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Sample records for radioactive chemical elements

  1. RADIOACTIVE CHEMICAL ELEMENTS IN THE ATOMIC TABLE.

    SciTech Connect

    HOLDEN, N.E.

    2005-08-13

    In the 1949 Report of the Atomic Weights Commission, a series of new elements were added to the Atomic Weights Table. Since these elements had been produced in the laboratory and were not discovered in nature, the atomic weight value of these artificial products would depend upon the production method. Since atomic weight is a property of an element as it occurs in nature, it would be incorrect to assign an atomic weight value to that element. As a result of that discussion, the Commission decided to provide only the mass number of the most stable (longest-lived) known isotope as the number to be associated with these entries in the Atomic Weights Table. As a function of time, the mass number associated with various elements has changed as longer-lived isotopes of a particular elements has been found in nature, or as improved half-life values of an element's isotopes might cause a shift in the longest-lived isotope from one mass number to another. In the 1957 Report of the Atomic Weights Commission, it was decided to discontinue the listing of the mass number in the Atomic Weights Table on the grounds that the kind of information supplied by the mass number is inconsistent with the primary purpose of the Table, i.e., to provide accurate values of ''these constants'' for use in chemical calculations. In addition to the Table of Atomic Weights, the Commission included an auxiliary Table of Radioactive Elements for the first time, where the entry would be the isotope of that element which was most stable, i.e., it had the longest known half-life. In their 1973 report, the Commission noted that the users of the Atomic Weights Table were dissatisfied with the omission of values in the Table for some elements and it was decided to reintroduce the mass number for elements. In their 1983 report, the Commission decided that radioactive elements were considered to lack a characteristic terrestrial isotopic composition, from which an atomic weight value could be calculated to

  2. TABLE OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS.

    SciTech Connect

    HOLDEN,N.E.

    2001-06-29

    For those chemical elements which have no stable nuclides with a terrestrial isotopic composition, the data on radioactive half-lives and relative atomic masses for the nuclides of interest and importance have been evaluated and the recommended values and uncertainties are listed.

  3. Tabulation of thermodynamic data for chemical reactions involving 58 elements common to radioactive waste package systems

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, L.V.; Teague, L.S.

    1980-08-01

    The rate of release and migration of radionuclides from a nuclear waste repository to the biosphere is dependent on chemical interactions between groundwater, the geologic host rock, and the radioactive waste package. For the purpose of this report, the waste package includes the wasteform, canister, overpack, and repository backfill. Chemical processes of interest include sorption (ion exchange), dissolution, complexation, and precipitation. Thermochemical data for complexation and precipitation calculations for 58 elements common to the radioactive waste package are presented. Standard free energies of formation of free ions, complexes, and solids are listed. Common logarithms of equilibrium constants (log K's) for speciation and precipitation reactions are listed. Unless noted otherwise, all data are for 298.15/sup 0/K and one atmosphere.

  4. Radioactive elements in stellar atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Gopka, Vira; Yushchenko, Alexander; Goriely, Stephane; Shavrina, Angelina; Kang, Young Woon

    2006-07-12

    The identification of lines of radioactive elements (Tc, Pm and elements with 83chemically peculiar stars HD101065, HR465, HD965 is made. Three possible explanations are proposed: natural radioactive decay of Th and U in the upper levels of stellar atmospheres, contamination of stellar atmosphere by recent SN explosion, and spallation reactions.

  5. Table of radioactive elements

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N.E.

    1985-01-01

    As has been the custom in the past, the Commission publishes a table of relative atomic masses and halflives of selected radionuclides. The information contained in this table will enable the user to calculate the atomic weight for radioactive materials with a variety of isotopic compositions. The atomic masses have been taken from the 1984 Atomic Mass Table. Some of the halflives have already been documented.

  6. Elemental Chemical Puzzlers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Nicholas C.

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides nine short chemically based puzzles or problems extensible for use with students from middle school to college. Some of these will strengthen students' recognition of individual elements and element names. Others require students to focus on the salient properties of given chemical elements.

  7. Radioactive dating of the elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowan, John J.; Thielemann, Friedrich-Karl; Truran, James W.

    1991-01-01

    The extent to which an accurate determination of the age of the Galaxy, and thus a lower bound on the age of the universe, can be obtained from radioactive dating is discussed. Emphasis is given to the use of the long-lived radioactive nuclei Re-187, Th-232, U-238, and U-235. The nature of the production sites of these and other potential Galactic chronometers is examined along with their production ratios. Age determinations from models of nucleocosmochronology are reviewed and compared with age determination from stellar sources and age constraints form cosmological considerations.

  8. Chemical experiments with superheavy elements.

    PubMed

    Türler, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Unnoticed by many chemists, the Periodic Table of the Elements has been extended significantly in the last couple of years and the 7th period has very recently been completed with eka-Rn (element 118) currently being the heaviest element whose synthesis has been reported. These 'superheavy' elements (also called transactinides with atomic number > or = 104 (Rf)) have been artificially synthesized in fusion reactions at accelerators in minute quantities of a few single atoms. In addition, all isotopes of the transactinide elements are radioactive and decay with rather short half-lives. Nevertheless, it has been possible in some cases to investigate experimentally chemical properties of transactinide elements and even synthesize simple compounds. The experimental investigation of superheavy elements is especially intriguing, since theoretical calculations predict significant deviations from periodic trends due to the influence of strong relativistic effects. In this contribution first experiments with hassium (Hs, atomic number 108), copernicium (Cn, atomic number 112) and element 114 (eka-Pb) are reviewed.

  9. Chemical experiments with superheavy elements.

    PubMed

    Türler, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Unnoticed by many chemists, the Periodic Table of the Elements has been extended significantly in the last couple of years and the 7th period has very recently been completed with eka-Rn (element 118) currently being the heaviest element whose synthesis has been reported. These 'superheavy' elements (also called transactinides with atomic number > or = 104 (Rf)) have been artificially synthesized in fusion reactions at accelerators in minute quantities of a few single atoms. In addition, all isotopes of the transactinide elements are radioactive and decay with rather short half-lives. Nevertheless, it has been possible in some cases to investigate experimentally chemical properties of transactinide elements and even synthesize simple compounds. The experimental investigation of superheavy elements is especially intriguing, since theoretical calculations predict significant deviations from periodic trends due to the influence of strong relativistic effects. In this contribution first experiments with hassium (Hs, atomic number 108), copernicium (Cn, atomic number 112) and element 114 (eka-Pb) are reviewed. PMID:21138073

  10. STATUS OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS IN THE ATOMIC WEIGHTS TABLE.

    SciTech Connect

    HOLDEN,N.E.

    2003-08-08

    During discussions within the Inorganic Chemistry Division Committee, that dealt with the Periodic Table of the Chemical Elements and the official IUPAC position on its presentation, the following question was raised. When the various chemical elements are presented, each with their appropriate atomic weight value, how should the radioactive elements be presented? The Atomic Weights Commission has treated this question in a number of different ways during the past century, almost in a random manner. This report reviews the position that the Commission has taken as a function of time, as a prelude to a discussion in Ottawa about how the Commission should resolve this question for the future.

  11. DISSOLVED CONCENTRATION LIMITS OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    NA

    2004-11-22

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate dissolved concentration limits (also referred to as solubility limits) of elements with radioactive isotopes under probable repository conditions, based on geochemical modeling calculations using geochemical modeling tools, thermodynamic databases, field measurements, and laboratory experiments. The scope of this modeling activity is to predict dissolved concentrations or solubility limits for 14 elements with radioactive isotopes (actinium, americium, carbon, cesium, iodine, lead, neptunium, plutonium, protactinium, radium, strontium, technetium, thorium, and uranium) important to calculated dose. Model outputs for uranium, plutonium, neptunium, thorium, americium, and protactinium are in the form of tabulated functions with pH and log (line integral) CO{sub 2} as independent variables, plus one or more uncertainty terms. The solubility limits for the remaining elements are either in the form of distributions or single values. The output data from this report are fundamental inputs for Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA) to determine the estimated release of these elements from waste packages and the engineered barrier system. Consistent modeling approaches and environmental conditions were used to develop solubility models for all of the actinides. These models cover broad ranges of environmental conditions so that they are applicable to both waste packages and the invert. Uncertainties from thermodynamic data, water chemistry, temperature variation, and activity coefficients have been quantified or otherwise addressed.

  12. DISSOLVED CONCENTRATION LIMITS OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    P. Bernot

    2005-07-13

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate dissolved concentration limits (also referred to as solubility limits) of elements with radioactive isotopes under probable repository conditions, based on geochemical modeling calculations using geochemical modeling tools, thermodynamic databases, field measurements, and laboratory experiments. The scope of this activity is to predict dissolved concentrations or solubility limits for elements with radioactive isotopes (actinium, americium, carbon, cesium, iodine, lead, neptunium, plutonium, protactinium, radium, strontium, technetium, thorium, and uranium) relevant to calculated dose. Model outputs for uranium, plutonium, neptunium, thorium, americium, and protactinium are provided in the form of tabulated functions with pH and log fCO{sub 2} as independent variables, plus one or more uncertainty terms. The solubility limits for the remaining elements are either in the form of distributions or single values. Even though selection of an appropriate set of radionuclides documented in Radionuclide Screening (BSC 2002 [DIRS 160059]) includes actinium, transport of Ac is not modeled in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) model because of its extremely short half-life. Actinium dose is calculated in the TSPA-LA by assuming secular equilibrium with {sup 231}Pa (Section 6.10); therefore, Ac is not analyzed in this report. The output data from this report are fundamental inputs for TSPA-LA used to determine the estimated release of these elements from waste packages and the engineered barrier system. Consistent modeling approaches and environmental conditions were used to develop solubility models for the actinides discussed in this report. These models cover broad ranges of environmental conditions so they are applicable to both waste packages and the invert. Uncertainties from thermodynamic data, water chemistry, temperature variation, and activity coefficients have been quantified or

  13. Dissolved Concentration Limits of Radioactive Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Chen; E.R. Thomas; F.J. Pearson; P.L. Cloke; T.L. Steinborn; P.V. Brady

    2003-06-20

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate dissolved concentration limits (also referred to as solubility limits) of radioactive elements under possible repository conditions, based on geochemical modeling calculations using geochemical modeling tools, thermodynamic databases, and measurements made in laboratory experiments and field work. The scope of this modeling activity is to predict dissolved concentrations or solubility limits for 14 radioactive elements (actinium, americium, carbon, cesium, iodine, lead, neptunium, plutonium, protactinium, radium, strontium, technetium, thorium, and uranium), which are important to calculated dose. Model outputs are mainly in the form of look-up tables plus one or more uncertainty terms. The rest are either in the form of distributions or single values. The results of this analysis are fundamental inputs for total system performance assessment to constrain the release of these elements from waste packages and the engineered barrier system. Solubilities of plutonium, neptunium, uranium, americium, actinium, thorium, protactinium, lead, and radium have been re-evaluated using the newly updated thermodynamic database (Data0.ymp.R2). For all of the actinides, identical modeling approaches and consistent environmental conditions were used to develop solubility models in this revision. These models cover broad ranges of environmental conditions so that they are applicable to both waste packages and the invert. Uncertainties from thermodynamic data, water chemistry, temperature variation, activity coefficients, and selection of solubility controlling phase have been quantified or otherwise addressed. Moreover, a new blended plutonium solubility model has been developed in this revision, which gives a mean solubility that is three orders of magnitude lower than the plutonium solubility model used for the Total System Performance Assessment for the Site Recommendation. Two alternative neptunium solubility models have also been

  14. Radioactive Elements in the Standard Atomic Weights Table.

    SciTech Connect

    Holden,N.E.

    2007-08-04

    In the 1949 Report of the Atomic Weights Commission, a series of new elements were added to the Atomic Weights Table. Since these elements had been produced in the laboratory and were not discovered in nature, the atomic weight value of these artificial products would depend upon the production method. Since atomic weight is a property of an element as it occurs in nature, it would be incorrect to assign an atomic weight value to that element. As a result of that discussion, the Commission decided to provide only the mass number of the most stable (or longest-lived) known isotope as the number to be associated with these entries in the Atomic Weights Table. As a function of time, the mass number associated with various elements has changed as longer-lived isotopes of a particular element has been found in nature, or as improved half-life values of an element's isotopes might cause a shift in the longest-lived isotope from one mass to another. In the 1957 Report of the Atomic Weights Commission, it was decided to discontinue the listing of the mass number in the Atomic Weights Table on the grounds that the kind of information supplied by the mass number is inconsistent with the primary purpose of the Table, i.e., to provide accurate values of 'these constants' for use in various chemical calculations. In addition to the Table of Atomic Weights, the Commission included an auxiliary Table of Radioactive Elements for the first time, where the entry would be the isotope of that element which was the most stable, i.e., the one with the longest known half-life. In their 1973 Report, the Commission noted that the users of the main Table of Atomic Weights were dissatisfied with the omission of values for some elements in that Table and it was decided to reintroduce the mass number for the radioactive elements into the main Table. In their 1983 Report, the Commission decided that radioactive elements were considered to lack a characteristic terrestrial isotopic composition

  15. Chemical characterization of element 112.

    PubMed

    Eichler, R; Aksenov, N V; Belozerov, A V; Bozhikov, G A; Chepigin, V I; Dmitriev, S N; Dressler, R; Gäggeler, H W; Gorshkov, V A; Haenssler, F; Itkis, M G; Laube, A; Lebedev, V Ya; Malyshev, O N; Oganessian, Yu Ts; Petrushkin, O V; Piguet, D; Rasmussen, P; Shishkin, S V; Shutov, A V; Svirikhin, A I; Tereshatov, E E; Vostokin, G K; Wegrzecki, M; Yeremin, A V

    2007-05-01

    The heaviest elements to have been chemically characterized are seaborgium (element 106), bohrium (element 107) and hassium (element 108). All three behave according to their respective positions in groups 6, 7 and 8 of the periodic table, which arranges elements according to their outermost electrons and hence their chemical properties. However, the chemical characterization results are not trivial: relativistic effects on the electronic structure of the heaviest elements can strongly influence chemical properties. The next heavy element targeted for chemical characterization is element 112; its closed-shell electronic structure with a filled outer s orbital suggests that it may be particularly susceptible to strong deviations from the chemical property trends expected within group 12. Indeed, first experiments concluded that element 112 does not behave like its lighter homologue mercury. However, the production and identification methods used cast doubt on the validity of this result. Here we report a more reliable chemical characterization of element 112, involving the production of two atoms of (283)112 through the alpha decay of the short-lived (287)114 (which itself forms in the nuclear fusion reaction of 48Ca with 242Pu) and the adsorption of the two atoms on a gold surface. By directly comparing the adsorption characteristics of (283)112 to that of mercury and the noble gas radon, we find that element 112 is very volatile and, unlike radon, reveals a metallic interaction with the gold surface. These adsorption characteristics establish element 112 as a typical element of group 12, and its successful production unambiguously establishes the approach to the island of stability of superheavy elements through 48Ca-induced nuclear fusion reactions with actinides.

  16. Chemical characterization of element 112.

    PubMed

    Eichler, R; Aksenov, N V; Belozerov, A V; Bozhikov, G A; Chepigin, V I; Dmitriev, S N; Dressler, R; Gäggeler, H W; Gorshkov, V A; Haenssler, F; Itkis, M G; Laube, A; Lebedev, V Ya; Malyshev, O N; Oganessian, Yu Ts; Petrushkin, O V; Piguet, D; Rasmussen, P; Shishkin, S V; Shutov, A V; Svirikhin, A I; Tereshatov, E E; Vostokin, G K; Wegrzecki, M; Yeremin, A V

    2007-05-01

    The heaviest elements to have been chemically characterized are seaborgium (element 106), bohrium (element 107) and hassium (element 108). All three behave according to their respective positions in groups 6, 7 and 8 of the periodic table, which arranges elements according to their outermost electrons and hence their chemical properties. However, the chemical characterization results are not trivial: relativistic effects on the electronic structure of the heaviest elements can strongly influence chemical properties. The next heavy element targeted for chemical characterization is element 112; its closed-shell electronic structure with a filled outer s orbital suggests that it may be particularly susceptible to strong deviations from the chemical property trends expected within group 12. Indeed, first experiments concluded that element 112 does not behave like its lighter homologue mercury. However, the production and identification methods used cast doubt on the validity of this result. Here we report a more reliable chemical characterization of element 112, involving the production of two atoms of (283)112 through the alpha decay of the short-lived (287)114 (which itself forms in the nuclear fusion reaction of 48Ca with 242Pu) and the adsorption of the two atoms on a gold surface. By directly comparing the adsorption characteristics of (283)112 to that of mercury and the noble gas radon, we find that element 112 is very volatile and, unlike radon, reveals a metallic interaction with the gold surface. These adsorption characteristics establish element 112 as a typical element of group 12, and its successful production unambiguously establishes the approach to the island of stability of superheavy elements through 48Ca-induced nuclear fusion reactions with actinides. PMID:17476264

  17. Chemical elements distribution in cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, R.

    2005-04-01

    Analysing, imaging and understanding the cellular chemistry, from macromolecules to monoatomic elements, is probably a major challenge for the scientific community after the conclusion of the genome project. In order to probe the distribution of elements in cells, especially the so-called inorganic elements, it is necessary to apply microanalytical techniques with sub-micrometer resolution and high chemical sensitivity. This paper presents the current status of chemical element imaging inside cells, and a comparison of the different analytical techniques available: nuclear microprobe, electron microprobe and electron energy loss spectroscopy, synchrotron radiation microprobe, secondary ion mass spectrometry and fluorescence microscopy methods. Examples of intracellular chemical elements distributions relevant to cancer pharmacology, medical imaging, metal carcinogenesis and neuropathology studies obtained by nuclear microprobe and other microanalytical techniques are presented.

  18. RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS IN THE STANDARD ATOMIC WEIGHTS TABLE

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N.E.; Holden, N.; Holden,N.E.

    2011-07-27

    In the 1949 Report of the Atomic Weights Commission, a series of new elements were added to the Atomic Weights Table. Since these elements had been produced in the laboratory and were not discovered in nature, the atomic weight value of these artificial products would depend upon the production method. Since atomic weight is a property of an element as it occurs in nature, it would be incorrect to assign an atomic weight value to that element. As a result of that discussion, the Commission decided to provide only the mass number of the most stable (or longest-lived) known isotope as the number to be associated with these entries in the Atomic Weights Table. As a function of time, the mass number associated with various elements has changed as longer-lived isotopes of a particular element has been found in nature, or as improved half-life values of an element's isotopes might cause a shift in the longest-lived isotope from one mass to another. In the 1957 Report of the Atomic Weights Commission, it was decided to discontinue the listing of the mass number in the Atomic Weights Table on the grounds that the kind of information supplied by the mass number is inconsistent with the primary purpose of the Table, i.e., to provide accurate values of 'these constants' for use in various chemical calculations. In addition to the Table of Atomic Weights, the Commission included an auxiliary Table of Radioactive Elements for the first time, where the entry would be the isotope of that element which was the most stable, i.e., the one with the longest known half-life. In their 1973 Report, the Commission noted that the users of the main Table of Atomic Weights were dissatisfied with the omission of values for some elements in that Table and it was decided to reintroduce the mass number for the radioactive elements into the main Table. In their 1983 Report, the Commission decided that radioactive elements were considered to lack a characteristic terrestrial isotopic composition

  19. HISTORY OF THE ORIGIN OF THE CHEMICAL ELEMENTS AND THEIR DISCOVERIES.

    SciTech Connect

    HOLDEN,N.E.

    2001-06-29

    What do we mean by a chemical element? A chemical element is matter, all of whose atoms are alike in having the same positive charge on the nucleus and the same number of extra-nuclear electrons. As we shall see in the following elemental review, the origin of the chemical elements show a wide diversity with some of these elements having an origin in antiquity, other elements having been discovered within the past few hundred years and still others have been synthesized within the past fifty years via nuclear reactions on heavy elements since these other elements are unstable and radioactive and do not exist in nature.

  20. Calculation of chemical quantities for the radioactive liquid waste treatment facility

    SciTech Connect

    Del Signore, John C.; McClenahan, Robert L.

    2007-03-01

    The Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF) receives, stores, and treats both low-level and transuranic radioactive liquid wastes (RLW). Treatment of RLW requires the use of different chemicals. Examples include the use of calcium oxide to precipitate metals and radioactive elements from the radioactive liquid waste, and the use of hydrochloric acid to clean membrane filters that are used in the treatment process. The RL WTF is a Hazard Category 2 nuclear facility, as set forth in the LANL Final Safety Analysis Report of October 1995, and a DOE letter of March 11, 1999. A revised safety basis is being prepared for the RLWTF, and will be submitted to the NNSA in early 2007. This set of calculations establishes maximum chemical quantities that will be used in the 2007 safety basis.

  1. Chemical characterization of bohrium (element 107)

    PubMed

    Eichler; Bruchle; Dressler; Dullmann; Eichler; Gaggeler; Gregorich; Hoffman; Hubener; Jost; Kirbach; Laue; Lavanchy; Nitsche; Patin; Piguet; Schadel; Shaughnessy; Strellis; Taut; Tobler; Tsyganov; Turler; Vahle; Wilk; Yakushev

    2000-09-01

    The arrangement of the chemical elements in the periodic table highlights resemblances in chemical properties, which reflect the elements' electronic structure. For the heaviest elements, however, deviations in the periodicity of chemical properties are expected: electrons in orbitals with a high probability density near the nucleus are accelerated by the large nuclear charges to relativistic velocities, which increase their binding energies and cause orbital contraction. This leads to more efficient screening of the nuclear charge and corresponding destabilization of the outer d and f orbitals: it is these changes that can give rise to unexpected chemical properties. The synthesis of increasingly heavy elements, now including that of elements 114, 116 and 118, allows the investigation of this effect, provided sufficiently long-lived isotopes for chemical characterization are available. In the case of elements 104 and 105, for example, relativistic effects interrupt characteristic trends in the chemical properties of the elements constituting the corresponding columns of the periodic table, whereas element 106 behaves in accordance with the expected periodicity. Here we report the chemical separation and characterization of six atoms of element 107 (bohrium, Bh), in the form of its oxychloride. We find that this compound is less volatile than the oxychlorides of the lighter elements of group VII, thus confirming relativistic calculations that predict the behaviour of bohrium, like that of element 106, to coincide with that expected on the basis of its position in the periodic table.

  2. Chemical characterization of bohrium (element 107)

    PubMed

    Eichler; Bruchle; Dressler; Dullmann; Eichler; Gaggeler; Gregorich; Hoffman; Hubener; Jost; Kirbach; Laue; Lavanchy; Nitsche; Patin; Piguet; Schadel; Shaughnessy; Strellis; Taut; Tobler; Tsyganov; Turler; Vahle; Wilk; Yakushev

    2000-09-01

    The arrangement of the chemical elements in the periodic table highlights resemblances in chemical properties, which reflect the elements' electronic structure. For the heaviest elements, however, deviations in the periodicity of chemical properties are expected: electrons in orbitals with a high probability density near the nucleus are accelerated by the large nuclear charges to relativistic velocities, which increase their binding energies and cause orbital contraction. This leads to more efficient screening of the nuclear charge and corresponding destabilization of the outer d and f orbitals: it is these changes that can give rise to unexpected chemical properties. The synthesis of increasingly heavy elements, now including that of elements 114, 116 and 118, allows the investigation of this effect, provided sufficiently long-lived isotopes for chemical characterization are available. In the case of elements 104 and 105, for example, relativistic effects interrupt characteristic trends in the chemical properties of the elements constituting the corresponding columns of the periodic table, whereas element 106 behaves in accordance with the expected periodicity. Here we report the chemical separation and characterization of six atoms of element 107 (bohrium, Bh), in the form of its oxychloride. We find that this compound is less volatile than the oxychlorides of the lighter elements of group VII, thus confirming relativistic calculations that predict the behaviour of bohrium, like that of element 106, to coincide with that expected on the basis of its position in the periodic table. PMID:10993071

  3. The Behavior of Chemical Elements in Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaschek, Carlos; Jaschek, Mercedes

    1995-06-01

    Part I. Quantitative Description of Each of 80 Chemical Elements; Part II: 1. Behaviour of molecules in stars; 2. Groups of elements; 3. Chromospheres and coronas; Part III: 1. Terminology of spectral lines; 2. Selection of stars; 3. Line identification; 4. Equivalent widths; 5. Abundances; 6. Afterthoughts; Part IV: 1. Periodic Table; 2. Elements in alphabetical order of names; 3. Elements in alphabetical order of formula; 4. Elements ordered by atomic number; 5. Abundances of chemical elements; 6. Spectral type and surface gravity as a function of luminosity class. 7. Effective temperature; References; Index.

  4. The Behavior of Chemical Elements in Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaschek, Carlos; Jaschek, Mercedes

    2009-03-01

    Part I. Quantitative Description of Each of 80 Chemical Elements; Part II: 1. Behaviour of molecules in stars; 2. Groups of elements; 3. Chromospheres and coronas; Part III: 1. Terminology of spectral lines; 2. Selection of stars; 3. Line identification; 4. Equivalent widths; 5. Abundances; 6. Afterthoughts; Part IV: 1. Periodic Table; 2. Elements in alphabetical order of names; 3. Elements in alphabetical order of formula; 4. Elements ordered by atomic number; 5. Abundances of chemical elements; 6. Spectral type and surface gravity as a function of luminosity class. 7. Effective temperature; References; Index.

  5. Production of the heaviest elements using radioactive beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loveland, Walter

    2009-05-01

    Previously we have evaluated quantitatively the prospects for the synthesis of transactinide nuclei using radioactive beams (PRC 76, 014612 (2007)). We have revised these calculations to include current approaches to properly deal with the excitation energy dependence of shell and pairing corrections along with recent experimental advances in our understanding of the fusion probability, PCN and the capture cross sections for very neutron-rich systems and the expected beam intensities at FRIB. Using our simple formalism for calculating the complete fusion cross sections that reproduces the known heavy element production cross sections over six orders of magnitude, we calculate the production rates for transactinide nuclei with Z <= 120. All possible projectile and target combinations are evaluated. Exciting new possibilities for studies of the atomic physics, chemistry and nuclear spectroscopy of the heaviest elements should be realized at a modern radioactive beam facility. Examples of possible experiments at pre-FRIB facilities will be discussed. The synthesis of new heavy elements is best undertaken at stable beam accelerators.

  6. Natural radioactivity and chemical concentrations in Egyptian groundwater.

    PubMed

    Amin, Rafat M; Khalil, F A; El Fayoumi, M A K

    2011-02-01

    Measurements of natural radioactivity in drinking water have been performed in many parts of the world, mostly for assessment of the doses and risk resulting from consuming water. A study of the radionuclide and chemical components in groundwater from Beni Suef Governate, Egypt has been carried out. Fifty water samples were analyzed by gamma ray spectroscopy to determine the 226Ra, 232Th, and 40K concentrations; major elements, pH, alkalinity, and conductivity were also measured. The specific activity values ranged from 0.008 to 0.040 Bq/l for 226Ra, from 0.003 to 0.019 Bq/l for 232Th, and from 0.025 to 0.344 Bq/l for 40K. The annual ingestions of these radionuclides, using local consumption rates (average over the whole population) of 1.5 l day(-1), were estimated to be 8.59, 4.86, and 83.47 Bq year(-1) for 226Ra, 232Th, and 40K, respectively. The estimated values and weighted means of these radionuclides compare well with the world average. The estimated effective doses from drinking water were found to be 2.4 μSv year(-1) (226Ra), 1.1 μSv year(-1) (232Th), and 0.51 μSv year(-1) (40K). Contribution of these radionuclides to the committed effective dose from 1 year consumption of drinking water is estimated to be only 4%.

  7. In-Situ Chemical Precipitation of Radioactive Liquid Waste - 12492

    SciTech Connect

    Osmanlioglu, Ahmet Erdal

    2012-07-01

    This paper presented in-situ chemical precipitation for radioactive liquid waste by using chemical agents. Results are reported on large-scale implementation on the removal of {sup 137}Cs, {sup 134}Cs and {sup 60}Co from liquid radioactive waste generating from Nuclear Research and Training Centre. Total amount of liquid radioactive waste was 35 m{sup 3} and main radionuclides were Cs-137, Cs- 134 and Co-60. Initial radioactivity concentration of the liquid waste was 2264, 17 and 9 Bq/liter for Cs-137, Cs-134 and Co-60 respectively. Potassium ferro cyanide was selected as chemical agent at high pH levels 8-10 according to laboratory tests. After the process, radioactive sludge precipitated at the bottom of the tank and decontaminated clean liquid was evaluated depending on discharge limits. By this precipitation method decontamination factors were determined as 60, 9 and 17 for Cs-137, Cs-134 and Co-60 respectively. At the bottom of the tank radioactive sludge amount was 0.98 m{sup 3}. It was transferred by sludge pumps to cementation unit for solidification. By in situ chemical processing 97% of volume reduction was achieved. Using the optimal concentration of 0.75 M potassium ferro cyanide about 98% of the {sup 137}Cs can be removed at pH 8. The Potassium ferro cyanide precipitation method could be used successfully in large scale applications with nickel and ferrum agents for removal of Cs-137, Cs-134 and Co- 60. Although DF values of laboratory test were much higher than in-situ implementation, liquid radioactive waste was decontaminated successfully by using potassium ferro cyanide. Majority of liquid waste were discharged as clean liquid. %97.2 volumetric amount of liquid waste was cleaned and discharged at the original site. Reduced amount of sludge transportation in drums is more economical and safer method than liquid transportation. Although DF values could be different for each of applications related to main specifications of original liquid waste, this

  8. Chemical investigation of hassium (element 108).

    PubMed

    Düllmann, Ch E; Brüchle, W; Dressler, R; Eberhardt, K; Eichler, B; Eichler, R; Gäggeler, H W; Ginter, T N; Glaus, F; Gregorich, K E; Hoffman, D C; Jäger, E; Jost, D T; Kirbach, U W; Lee, D M; Nitsche, H; Patin, J B; Pershina, V; Piguet, D; Qin, Z; Schädel, M; Schausten, B; Schimpf, E; Schött, H-J; Soverna, S; Sudowe, R; Thörle, P; Timokhin, S N; Trautmann, N; Türler, A; Vahle, A; Wirth, G; Yakushev, A B; Zielinski, P M

    2002-08-22

    The periodic table provides a classification of the chemical properties of the elements. But for the heaviest elements, the transactinides, this role of the periodic table reaches its limits because increasingly strong relativistic effects on the valence electron shells can induce deviations from known trends in chemical properties. In the case of the first two transactinides, elements 104 and 105, relativistic effects do indeed influence their chemical properties, whereas elements 106 and 107 both behave as expected from their position within the periodic table. Here we report the chemical separation and characterization of only seven detected atoms of element 108 (hassium, Hs), which were generated as isotopes (269)Hs (refs 8, 9) and (270)Hs (ref. 10) in the fusion reaction between (26)Mg and (248)Cm. The hassium atoms are immediately oxidized to a highly volatile oxide, presumably HsO(4), for which we determine an enthalpy of adsorption on our detector surface that is comparable to the adsorption enthalpy determined under identical conditions for the osmium oxide OsO(4). These results provide evidence that the chemical properties of hassium and its lighter homologue osmium are similar, thus confirming that hassium exhibits properties as expected from its position in group 8 of the periodic table.

  9. Chemical investigation of hassium (element 108)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Düllmann, Ch. E.; Brüchle, W.; Dressler, R.; Eberhardt, K.; Eichler, B.; Eichler, R.; Gäggeler, H. W.; Ginter, T. N.; Glaus, F.; Gregorich, K. E.; Hoffman, D. C.; Jäger, E.; Jost, D. T.; Kirbach, U. W.; Lee, D. M.; Nitsche, H.; Patin, J. B.; Pershina, V.; Piguet, D.; Qin, Z.; Schädel, M.; Schausten, B.; Schimpf, E.; Schött, H.-J.; Soverna, S.; Sudowe, R.; Thörle, P.; Timokhin, S. N.; Trautmann, N.; Türler, A.; Vahle, A.; Wirth, G.; Yakushev, A. B.; Zielinski, P. M.

    2002-08-01

    The periodic table provides a classification of the chemical properties of the elements. But for the heaviest elements, the transactinides, this role of the periodic table reaches its limits because increasingly strong relativistic effects on the valence electron shells can induce deviations from known trends in chemical properties. In the case of the first two transactinides, elements 104 and 105, relativistic effects do indeed influence their chemical properties, whereas elements 106 and 107 both behave as expected from their position within the periodic table. Here we report the chemical separation and characterization of only seven detected atoms of element 108 (hassium, Hs), which were generated as isotopes 269Hs (refs 8, 9) and 270Hs (ref. 10) in the fusion reaction between 26Mg and 248Cm. The hassium atoms are immediately oxidized to a highly volatile oxide, presumably HsO4, for which we determine an enthalpy of adsorption on our detector surface that is comparable to the adsorption enthalpy determined under identical conditions for the osmium oxide OsO4. These results provide evidence that the chemical properties of hassium and its lighter homologue osmium are similar, thus confirming that hassium exhibits properties as expected from its position in group 8 of the periodic table.

  10. Chemical investigation of hassium (element 108).

    PubMed

    Düllmann, Ch E; Brüchle, W; Dressler, R; Eberhardt, K; Eichler, B; Eichler, R; Gäggeler, H W; Ginter, T N; Glaus, F; Gregorich, K E; Hoffman, D C; Jäger, E; Jost, D T; Kirbach, U W; Lee, D M; Nitsche, H; Patin, J B; Pershina, V; Piguet, D; Qin, Z; Schädel, M; Schausten, B; Schimpf, E; Schött, H-J; Soverna, S; Sudowe, R; Thörle, P; Timokhin, S N; Trautmann, N; Türler, A; Vahle, A; Wirth, G; Yakushev, A B; Zielinski, P M

    2002-08-22

    The periodic table provides a classification of the chemical properties of the elements. But for the heaviest elements, the transactinides, this role of the periodic table reaches its limits because increasingly strong relativistic effects on the valence electron shells can induce deviations from known trends in chemical properties. In the case of the first two transactinides, elements 104 and 105, relativistic effects do indeed influence their chemical properties, whereas elements 106 and 107 both behave as expected from their position within the periodic table. Here we report the chemical separation and characterization of only seven detected atoms of element 108 (hassium, Hs), which were generated as isotopes (269)Hs (refs 8, 9) and (270)Hs (ref. 10) in the fusion reaction between (26)Mg and (248)Cm. The hassium atoms are immediately oxidized to a highly volatile oxide, presumably HsO(4), for which we determine an enthalpy of adsorption on our detector surface that is comparable to the adsorption enthalpy determined under identical conditions for the osmium oxide OsO(4). These results provide evidence that the chemical properties of hassium and its lighter homologue osmium are similar, thus confirming that hassium exhibits properties as expected from its position in group 8 of the periodic table. PMID:12192405

  11. Chemical and catalytic properties of elemental carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.G.; Brodzinsky, R.; Gundel, L.A.; Novakov, T.

    1980-10-01

    Elemental carbon particles resulting from incomplete combustion of fossil fuel are one of the major constituents of airborne particulate matter. These particles are a chemically and catalytically active material and can be an effective carrier for other toxic air pollutants through their adsorptive capability. The chemical, adsorptive, and catalytic behaviors of carbon particles depend very much on their crystalline structure, surface composition, and electronic properties. This paper discusses these properties and examines their relevance to atmospheric chemistry.

  12. System for chemically digesting low level radioactive, solid waste material

    DOEpatents

    Cowan, Richard G.; Blasewitz, Albert G.

    1982-01-01

    An improved method and system for chemically digesting low level radioactive, solid waste material having a high through-put. The solid waste material is added to an annular vessel (10) substantially filled with concentrated sulfuric acid. Concentrated nitric acid or nitrogen dioxide is added to the sulfuric acid within the annular vessel while the sulfuric acid is reacting with the solid waste. The solid waste is mixed within the sulfuric acid so that the solid waste is substantilly fully immersed during the reaction. The off gas from the reaction and the products slurry residue is removed from the vessel during the reaction.

  13. Physical-chemical studies of transuranium elements

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    Major advances in our continuing program to determine, interpret, and correlate the basic chemical and physical properties of the transuranium elements are summarized. Research topics include: Molar enthalpies of formation of BaCmO{sub 3} and BaCfO{sub 3}; luminescence of europium oxychloride at various pressures; and anti-stokes luminescence of selected actinide (III) compounds. 42 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Prolong Restoration of the Water Quality of River Ganga Effect of Heavy Metals and Radioactive Elements.

    PubMed

    Tare, Vinod; Basu, Subhankar

    2014-04-01

    The genesis of the present research was the belief since ages and the observations made through some studies that the water of river Ganga has unique characteristics, which allows storage of water quality even on prolong storage. Very few systematic studies have been conducted to support the contention that the Ganga water indeed has some special composition that could be attributed to its unique storage capacity. It was postulated that prolong restoration of water quality depends on the ability to arrest microbial activity that is generally responsible for deterioration in water quality on prolong storage. Hence, attempt has been made to identify the parameters that are likely to influence the prolong storage of river water. Along with Ganga river water, other three major rivers, viz. Yamuna, Godavari and Narmada, were selected for comparison. Emphasis was made on estimation of heavy metals, radioactive elements, dissolved carbon and other physicochemical parameters such as temperature, pH, alkalinity, hardness and dissolved organic carbon. Based on the available information regarding the impact of heavy metals, radioactive elements vis-à-vis the chemical composition of water on microorganisms in the aquatic environment, an overall impact score for the waters of the four Indian rivers selected in the study has been assigned. PMID:26563059

  15. Prolong Restoration of the Water Quality of River Ganga Effect of Heavy Metals and Radioactive Elements.

    PubMed

    Tare, Vinod; Basu, Subhankar

    2014-04-01

    The genesis of the present research was the belief since ages and the observations made through some studies that the water of river Ganga has unique characteristics, which allows storage of water quality even on prolong storage. Very few systematic studies have been conducted to support the contention that the Ganga water indeed has some special composition that could be attributed to its unique storage capacity. It was postulated that prolong restoration of water quality depends on the ability to arrest microbial activity that is generally responsible for deterioration in water quality on prolong storage. Hence, attempt has been made to identify the parameters that are likely to influence the prolong storage of river water. Along with Ganga river water, other three major rivers, viz. Yamuna, Godavari and Narmada, were selected for comparison. Emphasis was made on estimation of heavy metals, radioactive elements, dissolved carbon and other physicochemical parameters such as temperature, pH, alkalinity, hardness and dissolved organic carbon. Based on the available information regarding the impact of heavy metals, radioactive elements vis-à-vis the chemical composition of water on microorganisms in the aquatic environment, an overall impact score for the waters of the four Indian rivers selected in the study has been assigned.

  16. Radioactivity and elemental analysis in the Ruseifa municipal landfill, Jordan.

    PubMed

    Al-Jundi, J; Al-Tarazi, E

    2008-01-01

    In this study, a low background gamma-ray spectrometer based on a Hyper Pure Germanium detector was used to determine the activity concentrations of natural radionuclides in soil samples from various locations within the Ruseifa municipal landfill in Jordan. The chemical composition of the samples was also determined using a Wavelength Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer. The maximum and minimum annual outdoor effective doses were found to be 103 and 36microSva(-1) in the old landfill and Abu-Sayaah village, respectively. The annual outdoor effective dose at the recent landfill site was found to be 91microSva(-1). The annual effective dose equivalents from outdoor terrestrial gamma radiation at the old landfill and the recent landfill were higher than the typical worldwide value of 70microSva(-1). Thus, some remediation of the soils on both old and recent landfills should be considered before any development for public activities. This could be achieved by mixing with clean soil from areas which are known to have lower radiation background. The concentration of heavy metals Zn, Cr, and Ba in the three sites included in this study were found to be higher than the background levels in the soil samples of the control area (Abu-Sayaah village). The enrichment factors for the above three elements were calculated and found to be: complex building site: Zn=2.52 and Ba=1.33; old landfill site: Cr=1.88, Zn=3.64, and Ba=1.26; and recent landfill site: Cr=1.57, Zn=2.19, and Ba=1.28. There was a strong negative correlation between the concentrations of the metallic elements (Mg, Al, Mn, Fe and Rb) and the concentrations of Zn, Ba, and Cr. Moreover, a strong positive correlation was found between Zn, Ba, and Cr. Thus these elements were enriched in the solid waste.

  17. Naturally occurring heavy radioactive elements in the geothermal microcosm of the Los Azufres (Mexico) volcanic complex.

    PubMed

    Abuhani, W A; Dasgupta-Schubert, N; Villaseñor, L M; García Avila, D; Suárez, L; Johnston, C; Borjas, S E; Alexander, S A; Landsberger, S; Suárez, M C

    2015-01-01

    The Los Azufres geothermal complex of central Mexico is characterized by fumaroles and boiling hot-springs. The fumaroles form habitats for extremophilic mosses and ferns. Physico-chemical measurements of two relatively pristine fumarolic microcosms point to their resemblance with the paleo-environment of earth during the Ordovician and Devonian periods. These geothermal habitats were analysed for the distribution of elemental mass fractions in the rhizospheric soil (RS), the native volcanic substrate (VS) and the sediments (S), using the new high-sensitivity technique of polarized x-ray energy dispersive fluorescence spectrometry (PEDXRF) as well as instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) for selected elements. This work presents the results for the naturally occurring heavy radioactive elements (NOHRE) Bi, Th and U but principally the latter two. For the RS, the density was found to be the least and the total organic matter content the most. Bi was found to be negligibly present in all substrate types. The average Th and U mass fractions in the RS were higher than in the VS and about equal to their average mass fractions in the S. The VS mass fraction of Th was higher, and of U lower, than the mass fractions in the earth's crust. In fact for the fumaroles of one site, the average RS mass fractions of these elements were higher than the averaged values for S (without considering the statistical dispersion). The immobilization of the NOHRE in the RS is brought about by the bio-geochemical processes specific to these extremophiles. Its effectiveness is such that despite the small masses of these plants, it compares with, or may sometimes exceed, the immobilization of the NOHRE in the S by the abiotic and aggressive chemical action of the hot-springs. These results indicate that the fumarolic plants are able to transform the volcanic substrate to soil and to affect the NOHRE mass fractions even though these elements are not plant nutrients. Mirrored back to

  18. Naturally occurring heavy radioactive elements in the geothermal microcosm of the Los Azufres (Mexico) volcanic complex.

    PubMed

    Abuhani, W A; Dasgupta-Schubert, N; Villaseñor, L M; García Avila, D; Suárez, L; Johnston, C; Borjas, S E; Alexander, S A; Landsberger, S; Suárez, M C

    2015-01-01

    The Los Azufres geothermal complex of central Mexico is characterized by fumaroles and boiling hot-springs. The fumaroles form habitats for extremophilic mosses and ferns. Physico-chemical measurements of two relatively pristine fumarolic microcosms point to their resemblance with the paleo-environment of earth during the Ordovician and Devonian periods. These geothermal habitats were analysed for the distribution of elemental mass fractions in the rhizospheric soil (RS), the native volcanic substrate (VS) and the sediments (S), using the new high-sensitivity technique of polarized x-ray energy dispersive fluorescence spectrometry (PEDXRF) as well as instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) for selected elements. This work presents the results for the naturally occurring heavy radioactive elements (NOHRE) Bi, Th and U but principally the latter two. For the RS, the density was found to be the least and the total organic matter content the most. Bi was found to be negligibly present in all substrate types. The average Th and U mass fractions in the RS were higher than in the VS and about equal to their average mass fractions in the S. The VS mass fraction of Th was higher, and of U lower, than the mass fractions in the earth's crust. In fact for the fumaroles of one site, the average RS mass fractions of these elements were higher than the averaged values for S (without considering the statistical dispersion). The immobilization of the NOHRE in the RS is brought about by the bio-geochemical processes specific to these extremophiles. Its effectiveness is such that despite the small masses of these plants, it compares with, or may sometimes exceed, the immobilization of the NOHRE in the S by the abiotic and aggressive chemical action of the hot-springs. These results indicate that the fumarolic plants are able to transform the volcanic substrate to soil and to affect the NOHRE mass fractions even though these elements are not plant nutrients. Mirrored back to

  19. Chemical investigations of Element 108, Hassium (Hs)

    SciTech Connect

    Dullmann, Christoph E.

    2003-07-03

    The basic aim of chemistry experiments of transactinide elements (TAN) is to establish their place in the periodic table of the elements, i.e. to determine if their chemical behavior is similar to the one of supposed homologs. In this contribution I will try to give an overview of all chemical experiments on element 108, hassium (Hs) that have been reported to date. Based on the systematics of the periodic table, Hs is expected to be a member of group 8 and therefore homologous to osmium (Os) and ruthenium (Ru). As a member of the transactinide series, its experimental investigation is complicated by low production cross-sections and short half-lives. It has therefore been successfully investigated only recently. Already in the seventies of the last century, several authors mentioned the tetroxides of the two heavier group 8 elements, Ru and Os, to be very outstanding compounds with respect to their unusually high volatility. A possible HsO{sub 4} was considered suitable for isolating Hs from unwanted by-products of the nuclear production reaction. While RuO{sub 4}4 is rather unstable, OsO{sub 4} is well-known to be a stable compound and is widely used in organic chemistry. Recent theoretical calculations on the electronic structure and properties of Hs [5,6] predict the formation of a stable HsO{sub 4} whose properties should be similar to the ones of OsO{sub 4}. This is in agreement with an extrapolation of the trend established in group 8 of the periodic table by Ru and Os [7]. All of the reported experiments on the chemistry of Hs therefore aimed at a formation of this compound. Hs was discovered in 1984, when Muenzenberg et al. reported the observation of a correlated decay-chain from {sup 265}Hs formed in the nuclear reaction {sup 58}Fe({sup 208}Pb; n) [8]. However, its half-life is only 1.55 ms, too short for a successful chemistry experiment. Early chemistry experiments therefore aimed at the production and detection of more neutron-rich Hs isotopes which

  20. Bioleaching of rare earth and radioactive elements from red mud using Penicillium tricolor RM-10.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yang; Lian, Bin

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate biological leaching of rare earth elements (REEs) and radioactive elements from red mud, and to evaluate the radioactivity of the bioleached red mud used for construction materials. A filamentous, acid-producing fungi named RM-10, identified as Penicillium tricolor, is isolated from red mud. In our bioleaching experiments by using RM-10, a total concentration of 2% (w/v) red mud under one-step bioleaching process was generally found to give the maximum leaching ratios of the REEs and radioactive elements. However, the highest extraction yields are achieved under two-step bioleaching process at 10% (w/v) pulp density. At pulp densities of 2% and 5% (w/v), red mud processed under both one- and two-step bioleaching can meet the radioactivity regulations in China.

  1. SRS: Site ranking system for hazardous chemical and radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Rechard, R.P.; Chu, M.S.Y.; Brown, S.L.

    1988-05-01

    This report describes the rationale and presents instructions for a site ranking system (SRS). SRS ranks hazardous chemical and radioactive waste sites by scoring important and readily available factors that influence risk to human health. Using SRS, sites can be ranked for purposes of detailed site investigations. SRS evaluates the relative risk as a combination of potentially exposed population, chemical toxicity, and potential exposure of release from a waste site; hence, SRS uses the same concepts found in a detailed assessment of health risk. Basing SRS on the concepts of risk assessment tends to reduce the distortion of results found in other ranking schemes. More importantly, a clear logic helps ensure the successful application of the ranking procedure and increases its versatility when modifications are necessary for unique situations. Although one can rank sites using a detailed risk assessment, it is potentially costly because of data and resources required. SRS is an efficient approach to provide an order-of-magnitude ranking, requiring only readily available data (often only descriptive) and hand calculations. Worksheets are included to make the system easier to understand and use. 88 refs., 19 figs., 58 tabs.

  2. Attempts to chemically investigate element 112

    SciTech Connect

    Eichler, R.; Bruchle, W.; Buda, R.; Burger, S.; Dressler, R.; Dullmann, C.E.; Dvorak, J.; Eberhardt, K.; Eichler, B.; Folden, C.M.; Gaggeler, H.W.; Gregorich, K.E.; Haenssler, F.; Hoffman, D.C.; Hummrich,H.; Jager, E.; Kratz, J.V.; Kuczewski, B.; Liebe, D.; Nayak, D.; Nitsche,H.; Piguet, D.; Qin, Z.; Rieth, U.; Schadel, M.; Schausten, B.; Schimpf,E.; Semchenkov, A.; Soverna, S.; Sudowe, R.; Trautmann, N.; Thorle, P.; Turler, A.; Wierczinski, B.; Wiehl, N.; Wilk, P.A.; Wirth, G.; Yakushev,A.B.; von Zweidorf, A.

    2005-09-15

    Two experiments aiming at the chemical investigation of element 112 produced in the heavy ion induced nuclear fusion reaction of Ca-48 with U-238 were performed at the Geselischaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt, Germany. Both experiments were designed to determine the adsorption enthalpy of element 112 on a gold surface using a thermochromatography setup. The temperature range covered in the thermochromatography experiments allowed the adsorption of Hg at about 35 degrees C and of Rn at about -180 degrees C. Reports from the Flerov Laboratory for Nuclear Reactions (FLNR), Dubna, Russia claim production of a 5-min spontaneous fission (SF) activity assigned to 211112 for the U-238 (Ca-48,3n) (283)112 reaction. Hence, Experiment I was designed to detect spontaneously fissioning (SF) isotopes of element 112 with half-lives (t(1/2)) longer than about 20 s. 11 high-energy events were detected. 7 events exhibit a deposition pattern resembling a chromatographic peak in the vicinity of Rn deposition. However, the energy of the events observed in Experiment I was lower than expected for a SF-decay of (283)112. Therefore, these events could not be unambiguously attributed to the decay of (283)112. In contradiction with earlier publications newer reports from FLNR Dubna claim that (283)12 decays by a-particle emission (E-alpha = 9.5 MeV) with t(1/2) = 4 s followed by a SF-decay of (279)Ds (t(1/2) = 0.2 s). Therefore, Experiment II was designed to be sensitive to both claimed decay properties of (283)112. However, during this experiment neither short alpha-SF correlations nor SF coincidences were detected. The conclusion is that (283)112 was not unambiguously detected, neither in Experiment I nor in Experiment II.

  3. Chemical species of plutonium in Hanford radioactive tank waste

    SciTech Connect

    Barney, G.S.

    1997-10-22

    Large quantities of radioactive wastes have been generated at the Hanford Site over its operating life. The wastes with the highest activities are stored underground in 177 large (mostly one million gallon volume) concrete tanks with steel liners. The wastes contain processing chemicals, cladding chemicals, fission products, and actinides that were neutralized to a basic pH before addition to the tanks to prevent corrosion of the steel liners. Because the mission of the Hanford Site was to provide plutonium for defense purposes, the amount of plutonium lost to the wastes was relatively small. The best estimate of the amount of plutonium lost to all the waste tanks is about 500 kg. Given uncertainties in the measurements, some estimates are as high as 1,000 kg (Roetman et al. 1994). The wastes generally consist of (1) a sludge layer generated by precipitation of dissolved metals from aqueous wastes solutions during neutralization with sodium hydroxide, (2) a salt cake layer formed by crystallization of salts after evaporation of the supernate solution, and (3) an aqueous supernate solution that exists as a separate layer or as liquid contained in cavities between sludge or salt cake particles. The identity of chemical species of plutonium in these wastes will allow a better understanding of the behavior of the plutonium during storage in tanks, retrieval of the wastes, and processing of the wastes. Plutonium chemistry in the wastes is important to criticality and environmental concerns, and in processing the wastes for final disposal. Plutonium has been found to exist mainly in the sludge layers of the tanks along with other precipitated metal hydrous oxides. This is expected due to its low solubility in basic aqueous solutions. Tank supernate solutions do not contain high concentrations of plutonium even though some tanks contain high concentrations of complexing agents. The solutions also contain significant concentrations of hydroxide which competes with other

  4. Combustible radioactive waste treatment by incineration and chemical digestion

    SciTech Connect

    Stretz, L.A.; Crippen, M.D.; Allen, C.R.

    1980-05-28

    A review is given of present and planned combustible radioactive waste treatment systems in the US. Advantages and disadvantages of various systems are considered. Design waste streams are discussed in relation to waste composition, radioactive contaminants by amount and type, and special operating problems caused by the waste.

  5. [Impact of Radioactive Elements on Microbial Complexes in Cryogenic Soils of Yakutia].

    PubMed

    Ivanova, T I; Kuz'mina, N P; Sobakin, P I

    2016-01-01

    It has been found that microorganisms in cryogenic soils of Yakutia are resistant to the long-term impact of cesium and thorium. The number of microorganisms in the studied ecological-trophic groups does not depend on the concentrations of radioactive elements. Differences in the number of microorganisms are determined by the physicochemical conditions that are created in different horizons of the soils studied. The long-term impact of radiation (for 36 and 66 years) on microorganisms inhabiting the permafrost soils of Yakutia has developed their adaptive capacity to high concentrations of these radioactive elements. PMID:27396175

  6. [Impact of Radioactive Elements on Microbial Complexes in Cryogenic Soils of Yakutia].

    PubMed

    Ivanova, T I; Kuz'mina, N P; Sobakin, P I

    2016-01-01

    It has been found that microorganisms in cryogenic soils of Yakutia are resistant to the long-term impact of cesium and thorium. The number of microorganisms in the studied ecological-trophic groups does not depend on the concentrations of radioactive elements. Differences in the number of microorganisms are determined by the physicochemical conditions that are created in different horizons of the soils studied. The long-term impact of radiation (for 36 and 66 years) on microorganisms inhabiting the permafrost soils of Yakutia has developed their adaptive capacity to high concentrations of these radioactive elements.

  7. Turbulent mixing of chemical elements in galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Liubin

    Chemical elements synthesized in stars are released into the interstellar medium (ISM) from discrete and localized events such as supernova (SN) explosions and stellar winds. The efficiency of transport and mixing of the new nucleosynthesis products in the ISM determines the degree of chemical inhomogeneity in the galaxy, which is observable in objects of the same age, such as coeval stars and the ISM today. It also has implications for the transition from metal-poor to normal star formation in high-redshift galaxies. We develop a physical mixing model for chemical homogenization in the turbulent ISM of galaxies using modern theories and methods for passive scalar turbulence. A turbulent velocity field stretches, compresses and folds tracers into structures of smaller and smaller scales that can be homogenized faster by microscopic diffusivity, the only physical process that truly mixes. From a model that incorporates this physical process, an evolution equation for the probability distribution of the tracer concentration is derived. Including the processes of new metal release, infall of low metallicity gas and incorporation of metals into new stars in the equation, we establish a new approach to investigate chemical inhomogeneity in galaxies: a kinetic equation for the metallicity probability distribution function, containing all the 1-point statistical information of the metallicity fluctuations. Motivated by a recent interpretation of ultraviolet properties of high-redshift Lyman Break Galaxies, we apply this approach to study mixing of primordial gas in these galaxies and find that primordial gas can survive for ~ 100 Myr in the presence of continuous metal sources and turbulent mixing if the unlikely efficient mixing in SN shells is excluded. Recent observations show that the Galaxy has been extremely homogeneous during most of its history. In an attempt to understand the homogeneity using our approach, we find that standard chemical evolution models without

  8. Separation and recovery of radioactive and non-radioactive toxic trace elements from aqueous industrial effluents.

    PubMed

    Iyer, R H

    2003-09-01

    An update is presented on liquid membrane-based processes as viable and relevant alternatives to conventional approaches such as precipitation, solvent extraction, ion exchange processes and electrochemical techniques for the removal and recovery of some toxic and/or valuable trace metal ions including some actinides and fission products e.g. U, Am, Y etc and As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, Zn etc from radioactive as well as non-radioactive aqueous waste solutions respectively. In particular, results of experiments aimed at developing supported liquid membrane(SLM)-based process using commercially available porous membranes and indigenously prepared track--etch membranes (TEMs) have been critically examined in laboratory studies to generate basic data needed to evaluate their utility for continuous operation without regeneration. These include effect of pore size, porosity, optimum pore size and their reusability. It is clearly demonstrated that indigenously prepared 10 microm thick TEMs with a porosity in the range of 2-5% give comparable transport rates for metal ions-matching with that of commercial membranes of much higher thickness (160 microm) and higher porosity of 60-85%. The smaller thickness of TEMs more than compensates for their lower porosity. It is shown that because of their well defined pore characteristics TEMs could serve as model supports in SLM studies. By comparing the values of permeability coefficient (P) for TEM and polytetraflouroethylene (PTFE) supports for the transport of Pb2+ chosen as a typical divalent metal ion, and using di-2 ethyl hexyl phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) as the carrier, it is unambiguously proved that diffusion of the metal complex across the membrane is the rate controlling step in metal ion transport in SLM-based processes. An overview of the experimental findings along with future outlook and suggestions for further work are presented in this paper.

  9. Elements of natural radioactive decay series in Iranian drinking water and cigarettes.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Saeed

    2010-06-01

    The uranium (238U) decay series provides the most important isotopes of elements radium (226Ra), radon (222Rn), and polonium (210Po) with half-lives of about 1600 years, 3.8 days, and 140 days, respectively. Although the chemical structure of radium is very similar to calcium, the fact that it produces a radioactive gas (radon) complicates its handling in the laboratory and natural environment. In this study, we used the average concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclide 226Ra in drinking water at different parts of Iran to estimate the annual effective dose. In the other part of the study, we measured the concentrations of 210Po in Iranian cigarettes to estimate the internal intake of this radionuclide and its concentration in the lung tissues of smokers. The results indicate that the average concentration of 226Ra in Iranian drinking water was below the 100 mBq L(-1) recommended by the World Health Organization while the average concentration of 210Po and 210Pb in Iranian cigarettes was relatively high in comparison with other cigarettes found on the market.

  10. Chemical Investigations of Superheavy Elements - Current Results and New Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Duellmann, Christoph E.

    2007-02-26

    Chemical studies of the superheavy elements have progressed tremendously in recent years. This is illustrated here using the following four examples: (i) gas chemical studies of element 112, (ii) radiochemical investigations of the reaction 248Cm(26Mg,xn)274-xHs, (iii) complexation studies of rutherfordium, and (iv) the development of the technique of physical preseparation.

  11. Method for disposing of radioactive graphite and silicon carbide in graphite fuel elements

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, R.L.

    1995-09-12

    Method is described for destroying radioactive graphite and silicon carbide in fuel elements containing small spheres of uranium oxide coated with silicon carbide in a graphite matrix, by treating the graphite fuel elements in a molten salt bath in the presence of air, the salt bath comprising molten sodium-based salts such as sodium carbonate and a small amount of sodium sulfate as catalyst, or calcium-based salts such as calcium chloride and a small amount of calcium sulfate as catalyst, while maintaining the salt bath in a temperature range of about 950 to about 1,100 C. As a further feature of the invention, large radioactive graphite fuel elements, e.g. of the above composition, can be processed to oxidize the graphite and silicon carbide, by introducing the fuel element into a reaction vessel having downwardly and inwardly sloping sides, the fuel element being of a size such that it is supported in the vessel at a point above the molten salt bath therein. Air is bubbled through the bath, causing it to expand and wash the bottom of the fuel element to cause reaction and destruction of the fuel element as it gradually disintegrates and falls into the molten bath. 4 figs.

  12. Exploring the Everyday Context of Chemical Elements: Discovering the Elements of Car Components

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franco-Mariscal, Antonio Joaquín

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a project about the chemical elements made by 15-year-old Spanish high school students of Chemistry. It focuses on context-based teaching combined with the advantages of creating a large mural which subsequently is exposed in the school. The project consisted of researching the chemical elements in the different materials that…

  13. Natural radioactive nuclides and chemical components in the groundwater of Beni Suef Governate, Middle Egypt.

    PubMed

    Khalil, F A; Amin, Rafat M; El Fayoumi, M A K

    2009-03-01

    Measurements of natural radioactivity in drinking water have been performed in many parts of the world, mostly for assessment of the doses and risk resulting from consuming water. A study of the radionuclide and chemical components in groundwater from Beni Suef Governate, Egypt has been carried out. Fifty water samples were analysed by gamma-ray spectroscopy to determine the (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K concentrations; major elements, pH, alkalinity and conductivity were also measured. The activity concentration values ranged from 0.008 to 0.040 Bq l(-1) for (226)Ra, from 0.003 to 0.019 Bq l(-1) for (232)Th and from 0.025 to 0.344 Bq l(-1) for (40)K. The annual ingestion of these radionuclides, using local consumption rates (averaged over the whole population) of 1.5 l d(-1), was estimated to be 8.59, 4.86 and 83.47 Bq y(-1) for (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K, respectively. The estimated effective doses from drinking water were found to be 2.4 microSv y(-1) ((226)Ra), 1.1 microSv y(-1) ((232)Th) and 0.5 microSv y(-1) ((40)K). The contribution of these radionuclides to the committed effective dose from a year's consumption of drinking water is therefore estimated to be only 4% of the WHO value (0.1 mSv y(-1)). The moderate pH value is the most important parameter, and there was no observed correlation between natural radioactivity and electrical conductivity or concentrations of major ions.

  14. Remote detection and ecological monitoring of the industrial and natural nuclei activity of radioactive elements based on passive microwave radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chistyakova, Liliya K.; Chistyakov, Vyacheslav Y.; Losev, Dmitry V.; Penin, Sergei T.; Tarabrin, Yurij K.; Yakubov, Vladimir P.; Yurjev, Igor A.

    1998-12-01

    The passive remote method of microwave radiometry and its instrumental realization for express diagnostics of radioactive elements in the atmosphere have been discussed. Analysis of the microwave radiation due to ionization and dissociation of atmospheric components interacting with radioactive elements is carried out. The photochemical processes resulting in background microwave radiation power have been discussed. As an example, the results of natural experiment of detecting the atomic hydrogen radiation in the plume of emissions of nuclear cycle processing plants have been presented.

  15. An experimental method for quantitatively evaluating the elemental processes of indoor radioactive aerosol behavior.

    PubMed

    Yamazawa, H; Yamada, S; Xu, Y; Hirao, S; Moriizumi, J

    2015-11-01

    An experimental method for quantitatively evaluating the elemental processes governing the indoor behaviour of naturally occurring radioactive aerosols was proposed. This method utilises transient response of aerosol concentrations to an artificial change in aerosol removal rate by turning on and off an air purifier. It was shown that the indoor-outdoor exchange rate and the indoor deposition rate could be estimated by a continuous measurement of outdoor and indoor aerosol number concentration measurements and by the method proposed in this study. Although the scatter of the estimated parameters is relatively large, both the methods gave consistent results. It was also found that the size distribution of radioactive aerosol particles and hence activity median aerodynamic diameter remained not largely affected by the operation of the air purifier, implying the predominance of the exchange and deposition processes over other processes causing change in the size distribution such as the size growth by coagulation and the size dependence of deposition.

  16. Guidelines for generators of hazardous chemical waste at LBL and Guidelines for generators of radioactive and mixed waste at LBL

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide the acceptance criteria for the transfer of hazardous chemical, radioactive, and mixed waste to Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's (LBL) Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF). These guidelines describe how a generator of wastes can meet LBL's acceptance criteria for hazardous chemical, radioactive, and mixed waste. 9 figs.

  17. Radioactive elements on Mercury's surface from MESSENGER: implications for the planet's formation and evolution.

    PubMed

    Peplowski, Patrick N; Evans, Larry G; Hauck, Steven A; McCoy, Timothy J; Boynton, William V; Gillis-Davis, Jeffery J; Ebel, Denton S; Goldsten, John O; Hamara, David K; Lawrence, David J; McNutt, Ralph L; Nittler, Larry R; Solomon, Sean C; Rhodes, Edgar A; Sprague, Ann L; Starr, Richard D; Stockstill-Cahill, Karen R

    2011-09-30

    The MESSENGER Gamma-Ray Spectrometer measured the average surface abundances of the radioactive elements potassium (K, 1150 ± 220 parts per million), thorium (Th, 220 ± 60 parts per billion), and uranium (U, 90 ± 20 parts per billion) in Mercury's northern hemisphere. The abundance of the moderately volatile element K, relative to Th and U, is inconsistent with physical models for the formation of Mercury requiring extreme heating of the planet or its precursor materials, and supports formation from volatile-containing material comparable to chondritic meteorites. Abundances of K, Th, and U indicate that internal heat production has declined substantially since Mercury's formation, consistent with widespread volcanism shortly after the end of late heavy bombardment 3.8 billion years ago and limited, isolated volcanic activity since. PMID:21960624

  18. [Distribution and activity of microorganisms in the deep repository for liquid radioactive waste at the Siberian Chemical Combine].

    PubMed

    Nazina, T N; Luk'ianova, E A; Zakharova, E V; Ivoĭlov, V S; Poltaraus, A B; Kalmykov, S N; Beliaev, S S; Zubkov, A A

    2006-01-01

    The physicochemical conditions, composition of microbial communities, and the rates of anaerobic processes in the deep sandy horizons used as a repository for liquid radioactive wastes (LRW) at the Siberian Chemical Combine (Seversk, Tomsk oblast), were studied. Formation waters from the observation wells drilled into the production horizons of the radioactive waste disposal site were found to be inhabited by microorganisms of different physiological groups, including aerobic organotrophs, anaerobic fermentative, denitrifying, sulfate-reducing, and methanogenic bacteria. The density of microbial population, as determined by cultural methods, was low and usually did not exceed 10(4) cells/ml. Enrichment cultures of microorganisms producing gases (hydrogen, methane, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen sulfide) and capable of participation in the precipitation of metal sulfides were obtained from the waters of production horizons. The contemporary processes of sulfate reduction and methanogenesis were assayed; the rates of these terminal processes of organic matter destruction were found to be low. The denitrifying bacteria from the underground repository were capable of reducing the nitrates contained in the wastes, provided sources of energy and biogenic elements were available. Biosorption of radionuclides by the biomass of aerobic bacteria isolated from groundwater was demonstrated. The results obtained give us insight into the functional structure of the microbial community inhabiting the waters of repository production horizons. This study indicates that the numbers and activity of microbial cells are low both inside and outside the zone of radioactive waste dispersion, in spite of the long period of waste discharge.

  19. [Distribution and activity of microorganisms in the deep repository for liquid radioactive waste at the Siberian Chemical Combine].

    PubMed

    Nazina, T N; Luk'ianova, E A; Zakharova, E V; Ivoĭlov, V S; Poltaraus, A B; Kalmykov, S N; Beliaev, S S; Zubkov, A A

    2006-01-01

    The physicochemical conditions, composition of microbial communities, and the rates of anaerobic processes in the deep sandy horizons used as a repository for liquid radioactive wastes (LRW) at the Siberian Chemical Combine (Seversk, Tomsk oblast), were studied. Formation waters from the observation wells drilled into the production horizons of the radioactive waste disposal site were found to be inhabited by microorganisms of different physiological groups, including aerobic organotrophs, anaerobic fermentative, denitrifying, sulfate-reducing, and methanogenic bacteria. The density of microbial population, as determined by cultural methods, was low and usually did not exceed 10(4) cells/ml. Enrichment cultures of microorganisms producing gases (hydrogen, methane, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen sulfide) and capable of participation in the precipitation of metal sulfides were obtained from the waters of production horizons. The contemporary processes of sulfate reduction and methanogenesis were assayed; the rates of these terminal processes of organic matter destruction were found to be low. The denitrifying bacteria from the underground repository were capable of reducing the nitrates contained in the wastes, provided sources of energy and biogenic elements were available. Biosorption of radionuclides by the biomass of aerobic bacteria isolated from groundwater was demonstrated. The results obtained give us insight into the functional structure of the microbial community inhabiting the waters of repository production horizons. This study indicates that the numbers and activity of microbial cells are low both inside and outside the zone of radioactive waste dispersion, in spite of the long period of waste discharge. PMID:17205810

  20. HISTORY OF THE ORIGIN OF THE CHEMICAL ELEMENTS AND THEIR DISCOVERIES.

    SciTech Connect

    HOLDEN,N.E.

    2001-06-29

    The origin of the chemical elements show a wide diversity with some of these elements having their origin in antiquity. Still other elements have been synthesized within the past fifty years via nuclear reactions on heavy elements, because these other elements are unstable and radioactive and do not exist in nature. The names of the elements come from many sources including mythological concepts or characters; places, areas or countries; properties of the element or its compounds, such as color, smell or its inability to combine; and the names of scientists. There are also some miscellaneous names as well as some obscure names for particular elements. The claim of discovery of an element has varied over the centuries. Many claims, e.g., the discovery of certain rare earth elements of the lanthanide series, involved the discovery of a mineral ore from which an element was later extracted. The honor of discovery has often been accorded not to the person who first isolated the element but to the person who discovered the original mineral itself, even when the ore was impure and contained many elements. The reason for this is that in the case of these rare earth elements, the ''earth'' now refers to oxides of a metal not to the metal itself. This fact was not realized at the time of their discovery, until the English chemist Humphry Davy showed that earths were compounds of oxygen and metals in 1808. In the early discoveries, the atomic weight of an element and spectral analysis of the element were not available. Later both of these elemental properties would be required before discovery of the element would be accepted. In general, the requirements for discovery claims have tightened through the years and claims that were previously accepted would no longer meet the minimum constraints now imposed. There are cases where the honor of discovery is not given to the first person to actually discover the element but to the first person to claim the discovery in print. If a

  1. Analytical microscopy and environment. Current developments using bioindicators of pollution by stable and radioactive elements.

    PubMed

    Chassard-Bouchaud, C

    1996-05-01

    Ecotoxicological investigations were performed on three sets of bioindicators. The first one concerns marine pollution of invertebrates (molluscs: the mussel Mytilus edulis and related species, crustaceans: the crab Liocarcinus puber and related species), contaminated by stable or radioactive elements originating from wastes discharged into sea water. The second one concerns freshwater pollution of vertebrates (fish: the brown trout Salmo trutta fario), contaminated by aluminium dissolved in rivers, as a consequence of an atmospheric pollution by acid rain. The third one concerns the atmospheric pollution of trees by plutonium (Casuarina equisetifolia). Mechanisms involved in the uptake, storage and elimination processes of these toxicants were studied, with a special emphasis on cellular and subcellular aspects of concentration sites. Two microanalytical methods were employed: Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS), using the ion microscope and the ion microprobe, and X-ray spectrometry using the electron microprobe (EMP). In marine organisms, the target organs and tissues of bioaccumulation of stable and radioactive elements (238U, 239Pu and 241Am), were shown to be mainly digestive gland, gill and exoskeleton. The target organelles were shown to be spherocrystals and lysosomes. Amoebocytes, enzymatically equipped with lysosomal phosphatase, were involved in the phagocytic clearance of metal pollutants. In trout, insolubilisation of Al phosphate within lysosomes and a high metal concentration within bones were observed. The tree Casuarina equisetifolia exhibits a particular ability to concentrate atmospheric plutonium within its leaves.

  2. An Educational Card Game for Learning Families of Chemical Elements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mariscal, Antonio Joaquin Franco; Martinez, Jose Maria Oliva; Marquez, Serafin Bernal

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes an educational card game designed to help high school students (grade 10, 15-16 years old) "understand," as opposed to memorize, the periodic table. The game may also be used to identify different chemical elements found in daily life objects. As an additional value, students learn the names and symbols of the displayed…

  3. Metal complexes containing natural and and artificial radioactive elements and their applications.

    PubMed

    Kharissova, Oxana V; Méndez-Rojas, Miguel A; Kharisov, Boris I; Méndez, Ubaldo Ortiz; Martínez, Perla Elizondo

    2014-07-24

    Recent advances (during the 2007-2014 period) in the coordination and organometallic chemistry of compounds containing natural and artificially prepared radionuclides (actinides and technetium), are reviewed. Radioactive isotopes of naturally stable elements are not included for discussion in this work. Actinide and technetium complexes with O-, N-, N,O, N,S-, P-containing ligands, as well π-organometallics are discussed from the view point of their synthesis, properties, and main applications. On the basis of their properties, several mono-, bi-, tri-, tetra- or polydentate ligands have been designed for specific recognition of some particular radionuclides, and can be used in the processes of nuclear waste remediation, i.e., recycling of nuclear fuel and the separation of actinides and fission products from waste solutions or for analytical determination of actinides in solutions; actinide metal complexes are also usefulas catalysts forcoupling gaseous carbon monoxide,as well as antimicrobial and anti-fungi agents due to their biological activity. Radioactive labeling based on the short-lived metastable nuclide technetium-99m ((99m)Tc) for biomedical use as heart, lung, kidney, bone, brain, liver or cancer imaging agents is also discussed. Finally, the promising applications of technetium labeling of nanomaterials, with potential applications as drug transport and delivery vehicles, radiotherapeutic agents or radiotracers for monitoring metabolic pathways, are also described.

  4. Stellar alchemy: The origin of the chemical elements

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, E.B.

    1994-03-13

    What makes the stars shine? This question puzzled human beings for thousands of years. Early in this century, chemists and physicists discovered radioactivity; and the nuclear model of the atom was developed. Once nuclear reactions were produced in the laboratory, it did not take long before their role in stellar energy generation was realized. The theory that nuclear fusion is the source of stellar energy was initially developed in the 1930`s and was elaborated in detail in the 1950`s. Only within the last ten years, however, have astronomical observations provided direct confirmation of these theoretical ideas. In this paper, I describe the sequences of nuclear reactions that are believed to be responsible for the power generation in stars. The ashes of these reactions are the heavy elements that we find on earth and throughout the universe. The evolution and final fates of stars are examined. The key astronomical observations that provide support for these theoretical ideas are presented.

  5. Chemically bonded phosphate ceramics for radioactive and mixed waste solidification and stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Wagh, A.S.; Cunnane, J.C.; Singh, D.; Reed, D.T.; Armstrong, S.; Subhan, W.; Chawla, N.

    1993-01-01

    Results of an initial investigation of low temperature setting chemically bonded magnesium ammonium phosphate (MAP) ceramics as waste form materials, for solidification and stabilization of radioactive and mixed waste, are reported. The suitability of MAP for solidifying and encapsulating waste materials was tested by encapsulating zeolites at loadings up to [approximately]50 wt%. The resulting composites exhibited very good compressive strength characteristics. Microstructure studies show that zeolite grains remain unreacted in the matrix. Potential uses for solidifying and stab wastes are discussed.

  6. Chemically bonded phosphate ceramics for radioactive and mixed waste solidification and stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Wagh, A.S.; Cunnane, J.C.; Singh, D.; Reed, D.T.; Armstrong, S.; Subhan, W.; Chawla, N.

    1993-01-01

    Results of an initial investigation of low temperature setting chemically bonded magnesium ammonium phosphate (MAP) ceramics as waste form materials, for solidification and stabilization of radioactive and mixed waste, are reported. The suitability of MAP for solidifying and encapsulating waste materials was tested by encapsulating zeolites at loadings up to {approximately}50 wt%. The resulting composites exhibited very good compressive strength characteristics. Microstructure studies show that zeolite grains remain unreacted in the matrix. Potential uses for solidifying and stab wastes are discussed.

  7. Natural radioactivity and rare earth elements in feldspar samples, Central Eastern desert, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Walley El-Dine, Nadia; El-Shershaby, Amal; Afifi, Sofia; Sroor, Amany; Samir, Eman

    2011-05-01

    The pegmatite bodies of the Eastern Desert of Egypt are widely distributed especially along the Marsa-Alam-Idfu road. The Abu Dob area covers about 150km(2) of the Arabian Nubian shield at the central part of the Eastern Desert of Egypt. Most of the pegmatite is zoned; the zonation starts with milky quartz at the core followed by alkali feldspar at the margins. The feldspars vary in color from rose to milky and in composition from K-feldspar to Na-feldspar, sometimes interactions of both types are encountered. Thirteen feldspar samples were collected from different locations in the Abu Dob area for measuring the natural radioactivity of (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K using an HPGe detector. The variation in concentration of radionuclides for the area under investigation can be classified into regions of high, medium and low natural radioactivity. The average concentration in BqKg(-1) has been observed to be from 9.5 to 183675.7BqKg(-1) for (238)U, between 6.1 and 94,314.2BqKg(-1) for (232)Th and from 0 to 7894.6BqKg(-1) for (40)K. Radium equivalent activities (Ra(eq)), dose rate (D(R)) and external hazard (H(ex)) have also been determined. In the present work, the concentration of rare earth elements are measured for two feldspar samples using two techniques, Environmental Scanning Electron microscope XIL 30 ESEM, Philips, and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The existence of rare earth elements in this area are very high and can be used in different important industries.

  8. Natural radioactivity and rare earth elements in feldspar samples, Central Eastern desert, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Walley El-Dine, Nadia; El-Shershaby, Amal; Afifi, Sofia; Sroor, Amany; Samir, Eman

    2011-05-01

    The pegmatite bodies of the Eastern Desert of Egypt are widely distributed especially along the Marsa-Alam-Idfu road. The Abu Dob area covers about 150km(2) of the Arabian Nubian shield at the central part of the Eastern Desert of Egypt. Most of the pegmatite is zoned; the zonation starts with milky quartz at the core followed by alkali feldspar at the margins. The feldspars vary in color from rose to milky and in composition from K-feldspar to Na-feldspar, sometimes interactions of both types are encountered. Thirteen feldspar samples were collected from different locations in the Abu Dob area for measuring the natural radioactivity of (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K using an HPGe detector. The variation in concentration of radionuclides for the area under investigation can be classified into regions of high, medium and low natural radioactivity. The average concentration in BqKg(-1) has been observed to be from 9.5 to 183675.7BqKg(-1) for (238)U, between 6.1 and 94,314.2BqKg(-1) for (232)Th and from 0 to 7894.6BqKg(-1) for (40)K. Radium equivalent activities (Ra(eq)), dose rate (D(R)) and external hazard (H(ex)) have also been determined. In the present work, the concentration of rare earth elements are measured for two feldspar samples using two techniques, Environmental Scanning Electron microscope XIL 30 ESEM, Philips, and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The existence of rare earth elements in this area are very high and can be used in different important industries. PMID:21324705

  9. Geothermal chemical elements in lichens of Yellowstone National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennett, J.P.; Wetmore, C.M.

    1999-01-01

    Geothermal features (e.g. geysers, fumaroles, vents, and springs) emit gaseous mercury, sulfur and heavy metals and therefore, are natural sources of these elements in the atmosphere. Field studies of heavy metals in lichens in Italy have detected elevated concentrations near geothermal power plants, and have determined that the origin of mercury is from soil degassing, not soil particles. We studied this phenomenon in a geothermal area without power plants to determine the natural levels of mercury and other elements. Two common and abundant species of epiphytic Lichens, Bryoria fremontii and Letharia vulpina, were collected at six localities in Yellowstone National Park, USA in 1998 and analyzed for 22 chemical elements. Thirteen elements differed significantly between species. Some elements were significantly higher in the southern part of the park, while others were higher in the north. Levels of most elements were comparable with those in other national parks and wilderness areas in the region, except Hg, which was unusually high. The most likely sources of this element are the geothermal features, which are known emitters of Hg. Multivariate analyses revealed strong positive associations of Hg with S, and negative associations with soil elements, providing strong evidence that the Hg in the lichens is the result of soil degassing of elemental Hg rather than particulate Hg directly from soils. Average Hg levels in the lichens were 140 p.p.b. in Bryoria and 110 p.p.b. in Letharia, but maxima were 291 and 243 p.p.b., respectively. In spite of this, both species were healthy and abundant throughout the park.

  10. Status and Perspective of Chemical Studies of Heaviest Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gäggeler, H. W.

    2013-06-01

    During the last decade the elements hassium (Hs, Z=108), copernicium(Cn, Z=112), and flerovium (Fl, Z=114) have been studied for the first time by chemical means. Hassium as a member of group eight of the periodic table proved to form a volatile molecule with oxygen, HsO4. Copernicium and flerovium both behaved like a volatile noble metal. While HsO4 turned out to be less volatile compared to the nearestby homologue in the same group of the periodic table, OsO4, Cn and Fl were both significantly more volatile compared to their homologues Hg and Pb, respectively, in their elemental state. All first ever chemical studies were performed with very few atoms: seven in case of Hs, five with Cn and three with Fl, respectively.

  11. Are C1 chondrites chemically fractionated - A trace element study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebihara, M.; Wolf, R.; Anders, E.

    1982-01-01

    Six C1 chondrite samples and a C2 xenolith from the Plainview H5 chondrite were analyzed by radiochemical neutron activation for a large variety of elements, including rare earths. The sample processing is described, including the irradiation, chemical procedure, rare earths separation, counting techniques, radiochemical purity check, and chemical yields. The results of consistency checks on a number of elements are discussed. Abundances for siderophiles, volatiles, and rare earths are presented and discussed. Tests are presented for fractionation of rare earths and other refractories, compositional uniformity of C1's, and interelement correlations. There is no conclusive evidence for nebular fractionation affecting C1's. Three fractionation-prone rare earths have essentially the same relative abundances in C1's and all other chondrite classes, and hence are apparently not fractionated in C1's.

  12. Chemical and nuclear properties of lawrencium (element 103) and hahnium (element 105)

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, R.A.

    1990-09-10

    The chemical and nuclear properties of Lr and Ha have been studied, using 3-minute {sup 260}Lr and 35-second {sup 262}Ha. The crystal ionic radius of Lr{sup 3+} was determined by comparing its elution position from a cation-exchange resin column with those of lanthanide elements having known ionic radii. Comparisons are made to the ionic radii of the heavy actinides, Am{sup 3+} through Es{sup 3+}, obtained by x-ray diffraction methods, and to Md{sup 3+} and Fm{sup 3+} which were determined in the same manner as Lr{sup 3+}. The hydration enthalpy of {minus}3622 kJ/mol was calculated from the crystal ionic radius using an empirical form of the Born equation. Comparisons to the spacings between the ionic radii of the heaviest members of the lanthanide series show that the 2Z spacing between Lr{sup 3+} and Md{sup 3+} is anomalously small, as the ionic radius of Lr{sup 3+} of 0.0886 nm is significantly smaller than had been expected. The chemical properties of Ha were determined relative to the lighter homologs in group 5, Nb and Ta. Group 4 and group 5 tracer activities, as well as Ha, were absorbed onto glass surfaces as a first step toward the determination of the chemical properties of Ha. Ha was found to adsorb on surfaces, a chemical property unique to the group 5 elements, and as such demonstrates that Ha has the chemical properties of a group 5 element. A solvent extraction procedure was adapted for use as a micro-scale chemical procedure to examine whether or not Ha displays eka-Ta-like chemical under conditions where Ta will be extracted into the organic phase and Nb will not. Under the conditions of this experiment Ha did not extract, and does not show eka-Ta-like chemical properties.

  13. The Chemical Evolution of Heavy Elements in Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shingles, Luke J.; Karakas, Amanda I.; Hirschi, Raphael

    2014-01-01

    We present preliminary results from a chemical evolution model that tracks the composition of heavy elements beyond iron in a globular cluster. The heavy elements can be used as tracers of the nucleosynthetic events that defined the formation and evolution of star clusters in the early Universe. In particular, the chemical evolution model focuses on the hypothesis that rapidly-rotating massive stars produced the heavy elements via the slow neutron-capture process and seeded the proto-cluster while the stars we see today were still forming. We compare our model with heavy element abundances in M4 and M5, and M22. Our results are strongly dependent on the highly uncertain rate of the 17O(α,γ)21Ne reaction, which determines the strength of 16O as a neutron poison. We find that the [Pb/Ba] ratio is too low to match the empirical value, which might suggest that a contribution from AGB stars is required.

  14. Radioactivity, granulometric and elemental analysis of river sediments samples from the coast of Calabria, south of Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caridi, F.; D'Agostino, M.; Marguccio, S.; Belvedere, A.; Belmusto, G.; Marcianò, G.; Sabatino, G.; Mottese, A.

    2016-05-01

    River sediment samples from different sites of the coast of Calabria, south of Italy, were analyzed to determine the natural radioactivity concentration of the studied area and to investigate about their geological provenience. The radioactivity investigation was performed by using HPGe gamma spectrometry. Activity concentration data were reported and the influence of the particle size on the radionuclides concentration was investigated. X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) measurements were performed for the quantitative elemental analysis of the river sediments, revealing the major and minor elements present in the investigated samples. From XRF experimental results it was possible to estimate the geological provenience of the analyzed river sediments. Data obtained in this article provide useful information on the background radioactivity of the studied area and can be further used for radiological mapping of the coast of the Calabria rivers.

  15. Chemical durability of soda-lime-aluminosilicate glass for radioactive waste vitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Eppler, F.H.; Yim, M.S.

    1998-09-01

    Vitrification has been identified as one of the most viable waste treatment alternatives for nuclear waste disposal. Currently, the most popular glass compositions being selected for vitrification are the borosilicate family of glasses. Another popular type that has been around in glass industry is the soda-lime-silicate variety, which has often been characterized as the least durable and a poor candidate for radioactive waste vitrification. By replacing the boron constituent with a cheaper substitute, such as silica, the cost of vitrification processing can be reduced. At the same time, addition of network intermediates such as Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} to the glass composition increases the environmental durability of the glass. The objective of this study is to examine the ability of the soda-lime-aluminosilicate glass as an alternative vitrification tool for the disposal of radioactive waste and to investigate the sensitivity of product chemical durability to variations in composition.

  16. Evolution of palagonite: Crystallization, chemical changes, and element budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroncik, Nicole A.; Schmincke, Hans-Ulrich

    2001-07-01

    The structural and chemical evolution of palagonite was studied as a function of glass composition, alteration environment, and time by applying a range of analytical methods (electron microprobe, infrared photometry, atomic force microscopy, X-ray fluorescence, and X-ray diffraction). Palagonitization of volcanic glass is a continuous process of glass dissolution, palagonite formation, and palagonite evolution, which can be subdivided into two different reaction stages with changing element mobilities. The first stage is characterized by congruent dissolution of glass and contemporaneous precipitation of "fresh," gel-like, amorphous, optically isotropic, mainly yellowish palagonite. This stage is accompanied by loss of Si, Al, Mg, Ca, Na, and K, active enrichment of H2O, and the passive enrichment of Ti and Fe. The second stage is an aging process during which the thermodynamically unstable palagonite reacts with the surrounding fluid and crystallizes to smectite. This stage is accompanied by uptake of Si, Al, Mg, and K from solution and the loss of Ti and H2O. Ca and Na are still showing losses, whereas Fe reacts less consistently, remaining either unchanged or showing losses. The degree and direction of element mobility during palagonitization was found to vary mainly with palagonite aging, as soon as the first precipitation of palagonite occurs. This is indicated by the contrasting major element signatures of palagonites of different aging steps, by the changes in the direction of element mobility with palagonite aging, and by the general decrease of element loss with increasing formation of crystalline substances in the palagonite. Considering the overall element budget of a water-rock system, the conversion of glass to palagonite is accompanied by much larger element losses than the overall alteration process, which includes the formation of secondary phases and palagonite aging. The least evolved palagonitized mafic glass studied has undergone as much as 65

  17. Direct conversion of radioactive and chemical waste containing metals, ceramics, amorphous solids, and organics to glass

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

    1994-05-02

    The Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (CMODS) is a new process for direct conversion of radioactive, mixed, and chemical wastes to glass. The wastes can be in the chemical forms of metals, ceramics, amorphous solids, and organics. GMODS destroys organics and it incorporates heavy metals and radionuclides into a glass. Processable wastes may include miscellaneous spent fuels (SF), SF hulls and hardware, plutonium wastes in different forms, high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters, ion-exchange resins, failed equipment, and laboratory wastes. Thermodynamic calculations indicate theoretical feasibility. Small-scale laboratory experiments (< 100 g per test) have demonstrated chemical laboratory feasibility for several metals. Additional work is needed to demonstrate engineering feasibility.

  18. Data for the Reference Man: skeleton content of chemical elements.

    PubMed

    Zaichick, Vladimir

    2013-03-01

    This study was undertaken to provide reference values of chemical element mass fractions in intact bone of Reference (European Caucasian) Man/Woman. The rib bone samples investigated were obtained from autopsies of 84 apparently healthy 15-58-year-old citizens (38 females and 46 males) of a non-industrial region in the Central European part of Russia who had suffered sudden death. The mass fractions (mg/kg given on a wet mass basis) of 69 elements in these bone samples were measured by using neutron activation analysis with high-resolution spectrometry of short-lived and long-lived radionuclides, particle-induced gamma-ray emission, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry including necessary quality control measures. Using published and measured data, mass fraction values of the 79 elements for the rib bone have been derived. Based on accepted rib to skeleton mass fractions and reference values of skeleton mass for Reference Man, the elemental burdens in the skeleton were estimated. These results may provide a representative bases for establishing related reference values for the Russian Reference Man/Woman and for revising and adding current reference values for the International Commission on Radiological Protection. The data presented will also be very valuable for many other applications in radiation protection, radiotherapy radiation dosimetry, and other scientific fields.

  19. Migration and Retardation of Chemical Toxic Components from Radioactive Waste - Hydrochemical Aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Jedinakova-Krizova, V.; Hanslik, E.

    2003-02-24

    A systematic analysis of nuclear power plant (NPP) operation and radioactive wastes disposal (near-surface disposal and geologic disposal) in underground repositories has provided the basis for a comparison between the radiotoxicity and chemotoxicity as part of an EIA (environmental impact assessment) procedure. This contribution summarizes the hydrochemical mechanisms of transport and retardation processes, chemistry and migration behavior of radionuclides and chemical toxics in natural sorbents, especially bentonites. The effect of solubility and dissolution reactions, diffusion and sorption/desorption, complexation and variations in the aqueous phase composition, pH-value and oxidation-reduction properties and other phenomena affecting distribution coefficients (Kd values) is discussed.

  20. Calculations of the moon's heat history at different concentrations of radioactive elements taking account of the material differentiation with melting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnatskaya, O. I.; Alber, Y. I.; Ryazantseva, I. L.

    1974-01-01

    A mathematical procedure for analyzing the heat conductivity of the lunar surface is discussed. The solution is based on homogeneous and laminated moon models and considers the effects of radioactive elements conveyed to the lunar surface by melting. The various parameters which introduce uncertainties into the numerical analysis are identified. The application of data obtained from radio astronomy and from analyses of lunar samples returned by the Apollo flights is explained. Tables of data are included to show the types and amounts of radioactive materials which have been identified.

  1. Radioactive and chemical contamination of the water resources in the former uranium mining and milling sites of Mailuu Suu (Kyrgyzstan).

    PubMed

    Corcho Alvarado, J A; Balsiger, B; Röllin, S; Jakob, A; Burger, M

    2014-12-01

    An assessment of the radioactive and chemical contamination of the water resources at the former uranium mines and processing sites of Mailuu-Suu, in Kyrgyzstan, was carried out. A large number of water samples were collected from the drinking water distribution system (DWDS), rivers, shallow aquifers and drainage water from the mine tailings. Radionuclides and trace metal contents in water from the DWDS were low in general, but were extremely high for Fe, Al and Mn. These elements were associated with the particle fractions in the water and strongly correlated with high turbidity levels. Overall, these results suggest that water from the DWDS does not represent a serious radiological hazard to the Mailuu Suu population. However, due to the high turbidities and contents of some elements, this water is not good quality drinking water. Water from artesian and dug wells were characterized by elevated levels of U (up to 10 μg/L) and some trace elements (e.g. As, Se, Cr, V and F) and anions (e.g. Cl(-), NO3(-), SO4(2-)). In two artesian wells, the WHO guideline value of 10 μg/L for As in water was exceeded. As the artesian wells are used as a source of drinking water by a large number of households, special care should be taken in order to stay within the WHO recommended guidelines. Drainage water from the mine tailings was as expected highly contaminated with many chemicals (e.g. As) and radioactive contaminants (e.g. U). The concentrations of U were more than 200 times the WHO guideline value of 30 μg/L for U in drinking water. A large variation in (234)U/(238)U isotopic ratios in water was observed, with values near equilibrium at the mine tailings and far from equilibrium outside this area (reaching ratios of 2.3 in the artesian well). This result highlights the potential use of this ratio as an indicator of the origin of U contamination in Mailuu Suu.

  2. Chemical and nuclear properties of Rutherfordium (Element 104)

    SciTech Connect

    Kacher, C.D.

    1995-10-30

    The chemical-properties of rutherfordium (Rf) and its group 4 homologs were studied by sorption on glass support surfaces coated with cobalt(II)ferrocyanide and by solvent extraction with tributylphosphate (TBP) and triisooctylamine (TIOA). The surface studies showed that the hydrolysis trend in the group 4 elements and the pseudogroup 4 element, lb, decreases in the order Rf>Zr{approx}Hf>Th. This trend was attributed to relativistic effects which predicted that Rf would be more prone to having a coordination number of 6 than 8 in most aqueous solutions due to a destabilization of the 6d{sub 5/2} shell and a stabilization of the 7p{sub l/2} shell. This hydrolysis trend was confirmed in the TBP/HBr solvent extraction studies which showed that the extraction trend decreased in the order Zr>Hf>Rf?Ti for HBr, showing that Rf and Ti did not extract as well because they hydrolyzed more easily than Zr and Hf. The TIOA/HF solvent extraction studies showed that the extraction trend for the group 4 elements decreased in the order Ti>Zr{approx}Hf>Rf, in inverse order from the trend of ionic radii Rf>Zr{approx}Hf>Ti. An attempt was made to produce {sup 263}Rf (a) via the {sup 248}Cm({sup 22}Ne, {alpha}3n) reaction employing thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA) solvent extraction chemistry and (b) via the {sup 249}Bk({sup 18}O,4n) reaction employing the Automated Rapid Chemistry Apparatus (ARCA). In the TTA studies, 16 fissions were observed but were all attributed to {sup 256}Fm. No alpha events were observed in the Rf chemical fraction. A 0.2 nb upper limit production cross section for the {sup 248}Cm({sup 22}Ne, {alpha}3n){sup 263}Rf reaction was calculated assuming the 500-sec half-life reported previously by Czerwinski et al. [CZE92A].

  3. Stellar alchemy: The origin of the chemical elements

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, E.B. . Nuclear Science Div.)

    1994-10-01

    By examining the light that comes from the stars, one can deduce a great deal about the nature of the universe. Remarkably, it seems that the same basic laws of physics and chemistry apply everywhere. Furthermore, all observable astronomical objects seem to be made up of the same 92 chemical elements found on Earth. From such observations, we now know that approximately 73% of the mass of the visible universe is in the form of hydrogen, and helium makes up about 25%. Everything else represents only 2% of the mass of the universe. Although the abundance of these heavy (A > 4) elements seems quite low, most of the atoms in our bodies and in the Earth are a part of this small portion. It is generally believed that the hydrogen and helium were produced in the hot, dense conditions prevailing at the birth of the universe known as the big bang. As discussed in the article the heavy elements are the products of nuclear reactions in stars.

  4. Guidelines for generators of hazardous chemical waste at LBL and guidelines for generators of radioactive and mixed waste at LBL

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    In part one of this document the Governing Documents and Definitions sections provide general guidelines and regulations applying to the handling of hazardous chemical wastes. The remaining sections provide details on how you can prepare your waste properly for transport and disposal. They are correlated with the steps you must take to properly prepare your waste for pickup. The purpose of the second part of this document is to provide the acceptance criteria for the transfer of radioactive and mixed waste to LBL's Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF). These guidelines describe how you, as a generator of radioactive or mixed waste, can meet LBL's acceptance criteria for radioactive and mixed waste.

  5. Lab Astro and the Origins of the Chemical Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawler, James E.

    2010-03-01

    Interpretation of the spectra of metal-poor Galactic halo stars is dependent on AMO laboratory data [1,2]. Metal-poor Galactic halo stars were born when the Milky Way was young and they provide a record of the chemical evolution of the Galaxy. Elements heavier than iron are produced via r(apid)-process and s(low)-process n(eutron)-capture mechanisms. The s-process mechanism, which occurs in certain AGB stars, is relatively well understood. The explosive r-process is not well understood. The r-process n-capture mechanism was dominant early in the Galaxy's history [3]. New large aperture telescopes make it possible to record high-resolution spectra with high signal-to-noise ratios on a growing number of metal-poor stars. In addition to mapping the chemical evolution of the Galaxy, these studies are yielding an increasingly well-defined r-process elemental abundance pattern which constrains models of r-process nucleosynthesis [1]. The next phase of this ongoing research will address challenges in modeling stellar photospheres. Peculiar trends in abundances of specific Fe-group elements as a function of stellar age or metallicity may be due to limitations in traditional one dimensional (1d) local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) models of stellar photospheres or may be due to poorly understood nucleosynthesis [4]. Efforts are now underway to test the Saha or ionization equilibrium in a variety of stellar atmospheres for several Fe-group elements using the best available spectroscopic data for selected transitions. More comprehensive spectroscopic data of improved accuracy and accurate collisional data, especially for inelastic collisions of H atoms with metal atoms and ions, will be needed to fully develop 3d/non-LTE models of photospheres [e.g. 5]. [4pt] [1] C. Sneden, J. E. Lawler, J. J. Cowan, I. I. Ivans, and E. A. Den Hartog, Astrophys. J. Suppl. Ser. 182, 80-96 (2009). [0pt] [2] J. E. Lawler, C. Sneden, J. J. Cowan, I. I. Ivans, and E. A. Den Hartog, Astrophys. J

  6. Comparison of remote consequences in Taraxacum officinale seed progeny collected in radioactively or chemically contaminated areas.

    PubMed

    Pozolotina, Vera N; Antonova, Elena V; Bezel, Victor S

    2012-10-01

    We carried out a comparative study of seed progeny taken from the dandelion (Taraxacum officinale s.l.) coenopopulations exposed for a long time to radioactive or chemical contamination originated from the East-Ural radioactive trace zone (EURT) or Nizhniy Tagil metallurgical combine impact zone (NTMC), respectively. Coenopopulations from EURT, NTMC and background areas significantly differ from each other with respect to the qualitative and quantitative composition of allozyme phenes. An analysis of clonal diversity showed the uniqueness of all coenopopulations in terms of their phenogenetics. P-generation seed viability was found to decrease in a similar manner as all types of the industrial stress increased. Studies of F (1)-generation variability in radio- and metal resistance by family analysis showed that seed progeny from EURT impact zone possessed high viability that, however, was accompanied by development of latent injuries resulting in low resistance to additional man-caused impacts. In F (1)-generation originated from NTMC zone, high seed viability was combined with increased resistance to provocative heavy metal and radiation exposure. No significant differences in responses to 'habitual' and 'new' factors, i.e. pre-adaptation effect, were found in samples from the contaminated areas.

  7. Physical and chemical limitations to preparation of beta radioactive stents by direct neutron activation.

    PubMed

    Petelenz, Barbara; Rajchel, Bogusław; Bilski, Paweł; Misiak, Ryszard; Bartyzel, Mirosław; Wilczek, Krzysztof; Alber, Dorothea

    2003-02-01

    Pure beta emitters are the sources of choice for intracoronary irradiations in restenosis prevention. In this work we reconsidered preparation of low activity 32P sources by ion-implantation of stable 31P into highly biocompatible pure titanium stents, followed by neutron activation. Gamma-spectrometrical analysis has shown that during activations with high thermal neutrons flux production of gamma-active long-lived contaminants is much beyond the dosimetrically acceptable limit, mainly due to the competing (n,p) reactions induced by the fast neutrons on isotopes of the bulk stent material, and to a lesser extent due to (n,gamma) reactions on chemical impurities. A potential applicability of this method for obtaining alternative beta radioactive stents is discussed.

  8. [The adaptive strategy of rodent populations living in conditions of radioactive and chemical environmental pollution].

    PubMed

    Liubashevskiĭ, N M; Starichenko, V I

    2010-01-01

    The comparative analysis of demographic, morphological and physiological processes in mouselike rodents in pollution zones (90Sr + 90Y, 137Cs) on East-Ural radioactive track (EURT) and (Cu + Cd + Pb + Zn + SO2) on a site near copper-smelting factory is carried out. The direct (not mediated) defeat of animals by an irradiation leads to inherited adaptation (density preservation, tolerance increase to pollution, migration decrease and so forth). The mediated defeat of animals at pollution by metals influences animals as a result of degradation of a vegetative cover, reducing a forage reserve, shelters and reproduction places. Population is decreasing, migration is increasing. Hence, population reacts onto direct defeat of animals or on inhabitancy locuses degradation, id est unspecifically, without dependence from the physical and chemical nature of pollution.

  9. EXPLORING ENGINEERING CONTROL THROUGH PROCESS MANIPULATION OF RADIOACTIVE LIQUID WASTE TANK CHEMICAL CLEANING

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, A.

    2014-04-27

    One method of remediating legacy liquid radioactive waste produced during the cold war, is aggressive in-tank chemical cleaning. Chemical cleaning has successfully reduced the curie content of residual waste heels in large underground storage tanks; however this process generates significant chemical hazards. Mercury is often the bounding hazard due to its extensive use in the separations process that produced the waste. This paper explores how variations in controllable process factors, tank level and temperature, may be manipulated to reduce the hazard potential related to mercury vapor generation. When compared using a multivariate regression analysis, findings indicated that there was a significant relationship between both tank level (p value of 1.65x10{sup -23}) and temperature (p value of 6.39x10{sup -6}) to the mercury vapor concentration in the tank ventilation system. Tank temperature showed the most promise as a controllable parameter for future tank cleaning endeavors. Despite statistically significant relationships, there may not be confidence in the ability to control accident scenarios to below mercury’s IDLH or PAC-III levels for future cleaning initiatives.

  10. 3D Chemical and Elemental Imaging by STXM Spectrotomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Hitchcock, A. P.; Karunakaran, C.; Prange, A.; Franz, B.; Harkness, T.; Lu, Y.; Obst, M.; Hormes, J.

    2011-09-01

    Spectrotomography based on the scanning transmission x-ray microscope (STXM) at the 10ID-1 spectromicroscopy beamline of the Canadian Light Source was used to study two selected unicellular microorganisms. Spatial distributions of sulphur globules, calcium, protein, and polysaccharide in sulphur-metabolizing bacteria (Allochromatium vinosum) were determined at the S 2p, C 1s, and Ca 2p edges. 3D chemical mapping showed that the sulphur globules are located inside the bacteria with a strong spatial correlation with calcium ions (it is most probably calcium carbonate from the medium; however, with STXM the distribution and localization in the cell can be made visible, which is very interesting for a biologist) and polysaccharide-rich polymers, suggesting an influence of the organic components on the formation of the sulphur and calcium deposits. A second study investigated copper accumulating in yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) treated with copper sulphate. 3D elemental imaging at the Cu 2p edge showed that Cu(II) is reduced to Cu(I) on the yeast cell wall. A novel needle-like wet cell sample holder for STXM spectrotomography studies of fully hydrated samples is discussed.

  11. 3D Chemical and Elemental Imaging by STXM Spectrotomography

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Karunakaran, C.; Lu, Y.; Hormes, J.; Hitchcock, A. P.; Prange, A.; Franz, B.; Harkness, T.; Obst, M.

    2011-09-09

    Spectrotomography based on the scanning transmission x-ray microscope (STXM) at the 10ID-1 spectromicroscopy beamline of the Canadian Light Source was used to study two selected unicellular microorganisms. Spatial distributions of sulphur globules, calcium, protein, and polysaccharide in sulphur-metabolizing bacteria (Allochromatium vinosum) were determined at the S 2p, C 1s, and Ca 2p edges. 3D chemical mapping showed that the sulphur globules are located inside the bacteria with a strong spatial correlation with calcium ions (it is most probably calcium carbonate from the medium; however, with STXM the distribution and localization in the cell can be made visible, which is very interesting for a biologist) and polysaccharide-rich polymers, suggesting an influence of the organic components on the formation of the sulphur and calcium deposits. A second study investigated copper accumulating in yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) treated with copper sulphate. 3D elemental imaging at the Cu 2p edge showed that Cu(II) is reduced to Cu(I) on the yeast cell wall. A novel needle-like wet cell sample holder for STXM spectrotomography studies of fully hydrated samples is discussed.

  12. RADIOACTIVITY DOSAGE OF ORNAMENTAL GRANITIC ROCKS BASED ON CHEMICAL, MINERALOGICAL AND LITHOLOGICAL DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Salas, H.T.; Nalini, H.A. Jr.; Mendes, J.C.

    2004-10-03

    One hundred samples of granitic rock were collected from granite traders in Belo Horizonte. Autoradiography, optical microscopy, diffractometry, and chemical analysis (X-ray spectrometry, X-ray fluorescence, neutron activation, gravimetry and electron probe microanalysis) were used to determine the mineral assemblages and lithotypes. Autoradiographic results for several samples showed the presence of monazite, allanite and zircon. Chemical analysis revealed concentrations of uranium of {le} 30ppm, and thorium {le} 130ppm. Higher concentrations generally correlated with high concentrations of light rare earths in silica-rich rocks of granitic composition. Calculations were made of radioactive doses for floor tiles in a standard room for samples with total concentration of uranium and thorium greater than 60ppm. On the basis of calculations of {sup 232}Th, {sup 40}K and {sup 226}Ra from Th, K and U analysis, the doses calculated were between 0.11 and 0.34 mSv/year, which are much lower than the acceptable international exposure standard of 1.0 mSv/year.

  13. Matching Element Symbols with State Abbreviations: A Fun Activity for Browsing the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woelk, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    A classroom activity is presented in which students are challenged to find matches between the United States two-letter postal abbreviations for states and chemical element symbols. The activity aims to lessen negative apprehensions students might have when the periodic table of the elements with its more than 100 combinations of letters is first…

  14. Determination of abundances of chemical elements in open star clusters of the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozha, M. L.; Koval', V. V.; Marsakov, V. A.

    Spectroscopic determinations of the relative abundances of chemical elements produced in different nuclear-synthesis processes, [el/Fe], are collected for 90 open star clusters of the Galaxy using data from 109 papers published between 1991 and 2015. Information is gathered on the abundances of α -elements (O, Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti), iron-peak element (Fe), slow neutron capture elements (Y, Ba, La, Ce, Nd, and Zr), rapid neutron capture element (Eu), and elements with an odd number of protons (Na, Al). The weighted averages are calculated for the clusters with more than one determination of the abundances of each studied chemical element. Estimates of metallicities are found for 346 clusters. A compiled catalog of the open cluster parameters contains metallicities, positions, ages, velocities, elements of Galactic orbits, and relative abundances of fourteen chemical elements.

  15. [Distribution of chemical elements in whole blood and plasma].

    PubMed

    Barashkov, G K; Zaĭtseva, L I; Kondakhchan, M A; Konstantinova, E A

    2003-01-01

    The distribution factor (Fd) of 35 elements of plasma and whole blood in 26 healthy men and women was detected by ICP-OES. Usilig this parameter the elements were subdivided in 3 pools. 9 of them have Fd higher than 1.5 ("elements of plasma"-Ag, Ca, Cu, In, Li, Na, Se, Si, Sr); 6 have lower than 0.5 ("elements of blood cells"-Fe, K, Mn, Ni, V, Zn), other 20-about 1 ("blood elements"). Fd of all elements depends on ionic radius. Elements of 2nd sub-groups of all groups of Mendeleev's periodic table ("heavy metals") depend on the similar law: "with growing of ionic radius the concentration of elements in plasma enhances". In alkaline metals Fd depends on the opposite law:" with growing of ionic radius of alkaline metal the quantity of elements in blood cells enhance". Dependence of Fd on the value of atomic mass in periods or in exterior electronic cloud (s-, p-, d-, f-) was not established. The table of distribution of all detected elements in whole blood in relation to 8 macroelements (Ca, Mg, K, Na, S, P, Fe, Zn,) is presented, as a basic diagnostic criteria in metal-ligand homeostasis disturbance.

  16. Risk assessment for chemical pickling of metals contaminated by radioactive materials.

    PubMed

    Donzella, A; Formisano, P; Giroletti, E; Zenoni, A

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, many cases of contamination of metal scraps by unwanted radioactive materials have occurred. Moreover, international organisations are evaluating the possibility to re-use or to recycle metals coming from nuclear power plants. The metal recycling industry has started to worry about radiation exposure of workers that could be in contact with contaminated metals during each manufacturing phase. Risks are strongly dependent on the radiation source features. The aim of this study is to perform risk assessment for workers involved in chemical pickling of steel coils. Monte Carlo simulations have been performed, using the MCNP package and considering coils contaminated with (60)Co, (137)Cs, (241)Am and (226)Ra. Under the most conservative conditions (coil contaminated with 1.0 kBq g(-1) of (60)Co), the dose assessment results lower than the European dose limit for the population (1 mSv y(-1)), considering a maximum number of 10 contaminated coils handled per year. The only exception concerns the case of (241)Am, for which internal contamination could be non- negligible and should be verified in the specific cases. In every case, radiation exposure risk for people standing at 50 m from the coil is widely <1 mSv y(-1).

  17. Modular glovebox connector and associated good practices for control of radioactive and chemically toxic materials.

    PubMed

    Hoover, M D; Mewhinney, C J; Newton, G J

    1999-01-01

    Design and associated good practices are described for a modular glovebox connector to improve control of radioactive and chemically toxic materials. The connector consists of an anodized aluminum circular port with a mating spacer, gaskets, and retaining rings for joining two parallel ends of commercially available or custom-manufactured glovebox enclosures. Use of the connector allows multiple gloveboxes to be quickly assembled or reconfigured in functional units. Connector dimensions can be scaled to meet operational requirements for access between gloveboxes. Options for construction materials are discussed, along with recommendations for installation of the connector in new or retrofitted systems. Associated good practices include application of surface coatings and caulking, use of disposable glovebags, and proper selection and protection of gasket and glove materials. Use of the connector at an inhalation toxicology research facility has reduced the time and expense required to reconfigure equipment for changing operational requirements, the dispersion of contamination during reconfigurations, and the need for decommissioning and disposal of contaminated enclosures.

  18. Risk assessment for chemical pickling of metals contaminated by radioactive materials.

    PubMed

    Donzella, A; Formisano, P; Giroletti, E; Zenoni, A

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, many cases of contamination of metal scraps by unwanted radioactive materials have occurred. Moreover, international organisations are evaluating the possibility to re-use or to recycle metals coming from nuclear power plants. The metal recycling industry has started to worry about radiation exposure of workers that could be in contact with contaminated metals during each manufacturing phase. Risks are strongly dependent on the radiation source features. The aim of this study is to perform risk assessment for workers involved in chemical pickling of steel coils. Monte Carlo simulations have been performed, using the MCNP package and considering coils contaminated with (60)Co, (137)Cs, (241)Am and (226)Ra. Under the most conservative conditions (coil contaminated with 1.0 kBq g(-1) of (60)Co), the dose assessment results lower than the European dose limit for the population (1 mSv y(-1)), considering a maximum number of 10 contaminated coils handled per year. The only exception concerns the case of (241)Am, for which internal contamination could be non- negligible and should be verified in the specific cases. In every case, radiation exposure risk for people standing at 50 m from the coil is widely <1 mSv y(-1). PMID:16849378

  19. Chemical and radioactive composition of bulk deposition in Málaga (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dueñas, C.; Fernández, M. C.; Gordo, E.; Cañete, S.; Pérez, M.

    2012-12-01

    Chemical and radioactive composition of bulk deposition samples, which were collected monthly over a 5 year period (January 2007 until 31 December 2011) at a site located 30 m.a.l. in Málaga (4°28‧ 8″W; 36°43‧ 40″N) have been analysed. All samples were analysed for pH, major ions and gamma radionuclides. The average pH of bulk deposition was 6.4. Cl- and SO were the main anions, while Ca+ and Na+ were the main cations. Significant correlations were found in soil-derived species among Ca2+, Mg2+ and K+ and sea-salt species between Na+ and Cl-. Other relatively good correlations were also observed between acidic anions (SOandNO) and crustal-derived cations (Ca2+, Na+, K+). Sources of the major ions were assessed based on the enrichment factor method. The radionuclides present in all samples are 7Be and 210Pb and 40K appears in 50% of the samples. Relatively poor correlations were observed between the specific activities of gamma radionuclides and the major ions. The temporal variations of major ions and radionuclides exhibit similar seasonal behaviour with low values in winter-autumn months and maximum values in spring-summer months. The fluxes of major ions and gamma radionuclides have been discussed with meteorological factors controlling depositions.

  20. Theoretical chemistry for chemical identification of the heaviest elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pershina, V.; Bastug, T.; Anton, J.; Fricke, B.

    2007-05-01

    Adsorption of element 112 on various types of surfaces was studied on the basis of fully relativistic four-component Density-Functional Theory (DFT) electronic structure calculations for atoms, dimers and atom-cluster systems. Using models of localized and mobile adsorption, the equilibrium adsorption temperature for element 112 is predicted with respect to that of Hg on quartz and gold surfaces. On quartz, element 112 should be stronger adsorbed than Hg by about 5 kJ/mol (or by 5 degrees higher temperatures) due to the stronger van der Walls interaction. This is caused by the relativistically contracted smallest atomic radius of element 112. On surface of gold, element 112 should be weaker adsorbed than Hg by about 20 kJ/mol, i.e., at about 100 degrees lower temperatures than Hg. The predicted similarity to Hg indicates that element 112 should be a transition metal forming intermetallic compounds with Au and other metals due to the relatively large involvement of the relativistically destabilized 6d orbitals in bonding. The difference in adsorption enthalpy between Hg and element 112 depends, however, on the adsorption position.

  1. Heat production rate from radioactive elements in igneous and metamorphic rocks in Eastern Desert, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Abbady, Adel G E; El-Arabi, A M; Abbady, A

    2006-01-01

    Radioactive heat-production data of Igneous and Metamorphic outcrops in the Eastern Desert are presented. Samples were analysed using a low level gamma-ray spectrometer (HPGe) in the laboratory. A total of 205 rock samples were investigated, covering all major rock types of the area. The heat-production rate of igneous rocks ranges from 0.11 (basalt) to 9.53 microWm(-3) (granite). In metamorphic rocks it varies from 0.28 (serpentinite ) to 0.91 microWm(-3) (metagabbro). The contribution due to U is about 51%, as that from Th is 31% and 18% from K. The corresponding values in igneous rocks are 76%, 19% and 5%, respectively. The calculated values showed good agreement with global values except in some areas containing granites. PMID:16120480

  2. Heat production rate from radioactive elements in igneous and metamorphic rocks in Eastern Desert, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Abbady, Adel G E; El-Arabi, A M; Abbady, A

    2006-01-01

    Radioactive heat-production data of Igneous and Metamorphic outcrops in the Eastern Desert are presented. Samples were analysed using a low level gamma-ray spectrometer (HPGe) in the laboratory. A total of 205 rock samples were investigated, covering all major rock types of the area. The heat-production rate of igneous rocks ranges from 0.11 (basalt) to 9.53 microWm(-3) (granite). In metamorphic rocks it varies from 0.28 (serpentinite ) to 0.91 microWm(-3) (metagabbro). The contribution due to U is about 51%, as that from Th is 31% and 18% from K. The corresponding values in igneous rocks are 76%, 19% and 5%, respectively. The calculated values showed good agreement with global values except in some areas containing granites.

  3. Design and adaptation of a novel supercritical extraction facility for operation in a glove box for recovery of radioactive elements

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, V. Suresh; Kumar, R.; Sivaraman, N.; Ravisankar, G.; Vasudeva Rao, P. R.

    2010-09-15

    The design and development of a novel supercritical extraction experimental facility adapted for safe operation in a glove box for the recovery of radioactive elements from waste is described. The apparatus incorporates a high pressure extraction vessel, reciprocating pumps for delivering supercritical fluid and reagent, a back pressure regulator, and a collection chamber. All these components of the system have been specially designed for glove box adaptation and made modular to facilitate their replacement. Confinement of these materials must be ensured in a glove box to protect the operator and prevent contamination to the work area. Since handling of radioactive materials under high pressure (30 MPa) and temperature (up to 333 K) is involved in this process, the apparatus needs elaborate safety features in the design of the equipment, as well as modification of a standard glove box to accommodate the system. As a special safety feature to contain accidental leakage of carbon dioxide from the extraction vessel, a safety vessel has been specially designed and placed inside the glove box. The extraction vessel was enclosed in the safety vessel. The safety vessel was also incorporated with pressure sensing and controlling device.

  4. Extraction processes and solvents for recovery of cesium, strontium, rare earth elements, technetium and actinides from liquid radioactive waste

    DOEpatents

    Zaitsev, Boris N.; Esimantovskiy, Vyacheslav M.; Lazarev, Leonard N.; Dzekun, Evgeniy G.; Romanovskiy, Valeriy N.; Todd, Terry A.; Brewer, Ken N.; Herbst, Ronald S.; Law, Jack D.

    2001-01-01

    Cesium and strontium are extracted from aqueous acidic radioactive waste containing rare earth elements, technetium and actinides, by contacting the waste with a composition of a complex organoboron compound and polyethylene glycol in an organofluorine diluent mixture. In a preferred embodiment the complex organoboron compound is chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide, the polyethylene glycol has the formula RC.sub.6 H.sub.4 (OCH.sub.2 CH.sub.2).sub.n OH, and the organofluorine diluent is a mixture of bis-tetrafluoropropyl ether of diethylene glycol with at least one of bis-tetrafluoropropyl ether of ethylene glycol and bis-tetrafluoropropyl formal. The rare earths, technetium and the actinides (especially uranium, plutonium and americium), are extracted from the aqueous phase using a phosphine oxide in a hydrocarbon diluent, and reextracted from the resulting organic phase into an aqueous phase by using a suitable strip reagent.

  5. Alkaline chemistry of transuranium elements and technetium and the treatment of alkaline radioactive wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Delegard, C.H.; Peretrukhin, V.F.; Shilov, V.P.; Pikaev, A.K.

    1995-05-01

    Goal of this survey is to generalize the known data on fundamental physical-chemical properties of TRUs and Tc, methods for their isolation, and to provide recommendations that will be useful for partitioning them from alkaline high-level wastes.

  6. Canister arrangement for storing radioactive waste

    DOEpatents

    Lorenzo, Donald K.; Van Cleve, Jr., John E.

    1982-01-01

    The subject invention relates to a canister arrangement for jointly storing high level radioactive chemical waste and metallic waste resulting from the reprocessing of nuclear reactor fuel elements. A cylindrical steel canister is provided with an elongated centrally disposed billet of the metallic waste and the chemical waste in vitreous form is disposed in the annulus surrounding the billet.

  7. Canister arrangement for storing radioactive waste

    DOEpatents

    Lorenzo, D.K.; Van Cleve, J.E. Jr.

    1980-04-23

    The subject invention relates to a canister arrangement for jointly storing high level radioactive chemical waste and metallic waste resulting from the reprocessing of nuclear reactor fuel elements. A cylindrical steel canister is provided with an elongated centrally disposed billet of the metallic waste and the chemical waste in vitreous form is disposed in the annulus surrounding the billet.

  8. Structure of matter, radioactivity, and nuclear fission. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    Subject matter includes structure of matter (what is matter, forces holding atoms together, visualizing the atom, the chemical elements, atomic symbols, isotopes, radiation from the atom), radioactivity (what holds the nucleus together, can one element change into another element, radiation from the nucleus, half-life, chart of the nuclides), and nuclear fission (nuclear energy release, the fission process, where does fission energy go, radiation and radioactivity resulting from fission).

  9. Chemical and mineralogical modifications of simplified radioactive waste calcine during heat treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, A.; Schuller, S.; Toplis, M. J.; Podor, R.; Ravaux, J.; Clavier, N.; Brau, H. P.; Charpentier, T.; Angeli, F.; Leterrier, N.

    2014-05-01

    The microstructural and mineralogical changes associated with heating calcined mixtures of Al(NO3)3ṡ9H2O-NaNO3 have been studied. This system is a simplified analogue of high-level radioactive waste calcine, one of the raw materials used in the vitrification process employed for waste management. The decomposition (dehydration and denitration) and formation of secondary crystalline phases have been studied by differential thermal and gravimetric analysis (DTA & TGA), and heat-treated products characterized by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). It is found that pure Al(NO3)3ṡ9H2O transforms to amorphous Al2O3 at a temperature of ∼180 °C, well below that of the calcination process (500 °C). This amorphous Al2O3 is highly porous with a high specific surface area, but may in turn convert to denser γ-Al2O3 and α-Al2O3 with increasing temperature. On the other hand, pure NaNO3 remains stable up to ∼880 °C, despite a solid-liquid transition at ∼320 °C. For Al(NO3)3ṡ9H2O-NaNO3 mixtures, the products of calcination at 500 °C are found to consist of very fine porous material containing Na, Al and O, in addition to a variable proportion of well-defined crystals consisting of Na, and O. Heating these mixtures to temperatures of up to 1000 °C shows that for the case 80% Al(NO3)3ṡ9H2O -20% NaNO3 (weight%) a variety of crystalline sodium aluminates is formed (NaAlO2, NaAl11O17, NaAl6O9.5), while for the 50-50 mixture, only NaAlO2 is found. In large amounts, addition of alumina thus leads to the formation of crystalline phases rich in Al2O3 that are responsible for hardening the calcine as the temperature rises. The kinetics of nitrogen loss from NaNO3 are also found to be influenced by the relative proportion of Al(NO3)3ṡ9H2O in the calcine, larger amounts of Al leading to denitration at lower temperature. These results constitute the necessary background for understanding

  10. Bayesian evaluation of groundwater age distribution using radioactive tracers and anthropogenic chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massoudieh, Arash; Sharifi, Soroosh; Solomon, D. Kip

    2012-09-01

    The development of a Bayesian modeling approach for estimation of the age distribution of groundwater using radioactive isotopes and anthropogenic chemicals is described. The model considers the uncertainties associated with the measured tracer concentrations as well as the parameters affecting the concentration of tracers in the groundwater, and it provides the posterior probability densities of the parameters defining the groundwater age distribution using a Markov chain Monte Carlo method. The model also incorporates the effect of dissolution of aquifer minerals on diluting the 14C signature and the uncertainties associated with this process on the inferred age distribution parameters. Two demonstration modeling cases have been performed. First, the method was applied to simulated tracer concentrations at a discharge point of a hypothetical 2-D vertical aquifer with two recharge zones, leading to a mixed groundwater age distribution under different presumed uncertainties. When the error variance of the observed tracer concentrations is considered unknown, the method can estimate the parameters of the fitted exponential-lognormal distribution with a relatively narrow credible interval when five hypothetical samples are assumed to be collected at the discharge point. However, when a single sample is assumed, the credible intervals become wider, and credible estimations of the parameters are not obtained. Second, the method was applied to the data collected at La Selva Biological Station in Costa Rica. In this demonstration application, nine different forms of presumed groundwater age distributions have been considered, including four single forms and five mixed forms, assuming the groundwater consists of distinct young and old fractions. For the medium geometrical standard deviationδc,i = 1.41, the model estimates a young groundwater age of between 0 and 350 years, with the largest odds being given to a mean age of approximately 100 years, and a fraction of young

  11. Graphite nanoplatelet chemical cross-linking by elemental sulfur

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Graphite nanoplatelets (GNPs) react with elemental sulfur to provide a mechanically stable, spongy material characterized by good electrical conductivity and high surface development; such unique property combination makes these novel nanostructured materials very useful for applications in different technological fields. The carbon-sulfur reaction can be accurately investigated by thermal analysis (differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy combined with scanning electron microscopy. The thermal treatment required for the formation of electrically conductive monosulfur connections among the GNP unities has been investigated. PACS 81.05.Ue, 81.05.Rm, 81.16.Be PMID:23425002

  12. Determination of rare-earth elements in Luna 16 regolith sample by chemical spectral method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroganova, N. S.; Ryabukhin, V. A.; Laktinova, N. V.; Ageyeva, L. V.; Galkina, I. P.; Gatinskaya, N. G.; Yermakov, A. N.; Karyakin, A. V.

    1974-01-01

    An analysis was made of regolith from layer A of the Luna 16 sample for rare earth elements, by a chemical spectral method. Chemical and ion exchange concentrations were used to determine the content of 12 elements and Y at the level 0.001 to 0.0001 percent with 10 to 15 percent reproducibility of the emission determination. Results within the limits of reproducibility agree with data obtained by mass spectra, activation, and X-ray fluorescent methods.

  13. Calculations of the moon's thermal history at different concentrations of radioactive elements, taking into account differentiation on melting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ornatskaya, O. I.; Alber, Y. I.; Ryazantseva, I. L.

    1977-01-01

    Calculations of the thermal history of the moon were done by solving the thermal conductivity equation for the case in which the heat sources are the long lived radioactive elements Th, U, and K-40. The concentrations of these elements were adjusted to give 4 variations of heat flow. Calculations indicated that the moon's interior was heated to melting during the first 0.7 to 2.3 x 10 to the 9th power years. The maximum fusion involved practically the entire moon to a distance from 15 to 45 km beneath the surface, and started 3.5 to 4.0 x 10 to the 9th power years ago, or 2.5 x 3.0 x 10 to the 9th power years ago and continued for 1 to 2 x 10 to the 9th power years. The moon today is cooling. The current thickness of the solid crust is from 150 to 200 km and the heat flow exceeds the stationary value 1.5 fold.

  14. Molecular Computing And The Chemical Elements Of Logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Forrest L.

    1986-02-01

    Future developments in molecular electronicsi-b not only offer the possibility of high density archival memories, 1015 to 1018 gates/cc, but also new routes to fabrication of high levels of parallel processors (> 106) and hence to new computer architectures. A central theme of molecular electronics is that information can be stored as conformational changes in chemical moieties or functional groups. Further, these functional units are chosen or designed so that their structure facilitates the storage of information via reversible conformational changes, either in bond distances or in bond angles, or both. In exploring possible switching and information storage mechanisms at the molecular-size level, it has become apparent that there are many analogues or alternatives possible for any logical function which might be desired. It is even more exciting to realize that some structural chemical units or configurations offer completely new functional or logical capabilities. The example offered below is the molecular analogue of the CASE statement in PASCAL (proposed by an NRL summer student employee7). As suggested in the title, one of the purposes of this article is to enhance the appreciation of the universality of the 'chemical' or 'molecular' systems to express logical functions. The literature on molecular electronic concepts is growing and some reviews are available1-4. Two Molecular Electronic Device (MED) workshops5-6 have been held in Washington, D.C. (1981 and 1983) and an International Symposium on Bioelectric and Molecular Electronic Devices 8 was held in Tokyo, 20-21 November 1985. Beyond the strong interest current in Japan9, interest is also developing in England and Soviet block11.

  15. Virtual Laboratory as an Element of Visualization When Teaching Chemical Contents in Science Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herga, Nataša Rizman; Grmek, Milena Ivanuš; Dinevski, Dejan

    2014-01-01

    Using a variety of visualization tools for teaching and learning science and chemistry is necessary because pupils better understand chemical phenomena and formulate appropriate mental models. The purpose of the presented study was to determine the importance of a virtual laboratory as a visualization element when addressing chemical contents…

  16. Experiments on rehabilitation of radioactive metallic waste (RMW) of reactor stainless steels of Siberian chemical plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolpakov, G. N.; Zakusilov, V. V.; Demyanenko, N. V.; Mishin, A. S.

    2016-06-01

    Stainless steel pipes, used to cool a reactor plant, have a high cost, and after taking a reactor out of service they must be buried together with other radioactive waste. Therefore, the relevant problem is the rinse of pipes from contamination, followed by returning to operation.

  17. Chemical studies of elements with Z ≥ 104 in liquid phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagame, Yuichiro; Kratz, Jens Volker; Schädel, Matthias

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies of the chemical separation and characterization experiments of the first three transactinide elements, rutherfordium (Rf), dubnium (Db), and seaborgium (Sg), conducted atom-at-a-time in liquid phases, are reviewed. A short description on experimental techniques based on partition methods, specifically automated rapid chemical separation systems, is also given. A newly developed experimental approach to investigate single atoms of the heaviest elements with an electrochemical method is introduced. Perspectives for liquid-phase chemistry experiments on heavier elements are briefly discussed.

  18. Kinetics of Radioactive Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, S.

    At present there are over 3,000 known nuclides (see the Appendix in Vol. 2 on the “Table of the Nuclides”), 265 of which are stable, while the rest, i.e., more than 90% of them, are radioactive. The chemical applications of the specific isotopes of chemical elements are mostly connected with the latter group, including quite a number of metastable nuclear isomers, making the kinetics of radioactive decay an important chapter of nuclear chemistry. After giving a phenomenological and then a statistical interpretation of the exponential law, the various combinations of individual decay processes as well as the cases of equilibrium and nonequilibrium will be discussed. Half-life systematics of the different decay modes detailed in Chaps. 2 and 4 of this volume are also summarized.

  19. Extinct radioactivities and protosolar cosmic-rays : self-shielding and light elements.

    SciTech Connect

    Gounelle, M.; Shu, F. H.; Shang, H.; Glassgold, A. E.; Rehm, K. E.; Lee, T.; Physics; Univ. of California at Berkeley; Inst. of Earth Science

    2001-02-20

    We study the effects of self-shielding in the X-wind model of protosolar cosmic-ray irradiation of early solar-system rocks. We adopt a two-component picture of protoCAIs consisting of cores with the elemental abundances of type B1 CAIs (calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions) and mantles of less refractory material. The cores have a power-law distribution of sizes between R{sub min} and R{sub max}. The mantles have a uniform thickness, whose value is chosen to bring the total inventory of elements at least as refractory as sulfur to cosmic abundances for the entire population of protoCAIs. Each object is irradiated with a fluence consistent with the product of their residence time in the reconnection ring and the flux of solar cosmic rays obtained by a scaling of impulsive flares from the hard X-rays observed from low-mass protostars. For R{sub min} in the 50 {mu}m regime and R{sub max} in the few centimeter regime, which corresponds to the range of sizes of observed CAIs in micrometeorites and chondrites, we recover approximately the canonical values quoted for the ratios {sup 26}Al/{sup 27}Al, {sup 53}Mn/{sup 55}Mn, and {sup 41}Ca/{sup 40}Ca in CV3 meteorites. Moreover, the excess {sup 138}La (denoted as {sup 138}La*) produced by proton bombardment of {sup 138}Ba lies within the CAI range obtained in the experiments of Shen et al. When we include fragmentation reactions that produce {sup 10}Be from the impact of protons, alphas, and {sup 3}He on the {sup 16}O that is bound up in rocks, we further obtain a level of {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be that agrees approximately with the report of McKeegan et al. for a CAI from the Allende meteorite. Similar calculations for the expected anomalies in the stable isotopes of lithium show rough consistency with the measured values and further support our interpretation. The value for {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be is particularly difficult to produce by any other astrophysical mechanism. Thus, the {sup 10}Be discovery greatly strengthens the case

  20. Extinct Radioactivities and Protosolar Cosmic Rays: Self-Shielding and Light Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gounelle, Matthieu; Shu, Frank H.; Shang, Hsien; Glassgold, A. E.; Rehm, K. E.; Lee, Typhoon

    2001-02-01

    We study the effects of self-shielding in the X-wind model of protosolar cosmic-ray irradiation of early solar-system rocks. We adopt a two-component picture of protoCAIs consisting of cores with the elemental abundances of type B1 CAIs (calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions) and mantles of less refractory material. The cores have a power-law distribution of sizes between Rmin and Rmax. The mantles have a uniform thickness, whose value is chosen to bring the total inventory of elements at least as refractory as sulfur to cosmic abundances for the entire population of protoCAIs. Each object is irradiated with a fluence consistent with the product of their residence time in the reconnection ring and the flux of solar cosmic rays obtained by a scaling of impulsive flares from the hard X-rays observed from low-mass protostars. For Rmin in the 50 μm regime and Rmax in the few centimeter regime, which corresponds to the range of sizes of observed CAIs in micrometeorites and chondrites, we recover approximately the canonical values quoted for the ratios 26Al/27Al, 53Mn/55Mn, and 41Ca/40Ca in CV3 meteorites. Moreover, the excess 138La (denoted as 138La*) produced by proton bombardment of 138Ba lies within the CAI range obtained in the experiments of Shen et al. When we include fragmentation reactions that produce 10Be from the impact of protons, alphas, and 3He on the 16O that is bound up in rocks, we further obtain a level of 10Be/9Be that agrees approximately with the report of McKeegan et al. for a CAI from the Allende meteorite. Similar calculations for the expected anomalies in the stable isotopes of lithium show rough consistency with the measured values and further support our interpretation. The value for 10Be/9Be is particularly difficult to produce by any other astrophysical mechanism. Thus, the 10Be discovery greatly strengthens the case for an origin in early solar-system irradiation, rather than external stellar seeding, for the shortest-lived radionuclides

  1. A METHOD FOR DETERMINING TOTAL PROTEIN OF ISOLATED CELLULAR ELEMENTS AND CORRESPONDING TRITIUM RADIOACTIVITY

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, Edward

    1968-01-01

    A method is described for the microanalysis of protein, obtained from isolated tissue elements, in the range of 500 µµg-500 mµg. The method entails solubilization of cellular protein with phosphoric acid and heat after extraction of acid-soluble compounds, lipids, and RNA. A procedure for the extraction and recovery of cellular RNA by the use of 40% trichloroacetic acid is presented. The solubilized protein, in the form of a microdroplet, is photomicrographed with monochromatic light at 230 mµ. Total density in the microdroplet is determined from calibrated photographic plates by microdensitometry, and is converted to protein mass by using an experimentally determined average specific absorbance value. A solubilized protein labeled with tritium can be recovered after photomicrography, combusted, and reduced to generate tritiated gas for high-efficiency tritium radiometry. Total protein was analyzed in (a) nerve cells of three different sizes from Deiters' nucleus of the rabbit; and the whole rod cell and rod cell nucleus of the rabbit retina. PMID:5664225

  2. Chemical evolution of r-process elements in the hierarchical galaxy formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komiya, Yutaka

    2015-08-01

    In the concordance cosmology, galaxies are formed hierarchically. Metal-poor stars in the stellar halo are thought to be relics of stars formed in dwarf galaxies in the early universe. In order to investigate metal enrichment history in the early universe, we have been built the chemical evolution model with merger trees.In this presentation, we show our results of chemical evolution computations for r-process elements. For the r-process elements, two possible astronomical sources have been proposed: supernova and coalescence of neutron star binary. Recent nucleosynthetic studies favor the neutron star merger scenario but previous chemical evolution studies pointed out difficulties. We discuss the origin of r-process elements using our hierarchical chemical evolution model.

  3. On the occurrence of metallic character in the periodic table of the chemical elements.

    PubMed

    Hensel, Friedrich; Slocombe, Daniel R; Edwards, Peter P

    2015-03-13

    The classification of a chemical element as either 'metal' or 'non-metal' continues to form the basis of an instantly recognizable, universal representation of the periodic table (Mendeleeff D. 1905 The principles of chemistry, vol. II, p. 23; Poliakoff M. & Tang S. 2015 Phil. Trans. R. Soc. A 373: , 20140211). Here, we review major, pre-quantum-mechanical innovations (Goldhammer DA. 1913 Dispersion und Absorption des Lichtes; Herzfeld KF. 1927 Phys. Rev. 29: , 701-705) that allow an understanding of the metallic or non-metallic status of the chemical elements under both ambient and extreme conditions. A special emphasis will be placed on recent experimental advances that investigate how the electronic properties of chemical elements vary with temperature and density, and how this invariably relates to a changing status of the chemical elements. Thus, the prototypical non-metals, hydrogen and helium, becomes metallic at high densities; and the acknowledged metals, mercury, rubidium and caesium, transform into their non-metallic forms at low elemental densities. This reflects the fundamental fact that, at temperatures above the absolute zero of temperature, there is therefore no clear dividing line between metals and non-metals. Our conventional demarcation of chemical elements as metals or non-metals within the periodic table is of course governed by our experience of the nature of the elements under ambient conditions. Examination of these other situations helps us to examine the exact divisions of the chemical elements into metals and non-metals (Mendeleeff D. 1905 The principles of chemistry, vol. II, p. 23). PMID:25666074

  4. On the occurrence of metallic character in the periodic table of the chemical elements.

    PubMed

    Hensel, Friedrich; Slocombe, Daniel R; Edwards, Peter P

    2015-03-13

    The classification of a chemical element as either 'metal' or 'non-metal' continues to form the basis of an instantly recognizable, universal representation of the periodic table (Mendeleeff D. 1905 The principles of chemistry, vol. II, p. 23; Poliakoff M. & Tang S. 2015 Phil. Trans. R. Soc. A 373: , 20140211). Here, we review major, pre-quantum-mechanical innovations (Goldhammer DA. 1913 Dispersion und Absorption des Lichtes; Herzfeld KF. 1927 Phys. Rev. 29: , 701-705) that allow an understanding of the metallic or non-metallic status of the chemical elements under both ambient and extreme conditions. A special emphasis will be placed on recent experimental advances that investigate how the electronic properties of chemical elements vary with temperature and density, and how this invariably relates to a changing status of the chemical elements. Thus, the prototypical non-metals, hydrogen and helium, becomes metallic at high densities; and the acknowledged metals, mercury, rubidium and caesium, transform into their non-metallic forms at low elemental densities. This reflects the fundamental fact that, at temperatures above the absolute zero of temperature, there is therefore no clear dividing line between metals and non-metals. Our conventional demarcation of chemical elements as metals or non-metals within the periodic table is of course governed by our experience of the nature of the elements under ambient conditions. Examination of these other situations helps us to examine the exact divisions of the chemical elements into metals and non-metals (Mendeleeff D. 1905 The principles of chemistry, vol. II, p. 23).

  5. REDOX state analysis of platinoid elements in simulated high-level radioactive waste glass by synchrotron radiation based EXAFS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Yoshihiro; Shiwaku, Hideaki; Nakada, Masami; Komamine, Satoshi; Ochi, Eiji; Akabori, Mitsuo

    2016-04-01

    Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) analyses were performed to evaluate REDOX (REDuction and OXidation) state of platinoid elements in simulated high-level nuclear waste glass samples prepared under different conditions of temperature and atmosphere. At first, EXAFS functions were compared with those of standard materials such as RuO2. Then structural parameters were obtained from a curve fitting analysis. In addition, a fitting analysis used a linear combination of the two standard EXAFS functions of a given elements metal and oxide was applied to determine ratio of metal/oxide in the simulated glass. The redox state of Ru was successfully evaluated from the linear combination fitting results of EXAFS functions. The ratio of metal increased at more reducing atmosphere and at higher temperatures. Chemical form of rhodium oxide in the simulated glass samples was RhO2 unlike expected Rh2O3. It can be estimated rhodium behaves according with ruthenium when the chemical form is oxide.

  6. Some General Laws of Chemical Elements Composition Dynamics in the Hydrosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korzh, V.

    2012-12-01

    The biophysical oceanic composition is a result of substance migration and transformation on river-sea and ocean- atmosphere boundaries. Chemical composition of oceanic water is a fundamental multi-dimensional constant for our planet. Detailed studies revealed three types of chemical element distribution in the ocean: 1) Conservative: concentration normalized to salinity is constant in space and time; 2) Nutrient-type: element concentration in the surface waters decreases due to the biosphere consumption; and 3) Litho-generative: complex character of distribution of elements, which enter the ocean with the river runoff and interred almost entirely in sediments (Fig. 1). The correlation between the chemical compositions of the river and oceanic water is high (r = 0.94). We conclude that biogeochemical features of each element are determined by the relationship between its average concentration in the ocean and the intensity of its migration through hydrosphere boundary zones. In Fig.1 we show intensities of global migration and average concentrations in the ocean in the coordinates lgC - lg τ, where C is an average element concentration and τ is its residual time in the ocean. Fig. 1 shows a relationship between three main geochemical parameters of the dissolved forms of chemical elements in the hydrosphere: 1) average concentration in the ocean, 2) average concentration in the river runoff and 3) the type of distribution in oceanic water. Using knowledge of two of these parameters, it allows gaining theoretical knowledge of the third. The System covers all chemical elements for the entire range of observed concentrations. It even allows to predict the values of the annual river transport of dissolved Be, C, N, Ge, Tl, Re, to refine such estimates for P, V, Zn, Br, I, and to determine the character of distribution in the ocean for Au and U. Furthermore, the System allowed to estimate natural (unaffected by anthropogenic influence) mean concentrations of elements

  7. Chemical element concentrations in four lichens on a transect entering Voyageurs National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennett, J.; Wetmore, C.M.

    1997-01-01

    A three factor transect study was conducted to test the hypothesis that chemical elements from air emissions in the vicinity of International Falls, Minnesota could not be detected in lichens along a 24 km transect reaching into Voyageurs National Park. It was hypothesized that element concentrations in lichens would decline exponentially downwind and would reach background values at a distance before the park boundary. Four species (Cladina rangiferina, Evernia mesomorpha, Hypogymnia physodes, and Parmelia sulcata) were sampled at ten sites for 3 years and 17 chemical elements were measured. The most notable result was a curvilinear geographic trend for many elements, which decreased from International Falls and then increased towards the park. This trend was significant for many anthropogenic elements, including S, Hg, Cd, and Cr, and for all four species. This type of distribution pattern has been observed in Hypogymnia physodes in other studies downwind of a steel mill and an oil refinery. Cladina, a ground-dwelling lichen, generally had lower tissue concentrations of the elements than the three epiphytic species. Tissue concentrations over the 3 years of sampling declined an average of 12%. Sufficient evidence exists to conclude that lichen tissue element concentrations in the vicinity of International Falls may be related to local air emissions, and that an exponential decline of element concentrations downwind of the sources does not apply to this situation.

  8. Chemical studies of elements with Z ⩾ 104 in gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Türler, Andreas; Eichler, Robert; Yakushev, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    Chemical investigations of superheavy elements in the gas-phase, i.e. elements with Z ≥ 104, allow assessing the influence of relativistic effects on their chemical properties. Furthermore, for some superheavy elements and their compounds quite unique gas-phase chemical properties were predicted. The experimental verification of these properties yields supporting evidence for a firm assignment of the atomic number. Prominent examples are the high volatility observed for HsO4 or the very weak interaction of Cn with gold surfaces. The unique properties of HsO4 were exploited to discover the doubly-magic even-even nucleus 270Hs and the new isotope 271Hs. The combination of kinematic pre-separation and gas-phase chemistry allowed gaining access to a new class of relatively fragile compounds, the carbonyl complexes of elements Sg through Mt. A not yet resolved issue concerns the interaction of Fl with gold surfaces. While competing experiments agree on the fact that Fl is a volatile element, there are discrepancies concerning its adsorption on gold surfaces with respect to its daughter Cn. The elucidation of these and other questions amounts to the fascination that gas-phase chemical investigations exert on current research at the extreme limits of chemistry today.

  9. Chemical Evolution of R-process Elements in the Hierarchical Galaxy Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komiya, Yutaka; Shigeyama, Toshikazu

    2016-08-01

    The main astronomical source of r-process elements has not yet been identified. One plausible site is neutron star mergers (NSMs). From the perspective of Galactic chemical evolution, however, it has been pointed out that the NSM scenario is incompatible with observations. Recently, Tsujimoto & Shigeyama (2014) pointed out that NSM ejecta can spread into much larger volume than ejecta from a supernova. We re-examine the chemical evolution of r-process elements under the NSM scenario considering this difference in propagation of the ejecta. We find that the NSM scenario can be compatible with the observed abundances of the Milky Way halo stars.

  10. FINITE ELEMENT IMPLEMENTATION OF MECHANO-CHEMICAL PHENOMENA IN NEUTRAL DEFORMABLE POROUS MEDIA UNDER FINITE DEFORMATION

    PubMed Central

    ATESHIAN, GERARD A.; ALBRO, MICHAEL B.; MAAS, STEVE; WEISS, JEFFREY A.

    2012-01-01

    Biological soft tissues and cells may be subjected to mechanical as well as chemical (osmotic) loading under their natural physiological environment or various experimental conditions. The interaction of mechanical and chemical effects may be very significant under some of these conditions, yet the highly nonlinear nature of the set of governing equations describing these mechanisms poses a challenge for the modeling of such phenomena. This study formulated and implemented a finite element algorithm for analyzing mechano-chemical events in neutral deformable porous media under finite deformation. The algorithm employed the framework of mixture theory to model the porous permeable solid matrix and interstitial fluid, where the fluid consists of a mixture of solvent and solute. A special emphasis was placed on solute-solid matrix interactions, such as solute exclusion from a fraction of the matrix pore space (solubility) and frictional momentum exchange that produces solute hindrance and pumping under certain dynamic loading conditions. The finite element formulation implemented full coupling of mechanical and chemical effects, providing a framework where material properties and response functions may depend on solid matrix strain as well as solute concentration. The implementation was validated using selected canonical problems for which analytical or alternative numerical solutions exist. This finite element code includes a number of unique features that enhance the modeling of mechano-chemical phenomena in biological tissues. The code is available in the public domain, open source finite element program FEBio (http://mrl.sci.utah.edu/software). PMID:21950898

  11. Melting points and chemical bonding properties of 3d transition metal elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahara, Wataru

    2014-08-01

    The melting points of 3d transition metal elements show an unusual local minimal peak at manganese across Period 4 in the periodic table. The chemical bonding properties of scandium, titanium, vanadium, chromium, manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel and copper are investigated by the DV-Xα cluster method. The melting points are found to correlate with the bond overlap populations. The chemical bonding nature therefore appears to be the primary factor governing the melting points.

  12. Simulating the Changes of Minerals and Elements under Chemical Weathering by Acid Hydrothermal Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, F.; Chen, H.

    2013-12-01

    In paleoenvironmental research, previous investigations reveal that the intensity of chemical weathering can be inferred from the elemental variations of marine or lacustrine sediments. Different kinds of rocks from Taiwan were applied in hydrothermal experiments to simulate element proportions and leaching sequence under chemical weathering. In our experiments, powder samples (2g) are treated in sulfuric acid solutions (20 ml) of 0.05M and 0.5M at 150°C for 1, 4, 7, 14, 30 and 60 days, respectively. We can further discuss mineral alteration and relative elemental migration according to the experimental results. There is no obvious variation in mineral phase and element at 0.05M, but the results of 0.5M have significant variations. The elemental contents are affected by the mineral leaching and secondary mineral deposited, so we use XRD and SEM to identify the existence of secondary minerals and their compositions. Our research exhibits that K/Rb, Ti/Al and Rb/Sr ratios show similar trend in most parent rocks (i.e. granite, andesite, quartz sandstone, calcite sandstone and mudstone) at 0.5M long-term experiments; however, the CIA value, was generally used as the proxy of chemical weathering, keep in a stable condition. The K/Rb and Ti/Al ratio increase, but Rb/Sr ratio decreases. In contrast, the actinolite schist and serpentinite show the different result. It is probably caused by the major mineral, chlorite and serpentinite in the rocks. We conclude that the major element Ti is relatively stable. Therefore, we use each element divided by Ti for judging relatively enriched or depleted under chemical weathering processes. Finally, we find that K/Rb ratio, which has obvious variations, is seldom influenced by mineral assemblage, so it can be regarded as a suitable weathering proxy.

  13. Chemical stability of seven years aged cement-PET composite waste form containing radioactive borate waste simulates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, H. M.; Tawfik, M. E.; Bayoumi, T. A.

    2011-04-01

    Different samples of radioactive borate waste simulate [originating from pressurized water reactors (PWR)] have been prepared and solidified after mixing with cement-water extended polyester composite (CPC). The polymer-cement composite samples were prepared from recycled poly (ethylene terephthalate) (PET) waste and cement paste (water/cement ratio of 40%). The prepared samples were left to set at room temperature (25 °C ± 5) under humid conditions. After 28 days curing time the obtained specimens were kept in their molds to age for 7 years under ambient conditions. Cement-polymer composite waste form specimens (CPCW) have been subjected to leach tests for both 137Cs and 60Co radionuclides according to the method proposed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Leaching tests were justified under various factors that may exist within the disposal site (e.g. type of leachant, surrounding temperature, leachant behavior, the leachant volume to CPCW surface area…). The obtained data after 260 days of leaching revealed that after 7 years of aging the candidate cement-polymer composite (CPC) containing radioactive borate waste samples are characterized by adequate chemical stability required for the long-term disposal process.

  14. Advanced radiometric complex for detection of radioactive release from Siberian chemical combine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolotkov, Gennady A.; Penin, Sergei T.

    2015-11-01

    The paper states limited availability of the use of the automated radiation situation monitoring system and proposes radiometric complex as more reliable system in the case of an accidental release of the Siberian Chemical Enterprises.

  15. Applications of the Method of Space-Time Conservation Element and the Solution Element to Unsteady Chemically Reactive Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Sheng-Tao

    2001-01-01

    This document reports the conclusion and findings of our research activities for this grant. The goal of the project is the development and application of the method of Space-Time Conservation Element and Solution Element, or the CE/SE method, to simulate chemically reacting flows. The product of this project will be a high-fidelity, time-accurate flow solver analyzing unsteady flow fields advanced propulsion concepts, including the low-emission turbojet engine combustion and flow fields of the Pulse Detonation Engines (PDE). Based on the documents and computer software of the CE/SE method that we have received from the CE/SE working group at NASA Lewis, we have focused our research effort on addressing outstanding technical issues related to the extension of the CE/SE method for unsteady, chemically reactive flows. In particular, we have made progresses in the following three aspects: (1) Derivation of the governing equations for reacting flows; (2) Numerical treatments of stiff source terms; and (3) Detailed simulations of ZND detonation waves.

  16. Simultaneous topographic and elemental chemical and magnetic contrast in scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, Volker; Preissner, Curt A; Hla, Saw-Wai; Wang, Kangkang; Rosenmann, Daniel

    2014-09-30

    A method and system for performing simultaneous topographic and elemental chemical and magnetic contrast analysis in a scanning, tunneling microscope. The method and system also includes nanofabricated coaxial multilayer tips with a nanoscale conducting apex and a programmable in-situ nanomanipulator to fabricate these tips and also to rotate tips controllably.

  17. Chemical Identification of a Long-Lived Isotope of Dubnium, a Descendant of Element 115

    SciTech Connect

    Stoyer, N J; Landrum, J H; Wilk, P A; Moody, K J; Kenneally, J M; Shaughnessy, D A; Stoyer, M A; Wild, J F; Lougheed, R W; Dmitriev, S N; Oganessian, Y T; Shishkin, S V; Aksenov, N V; Tereshatov, E E; Bozhikov, G A; Vostokin, G K; Utyonkov, V K; Yeremin, A A

    2006-09-26

    The recognition criterion for discovery of a new chemical element includes two aspects, the characterization properties and the assignment properties. In this paper, we will discuss the status of element 115 experiments that have been performed in Dubna, Russia, highlighting the characterization and assignment properties as they specifically relate to a recent experiment. After discussing the status of what is known about the decay properties of element 115 [1], observed previously using the Dubna Gas-Filled Recoil Separator, we will discuss the prior chemical studies that have been performed on the Db descendant of element 115 [2]. Following the success of that experiment, some additional chemical information was desired. Two separation chemistries were then developed at LLNL and JINR. LLNL utilized reversed phase chromatography and JINR utilized anion exchange chromatography to perform not only +4/+5 separations, but also intra-group separations, where Nb-like and Ta-like fractions were eluted. The results from an experiment using these chemistries for the first time during December 2005 in Dubna, Russia, will be compared with prior chemical results. We will conclude with a discussion of possible enhancements to the work already performed and the current status of the future experimental plans.

  18. A Game-Based Approach to Learning the Idea of Chemical Elements and Their Periodic Classification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franco-Mariscal, Antonio Joaquín; Oliva-Martínez, José María; Blanco-López, Ángel; España-Ramos, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the characteristics and results of a teaching unit based on the use of educational games to learn the idea of chemical elements and their periodic classification in secondary education are analyzed. The method is aimed at Spanish students aged 15-16 and consists of 24 1-h sessions. The results obtained on implementing the teaching…

  19. Chemical elements diffusion in the stainless steel components brazed with Cu-Ag alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voiculescu, I.; Geanta, V.; Vasile, I. M.; Binchiciu, E. F.; Winestoock, R.

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents the study of diffusion of chemical elements through a brazing joint, between two thin components (0.5mm) made of stainless steel 304. An experimental brazing filler material has been used for brazing stainless steel component and then the diffusion phenomenon has been studied, in terms of chemical element displacement from the brazed separation interface. The filler material is in the form of a metal rod coated with ceramic slurry mixture of minerals, containing precursors and metallic powders, which can contribute to the formation of deposit brazed. In determining the distance of diffusion of chemical elements, on both sides of the fusion line, were performed measurements of the chemical composition using electron microscopy SEM and EDX spectrometry. Metallographic analysis of cross sections was performed with the aim of highlight the microstructural characteristics of brazed joints, for estimate the wetting capacity, adherence of filler metal and highlight any imperfections. Analyzes performed showed the penetration of alloying elements from the solder (Ag, Cu, Zn and Sn) towards the base material (stainless steel), over distances up to 60 microns.

  20. Serum chemical elements and oxidative status in Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson disease and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Alimonti, Alessandro; Ristori, Giovanni; Giubilei, Franco; Stazi, Maria Antonia; Pino, Anna; Visconti, Andrea; Brescianini, Sonia; Sepe Monti, Micaela; Forte, Giovanni; Stanzione, Paolo; Bocca, Beatrice; Bomboi, Giuseppe; D'Ippolito, Cristina; Annibali, Viviana; Salvetti, Marco; Sancesario, Giuseppe

    2007-05-01

    The role of some chemical elements in neurodegeneration was suggested by various authors. To obtain a profile of chemical elements and oxidative status in complex neurological diseases, an unbiased "omics" approach, i.e., quantification of 26 elements and oxidative stress parameters (serum oxidative status (SOS) and serum anti-oxidant capacity (SAC)), combined with multivariate statistical procedures (forward discriminant analysis, FDA) to analyse the vast amount of data, was applied to four groups of subjects (53 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), 71 with Parkinson disease (PD), 60 with multiple sclerosis (MS) and 124 healthy individuals). Descriptive statistics revealed numerous differences between each disease and healthy status. A concordant imbalance (reduction in Fe, Zn and SAC, and increase in SOS) was shared by AD, PD and MS. The FDA yielded three significant discriminant functions based on age, SOS, Ca, Fe, Si, Sn, V, Zn and Zr, and identified disease-specific profiles of element imbalances, thus showing the appropriateness of the "omics" approach. It may help assess the contribution of chemical elements and oxidative stress to disease causation and may provide complex predictors of disease evolution or treatment response.

  1. Methods for chemical recovery of non-carrier-added radioactive tin from irradiated intermetallic Ti-Sb targets

    DOEpatents

    Lapshina, Elena V.; Zhuikov, Boris L.; Srivastava, Suresh C.; Ermolaev, Stanislav V.; Togaeva, Natalia R.

    2012-01-17

    The invention provides a method of chemical recovery of no-carrier-added radioactive tin (NCA radiotin) from intermetallide TiSb irradiated with accelerated charged particles. An irradiated sample of TiSb can be dissolved in acidic solutions. Antimony can be removed from the solution by extraction with dibutyl ether. Titanium in the form of peroxide can be separated from tin using chromatography on strong anion-exchange resin. In another embodiment NCA radiotin can be separated from iodide solution containing titanium by extraction with benzene, toluene or chloroform. NCA radiotin can be finally purified from the remaining antimony and other impurities using chromatography on silica gel. NCA tin-117m can be obtained from this process. NCA tin-117m can be used for labeling organic compounds and biological objects to be applied in medicine for imaging and therapy of various diseases.

  2. Determination of radioactive elements and heavy metals in sediments and soil from domestic water sources in northern peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Bashir G; Jaafar, Mohammad Suhaimi; Abdul Rahman, Azhar; Ingawa, Farouk Abdulrasheed

    2012-08-01

    Soil serves as a major reservoir for contaminants as it posseses an ability to bind various chemicals together. To safeguard the members of the public from an unwanted exposure, studies were conducted on the sediments and soil from water bodies that form the major sources of domestic water supply in northern peninsular Malaysia for their trace element concentration levels. Neutron Activation Analysis, using Nigeria Research Reactor-1 (NIRR-1) located at the Centre for Energy Research and Training, Zaria, Nigeria was employed as the analytical tool. The elements identified in major quantities include Na, K, and Fe while As, Br, Cr, U, Th, Eu, Cs, Co, La, Sm, Yb, Sc, Zn, Rb, Ba, Lu, Hf, Ta, and Sb were also identified in trace quantities. Gamma spectroscopy was also employed to analyze some soil samples from the same area. The results indicated safe levels in terms of the radium equivalent activity, external hazard index as well as the mean external exposure dose rates from the soil. The overall screening of the domestic water sources with relatively high heavy metals concentration values in sediments and high activity concentration values in soil is strongly recommended as their accumulation overtime as a consequence of leaching into the water may be of health concern to the members of the public. PMID:21901308

  3. Determination of radioactive elements and heavy metals in sediments and soil from domestic water sources in northern peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Bashir G; Jaafar, Mohammad Suhaimi; Abdul Rahman, Azhar; Ingawa, Farouk Abdulrasheed

    2012-08-01

    Soil serves as a major reservoir for contaminants as it posseses an ability to bind various chemicals together. To safeguard the members of the public from an unwanted exposure, studies were conducted on the sediments and soil from water bodies that form the major sources of domestic water supply in northern peninsular Malaysia for their trace element concentration levels. Neutron Activation Analysis, using Nigeria Research Reactor-1 (NIRR-1) located at the Centre for Energy Research and Training, Zaria, Nigeria was employed as the analytical tool. The elements identified in major quantities include Na, K, and Fe while As, Br, Cr, U, Th, Eu, Cs, Co, La, Sm, Yb, Sc, Zn, Rb, Ba, Lu, Hf, Ta, and Sb were also identified in trace quantities. Gamma spectroscopy was also employed to analyze some soil samples from the same area. The results indicated safe levels in terms of the radium equivalent activity, external hazard index as well as the mean external exposure dose rates from the soil. The overall screening of the domestic water sources with relatively high heavy metals concentration values in sediments and high activity concentration values in soil is strongly recommended as their accumulation overtime as a consequence of leaching into the water may be of health concern to the members of the public.

  4. Radiochemical Separation of Group 5 Elements. Model Experiments for Investigation of Dubnium Chemical Behaviour

    SciTech Connect

    Tereshatov, E. E.; Bozhikov, G. A.; Aksenov, N. V.; Starodub, G. Ya.; Vostokin, G. K.; Shishkin, S. V.; Dmitriev, S. N.; Bruchertseifer, H.; Gaeggeler, H. W.

    2007-05-22

    Chemical behaviour of group 5 elements in the aqueous hydrofluoric acid solutions was studied. The radiochemical method for the cation exchange separation of Nb (Pa) and Ta from Zr, Hf and lanthanides is presented. The developed scheme allows excluding of the presence of SF heavy actinides in fractions of separated elements. On the basis of the data of the present work, it is possible to suggest the following order of the stability of the fluoride complexes of group 4 and 5 elements: Nb {approx_equal} Pa > Zr > Hf > Ta. The order of the complex formation is in agreement with theoretical predictions. This analytical procedure can be used in future heavy nuclei synthesis experiments for the separation of dubnium (Db) from other reactions products and for its chemical identification.

  5. Neutron Capture Elements in the Open Cluster Chemical Abundance & Mapping (OCCAM) Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, Julia; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Hearty, Fred R.; Majewski, Steven R.; Zasowski, Gail; Sdss /Apogee-1, III

    2015-01-01

    The Open Cluster Chemical Abundance & Mapping (OCCAM) survey is a systematic survey of Galactic open clusters using data primarily from the SDSS-III/APOGEE-1 survey. The high-resolution (R=22,500), near-infrared (H-band) APOGEE-1 survey allows for cluster membership probability determination and analysis of light and iron-peak elements. Neutron capture elements, however, prove to be elusive in the IR region covered by APOGEE. In an effort to fully study detailed Galactic chemical evolution, we conducted a high resolution (R~60,000) spectroscopic abundance analysis of neutron capture elements for OCCAM clusters in the optical regime to complement the APOGEE results. We present results based on prominent resonance lines for Eu, La, Ba, and Ce in the ~5400-6750 AA range using data obtained at McDonald Observatory with the 2.1m Otto Struve telescope and Sandiford Echelle Spectrograph.

  6. Chemical Differentiation of Osseous, Dental, and Non-skeletal Materials in Forensic Anthropology using Elemental Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Heather A; Meizel-Lambert, Cayli J; Schultz, John J; Sigman, Michael E

    2015-03-01

    Forensic anthropologists are generally able to identify skeletal materials (bone and tooth) using gross anatomical features; however, highly fragmented or taphonomically altered materials may be problematic to identify. Several chemical analysis techniques have been shown to be reliable laboratory methods that can be used to determine if questionable fragments are osseous, dental, or non-skeletal in nature. The purpose of this review is to provide a detailed background of chemical analysis techniques focusing on elemental compositions that have been assessed for use in differentiating osseous, dental, and non-skeletal materials. More recently, chemical analysis studies have also focused on using the elemental composition of osseous/dental materials to evaluate species and provide individual discrimination, but have generally been successful only in small, closed groups, limiting their use forensically. Despite significant advances incorporating a variety of instruments, including handheld devices, further research is necessary to address issues in standardization, error rates, and sample size/diversity.

  7. Chemical Differentiation of Osseous, Dental, and Non-skeletal Materials in Forensic Anthropology using Elemental Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Heather A; Meizel-Lambert, Cayli J; Schultz, John J; Sigman, Michael E

    2015-03-01

    Forensic anthropologists are generally able to identify skeletal materials (bone and tooth) using gross anatomical features; however, highly fragmented or taphonomically altered materials may be problematic to identify. Several chemical analysis techniques have been shown to be reliable laboratory methods that can be used to determine if questionable fragments are osseous, dental, or non-skeletal in nature. The purpose of this review is to provide a detailed background of chemical analysis techniques focusing on elemental compositions that have been assessed for use in differentiating osseous, dental, and non-skeletal materials. More recently, chemical analysis studies have also focused on using the elemental composition of osseous/dental materials to evaluate species and provide individual discrimination, but have generally been successful only in small, closed groups, limiting their use forensically. Despite significant advances incorporating a variety of instruments, including handheld devices, further research is necessary to address issues in standardization, error rates, and sample size/diversity. PMID:25753999

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: ASPCAP weights for the 15 APOGEE chemical elements (Garcia+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Perez, A. E.; Allende Prieto, C.; Holtzman, J. A.; Shetrone, M.; Meszaros, S.; Bizyaev, D.; Carrera, R.; Cunha, K.; Garcia-Hernandez, D. A.; Johnson, J. A.; Majewski, S. R.; Nidever, D. L.; Schiavon, R. P.; Shane, N.; Smith, V. V.; Sobeck, J.; Troup, N.; Zamora, O.; Weinberg, D. H.; Bovy, J.; Eisenstein, D. J.; Feuillet, D.; Frinchaboy, P. M.; Hayden, M. R.; Hearty, F. R.; Nguyen, D. C.; O'Connell, R. W.; Pinsonneault, M. H.; Wilson, J. C.; Zasowski, G.

    2016-07-01

    The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) has built the largest moderately high-resolution (R~22500) spectroscopic map of the stars across the Milky Way, and including dust-obscured areas. The APOGEE Stellar Parameter and Chemical Abundances Pipeline (ASPCAP) is the software developed for the automated analysis of these spectra. The pipeline matches the observations to a set of synthetic spectrum templates using the {chi}2 minimization in a multidimensional parameter space. Stellar parameters are derived first from the entire APOGEE spectral range, followed by the determination of individual chemical abundances from spectral windows optimized for each element. Table3 gives the weights as a function of wavelength, for the 15 APOGEE chemical elements. (1 data file).

  9. Abnormal chemical element concentrations in lichens of Isle Royale National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennett, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    Lichens have been used for many years to monitor changes in deposited airborne chemical elements in many areas, but few studies have focused on areas suspected of experiencing slightly elevated pollution. Detection of subtle patterns of slightly elevated pollutants calls for developing several lines of evidence as opposed to single line studies used in heavily polluted areas. This study of two lichen species, Hypogymnia physodes and Evernia mesomorpha, in Isle Royale National Park, Michigan compares the concentrations and ranks of elements with the concentrations and ranks of the elements in the earth's crust, changes in element concentrations over a nine year period, and the geography of element concentrations in the park. S, Zn, Pb, Cd and Se were elevated in both species and higher in rank compared to the concentrations and ranks in the earth's crust. Toxic elements increased 123% in Hypogymnia and 62% in Evernia over 9 years, compared to increases of 45% and 59% for non-toxic elements in each species, respectively. Geographically, the lichens at certain localities with higher exposures experienced higher than average element concentrations. Finally, tissue concentrations of Mn, S and Se at some localities were above levels known to be either toxic or similar to those found in polluted areas. These four lines of evidence suggest that Isle Royale National Park is experiencing the onset of chronic air pollution stress from a number of sources.

  10. The uses of synchrotron radiation sources for elemental and chemical microanalysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, J.R.; Chao, E.C.T.; Minkin, J.A.; Back, J.M.; Jones, K.W.; Rivers, M.L.; Sutton, S.R.

    1990-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation sources offer important features for the analysis of a material. Among these features is the ability to determine both the elemental composition of the material and the chemical state of its elements. For microscopic analysis synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) microprobes now offer spatial resolutions of 10 ??m with minimum detection limits in the 1-10 ppm range depending on the nature of the sample and the synchrotron source used. This paper describes the properties of synchrotron radiation and their importance for elemental analysis, existing synchrotron facilities and those under construction that are optimum for SXRF microanalysis, and a number of applications including the high energy excitation of the K lines of heavy elements, microtomography, and XANES and EXAFS spectroscopies. ?? 1990.

  11. The uses of synchrotron radiation sources for elemental and chemical microanalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.R.; Chao, E.C.T.; Minkin, J.A.; Back, J.M.; Jones, K.W.; Rivers, M.L.; Sutton, S.R.; Geological Survey, Reston, VA; Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY )

    1989-08-01

    Synchrotron radiation sources offer important features for the analysis of a material. Among these features is the ability to determine both the elemental composition of the material and the chemical state of its elements. For microscopic analysis synchrotron x-ray fluorescence (SXRF) microprobes now offer spatial resolutions of 10{mu}m with minimum detection limits in the 1--10 ppM range depending on the nature of the sample and the synchrotron source used. This paper describes the properties of synchrotron radiation and their importance for elemental analysis, existing synchrotron facilities and those under construction that are optimum for SXRF microanalysis, and a number of applications including the high energy excitation of the K lines of heavy elements, microtomography, and XANES and EXAFS spectroscopies. 45 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Methods of chemical analysis for organic waste constituents in radioactive materials: A literature review

    SciTech Connect

    Clauss, S.A.; Bean, R.M.

    1993-02-01

    Most of the waste generated during the production of defense materials at Hanford is presently stored in 177 underground tanks. Because of the many waste treatment processes used at Hanford, the operations conducted to move and consolidate the waste, and the long-term storage conditions at elevated temperatures and radiolytic conditions, little is known about most of the organic constituents in the tanks. Organics are a factor in the production of hydrogen from storage tank 101-SY and represent an unresolved safety question in the case of tanks containing high organic carbon content. In preparation for activities that will lead to the characterization of organic components in Hanford waste storage tanks, a thorough search of the literature has been conducted to identify those procedures that have been found useful for identifying and quantifying organic components in radioactive matrices. The information is to be used in the planning of method development activities needed to characterize the organics in tank wastes and will prevent duplication of effort in the development of needed methods.

  13. Natural radioactivity levels and heavy metals in chemical and organic fertilizers used in Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    El-Taher, A; Althoyaib, S S

    2012-01-01

    The present work deals with identifying and determining the activity levels of natural occuring radionuclides, (226)Ra and (232)Th series, their decay products and (40)K, in chemical and organic fertilizers used in Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. A total of 30 samples: 20 phosphatic fertilizers (single super-phosphate SSP and triple super-phosphate,TSP) and 10 organic fertilizers (cow, sheep and chicken) collected from markets and farms. The gamma-ray spectrometer consists of NaI(Tl) detector and its electronic circuit was used for measuring γ-ray spectra. The ranges of radioactivity levels of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K in chemical fertilizers are 51.5±5.2-106.3±7.5, 5.1±1.6-9.9±3.2. and 462.6±21-607.3±14Bqkg(-1), respectively. The activities of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K in natural fertilizers (cow, sheep and chicken) are lower than the activities in chemical fertilizers. The obtained data are compared with available reported data from other countries in literature. The Ra(eq) in chemical fertilizer ranges from 100.37 to 161.43Bqkg(-1) and in organic fertilizer ranges from 34.07 to 102.19Bqkg(-1), which are lower than the limit of 370Bqkg(-1) adopted from NEA-OECD (1979). The average heavy metal (Pb, Cd, Ni, Co and Cr) contents of the fertilizers marketed in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia are also determined and within the limits of those used worldwide.

  14. Chemical speciation and leaching properties of elements in municipal incinerator ashes

    SciTech Connect

    Kida, Akiko; Noma, Yukio; Imada, Teruji

    1996-12-31

    Different chemical properties of bottom ash and fly ash from municipal solid waste incinerators were compared based on the results of the five measuring techniques: (1) total contents and leaching amounts by regulatory leaching test in Japan; (2) leaching properties by pH-dependent leaching test; (3) modeling of pH-dependent leaching test using model compounds; (4) enriched chemical composition compared with bulk composition by an X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS); (5) estimation of chemical states of elements by XPS analysis. The difference between bottom ash and EP ash was clearly found in element content, leaching behavior and release rate. The release rates of many elements in bottom ash were lower than in electrostatic precipitation (EP) ash even in an acidic condition of pH 3 as well as at the inherent pH of 12. Corresponding to the relatively complicated components in bottom ash, leaching patterns depending on pH were not simple. Comparison between the pH-dependent pattern of Ca in a sample and in model compounds resulted in the estimation of some Ca compounds in ash. The surface analysis by XPS showed results that Na, Cl, Zn, Pb and S were enriched in EP ash and Fe and Ti were rarely found in the surface of ash. Possible chemical states of Na, Ca, K, Cl and S were estimated by a new method of comparing binding energies of standard compounds and their mixtures.

  15. Influence of chemical composition of precipitation on migration of radioactive caesium in natural soils.

    PubMed

    Thørring, H; Skuterud, L; Steinnes, E

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the present work was to study the impact of the chemical composition of precipitation on radiocaesium mobility in natural soil. This was done through column studies. Three types of precipitation regimes were studied, representing a natural range found in Norway: Acidic precipitation (southernmost part of the country); precipitation rich in marine cations (highly oceanic coastal areas); and low concentrations of sea salts (slightly continental inland areas). After 50 weeks and a total precipitation supply of ∼10 000 L m(-2) per column, results indicate that acidic precipitation increased the mobility of (134)Cs added during the experiment. However, depth distribution of already present Chernobyl fallout (137)Cs was not significantly affected by the chemical composition of precipitation. PMID:24704765

  16. Influence of chemical composition of precipitation on migration of radioactive caesium in natural soils.

    PubMed

    Thørring, H; Skuterud, L; Steinnes, E

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the present work was to study the impact of the chemical composition of precipitation on radiocaesium mobility in natural soil. This was done through column studies. Three types of precipitation regimes were studied, representing a natural range found in Norway: Acidic precipitation (southernmost part of the country); precipitation rich in marine cations (highly oceanic coastal areas); and low concentrations of sea salts (slightly continental inland areas). After 50 weeks and a total precipitation supply of ∼10 000 L m(-2) per column, results indicate that acidic precipitation increased the mobility of (134)Cs added during the experiment. However, depth distribution of already present Chernobyl fallout (137)Cs was not significantly affected by the chemical composition of precipitation.

  17. The geochemical role of phyto- and zooplankton in the extraction of chemical elements from water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chebotina, M. J.; Polyakov, E. V.; Guseva, V. P.; Khlebnikov, N. A.; Surikov, V. T.

    2011-08-01

    This paper provides for the first time comparative assessment of the contents of 70 chemical elements occurring in the aquatic environment in water, phytoplankton, and zooplankton. The assessment was made using modern highly sensitive methods. The studies were performed at Beloyarskoe Reservoir, a manmade freshwater lake situated in the Middle Urals that has been studied in detail. The chemical elements were ranked in groups differing in the accumulation coefficient (AC) values for the phyto- and zooplankton. The comparison revealed that for the vast majority of chemical elements, the AC values were higher in zooplankton (53, or 76%) than in phytoplankton (17, or 24%). The average AC values for zooplankton (˜740 000) exceeded that for phytoplankton (˜68 000) by more than 10 times. It was found that some elements had very high AC values in zooplankton compared to phytoplankton. For instance for Nb, the ratio ACzoo/ACphyto was 1 200 000; for B, Ta, Sn, Lu, U, 300 000-500 000; for Sb and Y, 100 000-130 000; for La and Nd, 80 000-85 000; for Mo, Cd, Pr, Gd, Dy, Sc, Se, Bi, 20 000-30 000; and for Pd, Hf, Sm, Sb, Er, As, 10 000-20 000. It is concluded that zooplankton is sometimes more suitable for the biogeochemical indication of the pollution of natural water bodies, because the AC values for most elements are much higher in zooplankton than in phytoplankton and the total plankton. Considering the high assimilability of microelements and radionuclides, the plankton may serve not only as an indication but also as the mean of regulated purification of waterbodies from these elements.

  18. Chemical properties of the transactinide elements studied inliquid phase with SISAK

    SciTech Connect

    Omtvedt, J.P.; Alstad, J.; Bjornstad, T.; Dullmann, Ch.E.; Gregorich, K.E.; Hoffman, D.C.; Nitsche, H.; Opel, K.; Polakova, D.; Samadani, F.; Schulz, F.; Skarnemark, G.; Stavsetra, L.; Sudowe, R.; Zheng, L.

    2007-05-01

    This article starts with a review of the current SISAKliquid-liquid extraction system, as used after the physical preseparatorBGS at LBNL for chemical studies of transactinide elements. Emphasis willbe on new additions and developments. Then the possibilities offered bythe new TASCA separator at GSI and the use of actinide targets at bothGSI and LBNL are discussed with respect to future SISAK transactinideexperiments. Finally, current and future liquid-liquid extraction systemsfor studying elements Rf up to Hs are discussed.

  19. Magnetically assisted chemical separation (MACS) process: Preparation and optimization of particles for removal of transuranic elements

    SciTech Connect

    Nunez, L.; Kaminski, M.; Bradley, C.; Buchholz, B.A.; Aase, S.B.; Tuazon, H.E.; Vandegrift, G.F.; Landsberger, S.

    1995-05-01

    The Magnetically Assisted Chemical Separation (MACS) process combines the selectivity afforded by solvent extractants with magnetic separation by using specially coated magnetic particles to provide a more efficient chemical separation of transuranic (TRU) elements, other radionuclides, and heavy metals from waste streams. Development of the MACS process uses chemical and physical techniques to elucidate the properties of particle coatings and the extent of radiolytic and chemical damage to the particles, and to optimize the stages of loading, extraction, and particle regeneration. This report describes the development of a separation process for TRU elements from various high-level waste streams. Polymer-coated ferromagnetic particles with an adsorbed layer of octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) diluted with tributyl phosphate (TBP) were evaluated for use in the separation and recovery of americium and plutonium from nuclear waste solutions. Due to their chemical nature, these extractants selectively complex americium and plutonium contaminants onto the particles, which can then be recovered from the solution by using a magnet. The partition coefficients were larger than those expected based on liquid[liquid extractions, and the extraction proceeded with rapid kinetics. Extractants were stripped from the particles with alcohols and 400-fold volume reductions were achieved. Particles were more sensitive to acid hydrolysis than to radiolysis. Overall, the optimization of a suitable NMCS particle for TRU separation was achieved under simulant conditions, and a MACS unit is currently being designed for an in-lab demonstration.

  20. Chemical cleaning of porous stainless steel cross-flow filter elements for nuclear waste applications

    SciTech Connect

    Billing, Justin M.; Daniel, Richard C.; Hallen, Richard T.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2011-05-10

    The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) currently under construction for treatment of High-Level Waste (HLW) at the Hanford Site will rely on cross-flow ultrafiltration to provide solids-liquid separation as a core part of the treatment process. To optimize process throughput, periodic chemical cleaning of the porous stainless steel filter elements has been incorporated into the design of the plant. It is currently specified that chemical cleaning with nitric acid will occur after significant irreversible membrane fouling is observed. Irreversible fouling is defined as fouling that cannot be removed by backpulsing the filter. PNNL has investigated chemical cleaning processes as part of integrated tests with HLW simulants and with actual Hanford tank wastes. To quantify the effectiveness of chemical cleaning, the residual membrane resistance after cleaning was compared against the initial membrane resistance for each test in a series of long-term fouling tests. The impact of the small amount of residual resistance in these tests could not be separated from other parameters and the historical benchmark of >1 GPM/ft2 for clean water flux was determined to be an adequate metric for chemical cleaning. Using the results from these tests, a process optimization strategy is presented suggesting that for the simulant material under test, the value of chemical cleaning may be suspect. The period of enhanced filtration may not be enough to offset the down time required for chemical cleaning, without respect to the other associated costs.

  1. The age of the Galactic disk - Inflow, chemical evolution, astration, and radioactivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, Donald D.

    1989-01-01

    Theoretical models of Galactic evolution and observational data on the age of the Galaxy are compared, with a focus on recent results. Topics addressed include the infall of material and its effects on the age-metallicity relation, the distribution of metallicity, the present gas fraction and metallicity, and the age spectrum of interstellar nuclei; the chemical evolution of the solar neighborhood; the key results of nuclear cosmochronology; and astration effects on Galactic age. It is found that both nuclear cosmochronology and detailed stellar and Galactic evolution models tend to support an age of 12-16 Gyr.

  2. Energy-dependent existence of soliton in the synthesis of chemical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Yoritaka

    2015-05-01

    Light chemical elements are, for instance, produced through ion collisions taking place in the core of stars, where fusion is particularly important to the synthesis of chemical elements. Meanwhile soliton provides transparency leading to the hindrance of fusion cross-section. In order to explain high fusion cross-section actually observed in low incident energies, it is necessary to discover the suppression mechanism of soliton propagation. In this paper, based on a systematic three-dimensional time-dependent density functional calculation, the existence of soliton is examined for ion collisions with some incident energies, impact parameters, and nuclear force parameter sets. As a result, solitons are suggested to exist highly depending on the energy. The suppression of soliton is consequently due to the spin-orbit force and the momentum-dependent components of the nuclear force.

  3. Three-dimensionality of space in the structure of the periodic table of chemical elements

    SciTech Connect

    Veremeichik, T. F.

    2006-07-15

    The effect of the dimension of the 3D homogeneous and isotropic Euclidean space, and the electron spin on the self-organization of the electron systems of atoms of chemical elements is considered. It is shown that the finite dimension of space creates the possibility of periodicity in the structure of an electron cloud, while the value of the dimension determines the number of stable systems of electrons at different levels of the periodic table of chemical elements and some characteristics of the systems. The conditions for the stability of systems of electrons and the electron system of an atom as a whole are considered. On the basis of the results obtained, comparison with other hierarchical systems (nanostructures and biological structures) is performed.

  4. Stratospheric Sampling and In Situ Atmospheric Chemical Element Analysis During Meteor Showers: A Resource Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.

    2000-01-01

    Resources studies for asteroidal mining evaluation have depended historically on remote sensing analysis for chemical elements. During the November 1998 Leonids meteor shower, a stratospheric balloon and various low-density capture media were used to sample fragments from Comet Tempel-Tuttle debris during a peak Earth crossing. The analysis not only demonstrates how potential sampling strategies may improve the projections for metals or rare elements in astromining, but also benchmarks materials during low temperature (-60 F), high dessication environments as seen during atmospheric exposure. The results indicate high aluminum, magnesium and iron content for various sampled particles recovered, but generalization to the sporadic meteors expected from asteroidal sources will require future improvements in larger sampling volumes before a broad-use strategy for chemical analysis can be described. A repeat of the experimental procedure is planned for the November 1999 Leonids' shower, and various improvements for atmospheric sampling will be discussed.

  5. CRMs for quality control of determinations of chemical forms of elements in support to EU legislation.

    PubMed

    Quevauviller, P

    1996-03-01

    The concern for the control of toxic chemical forms of elements in the environment is reflected by an increasing number of analyses performed by research and routine laboratories. The European Commission has recognised the need to include some of these species in the list of dangerous substances to be monitored, e.g. in the marine environment or in groundwater. However, in most cases, the specifications are far from being sufficient in respect to the chemical forms of the element to be determined. Furthermore, these determinations are in most cases based on multi-step analytical techniques which are often prone to errors (e.g. at the extraction, derivatization or separation steps). Certified reference materials (CRMs) certified for their content in chemical forms of elements are, therefore, necessary to ensure the accuracy of these measurements and hence the respect of the regulations. However, the lack of CRMs for speciation analysis hampers the quality control of determinations which in turn leads to an incomparability of data produced; so far the number of CRMs produced by international organisations, e.g. NIST (USA), NIES (Japan), NRCC (Canada) and BCR (Belgium), is very limited and concerns mainly compounds such as e.g. methyl-mercury and butyltin compounds in biological matrices or sediments. The Standards, Measurements and Testing Programme (formerly BCR) of the European Commission has started a series of projects for the improvement of speciation analysis in environmental matrices, the final aim of which being the production of a variety of environmental CRMs. The existing EU legislation involving chemical forms of elements is presented, the requirements for the preparation of CRMs for speciation analysis are discussed and an update of the most recent CRMs produced within the Standards, Measurements and Testing Programme (SM&T) is given.

  6. Genetic interpretations of elemental and chemical differences in a soil chronosequence, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harden, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    Soils developed on fluvial terraces in central California have similar parent materials, climatic settings, vegetation cover and slopes but range in age from 40,000 to 3,000,000 years. The soils have chemical compositions that change systematically with increasing age. Such chemical differentiation is most likely the result of long-term weathering and mineralogical transformations that occurred since deposition of terrace fills and stabilization of the geomorphic surfaces. The changes in composition with time closely mimic other studies on mineral weathering, in which alkali and alkali-earth elements are lost more rapidly than transitional elements. The relative rates of element loss were determined by changes in element ratios over time. Net losses and gains of elements in different size fractions were monitored by their concentrations relative to Zr, the most stable constituent. Both sand and finer size fractions have lost considerable amounts of Ca, Mg, Na and K. Aluminum appears to have been lost from the sand fraction and gained in the fine fraction over a 3-million-year-time-span. Although there is no evidence for losses of Fe and Ti from sands, there is a net influx of Fe and Ti into finer fractions, probably gained from undetectable yet significant weathering of sand grains. Etching of sand grains, clay mineralogy, and microprobe analyses also indicate that the soils have undergone these chemical transformations during their formation. Mineralogical analyses also mimic other studies on mineral weathering, in which the pyroxenes weather more rapidly than hornblende, which weathers more rapidly than sphene or zircon. ?? 1988.

  7. Chemical evolution of r-process elements in Draco dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitta Ishigaki, Miho; Tsujimoto, Takuji; Shigeyama, Toshikazu; Aoki, Wako

    2015-08-01

    Dwarf galaxies around the Milky Way halo are ideal laboratory of nucleosynthesis and chemical enrichments in the early universe. We studied chemical compositions including r-process elements for giant stars in Draco dwarf spheroidal galaxy based on high-resolution spectra obtained with the Subaru/HDS. Draco is known to mainly consist of old (age > 10 Gyr) and metal-poor ([Fe/H]<-1.5) stellar populations, which provides us an important insights about nucleosynthesis responsible for producing heavy elements in this galaxy. As reported in previous studies, we found that the Draco stars show enhanced [α/Fe] ratios at [Fe/H]<-2, decreasing at higher metallicity. This is consistent with an expectation that the chemical evolution is proceeded in a homogeneous manner initially by Type II and later by Type Ia supernovae. On the other hand, the [Eu/H] are constant over the metallicity range -2<[Fe/H]<-1 and low upper limits have been obtained at the lower [Fe/H]. The lack of increase in Eu abundance, despite the significant increase in Fe abundance by supernovae, implies that r-process elements were produced through much rarer events such as neutron-star mergers.

  8. Chemical Environment at Waste Package Surfaces in a High-Level Radioactive Waste Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, S; Alai, M; Craig, L; Gdowski, G; Hailey, P; Nguyen, Q A; Rard, J; Staggs, K; Sutton, M; Wolery, T

    2005-05-26

    We have conducted a series of deliquescence, boiling point, chemical transformation, and evaporation experiments to determine the composition of waters likely to contact waste package surfaces over the thermal history of the repository as it heats up and cools back down to ambient conditions. In the above-boiling period, brines will be characterized by high nitrate to chloride ratios that are stable to higher temperatures than previously predicted. This is clearly shown for the NaCl-KNO{sub 3} salt system in the deliquescence and boiling point experiments in this report. Our results show that additional thermodynamic data are needed in nitrate systems to accurately predict brine stability and composition due to salt deliquescence in dust deposited on waste package surfaces. Current YMP models capture dry-out conditions but not composition for NaCl-KNO{sub 3} brines, and they fail to predict dry-out conditions for NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3} brines. Boiling point and deliquescence experiments are needed in NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3} and NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3}-Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} systems to directly determine dry-out conditions and composition, because these salt mixtures are also predicted to control brine composition in the above-boiling period. Corrosion experiments are needed in high temperature and high NO{sub 3}:Cl brines to determine if nitrate inhibits corrosion in these concentrated brines at temperatures above 160 C. Chemical transformations appear to be important for pure calcium- and magnesium-chloride brines at temperatures greater than 120 C. This stems from a lack of acid gas volatility in NaCl/KNO{sub 3} based brines and by slow CO{sub 2}(g) diffusion in alkaline brines. This suggests that YMP corrosion models based on bulk solution experiments over the appropriate composition, temperature, and relative humidity range can be used to predict corrosion in thin brine films formed by salt deliquescence. In contrast to the above-boiling period, the

  9. New evidence for chemical fractionation of radioactive xenon precursors in fission chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshik, A. P.; Pravdivtseva, O. V.; Hohenberg, C. M.

    2016-04-01

    Mass-spectrometric analyses of Xe released from acid-treated U ore reveal that apparent Xe fission yields significantly deviate from the normal values. The anomalous Xe structure is attributed to chemically fractionated fission (CFF), previously observed only in materials experienced neutron bursts. The least retentive CFF-Xe isotopes, 136Xe and 134Xe, typically escape in 2:1 proportion. Xe retained in the sample is complimentarily depleted in these isotopes. This nucleochemical process allows understanding of unexplained Xe isotopic structures in several geophysical environments, which include well gasses, ancient anorthosite, some mantle rocks, as well as terrestrial atmosphere. CFF is likely responsible for the isotopic difference in Xe in the Earth's and Martian atmospheres and it is capable of explaining the relationship between two major solar system Xe carriers: the Sun and phase-Q, found in meteorites.

  10. Neutron Capture Elements in the Open Cluster Chemical Abundance & Mapping (OCCAM) Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, Julia; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Majewski, Steven R.; Zasowski, Gail; Hearty, Fred R.

    2016-01-01

    The Open Cluster Chemical Abundance & Mapping (OCCAM) survey is a systematic survey of Galactic open clusters using data primarily from the SDSS-III/APOGEE-1 survey. The high-resolution (R=22,500), near-infrared (H-band) APOGEE-1 survey allows for cluster membership probability determination and analysis of light and iron-peak elements. Neutron capture elements, however, prove to be elusive in the IR region covered by APOGEE. In an effort to fully study detailed Galactic chemical evolution, we conducted a high resolution (R~60,000) spectroscopic abundance analysis of neutron capture elements for OCCAM clusters in the optical regime to complement the APOGEE results. We present results for ten open clusters using data obtained at McDonald Observatory with the 2.1m Otto Struve telescope and Sandiford Echelle Spectrograph. We see abundance trends for Ba II, La II and Eu II that are consistent with Galactic abundance patterns for these elements. Ce II appears to be slightly enhanced in all program stars with a median value of ~0.1 dex and a spread of 0.5 dex for the entire sample.

  11. Effects of zinc on the content of chemical elements in the liver of rats during early stages of obesity.

    PubMed

    Churin, B V; Trunova, V A; Sidorina, A V; Zvereva, V V; Astashov, V V

    2013-12-01

    In rats with slight alimentary obesity, the content of chemical elements in the liver did not differ from normal, but the correlations between these elements were changed, which attested to metabolic disorders. Additional zinc dose administered to rats receiving lipid-rich rations did not affect animal body weights and content of chemical elements (including zinc) in the liver, but corrected correlations between the elements. Active contribution of strontium, bromine, and rubidium to interactions between the elements in the liver necessitates studies of their role in biological processes, specifically, in initiation and development of obesity.

  12. The heaviest elements

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.C. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1994-05-02

    How long does an atom need to exist before it's possible to do any meaningful chemistry on it Is it possible to learn anything at all about the reactions of an element for which no more than a few dozen atoms have ever existed simultaneously These are some of the questions colleagues in a few laboratories worldwide attempt to answer as they investigate the chemistry of the heaviest elements--elements produced one atom at a time in accelerators by bombarding radioactive targets with high-intensity beams of heavy ions. All of these elements spontaneously decay; the most stable of them have half-lives of only a few minutes, some that are less stable exist for only milliseconds. So far, no chemical studies have been performed on elements whose longest lived isotopes last only milliseconds because the difficulties of doing chemistry on this time scale under highly radioactive conditions are enormous. Over the past 10 years, however, nuclear chemists have developed new techniques or adapted existing ones to begin to probe the chemical properties of those very heavy elements that have half-lives in the range of seconds to minutes. Although the classic experiments are now nearly 40 years old, they are worth describing, as they were the first of their kind and illustrate many of the techniques that are still used and essential in studying these very short-lived, radioactive elements.

  13. Measurement of natural radioactivity in chemical fertilizer and agricultural soil: evidence of high alpha activity.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Dipak; Deb, Argha; Bera, Sukumar; Sengupta, Rosalima; Patra, Kanchan Kumar

    2008-02-01

    People are exposed to ionizing radiation from the radionuclides that are present in different types of natural sources, of which phosphate fertilizer is one of the most important sources. Radionuclides in phosphate fertilizer belonging to 232Th and 238U series as well as radioisotope of potassium (40K) are the major contributors of outdoor terrestrial natural radiation. The study of alpha activity in fertilizers, which is the first ever in West Bengal, has been performed in order to determine the effect of the use of phosphate fertilizers on human health. The data have been compared with the alpha activity of different types of chemical fertilizers. The measurement of alpha activity in surface soil samples collected from the cultivated land was also performed. The sampling sites were randomly selected in the cultivated land in the Midnapore district, which is the largest district in West Bengal. The phosphate fertilizer is widely used for large agricultural production, mainly potatoes. The alpha activities have been measured using solid-state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD), a very sensitive detector for alpha particles. The results show that alpha activity of those fertilizer and soil samples varies from 141 Bq/kg to 2,589 Bq/kg and from 109 Bq/kg to 660 Bq/kg, respectively. These results were used to estimate environmental radiation exposure on human health contributed by the direct application of fertilizers.

  14. Guidelines for generators of hazardous chemical waste at LBL and guidelines for generators of radioactive and mixed waste at LBL. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    In part one of this document the Governing Documents and Definitions sections provide general guidelines and regulations applying to the handling of hazardous chemical wastes. The remaining sections provide details on how you can prepare your waste properly for transport and disposal. They are correlated with the steps you must take to properly prepare your waste for pickup. The purpose of the second part of this document is to provide the acceptance criteria for the transfer of radioactive and mixed waste to LBL`s Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF). These guidelines describe how you, as a generator of radioactive or mixed waste, can meet LBL`s acceptance criteria for radioactive and mixed waste.

  15. Relationships between absorption efficiency of elements in mammals and chemical properties.

    PubMed

    Le, T T Yen; Hendriks, A Jan

    2013-10-01

    Oral absorption efficiency is an important factor to consider in human risk assessment and varies widely between elements. Linking absorption efficiency to chemical properties facilitates the understanding of underlying processes and enables extrapolation across elements. In our study, oral absorption efficiency in humans was predicted for a number of elements based on their ionization energy and electronegativity. Data on oral absorption efficiency in humans were retrieved via a literature survey. A model was developed based on the assumption that ionic species readily react with biotic ligands. Accordingly, ionization energy was presumed to represent the reactivity and absorption of atoms in the gastrointestinal tract. The coefficients of the model were parameterized by fitting the quantitative relationship between absorption efficiency and ionization energy to data collected from well-standardized studies. Generally, absorption efficiency was strongly related to ionization energy, explaining 94% of the variability in absorption efficiency between elements reported by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). In addition, the absorption efficiencies predicted based on ionization energy were within a factor of two of those given by the ICRP (ME = -0.05; RMSE = 0.31). However, the model is not applicable to alkaline metals and molybdenum because of the uniquely high solubility of their compounds or the flexible electron configuration of these elements. Approximately 56% of the variability in absorption efficiency between elements could be explained by electronegativity. These strong relationships between absorption efficiency and ionization energy and, to a lesser extent, electronegativity indicate potential for extrapolation across elements using atomic properties.

  16. Chemical species of metallic elements in the aquatic environment of an ex-mining catchment.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Muhammad Aqeel; Ahmad, Mushtaq; Akib, Shatirah; Balkhair, Khaled S; Abu Bakar, Nor Kartini

    2014-08-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the chemical speciation of dissolved and particulate elements (lead, zinc, copper, chromium, arsenic, and tin) in the mining wastewater of a former tin-mining catchment. The speciation patterns of dissolved elements were estimated by an adsorptive stripping voltammeter (ASV), while particulate elements were analyzed by using a newly developed sequential-extraction leaching procedure. The procedure has been operationally defined among five host fractions, namely exchangeable, carbonate, reducible, organic bound, and residual fractions. A total of six elements (lead, zinc, copper, chromium, arsenic, and tin) were analyzed in thirty samples at ten locations (P1-P10), with three samples taken from each of the ten locations, to get the average value from the former tin-mining catchment. The results showed that the heavy metal pollutions in locations P4 and P8 were more severe than in other sampling sites, especially tin and lead pollution. In the water samples from locations P4 and P8, both the total contents and the most dangerous non-residual fractions of tin and lead were extremely high. More than 90% of the total concentrations of arsenic and chromium existed in the residual fraction. Concentrations of copper and zinc mainly occurred in the residual fraction (more than 60%), while lead and tin presented mostly in the non-residual fractions in surface water. For all of the six dissolved elements, the less-labile species formed the predominant fraction in their speciation patterns. The speciation patterns of particulate elements showed that most of the concentrations of zinc, copper, chromium, and arsenic were found in the reducible fraction; whereas lead and tin were mainly associated with the organic fraction.

  17. The General Laws of Chemical Elements Composition Dynamics in the Biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korzh, Vyacheslav D.

    2013-04-01

    The key point of investigation of the specificity of the biosphere elemental composition formation is determination of patterns of redistribution of elemental average concentrations among various phases, like solid - liquid ( the lithosphere - the hydrosphere), which occurs as a result of a global continuous processing of inert matter by living substances. Our task here is to investigate this process in the system "lithosphere - hydrosphere" in view of the integrated involvement of living material in it. This process is most active in biogeochemical barriers, i.e. in places of "the life condensation" and runs under a nonlinear regularity that has been unknown before. It is established that this process results in a general relative increase in concentrations of chemical elements in the solid phase in proportion as their prevalence in the environment is reduced. This process running in various natural systems has practically the same parameter of nonlinearity (v) approximately equal to 0.7. For proto-lithosphere -"living material" - soil v = 0.75. For river - "living material" - ocean v = 0.67. For the contemporary factual awareness level these estimations of nonlinearity indices are practically negligible. Hence, it is for the first time that the existence of a universal constant of nonlinearity of elemental composition evolution in the biosphere has been proved and its quantitative evaluation has been made. REFERENCES 1. Korzh V.D. 1974. Some general laws governing the turnover of substance within the ocean-atmosphere-continent-ocean cycle. // Journal de Recherches Atmospheriques. Vol. 8. P. 653-660. 2. Korzh V.D. 2008. The general laws in the formation of the elemental composition of the Hydrosphere and Biosphere.// J. Ecologica, Vol. XV, P. 13-21. 3. Korzh V.D. 2012. Determination of general laws of elemental composition in Hydrosphere // Water: chemistry & ecology, Journal of water science and its practical application. # 1, P.56-62.

  18. The History and Use of Our Earth's Chemical Elements: A Reference Guide (by Robert E. Krebs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracken, Reviewed By Jeffrey D.

    1999-04-01

    Greenwood Press: Westport, CT, 1998. 282 pp + 25 pp glossary + 37 pp index. 15.9 x 24.1 cm. ISBN 0-313-30123-9. $39.95. This book is an excellent resource for chemical educators at the high school and college levels. The format of the text is consistent and the writing style is clear and concise, making it ideally suited for student use also. The first three chapters serve to introduce the reader to a brief history of chemistry, early models of the atom, and the development of the periodic table. Names of the contributing scientists are mentioned whenever necessary, but the overall purpose of these introductory chapters is simply to lay a foundation for the subsequent seven chapters. A complete glossary of important scientific terms mentioned in the text should allow beginning students to use this book without feeling overwhelmed. Each entry for the 112 elements contains the following information: elemental symbol, atomic number, period, common valence, atomic weight, natural state, common isotopes, properties, characteristics, abundance, natural sources, history, common uses and compounds, and safety hazards. This information is well organized, with clear headings and separate sections making the book extremely user-friendly. Readers can easily obtain the information they desire without having to skim the full entry for a chosen element. One very nice feature of this book is that the elements entries are arranged by their locations in the periodic table. For example, chapter 4 contains the alkali metals and alkaline earth metals. This organizational scheme allows one to quickly see the patterns and trends within groups of elements. This format is significantly better than arranging the elements in alphabetical order, which places the entry for sodium far removed from the entries for lithium and potassium. I would highly recommend this book to high school teachers and college chemistry professors. It is well written and is an excellent source of information for

  19. Atom-scale depth localization of biologically important chemical elements in molecular layers.

    PubMed

    Schneck, Emanuel; Scoppola, Ernesto; Drnec, Jakub; Mocuta, Cristian; Felici, Roberto; Novikov, Dmitri; Fragneto, Giovanna; Daillant, Jean

    2016-08-23

    In nature, biomolecules are often organized as functional thin layers in interfacial architectures, the most prominent examples being biological membranes. Biomolecular layers play also important roles in context with biotechnological surfaces, for instance, when they are the result of adsorption processes. For the understanding of many biological or biotechnologically relevant phenomena, detailed structural insight into the involved biomolecular layers is required. Here, we use standing-wave X-ray fluorescence (SWXF) to localize chemical elements in solid-supported lipid and protein layers with near-Ångstrom precision. The technique complements traditional specular reflectometry experiments that merely yield the layers' global density profiles. While earlier work mostly focused on relatively heavy elements, typically metal ions, we show that it is also possible to determine the position of the comparatively light elements S and P, which are found in the most abundant classes of biomolecules and are therefore particularly important. With that, we overcome the need of artificial heavy atom labels, the main obstacle to a broader application of high-resolution SWXF in the fields of biology and soft matter. This work may thus constitute the basis for the label-free, element-specific structural investigation of complex biomolecular layers and biological surfaces. PMID:27503887

  20. Multi-element analysis of manganese nodules by atomic absorption spectrometry without chemical separation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kane, J.S.; Harnly, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    Five manganese nodules, including the USGS reference nodules A-1 and P-1, were analyzed for Co, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni and Zn without prior chemical separation by using a simultaneous multi-element atomic absorption spectrometer with an air-cetylene flame. The nodules were prepared in three digestion matrices. One of these solutions was measured using sixteen different combinations of burner height and air/acetylene ratios. Results for A-1 and P-1 are compared to recommended values and results for all nodules are compared to those obtained with an inductively coupled plasma. The elements Co, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, and Zn are simultaneously determined with a composite recovery for all elements of 100 ?? 7%, independent of the digestion matrices, heights in the flame, or flame stoichiometries examined. Individual recoveries for Co, K, and Ni are considerably poorer in two digests than this composite figure, however. The optimum individual recoveries of 100 ?? 5% and imprecisions of 1-4%, except for zinc, are obtained when Co, K, Mn, Na and Ni are determined simultaneously in a concentrated digest, and in another analytical sequence, when Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn and Zn are measured simultaneously after dilution. Determination of manganese is equally accurate in the two sequences; its measurement in both assures internal consistency between the two measurement sequences. This approach improves analytical efficiency over that for conventional atomic absorption methods, while minimizing loss of accuracy or precision for individual elements. ?? 1982.

  1. Atom-scale depth localization of biologically important chemical elements in molecular layers

    PubMed Central

    Schneck, Emanuel; Scoppola, Ernesto; Drnec, Jakub; Mocuta, Cristian; Felici, Roberto; Novikov, Dmitri; Fragneto, Giovanna; Daillant, Jean

    2016-01-01

    In nature, biomolecules are often organized as functional thin layers in interfacial architectures, the most prominent examples being biological membranes. Biomolecular layers play also important roles in context with biotechnological surfaces, for instance, when they are the result of adsorption processes. For the understanding of many biological or biotechnologically relevant phenomena, detailed structural insight into the involved biomolecular layers is required. Here, we use standing-wave X-ray fluorescence (SWXF) to localize chemical elements in solid-supported lipid and protein layers with near-Ångstrom precision. The technique complements traditional specular reflectometry experiments that merely yield the layers’ global density profiles. While earlier work mostly focused on relatively heavy elements, typically metal ions, we show that it is also possible to determine the position of the comparatively light elements S and P, which are found in the most abundant classes of biomolecules and are therefore particularly important. With that, we overcome the need of artificial heavy atom labels, the main obstacle to a broader application of high-resolution SWXF in the fields of biology and soft matter. This work may thus constitute the basis for the label-free, element-specific structural investigation of complex biomolecular layers and biological surfaces. PMID:27503887

  2. Method and apparatus for mapping the distribution of chemical elements in an extended medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, L. G.; Trombka, J. I. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Contaminants in an extended medium such as the wall of a building are mapped by locating neutron excitation source on one side of the wall and a gamma ray spectrometer, including a gamma ray detector on the opposite side of the wall facing the excitation source. The source and detector are moved in unison in discrete steps over opposing wall surfaces so as to determine the chemical composition of the elements in a hemispheric region of the wall adjacent the detector with the radius of the region being substantially that of the mean free path distance of gamma rays emitted from elements interacting with neutrons on the detector side of the wall. The source and detector are reversed for relatively thick walls for mapping the distribution of elements on the other side of the wall thickness. The output of the detector is fed to a multichannel pulse height analyzer where the intensity of the various gamma ray spectral lines are indicated relative to a dominant constituent element such as silicon. Resolution of anomalies such as the presence of voids and/or determining the bulk density of the medium is achieved by substituting a gamma ray source technique is also applied to metal alloys, such as iron alloys, in either the solid or molten state.

  3. Atom-scale depth localization of biologically important chemical elements in molecular layers.

    PubMed

    Schneck, Emanuel; Scoppola, Ernesto; Drnec, Jakub; Mocuta, Cristian; Felici, Roberto; Novikov, Dmitri; Fragneto, Giovanna; Daillant, Jean

    2016-08-23

    In nature, biomolecules are often organized as functional thin layers in interfacial architectures, the most prominent examples being biological membranes. Biomolecular layers play also important roles in context with biotechnological surfaces, for instance, when they are the result of adsorption processes. For the understanding of many biological or biotechnologically relevant phenomena, detailed structural insight into the involved biomolecular layers is required. Here, we use standing-wave X-ray fluorescence (SWXF) to localize chemical elements in solid-supported lipid and protein layers with near-Ångstrom precision. The technique complements traditional specular reflectometry experiments that merely yield the layers' global density profiles. While earlier work mostly focused on relatively heavy elements, typically metal ions, we show that it is also possible to determine the position of the comparatively light elements S and P, which are found in the most abundant classes of biomolecules and are therefore particularly important. With that, we overcome the need of artificial heavy atom labels, the main obstacle to a broader application of high-resolution SWXF in the fields of biology and soft matter. This work may thus constitute the basis for the label-free, element-specific structural investigation of complex biomolecular layers and biological surfaces.

  4. Chemical fractionation of siderophile elements in impactites from Australian meteorite craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Attrep, A., Jr.; Orth, C. J.; Quintana, L. R.; Shoemaker, C. S.; Shoemaker, E. M.; Taylor, S. R.

    1991-01-01

    The abundance pattern of siderophile elements in terrestrial and lunar impact melt rocks was used extensively to infer the nature of the impacting projectiles. An implicit assumption made is that the siderophile abundance ratios of the projectiles are approximately preserved during mixing of the projectile constituents with the impact melts. As this mixture occurs during flow of strongly shocked materials at high temperatures, however there are grounds for suspecting that the underlying assumption is not always valid. In particular, fractionation of the melted and partly vaporized material of the projectile might be expected because of differences in volatility, solubility in silicate melts, and other characteristics of the constituent elements. Impactites from craters with associated meteorites offer special opportunities to test the assumptions on which projectile identifications are based and to study chemical fractionation that occurred during the impact process.

  5. Controlled chemical modification of the internal surface of photonic crystal fibers for application as biosensitive elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pidenko, Sergey A.; Burmistrova, Natalia A.; Pidenko, Pavel S.; Shuvalov, Andrey A.; Chibrova, Anastasiya A.; Skibina, Yulia S.; Goryacheva, Irina Y.

    2016-10-01

    Photonic crystal fibers (PCF) are one of the most promising materials for creation of constructive elements for bio-, drug and contaminant sensing based on unique optical properties of the PCF as effective nanosized optical signal collectors. In order to provide efficient and controllable binding of biomolecules, the internal surface of glass hollow core photonic crystal fibers (HC-PCF) has been chemically modified with silanol groups and functionalized with (3-aminopropyl) triethoxysilane (APTES). The shift of local maxima in the HC-PCF transmission spectrum has been selected as a signal for estimating the amount of silanol groups on the HC-PCF inner surface. The relationship between amount of silanol groups on the HC-PCF inner surface and efficiency of following APTES functionalization has been evaluated. Covalent binding of horseradish peroxidase (chosen as a model protein) on functionalized PCF inner surface has been performed successively, thus verifying the possibility of creating a biosensitive element.

  6. Numerical values of the surface free energies of solid chemical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezey, L. Z.; Giber, J.

    1984-10-01

    The knowledge of the surface free energies γ {i/o}of solid chemical elements is necessary in many practically important subjects. The description of the quantities γ {i/o}(more correctly termed as the surface free enthalpies) is a part of a new “complex calculation of surface segregation” (CCSS) method, proposed by the authors. Here the applicability of a “standard table” of the values of γ {/i o }, obtained in that part of CCSS is shown by comparing the calculated values of γ {/i o }with several recently published experimental results.

  7. Communications: Developing relationships between the local chemical reactivity of alloy catalysts and physical characteristics of constituent metal elements

    SciTech Connect

    Xin, Hongliang; Schweitzer, Neil; Nikolla, Eranda; Linic, Suljo

    2010-10-22

    We have used X-ray absorption spectroscopy and quantum chemical density functional theory calculations to identify critical features in the electronic structure of different sites in alloys that govern the local chemical reactivity. The measurements led to a simple model relating local geometric features of a site in an alloy to its electronic structure and chemical reactivity. The central feature of the model is that the formation of alloys does not lead to significant charge transfer between the constituent metal elements in the alloys, and that the local electronic structure and chemical reactivity can be predicted based on physical characteristics of constituent metal elements in their unalloyed form.

  8. THE DETAILED CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF M31 STAR CLUSTERS. I. Fe, ALPHA AND LIGHT ELEMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Colucci, Janet E.; Bernstein, Rebecca A.; Cohen, Judith G.

    2014-12-20

    We present ages, [Fe/H] and abundances of the α elements Ca I, Si I, Ti I, Ti II, and light elements Mg I, Na I, and Al I for 31 globular clusters (GCs) in M31, which were obtained from high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio >60 echelle spectra of their integrated light (IL). All abundances and ages are obtained using our original technique for high-resolution IL abundance analysis of GCs. This sample provides a never before seen picture of the chemical history of M31. The GCs are dispersed throughout the inner and outer halo, from 2.5 kpc < R {sub M31} < 117 kpc. We find a range of [Fe/H] within 20 kpc of the center of M31, and a constant [Fe/H] ∼ – 1.6 for the outer halo clusters. We find evidence for at least one massive GC in M31 with an age between 1 and 5 Gyr. The α-element ratios are generally similar to the Milky Way GC and field star ratios. We also find chemical evidence for a late-time accretion origin for at least one cluster, which has a different abundance pattern than other clusters at similar metallicity. We find evidence for star-to-star abundance variations in Mg, Na, and Al in the GCs in our sample, and find correlations of Ca, Mg, Na, and possibly Al abundance ratios with cluster luminosity and velocity dispersion, which can potentially be used to constrain GC self-enrichment scenarios. Data presented here were obtained with the HIRES echelle spectrograph on the Keck I telescope.

  9. The fate of minor alkali elements in the chemical evolution of salt lakes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Alkaline earth elements and alkali metals (Mg, Ca, Na and K) play an important role in the geochemical evolution of saline lakes as the final brine type is defined by the abundance of these elements. The role of major ions in brine evolution has been studied in great detail, but little has been done to investigate the behaviour of minor alkali elements in these systems despite their similar chemical affinities to the major cations. We have examined three major anionic brine types, chloride, sulphate, and bicarbonate-carbonate, in fifteen lakes in North America and Antarctica to determine the geochemical behaviour of lithium, rubidium, strontium, and barium. Lithium and rubidium are largely conservative in all water types, and their concentrations are the result of long-term solute input and concentration through evaporation and/or sublimation. Strontium and barium behaviours vary with anionic brine type. Strontium can be removed in sulphate and carbonate-rich lakes by the precipitation of carbonate minerals. Barium may be removed in chloride and sulphate brines by either the precipitation of barite and perhaps biological uptake. PMID:21992434

  10. Effects of chemical elements in the trophic levels of natural salt marshes.

    PubMed

    Kamiński, Piotr; Barczak, Tadeusz; Bennewicz, Janina; Jerzak, Leszek; Bogdzińska, Maria; Aleksandrowicz, Oleg; Koim-Puchowska, Beata; Szady-Grad, Małgorzata; Klawe, Jacek J; Woźniak, Alina

    2016-06-01

    The relationships between the bioaccumulation of Na, K, Ca, Mg, Fe, Zn, Cu, Mn, Co, Cd, and Pb, acidity (pH), salinity (Ec), and organic matter content within trophic levels (water-soil-plants-invertebrates) were studied in saline environments in Poland. Environments included sodium manufactures, wastes utilization areas, dumping grounds, and agriculture cultivation, where disturbed Ca, Mg, and Fe exist and the impact of Cd and Pb is high. We found Zn, Cu, Mn, Co, and Cd accumulation in the leaves of plants and in invertebrates. Our aim was to determine the selectivity exhibited by soil for nutrients and heavy metals and to estimate whether it is important in elucidating how these metals are available for plant/animal uptake in addition to their mobility and stability within soils. We examined four ecological plant groups: trees, shrubs, minor green plants, and water macrophytes. Among invertebrates, we sampled breastplates Malacostraca, small arachnids Arachnida, diplopods Diplopoda, small insects Insecta, and snails Gastropoda. A higher level of chemical elements was found in saline polluted areas (sodium manufactures and anthropogenic sites). Soil acidity and salinity determined the bioaccumulation of free radicals in the trophic levels measured. A pH decrease caused Zn and Cd to increase in sodium manufactures and an increase in Ca, Zn, Cu, Cd, and Pb in the anthropogenic sites. pH increase also caused Na, Mg, and Fe to increase in sodium manufactures and an increase in Na, Fe, Mn, and Co in the anthropogenic sites. There was a significant correlation between these chemical elements and Ec in soils. We found significant relationships between pH and Ec, which were positive in saline areas of sodium manufactures and negative in the anthropogenic and control sites. These dependencies testify that the measurement of the selectivity of cations and their fluctuation in soils provide essential information on the affinity and binding strength in these environments. The

  11. Chemical Heterogeneity By The Mobility Difference Of Elements During Peridotite-Basalt Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tominaga, A.; Kato, T.; Kubo, T.; Kurosawa, M.

    2006-12-01

    In order to elucidate the chemical heterogeneity during the material circulation of the mantle and the mantle source heterogeneity, it is necessary to understand the reaction process between the mantle peridotite and crustal materials. We have carried out reaction experiments between peridotite and basalt at the uppermost upper mantle conditions. Especially, we focus on the geochemical fractionation by the differences in mobility of each elements.We used two materials, JP-1(Horoman Peridotite) and JB-1(Kitamatsuura basalt) for the reaction experiments. The weight ratio of materials is JP-1: JB-1=2:1 and these are encapsulated into graphite heater so that a JB-1 layer is sandwiched by two JP-1 layers. We carried out reaction experiments at pressure of 3GPa, temperature of 1373K and heating duration are 10 and 60minutes using a multi-anvil high-pressure apparatus (MAX-90) at Kyushu University. After reaction experiments, we investigated the polished section of the recovered sample with SEM-EDS (Kyushu University) and LA-ICPMS (Tsukuba University).In these experimental conditions, the basalt layer is composed of melt and some crystals (garnet (Gar) + clinopyroxene (Cpx)), while subsolidus recrystalization progresses in the peridotite layer (olivine (Ol) + orthopyroxene (Opx) + Cpx). Especially we observed two reaction zones at the interface between basalt and peridotite layers. The reaction zones are formed Gar zone that has pyrope-rich composition and Opx zone that has smaller Mg# than Opx in the peridotite layer (Mg# = molar Mg/ (Mg+Fe)). The pyrope-rich Gar and low- Mg# Opx layers contact with the peridotite and the basalt respectively. Width of each reaction zone is about 15 micron. From these observations, Opx layer is formed by reactions between basalt melt and peridotite, and Gar crystallized from Mg-fertilized basalt melt. These reaction layers may act as a barrier of the rapid melt intrusion and the transfer of the major elements through these zones is

  12. Development of the chemical stabilization and solidification process for the treatment of radioactive raffinate sludges at the DOE Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, P.M.; Kakaria, V. [Morrison Knudsen Corp., Boise, ID . Environmental Enger, J.

    1996-12-31

    Chemical Solidification and Stabilization (CSS) is the mixing of chemical reagents with waste to solidify and chemically stabilize the contaminated material. The resulting product is resistant to leaching of certain contaminants. CSS treatment using Class C fly ash and Portland cement was chosen as the most feasible method for treatment of the chemically and radioactively contaminated sludge (raffinate) contained in raffinate pits on the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP) located outside of St. Louis, Missouri. Due to the uniqueness of the material, substantial bench-scale testing was performed on the raffinate to better understand its properties. Similarly, due to mixed results in the application of CSS treatment to radioactive materials, a pilot-scale testing facility was built to verify bench testing results and to establish and quantify design parameters for the full-scale CSS production facility. This paper discusses the development of the pilot-scale testing facility, the testing plan, and the results of the testing activities. Particular attention has been given to the applicability of the CSS treatment method and to the value of pilot-scale testing.

  13. Determination of chemical elements in deposition on the Western North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Kazuhiko; Dokiya, Yukiko; Ohyama, Jun-Ichi; Sagi, Takeshi; Maruta, Emiko; Fushimi, Katsuhiko; Kodama, Yukio; Tanaka, Shigeru

    Shipboard sampling was performed for the evaluation of the deposition amount of chemical species on the southwestern section of the North Pacific, utilizing simple plastic samplers fixed on the upper decks of research vessels of the Japan Meteorological Agency on their routine meteorological and oceanographical cruises from 1988 to 1990. The deposition of nss-sulfate (non-seasalt sulfate, calculated from the concentration of sodium) was found to be high in the western Japan Sea, East China Sea and southern sea adjacent to the Japanese Islands. In the Mariana Sea and the equatorial area, the lowest values were constantly observed in the summer of those 3 years. Values a little higher, but much lower than in the Japan Sea or East China Sea, were measured off the Philippine Islands. The deposition amounts of crustal elements such as silicon, aluminum and iron showed similar tendencies but with some difference in detail.

  14. Chemical Elemental Distribution and Soil DNA Fingerprints Provide the Critical Evidence in Murder Case Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Concheri, Giuseppe; Bertoldi, Daniela; Polone, Elisa; Otto, Stefan; Larcher, Roberto; Squartini, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Background The scientific contribution to the solution of crime cases, or throughout the consequent forensic trials, is a crucial aspect of the justice system. The possibility to extract meaningful information from trace amounts of samples, and to match and validate evidences with robust and unambiguous statistical tests, are the key points of such process. The present report is the authorized disclosure of an investigation, carried out by Attorney General appointment, on a murder case in northern Italy, which yielded the critical supporting evidence for the judicial trial. Methodology/Principal Findings The proportional distribution of 54 chemical elements and the bacterial community DNA fingerprints were used as signature markers to prove the similarity of two soil samples. The first soil was collected on the crime scene, along a corn field, while the second was found in trace amounts on the carpet of a car impounded from the main suspect in a distant location. The matching similarity of the two soils was proven by crossing the results of two independent techniques: a) elemental analysis via inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) approaches, and b) amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis by gel electrophoresis (ARDRA). Conclusions Besides introducing the novel application of these methods to forensic disciplines, the highly accurate level of resolution observed, opens new possibilities also in the fields of soil typing and tracking, historical analyses, geochemical surveys and global land mapping. PMID:21674041

  15. Chemical speciation of redox sensitive elements during hydrocarbon leaching in the Junggar Basin, Northwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Guodong; Fu, Bihong; Takahashi, Yoshio; Kuno, Akihito; Matsuo, Motoyuki; Zhang, Jindong

    2010-11-01

    Bleaching related to seepage of petroleum fluids and subsurface migration of crude oil and natural gas can alter the chemical and mineralogical properties of rocks, while concurrently depleting hydrocarbon reservoirs. Mud volcanoes constitute one type of petroleum seepage present in several areas on the southern margin of the Junggar Basin in the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, NW China. The results of XRD, XRF, XANES, and Mössbauer spectroscopy on rock samples collected from areas affected by these mud volcanoes revealed an enrichment of certain minerals and elements, as well changes in mineralogical, molecular, or ionic carrier ("species"). After bleaching, reddish sedimentary rocks showed depletion in silica and enrichment of calcium, magnesium, manganese, and iron. Other elements, including aluminum, potassium, sodium, and titanium, were largely unchanged. Reduced iron and sulfur compounds predominated in the bleached rocks, producing changes in color from the original reddish into green, deep gray, and black. Iron and calcium were associated with carbonates, indicating carbonation of these elements during the bleaching processes. Manganese also appeared to be associated with carbonate, though not with sulfate even though sulfate was present in the bleached rocks. Alkaline conditions were apparently the dominant because reduced manganese would have been absent under acidic condition. The alteration of certain minerals, clay minerals in particular, was also observed in bleached rocks, the alteration of smectite-group minerals to chlorite and muscovite, for example. Mineralogical and geochemical changes in rocks bleached by hydrocarbon fluids could provide a better overall understanding of bleaching processes, and may have applications in surface geochemical exploitation and remote imaging.

  16. A DIFFERENTIAL CHEMICAL ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF THE METAL-POOR GLOBULAR CLUSTER NGC 6397

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Andreas; McWilliam, Andrew E-mail: andy@obs.carnegiescience.edu

    2011-08-15

    We present chemical abundances in three red giants and two turnoff (TO) stars in the metal-poor Galactic globular cluster (GC) NGC 6397 based on spectroscopy obtained with the Magellan Inamori Kyocera Echelle high-resolution spectrograph on the Magellan 6.5 m Clay telescope. Our results are based on a line-by-line differential abundance analysis relative to the well-studied red giant Arcturus and the Galactic halo field star Hip 66815. At a mean of -2.10 {+-} 0.02 (stat.) {+-}0.07 (sys.), the differential iron abundance is in good agreement with other studies in the literature based on gf-values. As in previous differential works we find a distinct departure from ionization equilibrium in that the abundances of Fe I and Fe II differ by {approx}0.1 dex, with opposite signs for the red giant branch (RGB) and TO stars. The {alpha}-element ratios are enhanced to 0.4 (RGB) and 0.3 dex (TO), respectively, and we also confirm strong variations in the O, Na, and Al/Fe abundance ratios. Accordingly, the light-element abundance patterns in one of the red giants can be attributed to pollution by an early generation of massive Type II supernovae. TO and RGB abundances are not significantly different, with the possible exception of Mg and Ti, which are, however, amplified by the patterns in one TO star additionally belonging to this early generation of GC stars. We discuss interrelations of these light elements as a function of the GC metallicity.

  17. Chemical element ratios of Sloan Digital Sky Survey early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Jonas; Thomas, Daniel; Maraston, Claudia

    2012-04-01

    We discuss chemical enrichments of ˜4000 Sloan Digital Sky Survey early-type galaxies using as tracers a large variety of element abundance ratios, namely [C/Fe], [N/Fe], [O/Fe], [Mg/Fe], [Ca/Fe] and [Ti/Fe]. We utilize the stellar population models of absorption line indices from Thomas, Maraston & Johansson which are based on the MILES stellar library. We confirm previous results of increasing age, [Z/H] and [O/Fe] ratios (most often represented by [α/Fe] in the literature) with velocity dispersion. We further derive identical correlations with velocity dispersion for the abundance ratios [O/Fe], [Mg/Fe] and [C/Fe], implying that C/Mg and C/O are close to solar values. This sets a lower limit on the formation time-scales and starburst components of early-type galaxies to ˜0.4 Gyr, which is the lifetime of a 3 M⊙ star, since the full C enrichment must be reached. [N/Fe] correlates with velocity dispersion, but offset to lower values and with a steeper slope compared to the other element ratios. We do not find any environmental dependencies for the abundances of C and N, contrary to previous reports in the literature. [Fe/H] does not correlate with velocity dispersion over the entire parameter range covered, but for fixed age we find a steep trend for the [Fe/H]-σ relation. This trend is weaker than the analogous for total metallicity (which also shows steeper trends at fixed age) owing to the lower Fe contribution from Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) for more massive early-type galaxies. We find [Ca/Fe] ratios that are close to solar values over the entire velocity dispersion range covered. Tentative, due to large scatter, the results for [Ti/Fe] indicate that Ti follows the trends of Ca. This implies a significant contribution from SN Ia to the enrichment of heavy α-elements and puts strong constraints on supernova nucleosynthesis and models of galactic chemical evolution.

  18. Isotopic and impurity element probes of mesoscale chemical dynamics at mineral fluid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DePaolo, D. J.

    2012-12-01

    Mesoscale interactions control important Earth processes including the growth of minerals from aqueous solutions and silicate liquids, the diffusion of ions in solids and silicate liquids, and the solid-state deformation and recrystallization that constitutes metamorphism. Most of these processes are typically understood from the classical side in terms of macroscopic physical and thermodynamic properties and classical kinetics, and from the molecular side in terms of single molecule or nearest-neighbor interactions. However, in many cases the controlling processes occur at intermediate scales of both length and time, and involve complex interactions among multiple chemical species. A major limitation has been in characterizing and modeling the dynamic processes that lead to the macroscopic properties and behavior. Advanced microscopy techniques allow phase changes, for example, to be monitored at high resolution, and this capability continues to improve. However, other important information about the phase changes, such as the molecular exchange fluxes between phases and the detailed mechanisms of reaction, are not revealed by microscopy. High-resolution isotopic characterization now allows the molecular exchange fluxes to be quantified, and models suggest that the incorporation of impurity elements is directly tied to these fluxes. One of the main advances is that precise isotopic measurements have recently been extended to include major stoichiometric cations such as Ca, Mg, Fe, and K, as well as key impurity elements such as U, Cd, Mo, and Sr. Isotopic analysis at the nano- to microscale would further clarify the detailed dynamics of mineral chemistry controls but are not yet possible except in a few instances. Impurity element concentrations are more easily measured at these small scales, and they are a key bridge between isotopic measurements and microscopy.Other limitations to advancing our knowledge of the chemical and isotopic effects associated with

  19. Chemical Variations Among L-Group Chondrites, III. Major Element Variation in L6 Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, R. T.; Jarosewich, E.

    1981-03-01

    Bulk chemical and mineral analyses of five M chondrites of shock facies d to f bring the number of L6 falls analyzed by Jarosewich to 20 and enable us: 1) to examine the chemical effects of shock melting in chondrites of the same petrologic type that presumably sample a limited strati graphic range in their parent body; and 2) to seek depth-related chemical variations by comparing the compositions of L3 and melt-free L6 chondrites. The mean Fe/Mg, Si/Mg, S/Mg and Ni/Mg ratios of melt-free L6 chondrites (shock facies a to c) are virtually identical to those of L3 chondrites, suggesting that L-group material had the same bulk composition early (L6) and late (L3) in the accretion of the parent body. Wider variations of S/Mg and Ni/Mg in L6 chondrites may signify that L6 material was less well mixed than L3, or that some mobilization of metal and troilite occurred at shock intensities (facies c) too low to melt silicates. L6 chondrites that experienced shock melting of silicates (facies d to f) show wide variations of Fe/Mg, Si/Mg, S/Mg and Ni/Mg. It appears that most of the major element variation in the L-group is tertiary (shock-related) rather than primary (nebular, accretionary) or secondary (metamorphic). There is some evidence that L-group chondrites comprise two subgroups with different Fe/S ratios, but these subgroups are now poorly defined and their significance is unknown.

  20. Origin of major element chemical trends in DSDP Leg 37 basalts, Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byerly, G.R.; Wright, T.L.

    1978-01-01

    In this paper we summarize the major element chemical variation for basalts from the Deep Sea Drilling Project Leg 37 and relate it to stratigraphic position in each of five drilling sites. Least-squares techniques are successfully used to quantify the nature and extent of alteration in these basalts, and to correct the major element analysis back to a magmatic, or alteration-free, composition on the assumption that alteration takes place in two ways: (1) secondary minerals are introduced into veins and vesicles, and (2) CO2 and H2O react with components in the rock to form a simple alteration assemblage. A chemical stratigraphy is defined for these basalts by grouping lavas whose chemistries are related by low-pressure phenocryst-liquid differentiation as identified by least-squares calculation. Major chemical-stratigraphic units are as much as 200 m thick; correlations of these units can be made between the holes at site 332 (about 100 m apart), but not between the other sites. Compositions of parental magmas are calculated by extrapolating low-pressure variations to a constant value of 9% MgO. The differences in these extrapolated compositions reflect high-pressure processes, and suggest that clinopyroxene may be an important phase in either intermediate-level fractionation of basaltic liquids, or as a residual phase during the partial melting which produces these basaltic liquids. Several of the basaltic liquids calculated as parental to the Leg 37 basalts have CaO contents greater than 14% and indicate that the oceanic mantle is richer in CaO and Al2O3 than values used in pyrolite models for the upper mantle. A model for magma generation and eruption beneath the Mid-Atlantic Ridge embodies the following characteristics: 1. (1) Separate magma batches are generated in the mantle. 2. (2) Each of these may be erupted directly or stored at shallow depth where significant fractionation takes place. Common fractionation processes are inferred to be gravitative

  1. Distribution of chemical elements in attic dust and soil as reflection of lithology and anthropogenic influence in Slovenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajn, R.

    2003-05-01

    The aim of this study was to establish contents and distribution of chemical elements in attic dust in Slovenia, and to define them according to geology and anthiopogenic influence. Attic dust and topsoil (0-5 cm) samples were collected in the rural area in settlements without known industry and in six largest towns in Slovenia. Analysis of 42 chemical elements was performed. For estimation of the association between elements and sampling materials the R mode factor analysis was applied. Al, Ba, Co, Ci, Fe, La, Mn, Na, Nb, Ni, Sc, Th, Ti, Y, V and Zr in attic dust reflect the natural distribution. The highest elemental contents in attic dust occur in the areas of igneous and metmoiphic rocks and of flysch formation. High contents of the elemental association Co, Ci, Fe, Mn, and Ni reflect also centuries of ferrous metallurgy. Distribution of As, Cd, Cu, Hg, Mo, Sb, Sn, Sr, Pb and Zn represents the anthropogenically introduced chemical elements. Their averages in attic dust are higher compared to topsoil. High contents of these elements are a result of historical Pb-Zn mining and smelting.

  2. Transfer of chemical elements from a contaminated estuarine sediment to river water. A leaching assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreu, Manuela; Peres, Sara; Magalhães, M. Clara F.

    2014-05-01

    Wastes of a former Portuguese steel industry were deposited during 40 years on the left bank of the Coina River, which flows into the estuary of the Tagus River near Lisbon. The aim of this study was to evaluate the release of the chemical elements from the contaminated sediment to the river water. A leaching experiment (four replicates) was performed using 1.6 kg/replicate of sediment from a landfill located in the Coina River bank, forming a lagoon subject to tidal influence. River water coming from this lagoon was collected during low tide. This water (200 mL) was added to the moist sediment, contained in cylindrical reactors, and was collected after 24 h of percolation. The leaching experiments were conducted for 77 days being leachates collected at time zero, after 28, 49 and 77 days with the sediment always moist. The sediment was characterized for: pH, electric conductivity (EC), total organic carbon (TOC), extractable phosphorus and potassium, mineral nitrogen, iron from iron oxides (crystalline and non-crystalline) and manganese oxides. Multi-elemental analysis was also made by ICP-INAA. Leachates and river water were analysed for pH, EC, hydrogencarbonate and sulfatetot by titrations, chloride by potentiometry, and multi-elemental composition by ICP-MS. The sediment presented pH=7.2, EC=18.5 dS/m, TOC=147.8 g/kg, high concentrations of extractable phosphorous (62.8 mg/kg) and potassium (1236.8 mg/kg), mineral nitrogen=11.3 mg/kg. The non-crystalline fraction of iron oxides corresponds to 99% (167.5 g Fe/kg) of the total iron oxides, and manganese from manganese oxides was low (52.7 mg/kg). Sediment is considered contaminated. It contained high concentrations (g/kg) of Zn (2.9), Pb (0.9), Cr (0.59), Cu (0.16), As (0.07), Cd (0.005), and Hg (0.001), which are above Canadian values for marine sediments quality guidelines for protection of aquatic life. River water had: pH=8.2, EC=28.6 dS/m, csulfate=1.23 g/L, and [Cl-]=251.6 mg/L. The concentrations of Cd (0

  3. Yeasts associated with an abandoned mining area in Pernek and their tolerance to different chemical elements.

    PubMed

    Vadkertiová, Renáta; Molnárová, Jana; Lux, Alexander; Vaculík, Marek; Lišková, Desana

    2016-05-01

    Four plants, Cirsium arvense (creeping thistle), Equisetum arvense (field horsetail), Oxalis acetosella (wood sorrel) and Phragmites australis (common reed), which grew in an abandoned Sb-mining area in Pernek (Malé Karpaty Mts., Slovakia), were investigated for the yeast species. Yeasts were isolated from both the leaves of the plants and the soil adjacent to the plants. In total, 65 yeast cultures, belonging to 11 ascomycetous and 5 basidiomycetous yeast species, were isolated. The species most frequently isolated from both the soil and leaf samples were Trichosporon porosum, Galactomyces candidus and Candida solani, whereas Aureobasidium pullulans, Candida tsuchiyae and Sporidiobolus metaroseus were isolated exclusively from the plant leaves. All the yeast species isolated were tested for their tolerance to two heavy metals (Cd, Zn) and three metalloids (As, Sb and Si). The yeasts isolated from both the leaves and soils exhibited a high tolerance level to both As and Sb, present in elevated concentrations at the locality. Among the yeast species tested, Cryptococcus musci, a close relative to Cryptococcus humicola, was the species most tolerant to all the chemical elements tested, with the exception of Si. It grew in the presence of 200 mmol/L Zn, 200 mmol/L Cd, 60 mmol/L As and 50 mmol/L Sb, and therefore, it can be considered as a multi-tolerant species. Some of the yeast species were tolerant to the individual chemical elements. The yeast-like species Trichosporon laibachii exhibited the highest tolerance to Si of all yeasts tested, and Cryptococcus flavescens and Lindnera saturnus showed the same tolerance as Cryptococcus musci to Zn and As, respectively. The majority of the yeasts showed a notably low tolerance to Cd (not exceeded 0.5 mmol/L), which was present in small amounts in the soil. However, Candida solani, isolated from the soil, exhibited a higher tolerance to Cd (20 mmol/L) than to As (2 mmol/L). PMID:26358066

  4. Investigations of Near-Field Thermal-Hydrologic-Mechanical-Chemical Models for Radioactive Waste Disposal in Clay/Shale Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.H.; Li, L.; Zheng, L.; Houseworth, J.E.; Rutqvist, J.

    2011-06-20

    Clay/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at the Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon and Volckaert, 2003) have all been under intensive scientific investigation (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relationships to flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of radioactive waste. Figure 1-1 presents the distribution of clay/shale formations within the USA.

  5. Sampling and analysis of chemical element concentration distribution in rock units and orebodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agterberg, F. P.

    2012-01-01

    Existing sampling techniques applied within known orebodies, such as sampling along mining drifts, yield element concentration values for larger blocks of ore if they are extended into their surroundings. The resulting average concentration values have relatively small "extension variance". These techniques can be used for multifractal modeling as well as ore reserve estimation approaches. Geometric probability theory can aid in local spatial covariance modeling. It provides information about increase of variability of element concentration over short distances exceeding microscopic scale. In general, the local clustering of ore crystals results in small-scale variability known as the "nugget effect". Parameters to characterize spatial covariance estimated from ore samples subjected to chemical analysis for ore reserve estimation may not be valid at local scale because of the nugget effect. The novel method of local singularity mapping applied within orebodies provides new insights into the nature of the nugget effect. Within the Pulacayo orebody, Bolivia, local singularity for zinc is linearly related with logarithmically transformed concentration value. If there is a nugget effect, moving averages resulting from covariance models or estimated by other methods that have a smoothing effect, such as kriging, can be improved by incorporating local singularities indicating local element enrichment or depletion. Although there have been many successful applications of the multifractal binomial/p model, its application within the Pulacayo orebody results in inconsistencies, indicating some shortcomings of this relatively simple approach. Local singularity analysis and universal multifractal modeling are two promising new approaches to improve upon results obtained by commonly used geostatistical techniques and use of the binomial/p model. All methods in this paper are illustrated using a single example (118 Pulacayo zinc values), and several techniques are applied to

  6. Method for quantitative determination and separation of trace amounts of chemical elements in the presence of large quantities of other elements having the same atomic mass

    DOEpatents

    Miller, C.M.; Nogar, N.S.

    1982-09-02

    Photoionization via autoionizing atomic levels combined with conventional mass spectroscopy provides a technique for quantitative analysis of trace quantities of chemical elements in the presence of much larger amounts of other elements with substantially the same atomic mass. Ytterbium samples smaller than 10 ng have been detected using an ArF* excimer laser which provides the atomic ions for a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Elemental selectivity of greater than 5:1 with respect to lutetium impurity has been obtained. Autoionization via a single photon process permits greater photon utilization efficiency because of its greater absorption cross section than bound-free transitions, while maintaining sufficient spectroscopic structure to allow significant photoionization selectivity between different atomic species. Separation of atomic species from others of substantially the same atomic mass is also described.

  7. Ecotoxicological characteristic of a soil polluted by radioactive elements and heavy metals before and after its bioremediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, P.; Groudev, S.; Spasova, I.; Nikolova, M.

    2012-04-01

    Cinnamon soils from southeastern Bulgaria are heavily polluted with radionuclides (uranium, radium) and toxic heavy metals (copper and lead) due to the winds transportation of fine particles from flotation dumps to the soil surface. As a result of this, the polluted soils are characterized by a slightly alkaline pH (7.82) and positive net neutralization potential (+136.8 kg CaCO3/t). A fresh sample of cinnamon soil was subjected to remediation under laboratory conditions in four lysimeters each containing 70 kg of soil. The preliminary study revealed that most of the pollutants were presented as carbonate, reducible and oxidisable mobility fractions, i.e. pollutants ions were specifically adsorbed by carbonate and ferric iron minerals or were capsulated in sulfides. The applied soil treatment was connected with leaching of the pollutants located mainly in the horizon A, their transportation through the soil profile as soluble forms, and their precipitation in the rich-in-clay subhorizon B3. The efficiency of leaching depended on the activity of the indigenous microflora and on the chemical processes connected with solubilization of pollutants and formation of stable complexes with some organic compounds, chloride and hydrocarbonate ions. These processes were considerably enhanced by adding hay to the horizon A and irrigating the soil with water solutions containing the above-mentioned ions and some nutrients. After 18 months of treatment, each of the soil profiles in the different lysimeters was divided into five sections reflecting the different soil layers. The soil in these sections was subjected to a detailed chemical analysis and the data obtained were compared with the relevant data obtained before the start of the experiment. The best leaching of pollutants from horizon A was measured in the variants where soil mulching was applied. For example, the best leaching of lead (54.5 %) was found in the variant combining this technique and irrigation with solutions

  8. Increase in the power of lasing on atomic and ion transitions in chemical elements

    SciTech Connect

    Klimkin, V M; Sokovikov, V G

    2007-02-28

    A method for increasing the power of pulsed lasing on atomic and ion transitions in chemical elements obtained by the conversion of the UV radiation of excimer lasers in cells with metal vapours is studied. A part of UV radiation transmitted through a cell with metal vapour is used for pumping a dye solution in such a way that the cell converter with metal vapour represents a master oscillator, while the dye cell represents an amplifier. The study is performed by the example of amplification of weak spectral components of radiation from a XeCl* laser converted in mercury and barium vapours. In the amplifying stage the longitudinal pumping of the dye is used and a scheme for suppressing self-excitation is employed. It is found by selecting dyes that the alcohol solution of uranin is nearly optimal for amplification of the 546.1-nm laser line of mercury, while the best results in amplification of the 533-nm and 648.2-nm laser lines of barium were obtained by using alcohol solutions of rhodamine 6G and oxazine 17, respectively. The power of the 546.1-nm mercury line was increased by an order of magnitude, while the power of the 533-nm and 648.2-nm lines of barium - almost by a factor of twenty-five. (lasers)

  9. Plant absorption of trace elements in sludge amended soils and correlation with soil chemical speciation.

    PubMed

    Torri, Silvana; Lavado, Raúl

    2009-07-30

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between Lolium perenne L. uptake of Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn in sludge amended soils and soil availability of these elements assessed by soil sequential extraction. A greenhouse experiment was set with three representative soils of the Pampas Region, Argentina, amended with sewage sludge and sewage sludge enriched with its own incinerated ash. After the stabilization period of 60 days, half of the pots were sampled for soil analysis; the rest of the pots were sown with L. perenne and harvested 8, 12, 16 and 20 weeks after sowing, by cutting just above the soil surface. Cadmium and Pb concentrations in aerial tissues of L. perenne were below detection limits, in good agreement with the soil fractionation study. Copper and Zn concentration in the first harvest were significantly higher in the coarse textured soil compared to the fine textured soil, in contrast with soil chemical speciation. In the third harvest, there was a positive correlation between Cu and Zn concentration in aerial biomass and soil fractions usually considered of low availability. We conclude that the most available fractions obtained by soil sequential extraction did not provide the best indicator of Cu and Zn availability to L. perenne.

  10. Element and chemical compounds transfer in bio-crude from hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaohan; Zhang, Chao; Li, Zeyu; Yang, Xiaoyi

    2016-02-01

    In this study, hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) experiments of Nannochloropsis and Spirulina were carried out at different temperatures (220-300 °C) to explore the effects of temperature on bio-crude yield and properties. The optimal temperature for bio-crude yield was around 260-280 °C. Transfers of element and chemical compounds in bio-crude were discussed in detail to deduce the reaction mechanism. The hydrogen and carbon recoveries were consistent with the results of bio-crude yields at every temperature point. The relative percentage of fatty acid in bio-crude decreased and the amine and amide increased for both microalgae with temperature rising. The N-heterocyclic compounds in bio-crude increased with temperature rising for Nannochloropsis, while decreased when temperature increased from 220 °C to 280 °C for Spirulina. Bio-crude gained at higher temperature or from microalgae with high protein content may contain high heteroatom compounds.

  11. Element and chemical compounds transfer in bio-crude from hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaohan; Zhang, Chao; Li, Zeyu; Yang, Xiaoyi

    2016-02-01

    In this study, hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) experiments of Nannochloropsis and Spirulina were carried out at different temperatures (220-300 °C) to explore the effects of temperature on bio-crude yield and properties. The optimal temperature for bio-crude yield was around 260-280 °C. Transfers of element and chemical compounds in bio-crude were discussed in detail to deduce the reaction mechanism. The hydrogen and carbon recoveries were consistent with the results of bio-crude yields at every temperature point. The relative percentage of fatty acid in bio-crude decreased and the amine and amide increased for both microalgae with temperature rising. The N-heterocyclic compounds in bio-crude increased with temperature rising for Nannochloropsis, while decreased when temperature increased from 220 °C to 280 °C for Spirulina. Bio-crude gained at higher temperature or from microalgae with high protein content may contain high heteroatom compounds. PMID:26700753

  12. Evidence of uranium and associated trace element mobilization and retention processes at Oklo (Gabon), a naturally radioactive site.

    PubMed

    Casas, Ignasi; de Pablo, Joan; Pérez, Isabel; Giménez, Javier; Duro, Lara; Bruno, Jordi

    2004-06-15

    The processes that affect the mobility of uranium and other radionuclides in the environment have been largely studied at both the laboratory and the field scales. The natural reactors found at the Oklo uranium mine in Gabon constitute a unique investigation setting as spontaneous fission reactions occurred two billion years ago. Oklo uraninites contain a large amount of other radionuclides as a result of the fission process. We have investigated the dissolution behavior of four uraninite samples from Oklo as a function of temperature (25 and 60 degrees C) and bicarbonate concentration (2.7-30 mmol/L). We have also investigated the dissolution behavior of minor components of the uraninites (i.e., Nd, Cs, Mo, Yb, and Sb) in relation to the dissolution of uranium. The results of the reported work are in good agreement with the kinetic rate laws derived from other uranium(IV) dioxide studies. Some of the minor components are found to be congruently released from the uraninite phase, while it is postulated that dissolution from segregated phases might affect the final concentrations of some of the rare earth elements, i.e., Nd and Yb. In addition, we have performed dissolution studies at 60 degrees C with two uraninites representative of different geochemical environments at Oklo, to study the uranium dissolution rates as a function of the temperature. This has allowed derivation of apparent activation energies for the bicarbonate-promoted oxidative dissolution of the Oklo uraninites. The dissolution behavior of the minor components of the uraninites at 60 degrees C was found to closely follow the behavior observed at 25 degrees C. This indicates that similar codissolution mechanisms operate in the temperature range studied. The implications for the mobility of uranium and other radionuclides in natural and anthropogenic environments are discussed.

  13. Radioactive heat sources in the lunar interior.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    Published models for the moon's thermal history typically imply present day central temperatures far too high to be consistent with the recently proposed lunar temperature profile of Sonett et al. (1971). Furthermore, chemical data on Apollo samples show that the moon is depleted relative to chondrites in volatile elements, and possibly enriched relative to chondrites in refractory elements. Additional thermal models have therefore been investigated in order to set upper limits on lunar radioactivity consistent with the proposed temperature distribution. For an initially cold, uniform moon, devoid of potassium, a maximum uranium content of 23 parts per billion is inferred.

  14. Profiling Environmental Chemicals for Activity in the Antioxidant Response Element Signaling Pathway Using a High-Throughput Screening Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    1 ABSTRACT 2 3 BACKGROUND: Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety 4 of diseases ranging from cancer to neurodegeneration, highlighti.ng the need to identify 5 chemicals that can induce this effect. The antioxidant response element (ARE)...

  15. Understanding the Idea of Chemical Elements and Their Periodic Classification in Spanish Students Aged 16-18 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franco-Mariscal, Antonio-Joaquín; Oliva-Martínez, José María; Almoraima Gil, M. L.

    2016-01-01

    The work reported here involved a comparative study regarding the understanding that high school students (16-18 years) have of the concept of chemical elements and their periodic classification. More specifically, the level of knowledge on this topic was compared before and after the completion of baccalaureate studies in a sample of Spanish…

  16. Anatomical variants of transposition of the main vessels and their relationship with the content of chemical elements in heart ventricles.

    PubMed

    Kliver, E E; Okuneva, G N; Levicheva, E N; Nepomnyashchikh, L M; Loginova, I Yu; Volkov, A M; Lushnikova, E L; Trunova, V A; Zvereva, V V

    2008-05-01

    Cardiometrical characteristics of anatomical variants of the main vessels transposition are determined by different functional load of heart compartments and are associated with metabolic processes of different intensity, which is confirmed by the content of chemical elements in the right- and left-ventricular myocardium. It was shown that the content of chemicals was virtually the same in both cardiac ventricles in case of main vessels transposition and isolated atrial septal defect. Positive correlations between the degree of left-ventricular hypertrophy and content of S, K, Fe, and Sr in it and a negative correlation between this hypertrophy and Cu content were revealed. Transposition of the main vessels and defects of atrial and ventricular septa were associated with different levels of chemical elements in both ventricles, particularly of Zn, Mn, Fe, and Ca.

  17. A chemical-spectrochemical method for the determination of rare earth elements and thorium in cerium minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rose, H.J.; Murata, K.J.; Carron, M.K.

    1954-01-01

    In a combined chemical-spectrochemical procedure for quantitatively determining rare earth elements in cerium minerals, cerium is determined volumetrically, a total rare earths plus thoria precipitate is separated chemically, the ceria content of the precipitate is raised to 80??0 percent by adding pure ceria, and the resulting mixture is analyzed for lanthanum, praseodymium, neodymium, samarium, gadolinium, yttrium, and thorium spectrochemically by means of the d.c. carbon arc. Spectral lines of singly ionized cerium are used as internal standard lines in the spectrochemical determination which is patterned after Fassel's procedure [1]. Results of testing the method with synthetic mixtures of rare earths and with samples of chemically analyzed cerium minerals show that the coefficient of variation for a quadruplicate determination of any element does not exceed 5??0 (excepting yttrium at concentrations less than 1 percent) and that the method is free of serious systematic error. ?? 1954.

  18. Constrained positive matrix factorization: Elemental ratios, spatial distinction, and chemical transport model source contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturtz, Timothy M.

    Source apportionment models attempt to untangle the relationship between pollution sources and the impacts at downwind receptors. Two frameworks of source apportionment models exist: source-oriented and receptor-oriented. Source based apportionment models use presumed emissions and atmospheric processes to estimate the downwind source contributions. Conversely, receptor based models leverage speciated concentration data from downwind receptors and apply statistical methods to predict source contributions. Integration of both source-oriented and receptor-oriented models could lead to a better understanding of the implications sources have on the environment and society. The research presented here investigated three different types of constraints applied to the Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) receptor model within the framework of the Multilinear Engine (ME-2): element ratio constraints, spatial separation constraints, and chemical transport model (CTM) source attribution constraints. PM10-2.5 mass and trace element concentrations were measured in Winston-Salem, Chicago, and St. Paul at up to 60 sites per city during two different seasons in 2010. PMF was used to explore the underlying sources of variability. Information on previously reported PM10-2.5 tire and brake wear profiles were used to constrain these features in PMF by prior specification of selected species ratios. We also modified PMF to allow for combining the measurements from all three cities into a single model while preserving city-specific soil features. Relatively minor differences were observed between model predictions with and without the prior ratio constraints, increasing confidence in our ability to identify separate brake wear and tire wear features. Using separate data, source contributions to total fine particle carbon predicted by a CTM were incorporated into the PMF receptor model to form a receptor-oriented hybrid model. The level of influence of the CTM versus traditional PMF was

  19. Major and trace element concentrations in samples from 72275 and 72255. [chemical composition of lunar rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haskin, L. A.; Blanchard, D. P.; Korotev, R.; Jacobs, J. W.; Brannon, J. A.; Herrmann, A. G.

    1974-01-01

    Analytical data have been obtained for Co, Sc, Hf, Zn, Cr, Ga, Rb, Cs, Ni, major elements, and rare earth elements in eight samples from boulder 1. The data for trace elements were obtained by radiochemical neutron activation analysis. Major elements, except Na and Mn, were obtained by atomic absorption spectral photometry. Values for Na and Mn were obtained by neutron activation analysis of the same powder that was later dissolved to provide the atomic absorption analyses.

  20. Role of alkyl alcohol on viscosity of silica-based chemical gels for decontamination of highly radioactive nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, B. S.; Yoon, S. B.; Jung, C. H.; Lee, K. W.; Moon, J. K.

    2012-07-01

    Silica-based chemical gel for the decontamination of nuclear facilities was prepared by using fumed silica as a viscosifier, a 0.5 M Ce (IV) solution dissolved in concentrated nitric acid as a chemical decontamination agent, and tripropylene glycol butyl ether (TPGBE) as a co-viscosifier. A new effective strategy for the preparation of the chemical gel was investigated by introducing the alkyl alcohols as organic solvents to effectively dissolve the co-viscosifier. The mixture solution of the co-viscosifier and alkyl alcohols was more effective in the control of viscosity than that of the co-viscosifier only in gel. Here, the alkyl alcohols played a key role as an effective dissolution solvent for the co-viscosifier in the preparation of the chemical gel, resulting in a reducing of the amount of the co-viscosifier and gel time compared with that of the chemical gel prepared without the alkyl alcohols. It was considered that the alkyl alcohols contributed to the effective dissolution of the co-viscosifier as well as the homogeneous mixing in the formation of the gel, while the co-viscosifier in an aqueous media of the chemical decontamination agent solution showed a lower solubility. The decontamination efficiency of the chemical gels prepared in this work using a multi-channel analyzer (MCA) showed a high decontamination efficiency of over ca. 94% and ca. 92% for Co-60 and Cs-137 contaminated on surface of the stainless steel 304, respectively. (authors)

  1. Reconstruction of centennial-scale fluxes of chemical elements in the Australian coastal environment using seagrass archives.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Oscar; Davis, Grace; Lavery, Paul S; Duarte, Carlos M; Martinez-Cortizas, Antonio; Mateo, Miguel Angel; Masqué, Pere; Arias-Ortiz, Ariane; Rozaimi, Mohammad; Kendrick, Gary A

    2016-01-15

    The study of a Posidonia australis sedimentary archive has provided a record of changes in element concentrations (Al, Fe, Mn, Pb, Zn, Cr, Cd, Co, As, Cu, Ni and S) over the last 3000 years in the Australian marine environment. Human-derived contamination in Oyster Harbor (SW Australia) started ~100 years ago (AD ~1900) and exponentially increased until present. This appears to be related to European colonization of Australia and the subsequent impact of human activities, namely mining, coal and metal production, and extensive agriculture. Two contamination periods of different magnitude have been identified: Expansion period (EXP, AD ~1900-1970) and Establishment period (EST, AD ~1970 to present). Enrichments of chemical elements with respect to baseline concentrations (in samples older than ~115 cal years BP) were found for all elements studied in both periods, except for Ni, As and S. The highest enrichment factors were obtained for the EST period (ranging from 1.3-fold increase in Cu to 7.2-fold in Zn concentrations) compared to the EXP period (1.1-fold increase for Cu and Cr to 2.4-fold increase for Pb). Zinc, Pb, Mn and Co concentrations during both periods were 2- to 7-fold higher than baseline levels. This study demonstrates the value of Posidonia mats as long-term archives of element concentrations and trends in coastal ecosystems. We also provide preliminary evidence on the potential for Posidonia meadows to act as significant long-term biogeochemical sinks of chemical elements. PMID:26437357

  2. Reconstruction of centennial-scale fluxes of chemical elements in the Australian coastal environment using seagrass archives.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Oscar; Davis, Grace; Lavery, Paul S; Duarte, Carlos M; Martinez-Cortizas, Antonio; Mateo, Miguel Angel; Masqué, Pere; Arias-Ortiz, Ariane; Rozaimi, Mohammad; Kendrick, Gary A

    2016-01-15

    The study of a Posidonia australis sedimentary archive has provided a record of changes in element concentrations (Al, Fe, Mn, Pb, Zn, Cr, Cd, Co, As, Cu, Ni and S) over the last 3000 years in the Australian marine environment. Human-derived contamination in Oyster Harbor (SW Australia) started ~100 years ago (AD ~1900) and exponentially increased until present. This appears to be related to European colonization of Australia and the subsequent impact of human activities, namely mining, coal and metal production, and extensive agriculture. Two contamination periods of different magnitude have been identified: Expansion period (EXP, AD ~1900-1970) and Establishment period (EST, AD ~1970 to present). Enrichments of chemical elements with respect to baseline concentrations (in samples older than ~115 cal years BP) were found for all elements studied in both periods, except for Ni, As and S. The highest enrichment factors were obtained for the EST period (ranging from 1.3-fold increase in Cu to 7.2-fold in Zn concentrations) compared to the EXP period (1.1-fold increase for Cu and Cr to 2.4-fold increase for Pb). Zinc, Pb, Mn and Co concentrations during both periods were 2- to 7-fold higher than baseline levels. This study demonstrates the value of Posidonia mats as long-term archives of element concentrations and trends in coastal ecosystems. We also provide preliminary evidence on the potential for Posidonia meadows to act as significant long-term biogeochemical sinks of chemical elements.

  3. Near-field chemical composition of porewaters in a near-surface low-level radioactive waste vault

    SciTech Connect

    Caron, F.; Haas, M.K.; Torok, J.; Manni, G.

    1997-12-31

    A long-term waste degradation experiment has been performed with actual low-level radioactive wastes (LLRW) at the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL), to support the licensing and modelling efforts for near-surface disposal. The wastes consist of paper, mop heads, paper towels, used clothing, etc. The wastes were compacted into bales and sealed into separate steel containers, which were connected to leachate collection systems for sampling. The leachates collected had a composition typical of landfill leachates. The major inorganic ions were Na, Ca, Cl, and Fe, and the ionic strength was {approximately}0.05 M. The relative distribution of inorganic ions in the leachates was remarkably similar between bales. Volatile fatty acids (VFA) were the major species of dissolved organic carbon (DOC; total DOC up to 7,000 mg/L). A typical composition of leachates is proposed, which can be used in geochemical and source term modelling.

  4. Theoretical studies of atomic properties and chemical stabilities in acid solutions of element Uus (Z=117) and Astatine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Z. W.; Li, J. G.; Dong, C. Z.

    2012-11-01

    Multi-configuration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) method was employed to calculate the first five ionization potentials, electron affinities, resonance excitation energies, oscillator strengths and radii for the element Uus and its homologue At. Main valence correlation effects were taken into account. The Breit interaction and QED effects were also estimated. The uncertainties of calculated IPs, EAs and IR for Uus and At were reduced through an extrapolation procedure. The good consistency with available experimental and other theoretical values demonstrates the validity of the present results. These theoretical data were further used to predict the chemical stabilities of element Uus and At in acid solutions.

  5. RESULTS FROM ANALYSIS OF THE FIRST AND SECOND STRIP EFFLUENT COALESCER ELEMENTS FROM RADIOACTIVE OPERATIONS OF THE MODULAR CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T.; Fondeur, F.; Fink, S.

    2011-06-28

    The coalescer elements for the Strip Effluent (SE) acid within the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) experienced elevated differential pressure drop during radioactive operations. Following the end of operations for the first Macrobatch campaign and soon after start of the second Macrobatch campaign, personnel removed the coalescer media and provided to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for diagnostic investigation of the causes of reduced flow. This report summarizes those studies. Two Strip Effluent (SE) coalescers were delivered to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). One was removed from the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) between processing of Macrobatch 1 and 2 (coalescer 'Alpha'), and the second was removed from MCU after processing of {approx}24,000 gallons of salt solution (coalescer 'Beta'). Both coalescers underwent the same general strip acid flush program to reduce the dose and were delivered to SRNL for analysis of potential occluding solids. Analysis of Coalescer Alpha indicates the presence of aluminum hydroxide solids and aluminosilicate solids, while analysis of Coalescer Beta indicates the presence of aluminum hydroxide solids, but no aluminosilicates. Leaching studies on sections of both coalescers were performed. The results indicate that the coalescers had different amounts of solids present on them at the time of removal. Finally, samples of free liquids retrieved from both coalescers indicate no excessive amounts of CSSX solvent present. Given the strip acid flushing that occurred in the SE coalescers, the solids we detected on the coalescers are probably indicative of a larger quantity of these solids present before the strip acid flushing. Under this scenario, the excessive pressure drops are due to the solids and not from organic fouling.

  6. The pure rotational spectrum of HPS (X̃1A'): chemical bonding in second-row elements.

    PubMed

    Halfen, D T; Clouthier, D J; Ziurys, L M; Lattanzi, V; McCarthy, M C; Thaddeus, P; Thorwirth, S

    2011-04-01

    The pure rotational spectrum of HPS, as well as its (34)S and D isotopologues, has been recorded at microwave, millimeter, and submillimeter wavelengths, the first observation of this molecule in the gas phase. The data were obtained using a combination of millimeter direct absorption, Fourier transform microwave (FTMW), and microwave-microwave double-resonance techniques, which cover the total frequency range from 15 to 419 GHz. Quantum chemical calculations at the B3LYP and CCSD(T) levels were also performed to aid in spectral identification. HPS was created in the direct absorption experiment from a mixture of elemental phosphorus, H(2)S, and Ar carrier gas; DPS was produced by adding D(2). In the FTMW study, these species were generated in a pulsed discharge nozzle from PH(3) and H(2)S or D(2)S, diluted in neon. The spectra recorded for HPS and its isotopologues exhibit clear asymmetric top patterns indicating bent structures; phosphorus hyperfine splittings were also observed in HPS, but not DPS. Analysis of the data yielded rotation, centrifugal distortion, and phosphorus nuclear spin-rotation parameters for the individual species. The r(m) ((1)) structure for HPS, calculated from the rotational constants, is r(H-P) = 1.438(1) Å, r(P-S) = 1.9320(1) Å, and θ(H-P-S) = 101.85(9)°. Empirically correcting for zero-point vibrational effects yields the geometry r(e)(H-P) = 1.4321(2) Å, r(e)(P-S) = 1.9287(1) Å, and θ(e)(H-P-S) = 101.78(1)°, in close agreement with the r(m) ((1)) structure. A small inertial defect was found for HPS indicating a relatively rigid molecule. Based on these data, the bonding in this species is best represented as H-P=S, similar to the first-row analog HNO, as well as HNS and HPO. Therefore, substitution of phosphorus and sulfur for nitrogen and oxygen does not result in a dramatic structural change.

  7. Regional clarkes of chemical elements in soils of southern European Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'yachenko, V. V.; Matasova, I. Yu.

    2016-10-01

    Distribution patterns of 19 elements in soils of the southern part of European Russian were estimated on the basis of the analysis of more than 9000 soil samples; regional clarkes of the elements were compared with their global clarkes, The obtained data attest to the fact that southern Russia is characterized by increased concentrations of most of the microelements with a tendency for their rise in the recent decades. The great role of the aerial migration and deposition of elements results in the enrichment of the soils with technophilic elements, so that the geochemical convergence of the soils is observed. It can be concluded that natural element abundances in soils are subjected to the technogenic transformation reflecting the high rate of contamination of the biosphere.

  8. Technology for Treatment of Liquid Radioactive Waste Generated during Uranium and Plutonium Chemical and Metallurgical Manufacturing in FSUE PO Mayak - 13616

    SciTech Connect

    Adamovich, D.

    2013-07-01

    Created technological scheme for treatment of liquid radioactive waste generated while uranium and plutonium chemical and metallurgical manufacturing consists of: - Liquid radioactive waste (LRW) purification from radionuclides and its transfer into category of manufacturing waste; - Concentration of suspensions containing alpha-nuclides and their further conversion to safe dry state (calcinate) and moving to long controlled storage. The following technologies are implemented in LRW treatment complex: - Settling and filtering technology for treatment of liquid intermediate-level waste (ILW) with volume about 1500m{sup 3}/year and alpha-activity from 10{sup 6} to 10{sup 8} Bq/dm{sup 3} - Membrane and sorption technology for processing of low-level waste (LLW) of radioactive drain waters with volume about 150 000 m{sup 3}/year and alpha-activity from 10{sup 3} to 10{sup 4} Bq/dm{sup 3}. Settling and filtering technology includes two stages of ILW immobilization accompanied with primary settling of radionuclides on transition metal hydroxides with the following flushing and drying of the pulp generated; secondary deep after settling of radionuclides on transition metal hydroxides with the following solid phase concentration by the method of tangential flow ultrafiltration. Besides, the installation capacity on permeate is not less than 3 m{sup 3}/h. Concentrates generated are sent to calcination on microwave drying (MW drying) unit. Membrane and sorption technology includes processing of averaged sewage flux by the method of tangential flow ultrafiltration with total capacity of installations on permeate not less than 18 m{sup 3}/h and sorption extraction of uranium from permeate on anionite. According to radionuclide contamination level purified solution refers to general industrial waste. Concentrates generated during suspension filtering are evaporated in rotary film evaporator (RFE) in order to remove excess water, thereafter they are dried on infrared heating

  9. The Impact of Chemical Abrasion on Trace Element Analysis of Zircon by In Situ Micro-Analytical Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanoski, A.; Coint, N.; Cottle, J. M.; Hetherington, C. J.; Barnes, C. G.

    2011-12-01

    Introduction of the chemical abrasion technique has significantly increased the precision and accuracy of ID-TIMS U-Pb dating of zircon. The chemical abrasion technique, coupled with thermal annealing, removes inclusions and metamict domains from zircon reducing the impact of Pb-loss leading to more concordant analyses.In this study, zircon from the Red Bluff Granitic Suite (TX) (ID-TIMS age 1120 ± 35 Ma) has been thermally annealed and chemically abraded prior to SHRIMP-RG and LA-MC-ICP-MS analysis.Chemically abraded zircon gives a date of 1109 ± 22 Ma with an average of 3% discordancy. This compares with dates of 1137 ± 48 Ma with an average of 39% discordancy for non-abraded zircon from the same sample. The dates overlap within uncertainty, but the age from chemically abraded zircon has a lower population uncertainty. Other petrographic and analytical observations of the chemically abraded zircon include brighter CL intensity, lower REE abundances, more consistent (smaller scatter) negative Eu/Eu* anomalies, less scatter in the chondrite-normalized LREE values, and a slightly less-steep chondrite normalized HREE slope. The data show that thermal annealing and chemical abrasion of zircon prior to analysis by in situ ion-beam or laser ablation techniques may result in better accuracy and greater concordance in U-Pb analysis of zircon. However, while improving the quality of some components of the trace element dataset (e.g. Eu anomalies) the process may prejudice the interpretation of zircon trace element data (e.g. HREECN slopes).

  10. Distribution of chemical elements in calc-alkaline igneous rocks, soils, sediments and tailings deposits in northern central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyarzún, Jorge; Oyarzun, Roberto; Lillo, Javier; Higueras, Pablo; Maturana, Hugo; Oyarzún, Ricardo

    2016-08-01

    This study follows the paths of 32 chemical elements in the arid to semi-arid realm of the western Andes, between 27° and 33° S, a region hosting important ore deposits and mining operations. The study encompasses igneous rocks, soils, river and stream sediments, and tailings deposits. The chemical elements have been grouped according to the Goldschmidt classification, and their concentrations in each compartment are confronted with their expected contents for different rock types based on geochemical affinities and the geologic and metallogenic setting. Also, the element behavior during rock weathering and fluvial transport is here interpreted in terms of the ionic potentials and solubility products. The results highlight the similarity between the chemical composition of the andesites and that of the average Continental Crust, except for the higher V and Mn contents of the former, and their depletion in Mg, Ni, and Cr. The geochemical behavior of the elements in the different compartments (rocks, soils, sediments and tailings) is highly consistent with the mobility expected from their ionic potentials, their sulfates and carbonates solubility products, and their affinities for Fe and Mn hydroxides. From an environmental perspective, the low solubility of Cu, Zn, and Pb due to climatic, chemical, and mineralogical factors reduces the pollution risks related to their high to extremely high contents in source materials (e.g., rocks, altered zones, tailings). Besides, the complex oxyanions of arsenic get bound by colloidal particles of Fe-hydroxides and oxyhydroxides (e.g., goethite), thus becoming incorporated to the fine sediment fraction in the stream sediments.

  11. Experimental investigations on the chemical state of solid fission-product elements in U3Si2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugajin, M.; Itoh, A.

    1994-10-01

    The uranium silicide U3Si2 has a congruent melting point of 1665 C and possesses higher uranium density (11.3 g U/cc) and higher thermal conductivity than the uranium dioxide currently used in light water reactors. U3Si2 is in use as a research reactor fuel (US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, NUREG-1313, July, 1988), representing a potentiality for power reactor fuel. A first attempt is made in this study to predict the chemical state of the solid fission-product elements comprising zirconium, molybdenum, rare earth elements, alkaline earth metals and elements of the platinum group. Ternary phase equilibria in the U-Mo-Si and U-Ru-Si systems are also investigated to supplement the fission product chemistry in U3Si2.

  12. Permissible and background concentrations of pollutants in environmental regulation (heavy metals and other chemical elements)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernova, O. V.; Beketskaya, O. V.

    2011-09-01

    Approaches to the establishment of the limit concentrations of pollutants in Russia and abroad were considered. It was shown that the norms for the concentrations of total trace elements and heavy metals in soils used in Russia and European countries are comparable. On the basis of the analysis of cartographic data, general regularities in changes of the concentrations of some trace elements were revealed for soils of European Russia. Different computational methods were tested for establishing the background concentrations of elements in soils of different composition in different regions.

  13. Gas phase chemical studies of superheavy elements using the Dubna gas-filled recoil separator - Stopping range determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittwer, D.; Abdullin, F. Sh.; Aksenov, N. V.; Albin, Yu. V.; Bozhikov, G. A.; Dmitriev, S. N.; Dressler, R.; Eichler, R.; Gäggeler, H. W.; Henderson, R. A.; Hübener, S.; Kenneally, J. M.; Lebedev, V. Ya.; Lobanov, Yu. V.; Moody, K. J.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Petrushkin, O. V.; Polyakov, A. N.; Piguet, D.; Rasmussen, P.; Sagaidak, R. N.; Serov, A.; Shirokovsky, I. V.; Shaughnessy, D. A.; Shishkin, S. V.; Sukhov, A. M.; Stoyer, M. A.; Stoyer, N. J.; Tereshatov, E. E.; Tsyganov, Yu. S.; Utyonkov, V. K.; Vostokin, G. K.; Wegrzecki, M.; Wilk, P. A.

    2010-01-01

    Currently, gas phase chemistry experiments with heaviest elements are usually performed with the gas-jet technique with the disadvantage that all reaction products are collected in a gas-filled thermalisation chamber adjacent to the target. The incorporation of a physical preseparation device between target and collection chamber opens up the perspective to perform new chemical studies. But this approach requires detailed knowledge of the stopping force (STF) of the heaviest elements in various materials. Measurements of the energy loss of mercury (Hg), radon (Rn), and nobelium (No) in Mylar and argon (Ar) were performed at low kinetic energies of around (40-270) keV per nucleon. The experimentally obtained values were compared with STF calculations of the commonly used program for calculating stopping and ranges of ions in matter (SRIM). Using the obtained data points an extrapolation of the STF up to element 114, eka-lead, in the same stopping media was carried out. These estimations were applied to design and to perform a first chemical experiment with a superheavy element behind a physical preseparator using the nuclear fusion reaction 244Pu( 48Ca; 3n) 289114. One decay chain assigned to an atom of 285112, the α-decay product of 289114, was observed.

  14. Potential toxicity of chemical elements in beach sediments near Santa Rosalía copper mine, Baja California Peninsula, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonathan, M. P.; Shumilin, E.; Rodríguez-Figueroa, G. M.; Rodriguez-Espinosa, P. F.; Sujitha, S. B.

    2016-10-01

    A total of 17 beach sediment samples were analyzed for the determination of thirty-one chemical elements to generate a geochemical data set from the Santa Rosalía mining area in the State of Baja California Sur (south), Mexico. Results indicate that the beach sediments were enriched in Cu, Zn, Co, Pb, Cd (3856, 2599, 635, 236, 240 mg kg-1, respectively) and in Mn (2.01%) due to a century of mining and smelting activities. Comparison of these concentration with ecotoxicological sediment quality criteria (ERL, ERM, LEL, SEL) indicated the values of As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Sr, Zn and Mn were higher than the permissible limits. Average values of the calculated geoaccumulation index (Igeo) suggest that the key elements such as Mn, Ba, Cd, Co, Mo, Pb, Sr, Zn are categorized in class 4 to 6 encompassing the strongly polluted to extremely polluted groups. The association and enrichment of the above elements are also well supported statistically (factor analysis) which points to the role of Fe-Mn oxides as the main scavengers for retaining these chemical elements.

  15. Chemical studies of differentiated meteorites. I - Labile trace elements in Antarctic and non-Antarctic eucrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Rick L.; Lipschutz, Michael E.

    1990-01-01

    Element contents of Ag, Au, Bi, Cd, Co, Cs, Ga, In, Rb, Sb, Se, Te, Tl, U, and Zn were analyzed, using RNAA, in 25 Antarctic and nine non-Antarctic eucrites to determine whether these two populations differ significantly in thermal history and derive from the same or different eucrite parent body. Data for these 15 elements indicate that basaltic Antarctic and non-Antarctic eucrite populations reflect the same genetic processes and, hence, come from the same parent asteroid.

  16. Divergent variations in concentrations of chemical elements among shrub organs in a temperate desert.

    PubMed

    He, Mingzhu; Song, Xin; Tian, Fuping; Zhang, Ke; Zhang, Zhishan; Chen, Ning; Li, Xinrong

    2016-01-01

    Desert shrubs, a dominant component of desert ecosystems, need to maintain sufficient levels of nutrients in their different organs to ensure operation of various physiological functions for the purpose of survival and reproduction. In the present study, we analyzed 10 elements in leaves, stems, and roots of 24 dominant shrub species from 52 sites across a temperate desert ecosystem in northwestern China. We found that concentrations of all 10 elements were higher in leaves than in stems and roots, that non-legumes had higher levels of leaf Na and Mg than did legumes, and that Na was more concentrated in C4 leaves than in C3 leaves. Scaling relationships of elements between the photosynthetic organ (leaf) and non-photosynthetic organs (stem and root) were allometric. Results of principal components analysis (PCA) highlighted the important role of the elements responsible for osmoregulation (K and Na) in water utilization of desert shrubs. Soil properties and taxonomy explained most variation of element concentrations in desert shrubs. Desert shrubs may not be particularly susceptible to future change in climate factors, because most elements (including N, P, K, Ca, Mn, Zn, and Cu) associated with photosynthesis, osmoregulation, enzyme activity, and water use efficiency primarily depend on soil conditions. PMID:26818575

  17. Divergent variations in concentrations of chemical elements among shrub organs in a temperate desert.

    PubMed

    He, Mingzhu; Song, Xin; Tian, Fuping; Zhang, Ke; Zhang, Zhishan; Chen, Ning; Li, Xinrong

    2016-01-28

    Desert shrubs, a dominant component of desert ecosystems, need to maintain sufficient levels of nutrients in their different organs to ensure operation of various physiological functions for the purpose of survival and reproduction. In the present study, we analyzed 10 elements in leaves, stems, and roots of 24 dominant shrub species from 52 sites across a temperate desert ecosystem in northwestern China. We found that concentrations of all 10 elements were higher in leaves than in stems and roots, that non-legumes had higher levels of leaf Na and Mg than did legumes, and that Na was more concentrated in C4 leaves than in C3 leaves. Scaling relationships of elements between the photosynthetic organ (leaf) and non-photosynthetic organs (stem and root) were allometric. Results of principal components analysis (PCA) highlighted the important role of the elements responsible for osmoregulation (K and Na) in water utilization of desert shrubs. Soil properties and taxonomy explained most variation of element concentrations in desert shrubs. Desert shrubs may not be particularly susceptible to future change in climate factors, because most elements (including N, P, K, Ca, Mn, Zn, and Cu) associated with photosynthesis, osmoregulation, enzyme activity, and water use efficiency primarily depend on soil conditions.

  18. Divergent variations in concentrations of chemical elements among shrub organs in a temperate desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Mingzhu; Song, Xin; Tian, Fuping; Zhang, Ke; Zhang, Zhishan; Chen, Ning; Li, Xinrong

    2016-01-01

    Desert shrubs, a dominant component of desert ecosystems, need to maintain sufficient levels of nutrients in their different organs to ensure operation of various physiological functions for the purpose of survival and reproduction. In the present study, we analyzed 10 elements in leaves, stems, and roots of 24 dominant shrub species from 52 sites across a temperate desert ecosystem in northwestern China. We found that concentrations of all 10 elements were higher in leaves than in stems and roots, that non-legumes had higher levels of leaf Na and Mg than did legumes, and that Na was more concentrated in C4 leaves than in C3 leaves. Scaling relationships of elements between the photosynthetic organ (leaf) and non-photosynthetic organs (stem and root) were allometric. Results of principal components analysis (PCA) highlighted the important role of the elements responsible for osmoregulation (K and Na) in water utilization of desert shrubs. Soil properties and taxonomy explained most variation of element concentrations in desert shrubs. Desert shrubs may not be particularly susceptible to future change in climate factors, because most elements (including N, P, K, Ca, Mn, Zn, and Cu) associated with photosynthesis, osmoregulation, enzyme activity, and water use efficiency primarily depend on soil conditions.

  19. Divergent variations in concentrations of chemical elements among shrub organs in a temperate desert

    PubMed Central

    He, Mingzhu; Song, Xin; Tian, Fuping; Zhang, Ke; Zhang, Zhishan; Chen, Ning; Li, Xinrong

    2016-01-01

    Desert shrubs, a dominant component of desert ecosystems, need to maintain sufficient levels of nutrients in their different organs to ensure operation of various physiological functions for the purpose of survival and reproduction. In the present study, we analyzed 10 elements in leaves, stems, and roots of 24 dominant shrub species from 52 sites across a temperate desert ecosystem in northwestern China. We found that concentrations of all 10 elements were higher in leaves than in stems and roots, that non-legumes had higher levels of leaf Na and Mg than did legumes, and that Na was more concentrated in C4 leaves than in C3 leaves. Scaling relationships of elements between the photosynthetic organ (leaf) and non-photosynthetic organs (stem and root) were allometric. Results of principal components analysis (PCA) highlighted the important role of the elements responsible for osmoregulation (K and Na) in water utilization of desert shrubs. Soil properties and taxonomy explained most variation of element concentrations in desert shrubs. Desert shrubs may not be particularly susceptible to future change in climate factors, because most elements (including N, P, K, Ca, Mn, Zn, and Cu) associated with photosynthesis, osmoregulation, enzyme activity, and water use efficiency primarily depend on soil conditions. PMID:26818575

  20. Mass casualties and health care following the release of toxic chemicals or radioactive material--contribution of modern biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Göransson Nyberg, Ann; Stricklin, Daniela; Sellström, Åke

    2011-12-01

    Catastrophic chemical or radiological events can cause thousands of casualties. Such disasters require triage procedures to identify the development of health consequences requiring medical intervention. Our objective is to analyze recent advancements in biotechnology for triage in mass emergency situations. In addition to identifying persons "at risk" of developing health problems, these technologies can aid in securing the unaffected or "worried well". We also highlight the need for public/private partnerships to engage in some of the underpinning sciences, such as patho-physiological mechanisms of chemical and radiological hazards, and for the necessary investment in the development of rapid assessment tools through identification of biochemical, molecular, and genetic biomarkers to predict health effects. For chemical agents, biomarkers of neurotoxicity, lung damage, and clinical and epidemiological databases are needed to assess acute and chronic effects of exposures. For radiological exposures, development of rapid, sensitive biomarkers using advanced biotechnologies are needed to sort exposed persons at risk of life-threatening effects from persons with long-term risk or no risk. The final implementation of rapid and portable diagnostics tools suitable for emergency care providers to guide triage and medical countermeasures use will need public support, since commercial incentives are lacking.

  1. Mass Casualties and Health Care Following the Release of Toxic Chemicals or Radioactive Material—Contribution of Modern Biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Göransson Nyberg, Ann; Stricklin, Daniela; Sellström, Åke

    2011-01-01

    Catastrophic chemical or radiological events can cause thousands of casualties. Such disasters require triage procedures to identify the development of health consequences requiring medical intervention. Our objective is to analyze recent advancements in biotechnology for triage in mass emergency situations. In addition to identifying persons “at risk” of developing health problems, these technologies can aid in securing the unaffected or “worried well”. We also highlight the need for public/private partnerships to engage in some of the underpinning sciences, such as patho-physiological mechanisms of chemical and radiological hazards, and for the necessary investment in the development of rapid assessment tools through identification of biochemical, molecular, and genetic biomarkers to predict health effects. For chemical agents, biomarkers of neurotoxicity, lung damage, and clinical and epidemiological databases are needed to assess acute and chronic effects of exposures. For radiological exposures, development of rapid, sensitive biomarkers using advanced biotechnologies are needed to sort exposed persons at risk of life-threatening effects from persons with long-term risk or no risk. The final implementation of rapid and portable diagnostics tools suitable for emergency care providers to guide triage and medical countermeasures use will need public support, since commercial incentives are lacking. PMID:22408587

  2. Mass casualties and health care following the release of toxic chemicals or radioactive material--contribution of modern biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Göransson Nyberg, Ann; Stricklin, Daniela; Sellström, Åke

    2011-12-01

    Catastrophic chemical or radiological events can cause thousands of casualties. Such disasters require triage procedures to identify the development of health consequences requiring medical intervention. Our objective is to analyze recent advancements in biotechnology for triage in mass emergency situations. In addition to identifying persons "at risk" of developing health problems, these technologies can aid in securing the unaffected or "worried well". We also highlight the need for public/private partnerships to engage in some of the underpinning sciences, such as patho-physiological mechanisms of chemical and radiological hazards, and for the necessary investment in the development of rapid assessment tools through identification of biochemical, molecular, and genetic biomarkers to predict health effects. For chemical agents, biomarkers of neurotoxicity, lung damage, and clinical and epidemiological databases are needed to assess acute and chronic effects of exposures. For radiological exposures, development of rapid, sensitive biomarkers using advanced biotechnologies are needed to sort exposed persons at risk of life-threatening effects from persons with long-term risk or no risk. The final implementation of rapid and portable diagnostics tools suitable for emergency care providers to guide triage and medical countermeasures use will need public support, since commercial incentives are lacking. PMID:22408587

  3. Textbook Errors: 137. Physical and Chemical Properties and Bonding of Metallic Elements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, R. Thomas

    1979-01-01

    Focuses attention on the almost universal practice of discussing all metals as malleable. The author points out that some are brittle and then he presents the variation in chemical properties of metals. (SA)

  4. Finite element modeling of contaminant transport in soils including the effect of chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Javadi, A A; Al-Najjar, M M

    2007-05-17

    The movement of chemicals through soils to the groundwater is a major cause of degradation of water resources. In many cases, serious human and stock health implications are associated with this form of pollution. Recent studies have shown that the current models and methods are not able to adequately describe the leaching of nutrients through soils, often underestimating the risk of groundwater contamination by surface-applied chemicals, and overestimating the concentration of resident solutes. Furthermore, the effect of chemical reactions on the fate and transport of contaminants is not included in many of the existing numerical models for contaminant transport. In this paper a numerical model is presented for simulation of the flow of water and air and contaminant transport through unsaturated soils with the main focus being on the effects of chemical reactions. The governing equations of miscible contaminant transport including advection, dispersion-diffusion and adsorption effects together with the effect of chemical reactions are presented. The mathematical framework and the numerical implementation of the model are described in detail. The model is validated by application to a number of test cases from the literature and is then applied to the simulation of a physical model test involving transport of contaminants in a block of soil with particular reference to the effects of chemical reactions. Comparison of the results of the numerical model with the experimental results shows that the model is capable of predicting the effects of chemical reactions with very high accuracy. The importance of consideration of the effects of chemical reactions is highlighted.

  5. Chemical studies of H chondrites. I - Mobile trace elements and gas retention ages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lingner, David W.; Huston, Ted J.; Hutson, Melinda; Lipschutz, Michael E.

    1987-01-01

    Trends for 16 trace elements (Ag, As, Au, Bi, Cd, Co, Cs, Ga, In, K, Rb, Sb, Se, Te, Tl, and Zn), chosen to span a broad geochemical and thermal response range, in 44 H4-6 chondrites, differ widely from those in L4-6 chondrites. In particular, H chondrites classified as heavily shocked petrologically do not necessarily exhibit Ar-40 loss and vice versa. The clear-cut causal relationship between siderophile and mobile element loss with increasing late shock seen in L chondrites is not generally evident in the H group. H chondrite parent material experienced an early high temperature genetic episode that mobilized a substantial proportion of these trace elements so that later thermal episodes resulted in more subtle, collateral fractionations. Mildly shocked L chondrites escaped this early high temperature event, indicating that the two most numerous meteorite groups differ fundamentally in genetic history.

  6. Radioactive ion detector

    DOEpatents

    Bower, K.E.; Weeks, D.R.

    1997-08-12

    Apparatus for detecting the presence, in aqueous media, of substances which emit alpha and/or beta radiation and determining the oxidation state of these radioactive substances, that is, whether they are in cationic or anionic form. In one embodiment, a sensor assembly has two elements, one comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds cations and the other comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds anions. Each ion-exchange element is further comprised of a scintillation plastic and a photocurrent generator. When a radioactive substance to which the sensor is exposed binds to either element and emits alpha or beta particles, photons produced in the scintillation plastic illuminate the photocurrent generator of that element. Sensing apparatus senses generator output and thereby indicates whether cationic species or anionic species or both are present and also provides an indication of species quantity. 2 figs.

  7. Radioactive ion detector

    DOEpatents

    Bower, Kenneth E.; Weeks, Donald R.

    1997-01-01

    Apparatus for detecting the presence, in aqueous media, of substances which emit alpha and/or beta radiation and determining the oxidation state of these radioactive substances, that is, whether they are in cationic or anionic form. In one embodiment, a sensor assembly has two elements, one comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds cations and the other comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds anions. Each ion-exchange element is further comprised of a scintillation plastic and a photocurrent generator. When a radioactive substance to which the sensor is exposed binds to either element and emits alpha or beta particles, photons produced in the scintillation plastic illuminate the photocurrent generator of that element. Sensing apparatus senses generator output and thereby indicates whether cationic species or anionic species or both are present and also provides an indication of species quantity.

  8. The relationship between chemical elements in soil and whole blood, and fluorosis induced by coal-fired pollution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Mu, Lihong; Jiang, Miao; Wang, Yingxiong; Yan, Wei; Jiao, Yongzhuo

    2014-04-01

    To study the relationship between chemical elements in soil and whole blood, and fluorosis induced by coal-fired pollution, ecological and case-control studies were carried out. We determined the concentrations of 11 chemical elements and pH values in soil in two fluorosis-affected counties in Chongqing, China, and analyzed the correlation between these values and prevalence of dental fluorosis. Ni, I, F, Hg, and pH values positively correlated with fluorosis prevalence (P < 0.05); these soil parameters may be related to coal-fired pollution fluorosis. Cu, Zn, Ca, Mg, and Fe concentrations in whole blood, and fluoride levels in urine of residents in epidemic and non-epidemic areas were determined. Cu, Zn, Mg, and Fe levels of the children in the case group were lower than those of the children in the external control group; urine fluoride level in the children in the case group was higher than that of the children in the internal and external control groups (P < 0.05). The levels of Mg, Fe, and urine fluoride were higher in the case adult group than in the internal adult control group (P < 0.05). Anti-fluoride elements were deficient in endemic areas.

  9. Periodic Table Target: A Game that Introduces the Biological Significance of Chemical Element Periodicity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sevcik, Richard S.; McGinty, Ragan L.; Schultz, Linda D.; Alexander, Susan V.

    2008-01-01

    Periodic Table Target, a game for middle school or high school students, familiarizes students with the form of the periodic table and the biological significance of different elements. The Periodic Table Target game board is constructed as a class project, and the game is played to reinforce the content. Students are assigned several elements…

  10. An x ray scatter approach for non-destructive chemical analysis of low atomic numbered elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, H. Richard

    1993-01-01

    A non-destructive x-ray scatter (XRS) approach has been developed, along with a rapid atomic scatter algorithm for the detection and analysis of low atomic-numbered elements in solids, powders, and liquids. The present method of energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (EDXRF) makes the analysis of light elements (i.e., less than sodium; less than 11) extremely difficult. Detection and measurement become progressively worse as atomic numbers become smaller, due to a competing process called 'Auger Emission', which reduces fluorescent intensity, coupled with the high mass absorption coefficients exhibited by low energy x-rays, the detection and determination of low atomic-numbered elements by x-ray spectrometry is limited. However, an indirect approach based on the intensity ratio of Compton and Rayleigh scattered has been used to define light element components in alloys, plastics and other materials. This XRS technique provides qualitative and quantitative information about the overall constituents of a variety of samples.

  11. Spinel from Apollo 12 Olivine Mare Basalts: Chemical Systematics of Selected Major, Minor, and Trace Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papike, J. J.; Karner, J. M.; Shearer, C. K.; Spilde, M. N.

    2002-01-01

    Spinels from Apollo 12 Olivine basalts have been studied by Electron and Ion microprobe techniques. The zoning trends of major, minor and trace elements provide new insights into the conditions under which planetary basalts form. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  12. The influence of natural factors on the concentrations of chemical elements in urban soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseenko, Alexey; Alekseenko, Vladimir

    2013-04-01

    The statistically treated results of more than 10 000 soil samples analyses for 25 elements were used during the work preparing. For estimating the total influence of natural factors on the global level we could consider the average concentrations in urban soils (the Clarke numbers of urban soils) with the average concentrations in the Earth crust and Earth soils. The analysis showed the heredity of general properties of elements concentrations from the Earth crust. However the higher concentrations of As, Cd, Cs, Mo, N, S, Ti and V in the soils of cities are explained by the combined effects of processes of soil formation and human impact, and Zn, Pb, Ba, Sr, Ca, Hg, B - by the prevailing human impact. On the regional level the natural factors influence was estimated by the comparing of soils of cities with the equal technogenic impact and number of population, but located in different geographical and climate zones. The common conformities with law were not found out, but the mentioned factors had an effect on the elements concentrations. The valuation of natural factors influence in the soils of one city was carried out by comparison the urban landscapes soils, which differ only in one characteristic. Geomorphologic peculiarities had the doubtless influence on the background concentrations of Pb, Sr, Ag, Zn, Yb, Co, Sn, Cr. etc., but in every case the connection of maximum and minimum background concentrations of the specific elements with the certain geomorphologic structures depended on number of building storeys, location of industrial zones, parks, etc. The certain associations of plants were also affected the background elements concentrations in soils of several cities. The increased concentrations of elements were more often detected - other things being equal - in the landscapes with mixed decorative fruit and berry plant association (?u, Pb, Co, Mn, Ti, Sr), less often - with agricultural fruit and berry plant association (Zn, Ag, Sn, Ba, Cr). In parks

  13. Chemical evolution of r-process elements in the Draco dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishigaki, M. N.; Tsujimoto, T.; Shigeyama, T.; Aoki, W.

    2016-08-01

    A dominant astrophysical site for r-process, which is responsible for producing heavy neutron-capture elements, is unknown. Dwarf spheroidal galaxies around the Milky Way halo provide ideal laboratories to investigate the origin and evolution of r-process elements. We carried out high-resolution spectroscopic observations of three giant stars in the Draco dwarf spheroidal galaxy to estimate their europium abundances. We found that the upper-limits of [Eu/H] are very low in the range [Fe/H] < -2, while this ratio is nearly constant at higher metallicities. This trend is not well reproduced with models which assume that Eu is produced together with Fe by SNe, and may suggest the contribution from other objects such as neutron-star mergers.

  14. Theoretical Predictions for the Chemical Identification of Superheavy Elements. Role of Relativistic Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pershina, Valeria; Bastug, Turgut

    2005-09-01

    Adsorption behaviour of element 112 and its homolog Hg on inert and transition-metal surfaces was predicted on the basis of fully relativistic density functional theory calculations. Influence of relativistic effects on the adsorption enthalpy and temperature was established by comparing results of the relativistic and nonrelativistic calculations. Relativistic effects were found to increase the adsorption enthalpy, or increase the adsorption temperature of element 112 on both types of the surfaces. They, however, influence the trend in group 12 in a different way depending on the surface. Thus, for adsorption on inert surfaces, Tadsrel(112) > Tads(Hg) > Tadsnr(112), while for adsorption on transition-metal surfaces, Tads(Hg) > Tadsrel(112) > Tadsnr(112).

  15. Major and EDXRF Trace Element Chemical Analyses of Volcanic Rocks from Lassen Volcanic National Park and Vicinity, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clynne, Michael A.; Muffler, L.J.P.; Siems, D.F.; Taggart, J.E.; Bruggman, Peggy

    2008-01-01

    This open-file report presents WDXRF major-element chemical data for late Pliocene to Holocene volcanic rocks collected from Lassen Volcanic National Park and vicinity, California. Data for Rb, Sr, Ba, Y, Zr, Nb, Ni, Cr, Zn and Cu obtained by EDXRF are included for many samples. Data are presented in an EXCEL spreadsheet and are keyed to rock units as displayed on the Geologic Map of Lassen Volcanic National Park and vicinity (Clynne and Muffler, in press). Location of the samples is given in latitude and longitude in degrees and decimal minutes and in decimal degrees.

  16. Chemical elements in the muscle tissues of European eel (Anguilla anguilla) from selected lakes in Latvia.

    PubMed

    Rudovica, Vita; Bartkevics, Vadims

    2015-10-01

    Fish is a significant source of essential nutrients, as well as toxic elements in the human diet. Concentration of 17 elements was determined in muscles of eels (Anguilla anguilla) collected from five fishing lakes in the territory of Latvia. The concentration of main elements determined in muscle tissues varied within the following ranges: for Pb, 0.019-0.047; Cd, 0.0051-0.011; Hg, 0.13-0.36; Cu, 0.76-0.92; Zn, 28-42; and As, 0.13-0.23 mg kg(-1) wet weight. A positive correlation was revealed between the concentration of Hg in muscles and fish length in inland lakes. Concentration of metals in muscle tissues of eels from brackish coastal and inland lakes was without statistically significant difference. This research demonstrated that the elemental content of Cd and Pb in muscles of the examined fish was lower than the maximum allowed threshold set by the European Union legislation. Mercury content was over the threshold limit for all the analyzed eels if to compare with the Water Framework Directive Environmental Quality Standards. On other side, only 7% of analyzed fish have indicated values that are over threshold limits for mercury established by the European Union food legislation. The current study contributes to the implementation of Water Framework Directive in Latvia by collection of information necessary for the further protection measures of waters. To our knowledge, this study provides the first data on multielemental bioaccumulation in muscle tissues of European eels collected from fishing lakes of Latvia.

  17. Chemical elements in the muscle tissues of European eel (Anguilla anguilla) from selected lakes in Latvia.

    PubMed

    Rudovica, Vita; Bartkevics, Vadims

    2015-10-01

    Fish is a significant source of essential nutrients, as well as toxic elements in the human diet. Concentration of 17 elements was determined in muscles of eels (Anguilla anguilla) collected from five fishing lakes in the territory of Latvia. The concentration of main elements determined in muscle tissues varied within the following ranges: for Pb, 0.019-0.047; Cd, 0.0051-0.011; Hg, 0.13-0.36; Cu, 0.76-0.92; Zn, 28-42; and As, 0.13-0.23 mg kg(-1) wet weight. A positive correlation was revealed between the concentration of Hg in muscles and fish length in inland lakes. Concentration of metals in muscle tissues of eels from brackish coastal and inland lakes was without statistically significant difference. This research demonstrated that the elemental content of Cd and Pb in muscles of the examined fish was lower than the maximum allowed threshold set by the European Union legislation. Mercury content was over the threshold limit for all the analyzed eels if to compare with the Water Framework Directive Environmental Quality Standards. On other side, only 7% of analyzed fish have indicated values that are over threshold limits for mercury established by the European Union food legislation. The current study contributes to the implementation of Water Framework Directive in Latvia by collection of information necessary for the further protection measures of waters. To our knowledge, this study provides the first data on multielemental bioaccumulation in muscle tissues of European eels collected from fishing lakes of Latvia. PMID:26334326

  18. Transcutaneus photophoresis of metal ions using emitters of band spectrum of chemical elements.

    PubMed

    Rukin, E M; Izvolskaia, M S; Voronova, S N; Sharipova, M M

    2010-10-01

    Local exposure to light with hollow cathode lamp radiating band spectrum typical of manganese, copper, potassium, sodium, calcium, and magnesium enhances migration of these elements from the solution applied to the skin to the blood in rats. This effect is most pronounced at low initial blood level of manganese. Its serum concentration increased 17-fold after application of manganese salts and exposure to hollow cathode lamp radiating manganese spectrum.

  19. Numerical values of the surface free energies of solid chemical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezey, L. Z.; Giber, J.

    1984-10-01

    The applicability of a 'standard table' of values of surface free energies (or enthalpies) obtained by the CCSS (complex calculation of surface segregation) method is demonstrated by comparing calculated surface-free-energy values with several recently published experimental results. The investigation (encompassing temperatures from 1023 to 2075 K) shows that a simplified variation of the second step of CCSS is applicable in the calculation of the surface free energies of polycrystalline solid elements for any temperature of interest.

  20. Chemical properties of rare earth elements in typical medical waste incinerator ashes in China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lijuan; Zhang, Fu-Shen; Zhang, Jingxin

    2008-10-30

    Medical waste (MW) ashes from different types of MW incinerators were examined to detect the characteristics and environmental impact of rare earth elements (REEs). The results showed that total REE contents in the ash samples ranged from 10.2 to 78.9 mg/kg. REEs in bottom ash were apparently higher than those in fly ash. Average REE contents in the ashes followed the sequence of Ce>La>Nd>Y>Gd>Pr>Sm>Dy>Er>Yb>Ho>Eu>Tb>Lu>Tm. Some of the elements, such as Sm, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb in the ash samples were in normal or nearly normal distribution, but Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Eu, Gd, Tb, Tm, Lu were not normally distributed, indicating some of the ash samples were enriched with these elements. Crust-normalized REE patterns indicated that two types of the MW ashes were obviously enriched with Gd and La. Sequential extraction results showed that REEs in the ash mainly presented as residual fraction, while exchangeable and carbonate fractions were relatively low. DTPA- and EDTA-extraction tests indicated that REEs in the MW ashes were generally in low bioavailability. PMID:18329796

  1. Chemical studies of selected trace elements in hot-spring drainages of Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect

    Stauffer, R.E.; Jenne, E.A.; Ball, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    Intensive chemical studies were made of S(-II), O/sub 2/, Al, Fe, Mn, P, As(III), As(V), and Li in waters from two high-Cl, low Ca-Mg hotspring drainages in the Lower Geyser Basin, a warm spring system rich in Ca and Mg in the Yellowstone Canyon area, and the Madison River system above Hebgen Lake. Analyses were also made of other representative thermal waters from the Park.

  2. [Determination of multiple chemical elements in CSF in Parkinson disease after intracerebral autotransplantation of the adrenal medulla].

    PubMed

    Shi, M T

    1991-02-01

    The contents of indispensable major elements sodium (Na), phosphorus (P), calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), trace elements iron (Fe), copper (Cu), nickel (Ni), zinc (Zn), strontium (Sr), vanadium (V), chromium (Cr), manganese (Mn), molybdenum (Mo), and other elements lead (Pb), silicon (Si), aluminium (Al), titanium (Ti), barium (Ba), lanthanum (La), cadmium (Yb), cerium (Ce), scandium (Sc), silver (Ag), in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were measured in 13 patients suffering from Parkinson disease before and after autotransplantation of adrenal medulla. It was found that while the patients' objective symptoms were relieved and the contents of monoamine transmitters were changed, the contents of P, V, Co, Cr, in CSF increased significantly (P less than 0.05 or 0.01) at the first, 2nd, 4th, 6th, and 8th week, the contents of Mn in CSF also increased significantly at the first 4th week (P less than 0.05) but decreased significantly at the 8th week the contents of Zn in CSF increased significantly (P less than 0.05) at the 2nd week; Mo increased significantly (P less than 0.05 or 0.01) at the 4th and 8th week B increased significantly (P less than 0.05) at the first week; the contents of Ca, Na, Sr, Ba, Al, Ti, La, Ce, Yb, Sc, Ag in CSF increased significantly (P less than 0.05 or 0.01) at the 8th week, Mg, Fe, Cu Ni, Pb, Si, Cd remained unchanged after operation. The results suggest that the contents of these chemical elements can be affected by this kind of operation, indicating that these elements are involved in the pathogenesis of Parkinsonism. PMID:1864188

  3. THE ORIGINS OF LIGHT AND HEAVY R-PROCESS ELEMENTS IDENTIFIED BY CHEMICAL TAGGING OF METAL-POOR STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Tsujimoto, Takuji; Shigeyama, Toshikazu

    2014-11-01

    Growing interests in neutron star (NS) mergers as the origin of r-process elements have sprouted since the discovery of evidence for the ejection of these elements from a short-duration γ-ray burst. The hypothesis of a NS merger origin is reinforced by a theoretical update of nucleosynthesis in NS mergers successful in yielding r-process nuclides with A > 130. On the other hand, whether the origin of light r-process elements are associated with nucleosynthesis in NS merger events remains unclear. We find a signature of nucleosynthesis in NS mergers from peculiar chemical abundances of stars belonging to the Galactic globular cluster M15. This finding combined with the recent nucleosynthesis results implies a potential diversity of nucleosynthesis in NS mergers. Based on these considerations, we are successful in the interpretation of an observed correlation between [light r-process/Eu] and [Eu/Fe] among Galactic halo stars and accordingly narrow down the role of supernova nucleosynthesis in the r-process production site. We conclude that the tight correlation by a large fraction of halo stars is attributable to the fact that core-collapse supernovae produce light r-process elements while heavy r-process elements such as Eu and Ba are produced by NS mergers. On the other hand, stars in the outlier, composed of r-enhanced stars ([Eu/Fe] ≳ +1) such as CS22892-052, were exclusively enriched by matter ejected by a subclass of NS mergers that is inclined to be massive and consist of both light and heavy r-process nuclides.

  4. Levels and spatial distribution of airborne chemical elements in a heavy industrial area located in the north of Spain.

    PubMed

    Lage, J; Almeida, S M; Reis, M A; Chaves, P C; Ribeiro, T; Garcia, S; Faria, J P; Fernández, B G; Wolterbeek, H T

    2014-01-01

    The adverse health effects of airborne particles have been subjected to intense investigation in recent years; however, more studies on the chemical characterization of particles from pollution emissions are needed to (1) identify emission sources, (2) better understand the relative toxicity of particles, and (3) pinpoint more targeted emission control strategies and regulations. The main objective of this study was to assess the levels and spatial distribution of airborne chemical elements in a heavy industrial area located in the north of Spain. Instrumental and biomonitoring techniques were integrated and analytical methods for k0 instrumental neutron activation analysis and particle-induced x-ray emission were used to determine element content in aerosol filters and lichens. Results indicated that in general local industry contributed to the emissions of As, Sb, Cu, V, and Ni, which are associated with combustion processes. In addition, the steelwork emitted significant quantities of Fe and Mn and the cement factory was associated with Ca emissions. The spatial distribution of Zn and Al also indicated an important contribution of two industries located outside the studied area. PMID:25072718

  5. Mineralogical, chemical composition and distribution of rare earth elements in clay-rich sediments from Southeastern Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odoma, A. N.; Obaje, N. G.; Omada, J. I.; Idakwo, S. O.; Erbacher, J.

    2015-02-01

    Cretaceous claystone sediments from Enugu, Southeastern, Nigeria were analyzed for their mineralogy and chemistry. Major minerals are quartz and kaolinite while montmorillonite is in minor quantity. The sediments are silica-rich, but showed low values of Al, Fe, Sc and Cr. The values of the chemical index of alteration (CIA) ranged from 89.9 to 94.5 and the values of chemical index of weathering (CIW) ranged from 95.1 to 98.9. Low contents of the alkali and alkali earth elements (Na, K, Mg, Al, Ca) of the clay-rich sediments suggest a relatively more intense weathering of source area. Depleted Ba, Rb, Ca, and Mg suggest that they were probably flushed out by water during sedimentation. The mineralogical composition, REE contents, and elemental ratios in the sediments suggest a provenance from mainly felsic rocks, with only minor contributions from basic sources. Despite intense weathering the REE, Th, and Sc remained in the clays suggesting that they were immobile.

  6. Chemical elements in common vegetable components of Portuguese diets, determined by k0-INAA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, A. M. G.; Freitas, M. C.; Ventura, M. G.; Dionísio, I.; Ermakova, E.

    2006-08-01

    Vegetables play an important role in national diets, as a side dish to many a main-course fare the whole year round, and, especially in what concerns raw lettuce and tomato, with a higher seasonal rate of consumption during summer months, as associated to the traditional charcoal-grilled sardines. In March 2004, lettuces, tomatoes, carrots and cabbages of Portuguese origin (except for the carrots from one site) were purchased from large commercial areas or central markets of two central and southern regional hubs, respectively Coimbra and Évora. Even if from different growers, all vegetables had come from horticultural plots in the same general area of western Portugal, north of Lisboa. For lettuce plants, the inner leaves were separated from the external ones and processed as different samples for further analysis. In this work, the reactor and detector parameters were re-evaluated for the new IAEA k0-INAA software. Quality assessment was obtained through analysis of IAEA-359 (cabbage material) and BCR-679 (Bowen's kale). Traces of hazardous elements—namely, antimony, arsenic and bromine—could be found throughout, and, for lettuce samples, the overall results indicate that outer leaves feature higher concentrations than inner ones. Interestingly enough, vegetables from Coimbra and Évora appeared to differ from each other in their elemental levels, even if originally grown at relatively close range. Concentrations of trace elements are compared to available data from other countries' cultivars.

  7. Chemical imaging of biological materials by NanoSIMS using isotopic and elemental labels

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, P K; Fallon, S J; Pett-Ridge, J; Ghosal, S; Hutcheon, I D

    2006-04-10

    The NanoSIMS 50 combines unprecedented spatial resolution (as good as 50 nm) with ultra-high sensitivity (minimum detection limit of {approx}200 atoms). The NanoSIMS 50 incorporates an array of detectors, enabling simultaneous collection of 5 species originating from the same sputtered volume of a sample. The primary ion beam (Cs{sup +} or O{sup -}) can be scanned across the sample to produce quantitative secondary ion images. This capability for multiple isotope imaging with high spatial resolution provides a novel new approach to the study of biological materials. Studies can be made of sub-regions of tissues, mammalian cells, and bacteria. Major, minor and trace element distributions can be mapped on a submicron scale, growth and metabolism can be tracked using stable isotope labels, and biogenic origin can be determined based on composition. We have applied this technique extensively to mammalian and prokaryotic cells and bacterial spores. The NanoSIMS technology enables the researcher to interrogate the fate of molecules of interest within cells and organs through elemental and isotopic labeling. Biological applications at LLNL will be discussed.

  8. The distribution of some chemical elements between dissolved and particulate phases in the ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Bacon, M.P.; Fleer, A.P.; Hammar, T.R.; Belastock, R.A.; Hayward, N.A.

    1991-01-01

    The long-range goal of our DOE-supported research is an understanding of the processes that control the distribution and fate of chemical species in the ocean, with a particular emphasis on species which are reactive with respect to uptake by marine particulate matter. Such an understanding is essential in predicting the fate of reactive pollutants, such as heavy metals and radionuclides, that are released to the environment as a consequence of energy-producing activities. In pursuit of this goal we have, during the present grant period, been devoting all of our effort to participation in the Shelf-Edge Exchange Processes (SEEP) program. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Digital modeling of radioactive and chemical waste transport in the aquifer underlying the Snake River Plain at the National Reactor Testing Station, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, J.B.

    1974-01-01

    Industrial and low-level radioactive liquid wastes at the National Reactor Testing Station (NRTS) in Idaho have been disposed to the Snake River Plain aquifer since 1952. Monitoring studies have indicated that tritium and chloride have dispersed over a 15-square mile (39-square kilometer) area of the aquifer in low but detectable concentrations and have only migrated as far as 5 miles (8 kilometers) downgradient from discharge points. The movement of cationic waste solutes, particularly 90Sr and 137Cs, has been significantly retarded due to sorption phenomena, principally ion exchange. 137Cs has shown no detectable migration in the aquifer and 90Sr has migrated only about 1.5 miles (2 kilometers) from the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) discharge well, and is detectable over an area of only 1.5 square miles ( 4 square kilometers) of the aquifer. Digital modeling techniques have been applied successfully to the analysis of the complex waste-transport system by utilizing numerical solution of the coupled equations of groundwater motion and mass transport. The model includes the effects of convective transport, flow divergence, two-dimensional hydraulic dispersion, radioactive decay, and reversible linear sorption. The hydraulic phase of the model uses the iterative, alternating direction, implicit finite-difference scheme to solve the groundwater flow equations, while the waste-transport phase uses a modified method of characteristics to solve the solute transport equations simulated by the model. The modeling results indicate that hydraulic dispersion (especially transverse) is a much more significant influence than previously suggested by earlier studies. The model has been used to estimate future waste migration patterns for varied assumed hydrological and waste conditions up through the year 2000. The hydraulic effects of recharge from the Big Lost River have an important (but not predominant) influence on the simulated future migration patterns. For the

  10. Comparative study of the chemical composition and mineral element content of Artocarpus heterophyllus and Treculia africana seeds and seed oils.

    PubMed

    Ajayi, Ibironke Adetolu

    2008-07-01

    A comparative study of Artocarpus heterophyllus and Treculia africana seeds, both of Moraceae family, was carried out to establish their chemical compositions and evaluate their mineral element content in order to investigate the possibility of using them for human and or animal consumption and also to examine if there is a relationship between the properties of these seeds. A. heterophyllus and T. africana are rich in protein; their protein contents are higher than those from high protein animal sources such as beef and marine fishes. Both seeds have high carbohydrate content and could act as source of energy for animals if included in their diets. The oil contents of the seeds are 11.39% and 18.54% for A. heterophyllus and T. africana, respectively. The oils are consistently liquid at room temperature. The results of the physicochemical properties of the two seeds are comparable to those of conventional oil seeds such as groundnut and palm kernel oils and could be useful for nutritional and industrial purposes. The seeds were found to be good sources of mineral elements. The result revealed potassium to be the prevalent mineral elements which are 2470.00 ppm and 1680.00 ppm for A. heterophyllus and T. africana, respectively followed by sodium, magnesium and then calcium. They also contain reasonable quantity of iron, in particular A. heterophyllus 148.50 ppm.

  11. Preliminary results of determination of chemical element concentrations in the aerosol of Venus clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andreychikov, B. M.; Mukhin, L. M.; Korchuganov, B. N.; Akhmetshin, I. K.; Tokarev, Y. N.; Medvedev, A. V.; Goldfeld, M. N.; Faynboym, V. M.; Kalyuzhnyy, A. V.; Petryanov, I. V.

    1986-01-01

    An X-ray radiometeric experiment is described along with the results of measurements of the elemental composition of aerosols in Venusian clouds. A preliminary analysis of the data showed that sulfur is present in the range of heights 63 to 47 km with mean content of 5.8 mg/cu m and that chlorine is present in the height range 61 t0 52 km with a mean content of 4.1 mg/cu m. The results of measurements in the range 52 to 47 km may come to an agreement if phosphorus is present in the aerosol with a mean concentration of 7.7 mg/cu m.

  12. Chem I Supplement: Nuclear Synthesis and Identification of New Elements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seaborg, Glenn T.

    1985-01-01

    As background material for a paper on the transuranium elements (SE 537 837), this article reviews: (1) several descriptive terms; (2) nuclear reactions; (3) radioactive decay modes; (4) chemical background; and (5) experimental methods used in this field of research and more broadly in nuclear chemistry. (Author/JN)

  13. Radioactive Wastes.

    PubMed

    Choudri, B S; Baawain, Mahad

    2016-10-01

    Papers reviewed herein present a general overview of radioactive waste activities around the world in 2015. These include safety assessments, decommission and decontamination of nuclear facilities, fusion facilities, transportation and management solutions for the final disposal of low and high level radioactive wastes (LLW and HLW), interim storage and final disposal options for spent fuel (SF), and tritiated wastes, with a focus on environmental impacts due to the mobility of radionuclides in water, soil and ecosystem alongwith other progress made in the management of radioactive wastes. PMID:27620100

  14. Radioactive Wastes.

    PubMed

    Choudri, B S; Baawain, Mahad

    2015-10-01

    Papers reviewed herein present a general overview of radioactive waste activities around the world in 2014. These include safety assessments, decommission and decontamination of nuclear facilities, fusion facilities, transportation and management solutions for the final disposal of low and high level radioactive wastes (LLW and HLW), interim storage and final disposal options for spent fuel (SF), and tritiated wastes, with a focus on environmental impacts due to the mobility of radionuclides in water, soil and ecosystem alongwith other progress made in the management of radioactive wastes.

  15. Radioactive Wastes.

    PubMed

    Choudri, B S; Baawain, Mahad

    2016-10-01

    Papers reviewed herein present a general overview of radioactive waste activities around the world in 2015. These include safety assessments, decommission and decontamination of nuclear facilities, fusion facilities, transportation and management solutions for the final disposal of low and high level radioactive wastes (LLW and HLW), interim storage and final disposal options for spent fuel (SF), and tritiated wastes, with a focus on environmental impacts due to the mobility of radionuclides in water, soil and ecosystem alongwith other progress made in the management of radioactive wastes.

  16. Radioactive Wastes.

    PubMed

    Choudri, B S; Baawain, Mahad

    2015-10-01

    Papers reviewed herein present a general overview of radioactive waste activities around the world in 2014. These include safety assessments, decommission and decontamination of nuclear facilities, fusion facilities, transportation and management solutions for the final disposal of low and high level radioactive wastes (LLW and HLW), interim storage and final disposal options for spent fuel (SF), and tritiated wastes, with a focus on environmental impacts due to the mobility of radionuclides in water, soil and ecosystem alongwith other progress made in the management of radioactive wastes. PMID:26420096

  17. Assessment of chemical element migration in soil-plant complex of Urov endemic localities of East Transbaikalia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadim V., Ermakov; Valentina, Danilova; Sabsbakhor, Khushvakhtova; Aklexander, Degtyarev; Sergey, Tyutikov; Victor, Berezkin; Elena, Karpova

    2014-05-01

    The comparative evaluation of the levels of biologically active chemical elements and their migration in the soil-plant complex of two Urov endemic locations in East Transbaikalia (Zolinsky and Uryumkansky) and background areas (Western Baikal region and the western area of the Trans-Baikal region) was conducted. The predominant soil-forming rocks in East Transbaikalia are weathering products of Proterozoic carbonated granitoids PR2. The surface rocks consist from granite, granodiorite, diorite quartz diorite, gabbro, norite, gabbro-norite and other. Soils - mountain and cryogenic meadow forests, mountain permafrost taiga podzolised, meadow alluvial, peaty meadow [2]. The paludification of narrow valleys and thermokarst phenomena are typical in Urov endemic localities. It reflects on the spotted of soil and differentiation of chemical composition of soils and plants. Most of the chemical elements in soils were determined by means of X-ray fluorescence, and trace elements in soils and plants - by atomic absorption spectrometry. The selenium content was measured by spectrofluorimetric method [3]. The research processed by methods of variation statistics. It was found that the soils of two locations of the Urov subregion of the biosphere were more enriched with iron, barium, calcium, uranium, thorium, phosphorus, and to a lesser extent strontium compared to background soils. The ratio of Ca: P was significantly higher in the soil of background areas, and Ca: Sr, on the contrary, in endemic soils. In assessing the migration of trace elements in soil-plant complex by means of the total content of trace elements and biological absorption coefficient found a marked accumulation by plants manganese, chromium, arsenic and weak plants accumulation of cobalt and nickel. Soil landscape is not much different in content of selenium, but its migration in plants was reduced in places of spread of Urov disease [1]. The concentrators of cadmium (leaves of different species of willow

  18. Trace element variations in olivine phenocrysts from Ugandan potassic rocks as clues to the chemical characteristics of parental magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, Stephen F.; Jacob, Dorrit E.; O'Neill, Hugh St. C.

    2011-07-01

    Olivine phenocrysts in ugandite and leucite basanite from the western branch of the East African Rift have been analysed for up to 34 trace elements by Laser-ICP-MS with detection limits as low as 1 ppb. A combination of point analyses with varying ablation crater diameters and line scans allow the identification of subtle zonations from core to rim, as well as characterization of the chemical effects of contamination along cracks. Trace element concentrations are remarkably uniform between large and small phenocrysts; fractionated leucite basanites (Mg# 59) have higher D Ca and D Al, and less fractionated LREE/HREE than MgO-rich ugandites (Mg# 75-80). Minor zonation is seen in elements with cation charges from 5+ to 2+ (P, Ti, Zr, Cr, Al, Sc, V, Cu, Mn, Ni) and show correlation between Ti and Al, but not P. Early phenocryst cores with high Li or Ni, low Mn, or enrichments in many trace elements can be identified, whereas xenocrysts have exceptionally low Na, Cr, Ti, V and Co. Partition coefficients for Ni are 31-35, less than in lamproites, with which they demonstrate an approximately linear correlation with K2O content, K2O/Al2O3 and K2O/Na2O of the melt, but none with SiO2 content or Mg#. D-values for Cr, Mn and Co overlap with those of basalts, whereas those for Sc (0.011-0.018), Zn (0.44-0.49) and Ga (0.006-0.007) are lower. D V of various potassic rocks (0.015 in the Ugandan rocks) confirms the dependence on fO2 calibrated by the Fe3+/(Fe3++Fe2+) of spinels; the Ugandan potassic rocks crystallized at fO2 = FMQ to FMQ + 1. The ugandite olivines have some trace element characteristics reminiscent of those in metasomatized Kaapvaal peridotites, but not ocean islands. Line scan analyses are contaminated in Al, Ca, Cu, Ga, Sr, Zr, Nb, La and Ce, elements that are also concentrated in microcracks between subgrains, indicating smearing out during polishing, and demonstrating that large spot analyses produce the best results.

  19. Carbon black vs. black carbon and other airborne materials containing elemental carbon: physical and chemical distinctions.

    PubMed

    Long, Christopher M; Nascarella, Marc A; Valberg, Peter A

    2013-10-01

    Airborne particles containing elemental carbon (EC) are currently at the forefront of scientific and regulatory scrutiny, including black carbon, carbon black, and engineered carbon-based nanomaterials, e.g., carbon nanotubes, fullerenes, and graphene. Scientists and regulators sometimes group these EC-containing particles together, for example, interchangeably using the terms carbon black and black carbon despite one being a manufactured product with well-controlled properties and the other being an undesired, incomplete-combustion byproduct with diverse properties. In this critical review, we synthesize information on the contrasting properties of EC-containing particles in order to highlight significant differences that can affect hazard potential. We demonstrate why carbon black should not be considered a model particle representative of either combustion soots or engineered carbon-based nanomaterials. Overall, scientific studies need to distinguish these highly different EC-containing particles with care and precision so as to forestall unwarranted extrapolation of properties, hazard potential, and study conclusions from one material to another.

  20. Electron excitation and autoionisation cross sections for elements of chemically peculiar stars: Study of bismuth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Predojević, B.; Pejčev, V.; Šević, D.; Marinković, B. P.

    2014-12-01

    Electron impact excitation from the ground state of bismuth atoms has been studied. A beam of electrons was scattered from a beam of atoms and the intensity of scattered electrons was measured for scattering angles up to 150° and incident electron energies of 40 and 60 eV. Obtained intensities were used for the calculation of relative differential cross sections (DCS). In addition, we recorded the energy loss-spectra at different incident electron energies and scattering angles. These spectra were analysed in order to identify the energy levels of bismuth atom below and above (autoionisation) the first ionization limit in electron spectroscopy. The presence of bismuth was confirmed in spectra of the chemically peculiar (CP) magnetic Ap 73 Dra and HR 465 and nonmagnetic Hg-Mn HR 7775 and χ Lupi stars. The obtained results for relative DCS and identified autoionised energy levels of bismuth were analysed and compared with previous experimental and theoretical data. The connection between our investigations of bismuth and astrophysical measurements are discussed.

  1. Simulated Radioactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boettler, James L.

    1972-01-01

    Describes the errors in the sugar-cube experiment related to radioactivity as described in Project Physics course. The discussion considers some of the steps overlooked in the experiment and generalizes the theory beyond the sugar-cube stage. (PS)

  2. Radioactivity Calculations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onega, Ronald J.

    1969-01-01

    Three problems in radioactive buildup and decay are presented and solved. Matrix algebra is used to solve the second problem. The third problem deals with flux depression and is solved by the use of differential equations. (LC)

  3. Concentrating Radioactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrmann, Richard A.

    1974-01-01

    By concentrating radioactivity contained on luminous dials, a teacher can make a high reading source for classroom experiments on radiation. The preparation of the source and its uses are described. (DT)

  4. Radioactivity level and toxic elemental concentration in groundwater at Dei-Dei and Kubwa areas of Abuja, north-central Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, O.; Wagiran, H.; Lee, S. K.; Embong, Z.; Ugwuoke, P. E.

    2015-02-01

    The activity concentrations of uranium and toxic elements in Dei-Dei borehole, Kubwa borehole, Water Board and hand-dug well water samples in Abuja area were measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) system. The results obtained were used to calculate human radiological risk over lifetime consumption by the inhabitants in the area. The activity concentrations of 238U in all the water supplies for drinking ranges from 0.849 mBq L-1 to 2.699 mBq L-1 with the highest value of 2.699 mBq L-1 noted at Dei-Dei borehole whereas the lowest value of 0.849 mBq L-1 was noted in Kubwa borehole. The highest annual effective dose from natural 238U in all the water samples was found in Dei-Dei borehole with a value of 8.9×10-5 mSv y-1 whereas the lowest value was noted in Kubwa borehole with a value of 2.8×10-5 mSv y-1. The radiological risks for cancer mortality were found distinctly low, with the highest value of 1.01×10-7 reported at Dei-Dei borehole compared to Kubwa borehole with a value of 3.01×10-8. The cancer morbidity risk was noted higher in Dei-Dei borehole with a value of 1.55×10-7 whereas lower value of 4.88×10-9 was reported in Kubwa borehole. The chemical toxicity risk of 238U in drinking water over a lifetime consumption has a value of 0.006 μg kg-1 day-1 in Dei-Dei borehole whereas lower value of 0.002 μg kg-1 day-1 was found in Kubwa borehole. Measured lead (Pb) and chromium (Cr) concentrations reported higher in Water Board compared to Dei-Dei and Kubwa borehole samples. Significantly, this study inferred that the 238U concentrations originate from granitic strata of the tectonic events in the area; thus, there was a trend of diffusion towards north to south and re-deposition towards Dei-Dei area.

  5. Sensing of human plasma fibrinogen on polished, chemically etched and carbon treated titanium surfaces by diffractive optical element based sensor.

    PubMed

    Silvennoinen, Raimo; Vetterl, Vladimir; Hason, Stanislav; Tuononen, Heikki; Silvennoinen, Martti; Myller, Kari; Cvrcek, Ladislav; Vanek, Jiri; Prachar, Patrik

    2008-07-01

    Adsorption of human plasma fibrinogen (HPF) on 6 differently treated titanium samples (polished, polished and etched, and 4 titanium carbide coatings samples produced by using plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) method) is investigated by using diffractive optical element (DOE) sensor. Permittivity (susceptibility) change and fluctuation in optical roughness (R(opt)) of treated titanium surface in the presence of background electrolyte without and with HPF molecules are sensed by using DOE sensor and optical ellipsometry. Correlation between transmitted light and thickness of molecule layer was found. The findings allow to sense temporal organization and severity of adsorption of nano-scale HPF molecules on polished, on polished and etched, and on titanium carbide surface.

  6. Investigation of Chemical and Physical Changes to Bioapatite During Fossilization Using Trace Element Geochemistry, Infrared Spectroscopy and Stable Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez, C. A.; Kohn, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    Bioapatite in the form of vertebrate bone can be used for a wide variety of paleo-proxies, from determination of ancient diet to the isotopic composition of meteoric water. Bioapatite alteration during diagenesis is a constant barrier to the use of fossil bone as a paleo-proxy. To elucidate the physical and chemical alteration of bone apatite during fossilization, we analyzed an assortment of fossil bones of different ages for trace elements, using LA-ICP-MS, stable isotopes, and reflected IR spectroscopy. One set of fossil bones from the Pleistocene of Idaho show a diffusion recrystallization profile, however, rare earth element (REE) profiles indicate diffusion adsorption. This suggests that REE diffusion is controlled by changing (namely decreasing) boundary conditions (i.e. decreasing concentration of REE in surrounding pore fluids). Reflected IR analysis along this concentration profile reveal that areas high in U have lost type A carbonate from the crystal structure in addition to water and organics. Stable isotopic analysis of carbon and oxygen will determine what, if any, change in the isotopic composition of the carbonate component of apatite has occurred do to the diffusion and recrystallization process. Analysis of much older bone from the Cretaceous of China reveal shallow REE and U concentration profiles and very uniform reflected IR spectra with a significant loss of type A carbonate throughout the entire bone cortex. Analysis of stable isotopes through the bone cortex will be compared to the stable isotopes collected from the Pleistocene of Idaho.

  7. Elemental composition and chemical characteristics of five edible nuts (almond, Brazil, pecan, macadamia and walnut) consumed in Southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Moodley, Roshila; Kindness, Andrew; Jonnalagadda, Sreekanth B

    2007-01-01

    The total elemental concentrations and proximate chemical composition of five different tree nuts, almond (Prunus dulcus), Brazil (Bertholletia excelsa), pecan (Carya pecan), macadamia (Macadamia integrifolia) and walnut (Juglans nigra) that are consumed in South African households were investigated. In addition, six physicochemical properties of the extracted nut oils, namely acid value, iodine value, saponification value, refractive index, density and specific gravity were evaluated. A high concentration of Se (36.1 +/- 0.4 microg g(- 1)) was found in the Brazil nuts only. With maximum and minimum limits being set by the almond and pecan nut samples, Cr ranging from 0.94 +/- 0.14-2.02 +/- 0.07 microg g(- 1) was detected in the nut samples. Generally, the order of the concentrations of the elements in all the nut samples is found to be Mg > Ca > Fe > Cu > Cr > As > Se. The concentrations of Mn and Zn showed greater variation amongst the different types of nuts. The extracted oils showed low acid values and high saponification values with the macadamia nut sample having the highest oil content (76.0 +/- 0.5 g per 100 g of sample), the lowest acid value (0.42 +/- 0.01 mg KOH per g of oil) and highest saponification value (193.7 +/- 2.4 mg KOH per g of oil). The present findings are useful in calculating the Dietary Reference Intakes of these nutrients.

  8. Elemental composition and chemical characteristics of five edible nuts (almond, Brazil, pecan, macadamia and walnut) consumed in Southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Moodley, Roshila; Kindness, Andrew; Jonnalagadda, Sreekanth B

    2007-01-01

    The total elemental concentrations and proximate chemical composition of five different tree nuts, almond (Prunus dulcus), Brazil (Bertholletia excelsa), pecan (Carya pecan), macadamia (Macadamia integrifolia) and walnut (Juglans nigra) that are consumed in South African households were investigated. In addition, six physicochemical properties of the extracted nut oils, namely acid value, iodine value, saponification value, refractive index, density and specific gravity were evaluated. A high concentration of Se (36.1 +/- 0.4 microg g(- 1)) was found in the Brazil nuts only. With maximum and minimum limits being set by the almond and pecan nut samples, Cr ranging from 0.94 +/- 0.14-2.02 +/- 0.07 microg g(- 1) was detected in the nut samples. Generally, the order of the concentrations of the elements in all the nut samples is found to be Mg > Ca > Fe > Cu > Cr > As > Se. The concentrations of Mn and Zn showed greater variation amongst the different types of nuts. The extracted oils showed low acid values and high saponification values with the macadamia nut sample having the highest oil content (76.0 +/- 0.5 g per 100 g of sample), the lowest acid value (0.42 +/- 0.01 mg KOH per g of oil) and highest saponification value (193.7 +/- 2.4 mg KOH per g of oil). The present findings are useful in calculating the Dietary Reference Intakes of these nutrients. PMID:17562467

  9. RADIOACTIVE BATTERY

    DOEpatents

    Birden, J.H.; Jordan, K.C.

    1959-11-17

    A radioactive battery which includes a capsule containing the active material and a thermopile associated therewith is presented. The capsule is both a shield to stop the radiations and thereby make the battery safe to use, and an energy conventer. The intense radioactive decay taking place inside is converted to useful heat at the capsule surface. The heat is conducted to the hot thermojunctions of a thermopile. The cold junctions of the thermopile are thermally insulated from the heat source, so that a temperature difference occurs between the hot and cold junctions, causing an electrical current of a constant magnitude to flow.

  10. Radioactivity method.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duval, J.S.

    1980-01-01

    Radioactivity measurements have played an important role in geophysics since about 1935, and they have increased in importance to the present. The most important areas of application have been in petroleum and uranium exploration. Radioactivity measurements have proved useful in geologic mapping, as well as in specialized applications such as reactor-site monitoring. The technological development of the method has reached a plateau, and the future of the method for some applications will depend upon development of more sophisticated data processing and interpretation. -Author

  11. [The determination of the natural content of chemical elements in human biological objects (liver, kidney, stomach) by mass spectrometry with inductively coupled plasma].

    PubMed

    Luzanova, I S; Svetlolobov, D Iu; Zorin, Iu V

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to continue the studies of the sites of concentration of the chemical elements corresponding to normal homeostasis in human biological objects by mass spectrometry with inductively coupled plasma. The study yielded the data on the natural content of 27 elements in the cadaveric liver, kidney, and stomach. It is recommended to use these findings as the reference parameters corresponding to normal homeostasis.

  12. Trace Element Composition of Phytoplankton Along the US GEOTRACES Pacific Zonal Transect: Comparing Single-Cell SXRF Quotas, Chemical Leaching, and Bulk Particle Digestion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnemus, D.; Rauschenberg, S.; Twining, B. S.

    2014-12-01

    The elemental stoichiometries of phytoplankton are critical ecological and chemical parameters due to biological participation in, if not control over, the marine cycles of many GEOTRACES trace elements and isotopes (TEI). Elemental stoichiometries in euphotic zone protists can be used as end-members in biogeochemical models for bioactive elements (e.g. Fe, Si) and can provide insight into relationships found in the deep ocean and sediments (e.g. Cd:P, Zn:Si) due to broad and organism-specific geochemical links. Though sub-euphotic zone (e.g. hydrothermal, margin-sourced lateral) inputs and processes are also interesting aspects of these cycles, biological incorporation of TEIs in the euphotic zone is, fundamentally, where "the rubber meets the road." Using the 2013 Pacific GEOTRACES super stations and Peruvian coastal transect as ecological waypoints, we present and compare results from three methods for studying trace elemental composition of phytoplankton: single-cell synchrotron x-ray fluorescence (SXRF); weak chemical leaching (acetic acid/hydroxylamine); and total chemical digestion (HNO3/HCl/HF). This combination of techniques allows examination of taxon-specific trends in biotic stoichiometry across the Eastern Pacific and also provides traditional bulk chemical metrics for both biotic and bulk shallow particulate composition.

  13. ELEMENTAL ABUNDANCES AND THEIR IMPLICATIONS FOR THE CHEMICAL ENRICHMENT OF THE BOOeTES I ULTRAFAINT GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, Gerard; Norris, John E.; Yong, David; Monaco, Lorenzo; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Geisler, D. E-mail: jen@mso.anu.edu.au E-mail: lmonaco@eso.org E-mail: dgeisler@astro-udec.cl

    2013-01-20

    We present a double-blind analysis of high-dispersion spectra of seven red giant members of the Booetes I ultrafaint dwarf spheroidal galaxy, complemented with re-analysis of a similar spectrum of an eighth-member star. The stars cover [Fe/H] from -3.7 to -1.9 and include a CEMP-no star with [Fe/H] = -3.33. We conclude from our chemical abundance data that Booetes I has evolved as a self-enriching star-forming system, from essentially primordial initial abundances. This allows us uniquely to investigate the place of CEMP-no stars in a chemically evolving system, in addition to limiting the timescale of star formation. The elemental abundances are formally consistent with a halo-like distribution, with enhanced mean [{alpha}/Fe] and small scatter about the mean. This is in accord with the high-mass stellar initial mass function in this low-stellar-density, low-metallicity system being indistinguishable from the present-day solar neighborhood value. There is a non-significant hint of a decline in [{alpha}/Fe] with [Fe/H]; together with the low scatter, this requires low star formation rates, allowing time for supernova ejecta to be mixed over the large spatial scales of interest. One star has very high [Ti/Fe], but we do not confirm a previously published high value of [Mg/Fe] for another star. We discuss the existence of CEMP-no stars, and the absence of any stars with lower CEMP-no enhancements at higher [Fe/H], a situation that is consistent with knowledge of CEMP-no stars in the Galactic field. We show that this observation requires there be two enrichment paths at very low metallicities: CEMP-no and 'carbon-normal'.

  14. Radioactive Waste.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaylock, B. G.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of radioactive waste disposal, covering publications of 1976-77. Some of the studies included are: (1) high-level and long-lived wastes, and (2) release and burial of low-level wastes. A list of 42 references is also presented. (HM)

  15. Radioactive wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Devarakonda, M.S.; Hickox, J.A.

    1996-11-01

    This paper provides a review of literature published in 1995 on the subject of radioactive wastes. Topics covered include: national programs; waste repositories; mixed wastes; decontamination and decommissioning; remedial actions and treatment; and environmental occurrence and transport of radionuclides. 155 refs.

  16. Element Abundances in a Gas-rich Galaxy at z = 5: Clues to the Early Chemical Enrichment of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Sean; Kulkarni, Varsha P.; Som, Debopam; DeMarcy, Bryan; Quiret, Samuel; Péroux, Celine

    2016-10-01

    Element abundances in high-redshift quasar absorbers offer excellent probes of the chemical enrichment of distant galaxies, and can constrain models for population III and early population II stars. Recent observations indicate that the sub-damped Lyα (sub-DLA) absorbers are more metal-rich than DLA absorbers at redshifts 0 < z < 3. It has also been suggested that DLA metallicity drops suddenly at z > 4.7. However, only three DLAs at z > 4.5 and no sub-DLAs at z > 3.5 have “dust-free” metallicity measurements of undepleted elements. We report the first quasar sub-DLA metallicity measurement at z > 3.5, from detections of undepleted elements in high-resolution data for a sub-DLA at z = 5.0. We obtain fairly robust abundances of C, O, Si, and Fe, using lines outside the Lyα forest. This absorber is metal-poor, with [O/H] = ‑2.00 ± 0.12, which is ≳4σ below the level expected from extrapolation of the trend for z < 3.5 sub-DLAs. The C/O ratio is {1.8}-0.3+0.4 times lower than in the Sun. More strikingly, Si/O is {3.2}-0.5+0.6 times lower than in the Sun, whereas Si/Fe is nearly (1.2{}-0.3+0.4 times) solar. This absorber does not display a clear alpha/Fe enhancement. Dust depletion may have removed more Si from the gas phase than is common in the Milky Way interstellar medium, which may be expected if high-redshift supernovae form more silicate-rich dust. C/O and Si/O vary substantially between different velocity components, indicating spatial variations in dust depletion and/or early stellar nucleosynthesis (e.g., population III star initial mass function). The higher velocity gas may trace an outflow enriched by early stars. Based on observations obtained at the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W.M. Keck Foundation.

  17. Measurement of organic and elemental carbon in downtown Rome and background area: physical behavior and chemical speciation.

    PubMed

    Avino, Pasquale; Manigrasso, Maurizio; Rosada, Alberto; Dodaro, Alessandro

    2015-02-01

    A significant portion of the particulate matter is the total carbonaceous fraction (or total carbon, TC), composed of two main fractions, elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC), which shows a large variety of organic compounds, e.g. aliphatic, aromatic compounds, alcohols, acids, etc. In this paper, TC, EC and OC concentrations determined in a downtown Rome urban area are discussed considering the influence of meteorological conditions on the temporal-spatial aerosol distribution. Similar measurements were performed at ENEA Casaccia, an area outside Rome, which is considered as the ome background. Since 2000, TC, EC and OC measurements have been performed by means of an Ambient Carbon Particulate Monitor equipped with a NDIR detector. The EC and OC concentrations trends are compared with benzene and CO trends, which are specific indicators of autovehicular traffic, for identifying the primary EC and OC contributions and the secondary OC fraction origin. Further, a chemical investigation is reported for investigating how the main organic (i.e., n-alkanes, n-alkanoic acids, polyaromatic hydrocarbons and nitro-polyaromatic hydrocarbons) and inorganic (i.e., metals, ions) fractions vary their levels during the investigated period in relationship to new regulations and/or technological innovations.

  18. Chemical sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauh, R. David (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A sensor for detecting a chemical substance includes an insertion element having a structure which enables insertion of the chemical substance with a resulting change in the bulk electrical characteristics of the insertion element under conditions sufficient to permit effective insertion; the change in the bulk electrical characteristics of the insertion element is detected as an indication of the presence of the chemical substance.

  19. Chemical Exchange Between the Core and the Convecting Mantle of the Earth: Evidence from Highly Siderophile Elements (HSE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, G.; Palme, H.; Kratz, K. L.

    1995-09-01

    Core formation is a major physical and chemical event in the evolution of a differentiated planet. The core is the dominant repository of HSE in the Earth. Element ratios of HSE in peridotites provide insights into the accretion processes of the Earth and the effect of core formation. Depletion of HSE in the Earth's mantle results from core formation. Refractory siderophile elements are about a factor of > 100 depleted in the Earth's mantle compared to CI carbonaceous chondrites. Nevertheless, the concentrations of PGE, Re and Au (7.1 +/- 0.8 x 10^-3 CI chondrite abundances) are higher than would be expected from metal-silicate partitioning during core formation [1]. Several different explanations have been suggested to explain the low absolute abundances of these elements. (1) Os, Re, Ir, Ru, Rh, Pd, Pt, and Au were added with a late chondritic veneer containing less than 1% of a CI component [2-9]. (2) Insufficient core formation, i.e. some metallic Fe-Ni was retained in the upper mantle during core formation [10]. (3) Disequilibrium during core formation; Segregation of metal from the upper mantle in later stages of accretion was so rapid that equilibrium was not attained [4,11,12]. (4) There was continuous formation of the core during accretion; Equilibrium between sinking metal grains and a molten magma ocean at high temperatures (3000-3500 K) [13]. (5) Increase in silicate/metal partition coefficients by pressure, temperature, or high f(O2) [5,14]; Solution of FeO in the core raises the f(O2) conditions at the core-mantle interface sufficiently to increase the equilibrium concentrations of the siderophile elements in the mantle [15]. Studies of mantle-derived samples such as massif peridotites and peridotite xenoliths provide direct information on the nature and composition of the upper mantle. Massive peridotitic rocks from Zabargad island (Red Sea), Lanzo (Italy), Ronda (Spain) and peridotitic xenoliths from Mongolia were analysed for Os, Re, Ir, Ru, Rh, Pd

  20. Detailed chemical abundances in NGC 5824: another metal-poor globular cluster with internal heavy element abundance variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roederer, Ian U.; Mateo, Mario; Bailey, John I.; Spencer, Meghin; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Shectman, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    We present radial velocities, stellar parameters, and detailed abundances of 39 elements derived from high-resolution spectroscopic observations of red giant stars in the luminous, metal-poor globular cluster NGC 5824. We observe 26 stars in NGC 5824 using the Michigan/Magellan Fiber System (M2FS) and two stars using the Magellan Inamori Kyocera Echelle spectrograph. We derive a mean metallicity of [Fe/H] = -1.94 ± 0.02 (statistical) ±0.10 (systematic). The metallicity dispersion of this sample of stars, 0.08 dex, is in agreement with previous work and does not exceed the expected observational errors. Previous work suggested an internal metallicity spread only when fainter samples of stars were considered, so we cannot exclude the possibility of an intrinsic metallicity dispersion in NGC 5824. The M2FS spectra reveal a large internal dispersion in [Mg/Fe], 0.28 dex, which is found in a few other luminous, metal-poor clusters. [Mg/Fe] is correlated with [O/Fe] and anticorrelated with [Na/Fe] and [Al/Fe]. There is no evidence for internal dispersion among the other α- or Fe-group abundance ratios. 25 of the 26 stars exhibit a n-capture enrichment pattern dominated by r-process nucleosynthesis (<[Eu/Fe]> = +0.11 ± 0.12; <[Ba/Eu]> = -0.66 ± 0.05). Only one star shows evidence of substantial s-process enhancement ([Ba/Fe] = +0.56 ± 0.12; [Ba/Eu] = +0.38 ± 0.14), but this star does not exhibit other characteristics associated with s-process enhancement via mass transfer from a binary companion. The Pb and other heavy elements produced by the s-process suggest a time-scale of no more than a few hundred Myr for star formation and chemical enrichment, like the complex globular clusters M2, M22, and NGC 5286.

  1. Studying the effect of radioactive wastes at the Ak-Tyuz deposit on radionuclide and elemental composition of water objects of Kichi-Kemin River.

    PubMed

    Solodukhin, V; Poznyak, V

    2015-06-01

    This article reports on radionuclide and elemental composition studies of water and bottom sediment samples taken from Kichi-Kemin River in vicinity of the industrial area of the Ak-Tyuz thorium deposit in Kyrgyzstan near the border with Kazakhstan. The methods used included instrumental γ-spectrometry, neutron activation analysis, X-ray fluorescent analysis and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The obtained results demonstrated the pronounced negative anthropogenic impact of this area on the quality of water in the Kichi-Kemin River imposing radiological hazards on this tributary of the trans-boundary Shu River.

  2. Studying the effect of radioactive wastes at the Ak-Tyuz deposit on radionuclide and elemental composition of water objects of Kichi-Kemin River.

    PubMed

    Solodukhin, V; Poznyak, V

    2015-06-01

    This article reports on radionuclide and elemental composition studies of water and bottom sediment samples taken from Kichi-Kemin River in vicinity of the industrial area of the Ak-Tyuz thorium deposit in Kyrgyzstan near the border with Kazakhstan. The methods used included instrumental γ-spectrometry, neutron activation analysis, X-ray fluorescent analysis and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The obtained results demonstrated the pronounced negative anthropogenic impact of this area on the quality of water in the Kichi-Kemin River imposing radiological hazards on this tributary of the trans-boundary Shu River. PMID:25971344

  3. Source Apportionment of Elemental Carbon Across the San Francisco Bay Area Using Combined Radiocarbon and Chemical Mass Balances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, S.; Fairley, D.; Sheesley, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    The San Francisco Bay Area is impacted by ambient particulate matter (PM) from a variety of sources including motor vehicles, biomass burning, off-road vehicles, industry, and meat cooking. Ambient PM, especially fine PM (diameter less than 2.5μm, PM2.5), is known to negatively impact health. Elemental Carbon (EC) is one of the major constituents of PM2.5. It not only negatively affects health but is also a powerful short-lived climate forcer. The State of California and Bay Area Air Quality Management District (BAAQMD) have made efforts in regulating contribution of EC from diesel trucks and wood burning, respectively. These and other efforts have assisted in significantly reducing the annual average PM2.5 concentrations approximately 30% since 2005 and 70% since 1990. Despite these improvements, to better determine the relative contribution of contemporary vs. fossil carbon, radiocarbon source apportionment of EC was conducted on PM2.5 collected in the Bay Area. Measurements of the abundance of 14C in the EC fractions are used to quantify the relative contributions of fossil carbon (fossil fuel combustion, including motor vehicle exhaust) and contemporary carbon (biomass combustion and meat cooking). This comprehensive study included seven sites in the Bay Area and 12 months of sampling starting November 2011 through October 2012. The samples were composited to represent winter (November-February) and non-winter (March-October). In addition to radiocarbon analysis, Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) analysis using bulk PM2.5 composition and selected trace gases was used to understand the split among gasoline, natural gas, and diesel exhaust. Preliminary apportionment of the seven sites shows roughly equal contributions of fossil fuel and biomass burning/cooking for both winter and non-winter samples. There is evidence that the diesel contribution to EC, in particular, has decreased substantially over the last decade.

  4. The recognition of multi-class protein folds by adding average chemical shifts of secondary structure elements

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zhenxing; Hu, Xiuzhen; Jiang, Zhuo; Song, Hangyu; Ashraf, Muhammad Aqeel

    2015-01-01

    The recognition of protein folds is an important step in the prediction of protein structure and function. Recently, an increasing number of researchers have sought to improve the methods for protein fold recognition. Following the construction of a dataset consisting of 27 protein fold classes by Ding and Dubchak in 2001, prediction algorithms, parameters and the construction of new datasets have improved for the prediction of protein folds. In this study, we reorganized a dataset consisting of 76-fold classes constructed by Liu et al. and used the values of the increment of diversity, average chemical shifts of secondary structure elements and secondary structure motifs as feature parameters in the recognition of multi-class protein folds. With the combined feature vector as the input parameter for the Random Forests algorithm and ensemble classification strategy, we propose a novel method to identify the 76 protein fold classes. The overall accuracy of the test dataset using an independent test was 66.69%; when the training and test sets were combined, with 5-fold cross-validation, the overall accuracy was 73.43%. This method was further used to predict the test dataset and the corresponding structural classification of the first 27-protein fold class dataset, resulting in overall accuracies of 79.66% and 93.40%, respectively. Moreover, when the training set and test sets were combined, the accuracy using 5-fold cross-validation was 81.21%. Additionally, this approach resulted in improved prediction results using the 27-protein fold class dataset constructed by Ding and Dubchak. PMID:26980999

  5. Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM)

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, P.

    1997-02-01

    This paper discusses the broad problems presented by Naturally Occuring Radioactive Materials (NORM). Technologically Enhanced naturally occuring radioactive material includes any radionuclides whose physical, chemical, radiological properties or radionuclide concentration have been altered from their natural state. With regard to NORM in particular, radioactive contamination is radioactive material in an undesired location. This is a concern in a range of industries: petroleum; uranium mining; phosphorus and phosphates; fertilizers; fossil fuels; forestry products; water treatment; metal mining and processing; geothermal energy. The author discusses in more detail the problem in the petroleum industry, including the isotopes of concern, the hazards they present, the contamination which they cause, ways to dispose of contaminated materials, and regulatory issues. He points out there are three key programs to reduce legal exposure and problems due to these contaminants: waste minimization; NORM assesment (surveys); NORM compliance (training).

  6. Radioactive waste material disposal

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, Charles W.; Beahm, Edward C.; Parker, George W.

    1995-01-01

    The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide.

  7. Radioactive waste material disposal

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

    1995-10-24

    The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide. 3 figs.

  8. Seasonal and spatial variation of trace elements in multi-size airborne particulate matters of Beijing, China: Mass concentration, enrichment characteristics, source apportionment, chemical speciation and bioavailability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jiajia; Tian, Hezhong; Cheng, Ke; Lu, Long; Wang, Yuxuan; Wu, Ye; Zhu, Chuanyong; Liu, Kaiyun; Zhou, Junrui; Liu, Xingang; Chen, Jing; Hao, Jiming

    2014-12-01

    The seasonal and spatial variation characteristics of 19 elements (Al, As, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, S, Sb, Se, Zn) in TSP/PM10/PM2.5 samples were investigated, which were collected from April 2011 to January 2012 simultaneously at an urban downtown site, a traffic roadside site, a suburban site, and a rural site in Beijing. The elevated concentrations of several toxic trace elements (As, Cd, Mn, Ni, Pb, etc.) in particles revealed that the contamination of toxic elements in Beijing could not be neglected. Positive matrix factorization method (PMF) was applied for source apportionment of trace elements in PM, and three factors (crust related sources, combustion sources, and traffic and steel industrial related sources) were identified. Furthermore, the chemical speciation and bioavailability of various elements were identified by applying European Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) procedure. Our results showed that eight toxic elements (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Sb and Zn) exhibited higher mobility in PM2.5 than in PM10. Notably, elements of As, Cd, Pb and Zn were presented with higher mobility than the other elements, and these elements were lightly to release into the environment and easily available to human body. Additionally, As, Cd, Pb and Zn also accounted for higher percentages in the bound to mobile fractions at the central urban areas of Beijing. Therefore, special concerns should be paid to these toxic trace elements which had relatively high mobility in fine particles, when planning and implementing the comprehensive air pollution mitigation policies in Beijing.

  9. Natural radioactivity in Brazilian groundwater.

    PubMed

    Godoy, José Marcus; Godoy, Maria Luiza

    2006-01-01

    More than 220 groundwater samples were analyzed for 228Ra, 226Ra, 222Rn, 210Pb, U(nat), Th(nat), pH, conductivity, fluoride and some additional elements determined by ICP-MS. Since samples from several Brazilian states were taken, involving areas with quite different geologies, no general trend was observed relating the chemical composition and the natural radionuclide content. On the other hand, 210Pb strongly depends on the water content of its progenitor, 222Rn. The values obtained during the present work were compared with those reported by Hainberger et al. [Hainberger, P.L., de Oliveira Paiva, I.R., Salles Andrade, H.A., Zundel, G., Cullen, T.L., 1974. Radioactivity in Brazilian mineral waters. Radiation Data and Reports, 483-488.], when more than 270 groundwater samples were analyzed, mainly, for 226Ra. Based on the results of both works, it was possible to build a database including the results of both works, generating a set with the radium content of circa 350 groundwater sources. It was demonstrated that 228Ra, 226Ra, 222Rn, 210Pb and U(nat) content in Brazilian groundwater follows a lognormal distribution and the obtained geometric mean were 0.045, 0.014, 57.7, 0.040 BqL(-1) and 1.2 microgL(-1), respectively.

  10. Radioactivity in the environment; a case study of the Puerco and Little Colorado River basins, Arizona and New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wirt, Laurie

    1994-01-01

    This report, written for the nontechnical reader, summarizes the results of a study from 1988-91 of the occurrence and transport of selected radionuclides and other chemical constituents in the Puerco and Little Colorado River basins, Arizona and New Mexico. More than two decades of uranium mining and the 1979 failure of an earthen dam containing mine tailings released high levels of radionuclides and other chemical constituents to the Puerco River, a tributary of the Little Colorado River. Releases caused public concern that ground water and streamflow downstream from mining were contaminated. Study findings show which radioactive elements are present, how these elements are distributed between water and sediment in the environment, how concentrations of radioactive elements vary naturally within basins, and how levels of radioactivity have changed since the end of mining. Although levels of radioactive elements and other trace elements measured in streamflow commonly exceed drinking-water standards, no evidence was found to indicate that the high concentrations were still related to uraniurn mining. Sediment radioactivity was higher at sample sites on streams that drain the eastern part of the Little Colorado River basin than that of samples from the western part. Radioactivity of suspended sediment measured in this study, therefore, represents natural conditions for the streams sampled rather than an effect of mining. Because ground water beneath the Puerco River channel is shallow, the aquifer is vulnerable to contamination. A narrow zone of ground water beneath the Puerco River containing elevated uranium concentrations was identified during the study. The highest concentrations were nearest the mines and in samples collected in the first few feet beneath the streambed. Natuxal radiation levels in a few areas of the underlying sedimentary aquifer not connected to the Puerco River also exceeded water quality standards. Water testing would enable those residents

  11. Guidelines for generators of hazardous chemical waste at LBL and guidelines for generators of radioactive and mixed waste at LBL. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide the acceptance criteria for the transfer of hazardous chemical waste to LBL`s Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF). Hazardous chemical waste is a necessary byproduct of LBL`s research and technical support activities. This waste must be handled properly if LBL is to operate safely and provide adequate protection to staff and the environment. These guidelines describe how you, as a generator of hazardous chemical waste, can meet LBL`s acceptance criteria for hazardous chemical waste.

  12. CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF AMBIENT PARTICULATE MATTER NEAR THE WORLD TRADE CENTER: ELEMENTAL CARBON, ORGANIC CARBON, AND MASS RECONSTRUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concentrations of elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon matter (OM), particulate matter less than 2.5 um (PM2.5), and reconstructed soil, trace element oxides, and sulfate are reported from four locations near the World Trade Center (WTC) complex for airborne particulate matter (...

  13. CO2 utilization: an enabling element to move to a resource- and energy-efficient chemical and fuel production.

    PubMed

    Ampelli, Claudio; Perathoner, Siglinda; Centi, Gabriele

    2015-03-13

    CO(2) conversion will be at the core of the future of low-carbon chemical and energy industry. This review gives a glimpse into the possibilities in this field by discussing (i) CO(2) circular economy and its impact on the chemical and energy value chain, (ii) the role of CO(2) in a future scenario of chemical industry, (iii) new routes for CO(2) utilization, including emerging biotechnology routes, (iv) the technology roadmap for CO(2) chemical utilization, (v) the introduction of renewable energy in the chemical production chain through CO(2) utilization, and (vi) CO(2) as a suitable C-source to move to a low-carbon chemical industry, discussing in particular syngas and light olefin production from CO(2). There are thus many stimulating possibilities offered by using CO(2) and this review shows this new perspective on CO(2) at the industrial, societal and scientific levels.

  14. CO2 utilization: an enabling element to move to a resource- and energy-efficient chemical and fuel production.

    PubMed

    Ampelli, Claudio; Perathoner, Siglinda; Centi, Gabriele

    2015-03-13

    CO(2) conversion will be at the core of the future of low-carbon chemical and energy industry. This review gives a glimpse into the possibilities in this field by discussing (i) CO(2) circular economy and its impact on the chemical and energy value chain, (ii) the role of CO(2) in a future scenario of chemical industry, (iii) new routes for CO(2) utilization, including emerging biotechnology routes, (iv) the technology roadmap for CO(2) chemical utilization, (v) the introduction of renewable energy in the chemical production chain through CO(2) utilization, and (vi) CO(2) as a suitable C-source to move to a low-carbon chemical industry, discussing in particular syngas and light olefin production from CO(2). There are thus many stimulating possibilities offered by using CO(2) and this review shows this new perspective on CO(2) at the industrial, societal and scientific levels. PMID:25666059

  15. Plant-beneficial elements status assessment in soil-plant system in the vicinity of a chemical industry complex: shedding light on forage grass safety issues.

    PubMed

    Anjum, Naser A; Duarte, Armando C; Pereira, Eduarda; Ahmad, Iqbal

    2015-02-01

    Human health is closely linked with soils via plants, grazers, or plant-based products. This study estimated plant-beneficial elements (macronutrients: K, P; secondary macronutrients: Ca, Mg; micronutrients: Mo, Mn, Na, Ni, Se) in both soils and shoots of two forage grass species (Eriophorum angustifolium and Lolium perenne) prevalent in the vicinity of a chemical industry complex (Estarreja, Portugal). Both soils and plants from the chemical industrial areas exhibited differential concentrations of the studied elements. In soils, the role of contamination was evidenced as insignificant in context of its impact on all the tested macro and secondary macronutrients except P, and micronutrients such as Mo and Ni. In forage grass plant shoots, the role of contamination was evidenced as insignificant in relation to its impact on all the tested macro and secondary macronutrients except K. Between the two forage grass plants, high Se-harboring L. perenne cannot be recommended for its use as animal feed.

  16. Method for storing radioactive combustible waste

    DOEpatents

    Godbee, H.W.; Lovelace, R.C.

    1973-10-01

    A method is described for preventing pressure buildup in sealed containers which contain radioactively contaminated combustible waste material by adding an oxide getter material to the container so as to chemically bind sorbed water and combustion product gases. (Official Gazette)

  17. [Microbiological Aspects of Radioactive Waste Storage].

    PubMed

    Safonov, A V; Gorbunova, O A; German, K E; Zakharova, E V; Tregubova, V E; Ershov, B G; Nazina, T N

    2015-01-01

    The article gives information about the microorganisms inhabiting in surface storages of solid radioactive waste and deep disposal sites of liquid radioactive waste. It was shown that intensification of microbial processes can lead to significant changes in the chemical composition and physical state of the radioactive waste. It was concluded that the biogeochemical processes can have both a positive effect on the safety of radioactive waste storages (immobilization of RW macrocomponents, a decreased migration ability of radionuclides) and a negative one (biogenic gas production in subterranean formations and destruction of cement matrix).

  18. [Microbiological Aspects of Radioactive Waste Storage].

    PubMed

    Safonov, A V; Gorbunova, O A; German, K E; Zakharova, E V; Tregubova, V E; Ershov, B G; Nazina, T N

    2015-01-01

    The article gives information about the microorganisms inhabiting in surface storages of solid radioactive waste and deep disposal sites of liquid radioactive waste. It was shown that intensification of microbial processes can lead to significant changes in the chemical composition and physical state of the radioactive waste. It was concluded that the biogeochemical processes can have both a positive effect on the safety of radioactive waste storages (immobilization of RW macrocomponents, a decreased migration ability of radionuclides) and a negative one (biogenic gas production in subterranean formations and destruction of cement matrix). PMID:26310021

  19. The Natural Selection of the Chemical Elements (by R. J. P. Williams and J. J. R. Fraústo da Silva)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffman, George B.

    1998-12-01

    Clarendon: New York, 1996. xxvi + 646 pp. Figs., tables. 20.5 x 25.6 cm. ISBN 0-19-855843-0. $80.00. R. J. P. Williams, Royal Society Research Professor Emeritus at Wadham College, Oxford University, and J. J. R. Fraústo da Silva, Professor of Analytical Chemistry at the Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, have collaborated on two previous volumes: New Trends in Bio-inorganic Chemistry (1978) and The Biological Chemistry of the Elements (3rd printing, 1994). Their latest collaborative effort is a book whose ambitious objective is "to show the relationship of every kind of material around us, living and nonliving, to the properties of the chemical elements of the periodic table." The "natural selection" of the chemical elements results from a number of factors, all of which are described in detail. Among these are chemical affinity related to the electronic configuration of their atoms, thermodynamic and kinetic stability, and "functional value to an organisation such as a living system". The physicist's approach to material through phase structure and the phase rule is stressed rather than the chemist's approach through bonding theories. The entire book possesses a strong environmental and interdisciplinary emphasis.

  20. Radioactivity in trinitite six decades later.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Pravin P; Semkow, Thomas M; Torres, Miguel A; Haines, Douglas K; Cooper, Joseph M; Rosenberg, Peter M; Kitto, Michael E

    2006-01-01

    The first nuclear explosion test, named the Trinity test, was conducted on July 16, 1945 near Alamogordo, New Mexico. In the tremendous heat of the explosion, the radioactive debris fused with the local soil into a glassy material named Trinitite. Selected Trinitite samples from ground zero (GZ) of the test site were investigated in detail for radioactivity. The techniques used included alpha spectrometry, high-efficiency gamma-ray spectrometry, and low-background beta counting, following the radiochemistry for selected radionuclides. Specific activities were determined for fission products (90Sr, 137Cs), activation products (60Co, 133Ba, 152Eu, 154Eu, 238Pu, 241Pu), and the remnants of the nuclear fuel (239Pu, 240Pu). Additionally, specific activities of three natural radionuclides (40K, 232Th, 238U) and their progeny were measured. The determined specific activities of radionuclides and their relationships are interpreted in the context of the fission process, chemical behavior of the elements, as well as the nuclear explosion phenomenology. PMID:16102878

  1. Elemental mapping of Neuromelanin organelles of human Substantia Nigra: correlative ultrastructural and chemical analysis by analytical transmission electron microscopy and nano-secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Biesemeier, Antje; Eibl, Oliver; Eswara, Santhana; Audinot, Jean-Nicolas; Wirtz, Tom; Pezzoli, Gianni; Zucca, Fabio A; Zecca, Luigi; Schraermeyer, Ulrich

    2016-07-01

    Neuromelanin (NM) is a compound which highly accumulates mainly in catecholamine neurons of the substantia nigra (SN), and is contained in organelles (NM-containing organelles) with lipid bodies and proteins. These neurons selectively degenerate in Parkinson's disease and NM can play either a protective or toxic role. NM-containing organelles of SN were investigated by Analytical Electron Microscopy (AEM) and Nano-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (NanoSIMS) within human tissue sections with respect to ultrastructure and elemental composition. Within the NM-containing organelle, the single NM granules and lipid bodies had sizes of about 200-600 nm. Energy-Dispersive X-ray microanalysis spectra of the NM granules and lipid bodies were acquired with 100 nm beam diameter in AEM, NanoSIMS yielded elemental maps with a lateral resolution of about 150 nm. AEM yielded the quantitative elemental composition of NM granules and bound metals, e.g., iron with a mole fraction of about 0.15 atomic percent. Chemical analyses by AEM and NanoSIMS were consistent at the subcellular level so that nanoSIMS measurements have been quantitated. In NM granules of SN from healthy subjects, a significant amount of S, Fe, and Cu was found. In lipid bodies an amount of P consistent with the presence of phospholipids was measured. The improved detection limits of nanoSIMS offer new possibilities for chemical mapping, high-sensitivity trace element detection, and reduced acquisition times. Variations between individual NM granules can now be investigated effectively and quantitatively by NanoSIMS mapping Cu and Fe. This should yield new insight into the changes in chemical composition of NM pigments during healthy aging and disease. Neuromelanin-containing organelles of dopamine neurons in normal human substantia nigra were investigated by analytical electron mircoscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (NanoSIMS) yielding the ultrastructure and elemental composition. In neuromelanin

  2. Elemental mapping of Neuromelanin organelles of human Substantia Nigra: correlative ultrastructural and chemical analysis by analytical transmission electron microscopy and nano-secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Biesemeier, Antje; Eibl, Oliver; Eswara, Santhana; Audinot, Jean-Nicolas; Wirtz, Tom; Pezzoli, Gianni; Zucca, Fabio A; Zecca, Luigi; Schraermeyer, Ulrich

    2016-07-01

    Neuromelanin (NM) is a compound which highly accumulates mainly in catecholamine neurons of the substantia nigra (SN), and is contained in organelles (NM-containing organelles) with lipid bodies and proteins. These neurons selectively degenerate in Parkinson's disease and NM can play either a protective or toxic role. NM-containing organelles of SN were investigated by Analytical Electron Microscopy (AEM) and Nano-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (NanoSIMS) within human tissue sections with respect to ultrastructure and elemental composition. Within the NM-containing organelle, the single NM granules and lipid bodies had sizes of about 200-600 nm. Energy-Dispersive X-ray microanalysis spectra of the NM granules and lipid bodies were acquired with 100 nm beam diameter in AEM, NanoSIMS yielded elemental maps with a lateral resolution of about 150 nm. AEM yielded the quantitative elemental composition of NM granules and bound metals, e.g., iron with a mole fraction of about 0.15 atomic percent. Chemical analyses by AEM and NanoSIMS were consistent at the subcellular level so that nanoSIMS measurements have been quantitated. In NM granules of SN from healthy subjects, a significant amount of S, Fe, and Cu was found. In lipid bodies an amount of P consistent with the presence of phospholipids was measured. The improved detection limits of nanoSIMS offer new possibilities for chemical mapping, high-sensitivity trace element detection, and reduced acquisition times. Variations between individual NM granules can now be investigated effectively and quantitatively by NanoSIMS mapping Cu and Fe. This should yield new insight into the changes in chemical composition of NM pigments during healthy aging and disease. Neuromelanin-containing organelles of dopamine neurons in normal human substantia nigra were investigated by analytical electron mircoscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (NanoSIMS) yielding the ultrastructure and elemental composition. In neuromelanin

  3. Quantitative radiochemical methods for determination of the sources of natural radioactivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosholt, J.N.

    1957-01-01

    Study of the state of equilibrium of any natural radioactive source requires determination of several key nuclides or groups of nuclides to find their contribution to the total amount of radioactivity. Alpha activity measured by scintillation counting is used for determination of protactinium-231, thorium-232, thorium-230, and radium-226. The chemical procedures for the separations of the specific elements are described, as well as the measurement techniques used to determine the abundances of the individual isotopes. To correct for deviations in the ore standards, an independent means of evaluating the efficiencies of the individual separations and measurements is used. The development of these methods of radiochemical analysis facilitates detailed investigation of the major sources of natural radioactivity.

  4. Distribution of chemical elements in attic dust as reflection of their geogenic and anthropogenic sources in the vicinity of the copper mine and flotation plant.

    PubMed

    Balabanova, Biljana; Stafilov, Trajče; Sajn, Robert; Bačeva, Katerina

    2011-08-01

    The main aim of this article was to assess the atmospheric pollution with heavy metals due to copper mining Bučim near Radoviš, the Republic of Macedonia. The open pit and mine waste and flotation tailings are continually exposed to open air, which leads to winds carrying the fine particles into the atmosphere. Samples of attic dust were examined as historical archives of mine emissions, with the aim of elucidating the pathways of pollution. Dust was collected from the attics of 29 houses, built between 1920 and 1970. Nineteen elements (Ag, Al, As, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Li, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, Sr, and Zn) were analyzed by atomic emission spectrometry with inductively coupled plasma. The obtained values of the investigated elements in attic dust samples were statistically processed using nonparametric and parametric analysis. Factor analysis revealed three factors governing the source of individual chemical elements. Two of them grouping Ca, Li, Mg, Mn, and Sr (Factor 1) and Co, Cr, and Ni (Factor 2) can be characterized as geogenic. The third factor grouping As, Cu, and Pb is anthropogenic and mirrors dust fallout from mining operation and from flotation tailings. Maps of areal deposition were prepared for this group of elements, from which correlation of these anthropogenic born elements was confirmed.

  5. The content of selected chemical elements in the hair of young men of the Bantu language group from Tanzania versus environmental and social conditioning.

    PubMed

    Rębacz, Ewa; Baranowska-Bosiacka, Irena; Chlubek, Dariusz

    2010-12-01

    Research works that would determine the content of chemical elements in black population organisms on the basis of hair analysis are not numerous. There are no studies referring to black populations living in indigenous environment, like the Mafinga region, Iringa District in Tanzania examined by us. The aim of the study performed was to analyse the content of chemical elements Fe, Ca, Mg, Zn and Cu in easily available biological media like hair. The material was collected in October 2005 and March 2006 during anthropological examination, which came from young males (n = 91), students of a secondary school. Large Ca concentration range was found for the total number of subjects (680.20 to 2,089.70 µg/g d.m.). Mean Fe content in hair for the total number of subjects was 11.19 ± 3.70 µg/g d.m., while that of Mg 6.84 ± 2.02 µg/g d.m. Mean Zn concentration for the total number of subjects was 91.06 ± 39.22 µg/g d.m., being significantly higher in younger group than in older one (p = 0.039). Mean Cu concentration in hair for the total number of subjects was 7.50 ± 2.90 µg/g d.m Body mass index (BMI = kg/m²) was calculated for the subjects showing that out of 91 men participating in the study 15.4% was characterised by mediocre nutrition. No statistically significant correlations were found between BMI and the analysed chemical elements. The analysis of the content of trace elements in the hair of the examined young males showed deficiencies in Zn, Cu, Fe and significantly in Mg.

  6. Trace elements and organic chemicals in stream-bottom sediments and fish tissues, Red River of the North basin, Minnesota, North Dakota, and South Dakota, 1992-95

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brigham, M.E.; Goldstein, R.M.; Tornes, L.H.

    1998-01-01

    Stream-bottom sediment and fish-tissue samples from the Red River of the North Basin, were analyzed for a large suite of chemical elements and organic chemicals. Cadmium, lead, and mercury were widespread in sediments, at concentrations not indicative of acute contamination. Mercury, the element of greatest health concern in the region, was detected at low concentrations in 38 of 43 sediment samples (<0.02-0.13 micrograms per gram) and all of eleven fish-liver samples (0.03-0.6 micrograms per gram dry weight, or 0.0066-0.13 micrograms per gram wet weight). Concentrations of many elements appeared to be controlled by mineral rather than anthropogenic sources. DDT and its metabolites were the most frequently detected synthetic organochlorines: p,p'-DDE was detected in 9 of 38 sediment samples (concentration range: <1-16 nanograms per gram) and also frequently in whole-fish samples. Total DDT (the sum of DDT and its metabolites) concentrations ranged from <5 to 217 nanograms per gram, and at least one component of total DDT was detected in 19 of 23 fish samples. Concentrations of DDT and its metabolites in stream sediments were significantly higher in the intensively cropped Red River Valley Lake Plain, compared to upland areas, probably because of greater historical DDT usage in the lake plain. Several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were detected in stream-bottom sediments. Although the potentially toxic chemicals measured in this study were at low levels, relative to more contaminated areas of the Nation, maximum concentrations of some chemicals are of concern because of their possible effects on aquatic biota and human health.

  7. Radioactive decay.

    PubMed

    Groch, M W

    1998-01-01

    When a parent radionuclide decays to its daughter radionuclide by means of alpha, beta, or isomeric transition, the decay follows an exponential form, which is characterized by the decay constant lambda. The decay constant represents the probability per unit time that a single radioatom will decay. The decay equation can be used to provide a useful expression for radionuclide decay, the half-life, the time when 50% of the radioatoms present will have decayed. Radiotracer half-life has direct implications in nuclear imaging, radiation therapy, and radiation safety because radionuclide half-life affects the ability to evaluate tracer kinetics and create appropriate nuclear images and also affects organ, tumor, and whole-body radiation dose. The number of radioatoms present in a sample is equal to the activity, defined as the number of transitions per unit time, divided by the decay constant; the mass of radioatoms present in a sample can be calculated to determine the specific activity (activity per unit mass). The dynamic relationship between the number of parent and daughter atoms present over time may lead to radioactive equilibrium, which takes two forms--secular and transient--and has direct relevance to generator-produced radionuclides.

  8. The Effect of Risk Factors on the Levels of Chemical Elements in the Tibial Plateau of Patients with Osteoarthritis following Knee Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lanocha-Arendarczyk, Natalia; Kosik-Bogacka, Danuta Izabela; Prokopowicz, Adam; Kalisinska, Elzbieta; Sokolowski, Sebastian; Karaczun, Maciej; Zietek, Pawel; Podlasińska, Joanna; Pilarczyk, Bogumila; Tomza-Marciniak, Agnieszka; Baranowska-Bosiacka, Irena; Gutowska, Izabela; Safranow, Krzysztof; Chlubek, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the aforementioned chemical elements in tibial plateau samples obtained during knee arthroplasty. The gender-specific analysis of chemical element levels in the bone samples revealed that there were statistically significant differences in the concentration of Pb and Se/Pb ratio. The contents of elements in the tibial plateau in the patients with osteoarthritis (OA) can be arranged in the following descending order: F− > K > Zn > Fe > Sr > Pb > Mn > Se > Cd > THg. We observed statistical significant effects of environmental factors including smoking, seafood diet, and geographical distribution on the levels of the elements in tibial bone. Significant positive correlation coefficients were found for the relationships K-Cd, Zn-Sr, Zn-F−, THg-Pb, Pb-Cd, Se-Se/Pb, Se-Se/Cd, Se/Pb-Se/Cd, Pb-Cd/Ca, Cd-Cd/Ca, and F−-F−/Ca·1000. Significant negative correlations were found for the relationships THg-Se/Pb, Pb-Se/Pb, Cd-Se/Pb, K-Se/Cd, Pb-Se/Cd, Cd-Se/Cd, THg-Se/THg, Pb-Se/THg, Se-Pb/Cd, Zn-Cd/Ca, and Se/Cd-Cd/Ca. The results reported here may provide a basis for establishing reference values for the tibial plateau in patients with OA who had undergone knee replacement surgery. The concentrations of elements in the bone with OA were determined by age, presence of implants, smoking, fish and seafood diet, and sport activity. PMID:26583123

  9. The Effect of Risk Factors on the Levels of Chemical Elements in the Tibial Plateau of Patients with Osteoarthritis following Knee Surgery.

    PubMed

    Lanocha-Arendarczyk, Natalia; Kosik-Bogacka, Danuta Izabela; Prokopowicz, Adam; Kalisinska, Elzbieta; Sokolowski, Sebastian; Karaczun, Maciej; Zietek, Pawel; Podlasińska, Joanna; Pilarczyk, Bogumila; Tomza-Marciniak, Agnieszka; Baranowska-Bosiacka, Irena; Gutowska, Izabela; Safranow, Krzysztof; Chlubek, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the aforementioned chemical elements in tibial plateau samples obtained during knee arthroplasty. The gender-specific analysis of chemical element levels in the bone samples revealed that there were statistically significant differences in the concentration of Pb and Se/Pb ratio. The contents of elements in the tibial plateau in the patients with osteoarthritis (OA) can be arranged in the following descending order: F(-) > K > Zn > Fe > Sr > Pb > Mn > Se > Cd > THg. We observed statistical significant effects of environmental factors including smoking, seafood diet, and geographical distribution on the levels of the elements in tibial bone. Significant positive correlation coefficients were found for the relationships K-Cd, Zn-Sr, Zn-F(-), THg-Pb, Pb-Cd, Se-Se/Pb, Se-Se/Cd, Se/Pb-Se/Cd, Pb-Cd/Ca, Cd-Cd/Ca, and F(-)-F(-)/Ca·1000. Significant negative correlations were found for the relationships THg-Se/Pb, Pb-Se/Pb, Cd-Se/Pb, K-Se/Cd, Pb-Se/Cd, Cd-Se/Cd, THg-Se/THg, Pb-Se/THg, Se-Pb/Cd, Zn-Cd/Ca, and Se/Cd-Cd/Ca. The results reported here may provide a basis for establishing reference values for the tibial plateau in patients with OA who had undergone knee replacement surgery. The concentrations of elements in the bone with OA were determined by age, presence of implants, smoking, fish and seafood diet, and sport activity.

  10. Chemical bioimaging for the subcellular localization of trace elements by high contrast TEM, TEM/X-EDS, and NanoSIMS.

    PubMed

    Penen, Florent; Malherbe, Julien; Isaure, Marie-Pierre; Dobritzsch, Dirk; Bertalan, Ivo; Gontier, Etienne; Le Coustumer, Philippe; Schaumlöffel, Dirk

    2016-09-01

    Chemical bioimaging offers an important contribution to the investigation of biochemical functions, biosorption and bioaccumulation processes of trace elements via their localization at the cellular and even at the subcellular level. This paper describes the combined use of high contrast transmission electron microscopy (HC-TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (X-EDS), and nano secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) applied to a model organism, the unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. HC-TEM providing a lateral resolution of 1nm was used for imaging the ultrastructure of algae cells which have diameters of 5-10μm. TEM coupled to X-EDS (TEM/X-EDS) combined textural (morphology and size) analysis with detection of Ca, P, K, Mg, Fe, and Zn in selected subcellular granules using an X-EDS probe size of approx. 1μm. However, instrumental sensitivity was at the limit for trace element detection. NanoSIMS allowed chemical imaging of macro and trace elements with subcellular resolution (element mapping). Ca, Mg, and P as well as the trace elements Fe, Cu, and Zn present at basal levels were detected in pyrenoids, contractile vacuoles, and granules. Some metals were even localized in small vesicles of about 200nm size. Sensitive subcellular localization of trace metals was possible by the application of a recently developed RF plasma oxygen primary ion source on NanoSIMS which has shown good improvements in terms of lateral resolution (below 50nm), sensitivity, and stability. Furthermore correlative single cell imaging was developed combining the advantages of TEM and NanoSIMS. An advanced sample preparation protocol provided adjacent ultramicrotome sections for parallel TEM and NanoSIMS analyses of the same cell. Thus, the C. reinhardtii cellular ultrastructure could be directly related to the spatial distribution of metals in different cell organelles such as vacuoles and chloroplast. PMID:27288221

  11. ELECTRONIC ANALOG COMPUTER FOR DETERMINING RADIOACTIVE DISINTEGRATION

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, H.P.

    1959-07-14

    A computer is presented for determining growth and decay curves for elements in a radioactive disintegration series wherein one unstable element decays to form a second unstable element or isotope, which in turn forms a third element, etc. The growth and decay curves of radioactive elements are simulated by the charge and discharge curves of a resistance-capacitance network. Several such networks having readily adjustable values are connected in series with an amplifier between each successive pair. The time constant of each of the various networks is set proportional to the half-life of a corresponding element in the series represented and the charge and discharge curves of each of the networks simulates the element growth and decay curve.

  12. Chemical consequences of radioactive decay. 2. Spectrophotometric study of the ingrowth of berkelium-249 and californium-249 into halides of einsteinium-253

    SciTech Connect

    Young, J.P.; Haire, R.G.; Peterson, J.R.; Ensor, D.D.; Fellows, R.L.

    1981-11-01

    The ingrowth of /sup 249/Bk daughter and /sup 249/Cf granddaughter into fluorides, chlorides, bromides, and iodides of parent /sup 253/Es was followed by spectrophotometric methods. In the case of trivalent Es halides, the oxidation state of the parent is maintained by its progeny. In the case of divalent Es halides, the oxidation state of the parent is retained by the granddaughter species. No other oxidation states or chemical species of the progeny ions are observed even though experimental conditions of storage such as physical state, temperature, or cover-gas composition were varied. These results are considered in terms of mechanisms that would allow such chemical stability.

  13. Chemical elements in pearl oysters (Paxyodon ponderosus), phytoplankton and estuarine sediments from eastern Amazon (Northern Brazil): Bioaccumulation factors and trophic transfer factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilhena, Maria P. S. P.; Costa, Marcondes L.; Berrêdo, José F.; Paiva, Rosildo S.; Souza, Crisvaldo C. S.

    2016-04-01

    The current study was conducted near Barcarena County, which is a mid-sized urban center where aluminum ore processing industries (bauxite) and Vila do Conde cargo terminal are located. It aims to discuss the bioaccumulation factors as well as factors related to the trophic transfer of chemical elements in water, oyster, phytoplankton and bottom sediments from an estuary in the Brazilian Northern coast. The bioaccumulation factor (BAF), trophic transfer factor (TTF) and biota-sediment-water were used to correlate the contents of chemical elements found in organisms. The sediment, surface water, phytoplankton and pearl oysters chemical composition was analyzed by ICP-OES and ICP-MS. Pearl oysters showed K, Ca, Mg, P, Mn, Fe, Zn, Al, Ba and Pb accumulation, which concentration increase is associated with their diet (phytoplankton). Al concentrations are 14 times higher in pearl oysters (Paxyodon ponderosus), assuming that they are associated with wastewater emissions and with industrialization processes in the area. BAF and BSAF values are 1000 times higher than the metal concentrations in water and bioavailable fraction concentrations. The oyster-phytoplankton trophic transfer factor indicates that P, Ba, Ca, Na, Cd and Zn showed the largest transfers (from 5 to 19). These trophic transfers may be sufficient to cause significant ecotoxicological effects on the region biota.

  14. Establishment of a finite element model for extracting chemical reaction kinetics in a micro-flow injection system with high throughput sampling.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zeng-Qiang; Du, Wen-Bin; Li, Jin-Yi; Xia, Xing-Hua; Fang, Qun

    2015-08-01

    Numerical simulation can provide valuable insights for complex microfluidic phenomena coupling mixing and diffusion processes. Herein, a novel finite element model (FEM) has been established to extract chemical reaction kinetics in a microfluidic flow injection analysis (micro-FIA) system using high throughput sample introduction. To reduce the computation burden, the finite element mesh generation is performed with different scales based on the different geometric sizes of micro-FIA. In order to study the contribution of chemical reaction kinetics under non-equilibrium condition, a pseudo-first-order chemical kinetics equation is adopted in the numerical simulations. The effect of reactants diffusion on reaction products is evaluated, and the results demonstrate that the Taylor dispersion plays a determining role in the micro-FIA system. In addition, the effects of flow velocity and injection volume on the reaction product are also simulated. The simulated results agree well with the ones from experiments. Although gravity driven flow is used to the numerical model in the present study, the FEM model also can be applied into the systems with other driving forces such as pressure. Therefore, the established FEM model will facilitate the understanding of reaction mechanism in micro-FIA systems and help us to optimize the manifold of micro-FIA systems.

  15. Chemical studies of H chondrites - 9: Volatile trace element composition and petrographic classification of equilibrated H chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Stephen F.; Lipschutz, Michael E.

    1998-03-01

    To examine the thermal history of the parent(s) of equilibrated H chondrites, we treated data for 11 volatile trace elements (Co, Rb, Ag, Se, Cs, Te, Zn, Cd, Bi, Tl, and In in order of putative volatility) in 90 falls: 15 H4; 46 H5, and 29 H6. Using univariate statistical tests, contents of few of these elements differ significantly between any two of these suites. One element, Cs, differs systematically between all 3 pairs of suites: Co and Tl differ between 2 pairs of suites. For Co and Cs, contents varied as H4>H5>H6 while for Tl, H4element contents in the H5 suite being intermediate to those of H4 and H6. Surprisingly, the multivariate distinguishability reflects contents of less-volatile Co, Rb, Ag, Se and Cs, not of highly volatile Te, Zn, Cd, Bi, Tl and In. The compositional trends apparently reflect heterogeneous accretion >600 K, with the suites deriving from a stratified parent object(s).

  16. Quantitative chemical imaging of the intracellular spatial distribution of fundamental elements and light metals in single cells.

    PubMed

    Malucelli, Emil; Iotti, Stefano; Gianoncelli, Alessandra; Fratini, Michela; Merolle, Lucia; Notargiacomo, Andrea; Marraccini, Chiara; Sargenti, Azzurra; Cappadone, Concettina; Farruggia, Giovanna; Bukreeva, Inna; Lombardo, Marco; Trombini, Claudio; Maier, Jeanette A; Lagomarsino, Stefano

    2014-05-20

    We report a method that allows a complete quantitative characterization of whole single cells, assessing the total amount of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, sodium, and magnesium and providing submicrometer maps of element molar concentration, cell density, mass, and volume. This approach allows quantifying elements down to 10(6) atoms/μm(3). This result was obtained by applying a multimodal fusion approach that combines synchrotron radiation microscopy techniques with off-line atomic force microscopy. The method proposed permits us to find the element concentration in addition to the mass fraction and provides a deeper and more complete knowledge of cell composition. We performed measurements on LoVo human colon cancer cells sensitive (LoVo-S) and resistant (LoVo-R) to doxorubicin. The comparison of LoVo-S and LoVo-R revealed different patterns in the maps of Mg concentration with higher values within the nucleus in LoVo-R and in the perinuclear region in LoVo-S cells. This feature was not so evident for the other elements, suggesting that Mg compartmentalization could be a significant trait of the drug-resistant cells.

  17. Chemical characterization of high-temperature arc gasification slag with a focus on element release in the environment.

    PubMed

    Roessler, Justin G; Oehmig, Wesley N; Blaisi, Nawaf I; Townsend, Timothy G

    2014-07-15

    High-temperature arc gasification (HTAG) has been proposed as a viable technology for the generation of energy and the production of saleable byproducts from municipal solid waste (MSW). Total concentrations of elements in HTAG slag were assessed and indicated a high partitioning of trace elements (Pb, Cd, and As) into the flue gas, an issue of concern when assessing the air pollution control residues (APCR) status as a hazardous waste. Hazardous waste leaching tests [such as the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP)] were performed and confirmed that the slag did not meet U.S. criteria for a hazardous waste. Leaching was assessed using batch and column tests; the results revealed that Sb and Al were elevated in respect to risk-based regulatory thresholds. Slag samples were carbonated to simulate weathering effects, and although leachable concentrations of Al did decrease by an order of magnitude, Sb concentrations were found to increase. Low total concentrations of certain trace elements (As, Cd, and Pb), with respect to MSW incineration bottom ashes support the potential for reuse of HTAG slag; however, leaching of elements (Pb, Al, and Sb) in batch and column tests indicate that proper engineering controls would need to be taken to ensure protection of water supplies in a reuse application.

  18. Profiling Environmental Chemicals in the Antioxidant Response Element Pathway using Quantitative High Throughput Screening (qHTS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The antioxidant response element (ARE) signaling pathway plays an important role in the amelioration of oxidative stress, which can contribute to a number of diseases, including cancer. We screened 1408 NTP-provided substances in 1536-well qHTS format at concentrations ranging fr...

  19. Process for decontaminating radioactive liquids using a calcium cyanamide-containing composition. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Silver, G.L.

    1980-09-24

    The present invention provides a process for decontaminating a radioactive liquid containing a radioactive element capable of forming a hydroxide. This process includes the steps of contacting the radioactive liquid with a decontaminating composition and separating the resulting radioactive sludge from the resulting liquid. The decontaminating composition contains calcium cyanamide.

  20. Accident analysis of railway transportation of low-level radioactive and hazardous chemical wastes: Application of the /open quotes/Maximum Credible Accident/close quotes/ concept

    SciTech Connect

    Ricci, E.; McLean, R.B.

    1988-09-01

    The maximum credible accident (MCA) approach to accident analysis places an upper bound on the potential adverse effects of a proposed action by using conservative but simplifying assumptions. It is often used when data are lacking to support a more realistic scenario or when MCA calculations result in acceptable consequences. The MCA approach can also be combined with realistic scenarios to assess potential adverse effects. This report presents a guide for the preparation of transportation accident analyses based on the use of the MCA concept. Rail transportation of contaminated wastes is used as an example. The example is the analysis of the environmental impact of the potential derailment of a train transporting a large shipment of wastes. The shipment is assumed to be contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls and low-level radioactivities of uranium and technetium. The train is assumed to plunge into a river used as a source of drinking water. The conclusions from the example accident analysis are based on the calculation of the number of foreseeable premature cancer deaths the might result as a consequence of this accident. These calculations are presented, and the reference material forming the basis for all assumptions and calculations is also provided.

  1. PERSPECTIVE: Fireworks and radioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitenecker, Katharina

    2009-09-01

    both reaction products and unburnt constituents of a pyrotechnic mixture. One major environmental concern in pyrotechnics focuses on the emission of heavy metals. This is the topic discussed in the article by Georg Steinhauser and Andreas Musilek in this issue [4]. A possible interrelationship between respiratory effects and fireworks emissions of barium-rich aerosols was also raised last year [5]. In recent years the potential hazard of naturally occurring radioactive material has become of importance to the scientific community. Naturally occurring radionuclides can be of terrestrial or cosmological origin. Terrestrial radionuclides were present in the presolar cloud that later contracted in order to build our solar system. These radionuclides—mainly heavy metals—and their non-radioactive isotopes are nowadays fixed in the matrix of the Earth's structure. Usually, their percentage is quite small compared to their respective stable isotopes—though there are exceptions like in the case of radium. The problem with environmental pollution due to naturally occurring radioactive material begins when this material is concentrated due to mining and milling, and later further processed [6]. Environmental pollution due to radioactive material goes back as far as the Copper and Iron Ages, when the first mines were erected in order to mine ores (gold, silver, copper, iron, etc), resulting in naturally occurring radioactive material being set free with other dusts into the atmosphere. So where is the link between pyrotechnics and radioactivity? In this article presented by Georg Steinhauser and Andreas Musilek [4], the pyrotechnic ingredients barium nitrate and strontium nitrate are explored with respect to their chemical similarities to radium. The fundamental question, therefore, was whether radium can be processed together with barium and strontium. If so, the production and ignition of these pyrotechnic ingredients could cause atmospheric pollution with radium aerosols

  2. A pilot-scale radioactive test using in situ vitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Timmerman, C.L.; Oma, K.M.

    1985-11-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory is developing in situ vitrification (ISV) as a potential remedial action technique for previously disposed radioactive liquid drain sites. The process melts the contaminated soil to produce a durable glass and crystalline waste form and encapsulates the radionuclides. The development of this alternative technology is being performed for the US Department of Energy. The results of an ISV pilot-scale test conducted in June 1983 are discussed in which soils contaminated with actual radioactive transuranic and mixed fission product elements were vitrified. The test successfully demonstrated the containment of radionuclides during processing, both within the vitrified mass and in the off-gas system. No environmental release of radioactive material was detectable during testing operations. The vitrified soil retained >99% of all radionuclides. Losses to the offgas system varied from less than or equal to 0.03% for particulate materials (plutonium and strontium) to 0.8% for cesium, which is a more volatile element. The off-gas system effectively contained both volatile and entrained radioactive materials. Analysis of the vitrified soil revealed that all radionuclides were distributed throughout the vitrified zone, some more uniformly than others. Analysis of soil samples taken adjacent to the block indicated that no migration of radionuclides outside the vitrification zone occurred. Leaching studies have shown that the ISV process generates a highly durable waste form, comparable to Pyrex and granite. Based on geologic data from the hydration of obsidian, which is chemically similar to the ISV glass, the hydration or weathering rate is predicted to be much less than 1 mm in 10,000 yr.

  3. Radioactive Nanomaterials for Multimodality Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Daiqin; Dougherty, Casey A.; Yang, Dongzhi; Wu, Hongwei; Hong, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear imaging techniques, including primarily positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), can provide quantitative information for a biological event in vivo with ultra-high sensitivity, however, the comparatively low spatial resolution is their major limitation in clinical application. By convergence of nuclear imaging with other imaging modalities like computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and optical imaging, the hybrid imaging platforms can overcome the limitations from each individual imaging technique. Possessing versatile chemical linking ability and good cargo-loading capacity, radioactive nanomaterials can serve as ideal imaging contrast agents. In this review, we provide a brief overview about current state-of-the-art applications of radioactive nanomaterials in the circumstances of multimodality imaging. We present strategies for incorporation of radioisotope(s) into nanomaterials along with applications of radioactive nanomaterials in multimodal imaging. Advantages and limitations of radioactive nanomaterials for multimodal imaging applications are discussed. Finally, a future perspective of possible radioactive nanomaterial utilization is presented for improving diagnosis and patient management in a variety of diseases. PMID:27227167

  4. Selected elements and organic chemicals in bed sediment and fish tissue of the Tualatin River basin, Oregon, 1992-96

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonn, Bernadine A.

    1999-01-01

    Phthalate compounds are often associated with urban areas. They are used in a wide variety of industrial applications and in inks, adhesives, resins, and as plasticizers (chemicals that increase the flexibility of plastics). In aquatic systems, phthalates are found mostly in sediments where they degrade very slowly. Phthalates are thought t

  5. Chemical Technology Division progress report, April 1, 1983-March 31, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-10-01

    The status of the following programs is reported: fission energy; nuclear and chemical waste management; environmental control technology; basic science and technology; biotechnology programs; transuranium-element processing; Nuclear Regulatory Commission programs; Consolidated Edison Uranium Solidification Project; radioactive materials production; computer 1 engineering applications; and miscellanous programs.

  6. Spontaneously generated radioactive nanoparticles in the environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marlow, William H.; Cheng, Yung-Sung

    2003-04-01

    For almost 100 years, and perhaps longer, observers have detected spontaneous dispersal of radioactivity from macroscopic quantities of radioactive materials with the first published observations reported in 1910. In the 1960"s and later, radioactivity was observed to migrate through HEPA filters de-spite their well-established filtration characteristics. In measurements of ground water, radioactivity has been found to disperse from its original location of deposition in soil, despite the size, insolubility, and resistance to chemical reactions of the radioactive particles originally deposited. Similarly, measurements of the uptake of these materials in lung tissue and studies of their solubility in simulated biological fluids showed the solubility to be related to the radioactivity of the materials. In numerous practical examples, the migration and deposition of radioactivity affects work and operational practices. Despite this long and varied history indicating the importance of self-dispersal of radioactive materials, no measurements had ever been reported of the materials which were actually dispersed until recently and the results are quite surprising, suggesting a well-defined process creating discrete nanoparticle fractions. This paper will review the history of the observations of spontaneous dispersal of radioactivity and close with a description of the first measure-ments of the dispersed nanoparticles and suggestions of the physical processes involved in their formation.

  7. The study of chemical composition and elemental mappings of colored over-glaze porcelain fired in Qing Dynasty by micro-X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Cheng; Meitian, Li; Youshi, Kim; Changsheng, Fan; Shanghai, Wang; Qiuli, Pan; Zhiguo, Liu; Rongwu, Li

    2011-02-01

    It is very difficult to measure the chemical composition of colored pigments of over-glaze porcelain by X-ray fluorescence because it contains high concentration of Pb. One of the disadvantages of our polycapillary optics is that it has low transmission efficiency to the high energy X-ray. However, it is beneficial to measure the chemical compositions of rich Pb sample. In this paper, we reported the performances of a tabletop setup of micro-X-ray fluorescence system base on slightly focusing polycapillary and its applications for analysis of rich Pb sample. A piece of Chinese ancient over-glaze porcelain was analyzed by micro-X-ray fluorescence. The experimental results showed that the Cu, Fe and Mn are the major color elements. The possibilities of the process of decorative technology were discussed in this paper, also.

  8. Chemical studies of H chondrites-10: Contents of thermally labile trace elements are unaffected by late heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ming-Sheng; Wolf, Stephen F.; Lipschutz, Michael E.

    1999-09-01

    We have used radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA) to determine 15 trace elements, including 10 moderately and highly volatile ones - Rb, Ag, Se, Cs, Te, Zn, Cd, Bi, Tl, In (in increasing volatility order) - in 6 H chondrite falls with low 3He contents. These plus prior RNAA data provide a compositional database of 92 H4-6 chondrite falls. Three suites of samples can be identified from their noble gas contents: 44 with "normal" contents, and, therefore, "normal" orbits and cosmic ray exposure histories; 8 that lost radiogenic gases, presumably by shock late in their histories; and 17 that lost cosmogenic gases by heating during close solar approach. We used the standard multivariate statistical techniques of linear discriminant analysis and logistic regression to compare contents of the 10 moderately and highly volatile trace elements, listed above, in these 3 suites. We found no significant differences. This contrasts sharply with similar comparisons involving random falls and H4-6 chondrites that landed on Earth at specific time intervals. Apparently, contents of volatile trace elements in H4-6 chondrites were established early in their histories and they are so retentively sited that loss during later heating episodes did not occur.

  9. Radioactive waste processing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Robert E.; Ziegler, Anton A.; Serino, David F.; Basnar, Paul J.

    1987-01-01

    Apparatus for use in processing radioactive waste materials for shipment and storage in solid form in a container is disclosed. The container includes a top, and an opening in the top which is smaller than the outer circumference of the container. The apparatus includes an enclosure into which the container is placed, solution feed apparatus for adding a solution containing radioactive waste materials into the container through the container opening, and at least one rotatable blade for blending the solution with a fixing agent such as cement or the like as the solution is added into the container. The blade is constructed so that it can pass through the opening in the top of the container. The rotational axis of the blade is displaced from the center of the blade so that after the blade passes through the opening, the blade and container can be adjusted so that one edge of the blade is adjacent the cylindrical wall of the container, to insure thorough mixing. When the blade is inside the container, a substantially sealed chamber is formed to contain vapors created by the chemical action of the waste solution and fixant, and vapors emanating through the opening in the container.

  10. Seawater-like trace element signatures (REE + Y) of Eoarchaean chemical sedimentary rocks from southern West Greenland, and their corruption during high-grade metamorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friend, C. R. L.; Nutman, A. P.; Bennett, V. C.; Norman, M. D.

    2008-02-01

    Modern chemical sediments display a distinctive rare earth element + yttrium (REE + Y) pattern involving depleted LREE, positive La/La*SN, Eu/Eu*SN, and YSN anomalies (SN = shale normalised) that is related to precipitation from circumneutral to high pH waters with solution complexation of the REEs dominated by carbonate ions. This is often interpreted as reflecting precipitation from surface waters (usually marine). The oldest broadly accepted chemical sediments are c. 3,700 Ma amphibolite facies banded iron-formation (BIF) units in the Isua supracrustal belt, Greenland. Isua BIFs, including the BIF international reference material IF-G are generally considered to be seawater precipitates, and display these REE + Y patterns (Bolhar et al. in Earth Planet Sci Lett 222:43 60, 2004). Greenland Eoarchaean BIF metamorphosed up to granulite facies from several localities in the vicinity of Akilia (island), display REE + Y patterns identical to Isua BIF, consistent with an origin by chemical sedimentation from seawater and a paucity of clastic input. Furthermore, the much-debated magnetite-bearing siliceous unit of “earliest life” rocks (sample G91/26) from Akilia has the same REE + Y pattern. This suggests that sample G91/26 is also a chemical sediment, contrary to previous assertions (Bolhar et al. in Earth Planet Sci Lett 222:43 60, 2004), and including suggestions that the Akilia unit containing G91/26 consists entirely of silica-penetrated, metasomatised, mafic rock (Fedo and Whitehouse 2002a). Integration of our trace element data with those of Bolhar et al. (Earth Planet Sci Lett 222:43 60, 2004) demonstrates that Eoarchaean siliceous rocks in Greenland, with ages from 3.6 to 3.85 Ga, have diverse trace element signatures. There are now geographically-dispersed, widespread examples with Isua BIF-like REE + Y signatures, that are interpreted as chemically unaltered, albeit metamorphosed, chemical sediments. Other samples retain remnants of LREE depletion but

  11. Dynamic coupling of bulk chemistry, trace elements and mantle flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, J. H.; Heck, H. V.; Nowacki, A.; Wookey, J. M.; Elliott, T.; Porcelli, D.

    2015-12-01

    Fully dynamical models that not only track the evolution of chemical heterogeneities through the mantle, but also incorporate the effect of chemical heterogeneities on the dynamics of mantle convection are now emerging. Since in general analytical solutions to these complex problems are lacking, careful testing and investigations of the effect and usefulness of these models is needed. We extend our existing numerical mantle convection code that can track fluid flow in 3D spherical geometry and tracks both bulk chemical components (basal fraction) and different trace elements. The chemical components fractionate upon melting when and where the solidus is crossed. Now, the chemical information will effect the flow of the fluid in the following ways: The bulk composition will link to density and the (radioactive) trace element abundance to heat production. Results will be reported of the effect of different density structures; either starting with a primordial dense layer at the base of the mantle, having all density variation originate from melting (basalt production), or a combination between these two end-member scenarios. In particular we will focus on the connection between large scale bulk chemical structures in the (deep) mantle and the evolution of the distribution of noble gasses (He and Ar). The distribution of noble gasses depend upon 1) assumptions on the initial distributions in the mantle, 2) the mantle flow, 3) radioactive production and, 4) outgassing to the atmosphere upon melting close to the surface.

  12. Environmental evaluation of alternatives for long-term management of Defense high-level radioactive wastes at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is considering the selection of a strategy for the long-term management of the defense high-level wastes at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). This report describes the environmental impacts of alternative strategies. These alternative strategies include leaving the calcine in its present form at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), or retrieving and modifying the calcine to a more durable waste form and disposing of it either at the INEL or in an offsite repository. This report addresses only the alternatives for a program to manage the high-level waste generated at the ICPP. 24 figures, 60 tables.

  13. Accumulation of chemical elements in the raised peatbogs of the subtaiga Trans-Urals in the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larina, N. S.; Larin, S. I.; Merkushina, G. A.

    2014-07-01

    The results of studying the variability of the geochemical parameters of the layers of the Sartamskii upland peatbog in the south of Tyumen oblast based on the radiocarbon time scale are given. Four basic types of peat and stages of peat deposits formation in the Holocene are distinguished: the organomineral layer of the sediments in a paleolake (up to 5065 ± 60 years ago), the low moor layer (4300-4900 years ago), the transitional layer (3100-4300 years ago), and the high moor peat (250-3100 years ago). The upper peat layer (last 200-300 years) significantly differs from its main portion; in particular, it is characterized by an increased ash content and the accumulation of a number of elements. The relationship between the various characteristics of the deposit is analyzed using principal component analysis, and the conditions of the formation of the peat deposit in different time periods are estimated, including the climatic conditions (in relative units). The anthropogenic signal of the accumulation of some elements in wetland systems is identified.

  14. Trace elements in recent groundwater of an artesian flow system and comparison with snow: enrichments, depletions, and chemical evolution of the water.

    PubMed

    Shotyk, William; Krachler, Michael; Aeschbach-Hertig, Werner; Hillier, Stephen; Zheng, Jiancheng James

    2010-01-01

    chemical weathering: these could easily be explained if there are small amounts of sulfides (As, Mo, Te) and apatite (U) in the soils of the source area. Elements neither significantly enriched nor depleted at both sites include Fe, Ga, Ge, and P.

  15. Investigation of composition and chemical state of elements in iron boride by the method of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alyoshin, V. G.; Kharlamov, A. I.; Prokopenko, V. M.

    1981-06-01

    The composition and chemical state of iron and boron in the surface layer of iron boride under different kinds of pretreatment of samples have been investigated by the method of X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy. It has been found that in the initial sample there is oxygen chemically combined with iron and boron atoms. Upon heating (450°C) in hydrogen, in argon, and in vacuo there occurs removal of oxygen only from iron atoms (no pure iron was found to be formed). Boron oxidizes and there probably appears a new surface combination of boron with oxygen in which the bonding energy of 1 s electrons is higher than that in B 2O 3. Treatment of the iron boride surface with argon ions and with protons ensures uniform removal of oxygen from iron and boron atoms. It has been found that thermal treatment of iron boride leads to depletion of iron atoms from the sample surface layer, and pickling with argon ions and with protons leads to strong enrichment. Iron boride samples subjected to Ar + and H + bombardment tend to undergo significant oxidation when subsequently exposed to air at room temperature.

  16. REACTOR FUEL ELEMENTS TESTING CONTAINER

    DOEpatents

    Whitham, G.K.; Smith, R.R.

    1963-01-15

    This patent shows a method for detecting leaks in jacketed fuel elements. The element is placed in a sealed tank within a nuclear reactor, and, while the reactor operates, the element is sparged with gas. The gas is then led outside the reactor and monitored for radioactive Xe or Kr. (AEC)

  17. Interspecific distribution and co-associations of chemical elements in the liver tissue of marine mammals from the Polish Economical Exclusive Zone, Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Ciesielski, T; Szefer, P; Bertenyi, Zs; Kuklik, I; Skóra, K; Namieśnik, J; Fodor, P

    2006-05-01

    Concentrations of Al, B, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ga, Hg, Li, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Se, Si, Sr, Tl, V, Zn, Ca, K, Mg, Na and P in the livers of marine mammals obtained from by-catches or stranded on beaches on the Polish Baltic coast were determined by ICP-MS or ICP-AES and CV AAS. Interspecific diversity with respect to the contents of these elements was found in cetaceans and pinnipeds. The diverse Cd contents in the livers of these mammals can be attributed to the variable concentrations of this element in their food. Mercury was correlated with age and can reach high concentration associated with higher level of Se in older specimens. No significant relationships were found between concentration of the chemical elements studied and nutritional status/condition of the Baltic harbour porpoises as well as between their concentration in specimens from the Gulf of Gdańsk and open Baltic. It seems that the nutritional and health status of the specimens studied is generally enough good since the specimens studied were not stranded on beach because of starvation but almost incidentally caught in salmon gill nets. Strong correlations were found between the macroelements analysed, i.e. for the Ba-Ca-Sr, Ca-K, Ca-Mg, Mg-P, Zn-Mg and Zn-P assemblies. Significantly higher content of Al was found in males of harbour porpoises. PMID:16488474

  18. Effects of complexometric compounds found in liquid and solid oil shale waste products on release of chemical elements from retorted shale

    SciTech Connect

    Esmaili, E.; Carroll, R.B.; Jackson, L.P.

    1985-05-01

    Complexometric compounds found in oil shale wastes may have the ability to increase the release of trace elements from retorted oil shale when the solid and liquid wastes are codisposed. A laboratory investigation was conducted on the effects of various complexing agents found in liquid and solid oil shale wastes on the leachability of retorted shales. In batch experiments retorted shale samples were contacted with deionized-distilled water (DDW) and 10 different aqueous solutions of complexing agents. These agents included sodium-oxalate, ammonium-carbonate, sodium-thiosulfate, 2-pyridone, 2-hydroxy-6-methylpyridine, potassium-thiocyanate, acetonitrile, sodium-acetate, acetamide, and nicotinic acid. DDW leachate results were used as a baseline to compare with the results for aqueous complexometric leachates. Some of these agents aided in higher release of arsenic, boron, selenium, lead, and vanadium from the solids. The same complexing agents had different effects on different retorted shales, indicating that the results for one retorted shale may or may not be representative of other retorted shales. This is due to differences in mineralogical residence of elements in various retorted shales and differences in leachate chemical systems of various retorted shales. Concentration of cadium and cobalt did not exceed the quantitation limits of these elements in any of the leachates in this study. 10 refs., 15 tabs.

  19. Radioactive Waste Incineration: Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Diederich, A.R.; Akins, M.J.

    2008-07-01

    Incineration is generally accepted as a method of reducing the volume of radioactive waste. In some cases, the resulting ash may have high concentrations of materials such as Plutonium or Uranium that are valuable materials for recycling. Incineration can also be effective in treating waste that contains hazardous chemicals as well as radioactive contamination. Despite these advantages, the number of operating incinerators currently in the US currently appears to be small and potentially declining. This paper describes technical, regulatory, economic and political factors that affect the selection of incineration as a preferred method of treating radioactive waste. The history of incinerator use at commercial and DOE facilities is summarized, along with the factors that have affected each of the sectors, thus leading to the current set of active incinerator facilities. In summary: Incineration has had a long history of use in radioactive waste processing due to their ability to reduce the volume of the waste while destroying hazardous chemicals and biological material. However, combinations of technical, regulatory, economic and political factors have constrained the overall use of incineration. In both the Government and Private sectors, the trend is to have a limited number of larger incineration facilities that treat wastes from a multiple sites. Each of these sector is now served by only one or two incinerators. Increased use of incineration is not likely unless there is a change in the factors involved, such as a significant increase in the cost of disposal. Medical wastes with low levels of radioactive contamination are being treated effectively at small, local incineration facilities. No trend is expected in this group. (authors)

  20. A computational study of the effects of chemical kinetics on high frequency combustion instability in a single-element rocket combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiteman, Alexander Thomas

    The objective of this research is to determine and analyze the effect a significant change in the speed of reaction (chemical kinetics) has on combustion instability in a single-element rocket combustor. This is carried out using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and is a continuation of previous work on CFD modeling of combustion instability. Specifically, the goal is to determine whether the combustion will have the same, greater, or less instability with a significant decrease in the speed of reaction in the combustor. Other flow characteristics such as temperature, vorticity, and Rayleigh index are also analyzed and compared with those obtained with the original reaction speed. The combustor modeled is a single-element, longitudinal rocket combustor with a choked exhaust nozzle. The fuel is JP-8 and decomposed hydrogen peroxide is used as the oxidizer. The propellants are introduced to the combustion chamber coaxially and are non-premixed. Due to time and computational restraints, a number of simplifications are made to the computational model. These include using 2D axisymmetric modeling, using a single-step global combustion model, and neglecting two-phase effects. The results obtained show that the instability is slightly decreased by using the slower chemical kinetics. The results also show that a number of different and often competing phenomena contribute to the instability of the flow. Overall, the large change in chemical kinetics did not have a great effect on the stability of the combustion, although some flow characteristics were greatly changed. This research indicates that there are many contributing factors to combustion instability and the CFD can help in determining which factors are of greatest import for a given combustor.

  1. Derivation of the density and refractive index of organic matter and elemental carbon from closure between physical and chemical aerosol properties.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Otmar; Chand, Duli; Karg, Erwin; Guyon, Pascal; Frank, Goran P; Swietlicki, Erik; Andreae, Meinrat O

    2009-02-15

    Information on the density (rho) and refractive index m (=n-ik) of elemental carbon (ECa) and organic matter (OMa), the main carbon components of atmospheric aerosols, has frequently been obtained from closure calculations between physical and chemical aerosol properties. However, this approach has suffered from large uncertainties since there were more unknown (or poorly known) parameters than defining equations. In this study, we propose a method that avoids this ambiguity mainly by considering both optical and mass closure and by expressing the three ECa parameters (rho(ECa), n(ECa), k(ECa)) by a single (unknown) parameter. This allows mathematically rigorous determination of rho(Eca), m(ECa), rho(OMa) and m(OMa) from standard physico-chemical aerosol data and rigorous error analysis. The results are unambiguous and self-consistent, i.e., there is no difference between the chemically and physically derived p and m values of the atmospheric aerosol. Application of this method to our previously published data on biomass burning particles from Amazonia yields rho(ECa) = 1.8(+/-0.2) g/cm3, m(ECa) = 1.9(+/-0.1)-i0.20(-0.04/+0.02), rho(OMa) = 1.39(+/-0.13) g/cm3 and m(OMa) = 1.46(+/-0.02), where the launcertainty limits given in parenthesis are based on the principles of error propagation. The relatively low imaginary part of m(ECa) indicates the presence of only partially graphitized elemental carbon, which is consistentwith biomass burning aerosol dominated by smoldering combustion conditions.

  2. Selected elements and organic chemicals in bed sediment and fish tissue of the Tualatin River basin, Oregon, 1992-96

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonn, Bernadine A.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the results of a reconnaissance survey of elements and organic compounds found in bed sediment and fish tissue in streams of the Tualatin River Basin. The basin is in northwestern Oregon to the west of the Portland metropolitan area (fig. 1). The Tualatin River flows for about 80 miles, draining an area of about 712 square miles, before it enters the Willamette River. Land use in the basin changes from mostly forested in the headwaters, to mixed forest and agriculture, to predominately urban. The basin supports a growing population of more than 350,000 people, most of whom live in lower parts of the basin. Water quality in the Tualatin River and its tributaries is expected to be affected by the increasing urbanization of the basin.

  3. Linking chemical elements in forest floor humus (Oh-horizon) in the Czech Republic to contamination sources.

    PubMed

    Sucharova, Julie; Suchara, Ivan; Hola, Marie; Reimann, Clemens; Boyd, Rognvald; Filzmoser, Peter; Englmaier, Peter

    2011-05-01

    While terrestrial moss and other plants are frequently used for environmental mapping and monitoring projects, data on the regional geochemistry of humus are scarce. Humus, however, has a much larger life span than any plant material. It can be seen as the "environmental memory" of an area for at least the last 60-100 years. Here concentrations of 39 elements determined by ICP-MS and ICP AES, pH and ash content are presented for 259 samples of forest floor humus collected at an average sample density of 1 site/300 km2 in the Czech Republic. The scale of anomalies linked to known contamination sources (e.g., lignite mining and burning, metallurgical industry, coal fired power plants, metal smelters) is documented and discussed versus natural processes influencing humus quality. Most maps indicate a local impact from individual contamination sources: often more detailed sampling than used here would be needed to differentiate between likely sources.

  4. Mercury, elemental

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Mercury , elemental ; CASRN 7439 - 97 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinoge

  5. Preliminary study of radioactive limonite localities in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovering, T.G.; Beroni, E.P.

    1956-01-01

    Nine radioactive limonite localities of different types were sampled during the spring and fall of 1953 in an effort to establish criteria for differentiating limonite outcrops associated with uranium or thorium deposits from limonite outcrops not associated with such deposits. The samples were analyzed for uranium and thorium by standard chemical methods, for equivalent uranium by the radiometric method, and for a number of common metals by semiquantitative geochemical methods. Correlation coefficients were then calculated for each of the metals with respect to equivalent uranium, and to uranium where present, for all of the samples from each locality. The correlation coefficients may indicate a significant association between uranium or thorium and certain metals. Occurrences of specific that are interpreted as significant very considerably for different uranium localities but are more consistent for the thorium localities. Samples taken from radioactive outcrops in the vicinity of uranium or thorium deposits can be quickly analyzed by geochemical methods for various elements. Correlation coefficients can then be determined for the various elements with respect to uranium or thorium; if any significant correlations are obtained, the elements showing such correlation may be indicators of uranium or thorium. Soil samples of covered areas in the vicinity of the radioactive outcrop may then be analyzed for the indicator elements and any resulting anomalies used as a guide for prospecting where the depth of overburden is too great to allow the use of radiation-detecting instruments. Correlation coefficients of the associated indicator elements, used in conjunction with petrographic evidence, may also be useful in interpreting the origin and paragenesis of radioactive deposits. Changes in color of limonite stains on the outcrop may also be a useful guide to ore in some areas.

  6. Evolution of the chemical element abundances with age in open clusters: The Hyades, Pleiades, Coma Berenices and M6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiliçoǧlu, T.; Monier, R.; Gebran, M.; Fossati, L.

    2014-12-01

    We compare the averaged photospheric abundances of A and F stars in open clusters of different ages: M6 (˜80 Myr), Pleiades (˜100 Myr), Coma Berenices (˜450 Myr), and the Hyades (˜800 Myr). The variation in the averaged abundances among F stars generally reflects the differences between the initial compositions of the clusters in their various birthplaces. The differences of the averaged chemical composition of A stars may also reveal the effects of radiative difussion for the stars of different ages. We also discuss the methods, resolutions and wavelength coverages of spectra and discrepancies in the derived microturbulent velocities among the various studies to check if these studies are comparable. We also present the pattern of mean abundances and metallicity for the M6 cluster determined by spectral analysis of GIRAFFE spectra acquired with the VLT, Paranal Observatory.

  7. Radioactive diagnostic agent

    SciTech Connect

    Shigematsu, A.; Aihara, M.; Matsuda, M.; Suzuki, A.; Tsuya, A.

    1984-02-07

    A radioactive diagnostic agent for renal cortex, adrenal cortex, myocardium, brain stem, spinal nerve, etc., which comprises as an essential component monoiodoacetic acid wherein the iodine atom is radioactive.

  8. Abscess scan - radioactive

    MedlinePlus

    Radioactive abscess scan; Abscess scan; Indium Scan; Indium-labelled white blood cell scan ... the white blood cells are tagged with a radioactive substance called indium. The cells are then injected ...

  9. The New Model of Chemical Evolution of r-process Elements Based on the Hierarchical Galaxy Formation. I. Ba and Eu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komiya, Yutaka; Yamada, Shimako; Suda, Takuma; Fujimoto, Masayuki Y.

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the chemical enrichment of r-process elements in the early evolutionary stages of the Milky Way halo within the framework of hierarchical galaxy formation using a semi-analytic merger tree. In this paper, we focus on heavy r-process elements, Ba and Eu, of extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars and give constraints on their astronomical sites. Our models take into account changes of the surface abundances of EMP stars by the accretion of interstellar medium (ISM). We also consider metal-enrichment of intergalactic medium by galactic winds and the resultant pre-enrichment of proto-galaxies. The trend and scatter of the observed r-process abundances are well reproduced by our hierarchical model with ~10% of core-collapse supernovae in low-mass end (~10 M ⊙) as a dominant r-process source and the star formation efficiency of ~10-10 yr-1. For neutron star mergers as an r-process source, their coalescence timescale has to be ~107 yr, and the event rates ~100 times larger than currently observed in the Galaxy. We find that the accretion of ISM is a dominant source of r-process elements for stars with [Ba/H] < -3.5. In this model, a majority of stars at [Fe/H] < -3 are formed without r-process elements, but their surfaces are polluted by the ISM accretion. The pre-enrichment affects ~4% of proto-galaxies, and yet, is surpassed by the ISM accretion in the surface of EMP stars.

  10. The new model of chemical evolution of r-process elements based on the hierarchical galaxy formation. I. Ba and Eu

    SciTech Connect

    Komiya, Yutaka; Suda, Takuma; Yamada, Shimako; Fujimoto, Masayuki Y.

    2014-03-10

    We investigate the chemical enrichment of r-process elements in the early evolutionary stages of the Milky Way halo within the framework of hierarchical galaxy formation using a semi-analytic merger tree. In this paper, we focus on heavy r-process elements, Ba and Eu, of extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars and give constraints on their astronomical sites. Our models take into account changes of the surface abundances of EMP stars by the accretion of interstellar medium (ISM). We also consider metal-enrichment of intergalactic medium by galactic winds and the resultant pre-enrichment of proto-galaxies. The trend and scatter of the observed r-process abundances are well reproduced by our hierarchical model with ∼10% of core-collapse supernovae in low-mass end (∼10 M {sub ☉}) as a dominant r-process source and the star formation efficiency of ∼10{sup –10} yr{sup –1}. For neutron star mergers as an r-process source, their coalescence timescale has to be ∼10{sup 7} yr, and the event rates ∼100 times larger than currently observed in the Galaxy. We find that the accretion of ISM is a dominant source of r-process elements for stars with [Ba/H] < –3.5. In this model, a majority of stars at [Fe/H] < –3 are formed without r-process elements, but their surfaces are polluted by the ISM accretion. The pre-enrichment affects ∼4% of proto-galaxies, and yet, is surpassed by the ISM accretion in the surface of EMP stars.

  11. Chemical evolution of magmas in the proterozoic terrane of the St. Francois Mountains, southeastern Missouri: 2. Trace element data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cullers, R. L.; Koch, R. J.; Bickford, M. E.

    1981-11-01

    The St. Francois Mountains igneous complex of Proterozoic age consists of hypabyssal, granite plutons intruded into the overlying rhyolites of similar age. Melting and crystallization models of these rocks suggested by the field, petrographic, and major element contents are further refined using Rb, Ba, Sr, REE (rare-earth element), Th, Sc, and Co contents. There are two groups of relatively undifferentiated plutons associated with the Butler Hill caldera and Taum Sauk area that could have formed by partial melting of lower crustal rocks. The plutons associated with the Butler Hill caldera (Knoblick and Silvermine granites) could have formed by about 30% aggregate melting of a quartz diorite, graywacke, or subgraywacke. The plutons associated with the Taum Sauk area could have formed by about 30% equilibrium melting of a subarkose or arkose. More silicic rocks of the Butler Hill caldera could have formed by fractional crystallization. The Silvermine granite is internally zoned. Crystallization of plagioclase/biotite/hornblende/magnetite/apatite/zircon/sphene in a ratio of 0.70/0.10/0.15/0.04/0.005/0.003/0.007 from the least differentiated portion of the Silvermine granite could have formed intermediate portions of the Silvermine. Further crystallization of the Silvermine requires more biotite (Ba begins to decrease) and less hornblende, zircon, and sphene (HREE increase) to precipitate and form the most differentiated portions. Also fractional crystallization of undifferentiated Silvermine-type magmas could have produced the sequence of Butler Hill-Breadtray-Graniteville granites as residual liquids, respectively. The early crystallizing mineral assemblage is dominated by plagioclase and biotite, while the late crystallizing mineral assemblage is dominated by quartz, K-feldspar, and lesser plagioclase. The Gneissoid granodiorite in the Hawn Park area has the mineral assemblage and composition of a cumulate derived from the Silvermine granite-type differentiation

  12. Lattice parameters and stability of the spinel compounds in relation to the ionic radii and electronegativities of constituting chemical elements.

    PubMed

    Brik, Mikhail G; Suchocki, Andrzej; Kamińska, Agata

    2014-05-19

    A thorough consideration of the relation between the lattice parameters of 185 binary and ternary spinel compounds, on one side, and ionic radii and electronegativities of the constituting ions, on the other side, allowed for establishing a simple empirical model and finding its linear equation, which links together the above-mentioned quantities. The derived equation gives good agreement between the experimental and modeled values of the lattice parameters in the considered group of spinels, with an average relative error of about 1% only. The proposed model was improved further by separate consideration of several groups of spinels, depending on the nature of the anion (oxygen, sulfur, selenium/tellurium, nitrogen). The developed approach can be efficiently used for prediction of lattice constants for new isostructural materials. In particular, the lattice constants of new hypothetic spinels ZnRE2O4, CdRE2S4, CdRE2Se4 (RE = rare earth elements) are predicted in the present Article. In addition, the upper and lower limits for the variation of the ionic radii, electronegativities, and their certain combinations were established, which can be considered as stability criteria for the spinel compounds. The findings of the present Article offer a systematic overview of the structural properties of spinels and can serve as helpful guides for synthesis of new spinel compounds.

  13. Electrodynamic radioactivity detector for microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, T. L.; Davis, E. J.; Jenkins, R. W., Jr.; McRae, D. D.

    1989-03-01

    A new technique for the measurement of the radioactive decay of single microparticles has been demonstrated. Although the experiments were made with droplets of order 20 μm in diameter, microparticles in the range 0.1-100 μm can be accommodated. An electrodynamic balance and combination light-scattering photometer were used to measure the charge-loss rate and size of a charged microsphere suspended in a laser beam by superposed ac and dc electrical fields. The charged particle undergoes charge loss in the partially ionized gas atmosphere which results from radioactive decay of 14C-tagged compounds, and the rate of charge loss is proportional to the rate of decay here. The charge on a particle was determined by measuring the dc voltage necessary to stably suspend the particle against gravity while simultaneously determining the droplet size by light-scattering techniques. The parameters which affect the operation of the electrodynamic balance as a radioactivity detector are examined, and the limits of its sensitivity are explored. Radioactivity levels as low as 120 pCi have been measured, and it appears that by reducing the background contamination inside our balance activity levels on the order of 10 pCi can be detected. This new technique has application in the measurement of activity levels and source discrimination of natural and man-made aerosols and smokes and is also useful for studies involving specifically labeled radio-chemical probes.

  14. Trace elements in bivalves from the Rio Cruces, Chile, trace watershed evolution after a major earthquake and challenge a postulated chemical spill from a pulp plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risk, M.; Burchell, M.; Nairn, R.; Tubrett, M.; Forsterra, G.

    2009-05-01

    In May, 1960, the largest recorded earthquake in the history of the planet hit southern Chile, dropping part of the course of the Rio Cruces by 2m and creating an extensive wetland. The Brazilian Waterweed Egeria densa colonised the area, and became a primary food source for large populations of the Black-necked Swan, Cygnus melancoryphus. In 2004, a large pulp mill commenced operations upstream on the river. According to local reports, immediately after the opening of the plant, the weed died and the swans left. There was public outcry, and a search for a cause or a culprit. It was postulated that some sort of chemical spill from the plant caused the weed to die, resulting in departure of the swans. In 2008, we collected specimens of the bivalve Diplodon chilensis from several locations downstream from the Plant and towards the wetland to see if there was evidence of a chemical spill recorded in the shells. We prepared thin-sections of the shells to observe growth line development and patterns. Additionally, shell samples were analysed for stable oxygen isotopes and trace elements, using LA-ICP/MS. Based on annual growth lines, some of the bivalves were long-lived, with an age of more than 50 years. These individuals settled in the river shortly after the earthquake, and have lived there continuously ever since. Annual and sub-annual banding was clear, and the annual cyclicity of the major bands was verified with oxygen isotope analysis. There are no changes in growth corresponding to 2004. Trace element scans provided a wealth of information on the evolution of this earthquake-impacted wetland. Barium, Strontium and Manganese all showed strong annual cyclicity. From the analysis of older specimens, we interpret the high peaks of the Ba signal as reflecting soil erosion-Ba peaks are large immediately after the earthquake, then they diminish through time. Sr is likely a temperature signal, and Mn reflects runoff. Minor peaks in Cu, As and Pb probably reflect

  15. Element-ary Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schamp, Homer W., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the historic development of the periodic table from the four-element theory to the Lavoisier's table. Presents a table listing the old and new names of chemicals and the Lavoisier's table of elements. Lists two references. (YP)

  16. Development of a deep-sea laser-induced breakdown spectrometer for in situ multi-element chemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, Blair; Takahashi, Tomoko; Sato, Takumi; Sakka, Tetsuo; Tamura, Ayaka; Matsumoto, Ayumu; Nozaki, Tatsuo; Ohki, Toshihiko; Ohki, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Spectroscopy is emerging as a technique that can expand the envelope of modern oceanographic sensors. The selectivity of spectroscopic techniques enables a single instrument to measure multiple components of the marine environment and can form the basis for versatile tools to perform in situ geochemical analysis. We have developed a deep-sea laser-induced breakdown spectrometer (ChemiCam) and successfully deployed the instrument from a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) to perform in situ multi-element analysis of both seawater and mineral deposits at depths of over 1000 m. The instrument consists of a long-nanosecond duration pulse-laser, a spectrometer and a high-speed camera. Power supply, instrument control and signal telemetry are provided through a ROV tether. The instrument has two modes of operation. In the first mode, the laser is focused directly into seawater and spectroscopic measurements of seawater composition are performed. In the second mode, a fiber-optic cable assembly is used to make spectroscopic measurements of mineral deposits. In this mode the laser is fired through a 4 m long fiber-optic cable and is focused onto the target's surface using an optical head and a linear stage that can be held by a ROV manipulator. In this paper, we describe the instrument and the methods developed to process its measurements. Exemplary measurements of both seawater and mineral deposits made during deployments of the device at an active hydrothermal vent field in the Okinawa trough are presented. Through integration with platforms such as underwater vehicles, drilling systems and subsea observatories, it is hoped that this technology can contribute to more efficient scientific surveys of the deep-sea environment.

  17. Factors controlling the chemical composition of colloidal and dissolved fractions in soil solutions and the mobility of trace elements in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangloff, Sophie; Stille, Peter; Schmitt, Anne-Désirée; Chabaux, François

    2016-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the processes and physico-chemical conditions that affect the composition of the soil solutions of a forest soil and to elucidate their impact on the transport of major and trace elements through the colloidal (0.2 μm to 5 kDa) and dissolved (<5 kDa) fractions in the first meter of soil. All experiments were performed with soil solutions obtained using lysimeter plates situated on an experimental spruce parcel of the Strengbach catchment (Northeastern France). The surface samples filtered at 0.2 μm facilitated the examination of the influence of litter decomposition on the chemical composition of the upper soil solutions. The impact of the soils biogeochemical conditions (pH, moisture, temperature, oxic or anoxic conditions) on litter decomposition was also examined. More particularly, the increase in NH4+ and NO2- compounds in some of the soil solutions points to denitrification processes in an anoxic environment. Thus, under anoxic conditions, the soil solution is enriched in Ca, P, Mn and Zn, whereas under oxic conditions it is enriched in Al and Fe. The physico-chemical conditions are more seasonally dependent in the upper soil horizons than in the deeper ones and have an impact on the variability of the chemical composition of the soil solutions. The colloidal and dissolved fractions of the soil solutions were obtained by tangential flow ultra-filtration. The experimental results reveal that nutrients, such as NO3- and P, are primarily in the dissolved fraction and consequently bioavailable; secondary minerals may be dissolved and/or precipitate in the colloidal fraction, such as pyromorphite (Pb5(PO4)3(OH, Cl, F)). The results further indicate that microbial activity influences the composition of the colloidal and dissolved fractions, and possibly enriches the colloidal fraction in Ca, Mn and P, diminishes the concentrations of Pb, V, Cr and Fe in the dissolved fraction, and changes the structure of organic

  18. Radioactive waste processing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, R.E.; Ziegler, A.A.; Serino, D.F.; Basnar, P.J.

    1985-08-30

    Apparatus for use in processing radioactive waste materials for shipment and storage in solid form in a container is disclosed. The container includes a top, and an opening in the top which is smaller than the outer circumference of the container. The apparatus includes an enclosure into which the container is placed, solution feed apparatus for adding a solution containing radioactive waste materials into the container through the container opening, and at least one rotatable blade for blending the solution with a fixing agent such as cement or the like as the solution is added into the container. The blade is constructed so that it can pass through the opening in the top of the container. The rotational axis of the blade is displaced from the center of the blade so that after the blade passes through the opening, the blade and container can be adjusted so that one edge of the blade is adjacent the cylindrical wall of the container, to insure thorough mixing. When the blade is inside the container, a substantially sealed chamber is formed to contain vapors created by the chemical action of the waste solution and fixant, and vapors emanating through the opening in the container. The chamber may be formed by placing a removable extension over the top of the container. The extension communicates with the apparatus so that such vapors are contained within the container, extension and solution feed apparatus. A portion of the chamber includes coolant which condenses the vapors. The resulting condensate is returned to the container by the force of gravity.

  19. Rare earth element systematics of the chemically precipitated component in Early Precambrian iron formations and the evolution of the terrestrial atmosphere-hydrosphere-lithosphere system

    SciTech Connect

    Bau, M.; Moeller, P. )

    1993-05-01

    The chemically precipitated component in Early Precambrian (> 2.3 Ga) iron formations (IFs) displays (Sm/Yb)[sub CN] < 1 and (Eu/Sm)[sub SN] > 1 which reflects the corresponding ratios of contemporaneous seawater. In conjunction with [epsilon][sub Nd-IF] > [epsilon][sub Nd-shale] this rare earth element (REE) signature reveals that the REE distribution in Early Precambrian IFs must be explained by mixing between a marine bottom and a surface water component, and that the REEs (and by analogy the Fe) cannot be derived from weathering of a continental source. Mixing calculations reveal that (Sm/Yb)[sub CN] in Early Precambrian marine surface waters was significantly lower than it is today. To explain this difference, two mechanisms are discussed on the basis of higher P[sub CO[sub 2

  20. Comparison of abundances of chemical elements in mineralized and unmineralized sandstone of the Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation, Smith Lake District, Grants uranium region, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pierson, C.T.; Spirakis, C.S.; Robertson, J.F.

    1983-01-01

    Statistical treatment of analytical data from the Mariano Lake and Ruby uranium deposits in the Smith Lake district, New Mexico, indicates that organic carbon, arsenic, barium, calcium, cobalt, copper, gallium, iron, lead, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, strontium, sulfur, vanadium, yttrium, and zirconium are concentrated along with uranium in primary ore. Comparison of the Smith Lake data with information from other primary deposits in the Grants uranium region and elsewhere in the Morrison Formation of the Colorado Plateau suggests that these elements, with the possible exceptions of zirconium and gallium and with the probable addition of aluminum and magnesium, are typically associated with primary, tabular uranium deposits. Chemical differences between the Ruby and Mariano Lake deposits are consistent with the interpretation that the Ruby deposit has been more affected by post-mineralization oxidizing solutions than has the Mariano Lake deposit.

  1. Influence of the group V element on the chemical potential and crystal structure of Au-catalyzed III-V nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Dubrovskii, V. G.

    2014-02-03

    We present a kinetic growth model having a particular emphasis on the influence of the group V element on the preferred crystal structure of Au-catalyzed III-V nanowires. The model circumvents the uncertainty in the group V contribution into the overall liquid chemical potential. We show why the nanowire elongation rate is limited by the group III transport, while the crystal structure depends on the effective group V to III imbalance. Within the model, we are able to explain some important structural trends in Au-catalyzed III-V nanowires. In particular, we show that high group V flux always favors wurtzite structure in molecular-beam epitaxy. This tendency could be inverted in vapor deposition techniques due to suppression of the group III diffusion at high group V flux.

  2. Methodology to assess the mobility of trace elements between water and contaminated estuarine sediments as a function of the site physico-chemical characteristics.

    PubMed

    Fdez-Ortiz de Vallejuelo, Silvia; Gredilla, Ainara; de Diego, Alberto; Arana, Gorka; Madariaga, Juan Manuel

    2014-03-01

    This work presents an innovative methodology to have a rapid diagnosis about the mobility of selected trace elements of known toxicity and biological risk (Al, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sn and Zn) present in contaminated sediments. The novel strategy presented in this work uses, therefore, the own estuarine water in contact with sediments as the extracting agent to perform the mobility tests, simulating the real situation of the estuary. This water suffers from different physico-chemical conditions (low and high tides) and gives consequently, rather better information than the one obtained by the routine sequential extraction procedures. The final step of this methodology was the use of spatial modelling by kriging method and multivariate chemometric analysis, both for a better interpretation of the results. To achieve this goal, sediment and water samples were strategically collected at eight different points (four in tributary rivers, one in a closed dock, two in the main channel and another one in the mouth) along the Nerbioi-Ibaizabal River estuary (Metropolitan Bilbao, Basque Country) approximately every three months (summer, autumn, winter and spring) during a whole year. Physico-chemical changes, such as pH, carbonate content and organic matter of the sediments, together with variations in water salinity appear to be responsible for metal mobility from the sediment to the water layer. The influence of these variables was higher in the sites located close to the sea. Moreover, the mobility of trace elements was even higher at high tide in sediments with lower metal content.

  3. Radioactive Semivolatiles in Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R. T.; Strachan, D. M.; Ilas, G.; Spencer, B. B.; Soelberg, N. R.

    2014-09-01

    In nuclear fuel reprocessing, various radioactive elements enter the gas phase from the unit operations found in the reprocessing facility. In previous reports, the pathways and required removal were discussed for four radionuclides known to be volatile, 14C, 3H, 129I, and 85Kr. Other, less volatile isotopes can also report to the off-gas streams in a reprocessing facility. These were reported to be isotopes of Cs, Cd, Ru, Sb, Tc, and Te. In this report, an effort is made to determine which, if any, of 24 semivolatile radionuclides could be released from a reprocessing plant and, if so, what would be the likely quantities released. As part of this study of semivolatile elements, the amount of each generated during fission is included as part of the assessment for the need to control their emission. Also included in this study is the assessment of the cooling time (time out of reactor) before the fuel is processed. This aspect is important for the short-lived isotopes shown in the list, especially for cooling times approaching 10 y. The approach taken in this study was to determine if semivolatile radionuclides need to be included in a list of gas-phase radionuclides that might need to be removed to meet Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations. A list of possible elements was developed through a literature search and through knowledge and literature on the chemical processes in typical aqueous processing of nuclear fuels. A long list of possible radionuclides present in irradiated fuel was generated and then trimmed by considering isotope half-life and calculating the dose from each to a maximum exposed individual with the US EPA airborne radiological dispersion and risk assessment code CAP88 (Rosnick 1992) to yield a short list of elements that actually need to be considered for control because they require high decontamination factors to meet a reasonable fraction of the regulated release. Each of these elements is

  4. Processing of spent Ni-MH batteries for the recovery of cobalt, nickel and rare earth elements bearing materials by means of a chemical and electrochemical sequential process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delvasto, P.; Orta Rodríguez, R.; Blanco, S.

    2016-02-01

    Rechargeable Ni-MH batteries contain strategic metal values which are worth to be recovered. In the present work, a preliminary sequential chemical and electrochemical procedure is proposed, in order to reclaim materials bearing Ni, Co and rare earth elements (REE) from Ni-MH spent batteries. Initially, spent batteries are disassembled to separate the electrode materials (anode and cathode), which are then leached with an aqueous solution of 5w% sulphuric acid. The metal content of this solution is checked by atomic absorption spectrometry techniques. The obtained solution is pH-adjusted (with NaOH), until pH is between 4.0 and 4.3; then, it is heated up to 70°C to precipitate a rare earth elements sulphate (Nd, La, Pr, Ce), as determined by means of x-ray fluorescence techniques. The solids-free solution is then electrolyzed, in order to recover a Ni-Co alloy. The electrolysis conditions were established through a cyclic voltammetry technique.

  5. Rare-element granitic pegmatite of Miocene age emplaced in UHP rocks from Visole, Pohorje Mountains (Eastern Alps, Slovenia): accessory minerals, monazite and uraninite chemical dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uher, Pavel; Janák, Marian; Konečný, Patrik; Vrabec, Mirijam

    2014-04-01

    The granitic pegmatite dike intruded the Cretaceous UHP rocks at Visole, near Slovenska Bistrica, in the Pohorje Mountains (Slovenia). The rock consists mainly of K-feldspar, albite and quartz, subordinate muscovite and biotite, while the accessory minerals include spessartine-almandine, zircon, ferrocolumbite, fluorapatite, monazite- (Ce), uraninite, and magnetite. Compositions of garnet (Sps48-49Alm45-46Grs + And3-4 Prp1.5-2), metamict zircon with 3.5 to 7.8 wt. % HfO2 [atom. 100Hf/(Hf + Zr) = 3.3-7.7] and ferrocolumbite [atom. Mn/(Mn + Fe) = 0.27-0.43, Ta/(Ta + Nb) = 0.03-0.46] indicate a relatively low to medium degree of magmatic fractionation, characteristic of the muscovite - rare-element class or beryl-columbite subtype of the rare-element class pegmatites. Monazite-(Ce) reveals elevated Th and U contents (≤11 wt. % ThO2, ≤5 wt. % UO2). The monazite-garnet geothermometer shows a possible precipitation temperature of ~495 ± 30 °C at P~4 to 5 kbar. Chemical U-Th-Pb dating of the monazite yielded a Miocene age (17.2 ± 1.8 Ma), whereas uraninite gave a younger (~14 Ma) age. These ages are comtemporaneous with the main crystallization and emplacement of the Pohorje pluton and adjacent volcanic rocks (20 to 15 Ma), providing the first documented evidence of Neogene granitic pegmatites in the Eastern Alps. Consequently, the Visole pegmatite belongs to the youngest rare-element granitic pegmatite populations in Europe, together with the Paleogene pegmatite occurrences along the Periadriatic (Insubric) Fault System in the Alps and in the Rhodope Massif, as well as the Late Miocene to Pliocene pegmatites in the Tuscany magmatic province (mainly on the Island of Elba).

  6. PERSPECTIVE: Fireworks and radioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitenecker, Katharina

    2009-09-01

    both reaction products and unburnt constituents of a pyrotechnic mixture. One major environmental concern in pyrotechnics focuses on the emission of heavy metals. This is the topic discussed in the article by Georg Steinhauser and Andreas Musilek in this issue [4]. A possible interrelationship between respiratory effects and fireworks emissions of barium-rich aerosols was also raised last year [5]. In recent years the potential hazard of naturally occurring radioactive material has become of importance to the scientific community. Naturally occurring radionuclides can be of terrestrial or cosmological origin. Terrestrial radionuclides were present in the presolar cloud that later contracted in order to build our solar system. These radionuclides—mainly heavy metals—and their non-radioactive isotopes are nowadays fixed in the matrix of the Earth's structure. Usually, their percentage is quite small compared to their respective stable isotopes—though there are exceptions like in the case of radium. The problem with environmental pollution due to naturally occurring radioactive material begins when this material is concentrated due to mining and milling, and later further processed [6]. Environmental pollution due to radioactive material goes back as far as the Copper and Iron Ages, when the first mines were erected in order to mine ores (gold, silver, copper, iron, etc), resulting in naturally occurring radioactive material being set free with other dusts into the atmosphere. So where is the link between pyrotechnics and radioactivity? In this article presented by Georg Steinhauser and Andreas Musilek [4], the pyrotechnic ingredients barium nitrate and strontium nitrate are explored with respect to their chemical similarities to radium. The fundamental question, therefore, was whether radium can be processed together with barium and strontium. If so, the production and ignition of these pyrotechnic ingredients could cause atmospheric pollution with radium aerosols

  7. Use of selective chemical extractions as a strategy for the risk assessment in sites with a high level of potentially toxic elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Sirvent, Carmen; Martinez Sanchez, Maria Jose; Garcia Lorenzo, Maria Luz; Hernandez Perez, Carmen; Molina Ruiz, Jose; Bech, Jaume

    2016-04-01

    The present study deals with the geochemical fractions of Pb, Cd, Zn and As present on profiles using chemical simple extraction process. This work was conducted on Portman Bay, a site located in the SE Spain and strongly affected by mining activities. Four simple extractions were applied to selected samples in order to evaluate the potential mobility of metals. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy coupled to with an energy-dispersion spectrometry (SEM-EDS) were applied for the characterisation of both the samples and the residues remaining after each extraction, providing additional information about the sediment phases carrying the elements studied. Soil pollution assessment was carried out using the contamination factor (CF) and the pollution load index (PLI) for total contents, and indicators of mobility for each extraction: natural mobility indicator (NMI), acid mine drainage mobility indicator (AMI), oxic mobility indicator (OMI) and anoxic mobility indicator (ANMI). The results obtained after the extractions suggested that the highest PTEs content were extracted in the acidic medium. The mineralogical composition is an important factor that should be taken into account in the evaluation of PTEs mobility, firstly because the mineral phases react differently in the proposed situations depending on their chemical nature, and secondly, because the presence of a particular phase (with different degree of reactivity) depends on the degree of weathering.

  8. Chemistry of superheavy elements.

    PubMed

    Schädel, Matthias

    2006-01-01

    The number of chemical elements has increased considerably in the last few decades. Most excitingly, these heaviest, man-made elements at the far-end of the Periodic Table are located in the area of the long-awaited superheavy elements. While physical techniques currently play a leading role in these discoveries, the chemistry of superheavy elements is now beginning to be developed. Advanced and very sensitive techniques allow the chemical properties of these elusive elements to be probed. Often, less than ten short-lived atoms, chemically separated one-atom-at-a-time, provide crucial information on basic chemical properties. These results place the architecture of the far-end of the Periodic Table on the test bench and probe the increasingly strong relativistic effects that influence the chemical properties there. This review is focused mainly on the experimental work on superheavy element chemistry. It contains a short contribution on relativistic theory, and some important historical and nuclear aspects.

  9. Chemical and isotopical characterisation of atmospheric pollution from urban and rural environments of the Rhine Valley (PCBs, trace elements and Sr-, Nd- and Pb- isotope determinations)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guéguen, F.; Stille, P.; Millet, M.; Dietze, V.; Gieré, R.

    2010-05-01

    Atmosheric samples (gas and particulate matter (PM)) have been collected in the urban environment of the cities of Strasbourg and Kehl and in the rural environment of the Vosges mountains. For sampling of gas phase pollutants and particles two different passive sampler devices have been applied (PAS and Sigma-2, respectively). The PAS has been used for gas phase Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) sampling and is based on the passive adsorption of gas phase pollutants onto XAD-2 resin. The Sigma-2 sampler is based on the sedimentation principle (Stoke's law), collects particles in the size range 2.5-100 μm and allows the calculation of ambient air concentration. The sampler is mainly used for routine air quality measurements in German health and recreation resorts and in this field study the first time for collection of samples for subsequent trace element and isotope analysis. The collection time for the Sigma-2 and PAS are four and two weeks, respectively. Major and trace elements have been analyzed by ICP-MS and the Sr, Nd and Pb isotope ratios by a sector field MC-ICP-MS (Neptune) while PCBs were ASE extracted and analysed by GC-ECD. The aerosol data are compared with those from tree barks which have previously been used successfully as biomonitors of atmospheric pollution (Lahd Geagea et al. 2008)1. The outer 1 mm thick part of the bark has been analyzed corresponding to about 2 to 8 years of accumulation. Some of the trace elements (Cr, Ni and Mo) of the aerosol samples are strongly (up to 1000 times) enriched compared to average 'upper continental crust (UCC)'. Normalization to a « natural » sample with an atmospheric baseline composition allows to identify industrial contributions: transition metals (Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, Mo, Cd), Ba and Pb appear to be important elements in steel plant and incinerator (chemical waste) emissions. Similarly enrichment in light rare earth elements (La, Pr, Nd) is observable. The enrichments increase with decreasing distance

  10. Low radioactivity spectral gamma calibration facility

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, M.A.; Bowman, H.R.; Huang, L., H.; Lavelle, M.J.; Smith, A.R.; Hearst, J.R.; Wollenberg, H.A.; Flexser, S.

    1986-01-01

    A low radioactivity calibration facility has been constructed at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). This facility has four calibration models of natural stone that are 3 ft in diameter and 6 ft long, with a 12 in. cored borehole in the center of each model and a lead-shielded run pipe below each model. These models have been analyzed by laboratory natural gamma ray spectroscopy (NGRS) and neutron activation analysis (NAA) for their K, U, and Th content. Also, 42 other elements were analyzed in the NAA. The /sup 222/Rn emanation data were collected. Calibrating the spectral gamma tool in this low radioactivity calibration facility allows the spectral gamma log to accurately aid in the recognition and mapping of subsurface stratigraphic units and alteration features associated with unusual concentrations of these radioactive elements, such as clay-rich zones.

  11. Landscape of two-proton radioactivity.

    PubMed

    Olsen, E; Pfützner, M; Birge, N; Brown, M; Nazarewicz, W; Perhac, A

    2013-05-31

    Ground-state two-proton (2p) radioactivity is a decay mode found in isotopes of elements with even atomic numbers located beyond the two-proton drip line. So far, this exotic process has been experimentally observed in a few light- and medium-mass nuclides with Z≤30. In this study, using state-of-the-art nuclear density functional theory, we globally analyze 2p radioactivity and for the first time identify 2p-decay candidates in elements heavier than strontium. We predict a few cases where the competition between 2p emission and α decay may be observed. In nuclei above lead, the α-decay mode is found to be dominating and no measurable candidates for the 2p radioactivity are expected.

  12. Method for the elucidation of the elemental composition of low molecular mass chemicals using exact masses of product ions and neutral losses: application to environmental chemicals measured by liquid chromatography with hybrid quadrupole/time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shigeru; Ishii, Tetsuko; Yasuhara, Akio; Sakai, Shinichi

    2005-01-01

    A method for elucidating the elemental compositions of low molecular weight chemicals, based primarily on mass measurements made using liquid chromatography (LC) with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) and quadrupole/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/QTOFMS), was developed and tested for 113 chemicals of environmental interest with molecular masses up to approximately 400 Da. As the algorithm incorporating the method is not affected by differences in the instrument used, or by the ionization method and other ionization conditions, the method is useful not only for LC/TOFMS, but also for all kinds of mass spectra measured with higher accuracy and precision (uncertainties of a few mDa) employing all ionization methods and on-line separation techniques. The method involves calculating candidate compositions for intact ionized molecules (ionized forms of the sample molecule that have lost or gained no more than a proton, i.e., [M+H](+) or [M-H](-)) as well as for fragment ions and corresponding neutral losses, and eliminating those atomic compositions for the molecules that are inconsistent with the corresponding candidate compositions of fragment ions and neutral losses. Candidate compositions were calculated for the measured masses of the intact ionized molecules and of the fragment ions and corresponding neutral losses, using mass uncertainties of 2 and 5 mDa, respectively. Compositions proposed for the ionized molecule that did not correspond to the sum of the compositions of a candidate fragment ion and its corresponding neutral loss were discarded. One, 2-5, 6-10, 11-20, and >20 candidate compositions were found for 65%, 39%, 1%, 1%, and 0%, respectively, for the 124 ionized molecules formed from the 113 chemicals tested (both positive and negative ions were obtained from 11 of the chemicals). However, no candidate composition was found for 2% of the test cases (i.e., 3 chemicals), for each of which the measured mass of one of the product ions was in

  13. SHIPPING CONTAINER FOR RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL

    DOEpatents

    Nachbar, H.D.; Biggs, B.B.; Tariello, P.J.; George, K.O.

    1963-01-15

    A shipping container is described for transponting a large number of radioactive nuclear fuel element modules which produce a substantial amount of heat. The container comprises a primary pressure vessel and shield, and a rotatable head having an access port that can be indexed with module holders in the container. In order to remove heat generated in the fuel eleme nts, a heat exchanger is arranged within the container and in contact with a heat exchange fluid therein. The heat exchanger communicates with additional external heat exchangers, which dissipate heat to the atmosphere. (AEC)

  14. Radioactivity and food

    SciTech Connect

    Olszyna-Marzys, A.E. )

    1990-03-01

    Two topics relating to radioactivity and food are discussed: food irradiation for preservation purposes, and food contamination from radioactive substances. Food irradiation involves the use of electromagnetic energy (x and gamma rays) emitted by radioactive substances or produced by machine in order to destroy the insects and microorganisms present and prevent germination. The sanitary and economic advantages of treating food in this way are discussed. Numerous studies have confirmed that under strictly controlled conditions no undesirable changes take place in food that has been irradiated nor is radioactivity induced. Reference is made to the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power station, which aroused public concern about irradiated food. The events surrounding the accident are reviewed, and its consequences with regard to contamination of different foods with radioactive substances, particularly iodine-131 and cesium-137, are described. Also discussed are the steps that have been taken by different international organizations to set limits on acceptable radioactivity in food.15 references.

  15. Comparisons between radioactive and non-radioactive gas lantern mantles.

    PubMed

    Furuta, E; Yoshizawa, Y; Aburai, T

    2000-12-01

    Gas lantern mantles containing radioactive thorium have been used for more than 100 years. Although thorium was once believed to be indispensable for giving a bright light, non-radioactive mantles are now available. From the radioactivities of the daughter nuclides, we estimated the levels of radioactivity of 232Th and 228Th in 11 mantles. The mantles contained various levels of radioactivity from background levels to 1410 +/- 140 Bq. Our finding that radioactive and non-radioactive mantles are equally bright suggests that there is no advantage in using radioactive mantles. A remaining problem is that gas lantern mantles are sold without any information about radioactivity.

  16. Rapid synthesis of radioactive transition-metal carbonyl complexes at ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Even, Julia; Yakushev, Alexander; Düllmann, Christoph E; Dvorak, Jan; Eichler, Robert; Gothe, Oliver; Hild, Daniel; Jäger, Egon; Khuyagbaatar, Jadambaa; Kratz, Jens V; Krier, Jörg; Niewisch, Lorenz; Nitsche, Heino; Pysmenetska, Inna; Schädel, Matthias; Schausten, Brigitta; Türler, Andreas; Wiehl, Norbert; Wittwer, David

    2012-06-18

    Carbonyl complexes of radioactive transition metals can be easily synthesized with high yields by stopping nuclear fission or fusion products in a gas volume containing CO. Here, we focus on Mo, W, and Os complexes. The reaction takes place at pressures of around 1 bar at room temperature, i.e., at conditions that are easy to accommodate. The formed complexes are highly volatile. They can thus be transported within a gas stream without major losses to setups for their further investigation or direct use. The rapid synthesis holds promise for radiochemical purposes and will be useful for studying, e.g., chemical properties of superheavy elements. PMID:22663355

  17. Radioactive Waste Management Basis

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, B K

    2009-06-03

    The purpose of this Radioactive Waste Management Basis is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

  18. Size distribution of chemical elements and their source apportionment in ambient coarse, fine, and ultrafine particles in Shanghai urban summer atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Lü, Senlin; Zhang, Rui; Yao, Zhenkun; Yi, Fei; Ren, Jingjing; Wu, Minghong; Feng, Man; Wang, Qingyue

    2012-01-01

    Ambient coarse particles (diameter 1.8-10 microm), fine particles (diameter 0.1-1.8 microm), and ultrafine particles (diameter < 0.1 microm) in the atmosphere of the city of Shanghai were sampled during the summer of 2008 (from Aug 27 to Sep 08). Microscopic characterization of the particles was investigated by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX). Mass concentrations of Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Br, Rb, Sr, and Pb in the size-resolved particles were quantified by using synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SRXRF). Source apportionment of the chemical elements was analyzed by means of an enrichment factor method. Our results showed that the average mass concentrations of coarse particles, fine particles and ultrafine particles in the summer air were 9.38 +/- 2.18, 8.82 +/- 3.52, and 2.02 +/- 0.41 microg/m3, respectively. The mass percentage of the fine particles accounted for 51.47% in the total mass of PM10, indicating that fine particles are the major component in the Shanghai ambient particles. SEM/EDX results showed that the coarse particles were dominated by minerals, fine particles by soot aggregates and fly ashes, and ultrafine particles by soot particles and unidentified particles. SRXRF results demonstrated that crustal elements were mainly distributed in the coarse particles, while heavy metals were in higher proportions in the fine particles. Source apportionment revealed that Si, K, Ca, Fe, Mn, Rb, and Sr were from crustal sources, and S, Cl, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Br, and Pb from anthropogenic sources. Levels of P, V, Cr, and Ni in particles might be contributed from multi-sources, and need further investigation.

  19. Ultrastructure and chemical composition of the proboscis hooks of Acanthocephalus lucii (Müller, 1776) (Acanthocephala: Palaeacanthocephala) using X-ray elemental analysis.

    PubMed

    Brázová, Tímea; Poddubnaya, Larisa G; Miss, Noemí Ramírez; Hanzelová, Vladimíra

    2014-12-01

    The ultrastructure and chemical composition of the proboscis hooks and surrounding tegument of Acanthocephalus lucii (Müller, 1776), a parasite of European perch, Perca fluviatilis Linnaeus, were examined using scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopy and X-ray microanalysis (EDXA). The blade of middle hooks consists of three layers: an outer homogeneous layer, an inner heterogeneous layer and a central core. TEM observation revealed the presence of hollow tubes, which spaced the central core; fibrous inner hook layer surrounded by an electron-dense margin and the basal tegumental layer filled with electron-dense bodies and outer layer. We found for the first time that the so-called 'epidermal covering' surrounding of the exposed hook blade (outer hook layer) is a modified striped portion of the tegumental layer and there are no special contact sites between these two morphologically different structures, i.e. striped layer of the syncytial tegument and following proper outer hook layer, which is a homogeneous, moderately electron-dense layer of -0.3 μm in thickness. The hook root is embedded into subtegumental fibrous layer. X-ray microanalysis of both the surface and internal parts of A. lucii hooks demonstrated the presence of calcium, magnesium, phosphorus and sulphur. The highest concentration of sulphur was recorded at the tip of hooks, whereas the middle part of the hooks was most rich in calcium, phosphorus and magnesium. The proximal part of the hooks contained lower concentrations of sulphur, calcium and phosphorus. In the proboscis tegument, only two elements, calcium and silicon, were found. The differences observed in the chemical composition of the hook 'epidermal covering' and the proboscis tegument support our ultrastructural findings that the hook tegumental covering is a modified structure compared with that of the general proboscis tegument. PMID:25651697

  20. Ultrastructure and chemical composition of the proboscis hooks of Acanthocephalus lucii (Müller, 1776) (Acanthocephala: Palaeacanthocephala) using X-ray elemental analysis.

    PubMed

    Brázová, Tímea; Poddubnaya, Larisa G; Miss, Noemí Ramírez; Hanzelová, Vladimíra

    2014-12-01

    The ultrastructure and chemical composition of the proboscis hooks and surrounding tegument of Acanthocephalus lucii (Müller, 1776), a parasite of European perch, Perca fluviatilis Linnaeus, were examined using scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopy and X-ray microanalysis (EDXA). The blade of middle hooks consists of three layers: an outer homogeneous layer, an inner heterogeneous layer and a central core. TEM observation revealed the presence of hollow tubes, which spaced the central core; fibrous inner hook layer surrounded by an electron-dense margin and the basal tegumental layer filled with electron-dense bodies and outer layer. We found for the first time that the so-called 'epidermal covering' surrounding of the exposed hook blade (outer hook layer) is a modified striped portion of the tegumental layer and there are no special contact sites between these two morphologically different structures, i.e. striped layer of the syncytial tegument and following proper outer hook layer, which is a homogeneous, moderately electron-dense layer of -0.3 μm in thickness. The hook root is embedded into subtegumental fibrous layer. X-ray microanalysis of both the surface and internal parts of A. lucii hooks demonstrated the presence of calcium, magnesium, phosphorus and sulphur. The highest concentration of sulphur was recorded at the tip of hooks, whereas the middle part of the hooks was most rich in calcium, phosphorus and magnesium. The proximal part of the hooks contained lower concentrations of sulphur, calcium and phosphorus. In the proboscis tegument, only two elements, calcium and silicon, were found. The differences observed in the chemical composition of the hook 'epidermal covering' and the proboscis tegument support our ultrastructural findings that the hook tegumental covering is a modified structure compared with that of the general proboscis tegument.

  1. Remediation of groundwater contaminated with radioactive compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Both naturally radioactive isotopes and isotopes from man-made sources may appear in groundwater. Depending on the physical and chemical characteristics of the contaminant, different types of treatment methods must be applied to reduce the concentration. The following chapter discusses treatment opt...

  2. Reconnaissance of radioactive rocks of Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, John M.; Narten, Perry F.

    1951-01-01

    The state of Maine was traversed with car-mounted Geiger-Mueller equipment in the late summer of 1948 and the radioactivity of approximately 4,600 miles of road was logged. All samples were analyzed, both in the field by comparing the radioactivity of each sample to the radioactivity of a stranded measured with a simple scaling modification of a portable counter, and in the Geological Survey’s Trace Elements Section Washington Laboratory. Differences between both types of analyses were negligible. The maximum equivalent uranium content of the most radioactive rocks thus analyzed was 0.008 percent. A 1,400-square-mile abnormally radioactive province in southwestern Maine was outlined. The outcrop data obtained from car traversing are evaluated statistically. Cumulative frequency distribution curves are drawn to show the distribution of outcrops at various levels of radioactivity, and straight-line extensions are made to show to maximum probable grade for various rock types and areas in Maine. A maximum grade of 0.055 percent equivalent uranium is thus predicted for the entire state. This prediction necessarily is a broad generalization because large areas of Main are inaccessible for car traversing. A concept of evaluation of an area for possible mineral deposits is proposed on the basis of lithology, and observed and indicated ranges in grade.

  3. Chemical Technology Division. Annual technical report, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Laidler, J.J.; Myles, K.M.; Green, D.W.; McPheeters, C.C.

    1996-06-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division`s activities during 1995 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) methods for treatment of hazardous waste and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (3) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (4) processes for separating and recovering selected elements from waste streams, concentrating low-level radioactive waste streams with advanced evaporator technology, and producing {sup 99}Mo from low-enriched uranium; (5) electrometallurgical treatment of different types of spent nuclear fuel in storage at Department of Energy sites; and (6) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems.

  4. Radioactive waste disposal package

    DOEpatents

    Lampe, Robert F.

    1986-01-01

    A radioactive waste disposal package comprising a canister for containing vitrified radioactive waste material and a sealed outer shell encapsulating the canister. A solid block of filler material is supported in said shell and convertible into a liquid state for flow into the space between the canister and outer shell and subsequently hardened to form a solid, impervious layer occupying such space.

  5. Radioactive waste disposal package

    DOEpatents

    Lampe, Robert F.

    1986-11-04

    A radioactive waste disposal package comprising a canister for containing vitrified radioactive waste material and a sealed outer shell encapsulating the canister. A solid block of filler material is supported in said shell and convertible into a liquid state for flow into the space between the canister and outer shell and subsequently hardened to form a solid, impervious layer occupying such space.

  6. A Remote Radioactivity Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jona, Kemi; Vondracek, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Imagine a high school with very few experimental resources and limited budgets that prevent the purchase of even basic laboratory equipment. For example, many high schools do not have the means of experimentally studying radioactivity because they lack Geiger counters and/or good radioactive sources. This was the case at the first high school one…

  7. Radioactive Wastes. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Charles H.

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by the United States Atomic Energy Commission. This booklet deals with the handling, processing and disposal of radioactive wastes. Among the topics discussed are: The Nature of Radioactive Wastes; Waste Management; and Research and Development. There are…

  8. Early diagenesis of mangrove leaves in a tropical estuary: Bulk chemical characterization using solid-state 13C NMR and elemental analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benner, Ronald; Hatcher, Patrick G.; Hedges, John I.

    1990-07-01

    Changes in the chemical composition of mangrove ( Rhizophora mangle) leaves during decomposition in tropical estuarine waters were characterized using solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and elemental (CHNO) analysis. Carbohydrates were the most abundant components of the leaves accounting for about 50 wt% of senescent tissues. Tannins were estimated to account for about 20 wt% of leaf tissues, and lipid components, cutin, and possibly other aliphatic biopolymers in leaf cuticles accounted for about 15 wt%. Carbohydrates were generally less resistant to decomposition than the other constituents and decreased in relative concentration during decomposition. Tannins were of intermediate resistance to decomposition and remained in fairly constant proportion during decomposition. Paraffinic components were very resistant to decomposition and increased in relative concentration as decomposition progressed. Lignin was a minor component of all leaf tissues. Standard methods for the colorimetric determination of tannins (Folin-Dennis reagent) and the gravimetric determination of lignin (Klason lignin) were highly inaccurate when applied to mangrove leaves. The N content of the leaves was particularly dynamic with values ranging from 1.27 wt% in green leaves to 0.65 wt% in senescent yellow leaves attached to trees. During decomposition in the water the N content initially decreased to 0.51 wt% due to leaching, but values steadily increased thereafter to 1.07 wt% in the most degraded leaf samples. The absolute mass of N in the leaves increased during decomposition indicating that N immobilization was occurring as decomposition progressed.

  9. Early diagenesis of mangrove leaves in a tropical estuary: Bulk chemical characterization using solid-state 13C NMR and elemental analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benner, R.; Hatcher, P.G.; Hedges, J.I.

    1990-01-01

    Changes in the chemical composition of mangrove (Rhizophora mangle) leaves during decomposition in tropical estuarine waters were characterized using solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and elemental (CHNO) analysis. Carbohydrates were the most abundant components of the leaves accounting for about 50 wt% of senescent tissues. Tannins were estimated to account for about 20 wt% of leaf tissues, and lipid components, cutin, and possibly other aliphatic biopolymers in leaf cuticles accounted for about 15 wt%. Carbohydrates were generally less resistant to decomposition than the other constituents and decreased in relative concentration during decomposition. Tannins were of intermediate resistance to decomposition and remained in fairly constant proportion during decomposition. Paraffinic components were very resistant to decomposition and increased in relative concentration as decomposition progressed. Lignin was a minor component of all leaf tissues. Standard methods for the colorimetric determination of tannins (Folin-Dennis reagent) and the gravimetric determination of lignin (Klason lignin) were highly inaccurate when applied to mangrove leaves. The N content of the leaves was particularly dynamic with values ranging from 1.27 wt% in green leaves to 0.65 wt% in senescent yellow leaves attached to trees. During decomposition in the water the N content initially decreased to 0.51 wt% due to leaching, but values steadily increased thereafter to 1.07 wt% in the most degraded leaf samples. The absolute mass of N in the leaves increased during decomposition indicating that N immobilization was occurring as decomposition progressed. ?? 1990.

  10. Intronic DNA elements regulate Nrf-2 chemical responsiveness of the human microsomal epoxide hydrolase gene (EPHX1) through a far upstream alternative promoter

    PubMed Central

    Su, Shengzhong; Yang, Xi; Omiecinski, Curtis J.

    2014-01-01

    In humans, microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH) contributes important biological functions that underlie both detoxification and bioactivation fates arising from exposures to foreign chemicals. Previously, we discovered that human mEH gene transcription is initiated from alternative promoters. The respective transcripts are programmed with tissue specificity and the upstream E1b promoter contributes predominantly to mEH expression. The results presented demonstrate that exposures to the Nrf2 activators, sulforaphane (SFN) and tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ), markedly activate E1b transcription in human lung and liver cells. Genomic analyses identified two major DNase I hypersensitive regions (HS-1 and HS-2) within the ~15 kb intervening sequence separating E1b from the downstream E1 promoter. In BEAS-2B cells, the Nrf2 effectors, SFN and tBHQ, selectively activated the more distal HS-2 through an antioxidant-response element (ARE). An activator protein 1/12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate interaction was further identified within the HS-2 enhancer that functioned to additionally contribute to ARE-mediated induction responsiveness of the E1b promoter. The results demonstrate that ARE modulation, integrated with additional transcriptional complexes, regulates the tissue-specific expression of mEH and that these processes likely coordinate both the protective and bioactivation functions contributed by mEH activities in human tissues. PMID:24704207

  11. Chemical aspects of nuclear waste treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, W. D.

    1980-01-01

    The chemical aspects of the treatment of gaseous, liquid, and solid wastes are discussed in overview. The role of chemistry and the chemical reactions in waste treatment are emphasized. Waste treatment methods encompass the chemistry of radioactive elements from every group of the periodic table. In most streams, the radioactive elements are present in relatively low concentrations and are often associated with moderately large amounts of process reagents, or materials. In general, it is desirable that waste treatment methods are based on chemistry that is selective for the concentration of radionuclides and does not require the addition of reagents that contribute significantly to the volume of the treated waste. Solvent extraction, ion exchange, and sorbent chemistry play a major role in waste treatment because of the high selectivity provided for many radionuclides. This paper deals with the chemistry of the onsite treatment methods that is typically used at nuclear installations and is not concerned with the chemistry of the various alternative materials proposed for long-term storage of nuclear wastes. The chemical aspects are discussed from a generic point of view in which the chemistry of important radionuclides is emphasized.

  12. What are Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste ?

    SciTech Connect

    DOE

    2002-12-01

    Spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste are materials from nuclear power plants and government defense programs. These materials contain highly radioactive elements, such as cesium, strontium, technetium, and neptunium. Some of these elements will remain radioactive for a few years, while others will be radioactive for millions of years. Exposure to such radioactive materials can cause human health problems. Scientists worldwide agree that the safest way to manage these materials is to dispose of them deep underground in what is called a geologic repository.

  13. Radionuclides and trace elements in middle Chesapeake Bay sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrilas, M.

    1988-01-01

    Sediments play an important role in aquatic ecology by serving as a repository for radioactive substances and for soluble chemical pollutants that they may transport over considerable distances and may pass to a higher trophic level by way of bottom-feeding biota. The Chesapeake Bay is a moderately stratified, drowned river valley estuary. The oscillatory flood and ebb of the tidal currents are the most obvious motions in the bay and its tributary estuaries. It is considered that the distribution of most of the pollutants, once diluted by the mixing action of the tidal flow, remains relatively constant for many miles up and down the bay. This paper documents the present status of the radioactivity and of trace elements in sediment samples collected in March 1986 from and extended area around the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant.

  14. Element by Element Abundances in Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worthey, Guy; Serven, Jedidiah

    2006-02-01

    Element-by-element abundances will be derived from high quality long slit KPNO 4m spectra of nearby elliptical galaxies that span the range of velocity dispersion. Analysis of these spectra will give the abundances of 18 individual elements to bring to extragalactic astronomy the same luxurious situation now enjoyed only by stellar spectroscopists. These spectra will reveal the basic element ratio behavior as a function of galaxy velocity dispersion. For example, [Mg/Fe] is seen to be enhanced in large galaxies, but not small ones. We propose to expand our purview from 2 elements (Mg and Fe) to 18 elements. This, in turn, will tie directly to chemical evolution and chemical enrichment mechanisms. As a byproduct, we also decrease the stellar population age uncertainty by about a factor of ten from today's Balmer-metal index diagram techniques.

  15. In situ chemical analyses of extraterrestrial bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Economou, Thanasis E.; Turkevich, Anthony L.

    1988-01-01

    One of the most important tasks on any sample return mission will have to be a quick sample characterization in order to guarantee a variety of collected samples. An alpha particle instrument with alpha, proton and X-ray modes can provide a quick and almost complete chemical analysis of Mars samples. This instrument is based on three interactions of the alpha particles from a radioactive source with matter: elastic scattering of the alpha particles by nuclei (alpha mode), (alpha,p) nuclear reaction with some light elements (proton mode), and excitation of the atomic structure of atoms by alpha particles, leading to emission of characteristic X-rays of the lunar surface at three sites during the Surveyor mission of 1967 to 1968. Since then the instrument has been improved and miniaturized substantially. As shown in the past, the alpha particle instrument can operate under Martian conditions without any degradation in the performance. The alpha and proton modes can provide vital information about the light elements, while the X-ray mode with its ambient temperature X-ray detector will be useful for the heavier elements. The excitation of the atomic structure is provided by the same alpha radioactive source that is used by alpha and proton modes or by an auxiliary X-ray source that is selected to enhance the sensitivity to some important geochemical elements.

  16. Nondestructive measurement of environmental radioactive strontium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiba, Shuntaro; Okamiya, Tomohiro; Tanaka, Saki; Tanuma, Ryosuke; Totsuka, Yumi; Murata, Jiro

    2014-03-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident was triggered by the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake. The main radioactivity concerns after the accident are I-131 (half-life: 8.0 days), Cs-134 (2.1 years), Cs-137 (30 years), Sr-89 (51 days), and Sr-90 (29 years). We are aiming to establish a new nondestructive measurement and detection technique that will enable us to realize a quantitative evaluation of strontium radioactivity without chemical separation processing. This technique is needed to detect radiation contained in foods, environmental water, and soil, to prevent us from undesired internal exposure to radiation.

  17. A Remote Radioactivity Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jona, Kemi; Vondracek, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Imagine a high school with very few experimental resources and limited budgets that prevent the purchase of even basic laboratory equipment. For example, many high schools do not have the means of experimentally studying radioactivity because they lack Geiger counters and/or good radioactive sources. This was the case at the first high school one of us (MV) worked at, and after talking with numerous colleagues we know this is still the case at many schools. What options are there then for physics teachers to allow their students to experimentally investigate certain characteristics of radioactivity, such as how distance affects the intensity of radiation coming from a radioactive source? There are computer simulations that can be run, or perhaps the teacher has a light sensor and tries to make an analogy between the intensity of light from a light bulb and the intensity of radiation from a radioactive source based on geometric arguments to get an inverse-square law. But for many there is no direct experimental option if one does not possess a Geiger counter and good radioactive sample. It is for that teacher and class of students that an online, remote radioactivity experiment was created.

  18. Radioactive iodine uptake

    MedlinePlus

    ... much radioactive iodine is taken up by your thyroid gland in a certain time period. A similar test ... over the area of your neck where the thyroid gland is located. The probe detects the location and ...

  19. Understanding radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, R.L.

    1981-12-01

    This document contains information on all aspects of radioactive wastes. Facts are presented about radioactive wastes simply, clearly and in an unbiased manner which makes the information readily accessible to the interested public. The contents are as follows: questions and concerns about wastes; atoms and chemistry; radioactivity; kinds of radiation; biological effects of radiation; radiation standards and protection; fission and fission products; the Manhattan Project; defense and development; uses of isotopes and radiation; classification of wastes; spent fuels from nuclear reactors; storage of spent fuel; reprocessing, recycling, and resources; uranium mill tailings; low-level wastes; transportation; methods of handling high-level nuclear wastes; project salt vault; multiple barrier approach; research on waste isolation; legal requiremnts; the national waste management program; societal aspects of radioactive wastes; perspectives; glossary; appendix A (scientific American articles); appendix B (reference material on wastes). (ATT)

  20. Chemical analysis of solid materials by a LIMS instrument designed for space research: 2D elemental imaging, sub-nm depth profiling and molecular surface analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno-García, Pavel; Grimaudo, Valentine; Riedo, Andreas; Neuland, Maike B.; Tulej, Marek; Broekmann, Peter; Wurz, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Direct quantitative chemical analysis with high lateral and vertical resolution of solid materials is of prime importance for the development of a wide variety of research fields, including e.g., astrobiology, archeology, mineralogy, electronics, among many others. Nowadays, studies carried out by complementary state-of-the-art analytical techniques such as Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS), Glow Discharge Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (GD-TOF-MS) or Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) provide extensive insight into the chemical composition and allow for a deep understanding of processes that might have fashioned the outmost layers of an analyte due to its interaction with the surrounding environment. Nonetheless, these investigations typically employ equipment that is not suitable for implementation on spacecraft, where requirements concerning weight, size and power consumption are very strict. In recent years Laser Ablation/Ionization Mass Spectrometry (LIMS) has re-emerged as a powerful analytical technique suitable not only for laboratory but also for space applications.[1-3] Its improved performance and measurement capabilities result from the use of cutting edge ultra-short femtosecond laser sources, improved vacuum technology and fast electronics. Because of its ultimate compactness, simplicity and robustness it has already proven to be a very suitable analytical tool for elemental and isotope investigations in space research.[4] In this contribution we demonstrate extended capabilities of our LMS instrument by means of three case studies: i) 2D chemical imaging performed on an Allende meteorite sample,[5] ii) depth profiling with unprecedented sub-nm vertical resolution on Cu electrodeposited interconnects[6,7] and iii) preliminary molecular desorption of polymers without assistance of matrix or functionalized substrates.[8] On the whole

  1. Expected gamma ray emission spectra from the lunar surface as a function of chemical composition.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reedy, R. C.; Arnold, J. R.; Trombka, J. I.

    1973-01-01

    The gamma rays emitted from the moon or any similar body carry information on the chemical composition of the surface layer. The elements most easily measured are K, U, Th, and major elements such as O, Si, Mg, and Fe. The expected fluxes of gamma ray lines are calculated for four lunar compositions and one chondritic chemistry from a consideration of the important emission mechanisms: natural radioactivity, inelastic scatter, neutron capture, and induced radioactivity. The models used for cosmic ray interactions are those of Reedy and Arnold (1972) and Lingenfelter et al. (1972). The areal resolution of the experiment is calculated to be around 70-140 km under the conditions of the Apollo 15 and 16 experiments. Finally, a method is described for recovering the chemical information from the observed scintillation spectra obtained in these experiments.

  2. Expected gamma-ray emission spectra from the lunar surface as a function of chemical composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reedy, R. C.; Arnold, J. R.; Trombka, J. I.

    1973-01-01

    The gamma rays emitted from the moon or any similar body carry information on the chemical composition of the surface layer. The elements most easily measured are K, U, Th and major elements such as O, Si, Mg, and Fe. The expected fluxes of gamma ray lines were calculated for four lunar compositions and one chondritic chemistry from a consideration of the important emission mechanisms: natural radioactivity, inelastic scatter, neutron capture, and induced radioactivity. The models used for cosmic ray interactions were those of Reedy and Arnold and Lingenfelter. The areal resolution of the experiment was calculated to be around 70 to 140 km under the conditions of the Apollo 15 and 16 experiments. Finally, a method was described for recovering the chemical information from the observed scintillation spectra obtained in these experiments.

  3. Radioactive tank waste remediation focus area

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    EM`s Office of Science and Technology has established the Tank Focus Area (TFA) to manage and carry out an integrated national program of technology development for tank waste remediation. The TFA is responsible for the development, testing, evaluation, and deployment of remediation technologies within a system architecture to characterize, retrieve, treat, concentrate, and dispose of radioactive waste stored in the underground stabilize and close the tanks. The goal is to provide safe and cost-effective solutions that are acceptable to both the public and regulators. Within the DOE complex, 335 underground storage tanks have been used to process and store radioactive and chemical mixed waste generated from weapon materials production and manufacturing. Collectively, thes tanks hold over 90 million gallons of high-level and low-level radioactive liquid waste in sludge, saltcake, and as supernate and vapor. Very little has been treated and/or disposed or in final form.

  4. Waste management and chemical inventories

    SciTech Connect

    Gleckler, B.P.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the classification and handling of waste at the Hanford Site. Waste produced at the Hanford Site is classified as either radioactive, nonradioactive, or mixed waste. Radioactive wastes are further categorized as transuranic, high-level, and low-level. Mixed waste may contain both radioactive and hazardous nonradioactive substances. This section describes waste management practices and chemical inventories at the site.

  5. Radioactive gold ring dermatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.A.; Aldrich, J.E. )

    1990-08-01

    A superficial squamous cell carcinoma developed in a woman who wore a radioactive gold ring for more than 30 years. Only part of the ring was radioactive. Radiation dose measurements indicated that the dose to basal skin layer was 2.4 Gy (240 rad) per week. If it is assumed that the woman continually wore her wedding ring for 37 years since purchase, she would have received a maximum dose of approximately 4600 Gy.

  6. Temporary Personal Radioactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Fred

    2012-01-01

    As part of a bone scan procedure to look for the spread of prostate cancer, I was injected with radioactive technetium. In an effort to occupy/distract my mind, I used a Geiger counter to determine if the radioactive count obeyed the inverse-square law as a sensor was moved away from my bladder by incremental distances. (Contains 1 table and 2…

  7. Dynamic radioactive particle source

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Murray E.; Gauss, Adam Benjamin; Justus, Alan Lawrence

    2012-06-26

    A method and apparatus for providing a timed, synchronized dynamic alpha or beta particle source for testing the response of continuous air monitors (CAMs) for airborne alpha or beta emitters is provided. The method includes providing a radioactive source; placing the radioactive source inside the detection volume of a CAM; and introducing an alpha or beta-emitting isotope while the CAM is in a normal functioning mode.

  8. Container for radioactive materials

    DOEpatents

    Fields, Stanley R.

    1985-01-01

    A container for housing a plurality of canister assemblies containing radioactive material and disposed in a longitudinally spaced relation within a carrier to form a payload package concentrically mounted within the container. The payload package includes a spacer for each canister assembly, said spacer comprising a base member longitudinally spacing adjacent canister assemblies from each other and a sleeve surrounding the associated canister assembly for centering the same and conducting heat from the radioactive material in a desired flow path.

  9. Linear regression on the characterization of elements of natural origin and possible implications in the use of ground

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, Teresa; Oliveira, Amílcar; Caroço, Adolfo; Batista, Maria J.; Oliveira, Maria Manuela; Borges, José

    2015-03-10

    The observation of certain higher chemical element concentration, such as uranium and radiometric values, in the Alegrete-Assumar region of Portugal, has shown that locally occurrence of radioactive quartzites is responsible for these high values. The geostatistical treatment of exploration data and the crossing of the database with other variables, such as land use, allows one to study how these may affect the human health.

  10. Chemical composition of modern and fossil Hippopotamid teeth and implications for paleoenvironmental reconstructions and enamel formation: 1. major and minor element variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brügmann, G.; Krause, J.; Brachert, T. C.; Kullmer, O.; Schrenk, F.; Ssemmanda, I.; Mertz, D. F.

    2011-05-01

    Bioapatite in mammalian teeth is readily preserved in continental sediments and represents a very important archive for reconstructions of environment and climate evolution. This project intends to provide a detailed data base of major, minor and trace element and isotope tracers for tooth apatite using a variety of microanalytical techniques. The aim is to identify specific sedimentary environments and to improve our understanding on the interaction between internal metabolic processes during tooth formation and external nutritional control and secondary alteration effects. Here, we use the electron microprobe, to determine the major and minor element contents of fossil and modern molar enamel, cement and dentin from hippopotamids. Most of the studied specimens are from different ecosystems in Eastern Africa, representing modern and fossil lakustrine (Lake Kikorongo, Lake Albert, and Lake Malawi) and modern fluvial environments of the Nile River system. Secondary alteration effects in particular FeO, MnO, SO3 and F concentrations, which are 2 to 10 times higher in fossil than in modern enamel; secondary enrichments in fossil dentin and cement are even higher. In modern and fossil enamel, along sections perpendicular to the enamel-dentin junction (EDJ) or along cervix-apex profiles, P2O5 and CaO contents and the CaO/P2O5 ratios are very constant (StdDev ~1 %). Linear regression analysis reveals very tight control of the MgO (R2∼0.6), Na2O and Cl variation (for both R2>0.84) along EDJ-outer enamel rim profiles, despite large concentration variations (40 % to 300 %) across the enamel. These minor elements show well defined distribution patterns in enamel, similar in all specimens regardless of their age and origin, as the concentration of MgO and Na2O decrease from the enamel-dentin junction (EDJ) towards the outer rim, whereas Cl displays the opposite variation. Fossil enamel from hippopotamids which lived in the saline Lake Kikorongo have a much higher MgO/Na2O

  11. Chemical composition of modern and fossil Hippopotamid teeth and implications for paleoenvironmental reconstructions and enamel formation - Part 1: Major and minor element variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brügmann, G.; Krause, J.; Brachert, T. C.; Kullmer, O.; Schrenk, F.; Ssemmanda, I.; Mertz, D. F.

    2012-01-01

    Bioapatite in mammalian teeth is readily preserved in continental sediments and represents a very important archive for reconstructions of environment and climate evolution. This project provides a comprehensive data base of major, minor and trace element and isotope tracers for tooth apatite using a variety of microanalytical techniques. The aim is to identify specific sedimentary environments and to improve our understanding on the interaction between internal metabolic processes during tooth formation and external nutritional control and secondary alteration effects. Here, we use the electron microprobe to determine the major and minor element contents of fossil and modern molar enamel, cement and dentin from Hippopotamids. Most of the studied specimens are from different ecosystems in Eastern Africa, representing modern and fossil lacustrine (Lake Kikorongo, Lake Albert, and Lake Malawi) and modern fluvial environments of the Nile River system. Secondary alteration effects - in particular FeO, MnO, SO3 and F concentrations - are 2 to 10 times higher in fossil than in modern enamel; the secondary enrichment of these components in fossil dentin and cement is even higher. In modern and fossil enamel, along sections perpendicular to the enamel-dentin junction (EDJ) or along cervix-apex profiles, P2O5 and CaO contents and the CaO/P2O5 ratios are very constant (StdDev ∼1%). Linear regression analysis reveals tight control of the MgO (R2∼0.6), Na2O and Cl variation (for both R2>0.84) along EDJ-outer enamel rim profiles, despite large concentration variations (40% to 300%) across the enamel. These minor elements show well defined distribution patterns in enamel, similar in all specimens regardless of their age and origin, as the concentration of MgO and Na2O decrease from the enamel-dentin junction (EDJ) towards the outer rim, whereas Cl displays the opposite trend. Fossil enamel from Hippopotamids which lived in the saline Lake Kikorongo have a much higher Mg

  12. Oak Ridge National Laboratory shipping containers for radioactive materials

    SciTech Connect

    Schaich, R.W.

    1980-05-01

    The types of containers used at ORNL for the transport of radioactive materials are described. Both returnable and non-returnable types are included. Containers for solids, liquids and gases are discussed. Casks for the shipment of uranium, irradiated fuel elements, and non-irradiated fuel elements are also described. Specifications are provided. (DC)

  13. Analysis of radioactive metals by spark source mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A J; Kozy, A; Morris, R N

    1969-04-01

    A spark source mass spectrograph with photographic plate recording has been adapted for the analysis of plutonium and americium metals. Over seventy elements can be determined simultaneously in these metals. A comparison has been made between results obtained by mass spectrography and by conventional methods for impurity elements. The operations involved in handling radioactive materials in the mass spectrograph are also discussed. PMID:18960537

  14. Chemical preconcentrator

    DOEpatents

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.

    2001-01-01

    A chemical preconcentrator is disclosed with applications to chemical sensing and analysis. The preconcentrator can be formed by depositing a resistive heating element (e.g. platinum) over a membrane (e.g. silicon nitride) suspended above a substrate. A coating of a sorptive material (e.g. a microporous hydrophobic sol-gel coating or a polymer coating) is formed on the suspended membrane proximate to the heating element to selective sorb one or more chemical species of interest over a time period, thereby concentrating the chemical species in the sorptive material. Upon heating the sorptive material with the resistive heating element, the sorbed chemical species are released for detection and analysis in a relatively high concentration and over a relatively short time period. The sorptive material can be made to selectively sorb particular chemical species of interest while not substantially sorbing other chemical species not of interest. The present invention has applications for use in forming high-sensitivity, rapid-response miniaturized chemical analysis systems (e.g. a "chem lab on a chip").

  15. Superheavy Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, S.

    The nuclear shell model predicts that the next doubly magic shell closure beyond 208Pb is at a proton number Z=114, 120, or 126 and at a neutron number N=172 or 184. The outstanding aim of experimental investigations is the exploration of this region of spherical `SuperHeavy Elements' (SHEs). Experimental methods have been developed which allowed for the identification of new elements at production rates of one atom per month. Using cold fusion reactions which are based on lead and bismuth targets, relatively neutron-deficient isotopes of the elements from 107 to 113 were synthesized at GSI in Darmstadt, Germany, and/or at RIKEN in Wako, Japan. In hot fusion reactions of 48Ca projectiles with actinide targets more neutron-rich isotopes of the elements from 112 to 116 and even 118 were produced at the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions (FLNR) at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) in Dubna, Russia. Recently, part of these data which represent the first identification of nuclei located on the predicted island of SHEs were confirmed in two independent experiments. The decay data reveal that for the heaviest elements, the dominant decay mode is α emission rather than fission. Decay properties as well as reaction cross-sections are compared with results of theoretical studies. Finally, plans are presented for the further development of the experimental set-up and the application of new techniques. At a higher sensitivity, the detailed exploration of the region of spherical SHEs will be in the center of interest of future experimental work. New data will certainly challenge theoretical studies on the mechanism of the synthesis, on the nuclear decay properties, and on the chemical behavior of these heaviest atoms at the limit of stability.

  16. Laser decontamination of the radioactive lightning rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potiens, A. J.; Dellamano, J. C.; Vicente, R.; Raele, M. P.; Wetter, N. U.; Landulfo, E.

    2014-02-01

    Between 1970 and 1980 Brazil experienced a significant market for radioactive lightning rods (RLR). The device consists of an air terminal with one or more sources of americium-241 attached to it. The sources were used to ionize the air around them and to increase the attraction of atmospheric discharges. Because of their ineffectiveness, the nuclear regulatory authority in Brazil suspended the license for manufacturing, commerce and installation of RLR in 1989, and determined that the replaced RLR were to be collected to a centralized radioactive waste management facility for treatment. The first step for RLR treatment is to remove the radioactive sources. Though they can be easily removed, some contaminations are found all over the remaining metal scrap that must decontaminated for release, otherwise it must be treated as radioactive waste. Decontamination using various chemicals has proven to be inefficient and generates large amounts of secondary wastes. This work shows the preliminary results of the decontamination of 241Am-contaminated metal scrap generated in the treatment of radioactive lightning rods applying laser ablation. A Nd:YAG nanoseconds laser was used with 300 mJ energy leaving only a small amount of secondary waste to be treated.

  17. PINS chemical identification software

    DOEpatents

    Caffrey, Augustine J.; Krebs, Kennth M.

    2004-09-14

    An apparatus and method for identifying a chemical compound. A neutron source delivers neutrons into the chemical compound. The nuclei of chemical elements constituting the chemical compound emit gamma rays upon interaction with the neutrons. The gamma rays are characteristic of the chemical elements constituting the chemical compound. A spectrum of the gamma rays is generated having a detection count and an energy scale. The energy scale is calibrated by comparing peaks in the spectrum to energies of pre-selected chemical elements in the spectrum. A least-squares fit completes the calibration. The chemical elements constituting the chemical compound can be readily determined, which then allows for identification of the chemical compound.

  18. SEPARATION OF RADIOACTIVE COLUMBIUM TRACER

    DOEpatents

    Glendenin, L.E.; Gest, H.

    1958-08-26

    A process is presented for the recovery of radioactive columbium from solutions containing such columbium together with radioactive tellurium. The columbium and tellurium values are separated from such solutions by means of an inorganic oxide carrier precipitate, such as MnO/sub 2/. This oxide carrier precipitate and its associated columbium and telluriuan values are then dissolved in an aqueous acidic solution and nonradioactive tellurium, in an ionic form, is then introduced into such solution, for example in the form of H/sub 2/TeO/sub 3/. The tellurium present in the solution is then reduced to the elemental state and precipitates, and is then separated from the supernataat solution. A basic acetate precipitate is formed in the supernatant and carries the remaining columblum values therefrom. After separation, this basic ferric acetate precipitate is dissolved, and the ferric ions are removed by means of an organic solvent extraction process utilizing ether. The remaining solution contains carrier-free columbium as its only metal ion.

  19. Chemistry of the heaviest elements--one atom at a time

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, Darleane C.; Lee, Diana M.

    2000-01-01

    In keeping with the goal of the Viewpoint series of the Journal of Chemical Education, this article gives a 75-year perspective of the chemistry of the heaviest elements, including a 50-year retrospective view of past developments, a summary of current research achievements and applications, and some predictions about exciting, new developments that might be envisioned within the next 25 years. A historical perspective of the importance of chemical separations in the discoveries of the transuranium elements from neptunium (Z=93) through mendelevium (Z=101) is given. The development of techniques for studying the chemical properties of mendelevium and still heavier elements on the basis of measuring the radioactive decay of a single atom (''atom-at-a-time'' chemistry) and combining the results of many separate experiments is reviewed. The influence of relativistic effects (expected to increase as Z{sup 2}) on chemical properties is discussed. The results from recent atom-at-a-time studies of the chemistry of the heaviest elements through seaborgium (Z=106) are summarized and show that their properties cannot be readily predicted based on simple extrapolation from the properties of their lighter homologues in the periodic table. The prospects for extending chemical studies to still heavier elements than seaborgium are considered and appear promising.

  20. Radioactive springs geochemical data related to uranium exploration: basic data and use of multivariate factor scores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cadigan, Robert Allen; Felmlee, J. Karen

    1979-01-01

    Radioactive springs and wells at 33 localities in the States of Colorado, Utah, Arizona, and New Mexico have been studied and sampled to obtain geochemical data to determine whether such data are useful in a uranium exploration program. Most samples were collected from mineral-rich springs probably related to hydrothermal systems of various ages. Two sets of data were obtained, the first based on the chemical composition and physical and chemical properties of spring and ground water, and the second based on the chemical composition of mineral precipitates deposited by radioactive springs. Multivariate statistical analysis of the water data suggests four major geochemical factors affecting the 23 parameters measured. These factors were labeled as total dissolved solids, alkalinity, temperature, and Fe-U concentration. Multivariate statistical analysis of the precipitate data suggests five factors affecting the 32 element values measured. These factors were labeled as mineral contamination, Mn precipitation, Fe-As-Be precipitation, heavy metals precipitation, and Ba-Ra precipitation. Relative intensities of the geochemical processes represented by the factors were computed using factor scores. Sample localities were ranked on the basis of relative intensities, and the five localities with the highest intensities were selected as being the most favorable for more intensive exploration for uranium. Immediate use of such selection would be experimental because of the lack of industry experience at this time in the exploration of active hydrothermal systems for uranium.

  1. Characterization of trace elements and radionuclides and their risk assessment in red mud

    SciTech Connect

    Akinci, Akin; Artir, Recep

    2008-04-15

    Red mud is a waste and tail material from primary aluminum production, and is named for its color, coming from its iron oxide content. The quantity of red mud is almost equal to the primary aluminum production and leads to a considerable environmental issue. Red mud of the ETI Seydisehir Aluminum Plant is considered as detrimental waste for storage due to its content of various metal oxides, elements and caustics. This detrimental effect is classified into two groups: first, environmental health and second, the cost of storage. In order to minimize the negative effect of red mud, there have been or are presently many investigations carried out on usage of red mud in building materials. However, no effective way of utilizing red mud has yet been found. In this study domestic red mud was investigated and chemical analyses were performed by EDAX and XRF techniques. Radioactivity of the samples was also measured with gamma spectroscopy. The concentrations of elemental Na, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Fe, S and K were determined by EDAX and XRF. In addition, Cr, Zr, Sr, Ni and Y were also identified as impurities. According to gamma spectroscopy results radium, uranium, thorium and potassium were determined as radioactive elements. It was observed that the amounts of the radioactive elements present in the red mud are within safe limits. Therefore, if domestic red mud originated from Seydisehir could be utilized as reinforcement material in composites, and in building materials, it can be considered safe in terms of environmental and human health.

  2. Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) and Elevated Concentrations of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) in Unsaturated-Zone Vapors Near a Chemical and Low-Level Radioactivity Waste-Disposal Facility, Amargosa Desert Research Site, Nye County, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, R. J.; Andraski, B. J.; Walvoord, M. A.; Stonestrom, D. A.; Prudic, D. E.; Luo, W.

    2003-12-01

    As part of its Toxic Substances Hydrology Program, the U.S. Geological Survey is studying contaminant-transport processes in an arid environment at the Amargosa Desert Research Site (http://nevada.usgs.gov/adrs/). The site is near waste-disposal facilities 20 kilometers east of Death Valley National Park. Low-level radioactive waste was buried in unlined trenches of varying depth during 1962-92. Hazardous chemical waste was buried in unlined trenches at an adjacent facility during 1970-88. Mean annual precipitation at the site from 1981 to 2000 was 108 millimeters. The unsaturated zone is aerobic down to the water table, which is about 110 m (meters) deep. Sampling infrastructure south and west of the facility includes a grid of vapor probes 1.5 m deep, a 23.8-m-deep background borehole (JFDB), and two approximately 100-m-deep boreholes (UZB-2 and UZB-3), which are 160 m and 100 m from the nearest trench, respectively, and are instrumented for multi-level sampling. Analytes detected in unsaturated-zone-vapor samples include elevated concentrations of tritium and carbon-14; three chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) compounds, eight chlorinated solvent compounds, and toluene, all at concentrations exceeding 1,000 parts per billion (ppb) in UZB-3, and at lower concentrations in UZB-2 and in the shallow-vapor-probe grid; and CO2 in concentrations up to 2% in UZB-3, whereas maximum CO2 concentrations in JFDB are less than 0.2%. With the notable exception of toluene, VOCs that are known to be highly biodegradable are generally absent or occur at low concentrations (<100 ppb). The trends in the CO2 concentration profiles approximately parallel those of CFCs and radionuclides. The following preliminary conclusions have been drawn from the radionuclide, VOC, and CO2 data: 1. Biodegradation of organic substances is a reasonable explanation for the presence of CO2 in UZB-3 at concentrations greater those in JFDB (background), which are attributed to near-surface natural biological

  3. A chemical basis for the partitioning of radionuclides in incinerator operation

    SciTech Connect

    Burger, L.L.

    1994-09-01

    For waste containing small amounts of radioactivity, rad waste (RW), or mixed waste (MW) containing both radioactive and chemically hazardous components, incineration is a logical management candidate because of inherent safety, waste volume reduction, and low costs. Successful operation requires that the facility is properly designed and operated to protect workers and to limit releases of hazardous materials. The large decrease in waste volume achieved by incineration also results in a higher concentration of most of the radionuclides and non radioactive heavy metals in the ash products. These concentrations impact subsequent treatment and disposal. The various constituents (chemical elements) are not equal in concentration in the various incinerator feed materials, nor are they equal in their contribution to health risks on subsequent handling, or accidental release. Thus, for management of the wastes it is important to be able to predict how the nuclides partition between the primary combustion residue which may be an ash or a fused slag, the fine particulates or fly ash that is trapped in the burner off-gas by several different techniques, and the airborne fraction that escapes to the atmosphere. The objective of this report is to provide an estimate of how different elements of concern may behave in the chemical environment of the incinerator. The study briefly examines published incinerator operation data, then considers the properties of the elements of concern, and employs thermodynamic calculations, to help predict the fate of these RW and MW constituents. Many types and configurations of incinerators have been designed and tested.

  4. Radioactivity in food crops

    SciTech Connect

    Drury, J.S.; Baldauf, M.F.; Daniel, E.W.; Fore, C.S.; Uziel, M.S.

    1983-05-01

    Published levels of radioactivity in food crops from 21 countries and 4 island chains of Oceania are listed. The tabulation includes more than 3000 examples of 100 different crops. Data are arranged alphabetically by food crop and geographical origin. The sampling date, nuclide measured, mean radioactivity, range of radioactivities, sample basis, number of samples analyzed, and bibliographic citation are given for each entry, when available. Analyses were reported most frequently for /sup 137/Cs, /sup 40/K, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 226/Ra, /sup 228/Ra, plutonium, uranium, total alpha, and total beta, but a few authors also reported data for /sup 241/Am, /sup 7/Be, /sup 60/Co, /sup 55/Fe, /sup 3/H, /sup 131/I, /sup 54/Mn, /sup 95/Nb, /sup 210/Pb, /sup 210/Po, /sup 106/Ru, /sup 125/Sb, /sup 228/Th, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 95/Zr. Based on the reported data it appears that radioactivity from alpha emitters in food crops is usually low, on the order of 0.1 Bq.g/sup -1/ (wet weight) or less. Reported values of beta radiation in a given crop generally appear to be several orders of magnitude greater than those of alpha emitters. The most striking aspect of the data is the great range of radioactivity reported for a given nuclide in similar food crops with different geographical origins.

  5. Microbiological treatment of radioactive wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, A.J.

    1992-12-31

    The ability of microorganisms which are ubiquitous throughout nature to bring about information of organic and inorganic compounds in radioactive wastes has been recognized. Unlike organic contaminants, metals cannot be destroyed, but must be either removed or converted to a stable form. Radionuclides and toxic metals in wastes may be present initially in soluble form or, after disposal may be converted to a soluble form by chemical or microbiological processes. The key microbiological reactions include (i) oxidation/reduction; (ii) change in pH and Eh which affects the valence state and solubility of the metal; (iii) production of sequestering agents; and (iv) bioaccumulation. All of these processes can mobilize or stabilize metals in the environment.

  6. Trapping radioactive ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluge, H.-J.; Blaum, K.

    2004-12-01

    Trapping devices for atomic and nuclear physics experiments with radioactive ions are becoming more and more important at accelerator facilities. While about ten years ago only one online Penning trap experiment existed, namely ISOLTRAP at ISOLDE/CERN, meanwhile almost every radioactive beam facility has installed or plans an ion trap setup. This article gives an overview on ion traps in the operation, construction or planing phase which will be used for fundamental studies with short-lived radioactive nuclides such as mass spectrometry, laser spectroscopy and nuclear decay spectroscopy. In addition, this article summarizes the use of gas cells and radiofrequency quadrupole (Paul) traps at different facilities as a versatile tool for ion beam manipulation like retardation, cooling, bunching, and cleaning.

  7. Radioactivity of Consumer Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, David; Jokisch, Derek; Fulmer, Philip

    2006-11-01

    A variety of consumer products and household items contain varying amounts of radioactivity. Examples of these items include: FiestaWare and similar glazed china, salt substitute, bananas, brazil nuts, lantern mantles, smoke detectors and depression glass. Many of these items contain natural sources of radioactivity such as Uranium, Thorium, Radium and Potassium. A few contain man-made sources like Americium. This presentation will detail the sources and relative radioactivity of these items (including demonstrations). Further, measurements of the isotopic ratios of Uranium-235 and Uranium-238 in several pieces of china will be compared to historical uses of natural and depleted Uranium. Finally, the presenters will discuss radiation safety as it pertains to the use of these items.

  8. Radioactive mixed waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Jasen, W.G.; Erpenbeck, E.G.

    1993-02-01

    Various types of waste have been generated during the 50-year history of the Hanford Site. Regulatory changes in the last 20 years have provided the emphasis for better management of these wastes. Interpretations of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (AEA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA), and the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) have led to the definition of radioactive mixed wastes (RMW). The radioactive and hazardous properties of these wastes have resulted in the initiation of special projects for the management of these wastes. Other solid wastes at the Hanford Site include low-level wastes, transuranic (TRU), and nonradioactive hazardous wastes. This paper describes a system for the treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) of solid radioactive waste.

  9. Radioactivity in the industrial effluent disposed soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthilkumar, R. D.; Narayanaswamy, R.; Meenashisundaram, V.

    2012-04-01

    Studies on radiation and radioactivity distribution in the soils of effluent disposed from the sugar industry in India have been conducted. The external gamma dose rates in air and natural radionuclides activities in the soils were measured using an Environmental Radiation Dosimeter and a Gamma-ray Spectrometer respectively. The soil samples were also subject to various physico-chemical analyses. This study revealed some remarkable results that are discussed in the article.

  10. Records of wells and chemical analyses of water from wells for the period June 13, 1984 to December 4, 1986 at the Maxey Flats Radioactive Waste Disposal Site, Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lyverse, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    Lithologic data are presented for 113 wells drilled at the Maxey Flats Radioactive Waste Disposal Site for the period June 13, 1984 to December 4, 1986. Water levels, tritium concentrations, and specific conductance are also presented for wells yielding sufficient water for measuring and sampling. At least one sample was collected from most wells for the determination of gross alpha and beta activity. These activities and the results for gamma emitting radionuclides (Cobalt 60 and Cesium 137) are also presented. (USGS)

  11. Container for radioactive materials

    DOEpatents

    Fields, S.R.

    1984-05-30

    A container is claimed for housing a plurality of canister assemblies containing radioactive material. The several canister assemblies are stacked in a longitudinally spaced relation within a carrier to form a payload concentrically mounted within the container. The payload package includes a spacer for each canister assembly, said spacer comprising a base member longitudinally spacing adjacent canister assemblies from each other and sleeve surrounding the associated canister assembly for centering the same and conducting heat from the radioactive material in a desired flow path. 7 figures.

  12. Elemental Food for Thought

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cady, Susan

    2005-01-01

    One of the first tasks students learn in chemistry is to pronounce and spell the names of elements and learn their corresponding chemical symbols. Repetitive oral recitation is commonly used to learn this information, but games and puzzles can make this task creative, variable, and fun. Elemental Food for Thought is a puzzlelike activity that…

  13. Proceedings of transuranium elements

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The identification of the first synthetic elements was established by chemical evidence. Conclusive proof of the synthesis of the first artificial element, technetium, was published in 1937 by Perrier and Segre. An essential aspect of their achievement was the prediction of the chemical properties of element 43, which had been missing from the periodic table and which was expected to have properties similar to those of manganese and rhenium. The discovery of other artificial elements, astatine and francium, was facilitated in 1939-1940 by the prediction of their chemical properties. A little more than 50 years ago, in the spring of 1940, Edwin McMillan and Philip Abelson synthesized element 93, neptunium, and confirmed its uniqueness by chemical means. On August 30, 1940, Glenn Seaborg, Arthur Wahl, and the late Joseph Kennedy began their neutron irradiations of uranium nitrate hexahydrate. A few months later they synthesized element 94, later named plutonium, by observing the alpha particles emitted from uranium oxide targets that had been bombarded with deuterons. Shortly thereafter they proved that is was the second transuranium element by establishing its unique oxidation-reduction behavior. The symposium honored the scientists and engineers whose vision and dedication led to the discovery of the transuranium elements and to the understanding of the influence of 5f electrons on their electronic structure and bonding. This volume represents a record of papers presented at the symposium.

  14. Radioactive Cs capture in the early solar system

    PubMed Central

    Hidaka, Hiroshi; Yoneda, Shigekazu

    2013-01-01

    Barium isotopic compositions of primitive materials in the solar system are generally affected by s- and r-process nucleosynthetic components that hide the contribution of the isotopic excess of 135Ba formed by decay of radioactive 135Cs. However, the Ba isotopic composition of the chemical separates from chondrules in the Sayama CM2 chondrite shows an excess of 135Ba isotopic abundance up to (0.33 ± 0.06)%, which is independent of the isotopic components from s- and r-process nucleosyntheses. The isotopic excesses of 135Ba correlate with the elemental abundance of Ba relative to Cs, providing chemical and isotopic evidence for the existence of the presently extinct radionuclide 135Cs (t1/2 = 2.3 million years) in the early solar system. The estimated abundance of 135Cs/133Cs = (6.8 ± 1.9) × 10−4 is more than double that expected from the uniform production model of the short-lived radioisotopes, suggesting remobilization of Cs including 135Cs in the chondrules of the meteorite parent body. PMID:23435551

  15. Radioactive Cs capture in the early solar system.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, Hiroshi; Yoneda, Shigekazu

    2013-01-01

    Barium isotopic compositions of primitive materials in the solar system are generally affected by s- and r-process nucleosynthetic components that hide the contribution of the isotopic excess of (135)Ba formed by decay of radioactive (135)Cs. However, the Ba isotopic composition of the chemical separates from chondrules in the Sayama CM2 chondrite shows an excess of (135)Ba isotopic abundance up to (0.33 ± 0.06)%, which is independent of the isotopic components from s- and r-process nucleosyntheses. The isotopic excesses of (135)Ba correlate with the elemental abundance of Ba relative to Cs, providing chemical and isotopic evidence for the existence of the presently extinct radionuclide (135)Cs (t(1/2) = 2.3 million years) in the early solar system. The estimated abundance of (135)Cs/(133)Cs = (6.8 ± 1.9) × 10(-4) is more than double that expected from the uniform production model of the short-lived radioisotopes, suggesting remobilization of Cs including (135)Cs in the chondrules of the meteorite parent body. PMID:23435551

  16. Leaching of technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive materials.

    PubMed

    Chau, Nguyen Dinh; Chruściel, Edward

    2007-08-01

    A form of waste associated with mining activities is related to the type of deposit being mined and to the procedure of exploitation and enrichment adopted. The wastes usually contain relatively large amounts of technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive materials (TENORM). The TENORM are often stored on the surface. Consequently, they can be leached as a result of interaction with aqueous solutions of different chemical composition. This further leads to pollution of water and soil in the vicinity of the stored wastes. The paper presents the results of laboratory investigation aimed at quantifying the leaching process of samples originating from uranium dumps and storage reservoirs associated with brine pumped from coal mines. The leaching process was investigated with respect to selected elements: uranium isotopes, radium isotopes, iron, barium and sodium. The samples were exposed to aqueous solutions of different chemical composition. The experiments revealed that TENORM in form of sulphate compounds are the most resistant against leaching. The leaching coefficient for radium isotopes varies from a few thousandth percent to a few hundredth percent. On the other hand, for TENORM occurring in sand or sludge, the leaching coefficient for uranium and radium isotopes ranged from a few hundredth percent to a few percent. PMID:17482828

  17. Process for decontaminating radioactive waste water using a ferrofluid and magnetic separation

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, G.L.

    1980-07-31

    The present invention provides a process for decontaminating radioactive waste water containing a radioactive element that forms a water-insoluble compound. This process includes the steps of forming the compound of the radioactive element, treating the resulting waste water with a ferrofluid, dispersing the ferrofluid, diluting the solids concentration of the resulting mixture with a coagulation initiator, such as ethyl alcohol or acetone, and collecting by use of a magnetic field, the resulting radioactive sludge. In a variation of the process, the steps involving the use of the coagulation initiator and the use of the ferrofluid are reversed.

  18. Radioactivity in fossils at the Hagerman Fossil Beds National Monument.

    PubMed

    Farmer, C Neal; Kathren, Ronald L; Christensen, Craig

    2008-08-01

    Since 1996, higher than background levels of naturally occurring radioactivity have been documented in both fossil and mineral deposits at Hagerman Fossil Beds National Monument in south-central Idaho. Radioactive fossil sites occur primarily within an elevation zone of 900-1000 m above sea level and are most commonly found associated with ancient river channels filled with sand. Fossils found in clay rich deposits do not exhibit discernable levels of radioactivity. Out of 300 randomly selected fossils, approximately three-fourths exhibit detectable levels of natural radioactivity ranging from 1 to 2 orders of magnitude above ambient background levels when surveyed with a portable hand held Geiger-Muller survey instrument. Mineral deposits in geologic strata also show above ambient background levels of radioactivity. Radiochemical lab analysis has documented the presence of numerous natural radioactive isotopes. It is postulated that ancient groundwater transported radioactive elements through sand bodies containing fossils which precipitated out of solution during the fossilization process. The elevated levels of natural radioactivity in fossils may require special precautions to ensure that exposures to personnel from stored or displayed items are kept as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA).

  19. New insights into water oxidation reactions from photocatalysis, electrocatalysis to chemical catalysis: an example of iron-based oxides doped with foreign elements.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jingwei; Du, Xiaoqiang; Feng, YingYing; Zhao, Yukun; Ding, Yong

    2016-04-21

    We have examined the catalytic activity of four different iron-based oxides doped with foreign elements using three common driving forces. The data clearly demonstrate that their water oxidation catalytic activity differ widely under different driving forces.

  20. Chemical analysis of trace elements for air pollution detection. August 1973-May 1990 (A Bibliography from the NTIS data base). Report for August 1973-May 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning the identification and analysis of trace elements and compounds occurring in air and airborne particulate samples. The citations present methods of analysis and the equipment required for the determinations. Analytical techniques include spectrometry, inductively-coupled plasma, atomic absorption and atomic emission, Fourier transform infrared analysis, and ion chromatography. A separate Published Search covers analysis of trace elements in water pollution detection. (Contains 103 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  1. RESRAD: A computer code for evaluating radioactively contaminated sites

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C.; Zielen, A.J.; Cheng, J.J.

    1993-12-31

    This document briefly describes the uses of the RESRAD computer code in calculating site-specific residual radioactive material guidelines and radiation dose-risk to an on-site individual (worker or resident) at a radioactively contaminated site. The adoption by the DOE in order 5400.5, pathway analysis methods, computer requirements, data display, the inclusion of chemical contaminants, benchmarking efforts, and supplemental information sources are all described. (GHH)

  2. Isotope-abundance variations of selected elements (IUPAC technical report)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, T.B.; Böhlke, J.K.; De Bievre, P.; Ding, T.; Holden, N.E.; Hopple, J.A.; Krouse, H.R.; Lamberty, A.; Peiser, H.S.; Revesz, K.; Rieder, S.E.; Rosman, K.J.R.; Roth, E.; Taylor, P.D.P.; Vocke, R.D.; Xiao, Y.K.

    2002-01-01

    Documented variations in the isotopic compositions of some chemical elements are responsible for expanded uncertainties in the standard atomic weights published by the Commission on Atomic Weights and Isotopic Abundances of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry. This report summarizes reported variations in the isotopic compositions of 20 elements that are due to physical and chemical fractionation processes (not due to radioactive decay) and their effects on the standard atomic-weight uncertainties. For 11 of those elements (hydrogen, lithium, boron, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, silicon, sulfur, chlorine, copper, and selenium), standard atomic-weight uncertainties have been assigned values that are substantially larger than analytical uncertainties because of common isotope-abundance variations in materials of natural terrestrial origin. For 2 elements (chromium and thallium), recently reported isotope-abundance variations potentially are large enough to result in future expansion of their atomic-weight uncertainties. For 7 elements (magnesium, calcium, iron, zinc, molybdenum, palladium, and tellurium), documented isotope variations in materials of natural terrestrial origin are too small to have a significant effect on their standard atomic-weight uncertainties. This compilation indicates the extent to which the atomic weight of an element in a given material may differ from the standard atomic weight of the element. For most elements given above, data are graphically illustrated by a diagram in which the materials are specified in the ordinate and the compositional ranges are plotted along the abscissa in scales of (1) atomic weight, (2) mole fraction of a selected isotope, and (3) delta value of a selected isotope ratio.

  3. Comparison of the radioactive and modified techniques for measurement of stream reaeration coefficients

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rathbun, R.E.; Grant, R. Stephen

    1978-01-01

    There are advantages and disadvantages to both the radioactive and modified tracer techniques. The main advantage of the radioactive technique is that the tracer gas is chemically inert; the main disadvantage is that a radioactive isotope of the gas must be used to obtain the necessary analytical sensitivity. The main advantage of the modified technique is that radioactive tracers are not necessary; the main disadvantage is that the hydrocarbon tracer gases may be subject to biological degradation and sorption losses. Results of this comparison study suggest that the modified technique is a promising alternative to the use of radioactive tracers.

  4. Risk-informed radioactive waste classification and reclassification.

    PubMed

    Croff, Allen G

    2006-11-01

    Radioactive waste classification systems have been developed to allow wastes having similar hazards to be grouped for purposes of storage, treatment, packaging, transportation, and/or disposal. As recommended in the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements' Report No. 139, Risk-Based Classification of Radioactive and Hazardous Chemical Wastes, a preferred classification system would be based primarily on the health risks to the public that arise from waste disposal and secondarily on other attributes such as the near-term practicalities of managing a waste, i.e., the waste classification system would be risk informed. The current U.S. radioactive waste classification system is not risk informed because key definitions--especially that of high-level waste--are based on the source of the waste instead of its inherent characteristics related to risk. A second important reason for concluding the existing U.S. radioactive waste classification system is not risk informed is there are no general principles or provisions for exempting materials from being classified as radioactive waste which would then allow management without regard to its radioactivity. This paper elaborates the current system for classifying and reclassifying radioactive wastes in the United States, analyzes the extent to which the system is risk informed and the ramifications of its not being so, and provides observations on potential future direction of efforts to address shortcomings in the U.S. radioactive waste classification system as of 2004.

  5. Risk-informed radioactive waste classification and reclassification.

    PubMed

    Croff, Allen G

    2006-11-01

    Radioactive waste classification systems have been developed to allow wastes having similar hazards to be grouped for purposes of storage, treatment, packaging, transportation, and/or disposal. As recommended in the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements' Report No. 139, Risk-Based Classification of Radioactive and Hazardous Chemical Wastes, a preferred classification system would be based primarily on the health risks to the public that arise from waste disposal and secondarily on other attributes such as the near-term practicalities of managing a waste, i.e., the waste classification system would be risk informed. The current U.S. radioactive waste classification system is not risk informed because key definitions--especially that of high-level waste--are based on the source of the waste instead of its inherent characteristics related to risk. A second important reason for concluding the existing U.S. radioactive waste classification system is not risk informed is there are no general principles or provisions for exempting materials from being classified as radioactive waste which would then allow management without regard to its radioactivity. This paper elaborates the current system for classifying and reclassifying radioactive wastes in the United States, analyzes the extent to which the system is risk informed and the ramifications of its not being so, and provides observations on potential future direction of efforts to address shortcomings in the U.S. radioactive waste classification system as of 2004. PMID:17033455

  6. Radioactivity test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... type of nuclear test performed to evaluate thyroid function. The patient ingests radioactive iodine (I-123 or I-131) capsules or liquid. After a time (usually 6 and 24-hours later), a gamma probe is placed over the thyroid gland to ...

  7. Viewer Makes Radioactivity "Visible"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yin, L. I.

    1983-01-01

    Battery operated viewer demonstrates feasibility of generating threedimensional visible light simulations of objects that emit X-ray or gamma rays. Ray paths are traced for two pinhold positions to show location of reconstructed image. Images formed by pinholes are converted to intensified visible-light images. Applications range from radioactivity contamination surveys to monitoring radioisotope absorption in tumors.

  8. Radioactivity: A Natural Phenomenon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronneau, C.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed is misinformation people have on the subject of radiation. The importance of comparing artificial source levels of radiation to natural levels is emphasized. Measurements of radioactivity, its consequences, and comparisons between the risks induced by radiation in the environment and from artificial sources are included. (KR)

  9. AIR RADIOACTIVITY MONITOR

    DOEpatents

    Bradshaw, R.L.; Thomas, J.W.

    1961-04-11

    The monitor is designed to minimize undesirable background buildup. It consists of an elongated column containing peripheral electrodes in a central portion of the column, and conduits directing an axial flow of radioactively contaminated air through the center of the column and pure air through the annular portion of the column about the electrodes. (AEC)

  10. Radioactive Decay - An Analog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGeachy, Frank

    1988-01-01

    Presents an analog of radioactive decay that allows the student to grasp the concept of half life and the exponential nature of the decay process. The analog is devised to use small, colored, plastic poker chips or counters. Provides the typical data and a graph which supports the analog. (YP)

  11. Radioactivity and foods

    SciTech Connect

    Olszyna-Marzys, A.E. )

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe and contrast two relationships between radiation and food--on the one hand, beneficial preservation of food by controlled exposure to ionizing radiation; and, on the other, contamination of food by accidental incorporation of radioactive nuclides within the food itself. In food irradiation, electrons or electromagnetic radiation is used to destroy microorganisms and insects or prevent seed germination. The economic advantages and health benefits of sterilizing food in this manner are clear, and numerous studies have confirmed that under strictly controlled conditions no undersirable changes or induced radioactivity is produced in the irradiated food. An altogether different situation is presented by exposure of food animals and farming areas to radioactive materials, as occurred after the major Soviet nuclear reactor accident at Chenobyl. This article furnishes the basic information needed to understand the nature of food contamination associated with that event and describes the work of international organizations seeking to establish appropriate safe limits for levels of radioactivity in foods.

  12. Radioactivity as a significant energy source in prebiotic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Garzón, L; Garzón, M L

    2001-01-01

    Radioactivity in the continental crust (due mainly to the isotopes 238U, 235U, 232Th and 40K), as a energy source for chemical evolution in the early Archean (between 3.5 and approximately 4 Ga bp), is reviewed. The most important radioactive source in the continental crust is due to the production and accumulation of radioactive gases within the crust voids (porosity). The study of such mechanism has allowed us to reach a deeper understanding about the nature of the radioactive source and to describe its behavior, particularly with regard to prebiotic chemical evolution. An effective total energy of 3 x 10(18) Ja-1 has been obtained for a depth of 1 km, 4 Ga ago. If a depth of 30 km is taken, the obtained value is almost equal to the UV solar energy radiation (lambda < 150 nm). Within the voids the radioactive source of the continental crust played a relevant role in prebiotic synthesis. In uranium deposits of the same age, the role of radioactivity must have been even more relevant in favoring chemical evolution. PMID:11296523

  13. Environmental Radioactivity, Temperature, and Precipitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riland, Carson A.

    1996-01-01

    Reports that environmental radioactivity levels vary with temperature and precipitation and these effects are due to radon. Discusses the measurement of this environmental radioactivity and the theory behind it. (JRH)

  14. Distribution of chemical elements in soils and stream sediments in the area of abandoned Sb-As-Tl Allchar mine, Republic of Macedonia.

    PubMed

    Bačeva, Katerina; Stafilov, Trajče; Šajn, Robert; Tănăselia, Claudiu; Makreski, Petre

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the distribution of some toxic elements in topsoil and subsoil, focusing on the identification of natural and anthropogenic element sources in the small region of rare As-Sb-Tl mineralization outcrop and abandoned mine Allchar known for the highest natural concentration of Tl in soil worldwide. The samples of soil and sediments after total digestion were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Factor analysis (FA) was used to identify and characterize element associations. Six associations of elements were determined by the method of multivariate statistics: Rb-Ta-K-Nb-Ga-Sn-Ba-Bi-Li-Be-(La-Eu)-Hf-Zr-Zn-In-Pd-Ag-Pt-Mg; Tl-As-Sb-Hg; Te-S-Ag-Pt-Al-Sc-(Gd-Lu)-Y; Fe-Cu-V-Ge-Co-In; Pd-Zr-Hf-W-Be and Ni-Mn-Co-Cr-Mg. The purpose of the assessment was to determine the nature and extent of potential contamination as well as to broadly assess possible impacts to human health and the environment. The results from the analysis of the collected samples in the vicinity of the mine revealed that As and Tl elements have the highest median values. Higher median values for Sb are obviously as a result of the past mining activities and as a result of area surface phenomena in the past. PMID:24906071

  15. Distribution of chemical elements in soils and stream sediments in the area of abandoned Sb-As-Tl Allchar mine, Republic of Macedonia.

    PubMed

    Bačeva, Katerina; Stafilov, Trajče; Šajn, Robert; Tănăselia, Claudiu; Makreski, Petre

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the distribution of some toxic elements in topsoil and subsoil, focusing on the identification of natural and anthropogenic element sources in the small region of rare As-Sb-Tl mineralization outcrop and abandoned mine Allchar known for the highest natural concentration of Tl in soil worldwide. The samples of soil and sediments after total digestion were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Factor analysis (FA) was used to identify and characterize element associations. Six associations of elements were determined by the method of multivariate statistics: Rb-Ta-K-Nb-Ga-Sn-Ba-Bi-Li-Be-(La-Eu)-Hf-Zr-Zn-In-Pd-Ag-Pt-Mg; Tl-As-Sb-Hg; Te-S-Ag-Pt-Al-Sc-(Gd-Lu)-Y; Fe-Cu-V-Ge-Co-In; Pd-Zr-Hf-W-Be and Ni-Mn-Co-Cr-Mg. The purpose of the assessment was to determine the nature and extent of potential contamination as well as to broadly assess possible impacts to human health and the environment. The results from the analysis of the collected samples in the vicinity of the mine revealed that As and Tl elements have the highest median values. Higher median values for Sb are obviously as a result of the past mining activities and as a result of area surface phenomena in the past.

  16. Method for calcining radioactive wastes

    DOEpatents

    Bjorklund, William J.; McElroy, Jack L.; Mendel, John E.

    1979-01-01

    This invention relates to a method for the preparation of radioactive wastes in a low leachability form by calcining the radioactive waste on a fluidized bed of glass frit, removing the calcined waste to melter to form a homogeneous melt of the glass and the calcined waste, and then solidifying the melt to encapsulate the radioactive calcine in a glass matrix.

  17. Radioactive nanoparticles and their main applications: recent advances.

    PubMed

    Kharisov, Boris I; Kharissova, Oxana V; Berdonosov, Sergei S

    2014-01-01

    Selected nanoparticles and nanocomposites on the basis of radioactive elements are reviewed. Isotopes of metallic gold, iodine and technetium salts, CeO2 and other lanthanide and actinide compounds, as well as several p- (P, C, F, Te) and d- (Fe, Co, Cu, Cd, Zn) elements form most common radioactive nanoparticles. Methods for their fabrication, including dopation with radionuclides and neutron/proton/deuteron activation, are discussed. These nanocomposites possess a series of useful applications, in particular in biology and medicine, including cancer therapeutics, drug delivery systems and radiotracers, as well as in the studies of several catalytic processes and materials structure.

  18. Distribution of chemical elements in soils and stream sediments in the area of abandoned Sb–As–Tl Allchar mine, Republic of Macedonia

    SciTech Connect

    Bačeva, Katerina; Stafilov, Trajče; Šajn, Robert; Tănăselia, Claudiu; Makreski, Petre

    2014-08-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the distribution of some toxic elements in topsoil and subsoil, focusing on the identification of natural and anthropogenic element sources in the small region of rare As–Sb–Tl mineralization outcrop and abandoned mine Allchar known for the highest natural concentration of Tl in soil worldwide. The samples of soil and sediments after total digestion were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma–mass spectrometry (ICP–MS) and inductively coupled plasma–atomic emission spectrometry (ICP–AES). Factor analysis (FA) was used to identify and characterize element associations. Six associations of elements were determined by the method of multivariate statistics: Rb–Ta–K–Nb–Ga–Sn–Ba–Bi–Li–Be–(La–Eu)–Hf–Zr–Zn–In–Pd–Ag–Pt–Mg; Tl–As–Sb–Hg; Te–S–Ag–Pt–Al–Sc–(Gd–Lu)–Y; Fe–Cu–V–Ge–Co–In; Pd–Zr–Hf–W–Be and Ni–Mn–Co–Cr–Mg. The purpose of the assessment was to determine the nature and extent of potential contamination as well as to broadly assess possible impacts to human health and the environment. The results from the analysis of the collected samples in the vicinity of the mine revealed that As and Tl elements have the highest median values. Higher median values for Sb are obviously as a result of the past mining activities and as a result of area surface phenomena in the past. - Highlights: • Soil and river sediments were analyzed from Sb–As–Tl Allchar locality. • An increased content of certain toxic elements for environment was determined. • Highest As and Tl contents are obtained in the close vicinity of Allchar mine. • River sediments portray 160 times higher content of Sb than EU values. • The results classify Allchar as probably the highest natural Tl-deposit worldwide.

  19. The size distribution of chemical elements of atmospheric aerosol at a semi-rural coastal site in Venice (Italy). The role of atmospheric circulation.

    PubMed

    Masiol, Mauro; Squizzato, Stefania; Ceccato, Daniele; Pavoni, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    The concentrations of selected elemental tracers were determined in the aerosol of a semi-rural coastal site near Venice (Italy). Size-segregated aerosol samples were collected using an 8-stage cascade impactor set at 15m above ground, during the cold season (late autumn and winter), when high levels of many pollutants are known to cause risks for human health. From the experimental data, information was extracted on potential pollutant sources by investigating the relationships between elements in the different size fractions. Moreover, an approach to highlight the importance of local atmospheric circulation and air mass origin in influencing the PM composition and fractional distribution is proposed. Anthropogenic elements are strongly inter-correlated in the submicrometric (<1 μm) (S, K, Mn, Cu, Fe and Zn) and intermediate mode (1-4 μm) (Mn, Cu, Zn, Ni) and their relationships highlight the presence of several sources (combustions, secondary aerosol, road traffic). In the intermediate mode, associations having geochemical significance exist between marine (Na, Cl and Mg) and crustal (Si, Mg, Ca, Al, Ti and K) elements. In the coarse mode (>4 μm) Fe and Zn are well correlated and are probably linked to tire and brake wear emissions. Regarding atmospheric circulation, results show increasing levels of elements related to pollution sources (S, K, Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn) when air masses come from Central and Eastern Europe direction and on the ground wind blows from NWN-N-NE (from mainland Venice). Low wind speed and high percentage of wind calm hours favor element accumulation in the submicrometric and intermediate modes. Furthermore, strong winds favor the formation of sea-spray and the increase of Si in the coarse mode due to the resuspension of sand fine particles. PMID:25063963

  20. The size distribution of chemical elements of atmospheric aerosol at a semi-rural coastal site in Venice (Italy). The role of atmospheric circulation.

    PubMed

    Masiol, Mauro; Squizzato, Stefania; Ceccato, Daniele; Pavoni, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    The concentrations of selected elemental tracers were determined in the aerosol of a semi-rural coastal site near Venice (Italy). Size-segregated aerosol samples were collected using an 8-stage cascade impactor set at 15m above ground, during the cold season (late autumn and winter), when high levels of many pollutants are known to cause risks for human health. From the experimental data, information was extracted on potential pollutant sources by investigating the relationships between elements in the different size fractions. Moreover, an approach to highlight the importance of local atmospheric circulation and air mass origin in influencing the PM composition and fractional distribution is proposed. Anthropogenic elements are strongly inter-correlated in the submicrometric (<1 μm) (S, K, Mn, Cu, Fe and Zn) and intermediate mode (1-4 μm) (Mn, Cu, Zn, Ni) and their relationships highlight the presence of several sources (combustions, secondary aerosol, road traffic). In the intermediate mode, associations having geochemical significance exist between marine (Na, Cl and Mg) and crustal (Si, Mg, Ca, Al, Ti and K) elements. In the coarse mode (>4 μm) Fe and Zn are well correlated and are probably linked to tire and brake wear emissions. Regarding atmospheric circulation, results show increasing levels of elements related to pollution sources (S, K, Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn) when air masses come from Central and Eastern Europe direction and on the ground wind blows from NWN-N-NE (from mainland Venice). Low wind speed and high percentage of wind calm hours favor element accumulation in the submicrometric and intermediate modes. Furthermore, strong winds favor the formation of sea-spray and the increase of Si in the coarse mode due to the resuspension of sand fine particles.

  1. Chemical Mahjong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cossairt, Travis J.; Grubbs, W. Tandy

    2011-01-01

    An open-access, Web-based mnemonic game is described whereby introductory chemistry knowledge is tested using mahjong solitaire game play. Several tile sets and board layouts are included that are themed upon different chemical topics. Introductory tile sets can be selected that prompt the player to match element names to symbols and metric…

  2. Hydrologic characterization of the Fry Canyon, Utah site prior to field demonstration of reactive chemical barriers to control radionuclide and trace-element contamination in ground water

    SciTech Connect

    Naftz, D.L.; Freethey, G.W.; Davis, J.A.

    1997-12-31

    The Fry Canyon Site in southeastern Utah has been selected as a long term demonstration site to assess the performance of selected reaction barrier technologies for the removal of uranium and other trace elements from ground water. Objectives include site characterization and evaluation of barrier technologies.

  3. Nuclear astrophysics with radioactive ions at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reifarth, R.; Altstadt, S.; Göbel, K.; Heftrich, T.; Heil, M.; Koloczek, A.; Langer, C.; Plag, R.; Pohl, M.; Sonnabend, K.; Weigand, M.; Adachi, T.; Aksouh, F.; Al-Khalili, J.; AlGarawi, M.; AlGhamdi, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alkhomashi, N.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Alvarez-Rodriguez, R.; Andreev, V.; Andrei, B.; Atar, L.; Aumann, T.; Avdeichikov, V.; Bacri, C.; Bagchi, S.; Barbieri, C.; Beceiro, S.; Beck, C.; Beinrucker, C.; Belier, G.; Bemmerer, D.; Bendel, M.; Benlliure, J.; Benzoni, G.; Berjillos, R.; Bertini, D.; Bertulani, C.; Bishop, S.; Blasi, N.; Bloch, T.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Bonaccorso, A.; Boretzky, K.; Botvina, A.; Boudard, A.; Boutachkov, P.; Boztosun, I.; Bracco, A.; Brambilla, S.; Briz Monago, J.; Caamano, M.; Caesar, C.; Camera, F.; Casarejos, E.; Catford, W.; Cederkall, J.; Cederwall, B.; Chartier, M.; Chatillon, A.; Cherciu, M.; Chulkov, L.; Coleman-Smith, P.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Crespi, F.; Crespo, R.; Cresswell, J.; Csatlós, M.; Déchery, F.; Davids, B.; Davinson, T.; Derya, V.; Detistov, P.; Diaz Fernandez, P.; DiJulio, D.; Dmitry, S.; Doré, D.; Dueñas, J.; Dupont, E.; Egelhof, P.; Egorova, I.; Elekes, Z.; Enders, J.; Endres, J.; Ershov, S.; Ershova, O.; Fernandez-Dominguez, B.; Fetisov, A.; Fiori, E.; Fomichev, A.; Fonseca, M.; Fraile, L.; Freer, M.; Friese, J.; Borge, M. G.; Galaviz Redondo, D.; Gannon, S.; Garg, U.; Gasparic, I.; Gasques, L.; Gastineau, B.; Geissel, H.; Gernhäuser, R.; Ghosh, T.; Gilbert, M.; Glorius, J.; Golubev, P.; Gorshkov, A.; Gourishetty, A.; Grigorenko, L.; Gulyas, J.; Haiduc, M.; Hammache, F.; Harakeh, M.; Hass, M.; Heine, M.; Hennig, A.; Henriques, A.; Herzberg, R.; Holl, M.; Ignatov, A.; Ignatyuk, A.; Ilieva, S.; Ivanov, M.; Iwasa, N.; Jakobsson, B.; Johansson, H.; Jonson, B.; Joshi, P.; Junghans, A.; Jurado, B.; Körner, G.; Kalantar, N.; Kanungo, R.; Kelic-Heil, A.; Kezzar, K.; Khan, E.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kiselev, O.; Kogimtzis, M.; Körper, D.; Kräckmann, S.; Kröll, T.; Krücken, R.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Kratz, J.; Kresan, D.; Krings, T.; Krumbholz, A.; Krupko, S.; Kulessa, R.; Kumar, S.; Kurz, N.; Kuzmin, E.; Labiche, M.; Langanke, K.; Lazarus, I.; Le Bleis, T.; Lederer, C.; Lemasson, A.; Lemmon, R.; Liberati, V.; Litvinov, Y.; Löher, B.; Lopez Herraiz, J.; Münzenberg, G.; Machado, J.; Maev, E.; Mahata, K.; Mancusi, D.; Marganiec, J.; Martinez Perez, M.; Marusov, V.; Mengoni, D.; Million, B.; Morcelle, V.; Moreno, O.; Movsesyan, A.; Nacher, E.; Najafi, M.; Nakamura, T.; Naqvi, F.; Nikolski, E.; Nilsson, T.; Nociforo, C.; Nolan, P.; Novatsky, B.; Nyman, G.; Ornelas, A.; Palit, R.; Pandit, S.; Panin, V.; Paradela, C.; Parkar, V.; Paschalis, S.; Pawłowski, P.; Perea, A.; Pereira, J.; Petrache, C.; Petri, M.; Pickstone, S.; Pietralla, N.; Pietri, S.; Pivovarov, Y.; Potlog, P.; Prokofiev, A.; Rastrepina, G.; Rauscher, T.; Ribeiro, G.; Ricciardi, M.; Richter, A.; Rigollet, C.; Riisager, K.; Rios, A.; Ritter, C.; Rodriguez Frutos, T.; Rodriguez Vignote, J.; Röder, M.; Romig, C.; Rossi, D.; Roussel-Chomaz, P.; Rout, P.; Roy, S.; Söderström, P.; Saha Sarkar, M.; Sakuta, S.; Salsac, M.; Sampson, J.; Sanchez, J.; Rio Saez, del; Sanchez Rosado, J.; Sanjari, S.; Sarriguren, P.; Sauerwein, A.; Savran, D.; Scheidenberger, C.; Scheit, H.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, C.; Schnorrenberger, L.; Schrock, P.; Schwengner, R.; Seddon, D.; Sherrill, B.; Shrivastava, A.; Sidorchuk, S.; Silva, J.; Simon, H.; Simpson, E.; Singh, P.; Slobodan, D.; Sohler, D.; Spieker, M.; Stach, D.; Stan, E.; Stanoiu, M.; Stepantsov, S.; Stevenson, P.; Strieder, F.; Stuhl, L.; Suda, T.; Sümmerer, K.; Streicher, B.; Taieb, J.; Takechi, M.; Tanihata, I.; Taylor, J.; Tengblad, O.; Ter-Akopian, G.; Terashima, S.; Teubig, P.; Thies, R.; Thoennessen, M.; Thomas, T.; Thornhill, J.; Thungstrom, G.; Timar, J.; Togano, Y.; Tomohiro, U.; Tornyi, T.; Tostevin, J.; Townsley, C.; Trautmann, W.; Trivedi, T.; Typel, S.; Uberseder, E.; Udias, J.; Uesaka, T.; Uvarov, L.; Vajta, Z.; Velho, P.; Vikhrov, V.; Volknandt, M.; Volkov, V.; von Neumann-Cosel, P.; von Schmid, M.; Wagner, A.; Wamers, F.; Weick, H.; Wells, D.; Westerberg, L.; Wieland, O.; Wiescher, M.; Wimmer, C.; Wimmer, K.; Winfield, J. S.; Winkel, M.; Woods, P.; Wyss, R.; Yakorev, D.; Yavor, M.; Zamora Cardona, J.; Zartova, I.; Zerguerras, T.; Zgura, M.; Zhdanov, A.; Zhukov, M.; Zieblinski, M.; Zilges, A.; Zuber, K.

    2016-01-01

    The nucleosynthesis of elements beyond iron is dominated by neutron captures in the s and r processes. However, 32 stable, proton-rich isotopes cannot be formed during those processes, because they are shielded from the s-process flow and r-process, β-decay chains. These nuclei are attributed to the p and rp process. For all those processes, current research in nuclear astrophysics addresses the need for more precise reaction data involving radioactive isotopes. Depending on the particular reaction, direct or inverse kinematics, forward or time-reversed direction are investigated to determine or at least to constrain the desired reaction cross sections. The Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) will offer unique, unprecedented opportunities to investigate many of the important reactions. The high yield of radioactive isotopes, even far away from the valley of stability, allows the investigation of isotopes involved in processes as exotic as the r or rp processes.

  4. Radioactivity of the moon, planets, and meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surkou, Y. A.; Fedoseyev, G. A.

    1977-01-01

    Analytical data is summarized for the content of natural radioactive elements in meteorites, eruptive terrestrial rocks, and also in lunar samples returned by Apollo missions and the Luna series of automatic stations. The K-U systematics of samples analyzed in the laboratory are combined with data for orbital gamma-ray measurements for Mars (Mars 5) and with the results of direct gamma-ray measurements of the surface of Venus by the Venera 8 lander. Using information about the radioactivity of solar system bodies and evaluations of the content of K, U, and Th in the terrestrial planets, we examine certain aspects of the evolution of material in the protoplanetary gas-dust cloud and then in the planets of the solar system.

  5. Biochemical process of low level radioactive liquid simulation waste containing detergent

    SciTech Connect

    Kundari, Noor Anis Putra, Sugili; Mukaromah, Umi

    2015-12-29

    Research of biochemical process of low level radioactive liquid waste containing detergent has been done. Thse organic liquid wastes are generated in nuclear facilities such as from laundry. The wastes that are cotegorized as hazard and poison materials are also radioactive. It must be treated properly by detoxification of the hazard and decontamination of the radionuclides to ensure that the disposal of the waste meets the requirement of standard quality of water. This research was intended to determine decontamination factor and separation efficiensies, its kinetics law, and to produce a supernatant that ensured the environmental quality standard. The radioactive element in the waste was thorium with activity of 5.10{sup −5} Ci/m{sup 3}. The radioactive liquid waste which were generated in simulation plant contains detergents that was further processed by aerobic biochemical process using SGB 103 bacteria in a batch reactor equipped with aerators. Two different concentration of samples were processed and analyzed for 212 hours and 183 hours respectively at a room temperature. The product of this process is a liquid phase called as supernatant and solid phase material called sludge. The chemical oxygen demand (COD), biological oxygen demand (BOD), suspended solid (SS), and its alpha activity were analyzed. The results show that the decontamination factor and the separation efficiency of the lower concentration samples are higher compared to the samples with high concentration. Regarding the decontamination factor, the result for 212 hours processing of waste with detergent concentration of 1.496 g/L was 3.496 times, whereas at the detergent concentration of 0.748 g/L was 15.305 times for 183 hours processing. In case of the separation efficiency, the results for both samples were 71.396% and 93.465% respectively. The Bacterial growth kinetics equation follow Monod’s model and the decreasing of COD and BOD were first order with the rate constant of 0

  6. Biochemical process of low level radioactive liquid simulation waste containing detergent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundari, Noor Anis; Putra, Sugili; Mukaromah, Umi

    2015-12-01

    Research of biochemical process of low level radioactive liquid waste containing detergent has been done. Thse organic liquid wastes are generated in nuclear facilities such as from laundry. The wastes that are cotegorized as hazard and poison materials are also radioactive. It must be treated properly by detoxification of the hazard and decontamination of the radionuclides to ensure that the disposal of the waste meets the requirement of standard quality of water. This research was intended to determine decontamination factor and separation efficiensies, its kinetics law, and to produce a supernatant that ensured the environmental quality standard. The radioactive element in the waste was thorium with activity of 5.10-5 Ci/m3. The radioactive liquid waste which were generated in simulation plant contains detergents that was further processed by aerobic biochemical process using SGB 103 bacteria in a batch reactor equipped with aerators. Two different concentration of samples were processed and analyzed for 212 hours and 183 hours respectively at a room temperature. The product of this process is a liquid phase called as supernatant and solid phase material called sludge. The chemical oxygen demand (COD), biological oxygen demand (BOD), suspended solid (SS), and its alpha activity were analyzed. The results show that the decontamination factor and the separation efficiency of the lower concentration samples are higher compared to the samples with high concentration. Regarding the decontamination factor, the result for 212 hours processing of waste with detergent concentration of 1.496 g/L was 3.496 times, whereas at the detergent concentration of 0.748 g/L was 15.305 times for 183 hours processing. In case of the separation efficiency, the results for both samples were 71.396% and 93.465% respectively. The Bacterial growth kinetics equation follow Monod's model and the decreasing of COD and BOD were first order with the rate constant of 0.01 hour-1.

  7. Passive degassing at Nyiragongo (D.R. Congo) and Etna (Italy) volcanoes: the chemical characterization of the emissions and assessment of their uptake of trace elements emissions on the local environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabrese, Sergio; Scaglione, Sarah; Milazzo, Silvia; D'Alessandro, Walter; Bobrowski, Nicole; Giuffrida, Giovanni; Tedesco, Dario; Parello, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    Volcanoes are well known as an impressive large natural source of trace elements into the troposphere. Among others, Etna (Italy) and Nyiragongo (D.R. Congo), two noteworthy emitters on Earth, are two stratovolcanoes located in different geological settings, both characterized by persistent passive degassing from their summit craters. Here, we present some results on trace element composition in volcanic plume emissions, atmospheric bulk deposition (rainwater) and their uptake of the surrounding vegetation, with the aim to compare and identify differences and similarities between this these two volcanoes. Volcanic emissions were sampled by using active filter-pack for acid gases (sulfur and halogens) and specific teflon filters for particulates (major and trace elements). The impact of the volcanogenic deposition in the surrounding of the crater rims was investigated by using different sampling techniques: bulk rain collectors gauges were used to collect atmospheric bulk deposition, and biomonitoring technique was carried out to collect gases and particulates by using endemic plant species. Concentrations of major and trace elements of volcanic plume emissions (gases and particulates) were obtained by elution and microwave digestion of the collected filters: sulfur and halogens were determined by ion chromatography and ICP-MS, and untreated filters for particulate were acid digested and analysed by ICP-OES and ICP-MS. Rain water and plant samples were also analysed for major and trace elements by using ICP-OES and ICP-MS. In total 55 elements were determined. The estimates of the trace element fluxes confirm that Etna and Nyiragongo are large sources of metals to the atmosphere, especially considering their persistent state of passive degassing. In general, chemical composition of the volcanic aerosol particles of both volcanoes is characterized by two main components: one is related to the silicic component produced by magma bursting and fragmentation, enriching

  8. Use of unabsorbed radioactive marker substances in a re-assessment of the radioactive triolein test of fat absorption

    PubMed Central

    Ditchburn, R. K.; Smith, A. H.; Hayter, C. J.

    1971-01-01

    The radioactive triolein test has been compared with two chemical methods for the assessment of fat absorption in a group of inpatients from general medical wards. The special feature of the investigation is the use of a radioactive faecal marker to measure the completeness of faecal collections during the investigation period. Estimations of unabsorbed 131I triolein and faecal fat measured by the chemical methods were made on the same specimens. The results showed that only 48% of the patients provided a complete collection of faeces (defined as a recovery of more than 90% of the faecal marker). From these patients good correlations were found between the triolein absorption test and the two chemical methods. It is suggested that previous criticism of the radioactive triolein test may have been due to incomplete faecal collections causing false results. PMID:5094681

  9. Sources of radioactive ions

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.R.

    1985-05-01

    Beams of unstable nuclei can be formed by direct injection of the radioactive atoms into an ion source, or by using the momentum of the primary production beam as the basis for the secondary beam. The effectiveness of this latter mechanism in secondary beam formation, i.e., the quality of the emerging beam (emittance, intensity, energy spread), depends critically on the nuclear reaction kinematics, and on the magnitude of the incident beam energy. When this beam energy significantly exceeds the energies typical of the nuclear reaction process, many of the qualities of the incident beam can be passed on to the secondary beam. Factors affecting secondary beam quality are discussed, along with techniques for isolating and purifying a specific secondary product. The ongoing radioactive beam program at the Bevalac is used as an example, with applications, present performance and plans for improvements.

  10. Synthesis of transactinide nuclei in cold fusion reactions using radioactive beams

    SciTech Connect

    Smolanczuk, Robert

    2010-06-15

    Chances of synthesis of transactinide nuclei in cold fusion reactions (one-neutron-out reactions) using radioactive beams are evaluated. Because in most of the cases intensities of radioactive beams are significantly less than those of the stable beams, reactions with the greatest radioactive-beam intensities for the particular elements are considered. The results are compared with the recent ones obtained by Loveland [Phys. Rev. C 76, 014612 (2007)], who investigated the same nuclei.

  11. PROCESSING OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, B.M. Jr.; Barton, G.B.

    1961-11-14

    A process for treating radioactive waste solutions prior to disposal is described. A water-soluble phosphate, borate, and/or silicate is added. The solution is sprayed with steam into a space heated from 325 to 400 deg C whereby a powder is formed. The powder is melted and calcined at from 800 to 1000 deg C. Water vapor and gaseous products are separated from the glass formed. (AEC)

  12. Radioactive waste storage issues

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, D.E.

    1994-08-15

    In the United States we generate greater than 500 million tons of toxic waste per year which pose a threat to human health and the environment. Some of the most toxic of these wastes are those that are radioactively contaminated. This thesis explores the need for permanent disposal facilities to isolate radioactive waste materials that are being stored temporarily, and therefore potentially unsafely, at generating facilities. Because of current controversies involving the interstate transfer of toxic waste, more states are restricting the flow of wastes into - their borders with the resultant outcome of requiring the management (storage and disposal) of wastes generated solely within a state`s boundary to remain there. The purpose of this project is to study nuclear waste storage issues and public perceptions of this important matter. Temporary storage at generating facilities is a cause for safety concerns and underscores, the need for the opening of permanent disposal sites. Political controversies and public concern are forcing states to look within their own borders to find solutions to this difficult problem. Permanent disposal or retrievable storage for radioactive waste may become a necessity in the near future in Colorado. Suitable areas that could support - a nuclear storage/disposal site need to be explored to make certain the health, safety and environment of our citizens now, and that of future generations, will be protected.

  13. Radioactive deposits of Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovering, T.G.

    1953-01-01

    Thirty-five occurrences of radioactive rocks had been reported from Nevada prior to 1952. Twenty-five of these had been investigated by the U. S. Geological Survey and the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission. Of those investigated, uranium minerals were identified in 13; two contained a thorium mineral (monazite); the source of radioactivity on 7 properties was not ascertained; and one showed no abnormal radioactivity. Of the other reported occurrences, one is said to contain uraniferous hydrocarbons and 9 are placers containing thorian monazite. Pitchblende occurs at two localities; the East Walker River area, and the Stalin's Present prospect, where it is sparsely disseminated in tabular bodies cutting granitic rocks. Other uranium minerals found in the state include: carnotite, tyuyamunite, autunite, torbernite, gummite, uranophane, kasolite, and an unidentified mineral which may be dumontit. Monazite is the only thorium mineral of possible economic importance that has been reported. From an economic standpoint 9 only 4 of the properties examined showed reserves of uranium ore in 1952; these are: the Green Monster mine, which shipped 5 tons of ore to Marysvale, Utah, during 1951, the Majuba Hill mine, the Stalin's Present prospect, and the West Willys claim in the Washington district. Reserves of ore grade are small on all of these properties and probably cannot be developed commercially unless an ore-buying station is set up nearby. No estimate has been made of thorium reserves and no commercial deposits of thorium are known.

  14. Radioactive deposits of Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovering, T.G.

    1954-01-01

    Thirty-five occurrences of radioactive rocks had been reported from Nevada prior to 1952. Twenty-five of these had been investigated by personnel of the U. S. Geological Surveyor of the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission. Of those investigated, uranium minerals were identified at 13 sites; two sites contained a thorium mineral (monazite); the source of radioactivity on nine properties was not ascertained, and one showed no abnormal radioactivity. Of the other reported occurrences, one is said to contain uraniferous hydrocarbons and nine are placers containing thorian monazite. Pitchblende occurs at two localities, the East Walker River area, and the Stalin's Present prospect, where it is sparsely disseminated in tabular bodies cutting granitic rocks. Other uranium minerals found in the state include: carnotite, tyuyamunite, autunite, torbernite, gummite, uranophane, kasolite, and an unidentified mineral which may be dumontite. Monazite is the only thorium mineral of possible economic importance that has been reported. From an economic standpoint, only four of the properties examined showed reserves of uranium ore in 1952; these are: the Green Monster mine, which shipped 5 tons of ore to Marysvale, Utah, during 1951; the Majuba Hill mine; the Stalin's Present prospect; and the West Willys claim in the Washington district. No estimate has been made of thorium reserves and no commercial deposits of thorium are known.

  15. Controlled Containment, Radioactive Waste Management in the Netherlands

    SciTech Connect

    Codee, H.

    2002-02-26

    All radioactive waste produced in The Netherlands is managed by COVRA, the central organization for radioactive waste. The Netherlands forms a good example of a country with a small nuclear power program which will end in the near future. However, radioisotope production, nuclear research and other industrial activities will continue to produce radioactive waste. For the small volume, but broad spectrum of radioactive waste, including TENORM, The Netherlands has developed a management system based on the principles to isolate, to control and to monitor the waste. Long term storage is an essential element of the management system and forms a necessary step in the strategy of controlled containment that will ultimately result in final removal of the waste. Since the waste will remain retrievable for long time new technologies and new disposal options can be applied when available and feasible.

  16. Study of the chemical elements and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in atmospheric particles of PM 10 and PM 2.5 in the urban and rural areas of South Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallarosa, Juliana; Calesso Teixeira, Elba; Meira, Lindolfo; Wiegand, Flavio

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this work is to study the chemical elements and PAHs associated with atmospheric particulate in samples of PM 10 collected in the Metropolitan Area of Porto Alegre—MAPA, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. In addition, to study the chemical elements associated with particles of different fractions of PM 10-2.5 and PM 2.5 using dichotomous sampling, in urban (MAPA) and rural areas. Two types of samplers were used: HV PM 10 and Dichotomous (PM 10-2.5 and PM 2.5). Samples were collected during 2002 and 2005. The concentration of the elements Si, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, and Zn was determined by PIXE (Particle-Induced X-ray Emission), while the concentrations of 16 major PAHs were determined according to EPA with a gas chromatograph coupled to a mass spectrometer (GS/MS). Results showed that elements of anthropogenic origin (V, Zn, Cr, Ni, Cu, and S) were mainly associated with the fraction PM 2.5, while the soil dust (Si, Al, Ti and Fe) were found mainly on fraction PM 10-2.5. In samples of PM 10, the most frequent PAHs found were Bgp, Flt, BaA, Chr, B(b + k)F, BaP and Dba. The types of emission and their association with the atmospheric parameters were studied applying the statistical analysis of the principal component method. The main sources found in the area under study were vehicles, industries (steel mills and a coal-fired power station), dust, sea breeze, and burning.

  17. Chemical hygiene plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This plan was written to administer and monitor safety measures and chemical hygiene principles in the TAC Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action Project sample preparation facility in Albuquerque, New Mexico. It applies to toxic and/or hazardous materials to radioactive materials.

  18. Monitoring arrangement for vented nuclear fuel elements

    DOEpatents

    Campana, Robert J.

    1981-01-01

    In a nuclear fuel reactor core, fuel elements are arranged in a closely packed hexagonal configuration, each fuel element having diametrically opposed vents permitting 180.degree. rotation of the fuel elements to counteract bowing. A grid plate engages the fuel elements and forms passages for communicating sets of three, four or six individual vents with respective monitor lines in order to communicate vented radioactive gases from the fuel elements to suitable monitor means in a manner readily permitting detection of leakage in individual fuel elements.

  19. Chemical studies of L chondrites. V: compositional patterns for 49 trace elements in 14 L4-6 and 7 LL4-6 falls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, Jon M.; Wang, Ming-Sheng; Lipschutz, Michael E.

    2003-07-01

    To study compositional trends associated with open-system thermal metamorphism and shock-induced collisional breakup of L4-6 chondrite parent(s), we used inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and radiochemical neutron activation analysis to determine 49 trace elements in 62 falls. Trends for the 49 elements, especially of the 14 rare earth elements in 5 members of a putative L/LL group (Bjurböle, Cynthiana, Holbrook, Knyahinya, Sultanpur) and 9 additional L chondrites (Aïr, Aumieres, Bachmut, Forksville, Kandahar, Kiel, Milean, Narellan, Santa Isabel) differed markedly from those in the remaining normal 46 samples. Here, we report the data for the 14 L and putative L/LL chondrites and 7 LL (Appley Bridge, Athens, Bandong, Ensisheim, Mangwendi, Olivenza, Soko-Banja), analyzed to test the affinity of the putative L/LL suite to well-characterized LL chondrites. Compositional trends of the 14 atypical L chondrites (including Aïr's unique and possibly contaminated signature) and Mangwendi, an LL6 chondrite, indicate that each is compositionally unrepresentative of well-sampled, whole-rock chondrites. Indeed, half of the unrepresentative chondrites were ≤ 2-g samples. Compositionally, members of the putative L/LL chondrites demonstrate no affinities to normal LL chondrite falls. To establish compositional trends accompanying open-system, thermal episodes involving the L chondrite parent(s), we should ignore data for the 14 unrepresentative L chondrites reported here.

  20. Influence of chemical and mineralogical properties of organic amendments on the selection of an adequate analytical procedure for trace elements determination.

    PubMed

    García-Delgado, C; Cala, V; Eymar, E

    2012-01-15

    Six digestion procedures were tested to improve extraction methods for determination of trace elements in various organic amendments with high inorganic fractions. These procedures were tested in terms of pH, CaCO(3), organic matter, elemental analysis, BCR sequential extraction and X-ray diffraction analysis. Aqua regia extraction (ISO 11466), total digestion HF-HNO(3)-HClO(4) and four microwave-assisted digestions (i.e., HNO(3), HCl-HNO(3), HNO(3)-HF and HCl-HNO(3)-HF) were used. The effect of acid mixtures on microwave-assisted digestion of mineral fractions was assessed by Si and Al analysis and X-ray diffraction in the solid residues obtained. Microwave HF acid mixtures obtained highest trace element recoveries for all tested metals except Al. CaF(2) and CaAlF(5) precipitates were also detected using X-ray diffraction in the residues after microwave digestions with HF acid mixtures of amendments with high calcium content. A decision flowchart was suggested to determine the best acid mixture according to the amendment and the metals to be analyzed.