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Sample records for radiocarbon 14c determination

  1. A low cost optical radiocarbon (14C) sensor for greenhouse gas source attribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, D.; Fleisher, A. J.; Liu, Q.; Hodges, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    Radiocarbon (14C) provides a convenient means for the attribution of atmospheric greenhouse gases between anthropogenic and biogenic sources. Unfortunately, routine measurements are costly and require extensive sample preparation to meet sensitivity goals only achievable at large accelerator mass spectrometer facilities. We describe an alternate approach in which a laser is used to selectively record the absorption signatures of the 14C isotope of CO2. The designed instrument will allow for bench-top measurements of 14CO2 at and below ambient levels (~1.2 parts-per-trillion). The use of a commercially available mid-infrared quantum cascade laser as the optical source greatly reduces the cost of the instrument over more complicated sources and should allow for routine inline measurements.

  2. Growth rate determinations from radiocarbon in bamboo corals (genus Keratoisis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, Jesse R.; Robinson, Laura F.; Hönisch, Bärbel

    2015-11-01

    Radiocarbon (14C) measurements are an important tool for determining growth rates of bamboo corals, a cosmopolitan group of calcitic deep-sea corals. Published growth rate estimates for bamboo corals are highly variable, with potential environmental or ecological drivers of this variability poorly constrained. Here we systematically investigate the application of 14C for growth rate determinations in bamboo corals using 55 14C dates on the calcite and organic fractions of six bamboo corals (identified as Keratoisis sp.) from the western North Atlantic Ocean. Calcite 14C measurements on the distal surface of these corals and five previously published bamboo corals exhibit a strong one-to-one relationship with the 14C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DI14C) in ambient seawater (r2=0.98), confirming the use of Keratoisis sp. calcite 14C as a proxy for seawater 14C activity. Radial growth rates determined from 14C age-depth regressions, 14C plateau tuning and bomb 14C reference chronologies range from 12 to 78 μm y-1, in general agreement with previously published radiometric growth rates. We document potential biases to 14C growth rate determinations resulting from water mass variability, bomb radiocarbon, secondary infilling (ontogeny), and growth rate nonlinearity. Radial growth rates for Keratoisis sp. specimens do not correlate with ambient temperature, suggesting that additional biological and/or environmental factors may influence bamboo coral growth rates.

  3. Toward Radiocarbon Measurement of Individual Amino Acids in Marine Dissolved Organic Matter (DOM): Δ14C Blank Quantification for an HPLC Purification Method.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bour, A. L.; Broek, T.; Walker, B. D.; Mccarthy, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    The presence of much of the marine dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) pool as uncharacterized, biologically recalcitrant molecules is a central mystery in the marine nitrogen cycle. Radiocarbon14C) isotopic measurements have been perhaps the most important data constraining the cycling of dissolved organic matter (DOM), but little Δ14C data specific to DON is available. Amino acids (AAs) are the major component of DON that can be isolated on a molecular level. Δ14C measurements for the operational "protein-like" fraction of DOM in the deep ocean indicate that this compound class has radiocarbon ages greater than several ocean mixing cycles, suggesting remarkable preservation of labile AAs exported from the surface. However, it is possible that the previously defined operational "protein-like" fraction may also contain non-AA material. Radiocarbon measurement of purified individual AAs would provide a more direct and reliable proxy for DON Δ14C age and cycling rate. We present here Δ14C blank characterization of an AA purification method based on HPLC, with on-line fraction collection. This method allows the recovery of unmodified AAs, but accurate measurement of small AA samples that can be extracted from DOM requires a system with extremely low Δ 14C blanks. Here we assess the impact of HPLC purification on the Δ14C age of known amino acids standards. Individual AA standards with contrasting (modern vs. dead) and well- characterized Δ14C ages were processed in a range of sample sizes. The eluted peaks were collected and dried, and measurement of their post-chromatography Δ14C content allowed for determination of the Δ14C blank by method of additions. The same protocol was applied to a mixture of six AA standards, to evaluate tailing effects in consecutive AA peaks of contrasting Δ14C age. AA standards were selected to include both Δ14C modern and dead AAs that elute both early and late in the chromatographic solvent program. We discuss implications

  4. Radiocarbon ( 14C) measurements to quantify sources of atmospheric carbon monoxide in urban air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klouda, George A.; Connolly, Michael V.

    Atmospheric air samples were collected during the winter of 1989-1990 in Albuquerque, NM, U.S.A., for radiocarbon ( 14C) analysis of carbon monoxide (CO). An experimental sample design was prepared to target periods when the concentration of CO exceeds the 9 μl l-1 (volume fraction), 8 h National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) and during periods of attainment. Sampling sites, time of day, sampling duration, and meteorology were carefully considered so that source impacts be optimal. A balanced sampling factorial design was used to yield maximum information from the constraints imposed; the number of samples was limited by the number of sample canisters available, time and resources. Radiocarbon measurements of urban CO, " clean-air" CO background from Niwot Ridge, Colorado, average (wood) logs and oxygenated-gasolines were used in a three-source model to calculate the contribution of wood burning to the total atmospheric CO burden in Albuquerque. Results show that the estimated fractional contribution of residential wood combustion (Θ' Rwc) ranged from 0 to 0.30 of CO concentrations corrected for " clean-air" background. For these same samples, the respective CO concentrations attributed to wood burning range from 0 to 0.90 μmol mol -1 (mole fraction), well below the NAAQS. In all cases, fossil CO is the predominant source of ambient CO concentrations ranging from 0.96 to 6.34 μmol mol -1 A final comment is made on the potential of fossil CO measurements as an indirect tracer of atmospheric benzene, relevant to exposure risk estimates of motor vehicle emissions and occupational health and safety standards.

  5. 14C determination in different bio-based products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos Arévalo, Francisco-Javier; Gómez Martínez, Isabel; Agulló García, Lidia; Reina Maldonado, María-Teresa; García León, Manuel

    2015-10-01

    Radiocarbon determination can be used as a tool to investigate the presence of biological elements in different bio-based products, such as biodiesel blends. These products may also be produced from fossil materials obtaining the same final molecules, so that composition is chemically indistinguishable. The amount of radiocarbon in these products can reveal how much of these biological elements have been used, usually mixed with petrol derived components, free of 14C. Some of these products are liquid and thus the handling at the laboratory is not as straightforward as with solid samples. At Centro Nacional de Aceleradores (CNA) we have tested the viability of these samples using a graphitization system coupled to an elemental analyzer used for combustion of the samples, thus avoiding any vacuum process. Samples do not follow any chemical pre-treatment procedure and are directly graphitized. Specific equipment for liquid samples related to the elemental analyzer was tested. Measurement of samples was performed by low-energy AMS at the 1 MV HVEE facility at CNA, paying special attention to background limits and reproducibility during sample preparation.

  6. Radiocarbon (14C) diurnal variations in fine particles at sites downwind from Tokyo, Japan in summer.

    PubMed

    Fushimi, Akihiro; Wagai, Rota; Uchida, Masao; Hasegawa, Shuichi; Takahashi, Katsuyuki; Kondo, Miyuki; Hirabayashi, Motohiro; Morino, Yu; Shibata, Yasuyuki; Ohara, Toshimasa; Kobayashi, Shinji; Tanabe, Kiyoshi

    2011-08-15

    The radiocarbon ((14)C) of total carbon (TC) in atmospheric fine particles was measured at 6 h or 12 h intervals at two sites, 50 and 100 km downwind from Tokyo, Japan (Kisai and Maebashi) in summer 2007. The percent modern carbon (pMC) showed clear diurnal variations with minimums in the daytime. The mean pMC values at Maebashi were 28 ± 7 in the daytime and 45 ± 16 at night (37 ± 15 for the overall period). Those at Kisai were 26 ± 9 in the daytime and 44 ± 8 at night (37 ± 12 for the overall period). This data indicates that fossil sources were major contributors to the daytime TC, while fossil and modern sources had comparable contributions to nighttime TC in the suburban areas. At both sites, the concentration of fossil carbon as well as O(3) and the estimated secondary organic carbon increased in the daytime. These results suggest that fossil sources around Tokyo contributed significantly to the high daytime concentration of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) at the two suburban sites. A comparison of pMC and the ratio of elemental carbon/TC from our particulate samples with those from three end-member sources corroborates the dominant role of fossil SOA in the daytime.

  7. Accumulation of Sellafield-derived radiocarbon ((14)C) in Irish Sea and West of Scotland intertidal shells and sediments.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Kieran M; Muir, Graham K P; Cook, Gordon T; MacKinnon, Gillian; Howe, John A; Heymans, Johanna J; Xu, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear energy industry produces radioactive waste at various stages of the fuel cycle. In the United Kingdom, spent fuel is reprocessed at the Sellafield facility in Cumbria on the North West coast of England. Waste generated at the site comprises a wide range of radionuclides including radiocarbon ((14)C) which is disposed of in various forms including highly soluble inorganic carbon within the low level liquid radioactive effluent, via pipelines into the Irish Sea. This (14)C is rapidly incorporated into the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) reservoir and marine calcifying organisms, e.g. molluscs, readily utilise DIC for shell formation. This study investigated a number of sites located in Irish Sea and West of Scotland intertidal zones. Results indicate (14)C enrichment above ambient background levels in shell material at least as far as Port Appin, 265 km north of Sellafield. Of the commonly found species (blue mussel (Mytilus edulis), common cockle (Cerastoderma edule) and common periwinkle (Littorina littorea)), mussels were found to be the most highly enriched in (14)C due to the surface environment they inhabit and their feeding behaviour. Whole mussel shell activities appear to have been decreasing in response to reduced discharge activities since the early 2000s but in contrast, there is evidence of continuing enrichment of the carbonate sediment component due to in-situ shell erosion, as well as indications of particle transport of fine (14)C-enriched material close to Sellafield.

  8. Accumulation of Sellafield-derived radiocarbon ((14)C) in Irish Sea and West of Scotland intertidal shells and sediments.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Kieran M; Muir, Graham K P; Cook, Gordon T; MacKinnon, Gillian; Howe, John A; Heymans, Johanna J; Xu, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear energy industry produces radioactive waste at various stages of the fuel cycle. In the United Kingdom, spent fuel is reprocessed at the Sellafield facility in Cumbria on the North West coast of England. Waste generated at the site comprises a wide range of radionuclides including radiocarbon ((14)C) which is disposed of in various forms including highly soluble inorganic carbon within the low level liquid radioactive effluent, via pipelines into the Irish Sea. This (14)C is rapidly incorporated into the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) reservoir and marine calcifying organisms, e.g. molluscs, readily utilise DIC for shell formation. This study investigated a number of sites located in Irish Sea and West of Scotland intertidal zones. Results indicate (14)C enrichment above ambient background levels in shell material at least as far as Port Appin, 265 km north of Sellafield. Of the commonly found species (blue mussel (Mytilus edulis), common cockle (Cerastoderma edule) and common periwinkle (Littorina littorea)), mussels were found to be the most highly enriched in (14)C due to the surface environment they inhabit and their feeding behaviour. Whole mussel shell activities appear to have been decreasing in response to reduced discharge activities since the early 2000s but in contrast, there is evidence of continuing enrichment of the carbonate sediment component due to in-situ shell erosion, as well as indications of particle transport of fine (14)C-enriched material close to Sellafield. PMID:26555367

  9. Radiocarbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broecker, W. S.

    2003-12-01

    Willard Libby's invention of the radiocarbon dating method revolutionized the fields of archeology and Quaternary geology because it brought into being a means to correlate events that occurred during the past 3.5×104 years on a planet-wide scale (Libby et al., 1949). This contribution was recognized with the award of the Nobel Prize for Chemistry. In addition, radiocarbon measurements have been a boon to the quantification of many processes taking place in the environment, to name a few: the rate of "ventilation" of the deep ocean, the turnover time of humus in soils, the rate of growth of cave deposits, the source of carbon-bearing atmospheric particulates, the rates of gas exchange between the atmosphere and water bodies, the replacement time of carbon atoms in human tissue, and depths of bioturbation in marine sediment. Some of these applications have been greatly aided by the creation of excess 14C atoms as the result of nuclear tests conducted in the atmosphere. Since the 1960s, this so-called bomb radiocarbon has made its way into all of the Earth's active carbon reservoirs. To date, tens of thousands of radiocarbon measurements have been made in laboratories throughout the world.

  10. Year of Birth Determination Using Radiocarbon Dating of Dental Enamel

    SciTech Connect

    Buchholz, B A; Spalding, K L

    2009-03-10

    Radiocarbon dating is typically an archaeological tool rather than a forensic one. Recently however, we have shown that the amount of radiocarbon present in tooth enamel, as a result of nuclear bomb testing during the cold war, is a remarkably accurate indicator of when a person is born. Enamel isolated from human teeth is processed to form graphite and carbon-14 ({sup 14}C) levels are measured using accelerator mass spectrometry. Since there is no turnover of enamel after it is formed, {sup 14}C levels in the enamel represent {sup 14}C levels in the atmosphere at the time of its formation. In this paper we describe the strategy used to determine the date of birth of an individual based on radiocarbon levels in tooth enamel, focusing on the methodology of this strategy. Year of birth information can significantly assist police investigators when the identity of a deceased individual is unknown. In such cases police will try to match particulars of the unidentified individual (which is often only gender and/or an estimate of age), with particulars from missing persons lists.

  11. Year of birth determination using radiocarbon dating of dental enamel.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, B A; Spalding, K L

    2010-05-01

    Radiocarbon dating is typically an archaeological tool rather than a forensic one. Recently however, we have shown that the amount of radiocarbon present in tooth enamel, as a result of nuclear bomb testing during the cold war, is a remarkably accurate indicator of when a person is born. Enamel isolated from human teeth is processed to form graphite and carbon-14 ((14)C) levels are measured using accelerator mass spectrometry. Since there is no turnover of enamel after it is formed, (14)C levels in the enamel represent (14)C levels in the atmosphere at the time of its formation. In this paper we describe the strategy used to determine the date of birth of an individual based on radiocarbon levels in tooth enamel, focusing on the methodology of this strategy. Year of birth information can significantly assist police investigators when the identity of a deceased individual is unknown. In such cases police will try to match particulars of the unidentified individual (which is often only gender and/or an estimate of age), with particulars from missing persons lists.

  12. Year of birth determination using radiocarbon dating of dental enamel.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, B A; Spalding, K L

    2010-05-01

    Radiocarbon dating is typically an archaeological tool rather than a forensic one. Recently however, we have shown that the amount of radiocarbon present in tooth enamel, as a result of nuclear bomb testing during the cold war, is a remarkably accurate indicator of when a person is born. Enamel isolated from human teeth is processed to form graphite and carbon-14 ((14)C) levels are measured using accelerator mass spectrometry. Since there is no turnover of enamel after it is formed, (14)C levels in the enamel represent (14)C levels in the atmosphere at the time of its formation. In this paper we describe the strategy used to determine the date of birth of an individual based on radiocarbon levels in tooth enamel, focusing on the methodology of this strategy. Year of birth information can significantly assist police investigators when the identity of a deceased individual is unknown. In such cases police will try to match particulars of the unidentified individual (which is often only gender and/or an estimate of age), with particulars from missing persons lists. PMID:20976120

  13. Determination of 14C residue in eggs of laying hens administered orally with [14C] sulfaquinoxaline.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, B; Rummel, N; Smith, D

    2004-06-01

    Ten layer hens were dosed for 5 consecutive days with 6.2 mg kg(-1) [14C] sulfaquinoxaline (SQX). Eggs were collected from the hens during the 5-day dosing period and during a 10-day post-dose withdrawal period. Egg yolk and albumen were separated and assayed for total radioactive residues (TRR) using a combustion oxidizer and liquid scintillation counting techniques. Significant amounts of radioactivity were detected on the second day of dosing (greater than 24h after the initial dose) in both egg yolk and albumen. First eggs were collected about 8 h after dosing; the second-day eggs were collected during 8-h period after the second dose. Radioactive residues reached a maximum on the fifth day of dosing in albumen, whereas on the second day of withdrawal in egg yolk, the peak TRR levels in albumen were about threefold higher than in yolk. Thereafter, the TRR levels declined rapidly in albumen and were detectable up to withdrawal day 6, whereas the TRR levels in egg yolk declined more slowly and were detectable up to withdrawal day 10. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis indicated that the parent drug sulfaquinoxaline was the major component in both the egg albumen and yolk. Additionally, this work suggests that egg yolk is the appropriate matrix for monitoring SQX residues PMID:15204532

  14. Accelerator mass spectrometry 14C determination in CO2 produced from laser decomposition of aragonite.

    PubMed

    Rosenheim, Brad E; Thorrold, Simon R; Roberts, Mark L

    2008-11-01

    The determination of (14)C in aragonite (CaCO(3)) decomposed thermally to CO(2) using an yttrium-aluminum-garnet doped neodymium laser is reported. Laser decomposition accelerator mass spectrometry (LD-AMS) measurements reproduce AMS determinations of (14)C from the conventional reaction of aragonite with concentrated phosphoric acid. The lack of significant differences between these sets of measurements indicates that LD-AMS radiocarbon dating can overcome the significant fractionation that has been observed during stable isotope (C and O) laser decomposition analysis of different carbonate minerals. The laser regularly converted nearly 30% of material removed into CO(2) despite it being optimized for ablation, where laser energy breaks material apart rather than chemically altering it. These results illustrate promise for using laser decomposition on the front-end of AMS systems that directly measure CO(2) gas. The feasibility of such measurements depends on (1) the improvement of material removal and/or CO(2) generation efficiency of the laser decomposition system and (2) the ionization efficiency of AMS systems measuring continuously flowing CO(2).

  15. New insights into the radiocarbon calibration based on 14C and U-Th dating of corals drilled offshore Tahiti (IODP Expedition #310)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, Nicolas; Deschamps, Pierre; Bard, Edouard; Hamelin, Bruno; Camoin, Gilbert; Thomas, Alexander L.; Henderson, Gideon M.; Yokoyama, Yusuke

    2010-05-01

    Beyond the high-precision tree-ring calibration, the fossil corals are the most reliable archive that can be used to calibrate the radiocarbon time scale. In this contribution, we present a new radiocarbon dataset based on paired 14C and U-Th dating of fossil shallow-water tropical corals drilled offshore Tahiti during the IODP Expedition 310 'Tahiti Sea-Level'. Before 14C and U-Th analyses, rigorous screening criteria have been applied in order to select pristine aragonitic coral skeletons and avoid those displaying any post-mortem diagenesis that alters original ages. In particular, we made a significant effort to improve detection and quantification of very small amount of secondary calcite in the aragonitic coral lattice using X-ray diffraction measurements [1]. In addition, we apply a strict screening criterion based on δ234U. However, the new Tahiti dataset allow to refine the previous tolerance ranges previously adopted. More than 60 radiocarbon dates were processed at the Laboratoire de Mesure du Carbone 14 (Saclay, France) with the ARTEMIS AMS facility. This new Tahiti record provides new data to the radiocarbon calibration for two distinct time windows: for the interval between 29,200 and 36,200 years BP and for the last deglaciation period, with especially, a higher resolution (40 data) for the 14,000 - 16,000 years BP time interval. These new data extend the previous Tahiti record beyond 13,900 years BP which was the oldest U-Th age obtained on cores drilled onshore in the modern Tahiti barrier reef [2, 3]. These new results are compared with 14C chronologies from other corals, those of Barbados [4, 5] and those from other Pacific islands (Mururoa, Vanuatu, Marquesas, Christmas), and from the Cariaco Basin sediment [6, 7], the Iberian Margin sediment [8, 9] and the Bahamian speleothem [10] records. The new 14C dataset from the corals drilled offshore Tahiti allows to validate the precision and accuracy of other records either directly dated by U-Th or

  16. Year-round probing of soot carbon and secondary organic carbon contributions and sources to the South Asian Atmospheric Brown Cloud using radiocarbon (14C) measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillova, Elena; Sheesley, Rebecca J.; Andersson, August; Krusâ, Martin; Safai, P. D.; Budhavant, Krishnakant; Rao, P. S. P.; Praveen, P. S.; Gustafsson, Örjan

    2010-05-01

    South Asia is one region of vital importance for assessing human impact on radiative forcing by atmospheric aerosols. Previous research in the region has indicated that black carbon is a significant component of the regional aerosol load. In contrast, there is more ambiguous information regarding the contribution of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) to the total carbonaceous (TC) aerosol composition. Here we primarily address the SOA component of the South Asian Atmospheric Brown Cloud (ABC) by a combination of measurements of SOA concentrations and the 14C signature of TC. Atmospheric particulate matter was collected during fourteen-month continuous sampling campaigns Jan 2008 - March 2009 at both the Maldives Climate Observatory at Hannimaadho (MCO-H) and at the Sinhagad hilltop sampling site of the Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology (SIN) in central-western India. The radiocarbon method is an ideal approach to identify fossil sources (14C "dead") compared to biogenic and biomass combustion products (with a contemporary 14C signal). The radiocarbon source apportionment of TC revealed very similar contribution from biogenic/biomass combustion (60-70%) for Indian SIN site and the MCOH receptor regions for much of the year. However, during the summer monsoon season biomass contribution to TC at the Indian Ocean site increases to 70-80%, while it decreases to 40-50% at the Indian site. Source apportionment of a soot carbon (SC) isolate (CTO-375 method; a tracer of black carbon) shows a similar trend. According to preliminary data in summer biomass contribution is higher at the MCOH receptor site (70%) compared to the SIN background site (45%). These unique year-round 14C data will be interpreted in view of the SOA concentration and the varying origin of the air masses.

  17. Do site-specific radiocarbon measurements reflect localized distributions of 14C in biota inhabiting a wetland with point contamination sources?

    PubMed

    Yankovich, T; King-Sharp, K J; Benz, M L; Carr, J; Killey, R W D; Beresford, N A; Wood, M D

    2013-12-01

    Duke Swamp is a wetland ecosystem that receives (14)C via a groundwater pathway originating from a waste management area on Atomic Energy Canada Limited's Chalk River Laboratories site. This groundwater reaches the surface of the swamp, resulting in relatively high (14)C levels over an area of 146 m(2). The objective of this study was to quantify (14)C concentrations in flora and fauna inhabiting areas of Duke Swamp over the gradient of (14)C activity concentrations in moss to determine whether (14)C specific activities in receptor biota reflect the localized nature of the groundwater source in the swamp. Representative receptor plants and animals, and corresponding air and soil samples were collected at six sites in Duke Swamp with (14)C specific activities in air that ranged from 1140 to 45,900 Bq/kg C. In general, it was found that specific activities of (14)C in biota tissues reflected those measured in environmental media collected from the same sampling site. The findings demonstrate that mosses could be used in monitoring programs to ensure protection of biota in areas with elevated (14)C, negating the need to capture and euthanize higher organisms.

  18. A reconstruction of radiocarbon production and total solar irradiance from the Holocene 14C and CO2 records: implications of data and model uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Raphael; Joos, Fortunat

    2013-04-01

    Past atmospheric CO2 concentrations reconstructed from polar ice cores [Monnin et al., 2004] combined with its Δ14C signature as conserved in tree-rings [Reimer et al., 2009] provide important information both on the cycling of carbon as well as the production of radiocarbon in the atmosphere. As the 14C production rate (Q) is modulated by changes in the strength of the magnetic field enclosed in solar wind, it serves as a valuable proxy for past changes in solar activity. Using the Bern3D-LPX, a fully featured Earth System Model of Intermediate Complexity (EMIC) with a 3D ocean and a dynamic vegetation model component, we perform transient carbon-cycle simulations spanning the past 21 kyr. By solving the atmospheric 14C budget, the radiocarbon production rate over the Holocene is reconstructed. Applying different deglacial forcings, as well as a control-simulation with constant climate, the sensitivity of Q to carbon-cycle changes is discussed. The error in the terrestrial 14C record is translated into an uncertainty in Q using a Monte-Carlo approach. In addition, uncertainties in the global carbon inventory, GPP and air-sea gas-exchange are taken into account. The estimated modern (1950-2005) production rate of 1.55±0.20 atoms/cm2/s is close to a recent theoretical calculations by Kovaltsov et al. (2012) yielding a modern production rate of 1.64 atoms/cm2/s but considerably lower than the estimated 2 atoms/cm2/s by Masarik and Beer (2009). The newly produced production rate record is then interpreted as a proxy for solar activity changes in the past 10 kyrs. To do so, we use published results from particle simulations [Masarik and Beer, 1999] together with the latest reconstruction of the geomagnetic dipole moment [Knudsen et al., 2008] to calculate the past history of the so-called solar modulation potential (Φ). The 14C based Φ is extended to 2005 A.D. with instrumental data [Usoskin et al., 2011]. In a subsequent step, Φ is translated into past

  19. A reconstruction of radiocarbon production and total solar irradiance from the Holocene 14C and CO2 records: implications of data and model uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, R.; Joos, F.

    2013-03-01

    Past atmospheric CO2 concentrations reconstructed from polar ice cores combined with its Δ14C signature as conserved in tree-rings provide important information both on the cycling of carbon as well as the production of radiocarbon (Q) in the atmosphere. The latter is modulated by changes in the strength of the magnetic field enclosed in the solar wind and is a proxy for past changes in solar activity. We perform transient carbon-cycle simulations spanning the past 21 kyr using Bern3D-LPX, a fully featured Earth System Model of Intermediate Complexity (EMIC) with a 3-D ocean, sediment and a dynamic vegetation model. Using the latest atmospheric IntCal09/SHCal04 radiocarbon records, we reconstruct the Holocene radiocarbon fluxes and the total production rate. Our carbon-cycle based modern estimate of Q ≈ 1.7 atoms cm-2 s-1 is lower than previously reported by Masarik and Beer (2009) and more in line with Kovaltsov et al. (2012). Q is then translated into the solar modulation potential (Φ) using the latest geomagnetic field reconstruction and linked to a recent reanalysis of early instrumental data. In contrast to earlier reconstructions, our record suggests that periods of high solar activity (>600 MeV) were quite common not only in recent millennia but throughout the Holocene. Solar activity in our decadally-smoothed record is during 28% of the time higher than the modern average of 650 MeV during the past 9 ka. But due to considerable uncertainties in the normalization of Φ to instrumental data, the absolute value of Φ remains weakly constrained. Further, our simulations with a spatially resolved model (taking the interhemispheric Δ14C gradient into account) show that reconstructions that rely on the Northern Hemisphere 14C record only are biased towards low values during the Holocene. Notable deviations on decadal-to-centennial time scales are also found in comparison with earlier reconstructions. In a last step, past total solar irradiance (TSI) is

  20. Can UK fossil fuel emissions be determined by radiocarbon measurements?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenger, Angelina; O'Doherty, Simon; Rigby, Matthew; Manning, Alistair; Palmer, Paul

    2016-04-01

    The GAUGE project evaluates different methods to estimate UK emissions. However, estimating carbon dioxide emissions as a result of fossil fuel burning is challenging as natural fluxes in and out of the atmosphere are very large. Radiocarbon (14C) measurements offer a way to specifically measure the amount of recently added carbon dioxide from fossil fuel burning. This is possible as, due to their age, all the radiocarbon in fossil fuels has decayed. Hence the amount of recently added CO2 from fossil fuel burning can be measured as a depletion of the 14C content in air. While this method has been successfully applied by several groups on a city or a regional scale, this is the first attempt at using the technique for a national emission estimate. Geographically the UK, being an island, is a good location for such an experiment. But are 14CO2 measurements the ideal solution for estimating fossil fuel emissions as they are heralded to be? Previous studies have shown that 14CO2emissions from the nuclear industry mask the 14C depletion caused by fossil fuel burning and result in an underestimation of the fossil fuel CO2. While this might not be a problem in certain regions around the world, many countries like the UK have a substantial nuclear industry. A correction for this enhancement from the nuclear industry can be applied but are invariably difficult as 14CO2emissions from nuclear power plants have a high temporal variability. We will explain how our sampling strategy was chosen to minimize the influence form the nuclear industry and why this proved to be challenging. In addition we present the results from our ground based measurements to show why trying to estimate national emissions using radiocarbon measurements was overambitious, and how practical the technique is for the UK in general.

  1. A simple method to determine mineralization of (14) C-labeled compounds in soil.

    PubMed

    Myung, Kyung; Madary, Michael W; Satchivi, Norbert M

    2014-06-01

    Degradation of organic compounds in soil is often determined by measuring the decrease of the parent compound and analyzing the occurrence of its metabolites. However, determining carbon species as end products of parent compound dissipation requires using labeled materials that allow more accurate determination of the environmental fate of the compound of interest. The current conventional closed system widely used to monitor degradation of (14) C-labeled compounds in soil is complex and expensive and requires a specialized apparatus and facility. In the present study, the authors describe a simple system that facilitates measurement of mineralization of (14) C-labeled compounds applied to soil samples. In the system, soda lime pellets to trap mineralized (14) C-carbon species, including carbon dioxide, were placed in a cup, which was then inserted above the treated soil sample in a tube. Mineralization of [(14) C]2,4-D applied to soil samples in the simple system was compared with that in the conventional system. The simple system provided an equivalent detection of (14) C-carbon species mineralized from the parent compound. The results demonstrate that this cost- and space-effective simple system is suitable for examining degradation and mineralization of (14) C-labeled compounds in soil and could potentially be used to investigate their mineralization in other biological matrices.

  2. PRIME Lab Radiocarbon Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillegonds, D. J.; Mueller, K. A.; Ma, X.; Lipschutz, M. E.

    1996-03-01

    The Purdue Rare Isotope Measurement Laboratory (PRIME Lab) is one of three NSF national facilities for accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), and is the only one capable of determining six cosmogenic radionuclides: 10Be, 14C, 26Al, 36Cl, 41Ca, and 129I. This abstract describes the current status of the radiocarbon analysis program at PRIME Lab.

  3. Closing the global radiocarbon budget 1945-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naegler, Tobias; Levin, Ingeborg

    2006-06-01

    The global radiocarbon cycle of the last 60 years was simulated with the Global Radiocarbon Exploration Model (GRACE). The total radiocarbon production by atmospheric nuclear bomb tests was determined using available stratospheric and tropospheric radiocarbon (14C) observations as constraints. To estimate the range of uncertainty in the explosive force of atmospheric nuclear bomb tests and their respective 14C yield factor, we applied different published bomb test compilations. Furthermore, to account for a possible small bias in the available stratospheric excess radiocarbon observations, we tested the different bomb test compilations with both uncorrected and corrected stratospheric 14C observations. For each of these scenarios of the total bomb 14C burden, the model simulated the distribution of excess radiocarbon among the stratosphere, troposphere, biosphere, and ocean carbon reservoirs. With a global bomb 14C production of 598-632 · 1026 atoms (99-105 kmol) 14C between 1945 and 1980, simulated excess radiocarbon inventories are in good agreement with all available stratospheric and tropospheric radiocarbon observations as well as with the latest estimates of the ocean excess radiocarbon inventories during the GEOSECS and WOCE surveys from Peacock (2004) and Key et al. (2004). For the very first time, our model is thus capable of closing the excess radiocarbon budget on the basis of our current knowledge of exchange rates and reservoir sizes in the global carbon system.

  4. Dating ivory by determination of 14C, 90Sr and 228/232Th.

    PubMed

    Schmied, Stefanie A K; Brunnermeier, Matthias J; Schupfner, Robert; Wolfbeis, Otto S

    2012-09-10

    A method is described to determine the time of death of elephants. This is accomplished by analysis of the radionuclides 14C, 90Sr and 228/232Th in known samples of ivory, and in samples of unknown age. The reliability of this method is considerably increased by multi nuclide analysis.

  5. A reconstruction of radiocarbon production and total solar irradiance from the Holocene 14C and CO2 records: implications of data and model uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, R.; Joos, F.

    2013-08-01

    Radiocarbon production, solar activity, total solar irradiance (TSI) and solar-induced climate change are reconstructed for the Holocene (10 to 0 kyr BP), and TSI is predicted for the next centuries. The IntCal09/SHCal04 radiocarbon and ice core CO2 records, reconstructions of the geomagnetic dipole, and instrumental data of solar activity are applied in the Bern3D-LPJ, a fully featured Earth system model of intermediate complexity including a 3-D dynamic ocean, ocean sediments, and a dynamic vegetation model, and in formulations linking radiocarbon production, the solar modulation potential, and TSI. Uncertainties are assessed using Monte Carlo simulations and bounding scenarios. Transient climate simulations span the past 21 thousand years, thereby considering the time lags and uncertainties associated with the last glacial termination. Our carbon-cycle-based modern estimate of radiocarbon production of 1.7 atoms cm-2 s-1 is lower than previously reported for the cosmogenic nuclide production model by Masarik and Beer (2009) and is more in-line with Kovaltsov et al. (2012). In contrast to earlier studies, periods of high solar activity were quite common not only in recent millennia, but throughout the Holocene. Notable deviations compared to earlier reconstructions are also found on decadal to centennial timescales. We show that earlier Holocene reconstructions, not accounting for the interhemispheric gradients in radiocarbon, are biased low. Solar activity is during 28% of the time higher than the modern average (650 MeV), but the absolute values remain weakly constrained due to uncertainties in the normalisation of the solar modulation to instrumental data. A recently published solar activity-TSI relationship yields small changes in Holocene TSI of the order of 1 W m-2 with a Maunder Minimum irradiance reduction of 0.85 ± 0.16 W m-2. Related solar-induced variations in global mean surface air temperature are simulated to be within 0.1 K. Autoregressive

  6. Forensic applications of 14C at CIRCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzaioli, F.; Fiumano, V.; Capano, M.; Passariello, I.; Cesare, N. De.; Terrasi, F.

    2011-12-01

    The decreasing trend of the radiocarbon pulse produced during the atmospheric tests of nuclear weapons (bomb-carbon) coupled with high sensitivity accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) measurements, drastically increased the precision of radiocarbon age determinations since the second part of the sixties, allowing the application of radiocarbon AMS to a wide range of studies previously not directly involving conventional radiocarbon dating (i.e. food authenticity, forensic, biochemistry). In the framework of authenticity evaluation of artworks, high precision radiocarbon ( 14C) AMS measurements (Δ R/ R < 0.3%) reduce the conventional uncertainty of the dating to few decades, allowing precise age estimation of materials containing carbon (C). The Centre for Isotopic Research on Cultural and Environmental heritage (CIRCE) during its activity on AMS 14C dating achieved high precision measurements opening the opportunity to these kinds of applications. This paper presents the main results obtained from radiocarbon measurements on a set of bone samples analyzed for the determination of the post-mortem interval in the framework of an unsolved case investigated by the Rome prosecutor office. The chronological characterization of the wooden support of the "Acerenza portrait" is also presented with the aim to evaluate its age and to further investigate the possibility to attribute this artwork to Leonardo da Vinci. Bomb- 14C dating on the lipid and collagen fractions of bones allows the evaluation of the year of the death of the individuals by means of ad hoc calibration data sheet with the typical few years precision and difference between collagen apparent age and the year of death appeared in agreement with the age of one individual estimated by dating of tooth collagen. Conventional radiocarbon dating on both wood and wood extracted cellulose leads to an estimation of the portrait wood board age (2σ) of 1459-1524 AD (57% relative probability), 1571-1631 AD interval (42

  7. Radiocarbon Dating

    SciTech Connect

    Buchholz, B A

    2007-12-20

    Radiocarbon dating can be used to determine the age of objects that contain components that were once alive. In the case of human remains, a radiocarbon date can distinguish between a crime scene and an archeological site. Documents, museum artifacts and art objects can be dated to determine if their age is correct for the historical context. A radiocarbon date does not confirm authenticity, but it can help identify a forgery.

  8. Holocene age of the Yuha burial: Direct radiocarbon determinations by accelerator mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stafford, Thomas W.; Jull, A.J.T.; Zabel, T.H.; Donahue, D.J.; Duhamel, R.C.; Brendel, K.; Haynes, C.V.; Bischoff, J.L.; Payen, L.A.; Taylor, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    The view that human populations may not have arrived in the Western Hemisphere before about 12,000 radiocarbon yr BP1,2 has been challenged by claims of much greater antiquity for a small number of archaeological sites and human skeleton samples. One such site is the Homo sapiens sapiens cairn burial excavated in 1971 from the Yuha desert, Imperial County, California3-5. Radiocarbon analysis of caliche coating one of the bones of the skeleton yielded a radiocarbon age of 21,500??1,000 yr BP4, while radiocarbon and uranium series analyses of caliche coating a cairn boulder yielded ages of 22,125??400 and 19,000??3,000 yr BP, respectively5. The late Pleistocene age assignment to the Yuha burial has been challenged by comparing the cultural context of the burial with other cairn burials in the same region6, on the basis of the site's geomorphological context and from radiocarbon analyses of soil caliches. 7,8 In rebuttal, arguments in defence of the original age assignment have been presented9,10 as well as an amino acid racemization analysis on the Yuha skeleton indicating an age of 23,600??2,600 yr BP11. The tandem accelerator mass spectrometer at the University of Arizona has now been used to measure the ratio of 14C/13C in several organic and inorganic fractions of post-cranial bone from the Yuha H. sapiens sapiens skeleton. Isotope ratios from six chemical fractions all yielded radiocarbon ages for the skeleton of less than 4,000 yr BP. These results indicate that the Yuha skeleton is of Holocene age, in agreement with the cultural context of the burial, and in disagreement with the previously assigned Pleistocene age of 19,000-23,000 yr. ?? 1984 Nature Publishing Group.

  9. Radiocarbon dating of terrestrial carbonates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pigati, Jeffrey S.; Rink, W. Jack; Thompson, Jeroen

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial carbonates encompass a wide range of materials that potentially could be used for radiocarbon (14C) dating. Biogenic carbonates, including shells and tests of terrestrial and aquatic gastropods, bivalves, ostracodes, and foraminifera, are preserved in a variety of late Quaternary deposits and may be suitable for 14C dating. Primary calcareous deposits (marls, tufa, speleothems) and secondary carbonates (rhizoliths, fracture fill, soil carbonate) may also be targeted for dating when conditions are favorable. This chapter discusses issues that are commonly encountered in 14C dating of terrestrial carbonates, including isotopic disequilibrium and open-system behavior, as well as methods used to determine the reliability of ages derived from these materials. Recent methodological advancements that may improve the accuracy and precision of 14C ages of terrestrial carbonates are also highlighted.

  10. Determining the biomass fraction of mixed waste fuels: A comparison of existing industry and {sup 14}C-based methodologies

    SciTech Connect

    Muir, G.K.P.; Hayward, S.; Tripney, B.G.; Cook, G.T.; Naysmith, P.; Herbert, B.M.J.; Garnett, M.H; Wilkinson, M.

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Compares industry standard and {sup 14}C methods for determining bioenergy content of MSW. • Differences quantified through study at an operational energy from waste plant. • Manual sort and selective dissolution are unreliable measures of feedstock bioenergy. • {sup 14}C methods (esp. AMS) improve precision and reliability of bioenergy determination. • Implications for electricity generators and regulators for award of bio-incentives. - Abstract: {sup 14}C analysis of flue gas by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and liquid scintillation counting (LSC) were used to determine the biomass fraction of mixed waste at an operational energy-from-waste (EfW) plant. Results were converted to bioenergy (% total) using mathematical algorithms and assessed against existing industry methodologies which involve manual sorting and selective dissolution (SD) of feedstock. Simultaneous determinations using flue gas showed excellent agreement: 44.8 ± 2.7% for AMS and 44.6 ± 12.3% for LSC. Comparable bioenergy results were obtained using a feedstock manual sort procedure (41.4%), whilst a procedure based on selective dissolution of representative waste material is reported as 75.5% (no errors quoted). {sup 14}C techniques present significant advantages in data acquisition, precision and reliability for both electricity generator and industry regulator.

  11. Bicarbonate exchange through the human red cell membrane determined with [14C] bicarbonate.

    PubMed

    Wieth, J O

    1979-09-01

    1. Bicarbonate transport across human red cell membranes was studied between 0 and 10 degrees C at alkaline pH values by determining the efflux of 14C-labelled bicarbonate from resealed erythrocyte ghosts. Transfer of labelled CO2 was eliminated as a source of error, when formation of intracellular 14CO2 was inhibited with carbonic anhydrase inhibitors. The study showed that there are no fundamental differences between the characteristics of bicarbonate and of chloride self-exchange as has been inferred from previous studies of chloride-bicarbonate exchange. 2. Efflux of radioactivity could be reduced more than 99% by reversible and irreversible inhibitors of anion transport. Inhibition of both chloride and bicarbonate self-exchange was linearly related to the binding of 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid (DIDS) to the membranes. Complete (i.e. greater than 99%) inhibition was obtained after binding of 1.2 x 10(6) DIDS molecules per cell. 3. Bicarbonate self-exchange proved a saturable function of bicarbonate concentration, with a maximum at external and internal concentrations of approximately 100 mM, showing self-depression at higher bicarbonate concentrations, and half-maximum exchange flux at a concentration of 10 mM. The results were consistent with the hypothesis that the exchange mechanism has two anion binding sites, one mediating ion transport and the other causing transport inhibition. 4. Maximum exchange flux of bicarbonate was about 30% larger thant that of chloride, and the affinity of bicarbonate for the transport site was about three times larger than that of chloride. The apparent activation energy of bicarbonate exchange was 28 kcal/mole, the same order of magnitude as found for other inorganic anions between 0 and 10 degrees C. 5. The ability of other inorganic anions to exchange with bicarbonate decreased in the sequence Cl greater than NO3 greater than F greater than Br greater than or equal to I, corresponding to the sequence of

  12. Forensic applications of 14C bomb-pulse dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoppi, U.; Skopec, Z.; Skopec, J.; Jones, G.; Fink, D.; Hua, Q.; Jacobsen, G.; Tuniz, C.; Williams, A.

    2004-08-01

    After a brief review of the basics of 14C bomb-pulse dating, this paper presents two unique forensic applications. Particular attention is dedicated to the use of the 14C bomb-pulse to establish the time of harvest of illicit drugs such as heroin and opium. Preliminary measurements of 14C concentrations in milligram samples taken from seized drugs are presented. 14C bomb-pulse dating can determine whether drug distribution originates from stockpiles or recent manufacture, and support the action of law enforcement authorities against criminal organisations involved in drug trafficking. In addition, we describe the dating of wine vintages for a number of authenticated single label vintage red wines from the Barossa Valley - South Australia. Our results show that radiocarbon dating can be used to accurately determine wine vintages and therefore reveal the addition of unrelated materials of natural and synthetic origin.

  13. Determination of transfer rate and nature of the residue(s) in milk from {sup 14}C-atrazine cows

    SciTech Connect

    Thalacker, F.W.; Ash, S.G.; Simoneaux, B.J.

    1996-10-01

    In order to determine the rate of transfer and the nature of the atrazine residues present in milk, lactating dairy cattle were treated with atrazine at three concentrations, 0.764 ppm, 0.0747 ppm and 0.0085 ppm (dry weight of food consumed). The concentrations were selected to bridge the gap between the concentration used for EPA metabolism studies (10 ppm) and the potential exposure level of dairy cattle to atrazine and its chlorotriazine metabolites through feed. The cattle were dosed following the morning milking for nine consecutive days with a single capsule bolus of {sup 14}C-atrazine. Milk was collected twice daily and aliquots of each milking and the individual cow`s daily pool of milk were analyzed by liquid scinitllation counting (LSC). The concentrations of {sup 14}C-residues in the milk plateaued on approximately day 3 and the mean {sup 14}C-atrazine levels in milk were 11.2 ppb, 1.13 ppb and 0.152 ppb for the high, middle and low dosed animals, respectively. The transfer of radioactive level of exposure to {sup 14}C-atrazine. The nature of the residues in milk were determined by extracting milk samples and analysis by HPLC, TLC or Aminex chromatography. Diaminchlorotriazine was the only chlorinated metabolite in the milk, constituting approximately 65% to 75% of the total radioactive residues (TRR).

  14. Complexities in the Use of Bomb-Curve Radiocarbon to Determine Time Since Death of Human Skeletal Remains

    SciTech Connect

    Ubelaker, D H; Buchholz, B A

    2005-04-26

    Atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons during the 1950s and early 1960s doubled the level of radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) in the atmosphere. From the peak in 1963, the level of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} has decreased exponentially with a mean life of about 16 years, not due to radioactive decay, but due to mixing with large marine and terrestrial carbon reservoirs. Since radiocarbon is incorporated into all living things, the bomb-pulse is an isotopic chronometer of the past half century. The absence of bomb radiocarbon in skeletonized human remains generally indicates a date of death before 1950. Comparison of the radiocarbon values with the post 1950 bomb-curve may also help elucidate when in the post 1950 era, the individual was still alive. Such interpretation however, must consider the age at death of the individual and the type of tissue sampled.

  15. Determining the biomass fraction of mixed waste fuels: A comparison of existing industry and (14)C-based methodologies.

    PubMed

    Muir, G K P; Hayward, S; Tripney, B G; Cook, G T; Naysmith, P; Herbert, B M J; Garnett, M H; Wilkinson, M

    2015-01-01

    (14)C analysis of flue gas by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and liquid scintillation counting (LSC) were used to determine the biomass fraction of mixed waste at an operational energy-from-waste (EfW) plant. Results were converted to bioenergy (% total) using mathematical algorithms and assessed against existing industry methodologies which involve manual sorting and selective dissolution (SD) of feedstock. Simultaneous determinations using flue gas showed excellent agreement: 44.8 ± 2.7% for AMS and 44.6 ± 12.3% for LSC. Comparable bioenergy results were obtained using a feedstock manual sort procedure (41.4%), whilst a procedure based on selective dissolution of representative waste material is reported as 75.5% (no errors quoted). (14)C techniques present significant advantages in data acquisition, precision and reliability for both electricity generator and industry regulator.

  16. Determination of radiocarbon in stratospheric CO2, obtained through AirCore sampling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Dipayan; Chen, Huilin; Been, Henk A.; Kivi, Rigel; Meijer, Harro A. J.

    2016-04-01

    The concentration of Greenhouse Gases (GHG), with carbon dioxide as the most prominent example, has been and still is increasing, predominantly due to emissions from fossil fuel combustion. CO2 is also the most important component of the global carbon cycle. Among other tracers, radiocarbon (Carbon-14) is a unique and an important atmospheric tracer used in the understanding of the global carbon cycle. Radiocarbon is a naturally occurring isotope (radioactive, t 1/2 = 5730 ± 40 years) of carbon produced through the interaction of thermalized neutrons and nitrogen in the upper atmosphere. Generally, for performing atmospheric radiocarbon measurements in the higher atmosphere, large samples (few liters of air) were collected using aircrafts and balloons. However, collecting stratospheric samples on a regular basis for radiocarbon analysis is extremely expensive. Here we describe the determination of radiocarbon concentrations in stratospheric CO2, collected using AirCore sampling. AirCore is an innovative sampling technique for obtaining vertical atmospheric profiles and, in Europe, is done on a regular basis at Sodankylä, Finland for CO2, CH4 and CO. The stratospheric parts of two such AirCore profiles were used in this study as a proof-of-principle. CO2 from the stratospheric air samples were extracted and converted to elemental carbon, which were then measured at the Accelerator Mass Spectrometric (AMS) facility of the Centre for Isotope Research (CIO) at the University of Groningen. The stratospheric part of the AirCore profile was divided into six sections, each contained approximately 10 μg C. A detailed description of the extraction, graphitization, AMS analysis and the derivation of the stratospheric radiocarbon profile will be the main focus. Through our results, we will show that AirCore is a viable sampling method for performing high-precision radiocarbon measurements of stratospheric CO2 with reasonably good spatial resolution on a regular basis

  17. 14C dating with the bomb peak: An application to forensic medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, E. M.; Arlamovsky, K. A.; Golser, R.; Kutschera, W.; Priller, A.; Puchegger, S.; Rom, W.; Steier, P.; Vycudilik, W.

    2000-10-01

    Samples originating from the time period after 1950 can be radiocarbon dated utilising the 14C bomb peak as a calibration curve. The applicability of "radiocarbon dating" of recent organic human material for the determination of the time of death of humans was tested. The radiocarbon results from hair and lipid samples from individuals with known date of death were compared with the results from two individuals with unknown time of death. An estimate of the year of death for the unknowns could be derived by this way. Due to the long turnover time of collagen in human bones it is not possible to use the radiocarbon content of bone collagen for a reliable estimate. In order to study the time dependence of the collagen turnover we tested "soft" chemical methods for the isolation of collagen from the bone matrix. First radiocarbon results of this investigation are presented.

  18. Changes in the radiocarbon reservoir age in Lake Xingyun, Southwestern China during the Holocene.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Aifeng; He, Yuxin; Wu, Duo; Zhang, Xiaonan; Zhang, Can; Liu, Zhonghui; Yu, Junqing

    2015-01-01

    Chronology is a necessary component of paleoclimatology. Radiocarbon dating plays a central role in determining the ages of geological samples younger than ca. 50 ka BP. However, there are many limitations for its application, including radiocarbon reservoir effects, which may cause incorrect chronology in many lakes. Here we demonstrate temporal changes in the radiocarbon reservoir age of Lake Xingyun, Southwestern China, where radiocarbon ages based on bulk organic matter have been reported in previous studies. Our new radiocarbon ages, determined from terrestrial plant macrofossils suggest that the radiocarbon reservoir age changed from 960 to 2200 years during the last 8500 cal a BP years. These changes to the reservoir effect were associated with inputs from either pre-aged organic carbon or 14C-depleted hard water in Lake Xingyun caused by hydrological change in the lake system. The radiocarbon reservoir age may in return be a good indicator for the carbon source in lake ecosystems and depositional environment.

  19. Changes in the Radiocarbon Reservoir Age in Lake Xingyun, Southwestern China during the Holocene

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Aifeng; He, Yuxin; Wu, Duo; Zhang, Xiaonan; Zhang, Can; Liu, Zhonghui; Yu, Junqing

    2015-01-01

    Chronology is a necessary component of paleoclimatology. Radiocarbon dating plays a central role in determining the ages of geological samples younger than ca. 50 ka BP. However, there are many limitations for its application, including radiocarbon reservoir effects, which may cause incorrect chronology in many lakes. Here we demonstrate temporal changes in the radiocarbon reservoir age of Lake Xingyun, Southwestern China, where radiocarbon ages based on bulk organic matter have been reported in previous studies. Our new radiocarbon ages, determined from terrestrial plant macrofossils suggest that the radiocarbon reservoir age changed from 960 to 2200 years during the last 8500 cal a BP years. These changes to the reservoir effect were associated with inputs from either pre-aged organic carbon or 14C-depleted hard water in Lake Xingyun caused by hydrological change in the lake system. The radiocarbon reservoir age may in return be a good indicator for the carbon source in lake ecosystems and depositional environment. PMID:25815508

  20. 14C/C measurements support Andreev's internode method to determine lichen growth rates in Cladina stygia (Fr.) Ahti

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, E; Bench, G

    2007-12-05

    Growth rates and the ability to date an organism can greatly contribute to understanding its population biology and community dynamics. 1n 1954, Andreev proposed a method to date Cladina, a fruticose lichen, using total thallus length and number of internodes. No research, however, has demonstrated the reliability of this technique or compared its estimates to those derived by other means. In this study, we demonstrate the utility of {sup 14}C/C ratios to determine lichen age and growth rate in Cladina stygia (Fr.) Ahti collected from northwestern Alaska, USA. The average growth rate using {sup 14}C/C ratios was 6.5 mm {center_dot} yr{sup -1}, which was not significantly different from growth rates derived by Andreev's internode method (average = 6.2 mm {center_dot} yr{sup -1}); thus, suggesting the reliability of Andreev's simple field method for dating lichens. In addition, we found lichen growth rates appeared to differ with geographic location, yet did not seem related to ambient temperature and total precipitation.

  1. Abundance of (14)C in biomass fractions of wastes and solid recovered fuels.

    PubMed

    Fellner, Johann; Rechberger, Helmut

    2009-05-01

    In recent years thermal utilization of mixed wastes and solid recovered fuels has become of increasing importance in European waste management. Since wastes or solid recovered fuels are generally composed of fossil and biogenic materials, only part of the CO(2) emissions is accounted for in greenhouse gas inventories or emission trading schemes. A promising approach for determining this fraction is the so-called radiocarbon method. It is based on different ratios of the carbon isotopes (14)C and (12)C in fossil and biogenic fuels. Fossil fuels have zero radiocarbon, whereas biogenic materials are enriched in (14)C and reflect the (14)CO(2) abundance of the ambient atmosphere. Due to nuclear weapons tests in the past century, the radiocarbon content in the atmosphere has not been constant, which has resulted in a varying (14)C content of biogenic matter, depending on the period of growth. In the present paper (14)C contents of different biogenic waste fractions (e.g., kitchen waste, paper, wood), as well as mixtures of different wastes (household, bulky waste, and commercial waste), and solid recovered fuels are determined. The calculated (14)C content of the materials investigated ranges between 98 and 135pMC.

  2. Abundance of (14)C in biomass fractions of wastes and solid recovered fuels.

    PubMed

    Fellner, Johann; Rechberger, Helmut

    2009-05-01

    In recent years thermal utilization of mixed wastes and solid recovered fuels has become of increasing importance in European waste management. Since wastes or solid recovered fuels are generally composed of fossil and biogenic materials, only part of the CO(2) emissions is accounted for in greenhouse gas inventories or emission trading schemes. A promising approach for determining this fraction is the so-called radiocarbon method. It is based on different ratios of the carbon isotopes (14)C and (12)C in fossil and biogenic fuels. Fossil fuels have zero radiocarbon, whereas biogenic materials are enriched in (14)C and reflect the (14)CO(2) abundance of the ambient atmosphere. Due to nuclear weapons tests in the past century, the radiocarbon content in the atmosphere has not been constant, which has resulted in a varying (14)C content of biogenic matter, depending on the period of growth. In the present paper (14)C contents of different biogenic waste fractions (e.g., kitchen waste, paper, wood), as well as mixtures of different wastes (household, bulky waste, and commercial waste), and solid recovered fuels are determined. The calculated (14)C content of the materials investigated ranges between 98 and 135pMC. PMID:19157836

  3. Abundance of {sup 14}C in biomass fractions of wastes and solid recovered fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Fellner, Johann Rechberger, Helmut

    2009-05-15

    In recent years thermal utilization of mixed wastes and solid recovered fuels has become of increasing importance in European waste management. Since wastes or solid recovered fuels are generally composed of fossil and biogenic materials, only part of the CO{sub 2} emissions is accounted for in greenhouse gas inventories or emission trading schemes. A promising approach for determining this fraction is the so-called radiocarbon method. It is based on different ratios of the carbon isotopes {sup 14}C and {sup 12}C in fossil and biogenic fuels. Fossil fuels have zero radiocarbon, whereas biogenic materials are enriched in {sup 14}C and reflect the {sup 14}CO{sub 2} abundance of the ambient atmosphere. Due to nuclear weapons tests in the past century, the radiocarbon content in the atmosphere has not been constant, which has resulted in a varying {sup 14}C content of biogenic matter, depending on the period of growth. In the present paper {sup 14}C contents of different biogenic waste fractions (e.g., kitchen waste, paper, wood), as well as mixtures of different wastes (household, bulky waste, and commercial waste), and solid recovered fuels are determined. The calculated {sup 14}C content of the materials investigated ranges between 98 and 135 pMC.

  4. RADIOCARBON ANALYSIS OF PM 2.5 AMBIENT AEROSOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The radiocarbon (14C) content of an ambient aerosol sample can be directly related to the fraction of the sample's total carbon mass contributed by natural (biogenic) sources. Such knowledge is difficult to determine by other means, and important for devising ambient PM contro...

  5. Radiocarbon Determinations for Estimating Groundwater Flow Velocities in Central Florida.

    PubMed

    Hanshaw, B B; Back, W; Rubin, M

    1965-04-23

    Carbon-14 activity was determined from HCO(3)(-) in samples of groundwater obtained from the principal artesian aquifer in Florida. From these data the "age" of water obtained from a series of wells, each progressively farther down gradient on the piezometric surface, was established. Relative carbon-14 ages indicated a velocity of groundwater movement of 23 feet (7 meters) per year for about 85 miles (137 kilometers) of travel. A velocity of 23 feet per year was calculated independently from Darcy's law.

  6. Radiocarbon determinations for estimating groundwater flow velocities in central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanshaw, B.B.; Back, W.; Rubin, M.

    1965-01-01

    Carbon-14 activity was determined from HCO3- in samples of groundwater obtained from the principal artesian aquifer in Florida. From these data the "age" of water obtained from a series of wells, each progressively farther down gradient on the piezometric surface, was established. Relative carbon-14 ages indicated a velocity of groundwater movement of 23 feet (7 meters) per year for about 85 miles (137 kilometers) of travel. A velocity of 23 feet per year was calculated independently from Darcy's law.

  7. Impact of fossil fuel emissions on atmospheric radiocarbon and various applications of radiocarbon over this century.

    PubMed

    Graven, Heather D

    2015-08-01

    Radiocarbon analyses are commonly used in a broad range of fields, including earth science, archaeology, forgery detection, isotope forensics, and physiology. Many applications are sensitive to the radiocarbon ((14)C) content of atmospheric CO2, which has varied since 1890 as a result of nuclear weapons testing, fossil fuel emissions, and CO2 cycling between atmospheric, oceanic, and terrestrial carbon reservoirs. Over this century, the ratio (14)C/C in atmospheric CO2 (Δ(14)CO2) will be determined by the amount of fossil fuel combustion, which decreases Δ(14)CO2 because fossil fuels have lost all (14)C from radioactive decay. Simulations of Δ(14)CO2 using the emission scenarios from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report, the Representative Concentration Pathways, indicate that ambitious emission reductions could sustain Δ(14)CO2 near the preindustrial level of 0‰ through 2100, whereas "business-as-usual" emissions will reduce Δ(14)CO2 to -250‰, equivalent to the depletion expected from over 2,000 y of radioactive decay. Given current emissions trends, fossil fuel emission-driven artificial "aging" of the atmosphere is likely to occur much faster and with a larger magnitude than previously expected. This finding has strong and as yet unrecognized implications for many applications of radiocarbon in various fields, and it implies that radiocarbon dating may no longer provide definitive ages for samples up to 2,000 y old.

  8. Impact of fossil fuel emissions on atmospheric radiocarbon and various applications of radiocarbon over this century

    PubMed Central

    Graven, Heather D.

    2015-01-01

    Radiocarbon analyses are commonly used in a broad range of fields, including earth science, archaeology, forgery detection, isotope forensics, and physiology. Many applications are sensitive to the radiocarbon (14C) content of atmospheric CO2, which has varied since 1890 as a result of nuclear weapons testing, fossil fuel emissions, and CO2 cycling between atmospheric, oceanic, and terrestrial carbon reservoirs. Over this century, the ratio 14C/C in atmospheric CO2 (Δ14CO2) will be determined by the amount of fossil fuel combustion, which decreases Δ14CO2 because fossil fuels have lost all 14C from radioactive decay. Simulations of Δ14CO2 using the emission scenarios from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report, the Representative Concentration Pathways, indicate that ambitious emission reductions could sustain Δ14CO2 near the preindustrial level of 0‰ through 2100, whereas “business-as-usual” emissions will reduce Δ14CO2 to −250‰, equivalent to the depletion expected from over 2,000 y of radioactive decay. Given current emissions trends, fossil fuel emission-driven artificial “aging” of the atmosphere is likely to occur much faster and with a larger magnitude than previously expected. This finding has strong and as yet unrecognized implications for many applications of radiocarbon in various fields, and it implies that radiocarbon dating may no longer provide definitive ages for samples up to 2,000 y old. PMID:26195757

  9. Impact of fossil fuel emissions on atmospheric radiocarbon and various applications of radiocarbon over this century.

    PubMed

    Graven, Heather D

    2015-08-01

    Radiocarbon analyses are commonly used in a broad range of fields, including earth science, archaeology, forgery detection, isotope forensics, and physiology. Many applications are sensitive to the radiocarbon ((14)C) content of atmospheric CO2, which has varied since 1890 as a result of nuclear weapons testing, fossil fuel emissions, and CO2 cycling between atmospheric, oceanic, and terrestrial carbon reservoirs. Over this century, the ratio (14)C/C in atmospheric CO2 (Δ(14)CO2) will be determined by the amount of fossil fuel combustion, which decreases Δ(14)CO2 because fossil fuels have lost all (14)C from radioactive decay. Simulations of Δ(14)CO2 using the emission scenarios from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report, the Representative Concentration Pathways, indicate that ambitious emission reductions could sustain Δ(14)CO2 near the preindustrial level of 0‰ through 2100, whereas "business-as-usual" emissions will reduce Δ(14)CO2 to -250‰, equivalent to the depletion expected from over 2,000 y of radioactive decay. Given current emissions trends, fossil fuel emission-driven artificial "aging" of the atmosphere is likely to occur much faster and with a larger magnitude than previously expected. This finding has strong and as yet unrecognized implications for many applications of radiocarbon in various fields, and it implies that radiocarbon dating may no longer provide definitive ages for samples up to 2,000 y old. PMID:26195757

  10. Determination of the Prebomb Southern (Antartic) Ocean Radiocarbon in Organic Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Guilderson, T P

    2001-02-26

    The Southern Hemisphere is an important and unique region of the world's oceans for water-mass formation and mixing, upwelling, nutrient utilization, and carbon export. In fact, one of the primary interests of the oceanographic community is to decipher the climatic record of these processes in the source or sink terms for Southern Ocean surface waters in the CO{sub 2} balance of the atmosphere. Current coupled ocean-atmosphere modeling efforts to trace the input of CO{sub 2} into the ocean imply a strong sink of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} in the southern ocean. However, because of its relative inaccessibility and the difficulty in directly measuring CO{sub 2} fluxes in the Southern Ocean, these results are controversial at best. An accepted diagnostic of the exchange of CO{sub 2} between the atmosphere and ocean is the prebomb distribution of radiocarbon in the ocean and its time-history since atmospheric nuclear testing. Such histories of {sup 14}C in the surface waters of the Southern Ocean do not currently exist, primarily because there are few continuous biological archives (e.g., in corals) such as those that have been used to monitor the {sup 14}C history of the tropics and subtropics. One of the possible long-term archives is the scallop Adamussium collbecki. Although not independently confirmed, relatively crude growth rate estimates of A. collbecki indicate that it has the potential to provide continuous 100 year time-series. We are exploring the suitability of this potential archive.

  11. Radiocarbon Dating, Memories, and Hopes

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Libby, W. F.

    1972-10-01

    The history of radiocarbon dating from 1939 to the present is reviewed. The basic principles of radiocarbon dating are that cosmic rays make living things radioactive with {sup 14}C to a certain level fixed by the environment and that at death the intake of food stops so no replenishment of the {sup 14}C steadily lost by the immutable decay occurs. Therefore measurement of the degree of decay gives the time lapse since death, i.e., the radiocarbon age. The equipment developed and experiments performed to measure the specific activity of specimens to be dated are described. The results obtained by world-wide experimenters are discussed. These showed that on simultaneity radiocarbon dating is apparently reliable but that absolute dates may be incorrect by as much as 600 to 700 y. The value of radiocarbon dating to archaeologists, geologists, climatologists, and historians is stressed. (LCL)

  12. Radiocarbon Variability in the Tropical Pacific During the Last Millennium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaunbrecher, L. K.; Cobb, K. M.; Druffel, E. R.; Griffin, S. M.

    2007-12-01

    The strength of upwelling in the tropical Pacific strongly influences global climate, as demonstrated during El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) extremes. Understanding the causes of past variability in tropical Pacific upwelling will help to predict how future climate may evolve under radiative forcing caused by the increase in greenhouse gases. We measured radiocarbon (14C) records in corals collected from Palmyra (6°°N, 162°°W) and Christmas (2°°N, 157°°W) Islands, located in the central tropical Pacific, to reconstruct high-resolution variations in tropical Pacific upwelling over the last millennium. Corals incorporate 14C/12C ratios equal to those in the dissolved inorganic carbon of surrounding seawater, and thus provide monthly-resolved records of surface ocean radiocarbon concentrations back through time. Surface ocean waters are more enriched with radiocarbon than deep waters, owing to the atmospheric source for radiocarbon. Upwelled waters are depleted in radiocarbon because significant radioactive decay has occurred during their isolation in the deeper ocean. Previous work with central tropical Pacific corals has determined that upwelled waters are approximately -55‰° to -65‰° in this region, while currents flowing from the west Pacific to the east Pacific carry waters with a higher 14C signature, roughly -38‰, and waters from the east have a value of -72‰° (Konishi et. al, 1981, Druffel, 1981). Therefore, variations in 14C in the Palmyra and Christmas corals reflect the mixing of the cool, radiocarbon-depleted, waters associated with equatorial upwelling and the warm, radiocarbon-enriched waters advected from the western tropical Pacific. Oxygen isotopic (δ18O) analyses of the Palmyra and Christmas fossil corals reveal a rich climatic history of interannual to centennial variability (Cobb et al., 2003). Our approach targets specific time intervals associated with strong interannual to centennial δ18O anomalies for high

  13. Respiratory strategy is a major determinant of [3H]water and [14C]chlorpyrifos uptake in aquatic insects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchwalter, D.B.; Jenkins, J.J.; Curtis, L.R.

    2002-01-01

    Despite the extensive use of aquatic insects to evaluate freshwater ecosystem health, little is known about the underlying factors that result in sensitivity differences between taxa. Organismal characteristics (respiratory strategy and body size) were used to explore the rates of [3H]H2O and [14)C]chlorpyrifos accumulation in aquatic insects. Ten aquatic insect taxa, including ephemeropteran, trichopteran, dipteran, hemipteran, and coleopteran species, were exposed to [14C]chlorpyrifos (240 ng??L-1) and [3H]H2O for up to 12 h. Because exchange epithelial surfaces on the)integument are permeable to water, [3H]H2O was used as a quantitative surrogate for exposed cellular surface area.) [14C]Chlorpyrifos uptake rates were highly correlated with water permeability in all 10 taxa tested and largely covaried with body size and respiratory strategy. Rates were highest among smaller organisms on a per-weight basis and in taxa with relatively large external cellular surfaces such as gills. Air-breathing taxa were significantly less permeable to both [3)HH20 and [14C)C]chlorpyrifos. A method for labeling exposed epithelial surfaces with a fluorescent dye was developed. This technique allowed discrimination between exchange epithelium and barrier tissue on the integument. Fluorescent dye distributions on the body surface provided a rapid method for estimating exposed epithelium consistent with [3H]H2O and [14)C]chlorpyrifos accumulation.

  14. Examination of Surface Deposits on Oldbury Reactor Core Graphite to Determine the Concentration and Distribution of 14C

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Liam; Heard, Peter J.; Scott, Thomas B.

    2016-01-01

    Pile Grade A graphite was used as a moderator and reflector material in the first generation of UK Magnox nuclear power reactors. As all of these reactors are now shut down there is a need to examine the concentration and distribution of long lived radioisotopes, such as 14C, to aid in understanding their behaviour in a geological disposal facility. A selection of irradiated graphite samples from Oldbury reactor one were examined where it was observed that Raman spectroscopy can distinguish between underlying graphite and a surface deposit found on exposed channel wall surfaces. The concentration of 14C in this deposit was examined by sequentially oxidising the graphite samples in air at low temperatures (450°C and 600°C) to remove the deposit and then the underlying graphite. The gases produced were captured in a series of bubbler solutions that were analysed using liquid scintillation counting. It was observed that the surface deposit was relatively enriched with 14C, with samples originating lower in the reactor exhibiting a higher concentration of 14C. Oxidation at 600°C showed that the remaining graphite material consisted of two fractions of 14C, a surface associated fraction and a graphite lattice associated fraction. The results presented correlate well with previous studies on irradiated graphite that suggest there are up to three fractions of 14C; a readily releasable fraction (corresponding to that removed by oxidation at 450°C in this study), a slowly releasable fraction (removed early at 600°C in this study), and an unreleasable fraction (removed later at 600°C in this study). PMID:27706228

  15. Age assessment of ivory by analysis of 14C and 90Sr to determine whether there is an antique on hand.

    PubMed

    Schmied, Stefanie A K; Brunnermeier, Matthias J; Schupfner, Robert; Wolfbeis, Otto S

    2011-04-15

    A method is described to determine whether an elephant has died before 1955 or not. This is accomplished by determination of the radionuclides (14)C and (90)Sr in artifacts made of ivory. The reliability of this method is considerably increased by double nuclide analysis and therefore is applicable for judicial expert opinions.

  16. Determining the modern carbon content of biobased products using radiocarbon analysis.

    PubMed

    Norton, Glenn A; Devlin, Steven L

    2006-11-01

    In support of the USDA Federal Biobased Products Preferred Procurement Program (FB4P), Iowa State University is coordinating testing to determine the "biobased content" of manufactured products. These tests are part of a process to "designate" items that qualify for preferential procurement status with federal agencies. Biobased content determinations are being performed using three radiocarbon dating procedures specified in ASTM D 6866-05. Test results obtained thus far indicate that the AMS and benzene synthesis methods provide comparable results. Data from the CO(2) cocktail method did not agree as well with the data from the other two methods, but were still in reasonably good agreement with those data. Radiocarbon analysis is shown to be a reliable and valuable tool for verifying the biobased content of a wide variety of biobased products. Based on inter- and intra-laboratory comparisons, a reasonable uncertainty to associate with the analyses would be +/-3% (absolute) for the AMS and benzene synthesis methods. Because of limited data availability, additional work is needed to establish the uncertainty of the CO(2) cocktail method for analyzing biobased products.

  17. Age determination of mid-ocean ridge basalts by radiocarbon dating of lithified carbonate crusts

    SciTech Connect

    Kuptsov, V.M.; Bogdanov, Yu.A.; Palkina, A.M.; Lisitsyn, A.P.

    1986-01-01

    The processes that take place in the mid-ocean ridges are the key to their understanding of the evolution of the earth's crust and mantle. Mid-ocean ridge volcanism supplies vast masses of mantle material, forming new oceanic crust. In recent years, comprehensive study has been made of such processes. The problems of geochronology have an important place in these investigations, since only a study of the events in their time sequence will enable them to make a valid estimate of the intensity of these global processes. In 1980, crusts were obtained by the Pikar combined expedition in the Red Sea rift in the 18/sup 0/ study area on the lower tectonic terrace, in the axial zone, and in three deep water basins. Manned deep water submersible, dredges, trawls, bottom samplers, and impact tubes brought up basalts covered with lithified crusts, and also separate lithified crusts, collected from the basalt basement during sampling. The authors have dated the crusts by the radiocarbon method using the benzene technique. Results of the analysis give ages ranging from 2980 to 20,700 years. Results are discussed. The use of lithified carbonate crusts for determining the age of the basalts is effective within the range of the radiocarbon dating method (up to 40,000-45,000 years). This time interval is inaccessible for determinations by other methods of nuclear geochronology, which makes the method especially valuable. 1 reference, 2 figures, 1 table.

  18. Intracavity optogalvanic spectroscopy. An analytical technique for 14C analysis with subattomole sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Murnick, Daniel E; Dogru, Ozgur; Ilkmen, Erhan

    2008-07-01

    We show a new ultrasensitive laser-based analytical technique, intracavity optogalvanic spectroscopy, allowing extremely high sensitivity for detection of (14)C-labeled carbon dioxide. Capable of replacing large accelerator mass spectrometers, the technique quantifies attomoles of (14)C in submicrogram samples. Based on the specificity of narrow laser resonances coupled with the sensitivity provided by standing waves in an optical cavity and detection via impedance variations, limits of detection near 10(-15) (14)C/(12)C ratios are obtained. Using a 15-W (14)CO2 laser, a linear calibration with samples from 10(-15) to >1.5 x 10(-12) in (14)C/(12)C ratios, as determined by accelerator mass spectrometry, is demonstrated. Possible applications include microdosing studies in drug development, individualized subtherapeutic tests of drug metabolism, carbon dating and real time monitoring of atmospheric radiocarbon. The method can also be applied to detection of other trace entities.

  19. Youngest radiocarbon age for Jefferson's ground sloth, Megalonyx jeffersonii (Xenarthra, Megalonychidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory McDonald, H.; Stafford, Thomas W.; Gnidovec, Dale M.

    2015-03-01

    A partial skeleton of the extinct ground sloth, Megalonyx jeffersonii, recovered from a farm near Millersburg, Ohio in 1890, was radiocarbon dated for the first time. The ungual dated is part of a skeleton mounted for exhibit at the Orton Geological Museum at Ohio State University and was the first mounted skeleton of this animal. From its initial discovery the bones were treated with multiple organic compounds that had the potential to compromise the radiocarbon age and the specimen required special treatments in order to obtain a valid radiocarbon age. The 14C measurement on the ungual from this skeleton (11,235 ± 40 14C yr BP = 13,180-13,034 cal yr BP) is the youngest 14C age presently determined for M. jeffersonii.

  20. Is there an imbalance in the global budget of bomb-produced radiocarbon?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Atul K.; Kheshgi, Haroon S.; Wuebbles, Donald J.

    1997-01-01

    Several recent studies of the global inventory of radiocarbon produced by above ground nuclear weapons testing have brought into question our understanding of the global cycle of bomb-produced radiocarbon. Radiocarbon produced from these explosions has provided a unique test for global carbon cycle models used in the analysis of emission scenarios for carbon dioxide. We employ a globally aggregated model for the global cycles of carbon and its isotopes (13C and 14C) to examine these studies, and find several modeling approximations or assumptions which could be responsible for the differences between analyses. In light of the considerable uncertainty in both model-based and data-based estimates of global inventories, we conclude that the global budget of bomb-produced radiocarbon cannot be shown to be out of balance. Uncertainties limit the utility of 14C as a tracer for determining the flow of carbon dioxide within the atmosphere-ocean-terrestrial-biosphere system of carbon cycle. Our model-based analyses suggest that improved analysis of past nuclear tests and their production of radiocarbon, as well as additional measurements of 14C in the biosphere and oceans, could reduce uncertainties in model studies of the evolution of 14C in the carbon cycle system.

  1. The value of radiocarbon analysis in determining the forensic interest of human skeletal remains found in unusual circumstances.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Hugo F V; Puentes, Katerina; Soares, António Monge; Santos, Agostinho; Magalhães, Teresa

    2012-02-01

    The case under analysis refers to the remains of a young adult female found in a shallow grave during the construction work of a hospital in Northern Portugal. The forensic interest of the finding could not be ruled out since distinguishing features pointing to an archaeological grave were lacking. For example, absence of archaeological artefacts could not establish its forensic significance with certainty, together with the absence of modern objects, such as remnants of clothing or personal objects. In addition, although the remains were badly preserved, the condition may not have resulted from a long post-depositional period, but instead could be explained by the geology of the site and the presence of plant roots. The radiocarbon analysis of the remains was meant to establish the death of the individual to before or after the mid-1950s, from comparison with bomb-curve content values. A value of 0.9789 ± 0.0044 for F(14)C (pmC = 97.19 ± 0.44% Modern or Δ(14)C = -28.1 ± 4.4‰) was obtained, which placed the death of the individual in the pre-mod-1950s period. This report illustrates the use of radiocarbon analysis in establishing whether the human remains are contemporary or not and describes evidence for what appears to be an historic clandestine grave.

  2. The value of radiocarbon analysis in determining the forensic interest of human skeletal remains found in unusual circumstances.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Hugo F V; Puentes, Katerina; Soares, António Monge; Santos, Agostinho; Magalhães, Teresa

    2012-02-01

    The case under analysis refers to the remains of a young adult female found in a shallow grave during the construction work of a hospital in Northern Portugal. The forensic interest of the finding could not be ruled out since distinguishing features pointing to an archaeological grave were lacking. For example, absence of archaeological artefacts could not establish its forensic significance with certainty, together with the absence of modern objects, such as remnants of clothing or personal objects. In addition, although the remains were badly preserved, the condition may not have resulted from a long post-depositional period, but instead could be explained by the geology of the site and the presence of plant roots. The radiocarbon analysis of the remains was meant to establish the death of the individual to before or after the mid-1950s, from comparison with bomb-curve content values. A value of 0.9789 ± 0.0044 for F(14)C (pmC = 97.19 ± 0.44% Modern or Δ(14)C = -28.1 ± 4.4‰) was obtained, which placed the death of the individual in the pre-mod-1950s period. This report illustrates the use of radiocarbon analysis in establishing whether the human remains are contemporary or not and describes evidence for what appears to be an historic clandestine grave. PMID:22281219

  3. Carbon cycling in a complex lake: a novel use of Δ14C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keaveney, E. M.; Reimer, P. J.; Foy, R. H.

    2015-12-01

    Changing deposition chemistry, land use and climate induced impacts on hydrology will affect soil biogeochemistry and terrestrial C export and hence lake ecology with potential feedbacks for regional and global C cycling. Globally lakes bury and remineralise significant quantities of terrestrial C, and the associated flux of terrestrial C strongly influences their functioning. Primary production (autochthonous production) in lakes is based on dissolved inorganic C (DIC). DIC in alkaline lakes is partially derived from weathering of carbonaceous bedrock, a proportion of which is 14C-free. The low 14C activity yields an artificial age offset leading samples to appear hundreds to thousands of years older than their actual age. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and particulate organic carbon (POC) can contain terrestrial inputs. The terrestrial inputs can be labile or detrital; their age depends on their depth in catchment soil/peat stocks. We present a pilot study that uses the radiocarbon (∆14C) method to determine the source of carbon buried in the surface sediment of Lough Erne, a humic, alkaline lake in northwest Ireland. ∆14C, δ13C and δ15N values were measured from phytoplankton and other biota, dissolved inorganic, dissolved organic and particulate organic carbon. A novel radiocarbon method, Stepped Combustion1 was used to estimate the degree of the burial of terrestrial carbon in surface sediment. The ∆14C values of the low temperature fractions were comparable to algal ∆14C, while the high temperature fractions were 14C-depleted (older than bulk sediment). The ∆14C end-member model indicated that ~64% of carbon in surface sediment was derived from detrital terrestrial carbon. The use of ∆14C in conjunction with stepped combustion allows the quantification of the pathways of terrestrial carbon in the system, which has implications for regional and global carbon burial. 1McGeehin, J., Burr, G.S., Jull, A.J.T., Reines, D., Gosse, J., Davis, P.T., Muhs

  4. Tracing terrestrial carbon: a novel application of ∆14C in a humic lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keaveney, Evelyn; Reimer, Paula J.; Foy, Robert H.

    2016-04-01

    Lakes play an important yet underrated role in global carbon cycles. Terrestrial carbon (C) is buried and/or remineralised in significant quantities, and lake function may also be affected by catchment inputs with potential feedbacks for regional and global C cycling. Changing deposition chemistry, land use and climate induced impacts on hydrology will affect soil biogeochemistry, terrestrial C export, and hence lake ecology. Autochthonous production in lakes is based on dissolved inorganic C (DIC). DIC in alkaline lakes is partially derived from weathering of carbonaceous bedrock, a proportion of which is 14C-free. The low 14C activity yields an artificial age offset leading samples to appear hundreds to thousands of years older than their actual age. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and particulate organic carbon (POC) can contain terrestrial inputs. The terrestrial inputs can be labile or detrital and their age depends to a first order on their depth in catchment soil/peat stocks. We present a pilot study that uses the radiocarbon (∆14C) method to determine the source of carbon buried in the surface sediment of Lower Lough Erne, a humic, alkaline lake in northwest Ireland. ∆14C, δ13C and δ15N values were measured from phytoplankton and other biota, dissolved inorganic, dissolved organic and particulate organic carbon. A novel radiocarbon method, Stepped Combustion1 was used to estimate the degree of the burial of terrestrial carbon in surface sediment, collected in 2011. The ∆14C values of the low temperature fractions were comparable to algal ∆14C, while the high temperature fractions were 14C-depleted (older than bulk sediment). The ∆14C end-member model indicated that ~64% of carbon in surface sediment was derived from detrital terrestrial carbon. The same proportion of detrital/labile carbon was found in surface sediment of Upper Lough Erne in 2014, despite the differences in lake type and collection date. The use of ∆14C in conjunction with

  5. Application of compound-specific radiocarbon dating for Antarctic margin sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkouchi, N.; Koizumi, M.; Anderson, J. B.; Eglinton, T. I.; Miura, H.; Yokoyama, Y.

    2008-12-01

    Radiocarbon dating has been extensively applied for the development of chronologies of Antarctic margin sediments deposited during the late Quaternary. However, the problems are 1) the DIC reservoir age in the surface mixed layer is much older than that of the other oceans, 2) Antarctic margin sediments generally lack calcareous foraminifera conventionally used for radiocarbon dating and as stratigraphic tool, and 3) the sediments are subjected to significant "contamination" of relict organic matter eroded from the Antarctic continent, leading to substantially older radiocarbon ages of bulk sedimentary organic matter. Ohkouchi et al. (2003) first applied compound-specific radiocarbon dating to the surface sediments collected from Ross Sea, Antarctica for resolving the problem. They reported that the radiocarbon ages of solvent-extractable, short-chain (C14, C16, and C18) fatty acids are consistent with the modern DIC reservoir age (Pre-bomb: 14C -150, Post-bomb: 14C -100). Furthermore, the radiocarbon ages of these fatty acids at five down-core intervals progressively increase with the core depth. These results clearly show a utility of the compound- specific radiocarbon dating for developing sediment chronologies in Antarctic margin sediments. We also determined radiocarbon ages of the fatty acids from a core recovered in the NW Ross Sea to reconstruct sediment chronologies. Furthermore, we determined hydrogen isotopic compositions of sedimentary biomarkers in the core. Around 6.8, 5.7, 4.1, 2.5, and 1.5 kyr ago, the reconstructed D values of paleo- seawater were -200 or lower, suggesting a large amount of meltwater influx to the Ross Sea. Currently, we are applying the method to more sediment samples collected from wider area of Ross Sea to investigate the timing and pattern of retreat of West Antarctic Ice Sheet in the Holocene. I will present the up-dated results in my talk.

  6. Radiocarbon age of waters in the deep Atlantic revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Broecker, W.S.; Virgilio, A. ); Peng, T.H. )

    1991-01-01

    The authors use a simple box model to evaluate the impact of temporal changes of the atmosphere's {sup 14}C/C on ventilation fluxes for the deep Atlantic calculated from radiocarbon measurements. The conclusion is that despite the fact that over the 300 year period from 1650 to 1950 the atmosphere's radiocarbon content declined at the same rate as radiocarbon decays, this temporal change has a relatively small impact (10-15%) on radiocarbon-based estimates of the ventilation rate of the deep Atlantic. The reason is that the radiocarbon content of the source waters for deep Atlantic are reasonably well buffered against changes in atmospheric {sup 14}C/C.

  7. Determination of Natural 14C Abundances in Dissolved Organic Carbon in Organic-Rich Marine Sediment Porewaters by Thermal Sulfate Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, L.; Komada, T.

    2010-12-01

    The abundances of natural 14C in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the marine environment hold clues regarding the processes that influence the biogeochemical cycling of this large carbon reservoir. At present, UV irradiation is the widely accepted method for oxidizing seawater DOC for determination of their 14C abundances. This technique yields precise and accurate values with low blanks, but it requires a dedicated vacuum line, and hence can be difficult to implement. As an alternative technique that can be conducted on a standard preparatory vacuum line, we modified and tested a thermal sulfate reduction method that was previously developed to determine δ13C values of marine DOC (Fry B. et al., 1996. Analysis of marine DOC using a dry combustion method. Mar. Chem., 54: 191-201.) to determine the 14C abundances of DOC in marine sediment porewaters. In this method, the sample is dried in a 100 ml round-bottom Pyrex flask in the presence of excess oxidant (K2SO4) and acid (H3PO4), and combusted at 550 deg.C. The combustion products are cryogenically processed to collect and quantify CO2 using standard procedures. Materials we have oxidized to date range from 6-24 ml in volume, and 95-1500 μgC in size. The oxidation efficiency of this method was tested by processing known amounts of reagent-grade dextrose and sucrose (as examples of labile organic matter), tannic acid and humic acid (as examples of complex natural organic matter), and porewater DOC extracted from organic-rich nearshore sediments. The carbon yields for all of these materials averaged 99±4% (n=18). The 14C abundances of standard materials IAEA C-6 and IAEA C-5 processed by this method using >1mgC aliquots were within error of certified values. The size and the isotopic value of the blank were determined by a standard dilution technique using IAEA C-6 and IAEA C-5 that ranged in size from 150 to 1500 μgC (n=4 and 2, respectively). This yielded a blank size of 6.7±0.7 μgC, and a blank isotopic

  8. Preventing and Removing Contamination in a Natural Radiocarbon Sample Preparation Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Zermeno, P; Kurdyla, D K; Buchholz, B A; Heller, S J; Frantz, B R; Brown, T A; Kashgarian, M

    2002-10-25

    The introduction of elevated {sup 14}C contamination into a natural radiocarbon sample preparation laboratory can occur through many different pathways. The most difficult to control is the introduction of contaminated samples from outside labs. Laboratories can remain {sup 14}C contaminated as a result of earlier tracer based research, even if ''hot'' work has not occurred in the laboratories in decades. Prior to accepting samples from outside collaborators, it is recommended that the collaborators test their labs for {sup 14}C contamination. Any surface in a lab that has high use by multiple people has the potential to be contaminated. The standard procedure for determining whether a collaborator's lab is contaminated consists of swiping lab surfaces with small glass fiber filters wetted with alcohol and measuring them for {sup 14}C content using AMS. Volatile {sup 14}C can be detected by using aerosol monitors consisting of fine soot that is depleted in {sup 14}C. These monitors can be set out in the laboratory in question to check for volatile {sup 14}C contamination. In the event that a hot sample is introduced in the natural radiocarbon sample prep laboratory, all sample submission should be stopped until the lab is declared clean. Samples already being processed should be completed along with {sup 14}C depleted material and measured by AMS. This will help determine if the contaminated samples have affected other samples in the laboratory. After a contamination event, the laboratory and associated equipment requires cleaning or disposal. All surfaces and equipment should be wiped down with acetone or ethanol. All chemicals in use should be disposed of in the appropriate waste containers and those waste containers removed from the lab. Once the natural radiocarbon laboratory has been thoroughly ''cleaned'', several background samples consisting of {sup 14}C depleted material should be processed through the lab and measured by AMS before unknown samples are

  9. Extraction of in situ cosmogenic 14C from olivine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pigati, J.S.; Lifton, N.A.; Timothy, Jull A.J.; Quade, Jay

    2010-01-01

    Chemical pretreatment and extraction techniques have been developed previously to extract in situ cosmogenic radiocarbon (in situ 14C) from quartz and carbonate. These minerals can be found in most environments on Earth, but are usually absent from mafic terrains. To fill this gap, we conducted numerous experiments aimed at extracting in situ 14C from olivine ((Fe,Mg)2SiO4). We were able to extract a stable and reproducible in situ 14C component from olivine using stepped heating and a lithium metaborate (LiBO2) flux, following treatment with dilute HNO3 over a variety of experimental conditions. However, measured concentrations for samples from the Tabernacle Hill basalt flow (17.3 ?? 0.3 ka4) in central Utah and the McCarty's basalt flow (3.0 ?? 0.2 ka) in western New Mexico were significantly lower than expected based on exposure of olivine in our samples to cosmic rays at each site. The source of the discrepancy is not clear. We speculate that in situ 14C atoms may not have been released from Mg-rich crystal lattices (the olivine composition at both sites was ~Fo65Fa35). Alternatively, a portion of the 14C atoms released from the olivine grains may have become trapped in synthetic spinel-like minerals that were created in the olivine-flux mixture during the extraction process, or were simply retained in the mixture itself. Regardless, the magnitude of the discrepancy appears to be inversely proportional to the Fe/(Fe+Mg) ratio of the olivine separates. If we apply a simple correction factor based on the chemical composition of the separates, then corrected in situ 14C concentrations are similar to theoretical values at both sites. At this time, we do not know if this agreement is fortuitous or real. Future research should include measurement of in situ 14C concentrations in olivine from known-age basalt flows with different chemical compositions (i.e. more Fe-rich) to determine if this correction is robust for all olivine-bearing rocks. ?? 2010 by the Arizona

  10. Recent AMS measurements of {sup 14}C in soil organic matter: Understanding controls of carbon storage and turnover in soils

    SciTech Connect

    Trumbore, S.E.; Torn, M.S.; Chadwick, O.A.

    1996-10-01

    Radiocarbon measurements are one of the best tools available for determining the rates of carbon and turnover of in soil organic matter. AMS measurements of radiocarbon are essential they allow measurement of {sup 14}C in archived soils with very low carbon content, in physically or chemically fractionated soil organic matter, in dissolved organic carbon leached from soils, as well as in CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} produced during decomposition. We report recent results demonstrating the importance of applying AMS soil radiocarbon measurements to questions of soil C dynamics. We used the increase in {open_quote}bomb{close_quote} {sup 14}C between archived an modem soil profiles sampled along an elevation transect in the Sierra Nevada mountains, California, to determine the role of temperature in determining the rate of turnover of fast-cycling soil organic matter. To study the role of soil mineralogy in determining how carbon is stabilized in {open_quote}passive{close_quote} soil organic matter pools, we compare soil mineralogy and C and {sup 14}C storage in soils along a chronosequence in the Hawaiian islands. Implications for the global C cycle will be discussed.

  11. Radiocarbon dating of fossil mollusk shells in the Yucca Mountain region

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, R.; Quade, J.

    1995-12-01

    Fossil mollusk shells from late Quaternary deposits in Southern Nevada were radiocarbon dated to determine the age of paleogroundwater discharge events and to establish minimum {sup 14}C ages of paleogroundwater. Shells of the terrestrial taxa Vallonia sp. and Succineidae returned {sup 14}C dates consistent with those on organic material in the same stratigraphic position. The aquatic taxa Gyraulus parvus and Gyraulus circumstratus returned the oldest dates within each unit samples. These results show that (1) fossil Vallonia and Succineidae are useful in dating deposits in which no other radiocarbon-datable material is available, and (2) Gyraulus sp. select micro habitats with the most {sup 14}C deficient water, providing minimum ages of groundwater in the area during the last glacial period.

  12. Radiocarbon Dating.

    PubMed

    Van Strydonck, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Although most historians and art historians consider the radiocarbon dating technique not to be very precise by their criteria, the method has gained much importance over the last decades. Radiocarbon dating is increasingly used in the field of textile research and old polychrome statues, but also objects made of ivory, stucco, paper, and parchment are dated with the technique. Especially after the introduction of the AMS technique, a boom of this type of research has been noticed.

  13. Radiocarbon Dating.

    PubMed

    Van Strydonck, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Although most historians and art historians consider the radiocarbon dating technique not to be very precise by their criteria, the method has gained much importance over the last decades. Radiocarbon dating is increasingly used in the field of textile research and old polychrome statues, but also objects made of ivory, stucco, paper, and parchment are dated with the technique. Especially after the introduction of the AMS technique, a boom of this type of research has been noticed. PMID:27573138

  14. 14C Analysis of protein extracts from Bacillus spores.

    PubMed

    Cappuccio, Jenny A; Falso, Miranda J Sarachine; Kashgarian, Michaele; Buchholz, Bruce A

    2014-07-01

    Investigators of bioagent incidents or interdicted materials need validated, independent analytical methods that will allow them to distinguish between recently made bioagent samples versus material drawn from the archives of a historical program. Heterotrophic bacteria convert the carbon in their food sources, growth substrate or culture media, into the biomolecules they need. The F(14)C (fraction modern radiocarbon) of a variety of media, Bacillus spores, and separated proteins from Bacillus spores was measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). AMS precisely measures F(14)C values of biological materials and has been used to date the synthesis of biomaterials over the bomb pulse era (1955 to present). The F(14)C of Bacillus spores reflects the radiocarbon content of the media in which they were grown. In a survey of commercial media we found that the F(14)C value indicated that carbon sources for the media were alive within about a year of the date of manufacture and generally of terrestrial origin. Hence, bacteria and their products can be dated using their (14)C signature. Bacillus spore samples were generated onsite with defined media and carbon free purification and also obtained from archived material. Using mechanical lysis and a variety of washes with carbon free acids and bases, contaminant carbon was removed from soluble proteins to enable accurate (14)C bomb-pulse dating. Since media is contemporary, (14)C bomb-pulse dating of isolated soluble proteins can be used to distinguish between historical archives of bioagents and those produced from recent media.

  15. Influence of matrix diffusion and exchange reactions on radiocarbon ages in fissured carbonate aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Maloszewski, P. ); Zuber, A. )

    1991-08-01

    The parallel fissure model coupled with the equation of diffusion into the matrix and with exchange reaction equations has been used to derive a simple formula for estimating the influence of matrix porosity and reaction parameters on the determination of radiocarbon ages in fissured carbonate rocks. Examples of evidently too great radiocarbon ages in carbonate formations, which are not explainable by models for the initial {sup 14}C corrections, can easily be explained by this formula. Parameters obtained for a chalk formation from a known multitracer experiment combined with a pumping test suggest a possibility of {sup 14}C ages more than three orders of magnitude greater than the ages which would be observed if the radiocarbon transport took place only in the mobile water in the fissures. It is shown that contrary to the solute movement on a small scale and with a variable input, the large-scale movement, characteristic for the {sup 14}C dating, does not necessarily require the knowledge of kinetic parameters, because they may be replaced by the distribution coefficient. Discordant tritium and {sup 14}C concentrations are commonly interpreted as a proof of mixing either in the aquifer or at the discharge site. For fissured carbonate formations, however, an alternative explanation is given by the derived model showing a considerable delay of {sup 14}C with respect to nonsorbable tracers.

  16. 14C release from a Soviet-designed pressurized water reactor nuclear power plant.

    PubMed

    Uchrin, G; Csaba, E; Hertelendi, E; Ormai, P; Barnabas, I

    1992-12-01

    The Paks Nuclear Power Plant in Hungary runs with four pressurized water reactors, each of 440-MWe capacity. Sampling systems have been developed and used to determine the 14C of various chemical forms (14CO2, 14CO, 14CnHm) in the airborne releases. The average normalized yearly discharge rates for the time period 1988-1991 are equal to 0.77 TBq GWe-1 y-1 for hydrocarbons and 0.05 TBq GWe-1 y-1 for CO2. The contribution of 14CO was less than 0.5% of the total emission. The 14C discharge rate is estimated to be four times higher than the corresponding mean data of Western European pressurized water reactors. The calculated effective dose equivalent to individuals living in the vicinity of the power plant, due to 14C release, was 0.64 microSv in 1991 while the effective dose equivalent due to the natural 14C level was 15 microSv y-1. The long-term global impact of the 14C release in the operational period of the plant (1982-1991) was 1,270 man-Sv. The 14C excess in the environmental air has been measured since 1989 by taking biweekly samples at a distance of 1.7 km from the nuclear power plant. The long-term average of radiocarbon excess coming from the power plant was 2 mBq m-3. The local 14C deposition was followed by tree ring analysis, too. No 14C increase higher than the uncertainty of the measurement (four per thousand = 0.17 mBq m-3) was observed.

  17. Radiocarbon in otoliths of yelloweye rockfish (Sebastes ruberrimus): a reference time series for the coastal waters of southeast Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr-Ferrey, L A; Andrews, A H; Frantz, B R; Coale, K H; Brown, T A; Cailliet, G M

    2003-10-14

    Atmospheric testing of thermonuclear devices during the 1950s and 1960s created a global radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) signal in the environment that has provided a useful tracer and chronological marker in oceanic systems and organisms. The bomb-generated {sup 14}C signal retained in fish otoliths can be used as a permanent, time-specific recorder of the 14C present in ambient seawater, making it a useful tool in age validation of fishes. The goal of this study was to determine {sup 14}C levels in otoliths of the age-validated yelloweye rockfish (Sebastes ruberrimus) to establish a reference time series for the coastal waters of southeast Alaska. Radiocarbon values from the first year's growth of 43 yelloweye rockfish otoliths were plotted against estimated birth year to produce a 14C time series for these waters spanning 1940 to 1990. The time series shows the initial rise of bomb 14C occurred in 1958 in coastal southeast Alaskan waters and {sup 14}C levels rose relatively rapidly to peak {Delta}{sup 14}C values (60-70%) between 1966 and 1971, with a subsequent declining trend through the end of the record in 1990 (-3.2%). In addition, the radiocarbon data, independent of the radiometric study, confirms the longevity of the yelloweye rockfish up to a minimum of 44 years and strongly supports higher age estimates. The yelloweye rockfish record provides a {sup 14}C chronology that will be useful for the interpretation of {sup 14}C accreted in biological samples from these waters and in future rockfish age validation studies.

  18. Reconstructing Ocean Circulation using Coral (triangle)14C Time Series

    SciTech Connect

    Kashgarian, M; Guilderson, T P

    2001-02-23

    We utilize monthly {sup 14}C data derived from coral archives in conjunction with ocean circulation models to address two questions: (1) how does the shallow circulation of the tropical Pacific vary on seasonal to decadal time scales and (2) which dynamic processes determine the mean vertical structure of the equatorial Pacific thermocline. Our results directly impact the understanding of global climate events such as the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). To study changes in ocean circulation and water mass distribution involved in the genesis and evolution of ENSO and decadal climate variability, it is necessary to have records of climate variables several decades in length. Continuous instrumental records are limited because technology for continuous monitoring of ocean currents (e.g. satellites and moored arrays) has only recently been available, and ships of opportunity archives such as COADS contain large spatial and temporal biases. In addition, temperature and salinity in surface waters are not conservative and thus can not be independently relied upon to trace water masses, reducing the utility of historical observations. Radiocarbon in sea water is a quasi-conservative water mass tracer and is incorporated into coral skeletal material, thus coral {sup 14}C records can be used to reconstruct changes in shallow circulation that would be difficult to characterize using instrumental data. High resolution {Delta}{sup 14}C timeseries such as ours, provide a powerful constraint on the rate of surface ocean mixing and hold great promise to augment one time oceanographic surveys. {Delta}{sup 14}C timeseries such as these, not only provide fundamental information about the shallow circulation of the Pacific, but can also be directly used as a benchmark for the next generation of high resolution ocean models used in prognosticating climate. The measurement of {Delta}{sup 14}C in biological archives such as tree rings and coral growth bands is a direct record of

  19. No evidence for a deglacial intermediate water Δ14C anomaly in the SW Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sortor, R. N.; Lund, D. C.

    2010-12-01

    Reconstructions of Δ14C from the eastern tropical Pacific show that severe depletions in 14C occurred at intermediate depths during the last deglaciation (Marchitto et al. 2007; Stott et al. 2009). Marchitto et al. (2007) suggested that old radiocarbon from an isolated abyssal reservoir was injected via the Southern Ocean, and that this anomaly was then carried by Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) to the tropical Pacific. However, a core from the southeastern Pacific Ocean near Chile, which is in the direct path of modern-day AAIW, does not exhibit the excursion and therefore casts doubts upon the AAIW mechanism (De Pol-Holz et al. 2010). Here we evaluate whether or not a deglacial 14C anomaly similar to that in the eastern tropical Pacific occurred at intermediate depths in the South Atlantic. We reconstructed Δ14C using planktonic and benthic foraminifera from core KNR159-5-36GGC on the Brazil Margin (27○31’S and 46○28’W, 1268 m depth). In the modern ocean, the hydrography near this core site is heavily influenced by AAIW (Oppo & Horowitz, 2000). Benthic Δ14C values were determined using raw benthic 14C ages and calendar-calibrated planktonic ages. The deglacial benthic Δ14C trend at this site is similar to the atmospheric Δ14C trend, and is consistent with U/Th-dated corals from intermediate depths on the Brazil Margin (Mangini et al. 2010). The amplitude and timing of Δ14C changes in the foraminiferal and coral records are especially congruous during the Mystery Interval. We find no evidence in the southwestern Atlantic of a ~300‰ decrease in intermediate water Δ14C beginning at 18 kyr BP. Changes in reservoir age of ~1000 years are required to create a Baja-like Δ14C anomaly off Brazil, an implausible increase for a subtropical gyre location. Furthermore, the resulting sedimentation rates would be up to ~145 cm/kyr during the deglaciation, an order of magnitude higher than the average sedimentation rate for 36GGC. When our results are

  20. Study of the formation of biogenic speleothems found in submarine caves at the cape of Otranto, Italy, by 14C AMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Elia, M.; Quarta, G.; Calcagnile, L.; Belmonte, G.

    2007-06-01

    Submarine caves at the Cape of Otranto, Italy, contain eccentric stalactites that were recently identified as entirely biogenic. One of these stalactites was sectioned along its longitudinal axis in order to select samples for radiocarbon dating. 14C AMS measurements provided fundamental information for the interpretation of the biogenic process and revealed that the formation of the stalactite continued for approximately 5000 years with a decrease in the longitudinal growth rate over time. Measurements of modern organisms were performed to assess the accuracy of the radiocarbon determinations, calibrated in calendar years by measuring the local marine reservoir age.

  1. Low energy cyclotron for radiocarbon dating

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    The author built and tested a low energy cyclotron for radiocarbon dating similar to a conventional mass spectrometer. These tests clearly show that with the addition of a conventional ion source, the low energy cyclotron can perform the extremely high sensitivity /sup 14/C measurements that are now done at accelerator facilities. The author found that no significant background is present when the cyclotron is tuned to accelerate /sup 14/C negative ions and the transmission efficiency is adequate to perform radiocarbon dating on milligram samples of carbon. The internal ion source used did not produce sufficient current to detect /sup 14/C directly at modern concentrations. The author shows how a conventional carbon negative ion source located outside the cyclotron magnet, would produce sufficient beam and provide for quick sample changing to make radiocarbon dating milligram samples with a modest laboratory instrument feasible.

  2. Age validation of quillback rockfish (Sebastes maliger) using bomb radiocarbon

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, L A; Andrews, A H; Munk, K; Coale, K H; Frantz, B R; Cailliet, G M; Brown, T A

    2005-01-05

    Rockfishes (Sebastes spp.) support one of the most economically important fisheries of the Pacific Northwest and it is essential for sustainable management that age estimation procedures be validated for these species. Atmospheric testing of thermonuclear devices during the 1950s and 1960s created a global radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) signal in the ocean environment that scientists have identified as a useful tracer and chronological marker in natural systems. In this study, we first demonstrated that fewer samples are necessary for age validation using the bomb-generated {sup 14}C signal by emphasizing the utility of the time-specific marker created by the initial rise of bomb-{sup 14}C. Second, the bomb-generated {sup 14}C signal retained in fish otoliths was used to validate the age and age estimation methodology of the quillback rockfish (Sebastes maliger) in the waters of southeast Alaska. Radiocarbon values from the first year's growth of quillback rockfish otoliths were plotted against estimated birth year producing a {sup 14}C time series spanning 1950 to 1985. The initial rise of bomb-{sup 14}C from pre-bomb levels ({approx} -90 {per_thousand}) occurred in 1959 {+-} 1 year and {sup 14}C levels rose relatively rapidly to peak {Delta}{sup 14}C values in 1967 (+105.4 {per_thousand}), with a subsequent declining trend through the end of the record in 1985 (+15.4 {per_thousand}). The agreement between the year of initial rise of {sup 14}C levels from the quillback rockfish record and the chronometer determined for the waters of southeast Alaska from yelloweye rockfish (S. ruberrimus) otoliths validated the ageing methodology for the quillback rockfish. The concordance of the entire quillback rockfish {sup 14}C record with the yelloweye rockfish time series demonstrated the effectiveness of this age validation technique, confirmed the longevity of the quillback rockfish up to a minimum of 43 years, and strongly supports higher age estimates of up to 90 years.

  3. Long-term sampling of CO(2) from waste-to-energy plants: (14)C determination methodology, data variation and uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Fuglsang, Karsten; Pedersen, Niels Hald; Larsen, Anna Warberg; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2014-02-01

    A dedicated sampling and measurement method was developed for long-term measurements of biogenic and fossil-derived CO(2) from thermal waste-to-energy processes. Based on long-term sampling of CO(2) and (14)C determination, plant-specific emission factors can be determined more accurately, and the annual emission of fossil CO(2) from waste-to-energy plants can be monitored according to carbon trading schemes and renewable energy certificates. Weekly and monthly measurements were performed at five Danish waste incinerators. Significant variations between fractions of biogenic CO(2) emitted were observed, not only over time, but also between plants. From the results of monthly samples at one plant, the annual mean fraction of biogenic CO(2) was found to be 69% of the total annual CO(2) emissions. From weekly samples, taken every 3 months at the five plants, significant seasonal variations in biogenic CO(2) emissions were observed (between 56% and 71% biogenic CO(2)). These variations confirmed that biomass fractions in the waste can vary considerably, not only from day to day but also from month to month. An uncertainty budget for the measurement method itself showed that the expanded uncertainty of the method was ± 4.0 pmC (95 % confidence interval) at 62 pmC. The long-term sampling method was found to be useful for waste incinerators for determination of annual fossil and biogenic CO(2) emissions with relatively low uncertainty.

  4. Radiocarbon: nature's tracer for carbonaceous pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Currie, L.A.; Klouda, G.A.; Gerlach, R.W.

    1982-01-01

    Recent developments in radiocarbon dating techniques have made it feasible to determine /sup 14/C//sup 12/C ratios in samples containing milligram or even microgram quantities of carbon. As a result, it has become practicable to apply these techniques to the study of trace gases and particles in the atmosphere, as a means of resolving anthropogenic from natural source components. Interpretation of /sup 14/C data is straightforward: biospheric carbon (such as vegetation) is alive with a /sup 14/C//sup 12/C ratio of about 1.5 x 10 to the 12th power, whereas fossil carbon is dead. Beyond this dichotomous classification it becomes very interesting to combine the isotopic data with concurrent chemical data, as well as spatial and temporal distributions, in order to infer the strengths of specific sources of carbonaceous pollutants. A brief review will be presented of program on atmospheric gases and carbonaceous particles. For the latter, the authors have assayed individual chemical and size fractions, and samples collected in urban, rural, and remote locales. The biogenic carbon fraction -- presumably from wood-burning -- ranged from 10 to 100% for the urban samples analyzed.

  5. 14C-carbaryl residues in hazelnut.

    PubMed

    Yücel, Ulkü; Ilim, Murat; Aslan, Nazife

    2006-01-01

    A hazelnut ocak (shrub growing form) in the field in Black Sea region of Turkey was treated with commercial carbaryl insecticide spiked with 14C-carbaryl. Three months later, the harvested hazelnuts were separated into husk, shell, and kernel components, then homogenized and analyzed. The total and unextractable (bound) 14C-residues were determined by combustion and the extractable 14C-residues were obtained by extracting the samples with methanol. Concentrated extracts were first analyzed by thin layer chromatography (TLC). The extracts were also subjected to a series of liquid-liquid extraction procedures for clean-up and the final extracts were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Crude hazelnut oil was also extracted with hexane and analyzed for total 14C-residue. A total of 1.3% of applied radioactivity was recovered from the total nut harvested, with 0.04%, 0.06%, and 1.2% present in shell, kernel, and husk, respectively. The results show that the inedible husk and shell contained 95.7% 14C, whereas the edible kernel contained 4.3% of the total 14C recovered. The terminal 14C-residue in hazelnut kernel and oil did not contain carbaryl and/or its metabolite naphthol.

  6. Coastal New England pilot study to determine fossil and biogenic formaldehyde source contributions using radiocarbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Haiwei; Heikes, Brian G.; Merrill, John T.; McNichol, Ann P.; Xu, Li

    2010-05-01

    Compound specific radiocarbon analyses of atmospheric formaldehyde are reported as fraction modern (Fm) for a limited number of winter and summer air samples collected in coastal southern New England in 2007. The 11 of 13 samples with Fm < 0.2 were collected under the influence of the semipermanent Bermuda high-pressure system with transport from the Washington, D. C., to New York City urban corridor. The two samples with Fm > 0.2 (max ˜ 0.35) were collected on days with strong northwesterly flow and the least urban impact. The Fm data were combined with VOC observations from the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management, estimates of oxygenated VOC (OVOC), and back trajectories to interpret the relative contributions of biogenic and fossil carbon sources. It is argued that CH2O sources were dominated by pollutant VOCs and OVOCs from upwind coastal cities as opposed to more local biogenic VOCs at the times of sample collection.

  7. Whole Ecosystem Low-level 14C Pulse Labeling and CO2 Flux Measurements in a Boreal Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, M.; Trumbore, S.; Czimczik, C.; McDuffee, K.; McMillan, A.

    2004-12-01

    We developed a large volume, low level, 14C pulse-chase, field labeling method to determine the timing and contribution of recent photosynthetic products to total ecosystem respiration in a poorly drained black spruce forest stand in Manitoba, Canada. The site is part of a chronosequence of black spruce stands located in the BOREAS Northern Study Area (55N, 98W), and time since fire is 40 years. The radiocarbon addition was designed to produce a 14C signature of ~1500 times Modern for CO2 at ambient levels inside the ~37,000 L volume light chamber. At this level of labeling, the radioactivity in our 14C source (acidified sodium bicarbonate solution with specific activity of ~30 nCi/g) and in the chamber were well below levels that are regulated. We labeled two chambers in August 2004. The vegetation inside the first (37,000 L) chamber included black spruce trees (ranging from seedlings to 4 m tall) with feather moss and shrub understory. A second 14CO2 label was applied in a smaller chamber (500 L) containing only feather mosses. Both chambers were constructed from polyethylene plastic that allowed for 70 percent transmission of PAR. For seven days following the label, we measured the quantity and 14C content of soil respiration with small (10 L) dark chambers, above-ground respiration with branch bags, and total ecosystem respiration with a dark chamber. Live root and moss 14C content were measured by field incubations. Additionally, soil gas 14C content at two depths within the moss/organic layer was measured. Radiocarbon measurements are made using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry, which allows us to easily distinguish the presence of the label in small amounts (mg) of material. We will report the radiocarbon (delta 14C) signature of individual respiration sources. Preliminary results show that we can use these isotopic signatures to follow the labeled contribution of respiration from individual sources (moss, root/root exudates, and needle) to total ecosystem

  8. A simplified In Situ cosmogenic 14C extraction system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pigati, J.S.; Lifton, N.A.; Timothy, Jull A.J.; Quade, Jay

    2010-01-01

    We describe the design, construction, and testing of a new, simplified in situ radiocarbon extraction system at the University of Arizona. Blank levels for the new system are low ((234 ?? 11) ?? 103 atoms (1 ??; n = 7)) and stable. The precision of a given measurement depends on the concentration of 14C, but is typically <5% for concentrations of 100 ?? 103 atoms g-1 or more. The new system is relatively small and easy to construct, costs significantly less than the original in situ 14C extraction system at Arizona, and lends itself to future automation. ?? 2010 by the Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona.

  9. Radiocarbon-based source apportionment of black carbon (BC) in PM 10 aerosols from residential area of suburban Tokyo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Masao; Kumata, Hidetoshi; Koike, Yasuyo; Tsuzuki, Mikio; Uchida, Tatsuya; Fujiwara, Kitao; Shibata, Yasuyuki

    2010-04-01

    The AMS technique was applied to analyse black carbon (BC), total organic carbon (TOC), and previously reported polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in PM 10 aerosols from a residential area, suburban Tokyo, to determine natural abundance of radiocarbon ( 14C), an ideal tracer to distinguish fossil fuel ( 14C-free) from modern biomass combustion sources of pyrolytic products. The 14C concentrations in BC, isolated using the CTO-375 method, were 42% and 30% pMC (in terms of percent Modern Carbon: pMC) in summer and winter, respectively. The 14C concentrations in BC were also compared with those of compound-class specific 14C content of PAHs previously reported for the same samples: they were 45% and 33% pMC in summer and winter, respectively. The 14C signals of BC were identical to those of high molecular weight (MW ⩾ 226, 5-6 rings) PAHs. The resemblance between 14C signals of BC and PAHs can be referred as a 'certificate' for the validity of the BC isolation method employed in this study. Also, it suggests that 14C-BC approach can be a surrogate for PAHs specific 14C analyses to monitor seasonal source variation of combustion-derived pyrolytic products. On the other hand, 14C contents of total organic carbon in 2004 were 61% and 42% pMC in summer and winter, respectively. This is likely attributed to higher contribution of plant activity in summer.

  10. Extraneous carbon assessment in ultra-microscale radiocarbon analysis using benzene polycarboxylic acids (BPCA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanke, Ulrich M.; McIntyre, Cameron P.; Schmidt, Michael W. I.; Wacker, Lukas; Eglinton, Timothy I.

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of the natural abundance of radiocarbon (14C) concentrations in inorganic and organic carbon-containing materials can be used to investigate their date of origin. Particularly, the biogeochemical cycling of specific compounds in the environment may be investigated applying molecular marker analyses. However, the isolation of specific molecules from environmental matrices requires a complex processing procedure resulting in small sample sizes that often contain less than 30 μg C. Such small samples are sensitive to extraneous carbon (Cex) that is introduced during the purification of the compounds (Shah and Pearson, 2007). We present a thorough radiocarbon blank assessment for benzene polycarboxylic acids (BPCA), a proxy for combustion products that are formed during the oxidative degradation of condensed polyaromatic structures (Wiedemeier et al, in press). The extraneous carbon assessment includes reference material for (1) chemical extraction, (2) preparative liquid chromatography (3) wet chemical oxidation which are subsequently measured with gas ion source AMS (Accelerator Mass Spectrometer, 5-100 μg C). We always use pairs of reference materials, radiocarbon depleted (14Cfossil) and modern (14Cmodern) to determine the fraction modern (F14C) of Cex.Our results include detailed information about the quantification of Cex in radiocarbon molecular marker analysis using BPCA. Error propagation calculations indicate that ultra-microscale samples (20-30 μg) are feasible with uncertainties of less than 10 %. Calculations of the constant contamination reveal important information about the source (F14C) and mass (μg) of Cex (Wacker and Christl, 2011) for each sub procedure. An external correction of compound specific radiocarbon data is essential for robust results that allow for a high degree of confidence in the 14C results. References Shah and Pearson, 2007. Ultra-microscale (5-25μg C) analysis of individual lipids by 14C AMS: Assessment and

  11. 14C dating of bone using (gamma) Carboxyglutamic Acid and Carboxyglycine (Aminomalonate)

    SciTech Connect

    Southon, J R; Burky, R T; Kirner, D L; Taylor, R E; Hare, P E

    1999-04-27

    Radiocarbon determinations have been obtained on {gamma}-carboxyglutamic acid [Gla] and {alpha}-carboxyglycine (aminomalonate) [Am] as well as acid- and base-hydrolyzed total amino acids isolated from a series of fossil bones. As far as they are aware, Am has not been reported previously in fossil bone and neither Gla nor Am {sup 14}C values have been measured previously. Interest in Gla, an amino acid found in the non-collagen proteins osteocalcin and matrix Gla-protein (MGP), proceeds from the suggestion that it may be preferentially retained and more resistant to diagenetic contamination affecting {sup 14}C values in bones exhibiting low and trace amounts of collagen. The data do not support these suggestions. The suite of bones examined showed a general tendency for total amino acid and Gla concentrations to decrease in concert. Even for bones retaining significant amounts of collagen, Gla (and Am extracts) can yield {sup 14}C values discordant with their expected age and with {sup 14}C values obtained on total amino-acid fractions isolated from the same bone sample.

  12. Test of AMS 14C dating of pollen concentrates using tephrochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newnham, Rewi M.; Vandergoes, Marcus J.; Garnett, Mark H.; Lowe, David J.; Prior, Christine; Almond, Peter C.

    2007-01-01

    Previous attempts to radiocarbon date sediments >10 kyr from the high rainfall region of Westland, New Zealand, a critical location for investigation of interhemispheric patterns of climate change, have been problematic. This study, building on recent work by Vandergoes and Prior ([2003]), shows that AMS 14C dating of pollen concentrates has potential to provide more reliable ages than other sediment constituents, including plant macrofossils. The method was applied to sediments from three sites containing the 22.6k 14C yr Kawakawa Tephra, which provided an independent test of the 14C ages. Although some minor laboratory contamination was detected in tests on background standards, the modelled relationship between sample mass and measured 14C content permitted an appropriate correction to be determined. Improved pollen concentrations derived by density separation between 1.4 and 1.2 specific gravity and sieving in the range 10-50 m provided either older ages than other fractions of the same sample or, where in situ contamination was not evident, equivalent ages. Differences in degree of in situ contamination between depositional environments indicated that, in Westland, lake sites may be less susceptible to contamination by younger carbon than peat sites, where this process may be facilitated by root penetration into underlying sediments. Copyright

  13. The application of in situ 14C to Holocene terrestrial Antarctic ice-sheet reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogwill, Christopher; Turney, Christian; Hippe, Kristina; Rood, Dylan; Golledge, Nick; Wacker, Lukas; Wieler, Rainer

    2013-04-01

    Determining detailed Holocene ice-sheet behaviour in Antarctica is critical for understanding and predicting likely dynamic responses of ice sheets to future climate change. However, to date terrestrial studies using in situ cosmogenic isotopes have struggled to overcome inheritance issues in this cold-based ice setting. Here we present new terrestrial geological constraints that take advantage of recent technological developments in the extraction and measurement of in situ cosmogenic radiocarbon (14C)- a cosmogenic nuclide with a considerably shorter half-life than that of 10Be (10Be: 1.36x103 kyr; 14C: 5.73 kyr) - to assess the potential influence of prior exposure or recycling of glacial erratics and therefore improve reconstructions of past ice-sheet surface profile changes. Glacial erratics were sampled from steep exposed bedrock surfaces in the Ellsworth Mountains overlooking the Weddell Sea, serving as 'dipsticks' that allow us to reconstruct past surface elevation changes in the Rutford Ice Stream as it decayed through the Holocene. Our in situ 14C analysis reveals a complex relationship, reflecting inheritance and burial, in samples that record anomalously 'old' apparent 10Be exposure ages from previous exposure. Our results enable us to test and refine previous interpretations and thereby reduce chronological uncertainties in Holocene ice-sheet change in this sector of Antarctica, demonstrating the exiting potential of in situ 14C in ice-sheet reconstruction.

  14. Predicted net efflux of radiocarbon from the ocean and increase in atmospheric radiocarbon content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldeira, Ken; Rau, Greg H.; Duffy, Philip B.

    Prior to changes introduced by man, production of radiocarbon (14C) in the stratosphere nearly balanced the flux of 14C from the atmosphere to the ocean and land biosphere, which in turn nearly balanced radioactive decay in these 14C reservoirs. This balance has been altered by land-use changes, fossil-fuel burning, and atmospheric nuclear detonations. Here, we use a model of the global carbon cycle to quantify these radiocarbon fluxes and make predictions about their magnitude in the future. Atmospheric nuclear detonations increased atmospheric 14C content by about 80% by the mid-1960's. Since that time, the 14C content of the atmosphere has been diminishing as this bomb radiocarbon has been entering the oceans and terrestrial biosphere. However, we predict that atmospheric 14C content will reach a minimum and start to increase within the next few years if fossil-fuel burning continues according to a “business-as-usual” scenario, even though fossil fuels are devoid of 14C. This will happen because fossil-fuel carbon diminishes the net flux of 14C from the atmosphere to the oceans and land biosphere, forcing 14C to accumulate in the atmosphere. Furthermore, the net flux of both bomb and natural 14C into the ocean are predicted to continue to slow and then, in the middle of the next century, to reverse, so that there will be a net flux of 14C from the ocean to the atmosphere. The predicted reversal of net 14C fluxes into the ocean is a further example of human impacts on the global carbon cycle.

  15. Anomalous elevated radiocarbon measurements of PM2.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchholz, Bruce A.; Fallon, Stewart J.; Zermeño, Paula; Bench, Graham; Schichtel, Bret A.

    2013-01-01

    Two-component models are often used to determine the contributions made by fossil fuel and natural sources of carbon in airborne particulate matter (PM). The models reduce thousands of actual sources to two end members based on isotopic signature. Combustion of fossil fuels produces PM free of carbon-14 (14C). Wood or charcoal smoke, restaurant fryer emissions, and natural emissions from plants produce PM with the contemporary concentration of 14C approximately 1.2 × 10-1214C/C. Such data can be used to estimate the relative contributions of fossil fuels and biogenic aerosols to the total aerosol loading and radiocarbon analysis is becoming a popular source apportionment method. Emissions from incinerators combusting medical or biological wastes containing tracer 14C can skew the 14C/C ratio of PM, however, so critical analysis of sampling sites for possible sources of elevated PM needs to be completed prior to embarking on sampling campaigns. Results are presented for two ambient monitoring sites in different areas of the United States where 14C contamination is apparent. Our experience suggests that such contamination is uncommon but is also not rare (∼10%) for PM sampling sites.

  16. Construction of reliable radiocarbon-based chronologies for speleothems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechleitner, Franziska; Fohlmeister, Jens; McIntyre, Cameron; Baldini, Lisa M.; Jamieson, Robert A.; Hercman, Helena; Gasiorowski, Michal; Pawlak, Jacek; Stefaniak, Krzysztof; Socha, Pawel; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Baldini, James U. L.

    2016-04-01

    Speleothems have become one of the most widely applied archives for paleoclimate research. One of their key advantages is their amenability for U-series dating, often producing excellent high precision chronologies. However, stalagmites with high detrital Th or very low U concentrations are problematic to date using U-series, and sometimes need to be discarded from further paleoclimate analysis. Radiocarbon chronologies could present an alternative for stalagmites that cannot be dated using U-series, if offsets from the "dead carbon fraction" (DCF) can be resolved. The DCF is a variable reservoir effect introduced by the addition of 14C-dead carbon from host rock dissolution and soil organic matter. We present a novel age modeling technique that provides accurate 14C-based chronologies for stalagmites. As this technique focuses on the long-term decay pattern of 14C, it is only applicable on stalagmites that show no secular variability in their 14C-depth profiles, but is independent of short-term DCF variations. In order to determine whether a stalagmite is suitable for this method without direct knowledge of long-term trends in the DCF, we highlight how other geochemical proxies (δ13C, Mg/Ca) can provide additional information on changes in karst hydrology, soil conditions, and climate that would affect DCF. We apply our model on a previously published U-Th dated stalagmite 14C dataset from Heshang Cave, China with excellent results, followed by a previously 'undateable' stalagmite from southern Poland.

  17. New Radiocarbon Dates on Upper Mid-West Proboscideans: Determining Date Robustness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgins, G.; Widga, C.; Lengyel, S. N.; Saunders, J.; Walker, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    With the objective of refining the picture of Megafaunal extinction patterns in the upper Midwest in the terminal Pleistocene, we have assembled for radiocarbon dating specimens from more than 80 distinct Mammut and Mammuthus remains from potentially late sites. So far, we have measurements for 65 bones, tusks and teeth, nearly double the extant number of published dates . These new specimens were all from museums rather than excavation sites, and 60% were known to be coated with a consolidant. The predominant consolidant was Butvar B-76, however shellac, Elmer's Glue, Glyptol were also noted in the conservation records, or deduced from knowledge of a particular museum's practices. Given the objective of the project is to identify extinction patterns, coupled with the wide prevalence of consolidants amongst the specimen set, it was imperative that testing be carried out to confirm that radiocarbon laboratory protocols removed the consolidants, so that ultimately the dates can be considered robust. To this end, key specimens were dated three times using different sample preparation protocols. These were 1) a solvent extraction followed by a modified Longin-plus -Base continuous flow collagen extraction method used in the NSF-Arizona AMS facility, 2) the solvent/modified Longin method plus ultrafiltration, and 3) solvent/modified Longin method plus hydroxyproline single amino acid dating. Among the specimens subjected to triplicate testing were some of the youngest late Wisconsin proboscidean specimens from the Upper Midwest Region. The data reveal general agreement between the different protocols, and suggested either limited penetration of consolidants into the specimens, or that the standard laboratory cleaning protocols were sufficient to remove traces from deep within bone, tooth or tusk tissue. The preservation of each specimen, recorded in terms of collagen content, C/N ratio and stable isotope values, indicated that most were actually well preserved, implying

  18. Using 10Be records to identify possible 14C calibration uncertainties during the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimund, Muscheler

    2010-05-01

    The Intcal04 and Intcal09 radiocarbon calibration records are based on multiple tree-ring 14C data sets for Holocene period (Reimer et al. 2004, Reimer et al. 2009). While the dendrochronolgical dating of the trees is supposedly free of errors there are differences between various 14C data sets that underlie the 14C calibration curve. Due to lack of knowledge about the reasons for the differences the Intcal04/09 calibration curves provide a smoothed average of the underlying 14C records. Therefore, problems in one or several of the underlying 14C records would translate directly into errors in the 14C age calibration. Additional knowledge about expected variations in the 14C production rate could help to improve the calibration record since it would allow us to assess how well the different 14C records represent the atmospheric 14C concentration. I propose that 10Be records could be used as additional criteria to chose which of the published 14C records should be preferred (or given stronger weight) for the construction of the calibration curve. Alternatively, 10Be records could point to periods where 14C data should be re-measured in order to improve the calibration curve. I will show for some case studies that the 10Be records from the Greenland ice cores (Muscheler et al. 2004, Vonmoos et al. 2006) indeed provide useful information to scrutinise the Intcal04/09 calibration curve, which could help to improve the 14C calibration curve during the Holocene. Especially shorter-term changes are strongly dampened in the Intcal04/09 calibration record. However, 10Be and some 14C records do exhibit more variability as compared to the calibration record. Therefore, the combined 10Be/14C approach could add confidence that these should be reflected in the 14C calibration record. References: Muscheler, R., Beer, J. et al., 2004. Changes in the carbon cycle during the last deglaciation as indicated by the comparison of 10Be and 14C records. Earth and Planetary Science Letters

  19. Bioconversion of. cap alpha. -(/sup 14/C)Zearalenol and. beta. -(/sup 14/C)Zearalenol into (/sup 14/C)Zearalenone by Fusarium roseum Gibbosum

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, K.E.; Hagler, W.M. Jr.; Hamilton, P.B.

    1984-06-01

    Cultures of Fusarium roseum Gibbosum on rice were treated with (/sup 14/C)zearalenone, ..cap alpha..-(/sup 14/C)zearalenol, or ..beta..-(/sup 14/C)zearalenol to determine whether a precursor-product relationship exists among these closely related fungal metabolites. Culture extracts were purified by silica gel column chromatography and fractionated by high-pressure liquid chromatography, and the level of radioactivity was determined. Within 7 days, the ..beta..-(/sup 14/C)zearalenol was converted to zearalenone, and no residual ..beta..-(/sup 14/C)zearalenol was detectable. Most of the ..cap alpha..-(/sup 14/C)zearalenol added was also converted into zearalenone within 14 days. In cultures treated with (/sup 14/C)zearalenone, no radioactivity was noted in any other components.

  20. 14C Analysis of Protein Extracts from Bacillus Spores

    PubMed Central

    Cappucio, Jenny A.; Sarachine Falso, Miranda J.; Kashgarian, Michaele; Buchholz, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Investigators of bioagent incidents or interdicted materials need validated, independent analytical methods that will allow them to distinguish between recently made bioagent samples versus material drawn from the archives of a historical program. Heterotrophic bacteria convert the carbon in their food sources, growth substrate or culture media, into the biomolecules they need. The F14C (fraction modern radiocarbon) of a variety of media, Bacillus spores, and separated proteins from Bacillus spores was measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). AMS precisely measures F14C values of biological materials and has been used to date the synthesis of biomaterials over the bomb pulse era (1955 to present). The F14C of Bacillus spores reflects the radiocarbon content of the media in which they were grown. In a survey of commercial media we found that the F14C value indicated that carbon sources for the media were alive within about a year of the date of manufacture and generally of terrestrial origin. Hence, bacteria and their products can be dated using their 14C signature. Bacillus spore samples were generated onsite with defined media and carbon free purification and also obtained from archived material. Using mechanical lysis and a variety of washes with carbon free acids and bases, contaminant carbon was removed from soluble proteins to enable accurate 14C bomb-pulse dating. Since media is contemporary, 14C bomb-pulse dating of isolated soluble proteins can be used to distinguish between historical archives of bioagents and those produced from recent media. PMID:24814329

  1. Radiocarbon dating of VIRI bone samples using ultrafiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, Masayo; Yamazaki, Kana; Omori, Takayuki; Nakamura, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    Ultrafiltration can effectively remove low-molecular-weight (LMW) contaminants from bone gelatin to extract high-molecular-weight (HMW) proteins that are derived from original bone collagen, though it cannot remove HMW collagen crosslinked with humic acids. Therefore, ultrafiltration is often used to obtain more accurate 14C dates of bones. However, ultrafiltration may introduce new contaminants to bone gelatins, mainly from ultrafilters used. To study the effects of ultrafiltration on 14C age, we analyzed the C/N ratio, δ13CPDB and δ15NAIR values, and 14C ages of acid-soluble bone collagen obtained by decalcification, gelatin extracted from acid-insoluble bone collagen, and the HMW gelatin and LMW fractions produced during ultrafiltration of the extracted gelatin. Bone samples from the Fifth International Radiocarbon Intercomparison (VIRI) were used: VIRI-E (mammoth), -F (horse), -G (human), and -I (whale). In this study, carbon and nitrogen content and gelatin yields were used to evaluate collagen preservation in the VIRI bone samples. Radiocarbon ages, δ13CPDB and δ15NAIR values of unfiltered and HMW gelatins were obtained and compared with the published consensus values. The LMW fraction was found to exhibit different values from those of the other fractions, indicating the possible presence of extraneous contamination. The Vivaspin™ 6 ultrafilters used in this study were analyzed and radiocarbon dated both before and after cleaning. We present evidence to suggest that LMW fraction contaminants could be derived from the ultrafilters rather than humic substances. Excessively long ultrafiltration time was suspected to have contaminated the bone samples with material from the ultrafilter, because those samples exhibited older 14C ages than did those filtered for shorter durations. The results in this study indicate that 14C ages of unfiltered gelatin extracted from well-preserved bones can be sufficiently accurate, and that care should be taken not to

  2. Blade-order-dependent radiocarbon variability in brown seaweed (Undaria pinnatifida) reflected a cold Oyashio water intrusion event in an embayment of the Sanriku coast, northeastern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, N.; Fukuda, H.; Miyairi, Y.; Yokoyama, Y.; Nagata, T.

    2015-12-01

    Radiocarbon in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in seawater varies greatly, both geographically and with depth. This "reservoir effect" is thought to be reflected in the radiocarbon content (∆14C) of marine organisms, via DIC fixation by primary producers and subsequent trophic transfer. The ∆14C of marine organismal soft tissues might thus provide unique information about their habitats, diets, migration and other environmental histories. However, the effectiveness of this approach has yet to be extensively explored, with data on ∆14C variability in soft tissues of marine organisms being markedly limited. Here we examined whether ∆14C values of individual pinnate blades (leaf-like structures) of brown seaweed (Undaria pinnatifida) reflect the ∆14C of DIC in the water current prevailing at the time of blade formation. The study was conducted in Otsuchi Bay located in the Sanriku coastal region, northeastern Japan, where 14C-depleted cold Oyashio current and warm Tsugaru current (high ∆14C) converge, affecting the physiology and growth of marine organisms growing there. U. pinnatifida individuals cultured in the bay (length of saprophytes, 140-215 cm) were harvested in April 2014 and ∆14C of blades were determined by accelerator mass spectrometry. Younger blades formed after the Oyashio water intrusion had significantly lower ∆14C values compared to older blades formed before the event. The ∆14C values of younger and older blades were generally consistent with the ∆14C of DIC in Oyashio (-60.5 ‰) and Tsugaru (24.9 ‰) waters, respectively. Thus, despite possible turnover of organic carbon in seaweed soft tissues, blade-order-dependent ∆14C variability appeared to strongly reflect the Oyashio intrusion event (radiocarbon shift) in the bay.

  3. Determination of the Tissue Distribution and Excretion by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry of the Nonadecapeptide 14C-Moli1901 in Beagle dogs after Intratracheal Instillation

    SciTech Connect

    Rickert, D E; Dingley, K H; Ubick, E; Dix, K J; Molina, L

    2004-07-02

    Administration of {sup 14}C-Moli1901 (duramycin, 2622U90), a 19 amino acid polycyclic peptide by intratracheal instillation (approximately 100 {micro}g) into the left cranial lobe of the lung of beagle dogs resulted in retention of 64% of the dose in the left cranial lobe for up to 28 days. In this study, we used accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) to quantify Moli901 following administration of only 0.045 {micro}Ci of {sup 14}C-Moli901 per dog. Limits of quantitation of AMS were 0.03 (urine) to 0.3 (feces) ng equiv. Moli1901/g. Whole blood and plasma concentrations of {sup 14}C were <5ng/ml at all times after the dose. Concentrations of {sup 14}C in whole blood and plasma declined over the first day after the dose and rose thereafter, with the rise in plasma concentrations lagging behind those in whole blood. During the first 3 days after the dose, plasma accounted for the majority of {sup 14}C in whole blood, but after that time, plasma accounted for only 25-30% of the {sup 14}C in whole blood. Tissue (left and right caudal lung lobe, liver, kidney, spleen, brain) and bile concentrations were low, always less than 0.25% the concentrations found in the left cranial lung lobe. Approximately 13% of the dose was eliminated in urine and feces in 28 days, with fecal elimination accounting for about 10% of the dose. The data presented here are consistent with that obtained in other species. Moli1901 is slowly absorbed and excreted from the lung, and it does not accumulate in other tissues. Moli1901 is currently in the clinic and has proven to be safe in single dose studies in human volunteers and cystic fibrosis patients by the inhalation route. No information on the disposition of the compound in humans is available. This study in dogs demonstrates the feasibility of obtaining that information using {sup 14}C-Moli1901 and AMS.

  4. A Brief Review of the Application of 14C in Terrestrial Carbon Cycle Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Guilderson, T; Mcfarlane, K

    2009-10-22

    An over-arching goal of the DOE TCP program is to understand the mechanistic controls over the fate, transport, and residence time of carbon in the terrestrial biosphere. Many of the modern process and modeling studies focus on seasonal to interannual variability. However, much of the carbon on the landscape and in soils is in separate reservoirs with turnover times that are multi-decadal to millennial. It is the controls on these longer term pools or reservoirs that is a critical unknown in the face of rising GHGs and climate change and uncertainties of the terrestrial biosphere as a future global sink or source of atmospheric CO{sub 2} [eg., Friedlingstein et al., 2006; Govindasamy et al., 2005; Thompson et al., 2004]. Radiocarbon measurements, in combination with other data, can provide insight into, and constraints on, terrestrial carbon cycling. Radiocarbon (t{sub 1/2} 5730yrs) is produced naturally in the stratosphere when secondary neutrons generated by cosmic rays collide with {sup 14}N atoms [Libby 1946; Arnold and Libby, 1949]. Upon formation, {sup 14}C is rapidly oxidized to CO and then to CO{sub 2}, and is incorporated into the carbon cycle. Due to anthropogenic activities, the amount of {sup 14}C in the atmosphere doubled in the mid/late 1950s and early 1960s from its preindustrial value of {sup 14}C/{sup 12}C ratio of 1.18 x 10{sup -12} [eg., Nydal and Lovseth, 1983]. Following the atmospheric weapons test ban in 1963, the {sup 14}C/{sup 12}C ratio, has decreased due to the net isotopic exchange between the ocean and terrestrial biosphere [eg., Levin and Hessheimer, 2000] and a dilution effect due to the burning of {sup 14}C-free fossil fuel carbon, the 'Suess Effect' [Suess, 1955]. In the carbon cycle literature, radiocarbon measurements are generally reported as {Delta}{sup 14}C, which includes a correction for mass dependent fractionation [Stuiver and Polach, 1977]. In the context of carbon cycle studies radiocarbon measurements can be used to

  5. Reconstructing the Vertical 14C Gradient of the Baja Margin during the Last Deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, C. M.; Lehman, S. J.; Marchitto, T. M.; Ortiz, J. D.; van Geen, A.

    2011-12-01

    The radiocarbon activity (Δ14C) of the atmosphere decreased in two steps during the last deglaciation, coinciding with the well-known Heinrich 1 (H1) and Younger Dryas (YD) stadials. A leading explanation for these periods of decline involves the release of 14C-depleted carbon from a deep, isolated ocean reservoir- a mechanism that may also help to explain the deglacial rise in atmospheric CO2. Reconstructions of intermediate water Δ14C near Baja California, Mexico (Marchitto et al., 2007 Science) and in the Arabian Sea (Bryan et al., 2010 Earth Planet. Sci. Lett.) document two intervals of extreme depletion relative to the coeval atmosphere during H1 and the YD that are interpreted as evidence of the return of this aged carbon from the deep reservoir to the upper ocean and atmosphere. Here we report on 14C measurements in additional cores from the Baja margin that expand the depth range of our observations and enable reconstruction of the vertical Δ14C gradient. Calendar ages were determined by (1) correlation of diffuse spectral reflectance (DSR, a proxy related to local productivity) with the layer-counted age model in the GISP2 ice core and (2) correlation of raw planktic G. ruber 14C ages to new measurements in core PC08 previously studied by Marchitto et al. (2007). Together these provide a common and consistent calendar age model for margin core PCO8 (depth 705 m), core PC13 from Soledad Basin (sill depth 290 m) and margin core GC38 (depth 1270 m). In preliminary results, G. ruber Δ14C data from PC08 exhibit a record of deglacial depletion events that is consistent with partial upward mixing of the intermediate-depth signal to the surface. Δ14C at 1270 meters showed relatively little change during H1 and YD, indicating that anomalously depleted water did not penetrate to this depth. The vertical gradient collapsed to within observational uncertainties at the start of the Bølling-Allerød/Antarctic Climate Reversal. Taken together the results support

  6. Rapid, high-resolution 14C chronology of ooids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaupré, Steven R.; Roberts, Mark L.; Burton, Joshua R.; Summons, Roger E.

    2015-06-01

    Ooids are small, spherical to ellipsoidal grains composed of concentric layers of CaCO3 that could potentially serve as biogeochemical records of the environments in which they grew. Such records, however, must be placed in the proper temporal context. Therefore, we developed a novel acidification system and employed an accelerator mass spectrometer (AMS) with a gas accepting ion source to obtain radiocarbon (14C) chronologies extending radially through ooids within one 8-h workday. The method was applied to ooids from Highborne Cay, Bahamas and Shark Bay, Australia, yielding reproducible 14C chronologies, as well as constraints on the rates and durations of ooid growth and independent estimates of local 14C reservoir ages.

  7. Determination of shell deposition rates of Arctica islandica from the New York Bight using natural /sup 228/Ra and /sup 228/Th and bomb-produced /sup 14/C

    SciTech Connect

    Turekian, K.K.; Cochran, J.K.; Nozaki, Y.; Thompson, I.; Jones, D.S.

    1982-01-01

    Shell deposition rates of specimens of Arctica islandica (Mollusca: Bivalvia) from the New York Bight were determined using natural /sup 228/Ra and /sup 228/Th and bomb /sup 14/C. The specimens from deep (>55 m) offshore waters show annual growth banding. A shell obtained from the inner bight at <30-m depth seems to be younger than indicated by band counting.

  8. Constructing a database of terrestrial radiocarbon measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trumbore, Susan; Torn, Margaret; Smith, Lydia

    2011-10-01

    Terrestrial Radiocarbon Database Workshop; Berkeley, California, 20-22 July 2011 Soils play a large role in the global carbon (C) cycle, but soil C stocks and dynamics remain highly uncertain. Radiocarbon (14C) observations provide critical information on the rates of exchange of soil C with the atmosphere and hydrosphere and how those rates vary with edaphic (soil-related) factors and over a range of time scales. For example, the degree to which radio decay has affected 14C demonstrates the importance of short-range-order minerals for stabilizing organic C on millennial time scales in some soils. Time series that track the infiltration of "bomb" 14C help identify the components of soil C that cycle on decadal to centennial time scales.

  9. Tumour cell recruitment of the JB-1 and L 1210 ascites tumour determined directly by double labelling with [14C]- and [3H]-thymidine.

    PubMed

    Maurer-Schultze, B; Kondziella, U; Böswald, M

    1988-07-01

    Tumour cell recruitment of the JB-1 and L 1210 ascites tumour has been demonstrated directly by a double-labelling method with [14C]- and [3H]-thymidine (TdR). After [14C]-labelling of all proliferating tumour cells by multiple injections of [14C]TdR, recruitment of resting cells was stimulated by removal of the majority of tumour cells, i.e. by maximum aspiration of ascitic fluid. The number of recruited resting cells in the remaining tumour that re-enter the cell cycle after stimulation was demonstrated directly by a single injection of [3H]TdR given at different times after stimulation. The increase in the percentage of purely [3H]-labelled cells, i.e. recruited cells, with increasing time after stimulation, shows that recruitment is not a synchronous but a continuous process, the maximum of which occurs earlier in the case of the L 1210 than the JB-1 tumour. This suggests that there seems to be a relationship between the time required for maximum recruitment and the corresponding cell cycle parameters of the unperturbed tumour. There is a transitory increase of the growth fraction to about 100% and a considerable shortening of the cycle time at the maximum of recruitment.

  10. Degradation of 4-fluorobiphenyl by mycorrhizal fungi as determined by {sup 19}F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and {sup 14}C radiolabelling analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Green, N.A.; Meharg, A.A.; Till, C.; Troke, J.; Nicholson, J.K.

    1999-09-01

    The pathways of biotransformation of 4-fluorobiphenyl (4FBP) by the ectomycorrhizal fungus Tylospora fibrilosa and several other mycorrhizal fungi were investigated by using {sup 19}F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in combination with {sup 14}C radioisotope-detected high-performance liquid chromatography ({sup 14}C-HPLC). Under the conditions used in this study T. fibrillosa and some other species degraded 4FBP. {sup 14}C-HPLC profiles indicated that there were four major biotransformation products, whereas {sup 19}F NMR showed that there were six major fluorine-containing products. The authors confirmed that 4-fluorobiphen-4{prime}-ol and 4-fluorobiphen-3{prime}-ol were two of the major products formed, but no other products were conclusively identified. There was no evidence for the expected biotransformation pathway (namely, meta cleavage of the less halogenated ring), as none of the expected products of this route were found. To the best of their knowledge, this is the first report describing intermediates formed during mycorrhizal degradation of halogenated biphenyls.

  11. Effects of polyacrylamide, biopolymer, and biochar on decomposition of soil organic matter and 14C-labeled plant residues as determined by enzyme activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud Awad, Yasser; Ok, Young Sik; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2014-05-01

    Application of polymers for the improvement of aggregate structure and reduction of soil erosion may alter the availability and decomposition of plant residues. In this study, we assessed the effects of anionic polyacrylamide (PAM), synthesized biopolymer (BP), and biochar (BC) on the decomposition of 14C-labeled maize residue in sandy and sandy loam soils. Specifically, PAM and BP with or without 14C-labeled plant residue were applied at 400 kg ha-1, whereas BC was applied at 5000 kg ha-1, after which the soils were incubated for 80 days at 22 oC. Initially, plant residue decomposition was much higher in untreated sandy loam soil than in sandy soil. Nevertheless, the stimulating effects of BP and BC on the decomposition of plant residue were more pronounced in sandy soil, where it accounted for 13.4% and 23.4% of 14C input, respectively, whereas in sandy loam soil, the acceleration of plant residue decomposition by BP and BC did not exceed 2.6% and 14.1%, respectively, compared to untreated soil with plant residue. The stimulating effects of BP and BC on the decomposition of plant residue were confirmed based on activities of β-cellobiohydrolase, β-glucosidase, and chitinase in both soils. In contrast to BC and BP, PAM did not increase the decomposition of native or added C in both soils.

  12. Limitations in the use of /sup 14/C-glycocholate breath and stool bile acid determinations in patients with chronic diarrhea

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, J.; Walker, K.; Thomson, A.B.

    1986-06-01

    Analysis of a modified /sup 14/C-glycocholate breath test on 165 consecutive in-patients being investigated for chronic diarrhea showed that the measurement of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ between 3 and 6 h after oral dosing of 5 microCi of /sup 14/C-glycocholic acid was of only limited use to distinguish between patients with Crohn's disease (CD), idiopathic bile salt wastage (IBW), or ileal resection (IR) from those with the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Continuing /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ collections for up to 24 h was of little more help in establishing the presence of bacterial overgrowth syndrome (BOS) and in distinguishing between BOS and CD. Stool bile acid measurements were of use in differentiating between IBW and IBS, but did not distinguish between CD and BOS or between CD and IR. Since the range of normal values was defined by measurements in the IBS group, a positive test was specific for an organic cause of chronic diarrhea. Even so, the sensitivity of the test was relatively low: CD, 53%; IR, 23%; IBW, /sup 14/%; and BOS, 10%. We believe that the 24-h /sup 14/C-glycocholic breath test combined with the measurement of stool bile acids represents a screening test of only limited use for the identification of organic causes of chronic diarrhea.

  13. Investigating bomb radiocarbon transport in the southern Pacific Ocean with otolith radiocarbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grammer, G. L.; Fallon, S. J.; Izzo, C.; Wood, R.; Gillanders, B. M.

    2015-08-01

    To explore the transport of carbon into water masses from the surface ocean to depths of ∼ 1000 m in the southwest Pacific Ocean, we generated time series of radiocarbon14C) from fish otoliths. Otoliths (carbonate earstones) from long-lived fish provide an indirect method to examine the "bomb pulse" of radiocarbon that originated in the 1950s and 1960s, allowing identification of changes to distributions of 14C that has entered and mixed within the ocean. We micro-sampled ocean perch (Helicolenus barathri) otoliths, collected at ∼ 400- 500 m in the Tasman Sea, to obtain measurements of Δ14C for those depths. We compared our ocean perch Δ14C series to published otolith-based marine surface water Δ14C values (Australasian snapper (Chrysophrys auratus) and nannygai (Centroberyx affinis)) and to published deep-water values (800-1000 m; orange roughy (Hoplostethus atlanticus)) from the southwest Pacific to establish a mid-water Δ14C series. The otolith bomb 14C results from these different depths were consistent with previous water mass results in the upper 1500 m of the southwest Pacific Ocean (e.g. World Ocean Circulation Experiment and Geochemical Ocean Sections Study). A comparison between the initial Δ14C bomb pulse rise at 400-500 m suggested a ventilation lag of 5 to 10 yr, whereas a comparison of the surface and depths of 800-1000 m detailed a 10 to 20 yr lag in the time history of radiocarbon invasion at this depth. Pre-bomb reservoir ages derived from otolith 14C located in Tasman Sea thermocline waters were ∼ 530 yr, while reservoir ages estimated for Tasman Antarctic intermediate water were ∼ 730 yr.

  14. Pyrolysis-combustion 14C dating of soil organic matter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Hongfang; Hackley, Keith C.; Panno, S.V.; Coleman, D.D.; Liu, J.C.-L.; Brown, J.

    2003-01-01

    Radiocarbon (14C) dating of total soil organic matter (SOM) often yields results inconsistent with the stratigraphic sequence. The onerous chemical extractions for SOM fractions do not always produce satisfactory 14C dates. In an effort to develop an alternative method, the pyrolysis-combustion technique was investigated to partition SOM into pyrolysis volatile (Py-V) and pyrolysis residue (Py-R) fractions. The Py-V fractions obtained from a thick glacigenic loess succession in Illinois yielded 14C dates much younger but more reasonable than the counterpart Py-R fractions for the soil residence time. Carbon isotopic composition (??13C) was heavier in the Py-V fractions, suggesting a greater abundance of carbohydrate- and protein-related constituents, and ??13C was lighter in the Py-R fractions, suggesting more lignin- and lipid-related constituents. The combination of 14C dates and ??13C values indicates that the Py-V fractions are less biodegradation resistant and the Py-R fractions are more biodegradation resistant. The pyrolysis-combustion method provides a less cumbersome approach for 14C dating of SOM fractions. With further study, this method may become a useful tool for analyzing unlithified terrestrial sediments when macrofossils are absent. ?? 2003 University of Washington. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Constraint on radiocarbon age correction in Lake Biwa environment from the middle to late Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyata, Y.; Minami, M.; Onbe, S.; Sakamoto, M.; Nakamura, T.; Imamura, M.

    2013-01-01

    Using data from previous studies and newly collected data, we compared the measured radiocarbon ages of molluscan shells, common reed (Phragmites australis) and pine needles (Pinus thunbergii) collected in 1966, 1970, 1990 and 2008 at Lake Biwa in Japan, and of archaeological samples, to examine radiocarbon reservoir effects at Lake Biwa. We also tested for differences in the radiocarbon reservoir effect between species and locations in the lake. The effects of nuclear bomb tests conducted in the 1950s and 1960s are clear, the offset between atmospheric 14C and the Lake Biwa freshwater 14C is larger for this period because the atmospheric 14C is so high. The semiclosed Lake Biwa system is in dynamic equilibrium with the atmosphere, resulting in the 14C content of the water following the changes in atmospheric 14C caused by nuclear testing. The shells collected after 1990 had radiocarbon ages that were 330-450 14C years older than those of the coeval atmosphere. The apparent differences in radiocarbon age (about 300 14C years) between shell fossils and wood samples excavated from the same layer of the submerged Awazu shell midden at Lake Biwa suggest that the radiocarbon reservoir effect also existed in the middle Holocene (the Middle Jomon period, about 5000 years ago). Because the present-day average residence time of Lake Biwa water is 3-6 years, its direct influence on the radiocarbon reservoir effect is small, which suggests that old carbon has been supplied into Lake Biwa.

  16. Radiocarbon ages of pre-bomb clams and the hard-water effect in Lakes Michigan and Huron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rea, David K.; Colman, Steven M.

    1995-01-01

    Five radiocarbon ages, all determined by accelerator mass spectrometry, have been obtained for two pre-bomb bivalves from Lake Michigan and one from Lake Huron. After correcting those ages for the fractionation of14C in calcite and for the radioactively inert CO2 in the atmosphere, we find residual ages, caused by the hard water effect, of about 250 years for Lake Michigan and 440 years for Lake Huron.

  17. A Column Experiment To Determine Black Shale Degradation And Colonization By Means of δ13C and 14C Analysis Of Phospholipid Fatty Acids And DNA Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, A.; Gleixner, G.

    2008-12-01

    We investigated the degradation of black shale organic matter by microbial communities. We inoculated two columns respectively, with the fungi Schizophyllum commune, the gram-positive bacterium Pseudomonas putida and the gram-negative bacteria Streptomyces griseus and Streptomyces chartreusis. These microorganisms are known to degrade a wide variety of organic macromolecules. Additionally, we had two sets of control columns. To one set the same nutrient solution was added as to the inoculated columns and to the other set only sterile deionised water was supplied. All columns contained 1.5 kg of freshly crushed not autoclaved black shale material with a particle size of 0.63-2 mm. The columns were incubated at 28° C and 60% humidity in the dark. The aim was to investigate, which microorganisms live on black shales and if these microorganisms are able to degrade ancient organic matter. We used compound specific stable isotope measurement techniques and compound specific 14C-dating methods. After 183 days PLFAs were extracted from the columns to investigate the microbial community, furthermore we extracted on one hand total-DNA of column material and on the other hand DNA from pure cultures isolates which grew on Kinks-agar B, Starch-casein-nitrate-agar (SCN) and on complete-yeast-medium-agar (CYM). According to the PLFA analysis bacteria dominated in the columns, whereas in pure cultures more fungi were isolated. A principal component analysis revealed differences between the columns in accordance with the inoculation, but it seems that the inoculated microorganisms were replaced by the natural population. For AMS measurements palmitic acid (C 16:0) was re-isolated from total-PLFA-extract with a preparative fraction collector (PFC). Preliminary results of the study revealed that microorganisms are able to degrade black shale material and that PLFA analysis are useful methods to be combined with analysis of stable isotope and 14C measurements to study microbial

  18. Comment on "Radiocarbon Calibration Curve Spanning 0 to 50,000 Years B.P. Based on Paired 230Th/234U/238U and 14C Dates on Pristine Corals" by R.G. Fairbanks, R. A. Mortlock, T.-C. Chiu, L. Cao, A. Kaplan, T. P. Guilderson, T. W. Fairbanks, A. L. Bloom, P

    SciTech Connect

    Reimer, P J; Baillie, M L; Bard, E; Beck, J W; Blackwell, P G; Buck, C E; Burr, G S; Edwards, R L; Friedrich, M; Guilderson, T P; Hogg, A G; Hughen, K A; Kromer, B; McCormac, G; Manning, S; Reimer, R W; Southon, J R; Stuiver, M; der Plicht, J v; Weyhenmeyer, C E

    2005-10-02

    Radiocarbon calibration curves are essential for converting radiocarbon dated chronologies to the calendar timescale. Prior to the 1980's numerous differently derived calibration curves based on radiocarbon ages of known age material were in use, resulting in ''apples and oranges'' comparisons between various records (Klein et al., 1982), further complicated by until then unappreciated inter-laboratory variations (International Study Group, 1982). The solution was to produce an internationally-agreed calibration curve based on carefully screened data with updates at 4-6 year intervals (Klein et al., 1982; Stuiver and Reimer, 1986; Stuiver and Reimer, 1993; Stuiver et al., 1998). The IntCal working group has continued this tradition with the active participation of researchers who produced the records that were considered for incorporation into the current, internationally-ratified calibration curves, IntCal04, SHCal04, and Marine04, for Northern Hemisphere terrestrial, Southern Hemisphere terrestrial, and marine samples, respectively (Reimer et al., 2004; Hughen et al., 2004; McCormac et al., 2004). Fairbanks et al. (2005), accompanied by a more technical paper, Chiu et al. (2005), and an introductory comment, Adkins (2005), recently published a ''calibration curve spanning 0-50,000 years''. Fairbanks et al. (2005) and Chiu et al. (2005) have made a significant contribution to the database on which the IntCal04 and Marine04 calibration curves are based. These authors have now taken the further step to derive their own radiocarbon calibration extending to 50,000 cal BP, which they claim is superior to that generated by the IntCal working group. In their papers, these authors are strongly critical of the IntCal calibration efforts for what they claim to be inadequate screening and sample pretreatment methods. While these criticisms may ultimately be helpful in identifying a better set of protocols, we feel that there are also several erroneous and misleading

  19. Microscale radiocarbon dating of paintings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendriks, Laura; Hajdas, Irka; McIntyre, Cameron; Küffner, Markus; Scherrer, Nadim C.; Ferreira, Ester S. B.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, radiocarbon dating of paintings using minimal sample sizes has been investigated, in an effort to address the problem of limited access to sample material in paintings. 14C analyses were conducted on signed and dated paintings from two Swiss artists of the twentieth century. The selected paintings dated from the 1930s and 1960s, provided the opportunity to evaluate the dating accuracy on paintings realized before and after 1950 AD when the 14C bomb peak was created, as a result of the nuclear tests conducted in the 1950/1960s. The work focused on the one hand on minimizing the size of the canvas sample required for accelerator mass spectrometer radiocarbon measurement on the gas ion source of the MICADAS and, on the other hand, on testing the possibility of dating the organic binder of the paint. Following careful characterization of the paint composition by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy, paints containing no other carbon source than the natural organic binder were identified and dated.

  20. Establishing chronologies for loess records within 40 ka by AMS 14C-dating of small mollusc shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ujvari, Gabor; Molnar, Mihaly; Novothny, Agnes; Kovacs, Janos

    2014-05-01

    The key objective of the INTIMATE project is to determine whether abrupt climatic changes during the period of 60 to 8 ka, as reflected in a range of proxy records, were regionally synchronous or whether there were significant 'leads' and 'lags' between the atmospheric, marine, terrestrial and cryospheric realms. Such goals require precisely dated records of paleoenvironmental change for this period. Although wind-blown loess deposits are regarded as key terrestrial archives of millennial or even centennial scale environmental changes, these records are mostly poorly dated and/or their age-depth models have uncertainties of millennial magnitude. This prevents us from addressing issues like synchroneity of abrupt climatic/environmental events on millennial time scales. Two different means of dating are commonly applied for loess sequences: luminescence and radiocarbon dating. Major problems are low precision of luminescence ages and the general lack of organic macrofossils (e.g. charcoal) in loess that can reliably be dated using 14C. Other datable phases in loess are mollusc shells, rhizoliths and organic matter. While organic matter 14C ages are often seriously compromised by rejuvenation in loess sequences, rhizolites consistently yield very young ages as first demonstrated in German loess profiles. Indeed, hypocatings (rhizolites) gave Holocene ages from three different depths (4.00 m: 9744-10156 2σ age range in cal yr BP, 5.00 m: 8013-8167 cal yr BP and 6.00 m: 9534-9686 cal yr BP) in the Dunaszekcső loess record we investigated. Mollusc shells are the only remaining phases for dating, but these are usually regarded as unreliable material for 14C-dating, as they may incorporate 14C-deficient (or dead) carbon from the local carbonate-rich substrate during shell formation, thereby producing anomalously old ages by up to 3000 years. Recent studies, however, indicated that reliable ages can be obtained by radiocarbon dating of molluscs having comparatively small (

  1. Atmospheric 14C variations derived from tree rings during the early Younger Dryas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Quan; Barbetti, Mike; Fink, David; Kaiser, Klaus Felix; Friedrich, Michael; Kromer, Bernd; Levchenko, Vladimir A.; Zoppi, Ugo; Smith, Andrew M.; Bertuch, Fiona

    2009-12-01

    Atmospheric radiocarbon variations over the Younger Dryas interval, from ˜13,000 to 11,600 cal yr BP, are of immense scientific interest because they reveal crucial information about the linkages between climate, ocean circulation and the carbon cycle. However, no direct and reliable atmospheric 14C records based on tree rings for the entire Younger Dryas have been available. In this paper, we present (1) high-precision 14C measurements on the extension of absolute tree-ring chronology from 12,400 to 12,560 cal yr BP and (2) high-precision, high-resolution atmospheric 14C record derived from a 617-yr-long tree-ring chronology of Huon pine from Tasmania, Australia, spanning the early Younger Dryas. The new tree-ring 14C records bridge the current gap in European tree-ring radiocarbon chronologies during the early Younger Dryas, linking the floating Lateglacial Pine record to the absolute tree-ring timescale. A continuous and reliable atmospheric 14C record for the past 14,000 cal yr BP including the Younger Dryas is now available. The new records indicate that the abrupt rise in atmospheric Δ 14C associated with the Younger Dryas onset occurs at ˜12,760 cal yr BP, ˜240 yrs later than that recorded in Cariaco varves, with a smaller magnitude of ˜40‰ followed by several centennial Δ 14C variations of 20-25‰. Comparing the tree-ring Δ 14C to marine-derived Δ 14C and modelled Δ 14C based on ice-core 10Be fluxes, we conclude that changes in ocean circulation were mainly responsible for the Younger Dryas onset, while a combination of changes in ocean circulation and 14C production rate were responsible for atmospheric Δ 14C variations for the remainder of the Younger Dryas.

  2. The metabolism of [14C]nicotine in the cat

    PubMed Central

    Turner, D. M.

    1969-01-01

    The metabolism of [2′-14C]nicotine given as an intravenous injection in small doses to anaesthetized and unanaesthetized cats has been studied. A method is described for the quantitative determination of [14C]nicotine and [14C]cotinine in tissues and body fluids. Nanogram amounts of these compounds have been detected. After a single dose of 40μg. of [14C]nicotine/kg., 55% of the injected radioactivity was excreted in the urine within 24hr., but only 1% of this radioactivity was unchanged nicotine. [14C]Nicotine is metabolized extremely rapidly, [14C]cotinine appearing in the blood within 2·5min. of intravenous injection. [14C]Nicotine accumulates rapidly in the brain and 15min. after injection 90% of the radioactivity still represents [14C]nicotine. Metabolites of [14C]nicotine have been identified in liver and urine extracts. [14C]Nicotine-1′-oxide has been detected in both liver and urine. PMID:5360723

  3. Synthesis of [(14) C]omarigliptin.

    PubMed

    Ren, Sumei; Gauthier, Donald; Marques, Rosemary; Helmy, Roy; Hesk, David

    2016-08-01

    An efficient synthesis for [(14) C]Omarigliptin (MK-3102) is described. The initial synthesis of a key (14) C-pyrazole moiety did not work due to the lack of stability of (14) C-DMF-DMA reagent. Thus, a new radiolabeled synthon, (14) C-biphenylmethylformate, was synthesized from (14) C-sodium formate in one step in 92% yield and successfully used in construction of the key (14) C-pyrazole moiety. Regioselective N-sulfonation of the pyrazole moiety was achieved through a dehydration-sulfonation-isomerization sequence. [(14) C]MK 3102 was synthesized in five steps from (14) C-biphenylmethylformate with 25% overall yield. PMID:27334864

  4. Developing inorganic carbon-based radiocarbon chronologies for Holocene lake sediments in arid NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiawu; Ma, Xueyang; Qiang, Mingrui; Huang, Xiaozhong; Li, Shuang; Guo, Xiaoyan; Henderson, Andrew C. G.; Holmes, Jonathan A.; Chen, Fahu

    2016-07-01

    Inorganic carbonates are often used to establish radiocarbon (14C) chronologies for lake sediments when terrestrial plant remains (TPR) are rare or when bulk organic matter is insufficient for dating, a problem that is common for many lakes in arid regions. However, the reservoir effect (RE), as well as old carbon contributed from the lakes catchment make it difficult to establish reliable chronologies. Here we present a systematic study of inorganic 14C ages of two lake-sediment sequences, one from a small-enclosed saline lake - Lake Gahai in Qaidam Basin, and the other from a large freshwater lake - Lake Bosten in Xinjiang. Modern dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) of the lakes, paleo-lake sediments exposed in the catchment, and mollusk shells in core sediments from Lake Gahai were dated to assess the RE and the contribution of pre-aged carbon to the old ages in the cores. We propose a statistical regression to assess more than one RE for the 14C carbonate ages within our sedimentary sequences. Old radiocarbon ages contributed by detrital carbonates were assessed by comparing the ages of mollusk shells with those of carbonates at the same sediment depths. We established the RE of the authigenic component and assessed detrital old carbon contributions to our two sites, and this was used to correct the 14C ages. Based on this approach, we developed age models for both cores, and tested them using 210Pb ages in both cores and TPR-based 14C-ages recovered from Lake Bosten. We further tested our age models by comparing carbonate-based oxygen isotope (δ18O) records from both lakes to an independently-dated regional speleothem δ18O record. Our results suggest if sedimentary sequences are densely dated and the RE and the contribution of old carbon from detrital carbonates can be ascertained, robust chronological frameworks based on carbonate-based 14C determinations can be established.

  5. Focal cerebral ischaemia in the rat: 2. Regional cerebral blood flow determined by (14C)iodoantipyrine autoradiography following middle cerebral artery occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, A.; Graham, D.I.; McCulloch, J.; Teasdale, G.M.

    1981-01-01

    Local cerebral blood flow has been measured by quantitative autoradiography, employing (14C)iodoantipyrine as tracer, in rats killed half an hour after occlusion of the middle cerebral artery. The results were compared with pattern of local cerebral blood flow (CBF) in sham-operated rats and with neuropathological findings. In every animal there was a profound reduction (to 13% of control levels)in blood flow in the neocortex previously by the occluded artery. The level of blood flow in the areas in which ischaemic brain damage occurred was 0.24 +/- 0.03 ml g-1 min-1 (mean +/- SEM). this level of CBF is considerably greater than that reported following a similar surgical procedure in cats and primates. Moderate reductions in blood flow were also seen outside the territory of the occluded artery and in parts of the opposite hemisphere. Absolute increases in blood flow (hyperaemia) were seen only in the substantia nigra and globus pallidus ipsilateral to the occlusion. It is of the middle cerebral artery are reflections of alterations in neuronal function and metabolic activity secondary to the ischaemic lesion.

  6. May 14C be used to date contemporary art?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedi, M. E.; Caforio, L.; Mandò, P. A.; Petrucci, F.; Taccetti, F.

    2013-01-01

    The use of radiocarbon in forensics is by now widespread, thanks to the so-called bomb peak, which makes it possible to perform high-precision dating. Since 1955, 14C concentration in the atmosphere had strongly increased due to nuclear explosions, reaching its maximum value in 1963-1965. After the Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, 14C started to decrease as a consequence of the exchanges between atmosphere and the other natural carbon reservoirs. Nowadays, it is still slightly above the pre-bomb value. The work presented in this paper is based on the idea of exploiting the bomb peak to “precisely” date works of contemporary art, with the aim at identifying possible fakes. We analysed two kinds of materials from the 20th century: newspapers and painting canvases. Newspaper samples were taken because they might in principle be considered to represent dated samples (considering the date on the issues). Our data (28 samples) show a trend similar to atmospheric data in the literature, although with some differences; the paper peak is flatter and shifted towards more recent years (about five years) with respect to the atmospheric data. This can be explained by taking paper manufacturing processes into account. As to the canvas samples, the measured 14C concentrations were generally reasonably consistent with the expected concentrations (based on the year on the paintings). However, this does not indicate that the interpretation of the results is simpler and more straightforward. Obviously, we only measure the 14C concentration of the fibre used for the canvas, which does not necessarily measure the date the painting was manufactured. In this paper, sample preparation and experimental results will be discussed, in order to show the potential as well as the limitations of radiocarbon to date contemporary art.

  7. Gas chromatographic isolation of individual compounds from complex matrices for radiocarbon dating.

    PubMed

    Eglinton, T I; Aluwihare, L I; Bauer, J E; Druffel, E R; McNichol, A P

    1996-03-01

    This paper describes the application of a novel, practical approach for isolation of individual compounds from complex organic matrices for natural abundance radiocarbon measurement. This is achieved through the use of automated preparative capillary gas chromatography (PCGC) to separate and recover sufficient quantities of individual target compounds for (14)C analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). We developed and tested this approach using a suite of samples (plant lipids, petroleums) whose ages spanned the (14)C time scale and which contained a variety of compound types (fatty acids, sterols, hydrocarbons). Comparison of individual compound and bulk radiocarbon signatures for the isotopically homogeneous samples studied revealed that Δ(14)C values generally agreed well (±10%). Background contamination was assessed at each stage of the isolation procedure, and incomplete solvent removal prior to combustion was the only significant source of additional carbon. Isotope fractionation was addressed through compound-specific stable carbon isotopic analyses. Fractionation of isotopes during isolation of individual compounds was minimal (<5‰ for δ(13)C), provided the entire peak was collected during PCGC. Trapping of partially coeluting peaks did cause errors, and these results highlight the importance of conducting stable carbon isotopic measurements of each trapped compound in concert with AMS for reliable radiocarbon measurements. The addition of carbon accompanying derivatization of functionalized compounds (e.g., fatty acids and sterols) prior to chromatographic separation represents a further source of potential error. This contribution can be removed using a simple isotopic mass balance approach. Based on these preliminary results, the PCGC-based approach holds promise for accurately determining (14)C ages on compounds specific to a given source within complex, heterogeneous samples.

  8. Late Holocene Radiocarbon Variability in Northwest Atlantic Slope Waters

    SciTech Connect

    Sherwood, O; Edinger, E; Guilderson, T P; Ghaleb, B; Risk, M J; Scott, D B

    2008-08-15

    Deep-sea gorgonian corals secrete a 2-part skeleton of calcite, derived from dissolved inorganic carbon at depth, and gorgonin, derived from recently fixed and exported particulate organic matter. Radiocarbon contents of the calcite and gorgonin provide direct measures of seawater radiocarbon at depth and in the overlying surface waters, respectively. Using specimens collected from Northwest Atlantic slope waters, we generated radiocarbon records for surface and upper intermediate water layers spanning the pre- and post bomb-{sup 14}C eras. In Labrador Slope Water (LSW), convective mixing homogenizes the pre-bomb {Delta}{sup 14}C signature (-67 {+-} 4{per_thousand}) to at least 1000 m depth. Surface water bomb-{sup 14}C signals were lagged and damped (peaking at {approx} +45{per_thousand} in the early 1980s) relative to other regions of the northwest Atlantic, and intermediate water signals were damped further. Off southwest Nova Scotia, the vertical gradient in {Delta}{sup 14}C is much stronger. In surface water, pre-bomb {Delta}{sup 14}C averaged -75 {+-} 5{per_thousand}. At 250-475 m depth, prebomb {Delta}{sup 14}C oscillated quasi-decadally between -80 and -100{per_thousand}, likely reflecting interannual variability in the presence of Labrador Slope Water vs. Warm Slope Water (WSW). Finally, subfossil corals reveal no systematic changes in vertical {Delta}{sup 14}C gradients over the last 1200 years.

  9. Low energy cyclotron for radiocarbon dating

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, J.J.

    1984-12-01

    The measurement of naturally occurring radioisotopes whose half lives are less than a few hundred million years but more than a few years provides information about the temporal behavior of geologic and climatic processes, the temporal history of meteoritic bodies as well as the production mechanisms of these radioisotopes. A new extremely sensitive technique for measuring these radioisotopes at tandem Van de Graaff and cyclotron facilities has been very successful though the high cost and limited availability have been discouraging. We have built and tested a low energy cyclotron for radiocarbon dating similar in size to a conventional mass spectrometer. These tests clearly show that with the addition of a conventional ion source, the low energy cyclotron can perform the extremely high sensitivity /sup 14/C measurements that are now done at accelerator facilities. We found that no significant background is present when the cyclotron is tuned to accelerate /sup 14/C negative ions and the transmission efficiency is adequate to perform radiocarbon dating on milligram samples of carbon. The internal ion source used did not produce sufficient current to detect /sup 14/C directly at modern concentrations. We show how a conventional carbon negative ion source, located outside the cyclotron magnet, would produce sufficient beam and provide for quick sampling to make radiocarbon dating milligram samples with a modest laboratory instrument feasible.

  10. Using Methane 14C to Determine the Origin of the Rapid Methane Rise at the End of the Younger Dryas 11,600 Years Ago: Increased Wetland Production or Methane Hydrates? A Progress Report.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrenko, V. V.; Severinghaus, J.; Brook, E.; Reeh, N.

    2002-12-01

    The atmospheric methane concentration rose from about 500 parts per billion (ppb) to about 750 ppb over a period of just 150 years at the termination of the Younger Dryas cold period 11,600 years ago, as indicated by Greenland ice core records. The start of this rapid methane increase was synchronous with an even more rapid climate warming -- Greenland ice core nitrogen and argon isotope records indicate that temperatures rose 5 - 10 ?C over just a few decades. There has been considerable debate about the source of this methane rise. Currently, the two main hypotheses attribute the methane rise either to increased bacterial methane production in wetlands, or to the dissociation of large quantities of methane hydrates on the ocean floor. Here we describe the progress of a project whose aim is to determine the origin of this methane rise. Our approach involves using 14C of ancient methane (derived from air bubbles in glacial ice) to determine its source. Methane hydrates are hundreds of thousands to millions of years old, and should contain virtually no 14C, whereas wetland-derived methane will have 14C content identical to that of atmospheric CO2 at the time of production. Obtaining enough ancient methane for a 14C measurement requires very large samples -- about 2 cubic meters. We have been able to locate a site on the western margin of the Greenland ice sheet where large amounts of uncontaminated ancient ice are available at the surface. Furthermore, our measurements of oxygen isotopes in the ice, as well as measurements of methane and oxygen and nitrogen isotopes in the air trapped in this ice have allowed us to date the ice and precisely locate the ice that contains the end-of-Younger-Dryas methane increase signal. Our data also demonstrate that the methane record in this ice is uncontaminated and suitable for methane 14C analysis. During the past year, we also constructed and are testing a device for melting and extracting air from large volumes of glacial ice.

  11. Bomb-curve radiocarbon measurement of recent biologic tissues and applications to wildlife forensics and stable isotope (paleo)ecology.

    PubMed

    Uno, Kevin T; Quade, Jay; Fisher, Daniel C; Wittemyer, George; Douglas-Hamilton, Iain; Andanje, Samuel; Omondi, Patrick; Litoroh, Moses; Cerling, Thure E

    2013-07-16

    Above-ground thermonuclear weapons testing from 1952 through 1962 nearly doubled the concentration of radiocarbon ((14)C) in the atmosphere. As a result, organic material formed during or after this period may be radiocarbon-dated using the abrupt rise and steady fall of the atmospheric (14)C concentration known as the bomb-curve. We test the accuracy of accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon dating of 29 herbivore and plant tissues collected on known dates between 1905 and 2008 in East Africa. Herbivore samples include teeth, tusks, soft tissue, hair, and horn. Tissues formed after 1955 are dated to within 0.3-1.3 y of formation, depending on the tissue type, whereas tissues older than ca. 1955 have high age uncertainties (>17 y) due to the Suess effect. (14)C dating of tissues has applications to stable isotope (paleo)ecology and wildlife forensics. We use data from 41 additional samples to determine growth rates of tusks, molars, and hair, which improve interpretations of serial stable isotope data for (paleo)ecological studies. (14)C dating can also be used to calculate the time interval represented in periodic histological structures in dental tissues (i.e., perikymata), which in turn may be used as chronometers in fossil teeth. Bomb-curve (14)C dating of confiscated animal tissues (e.g., ivory statues) can be used to determine whether trade of the item is legal, because many Convention of International Trade of Endangered Species restrictions are based on the age of the tissue, and thus can serve as a powerful forensic tool to combat illegal trade in animal parts. PMID:23818577

  12. Bomb-curve radiocarbon measurement of recent biologic tissues and applications to wildlife forensics and stable isotope (paleo)ecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Kevin T.; Quade, Jay; Fisher, Daniel C.; Wittemyer, George; Douglas-Hamilton, Iain; Andanje, Samuel; Omondi, Patrick; Litoroh, Moses; Cerling, Thure E.

    2013-07-01

    Above-ground thermonuclear weapons testing from 1952 through 1962 nearly doubled the concentration of radiocarbon (14C) in the atmosphere. As a result, organic material formed during or after this period may be radiocarbon-dated using the abrupt rise and steady fall of the atmospheric 14C concentration known as the bomb-curve. We test the accuracy of accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon dating of 29 herbivore and plant tissues collected on known dates between 1905 and 2008 in East Africa. Herbivore samples include teeth, tusks, soft tissue, hair, and horn. Tissues formed after 1955 are dated to within 0.3-1.3 y of formation, depending on the tissue type, whereas tissues older than ca. 1955 have high age uncertainties (>17 y) due to the Suess effect. 14C dating of tissues has applications to stable isotope (paleo)ecology and wildlife forensics. We use data from 41 additional samples to determine growth rates of tusks, molars, and hair, which improve interpretations of serial stable isotope data for (paleo)ecological studies. 14C dating can also be used to calculate the time interval represented in periodic histological structures in dental tissues (i.e., perikymata), which in turn may be used as chronometers in fossil teeth. Bomb-curve 14C dating of confiscated animal tissues (e.g., ivory statues) can be used to determine whether trade of the item is legal, because many Convention of International Trade of Endangered Species restrictions are based on the age of the tissue, and thus can serve as a powerful forensic tool to combat illegal trade in animal parts.

  13. Bomb-curve radiocarbon measurement of recent biologic tissues and applications to wildlife forensics and stable isotope (paleo)ecology

    PubMed Central

    Uno, Kevin T.; Quade, Jay; Fisher, Daniel C.; Wittemyer, George; Douglas-Hamilton, Iain; Andanje, Samuel; Omondi, Patrick; Litoroh, Moses; Cerling, Thure E.

    2013-01-01

    Above-ground thermonuclear weapons testing from 1952 through 1962 nearly doubled the concentration of radiocarbon (14C) in the atmosphere. As a result, organic material formed during or after this period may be radiocarbon-dated using the abrupt rise and steady fall of the atmospheric 14C concentration known as the bomb-curve. We test the accuracy of accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon dating of 29 herbivore and plant tissues collected on known dates between 1905 and 2008 in East Africa. Herbivore samples include teeth, tusks, soft tissue, hair, and horn. Tissues formed after 1955 are dated to within 0.3–1.3 y of formation, depending on the tissue type, whereas tissues older than ca. 1955 have high age uncertainties (>17 y) due to the Suess effect. 14C dating of tissues has applications to stable isotope (paleo)ecology and wildlife forensics. We use data from 41 additional samples to determine growth rates of tusks, molars, and hair, which improve interpretations of serial stable isotope data for (paleo)ecological studies. 14C dating can also be used to calculate the time interval represented in periodic histological structures in dental tissues (i.e., perikymata), which in turn may be used as chronometers in fossil teeth. Bomb-curve 14C dating of confiscated animal tissues (e.g., ivory statues) can be used to determine whether trade of the item is legal, because many Convention of International Trade of Endangered Species restrictions are based on the age of the tissue, and thus can serve as a powerful forensic tool to combat illegal trade in animal parts. PMID:23818577

  14. Bomb-curve radiocarbon measurement of recent biologic tissues and applications to wildlife forensics and stable isotope (paleo)ecology.

    PubMed

    Uno, Kevin T; Quade, Jay; Fisher, Daniel C; Wittemyer, George; Douglas-Hamilton, Iain; Andanje, Samuel; Omondi, Patrick; Litoroh, Moses; Cerling, Thure E

    2013-07-16

    Above-ground thermonuclear weapons testing from 1952 through 1962 nearly doubled the concentration of radiocarbon ((14)C) in the atmosphere. As a result, organic material formed during or after this period may be radiocarbon-dated using the abrupt rise and steady fall of the atmospheric (14)C concentration known as the bomb-curve. We test the accuracy of accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon dating of 29 herbivore and plant tissues collected on known dates between 1905 and 2008 in East Africa. Herbivore samples include teeth, tusks, soft tissue, hair, and horn. Tissues formed after 1955 are dated to within 0.3-1.3 y of formation, depending on the tissue type, whereas tissues older than ca. 1955 have high age uncertainties (>17 y) due to the Suess effect. (14)C dating of tissues has applications to stable isotope (paleo)ecology and wildlife forensics. We use data from 41 additional samples to determine growth rates of tusks, molars, and hair, which improve interpretations of serial stable isotope data for (paleo)ecological studies. (14)C dating can also be used to calculate the time interval represented in periodic histological structures in dental tissues (i.e., perikymata), which in turn may be used as chronometers in fossil teeth. Bomb-curve (14)C dating of confiscated animal tissues (e.g., ivory statues) can be used to determine whether trade of the item is legal, because many Convention of International Trade of Endangered Species restrictions are based on the age of the tissue, and thus can serve as a powerful forensic tool to combat illegal trade in animal parts.

  15. Age estimation in forensic sciences: Application of combined aspartic acid racemization and radiocarbon analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Alkass, K; Buchholz, B A; Ohtani, S; Yamamoto, T; Druid, H; Spalding, S L

    2009-11-02

    Age determination of unknown human bodies is important in the setting of a crime investigation or a mass disaster, since the age at death, birth date and year of death, as well as gender, can guide investigators to the correct identity among a large number of possible matches. Traditional morphological methods used by anthropologists to determine age are often imprecise, whereas chemical analysis of tooth dentin, such as aspartic acid racemization has shown reproducible and more precise results. In this paper we analyze teeth from Swedish individuals using both aspartic acid racemization and radiocarbon methodologies. The rationale behind using radiocarbon analysis is that above-ground testing of nuclear weapons during the cold war (1955-1963) caused an extreme increase in global levels of carbon-14 ({sup 14}C) which have been carefully recorded over time. Forty-four teeth from 41 individuals were analyzed using aspartic acid racemization analysis of tooth crown dentin or radiocarbon analysis of enamel and ten of these were split and subjected to both radiocarbon and racemization analysis. Combined analysis showed that the two methods correlated well (R2=0.66, p < 0.05). Radiocarbon analysis showed an excellent precision with an overall absolute error of 0.6 {+-} 04 years. Aspartic acid racemization also showed a good precision with an overall absolute error of 5.4 {+-} 4.2 years. Whereas radiocarbon analysis gives an estimated year of birth, racemization analysis indicates the chronological age of the individual at the time of death. We show how these methods in combination can also assist in the estimation of date of death of an unidentified victim. This strategy can be of significant assistance in forensic casework involving dead victim identification.

  16. Age estimation in forensic sciences: application of combined aspartic acid racemization and radiocarbon analysis.

    PubMed

    Alkass, Kanar; Buchholz, Bruce A; Ohtani, Susumu; Yamamoto, Toshiharu; Druid, Henrik; Spalding, Kirsty L

    2010-05-01

    Age determination of unknown human bodies is important in the setting of a crime investigation or a mass disaster because the age at death, birth date, and year of death as well as gender can guide investigators to the correct identity among a large number of possible matches. Traditional morphological methods used by anthropologists to determine age are often imprecise, whereas chemical analysis of tooth dentin, such as aspartic acid racemization, has shown reproducible and more precise results. In this study, we analyzed teeth from Swedish individuals using both aspartic acid racemization and radiocarbon methodologies. The rationale behind using radiocarbon analysis is that aboveground testing of nuclear weapons during the cold war (1955-1963) caused an extreme increase in global levels of carbon-14 ((14)C), which has been carefully recorded over time. Forty-four teeth from 41 individuals were analyzed using aspartic acid racemization analysis of tooth crown dentin or radiocarbon analysis of enamel, and 10 of these were split and subjected to both radiocarbon and racemization analysis. Combined analysis showed that the two methods correlated well (R(2) = 0.66, p < 0.05). Radiocarbon analysis showed an excellent precision with an overall absolute error of 1.0 +/- 0.6 years. Aspartic acid racemization also showed a good precision with an overall absolute error of 5.4 +/- 4.2 years. Whereas radiocarbon analysis gives an estimated year of birth, racemization analysis indicates the chronological age of the individual at the time of death. We show how these methods in combination can also assist in the estimation of date of death of an unidentified victim. This strategy can be of significant assistance in forensic casework involving dead victim identification.

  17. Age estimation in forensic sciences: application of combined aspartic acid racemization and radiocarbon analysis.

    PubMed

    Alkass, Kanar; Buchholz, Bruce A; Ohtani, Susumu; Yamamoto, Toshiharu; Druid, Henrik; Spalding, Kirsty L

    2010-05-01

    Age determination of unknown human bodies is important in the setting of a crime investigation or a mass disaster because the age at death, birth date, and year of death as well as gender can guide investigators to the correct identity among a large number of possible matches. Traditional morphological methods used by anthropologists to determine age are often imprecise, whereas chemical analysis of tooth dentin, such as aspartic acid racemization, has shown reproducible and more precise results. In this study, we analyzed teeth from Swedish individuals using both aspartic acid racemization and radiocarbon methodologies. The rationale behind using radiocarbon analysis is that aboveground testing of nuclear weapons during the cold war (1955-1963) caused an extreme increase in global levels of carbon-14 ((14)C), which has been carefully recorded over time. Forty-four teeth from 41 individuals were analyzed using aspartic acid racemization analysis of tooth crown dentin or radiocarbon analysis of enamel, and 10 of these were split and subjected to both radiocarbon and racemization analysis. Combined analysis showed that the two methods correlated well (R(2) = 0.66, p < 0.05). Radiocarbon analysis showed an excellent precision with an overall absolute error of 1.0 +/- 0.6 years. Aspartic acid racemization also showed a good precision with an overall absolute error of 5.4 +/- 4.2 years. Whereas radiocarbon analysis gives an estimated year of birth, racemization analysis indicates the chronological age of the individual at the time of death. We show how these methods in combination can also assist in the estimation of date of death of an unidentified victim. This strategy can be of significant assistance in forensic casework involving dead victim identification. PMID:19965905

  18. Chlorophyll a-specific Δ14C, δ13C and δ15N values in stream periphyton: implications for aquatic food web studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, N. F.; Yamane, M.; Suga, H.; Ogawa, N. O.; Yokoyama, Y.; Ohkouchi, N.

    2015-11-01

    Periphytic algae attached to a streambed substrate (periphyton) are an important primary producer in stream ecosystems. We determined the isotopic composition of chlorophyll a in periphyton collected from a stream flowing on limestone bedrock in the Seri River, central Japan. Stable isotope ratios of carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) and natural radiocarbon abundances (Δ14C) were measured in chlorophyll a (δ13Cchl, δ15Nchl and Δ14Cchl) and bulk (δ13Cbulk, δ15Nbulk and Δ14Cbulk) for periphyton, a pure aquatic primary producer (Cladophora sp.) and a terrestrial primary producer (Quercus glauca). Periphyton δ13Cbulk and δ13Cchl values did not necessarily correspond to δ13Cbulk for an algal-grazing specialist (Epeorus latifolium). Periphyton Δ14Cchl values (-258 ‰ in April and -190 ‰ in October) were slightly lower than Δ14Cbulk values (-228 ‰ in April and -179 ‰ in October) but were close to the Δ14C value for dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC; -217 ± 31 ‰), which is a mixture of weathered carbonates (Δ14C = -1000 ‰), CO2 derived from aquatic and terrestrial organic matters (variable Δ14C) and dissolved atmospheric CO2 (Δ14C approximately +30 ‰ in 2013). Δ14Cchl values were also close to Δ14Cbulk for E. latifolium (-215 ‰ in April and -199 ‰ in October) and Cladophora sp. (-210 ‰), whereas the Δ14Cbulk value for Q. glauca (+27 ‰) was closer to Δ14C for atmospheric CO2. Although the bulk isotopic composition of periphyton is recognised as a surrogate for the photosynthetic algal community, natural periphyton is a mixture of aquatic and terrestrial organic materials. Our results indicate that the bulk periphyton matrix at the study site consists of 89 to 95 % algal carbon (derived from 14C-depleted DIC) and 5 to 11 % terrestrial organic carbon (derived from 14C-enriched atmospheric CO2).

  19. The direct absorption method of 14C assay—historical perspective and future potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vita-Finzi, Claudio; Leaney, Fred

    2006-05-01

    Radiocarbon dating by liquid scintillation counting of 14CO 2 absorbed into an alkaline liquid was first developed for groundwater research. In the 1980s it was applied to molluscs, barnacles, corals and other carbonates, and yielded dependable results within a few hours, with standard errors of ˜10% for ages <14 000 yr, at about 1/200 the price of commercial 14C dates. Although its cost has risen fivefold, the first-order approach remains useful in coastal neotectonics, where numerous low-precision determinations are often more useful than a few high-precision dates. Direct absorption (DA) 14C dating has now been improved and extended to include wood and charcoal samples, and provides ages in a variety of environments with standard errors similar to those reported by conventional radiometric laboratories and for ages spanning the last 30 000 years. The unit cost for a 'state of the art' DA determination is close to 50% of that by benzene synthesis, but the method is favoured in many hydrological and archaeological applications because it is robust and rapid.

  20. Old radiocarbon ages in the southwest Pacific Ocean during the last glacial period and deglaciation

    PubMed

    Sikes; Samson; Guilderson; Howard

    2000-06-01

    Marine radiocarbon (14C) dates are widely used for dating oceanic events and as tracers of ocean circulation, essential components for understanding ocean-climate interactions. Past ocean ventilation rates have been determined by the difference between radiocarbon ages of deep-water and surface-water reservoirs, but the apparent age of surface waters (currently approximately 400 years in the tropics and approximately 1,200 years in Antarctic waters) might not be constant through time, as has been assumed in radiocarbon chronologies and palaeoclimate studies. Here we present independent estimates of surface-water and deep-water reservoir ages in the New Zealand region since the last glacial period, using volcanic ejecta (tephras) deposited in both marine and terrestrial sediments as stratigraphic markers. Compared to present-day values, surface-reservoir ages from 11,900 14C years ago were twice as large (800 years) and during glacial times were five times as large (2,000 years), contradicting the assumption of constant surface age. Furthermore, the ages of glacial deep-water reservoirs were much older (3,000-5,000 years). The increase in surface-to-deep water age differences in the glacial Southern Ocean suggests that there was decreased ocean ventilation during this period.

  1. Calibration of the radiocarbon time scale at 37ka BP

    SciTech Connect

    Southon, J.R.; Deino, A.L.; Orsi, G.

    1995-12-01

    Results from radiocarbon and U-Th measurements on corals have provided a radiocarbon calibration beyond the range covered by tree ring series, but the uncertainties in the measurements beyond 20ka BP are very large. We have obtained new calibration data from radiocarbon dates on material associated with the catastrophic Campanian Ignimbrite eruption from the Phlegrean Fields near Naples. The eruption has been well dated by {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar to 37ka BP. Radiocarbon measurements were carried out on charcoal from a carbonized branch exposed within the ignimbrite tuff on the wall of an active quarry. The sample was split and analyzed at both the Naples and Lawrence Livermore AMS facilities. The offset between the Ar-Ar data and the radiocarbon results (recalculated using the true 5730-year half life for {sup 14}C) is consistent with predictions from paleomagnetic data and carbon cycle modeling.

  2. Adult Human Pancreatic Islet Beta-Cells Display Limited Turnover and Long Lifespan as Determined by In-Vivo Thymidine Analog Incorporation and Radiocarbon Dating

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, S; Kushner, J A; Buchholz, B A; Meeker, A K; Stein, G M; Hsieh, M; Kirby, M; Pechhold, S; Liu, E H; Harlan, D M; Tisdale, J F

    2010-03-15

    Diabetes mellitus results from an absolute or relative deficiency of insulin producing pancreatic beta-cells. The adult human beta-cell's turnover rate remains unknown. We employed novel techniques to examine adult human islet beta-cell turnover and longevity in vivo. Subjects enrolled in NIH clinical trials received thymidine analogues [iododeoxyuridine (IdU) or bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)] 8-days to 4-years prior to death. Archival autopsy samples from ten patients (aged 17-74 years) were employed to assess beta-cell turnover by scoring nuclear analog labeling within insulin staining cells. Human adult beta-cell longevity was determined by estimating the cells genomic DNA integration of atmospheric carbon-14 ({sup 14}C). DNA was purified from pancreatic islets isolated from cadaveric donors; whole islet prep DNA was obtained from a 15 year old donor, and purified beta-cell DNA was obtained from two donors (age 48 and 80 years). {sup 14}C levels were then determined using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Cellular 'birth date' was determined by comparing the subject's DNA {sup 14}C content relative to a well-established {sup 14}C atmospheric prevalence curve. In the two subjects less than age 20 years, 1-2% of the beta-cell nuclei co-stained for BrdU/IdU. No beta-cell nuclei co-stained in the eight patients more than 30 years old. Consistent with the BrdU/IdU turnover data, beta-cell DNA {sup 14}C content indicated the cells 'birth date' occurred within the subject's first 30 years of life. Under typical circumstances, adult human beta-cells and their cellular precursors are established by young adulthood.

  3. Root-uptake of (14)C derived from acetic acid and (14)C transfer to rice edible parts.

    PubMed

    Ogiyama, Shinichi; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Inubushi, Kazuyuki; Takeda, Hiroshi; Uchida, Shigeo

    2010-02-01

    Three types of culture experiments using paddy rice (Oryza sativa L.) were performed to examine root-uptake of (14)C in the form of acetic acid: double pot experiment (hydroponics), wet culture experiment (submerged sand medium), and chamber experiment (hydroponics and submerged sand medium). The (14)C radioactivity in the plant, mediums, and atmospheric carbon dioxide ((14)CO(2)) in the chamber were determined, and the distribution of (14)C in the plant was visualized using autoradiography. In the double pot experiment, the shoot of the plant and the lower root which was soaked in the culture solution had (14)C radioactivity, but the upper root which did not have contact with the solution had none. There were also (14)C radioactivity in the grains and roots in the wet culture experiment. Results of the chamber experiment showed that (14)CO(2) gas was released from the culture solution in both types of cultures. Results indicated that the (14)C-acetic acid absorbed by rice plant through its root would be very small. Most of the (14)C-acetic acid was transformed into gaseous forms either in the culture solution or rhizosphere. A relatively longer time would be needed to assimilate (14)C derived from acetic acid to grain parts after it was once absorbed by the shoot through the root. Availability of (14)C for the plant in sand culture was considered to be decreased compared with that for the plant in the hydroponics experiment. It was suggested that rice plant absorbed and assimilated (14)C through the plant roots not because of uptake of (14)C-acetic acid but because of uptake of (14)C in gaseous forms such as (14)CO(2). PMID:19962904

  4. Sea Water Radiocarbon Evolution in the Gulf of Alaska: 2002 Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Guilderson, T P; Roark, E B; Quay, P D; Flood-Page, S R; Moy, C

    2005-04-08

    Oceanic uptake and transport of bomb radiocarbon as {sup 14}CO{sub 2} created by atmospheric nuclear weapons testing in the 1950s and 1960s has been a useful diagnostic to determine the carbon transfer between the ocean and atmosphere. In addition, the distribution of radiocarbon in the ocean can be used as a tracer of oceanic circulation. Results obtained from samples collected in the Gulf of Alaska in the summer of 2002 provide a direct comparison with results in the 1970s during GEOSECS and in the early 1990s during WOCE. The open gyre values are 20-40{per_thousand} more negative than those documented in 1991 and 1993 (WOCE) although the general trends as a function of latitude are reproduced. Surface values are still significantly higher than pre-bomb levels ({approx}-105{per_thousand} or lower). In the central gyre, we observe {Delta}{sup 14}C-values that are lower in comparison to GEOSECS (stn 218) and WOCE P16/P17 to a density of {approx}26.8{sigma}t. This observation is consistent with the overall decrease in surface {Delta}{sup 14}C values, and reflects the erosion of the bomb-{sup 14}C transient. We propose that erosion of the bomb-{sup 14}C transient is accomplished by entrainment of low {sup 14}C water via vertical exchange within the Gulf of Alaska and replenishment of surface and sub-thermocline waters with waters derived from the far northwest Pacific.

  5. Analysis of 14C and 13C in teeth provides precise birth dating and clues to geographical origin

    PubMed Central

    K, Alkass; BA, Buchholz; H, Druid; KL, Spalding

    2011-01-01

    The identification of human bodies in situations when there are no clues as to the person’s identity from circumstantial data, poses a difficult problem to investigators. The determination of age and sex of the body can be crucial in order to limit the search to individuals that are a possible match. We analyzed the proportion of bomb pulse derived carbon-14 (14C) incorporated in the enamel of teeth from individuals from different geographical locations. The ‘bomb pulse’ refers to a significant increase in 14C levels in the atmosphere caused by above ground test detonations of nuclear weapons during the cold war (1955-1963). By comparing 14C levels in enamel with 14C atmospheric levels systematically recorded over time, high precision birth dating of modern biological material is possible. Above ground nuclear bomb testing was largely restricted to a couple of locations in the northern hemisphere, producing differences in atmospheric 14C levels at various geographical regions, particularly in the early phase. Therefore, we examined the precision of 14C birth dating of enamel as a function of time of formation and geographical location. We also investigated the use of the stable isotope 13C as an indicator of geographical origin of an individual. Dental enamel was isolated from 95 teeth extracted from 84 individuals to study the precision of the 14C method along the bomb spike. For teeth formed before 1955 (N = 17), all but one tooth showed negative Δ14C values. Analysis of enamel from teeth formed during the rising part of the bomb-spike (1955-1963, N = 12) and after the peak (>1963, N = 66) resulted in an average absolute date of birth estimation error of 1.9 ±1.4 and 1.3 ± 1.0 years, respectively. Geographical location of an individual had no adverse effect on the precision of year of birth estimation using radiocarbon dating. In 46 teeth, measurement of 13C was also performed. Scandinavian teeth showed a substantially greater depression in average δ13C

  6. Analysis of 14C and 13C in teeth provides precise birth dating and clues to geographical origin.

    PubMed

    Alkass, K; Buchholz, B A; Druid, H; Spalding, K L

    2011-06-15

    The identification of human bodies in situations when there are no clues as to the person's identity from circumstantial data, poses a difficult problem to the investigators. The determination of age and sex of the body can be crucial in order to limit the search to individuals that are a possible match. We analyzed the proportion of bomb pulse derived carbon-14 ((14)C) incorporated in the enamel of teeth from individuals from different geographical locations. The 'bomb pulse' refers to a significant increase in (14)C levels in the atmosphere caused by above ground test detonations of nuclear weapons during the cold war (1955-1963). By comparing (14)C levels in enamel with (14)C atmospheric levels systematically recorded over time, high precision birth dating of modern biological material is possible. Above ground nuclear bomb testing was largely restricted to a couple of locations in the northern hemisphere, producing differences in atmospheric (14)C levels at various geographical regions, particularly in the early phase. Therefore, we examined the precision of (14)C birth dating of enamel as a function of time of formation and geographical location. We also investigated the use of the stable isotope (13)C as an indicator of geographical origin of an individual. Dental enamel was isolated from 95 teeth extracted from 84 individuals to study the precision of the (14)C method along the bomb spike. For teeth formed before 1955 (N=17), all but one tooth showed negative Δ(14)C values. Analysis of enamel from teeth formed during the rising part of the bomb-spike (1955-1963, N=12) and after the peak (>1963, N=66) resulted in an average absolute date of birth estimation error of 1.9±1.4 and 1.3±1.0 years, respectively. Geographical location of an individual had no adverse effect on the precision of year of birth estimation using radiocarbon dating. In 46 teeth, measurement of (13)C was also performed. Scandinavian teeth showed a substantially greater depression in

  7. Analysis of 14C and 13C in teeth provides precise birth dating and clues to geographical origin.

    PubMed

    Alkass, K; Buchholz, B A; Druid, H; Spalding, K L

    2011-06-15

    The identification of human bodies in situations when there are no clues as to the person's identity from circumstantial data, poses a difficult problem to the investigators. The determination of age and sex of the body can be crucial in order to limit the search to individuals that are a possible match. We analyzed the proportion of bomb pulse derived carbon-14 ((14)C) incorporated in the enamel of teeth from individuals from different geographical locations. The 'bomb pulse' refers to a significant increase in (14)C levels in the atmosphere caused by above ground test detonations of nuclear weapons during the cold war (1955-1963). By comparing (14)C levels in enamel with (14)C atmospheric levels systematically recorded over time, high precision birth dating of modern biological material is possible. Above ground nuclear bomb testing was largely restricted to a couple of locations in the northern hemisphere, producing differences in atmospheric (14)C levels at various geographical regions, particularly in the early phase. Therefore, we examined the precision of (14)C birth dating of enamel as a function of time of formation and geographical location. We also investigated the use of the stable isotope (13)C as an indicator of geographical origin of an individual. Dental enamel was isolated from 95 teeth extracted from 84 individuals to study the precision of the (14)C method along the bomb spike. For teeth formed before 1955 (N=17), all but one tooth showed negative Δ(14)C values. Analysis of enamel from teeth formed during the rising part of the bomb-spike (1955-1963, N=12) and after the peak (>1963, N=66) resulted in an average absolute date of birth estimation error of 1.9±1.4 and 1.3±1.0 years, respectively. Geographical location of an individual had no adverse effect on the precision of year of birth estimation using radiocarbon dating. In 46 teeth, measurement of (13)C was also performed. Scandinavian teeth showed a substantially greater depression in

  8. Surface water processes in the Indonesian throughflow as documented by a high-resolution coral Δ14C record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallon, Stewart J.; Guilderson, Thomas P.

    2008-09-01

    To explore the seasonal to decadal variability in surface water masses that contribute to the Indonesian throughflow, we have generated a 115-year bimonthly coral-based radiocarbon time series from a coral in the Makassar Straits. In the pre-bomb (pre-1955) era from 1890 to 1954, the radiocarbon time series occasionally displays a small seasonal signal (10-15‰). After 1954 the radiocarbon record increases rapidly, in response to the increased atmospheric 14C content caused by nuclear weapons testing. From 1957 to 1986 the record displays clear seasonal variability from 15 to 60‰ and the post-bomb peak (163 per mil) occurred in 1974. The seasonal cycle of radiocarbon can be attributed to variations of surface waters passing through the South Makassar Strait. Southern Makassar is under the influence of the Northwest Monsoon, which is responsible for the high austral summer radiocarbon (North Pacific waters) and the Southeast Monsoon that flushes back a mixture of low (South Pacific and upwelling altered) radiocarbon water from the Banda Sea. The coral record also shows a significant 14C peak in 1955 due to the bomb-14C water advected into this region from nuclear weapons tests in the Marshall Islands in 1954.

  9. Chlorophyll a specific Δ14C, δ13C and δ15N values in stream periphyton: implications for aquatic food web studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, N. F.; Yamane, M.; Suga, H.; Ogawa, N. O.; Yokoyama, Y.; Ohkouchi, N.

    2015-07-01

    We determined the isotopic composition of chlorophyll a in periphytic algae attached to a streambed substrate (periphyton). The samples were collected from a stream flowing on limestone bedrock in the Seri River, central Japan. Stable isotope ratios of carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) and natural radiocarbon abundances (Δ14C) were measured in chlorophyll a (δ13Cchl, δ15Nchl and Δ14Cchl) and bulk (δ13Cbulk, δ15Nbulk and Δ14Cbulk) for periphyton, pure aquatic primary producer (Cladophora sp.) and terrestrial primary producer (Quercus glauca). Periphyton δ13Cbulk and δ13Cchl values did not necessarily correspond to δ13Cbulk for an algal-grazing specialist (Mayfly larva, Epeorus latifolium), suggesting that periphyton δ13C values do not faithfully trace carbon transfer between primary producers and primary consumers. Periphyton Δ14Cchl values (-258 ‰ in April and -190 ‰ in October) were slightly lower than Δ14Cbulk values (-228 ‰ in April and -179 ‰ in October), but were close to the Δ14C value for dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) (-217 ± 31 ‰), which is a mixture of weathered carbonates (Δ14C = -1000 ‰) and dissolved atmospheric CO2 (Δ14C approximately +30 ‰ in 2013). Δ14Cchl values were also close to Δ14Cbulk for E. latifolium (-215 ‰ in April and -199 ‰ in October) and Cladophora sp. (-210 ‰), whereas the Δ14Cbulk value for Q. glauca (+27 ‰) was closer to Δ14C for atmospheric CO2. Although the bulk isotopic composition of periphyton is recognised as a surrogate for the photosynthetic algal community, natural periphyton is a mixture of aquatic and terrestrial organic materials. Our results indicate that the bulk periphyton matrix at the study site consists of 89 to 95 % algal carbon (derived from 14C-depleted DIC) and 5 to 11 % terrestrial organic carbon (derived from 14C-enriched atmospheric CO2).

  10. Simple determination of the CO sub 2 /O sub 2 specificity of Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase by the specific radioactivity of ( sup 14 C) glycerate 3-phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Genhai Zhu; Jensen, R.G.; Hallick, R.B.; Wildner, G.F. )

    1992-02-01

    A new method is presented for measurement of the CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} specificity factor of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco). The ({sup 14}C)3-phosphoglycerate (PGA) from the Rubisco carboxylase reaction and its dilution by the Rubisco oxygenase reaction was monitored by directly measuring the specific radioactivity of PGA. {sup 14}CO{sub 2} fixation with Rubisco occurred under two reaction conditions: carboxylase with oxygenase with 40 micromolar CO{sub 2} in O{sub 2}-saturated water and carboxylase only with 160 micromolar CO{sub 2} under N{sub 2}. Detection of the specific radioactivity used the amount of PGA as obtained from the peak area, which was determined by pulsed amperometry following separation by high-performance anion exchange chromatography and the radioactive counts of the ({sup 14}C)PGA in the same peak. The specificity factor of Rubisco from spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) (93 {plus minus} 4), from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (66 {plus minus} 1), and from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum (13) were comparable with the published values measured by different methods.

  11. Observation of 23 Supernovae that Exploded <300 pc from Earth During the Past 300 kyr in the Radiocarbon and 10Be Cosmogenic Isotope Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firestone, R. B.

    2014-12-01

    The global excess radiocarbon abundance record for the past 50 kyr can be entirely explained by the explosion of four supernovae 44, 37, 32, and 22 kyr ago less than 250 pc from Earth. Each supernova left a nearly identical signature beginning with a sudden increase at the time of the explosion, followed by a hiatus of 1500 years, and continuing with a sustained, 2000 year increase in radiocarbon from gamma rays produced by diffusive shock in the supernova remnant. For the past 18 kyr excess radiocarbon from SN22kyrBP, identified as the Vela supernova, has decayed with the 5700 year half-life of 14C. The absolute scale for radiocarbon abundance has been determined from the decay curve as Δ14C=5±2% in 1950. Small oscillations in the decay curve are shown to coincide with variations in Earth's Virtual Axial Dipole Moment (VADM). SN44kyrBP exploded approximately 110 pc from Earth doubling the radiocarbon abundance. These supernovae are confirmed in the 10Be, 26Al, 36Cl and nitrate geological records. An additional 19 supernovae are observed 50-300 kyr ago in the 10Be record. Using the Earth as a calorimeter I have determined that approximated 2×1049 ergs were released at the time of each supernova explosion and 1049-50 ergs afterwards, consistent with theoretical predictions. The background rate of radiocarbon productions from more distant sources was determined as 1.61 atoms/cm2s at the top of the atmosphere. Although little danger to life on Earth is expected from these supernovae, each of the recent events were shown to correlate with concurrent global warming of 3-4°C.

  12. RADIOCARBON MEASUREMENTS ON PM-2.5 AMBIENT AEROSOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Radiocarbon (14C) measurements provide an estimate of the fraction of carbon in a sample that is biogenic. The methodology has been extensively used in past wintertime studies to quantify the contribution of wood smoke to ambient aerosol. In summertime such measurements can p...

  13. VOC RADIOCARBON MEASUREMENTS DURING SCOS97 AND EMISSIONS INVENTORY VALIDATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Radiocarbon (14C) measurements provide an estimate of the fraction of carbon in a sample that is biogenic. In September 1997 during SCOS97 a series of 3-h canister samples of ambient air were collected at the Azusa air monitoring station during morning and afternoon periods. ...

  14. Fate of (/sup 14/C)xanthotoxin (8-methoxypsoralen) in a goat and in bovine ruminal fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Ivie, G.W.; Beier, R.C.; Bull, D.L.; Oertli, E.H.

    1986-04-01

    A lactating Nubian goat was treated with (/sup 14/C)xanthotoxin, a photosensitizing psoralen that occurs naturally in some phototoxic range plants, as a single oral dose equivalent to 10.0 mg of xanthotoxin/kg of body weight. The radiochemical was rapidly absorbed, metabolized, and excreted. Although expired air was not monitored for the presence of volatile radiocarbon, the data indicated that greater than 50% of the administered (/sup 14/C)xanthotoxin was metabolized by cleavage of the O-(/sup 14/C)methyl moiety, with subsequent loss of the label as, presumably, (/sup 14/C)CO/sub 2/. Studies with bovine ruminal fluid in vitro indicated that cleavage of the O-methyl moiety of xanthotoxin could occur rapidly in the rumen. In the goat, nonmetabolized xanthotoxin was not excreted in urine, and of several metabolites in urine extracts, 3 were identified as resulting from opening of the furan or lactone ring. Only about 2% of the dose was recovered in the feces, and this consisted mainly of unmetabolized xanthotoxin. Although appreciable amounts of radiocarbon were secreted into milk, this radiocarbon was not in the form of xanthotoxin or any identifiable metabolites. The radiocarbon in milk likely resulted from the biosynthetic incorporation of (/sup 14/C)CO/sub 2/ into normal milk components.

  15. Single-stage accelerator mass spectrometer radiocarbon-interference identification and positive-ionisation characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcken, K. M.; Freeman, S. P. H. T.; Xu, S.; Dougans, A.

    2013-01-01

    A single-stage accelerator mass spectrometer (SSAMS) is a good alternative to conventional spectrometers based on tandem electrostatic acceleration for radiocarbon measurement and permits experimentation with both negative and positive carbon ions. However, such 14C AMS of either polarity ions is limited by an interference. In the case of anion acceleration we have newly determined this to be summed 13C and 16O by improvising an additional Wien filter on our SSAMS deck. Also, 14C AMS might be improved by removing its dependency on negative-ionisation in a sputter ion source. This requires negative-ionisation of sample atoms elsewhere to suppress the 14N interference, which we accomplish by transmitting initially positive ions through a thin membrane. The ionisation dependence on ion-energy is found to be consistent with previous experimentation with vapours and thicker foils.

  16. Insights into soil carbon dynamics across climatic and geologic gradients from time-series and fraction-specific radiocarbon analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Voort, Tessa Sophia; Hagedorn, Frank; Zell, Claudia; McIntyre, Cameron; Eglinton, Tim

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the interaction between soil organic matter (SOM) and climatic, geologic and ecological factors is essential for the understanding of potential susceptibility and vulnerability to climate and land use change. Radiocarbon constitutes a powerful tool for unraveling SOM dynamics and is increasingly used in studies of carbon turnover. The complex and inherently heterogeneous nature of SOM renders it challenging to assess the processes that govern SOM stability by solely looking at the bulk signature on a plot-scale level. This project combines bulk radiocarbon measurements on a regional-scale spanning wide climatic and geologic gradients with a more in-depth approach for a subset of locations. For this subset, time-series and carbon pool-specific radiocarbon data has been acquired for both topsoil and deeper soils. These well-studied sites are part of the Long-Term Forest Ecosystem Research (LWF) program of the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape research (WSL). Statistical analysis was performed to examine relationships of radiocarbon signatures with variables such as temperature, precipitation and elevation. Bomb-curve modeling was applied determine carbon turnover using time-series data. Results indicate that (1) there is no significant correlation between Δ14C signature and environmental conditions except a weak positive correlation with mean annual temperature, (2) vertical gradients in Δ14C signatures in surface and deeper soils are highly similar despite covering disparate soil-types and climatic systems, and (3) radiocarbon signatures vary significantly between time-series samples and carbon pools. Overall, this study provides a uniquely comprehensive dataset that allows for a better understanding of links between carbon dynamics and environmental settings, as well as for pool-specific and long-term trends in carbon (de)stabilization.

  17. 14C-age tracers in global ocean circulation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koeve, W.; Wagner, H.; Kähler, P.; Oschlies, A.

    2015-07-01

    The natural abundance of 14C in total CO2 dissolved in seawater (DIC) is a property applied to evaluate the water age structure and circulation in the ocean and in ocean models. In this study we use three different representations of the global ocean circulation augmented with a suite of idealised tracers to study the potential and limitations of using natural 14C to determine water age, which is the time elapsed since a body of water has been in contact with the atmosphere. We find that, globally, bulk 14C-age is dominated by two equally important components, one associated with ageing, i.e. the time component of circulation, and one associated with a "preformed 14C-age". The latter quantity exists because of the slow and incomplete atmosphere-ocean equilibration of 14C particularly in high latitudes where many water masses form. In the ocean's interior, preformed 14C-age behaves like a passive tracer. The relative contribution of the preformed component to bulk 14C-age varies regionally within a given model, but also between models. Regional variability in the Atlantic Ocean is associated with the mixing of waters with very different end members of preformed 14C-age. Here, variations in the preformed component over space and time mask the circulation component to an extent that its patterns are not detectable from bulk 14C-age. Between models, the variability of preformed 14C-age can also be considerable (factor of 2), related to the combination of physical model parameters, which influence circulation dynamics or gas exchange. The preformed component was found to be very sensitive to gas exchange and moderately sensitive to ice cover. In our model evaluation, the choice of the gas-exchange constant from within the currently accepted range of uncertainty had such a strong influence on preformed and bulk 14C-age that if model evaluation would be based on bulk 14C-age, it could easily impair the evaluation and tuning of a model's circulation on global and regional

  18. Calibration of radiocarbon dates: tables based on the consensus data of the workshop on calibrating the radiocarbon time scale

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J.; Lerman, J.C.; Damon, P.E.; Ralph, E.K.

    1982-01-01

    A calibration is presented for conventional radiocarbon ages ranging from 10 to 7240 years BP and thus covering a calendric range of 8000 years from 6050 BC to AD 1950. Distinctive features of this calibration include: (1) an improved data set consisting of 1154 radiocarbon measurements on samples of known age, (2) an extended range over which radiocarbon ages may be calibrated (an additional 530 years), (3) separate 95% confidence intervals (in tubular form) for six different radiocarbon uncertainties (20, 50, 100, 150, 200, 300 years), and (4) an estimate of the non-Poisson errors related to radiocarbon determinations, including an estimate of the systematic errors between laboratories.

  19. Radiocarbon Content of Intermediate Waters off West Sumatra During the Last 45,000 Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Pol-Holz, R.; Mohtadi, M.; Southon, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    Radiocarbon content of intermediate waters originating from the Southern Ocean is held as a likely smoking gun of the events that triggered the atmospheric CO2 rise and its radiocarbon decline during the last glacial-interglacial transition. Late Glacial depleted radiocarbon water masses have been found at intermediate depths off the coast of Baja California, the Galapagos, the Arabian Sea, but not unequivocally elsewhere. Knowing the route of the old water is therefore central for the required mechanistic linkage of Southern Ocean processes and the atmospheric response. A common approach to search for the old water reservoir is the radiocarbon difference between planktonic and benthic foraminifera or 'apparent ventilation age'. Caveats of this approach are due to the fact that it relies strongly on the knowledge of the surface water reservoir age. In this study, we present a high-resolution radiocarbon difference between surface and intermediate depth waters off west Sumatra in the attempt to elucidate a possible route of the old water from its hypothetical source in the high latitudes near Antarctica on its way to the lower latitude sites where it has been observed. Samples come from core SO189-39KL (0°47'S, 99°55'E, 517 m), a 1350 cm hemipelagic sedimentary sequence that spans the last 45,000 years. Radiocarbon determinations were made at centennial time resolution on both planktonic and benthic species. Calibration of the planktonic radiocarbon as age control points allowed us to infer the Δ14C of the intermediate waters. Our results show that throughout the LGM and the entire deglaciation, radiocarbon content of intermediate depths in the area remained with an almost constant age difference with the contemporaneous atmosphere. Unless we have grossly underestimated the local planktonic reservoir age, our results discard this area as a probable route for the spreading of the old water along its way to northern latitudes. In light of recent evidence from the

  20. TMEM14C is required for erythroid mitochondrial heme metabolism.

    PubMed

    Yien, Yvette Y; Robledo, Raymond F; Schultz, Iman J; Takahashi-Makise, Naoko; Gwynn, Babette; Bauer, Daniel E; Dass, Abhishek; Yi, Gloria; Li, Liangtao; Hildick-Smith, Gordon J; Cooney, Jeffrey D; Pierce, Eric L; Mohler, Kyla; Dailey, Tamara A; Miyata, Non; Kingsley, Paul D; Garone, Caterina; Hattangadi, Shilpa M; Huang, Hui; Chen, Wen; Keenan, Ellen M; Shah, Dhvanit I; Schlaeger, Thorsten M; DiMauro, Salvatore; Orkin, Stuart H; Cantor, Alan B; Palis, James; Koehler, Carla M; Lodish, Harvey F; Kaplan, Jerry; Ward, Diane M; Dailey, Harry A; Phillips, John D; Peters, Luanne L; Paw, Barry H

    2014-10-01

    The transport and intracellular trafficking of heme biosynthesis intermediates are crucial for hemoglobin production, which is a critical process in developing red cells. Here, we profiled gene expression in terminally differentiating murine fetal liver-derived erythroid cells to identify regulators of heme metabolism. We determined that TMEM14C, an inner mitochondrial membrane protein that is enriched in vertebrate hematopoietic tissues, is essential for erythropoiesis and heme synthesis in vivo and in cultured erythroid cells. In mice, TMEM14C deficiency resulted in porphyrin accumulation in the fetal liver, erythroid maturation arrest, and embryonic lethality due to profound anemia. Protoporphyrin IX synthesis in TMEM14C-deficient erythroid cells was blocked, leading to an accumulation of porphyrin precursors. The heme synthesis defect in TMEM14C-deficient cells was ameliorated with a protoporphyrin IX analog, indicating that TMEM14C primarily functions in the terminal steps of the heme synthesis pathway. Together, our data demonstrate that TMEM14C facilitates the import of protoporphyrinogen IX into the mitochondrial matrix for heme synthesis and subsequent hemoglobin production. Furthermore, the identification of TMEM14C as a protoporphyrinogen IX importer provides a genetic tool for further exploring erythropoiesis and congenital anemias.

  1. TMEM14C is required for erythroid mitochondrial heme metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Yien, Yvette Y.; Robledo, Raymond F.; Schultz, Iman J.; Takahashi-Makise, Naoko; Gwynn, Babette; Bauer, Daniel E.; Dass, Abhishek; Yi, Gloria; Li, Liangtao; Hildick-Smith, Gordon J.; Cooney, Jeffrey D.; Pierce, Eric L.; Mohler, Kyla; Dailey, Tamara A.; Miyata, Non; Kingsley, Paul D.; Garone, Caterina; Hattangadi, Shilpa M.; Huang, Hui; Chen, Wen; Keenan, Ellen M.; Shah, Dhvanit I.; Schlaeger, Thorsten M.; DiMauro, Salvatore; Orkin, Stuart H.; Cantor, Alan B.; Palis, James; Koehler, Carla M.; Lodish, Harvey F.; Kaplan, Jerry; Ward, Diane M.; Dailey, Harry A.; Phillips, John D.; Peters, Luanne L.; Paw, Barry H.

    2014-01-01

    The transport and intracellular trafficking of heme biosynthesis intermediates are crucial for hemoglobin production, which is a critical process in developing red cells. Here, we profiled gene expression in terminally differentiating murine fetal liver-derived erythroid cells to identify regulators of heme metabolism. We determined that TMEM14C, an inner mitochondrial membrane protein that is enriched in vertebrate hematopoietic tissues, is essential for erythropoiesis and heme synthesis in vivo and in cultured erythroid cells. In mice, TMEM14C deficiency resulted in porphyrin accumulation in the fetal liver, erythroid maturation arrest, and embryonic lethality due to profound anemia. Protoporphyrin IX synthesis in TMEM14C-deficient erythroid cells was blocked, leading to an accumulation of porphyrin precursors. The heme synthesis defect in TMEM14C-deficient cells was ameliorated with a protoporphyrin IX analog, indicating that TMEM14C primarily functions in the terminal steps of the heme synthesis pathway. Together, our data demonstrate that TMEM14C facilitates the import of protoporphyrinogen IX into the mitochondrial matrix for heme synthesis and subsequent hemoglobin production. Furthermore, the identification of TMEM14C as a protoporphyrinogen IX importer provides a genetic tool for further exploring erythropoiesis and congenital anemias. PMID:25157825

  2. The fate of {sup 14}C-pyrene and {sup 14}C-chrysene in soils amended with a PAH mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Guthrie, E.; Thompkins, J.; Pfaender, F.

    1995-12-31

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) are ubiquitous environmental contaminants at many hazardous waste sites. Microbial processes are known to influence the fate of PAH in soils and can effect PAH structure, toxicity, bioavailability, and association with soil organic matter (SOM). Experiments were conducted to determine the extent of {sup 14}C-pyrene or {sup 14}C-chrysene associations with soil organic matter (SOM) in soils amended with a PAH mixture and either a [4,5,9,10-{sup 14}C]pyrene or [5,6,11,12-{sup 14}C] chrysene tracer. Changes in microbial respiration ({sup 14}CO{sub 2} efflux), {sup 14}C-volatile organics, {sup 14}C-water soluble metabolites, and {sup 14}C-SOM were measured over time in continuously, aerated microcosms. The bioavailability of {sup 14}C-products in SOM fractions was determined using a mineralization endpoint assay. Extracts of {sup 14}C products in SOM fractions were tested for acute and chronic toxicity using Microtox{trademark}. The {sup 14}C-products associated with residual soil fractions were further extracted with HF/HCI and methylene chloride and then analyzed with LC-MS. The presence of a PAH mixture enhanced {sup 14}C-pyrene mineralization in non-adapted, pristine soils to a greater extent than {sup 14}C-pyrene mineralization observed in pristine soils amended with a known PAH-mineralizing, microbial community. Mineralization of {sup 14}C-chrysene in non-adapted, pristine soils was greater than NaN{sup 3} abiotic, control soils, but significantly less than {sup 14}C-chrysene mineralization in pristine soils amended with a known PAH-mineralizing, microbial community. The major fate of {sup 14}C-pyrene, {sup 14}C-chrysene, and PAH mixtures is association with SOM.

  3. Intermediate Water Radiocarbon Anomalies During the Last Deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, S. P.; Lehman, S. J.; Marchitto, T. M.; Ninnemann, U. S.

    2011-12-01

    Several recent reconstructions of intermediate water radiocarbon activities (Δ14C) have revealed intervals of very low Δ14C during the last deglaciation [Bryan et al., 2010; Marchitto et al., 2007; Thornalley et al., 2011]. Anomalously low Δ14C values coincided with increases in atmospheric CO2 and decreases in atmospheric Δ14C. As such, these Δ14C anomalies have been interpreted as the transfer of 14C-depleted carbon from the deep ocean to the upper ocean and atmosphere. An important component of this interpretation is the transport of low-Δ14C waters from the Southern Ocean, where they presumably upwelled from the deep ocean, northward to the core sites via intermediate waters. However, contrary to expectations, anomalously low Δ14C values have not been found at intermediate water sites closer to the Southern Ocean [e.g., De Pol-Holz et al., 2009; Rose et al., 2010]. In this talk, we will present new intermediate water Δ14C measurements from ~53°S along the Chile Margin, reconstructed using sediment core MD07-3128. Consistent with other intermediate water records from the Southern Hemisphere, these measurements do not show anomalously low Δ14C during the deglaciation. Instead, these results indicate lower Δ14C values during the Last Glacial Maximum and a rapid increase in Δ14C at the start of the deglaciation. We interpret this change as a shift in the boundary between Circumpolar Deep Water and Antarctic Intermediate Water. These results along with the previously published records provide strong evidence that low-Δ14C waters were not transported by an intermediate water mass analogous to modern Antarctic Intermediate Water. We synthesize the currently available deglacial intermediate water Δ14C records and discuss possible changes to Southern Ocean intermediate water formation, which could reconcile the available data.

  4. No evidence for a deglacial intermediate water Δ 14C anomaly in the SW Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sortor, Rachel N.; Lund, David C.

    2011-10-01

    The last deglaciation was characterized by an increase in atmospheric pCO 2 and decrease in atmospheric radiocarbon activity. One hypothesis is that these changes were due to out-gassing of 14C-depleted carbon from the abyssal ocean. Reconstructions of foraminiferal Δ 14C from the eastern tropical Pacific, Arabian Sea, and high latitude North Atlantic show that severe depletions in 14C occurred at intermediate water depths during the last deglaciation. It has been suggested that 14C-depleted water from the abyss upwelled in the Southern Ocean and was then carried by Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) to these sites. However, locations in the South Pacific in the direct path of modern-day AAIW do not exhibit the Δ 14C excursion and therefore cast doubt upon the AAIW mechanism ( De Pol-Holz et al., 2010; Rose et al., 2010). Here we evaluate whether or not a deglacial 14C anomaly occurred at intermediate depths in the Southwest Atlantic. We find that the deglacial benthic Δ 14C trend at our site is similar to the atmospheric Δ 14C trend. Our results are also largely consistent with results from U/Th-dated corals at shallower water depths on the Brazil Margin (Mangini et al., 2010). We find no evidence in the southwestern Atlantic of a ~ 300‰ decrease in intermediate water Δ 14C from 18 to 14 kyr BP like that observed in the eastern tropical Pacific ( Marchitto et al., 2007). When our results are paired with those from the South Pacific, it appears AAIW did not carry a highly 14C-depleted signal during the deglaciation. Another source of carbon is apparently required to explain the intermediate-depth Δ 14C anomalies in the North Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Oceans.

  5. Constraining the shallow subtropical overturning circulation with archived radiocarbon records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenheim, B. E.; Swart, P. K.; Thorrold, S. R.; Roberts, M. L.

    2007-12-01

    Archived radiocarbon records in accretionary skeletons can be used to constrain the shallow overturning subtropical cells (STC's) that transport significant amounts of tropical heat poleward in the world's oceans. Radiocarbon values of DIC in the world's oceans reflect a continuum between waters residing on the surface over long periods (high Δ14C due to equilibration with "modern" atmosphere) and waters decoupled from the atmosphere in the abyss (low Δ14C due to radioisotope decay), as well as mixtures between water masses of different ages. Thus, measurements of radiocarbon have demonstrated utility in assessing convective heat tranport such as the Meridional Overturning Circulation that is central to global climate. A prominent radiocarbon gradient is also present between the subsiding subtropical surface waters and the upwelling equatorial surface waters in the world's oceans due to the presence of STC's. These convection cells transport a major proportion of tropical heat in the Pacific and a significant proportion of tropical heat in the Atlantic towards the poles. Archived radiocarbon records in surface corals and subsurface sclerosponges constrain the N. Atlantic STC's on a centennial time scale. Published short records from Cape Verde corals indicate significant changes in radiocarbon content; this is potentially related to migration of the front between upwelled tropical waters and downwelled subtropical waters. An approach is outlined to estimate the proportion of tropical to subtropical waters at Cape Verde using as endmembers high-resolution sclerosponge radiocarbon records from Bahamas subsurface waters and coral radiocarbon records from São Tome and Principe in the Gulf of Guinea. Preliminary data from Bahamas sclerosponges indicate the need for high-resolution subsampling of the skeletons. Initial novel AMS measurements from fine scale laser-decomposition of the skeletons are presented.

  6. The 14C Record in Bristlecone Pine Wood of the past 8000 Years Based on the Dendrochronology of the Late C. W. Ferguson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suess, H. E.; Linick, T. W.

    1990-04-01

    When, in 1950, Willard Libby and his coworkers obtained their first radiocarbon (14C) dates, C. W. Ferguson at the University of Arizona Tree Ring Laboratory was working on establishing a continuous tree ring series for the newly discovered bristlecone pine Pinus aristata. Before his untimely death in 1986, he had extended the series nearly 8000 years into the past. From the Ferguson series I obtained for 14C determinations wood samples grown at various times. Also, two other laboratories obtained such samples. For B.C. times in particular, our measured 14C-values that deviated consistently from those calculated from tree rings, and the deviations increased with age. This general trend was observed by other laboratories, but the presence of deviations from these trends, of the so-called `wiggles', was questioned by other workers. To me these wiggles indicated the existence of a most interesting geophysical parameter valid for the whole terrestrial atmosphere. Fourier spectra obtained at my request by Kruse in 1972, and by Neftel, demonstrated the consistency of the results, and supported my contention that the secular variations of 14C in atmospheric CO2 are related to variations of solar activity.

  7. Bringing AMS radiocarbon into the Anthropocene: Potential and drawbacks in the determination of the bio-fraction in industrial emissions and in carbon-based products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quarta, Gianluca; Ciceri, Giovanni; Martinotti, Valter; D'Elia, Marisa; Calcagnile, Lucio

    2015-10-01

    In the frame of the general efforts to reduce atmospheric CO2 emissions different efforts are being carried out to stimulate the use of non-fossil energy sources and raw materials. Among these a significant role is played by the use of waste in Waste to Energy (WTE) plants. In this case a relevant problem is related to the determination of the proportion between the bio and the fossil derived fraction in CO2 atmospheric emissions since only the share of energy derived from the bio-fraction combustion can be labelled as "renewable". We discuss the potential of radiocarbon in this field by presenting the results of different campaigns carried out by analysing CO2 sampled at the stack of different power plants in Italy with different expected bio-content of the released carbon dioxide. The still open issues related to the calculation procedures and the achievable precision and accuracy levels are discussed.

  8. A complete terrestrial radiocarbon record for 11.2 to 52.8 kyr B.P.

    PubMed

    Bronk Ramsey, Christopher; Staff, Richard A; Bryant, Charlotte L; Brock, Fiona; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki; van der Plicht, Johannes; Schlolaut, Gordon; Marshall, Michael H; Brauer, Achim; Lamb, Henry F; Payne, Rebecca L; Tarasov, Pavel E; Haraguchi, Tsuyoshi; Gotanda, Katsuya; Yonenobu, Hitoshi; Yokoyama, Yusuke; Tada, Ryuji; Nakagawa, Takeshi

    2012-10-19

    Radiocarbon ((14)C) provides a way to date material that contains carbon with an age up to ~50,000 years and is also an important tracer of the global carbon cycle. However, the lack of a comprehensive record reflecting atmospheric (14)C prior to 12.5 thousand years before the present (kyr B.P.) has limited the application of radiocarbon dating of samples from the Last Glacial period. Here, we report (14)C results from Lake Suigetsu, Japan (35°35'N, 135°53'E), which provide a comprehensive record of terrestrial radiocarbon to the present limit of the (14)C method. The time scale we present in this work allows direct comparison of Lake Suigetsu paleoclimatic data with other terrestrial climatic records and gives information on the connection between global atmospheric and regional marine radiocarbon levels.

  9. Pre to Post-Bomb Seawater 14C History in the Gulf of Alaska Inferred From a Deep Sea Coral: Isididae sp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roark, B.; Guilderson, T. P.; Fallon, S.; Dunbar, R. B.; McCulloch, M.

    2006-12-01

    Deep-sea corals are an important archive of intermediate and deep-water variability, and provide the means to explore decadal to century-scale ocean dynamics in regions and time periods heretofore unexplored. We present a reconstruction of pre to post-bomb surface and interior water Δ14C based on analysis of deep-sea Isididae (bamboo) corals collected live at ~700 meters in June 2002 at Warwick Seamount, Gulf of Alaska. Concurrent isotope analyses of polyp/tissue and outermost portion of the hard horny proteinaceous gorgonin nodes compared with in situ dissolved inorganic carbon indicates that the gorgonin portion is derived exclusively from recently fixed/exported particulate organic carbon and thus a record of the surface water 14C/12C history. This is in contrast to the carbonate internode portion which is primarily derived from in situ dissolved inorganic carbon, and thus a record of the in situ 14C/12C. Radiocarbon analysis of gorgonin nodal sections captures the surface water D14C evolution. Pre-bomb values are -105‰ reaching a maximum of 100‰ before decreasing to collection values of 20‰. We anticipate that the post-bomb maximum will be in the early 1970s consistent with other mid to high latitude records and that the pre/post bomb transition initiates near 1956. If we utilize the gorgonin pre/post bomb transition as a tie-point and assume a linear growth rate the Isididae used in this study are 75- 125 years old. Carbonate Δ14C shows a 25‰ increase from -215 to -190‰ reflecting the penetration of bomb-14C in the sub-polar North Pacific. To place the carbonate time-series on a fixed timescale we determined the minor element chemistry and tested the inter-species reproducibility. The distribution of Sr is quite homogenous whereas Mg is not with higher Mg concentrations associated with centers of calcification. Age estimates using what appear to be annual Sr/Ca cycles, which we hypothesize are related to biomineralization cycles associated with a

  10. The radiocarbon hydroxyl technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Malcolm J.; Sheppard, John C.

    1994-01-01

    The Radiocarbon Technique depends upon measuring the rate of oxidation of CO in an essentially unperturbed sample of air. The airborne technique is slightly different. Hydroxyl concentrations can be calculated directly; peroxyl concentrations can be obtained by NO doping.

  11. Towards constraining the stratosphere-troposphere exchange of radiocarbon: strategies of stratospheric 14CO2 measurements using AirCore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huilin; Paul, Dipayan; Meijer, Harro; Miller, John; Kivi, Rigel; Krol, Maarten

    2016-04-01

    Radiocarbon (14C) plays an important role in the carbon cycle studies to understand both natural and anthropogenic carbon fluxes, but also in atmospheric chemistry to constrain hydroxyl radical (OH) concentrations in the atmosphere. Apart from the enormous 14C emissions from nuclear bomb testing in the 1950s and 1960s, radiocarbon is primarily produced in the stratosphere due to the cosmogenic production. To this end, better understanding the stratospheric radiocarbon source is very useful to advance the use of radiocarbon for these applications. However, stratospheric 14C observations have been very limited so that there are large uncertainties on the magnitude and the location of the 14C production as well as the transport of radiocarbon from the stratosphere to the troposphere. Recently we have successfully made stratospheric 14C measurements using AirCore samples from Sodankylä, Northern Finland. AirCore is an innovative atmospheric sampling system, which passively collects atmospheric air samples into a long piece of coiled stainless steel tubing during the descent of a balloon flight. Due to the relatively low cost of the consumables, there is a potential to make such AirCore profiling in other parts of the world on a regular basis. In this study, we simulate the 14C in the atmosphere and assess the stratosphere-troposphere exchange of radiocarbon using the TM5 model. The Sodankylä radiocarbon measurements will be used to verify the performance of the model at high latitude. Besides this, we will also evaluate the influence of different cosmogenic 14C production scenarios and the uncertainties in the OH field on the seasonal cycles of radiocarbon and on the stratosphere-troposphere exchange, and based on the results design a strategy to set up a 14C measurement program using AirCore.

  12. Blank corrections for ramped pyrolysis radiocarbon dating of sedimentary and soil organic carbon.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Alvaro; Santos, Guaciara M; Williams, Elizabeth K; Pendergraft, Matthew A; Vetter, Lael; Rosenheim, Brad E

    2014-12-16

    Ramped pyrolysis (RP) targets distinct components of soil and sedimentary organic carbon based on their thermochemical stabilities and allows the determination of the full spectrum of radiocarbon ((14)C) ages present in a soil or sediment sample. Extending the method into realms where more precise ages are needed or where smaller samples need to be measured involves better understanding of the blank contamination associated with the method. Here, we use a compiled data set of RP measurements of samples of known age to evaluate the mass of the carbon blank and its associated (14)C signature, and to assess the performance of the RP system. We estimate blank contamination during RP using two methods, the modern-dead and the isotope dilution method. Our results indicate that during one complete RP run samples are contaminated by 8.8 ± 4.4 μg (time-dependent) of modern carbon (MC, fM ∼ 1) and 4.1 ± 5.5 μg (time-independent) of dead carbon (DC, fM ∼ 0). We find that the modern-dead method provides more accurate estimates of uncertainties in blank contamination; therefore, the isotope dilution method should be used with caution when the variability of the blank is high. Additionally, we show that RP can routinely produce accurate (14)C dates with precisions ∼100 (14)C years for materials deposited in the last 10,000 years and ∼300 (14)C years for carbon with (14)C ages of up to 20,000 years.

  13. 14C-age tracers in global ocean circulation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koeve, W.; Wagner, H.; Kähler, P.; Oschlies, A.

    2014-10-01

    The natural abundance of 14C in total CO2 dissolved in seawater is a property applied to evaluate the water age structure and circulation in the ocean and in ocean models. In this study we use three different representations of the global ocean circulation augmented with a suite of idealised tracers to study the potential and limitations of using natural 14C to determine water age, the time elapsed since a body of water had contact with the atmosphere. We find that, globally, bulk 14C-age is dominated by two equally important components, one associated with aging, i.e. the time component of circulation and one associated with a "preformed 14C-age". This latter quantity exists because of the slow and incomplete atmosphere/ocean equilibration of 14C in particular in high latitudes where many water masses form. The relative contribution of the preformed component to bulk 14C-age varies regionally within a given model, but also between models. Regional variability, e.g. in the Atlantic Ocean is associated with the mixing of waters with very different end members of preformed 14C-age. In the Atlantic, variations in the preformed component over space and time mask the circulation component to an extent that its patterns are not detectable from bulk 14C-age alone. Between models the variability of age can also be considerable (factor of 2), related to the combinations of physical model parameters, which influence circulation dynamics, and gas exchange in the models. The preformed component was found to be very sensitive to gas exchange and moderately sensitive to ice cover. In our model evaluation exercise, the choice of the gas exchange constant from within the current range of uncertainty had such a strong influence on preformed and bulk 14C-age that if model evaluation would be based on bulk 14C-age it could easily impair the evaluation and tuning of a models circulation on global and regional scales. Based on the results of this study, we propose that considering

  14. RADIOCARBON MEASUREMENT OF THE BIOGENIC CONTRIBUTION TO SUMMERTIME PM 2.5 AMBIENT AEROSOL IN NASHVILLE, TN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Radiocarbon (14C) measurements performed on PM-2.5 samples collected near Nashville, TN from June 21 to July 13, 1999, showed high levels of modern carbon, ranging from 56 to 80% of the total carbon in the samples. Radiocarbon measurements performed on dichloromethane extracts of...

  15. Time since death and decay rate constants of Norway spruce and European larch deadwood in subalpine forests determined using dendrochronology and radiocarbon dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrillo, Marta; Cherubini, Paolo; Fravolini, Giulia; Marchetti, Marco; Ascher-Jenull, Judith; Schärer, Michael; Synal, Hans-Arno; Bertoldi, Daniela; Camin, Federica; Larcher, Roberto; Egli, Markus

    2016-03-01

    100 years in larch CWD. Consequently, the decay of Picea abies and Larix decidua is very low. Several uncertainties, however, remain: 14C dating of CWD from decay classes 4 and 5 and having a pre-bomb age is often difficult (large age range due to methodological constraints) and fall rates of both European larch and Norway spruce are missing.

  16. Radiocarbon--a low-impact tool to study nutrient transport by soil fungi under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Czimczik, Claudia I; Treseder, Kathleen K; Carbone, Mariah S; Trumbore, Susan E

    2005-05-01

    Here, we present a new in-situ method to study the uptake of amino acids by soil fungi. We injected 14C-labeled glycine into a marshland soil and measured the rate and the 14C signature of CO2 respired from sporocarps of Pholiota terrestris over 53.5 h and 2 m. We also determined the incorporation of glycine-C into sporocarp tissue. The 14C signature of the CO2 and tissue was quantified by accelerator mass spectrometry. After the label application, the rate of CO2 flux and its 14C signature from chambers with sporocarps were significantly higher than from chambers without sporocarps, and then declined with time. Postlabel, the 14C signature of the sporocarp tissue increased by 35 per thousand. We show that this approach can be used to study below-ground food webs on an hourly time-scale while minimizing the perturbation of competitive relationships among soil microorganisms and between plants and soil microorganisms. Additionally we show that care must be taken to avoid confounding effects of sporocarp senescence on rates and radiocarbon signatures of respired CO2. PMID:15819921

  17. Radiocarbon Based Ages and Growth Rates: Hawaiian Deep Sea Corals

    SciTech Connect

    Roark, E B; Guilderson, T P; Dunbar, R B; Ingram, B L

    2006-01-13

    The radial growth rates and ages of three different groups of Hawaiian deep-sea 'corals' were determined using radiocarbon measurements. Specimens of Corallium secundum, Gerardia sp., and Leiopathes glaberrima, were collected from 450 {+-} 40 m at the Makapuu deep-sea coral bed using a submersible (PISCES V). Specimens of Antipathes dichotoma were collected at 50 m off Lahaina, Maui. The primary source of carbon to the calcitic C. secundum skeleton is in situ dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). Using bomb {sup 14}C time markers we calculate radial growth rates of {approx} 170 {micro}m y{sup -1} and ages of 68-75 years on specimens as tall as 28 cm of C. secundum. Gerardia sp., A. dichotoma, and L. glaberrima have proteinaceous skeletons and labile particulate organic carbon (POC) is their primary source of architectural carbon. Using {sup 14}C we calculate a radial growth rate of 15 {micro}m y{sup -1} and an age of 807 {+-} 30 years for a live collected Gerardia sp., showing that these organisms are extremely long lived. Inner and outer {sup 14}C measurements on four sub-fossil Gerardia spp. samples produce similar growth rate estimates (range 14-45 {micro}m y{sup -1}) and ages (range 450-2742 years) as observed for the live collected sample. Similarly, with a growth rate of < 10 {micro}m y{sup -1} and an age of {approx}2377 years, L. glaberrima at the Makapuu coral bed, is also extremely long lived. In contrast, the shallow-collected A. dichotoma samples yield growth rates ranging from 130 to 1,140 {micro}m y{sup -1}. These results show that Hawaiian deep-sea corals grow more slowly and are older than previously thought.

  18. Radiocarbon dating and compositional analysis of pre-Columbian human bones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, E.; Solís, C.; Canto, C. E.; de Lucio, O. G.; Chavez, E.; Rocha, M. F.; Villanueva, O.; Torreblanca, C. A.

    2014-08-01

    Analysis of ancient human bones found in "El Cóporo", an archaeological site in Guanajuato, Mexico; were performed using a multi techniques scheme: 14C radiocarbon dating, IBA (Ion Beam Analysis), SEM-EDS (Scanning Electron Microscope Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy). We measured the elemental composition of the bones, especially some with a superficial black pigmentation. Soil samples collected from the burial place were also analyzed. The 14C dating was performed with a new High Voltage Europe 1 MV Tandentron Accelerator Mass Spectrometer (AMS) recently installed in the IFUNAM (Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México). The radiocarbon dating allowed us to determine the date of death of the individual in a period between the year 890 and 975 AD, which is consistent with the late period of the Cóporo civilization. The element sample analysis of bones with the surface black pigmentation show higher levels of Fe, Mn and Ba compared when bone's black surface was mechanically removed. These three elements were found in soil samples from the skeleton burial place. These results indicate more likely that the bone black coloration is due to a postmortem alteration occurring in the burial environment.

  19. Radiocarbon dating of open systems with bomb effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, C. P.; Long, A.; Friedmann, E. I.

    1986-01-01

    The application of radiocarbon dating is extended to include systems that are slowly exchanging carbon with the atmosphere. Simple formulae are derived that relate the true age and the exchange rate of carbon to the apparent radiocarbon age. A radiocarbon age determination does not give a unique true age and exchange rate but determines a locus of values bounded by a minimum age and a minimum exchange rate. It is found that for radiocarbon ages as large as 10,000 years it is necessary to correct for the anthropogenic radiocarbon produced in the atmosphere by nuclear weapons testing. A one-term exponential approximation, with an e-folding time of 14.43 years, is used to model this effect and is shown to be accurate to within 3 percent for exchange time constants of 100 years and greater. The approach developed here is not specific to radiocarbon and can be applied to other radioisotopes in open systems.

  20. Radiocarbon dating of open systems with bomb effect

    SciTech Connect

    McKay, C.P.; Long, A.; Friedmann, E.I.

    1986-03-10

    The application of radiocarbon dating is extended to include systems that are slowly exchanging carbon with the atmosphere. Simple formulae are derived that relate the true age and the exchange rate of carbon to the apparent radiocarbon age. A radiocarbon age determination does not give a unique true age and exchange rate but determines a locus of values bounded by a minimum age and a minimum exchange rate. It is found that for radiocarbon ages as large as 10,000 years it is necessary to correct for the anthropogenic radiocarbon produced in the atmosphere by nuclear weapons testing. A one-term exponential approximation, with an e-folding time of 14.43 years, is used to model this effect and is shown to be accurate to within 3% for exchange time constants of 100 years and greater. The approach developed here is not specific to radiocarbon and can be applied to other radioisotopes in open systems.

  1. Development of a nanofiltration method for bone collagen 14C AMS dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudin, Mathieu; Boeckx, Pascal; Buekenhoudt, Anita; Vandenabeele, Peter; Van Strydonck, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Radiocarbon dating of bones is usually performed on the collagen fraction. However, this collagen can contain exogenous molecules, including humic substances (HSs) and/or other soil components that may have a different age than the bone. Incomplete removal can result in biased 14C dates. Ultrafiltration of collagen, dissolved as gelatin (molecular weight (MW) ∼100,000 Dalton), has received considerable attention to obtain more reliable dates. Ultrafiltration is an effective method of removal of low-molecular weight contaminants from bone collagen but it does not remove high-molecular weight contaminants, such as cross-linked humic collagen complexes. However, comparative dating studies have raised the question whether this cleaning step itself may introduce contamination with carbon from the filters used. In this study, a nanofiltration method was developed using a ceramic filter to avoid a possible extraneous carbon contamination introduced by the filter. This method should be applicable to various protein materials e.g. collagen, silk, wool, leather and should be able to remove low-molecular and high molecular weight HSs. In this study bone collagen was hot acid hydrolyzed to amino acids and nanofiltrated. A filter with a molecular weight cutoff (MWCO) of 450 Dalton was chosen in order to collect the amino acids in the permeate and the HSs in the retentate. Two pilot studies were set up. Two nanofiltration types were tested in pilot study 1: dead end and cross flow filtration. Humic substance (HS)-solutions with fossil carbon and modern hydrolyzed collagen contaminated with HSs were filtrated and analyzed with spectrofluorescence to determine the HS removal. Cross flow nanofiltration showed the most efficient HS removal. A second pilot study based upon these results was set up wherein only cross flow filtration was performed. 14C measurements of the permeates of hydrolyzed modern collagen contaminated with fossil HSs demonstrate a significant but incomplete

  2. Radiocarbon-based assessments of the role of fungal species in decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treseder, K. K.; Lansing, J. L.; Choi, N.

    2004-12-01

    We used natural radiocarbon signatures to determine if species of decomposer fungi specialize on different pools of organic matter in the soil. Specifically, we examined natural radiocarbon signatures of mushrooms to estimate the average integrated age of C compounds metabolized by individual species. This method takes advantage of rapid changes in atmospheric radiocarbon signatures of carbon dioxide since the early 1960s, when several years of above-ground weapons testing produced a spike in atmospheric Δ 14C. This signature has been rapidly declining since then. Therefore, we can measure radiocarbon signatures of tissues and determine the time at which their component C was originally photosynthesized. We conducted our study in a fire chronosequence in boreal forests near Delta Junction, Alaska. The chronosequence includes sites burned in severe fires during the summers of 1999, 1987, and 1956. A "control" site was established in a neighboring 80 yr old black spruce forest. In 2002, we collected mushrooms each week from six 50 m long transects in each site. Mushrooms were weighed and assigned to species based on morphological and molecular analyses (i.e. typing by restriction fragment length polymorphism). Saprotrophic species could be distinguished from ectomycorrhizal species based on 15N and 13C signatures. Specifically, saprotrophic mushrooms had δ 15N values less than 4.66\\permil and δ 13C values greater than -23.1\\permil. We then measured the Δ 14C values of mushrooms from 20 of the most abundant saprotrophic species. Radiocarbon signatures varied widely among species, implying that species take up C from compounds that range in turnover time. For example, fungi of the Polyporaceae often grow on woody debris in our sites, and their Δ 14C signatures (-65.1 to 15.0\\permil) indicate the use of several decades-old, recalcitrant C. These fungi are known to possess the necessary enzymes for lignin degradation, so lignocellulose is a likely C source. In

  3. 14C activity and global carbon cycle changes over the past 50,000 years.

    PubMed

    Hughen, K; Lehman, S; Southon, J; Overpeck, J; Marchal, O; Herring, C; Turnbull, J

    2004-01-01

    A series of 14C measurements in Ocean Drilling Program cores from the tropical Cariaco Basin, which have been correlated to the annual-layer counted chronology for the Greenland Ice Sheet Project 2 (GISP2) ice core, provides a high-resolution calibration of the radiocarbon time scale back to 50,000 years before the present. Independent radiometric dating of events correlated to GISP2 suggests that the calibration is accurate. Reconstructed 14C activities varied substantially during the last glacial period, including sharp peaks synchronous with the Laschamp and Mono Lake geomagnetic field intensity minimal and cosmogenic nuclide peaks in ice cores and marine sediments. Simulations with a geochemical box model suggest that much of the variability can be explained by geomagnetically modulated changes in 14C production rate together with plausible changes in deep-ocean ventilation and the global carbon cycle during glaciation.

  4. Refined modeling and 14C plateau tuning reveal consistent patterns of glacial and deglacial 14C reservoir ages of surface waters in low-latitude Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balmer, Sven; Sarnthein, Michael; Mudelsee, Manfred; Grootes, Pieter M.

    2016-08-01

    Modeling studies predict that changes in radiocarbon (14C) reservoir ages of surface waters during the last deglacial episode will reflect changes in both atmospheric 14C concentration and ocean circulation including the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation. Tests of these models require the availability of accurate 14C reservoir ages in well-dated late Quaternary time series. We here test two models using plateau-tuned 14C time series in multiple well-placed sediment core age-depth sequences throughout the lower latitudes of the Atlantic Ocean. 14C age plateau tuning in glacial and deglacial sequences provides accurate calendar year ages that differ by as much as 500-2500 years from those based on assumed global reservoir ages around 400 years. This study demonstrates increases in local Atlantic surface reservoir ages of up to 1000 years during the Last Glacial Maximum, ages that reflect stronger trades off Benguela and summer winds off southern Brazil. By contrast, surface water reservoir ages remained close to zero in the Cariaco Basin in the southern Caribbean due to lagoon-style isolation and persistently strong atmospheric CO2 exchange. Later, during the early deglacial (16 ka) reservoir ages decreased to a minimum of 170-420 14C years throughout the South Atlantic, likely in response to the rapid rise in atmospheric pCO2 and Antarctic temperatures occurring then. Changes in magnitude and geographic distribution of 14C reservoir ages of peak glacial and deglacial surface waters deviate from the results of Franke et al. (2008) but are generally consistent with those of the more advanced ocean circulation model of Butzin et al. (2012).

  5. Direct dating of archaeological pottery by compound-specific 14C analysis of preserved lipids.

    PubMed

    Stott, Andrew W; Berstan, Robert; Evershed, Richard P; Bronk-Ramsey, Christopher; Hedges, Robert E M; Humm, Martin J

    2003-10-01

    A methodology is described demonstrating the utility of the compound-specific 14C technique as a direct means of dating archaeological pottery. The method uses automated preparative capillary gas chromatography employing wide-bore capillary columns to isolate individual compounds from lipid extracts of archaeological potsherds in high purity (>95%) and amounts (>200 microg) sufficient for radiocarbon dating using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). A protocol was developed and tested on n-alkanes and n-carboxylic acids possessing a broad range of 14C ages. Analytical blanks and controls allowed background 14C measurements to be assessed and potential sources of errors to be detected, i.e., contamination with modern or dead 14C, isotopic fraction effects, etc. A "Russian doll" method was developed to transfer isolated target compounds onto tin powder/capsules prior to combustion and AMS analyses. The major advantage of the compound-specific technique is that 14C dates obtained for individual compounds can be directly linked to the commodities processed in the vessels during their use, e.g., animal fats. The compound-specific 14C dating protocol was validated on a suite of ancient pottery whose predicted ages spanned a 5000-year date range. Initial results indicate that meaningful correlations can be obtained between the predicted date of pottery and that of the preserved lipids. These findings constitute an important step forward to the direct dating of archaeological pottery.

  6. Mass spectrometric detection of radiocarbon for dating applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Synal, H.-A.; Schulze-König, T.; Seiler, M.; Suter, M.; Wacker, L.

    2013-01-01

    Radiocarbon is still the most important nuclide measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The related capabilities for dating and tracer studies are eminent not only in archaeology but also drive important applications in the earth and environmental sciences as well as in biomedical research. So far, standard mass spectrometric systems have not been capable of radiocarbon dating because of interfering molecular isobars which, however, can be completely eliminated in charge changing processes at high ion beam energies (MeV) [1,2]. Here, we present a novel type mass spectrometry system for radiocarbon analyses. Radiocarbon dating was performed using 45 keV 14C ions from the ion source and a molecule dissociation unit kept at ground potential. This proof-of-principle experiment demonstrates for the first time the feasibility of mass spectrometric radiocarbon dating without an accelerator. The results obtained will be the basis of an optimized design for a radiocarbon dating instrument comparable in size, complexity and cost to standard mass spectrometers.

  7. Detection of radiocarbon in the cyclotrino

    SciTech Connect

    Bertsche, K.J.; Karadi, C.A.; Muller, R.A.; Paulson, G.C.

    1990-04-01

    A small low energy cyclotron (the cyclotrino''), which was proposed for direct detection of radiocarbon in 1980, has now detected radiocarbon at natural abundance. This device combines the suppression of background through the use of negative ions with the high intrinsic mass resolution of a cyclotron. A high current cesium sputter negative ion source generates a beam of carbon ions which is pre-separated with Wien filter and is transported to the cyclotron via a series of electrostatic lenses. Beam is injected radially into the cyclotron using electrostatic deflectors and an electrostatic mirror. Axial focusing is entirely electrostatic. A microchannel plate detector is used with a phase-gated output. Data is presented showing resolution of radiocarbon at natural abundance. In its present form the system is capable of improving the sensitivity of detecting {sup 14}C in some biomedical experiments by a factor of 10{sup 4}. Modifications are discussed which could bring about an additional factor of 100 in sensitivity, which is important for archaeological and geological applications. Possibilities for measurements of other isotopes are discussed. 16 refs., 7 figs.

  8. Online coupling of pure O2 thermo-optical methods - 14C AMS for source apportionment of carbonaceous aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrios, Konstantinos; Salazar, Gary; Zhang, Yan-Lin; Uglietti, Chiara; Battaglia, Michael; Luginbühl, Marc; Ciobanu, Viorela Gabriela; Vonwiller, Matthias; Szidat, Sönke

    2015-10-01

    This paper reports on novel separation methods developed for the direct determination of 14C in organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC), two sub-fractions of total carbon (TC) of atmospheric air particulate matter. Until recently, separation of OC and EC has been performed off-line by manual and time-consuming techniques that relied on the collection of massive CO2 fractions. We present here two on-line hyphenated techniques between a Sunset OC/EC analyzer and a MICADAS (MIni radioCArbon DAting System) accelerator mass spectrometer (AMS) equipped with a gas ion source. The first implementation facilitates the direct measurement in the low sample size range (<10 μg C) with high throughput on a routine basis, while the second explores the potential for a continuous-flow real-time CO2 gas feed into the ion source. The performance achieved with reference materials and real atmospheric samples will be discussed to draw conclusions on the improvement offered in the field of 14C aerosol source apportionment.

  9. Upper-ocean-to-atmosphere radiocarbon offsets imply fast deglacial carbon dioxide release.

    PubMed

    Rose, Kathryn A; Sikes, Elisabeth L; Guilderson, Thomas P; Shane, Phil; Hill, Tessa M; Zahn, Rainer; Spero, Howard J

    2010-08-26

    Radiocarbon in the atmosphere is regulated largely by ocean circulation, which controls the sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) in the deep sea through atmosphere-ocean carbon exchange. During the last glaciation, lower atmospheric CO(2) levels were accompanied by increased atmospheric radiocarbon concentrations that have been attributed to greater storage of CO(2) in a poorly ventilated abyssal ocean. The end of the ice age was marked by a rapid increase in atmospheric CO(2) concentrations that coincided with reduced (14)C/(12)C ratios (Delta(14)C) in the atmosphere, suggesting the release of very 'old' ((14)C-depleted) CO(2) from the deep ocean to the atmosphere. Here we present radiocarbon records of surface and intermediate-depth waters from two sediment cores in the southwest Pacific and Southern oceans. We find a steady 170 per mil decrease in Delta(14)C that precedes and roughly equals in magnitude the decrease in the atmospheric radiocarbon signal during the early stages of the glacial-interglacial climatic transition. The atmospheric decrease in the radiocarbon signal coincides with regionally intensified upwelling and marine biological productivity, suggesting that CO(2) released by means of deep water upwelling in the Southern Ocean lost most of its original depleted-(14)C imprint as a result of exchange and isotopic equilibration with the atmosphere. Our data imply that the deglacial (14)C depletion previously identified in the eastern tropical North Pacific must have involved contributions from sources other than the previously suggested carbon release by way of a deep Southern Ocean pathway, and may reflect the expanded influence of the (14)C-depleted North Pacific carbon reservoir across this interval. Accordingly, shallow water masses advecting north across the South Pacific in the early deglaciation had little or no residual (14)C-depleted signals owing to degassing of CO(2) and biological uptake in the Southern Ocean.

  10. Surface Water Processes in the Indonesian Throughflow as Documented by a 115-Year High-Resolution Coral Δ 14C Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallon, S. J.; Guilderson, T. P.; Caldeira, K.; Moore, M.

    2003-12-01

    Radiocarbon has been used as a tracer to study global ocean circulation through the distribution of natural and bomb-derived 14C. In order to get a complete picture of the temporal variation of 14C, proxy records, such as those provided by corals are needed. Corals can provide time series of seasonal and interannual 14C variations of the surface ocean over time scales of hundreds of years. Bi-monthly radiocarbon values from a 115-year time series have been recovered from a coral in the Indonesian Seaway in order to better understand seasonal, interannual and decadal variability in the surface water masses that contribute to the Indonesian Throughflow. The radiocarbon time series occasionally displays a small seasonal signal (10-15 per mil) from 1890 to 1954, with the time period 1875-1880 displaying higher radiocarbon possibly due to a strong El Nino. After 1954 the radiocarbon record increases rapidly, a response to the increased atmospheric 14C caused by nuclear weapons testing. From 1954 to 1986 the record displays clear seasonal variability from 15 to 60 (per mil). The quick response to the increased atmospheric 14C and the high post-bomb peak (+160 per mil) indicate a North Pacific source to the waters entering the Indonesian Throughflow. Sensitivity tests were run to investigate the role of surface mixed layer depth and parameterization using an atmosphere/ocean coupled model (GFDL MOM) and compared to the coral radiocarbon time series. The model results exhibit a post-bomb peak that is too high and slightly early but displays the seasonal signal shown by the coral. The model also retains too much radiocarbon after the bomb-peak suggesting the model is exchanging too much CO2 and not mixing it through the water column rapidly enough.

  11. Measuring the 14C content in liquid scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enqvist, T.; Barabanov, I. R.; Bezrukov, L. B.; Gangapshev, A. M.; Gavrilyuk, Y. M.; Grishina, V. Yu; Gurentsov, V. I.; Hissa, J.; Joutsenvaara, J.; Kazalov, V. V.; Krokhaleva, S.; Kutuniva, J.; Kuusiniemi, P.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Kurlovich, A. S.; Loo, K.; Lubsandorzhiev, B. K.; Lubsandorzhiev, S.; Morgalyuk, V. P.; Novikova, G. Y.; Pshukov, A. M.; Sinev, V. V.; Słupecki, M.; Trzaska, W. H.; Umerov, Sh I.; Veresnikova, A. V.; Virkajärvi, A.; Yanovich, Y. A.; Zavarzina, V. P.

    2016-05-01

    We are going to perform a series of measurements where the 14C/12 C ratio will be measured from several liquid scintillator samples with a dedicated setup. The setup is designed with the aim of measuring ratios smaller than 10-18. Measurements take place in two underground laboratories: in the Baksan Neutrino Observatory, Russia and in the Pyhäsalmi mine, Finland. In Baksan the measurements started in 2015 and in Pyhäsalmi they start in the beginning of 2015. In order to fully understand the operation of the setup and its background contributions a development of simulation packages has also been started. Low-energy neutrino detection with a liquid scintillator requires that the intrinsic 14C content in the liquid is extremely low. In the Borexino CTF detector at Gran Sasso, Italy the 14C/12C ratio of 2 × 10-18 has been achieved being the lowest 14C concentration ever measured. In principle, the older the oil or gas source that the liquid scintillator is derived of and the deeper it situates, the smaller the 14C/12C ratio is supposed to be. This, however, is not generally the case, and the ratio is probably determined by the U and Th content of the local environment.

  12. Centuries of marine radiocarbon reservoir age variation within archaeological Mesodesma Donacium shells from Southern Peru

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, K.B.; Hodgins, G.W.L.; Etayo-Cadavid, M. F.; Andrus, C.F.T.; Sandweiss, D.H.

    2010-01-01

    Mollusk shells provide brief (<5 yr per shell) records of past marine conditions, including marine radiocarbon reservoir age (R) and upwelling. We report 21 14C ages and R calculations on small (~2 mg) samples from 2 Mesodesma donacium (surf clam) shells. These shells were excavated from a semi-subterranean house floor stratum 14C dated to 7625 ?? 35 BP at site QJ-280, Quebrada Jaguay, southern Peru. The ranges in marine 14C ages (and thus R) from the 2 shells are 530 and 170 14C yr; R from individual aragonite samples spans 130 ?? 60 to 730 ?? 170 14C yr. This intrashell 14C variability suggests that 14C dating of small (time-slice much less than 1 yr) marine samples from a variable-R (i.e. variable-upwelling) environment may introduce centuries of chronometric uncertainty. ?? 2010 by the Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona.

  13. The radiocarbon budget for Mono Lake: an unsolved mystery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Broecker, W.S.; Wanninkhof, R.; Mathieu, G.; Peng, T.-H.; Stine, S.; Robinson, S.; Herczeg, A.; Stuiver, M.

    1988-01-01

    Since 1957 the 14C C ratio of the dissolved inorganic carbon in Mono Lake has risen by about 60???. The magnitude of this increase is about four times larger than that expected from the invasion of bomb-produced 14C from the atmosphere. We have eliminated the following explanations: (1) measurement error, (2) an unusually high physical exchange rate for non-reactive gases, (3) inorganic enhancement of the CO2 exchange rate, and (4) biological enhancement of the CO2 exchange rate. Clandestine disposal of waste radiocarbon remains a dark-horse explanation. In the course of our investigations we have uncovered evidence for at least one episodic input of radiocarbon-free carbon to the lake over the last 1000 years. We speculate that this injection was related to a hydrothermal event resulting from sublacustrine volcanic activity. ?? 1988.

  14. Radiocarbon concentration in modern tree rings from Valladolid, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakowski, Andrzej Z.; Nakamura, Toshio; Pazdur, Anna; Charro, Elena; Villanueva, Jose Luis Gutierrez; Piotrowska, Natalia

    2010-04-01

    New results of radiocarbon concentration in tree rings from the City of Valladolid (Spain) covering a growth period of 22 year have been measured using an AMS. Samples were taken using a hollow drill from a living tree, and α-cellulose was extracted from each of annual rings (early and late wood separately). The set of data shows lower radiocarbon concentration than that reported for "clean air" at the reference station, indicating a remarkable input of "dead" CO 2 of fossil fuel origin. Using data of carbon dioxide and 14C concentrations from Schauinsland, the corresponding summer and winter values of the fossil component ( cf) in carbon dioxide were calculated for the City of Valladolid. By fitting exponential and linear functions to the experimental data, the exchange time was calculated, and the expected future 14C concentration in the atmosphere was estimated.

  15. Molecular gas sensing below parts per trillion: radiocarbon-dioxide optical detection.

    PubMed

    Galli, I; Bartalini, S; Borri, S; Cancio, P; Mazzotti, D; De Natale, P; Giusfredi, G

    2011-12-30

    Radiocarbon ((14)C) concentrations at a 43 parts-per-quadrillion level are measured by using saturated-absorption cavity ringdown spectroscopy by exciting radiocarbon-dioxide ((14)C(16)O(2)) molecules at the 4.5 μm wavelength. The ultimate sensitivity limits of molecular trace gas sensing are pushed down to attobar pressures using a comb-assisted absorption spectroscopy setup. Such a result represents the lowest pressure ever detected for a gas of simple molecules. The unique sensitivity, the wide dynamic range, the compactness, and the relatively low cost of this table-top setup open new perspectives for ^{14}C-tracing applications, such as radiocarbon dating, biomedicine, or environmental and earth sciences. The detection of other very rare molecules can be pursued as well thanks to the wide and continuous mid-IR spectral coverage of the described setup.

  16. Using 14C to investigate Methane Production and DOC Reactivity in Northern Peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbett, J.; Chanton, J.; Glaser, P.; Burdige, D.; Siegel, D.; Cooper, W.

    2008-12-01

    We found a consistent distribution pattern for radiocarbon in dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), and methane replicated across spatial and temporal scales in northern peatlands from Minnesota to Alaska. The 14C content of DOC is relatively modern throughout the peat column, to depths of 3 meters. In sedge-dominated peatlands, the 14C content of the products of respiration, CH4 and DIC are essentially the same, and are similar to that of DOC. In Sphagnum-woody plant dominated peatlands with few sedges, however, the respiration products are similar but intermediate between the 14C content of the solid-phase peat and the DOC. Preliminary data indicates qualitative differences in the pore-water DOC depending on the extent of sedge cover, consistent with the hypothesis that the DOC in sedge-dominated peatlands is more reactive than DOC in peatlands where Sphagnum or other vascular plants dominate. These data are supported by molecular-level analysis of DOC by ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry which suggests dramatic changes with depth in the composition of DOC in the sedge-dominated peatland porewaters but not in porewaters where Sphagnum dominates. The higher reactivity of DOC from sedge- dominated peatlands may be a function of either different source materials or environmental factors that are related to the abundance of sedges in peatlands. To further investigate the reactivity of peat DOC in anaerobic methane producing environments, we are conducting size fractionation experiments for both the bog and fen samples. We will analyze resulting size fractions of DOC for radiocarbon. Previous research has shown that microorganisms tend to prefer HMW DOC to LMW DOC. Due to this, we believe that LMW DOC from both the bogs and the fens will result in radiocarbon values that are more depleted in 14C relative to HMW DOC. We hypothesize that the HMW DOC from the bogs will show depletion in 14C relative to HMW DOC in the fens. We further

  17. Variability in 14C contents of soil organic matter at the plot and regional scale across climatic and geologic gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Voort, Tessa Sophia; Hagedorn, Frank; McIntyre, Cameron; Zell, Claudia; Walthert, Lorenz; Schleppi, Patrick; Feng, Xiaojuan; Eglinton, Timothy Ian

    2016-06-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) forms the largest terrestrial pool of carbon outside of sedimentary rocks. Radiocarbon is a powerful tool for assessing soil organic matter dynamics. However, due to the nature of the measurement, extensive 14C studies of soil systems remain relatively rare. In particular, information on the extent of spatial and temporal variability in 14C contents of soils is limited, yet this information is crucial for establishing the range of baseline properties and for detecting potential modifications to the SOM pool. This study describes a comprehensive approach to explore heterogeneity in bulk SOM 14C in Swiss forest soils that encompass diverse landscapes and climates. We examine spatial variability in soil organic carbon (SOC) 14C, SOC content and C : N ratios over both regional climatic and geologic gradients, on the watershed- and plot-scale and within soil profiles. Results reveal (1) a relatively uniform radiocarbon signal across climatic and geologic gradients in Swiss forest topsoils (0-5 cm, Δ14C = 130 ± 28.6, n = 12 sites), (2) similar radiocarbon trends with soil depth despite dissimilar environmental conditions, and (3) micro-topography dependent, plot-scale variability that is similar in magnitude to regional-scale variability (e.g., Gleysol, 0-5 cm, Δ14C 126 ± 35.2, n = 8 adjacent plots of 10 × 10 m). Statistical analyses have additionally shown that Δ14C signature in the topsoil is not significantly correlated to climatic parameters (precipitation, elevation, primary production) except mean annual temperature at 0-5 cm. These observations have important consequences for SOM carbon stability modelling assumptions, as well as for the understanding of controls on past and current soil carbon dynamics.

  18. Challenges faced when using radiocarbon measurements to estimate fossil fuel emissions in the UK.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenger, A.; O'Doherty, S.; Rigby, M. L.; Ganesan, A.; Manning, A.; Allen, G.

    2015-12-01

    Estimating the anthropogenic component of carbon dioxide emissions from direct atmospheric measurements is difficult, due to the large natural carbon dioxide fluxes. One way of determining the fossil fuel component of atmospheric carbon dioxide is the use of radiocarbon measurements. Whilst carbon reservoirs with a reasonably fast carbon exchange rate all have a similar radiocarbon content, fossil fuels are completely devoid of radiocarbon due to their age. Previous studies have 14CO2 (UK) this approach is compromised by the high density of 14CO2 emitting nuclear power plants. Of the 16 nuclear reactors in the UK, 14 are advanced gas cooled reactors, which have one of the highest 14CO2 emission rates of all reactor types. These radiocarbon emissions not only lead to a serious underestimation of the recently added fossil fuel CO2, by masking the depletion of 14C in CO2, but can in fact overshadow the depletion by a factor of 2 or more. While a correction for this enhancement can be applied, the emissions from the nuclear power plants are highly variable, and an accurate correction is therefore not straightforward. We present the first attempt to quantify UK fossil fuel CO2 emissions through the use of 14CO2. We employ a sampling strategy that makes use of a Lagrangian particle dispersion model, in combination with nuclear industry emission estimates, to forecast "good" sampling times, in an attempt to minimize the correction due to emissions from the nuclear industry. As part of the Greenhouse gAs Uk and Global Emissions (GAUGE) project, 14CO2measurements are performed at two measurement sites in the UK and Ireland, as well as during science flights around the UK. The measurement locations have been chosen with a focus on high emitting regions such as London and the Midlands. We discuss the unique challenges that face the determination of fossil fuel emissions through radiocarbon measurements in the UK and our sampling strategy to deal with them. In addition we

  19. Surface water processes in the Indonesian Throughflow as documented by a high-resolution coral (Delta)14C record

    SciTech Connect

    Fallon, S J; Guilderson, T P

    2008-04-23

    To explore the seasonal to decadal variability in surface water masses that contribute to the Indonesian Throughflow we have generated a 115-year bi-monthly coral-based radiocarbon time-series from a coral in the Makassar Straits. In the pre-bomb (pre-1955) era from 1890 to 1954, the radiocarbon time series occasionally displays a small seasonal signal (10-15{per_thousand}). After 1954 the radiocarbon record increases rapidly, in response to the increased atmospheric {sup 14}C content caused by nuclear weapons testing. From 1957 to 1986 the record displays clear seasonal variability from 15 to 60{per_thousand} and the post-bomb peak (163 per mil) occurred in 1974. The seasonal cycle of radiocarbon can be attributed to variations of surface waters passing through South Makassar Strait. Southern Makassar is under the influence of the Northwest Monsoon, which is responsible for the high Austral summer radiocarbon (North Pacific waters) and the Southeast Monsoon that flushes back a mixture of low (South Pacific and upwelling altered) radiocarbon water from the Banda Sea. The coral record also shows a significant {sup 14}C peak in 1955 due to bomb {sup 14}C water advected into this region in the form of CaCO{sub 3} particles (this implies that the particles were advected intact and then become entrapped in the coral skeleton--is this what we really mean? Wouldn't even fine particles settle out over the inferred transit time from Bikini to MAK?) or water particles with dissolved labeled CO{sub 2} produced during fallout from the Castle tests in 1954.

  20. Radiocarbon Dating: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortine, Suellen

    This selective annotated bibliography covers various sources of information on the radiocarbon dating method, including journal articles, conference proceedings, and reports, reflecting the most important and useful sources of the last 25 years. The bibliography is divided into five parts--general background on radiocarbon, radiocarbon dating,…

  1. Assessing open-system behavior of 14C in terrestrial gastropod shells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rech, J.A.; Pigati, J.S.; Lehmann, S.B.; McGimpsey, C.N.; Grimley, D.A.; Nekola, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    In order to assess open-system behavior of radiocarbon in fossil gastropod shells, we measured the 14C activity on 10 aliquots of shell material recovered from Illinoian (~190-130 ka) and pre-Illinoian (~800 ka) loess and lacustrine deposits in the Midwestern USA. Eight of the 10 aliquots yielded measurable 14C activities that ranged from 0.25 to 0.53 percent modern carbon (pMC), corresponding to apparent 14C ages between 48.2 and 42.1 ka. This small level of open-system behavior is common in many materials that are used for 14C dating (e.g. charcoal), and typically sets the upper practical limit of the technique. Two aliquots of gastropod shells from the Illinoian-aged Petersburg Silt (Petersburg Section) in central Illinois, USA, however, yielded elevated 14C activities of 1.26 and 1.71 pMC, which correspond to apparent 14C ages of 35.1 and 32.7 ka. Together, these results suggest that while many fossil gastropods shells may not suffer from major (>1%) open-system problems, this is not always the case. We then examined the mineralogy, trace element chemistry, and physical characteristics of a suite of fossil and modern gastropod shells to identify the source of contamination in the Petersburg shells and assess the effectiveness of these screening techniques at identifying samples suitable for 14C dating. Mineralogical (XRD) and trace element analyses were inconclusive, which suggests that these techniques are not suitable for assessing open-system behavior in terrestrial gastropod shells. Analysis with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), however, identified secondary mineralization (calcium carbonate) primarily within the inner whorls of the Petersburg shells. This indicates that SEM examination, or possibly standard microscope examination, of the interior of gastropod shells should be used when selecting fossil gastropod shells for 14C dating. ?? 2011 by the Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona.

  2. Assessing open-system behavior of 14C in terrestrial gastropod shells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rech, Jason A.; Pigati, Jeffrey S.; Lehmann, Sophie B.; McGimpsey, Chelsea N.; Grimley, David A.; Nekola, Jeffrey C.

    2011-01-01

    In order to assess open-system behavior of radiocarbon in fossil gastropod shells, we measured the 14C activity on 10 aliquots of shell material recovered from Illinoian (~190-130 ka) and pre-Illinoian (~800 ka) loess and lacustrine deposits in the Midwestern USA. Eight of the 10 aliquots yielded measurable 14C activities that ranged from 0.25 to 0.53 percent modern carbon (pMC), corresponding to apparent 14C ages between 48.2 and 42.1 ka. This small level of open-system behavior is common in many materials that are used for 14C dating (e.g. charcoal), and typically sets the upper practical limit of the technique. Two aliquots of gastropod shells from the Illinoian-aged Petersburg Silt (Petersburg Section) in central Illinois, USA, however, yielded elevated 14C activities of 1.26 and 1.71 pMC, which correspond to apparent 14C ages of 35.1 and 32.7 ka. Together, these results suggest that while many fossil gastropods shells may not suffer from major (>1%) open-system problems, this is not always the case. We then examined the mineralogy, trace element chemistry, and physical characteristics of a suite of fossil and modern gastropod shells to identify the source of contamination in the Petersburg shells and assess the effectiveness of these screening techniques at identifying samples suitable for 14C dating. Mineralogical (XRD) and trace element analyses were inconclusive, which suggests that these techniques are not suitable for assessing open-system behavior in terrestrial gastropod shells. Analysis with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), however, identified secondary mineralization (calcium carbonate) primarily within the inner whorls of the Petersburg shells. This indicates that SEM examination, or possibly standard microscope examination, of the interior of gastropod shells should be used when selecting fossil gastropod shells for 14C dating.

  3. Insights from 14C into C loss pathways in degraded peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Martin; Evans, Chris; Allott, Tim; Stimson, Andrew; Goulsbra, Claire

    2016-04-01

    Peatlands are important global stores of terrestrial carbon. Lowered water tables due to changing climate and direct or indirect human intervention produce a deeper aerobic zone and have the potential to enhance loss of stored carbon from the peat profile. The quasi continuous accumulation of organic matter in active peatlands means that the age of fluvial dissolved organic carbon exported from peatland systems is related to the source depth in the peat profile. Consequently 14C analysis of DOC in waters draining peatlands has the potential not only to tell us about the source of fluvial carbon and the stability of the peatland but also about the dominant hydrological pathways in the peatland system. This paper will present new radiocarbon determinations from peatland streams draining the heavily eroded peatlands of the southern Pennine uplands in the UK. These blanket peatland systems are highly degraded, with extensive bare peat and gully erosion resulting from air pollution during the industrial revolution, overgrazing, wildfire and climatic changes. Deep and extensive gullying has significantly modified the hydrology of these systems leading to local and more widespread drawdown of water table. 14C data from DOC in drainage waters are presented from two catchments; one with extensive gully erosion and the other with a combination of gully erosion and sheet erosion of the peat. At the gully eroded site DOC in drainage waters is as old as 160 BP but at the site with extensive sheet erosion dates of up to 1069 BP are amongst the oldest recorded from blanket peatland globally These data indicate significant degradation of stored carbon from the eroding peatlands. Initial comparisons of the 14C data with modelled water table for the catchments and depth-age curves for catchment peats suggests that erosion of the peat surface, allowing decomposition of exposed older organic material is a potential mechanism producing aged carbon from the eroded catchment. This

  4. Methane sources in gas hydrate-bearing cold seeps: Evidence from radiocarbon and stable isotopes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pohlman, J.W.; Bauer, J.E.; Canuel, E.A.; Grabowski, K.S.; Knies, D.L.; Mitchell, C.S.; Whiticar, Michael J.; Coffin, R.B.

    2009-01-01

    Fossil methane from the large and dynamic marine gas hydrate reservoir has the potential to influence oceanic and atmospheric carbon pools. However, natural radiocarbon (14C) measurements of gas hydrate methane have been extremely limited, and their use as a source and process indicator has not yet been systematically established. In this study, gas hydrate-bound and dissolved methane recovered from six geologically and geographically distinct high-gas-flux cold seeps was found to be 98 to 100% fossil based on its 14C content. Given this prevalence of fossil methane and the small contribution of gas hydrate (??? 1%) to the present-day atmospheric methane flux, non-fossil contributions of gas hydrate methane to the atmosphere are not likely to be quantitatively significant. This conclusion is consistent with contemporary atmospheric methane budget calculations. In combination with ??13C- and ??D-methane measurements, we also determine the extent to which the low, but detectable, amounts of 14C (~ 1-2% modern carbon, pMC) in methane from two cold seeps might reflect in situ production from near-seafloor sediment organic carbon (SOC). A 14C mass balance approach using fossil methane and 14C-enriched SOC suggests that as much as 8 to 29% of hydrate-associated methane carbon may originate from SOC contained within the upper 6??m of sediment. These findings validate the assumption of a predominantly fossil carbon source for marine gas hydrate, but also indicate that structural gas hydrate from at least certain cold seeps contains a component of methane produced during decomposition of non-fossil organic matter in near-surface sediment.

  5. Wine ethanol 14C as a tracer for fossil fuel CO2 emissions in Europe: Measurements and model comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palstra, Sanne W. L.; Karstens, Ute; Streurman, Harm-Jan; Meijer, Harro A. J.

    2008-11-01

    14C (radiocarbon) in atmospheric CO2 is the most direct tracer for the presence of fossil-fuel-derived CO2 (CO2-ff). We demonstrate the 14C measurement of wine ethanol as a way to determine the relative regional atmospheric CO2-ff concentration compared to a background site ("regional CO2-ff excess") for specific harvest years. The carbon in wine ethanol is directly back traceable to the atmospheric CO2 that the plants assimilate. An important advantage of using wine is that the atmosphere can be monitored annually back in time. We have analyzed a total of 165 wines, mainly from harvest years 1990-1993 and 2003-2004, among which is a semicontinuous series (1973-2004) of wines from one vineyard in southwest Germany. The results show clear spatial and temporal variations in the regional CO2-ff excess values. We have compared our measured regional CO2-ff excess values of 2003 and 2004 with those simulated by the REgional MOdel (REMO). The model results show a bias of almost +3 parts per million (ppm) CO2-ff compared with those of the observations. The modeled differences between 2003 and 2004, however, which can be used as a measure for the variability in atmospheric mixing and transport processes, show good agreement with those of the observations all over Europe. Correcting for interannual variations using modeled data produces a regional CO2-ff excess signal that is potentially useful for the verification of trends in regional fossil fuel consumption. In this fashion, analyzing 14C from wine ethanol offers the possibility to observe fossil fuel emissions back in time on many places in Europe and elsewhere.

  6. Characterization of 14C in Neutron-Irradiated Graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaBrier, Daniel Patrick

    A long-term radiological concern regarding irradiated graphite waste is the presence of the radionuclide 14C. Recent studies suggest that a significant portion of 14C contamination present in reactor-irradiated graphite is concentrated on the surface and within near-surface layers. Methods for treating irradiated graphite waste (e.g. pyrolysis, oxidation) in order to remove 14C-bearing species from the bulk graphite are being investigated to lend guidance in optimizing long-term disposal strategies. Characterization studies were performed in order to determine the chemical nature of 14C on irradiated graphite surfaces. Samples of the nuclear-grade graphite NBG-25 were irradiated in a neutron flux of 10 14 n/cm2-s for 360 days at the Advanced Test Reactor (at the Idaho National Laboratory). Surface-sensitive analysis techniques (XPS, ToF-SIMS, SEM/EDS and Raman) were employed to determine the type, location and quantity of specific chemical species and bonds that were present on the surfaces of irradiated graphite samples. Several 14C precursor species were identified on the surfaces of irradiated NBG-25; the quantities of these species decrease at sub-surface depths, which, is consistent with the observation of high concentrations of 14C on the surfaces of graphite reactor components. The elevated presence of surface oxide complexes on irradiated NBG-25 surfaces was attributed directly to neutron irradiation. Pathways for the release of 14C were identified for irradiated NBG-25: carboxyls and lactones (14CO 2), and carbonyls, ethers and quinones (14CO). Increased amounts of C-O and C=O bonding were observed on irradiated NBG-25 surfaces (when compared to unirradiated samples) in the form of interlattice (e.g. ether) and dangling (e.g. carboxyl or quinone) bonds; the quantities of these bond types also decrease at sub-surface depths. The results of this study are consistent with thermal treatment studies that indicate that the primary candidates for the release of

  7. Radiocarbon to calendar date conversion: Calendrical band widths as a function of radiocarbon precision

    SciTech Connect

    McCormac, F.G.; Baillie, M.G.L. )

    1993-01-01

    Accurate high-precision [sup 14]C dating (i.e., [plus minus] 20 yr precision or less on the [sup 14]C date) provides the narrowest calendrical band width and, hence, the best age range determination possible. However, because of the structure in the [sup 14]C calibration curve, the calendar age range for a given [sup 14]C precision is not constant throughout the calibration range. In this study, they quantify the calendar band widths for a range of [sup 14]C precisions throughout the calibration range. They show that an estimate of the likely calendar band width in years can be obtained from the expression: Band width (yr) = 2.12 x [sup 14]C precision (1 [sigma]) + 54.6. They also show that calendar band widths are widest around 4000 Bp at the start of the Bronze Age, and become narrow through the later Bronze Age and Iron Age and back into the Neolithic.

  8. The use of hair as an indicator of occupational 14C contamination.

    PubMed

    Stenström, Kristina; Unkel, Ingmar; Nilsson, Carl Magnus; Rääf, Christopher; Mattsson, Sören

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents a study in which the specific activity of (14)C in hair has been investigated as an easily determined bio-indicator of the integrated (14)C exposure (over several months). The study includes 28 Swedish workers handling (14)C-labelled compounds, or working in a (14)C-enriched environment. Hair samples from personnel at a Swedish nuclear power plant showed very low levels of (14)C contamination, if any. In contrast, personnel at the investigated research departments showed (14)C levels in hair of up to 60% above the natural specific activity of (14)C. Much higher levels, up to 80 times the natural specific activity of (14)C, were found in hair from individuals working at a pharmaceutical research laboratory. This contamination was, however, not solely an internal contamination. There were indications that most of the (14)C in the hair originated from airborne (14)C-compounds, which were adsorbed onto the hair. The difficulties in removing this external (14)C contamination prior to analysis are discussed, as are the possibilities of using accelerator mass spectrometry to analyse various types of samples for retrospective dose assessment.

  9. Tips and traps in the 14C Bio-AMS preparation laboratory (WSam 7)

    SciTech Connect

    Buchholz, B A; Haack, K W; Stewart, P H; Vogel, J S

    1999-10-12

    Maintaining a contamination free sample preparation lab for biological 14 C AMS requires the same or more diligence as a radiocarbon dating prep lab. Isotope ratios of materials routinely range over 4-8 orders of magnitude in a single experiment, dosing solutions contain thousands of DPM and gels used to separate proteins possess 14 C ratios of 1pMC. Radiocarbon contamination is a legacy of earlier tracer work in most biological laboratories, even if they were never hot labs. Removable surface contamination can be found and monitored using swipes. Contamination can be found on any surface routinely touched: door knobs, light switches, drawer handles, water faucets. In general, all surfaces routinely touched need to be covered with paper, foil, or plastic that can be changed frequently. Shared air supplies can also present problems by distributing hot aerosols throughout a building. Aerosols can be monitored for 14 C content using graphitized coal or fullerene soot mixed with metal powder as an absorber. The monitors can be set out in work spaces for 1-2 weeks and measured by AMS with regular samples. Frequent air changes help minimize aerosol contamination in many cases. Cross contamination of samples can be minimized by using disposable plastic or glassware in the prep lab, isolating samples from the air when possible and using positive displacement pipetters.

  10. Radiocarbon in the Weddell Sea as observed in a deep-sea coral and in krill

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, R.L.; Druffel, E.M.

    1983-03-01

    Radiocarbon mesurements were performed on krill and coral samples collected from the Weddell Sea during IWSOE '80. These are the first radiocarbon measurements available from this area since 1973. These data reveal carbon-14 levels for Weddell surface water and southern Weddell Shelf water. These data indicate that the radiocarbon levels in surface waters in 1980 were the same or slightly lower than those present in 1973. In addition, an unusually low ..delta../sup 14/C value for shelf water (from coral) at 500 m is evidence that Warm Deep Water (WDW) may penetrate much further and more frequently onto the shelf region than had previously been expected.

  11. New and revised 14C dates for Hawaiian surface lava flows: Paleomagnetic and geomagnetic implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pressline, N.; Trusdell, F.A.; Gubbins, David

    2009-01-01

    Radiocarbon dates have been obtained for 30 charcoal samples corresponding to 27 surface lava flows from the Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes on the Island of Hawaii. The submitted charcoal was a mixture of fresh and archived material. Preparation and analysis was undertaken at the NERC Radiocarbon Laboratory in Glasgow, Scotland, and the associated SUERC Accelerator Mass Spectrometry facility. The resulting dates range from 390 years B.P. to 12,910 years B.P. with corresponding error bars an order of magnitude smaller than previously obtained using the gas-counting method. The new and revised 14C data set can aid hazard and risk assessment on the island. The data presented here also have implications for geomagnetic modelling, which at present is limited by large dating errors. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  12. Integration of radiocarbon dating in the hydrodynamic scheme of north western Sahara aquifer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ould Baba Sy, M.; Besbes, M.

    2003-04-01

    Radiocarbon dating methods can be applied to obtain the age of ground water. Carbon exists in several naturally occurring isotopes, l2C, 13C, and 14C. Carbon 14 is formed in the atmosphere by the bombardment of 14N by cosmic radiation (DeVries 1959). The l4C forms CO2, so that the atmospheric CO2 has a constant radioactivity due to modern 14C. If the CO2 is incorporated into a form in which it is isolated from modern 14C, age determinations can be made from the 14C radioactivity as a percent of the original. The half-life of l4C is 5730 y, so that if one-fourth of the original activity is present, two half-lives, or 11,460 y, have elapsed. When precipitation soaks into the ground, it is saturated with respect to CO2, with a known 14C activity. Once the water has entered the soil, additional carbon may come from soil CO2 and the solution of carbonate minerals. The modern carbon is diluted by the inactive carbon from carbonate minerals. The raw dates obtained must be adjusted for this dilution. In the present research, we present a contribution of radiocarbon dating in the North Western Sahara Aquifer System, the NWSAS, shared by three countries (Algeria, Libya and Tunisia). This will be done while showing the utility of the log-linear function gotten by regression of some values representing the age of water by the activity of the carbon 14. This function has permitted to estimate the age of water for a sample of 72 water points. It leads, by interpolation on a cartographic support, to the distribution of the carbon 14 activities measured to the wells, translated in equivalent ages of water in the Continental Intercalaire aquifer, which is part of NWSAS and extends over one million square km. The reading of this ages map shows well the hydaulic behavior of the aquifer system.

  13. Radiocarbon signal of a low and intermediate level radioactive waste disposal facility in nearby trees.

    PubMed

    Janovics, R; Kelemen, D I; Kern, Z; Kapitány, S; Veres, M; Jull, A J T; Molnár, M

    2016-03-01

    Tree ring series were collected from the vicinity of a Hungarian radioactive waste treatment and disposal facility and from a distant control background site, which is not influenced by the radiocarbon discharge of the disposal facility but it represents the natural regional (14)C level. The (14)C concentration of the cellulose content of tree rings was measured by AMS. Data of the tree ring series from the disposal facility was compared to the control site for each year. The results were also compared to the (14)C data of the atmospheric (14)C monitoring stations at the disposal facility and to international background measurements. On the basis of the results, the excess radiocarbon of the disposal facility can unambiguously be detected in the tree from the repository site. PMID:26704325

  14. Radiocarbon signal of a low and intermediate level radioactive waste disposal facility in nearby trees.

    PubMed

    Janovics, R; Kelemen, D I; Kern, Z; Kapitány, S; Veres, M; Jull, A J T; Molnár, M

    2016-03-01

    Tree ring series were collected from the vicinity of a Hungarian radioactive waste treatment and disposal facility and from a distant control background site, which is not influenced by the radiocarbon discharge of the disposal facility but it represents the natural regional (14)C level. The (14)C concentration of the cellulose content of tree rings was measured by AMS. Data of the tree ring series from the disposal facility was compared to the control site for each year. The results were also compared to the (14)C data of the atmospheric (14)C monitoring stations at the disposal facility and to international background measurements. On the basis of the results, the excess radiocarbon of the disposal facility can unambiguously be detected in the tree from the repository site.

  15. No evidence for a deglacial intermediate water Δ14C anomaly in the SW Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sortor, R. N.; Lund, D. C.

    2011-12-01

    The last deglaciation was characterized by an increase in atmospheric pCO2 and decrease in atmospheric radiocarbon activity. One hypothesis is that these changes were due to out-gassing of 14C-depleted carbon from the abyssal ocean (Broecker and Barker, 2007). Reconstructions of foraminiferal Δ14C from the eastern tropical Pacific (Marchitto et al., 2007; Stott et al. 2009), Arabian Sea (Bryan et al., 2010), and high latitude North Atlantic (Thornalley et al., 2011) show that severe depletions in 14C occurred at intermediate water depths during the last deglaciation. It has been suggested that 14C-depleted water from the abyss upwelled in the Southern Ocean and was then carried by Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) to these sites (Marchitto et al., 2007). On the South Icelandic Rise, Thornalley et al. (2011) find deglacial Δ14C values up to 600% lower than the atmosphere. Since North Atlantic deep waters are not believed to be old enough to cause such an anomaly (Robinson et al. 2005), one possible source is AAIW (Thornalley et al., 2011). Here we evaluate whether or not a large deglacial 14C anomaly occurred at intermediate depths in the Southwest Atlantic. We find that the deglacial Δ14C trend at our site is similar to the atmospheric Δ14C trend. Our results are also largely consistent with data from U/Th-dated corals at shallower water depths on the Brazil Margin (Mangini et al., 2010). We find no evidence in the southwestern Atlantic of large deglacial Δ14C anomalies like those observed in the high latitude North Atlantic (Thornalley et al., 2011). When our results are paired with those from the South Pacific (De Pol-Holz et al., 2010; Rose et al., 2010), it appears AAIW did not carry a highly 14C- depleted signal during the deglaciation. Another source of carbon is apparently required to explain the intermediate-depth Δ14C anomalies in the North Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Oceans.

  16. 14C tebuconazole degradation in Colombian soils.

    PubMed

    Mosquera, C S; Martínez, M J; Guerrero, J A

    2010-01-01

    Tebuconazole is a fungicide used on onion crops (Allium Fistulosum L) in Colombia. Persistence of pesticides in soils is characterized by the half-life (DT50), which is influenced by their chemical structure, the physical and chemical properties of the soil and the previous soil history. Based on its structural and chemical properties, tebuconazole should be expected to be relatively persistent in soils. Laboratory incubation studies were conducted to evaluate persistence and bond residues of 14C tebuconazole in three soils, two inceptisol (I) and one histosol (H). Textural classifications were: loam (101), loamy sand (102) and loam (H03), respectively. Data obtained followed a first-order degradation kinetics (R2 > or = 0.899) with DT50 values between 158 and 198 days. The production of 14CO2 from the 14C-ring-labelled test chemicals was very low and increased slightly during 63 days in all cases. The methanol extractable 14C-residues were higher than aqueous ones and both decreased over incubation time for the three soils. The formation of bound 14C-residues increased with time and final values were 11.3; 5.55 and 7.87% for 101, 102 and H03 respectively. Soil 101 showed the lowest mineralization rate and the highest bound residues formation, which might be explained by the clay fraction content. In contrast, an inverse behavior was found for soils 102 and H03, these results might be explained by the higher soil organic carbon content. PMID:21542480

  17. 14C tebuconazole degradation in Colombian soils.

    PubMed

    Mosquera, C S; Martínez, M J; Guerrero, J A

    2010-01-01

    Tebuconazole is a fungicide used on onion crops (Allium Fistulosum L) in Colombia. Persistence of pesticides in soils is characterized by the half-life (DT50), which is influenced by their chemical structure, the physical and chemical properties of the soil and the previous soil history. Based on its structural and chemical properties, tebuconazole should be expected to be relatively persistent in soils. Laboratory incubation studies were conducted to evaluate persistence and bond residues of 14C tebuconazole in three soils, two inceptisol (I) and one histosol (H). Textural classifications were: loam (101), loamy sand (102) and loam (H03), respectively. Data obtained followed a first-order degradation kinetics (R2 > or = 0.899) with DT50 values between 158 and 198 days. The production of 14CO2 from the 14C-ring-labelled test chemicals was very low and increased slightly during 63 days in all cases. The methanol extractable 14C-residues were higher than aqueous ones and both decreased over incubation time for the three soils. The formation of bound 14C-residues increased with time and final values were 11.3; 5.55 and 7.87% for 101, 102 and H03 respectively. Soil 101 showed the lowest mineralization rate and the highest bound residues formation, which might be explained by the clay fraction content. In contrast, an inverse behavior was found for soils 102 and H03, these results might be explained by the higher soil organic carbon content.

  18. Radiocarbon Dating the Anthropocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaput, M. A.; Gajewski, K. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Anthropocene has no agreed start date since current suggestions for its beginning range from Pre-Industrial times to the Industrial Revolution, and from the mid-twentieth century to the future. To set the boundary of the Anthropocene in geological time, we must first understand when, how and to what extent humans began altering the Earth system. One aspect of this involves reconstructing the effects of prehistoric human activity on the physical landscape. However, for global reconstructions of land use and land cover change to be more accurately interpreted in the context of human interaction with the landscape, large-scale spatio-temporal demographic changes in prehistoric populations must be known. Estimates of the relative number of prehistoric humans in different regions of the world and at different moments in time are needed. To this end, we analyze a dataset of radiocarbon dates from the Canadian Archaeological Radiocarbon Database (CARD), the Palaeolithic Database of Europe and the AustArch Database of Australia, as well as published dates from South America. This is the first time such a large quantity of dates (approximately 60,000) has been mapped and studied at a global scale. Initial results from the analysis of temporal frequency distributions of calibrated radiocarbon dates, assumed to be proportional to population density, will be discussed. The utility of radiocarbon dates in studies of the Anthropocene will be evaluated and potential links between population density and changes in atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations, climate, migration patterning and fire frequency coincidence will be considered.

  19. Percutaneous absorption of [14C]DDT and [14C]benzo[a]pyrene from soil.

    PubMed

    Wester, R C; Maibach, H I; Bucks, D A; Sedik, L; Melendres, J; Liao, C; DiZio, S

    1990-10-01

    The objective was to determine percutaneous absorption of DDT and benzo[a]pyrene in vitro and in vivo from soil into and through skin. Soil (Yolo County 65-California-57-8; 26% sand, 26% clay, 48% silt) was passed through 10-, 20-, and 48-mesh sieves. Soil then retained by 80-mesh was mixed with [14C]-labeled chemical at 10 ppm. Acetone solutions at 10 ppm were prepared for comparative analysis. Human cadaver skin was dermatomed to 500 microns and used in glass diffusion cells with human plasma as the receptor fluid (3 ml/hr flow rate) for a 24-hr skin application time. With acetone vehicle, DDT (18.1 +/- 13.4%) readily penetrated into human skin. Significantly less DDT (1.0 +/- 0.7%) penetrated into human skin from soil. DDT would not partition from human skin into human plasma in the receptor phase (less than 0.1%). With acetone vehicle, benzo[a]pyrene (23.7 +/- 9.7%) readily penetrated into human skin. Significantly less benzo[a]pyrene (1.4 +/- 0.9%) penetrated into human skin from soil. Benzo[a]pyrene would not partition from human skin into human plasma in the receptor phase (less than 0.1%). Substantivity (skin retention) was investigated by applying 14C-labeled chemical to human skin in vitro for only 25 min. After soap and water wash, 16.7 +/- 13.2% of DDT applied in acetone remained absorbed to skin. With soil only 0.25 +/- 0.11% of DDT remained absorbed to skin. After soap and water wash 5.1 +/- 2.1% of benzo[a]pyrene applied in acetone remained absorbed to skin. With soil only 0.14 +/- 0.13% of benzo[a]pyrene remained absorbed to skin.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Investigating the Impact of Past and Future CO2 Emissions on the Distribution of Radiocarbon in the Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatiwala, S.; Payne, S.; Graven, H. D.; Heimbach, P.

    2015-12-01

    The ocean is a significant sink for carbon dioxide from fossil fuel burning, absorbing roughly a third of human CO2 emitted over the industrial period. This has implications not only for climate but also for the chemical and isotopic composition of the ocean. Human activities have increased the ocean radiocarbon content through nuclear bomb tests in the 1950s-60s, which released a large amount of radiocarbon (14C) into the atmosphere, but fossil fuel emissions are decreasing the radiocarbon content through the release of 14C-depleted CO2. Here, we use the ECCO-v4 ocean state estimate to examine the changing nature of the air-sea flux of radiocarbon and its spatial distribution in the ocean in response to past and future CO2 emissions, the latter taken from the the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) database used in IPCC simulations. In line with previous studies we find that the large air-sea gradient of 14C induced by nuclear bomb testing led to rapid accumulation of radiocarbon in the surface ocean. Surface fluxes of 14C have considerably weakened over the past several decades and in some areas 14C is being returned to the atmosphere. As fossil fuel emissions continue to reduce the atmospheric 14C/C ratio (∆14C), in most RCP scenarios the total ocean 14C inventory starts decreasing by 2030. With strong emissions, the Δ14C of surface waters is driven to increasingly negative values and in RCP 8.5 by 2100 much of the surface ocean has apparent radiocarbon ages in excess of 2000 years, with subtropical gyres more depleted in 14C than the Southern Ocean. Surface waters become significantly more negative in Δ14C than underlying waters. As a result, turning conventional tracer oceanography on its head, recently ventilated waters are characterized by more negative Δ14C values. Similar patterns can be expected for CFCs in the ocean as atmospheric concentrations decrease over the next several decades. Our results have a number of implications, notably for

  1. Radiocarbon in the Northern Indian Ocean two decades after GEOSECS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Koushik; Bhushan, Ravi

    2012-06-01

    The 14C measurements in the Arabian Sea and the Bay of Bengal during the late 1990s offer a way to assess the temporal changes in the inventories of bomb-14C and its penetration into the ocean, in two decades since GEOSECS expeditions (1977-1978). The mean penetration depth of bomb radiocarbon during GEOSECS (1977-1978) was 270 m, which increased by ˜40% to 381 m in 1994-1998. The small changes in bomb-14C inventories, significant increase in the mean penetration depths and lowering of the surface Δ14C values in the northern Indian Ocean indicate the temporal variation of bomb-14C in two decades is mainly through downward transfer through mixing with deeper waters. The observed bomb-14C inventory in the northern Indian Ocean agrees with numerical model simulated values, except at the equatorial Indian Ocean. The high bomb-14C inventory at the equator can be attributed to lateral advection of 14C-enriched waters from the Pacific Ocean through the Indonesian archipelago. The air-sea CO2exchange rates in the northern Indian Ocean calculated from the bomb-14C inventories range from ˜7 mol m-2 yr-1 (in the northern Bay of Bengal) to 20 mol m-2 yr-1(in the equatorial Indian Ocean). Net sea-air flux of CO2 estimated for the northern Indian Ocean between 0° and 25°N is ˜104 ± 30 TgC yr-1. The Bay of Bengal is a net sink of atmospheric CO2 (˜-1 ± 0.4 TgC yr-1), while the Arabian Sea is a source of CO2 (˜69 ± 21 TgC yr-1).

  2. A new 14C calibration data set for the last deglaciation based on marine varves

    SciTech Connect

    Hughen, K A; Kashgarian, M; Lehman, S J; Overpeck, J T; Peterson, L C; Southon, J R

    1999-02-22

    Varved sediments of the tropical Cariaco basin provide a new {sup 14}C calibration data set for the period of deglaciation (10,000 to 14,500 years before present: 10-14.5 cal ka BP). Independent evaluations of the Cariasco Basin calendar and {sup 14}C chronologies were based on the agreement of varve ages with the GISP2 ice core layer chronology for similar high-resolution paleoclimate records, in addition to {sup 14}C age agreement with terrestrial {sup 14}C dates, even during large climatic changes. These assessments indicate that the Cariaco Basin {sup 14}C reservoir age remained stable throughout the Younger Dryas and late Alleroed climatic events and that the varve and {sup 14}C chronologies provide an accurate alternative to existing calibrations based on coral U/Th dates. The Cariaco Basin calibration generally agrees with coral-derived calibrations but is more continuous and resolves century-scale details of {sup 14}C change not seen in the coral records. {sup 14}C plateaus can be identified at 9.6, 11.4, and 11.7 {sup 14}C ka BP, in addition to a large, sloping plateau during the Younger Dryas ({approximately}10 to 11 {sup 14}C ka BP). Accounting for features such as these is crucial to determining the relative timing and rates of change during abrupt global climate changes of the last deglaciation.

  3. Coral Radiocarbon Records of Indian Ocean Water Mass Mixing and Wind-Induced Upwelling Along the Coast of Sumatra, Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Guilderson, T P; Grumet, N S; Abram, N J; Beck, J W; Dunbar, R B; Gagan, M K; Hantoro, W S; Suwargadi, B W

    2004-02-06

    Radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) in the skeletal aragonite of annually banded corals track radiocarbon concentrations in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in surface seawater. As a result of nuclear weapons testing in the 1950s, oceanic uptake of excess {sup 14}C in the atmosphere has increased the contrast between surface and deep ocean {sup 14}C concentrations. We present accelerator mass spectrometric (AMS) measurements of radiocarbon isotope ({Delta}{sup 14}C) in Porites corals from the Mentawai Islands, Sumatra (0 S, 98 E) and Watamu, Kenya (3 S, 39 E) to document the temporal and spatial evolution of the {sup 14}C gradient in the tropical Indian Ocean. The rise in {Delta}{sup 14}C in the Sumatra coral, in response to the maximum in nuclear weapons testing, is delayed by 2-3 years relative to the rise in coral {Delta}{sup 14}C from the coast of Kenya. Kenya coral {Delta}{sup 14}C values rise quickly because surface waters are in prolonged contact with the atmosphere. In contrast, wind-induced upwelling and rapid mixing along the coast of Sumatra entrains {sup 14}C-depleted water from the subsurface, which dilutes the effect of the uptake of bomb-laden {sup 14}C by the surface-ocean. Bimonthly AMS {Delta}{sup 14}C measurements on the Mentawai coral reveal mainly interannual variability with minor seasonal variability. The interannual signal may be a response to changes in the Walker circulation, the development of easterly wind anomalies, shoaling of the eastern thermocline, and upwelling of {sup 14}C-depleted water along the coast of Sumatra. Singular spectrum analysis of the Sumatra coral {Delta}{sup 14}C record reveals a significant 3-year periodicity. The results lend support to the concept that ocean atmosphere interactions between the Pacific and Indian Oceans operate in concert with the El Ni{tilde n}o-Southern Oscillation (ENSO).

  4. Changes in14c activity over time during vacuum distillation of carbon from rock pore water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davidson, G.R.; Yang, I.C.

    1999-01-01

    The radiocarbon activity of carbon collected by vacuum distillation from a single partially saturated tuff began to decline after approximately 60% of the water and carbon had been extracted. Disproportionate changes in 14C activity and ??13C during distillation rule out simple isotopic fractionation as a causative explanation. Additional phenomena such as matrix diffusion and ion exclusion in micropores may play a role in altering the isotopic value of extracted carbon, but neither can fully account for the observed changes. The most plausible explanation is that distillation recovers carbon from an adsorbed phase that is depleted in 14C relative to DIC in the bulk pore water. ?? 1999 by the Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona.

  5. Observation-based global biospheric excess radiocarbon inventory 1963-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naegler, Tobias; Levin, Ingeborg

    2009-09-01

    For the very first time, we present an observation-based estimate of the temporal development of the biospheric excess radiocarbon (14C) inventory IB14,E, i.e., the change in the biospheric 14C inventory relative to prebomb times (1940s). IB14,E was calculated for the period 1963-2005 with a simple budget approach as the difference between the accumulated excess 14C production by atmospheric nuclear bomb tests and the nuclear industry and observation-based reconstructions of the excess 14C inventories in the atmosphere and the ocean. IB14,E increased from the late 1950s onward to maximum values between 126 and 177 × 1026 atoms 14C between 1981 and 1985. In the early 1980s, the biosphere turned from a sink to a source of excess 14C. Consequently, IB14,E decreased to values of 108-167 × 1026 atoms 14C in 2005. The uncertainty of IB14,E is dominated by uncertainties in the total bomb 14C production and the oceanic excess 14C inventory. Unfortunately, atmospheric Δ14CO2 from the early 1980s lack the necessary precision to reveal the expected small change in the amplitude and phase of atmospheric Δ14C seasonal cycle due to the sign flip in the biospheric net 14C flux during that time.

  6. 14C in cropland soil of a long-term field trial - experimental variability and implications for estimating carbon turnover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leifeld, J.; Mayer, J.

    2015-07-01

    Because of their controlled nature, the presence of independent replicates, and their known management history, long-term field experiments are key to the understanding of factors controlling soil carbon. Together with isotope measurements, they provide profound insight into soil carbon dynamics. For soil radiocarbon, an important tracer for understanding these dynamics, experimental variability across replicates is usually not accounted for; hence, a relevant source of uncertainty for quantifying turnover rates is missing. Here, for the first time, radiocarbon measurements of five independent field replicates, and for different layers, of soil from the 66-year-old controlled field experiment ZOFE in Zurich, Switzerland, are used to address this issue. 14C variability was the same across three different treatments and for three different soil layers between the surface and 90 cm depths. On average, experimental variability in 14C content was 12 times the analytical error but still, on a relative basis, smaller than variability in soil carbon concentration. Despite a relative homogeneous variability across the field and along the soil profile, the curved nature of the relationship between radiocarbon content and modelled carbon mean residence time implies that the absolute error of calculated soil carbon turnover time increases with soil depth. In our field experiment findings on topsoil carbon turnover variability would, if applied to subsoil, tend to underweight turnover variability even if experimental variability in the subsoil isotope concentration is the same. Together, experimental variability in radiocarbon is an important component in an overall uncertainty assessment of soil carbon turnover.

  7. Comparison of sampling methods for radiocarbon dating of carbonyls in air samples via accelerator mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, Matthias; Kretschmer, Wolfgang; Scharf, Andreas; Tschekalinskij, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    Three new methods to sample and prepare various carbonyl compounds for radiocarbon measurements were developed and tested. Two of these procedures utilized the Strecker synthetic method to form amino acids from carbonyl compounds with either sodium cyanide or trimethylsilyl cyanide. The third procedure used semicarbazide to form crystalline carbazones with the carbonyl compounds. The resulting amino acids and semicarbazones were then separated and purified using thin layer chromatography. The separated compounds were then combusted to CO2 and reduced to graphite to determine 14C content by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). All of these methods were also compared with the standard carbonyl compound sampling method wherein a compound is derivatized with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine and then separated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC).

  8. The remarkable metrological history of 14C dating: From ancient Egyptian artifacts to particles of soot and grains of pollen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, L. A.

    2003-01-01

    Radiocarbon dating would not have been possible if 14C had not had the “wrong” half-life—a fact that delayed its discovery [1]. Following the discovery of this 5730 year radionuclide in laboratory experiments by Ruben and Kamen, it became clear to W. F. Libby that 14C should exist in nature, and that it could serve as a quantitative means for dating artifacts and events marking the history of civilization. The search for natural radiocarbon was a metrological challenge; the level in the living biosphere [ca. 230 Bq/kg] lay far beyond the then current state of the measurement art. This article traces the metrological history of radiocarbon, from the initial breakthrough devised by Libby, to minor (evolutionary) and major (revolutionary) advances that have brought 14C measurement from a crude, bulk [8 g carbon] dating tool, to a refined probe for dating tiny amounts of precious artifacts, and for “molecular dating” at the 10 μg to 100 μg level. The metrological advances led to opportunities and surprises, such as the non-monotonic dendrochronological calibration curve and the “bomb effect,” that spawned new multidisciplinary areas of application, ranging from cosmic ray physics to oceanography to the reconstruction of environmental history.

  9. Radiocarbon dates on bones of extinct birds from Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    James, H.F.; Stafford, T.W. Jr.; Steadman, D.W.; Olson, S.L.; Martin, P.S.; Jull, A.J.; McCoy, P.C.

    1987-04-01

    Bones from a stratified sedimentary deposit in the Puu Naio Cave site on Maui, Hawaiian Islands, reveal the late Holocene extinction of 19 species of birds. The age of the sediment and associated fauna was determined by direct radiocarbon dating (tandem particle accelerator-mass spectrometer; TAMS) of amino acids extracted from bones weighing as little as 450 mg. The /sup 14/C dates indicate that sediment has been accumulating in the lava tube for at least the last 7750 years, a suitable time frame for testing the hypothesis that Holocene extinction on islands began after human colonization. Despite growing evidence that a worldwide wave of extinctions coincided with human colonization of oceanic islands, little radiometric data have been available to date the extinction of most small fossil vertebrates on islands. The TAMS technique of dating purified collagen from the bones of small vertebrates could lead to vastly improved chronologies of extinction for oceanic islands where catastrophic mid- to late-Holocene extinction is expected or known to have occurred. Chronologies derived from nonarcheological sites that show continuous sedimentation, such as the Puu Naio Cave deposit, may also yield key evidence on the timing of earliest human settlement of Oceania.

  10. Radiocarbon dates on bones of extinct birds from Hawaii.

    PubMed

    James, H F; Stafford, T W; Steadman, D W; Olson, S L; Martin, P S; Jull, A J; McCoy, P C

    1987-04-01

    Bones from a stratified sedimentary deposit in the Puu Naio Cave site on Maui, Hawaiian Islands, reveal the late Holocene extinction of 19 species of birds. The age of the sediment and associated fauna was determined by direct radiocarbon dating (tandem particle accelerator-mass spectrometer; TAMS) of amino acids extracted from bones weighing as little as 450 mg. The 14C dates indicate that sediment has been accumulating in the lava tube for at least the last 7750 years, a suitable time frame for testing the hypothesis that Holocene extinction on islands began after human colonization. Despite growing evidence that a worldwide wave of extinctions coincided with human colonization of oceanic islands, little radiometric data have been available to date the extinction of most small fossil vertebrates on islands. The TAMS technique of dating purified collagen from the bones of small vertebrates could lead to vastly improved chronologies of extinction for oceanic islands where catastrophic mid- to late-Holocene extinction is expected or known to have occurred. Chronologies derived from nonarcheological sites that show continuous sedimentation, such as the Puu Naio Cave deposit, may also yield key evidence on the timing of earliest human settlement of Oceania.

  11. Biological Removal of Radiocarbon-14 from Irradiated Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Molokwane, P.E.; Chirwa, E.M.N.

    2008-07-01

    This paper reports on the preliminary study on the bioseparation of radiocarbon-14 (C-14) using a mixed-culture of microorganisms. The bioseparation principle is critically analyzed and is benchmarked against existing C-14 separation methods using physical chemical processes. The preliminary study indicated probable bio-separate of C-14 from solution prepared from a nuclear graphite mixture, even though the findings need to be verified. The current experiment consisted of a growth vessel and a bio-filter operated in a closed loop. The bio-filter was not installed for the purpose of treatment but rather as a method of isolation of microorganisms for further processing. Significant amounts of C-14 were detected in the trapped cells in the bio-filter, significantly higher than in controls taken before adding carbon sources containing C-14. The microorganisms were grown under micro-aerobic conditions with graphite carbon and commercially purchased powdered carbon as the predominant supplied carbon sources. Small amounts of sucrose (500 mg/L) were added at 48 hour intervals to maintain culture balance. A proof of concept study is underway to determine the C-14 mass balance, characterize the microorganisms in the reactor, and establish the presence or absence of processes that might have affected the preliminary observations. This research represents an exploration into a new field using a new philosophy for treatment of C-14 in low-level waste. (authors)

  12. Radiocarbon dates on bones of extinct birds from Hawaii.

    PubMed Central

    James, H F; Stafford, T W; Steadman, D W; Olson, S L; Martin, P S; Jull, A J; McCoy, P C

    1987-01-01

    Bones from a stratified sedimentary deposit in the Puu Naio Cave site on Maui, Hawaiian Islands, reveal the late Holocene extinction of 19 species of birds. The age of the sediment and associated fauna was determined by direct radiocarbon dating (tandem particle accelerator-mass spectrometer; TAMS) of amino acids extracted from bones weighing as little as 450 mg. The 14C dates indicate that sediment has been accumulating in the lava tube for at least the last 7750 years, a suitable time frame for testing the hypothesis that Holocene extinction on islands began after human colonization. Despite growing evidence that a worldwide wave of extinctions coincided with human colonization of oceanic islands, little radiometric data have been available to date the extinction of most small fossil vertebrates on islands. The TAMS technique of dating purified collagen from the bones of small vertebrates could lead to vastly improved chronologies of extinction for oceanic islands where catastrophic mid- to late-Holocene extinction is expected or known to have occurred. Chronologies derived from nonarcheological sites that show continuous sedimentation, such as the Puu Naio Cave deposit, may also yield key evidence on the timing of earliest human settlement of Oceania. Images PMID:3470800

  13. Vulcanism and Radiocarbon Dates

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Libby, L. M.; Libby, W. F.

    1972-10-01

    We consider whether the long term perturbation of radiocarbon dates, which is known to be approximately a sin function of period about 8000 years and amplitude of about 8% peak-to-peak, could have been caused in any major part by vulcanism. We conclude that this is not the case. On the contrary, present day volcanoes are a far less important source of inert CO{sub 2} (about 100 fold less) than is man's burning of fossil fuels which has caused the Suess dilution of about 2%. (auth)

  14. Determination of tritium and 14C concentration in two hydrostratigraphic units below the University of California, Davis, waste burial holes at the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research/South Campus Disposal Site (LEHR/SCDS).

    PubMed

    Pay, Stephen

    2003-08-01

    The Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research site at the University of California at Davis was used as a disposal site for tritium and 14C waste generated by campus related research. This low-level radioactive waste was disposed of by shallow land burial from 1956 to 1974 in waste burial holes and resulted in extensive contamination of soils and groundwater at the LEHR/SCDS. In part, due to this contamination, the LEHR/SCDS was placed on the National Priority List in May of 1994. In 1999, soils in the vicinity of the waste burial holes were subject to a CERCLA Removal Action. To this day elevated tritium and 14C concentrations are found in two groundwater monitoring wells that are located down gradient from the waste burial holes. The Bioscreen, Natural Attenuation Decision Support System software program was used, along with site-specific hydrogeologic conditions, to estimate the maximum source zone concentrations in the water bearing intervals below the waste burial holes. The first order decay process, and assumptions of horizontal flow provided reasonably accurate estimates of contaminant concentrations in the unconfined portion of the water bearing interval, but results for the confined portion of the water bearing intervals were mixed. Dose estimates for the time period of maximum contaminant concentration in the aquifer below the waste burial holes, predicted by modeling, suggested that the 4 mrem drinking water standard had not been exceeded at this site.

  15. Determination of tritium and 14C concentration in two hydrostratigraphic units below the University of California, Davis, waste burial holes at the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research/South Campus Disposal Site (LEHR/SCDS).

    PubMed

    Pay, Stephen

    2003-08-01

    The Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research site at the University of California at Davis was used as a disposal site for tritium and 14C waste generated by campus related research. This low-level radioactive waste was disposed of by shallow land burial from 1956 to 1974 in waste burial holes and resulted in extensive contamination of soils and groundwater at the LEHR/SCDS. In part, due to this contamination, the LEHR/SCDS was placed on the National Priority List in May of 1994. In 1999, soils in the vicinity of the waste burial holes were subject to a CERCLA Removal Action. To this day elevated tritium and 14C concentrations are found in two groundwater monitoring wells that are located down gradient from the waste burial holes. The Bioscreen, Natural Attenuation Decision Support System software program was used, along with site-specific hydrogeologic conditions, to estimate the maximum source zone concentrations in the water bearing intervals below the waste burial holes. The first order decay process, and assumptions of horizontal flow provided reasonably accurate estimates of contaminant concentrations in the unconfined portion of the water bearing interval, but results for the confined portion of the water bearing intervals were mixed. Dose estimates for the time period of maximum contaminant concentration in the aquifer below the waste burial holes, predicted by modeling, suggested that the 4 mrem drinking water standard had not been exceeded at this site. PMID:12865745

  16. Comparison of Radiocarbon Ages for Multiproxy Paleoclimate Reconstruction of the Great Salt Lake, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielson, K. E.; Bowen, G. J.; Eglinton, T. I.

    2008-12-01

    Multiproxy paleoclimate reconstructions from high sedimentation-rate systems offer promising opportunities to deconvolve multiple aspects climate system response to past forcing. However, the time-equivalence of proxies must be established before such reconstructions can be usefully interpreted. Differences in source ages, transport pathways, and surface residence times for substrates may lead to differences in lag times between proxy formation and deposition, compromising comparative analysis of data from multiple proxies. We used multi-substrate radiocarbon dating to investigate the potential for multi-proxy reconstruction of Holocene changes in the volume of the Great Salt Lake (GSL), Utah, based on the stable isotope composition of organic and inorganic substrates in lake sediment cores. Among potential substrates for this work are normal alkanes of vascular higher plant and algal origin, fossil cysts of lake-dwelling brine shrimp (Artemia), and micritic aragonite. Radiocarbon ages for all organic substrates (alkanes, cysts) sampled at any given core depth are concordant within analytical uncertainty and are similar to ages determined on land-plant debris and filamentous algae isolated from the sediment. Inorganic carbonate, in contrast, is depleted in 14C compare to the organic proxies, giving ages that were apparently 2000 to 3000 years older, likely due to winnowing and re-deposition of carbonate at the core site. These results suggest that the maximum temporal resolution achievable through analysis of mineral substrates is on the order of several millennia. Although the limited precision of the radiocarbon analysis precludes precise determination of the maximum potential resolution of organic-proxy based climate reconstructions, the relatively high sedimentation rates (50--150 cm/kyr) and age-equivalence of the substrates analyzed implies that sub- centennial scale resolution should be achievable throughout much of the Holocene portion of the GSL

  17. Temporal and spatial variations in bomb-produced radiocarbon along BEAGLE2003 lines—Revisits of WHP P06, A10, and I03/I04 in the Southern Hemisphere Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumamoto, Yuichiro; Murata, Akihiko; Watanabe, Shuichi; Fukasawa, Masao

    2011-04-01

    Radiocarbon ( 14C) in dissolved inorganic carbon was measured during revisit cruises along World Ocean Circulation Experiment-Hydrographic Programme (WHP) lines A10 in the South Atlantic, I03/I04 in the Indian, and P06 in the South Pacific Oceans from August 2003 to January 2004, during the Blue Earth Global Expedition 2003 (BEAGLE2003). Zonal means of the water-column inventory of bomb-produced 14C in 2003/2004 in the South Atlantic, Indian, and South Pacific Oceans were about 180, 128, and 159 × 10 12 atoms m -2, respectively. The smallest zonal inventory along the I03 line among the three lines was primarily due to a sampling bias, because the I03 line in the Indian Ocean was along 20°S, which is more equatorward than the other two lines along approximately 30°S in the South Atlantic and South Pacific Oceans. The I03 line in the Indian Ocean had the smallest zonal inventory of bomb-produced 14C and the largest of bomb-produced 137Cs, suggesting that the distribution of bomb 14C in the Indian Ocean is determined primarily by the thermocline ventilation within the Indian Ocean. The history of bomb 14C over time suggests that the bomb 14C inventory in the southern subtropical regions increased steadily up to the early 1990s. The rate of increase then slowed between the early 1990s and 2003/2004 because of a decrease in the bomb 14C influx from the atmosphere to the surface ocean. The highest bomb 14C inventory among the southern subtropical regions was in the subtropical Indian Ocean. However, the contribution of the Indonesian throughflow from the North Pacific and Indian Oceans to this large inventory in the Indian Ocean is not clear. The 14C data along the BEAGLE2003 lines in 2003/2004 were compared with those obtained during WHP in the 1990s and during the South Atlantic Ventilation Experiment in the late 1980s. The zonal averages of the decadal changes in 14C revealed that bomb 14C continued to increase between the late 1980s/1990s and 2003/2004 in the

  18. Microflora distributions in paleosols: a method for calculating the validity of radiocarbon-dated surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Mahaney, W.C.; Boyer, M.G.

    1986-08-01

    Microflora (bacteria and fungi) distributions in several paleosols from Mount Kenya, East Africa, provide important information about contamination of buried soil horizons dated by radiocarbon. High counts of bacteria and fungi in buried soils provide evidence for contamination by plant root effects or ground water movement. Profiles with decreasing counts versus depth appear to produce internally consistent and accurate radiocarbon dates. Profiles with disjunct or bimodal distributions of microflora at various depths produce internally inconsistent chronological sequences of radiocarbon-dated buried surfaces. Preliminary results suggest that numbers up to 5 x 10/sup 2/ g/sup -1/ for bacteria in buried A horizons do not appear to affect the validity of /sup 14/C dates. Beyond this threshold value, contamination appears to produce younger dates, the difference between true age and /sup 14/C age increasing with the amount of microflora contamination.

  19. A graphical method to evaluate predominant geochemical processes occurring in groundwater systems for radiocarbon dating

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Han, Liang-Feng; Plummer, L. Niel; Aggarwal, Pradeep

    2012-01-01

    A graphical method is described for identifying geochemical reactions needed in the interpretation of radiocarbon age in groundwater systems. Graphs are constructed by plotting the measured 14C, δ13C, and concentration of dissolved inorganic carbon and are interpreted according to specific criteria to recognize water samples that are consistent with a wide range of processes, including geochemical reactions, carbon isotopic exchange, 14C decay, and mixing of waters. The graphs are used to provide a qualitative estimate of radiocarbon age, to deduce the hydrochemical complexity of a groundwater system, and to compare samples from different groundwater systems. Graphs of chemical and isotopic data from a series of previously-published groundwater studies are used to demonstrate the utility of the approach. Ultimately, the information derived from the graphs is used to improve geochemical models for adjustment of radiocarbon ages in groundwater systems.

  20. 14C content in aerosols in Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, V.; Solís, C.; Chávez, E.; Andrade, E.; Ortiz, M. E.; Huerta, A.; Aragón, J.; Rodríguez-Ceja, M.; Martínez, M. A.; Ortiz, E.

    2016-03-01

    14C-AMS of total carbon was determined in aerosols (PM10 fraction), collected in Mexico City during two weeks from 21 November to 3 December 2012. Other tracers such as total carbon (TC), organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC) and trace element contents were also determined. F14C values varied from 0.39 to 0.48 with an average of 0.43. These values are slightly lower than those previously obtained for PM2.5 in 2003 and 2006 and reflect a high contribution of fossil CO2 to the carbonaceous matter in aerosols from Mexico City. In contrast, from 2006 to 2012 PM10 increased; EC, Ca, Ti and Fe concentrations remained constant, while OC, TC and K concentrations decreased. The use of potassium as an indicator of biomass burning showed that this source was negligible during this campaign. Combined analytical approaches allowed us to distinguish temporal variations of anthropogenic and natural inputs to the F14C.

  1. Metabolism of (2-14C)acetate and its use in assessing hepatic Krebs cycle activity and gluconeogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Schumann, W.C.; Magnusson, I.; Chandramouli, V.; Kumaran, K.; Wahren, J.; Landau, B.R. )

    1991-04-15

    To examine the fate of the carbons of acetate and to evaluate the usefulness of labeled acetate in assessing intrahepatic metabolic processes during gluconeogenesis, (2-14C)acetate, (2-14C)ethanol, and (1-14C)ethanol were infused into normal subjects fasted 60 h and given phenyl acetate. Distributions of 14C in the carbons of blood glucose and glutamate from urinary phenylacetylglutamine were determined. With (2-14C)acetate and (2-14C)ethanol, carbon 1 of glucose had about twice as much 14C as carbon 3. Carbon 2 of glutamate had about twice as much 14C as carbon 1 and one-half to one-third as much as carbon 4. There was only a small amount in carbon 5. These distributions are incompatible with the metabolism of (2-14C)acetate being primarily in liver. Therefore, (2-14C)acetate cannot be used to study Krebs cycle metabolism in liver and in relationship to gluconeogenesis, as has been done. The distributions can be explained by: (a) fixation of 14CO2 from (2-14C)acetate in the formation of the 14C-labeled glucose and glutamate in liver and (b) the formation of 14C-labeled glutamate in a second site, proposed to be muscle. (1,3-14C)Acetone formation from the (2-14C)acetate does not contribute to the distributions, as evidenced by the absence of 14C in carbons 2-4 of glutamate after (1-14C)ethanol administration.

  2. Radiocarbon evidence for annual growth rings in a deep sea octocoral (Primnoa resedaeformis)

    SciTech Connect

    Sherwood, O A; Scott, D B; Risk, M J; Guilderson, T P

    2005-04-05

    The deep-sea gorgonian octocoral Primnoa resedaeformis is distributed throughout the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans at depths of 65-3200 m. It has a two-part skeleton of calcite and gorgonin. Towards the inside of the axial skeleton gorgonin and calcite are deposited in concentric growth rings, similar to tree rings. Colonies were collected from the Northeast Channel (northwest Atlantic Ocean, southwest of Nova Scotia, Canada) from depths of 250-475 m. Radiocarbon was measured in individual rings isolated from sections of each colony, after dissolution of calcite. Each {Delta}{sup 14}C measurement was paired with a ring age determined by three amateur ring counters. The precision of ring counts averaged better than {+-} 2 years. Accurate reconstruction of 20th century bomb-radiocarbon shows that (1) the growth rings are formed annually, (2) the gorgonin is derived from surface particulate organic matter (POM) and (3) useful environmental data are recorded in the organic endoskeletons of deep-sea octocorals. These results support the use of Primnoa resedaeformis as a long-term, high resolution monitor of surface ocean conditions, particularly in temperate and boreal environments where proxy data are lacking.

  3. Fossil and biogenic CO{sub 2} from waste incineration based on a yearlong radiocarbon study

    SciTech Connect

    Mohn, J.; Szidat, S.; Zeyer, K.; Emmenegger, L.

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Yearlong radiocarbon study on the share of biogenic CO{sub 2} from waste incineration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Direct approach combining temporal integrating gas sampling and {sup 14}CO{sub 2} analysis by AMS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Significant differences between incinerators with 43% and 54%Fos C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer No annual cycle of fossil CO{sub 2} for all, except one, of the included incinerators. - Abstract: We describe the first long-term implementation of the radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) method to study the share of biogenic (%Bio C) and fossil (%Fos C) carbon in combustion CO{sub 2}. At five Swiss incinerators, a total of 24 three-week measurement campaigns were performed over 1 year. Temporally averaged bag samples were analyzed for {sup 14}CO{sub 2} by accelerator mass spectrometry. Significant differences between the plants in the share of fossil CO{sub 2} were observed, with annual mean values from 43.4 {+-} 3.9% to 54.5 {+-} 3.1%. Variations can be explained by the waste composition of the respective plant. Based on our dataset, an average value of 48 {+-} 4%Fos C was determined for waste incineration in Switzerland. No clear annual trend in %Fos C was observed for four of the monitored incinerators, while one incinerator showed considerable variations, which are likely due to the separation and temporary storage of bulky goods.

  4. A comparison of the Greenland Ice-Core and IntCal timescales through the Laschamp geomagnetic excursion, utilising new 14c data from Tenaghi Philippon, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staff, Richard A.; Hardiman, Mark; Bronk Ramsey, Christopher; Koutsodendris, Andreas; Pross, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    Cosmogenic radionuclides, such as 10Be and 14C, share a common production signal, with their formation in the Earth's upper atmosphere modulated by changes to the geomagnetic field, as well as variations in the intensity of the solar wind. Here, we present 54 new 14C measurements from a terrestrial fen peat core extracted from the classical site of Tenaghi Philippon, NE Greece, contiguously spanning the time period between ~48,000 and 39,000 cal. BP. Utilising the most pronounced cosmogenic production peak of the last 100,000 years - that associated with the Laschamp geomagnetic excursion circa 41,000 years ago - we exploit this common production signal, comparing Greenland 10Be with our Tenaghi Philippon 14C record, thereby providing a means to assess the concordance between the radiocarbon (IntCal) and Greenland ice-core (GICC05) timescales themselves for this, the oldest portion of the radiocarbon technique.

  5. Radiocarbon dating of archaeological samples (sambaqui) using CO(2) absorption and liquid scintillation spectrometry of low background radiation.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Maria Lúcia T G; Godoy, José M; da Cruz, Rosana P; Perez, Rhoneds A R

    2006-01-01

    Sambaqui means, in the Tupi language, a hill of shells. The sambaquis are archaeological sites with remains of pre-historical Brazilian occupation. Since the sambaqui sites in the Rio de Janeiro state region are older than 10,000 years, the applicability of CO(2) absorption on Carbo-sorb and (14)C determination by counting on a low background liquid scintillation counter was tested. In the present work, sambaqui shells were treated with H(3)PO(4) in a closed vessel in order to generate CO(2). The produced CO(2) was absorbed on Carbo-sorb. On saturation about 0.6g of carbon, as CO(2), was mixed with commercial liquid scintillation cocktail (Permafluor), and the (14)C activity determined by counting on a low background counter, Packard Tricarb 3170 TR/SL, for a period of 1000 mins to enable detection of a radiocarbon age of 22,400 BP. But only samples with ages up to 3500 BP were submitted to the method because the samples had been collected in the municipality of Guapimirim, in archaeological sambaqui-type sites belonging to this age range. The same samples were sent to the (14)C Laboratory of the Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP) where similar results were obtained.

  6. Cross-checking groundwater age by 4He and 14C dating in a granite, Tono area, central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Takuma; Nakata, Kotaro; Tomioka, Yuichi; Goto, Kazuyuki; Kashiwaya, Koki; Hama, Katsuhiro; Iwatsuki, Teruki; Kunimaru, Takanori; Takeda, Masaki

    2016-11-01

    Groundwater dating was performed simultaneously by the 4He and 14C methods in granite of the Tono area in central Japan. Groundwater was sampled at 30 packed-off sections of six 1000-m boreholes. 4He concentrations increased and 14C concentrations decreased along a groundwater flow path on a topographic gradient. 4He ages were calculated by using the in situ 4He production rate derived from the porosity, density, and U and Th content of the rock, neglecting external flux. 14C ages were calculated with a noncorrected model in which the initial 14C content was 100 percent of the modern radiocarbon level (Co = 100 pmC), a statistical model using the average 14C content of tritium-bearing samples (Co = 46.4 pmC), and a δ13C model based on the isotopic mass balance. Although the absolute 14C ages calculated by the models were different, the relative 14C ages were almost identical. The relative 14C ages were considered reliable because dissolved inorganic carbon has no significant geochemical reactions in granite. The relation between the 4He ages and the noncorrected 14C ages was [4He age] = 1.15 [14C age] + 7200 (R2 = 0.81), except in the discharge area. The slope of this relation was equivalent to unity, which indicates that the 4He accumulation rate is confirmed by the relative 14C ages. Moreover, the accumulated 3He/4He ratio was equivalent to that derived from the 6Li(α,n)3H reaction in granite. These results show that the accumulated He is of crustal origin, produced in situ without external flux, except in the discharge area. The intercept value of 7200 a implies that the 14C concentrations were diluted due to geochemical reactions. Tritium-bearing samples supported this result. Simultaneous measurements make it feasible to estimate the accumulation rate of 4He and initial dilution of 14C, which cannot be done with a single method. Cross-checking groundwater dating has the potential to provide more reliable groundwater ages. The circulation time of the

  7. Marine radiocarbon reservoir age simulations for the past 50000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butzin, Martin; Köhler, Peter; Lohmann, Gerrit

    2016-04-01

    We present simulations of marine radiocarbon reservoir ages using the ocean general circulation model LSG-HAMOCC2s, and evaluate the results with Marine13 raw data records. Our model considers various climatic background states. Radiocarbon cycle boundary conditions are atmospheric Δ14C values according to IntCal13, a recent atmospheric CO2 reconstruction, and spatially variable concentrations of dissolved inorganic carbon derived from marine carbon cycle simulations. Our model reasonably agrees with glacial marine Δ14C records but indicates reservoir ages varying with time, different to the invariant reservoir age corrections applied to the observations and to Marine13. Modelled global-mean reservoir ages are in the range 400-800 years compared to the invariant Marine13 value of 405 years. Self-consistent simulations involving the Cariaco Basin record (which is the most continuous marine record contributing to IntCal13 for periods prior to about 30 kyears) amplify the temporal reservoir age variability with global-mean values of about 350-850 years, and improve the agreement with Δ14C observations in some areas.

  8. Relative sea-level trends along the coast of Maine during the past 5,000 [sup 14]C years

    SciTech Connect

    Gehrels, W.R.; Belknap, D.F. . Dept. of Geological Sciences); Kelley, J.T. ); Gong, B.; Pearce, B.R. . Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1993-03-01

    Holocene differential crustal movements in coastal regions are best inferred by comparing slopes of relative sea-level curves from different coastal localities. Sea-level indicators must have a narrow vertical range that is precisely established in the modern environment. Their age must be determined with the highest degree of certainty; Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) [sup 14]C dating of very small samples minimizes the changes of mixing older and younger materials. Finally, when indicators not related to Mean Tide Level are used, a correction should be applied to account for changes in paleotidal range. This study reports on sea-level chronologies from three salt marshes along the coast of Maine: Well(43[degree]17 minutes N, 70[degree]34 minutes W), Phippsburg (43[degree]45 minutes N, 69[degree]49 minutes W), and Machiasport (44[degree]41 minutes N, 67[degree]24 minutes W). Radiocarbon dates number 44 for Wells (23 new: 7 conventional basal, 2 AMS basal), 21 for Phippsburg (11 new: 5 conventional basal, 3 AMS basal), and 11 for Machiasport (all new: 7 conventional basal, 4 AMS basal). All newly collected [sup 14]C samples were analyzed for associated foraminiferal assemblages. These fossil assemblages were then compared with the modern vertical zonation of salt marsh foraminifera that was established along transects in each marsh. In agreement with earlier studies from Nova Scotia marshes, a 100% Trochammina macrescens zone occurs within a narrow (20 cm) vertical range along the edge of the marshes in Maine (level of Highest High Water). In addition, Tiphotrocha comprimata is abundantly observed in a 30 cm vertical zone between Mean High Water (MHW) and Mean Higher High Water. After elevations of sea-level indicators were adjusted to a common datum (MHW), a final correction was applied to account for changes in tidal range using a numerical tidal model for the Gulf of Maine.

  9. Groundwater residence time and palaeohydrology in the Otway Basin, South Australia: 2H, 18O and 14C data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, A. J.; Herczeg, A. L.; Leaney, F. W.; Stadter, M. F.; Dighton, J. C.; Armstrong, D.

    1994-01-01

    Stable isotopes (δ 2H, δ 18O and δ 13C) and radiocarbon ( 14C) have been used in conjunction with chemical data to evaluate recharge mechanisms, groundwater residence time and palaeohydrology within the confined Dilwyn sand aquifer in the Gambier Embayment of the Otway Basin. This aquifer does not receive recharge down-gradient of the hydraulic hinge-line and data have been interpreted along two discrete flow lines. The mean residence time of groundwater (determined by 14C) in the confined aquifer from the hydraulic hinge position to the sea (a distance of about 50 km) along an inferred flow path is approximately 12 800 years. The corresponding hydraulic travel time calculated from Darcy's law is approximately 49 000 years. The apparent discrepancy may be a result of eustatic sea-level lowering during the last glacial. Because the groundwater system is hydraulically connected to the sea, lower sea-level would result in increased gradients and a decrease in groundwater residence time. Variations in stable isotopic composition along flow lines suggest a number of recharge mechanisms. Stable isotope data indicate progressive depletion of 2H and 18O in the groundwaters over the past 30 000 years. Groundwaters older than about 10 000 years B.P. were recharged either during a cooler climate climatic regime (lower precipitation/evapotranspiration and temperature) and/or the vapour source(s) had travelled over greater continental mass than those recharged over the past 10 000 years. Lower chloride concentrations in some of the older groundwaters indicate lower evapotranspiration rates in the recharge areas before 10 000 years ago.

  10. Absorption, tissue distribution, and elimination of residues after 2,4,6-trinitro[14C]toluene administration to sheep.

    PubMed

    Smith, D J; Craig, A M; Duringer, J M; Chaney, R L

    2008-04-01

    The compound 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) is a persistent contaminant of some industrial and military sites. Biological bioremediation techniques typically rely on the immobilization of TNT reduction products rather than on TNT mineralization. We hypothesized that sheep ruminal microbes would be suitable for TNT destruction after phytoremediation of TNT-contaminated soils by cool-season grasses. Therefore we investigated the fate of [14C]TNT in ruminating sheep to determine the utility of ruminant animals as a portion of the bioremediation process. Three wether sheep were dosed with 35.5 mg each of dietary unlabeled TNT for 21 consecutive days. On day 22 sheep (41.9 +/- 3.0 kg) were orally dosed with 35.5 mg of [14C]TNT (129 microCi; 99.1% radiochemical purity). Blood, urine, and feces were collected at regular intervals for 72 h. At slaughter, tissues were quantitatively collected. Tissues and blood were analyzed for total radioactive residues (TRR); excreta were analyzed for TRR, bound residues, and TNT metabolites. Plasma radioactivity peaked within 1 h of dosing and was essentially depleted within 18 h. Approximately 76% of the radiocarbon was excreted in feces, 17% in urine, with 5% being retained in the gastrointestinal tract and 1% retained in tissues. Parent TNT, dinitroamino metabolites, and diaminonitro metabolites were not detected in excreta. Ruminal and fecal radioactivity was essentially nonextractable using ethyl acetate, acetone, and methanol; covalent binding of fecal radioactive residues was evenly distributed among extractable organic molecules (i.e., soluble organic matter, soluble carbohydrate, protein, lipid, and nucleic acid fractions) and undigested fibers (cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin). This study demonstrated that TNT reduction within the ruminant gastrointestinal tract leads to substantial immobilization of residues to organic matter, a fate similar to TNT in other strongly reducing environments. PMID:18504997

  11. Status of mass spectrometric radiocarbon detection at ETHZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiler, Martin; Maxeiner, Sascha; Wacker, Lukas; Synal, Hans-Arno

    2015-10-01

    A prototype of a mass spectrometric radiocarbon detection instrument without accelerator stage was built for the first time and set into operation at ETH Zurich. The system is designed as an experimental platform to optimize performance of 14C detection at low ion energies and to study the most relevant processes that may limit system performance. The optimized stripper unit incorporates differential pumping to maintain a low gas outflow and a revised tube design to better match the phase space volume of the ion beam at low energies. The system is fully operational and has demonstrated true radiocarbon dating capabilities. The overall beam transmission through the stripper tube is about 40% for the 1+ charge state. Radiocarbon analyses with an overall precision of 0.6% were obtained on a single sample under regular measurement conditions. By analyzing multiple targets of the same sample material an uncertainty level of 0.3% has been reached. The background level corresponds to a radiocarbon age of 40,000 years.

  12. Enhancing sample preparation capabilities for accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon and radiocalcium studies

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R E

    1991-08-20

    With support provided by the LLNL Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Laboratory, the UCR Radiocarbon Laboratory continued its studies involving sample pretreatment and target preparation for both AMS radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) and radiocalcium ({sup 41}Ca) involving applications to archaeologically -- and paleoanthropologically- related samples. With regard to AMS {sup 14}C-related studies, we have extended the development of a series of procedures which have, as their initial goal, the capability to combust several hundred microgram amounts of a chemically-pretreated organic sample and convert the resultant CO{sub 2} to graphitic carbon which will consistently yield relatively high {sup 13}C{sup {minus}} ion currents and blanks which will yield, on a consistent basis, {sup 14}C count rates at or below 0.20% modern, giving an 2 sigma age limit of >50,000 yr BP.

  13. Radiocarbon pollution and self-purification of humus in chernozems of the East-European plain in 1900-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, I. V.; Khokhlova, O. S.; Galitskii, V. V.; Chichagova, O. A.; Zazovskaya, E. P.

    2012-08-01

    The dynamics of the 14C content in the humus of chernozems in 1900-2008 are considered. The elevated 14C content in the atmosphere because of nuclear weapons tests has led to the contamination of humus with bomb radiocarbon. In 1966-1968, the 14C reserves in the profiles of chernozems exceeded the background ones by 15%; in 1978, by 12%; and, in 1998, by 2%. By the year of 2008, its reserves became equal to the background ones. The 14C distribution along the soil profiles changed. By 1978, the 0- to 30-cm-thick soil layer became free from radiocarbon due to its self-purification; however, at depths of 40-70 and 100-115 cm, its weak accumulation was registered. By 2008, the whole soil profile was free from 14C. The main mechanism of the soil self-purification from radiocarbon is suggested to be the constant substitution of fragments of humus compound structures for those of fresh organic matter entering the soils with the 14C content being in equilibrium with the atmospheric one, i.e., due to the renewal of the carbon in the humus. The rate of the carbon renewal and its migration in the soils are assed based on the 14C concentrations in the humus.

  14. At the end of the 14C time scale--the Middle to Upper Paleolithic record of western Eurasia.

    PubMed

    Jöris, Olaf; Street, Martin

    2008-11-01

    The dynamics of change underlying the demographic processes that led to the replacement of Neandertals by Anatomically Modern Humans (AMH) and the emergence of what are recognized as Upper Paleolithic technologies and behavior can only be understood with reference to the underlying chronological framework. This paper examines the European chronometric (mainly radiocarbon-based) record for the period between ca. 40 and 30 ka 14C BP and proposes a relatively rapid transition within some 2,500 years. This can be summarized in the following falsifiable hypotheses: (1) final Middle Paleolithic (FMP) "transitional" industries (Uluzzian, Chatelperronian, leaf-point industries) were made by Neandertals and date predominantly to between ca. 41 and 38 ka 14C BP, but not younger than 35/34 ka 14C BP; (2) initial (IUP) and early (EUP) Upper Paleolithic "transitional" industries (Bachokirian, Bohunician, Protoaurignacian, Kostenki 14) will date to between ca. 39/38 and 35 ka 14C BP and document the appearance of AMH in Europe; (3) the earliest Aurignacian (I) appears throughout Europe quasi simultaneously at ca. 35 ka 14C BP. The earliest appearance of figurative art is documented only for a later phase ca. 33.0/32.5-29.2 ka 14C BP. Taken together, the Middle to Upper Paleolithic transition appears to be a cumulative process involving the acquisition of different elements of "behavioral modernity" through several "stages of innovation."

  15. Disposition of /sup 14/C tolrestat in laboratory animals and man

    SciTech Connect

    Ferdinandi, E.S.; Hicks, D.R.; Cayen, M.N.

    1986-03-01

    The disposition of the aldose reductase inhibitor tolrestat (T) was determined in the mouse, rat, dog, assemensis monkey, and man. Serum T and radioactivity ratios, and % of dose excreted after p.o. administration of /sup 14/C-T at a dose of 10 mk/kg (100 mg to man), are presented. Except for the rat and monkey, 55 to 95% of the urinary /sup 14/C was due to T and oxo-tolrestat (oxo-T, N-((5-(trifluoromethyl)-6-methoxy-1-napthalenyl)oxo-methyl)-N-methylglycine). Oxo-T is formed, in part, non-enzymatically from T; a potential intermediate in this transformation was detected in all the urine samples. In man and monkey, about 15% and 68%, respectively, of the urinary /sup 14/C was due to T-glucuronide. In rat urine, >90% of the /sup 14/C was due to polar metabolites; in bile, about 66% of the /sup 14/C was due to T. The composition of the serum /sup 14/C in the mouse and rat was determined. In conclusion, /sup 14/C-T was rapidly and well absorbed by all species. Except for the rat and dog, urine was the main excretion route for /sup 14/C. Urine/sup 14/ comprised mainly T, t-glucuronide of oxo-T in all the species except the rat.

  16. Strong carbon release from the deep ocean induced a major atmospheric 14C drop over Heinrich Stadial 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarnthein, M.; Grootes, P. M.; Schneider, B.

    2012-12-01

    Using the modern global distributions of apparent 14C ventilation ages and DIC we established a transfer function to trace past changes in the carbon storage of ocean waters >2000 m water depth. On this basis we concluded that the LGM carbon inventory was approximately 730-980 Gt larger than during pre-industrial times. This amount compares well with an estimated glacial transfer of 530-700 Gt from both the atmosphere and terrestrial biosphere in addition to a major DIC relocation from ocean intermediate waters. We consider that the LGM atmosphere contained 190 ppm CO2 (~375 Gt C) with a 14C concentration 1.4 times higher than that of the standard modern atmosphere (fMC) (Reimer et al. 2009). The LGM deep ocean had an average reservoir age of 2100 yr, which means that its 14C concentration was 0.77 times that of the LGM atmosphere, 1.08 times that of the modern atmosphere (fMC). During the subsequent early deglac¬ial Heinrich Stadial 1, a large portion of this 14C depleted carbon was released to the atmosphere and terrestrial biosphere (Monnin et al. 2001; Ciais et al. 2012). Our estimates suggest that the ocean-atmosphere exchange, producing this deglacial transfer of deep-ocean carbon, was sufficient to account for a 190-permil drop in atmospheric 14C. Thus an alleged major 'mystery' of last deglacial times, the source of 14C-depleted additional atmospheric carbon, appears solved. -- Ciais, P., Tagliabue, A., Cuntz, M., Bopp, L., et al. (2012), Large inert carbon pool in the terrestrial biosphere during the Last Glacial Maximum. Nature Geoscience 5, 74-79. Monnin, E., et al. (2001), Atmospheric CO2 concentrations over the last glacial termination. Science 291, 112-114. Reimer, P., et al. (2009), INTCAL09 and MARINE09 radiocarbon age calibration curves, 0-50,000 years cal. BP. Radiocarbon 51, 1111-1150.

  17. Sources and transport of Δ14C in CO2 within the Mexico City Basin and vicinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vay, S. A.; Tyler, S. C.; Choi, Y.; Blake, D. R.; Blake, N. J.; Sachse, G. W.; Diskin, G. S.; Singh, H. B.

    2009-07-01

    Radiocarbon samples taken over Mexico City and the surrounding region during the MILAGRO field campaign in March 2006 exhibited an unexpected distribution: (1) relatively few samples (23%) were below the North American free tropospheric background value (57±2‰) despite the fossil fuel emissions from one of the world's most highly polluted environments; and (2) frequent enrichment well above the background value was observed. Correlate source tracer species and air transport characteristics were examined to elucidate influences on the radiocarbon distribution. Our analysis suggests that a combination of radiocarbon sources biased the "regional radiocarbon background" above the North American value thereby decreasing the apparent fossil fuel signature. Likely sources include the release of 14C-enhanced carbon from bomb 14C sequestered in plant carbon pools via the ubiquitous biomass burning in the region as well as the direct release of radiocarbon as CO2 from other "hot" sources. Plausible perturbations from local point "hot" sources include the burning of hazardous waste in cement kilns; medical waste incineration; and emissions from the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant. These observations provide insight into the use of Δ14CO2 to constrain fossil fuel emissions in the megacity environment, indicating that underestimation of the fossil fuel contribution to the CO2 flux is likely wherever biomass burning coexists with urban emissions and is unaccounted for as a source of the elevated CO2 observed above local background. Our findings increase the complexity required to quantify fossil fuel-derived CO2 in source-rich environments characteristic of megacities, and have implications for the use of Δ14CO2 observations in evaluating bottom-up emission inventories and their reliability as a tool for validating national emission claims of CO2 within the framework of the Kyoto Protocol.

  18. Autoradiographic disposition of (1-methyl-/sup 14/C)- and (2-/sup 14/C)caffeine in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lachance, M.P.; Marlowe, C.; Waddell, W.J.

    1983-11-01

    Male, C57B1/6J mice received either (1-methyl-14C)caffeine or (2-14C)caffeine via the tail vein at a dose of 0.7 or 11 mg/kg, respectively. At 0.1, 0.33, 1, 3, 9, and 24 hr after treatment, the mice were anesthetized with ether and frozen by immersion in dry ice/hexane. The mice were processed for whole-body autoradiography by the Ullberg technique; this procedure does not allow thawing or contact with solvents. All autoradiographs revealed some retention of radioactivity at early time intervals in the lacrimal glands, seminal vesicle fluid, nasal and olfactory epithelium, and retinal melanocytes. The remaining portion of the animal was densitometrically uniform except for the lower levels noted in the CNS and adipose tissues. Excretion of radioactivity by the liver and kidneys seems to be the major routes of elimination. Localization in the liver at late time intervals was confined principally to the centrilobular region. Late sites of retention, observed only after (1-methyl-14C)caffeine administration, included the pancreas, minor and major salivary glands, splenic red pulp, thymal cortex, bone marrow, and gastrointestinal epithelium. Sites of localization present in both studies included the olfactory epithelium, lacrimal glands, hair follicles, and retinal melanocytes. Further studies are needed to determine whether the localization at these various sites is due to metabolic degradation, active transport, or possibly a specific receptor interaction.

  19. Comparative radiocarbon dating of terrestrial plant macrofossils and aquatic moss from the ice-free corridor of western Canada

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, G.M.; Beukens, R.P.; Kieser, W.E.; Vitt, D.H.

    1987-09-01

    In order to assess the reliability of aquatic moss for radiocarbon dating, /sup 14/C analyses were performed on a stratigraphic series of terrestrial plant macrofossils and samples of Drepanocladus crassicostatus from a small, hard-water lake (pH = 8.2) in the ice-free corridor of Alberta. All /sup 14/C dating was done by using accelerator mass spectrometry. Mazama Ash provided an independent chronological control. The aquatic bryophyte samples consistently produced /sup 14/C ages significantly older than the terrestrial macrofossils. The relation between the radiocarbon dates from the macrofossils and the moss was not linear, and age differences ranged from approximately 1400 to 6400 yr. The /sup 14/C content of D. crassicostatus growing in the lake at present was less than 85% modern. Despite the apparent inability to take up /sup 14/C-deficient carbon by the direct incorporation of bicarbonate, the bryophytes clearly do not provide reliable material /sup 14/C dating. The /sup 14/C deficiency of aquatic mosses may be explained by the generation of /sup 14/C-deficient CO/sub 2/ through isotopic exchange, the formation of CO/sub 2/ from bicarbonate by chemical processes, and metabolic CO/sub 2/ production. These results demonstrate the potential unreliability of /sup 14/C dates from aquatic mosses and raise serious concerns about the deglaciation dates from the ice-free corridor that were obtained from aquatic Drepanocladus.

  20. Reconciling Change in Oi-Horizon 14C With Mass Loss for an Oak Forest

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, P J; Swanston, C W; Garten, Jr., C T; Todd, D E; Trumbore, S E

    2005-06-27

    First-year litter decomposition was estimated for an upland-oak forest ecosystem using enrichment or dilution of the {sup 14}C-signature of the Oi-horizon. These isotopically-based mass-loss estimates were contrasted with measured mass-loss rates from past litterbag studies. Mass-loss derived from changes in the {sup 14}C-signature of the Oi-horizon suggested mean mass loss over 9 months of 45% which was higher than the corresponding 9-month rate extrapolated from litterbag studies ({approx}35%). Greater mass loss was expected from the isotopic approach because litterbags are known to limit mass loss processes driven by soil macrofauna (e.g., fragmentation and comminution). Although the {sup 14}C-isotope approach offers the advantage of being a non-invasive method, it exhibited high variability that undermined its utility as an alternative to routine litterbag mass loss methods. However, the {sup 14}C approach measures the residence time of C in the leaf litter, rather than the time it takes for leaves to disappear; hence radiocarbon measures are subject to C immobilization and recycling in the microbial pool, and do not necessarily reflect results from litterbag mass loss. The commonly applied two-compartment isotopic mixing model was appropriate for estimating decomposition from isotopic enrichment of near-background soils, but it produced divergent results for isotopic dilution of a multi-layered system with litter cohorts having independent {sup 14}C-signatures. This discrepancy suggests that cohort-based models are needed to adequately capture the complex processes involved in carbon transport associated with litter mass-loss. Such models will be crucial for predicting intra- and interannual differences in organic horizon decomposition driven by scenarios of climatic change.

  1. On the isolation of OC and EC and the optimal strategy of radiocarbon-based source apportionment of carbonaceous aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. L.; Perron, N.; Ciobanu, V. G.; Zotter, P.; Minguillón, M. C.; Wacker, L.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.; Szidat, S.

    2012-11-01

    Radiocarbon (14C) measurements of elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC) separately (as opposed to only total carbon, TC) allow an unambiguous quantification of their non-fossil and fossil sources and represent an improvement in carbonaceous aerosol source apportionment. Isolation of OC and EC for accurate 14C determination requires complete removal of interfering fractions with maximum recovery. The optimal strategy for 14C-based source apportionment of carbonaceous aerosols should follow an approach to subdivide TC into different carbonaceous aerosol fractions for individual 14C analyses, as these fractions may differ in their origins. To evaluate the extent of positive and negative artefacts during OC and EC separation, we performed sample preparation with a commercial Thermo-Optical OC/EC Analyser (TOA) by monitoring the optical properties of the sample during the thermal treatments. Extensive attention has been devoted to the set-up of TOA conditions, in particular, heating program and choice of carrier gas. Based on different types of carbonaceous aerosols samples, an optimised TOA protocol (Swiss_4S) with four steps is developed to minimise the charring of OC, the premature combustion of EC and thus artefacts of 14C-based source apportionment of EC. For the isolation of EC for 14C analysis, the water-extraction treatment on the filter prior to any thermal treatment is an essential prerequisite for subsequent radiocarbon measurements; otherwise the non-fossil contribution may be overestimated due to the positive bias from charring. The Swiss_4S protocol involves the following consecutive four steps (S1, S2, S3 and S4): (1) S1 in pure oxygen (O2) at 375 °C for separation of OC for untreated filters and water-insoluble organic carbon (WINSOC) for water-extracted filters; (2) S2 in O2 at 475 °C followed by (3) S3 in helium (He) at 650 °C, aiming at complete OC removal before EC isolation and leading to better consistency with thermal-optical protocols

  2. On the isolation of OC and EC and the optimal strategy of radiocarbon-based source apportionment of carbonaceous aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. L.; Perron, N.; Ciobanu, V. G.; Zotter, P.; Minguillón, M. C.; Wacker, L.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.; Szidat, S.

    2012-07-01

    Radiocarbon (14C) measurements of elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC) separately (as opposed to only total carbon, TC) allow an unambiguous quantification of their non-fossil and fossil sources and represent an improvement in carbonaceous aerosol source apportionment. Isolation of OC and EC for accurate 14C determination requires complete removal of interfering fractions with maximum recovery. To evaluate the extent of positive and negative artefacts during OC and EC separation, we performed sample preparation with a commercial Thermo-Optical OC/EC Analyser (TOA) by monitoring the optical properties of the sample during the thermal treatments. Extensive attention has been devoted to the set-up of TOA conditions, in particular, heating program and choice of carrier gas. Based on different types of carbonaceous aerosols samples, an optimised TOA protocol (Swiss_4S) with four steps is developed to minimise the charring of OC, the premature combustion of EC and thus artefacts of 14C-based source apportionment of EC. For the isolation of EC for 14C analysis, the water-extraction treatment on the filter prior to any thermal treatment is an essential prerequisite for subsequent radiocarbon; otherwise the non-fossil contribution may be overestimated due to the positive bias from charring. The Swiss_4S protocol involves the following consecutive four steps (S1, S2, S3 and S4): (1) S1 in pure oxygen (O2) at 375 °C for separation of OC for untreated filters, and water-insoluble organic carbon (WINSOC) for water-extracted filters; (2) S2 in O2 at 475 °C, followed by (3) S3 in helium (He) at 650 °C, aiming at complete OC removal before EC isolation and leading to better consistency with thermal-optical protocols like EUSAAR_2, compared to pure oxygen methods; and (4) S4 in O2 at 760 °C for recovery of the remaining EC. WINSOC was found to have a significantly higher fossil contribution than the water-soluble OC (WSOC). Moreover, the experimental results

  3. Bottom sediments of the Caspian Sea and Dnepr-Bug Liman with the use of radiocarbon analysis data

    SciTech Connect

    Karpychev, Yu.A.

    1987-11-01

    On the basis of the age determinations obtained they can judge the arrival of /sup 14/C and its distribution in sediments of the Caspian Sea and Dnepr-Bug liman. The age of the organic material being removed by rivers is 1500-2700 years for the Kura and Terek Rivers and 950-1200 years for the Dnepr and Southern Bug Rivers. The age of the carbonate of the Kura and Terek is in the range 13,000-14,000 years. The difference in the results of determining the age from the organic and carbonate fractions indicates the presence of a terrigenous component in the sediments. Slump phenomena and abrasion of the shores have a considerable effect on the distribution of radiocarbon in sediments. Despite the complexity of the process of sedimentogenesis, dating over the section makes it possible to calculate the sedimentation rates.

  4. Coral radiocarbon records of Indian Ocean water mass mixing and wind-induced upwelling along the coast of Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grumet, N. S.; Abram, N. J.; Beck, J. W.; Dunbar, R. B.; Gagan, M. K.; Guilderson, T. P.; Hantoro, W. S.; Suwargadi, B. W.

    2004-05-01

    Radiocarbon (14C) in the skeletal aragonite of annually banded corals track radiocarbon concentrations in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in surface seawater. As a result of nuclear weapons testing in the 1950s, oceanic uptake of excess 14C in the atmosphere has increased the contrast between surface and deep ocean 14C concentrations. We present accelerator mass spectrometric (AMS) measurements of 14C/12C ratios (Δ14C) in Porites corals from the Mentawai Islands, Sumatra (0°S, 98°E) and Watamu, Kenya (3°S, 39°E) to document the temporal and spatial evolution of the 14C zonal gradient in the tropical Indian Ocean. The rise in Δ14C in the Sumatra coral, in response to the maximum in nuclear weapons testing, is delayed by 2-3 years relative to the rise in coral Δ14C from the coast of Kenya. Kenya coral Δ14C values rise quickly because surface waters are in prolonged contact with the atmosphere. In contrast, wind-induced upwelling and rapid mixing along the coast of Sumatra entrains 14C-depleted water from the subsurface, which dilutes the effect of the uptake of bomb-produced 14C by the surface ocean. Bimonthly AMS Δ14C measurements on the Mentawai coral reveal mainly interannual variability with minor seasonal variability. Singular spectrum analysis of the Sumatra coral Δ14C record reveals a significant 3-year periodicity. These results lend support to the concept that interannual variability in Indian Ocean upwelling and sea surface temperatures is related to ENSO-like teleconnections over the Indo-Pacific basin.

  5. Measurement of biocarbon in flue gases using 14C

    SciTech Connect

    Haemaelaeinen, K.M.; Jungner, H.; Antson, O.; Rasanen, J.; Tormonen, K.; Roine, J.

    2007-07-01

    A preliminary investigation of the biocarbon fraction in carbon dioxide emissions of power plants using both fossil- and biobased fuels is presented. Calculation of the biocarbon fraction is based on radiocarbon content measured in power plant flue gases. Samples were collected directly from the chimneys into plastic sampling bags. The C-14 content in CO{sub 2} was measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Flue gases from power plants that use natural gas, coal, wood chips, bark, plywood residue, sludge from the pulp factory, peat, and recovered fuel were measured. Among the selected plants, there was one that used only fossil fuel and one that used only biofuel; the other investigated plants burned mixtures of fuels. The results show that C-14 measurement provides the possibility to determine the ratio of bio and fossil fuel burned in power plants.

  6. Sun, Ocean, Nuclear Bombs, and Fossil Fuels: Radiocarbon Variations and Implications for High-Resolution Dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Koushik

    2016-06-01

    Radiocarbon, or 14C, is a radiometric dating method ideally suited for providing a chronological framework in archaeology and geosciences for timescales spanning the last 50,000 years. 14C is easily detectable in most common natural organic materials and has a half-life (5,730±40 years) relevant to these timescales. 14C produced from large-scale detonations of nuclear bombs between the 1950s and the early 1960s can be used for dating modern organic materials formed after the 1950s. Often these studies demand high-resolution chronology to resolve ages within a few decades to less than a few years. Despite developments in modern, high-precision 14C analytical methods, the applicability of 14C in high-resolution chronology is limited by short-term variations in atmospheric 14C in the past. This article reviews the roles of the principal natural drivers (e.g., solar magnetic activity and ocean circulation) and the anthropogenic perturbations (e.g., fossil fuel CO2 and 14C from nuclear and thermonuclear bombs) that are responsible for short-term 14C variations in the environment. Methods and challenges of high-resolution 14C dating are discussed.

  7. Factors determining the stability, size distribution, and cellular accumulation of small, monodisperse chitosan nanoparticles as candidate vectors for anticancer drug delivery: application to the passive encapsulation of [14C]-doxorubicin

    PubMed Central

    Masarudin, Mas Jaffri; Cutts, Suzanne M; Evison, Benny J; Phillips, Don R; Pigram, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    Development of parameters for the fabrication of nanosized vectors is pivotal for its successful administration in therapeutic applications. In this study, homogeneously distributed chitosan nanoparticles (CNPs) with diameters as small as 62 nm and a polydispersity index (PDI) of 0.15 were synthesized and purified using a simple, robust method that was highly reproducible. Nanoparticles were synthesized using modified ionic gelation of the chitosan polymer with sodium tripolyphosphate. Using this method, larger aggregates were mechanically isolated from single particles in the nanoparticle population by selective efficient centrifugation. The presence of disaggregated monodisperse nanoparticles was confirmed using atomic force microscopy. Factors such as anions, pH, and concentration were found to affect the size and stability of nanoparticles directly. The smallest nanoparticle population was ∼62 nm in hydrodynamic size, with a low PDI of 0.15, indicating high particle homogeneity. CNPs were highly stable and retained their monodisperse morphology in serum-supplemented media in cell culture conditions for up to 72 hours, before slowly degrading over 6 days. Cell viability assays demonstrated that cells remained viable following a 72-hour exposure to 1 mg/mL CNPs, suggesting that the nanoparticles are well tolerated and highly suited for biomedical applications. Cellular uptake studies using fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled CNPs showed that cancer cells readily accumulate the nanoparticles 30 minutes posttreatment and that nanoparticles persisted within cells for up to 24 hours posttreatment. As a proof of principle for use in anticancer therapeutic applications, a [14C]-radiolabeled form of the anticancer agent doxorubicin was efficiently encapsulated within the CNP, confirming the feasibility of using this system as a drug delivery vector. PMID:26715842

  8. Terrestrial model food chain and environmental chemicals. I. Transfer of sodium (/sup 14/C)pentachlorophenate between springtails and carabids

    SciTech Connect

    Gruttke, H.; Kratz, W.; Weigmann, G.; Haque, A.

    1988-06-01

    A model soil food chain of a ruderal ecosystem has been constructed in order to study the uptake, transfer, and accumulation of (/sup 14/C)pentachlorophenate (PCP-Na). The model was based on three food levels, viz. baker's yeast, collembola, and carabid beetles, and the contaminant chemical introduced was via initial food. Continuous exposure of the organisms to the test chemical resulted in a significant uptake and transfer of radiocarbon into the food chain elements. Bioaccumulation of radiocarbon in the body tissues of the organisms was low, as large amounts taken up were quickly eliminated through the excrements. The radiocarbon level of prey animals was about 100 times higher than that of their predators, but there was only small difference in concentration between collembolas and yeast. This was probably because of a faster excretion of the chemical by the beetles than by the collembolas. During the test period no conversion of (/sup 14/C)PCP-Na took place in the yeast, but the collembolas and beetles metabolized 50 and 59%, respectively. Criteria are proposed for successful implementation of food chain models.

  9. New biomedical applications of radiocarbon

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.C.

    1990-12-01

    The potential of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and radiocarbon in biomedical applications is being investigated by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). A measurement of the dose-response curve for DNA damage caused by a carcinogen in mouse liver cells was an initial experiment. This demonstrated the sensitivity and utility of AMS for detecting radiocarbon tags and led to numerous follow-on experiments. The initial experiment and follow-on experiments are discussed in this report. 12 refs., 4 figs. (SM)

  10. Disposition and metabolism of 2,3-[14C]dichloropropene in rats after inhalation.

    PubMed

    Bond, J A; Medinsky, M A; Dutcher, J S; Henderson, R F; Cheng, Y S; Mewhinney, J A; Birnbaum, L S

    1985-03-30

    2,3-Dichloropropene (2,3-DCP) is a constituent of some commercially available preplant soil fumigants for the control of plant parasitic nematodes. Human exposure potential exists during manufacture of the chemicals or during bulk handling activities. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the disposition and metabolism of 2,3-[14C]DCP in rats after inhalation. Male Fischer-344 rats were exposed nose-only to a vapor concentration of 250 nmol 2,3-[14C]DCP/liter air (7.5 ppm; 25 degrees C, 620 Torr) for 6 hr. Blood samples were taken during exposure, and urine, feces, expired air, and tissues were collected for up to 65 hr after exposure. Urinary excretion was the major route of elimination of 14C (55% of estimated absorbed 2,3-DCP). Half-time for elimination of 14C in urine was 9.8 +/- 0.05 hr (means +/- SE). Half-time for elimination of 14C feces (17% of absorbed 2,3-DCP) was 12.9 +/- 0.14 hr (means +/- SE). Approximately 1 and 3% of the estimated absorbed 2,3-[14C]DCP were exhaled as either 2,3-[14C]DCP or 14CO2, respectively. Concentrations of 14C in blood increased during 240 min of exposure, after which no further increases in blood concentration of 14C were seen. 14C was widely distributed in tissues analyzed after a 6-hr exposure of rats to 2,3-[14C]DCP. Urinary bladder (150 nmol/g), nasal turbinates (125 nmol/g), kidneys (84 nmol/g), small intestine (61 nmol/g), and liver (35 nmol/g) were tissues with the highest concentrations of 14C immediately after exposure. Over 90% of the 14C in tissues analyzed was 2,3-DCP metabolites. Half-times for elimination of 14C from tissues examined ranged from 3 to 11 hr. The data from this study indicate that after inhalation 2,3-DCP is metabolized in tissues and readily excreted.

  11. Using accelerator mass spectrometry for radiocarbon dating of textiles

    SciTech Connect

    Jull, A.J.T.

    1997-12-01

    Since 1981 we have operated an NSF Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) Facility at the University of Arizona. The AMS method allows us to use very small samples of carbon, <1 mg for radiocarbon dating in contrast to earlier counting techniques. This has opened a vast array of applications of radiocarbon dating that was difficult to do before AMS because of sample size limitations of decay counting. Some of the many applications of AMS include paleoclimatic studies, archaeological research and the age of first settlement of North America by man, dating of art works and artifacts, fall times and terrestrial residence ages of meteorites, production of {sup 14}C in lunar samples by galactic and solar cosmic rays, studies of in situ {sup 14}C produced by cosmic ray spallation in rocks and ice, and studies of {sup 14}C in groundwater dissolved inorganic carbon and dissolved organic carbon. At our laboratory, we have also successfully applied AMS {sup 14}C to dating of many types of textiles, including silks and linens, art works, documents and artifacts fabricated from wood, parchment, ivory, and bone. The results for many of these samples are often important in questions of the authenticity of these works of art and artifacts. Our studies have encompassed a wide range of art works ranging from the Dead Sea Scrolls, the Shroud of Turin, and the Chinese silk trade to the works of Raphael, Rembrandt, and Picasso. Recently, we also dated the Vinland Map, a controversial document that shows the eastern coast of North America apparently using information from Viking voyages.

  12. Distribution of photosynthetically fixed /sup 14/C in perennial plant species of the northern Mojave Desert

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, A.; Cha, J.W.; Romney, E.M.

    1980-01-01

    The distribution of photosynthate among plant parts subsequent to its production is needed to fully understand behavior of vegetation in any ecosystem. The present study, undertaken primarily to obtain information on transport of assimilates into roots of desert vegetation, was conducted in the northern Mojave Desert, where the mean annual rainfall is about 10 cm. Shoots of Ambrosia dumosa (A. Gray) Payne plants were exposed to /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ in 1971, and the distribution of /sup 14/C in roots, stems, and leaves was subsequently measured at 1 week, 2 months, and 5 months. Only about 12 percent of the /sup 14/C photosynthate was stored in the root. Much of that stored in stems was available for new leaf growth. Photosynthate was labeled with /sup 14/C for 24 plants representing eight species in 1972. Results showed that after 127 days the mean percentage of /sup 14/C in roots as compared with the estimate of that originally fixed was 11.8; the percentage in stems was 43.8. To check the validity of the /sup 14/C data, root growth of eight perennial desert plants grown in the glasshouse was followed as plants increased in size. The mean percent of the whole plant that was root for eight species was 17.7 percent. The mean proportion of the increase in plant weights that went below ground for the eight species was 19.5 percent. This value is higher than the fraction of /sup 14/C found below ground, and therefore the /sup 14/C technique underestimates the movement of C to roots. Results of an experiment designed to test the value of the /sup 14/C-pulse technique for determining current root growth for some perennial species from the desert indicated that the transition part of roots where root growth continued after exposure to /sup 14/C was highly labeled. Old growth contained less /sup 14/C than new growth.

  13. Disposition of 14C-β-carotene following delivery with autologous triacylglyceride-rich lipoproteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dueker, Stephen R.; Vuong, Le Thuy; Faulkner, Brian; Buchholz, Bruce A.; Vogel, John S.

    2007-06-01

    Following ingestion, a fraction of β-carotene is cleaved into vitamin A in the intestine, while another is absorbed intact and distributed among tissues and organs. The extent to which this absorbed β-carotene serves as a source of vitamin A is unknown in vivo. In the present study we use the attomole sensitivity of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) for 14C to quantify the disposition of 14C-β-carotene (930 ng; 60.4 nCi of activity) after intravenous injection with an autologous triacylglyceride-rich lipoprotein fraction in a single volunteer. Total 14C was quantified in serial plasma samples and also in triglyceride-rich, and low density lipoprotein, subfractions. The appearance of 14C-retinol, the circulating form of vitamin A in plasma, was determined by chromatographic separation of plasma retinol extracts prior to AMS analysis. The data showed that 14C concentrations rapidly decayed within the triglyceride-rich lipoprotein fractions after injection, whereas low density lipoprotein 14C began a significant rise in 14C 5 h post dose. Plasma 14C-retinol also appeared at 5 h post dose and its concentrations were maintained above baseline for >88 days. Based upon comparisons of 14C-retinol concentrations following an earlier study with orally dosed 14C-β-carotene, a molar vitamin A value of the absorbed β-carotene of 0.19 was derived, meaning that 1 mole of absorbed β-carotene provides 0.19 moles of vitamin A. This is the first study to show that infused β-carotene contributes to the vitamin A economy in humans in vivo.

  14. Structure of ^27Na Using the ^14C(^14C,p) Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, M. W.; Campbell, D. B.; Chandler, C.; Kemper, K. W.; Pipidis, A.; Riley, M. A.; Wiedeking, M.; Tabor, S. L.; Ragnarsson, I.

    2000-10-01

    Several new transitions in ^27Na were found using the ^14C(^14C,p) reaction at 22 MeV. The ^14C target was 0.28 mg/cm^2 thick and the beam was stopped in a 33.8 mg/cm^2 Au foil. γ-γ, particle-γ, and particle-γ-γ coincidences were measured using 2 four-crystal Eurogam type ``clover'' detectors, 7 Compton suppressed HPGe detectors, and a particle E-ΔE telescope at 0^circ.The 67, 1660, 1752, 1820, and 2222 keV transitions, which are in coincidence with the high energy protons, have been identified as transitions in ^27Na. Some of the resulting levels correspond to particle groups seen in an earlier ^26Mg(^18O, ^17F) reaction (L.K. Fifield et al.), Nucl. Phys. A437, 141 (1985).. The results will be discussed in terms of both the shell model and the cranked Nilsson-Strutinsky rotational model.

  15. 14C AMS dating Yongcheon cave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. H.; Choe, K.; Kim, J. C.; Choi, S. H.; Kang, J.; Song, S.; Song, Y. M.; Jang, J. G.

    2013-01-01

    The biggest island in South Korea is Jeju Island, which lies 80 km south of the mainland and has one shield volcano, Mt. Halla. The volcanic island and its lava tubes were added to the world heritage list by UNESCO in 2007. Among the many lava tubes on the island, a unique cave had been accidentally found in 2005 while some workers were replacing a telephone pole. Until the discovery, it had been completely isolated from the outside by naturally-built sand blocks. Yongcheon cave is a lime-decorated lava tube showing both the properties of a volcanic lava tube and a limestone cave. This cave, about 3 km in length, is acknowledged to be the best of this type in the world and includes a large clean-water lake, lava falls, and richly developed speleothems inside it. Even though there is archaeological evidence from well preserved pottery that ancient people entered this place, the preservation of artifacts was ensured by a geological change that made later entrance difficult. We have collected charcoal samples scattered around the cave and dated them using AMS. Ages were in the range of ca. 1570-1260 BP (A.D. 340-880) and this corresponds to the Ancient Three Kingdoms and the Unified Silla era in Korean history. The 14C AMS measurement results presented in this paper on wood charcoal provide precise dates which will be very useful not only to clarify the nature of human activities in this cave but also to provide reference dates when comparing other dating methods.

  16. Lack of tissue renewal in human adult Achilles tendon is revealed by nuclear bomb 14C

    PubMed Central

    Heinemeier, Katja Maria; Schjerling, Peter; Heinemeier, Jan; Magnusson, Stig Peter; Kjaer, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Tendons are often injured and heal poorly. Whether this is caused by a slow tissue turnover is unknown, since existing data provide diverging estimates of tendon protein half-life that range from 2 mo to 200 yr. With the purpose of determining life-long turnover of human tendon tissue, we used the 14C bomb-pulse method. This method takes advantage of the dramatic increase in atmospheric levels of 14C, produced by nuclear bomb tests in 1955–1963, which is reflected in all living organisms. Levels of 14C were measured in 28 forensic samples of Achilles tendon core and 4 skeletal muscle samples (donor birth years 1945–1983) with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and compared to known atmospheric levels to estimate tissue turnover. We found that Achilles tendon tissue retained levels of 14C corresponding to atmospheric levels several decades before tissue sampling, demonstrating a very limited tissue turnover. The tendon concentrations of 14C approximately reflected the atmospheric levels present during the first 17 yr of life, indicating that the tendon core is formed during height growth and is essentially not renewed thereafter. In contrast, 14C levels in muscle indicated continuous turnover. Our observation provides a fundamental premise for understanding tendon function and pathology, and likely explains the poor regenerative capacity of tendon tissue.—Heinemeier, K. M., Schjerling, P., Heinemeier, J., Magnusson, S. P., Kjaer, M. Lack of tissue renewal in human adult Achilles tendon is revealed by nuclear bomb 14C. PMID:23401563

  17. Secretin enhances (/sup 14/C)erythritol clearance in unanesthetized dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.H.; Baker, A.L.; Dhorajiwala, J.; Moossa, A.R.

    1982-01-01

    To determine the effect of secretin infusion on clearance of inert markers into bile, unanesthetized dogs fitted with Thomas cannulas received continuous infusions of (/sup 14/C)erythritol and (/sup 3/H)inulin throughout study. Taurocholic acid administered sequentially at 9.0, 20.0, and 40.0 mumol/min enhanced (/sup 14/C)erythritol clearance, and GIH secretin (3 units/min) administered along with TCA (40.0 mumol/min) increased (/sup 14/C)erythritol clearance from 4.9 +/- 1.2 ml/10 min to 6.8 +/- 1.3 ml/10 min (P less than 0.001), but simultaneously measured (/sup 3/H)inulin clearance was unaltered. Secretin alone also increased (/sup 14/C)erythritol clearance but did not alter (/sup 3/H)inulin clearance. The increase in (/sup 14/C)erythritol clearance per unit increase in bile flow was less during secretin infusion than TCA. Thus, secretin increases (/sup 14/C)erythritol transport through restricted channels, probably distal to the canaliculi. (/sup 14/C)Erythritol may not be an accurate marker for canalicular bile flow in dogs during secretin infusion.

  18. The biological fate of sup 14 C-dimercaptosuccinic acid in monkeys and rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Tillotson, J.A.; Boswell, G.; Kincannon, L.; Speckman, C.L.

    1989-09-01

    The biological fate of {sup 14}C-labeled dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) in monkeys and rabbits was determined by measuring the {sup 14}C activity in their urine, feces, and expired air ({sup 14}CO{sub 2}). Monkeys absorbed less than 20% DMSA from three oral dose levels (0.082, 0.16, and 0.5 mmol/kg) of {sup 14}C-DMSA, and the rabbits absorbed 32% DMSA or less from an oral dose of {sup 14}C-DMSA (0.5 mmol/kg). Although the bioavailability of DMSA was limited in either species, DMSA was detected in the blood of both species within minutes after oral dosing. In either species, most of the radiolabel from the absorbed {sup 14}C-DMSA was detected in the urine within 12 hours. We also developed a sensitive assay for directly measuring levels of DMSA (as free thiols) in blood. Intact DMSA was not detected in the blood of the monkeys or the rabbits more than 200 minutes after oral or intravenous dosing at 0.5 mmol DMSA/kg body weight. However, {sup 14}C activity in blood and urine of the monkeys was measurable 72 hours after this dose. Differences between measured {sup 14}C concentrations and intact DMSA concentrations in the blood suggest the presence of DMSA metabolites that have longer half-lives than DMSA. Consequently, until the biological activities of these compounds are identified, the pharmacokinetic analysis of DMSA may be incomplete.

  19. Atmospheric 14 C CO 2 variations in Japan during 1982--1999 based on 14 C measurements of rice grains.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Setsuko; Kawano, Eiko; Nakabayashi, Takeshige

    2005-08-01

    (14)C in rice grains is a useful tracer of atmospheric (14)C(CO(2)). (14)C measurement in rice grains for 17 years during 1982--1999 reveals the following. There is negative correlation between Delta(14)C and the population densities of localities in Japan. Under-populated areas in the northern area of Japan and Okinawa remained clean in the 1990s. The (14)C(CO(2)) decline rates at those areas are near to that of Shauinsland. A latitudinal effect due to Chinese nuclear tests is observed in 1982. Small Seuss effects is observed at the middle latitudes in East Asia after 1995.

  20. Towards a global understanding of vertical soil carbon dynamics: meta-analysis of soil 14C data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    hatte, C.; Balesdent, J.; Guiot, J.

    2012-12-01

    Soil represents the largest terrestrial storage mechanism for atmospheric carbon from photosynthesis, with estimates ranging from 1600 Pg C within the top 1 meter to 2350 Pg C for the top 3 meters. These values are at least 2.5 times greater than atmospheric C pools. Small changes in soil organic carbon storage could result in feedback to atmospheric CO2 and the sensitivity of soil organic matter to changes in temperature, and precipitation remains a critical area of research with respect to the global carbon cycle. As an intermediate storage mechanism for organic material through time, the vertical profile of carbon generally shows an age continuum with depth. Radiocarbon provides critical information for understanding carbon exchanges between soils and atmosphere, and within soil layers. Natural and "bomb" radiocarbon has been used to demonstrate the importance and nature of the soil carbon response to climatic and human impacts on decadal to millennial timescales. Radiocarbon signatures of bulk, or chemically or physically fractionated soil, or even of specific organic compounds, offer one of the only ways to infer terrestrial carbon turnover times or test ecosystem carbon models. We compiled data from the literature on radiocarbon distribution on soil profiles and characterized each study according to the following categories: soil type, analyzed organic fraction, location (latitude, longitude, elevation), climate (temperature, precipitation), land use and sampling year. Based on the compiled data, soil carbon 14C profiles were reconstructed for each of the 226 sites. We report here partial results obtained by statistical analyses of portion of this database, i.e. bulk and bulk-like organic matter and sampling year posterior to 1980. We highlight here 14C vertical pattern in relationship with external parameters (climate, location and land use).

  1. The radiocarbon signature of microorganisms in the mesopelagic ocean.

    PubMed

    Hansman, Roberta L; Griffin, Sheila; Watson, Jordan T; Druffel, Ellen R M; Ingalls, Anitra E; Pearson, Ann; Aluwihare, Lihini I

    2009-04-21

    Several lines of evidence indicate that microorganisms in the meso- and bathypelagic ocean are metabolically active and respiring carbon. In addition, growing evidence suggests that archaea are fixing inorganic carbon in this environment. However, direct quantification of the contribution from deep ocean carbon sources to community production in the dark ocean remains a challenge. In this study, carbon flow through the microbial community at 2 depths in the mesopelagic zone of the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre was examined by exploiting the unique radiocarbon signatures (Delta(14)C) of the 3 major carbon sources in this environment. The radiocarbon content of nucleic acids, a biomarker for viable cells, isolated from size-fractionated particles (0.2-0.5 microm and >0.5 microm) showed the direct incorporation of carbon delivered by rapidly sinking particles. Most significantly, at the 2 mesopelagic depths examined (670 m and 915 m), carbon derived from in situ autotrophic fixation supported a significant fraction of the free-living microbial community (0.2-0.5 microm size fraction), but the contribution of chemoautotrophy varied markedly between the 2 depths. Results further showed that utilization of the ocean's largest reduced carbon reservoir, (14)C-depleted, dissolved organic carbon, was negligible in this environment. This isotopic portrait of carbon assimilation by the in situ, free-living microbial community, integrated over >50,000 L of seawater, implies that recent, photosynthetic carbon is not always the major carbon source supporting microbial community production in the mesopelagic realm.

  2. Vertebral Bomb Radiocarbon Suggests Extreme Longevity in White Sharks

    PubMed Central

    Hamady, Li Ling; Natanson, Lisa J.; Skomal, Gregory B.; Thorrold, Simon R.

    2014-01-01

    Conservation and management efforts for white sharks (Carcharodon carcharias) remain hampered by a lack of basic demographic information including age and growth rates. Sharks are typically aged by counting growth bands sequentially deposited in their vertebrae, but the assumption of annual deposition of these band pairs requires testing. We compared radiocarbon14C) values in vertebrae from four female and four male white sharks from the northwestern Atlantic Ocean (NWA) with reference chronologies documenting the marine uptake of 14C produced by atmospheric testing of thermonuclear devices to generate the first radiocarbon age estimates for adult white sharks. Age estimates were up to 40 years old for the largest female (fork length [FL]: 526 cm) and 73 years old for the largest male (FL: 493 cm). Our results dramatically extend the maximum age and longevity of white sharks compared to earlier studies, hint at possible sexual dimorphism in growth rates, and raise concerns that white shark populations are considerably more sensitive to human-induced mortality than previously thought. PMID:24416189

  3. Measurements and modeling of contemporary radiocarbon in the stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanu, A. M.; Comfort, L. L.; Guilderson, T. P.; Cameron-Smith, P. J.; Bergmann, D. J.; Atlas, E. L.; Schauffler, S.; Boering, K. A.

    2016-02-01

    Measurements of the 14C content of carbon dioxide in air collected by high-altitude balloon flights in 2003-2005 reveal the contemporary radiocarbon distribution in the northern midlatitude stratosphere, four decades after the Limited Test Ban Treaty restricted atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons. Comparisons with results from a 3-D chemical-transport model show that the 14CO2 distribution is now largely governed by the altitude/latitude dependence of the natural cosmogenic production rate, stratospheric transport, and propagation into the stratosphere of the decreasing radiocarbon trend in tropospheric CO2 due to fossil fuel combustion. From the observed correlation of 14CO2 with N2O mixing ratios, an annual global mean net flux of 14CO2 to the troposphere of 1.6(±0.4) × 1017‰ mol CO2 yr-1 and a global production rate of 2.2(±0.6) × 1026 atoms 14C yr-1 are empirically derived. The results also indicate that contemporary 14CO2 observations provide highly sensitive diagnostics for stratospheric transport and residence times in models.

  4. The role of inter-comparisons in radiocarbon quality assurance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Marian; Cook, Gordon; Naysmith, Philip

    2016-04-01

    Radiocarbon dating is used widely in many geochronology projects as a basis for the creation and testing of chronological constructs. Radiocarbon measurements are by their nature complex and the degree of sample pre-treatment varies considerably depending on the material. Within the UK and Europe, there are a number of well-established laboratories and increasingly, scientists are not just commissioning new dates, but also using statistical modelling of assemblages of dates, perhaps measured in different laboratories, to provide formal date estimates for their investigations. The issue of comparability of measurements (and thus bias, accuracy and precision of measurement) from the diverse laboratories is one which has been the focus of some attention both within the 14C community and the wider user communities for some time. As a result of this but also as part of laboratory benchmarking and quality assurance, the 14C community has undertaken a wide-scale, far-reaching and evolving programme of inter-comparisons, to the benefit of laboratories and users alike. This paper presents the results from the most recent exercise SIRI. The objectives of SIRI included, through choice of material, to contribute to the discussion concerning laboratory offsets and error multipliers in the context of IntCal (the International Calibration Programme) and to gain a better understanding of differences in background derived from a range of infinite age material types.

  5. Correlating the Ancient Maya and Modern European Calendars with High-Precision AMS 14C Dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennett, Douglas J.; Hajdas, Irka; Culleton, Brendan J.; Belmecheri, Soumaya; Martin, Simon; Neff, Hector; Awe, Jaime; Graham, Heather V.; Freeman, Katherine H.; Newsom, Lee; Lentz, David L.; Anselmetti, Flavio S.; Robinson, Mark; Marwan, Norbert; Southon, John; Hodell, David A.; Haug, Gerald H.

    2013-04-01

    The reasons for the development and collapse of Maya civilization remain controversial and historical events carved on stone monuments throughout this region provide a remarkable source of data about the rise and fall of these complex polities. Use of these records depends on correlating the Maya and European calendars so that they can be compared with climate and environmental datasets. Correlation constants can vary up to 1000 years and remain controversial. We report a series of high-resolution AMS 14C dates on a wooden lintel collected from the Classic Period city of Tikal bearing Maya calendar dates. The radiocarbon dates were calibrated using a Bayesian statistical model and indicate that the dates were carved on the lintel between AD 658-696. This strongly supports the Goodman-Martínez-Thompson (GMT) correlation and the hypothesis that climate change played an important role in the development and demise of this complex civilization.

  6. The coevolution of ritual and society: New 14C dates from ancient Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Joyce; Flannery, Kent V.

    2004-01-01

    New 14C dates from Oaxaca, Mexico, document changes in religious ritual that accompanied the evolution of society from hunting and gathering to the archaic state. Before 4000 B.P. in conventional radiocarbon years, a nomadic egalitarian lifeway selected for unscheduled (ad hoc) ritual from which no one was excluded. With the establishment of permanent villages (4000–3000 B.P.), certain rituals were scheduled by solar or astral events and restricted to initiates/social achievers. After state formation (2050 B.P.), many important rituals were performed only by trained full-time priests using religious calendars and occupying temples built by corvée labor. Only 1,300–1,400 years seem to have elapsed between the oldest known ritual building and the first standardized state temple. PMID:15601758

  7. The coevolution of ritual and society: new 14C dates from ancient Mexico.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Joyce; Flannery, Kent V

    2004-12-28

    New (14)C dates from Oaxaca, Mexico, document changes in religious ritual that accompanied the evolution of society from hunting and gathering to the archaic state. Before 4000 B.P. in conventional radiocarbon years, a nomadic egalitarian lifeway selected for unscheduled (ad hoc) ritual from which no one was excluded. With the establishment of permanent villages (4000-3000 B.P.), certain rituals were scheduled by solar or astral events and restricted to initiates/social achievers. After state formation (2050 B.P.), many important rituals were performed only by trained full-time priests using religious calendars and occupying temples built by corvee labor. Only 1,300-1,400 years seem to have elapsed between the oldest known ritual building and the first standardized state temple.

  8. Correlating the ancient Maya and modern European calendars with high-precision AMS 14C dating.

    PubMed

    Kennett, Douglas J; Hajdas, Irka; Culleton, Brendan J; Belmecheri, Soumaya; Martin, Simon; Neff, Hector; Awe, Jaime; Graham, Heather V; Freeman, Katherine H; Newsom, Lee; Lentz, David L; Anselmetti, Flavio S; Robinson, Mark; Marwan, Norbert; Southon, John; Hodell, David A; Haug, Gerald H

    2013-01-01

    The reasons for the development and collapse of Maya civilization remain controversial and historical events carved on stone monuments throughout this region provide a remarkable source of data about the rise and fall of these complex polities. Use of these records depends on correlating the Maya and European calendars so that they can be compared with climate and environmental datasets. Correlation constants can vary up to 1000 years and remain controversial. We report a series of high-resolution AMS (14)C dates on a wooden lintel collected from the Classic Period city of Tikal bearing Maya calendar dates. The radiocarbon dates were calibrated using a Bayesian statistical model and indicate that the dates were carved on the lintel between AD 658-696. This strongly supports the Goodman-Martínez-Thompson (GMT) correlation and the hypothesis that climate change played an important role in the development and demise of this complex civilization.

  9. Correlating the Ancient Maya and Modern European Calendars with High-Precision AMS 14C Dating

    PubMed Central

    Kennett, Douglas J.; Hajdas, Irka; Culleton, Brendan J.; Belmecheri, Soumaya; Martin, Simon; Neff, Hector; Awe, Jaime; Graham, Heather V.; Freeman, Katherine H.; Newsom, Lee; Lentz, David L.; Anselmetti, Flavio S.; Robinson, Mark; Marwan, Norbert; Southon, John; Hodell, David A.; Haug, Gerald H.

    2013-01-01

    The reasons for the development and collapse of Maya civilization remain controversial and historical events carved on stone monuments throughout this region provide a remarkable source of data about the rise and fall of these complex polities. Use of these records depends on correlating the Maya and European calendars so that they can be compared with climate and environmental datasets. Correlation constants can vary up to 1000 years and remain controversial. We report a series of high-resolution AMS 14C dates on a wooden lintel collected from the Classic Period city of Tikal bearing Maya calendar dates. The radiocarbon dates were calibrated using a Bayesian statistical model and indicate that the dates were carved on the lintel between AD 658-696. This strongly supports the Goodman-Martínez-Thompson (GMT) correlation and the hypothesis that climate change played an important role in the development and demise of this complex civilization. PMID:23579869

  10. Uptake and distribution of /sup 14/C during and following exposure to (/sup 14/C)methyl isocyanate

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, J.S.; Kennedy, A.L.; Stock, M.F.; Brown, W.E.; Alarie, Y.

    1988-06-15

    Guinea pigs were exposed to (/sup 14/C)methyl isocyanate (/sup 14/CH/sub 3/-NCO, /sup 14/C MIC) for periods of 1 to 6 hr at concentrations of 0.5 to 15 ppm. Arterial blood samples taken during exposure revealed immediate and rapid uptake of /sup 14/C. Clearance of /sup 14/C was then gradual over a period of 3 days. Similarly /sup 14/C was present in urine and bile immediately following exposure, and clearance paralleled that observed in blood. Guinea pigs fitted with a tracheal cannula and exposed while under anesthesia showed a reduced /sup 14/C uptake in blood indicating that most of the /sup 14/C MIC uptake in normal guinea pigs occurred from retention of this agent in the upper respiratory tract passages. In exposed guinea pigs /sup 14/C was distributed to all examined tissues. In pregnant female mice similarly exposed to /sup 14/C MIC, /sup 14/C was observed in all tissues examined following exposure including the uterus, placenta, and fetus. While the form of /sup 14/C distributed in blood and tissues has not yet been identified, these findings may help to explain the toxicity of MIC or MIC reaction products on organs other than the respiratory tract, as noted by several investigators.

  11. Radiocarbon Signatures and Cycling of Dissolved Organic Carbon in the World Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druffel, E. R.; Griffin, S.; Walker, B. D.

    2012-12-01

    Radiocarbon (Delta14C) measurements of bulk dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the deep ocean range from -390 per mil in the North Atlantic to -550 per mil in the Northeast Pacific. We report Delta14C measurements of DOC from six sites in the South Pacific and three sites in the South Atlantic collected on Repeat Hydrography cruises P6 (2010) and A10 (2011). We compare our new results with those reported earlier for the North central Pacific, Northeast Pacific, Southern Ocean and Sargasso Sea. We find that the Delta14C results from the deep South Pacific are lower than expected, given the range between Southern Ocean DOC Delta14C values (-500 per mil) and those from the North central Pacific (-525 per mil). Implications for DOC cycling in the world ocean are presented.

  12. Stimulation of Microbially Mediated Arsenic Release in Bangladesh Aquifers by Young Carbon Indicated by Radiocarbon Analysis of Sedimentary Bacterial Lipids.

    PubMed

    Whaley-Martin, K J; Mailloux, B J; van Geen, A; Bostick, B C; Silvern, R F; Kim, C; Ahmed, K M; Choudhury, I; Slater, G F

    2016-07-19

    The sources of reduced carbon driving the microbially mediated release of arsenic to shallow groundwater in Bangladesh remain poorly understood. Using radiocarbon analysis of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) and potential carbon pools, the abundance and carbon sources of the active, sediment-associated, in situ bacterial communities inhabiting shallow aquifers (<30 m) at two sites in Araihazar, Bangladesh, were investigated. At both sites, sedimentary organic carbon (SOC) Δ(14)C signatures of -631 ± 54‰ (n = 12) were significantly depleted relative to dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) of +24 ± 30‰ and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) of -230 ± 100‰. Sediment-associated PLFA Δ(14)C signatures (n = 10) at Site F (-167‰ to +20‰) and Site B (-163‰ to +21‰) were highly consistent and indicated utilization of carbon sources younger than the SOC, likely from the DOC pool. Sediment-associated PLFA Δ(14)C signatures were consistent with previously determined Δ(14)C signatures of microbial DNA sampled from groundwater at Site F indicating that the carbon source for these two components of the subsurface microbial community is consistent and is temporally stable over the two years between studies. These results demonstrate that the utilization of relatively young carbon sources by the subsurface microbial community occurs at sites with varying hydrology. Further they indicate that these young carbon sources drive the metabolism of the more abundant sediment-associated microbial communities that are presumably more capable of Fe reduction and associated release of As. This implies that an introduction of younger carbon to as of yet unaffected sediments (such as those comprising the deeper Pleistocene aquifer) could stimulate microbial communities and result in arsenic release.

  13. Stimulation of Microbially Mediated Arsenic Release in Bangladesh Aquifers by Young Carbon Indicated by Radiocarbon Analysis of Sedimentary Bacterial Lipids.

    PubMed

    Whaley-Martin, K J; Mailloux, B J; van Geen, A; Bostick, B C; Silvern, R F; Kim, C; Ahmed, K M; Choudhury, I; Slater, G F

    2016-07-19

    The sources of reduced carbon driving the microbially mediated release of arsenic to shallow groundwater in Bangladesh remain poorly understood. Using radiocarbon analysis of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) and potential carbon pools, the abundance and carbon sources of the active, sediment-associated, in situ bacterial communities inhabiting shallow aquifers (<30 m) at two sites in Araihazar, Bangladesh, were investigated. At both sites, sedimentary organic carbon (SOC) Δ(14)C signatures of -631 ± 54‰ (n = 12) were significantly depleted relative to dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) of +24 ± 30‰ and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) of -230 ± 100‰. Sediment-associated PLFA Δ(14)C signatures (n = 10) at Site F (-167‰ to +20‰) and Site B (-163‰ to +21‰) were highly consistent and indicated utilization of carbon sources younger than the SOC, likely from the DOC pool. Sediment-associated PLFA Δ(14)C signatures were consistent with previously determined Δ(14)C signatures of microbial DNA sampled from groundwater at Site F indicating that the carbon source for these two components of the subsurface microbial community is consistent and is temporally stable over the two years between studies. These results demonstrate that the utilization of relatively young carbon sources by the subsurface microbial community occurs at sites with varying hydrology. Further they indicate that these young carbon sources drive the metabolism of the more abundant sediment-associated microbial communities that are presumably more capable of Fe reduction and associated release of As. This implies that an introduction of younger carbon to as of yet unaffected sediments (such as those comprising the deeper Pleistocene aquifer) could stimulate microbial communities and result in arsenic release. PMID:27333443

  14. Geographic and temporal trends in proboscidean and human radiocarbon histories during the late Pleistocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugan, Andrew; Byers, David

    2007-12-01

    The causes of large animal extinctions at the end of the Pleistocene remain a hotly debated topic focused primarily on the effects of human over hunting and climate change. Here we examine multiple, large radiocarbon data sets for humans and extinct proboscideans and explore how variation in their temporal and geographic distributions were related prior to proboscidean extinction. These data include 4532 archaeological determinations from Europe and Siberia and 1177 mammoth and mastodont determinations from Europe, Siberia, and North America. All span the period from 45,000 to 12,000 calendar years BP. We show that while the geographic ranges of dated human occupations and proboscidean remains overlap across the terminal Pleistocene of the Old World, the two groups remain largely segregated and increases in the frequency of human occupations do not coincide with declines in proboscidean remains. Prior to the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM; ca 21,000 years BP), archaeological 14C determinations increase slightly in frequency worldwide while the frequency of dated proboscidean remains varies depending on taxon and location. After the LGM, both sympatric and allopatric groups of humans and proboscideans increase sharply as climatic conditions ameliorate. Post-LGM radiocarbon frequencies among proboscideans peak at different times, also depending upon taxon and location. Woolly mammoths in Beringia reach a maximum and then decline beginning between 16,000 and 15,500 years BP, woolly mammoths in Europe and Siberia ca 14,500 and 13,500 BP, and Columbian mammoth and American mastodont only after 13,000 BP. Declines among woolly mammoths appear to coincide with the restructuring of biotic communities following the Pleistocene-Holocene transition.

  15. Age and geomorphic history of Meteor Crater, Arizona, from cosmogenic 36Cl and 14C in rock varnish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phillips, F.M.; Zreda, M.G.; Smith, S.S.; Elmore, D.; Kubik, P.W.; Dorn, R.I.; Roddy, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    Using cosmogenic 36Cl buildup and rock varnish radiocarbon, we have measured the exposure age of rock surfaces at Meteor Crater, Arizona. Our 36Cl measurements on four dolomite boulders ejected from the crater by the impact yield a mean age of 49.7 ?? 0.85 ka, which is in excellent agreement with an average age of 49 ?? 3 ka obtained from thermoluminescence studies on shock-metamorphosed dolomite and quartz. These ages are supported by undetectably low 14C in the oldest rock varnish sample. ?? 1991.

  16. Annual variability in the radiocarbon age and source of dissolved CO2 in a peatland stream.

    PubMed

    Garnett, Mark H; Dinsmore, Kerry J; Billett, Michael F

    2012-06-15

    Radiocarbon dating has the capacity to significantly improve our understanding of the aquatic carbon cycle. In this study we used a new passive sampler to measure the radiocarbon ((14)C) and stable carbon (δ(13)C) isotopic composition of dissolved CO(2) for the first time in a peatland stream throughout a complete year (May 2010-June 2011). The in-stream sampling system collected time-integrated samples of CO(2) continuously over approximately 1 month periods. The rate of CO(2) trapping was proportional to independently measured streamwater CO(2) concentrations, demonstrating that passive samplers can be used to estimate the time-averaged dissolved CO(2) concentration of streamwater. While there was little variation and no clear trend in δ(13)CO(2) values (suggesting a consistent CO(2) source), we found a clear temporal pattern in the (14)C concentration of dissolved CO(2). The (14)C age of CO(2) varied from 707±35 to 1210±39 years BP, with the youngest CO(2) in the autumn and oldest in spring/early summer. Mean stream discharge and (14)C content of dissolved CO(2) were positively correlated. We suggest that the observed pattern in the (14)C content of dissolved CO(2) reflects changes in its origin, with older carbon derived from deeper parts of the peat profile contributing proportionally more gaseous carbon during periods of low stream flow.

  17. Towards radiocarbon calibration beyond 28 ka using speleothems from the Bahamas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Dirk L.; Beck, J. Warren; Richards, David A.; Smart, Peter L.; Singarayer, Joy S.; Ketchmark, Tricia; Hawkesworth, Chris J.

    2010-01-01

    We present a new speleothem record of atmospheric Δ 14C between 28 and 44 ka that offers considerable promise for resolving some of the uncertainty associated with existing radiocarbon calibration curves for this time period. The record is based on a comprehensive suite of AMS 14C ages, using new low-blank protocols, and U-Th ages using high precision MC-ICPMS procedures. Atmospheric Δ 14C was calculated by correcting 14C ages with a constant dead carbon fraction (DCF) of 22.7 ± 5.9%, based on a comparison of stalagmite 14C ages with the IntCal04 ( Reimer et al., 2004) calibration curve between 15 and 11 ka. The new Δ 14C speleothem record shows similar structure and amplitude to that derived from Cariaco Basin foraminifera (Hughen et al., 2004, 2006), and the match is further improved if the latter is tied to the most recent Greenland ice core chronology ( Svensson et al., 2008). These data are however in conflict with a previously published 14C data set for a stalagmite record from the Bahamas — GB-89-24-1 ( Beck et al., 2001), which likely suffered from 14C analytical blank subtraction issues in the older part of the record. The new Bahamas speleothem ∆ 14C data do not show the extreme shifts between 44 and 40 ka reported in the previous study ( Beck et al., 2001). Causes for the observed structure in derived atmospheric Δ 14C variation based on the new speleothem data are investigated with a suite of simulations using an earth system model of intermediate complexity. Data-model comparison indicates that major fluctuations in atmospheric ∆ 14C during marine isotope stage 3 is primarily a function of changes in geomagnetic field intensity, although ocean-atmosphere system reorganisation also played a supporting role.

  18. Interpretation of the fine structure in the sup 14 C radioactive decay of sup 223 Ra

    SciTech Connect

    Sheline, R.K. ); Ragnarsson, I. )

    1991-03-01

    The experimental hindrance factors determined from the fine structure in the {sup 14}C decay of {sup 223}Ra are strikingly similar to the hindrance factors observed in the alpha decay of odd-{ital A} reflection-asymmetric deformed nuclei in spite of the deformed to spherical shape which occurs in the {sup 14}C decay. Calculations of the overlap between the reflection-asymmetric ground state of {sup 223}Ra and the spherical shell-model orbitals of {sup 209}Pb involved in the {sup 14}C decay are consistent with the experimental hindrance factors from the {sup 14}C fine structure except that the {ital j}{sub 15/2} orbital is more strongly populated experimentally than the calculations suggest.

  19. A shell-derived time history of bomb {sup 14}C on Georges Bank and its Labrador Sea implications

    SciTech Connect

    Weidman, C.R.; Jones, G.A.

    1993-08-15

    Bomb-produced radiocarbon has been used in the past as an important tracer of ocean circulation and as a valuable tool for calculating CO{sub 2} air-sea exchange. However, previous studies of the ocean`s time-varying bomb {sup 14}C record have been confined exclusively to analyzing banded corals, and thus their application has been limited to the lower latitudes. The first time history of bomb {sup 14}C from the high-latitude North Atlantic Ocean is obtained from a 54-year-old mollusc specimen, (Bivalvia) Arctica islandica, which was collected live from Georges Bank (41{degrees}N) in 1990. The annual growth bands of its shell were analyzed for {Delta}{sup 14}C using accelerator mass spectrometry, producing a {Delta}{sup 14}C time history from 1939 to 1990. The depleted condition of the Georges Bank bomb {sup 14}C signal relative to two coral-derived North Atlantic {Delta}{sup 14}C time histories suggests a significant deepwater source for the waters on Georges Bank. Supported by previous work linking the origin of waters on Georges Bank to the Labrador Sea, the {Delta}{sup 14}C budget on Georges Bank is modeled as Labrador Sea water, which largely becomes confined to the shelf and partially equilibrates with the atmosphere during a 1-year transit time from the Labrador Sea to Georges Bank. This model is also used to estimate a time history of bomb {sup 14}C for the Labrador Sea. Prebomb {Delta}{sup 14}C values calculated for the surface Labrador Sea suggest that a greater inventory of bomb {sup 14}C has accumulated here than has previously been reported. Deduced variations in the ventilation and/or {sup 14}CO{sub 2} uptake rates in the Labrador Sea correspond with observed changes in surface salinity of the Labrador Sea, suggesting a reduction in deepwater formation during the late 1960s and 1970s. 59 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Disposition of [14C]methyl bromide in Fischer-344 rats after oral or intraperitoneal administration.

    PubMed

    Medinsky, M A; Bond, J A; Dutcher, J S; Birnbaum, L S

    1984-09-14

    Methyl bromide is used as a disinfectant to fumigate soil. The intent of our study was to determine the disposition of methyl bromide following a single acute administration. Male Fischer-344 rats were given 250 mumol of [14C] methyl bromide/kg body wt by either oral or i.p. administration. Urine, feces and expired air were collected and at the end of 72 h the rats were sacrificed and tissues analyzed to determine 14C excretion and tissue distribution. After i.p. administration of methyl bromide, the dominant route of excretion was exhalation of 14CO2, with 46% of the dose exhaled as 14CO2. In contrast, urinary excretion of 14C was the major route of elimination (43% of the dose) when methyl bromide was given orally. Very little of the 14C appeared in the feces (less than 3% of the dose) regardless of route of administration. In rats with bile duct cannulations, 46% of an oral dose appeared in the bile over a 24-h period. Collection of bile significantly decreased the exhalation of 14CO2 and 14C excreted in urine compared to controls. At 72 h after oral or i.p. administration, 14-17% of the 14C remained in the rats, with liver and kidney being the major organs of retention. Results indicate that route of administration can affect the pathways for excretion. In addition, excretion of 14C in bile, coupled with the low levels of radioactivity found in the feces, indicates that reabsorption of biliary metabolites from the gut plays a significant role in the disposition of [14C] methyl bromide.

  1. Radiocarbon detection by ion charge exchange mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotchkis, Michael; Wei, Tao

    2007-06-01

    A method for detection of radiocarbon at low levels is described and the results of tests are presented. We refer to this method as ion charge exchange mass spectrometry (ICE-MS). The ICE-MS instrument is a two stage mass spectrometer. In the first stage, molecular interferences which would otherwise affect radiocarbon detection at mass 14 are eliminated by producing high charge state ions directly in the ion source (charge state ⩾2). 14N interference is eliminated in the second stage by converting the beam to negative ions in a charge exchange cell. The beam is mass-analysed at each stage. We have built a test apparatus consisting of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source and a pair of analysing magnets with a charge exchange cell in between, followed by an electrostatic analyser to improve the signal to background ratio. With this apparatus we have measured charge exchange probabilities for (Cn+ → C-) from 4.5 to 40.5 keV (n = 1-3). We have studied the sources of background including assessment of limits for nitrogen interference by searching for negative ions from charge exchange of 14N ions. Our system has been used to detect 14C in enriched samples of CO2 gas with 14C/12C isotopic ratio down to the 10-9 level. Combined with a measured sample consumption rate of 4 ng/s, this corresponds to a capability to detect transient signals containing only a few μBq of 14C activity, such as may be obtained from chromatographic separation. The method will require further development to match the sensitivity of AMS with a gas ion source; however, even in its present state its sensitivity is well suited to tracer studies in biomedical research and drug development.

  2. Holocene marine 14C reservoir age variability: Evidence from 230Th-dated corals in the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Kefu; Hua, Quan; Zhao, Jian-xin; Hodge, Ed; Fink, David; Barbetti, Mike

    2010-07-01

    The South China Sea (SCS) is well connected with the western Pacific and influenced by the East Asian monsoon. We have examined temporal variations in radiocarbon marine reservoir ages (R) and regional marine reservoir corrections (ΔR) of the SCS during the Holocene using paired measurements of AMS 14C and TIMS 230Th on 20 pristine corals. The results show large fluctuations in both R and ΔR values over the past 7500 years (yrs) with two distinct plateaus during 7.5-5.6 and 3.5-2.5 thousand calendar years before present (cal ka BP). The respective weighted mean ΔR values of these plateaus are 151 ± 85 and 89 ± 59 yrs, which are significantly higher than its modern value of -23 ± 52 yrs. This suggests that using a constant modern ΔR value to calibrate 14C dates of the SCS marine samples will introduce additional errors to the calibrated ages. Our results provide the first database for the Holocene R and ΔR values of the SCS for improved radiocarbon calibration of marine samples. We interpret the two ΔR plateaus as being related to two intervals with weakened El Niño - Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and intensified East Asian summer monsoon (EASM). This is because the 14C content of the SCS surface water is controlled by both the 14C concentration of the Pacific North Equatorial Current (NEC) which is in turn influenced by ENSO-induced upwelling along the Pacific equator and vertical upwelling within the SCS as a result of moisture transportation to midlatitude region to supply the EASM rainfall.

  3. Radiocarbon dating of marine material: mollusc versus foraminifera ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callard, L.; Long, A. J.; Plets, R. M.; Cooper, A.; Belknap, D. F.; Edwards, R.; Jackson, D.; Kelley, J. T.; Long, D.; Milne, G. A.; Monteys, X.; Quinn, R.

    2013-12-01

    A key challenge in reconstructing Quaternary environmental change from marine archives is developing a robust chronology. During the last ~50k a-1, radiocarbon dating is the mainstay for many studies. Often investigators are restricted in the material that is available for dating, with studies relying on AMS dating of either mono-specific or mixed assemblages of foraminifera. In some instances, marine molluscs (broken or whole, articulated or disarticulated) may also be present and can provide an alternative or complementary dating target. Previous radiocarbon dating of paired foraminiferal and marine molluscan samples from the Kattegat (Denmark) revealed significant age offsets between these materials, inferred to reflect greater reworking of foraminifera compared to the marine molluscs (Heier-Nielsen et al., 1995). Here we present the results of a comparable study from the Irish Sea Basin, which forms part of a wider investigation into the evidence for the Late Glacial sea-level minima at offshore sites from around Britain and Ireland. We have collected and AMS 14C-dated twelve paired samples of foraminifera and marine shells. The results shows a systematic age offset with the monospecific foraminifera samples consistently giving older ages than their shell counterparts. This offset increases with sample age, reaching a maximum offset of 3000 years in the oldest sample (~ 13 ka cal a BP). These results are consistent with the observations of Heier-Nielsen et al. (1995), and we hypothesize that foraminifera may be more susceptible to reworking from older deposits because of their lower effective density than the shell samples. However, foraminifera size and shape may also be contributing factors. These findings are potentially significant for studies that develop chronologies based on radiocarbon dating of foraminifera alone, since the resulting dates may over-estimate sample age by several thousand years. We conclude by outlining an experimental design that seeks

  4. Age models for peat deposits on the basis of coupled lead-210 and radiocarbon data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowska, Natalia; de Vleeschouwer, François; Sikorski, Jarosław; Sensuła, Barbara; Michczyński, Adam; Fiałkiewicz-Kozieł, Barbara; Palowski, Bernard

    2010-05-01

    The study presents three examples of age-model construction based on the results of 210Pb and 14C dating methods applied to peat deposits. The three sites are ombrotrophic peat bogs: the Misten (Belgium), Slowinskie Bloto (N Poland) and Puscizna Mala (S Poland). All sites have been subjected to multiproxy studies aimed at reconstructing paleoenvironment and human activity, covering the last 1500, 1300 and 1800 years, respectively (De Vleeschouwer et al. 2009A, 2009B, in prep., Fialkiewicz-Koziel, ongoing PhD). A detailed comparison between 210Pb and post-bomb 14C results in the Misten bog has also been carried out by Piotrowska et al. (2009). In all cores, the 210Pb activity was calculated using 210Po and 208Po activities after acid-extraction from bulk samples, subsequent deposition on silver discs and measurements by alpha spectrometry. Unsupported 210Pb was detected until 35cm in Slowinskie Bloto, 15cm in the Misten and 19cm in Puscizna Mala. Constant Rate of Supply (CRS) model was then applied to compute ages of each 1-cm core interval. For the Misten and Slowinskie Bloto, radiocarbon measurements were performed on selected aboveground plant macrofossils, mainly Sphagnum spp. or Calluna vulgaris, Erica tetralix, and Andromeda polyfolia. Radiocarbon ages were determined using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) after acid-alkali-acid wash, combustion, purification of carbon dioxide and graphitisation. For Puscizna Mala bulk samples were dated after chemical preparation of benzene for liquid scintillation counting (LSC) or CO2 for gas proportional counting (GPC). Radiocarbon calibration was undertaken using the Intcal04 calibration curve and OxCal 4 software. As a priori information the 210Pb-derived ages were used in a P_Sequence model (Bronk Ramsey, 2008). A number of dates characterized by low agreement with stratigraphical order had to be considered as outliers and rejected from the final age model. For building a continuous age models a non-linear approach

  5. Time since death and decay rate constants of Norway spruce and European larch deadwood in subalpine forests determined using dendrochronology and radiocarbon dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrillo, M.; Cherubini, P.; Fravolini, G.; Ascher, J.; Schärer, M.; Synal, H.-A.; Bertoldi, D.; Camin, F.; Larcher, R.; Egli, M.

    2015-09-01

    Due to the large size and highly heterogeneous spatial distribution of deadwood, the time scales involved in the coarse woody debris (CWD) decay of Picea abies (L.) Karst. and Larix decidua Mill. in Alpine forests have been poorly investigated and are largely unknown. We investigated the CWD decay dynamics in an Alpine valley in Italy using the five-decay class system commonly employed for forest surveys, based on a macromorphological and visual assessment. For the decay classes 1 to 3, most of the dendrochronological samples were cross-dated to assess the time that had elapsed since tree death, but for decay classes 4 and 5 (poorly preserved tree rings) and some others not having enough tree rings, radiocarbon dating was used. In addition, density, cellulose and lignin data were measured for the dated CWD. The decay rate constants for spruce and larch were estimated on the basis of the density loss using a single negative exponential model. In the decay classes 1 to 3, the ages of the CWD were similar varying between 1 and 54 years for spruce and 3 and 40 years for larch with no significant differences between the classes; classes 1-3 are therefore not indicative for deadwood age. We found, however, distinct tree species-specific differences in decay classes 4 and 5, with larch CWD reaching an average age of 210 years in class 5 and spruce only 77 years. The mean CWD rate constants were 0.012 to 0.018 yr-1 for spruce and 0.005 to 0.012 yr-1 for larch. Cellulose and lignin time trends half-lives (using a multiple-exponential model) could be derived on the basis of the ages of the CWD. The half-lives for cellulose were 21 yr for spruce and 50 yr for larch. The half-life of lignin is considerably higher and may be more than 100 years in larch CWD.

  6. The release of 14C-depleted carbon from the deep ocean during the last deglaciation: Evidence from the Arabian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, Sean P.; Marchitto, Thomas M.; Lehman, Scott J.

    2010-09-01

    During the last deglaciation the concentration of CO 2 in the atmosphere increased and the radiocarbon activity (Δ 14C) of the atmosphere declined in two steps corresponding in timing to Heinrich Stadial 1 and the Younger Dryas. These changes have been attributed to the redistribution of 14C-depleted carbon from the deep ocean into the upper ocean and atmosphere. Recently, reconstructions of Δ 14C in intermediate waters of the eastern tropical Pacific have revealed pulses of very old water during the deglaciation, consistent with the release of 14C-depleted carbon from the deep ocean at this time. Here, we present reconstructions of intermediate water Δ 14C from the northern Arabian Sea near the coast of Oman. These reconstructions record significant aging of intermediate waters in the Arabian Sea during Heinrich Stadial 1 and, to a lesser extent, during the Younger Dryas. The timing and magnitude of 14C depletion in the Arabian Sea during Heinrich Stadial 1 is very similar to that previously observed in the eastern North Pacific near Baja California, indicating that similar mechanisms were involved in controlling Δ 14C at these two sites. The most parsimonious explanation of the Δ 14C records from the Arabian Sea and Baja California remains the release of 14C-depleted carbon from the deep ocean by renewal of upwelling and mixing in the Southern Ocean. These 14C-depleted waters would have been incorporated into thermocline and intermediate water masses formed in the Southern Ocean and spread northward into the Pacific, Indian and Atlantic Ocean basins.

  7. A Coral Based Reconstruction of Atmospheric Δ14C through the Mystery Interval (17.5 to 14.5 kyr BP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortlock, R. A.; Abdul, N. A.; Wright, J. D.; Fairbanks, R. G.; Cao, L.

    2011-12-01

    Reconstructions of atmospheric Δ14C from various archives (speleothems, planktic foraminifera, surface corals) record a ~ 190 per mil (%) decrease in Δ14C during the Mystery Interval (17.5 to 14.5 kyr BP). It has been suggested that the decrease results from the injection of 14C depleted waters during the deglacial. Supporting evidence comes from benthic forams in sediment cores off Baja, CA that record a 300% decrease in the 14C content of intermediate waters at the same time ice core records display an increase in atmospheric CO2. Records of opal burial in Southern Ocean sediments suggest increased upwelling (and release of 14C depleted CO2 to the atmosphere) during the Mystery Interval. We have updated our previously published record of atmospheric Δ14C with an additional 60-paired radiocarbon and U-series dated surface corals. A unique advantage to using the fossil coral archive is that both radiocarbon and calendar ages can be obtained from the same sample, whereas atmospheric 14C reconstructions generated from deep sea core microfossils require assigned calendar ages which are based on proxies correlated to ice cores and are subject to proxy interpretations, correlation errors, and uncertainties in ice core chronologies. Unfortunately small inaccuracies in the estimated calendar ages lead to large Δ14C errors. The updated coral record adds considerable coverage to both the Mystery Interval (previously constrained by coral data only at the boundaries in INTCAL04 and 09), and for the time period 26 to 18 kyr BP. Our record permits a better estimate as to the timing, duration, and magnitude of the decrease in Δ14C during the Mystery Interval. We observe a break in the declining 27 to 21 kyr BP trend of Δ14C at about 20 kyr BP. From 20 to 18.5 kyr BP Δ14C increases by about 100% to a maximum value of about 430%. Δ14C decreases to 300% by about 17 kyr BP at which time the long term declining trend in Δ14C is re-established and continues throughout the

  8. Increase of radiocarbon concentration in tree rings from Kujawy (SE Poland) around AD 774-775

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakowski, Andrzej Z.; Krąpiec, Marek; Huels, Mathias; Pawlyta, Jacek; Dreves, Alexander; Meadows, John

    2015-10-01

    Evidence of a rapid increase in atmospheric radiocarbon (14C) content in AD 774-775 was presented by Miyake et al. (2012), who observed an increase of about 12‰ in the 14C content in annual tree rings from Japanese cedar. Usoskin et al. (2013) report a similar 14C spike in German oak, and attribute it to exceptional solar activity. If this phenomenon is global in character, such rapid changes in 14C concentration may affect the accuracy of calibrated dates, as the existing calibration curve is composed mainly of decadal samples. Single-year samples of dendro-chronologically dated tree rings of deciduous oak (Quercus robur) from Kujawy, a village near Krakow (SE Poland), spanning the years AD 765-796, were collected and their 14C content was measured using the AMS system in the Leibniz Laboratory. The results clearly show a rapid increase of 9.2 ± 2.1‰ in the 14C concentration in tree rings between AD 774 and AD 775, with maximum Δ14C = 4.1 ± 2.3‰ noted in AD 776.

  9. Linked changes in marine dissolved organic carbon molecular size and radiocarbon age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, B. D.; Primeau, F. W.; Beaupré, S. R.; Guilderson, T. P.; Druffel, E. R. M.; McCarthy, M. D.

    2016-10-01

    Marine dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is a major global carbon reservoir, yet its cycling remains poorly understood. Previous work suggests that DOC molecular size and chemical composition can significantly affect its bioavailability. Thus, DOC size and composition may control DOC cycling and radiocarbon age (via Δ14C). Here we show that DOC molecular size is correlated to DOC Δ14C in the Pacific Ocean. Our results, based on a series of increasing molecular size fractions from three depths in the Pacific, show increasing DOC Δ14C with increasing molecular size. We use a size-age distribution model to predict the DOC and Δ14C of ultrafiltered DOC. The model predicts both large and small surface DOC with high Δ14C and a narrow range (200-500 Da) of low Δ14C DOC. Deep model offsets suggest different size distributions and/or Δ14C sources at 670-915 m. Our results suggest that molecular size and composition are linked to DOC reactivity and storage in the ocean.

  10. Radiocarbon constraints on the extent and evolution of the South Pacific glacial carbon pool.

    PubMed

    Ronge, T A; Tiedemann, R; Lamy, F; Köhler, P; Alloway, B V; De Pol-Holz, R; Pahnke, K; Southon, J; Wacker, L

    2016-01-01

    During the last deglaciation, the opposing patterns of atmospheric CO2 and radiocarbon activities (Δ(14)C) suggest the release of (14)C-depleted CO2 from old carbon reservoirs. Although evidences point to the deep Pacific as a major reservoir of this (14)C-depleted carbon, its extent and evolution still need to be constrained. Here we use sediment cores retrieved along a South Pacific transect to reconstruct the spatio-temporal evolution of Δ(14)C over the last 30,000 years. In ∼2,500-3,600 m water depth, we find (14)C-depleted deep waters with a maximum glacial offset to atmospheric (14)C (ΔΔ(14)C=-1,000‰). Using a box model, we test the hypothesis that these low values might have been caused by an interaction of aging and hydrothermal CO2 influx. We observe a rejuvenation of circumpolar deep waters synchronous and potentially contributing to the initial deglacial rise in atmospheric CO2. These findings constrain parts of the glacial carbon pool to the deep South Pacific. PMID:27157845

  11. Groundwater dating using radiocarbon in fulvic acid in groundwater containing fluorescein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, Kotaro; Kodama, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Takuma; Hama, Katsuhiro; Iwatsuki, Teruki; Miyajima, Tohru

    2013-05-01

    Natural DO14C is recognized as one of the most useful tracers in the estimation of groundwater age. Fluorescent dye is commonly used as an indicator of drilling fluid contamination during borehole investigation. Fluorescein (FS) is one of the most frequently used fluorescent dyes, yet as it contains little radiocarbon it may affect DO14C age when it is mixed with natural DOC. In this study, fulvic acid (FA) was isolated from groundwater containing FS and DO14C value of isolated FA was measured. Separation methods were proposed by using the difference between sorption and desorption behavior of FA and FS onto synthetic adsorbent resin. DO14C measurement on FA from a mixture of FA and FS is estimated by removing FS from the mixture and correcting for the amount of C derived from FS. Furthermore, DO14C age is compared with the groundwater age estimated by He. The results show that the values of DO14C age for separated FA estimated by the two methods had good agreement with those that corresponded to groundwater age estimated by He. This result indicates that DO14C is a useful indicator of groundwater age even for groundwater contaminated with FS.

  12. Radiocarbon constraints on the extent and evolution of the South Pacific glacial carbon pool

    PubMed Central

    Ronge, T. A.; Tiedemann, R.; Lamy, F.; Köhler, P.; Alloway, B. V.; De Pol-Holz, R.; Pahnke, K.; Southon, J.; Wacker, L.

    2016-01-01

    During the last deglaciation, the opposing patterns of atmospheric CO2 and radiocarbon activities (Δ14C) suggest the release of 14C-depleted CO2 from old carbon reservoirs. Although evidences point to the deep Pacific as a major reservoir of this 14C-depleted carbon, its extent and evolution still need to be constrained. Here we use sediment cores retrieved along a South Pacific transect to reconstruct the spatio-temporal evolution of Δ14C over the last 30,000 years. In ∼2,500–3,600 m water depth, we find 14C-depleted deep waters with a maximum glacial offset to atmospheric 14C (ΔΔ14C=−1,000‰). Using a box model, we test the hypothesis that these low values might have been caused by an interaction of aging and hydrothermal CO2 influx. We observe a rejuvenation of circumpolar deep waters synchronous and potentially contributing to the initial deglacial rise in atmospheric CO2. These findings constrain parts of the glacial carbon pool to the deep South Pacific. PMID:27157845

  13. Solar activity around AD 775 from aurorae and radiocarbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuhäuser, R.; Neuhäuser, D. L.

    2015-04-01

    A large variation in 14C around AD 775 has been considered to be caused by one or more solar super-flares within one year. We critically review all known aurora reports from Europe as well as the Near, Middle, and Far East from AD 731 to 825 and find 39 likely true aurorae plus four more potential aurorae and 24 other reports about halos, meteors, thunderstorms etc., which were previously misinterpreted as aurorae or misdated; we assign probabilities for all events according to five aurora criteria. We find very likely true aurorae in AD 743, 745, 762, 765, 772, 773, 793, 796, 807, and 817. There were two aurorae in the early 770s observed near Amida (now Diyarbak\\i r in Turkey near the Turkish-Syrian border), which were not only red, but also green-yellow - being at a relatively low geomagnetic latitude, they indicate a relatively strong solar storm. However, it cannot be argued that those aurorae (geomagnetic latitude 43 to 50°, considering five different reconstructions of the geomagnetic pole) could be connected to one or more solar super-flares causing the 14C increase around AD 775: There are several reports about low- to mid-latitude aurorae at 32 to 44° geomagnetic latitude in China and Iraq; some of them were likely observed (quasi-)simultaneously in two of three areas (Europe, Byzantium/Arabia, East Asia), one lasted several nights, and some indicate a particularly strong geomagnetic storm (red colour and dynamics), namely in AD 745, 762, 793, 807, and 817 - always without 14C peaks. We use 39 likely true aurorae as well as historic reports about sunspots together with the radiocarbon content from tree rings to reconstruct the solar activity: From AD {˜ 733} to {˜ 823}, we see at least nine Schwabe cycles; instead of one of those cycles, there could be two short, weak cycles - reflecting the rapid increase to a high 14C level since AD 775, which lies at the end of a strong cycle. In order to show the end of the dearth of naked-eye sunspots, we

  14. Radiocarbon source apportionment of urban and wildfire black and organic carbon aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouteva, G.; Fahrni, S. M.; Santos, G.; Randerson, J. T.; Czimczik, C. I.

    2013-12-01

    Fossil and non-fossil sources of black carbon (BC) and organic carbon (OC) in carbonaceous aerosols can be quantified unambiguously by radiocarbon (14C) measurements. However, accurate 14C-based source apportionment requires a clear and reproducible physical separation of OC and BC, as well as minimal sample contaminations with non-sample carbon. To achieve a clear separation, we used a thermo-optical aerosol analyzer (Sunset Laboratory Inc, USA) with a newly established protocol (Swiss_4S protocol, Zhang et al., 2012), specifically optimized to completely separate the OC and BC fractions with minimal charring and maximum BC recovery. A simple and efficient vacuum line was coupled to the analyzer to trap produced CO2 with high yields and low carbon blanks. Upon trapping, CO2 samples sealed into glass ampoules were converted to graphite and measured for their radiocarbon content at the Keck Carbon Cycle Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Laboratory at the University of California, Irvine. Here, we present the results from the radiocarbon analysis of a set of 14C reference materials, blanks and inter-comparison samples for both OC and BC with sample sizes as small as 5 μg C. We will also present initial results from a set of urban aerosol samples from Salt Lake City, collected throughout 2012 and 2013, and from interior Alaska, collected during the summer of 2013 near the Stuart Creek 2 wildfire.

  15. Gas chromatographic isolation of individual compounds from complex matrices for radiocarbon dating

    SciTech Connect

    Eglinton, T.I.; Aluwihare, L.I.; McNichol, A.P.; Bauer, J.E.; Druffel, E.R.M.

    1996-03-01

    This paper describes the application of a novel, practical approach for isolation of individual compounds from complex organic matrices for natural abundance radiocarbon measurement. This is achieved through the use of automated pereparative capillary gas chromatography (PCGC) to separate and recover sufficient quantities of individual target compounds for {sup 14}C analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). We developed and tested this approach using a suite of samples (plant lipids, petroleums) whose ages spanned the {sup 14}C time scale and which contained a variety of compound types (fatty acids, sterols, hydrocarbons). Comparison of individual compound and bulk radiocarbon signatures for the isotopically homogeneous samples studied revealed that {Delta}{sup 14}C values generally agreed well ({+-}10%). Background contamination was assessed at each stage of the isolation procedure, and incomplete solvent removal prior to combustion was the only significant source of additional carbon. Isotope fractionation was addressed through compound-specific stable carbon isotopic analyses. Fractionation of isotopes during isolation of individual compounds was minimal (<5% for {delta}{sup 13}C), provided the entire peak was collected during PCGC. Trapping of partially coeluting peaks did cause errors, and these results highlight the importance of conducting stable carbon isotopic measurements of each trapped compound in concert with AMS for reliable radiocarbon measurements. 29 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Lack of tissue renewal in human adult Achilles tendon is revealed by nuclear bomb (14)C.

    PubMed

    Heinemeier, Katja Maria; Schjerling, Peter; Heinemeier, Jan; Magnusson, Stig Peter; Kjaer, Michael

    2013-05-01

    Tendons are often injured and heal poorly. Whether this is caused by a slow tissue turnover is unknown, since existing data provide diverging estimates of tendon protein half-life that range from 2 mo to 200 yr. With the purpose of determining life-long turnover of human tendon tissue, we used the (14)C bomb-pulse method. This method takes advantage of the dramatic increase in atmospheric levels of (14)C, produced by nuclear bomb tests in 1955-1963, which is reflected in all living organisms. Levels of (14)C were measured in 28 forensic samples of Achilles tendon core and 4 skeletal muscle samples (donor birth years 1945-1983) with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and compared to known atmospheric levels to estimate tissue turnover. We found that Achilles tendon tissue retained levels of (14)C corresponding to atmospheric levels several decades before tissue sampling, demonstrating a very limited tissue turnover. The tendon concentrations of (14)C approximately reflected the atmospheric levels present during the first 17 yr of life, indicating that the tendon core is formed during height growth and is essentially not renewed thereafter. In contrast, (14)C levels in muscle indicated continuous turnover. Our observation provides a fundamental premise for understanding tendon function and pathology, and likely explains the poor regenerative capacity of tendon tissue.

  17. Fate of 14C-ethyl prothiofos insecticide in canola seeds and oils.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Gawad, Hassan; Hegazi, Bahira

    2010-02-01

    Canola plants were treated with (14)C- prohiofos under conditions simulating local agricultural practices. (14)C-residues in seeds were determined at different time intervals. At harvest time about 32 % of (14)C-activity was associated with oil. The methanol soluble (14)C-residues accounted for 12 % of the total seed residues after further seeds extraction, while the cake contained about 49 % of the total residues. About 69 % of the (14)C-activity in the crude oil could be eliminated by simulated commercial processes locally used for oil refining. Chromatographic analysis of crude and refined oil revealed the presence of the parent compound together with three metabolites which were identified as prothiofos oxon, O-ethyl phosphorothioate and O-ethyl S-propyl phosphorothioate, besides one unknown compound. While methanol extract revealed the presence of despropylthio prothiofos and O-ethyl phosphoric acid as free metabolites acid hydrolysis of the conjugated metabolites in the methanol extract yielded 2, 4-dichlorophenole which was detected by color. When rats were fed the extracted cake for 72 hours, the bound residues were found to be bioavailable. The main excretion route was via the expired air (42 %), while the (14)C-residues excreted in urine and feces were 30 % and 11 %, respectively. The radioactivity detected among various organs accounted to 7.5 %.Chromatographic analysis of urine indicated the presence of prothiofos oxon, O-ethyl phosphoric acid and 2, 4-dichlorophenole as main degradation products of prothiofos in free and conjugated form.

  18. In vitro dissolution and in vivo absorption of calcium [1-(14)c]butyrate in free or protected forms.

    PubMed

    Smith, David J; Barri, Adriana; Herges, Grant; Hahn, Joe; Yersin, Andrew G; Jourdan, Alissa

    2012-03-28

    Butyrate is a byproduct of microbial carbohydrate fermentation that occurs primarily in the large intestine. When added to feed, butyrate quickly disappears in the upper digestive tract. Because butyrate is important for epithelial cell development, mucosal integrity, and animal growth, an encapsulation technique has been developed that allows for the slow release of butyrate into the small and large intestines. The purpose of this study was to describe the in vitro release of calcium [1-(14)C]butyrate, formulated into a slow-release (protected) bead, into water and simulated intestinal fluids and to compare the in vivo absorption and disposition of unprotected versus protected calcium [1-(14)C]butyrate in broiler chicks. Formulation of calcium [1-(14)C]butyrate into protected beads allowed release of 5.8 ± 0.2 and 3.4 ± 0.2% of the formulated radiocarbon into water and gastric fluid, respectively, after 2 h of incubation. Beads incubated in gastric fluid for 2 h and subsequently incubated in simulated intestinal fluid released a total of 17.4 ± 0.8% of the formulated radioactivity. Release of respiratory [(14)C]CO(2) after oral dosing of aqueous calcium [1-(14)C]butyrate in broiler chicks peaked at 15.2 ± 5.2% per hour 1.5 h after dosing; in contrast, maximal rates of release in chicks dosed with protected calcium [1-(14)C]butyrate occurred 4 h after dosing at 9.0 ± 3.1% per hour. The data suggested an improved efficacy of protected butyrate delivery to intestinal tissues over nonprotected butyrate. This study confirmed that encapsulation strategies designed to enhance delivery of ingredients to improve intestinal health are effective at prolonging intestinal exposure to butyrate. Encapsulation of such ingredients might benefit the food and feed industries.

  19. 17 CFR 240.14c-1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... to indicate a relationship with any person, means: (1) Any corporation or organization (other than..., addresses and securities positions of beneficial owners has been given pursuant to § 240.14c-7(b)(3... purposes of § 240.14c-7, the term “record holder” means any broker, dealer, voting trustee,...

  20. Coral Radiocarbon Record of Interannual Variability in Wind-induced Upwelling Along the Coast of Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grumet, N. S.; Abram, N. J.; Beck, J. W.; Dunbar, R. B.; Gagan, M. K.

    2002-12-01

    Radiocarbon measurements from annually banded corals have been shown to track radiocarbon levels of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the surrounding surface water. As a result of nuclear weapons testing in the 1950s, production of excess radiocarbon has increased the contrast between surface and deep ocean carbon-14 concentrations. The temporal evolution of this gradient in radiocarbon is preserved in a coral record from the Mentawai Islands, Sumatra (0S, 98E), in the eastern Indian Ocean. During the southeast monsoon, alongshore winds generate Ekman upwelling along the Java-Sumatra coasts, which transports 14C-depleted thermocline water toward the surface-dwelling Mentawai corals. The strength of upwelling in the Mentawai Islands, which is characterized by lower sea surface temperatures, a shallower thermocline and lower sea surface height, reflects variability in the monsoon winds and is modulated by interannual atmosphere-ocean teleconnections. Bimonthly AMS-14C measurements on the Mentawai coral show that the seasonal radiocarbon signal is relatively weak, while the interannual signal is clearly marked by episodic depletions in radiocarbon levels. These events are most likely responding to a relaxation of the westerly trades and subsequent strengthening of the easterlies. Easterly anomalies are linked to a large scale adjustment of the sea surface height along the equator and a shallower eastern thermocline. Our results suggest that interannual climate variability is the dominant forcing mechanism with seasonal variability secondary. Together, bimonthly coral oxygen isotope and radiocarbon records capture variability in upwelling, and hence the strength of the southeast monsoon. Comparison with a coral radiocarbon record from the western Indian Ocean provides insights into oceanic processes across the Indian Ocean basin and the question of the existence of an Indian Ocean Dipole.

  1. A 14C age calibration curve for the last 60 ka: the Greenland-Hulu U/Th timescale and its impact on understanding the Middle to Upper Paleolithic transition in Western Eurasia.

    PubMed

    Weninger, Bernhard; Jöris, Olaf

    2008-11-01

    This paper combines the data sets available today for 14C-age calibration of the last 60 ka. By stepwise synchronization of paleoclimate signatures, each of these sets of 14C-ages is compared with the U/Th-dated Chinese Hulu Cave speleothem records, which shows global paleoclimate change in high temporal resolution. By this synchronization we have established an absolute-dated Greenland-Hulu chronological framework, against which global paleoclimate data can be referenced, extending the 14C-age calibration curve back to the limits of the radiocarbon method. Based on this new, U/Th-based Greenland(Hulu) chronology, we confirm that the radiocarbon timescale underestimates calendar ages by several thousand years during most of Oxygen Isotope Stage 3. Major atmospheric 14C variations are observed for the period of the Middle to Upper Paleolithic transition, which has significant implications for dating the demise of the last Neandertals. The early part of "the transition" (with 14C ages > 35.0 ka 14C BP) coincides with the Laschamp geomagnetic excursion. This period is characterized by highly-elevated atmospheric 14C levels. The following period ca. 35.0-32.5 ka 14C BP shows a series of distinct large-scale 14C age inversions and extended plateaus. In consequence, individual archaeological 14C dates older than 35.0 ka 14C BP can be age-calibrated with relatively high precision, while individual dates in the interval 35.0-32.5 ka 14C BP are subject to large systematic age-'distortions,' and chronologies based on large data sets will show apparent age-overlaps of up to ca. 5,000 cal years. Nevertheless, the observed variations in past 14C levels are not as extreme as previously proposed ("Middle to Upper Paleolithic dating anomaly"), and the new chronological framework leaves ample room for application of radiocarbon dating in the age-range 45.0-25.0 ka 14C BP at high temporal resolution.

  2. Concentrations and 14C age of nonstructural carbon in California oaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czimczik, C. I.; Druffel-Rodriguez, K.; Trumbore, S. E.

    2008-12-01

    Plants store photosynthetic assimilates as nonstructural carbon (NSC), mainly glucose, fructose, sucrose, and starch. NSC fuels processes such as respiration and growth. Research suggests that NSC represents a significant fraction of a plant's annual C budget, but temporal dynamics of NSC are poorly understood. We used concentration and radiocarbon (14C) measurements of NSC to investigate how temporal dynamics of NSC vary with life strategy and throughout a species' range. In Mediterranean environments, oaks have developed two strategies (evergreen and deciduous) to cope with drought. Within California, the uncertainty of annual winter rain increases from north to south. We compared two evergreen and deciduous species: Coastal and Interior live oak (Quercus agrifolia and wislizenii) and Valley and Blue oak (Q. lobata and douglasii). Samples (4 mm cores to 20 cm depth at dbh) were taken in 2008 before leaf-out and fall at five sites which represent an inland to coast temperature gradient from high to low summer temperatures as well as a north- south precipitation gradient. Sugars were isolated by shaking in methanol-water and quantified using a spectrometric micro-plate technique. Starch was isolated by boiling in ethanol followed by HCl digestion and quantified manometrically. 14C contents were measured by AMS. Preliminary findings indicate that in live oaks, winter sugar concentrations are constant throughout the tree and across sites, while 14C concentrations increase towards a tree's center. This suggests that the NSC pool oaks is not well mixed. Future work will elucidate whether plants can access these older NSC stores.

  3. Low-Charge State AMS for High Throughput 14C Quantification

    SciTech Connect

    Ognibene, T.J.; Roberts, M.L.; Southon, J.R.; Vogel, J.S.

    2000-06-16

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) quantifies attomole (10{sup -18}) amounts of {sup 14}C in milligram sized samples. This sensitivity is used to trace nutrients, toxins and therapeutics in humans and animals at less than {micro}g/kg doses containing 1-100 nCi of {sup 14}C. Widespread use of AMS in pharmaceutical development and biochemical science has been hampered by the size and expense of the typical spectrometer that has been developed for high precision radiocarbon dating. The precision of AMS can be relaxed for biochemical tracing, but sensitivity, accuracy and throughput are important properties that must be maintained in spectrometers designed for routine quantification. We are completing installation of a spectrometer that will maintain the high throughput of our primary spectrometer but which requires less than 20% of the floor space and of the cost. Sensitivity and throughput are kept high by using the LLNL intense cesium sputter ion source with solid graphitic samples. Resultant space-charge effects are minimized by careful modeling to find optimal ion transport in the spectrometer. A long charge-changing ''stripper gas'' volume removes molecular isobars at potentials of a few hundred kiloVolts, reducing the size of the accelerating component. Fast ion detectors count at high rates to keep a wide dynamic range for 14 C concentrations. Solid sample presentation eliminates the sample cross contamination that degrades accuracy and the effects of ''memory'' in the ion source. Automated processes are under development for conversion of liquid and solid biological samples to the preferred graphitic form for the ion source.

  4. Decay of sup 226 Ra by sup 14 C emission

    SciTech Connect

    Weselka, D.; Hille, P.; Chalupka, A. )

    1990-02-01

    Previous observation of heavy-ion emission from {sup 226}Ra has been confirmed. Charge and energy of the emitted fragment were measured using thin {sup 226}Ra sources and polycarbonate track-recording films. Decay by {sup 14}C emission could be identified unambiguously. The track-detector was calibrated with tandem-accelerated {sup 14}C and {sup 16}O ions and tested by observing the {sup 14}C emission from {sup 223}Ra yielding a branching ratio of (5.0{plus minus}1.0){times}10{sup {minus}10}. In the case of {sup 226}Ra our result for the {sup 14}C/{alpha} ratio is (2.3{plus minus}0.8){times}10{sup {minus}11}. Estimates of partial half-lives of Ra isotopes for {sup 14}C emission are discussed.

  5. New constraints on deglacial marine radiocarbon anomalies from a depth transect near Baja California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, Colin M.; Lehman, Scott J.; Marchitto, Thomas M.; Carriquiry, José D.; Ortiz, Joseph D.

    2016-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that radiocarbon activities (Δ14C) in the low-latitude, middepth Pacific and Indian Oceans were anomalously low during Heinrich Stadial 1 (HS1, ~17.8-14.6 ka) and the Younger Dryas (YD, ~12.8-11.5 ka), coincident with intervals of rising atmospheric CO2 concentration and declining atmospheric Δ14C. However, a full explanation of these events remains elusive due to sparse and sometimes conflicting data. Here we present new 14C measurements on benthic and planktic foraminifera that, in combination with previously published measurements, enable us to reconstruct the Δ14C depth gradient near Baja California. Vertical profiles were similar to present during the Last Glacial Maximum and Bølling/Allerod (14.6-12.8 ka) but display a pronounced middepth (~700 m) Δ14C minimum during HS1 and the YD. The latter observation, along with a comparison to other regional reconstructions, appears to rule out intermediate waters from the north or from directly below as proximate sources of aged 14C-depleted ocean carbon during deglaciation and point instead to changes in the composition of Equatorial Pacific intermediate waters. Simple mixing constraints require Equatorial Pacific intermediate waters to be only slightly lower in Δ14C than at Baja California, in contrast with previous observations of extremely low Δ14C at Galapagos Rise. While the latter may have been influenced by localized releases of geologic (14C-dead) CO2, the smaller and more widespread deglacial Δ14C anomalies in the Arabian Sea and North Pacific seem to require a source of aged carbon in the glacial deep Southern and Pacific Oceans for which there is growing evidence.

  6. Appearance of circulating and tissue /sup 14/C-lipids after oral /sup 14/C-tripalmitate administration in the late pregnant rat

    SciTech Connect

    Argiles, J.; Herrera, E.

    1989-02-01

    Studies were performed to determine whether and/or how dietary lipids participate in maternal hypertriglyceridemia during late gestation in the rat. After oral administration of glycerol-tri(1-14C)-palmitate, total radioactivity in plasma increased more rapidly in 20-day pregnant rats than in either 19-day pregnant rats or virgin controls. At the peak of plasma radioactivity, four hours after the tracer was administered, most of the plasma label corresponded to 14C-lipids in triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (d less than 1.006), and when expressed per micromol of triglyceride, values were higher in pregnant than in virgin rats. The difference was less after 24 hours, although at this time the level of 14C-lipids in d less than 1.006 lipoproteins was still higher in 20-day pregnant rats than in virgins. Tissue 14C-lipids, as expressed per gram of fresh weight, were similar in pregnant and virgin rats, but the values in mammary glands were much higher in the former group. Estimated recovery of administered radioactivity four hours after tracer in total white adipose tissue, mammary glands, and plasma lipids was higher in pregnant than in virgin rats. No difference was found between 20-day pregnant and virgin rats either in the label retained in the gastrointestinal tract or in that exhaled as 14C-CO2 during the first four hours following oral administration of 14C-tripalmitate. These findings plus the known maternal hyperphagia, indicate that in the rat at late pregnancy triglyceride intestinal absorption is unchanged or even enhanced and that dietary lipids actively contribute to both maternal hypertriglyceridemia and lipid uptake by the mammary gland.

  7. AMS radiocarbon dating of mortar: The case study of the medieval UNESCO site of Modena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmine, Lubritto; Caroselli, Marta; Lugli, Stefano; Marzaioli, Fabio; Nonni, Sara; Marchetti Dori, S.; Terrasi, Filippo

    2015-10-01

    The carbon dioxide contributing to binder formation during the set of a lime mortar reflects the atmospheric 14C content at the time of construction of a building. For this reason, the 14C dating of mortars is used with increasing frequencies in archaeological and architectural research. Mortars, however, may also contain carbonaceous contaminants potentially affecting radiocarbon dating. The Centre for Isotopic Research on Cultural and Environmental heritage (CIRCE) of the Second University of Naples (SUN) has recently obtained some promising results in mortar radiocarbon dating thanks to the development of a procedure (i.e. CryoSoniC/Cryo2SoniC) aiming to eliminate exogenous C contamination that may occur in a mortar. The construction history of the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Modena (Italy) is still controversial and represents a challenging case study for the application of absolute dating methodologies for different reasons. From the point of view of 14C dating, for example, given the high percentage of carbonate aggregates composing these samples, Modena mortars represent an experimental test particularly indicative of exogenous carbon sources suppression ensuring methodology accuracy. In this paper several AMS Radiocarbon dates were carried out on lime lumps with the aim to: (i) verify procedure accuracy by a comparison of the results obtainable from lime lumps dated after different treatments (i.e. bulk lime lumps vs. CryoSoniC purified lime lumps); (ii) compare different building phases absolute chronology for the medieval UNESCO site of Modena, with that assumed by historical sources in order to assess preliminary the 14C dating feasibility for of the site. Historical temporal constraints and mortar clustering, based on petrography, have been applied to define a temporal framework of the analyzed structure. Moreover, a detailed petrographic characterization of mortars was used both as a preliminary tool for the choice of samples and to infer about the

  8. Past Radiocarbon Profiles from Deep-Sea Corals in the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, L. F.; Adkins, J. F.; Fernandez, D. P.; Wang, S. L.

    2004-12-01

    Deep-sea corals are an excellent archive of ocean history since their aragonitic, uranium-rich skeletons are well suited to U-Th dating. This independent dating technique means that 14C is no longer needed for chronometry and can be used to reconstruct radiocarbon profiles of the water column. We have many thousands of coral individuals ranging in depth from 1000 - 2500 m and the first 100 U-Th dates show a bias towards ages of the last glacial and deglaciation. These samples are ideally suited to monitoring the variable depth of the contact between Northern and Southern sourced waters. Initial radiocarbon data exhibit D14C gradients with depth that are large compared to the smooth profile observed in the modern ocean. Samples from one depth (~1750m) but with ages spanning Heinrich 1 through to the Younger Dryas not only reflect the events seen in global records, but also demonstrate transient deep-sea circulation changes. These transient D14C excursions are observed to occur abruptly, even within the lifetime of one coral (~100 years). In addition, these samples allow us to investigate the controls on the atmospheric 14C/12C record, namely the interplay between the production rate of 14C and its removal by ocean circulation. Combining this radiocarbon data with passive tracers of the mixing ratio of Northern to Southern sourced water would allow us to calculate ventilation rates for the deep ocean. Ultimately, we aim to reconstruct ventilation rates for the NW Atlantic through the last glacial and deglaciation.

  9. Premises and physical mechanisms to explain plateau boundaries in marine planktic 14C records as absolute age markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarnthein, Michael; Grootes, Pieter M.

    2010-05-01

    resultant sedimentation rate changes to a minimum, minimizing resultant planktic reservoir ages, and monitoring strict criteria regarding realistic paired benthic reservoir ages, e.g., by testing alternative models of 14C plateau tuning. Being applied to eight cores this approach led to realistic estimates of absolute and 14C reservoir ages as well as of sedimentation rates for various key regions of the ocean. Refs.: Reimer, P. et al., 2010, Radiocarbon, 51 (4), 1111-1150. Sarnthein et al., 2007, in: A. Schmittner et al., AGU Monograph 173, 175-196.

  10. Age validation of canary rockfish (Sebastes pinniger) using two independent otolith techniques: lead-radium and bomb radiocarbon dating.

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, A H; Kerr, L A; Cailliet, G M; Brown, T A; Lundstrom, C C; Stanley, R D

    2007-11-04

    Canary rockfish (Sebastes pinniger) have long been an important part of recreational and commercial rockfish fishing from southeast Alaska to southern California, but localized stock abundances have declined considerably. Based on age estimates from otoliths and other structures, lifespan estimates vary from about 20 years to over 80 years. For the purpose of monitoring stocks, age composition is routinely estimated by counting growth zones in otoliths; however, age estimation procedures and lifespan estimates remain largely unvalidated. Typical age validation techniques have limited application for canary rockfish because they are deep dwelling and may be long lived. In this study, the unaged otolith of the pair from fish aged at the Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada was used in one of two age validation techniques: (1) lead-radium dating and (2) bomb radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) dating. Age estimate accuracy and the validity of age estimation procedures were validated based on the results from each technique. Lead-radium dating proved successful in determining a minimum estimate of lifespan was 53 years and provided support for age estimation procedures up to about 50-60 years. These findings were further supported by {Delta}{sup 14}C data, which indicated a minimum estimate of lifespan was 44 {+-} 3 years. Both techniques validate, to differing degrees, age estimation procedures and provide support for inferring that canary rockfish can live more than 80 years.

  11. The in-vitro metabolism of [14C]pentobarbitone and [14C]phenobarbitone by hamster liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Seago, A; Gorrod, J W

    1987-02-01

    The metabolism of [14C]pentobarbitone and [14C]phenobarbitone has been reinvestigated using an in-vitro hepatic microsomal system (Syrian hamsters, Aroclor 1254 induction). The incubation system was routinely supplemented with EDTA (1 mM) and a substrate concentration study revealed the metabolism of [14C]pentobarbitone to be concentration-dependent, with the greatest overall metabolism (greater than 50%) occurring at 0.054 mumol per 3.5 mL. With [14C]phenobarbitone as substrate, overall metabolism was extremely low (3%) and independent of substrate concentration. Addition of further cofactors to the incubation mixture at 20 min intervals over an extended period resulted in almost complete metabolism of [14C]pentobarbitone (100 min), 3'-hydroxypentobarbitone and 3'-oxopentobarbitone being identified as metabolites together with many minor, unidentified products. With [14C]phenobarbitone as the substrate, cofactor addition up to 120 min resulted in 8% overall metabolism; p-hydroxyphenobarbitone was identified as a product of metabolism; other minor products were unidentified. The metabolism studies failed to produce a metabolite having the properties of the N-hydroxylated product of either [14C]pentobarbitone or [14C]phenobarbitone within the detection limits available (0.02% of 0.5 mumol per incubate).

  12. Radiocarbon dating of small terrestrial gastropod shells in North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pigati, J.S.; Rech, J.A.; Nekola, J.C.

    2010-01-01

    Fossil shells of small terrestrial gastropods are commonly preserved in wetland, alluvial, loess, and glacial deposits, as well as in sediments at many archeological sites. These shells are composed largely of aragonite (CaCO3) and potentially could be used for radiocarbon dating, but they must meet two criteria before their 14C ages can be considered to be reliable: (1) when gastropods are alive, the 14C activity of their shells must be in equilibrium with the 14C activity of the atmosphere, and (2) after burial, their shells must behave as closed systems with respect to carbon. To evaluate the first criterion, we conducted a comprehensive examination of the 14C content of the most common small terrestrial gastropods in North America, including 247 AMS measurements of modern shell material (3749 individual shells) from 46 different species. The modern gastropods that we analyzed were all collected from habitats on carbonate terrain and, therefore, the data presented here represent worst-case scenarios. In sum, ~78% of the shell aliquots that we analyzed did not contain dead carbon from limestone or other carbonate rocks even though it was readily available at all sites, 12% of the aliquots contained between 5 and 10% dead carbon, and a few (3% of the total) contained more than 10%. These results are significantly lower than the 20-30% dead carbon that has been reported previously for larger taxa living in carbonate terrain. For the second criterion, we report a case study from the American Midwest in which we analyzed fossil shells of small terrestrial gastropods (7 taxa; 18 AMS measurements; 173 individual shells) recovered from late-Pleistocene sediments. The fossil shells yielded 14C ages that were statistically indistinguishable from 14C ages of well-preserved plant macrofossils from the same stratum. Although just one site, these results suggest that small terrestrial gastropod shells may behave as closed systems with respect to carbon over geologic

  13. Cutaneous uptake of 14C-HD vapor by the hairless guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Logan, T P; Millard, C B; Shutz, M; Schulz, S M; Lee, R B; Bongiovanni, R

    1999-05-01

    The hairless guinea pig (HGP) is used by our laboratory to model the human cutaneous response to sulfur mustard (HD), bis(2-chloroethylsulfide), exposure. We determined the HD content in the skin of HGP after a 7-min exposure to vapors saturated with a mixture of HD and 14C-HD. Concentration/time (CT) values in the range of 2 micrograms/cm2/min were determined by counting skin 14C disintegrations per min (dpm) in animals euthanized immediately after exposure. These values are similar to human penetration rates obtained by other investigators. A rate curve monitoring the reduction in skin 14C dpm was developed for animals euthanized between 0 and 24 hr post- exposure. This curve showed the greatest change after 1 hr. The epidermal (62%) to dermal (38%) ratio of 14C at 24 hr was measured for two animals. We saw no site preference for HD penetration among the 8 sites used. The 14C content of template adhesive tape was determined to follow HD distribution. These results contribute to a better understanding of the cutaneous response to HD in the HGP model.

  14. Percutaneous absorption of ( sup 14 C)DDT and ( sup 14 C)benzo(a)pyrene from soil

    SciTech Connect

    Wester, R.C.; Maibach, H.I.; Bucks, D.A.; Sedik, L.; Melendres, J.; Liao, C.; DiZio, S. )

    1990-10-01

    The objective was to determine percutaneous absorption of DDT and benzo(a)pyrene in vitro and in vivo from soil into and through skin. Soil (Yolo County 65-California-57-8; 26% sand, 26% clay, 48% silt) was passed through 10-, 20-, and 48-mesh sieves. Soil then retained by 80-mesh was mixed with (14C)-labeled chemical at 10 ppm. Acetone solutions at 10 ppm were prepared for comparative analysis. Human cadaver skin was dermatomed to 500 microns and used in glass diffusion cells with human plasma as the receptor fluid (3 ml/hr flow rate) for a 24-hr skin application time. With acetone vehicle, DDT (18.1 +/- 13.4%) readily penetrated into human skin. Significantly less DDT (1.0 +/- 0.7%) penetrated into human skin from soil. DDT would not partition from human skin into human plasma in the receptor phase (less than 0.1%). With acetone vehicle, benzo(a)pyrene (23.7 +/- 9.7%) readily penetrated into human skin. Significantly less benzo(a)pyrene (1.4 +/- 0.9%) penetrated into human skin from soil. Benzo(a)pyrene would not partition from human skin into human plasma in the receptor phase (less than 0.1%). Substantivity (skin retention) was investigated by applying 14C-labeled chemical to human skin in vitro for only 25 min. After soap and water wash, 16.7 +/- 13.2% of DDT applied in acetone remained absorbed to skin. With soil only 0.25 +/- 0.11% of DDT remained absorbed to skin. After soap and water wash 5.1 +/- 2.1% of benzo(a)pyrene applied in acetone remained absorbed to skin. With soil only 0.14 +/- 0.13% of benzo(a)pyrene remained absorbed to skin.

  15. Radiocarbon analysis of stratospheric CO2 retrieved from AirCore sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Dipayan; Chen, Huilin; Been, Henk A.; Kivi, Rigel; Meijer, Harro A. J.

    2016-10-01

    Radiocarbon (14C) is an important atmospheric tracer and one of the many used in the understanding of the global carbon budget, which includes the greenhouse gases CO2 and CH4. Measurement of radiocarbon in atmospheric CO2 generally requires the collection of large air samples (a few liters) from which CO2 is extracted and then the concentration of radiocarbon is determined using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). However, the regular collection of air samples from the stratosphere, for example using aircraft and balloons, is prohibitively expensive. Here we describe radiocarbon measurements in stratospheric CO2 collected by the AirCore sampling method. AirCore is an innovative atmospheric sampling system, which comprises a long tube descending from a high altitude with one end open and the other closed, and it has been demonstrated to be a reliable, cost-effective sampling system for high-altitude profile (up to ≈ 30 km) measurements of CH4 and CO2. In Europe, AirCore measurements have been being performed on a regular basis near Sodankylä (northern Finland) since September 2013. Here we describe the analysis of samples from two such AirCore flights made there in July 2014, for determining the radiocarbon concentration in stratospheric CO2. The two AirCore profiles were collected on consecutive days. The stratospheric part of the AirCore was divided into six sections, each containing ≈ 35 µg CO2 ( ≈ 9.6 µgC), and stored in a stratospheric air subsampler constructed from 1/4 in. coiled stainless steel tubing ( ≈ 3 m). A small-volume extraction system was constructed that enabled > 99.5 % CO2 extraction from the stratospheric air samples. Additionally, a new small-volume high-efficiency graphitization system was constructed for graphitization of these extracted CO2 samples, which were measured at the Groningen AMS facility. Since the stratospheric samples were very similar in mass, reference samples were also prepared in the same mass range for

  16. A simplified approach to calibrating [sup 14]C dates

    SciTech Connect

    Talma, A.S.; Vogel, J.C. )

    1993-01-01

    The authors propose a simplified approach to the calibration of radiocarbon dates. They use splines through the tree-ring data as calibration curves, thereby eliminating a large part of the statistical scatter of the actual data points. To express the age range, they transform the [plus minus]1 [sigma] and [plus minus]2 [sigma] values of the BP age to calendar dates and interpret them as the 68% and 95% confidence intervals. This approach by-passes the conceptual problems of the transfer of individual probability values from the radiocarbon to the calendar age. They have adapted software to make this calibration possible.

  17. Application of Bomb Radiocarbon Chronologies to Shortfin Mako (Isurus oxyrinchus)

    SciTech Connect

    Ardizzone, D; Cailliet, G M; Natanson, L J; Andrews, A H; Kerr, L A; Brown, T A

    2007-07-16

    and the number of samples for MIA analysis was insufficient for some months. Hence, unequivocal validation of shortfin mako age estimates has yet to be accomplished. Atmospheric testing of thermonuclear devices in the 1950s and 1960s effectively doubled the natural atmospheric radiocarbon ({sup 14}C). The elevated {sup 14}C levels were first recorded in 1957-58, with a peak around 1963. As a consequence, {sup 14}C entered the ocean through gas exchange with the atmosphere at the ocean surface and in terrestrial runoff. Despite variable oceanographic conditions, a worldwide rise of the bomb {sup 14}C signal entered the ocean mixed layer as dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in 1957-58. The large amounts of {sup 14}C released from the bomb tests produced a signature that can be followed through time, throughout the marine food web, and into deeper waters. The marked increase of radiocarbon levels was first measured in the DIC of seawater and in biogenic marine carbonates of hermatypic corals in Florida. Subsequently, this record was documented in corals from other regions and in the thallus of rhodoliths. The accumulation of radiocarbon in the hard parts of most marine organisms in the mixed layer (such as fish otoliths and bivalves) was synchronous with the coral time-series. This technique has been used to validate age estimates and longevity of numerous bony fishes to date, as well as to establish bomb radiocarbon chronologies from different oceans. In the first application of this technique to lamnoid sharks, validated annual band-pair deposition in vertebral growth bands for the porbeagle (Lamna nasus) aged up to 26 years. Radiocarbon values from samples obtained from 15 porbeagle caught in the western North Atlantic Ocean (some of which were known-age) produced a chronology similar in magnitude to the reference carbonate chronology for that region. The observed phase shift of about 3 years was attributed to different sources of carbon between vertebrae and those for

  18. Distributions of dissolved organic and inorganic carbon and radiocarbon in the eastern North Pacific continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, James E.; Druffel, Ellen R. M.; Wolgast, David M.; Griffin, Sheila; Masiello, Caroline A.

    Temporal variations in the natural radiocarbon ( 14C) signatures of dissolved organic and inorganic carbon (DOC and DIC, respectively) in seawater have been studied previously (Druffel, E.R.M., Bauer, J.E., Williams, P.M., Griffin, S., Wolgast, D.M., 1996. Seasonal variability of radiocarbon in particulate organic carbon in the northeast Pacific. J. Geophys. Res. 101, 20 543-20 552; Bauer, J.E., Druffel, E.R.M., Williams, P.M., Wolgast, D.M., Griffin, S., 1998. Temporal variability in dissolved organic carbon and radiocarbon in the eastern North Pacific Ocean. J. Geophys. Res. 103, 2867-2882) at a long-term time-series station (Sta. M: 32°N, 123W) in the eastern North Pacific located at the eastern edge of the North Pacific abyssal plain. In June 1995 a transect was made from Sta. M inshore to approximately 500 m depth in order to evaluate the distributions of 14C in DOC and DIC from the abyssal plain to the upper continental slope. Concentrations and Δ 14C values of DOC in mixed layer waters (25 and 85 m) decreased toward the upper slope. In deeper waters, concentrations and Δ 14C values were in general similar at all three sites. Differences in DOC concentrations and Δ 14C-DOC between Sta. M and the rise and upper slope sites were explained in part by the mixing of DOC and Δ 14C along constant density ( σt) surfaces. However, specific deviations from conservative behavior due to mixing were observed for Δ 14C-DOC at mesopelagic (˜700 m) and near-bottom (˜3600- 3900 m) depths of the continental rise. Comparable findings are reported for DIC, where σt-normalized concentrations and Δ 14C values in Sta. M, rise and upper slope waters were similar, with the exception of slight increases in concentrations and Δ 14C values in near-bottom waters of the rise. These observations indicate that both DOC and DIC in continental rise and slope surface waters of the eastern North Pacific Ocean margin are comprised of a component of actively upwelled material derived

  19. Laboratory Experiments to Evaluate Diffusion of 14C into Nevada Test Site Carbonate Aquifer Matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald L. Hershey; William Howcroft; Paul W. Reimus

    2003-03-01

    Determination of groundwater flow velocities at the Nevada Test Site is important since groundwater is the principal transport medium of underground radionuclides. However, 14C-based groundwater velocities in the carbonate aquifers of the Nevada Test Site are several orders of magnitude slower than velocities derived from the Underground Test Area regional numerical model. This discrepancy has been attributed to the loss or retardation of 14C from groundwater into the surrounding aquifer matrix making 14C-based groundwater ages appear much older. Laboratory experiments were used to investigate the retardation of 14C in the carbonate aquifers at the Nevada Test Site. Three sets of experiments were conducted evaluating the diffusion of 14C into the carbonate aquifer matrix, adsorption and/or isotopic exchange onto the pore surfaces of the carbonate matrix, and adsorption and/or isotopic exchange onto the fracture surfaces of the carbonate aquifer. Experimental results a nd published aquifer matrix and fracture porosities from the Lower Carbonate Aquifer were applied to a 14C retardation model. The model produced an extremely wide range of retardation factors because of the wide range of published aquifer matrix and fracture porosities (over three orders of magnitude). Large retardation factors suggest that groundwater with very little measured 14C activity may actually be very young if matrix porosity is large relative to the fracture porosity. Groundwater samples collected from highly fractured aquifers with large effective fracture porosities may have relatively small correction factors, while samples from aquifers with a few widely spaced fractures may have very large correction factors. These retardation factors were then used to calculate groundwater velocities from a proposed flow path at the Nevada Test Site. The upper end of the range of 14C correction factors estimated groundwater velocities that appear to be at least an order of magnitude too high compared

  20. Radiocarbon dating and archeology in North America.

    PubMed

    Johnson, F

    1967-01-13

    The history of the development of a radiocarbon chronology shows how the establishment of the times of events and the order of them has greatly improved the understanding of prehistory in North America. This is true also of other parts of the world. Too little has been said of existing discordance between archeologically determined sequences, and interregional associations, and the radiocarbon chronology. It does appear that these will be resolved as additional dates are added and as the results become more finely calibrated so that secular variations may be accounted for. The collaborative aspect of the venture was apparent at the outset. Nevertheless no one expects an archeologist to delve into nuclear physics and geochemistry, and vice versa. There is great need, nevertheless, for the man in the laboratory to comprehend the difficulties of sample collecting and of judgement of the significance of the source of organic matter to be dated. At the same time, the archeologist must become more familiar with the importance of the various steps in the processing of the sample and with, what is most vital, interpretation of the significance of the numbers that appear on the counters.

  1. Gaseous radiocarbon measurements of small samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruff, M.; Szidat, S.; Gäggeler, H. W.; Suter, M.; Synal, H.-A.; Wacker, L.

    2010-04-01

    Radiocarbon dating by means of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is a well-established method for samples containing carbon in the milligram range. However, the measurement of small samples containing less than 50 μg carbon often fails. It is difficult to graphitise these samples and the preparation is prone to contamination. To avoid graphitisation, a solution can be the direct measurement of carbon dioxide. The MICADAS, the smallest accelerator for radiocarbon dating in Zurich, is equipped with a hybrid Cs sputter ion source. It allows the measurement of both, graphite targets and gaseous CO 2 samples, without any rebuilding. This work presents experiences dealing with small samples containing 1-40 μg carbon. 500 unknown samples of different environmental research fields have been measured yet. Most of the samples were measured with the gas ion source. These data are compared with earlier measurements of small graphite samples. The performance of the two different techniques is discussed and main contributions to the blank determined. An analysis of blank and standard data measured within years allowed a quantification of the contamination, which was found to be of the order of 55 ng and 750 ng carbon (50 pMC) for the gaseous and the graphite samples, respectively. For quality control, a number of certified standards were measured using the gas ion source to demonstrate reliability of the data.

  2. Cosmogenic Radiocarbon as a Means of Studying Solar Activity in the Past

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocharov, G. E.; Ogurtsov, M. G.; Tsereteli, S. L.

    2003-12-01

    A series of yearly data on the concentration of radioactive carbon 14C in tree rings measured at the Tbilisi State University in 1983-1986 and covering the time interval 1600-1940 is statistically analyzed. We find evidence for a 22-year cyclicity in the intensity of Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) during the Maunder minimum of the solar activity (1645-1715), testifying that the solar dynamo mechanism continued to operate during this epoch. Variations of Δ14C on timescales of tens and hundreds of years correlate well with the corresponding variations of the GCR intensity and solar activity, making radiocarbon a reliable source of information on long-timescale variations of solar activity in the past. Short-timescale (<30 years) fluctuations of Δ14C may be appreciably distorted by time variations not associated directly with solar activity; probable origins of this distortion are discussed.

  3. Radiocarbon variability in the western equatorial Pacific inferred from a high-resolution coral record from Nauru Island

    SciTech Connect

    Guilderson, T.P.; Schrag, D.P.; Kashgarian, M.; Southon, J.

    1998-10-01

    We have generated a high resolution coral {Delta}{sup 14}C record spanning the last 50 years to document the seasonal and interannual redistribution of surface waters in the western tropical Pacific. Prebomb (1947{endash}1956) {Delta}{sup 14}C values average {minus}63{per_thousand} and have a total range of 30{per_thousand}. Values begin to increase in 1957, reaching a maximum of 137{per_thousand} in mid-1983. Large interannual variability of up to 80{per_thousand} closely follows the El Ni{tilde n}o-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). During each ENSO warm phase, {Delta}{sup 14}C values begin to increase, reflecting the reduction of low-{sup 14}C water upwelling in the east and the invasion of subtropical water into the western equatorial tropical Pacific. Maximum {Delta}{sup 14}C values are in phase or lag the corresponding sea surface temperature maxima in the eastern tropical Pacific, whereas the rapid return to more negative {Delta}{sup 14}C is in phase with eastern Pacific ENSO indices. The highest-amplitude excursions occur during the 1965/1966 and 1972/1973 events, when the {sup 14}C contrast is highest between the eastern Pacific and subtropics. The 1982/1983 El Ni{tilde n}o, although a larger ENSO event, has a lower {Delta}{sup 14}C amplitude, reflecting the penetration of bomb radiocarbon into the equatorial undercurrent and the reduced contrast in {Delta}{sup 14}C between thermocline and subtropical surface waters at that time. This coral record demonstrates the potential for using similar radiocarbon time series for documenting variability in Pacific shallow circulation over interannual and decadal timescales. {copyright} 1998 American Geophysical Union

  4. Simulation of bombe radiocarbon transient in the Mediterranean Sea using a high-resolution regional model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayache, Mohamed; Dutay, Jean-claude; Mouchet, Anne; Tisnérat-Laborde, Nadine; Houma-Bachari, Fouzia; Louanchi, Ferial; jean-baptiste, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    The radiocarbon isotope of carbon "14C", which a half-life of 5730 years, is continually formed naturally in the atmosphere by the neutron bombardment of 14N atoms. However, in the 1950s and early1960s, the atmospheric testing of thermonuclear weapons added a large amount of 14C into the atmosphere. The gradual infusion and spread of this "bomb" 14C through the oceans has provided a unique opportunity to gain insight into the specific rates characterizing the carbon cycle and ocean ventilations on such timescales. This numerical study provides, for the first time in the Mediterranean Sea, a simulation of the anthropogenic 14C invasion covers a 70-years period spanning the entire 14C generated by the bomb test, by using a high resolution regional model NEMO-MED12 (1/12° of horizontal resolution). This distribution and evolution of Δ14C of model is compared with recent high resolution 14C measurements obtained from surface water corals (Tisnérat-Laborde et al, 2013). In addition to providing constraints on the air-sea transfer of 14C, our work provides information on the thermohaline circulation and the ventilation of the deep waters to constrain the degree to which the NEMO-MED12 can reproduce correctly the main hydrographic features of the Mediterranean Sea circulation and its variations estimated from corals 14C time series measurements. This study is part of the work carried out to assess the robustness of the NEMO-MED12 model, which will be used to study the evolution of the climate and its effect on the biogeochemical cycles in the Mediterranean Sea, and to improve our ability to predict the future evolution of the Mediterranean Sea under the increasing anthropogenic pressure.

  5. Effect of HF leaching on 14C dates of pottery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goslar, Tomasz; Kozłowski, Janusz; Szmyt, Marzena; Czernik, Justyna

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the experiments with 14C dating of two potsherds, which contained carbon dispersed rather homogeneously in their clay fabric. After AAA treatment, the potsherds still appeared to be contaminated with young carbon, presumably connected with humic acids. To make removal of humic acids more effective, we treated the sherds with HF acid of different concentration. The 14C results obtained demonstrate that HF treatment indeed helps to remove humic contaminants, but it also mobilizes carbon bound to raw clay, which may make 14C dates too old. We conclude therefore, that using a simple combination of HF and AAA treatment seems insufficient in reliable 14C dating of carbon homogeneously dispersed in the volume of potsherds.

  6. The next chapter of direct phytolith 14C dating: debunking the myth of occluded photosynthetic carbon exclusivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, G.; Harutyunyan, A.; Alexandre, A. E.; Reyerson, P. E.; Gallagher, K. L.; Isabelle, B. D.

    2014-12-01

    Radiocarbon dating of carbon (C) encapsulated in phytoliths (phytC) is currently used in many Earth Science disciplines for absolute chronologies and paleoclimatic reconstructions; however, the usefulness of phytC has been hampered by inadequate extraction methods[1] and uncertainties regarding its origin as purely photosynthetic [2,3,4]. An early investigation measuring isotopes from Gramineae spp. grown in free-air C enrichment experiments (FACE), showed that part of of its phytC is from a non-photosynthetic source, thus indicating a dual origin[5]. To demonstrate that non-photosynthetic sources within phytC could be from soil C stocks, we measured 14C-AMS phytC extracted from a set of Sorghum bicolor growing on known 14C and d13C bulk substrates and hydroponic solutions. The phytolith concentrates and a silica blank were extracted at UCI, CEREGE and Wisconsin using an improved protocol [1,2]. We also measured CO2 fluxes and isotopic signatures of microbial respiration, percentage of biomass and phytolith extracts produced, and isotopic signatures of the local air and bulk-plant during the growing season of 2012. This allowed comparison of the belowground substrate and nutrient C contributions to phytC 14C results. Meanwhile, NanoSIMS analyses of phytolith polished sections was used to locate phytC in the phytolith siliceous structure [6]. These results will be shown and discussed. [1] Corbineau et al. 2013 R. Paleobot. Palyn. 197: 179 [2] Santos et al. 2010 T. Radiocarbon 52:113 [3] Santos et al. 2012a Biogeosci. 9:1873 [4] Santos et al. 2012b Biogeosci. Discussion 9:C6114 [5] Reyerson et al. 2013 AGU Fall meeting 2013 (Abstract ID: 1803125). [6] Alexandre, et al., submitted.

  7. Radiocarbon Depression in Aquatic Foodwebs of the Colorado River, USA: Coupling Between Carbonate Weathering and the Biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sickman, J. O.; Huang, W.; Lucero, D.; Anderson, M.

    2012-12-01

    The 14C isotopic composition of living organisms is generally considered to be in isotopic equilibrium with atmosphere CO2. During the course of investigations of aquatic foodwebs of the Colorado River, we measured substantial radiocarbon depression of organisms within planktonic and benthic foodwebs of Copper Basin Reservoir, a short residence-time water body at the intake to the Colorado River Aqueduct. All trophic levels had depressed radiocarbon content with inferred "age" of ca. 1,200 radiocarbon years (range: 0.85 to 0.87 fraction modern carbon (fmc)). Additional measurements of the radiocarbon content of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were made in other major rivers in California (New (near Salton Sea), Santa Ana (near Riverside), San Joaquin (near Fresno) and Salinas (near San Luis Obispo)). In the New River (which is composed primarily of irrigation tailwater derived from the Colorado River), the radiocarbon values for DIC closely matched those found in biota of the Copper Basin Reservoir (0.85 to 0.87 fmc), but radiocarbon values for DOC were slightly higher (0.91 to 0.95 fmc). In the other California rivers, radiocarbon concentrations in DIC were generally below modern and lower than corresponding levels in DOC; in the case of the Santa Ana River, DOC was older than DIC as a result of wastewater inputs from upstream treatment plants. Together these data suggest that the carbonate equilibrium of California rivers is influenced by weathering of carbonate minerals which produces HCO3- with no 14C. We hypothesize that this dead carbon can move into aquatic foodwebs via algae and phytoplankton uptake during photosynthesis, depressing the 14C content of aquatic foodwebs below that of the atmosphere. Based on a simple two-component mixing model incorporating carbonate weathering and atmospheric CO2, we estimate that 15-17% of the carbon in the aquatic foodweb of Copper Basin is derived directly from mineral weathering of

  8. AMS radiocarbon dating of Middle and Upper Palaeolithic bone in the British Isles: improved reliability using ultrafiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobi, R. M.; Higham, T. F. G.; Bronk Ramsey, C.

    2006-07-01

    Recent research at the Oxford Radiocarbon Accelerator Unit (ORAU) has shown that ultrafiltration of gelatin from archaeological bone can, in many instances, remove low molecular weight contaminants. These can sometimes be of a different radiocarbon age and, unless removed, may severely influence results, particularly when dating bones greater than two to three half-lives of 14C. In this study this methodology is applied to samples of Late Middle and Early Upper Palaeolithic age from the British Isles. In many instances the results of redating invite serious reconsideration of the chronology for these periods. Copyright

  9. Collagen Fingerprinting: A New Screening Technique for Radiocarbon Dating Ancient Bone.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Virginia L; Egerton, Victoria M; Chamberlain, Andrew T; Manning, Phillip L; Buckley, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Collagen is the dominant organic component of bone and is intimately locked within the hydroxyapatite structure of this ubiquitous biomaterial that dominates archaeological and palaeontological assemblages. Radiocarbon analysis of extracted collagen is one of the most common approaches to dating bone from late Pleistocene or Holocene deposits, but dating is relatively expensive compared to other biochemical techniques. Numerous analytical methods have previously been investigated for the purpose of screening out samples that are unlikely to yield reliable dates including histological analysis, UV-stimulated fluorescence and, most commonly, the measurement of percentage nitrogen (%N) and ratio of carbon to nitrogen (C:N). Here we propose the use of collagen fingerprinting (also known as Zooarchaeology by Mass Spectrometry, or ZooMS, when applied to species identification) as an alternative screening method for radiocarbon dating, due to its ability to provide information on collagen presence and quality, alongside species identification. The method was tested on a series of sub-fossil bone specimens from cave systems on Cayman Brac (Cayman Islands), chosen due to the observable range in diagenetic alteration, and in particular, the extent of mineralisation. Six (14)C dates, of 18 initial attempts, were obtained from remains of extinct hutia, Capromys sp. (Rodentia; Capromyidae), recovered from five distinct caves on Cayman Brac, and ranging from 393 ± 25 to 1588 ± 26 radiocarbon years before present (yr BP). All of the bone samples that yielded radiocarbon dates generated excellent collagen fingerprints, and conversely those that gave poor fingerprints also failed dating. Additionally, two successfully fingerprinted bone samples were screened out from a set of 81. Both subsequently generated (14)C dates, demonstrating successful utilisation of ZooMS as an alternative screening mechanism to identify bone samples that are suitable for 1(4)C analysis.

  10. Collagen Fingerprinting: A New Screening Technique for Radiocarbon Dating Ancient Bone

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Virginia L.; Egerton, Victoria M.; Chamberlain, Andrew T.; Manning, Phillip L.; Buckley, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Collagen is the dominant organic component of bone and is intimately locked within the hydroxyapatite structure of this ubiquitous biomaterial that dominates archaeological and palaeontological assemblages. Radiocarbon analysis of extracted collagen is one of the most common approaches to dating bone from late Pleistocene or Holocene deposits, but dating is relatively expensive compared to other biochemical techniques. Numerous analytical methods have previously been investigated for the purpose of screening out samples that are unlikely to yield reliable dates including histological analysis, UV-stimulated fluorescence and, most commonly, the measurement of percentage nitrogen (%N) and ratio of carbon to nitrogen (C:N). Here we propose the use of collagen fingerprinting (also known as Zooarchaeology by Mass Spectrometry, or ZooMS, when applied to species identification) as an alternative screening method for radiocarbon dating, due to its ability to provide information on collagen presence and quality, alongside species identification. The method was tested on a series of sub-fossil bone specimens from cave systems on Cayman Brac (Cayman Islands), chosen due to the observable range in diagenetic alteration, and in particular, the extent of mineralisation. Six 14C dates, of 18 initial attempts, were obtained from remains of extinct hutia, Capromys sp. (Rodentia; Capromyidae), recovered from five distinct caves on Cayman Brac, and ranging from 393 ± 25 to 1588 ± 26 radiocarbon years before present (yr BP). All of the bone samples that yielded radiocarbon dates generated excellent collagen fingerprints, and conversely those that gave poor fingerprints also failed dating. Additionally, two successfully fingerprinted bone samples were screened out from a set of 81. Both subsequently generated 14C dates, demonstrating successful utilisation of ZooMS as an alternative screening mechanism to identify bone samples that are suitable for 14C analysis. PMID:26938469

  11. Collagen Fingerprinting: A New Screening Technique for Radiocarbon Dating Ancient Bone.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Virginia L; Egerton, Victoria M; Chamberlain, Andrew T; Manning, Phillip L; Buckley, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Collagen is the dominant organic component of bone and is intimately locked within the hydroxyapatite structure of this ubiquitous biomaterial that dominates archaeological and palaeontological assemblages. Radiocarbon analysis of extracted collagen is one of the most common approaches to dating bone from late Pleistocene or Holocene deposits, but dating is relatively expensive compared to other biochemical techniques. Numerous analytical methods have previously been investigated for the purpose of screening out samples that are unlikely to yield reliable dates including histological analysis, UV-stimulated fluorescence and, most commonly, the measurement of percentage nitrogen (%N) and ratio of carbon to nitrogen (C:N). Here we propose the use of collagen fingerprinting (also known as Zooarchaeology by Mass Spectrometry, or ZooMS, when applied to species identification) as an alternative screening method for radiocarbon dating, due to its ability to provide information on collagen presence and quality, alongside species identification. The method was tested on a series of sub-fossil bone specimens from cave systems on Cayman Brac (Cayman Islands), chosen due to the observable range in diagenetic alteration, and in particular, the extent of mineralisation. Six (14)C dates, of 18 initial attempts, were obtained from remains of extinct hutia, Capromys sp. (Rodentia; Capromyidae), recovered from five distinct caves on Cayman Brac, and ranging from 393 ± 25 to 1588 ± 26 radiocarbon years before present (yr BP). All of the bone samples that yielded radiocarbon dates generated excellent collagen fingerprints, and conversely those that gave poor fingerprints also failed dating. Additionally, two successfully fingerprinted bone samples were screened out from a set of 81. Both subsequently generated (14)C dates, demonstrating successful utilisation of ZooMS as an alternative screening mechanism to identify bone samples that are suitable for 1(4)C analysis. PMID:26938469

  12. Radiocarbon Signature and Cycling of Dissolved Organic Carbon in the South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druffel, E. R.; Griffin, S.

    2010-12-01

    The average radiocarbon (Delta14C) measurements of bulk dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the deep ocean range from -390 per mil in the deep Sargasso Sea to -550 per mil in the deep Northeast Pacific. The data set used to estimate this range is based on only four sites in the world ocean. We participated in the P-6 Repeat Hydrography cruise in January to February 2010 along 30-32°S in the South Pacific and collected samples from four depth profiles. High-precision Delta14C measurements of bulk DOC are ongoing using AMS (accelerator mass spectrometry) techniques at the Keck Carbon Cycle AMS Laboratory. We will report completed Delta14C measurements from these South Pacific sites and compare them to those available from two other sites in the North Pacific and one in the Southern Ocean. It is anticipated that Delta14C values of deep South Pacific DOC are intermediate between those in the Southern Ocean (Delta14C = -500‰) and those in the North central Pacific (-525‰). These DOC Delta14C values will be used to assess the residence time and overall cycling of bulk DOC in deep waters of the Pacific.

  13. On the radiocarbon record in banded corals: exchange parameters and net transport of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ between atmosphere and surface ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Druffel, E.M.; Suess, H.E.

    1983-02-20

    We have made radiocarbon measurements of banded hermatypic corals from Florida, Belize, and the Galapagos Islands. Interpretation is presented here of these previously reported results. These measurements represent the /sup 14/C//sup 12/C ratios in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIOC) in the surface ocean waters of the Gulf Stream and the Peru Current at the time of coral ring formation. A depletion in radiocarbon concentration was observed incoral rings that grew from A.D. 1900--1952. It was caused by dilution of existing /sup 14/C levels with dead CO/sub 2/ from fossil fuel burning (the Suess effect, or S/sub e/). A similar trend was observed in the distribution of bomb-produced /sup 14/C in corals that had grown during the years following A.D. 1952. The concentration of bomb-produced radiocarbon was much higher in corals from temperate regions (Florida, Belize, Hawaiian Islands) than in corals from tropical regions (Galapagos Islands and Canton Island). The apparent radiocarbon ages of the surface waters in temperate and tropical oceans during the preanthropogenic period range from about 280 to 520 years B.P. (-40 to -69%). At all investigated locations, it is likely that waters at subsurface depths have the same apparent radiocarbon age of about 670 years B.P. From the change of oceanic ..delta../sup 14/C in the surface during post-bomb times, the approximate annual rate of net input of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ to the ocean waters is calculated to be about 8% of the prevailing /sup 14/C difference between atmosphere and ocean. From this input and from preanthropogenic ..delta../sup 14/C values found at each location, it can be seen that vertical mixing of water in the Peru Current is about 3 times greater than that in the Gulf Stream.

  14. Application and detection of (14)c-hd in two mouse models.

    PubMed

    Logan, Thomas P; Shutz, Michael; Schulz, Susan M; Railer, Roy; Ricketts, Karen M; Casillas, Robert P

    2002-01-01

    The CD1-haired mouse and the SKH-hairless mouse are two animal models that have been used to evaluate sulfur mustard (HD) exposure and protection in our laboratory. In a recent study we observed that a substance P inhibitor protected the haired mouse ear against an HD solution, but the same drug was not successful in protecting the hairless mouse against HD vapor. This experiment prompted us to compare HD exposures between these models. We determined the (14)C content in the skin after exposures to HD containing (14)C-HD. Rate curves were generated for applications of (1) HD in methylene chloride to the haired mouse ear; (2) HD in methylene chloride to the hairless mouse dorsal skin; and (3) saturated HD vapor to the hairless mouse dorsal skin for 6 min. The curves showed a reduction in (14)C disintegrations per min in animals euthanized 0 to 2 h postexposure. The largest percentage of decrease of (14)C content in skin occurred within 30 min of HD challenge for all exposures. An 8-mm skin-punch biopsy and a 14-mm annular skin section surrounding the region of the 8-mm skin punch were taken from the hairless mouse dorsal skin exposed to HD in methylene chloride. The ratio of the (14)C content in the 8-mm skin punch to that in the surrounding 14-mm annular skin section was 7.3, demonstrating that the HD application spreads beyond the initially biopsied site. A concentration/time value of 6.3 mug/cm(2)/min was determined by counting skin (14)C disintegrations per minute in animals euthanized immediately after exposure to saturated HD vapor. Determinations of the amount of HD showed that similar quantities of HD, 0.4 mg, were detected on each model. These results contribute to a better quantitative understanding of HD application in the haired and hairless mouse models.

  15. Intestinal absorption and tissue distribution of ( sup 14 C)pyrroloquinoline quinone in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Smidt, C.R.; Unkefer, C.J.; Houck, D.R.; Rucker, R.B. )

    1991-05-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) functions as a cofactor for prokaryotic oxidoreductases, such as methanol dehydrogenase and membrane-bound glucose dehydrogenase. In animals fed chemically defined diets, PQQ improves reproductive outcome and neonatal growth. Consequently, the present study was undertaken to determine the extent to which PQQ is absorbed by the intestine, its tissue distribution, and route of excretion. About 28 micrograms of PQQ (0.42 microCi/mumol), labeled with {sup 14}C derived from L-tyrosine, was administered orally to Swiss-Webster mice (18-20 g) to estimate absorption. PQQ was readily absorbed (62%, range 19-89%) in the lower intestine, and was excreted by the kidneys (81% of the absorbed dose) within 24 hr. The only tissues that retained significant amounts of ({sup 14}C)PQQ at 24 hr were skin and kidney. For kidney, it was assumed that retention of ({sup 14}C)PQQ represented primarily PQQ destined for excretion. For skin, the concentration of ({sup 14}C)PQQ increased from 0.3% of the absorbed dose at 6 hr to 1.3% at 24 hr. Furthermore, most of the ({sup 14}C)PQQ in blood (greater than 95%) was associated with the blood cell fraction, rather than plasma.

  16. Uptake and metabolism of (14C)-aspartate by developing kernels of maize (Zea mays L. )

    SciTech Connect

    Muhitch, M.J. )

    1990-05-01

    Pulse-chase experiments were performed to determine the metabolic fate of (14C)-aspartate in the pedicel region and subsequent uptake into the endosperm. Kernels were removed from the cob, leaving the pedicel attached but removing glumes, palea, and lemma. The basal tips were incubated in (14C)-aspartate for 0.5 h, followed by a 2 h chase period with unlabeled aspartate. In contrast to a previous study in which 70% of the 14C from aspartate was recovered in the organic acid fraction (Lyznik, et al., Phytochemistry 24: 425, 1985), only 20 to 25% of the radioactivity found in the 2 h chase period. While a small amount of the 14C transiently appeared in alanine at the beginning of the chase period, the most heavily labeled non-fed amino acid was glutamine, which accounted for 21% of the radioactivity within the pedicel amino acid fraction by 0.5 h into the chase period. There was no evidence for asparagine synthesis within the pedicel region of the kernel. 14C recovered from the endosperm in the form of amino acids were aspartate (60%), glutamine (20%), glutamate (15%), and alanine (5%). These results suggest that some of the maternally supplied amino acids undergo metabolic conversion to other amino acids before being taken up by the endosperm.

  17. Liquid scintillation counting of /sup 14/C for differentiation of synthetic ethanol from ethanol of fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, G.E.; Noakes, J.E.; Alfonso, F.C.; Figert, D.M.

    1981-09-01

    Samples containing ethanol are fractionated on a column so that the resultant ethanol content is > 93%. Determination of /sup 14/C by liquid scintillation counting on the ethanol fraction differentiates ethanol produced by fermentation from synthetic ethanol produced from fossil fuel sources. Twenty-seven samples were fractionated and analyzed for the /sup 14/C isotope. Six samples were synthetic ethanol derived from ethylene gas (direct and indirect process), and yielded a mean value for /sup 14/C isotope of 0.167 dpm/g carbon with a standard deviation (SD) of 0.066 dpm/g carbon (disintegrations per minute per gram of carbon). The remaining samples were ethanol derived from the fermentation of natural materials, such as corn, pear, sugar cane, grape, cherry, and blackberry, and yielded a mean value for /sup 14/C isotope of 16.11 dpm/g carbon with an SD of 1.27. The /sup 14/C values for specific mixtures of a synthetic and a natural ethanol compare favorably with the analytical values obtained by this procedure.

  18. Atmosphere-ocean gas exchange based on radiocarbon data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byalko, Alexey

    2014-05-01

    In recent decades, the intensity of global atmospheric convection has accelerated faster than climate warming; it is possible to judge this process from indirect data. Increasing ocean salinity contrasts provide evidence that evaporation has intensified [1]; sea surface wind velocities and wave heights have increased [2]. The CO2 gas exchange between the atmosphere and ocean must also simultaneously increase. Monthly measurements of atmospheric CO2 concentration have been published since 1958 [3], but directly measuring its fluxes from the atmosphere to the ocean and back is hardly possible. We show they can be reconstructed from 14C isotope concentration data. In the past century, two processes influenced the atmospheric 14C concentration in opposite directions: burning fossil fuels and testing nuclear weapons in the atmosphere. We compare the gas exchange theory with measurements of radiocarbon content in the atmosphere [4—6], which allows assessing the gas exchange quantitatively for the ocean to atmosphere and atmosphere to ocean fluxes separately for period 1960—2010 [7]. References 1. Durack P. J. and Wijffels S. E., J. Climate 23, 4342 (2010). 2. Young I. R., Sieger S., and Babanin A.V., Science 332, 451 (2011). 3. NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory Data: ftp://ftp.cmdl.noaa.gov/ccg/co2/trends/co2_mm_mlo.txt. 4. Nydal R., Lövseth K. // J. Geophys. Res. 1983. V. 88. P. 3579. 5. Levin I., Kromer B. // Radiocarbon. 1997. V. 39. P. 205. 6. Miller J.B., Lehman S.J., Montzka S.A., et al. // J. Geophys. Res. 2012. V. 117. D08302. 7. Byalko A.V. Doklady Physics, 2013. V. 58, 267-271.

  19. The radiocarbon signature of microorganisms in the mesopelagic ocean

    PubMed Central

    Hansman, Roberta L.; Griffin, Sheila; Watson, Jordan T.; Druffel, Ellen R. M.; Ingalls, Anitra E.; Pearson, Ann; Aluwihare, Lihini I.

    2009-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that microorganisms in the meso- and bathypelagic ocean are metabolically active and respiring carbon. In addition, growing evidence suggests that archaea are fixing inorganic carbon in this environment. However, direct quantification of the contribution from deep ocean carbon sources to community production in the dark ocean remains a challenge. In this study, carbon flow through the microbial community at 2 depths in the mesopelagic zone of the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre was examined by exploiting the unique radiocarbon signatures (Δ14C) of the 3 major carbon sources in this environment. The radiocarbon content of nucleic acids, a biomarker for viable cells, isolated from size-fractionated particles (0.2–0.5 μm and >0.5 μm) showed the direct incorporation of carbon delivered by rapidly sinking particles. Most significantly, at the 2 mesopelagic depths examined (670 m and 915 m), carbon derived from in situ autotrophic fixation supported a significant fraction of the free-living microbial community (0.2–0.5 μm size fraction), but the contribution of chemoautotrophy varied markedly between the 2 depths. Results further showed that utilization of the ocean's largest reduced carbon reservoir, 14C-depleted, dissolved organic carbon, was negligible in this environment. This isotopic portrait of carbon assimilation by the in situ, free-living microbial community, integrated over >50,000 L of seawater, implies that recent, photosynthetic carbon is not always the major carbon source supporting microbial community production in the mesopelagic realm. PMID:19366673

  20. Total radioactive residues and clenbuterol residues in swine after dietary administration of [14C]clenbuterol for seven days and preslaughter withdrawal periods of zero, three, or seven days.

    PubMed

    Smith, D J

    2000-11-01

    Nine barrows (23.8 +/- 0.9 kg) and 9 gilts (23.1 +/- 0.9 kg) were used to determine the disposition of radiocarbon after oral [14C]clenbuterol (4-amino-alpha-[t-butylaminomethyl]-3,5-dichlorobenzyl [7-(14)C]alcohol hydrochloride) administration and to determine total and parent residues in edible tissues. Three barrows and three gilts, housed in metabolism crates, were fed 1 ppm [14C]clenbuterol HCl for seven consecutive days in three separate trials; a single barrow and gilt from each trial was slaughtered after 0-, 3-, or 7-d preslaughter withdrawal periods. Urine and feces were collected during the dosing and the withdrawal period; edible and inedible tissues were collected at slaughter. Total recovery of radiocarbon was 94.2 +/- 6.5%. Total clenbuterol absorption was greater than 75% for barrows and 60% for gilts. Total radioactive residues in tissues were not different (P > 0.05) between barrows and gilts. Concentrations of parent clenbuterol in liver, kidney, skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, and lung did not differ between barrows and gilts (P > 0.05). Total radioactive and parent residues declined in tissues as withdrawal period increased. After the 0-d withdrawal period, total liver residues (286 ppb) were approximately equal to lung residues, twice those of the kidney, and about 15 times those of adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. After a 7-d withdrawal period, total radioactive residues in liver (15 ppb) were roughly three times greater than lung, kidney, and adipose tissue total residues and about 13 times those of skeletal muscle total residues. Parent clenbuterol represented 79, 63, 42, 67, and 100% of the total radioactive residue in adipose tissue, kidney, liver, lung, and skeletal muscle, respectively, in hogs slaughtered with a 0-d withdrawal period. With increasing withdrawal period, the percentage of total radioactive residue present as parent clenbuterol within edible tissues (including lung) decreased, so that after a 7-d withdrawal period, 7

  1. Marine04 Marine radiocarbon age calibration, 26 ? 0 ka BP

    SciTech Connect

    Hughen, K; Baille, M; Bard, E; Beck, J; Bertrand, C; Blackwell, P; Buck, C; Burr, G; Cutler, K; Damon, P; Edwards, R; Fairbanks, R; Friedrich, M; Guilderson, T; Kromer, B; McCormac, F; Manning, S; Bronk-Ramsey, C; Reimer, P; Reimer, R; Remmele, S; Southon, J; Stuiver, M; Talamo, S; Taylor, F; der Plicht, J v; Weyhenmeyer, C

    2004-11-01

    New radiocarbon calibration curves, IntCal04 and Marine04, have been constructed and internationally ratified to replace the terrestrial and marine components of IntCal98. The new calibration datasets extend an additional 2000 years, from 0-26 ka cal BP (Before Present, 0 cal BP = AD 1950), and provide much higher resolution, greater precision and more detailed structure than IntCal98. For the Marine04 curve, dendrochronologically dated tree-ring samples, converted with a box-diffusion model to marine mixed-layer ages, cover the period from 0-10.5 ka cal BP. Beyond 10.5 ka cal BP, high-resolution marine data become available from foraminifera in varved sediments and U/Th-dated corals. The marine records are corrected with site-specific {sup 14}C reservoir age information to provide a single global marine mixed-layer calibration from 10.5-26.0 ka cal BP. A substantial enhancement relative to IntCal98 is the introduction of a random walk model, which takes into account the uncertainty in both the calendar age and the radiocarbon age to calculate the underlying calibration curve. The marine datasets and calibration curve for marine samples from the surface mixed layer (Marine04) are discussed here. The tree-ring datasets, sources of uncertainty, and regional offsets are presented in detail in a companion paper by Reimer et al.

  2. A rapid phospholipase A2 bioassay using 14C-oleate-labelled E. coli bacterias.

    PubMed

    Meyer, T; von Wichert, P; Weins, D

    1989-02-01

    Two methods of phospholipase A2 determination using 14C-labelled E. coli bacterias as substrate were compared. One method works with a filter membrane for separation of cleaved 14C-oleate from remaining phospholipids, the other uses the well-known thin-layer chromatography for lipid analysis. Some features of human serum phospholipase A2 regarding pH and Ca2+ dependency were investigated. Possible sources of errors were discussed. It was shown that either method can differentiate between normal and pathologically elevated phospholipase A2 levels, but that the filter method is superior in terms of sensitivity and workload.

  3. Intramolecular labelling of sucrose made by leaves from [14C)carbon dioxide or [3-14C]serine.

    PubMed

    Bird, I F; Cornelius, M J; Keys, A J; Whittingham, C P

    1978-04-15

    Pea leaves were illuminated in air containing 150 or 1000p.p.m. of 14CO2 for various times. Alternatively, segments of wheat leaves were supplied with [3-14C]serine for 40 min in the light in air with 145, 326 or 944p.p.m. of 12CO2. Sucrose was extracted from the leaf material, hydrolysed with invertase, and 14C in the pairs of carbon atoms C-3+C-4, C-2+C-5 and C-1+C-6 in the glucose moiety was measured. The results obtained after metabolism of 14CO2 were consistent with the operation of the photosynthetic carbon-reduction cycle; the effects of CO2 concentration on distribution of 14C in the carbon chain of glucose after metabolism of [3-14C]serine is more easily explained by metabolism through the glycollate pathway than by the carbon-reduction cycle. PMID:656073

  4. Comparison of Varve and 14C Chronologies from Steel Lake, Minnesota, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, J; Brown, T A; Hu, F S

    2004-12-29

    Annually laminated sediments (varves) offer an effective means of acquiring high-quality paleoenvironmental records. However, the strength of a varve chronology can be compromised by a number of factors, such as missing varves, ambiguous laminations, and human counting error. We assess the quality of a varve chronology for the last three millennia from Steel Lake, Minnesota, through comparisons with nine AMS {sup 14}C dates on terrestrial plant macrofossils from the same core. These comparisons revealed an overall 8.4% discrepancy, primarily because of missing/uncountable varves within two stratigraphic intervals characterized by low carbonate concentrations and obscure laminations. Application of appropriate correction factors to these two intervals results in excellent agreement between the varve and {sup 14}C chronologies. These results, together with other varve studies, demonstrate that an independent age-determination method, such as {sup 14}C dating, is usually necessary to verify, and potentially correct, varve chronologies.

  5. Revised 14C dating of ice wedge growth in interior Alaska (USA) to MIS 2 reveals cold paleoclimate and carbon recycling in ancient permafrost terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachniet, Matthew S.; Lawson, Daniel E.; Sloat, Alison R.

    2012-09-01

    Establishing firm radiocarbon chronologies for Quaternary permafrost sequences remains a challenge because of the persistence of old carbon in younger deposits. To investigate carbon dynamics and establish ice wedge formation ages in Interior Alaska, we dated a late Pleistocene ice wedge, formerly assigned to Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 3, and host sediments near Fairbanks, Alaska, with 24 radiocarbon analyses on wood, particulate organic carbon (POC), air-bubble CO2, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Our new CO2 and DOC ages are up to 11,170 yr younger than ice wedge POC ages, indicating that POC is detrital in origin. We conclude an ice wedge formation age between 28 and 22 cal ka BP during cold stadial conditions of MIS 2 and solar insolation minimum, possibly associated with Heinrich event 2 or the last glacial maximum. A DOC age for an ice lens in a thaw unconformity above the ice wedge returned a maximum age of 21,470 ± 200 cal yr BP. Our variable 14C data indicate recycling of older carbon in ancient permafrost terrain, resulting in radiocarbon ages significantly older than the period of ice-wedge activity. Release of ancient carbon with climatic warming will therefore affect the global 14C budget.

  6. Characterization of 14C in Swedish light water reactors.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Asa; Aronsson, Per-Olof; Lundgren, Klas; Stenström, Kristina

    2008-08-01

    This paper presents the results of a 4-y investigation of 14C in different waste streams of both boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Due to the potential impact of 14C on human health, minimizing waste and releases from the nuclear power industry is of considerable interest. The experimental data and conclusions may be implemented to select appropriate waste management strategies and practices at reactor units and disposal facilities. Organic and inorganic 14C in spent ion exchange resins, process water systems, ejector off-gas and replaced steam generator tubes were analyzed using a recently developed extraction method. Separate analysis of the chemical species is of importance in order to model and predict the fate of 14C within process systems as well as in dose calculations for disposal facilities. By combining the results of this investigation with newly calculated production rates, mass balance assessments were made of the 14C originating from production in the coolant. Of the 14C formed in the coolant of BWRs, 0.6-0.8% was found to be accumulated in the ion exchange resins (core-specific production rate in the coolant of a 2,500 MWth BWR calculated to be 580 GBq GW(e)(-1) y(-1)). The corresponding value for PWRs was 6-10% (production rate in a 2,775 MWth PWR calculated to be 350 GBq GW(e)(-1) y(-1)). The 14C released with liquid discharges was found to be insignificant, constituting less than 0.5% of the production in the coolant. The stack releases, routinely measured at the power plants, were found to correspond to 60-155% of the calculated coolant production, with large variations between the BWR units.

  7. Characterization of 14C in Swedish light water reactors.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Asa; Aronsson, Per-Olof; Lundgren, Klas; Stenström, Kristina

    2008-08-01

    This paper presents the results of a 4-y investigation of 14C in different waste streams of both boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Due to the potential impact of 14C on human health, minimizing waste and releases from the nuclear power industry is of considerable interest. The experimental data and conclusions may be implemented to select appropriate waste management strategies and practices at reactor units and disposal facilities. Organic and inorganic 14C in spent ion exchange resins, process water systems, ejector off-gas and replaced steam generator tubes were analyzed using a recently developed extraction method. Separate analysis of the chemical species is of importance in order to model and predict the fate of 14C within process systems as well as in dose calculations for disposal facilities. By combining the results of this investigation with newly calculated production rates, mass balance assessments were made of the 14C originating from production in the coolant. Of the 14C formed in the coolant of BWRs, 0.6-0.8% was found to be accumulated in the ion exchange resins (core-specific production rate in the coolant of a 2,500 MWth BWR calculated to be 580 GBq GW(e)(-1) y(-1)). The corresponding value for PWRs was 6-10% (production rate in a 2,775 MWth PWR calculated to be 350 GBq GW(e)(-1) y(-1)). The 14C released with liquid discharges was found to be insignificant, constituting less than 0.5% of the production in the coolant. The stack releases, routinely measured at the power plants, were found to correspond to 60-155% of the calculated coolant production, with large variations between the BWR units. PMID:18617793

  8. Coral skeletal carbon isotopes (δ13C and Δ14C) record the delivery of terrestrial carbon to the coastal waters of Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moyer, R.P.; Grottoli, A.G.

    2011-01-01

    Tropical small mountainous rivers deliver a poorly quantified, but potentially significant, amount of carbon to the world's oceans. However, few historical records of land-ocean carbon transfer exist for any region on Earth. Corals have the potential to provide such records, because they draw on dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) for calcification. In temperate systems, the stable- (δ13C) and radiocarbon14C) isotopes of coastal DIC are influenced by the δ13C and Δ14C of the DIC transported from adjacent rivers. A similar pattern should exist in tropical coastal DIC and hence coral skeletons. Here, δ13C and Δ14C measurements were made in a 56-year-old Montastraea faveolata coral growing ~1 km from the mouth of the Rio Fajardo in eastern Puerto Rico. Additionally, the δ13C and Δ14C values of the DIC of the Rio Fajardo and its adjacent coastal waters were measured during two wet and dry seasons. Three major findings were observed: (1) synchronous depletions of both δ13C and Δ14C in the coral skeleton are annually coherent with the timing of peak river discharge, (2) riverine DIC was always more depleted in δ13C and Δ14C than seawater DIC, and (3) the correlation of δ13C and Δ14C was the same in both coral skeleton and the DIC of the river and coastal waters. These results indicate that coral skeletal δ13C and Δ14C are recording the delivery of riverine DIC to the coastal ocean. Thus, coral records could be used to develop proxies of historical land-ocean carbon flux for many tropical regions. Such information could be invaluable for understanding the role of tropical land-ocean carbon flux in the context of land-use change and global climate change.

  9. Coral skeletal carbon isotopes (δ13C and Δ14C) record the delivery of terrestrial carbon to the coastal waters of Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moyer, R.P.; Grottoli, A.G.

    2011-01-01

    Tropical small mountainous rivers deliver a poorly quantified, but potentially significant, amount of carbon to the world's oceans. However, few historical records of land-ocean carbon transfer exist for any region on Earth. Corals have the potential to provide such records, because they draw on dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) for calcification. In temperate systems, the stable- (??13C) and radiocarbon (??14C) isotopes of coastal DIC are influenced by the ??13C and ??14C of the DIC transported from adjacent rivers. A similar pattern should exist in tropical coastal DIC and hence coral skeletons. Here, ??13C and ??14C measurements were made in a 56-year-old Montastraea faveolata coral growing ~1 km from the mouth of the Rio Fajardo in eastern Puerto Rico. Additionally, the ??13C and ??14C values of the DIC of the Rio Fajardo and its adjacent coastal waters were measured during two wet and dry seasons. Three major findings were observed: (1) synchronous depletions of both ??13C and ??14C in the coral skeleton are annually coherent with the timing of peak river discharge, (2) riverine DIC was always more depleted in ??13C and ??14C than seawater DIC, and (3) the correlation of ??13C and ??14C was the same in both coral skeleton and the DIC of the river and coastal waters. These results indicate that coral skeletal ??13C and ??14C are recording the delivery of riverine DIC to the coastal ocean. Thus, coral records could be used to develop proxies of historical land-ocean carbon flux for many tropical regions. Such information could be invaluable for understanding the role of tropical land-ocean carbon flux in the context of land-use change and global climate change. ?? 2011 United States Geological Survey.

  10. Estimates of upwelling rates in the Arabian Sea and the equatorial Indian Ocean based on bomb radiocarbon.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, R; Dutta, K; Somayajulu, B L K

    2008-10-01

    Radiocarbon measurements were made in the water column of the Arabian Sea and the equatorial Indian Ocean during 1994, 1995 and 1997 to assess the temporal variations in bomb 14C distribution and its inventory in the region with respect to GEOSECS measurements made during 1977-1978. Four GEOSECS stations were reoccupied (three in the Arabian Sea and one in the equatorial Indian Ocean) during this study, with all of them showing increased penetration of bomb 14C along with decrease in its surface water activity. The upwelling rates derived by model simulation of bomb 14C depth profile using the calculated exchange rates ranged from 3 to 9 m a(-1). The western region of the Arabian Sea experiencing high wind-induced upwelling has higher estimated upwelling rates. However, lower upwelling rates obtained for the stations occupied during this study could be due to reduced 14C gradient compared to that during GEOSECS.

  11. Radiocarbon dating casts doubt on the late chronology of the Middle to Upper Palaeolithic transition in southern Iberia.

    PubMed

    Wood, Rachel E; Barroso-Ruíz, Cecilio; Caparrós, Miguel; Jordá Pardo, Jesús F; Galván Santos, Bertila; Higham, Thomas F G

    2013-02-19

    It is commonly accepted that some of the latest dates for Neanderthal fossils and Mousterian industries are found south of the Ebro valley in Iberia at ca. 36 ka calBP (calibrated radiocarbon date ranges). In contrast, to the north of the valley the Mousterian disappears shortly before the Proto-Aurignacian appears at ca. 42 ka calBP. The latter is most likely produced by anatomically modern humans. However, two-thirds of dates from the south are radiocarbon dates, a technique that is particularly sensitive to carbon contaminants of a younger age that can be difficult to remove using routine pretreatment protocols. We have attempted to test the reliability of chronologies of 11 southern Iberian Middle and early Upper Paleolithic sites. Only two, Jarama VI and Zafarraya, were found to contain material that could be reliably dated. In both sites, Middle Paleolithic contexts were previously dated by radiocarbon to less than 42 ka calBP. Using ultrafiltration to purify faunal bone collagen before radiocarbon dating, we obtain ages at least 10 ka (14)C years older, close to or beyond the limit of the radiocarbon method for the Mousterian at Jarama VI and Neanderthal fossils at Zafarraya. Unless rigorous pretreatment protocols have been used, radiocarbon dates should be assumed to be inaccurate until proven otherwise in this region. Evidence for the late survival of Neanderthals in southern Iberia is limited to one possible site, Cueva Antón, and alternative models of human occupation of the region should be considered.

  12. Interface dissolution control of the 14C profile in marine sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keir, R.S.; Michel, R.L.

    1993-01-01

    The process of carbonate dissolution at the sediment-water interface has two possible endmember boundary conditions. Either the carbonate particles dissolve mostly before they are incorporated into the sediment by bioturbation (interface dissolution), or the vertical mixing is rapid relative to their extermination rate (homogeneous dissolution). In this study, a detailed radiocarbon profile was determined in deep equatorial Pacific sediment that receives a high rate of carbonate supply. In addition, a box model of sediment mixing was used to simulate radiocarbon, carbonate content and excess thorium profiles that result from either boundary process following a dissolution increase. Results from homogeneous dissolution imply a strong, very recent erosional event, while interface dissolution suggests that moderately increased dissolution began about 10,000 years ago. In order to achieve the observed mixed layer radiocarbon age, increased homogeneous dissolution would concentrate a greater amount of clay and 230Th than is observed, while for interface dissolution the predicted concentrations are too small. These results together with small discontinuities beneath the mixed layer in 230Th profiles suggest a two-stage increase in interface dissolution in the deep Pacific, the first occurring near the beginning of the Holocene and the second more recently, roughly 5000 years ago. ?? 1993.

  13. Interface dissolution control of the [sup 14]C profile in marine sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Keir, R.S. ); Michel, R.L. )

    1993-08-01

    The process of carbonate dissolution at the sediment-water interface has two possible end-member boundary conditions. Either the carbonate particles dissolve mostly before they are incorporated into the sediment by bioturbation (interface dissolution), or the vertical mixing is rapid relative to their extermination rate (homogeneous dissolution). In this study, a detailed radiocarbon profile was determined in deep equatorial Pacific sediment that receives a high rate of carbonate supply. In addition, a box model of sediment mixing was used to simulate radiocarbon, carbonate content, and excess thorium profiles that result from either boundary process following a dissolution increase. Results from homogeneous dissolution imply a strong, very recent erosional event, while interface dissolution suggests that moderately increased dissolution began about 10,000 years ago. In order to achieve the observed mixed layer radiocarbon age, increased homogeneous dissolution would concentrate a greater amount of clay and [sup 230]Th than is observed, while for interface dissolution the predicted concentrations are too small. These results together with small discontinuities beneath the mixed layer in [sup 230]Th profiles suggest a two-stage increase in interface dissolution in the deep Pacific, the first occurring near the beginning of the Holocene and the second more recently, roughly 5,000 years ago. 30 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Revision of Fontes & Garnier's model for the initial 14C content of dissolved inorganic carbon used in groundwater dating

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Han, Liang-Feng; Plummer, L. Niel

    2013-01-01

    The widely applied model for groundwater dating using 14C proposed by Fontes and Garnier (F&G) (Fontes and Garnier, 1979) estimates the initial 14C content in waters from carbonate-rock aquifers affected by isotopic exchange. Usually, the model of F&G is applied in one of two ways: (1) using a single 13C fractionation factor of gaseous CO2 with respect to a solid carbonate mineral, εg/s, regardless of whether the carbon isotopic exchange is controlled by soil CO2 in the unsaturated zone, or by solid carbonate mineral in the saturated zone; or (2) using different fractionation factors if the exchange process is dominated by soil CO2 gas as opposed to solid carbonate mineral (typically calcite). An analysis of the F&G model shows an inadequate conceptualization, resulting in underestimation of the initial 14C values (14C0) for groundwater systems that have undergone isotopic exchange. The degree to which the 14C0 is underestimated increases with the extent of isotopic exchange. Examples show that in extreme cases, the error in calculated adjusted initial 14C values can be more than 20% modern carbon (pmc). A model is derived that revises the mass balance method of F&G by using a modified model conceptualization. The derivation yields a “global” model both for carbon isotopic exchange dominated by gaseous CO2 in the unsaturated zone, and for carbon isotopic exchange dominated by solid carbonate mineral in the saturated zone. However, the revised model requires different parameters for exchange dominated by gaseous CO2 as opposed to exchange dominated by solid carbonate minerals. The revised model for exchange dominated by gaseous CO2 is shown to be identical to the model of Mook (Mook, 1976). For groundwater systems where exchange occurs both in the unsaturated zone and saturated zone, the revised model can still be used; however, 14C0 will be slightly underestimated. Finally, in carbonate systems undergoing complex geochemical reactions, such as oxidation of

  15. Decadal- to interannual-scale source water variations in the Caribbean Sea recorded by Puerto Rican coral radiocarbon

    SciTech Connect

    Kilbourne, K H; Quinn, T M; Guilderson, T P; Webb, R S; Taylor, F W

    2006-12-05

    Water that forms the Florida Current, and eventually the Gulf Stream, coalesces in the Caribbean from both subtropical and equatorial sources. The equatorial sources are made up of, in part, South Atlantic water moving northward and compensating for southward flow at depth related to meridional overturning circulation. Subtropical surface water contains relatively high amounts of radiocarbon ({sup 14}C), whereas equatorial waters are influenced by the upwelling of low {sup 14}C water and have relatively low concentrations of {sup 14}C. We use a 250-year record of {Delta}{sup 14}C in a coral from southwestern Puerto Rico along with previously published coral {Delta}{sup 14}C records as tracers of subtropical and equatorial water mixing in the northern Caribbean. Data generated in this study and from other studies indicate that the influence of either of the two water masses can change considerably on interannual to interdecadal time scales. Variability due to ocean dynamics in this region is large relative to variability caused by atmospheric {sup 14}C changes, thus masking the Suess effect at this site. A mixing model produced using coral {Delta}{sup 14}C illustrates the time varying proportion of equatorial versus subtropical waters in the northern Caribbean between 1963 and 1983. The results of the model are consistent with linkages between multidecadal thermal variability in the North Atlantic and meridional overturning circulation. Ekman transport changes related to tradewind variability are proposed as a possible mechanism to explain the observed switches between relatively low and relatively high {Delta}{sup 14}C values in the coral radiocarbon records.

  16. Deconvolution of the atmospheric radiocarbon record in the last 50,000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lal, Devendra; Charles, Christopher

    2007-06-01

    Here we identify the principal causes of changes in the atmospheric Δ14C record by removing the influence of two discrete large changes in the geomagnetic field between 45 and 30 kyr. The marked transitions in the Δ14C record during this period can be interpreted as being the result of either "zero magnetic field" for periods of the order of 6500 y and 600 y at ˜ 40 kyr and 32 kyr B.P., respectively, or for longer durations if the field was non-zero for appreciable time during the event. Once the effect of these events has been removed, the residual Δ14C record shows a plateau with nearly constant value at ˜ 300‰ during 28-17 kyr B.P, followed by a sharp decrease in Δ14C between 17 kyr B.P. and the present, to a Δ14C value of ˜ 0‰. Estimated global paleomagnetic fields derived from paleointensity measurements in deep sea sediments (SINT-800, NAPIS-75 and Sumatra Basin) can only explain a maximum of 50% of this residual Δ14C record during 30-0 kyr B.P. We propose that the remainder must have resulted from changes in oceanic circulation leading to isolation of ≥ 20% of oceanic radiocarbon inventory from large scale mixing with the atmosphere during 28-17 kyr B.P. Subsequent inclusion of this carbon may be responsible in part for the decrease between 17 kyr B.P. to the present, to a Δ14C value of ˜ 0‰. We also note that the deconvoluted Δ14C record during the past 15,000 y B.P. seems to be primarily influenced by the changes in the atmospheric CO 2 concentrations. These possibilities have been discussed in previous works, but our results here point to a seemingly cyclical change in carbon exchange that was initiated prior to the Last Glacial Maximum.

  17. Anomalous radiocarbon ages from a Holocene detrital organic lens in Alaska and their implications for radiocarbon dating and paleoenvironmental reconstructions in the arctic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, R.E.; Carter, L.D.; Robinson, S.W.

    1988-01-01

    Eleven radiocarbon age determinations clearly show that a lens of Holocene fluvial organic debris on the Alaskan Arctic Coastal Plain contains mostly pre-Holocene organic material. Radio-carbon ages of identified plant macrofossils indicate the material was deposited about 9000 to 9500 yr B.P. Radiocarbon analyses of bulk samples from this deposit, however, range from 13,300 to 30,300 yr B.P. Most of the old organic matter seems to be in the smaller size fractions in the deposit, particularly in the fraction between 0.25 and 0.5 mm, but all size fractions are contaminated. Particular caution must be exercised in submitting bulk samples for radiocarbon dating from areas where conditions favor redeposition of isotopically "dead" carbon. ?? 1988.

  18. {sup 14}C depth profiles in Apollo 15 and 17 cores and lunar rock 68815

    SciTech Connect

    Jull, A.J.T.; Cloudt, S.; Donahue, D.J.; Sisterson, J.M.; Reedy, R.C.; Masarik, J.

    1998-09-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) was used to measure the activity vs. depth profiles of {sup 14}C produced by both solar cosmic rays (SCR) and galactic cosmic rays (GCR) in Apollo 15 lunar cores 15001-6 and 15008, Apollo 17 core 76001, and lunar rock 68815. Calculated GCR production rates are in good agreement with {sup 14}C measurements at depths below {approximately}10 cm. Carbon-14 produced by solar protons was observed in the top few cm of the Apollo 15 cores and lunar rock 68815, with near-surface values as high as 66 dpm/kg in 68815. Only low levels of SCR-produced {sup 14}C were observed in the Apollo 17 core 76001. New cross sections for production of {sup 14}C by proton spallation on O, Si, Al, Mg, Fe, and Ni were measured using AMS. These cross sections are essential for the analysis of the measured {sup 14}C depth profiles. The best fit to the activity-depth profiles for solar-proton-produced {sup 14}C measured in the tops of both the Apollo 15 cores and 68815 was obtained for an exponential rigidity spectral shape R{sub 0} of 110--115 MV and a 4 {pi} flux (J{sub 10}, Ep > 10 MeV) of 103--108 protons/cm{sup 2}/s. These values of R{sub 0} are higher, indicating a harder rigidity, and the solar-proton fluxes are higher than those determined from {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al, and {sup 53}Mn measurements.

  19. An analytical method for 14C in environmental water based on a wet-oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan-Jun; Guo, Gui-Yin; Wu, Lian-Sheng; Zhang, Bing; Chen, Chao-Feng; Zhang, Hai-Ying; Qin, Hong-Juan; Shang-Guan, Zhi-Hong

    2015-04-01

    An analytical method for (14)C in environmental water based on a wet-oxidation process was developed. The method can be used to determine the activity concentrations of organic and inorganic (14)C in environmental water, or total (14)C, including in drinking water, surface water, rainwater and seawater. The wet-oxidation of the organic component allows the conversion of organic carbon to an inorganic form, and the extraction of the inorganic (14)C can be achieved by acidification and nitrogen purging. Environmental water with a volume of 20 L can be used for the wet-oxidation and extraction, and a detection limit of about 0.02 Bq/g(C) can be achieved for water with carbon content above 15 mg(C)/L, obviously lower than the natural level of (14)C in the environment. The collected carbon is sufficient for measurement with a low level liquid scintillation counter (LSC) for typical samples. Extraction or recovery experiments for inorganic carbon and organic carbon from typical materials, including analytical reagents of organic benzoquinone, sucrose, glutamic acid, nicotinic acid, humic acid, ethane diol, et cetera., were conducted with excellent results based on measurement on a total organic carbon analyzer and LSC. The recovery rate for inorganic carbon ranged tween 98.7%-99.0% with a mean of 98.9(± 0.1)%, for organic carbon recovery ranged between 93.8% and 100.0% with a mean of 97.1(± 2.6)%. Verification and an uncertainty budget of the method are also presented for a representative environmental water. The method is appropriate for (14)C analysis in environmental water, and can be applied also to the analysis of liquid effluent from nuclear facilities. PMID:25590997

  20. Effect of foliar treatments on distribution of /sup 14/C-glyphosate in Convolvulus arvensis L

    SciTech Connect

    Lauridson, T.C.

    1986-01-01

    Field bindweed is a perennial weed which produces shoots from buds on its roots. Herbicides, such as glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine) used for control of field bindweed usually do not kill all shoot buds on the roots, thus field bindweed often reinfests areas within 3 to 6 weeks of treatment. This dissertation deals with the development of a technique to change glyphosate distribution in field bindweed roots and could result in less shoot regrowth after glyphosate application. In field studies eight plant growth regulators were applied in September, 3 days before 2.24 kg/ha of 2.4-D((2,4-dichlorophenoxy) acetic acid) or 1.68 kg/ha of glyphosate. Eight months later, regrowth of shoots was least where glyphosate was applied at 0.028 kg/ha as a pretreatment, followed by a standard rate of 1.68 kg/ha. In subsequent greenhouse studies, typical patterns of shoot growth and /sup 14/C-glyphosate distribution in isolated root sections taken from 15-week-old intact plants were determined. In subsequent growth chamber studies, plants were decapitated to observe the effect of shoot apical dominance on /sup 14/C-glyphosate translocation. After /sup 14/C-glyphosate was applied, intact plants had about twice as much /sup 14/C in distal root sections as in proximal or middle root sections. Decapitated plants had more /sup 14/C in proximal and middle root sections than in distal sections, and about twice as much /sup 14/C was translocated to roots of decapitated plants than intact plants. Eight concentrations of 2,4,-D or glyphosate from 1 to 5000 ppm were applied in logarithmic series to 6-week old plants.

  1. An analytical method for 14C in environmental water based on a wet-oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan-Jun; Guo, Gui-Yin; Wu, Lian-Sheng; Zhang, Bing; Chen, Chao-Feng; Zhang, Hai-Ying; Qin, Hong-Juan; Shang-Guan, Zhi-Hong

    2015-04-01

    An analytical method for (14)C in environmental water based on a wet-oxidation process was developed. The method can be used to determine the activity concentrations of organic and inorganic (14)C in environmental water, or total (14)C, including in drinking water, surface water, rainwater and seawater. The wet-oxidation of the organic component allows the conversion of organic carbon to an inorganic form, and the extraction of the inorganic (14)C can be achieved by acidification and nitrogen purging. Environmental water with a volume of 20 L can be used for the wet-oxidation and extraction, and a detection limit of about 0.02 Bq/g(C) can be achieved for water with carbon content above 15 mg(C)/L, obviously lower than the natural level of (14)C in the environment. The collected carbon is sufficient for measurement with a low level liquid scintillation counter (LSC) for typical samples. Extraction or recovery experiments for inorganic carbon and organic carbon from typical materials, including analytical reagents of organic benzoquinone, sucrose, glutamic acid, nicotinic acid, humic acid, ethane diol, et cetera., were conducted with excellent results based on measurement on a total organic carbon analyzer and LSC. The recovery rate for inorganic carbon ranged tween 98.7%-99.0% with a mean of 98.9(± 0.1)%, for organic carbon recovery ranged between 93.8% and 100.0% with a mean of 97.1(± 2.6)%. Verification and an uncertainty budget of the method are also presented for a representative environmental water. The method is appropriate for (14)C analysis in environmental water, and can be applied also to the analysis of liquid effluent from nuclear facilities.

  2. Radiocarbon constraints on fossil thinolite tufa formation in the Mono Basin, CA, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, S. L.; Zimmerman, S. R.; Hemming, S. R.; Stine, S.; Guilderson, T. P.

    2009-12-01

    Mono Lake is a terminal lake located at the western edge of the Great Basin, and is famous for its tufa towers. Thinolite, which is thought to be a CaCO3 pseudomorph of ikaite, is found around the Mono Basin in many fossil tufa towers, particularly at elevations above 2000 meters. The subaqueous parent mineral ikaite forms at low temperatures (< 6 °C) (Bischoff et al., 1993) and requires specific water chemistry. Previous radiocarbon dating of fossil tufa towers around the Mono Basin has yielded a rather small range of ages for the highest elevation towers, between 11.8 and 14.1 14C kyr BP (no corrections for reservoir effects have been made). A thinolite fan collected from outcrops in Mill Creek, just north of the current Mono Lake yielded an age of 10,690 ± 45 14C yr BP (12,750 ± 80 cal yr BP), consistent with a ca. 1000 year reservoir age and coincidence with thinolite crystals found in a core from the northwestern embayment of Mono Lake (Davis, 1999, QR), and thus correlating with the Younger Dryas cooling event as exhibited in the GISP2 δ18O record. While most of the thinolite textures are found at high elevations, we sampled a mound at 1955 meters (near the current shoreline, north of the lake and just east of Black Point) that has many concentric layers, some containing thinolite textures. Although tufa mounds can form very rapidly, the location at low elevation and the presence of at least 19 distinct layers led us to consider that this mound might represent a long term record of Mono Lake’s chemistry. The new data confirm that the mound formed over a long period within the last glacial cycle, with ages ranging beyond the current limits of measurement (>34 kyr) to as young as 15.5 14C kyr BP. In general there is a consistent stratigraphic trend of ages within the mound, but the thinolite ages are anomalously young and one thinolite sample shows a large age reversal. The best estimate of the age of the precipitation of this tufa mound is given by the

  3. The Remarkable Metrological History of Radiocarbon Dating [II].

    PubMed

    Currie, Lloyd A

    2004-01-01

    This article traces the metrological history of radiocarbon, from the initial breakthrough devised by Libby, to minor (evolutionary) and major (revolutionary) advances that have brought (14)C measurement from a crude, bulk [8 g carbon] dating tool, to a refined probe for dating tiny amounts of precious artifacts, and for "molecular dating" at the 10 µg to 100 µg level. The metrological advances led to opportunities and surprises, such as the non-monotonic dendrochronological calibration curve and the "bomb effect," that gave rise to new multidisciplinary areas of application, ranging from archaeology and anthropology to cosmic ray physics to oceanography to apportionment of anthropogenic pollutants to the reconstruction of environmental history. Beyond the specific topic of natural (14)C, it is hoped that this account may serve as a metaphor for young scientists, illustrating that just when a scientific discipline may appear to be approaching maturity, unanticipated metrological advances in their own chosen fields, and unanticipated anthropogenic or natural chemical events in the environment, can spawn new areas of research having exciting theoretical and practical implications. PMID:27366605

  4. Mortar radiocarbon dating: preliminary accuracy evaluation of a novel methodology.

    PubMed

    Marzaioli, Fabio; Lubritto, Carmine; Nonni, Sara; Passariello, Isabella; Capano, Manuela; Terrasi, Filippo

    2011-03-15

    Mortars represent a class of building and art materials that are widespread at archeological sites from the Neolithic period on. After about 50 years of experimentation, the possibility to evaluate their absolute chronology by means of radiocarbon ((14)C) remains still uncertain. With the use of a simplified mortar production process in the laboratory environment, this study shows the overall feasibility of a novel physical pretreatment for the isolation of the atmospheric (14)CO(2) (i.e., binder) signal absorbed by the mortars during their setting. This methodology is based on the assumption that an ultrasonic attack in liquid phase isolates a suspension of binder carbonates from bulk mortars. Isotopic ((13)C and (14)C), % C, X-ray diffractometry (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses were performed to characterize the proposed methodology. The applied protocol allows suppression of the fossil carbon (C) contamination originating from the incomplete burning of the limestone during the quick lime production, providing unbiased dating for "laboratory" mortars produced operating at historically adopted burning temperatures.

  5. The Remarkable Metrological History of Radiocarbon Dating [II].

    PubMed

    Currie, Lloyd A

    2004-01-01

    This article traces the metrological history of radiocarbon, from the initial breakthrough devised by Libby, to minor (evolutionary) and major (revolutionary) advances that have brought (14)C measurement from a crude, bulk [8 g carbon] dating tool, to a refined probe for dating tiny amounts of precious artifacts, and for "molecular dating" at the 10 µg to 100 µg level. The metrological advances led to opportunities and surprises, such as the non-monotonic dendrochronological calibration curve and the "bomb effect," that gave rise to new multidisciplinary areas of application, ranging from archaeology and anthropology to cosmic ray physics to oceanography to apportionment of anthropogenic pollutants to the reconstruction of environmental history. Beyond the specific topic of natural (14)C, it is hoped that this account may serve as a metaphor for young scientists, illustrating that just when a scientific discipline may appear to be approaching maturity, unanticipated metrological advances in their own chosen fields, and unanticipated anthropogenic or natural chemical events in the environment, can spawn new areas of research having exciting theoretical and practical implications.

  6. The Remarkable Metrological History of Radiocarbon Dating [II

    PubMed Central

    Currie, Lloyd A.

    2004-01-01

    This article traces the metrological history of radiocarbon, from the initial breakthrough devised by Libby, to minor (evolutionary) and major (revolutionary) advances that have brought 14C measurement from a crude, bulk [8 g carbon] dating tool, to a refined probe for dating tiny amounts of precious artifacts, and for “molecular dating” at the 10 µg to 100 µg level. The metrological advances led to opportunities and surprises, such as the non-monotonic dendrochronological calibration curve and the “bomb effect,” that gave rise to new multidisciplinary areas of application, ranging from archaeology and anthropology to cosmic ray physics to oceanography to apportionment of anthropogenic pollutants to the reconstruction of environmental history. Beyond the specific topic of natural 14C, it is hoped that this account may serve as a metaphor for young scientists, illustrating that just when a scientific discipline may appear to be approaching maturity, unanticipated metrological advances in their own chosen fields, and unanticipated anthropogenic or natural chemical events in the environment, can spawn new areas of research having exciting theoretical and practical implications. PMID:27366605

  7. Analysis of past recurrent methane seep activity using radiocarbon dating of Calyptogena spp. shells in the eastern Nankai subduction zone, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagasaki, Kazuhiro; Ashi, Juichiro; Yokoyama, Yusuke; Miyairi, Yosuke; Kuramoto, Shin'ichi

    2016-04-01

    Fault activity around subduction zones have been widely studied and monitored through drilling of oceanic plates, studying piston cores, use of monitoring equipment or through visual analysis using submersible vehicles. Yet the understanding of how small scale faults near shallow regions of the seabed behave in relation to cold seep vent activity is still vague, especially determining when they were active in the past. In tectonically active margins such as the Nankai and Tokai regions off Japan, dense methane hydrate reservoirs have been identified. Cold seeps releasing methane rich hydrocarbon fluids are common here, supporting a wide variety of biological species that hold a symbiotic relationship with the chemosynthetic bacteria. In 1998 a large dead Calyptogena spp. bivalve colony (over 400m2 in size) was discovered off Tokai, Japan. It is unusual for a bivalve colony this size to mostly be dead, raising questions as to what caused their death. In this study we document the radiocarbon 14C age of these bivalve shells to attempt analysing the possible methane seep bahaviour in the past. The measured 14C age ranged in three age groups of 1396±36-1448±34, 1912±31-1938±35 and 5975±34. The 14C age of shells that were alive upon collection and the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in seawater show little difference (˜100 14C age) indicating that shells are not heavily affected by the dead carbon effect from cold seeps that is of biogenic or thermogenic origin, which can make the age to become considerably older than the actual age. Thus the novel calibration model used was based on the seawater DIC collected above the Calyptogena spp. colony site (1133±31), which resulted in the dead shells to be clustered around 1900 Cal AD. This proves to be interesting as the predicted epicenter of the Ansei-Tokai earthquake (M 8.4) in 1854 is extremely close to the bibalve colony site. Using geological data obtained using visual analysis and sub-seafloor structural

  8. Changing controls on oceanic radiocarbon: New insights on shallow-to-deep ocean exchange and anthropogenic CO2 uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graven, H. D.; Gruber, N.; Key, R.; Khatiwala, S.; Giraud, X.

    2012-10-01

    The injection of radiocarbon (14C) into the atmosphere by nuclear weapons testing in the 1950s and 1960s has provided a powerful tracer to investigate ocean physical and chemical processes. While the oceanic uptake of bomb-derived 14C was primarily controlled by air-sea exchange in the early decades after the bomb spike, we demonstrate that changes in oceanic 14C are now primarily controlled by shallow-to-deep ocean exchange, i.e., the same mechanism that governs anthropogenic CO2 uptake. This is a result of accumulated bomb 14C uptake that has rapidly decreased the air-sea gradient of 14C/C (Δ14C) and shifted the main reservoir of bomb 14C from the atmosphere to the upper ocean. The air-sea Δ14C gradient, reduced further by fossil fuel dilution, is now weaker than before weapons testing in most regions. Oceanic 14C, and particularly its temporal change, can now be used to study the oceanic uptake of anthropogenic CO2. We examine observed changes in oceanic Δ14C between the WOCE/SAVE (1988-1995) and the CLIVAR (2001-2007) eras and simulations with two ocean general circulation models, the Community Climate System Model (CCSM) and the Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean Model (ECCO). Observed oceanic Δ14C and its changes between the 1980s-90s and 2000s indicate that shallow-to-deep exchange is too efficient in ECCO and too sluggish in CCSM. These findings suggest that mean global oceanic uptake of anthropogenic CO2 between 1990 and 2007 is bounded by the ECCO-based estimate of 2.3 Pg C yr-1 and the CCSM-based estimate of 1.7 Pg C yr-1.

  9. Measuring chlorophyll. cap alpha. and /sup 14/C-labeled photosynthate in aquatic angiosperms by the use of a tissue solubilizer. [/sup 14/C-labelled photosynthate

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, S.; Stewart, A.J.; Wetzel, R.G.

    1982-01-01

    A compound that quantitatively correlated with chlorophyll ..cap alpha.. could be measured fluorometrically in the extracts of leaves of three aquatic angiosperms (Myriophyllum heterophyllum Michx., Potamogeton crispus L., Elodea canadensis Michx.) treated with the tissue solubilizer BTS-450. Fluorescent characteristics of the solubilized plant tissues were stable for several weeks in the dark at temperatures up to 60/sup 0/C but rapidly degraded in sunlight or when acidified. /sup 14/C-Labeled photosynthate, which had been fixed by leaf discs during 1- to 10-hour exposure to H/sup 14/CO/sub 3/, was also readily extracted by the tissue solubilizer. Solubilizer extraction can, therefore, be used to determine both chlorophyll ..cap alpha.. content and /sup 14/C incorporation rates in the same leaf sample. The method is practical, because no grinding is required, the fluorescent characteristics of the extracts are stable, and analyses can be performed with very little plant material (about 3 milligrams).

  10. Persistence of the herbicides (/sup 14/C)chlorsulfuron and (/sup 14/C)metsulfuron methyl in prairie soils under laboratory conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.E.

    1986-11-01

    Metsulfuron methyl, whose structure is closely related to that of chlorsulfuron, is currently being evaluated on the Canadian prairies as a postemergence treatment for the control of broadleaf weeds in cereal crops, in non-crop land and for brush control. Although applied postemergence, some of the herbicide will come into contact with the soil making it necessary to determine the fate of metsulfuron methyl in the soil. These studies were undertaken to investigate the rate of breakdown and the fate of (/sup 14/C)metsulfuron methyl in three soils under laboratory conditions where no leaching could occur. The rate of breakdown of (/sup 14/C)chlorsulfuron was also investigated in one of the soils.

  11. Low-level 14C measurements and Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Litherland, A.E.; Beukens, R.P.; Zhao, X.-L.; Kieser, W.E.; Gove, H.E.

    2005-09-08

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) and isotope enrichment were used in 1991 to estimate that the 14C content of methane in natural gas was {<=}1.6x10-18 of the total carbon. The low content of 14C in underground hydrocarbons was verified later in the remarkable results from the Borexino test scintillation counter for solar neutrino studies. Since then studies of the 14C background problem have demonstrated that much of the background originally observed in the AMS measurements can, in principle, be eliminated. However, many difficulties and other backgrounds are to be faced as the limit for AMS is pushed still further towards possibly a ratio of < 10-21. These will be discussed.

  12. 14C as a tool for evaluating riverine POC sources and erosion of the Zhujiang (Pearl River) drainage basin, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiuguo; Yi, Weixi; Shen, Chengde; Yechieli, Yoseph; Li, Ningli; Ding, Ping; Wang, Ning; Liu, Kexin

    2010-04-01

    Radiocarbon can serve as a powerful tool for identifying sources of organic carbon and evaluating the erosion intensity in river drainage basins. In this paper we present 14C-AMS measurements of particulate organic carbon (POC) collected from the three major tributaries of the Zhujiang (Pearl River) system: the Xijiang (Western River), Beijiang (Northern River) and Dongjiang (Eastern River) rivers. Furthermore, we discuss the distribution of POC 14C apparent ages and the related watersheds erosion of these rivers. Results yield Δ 14C values of -425‰ to -65‰ which indicate that the 14C apparent ages of suspended POC in the entire area are in the range of 540-4445 years. The POC apparent ages from Xijiang are mostly between 2000 and 4000 years, while in Dongjiang they mostly range from 540 to 1010 years. These 14C apparent ages indicate that the watershed erosion of the Xijiang is more severe than that of the Dongjiang. This is in agreement with other data showing deeper erosion in Xijiang due to human activities.

  13. 87Sr/86Sr as a quantitative geochemical proxy for 14C reservoir age in dynamic, brackish waters: Assessing applicability and quantifying uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lougheed, Bryan C.; Lubbe, H. J. L.; Davies, Gareth R.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate geochronologies are crucial for reconstructing the sensitivity of brackish and estuarine environments to dynamic external impacts of the past. Radiocarbon (14C) dating is commonly used for palaeoclimate studies, but its application in brackish environments is severely limited by an inability to quantify spatiotemporal variations in 14C reservoir age, or R(t), due to dynamic interplay between river runoff and marine water. Additionally, old carbon effects and species-specific behavioral processes also influence 14C ages. Using the world's largest brackish water body (the estuarine Baltic Sea) as a test bed, combined with a comprehensive approach that objectively excludes both old carbon (using GIS) and species-specific 14C effects, we demonstrate the use of 87Sr/86Sr ratios for quantifying R(t) in ubiquitous mollusc shell material, leading to almost an order of magnitude increase in Baltic Sea 14C geochronological precision over the current state of the art. We propose that similar proxy methods can be developed for other brackish water bodies worldwide.

  14. Radiocarbon and stable isotope investigations at the Central Rhineland sites of Gönnersdorf and Andernach-Martinsberg, Germany.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Rhiannon E; O'Connell, Tamsin C; Hedges, Robert E M; Street, Martin

    2009-08-01

    The late glacial open-air sites of Gönnersdorf and Andernach-Martinsberg in the German Central Rhineland are well known for their Magdalenian occupation and activities. The latter site also produced evidence for a younger, Final Palaeolithic occupation of the locality by people of the Federmessergruppen. Both sites are particularly well preserved, largely due to their burial beneath volcanic deposits of the late glacial Laacher See eruption. We conducted a program of AMS radiocarbon dating and stable isotope analyses with the aim of improving understanding of the chronological history and ecological setting of the two sites. Previously published radiocarbon dates appeared to indicate that the earliest Magdalenian occupation at Gönnersdorf fell around 12,900 uncalibrated (14)C yr BP, while the earliest occupation at Andernach may have been more than 500 radiocarbon years earlier. The AMS determinations presented here revise this impression and suggest that the onset of occupation at the two sites was in fact simultaneous and prior to the warming of Greenland Interstadial GI 1e. At Gönnersdorf, a chronological hiatus exists between the main Magdalenian faunal assemblage and mega-faunal remains interpreted as collected sub-fossil material. At Andernach-Martinsberg, there is a clear chronological hiatus between the Magdalenian occupation and subsequent Federmessergruppen activities at the site. However, an intermediate radiocarbon date on an atypically preserved horse bone is suggestive of ephemeral human visits to the site between these well demonstrated phases. A date of similar age on an elk bone from Gönnersdorf may indicate broadly contemporaneous human presence at Gönnersdorf too. Stable isotope analysis of faunal remains from Gönnersdorf and Andernach-Martinsberg was conducted with the aim of both reconstructing and comparing local environmental conditions at the two sites, and also potentially identifying subtle variations in the chronological development

  15. Search for exotic cluster configurations in 14C nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotkova, L. Yu; Chernyshev, B. A.; Gurov, Yu B.; Karpuhin, V. S.; Lapushkin, S. V.; Pritula, R. V.; Schurenkova, T. D.

    2016-02-01

    The analysis of 2-dimentional Dalitz’ diagram, measured in 14C(π-, pd)X reaction, allowed to distinguish the pion absorption by p intranuclear cluster and to obtain an indication on the existence of 3p + 11Li configuration in 14C nucleus. Highly excited states of 12,13Be isotopes were found with the energy of Ex ≈ 30 MeV for the first time. It was shown that these states decay as follows 12Be*→p + 11Li and 13Be*→d + 11Li.

  16. Radiocarbon dating of magnetic and non magnetic soil fractions as a method to estimate the heterotrophic component of soil respiration in a primary forest of Ghana.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiti, T.; Certini, G.; Marzaioli, F.; Valentini, R.

    2012-04-01

    We estimated the heterotrophic component (Rh) of soil respiration in a primary forest of Ghana by radiocarbon dating, a method we already successfully applied in temperate and Mediterranean forests. In this case, given the advanced stage of alteration of tropical soils, which are thus rich in oxides, we implemented the method on soil fractions obtained by High Gradient Magnetic Separation (HGMS), hence based on different degrees of magnetic susceptibility. In particular, we separated an organic pool associated with magnetic minerals (e.g iron oxides) from an organic pool engaged with non-magnetic minerals. This non destructive method of fractionation, often applied to the finest fraction of soil (clay), is here attempted on the bulk fine earth (< 2 mm). We sampled the soil at 0-5, 5-15, 15-10, and 30-50 cm depth intervals, since a previous study in the same site suggested that only the first 50 cm of soil was enriched in bomb carbon (C younger than 1950). The samples of each layer were sieved at 2 mm and further at 0.5 mm ,so as to have two size fractions: 2 to 0.5 mm and <0.5 mm, and both of them were separated into a magnetic and non magnetic fraction. All the specimens were then investigated in terms of mineralogical assemblage (by X-Ray diffrattometry), chemical structure of the organic component (13C NMR spectroscopy), and 14C concentration (AMS) for inferring the mean residence time (MRT) of the organic component in the soil. Radiocarbon concentration was always higher in the finest SOC fractions (<0.5 mm), with the magnetic fraction always showing an higher 14C concentration than the non magnetic one. The magnetic and non magnetic materials of the coarser fraction (0.5-2 mm) showed quite similar 14C concentrations in all of the soil layers investigated. The composition of the organic matter is different in the different fractions and partly explains the differences in MRT, although a major role in preserving the organics from decomposition is probably played

  17. Carbon and 14C distribution in tropical and subtropical agricultural soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prastowo, Erwin; Grootes, Pieter; Nadeau, Marie

    2016-04-01

    Paddy soil management affects, through the alternating anoxic and oxic conditions it creates, the transport and stabilisation of soil organic matter (SOM). Irrigation water may percolate more organic materials - dissolved (DOM) and colloidal - into the subsoil during anoxic conditions. Yet a developed ploughpan tends to prevent C from going deeper in the subsoil and partly decouple C distribution in top and sub soil. We investigate the influence of different soil type and environment. We observed the C and 14C distribution in paddy and non-paddy soil profiles in three different soil types from four different climatic regions of tropical Indonesia, and subtropical China. Locations were Sukabumi (Andosol, ca. 850 m a.s.l), Bogor (clayey Alisol, ca. 240 m a.s.l), and Ngawi (Vertisol, ca. 70 m a.s.l) in Jawa, Indonesia, and Cixi (Alisol(sandy), ca. 4 - 6 m a.s.l) in Zhejiang Province, China. We compared rice paddies with selected neighbouring non-paddy fields and employed AMS 14C as a tool to study C dynamics from bulk, alkali soluble-humic, and insoluble humin samples, and macrofossils (plant remains, charcoal). Our data suggest that vegetation type determines the quantity and quality of biomass introduced as litter and root material in top and subsoil, and thus contributes to the soil C content and profile, which fits the 14C signal distribution, as well as 13C in Ngawi with C4 sugar cane as upland crop. 14C concentrations for the mobile humic acid fraction were generally higher than for bulk samples from the same depth, except when recent plant and root debris led to high 14C levels in near-surface samples. The difference in sampling, - averaged layer for bulk sample and 1-cm layer thickness for point sample - shows gradients in C and 14C across the layers, which could be a reason for discrepancies between the two. High 14C concentrations - in Andosol Sukabumi up to 111 pMC - exceed the atmospheric 14CO2concentration in the sampling year in 2012 (˜ 103 pMC) and

  18. Disposition of [14C]methyl bromide in rats after inhalation.

    PubMed

    Bond, J A; Dutcher, J S; Medinsky, M A; Henderson, R F; Birnbaum, L S

    1985-04-01

    Methyl bromide is used as a disinfectant to fumigate soil and a wide range of stored food commodities in warehouses and mills. Human exposure occurs during the manufacture and use of the chemical. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the disposition and metabolism of [14C]methyl bromide in rats after inhalation. Male Fischer-344 rats were exposed nose only to a vapor concentration of 337 nmol [14C]methyl bromide/liter air (9.0 ppm, 25 degrees C, 620 torr) for 6 hr. Urine, feces, expired air, and tissues were collected for up to 65 hr after exposure. Elimination of 14C as 14CO2 was the major route of excretion with about 47% (3900 nmol/rat) of the total [14C]methyl bromide absorbed excreted by this route. CO2 excretion exhibited a biphasic elimination pattern with 85% of the 14CO2 being excreted with a half-time of 3.9 +/- 0.1 hr (means +/- SE) and 15% excreted with a half-time of 11.4 +/- 0.2 hr. Half-times for elimination of 14C in urine and feces were 9.6 +/- 0.1 and 16.1 +/- 0.1 hr, respectively. By 65 hr after exposure, about 75% of the initial radioactivity had been excreted with 25% remaining in the body. Radioactivity was widely distributed in tissues immediately following exposure with lung (250 nmol equivalents/g), adrenal (240 nmol equivalents/g), kidney (180 nmol equivalents/g), liver (130 nmol equivalents/g), and nasal turbinates (110 nmol equivalents/g) containing the highest concentrations of 14C. Radioactivity in livers immediately after exposure accounted for about 17% of the absorbed methyl bromide. Radioactivity in all other tissues examined accounted for about 10% of the absorbed methyl bromide. Elimination half-times of 14C from tissues were on the order of 1.5 to 8 hr. In all tissues examined, over 90% of the 14C in the tissues was methyl bromide metabolites. The data from this study indicate that after inhalation methyl bromide is rapidly metabolized in tissues and readily excreted.

  19. Estimating Sources and Rates of Internal Cycling of DOM Using Radiocarbon in the San Joaquin-Sacramento Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sickman, J. O.; Digiorgio, C. L.; Davisson, M. L.; Lucero, D. M.

    2005-12-01

    Uncertainties in sources and transformations of dissolved organic matter (DOM) typically cannot be overcome using stable isotopes of carbon due to low natural variability of δ13C in sources and relatively small isotopic discrimination for the major processes producing or consuming DOM in large riverine systems. Radiocarbon, in contrast, has the potential to be a powerful tool in unraveling DOM dynamics owing to substantial variations in 14C content of autochthonous and allochthonous DOM sources to rivers. In addition, coupling radiocarbon fingerprints to DOM mass fluxes produces a powerful tool to measure internal rates of DOM turnover in complex riverine systems. Radiocarbon and stable isotopic composition of three fractions of DOM (whole water, hydrophobic and hydrophilic) were measured over a one-year period at six locations in the in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California including the California Aqueduct. Overall variation in radiocarbon concentrations ranged from 0.6 to 1.3 fmc. DOM in agricultural runoff was more 14C depleted (0.78 and 0.79 fmc for mean whole water and hydrophobic fractions) than riverine DOM inputs (0.83 and 0.98 fmc respectively). In many samples collected during the growing season, whole-water DOM 14C content was lower than in hydrophobic fractions indicating a substantial contribution of old, non-humic substances to riverine DOM loads. Coupling this wide range of radiocarbon variability to DOM fluxes reveals that the major source of organic matter to the California Aqueduct is riverine input. Furthermore, the mixing analysis suggests that a substantial amount of DOM from agricultural sources is retained within the Delta through a combination of biotic and abiotic processes.

  20. Difference in radiocarbon ages of carbonized material from the inner and outer surfaces of pottery from a wetland archaeological site.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Yoshiki; Minami, Masayo; Onbe, Shin; Sakamoto, Minoru; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Toshio; Imamura, Mineo

    2011-01-01

    AMS (Accelerator Mass Spectrometry) radiocarbon dates for eight potsherds from a single piece of pottery from a wetland archaeological site indicated that charred material from the inner pottery surfaces (5052 ± 12 BP; N = 5) is about 90 (14)C years older than that from the outer surfaces (4961 ± 22 BP; N = 7). We considered three possible causes of this difference: the old wood effect, reservoir effects, and diagenesis. We concluded that differences in the radiocarbon ages between materials from the inner and outer surfaces of the same pot were caused either by the freshwater reservoir effect or by diagenesis. Moreover, we found that the radiocarbon ages of carbonized material on outer surfaces (soot) of pottery from other wetland archaeological sites were the same as the ages of material on inner surfaces (charred food) of the same pot within error, suggesting absence of freshwater reservoir effect or diagenesis.

  1. Difference in radiocarbon ages of carbonized material from the inner and outer surfaces of pottery from a wetland archaeological site

    PubMed Central

    MIYATA, Yoshiki; MINAMI, Masayo; ONBE, Shin; SAKAMOTO, Minoru; MATSUZAKI, Hiroyuki; NAKAMURA, Toshio; IMAMURA, Mineo

    2011-01-01

    AMS (Accelerator Mass Spectrometry) radiocarbon dates for eight potsherds from a single piece of pottery from a wetland archaeological site indicated that charred material from the inner pottery surfaces (5052 ± 12 BP; N = 5) is about 90 14C years older than that from the outer surfaces (4961 ± 22 BP; N = 7). We considered three possible causes of this difference: the old wood effect, reservoir effects, and diagenesis. We concluded that differences in the radiocarbon ages between materials from the inner and outer surfaces of the same pot were caused either by the freshwater reservoir effect or by diagenesis. Moreover, we found that the radiocarbon ages of carbonized material on outer surfaces (soot) of pottery from other wetland archaeological sites were the same as the ages of material on inner surfaces (charred food) of the same pot within error, suggesting absence of freshwater reservoir effect or diagenesis. PMID:21986315

  2. A new procedure for extraction of collagen from modern and archaeological bones for 14C dating.

    PubMed

    Maspero, F; Sala, S; Fedi, M E; Martini, M; Papagni, A

    2011-10-01

    Bones are potentially the best age indicators in a stratigraphic study, because they are closely related to the layer in which they are found. Collagen is the most suitable fraction and is the material normally used in radiocarbon dating. Bone contaminants can strongly alter the carbon isotopic fraction values of the samples, so chemical pretreatment for (14)C dating by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is essential. The most widespread method for collagen extraction is based on the Longin procedure, which consists in HCl demineralization to dissolve the inorganic phase of the samples, followed by dissolution of collagen in a weak acid solution. In this work the possible side effects of this procedure on a modern bone are presented; the extracted collagen was analyzed by ATR-IR spectroscopy. An alternative procedure, based on use of HF instead of HCl, to minimize unwanted degradation of the organic fraction, is also given. A study by ATR-IR spectroscopic analysis of collagen collected after different demineralization times and with different acid volumes, and a study of an archaeological sample, are also presented.

  3. Current perspectives of 14C-isotope measurement in biomedical accelerator mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lappin, Graham; Garner, R Colin

    2004-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an extremely sensitive nuclear physics technique developed in the mid-70's for radiocarbon dating of historical artefacts. The technique centres round the use of a tandem Van de Graaff accelerator to generate the potential energy to permit separation of elemental isotopes at the single atom level. AMS was first used in the early 90's for the analysis of biological samples containing enriched 14C for toxicology and cancer research. Since that time biomedical AMS has been used in the study of (1) metabolism of xenobiotics in animals and humans (2) pathways of drug metabolism (3) biomarkers (4) metabolism of endogenous molecules including vitamins (5) DNA and protein binding studies and (6) clinical diagnosis. A new drug development concept which relies on the ultrasensitivity of AMS known as human microdosing (Phase 0) is being used to obtain early human metabolism information of candidate drugs arising out of discovery. These various aspects of AMS are reviewed in this article and a perspective on future applications of AMS provided.

  4. Insights into Holocene megafauna survival and extinction in southeastern Brazil from new AMS 14C dates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbe, Alex; Hubbe, Mark; Karmann, Ivo; Cruz, Francisco W.; Neves, Walter A.

    2013-03-01

    The extinction of late Quaternary megafauna in South America has been extensively debated in past decades. The majority of the hypotheses explaining this phenomenon argue that the extinction was the result of human activities, environmental changes, or even synergism between the two. Although still limited, a good chronological framework is imperative to discuss the plausibility of the available hypotheses. Here we present six new direct AMS 14C radiocarbon dates from the state of São Paulo (Brazil) to further characterize the chronological distribution of extinct fauna in this part of South America. The new dates make evident that ground sloths, toxodonts, and saber-toothed cats lived in the region around the Pleistocene/Holocene transition, and, in agreement with previous studies, also suggest an early Holocene survival for the ground sloth Catonyx cuvieri. Taken together with local paleoclimatic and archaeological data, the new dates do not support hunting or indirect human activities as a major cause for megafauna extinction. Although more data are required, parsimony suggests that climatic changes played a major role in this extinction event.

  5. Percutaneous absorption of [14C]chlordane from soil.

    PubMed

    Wester, R C; Maibach, H I; Sedik, L; Melendres, J; Liao, C L; DiZio, S

    1992-04-01

    The objective was to determine percutaneous absorption of chlordane in vitro and in vivo from soil into and through skin. The data are needed to calculate the absorbed dose of chlordane from soil, which is then used to assess the toxicity risk. Chlordane, an insecticide for which residues exist in soil, is restricted currently to use for termite control. Chlordane is highly lipophilic with little or no movement out of soil. Soil (Yolo County 65-California-57-8; 26% sand, 26% clay, 48% silt, 0.9% organic) was passed through 10-, 20-, and 48-mesh sieves. Soil then retained by 80-mesh was mixed with 14C-labeled chemical at 67 ppm. Acetone solutions were prepared for comparative analysis. Human cadaver skin was dermatomed to 500 microns and used in glass diffusion cells with human plasma as the receptor fluid (3 ml/h flow rate) for a 24-h skin application time. Chlordane concentration within skin from in vitro studies was 0.34 +/- 0.31% from soil and 10.8 +/- 8.2% from acetone vehicle (p less than .01). Individual variation from human skin sources was evident (p less than .008). Chlordane accumulation in human plasma receptor fluid was the same for soil (0.04 +/- 0.05%) and acetone (0.07% +/- 0.06%) formulations. Most of the remaining chlordane was recovered in the soap and water skin surface wash. In contrast, in vivo percutaneous absorption of chlordane in the rhesus monkey was the same for soil (4.2 +/- 1.8%) and acetone (6.0 +/- 2.8%) formulations (p = .29, nonsignificant). Multiple soap and water washings were necessary to remove chlordane from skin, suggesting that a single wash may not adequately remove all the chlordane. PMID:1578510

  6. Percutaneous absorption of [14C]chlordane from soil.

    PubMed

    Wester, R C; Maibach, H I; Sedik, L; Melendres, J; Liao, C L; DiZio, S

    1992-04-01

    The objective was to determine percutaneous absorption of chlordane in vitro and in vivo from soil into and through skin. The data are needed to calculate the absorbed dose of chlordane from soil, which is then used to assess the toxicity risk. Chlordane, an insecticide for which residues exist in soil, is restricted currently to use for termite control. Chlordane is highly lipophilic with little or no movement out of soil. Soil (Yolo County 65-California-57-8; 26% sand, 26% clay, 48% silt, 0.9% organic) was passed through 10-, 20-, and 48-mesh sieves. Soil then retained by 80-mesh was mixed with 14C-labeled chemical at 67 ppm. Acetone solutions were prepared for comparative analysis. Human cadaver skin was dermatomed to 500 microns and used in glass diffusion cells with human plasma as the receptor fluid (3 ml/h flow rate) for a 24-h skin application time. Chlordane concentration within skin from in vitro studies was 0.34 +/- 0.31% from soil and 10.8 +/- 8.2% from acetone vehicle (p less than .01). Individual variation from human skin sources was evident (p less than .008). Chlordane accumulation in human plasma receptor fluid was the same for soil (0.04 +/- 0.05%) and acetone (0.07% +/- 0.06%) formulations. Most of the remaining chlordane was recovered in the soap and water skin surface wash. In contrast, in vivo percutaneous absorption of chlordane in the rhesus monkey was the same for soil (4.2 +/- 1.8%) and acetone (6.0 +/- 2.8%) formulations (p = .29, nonsignificant). Multiple soap and water washings were necessary to remove chlordane from skin, suggesting that a single wash may not adequately remove all the chlordane.

  7. Radiocarbon isotopic evidence for assimilation of atmospheric CO2 by the seagrass Zostera marina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, K.; Kuwae, T.

    2015-10-01

    Submerged aquatic vegetation takes up water-column dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) as a carbon source across its thin cuticle layer. It is expected that marine macrophytes also use atmospheric CO2 when exposed to air during low tide, although assimilation of atmospheric CO2 has never been quantitatively evaluated. Using the radiocarbon isotopic signatures (Δ14C) of the seagrass Zostera marina, DIC and particulate organic carbon (POC), we show quantitatively that Z. marina takes up and assimilates atmospheric modern CO2 in a shallow coastal ecosystem. The Δ14C values of the seagrass (-40 to -10 ‰) were significantly higher than those of aquatic DIC (-46 to -18 ‰), indicating that the seagrass uses a 14C-rich carbon source (atmospheric CO2, +17 ‰). A carbon-source mixing model indicated that the seagrass assimilated 0-40 % (mean, 17 %) of its inorganic carbon as atmospheric CO2. CO2 exchange between the air and the seagrass might be enhanced by the presence of a very thin film of water over the air-exposed leaves during low tide. Our radiocarbon isotope analysis, showing assimilation of atmospheric modern CO2 as an inorganic carbon source, improves our understanding of the role of seagrass meadows in coastal carbon dynamics.

  8. Soil Carbon Vulnerability in Arctic Coastal Tundra: Seasonal and Spatial Variations in 14C-CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, L. J.; Torn, M. S.; Conrad, M. E.; Curtis, J. B.; Hahn, M. S.

    2013-12-01

    One reason permafrost soils contain large, old soil organic carbon stores is slow decomposition rates due to cold and waterlogged conditions. If climate change causes high latitude soils to warm and dry, carbon emissions from permafrost soils could be an important atmospheric greenhouse gas source. The vulnerability of global Arctic soil carbon stocks to increased decomposition due to thaw is hard to assess, due to environmental heterogeneity, complex controls on microbial processes, uncertain carbon stocks and flux rates, and poorly understood soil carbon stabilization mechanisms. To address these knowledge gaps, we are using radiocarbon measurements to estimate carbon turnover times in polygonal tundra in Barrow, Alaska. Specifically, we ask: (1) how do old versus recently fixed soil carbon pools contribute to total decomposition, (2) how does this vary seasonally, and (3) how does it vary across a permafrost degradation gradient? Old radiocarbon ages of soil organic matter in perennially frozen soils and deep portions of the seasonally thawed active layer reflect slow historic decomposition rates, and changes in the radiocarbon content of respired CO2 indicate relative mineralization rates of this old, stored carbon. At four time points from June-October 2013, we sample soil organic matter and respired CO2 from low-centered, transitional, and high-centered polygons characteristic of a permafrost degradation cycle. We measure the radiocarbon content of CO2 in surface fluxes and soil pore space from 3 depths in the soil profile, and concurrently incubate active layer soils to resolve the 14C-CO2 signatures of individual soil layers. Preliminary data from 2012 suggest that old soil carbon stores are vulnerable to decomposition. CO2 ages increase with depth in the profile from modern radiocarbon ages to as old as 3115 BP, and high incubation flux rates indicate availability to microbes. As part of the Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment (NGEE-Arctic), we now study

  9. 14C in cropland soil of a long-term field trial - in-field variability and implications for estimating carbon turnover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leifeld, J.; Mayer, J.

    2015-03-01

    Because of their controlled nature, the presence of independent replicates, and their known management history long-term field experiments are key to the understanding of factors controlling soil carbon. Together with isotope measurements, they provide profound insight into soil carbon dynamics. For soil radiocarbon, an important tracer for understanding these dynamics, in-field variability across replicates is usually not accounted for, hence, a relevant source of uncertainty for quantifying turnover rates is missing. Here, for the first time, radiocarbon measurements of independent field replicates, and for different layers, of soil from the 60 years old controlled field experiment ZOFE in Zurich, Switzerland, is used to address this issue. 14C variability was the same across three different treatments and for three different soil layers between surface and 90 cm depths. On average, in-field variability in 14C content was 12 times the analytical error but still, on a relative basis, smaller than that of in-field soil carbon concentration variability. Despite a relative homogeneous variability across the field and along the soil profile, the curved nature of the relationship between radiocarbon content and modelled carbon mean residence time suggests that the absolute error, without consideration of in-field variability, introduced to soil carbon turnover time calculations increases with soil depth. In our field experiment findings on topsoil carbon turnover variability would, if applied to subsoil, tend to underweight turnover variability even if in-field variability of the subsoil isotope concentration is not higher. Together, in-field variability in radiocarbon is an important component in an overall uncertainty assessment of soil carbon turnover.

  10. Convenient preparative synthesis of ( sup 14 C)trehalose from ( sup 14 C)glucose by intact Escherichia coli cells

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, B.; Boos, W. )

    1989-09-01

    At high osmolarity, Escherichia coli synthesizes trehalose intracellularly, irrespective of the nature of the carbon source. Synthesis proceeds via the transfer of UDP-glucose to glucose 6-phosphate, yielding trehalose 6-phosphate, followed by its dephosphorylation to trehalose. This reaction was exploited to preparatively synthesize ({sup 14}C)trehalose from exogenous ({sup 14}C)glucose by using intact bacteria of a mutant (DF214) that could not metabolize glucose. The total yield of radiochemically pure trehalose from glucose was routinely more than 50%.

  11. Applications of AMS {sup 14}C on Climate and Archaeology

    SciTech Connect

    Gomes, P. R. S.

    2007-10-26

    We describe the Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) technique and two distinct applications of its use with {sup 14}C to study environmental problems in Brazil, such as forest fires and climate changes in the Amazon region and archaeological studies on the early settlements in the Southeast Brazilian coast.

  12. Excretion of radioactivity following the intraperitoneal administration of /sup 14/C-DDT, /sup 14/C-DDD, /sup 14/C-DDE and /sup 14/C-DDMU to the rat and Japanese Quail

    SciTech Connect

    Fawcett, S.C.; Bunyan, P.J.; Huson, L.W.; King, L.J.; Stanley, P.I.

    1981-09-01

    A study in progress to examine the metabolic fate of DDT in birds and mammals is discussed. The first phase of the study, which is reported in this article, has been to establish the rate of excretion of ratioactivity following the intraperitoneal administrations of /sup 14/C-DDT, /sup 14/C-DDE, /sup 14/C-DDD, and /sup 14/C-DDMU to male rats and male Japanese quail. The mean values from the three animals in each experimental group for the amount of radioactivity excreted daily are given, and it was found that the rats excreted the radioactivity administered as DDT, DDD, and DDE substantially faster than did the quail. DDMU was excreted relatively rapidly and at similar rates. This finding suggests that apparent differences in the rates of excretion of DDT by birds and mammals probably arise from differences in the conversion of DDT to DDD or DDE or in the degradation of these metabolites to DDMU. The Japanese quail differ from the rats in excreting substantial amounts of unchanged DDT, DDE, and DDD, which probably reflects the inability of the Japanese quail to readily metabolise these compounds.

  13. Quantifying Fine Root Carbon Inputs To Soil: Results From Combining Radiocarbon And Traditional Methodologies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudinski, J. B.; Trumbore, S. E.; Dawson, T.; Torn, M.; Pregitzer, K.; Joslin, J. D.

    2002-12-01

    Estimates of high belowground net primary productivity (50% or more) in forest ecosystems are often based on assumptions that almost all fine roots (< 2 mm in diameter) live and die within one year. Recent radiocarbon (14C) measurements of fine root cellulose in three eastern temperate forests of the United States show that at least a portion of fine roots are living for more than 8 years (Gaudinski et al. 2001) and that fine root lifespans likely vary as a function of both diameter and position on the root branch system. New data from investigations under way in several different temperate forests further support the idea of large variations in root lifespans with radiocarbon-derived ages ranging from approximately one year to several years. In forests where both mini-rhizotron and 14C lifespan estimates have been made, the two techniques agree well when the 14C sampling is made on the same types of roots viewed by mini-rhizotron cameras (i.e. first and second order roots; the most distal and newest roots on the root branching system), and the 14C signature of new root growth is known. We have quantified the signature of new tree roots by taking advantage of locally-elevated 14C at Oak Ridge Tennessee, which shows that carbon making up new roots was photosynthesized approximately 1.5 years prior to new root growth. Position on the root branching system shows a correlation with age, with ages up to 7 years for 4th order roots of red maple. The method by which roots are sampled also affects the 14C-estimated age, with total fine root population, sampled via soil cores, showing longer lifespans relative to roots sampled by position on the root branch system (when similar diameter classes are compared). Overall, the implication of our studies is that assumptions of turnover times of 1 year result in underestimates of the true lifespan of a large portion of fine root biomass in temperate forests. This suggests that future calculations of belowground net primary

  14. Radiocarbon version of 11-year variations in the interplanetary magnetic field since 1250

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volobuev, D. M.; Makarenko, N. G.

    2015-12-01

    It is known that the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), which is controlled by solar activity, modulates the flux of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs). Because GCRs are the only source of the 14C isotope in the atmosphere before the era of atmospheric nuclear tests, the formation rate of this isotope in the atmosphere is one of the few reliable sources of information on solar activity before the initiation of regular telescopic observations. In this study, we solve the inverse problem for the equation of radiocarbon diffusion from the atmosphere into the ocean by calibrating the radiocarbon content in tree rings from 1510 to 1950. We obtain an approximation of 11-year IMF cycles represented by the IDV index from 1872 to 1950. The model extrapolation to the calibration curve for the Korean Peninsula over the time period from 1250 to 1650 makes it possible to calculate the sequence of minima of quasi-11-year cycles since 1250.

  15. High-resolution chronology for the Mesoamerican urban center of Teotihuacan derived from Bayesian statistics of radiocarbon and archaeological data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beramendi-Orosco, Laura E.; Gonzalez-Hernandez, Galia; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, Jaime; Manzanilla, Linda R.; Soler-Arechalde, Ana M.; Goguitchaishvili, Avto; Jarboe, Nick

    2009-03-01

    A high-resolution 14C chronology for the Teopancazco archaeological site in the Teotihuacan urban center of Mesoamerica was generated by Bayesian analysis of 33 radiocarbon dates and detailed archaeological information related to occupation stratigraphy, pottery and archaeomagnetic dates. The calibrated intervals obtained using the Bayesian model are up to ca. 70% shorter than those obtained with individual calibrations. For some samples, this is a consequence of plateaus in the part of the calibration curve covered by the sample dates (2500 to 1450 14C yr BP). Effects of outliers are explored by comparing the results from a Bayesian model that incorporates radiocarbon data for two outlier samples with the same model excluding them. The effect of outliers was more significant than expected. Inclusion of radiocarbon dates from two altered contexts, 500 14C yr earlier than those for the first occupational phase, results in ages calculated by the model earlier than the archaeological records. The Bayesian chronology excluding these outliers separates the first two Teopancazco occupational phases and suggests that ending of the Xolalpan phase was around cal AD 550, 100 yr earlier than previously estimated and in accordance with previously reported archaeomagnetic dates from lime plasters for the same site.

  16. Application of radiocarbon analysis and receptor modeling to the source apportionment of PAHs (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) in the atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, A.E.

    1988-01-01

    The radiocarbon tracer technique was used to demonstrate that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) can be used for quantitative receptor modeling of air pollution. Fine-particle samples were collected during December, 1985, in Albuquerque, NM. Motor vehicles (fossil) and residential wood combustion (RWC, modern) were the major PAH-sources. For each sample, the PAH-fraction was solvent-extracted, isolated by liquid chromatography, and analyzed by GC-FID and GC-MS. The PAH-fractions from sixteen samples were analyzed for {sup 14}C by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry. Radiocarbon data were used to calculate the relative RWC contribution (f{sub RWC}) for samples analyzed for {sup 14}C. Normalized concentrations of a prospective motor vehicle tracer, benzo(ghi)perylene (BGP) had a strong, negative correlation with f{sub RWC}. Normalized BGP concentrations were used to apportion sources for samples not analyzed for {sup 14}C. Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) vs. ADCS and BGP was used to estimate source profiles for use in Target Factor Analysis (TFA). Profiles predicted by TFA were used in Chemical Mass Balances (CMBs). For non-volatile, stable PAHs, agreement between observed and predicted concentrations was excellent. The worst fits were observed for the most volatile PAHs and for coronene. The total RWC contributions predicted by CMBs correlated well with the radiocarbon data.

  17. Stepped-combustion 14C dating of bomb carbon in lake sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGeehin, J.; Burr, G.S.; Hodgins, G.; Bennett, S.J.; Robbins, J.A.; Morehead, N.; Markewich, H.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we applied a stepped-combustion approach to dating post-bomb lake sediment from north-central Mississippi. Samples were combusted at a low temperature (400 ??C) and then at 900 ??C. The CO2 was collected separately for both combustions and analyzed. The goal of this work was to develop a methodology to improve the accuracy of 14C dating of sediment by combusting at a lower temperature and reducing the amount of reworked carbon bound to clay minerals in the sample material. The 14C fraction modern results for the low and high temperature fractions of these sediments were compared with well-defined 137Cs determinations made on sediment taken from the same cores. Comparison of "bomb curves" for 14C and 137Cs indicate that low temperature combustion of sediment improved the accuracy of 14C dating of the sediment. However, fraction modern results for the low temperature fractions were depressed compared to atmospheric values for the same time frame, possibly the result of carbon mixing and the low sedimentation rate in the lake system.

  18. Disposition of 14C-derived residues in tissues of pigs fed radiolabelled fumonisin B1.

    PubMed

    Prelusky, D B; Miller, J D; Trenholm, H L

    1996-01-01

    The uptake and distribution of radioactive material-derived residues were determined in tissues of growing pigs consuming 14C-labelled fumonisin B1 (FB1) in the diet. Animals were fed 3.0 mg (3.0 microCi) 14C-FB1/kg feed from days 1-12, followed by 2.0 mg (2.0 microCi) 14C-FB1/kg feed during days 13-24, followed by a 9-day withdrawal period where pigs received clean feed only. Of the tissues analysed, residues were found to accumulate only in liver and kidney. Radioactivity was detected at the first sampling time (day 3), and continued to increase until the 14C-toxin was removed from the diet. Peak tissue levels (dpm/g tissue +/- SD, N = 2) in liver and kidney were 347 +/- 28 and 146 +/- 14, respectively, on day 24, which were equivalent to about 160 and 65 ng FB1 and/or metabolites per g tissue, respectively. Once pigs were placed on clean feed, tissue levels declined rapidly; down to approximately 35% of peak levels after 3 days, and only marginally above detection limits (approximately 25 dpm/g) after 9 days. Delayed recovery of the radioactive material consumed indicated a persistence within the body of FB1-derived residues, which could be eliminated only upon removal of the contaminated diet. PMID:9064240

  19. Fate of the naphthenic acid, U-{sup 14}C-palmitic acid, in constructed wetlands; A microcosm study

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, A.; Barjaktarovic, L.; Moore, M.; Kennedy, C.; Farrell, A.P.; Bendell-Young, L.I.

    1995-12-31

    This study represents part of an overall initiative to assess the ecological viability of constructed wetlands for the treatment of oil sands wastewater. To determine the fate of naphthenic acids (C{sub n}H{sub 2n+z}O{sub 2}), the most toxic component of oil sands wastewater, in constructed wetlands, a representative naphthenic acid (NA), U-{sup 14}C-palmitic acid was added to microcosms placed within three control and three treatment wetlands. Treatment wetlands receive wastewater typical of effluent resulting from the oil sands extraction process. In each of the 6 microcosms, biotic compartments measured for {sup 14}C at t = 0, 1, 3, 5, 7, 14 and 21 days were: mineralized palmitic acid (evolved {sup 14}C-CO{sub 2}), water, suspended sediments, bottom sediments, cattail, chironomid larvae, and sticklebacks (liver, muscle and skin). The fate of the {sup 14}C-palmitic acid was similar between the control versus treatment microcosms. Exceptions were greater amounts of {sup 14}C-palmitic acid detected in water and suspended sediments of treatment versus control microcosms. Of the biotic compartments, at t = 21 days, the majority of the {sup 14}C-palmitic acid was found in chironomids and fish tissues. Mineralization and partitioning of {sup 14}C-palmitic acid onto sediments also represented important fates. From the initial addition of the labelled compound, with the exception of bottom sediments, by t = 1 day {sup 14}C was detected in ail biotic compartments. {sup 14}C was detected in bottom sediments by t = 7 days. These results indicate that in addition to mineralization being an important process influencing the fate palmitic acid within the wetlands, partitioning into biotic compartments such as chironomids and fish are also important fates. Hence, when considering the use of constructed wetlands for the treatment of oil sands effluent, the adverse effects of naphthenic acids on the biota needs to be fully addressed.

  20. Reexposure and advection of 14C-depleted organic carbon from old deposits at the upper continental slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesi, Tommaso; GoñI, Miguel A.; Langone, Leonardo; Puig, Pere; Canals, Miquel; Nittrouer, Charles A.; Durrieu de Madron, Xavier; Calafat, Antoni; Palanques, Albert; Heussner, Serge; Davies, Maureen H.; Drexler, Tina M.; Fabres, Joan; Miserocchi, Stefano

    2010-12-01

    Outcrops of old strata at the shelf edge resulting from erosive gravity-driven flows have been globally described on continental margins. The reexposure of old strata allows for the reintroduction of aged organic carbon (OC), sequestered in marine sediments for thousands of years, into the modern carbon cycle. This pool of reworked material represents an additional source of 14C-depleted organic carbon supplied to the ocean, in parallel with the weathering of fossil organic carbon delivered by rivers from land. To understand the dynamics and implications of this reexposure at the shelf edge, a biogeochemical study was carried out in the Gulf of Lions (Mediterranean Sea) where erosive processes, driven by shelf dense water cascading, are currently shaping the seafloor at the canyon heads. Mooring lines equipped with sediment traps and current meters were deployed during the cascading season in the southwestern canyon heads, whereas sediment cores were collected along the sediment dispersal system from the prodelta regions down to the canyon heads. Evidence from grain-size, X-radiographs and 210Pb activity indicate the presence in the upper slope of a shelly-coarse surface stratum overlying a consolidated deposit. This erosive discontinuity was interpreted as being a result of dense water cascading that is able to generate sufficient shear stress at the canyon heads to mobilize the coarse surface layer, eroding the basal strata. As a result, a pool of aged organic carbon (Δ14C = -944.5 ± 24.7‰; mean age 23,650 ± 3,321 ybp) outcrops at the modern seafloor and is reexposed to the contemporary carbon cycle. This basal deposit was found to have relatively high terrigenous organic carbon (lignin = 1.48 ± 0.14 mg/100 mg OC), suggesting that this material was deposited during the last low sea-level stand. A few sediment trap samples showed anomalously depleted radiocarbon concentrations (Δ14C = -704.4 ± 62.5‰) relative to inner shelf (Δ14C = -293.4 ± 134.0

  1. A proposed method for the determination of cerebral regional intermediary glucose metabolism in humans in vivo using specifically labeled /sup 11/C-glucose and positron emission transverse tomography (PETT). I. An animal model with /sup 14/C-glucose and rat brain autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Sacks, W.; Sacks, S.; Badalamenti, A.; Fleischer, A.

    1982-01-01

    Based upon data obtained with our arterio-venous technique for the determination of cerebral metabolism in humans in vivo we have proposed a method for the determination of cerebral regional intermediary glucose metabolism in humans in vivo using specifically labeled /sup 11/C-glucose and positron emission transverse tomography (PETT). In it we would give the subject successive intravenous injections of (3,4-/sup 11/C) glucose, (2,5-/sup 11/C) glucose and (1-/sup 11/C) glucose. There would be a 30 min period of continuous PETT measurements following each injection and a 2 hr interval after the first and second injections. The data would be used with suitable equations and algorithms to estimate for each specific region of the subject's brain the dynamics of the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas (EMP) and the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) metabolic pathways and the incorporation of glucose carbons into lactate, and the extent of dilution of glucose carbons into lactate, and the extent of dilution of glucose carbons in traversing the TCA with their subsequent incorporation into other carbon pools of the brain (ie, glutamate, glutamine, GABA, alanine). Using /sup 14/C as a model for /sup 11/C and autoradiographs made with rat brain slices, we have produced an animal model to demonstrate the feasibility of our proposed method. The resulting autoradiographs have provided evidence of the validity of the predictions made from our arterio-venous data. The model was employed to show the selective reductions in the rates of incorporation of specific carbon atoms of glucose into regions of the rat brain and evidence of altered metabolic pathways following a single electroconvulsive shock (ECS) and after a series of nine ECS.

  2. Source Apportionment of Elemental Carbon Across the San Francisco Bay Area Using Combined Radiocarbon and Chemical Mass Balances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, S.; Fairley, D.; Sheesley, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    The San Francisco Bay Area is impacted by ambient particulate matter (PM) from a variety of sources including motor vehicles, biomass burning, off-road vehicles, industry, and meat cooking. Ambient PM, especially fine PM (diameter less than 2.5μm, PM2.5), is known to negatively impact health. Elemental Carbon (EC) is one of the major constituents of PM2.5. It not only negatively affects health but is also a powerful short-lived climate forcer. The State of California and Bay Area Air Quality Management District (BAAQMD) have made efforts in regulating contribution of EC from diesel trucks and wood burning, respectively. These and other efforts have assisted in significantly reducing the annual average PM2.5 concentrations approximately 30% since 2005 and 70% since 1990. Despite these improvements, to better determine the relative contribution of contemporary vs. fossil carbon, radiocarbon source apportionment of EC was conducted on PM2.5 collected in the Bay Area. Measurements of the abundance of 14C in the EC fractions are used to quantify the relative contributions of fossil carbon (fossil fuel combustion, including motor vehicle exhaust) and contemporary carbon (biomass combustion and meat cooking). This comprehensive study included seven sites in the Bay Area and 12 months of sampling starting November 2011 through October 2012. The samples were composited to represent winter (November-February) and non-winter (March-October). In addition to radiocarbon analysis, Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) analysis using bulk PM2.5 composition and selected trace gases was used to understand the split among gasoline, natural gas, and diesel exhaust. Preliminary apportionment of the seven sites shows roughly equal contributions of fossil fuel and biomass burning/cooking for both winter and non-winter samples. There is evidence that the diesel contribution to EC, in particular, has decreased substantially over the last decade.

  3. Movement and Metabolism of Kinetin-14C and of Adenine-14C in Coleus Petiole Segments of Increasing Age 1

    PubMed Central

    Veen, Henk; Jacobs, William P.

    1969-01-01

    To see if polar movement was typical of growth-regulators other than auxins, the movement of adenine-8-14C and of kinetin-8-14C was studied in segments cut from petioles of increasing age. No polarity was found. In time-course experiments lasting 24 hr, kinetin showed a progressive increase of radioactivity in receiver blocks, while adenine showed a maximum at 8 hr with a decline thereafter. More kinetin moved through older segments than through younger ones. There was no difference in net loss as far as the position of the donor block is concerned. However, the loss of radioactivity from adenine donor blocks was much higher than the loss of radioactivity from kinetin donor blocks. The radioactivity in receiver blocks after 24 hr treatment with kinetin-14C was still with kinetin, judging by location on chromatograms. By the same criterion, adenine and a smaller amount of some other compound were in receiver blocks after a 6 hr transport with adenine-14C in the donors. By contrast, more zones of radioactivity were extracted from petiole segments to which kinetin or adenine had been added. For both purine derivatives the original compound represented no more than 20% of the total radioactivity extracted from the tissue after a transport period of 24 hr. PMID:16657203

  4. Assessing influences on speleothem dead carbon variability over the Holocene: Implications for speleothem-based radiocarbon calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noronha, Alexandra L.; Johnson, Kathleen R.; Hu, Chaoyong; Ruan, Jiaoyang; Southon, John R.; Ferguson, Julie E.

    2014-05-01

    Recently, it has been shown that U-Th dated speleothems may provide a valuable archive of atmospheric radiocarbon (14C), but the reliability of these records is dependent upon the stability of the dead carbon proportion (DCP) derived from the soil and bedrock. In order to assess climatic influences on speleothem DCP, we have investigated DCP variability over the Holocene interval where atmospheric 14C is well known based on dendrochronologically dated tree rings by conducting 14C measurements on a U-Th dated stalagmite (HS4) from Heshang Cave, Hubei Province, China (30°27‧N, 110°25‧E; 294 m) spanning 0.5-9.6 ka. We investigated climatic controls on DCP, and found that DCP in HS4 has an average value over the Holocene of 10.3±1.5%, with an average age offset from atmospheric radiocarbon of 875±130 years, and displays a response to both precipitation increases and decreases. HS4 DCP increases during the wetter mid-Holocene interval (˜5.5-7.1 ka), likely reflecting a shift to more closed-system dissolution in response to increased soil moisture. DCP decreases during the 8.2 ka event, a time period of dry conditions at Heshang Cave, though the lower amplitude of this shift indicates that DCP may be less sensitive to dry events. Speleothems are potentially valuable archives of atmospheric radiocarbon, especially in older portions of the 14C calibration curve where knowledge of atmospheric 14C is limited, however minor climatic influences on DCP could introduce uncertainties of several hundred years to calibrated ages.

  5. Radiocarbon dating with electrostatic accelerators: dating of milligram samples.

    PubMed

    Bennett, C L; Beukens, R P; Clover, M R; Elmore, D; Gove, H E; Kilius, L; Litherland, A E; Purser, K H

    1978-07-28

    The recently developed direct counting technique for radiocarbon atoms has been used to measure the relative numbers of such atoms in various geological samples which had earlier been dated by the beta-ray counting method. Sample weights ranged from 3.5 to 15 milligrams. The dates determined by the two methods are consistent with each other. Further experience with the new method is also reported.

  6. Degradation of /sup 14/C-labeled lignins and /sup 14/C-labeled aromatic acids by fusarium solani

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, D.M.

    1980-08-01

    Abilities of isolate AF-W1 of Fusarium solani to degrade the side chain and the ring structure of synthetic dehydrogenative polymerizates, aromatic acids, or lignin in sound wood were investigated under several conditions of growth substrate or basal medium and pH. Significant transformations of lignins occurred in 50 days in both unextracted and extracted sound wood substrances with 3% malt as the growth substrate and the pH buffered initially at 4.0 with 2,2-dimethylsuccinate. Degradation of lignin in such woods also occurred under unbuffered pH conditions when a basal medium of either 3% malt or powdered cellulose in deionized water was present. Decomposition of the lignin in these woods did not occur in cultures where D-glucose was present as a growth substrate. F. solani significantly transformed, as measured as evolved /sup 14/CO/sub 2/, both synthetic side chain (beta, gamma)-/sup 14/C- and U-ring-/sup 14/C-labeled lignins in 30 days under liquid culture conditions of only distilled deionized water and no pH adjustment. Degradation of dehydrogenative polymerizates by F. solani was reduced drastically when D2 was the liquid medium. AF-W1 also cleaved the alpha-/sup 14/C from p- hydroxybenzoic acid and evolved /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ from the substrace, (3-/sup 14/C) cinnamic acid. Thus, the fungus cleaved side chain carbon from substrate that originally lacked hydroxyl substitution on the aromatic nucleus. Surprisingly, small amounts of /sup 14/C cleaved from aromatic acids by F. solani were incorporated into cell mass. Initial buffering of the culture medium to pH 4.0 or 5.0 with 0.1 M2,2-dimethylsuccinate significantly increased F. solani degradation of all lignins or aromatic acids. Results indicated that AF-W1 used lignin as a sole carbon source.

  7. Quantification of fossil organic matter in contaminated sediments from an industrial watershed: validation of the quantitative multimolecular approach by radiocarbon analysis.

    PubMed

    Jeanneau, Laurent; Faure, Pierre

    2010-09-01

    The quantitative multimolecular approach (QMA) based on an exhaustive identification and quantification of molecules from the extractable organic matter (EOM) has been recently developed in order to investigate organic contamination in sediments by a more complete method than the restrictive quantification of target contaminants. Such an approach allows (i) the comparison between natural and anthropogenic inputs, (ii) between modern and fossil organic matter and (iii) the differentiation between several anthropogenic sources. However QMA is based on the quantification of molecules recovered by organic solvent and then analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, which represent a small fraction of sedimentary organic matter (SOM). In order to extend the conclusions of QMA to SOM, radiocarbon analyses have been performed on organic extracts and decarbonated sediments. This analysis allows (i) the differentiation between modern biomass (contemporary (14)C) and fossil organic matter ((14)C-free) and (ii) the calculation of the modern carbon percentage (PMC). At the confluence between Fensch and Moselle Rivers, a catchment highly contaminated by both industrial activities and urbanization, PMC values in decarbonated sediments are well correlated with the percentage of natural molecular markers determined by QMA. It highlights that, for this type of contamination by fossil organic matter inputs, the conclusions of QMA can be scaled up to SOM. QMA is an efficient environmental diagnostic tool that leads to a more realistic quantification of fossil organic matter in sediments.

  8. The [14C-N-methyl]-erythromycin breath test dosimetry complies with the French regulations for radiation safety.

    PubMed

    Salvat, Cécile; Mouly, Stéphane; Rizzo-Padoin, Nathalie; Knellwolf, Anne-Laure; Simoneau, Guy; Duet, Michèle; Nataf, Valérie; Bailliart, Olivier; Bergmann, Jean-François

    2003-06-01

    The [14C-N-methyl]-erythromycin breath test (14C-ERMBT) is one of the most valuable probes for liver cytochrome P450-3A4 activity in humans. In order to extend the use of this test in France, we herein provide safety data regarding either patient dosimetry or worker exposure to [14C-N-methyl]-erythromycin. In order to determine the maximum radiation exposure for patient and nuclear medicine technician following one intravenous 14C-ERMBT [111 kiloBequerel (kBq)], we have used the dosimetric data gathered in animal studies and extrapolated to humans using a weight-based method, approximate data provided by the French Society of Radioprotection and erythromycin pharmacokinetics in humans, considering always the worst conditions for the patient and worker exposure determination. The radioactivity administered to a patient after one 14C-ERMBT was equal to 108.8 kBq (i.e. 98% of the total radioactivity in the 14C-erythromycin vial) leading to a patient effective dose of 20 microsievert (microSv) and a maximum effective dose after 14CO2 inhalation by the exposed worker of 16 microSv compared with a mean individual annual effective dose from natural and artificial radioactivity exposure of 3500 microSv in France. The 14C-ERMBT is safe and complies with the European regulations regarding the administration of 14C-labelled compounds in humans. It can therefore be used in clinical research in France without any particular safety requirement.

  9. Characterization of terrestrial organic matter transported through the Lena River Delta (NE Siberia) to its adjacent nearshore zone using lignin phenols, δ13C and ∆14C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterfeld, M.; Goni, M. A.; Just, J.; Hefter, J.; Han, P.; Mollenhauer, G.

    2014-12-01

    The Lena River in central Siberia is one of the major pathways translocating terrestrial organic matter (OMterr) from its southernmost reaches near Lake Baikal to the coastal zone of the Laptev Sea and the Arctic Ocean. Permafrost soils from its vast catchment area store huge amounts of pre-aged OM, which is expected to be remobilized due to climate warming. To characterize the composition and vegetation sources of OM discharged by the Lena River, we analyzed the lignin phenol and carbon isotopic composition (δ13C and ∆14C) in total suspended matter (TSM) from surface waters collected in spring and summer, surface sediments from the Buor Khaya Bay along with soils from the Lena Delta. A simple linear mixing model based on the lignin phenol distributions indicates OM in TSM samples from the delta and Buor Khaya Bay surface sediments contains comparable contributions from gymnosperm sources, which are primarily from the taiga forests south of the delta, and angiosperm material typical for tundra vegetation. Considering the small area covered by tundra (~12% of total catchment), the input of tundra-derived OM input is substantial and likely to increase in a warming Arctic. Radiocarbon compositions (∆14C) of bulk OM in TSM samples varied from -55 to -391‰, i.e. 14C ages of 395 to 3920 yrs BP. Using δ13C compositions to estimate the fraction of phytoplankton-derived OM and assuming that this material has a modern 14C signature, we inferred the ∆14C compositions of OMterr in TSM exported by the Lena River to range between -190 and -700‰. Such variability in the ages of OMTERR (i.e. 1640 to 9720 14C yrs BP) reflects the heterogeneous composition and residence time of OM in the Lena River catchment soils (Holocene to Pleistocene ages). Lignin phenol and ∆14C compositions of surface sediments from the adjacent Buor Khaya Bay suggest that OMTERR deposited there is older and more degraded than materials present in river particles and catchment soils. Stronger

  10. Migration of (14)C in the paddy soil-to-rice plant system after (14)C-acetic acid breakdown by microorganisms below the plow layer.

    PubMed

    Ogiyama, Shinichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Ishii, Nobuyoshi; Uchida, Shigeo

    2010-02-01

    Migration of (14)C derived from (14)C-acetic acid was examined by using soils sampled from paddies in four administrative areas in Japan (Aomori, Yamanashi, Ehime and Okinawa) and rice plant in a tracer experiment to understand the fate of (14)C in the paddy soil-to-rice plant system. The loss of (14)C radioactivity levels derived from (14)C-acetic acid was caused by soil microorganism breakdown. A part of the (14)C fixation to soil was caused by microbial assimilation into the fatty acid fraction. (14)C moved upward via two different types of (14)C dynamics in soil: quick movement upward; and constant but slow movement upward. (14)C was highly assimilated into the plant panicle and that was caused by the root-uptake and the transfer of (14)C. Migration of (14)C derived from (14)C-acetic acid relied heavily upon changes of chemical forms and characteristics of (14)C-compound as caused by microorganisms in soil.

  11. Air pollutants targeted by radiocarbon dating

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-07-01

    Chemists at the Commerce Department's National Bureau of Standards (NBS) are answering questions about where certain atmospheric contaminants originate by refining a method best known for determining the age of archeological objects. Called radiocarbon dating, the method allows NBS scientists to examine air samples and determine whether contaminants come from naturally occurring or manmade sources-or a combination of the two. Making these distinctions is important to federal and state environmental agencies, which identify industrial sources of pollution for regulatory action. An overbalance of atmospheric carbon can cause a number of environmental problems. In methane's case, high levels are of concern to environmental agencies because of greenhouse properties. Methane also has been implicated as a possible contributor to changes in the ozone layer that protects the Earth from excessive ultraviolet light. Levels of methane have been increasing at an annual rate of about one percent over the last decade. This has caused concern in the environmental community, which hopes to determine just where the elevated levels are coming from. The NBS research is aimed at definitively pinpointing sources of methane and other atmospheric contaminants.

  12. The metabolism of [14C]-debrisoquine in man.

    PubMed Central

    Idle, J R; Mahgoub, A; Angelo, M M; Dring, L G; Lancaster, R; Smith, R L

    1979-01-01

    1 The synthesis of [14C]-debrisoquine hydrochloride and 4-hydroxy-debrisoquine sulphate is described. 2 The metabolic fate and excretion profile in both urine and faeces of 14C-labelled debrisoquine was studied in five healthy human subjects. 3 Investigations showed that the drug is well-absorbed after a single oral dose of 32 mg and quantitatively eliminated from the body within three days. 4 4-Hydroxy-debrisoquine is the major metabolite of debrisoquine, although significant amounts of 5-,6-, 7- and 8-hydroxy-debrisoquine are also formed. 5 Electron-capture gas chromatography is a useful method for measuring debrisoquine and its five hydroxylated metabolites in urine at the pg level. PMID:371651

  13. Thirteenth radioactive conference, radiocarbon measurements and applications, Dubrovnik, Yugoslavia, June 20--25, 1988: Foreign trip report

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, T.H.

    1988-07-08

    The International Radiocarbon Conference is held once every three years. The purpose of the meeting is to offer an opportunity for an international community of scientists to present and discuss results of their research on improving techniques for radiocarbon measurement and their application in various aspects of natural systems, including the ocean-atmosphere carbon cycle. Four major sessions were held for the presentation of scientific results, another session dealt with radiocarbon data bases, and the final session was devoted to workshops for radiocarbon measurement and international comparison. A total of 152 papers were presented, which included both oral and poster presentations. Participants came from over 30 countries, with a total number of about 200. The paper presented by the traveler, entitled ''Changes in Ocean Ventilation Rates Over the Last 7000 Years Based on /sup 14/C Variations in the Atmosphere and Oceans,'' was included in the oceanography portion of the Carbon Cycle in the Environment session. Radiocarbon is the most powerful and useful tracer for studying the carbon cycle in the atmosphere-biosphere-ocean system. The measuring technique has mostly shifted from a conventional ..beta..-counting approach that uses gas or liquid scintillation counters to an atom counting approach that uses the accelerator mass spectrometer.

  14. Pediatric microdose and microtracer studies using 14C in Europe.

    PubMed

    Turner, M A; Mooij, M G; Vaes, W H J; Windhorst, A D; Hendrikse, N H; Knibbe, C A J; Kõrgvee, L T; Maruszak, W; Grynkiewicz, G; Garner, R C; Tibboel, D; Park, B K; de Wildt, S N

    2015-09-01

    Important information gaps remain on the efficacy and safety of drugs in children. Pediatric drug development encounters several ethical, practical, and scientific challenges. One barrier to the evaluation of medicines for children is a lack of innovative methodologies that have been adapted to the needs of children. This article presents our successful experience of pediatric microdose and microtracer studies using (14) C-labeled probes in Europe to illustrate the strengths and limitations of these approaches.

  15. Airy structure in 16O+14C nuclear rainbow scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkubo, S.; Hirabayashi, Y.

    2015-08-01

    The Airy structure in 16 O +14 C rainbow scattering is studied with an extended double-folding (EDF) model that describes all the diagonal and off-diagonal coupling potentials derived from the microscopic realistic wave functions for 16 O by using a density-dependent nucleon-nucleon force. The experimental angular distributions at EL=132 , 281, and 382.2 MeV are well reproduced by the calculations. By studying the energy evolution of the Airy structure, the Airy minimum around θ =76∘ in the angular distribution at EL=132 MeV is assigned as the second-order Airy minimum A 2 in contrast to the recent literature which assigns it as the third order A 3 . The Airy minima in the 90∘ excitation function is investigated in comparison with well-known 16 O +16 O and 12 C +12 C systems. Evolution of the Airy structure into the molecular resonances with the 16 O +14 C cluster structure in the low-energy region around Ec .m .=30 MeV is discussed. It is predicted theoretically for the first time for a non-4 N 16O +14 C system that Airy elephants in the 90∘ excitation function are present.

  16. Temporal variation in the interhemispheric 14C offset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormac, F. G.; Hogg, A. G.; Higham, T. F. G.; Lynch-Stieglitz, J.; Broecker, W. S.; Baillie, M. G. L.; Palmer, J.; Xiong, L.; Pilcher, J. R.; Brown, D.; Hoper, S. T.

    Contemporaneous tree-ring dated wood, from trees in the northern and southern hemispheres, gives different 14C dates. Previous studies [Vogel et al., 1986; 1993] using wood from South Africa and The Netherlands have shown depletion's of -4.56 ± 0.85‰ and -5.12±0.62‰ respectively. This translates to age differences of 36±7 and 41±5 years (yrs) with the southern hemisphere giving the older dates. More recently, Stuiver and Braziunas [1998] have shown that an offset of 23±4 yrs exists between combined 19th century wood measurements from Tasmania and Chile in the southern hemisphere and the west coast of the U.S. (Washington) in the northern hemisphere. In this study measurements on contemporaneous decadal samples of oak from the British Isles and cedar from New Zealand over the period 1725 to 1885 AD show a depletion of -3.4±0.58‰ (27.2±4.7 yrs). However, data after 1895 AD has a mean offset of 0.66±1.06‰ (-5.3±8.5 yrs) with increased variance compared to 19th century data. This, we believe, is attributable to anthropogenic fossil fuel, which, due to its long residence time in the earth, has long since lost any 14C component and when burned preferentially depletes the northern hemisphere atmosphere of 14C.

  17. Disposition of (/sup 14/C)dimercaptosuccinic acid in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Y.Y.; Marlowe, C.; Waddell, W.J.

    1986-04-01

    Dimercaptosuccinic acid labeled with /sup 14/C ((/sup 14/C)DMSA) was administered to mice iv; the mice were frozen by immersion in dry ice/hexane at 6 and 20 min and 1, 3, 9, and 24 hr after injection. The frozen mice were sectioned and processed for whole-body autoradiography for soluble substances. The radioactivity was highly localized in extracellular fluids such as the subcutaneous, intrapleural, intraperitoneal, and periosteal spaces. There was a pronounced accumulation in the periosteal fluid above that in other fluids during the first hour after injection. Most of the radioactivity was eliminated by the kidney and liver. Pretreatment of a mouse with HgCl/sub 2/ subcutaneously 1 hr before (/sup 14/C)DMSA produced an increase in radioactivity in the liver and a decrease in the lungs. A high concentration of radioactivity was seen at the subcutaneous site of injection of the HgCl/sub 2/. The results are interpreted to indicate that most of the DMSA is in the extracellular space but that it can cross cellular membranes to some extent. The pronounced accumulation in periosteal fluid may be an interaction of DMSA with Ca2+ in this space. No tissue had a pronounced retention of the compound, but the lungs retained more than most other tissues.

  18. Radiocarbon age of the kohitsugire calligraphy and the kiwamefuda certificate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Hirotaka; Ikeda, Kazuomi; Nakamura, Toshio

    2007-06-01

    Kohitsugire are ancient paper sheets with elegant calligraphy. They were originally leaves of ancient manuscripts written mainly from the 8th to the 15th century. Old manuscripts are rarely discovered as complete books; therefore, kohitsugire can be significant materials for historical studies if the written ages or the calligraphists or both are known. Most of kohitsugire have kiwamefuda certificates which identify the calligraphists. This is also a clue about the written age. In this study, we determined the written ages of kohitsugire from three viewpoints: radiocarbon dating, calligraphical investigation and the kiwamefuda. Comparison of radiocarbon age and the calligraphical evidence of each kohitsugire give fair agreement. The results are, however, in obvious conflict with the age of the calligraphist noted on the kiwamefuda, and showed the doubtful reliability of kiwamefuda.

  19. New radiocarbon dates on the cereals from Wadi Kubbaniya

    SciTech Connect

    Wendorf, F.; Schild, R.; Close, A.E.; Donahue, D.J.; Jull, A.J.T.; Zabel, T.H.; Wieckowska, H.; Kobusiewicz, M.; Issawi, B.; el Hadidi, N.

    1984-01-01

    In 1978, three carbonized grains of barley and a carbonized grain of einkorn wheat were found in a buried hearth at a Late Paleolithic site at Wadi Kubbaniya in Egypt. In 1981, two large clusters of barley seeds, which were identified as six-row barley and thus domestic, were found at a nearby site of comparable age. Numerous grinding stones, presumed to have been used for processing the cereals, were found in these and other sites, often deeply buried, and 30 radiocarbon dates placed the occupations between 18,500 and 17,000 radiocarbon years ago. These finds led us to suggest an early origin of food production, with implications for the initial development of complex societies. Several barley seeds were analyzed by electron spin resonance spectroscopy to determine