfection. Transinfected CD4+ T cells digest internalized bacteria like professional phagocytes and secrete large amounts of proinflammatory cytokines, protecting for further bacterial challenges. In the present review, we will focus on the data showing such innate-like behavior of lymphocytes following bacteria encounter. PMID:27774092

  1. Ferrous iron oxidation by anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widdel, Friedrich; Schnell, Sylvia; Heising, Silke; Ehrenreich, Armin; Assmus, Bernhard; Schink, Bernhard

    1993-04-01

    NATURAL oxidation of ferrous to ferric iron by bacteria such as Thiobacillus ferrooxidans or Gallionella ferruginea1, or by chemical oxidation2,3 has previously been thought always to involve molecular oxygen as the electron acceptor. Anoxic photochemical reactions4-6 or a photobiological process involving two photosystems7-9 have also been discussed as mechanisms of ferrous iron oxidation. The knowledge of such processes has implications that bear on our understanding of the origin of Precambrian banded iron formations10-14. The reducing power of ferrous iron increases dramatically at pH values higher than 2-3 owing to the formation of ferric hydroxy and oxyhydroxy compounds1,2,15 (Fig. 1). The standard redox potential of Fe3+/Fe2+ (E0 = +0.77 V) is relevant only under acidic conditions. At pH 7.0, the couples Fe(OH)3/Fe2+ (E'0 = -0.236V) or Fe(OH)3 + HCO-3FeCO3 (E'0 = +0.200 V) prevail, matching redox potentials measured in natural sediments9,16,17. It should thus be possible for Fe(n) around pH 7.0 to function as an electron donor for anoxygenic photosynthesis. The midpoint potential of the reaction centre in purple bacteria is around +0.45 V (ref. 18). Here we describe purple, non-sulphur bacteria that can indeed oxidize colourless Fe(u) to brown Fe(in) and reduce CO2 to cell material, implying that oxygen-independent biological iron oxidation was possible before the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis.

  2. Do foliar endophytic bacteria fix nitrogen?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kueppers, L. M.; Moyes, A. B.; Frank, C.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Carper, D.; Vandehey, N.; O'Neil, J.; Dekas, A.

    2015-12-01

    Endophytic microorganisms - bacteria and fungi that live inside healthy plant tissue - are a relatively unexplored source of functional diversity in natural ecosystems. Prior to modern sequencing technology, detecting uncultured endophytic bacteria and assessing their putative functions was challenging. However, recent work has revealed a remarkable diversity of as yet non-culturable endophytic taxa and is beginning to identify functional roles within plant microbiomes. We recently examined bacterial communities in the foliage of a long-lived, high-elevation conifer species, limber pine (Pinus flexilis), and discovered a community strongly dominated by acetic acid bacteria (Acetobacteraceae), with several taxa closely related to known nitrogen fixers. Given limber pine's status as a pioneer species that is able to grow in low fertility soils, we hypothesized that this bacterial community has a potential functional role in fixing atmospheric nitrogen, providing a source of this limiting nutrient to the host tree. We used the radioisotope 13N2 to confirm that N2 rapidly diffuses into pine needles, where it could potentially be fixed. With an acetylene reduction assay we confirmed nitrogenase enzyme activity inside excised twigs 4 times over a growing season, and estimate potential rates of N2 fixation at 0.1 nmol N2 g needle-1 hr-1. Scaled to the stand level, this N input could be on the order of ~20 mg N m-2 d-1 over a growing season. While these rates are low, the long lifespan of individual trees (~1000 years) makes them biologically meaningful. Still, measured rates of acetylene reduction and bulk 15N2 incorporation are quite variable in space and time. Much work remains to better characterize the plant-microbial interactions in this system, including the rates of nitrogen fixation and their variability over the growing season, across edaphic conditions, among host species, and through plant development; and to determine which community members are responsible

  3. Differential staining of bacteria: endospore stain.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Jackie; Moyes, Rita; Breakwell, Donald P

    2009-11-01

    Endospore production is a very important characteristic of some bacteria, allowing them to resist adverse environmental conditions such as desiccation, chemical exposure, extreme heat, radiation, etc. The identification of endospores is also very important for the clinical microbiologist who is analyzing a patient's body fluid or tissue-there are not that many spore-forming genera. In fact, there are two major pathogenic spore-forming genera, Bacillus and Clostridium, together causing a number of lethal diseases-botulism, gangrene, tetanus, and anthrax, to name a few.

  4. Nitrogen fixation by hydrogen-utilizing bacteria.

    PubMed

    De Bont, J A; Leijten, M W

    1976-04-01

    Seventeen strains of nitrogen-fixing bacteria, isolated from different habitats on hydrogen and carbon dioxide as well as on other substrates, morphologically resembled each other. All strains, including Mycobacterium flavum 301, grew autotrophically with hydrogen. The isolate strain 6 was sensitive to oxygen when dependent on N2 as nitrogen source, a consequence of the sensitivity of its nitrogenase towards oxygen. At the same time, strain 6 was sensitive to hydrogen when growing autotrophically on N2 as nitrogen source, but hydrogen did not affect acetylene reduction by these cells.

  5. Bacteriophage Infection of Model Metal Reducing Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, K. A.; Bender, K. S.; Gandhi, K.; Coates, J. D.

    2008-12-01

    Microbially-mediated metal reduction plays a significant role controlling contaminant mobility in aqueous, soil, and sedimentary environments. From among environmentally relevant microorganisms mediating metal reduction, Geobacter spp. have been identified as predominant metal-reducing bacteria under acetate- oxidizing conditions. Due to the significance of these bacteria in environmental systems, it is necessary to understand factors influencing their metabolic physiology. Examination of the annotated finished genome sequence of G. sulfurreducens PCA, G. uraniumreducens Rf4, G. metallireduceans GS-15 as well as a draft genome sequence of Geobacter sp. FRC-32 have identified gene sequences of putative bacteriophage origin. Presence of these sequences indicates that these bacteria are susceptible to phage infection. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primer sets designed tested for the presence of 12 of 25 annotated phage-like sequences in G. sulfurreducens PCA and 9 of 17 phage-like sequences in FRC- 32. The following genes were successfully amplified in G. sulfurreducens PCA: prophage type transcription regulator, phage-induced endonuclease, phage tail sheath, 2 phage tail proteins, phage protein D, phage base plate protein, phage-related DNA polymerase, integrase, phage transcriptional regulator, and Cro-like transcription regulator. Nine of the following sequences were present in FRC-32: 4 separate phage- related proteins, phage-related tail component, viron core protein, phage Mu protein, phage base plate, and phage tail sheath. In addition to the bioinformatics evidence, incubation of G. sulfurreducens PCA with 1 μg mL-1 mytomycin C (mutagen stimulating prophage induction) during mid-log phase resulted in significant cell lysis relative to cultures that remained unamended. Cell lysis was concurrent with an increase in viral like particles enumerated using epifluorescent microscopy. In addition, samples collected following this lytic event (~44hours) were

  6. Bacteriocins of gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Jack, R W; Tagg, J R; Ray, B

    1995-01-01

    In recent years, a group of antibacterial proteins produced by gram-positive bacteria have attracted great interest in their potential use as food preservatives and as antibacterial agents to combat certain infections due to gram-positive pathogenic bacteria. They are ribosomally synthesized peptides of 30 to less than 60 amino acids, with a narrow to wide antibacterial spectrum against gram-positive bacteria; the antibacterial property is heat stable, and a producer strain displays a degree of specific self-protection against its own antibacterial peptide. In many respects, these proteins are quite different from the colicins and other bacteriocins produced by gram-negative bacteria, yet customarily they also are grouped as bacteriocins. Although a large number of these bacteriocins (or bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances) have been reported, only a few have been studied in detail for their mode of action, amino acid sequence, genetic characteristics, and biosynthesis mechanisms. Nevertheless, in general, they appear to be translated as inactive prepeptides containing an N-terminal leader sequence and a C-terminal propeptide component. During posttranslational modifications, the leader peptide is removed. In addition, depending on the particular type, some amino acids in the propeptide components may undergo either dehydration and thioether ring formation to produce lanthionine and beta-methyl lanthionine (as in lantibiotics) or thio ester ring formation to form cystine (as in thiolbiotics). Some of these steps, as well as the translocation of the molecules through the cytoplasmic membrane and producer self-protection against the homologous bacteriocin, are mediated through specific proteins (enzymes). Limited genetic studies have shown that the structural gene for such a bacteriocin and the genes encoding proteins associated with immunity, translocation, and processing are present in a cluster in either a plasmid, the chromosome, or a transposon. Following

  7. Intestinal barriers to bacteria and their toxins

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, R.I.; Owen, R.L. )

    1990-01-01

    Immunologic and nonimmunologic processes work together to protect the host from the multitude of microorganisms residing within the intestinal lumen. Mechanical integrity of the intestinal epithelium, mucus in combination with secretory antibody, antimicrobial metabolites of indigenous microorganisms, and peristalsis each limit proliferation and systemic dissemination of enteric pathogens. Uptake of microorganisms by Peyer's patches and other intestinal lymphoid structures and translocation circumvent the mucosal barrier, especially in immunosuppressed individuals. Improved understanding of the composition and limitation of the intestinal barrier, coupled with advances in genetic engineering of immunogenic bacteria, development of oral delivery systems, and immunomodulators, now make enhancement of mucosal barriers feasible. 32 references.

  8. Genetics in methylotrophic bacteria: Appendix. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lidstrom, M.E.

    1998-09-01

    This research has focused primarily on promoters in Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 and in methanotrophic bacteria. In Methylobacterium extorquens work continued on the moxF promoter. The author constructed chromosomal lacZ fusions of this promoter to avoid the regulation problems of plasmid-borne fragments and has shown that this is regulated normally in the chromosome. She has constructed lacZ fusions to some of the mox genes involved in the synthesis of the cofactor, PQQ, in order to carry out similar analysis of transcription of PQQ genes. The author has continued to isolate mox genes in methanotrophs for the purpose of studying their promoters and transcriptional regulation.

  9. Polymorphic transformation of helical flagella of bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sookkyung; Howard Berg Collaboration; William Ko Collaboration; Yongsam Kim Collaboration; Wanho Lee Collaboration; Charles Peskin Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    Bacteria such as E. coli swim in an aqueous environment by utilizing the rotation of flagellar motors and alternate two modes of motility, runs and tumbles. Runs are steady forward swimming driven by bundles of flagellar filaments whose motors are turning CCW; tumbles involve a reorientation of the direction of swimming triggered by motor reversals. During tumbling, the helical flagellum undergoes polymorphic transformations, which is a local change in helical pitch, helical radius, and handedness. In this work, we investigate the underlying mechanism of structural conformation and how this polymorphic transition plays a role in bacterial swimming. National Science Foundation.

  10. Ethylene-producing bacteria that ripen fruit.

    PubMed

    Digiacomo, Fabio; Girelli, Gabriele; Aor, Bruno; Marchioretti, Caterina; Pedrotti, Michele; Perli, Thomas; Tonon, Emil; Valentini, Viola; Avi, Damiano; Ferrentino, Giovanna; Dorigato, Andrea; Torre, Paola; Jousson, Olivier; Mansy, Sheref S; Del Bianco, Cristina

    2014-12-19

    Ethylene is a plant hormone widely used to ripen fruit. However, the synthesis, handling, and storage of ethylene are environmentally harmful and dangerous. We engineered E. coli to produce ethylene through the activity of the ethylene-forming enzyme (EFE) from Pseudomonas syringae. EFE converts a citric acid cycle intermediate, 2-oxoglutarate, to ethylene in a single step. The production of ethylene was placed under the control of arabinose and blue light responsive regulatory systems. The resulting bacteria were capable of accelerating the ripening of tomatoes, kiwifruit, and apples.

  11. Spatial and temporal variability of fecal indicator bacteria in an urban stream under different meteorological regimes.

    PubMed

    Cha, Sung Min; Lee, Seung Won; Park, Yong Eun; Cho, Kyung Hwa; Lee, Seungyoon; Kim, Joon Ha

    2010-01-01

    As a representative urban stream in Korea, the Gwangju (GJ) stream suffers from chronic fecal contamination. In this study, to characterize levels of fecal pollution in the GJ stream, the monthly monitoring data for seven years (from 2001 to 2007) and the hourly monitoring data from two field experiments were examined with respect to seasonal/daily variations and spatial distribution under wet and dry weather conditions. This research revealed that concentrations of fecal indicator bacteria strongly varied depending on the prevalent meteorological conditions. That is, during the dry daytime, fecal indicator bacteria concentrations decreased due to inactivation from solar irradiation, but rapidly increased in the absence of sunlight, suggesting external source inputs. In addition, bacterial concentrations substantially increased during rainfall events, due probably to a major contribution from combined sewer overflow. The observations in this study can be useful for implementing fecal pollution management strategies and for predicting fecal contamination as a function of meteorological conditions.

  12. Small regulatory RNAs from low-GC Gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Brantl, Sabine; Brückner, Reinhold

    2014-01-01

    Small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) that act by base-pairing were first discovered in so-called accessory DNA elements—plasmids, phages, and transposons—where they control replication, maintenance, and transposition. Since 2001, a huge body of work has been performed to predict and identify sRNAs in a multitude of bacterial genomes. The majority of chromosome-encoded sRNAs have been investigated in E. coli and other Gram-negative bacteria. However, during the past five years an increasing number of sRNAs were found in Gram-positive bacteria. Here, we outline our current knowledge on chromosome-encoded sRNAs from low-GC Gram-positive species that act by base-pairing, i.e., an antisense mechanism. We will focus on sRNAs with known targets and defined regulatory mechanisms with special emphasis on Bacillus subtilis. PMID:24576839

  13. Decoding the Chemical Language of Motile Bacteria by Using High-Throughput Microfluidic Assays.

    PubMed

    Crooks, John A; Stilwell, Matthew D; Oliver, Piercen M; Zhong, Zhou; Weibel, Douglas B

    2015-10-12

    Motile bacteria navigate chemical environments by using chemoreceptors. The output of these protein sensors is linked to motility machinery and enables bacteria to follow chemical gradients. Understanding the chemical specificity of different families of chemoreceptors is essential for predicting and controlling bacterial behavior in ecological niches, including symbiotic and pathogenic interactions with plants and mammals. The identification of chemical(s) recognized by specific families of receptors is limited by the low throughput and complexity of chemotaxis assays. To address this challenge, we developed a microfluidic-based chemotaxis assay that is quantitative, simple, and enables high-throughput measurements of bacterial response to different chemicals. Using the model bacterium Escherichia coli, we demonstrated a strategy for identifying molecules that activate chemoreceptors from a diverse compound library and for determining how global behavioral strategies are tuned to chemical environments.

  14. A novel pathway producing dimethylsulphide in bacteria is widespread in soil environments.

    PubMed

    Carrión, O; Curson, A R J; Kumaresan, D; Fu, Y; Lang, A S; Mercadé, E; Todd, J D

    2015-03-25

    The volatile compound dimethylsulphide (DMS) is important in climate regulation, the sulphur cycle and signalling to higher organisms. Microbial catabolism of the marine osmolyte dimethylsulphoniopropionate (DMSP) is thought to be the major biological process generating DMS. Here we report the discovery and characterization of the first gene for DMSP-independent DMS production in any bacterium. This gene, mddA, encodes a methyltransferase that methylates methanethiol and generates DMS. MddA functions in many taxonomically diverse bacteria including sediment-dwelling pseudomonads, nitrogen-fixing bradyrhizobia and cyanobacteria, and mycobacteria including the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The mddA gene is present in metagenomes from varied environments, being particularly abundant in soil environments, where it is predicted to occur in up to 76% of bacteria. This novel pathway may significantly contribute to global DMS emissions, especially in terrestrial environments and could represent a shift from the notion that DMSP is the only significant precursor of DMS.

  15. The talking language in some major Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Goutam; Ray, Arun Kumar

    2016-08-01

    Cell-cell interaction or quorum sensing (QS) is a vital biochemical/physiological process in bacteria that is required for various physiological functions, including nutrient uptake, competence development, biofilm formation, sporulation, as well as for toxin secretion. In natural environment, bacteria live in close association with other bacteria and interaction among them is crucial for survival. The QS-regulated gene expression in bacteria is a cell density-dependent process and the initiation process depends on the threshold level of the signaling molecule, N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL). The present review summarizes the QS signal and its respective circuit in Gram-negative bacteria. Most of the human pathogens belong to Gram-negative group, and only a few of them cause disease through QS system. Thus, inhibition of pathogenic bacteria is important. Use of antibiotics creates a selective pressure (antibiotics act as natural selection factor to promote one group of bacteria over another group) for emerging multidrug-resistant bacteria and will not be suitable for long-term use. The alternative process of inhibition of QS in bacteria using different natural and synthetic molecules is called quorum quenching. However, in the long run, QS inhibitors or blockers may also develop resistance, but obviously it will solve some sort of problems. In this review, we also have stated the mode of action of quorum-quenching molecule. The understanding of QS network in pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria will help us to solve many health-related problems in future.

  16. Co-electrospinning of bacteria and viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salalha, Wael; Kuhn, Jonathan; Chervinsky, Shmuel; Zussman, Eyal

    2006-03-01

    Co-electrospinning provides a novel and highly versatile approach towards composite fibers with diameters ranging from a few hundred nm down to 30 nm with embedded elements. In the present work, co-electrospinning of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and viruses (T7, T4, λ) or bacteria (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus albus) was carried out. These preparations should have applications for tissue engineering, gene therapy, phage therapy and biosensing. The average diameter of the co-spun nanofibers was about 300 nm. We found that the encapsulated viruses and bacteria manage to survive the electrospinning process, its pressure buildup in the core of the fiber and the electrostatic field in the co-electrospinning process. Approximately 10% of the Escherichia coli and 20% of Staphylococcus albus cells are viable after spinning. Approximately 5% of the bacterial viruses were also viable after the electrospinning. It should be noted that the encapsulated cells and viruses remain stable for two months without a further decrease in number. These results demonstrate the potential of the co-electrospinning process for the encapsulation and immobilization of bio-objects and the possibility of adapting them to technical applications (e.g., bio-chips).

  17. Detection of phenols using engineered bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Wise, Arlene A.; Kuske, Cheryl R.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.

    2007-12-04

    Detection of phenols using engineered bacteria. A biosensor can be created by placing a reporter gene under control of an inducible promoter. The reporter gene produces a signal when a cognate transcriptional activator senses the inducing chemical. Creation of bacterial biosensors is currently restricted by limited knowledge of the genetic systems of bacteria that catabolize xenobiotics. By using mutagenic PCR to change the chemical specificity of the Pseudomonas species CF600 DmpR protein, the potential for engineering novel biosensors for detection of phenols has been demonstrated. DmpR, a well-characterized transcriptional activator of the P. CF600's dmp operon mediates growth on simple phenols. Transcription from Po, the promoter heading the dmp operon, is activated when the sensor domain of DmpR interacts with phenol and mono-substituted phenols. By altering the sensor domain of the DmpR, a group of DmpR derivatives that activate transcription of a Po-lacZ fusion in response to eight of the EPA's eleven priority pollutant phenols has been created. The assays and the sensor domain mutations that alter the chemical specificity of DmpR is described.

  18. Detection of phenols using engineered bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Wise, Arlene A.; Kuske, Cheryl R.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.

    2004-08-10

    Detection of phenols using engineered bacteria. A biosensor can be created by placing a reporter gene under control of an inducible promoter. The reporter gene produces a signal when a cognate transcriptional activator senses the inducing chemical. Creation of bacterial biosensors is currently restricted by limited knowledge of the genetic systems of bacteria that catabolize xenobiotics. By using mutagenic PCR to change the chemical specificity of the Pseudomonas species CF600 DmpR protein, the potential for engineering novel biosensors for detection of phenols has been demonstrated. DmpR, a well-characterized transcriptional activator of the P. CF600's dmp operon mediates growth on simple phenols. Transcription from Po, the promoter heading the dmp operon, is activated when the sensor domain of DmpR interacts with phenol and mono-substituted phenols. By altering the sensor domain of the DmpR, a group of DmpR derivatives that activate transcription of a Po-lacZ fusion in response to eight of the EPA's eleven priority pollutant phenols has been created. The assays and the sensor domain mutations that alter the chemical specificity of DmpR is described.

  19. Construction of bacteria-eukaryote synthetic mutualism.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Isao; Hosoda, Kazufumi; Suzuki, Shingo; Yamamoto, Kayo; Kihara, Kumiko; Mori, Kotaro; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2013-08-01

    Mutualism is ubiquitous in nature but is known to be intrinsically vulnerable with regard to both population dynamics and evolution. Synthetic ecology has indicated that it is feasible for organisms to establish novel mutualism merely through encountering each other by showing that it is feasible to construct synthetic mutualism between organisms. However, bacteria-eukaryote mutualism, which is ecologically important, has not yet been constructed. In this study, we synthetically constructed mutualism between a bacterium and a eukaryote by using two model organisms. We mixed a bacterium, Escherichia coli (a genetically engineered glutamine auxotroph), and an amoeba, Dictyostelium discoideum, in 14 sets of conditions in which each species could not grow in monoculture but potentially could grow in coculture. Under a single condition in which the bacterium and amoeba mutually compensated for the lack of required nutrients (lipoic acid and glutamine, respectively), both species grew continuously through several subcultures, essentially establishing mutualism. Our results shed light on the establishment of bacteria-eukaryote mutualism and indicate that a bacterium and eukaryote pair in nature also has a non-negligible possibility of establishing novel mutualism if the organisms are potentially mutualistic.

  20. Metabolic Effects of Sucralose on Environmental Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Sucralose was developed as a low cost artificial sweetener that is nonmetabolizable in humans. Sucralose can withstand changes in pH and temperature and is not degraded by the wastewater treatment process. Since the molecule can withstand heat, acidification, and microbial degradation, it is accumulating in the environment and has been found in wastewater, estuaries, rivers, and the Gulf Stream. Environmental isolates were cultured in the presence of sucralose looking for potential sucralose metabolism or growth acceleration responses. Sucralose was found to be nonnutritive and demonstrated bacteriostatic effects on all six isolates. This growth inhibition was directly proportional to the concentration of sucralose exposure, and the amount of the growth inhibition appeared to be species-specific. The bacteriostatic effect may be due to a decrease in sucrose uptake by bacteria exposed to sucralose. We have determined that sucralose inhibits invertase and sucrose permease. These enzymes cannot catalyze hydrolysis or be effective in transmembrane transport of the sugar substitute. Current environmental concentrations should not have much of an effect on environmental bacteria since the bacteriostatic effect seems to be consecration based; however, as sucralose accumulates in the environment, we must consider it a contaminant, especially for microenvironments. PMID:24368913

  1. Are ruminal bacteria armed with bacteriocins?

    PubMed

    Kalmokoff, M L; Bartlett, F; Teather, R M

    1996-12-01

    The production of toxic compounds or antibiotics is a common component of intermicrobial competitive interactions, and many of these toxins have been adopted and adapted for the control of microbial populations. One class of these toxins, the bacteriocins, is a heterogeneous group of proteinaceous antibiotics that often display a high degree of target specificity, although many have a very wide spectrum of activity. To date, only limited information is available concerning the occurrence of bacteriocins among ruminal isolates or the sensitivity of ruminal microorganisms to exogenous bacteriocins. A survey of 50 strains of Butyrivibrio spp. isolated from a variety of sources (sheep, deer, and cattle) for bacteriocin production indicated a high incidence of bacteriocin-like activity (50%). Many of these inhibitory compounds appear to have a broad spectrum of activity, which suggests that bacteriocins may have a significant impact on both the competitive fitness of individual microbial strains within the rumen and on the overall structure of the microbial population within the rumen. Selected bacteriocins from lactic acid bacteria also were shown to have activity against Butyrivibrio spp. and may have application in ruminant systems. Bacteriocins may provide an alternative group of antibiotics for the manipulation of ruminal microbial populations. Bacteriocins have significant advantages over other antibiotics in target specificity, susceptibility to proteolytic digestion, possibility of genetic transfer and manipulation, and, in the case of some bacteriocins derived from lactic acid bacteria, a long history of safe use.

  2. Methods for fabricating microarrays of motile bacteria.

    PubMed

    Rozhok, Sergey; Shen, Clifton K-F; Littler, Pey-Lih H; Fan, Zhifang; Liu, Chang; Mirkin, Chad A; Holz, Richard C

    2005-04-01

    Motile bacterial cell microarrays were fabricated by attaching Escherichia coli K-12 cells onto predesigned 16-mercaptohexadecanoic acid patterned microarrays, which were covalently functionalized with E. coli antibodies or poly-L-lysine. By utilizing 11-mercaptoundecyl-penta(ethylene glycol) or 11-mercapto-1-undecanol as passivating molecules, nonspecific binding of E. coli was significantly reduced. Microcontact printing and dip-pen nanolithography were used to prepare microarrays for bacterial adhesion, which was studied by optical fluorescence and atomic force microscopy. These data indicate that single motile E. coli can be attached to predesigned line or dot features and binding can occur via the cell body or the flagella of bacteria. Adherent bacteria are viable (remain alive and motile after adhesion to patterned surface features) for more than four hours. Individual motile bacterial cells can be placed onto predesigned surface features that are at least 1.3 microm in diameter or larger. The importance of controlling the adhesion of single bacterial cell to a surface is discussed with regard to biomotor design.

  3. Designing surfaces that kill bacteria on contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiller, Joerg C.; Liao, Chun-Jen; Lewis, Kim; Klibanov, Alexander M.

    2001-05-01

    Poly(4-vinyl-N-alkylpyridinium bromide) was covalently attached to glass slides to create a surface that kills airborne bacteria on contact. The antibacterial properties were assessed by spraying aqueous suspensions of bacterial cells on the surface, followed by air drying and counting the number of cells remaining viable (i.e., capable of growing colonies). Amino glass slides were acylated with acryloyl chloride, copolymerized with 4-vinylpyridine, and N-alkylated with different alkyl bromides (from propyl to hexadecyl). The resultant surfaces, depending on the alkyl group, were able to kill up to 94 ± 4% of Staphylococcus aureus cells sprayed on them. A surface alternatively created by attaching poly(4-vinylpyridine) to a glass slide and alkylating it with hexyl bromide killed 94 ± 3% of the deposited S. aureus cells. On surfaces modified with N-hexylated poly(4-vinylpyridine), the numbers of viable cells of another Gram-positive bacterium, Staphylococcus epidermidis, as well as of the Gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli, dropped more than 100-fold compared with the original amino glass. In contrast, the number of viable bacterial cells did not decline significantly after spraying on such common materials as ceramics, plastics, metals, and wood.

  4. Magneto-aerotaxis in marine coccoid bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Frankel, R B; Bazylinski, D A; Johnson, M S; Taylor, B L

    1997-01-01

    Magnetotactic cocci swim persistently along local magnetic field lines in a preferred direction that corresponds to downward migration along geomagnetic field lines. Recently, high cell concentrations of magnetotactic cocci have been found in the water columns of chemically stratified, marine and brackish habitats, and not always in the sediments, as would be expected for persistent, downward-migrating bacteria. Here we report that cells of a pure culture of a marine magnetotactic coccus, designated strain MC-1, formed microaerophilic bands in capillary tubes and used aerotaxis to migrate to a preferred oxygen concentration in an oxygen gradient. Cells were able to swim in either direction along the local magnetic field and used magnetotaxis in conjunction with aerotaxis, i.e., magnetically assisted aerotaxis, or magneto-aerotaxis, to more efficiently migrate to and maintain position at their preferred oxygen concentration. Cells of strain MC-1 had a novel, aerotactic sensory mechanism that appeared to function as a two-way switch, rather than the temporal sensory mechanism used by other bacteria, including Magnetospirillum megnetotacticum, in aerotaxis. The cells also exhibited a response to short-wavelength light (< or = 500 nm), which caused them to swim persistently parallel to the magnetic field during illumination. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 PMID:9251816

  5. Magnetotactic bacteria on Earth and on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, Christopher P.; Friedmann, E. Imre; Frankel, Richard B.; Bazylinski, Dennis A.

    2003-01-01

    Continued interest in the possibility of evidence for life in the ALH84001 Martian meteorite has focused on the magnetite crystals. This review is structured around three related questions: is the magnetite in ALH84001 of biological or non-biological origin, or a mixture of both? does magnetite on Earth provide insight to the plausibility of biogenic magnetite on Mars? could magnetotaxis have developed on Mars? There are credible arguments for both the biological and non-biological origin of the magnetite in ALH84001, and we suggest that more studies of ALH84001, extensive laboratory simulations of non-biological magnetite formation, as well as further studies of magnetotactic bacteria on Earth will be required to further address this question. Magnetite grains produced by bacteria could provide one of the few inorganic traces of past bacterial life on Mars that could be recovered from surface soils and sediments. If there was biogenic magnetite on Mars in sufficient abundance to leave fossil remains in the volcanic rocks of ALH84001, then it is likely that better-preserved magnetite will be found in sedimentary deposits on Mars. Deposits in ancient lakebeds could contain well-preserved chains of magnetite clearly indicating a biogenic origin.

  6. The predominant bacteria isolated from radicular cysts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To detect predominant bacteria associated with radicular cysts and discuss in light of the literature. Material and methods Clinical materials were obtained from 35 radicular cysts by aspiration. Cultures were made from clinical materials by modern laboratory techniques, they underwent microbiologic analysis. Results The following are microorganisms isolated from cultures: Streptococcus milleri Group (SMG) (23.8%) [Streptococcus constellatus (19.1%) and Streptococcus anginosus (4.7%)], Streptococcus sanguis (14.3%), Streptococcus mitis (4.7%), Streptococcus cremoris (4.7%), Peptostreptococcus pevotii (4.7%), Prevotella buccae (4.7%), Prevotella intermedia (4.7%), Actinomyces meyeri (4.7%), Actinomyces viscosus (4.7%), Propionibacterium propionicum (4.7%), Bacteroides capillosus (4.7%), Staphylococcus hominis (4.7%), Rothia denticariosa (4.7%), Gemella haemolysans (4.7%), and Fusobacterium nucleatum (4.7%). Conclusions Results of this study demonstrated that radicular cysts show a great variety of anaerobic and facultative anaerobic bacterial flora. It was observed that all isolated microorganisms were the types commonly found in oral flora. Although no specific microorganism was found, Streptococcus spp. bacteria (47.5%) – especially SMG (23.8%) – were predominantly found in the microorganisms isolated. Furthermore, radicular cysts might be polymicrobial originated. Although radicular cyst is an inflammatory cyst, some radicular cyst fluids might be sterile. PMID:24011184

  7. Peroxide-Sensing Transcriptional Regulators in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Mongkolsuk, Skorn

    2012-01-01

    The ability to maintain intracellular concentrations of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) within safe limits is essential for all aerobic life forms. In bacteria, as well as other organisms, ROS are produced during the normal course of aerobic metabolism, necessitating the constitutive expression of ROS scavenging systems. However, bacteria can also experience transient high-level exposure to ROS derived either from external sources, such as the host defense response, or as a secondary effect of other seemingly unrelated environmental stresses. Consequently, transcriptional regulators have evolved to sense the levels of ROS and coordinate the appropriate oxidative stress response. Three well-studied examples of these are the peroxide responsive regulators OxyR, PerR, and OhrR. OxyR and PerR are sensors of primarily H2O2, while OhrR senses organic peroxide (ROOH) and sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). OxyR and OhrR sense oxidants by means of the reversible oxidation of specific cysteine residues. In contrast, PerR senses H2O2 via the Fe-catalyzed oxidation of histidine residues. These transcription regulators also influence complex biological phenomena, such as biofilm formation, the evasion of host immune responses, and antibiotic resistance via the direct regulation of specific proteins. PMID:22797754

  8. Bioactivation of Phytoestrogens: Intestinal Bacteria and Health.

    PubMed

    Landete, J M; Arqués, J; Medina, M; Gaya, P; de Las Rivas, B; Muñoz, R

    2016-08-17

    Phytoestrogens are polyphenols similar to human estrogens found in plants or derived from plant precursors. Phytoestrogens are found in high concentration in soya, flaxseed and other seeds, fruits, vegetables, cereals, tea, chocolate, etc. They comprise several classes of chemical compounds (stilbenes, coumestans, isoflavones, ellagitannins, and lignans) which are structurally similar to endogenous estrogens but which can have both estrogenic and antiestrogenic effects. Although epidemiological and experimental evidence indicates that intake of phytoestrogens in foods may be protective against certain chronic diseases, discrepancies have been observed between in vivo and in vitro experiments. The microbial transformations have not been reported so far in stilbenes and coumestans. However, isoflavones, ellagitanins, and lignans are metabolized by intestinal bacteria to produce equol, urolithins, and enterolignans, respectively. Equol, urolithin, and enterolignans are more bioavailable, and have more estrogenic/antiestrogenic and antioxidant activity than their precursors. Moreover, equol, urolithins and enterolignans have anti-inflammatory effects and induce antiproliferative and apoptosis-inducing activities. The transformation of isoflavones, ellagitanins, and lignans by intestinal microbiota is essential to be protective against certain chronic diseases, as cancer, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, and menopausal symptoms. Bioavailability, bioactivity, and health effects of dietary phytoestrogens are strongly determined by the intestinal bacteria of each individual.

  9. Rapid detection of bacteria in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deininger, Rolf A.; Lee, Ji Y.

    2002-06-01

    A rapid detection of bacteria in water is essential for a timely response. This applies primarily to drinking water, be it bottled water or water from a public supply system, but is equally important for the analysis of water from swimming pools and beaches, and ballast water from oceangoing ships discharging into coastal or inland waters of the US. There are several methods available today for a rapid test including PCR based methods, flow cytometry, and electro chemiluminescence, to name a few. All of the above methods work, but are complicated and/or require expensive equipment and highly trained analysts in a laboratory. The method described here is based on lysing the bacteria after capture on a membrane filter, and measuring the ATP in a luminometer after the addition of luciferin/luciferase. This bioluminescence test can be done onsite, in less than 5 minutes, with equipment that fits onto a clipboard. It is a fast screening test that indicates if there is enough biologically active material in the same to pose a threat to the consumer. If this is the case, an additional step using immunomagnetic separation may be used to identify the responsible organisms. Tests have been done with E. coli 0157:H7, pseudomonas, and logionella. These tests take about 30 minutes each, and allow a quick determination of bacterial threats in a field situation.

  10. Mammalian prion amyloid formation in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Bruno; Cordeiro, Yraima; Ventura, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mammalian prion proteins (PrPs) that cause transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are misfolded conformations of the host cellular PrP. The misfolded form, the scrapie PrP (PrPSc), can aggregate into amyloid fibrils that progressively accumulate in the brain, evolving to a pathological phenotype. A particular characteristic of PrPSc is to be found as different strains, related to the diversity of conformational states it can adopt. Prion strains are responsible for the multiple phenotypes observed in prion diseases, presenting different incubation times and diverse deposition profiles in the brain. PrP biochemical properties are also strain-dependent, such as different digestion pattern after proteolysis and different stability. Although they have long been studied, strain formation is still a major unsolved issue in prion biology. The recreation of strain-specific conformational features is of fundamental importance to study this unique pathogenic phenomenon. In our recent paper, we described that murine PrP, when expressed in bacteria, forms amyloid inclusion bodies that possess different strain-like characteristics, depending on the PrP construct. Here, we present an extra-view of these data and propose that bacteria might become a successful model to generate preparative amounts of prion strain-specific assemblies for high-resolution structural analysis as well as for addressing the determinants of infectivity and transmissibility. PMID:26910379

  11. Food phenolics and lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Héctor; Curiel, José Antonio; Landete, José María; de las Rivas, Blanca; López de Felipe, Félix; Gómez-Cordovés, Carmen; Mancheño, José Miguel; Muñoz, Rosario

    2009-06-30

    Phenolic compounds are important constituents of food products of plant origin. These compounds are directly related to sensory characteristics of foods such as flavour, astringency, and colour. In addition, the presence of phenolic compounds on the diet is beneficial to health due to their chemopreventive activities against carcinogenesis and mutagenesis, mainly due to their antioxidant activities. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are autochthonous microbiota of raw vegetables. To get desirable properties on fermented plant-derived food products, LAB has to be adapted to the characteristics of the plant raw materials where phenolic compounds are abundant. Lactobacillus plantarum is the commercial starter most frequently used in the fermentation of food products of plant origin. However, scarce information is still available on the influence of phenolic compounds on the growth and viability of L. plantarum and other LAB species. Moreover, metabolic pathways of biosynthesis or degradation of phenolic compounds in LAB have not been completely described. Results obtained in L. plantarum showed that L. plantarum was able to degrade some food phenolic compounds giving compounds influencing food aroma as well as compounds presenting increased antioxidant activity. Recently, several L. plantarum proteins involved in the metabolism of phenolic compounds have been genetically and biochemically characterized. The aim of this review is to give a complete and updated overview of the current knowledge among LAB and food phenolics interaction, which could facilitate the possible application of selected bacteria or their enzymes in the elaboration of food products with improved characteristics.

  12. Separation and Purification of Bacteria from Soil

    PubMed Central

    Bakken, Lars R.

    1985-01-01

    Bacteria were released and separated from soil by a simple blending-centrifugation procedure. The percent yield of bacterial cells (microscopic counts) in the supernatants varied over a wide range depending on the soil type. The superantants contained large amounts of noncellular organic material and clay particles. Further purification of the bacterial cells was obtained by centrifugation in density gradients, whereby the clay particles and part of the organic materials sedimented. A large proportion of the bacteria also sedimented through the density gradient, showing that they had a buoyant density above 1.2 g/ml. Attachment to clay minerals and humic material may account for this apparently high buoyant density. The percent yield of cells was negatively correlated with the clay content of the soils, whereas the purity was positively correlated with it. The cell size distribution and the relative frequency of colony-forming cells were similar in the soil homogenate, the supernatants after blending-centrifugation, and the purified bacterial fraction. In purified bacterial fraction from a clay loam, the microscopically measured biomass could account for 20 to 25% of the total C and 30 to 40% of the total N as cellular C and N. The amount of cellular C and N may be higher, however, owing to an underestimation of the cell diameter during fluorescence. A part of the contamination could be ascribed to extracellular structures as well as partly decayed cells, which were not revealed by fluorescence microscopy. PMID:16346816

  13. Peroxide-sensing transcriptional regulators in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Dubbs, James M; Mongkolsuk, Skorn

    2012-10-01

    The ability to maintain intracellular concentrations of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) within safe limits is essential for all aerobic life forms. In bacteria, as well as other organisms, ROS are produced during the normal course of aerobic metabolism, necessitating the constitutive expression of ROS scavenging systems. However, bacteria can also experience transient high-level exposure to ROS derived either from external sources, such as the host defense response, or as a secondary effect of other seemingly unrelated environmental stresses. Consequently, transcriptional regulators have evolved to sense the levels of ROS and coordinate the appropriate oxidative stress response. Three well-studied examples of these are the peroxide responsive regulators OxyR, PerR, and OhrR. OxyR and PerR are sensors of primarily H(2)O(2), while OhrR senses organic peroxide (ROOH) and sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). OxyR and OhrR sense oxidants by means of the reversible oxidation of specific cysteine residues. In contrast, PerR senses H(2)O(2) via the Fe-catalyzed oxidation of histidine residues. These transcription regulators also influence complex biological phenomena, such as biofilm formation, the evasion of host immune responses, and antibiotic resistance via the direct regulation of specific proteins.

  14. Effects of heavy ions on bacteria.

    PubMed

    Atlan, H

    1973-01-01

    Genetically well-known bacteria have been used to study efficiencies of heavy ions for mutation induction. For space experiments a technique of correlation of tracks of particles (in emulsion stacked on and between Petri dishes) with individual mutations, has been designed and checked in balloon flights. No clear cut results could be obtained without previous identification of genetic markers sensitive to irradiation by heavy ions. Accelerator experiments were performed at the Berkeley HILAC for systematic study. The results obtained on a strain of E. coli K12F- requiring threonine, leucine and arginine showed that the cell inactivation kinetics for gamma rays, helium, carbon and oxygen ions were almost identical (LD90 approaches 22krads) while argon was less effective (LD90 approaches 40 krads). Heavy ions up to oxygen were either equally or less efficient than gamma rays for induction of reverse mutations. Discrepancies between these findings and previous data on bacteria, yeast and Neurospora systems are discussed on the basis of radiosensitivity, ploidy, deletions, forward and reverse mutations.

  15. Bacteria survival probability in bactericidal filter paper.

    PubMed

    Mansur-Azzam, Nura; Hosseinidoust, Zeinab; Woo, Su Gyeong; Vyhnalkova, Renata; Eisenberg, Adi; van de Ven, Theo G M

    2014-05-01

    Bactericidal filter papers offer the simplicity of gravity filtration to simultaneously eradicate microbial contaminants and particulates. We previously detailed the development of biocidal block copolymer micelles that could be immobilized on a filter paper to actively eradicate bacteria. Despite the many advantages offered by this system, its widespread use is hindered by its unknown mechanism of action which can result in non-reproducible outcomes. In this work, we sought to investigate the mechanism by which a certain percentage of Escherichia coli cells survived when passing through the bactericidal filter paper. Through the process of elimination, the possibility that the bacterial survival probability was controlled by the initial bacterial load or the existence of resistant sub-populations of E. coli was dismissed. It was observed that increasing the thickness or the number of layers of the filter significantly decreased bacterial survival probability for the biocidal filter paper but did not affect the efficiency of the blank filter paper (no biocide). The survival probability of bacteria passing through the antibacterial filter paper appeared to depend strongly on the number of collision between each bacterium and the biocide-loaded micelles. It was thus hypothesized that during each collision a certain number of biocide molecules were directly transferred from the hydrophobic core of the micelle to the bacterial lipid bilayer membrane. Therefore, each bacterium must encounter a certain number of collisions to take up enough biocide to kill the cell and cells that do not undergo the threshold number of collisions are expected to survive.

  16. Characterization of rat cecum cellulolytic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, L; Macy, J M

    1982-01-01

    Cellulose-degrading bacteria previously isolated from the ceca of rats have been characterized and identified. The most commonly isolated type was rods identified as Bacteroides succinogenes. These bacteria fermented only cellulose (e.g., pebble-milled Whatman no. 1 filter paper), cellobiose, and in 43 of 47 strains, glucose, with succinic and acetic acids as the major products. The only organic growth factors found to be required by selected strains were p-aminobenzoic acid, cyanocobalamine, thiamine, and a straight-chain and a branched-chain volatile fatty acid. These vitamin requirements differ from those of rumen strains of B. succinogenes, indicating the rat strains may form a distinct subgroup within the species. The mole percent guanine plus cytosine was 45%, a value lower than those (48 to 51%) found for three rumen strains of B. succinogenes included in this study. Cellulolytic cocci were isolated less frequently than the rods and were identified as Rumminococcus flavefaciens. Most strains fermented only cellulose and cellobiose, and their major fermentation products were also succinic and acetic acids. Their required growth factors were not identified but were supplied by rumen fluid. Images PMID:7159086

  17. Estuarine ecology of phenanthrene-degrading bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerin, William F.; Jones, Galen E.

    1989-08-01

    Phenanthrene degrading bacteria were ubiquitously distributed in waters and sediments of the Great Bay Estuary, NH, as determined using a 14C-phenanthrene mineralization assay. Similar activities were observed in water samples collected in March and June when these were incubated at 18 °C even though ambient water temperatures were 1-4 °C and 10-22 °C, respectively. This observation indicated the constant presence of a mesophilic phenanthrene-degrading bacterial population in the estuary. Among water samples, the highest biodegradation activities were associated with samples collected downstream from a dredging operation which introduced high concentrations of coal tar PAH (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) into the Cocheco River, and in areas receiving PAH from pleasure and commercial boating activities. Mid-estuarine maxima in biodegradation activity during both sampling trips suggested adaptation of the microbial flora to the salinities prevailing in the low turnover, high residence time portion of the Estuary at the time of sampling. Despite the hydrophobicity of phenanthrene, no correlation between biodegradation rates and particulate matter concentrations were observed. Similarly, concentrations of nutrients and dissolved and particulate organic matter correlated poorly with biodegradation rates. Better agreements between 14C-phenanthrene mineralization potentials and plate counts on a phenanthrene/toluene agar (PTA) medium were observed. Phenanthrene biodegradative activities and numbers of culturable bacteria growing on PTA were governed by the degree of previous exposure to PAH.

  18. Magnetotactic bacteria on Earth and on Mars.

    PubMed

    McKay, Christopher P; Friedmann, E Imre; Frankel, Richard B; Bazylinski, Dennis A

    2003-01-01

    Continued interest in the possibility of evidence for life in the ALH84001 Martian meteorite has focused on the magnetite crystals. This review is structured around three related questions: is the magnetite in ALH84001 of biological or non-biological origin, or a mixture of both? does magnetite on Earth provide insight to the plausibility of biogenic magnetite on Mars? could magnetotaxis have developed on Mars? There are credible arguments for both the biological and non-biological origin of the magnetite in ALH84001, and we suggest that more studies of ALH84001, extensive laboratory simulations of non-biological magnetite formation, as well as further studies of magnetotactic bacteria on Earth will be required to further address this question. Magnetite grains produced by bacteria could provide one of the few inorganic traces of past bacterial life on Mars that could be recovered from surface soils and sediments. If there was biogenic magnetite on Mars in sufficient abundance to leave fossil remains in the volcanic rocks of ALH84001, then it is likely that better-preserved magnetite will be found in sedimentary deposits on Mars. Deposits in ancient lakebeds could contain well-preserved chains of magnetite clearly indicating a biogenic origin.

  19. Magnetotactic bacteria and magnetosomes - Scope and challenges.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Jobin John; Suthindhiran, K

    2016-11-01

    Geomagnetism aided navigation has been demonstrated by certain organisms which allows them to identify a particular location using magnetic field. This attractive technique to recognize the course was earlier exhibited in numerous animals, for example, birds, insects, reptiles, fishes and mammals. Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are one of the best examples for magnetoreception among microorganisms as the magnetic mineral functions as an internal magnet and aid the microbe to move towards the water columns in an oxic-anoxic interface (OAI). The ability of MTB to biomineralize the magnetic particles (magnetosomes) into uniform nano-sized, highly crystalline structure with uniform magnetic properties has made the bacteria an important topic of research. The superior properties of magnetosomes over chemically synthesized magnetic nanoparticles made it an attractive candidate for potential applications in microbiology, biophysics, biochemistry, nanotechnology and biomedicine. In this review article, the scope of MTB, magnetosomes and its challenges in research and industrial application have been discussed in brief. This article mainly focuses on the application based on the magnetotactic behaviour of MTB and magnetosomes in different areas of modern science.

  20. Conjugation in Gram-Positive Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Goessweiner-Mohr, Nikolaus; Arends, Karsten; Keller, Walter; Grohmann, Elisabeth

    2014-08-01

    Conjugative transfer is the most important means of spreading antibiotic resistance and virulence factors among bacteria. The key vehicles of this horizontal gene transfer are a group of mobile genetic elements, termed conjugative plasmids. Conjugative plasmids contain as minimum instrumentation an origin of transfer (oriT), DNA-processing factors (a relaxase and accessory proteins), as well as proteins that constitute the trans-envelope transport channel, the so-called mating pair formation (Mpf) proteins. All these protein factors are encoded by one or more transfer (tra) operons that together form the DNA transport machinery, the Gram-positive type IV secretion system. However, multicellular Gram-positive bacteria belonging to the streptomycetes appear to have evolved another mechanism for conjugative plasmid spread reminiscent of the machinery involved in bacterial cell division and sporulation, which transports double-stranded DNA from donor to recipient cells. Here, we focus on the protein key players involved in the plasmid spread through the two different modes and present a new secondary structure homology-based classification system for type IV secretion protein families. Moreover, we discuss the relevance of conjugative plasmid transfer in the environment and summarize novel techniques to visualize and quantify conjugative transfer in situ.