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Sample records for radiofrequency cardiac catheter

  1. Radiation exposure to operator and patients during cardiac electrophysiology study, radiofrequency catheter ablation and cardiac device implantation procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. H.; Cho, J. H.; Park, S. J.; Kim, J. S.; On, Y. K.; Huh, J.

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the radiation exposure to operator and patient during cardiac electrophysiology study, radiofrequency catheter ablation and cardiac device implantation procedures and to calculate the allowable number of cases per year. We carried out 9 electrophysiology studies, 40 radiofrequency catheter ablation and 11 cardiac device implantation procedures. To measure occupational radiation dose and dose-area product (DAP), 13 photoluminescence glass dosimeters were placed at eyes (inside and outside lead glass), thyroids (inside and outside thyroid collar), chest (inside and outside lead apron), wrists, genital of the operator (inside lead apron), and 6 of photoluminescence glass dosimeters were placed at eyes, thyroids, chest and genital of the patient. Exposure time and DAP values were 11.7 ± 11.8 min and 23.2 ± 26.2 Gy cm2 for electrophysiology study; 36.5 ± 42.1 min and 822.4 ± 125.5 Gy cm2 for radiofrequency catheter ablation; 16.2 ± 9.3 min and 27.8 ± 16.5 Gy cm2 for cardiac device implantation procedure, prospectively. 4591 electrophysiology studies can be conducted within the occupational exposure limit for the eyes (150 mSv), and 658-electrophysiology studies with radiofrequency catheter ablation can be carried out within the occupational exposure limit for the hands (500 mSv). 1654 cardiac device implantation procedure can be conducted within the occupational exposure limit for the eyes (150 mSv). The amounts of the operator and patient's radiation exposure were comparatively small. So, electrophysiology study, radio frequency catheter ablation and cardiac device implantation procedures are safe when performed with modern equipment and optimized protective radiation protect equipment.

  2. Dual-enhancement cardiac computed tomography for assessing left atrial thrombus and pulmonary veins before radiofrequency catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Hur, Jin; Pak, Hui-Nam; Kim, Young Jin; Lee, Hye-Jeong; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Hong, Yoo Jin; Choi, Byoung Wook

    2013-07-15

    Noninvasive imaging that provides anatomic information while excluding intracardiac thrombus would be of significant clinical value for patients referred for catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF). This study assessed the diagnostic performance of a dual-enhancement single-phase cardiac computed tomography (CT) protocol for thrombus and circulatory stasis detection in AF patients before catheter ablation. We studied 101 consecutive symptomatic AF patients (71 men and 30 women; mean age, 61.8 years) who were scheduled to have catheter ablation. All patients had undergone pre-AF ablation CT imaging and transesophageal echocardiography on the same day. CT was performed with prospective electrocardiographic gating, and scanning began 180 seconds after the test bolus. Mean left atrial appendage (LAA)/ascending aorta Hounsfield unit (HU) ratios were measured on CT images. Among the 101 patients, 9 thrombi and 18 spontaneous echo contrasts were detected by transesophageal echocardiography. The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of CT for the detection of thrombi in the LAA were 89%, 100%, 100%, and 99%, respectively. The mean LAA/ascending aorta HU ratios were significantly different between thrombus and circulatory stasis (0.17 vs 0.33, p = 0.002). Dual-enhancement single-scan cardiac CT is a sensitive modality for detecting and differentiating LAA thrombus and circulatory stasis.

  3. Efficacy and effects on cardiac function of radiofrequency catheter ablation vs. direct current cardioversion of persistent atrial fibrillation with left ventricular systolic dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Maojing; Cai, Shanglang; Ding, Wei; Deng, Yujie; Zhao, Qing

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of catheter ablation vs. direct current synchronized cardioversion (DCC) in patients with persistent atrial fibrillation (AF) and left ventricular systolic dysfunction, and to define baseline features of patients that will get more benefit from ablation. Methods From July 2013 to October 2014, 97 consecutive single-center patients with persistent AF and symptomatic heart failure (left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) <50%) underwent DCC followed by amiodarone (n = 40) or circumferential pulmonary vein isolation (PVI; n = 57) according to patient’s preference were recruited in the study. Post-ablation recurrence was treated with atrial roof and mitral isthmus lines ablation with or without PVI based on restoration or not of pulmonary vein (PV) potential conduction. Study outcomes were 12-month rate of sustained sinus rhythm (SR) and cardiac function. Baseline characteristics were compared between patients with and without cardiac function improvement post ablation. Results With similarly distributed characteristics at baseline, ablation (mean 1.8 procedures) relative to DCC yielded significantly higher level of 12-month SR maintenance rate (68.42% vs. 35%, P = 0.001); and better LVEF and New York Heart Association class. with significant effect for DCC only in maintained SR cases. Post ablation LVEF increased (>20% or to over 55%) in 31 (54.39%) patients with worse baseline cardiac function and ventricular rate control. Conclusions Catheter ablation relative to cardioversion of persistent AF with symptomatic heart failure yielded better 12-month SR maintenance and cardiac function. Compared with non-responders, patients with improved LVEF post-ablation had poorer ventricular rate control and cardiac function at baseline, suggesting a significant component of tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy in this group. PMID:28350861

  4. In Vivo Evaluation and Proof of Radiofrequency Safety of a Novel Diagnostic MR-Electrophysiology Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Steffen; Wirtz, Daniel; David, Bernd; Krueger, Sascha; Lips, Oliver; Caulfield, Dennis; Pedersen, Steen Fjord; Bostock, Julian; Razavi, Reza; Schaeffter, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    An MR-electrophysiology (EP) catheter is presented that provides full diagnostic EP functionality and a high level of radiofrequency safety achieved by custom-designed transmission lines. Highly resistive wires transmit intracardiac electrograms and currents for intracardiac pacing. A transformer cable transmits the localization signal of a tip coil. Specific absorption rate simulations and temperature measurements at 1.5 T demonstrate that a wire resistance > 3 kΩ/m limits dielectric heating to a physiologically irrelevant level. Additional wires do not increase tip specific absorption rate significantly, which is important because some clinical catheters require up to 20 electrodes. It is further demonstrated that radiofrequency-induced and pacing-induced resistive heating of the wires is negligible under clinical conditions. The MR-EP catheters provided uncompromised recording of electrograms and cardiac pacing in combination with a standard EP recorder in MR-guided in vivo EP studies, and the tip coil enabled fast and robust catheter localization. In vivo temperature measurements during such a study did not detect any device-related heating, which confirms the high level of safety of the catheter, whereas unacceptable heating was found with a standard EP catheter. The presented concept for the first time enables catheters with full diagnostic EP functionality and active tracking and at the same time a sufficient level of radiofrequency safety for MRI without specific absorption rate-related limitations. PMID:21337409

  5. In vivo evaluation and proof of radiofrequency safety of a novel diagnostic MR-electrophysiology catheter.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Steffen; Wirtz, Daniel; David, Bernd; Krueger, Sascha; Lips, Oliver; Caulfield, Dennis; Pedersen, Steen Fjord; Bostock, Julian; Razavi, Reza; Schaeffter, Tobias

    2011-03-01

    An MR-electrophysiology (EP) catheter is presented that provides full diagnostic EP functionality and a high level of radiofrequency safety achieved by custom-designed transmission lines. Highly resistive wires transmit intracardiac electrograms and currents for intracardiac pacing. A transformer cable transmits the localization signal of a tip coil. Specific absorption rate simulations and temperature measurements at 1.5 T demonstrate that a wire resistance > 3 kΩ/m limits dielectric heating to a physiologically irrelevant level. Additional wires do not increase tip specific absorption rate significantly, which is important because some clinical catheters require up to 20 electrodes. It is further demonstrated that radiofrequency-induced and pacing-induced resistive heating of the wires is negligible under clinical conditions. The MR-EP catheters provided uncompromised recording of electrograms and cardiac pacing in combination with a standard EP recorder in MR-guided in vivo EP studies, and the tip coil enabled fast and robust catheter localization. In vivo temperature measurements during such a study did not detect any device-related heating, which confirms the high level of safety of the catheter, whereas unacceptable heating was found with a standard EP catheter. The presented concept for the first time enables catheters with full diagnostic EP functionality and active tracking and at the same time a sufficient level of radiofrequency safety for MRI without specific absorption rate-related limitations.

  6. Position Control of Motion Compensation Cardiac Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Kesner, Samuel B.; Howe, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    Robotic catheters have the potential to revolutionize cardiac surgery by enabling minimally invasive structural repairs within the beating heart. This paper presents an actuated catheter system that compensates for the fast motion of cardiac tissue using 3D ultrasound image guidance. We describe the design and operation of the mechanical drive system and catheter module and analyze the catheter performance limitations of friction and backlash in detail. To mitigate these limitations, we propose and evaluate mechanical and control system compensation methods, including inverse and model-based backlash compensation, to improve the system performance. Finally, in vivo results are presented that demonstrate that the catheter can track the cardiac tissue motion with less than 1 mm RMS error. The ultimate goal of this research is to create a fast and dexterous robotic catheter system that can perform surgery on the delicate structures inside of the beating heart. PMID:21874124

  7. [Thrombus visualisation during radiofrequency catheter ablation. A case report].

    PubMed

    Maciag, Aleksander; Szwed, Hanna; Pytkowski, Mariusz; Kraska, Alicja; Sterliński, Maciej

    2005-10-01

    We report two patients in whom thrombus formation during radiofrequency catheter ablation was detected by echocardiography. Resolution of thrombus after intravenous use of heparin was observed in both patients. Transesophageal and intracardiac echocardiography may be useful in management of this complication.

  8. Irrigated Tip Catheters for Radiofrequency Ablation in Ventricular Tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Grothoff, Matthias; Dinov, Borislav; Kosiuk, Jedrzej; Richter, Sergio; Sommer, Philipp; Breithardt, Ole A.; Bollmann, Andreas; Arya, Arash; Hindricks, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) ablation with irrigated tip catheters decreases the likelihood of thrombus and char formation and enables the creation of larger lesions. Due to the potential dramatic consequences, the prevention of thromboembolic events is of particular importance for left-sided procedures. Although acute success rates of ventricular tachycardia (VT) ablation are satisfactory, recurrence rate is high. Apart from the progress of the underlying disease, reconduction and the lack of effective transmural lesions play a major role for VT recurrences. This paper reviews principles of lesion formation with radiofrequency and the effect of tip irrigation as well as recent advances in new technology. Potential areas of further development of catheter technology might be the improvement of mapping by better substrate definition and resolution, the introduction of bipolar and multipolar ablation techniques into clinical routine, and the use of alternative sources of energy. PMID:25705659

  9. Fiber-optic catheter-based polarization-sensitive OCT for radio-frequency ablation monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xiaoyong; Wang, Zhao; Wang, Hui; Wang, Yves T; Jenkins, Michael W; Rollins, Andrew M

    2015-01-01

    An all-fiber optic catheter-based polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography system is demonstrated. A novel multiplexing method was used to illuminate the sample, splitting the light from a 58.5kHz Fourier-domain mode-locked laser such that two different polarization states, alternated in time, are generated by two semiconductor optical amplifiers. A 2.3mm forward-view cone-scanning catheter probe was designed, fabricated, and used to acquire sample scattering intensity and phase retardation images. The system was first verified with a quarter-wave plate and then by obtaining intensity and phase retardation images of high-birefringence plastic, human skin in vivo, and untreated and thermally ablated porcine myocardium ex vivo. The system can potentially in vivo image of the cardiac wall to aid radio-frequency ablation therapy for cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:25166075

  10. Anesthetic Management in Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation of Ventricular Tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Naeini, Payam S.; Razavi, Mehdi; Collard, Charles D.; Tolpin, Daniel A.; Anton, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation is increasingly being used to treat patients who have ventricular tachycardia, and anesthesiologists frequently manage their perioperative care. This narrative review is intended to familiarize anesthesiologists with preprocedural, intraprocedural, and postprocedural implications of this ablation. Ventricular tachycardia typically arises from structural heart disease, most often from scar tissue after myocardial infarction. Many patients thus affected will benefit from radiofrequency catheter ablation in the electrophysiology laboratory to ablate the foci of arrhythmogenesis. The pathophysiology of ventricular tachycardia is complex, as are the technical aspects of mapping and ablating these arrhythmias. Patients often have substantial comorbidities and tenuous hemodynamic status, necessitating pharmacologic and mechanical cardiopulmonary support. General anesthesia and monitored anesthesia care, when used for sedation during ablation, can lead to drug interactions and side effects in the presence of ventricular tachycardia, so anesthesiologists should also be aware of potential perioperative complications. We discuss variables that can help anesthesiologists safely guide patients through the challenges of radiofrequency catheter ablation of ventricular tachycardia. PMID:28100967

  11. Compensation for Unconstrained Catheter Shaft Motion in Cardiac Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Degirmenci, Alperen; Loschak, Paul M.; Tschabrunn, Cory M.; Anter, Elad; Howe, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac catheterization with ultrasound (US) imaging catheters provides real time US imaging from within the heart, but manually navigating a four degree of freedom (DOF) imaging catheter is difficult and requires extensive training. Existing work has demonstrated robotic catheter steering in constrained bench top environments. Closed-loop control in an unconstrained setting, such as patient vasculature, remains a significant challenge due to friction, backlash, and physiological disturbances. In this paper we present a new method for closed-loop control of the catheter tip that can accurately and robustly steer 4-DOF cardiac catheters and other flexible manipulators despite these effects. The performance of the system is demonstrated in a vasculature phantom and an in vivo porcine animal model. During bench top studies the robotic system converged to the desired US imager pose with sub-millimeter and sub-degree-level accuracy. During animal trials the system achieved 2.0 mm and 0.65° accuracy. Accurate and robust robotic navigation of flexible manipulators will enable enhanced visualization and treatment during procedures. PMID:27525170

  12. Ultraminiature manometer-tipped cardiac catheter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coon, G. W.

    1967-01-01

    Miniature diaphragm-type capacitance transducer capable of being mounted on the end of a cardiac catheter has been developed for measurement of intravascular pressures. The transducer can be inserted in small ducts /arteries and veins/ without disturbing the flow characteristics. It is very useful for making measurements in babies.

  13. Cost analysis of radiofrequency catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Gorenek, Bulent; Kudaiberdieva, Gulmira

    2013-09-10

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common arrhythmia associated with increased mortality and morbidity. Its management requires high healthcare expenditures; 52%-70% of expenses for AF care are constituted by hospitalization costs. The current management strategies of pharmacological rhythm control and pharmacological or invasive rate control show no difference in impact on major outcomes in patients with AF. Radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFA) has been shown to reduce the risk of AF recurrence, improve quality of life and reduce hospitalization rate as compared to pharmacological rhythm control and rate control strategies. This review summarizes current knowledge on cost and cost-effectiveness analysis of RFA for patients with atrial fibrillation.

  14. Neurohumoral indicators of efficacy radiofrequency cardiac denervation

    SciTech Connect

    Evtushenko, A. V. Evtushenko, V. V.; Saushkina, Yu. V.; Gusakova, A. M.; Suslova, T. E.; Dymbrylova, O. N.; Smyshlyaev, K. A.; Kurlov, I. O.; Lishmanov, Yu. B.; Anfinogenova, Ya. D.; Sergeevichev, D. S.; Bykov, A. N.; Syryamkin, V. I.; Kistenev, Yu. V.; Lotkov, A. I.; Pokushalov, E. A.

    2015-11-17

    In this study, we compared pre- and postoperative parameters of the cardiac sympathetic innervation. The aim of the study was to examine the approaches to evaluating the quality of radiofrequency (RF)-induced cardiac denervation by using non-invasive and laboratory methods. The study included 32 people with long-lasting persistent atrial fibrillation (AF). The patients were divided into 2 groups according to the objectives of the study: group 1 (main) - 21 patients with mitral valve diseases, which simultaneously with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) AF carried out on the effects of the paraganglionic nervous plexuses by C. Pappone (2004) and N. Doll (2008) schemes. The second group (control) contained 11 patients with heart diseases in sinus rhythm (the RF denervation not been performed). All patients, who underwent surgical treatment, were received examination of cardiac sympathetic tone by using {sup 123}I-MIBG. All of them made blood analysis from ascending aorta and coronary sinus to determine the level of norepinephrine and its metabolites before and after cardiac denervation. Data of radionuclide examination are correlating with laboratory data.

  15. Neurohumoral indicators of efficacy radiofrequency cardiac denervation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evtushenko, A. V.; Evtushenko, V. V.; Saushkina, Yu. V.; Lishmanov, Yu. B.; Pokushalov, E. A.; Sergeevichev, D. S.; Gusakova, A. M.; Suslova, T. E.; Dymbrylova, O. N.; Bykov, A. N.; Syryamkin, V. I.; Kistenev, Yu. V.; Anfinogenova, Ya. D.; Smyshlyaev, K. A.; Lotkov, A. I.; Kurlov, I. O.

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we compared pre- and postoperative parameters of the cardiac sympathetic innervation. The aim of the study was to examine the approaches to evaluating the quality of radiofrequency (RF)-induced cardiac denervation by using non-invasive and laboratory methods. The study included 32 people with long-lasting persistent atrial fibrillation (AF). The patients were divided into 2 groups according to the objectives of the study: group 1 (main) - 21 patients with mitral valve diseases, which simultaneously with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) AF carried out on the effects of the paraganglionic nervous plexuses by C. Pappone (2004) and N. Doll (2008) schemes. The second group (control) contained 11 patients with heart diseases in sinus rhythm (the RF denervation not been performed). All patients, who underwent surgical treatment, were received examination of cardiac sympathetic tone by using 123I-MIBG. All of them made blood analysis from ascending aorta and coronary sinus to determine the level of norepinephrine and its metabolites before and after cardiac denervation. Data of radionuclide examination are correlating with laboratory data.

  16. Noninvasive Assessment of Tissue Heating During Cardiac Radiofrequency Ablation Using MRI Thermography

    PubMed Central

    Kolandaivelu, Aravindan; Zviman, Menekhem M.; Castro, Valeria; Lardo, Albert C.; Berger, Ronald D.; Halperin, Henry R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Failure to achieve properly localized, permanent tissue destruction is a common cause of arrhythmia recurrence after cardiac ablation. Current methods of assessing lesion size and location during cardiac radiofrequency ablation are unreliable or not suited for repeated assessment during the procedure. MRI thermography could be used to delineate permanent ablation lesions because tissue heating above 50°C is the cause of permanent tissue destruction during radiofrequency ablation. However, image artifacts caused by cardiac motion, the ablation electrode, and radiofrequency ablation currently pose a challenge to MRI thermography in the heart. In the current study, we sought to demonstrate the feasibility of MRI thermography during cardiac ablation. Methods and Results An MRI-compatible electrophysiology catheter and filtered radiofrequency ablation system was used to perform ablation in the left ventricle of 6 mongrel dogs in a 1.5-T MRI system. Fast gradient-echo imaging was performed before and during radiofrequency ablation, and thermography images were derived from the preheating and postheating images. Lesion extent by thermography was within 20% of the gross pathology lesion. Conclusions MR thermography appears to be a promising technique for monitoring lesion formation and may allow for more accurate placement and titration of ablation, possibly reducing arrhythmia recurrences. PMID:20657028

  17. Chronic incomplete atrioventricular block induced by radiofrequency catheter ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, S.K.; Bharati, S.; Graham, A.R.; Gorman, G.; Lev, M. )

    1989-10-01

    To determine if catheter ablation of the atrioventricular (AV) junction with radiofrequency energy can induce chronic incomplete (first- and second-degree) AV block to avoid the need for a permanent pacemaker, 20 closed-chest dogs were studied. Group 1 (10 dogs) received radiofrequency energy (750 kHz) with a fixed power setting (5 or 10 W) while increasing the pulse duration from 10 to 50 seconds for each application. Group 2 (10 dogs) received energy with a fixed pulse duration (20 or 30 seconds) while increasing the power setting from 5 to 10 W or from 10 to 20 W during each energy delivery. Radiofrequency energy was delivered between a chest-patch electrode and the distal electrode of a regular 7F tripolar His bundle catheter. For each application, the energy delivery was interrupted when (1) the PR interval prolonged (greater than 50%) or (2) second-degree or complete AV block occurred and persisted up to 5 seconds. The ablation procedure ended when there was (1) persistent PR prolongation (greater than 50%) or persistent second-degree AV block (lasting greater than 30 minutes) after ablation, (2) occurrence of two consecutive transient (less than 1 minute) complete AV blocks after each energy delivery, or (3) complete AV block (lasting greater than 2 minutes) after ablation. Of seven dogs in group 1 and five dogs in group 2 in which incomplete AV block was achieved 1 hour after the procedure, six in group 1 and five in group 2 remained in incomplete AV block 2-3 months after ablation. One dog in group 1 progressed into complete AV block. Of the remaining three dogs in group 1 and five dogs in group 2 in which complete AV block was initially achieved 1 hour after ablation, two in group 1 and four in group 2 continued to have complete AV block, whereas one in each group had AV conduction returned to incomplete at 1-2 months of follow-up.

  18. Catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Fromer, M; Shenasa, M

    1991-02-01

    Catheter ablation is gaining increasing interest for the therapy of symptomatic, sustained arrhythmias of various origins. The scope of this review is to give an overview of the biophysical aspects and major characteristics of some of the most widely used energy sources in catheter ablation, e.g., the discharge of conventional defibrillators, modified defibrillators, laser light, and radiofrequency current application. Results from animal studies are considered to explain the basic mechanisms of catheter ablation. The recent achievements with the use of radiofrequency current to modify or ablate cardiac conduction properties are outlined in more detail.

  19. Intracardiac rhabdomyomas producing symptoms in infancy: the role of radiofrequency catheter ablation

    PubMed Central

    Emmel, M.; Brockmeier, K.; Sreeram, N.

    2006-01-01

    Background Cardiac rhabdomyomas, although benign, may produce symptoms related to arrhythmia or mechanical obstruction. Surgical excision is the therapy of choice for symptomatic rhabdomyomas in infancy. Patients and Methods Two infants with intracardiac rhabdomyomas producing symptoms underwent radiofrequency catheter ablation of the tumour. In patient 1 the diagnosis of multiple rhabdomyomas associated with recurrent supraventricular tachyarrhythmias and foetal hydrops was made in utero. After birth, several antiarrhythmic agents were administered, without successful suppression of the tachyarrhythmia. At seven months of age, the infant had one large residual tumour on the left atrial aspect of the anterior mitral valve leaflet with associated pre-excitation and re-entrant supraventricular tachyarrhythmia suggestive of a left-sided pathway. Catheter ablation of the accessory pathway was performed via a retrograde femoral arterial approach, targeting the earliest site of ventricular activation. Patient 2 presented as a neonate with multiple rhabdomyomas, one of which, measuring 15 mm × 15 mm, was producing severe mitral valve inflow obstruction resulting in symptoms of heart failure due to a large left-to-right shunt at atrial level and persistent pulmonary hypertension. Via the femoral vein, a 5F ablation catheter was advanced across the atrial septum, and the tumour directly ablated. Results Echocardiography performed 24 hours later demonstrated alteration in tumour morphology, with the development of a large central echolucent area, followed by progressive tumour shrinkage in both infants. Patient 1 was discharged at 24 hours, and patient 2 at seven days post-ablation, without symptoms. Follow-up at four weeks confirmed further tumour shrinkage. Conclusion Transcatheter tumour ablation may be beneficial in selected infants and children. ImagesFigure 2AFigure 2BFigure 2CFigure 3AFigure 3BFigure 3C PMID:25696636

  20. Radiofrequency catheter ablation of the atrioventricular junction from the left ventricle

    SciTech Connect

    Sousa, J.; el-Atassi, R.; Rosenheck, S.; Calkins, H.; Langberg, J.; Morady, F. )

    1991-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe a new technique for catheter ablation of the atrioventricular junction using radiofrequency energy delivered in the left ventricle. Catheter ablation of the atrioventricular (AV) junction using a catheter positioned across the tricuspid annulus was unsuccessful in eight patients with a mean {plus minus} SD age of 51 {plus minus} 19 years who had AV nodal reentry tachycardia (three patients), orthodromic tachycardia using a concealed midseptal accessory pathway, atrial tachycardia, atrial flutter (two patients), or atrial fibrillation. Before attempts at catheter ablation of the AV junction, each patient had been refractory to pharmacological therapy, and four had failed attempts at either catheter modification of the AV node using radiofrequency energy or surgical and catheter ablation of the accessory pathway. Conventional right-sided catheter ablation of the AV junction using radiofrequency energy in six patients and both radiofrequency energy and direct current shocks in two patients was ineffective. The mean amplitude of the His bundle potential recorded at the tricuspid annulus at the sites of unsuccessful AV junction ablation was 0.1 {plus minus} 0.08 mV, with a maximum His amplitude of 0.03-0.28 mV. A 7F deflectable-tip quadripolar electrode catheter with a 4-mm distal electrode was positioned against the upper left ventricular septum using a retrograde aortic approach from the femoral artery. Third-degree AV block was induced in each of the eight patients with 20-36 W applied for 15-30 seconds. The His bundle potential at the sites of successful AV junction ablation ranged from 0.06 to 0.99 mV, with a mean of 0.27 {plus minus} 0.32 mV. There was no rise in the creatine kinase-MB fraction and no complications occurred. An intrinsic escape rhythm of 30-60 beats/min was present in seven of the eight patients.

  1. Integrated RFA/OCT catheter for real-time guidance of cardiac RFA therapy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiaoyong; Blumenthal, Colin; Dosluoglu, Deniz; Wang, Yves T.; Jenkins, Michael W.; Souza, Rakesh; Snyder, Christopher; Arruda, Mauricio; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2016-03-01

    Currently, cardiac radiofrequency ablation is guided by indirect signals. We demonstrate an integrated radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) probe for directly monitoring of the RFA procedure with OCT images in real time. The integrated RFA/OCT probe is modified from a standard commercial RFA catheter, and a newly designed and fabricated miniature forward-viewing cone-scanning OCT probe is integrated into the modified probe. The OCT system is verified with the human finger images, and the results show the integrated RFA/OCT probe can acquire high quality OCT images. The radiofrequency energy delivering function of the integrated probe is verified by comparing the RFA lesion sizes with standard commercial RFA probe. For the standard commercial probe, the average width and depth of the 10 lesions were 3.5 mm and 1.8 mm respectively. For the integrated RFA/OCT probe, the average width and depth of the 10 lesions were 3.6 mm and 1.7 mm respectively. The lesions created by the two probes are indistinguishable in size. This demonstrates that our glass window in the integrated probe has little effect on the RF energy delivery. And the integrated probe is used to monitoring the cardiac RFA procedure in real time. The results show that the RFA lesion formation can be confirmed by the loss of birefringence in the heart tissue. The system can potentially in vivo image of the cardiac wall to aid RFA therapy for cardiac arrhythmias.

  2. Tachycardiomyopathy Induced by Ventricular Premature Complexes: Complete Recovery after Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Kyoung-Hoon; Jung, Ju-Young; Kim, Hyun-Sook; Chae, Jei-Keon; Kim, Won-Ho; Ko, Jae-Ki

    2006-01-01

    Ventricular premature complexes (VPCs) are known to be one of the most benign cardiac arrhythmias when they occur in structurally normal hearts. We experienced a 32-year old man who presented with dyspnea, palpitations and very frequent VPCs (31% of the total heart beats). Echocardiography revealed a dilated left ventricle (LV 66 mm at end-diastole and 57 mm at end-systole) and a decreased ejection fraction (34%). Very frequent VPCs had been detected 10 years previously and he underwent a failed radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) procedure at that time. The patient had been treated with heart failure medications including betablockers, ACE inhibitors and spironolactone for the two most recent years. Six months after we eliminated these VPCs with a second RFCA procedure, the heart returned to normal function and size. Long standing and very frequent VPCs could be the cause of left ventricular dysfunction in a subset of patients who suffer with dilated cardiomyopathy, and RFCA should be the choice of therapy for these patients. PMID:17017676

  3. Automated Pointing of Cardiac Imaging Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Loschak, Paul M.; Brattain, Laura J.; Howe, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    Intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) catheters enable high-quality ultrasound imaging within the heart, but their use in guiding procedures is limited due to the difficulty of manually pointing them at structures of interest. This paper presents the design and testing of a catheter steering model for robotic control of commercial ICE catheters. The four actuated degrees of freedom (4-DOF) are two catheter handle knobs to produce bi-directional bending in combination with rotation and translation of the handle. An extra degree of freedom in the system allows the imaging plane (dependent on orientation) to be directed at an object of interest. A closed form solution for forward and inverse kinematics enables control of the catheter tip position and the imaging plane orientation. The proposed algorithms were validated with a robotic test bed using electromagnetic sensor tracking of the catheter tip. The ability to automatically acquire imaging targets in the heart may improve the efficiency and effectiveness of intracardiac catheter interventions by allowing visualization of soft tissue structures that are not visible using standard fluoroscopic guidance. Although the system has been developed and tested for manipulating ICE catheters, the methods described here are applicable to any long thin tendon-driven tool (with single or bi-directional bending) requiring accurate tip position and orientation control. PMID:24683501

  4. Pulmonary artery catheter entrapment in cardiac surgery: a simple percutaneous solution.

    PubMed

    Divakaran, Vijay; Caldera, Angel; Stephens, Jack; Gonzalez, Rafael

    2015-10-01

    Pulmonary artery catheter entrapment is a reported complication after cardiac surgery from inadvertent suturing of the catheter to the vena-caval wall during surgery. This article reports a simple percutaneous technique to retrieve the trapped catheter.

  5. Materials for multifunctional balloon catheters with capabilities in cardiac electrophysiological mapping and ablation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dae-Hyeong; Lu, Nanshu; Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Kim, Yun-Soung; Lee, Stephen P.; Xu, Lizhi; Wu, Jian; Kim, Rak-Hwan; Song, Jizhou; Liu, Zhuangjian; Viventi, Jonathan; de Graff, Bassel; Elolampi, Brian; Mansour, Moussa; Slepian, Marvin J.; Hwang, Sukwon; Moss, Joshua D.; Won, Sang-Min; Huang, Younggang; Litt, Brian; Rogers, John A.

    2011-04-01

    Developing advanced surgical tools for minimally invasive procedures represents an activity of central importance to improving human health. A key challenge is in establishing biocompatible interfaces between the classes of semiconductor device and sensor technologies that might be most useful in this context and the soft, curvilinear surfaces of the body. This paper describes a solution based on materials that integrate directly with the thin elastic membranes of otherwise conventional balloon catheters, to provide diverse, multimodal functionality suitable for clinical use. As examples, we present sensors for measuring temperature, flow, tactile, optical and electrophysiological data, together with radiofrequency electrodes for controlled, local ablation of tissue. Use of such ‘instrumented’ balloon catheters in live animal models illustrates their operation, as well as their specific utility in cardiac ablation therapy. The same concepts can be applied to other substrates of interest, such as surgical gloves.

  6. Bradycardia during Transradial Cardiac Catheterization due to Catheter Manipulation: Resolved by Catheter Removal

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vishesh; Stys, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To report the resolution of bradycardia encountered during transradial cardiac catheterization through the catheter pullback technique in two cases. Case Report. A 62-year-old male and an 81-year-old male underwent coronary angiogram to evaluate for coronary artery disease and as a result of positive stress test, respectively. Upon engagement of the FL 3.5 catheter into the ascending aorta through the transradial approach, the first case developed bradycardia with a heart rate of 39 beats per minute. The second case developed profound bradycardia with a heart rate of 25 beats per minute upon insertion of the 5 Fr FL 3.5 catheter near the right brachiocephalic trunk through the right radial access. Conclusion. Bradycardia can be subsided by removal of the catheter during catheter manipulation in patients undergoing transradial coronary angiogram if there is a suspicion of excessive stretching of aortic arch receptors and/or carotid sinus receptors. PMID:28348915

  7. Cardiac Magnetic Resonance for Evaluating Catheter Related FDG Avidity

    PubMed Central

    Gage, Kenneth L.; Berman, Claudia G.; Montilla-Soler, Jaime L.

    2016-01-01

    A 53-year-old female with a history of metastatic left arm melanoma presented for F(18) fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) which showed a moderately FDG avid focus at her port catheter tip near the cavoatrial junction. Although catheter tip related FDG avidity has previously been suggested to be bland thrombus or infection, melanoma can metastasize to unusual locations including the superior vena cava. In addition, the patient had an elevated risk of anticoagulation due to a history of hemorrhagic brain metastases. Therefore, confirmatory cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) was obtained and findings were consistent with bland catheter-related thrombus. PMID:27867676

  8. Color Doppler Imaging of Cardiac Catheters Using Vibrating Motors

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Kalyan E.; Light, Edward D.; Rivera, Danny J.; Kisslo, Joseph A.; Smith, Stephen W.

    2010-01-01

    We attached a miniature motor rotating at 11,000 rpm onto the proximal end of cardiac electrophysiological (EP) catheters in order to produce vibrations at the tip which were then visualized by color Doppler on ultrasound scanners. We imaged the catheter tip within a vascular graft submerged in a water tank using the Volumetrics Medical Imaging 3D scanner, the Siemens Sonoline Antares 2D scanner, and the Philips ie33 3D ultrasound scanner with TEE probe. The vibrating catheter tip was visualized in each case though results varied with the color Doppler properties of the individual scanner. PMID:19514134

  9. Cardiac tamponade caused by central venous catheter in two newborns.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Andrey José; Canale, Leonardo Secchin; Barbosa, Rodrigo; Méier, Milton

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac tamponade secondary to the use of central venous catheter is a rare complication; however, it is potentially reversible when it is caught in time. We report two cases of cardiac tamponade that was diagnosed using a transthoracic echocardiography, followed by urgent pericardiocentesis and surgical pericardial drainage as a complication from umbilical venous catheterization. In one case, the tip of the catheter was properly placed, and in the other case, it was not. In both cases, a hyperosmolar solution was being injected. Although it may be an uncommon situation, it should be always considered as a possibility in a newborn who develops cardiogenic shock without an apparent cause.

  10. [Cardiac tamponade after withdrawal of a peripheral access central catheter].

    PubMed

    García-Galiana, E; Sanchis-Gil, V; Martínez-Navarrete, M Á

    2015-03-01

    Central venous catheterization is a very common technique, although its complications can be multiple and sometimes fatal. A case is presented of cardiac tamponade by parenteral nutrition a few hours after moving a central venous catheter peripherally inserted a few days before. The diagnosis was made by echocardiography, and an emergency pericardiocentesis was performed, achieving complete recovery of the patient. Peripherally inserted central venous catheters are more likely to change their position secondary to the movements of the patient's arm, thus it is important to use soft catheters, make sure the tip lies above the carina to avoid perforation of the pericardial reflexion, and fix it well to the skin. Diagnosis must be made as soon as possible, given the high mortality rate of this complication, and the essential diagnostic tool is echocardiography. Elective treatment consists of early catheter withdrawal and emergency pericardiocentesis.

  11. New-onset ventricular arrhythmias post radiofrequency catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lingmin; Lu, Yanlai; Yao, Yan; Zheng, Lihui; Chen, Gang; Ding, Ligang; Hou, Bingbo; Qiao, Yu; Sun, Wei; Zhang, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract As a new complication, new-onset ventricular arrhythmias (VAs) post atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation have not been well defined. This prospective study aimed to describe the details of new-onset VAs post AF ablation in a large study cohort. One thousand fifty-three consecutive patients who underwent the first radiofrequency catheter ablation for AF were enrolled. All patients had no evidence of pre-ablation VAs. New-onset VAs were defined as new-onset ventricular tachycardia (VT) or premature ventricular contractions (PVC) ≥1000/24 h within 1 month post ablation. There were 46 patients (4.4%) who had 62 different new-onset VAs, among whom 42 were PVC alone, and 4 were PVC coexisting with nonsustained VT. Multivariate analysis showed that increased serum leukocyte counts ≥50% post ablation were independently associated with new-onset VAs (OR: 1.9; 95% CI: 1.0–3.5; P = 0.043). The median number of PVC was 3161 (1001–27,407) times/24 h. Outflow tract VAs were recorded in 35 (76.1%) patients. No significant differences were found in origin of VAs (P = 0.187). VAs disappeared without any treatment in 6 patients (13.0%). No VAs-related adverse cardiac event occurred. The study revealed a noticeable prevalence but relatively benign prognosis of new-onset VAs post AF ablation. Increased serum leukocyte counts ≥50% post ablation appeared to be associated with new-onset VAs, implying that inflammatory response caused by ablation might be the mechanism. PMID:27603357

  12. Toward guidance of epicardial cardiac radiofrequency ablation therapy using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, Christine P.; Quan, Kara J.; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2010-07-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is the standard of care to cure many cardiac arrhythmias. Epicardial ablation for the treatment of ventricular tachycardia has limited success rates due in part to the presence of epicardial fat, which prevents proper rf energy delivery, inadequate contact of ablation catheter with tissue, and increased likelihood of complications with energy delivery in close proximity to coronary vessels. A method to directly visualize the epicardial surface during RFA could potentially provide feedback to reduce complications and titrate rf energy dose by detecting critical structures, assessing probe contact, and confirming energy delivery by visualizing lesion formation. Currently, there is no technology available for direct visualization of the heart surface during epicardial RFA therapy. We demonstrate that optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging has the potential to fill this unmet need. Spectral domain OCT at 1310 nm is employed to image the epicardial surface of freshly excised swine hearts using a microscope integrated bench-top scanner and a forward imaging catheter probe. OCT image features are observed that clearly distinguish untreated myocardium, ablation lesions, epicardial fat, and coronary vessels, and assess tissue contact with catheter-based imaging. These results support the potential for real-time guidance of epicardial RFA therapy using OCT imaging.

  13. Optoacoustic monitoring of real-time lesion formation during radiofrequency catheter ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Genny A.; Bay, Erwin; Deán-Ben, Xosé L.; Razansky, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Current radiofrequency cardiac ablation procedures lack real-time lesion monitoring guidance, limiting the reliability and efficacy of the treatment. The objective of this work is to demonstrate that optoacoustic imaging can be applied to develop a diagnostic technique applicable to radiofrequency ablation for cardiac arrhythmia treatment with the capabilities of real-time monitoring of ablated lesion size and geometry. We demonstrate an optoacoustic imaging method using a 256-detector optoacoustic imaging probe and pulsed-laser illumination in the infrared wavelength range that is applied during radiofrequency ablation in excised porcine myocardial tissue samples. This technique results in images with high contrast between the lesion volume and unablated tissue, and is also capable of capturing time-resolved image sequences that provide information on the lesion development process. The size and geometry of the imaged lesion were shown to be in excellent agreement with the histological examinations. This study demonstrates the first deep-lesion real-time monitoring for radiofrequency ablation generated lesions, and the technique presented here has the potential for providing critical feedback that can significantly impact the outcome of clinical radiofrequency ablation procedures.

  14. In vitro cardiac catheter navigation via augmented reality surgical guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linte, Cristian A.; Moore, John; Wiles, Andrew; Lo, Jennifer; Wedlake, Chris; Peters, Terry M.

    2009-02-01

    Catheter-driven cardiac interventions have emerged in response to the need of reducing invasiveness associated with the traditional cut-and-sew techniques. Catheter manipulation is traditionally performed under real-time fluoroscopy imaging, resulting in an overall trade-off of procedure invasiveness for radiation exposure of both the patient and clinical staff. Our approach to reducing and potentially eliminating the use of flouroscopy in the operating room entails the use of multi-modality imaging and magnetic tracking technologies, wrapped together into an augmented reality environment for enhanced intra-procedure visualization and guidance. Here we performed an in vitro study in which a catheter was guided to specific targets located on the endocardial atrial surface of a beating heart phantom. "Therapy delivery" was modeled in the context of a blinded procedure, mimicking a beating heart, intracardiac intervention. The users navigated the tip of a magnetically tracked Freezor 5 CRYOCATH catheter to the specified targets. Procedure accuracy was determined as the distance between the tracked catheter tip and the tracked surgical target at the time of contact, and it was assessed under three different guidance modalities: endoscopic, augmented reality, and ultrasound image guidance. The overall RMS targeting accuracy achieved under augmented reality guidance averaged to 1.1 mm. This guidance modality shows significant improvements in both procedure accuracy and duration over ultrasound image guidance alone, while maintianing an overall targeting accuracy comparable to that achieved under endoscopic guidance.

  15. In vitro assessment of a combined radiofrequency ablation and cryo-anchoring catheter for treatment of mitral valve prolapse.

    PubMed

    Boronyak, Steven M; Merryman, W David

    2014-03-21

    Percutaneous approaches to mitral valve repair are an attractive alternative to surgical repair or replacement. Radiofrequency ablation has the potential to approximate surgical leaflet resection by using resistive heating to reduce leaflet size, and cryogenic temperatures on a percutaneous catheter can potentially be used to reversibly adhere to moving mitral valve leaflets for reliable application of radiofrequency energy. We tested a combined cryo-anchoring and radiofrequency ablation catheter using excised porcine mitral valves placed in a left heart flow loop capable of reproducing physiologic pressure and flow waveforms. Transmitral flow and pressure were monitored during the cryo-anchoring procedure and compared to baseline flow conditions, and the extent of radiofrequency energy delivery to the mitral valve was assessed post-treatment. Long term durability of radiofrequency ablation treatment was assessed using statically treated leaflets placed in a stretch bioreactor for four weeks. Transmitral flow and pressure waveforms were largely unaltered during cryo-anchoring. Parameter fitting to mechanical data from leaflets treated with radiofrequency ablation and cryo-anchoring revealed significant mechanical differences from untreated leaflets, demonstrating successful ablation of mitral valves in a hemodynamic environment. Picrosirius red staining showed clear differences in morphology and collagen birefringence between treated and untreated leaflets. The durability study indicated that statically treated leaflets did not significantly change size or mechanics over four weeks. A cryo-anchoring and radiofrequency ablation catheter can adhere to and ablate mitral valve leaflets in a physiologic hemodynamic environment, providing a possible percutaneous alternative to surgical leaflet resection of mitral valve tissue.

  16. [Successful radiofrequency catheter ablation of the symptomatic ventricular tachycardia in structurally normal heart. Case report].

    PubMed

    Maciag, Aleksander; Sterliński, Maciej; Pytkowski, Mariusz; Jankowska, Agnieszka; Szwed, Hanna

    2003-12-01

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFA) in structurally normal heart ventricular arrhythmias has been found to be promising direction of develop. Authors presented the case of successful RFA of symptomatic ventricular tachycardia originating from right ventricle outflow tract (RVOT). Arrhythmogenic locus was localised basing on ECG pattern, analyze of endocardial potentials and pace mapping method. In two-year follow up she was free of symptoms and ventricular arrhythmia, no medication needed. RFA is an effective and safe therapy in ventricular tachycardia in structurally normal heart.

  17. Towards patient-specific modelling of lesion formation during radiofrequency catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Soor, Navjeevan; Morgan, Ross; Varela, Marta; Aslanidi, Oleg V.

    2017-01-01

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation procedures are a first-line method of clinical treatment for atrial fibrillation. However, they suffer from suboptimal success rates and are also prone to potentially serious adverse effects. These limitations can be at least partially attributed to the inter- and intra- patient variations in atrial wall thickness, and could be mitigated by patient-specific approaches to the procedure. In this study, a modelling approach to optimising ablation procedures in subject-specific 3D atrial geometries was applied. The approach enabled the evaluation of optimal ablation times to create lesions for a given wall thickness measured from MRI. A nonliner relationship was revealed between the thickness and catheter contact time required for fully transmural lesions. Hence, our approach based on MRI reconstruction of the atrial wall combined with subject-specific modelling of ablation can provide useful information for improving clinical procedures.

  18. [Infectious mitral endocarditis after radiofrequency catheter ablation of a left lateral accessory pathway].

    PubMed

    Benito Bartolomé, F; Sánchez Fernández-Bernal, C

    2001-08-01

    A 2-years-old child with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome associated with life-threatening symptoms underwent radiofrequency ablation of a left lateral accessory pathway. A deflectable 5F bipolar electrode catheter positioned above the atrioventricular groove by transeptal approach was used for ablation. The catheters were repeatedly used after ethylene oxide sterilisation. Although immediate post-ablation echocardiography demonstrated no complications, the patient was readmitted two days later with fever and a new mitral murmur. Penicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus was isolated and intravenous antibiotics were administered. In the following weeks, the patient developed constrictive pericarditis requiring surgical treatment and acute hemiplegia caused by brain embolism arising from valvular vegetation. At 5 years of follow-up the patient presents residual hemiparesia and grade II/IV mitral insufficiency.

  19. Initial outcome following invasive cardiac electrophysiologic studies and radiofrequency ablation of atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Uwanuruochi, Kelechukwu; Saravanan, Sabari; Ganasekar, Anita; Solomon, Benjamin S; Murugesan, Ravikumar; Shah, Ruchit A; Krishnamoorthy, Jaishankar; Pandurangi, Ulhas M

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cardiac electrophysiologic study and radiofrequency ablation (RFA) have become an established mode of treatment for patients with refractory arrhythmias. These procedures are carried out regularly at the cardiac catheterization laboratory of Madras Medical Mission India. Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate our experience with cardiac electrophysiologic studies (EPS) and RFA catheter of atrial fibrillation (AF). Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study carried out in the Cardiac Electrophysiology Department of the Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, Madras Medical Mission, India. All cases diagnosed to have AF following cardiac EPS between January 2010 and April 2014 was selected for the study. The records, which were obtained from the Cardiac Electrophysiology Clinical Research Office of Madras Medical Mission, were reviewed. Forty-nine cases were chosen for analysis, using SPSS statistical software version 15. Results: There were 49 patients, 23 males and 26 females. The mean age was 57.53 years. Commonly associated diseases were diabetes mellitus 8 (16.3%), hypertension 18 (36.7%), and coronary heart disease 14 (28.5%). The ventricular rate was rapid most cases (91.2%). AF was diagnosed as being paroxysmal in 40 (81.6%), persistent in 5 (10.2%), chronic in 3 (6.1%), and lone in 1 (2.0%). Ablation was carried out in 28 (57.1%), the success rate being 90% for pulmonary vein isolation, and 90.9% for atrioventricular node ablation. Complication rate was 2.04%. Conclusions: Treatment of AF by RFA is highly effective and safe. PMID:27127736

  20. PATH OPTIMIZATION AND CONTROL OF A SHAPE MEMORY ALLOY ACTUATED CATHETER FOR ENDOCARDIAL RADIOFREQUENCY ABLATION

    PubMed Central

    Wiest, Jennifer H.; Buckner, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces a real-time path optimization and control strategy for shape memory alloy (SMA) actuated cardiac ablation catheters, potentially enabling the creation of more precise lesions with reduced procedure times and improved patient outcomes. Catheter tip locations and orientations are optimized using parallel genetic algorithms to produce continuous ablation paths with near normal tissue contact through physician-specified points. A nonlinear multivariable control strategy is presented to compensate for SMA hysteresis, bandwidth limitations, and coupling between system inputs. Simulated and experimental results demonstrate efficient generation of ablation paths and optimal reference trajectories. Closed-loop control of the SMA-actuated catheter along optimized ablation paths is validated experimentally. PMID:25684857

  1. Acute myocardial infarction after radiofrequency catheter ablation of typical atrial flutter.

    PubMed

    Yune, Sehyo; Lee, Woo Joo; Hwang, Ji-won; Kim, Eun; Ha, Jung Min; Kim, June Soo

    2014-02-01

    A 53-yr-old man underwent radiofrequency ablation to treat persistent atrial flutter. After the procedure, the chest pain was getting worse, and the electrocardiogram showed ST-segment elevation in inferior leads with reciprocal changes. Immediate coronary angiography showed total occlusion with thrombi at the distal portion of the right coronary artery, which was very close to the ablation site. Intervention with thrombus aspiration and balloon dilatation was successful, and the patient recovered without any kind of sequelae. Although the exact mechanism is obscure, the most likely explanation is a thermal injury to the vascular wall that ruptured into the lumen and formed thrombus. Vasospasm and thromboembolism can also be other possibilities. This case raise the alarm to cardiologists who perform radiofrequency ablation to treat various kinds of cardiac arrhythmias, in that myocardial infarction has been rarely considered one of the complications.

  2. Clinical course of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy in the era of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators and radiofrequency catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Komura, Masatoshi; Suzuki, Jun-Ichi; Adachi, Susumu; Takahashi, Atsushi; Otomo, Kenichiro; Nitta, Junichi; Nishizaki, Mitsuhiro; Obayashi, Tohru; Nogami, Akihiko; Satoh, Yasuhiro; Okishige, Kaoru; Hachiya, Hitoshi; Hirao, Kenzo; Isobe, Mitsuaki

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the clinical course of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) patients and in particular evaluated the contribution of radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) and an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) to the treatment of ARVC. ARVC is a myocardial disorder and a cause of sudden cardiac death due to ventricular tachycardia (VT). Little is known about its prognosis in Japanese ARVC patients. Thirty-five ARVC patients were studied. Mean age of patients whose onset of ARVC was congestive heart failure (CHF) (66.0 +/- 4.0 years) was significantly higher than those whose onset was VT (44.5 +/- 14.8 years, P < 0.05). ARVC patients with CHF onset showed significantly higher death rates compared to those with VT onset. ICD treatment significantly reduced episodes of hospitalization due to VT (0.1 +/- 0.4 episodes) in comparison to treatment by RFCA (1.7 +/- 2.2 episodes, P < 0.03). RFCA treatment did not reduce recurrence of VT in the follow-up period. ICD therapy showed comparable mortality to RFCA treatment. The prognosis of ARVC with CHF onset is poor. ICD therapy significantly reduced hospitalization due to VT compared with RFCA treatment. ICD implantation in combination with medication may be a better treatment for ARVC.

  3. Computational Modeling of Open-Irrigated Electrodes for Radiofrequency Cardiac Ablation Including Blood Motion-Saline Flow Interaction

    PubMed Central

    González-Suárez, Ana; Berjano, Enrique; Guerra, Jose M.; Gerardo-Giorda, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) is a routine treatment for cardiac arrhythmias. During RFCA, the electrode-tissue interface temperature should be kept below 80°C to avoid thrombus formation. Open-irrigated electrodes facilitate power delivery while keeping low temperatures around the catheter. No computational model of an open-irrigated electrode in endocardial RFCA accounting for both the saline irrigation flow and the blood motion in the cardiac chamber has been proposed yet. We present the first computational model including both effects at once. The model has been validated against existing experimental results. Computational results showed that the surface lesion width and blood temperature are affected by both the electrode design and the irrigation flow rate. Smaller surface lesion widths and blood temperatures are obtained with higher irrigation flow rate, while the lesion depth is not affected by changing the irrigation flow rate. Larger lesions are obtained with increasing power and the electrode-tissue contact. Also, larger lesions are obtained when electrode is placed horizontally. Overall, the computational findings are in close agreement with previous experimental results providing an excellent tool for future catheter research. PMID:26938638

  4. Inappropriate Sinus Tachycardia Diagnosed and Treated as Depression Successfully Treated by Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation.

    PubMed

    Masumoto, Akihiro; Takemoto, Masao; Mito, Takahiro; Tanaka, Atsushi; Kawano, Yuki; Kumeda, Hiroshi; Kang, Honsa; Matsuo, Atsutoshi; Hida, Satoru; Okazaki, Teiji; Tayama, Kei-Ichiro; Yoshitake, Kiyonobu; Kosuga, Kenichi

    2017-01-01

    We experienced a man in his 20s with inappropriate sinus tachycardia (IST) initially diagnosed and treated as depression who was steadily treated with radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) using an EnSite™ system. The patient has remained well without any symptoms or medications, including antidepressants, for two years since the RFCA. To avoid missing IST and treating it as an emotional problem and/or mental illness such as depression, physicians - including cardiologists - should be aware of these conditions when examining patients with multiple and incapacitating complaints including palpitations and general fatigue and/or tachycardia, especially characterized by an elevated resting heart rate or a disproportionate increase in the heart rate with minimal exertion.

  5. Novel use of epidural catheter: Air injection for neuroprotection during radiofrequency ablation of spinal osteoid osteoma

    PubMed Central

    Doctor, JR; Solanki, SL; Patil, VP; Divatia, JV

    2016-01-01

    Osteoid osteoma (OO) is a benign bone tumor, with a male-female ratio of approximately 2:1 and mainly affecting long bones. Ten percent of the lesions occur in the spine, mostly within the posterior elements. Treatment options for OO include surgical excision and percutaneous imaging-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Lesions within the spine have an inherent risk of thermal damage to the vital structure because of proximity to the neural elements. We report a novel use of the epidural catheter for air injection for the neuroprotection of nerves close to the OO of the spine. A 12-year-old and 30 kg male child with an OO of the L3 vertebra was taken up for RFA. His preoperative examinations were within normal limits. The OO was very close to the L3 nerve root. Under general anesthesia, lumbar epidural catheter was placed in the L3-L4 space under imaging guidance. Ten ml of aliquots of air was injected under imaging guidance to avoid injury to the neural structures due to RFA. The air created a gap between neural elements and the tumor and served as an insulating material thereby protecting the neural elements from damage due to the RFA. Postoperatively, the patient did not develop any neurological deficit. PMID:27375396

  6. Development of a force-reflecting robotic platform for cardiac catheter navigation.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun Woo; Choi, Jaesoon; Pak, Hui-Nam; Song, Seung Joon; Lee, Jung Chan; Park, Yongdoo; Shin, Seung Min; Sun, Kyung

    2010-11-01

    Electrophysiological catheters are used for both diagnostics and clinical intervention. To facilitate more accurate and precise catheter navigation, robotic cardiac catheter navigation systems have been developed and commercialized. The authors have developed a novel force-reflecting robotic catheter navigation system. The system is a network-based master-slave configuration having a 3-degree of freedom robotic manipulator for operation with a conventional cardiac ablation catheter. The master manipulator implements a haptic user interface device with force feedback using a force or torque signal either measured with a sensor or estimated from the motor current signal in the slave manipulator. The slave manipulator is a robotic motion control platform on which the cardiac ablation catheter is mounted. The catheter motions-forward and backward movements, rolling, and catheter tip bending-are controlled by electromechanical actuators located in the slave manipulator. The control software runs on a real-time operating system-based workstation and implements the master/slave motion synchronization control of the robot system. The master/slave motion synchronization response was assessed with step, sinusoidal, and arbitrarily varying motion commands, and showed satisfactory performance with insignificant steady-state motion error. The current system successfully implemented the motion control function and will undergo safety and performance evaluation by means of animal experiments. Further studies on the force feedback control algorithm and on an active motion catheter with an embedded actuation mechanism are underway.

  7. Medical Devices; Cardiovascular Devices; Classification of the Steerable Cardiac Ablation Catheter Remote Control System. Final order.

    PubMed

    2015-09-30

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying the steerable cardiac ablation catheter remote control system into class II (special controls). The special controls that will apply to the device are identified in this order and will be part of the codified language for the steerable cardiac ablation catheter remote control system's classification. The Agency is classifying the device into class II (special controls) in order to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device.

  8. Radiofrequency catheter ablation of intractable ventricular tachycardia in an infant following arterial switch operation.

    PubMed

    Costello, John P; He, Dingchao; Greene, Elizabeth A; Berul, Charles I; Moak, Jeffrey P; Nath, Dilip S

    2014-01-01

    A full-term male neonate presented with cyanosis upon delivery and was subsequently diagnosed with d-transposition of the great arteries, ventricular septal defect, and restrictive atrial septal defect. Following initiation of intravenous prostaglandins and balloon atrial septostomy, an arterial switch operation was performed on day 3 of life. The postoperative course was complicated by intractable ventricular tachycardia that was refractory to lidocaine, amiodarone, esmolol, fosphenytoin, and mexiletine drug therapy. Ventricular tachycardia was suppressed with overdrive atrial pacing but recurred upon discontinuation. Seven weeks postoperatively, radiofrequency catheter ablation was performed due to hemodynamically compromising persistent ventricular tachycardia refractory to medical therapy. The ventricular tachycardia was localized to the inferior-lateral right ventricular outlet septum. The procedure was successful without complications or recurrence. Antiarrhythmics were discontinued after the ablation procedure. Seven days after the ablation, a different, slower fascicular rhythm was noted to compete with the infant's sinus rhythm. This was consistent with the preablation amiodarone having reached subtherapeutic levels given its very long half-life. The patient was restarted on oral beta blockers and amiodarone. The patient was subsequently discharged home in predominantly sinus rhythm with intermittent fascicular rhythm.

  9. Radiofrequency catheter ablation: different cooled and noncooled electrode systems induce specific lesion geometries and adverse effects profiles.

    PubMed

    Dorwarth, Uwe; Fiek, Michael; Remp, Thomas; Reithmann, Cristopher; Dugas, Martin; Steinbeck, Gerhard; Hoffmann, Ellen

    2003-07-01

    The success and safety of standard catheter radiofrequency ablation may be limited for ablation of atrial fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia. The aim of this study was to characterize and compare different cooled and noncooled catheter systems in terms of their specific lesion geometry, incidence of impedance rise, and crater and coagulum formation to facilitate appropriate catheter selection for special indications. The study investigated myocardial lesion generation of three cooled catheter systems (7 Fr, 4-mm tip): two saline irrigation catheters with a showerhead-type electrode tip (sprinkler) and a porous metal tip and an internally cooled catheter. Noncooled catheters (7 Fr) had a large tip electrode (8 mm) and a standard tip electrode (4 mm). RF energy was delivered on isolated porcine myocardium superfused with heparinized pig blood (37 degrees C) at power settings of 10-40 W. Both irrigated systems were characterized by a large lesion depth (8.1 +/- 1.6 mm) and a large lesion diameter (13.8 +/- 1.6 mm). In comparison, internally cooled lesions showed a similar lesion depth (8.0 +/- 1.0 mm), but a significantly smaller lesion diameter (12.3 +/- 1.2 mm,P = 0.04). Large tip lesions had a similar lesion diameter (14.5 +/- 1.6 mm), but a significantly smaller lesion depth (6.3 +/- 1.0 mm,P = 0.002) compared to irrigated lesions. However, lesion volume was not significantly different between the three cooled and the large tip catheter. To induce maximum lesion size, power requirements were three times higher for the irrigation systems and two times higher for the internally cooled and the large tip catheter compared to the standard catheter. Impedance rise was rarest with irrigated and large tip ablation. In case of impedance rise crater formation was a frequent observation (61-93%). Irrigated catheters prevented coagulum formation most effectively. Irrigated rather than internally cooled ablation appears to be most adequate for the induction of deep and

  10. Atrial conduction delay predicts atrial fibrillation in paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia patients after radiofrequency catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhen-Xing; Zhong, Jing-Quan; Zhang, Wei; Yue, Xin; Rong, Bing; Zhu, Qing; Zheng, Zhaotong; Zhang, Yun

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to assess whether intra- and inter-atrial conduction delay could predict atrial fibrillation (AF) for paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT) patients after successful treatment by radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA). Echocardiography examination was performed on 524 consecutive PSVT patients (15 patients were excluded). Left atrial dimension, right atrial diameter and intra- and inter-atrial conduction delay were measured before ablation. Patients were divided into group A (n = 32): occurrence of AF after the ablation and group B (n = 477): remained in sinus rhythm during follow-up. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to estimate the predictive value of intra- and inter-atrial conduction delay. Both intra- and inter-atrial conduction delay were higher in group A than in group B (4.79 ± 0.30 msec vs. 4.56 ± 0.32 msec; 21.98 ± 1.32 msec vs. 20.01 ± 1.33; p < 0.05). Binary logistic regression analysis showed that intra- and inter-atrial conduction were significant influential factors for the occurrence of AF (odds ratio [OR] = 13.577, 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.469-48.914; OR = 2.569, 95% CI, 1.909-3.459, p < 0.05). The ROC cure analysis revealed that intra-atrial conduction delay ≥ 4.45 msec and inter-atrial conduction delay ≥ 20.65 were the most optimal cut-off value for predicting AF in PSVT patients after RFCA. In conclusion, this is the first study to show that the intra- and inter-atrial conduction delay could effectively predict AF in post-ablation PSVT patients.

  11. [Clinical analysis of 19 cases of pregnant women with rapid arrhythmia in the treatment of radiofrequency catheter ablation].

    PubMed

    Chu, L; Zhang, J; Li, Y N; Long, D Y

    2016-10-25

    Objective: To investigate the risk of radiofrequency catheter ablation and maternal and infant in pregnant women with rapid arrhythmia during pregnancy. Methods: The clinical data of the 19 cases of pregnancy complicated with rapid arrhythmia were retrospectively analyzed and followed up, including the gestational week, the type of arrhythmia, the treatment, and the outcome of the mother and child in Beijing Anzhen Hospital of Capital Medical University from January 2002 to March 2016. Results: (1)Clinical characteristics: the ages of the 19 cases were(31±4)years old(ranged from 26 to 35 years old), the onset gestational ages were(21±4)weeks(ranged from 15 to 32 weeks).

  12. Near-infrared spectroscopy integrated catheter for characterization of myocardial tissues: preliminary demonstrations to radiofrequency ablation therapy for atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Singh-Moon, Rajinder P.; Marboe, Charles C.; Hendon, Christine P.

    2015-01-01

    Effects of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) treatment of atrial fibrillation can be limited by the ability to characterize the tissue in contact. Parameters obtained by conventional catheters, such as impedance and temperature can be insufficient in providing physiological information pertaining to effective treatment. In this report, we present a near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)-integrated catheter capable of extracting tissue optical properties. Validation experiments were first performed in tissue phantoms with known optical properties. We then apply the technique for characterization of myocardial tissues in swine and human hearts, ex vivo. Additionally, we demonstrate the recovery of critical parameters relevant to RFA therapy including contact verification, and lesion transmurality. These findings support the application of NIRS for improved guidance in RFA therapeutic interventions. PMID:26203376

  13. Ultrasound Current Source Density Imaging of the Cardiac Activation Wave Using a Clinical Cardiac Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yexian; Li, Qian; Ingram, Pier; Barber, Christy; Liu, Zhonglin

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound current source density imaging (UCSDI), based on the acoustoelectric (AE) effect, is a noninvasive method for mapping electrical current in 4-D (space + time). This technique potentially overcomes limitations with conventional electrical mapping procedures typically used during treatment of sustained arrhythmias. However, the weak AE signal associated with the electrocardiogram is a major challenge for advancing this technology. In this study, we examined the effects of the electrode configuration and ultrasound frequency on the magnitude of the AE signal and quality of UCSDI using a rabbit Langendorff heart preparation. The AE signal was much stronger at 0.5 MHz (2.99 μV/MPa) than 1.0 MHz (0.42 μV/MPa). Also, a clinical lasso catheter placed on the epicardium exhibited excellent sensitivity without penetrating the tissue. We also present, for the first time, 3-D cardiac activation maps of the live rabbit heart using only one pair of recording electrodes. Activation maps were used to calculate the cardiac conduction velocity for atrial (1.31 m/s) and apical (0.67 m/s) pacing. This study demonstrated that UCSDI is potentially capable of real-time 3-D cardiac activation wave mapping, which would greatly facilitate ablation procedures for treatment of arrhythmias. PMID:25122512

  14. Large-deflection statics analysis of active cardiac catheters through co-rotational modelling.

    PubMed

    Peng Qi; Chen Qiu; Mehndiratta, Aadarsh; I-Ming Chen; Haoyong Yu

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a co-rotational concept for large-deflection formulation of cardiac catheters. Using this approach, the catheter is first discretized with a number of equal length beam elements and nodes, and the rigid body motions of an individual beam element are separated from its deformations. Therefore, it is adequate for modelling arbitrarily large deflections of a catheter with linear elastic analysis at the local element level. A novel design of active cardiac catheter of 9 Fr in diameter at the beginning of the paper is proposed, which is based on the contra-rotating double helix patterns and is improved from the previous prototypes. The modelling section is followed by MATLAB simulations of various deflections when the catheter is exerted different types of loads. This proves the feasibility of the presented modelling approach. To the best knowledge of the authors, it is the first to utilize this methodology for large-deflection static analysis of the catheter, which will enable more accurate control of robot-assisted cardiac catheterization procedures. Future work would include further experimental validations.

  15. [Cardiac tamponade associated with umbilical venous catheter (UVC) placed in inappropriate position].

    PubMed

    Gálvez-Cancino, Franco; de la Luz Sánchez-Tirado, María

    2015-01-01

    Umbilical venous catheter (UVC) is widely used in neonatal intensive care units. Pericardial effusion is an uncommon but life-threatening complication; and tamponade have been reported in 3% of neonates having such catheters. We present a case of cardiac tamponade as a complication of venous catheter in a neonate. The patient was diagnosed at the appropriate time by echocardiography and the pericardiocentesis was performed, and after removal of the complete pericardial effusion,an improvement of the critical condition was achieved. It is important to document the optimal positioning of UVC before the start of infusions.

  16. [Right ventricular perforation and cardiac tamponade caused by a central venous catheter].

    PubMed

    Fukuda, H; Kasuda, H; Shimizu, R

    1993-02-01

    A 5 year old girl with ASD was scheduled for open heart surgery. A central venous catheter was placed via the right infraclavicular vein after induction of anesthesia. Thirty minutes after insertion of the catheter, a decrease in arterial pressure and pulse pressure, an increase in heart rate and central venous pressure were observed. Cardiac tamponade was revealed by rapid opening of the chest. Gushing blood out of a hole in the right ventricular free wall was confirmed by pericardiotomy. The hemodynamics were stabilized by blood transfusion and surgical closure of the hole on the ventricle. This perforation was thought to be caused by careless insertion of a relatively stiff central venous catheter.

  17. Delayed cardiac tamponade: A rare but life-threatening complication of catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Yetter, Elizabeth; Brazg, Jared; Del Valle, Diane; Mulvey, Laura; Dickman, Eitan

    2016-11-17

    Delayed cardiac tamponade (DCT) is a rare and life-threatening complication of catheter ablation performed as a treatment of atrial fibrillation, with few cases described in the medical literature. We present the case of a 57year-old man presenting with DCT 61days following a catheter ablation procedure. To the best of our knowledge, this is the most delayed case of cardiac tamponade (CT) following catheter ablation described in the literature. We also discuss the importance of point of care ultrasound (POCUS) in the diagnosis and treatment of CT. Emergency physicians must maintain a high index of suspicion in making the diagnosis of CT as patients may present with vague symptoms such as neck or back pain, shortness of breath, fatigue, dizziness, or altered mental status, often without chest pain. Common risk factors for CT include cancer, renal failure, pericarditis, cardiac surgery, myocardial rupture, trauma, and retrograde aortic dissection. In addition, although rare, both catheter ablation and use of anticoagulation carry risks of developing CT. A worldwide survey of medical centers performing catheter ablation found CT as a complication in less than 2% of cases [1]. Some proposed mechanisms of DCT include small pericardial hemorrhages following post-procedural anticoagulation or rupture of the sealed ablation-induced left atrial wall [2]. Clinical examination and electrocardiography may be helpful. However, the criterion standard for diagnosing CT is echocardiography [3].

  18. Using central venous catheter for suprapubic catheterization in cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Bilehjani, Eissa; Fakhari, Solmaz

    2017-01-01

    Suprapubic catheterization is an alternative method for urinary drainage that is used when transurethral catheterization fails. Traditionally, inserted large-bore suprapubic catheters may cause fatal complications. During the past decade, we used a small central venous catheter (CVC) suprapubicly in 16 male patients for the purpose of urinary drainage, when transurethral catheterization failed. The procedure is performed in no more than 10 minutes. Success rate was 100% and this approach did not lead to any complications. In conclusion, placing a CVC for suprapubic drainage is a safe method with a high success rate and we recommend it in patients with failed transurethral catheterization after a few attempts (2-3 attempts).

  19. Three-Degree-of-Freedom MR-Compatible Multisegment Cardiac Catheter Steering Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ataollahi, Asghar; Karim, Rashed; Fallah, Arash Soleiman; Rhode, Kawal; Razavi, Reza; Seneviratne, Lakmal D; Schaeffter, Tobias; Althoefer, Kaspar

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a novel MR-compatible 3-DOF cardiac catheter steering mechanism. The catheter's steerable structure is tendon driven and consists of miniature deflectable, helical segments created by a precise rapid prototyping technique. The created catheter prototype has an outer diameter of 9 Fr (3 mm) and a steerable distal end that can be deflected in a 3-D space via four braided high-tensile Spectra fiber tendons. Any longitudinal twist commonly observed in helical structures is compensated for by employing clockwise (CW) and counter clockwise (CCW) helical segments in an alternating fashion. A 280 μm flexible carbon fiber rod is used as a backbone in a central channel to improve the structure's steering and positioning repeatability. In addition to the backbone, a carbon fiber tube can be inserted into the structure to a varying amount capable of changing the structure's forcibility and, thus, providing a means to change the curvature and to modify the deflectable length of the catheter leading to an extension of reachable points in the catheter-tip workspace. A unique feature of this helical segment structure is that the stiffness can be further adjusted by appropriately tensioning tendons simultaneously. An experimental study has been conducted examining the catheter-tip trajectory in a 3-D space and its positioning repeatability using a 5-DOF magnetic coil tracking system. Furthermore, MRI experiments in a 1.5-T scanner confirmed the MR-compatibility of the catheter prototype. The study shows that the proposed concept for catheter steering has great potential to be employed for robotically steered and MR-guided cardiac catheterization.

  20. Using central venous catheter for suprapubic catheterization in cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bilehjani, Eissa; Fakhari, Solmaz

    2017-01-01

    Suprapubic catheterization is an alternative method for urinary drainage that is used when transurethral catheterization fails. Traditionally, inserted large-bore suprapubic catheters may cause fatal complications. During the past decade, we used a small central venous catheter (CVC) suprapubicly in 16 male patients for the purpose of urinary drainage, when transurethral catheterization failed. The procedure is performed in no more than 10 minutes. Success rate was 100% and this approach did not lead to any complications. In conclusion, placing a CVC for suprapubic drainage is a safe method with a high success rate and we recommend it in patients with failed transurethral catheterization after a few attempts (2–3 attempts). PMID:28116283

  1. Three-dimensional tracking of cardiac catheters using an inverse geometry x-ray fluoroscopy system

    SciTech Connect

    Speidel, Michael A.; Tomkowiak, Michael T.; Raval, Amish N.; Van Lysel, Michael S.

    2010-12-15

    Purpose: Scanning beam digital x-ray (SBDX) is an inverse geometry fluoroscopic system with high dose efficiency and the ability to perform continuous real-time tomosynthesis at multiple planes. This study describes a tomosynthesis-based method for 3D tracking of high-contrast objects and present the first experimental investigation of cardiac catheter tracking using a prototype SBDX system. Methods: The 3D tracking algorithm utilizes the stack of regularly spaced tomosynthetic planes that are generated by SBDX after each frame period (15 frames/s). Gradient-filtered versions of the image planes are generated, the filtered images are segmented into object regions, and then a 3D coordinate is calculated for each object region. Two phantom studies of tracking performance were conducted. In the first study, an ablation catheter in a chest phantom was imaged as it was pulled along a 3D trajectory defined by a catheter sheath (10, 25, and 50 mm/s pullback speeds). SBDX tip tracking coordinates were compared to the 3D trajectory of the sheath as determined from a CT scan of the phantom after the registration of the SBDX and CT coordinate systems. In the second study, frame-to-frame tracking precision was measured for six different catheter configurations as a function of image noise level (662-7625 photons/mm{sup 2} mean detected x-ray fluence at isocenter). Results: During catheter pullbacks, the 3D distance between the tracked catheter tip and the sheath centerline was 1.0{+-}0.8 mm (mean {+-}one standard deviation). The electrode to centerline distances were comparable to the diameter of the catheter tip (2.3 mm), the confining sheath (4 mm outside diameter), and the estimated SBDX-to-CT registration error ({+-}0.7 mm). The tip position was localized for all 332 image frames analyzed and 83% of tracked positions were inside the 3D sheath volume derived from CT. The pullback speeds derived from the catheter trajectories were within 5% of the programed pullback speeds

  2. Radiofrequency Coils and Pulse Sequences for Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Applications: New Perspectives and Future Developments.

    PubMed

    Giovannetti, Giulio; De Marchi, Daniele; Pingitore, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is a relevant diagnostic tool for the evaluation of cardiac morphology, function, and mass. The assessment of myocardial tissue content through the measurement of longitudinal (T1) and transversal (T2) relaxation properties and the development of different technical advances are important clinical novelties of CMR. Recently, magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been explored for the assessment of the metabolic state of tissue for cardiac function evaluation by using nuclei other than protons, such as (13)C and (23)Na, expanding our knowledge of the kinetics of metabolic processes. The design and development of dedicated radiofrequency coils and pulse sequences are fundamental to maximizing signal-to-noise ratio data while achieving faster cardiac examination. This review highlights the new technical developments in CMR sequences and coils.

  3. An augmented reality system for patient-specific guidance of cardiac catheter ablation procedures.

    PubMed

    De Buck, Stijn; Maes, Frederik; Ector, Joris; Bogaert, Jan; Dymarkowski, Steven; Heidbüchel, Hein; Suetens, Paul

    2005-11-01

    We present a system to assist in the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias by catheter ablation. A patient-specific three-dimensional (3-D) anatomical model, constructed from magnetic resonance images, is merged with fluoroscopic images in an augmented reality environment that enables the transfer of electrocardiography (ECG) measurements and cardiac activation times onto the model. Accurate mapping is realized through the combination of: a new calibration technique, adapted to catheter guided treatments; a visual matching registration technique, allowing the electrophysiologist to align the model with contrast-enhanced images; and the use of virtual catheters, which enable the annotation of multiple ECG measurements on the model. These annotations can be visualized by color coding on the patient model. We provide an accuracy analysis of each of these components independently. Based on simulation and experiments, we determined a segmentation error of 0.6 mm, a calibration error in the order of 1 mm and a target registration error of 1.04 +/- 0.45 mm. The system provides a 3-D visualization of the cardiac activation pattern which may facilitate and improve diagnosis and treatment of the arrhytmia. Because of its low cost and similar advantages we believe our approach can compete with existing commercial solutions, which rely on dedicated hardware and costly catheters. We provide qualitative results of the first clinical use of the system in 11 ablation procedures.

  4. An Endovascular Approach to the Entrapped Central Venous Catheter After Cardiac Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, Shamit S.; Konanur, Meghana; Foltz, Gretchen; Malaisrie, S. Chris; Resnick, Scott

    2016-03-15

    PurposeEntrapment of central venous catheters (CVC) at the superior vena cava (SVC) cardiopulmonary bypass cannulation site by closing purse-string sutures is a rare complication of cardiac surgery. Historically, resternotomy has been required for suture release. An endovascular catheter release approach was developed.Materials and MethodsFour cases of CVC tethering against the SVC wall and associated resistance to removal, suggestive of entrapment, were encountered. In each case, catheter removal was achieved using a reverse catheter fluoroscopically guided over the suture fixation point between catheter and SVC wall, followed by the placement of a guidewire through the catheter. The guidewire was snared and externalized to create a through-and-through access with the apex of the loop around the suture. A snare placed from the femoral venous access provided concurrent downward traction on the distal CVC during suture release maneuvers.ResultsIn the initial attempt, gentle traction freed the CVC, which fractured and was removed in two sections. In the subsequent three cases, traction alone did not release the CVC. Therefore, a cutting balloon was introduced over the guidewire and inflated. Gentle back-and-forth motion of the cutting balloon atherotomes successfully incised the suture in all three attempts. No significant postprocedural complications were encountered. During all cases, a cardiovascular surgeon was present in the interventional suite and prepared for emergent resternotomy, if necessary.ConclusionAn endovascular algorithm to the “entrapped CVC” is proposed, which likely reduces risks posed by resternotomy to cardiac surgery patients in the post-operative period.

  5. 3D X-ray imaging methods in support catheter ablations of cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Stárek, Zdeněk; Lehar, František; Jež, Jiří; Wolf, Jiří; Novák, Miroslav

    2014-10-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are a very frequent illness. Pharmacotherapy is not very effective in persistent arrhythmias and brings along a number of risks. Catheter ablation has became an effective and curative treatment method over the past 20 years. To support complex arrhythmia ablations, the 3D X-ray cardiac cavities imaging is used, most frequently the 3D reconstruction of CT images. The 3D cardiac rotational angiography (3DRA) represents a modern method enabling to create CT like 3D images on a standard X-ray machine equipped with special software. Its advantage lies in the possibility to obtain images during the procedure, decreased radiation dose and reduction of amount of the contrast agent. The left atrium model is the one most frequently used for complex atrial arrhythmia ablations, particularly for atrial fibrillation. CT data allow for creation and segmentation of 3D models of all cardiac cavities. Recently, a research has been made proving the use of 3DRA to create 3D models of other cardiac (right ventricle, left ventricle, aorta) and non-cardiac structures (oesophagus). They can be used during catheter ablation of complex arrhythmias to improve orientation during the construction of 3D electroanatomic maps, directly fused with 3D electroanatomic systems and/or fused with fluoroscopy. An intensive development in the 3D model creation and use has taken place over the past years and they became routinely used during catheter ablations of arrhythmias, mainly atrial fibrillation ablation procedures. Further development may be anticipated in the future in both the creation and use of these models.

  6. Renal sympathetic denervation using an externally irrigated radiofrequency ablation catheter for treatment of resistant hypertension – Acute safety and short term efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Yalagudri, Sachin; Raju, Narayana; Das, Bharati; Daware, Ashwin; Maiya, Shreesha; Jothiraj, Kannan; Ravikishore, A.G.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study was conducted to assess the acute safety and short term efficacy of renal sympathetic denervation (RSDN) using solid tip radiofrequency ablation (RFA) catheter and saline irrigation through the renal guiding catheter to achieve effective denervation. Background RSDN using a specialized solid-tip RFA catheter has recently been demonstrated to safely reduce systemic blood pressure in patients with refractory hypertension, the limitation being inadequate power delivery in renal arteries. So, we used solid-tip RFA catheter along with saline irrigation for RSDN. Methods Nine patients with resistant hypertension underwent CT and conventional renal angiography, followed by bilateral or unilateral RSDN using 5F RFA catheter with saline irrigation through renal guiding catheter. Repeat renal angiography was performed at the end of the procedure. In all patients, pre- and post-procedure serum creatinine was measured. Results Over 1-month period: 1) the systolic/diastolic blood pressure decreased by −57 ± 20/−25 ± 7.5 mm Hg; 2) all patients experienced a decrease in systolic blood pressure of at least −36 mm Hg (range 36–98 mm Hg); 3) there was no evidence of renal artery injury immediate post-procedure. There was no significant change in serum creatinine level. Conclusions This data shows the acute procedural safety and short term efficacy of RSDN using modified externally irrigated solid tip RFA catheter. PMID:26138176

  7. Catheter Ablation of Idiopathic Ventricular Arrhythmias Arising From the Cardiac Outflow Tracts - Recent Insights and Techniques for the Successful Treatment of Common and Challenging Cases.

    PubMed

    Heeger, Christian-Hendrik; Hayashi, Kentaro; Kuck, Karl-Heinz; Ouyang, Feifan

    2016-04-25

    Ventricular arrhythmias (VA), like premature ventricular contractions (PVC) and ventricular tachycardia (VT) in patients without structural heart disease (idiopathic VA), mainly arise from the right and left ventricular outflow tracts (RVOT/LVOT). The prognosis for OT VA is generally good in the majority of patients, but there is potential for developing dilated cardiomyopathies from the high burden of VA, as well as a certain risk for sudden cardiac death because of fast monomorphic VT or polymorphic VT triggered by short-coupling PVC. Radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) has evolved into a widely accepted treatment strategy for patients suffering from VAs. A detailed knowledge of surface ECGs and complex cardiac anatomy, especially within the ventricular OTs, is essential for the understanding of cardiac OT-VAs and highly related to safe and successful RFCA procedures. This review article focuses on RFCA of idiopathic VA arising from the cardiac OT as well as adjacent regions and will illustrate recent insights and technical issues. (Circ J 2016; 80: 1073-1086).

  8. [Possibilities of minimal invasive cardiac catheter interventions in the dog].

    PubMed

    Glaus, T M; Unterer, S; Tomsa, K; Baumgartner, C; Geissbühler, U; Gardelle, O; Reusch, C

    2003-09-01

    The therapeutic possibilities in veterinary cardiology have developed rapidly in the past few years. Whereas until recently cardiac intervention in dogs could only be performed by thoracotomy, new minimally invasive techniques are adopted. Procedures like balloondilatation of pulmonic stenosis, coil embolisation of patent ductus arteriosus, pacemaker implantation in symptomatic bradyarrhyhtmia, and palliative balloon pericardiotomy are becoming more and more established. These alternative interventional methods are attractive, because no postsurgical pain and no complications potentially associated with thoracotomy ensue. The knowledge of such new treatment modalities and particularly the indications for an intervention are prerequisites to apply them optimally and broadly.

  9. Long-Term Outcomes of Radio-Frequency Catheter Ablation on Ventricular Tachycardias Due to Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy: A Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yumei; Fang, Xianhong; Huang, Jun; Liu, Yang; Deng, Hai; Liang, Yuanhong; Liao, Zili; Liu, Fangzhou; Lin, Weidong; Zhan, Xianzhang; Wu, Shulin

    2017-01-01

    Aims To summarize our experience of radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) for recurrent drug-refractory ventricular tachycardias (VTs) due to arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) in our center over the past 11 years and its related factors. Methods and Results We reviewed 48 adults (mean age 39.9 ± 12.9 years, range: 14 to 65) who met the present ARVC diagnostic criteria and accepted RFCA for VTs from December 2004 to April 2016. The patients received a total of 70 procedures using two ablation approaches, the endocardial approach in 52 RFCAs, and the combined epicardial and endocardial approach (the combined approach) in 18 RFCAs. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that the combined approach achieved better acute procedural success (p = 0.003) and better long-term outcomes (p = 0.028) than the endocardial approach. Patients who obtained acute procedural success with non-inducibility had better long-term outcomes (p < 0.001). COX regression of multivariate analysis showed that procedural success was the only factor that benefited long-term outcome, irrespective of the endocardial or the combined approach (p = 0.001). The rate of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in patients without procedural success was significantly higher than that in patients with procedural success (p = 0.005). All patients without implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implantation who had successful final RFCA survived. Conclusions The combined approach resulted in better procedural success and long-term VT-free survival compared with the endocardial approach in ARVC patients with recurrent VTs. Acute procedural success with non-inducibility was strongly related to better long-term VT-free survival and reduced SCD, irrespective of whether this was achieved by the endocardial approach or the combined approach. PMID:28122031

  10. Restoration of Atrial Mechanical Function after Successful Radio-Frequency Catheter Ablation of Atrial Flutter

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Kyoung-Suk; Kang, Duk-Hyun; Song, Jae-Kwan; Nam, Gi-Byoung; Choi, Kee-Joon; Kim, You-Ho

    2001-01-01

    Background: Atrial mechanical dysfunction and its recovery time course after successful radiofrequency ablation of chronic atrial flutter (AFL) has been largely unknown. We serially evaluated left atrial function by echocardiography after successful ablation of chronic atrial flutter. Methods: In 13 patients with chronic AFL, mitral E wave A wave, and the ratio of A/E velocity were measured at 1 day, 1 month, 3 months and 6–12 months after successful radiofrequency (RF) ablation. Doppler tissue imaging (DTI) technique was also used to avoid load-dependent variation in the flow velocity pattern. Results: Left atrial mechanical function, assessed by A wave velocity and the annular motion, was depressed at 1 day, but improved significantly at 1 month and maintained through 6–12 months after the ablation. Left atrial size did not change significantly. Conclusion: Left atrial mechanical function was depressed immediately after successful RF ablation of chronic AFL, but it improved significantly after 1 month and was maintained over one year. PMID:11590904

  11. Use of an Intravascular Heat Exchange Catheter and Intravenous Lipid Emulsion for Hypothermic Cardiac Arrest After Cyclobenzaprine Overdose.

    PubMed

    Westrol, Michael S; Awad, Nadia I; Bridgeman, Patrick J; Page, Erika; McCoy, Jonathan V; Jeges, Janos

    2015-09-01

    In this case report, a 22-year-old male developed severe hypothermia after an accidental overdose of cyclobenzaprine. During transport, the patient developed cardiac arrest. He received active rewarming measures, including pleural lavage, gastric lavage, an intravascular heat exchange catheter, and cardiopulmonary bypass. Intravenous lipid emulsion (ILE) was also administered. A discussion of cyclobenzaprine toxicity, hypothermia, ILE, and accidental hypothermic cardiac arrest follows.

  12. High Patient Satisfaction with Deep Sedation for Catheter Ablation of Cardiac Arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Münkler, Paula; Attanasio, Philipp; Parwani, Abdul Shokor; Huemer, Martin; Boldt, Leif-Hendrik; Haverkamp, Wilhelm; Wutzler, Alexander

    2017-02-27

    Patients' satisfaction with invasive procedures largely relies on periprocedural perception of pain and discomfort. The necessity for intraprocedural sedation during catheter ablation of cardiac arrhythmias for technical reasons is widely accepted, but data on patients' experience of pain and satisfaction with the procedural sedation are scarce. We have assessed patients' pain and discomfort during and after the procedure using a standardized questionnaire. One-hundred seventeen patients who underwent catheter ablation answered a standardized questionnaire on periprocedural perception of pain and discomfort after different anesthetic protocols with propofol/midazolam with and without additional piritramide and ketamine/midazolam. Patients report a high level of satisfaction with periprocedural sedation with 83% judging sedation as good or very good. The majority of patients was unconscious of the whole procedure and did not recollect experiencing pain. Procedural pain was reported by 7.7% of the patients and 16% reported adverse effects, e.g. postprocedural nausea and episodes of headache. The results of our study show, that deep sedation during catheter ablation of cardiac arrhythmias is generally well tolerated and patients are satisfied with the procedure. Yet, a number of patients reports pain or adverse events. Therefore, studies comparing different sedation strategies should be conducted in order to optimize sedation and analgesia. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Prevention and Treatment of Lower Limb Deep Vein Thrombosis after Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation: Results of a Prospective active controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lan; Zhang, Bao-jian; Zhang, Bao-ku; Ma, Jun; Liu, Xu-zheng; Jiang, Shu-bin

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a prospective, single-center, active controlled study from July 2013 to January 2015, in Chinese patients with rapid ventricular arrhythmia who had received radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) treatment to determine formation of lower extremity deep vein thrombosis (LDVT) post RFCA procedure, and evaluated the effect of rivaroxaban on LDVT. Patients with asymptomatic pulmonary thromboembolism who had not received any other anticoagulant and had received no more than 36 hours of treatment with unfractionated heparin were included. Post RFCA procedure, patients received either rivaroxaban (10 mg/d for 14 days beginning 2–3 hours post-operation; n = 86) or aspirin (100 mg/d for 3 months beginning 2–3 hours post-operation; n = 90). The primary outcome was a composite of LDVT occurrence, change in diameter of femoral veins, and safety outcomes that were analyzed based on major or minor bleeding events. In addition, blood flow velocity was determined. No complete occlusive thrombus or bleeding events were reported with either of the group. The lower incidence rate of non-occluded thrombus in rivaroxaban (5.8%) compared to the aspirin group (16.7%) indicates rivaroxaban may be administered post-RFCA to prevent and treat femoral venous thrombosis in a secure and effective way with a faster inset of action than standard aspirin therapy. PMID:27329582

  14. Unintended Thermal Injuries from Radiofrequency Ablation: Organ Protection with an Angioplasty Balloon Catheter in an Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Knuttinen, Martha-Grace; Van Ha, Thuong G.; Reilly, Christopher; Montag, Anthony; Straus, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate a novel approach of using a balloon catheter as a protective device to separate liver from the diaphragm or nearby bowel during radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of hepatic dome tumors in an animal model. Materials and Methods: All experimental procedures were approved by animal Institutional Review Board. Using a 3 cm RF needle electrode, 70 hepatic ablation zones were created using ultrasound in 7 pigs. 50 lesions were created using balloon interposition between liver and diaphragm; 20 lesions were created using the balloon device interposed posteriorly between liver and bowel. Additional 21 control lesions were performed. Animals were sacrificed immediately; diaphragm and bowel were then visually inspected and sectioned. Diaphragmatic and bowel injury was then classified according to the depth of thickness. Results: Control lesions caused full thickness injury, either to diaphragm or bowel. During ablation of lesions with balloon interposition, there was significantly less diaphragmatic injury, P < 0.001 and less bowel injury, P < 0.01. Conclusion: Using balloon interposition as a protective device has advantages over previous saline infusion or CO2 insufflation, providing a safe way to expand percutaneous RFA of liver tumors located on the undersurface of the diaphragm. In addition, this method may be used in protection of other organs adjacent to areas being ablated. PMID:24678433

  15. Real-time x-ray fluoroscopy-based catheter detection and tracking for cardiac electrophysiology interventions

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Yingliang; Housden, R. James; Razavi, Reza; Rhode, Kawal S.; Gogin, Nicolas; Cathier, Pascal; Gijsbers, Geert; Cooklin, Michael; O'Neill, Mark; Gill, Jaswinder; Rinaldi, C. Aldo

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: X-ray fluoroscopically guided cardiac electrophysiology (EP) procedures are commonly carried out to treat patients with arrhythmias. X-ray images have poor soft tissue contrast and, for this reason, overlay of a three-dimensional (3D) roadmap derived from preprocedural volumetric images can be used to add anatomical information. It is useful to know the position of the catheter electrodes relative to the cardiac anatomy, for example, to record ablation therapy locations during atrial fibrillation therapy. Also, the electrode positions of the coronary sinus (CS) catheter or lasso catheter can be used for road map motion correction.Methods: In this paper, the authors present a novel unified computational framework for image-based catheter detection and tracking without any user interaction. The proposed framework includes fast blob detection, shape-constrained searching and model-based detection. In addition, catheter tracking methods were designed based on the customized catheter models input from the detection method. Three real-time detection and tracking methods are derived from the computational framework to detect or track the three most common types of catheters in EP procedures: the ablation catheter, the CS catheter, and the lasso catheter. Since the proposed methods use the same blob detection method to extract key information from x-ray images, the ablation, CS, and lasso catheters can be detected and tracked simultaneously in real-time.Results: The catheter detection methods were tested on 105 different clinical fluoroscopy sequences taken from 31 clinical procedures. Two-dimensional (2D) detection errors of 0.50 {+-} 0.29, 0.92 {+-} 0.61, and 0.63 {+-} 0.45 mm as well as success rates of 99.4%, 97.2%, and 88.9% were achieved for the CS catheter, ablation catheter, and lasso catheter, respectively. With the tracking method, accuracies were increased to 0.45 {+-} 0.28, 0.64 {+-} 0.37, and 0.53 {+-} 0.38 mm and success rates increased to 100%, 99

  16. Factors affecting survival in pediatric cardiac tamponade caused by central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Kayashima, Kenji

    2015-12-01

    Pediatric central venous catheter (CVC) placement is useful but associated with complications such as cardiac tamponade. We aimed to identify risk factors for death in cardiac tamponade. Published articles on pediatric CVC-associated cardiac tamponade were obtained by searching PubMed and Google and retrospectively reviewed to analyze risk factors for death. Factors examined for their effect on mortality risk included patient age, weight, CVC size, days from CVC insertion to tamponade occurrence, substances administered, insertion site, treatment, CVC material, and initial CVC tip position. Of 110 patients reported in 62 articles, 69 survived and 41 died. Among survivors, 55 of 69 patients were treated; among deaths, only 7 of 38 (OR 537.9, 95% CI 29.3-9,877, p < 0.0001). Multiple regression analysis in 44 cases showed that treatment (p < 0.0001) and initial CVC tip position (p = 0.020) were independent predictive factors related to improved cardiac tamponade survival. Past studies have mainly discussed how to avoid pediatric cardiac tamponade; by contrast, the present study focused on how to avoid deaths. The findings of this review suggest that cardiac tamponade survival is better when tamponade is detected early and treated promptly and might be affected by initial CVC tip position.

  17. Low Cardiac Output Secondary to a Malpositioned Umbilical Venous Catheter: Value of Targeted Neonatal Echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Weisz, Dany E.; Poon, Wei Bing; James, Andrew; McNamara, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Systemic hypotension is common in very low birthweight preterm infants but the nature of the precipitating cause may be unclear. Targeted neonatal echocardiography (TnEcho) is being increasingly used to support hemodynamic decisions in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), including identifying impairments in the transitional circulation of preterm infants, providing timely re-evaluation after institution of therapies and evaluating the placement of indwelling catheters. We present a case of a preterm infant with systemic hypotension and low cardiac output secondary to a large transatrial shunt induced by a malpositioned umbilical venous catheter. Repositioning of the line led to resolution of the hemodynamic disturbance and clinical instability, highlighting the utility of TnEcho in the NICU. PMID:25032055

  18. Radiofrequency ablation of numerous premature ventricular contractions in a cardiac resynchronisation therapy patient: a long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Farkowski, Michał Mirosław; Chwyczko, Tomasz; Sterliński, Maciej; Syska, Paweł; Szwed, Hanna; Pytkowski, Mariusz

    2013-01-01

    We present a case study of a patient with dilated cardiomyopathy and a cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) device who was repeatedly hospitalised due to heart failure (HF) exacerbations. A successful radiofrequency ablation of numerous premature ventricular contractions enabled the proper action of CRT and stabilised the patient's condition in NYHA II without HF subsequent hospitalisations during a 30 month follow-up.

  19. Acute success and short-term follow-up of catheter ablation of isthmus-dependent atrial flutter; a comparison of 8 mm tip radiofrequency and cryothermy catheters

    PubMed Central

    Janse, P.; Alings, M.; Scholten, M. F.; Mekel, J. M.; Miltenburg, M.; Jessurun, E.; Jordaens, L.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To compare the acute success and short-term follow-up of ablation of atrial flutter using 8 mm tip radiofrequency (RF) and cryocatheters. Methods Sixty-two patients with atrial flutter were randomized to RF or cryocatheter (cryo) ablation. Right atrial angiography was performed to assess the isthmus. End point was bidirectional isthmus block on multiple criteria. A pain score was used and the analgesics were recorded. Patients were followed for at least 3 months. Results The acute success rate for RF was 83% vs 69% for cryo (NS). Procedure times were similar (mean 144 ± 48 min for RF, vs 158 ± 49 min for cryo). More applications were given with RF than with cryo (26 ± 17 vs. 18 ± 10, p < 0.05). Fluoroscopy time was longer with RF (29 ± 15 vs. 19 ± 12 min, p < 0.02). Peak CK, CK-MB and CK-MB mass were higher, also after 24 h in the cryo group. Troponin T did not differ. Repeated transient block during application (usually with cryoablation) seemed to predict failure. Cryothermy required significantly less analgesia (p < 0.01), and no use of long sheaths (p < 0.005). The isthmus tended to be longer in the failed procedures (p = 0.117). This was similar for both groups, as was the distribution of anatomic variations. Recurrences and complaints in the successful patients were similar for both groups, with a very low recurrence of atrial flutter after initial success. Conclusions In this randomized study there was no statistical difference but a trend to less favorable outcome with 8 mm tip cryocatheters compared to RF catheters for atrial flutter ablation. Cryoablation was associated with less discomfort, fewer applications, shorter fluoroscopy times and similar procedure times. The recurrence rate was very low. Cryotherapy can be considered for atrial flutter ablation under certain circumstances especially when it has been used previously in the same patient, such as in an AF ablation. PMID:18363087

  20. A finite-element model of a microwave catheter for cardiac ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Kaouk, Z.; Khebir, A.; Savard, P.

    1996-10-01

    To investigate the delivery of microwave energy by a catheter located inside the heart for the purpose of ablating small abnormal regions producing cardiac arrhythmias, a numerical model was developed. This model is based on the finite element method and can solve both the electromagnetic field and the temperature distribution resulting from the radiated power for axisymmetrical geometries. The antenna, which is fed by a coaxial cable with a 2.4 mm diameter, is constituted by a monopole which is terminated by a metallic cylindrical cap. The heart model can be either homogeneous or constituted of coaxial cylindrical shells with different electrical and thermal conductivities representing the intracavitary blood masses, the heart, and the torso. Experimental measurements obtained in an homogeneous tissue equivalent medium, such as the reflection coefficient of the antenna at different frequencies and for different monopole lengths, the radial and axial steady-state temperature profiles, and the time course of the temperature rise, were all in close agreement with the values computed with the model. Accurate modeling is a useful prerequisite for the design of antennas, and these results confirm the validity of the catheter-heart model for the investigation and the development of microwave catheters.

  1. Materials for Multifunctional Balloon Catheters With Capabilities in Cardiac Electrophysiological Mapping and Ablation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae-Hyeong; Lu, Nanshu; Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Kim, Yun-Soung; Lee, Stephen P.; Xu, Lizhi; Wu, Jian; Kim, Rak-Hwan; Song, Jizhou; Liu, Zhuangjian; Viventi, Jonathan; de Graff, Bassel; Elolampi, Brian; Mansour, Moussa; Slepian, Marvin J.; Hwang, Sukwon; Moss, Joshua D.; Won, Sang-Min; Huang, Younggang; Litt, Brian; Rogers, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Development of advanced surgical tools for minimally invasive procedures represents an activity of central importance to improvements in human health. A key materials challenge is in the realization of bio-compatible interfaces between the classes of semiconductor and sensor technologies that might be most useful in this context and the soft, curvilinear surfaces of the body. This paper describes a solution based on biocompatible materials and devices that integrate directly with the thin elastic membranes of otherwise conventional balloon catheters, to provide multimodal functionality suitable for clinical use. We present sensors for measuring temperature, flow, tactile, optical and electrophysiological data, together with radio frequency (RF) electrodes for controlled, local ablation of tissue. These components connect together in arrayed layouts designed to decouple their operation from large strain deformations associated with deployment and repeated inflation/deflation. Use of such ‘instrumented’ balloon catheter devices in live animal models and in vitro tests illustrates their operation in cardiac ablation therapy. These concepts have the potential for application in surgical systems of the future, not only those based on catheters but also on other platforms, such as surgical gloves. PMID:21378969

  2. Prediction of very late arrhythmia recurrence after radiofrequency catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation: The MB-LATER clinical score.

    PubMed

    Mujović, Nebojša; Marinković, Milan; Marković, Nebojša; Shantsila, Alena; Lip, Gregory Y H; Potpara, Tatjana S

    2017-01-20

    Reliable prediction of very late recurrence of atrial fibrillation (VLRAF) occuring >12 months after catheter ablation (CA) in apparently "cured" patients could optimize long-term follow-up and modify decision-making regarding the discontinuation of oral anticoagulant therapy. In a single-centre cohort of consecutive patients post radiofrequency AFCA, we retrospectively derived a novel score for VLRAF prediction. Of 133 consecutive post AFCA patients (mean age 56.9 ± 11.8 years, 63.9% male, 69.2% with paroxysmal AF) who were arrhythmia-free at 12 months (excluding 3-month "blanking period"), 20 patients expirienced a VLRAF during a 29.1 ± 10.1-month follow-up, with a 3-year cumulative VLRAF rate of 31.1%. The MB-LATER score (Male, Bundle brunch block, Left atrium ≥47 mm, Type of AF [paroxysmal, persistent or long-standing persistent], and ER-AF = early recurrent AF), had better predictive ability for VLRAF (AUC 0.782) than the APPLE, ALARMc, BASE-AF2, CHADS2, CHA2DS2VASc or HATCH score (AUC 0.716, 0.671, 0.648, 0.552, 0.519 and 0.583, respectively), resulted in an improved net reclassification index (NRI) of 48.6-95.1% and better identified patients with subsequent VLRAF using decision-curve analysis (DCA). The MB-LATER score provides a readily available VLRAF risk assessment, and performs better than other scores. Validation of the MB-LATER score in other cohorts is underway.

  3. Prediction of very late arrhythmia recurrence after radiofrequency catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation: The MB-LATER clinical score

    PubMed Central

    Mujović, Nebojša; Marinković, Milan; Marković, Nebojša; Shantsila, Alena; Lip, Gregory Y. H.; Potpara, Tatjana S.

    2017-01-01

    Reliable prediction of very late recurrence of atrial fibrillation (VLRAF) occuring >12 months after catheter ablation (CA) in apparently “cured” patients could optimize long-term follow-up and modify decision-making regarding the discontinuation of oral anticoagulant therapy. In a single-centre cohort of consecutive patients post radiofrequency AFCA, we retrospectively derived a novel score for VLRAF prediction. Of 133 consecutive post AFCA patients (mean age 56.9 ± 11.8 years, 63.9% male, 69.2% with paroxysmal AF) who were arrhythmia-free at 12 months (excluding 3-month “blanking period”), 20 patients expirienced a VLRAF during a 29.1 ± 10.1-month follow-up, with a 3-year cumulative VLRAF rate of 31.1%. The MB-LATER score (Male, Bundle brunch block, Left atrium ≥47 mm, Type of AF [paroxysmal, persistent or long-standing persistent], and ER-AF = early recurrent AF), had better predictive ability for VLRAF (AUC 0.782) than the APPLE, ALARMc, BASE-AF2, CHADS2, CHA2DS2VASc or HATCH score (AUC 0.716, 0.671, 0.648, 0.552, 0.519 and 0.583, respectively), resulted in an improved net reclassification index (NRI) of 48.6–95.1% and better identified patients with subsequent VLRAF using decision-curve analysis (DCA). The MB-LATER score provides a readily available VLRAF risk assessment, and performs better than other scores. Validation of the MB-LATER score in other cohorts is underway. PMID:28106147

  4. Safety and Efficacy of Switching Anticoagulation to Aspirin Three Months after Successful Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Uhm, Jae-Sun; Won, Hoyoun; Joung, Boyoung; Nam, Gi-Byoung; Choi, Kee-Joon; Lee, Moon-Hyoung; Kim, You-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Although current guidelines recommend continuing the same antithrombotic strategy regardless of rhythm control after radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) of atrial fibrillation (AF), anticoagulation has a risk of major bleeding. We evaluated the safety of switching warfarin to aspirin in patients with successful AF ablation. Materials and Methods Among 721 patients who underwent RFCA of AF, 608 patients (age, 57.3±10.9 years; 77.0% male, 75.5% paroxysmal AF) who had no evidence of AF recurrence at 3 months post-RFCA were included. We compared the thromboembolic and hemorrhagic events in patients for whom warfarin was switched to aspirin (ASA group; n=296) and patients who were kept on warfarin therapy (W group; n=312). Results There were no significant differences in CHA2DS2-VASc or HAS-BLED scores between the groups. In 30 patients in the ASA group and 37 patients in W group, AF recurred and warfarin was restarted or maintained during the 18.0±12.2 months of follow-up. There were no significant differences in thromboembolic (0.3% vs. 1.0%, p=0.342) and major bleeding incidences (0.7% vs. 0.6%, p=0.958) between ASA and W groups during the follow-up period. In the 259 patients with a CHA2DS2-VASc score ≥2, there were no significant differences in thromboembolism (0.8% and 2.2%, p=0.380) or major bleeding incidences (0.8% and 1.4%, p=0.640) between ASA and W groups. Conclusion Switching warfarin to aspirin 3 months after successful RFCA of AF could be as safe and efficacious as long-term anticoagulation even in patients with CHA2DS2-VASc score ≥2. However, strict rhythm monitoring cannot be overemphasized. PMID:25048480

  5. The Role of Intravenous Dopamine on Hemodynamic Support during Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation of Poorly Tolerated Idiopathic Ventricular Tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jinhee; Kim, Dong-Hyeok; Roh, Seung-Young; Lee, Kwang No; Lee, Dae-In; Shim, Jaemin; Choi, Jong-Il

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives Hemodynamically unstable idiopathic ventricular tachycardias (VTs) are a challenge for activation or entrainment mapping technique. Mechanical circulatory support is an option, but is not always readily available. In this study, we investigated the safety and efficacy of hemodynamic support using intravenous (IV) dopamine solely during radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) of hemodynamically unstable VT. Subjects and Methods Seven out of 86 patients with hemodynamically unstable idiopathic VT underwent de novo RFCA using dopamine in our single center. They were included in the study and reviewed retrospectively to investigate the procedural characteristics and outcomes. Results All patients were male, and the mean age was 50.7±5.3 years. One patient had implantable cardioverter-defibrillator for the secondary prevention. No evidence of myocardial ischemia was found in all patients. During the procedure, the mean blood pressure during VT without dopamine was 52.3±4.1 mmHg and increased to 82.6±3.8 mmHg after administering dopamine (Δ28.8±3.2 mmHg; total average dopamine dosage was 1266.1±389.6 mcg/kg). In all patients, activation mapping was safely applied, and VTs were terminated during energy delivery. Non-inducibility of clinical VT was achieved in all cases. There was no evidence of deterioration due to hypoperfusion during the peri-procedural period. No recurrence of ventricular tachyarrhythmias was observed in any of the patients, during a median follow-up of 23.0±6.1 months. Conclusion Hemodynamic support using IV dopamine during RFCA of hemodynamically unstable idiopathic VT facilitated detailed mapping to guide successful ablation. PMID:28154593

  6. Three catheter-based strategies for cardiac delivery of therapeutic gelatin microspheres.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, K; Kimura, T; De Grand, A M; Yoneyama, R; Kawase, Y; Houser, S; Ly, H Q; Kushibiki, T; Furukawa, Y; Ono, K; Tabata, Y; Frangioni, J V; Kita, T; Hajjar, R J; Hayase, M

    2006-09-01

    Gelatin hydrogel microspheres (GHMs) have been reported as novel non-viral vectors for gene or protein delivery (GHM therapy). However, the components of an effective catheter-based delivery strategy for GHM therapy are unknown. We evaluated the effectiveness of three catheter-based strategies for cardiac GHM therapy: (1) antegrade injection (AI) via coronary arteries; (2) retrograde injection (RI) via coronary veins; and (3) direct myocardial injection (DI) via the coronary sinus. AI distributed microspheres homogeneously throughout the target area with 73+/-11% retention. RI scattered microspheres non-homogenously with 22+/-8% retention. DI distributed microspheres in the needle-advanced area with 47+/-14% retention. However, despite high efficiency, AI did not show biological effects of inducing angiogenesis from basic fibroblast growth factor bound to GHMs. Furthermore, focal micro-infarctions, owing to micro-embolism of aggregated GHMs into small coronary arterioles, were detected in the AI group. Conversely, only RI and DI groups displayed increased coronary flow reserve. DI groups also demonstrated increased capillary density. These results suggest that RI and DI are effective for cardiac GHM therapy, while AI appears inappropriate owing to the risk of focal infarctions.

  7. Real-time optical monitoring of permanent lesion progression in radiofrequency ablated cardiac tissue (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh-Moon, Rajinder P.; Hendon, Christine P.

    2016-02-01

    Despite considerable advances in guidance of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) therapies for atrial fibrillation, success rates have been hampered by an inability to intraoperatively characterize the extent of permanent injury. Insufficient lesions can elusively create transient conduction blockages that eventually reconduct. Prior studies suggest significantly greater met-myoglobin (Mmb) concentrations in the lesion core than those in the healthy myocardium and may serve as a marker for irreversible tissue damage. In this work, we present real-time monitoring of permanent injury through spectroscopic assessment of Mmb concentrations at the catheter tip. Atrial wedges (n=6) were excised from four fresh swine hearts and submerged under pulsatile flow of warm (37oC) phosphate buffered saline. A commercial RFA catheter inserted into a fiber optic sheath allowed for simultaneous measurement of tissue diffuse reflectance (DR) spectra (500-650nm) during application of RF energy. Optical measurements were continuously acquired before, during, and post-ablation, in addition to healthy neighboring tissue. Met-myoglobin, oxy-myoglobin, and deoxy-myoglobin concentrations were extracted from each spectrum using an inverse Monte Carlo method. Tissue injury was validated with Masson's trichrome and hematoxylin and eosin staining. Time courses revealed a rapid increase in tissue Mmb concentrations at the onset of RFA treatment and a gradual plateauing thereafter. Extracted Mmb concentrations were significantly greater post-ablation (p<0.0001) as compared to healthy tissue and correlated well with histological assessment of severe thermal tissue destruction. On going studies are aimed at integrating these findings with prior work on near infrared spectroscopic lesion depth assessment. These results support the use of spectroscopy-facilitated guidance of RFA therapies for real-time permanent injury estimation.

  8. Catheter-Based Educational Experiences: A Canadian Survey of Current Residents and Recent Graduates in Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Juanda, Nadzir; Chan, Vincent; Chan, Ryan; Rubens, Fraser D

    2016-03-01

    The past decade has witnessed significant developments in the use of catheter-based therapies in cardiovascular medicine. We sought to assess the educational opportunities for cardiac surgery trainees to determine their readiness for participation in these strategies. A web-based survey was distributed to current residents, recent graduates, and program directors in Canadian cardiac surgery residency programs from 2008-2013. The survey was distributed to 110 residents and graduates. Forty-five percent completed the survey. Thirty-five percent expressed that they experienced resistance organizing their rotations because they had to compete with non-cardiac surgery colleagues, and 6 were denied local cardiac catheterization rotations. By the end of the rotation, 56% were comfortable performing a diagnostic cardiac catheterization independently. Exposure to being the operator performing diagnostic catheterization was significantly associated with the positive perception of being able to perform a diagnostic catheterization independently (odds ratio [OR], 5.14; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.33-19.81; P = 0.017). Eighty-eight percent of respondents expressed the need for more exposure in catheter-based rotations. Seven of 11 program directors completed the survey. All believed such rotations should be mandatory and foresaw a bigger role for hybrid catheter-based/cardiac surgery procedures in the future. Trainees and program directors perceive that increased exposure to catheter-based therapies is important to career development as a cardiac surgeon. This survey will contribute to the development of a cardiac surgery training curriculum as we foresee more hybrid and team procedures.

  9. A method for the in vitro testing of cardiac ablation catheters

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, S.S.; Hoh, L.; Rosenbaum, R.M.; Rosen, A.; Walinsky, P.; Greenspon, A.J.

    1996-10-01

    The authors have developed a flow-phantom model in order to measure the temperature profile of radio frequency (RF) and microwave (MW) catheters. The model consists of a muscle equivalent phantom in a perfusion chamber with constant saline infusion of 4 L/min immersed in a 37 C saline bath. RF (4 or 8 mm, 550 kHz) or MW (12 mm helical antenna, 915 MHz) catheters were placed on the surface of the phantom and various energies were applied. Temperature measurements were obtained with fiberoptic thermometry probes placed at various distances from the catheter. Temperature contours were generated, and lesion volumes were estimated using 47 C isotherm ({Delta}T {ge} 10 C). The dosimetry of power versus {Delta}T was linear. A 2.59 fold increase in power density was required to achieve a similar surface temperature with the 8 mm versus 4 mm electrode tip. The volumes of lesions created with an 8 mm electrode were 2.5x larger than those made with a 4 mm electrode at a similar surface temperature. The RF phantom data compared favorably with the lesion volumes seen in the in vivo canine left ventricular model. The temperature profile of the microwave electrode showed heating along the length of the catheter due to imperfect tuning of the antenna. Deeper heating was seen with 8 mm RF and MW electrodes than with an RF 4 mm electrode given the same surface temperature. Measurements obtained with both a static and flow-phantom model demonstrated the cooling effects of flow on surface temperature measured during power delivery. The flow-phantom model accurately predicts the lesion geometry but underestimates the lesion volume at higher temperature when compared to the in vivo left ventricular canine model. Static phantom models will overestimate lesion size due to the surface cooling effects of cardiac blood flow. Changes in microwave catheter design may be carefully analyzed with the flow-phantom model prior to in vivo testing.

  10. Fast catheter segmentation from echocardiographic sequences based on segmentation from corresponding X-ray fluoroscopy for cardiac catheterization interventions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xianliang; Housden, James; Ma, YingLiang; Razavi, Benjamin; Rhode, Kawal; Rueckert, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Echocardiography is a potential alternative to X-ray fluoroscopy in cardiac catheterization given its richness in soft tissue information and its lack of ionizing radiation. However, its small field of view and acoustic artifacts make direct automatic segmentation of the catheters very challenging. In this study, a fast catheter segmentation framework for echocardiographic imaging guided by the segmentation of corresponding X-ray fluoroscopic imaging is proposed. The complete framework consists of: 1) catheter initialization in the first X-ray frame; 2) catheter tracking in the rest of the X-ray sequence; 3) fast registration of corresponding X-ray and ultrasound frames; and 4) catheter segmentation in ultrasound images guided by the results of both X-ray tracking and fast registration. The main contributions include: 1) a Kalman filter-based growing strategy with more clinical data evalution; 2) a SURF detector applied in a constrained search space for catheter segmentation in ultrasound images; 3) a two layer hierarchical graph model to integrate and smooth catheter fragments into a complete catheter; and 4) the integration of these components into a system for clinical applications. This framework is evaluated on five sequences of porcine data and four sequences of patient data comprising more than 3000 X-ray frames and more than 1000 ultrasound frames. The results show that our algorithm is able to track the catheter in ultrasound images at 1.3 s per frame, with an error of less than 2 mm. However, although this may satisfy the accuracy for visualization purposes and is also fast, the algorithm still needs to be further accelerated for real-time clinical applications.

  11. Catheter Ablation

    MedlinePlus

    ... you during the procedure. Machines will measure your heart’s activity. All types of ablation require cardiac catheterization to place flexible tubes, or catheters, inside your heart to make the scars. Your doctor will clean ...

  12. Cardiac lymphoscintigraphy following closed-chest catheter injection of radiolabeled colloid into the myocardium of dogs: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Osbakken, M.D.; Kopiwoda, S.Y.; Swan, A.; Castronovo, F.P.; Strauss, H.W.

    1982-10-01

    A catheter technique for injection of radiolabeled colloids into the myocardium was developed and tested in a series of 15 dogs. A multipurpose angiographic catheter was modified to permit an inner core of PE-50 polyethylene tubing, tipped with a 23-gage needle, to pass through the lumen for intra-myocardial injection of radiocolloids. For injection of the left ventricle, the catheter is introduced through the femoral artery: for the right ventricle, the femoral vein. The catheter advanced under fluoroscopy until the desired surface for injection is reached. The inner core is then extended to lodge the needle in the endocardium. A mixture of Renografin (to confirm the endocardial injection site) and radiolabeled colloid was injected in 13 animals. Ten minutes after injection, scintigraphy was begun and continued for up to 6 hr. In three dogs the procedure was repeated 3 or 4 times. From two to five nodes were visible in all animals, irrespective of whether the right or left ventricular myocardium was injected. In two animals the injection was given intravenously, and no nodes were seen. These data suggest that cardiac lymphatic drainage can be studied with a catheter injection method.

  13. Induction of ventricular tachycardia during radiofrequency ablation via pulmonary vein ablation catheter in a patient with an implanted pacemaker.

    PubMed

    Hammwöhner, Matthias; Stachowitz, Jörg; Willich, Tobias; Goette, Andreas

    2012-02-01

    Pulmonary vein isolation in a dual-chamber pacemaker patient using the pulmonary vein ablation catheter (PVAC) system resulted in perpetual induction of ventricular tachycardia (VT) during radio frequency energy application. Induction of VT was abolished by programming the PVAC-system to a pure bipolar ablation mode. Patients with implanted devices should be closely monitored when using the PVAC system in unipolar modes.

  14. [Catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation: Health Technology Assessment Report from the Italian Association of Arrhythmology and Cardiac Pacing (AIAC)].

    PubMed

    Themistoclakis, Sakis; Tritto, Massimo; Bertaglia, Emanuele; Berto, Patrizia; Bongiorni, Maria Grazia; Catanzariti, Domenico; De Fabrizio, Giuseppe; De Ponti, Roberto; Grimaldi, Massimo; Pandozi, Claudio; Tondo, Claudio; Gulizia, Michele

    2011-11-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia and significantly impact patients' quality of life, morbidity and mortality. The number of affected patients is expected to increase as well as the costs associated with AF management, mainly driven by hospitalizations. Over the last decade, catheter ablation techniques targeting pulmonary vein isolation have demonstrated to be effective in treating AF and preventing AF recurrence. This Health Technology Assessment report of the Italian Association of Arrhythmology and Cardiac Pacing (AIAC) aims to define the current role of catheter ablation of AF in terms of effectiveness, efficiency and appropriateness. On the basis of an extensive review of the available literature, this report provides (i) an overview of the epidemiology, clinical impact and socio-economic burden of AF; (ii) an evaluation of therapeutic options other than catheter ablation of AF; and (iii) a detailed presentation of clinical outcomes and cost-benefit ratio associated with catheter ablation. The costs of catheter ablation of AF in Italy were obtained using a bottom-up analysis of a resource utilization survey of 52 hospitals that were considered a representative sample, including 4 Centers that contributed with additional unit cost information in a separate questionnaire. An analysis of budget impact was also performed to evaluate the impact of ablation on the management costs of AF. Results of this analysis show that (1) catheter ablation is effective, safe and superior to antiarrhythmic drug therapy in maintaining sinus rhythm; (2) the cost of an ablation procedure in Italy typically ranges from €8868 to €9455, though current reimbursement remains insufficient, covering only about 60% of the costs; (3) the costs of follow-up are modest (about 8% of total costs); (4) assuming an adjustment of reimbursement to the real cost of an ablation procedure and a 5-10% increase in the annual rate of ablation procedures, after

  15. Minimal Use of Fluoroscopy to Reduce Fetal Radiation Exposure during Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation of Maternal Supraventricular Tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Ajay Sundara; Hariharan, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Electrophysiologic procedures in the young engender concern about the potential long-term effects of radiation exposure. This concern is manifold if such procedures are contemplated during pregnancy. Catheter ablations in pregnancy are indicated only in the presence of an unstable tachycardia that cannot be controlled by antiarrhythmic agents. This report describes the case of an 18-year-old pregnant woman and our stratagem to minimize irradiation of the mother and the fetus. PMID:25873828

  16. Measurement of cardiac output in ventricular rupture following acute myocardial infarction--pulmonary artery catheter vs transpulmonary thermodilution--a case report.

    PubMed

    Schwarzkopf, Konrad; Simon, Stefan; Preussler, Niels-Peter; Hüter, Lars

    2009-02-01

    We compared the cardiac output measured by the transpulmonary aortic single indicator thermodilution method with that by the pulmonary artery catheterization in a patient with ventricular septal rupture after acute myocardial infarction. Though the former cardiac output was lower than the latter, in the presence of the ventricular septal rupture, the cardiac outputs were equal after the rupture was closed. This indicates that, while the cardiac output measured by the pulmonary artery catheter is influenced by the ventricular left-to-right shunt, transpulmonary aortic thermodilution method measures the true cardiac output of the left heart, which is responsible for organ perfusion.

  17. Comparison of Conventional versus Steerable-Catheter Guided Coronary Sinus Lead Positioning in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Resynchronization Device Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Er, Fikret; Yüksel, Dilek; Hellmich, Martin; Gassanov, Natig

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to compare conventional versus steerable catheter guided coronary sinus (CS) cannulation in patients with advanced heart failure undergoing cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). Background Steerable catheter guided coronary sinus cannulation could reduce fluoroscopy time and contrast medium use during CRT implantation. Methods 176 consecutive patients with ischemic and non-ischemic heart failure undergoing CRT implantation from January 2008 to December 2012 at the University Hospital of Cologne were identified. During the study period two concurrent CS cannulation techniques were used: standard CS cannulation technique (standard-group, n = 113) and CS cannulation using a steerable electrophysiology (EP) catheter (EPCath-group, n = 63). Propensity-score matched pairs of conventional and EP-catheter guided CS cannulation made up the study population (n = 59 pairs). Primary endpoints were total fluoroscopy time and contrast medium amount used during procedure. Results The total fluoroscopy time was 30.9 min (interquartile range (IQR), 19.9–44.0 min) in the standard-group and 23.4 min (IQR, 14.2-34-2 min) in the EPCath-group (p = 0.011). More contrast medium was used in the standard-group (60.0 ml, IQR, 30.0–100 ml) compared to 25.0 ml (IQR, 20.0–50.0 ml) in the EPCath-group (P<0.001). Conclusions Use of steerable EP catheter was associated with significant reduction of fluoroscopy time and contrast medium use in patients undergoing CRT implantation. PMID:26599637

  18. Use of a simply modified drainage catheter for peritoneal dialysis treatment of acute renal failure associated with cardiac surgery in infants.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; Cao, Hua; Hu, Yun-Nan; Chen, Liang-Wan; He, Jia-Jun

    2014-09-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is a common complication in infants who undergo cardiac surgery in the intensive care unit. We report on a modified drainage catheter used in peritoneal dialysis (PD) for the treatment of ARF associated with cardiac surgery in infants. Thirty-nine infants with congenital heart disease undergoing cardiac surgery who developed ARF at our center between January 2009 and January 2012 were assessed. A modified drainage catheter for PD was used in these infants. Their demographic, clinical, and surgical data were analyzed. Thirty infants with ARF were cured by PD, and the other 9 died in the first 48 hours because of the severity of the acute cardiac dysfunction. All these infants were dependent upon mechanical ventilation during the postoperative period and used vasoactive drugs. In the survival group, the interval between the procedure and initiation of PD was 13.6 ± 6.5 (range, 6-30) hours. PD duration was 3.9 ± 0.9 (3-6) days. Minor complications were encountered in some patients (asymptomatic hypokalemia, hyperglycemia, and thrombocytopenia). These complications were readily treated by drugs or resolved spontaneously. Hemodynamics, cardiac function, and renal function improved significantly during PD. These data suggest that PD using a modified drainage catheter for ARF after cardiac surgery in infants is safe, feasible, inexpensive, and yields good results.

  19. Cardiac Assist Devices and Hemodialysis Catheter Procedures - What Do the Nephrologists Need to Know?

    PubMed

    Florescu, Marius C; Sacks, Andrew R; Um, John Y

    2015-01-01

    The use of ventricular assist devices (VAD) and total artificial heart (TAH) is increasing rapidly, and a large proportion of these device recipients already have or will develop severe renal dysfunction at the time of device implantation. As a consequence, nephrologists are becoming more and more involved in the care of this challenging population. As nephrologists take upon themselves many aspects of dialysis vascular access care, they need to be familiar with the special circumstances of performing hemodialysis catheter procedures in these patients. This review describes the important characteristics of these devices that have serious implications for the technique of placing or replacing dialysis catheters. These implications apply for both tunneled and nontunneled dialysis catheters and so concern all nephrologists, not only the interventionalists. We describe the important anatomical factors, anticoagulation management, device management, vascular access management and technical considerations of placing or replacing tunneled and nontunneled hemodialysis catheters from the perspective of a nephrologist establishing and maintaining lifesaving dialysis vascular access. Without a good understanding of these devices, serious consequences such as VAD rotor damage or blockage, or artificial heart valve blockage or damage can occur. These artificial devices are lifesaving, and any such complication is unacceptable. This review describes steps to minimize the risks.

  20. Anatomical Basis for the Cardiac Interventional Electrophysiologist

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Quintana, Damián; Doblado-Calatrava, Manuel; Cabrera, José Angel; Macías, Yolanda; Saremi, Farhood

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of radiofrequency catheter ablation techniques as the mainstay in the treatment of tachycardia has renewed new interest in cardiac anatomy. The interventional arrhythmologist has drawn attention not only to the gross anatomic details of the heart but also to architectural and histological characteristics of various cardiac regions that are relevant to the development or recurrence of tachyarrhythmias and procedural related complications of catheter ablation. In this review, therefore, we discuss some anatomic landmarks commonly used in catheter ablations including the terminal crest, sinus node region, Koch's triangle, cavotricuspid isthmus, Eustachian ridge and valve, pulmonary venous orifices, venoatrial junctions, and ventricular outflow tracts. We also discuss the anatomical features of important structures in the vicinity of the atria and pulmonary veins, such as the esophagus and phrenic nerves. This paper provides basic anatomic information to improve understanding of the mapping and ablative procedures for cardiac interventional electrophysiologists. PMID:26665006

  1. Iatrogenic acute cardiac tamponade during percutaneous removal of a fractured peripherally inserted central catheter in a premature neonate.

    PubMed

    Minghui, Zou; Hujun, Cui; Li, Ma; Weidan, Chen; Yanqin, Cui; Xinxin, Chen

    2015-01-01

    Acute cardiac tamponade (ACT) is a life-threatening complication associated with a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) in premature neonates. We present a case of ACT in a 4-day-old male infant. On the second admission day, a PICC was inserted. After 2.5 months, chest radiography showed PICC fracture, and its distal portion had migrated into the right pulmonary artery. Percutaneous removal through cardiac catheterization was attempted. However, right ventriculography demonstrated intrapericardial spillage of contrast agents, and iatrogenic ACT was confirmed. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was immediately started with open-chest cardiac massage. Further surgical exploration revealed right atrial appendage perforation. After 25-min CPR, the patient restored spontaneous circulation, and removal of the foreign bodies was performed. The post-operative course was uneventful. PICC fracture is an uncommon complication, but may be life-threatening. Precaution should be taken to avoid ACT during removal of a broken PICC. Once the tamponade is diagnosed, immediate interventions are mandatory.

  2. Iatrogenic catheter-related cardiac tamponade: a case report of fatal hydropericardium following subcutaneous implantation of a chemotherapeutic injection port.

    PubMed

    Shields, Lisa B E; Hunsaker, Donna M; Hunsaker, John C

    2003-03-01

    The need to obtain dependable access to the vascular system constitutes a significant component in the treatment and management of critically ill patients. Intravenous chemotherapy administered to cancer patients over an extended period of time often results in loss of peripheral vascular access due to vein sclerosis, "exhaustion" or tissue necrosis. Medical investigators have designed and steadily upgraded a variety of devices constructed to improve venous access for long-term utilization. As with the introduction of any foreign object into the body, each of these devices has complications which may be life threatening and occasionally fatal. We present an unusual case of iatrogenic acute hydropericardium and cardiac tamponade caused by the percutaneous infusion of chemotherapeutic fluid via a right subclavian central venous implant system (Port-a-Cath). Failure to implant and monitor the device with a radiograph following placement according to manufacturer's guidelines and accepted standards of medical practice were causally related to an unusual complication, namely, perforation of the right cardiac ventricle by the catheter tip, resulting in sudden and unexpected cardiac death.

  3. Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation Improves the Quality of Life Measured with a Short Form-36 Questionnaire in Atrial Fibrillation Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jong-Il; Kim, Young-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Background The main purpose of performing radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients is to improve the quality of life (QoL) and alleviate AF-related symptoms. We aimed to determine the qualitative and quantitative effects of RFCA on the QoL in AF patients. Methods We performed a systemic review and meta-analysis using a random effects model. We searched for the studies that reported the physical component summary score (PCS) and mental component summary score (MCS) of the short form-36, a validated system to assess and quantify the QoL, before and after RFCA in AF patients. PCS and MCS are T-scores with a mean of 50 and standard deviation of 10. Results Of the 470 studies identified through systematic search, we included 13 studies for pre-RFCA vs. the post-RFCA analysis and 5 studies for treatment success vs. AF recurrence analyses. In the pre-RFCA vs. post-RFCA analysis, RFCA was associated with a significant increase in both the PCS (weighted mean difference [WMD] = 6.33 [4.81–7.84]; p < 0.001) and MCS (WMD = 7.80 [6.15–9.44]; p < 0.001). The ΔPCS (post-RFCA PCS–pre-RFCA PCS) and ΔMCS values were used for the treatment success vs. AF recurrence analysis. Patients with successful ablation had a higher ΔPCS (WMD = 7.46 [4.44–10.49]; p < 0.001) and ΔMCS (WMD = 7.59 [4.94–10.24]; p < 0.001). Conclusions RFCA is associated with a significant increase in the PCS and MCS in AF patients. Patients without AF recurrence after RFCA had a better improvement in the PCS and MCS than patients who had AF recurrence. PMID:27681507

  4. Pulmonary Artery Catheter (PAC) Accuracy and Efficacy Compared with Flow Probe and Transcutaneous Doppler (USCOM): An Ovine Cardiac Output Validation.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Robert A; Hood, Sally G; Jacobson, Beverley M; West, Malcolm J; Wan, Li; May, Clive N

    2012-01-01

    Background. The pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) is an accepted clinical method of measuring cardiac output (CO) despite no prior validation. The ultrasonic cardiac output monitor (USCOM) is a noninvasive alternative to PAC using Doppler ultrasound (CW). We compared PAC and USCOM CO measurements against a gold standard, the aortic flow probe (FP), in sheep at varying outputs. Methods. Ten conscious sheep, with implanted FPs, had measurements of CO by FP, USCOM, and PAC, at rest and during intervention with inotropes and vasopressors. Results. CO measurements by FP, PAC, and USCOM were 4.0 ± 1.2 L/min, 4.8 ± 1.5 L/min, and 4.0 ± 1.4 L/min, respectively, (n = 280, range 1.9 L/min to 11.7 L/min). Percentage bias and precision between FP and PAC, and FP and USCOM was -17 and 47%, and 1 and 36%, respectively. PAC under-measured Dobutamine-induced CO changes by 20% (relative 66%) compared with FP, while USCOM measures varied from FP by 3% (relative 10%). PAC reliably detected -30% but not +40% CO changes, as measured by receiver operating characteristic area under the curve (AUC), while USCOM reliably detected ±5% changes in CO (AUC > 0.70). Conclusions. PAC demonstrated poor accuracy and sensitivity as a measure of CO. USCOM provided equivalent measurements to FP across a sixfold range of outputs, reliably detecting ±5% changes.

  5. Management of cardiac migration of a distal shunt catheter: the radiological pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Aboukais, R; Zairi, F; Marinho, P; Lejeune, J-P

    2015-02-01

    Cardiac migration is a rare complication of the ventriculoperitoneal shunt. We report a case of a late migration of the distal shunt into the pulmonary arteries. The authors underline the radiological features that suggested the presence of a knot. Preoperative planning and the assistance of a vascular surgeon were required due to the presence of a knot.

  6. The association of willingness-to-pay and patient attributes: a cost-volume-profit analysis of cardiac catheter unit services in Ramallah Hospital, Palestine.

    PubMed

    Jabr, Samer F K; Younis, Mustafa Mike Z; Forgione, Dana A

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the association of willingness-to-pay and patient attributes in relation to the multi-service cost-volume-profit structure of a cardiac catheter unit in Ramallah Hospital. This article contributes to the literature by providing primary evidence on patient willingness-to-pay, by identifying the specific break-even parameters of three hospital cardiac catheter unit service types (diagnosis, balloon, and pacemaker), and by demonstrating the cross-subsidization of patient income groups that is inherent in the existing hospital rate structure. Our results provide information useful for (1) evidence-based policy making with respect to hospital rate setting and cross-subsidies of patient income groups; (2) the advancement of hospital management, by demonstrating the estimated variable and fixed cost parameters and the impact of patient revenue mix on the profitability of cardiac catheter unit services; and (3) the advancement of theory, by documenting the relationship of patient demand and the cost of supply in a multi-patient-group, multi-service hospital setting.

  7. Pulmonary Artery Catheter (PAC) Accuracy and Efficacy Compared with Flow Probe and Transcutaneous Doppler (USCOM): An Ovine Cardiac Output Validation

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Robert A.; Hood, Sally G.; Jacobson, Beverley M.; West, Malcolm J.; Wan, Li; May, Clive N.

    2012-01-01

    Background. The pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) is an accepted clinical method of measuring cardiac output (CO) despite no prior validation. The ultrasonic cardiac output monitor (USCOM) is a noninvasive alternative to PAC using Doppler ultrasound (CW). We compared PAC and USCOM CO measurements against a gold standard, the aortic flow probe (FP), in sheep at varying outputs. Methods. Ten conscious sheep, with implanted FPs, had measurements of CO by FP, USCOM, and PAC, at rest and during intervention with inotropes and vasopressors. Results. CO measurements by FP, PAC, and USCOM were 4.0 ± 1.2 L/min, 4.8 ± 1.5 L/min, and 4.0 ± 1.4 L/min, respectively, (n = 280, range 1.9 L/min to 11.7 L/min). Percentage bias and precision between FP and PAC, and FP and USCOM was −17 and 47%, and 1 and 36%, respectively. PAC under-measured Dobutamine-induced CO changes by 20% (relative 66%) compared with FP, while USCOM measures varied from FP by 3% (relative 10%). PAC reliably detected −30% but not +40% CO changes, as measured by receiver operating characteristic area under the curve (AUC), while USCOM reliably detected ±5% changes in CO (AUC > 0.70). Conclusions. PAC demonstrated poor accuracy and sensitivity as a measure of CO. USCOM provided equivalent measurements to FP across a sixfold range of outputs, reliably detecting ±5% changes. PMID:22649718

  8. Preparation of liposomal amiodarone and investigation of its cardiomyocyte-targeting ability in cardiac radiofrequency ablation rat model

    PubMed Central

    Zhuge, Ying; Zheng, Zhi-Feng; Xie, Mu-Qing; Li, Lin; Wang, Fang; Gao, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop an amiodarone hydrochloride (ADHC)-loaded liposome (ADHC-L) formulation and investigate its potential for cardiomyocyte targeting after cardiac radiofrequency ablation (CA) in vivo. The ADHC-L was prepared by thin-film method combined with ultrasonication and extrusion. The preparation process was optimized by Box–Behnken design with encapsulation efficiency as the main evaluation index. The optimum formulation was quantitatively obtained with a diameter of 99.9±0.4 nm, a zeta potential of 35.1±10.9 mV, and an encapsulation efficiency of 99.5%±13.3%. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the liposomes were spherical particles with integrated bilayers and well dispersed with high colloidal stability. Pharmacokinetic studies were investigated in rats after intravenous administration, which revealed that compared with free ADHC treatment, ADHC-L treatment showed a 5.1-fold increase in the area under the plasma drug concentration–time curve over a period of 24 hours (AUC0–24 h) and an 8.5-fold increase in mean residence time, suggesting that ADHC-L could facilitate drug release in a more stable and sustained manner while increasing the circulation time of ADHC, especially in the blood. Biodistribution studies of ADHC-L demonstrated that ADHC concentration in the heart was 4.1 times higher after ADHC-L treatment in CA rat model compared with ADHC-L sham-operated treatment at 20 minutes postinjection. Fluorescence imaging studies further proved that the heart-targeting ability of ADHC-L was mainly due to the CA in rats. These results strongly support that ADHC-L could be exploited as a potential heart-targeting drug delivery system with enhanced bioavailability and reduced side effects for arrhythmia treatment after CA. PMID:27313453

  9. Catheter-based Intramyocardial Injection of FGF1 or NRG1-loaded MPs Improves Cardiac Function in a Preclinical Model of Ischemia-Reperfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbayo, Elisa; Gavira, Juan José; de Yebenes, Manuel Garcia; Pelacho, Beatriz; Abizanda, Gloria; Lana, Hugo; Blanco-Prieto, María José; Prosper, Felipe

    2016-05-01

    Cardiovascular protein therapeutics such as neuregulin (NRG1) and acidic-fibroblast growth factor (FGF1) requires new formulation strategies that allow for sustained bioavailability of the drug in the infarcted myocardium. However, there is no FDA-approved injectable protein delivery platform due to translational concerns about biomaterial administration through cardiac catheters. We therefore sought to evaluate the efficacy of percutaneous intramyocardial injection of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) microparticles (MPs) loaded with NRG1 and FGF1 using the NOGA MYOSTAR injection catheter in a porcine model of ischemia-reperfusion. NRG1- and FGF1-loaded MPs were prepared using a multiple emulsion solvent-evaporation technique. Infarcted pigs were treated one week after ischemia-reperfusion with MPs containing NRG1, FGF1 or non-loaded MPs delivered via clinically-translatable percutaneous transendocardial-injection. Three months post-treatment, echocardiography indicated a significant improvement in systolic and diastolic cardiac function. Moreover, improvement in bipolar voltage and decrease in transmural infarct progression was demonstrated by electromechanical NOGA-mapping. Functional benefit was associated with an increase in myocardial vascularization and remodeling. These findings in a large animal model of ischemia-reperfusion demonstrate the feasibility and efficacy of using MPs as a delivery system for growth factors and provide strong evidence to move forward with clinical studies using therapeutic proteins combined with catheter-compatible biomaterials.

  10. Catheter-based Intramyocardial Injection of FGF1 or NRG1-loaded MPs Improves Cardiac Function in a Preclinical Model of Ischemia-Reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Garbayo, Elisa; Gavira, Juan José; de Yebenes, Manuel Garcia; Pelacho, Beatriz; Abizanda, Gloria; Lana, Hugo; Blanco-Prieto, María José; Prosper, Felipe

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular protein therapeutics such as neuregulin (NRG1) and acidic-fibroblast growth factor (FGF1) requires new formulation strategies that allow for sustained bioavailability of the drug in the infarcted myocardium. However, there is no FDA-approved injectable protein delivery platform due to translational concerns about biomaterial administration through cardiac catheters. We therefore sought to evaluate the efficacy of percutaneous intramyocardial injection of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) microparticles (MPs) loaded with NRG1 and FGF1 using the NOGA MYOSTAR injection catheter in a porcine model of ischemia-reperfusion. NRG1- and FGF1-loaded MPs were prepared using a multiple emulsion solvent-evaporation technique. Infarcted pigs were treated one week after ischemia-reperfusion with MPs containing NRG1, FGF1 or non-loaded MPs delivered via clinically-translatable percutaneous transendocardial-injection. Three months post-treatment, echocardiography indicated a significant improvement in systolic and diastolic cardiac function. Moreover, improvement in bipolar voltage and decrease in transmural infarct progression was demonstrated by electromechanical NOGA-mapping. Functional benefit was associated with an increase in myocardial vascularization and remodeling. These findings in a large animal model of ischemia-reperfusion demonstrate the feasibility and efficacy of using MPs as a delivery system for growth factors and provide strong evidence to move forward with clinical studies using therapeutic proteins combined with catheter-compatible biomaterials. PMID:27184924

  11. Successful removal of an entrapped and kinked catheter during right transradial cardiac catheterization by snaring and unwinding the catheter via femoral access.

    PubMed

    Khoubyari, Rostam; Arsanjani, Reza; Habibzadeh, Mohammad Reza; Echeverri, Jose; Movahed, Mohammad Reza

    2012-01-01

    Since its introduction by Campeau in 1989, the transradial approach for coronary angiography has gained significant popularity among interventional cardiologists due to its lower access site complication rates, cost-effectiveness, and shorter hospital course. Although the transradial approach is much safer than the transfemoral approach, it has its own inherent rare complications including radial artery occlusion, thrombosis, nonocclusive radial artery injury, vasospasm, and compartment syndrome. Herein, we present an unusual case of entrapment and kinking of a catheter in the radial artery, which was successfully removed by using a gooseneck snare via the transfemoral route. The distal and proximal tips were then simultaneously rotated in opposite directions, allowing for the unkinking and removal of the catheter. To our knowledge, this is the first report of this rare complication.

  12. Image-based view-angle independent cardiorespiratory motion gating and coronary sinus catheter tracking for x-ray-guided cardiac electrophysiology procedures.

    PubMed

    Panayiotou, Maria; Rhode, Kawal S; King, Andrew P; Ma, Yingliang; Cooklin, Michael; O'Neill, Mark; Gill, Jaswinder; Rinaldi, C A; Housden, R James

    2015-10-21

    Determination of the cardiorespiratory phase of the heart has numerous applications during cardiac imaging. In this article we propose a novel view-angle independent near-real time cardiorespiratory motion gating and coronary sinus (CS) catheter tracking technique for x-ray fluoroscopy images that are used to guide cardiac electrophysiology procedures. The method is based on learning CS catheter motion using principal component analysis and then applying the derived motion model to unseen images taken at arbitrary projections, using the epipolar constraint. This method is also able to track the CS catheter throughout the x-ray images in any arbitrary subsequent view. We also demonstrate the clinical application of our model on rotational angiography sequences. We validated our technique in normal and very low dose phantom and clinical datasets. For the normal dose clinical images we established average systole, end-expiration and end-inspiration gating success rates of 100%, 85.7%, and 92.3%, respectively. For very low dose applications, the technique was able to track the CS catheter with median errors not exceeding 1 mm for all tracked electrodes. Average gating success rates of 80.3%, 71.4%, and 69.2% were established for the application of the technique on clinical datasets, even with a dose reduction of more than 10 times. In rotational sequences at normal dose, CS tracking median errors were within 1.2 mm for all electrodes, and the gating success rate was 100%, for view angles from RAO 90° to LAO 90°. This view-angle independent technique can extract clinically useful cardiorespiratory motion information using x-ray doses significantly lower than those currently used in clinical practice.

  13. Urinary catheters

    MedlinePlus

    ... provider's office. An indwelling catheter has a small balloon inflated on the end of it. This prevents ... When the catheter needs to be removed, the balloon is deflated. CONDOM CATHETERS Condom catheters can be ...

  14. Development of a Novel Shock Wave Catheter Ablation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, H.; Hasebe, Yuhi; Kondo, Masateru; Fukuda, Koji; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Shimokawa, Hiroaki

    Although radio-frequency catheter ablation (RFCA) is quite effective for the treatment tachyarrhythmias, it possesses two fundamental limitations, including limited efficacy for the treatment of ventricular tachyarrhythmias of epicardial origin and the risk of thromboembolism. Consequently, new method is required, which can eradicate arrhythmia source in deep part of cardiac muscle without heating. On the other hand, for a medical application of shock waves, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripter (ESWL) has been established [1]. It was demonstrated that the underwater shock focusing is one of most efficient method to generate a controlled high pressure in a small region [2]. In order to overcome limitations of existing methods, we aimed to develop a new catheter ablation system with underwater shock waves that can treat myocardium at arbitrary depth without causing heat.

  15. Continuous registration of blood velocity and cardiac output with a hot-film anemometer probe, mounted on a Swan-Ganz thermodilution catheter.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, P K; Andersen, M

    1981-01-01

    In order to construct a catheter, capable of monitoring cardiac output, a specially designed double-conical hot-film anemometer probe was fastened at the tip of a Swan-Ganz thermodilution catheter. Common sources of error for most catheter velocity probes include difficult calibration, unknown velocity profile at the point of measurement and unknown position of the probe in this profile. By using mongrel dogs and in order to exclude these sources of error, the intermittent thermodilution method was used to in vitro calibrate the hot-film anemometer, which registered velocity continuously. A mean correlation coefficient between these two methods was found to be 0.886. A mean line of regression between thermodilution (abscissa) and anemometer (ordinate) had a slope of 0.796 +/- 0.223 (+/- SD) and a y-intercept of 24 +/- 14 ml/min/kg. The slope was significantly lower than one (t test, p less than 0.05) and the y-intercept significantly larger than zero (t test, p less than 0.02). As a control of the thermodilution method, electromagnetic flow in the ascending aorta was registered and a mean correlation coefficient of 0.967 found. The hot-film sensor itself can be used as thermodilution method with the hot-film anemometer's continuous registration of velocity.

  16. Reinnervation of renal afferent and efferent nerves at 5.5 and 11 months after catheter-based radiofrequency renal denervation in sheep.

    PubMed

    Booth, Lindsea C; Nishi, Erika E; Yao, Song T; Ramchandra, Rohit; Lambert, Gavin W; Schlaich, Markus P; May, Clive N

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies indicate that catheter-based renal denervation reduces blood pressure and renal norepinephrine spillover in human resistant hypertension. The effects of this procedure on afferent sensory and efferent sympathetic renal nerves, and the subsequent degree of reinnervation, have not been investigated. We therefore examined the level of functional and anatomic reinnervation at 5.5 and 11 months after renal denervation using the Symplicity Flex catheter. In normotensive anesthetized sheep (n=6), electric stimulation of intact renal nerves increased arterial pressure from 99±3 to 107±3 mm Hg (afferent response) and reduced renal blood flow from 198±16 to 85±20 mL/min (efferent response). In a further group (n=6), immediately after denervation, renal sympathetic nerve activity was absent and the responses to electric stimulation were abolished. At 11 months after denervation (n=5), renal sympathetic nerve activity and the responses to electric stimulation were at normal levels. Immunohistochemical staining for renal efferent (tyrosine hydroxylase) and renal afferent nerves (calcitonin gene-related peptide), as well as renal norepinephrine levels, was normal 11 months after denervation. Findings at 5.5 months after denervation were similar (n=5). In summary, catheter-based renal denervation effectively ablated the renal afferent and efferent nerves in normotensive sheep. By 11 months after denervation the functional afferent and efferent responses to electric stimulation were normal. Reinnervation at 11 months after denervation was supported by normal anatomic distribution of afferent and efferent renal nerves. In view of this evidence, the mechanisms underlying the prolonged hypotensive effect of catheter-based renal denervation in human resistant hypertension need to be reassessed.

  17. In vivo intracardiac OCT imaging through percutaneous access: towards image guided radio-frequency ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Kang, Wei; Carrigan, Thomas; Bishop, Austin; Rosenthal, Noah; Arruda, Mauricio; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Complete catheter-tissue contact and permanent tissue destruction are essential for efficient radio-frequency ablation (RFA) during cardiac arrhythmia treatment. Current methods of monitoring lesion formation are indirect and unreliable. We aim to develop optical coherence tomography (OCT) as an imaging guidance for RFA. OBJECTIVES The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of using OCT catheter to image endocardia wall in active beating hearts through percutaneous access. This is a critical step toward image guided RFA in a clinic setting. METHODS A cone-scanning forward-viewing OCT catheter was advanced into active beating hearts through percutaneous access in four swine. The OCT catheter was steered by an introducer to touch the endocardia wall. The images were then acquired at 10 frames per second at an axial resolution and lateral resolution of 15 μm. RESULTS We report the first in vivo intracardiac OCT imaging through percutaneous access with a thin and flexible OCT catheter. We are able to acquire high quality OCT images in active beating hearts, observe the polarization-related artifacts induced by the birefringence of myocardium and readily evaluate catheter-tissue contact. CONCLUSIONS It is feasible to acquire OCT images in beating hearts through percutaneous access. The observations indicate that OCT could be a promising technique for in vivo guidance of RFA.

  18. Transcatheter desiccation of the canine left ventricle using radiofrequency energy: a pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, S.K.; Graham, A.R.; Hoyt, R.H.; Odell, R.C.

    1987-07-01

    Catheter ablation of cardiac tissue by means of direct-current electrical energy is associated with several complications. We assessed the efficacy and safety of closed-chest catheter desiccation of the left ventricular myocardium with microbipolar radiofrequency (RF) energy (750 kHz) in five dogs. The unipolar configuration was used with RF energy delivered between the tip electrode of a standard No. 7F tripolar catheter in the left ventricle and an external patch electrode on the left lateral chest wall. A single application with different RF energy settings (100 J, 200 J, and 300 J) was delivered to three individual endocardial sites of the left ventricle. Ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation was not observed during energy application and 24 hours after ablation, as assessed by a Holter recording. There was no damage to the electrode catheter. Dogs were killed on the fifth day. Pathology showed well-delineated ovoid or round-shaped coagulation necrosis at the ablation sites. Microscopic findings consisted of circumscribed areas of necrosis surrounded by a zone of fibroblastic and mononuclear proliferation. In conclusion, catheter ablation of the ventricular myocardium with RF energy is an apparently safe procedure and can effectively produce discrete areas of injury without destruction of surrounding uninvolved myocardium. This method offers potential clinical utility for catheter ablation of refractory sustained ventricular tachycardia.

  19. Radiofrequency energy loop primes cardiac, neuronal, and skeletal muscle differentiation in mouse embryonic stem cells: a new tool for improving tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Maioli, Margherita; Rinaldi, Salvatore; Santaniello, Sara; Castagna, Alessandro; Pigliaru, Gianfranco; Gualini, Sara; Fontani, Vania; Ventura, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) waves from Wi-Fi (wireless fidelity) technologies have become ubiquitous, with Internet access spreading into homes, and public areas. The human body harbors multipotent stem cells with various grading of potentiality. Whether stem cells may be affected by Wi-Fi RF energy remains unknown. We exposed mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells to a Radio Electric Asymmetric Conveyer (REAC), an innovative device delivering Wi-Fi RF of 2.4 GHz with its conveyer electrodes immersed into the culture medium. Cell responses were investigated by real-time PCR, Western blot, and confocal microscopy. Single RF burst duration, radiated power, electric and magnetic fields, specific absorption rate, and current density in culture medium were monitored. REAC stimulation primed transcription of genes involved in cardiac (GATA4, Nkx-2.5, and prodynorphin), skeletal muscle (myoD) and neuronal (neurogenin1) commitment, while downregulating the self renewal/pluripotency-associated genes Sox2, Oct4, and Nanog. REAC exposure enhanced the expression of cardiac, skeletal, and neuronal lineage-restricted marker proteins. The number of spontaneously beating ES-derived myocardial cells was also increased. In conclusion, REAC stimulation provided a "physical milieu" optimizing stem cell expression of pluripotentiality and the attainment of three major target lineages for regenerative medicine, without using chemical agonists or vector-mediated gene delivery.

  20. Polymorphism rs2200733 at chromosome 4q25 is associated with atrial fibrillation recurrence after radiofrequency catheter ablation in the Chinese Han population

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Feifei; Yang, Yanzong; Zhang, Rongfeng; Zhang, Shulong; Dong, Yingxue; Yin, Xiaomeng; Chang, Dong; Yang, Zhiqiang; Wang, Kejing; Gao, Lianjun; Xia, Yunlong

    2016-01-01

    To test polymorphisms rs2200733 (chromosome 4q25) and rs2106261 (ZFHX3) were associated with AF recurrence after catheter ablation in a Chinese Han cohort. A total of 235 AF patients who underwent catheter ablation were recruited consecutively. Two polymorphisms were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and genotyped using high resolution melting analysis. Primary endpoints for AF recurrence were defined as the time to the first recurrence of atrial tachycardia/flutter/fibrillation (AT/AF). AT/AF recurrence was observed in 76 patients (35%). Allelic analysis demonstrated that rs2200733 was strongly associated with AF recurrence after ablation (P = 0.011) and the minor allele T increased the risk for recurrence (OR = 1.715). Diameters of the right atrium as well as the left and right superior pulmonary veins (PVs) were associated with rs2200733 in different genetic models (P = 0.040, 0.047 and 0.028, respectively). No significant association was detected between rs2106261 and AT/AF recurrence after ablation or atrial/PV diameters in any models. On multivariate Cox regression analysis, only rs2200733 was an independent factor of AF recurrence after ablation (HR = 0.532, P = 0.022). In Chinese Han population, rs2200733 but not rs2106261 is associated with AT/AF recurrence after ablation. The patients with genotype TT have larger size of right atrium and superior PVs than those of CC genotype. The findings suggest that rs2200733 may play a key role in regulating proper development and differentiation of atria/PVs. PMID:27158361

  1. Pericardial effusion with cardiac tamponade caused by a central venous catheter in a very low birth weight infant.

    PubMed

    Chioukh, Fatma-Zohra; Ameur, Karim Ben; Hmida, Hayet Ben; Monastiri, Kamel

    2016-01-01

    With more and more extreme premature and very low-birth weight babies being resuscitated, umbilical central venous catheterisation is now being used more frequently in neonatal intensive care. One of the life-threatening complications is pericardial effusion and cardiac tamponade; however, it is potentially reversible when it is caught in time. The authors present a case of cardiac tamponade following umbilical venous catheterisation in a neonate. The patient was diagnosed at the appropriate time by echocardiography and urgent pericardiocentesis proved lifesaving.

  2. Pericardial effusion with cardiac tamponade caused by a central venous catheter in a very low birth weight infant

    PubMed Central

    Chioukh, Fatma-Zohra; Ameur, Karim Ben; Hmida, Hayet Ben; Monastiri, Kamel

    2016-01-01

    With more and more extreme premature and very low-birth weight babies being resuscitated, umbilical central venous catheterisation is now being used more frequently in neonatal intensive care. One of the life-threatening complications is pericardial effusion and cardiac tamponade; however, it is potentially reversible when it is caught in time. The authors present a case of cardiac tamponade following umbilical venous catheterisation in a neonate. The patient was diagnosed at the appropriate time by echocardiography and urgent pericardiocentesis proved lifesaving. PMID:28154705

  3. In vivo intracardiac optical coherence tomography imaging through percutaneous access: toward image-guided radio-frequency ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Kang, Wei; Carrigan, Thomas; Bishop, Austin; Rosenthal, Noah; Arruda, Mauricio; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2011-11-01

    Complete catheter-tissue contact and permanent tissue destruction are essential for efficient radio-frequency ablation (RFA) during cardiac arrhythmia treatment. Current methods of monitoring lesion formation are indirect and unreliable. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of using optical coherence tomography (OCT) catheter to image endocardial wall in actively beating hearts through percutaneous access. We reported the first in vivo intracardiac OCT imaging through percutaneous access with a thin and flexible OCT catheter. This is a critical step toward image-guided RFA in a clinical setting. A cone-scanning forward-viewing OCT catheter was advanced into beating hearts through percutaneous access in four swine. The OCT catheter was steered by an introducer to touch the endocardial wall. We are able to acquire high quality OCT images in beating hearts, observe the polarization-related artifacts induced by the birefringence of myocardium, and readily evaluate catheter-tissue contact. The observations indicate that OCT could be a promising technique for in vivo guidance of RFA.

  4. Cardiac tissue characterization using near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh Moon, Rajinder; Hendon, Christine P.

    2014-03-01

    Cardiac tissue from swine and canine hearts were assessed using diffuse reflectance near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) ex vivo. Slope measured between 800-880 nm reflectance was found to reveal differences between epicardial fat and normal myocardium tissue. This parameter was observed to increase monotonically from measurements obtained from the onset of radiofrequency ablation (RFA). A sheathe-style fiber optic catheter was then developed to allow real-time sampling of the zone of resistive heating during RFA treatment. A model was developed and used to extract changes in tissue absorption and reduced scattering based on the steady-state diffusion approximation. It was found that key changes in tissue optical properties occur during application of RF energy and can be monitored using NIRS. These results encourage the development of NIRS integrated catheters for real-time guidance of the cardiac ablation treatment.

  5. Incorporating a Gaussian model at the catheter tip for improved registration of preoperative surface models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rettmann, M. E.; Holmes, D. R., III; Packer, D. L.; Robb, R. A.

    2011-03-01

    Atrial fibrillation is a common cardiac arrhythmia in which aberrant electrical activity cause the atria to quiver which results in irregular beating of the heart. Catheter ablation therapy is becoming increasingly popular in treating atrial fibrillation, a procedure in which an electrophysiologist guides a catheter into the left atrium and creates radiofrequency lesions to stop the arrhythmia. Typical visualization tools include bi-plane fluoroscopy, 2-D ultrasound, and electroanatomic maps, however, recently there has been increased interest in incorporating preoperative surface models into the procedure. Typical strategies for registration include landmark-based and surface-based methods. Drawbacks of these approaches include difficulty in accurately locating corresponding landmark pairs and the time required to sample surface points with a catheter. In this paper, we describe a new approach which models the catheter tip as a Gaussian kernel and eliminates the need to collect surface points by instead using the stream of continuosly tracked catheter points. We demonstrate the feasibility of this technique with a left atrial phantom model and compare the results with a standard surface based approach.

  6. Real-time circumferential mapping catheter tracking for motion compensation in atrial fibrillation ablation procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brost, Alexander; Bourier, Felix; Wimmer, Andreas; Koch, Martin; Kiraly, Atilla; Liao, Rui; Kurzidim, Klaus; Hornegger, Joachim; Strobel, Norbert

    2012-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AFib) has been identified as a major cause of stroke. Radiofrequency catheter ablation has become an increasingly important treatment option, especially when drug therapy fails. Navigation under X-ray can be enhanced by using augmented fluoroscopy. It renders overlay images from pre-operative 3-D data sets which are then fused with X-ray images to provide more details about the underlying soft-tissue anatomy. Unfortunately, these fluoroscopic overlay images are compromised by respiratory and cardiac motion. Various methods to deal with motion have been proposed. To meet clinical demands, they have to be fast. Methods providing a processing frame rate of 3 frames-per-second (fps) are considered suitable for interventional electrophysiology catheter procedures if an acquisition frame rate of 2 fps is used. Unfortunately, when working at a processing rate of 3 fps, the delay until the actual motion compensated image can be displayed is about 300 ms. More recent algorithms can achieve frame rates of up to 20 fps, which reduces the lag to 50 ms. By using a novel approach involving a 3-D catheter model, catheter segmentation and a distance transform, we can speed up motion compensation to 25 fps which results in a display delay of only 40 ms on a standard workstation for medical applications. Our method uses a constrained 2-D/3-D registration to perform catheter tracking, and it obtained a 2-D tracking error of 0.61 mm.

  7. Radiofrequency Ablation of Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Marc; Mikityansky, Igor; Kam, Anthony; Libutti, Steven K.; Walther, McClellan M.; Neeman, Ziv; Locklin, Julia K.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2004-09-15

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been used for over 18 years for treatment of nerve-related chronic pain and cardiac arrhythmias. In the last 10 years, technical developments have increased ablation volumes in a controllable, versatile, and relatively inexpensive manner. The host of clinical applications for RFA have similarly expanded. Current RFA equipment, techniques, applications, results, complications, and research avenues for local tumor ablation are summarized.

  8. Deep venous thrombosis of the neck and pulmonary embolism in patients with a central venous catheter admitted to cardiac rehabilitation after cardiac surgery: a prospective study of 815 patients.

    PubMed

    Frizzelli, Rino; Tortelli, Ornella; Di Comite, Vincenzo; Ghirardi, Redenta; Pinzi, Claudio; Scarduelli, Cleante

    2008-12-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are widely used for therapeutic purposes and to measure hemodynamic variables that cannot be recorded from a peripheral vein. However, the method can involve complications. In cardiac surgery, CVCs are electively placed in the right internal jugular vein but there is little information on deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in catheterized veins (CVC-related DVT) or on secondary pulmonary embolism (PE). The impact of CVC-related DVT and PE in cardiac surgery and measures to prevent PE were assessed. We used ultrasonography (US) to check the point of insertion of CVC in 815 patients in the intensive cardiac rehabilitation unit after heart surgery. In this series, 386 patients (48%) had CVC-related DVT; those already receiving anticoagulant, and considered at low risk, continued that therapy, while those taking an antiplatelet agent (aspirin 100 mg daily) but deemed at high risk of PE from the US findings were given an anticoagulant instead. Only patients with CVC-related DVT at low risk of PE continued taking aspirin. At 3 months, there were no cases of PE among patients receiving an anticoagulant, but six on antiplatelet had non-fatal PE. The prevalence of PE in the whole series of 815 patients was 0.7%. CVC-related DVT is a frequent complication of heart surgery. Anticoagulant therapy started early does not prevent thrombus formation but probably prevents PE, whereas antiplatelet gives no such protection. Sonographic screening of the CVC removal in intensive care unit may be useful for avoiding PE after CVC-related DVT.

  9. Radiofrequency Neurotomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 24 hours after your procedure. Avoid using a heating pad on the injection sites. Avoid baths for ... Smith AD, et al. Cervical radiofrequency neurotomy reduces central hyperexcitability and improves neck movement in individuals with ...

  10. Architecture of the pulmonary veins: relevance to radiofrequency ablation

    PubMed Central

    Ho, S; Cabrera, J; Tran, V; Farre, J; Anderson, R; Sanchez-Quintana, D

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Radiofrequency ablation of tissues in pulmonary veins can eliminate paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.
OBJECTIVE—To explore the characteristics of normal pulmonary veins so as to provide more information relevant to radiofrequency ablation.
METHODS—20 structurally normal heart specimens were examined grossly. Histological sections were made from 65 pulmonary veins.
RESULTS—The longest myocardial sleeves were found in the superior veins. The sleeves were thickest at the venoatrial junction in the left superior pulmonary veins. For the superior veins, the sleeves were thickest along the inferior walls and thinnest superiorly. The sleeves were composed mainly of circularly or spirally oriented bundles of myocytes with additional bundles that were longitudinally or obliquely oriented, sometimes forming mesh-like arrangements. Fibrotic changes estimated at between 5% and 70% across three transverse sections were seen in 17 veins that were from individuals aged 30 to 72 years.
CONCLUSIONS—The myocardial architecture in normal pulmonary veins is highly variable. The complex arrangement, stretch, and increase in fibrosis may produce greater non-uniform anisotropic properties.


Keywords: arrhythmias; catheter ablation; fibrillation; cardiac veins PMID:11514476

  11. Esophageal papilloma: Flexible endoscopic ablation by radiofrequency

    PubMed Central

    del Genio, Gianmattia; del Genio, Federica; Schettino, Pietro; Limongelli, Paolo; Tolone, Salvatore; Brusciano, Luigi; Avellino, Manuela; Vitiello, Chiara; Docimo, Giovanni; Pezzullo, Angelo; Docimo, Ludovico

    2015-01-01

    Squamous papilloma of the esophagus is a rare benign lesion of the esophagus. Radiofrequency ablation is an established endoscopic technique for the eradication of Barrett esophagus. No cases of endoscopic ablation of esophageal papilloma by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) have been reported. We report a case of esophageal papilloma successfully treated with a single session of radiofrequency ablation. Endoscopic ablation of the lesion was achieved by radiofrequency using a new catheter inserted through the working channel of endoscope. The esophageal ablated tissue was removed by a specifically designed cup. Complete ablation was confirmed at 3 mo by endoscopy with biopsies. This case supports feasibility and safety of as a new potential indication for BarrxTM RFA in patients with esophageal papilloma. PMID:25789102

  12. Catheter Embolization

    MedlinePlus

    ... the scrotum that may be a cause of infertility. Catheter embolization may be used alone or combined ... in patients with diabetes or other pre-existing kidney disease. top of page What are the limitations of ...

  13. Urinary catheter - infants

    MedlinePlus

    Bladder catheter - infants; Foley catheter - infants; Urinary catheter - neonatal ... Fanaroff AA, Walsh MC, eds. Fanaroff and Martin's Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; ...

  14. Primary Cardiac Sarcoidosis with Syncope and Refractory Atrial Arrhythmia: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Thangam, Manoj; Nathan, Sriram; Kar, Biswajit; Petrovic, Marija; Patel, Manish; Loyalka, Pranav; Buja, L. Maximilian

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the case of a 38-year-old black man who presented at our hospital with his first episode of syncope, recently developed atrial arrhythmias refractory to pharmacologic therapy, and a left atrial thrombus. He was diagnosed with primary cardiac sarcoidosis characterized by predominant involvement of the epicardium that caused atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter. Histologic analysis of his epicardial lesions yielded a diagnosis of sarcoidosis. This patient's atrial arrhythmia was successfully treated with a hybrid operation that involved resection of his atrial appendage, an Epicor maze procedure, and radiofrequency ablation during a catheter-based electrophysiologic study. The cardiac sarcoidosis was successfully managed with corticosteroid therapy. Our case report shows that sarcoidosis can initially manifest itself as syncope with new-onset atrial arrhythmia. Sarcoidosis is important in the differential diagnosis because of its progressive nature and its potential for treatment with pharmacologic, surgical, and catheter-based interventions. PMID:27303240

  15. Ethanol for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Schurmann, Paul; Peñalver, Jorge; Valderrábano, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ethanol infusion was an early mode of ablative treatment for cardiac arrhythmias. Its initial descriptions involved coronary intra-arterial delivery, targeting arrhythmogenic substrates in drug-refractory ventricular tachycardia or the atrioventricular node. Largely superseded by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and other contact-based technologies as a routine ablation strategy, intracoronary arterial ethanol infusion remains as an alternative option in the treatment of ventricular tachycardia when conventional ablation fails. Arrhythmic foci that are deep-seated in the myocardium may not be amenable to catheter ablation from either the endocardium or the epicardium by RFA, but they can be targeted by an ethanol infusion. Recent findings Recently, we have explored ethanol injection through cardiac venous systems, in order to avoid the risks of complications and limitations of coronary arterial instrumentation. Vein of Marshall ethanol infusion is being studied as an adjunctive procedure in ablation of atrial fibrillation, and coronary venous ethanol infusion for ventricular tachycardia. Conclusion Ethanol ablation remains useful as a bail-out technique for refractory cases to RFA, or as an adjunctive therapy that may improve the efficacy of catheter ablation procedures. PMID:26049378

  16. Thermal compression and molding of atherosclerotic vascular tissue with use of radiofrequency energy: implications for radiofrequency balloon angioplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, B.I.; Becker, G.J.; Waller, B.F.; Barry, K.J.; Connolly, R.J.; Kaplan, J.; Shapiro, A.R.; Nardella, P.C.

    1989-04-01

    The combined delivery of pressure and thermal energy may effectively remodel intraluminal atherosclerotic plaque and fuse intimal tears. To test these hypotheses with use of a non-laser thermal energy source, radiofrequency energy was delivered to postmortem human atherosclerotic vessels from a metal hot-tip catheter, block-mounted bipolar electrodes and from a prototype radiofrequency balloon catheter. Sixty-two radiofrequency doses delivered from a metal electrode tip produced dose-dependent ablation of atherosclerotic plaque, ranging from clean and shallow craters with histologic evidence of thermal compression at doses less than 40 J to tissue charring and vaporization at higher (greater than 80 J) doses. Lesion dimensions ranged between 3.14 and 3.79 mm in diameter and 0.20 and 0.47 mm in depth. Tissue perforation was not observed. To test the potential for radiofrequency fusion of intimal tears, 5 atm of pressure and 200 J radiofrequency energy were delivered from block-mounted bipolar electrodes to 48 segments of human atherosclerotic aorta, which had been manually separated into intima-media and media-adventitial layers. Significantly stronger tissue fusion resulted (28.5 +/- 3.3 g) with radiofrequency compared with that with pressure alone (4.8 +/- 0.26 g; p less than 0.0001). A prototype radiofrequency balloon catheter was used to deliver 3 atm of balloon pressure with or without 200 J radiofrequency energy to 20 postmortem human atherosclerotic arterial segments. In 10 of 10 radiofrequency-treated vessels, thermal molding of both normal and atherosclerotic vessel wall segments resulted with increased luminal diameter and histologic evidence of medial myocyte damage.

  17. Cardiac Catheterization (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... a person will have only a small puncture hole where the catheter was put in. Doctors usually ... done using a cardiac catheterization, including: closing small holes inside the heart repairing leaky or narrow heart ...

  18. A novel catheter design for laser photocoagulation of the myocardium to ablate ventricular tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Wagshall, Alan; Abela, George S; Maheshwari, Alok; Gupta, Anoop; Bowden, Russell; Huang, S K Stephen

    2002-08-01

    Nd:YAG laser energy has been proposed as an alternative to radiofrequency energy for ablation of ventricular tachycardia (VT) associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) in an effort to increase lesion size and success rates. However, issues of catheter design to maintain flexibility and ensure adequate tissue contact have hindered development of laser catheters. We developed and tested a prototype 8 Fr. steerable catheter with a flexible and extendible tip (designed to ensure tissue contact and efficient ventricular mapping), which projects the laser beam through a side port containing a lens-tipped optical fiber that rests against the endocardial surface. The catheter has a channel for simultaneous saline irrigation to displace the interceding blood and discharge a laser beam between two electrodes for bipolar mapping and a thermocouple for temperature monitoring. The catheter was tested on bench top using the epicardial surface of freshly slaughtered bovine hearts and in vivo using six anaesthetized closed-chest sheep. In vitro experiments demonstrated that lesion size increased linearly with applied power up to 40 watts. When compared to radio frequency, laser energy penetrated more deeply into the myocardium. In the in vivo studies, using increasing powers of up to 40 watts for application times of 60 to 120 seconds created circular or elliptical lesions with surface dimensions up to 12 mm x 12 mm and depth of 9 mm (full LV wall thickness with a mean lesion diameter of 9.9 +/- 5.2 mm and depth 5.8 +/- 3.2 mm). Most lesions, 16 total in both right and left ventricular walls were transmural or near transmural in thickness. Lesions demonstrated coagulation necrosis with smooth well-demarcated borders. No animal suffered cardiac perforation, hypotension, hemopericardium, damage to cardiac valves, or cavitation effect from any of the ablations. Runs of VT were seen during energy application at the highest laser outputs in two animals. In conclusion, this catheter

  19. Catheter-directed interventions for pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Zarghouni, Mehrzad; Charles, Hearns W.; Maldonado, Thomas S.

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE), a potentially life-threatening entity, can be treated medically, surgically, and percutaneously. In patients with right ventricular dysfunction (RVD), anticoagulation alone may be insufficient to restore cardiac function. Because of the morbidity and mortality associated with surgical embolectomy, clinical interest in catheter-directed interventions (CDI) has resurged. We describe specific catheter-directed techniques and the evidence supporting percutaneous treatments. PMID:28123985

  20. Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Site Index A-Z Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA) of Liver Tumors Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a treatment that ... of Liver Tumors? What is Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumors? Radiofrequency ablation, sometimes referred to as RFA, ...

  1. Patient-specific left atrial wall-thickness measurement and visualization for radiofrequency ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Jiro; Skanes, Allan C.; White, James A.; Rajchl, Martin; Drangova, Maria

    2014-03-01

    INTRODUCTION: For radiofrequency (RF) catheter ablation of the left atrium, safe and effective dosing of RF energy requires transmural left atrium ablation without injury to extra-cardiac structures. The thickness of the left atrial wall may be a key parameter in determining the appropriate amount of energy to deliver. While left atrial wall-thickness is known to exhibit inter- and intra-patient variation, this is not taken into account in the current clinical workflow. Our goal is to develop a tool for presenting patient-specific left atrial thickness information to the clinician in order to assist in the determination of the proper RF energy dose. METHODS: We use an interactive segmentation method with manual correction to segment the left atrial blood pool and heart wall from contrast-enhanced cardiac CT images. We then create a mesh from the segmented blood pool and determine the wall thickness, on a per-vertex basis, orthogonal to the mesh surface. The thickness measurement is visualized by assigning colors to the vertices of the blood pool mesh. We applied our method to 5 contrast-enhanced cardiac CT images. RESULTS: Left atrial wall-thickness measurements were generally consistent with published thickness ranges. Variations were found to exist between patients, and between regions within each patient. CONCLUSION: It is possible to visually determine areas of thick vs. thin heart wall with high resolution in a patient-specific manner.

  2. Nonfluoroscopic Imaging as Guidance for Radiofrequency Ablation of Atrioventricular Nodal Reentrant Tachycardia after Mustard Repair

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Dinh Q.; Sobczak, Henrik; Brandts, Bodo

    2017-01-01

    Most tachycardias in the pulmonary venous atrium are inaccessible by direct means and require either a retrograde approach or a transseptal approach for ablation. We present a case in which successful radiofrequency ablation of common atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia was accomplished via a retrograde transaortic approach guided by nonfluoroscopic mapping with use of the NavX™ mapping system. The patient was a 49-year-old woman who at the age of 4 years had undergone Mustard repair for complete dextrotransposition of the great arteries. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the ascending aorta, right ventricle, systemic venous atrium, left ventricle, and superior vena cava–inferior vena cava baffle complex were created, and the left-sided His bundle was marked. After a failed attempt at ablation from the systemic venous side, we eliminated the atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia by ablation from the pulmonary venous side. This case is, to our knowledge, the first report of successful radiofrequency ablation of common atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia after Mustard repair for this congenital cardiac malformation in which ablation was guided by 3-dimensional nonfluoroscopic imaging. This imaging technique enabled accurate anatomic location of the ablation catheters in relation to the His bundle marked from the systemic venous side. PMID:28265215

  3. Balloon catheter coronary angioplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Angelini, P.

    1987-01-01

    The author has produced a reference and teaching book on balloon angioplasty. Because it borders in surgery and is performed on an awake patient without circulatory assistance, it is a complex and demanding procedure that requires thorough knowledge before it is attempted. The text is divided into seven sections. The first section describes coronary anatomy and pathophysiology, defines the objectives and mechanisms of the procedure and lists four possible physiologic results. The next section describes equipment in the catheterization laboratory, catheters, guidewires and required personnel. The following section is on the procedure itself and includes a discussion of examination, testing, technique and follow-up. The fourth section details possible complications that can occur during the procedure, such as coronary spasms, occlusion, thrombosis, perforations and ruptures, and also discusses cardiac surgery after failed angioplasty. The fifth section details complex or unusual cases that can occur. The sixth and seventh sections discuss radiation, alternative procedures and the future of angioplasty.

  4. Automatic classification of scar tissue in late gadolinium enhancement cardiac MRI for the assessment of left-atrial wall injury after radiofrequency ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Daniel; Morris, Alan; Burgon, Nathan; McGann, Christopher; MacLeod, Robert; Cates, Joshua

    2012-03-01

    Radiofrequency ablation is a promising procedure for treating atrial fibrillation (AF) that relies on accurate lesion delivery in the left atrial (LA) wall for success. Late Gadolinium Enhancement MRI (LGE MRI) at three months post-ablation has proven effective for noninvasive assessment of the location and extent of scar formation, which are important factors for predicting patient outcome and planning of redo ablation procedures. We have developed an algorithm for automatic classification in LGE MRI of scar tissue in the LA wall and have evaluated accuracy and consistency compared to manual scar classifications by expert observers. Our approach clusters voxels based on normalized intensity and was chosen through a systematic comparison of the performance of multivariate clustering on many combinations of image texture. Algorithm performance was determined by overlap with ground truth, using multiple overlap measures, and the accuracy of the estimation of the total amount of scar in the LA. Ground truth was determined using the STAPLE algorithm, which produces a probabilistic estimate of the true scar classification from multiple expert manual segmentations. Evaluation of the ground truth data set was based on both inter- and intra-observer agreement, with variation among expert classifiers indicating the difficulty of scar classification for a given a dataset. Our proposed automatic scar classification algorithm performs well for both scar localization and estimation of scar volume: for ground truth datasets considered easy, variability from the ground truth was low; for those considered difficult, variability from ground truth was on par with the variability across experts.

  5. Automatic classification of scar tissue in late gadolinium enhancement cardiac MRI for the assessment of left-atrial wall injury after radiofrequency ablation.

    PubMed

    Perry, Daniel; Morris, Alan; Burgon, Nathan; McGann, Christopher; Macleod, Robert; Cates, Joshua

    2012-02-23

    Radiofrequency ablation is a promising procedure for treating atrial fibrillation (AF) that relies on accurate lesion delivery in the left atrial (LA) wall for success. Late Gadolinium Enhancement MRI (LGE MRI) at three months post-ablation has proven effective for noninvasive assessment of the location and extent of scar formation, which are important factors for predicting patient outcome and planning of redo ablation procedures. We have developed an algorithm for automatic classification in LGE MRI of scar tissue in the LA wall and have evaluated accuracy and consistency compared to manual scar classifications by expert observers. Our approach clusters voxels based on normalized intensity and was chosen through a systematic comparison of the performance of multivariate clustering on many combinations of image texture. Algorithm performance was determined by overlap with ground truth, using multiple overlap measures, and the accuracy of the estimation of the total amount of scar in the LA. Ground truth was determined using the STAPLE algorithm, which produces a probabilistic estimate of the true scar classification from multiple expert manual segmentations. Evaluation of the ground truth data set was based on both inter- and intra-observer agreement, with variation among expert classifiers indicating the difficulty of scar classification for a given a dataset. Our proposed automatic scar classification algorithm performs well for both scar localization and estimation of scar volume: for ground truth datasets considered easy, variability from the ground truth was low; for those considered difficult, variability from ground truth was on par with the variability across experts.

  6. Hemodialysis Tunneled Catheter Noninfectious Complications

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Lisa M.; MacRae, Jennifer M.; Kiaii, Mercedeh; Clark, Edward; Dipchand, Christine; Kappel, Joanne; Lok, Charmaine; Luscombe, Rick; Moist, Louise; Oliver, Matthew; Pike, Pamela; Hiremath, Swapnil

    2016-01-01

    Noninfectious hemodialysis catheter complications include catheter dysfunction, catheter-related thrombus, and central vein stenosis. The definitions, causes, and treatment strategies for catheter dysfunction are reviewed below. Catheter-related thrombus is a less common but serious complication of catheters, requiring catheter removal and systemic anticoagulation. In addition, the risk factors, clinical manifestation, and treatment options for central vein stenosis are outlined. PMID:28270922

  7. Latex anaphylaxis caused by a Swan-Ganz catheter.

    PubMed

    Sekiya, Kiyoshi; Watai, Kentaro; Taniguchi, Masami; Mitsui, Chihiro; Fukutomi, Yuma; Tanimoto, Hidenori; Kawaura, Noriyuki; Akiyama, Kazuo

    2011-01-01

    A 78-year-old woman visited the division of cardiovascular disease in our hospital. She underwent a cardiac catheter examination, and a Swan-Ganz catheter was inserted. Several minutes later, she developed anaphylactic shock. She had no past history of latex allergy, but did have a banana allergy. Skin prick tests showed a positive reaction to an extract of latex gloves and an extract of the balloon of a Swan-Ganz catheter. Anaphylactic shock caused by the latex balloon of a Swan-Ganz catheter was diagnosed. It is necessary to pay attention to not only latex allergy but also fruit allergies with a cross-reactivity to latex.

  8. Catheter-Associated Infections

    PubMed Central

    Trautner, Barbara W.; Darouiche, Rabih O.

    2010-01-01

    Intravascular catheters and urinary catheters are the 2 most commonly inserted medical devices in the United States, and they are likewise the two most common causes of nosocomially acquired bloodstream infection. Biofilm formation on the surfaces of indwelling catheters is central to the pathogenesis of infection of both types of catheters. The cornerstone to any preventive strategy of intravascular catheter infections is strict attention to infection control practices. Antimicrobial-impregnated intravascular catheters are a useful adjunction to infection control measures. Prevention of urinary catheter–associated infection is hindered by the numbers and types of organisms present in the periurethral area as well as by the typically longer duration of catheter placement. Antimicrobial agents in general have not been effective in preventing catheter-associated urinary tract infection in persons with long-term, indwelling urethral catheters. Preventive strategies that avoid the use of antimicrobial agents may be necessary in this population. PMID:15111369

  9. A statistical model of catheter motion from interventional x-ray images: application to image-based gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panayiotou, M.; King, A. P.; Ma, Y.; Housden, R. J.; Rinaldi, C. A.; Gill, J.; Cooklin, M.; O'Neill, M.; Rhode, K. S.

    2013-11-01

    The motion and deformation of catheters that lie inside cardiac structures can provide valuable information about the motion of the heart. In this paper we describe the formation of a novel statistical model of the motion of a coronary sinus (CS) catheter based on principal component analysis of tracked electrode locations from standard mono-plane x-ray fluoroscopy images. We demonstrate the application of our model for the purposes of retrospective cardiac and respiratory gating of x-ray fluoroscopy images in normal dose x-ray fluoroscopy images, and demonstrate how a modification of the technique allows application to very low dose scenarios. We validated our method on ten mono-plane imaging sequences comprising a total of 610 frames from ten different patients undergoing radiofrequency ablation for the treatment of atrial fibrillation. For normal dose images we established systole, end-inspiration and end-expiration gating with success rates of 100%, 92.1% and 86.9%, respectively. For very low dose applications, the method was tested on the same ten mono-plane x-ray fluoroscopy sequences without noise and with added noise at signal to noise ratio (SNR) values of √50, √10, √8, √6, √5, √2 and √1 to simulate the image quality of increasingly lower dose x-ray images. The method was able to detect the CS catheter even in the lowest SNR images with median errors not exceeding 2.6 mm per electrode. Furthermore, gating success rates of 100%, 71.4% and 85.7% were achieved at the low SNR value of √2, representing a dose reduction of more than 25 times. Thus, the technique has the potential to extract useful information whilst substantially reducing the radiation exposure.

  10. [Indications for catheter ablation of ventricular tachycardia].

    PubMed

    Deneke, T; Israel, C W; Krug, J; Nentwich, K; Müller, P; Mügge, A; Schade, A

    2013-09-01

    Ventricular tachyarrhythmias (VT) can cause sudden cardiac death. This can be prevented by an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) but approximately 25% of patients with an ICD develop electrical storm (≥ 3 VTs within 24 hours) during the course of 4-5 years. This is a life-threatening event even in the presence of an ICD, particularly if incessant VT is present, and may significantly deteriorate the patient's psychological state if multiple shocks are discharged. Catheter ablation of VT has developed into a standard procedure in many specialized electrophysiology centers. Patients with hemodynamically stable and unstable VT are amendable to substrate-based ablation strategies. Catheter ablation can be performed as emergency procedure in patients with electrical storm as well as electively in patients with monomorphic VT stored in ICD memory. In patients with ischemic or non-ischemic cardiomyopathy, VT ablation is complementary to ICD implantation and can reduce the number of ventricular arrhythmia episodes and shocks and should be performed early. In patients with electrical storm, catheter ablation can acutely achieve rhythm stabilization and may improve prognosis in the long term. Further indications for catheter ablation exist in patients with idiopathic VT where catheter ablation represents a curative therapy, and in patients with symptomatic or asymptomatic frequent premature ventricular beats which may improve prognosis in patients with heart failure and cardiac resynchronization therapy.

  11. Ultrasound Current Source Density Imaging in live rabbit hearts using clinical intracardiac catheter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qian

    Ultrasound Current Source Density Imaging (UCSDI) is a noninvasive modality for mapping electrical activities in the body (brain and heart) in 4-dimensions (space + time). Conventional cardiac mapping technologies for guiding the radiofrequency ablation procedure for treatment of cardiac arrhythmias have certain limitations. UCSDI can potentially overcome these limitations and enhance the electrophysiology mapping of the heart. UCSDI exploits the acoustoelectric (AE) effect, an interaction between ultrasound pressure and electrical resistivity. When an ultrasound beam intersects a current path in a material, the local resistivity of the material is modulated by the ultrasonic pressure, and a change in voltage signal can be detected based on Ohm's Law. The degree of modulation is determined by the AE interaction constant K. K is a fundamental property of any type of material, and directly affects the amplitude of the AE signal detected in UCSDI. UCSDI requires detecting a small AE signal associated with electrocardiogram. So sensitivity becomes a major challenge for transferring UCSDI to the clinic. This dissertation will determine the limits of sensitivity and resolution for UCSDI, balancing the tradeoff between them by finding the optimal parameters for electrical cardiac mapping, and finally test the optimized system in a realistic setting. This work begins by describing a technique for measuring K, the AE interaction constant, in ionic solution and biological tissue, and reporting the value of K in excised rabbit cardiac tissue for the first time. K was found to be strongly dependent on concentration for the divalent salt CuSO4, but not for the monovalent salt NaCl, consistent with their different chemical properties. In the rabbit heart tissue, K was determined to be 0.041 +/- 0.012 %/MPa, similar to the measurement of K in physiologic saline: 0.034 +/- 0.003 %/MPa. Next, this dissertation investigates the sensitivity limit of UCSDI by quantifying the relation

  12. Intrinsic Cardiac Autonomic Ganglionated Plexi within Epicardial Fats Modulate the Atrial Substrate Remodeling: Experiences with Atrial Fibrillation Patients Receiving Catheter Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Rahul; Lo, Li-Wei; Lin, Yenn-Jiang Lin; Chang, Shih-Lin; Hu, Yu-Feng; Chao, Tze-Fan; Chung, Fa-Po; Chiou, Cheun-Wang; Tsao, Hsuan-Ming; Chen, Shih-Ann

    2016-01-01

    Background A recent study reported the close relationship between high dominant frequent (DF) sites [atrial fibrillation (AF) nest] and the intrinsic cardiac autonomic nervous system. The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between the regional distribution of epicardial fat and the properties of the biatrial substrates in AF patients. Methods We studied 32 patients with paroxysmal (n = 23) and persistent (n = 9) AF. The epicardial fat volume around the left atrium (LA) was evaluated using 64-slice multidetector computed tomography and the topographic distribution of the fat volume was assessed. The biatrial DFs, voltages, and total activation times (TATs) were obtained during sinus rhythm. Results Out of the 8 divided LA regions, a significant linear correlation existed between the LA fat and mean DF values in the right upper anterior LA, left upper anterior LA, right lower anterior LA, right upper posterior LA, left upper posterior LA, and left lower posterior LA. There was no significant correlation between the regional LA fat distribution and regional LA peak-to-peak bipolar voltage and TAT. During a mean follow-up of 17 ± 8 months, 22 of the 32 (69%) patients were free of AF. In the multivariate analysis, only the mean LA DF was found to be a significant predictor of recurrence. Conclusions There was a close association between the regional distribution of the LA epicardial fat and the atrial substrate manifesting high frequency during sinus rhythm (AF nest). Those nests were related to ablation outcome. Hence, epicardial fat may play a significant role in atrial substrate remodeling and thereby in the pathogenesis and maintenance of AF. PMID:27122948

  13. 21 CFR 876.5130 - Urological catheter and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... generic type of device includes radiopaque urological catheters, ureteral catheters, urethral catheters, coude catheters, balloon retention type catheters, straight catheters, upper urinary tract...

  14. 21 CFR 876.5130 - Urological catheter and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... generic type of device includes radiopaque urological catheters, ureteral catheters, urethral catheters, coude catheters, balloon retention type catheters, straight catheters, upper urinary tract...

  15. 21 CFR 876.5130 - Urological catheter and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... generic type of device includes radiopaque urological catheters, ureteral catheters, urethral catheters, coude catheters, balloon retention type catheters, straight catheters, upper urinary tract...

  16. 21 CFR 876.5130 - Urological catheter and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... generic type of device includes radiopaque urological catheters, ureteral catheters, urethral catheters, coudé catheters, balloon retention type catheters, straight catheters, upper urinary tract...

  17. 21 CFR 876.5130 - Urological catheter and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... generic type of device includes radiopaque urological catheters, ureteral catheters, urethral catheters, coudé catheters, balloon retention type catheters, straight catheters, upper urinary tract...

  18. The stuck central venous catheter: a word of caution.

    PubMed

    Makhija, Neeti; Choudhury, Minati; Kiran, Usha; Chowdhury, Ujjwal

    2008-10-01

    The placement of central venous catheter (CVC) through internal jugular vein is not free from potential hazards. We report two cases of triple lumen central venous catheter, placed into right internal jugular vein, which got entrapped in patients who had undergone mitral valve replacement. The entrapment of catheter went unnoticed until the time of removal. Subsequent investigations, mechanism of entrapment, prevention, and removal is described. To conclude, we encountered an unusual cause of stuck central venous catheter, in the left atrial suture line. Removal of central venous catheter requires utmost care, and should never be done by forceful traction in the postoperative cardiac surgical patients, as it may lead to disruption of suture lines or rupture of vessels.

  19. Temperature measurement within myocardium during in vitro RF catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Cao, H; Vorperian, V R; Tsai, J Z; Tungjitkusolmun, S; Woo, E J; Webster, J G

    2000-11-01

    While most commercial ablation units and research systems can provide catheter tip temperature during ablation, they do not provide information about the temperature change inside the myocardium, which determines the lesion size. We present the details of a flow simulation and temperature measurement system, which allows the monitoring of the temperature change inside the myocardium during in vitro radio frequency (RF) cardiac catheter ablation at different blood flow rates to which the catheter site may be exposed. We set up a circulation system that simulated different blood flow rates of 0 to 5 L/min at 37 degrees C. We continuously measured the temperature at the catheter tip using the built-in thermistor and inside the myocardium using a three-thermocouple probe. The system provides a means for further study of the temperature inside myocardium during RF catheter ablation under different flow conditions and at different penetration depths.

  20. Pericardial effusion associated with an appropriately placed umbilical venous catheter.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, A; Cook, V; Dunn, M

    2007-05-01

    Central venous catheterization is widely used in neonatal intensive care units to support tiny preterm babies. Pericardial effusion (PCE) and cardiac tamponade are uncommon but potentially fatal complications of percutaneous, umbilical and surgically placed central venous catheters related to intracardiac position or migration. This report describes a case of PCE arising from fluid infused via umbilical venous catheter. The case study highlights two important aspects: one, occurrence of PCE in a baby with satisfactory position of the umbilical catheter, and second, the life-saving application of basic echocardiography by bedside caregivers for the diagnosis and treatment of this critical condition.

  1. Central venous catheters - ports

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Intravascular Catheter-Related Infections. Centers For Disease Control and Prevention. April 2011. ... MPH, ABIM Board Certified in Internal Medicine and Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Atlanta, GA. ...

  2. Cryo-balloon catheter localization in fluoroscopic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurzendorfer, Tanja; Brost, Alexander; Jakob, Carolin; Mewes, Philip W.; Bourier, Felix; Koch, Martin; Kurzidim, Klaus; Hornegger, Joachim; Strobel, Norbert

    2013-03-01

    Minimally invasive catheter ablation has become the preferred treatment option for atrial fibrillation. Although the standard ablation procedure involves ablation points set by radio-frequency catheters, cryo-balloon catheters have even been reported to be more advantageous in certain cases. As electro-anatomical mapping systems do not support cryo-balloon ablation procedures, X-ray guidance is needed. However, current methods to provide support for cryo-balloon catheters in fluoroscopically guided ablation procedures rely heavily on manual user interaction. To improve this, we propose a first method for automatic cryo-balloon catheter localization in fluoroscopic images based on a blob detection algorithm. Our method is evaluated on 24 clinical images from 17 patients. The method successfully detected the cryoballoon in 22 out of 24 images, yielding a success rate of 91.6 %. The successful localization achieved an accuracy of 1.00 mm +/- 0.44 mm. Even though our methods currently fails in 8.4 % of the images available, it still offers a significant improvement over manual methods. Furthermore, detecting a landmark point along the cryo-balloon catheter can be a very important step for additional post-processing operations.

  3. Effects of multipolar electrode radiofrequency energy delivery on ventricular endocardium

    SciTech Connect

    Oeff, M.; Langberg, J.J.; Franklin, J.O.; Chin, M.C.; Sharkey, H.; Finkbeiner, W.; Herre, J.M.; Scheinman, M.M. )

    1990-03-01

    This study examined the effects of radiofrequency energy applied in a bipolar fashion with single as compared with multiple sequential applications at the canine endocardium. In this closed-chest model, radiofrequency energy (750 kHz) was delivered between two adjacent poles of an electrode catheter. Single applications were performed at distinct sites in the left (n = 30) and right ventricles (n = 29) of 13 normal dogs. A multiple sequential technique, which enlarges the ablated endocardial surface, was applied in the left (n = 13) and right ventricles (n = 4) of seven normal dogs and six dogs with remote myocardial infarction. Single applications (199 +/- 200 joules) resulted in lesions with a volume of 0.12 +/- 0.06 cm3 (range 0.03 to 0.31 cm3) and an endocardial surface area of 0.29 +/- 0.15 cm2 (range 0.06 to 0.63 cm2). Changes at the catheter/tissue interface led to a rise in impedance, restricting further enlargement of the necrosis. Sequential delivery of radiofrequency energy between poles 1 and 2, 2 and 3, and 3 and 4 of a quadripolar electrode catheter repeated 9 to 11 times in slightly different positions allowed a cumulative energy of 6571 +/- 3857 joules to be applied to the endocardium, resulting in a lesion volume of 0.84 +/- 0.38 cm3, with an endocardial lesion surface area of 3.7 +/- 1.2 cm2 (range 2.9 to 5.1 cm2). Histologically, all radiofrequency lesions were restricted to the endocardium/subendocardium with a small border zone of injury. Aggressive stimulation techniques did not induce ventricular tachycardia in any of the dogs before and 19 +/- 11.4 days after multiple sequential ablations.

  4. [The bladder catheter].

    PubMed

    Pestalozzi, D M

    1996-09-01

    The benefit of the transurethral catheter to protect or measure renal function is well accepted. Urethral stricture and infection of the lower urinary tract as the complications should lead to a cautious use of catheters. A careful placement, the choice of the best material and a correct management help to avoid complications. Alternatives are discussed.

  5. Novel Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation of Portal Vein Tumor Thrombus: Safety and Feasibility

    SciTech Connect

    Mizandari, Malkhaz; Ao, Guokun; Zhang Yaojun; Feng Xi; Shen Qiang; Chen Minshan; Lau, Wan Yee; Nicholls, Joanna; Jiao Long; Habib, Nagy

    2013-02-15

    We report our experience of the safety of partial recanalization of the portal vein using a novel endovascular radiofrequency (RF) catheter for portal vein tumor thrombosis. Six patients with liver cancer and tumor thrombus in the portal vein underwent percutaneous intravascular radiofrequency ablation (RFA) using an endovascular bipolar RF device. A 0.035-inch guidewire was introduced into a tributary of the portal vein and through which a 5G guide catheter was introduced into the main portal vein. After manipulation of the guide catheter over the thrombus under digital subtraction angiography, the endovascular RF device was inserted and activated around the thrombus. There were no observed technique specific complications, such as hemorrhage, vessel perforation, or infection. Post-RFA portography showed partial recanalization of portal vein. RFA of portal vein tumor thrombus in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma is technically feasible and warrants further investigation to assess efficacy compared with current recanalization techniques.

  6. Insights into energy delivery to myocardial tissue during radiofrequency ablation through application of the first law of thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Bunch, T Jared; Day, John D; Packer, Douglas L

    2009-04-01

    The approach to catheter-based radiofrequency ablation of atrial fibrillation has evolved, and as a consequence, more energy is delivered in the posterior left atrium, exposing neighboring tissue to untoward thermal injury. Simultaneously, catheter technology has advanced to allow more efficient energy delivery into the myocardium, which compounds the likelihood of collateral injury. This review focuses on the basic principles of thermodynamics as they apply to energy delivery during radiofrequency ablation. These principles can be used to titrate energy delivery and plan ablative approaches in an effort to minimize complications during the procedure.

  7. Force Control of Flexible Catheter Robots for Beating Heart Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kesner, Samuel B.; Howe, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    Recent developments in cardiac catheter technology promise to allow physicians to perform most cardiac interventions without stopping the heart or opening the chest. However, current cardiac devices, including newly developed catheter robots, are unable to accurately track and interact with the fast moving cardiac tissue without applying potentially damaging forces. This paper examines the challenges of implementing force control on a flexible robotic catheter. In particular, catheter friction and backlash must be compensated when controlling tissue interaction forces. Force controller designs are introduced and evaluated experimentally in a number of configurations. The controllers are based on the inner position loop force control approach where the position trajectory is adjusted to achieve a desired force on the target. Friction and backlash compensation improved force tracking up to 86% with residual RMS errors of 0.11 N while following a prerecorded cardiac tissue trajectory with accelerations of up to 3800 mm/s2. This performance provides sufficient accuracy to enable a wide range of beating heart surgical procedures. PMID:21874164

  8. Misplaced central venous catheter in the jugular venous arch exposed during dissection before sternotomy.

    PubMed

    Jung, Tae-Eun; Jee, Daelim

    2008-11-01

    Subclavian vein catheterization rarely results in misplacement of the central venous catheter (CVC) into the jugular venous arch (JVA). We present a case of misplacement of the CVC into the JVA during cardiac surgery.

  9. Percutaneous Retrieval of a Pulmonary Artery Catheter Knot in Pacing Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Valenzuela-Garcia, Luis Felipe Almendro-Delia, Manuel; Gonzalez-Valdayo, Miguel; Munoz-Campos, Juan; Dorado-Garcia, Jose C.; Gomez-Rosa, Francisco; Vazquez-Garcia, Rafael; Calderon-Leal, Jose M.

    2007-09-15

    To illustrate a successful approach to resolving a pulmonary artery catheter knot in the pacing leads of a cardiac resynchronization device. When planning invasive monitoring for patients having right chamber electrodes, fluoroscopic-guided catheter insertion and extraction is advisable. In the event of coiling or knotting, an interventional radiologist should be contacted as soon as possible to avoid serious complications.

  10. Radiofrequency ablation for benign thyroid nodules.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, S; Stacul, F; Zecchin, M; Dobrinja, C; Zanconati, F; Fabris, B

    2016-09-01

    Benign thyroid nodules are an extremely common occurrence. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is gaining ground as an effective technique for their treatment, in case they become symptomatic. Here we review what are the current indications to RFA, its outcomes in terms of efficacy, tolerability, and cost, and also how it compares to the other conventional and experimental treatment modalities for benign thyroid nodules. Moreover, we will also address the issue of treating with this technique patients with cardiac pacemakers (PM) or implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICD), as it is a rather frequent occurrence that has never been addressed in detail in the literature.

  11. Cardiac catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    Catheterization - cardiac; Heart catheterization; Angina - cardiac catheterization; CAD - cardiac catheterization; Coronary artery disease - cardiac catheterization; Heart valve - cardiac catheterization; Heart failure - ...

  12. Registry of Malignant Arrhythmias and Sudden Cardiac Death - Influence of Diagnostics and Interventions

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-30

    Ventricular Tachycardia; Ventricular Fibrillation; Sudden Cardiac Death; Coronary Angiography; Electrophysiologic Testing (EP); Catheter Ablation; Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PCI); Internal Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD)

  13. Left ventricular volumetric conductance catheter for rats.

    PubMed

    Ito, H; Takaki, M; Yamaguchi, H; Tachibana, H; Suga, H

    1996-04-01

    Left ventricular (LV) volume (V) is an essential parameter for assessment of the cardiac pump function. Measurement of LVV in situ by a conductance catheter method has been widely used in dogs and humans but not yet in small experimental animals such as rats. We instituted a miniaturized six-electrode conductance catheter (3-F) for rat LVV measurement and its signal processing apparatus. We compared stroke volumes (SVs) simultaneously measured with this conductance catheter introduced into the LV through the apex and an electromagnetic flow probe placed on the ascending aorta during gradual decreases in LVV by an inferior vena caval occlusion. A high and linear correlation (r = 0.982) was obtained between these differently measured by SVs pooled from six rats. In another group of three rats, LV pressure was simultaneously measured with a 3-F catheter-tip micromanometer introduced into the LV through the apex. We obtained the slope of the end-systolic pressure-volume (P-V) relationship (Emax) by a gradual ascending aortic occlusion. After administration of propranolol, Emax obviously decreased with no change in volume intercept of the P-V relationship. The conductance volumetry proved to be useful in rats.

  14. Sinuplasty (Balloon Catheter Dilation)

    MedlinePlus

    ... development of the balloon dilating catheter and its adaptation to sinus surgery. In the 1980s, the field ... used in endoscopic sinus surgery. It is the adaptation or application of minimally-invasive balloon technology to ...

  15. Central venous catheter - flushing

    MedlinePlus

    ... To flush your catheter, you will need: Clean paper towels Saline syringes (clear), and maybe heparin syringes ( ... your fingers before washing. Dry with a clean paper towel. Set up your supplies on a clean ...

  16. Indwelling catheter care

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin care part of your daily routine. Avoid physical activity for a week or two after your catheter is placed in your bladder. Cleaning Your Skin You will need these supplies for cleaning your ...

  17. MR-Guided Percutaneous Angioplasty: Assessment of Tracking Safety, Catheter Handling and Functionality

    SciTech Connect

    Wildermuth, Simon; Dumoulin, Charles L.; Pfammatter, Thomas; Maier, Stephan E.; Hofmann, Eugen; Debatin, Joerg F.

    1998-09-15

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance (MR)-guided percutaneous vascular interventions have evolved to a practical possibility with the advent of open-configuration MR systems and real-time tracking techniques. The purpose of this study was to assess an MR-tracking percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) catheter with regard to its safety profile and functionality. Methods: Real-time, biplanar tracking of the PTA catheter was made possible by incorporating a small radiofrequency (RF) coil in the catheter tip and connecting it to a coaxial cable embedded in the catheter wall. To evaluate potentially hazardous thermal effects due to the incorporation of the coil, temperature measurements were performed within and around the coil under various scanning and tracking conditions at 1.5 Tesla (T). Catheter force transmission and balloon-burst pressure of the MR-tracking PTA catheter were compared with those of a standard PTA catheter. The dilatative capability of the angioplasty balloon was assessed in vitro as well as in vivo, in an isolated femoral artery segment in a swine. Results: The degree of heating at the RF coil was directly proportional to the power of the RF pulses. Heating was negligible with MR tracking, conventional spin-echo and low-flip gradient-echo sequences. Sequences with higher duty cycles, such as fast spin echo, produced harmful heating effects. Force transmission of the MR-tracking PTA catheter was slightly inferior to that of the standard PTA catheter, while balloon-burst pressures were similar to those of conventional catheters. The MR-tracking PTA catheter functioned well both in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion: The in vivo use of an MR-tracking PTA catheter is safe under most scanning conditions.

  18. [Urinary catheter biofilm infections].

    PubMed

    Holá, V; Růzicka, F

    2008-04-01

    Urinary tract infections, most of which are biofilm infections in catheterized patients, account for more than 40% of hospital infections. Bacterial colonization of the urinary tract and catheters causes not only infection but also other complications such as catheter blockage by bacterial encrustation, urolithiasis and pyelonephritis. About 50% of long-term catheterized patients face urinary flow obstruction due to catheter encrustation, but no measure is currently available to prevent it. Encrustation has been known either to result from metabolic dysfunction or to be of microbial origin, with urease positive bacterial species implicated most often. Infectious calculi account for about 15-20% of all cases of urolithiasis and are often associated with biofilm colonization of a long-term indwelling urinary catheter or urethral stent. The use of closed catheter systems is helpful in reducing such problems; nevertheless, such a system only delays the inevitable, with infections emerging a little later. Various coatings intended to prevent the bacterial adhesion to the surface of catheters and implants and thus also the emergence of biofilm infections, unfortunately, do not inhibit the microbial adhesion completely and permanently and the only reliable method for biofilm eradication remains the removal of the foreign body from the patient.

  19. Cryo-balloon catheter position planning using AFiT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinoeder, Andreas; Brost, Alexander; Bourier, Felix; Koch, Martin; Kurzidim, Klaus; Hornegger, Joachim; Strobel, Norbert

    2012-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AFib) is the most common heart arrhythmia. In certain situations, it can result in life-threatening complications such as stroke and heart failure. For paroxsysmal AFib, pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) by catheter ablation is the recommended choice of treatment if drug therapy fails. During minimally invasive procedures, electrically active tissue around the pulmonary veins is destroyed by either applying heat or cryothermal energy to the tissue. The procedure is usually performed in electrophysiology labs under fluoroscopic guidance. Besides radio-frequency catheter ablation devices, so-called single-shot devices, e.g., the cryothermal balloon catheters, are receiving more and more interest in the electrophysiology (EP) community. Single-shot devices may be advantageous for certain cases, since they can simplify the creation of contiguous (gapless) lesion sets around the pulmonary vein which is needed to achieve PVI. In many cases, a 3-D (CT, MRI, or C-arm CT) image of a patient's left atrium is available. This data can then be used for planning purposes and for supporting catheter navigation during the procedure. Cryo-thermal balloon catheters are commercially available in two different sizes. We propose the Atrial Fibrillation Planning Tool (AFiT), which visualizes the segmented left atrium as well as multiple cryo-balloon catheters within a virtual reality, to find out how well cryo-balloons fit to the anatomy of a patient's left atrium. First evaluations have shown that AFiT helps physicians in two ways. First, they can better assess whether cryoballoon ablation or RF ablation is the treatment of choice at all. Second, they can select the proper-size cryo-balloon catheter with more confidence.

  20. Peritoneal catheters and related infections.

    PubMed

    Thodis, Elias; Passadakis, Ploumis; Lyrantzopooulos, Nikolaos; Panagoutsos, Stelios; Vargemezis, Vassilis; Oreopoulos, Dimitrios

    2005-01-01

    Catheter related infectious complications (exit-site infections, tunnel infections, and peritonitis) remain the major reasons for technique failure during the three decades since, continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) treatment has been first established. Despite improvements in catheter's survival rates, catheter related complications result in an increase in the cumulative patients' morbidity and often leading to the catheter removal. The ideal catheter provides reliable and rapid dialysate flow rates without leaks or infections. Among several types, the double-cuff straight Tenckhoff catheter, developed in 1968, is still the most widely used, although its use is decreasing in favour of swanneck catheters. Although there are only few well-designed trials comparing catheters and catheters related infectious complications, controlling for all other important variables, no difference in these complications among the main types of catheters was seen. The single cuff catheters have been associated with a shorter survival rate and time to the first peritonitis episode than the double-cuff catheters. Also exit-site infections were found to be more frequent and significantly more resistant to treatment with single-cuff compared to double-cuff ones. Finally, better results have been reported with the latest developed presternal peritoneal dialysis catheter both regarding survival rates and exit-site infection and peritonitis rates. Recently a renewed interest in continuous flow peritoneal dialysis stimulated inventions of imaginative, double-lumen catheters since a suitable peritoneal access is a sine qua non condition for the development of this new technique of peritoneal dialysis.

  1. The effect of elastic modulus on ablation catheter contact area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camp, Jon J.; Linte, Cristian A.; Rettmann, Maryam E.; Sun, Deyu; Packer, Douglas L.; Robb, Richard A.; Holmes, David R.

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac ablation consists of navigating a catheter into the heart and delivering RF energy to electrically isolate tissue regions that generate or propagate arrhythmia. Besides the challenges of accurate and precise targeting of the arrhythmic sites within the beating heart, limited information is currently available to the cardiologist regarding intricate electrodetissue contact, which directly impacts the quality of produced lesions. Recent advances in ablation catheter design provide intra-procedural estimates of tissue-catheter contact force, but the most direct indicator of lesion quality for any particular energy level and duration is the tissue-catheter contact area, and that is a function of not only force, but catheter pose and material elasticity as well. In this experiment, we have employed real-time ultrasound (US) imaging to determine the complete interaction between the ablation electrode and tissue to accurately estimate contact, which will help to better understand the effect of catheter pose and position relative to the tissue. By simultaneously recording tracked position, force reading and US image of the ablation catheter, the differing material properties of polyvinyl alcohol cryogel[1] phantoms are shown to produce varying amounts of tissue depression and contact area (implying varying lesion quality) for equivalent force readings. We have shown that the elastic modulus significantly affects the surface-contact area between the catheter and tissue at any level of contact force. Thus we provide evidence that a prescribed level of catheter force may not always provide sufficient contact area to produce an effective ablation lesion in the prescribed ablation time.

  2. Central Venous Catheter-Related Tachycardia in the Newborn: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Amer, Aya; Broadbent, Roland S.; Edmonds, Liza

    2016-01-01

    Central venous access is an important aspect of neonatal intensive care management. Malpositioned central catheters have been reported to induce cardiac tachyarrhythmia in adult populations and there are case reports within the neonatal population. We present a case of a preterm neonate with a preexisting umbilical venous catheter (UVC), who then developed a supraventricular tachycardia (SVT). This was initially treated with intravenous adenosine with transient reversion. Catheter migration was subsequently detected, with the UVC tip located within the heart. Upon withdrawal of the UVC and a final dose of adenosine, the arrhythmia permanently resolved. Our literature review confirms that tachyarrhythmia is a rare but recognised neonatal complication of malpositioned central venous catheters. We recommend the immediate investigation of central catheter position when managing neonatal tachyarrhythmia, as catheter repositioning is an essential aspect of management. PMID:28058050

  3. RF transmit power limit for the barewire loopless catheter antenna.

    PubMed

    Yeung, C J; Atalar, E

    2000-07-01

    The safety of the barewire loopless catheter antenna in transmit mode is addressed with respect to radiofrequency (RF) heating. Analytical expressions for electric field and specific absorption rate (SAR) distributions surrounding the antenna are postulated and experimentally verified. Limiting RF transmit power to 40-70 mW time-averaged power, depending on the specific antenna design, will ensure that the current regulatory guideline of SAR of 8 W/kg in any gram of tissue is not exceeded. These limits can act as guidelines for the design of RF pulses for use with this device. Further study is required to examine the safety of the antenna in receive mode.

  4. Catheter-related bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Tracie A

    2009-06-01

    Tunneled, cuffed, double-lumen catheters are commonly used for long-term venous access in hemodialysis patients. Complications of these catheters, including catheter-related infection, are a major cause of morbidity and resource utilization in the hemodialysis population. Treatment of catheter-related bloodstream infections includes the use of antibiotics and evaluation of the need for catheter removal or exchange. Measures to prevent catheter-related infections include use of an aseptic technique and antiseptic cleaning solution, elimination of Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage, topical exit site application of antibiotics, use of antibiotic lock solutions, and use of catheters and cuffs coated or impregnated with antimicrobial or antiseptic agents. This review article will provide an update on the prevalence, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of catheter-related infections in the hemodialysis population.

  5. Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation ablation: Achieving permanent pulmonary vein isolation by point-by-point radiofrequency lesions

    PubMed Central

    Pedrote, Alonso; Acosta, Juan; Jáuregui-Garrido, Beatriz; Frutos-López, Manuel; Arana-Rueda, Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary vein isolation by point-by-point radiofrequency catheter ablation constitutes the cornerstone of catheter ablation strategies for the treatment of atrial fibrillation. However, despite advances in pulmonary vein isolation ablation strategies, long-term success rates after ablation remain suboptimal, which highlights the need to develop techniques to achieve more durable lesions. Strategies proposed to improve the durability of pulmonary vein isolation can be divided into two groups: Those addressed to improving the quality of the lesion and those that optimize the detection of acute PV reconnection during the ablation procedure. This manuscript reviews the role and potential benefits of these techniques according to current clinical evidence.

  6. [Patient selection for catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Márquez, Manlio F

    2007-01-01

    The present report describes the program of radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) for atrial fibrillation (AF) in patients referred to the AF Clinic of the National Institute of Cardiology. Specific inclusion criteria are required for RFCA of AF. If the patient fulfills it, then an electrophysiological study is performed. A transseptal approach and special mapping catheters are used to detect abnormal electrical activity (AEA). Pulmonary vein isolation is performed at the ostium/ antrum of those veins with AEA if the patient had paroxysmal AF. Global pulmonary vein isolation with some additional lines guided by electroanatomical mapping is performed in the case of chronic AF. Postoperative follow-up includes consultation, ECG and Holter monitoring at 1, 3, 6 and 12-month. RFCA is a useful and relatively safe procedure for the treatment of AF and the only one with curative potential.

  7. Balloon Catheter Prevents Contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higginson, Gregory A.; Bouffard, Marc R.; Hoehicke, Beth S.; King, Bradley D.; Peterson, Sandra L.

    1994-01-01

    Balloon catheter similar to that used in such medical procedures as angioplasty and heart surgery protects small orifices against contamination and blockage by chips generated in machining operations. Includes small, inflatable balloon at end of thin, flexible tube. Contains additional features adapting it to anticontamination service: balloon larger to fit wider channel it must block; made of polyurethane (rather than latex), which does not fragment if bursts; material made thicker to resist abrasion better; and kink-resistant axial wire helps catheter negotiate tight bends.

  8. Catheter-associated UTI

    MedlinePlus

    ... UTI; Health care-associated UTI; Catheter-associated bacteriuria; Hospital acquired-UTI Images Bladder catheterization, female Bladder catheterization, male References Calfee DP. Prevention and control of health care-associated infections. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil ...

  9. Suprapubic catheter care

    MedlinePlus

    ... area around your catheter every day with mild soap and water. Gently pat it dry. Showers are fine. Ask your providers about bathtubs, swimming pools, and hot tubs. DO NOT use creams, powders, or sprays near the site. Apply bandages around ...

  10. [Hemodynamic monitoring in the intensive care unit: pulmonary artery catheter versus PiCCO].

    PubMed

    Gassanov, N; Caglayan, E; Nia, A; Erdmann, E; Er, F

    2011-02-01

    Hemodynamic monitoring is essential in the diagnosis and management of critically ill patients. Cardiac output represents a major monitoring parameter. There are a number of methods for measurement of cardiac output with various invasive capacities and functional reliability. Thermodilution pulmonary artery catheter and pulse contour analysis by PiCCO are widely used techniques to measure cardiac output in intensive care unit. This review describes the basic principles, limitations and complications of both monitoring tools.

  11. Radiofrequency Guide Wire Recanalization of Venous Occlusions in Patients with Malignant Superior Vena Cava Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Robert M.; David, Elizabeth; Pugash, Robyn A.; Annamalai, Ganesan

    2012-06-15

    Fibrotic central venous occlusions in patients with thoracic malignancy and prior radiotherapy can be impassable with standard catheters and wires, including the trailing or stiff end of a hydrophilic wire. We report two patients with superior vena cava syndrome in whom we successfully utilized a radiofrequency guide wire (PowerWire, Baylis Medical, Montreal, Quebec, Canada) to perforate through the occlusion and recanalize the occluded segment to alleviate symptoms.

  12. [Endocavitary ablation for arrhythmias. New modalities of radiofrequency applications. New energy types].

    PubMed

    Cauchemez, B; Lavergne, Th; Extramiana, F; Siliste, C; Leenhardt, A; Coumel, Ph

    2002-04-01

    Radiofrequency remains the reference energy type for catheter ablation of rhythm disorders. In the classic indications, which are atrial flutter or tachycardia, nodal re-entry and Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, this energy source has the best cost-efficiency-safety ratio, subject to strict conditions of use. Some new modalities of application have further improved performance, especially active irrigation of the electrode which allows induction of deeper lesions which is very useful for the ablation of difficult atrial flutters, epicardial fascicles of Kent and ischaemic ventricular tachycardias. The only emerging alternative energy type, in the framework of classical ablation, is cold, for which the principal advantages are the homogenous and slightly thrombogenic character for the lesion involved, and the possibility of reversible applications tests which are especially useful in the ablation of structures at risk. The situation is more open-ended concerning research on ablation for atrial fibrillation or the so-called new energy types, such as ultrasound and laser, whilst recognising a renewal in interest, especially for circumferential ablation of the pulmonary veins to isolate the ectopic venous foci. Mechanical energy such as luminous energy is emitted across a catheter balloon deployed at the orifice of the vein, perpendicular to its axis, aiming to reach a continuous circumferential lesion with a minimum of applications. Equally radiofrequency has been undergoing significant evolution for this application, such as by the development of porous catheter balloons with a liquid electrode, as well as by the development of deployable circumferential catheters. Ablation is use for atrial fibrillation, by endocavity atrial segmentation remains a field of research in which radiofrequency retains an important place. It is delivered via multi-electrode catheters according to the new application modalities, either pulsed or by phase interval, which secure better

  13. Programmable infusion pump and catheter: evaluation using 3-tesla magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Shellock, Frank G; Crivelli, Rocco; Venugopalan, Ramakrishna

    2008-07-01

    Objective.  This study assessed 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) issues for a programmable infusion pump and associated catheters. Methods.  A programmable infusion pump and associated catheters (MedStream Programmable Infusion Pump, 40 mL; SureStream TI Coil-Reinforced Intraspinal Catheter; SureStream TI Connector; and SureStream Silicone Catheter; Codman and Shurtleff Inc., a Johnson & Johnson Company, Raynham, MA, USA) underwent evaluation for magnetic field interactions (deflection angle and torque), heating (transmit/receive body radiofrequency coil; whole-body averaged specific absorption rate, 3 W/kg for 15 min), functional changes (before and after MRI using eight different MRI conditions), and artifacts (T1-weighted spin-echo and gradient-echo pulse sequences) at 3-Tesla. Results.  The programmable infusion pump and associated catheters exhibited minor magnetic field interactions. Heating was not excessive (≤ 1.9°), especially considering the experimental conditions used for this evaluation (ie, relatively high radiofrequency power/specific absorption rate level and use of a nonperfused phantom). The function of three out of six pumps was temporarily altered by exposures to 3-Tesla MRI conditions. Reset was achieved in each case. Artifacts were relatively large for the pump and minor for the catheter. Conclusions.  The programmable infusion pump and catheters will not pose increased risk to a patient examined using 3-Tesla MRI as long as specific safety guidelines are followed, which includes interrogation of the pump post-MRI to ensure proper settings. Artifacts for the programmable infusion pump may impact the diagnostic use of MRI if the area of interest is in the same area or near the device.

  14. Cardiac Arrhythmias: Diagnosis, Symptoms, and Treatments.

    PubMed

    Fu, Du-Guan

    2015-11-01

    The cardiac arrhythmia is characterized by irregular rhythm of heartbeat which could be either too slow (<60 beats/min) or too fast (>100 beats/min) and can happen at any age. The use of pacemaker and defibrillators devices has been suggested for heart arrhythmias patients. The antiarrhythmic medications have been reported for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias or irregular heartbeats. The diagnosis, symptoms, and treatments of cardiac arrhythmias as well as the radiofrequency ablation, tachycardia, Brugada syndrome, arterial fibrillation, and recent research on the genetics of cardiac arrhythmias have been described here.

  15. Motion compensation by registration-based catheter tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brost, Alexander; Wimmer, Andreas; Liao, Rui; Hornegger, Joachim; Strobel, Norbert

    2011-03-01

    The treatment of atrial fibrillation has gained increasing importance in the field of computer-aided interventions. State-of-the-art treatment involves the electrical isolation of the pulmonary veins attached to the left atrium under fluoroscopic X-ray image guidance. Due to the rather low soft-tissue contrast of X-ray fluoroscopy, the heart is difficult to see. To overcome this problem, overlay images from pre-operative 3-D volumetric data can be used to add anatomical detail. Unfortunately, these overlay images are static at the moment, i.e., they do not move with respiratory and cardiac motion. The lack of motion compensation may impair X-ray based catheter navigation, because the physician could potentially position catheters incorrectly. To improve overlay-based catheter navigation, we present a novel two stage approach for respiratory and cardiac motion compensation. First, a cascade of boosted classifiers is employed to segment a commonly used circumferential mapping catheter which is firmly fixed at the ostium of the pulmonary vein during ablation. Then, a 2-D/2-D model-based registration is applied to track the segmented mapping catheter. Our novel hybrid approach was evaluated on 10 clinical data sets consisting of 498 fluoroscopic monoplane frames. We obtained an average 2-D tracking error of 0.61 mm, with a minimum error of 0.26 mm and a maximum error of 1.62 mm. These results demonstrate that motion compensation using registration-based catheter tracking is both feasible and accurate. Using this approach, we can only estimate in-plane motion. Fortunately, compensating for this is often sufficient for EP procedures where the motion is governed by breathing.

  16. Endovascular treatment of PA pseudoaneurysm caused by Swan-Ganz catheter.

    PubMed

    Rudziński, Piotr N; Demkow, Marcin; Michałowska, Ilona; Abramczuk, Elżbieta; Szymański, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    The following case report describes a complication of Swan-Ganz catheterization and its endovascular treatment with a single coil. Application of this particular catheter in the pulmonary artery during cardiac surgery may lead to mechanical perforation and creation of an extravascular sac, which is called a pseudoaneurysm. There are different methods that lead to tamponade or closure of the leakage. Interventional cardiology procedures are nowadays the most appropriate way of treatment of Swan-Ganz catheter induced vascular complications.

  17. Assessment of atrial electromechanical interval using echocardiography after catheter ablation in patients with persistent atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaodong; Chen, Minglong; Wang, Yingying; Yang, Bing; Ju, Weizhu; Zhang, Fengxiang; Cao, Kejiang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We sought to investigate variation of atrial electromechanical interval after catheter ablation procedure in patients with persistent atrial fibrillation using pulse Doppler (PW) and pulse tissue Doppler imaging (PW-TDI). A total of 25 consecutive in-patients with persistent atrial fibrillation, who restored sinus rhythm after ablation procedure, were recruited in our cardiac center. Echocardiography was performed on each patient at 2 hours, 1 day, 5 days, 1 month and 3 months after the ablation therapy, and atrial electromechanical delay was measured simultaneously by PW and PW-TDI. There was no significant difference between PW and TDI in measuring atrial electromechanical delay. However, at postoperative 2 hours, peak A detection rates were mathematically but nonsignificantly greater by PW-TDI than by PW. Second, there was a significant decreasing trend in atrial electromechanical interval from postoperative 2 hours to 3 months, but only postoperative 2-hour atrial electromechanical interval was significantly greater than atrial electromechanical interval at other time. Lastly, patients without postoperative 2-hour atrial electromechanical interval had a significantly longer duration of atrial fibrillation as compared to those with postoperative 2-hour atrial electromechanical interval, by the PW or by PW-TDI, respectively. In patients with persistent atrial fibrillation, atrial electromechanical interval may decrease significantly within the first 24 hours after ablation but remain consistent later, and was significantly related to patients’ duration of atrial fibrillation. Atrial electromechanical interval, as a potential predicted factor, is recommended to be measured by either PW or TDI after 24 hours, when patients had recovered sinus rhythm by radiofrequency ablation. PMID:27924066

  18. In Vivo Evaluations of a Phased Ultrasound Array for Transesophageal Cardiac Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, Devina; Werner, Jacob; Park, Eun-Joo; Francischelli, David; Smith, Nadine Barrie

    2010-03-01

    Atrial fibrillation is one of the most common arrhythmias that affects over 2.2 million Americans each year. Catheter ablation, one of the effective treatments, has shown high rate of success in treating paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Currently, radiofrequency which is being used for catheter ablation is an invasive procedure. Measurable morbidity and significant costs and time are associated with this modality of treatment of permanent or persistent atrial fibrillation. In order to address these issues, a transesophageal ultrasound applicator for noninvasive cardiac ablation was designed, developed and evaluated. The ultrasound energy delivered by the phased array was used to create a lesion in the myocardial tissue. Various factors, simulation results of transducer arrays, current transesophageal medical devices, and throat anatomy, were considered while designing a phased ultrasound transducer that can be inserted into the esophagus. For this research, a two-dimensional sparse phased array with flat tapered elements was fabricated and evaluated in in vivo experiments. Five pigs were anesthetized; the array was passed transesophagealy and positioned over the heart. An operating frequency of 1.6 MHz and 8˜15 minutes of array operation resulted in both single and multiple lesions on atrial and ventricular myocardium. The average size of lesions was 5.1±2.1 mm in diameter and 7.8±2.5 mm in length. Experimental results indicate that the array delivered sufficient power to produce ablation at the focal point while not grossly damaging the tissue surrounding the area of interest. These results demonstrate a potential application of the ultrasound applicator for noninvasive transesophageal cardiac surgery in atrial fibrillation treatment.

  19. [Rotational stability of angiography catheters].

    PubMed

    Schröder, J; Weber, M

    1992-10-01

    Rotatory stability is a parameter that reflects the ability of a catheter to transmit a rotation applied at the outer end to the catheter tip for the purpose of selective probing. A method for measuring the rotatory stability is described, and the results of rotatory stability measurements of 70 different commercially available catheters are reported. There is an almost linear correlation between the rotatory stability and the difference between the respective fourth power of the external and internal diameter or, approximately, to the fourth power of the external diameter for catheters without wire reinforcement. With the same cross-sectional dimensions, the rotatory stability of teflon, polyethylene, and nylon catheters has an approximate ratio of 1:2:4. Wire reinforcement increases rotatory stability by an average factor of about 3. For catheters of calibers 5 F and 6 F, a correlation between the rotatory stability and the weight of the reinforcing wire mesh is apparent.

  20. Results of a comparative study of low energy direct current with radiofrequency ablation in patients with the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Lemery, R; Talajic, M; Roy, D; Lavoie, L; Coutu, B; Hii, J T; Radzik, D; Lavallee, E; Cartier, R

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare two new power sources for catheter ablation in patients with the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. DESIGN--120 consecutive patients with accessory pathways had catheter ablation. Low energy direct current (DC) was used in the first 60 patients and radio-frequency current in the next 60 patients. SETTING--Electrophysiological laboratory of a large heart institute. PATIENTS--72 men and 48 women (mean (SD) age 35 (14) years (range 9-75)). The accessory pathways were in the left free wall in 73 patients. They were posteroseptal in 35 patients, in the right free wall in five, and anteroseptal in seven. There was no significant difference in the clinical or electrophysiological variables between the two ablation groups. RESULTS--Catheter ablation with low energy direct current was successful in 55/60 patients (92%) and radiofrequency energy was successful in 52/60 patients (87%). Low energy direct current was also successful in four of the eight patients in whom radiofrequency ablation had failed. Radiofrequency ablation was successful in two of the five patients in whom low energy direct current ablation had failed. The mean (SD) procedure and fluoroscopy times for successful ablation were 3.2 (1.5) h and 61 (40) min respectively. These times were similar for both power sources. Accessory pathway conduction recurred in 17 patients (28%) who had low energy direct current and four patients (7%) who received radiofrequency energy (p < 0.004). All patients with recurrence of an accessory pathway had successful re-ablation. CONCLUSIONS--Both new power sources successfully ablated accessory pathways, (overall success rate 94% (113/120 patients)). Radiofrequency ablation, however, did not require general anaesthesia and was associated with a significantly lower rate of recurrence of accessory pathway conduction. Therefore radiofrequency should be used initially for ablation. Low energy direct current may be most useful as a back-up in patients in whom

  1. Superconductive radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, H.L.; Elliott, T.S.

    1998-05-19

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The SRF window assembly has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The SRF window assembly comprises a superconducting frame, a ceramic plate having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet for sealing plate into frame. The plate is brazed to eyelet which is then electron beam welded to frame. A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the SRF window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator. 11 figs.

  2. Superconducting radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, H.L.; Elliott, T.S.

    1997-03-11

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly comprises a superconducting frame, a ceramic plate having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet for sealing plate into frame. The plate is brazed to eyelet which is then electron beam welded to frame. A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator. 11 figs.

  3. Radiofrequency attenuator and method

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Benjamin P.; McCleskey, T. Mark; Burrell, Anthony K.; Agrawal, Anoop; Hall, Simon B.

    2009-11-10

    Radiofrequency attenuator and method. The attenuator includes a pair of transparent windows. A chamber between the windows is filled with molten salt. Preferred molten salts include quarternary ammonium cations and fluorine-containing anions such as tetrafluoroborate (BF.sub.4.sup.-), hexafluorophosphate (PF.sub.6.sup.-), hexafluoroarsenate (AsF.sub.6.sup.-), trifluoromethylsulfonate (CF.sub.3SO.sub.3.sup.-), bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-), bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3CF.sub.2SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-) and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.3 C.sup.-). Radicals or radical cations may be added to or electrochemically generated in the molten salt to enhance the RF attenuation.

  4. Radiofrequency attenuator and method

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Benjamin P.; McCleskey, T. Mark; Burrell, Anthony K.; Agrawal, Anoop; Hall, Simon B.

    2009-01-20

    Radiofrequency attenuator and method. The attenuator includes a pair of transparent windows. A chamber between the windows is filled with molten salt. Preferred molten salts include quarternary ammonium cations and fluorine-containing anions such as tetrafluoroborate (BF.sub.4.sup.-), hexafluorophosphate (PF.sub.6.sup.-), hexafluoroarsenate (AsF.sub.6.sup.-), trifluoromethylsulfonate (CF.sub.3SO.sub.3.sup.-), bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-), bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3CF.sub.2SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-) and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.3C.sup.-). Radicals or radical cations may be added to or electrochemically generated in the molten salt to enhance the RF attenuation.

  5. Development of a balloon volume sensor for pulsating balloon catheters.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Timothy D C; Hattler, Brack G; Federspiel, William J

    2004-01-01

    Helium pulsed balloons are integral components of several cardiovascular devices, including intraaortic balloon pumps (IABP) and a novel intravenous respiratory support catheter. Effective use of these devices clinically requires full inflation and deflation of the balloon, and improper operating conditions that lead to balloon under-inflation can potentially reduce respiratory or cardiac support provided to the patient. The goal of the present study was to extend basic spirographic techniques to develop a system to dynamically measure balloon volumes suitable for use in rapidly pulsating balloon catheters. The dynamic balloon volume sensor system (DBVSS) developed here used hot wire anemometry to measure helium flow in the drive line from console to catheter and integrated the flow to determine the volume delivered in each balloon pulsation. An important component of the DBVSS was an algorithm to automatically detect and adjust flow signals and measured balloon volumes in the presence of gas composition changes that arise from helium leaks occurring in these systems. The DBVSS was capable of measuring balloon volumes within 5-10% of actual balloon volumes over a broad range of operating conditions relevant to IABP and the respiratory support catheter. This includes variations in helium concentration from 70-100%, pulsation frequencies from 120-480 beats per minute, and simulated clinical conditions of reduced balloon filling caused by constricted vessels, increased driveline, or catheter resistance.

  6. A 4-DOF Robot for Positioning Ultrasound Imaging Catheters.

    PubMed

    Loschak, Paul M; Degirmenci, Alperen; Tenzer, Yaroslav; Howe, Robert D

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we present the design, fabrication, and testing of a robot for automatically positioning ultrasound imaging catheters. Our system will point ultrasound (US) catheters to provide real-time imaging of anatomical structures and working instruments during minimally invasive surgeries. Manually navigating US catheters is difficult and requires extensive training in order to aim the US imager at desired targets. Therefore, a four DOF robotic system was developed to automatically navigate US imaging catheters for enhanced imaging. A rotational transmission enables three DOF for pitch, yaw, and roll of the imager. This transmission is translated by the fourth DOF. An accuracy analysis was conducted to calculate the maximum allowable joint motion error. Rotational joints must be accurate to within 1.5° and the translational joint must be accurate within 1.4 mm. Motion tests were then conducted to validate the accuracy of the robot. The average resulting errors in positioning of the rotational joints were measured to be 0.28°-0.38° with average measured backlash error 0.44°. Average translational positioning and backlash errors were measured to be significantly lower than the reported accuracy of the position sensor. The resulting joint motion errors were well within the required specifications for accurate robot motion. Such effective navigation of US imaging catheters will enable better visualization in various procedures ranging from cardiac arrhythmia treatment to tumor removal in urological cases.

  7. A 4-DOF Robot for Positioning Ultrasound Imaging Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Loschak, Paul M.; Degirmenci, Alperen; Tenzer, Yaroslav; Howe, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present the design, fabrication, and testing of a robot for automatically positioning ultrasound imaging catheters. Our system will point ultrasound (US) catheters to provide real-time imaging of anatomical structures and working instruments during minimally invasive surgeries. Manually navigating US catheters is difficult and requires extensive training in order to aim the US imager at desired targets. Therefore, a four DOF robotic system was developed to automatically navigate US imaging catheters for enhanced imaging. A rotational transmission enables three DOF for pitch, yaw, and roll of the imager. This transmission is translated by the fourth DOF. An accuracy analysis was conducted to calculate the maximum allowable joint motion error. Rotational joints must be accurate to within 1.5° and the translational joint must be accurate within 1.4 mm. Motion tests were then conducted to validate the accuracy of the robot. The average resulting errors in positioning of the rotational joints were measured to be 0.28°-0.38° with average measured backlash error 0.44°. Average translational positioning and backlash errors were measured to be significantly lower than the reported accuracy of the position sensor. The resulting joint motion errors were well within the required specifications for accurate robot motion. Such effective navigation of US imaging catheters will enable better visualization in various procedures ranging from cardiac arrhythmia treatment to tumor removal in urological cases. PMID:26925468

  8. Transhepatic central venous catheter for long-term access in paediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Mortell, Alan; Said, Hanan; Doodnath, Reshma; Walsh, Kevin; Corbally, Martin

    2008-02-01

    Vascular access in paediatric patients with chronic and/or life-threatening illness is crucial to survival. Access is frequently lost in this group because of thrombosis, infection, or displacement, and vascular options can quickly be exhausted. The last resort access procedure is generally a direct atrial catheter inserted via a thoracotomy. A viable alternative is the percutaneous transhepatic Broviac catheter (Bard Access Systems, Salt Lake City, UT). We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 5 patients who underwent percutaneous transhepatic Broviac insertion for long-term access over a 4-year period in a single institution. Four of the patients (80%) had a significant cardiac abnormality, with 1 patient requiring long-term parenteral nutrition after complicated necrotizing enterocolitis. All patients had significant caval thrombosis, which precluded them having placement of a standard percutaneous or openly placed central catheter. Of the 5 patients, 2 (40%) died of cardiac-related illnesses. Of the 3 surviving patients, 2 had functioning catheters electively removed because they were no longer required. One catheter was removed at thoracotomy for right atrial perforation because of catheter erosion. Vascular access in paediatric patients with chronic and/or life-threatening illness is crucial to survival. Transhepatic central venous catheters are a feasible, reliable, and relatively easily placed form of central access in patients with multiple venous thromboses requiring long-term access. This route should be considered in paediatric patients requiring central access in preference to a thoracotomy.

  9. Creation of transcatheter aortopulmonary and cavopulmonary shunts using magnetic catheters: feasibility study in swine.

    PubMed

    Levi, Daniel S; Danon, Saar; Gordon, Brent; Virdone, Nicky; Vinuela, Fernando; Shah, Sanjay; Carman, Greg; Moore, John W

    2009-05-01

    Surgical shunts are the basic form of palliation for many types of congenital heart disease. The Glenn shunt (superior cavopulmonary connection) and central shunt (aortopulmonary connection) represent surgical interventions that could potentially be accomplished by transcatheter techniques. We sought to investigate the efficacy of using neodymium iron boron (NdFeB) magnetic catheters to create transcatheter cavopulmonary and aortopulmonary shunts. NdFeB magnets were machined and integrated into catheters. "Target" catheters were placed in the pulmonary arteries (PAs), and radiofrequency "perforation" catheters were placed in either the descending aorta (DAo) for central shunts or the superior vena cava (SVC) for Glenn shunts. The magnet technique or "balloon target" method was used to pass wires from the DAo or the SVC into the PA. Aortopulmonary and cavopulmonary connections were then created using Atrium iCAST covered stents. Magnet catheters were used to perforate the left pulmonary artery from the DAo, thereby establishing a transcatheter central shunt. Given the orientation of the vasculature, magnetic catheters could not be used for SVC-to-PA connections; however, perforation from the SVC to the right pulmonary artery was accomplished with a trans-septal needle and balloon target. Transcatheter Glenn or central shunts were successfully created in four swine.

  10. Nephrologists Hate the Dialysis Catheters: A Systemic Review of Dialysis Catheter Associated Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Kavita

    2017-01-01

    A 53-year-old Egyptian female with end stage renal disease, one month after start of hemodialysis via an internal jugular catheter, presented with fever and shortness of breath. She developed desquamating vesiculobullous lesions, widespread on her body. She was in profound septic shock and broad spectrum antibiotics were started with appropriate fluid replenishment. An echocardiogram revealed bulky leaflets of the mitral valve with a highly mobile vegetation about 2.3 cm long attached to the anterior leaflet. CT scan of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis showed bilateral pleural effusions in the chest, with triangular opacities in the lungs suggestive of infarcts. There was splenomegaly with triangular hypodensities consistent with splenic infarcts. Blood cultures repeatedly grew Candida albicans. Despite parenteral antifungal therapy, the patient deteriorated over the course of 5 days. She died due to a subsequent cardiac arrest. Systemic review of literature revealed that the rate of infection varies amongst the various types of accesses, and it is well documented that AV fistulas have a much less rate of infection in comparison to temporary catheters. All dialysis units should strive to make a multidisciplinary effort to have a referral process early on, for access creation, and to avoid catheters associated morbidity.

  11. Superconductive radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Harry Lawrence; Elliott, Thomas S.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly (20) has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly (20) comprises a superconducting frame (30), a ceramic plate (40) having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet (50) for sealing plate (40) into frame (30). The plate (40) is brazed to eyelet (50) which is then electron beam welded to frame (30). A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator.

  12. Superconducting radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Harry L.; Elliott, Thomas S.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly (20) has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly (20) comprises a superconducting frame (30), a ceramic plate (40) having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet (50) for sealing plate (40) into frame (30). The plate (40) is brazed to eyelet (50) which is then electron beam welded to frame (30). A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator.

  13. Measurement of radiofrequency fields

    SciTech Connect

    Leonowich, J.A.

    1992-05-01

    We are literally surrounded by radiofrequency (RFR) and microwave radiation, from both natural and man-made sources. The identification and control of man-made sources of RFR has become a high priority of radiation safety professionals in recent years. For the purposes of this paper, we will consider RFR to cover the frequencies from 3 kHz to 300 MHz, and microwaves from 300 MHz to 300 GHz, and will use the term RFR interchangeably to describe both. Electromagnetic radiation and field below 3 kHz is considered Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) and will not be discussed in this paper. Unlike x- and gamma radiation, RFR is non-ionizing. The energy of any RFR photon is insufficient to produce ionizations in matter. The measurement and control of RFR hazards is therefore fundamentally different from ionizing radiation. The purpose of this paper is to acquaint the reader with the fundamental issues involved in measuring and safely using RFR fields. 23 refs.

  14. Photoacoustic characterization of radiofrequency ablation lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, Richard; Dana, Nicholas; Di Biase, Luigi; Natale, Andrea; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2012-02-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) procedures are used to destroy abnormal electrical pathways in the heart that can cause cardiac arrhythmias. Current methods relying on fluoroscopy, echocardiography and electrical conduction mapping are unable to accurately assess ablation lesion size. In an effort to better visualize RFA lesions, photoacoustic (PA) and ultrasonic (US) imaging were utilized to obtain co-registered images of ablated porcine cardiac tissue. The left ventricular free wall of fresh (i.e., never frozen) porcine hearts was harvested within 24 hours of the animals' sacrifice. A THERMOCOOLR Ablation System (Biosense Webster, Inc.) operating at 40 W for 30-60 s was used to induce lesions through the endocardial and epicardial walls of the cardiac samples. Following lesion creation, the ablated tissue samples were placed in 25 °C saline to allow for multi-wavelength PA imaging. Samples were imaged with a VevoR 2100 ultrasound system (VisualSonics, Inc.) using a modified 20-MHz array that could provide laser irradiation to the sample from a pulsed tunable laser (Newport Corp.) to allow for co-registered photoacoustic-ultrasound (PAUS) imaging. PA imaging was conducted from 750-1064 nm, with a surface fluence of approximately 15 mJ/cm2 maintained during imaging. In this preliminary study with PA imaging, the ablated region could be well visualized on the surface of the sample, with contrasts of 6-10 dB achieved at 750 nm. Although imaging penetration depth is a concern, PA imaging shows promise in being able to reliably visualize RF ablation lesions.

  15. Radiofrequency power deposition near metallic wires during MR imaging: feasibility study using T1-weighted thermal imaging.

    PubMed

    Oulmane, F; Detti, V; Grenier, D; Perrin, E; Saint-Jalmes, H

    2007-01-01

    The presence of metallic conductors (implants, wires or catheters) is prohibited in MR imaging for safety purpose with respect to radiofrequency (RF) power deposition caused by RF excitation B1 field. This work describes the use of T1-weigthed MR imaging for estimating a thermal map around a metallic (copper) wire located in the center of a MR imaging unit during an imaging sequence. The experimental set up and the methodology used for capturing the elevation of temperature created by radiofrequency power deposition around the wire is presented. A proof of its efficiency to followup temperature elevation about 0,5 degrees C in a milimetric region of interest (pixel size: 1 x 1 mm2, slice thickness 5 mm) located around the wire is given, leading to further developments of MR imaging in presence of metallic implants, coils or catheters.

  16. A statistical method for retrospective cardiac and respiratory motion gating of interventional cardiac x-ray images

    SciTech Connect

    Panayiotou, Maria King, Andrew P.; Housden, R. James; Ma, YingLiang; Rhode, Kawal S.; Cooklin, Michael; O'Neill, Mark; Gill, Jaswinder; Rinaldi, C. Aldo

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Image-guided cardiac interventions involve the use of fluoroscopic images to guide the insertion and movement of interventional devices. Cardiorespiratory gating can be useful for 3D reconstruction from multiple x-ray views and for reducing misalignments between 3D anatomical models overlaid onto fluoroscopy. Methods: The authors propose a novel and potentially clinically useful retrospective cardiorespiratory gating technique. The principal component analysis (PCA) statistical method is used in combination with other image processing operations to make our proposed masked-PCA technique suitable for cardiorespiratory gating. Unlike many previously proposed techniques, our technique is robust to varying image-content, thus it does not require specific catheters or any other optically opaque structures to be visible. Therefore, it works without any knowledge of catheter geometry. The authors demonstrate the application of our technique for the purposes of retrospective cardiorespiratory gating of normal and very low dose x-ray fluoroscopy images. Results: For normal dose x-ray images, the algorithm was validated using 28 clinical electrophysiology x-ray fluoroscopy sequences (2168 frames), from patients who underwent radiofrequency ablation (RFA) procedures for the treatment of atrial fibrillation and cardiac resynchronization therapy procedures for heart failure. The authors established end-systole, end-expiration, and end-inspiration success rates of 97.0%, 97.9%, and 97.0%, respectively. For very low dose applications, the technique was tested on ten x-ray sequences from the RFA procedures with added noise at signal to noise ratio (SNR) values of√(5)0, √(1)0, √(8), √(6), √(5), √(2), and √(1) to simulate the image quality of increasingly lower dose x-ray images. Even at the low SNR value of √(2), representing a dose reduction of more than 25 times, gating success rates of 89.1%, 88.8%, and 86.8% were established. Conclusions: The proposed

  17. The Hunter pulmonary angiography catheter for a brachiocephalic vein approach.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Galia; Kowalik, Karen J; Ganguli, Suverano; Hunter, David W

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to describe our experience in performing pulmonary angiography using the Hunter pulmonary catheter, manufactured by Cook, Inc., which is a modified 6F pigtail catheter with a "C-shaped" curve, designed for a brachiocephalic vein approach. One hundred twenty-three patients underwent pulmonary angiograms using the Hunter catheter between August 1997 and January 2002. Operator comments were gathered in 86 (70%) of the cases. The operator was, if possible, the most junior resident on the service. Thirty-nine operators participated in the survey. Efficacy, safety, and ease of use of the catheter were determined by operators' comments and ECG observations during the procedure. Corroborating clinical data were gathered from medical records. In 68 (79%) of the procedures that were commented upon, the operator described insertion into the pulmonary artery (PA) as easy; only 2 (2%) indicated difficulty in accessing the PA. In 41 (63%) of the bilateral angiograms that were commented upon, the operator described accessing the left PA from the right PA as easy; only 6 (9%) rated it as difficult and all were with an older technique in which the catheter was withdrawn to the pulmonary bifurcation without a wire or with only the soft tip of the wire in the pigtail and then rotated to the left main pulmonary artery. Thirty-one of the 41 patients who demonstrated premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) had a previous history of heart disease. Nineteen of the 39 patients who did not have PVCs had a history of heart disease (p = 0.018). The maneuverability and shape of the Hunter catheter make pulmonary angiography an easy procedure, even for operators with minimal experience and limited technical proficiency. PVCs demonstrated a statistically significant correlation with a positive patient history for cardiac disease, rather than being a universal risk.

  18. The Hunter Pulmonary Angiography Catheter for a Brachiocephalic Vein Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, Galia Kowalik, Karen J.; Ganguli, Suverano; Hunter, David W.

    2006-12-15

    The purpose of this work was to describe our experience in performing pulmonary angiography using the Hunter pulmonary catheter, manufactured by Cook, Inc., which is a modified 6F pigtail catheter with a 'C-shaped' curve, designed for a brachiocephalic vein approach. One hundred twenty-three patients underwent pulmonary angiograms using the Hunter catheter between August 1997 and January 2002. Operator comments were gathered in 86 (70%) of the cases. The operator was, if possible, the most junior resident on the service. Thirty-nine operators participated in the survey. Efficacy, safety, and ease of use of the catheter were determined by operators' comments and ECG observations during the procedure. Corroborating clinical data were gathered from medical records. In 68 (79%) of the procedures that were commented upon, the operator described insertion into the pulmonary artery (PA) as easy; only 2 (2%) indicated difficulty in accessing the PA. In 41 (63%) of the bilateral angiograms that were commented upon, the operator described accessing the left PA from the right PA as easy; only 6 (9%) rated it as difficult and all were with an older technique in which the catheter was withdrawn to the pulmonary bifurcation without a wire or with only the soft tip of the wire in the pigtail and then rotated to the left main pulmonary artery. Thirty-one of the 41 patients who demonstrated premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) had a previous history of heart disease. Nineteen of the 39 patients who did not have PVCs had a history of heart disease (p = 0.018). The maneuverability and shape of the Hunter catheter make pulmonary angiography an easy procedure, even for operators with minimal experience and limited technical proficiency. PVCs demonstrated a statistically significant correlation with a positive patient history for cardiac disease, rather than being a universal risk.

  19. The biophysics of renal sympathetic denervation using radiofrequency energy.

    PubMed

    Patel, Hitesh C; Dhillon, Paramdeep S; Mahfoud, Felix; Lindsay, Alistair C; Hayward, Carl; Ernst, Sabine; Lyon, Alexander R; Rosen, Stuart D; di Mario, Carlo

    2014-05-01

    Renal sympathetic denervation is currently performed in the treatment of resistant hypertension by interventionists who otherwise do not typically use radiofrequency (RF) energy ablation in their clinical practice. Adequate RF lesion formation is dependent upon good electrode-tissue contact, power delivery, electrode-tissue interface temperature, target-tissue impedance and the size of the catheter's active electrode. There is significant interplay between these variables and hence an appreciation of the biophysical determinants of RF lesion formation is required to provide effective and safe clinical care to our patients. In this review article, we summarize the biophysics of RF ablation and explain why and how complications of renal sympathetic denervation may occur and discuss methods to minimise them.

  20. Light modulated electron beam driven radiofrequency emitter

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, M.T.; Tallerico, P.J.

    1979-10-10

    The disclosure relates to a light modulated electron beam-driven radiofrequency emitter. Pulses of light impinge on a photoemissive device which generates an electron beam having the pulse characteristics of the light. The electron beam is accelerated through a radiofrequency resonator which produces radiofrequency emission in accordance with the electron, hence, the light pulses.

  1. Radiofrequency fields and teratogenesis.

    PubMed

    Heynick, Louis N; Merritt, James H

    2003-01-01

    Experimental studies that sought teratologic effects or developmental abnormalities from exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RFEMF) in the range 3 kHz-300 GHz are critically reviewed for their possible consequences on human health. Those studies were conducted on beetles, birds, rodents, and nonhuman primates. Collectively, those experimental studies indicate that teratologic effects can occur only from exposure levels that cause biologically detrimental increases in body temperature. No reliable experimental evidence was found for nonthermal teratologic effects; rodents, mouse fetuses, and perinatal mice are more susceptible to such effects than rats. The primary confirmed effect in rats at high RFEMF levels was initial weight deficits in fetuses and neonates that decreased with infant growth. More generally from findings with pregnant mammals, exposures at RFEMF levels far higher than those permitted under the IEEE human exposure guidelines are necessary to reach or exceed cited experimental thresholds for maternal temperature increases. Some results indicated that the levels necessary to cause such effects in pregnant mammals could exceed those lethal to the dams. In a behavioral study of squirrel monkeys, no effects were observed on usual dam-offspring interactions or EEGs, but unexpected deaths of a number of offspring had occurred. However, this finding was not confirmed in a study solely on infant death using a larger number of subjects for greater statistical validity. Also reviewed were epidemiologic studies of various human populations considered to have been chronically exposed to environmental levels of RFEMF. Early studies on the incidence of congenital anomalies yielded no credible evidence that chronic exposure of pregnant women or of fathers exposed to RFEMF from nearby sources at levels below those guidelines would cause any anomalies in their offspring. The findings of studies on pregnancy outcomes of female physiotherapists

  2. [Catheter-related infections: microbiology].

    PubMed

    Timsit, J F

    2005-03-01

    Coagulase negative staphylococci, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas sp. are the most frequent microorganisms responsible for catheter-related infections. A relative frequency of microorganisms varies according to the countries, microenvironment and outbreaks of multiresistant bacterias. Infections due to fungi, S. aureus and Pseudomonas sp. are associated with the more severe complications. Recent data suggest that chlorhexidine, either used for cutaneous antisepsis or for catheter impregnation decreases infections due to gram positive cocci. Ecological data should be taken into account when deciding a probabilistic treatment in case of suspicion of catheter-related infection.

  3. Feasibility of in vivo transesophageal cardiac ablation using a phased ultrasound array.

    PubMed

    Werner, Jacob; Park, Eun-Joo; Lee, Hotaik; Francischelli, David; Smith, Nadine Barrie

    2010-05-01

    Over 2.2 million Americans suffer from atrial fibrillation making it one of the most common arrhythmias. Cardiac ablation has shown a high rate of success in treating paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Prevailing modalities for this treatment are catheter based radio-frequency ablation or surgery. However, there is measurable morbidity and significant costs and time associated with these invasive procedures. Due to these issues, developing a method that is less invasive to treat atrial fibrillation is needed. In the development of such a device, a transesophageal ultrasound applicator for cardiac ablation was designed, constructed and evaluated. A goal of this research was to create lesions in myocardial tissue using a phased array. Based on multiple factors from array simulations, transesophageal imaging devices and throat anatomy, a phased ultrasound transducer that can be inserted into the esophagus was designed and tested. In this research, a two-dimensional sparse phased array with the aperture size of 20.7 mm x 10.2 mm with flat tapered elements as a transesophageal ultrasound applicator was fabricated and evaluated with in vivo experiments. Five pigs were anesthetized; the array was passed through the esophagus and positioned over the heart. The array was operated for 8-15 min at 1.6 MHz with the acoustic intensity of 150-300 W/cm(2) resulting in both single and multiple lesions on atrial and ventricular myocardium. The average size of lesions was 5.1 +/- 2.1 mm in diameter and 7.8 +/- 2.5 mm in length. Based on the experimental results, the array delivered sufficient power to the focal point to produce ablation while not grossly damaging nearby tissue outside the target area. These results demonstrate a potential application of the ultrasound applicator to transesophageal cardiac surgery in atrial fibrillation treatment.

  4. An integrated semicompliant balloon ultrasound catheter for quantitative feedback and image guidance during stent deployment.

    PubMed

    Choi, Charles D; Savage, James; Stephens, Douglas N; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2005-09-01

    An integrated balloon ultrasound catheter prototype was designed to image from inside the balloon for real-time guidance during stent deployment. It was fabricated using a semicompliant balloon material (polyethylene) and a 20 MHz, 64-element circumferential ultrasound array. A commercial stent, nominally 4.4 mm in diameter and 12 mm in length, was used for a phantom study and placed along the length of the integrated balloon ultrasound catheter. A rubber phantom was created with an elastic modulus of 175 kPa with a 4.36 mm diameter lumen. Real-time balloon pressure measurements were recorded using a digital pressure sensor, and real-time radio-frequency (RF) data were captured as the balloon was inflated. The slope of the area-pressure ratio (APR) was compared to a reference measure of the balloon and stent expanded in water to determine a measure for optimal stent deployment. The results clearly indicate stent deployment at 11.1 atm using this metric. The APR slope could serve as quantitative feedback parameter for guiding stent deployment to reduce arterial injury and subsequent restenosis. After the stent deployment experiment, RF data were captured as the balloon catheter was moved along the length of the stent in pullback mode to confirm successful stent deployment. Ultimately, an integrated balloon ultrasound catheter could serve as a single catheter intervention device by providing real-time intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging and quantitative feedback during stent deployment.

  5. Radiofrequency Renal Denervation Protects the Ischemic Heart via Inhibition of GRK2 and Increased Nitric Oxide Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Polhemus, David J.; Gao, Juan; Scarborough, Amy L.; Trivedi, Rishi; McDonough, Kathleen H.; Goodchild, Traci T.; Smart, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: Catheter-based renal denervation (RDN) is currently under development for the treatment of resistant hypertension and is thought to reduce blood pressure via interruption of sympathetic pathways that modulate cardiovascular function. The sympathetic nervous system also plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of acute myocardial infarction and heart failure. Objective: We examined whether treatment with radiofrequency (RF)-RDN would protect the heart against subsequent myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury via direct effects on the myocardium. Methods and Results: Spontaneously hypertensive rats received either bilateral RF-RDN or sham-RDN. At 4 weeks after RF-RDN (n=14) or sham-RDN (n=14) treatment, spontaneously hypertensive rats were subjected to 30 minutes of transient coronary artery occlusion and 24 hours –7 days reperfusion. Four weeks after RF-RDN, myocardial oxidative stress was markedly attenuated, and transcription and translation of antioxidants, superoxide dismutase 1 and glutathione peroxidase-1, were significantly upregulated compared with sham-RDN spontaneously hypertensive rats. RF-RDN also inhibited myocardial G protein–coupled receptor kinase 2 pathological signaling and enhanced myocardial endothelial nitric oxide synthase function and nitric oxide signaling. RF-RDN therapy resulted in a significant reduction in myocardial infarct size per area at risk compared with sham-RDN (26.8 versus 43.9%; P<0.01) at 24 hours postreperfusion and significantly improved left ventricular function at 7 days after myocardial ischemia/reperfusion. Conclusions: RF-RDN reduced oxidative stress, inhibited G protein–coupled receptor kinase 2 signaling, increased nitric oxide bioavailability, and ameliorated myocardial reperfusion injury in the setting of severe hypertension. These findings provide new insights into the remote cardioprotective effects of RF-RDN acting directly on cardiac myocytes to attenuate cell death and protect against ischemic

  6. Successful catheter ablation of a left anterior accessory pathway from the non-coronary cusp of the aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Laranjo, Sérgio; Oliveira, Mário; Trigo, Conceição

    2015-08-01

    Left anterior accessory pathways are considered to be rare findings. Catheter ablation of accessory pathways in this location remains a challenging target, and few reports about successful ablation of these accessory pathways are available. We describe our experience regarding a case of a manifest left anterior accessory pathway ablation using radiofrequency energy at the junction of the left coronary cusp with the non-coronary cusp.

  7. Percutaneously inserted central catheter - infants

    MedlinePlus

    PICC - infants; PQC - infants; Pic line - infants; Per-Q cath - infants ... A percutaneously inserted central catheter (PICC) is a long, very thin, soft plastic tube that is put into a small blood vessel. This article addresses PICCs in ...

  8. Peripherally inserted central catheter - flushing

    MedlinePlus

    ... To flush your catheter, you will need: Clean paper towels Saline syringes (clear), and maybe heparin syringes ( ... your fingers before washing. Dry with a clean paper towel. Set up your supplies on a clean ...

  9. Catheter Ablation for Ventricular Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Nof, Eyal; Stevenson, William G; John, Roy M

    2013-01-01

    Catheter ablation has emerged as an important and effective treatment option for many recurrent ventricular arrhythmias. The approach to ablation and the risks and outcomes are largely determined by the nature of the severity and type of underlying heart disease. In patients with structural heart disease, catheter ablation can effectively reduce ventricular tachycardia (VT) episodes and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) shocks. For VT and symptomatic premature ventricular beats that occur in the absence of structural heart disease, catheter ablation is often effective as the sole therapy. Advances in catheter technology, imaging and mapping techniques have improved success rates for ablation. This review discusses current approaches to mapping and ablation for ventricular arrhythmias. PMID:26835040

  10. Peripherally inserted central catheter - insertion

    MedlinePlus

    ... nontunneled central venous catheters. In: Mauro MA, Murphy KPJ, Thomson KR, et al., eds. Image-Guided Interventions . ... by URAC, also known as the American Accreditation HealthCare Commission (www.urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is ...

  11. Comparison of cuffed tunneled hemodialysis catheter survival.

    PubMed

    Rocklin, M A; Dwight, C A; Callen, L J; Bispham, B Z; Spiegel, D M

    2001-03-01

    Despite efforts to have hemodialysis patients begin renal replacement therapy with a mature arteriovenous shunt, many patients begin dialysis with a cuffed tunneled catheter as their access. An increasing number of differently designed tunneled hemodialysis catheters have become available in the last decade. The primary aim of this study is to compare catheter survival for Hickman (Bard, Salt Lake City, UT) and Opti-flow (Bard) catheters. The 16-month experience with 182 catheters, totaling 13,861 catheter-days, is reported. The probability of Hickman catheter failure at 30, 60, and 90 days was 29%, 49%, and 67%. The probability of Opti-flow catheter failure was significantly less at 10%, 24%, and 38% for the same times, respectively (P: < 0.05 for all time points). The difference in catheter failure rates was caused by a greater malfunction rate of Hickman catheters; the two catheters had similar infection rates. We conclude that survival of Opti-flow catheters was significantly better than that of Hickman catheters from 30 to 90 days, which is a clinically relevant period when patients are waiting for maturation of a permanent access or replacement of a failed access. Since the conclusion of our study, we documented 10 episodes of Opti-flow catheter malfunction within 4 months secondary to hairline fracture of the arterial hub. The Opti-flow catheter was recalled and is now available with retooled hubs.

  12. a Radio-Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foo, Thomas Kwok-Fah

    Radio-frequency (RF) inhomogeneity encountered in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging poses a significant impediment to obtaining images of the highest diagnostic quality. This inhomogeneity arises from the conductivity effect, which attenuates the RF field with increasing depth, and the permittivity effect. The latter is the dominant effect at 1.5 Tesla (64 MHz), and contributes to standing waves within the body. A theoretical model has been developed which describes these effects for an infinitely long right circularly cylindrical object inside a concentric RF coil and RF shield. This model assumes that the RF field propagates as a travelling wave in the z direction, along the long axis of the cylinder. The resulting solutions adequately predict the field distribution for RF coils which have both a finite wavelength and an infinite wavelength in z. This corresponds to high-pass and low-pass birdcage resonators, respectively, that are in general used in MR imaging. Standing wave models are easily obtained from the superposition of solutions of two travelling waves in opposite directions. The results of this model indicate that the axial propagation constant k_{z} is a strong function of the dielectric present in the coil -to-shield space. The field distribution in the axial plane can be represented by the Bessel function J_1(k _{rho}r), where k _sp{rho}{2} = k^2-k_sp{z}{2} . By varying the dielectric material occupying the coil-to-shield space, an optimum value of k _{z} can be obtained for a particular coil and shield configuration which minimizes the amplitude variations in the axial plane. Experimental verification of the theoretical model has been obtained. These measurements were performed on a non-resonant, travelling wave test coil with a saline phantom as a load simulating the body. The measured field profiles in the axial plane agree with the predicted values, establishing the validity of the theoretical model. As expected, optimal RF homogeneity was obtained

  13. Fetal cardiac interventions: clinical and experimental research

    PubMed Central

    Humuruola, Gulimila

    2016-01-01

    Fetal cardiac interventions for congenital heart diseases may alleviate heart dysfunction, prevent them evolving into hypoplastic left heart syndrome, achieve biventricular outcome and improve fetal survival. Candidates for clinical fetal cardiac interventions are now restricted to cases of critical aortic valve stenosis with evolving hypoplastic left heart syndrome, pulmonary atresia with an intact ventricular septum and evolving hypoplastic right heart syndrome, and hypoplastic left heart syndrome with an intact or highly restrictive atrial septum as well as fetal heart block. The therapeutic options are advocated as prenatal aortic valvuloplasty, pulmonary valvuloplasty, creation of interatrial communication and fetal cardiac pacing. Experimental research on fetal cardiac intervention involves technical modifications of catheter-based cardiac clinical interventions and open fetal cardiac bypass that cannot be applied in human fetuses for the time being. Clinical fetal cardiac interventions are plausible for midgestation fetuses with the above-mentioned congenital heart defects. The technical success, biventricular outcome and fetal survival are continuously being improved in the conditions of the sophisticated multidisciplinary team, equipment, techniques and postnatal care. Experimental research is laying the foundations and may open new fields for catheter-based clinical techniques. In the present article, the clinical therapeutic options and experimental fetal cardiac interventions are described. PMID:27279868

  14. Successful Treatment of Persistent Pain After Pectus Excavatum Repair Using Paravertebral Nerve Radiofrequency Thermoablation.

    PubMed

    Ladenhauf, Hannah Noemi; Stundner, Ottokar; Likar, Rudolf; Schnöll, Jörg; Metzger, Roman P

    2017-01-01

    We present a case of a 25-year-old male patient suffering from severe prolonged pain after uneventful pectus excavatum repair that could be treated successfully by paravertebral nerve radiofrequency thermoablation. The patient was scheduled for a minimally invasive Nuss pectus excavatum repair. Surgical correction was performed under general anesthesia in combination with a thoracic peridural catheter. The immediate postoperative course was uneventful; however, the patient developed severe prolonged bilateral chest wall pain across segments T8 and T9. After failure of conservative treatment options, a specialized interventional anesthesiologist performed paravertebral nerve radiofrequency thermoablation of segment T9 bilaterally, after which the patient was pain free until scheduled removal of the pectus bar 3 years after placement.

  15. Prevention and management of hemodialysis catheter infections.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Venkat; Darouiche, Rabih O

    2012-12-01

    Hemodialysis (HD) catheters are associated with blood stream infections, and catheter use continues to be high among incident and prevalent patients on maintenance HD. Migration of micro-organism along the external surface of the catheter is probably the most common route of infection, followed by the endoluminal route of contamination. Almost all HD catheters have biofilm formation on their surfaces and this serves as a good reservoir for micro-organisms. These active but protected microorganisms have been implicated in local and systemic infections associated with HD catheters. Good personal hygiene, exit-site care with topical antibiotics and antibiotic lock solution in the dialysis catheter reduce the incidence of catheter infection. In selected subgroup of patients, HD catheter is promptly removed after the diagnosis of blood stream infection. However, catheter guidewire exchange is an acceptable alternate strategy in some patients. The most important goal should be to increase the rate of incident arteriovenous fistula use in the HD population.

  16. Intracorporeal knotting of a femoral nerve catheter.

    PubMed

    Ghanem, Mohamed; Schnoor, Jörg; Wiegel, Martin; Josten, Christoph; Reske, Andreas W

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerve catheters are effective and well-established tools to provide postoperative analgesia to patients undergoing orthopedic surgery. The performance of these techniques is usually considered safe. However, placement of nerve catheters may be associated with a considerable number of side effects and major complications have repeatedly been published. In this work, we report on a patient who underwent total knee replacement with spinal anesthesia and preoperative insertion of femoral and sciatic nerve catheters for postoperative analgesia. During insertion of the femoral catheter, significant resistance was encountered upon retracting the catheter. This occurred due to knotting of the catheter. The catheter had to be removed by operative intervention which has to be considered a major complication. The postoperative course was uneventful. The principles for removal of entrapped peripheral catheters are not well established, may differ from those for neuroaxial catheters, and range from cautious manipulation up to surgical intervention.

  17. Intracorporeal knotting of a femoral nerve catheter

    PubMed Central

    Ghanem, Mohamed; Schnoor, Jörg; Wiegel, Martin; Josten, Christoph; Reske, Andreas W.

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerve catheters are effective and well-established tools to provide postoperative analgesia to patients undergoing orthopedic surgery. The performance of these techniques is usually considered safe. However, placement of nerve catheters may be associated with a considerable number of side effects and major complications have repeatedly been published. In this work, we report on a patient who underwent total knee replacement with spinal anesthesia and preoperative insertion of femoral and sciatic nerve catheters for postoperative analgesia. During insertion of the femoral catheter, significant resistance was encountered upon retracting the catheter. This occurred due to knotting of the catheter. The catheter had to be removed by operative intervention which has to be considered a major complication. The postoperative course was uneventful. The principles for removal of entrapped peripheral catheters are not well established, may differ from those for neuroaxial catheters, and range from cautious manipulation up to surgical intervention. PMID:26504733

  18. JAG tearing technique with radiofrequency guide wire for aortic fenestration in thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Carmelo; Ceccherini, Claudio; Leonini, Sara; Cini, Marco; Vigni, Francesco; Neri, Eugenio; Tucci, Enrico; Benvenuti, Antonio; Tommasino, Giulio; Sassi, Carlo

    2012-02-01

    An innovative approach, the JAG tearing technique, was performed during thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair in a patient with previous surgical replacement of the ascending aorta with a residual uncomplicated type B aortic dissection who developed an aneurysm of the descending thoracic aorta with its lumen divided in two parts by an intimal flap. The proximal landing zone was suitable to place a thoracic stent graft. The distal landing zone was created by cutting the intimal flap in the distal third of the descending thoracic aorta with a radiofrequency guide wire and intravascular ultrasound catheter.

  19. JAG Tearing Technique with Radiofrequency Guide Wire for Aortic Fenestration in Thoracic Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Ricci, Carmelo; Ceccherini, Claudio Leonini, Sara; Cini, Marco; Vigni, Francesco; Neri, Eugenio; Tucci, Enrico; Benvenuti, Antonio; Tommasino, Giulio; Sassi, Carlo

    2012-02-15

    An innovative approach, the JAG tearing technique, was performed during thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair in a patient with previous surgical replacement of the ascending aorta with a residual uncomplicated type B aortic dissection who developed an aneurysm of the descending thoracic aorta with its lumen divided in two parts by an intimal flap. The proximal landing zone was suitable to place a thoracic stent graft. The distal landing zone was created by cutting the intimal flap in the distal third of the descending thoracic aorta with a radiofrequency guide wire and intravascular ultrasound catheter.

  20. The supraclavicular fossa ultrasound view for central venous catheter placement and catheter change over guidewire.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se-Chan; Klebach, Christian; Heinze, Ingo; Hoeft, Andreas; Baumgarten, Georg; Weber, Stefan

    2014-12-23

    The supraclavicular fossa ultrasound view can be useful for central venous catheter (CVC) placement. Venipuncture of the internal jugular veins (IJV) or subclavian veins is performed with a micro-convex ultrasound probe, using a neonatal abdominal preset with a probe frequency of 10 Mhz at a depth of 10-12 cm. Following insertion of the guidewire into the vein, the probe is shifted to the right supraclavicular fossa to obtain a view of the superior vena cava (SVC), right pulmonary artery and ascending aorta. Under real-time ultrasound view, the guidewire and its J-tip is visualized and pushed forward to the lower SVC. Insertion depth is read from guidewire marks using central venous catheter. CVC is then inserted following skin and venous dilation. The supraclavicular fossa view is most suitable for right IJV CVC insertion. If other insertion sites are chosen the right supraclavicular fossa should be within the sterile field. Scanning of the IJVs, brachiocephalic veins and SVC can reveal significant thrombosis before venipuncture. Misplaced CVCs can be corrected with a change over guidewire technique under real-time ultrasound guidance. In conjunction with a diagnostic lung ultrasound scan, this technique has a potential to replace chest radiograph for confirmation of CVC tip position and exclusion of pneumothorax. Moreover, this view is of advantage in patients with a non-p-wave cardiac rhythm were an intra-cardiac electrocardiography (ECG) is not feasible for CVC tip position confirmation. Limitations of the method are lack of availability of a micro-convex probe and the need for training.

  1. Efficacy comparison between cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation for patients with cavotricuspid valve isthmus dependent atrial flutter: a meta-analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-He; Lin, Hui; Xie, Cheng-Long; Zhang, Xiao-Ting; Li, Yi-Gang

    2015-06-01

    We perform this meta-analysis to compare the efficacy and safety of cryoablation versus radiofrequency ablation for patients with cavotricuspid valve isthmus dependent atrial flutter. By searching EMBASE, MEDLINE, PubMed and Cochrane electronic databases from March 1986 to September 2014, 7 randomized clinical trials were included. Acute (risk ratio[RR]: 0.93; P = 0.14) and long-term (RR: 0.94; P = 0.08) success rate were slightly lower in cryoablation group than in radiofrequency ablation group, but the difference was not statistically significant. Additionally, the fluoroscopy time was nonsignificantly reduced (weighted mean difference[WMD]: -2.83 P = 0.29), whereas procedure time was significantly longer (WMD: 25.95; P = 0.01) in cryoablation group compared with radiofrequency ablation group. Furthermore, Pain perception during the catheter ablation was substantially less in cryoabaltion group than in radiofrequency ablation group (standardized mean difference[SMD]: -2.36 P < 0.00001). Thus, our meta-analysis demonstrated that cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation produce comparable acute and long-term success rate for patients with cavotricuspid valve isthmus dependent atrial flutter. Meanwhile, cryoablation ablation tends to reduce the fluoroscopy time and significantly reduce pain perception in cost of significantly prolonged procedure time.

  2. A systematic review of surgical ablation versus catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Kearney, Katherine; Stephenson, Rowan; Phan, Kevin; Chan, Wei Yen; Huang, Min Yin

    2014-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an increasingly prevalent condition in the ageing population, with significantly associated morbidity and mortality. Surgical and catheter ablative strategies both aim to reduce mortality and morbidity through freedom from AF. This review consolidates all currently available comparative data to evaluate these two interventions. Methods A systematic search was conducted across MEDLINE, PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from January 2000 until August 2013. All studies were critically appraised and only those directly comparing surgical and catheter ablation were included. Results Seven studies were deemed suitable for analysis according to the inclusion criteria. Freedom from AF was significantly higher in the surgical ablation group versus the catheter ablation group at 6-month, 12-month and study endpoint follow-up periods. Subgroup analysis demonstrated similar trends, with higher freedom from AF in the surgical ablation group for paroxysmal AF patients. The incidence of pacemaker implantation was higher, while no difference in stroke or cardiac tamponade was demonstrated for the surgical versus catheter ablation groups. Conclusions Current evidence suggests that epicardial ablative strategies are associated with higher freedom from AF, higher pacemaker implantation rates and comparable neurological complications and cardiac tamponade incidence to catheter ablative treatment. Other complications and risks were poorly reported, which warrants further randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of adequate power and follow-up duration. PMID:24516794

  3. A system for visualization and automatic placement of the endoclamp balloon catheter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furtado, Hugo; Stüdeli, Thomas; Sette, Mauro; Samset, Eigil; Gersak, Borut

    2010-02-01

    The European research network "Augmented Reality in Surgery" (ARIS*ER) developed a system that supports minimally invasive cardiac surgery based on augmented reality (AR) technology. The system supports the surgical team during aortic endoclamping where a balloon catheter has to be positioned and kept in place within the aorta. The presented system addresses the two biggest difficulties of the task: lack of visualization and difficulty in maneuvering the catheter. The system was developed using a user centered design methodology with medical doctors, engineers and human factor specialists equally involved in all the development steps. The system was implemented using the AR framework "Studierstube" developed at TU Graz and can be used to visualize in real-time the position of the balloon catheter inside the aorta. The spatial position of the catheter is measured by a magnetic tracking system and superimposed on a 3D model of the patient's thorax. The alignment is made with a rigid registration algorithm. Together with a user defined target, the spatial position data drives an actuator which adjusts the position of the catheter in the initial placement and corrects migrations during the surgery. Two user studies with a silicon phantom show promising results regarding usefulness of the system: the users perform the placement tasks faster and more accurately than with the current restricted visual support. Animal studies also provided a first indication that the system brings additional value in the real clinical setting. This work represents a major step towards safer and simpler minimally invasive cardiac surgery.

  4. Cardiac catheterization - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Catheterization - cardiac - discharge; Heart catheterization - discharge: Catheterization - cardiac; Heart catheterization; Angina - cardiac catheterization discharge; CAD - cardiac catheterization discharge; Coronary artery disease - cardiac catheterization ...

  5. Catheter-based photoacoustic endoscope

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Joon-Mo; Li, Chiye; Chen, Ruimin; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. We report a flexible shaft-based mechanical scanning photoacoustic endoscopy (PAE) system that can be potentially used for imaging the human gastrointestinal tract via the instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope. The development of such a catheter endoscope has been an important challenge to realize the technique’s benefits in clinical settings. We successfully implemented a prototype PAE system that has a 3.2-mm diameter and 2.5-m long catheter section. As the instrument’s flexible shaft and scanning tip are fully encapsulated in a plastic catheter, it easily fits within the 3.7-mm diameter instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope. Here, we demonstrate the intra-instrument channel workability and in vivo animal imaging capability of the PAE system. PMID:24887743

  6. Catheter-based photoacoustic endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Joon-Mo; Li, Chiye; Chen, Ruimin; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-06-01

    We report a flexible shaft-based mechanical scanning photoacoustic endoscopy (PAE) system that can be potentially used for imaging the human gastrointestinal tract via the instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope. The development of such a catheter endoscope has been an important challenge to realize the technique's benefits in clinical settings. We successfully implemented a prototype PAE system that has a 3.2-mm diameter and 2.5-m long catheter section. As the instrument's flexible shaft and scanning tip are fully encapsulated in a plastic catheter, it easily fits within the 3.7-mm diameter instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope. Here, we demonstrate the intra-instrument channel workability and in vivo animal imaging capability of the PAE system.

  7. Ventricular Tachycardia Originating from Moderator Band: New Perspective on Catheter Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jin-yi; Jiang, Jing-bo; He, Yan; Luo, Jian-chun

    2017-01-01

    A 59-year-old woman was referred to the institution with burdens of idiopathic ventricular tachycardia (IVT). Electroanatomic mapping revealed a complex fractionated, high frequency potential with long duration preceding the QRS onset of the IVT. The real end point of ablation was the disappearance of the conduction block of Purkinje potential during the sinus rhythm besides the disappearance of the inducible tachycardia. Location of distal catheter was at the moderator band (MB) by transthoracic echocardiography (TTE). Only irrigated radiofrequency current was delivered at both insertions of the MB which can completely eliminate the IVT. PMID:28197345

  8. Safeguards May Be Reducing Serious Catheter Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... They include using sterile gloves, covering catheters with antimicrobial dressings and checking catheters daily for signs of movement or infection. Many hospitals have also added extra training, equipment and supplies. For this study, Nuckols and her colleagues analyzed ...

  9. Reduction of Fluoroscopy Time and Radiation Dosage During Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Aldhoon, Bashar; Kautzner, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation has become the treatment of choice for atrial fibrillation (AF) that does not respond to antiarrhythmic drug therapy. During the procedure, fluoroscopy imaging is still considered essential to visualise catheters in real-time. However, radiation is often ignored by physicians since it is invisible and the long-term risks are underestimated. In this respect, it must be emphasised that radiation exposure has various potentially harmful effects, such as acute skin injury, malignancies and genetic disease, both to patients and physicians. For this reason, every electrophysiologist should be aware of the problem and should learn how to decrease radiation exposure by both changing the setting of the system and using complementary imaging technologies. In this review, we aim to discuss the basics of X-ray exposure and suggest practical instructions for how to reduce radiation dosage during AF ablation procedures. PMID:27617094

  10. Hemodialysis Tunneled Catheter-Related Infections

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Lisa M.; Clark, Edward; Dipchand, Christine; Hiremath, Swapnil; Kappel, Joanne; Kiaii, Mercedeh; Lok, Charmaine; Luscombe, Rick; Moist, Louise; Oliver, Matthew; MacRae, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections, exit-site infections, and tunnel infections are common complications related to hemodialysis central venous catheter use. The various definitions of catheter-related infections are reviewed, and various preventive strategies are discussed. Treatment options, for both empiric and definitive infections, including antibiotic locks and systemic antibiotics, are reviewed. PMID:28270921

  11. 21 CFR 874.4175 - Nasopharyngeal catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4175 Nasopharyngeal catheter. (a) Identification. A nasopharyngeal catheter is a device consisting of a bougie or filiform catheter that is intended for use in probing or dilating the eustachian tube. This generic type of device...

  12. 21 CFR 874.4175 - Nasopharyngeal catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4175 Nasopharyngeal catheter. (a) Identification. A nasopharyngeal catheter is a device consisting of a bougie or filiform catheter that is intended for use in probing or dilating the eustachian tube. This generic type of device...

  13. 21 CFR 870.1280 - Steerable catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Steerable catheter. 870.1280 Section 870.1280 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1280 Steerable catheter. (a) Identification. A steerable catheter is...

  14. Minimally invasive per-catheter occlusion and dilation procedures for congenital cardiovascular abnormalities in dogs.

    PubMed

    Tobias, Anthony H; Stauthammer, Christopher D

    2010-07-01

    With ever-increasing sophistication of veterinary cardiology, minimally invasive per-catheter occlusion and dilation procedures for the treatment of various congenital cardiovascular abnormalities in dogs have become not only available, but mainstream. Much new information about minimally invasive per-catheter patent ductus arteriosus occlusion has been published and presented during the past few years. Consequently, patent ductus arteriosus occlusion is the primary focus of this article. Occlusion of other less common congenital cardiac defects is also briefly reviewed. Balloon dilation of pulmonic stenosis, as well as other congenital obstructive cardiovascular abnormalities is discussed in the latter part of the article.

  15. Right atrial thrombus associated with subclavian catheter developed due to total parenteral nutrition application

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Nursel; Basarici, Ibrahim; Erbasan, Ozan

    2016-01-01

    Central venous catheterization as a frequent routine clinical procedure may have significant complications. Mechanical complications may occur during catheter placement, whereas thromboembolic and infectious complications can be seen during follow-up. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) associated central venous catheterizations may result in early mechanical complications and thrombotic and infectious complications in the long term. This paper describes a patient diagnosed as mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy requiring long-term central venous catheterization for TPN implementation, who had an infected thrombus on the catheter tip resected by cardiac surgery. PMID:27212985

  16. Effectiveness of different central venous catheters for catheter-related infections: a network meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Huang, T; Jing, J; Jin, J; Wang, P; Yang, M; Cui, W; Zheng, Y; Shen, H

    2010-09-01

    We aimed to compare the effectiveness of various catheters for prevention of catheter-related infection and to evaluate whether specific catheters are superior to others for reducing catheter-related infections. We identified randomised, controlled trials that compared different types of central venous catheter (CVC), evaluating catheter-related infections in a systematic search of articles published from January 1996 to November 2009 via Medline, Embase, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Network meta-analysis with a mixed treatment comparison method using Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulation was used to combine direct within-trial, between-treatment comparisons with indirect trial evidence. Forty-eight clinical trials (12 828 CVCs) investigating 10 intervention catheters contributed to the analyses. For prevention of CVC colonisation, adjusted silver iontophoretic catheters (odds ratio: 0.58; 95% confidence interval: 0.33-0.95), chlorhexidine and silver sulfadiazine catheters (0.49; 0.36-0.64), chlorhexidine and silver sulfadiazine blue plus catheters (0.37; 0.17-0.69), minocycline-rifampicin catheters (0.28; 0.17-0.43) and miconazole-rifampicin catheters (0.11; 0.02-0.33) were associated with a significantly lower rate of catheter colonisation compared with standard catheters. For prevention of CRBSI, adjusted heparin-bonded catheters (0.20; 0.06-0.44) and minocycline-rifampicin catheters (0.18; 0.08-0.34) were associated with a significantly lower rate of CRBSI with standard catheters. Rifampicin-based impregnated catheters seem to be better for prevention of catheter-related infection compared with the other catheters.

  17. Respiratory motion influence on catheter contact force during radio frequency ablation procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Martin; Brost, Alexander; Hornegger, Joachim; Strobel, Norbert

    2013-03-01

    Minimally invasive catheter ablation is a common treatment option for atrial fibrillation. A common treatment strategy is pulmonary vein isolation. In this case, individual ablation points need to be placed around the ostia of the pulmonary veins attached to the left atrium to generate transmural lesions and thereby block electric signals. To achieve a durable transmural lesion, the tip of the catheter has to be stable with a sufficient tissue contact during radio-frequency ablation. Besides the steerable interface operated by the physician, the movement of the catheter is also influenced by the heart and breathing motion - particularly during ablation. In this paper we investigate the influence of breathing motion on different areas of the endocardium during radio frequency ablation. To this end, we analyze the frequency spectrum of the continuous catheter contact force to identify areas with increased breathing motion using a classification method. This approach has been applied to clinical patient data acquired during three pulmonary vein isolation procedures. Initial findings show that motion due to respiration is more pronounced at the roof and around the right pulmonary veins.

  18. MEMS-Based Flexible Force Sensor for Tri-Axial Catheter Contact Force Measurement.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Hardik J; Sheng, Jun; Desai, Jaydev P

    2017-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AFib) is a significant healthcare problem caused by the uneven and rapid discharge of electrical signals from pulmonary veins (PVs). The technique of radiofrequency (RF) ablation can block these abnormal electrical signals by ablating myocardial sleeves inside PVs. Catheter contact force measurement during RF ablation can reduce the rate of AFib recurrence, since it helps to determine effective contact of the catheter with the tissue, thereby resulting in effective power delivery for ablation. This paper presents the development of a three-dimensional (3D) force sensor to provide the real-time measurement of tri-axial catheter contact force. The 3D force sensor consists of a plastic cubic bead and five flexible force sensors. Each flexible force sensor was made of a PEDOT:PSS strain gauge and a PDMS bump on a flexible PDMS substrate. Calibration results show that the fabricated sensor has a linear response in the force range required for RF ablation. To evaluate its working performance, the fabricated sensor was pressed against gelatin tissue by a micromanipulator and also integrated on a catheter tip to test it within deionized water flow. Both experiments simulated the ventricular environment and proved the validity of applying the 3D force sensor in RF ablation.

  19. Endovascular Radiofrequency Ablation for Varicose Veins

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    or worse as other chronic diseases such as back pain and arthritis. Lower limb VV is a very common disease affecting adults – estimated to be the 7th most common reason for physician referral in the US. There is a very strong familial predisposition to VV. The risk in offspring is 90% if both parents affected, 20% when neither affected and 45% (25% boys, 62% girls) if one parent affected. The prevalence of VV worldwide ranges from 5% to 15% among men and 3% to 29% among women varying by the age, gender and ethnicity of the study population, survey methods and disease definition and measurement. The annual incidence of VV estimated from the Framingham Study was reported to be 2.6% among women and 1.9% among men and did not vary within the age range (40-89 years) studied. Approximately 1% of the adult population has a stasis ulcer of venous origin at any one time with 4% at risk. The majority of leg ulcer patients are elderly with simple superficial vein reflux. Stasis ulcers are often lengthy medical problems and can last for several years and, despite effective compression therapy and multilayer bandaging are associated with high recurrence rates. Recent trials involving surgical treatment of superficial vein reflux have resulted in healing and significantly reduced recurrence rates. Endovascular Radiofrequency Ablation for Varicose Veins RFA is an image-guided minimally invasive treatment alternative to surgical stripping of superficial venous reflux. RFA does not require an operating room or general anaesthesia and has been performed in an outpatient setting by a variety of medical specialties including surgeons and interventional radiologists. Rather than surgically removing the vein, RFA works by destroying or ablating the refluxing vein segment using thermal energy delivered through a radiofrequency catheter. Prior to performing RFA, color-flow Doppler ultrasonography is used to confirm and map all areas of venous reflux to devise a safe and effective

  20. Patency and complications of translumbar dialysis catheters

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fanna; Bennett, Stacy; Arrigain, Susana; Schold, Jesse; Heyka, Robert; McLennan, Gordon; Navaneethan, Sankar D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Translumbar tunneled dialysis catheter (TLDC) is a temporary dialysis access for patients exhausted traditional access for dialysis. While few small studies reported successes with TLDC, additional studies are warranted to understand the short and long-term patency and safety of TLDC. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of adult patients who received TLDC for hemodialysis access from June 2006 to June 2013. Patient demographics, comorbid conditions, dialysis details, catheter insertion procedures and associated complications, catheter patency, and patient survival data were collected. Catheter patency was studied using Kaplan-Meier curve; catheter functionality was assessed with catheter intervals and catheter related complications were used to estimate catheter safety. Results There were 84 TLDCs inserted in 28 patients with 28 primary insertions and 56 exchanges. All TLDC insertions were technically successful with good blood flow during dialysis (>300 ml/min) and no immediate complications (major bleeding or clotting) were noted. The median number of days in place for initial catheter, secondary catheter and total catheter were 65, 84 and 244 respectively. The catheter patency rate at 3, 6 and 12 months were 43%, 25% and 7% respectively. The main complications were poor blood flow (40%) and catheter related infection (36%), which led to 30.8% and 35.9% catheter removal respectively. After translumbar catheter, 42.8% of the patients were successfully converted to another vascular access or peritoneal dialysis. Conclusion This study data suggests that TLDC might serve as a safe, alternate access for dialysis patients in short-term who have exhausted conventional vascular access. PMID:25800550

  1. Catheter-related bloodstream infections

    PubMed Central

    Gahlot, Rupam; Nigam, Chaitanya; Kumar, Vikas; Yadav, Ghanshyam; Anupurba, Shampa

    2014-01-01

    Central-venous-catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) are an important cause of hospital-acquired infection associated with morbidity, mortality, and cost. Consequences depend on associated organisms, underlying pre-morbid conditions, timeliness, and appropriateness of the treatment/interventions received. We have summarized risk factors, pathogenesis, etiology, diagnosis, and management of CRBSI in this review. PMID:25024944

  2. Central venous catheter - dressing change

    MedlinePlus

    ... flushing Peripherally inserted central catheter - flushing Sterile technique Surgical wound care - open Review Date 9/17/2016 Updated by: Debra G. Wechter, MD, FACS, general surgery practice specializing in breast cancer, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, ...

  3. Cytometric Catheter for Neurosurgical Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Evans III, Boyd Mccutchen; Allison, Stephen W; Fillmore, Helen; Broaddus, William C; Dyer, Rachel L; Gillies, George

    2010-01-01

    Implantation of neural progenitor cells into the central nervous system has attracted strong interest for treatment of a variety of pathologies. For example, the replacement of dopamine-producing (DA) neural cells in the brain appears promising for the treatment of patients affected by Parkinson's disease. Previous studies of cell-replacement strategies have shown that less than 90% of implanted cells survive longer than 24 - 48 hours following the implantation procedure. However, it is unknown if these cells were viable upon delivery, or if they were affected by other factors such as brain pathology or an immune response. An instrumented cell-delivery catheter has been developed to assist in answering these questions by facilitating quantification and monitoring of the viability of the cells delivered. The catheter uses a fiber optic probe to perform flourescence-based cytometric measurments on cells exiting the port at the catheter tip. The current implementation of this design is on a 3.2 mm diameter catheter with 245 micrometer diameter optical fibers. Results of fluorescence testing data are presented and show that the device can characterize the quantity of cell densities ranging from 60,000 cells/ml to 600,000 cells/ml with a coefficient of determination of 0.93.

  4. Predicting nurses' acceptance of radiofrequency identification technology.

    PubMed

    Norten, Adam

    2012-10-01

    The technology of radiofrequency identification allows for the scanning of radiofrequency identification-tagged objects and individuals without line-of-sight requirements. Healthcare organizations use radiofrequency identification to ensure the health and safety of patients and medical personnel and to uncover inefficiencies. Although the successful implementation of a system incorporating radiofrequency identification technologies requires acceptance and use of the technology, some nurses using radiofrequency identification in hospitals feel like "Big Brother" is watching them. This predictive study used a theoretical model assessing the effect of five independent variables: privacy concerns, attitudes, subjective norms, controllability, and self-efficacy, on a dependent variable, nurses' behavioral intention to use radiofrequency identification. A Web-based questionnaire containing previously validated questions was answered by 106 US RNs. Multiple linear regression showed that all constructs together accounted for 60% of the variance in nurses' intention to use radiofrequency identification. Of the predictors in the model, attitudes provided the largest unique contribution when the other predictors in the model were held constant; subjective norms also provided a unique contribution. Privacy concerns, controllability, and self-efficacy did not provide a significant contribution to nurses' behavioral intention to use radiofrequency identification.

  5. A cost effectiveness based safety and efficacy study of resterilized intra-parenchymal catheter based intracranial pressure monitoring in developing world

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Deepak Kumar; Bisht, Ajay; Batra, Priyam; Mathur, Purva; Mahapatra, Ashok Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background: The management of traumatic brain injury (TBI) aims to maintain the normal cerebral perfusion in spite of the mass lesions that may occur (haematoma, contusion, and oedema). The monitoring of the intracranial pressure (ICP) is a step in that direction. The intra-parenchymal catheters have the lowest incidence of infection compared to intra-ventricular/subdural catheters with reliable and accurate pressure recordings. The major disadvantage of the intra-parenchymal catheters is the cost, especially in developing nations. Hypothesis: Resterilized intra-parenchymal strain gauge catheters can be used safely for ICP monitoring without any added risk of meningitis. The reusage of catheters can bring down the costs. Resterilized catheters/equipment have been approved for usage in cardiac usage, but such study on ICP catheters has not been carried out so far in any part of the world. Methodology: A total of 100 consecutive cases of severe TBI receiving ICP monitoring at a level 1 trauma center of a developing nation were prospectively studied (34 cases had fresh catheters, and 66 had resterilized [using ethylene oxide] catheters). Observations: The use of reused resterilized catheters was not associated with increased incidence of meningitis or fever (the surrogate marker for infection in this study). Also, there was concordance between the pressure recording of reused catheters and operative finding/subsequent computed tomography scans. These catheters after sterilization could be reused 2–4 times and reliably recorded the ICP (insignificant drift) with no increase in the incidence of meningitis. Conclusions: Usage of resterilized intra-parenchymal ICP catheters is feasible, safe, efficacious, and cost effective and brings down the cost of monitoring significantly. PMID:27695548

  6. Radio-Frequency Strain Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph S.; Rogowski, Robert S.; Holben, Milford S., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Radio-frequency (RF) strain monitor developed to measure lengths of objects. RF waveguide or cable bonded to structure monitored. Propagation of RF signal along waveguide results in phase shift proportional to length of path traveled. Impedance mismatches placed in RF cable at nodes of structure. Records mismatches and detects overall length of line and lengths of intervals between nodes. Used to detect changes in elements of large structure with single cable. Monitor has potential for many applications, including monitoring stability of such large structures as aircraft, bridges, and buildings in Earthquake zones.

  7. Laser Navigation for Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Varro, Zoltan; Locklin, Julia K. Wood, Bradford J.

    2004-09-15

    A 45-year-old male with renal cell carcinoma secondary to von-Hippel Lindau (VHL) disease presented for radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of kidney tumors. Due to his prior history of several partial nephrectomies and limited renal reserve, RFA was chosen because of its relatively nephron-sparing nature. A laser guidance device was used to help guide probe placement in an attempt to reduce procedure time and improve targeting accuracy. The device was successful at guiding needle placement, as both tumors were located with a single pass. Follow-up CT scan confirmed accurate needle placement, showing an area of coagulation necrosis covering the previously seen tumor.

  8. Radiofrequency Ablation for Liver Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Interventional ablative technologies aided by imaging techniques such as ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging have been crucial in managing patients with primary liver cancer and liver metastases over the past 20 years. Several ablative technologies have been used to treat liver cancer; however, radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has emerged as the most common ablative therapy for hepatic lesions, both in the United States and globally. RFA is the treatment of choice for patients who cannot have surgical resection of the liver. This article focuses on the role of imaging in RFA treatment of primary and metastatic hepatic lesions.

  9. Evaluation of left ventricular scar identification from contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for guidance of ventricular catheter ablation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rettmann, M. E.; Lehmann, H. I.; Johnson, S. B.; Packer, D. L.

    2016-03-01

    Patients with ventricular arrhythmias typically exhibit myocardial scarring, which is believed to be an important anatomic substrate for reentrant circuits, thereby making these regions a key target in catheter ablation therapy. In ablation therapy, a catheter is guided into the left ventricle and radiofrequency energy is delivered into the tissue to interrupt arrhythmic electrical pathways. Low bipolar voltage regions are typically localized during the procedure through point-by-point construction of an electroanatomic map by sampling the endocardial surface with the ablation catheter and are used as a surrogate for myocardial scar. This process is time consuming, requires significant skill, and has the potential to miss low voltage sites. This has led to efforts to quantify myocardial scar preoperatively using delayed, contrast-enhanced MRI. In this paper, we evaluate the utility of left ventricular scar identification from delayed contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for guidance of catheter ablation of ventricular arrhythmias. Myocardial infarcts were created in three canines followed by a delayed, contrast enhanced MRI scan and electroanatomic mapping. The left ventricle and myocardial scar is segmented from preoperative MRI images and sampled points from the procedural electroanatomical map are registered to the segmented endocardial surface. Sampled points with low bipolar voltage points visually align with the segmented scar regions. This work demonstrates the potential utility of using preoperative delayed, enhanced MRI to identify myocardial scarring for guidance of ventricular catheter ablation therapy.

  10. Catheter Ablation in Combination With Left Atrial Appendage Closure for Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Swaans, Martin J.; Alipour, Arash; Rensing, Benno J.W.M.; Post, Martijn C.; Boersma, Lucas V.A.

    2013-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia, affecting millions of individuals worldwide 1-3. The rapid, irregular, and disordered electrical activity in the atria gives rise to palpitations, fatigue, dyspnea, chest pain and dizziness with or without syncope 4, 5. Patients with AF have a five-fold higher risk of stroke 6. Oral anticoagulation (OAC) with warfarin is commonly used for stroke prevention in patients with AF and has been shown to reduce the risk of stroke by 64% 7. Warfarin therapy has several major disadvantages, however, including bleeding, non-tolerance, interactions with other medications and foods, non-compliance and a narrow therapeutic range 8-11. These issues, together with poor appreciation of the risk-benefit ratio, unawareness of guidelines, or absence of an OAC monitoring outpatient clinic may explain why only 30-60% of patients with AF are prescribed this drug 8. The problems associated with warfarin, combined with the limited efficacy and/or serious side effects associated with other medications used for AF 12,13, highlight the need for effective non-pharmacological approaches to treatment. One such approach is catheter ablation (CA), a procedure in which a radiofrequency electrical current is applied to regions of the heart to create small ablation lesions that electrically isolate potential AF triggers 4. CA is a well-established treatment for AF symptoms 14, 15, that may also decrease the risk of stroke. Recent data showed a significant decrease in the relative risk of stroke and transient ischemic attack events among patients who underwent ablation compared with those undergoing antiarrhythmic drug therapy 16. Since the left atrial appendage (LAA) is the source of thrombi in more than 90% of patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation 17, another approach to stroke prevention is to physically block clots from exiting the LAA. One method for occluding the LAA is via percutaneous placement of the WATCHMAN

  11. Percutaneous Intraductal Radiofrequency Ablation is a Safe Treatment for Malignant Biliary Obstruction: Feasibility and Early Results

    SciTech Connect

    Mizandari, Malkhaz; Pai, Madhava Xi Feng; Valek, Vlastimil; Tomas, Andrasina; Quaretti, Pietro; Golfieri, Rita; Mosconi, Cristina; Ao Guokun; Kyriakides, Charis; Dickinson, Robert; Nicholls, Joanna; Habib, Nagy

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. Previous clinical studies have shown the safety and efficacy of this novel radiofrequency ablation catheter when used for endoscopic palliative procedures. We report a retrospective study with the results of first in man percutaneous intraductal radiofrequency ablation in patients with malignant biliary obstruction. Methods. Thirty-nine patients with inoperable malignant biliary obstruction were included. These patients underwent intraductal biliary radiofrequency ablation of their malignant biliary strictures following external biliary decompression with an internal-external biliary drainage. Following ablation, they had a metal stent inserted. Results. Following this intervention, there were no 30-day mortality, hemorrhage, bile duct perforation, bile leak, or pancreatitis. Of the 39 patients, 28 are alive and 10 patients are dead with a median survival of 89.5 (range 14-260) days and median stent patency of 84.5 (range 14-260) days. One patient was lost to follow-up. All but one patient had their stent patent at the time of last follow-up or death. One patient with stent blockage at 42 days postprocedure underwent percutaneous transhepatic drain insertion and restenting. Among the patients who are alive (n = 28) the median stent patency was 92 (range 14-260) days, whereas the patients who died (n = 10) had a median stent patency of 62.5 (range 38-210) days. Conclusions. In this group of patients, it appears that this new approach is feasible and safe. Efficacy remains to be proven in future, randomized, prospective studies.

  12. Disruption of cardiac cholinergic neurons enhances susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Jungen, Christiane; Scherschel, Katharina; Eickholt, Christian; Kuklik, Pawel; Klatt, Niklas; Bork, Nadja; Salzbrunn, Tim; Alken, Fares; Angendohr, Stephan; Klene, Christiane; Mester, Janos; Klöcker, Nikolaj; Veldkamp, Marieke W.; Schumacher, Udo; Willems, Stephan; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O.; Meyer, Christian

    2017-01-01

    The parasympathetic nervous system plays an important role in the pathophysiology of atrial fibrillation. Catheter ablation, a minimally invasive procedure deactivating abnormal firing cardiac tissue, is increasingly becoming the therapy of choice for atrial fibrillation. This is inevitably associated with the obliteration of cardiac cholinergic neurons. However, the impact on ventricular electrophysiology is unclear. Here we show that cardiac cholinergic neurons modulate ventricular electrophysiology. Mechanical disruption or pharmacological blockade of parasympathetic innervation shortens ventricular refractory periods, increases the incidence of ventricular arrhythmia and decreases ventricular cAMP levels in murine hearts. Immunohistochemistry confirmed ventricular cholinergic innervation, revealing parasympathetic fibres running from the atria to the ventricles parallel to sympathetic fibres. In humans, catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation, which is accompanied by accidental parasympathetic and concomitant sympathetic denervation, raises the burden of premature ventricular complexes. In summary, our results demonstrate an influence of cardiac cholinergic neurons on the regulation of ventricular function and arrhythmogenesis. PMID:28128201

  13. Untangling of knotted urethral catheters.

    PubMed

    Sambrook, Andrew J; Todd, Alistair

    2007-04-01

    Intravesical catheter knotting during micturating cystourethrography is a rare but recognized complication of the procedure. We were able to untangle a knot utilizing a fluoroscopically guided vascular guidewire. Following this success, a small study was performed using a model. Various types of guidewires and techniques were tested for different diameters of knots in order to predict the likelihood of success in this type of situation.

  14. Central vascular catheters and infections.

    PubMed

    Dioni, Elisabetta; Franceschini, Renata; Marzollo, Roberto; Oprandi, Daniela; Chirico, Gaetano

    2014-03-01

    Newborn infants in critical conditions require a permanent intra-venous line to allow for the administration of fluids, parenteral nutrition and drugs. The use of central venous catheters, however, is associated with an increased risk of infections, leading to prolongation of length of stay and higher hospitalization costs, particularly in extremely preterm infants. Dwell time is a significant factor for complications, with a predicted risk of catheter related infections of about 4 per 1000 catheter-days. To reduce the incidence of complications, several requirements must be met, including adequate staff and resources to provide education, training, and quality improvement programs, within a culture of communication and teamwork. Rigorous reporting schedule on line care and the implementation of unique bundle elements, the use of health care failure mode and effect analysis, the judicious use of antibiotics through an antimicrobial stewardship strategy, the application of specific antifungal prophylaxis are among the most effective interventions, while the addition of heparin to parenteral solution, or the use of antibiotic plus heparin lock therapy are under evaluation. Nursing assistance plays a fundamental role in managing central venous lines and in reducing or preventing the incidence of infection, by the application of several complex professional strategies.

  15. Surgical and catheter delivery of autologous myoblasts in patients with congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Opie, Shaun R; Dib, Nabil

    2006-03-01

    Autologous skeletal myoblast (ASM) transplantation is being explored as a possible therapy for patients who have suffered a myocardial infarction. Our initial experience with direct injection during coronary artery bypass grafting demonstrated that this method of delivery was both feasible and safe. In addition, proof of concept of the engraftment and survival of ASMs was shown. However, since many patients who have survived a myocardial infarction are not candidates for surgery, a less invasive delivery method is preferred. We implemented a series of translational research steps to bring catheter-based technology to a clinical application. This included assessing the biocompatibility of the ASM and a novel needle injection catheter using a 3-dimensional endoventricular navigation system, the bioretention and biodistribution of ASMs in a porcine model of myocardial infarction, and the safety and efficacy of ASM transplantation for cardiac function in the porcine model. After catheter functionality had been demonstrated, electromechanical mapping was used to assess the viability in the region of ASM transplantation, and echocardiography, electrocardiogram, and angiography tests were used to assess cardiac function 2 months after ASM transplantation. The results from these preclinical studies were used as a foundation for application of these concepts to a human clinical trial. Here we review the results from our preclinical experiments and surgical delivery clinical trial, and describe the recent clinical studies undertaken to assess the safety and feasibility of catheter-based ASM transplantation into human subjects.

  16. Effect of percutaneous renal sympathetic nerve radiofrequency ablation in patients with severe heart failure.

    PubMed

    Dai, Qiming; Lu, Jing; Wang, Benwen; Ma, Genshan

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the clinical feasibility and effects of percutaneous renal sympathetic nerve radiofrequency ablation in patients with heart failure. A total of 20 patients with heart failure were enrolled, aged from 47 to 75 years (63±10 years). They were divided into the standard therapy (n = 10), and renal nerve radiofrequency ablation groups (n = 10). There were 15 males and 5 female patients, including 8 ischemic cardiomyopathy, 8 dilated cardiomyopathy, and 8 hypertensive cardiopathy. All of the patients met the criteria of New York Heart Association classes III-IV cardiac function. Patients with diabetes and renal failure were excluded. Percutaneous renal sympathetic nerve radiofrequency ablation was performed on the renal artery wall under X-ray guidance. Serum electrolytes, neurohormones, and 24 h urine volume were recorded 24 h before and after the operation. Echocardiograms were performed to obtain left ventricular ejection fraction at baseline and 6 months. Heart rate, blood pressure, symptoms of dyspnea and edema were also monitored. After renal nerve ablation, 24 h urine volume was increased, while neurohormone levels were decreased compared with those of pre-operation and standard therapy. No obvious change in heart rate or blood pressure was recorded. Symptoms of heart failure were improved in patients after the operation. No complications were recorded in the study. Percutaneous renal sympathetic nerve radiofrequency ablation may be a feasible, safe, and effective treatment for the patients with severe congestive heart failure.

  17. Guide Wire Induced Cardiac Tamponade: The Soft J Tip Is Not So Benign.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Sankalp; Siddiqui, Fayez; Patel, Milan; Cardozo, Shaun

    2016-01-01

    Central venous catheter (CVC) insertion rarely causes cardiac tamponade due to perforation. Although it is a rare complication, it can be lethal if not identified early. We report a case of cardiac tamponade caused by internal jugular (IJ) central venous catheter (CVC) insertion using a soft J-tipped guide wire which is considered safe and rarely implicated with cardiac tamponade. A bedside transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE) revealed a pericardial effusion with tamponade. An emergent bedside pericardiocentesis was done revealing bloody fluid and resulted in clinical stabilization.

  18. Guide Wire Induced Cardiac Tamponade: The Soft J Tip Is Not So Benign

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Milan

    2016-01-01

    Central venous catheter (CVC) insertion rarely causes cardiac tamponade due to perforation. Although it is a rare complication, it can be lethal if not identified early. We report a case of cardiac tamponade caused by internal jugular (IJ) central venous catheter (CVC) insertion using a soft J-tipped guide wire which is considered safe and rarely implicated with cardiac tamponade. A bedside transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE) revealed a pericardial effusion with tamponade. An emergent bedside pericardiocentesis was done revealing bloody fluid and resulted in clinical stabilization. PMID:27597903

  19. 3D model-based catheter tracking for motion compensation in EP procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brost, Alexander; Liao, Rui; Hornegger, Joachim; Strobel, Norbert

    2010-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common sustained heart arrhythmia and a leading cause of stroke. Its treatment by radio-frequency catheter ablation, performed using fluoroscopic image guidance, is gaining increasingly more importance. Two-dimensional fluoroscopic navigation can take advantage of overlay images derived from pre-operative 3-D data to add anatomical details otherwise not visible under X-ray. Unfortunately, respiratory motion may impair the utility of these static overlay images for catheter navigation. We developed an approach for image-based 3-D motion compensation as a solution to this problem. A bi-plane C-arm system is used to take X-ray images of a special circumferential mapping catheter from two directions. In the first step of the method, a 3-D model of the device is reconstructed. Three-dimensional respiratory motion at the site of ablation is then estimated by tracking the reconstructed catheter model in 3-D. This step involves bi-plane fluoroscopy and 2-D/3-D registration. Phantom data and clinical data were used to assess our model-based catheter tracking method. Experiments involving a moving heart phantom yielded an average 2-D tracking error of 1.4 mm and an average 3-D tracking error of 1.1 mm. Our evaluation of clinical data sets comprised 469 bi-plane fluoroscopy frames (938 monoplane fluoroscopy frames). We observed an average 2-D tracking error of 1.0 mm +/- 0.4 mm and an average 3-D tracking error of 0.8 mm +/- 0.5 mm. These results demonstrate that model-based motion-compensation based on 2-D/3-D registration is both feasible and accurate.

  20. Orthogonal electrode catheter array for mapping of endocardial focal site of ventricular activation

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, J.M.; Nyo, H.; Vera, Z.; Seibert, J.A.; Vogelsang, P.J. )

    1991-04-01

    Precise location of the endocardial site of origin of ventricular tachycardia may facilitate surgical and catheter ablation of this arrhythmia. The endocardial catheter mapping technique can locate the site of ventricular tachycardia within 4-8 cm2 of the earliest site recorded by the catheter. This report describes an orthogonal electrode catheter array (OECA) for mapping and radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of endocardial focal site of origin of a plunge electrode paced model of ventricular activation in dogs. The OECA is an 8 F five pole catheter with four peripheral electrodes and one central electrode (total surface area 0.8 cm{sup 2}). In eight mongrel dogs, mapping was performed by arbitrarily dividing the left ventricle (LV) into four segments. Each segment was mapped with OECA to find the earliest segment. Bipolar and unipolar electrograms were obtained. The plunge electrode (not visible on fluoroscopy) site was identified by the earliest wave front arrival times of -30 msec or earlier at two or more electrodes (unipolar electrograms) with reference to the earliest recorded surface ECG (I, AVF, and V1). Validation of the proximity of the five electrodes of the OECA to the plunge electrode was performed by digital radiography and RFA. Pathological examination was performed to document the proximity of the OECA to the plunge electrode and also for the width, depth, and microscopic changes of the ablation. To find the segment with the earliest LV activation a total of 10 {plus minus} 3 (mean {plus minus} SD) positions were mapped. Mean arrival times at the two earlier electrodes were -39 {plus minus} 4 msec and -35 {plus minus} 3 msec. Digital radiography showed the plunge electrode to be within the area covered by all five electrodes in all eight dogs. The plunge electrode was within 1 cm2 area of the region of RFA in all eight dogs.

  1. Infections associated with the central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Drasković, Biljana; Fabri, Izabella; Benka, Anna Uram; Rakić, Goran

    2014-01-01

    Central venous catheters are of an essential importance to critically ill patients who require long-term venous access for various purposes. Their use made the treatment much easier, but still they are not harmless and are prone to numerous complications. Catheter infections represent the most significant complication in their use. The frequency of infections varies in different patient care settings, but their appearance mostly depends on the patient's health condition, catheter insertion time, localization of the catheter and type of the used catheter. Since they are one of the leading causes of nosocomial infections and related to significant number of morbidity and mortality in intensive care units, it is very important that maximal aseptic precautions are taken during the insertion and the maintenance period. Prevention of infection of the central venous catheters demands several measures that should be applied routinely.

  2. Catheter-associated urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Warren, J W

    2001-04-01

    Nosocomial urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common infection acquired in both hospitals and nursing homes and is usually associated with catheterization. This infection would be even more common but for the use of the closed catheter system. Most modifications have not improved on the closed catheter itself. Even with meticulous care, this system will not prevent bacteriuria. After bacteriuria develops, the ability to limit its complications is minimal. Once a catheter is put in place, the clinician must keep two concepts in mind: keep the catheter system closed in order to postpone the onset of bacteriuria, and remove the catheter as soon as possible. If the catheter can be removed before bacteriuria develops, postponement becomes prevention.

  3. Accidental Entrapment of Electrical Mapping Catheter by Chiari's Network in Right Atrium during Catheter Ablation Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Atsushi; Urushida, Tsuyoshi; Sakakibara, Tomoaki; Sano, Makoto; Suwa, Kenichiro; Saitoh, Takeji; Saotome, Masao; Katoh, Hideki; Satoh, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Hideharu

    2016-01-01

    A 78-year-old male was admitted to our hospital due to frequent palpitation. His electrocardiogram (ECG) presented regular narrow QRS tachycardia with 170 bpm, and catheter ablation was planned. During electroanatomical mapping of the right atrium (RA) with a multiloop mapping catheter, the catheter head was entrapped nearby the ostium of inferior vena cava. Rotation and traction of the catheter failed to detach the catheter head from the RA wall. Exfoliation of connective tissue twined around catheter tip by forceps, which were designed for endomyocardial biopsy, succeeded to retract and remove the catheter. Postprocedural echocardiography and pathologic examination proved the existence of Chiari's network. The handling of complex catheters in the RA has a potential risk of entrapment with Chiari's network. PMID:27366332

  4. Systems biology and cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Grace, Andrew A; Roden, Dan M

    2012-10-27

    During the past few years, the development of effective, empirical technologies for treatment of cardiac arrhythmias has exceeded the pace at which detailed knowledge of the underlying biology has accumulated. As a result, although some clinical arrhythmias can be cured with techniques such as catheter ablation, drug treatment and prediction of the risk of sudden death remain fairly primitive. The identification of key candidate genes for monogenic arrhythmia syndromes shows that to bring basic biology to the clinic is a powerful approach. Increasingly sophisticated experimental models and methods of measurement, including stem cell-based models of human cardiac arrhythmias, are being deployed to study how perturbations in several biologic pathways can result in an arrhythmia-prone heart. The biology of arrhythmia is largely quantifiable, which allows for systematic analysis that could transform treatment strategies that are often still empirical into management based on molecular evidence.

  5. Candida utilis catheter-related bloodstream infection

    PubMed Central

    Scoppettuolo, Giancarlo; Donato, Concetta; De Carolis, Elena; Vella, Antonietta; Vaccaro, Luisa; La Greca, Antonio; Fantoni, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Central venous catheter-related fungemia are increasing in the last years, also due to rare fungi. We report the case of a Candida utilis catheter-related bloodstream infection in a patient with metastatic carcinoma of the bladder and a long term totally implanted venous catheter. The diagnosis was done by paired blood cultures and differential time to positivity. The Candida species was rapidly identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. The patient was successfully treated with anidulafungine. PMID:25473600

  6. Thrombolytic therapy for central venous catheter occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Baskin, Jacquelyn L.; Reiss, Ulrike; Wilimas, Judith A.; Metzger, Monika L.; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Howard, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Long-term central venous catheters have improved the quality of care for patients with chronic illnesses, but are complicated by obstructions which can result in delay of treatment or catheter removal. Design and Methods This paper reviews thrombolytic treatment for catheter obstruction. Literature from Medline searches using the terms “central venous catheter”, “central venous access device” OR “central venous line” associated with the terms “obstruction”, “occlusion” OR “thrombolytic” was reviewed. Efficacy of thrombolytic therapy, central venous catheter clearance rates and time to clearance were assessed. Results Alteplase, one of the current therapies, clears 52% of obstructed catheters within 30 min with 86% overall clearance (after 2 doses, when necessary). However, newer medications may have higher efficacy or shorter time to clearance. Reteplase cleared 67–74% within 30–40 min and 95% of catheters overall. Occlusions were resolved in 70 and 83% of patients with one and 2 doses of tenecteplase, respectively. Recombinant urokinase cleared 60% of catheters at 30 min and 73% overall. Alfimeprase demonstrated rapid catheter clearance with resolution in 40% of subjects within 5 min, 60% within 30 min, and 80% within 2 h. Additionally, urokinase prophylaxis decreased the incidence of catheter occlusions from 16–68% in the control group to 4–23% in the treatment group; in some studies, rates of catheter infections were also decreased in the urokinase group. Conclusions Thrombolytic agents successfully clear central venous catheter occlusions in most cases. Newer agents may act more rapidly and effectively than currently utilized therapies, but randomized studies with direct comparisons of these agents are needed to determine optimal management for catheter obstruction. PMID:22180420

  7. Optimal transseptal puncture location for robot-assisted left atrial catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Jayender, Jagadeesan; Patel, Rajni V; Michaud, Gregory F; Hatal, Nobuhiko

    2009-01-01

    The preferred method of treatment for Atrial Fibrillation (AF) is by catheter ablation wherein a catheter is guided into the left atrium through a transseptal puncture. However, the transseptal puncture constrains the catheter, thereby limiting its maneuverability and increasing the difficulty in reaching various locations in the left atrium. In this paper, we address the problem of choosing the optimal transseptal puncture location for performing cardiac ablation to obtain maximum maneuverability of the catheter. We have employed an optimization algorithm to maximize the Global Isotropy Index (GII) to evaluate the optimal transseptal puncture location. As part of this algorithm, a novel kinematic model for the catheter has been developed based on a continuum robot model. Preoperative MR/CT images of the heart are segmented using the open source image-guided therapy software, Slicer 3, to obtain models of the left atrium and septal wall. These models are input to the optimization algorithm to evaluate the optimal transseptal puncture location. Simulation results for the optimization algorithm are presented in this paper.

  8. Impact of misplaced subclavian vein catheter into jugular vein on transpulmonary thermodilution measurement variables*

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Wen-qiao; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Shao-yang; Liang, Zhong-yan; Fu, Shui-qiao; Xu, Jia; Liang, Ting-bo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The subclavian vein (SCV) is usually used to inject the indicator of cold saline for a transpulmonary thermodilution (TPTD) measurement. The SCV catheter being misplaced into the internal jugular (IJV) vein is a common occurrence. The present study explores the influence of a misplaced SCV catheter on TPTD variables. Methods: Thirteen severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) patients with malposition of the SCV catheter were enrolled in this study. TPTD variables including cardiac index (CI), global end-diastolic volume index (GEDVI), intrathoracic blood volume index (ITBVI), and extravascular lung water index (EVLWI) were obtained after injection of cold saline via the misplaced SCV catheter. Then, the misplaced SCV catheter was removed and IJV access was constructed for a further set of TPTD variables. Comparisons were made between the TPTD results measured through the IJV and misplaced SCV accesses. Results: A total of 104 measurements were made from TPTD curves after injection of cold saline via the IJV and misplaced SCV accesses. Bland-Altman analysis demonstrated an overestimation of +111.40 ml/m2 (limits of agreement: 6.13 and 216.70 ml/m2) for GEDVI and ITBVI after a misplaced SCV injection. There were no significant influences on CI and EVLWI. The biases of +0.17 L/(min·m2) for CI and +0.17 ml/kg for EVLWI were revealed by Bland-Altman analysis. Conclusions: The malposition of an SCV catheter does influence the accuracy of TPTD variables, especially GEDVI and ITBVI. The position of the SCV catheter should be confirmed by chest X-ray in order to make good use of the TPTD measurements. PMID:26739527

  9. Erroneous laboratory values obtained from central catheters.

    PubMed

    Johnston, J B; Messina, M

    1991-01-01

    Serious analytic errors in potassium measurements have been identified in blood specimens obtained from newly inserted central catheters. Erroneous elevated readings have been related to interactions of chemistry analyzer electrodes and substances fixed to external and intraluminal walls of the central catheter. Anecdotal summaries of this phenomenon are presented to enable the nurse to recognize potential problems when sampling blood from central catheters. Studies were performed to determine the amount of flush necessary to clear the catheter of interfering residue. To eliminate this potentially hazardous occurrence, recommended flush volumes, nursing implications, and actions are described.

  10. Radiofrequency Ablation: A Nursing Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Locklin, Julia K.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2008-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has emerged as a safe and predictable technology for treating certain patients with cancer who otherwise have few treatment options. Nurses need to be familiar with all phases of the RFA procedure to create an optimal environment for patients. This article offers a brief review of the RFA procedure and nurses' responsibilities in caring for these patients. Before RFA, nurses should focus on patient education and aggressive hydration. During the procedure, nurses can prevent injury by placing grounding pads appropriately, monitoring vital signs, and medicating patients as needed. After RFA, nurses should assess the skin puncture site, provide adequate pain relief, and, again, hydrate patients. Nurses who care appropriately for RFA recipients may help to improve patient outcomes and make an otherwise frightening procedure more comfortable. PMID:15973845

  11. Housestaff Knowledge Related to Urinary Catheter Utilization and Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections (CAUTIs)

    PubMed Central

    Paras, Molly L.; Shenoy, Erica S.; Hsu, Heather E.; Walensky, Rochelle P.; Hooper, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Despite published catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) prevention guidelines, inappropriate catheter use is common. We surveyed housestaff about their knowledge of CAUTIs at a teaching hospital and found the majority is aware of prevention guidelines; however, their application to clinical scenarios and catheter practices fall short of national goals. PMID:26278269

  12. Catheter indwell time and phlebitis development during peripheral intravenous catheter administration

    PubMed Central

    Pasalioglu, Kadriye Burcu; Kaya, Hatice

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Intravenous catheters have been indispensable tools of modern medicine. Although intravenous applications can be used for a multitude of purposes, these applications may cause complications, some of which have serious effects. Of these complications, the most commonly observed is phlebitis. This study was conducted to determine the effect of catheter indwell time on phlebitis development during peripheral intravenous catheter administration. Methods: This study determined the effect of catheter indwell time on phlebitis development during peripheral intravenous catheter administration. The study included a total of 103 individuals who were administered 439 catheters and satisfied the study enrollment criteria at one infectious diseases clinic in Istanbul/Turkey. Data were compiled from Patient Information Forms, Peripheral Intravenous Catheter and Therapy Information Forms, reported grades based on the Visual Infusion Phlebitis Assessment Scale, and Peripheral Intravenous Catheter Nurse Observation Forms. The data were analyzed using SPSS. Results : The mean patient age was 53.75±15.54 (standard deviation) years, and 59.2% of the study participants were men. Phlebitis was detected in 41.2% of peripheral intravenous catheters, and the rate decreased with increased catheter indwell time. Analyses showed that catheter indwell time, antibiotic usage, sex, and catheterization sites were significantly associated with development of phlebitis. Conclusion: The results of this study show that catheters can be used for longer periods of time when administered under optimal conditions and with appropriate surveillance. PMID:25097505

  13. Cardiac Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Birnie, David; Ha, Andrew C T; Gula, Lorne J; Chakrabarti, Santabhanu; Beanlands, Rob S B; Nery, Pablo

    2015-12-01

    Studies suggest clinically manifest cardiac involvement occurs in 5% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis. The principal manifestations of cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) are conduction abnormalities, ventricular arrhythmias, and heart failure. Data indicate that an 20% to 25% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis have asymptomatic (clinically silent) cardiac involvement. An international guideline for the diagnosis and management of CS recommends that patients be screened for cardiac involvement. Most studies suggest a benign prognosis for patients with clinically silent CS. Immunosuppression therapy is advocated for clinically manifest CS. Device therapy, with implantable cardioverter defibrillators, is recommended for some patients.

  14. MRS: a noninvasive window into cardiac metabolism.

    PubMed

    van Ewijk, Petronella A; Schrauwen-Hinderling, Vera B; Bekkers, Sebastiaan C A M; Glatz, Jan F C; Wildberger, Joachim E; Kooi, M Eline

    2015-07-01

    A well-functioning heart requires a constant supply of a balanced mixture of nutrients to be used for the production of adequate amounts of adenosine triphosphate, which is the main energy source for most cellular functions. Defects in cardiac energy metabolism are linked to several myocardial disorders. MRS can be used to study in vivo changes in cardiac metabolism noninvasively. MR techniques allow repeated measurements, so that disease progression and the response to treatment or to a lifestyle intervention can be monitored. It has also been shown that MRS can predict clinical heart failure and death. This article focuses on in vivo MRS to assess cardiac metabolism in humans and experimental animals, as experimental animals are often used to investigate the mechanisms underlying the development of metabolic diseases. Various MR techniques, such as cardiac (31) P-MRS, (1) H-MRS, hyperpolarized (13) C-MRS and Dixon MRI, are described. A short overview of current and emerging applications is given. Cardiac MRS is a promising technique for the investigation of the relationship between cardiac metabolism and cardiac disease. However, further optimization of scan time and signal-to-noise ratio is required before broad clinical application. In this respect, the ongoing development of advanced shimming algorithms, radiofrequency pulses, pulse sequences, (multichannel) detection coils, the use of hyperpolarized nuclei and scanning at higher magnetic field strengths offer future perspective for clinical applications of MRS.

  15. [Radiofrequency for the treatment of liver tumors].

    PubMed

    Elias, D; De Baere, T

    2001-04-01

    Radiofrequency is performed with thin electrodes that are placed in the center of a tumor under ultrasonographic guidance. Radiofrequency waves induce ionic agitation which destroys neighboring tissues by heat. The most recent equipment can produce necrosis of 4-cm diameter areas. Efficacy is enhanced by blocking intrahepatic blood flow which naturally refreshes the liver parenchyma. The technique has the advantage of minimal invasion and of sparing liver parenchymal tissue. radiofrequency can be performed percutaneously or by laparoscopi or laparotomy. results in most reported series have been good with low morbidity. rapid improvment of material and of new associated procedures (vascular clamping, cooling infusion of the bile ducts, transplaeurodiaphragmatic approach, combination with other new approaches in liver surgery) are continuously modifying performance levels and potential indications curently under validation. radiofrequency, like other tools for local tumor destruction, will greatly change our therapeutic strategies in the neat future.

  16. FAQs about Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to help prevent catheter-associated urinary tract infections if I have a catheter? • Always clean your hands before and after doing catheter care. • Always keep your urine bag below the level ...

  17. 21 CFR 870.1200 - Diagnostic intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... intracardiac pressures, to sample blood, and to introduce substances into the heart and vessels. Included in this generic device are right-heart catheters, left-heart catheters, and angiographic catheters,...

  18. 21 CFR 870.1200 - Diagnostic intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... intracardiac pressures, to sample blood, and to introduce substances into the heart and vessels. Included in this generic device are right-heart catheters, left-heart catheters, and angiographic catheters,...

  19. 21 CFR 870.1200 - Diagnostic intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... intracardiac pressures, to sample blood, and to introduce substances into the heart and vessels. Included in this generic device are right-heart catheters, left-heart catheters, and angiographic catheters,...

  20. 21 CFR 870.1200 - Diagnostic intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... intracardiac pressures, to sample blood, and to introduce substances into the heart and vessels. Included in this generic device are right-heart catheters, left-heart catheters, and angiographic catheters,...

  1. 21 CFR 870.1200 - Diagnostic intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... intracardiac pressures, to sample blood, and to introduce substances into the heart and vessels. Included in this generic device are right-heart catheters, left-heart catheters, and angiographic catheters,...

  2. Electrophysiological mapping and radiofrequency catheter ablation for ventricular tachycardia in a patient with peripartum cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Tokuda, Michifumi; Stevenson, William G; Nagashima, Koichi; Rubin, David A

    2013-11-01

    A 38-year-old female with prior failed endocardial ablation for ventricular tachycardia (VT) was referred for further treatment. She had been diagnosed with peripartum cardiomyopathy 7 years before and had persistent left ventricular dysfunction with an ejection fraction of 20%. Epicardial voltage mapping showed extensive epicardial scar despite absence of endocardial scar. Five distinct VT morphologies were induced. Ablation was aided by electrogram characteristics, pace mapping, entrainment mapping, and establishing electrical inexcitability along areas of epicardial scar. After epicardial ablation no sustained VT was induced. She had been doing well without VT occurrence but died 1 year later unexpectedly at home.

  3. Successful retrieval of an irretrievable jugular tesio catheter using a fogarty arterial embolectomy catheter.

    PubMed

    Arnáiz-García, María Elena; Gutiérrez-Diez, Francisco; Arnáiz-García, Ana María; Arnáiz, Javier; Expósito, Víctor; Nistal, Juan Francisco; Rodríquez-Entem, Felipe; Olalla, Juan José; López-Rodríguez, Javier; González-Santos, José María

    2014-05-01

    Long life expectancy and wide development of therapies have increased the number of patients under artificial treatment for lost kidney function or dialysis. Different options for vascular access are suitable for receiving this therapy. The use of tunneled catheters has consequently increased complications related to its use. A difficult retrieval of catheters caused by a hard fibrin sheath along its trajectory is a common drawback. Herein, we report a woman with suspicion of hemodialysis catheter infection and an irretrievable Tesio catheter. A novel technique using a Fogarty arterial catheter allowed a successful retrieval and avoided an aggressive management.

  4. Coronary artery embolism from infectious endocarditis treated with catheter thrombectomy using a GuideLiner catheter.

    PubMed

    Oestreich, Brett A; Sommer, Per; Armstrong, Ehrin J

    2016-04-01

    A 27-year-old male with history of IV drug use and recurrent endocarditis necessitating bioprosthetic mitral and tricuspid valve replacements presented with 2 weeks of fevers and chest pain. ECG revealed inferior ST-elevation myocardial infarction and he was taken urgently to the cardiac catheterization laboratory. Coronary angiography revealed thrombotic occlusion of the distal right coronary artery (RCA) with no angiographic evidence of atherosclerotic disease. Aspiration thrombectomy was performed followed by rheolytic thrombectomy. Despite multiple attempts at thrombectomy, significant residual organized thrombus persisted in the distal RCA. Therefore, further thrombectomy was performed by placing a GuideLiner catheter (Vascular Solutions, Minneapolis, MN) deep within the right coronary artery near the bifurcation into the posterior descending and posterior left ventricular arteries. After repeat aspiration, there was significant improvement with thrombolysis in myocardial infarction 3 flow. Intravascular ultrasound of the RCA revealed a normal-appearing vessel without evidence of atherosclerotic disease and mild residual thrombus. The decision was made to not pursue stent placement, given the concern for a likely embolic source. Following the procedure, the patient's chest pain resolved and his ST-segments normalized.

  5. Robust pigtail catheter tip detection in fluoroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzoumas, Stratis; Wang, Peng; Zheng, Yefeng; John, Matthias; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2012-02-01

    The pigtail catheter is a type of catheter inserted into the human body during interventional surgeries such as the transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). The catheter is characterized by a tightly curled end in order to remain attached to a valve pocket during the intervention, and it is used to inject contrast agent for the visualization of the vessel in fluoroscopy. Image-based detection of this catheter is used during TAVI, in order to overlay a model of the aorta and enhance visibility during the surgery. Due to the different possible projection angles in fluoroscopy, the pigtail tip can appear in a variety of different shapes spanning from pure circular to ellipsoid or even line. Furthermore, the appearance of the catheter tip is radically altered when the contrast agent is injected during the intervention or when it is occluded by other devices. All these factors make the robust real-time detection and tracking of the pigtail catheter a challenging task. To address these challenges, this paper proposes a new tree-structured, hierarchical detection scheme, based on a shape categorization of the pigtail catheter tip, and a combination of novel Haar features. The proposed framework demonstrates improved detection performance, through a validation on a data set consisting of 272 sequences with more than 20,000 images. The detection framework presented in this paper is not limited to pigtail catheter detection, but it can also be applied successfully to any other shape-varying object with similar characteristics.

  6. 21 CFR 874.4175 - Nasopharyngeal catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal catheter. 874.4175 Section 874.4175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4175 Nasopharyngeal catheter....

  7. 21 CFR 874.4175 - Nasopharyngeal catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal catheter. 874.4175 Section 874.4175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4175 Nasopharyngeal catheter....

  8. 21 CFR 874.4175 - Nasopharyngeal catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal catheter. 874.4175 Section 874.4175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4175 Nasopharyngeal catheter....

  9. Haemodialysis catheters in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Huriaux, Laetitia; Costille, Paul; Quintard, Hervé; Journois, Didier; Kellum, John A; Rimmelé, Thomas

    2016-11-29

    Ten to 15% of critically ill patients need renal replacement therapy (RRT) for severe acute kidney injury. The dialysis catheter is critical for RRT quality and efficiency. Catheters have several properties that must be optimized to promote RRT success. The distal tip has to be located in a high blood flow location, which means central venous territory. Therefore, catheters are mostly inserted into the right internal jugular vein or in femoral veins. External diameter should vary from 12 to 16 Fr in order to ensure adequate blood flow inside the catheter. Lumen shapes are theoretically designed to limit thrombotic risk with low turbulences and frictional forces against the internal wall. With low aspiration pressure, distal tip shape has to deliver sufficient blood flow, while limiting recirculation rate. Catheter material should be biocompatible. Despite in vitro data, no strong evidence supports the use of coated catheters in the ICU in order to reduce infectious risk. Antibiotic "lock" solutions are not routinely recommended. Ultrasound guidance for catheterization significantly decreases mechanical complications. Clinicians should select the optimal catheter according to patient body habitus, catheter intrinsic properties and RRT modality to be used.

  10. Cost/benefit analysis of chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine-impregnated venous catheters for femoral access.

    PubMed

    Lorente, Leonardo; Lecuona, María; Jiménez, Alejandro; Lorenzo, Lisset; Diosdado, Sara; Marca, Lucía; Mora, María L

    2014-10-01

    Sixty-four patients with chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine-impregnated catheters had a lower rate of catheter-related bloodstream infection and lower central venous catheter-related costs per catheter day than 190 patients with a standard catheter.

  11. MediGuide-impact on catheter ablation techniques and workflow.

    PubMed

    Pillarisetti, Jayasree; Kanmanthareddy, Arun; Reddy, Yeruva Madhu; Lakkireddy, Dhanunjaya

    2014-09-01

    Since the introduction of percutaneous intervention in modern medical science, specifically cardiovascular medicine fluoroscopy has remained the gold standard for navigation inside the cardiac structures. As the complexity of the procedures continue to increase with advances in interventional electrophysiology, the procedural times and fluoroscopy times have proportionately increased and the risks of radiation exposure both to the patients as well as the operator continue to rise. 3D electroanatomic mapping systems have to some extent complemented fluoroscopic imaging in improving catheter navigation and forming a solid platform for exploring the electroanatomic details of the target substrate. The 3D mapping systems are still limited as they continue to be static representations of a dynamic heart without being completely integrated with fluoroscopy. The field needed a technological solution that could add a dynamic positioning system that can be successfully incorporated into fluoroscopic imaging as well as electroanatomic imaging modalities. MediGuide is one such innovative technology that exploits the geo-positioning system principles. It employs a transmitter mounted on the X-ray panel that emits an electromagnetic field within which sensor-equipped diagnostic and ablation catheters are tracked within prerecorded fluoroscopic images. MediGuide is also integrated with NavX mapping system and helps in developing better 3D images by field scaling-a process that reduces field distortions that occur from impedance mapping alone. In this review, we discuss about the principle of MediGuide technology, the catheter ablation techniques, and the workflow in the EP lab for different procedures.

  12. Laser welding of balloon catheters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan, Aidan J.

    2003-03-01

    The balloon catheter is one of the principal instruments of non-invasive vascular surgery. It is used most commonly for angioplasty (and in recent years for delivering stents) at a multitude of different sites in the body from small arteries in the heart to the bilary duct. It is composed of a polymer balloon that is attached to a polymer shaft at two points called the distal and proximal bonds. The diverse utility of balloon catheters means a large range of component sizes and materials are used during production; this leads to a complexity of bonding methods and technology. The proximal and distal bonds have been conventionally made using cyanoacrylate or UV curing glue, however with performance requirements of bond strength, flexibility, profile, and manufacturing costs these bonds are increasingly being made by welding using laser, RF, and Hot Jaw methods. This paper describes laser welding of distal and proximal balloon bonds and details beam delivery, bonding mechanisms, bond shaping, laser types, and wavelength choice.

  13. Prevention of central venous catheter bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Walz, J Matthias; Memtsoudis, Stavros G; Heard, Stephen O

    2010-01-01

    The majority of nosocomial bloodstream infections in critically ill patients originate from an infected central venous catheter (CVC). Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) cause significant morbidity and mortality and increase the cost of care. The most frequent causative organisms for CRBSI are coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNSs), Staphylococcus aureus, enterococci, and Candida species. The path to infection frequently includes migration of skin organisms at the insertion site into the cutaneous catheter tract, resulting in microbial colonization of the catheter tip and formation of biofilm. Evidence-based strategies for the prevention of CRBSI include behavioral and educational interventions, effective skin antisepsis coupled with maximum barrier precautions, the use of antiseptic dressings, and the use of antiseptic or antibiotic impregnated catheters. Achieving and maintaining very low rates of CRBSI requires a multidisciplinary approach involving the entire health care team, the use of novel technologies in patients with the highest risk of CRBSI, and frequent reeducation of staff.

  14. Catheter-related urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Nicolle, Lindsay E

    2005-01-01

    Indwelling urinary catheters are used frequently in older populations. For either short- or long-term catheters, the infection rate is about 5% per day. Escherichia coli remains the most common infecting organism, but a wide variety of other organisms may be isolated, including yeast species. Bacteria tend to show increased resistance because of the repeated antimicrobial courses. Urinary tract infection (UTI) usually follows formation of biofilm on both the internal and external catheter surface. The biofilm protects organisms from both antimicrobials and the host immune response. Morbidity from UTI with short-term catheter use is limited if appropriate catheter care is practised. In patients with long-term catheters, fever from a urinary source is common with a frequency varying from 1 per 100 to 1 per 1000 catheter days. Long-term care facility residents with chronic indwelling catheters have a much greater risk for bacteraemia and other urinary complications than residents without catheters. Asymptomatic catheter-acquired UTI should not be treated with antimicrobials. Antimicrobial treatment does not decrease symptomatic episodes but will lead to emergence of more resistant organisms. For treatment of symptomatic infection, many antimicrobials are effective. Wherever possible, antimicrobial selection should be delayed until culture results are available. Whether to administer initial treatment by an oral or parenteral route is determined by clinical presentation. If empirical therapy is required, antimicrobial selection is based on variables such as route of administration, anticipated infecting organism and susceptibility, and patient tolerance. Renal function, concomitant medications, local formulary and cost may also be considered in selection of the antimicrobial agent. The duration of therapy is usually 10-14 days, but patients who respond promptly and in whom the catheter must remain in situ may be treated with a shorter 7-day course to reduce

  15. Development of Bend Sensor for Catheter Tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagano, Yoshitaka; Sano, Akihito; Fujimoto, Hideo

    Recently, a minimally invasive surgery which makes the best use of the catheter has been becoming more popular. In endovascular coil embolization for a cerebral aneurysm, the observation of the catheter's painting phenomenon is very important to execute the appropriate manipulation of the delivery wire and the catheter. In this study, the internal bend sensor which consists of at least two bending enhanced plastic optical fibers was developed in order to measure the curvature of the catheter tip. Consequently, the painting could be more sensitively detected in the neighborhood of the aneurysm. In this paper, the basic characteristics of the developed sensor system are described and its usefulness is confirmed from the comparison of the insertion force of delivery wire and the curvature of catheter tip in the experiment of coil embolization.

  16. Intraluminal fluorescence spectroscopy catheter with ultrasound guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Douglas N.; Park, Jesung; Sun, Yang; Papaioannou, Thanassis; Marcu, Laura

    2009-05-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of a time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) technique for intraluminal investigation of arterial vessel composition under intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) guidance. A prototype 1.8-mm (5.4 Fr) catheter combining a side-viewing optical fiber (SVOF) and an IVUS catheter was constructed and tested with in vitro vessel phantoms. The prototype catheter can locate a fluorophore in the phantom vessel wall, steer the SVOF in place, perform blood flushing under flow conditions, and acquire high-quality TRFS data using 337-nm wavelength excitation. The catheter steering capability used for the coregistration of the IVUS image plane and the SVOF beam produce a guiding precision to an arterial phantom wall site location of 0.53+/-0.16 mm. This new intravascular multimodal catheter enables the potential for in vivo arterial plaque composition identification using TRFS.

  17. Evaluation of an intravenous catheter for use in the horse.

    PubMed

    Gulick, B A; Meagher, D M

    1981-02-01

    A commercially available polyvinyl chloride intravenous catheter was studied in 9 horses for 3 to 10 days to evaluate the catheter's suitability for use in the horse, to develop a new insertion technique, and to establish a protocol for catheter care. Seven of the animals were clinically normal horses receiving parenteral nutrition; one was a horse with hypocalcemia receiving frequent intravenous injections of calcium gluconate, and one was a clinically normal horse receiving no infusions. The catheter dressings were changed every 48 hours, and an aspirate from the catheter and the catheter tip was cultured at the time of catheter removal. One catheter became infected following a break in the protocol. It was concluded that the polyvinyl catheter is suitable for use in the horse and that the proposed protocol for catheter insertion and maintenance may reduce the likelihood of complications such as catheter sepsis, thrombophlebitis, and embolism.

  18. The association between the use of urinary catheters and morbidity and mortality among elderly patients in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Kunin, C M; Douthitt, S; Dancing, J; Anderson, J; Moeschberger, M

    1992-02-01

    To determine whether the use of urinary catheters in elderly patients in nursing homes has an independent effect on morbidity and mortality, the authors conducted a 1-year prospective study among 1,540 patients in a stratified random sample of nursing homes. Patient mortality was assessed at 1 year in relation to the presence or absence of a catheter at entry to the study, acquisition of a catheter, and the proportion of nursing home days spent catheterized during the study year. The independent association of catheter use with mortality was assessed by logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, activities of daily living, mental status, skin condition (decubitus ulcers), and 20 medical diagnoses. The effect of catheterization on hospitalization, use of systemic antimicrobial drugs, and mortality was also examined by matched pairs analysis. At entry, 10.5% of patients had catheters, and they tended to remain catheterized during most of the study year. An additional 10% were catheterized during the year. The following factors were found to have a significant independent association with mortality: urinary catheters, age, mental status or activities of daily living, cancer, cardiac disease, diabetes, and skin condition. There was a stepwise increase in mortality with duration of catheterization. Patients who were catheterized for 76% or more of their days in the nursing home were three times more likely to die within a year. The number of hospitalizations, duration of hospitalization, and use of antimicrobial drugs were all three times greater among catheterized patients.

  19. Radiological Interventions for Correction of Central Venous Port Catheter Migrations

    SciTech Connect

    Gebauer, Bernhard Teichgraeber, Ulf Karl; Podrabsky, Petr; Werk, Michael; Haenninen, Enrique Lopez; Felix, Roland

    2007-07-15

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate radiological-interventional central venous port catheter corrections in migrated/malpositioned catheter tips. Materials and Methods. Thirty patients with migrated/malpositioned port catheter tips were included in this retrospective analysis. To visualize the catheter patency a contrast-enhanced port catheter series was performed, followed by transfemoral port catheter correction with various 5-F angiographic catheters (pigtail; Sos Omni), gooseneck snares, or combinations thereof. Results. One patient showed spontaneous reposition of the catheter tip. In 27 of 29 patients (93%), radiological-interventional port catheter correction was successful. In two patients port catheter malposition correction was not possible, because of the inability to catch either the catheter tip or the catheter in its course, possibly due to fibrin sheath formation with attachment of the catheter to the vessel wall. No disconnection or port catheter dysfunction was observed after correction. Conclusions. We conclude that in migrated catheter tips radiological-interventional port catheter correction is a minimally invasive alternative to port extraction and reimplantation. In patients with a fibrin sheath and/or thrombosis port catheter correction is often more challenging.

  20. The radiofrequency magnetic dipole discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martines, E.; Zuin, M.; Marcante, M.; Cavazzana, R.; Fassina, A.; Spolaore, M.

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes a novel and simple concept of plasma source, which is able to produce a radiofrequency magnetized discharge with minimal power requirements. The source is based on the magnetron concept and uses a permanent magnet as an active electrode. The dipolar field produced by the magnet confines the electrons, which cause further ionization, thus producing a toroidally shaped plasma in the equatorial region around the electrode. A plasma can be ignited with such scheme with power levels as low as 5 W. Paschen curves have been built for four different working gases, showing that in Helium or Neon, plasma breakdown is easily obtained also at atmospheric pressure. The plasma properties have been measured using a balanced Langmuir probe, showing that the electron temperature is around 3-4 eV and higher in the cathode proximity. Plasma densities of the order of 1016 m-3 have been obtained, with a good positive scaling with applied power. Overall, the electron pressure appears to be strongly correlated with the magnetic field magnitude in the measurement point.

  1. Radiofrequency Ablation Beyond the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Neeman, Ziv; Wood, Bradford J.

    2008-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has begun to show promise for extrahepatic indications. Although much of the reported work on image-guided RFA of liver neoplasms is quite promising, it is even earlier in the evaluation and validation process for extrahepatic RFA, with few short-term and no long-term studies reported. Although there are much more data for liver RFA with almost 3,000 cases reported in the literature, there are a number of ongoing investigations of RFA for tumors in the kidney, lung, bone, breast, bone, and adrenal gland. Debulking and pain control with RFA present palliative options becoming increasingly popular weapons in the interventionalist's oncology arsenal. Metastatic disease with a wide variety of primary histologies in a myriad of locations may be treated with RFA after a careful consideration of the risk-to-benefit ratio balance. The RFA technique can be slightly different outside the liver. Specifically, differing dielectric tissue characteristics may markedly alter the RFA treatment. Each different RFA system has a unique risk and advantage profile. Extrahepatic indications and contraindications will be suggested. Treatment tips and the unique complications and considerations will be introduced for some of the more common extrahepatic locations. PMID:12524646

  2. Cardiac Cephalgia

    PubMed Central

    Wassef, Nancy; Ali, Ali Turab; Katsanevaki, Alexia-Zacharoula; Nishtar, Salman

    2014-01-01

    Although most of the patients presenting with ischemic heart disease have chest pains, there are other rare presenting symptoms like cardiac cephalgia. In this report, we present a case of acute coronary syndrome with an only presentation of exertional headache. It was postulated as acute presentation of coronary artery disease, due to previous history of similar presentation associated with some chest pains with previous left coronary artery stenting. We present an unusual case with cardiac cephalgia in a young patient under the age of 50 which was not reported at that age before. There are four suggested mechanisms for this cardiac presentation. PMID:28352454

  3. The efficacy of noble metal alloy urinary catheters in reducing catheter-associated urinary tract infection

    PubMed Central

    Aljohi, Alanood Ahmed; Hassan, Hanan Elkefafy; Gupta, Rakesh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) is the most common device-related healthcare-acquired infection. CAUTI can be severe and lead to bacteremia, significant morbidity, prolonged hospital stay, and high antibiotic consumption. Patients and Methods: In this study, we evaluated the CAUTI-reducing efficacy of noble metal alloy catheters in sixty patients (thirty per group) in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) at the King Fahad Hospital in Saudi Arabia. The study was a single-blinded, randomized, single-centered, prospective investigation that included patients using urinary catheters for 3 days. Results: A 90% relative risk reduction in the rate of CAUTI was observed with the noble metal alloy catheter compared to the standard catheter (10 vs. 1 cases, P = 0.006). When considering both catheter-associated asymptomatic bacteriuria and CAUTI, the relative risk reduction was 83% (12 vs. 2 cases, P = 0.005). In addition to CAUTI, the risk of acquiring secondary bacteremia was lower (100%) for the patients using noble metal alloy catheters (3 cases in the standard group vs. 0 case in the noble metal alloy catheter group, P = 0.24). No adverse events related to any of the used catheters were recorded. Conclusion: Results from this study revealed that noble metal alloy catheters are safe to use and significantly reduce CAUTI rate in ICU patients after 3 days of use. PMID:28057985

  4. 21 CFR 882.4725 - Radiofrequency lesion probe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... (a) Identification. A radiofrequency lesion probe is a device connected to a radiofrequency (RF) lesion generator to deliver the RF energy to the site within the nervous system where a lesion is...

  5. 21 CFR 882.4725 - Radiofrequency lesion probe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... (a) Identification. A radiofrequency lesion probe is a device connected to a radiofrequency (RF) lesion generator to deliver the RF energy to the site within the nervous system where a lesion is...

  6. 21 CFR 882.4725 - Radiofrequency lesion probe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... (a) Identification. A radiofrequency lesion probe is a device connected to a radiofrequency (RF) lesion generator to deliver the RF energy to the site within the nervous system where a lesion is...

  7. 21 CFR 882.4725 - Radiofrequency lesion probe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... (a) Identification. A radiofrequency lesion probe is a device connected to a radiofrequency (RF) lesion generator to deliver the RF energy to the site within the nervous system where a lesion is...

  8. 21 CFR 882.4725 - Radiofrequency lesion probe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... (a) Identification. A radiofrequency lesion probe is a device connected to a radiofrequency (RF) lesion generator to deliver the RF energy to the site within the nervous system where a lesion is...

  9. Impact of catheter and surgical ablation on arrhythmia treatment in a tertiary referral centre.

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, D; Rowland, E

    1992-01-01

    Invasive cardiac electrophysiology studies began as diagnostic studies. The past decade has seen the introduction of several new treatments which have broadened the scope of invasive electrophysiology studies. In particular, the development of catheter ablation techniques increasingly allows curative treatment to be delivered in the catheter laboratory. The workload of electrophysiological procedures has steadily increased in our tertiary referral centre. Over 1000 patients have been treated in the past 20 years and it is projected that 219 new patients will be treated in 1991 and 342 procedures will be carried out. Over 25% of patients now receive either catheter or surgical ablation and almost 80% of these are cured permanently without the need for further drug treatment. The development of safer techniques for catheter ablation has led to its increased use and a decline in surgical ablations. Because catheter ablation is a much simpler and less traumatic procedure than surgical ablation there are great advantages both for the patient and in terms of cost-effectiveness. Antitachycardia pacing, relatively common in 1985, has now largely been supplanted by ablation and implantation of defibrillators. As the tendency to non-pharmacological treatment increases and evidence mounts that cost-effectiveness is greater for electrophysiological treatments, the implications for the funding of electrophysiology services grow. The initially high cost of curative treatment needs to be balanced against the longer term and potentially higher costs of palliative drug treatment. The potential to cure patients with catheter procedures may lead to a greater demand for this expertise and a need for an increase in training and facilities. PMID:1739536

  10. Ultrasound for Localization of Central Venous Catheter: A Good Alternative to Chest X-Ray?

    PubMed Central

    Kamalipour, Hamid; Ahmadi, Sedigheh; Kamali, Karmella; Moaref, Alireza; Shafa, Masih; Kamalipour, Parsa

    2016-01-01

    Background Chest radiography after central venous catheter (CVC) insertion is the main method of verifying the catheter location. Despite the widespread use of radiography for detecting catheter position, x-ray may not always be readily available, especially in the operating room. Objectives We aimed to compare contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) and chest radiography for detecting the correct location of CVCs. Methods One hundred sixteen consecutive patients with indications for CVC before cardiac surgery were enrolled in this observational study. After catheter insertion, CEUS was performed. Portable radiography was obtained postoperatively in the intensive care unit. Sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values were determined by comparing the ultrasonography results with radiographic findings as a reference standard. Results Chest radiography revealed 16 CVC misplacements: two cases of intravascular and 14 cases of right atrium (RA) misplacement. CEUS detected 11 true catheter malpositionings in the RA, while it could not recognize seven catheter placements correctly. CEUS showed two false RA misplacements and five falsely correct CVC positions. A sensitivity of 98% and specificity of 69% were achieved for CEUS in detecting CVC misplacements. Positive and negative predictive values were 95% and 85%, respectively. The interrater agreement (kappa) between CEUS and radiography was 0.72 (P < 0.001). Conclusions Despite close concordance between ultrasonography and chest radiography, CEUS is not a suitable alternative for standard chest radiography in detecting CVC location; however, considering its high sensitivity and acceptable specificity in our study, its usefulness as a triage method for detecting CVC location on a real-time basis in the operating room cannot be ignored. PMID:27847699

  11. Catheter-related complications of cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Greene, J N

    1996-06-01

    Although the management of CVC-related infection appears complex and at times the literature seems to be contradictory, simple guidelines can direct the clinician in a stepwise fashion. Knowledge of the pathogenesis of each organism and the immune status of the host is crucial to decide whether catheter removal or retention is indicated. For example, in general, GNB bacteremia does not immediately prompt catheter removal in a neutropenic patient but does in a nonneutropenic host because of the gastrointestinal source of the former and a primary catheter source in the latter. In summary, as more CVCs are inserted in patients undergoing chemotherapeutic, antimicrobial, transfusional, and nutritional supportive care, novel approaches to prevention and treatment of the associated infectious complications inherent with such devices are needed. A multifaceted approach from impregnated catheters to local catheter-site antisepsis was reviewed. We may find, however, that as simple handwashing between patients is crucial to infection control, so too is a trained catheter-care team using total barrier precautions and ensuring proper local catheter maintenance critical to preventing CVC-related infections.

  12. Principles of tunneled cuffed catheter placement.

    PubMed

    Heberlein, Wolf

    2011-12-01

    Tunneled cuffed catheters provide reliable and instant long-term intravenous access for a large variety of therapeutic purposes, including chemotherapy, parenteral nutrition, and apheresis. The most frequent application is for patients with renal failure as an access device for hemodialysis. In this capacity, the rate of catheter use has remained stable in the United States, despite the promotion of arteriovenous fistulas and arteriovenous grafts. The latter 2 procedures achieve superior longevity and much higher cost-efficiency. Tunneled catheters, however, serve as bridging devices during maturation of newly placed arteriovenous fistulas or as the final option in patients in whom fistulas and grafts have failed. High-quality vascular access is a hallmark of interventional radiology, and its significance for patient care and for our specialty cannot be overestimated. Familiarity with basic concepts of the device and procedural techniques are crucial to achieve successful long-term venous access. The following article demonstrates key concepts of tunneled venous catheter placement by means of dialysis, inasmuch as dialysis catheters represent the most commonly placed tunneled central venous catheters. The principles of placement and techniques utilized, however, are applicable to devices that are used for chemotherapy or parenteral nutrition, such as the Hickman, Broviac, Groshong, or tunneled peripherally inserted central catheters.

  13. [Multifunctional testing of PTCA balloon catheters].

    PubMed

    Kraft, M; Schmitz, H; Schulte, R; Boenick, U

    2000-06-01

    New in vitro measuring methods for balloon catheters used for percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) and their verification in a complex test device are presented. This system can mimic all relevant application situations. The central element of the test device is a coronary vessel model matching the physiological situation in terms of geometrical structure and frictional properties. Reactive force sensors are used to measure the application-relevant forces exerted by the catheter on the model vessel walls and accessories, such as guide wire and guiding catheter. To generate a kink-free advancement of the catheter and permit measurement of the active forces, an alternating drive unit has been specially developed. The testing and application of the newly developed methods revealed statistically significant differences between various types of catheter. The test device closes a gap between complex but subjective clinical tests, and individual objective, but application-removed in vitro test setups for PTCA catheters. While the initial prototype had shortcomings with regard to the reproducibility of measurements, successor systems developed for industrial use are now in production. The properties of these measuring systems developed for the benefit of manufacturer and reprocessor of PTCA catheters are discussed.

  14. ATLS: Catheter and tube placement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosbee, John; Krupa, Debra T.; Pepper, L.; Orsak, Debra

    1991-01-01

    The specific objectives of this experiment are: to evaluate the rack mounted equipment and medical supplies necessary for medical procedures; to evaluate the attachments, mounting points, and inner drawer assemblies for the medical supplies; and to evaluate the procedures for performing medical scenarios. The resources available in the HMF miniracks to accomplish medical scenarios and/or procedures include: medical equipment mounted in the racks; a patch panel with places to attach tubing and catheters; self contained drawers full of critical care medical supplies; and an ALS 'backpack' for deploying supplies. The attachment lines, tubing and associated medical supplies will be deployed and used with the equipment and a patient mannequin. Data collection is provided by direct observations by the inflight experimenters, and analysis of still and video photography.

  15. Catheters for optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atif, M.; Ullah, H.; Hamza, M. Y.; Ikram, M.

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this review article is to overview technology, clinical evidence, and future applications to date optical coherence tomography (OCT) probes to yield the diagnostic purpose. We have reviewed the designing, construction and working of different categories of OCT probes developed for optical diagnostics having a potential for non invasive and improved detection of different types of cancer as well as other neoplasm. Rotational and balloon catheters, imaging needles and hand-held, linear scanning, multichannel, micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) technology based, dynamic focusing, forward view imaging, and common path interferometer based probes have been discussed in details. The fiber probes have shown excellent performance for two dimensional and three dimensional higher resolution, cross-sectional imaging of interior and exterior body tissues that can be compared with histopathology to provide the information about the angiogenesis and other lesions in the tissue. The MEMS-technology based probes are found to be more suitable for three dimensional morphological imaging.

  16. Nuclear cardiac

    SciTech Connect

    Slutsky, R.; Ashburn, W.L.

    1982-01-01

    The relationship between nuclear medicine and cardiology has continued to produce a surfeit of interesting, illuminating, and important reports involving the analysis of cardiac function, perfusion, and metabolism. To simplify the presentation, this review is broken down into three major subheadings: analysis of myocardial perfusion; imaging of the recent myocardial infarction; and the evaluation of myocardial function. There appears to be an increasingly important relationship between cardiology, particularly cardiac physiology, and nuclear imaging techniques. (KRM)

  17. 21 CFR 870.1210 - Continuous flush catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1210 Continuous flush catheter. (a) Identification. A continuous flush catheter is an attachment to a catheter-transducer system... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Continuous flush catheter. 870.1210 Section...

  18. 21 CFR 870.1210 - Continuous flush catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1210 Continuous flush catheter. (a) Identification. A continuous flush catheter is an attachment to a catheter-transducer system... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Continuous flush catheter. 870.1210 Section...

  19. 21 CFR 870.1210 - Continuous flush catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1210 Continuous flush catheter. (a) Identification. A continuous flush catheter is an attachment to a catheter-transducer system... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Continuous flush catheter. 870.1210 Section...

  20. 21 CFR 870.1210 - Continuous flush catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1210 Continuous flush catheter. (a) Identification. A continuous flush catheter is an attachment to a catheter-transducer system... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Continuous flush catheter. 870.1210 Section...

  1. 21 CFR 870.1210 - Continuous flush catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1210 Continuous flush catheter. (a) Identification. A continuous flush catheter is an attachment to a catheter-transducer system... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Continuous flush catheter. 870.1210 Section...

  2. Cardiac cameras.

    PubMed

    Travin, Mark I

    2011-05-01

    Cardiac imaging with radiotracers plays an important role in patient evaluation, and the development of suitable imaging instruments has been crucial. While initially performed with the rectilinear scanner that slowly transmitted, in a row-by-row fashion, cardiac count distributions onto various printing media, the Anger scintillation camera allowed electronic determination of tracer energies and of the distribution of radioactive counts in 2D space. Increased sophistication of cardiac cameras and development of powerful computers to analyze, display, and quantify data has been essential to making radionuclide cardiac imaging a key component of the cardiac work-up. Newer processing algorithms and solid state cameras, fundamentally different from the Anger camera, show promise to provide higher counting efficiency and resolution, leading to better image quality, more patient comfort and potentially lower radiation exposure. While the focus has been on myocardial perfusion imaging with single-photon emission computed tomography, increased use of positron emission tomography is broadening the field to include molecular imaging of the myocardium and of the coronary vasculature. Further advances may require integrating cardiac nuclear cameras with other imaging devices, ie, hybrid imaging cameras. The goal is to image the heart and its physiological processes as accurately as possible, to prevent and cure disease processes.

  3. 47 CFR 1.1310 - Radiofrequency radiation exposure limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radiofrequency radiation exposure limits. 1... Radiofrequency radiation exposure limits. The criteria listed in table 1 shall be used to evaluate the environmental impact of human exposure to radiofrequency (RF) radiation as specified in § 1.1307(b), except...

  4. 47 CFR 2.801 - Radiofrequency device defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radiofrequency device defined. 2.801 Section 2.801 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Marketing of Radio-frequency Devices § 2.801 Radiofrequency...

  5. 47 CFR 2.801 - Radiofrequency device defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radiofrequency device defined. 2.801 Section 2.801 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Marketing of Radio-frequency Devices § 2.801 Radiofrequency...

  6. 47 CFR 2.801 - Radiofrequency device defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radiofrequency device defined. 2.801 Section 2.801 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Marketing of Radio-frequency Devices § 2.801 Radiofrequency...

  7. 47 CFR 2.801 - Radiofrequency device defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radiofrequency device defined. 2.801 Section 2.801 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Marketing of Radio-frequency Devices § 2.801 Radiofrequency...

  8. 47 CFR 2.801 - Radiofrequency device defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radiofrequency device defined. 2.801 Section 2.801 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Marketing of Radio-frequency Devices § 2.801 Radiofrequency...

  9. Visualization of cardiac wavefronts using data fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kynor, David B.; Dietz, Anthony; Friets, Eric; Peterson, Jon; Bergstrom, Ursula; Triedman, John; Hammer, Peter

    2002-05-01

    Catheter ablation has emerged as a highly effective treatment for arrhythmias that are constrained by known, easily located, anatomic landmarks. However, this treatment has enjoyed limited success for arrhythmias that are characterized by complex activation patterns or are not anatomically constrained. This class of arrhythmias, which includes atrial fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia resulting from ischemic heart disease, demands improved mapping tools. Current technology forces the cardiologist to view cardiac anatomy independently from the functional information contained in the electrical activation patterns. This leads to difficulties in interpreting the large volumes of data provided by high-density recording catheters and in mapping patients with abnormal anatomy (e.g., patients with congenital heart disease). The goal of this is work is development of new data processing and display algorithms that will permit the clinician to view activation sequences superimposed onto existing fluoroscopic images depicting the location of recording catheters within the heart. In cases where biplane fluoroscopic images and x-ray camera position data are available, the position of the catheters can be reconstructed in three-dimensions.

  10. Real time assessment of RF cardiac tissue ablation with optical spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Demos, S G; Sharareh, S

    2008-03-20

    An optical spectroscopy approach is demonstrated allowing for critical parameters during RF ablation of cardiac tissue to be evaluated in real time. The method is based on incorporating in a typical ablation catheter transmitting and receiving fibers that terminate at the tip of the catheter. By analyzing the spectral characteristics of the NIR diffusely reflected light, information is obtained on such parameters as, catheter-tissue proximity, lesion formation, depth of penetration of the lesion, formation of char during the ablation, formation of coagulum around the ablation site, differentiation of ablated from healthy tissue, and recognition of micro-bubble formation in the tissue.

  11. Radiofrequency uvulopalatoplasty for primary snoring.

    PubMed

    Samimi Ardestani, Seyed Hadi; Dadgarnia, Mohammad Hossein; Baradaranfar, Mohammad Hossein; Mazidi, Mona; Rabbani, Mahtab; Behniafard, Nasim; Baradaranfar, Amin

    2013-09-09

    Simple snoring is a social problem, one that can gravely affect the patient's married life. About 40% of men and 20% of women are affected, and it often goes along with sleep-disordered breathing. Up to now various surgical techniques have been defined such as UPPP(uvulopalatopharyngo plasty), and laser-assisted uvulopalatoplasty (LAUP). Among the surgical methods, RAUP (radiofrequency assisted uvulopalatoplasty) is a minimal invasive, an easy performed, and time and cost effective one. We designed a before and after a clinical trial. The inclusion criteria were age >18 years, complaint of nocturnal snoring, have a bed partner to assess snoring, AHI<5 events per hour in the polysomnography, malampathy score (soft palate position) I or II, an elongated uvula, grade I and II of pharyngeal webbing and patient consent was needed too. A 10-score visual analog scale (VAS) of snoring severity was completed by bed partner. All of 35 included patients underwent RAUP under local anesthesia by the same expert surgeon. After 3 months, 6 months and one year, subjective snoring decreased significantly compared to the preoperative period. The decline in VAS in 6 month compared to 3 months postoperatively, was not significant (P=0.223). When comparing 1 year and 6 months after treatment, the VAS scores were increased, but they were not significant (From 1.8 to 1.9, P=0.78). Three months after treatment minor complications consisted of: nasal regurgitation in 2 patients (5.7%), nasal speech in 2 (5.7%) and exacerbation of snoring in 2 (5.7%) patients.There was no major complication including mucosal laceration, uvular damage and obstruction of the airway. The rate of snoring decrease did not correlate with age, sex and BMI. Based on this study and literature review, it seems RAUP is a safe surgery, which may decrease symptoms of snoring, at least, in short-term follow-up.

  12. Early removal of urinary catheters in patients with thoracic epidural catheters.

    PubMed

    Tripepi-Bova, Kathleen A; Sun, Zhiyuan; Mason, David; Albert, Nancy M

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether early removal of urinary catheters in patients with thoracic epidurals resulted in urinary retention (>500 mL by bladder scanner). Patients were given up to 8 hours to void before further intervention. Of 61 patients, only 4 (6.6%) required urinary catheter reinsertion due to urinary retention. Early removal of urinary catheters after thoracic surgery in patients with thoracic epidurals was safe, with minimal urinary retention.

  13. Randomized comparison of popliteal-sciatic perineural catheter tip migration and dislocation in a cadaver model using two catheter designs

    PubMed Central

    Steffel, Lauren; Howard, Steven K.; Borg, Lindsay; Leng, Jody C.; Kim, T. Edward

    2017-01-01

    Background New catheter-over-needle (CON) technology for continuous peripheral nerve blockade has emerged, but its effect on the risk of perineural catheter tip dislocation is unknown. Less flexible catheters may be more likely to migrate away from the nerve with simulated patient movement. In the present study, we evaluated catheter tip migration between CON catheters and traditional catheter-through-needle (CTN) catheters during ultrasound-guided short-axis in-plane (SAX-IP) insertion. Methods We evaluated the migration of popliteal-sciatic catheters in a prone, unembalmed male cadaver. Thirty catheter placement trials were divided randomly into two groups based on the catheter type: CON or CTN. A single anesthesiology resident placed the catheters by SAX-IP insertion, and the catheters were then examined by ultrasound before and after ipsilateral knee range of motion (ROM) exercises (0°–130° flexion). A blinded expert regional anesthesiologist performed caliper measurements on the ultrasound images before and after the ROM exercises. The primary outcome was the change in distance from the catheter tip to the center of the nerve (cm) between before and after the ROM exercises. Results The change in the tip-to-nerve distance (median [10th–90th percentile]) was 0.06 (−0.16 to 0.23) cm for the CTN catheter and 0.00 (−0.12 to 0.69) for the CON catheter (P = 0.663). However, there was a statistically significant increase in dislocation out of the nerve compartment for the CON catheter (4/15; 0/15 for CTN) (P = 0.043). Conclusions Although the use of different catheter designs had no effect on the change in the measured migration distance of popliteal-sciatic catheters, 27% of the CON catheters were dislocated out of the nerve compartment. These results may influence the choice of catheter design when using SAX-IP perineural catheter insertion. PMID:28184270

  14. Intracardiac Forward-Looking Ultrasound Imaging Catheters Using Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasonic Transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikoozadeh, A.; Wygant, I. O.; Lin, D.-S.; Oralkan, Ö.; Thomenius, K.; Dentinger, A.; Wildes, D.; Akopyan, G.; Shivkumar, K.; Mahajan, A.; Stephens, D. N.; O'Donnell, M.; Sahn, D.; Khuri-Yakub, P. T.

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common sustained arrhythmia that now affects approximately 2.2 million adults in the United States alone. Minimally invasive catheter-based electrophysiological interventions have revolutionized the management of cardiac arrhythmias. We are developing forward-viewing ultrasound imaging catheters based on two types of transducer arrays using the capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer technology: A 10-MHz, 24-element MicroLinear (ML) array with a footprint of 1.7 mm × 1.3 mm, and a 10-MHz, 64-element annular ring array with an outside diameter of 2.6 mm and inner diameter of 1.6 mm. Both arrays are integrated with custom-designed front-end electronic circuitry to overcome the performance degradation associated with long cables in the catheter. The ML and ring arrays provide real-time 2-D and 3-D images, respectively, in front of the catheter tip. Using the ML array, we demonstrated ex-vivo images of the left atrial appendage in an isolated Langendorff-perfused rabbit heart model and in-vivo images of heart through the open chest in a porcine animal model. We used the ring array to demonstrate 3-D images of coronary stents and an anatomic cast of a left atrial model.

  15. Management and visualization of a kinked epidural catheter

    PubMed Central

    Aslanidis, T; Fileli, A; Pyrgos, P

    2010-01-01

    A lumbar epidural catheter inserted in a 29-year-old woman for labor analgesia. The catheter failed to provide adequate analgesia. Moreover, after labor, it proved difficult to be removed. After computer tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance impedance (MRI) examination the course of the catheter was visible, the entrapped catheter was dislodged intact, revealing a kinking near its distal tip. Kinking of an epidural catheter leading to entrapment is an unusual complication of epidural catheterization. PMID:21311644

  16. Antimicrobial-impregnated catheters for the prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Lorente, Leonardo

    2016-05-04

    Central venous catheters are commonly used in critically ill patients. Such catheterization may entail mechanical and infectious complications. The interest in catheter-related infection lies in the morbidity, mortality and costs that it involved. Numerous contributions have been made in the prevention of catheter-related infection and the current review focuses on the possible current role of antimicrobial impregnated catheters to reduce catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI). There is evidence that the use of chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine (CHSS), rifampicin-minocycline, or rifampicin-miconazol impregnated catheters reduce the incidence of CRBSI and costs. In addition, there are some clinical circumstances associated with higher risk of CRBSI, such as the venous catheter access and the presence of tracheostomy. Current guidelines for the prevention of CRBSI recommended the use of a CHSS or rifampicin-minocycline impregnated catheter in patients whose catheter is expected to remain in place > 5 d and if the CRBSI rate has not decreased after implementation of a comprehensive strategy to reduce it.

  17. Prevention of central venous catheter-related infections: what works other than impregnated or coated catheters?

    PubMed

    Mermel, Leonard A

    2007-06-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) are a significant cause of morbidity and excess hospital cost. Data from prospective, randomized trials demonstrate that the risk of these infections can be minimized by simple interventions. Changing the behaviour of healthcare workers who insert and care for intravascular catheters is imperative. Creating a culture of patient safety and assuring easy access to the products necessary to maintain strict asepsis during catheter insertion, dressing changes, and when manipulating catheter hubs, will enhance adherence to optimal practice and will reduce the risk posed to the millions of patients in need of such devices.

  18. Antimicrobial-impregnated catheters for the prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infections

    PubMed Central

    Lorente, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Central venous catheters are commonly used in critically ill patients. Such catheterization may entail mechanical and infectious complications. The interest in catheter-related infection lies in the morbidity, mortality and costs that it involved. Numerous contributions have been made in the prevention of catheter-related infection and the current review focuses on the possible current role of antimicrobial impregnated catheters to reduce catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI). There is evidence that the use of chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine (CHSS), rifampicin-minocycline, or rifampicin-miconazol impregnated catheters reduce the incidence of CRBSI and costs. In addition, there are some clinical circumstances associated with higher risk of CRBSI, such as the venous catheter access and the presence of tracheostomy. Current guidelines for the prevention of CRBSI recommended the use of a CHSS or rifampicin-minocycline impregnated catheter in patients whose catheter is expected to remain in place > 5 d and if the CRBSI rate has not decreased after implementation of a comprehensive strategy to reduce it. PMID:27152256

  19. Management of catheter-related infection.

    PubMed

    Pagani, Jean-Luc; Eggimann, Philippe

    2008-02-01

    Nosocomial infections related to the development of catheter-related infections are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among critically ill hospitalized patients. Despite important preventive efforts, these infections remain a daily concern for most clinicians. Significant improvements in the knowledge of their pathophysiology and diagnosis allow us to treat them more efficiently. Current practices, such as guidewire exchange of catheters suspected to be the source of clinical sepsis, are supported by indirect evidence only. Infected catheters should systematically be removed, but some of them may be salved by combining systemic and antibiotic-lock treatment. After reviewing some specific therapeutic aspects, we suggest a practical approach to manage catheter-related infections.

  20. Designing a catheter skills training programme.

    PubMed

    Logan, Karen

    Karen Logan describes how a team of continence advisers designed and implemented a training programme that allows local nurses to meet the national occupational standards and competencies in catheterisation and catheter care.

  1. Peripherally inserted central catheter - dressing change

    MedlinePlus

    PICC - dressing change ... You have a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC). This is a tube that goes into a vein in your arm. It carries nutrients and medicines into your body. It may also ...

  2. FAQs about Catheter-Associated Bloodstream Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... several weeks. A bloodstream infection can occur when bacteria or other germs travel down a “central line” and enter the blood. If you develop a catheter-associated blood- stream infection you may become ill with fevers and ...

  3. 21 CFR 882.4100 - Ventricular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Identification. A ventricular catheter is a device used to gain access to the cavities of the brain for injection of material into, or removal of material from, the brain. (b) Classification. Class II...

  4. 21 CFR 882.4100 - Ventricular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Identification. A ventricular catheter is a device used to gain access to the cavities of the brain for injection of material into, or removal of material from, the brain. (b) Classification. Class II...

  5. 21 CFR 882.4100 - Ventricular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Identification. A ventricular catheter is a device used to gain access to the cavities of the brain for injection of material into, or removal of material from, the brain. (b) Classification. Class II...

  6. 21 CFR 882.4100 - Ventricular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Identification. A ventricular catheter is a device used to gain access to the cavities of the brain for injection of material into, or removal of material from, the brain. (b) Classification. Class II...

  7. 21 CFR 882.4100 - Ventricular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Identification. A ventricular catheter is a device used to gain access to the cavities of the brain for injection of material into, or removal of material from, the brain. (b) Classification. Class II...

  8. The history of cardiac catheterization.

    PubMed

    Bourassa, Martial G

    2005-10-01

    The evolution of cardiac catheterization has occurred over at least four centuries. One of the first major steps was the description of the circulation of the blood by William Harvey in 1628. The next milestone was the measurement of arterial pressure by Stephen Hales, one century later. However, the 19th century represented the golden age of cardiovascular physiology, highlighted by the achievements of Carl Ludwig, Etienne-Jules Marey and Claude Bernard, among others. Human cardiac catheterization developed during the 20th century. The first right heart catheterization in a human was performed by Werner Forssmann on himself in 1929. Diagnostic cardiac catheterization was introduced by André Cournand and Dickinson Richards in the early 1940s, and selective coronary angiography was described by Mason Sones in the early 1960s. More recently, with the advent of catheter-based interventions, pioneered by Andreas Gruentzig in the late 1970s, there has been considerable progress in the refinement and expansion of these techniques. Currently, the Sones technique is used only infrequently, and coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary intervention rely mainly on percutaneous femoral and percutaneous radial artery approaches. On the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the Montreal Heart Institute, it seems appropriate to highlight the contribution of this institution in these two areas.

  9. Advanced Imaging Catheter: Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Krulevitch, P; Colston, B; DaSilva, L; Hilken, D; Kluiwstra, J U; Lee, A P; London, R; Miles, R; Schumann, D; Seward, K; Wang, A

    2001-07-20

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) is an approach whereby procedures conventionally performed with large and potentially traumatic incisions are replaced by several tiny incisions through which specialized instruments are inserted. Early MIS, often called laparoscopic surgery, used video cameras and laparoscopes to visualize and control the medical devices, which were typically cutting or stapling tools. More recently, catheter-based procedures have become a fast growing sector of all surgeries. In these procedures, small incisions are made into one of the main arteries (e.g. femoral artery in the thigh), and a long thin hollow tube is inserted and positioned near the target area. The key advantage of this technique is that recovery time can be reduced from months to a matter of days. In the United States, over 700,000 catheter procedures are performed annually representing a market of over $350 million. Further growth in this area will require significant improvements in the current catheter technology. In order to effectively navigate a catheter through the tortuous vessels of the body, two capabilities must exist: imaging and positioning. In most cases, catheter procedures rely on radiography for visualization and manual manipulation for positioning of the device. Radiography provides two-dimensional, global images of the vasculature and cannot be used continuously due to radiation exposure to both the patient and physician. Intravascular ultrasound devices are available for continuous local imaging at the catheter tip, but these devices cannot be used simultaneously with therapeutic devices. Catheters are highly compliant devices, and manipulating the catheter is similar to pushing on a string. Often, a guide wire is used to help position the catheter, but this procedure has its own set of problems. Three characteristics are used to describe catheter maneuverability: (1) pushability -- the amount of linear displacement of the distal end (inside body) relative to

  10. Assessment of radiofrequency self-heating around a metallic wire with MR T1-based thermometry.

    PubMed

    Detti, V; Grenier, D; Perrin, E; Beuf, O

    2011-08-01

    Heat produced by a magnetic resonance (MR) imaging sequence in the vicinity of a conductive wire (pacemaker, electrodes, or catheter), is a subject of interest for the assessment of patient safety during imaging. For this purpose, the measurement of temperature rises during an MR imaging sequence using MR T1-based thermometry provides several advantages, mainly in its ability to retrieve in situ real-time thermal maps. Recent studies investigated the heat produced by an independent radiofrequency pulse, assessing MR imaging sequence heating using a specific MR thermometry sequence. This study focuses on self-heating for which the radiofrequency pulses used for measuring temperature create the heat. An experimental design was set up to evaluate T1-based thermometry self-heating using a coupled/decoupled wire and to compare it with a reference temperature gathered by an optical fiber device. For the tested experimental set up, T1-based thermometry is in fairly good agreement with optical fiber reference temperature.

  11. Unguarded tricuspid orifice with pulmonary atresia: successful radiofrequency ablation of an accessory pathway in an infant

    PubMed Central

    Magee, A.; Rosenthal, E.; Bostock, J.; Gill, J.

    1998-01-01

    A male infant with the rare lesion of unguarded tricuspid orifice in the setting of pulmonary valve atresia, intact ventricular septum, and a hypoplastic right ventricle is described. The patient presented with cyanosis at 1 day old; transcutaneous oxygen saturations were between 20% and 30% in room air, and 60% in 100% inspired oxygen. Pre-excitation was found incidentally on the ECG and the potential for rapid antegrade conduction of atrial tachyarrhythmias, after eventual extended palliation with the Fontan procedure, was demonstrated at electrophysiological study. By 11 months old the patient was becoming increasingly cyanosed and interim palliation with a bidirectional cavopulmonary shunt was proposed. Successful radiofrequency ablation of the accessory pathway was performed before bidirectional cavopulmonary shunt, which would have prevented access to the heart via the superior vena cava. Difficulty with femoral venous access because of previous occlusion of a femoral vein was overcome by the use of 2 F pacing electrodes and a 5 F ablation catheter.

 Keywords: radiofrequency ablation;  accessory pathway;  unguarded tricuspid orifice PMID:9505931

  12. Evaluation of antiseptic-impregnated central venous catheters for prevention of catheter-related infection in intensive care unit patients.

    PubMed

    Sheng, W H; Ko, W J; Wang, J T; Chang, S C; Hsueh, P R; Luh, K T

    2000-09-01

    Central venous catheterization represents a significant medical advancement, particularly in the treatment of critical ill. However, there is a high risk of central venous catheters-related infection. A novel antiseptic central venous catheter, made of polyurethane and impregnated with chlorhexidine and silver sulfadiazine, was developed to reduce the risk of catheters-related infection. In this study, we did a randomized clinical study to determine the efficacy by using antiseptic catheters for the prevention of central venous catheters-related infection in the intensive care units. A total of 204 patients with 235 central venous catheters were studied at the surgical intensive care units at National Taiwan University Hospital between November 1998 and June 1999. Participants received either a standard triple-lumen polyurethane catheter or an antiseptic catheter (Arrow International, Reading, Pennsylvania, USA). Both were indistinguishable from each other. Compared to standard polyurethane catheters, antiseptic catheters were less likely to be colonized by microorganisms when they were cultured at the removal (8.0 versus 20.0 colonized catheters per 100 catheters; relative risk 0.34 [95% CI, 0.15 to 0.74]; p<0.01). There was no significant differences between both groups in catheter-related infections (0.9 versus 4.9 infections per 100 catheters; relative risk 0.17 [95% CI, 0.03 to 1.15]; p = 0.07). Gram-positive cocci and fungi were more likely to colonize in the standard polyurethane catheters (p = 0.06 and 0.04, compared to antiseptic catheters respectively). Two of our cases in the control group died directly due to catheter-related candidemia. No adverse reactions such as hypersensitivity or leukopenia were found in the antiseptic catheter group. Our study showed that central venous catheters with antiseptic coating were safe and had less risk of colonization of bacteria and fungi than standard catheters in the critically ill patients.

  13. Radiofrequency balloon angioplasty. Rationale and proof of principle

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, G.J.; Lee, B.I.; Waller, B.F.; Barry, K.J.; Kaplan, J.; Connolly, R.; Dreesen, R.G.; Nardella, P.

    1988-11-01

    Post-angioplasty restenosis (PARS) in atherosclerotic lesions of medium and small arteries occurs in about one-third of cases in the first year following percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) (early PARS). PARS includes acute spasm, dissection with reclosure, elastic recoil, fibrocellular proliferative response, and progressive atheromatous disease. Fibrocellular proliferation (possibly initiated by platelet derived growth factor) is felt to be culpable in many cases of early PARS (months). Pharmacologic regimens, stents, and thermal welding of the intimal-medial cracks of PTA are among the interventions being developed to deal with PARS. Radiofrequency (RF) current as a source of thermal energy may be useful in combination with balloon angioplasty to reduce PARS. Ideally, this combination would (1) weld intimal-medial cracks of PTA; (2) mold plaque and normal vessel to increase lumen diameters without creating intimal-medial cracks; and (3) destroy medial smooth muscle cells and multipotential cells (cellular substrate of PARS). Canine in vivo studies have established the feasibility of RF-mediated vascular tissue welding. Human aortic specimens (N = 28) were manually dissected into intima-media and media-adventitia layers. Bipolar RF energy (650 KHz, total 300 J) and mechanical pressure (1 atm) (experimental group, N = 24) or mechanical pressure alone (control group, N = 4) were applied to the reapposed specimen layers in a special chamber. The chamber was modified with a bipolar electrode designed to reproduce that planned for an RF balloon angioplasty catheter. Welding was demonstrated in normal and atherosclerotic treated specimens (23/24 or 96%) but not controls (0/4).

  14. MR-trackable intramyocardial injection catheter.

    PubMed

    Karmarkar, P V; Kraitchman, D L; Izbudak, I; Hofmann, L V; Amado, L C; Fritzges, D; Young, R; Pittenger, M; Bulte, J W M; Atalar, E

    2004-06-01

    There is growing interest in delivering cellular agents to infarcted myocardium to prevent postinfarction left ventricular remodeling. MRI can be effectively used to differentiate infarcted from healthy myocardium. MR-guided delivery of cellular agents/therapeutics is appealing because the therapeutics can be precisely targeted to the desired location within the infarct. In this study, a steerable intramyocardial injection catheter that can be actively tracked under MRI was developed and tested. The components of the catheter were arranged to form a loopless RF antenna receiver coil that enabled active tracking. Feasibility studies were performed in canine and porcine myocardial infarction models. Myocardial delayed-enhancement (MDE) imaging identified the infarcted myocardium, and real-time MRI was used to guide left ventricular catheterization from a carotid artery approach. The distal 35 cm of the catheter was seen under MRI with a bright signal at the distal tip of the catheter. The catheter was steered into position, the distal tip was apposed against the infarct, the needle was advanced, and a bolus of MR contrast agent and tissue marker dye was injected intramyocardially, as confirmed by imaging and postmortem histology. A pilot study involving intramyocardial delivery of magnetically labeled stem cells demonstrated the utility of the active injection catheter system.

  15. Comparison of a Balloon Guide Catheter and a Non-Balloon Guide Catheter for Mechanical Thrombectomy.

    PubMed

    Velasco, Aglaé; Buerke, Boris; Stracke, Christian P; Berkemeyer, Shoma; Mosimann, Pascal J; Schwindt, Wolfram; Alcázar, Pedro; Cnyrim, Christian; Niederstadt, Thomas; Chapot, René; Heindel, Walter

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effectiveness of mechanical thrombectomy with the use of a stent retriever in acute ischemic stroke, performed by using a balloon guide catheter or non-balloon guide catheter. Materials and Methods In accordance with the institutional review board approval obtained at the two participating institutions, retrospective analysis was performed in 183 consecutive patients treated between 2013 and 2014 for occlusions in the middle cerebral artery or carotid terminus by using a stent retriever with a balloon guide catheter (n = 102) at one center and a non-balloon guide catheter (n = 81) at the other center. Data on procedure duration, number of passes, angiographic findings, type of stent retriever used, and expertise of the operators were collected. Successful recanalization was defined as grade 3 or 2b modified Treatment in Cerebral Ischemia recanalization accomplished in up to three passes. Univariate and multivariate subgroup analyses were conducted to control for the confounding variables of prior thrombolysis, location of occlusion, and operator expertise. Results Successful recanalization with the balloon guide catheter was achieved in 89.2% of thrombectomies (91 of 102) versus 67.9% (55 of 81) achieved with the non-balloon guide catheter (P = .0004). The one-pass thrombectomy rate with the balloon guide catheter was significantly higher than for that with the non-balloon guide catheter (63.7% [65 of 102] vs 35.8% [29 of 81], respectively; P = .001). The procedure duration was significantly shorter by using the balloon guide catheter than the non-balloon guide catheter (median, 20.5 minutes vs 41.0 minutes, respectively; P < .0001). Conclusion The effectiveness of mechanical thrombectomy with stent retrievers in acute ischemic stroke in the anterior circulation in terms of angiographic results and procedure duration was improved when performed in combination with the balloon guide catheter. (©) RSNA, 2016.

  16. Autonomic dysreflexia in a tetraplegic patient due to a blocked urethral catheter: spinal cord injury patients with lesions above T-6 require prompt treatment of an obstructed urinary catheter to prevent life-threatening complications of autonomic dysreflexia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Manchester Triage System is commonly used as the triage system in emergency departments of the UK. As per the Manchester Triage System, patients presenting with retention of urine to the accident and emergency department are categorized to yellow, which denotes that the ideal maximum time to first contact with a treating clinician will be 60 min. Cervical spinal cord injury patients, in whom urinary catheter is blocked, may develop suddenly headache, sweating, high blood pressure, cardiac dysrhythmia, convulsions, intracranial bleed, and acute neurogenic pulmonary oedema as a result of autonomic dysreflexia due to a distended bladder. Case presentation A 46-year-old male with C-6 tetraplegia developed urinary retention because of a blocked catheter. He was seen immediately on arrival in the spinal injuries unit. The blocked catheter was removed and a new catheter was about to be inserted. Then this patient said that the ceiling lights were very bright and glaring. Five milligrams of Nifedipine was given sublingually. This patient started having fits involving his head, face, neck and shoulders with loss of consciousness. A 14-French silicone Foley catheter was inserted per urethra without any delay and 300 ml of clear urine was drained. This patient recovered consciousness within 5 min. Computed tomography of the brain revealed no focal cerebral or cerebellar abnormality. There was no intra-cranial haemorrhage. Conclusion This case illustrates that spinal cord injury patients with lesion above T-6, who develop retention of urine because of a blocked catheter, may look apparently well, but these patients can develop suddenly life-threatening autonomic dysreflexia. Therefore, spinal cord injury patients, who present to the accident and emergency department or spinal units with a blocked urinary catheter, should be seen urgently although their vital signs may be stable on arrival. Increasing the awareness of staff in emergency departments regarding

  17. [Appropriate and inappropriate use of indwelling urinary catheters].

    PubMed

    Janzen, Jolien; Geerlings, Suzanne E

    2012-01-01

    Many hospitalized patients receive a urinary catheter during their stay. In 21-54% of patients, however, there is no appropriate indication for this. The most significant complication caused by the use of urinary catheters is the development of a urinary tract infection (UTI), one of the most common nosocomial infections. In 71-80% of hospital acquired UTIs a urinary catheter is present. The duration of the presence of a catheter is the major risk factor for catheter-associated UTI. Reducing the number of inappropriate catheterisations is an effective way of preventing catheter-related UTIs. Inappropriate use of indwelling urinary catheters can be reduced by maintaining strict guidelines on justifiable indications for inserting a urinary catheter, verifying daily whether the indication still applies, and by timely removal of the catheter when it is not or no longer needed.

  18. Antibiotic lock for treatment of tunneled hemodialysis catheter bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Maya, Ivan D

    2008-01-01

    Catheter-related bacteremia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among catheter-dependent hemodialysis patients. Microorganism biofilm matrix formation in the catheter is the pathogenic process of this entity. Administration of systemic antibiotics and removal of the offending catheter is the most logical treatment. This article discusses an alternative option, instillation of an antibiotic-lock solution into the lumen of the catheter plus systemic antibiotic therapy. Recent studies suggest that this strategy could treat the infection and salvage the catheter, thus avoiding the need for further interventional procedures including but not limited to the removal of the catheter, placement of a temporary catheter, and finally placement of a new permanent catheter. The implementation of this effective approach will reduce morbidity and possibly reduce the cost and interventions associated with it.

  19. Reducing inappropriate urinary catheter use: quality care initiatives.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Catherine; Clements, Charlotte; Hopper, Adrian

    Healthcare-acquired urinary infection presents a substantial burden for patients and the healthcare system. Urinary tract infections have not gained the same level of media attention as other healthcare-associated infections, yet interventions to reduce urinary catheter use are one of the top ten recommended patient safety strategies. To improve practice around urinary catheter placement and removal requires interventions to change the expectations and habits of nurses, medical teams and patients regarding the need for a urinary catheter. In the authors' trust, a redesign of the existing urinary catheter device record was undertaken to help avoid unnecessary placement of catheters, and resulted in a reduction of urinary catheters in situ longer than 48 hours. Other strategies included implementation of catheter rounds in a high-usage area, and credit-card-sized education cards. A catheter 'passport' was introduced for patients discharged with a catheter to ensure information for insertion and ongoing use were effectively communicated.

  20. Practical approach to catheter-related bloodstream infections in paediatrics

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Joan

    2005-01-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBIs) are a common problem in paediatrics. Sterile insertion and proper care of the catheter is likely more important than the type of catheter in determining the rate of CRBIs. The accuracy of the diagnosis of CRBIs can be improved by comparing the time to positivity or the concentration of organisms in blood drawn through the catheter with blood drawn from other sites, or by changing the catheter over a guidewire and culturing the removed catheter. When a CRBI is suspected, the catheter should be removed if it is no longer required, the child is hemodynamically unstable, there are metastatic foci of infection, the infecting organism is Candida or a mycobacterium, or there is a tunnel infection. The necessity for catheter removal is controversial if the infecting organism is Staphylococcus aureus or a Gram-negative organism. In most other situations, the catheter only needs to be removed if bacteremia persists despite appropriate antibiotic use. PMID:19668658

  1. Uptake of drugs by catheters: the influence of the drug molecule on sorption by polyurethane catheters.

    PubMed

    Smith, J C; Davies, M C; Melia, C D; Denyer, S P; Derrick, M R

    1996-08-01

    The sorption of drugs by indwelling intravenous catheters may have clinical consequences both by alteration of the dose received by the patient and by physically affecting the catheter materials themselves which may lead to changes in mechanical properties and biocompatibility. Studies of drug sorption to new catheter materials are therefore important. Pellethane, a polyurethane increasingly used in vascular access catheters, is as yet little studied in terms of its capacity for drug sorption. In this work a range of drugs known to be sorbed by PVC infusion sets were studied with respect to their sorption by Pellethane catheters. Standard lengths of catheter were incubated with solutions of drugs and samples of the solution were taken at intervals, assayed spectrophotometrically and compared with control solutions incubated without catheter. Losses from solution of up to 93% were found after 24 h. A series of highly sorbing and clinically relevant drugs was identified and their uptake was studied until equilibrium had been reached. A correlation was evident between the octanol/water partition coefficient and the fraction of drug taken up from solution at equilibrium, with the more hydrophobic drugs being taken up to a greater extent by the catheter.

  2. [The evolving of cardiac interventions].

    PubMed

    Billinger, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Treatment modalities for heart diseases have considerable evolved during the last 20 years. Coronary and valvular heart disease are treated increasingly by less invasive percutaneous catheter based procedures instead of open-heart surgery. In addition, new cutting-edge interventions allow to cure heart disease for which until recently only medical treatment options were available. Whilst many patients benefit from these innovative therapies, rapidly developing technologies potentially carry the risk of overtreatment. In order to select patients for the most appropriate treatment, an intensive interdisciplinary teamwork between cardiologists and cardiac surgeons is a mandatory requirement. Additionally, knowledge transfer between cardiologists, their growing subspecialties and practitioners should be encouraged. Finally, timely scientific evaluation of new therapies and subsequent incorporation in guidelines remains crucial.

  3. [Effects of temporary dual-chamber cardiac pacing in refractory cardiac failure].

    PubMed

    Scanu, P; Lecluse, E; Michel, L; Bureau, G; Saloux, E; Cleron, S; Valette, B; Grollier, G; Potier, J C; Foucault, J P

    1996-12-01

    The authors studied 18 patients (15 men, 3 women) with an average age of 67 +/- 8 years with refractory cardiac failure. In order to determine the potential of pacing to raise cardiac output in severe cardiac failure. The average ejection fraction was 26 +/- 6.5%. All patients were in sinus rhythm:resting cardiac output was 3.35 l/min. Two temporary pacing catheters were positioned in the right atrium and at the apex of the right ventricle for dual-chamber mode pacing triggered by the spontaneous P waves. Changes in cardiac output were measured by Doppler echocardiography at different values of atrioventricular delay. Patients were considered to be responders if their cardiac outputs rose by 15%. In 7 patients meeting this criterion, the average increase in cardiac output was 27% (2.99 +/- 0.7 to 3.81 +/- 0.86 l/mn; p < 0.01); all had dilated cardiomyopathies with left bundle branch block and the optimal AV delay was 103 +/- 21 ms (80-140 ms); the duration of diastolic filling increased from 212 +/- 98 to 292 +/- 116 ms (p = 0.02). In the non-responding group (11 patients with an increase of cardiac output of only 3.6 +/- 0.09 to 3.9 +/- 0.92 l/mn; p < 0.01), the underlying disease process was mainly ischaemic. Two predictive factors of efficacy of dual-chamber pacing were identified: a short ventricular filling period (29 +/- 8% of the RR interval in the responders vs 44 +/- 9% in the non-responders; p < 0.01) and the presence of 1st degree atrioventricular block. Dual-chamber pacing could be a valuable method of increasing resting cardiac outputs in a selected group of patients with severe, refractory, cardiac failure.

  4. To reduce catheter-related bloodstream infections: is the subclavian route better than the jugular route for central venous catheterization?

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Goro; Kikuchi, Toshiki; Tsuyuzaki, Hitomi; Kawano, Rumiko; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Nemoto, Hiroshi; Taguchi, Kazumi; Ugajin, Kazuhisa

    2006-12-01

    The most important targets of hospital-acquired infection control are to reduce the incidence of surgical-site, catheter-related, and ventilator-associated infections. In this report, we address previously presented infection-control strategies for central venous (CV) line catheterization, using a CV catheter-related infection surveillance system. Data concerning CV catheter insertion were collected from all facilities in our 650-bed hospital, excluding the operating and hemodialysis wards. Collected data included the insertion method, purpose, length of catheter inserted, duration of catheterization, infection rate, and complication rate. Catheter-related infection was diagnosed based on bacteriological examinations from blood cultures. The total number of catheterizations was 806 a year, and average duration of catheterization was 9.8 days. The purpose of catheterization was nutritional support in 210 cases, hemodialysis in 96 cases, cardiac support in 174 cases, and other treatments in 260 cases. In 66 cases, the purpose of CV catheter was not specified. The rate of positive cultures was 7.1%, and complications other than infection occurred in 0.5%. The main causative organisms were methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in 38.6%, coagulase-negative Staphylococcus epidermidis (CNS) in 33.3%, and S. aureus in 12.3% of infections. Infection rates were 3.8 per 1000 catheter-days in subclavian, 6.1 in jugular, and 15.7 in femoral vein catheterization. In high-risk departments (intensive care unit [ICU] and emergency departments) the infection rate was 5.4 for subclavian and 10.2 for jugular catheterization, whereas it was 3.6 for subclavian and 4.6 for jugular catheterization in noncritical-care departments. Considering complications such as pneumothorax, CV catheterization of the jugular vein is recommended in certain situations.

  5. Advantages of a workbench reshaped AR1 mod catheter for right coronary angiography by right radial approach.

    PubMed

    Baldi, Cesare; Mirra, Marco; Di Maio, Marco; Attisano, Tiziana; Di Muro, Michele Roberto; Vigorito, Francesco; Farina, Rosario; Polito, Maria Vincenza; Giudice, Pietro; Piscione, Federico

    2014-03-01

    Transradial approach in cardiac catheterization is increasing. In daily practice, coronary angiography via radial artery is usually performed by using catheters designed for femoral approach. The aim of this study was to evaluate advantages in the use of a workbench reshaped AR1 mod catheter, in terms of procedural duration time, number of catheters per procedure, fluoroscopy time, contrast agent administered volume, images quality and costs. Two hundred patients, submitted to coronary angiography via right radial artery in our institution, have been retrospectively reviewed. Patients have been divided in two groups, depending on whether a workbench reshaped Cordis Amplatz AR1 mod catheter (rAR1 mod), or catheters in their original shape (OC) have been employed. In the rAR1 mod group (100 patients) a lower number of catheters per procedure (1.07 ± 0.25 vs. 1.47 ± 1.65; p < 0.001), a more frequent right coronary selective engagement (76.76% vs. 53.12%; p < 0.001), a smaller amount of contrast agent (63.02 ± 27.77 vs. 80.85 ± 29.22 ml, p < 0.001), a reduced fluoroscopy and global procedural time (4.19 ± 2.91 vs. 5.69 ± 3.85 min, p = 0.004; and 34.58 ± 17.05 vs. 42.58 ± 17.26 min, p = 0.001, respectively) were observed. According to our experience, when right coronary angiography via right radial approach is performed, the utilization of rAR1 mod catheter correlates with multiple advantages in terms of procedural parameters.

  6. Cardiac Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... your risk of future heart problems, and to improve your health and quality of life. Cardiac rehabilitation programs increase ... exercise routine at home or at a local gym. You may also continue to ... health concerns. Education about nutrition, lifestyle and weight loss ...

  7. The benefits of the Atlas of Human Cardiac Anatomy website for the design of cardiac devices.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Julianne H; Quill, Jason L; Bateman, Michael G; Eggen, Michael D; Howard, Stephen A; Goff, Ryan P; Howard, Brian T; Quallich, Stephen G; Iaizzo, Paul A

    2013-11-01

    This paper describes how the Atlas of Human Cardiac Anatomy website can be used to improve cardiac device design throughout the process of development. The Atlas is a free-access website featuring novel images of both functional and fixed human cardiac anatomy from over 250 human heart specimens. This website provides numerous educational tutorials on anatomy, physiology and various imaging modalities. For instance, the 'device tutorial' provides examples of devices that were either present at the time of in vitro reanimation or were subsequently delivered, including leads, catheters, valves, annuloplasty rings and stents. Another section of the website displays 3D models of the vasculature, blood volumes and/or tissue volumes reconstructed from computed tomography and magnetic resonance images of various heart specimens. The website shares library images, video clips and computed tomography and MRI DICOM files in honor of the generous gifts received from donors and their families.

  8. EM-navigated catheter placement for gynecologic brachytherapy: an accuracy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrtash, Alireza; Damato, Antonio; Pernelle, Guillaume; Barber, Lauren; Farhat, Nabgha; Viswanathan, Akila; Cormack, Robert; Kapur, Tina

    2014-03-01

    Gynecologic malignancies, including cervical, endometrial, ovarian, vaginal and vulvar cancers, cause significant mortality in women worldwide. The standard care for many primary and recurrent gynecologic cancers consists of chemoradiation followed by brachytherapy. In high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, intracavitary applicators and /or interstitial needles are placed directly inside the cancerous tissue so as to provide catheters to deliver high doses of radiation. Although technology for the navigation of catheters and needles is well developed for procedures such as prostate biopsy, brain biopsy, and cardiac ablation, it is notably lacking for gynecologic HDR brachytherapy. Using a benchtop study that closely mimics the clinical interstitial gynecologic brachytherapy procedure, we developed a method for evaluating the accuracy of image-guided catheter placement. Future bedside translation of this technology offers the potential benefit of maximizing tumor coverage during catheter placement while avoiding damage to the adjacent organs, for example bladder, rectum and bowel. In the study, two independent experiments were performed on a phantom model to evaluate the targeting accuracy of an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system. The procedure was carried out using a laptop computer (2.1GHz Intel Core i7 computer, 8GB RAM, Windows 7 64-bit), an EM Aurora tracking system with a 1.3mm diameter 6 DOF sensor, and 6F (2 mm) brachytherapy catheters inserted through a Syed-Neblett applicator. The 3D Slicer and PLUS open source software were used to develop the system. The mean of the targeting error was less than 2.9mm, which is comparable to the targeting errors in commercial clinical navigation systems.

  9. EM-Navigated Catheter Placement for Gynecologic Brachytherapy: An Accuracy Study.

    PubMed

    Mehrtash, Alireza; Damato, Antonio; Pernelle, Guillaume; Barber, Lauren; Farhat, Nabgha; Viswanathan, Akila; Cormack, Robert; Kapur, Tina

    2014-03-12

    Gynecologic malignancies, including cervical, endometrial, ovarian, vaginal and vulvar cancers, cause significant mortality in women worldwide. The standard care for many primary and recurrent gynecologic cancers consists of chemoradiation followed by brachytherapy. In high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, intracavitary applicators and/or interstitial needles are placed directly inside the cancerous tissue so as to provide catheters to deliver high doses of radiation. Although technology for the navigation of catheters and needles is well developed for procedures such as prostate biopsy, brain biopsy, and cardiac ablation, it is notably lacking for gynecologic HDR brachytherapy. Using a benchtop study that closely mimics the clinical interstitial gynecologic brachytherapy procedure, we developed a method for evaluating the accuracy of image-guided catheter placement. Future bedside translation of this technology offers the potential benefit of maximizing tumor coverage during catheter placement while avoiding damage to the adjacent organs, for example bladder, rectum and bowel. In the study, two independent experiments were performed on a phantom model to evaluate the targeting accuracy of an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system. The procedure was carried out using a laptop computer (2.1GHz Intel Core i7 computer, 8GB RAM, Windows 7 64-bit), an EM Aurora tracking system with a 1.3mm diameter 6 DOF sensor, and 6F (2 mm) brachytherapy catheters inserted through a Syed-Neblett applicator. The 3D Slicer and PLUS open source software were used to develop the system. The mean of the targeting error was less than 2.9mm, which is comparable to the targeting errors in commercial clinical navigation systems.

  10. Experience of robotic catheter ablation in humans using a novel remotely steerable catheter sheath

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Daniel T.; Goldenberg, Alex S.; Peters, Nicholas S.; Davies, D. Wyn

    2008-01-01

    Background A novel remotely controlled steerable guide catheter has been developed to enable precise manipulation and stable positioning of any eight French (Fr) or smaller electrophysiological catheter within the heart for the purposes of mapping and ablation. Objective To report our initial experience using this system for remotely performing catheter ablation in humans. Methods Consecutive patients attending for routine ablation were recruited. Various conventional diagnostic catheters were inserted through the left femoral vein in preparation for treating an accessory pathway (n = 1), atrial flutter (n = 2) and atrial fibrillation (n = 7). The steerable guide catheter was inserted into the right femoral vein through which various irrigated and non-irrigated tip ablation catheters were used. Conventional endpoints of loss of pathway conduction, bidirectional cavotricuspid isthmus block and four pulmonary vein isolation were used to determine acute procedural success. Results Ten patients underwent remote catheter ablation using conventional and/or 3D non-fluoroscopic mapping technologies. All procedural endpoints were achieved using the robotic control system without manual manipulation of the ablation catheter. There was no major complication. A radiation dosimeter positioned next to the operator 2.7 m away from the X-ray source showed negligible exposure despite a mean cumulative dose area product of 7,281.4 cGycm2 for all ten ablation procedures. Conclusions Safe and clinically effective remote navigation of ablation catheters can be achieved using a novel remotely controlled steerable guide catheter in a variety of arrhythmias. The system is compatible with current mapping and ablation technologies Remote navigation substantially reduces radiation exposure to the operator. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10840-007-9184-z) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  11. Midline catheters: the middle ground of intravenous therapy administration.

    PubMed

    Anderson, N Richard

    2004-01-01

    Evangelical Community Hospital at Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, is a small community hospital with 110 beds. This organization sought a device to bridge between the short peripheral catheter and the peripherally inserted central catheter. The midline catheter provided an answer to this dilemma. However, a literature search for midline catheters yielded only four published articles, and only one of these was related to outcomes. The drugs used and the type of patients treated at Evangelical Community Hospital provided a challenge for the infusion therapist. This article examines the management of the patients who fell into a midlength of stay, and for whom both the short peripheral catheter and the peripherally inserted central catheter were inappropriate.

  12. Malfunctioning central venous catheters in children: a diagnostic approach

    PubMed Central

    Barnacle, Alex; Arthurs, Owen J.; Roebuck, Derek

    2007-01-01

    Central venous access is increasingly becoming the domain of the radiologist, both in terms of the insertion of central venous catheters (CVCs) and in the subsequent management of these lines. This article seeks to provide an overview of the CVC types available for paediatric patients and a more detailed explanation of the spectrum of complications that may lead to catheter malfunction. A standard catheter contrast study or ‘linogram’ technique is described. The normal appearances of such a study and a detailed pictorial review of abnormal catheter studies are provided, together with a brief overview of how information from catheter investigations can guide the management of catheter complications. PMID:17932667

  13. Intravenous catheter for intracorporeal plasma filtration.

    PubMed

    Handley, Harold H; Gorsuch, Rey; Levin, Nathan W; Ronco, Claudio

    2002-01-01

    Future advances in dialysis of end-stage renal disease patients may include improvements in therapeutic continuity and patient mobility. Continuous renal replacement therapies could lead to self-contained, mobile and potentially wearable dialysis units. We investigated an experimental, intravenous slow-continuous plasma separation system (IPSS) as a precursor to direct intravenous hemofiltration. An intracorporeal catheter employs asymmetric hollow fibers to separate blood cells from plasma in vivo. The fibers possess a sieving coefficient of 0.7 microm and remove 99.99% of all platelets. In vivo, catheters sustain an average plasma separation flow rate of 3 ml/min over 22 h, sufficient to remove 2 net liters of water from pigs through an extracorporeal hemofilter. Used catheter fibers are relatively free of protein deposition or clots in situ. In vitro studies suggest that human catheters may perform at 3-4 times the rate of porcine catheters. IPSS is proposed for acute fluid removal in CHF patients refractory to diuretics.

  14. Nonholonomic catheter path reconstruction using electromagnetic tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugez, Elodie; Sadjadi, Hossein; Akl, Selim G.; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2015-03-01

    Catheter path reconstruction is a necessary step in many clinical procedures, such as cardiovascular interventions and high-dose-rate brachytherapy. To overcome limitations of standard imaging modalities, electromagnetic tracking has been employed to reconstruct catheter paths. However, tracking errors pose a challenge in accurate path reconstructions. We address this challenge by means of a filtering technique incorporating the electromagnetic measurements with the nonholonomic motion constraints of the sensor inside a catheter. The nonholonomic motion model of the sensor within the catheter and the electromagnetic measurement data were integrated using an extended Kalman filter. The performance of our proposed approach was experimentally evaluated using the Ascension's 3D Guidance trakStar electromagnetic tracker. Sensor measurements were recorded during insertions of an electromagnetic sensor (model 55) along ten predefined ground truth paths. Our method was implemented in MATLAB and applied to the measurement data. Our reconstruction results were compared to raw measurements as well as filtered measurements provided by the manufacturer. The mean of the root-mean-square (RMS) errors along the ten paths was 3.7 mm for the raw measurements, and 3.3 mm with manufacturer's filters. Our approach effectively reduced the mean RMS error to 2.7 mm. Compared to other filtering methods, our approach successfully improved the path reconstruction accuracy by exploiting the sensor's nonholonomic motion constraints in its formulation. Our approach seems promising for a variety of clinical procedures involving reconstruction of a catheter path.

  15. Almanac 2013: cardiac arrhythmias and pacing.

    PubMed

    Liew, Reginald

    2013-10-01

    Important advances have been made in the past few years in the fields of clinical cardiac electrophysiology and pacing. Researchers and clinicians have a greater understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying atrial fibrillation (AF), which has transpired into improved methods of detection, risk stratification, and treatments. The introduction of novel oral anticoagulants has provided clinicians with alternative options in managing patients with AF at moderate to high thromboembolic risk and further data has been emerging on the use of catheter ablation for the treatment of symptomatic AF. Another area of intense research in the field of cardiac arrhythmias and pacing is in the use of cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) for the treatment of patients with heart failure. Following the publication of major landmark randomised controlled trials reporting that CRT confers a survival advantage in patients with severe heart failure and improves symptoms, many subsequent studies have been performed to further refine the selection of patients for CRT and determine the clinical characteristics associated with a favourable response. The field of sudden cardiac death and implantable cardioverter defibrillators also continues to be actively researched, with important new epidemiological and clinical data emerging on improved methods for patient selection, risk stratification, and management. This review covers the major recent advances in these areas related to cardiac arrhythmias and pacing.

  16. Contact Force-Guided Deep Engagement with a Steerable Sheath in the Distal Great Cardiac Vein: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Y U; Arimoto, Takanori; Iwayama, Tadateru; Hashimoto, Naoaki; Watanabe, Tetsu; Kubota, Isao

    2016-05-01

    Ablation of ventricular tachycardia originating from the great cardiac vein involves the difficult step of deep engagement with an ablation catheter. The catheter and a steerable sheath (MobiCath, Biosense Webster, Diamond Bar, CA, USA) were advanced alternately only when the contact force vector was parallel to the coronary venous system. Deep engagement with a steerable sheath ensured a powerful backup force during ablation.

  17. Optimization of Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation: Insights Gained from Clinically-Derived Computer Models

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jichao; Kharche, Sanjay R.; Hansen, Brian J.; Csepe, Thomas A.; Wang, Yufeng; Stiles, Martin K.; Fedorov, Vadim V.

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common heart rhythm disturbance, and its treatment is an increasing economic burden on the health care system. Despite recent intense clinical, experimental and basic research activity, the treatment of AF with current antiarrhythmic drugs and catheter/surgical therapies remains limited. Radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) is widely used to treat patients with AF. Current clinical ablation strategies are largely based on atrial anatomy and/or substrate detected using different approaches, and they vary from one clinical center to another. The nature of clinical ablation leads to ambiguity regarding the optimal patient personalization of the therapy partly due to the fact that each empirical configuration of ablation lines made in a patient is irreversible during one ablation procedure. To investigate optimized ablation lesion line sets, in silico experimentation is an ideal solution. 3D computer models give us a unique advantage to plan and assess the effectiveness of different ablation strategies before and during RFCA. Reliability of in silico assessment is ensured by inclusion of accurate 3D atrial geometry, realistic fiber orientation, accurate fibrosis distribution and cellular kinetics; however, most of this detailed information in the current computer models is extrapolated from animal models and not from the human heart. The predictive power of computer models will increase as they are validated with human experimental and clinical data. To make the most from a computer model, one needs to develop 3D computer models based on the same functionally and structurally mapped intact human atria with high spatial resolution. The purpose of this review paper is to summarize recent developments in clinically-derived computer models and the clinical insights they provide for catheter ablation. PMID:25984605

  18. [Silastic catheters: pinpointing the end tip of the catheter by means of electrocardiographic monitoring].

    PubMed

    Giraldo Lozano, L; Barjau Capdevila, M

    1997-10-01

    The placement of catheters with a silastic center has been a common procedure in neonatal intensive care units for several years. Nonetheless, this procedure, like many others, bears its risks and complications if not properly carried out. The majority of complications, which are described in medical journals, include arrhythmias, myocardiac perforations, thrombosis, hemorrhage in the pleura, etc., and these are related with the catheter and its possible movement inside the blood vessel where it was originally inserted. The usual exploratory procedure to pinpoint the end tip of the catheter has been an ordinary x-ray, but often this x-ray does not allow one to see precisely where the catheter tip is located. This problem is caused by the tiny catheter calibre which does not allow for all the necessary contrast; because of this, it is frequently necessary to administer a radiopaque contrasting sub-stance and then repeat the x-ray in order to ensure that the catheter tip is located exactly where it should be. By means of electrocardiographic monitoring, a three-pronged key with an electrode and a 5.85% sodium chloride solution, it is possible to pinpoint the end tip of the catheter without resorting to an x-ray nor administering a contrasting solution.

  19. Anatomical basis of central venous catheter fracture.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Mark O

    2008-03-01

    Central venous catheter fracture is a rare complication of long-term indwelling subclavian venous access. Subclavian vein access has been the recommended approach for placing central venous catheters. The anatomical landmark method for subclavian access remains a highly successful and nonequipment-dependent method for rapid central access. More recently, the internal jugular vein approach has emerged as the preferred route for long-term central venous access. However, variations in internal jugular vein anatomy make the landmark method less reliable. Use of two-dimensional real-time ultrasound during internal jugular vein access is associated with better success, a lower complication rate, and faster access. A case of central venous catheter fracture initiated an internal review of long-term central venous access procedures. We have converted to a predominantly internal jugular vein approach. This case report and literature review may assist other physicians and institutions in re-evaluating long-term central venous access protocols.

  20. Lesion-specific laser catheters for angioplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy-Chutorian, Douglas

    1992-08-01

    Since no one laser catheter can treat all types of disease, a new family of `lesion-specific' devices was evaluated with a holmium laser source. Three-hundred-thirty-one patients (avg. 60 years) with symptomatic coronary disease were studied. Average lesion length was 1.2 cm. A 1.4, 1.5, 1.7, or 2.0 mm, tapered-tip or non-tapered, multifiber catheter (Eclipse, Palo Alto, Calif.) was advanced over the wire while emitting 250 - 600 mj/pulse at 5 Hz. Mean percent stenosis decreased from 89% to 57% after lasing with a mean of 140 pulses. Complications were infrequent. Overall procedural success was 95%. The conclusion is that specialized laser catheters delivering holmium laser energy are capable of reducing the severity of coronary stenoses including balloon angioplasty failures and bypass graft failures. Follow up studies are in progress to assess long term efficacy.

  1. Ambulatory setting for peritoneal dialysis catheter placement.

    PubMed

    Maya, Ivan D

    2008-01-01

    A modified fluoroscopic technique by adding ultrasound-assistance ensuring entry into the abdominal cavity and avoiding the risk of epigastric artery injury under direct ultrasound visualization was recently published. This study demonstrated that the technique was minimally invasive and allowed for accurate assessment of entry into the abdominal cavity and avoidance of vascular injury. In the current analysis, we report the impact of this technique on hospital stay during a peritoneal dialysis (PD) catheter insertion. Twenty-six PD catheters have been placed on an outpatient basis using this technique. All catheter insertions were successful. Patients were discharge on the same day of the procedure. There were no procedure-related complication or related to short hospital stay. An ambulatory setting allows for a short hospital stay without compromising patient care. This brief paper explains in detail the pre, peri and postoperative period and follow-up.

  2. Catheter tip force transducer for cardiovascular research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldstein, C.; Lewis, G. W.; Silver, R. H.; Culler, V. H. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A force transducer for measuring dynamic force activity within the heart of a subject essentially consists of a U-shaped beam of low elastic compliance material. Two lines extend from the beams's legs and a long coil spring is attached to the beam. A strain gauge is coupled to one of the beam's legs to sense deflections thereof. The beam with the tines and most of the spring are surrounded by a flexible tube, defining a catheter, which is insertable into a subject's heart through an appropriate artery. The tines are extractable from the catheter for implantation into the myocardium by pushing on the end of the spring which extends beyond the external end of the catheter.

  3. Less-invasive cardiac output monitoring by earpiece densitometry.

    PubMed

    Grasberger, R C; Yeston, N S

    1986-06-01

    Cardiac output was measured by thermodilution and ear densitometry in surgical ICU patients who had pulmonary arterial catheters. Overall comparison based on 56 sets of triplicate measurements revealed a correlation coefficient (r) of 0.76 between the two techniques. Although ear densitometry was more accurate with injection via the antecubital vein (r = 0.88) vs. more distal injection (r = 0.67), these data suggest that this technique lacks the accuracy for clinical application.

  4. 21 CFR 870.1230 - Fiberoptic oximeter catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic oximeter catheter is a device used to estimate the oxygen saturation of the blood. It consists of two fiberoptic bundles that conduct light at a desired...

  5. 21 CFR 870.1230 - Fiberoptic oximeter catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic oximeter catheter is a device used to estimate the oxygen saturation of the blood. It consists of two fiberoptic bundles that conduct light at a desired...

  6. 21 CFR 870.1230 - Fiberoptic oximeter catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic oximeter catheter is a device used to estimate the oxygen saturation of the blood. It consists of two fiberoptic bundles that conduct light at a desired...

  7. 21 CFR 870.1230 - Fiberoptic oximeter catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic oximeter catheter is a device used to estimate the oxygen saturation of the blood. It consists of two fiberoptic bundles that conduct light at a desired...

  8. 21 CFR 870.1230 - Fiberoptic oximeter catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic oximeter catheter is a device used to estimate the oxygen saturation of the blood. It consists of two fiberoptic bundles that conduct light at a desired...

  9. Intravascular magnetic resonance imaging using a loopless catheter antenna.

    PubMed

    Ocali, O; Atalar, E

    1997-01-01

    Recently, intravascular catheter probes have been developed to increase signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for MR imaging of blood vessels. Miniaturization of these catheter probes without degrading their performances is very critical in imaging small vessels such as coronary arteries. Catheter coils have a loop incorporated in their structure and have limitations in physical dimensions and electromagnetic properties. The use of a loopless intravascular catheter antenna is proposed to overcome these problems. The catheter antenna is essentially a dipole, which makes a very thin diameter possible, and its electronic circuitry can be placed outside the blood vessels without performance degradation. The theoretical foundation for the design and operation of the catheter antenna is presented. Several catheter antennae, as small as 1.5 French, were constructed and tested on phantoms and rabbits with great success. The catheter antenna has a simple structure and is easy to design, implement, and operate.

  10. Fraxelated radiofrequency device for acne scars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Babar K.; Khokher, Sairah

    2012-09-01

    Acne scars can be improved with various treatments such as topical creams, chemical peels, dermal fillers, microdermabrasion, laser, and radiofrequency devices. Some of these treatments especially lasers and deep chemical peels can have significant side effects such as post inflammatory hyperpigmentation in darker skin types. Fraxelated RF Laser devices have been reported to have lower incidence of side effects in all skin phototypes. Nine patients between ages 18 and 35 of various skin phototypes were selected from a private practice and treated with a RF fraxelated device (E-matrix) for acne scars. Outcomes were measured by physician observation, subjective feedback received by patients, and comparison of before and after photographs. In this small group of patients with various skin phototypes, fraxelated radiofrequency device improved acne scars with minimal side effects and downtime.

  11. Cryoablation and radiofrequency for kidney tumor.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Daniel S; Landman, Jaime

    2008-03-01

    The detection of incidental and asymptomatic renal cortical neoplasms has concomitantly increased with radiographic imaging use. The gold standard for treating small renal tumors includes open and laparoscopic partial nephrectomy. Ablative renal procedures intend to duplicate the excellent oncologic outcomes of partial nephrectomy, while decreasing complications and shortening hospitalization time and convalescence. Only short and medium-term data are available, but ablation with cryotherapy or radiofrequency probes may achieve these goals. Ablation also offers the advantages of a minimally invasive surgical approach, with a significantly lower complication rate than partial nephrectomy. Ablated lesions are typically left in situ. Leaving potentially malignant tissues in place, albeit in a nonviable condition, certainly represents a major change in surgical thinking processes. This article reviews the status of cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation, the two ablative modalities currently available for clinical application.

  12. Pulmonary radiofrequency ablation (Part 1): current state.

    PubMed

    Plasencia Martínez, J M

    2015-01-01

    The risks involved in surgical treatment and conventional radiotherapy in patients with early lung cancer or lung metastases often make these treatments difficult to justify. However, on the other hand, it is also unacceptable to allow these lesions to evolve freely because, left untreated, these neoplasms will usually lead to the death of the patient. In recent years, alternative local therapies have been developed, such as pulmonary radiofrequency ablation, which has proven to increase survival with a minimal risk of complications. There are common recommendations for these treatments, and although the specific indications for using one technique or another have yet to be established, there are clearly defined situations that will determine the outcome of the treatment. It is important to know these situations, because appropriate patient selection is essential for therapeutic success. This article aims to describe the characteristics and constraints of pulmonary radiofrequency ablation and to outline its role in thoracic oncology in light of the current evidence.

  13. Cardiac Gene Delivery in Large Animal Models: Antegrade Techniques.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shin; Leonardson, Lauren; Hajjar, Roger J; Ishikawa, Kiyotake

    2017-01-01

    Percutaneous antegrade coronary injection is among the least invasive cardiac selective gene delivery methods. However, transduction efficiency is quite low with a simple bolus antegrade injection. In order to improve the transduction efficiency using antegrade delivery, several additional approaches have been proposed.In this chapter, we briefly discuss important elements associated with intracoronary delivery methods and present protocols for three different catheter-based antegrade delivery techniques in a preclinical large animal model. Despite the lower transduction efficacy relative to more invasive delivery techniques, antegrade techniques have the advantage of being clinically well established and having safer profiles which is important when treating patients with cardiac disease.

  14. Development of a postgraduate interventional cardiac nursing curriculum.

    PubMed

    Currey, Judy; White, Kevin; Rolley, John; Oldland, Elizabeth; Driscoll, Andrea

    2015-11-01

    Interventional cardiology practices have advanced immensely in the last two decades, but the educational preparation of the workforce in cardiac catheter laboratories has not seen commensurate changes. Although on-the-job training has sufficed in the past, recognition of this workforce as a specialty practice domain now demands specialist educational preparation. The aim of this paper is to present the development of an interventional cardiac nursing curriculum nested within a Master of Nursing Practice in Australia. International and national health educational principles, teaching and learning theories and professional frameworks and philosophies are foundational to the program designed for interventional cardiac specialist nurses. These broader health, educational and professional underpinnings will be described to illustrate their application to the program's theoretical and clinical components. Situating interventional cardiac nursing within a Master's degree program at University provides nurses with the opportunities to develop high level critical thinking and problem solving knowledge and skills.

  15. Cardiac optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Optogenetics is an emerging technology for optical interrogation and control of biological function with high specificity and high spatiotemporal resolution. Mammalian cells and tissues can be sensitized to respond to light by a relatively simple and well-tolerated genetic modification using microbial opsins (light-gated ion channels and pumps). These can achieve fast and specific excitatory or inhibitory response, offering distinct advantages over traditional pharmacological or electrical means of perturbation. Since the first demonstrations of utility in mammalian cells (neurons) in 2005, optogenetics has spurred immense research activity and has inspired numerous applications for dissection of neural circuitry and understanding of brain function in health and disease, applications ranging from in vitro to work in behaving animals. Only recently (since 2010), the field has extended to cardiac applications with less than a dozen publications to date. In consideration of the early phase of work on cardiac optogenetics and the impact of the technique in understanding another excitable tissue, the brain, this review is largely a perspective of possibilities in the heart. It covers the basic principles of operation of light-sensitive ion channels and pumps, the available tools and ongoing efforts in optimizing them, overview of neuroscience use, as well as cardiac-specific questions of implementation and ideas for best use of this emerging technology in the heart. PMID:23457014

  16. Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Weisse, Allen B.

    2011-01-01

    Well into the first decades of the 20th century, medical opinion held that any surgical attempts to treat heart disease were not only misguided, but unethical. Despite such reservations, innovative surgeons showed that heart wounds could be successfully repaired. Then, extracardiac procedures were performed to correct patent ductus arteriosus, coarctation of the aorta, and tetralogy of Fallot. Direct surgery on the heart was accomplished with closed commissurotomy for mitral stenosis. The introduction of the heart-lung machine and cardiopulmonary bypass enabled the surgical treatment of other congenital and acquired heart diseases. Advances in aortic surgery paralleled these successes. The development of coronary artery bypass grafting greatly aided the treatment of coronary heart disease. Cardiac transplantation, attempts to use the total artificial heart, and the application of ventricular assist devices have brought us to the present day. Although progress in the field of cardiovascular surgery appears to have slowed when compared with the halcyon times of the past, substantial challenges still face cardiac surgeons. It can only be hoped that sufficient resources and incentive can carry the triumphs of the 20th century into the 21st. This review covers past developments and future opportunities in cardiac surgery. PMID:22163121

  17. Radio-frequency association of Efimov trimers.

    PubMed

    Lompe, Thomas; Ottenstein, Timo B; Serwane, Friedhelm; Wenz, Andre N; Zürn, Gerhard; Jochim, Selim

    2010-11-12

    The quantum mechanical three-body problem is one of the fundamental challenges of few-body physics. When the two-body interactions become resonant, an infinite series of universal three-body bound states is predicted to occur, whose properties are determined by the strength of the two-body interactions. We used radio-frequency fields to associate Efimov trimers consisting of three distinguishable fermions. The measurements of their binding energy are consistent with theoretical predictions that include nonuniversal corrections.

  18. Superconducting surface impedance under radiofrequency field

    DOE PAGES

    Xiao, Binping P.; Reece, Charles E.; Kelley, Michael J.

    2013-04-26

    Based on BCS theory with moving Cooper pairs, the electron states distribution at 0K and the probability of electron occupation with finite temperature have been derived and applied to anomalous skin effect theory to obtain the surface impedance of a superconductor under radiofrequency (RF) field. We present the numerical results for Nb and compare these with representative RF field-dependent effective surface resistance measurements from a 1.5 GHz resonant structure.

  19. Hemodialysis catheter-associated central venous stenosis.

    PubMed

    Yevzlin, Alexander S

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to explore the pathophysiology, epidemiology, and interventional treatment of central vein stenosis (CVS) that may result from central vein catheter (CVC) placement. The precise mechanism of CVC-associated CVS remains largely undefined, though anatomic considerations appear to play a prominent pathologic role. The impact of CVC-associated CVS on arteriovenous fistula outcomes is reviewed. The percutaneous treatment of CVS, observation, angioplasty, or angioplasty with stent placement is reviewed, along with potential surgical treatment options. As the treatment outcomes of CVC-associated CVS have been disappointing, catheter avoidance remains the best strategy.

  20. Magnetic Resonance-guided Active Catheter Tracking.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei

    2015-11-01

    Several advantages of MR imaging compared with other imaging modalities have provided the rationale for increased attention to MR-guided interventions, including its excellent soft tissue contrast, its capability to show both anatomic and functional information, and no use of ionizing radiation. An important aspect of MR-guided intervention is to provide visualization and navigation of interventional devices relative to the surrounding tissues. This article focuses on the methods for MR-guided active tracking in catheter-based interventions. Practical issues about implementation of active catheter tracking in a clinical setting are discussed and several current application examples are highlighted.

  1. [Medial venous catheter or midline (MVC)].

    PubMed

    Carrero Caballero, Ma Carmen; Montealegre Sanz, María; Cubero Pérez, Ma Antonia

    2014-01-01

    Current clinical practice is characterised for importance of the patient's quality of life and the need to reduce the costs of their treatment. We search intravenous therapy alternatives that meet the needs of the patient, reducing the complications associated with the use of venous catheters. Scientific evidence shows that there are midline venous catheters that offer patients and professionals the possibility of extending the duration of infusion therapy, using more venous compatibility materials, and with less risk of infection. The Midlines are becoming in a safe an efficient device for intravenous therapy, continuous and intermittent infusion, provided the necessary care by expert nurses. Midline catheters are peripheral venous access devices between 3 to 10 inches in length (8 to 25 cm). Midlines are usually placed in an upper arm vein, such as the brachial or cephalic, and the distal extreme ends below the level of the axillary line. Midlines catheters implanted in the cephalic or deep basilica veins get more blood flow. This large blood volume justifies the lower risk of mechanical or chemical phlebitis. Midlines are routinely used for two to six weeks. Due that the extrem of these catheters does not extend beyond the axillary line, there are limitations for its use: type of infused drugs, velocity of infusion, etc. In general, solutions that have pH 5 to 9, or an osmolarity less than 500 mOsm are appropriate for infusion through a Midline. Its use is recommended in case of treatments over 7 days with low irritant capacity fluids. According to the Infusion Nurses Society's standards of practice, Midline catheters are appropriate for all intravenous fluids that would normally be administered through a short peripheral IV Importantly, due that the catheter does not pass through the central veins, Midlines can be placed without a chest X-ray to confirm placement. For certain situations, Midlines are suitable for acute units and even for care home settings

  2. Radiofrequency and microwave radiation in the microelectronics industry.

    PubMed

    Cohen, R

    1986-01-01

    The microscopic precision required to produce minute integrated circuits is dependent on several processes utilizing radiofrequency and microwave radiation. This article provides a review of radiofrequency and microwave exposures in microelectronics and of the physical and biologic properties of these types of radiation; summarizes the existing, relevant medical literature; and provides the clinician with guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of excessive exposures to microwave and radiofrequency radiation.

  3. Prevention of indwelling catheter-associated urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Dailly, Sue

    2011-03-01

    The use of indwelling urethral catheters has become a common aspect of patient care, but they can be a source of infection. Nurses can help to prevent catheter-associated urinary tract infections by using aseptic technique on insertion, following best practice in ongoing care and promptly removing catheters. The urinary catheter assessment and monitoring form (UCAM) is used at the Royal Hampshire County Hospital, Winchester, to remind staff of best practice and promote their early removal.

  4. Echinocandin and ethanol lock therapy treatment of fungal catheter infections.

    PubMed

    Pieroni, Kevin P; Nespor, Colleen; Poole, Robert L; Kerner, John A; Berquist, William E

    2013-03-01

    Ethanol lock therapy has been implemented to prevent infections of central venous catheters as well as to treat infections. Fungal catheter-associated blood stream infections are historically more difficult to treat and have required removal of central venous catheters. We report the largest case series to date, successfully treating 5 of 7 fungal catheter-associated blood stream infections with ethanol lock therapy and systemic echinocandin administration.

  5. Non-invasive Mapping of Cardiac Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ashok; Hocini, Meleze; Haissaguerre, Michel; Jaïs, Pierre

    2015-08-01

    Since more than 100 years, 12-lead electrocardiography (ECG) is the standard-of-care tool, which involves measuring electrical potentials from limited sites on the body surface to diagnose cardiac disorder, its possible mechanism, and the likely site of origin. Several decades of research has led to the development of a 252-lead ECG and computed tomography (CT) scan-based three-dimensional electro-imaging modality to non-invasively map abnormal cardiac rhythms including fibrillation. These maps provide guidance towards ablative therapy and thereby help advance the management of complex heart rhythm disorders. Here, we describe the clinical experience obtained using non-invasive technique in mapping the electrical disorder and guide the catheter ablation of atrial arrhythmias (premature atrial beat, atrial tachycardia, atrial fibrillation), ventricular arrhythmias (premature ventricular beats), and ventricular pre-excitation (Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome).

  6. Radiofrequency Microtenotomy for Elbow Epicondylitis: Midterm Results.

    PubMed

    Tasto, James P; Richmond, John M; Cummings, Jeffrey R; Hardesty, Renee; Amiel, David

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a prospective, nonrandomized, single-center clinical study to evaluate the safety and midterm effectiveness of microtenotomy using a radiofrequency probe to treat chronic tendinosis of the elbow. All patients had failed conservative treatment for 6 months. The radiofrequency-based microtenotomy was performed using the Topaz Microdebrider (ArthroCare). Patients were followed annually for up to 9 years postoperatively. Pain status was documented using a visual analog scale self-reported measure. Eighty consecutive patients with tendinosis of the elbow were enrolled; 69 patients were treated for lateral epicondylitis and 11 for medial epicondylitis. The duration of follow-up ranged from 6 months to 9 years (mean, 2.5 years). Ninety-one percent of the patients reported a successful outcome. Within the lateral epicondylitis group, the preoperative visual analog scale improved from 6.9 to 1.3 postoperatively and demonstrated an 81% improvement (P ≤ .01). For the medial epicondylitis patients, the preoperative visual analog scale improved from 6.1 to 1.3 after surgery, a 79% improvement (P ≤ .01). No complications were reported. Radiofrequency-based microtenotomy is a safe and effective procedure for elbow epicondylitis. The results are durable with successful outcomes observed at 9 years after surgery.

  7. Intermittent back pain after central venous catheter placement.

    PubMed

    Rosa, U W; Foreman, M; Willsie-Ediger, S

    1993-01-01

    We report a case of inadvertent azygos placement of a central venous catheter. The patient experienced ill-defined back pain associated with total parenteral nutrition infusion. The catheter malposition remained unrecognized and resulted in extensive diagnostic work-up. Symptoms resolved after the catheter was withdrawn.

  8. 21 CFR 870.1330 - Catheter guide wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Catheter guide wire. 870.1330 Section 870.1330...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1330 Catheter guide wire. (a) Identification. A catheter guide wire is a coiled wire that is designed to fit inside...

  9. 21 CFR 870.1330 - Catheter guide wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Catheter guide wire. 870.1330 Section 870.1330...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1330 Catheter guide wire. (a) Identification. A catheter guide wire is a coiled wire that is designed to fit inside...

  10. 21 CFR 870.1330 - Catheter guide wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Catheter guide wire. 870.1330 Section 870.1330...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1330 Catheter guide wire. (a) Identification. A catheter guide wire is a coiled wire that is designed to fit inside...

  11. 21 CFR 870.1330 - Catheter guide wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Catheter guide wire. 870.1330 Section 870.1330...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1330 Catheter guide wire. (a) Identification. A catheter guide wire is a coiled wire that is designed to fit inside...

  12. 21 CFR 870.1330 - Catheter guide wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Catheter guide wire. 870.1330 Section 870.1330...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1330 Catheter guide wire. (a) Identification. A catheter guide wire is a coiled wire that is designed to fit inside...

  13. 21 CFR 876.4020 - Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. 876.4020... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4020 Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic light ureteral catheter is a device that consists of...

  14. 21 CFR 876.4020 - Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. 876.4020... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4020 Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic light ureteral catheter is a device that consists of...

  15. 21 CFR 876.4020 - Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. 876.4020... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4020 Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic light ureteral catheter is a device that consists of...

  16. 21 CFR 876.4020 - Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. 876.4020... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4020 Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic light ureteral catheter is a device that consists of...

  17. 21 CFR 876.4020 - Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. 876.4020... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4020 Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic light ureteral catheter is a device that consists of...

  18. 21 CFR 870.1290 - Steerable catheter control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Steerable catheter control system. 870.1290... catheter control system. (a) Identification. A steerable catheter control system is a device that is connected to the proximal end of a steerable guide wire that controls the motion of the steerable...

  19. 21 CFR 870.1290 - Steerable catheter control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Steerable catheter control system. 870.1290... catheter control system. (a) Identification. A steerable catheter control system is a device that is connected to the proximal end of a steerable guide wire that controls the motion of the steerable...

  20. 21 CFR 868.5350 - Nasal oxygen catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nasal oxygen catheter. 868.5350 Section 868.5350...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5350 Nasal oxygen catheter. (a) Identification. A nasal oxygen catheter is a device intended to be inserted through a patient's nostril...

  1. 21 CFR 868.5350 - Nasal oxygen catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nasal oxygen catheter. 868.5350 Section 868.5350...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5350 Nasal oxygen catheter. (a) Identification. A nasal oxygen catheter is a device intended to be inserted through a patient's nostril...

  2. 21 CFR 868.5350 - Nasal oxygen catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nasal oxygen catheter. 868.5350 Section 868.5350...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5350 Nasal oxygen catheter. (a) Identification. A nasal oxygen catheter is a device intended to be inserted through a patient's nostril...

  3. 21 CFR 868.5350 - Nasal oxygen catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nasal oxygen catheter. 868.5350 Section 868.5350...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5350 Nasal oxygen catheter. (a) Identification. A nasal oxygen catheter is a device intended to be inserted through a patient's nostril...

  4. 21 CFR 868.5350 - Nasal oxygen catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nasal oxygen catheter. 868.5350 Section 868.5350...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5350 Nasal oxygen catheter. (a) Identification. A nasal oxygen catheter is a device intended to be inserted through a patient's nostril...

  5. 21 CFR 870.1350 - Catheter balloon repair kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Catheter balloon repair kit. 870.1350 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1350 Catheter balloon repair kit. (a) Identification. A catheter balloon repair kit is a device used to repair or replace...

  6. 21 CFR 870.1350 - Catheter balloon repair kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Catheter balloon repair kit. 870.1350 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1350 Catheter balloon repair kit. (a) Identification. A catheter balloon repair kit is a device used to repair or replace...

  7. 21 CFR 870.1350 - Catheter balloon repair kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Catheter balloon repair kit. 870.1350 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1350 Catheter balloon repair kit. (a) Identification. A catheter balloon repair kit is a device used to repair or replace...

  8. 21 CFR 868.5120 - Anesthesia conduction catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction catheter. 868.5120 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5120 Anesthesia conduction catheter. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction catheter is a flexible tubular device used to...

  9. 21 CFR 868.5120 - Anesthesia conduction catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction catheter. 868.5120 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5120 Anesthesia conduction catheter. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction catheter is a flexible tubular device used to...

  10. 21 CFR 884.6110 - Assisted reproduction catheters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Assisted reproduction catheters. 884.6110 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction Devices § 884.6110 Assisted reproduction catheters. (a) Identification. Assisted reproduction catheters are devices used in...

  11. 21 CFR 884.6110 - Assisted reproduction catheters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Assisted reproduction catheters. 884.6110 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction Devices § 884.6110 Assisted reproduction catheters. (a) Identification. Assisted reproduction catheters are devices used in...

  12. 21 CFR 884.6110 - Assisted reproduction catheters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Assisted reproduction catheters. 884.6110 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction Devices § 884.6110 Assisted reproduction catheters. (a) Identification. Assisted reproduction catheters are devices used in...

  13. 21 CFR 884.6110 - Assisted reproduction catheters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Assisted reproduction catheters. 884.6110 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction Devices § 884.6110 Assisted reproduction catheters. (a) Identification. Assisted reproduction catheters are devices used in...

  14. 21 CFR 884.6110 - Assisted reproduction catheters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Assisted reproduction catheters. 884.6110 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction Devices § 884.6110 Assisted reproduction catheters. (a) Identification. Assisted reproduction catheters are devices used in...

  15. 21 CFR 870.1240 - Flow-directed catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Flow-directed catheter. 870.1240 Section 870.1240...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1240 Flow-directed catheter. (a) Identification. A flow-directed catheter is a device that incorporates a gas-filled balloon...

  16. Serendipitous detection of an errant central venous catheter

    SciTech Connect

    Orzel, J.A.; Romdall, K.; Griep, R.

    1985-09-01

    The inappropriate placement of a patient's central venous catheter in the pleural space by the serendipitous injection of Tc-99m labeled red blood cells through the catheter during a GI bleeding study was discovered. Position and patency of central venous lines can be incidentally evaluated by using existing central venous catheters for administration of radiopharmaceuticals during radionuclide imaging studies.

  17. 21 CFR 868.5120 - Anesthesia conduction catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction catheter. 868.5120 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5120 Anesthesia conduction catheter. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction catheter is a flexible tubular device used to...

  18. 21 CFR 868.5120 - Anesthesia conduction catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction catheter. 868.5120 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5120 Anesthesia conduction catheter. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction catheter is a flexible tubular device used to...

  19. 21 CFR 868.5120 - Anesthesia conduction catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction catheter. 868.5120 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5120 Anesthesia conduction catheter. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction catheter is a flexible tubular device used to...

  20. The clinical application of pulse contour cardiac output and intrathoracic volume measurements in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Nicky A; Braaf, Sandra C

    2006-08-01

    Cardiac output (CO) determination by pulmonary artery (PA) catheter has increasingly been criticised within the literature due to its invasive nature and poor correlation between the pressure measurements and intravascular volume status in mechanically ventilated patients. Consequently, alternative less invasive technologies to PA catheterisation are emerging within intensive care. One such novel technology are pulse contour CO (PCCO) systems. They establish comprehensive and continuous haemodynamic monitoring utilising a central venous catheter (CVC) and an arterial line. Furthermore, a key feature of this technology is its ability to produce intrathoracic volume measurements which may provide a better estimation of cardiac preload as well as indicate the presence and severity of pulmonary oedema. This article aims to discuss the theoretical basis and clinical application of PCCO systems, how PCCO systems differ from PA catheters and how the intrathoracic volume measurements are derived. Understanding these advanced concepts will ensure that clinicians are able to employ this innovative monitoring technology more effectively.

  1. Medical Applications of Radiofrequency-Radiation Hyperthermia.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-01

    recruited through their thermoregulatory functions to decrease the demand for metabolic heat production. As a result, cardiac output, although...compromised, would again become sufficient to maintain life. Such support would provide crucial time required to reestablish normal cardiac output. The...Sciences Center, Lubbock, Tex.). Ann Arbor, Mich .: Xerox University Microfilms International, 1981. 17

  2. Cardiac shear-wave elastography using a transesophageal transducer: application to the mapping of thermal lesions in ultrasound transesophageal cardiac ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiecinski, Wojciech; Bessière, Francis; Constanciel Colas, Elodie; Apoutou N'Djin, W.; Tanter, Mickaël; Lafon, Cyril; Pernot, Mathieu

    2015-10-01

    Heart rhythm disorders, such as atrial fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia can be treated by catheter-based thermal ablation. However, clinically available systems based on radio-frequency or cryothermal ablation suffer from limited energy penetration and the lack of lesion’s extent monitoring. An ultrasound-guided transesophageal device has recently successfully been used to perform High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) ablation in targeted regions of the heart in vivo. In this study we investigate the feasibility of a dual therapy and imaging approach on the same transesophageal device. We demonstrate in vivo that quantitative cardiac shear-wave elastography (SWE) can be performed with the device and we show on ex vivo samples that transesophageal SWE can map the extent of the HIFU lesions. First, SWE was validated with the transesophageal endoscope in one sheep in vivo. The stiffness of normal atrial and ventricular tissues has been assessed during the cardiac cycle (n=11 ) and mapped (n= 7 ). Second, HIFU ablation has been performed with the therapy-imaging transesophageal device in ex vivo chicken breast samples (n  =  3), then atrial (left, n= 2 ) and ventricular (left n=1 , right n=1 ) porcine heart tissues. SWE provided stiffness maps of the tissues before and after ablation. Areas of the lesions were obtained by tissue color change with gross pathology and compared to SWE. During the cardiac cycle stiffness varied from 0.5   ±   0.1 kPa to 6.0   ±   0.3 kPa in the atrium and from 1.3   ±   0.3 kPa to 13.5   ±   9.1 kPa in the ventricles. The thermal lesions were visible on all SWE maps performed after ablation. Shear modulus of the ablated zones increased to 16.3   ±   5.5 kPa (versus 4.4   ±   1.6 kPa before ablation) in the chicken breast, to 30.3   ±   10.3 kPa (versus 12.2   ±   4.3 kPa) in the atria and to 73.8   ±   13

  3. SvO2 Trigger in Transfusion Strategy After Cardiac Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-18

    Undergoing Nonemergent Cardiac Surgery; Central Venous Catheter on the Superior Vena Cava (to Perform ScVO2 Measure); Anemia (<9g/dL) Requiring Blood Transfusion; Hemodynamic and Respiratory Stability; Bleeding Graded as Insignificant, Mild, Moderate of Universal Definition of Perioperative Bleeding

  4. Correlative anatomy for the electrophysiologist, part II: cardiac ganglia, phrenic nerve, coronary venous system.

    PubMed

    Lachman, Nirusha; Syed, Faisal F; Habib, Ammar; Kapa, Suraj; Bisco, Susan E; Venkatachalam, K L; Asirvatham, Samuel J

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac Ganglia, Phrenic Nerve, Coronary Venous System. There is an increasing need for invasive electrophysiologists to appreciate the exact anatomy of the epicardial space and the coronary veins. The location of the epicardial fat, the complementary relationship with the main cardiac veins, and the location of sensitive structures (arteries, phrenic nerve, esophagus) have become required knowledge for electrophysiologists, and accessing the epicardial space with this thorough knowledge of the pericardial sinuses and recesses is essential to allow radiographic correlation during catheter manipulation. In this review, we briefly describe the anatomy of the pericardial space and then discuss the specific correlation for the invasive electrophysiologist, highlighting epicardial access, catheter navigation, and avoidance of collateral injury, with specific attention to the important recesses of the pericardial space, their regional anatomy, and radiographic correlation when navigating catheters to these locations. We also discuss the anatomy of the main cardiac veins in the context of catheter mapping and ablation of the epicardial substrate through the venous system and without subxiphoid pericardial access. In part II of this series we discuss the detailed regional anatomy of the cardiac ganglia, phrenic nerve, and coronary venous system.

  5. An Experimental-Computational Study of Catheter Induced Alterations in Pulse Wave Velocity in Anesthetized Mice.

    PubMed

    Cuomo, Federica; Ferruzzi, Jacopo; Humphrey, Jay D; Figueroa, C Alberto

    2015-07-01

    Computational methods for solving problems of fluid dynamics and fluid-solid-interactions have advanced to the point that they enable reliable estimates of many hemodynamic quantities, including those important for studying vascular mechanobiology or designing medical devices. In this paper, we use a customized version of the open source code SimVascular to develop a computational model of central artery hemodynamics in anesthetized mice that is informed with experimental data on regional geometries, blood flows and pressures, and biaxial wall properties. After validating a baseline model against available data, we then use the model to investigate the effects of commercially available catheters on the very parameters that they are designed to measure, namely, murine blood pressure and (pressure) pulse wave velocity (PWV). We found that a combination of two small profile catheters designed to measure pressure simultaneously in the ascending aorta and femoral artery increased the PWV due to an overall increase in pressure within the arterial system. Conversely, a larger profile dual-sensor pressure catheter inserted through a carotid artery into the descending thoracic aorta decreased the PWV due to an overall decrease in pressure. In both cases, similar reductions in cardiac output were observed due to increased peripheral vascular resistance. As might be expected, therefore, invasive transducers can alter the very quantities that are designed to measure, yet advanced computational models offer a unique method to evaluate or augment such measurements.

  6. Simplified point-of-care ultrasound protocol to confirm central venous catheter placement: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Sean P.; Assaf, Samer; Lahham, Shadi; Subeh, Mohammad; Chiem, Alan; Anderson, Craig; Shwe, Samantha; Nguyen, Ryan; Fox, John C.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The current standard for confirmation of correct supra-diaphragmatic central venous catheter (CVC) placement is with plain film chest radiography (CXR). We hypothesized that a simple point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) protocol could effectively confirm placement and reduce time to confirmation. METHODS: We prospectively enrolled a convenience sample of patients in the emergency department and intensive care unit who required CVC placement. Correct positioning was considered if turbulent flow was visualized in the right atrium on sub-xiphoid, parasternal or apical cardiac ultrasound after injecting 5 cc of sterile, non-agitated, normal saline through the CVC. RESULTS: Seventy-eight patients were enrolled. POCUS had a sensitivity of 86.8% (95%CI 77.1%–93.5%) and specificity of 100% (95%CI 15.8%–100.0%) for identifying correct central venous catheter placement. Median POCUS and CXR completion were 16 minutes (IQR 10–29) and 32 minutes (IQR 19–45), respectively. CONCLUSION: Ultrasound may be an effective tool to confirm central venous catheter placement in instances where there is a delay in obtaining a confirmatory CXR. PMID:28123616

  7. Peripherally inserted central catheters. Intravenous Nurses Society.

    PubMed

    1997-01-01

    The Intravenous Nurses Society (INS) recognizes the need for uniform terminology for peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) to encourage standardization for indications, care, and maintenance strategies for these devices. It also recognizes the need for recommendations regarding the choice, use, management, and discontinuation of PICCs to promote positive patient outcomes and enhance patient comfort, safety, and satisfaction.

  8. Lymphatic Leak Complicating Central Venous Catheter Insertion

    SciTech Connect

    Barnacle, Alex M. Kleidon, Tricia M.

    2005-12-15

    Many of the risks associated with central venous access are well recognized. We report a case of inadvertent lymphatic disruption during the insertion of a tunneled central venous catheter in a patient with raised left and right atrial pressures and severe pulmonary hypertension, which led to significant hemodynamic instability. To our knowledge, this rare complication is previously unreported.

  9. 21 CFR 870.5175 - Septostomy catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Septostomy catheter. 870.5175 Section 870.5175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... enlarge the atrial septal defect found in the heart of certain infants. (b) Classification. Class...

  10. 21 CFR 870.5175 - Septostomy catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Septostomy catheter. 870.5175 Section 870.5175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... enlarge the atrial septal defect found in the heart of certain infants. (b) Classification. Class...

  11. 21 CFR 870.5175 - Septostomy catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Septostomy catheter. 870.5175 Section 870.5175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... enlarge the atrial septal defect found in the heart of certain infants. (b) Classification. Class...

  12. 21 CFR 870.5175 - Septostomy catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Septostomy catheter. 870.5175 Section 870.5175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... enlarge the atrial septal defect found in the heart of certain infants. (b) Classification. Class...

  13. 21 CFR 870.5175 - Septostomy catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Septostomy catheter. 870.5175 Section 870.5175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... enlarge the atrial septal defect found in the heart of certain infants. (b) Classification. Class...

  14. [Femoral venous catheter: an unusual complication].

    PubMed

    Garcia, P; Mora, A; Trambert, P; Maler, E; Courant, P

    2000-08-01

    We report an erratic course of a venous femoral catheter which was in the abdominal cavity in a patient with an haemoperitoneum and an hepatic injury. This complication led to an inefficiency of the transfusion and a worsening of the haemoperitoneum.

  15. About Cardiac Arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More About Cardiac Arrest Updated:Mar 10,2017 What is cardiac arrest? Cardiac arrest is the abrupt loss of heart function in a person who may or may not have diagnosed heart ...

  16. Two cases of delayed cardiac tamponade due to pericarditis after pulmonary vein (PV) isolation for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Torihashi, Sadayoshi; Shiraishi, Hirokazu; Hamaoka, Tetsuro; Imai, Mikimasa; Kuroyanagi, Akira; Nakanishi, Naohiko; Nakamura, Takeshi; Yamano, Tetsuhiro; Matsumuro, Akiyoshi; Shirayama, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Catheter ablation is an established treatment for atrial fibrillation (AF). The incidence of major complications related to the procedure is reported to be 4.5%, and delayed cardiac tamponade (DCT) is a rare, although recently recognized, complication. However, the mechanisms underlying the development of DCT remain unclear. We herein report the cases of two men, both 49 years of age, who developed cardiac tamponade requiring pericardiocentesis a few weeks after undergoing pulmonary vein isolation for persistent AF. Physicians should explain to the patient the potential for DCT as a complication prior to performing catheter ablation and provide careful follow-up for at least a few weeks after the session.

  17. Toward microendoscopy-inspired cardiac optogenetics in vivo: technical overview and perspective.

    PubMed

    Klimas, Aleksandra; Entcheva, Emilia

    2014-08-01

    The ability to perform precise, spatially localized actuation and measurements of electrical activity in the heart is crucial in understanding cardiac electrophysiology and devising new therapeutic solutions for control of cardiac arrhythmias. Current cardiac imaging techniques (i.e. optical mapping) employ voltage- or calcium-sensitive fluorescent dyes to visualize the electrical signal propagation through cardiac syncytium in vitro or in situ with very high-spatiotemporal resolution. The extension of optogenetics into the cardiac field, where cardiac tissue is genetically altered to express light-sensitive ion channels allowing electrical activity to be elicited or suppressed in a precise cell-specific way, has opened the possibility for all-optical interrogation of cardiac electrophysiology. In vivo application of cardiac optogenetics faces multiple challenges and necessitates suitable optical systems employing fiber optics to actuate and sense electrical signals. In this technical perspective, we present a compendium of clinically relevant access routes to different parts of the cardiac electrical conduction system based on currently employed catheter imaging systems and determine the quantitative size constraints for endoscopic cardiac optogenetics. We discuss the relevant technical advancements in microendoscopy, cardiac imaging, and optogenetics and outline the strategies for combining them to create a portable, miniaturized fiber-based system for all-optical interrogation of cardiac electrophysiology in vivo.

  18. Toward microendoscopy-inspired cardiac optogenetics in vivo: technical overview and perspective

    PubMed Central

    Klimas, Aleksandra; Entcheva, Emilia

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. The ability to perform precise, spatially localized actuation and measurements of electrical activity in the heart is crucial in understanding cardiac electrophysiology and devising new therapeutic solutions for control of cardiac arrhythmias. Current cardiac imaging techniques (i.e. optical mapping) employ voltage- or calcium-sensitive fluorescent dyes to visualize the electrical signal propagation through cardiac syncytium in vitro or in situ with very high-spatiotemporal resolution. The extension of optogenetics into the cardiac field, where cardiac tissue is genetically altered to express light-sensitive ion channels allowing electrical activity to be elicited or suppressed in a precise cell-specific way, has opened the possibility for all-optical interrogation of cardiac electrophysiology. In vivo application of cardiac optogenetics faces multiple challenges and necessitates suitable optical systems employing fiber optics to actuate and sense electrical signals. In this technical perspective, we present a compendium of clinically relevant access routes to different parts of the cardiac electrical conduction system based on currently employed catheter imaging systems and determine the quantitative size constraints for endoscopic cardiac optogenetics. We discuss the relevant technical advancements in microendoscopy, cardiac imaging, and optogenetics and outline the strategies for combining them to create a portable, miniaturized fiber-based system for all-optical interrogation of cardiac electrophysiology in vivo. PMID:25117076

  19. Causes and nursing countermeasures in pediatric PICC catheter complications.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Mingli; Li, Na; Yi, Lan; Liu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the complications and nursing countermeasures of PICC (Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter) catheters using children PICC catheter technique 40 cases, complications were observed, and analyze the original causes, in order to propose a solution. There were 10 cases of catheter blockage, 5 cases of catheter infection, 6 cases of phlebitis, 5 cases of puncture difficulties, 2 cases of poor feeding tube, 2 cases of bleeding puncture site with the continuous exploration and research of nursing intervention, the production of clinical complications from PICC has been used in children were greatly reduced.

  20. Catheter-based high-intensity ultrasound for epicardial ablation of the left ventricle: device design and in vivo feasiblity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Nazer, Babak; Jones, Peter D.; Tanaka, Yasuaki; Martin, Alastair; Ng, Bennett; Duggirala, Srikant; Diederich, Chris J.; Gerstenfeld, Edward P.

    2015-03-01

    The development and in vivo testing of a high-intensity ultrasound thermal ablation catheter for epicardial ablation of the left ventricle (LV) is presented. Scar tissue can occur in the mid-myocardial and epicardial space in patients with nonischemic cardiomyopathy and lead to ventricular tachycardia. Current ablation technology uses radiofrequency energy, which is limited epicardially by the presence of coronary vessels, phrenic nerves, and fat. Ultrasound energy can be precisely directed to deliver targeted deep epicardial ablation while sparing intervening epicardial nerve and vessels. The proof-of-concept ultrasound applicators were designed for sub-xyphoid access to the pericardial space through a steerable 14-Fr sheath. The catheter consists of two rectangular planar transducers, for therapy (6.4 MHz) and imaging (5 MHz), mounted at the tip of a 3.5-mm flexible nylon catheter coupled and encapsulated within a custom-shaped balloon for cooling. Thermal lesions were created in the LV in a swine (n = 10) model in vivo. The ultrasound applicator was positioned fluoroscopically. Its orientation and contact with the LV were verified using A-mode imaging and a radio-opaque marker. Ablations employed 60-s exposures at 15 - 30 W (electrical power). Histology indicated thermal coagulation and ablative lesions penetrating 8 - 12 mm into the left ventricle on lateral and anterior walls and along the left anterior descending artery. The transducer design enabled successful sparing from the epicardial surface to 2 - 4 mm of intervening ventricle tissue and epicardial fat. The feasibility of targeted epicardial ablation with catheter-based ultrasound was demonstrated.

  1. Translational aspects of cardiac cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cheng-Han; Sereti, Konstantina-Ioanna; Wu, Benjamin M; Ardehali, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Cell therapy has been intensely studied for over a decade as a potential treatment for ischaemic heart disease. While initial trials using skeletal myoblasts, bone marrow cells and peripheral blood stem cells showed promise in improving cardiac function, benefits were found to be short-lived likely related to limited survival and engraftment of the delivered cells. The discovery of putative cardiac ‘progenitor’ cells as well as the creation of induced pluripotent stem cells has led to the delivery of cells potentially capable of electromechanical integration into existing tissue. An alternative strategy involving either direct reprogramming of endogenous cardiac fibroblasts or stimulation of resident cardiomyocytes to regenerate new myocytes can potentially overcome the limitations of exogenous cell delivery. Complimentary approaches utilizing combination cell therapy and bioengineering techniques may be necessary to provide the proper milieu for clinically significant regeneration. Clinical trials employing bone marrow cells, mesenchymal stem cells and cardiac progenitor cells have demonstrated safety of catheter based cell delivery, with suggestion of limited improvement in ventricular function and reduction in infarct size. Ongoing trials are investigating potential benefits to outcome such as morbidity and mortality. These and future trials will clarify the optimal cell types and delivery conditions for therapeutic effect. PMID:26119413

  2. Effect of radiofrequency-generated thermal energy on the mechanical and histologic characteristics of the arterial wall in vivo: implications for radiofrequency angioplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Barry, K.J.; Kaplan, J.; Connolly, R.J.; Nardella, P.; Lee, B.I.; Becker, G.J.; Waller, B.F.; Callow, A.D.

    1989-02-01

    Abrupt reclosure of atherosclerotic vessels after percutaneous transluminal balloon angioplasty has been blamed on traumatic dissections and elastic recoil of the vessel wall. Thermal energy with compression produces fusion of separated arterial wall layers, and heat appears to alter the elastic recoil of the vessel wall. Radiofrequency (RF) thermal energy has been used to perform vascular anastomoses and thermal angioplasty. A simple in vivo experiment was designed to describe and quantitate vascular tissue weld strength produced by a range of RF thermal energy levels. Canine carotid arteries were compressed between a pair of modified bipolar forceps that applied RF energy, causing occlusive tissue welds between the apposed intimal surfaces. The strength of the welds was evaluated by measuring the perfusion pressure required to reopen the vessel lumen. A dosimetry range of 0 to 205 joules showed a typical dose-response curve for the relationship between energy applied and bond strength, plateauing at approximately 300 mm Hg. Light microscopy showed fusion of the inner surfaces of the vessel with preservation of vessel wall architecture. Additionally inflation of a bipolar RF balloon catheter in the normal canine carotid lumen produced an alteration of vessel profile angiographically and histologically. Results of these preliminary experiments suggest that balloon angioplasty with adjunctive RF thermal energy may have benefits in reducing the factors causing acute failure of conventional percutaneous transluminal balloon angioplasty.

  3. Technique for creation of artificial pneumothorax for pain relief during radiofrequency ablation of peripheral lung tumors: report of seven cases.

    PubMed

    Hiraki, Takao; Gobara, Hideo; Shibamoto, Kentaro; Mimura, Hidefumi; Soda, Yuko; Uka, Mayu; Masaoka, Yoshihisa; Toyooka, Shinichi; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2011-04-01

    This report describes seven cases in which a pneumothorax was artificially created for relief from severe pain that occurred during radiofrequency (RF) ablation of peripheral lung tumors. In this procedure, the multitined probe surrounding the lesion was advanced into the chest, displacing the tines and the peripheral tumor away from the parietal pleura and the chest wall and resulting in pain relief in one patient; in the remaining patients, an intravenous catheter was also introduced, followed by the administration of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) into the space between the tumor and the parietal pleura. The pain decreased considerably immediately after this procedure. No complication related to the creation of the artificial pneumothorax was observed. Creation of an artificial pneumothorax is a safe and effective method for pain relief.

  4. 21 CFR 886.4100 - Radiofrequency electrosurgical cautery apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Radiofrequency electrosurgical cautery apparatus. 886.4100 Section 886.4100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... electrosurgical cautery apparatus. (a) Identification. A radiofrequency electrosurgical cautery apparatus is an...

  5. 21 CFR 886.4100 - Radiofrequency electrosurgical cautery apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radiofrequency electrosurgical cautery apparatus. 886.4100 Section 886.4100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... electrosurgical cautery apparatus. (a) Identification. A radiofrequency electrosurgical cautery apparatus is an...

  6. 21 CFR 882.4400 - Radiofrequency lesion generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Radiofrequency lesion generator. 882.4400 Section 882.4400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... lesion generator. (a) Identification. A radiofrequency lesion generator is a device used to...

  7. 21 CFR 882.4400 - Radiofrequency lesion generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Radiofrequency lesion generator. 882.4400 Section 882.4400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... lesion generator. (a) Identification. A radiofrequency lesion generator is a device used to...

  8. 21 CFR 882.4400 - Radiofrequency lesion generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Radiofrequency lesion generator. 882.4400 Section 882.4400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... lesion generator. (a) Identification. A radiofrequency lesion generator is a device used to...

  9. 21 CFR 882.4400 - Radiofrequency lesion generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Radiofrequency lesion generator. 882.4400 Section 882.4400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... lesion generator. (a) Identification. A radiofrequency lesion generator is a device used to...

  10. 21 CFR 882.4400 - Radiofrequency lesion generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radiofrequency lesion generator. 882.4400 Section 882.4400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... lesion generator. (a) Identification. A radiofrequency lesion generator is a device used to...

  11. Validation of the Accuracy and Reliability of Culturing Intravascular Catheter Segments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-24

    catheters located in central veins of adult surgical and medical intensive care patients were cultured. Any type of central venous catheter was accepted for...20 to 92 years). All catheters were central venous catheters, including 76 triple lumen catheters, 60 Swan-Ganz pulmonary artery catheters, 54 Cordis...RT, Kruse JA, Thill-Baharozian MC, Carlson RW. Triple-vs. Single-Lumen Central Venous Catheters: A prospective study in a critically ill population

  12. Radiofrequency energy in surgery: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Ihnát, Peter; Ihnát Rudinská, Lucia; Zonča, Pavel

    2014-06-01

    Over a period of more than 100 years, radiofrequency energy has been introduced in many fields and applications in medicine. At present, radiofrequency constitutes the basis of numerous medical devices employed in almost all medical specialties. It is particularly applicable and valuable in various minimally invasive procedures for its locally focused effects. Radiofrequency energy is a technical term established to describe high-frequency alternating electrical currents (with a frequency ranging from 300 kHz to 3 MHz) and their impact on biological tissue. The application of RF energy causes controlled tissue heating with consequent cell protein denaturation and desiccation, which leads to cell death and tissue destruction. The primary principle of radiofrequency is that the generated heat can be used to cut, coagulate or induce metabolic processes in the target tissue. The authors of this paper offer a comprehensive and compact review of the definition, history, physics, biological principles and applications of radiofrequency energy in current surgery.

  13. A Three-Dimensional Shape-Based Force and Stiffness-Sensing Platform for Tendon-Driven Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Kouh Soltani, Minou; Khanmohammadi, Sohrab; Ghalichi, Farzan

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an efficient shape-based three-axial force and stiffness estimator for active catheters commonly implemented in cardiac ablation. The force-sensing capability provides important feedback for catheterization procedures including real-time control and catheter steering in autonomous navigation systems. The proposed platform is based on the introduced accurate and computationally efficient Cosserat rod model for tendon-driven catheters. The proposed nonlinear Kalman filter formulation for contact force estimation along with the developed catheter model provides a real-time force observer robust to nonlinearities and noise covariance uncertainties. Furthermore, the proposed platform enables stiffness estimation in addition to tip contact force sensing in different operational circumstances. The approach incorporates pose measurements which can be achieved using currently developed pose-sensing systems or imaging techniques. The method makes the approach compatible with the range of forces applied in clinical applications. The simulation and experimental results verify the viability of the introduced force and stiffness-sensing technique. PMID:27367685

  14. A Three-Dimensional Shape-Based Force and Stiffness-Sensing Platform for Tendon-Driven Catheters.

    PubMed

    Kouh Soltani, Minou; Khanmohammadi, Sohrab; Ghalichi, Farzan

    2016-06-28

    This paper presents an efficient shape-based three-axial force and stiffness estimator for active catheters commonly implemented in cardiac ablation. The force-sensing capability provides important feedback for catheterization procedures including real-time control and catheter steering in autonomous navigation systems. The proposed platform is based on the introduced accurate and computationally efficient Cosserat rod model for tendon-driven catheters. The proposed nonlinear Kalman filter formulation for contact force estimation along with the developed catheter model provides a real-time force observer robust to nonlinearities and noise covariance uncertainties. Furthermore, the proposed platform enables stiffness estimation in addition to tip contact force sensing in different operational circumstances. The approach incorporates pose measurements which can be achieved using currently developed pose-sensing systems or imaging techniques. The method makes the approach compatible with the range of forces applied in clinical applications. The simulation and experimental results verify the viability of the introduced force and stiffness-sensing technique.

  15. Catheter-related infections: diagnosis and intravascular treatment.

    PubMed

    Bouza, E; Burillo, A; Muñoz, P

    2001-11-01

    The diagnosis of catheter-related infections relies on the presence of clinical manifestations of infection and the evidence of colonization of the catheter tip by bacteria, mycobacteria or fungi. The reference method to confirm the latter requires the withdrawal of the catheter for culturing, which frequently turns out to be inconvenient, unnecessary and costly. New methods try to avoid these inconveniences and to assess the presence of tip colonization without withdrawal. One of these methods uses quantitative blood cultures with a jump (> or = 5) in colony counts between blood obtained from the catheter lumen and simultaneously from a peripheral vein. It has a high sensitivity (>80%) and specificity (94%-100%) but is cumbersome and requires both an easy backflow of blood in the catheter and the existence of bacteremia. Cytocentrifugation and acridine orange staining of blood withdrawn from an infected catheter lumen has a sensitivity and a specificity of over 90% for the diagnosis of tip colonization. "Superficial cultures" consist in the semiquantitative culture of the hub, of the skin surrounding the catheter entrance and of the first (1 cm) subcutaneous portion of the catheter after swabbing. Sensitivity of this method is >90% and specificity is >80%, and positive and negative predictive values for catheters (considering together those with and without clinical data of infection) are 66% and 97%, respectively. Endoluminal brushing has turned out to be an impractical and unreliable procedure, at least in our experience. New methods based on the speed of bacterial growth to detectable levels of microorganisms in conventional blood cultures are a new and interesting way of assessing catheter-related infections. Besides, as use of antimicrobial-coated catheters becomes more prevalent, the existing definitions of catheter colonization and catheter-related infection may need to be modified, because such coatings may lead to false-negative culture results. Many

  16. Theoretical modeling for radiofrequency ablation: state-of-the-art and challenges for the future

    PubMed Central

    Berjano, Enrique J

    2006-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation is an interventional technique that in recent years has come to be employed in very different medical fields, such as the elimination of cardiac arrhythmias or the destruction of tumors in different locations. In order to investigate and develop new techniques, and also to improve those currently employed, theoretical models and computer simulations are a powerful tool since they provide vital information on the electrical and thermal behavior of ablation rapidly and at low cost. In the future they could even help to plan individual treatment for each patient. This review analyzes the state-of-the-art in theoretical modeling as applied to the study of radiofrequency ablation techniques. Firstly, it describes the most important issues involved in this methodology, including the experimental validation. Secondly, it points out the present limitations, especially those related to the lack of an accurate characterization of the biological tissues. After analyzing the current and future benefits of this technique it finally suggests future lines and trends in the research of this area. PMID:16620380

  17. Irrigated and non-irrigated radiofrequency ablation systems and ways of non-irrigated RF systems development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evtushenko, A. V.; Evtushenko, V. V.; Bykov, A. N.; Sergeev, V. S.; Syryamkin, V. I.; Kistenev, Yu. V.; Anfinogenova, Ya. D.; Smyshlyaev, K. A.; Kurlov, I. O.

    2015-11-01

    Improving of radiofrequency ablation systems for the myocardium is one of the fundamental problems of cardiac surgery. We used pig left ventricular myocardium as a working model. Mean thickness of the left ventricular wall was 10.1 ± 5.6 mm. The studies were performed on 10 hearts. The mean weight of hearts was 294.7 ± 21g. Research is being done on the electrophysical bench in 2 stages. In the first stage the hearts were placed on the electrophysical bench and heated to 36.6°C. In the second stage heart cooled to 20°C. The monopolar radiofrequency exposure was processing on the myocardium by two types of electrodes: spherical irrigated electrode and non-irrigated penetrating one within 20 seconds. The electrical resistance of the myocardium was measured at different temperatures before and after exposure. This paper shows that the decrease in ambient temperature combined with using of new penetrating electrodes for radiofrequency ablation gives better results than using of irrigated and non-irrigated systems. This method allows significantly reduce time exposure for a maximum depth of destruction in the myocardium.

  18. Validation of catheter semiquantitative culture technique for nonstaphylococcal organisms.

    PubMed Central

    Dooley, D P; Garcia, A; Kelly, J W; Longfield, R N; Harrison, L

    1996-01-01

    The catheter semiquantitative culture roll tip technique has been validated as a discriminator between non-catheter-related bacteremias and catheter-related bacteremias (CRBs) caused by Staphylococcus species. However, this technique has not been specifically validated when used for the evaluation of catheters infected with organisms other than staphylococci. We reviewed catheters that had been submitted for semiquantitative roll tip culture as well as hospital records to determine clinical correlates of infection. Local infection and CRB were defined by standard criteria. Catheter-related sepsis (CRS) was defined as fever, leukocytosis, or hypotension which resolved with catheter removal, without another source of infection. For 195 catheters from 93 patients, gram-negative rods and enterococci were present on 36, fungi were on 25, Corynebacterium species were on 5, Bacillus species were on 3, Staphylococcus species were on 79, and 41 demonstrated no growth. Of 21 episodes of CRB or CRS due to nonstaphylococcal organisms, only 1 (questionable) episode was due to a catheter with < 15 CFU (P < 0.05). Eleven of these 21 episodes of CRB or CRS were due to gram-negative rods and enterococci, of which only the questionable episode was due to a catheter with < 15 CFU. Nine of these 21 episodes of CRB or CRS were due to fungi, none of which were associated with a catheter with < 15 CFU. The data for Staphylococcus species recapitulated published data (none of 21 CRB or CRS episodes were associated with catheters with < 15 CFU) and validated this retrospective technique. The data presented in this study validate the use of the semiquantitative culture technique for the evaluation of catheter-related infections caused by organisms other than staphylococci. PMID:8789025

  19. Pancreas tumor interstitial pressure catheter measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieskoski, Michael D.; Gunn, Jason; Marra, Kayla; Trembly, B. Stuart; Pogue, Brian W.

    2016-03-01

    This paper highlights the methodology in measuring interstitial pressure in pancreatic adenocarcinoma tumors. A Millar Mikrotip pressure catheter (SPR-671) was used in this study and a system was built to amplify and filter the output signal for data collection. The Millar pressure catheter was calibrated prior to each experiment in a water column at 37°C, range of 0 to 60 inH2O (112 mmHg), resulting in a calibration factor of 33 mV / 1 inH2O. The interstitial pressures measured in two orthotopically grown pancreatic adenocarcinoma tumor were 57 mmHg and 48 mmHg, respectively. Verteporfin uptake into the pancreatic adenocarcinoma tumor was measured using a probe-based experimental dosimeter.

  20. Urgent peritoneal dialysis or hemodialysis catheter dialysis.

    PubMed

    Lok, Charmaine E

    2016-03-01

    Worldwide, there is a steady incident rate of patients with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) who require renal replacement therapy. Of these patients, approximately one-third have an "unplanned" or "urgent" start to dialysis. This can be a very challenging situation where patients have either not had adequate time for education and decision making regarding dialysis modality and appropriate dialysis access, or a decision was made and plans were altered due to unforeseen circumstances. Despite such unplanned starts, clinicians must still consider the patient's ESKD "life-plan", which includes the best initial dialysis modality and access to suit the patient's individual goals and their medical, social, logistic, and facility circumstances. This paper will discuss the considerations of peritoneal dialysis and a peritoneal dialysis catheter access and hemodialysis and central venous catheter access in patients who require an urgent start to dialysis.