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Sample records for radiography industrial

  1. INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY INSTRUCTOR'S GUIDE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Adult, Vocational, and Technical Education (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC. Div. of Vocational and Technical Education.

    THIS LABORATORY GUIDE WAS DEVELOPED FOR AN 80-HOUR COURSE IN INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY FOR HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES TRAINING TO BECOME BEGINNING RADIOGRAPHERS. IT IS USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH TWO OTHER VOLUMES--(1) INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY INSTRUCTOR'S GUIDE, AND (2) INUDSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY MANUAL. THE PROGRAM WAS DEVELOPED BY A COMMITTEE OF REPRESENTATIVES…

  2. Industrial Radiography | Radiation Protection | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    2016-12-09

    Manufacturers use a method called industrial radiography to check for cracks or flaws in materials. Radiation is used in industrial radiography to show problems not visible from the outside without damaging the material.

  3. Industrial Radiography Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Harry D.

    The curriculum guide was developed for teacher use in an 80-hour course for industrial radiographers. The units include: (1) The Structure of Matter and Radiation, (2) Nuclear Reactions and Radioisotopes, (3) The Nature and Consequences of Radiation Exposure, (4) Radiation Attenuation, (5) Absorption of Radiation, (6) Radiation Detection and…

  4. Industrial Radiography Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Harry D.

    This text was developed for use by students in an 80-hour course for industrial radiographers. Chapter headings are: (1) The Structure of Matter, (2) Radiation and Radiation Machines, (3) Nuclear Reactions and Radioisotopes, (4) Interaction of Radiation with Matter, (5) Radiation Detection and Measurement, (6) The Nature and Consequences of…

  5. INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY STUDENT GUIDE AND LABORATORY EXERCISES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Adult, Vocational, and Technical Education (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC. Div. of Vocational and Technical Education.

    THIS INSTRUCTOR'S GUIDE TO AN 80-HOUR COURSE IN INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY IS COORDINATED WITH LESSONS IN THE STUDENT GUIDE AND LABORATORY EXERCISES AND IS BASED ON MATERIAL IN THE COURSE MANUAL, INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY. THE COURSE IS INTENDED TO TRAIN HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES AS BEGINNING RADIOGRAPHERS WHO ARE EXPECTED TO BE ABLE TO EXTEND THEIR…

  6. INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY COURSE, INSTRUCTORS' GUIDE. VOLUME 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Engineering Extension Service.

    INFORMATION RELATIVE TO THE LESSON PLANS IN "INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY COURSE, INSTRUCTOR'S GUIDE, VOLUME I" (VT 003 565) IS PRESENTED ON 52 INFORMATION SHEETS INCLUDING THE SUBJECTS SHIELDING EQUATIONS AND LOGARITHMS, METAL PROPERTIES, FIELD TRIP INSTRUCTIONS FOR STUDENTS, WELDING SYMBOLS AND SIZES, SAMPLE REPORT FORMS, AND TYPICAL SHIPPING…

  7. 10 CFR 34.13 - Specific license for industrial radiography.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Specific license for industrial radiography. 34.13 Section 34.13 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Specific Licensing Provisions § 34.13 Specific license for...

  8. Using ytterbium-169 for safe and economical industrial radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Dowalo, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    Safety has become an issue of paramount importance for industrial radiography. Many NDE facilities and suppliers are finding the cost of performing radiography Prohibitive due to heightened safety concerns for radiation area protection. The most common sources used in radiography, Iridium-192 and Cobalt-60, result in high radiation fields over a large area. Even when collimators are used large radiation fields can result from multicurie source radiography. Radiographic operations are being forced to find alternative test methods and techniques to the use of the old stand-by sources. These alternate methods are not always as comprehensive a test as full volumetric examination with radiography. Since Iridium and Cobalt are in such wide spread use, they are sometimes called upon to perform test of materials which are not in their optimum sensitivity range.

  9. Safety Testing of Industrial Radiography Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Trapp, D.J.

    1999-09-29

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission contracted the Savannah River Technology Center to verify the relevancy of the 10 CFR Part 34 requirements for the normal use of portable gamma radiography systems and to propose recommendations for changes or modifications to the requirements.

  10. 10 CFR 34.13 - Specific license for industrial radiography.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 34.13 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY AND RADIATION SAFETY... may affirm that all individuals acting as industrial radiographers will be certified in radiation... submits a description of the applicant's overall organizational structure as it applies to the...

  11. 10 CFR 34.13 - Specific license for industrial radiography.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 34.13 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY AND RADIATION SAFETY... may affirm that all individuals acting as industrial radiographers will be certified in radiation... submits a description of the applicant's overall organizational structure as it applies to the...

  12. Occupational exposure in Greek industrial radiography laboratories (1996-2003).

    PubMed

    Economides, S; Tritakis, P; Papadomarkaki, E; Carinou, E; Hourdakis, C; Kamenopoulou, V; Dimitriou, P

    2006-01-01

    More than 40 industrial radiography laboratories are operating in Greece using X-ray or gamma-ray sources and more than 250 workers occupationally exposed to ionising radiation in these facilities are monitored on a regular basis. This study presents the evolution of individual doses received by radiographers during the past years. The mean annual dose (MAD) of all workers as well as of exposed workers is estimated, and correlated to the types of laboratories and practices applied. The MAD of the exposed workers in industrial radiography is compared with the doses of workers in other specialties and with the doses of radiographers in other countries. Furthermore, the study attempts to propose dose constraints for the practices in industrial radiography, according to the BSS European directive and the relevant Greek radiation protection legislation. The proposed value was defined as the dose below which the annual doses of 75% of the exposed radiographers are expected to be included.

  13. Applications of Neutron Radiography for the Nuclear Power Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craft, Aaron E.; Barton, John P.

    The World Conference on Neutron Radiography (WCNR) and International Topical Meeting on Neutron Radiography (ITMNR) series have been running over 35 years. The most recent event, ITMNR-8, focused on industrial applications and was the first time this series was hosted in China. In China, more than twenty new nuclear power plants are under construction and plans have been announced to increase the nuclear capacity by a factor of three within fifteen years. There are additional prospects in many other nations. Neutron tests were vital during previous developments of materials and components for nuclear power applications, as reported in the WCNR and ITMNR conference series. For example a majority of the 140 papers in the Proceedings of the First WCNR are for the benefit of the nuclear power industry. Many of those techniques are being utilized and advanced to the present time. Neutron radiography of irradiated nuclear fuel provides more comprehensive information about the internal condition of irradiated nuclear fuel than any other non-destructive technique to date. Applications include examination of nuclear waste, nuclear fuels, cladding, control elements, and other critical components. In this paper, applications of neutron radiography techniques developed and applied internationally for the nuclear power industry since the earliest years are reviewed, and the question is asked whether neutron test techniques, in general, can be of value in development of the present and future generations of nuclear power plants world-wide.

  14. Radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, C. G.

    1973-01-01

    Radiography is discussed as a method for nondestructive evaluation of internal flaws of solids. Gamma ray and X-ray equipment are described along with radiographic film, radiograph interpretation, and neutron radiography.

  15. INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY COURSE, INSTRUCTOR'S GUIDE, VOLUME 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Engineering Extension Service.

    THE PURPOSE OF THE GUIDE IS TO GIVE MAXIMUM ASSISTANCE TO INSTRUCTORS IN PLANNING THE TRAINING OF LICENSED INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHERS. IT WAS DEVELOPED BY THE ENGINEERING EXTENSION SERVICE, TEXAS AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL UNIVERSITY, COLLEGE STATION, TEXAS. THE 21 UNITS INCLUDE (1) INDUSTRIAL APPLICATIONS, (2) NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING METHODS, (3)…

  16. Personal computer equipment for dental digital subtraction radiography vs. industrial computer equipment and conventional radiography.

    PubMed

    Möystad, A; Svanaes, D B; Larheim, T A

    1992-04-01

    A "low-cost" personal computer (PC) system used to digitize dental radiographs was tested by assessing the accuracy of its subtraction images versus those of "high-cost" industrial equipment and conventional radiography. Subtraction images were made of artificial lesions in human femur bone and subsequently evaluated by students and teachers. The observations were analyzed in terms of true positive and false positive reports. "Low-cost" and "high-cost" subtraction images revealed only small differences in diagnostic accuracy. Compared to conventional radiography, the diagnostic accuracy of the subtraction images with the "low-cost" PC system was significantly higher for all observers. The interexaminer variance was similar for the subtraction and the conventional images for both students and teachers, except for a significantly reduced interexaminer variance for the teachers concerning the true positive reports with the "low-cost" PC subtraction technique.

  17. Human performance analysis of industrial radiography radiation exposure events

    SciTech Connect

    Reece, W.J.; Hill, S.G.

    1995-12-01

    A set of radiation overexposure event reports were reviewed as part of a program to examine human performance in industrial radiography for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Incident records for a seven year period were retrieved from an event database. Ninety-five exposure events were initially categorized and sorted for further analysis. Descriptive models were applied to a subset of severe overexposure events. Modeling included: (1) operational sequence tables to outline the key human actions and interactions with equipment, (2) human reliability event trees, (3) an application of an information processing failures model, and (4) an extrapolated use of the error influences and effects diagram. Results of the modeling analyses provided insights into the industrial radiography task and suggested areas for further action and study to decrease overexposures.

  18. Applications of neutron radiography for the nuclear power industry

    SciTech Connect

    Craft, Aaron E.; Barton, John P.

    2016-11-01

    The World Conference on Neutron Radiography (WCNR) and International Topical Meeting on Neutron Radiography (ITMNR) series have been running over 35 years. The most recent event, ITMNR-8, focused on industrial applications and was the first time this series was hosted in China. In China, more than twenty new nuclear power plants are in construction and plans have been announced to increase the nuclear capacity further by a factor of three within fifteen years. There are additional prospects in many other nations. Neutron tests were vital during previous developments of materials and components for nuclear power applications, as reported in this conference series. For example a majority of the 140 papers in the Proceedings of the First WCNR are for the benefit of the nuclear power industry. Included are reviews of the diverse techniques being applied in Europe, Japan, the United States, and at many other centers. Many of those techniques are being utilized and advanced to the present time. Neutron radiography of irradiated nuclear fuel provides more comprehensive information about the internal condition of irradiated nuclear fuel than any other non-destructive technique to date. Applications include examination of nuclear waste, nuclear fuels, cladding, control elements, and other critical components. In this paper, the techniques developed and applied internationally for the nuclear power industry since the earliest years are reviewed, and the question is asked whether neutron test techniques can be of value in development of the present and future generations of nuclear power plants world-wide.

  19. 10 CFR 34.61 - Records of the specific license for industrial radiography.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Records of the specific license for industrial radiography. 34.61 Section 34.61 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Recordkeeping Requirements §...

  20. 10 CFR 34.61 - Records of the specific license for industrial radiography.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Records of the specific license for industrial radiography. 34.61 Section 34.61 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Recordkeeping Requirements §...

  1. 10 CFR 34.61 - Records of the specific license for industrial radiography.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Records of the specific license for industrial radiography. 34.61 Section 34.61 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Recordkeeping Requirements §...

  2. 10 CFR 34.61 - Records of the specific license for industrial radiography.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Records of the specific license for industrial radiography. 34.61 Section 34.61 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Recordkeeping Requirements §...

  3. 10 CFR 34.61 - Records of the specific license for industrial radiography.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Records of the specific license for industrial radiography. 34.61 Section 34.61 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Recordkeeping Requirements §...

  4. 10 CFR 34.42 - Radiation Safety Officer for industrial radiography.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Radiation Safety Officer for industrial radiography. 34.42 Section 34.42 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Radiation Safety Requirements § 34.42...

  5. 10 CFR 34.42 - Radiation Safety Officer for industrial radiography.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Radiation Safety Officer for industrial radiography. 34.42 Section 34.42 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Radiation Safety Requirements § 34.42...

  6. 10 CFR 34.42 - Radiation Safety Officer for industrial radiography.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Radiation Safety Officer for industrial radiography. 34.42 Section 34.42 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Radiation Safety Requirements § 34.42...

  7. 10 CFR 34.42 - Radiation Safety Officer for industrial radiography.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Radiation Safety Officer for industrial radiography. 34.42 Section 34.42 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Radiation Safety Requirements § 34.42...

  8. 10 CFR 34.42 - Radiation Safety Officer for industrial radiography.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Radiation Safety Officer for industrial radiography. 34.42 Section 34.42 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Radiation Safety Requirements § 34.42...

  9. DIANE stationary neutron radiography system image quality and industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cluzeau, S.; Huet, J.; Le Tourneur, P.

    1994-05-01

    The SODERN neutron radiography laboratory has operated since February 1993 using a sealed tube generator (GENIE 46). An experimental programme of characterization (dosimetry, spectroscopy) has confirmed the expected performances concerning: neutron flux intensity, neutron energy range, residual gamma flux. Results are given in a specific report [2]. This paper is devoted to the image performance reporting. ASTM and specific indicators have been used to test the image quality with various converters and films. The corresponding modulation transfer functions are to be determined from image processing. Some industrial applications have demonstrated the capabilities of the system: corrosion detection in aircraft parts, ammunitions filling testing, detection of polymer lacks in sandwich steel sheets, detection of moisture in a probe for geophysics, residual ceramic cores imaging in turbine blades. Various computerized electronic imaging systems will be tested to improve the industrial capabilities.

  10. 10 CFR 34.20 - Performance requirements for industrial radiography equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Performance requirements for industrial radiography equipment. 34.20 Section 34.20 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY AND... meet the following minimum criteria: (a)(1) Each radiographic exposure device, source assembly...

  11. Methodology for digital radiography simulation using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX for industrial applications.

    PubMed

    Souza, E M; Correa, S C A; Silva, A X; Lopes, R T; Oliveira, D F

    2008-05-01

    This work presents a methodology for digital radiography simulation for industrial applications using the MCNPX radiography tally. In order to perform the simulation, the energy-dependent response of a BaFBr imaging plate detector was modeled and introduced in the MCNPX radiography tally input. In addition, a post-processing program was used to convert the MCNPX radiography tally output into 16-bit digital images. Simulated and experimental images of a steel pipe containing corrosion alveoli and stress corrosion cracking were compared, and the results showed good agreement between both images.

  12. Working safely in gamma radiography. A training manual for industrial radiographers

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, S.A.; Peabody, C.A.

    1982-09-01

    This manual is designed for classroom training in working safely in industrial radiography using gamma sources. The purpose is to train radiographers' assistants to work safely as a qualified gamma radiographer. The contents cover the essentials of radiation, radiation protection, emergency procedures, gamma cameras, and biological effects of radiation. (ACR)

  13. 10 CFR 34.20 - Performance requirements for industrial radiography equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... equipment. 34.20 Section 34.20 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY AND... inspection at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Library, 11545 Rockville Pike, Rockville, Maryland 20852. A.../federal_register/code_of_federal_regulations/ibr_locations.html. (2) Engineering analysis may be...

  14. Application Of Flash X-Ray Radiography To Problems In The Pulp And Paper Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrington, Theodore E.

    1988-02-01

    The use of flash x-ray radiography to investigate high speed multiphase flows is demonstrated. Both fundamental and practical problems of interest to the pulp and paper industry are used as examples. More specifically, studies of concentrated fiber suspension flows, kraft black liquor sprays and impulse drying are discussed.

  15. Understanding the Challenges in the Transition from Film Radiography in the Nuclear Power Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Moran, Traci L.; Nove, Carol A.; Pardini, Allan F.

    2012-09-01

    Nondestructive examination (NDE) applications in the nuclear power industry using film radiography are shrinking due to the advent of modern digital imaging technologies and advances in alternative inspection methods that do not present an ionizing radiation hazard. Technologies that are used routinely in the medical industry for patient diagnosis are being adapted to industrial NDE applications including the detection and characterization of defects in welds. From the user perspective, non-film inspection techniques provide several advantages over film techniques. It is anticipated that the shift away from the application of film radiography in the nuclear power industry represents an irreversible trend. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has noted this trend in the U.S. nuclear power industry and will be working to ensure that the effectiveness and reliability of component inspections is not compromised by this transition. Currently, specific concerns are associated with 1) obtaining a fundamental understanding of how inspection effectiveness and reliability may be impacted by this transition and 2) ensuring training standards and qualifications remain compatible with modern industrial radiographic practice. This paper discusses recent trends in industrial radiography and assesses their advantages and disadvantages from the perspective of nuclear power plant component inspections.

  16. Tests of cosmic ray radiography for power industry applications

    DOE PAGES

    Durham, J. M.; Guardincerri, E.; Morris, C. L.; ...

    2015-06-30

    In this report, we assess muon multiple scattering tomography as a non-destructive inspection technique in several typical areas of interest to the nuclear power industry, including monitoring concrete degradation, gate valve conditions, and pipe wall thickness. This work is motivated by the need for imaging methods that do not require the licensing, training, and safety controls of x-rays, and by the need to be able to penetrate considerable overburden to examine internal details of components that are otherwise inaccessible, with minimum impact on industrial operations. In some instances, we find that muon tomography may be an attractive alternative to moremore » typical measurements.« less

  17. Tests of cosmic ray radiography for power industry applications

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, J. M. Guardincerri, E.; Morris, C. L.; Bacon, J.; Fabritius, J.; Fellows, S.; Poulson, D.; Plaud-Ramos, K.; Renshaw, J.

    2015-06-15

    In this report, we assess muon multiple scattering tomography as a non-destructive inspection technique in several typical areas of interest to the nuclear power industry, including monitoring concrete degradation, gate valve conditions, and pipe wall thickness. This work is motivated by the need for imaging methods that do not require the licensing, training, and safety controls of x-rays, and by the need to be able to penetrate considerable overburden to examine internal details of components that are otherwise inaccessible, with minimum impact on industrial operations. In some scenarios, we find that muon tomography may be an attractive alternative to more typical measurements.

  18. An overexposure in industrial radiography using an /sup 192/Ir radionuclide

    SciTech Connect

    Jalil, A.; Molla, M.A.

    1989-07-01

    An industrial radiographer was accidentally exposed to a high dose of ionizing radiation from an /sup 192/Ir source during radiography of weldjoints in gas pipelines. Some symptoms of high radiation exposure occurred immediately after the incident. The clinical effect of skin erythema developed within 7 d, leading to progressive tissue deterioration. The dose to the body was estimated to be about 2-3 Gy, and the dose to the fingertips was approximately 24 Gy.

  19. Industrial radiography with cosmic-ray muons: A progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilboy, W. B.; Jenneson, P. M.; Simons, S. J. R.; Stanley, S. J.; Rhodes, D.

    2007-09-01

    Cosmic-ray produced muons arrive at the surface of the earth with enormous energies ranging up to 1012 GeV. There have been sporadic attempts to exploit their extreme penetration through matter to probe the internal structures of very large objects, including an Egyptian pyramid and a volcano but their very low intensity per unit area ( ≈1 cm-2 per min) generally restricts the practicably attainable spatial resolution to large dimensions. Nevertheless the more intense low energy region of the muon spectrum has recently been shown to be capable of detecting high-Z objects with dimensions of the order of 10 cm hidden inside large transport containers in measurement times of minutes. These various developments have encouraged further studies of potential industrial uses of cosmic-ray muons in industrial applications. In order to gain maximum benefit from the low muon flux large area detectors are required and plastic scintillators offer useful advantages in size, cost and simplicity. Scintillator slabs up to 1 m2 square and 76.2 mm thick are undergoing testing for applications in the nuclear industry. The most direct approach employs photomultiplier tubes at each corner to measure the relative sizes of muon induced pulses to determine the location of each muon track passing through the scintillator. The performance of this technique is reported and its imaging potential is assessed.

  20. An industrial radiography exposure device based on measurement of transmitted gamma-ray intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polee, C.; Chankow, N.; Srisatit, S.; Thong-Aram, D.

    2015-05-01

    In film radiography, underexposure and overexposure may happen particularly when lacking information of specimen material and hollowness. This paper describes a method and a device for determining exposure in industrial gamma-ray radiography based on quick measurement of transmitted gamma-ray intensity with a small detector. Application software was developed for Android mobile phone to remotely control the device and to display counting data via Bluetooth communication. Prior to film exposure, the device is placed behind a specimen to measure transmitted intensity which is inversely proportional to the exposure. Unlike in using the conventional exposure curve, correction factors for source decay, source-to- film distance, specimen thickness and kind of material are not needed. The developed technique and device make radiographic process economic, convenient and more reliable.

  1. Advances in digital industrial radiology - New application areas beyond film radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewert, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    Similar to the success story of digital photography a major upheaval has been observed in digital industrial radiology. Digital Detector Arrays enable the increase of contrast sensitivity up to a factor of 10 in comparison to film radiography. Computed radiography with phosphor imaging plates substitutes film applications. The increased sensitivity of digital detectors enables the efficient usage for dimensional measurements and functionality tests substituting manual maintenance. The measurement of wall thickness and corrosion status is state of the art in petrochemical industry. X-ray back scatter techniques have been applied in safety and security relevant applications with single sided access of source and detector. Computed tomography (CT) applications cover the range from m to nm scale. The scope of CT applications changes from flaw detection to dimensional measurement in industry. Mobile computed tomography is applied for in-service radiographic crack detection and sizing in welded pipes in nuclear power industry and aerospace applications. CT has been applied for evaluation of hot cracking susceptibility of modern weld alloys. In combination with modified varestraint transvarestraint tests (MVT) the cumulative crack length as function of stress and depth was determined. This enables the quantitative characterization of the weldability properties of different materials.

  2. Safety and security of radioactive sources in industrial radiography in Bangladesh

    SciTech Connect

    Mollah, A. S.; Nazrul, M. Abdullah

    2013-07-01

    Malicious use of radioactive sources can involve dispersal of that material through an explosive device. There has been recognition of the threat posed by the potential malicious misuse of NDT radioactive source by terrorists. The dispersal of radioactive material using conventional explosives, referred to as a 'dirty bomb', could create considerable panic, disruption and area access denial in an urban environment. However, as it is still a relatively new topic among regulators, users, and transport and storage operators worldwide, international assistance and cooperation in developing the necessary regulatory and security infrastructure is required. The most important action in reducing the risk of radiological terrorism is to increase the security of radioactive sources. This paper presents safety and security considerations for the transport and site storage of the industrial radiography sources as per national regulations entitled 'Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control Rules-1997'.The main emphasis was put on the stages of some safety and security actions in order to prevent theft, sabotage or other malicious acts during the transport of the packages. As a conclusion it must be mentioned that both safety and security considerations are very important aspects that must be taking in account for the transport and site storage of radioactive sources used in the practice of industrial radiography. (authors)

  3. Dose estimation to eye lens of industrial gamma radiography workers using Monte Carlo method.

    PubMed

    Lima, Alexandre Roza; Hunt, John Graham; Da Silva, Francisco Cesar Augusto

    2017-07-11

    The ICRP Statement on Tissue Reactions (2011) based on epidemiological evidences recommended a reduction for the eye lens equivalent dose limit from 150 to 20 mSv per year. This paper presents mainly the doses estimation received by industrial gamma radiography workers, during planned or accidental exposure situations to eye lens, Hp(10) and effective dose. A Brazilian Visual Monte Carlo Dose Calculation program was used and two relevant scenarios were considered. For the planned exposure situation, twelve radiographic exposures per day for 250 days per year, which leads to a direct exposure of 10 hours per year, were considered. The simulation was carried out using a 192Ir source with 1.0 TBq of activity; the source/operator distance from 5 to 10 m placed at heights of 0.02, 1 and 2 m and; exposure time of 12 seconds. Using a standard height of 1 m, the eyes lens doses were estimated as being between 16.3 and 60.3 mGy per year. For the accidental exposure situation, the same radionuclide and activity were used, but in this case the doses were calculated with and without a collimator. The heights above ground considered were 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 m; the source/operator distance was 40 cm and; the exposure time 74 seconds. The eyes lens doses, for 1.5 m, were 12.3 and 0.28 mGy without and with a collimator, respectively. The conclusions were that (1) the estimated doses show that the 20 mSv annual limit for eye lens equivalent dose can directly impact industrial gamma radiography activities, mainly in industries with high number of radiographic exposures per year; (2) the risk of lens opacity has a low probability for a single accident; however, depending on the number of accidental exposures and the dose levels found in planned exposure situations, the threshold dose can easily be exceeded during the professional career of the industrial radiography operator and; (3) in a first approximation, Hp(10) can be used to estimate the equivalent dose to the eye lens. © 2017

  4. New X-ray testing methods of aerosol products for industrial radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozydar Knyziak, Adrian; Rzodkiewicz, Witold; Kaczorowska, Ewa; Derlacinski, Michal

    2017-02-01

    An amount of product in e.g. an aerosol canister is not difficult to estimate by weighing a filled can and subtracting the tare of packaging. In this way, we can obtain the net weight of the ingredients present in the can. Although, this does not indicate the volumetric content. Therefore, in the paper, the fundamental (the weight method and given by FEICA) and new methods (given by authors) related to the determination of the volumetric content of canister filled with aeorosol products are presented. The new methods are based on direct digital radiography (DR) using X-ray radiation. For the needs of new methods, the X-ray CCD-DR imaging system was built and developed in our Laboratory in Department of Radiation and Vibration at the Central Office of Measures. For comparison purposes, with regard to the volumetric content, a lot of metal cans of capacities 140, 185, 450, 700 ml were inspected. In future, computed tomography (CT) for industrial radiography in our laboratory will be used. Currently, an algorithm for CT is being tested. It will give us possibility for very precise measurements to determine volumetric content of examined canisters.

  5. A comprehensive dose assessment of irradiated hand by iridium-192 source in industrial radiography.

    PubMed

    Hosseini Pooya, S M; Dashtipour, M R; Paydar, R; Mianji, F; Pourshahab, B

    2017-09-04

    Among the various incidents in industrial radiography, inadvertent handling of sources by hands is one of the most frequent incidents in which some parts of the hands may be locally exposed to high doses. An accurate assessment of extremity dose assists medical doctors in selecting appropriate treatments, preventing the injury expansion in the region. In this study, a phantom was designed to simulate a fisted hand of a radiographer when the worker holds a radioactive source in their hands. The local doses were measured using implanted TLDs in the phantom at different distances from a source. Furthermore, skin dose distribution was measured by Gaf-chromic films in the palm region of the phantom. The reliability of the measurements has been studied via analytical as well as Monte-Carlo simulation methods. The results showed that the new phantom design can be used reliably in extremity dose assessments, particularly at the points next to the source.

  6. Local liquid velocity measurement of Trickle Bed Reactor using Digital Industrial X-ray Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd Salleh, Khairul Anuar

    Trickle Bed Reactors (TBRs) are fixed beds of particles in which both liquid and gas flow concurrently downward. They are widely used to produce not only fuels but also lubrication products. The measurement and the knowledge of local liquid velocities (VLL) in TBRs is less which is essential for advancing the understanding of its hydrodynamics and for validation computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Therefore, this work focused on developing a new, non-invasive, statistically reliable technique that can be used to measure local liquid velocity (VLL) in two-dimensions (2-D). This is performed by combining Digital Industrial X-ray Radiography (DIR) and Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) techniques. This work also make possible the development of three-dimensional (3-D) VLL measurements that can be taken in TBRs. Measurements taken through both the combined and the novel technique, once validated, were found to be comparable to another technique (a two-point fiber optical probe) currently being developed at Missouri University of Science and Technology. The results from this study indicate that, for a gas-liquid-solid type bed, the measured VLL can have a maximum range that is between 35 and 51 times that of its superficial liquid velocity (VSL). Without the existence of gas, the measured VLL can have a maximum range that is between 4 and 4.7 times that of its VSL. At a higher V SL, the particle tracer was greatly distributed and became carried away by a high liquid flow rate. Neither the variance nor the range of measured VLL varied for any of the replications, confirming the reproducibility of the experimental measurements used, regardless of the VSL . The liquid's movement inside the pore was consistent with findings from previous studies that used various techniques.

  7. Characterization of mono-ethylene-glycol based industrial polyurethanes samples by fast-neutron radiography and neutron tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogante, Massimo; Söllradl, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    A complicated structural organization of polyurethanes may have a strong influence on the materials functional properties. Under particular conditions such as mechanical and thermal loading and aging, it leads to the material degradation, even in fresh-prepared bulk polymers and especially if defects are present in the material. Unwanted bubbles can be observed, which form during the expansion of the mixture during its chemical reaction and remain present in the final product. These macro-, micro- and nano-bubbles influence the material's performance. In this work, neutron radiography and tomography have been adopted to characterize at a macro-scale level the bulk of commercially available polyurethane samples, obtained from dissimilar- mixture ratios with different densities and branching levels as well as from different zones of the production mould. The characterisation allowed an estimation of the different dense materials - as they are used, e.g., in soles of shoes - as well as the invisible defects like pores and cracks, responsible for the materials fracture by mechanical loading. The obtained information are expected to be useful for various industrial sectors such as automotive and footwear industry. It will be completed by applying SANS, which has already proved to characterize the microstructure of the bulk-polymer with respect to nano-pores, micro-cracks and their arrangement in the polymer matrix.

  8. 10 CFR 34.20 - Performance requirements for industrial radiography equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Equipment § 34.20 Performance... Standards Institute, N432-1980 “Radiological Safety for the Design and Construction of Apparatus for Gamma...

  9. 10 CFR 34.20 - Performance requirements for industrial radiography equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Equipment § 34.20 Performance... Standards Institute, N432-1980 “Radiological Safety for the Design and Construction of Apparatus for Gamma...

  10. Neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, H.; Iddings, F.

    1998-08-01

    Neutron radiography is becoming a well established nondestructive testing (NDT) method. The American Society for Nondestructive Testing (ASNT) has recognized the method through its recommended practice SNT-TCIA which outlines training, knowledge, and experience necessary to obtain levels of competency in the method. Certification of nondestructive testing personnel is also covered in a military standard. Technical publications in the field of NDT and nuclear technology carry articles on neutron radiography and technical meetings include papers or even entire sessions on neutron radiography. There is an on-going series of international conferences on neutron radiography. Many books are available to provide introductory and advanced material on neutron radiographic techniques and applications. Neutron radiography as a service for hire is available, similar to that offered for other NDT services. The method is being adopted to solve NDT problems in specialty areas. The objective of this report is to provide a brief survey of the current state of the art in the use of neutron radiography. The survey will include information on the technique including principles of the method, sources of neutrons, detection methodology, standards and image quality indicators, and representative applications. An extensive reference list provides additional information for those who wish to investigate further and a Glossary is included which provides definitions for terms used in Neutron Radiography.

  11. X-ray digital industrial radiography (DIR) for local liquid velocity (VLL) measurement in trickle bed reactors (TBRs): Validation of the technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd Salleh, Khairul Anuar; Rahman, Mohd Fitri Abdul; Lee, Hyoung Koo; Al Dahhan, Muthanna H.

    2014-06-01

    Local liquid velocity measurements in Trickle Bed Reactors (TBRs) are one of the essential components in its hydrodynamic studies. These measurements are used to effectively determine a reactor's operating condition. This study was conducted to validate a newly developed technique that combines Digital Industrial Radiography (DIR) with Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) to measure the Local Liquid Velocity (VLL) inside TBRs. Three millimeter-sized Expanded Polystyrene (EPS) beads were used as packing material. Three validation procedures were designed to test the newly developed technique. All procedures and statistical approaches provided strong evidence that the technique can be used to measure the VLL within TBRs.

  12. X-ray digital industrial radiography (DIR) for local liquid velocity (V(LL)) measurement in trickle bed reactors (TBRs): validation of the technique.

    PubMed

    Mohd Salleh, Khairul Anuar; Rahman, Mohd Fitri Abdul; Lee, Hyoung Koo; Al Dahhan, Muthanna H

    2014-06-01

    Local liquid velocity measurements in Trickle Bed Reactors (TBRs) are one of the essential components in its hydrodynamic studies. These measurements are used to effectively determine a reactor's operating condition. This study was conducted to validate a newly developed technique that combines Digital Industrial Radiography (DIR) with Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) to measure the Local Liquid Velocity (V(LL)) inside TBRs. Three millimeter-sized Expanded Polystyrene (EPS) beads were used as packing material. Three validation procedures were designed to test the newly developed technique. All procedures and statistical approaches provided strong evidence that the technique can be used to measure the V(LL) within TBRs.

  13. X-ray digital industrial radiography (DIR) for local liquid velocity (V{sub LL}) measurement in trickle bed reactors (TBRs): Validation of the technique

    SciTech Connect

    Mohd Salleh, Khairul Anuar Lee, Hyoung Koo; Rahman, Mohd Fitri Abdul; Al Dahhan, Muthanna H.

    2014-06-15

    Local liquid velocity measurements in Trickle Bed Reactors (TBRs) are one of the essential components in its hydrodynamic studies. These measurements are used to effectively determine a reactor's operating condition. This study was conducted to validate a newly developed technique that combines Digital Industrial Radiography (DIR) with Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) to measure the Local Liquid Velocity (V{sub LL}) inside TBRs. Three millimeter-sized Expanded Polystyrene (EPS) beads were used as packing material. Three validation procedures were designed to test the newly developed technique. All procedures and statistical approaches provided strong evidence that the technique can be used to measure the V{sub LL} within TBRs.

  14. Digital radiography.

    PubMed

    Mattoon, J S

    2006-01-01

    Digital radiography has been used in human medical imaging since the 1980s with recent and rapid acceptance into the veterinary profession. Using advanced image capture and computer technology, radiographic images are viewed on a computer monitor. This is advantageous because radiographic images can be adjusted using dedicated computer software to maximize diagnostic image quality. Digital images can be accessed at computer workstations throughout the hospital, instantly retrieved from computer archives, and transmitted via the internet for consultation or case referral. Digital radiographic data can also be incorporated into a hospital information system, making record keeping an entirely paperless process. Digital image acquisition is faster when compared to conventional screen-film radiography, improving workflow and patient throughput. Digital radiography greatly reduces the need for 'retake' radiographs because of wide latitude in exposure factors. Also eliminated are costs associated with radiographic film and x-ray film development. Computed radiography, charged coupled devices, and flat panel detectors are types of digital radiography systems currently available.

  15. Neutron Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, A. K.; Brenizer, J. S.

    Neutron radiography and its related two-dimensional (2D) neutron imaging techniques have been established as invaluable nondestructive inspection methods and quantitative measurement tools. They have been used in a wide variety of applications ranging from inspection of aircraft engine turbine blades to study of two-phase fluid flow in operating proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Neutron radiography is similar to X-ray radiography in that the method produces a 2D attenuation map of neutron radiation that has penetrated the object being examined. However, the images produced differ and are often complementary due to the differences between X-ray and neutron interaction mechanisms. The uses and types of 2D neutron imaging have expanded over the past 15 years as a result of advances in imaging technology and improvements in neutron generators/sources and computers. Still, high-intensity sources such as those from reactors and spallation neutron sources, together with conventional film radiography, remain the mainstay of high-resolution, large field-of-view neutron imaging. This chapter presents a summary of the history, methods, and related variations of neutron radiography techniques.

  16. Digital Radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    System One, a digital radiography system, incorporates a reusable image medium (RIM) which retains an image. No film is needed; the RIM is read with a laser scanner, and the information is used to produce a digital image on an image processor. The image is stored on an optical disc. System allows the radiologist to "dial away" unwanted images to compare views on three screens. It is compatible with existing equipment and cost efficient. It was commercialized by a Stanford researcher from energy selective technology developed under a NASA grant.

  17. [Digital radiography].

    PubMed

    Haendle, J

    1983-03-01

    Digital radiography is a generally accepted term comprising all x-ray image systems producing a projected image which resembles the conventional x-ray film image, and which are linked to any type of digital image processing. Fundamental criteria of differentiation are based on the production and detection method of the x-ray image. Various systems are employed, viz. the single-detector, line-detector or fanbeam detector and the area-beam or area-detector image converters, which differ from one another mainly in the manner of conversion of the radiation produced by the x-ray tube. The article also deals with the pros and cons of the various principles, the multitude of systems employed, and the varying frequency of their use in x-ray diagnosis work.

  18. Increasing mobile radiography productivity.

    PubMed

    Wong, Edward; Lung, Ngan Tsz; Ng, Kris; Jeor, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Mobile radiography using computed radiography (CR) cassettes is a common equipment combination with a workflow bottleneck limited by location of CR readers. Advent of direct digital radiography (DDR) mobile x-ray machines removes this limitation by immediate image review and quality control. Through the use of key performance indicators (KPIs), the increase in efficiency can be quantified.

  19. Clinical feline dental radiography.

    PubMed

    Lemmons, Matthew

    2013-05-01

    Dental radiography is a necessary diagnostic modality in small animal practice. It is not possible to accurately assess and diagnose tooth resorption, periodontal disease, endodontic disease, neoplasia and injury without it. Dental radiography is also necessary for treatment and assessment of the patient postoperatively.

  20. High energy neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Gavron, A.; Morley, K.; Morris, C.; Seestrom, S.; Ullmann, J.; Yates, G.; Zumbro, J.

    1996-06-01

    High-energy spallation neutron sources are now being considered in the US and elsewhere as a replacement for neutron beams produced by reactors. High-energy and high intensity neutron beams, produced by unmoderated spallation sources, open potential new vistas of neutron radiography. The authors discuss the basic advantages and disadvantages of high-energy neutron radiography, and consider some experimental results obtained at the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility at Los Alamos.

  1. Phase-contrast radiography.

    PubMed

    Gao, D; Pogany, A; Stevenson, A W; Wilkins, S W

    1998-01-01

    For the past 100 years, the paradigm for radiography has been premised on absorption as the sole means of contrast formation and on ray optics as the basis for image interpretation. A new conceptual approach to radiography has been developed that includes phase (ie, refractive) contrast and requires wave optics for proper treatment. This new approach greatly increases the amount of information that can be obtained with radiographic techniques and is particularly well suited to the imaging of soft tissue and of very small features in biologic samples. A key feature of the present technique of phase-contrast radiography is the use of a microfocus x-ray source about an order of magnitude (< or = 20 microm) smaller than that used in conventional radiography. Phase-contrast radiography offers a number of improvements over conventional radiography in a clinical setting, especially in soft-tissue imaging. These improvements include increased contrast resulting in improved visualization of anatomic detail, reduced absorbed dose to the patient, inherent image magnification and high spatial resolution, use of harder x rays, and relative ease of implementation. More technologically advanced detectors are currently being developed and commercialized, which will help fully realize the considerable potential of phase-contrast imaging.

  2. 8. VIEW OF RADIOGRAPHY EQUIPMENT, TEST METHODS INCLUDED RADIOGRAPHY AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF RADIOGRAPHY EQUIPMENT, TEST METHODS INCLUDED RADIOGRAPHY AND BETA BACKSCATTERING. (7/13/56) - Rocky Flats Plant, Non-Nuclear Production Facility, South of Cottonwood Avenue, west of Seventh Avenue & east of Building 460, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  3. Radiography of the Paranasal Sinuses

    MedlinePlus

    ... your back or over your lap. This head. Radiography of the paranasal sinuses apron will protect your ... face, especially when lowering his or her head. Radiography of sitting and others while you are standing. ...

  4. Real-time radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Bossi, R.H.; Oien, C.T.

    1981-02-26

    Real-time radiography is used for imaging both dynamic events and static objects. Fluorescent screens play an important role in converting radiation to light, which is then observed directly or intensified and detected. The radiographic parameters for real-time radiography are similar to conventional film radiography with special emphasis on statistics and magnification. Direct-viewing fluoroscopy uses the human eye as a detector of fluorescent screen light or the light from an intensifier. Remote-viewing systems replace the human observer with a television camera. The remote-viewing systems have many advantages over the direct-viewing conditions such as safety, image enhancement, and the capability to produce permanent records. This report reviews real-time imaging system parameters and components.

  5. Quality assurance in film radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Van Bellegem, L.; Vaessen, B.

    1993-12-31

    The ISO 9000 standards were originally developed during the 1980`s to provide uniform, worldwide quality assurance requirements. The EC (European Communities) adopted these standards as part of their modular approach to ``conformity assessment`` procedures, for several product categories. This includes the development of standards (specifications) which define what the purchaser wants and what the supplier agrees to provide, as well as quality system registration (certification) which increases confidence in the supplier`s ability to produce consistently. The requirements are typically most rigorous for regulated products that have a major impact on health and safety i.e film radiographic systems. This is the main reason for making available the necessary Q.C. tools in film radiography to comply with Q.A. specifications and guarantee the required consistent performance. These tools can only give satisfying support if they are dedicated, easy to use, precise and cost effective at the user`s level. The main topics for such a Q.A. package are: (1) standard for Film System classification for industrial radiography; (2) film system certification; and (3) standard for control of film processing by means of reference values i.e. pre-exposed film wedges and archiving quality control method.

  6. Transitioning to digital radiography.

    PubMed

    Drost, Wm Tod

    2011-04-01

    To describe the different forms of digital radiography (DR), image file formats, supporting equipment and services required for DR, storage of digital images, and teleradiology. Purchasing a DR system is a major investment for a veterinary practice. Types of DR systems include computed radiography, charge coupled devices, and direct or indirect DR. Comparison of workflow for analog and DR is presented. On the surface, switching to DR involves the purchase of DR acquisition hardware. The X-ray machine, table and grids used in analog radiography are the same for DR. Realistically, a considerable infrastructure supports the image acquisition hardware. This infrastructure includes monitors, computer workstations, a robust computer network and internet connection, a plan for storage and back up of images, and service contracts. Advantages of DR compared with analog radiography include improved image quality (when used properly), ease of use (more forgiving to the errors of radiographic technique), speed of making a complete study (important for critically ill patients), fewer repeat radiographs, less time looking for imaging studies, less physical storage space, and the ability to easily send images for consultation. With an understanding of the infrastructure requirements, capabilities and limitations of DR, an informed veterinary practice should be better able to make a sound decision about transitioning to DR. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2011.

  7. Apparatus for proton radiography

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Ronald L.

    1976-01-01

    An apparatus for effecting diagnostic proton radiography of patients in hospitals comprises a source of negative hydrogen ions, a synchrotron for accelerating the negative hydrogen ions to a predetermined energy, a plurality of stations for stripping extraction of a radiography beam of protons, means for sweeping the extracted beam to cover a target, and means for measuring the residual range, residual energy, or percentage transmission of protons that pass through the target. The combination of information identifying the position of the beam with information about particles traversing the subject and the back absorber is performed with the aid of a computer to provide a proton radiograph of the subject. In an alternate embodiment of the invention, a back absorber comprises a plurality of scintillators which are coupled to detectors.

  8. Forensic radiography: an overview.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, April

    2010-01-01

    Perhaps the first instance of forensic radiography occurred in the 1890s when Professor AW Wright of Yale University tested Wilhelm Roentgen's newly discovered x-ray photography on a deceased rabbit. Of interest were small, round objects inside the rabbit that appeared as dark spots on the positive film. The objects were extracted and identified as bullets, thereby helping to determine the cause of the rabbit's death. In the years since Roentgen's discovery, the use of radiography and other medical imaging specialties to aid in investigating civil and criminal matters has increased as investigators realize how radiologic technology can yield information that otherwise is unavailable. Radiologic technologists can play a key role in forensic investigations.

  9. Quantitative film radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Devine, G.; Dobie, D.; Fugina, J.; Hernandez, J.; Logan, C.; Mohr, P.; Moss, R.; Schumacher, B.; Updike, E.; Weirup, D.

    1991-02-26

    We have developed a system of quantitative radiography in order to produce quantitative images displaying homogeneity of parts. The materials that we characterize are synthetic composites and may contain important subtle density variations not discernible by examining a raw film x-radiograph. In order to quantitatively interpret film radiographs, it is necessary to digitize, interpret, and display the images. Our integrated system of quantitative radiography displays accurate, high-resolution pseudo-color images in units of density. We characterize approximately 10,000 parts per year in hundreds of different configurations and compositions with this system. This report discusses: the method; film processor monitoring and control; verifying film and processor performance; and correction of scatter effects.

  10. Cosmic Ray Scattering Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    Cosmic ray muons are ubiquitous, are highly penetrating, and can be used to measure material densities by either measuring the stopping rate or by measuring the scattering of transmitted muons. The Los Alamos team has studied scattering radiography for a number of applications. Some results will be shown of scattering imaging for a range of practical applications, and estimates will be made of the utility of scattering radiography for nondestructive assessments of large structures and for geological surveying. Results of imaging the core of the Toshiba Nuclear Critical Assembly (NCA) Reactor in Kawasaki, Japan and simulations of imaging the damaged cores of the Fukushima nuclear reactors will be presented. Below is an image made using muons of a core configuration for the NCA reactor.

  11. Digital radiography in space.

    PubMed

    Hart, Rob; Campbell, Mark R

    2002-06-01

    With the permanent habitation of the International Space Station, the planning of longer duration exploration missions, and the possibility of space tourism, it is likely that digital radiography will be needed in the future to support medical care in space. Ultrasound is currently the medical imaging modality of choice for spaceflight. Digital radiography in space is limited because of prohibitive launch costs (in the region of $20,000/kg) that severely restrict the volume, weight, and power requirements of medical care hardware. Technological increases in radiography, a predicted ten-fold decrease in future launch costs, and an increasing clinical need for definitive medical care in space will drive efforts to expand the ability to provide medical care in space including diagnostic imaging. Normal physiological responses to microgravity, in conjunction with the high-risk environment of spaceflight, increase the risk of injury and could imply an extended recovery period for common injuries. The advantages of gravity on Earth, such as the stabilization of patients undergoing radiography and the drainage of fluids, which provide radiographic contrast, are unavailable in space. This creates significant difficulties in patient immobilization and radiographic positioning. Gravity-dependent radiological signs, such as lipohemarthrosis in knee and shoulder trauma, air or fluid levels in pneumoperitoneum, pleural effusion, or bowel obstruction, and the apical pleural edge in pneumothorax become unavailable. Impaired healing processes such as delayed callus formation following fracture will have implications on imaging, and recovery time lines are unknown. The confined nature of spacecraft and the economic impossibility of launching lead-based personal protective equipment present significant challenges to crew radiation safety. A modified, free-floating radiographic C-arm device equipped with a digital detector and utilizing teleradiology support is proposed as a

  12. Patient care in radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrlich, R.A.; McCloskey, E.D.

    1989-01-01

    This book focuses on patient care procedures for radiographers. The authors focus on the role of the radiographer as a member of the health care team. The authors report on such topics as communication in patient care: safety, medico-legal considerations, transfer and positioning; physical needs; infection control; medication; CPR standards, acute situations; examination of the GI tract; contrast media; special imaging techniques and bedside radiography.

  13. Particle Beam Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peach, Ken; Ekdahl, Carl

    2014-02-01

    Particle beam radiography, which uses a variety of particle probes (neutrons, protons, electrons, gammas and potentially other particles) to study the structure of materials and objects noninvasively, is reviewed, largely from an accelerator perspective, although the use of cosmic rays (mainly muons but potentially also high-energy neutrinos) is briefly reviewed. Tomography is a form of radiography which uses multiple views to reconstruct a three-dimensional density map of an object. There is a very wide range of applications of radiography and tomography, from medicine to engineering and security, and advances in instrumentation, specifically the development of electronic detectors, allow rapid analysis of the resultant radiographs. Flash radiography is a diagnostic technique for large high-explosive-driven hydrodynamic experiments that is used at many laboratories. The bremsstrahlung radiation pulse from an intense relativistic electron beam incident onto a high-Z target is the source of these radiographs. The challenge is to provide radiation sources intense enough to penetrate hundreds of g/cm2 of material, in pulses short enough to stop the motion of high-speed hydrodynamic shocks, and with source spots small enough to resolve fine details. The challenge has been met with a wide variety of accelerator technologies, including pulsed-power-driven diodes, air-core pulsed betatrons and high-current linear induction accelerators. Accelerator technology has also evolved to accommodate the experimenters' continuing quest for multiple images in time and space. Linear induction accelerators have had a major role in these advances, especially in providing multiple-time radiographs of the largest hydrodynamic experiments.

  14. Lessons Learned Through the Follow-up of the Long-Term Effects of Over-Exposure to an Ir192 Industrial Radiography Source in Bangladesh

    SciTech Connect

    Jalil, A.; Rabbani, G.; Hossain, M. K.; Alam, M. K.; Koddus, A.

    2003-02-24

    An industrial radiographer was accidentally over-exposed while taking the radiograph of weld-joints of gas pipe-lines in 1985 in Bangladesh. Symptoms of high radiation exposure occurred immediately after the accident and skin erythema developed leading to progressive tissue deterioration. The consequences of this over-exposure is being followed up to assess the long-term effects of ionizing radiation on the victim. Progressive tissue deteriorations have already led to multiple surgeries and successive amputations of the finger-tips so far. Lessons learned from this accident are also reported in this paper.

  15. Lower Gastrointestinal (GI) Tract X-Ray (Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Lower GI Tract Lower gastrointestinal tract radiography ... GI Tract Radiography? What is Lower GI Tract X-ray Radiography (Barium Enema)? Lower gastrointestinal (GI) tract radiography, ...

  16. Neutron Induced Beta Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Shaikh, A. M.; Shylaja, D.

    2011-07-15

    In the present paper we give a new methodology named, 'neutron induced beta radiography-NIBR' which makes use of neutron activated Dy or In foils as source of (3-radiation. Radiographs are obtained with an aluminium cassette containing image plate, a sample under inspection and the activated Dy or In foil kept in tight contact. The sensitivity of the technique to thickness was evaluated for different materials in the form of step wedges. Some radiographs are presented to demonstrate potential of method to inspect thin samples.

  17. Student Incivility in Radiography Education.

    PubMed

    Clark, Kevin R

    2017-07-01

    To examine student incivility in radiography classrooms by exploring the prevalence of uncivil behaviors along with the classroom management strategies educators use to manage and prevent classroom disruptions. A survey was designed to collect data on the severity and frequency of uncivil student behaviors, classroom management strategies used to address minor and major behavioral issues, and techniques to prevent student incivility. The participants were educators in radiography programs accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology. Findings indicated that severe uncivil student behaviors in radiography classrooms do not occur as often as behaviors classified as less severe. Radiography educators in this study used a variety of strategies and techniques to manage and prevent student incivility; however, radiography educators who received formal training in classroom management reported fewer incidents of student incivility than those who had not received formal training. The participants in this study took a proactive approach to addressing severe behavioral issues in the classroom. Many radiography educators transition from the clinical environment to the classroom setting with little to no formal training in classroom management. Radiography educators are encouraged to attend formal training sessions to learn how to manage the higher education classroom effectively. Student incivility is present in radiography classrooms. This study provides a foundation for future research on incivility. ©2017 American Society of Radiologic Technologists.

  18. Assessment of cold neutron radiography capability

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, T.E. Jr.; Roberts, J.A.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The authors goals were to demonstrate and assess cold neutron radiography techniques at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), Manual Lujan Neutron Scattering Center (Lujan Center), and to investigate potential applications of the capability. The authors have obtained images using film and an amorphous silicon detector. In addition, a new technique they have developed allows neutron radiographs to be made using only a narrow range of neutron energies. Employing this approach and the Bragg cut-off phenomena in certain materials, they have demonstrated material discrimination in radiography. They also demonstrated the imaging of cracks in a sample of a fire-set case that was supplied by Sandia National Laboratory, and they investigated whether the capability could be used to determine the extent of coking in jet engine nozzles. The LANSCE neutron radiography capability appears to have applications in the DOE stockpile maintenance and science-based stockpile stewardship (SBSS) programs, and in industry.

  19. Mobile real time radiography system

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, J.; Taggart, D.; Betts, S.

    1997-11-01

    A 450-keV Mobile Real Time Radiography (RTR) System was delivered to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in January 1996. It was purchased to inspect containers of radioactive waste produced at (LANL). Since its delivery it has been used to radiograph more than 600 drums of radioactive waste at various LANL sites. It has the capability of inspecting waste containers of various sizes from <1-gal. buckets up to standard waste boxes (SWB, dimensions 54.5 in. x 71 in. x 37 in.). It has three independent x-ray acquisition formats. The primary system used is a 12- in. image intensifier, the second is a 36-in. linear diode array (LDA) and the last is an open system. It is fully self contained with on board generator, HVAC, and a fire suppression system. It is on a 53-ft long x 8-ft. wide x 14-ft. high trailer that can be moved over any highway requiring only an easily obtainable overweight permit because it weights {approximately}38 tons. It was built to conform to industry standards for a cabinet system which does not require an exclusion zone. The fact that this unit is mobile has allowed us to operate where the waste is stored, rather than having to move the waste to a fixed facility.

  20. Axial Tomography from Digitized Real Time Radiography

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Zolnay, A. S.; McDonald, W. M.; Doupont, P. A.; McKinney, R. L.; Lee, M. M.

    1985-01-18

    Axial tomography from digitized real time radiographs provides a useful tool for industrial radiography and tomography. The components of this system are: x-ray source, image intensifier, video camera, video line extractor and digitizer, data storage and reconstruction computers. With this system it is possible to view a two dimensional x-ray image in real time at each angle of rotation and select the tomography plane of interest by choosing which video line to digitize. The digitization of a video line requires less than a second making data acquisition relatively short. Further improvements on this system are planned and initial results are reported.

  1. Axial tomography from digitized real time radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Zolnay, A.S.; McDonald, W.M.; Doupont, P.A.; McKinney, R.L.; Lee, M.M.

    1985-01-18

    Axial tomography from digitized real time radiographs provides a useful tool for industrial radiography and tomography. The components of this system are: x-ray source, image intensifier, video camera, video line extractor and digitizer, data storage and reconstruction computers. With this system it is possible to view a two dimensional x-ray image in real time at each angle of rotation and select the tomography plane of interest by choosing which video line to digitize. The digitization of a video line requires less than a second making data acquisition relatively short. Further improvements on this system are planned and initial results are reported.

  2. The value of preplacement screening radiography of the low back.

    PubMed

    Gibson, E S

    1988-01-01

    Because there has not been a randomized controlled trial on the validity of preplacement screening radiography of the low back, the author assesses this procedure indirectly by reviewing empirical evidence concerning its usefulness in industrial settings and by evaluating it against the basic requirements of a successful screening test.

  3. Digital radiography: an overview.

    PubMed

    Parks, Edwin T; Williamson, Gail F

    2002-11-15

    Since the discovery of X-rays in 1895, film has been the primary medium for capturing, displaying, and storing radiographic images. It is a technology that dental practitioners are the most familiar and comfortable with in terms of technique and interpretation. Digital radiography is the latest advancement in dental imaging and is slowly being adopted by the dental profession. Digital imaging incorporates computer technology in the capture, display, enhancement, and storage of direct radiographic images. Digital imaging offers some distinct advantages over film, but like any emerging technology, it presents new and different challenges for the practitioner to overcome. This article presents an overview of digital imaging including basic terminology and comparisons with film-based imaging. The principles of direct and indirect digital imaging modalities, intraoral and extraoral applications, image processing, and diagnostic efficacy will be discussed. In addition, the article will provide a list of questions dentists should consider prior to purchasing digital imaging systems for their practice.

  4. Radiography students' clinical learning styles.

    PubMed

    Ward, Patti; Makela, Carole

    2010-01-01

    To examine the common learning styles of radiography students during clinical practice. Descriptive research methodology, using a single self-report questionnaire, helped to identify common learning styles of radiography students during clinical practice. The results indicated that 3 learning styles predominate among radiography students during clinical practice: task oriented, purposeful and tentative. Insight into clinical practice learning styles can help students understand how they learn and allow them to recognize ways to maximize learning. It also heightens awareness among clinical instructors and technologists of the different learning styles and their relevance to clinical practice education.

  5. Unified Database for Rejected Image Analysis Across Multiple Vendors in Radiography.

    PubMed

    Little, Kevin J; Reiser, Ingrid; Liu, Lili; Kinsey, Tiffany; Sánchez, Adrian A; Haas, Kateland; Mallory, Florence; Froman, Carmen; Lu, Zheng Feng

    2017-02-01

    Reject rate analysis has been part of radiography departments' quality control since the days of screen-film radiography. In the era of digital radiography, one might expect that reject rate analysis is easily facilitated because of readily available information produced by the modality during the examination procedure. Unfortunately, this is not always the case. The lack of an industry standard and the wide variety of system log entries and formats have made it difficult to implement a robust multivendor reject analysis program, and logs do not always include all relevant information. The increased use of digital detectors exacerbates this problem because of higher reject rates associated with digital radiography compared with computed radiography. In this article, the authors report on the development of a unified database for vendor-neutral reject analysis across multiple sites within an academic institution and share their experience from a team-based approach to reduce reject rates.

  6. Lower Gastrointestinal (GI) Tract X-Ray (Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Lower GI Tract Lower gastrointestinal tract radiography or lower GI ... of Lower GI Tract Radiography? What is Lower GI Tract X-ray Radiography (Barium Enema)? Lower gastrointestinal ( ...

  7. Accelerator system for neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Rusnak, B; Hall, J

    2000-09-21

    The field of x-ray radiography is well established for doing non-destructive evaluation of a vast array of components, assemblies, and objects. While x-rays excel in many radiography applications, their effectiveness diminishes rapidly if the objects of interest are surrounded by thick, high-density materials that strongly attenuate photons. Due to the differences in interaction mechanisms, neutron radiography is highly effective in imaging details inside such objects. To obtain a high intensity neutron source suitable for neutron imaging a 9-MeV linear accelerator is being evaluated for putting a deuteron beam into a high-pressure deuterium gas cell. As a windowless aperture is needed to transport the beam into the gas cell, a low-emittance is needed to minimize losses along the high-energy beam transport (HEBT) and the end station. A description of the HEBT, the transport optics into the gas cell, and the requirements for the linac will be presented.

  8. Image Acquisition and Quality in Digital Radiography.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Shannon

    2016-09-01

    Medical imaging has undergone dramatic changes and technological breakthroughs since the introduction of digital radiography. This article presents information on the development of digital radiography and types of digital radiography systems. Aspects of image quality and radiation exposure control are highlighted as well. In addition, the article includes related workplace changes and medicolegal considerations in the digital radiography environment. ©2016 American Society of Radiologic Technologists.

  9. Digital Radiography: A Technology Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Ben A.

    1982-12-01

    Digital radiography, a term hardly recognized two years ago, has grown to become the talk of the radiology community and the excitement of many commercial companies. M2st of this attention has been directed toward digital subtraction intravenous angiography), although during this same time period, a variety of digital radiography apparatus and image processing techniques have been under development. In November of 1980 at the RSNA Conference in Chicago, three commercial digital angiography systems were announced by Philips, Technicare and ADAC Corporations. During this same time period, the University of Arizona was discussing the concept of a photo electronic radiology department2, the University of Pittsburg and Stanford University were investigating line scan radiography3,4 and approximately five laboratories were carrying out clinical IV angiography with digital video systems.5-9 These developments followed basic research programs in digital electronic and computerized imaging at various locations around the world. 10-18 In the spring of 1981 we attempted to review the state of digital radiography, focusing on the various detector systems and image acquisition approaches.19 Since that time, rapid advancements in digital radiography have occurred. A major conference was held on digital radiography at Stanford UniversityzO, a new area detector system for digital radiography was announced by Fuji Film Corporation, clinical testing began on the Picker line scan digital chest unit21, and improvements were made in selenium detectors for digital radiography. Several additional companies announced digital video angiography systems, bringing the total now to approximately 15 companies worldwide. Digital video subtraction angiography is now well established as an important clinical diagnostic procedure and a variety of improvements and extensions of digital angiography systems are now ongoing. Digital acquisition and storage systems are increasing in both speed and

  10. Chest X-Ray (Chest Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Chest Chest x-ray uses a very ... limitations of Chest Radiography? What is a Chest X-ray (Chest Radiography)? The chest x-ray is the ...

  11. Neutron Radiography Facility at IBR-2 High Flux Pulsed Reactor: First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlenko, D. P.; Kichanov, S. E.; Lukin, E. V.; Rutkauskas, A. V.; Bokuchava, G. D.; Savenko, B. N.; Pakhnevich, A. V.; Rozanov, A. Yu.

    A neutron radiography and tomography facilityhave been developed recently at the IBR-2 high flux pulsed reactor. The facility is operated with the CCD-camera based detector having maximal field of view of 20x20 cm, and the L/D ratio can be varied in the range 200 - 2000. The first results of the radiography and tomography experiments with industrial materials and products, paleontological and geophysical objects, meteorites, are presented.

  12. Abdomen X-Ray (Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Abdomen Abdominal x-ray uses a very ... of an abdominal x-ray? What is abdominal x-ray? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical ...

  13. Embossed radiography utilizing energy subtraction.

    PubMed

    Osawa, Akihiro; Watanabe, Manabu; Sato, Eiichi; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Nagao, Jiro; Abderyim, Purkhet; Aizawa, Katsuo; Tanaka, Etsuro; Mori, Hidezo; Kawai, Toshiaki; Ehara, Shigeru; Sato, Shigehiro; Ogawa, Akira; Onagawa, Jun

    2009-01-01

    Currently, it is difficult to carry out refraction-contrast radiography by using a conventional X-ray generator. Thus, we developed an embossed radiography system utilizing dual-energy subtraction for decreasing the absorption contrast in unnecessary regions, and the contrast resolution of a target region was increased by use of image-shifting subtraction and a linear-contrast system in a flat panel detector (FPD). The X-ray generator had a 100-microm-focus tube. Energy subtraction was performed at tube voltages of 45 and 65 kV, a tube current of 0.50 mA, and an X-ray exposure time of 5.0 s. A 1.0-mm-thick aluminum filter was used for absorbing low-photon-energy bremsstrahlung X-rays. Embossed radiography was achieved with cohesion imaging by use of the FPD with pixel sizes of 48 x 48 microm, and the shifting dimension of an object in the horizontal direction ranged from 100 to 200 microm. At a shifting distance of 100 mum, the spatial resolutions in the horizontal and vertical directions measured with a lead test chart were both 83 microm. In embossed radiography of non-living animals, we obtained high-contrast embossed images of fine bones, gadolinium oxide particles in the kidney, and coronary arteries approximately 100 microm in diameter.

  14. Recognition of internal structure of unknown objects with simultaneous neutron and gamma radiography.

    PubMed

    Moghadam, K Kamali; Nasseri, M M

    2004-10-01

    Generally speaking in customary industrial and medical radiography, there is no tendency to reveal the nature of the samples. Ordinarily, the main objective of taking a radiograph is to show the position and dimension of unknown parts, inside the test object and to determine cracks, defects, etc. Whereas in radiography many important factors such as material cross-sections and build-up factors are also involved. In this paper, by using both neutron and gamma radiography techniques, some mathematical relations were successfully generated, in order to calculate the neutron and gamma total macroscopic cross-sections of some unknown elements in the presence of the other elements. For this work, some test pieces were defined and made of lead, silver, copper, Nickel, tin, graphite and polyethylene. The neutron radiography facility at Tehran Research Reactor (TRR) was used as mixed neutron and gamma radiography source (Proceedings of the Second World Conference on Neutron Radiography, Paris, France, pp. 25-32). On testing of a correction of the above-mentioned generated relations, a new technique of simultaneous neutron and gamma radiography was also investigated.

  15. Use of computed radiography in the study of an historic painting.

    PubMed

    Reiner, B I; Siegel, E L; French, K J; Dentry, R S; Mazan, W T; Maroney, M J

    1997-01-01

    The authors demonstrate the use of radiography in the investigation of an historic painting and describe the potential benefits of computed radiography compared with conventional screen-film radiography. The subject for the comparison was a 16 x 19-foot oil-on-canvas painting, Scipio Africanus Freeing Massiva, by Giovanni Battista Tiepolo. Radiographs of the painting were obtained by using a portable, industrial radiographic unit and both conventional screen-film and photostimulable phosphor plate cassettes. For this investigation, computed radiography had a number of advantages over screen-film radiography, largely due to its wider dynamic range and its capabilities for enhancing the digital images with image processing tools such as magnification, edge enhancement, colorization, and airbrushing. The ability to electronically combine images from the large painting into a single composite image file was extremely valuable, as this technique was much less cumbersome and resulted in much higher quality composite images than could be achieved with conventional radiography. An additional advantage of computed radiography includes the capability to easily archive and transmit these images in a digital format for subsequent review.

  16. High Brightness Neutron Source for Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Cremer, J. T.; Piestrup, Melvin, A.; Gary, Charles, K.; Harris, Jack, L. Williams, David, J.; Jones, Glenn, E.; Vainionpaa, J. , H.; Fuller, Michael, J.; Rothbart, George, H.; Kwan, J., W.; Ludewigt, B., A.; Gough, R.., A..; Reijonen, Jani; Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2008-12-08

    of yield of two orders of magnitude. The first fast neutron radiographic images were obtained using neutron cameras and a new fast neutron generator. These early images demonstrated the feasibility of using fast neutrons for imaging and penetrating thick objects of high density and imaging. Fast neutrons can be used to image low atomic number materials (e.g. plastics, explosives, lubricants and ceramics) that are shielded by high density materials (e.g. lead, tungsten and uranium). Fast neutron radiography could be used as a means to screen weapons for flaws and chemical stability. X-ray radiography can not easily do this. Fast neutron imaging is technically difficult and, consequently, a completely undeveloped market. Two of the generators were designed to have small source size and high brightness, ideal for fast-neutron imaging. With these generators we successfully used two fast neutron cameras: one developed by us, and another developed by a collaborator, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, CSIRO. We have successfully used these cameras to obtain low resolution images of various objects such as pipe fittings filled with water and other mechanical objects. Higher resolution and contrast images are expected by decreasing the source size and increasing generator yield.

  17. Nondestructive testing handbook. Second edition, Volume 3: Radiography and radiation testing

    SciTech Connect

    Bryant, L.E.

    1985-01-01

    This book offers comprehensive coverage of radiographic applications, theory and research. Indexed with over 3000 entries for easy access to needed information, it also includes, as an introduction, a description of radiography's role in nondestructive testing and NDT's role in industry. It ranks among the most current and extensive books available on the subject of industrial radiographic techniques.

  18. System for uncollimated digital radiography

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Han; Hall, James M.; McCarrick, James F.; Tang, Vincent

    2015-08-11

    The inversion algorithm based on the maximum entropy method (MEM) removes unwanted effects in high energy imaging resulting from an uncollimated source interacting with a finitely thick scintillator. The algorithm takes as input the image from the thick scintillator (TS) and the radiography setup geometry. The algorithm then outputs a restored image which appears as if taken with an infinitesimally thin scintillator (ITS). Inversion is accomplished by numerically generating a probabilistic model relating the ITS image to the TS image and then inverting this model on the TS image through MEM. This reconstruction technique can reduce the exposure time or the required source intensity without undesirable object blurring on the image by allowing the use of both thicker scintillators with higher efficiencies and closer source-to-detector distances to maximize incident radiation flux. The technique is applicable in radiographic applications including fast neutron, high-energy gamma and x-ray radiography using thick scintillators.

  19. Videoscopic assessment of the maintenance status of gamma radiography exposure containers employed in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Candeias, J P; Estrada, J J S; Pinho, A S; D'Avila, R L; Ramalho, A T

    2007-03-01

    Industrial radiography is the most frequent method of non-destructive testing (NDT) used by Brazilian industrial facilities for investigating the material integrity of a test object. In Brazil, industrial radiography employs around 220 x-ray and 290 gamma radiography machines. About 90% of the latter uses iridium ((192)Ir) sources. The large majority of (192)Ir projectors in operation in Brazil have been in continuous usage for more than 25 years, which means that they are old and worn-out. Usually the majority of accidents concerning gamma radiography occur during the return of the source into the exposure container. Poor maintenance or imperfections of the internal channel of the exposure container can lead to accidental source exposure. In the present work the internal tube of 65 gamma machines from nine Brazilian companies that render gamma radiography services were analysed using an industrial videoscope. The internal images from the projectors were compared with the internal image of an apparatus that had never been used, i.e. has never received a radioactive source. From the 65 machines evaluated, nine showed irregularities of the internal tube. It was also observed that each company follows a different methodology for the maintenance and lubrication of the exposure containers and drive cables.

  20. Clinical radiography education across Europe.

    PubMed

    England, A; Geers-van Gemeren, S; Henner, A; Kukkes, T; Pronk-Larive, D; Rainford, L; McNulty, J P

    2017-09-01

    To establish a picture of clinical education models within radiography programmes across Europe by surveying higher education institutions registered as affiliate members of the European Federation of Radiography Societies (EFRS). An online survey was developed to ascertain data on: practical training, supervisory arrangements, placement logistics, quality assurance processes, and the assessment of clinical competencies. Responses were identifiable in terms of educational institution and country. All educational institutions who were affiliate members at the time of the study were invited to participate (n = 46). Descriptive and thematic analyses are reported. A response rate of 82.6% (n = 38) was achieved from educational institutions representing 21 countries. Over half of responding institutions (n = 21) allocated in excess of 60 European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System (ECTS) credits to practical training. In nearly three-quarters of clinical placements there was a dedicated clinical practice supervisor in place; two-thirds of these were employed directly by the hospital. Clinical practice supervisors were typically state registered radiographers, who had a number of years of clinical experience and had received specific training for the role. Typical responsibilities included monitoring student progress, providing feedback and completing paperwork, this did however vary between respondents. In almost all institutions there were support systems in place for clinical placement supervisors within their roles. Similarities exist in the provision of clinical radiography education across Europe. Clinical placements are a core component of radiography education and are supported by experienced clinical practice supervisors. Mechanisms are in place for the selection, training and support of clinical practice supervisors. Professional societies should work collaboratively to establish guidelines for effective clinical placements. Copyright © 2017 The

  1. A New Neutron Radiography / Tomography / Imaging Station DINGO at OPAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbe, U.; Randall, T.; Hughes, C.; Davidson, G.; Pangelis, S.; Kennedy, S. J.

    A new neutron radiography / tomography / imaging instrument DINGO was built to support the area of neutron imaging research (neutron radiography/tomography) at ANSTO. The instrument is designed for an international user community and for routine quality control for defense, industrial, cultural heritage and archaeology applications. In the industrial field it provides a useful tool for studying cracking and defects in steel or other metals. The instrument construction was completed at the end of June 2013 and it is currently in the hot commissioning stage. The usable neutron flux is mainly determined by the neutron source, but it depends on the instrument position and the resolution. The instrument position for DINGO is the thermal neutron beam port HB-2 in the reactor hall. The measured flux (using gold foil) for an L/D of approximately 500 at HB-2 is 5.3*107 [n/cm2s], which is in a similar range to other facilities. A special feature of DINGO is the in-pile collimator position in front of the main shutter at HB-2. The collimator offers two pinholes with a possible L/D of 500 and 1000. A secondary collimator separates the two beams by blocking one and positions another aperture for the other beam. The whole instrument operates in two different positions, one for high resolution and one for high speed. In the current configuration DINGO measured first radiography and tomography data sets on friendly user test samples.

  2. An improved method for profile radiography of piping

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, M.S.; Haupt, J.D.

    1996-07-01

    The Petro-Chemical industry has used profile radiography for more than thirty years to find, and evaluate, corrosion in piping systems. The technique offers a method of ``seeing into`` a piece of pipe. This allows the inspector to see the ``whole picture``. Single point ultrasonic measurements cannot provide this degree of information. Shell`s objective for studying the use of this method centered on optimizing their profile radiography technique to improve accuracy and reproducibility of wall thickness measurements. Accuracy and reproducibility of measurements are particularly important when used to determine corrosion rates. To help achieve this objective, the authors developed an inspection procedure to minimize the more prominent sources of inaccuracies associated with this technique. Along with this procedure, they also developed an associated training program. All of Shell Oil`s Pressure Equipment inspectors and key contract employees have received this training.

  3. Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Delhotal, K. Casey; Harnisch, Jochen; Matsuhashi, Ryuji; Price, Lynn; Tanaka, Kanako; Worrell, Ernst; Yamba, Francis; Fengqi, Zhou; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Gielen, Dolf; Joosen, Suzanne; Konar, Manaswita; Matysek, Anna; Miner, Reid; Okazaki, Teruo; Sanders, Johan; Sheinbaum Parado, Claudia

    2007-12-01

    This chapter addresses past, ongoing, and short (to 2010) and medium-term (to 2030) future actions that can be taken to mitigate GHG emissions from the manufacturing and process industries. Globally, and in most countries, CO{sub 2} accounts for more than 90% of CO{sub 2}-eq GHG emissions from the industrial sector (Price et al., 2006; US EPA, 2006b). These CO{sub 2} emissions arise from three sources: (1) the use of fossil fuels for energy, either directly by industry for heat and power generation or indirectly in the generation of purchased electricity and steam; (2) non-energy uses of fossil fuels in chemical processing and metal smelting; and (3) non-fossil fuel sources, for example cement and lime manufacture. Industrial processes also emit other GHGs, e.g.: (1) Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) is emitted as a byproduct of adipic acid, nitric acid and caprolactam production; (2) HFC-23 is emitted as a byproduct of HCFC-22 production, a refrigerant, and also used in fluoroplastics manufacture; (3) Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are emitted as byproducts of aluminium smelting and in semiconductor manufacture; (4) Sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is emitted in the manufacture, use and, decommissioning of gas insulated electrical switchgear, during the production of flat screen panels and semiconductors, from magnesium die casting and other industrial applications; (5) Methane (CH{sub 4}) is emitted as a byproduct of some chemical processes; and (6) CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O can be emitted by food industry waste streams. Many GHG emission mitigation options have been developed for the industrial sector. They fall into three categories: operating procedures, sector-wide technologies and process-specific technologies. A sampling of these options is discussed in Sections 7.2-7.4. The short- and medium-term potential for and cost of all classes of options are discussed in Section 7.5, barriers to the application of these options are addressed in Section 7.6 and the implication of

  4. Radiography of Chaotically Moving Objects

    SciTech Connect

    Vavrik, Daniel; Jandejsek, Ivan; Dammer, Jiri; Holy, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jakubek, Martin

    2007-11-26

    Radiography of moving objects is an advanced problem when the dynamic range of acquired radiograms is restricted by a limited exposition time. Exposition time has to be short to avoid image blurring due to object moving. It is possible to increase the dynamic range by summing short time radiograms set when the periodical object movement is presented as in the case of heart beating for instance. On the other hand a non periodical movement can be studied using tools of X-ray Digital Image Correlation technique. Short time radiograms are fitted into corresponding positions and consequently summed for higher data statistics as it is presented in this work.

  5. Patient risk from interproximal radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, S.J.; Pujol, A. Jr.; Chen, T.S.; Malcolm, A.W.; James, A.E. Jr.

    1984-09-01

    Computer simulation methods for determining patient dose from dental radiography have demonstrated that patient risk from a two-film interproximal examination ranges from 1.1 X 10(-8) to 3.4 X 10(-7) using 90-kVp beams, depending on film speed, projection technique, and age and sex of the patient. Further, changing from a short-cone round-beam to a long-cone technique with rectangular collimation reduces risk by a factor of 2.9, independent of other factors.

  6. Lesion detectability in digital radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagne, Robert M.; Boswell, Jonathan S.; Myers, Kyle J.; Peter, Guillaume

    2001-06-01

    The usefulness of Fourier-based measures of imaging performance has come into question for the evaluation of digital imaging systems. Figures of merit such as detective quantum efficiency are relevant for linear, shift-invariant systems with stationary noise. However, no digital imaging system is shift invariant, and realistic images do not satisfy the stationarity condition. Our methods for task- based evaluation of imaging systems, based on lesion detectability, do not require such assumptions. We have computed the performance of Hotelling and nonprewhitening matched-filter observers for the task of lesion detection in digital radiography.

  7. PROTON RADIOGRAPHY FOR AN ADVANCED HYDROTEST FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    C. MORRIS

    2000-11-01

    Analysis of data from BNL experiment 933 is presented. Results demonstrate that proton radiography can meet many of the requirements for an Advanced Hydrotest Facility (AHF). Results for background, position resolution, metrology, quantitative radiography, material identification, and edge resolution are presented.

  8. ARG portable neutron radiography. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, J.P.

    1995-04-01

    In this report all available neutron radiographic data, including results of tests run at LANL, McClellan AFB, and University of Virginia, will be combined to outline specific transportable neutron radiography systems that could achieve the desired results as a complement to x-radiography capabilities for the Accident Response Group (ARG).

  9. Radiological protection in equine radiography and radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yoxall, A T

    1977-10-01

    The principles of radiological protection are summarised and consideration is then given to problems, which may confront the equine practitioner, in the fulfillment of these principles during diagnostic radiography of the limbs, head, and spine of the horse. The place of anaesthesia in such procedures is discussed and the special problems associated with therapeutic radiography of the horse are considered.

  10. Process waste assessment for the Radiography Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, N.M.

    1994-07-01

    This Process Waste Assessment was conducted to evaluate the Radiography Laboratory, located in Building 923. It documents the processes, identifies the hazardous chemical waste streams generated by these processes, recommends possible ways to minimize waste, and serves as a reference for future assessments of this facility. The Radiography Laboratory provides film radiography or radioscopy (electronic imaging) of weapon and nonweapon components. The Radiography Laboratory has six x-ray machines and one gamma ray source. It also has several other sealed beta- and gamma-ray isotope sources of low microcurie ({mu}Ci) activity. The photochemical processes generate most of the Radiography Laboratory`s routinely generated hazardous waste, and most of that is generated by the DuPont film processor. Because the DuPont film processor generates the most photochemical waste, it was selected for an estimated material balance.

  11. Reference doses for dental radiography.

    PubMed

    Napier, I D

    1999-04-24

    To establish reference doses for use within dental radiography. Retrospective analysis, single centre. UK General Dental Practice, 1995-1998. A statistical analysis was performed on the results from NRPB evaluations of dental x-ray equipment within general practice. The third quartile patient entrance dose was determined from 6,344 assessments of intra-oral x-ray equipment. The third quartile dose-width product was determined from 387 assessments of panoramic x-ray equipment. The third quartile patient entrance dose for an adult mandibular molar intra-oral radiograph is 3.9 mGy. The third quartile dose-width product for a standard adult panoramic radiograph is 66.7 mGy mm. NRPB recommends the adoption of reference doses of 4 mGy for an adult mandibular molar intra-oral radiograph and 65 mGy mm for a standard adult panoramic radiograph. These reference values can be used as a guide to accepted clinical practice. Where radiography is carried out using doses above these reference values, a thorough review of radiographic practice should be made to either improve techniques, or justify keeping the current techniques. However, attainment of doses at or below the reference values cannot be construed as achievement of optimum performance; further dose reductions below the reference value are still practicable.

  12. A dose monitoring system for dental radiography

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chena; Kim, Jo-Eun; Symkhampha, Khanthaly; Lee, Woo-Jin; Huh, Kyung-Hoe; Yi, Won-Jin; Heo, Min-Suk; Choi, Soon-Chul; Yeom, Heon-Young

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The current study investigates the feasibility of a platform for a nationwide dose monitoring system for dental radiography. The essential elements for an unerring system are also assessed. Materials and Methods An intraoral radiographic machine with 14 X-ray generators and five sensors, 45 panoramic radiographic machines, and 23 cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) models used in Korean dental clinics were surveyed to investigate the type of dose report. A main server for storing the dose data from each radiographic machine was prepared. The dose report transfer pathways from the radiographic machine to the main sever were constructed. An effective dose calculation method was created based on the machine specifications and the exposure parameters of three intraoral radiographic machines, five panoramic radiographic machines, and four CBCTs. A viewing system was developed for both dentists and patients to view the calculated effective dose. Each procedure and the main server were integrated into one system. Results The dose data from each type of radiographic machine was successfully transferred to the main server and converted into an effective dose. The effective dose stored in the main server is automatically connected to a viewing program for dentist and patient access. Conclusion A patient radiation dose monitoring system is feasible for dental clinics. Future research in cooperation with clinicians, industry, and radiologists is needed to ensure format convertibility for an efficient dose monitoring system to monitor unexpected radiation dose. PMID:27358817

  13. Image enhancement for radiography inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Wong, Brian Stephen; Guan, Tui Chen

    2005-04-01

    The x-ray radiographic testing method is often used for detecting defects as a non-destructive testing method (NDT). In many cases, NDT is used for aircraft components, welds, etc. Hence, the backgrounds are always more complex than a piece of steel. Radiographic images are low contrast, dark and high noise image. It is difficult to detect defects directly. So, image enhancement is a significant part of automated radiography inspection system. Histogram equalization and median filter are the most frequently used techniques to enhance the radiographic images. In this paper, the adaptive histogram equalization and contrast limited histogram equalization are compared with histogram equalization. The adaptive wavelet thresholding is compared with median filter. Through comparative analysis, the contrast limited histogram equalization and adaptive wavelet thresholding can enhance perception of defects better.

  14. Multi-purpose neutron radiography system

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, J.P.; Bryant, L.E.; Berry, P.

    1996-07-01

    A conceptual design is given for a low cost, multipurpose radiography system suited for the needs of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The proposed neutron source is californium-252. One purpose is to provide an in-house capability for occasional, reactor quality, neutron radiography thus replacing the recently closed Omega-West Reactor. A second purpose is to provide a highly reliable standby transportable neutron radiography system. A third purpose is to provide for transportable neutron probe gamma spectroscopy techniques. The cost is minimized by shared use of an existing x-ray facility, and by use of an existing transport cask. The achievable neutron radiography and radioscopy performance characteristics have been verified. The demonstrated image qualities range from high resolution gadolinium - SR film, with L:D = 100:1, to radioscopy using a LIXI image with L:D = 30:1 and neutron fluence 3.4 x 10{sup 5} n/cm{sup 2}.

  15. Information extraction from muon radiography data

    SciTech Connect

    Borozdin, K. N.; Asaki, T. J.; Chartrand, R.; Hengartner, N. W.; Hogan, G. E.; Morris, C. L.; Priedhorsky, W. C.; Schirato, R.C.; Schultz, L. J.; Sottile, M. J.; Vixie, K. R.; Wohlberg, B. E.; Blanpied, G.

    2004-01-01

    Scattering muon radiography was proposed recently as a technique of detection and 3-d imaging for dense high-Z objects. High-energy cosmic ray muons are deflected in matter in the process of multiple Coulomb scattering. By measuring the deflection angles we are able to reconstruct the configuration of high-Z material in the object. We discuss the methods for information extraction from muon radiography data. Tomographic methods widely used in medical images have been applied to a specific muon radiography information source. Alternative simple technique based on the counting of high-scattered muons in the voxels seems to be efficient in many simulated scenes. SVM-based classifiers and clustering algorithms may allow detection of compact high-Z object without full image reconstruction. The efficiency of muon radiography can be increased using additional informational sources, such as momentum estimation, stopping power measurement, and detection of muonic atom emission.

  16. Corrosion Inhibitors as Penetrant Dyes for Radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, Howard L.; Hall, Phillip B.

    2003-01-01

    Liquid/vapor-phase corrosion inhibitors (LVCIs) have been found to be additionally useful as penetrant dyes for neutron radiography (and perhaps also x-radiography). Enhancement of radiographic contrasts by use of LVCIs can reveal cracks, corrosion, and other defects that may be undetectable by ultrasonic inspection, that are hidden from direct optical inspection, and/or that are difficult or impossible to detect in radiographs made without dyes.

  17. Motivations for muon radiography of active volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macedonio, G.; Martini, M.

    2010-02-01

    Muon radiography represents an innovative tool for investigating the interior of active volcanoes. This method integrates the conventional geophysical techniques and provides an independent way to estimate the density of the volcano structure and reveal the presence of magma conduits. The experience from the pioneer experiments performed at Mt. Asama, Mt. West Iwate, and Showa-Shinzan (Japan) are very encouraging. Muon radiography could be applied, in principle, at any stratovolcano. Here we focus our attention on Vesuvius and Stromboli (Italy).

  18. Recent Progress of Radiography and Tomography at the Energy-resolved Neutron Imaging System RADEN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Y.; Segawa, M.; Kai, T.; Shinohara, T.; Nakatani, T.; Oikawa, K.; Hiroi, K.; Su, Y. H.; Hayashida, H.; Parker, J. D.; Zhang, S. Y.; Kiyanagi, Y.

    We have performed neutron radiography and tomography using a CCD camera-type detector for some test samples at RADEN. The current spatial resolution for neutron radiography is estimated to about 350 μm in the largest field-of-view of 300 × 300 mm2 and 100 μm in the field-of-view of 60 × 60 mm2. It is thought that the latter spatial resolution is strongly affected by the image blur in the scintillator screen. In the case of neutron tomography, the current spatial resolution is estimated to be better than 0.5 mm using an iron and aluminum test sample. Furthermore, we have performed neutron tomography for a cast aluminum product. As a result, small blowholes are found in the center of the product. This demonstrates the importance of non-destructive testing by neutron radiography and tomography for industrial products.

  19. Neutron radiography and other NDE tests of main rotor helicopter blades.

    PubMed

    de Beer, F C; Coetzer, M; Fendeis, D; Da Costa E Silva, A

    2004-10-01

    A few nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques are extensively being used worldwide to investigate aircraft structures for all types of defects. The detection of corrosion and delaminations, which are believed to be the major initiators of defects leading to aircraft structural failures, are addressed by various NDE techniques. In a combined investigation by means of visual inspection, X-ray radiography and shearography on helicopter main rotor blades, neutron radiography (NRad) at SAFARI-1 research reactor operated by Necsa, was performed to introduce this form of NDE testing to the South African aviation industry to be evaluated for applicability. The results of the shearography, visual inspection and NRad techniques are compared in this paper. The main features and advantages of neutron radiography, within the framework of these investigations, will be highlighted.

  20. Digital radiography image quality: image acquisition.

    PubMed

    Williams, Mark B; Krupinski, Elizabeth A; Strauss, Keith J; Breeden, William K; Rzeszotarski, Mark S; Applegate, Kimberly; Wyatt, Margaret; Bjork, Sandra; Seibert, J Anthony

    2007-06-01

    This article on digital radiography image acquisition is the first of two articles written as part of an intersociety effort to establish image quality standards for digital and computed radiography. The topic of the other paper is digital radiography image processing and display. The articles were developed collaboratively by the ACR, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, and the Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine. Increasingly, medical imaging and patient information are being managed using digital data during acquisition, transmission, storage, display, interpretation, and consultation. Data management during each of these operations has a direct impact on the quality of patient care. These articles describe what is known to improve image quality for digital and computed radiography and make recommendations on optimal acquisition, processing, and display. The practice of digital radiography is a rapidly evolving technology that will require the timely revision of any guidelines and standards. This document provides a basis for the technologies available today in clinical practice and may be useful in guiding the future clinical practice of digital radiography.

  1. Thorium-uranium fission radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, E. L.; Weiss, J. R.; Burnett, D. S.; Woolum, D. S.

    1976-01-01

    Results are described for studies designed to develop routine methods for in-situ measurement of the abundance of Th and U on a microscale in heterogeneous samples, especially rocks, using the secondary high-energy neutron flux developed when the 650 MeV proton beam of an accelerator is stopped in a 42 x 42 cm diam Cu cylinder. Irradiations were performed at three different locations in a rabbit tube in the beam stop area, and thick metal foils of Bi, Th, and natural U as well as polished silicate glasses of known U and Th contents were used as targets and were placed in contact with mica which served as a fission track detector. In many cases both bare and Cd-covered detectors were exposed. The exposed mica samples were etched in 48% HF and the fission tracks counted by conventional transmitted light microscopy. Relative fission cross sections are examined, along with absolute Th track production rates, interaction tracks, and a comparison of measured and calculated fission rates. The practicality of fast neutron radiography revealed by experiments to data is discussed primarily for Th/U measurements, and mixtures of other fissionable nuclei are briefly considered.

  2. Proton radiography for clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talamonti, C.; Reggioli, V.; Bruzzi, M.; Bucciolini, M.; Civinini, C.; Marrazzo, L.; Menichelli, D.; Pallotta, S.; Randazzo, N.; Sipala, V.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Petterson, M.; Blumenkrantz, N.; Feldt, J.; Heimann, J.; Lucia, D.; Seiden, A.; Williams, D. C.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Bashkirov, V.; Schulte, R.

    2010-01-01

    Proton imaging is not yet applied as a clinical routine, although its advantages have been demonstrated. In the context of quality assurance in proton therapy, proton images can be used to verify the correct positioning of the patient and to control the range of protons. Proton computed tomography (pCT) is a 3D imaging method appropriate for planning and verification of proton radiation treatments, because it allows evaluating the distributions of proton stopping power within the tissues and can be directly utilized when the patient is in the actual treatment position. The aim of the PRoton IMAging experiment, supported by INFN, and the PRIN 2006 project, supported by MIUR, is to realize a proton computed radiography (pCR) prototype for reconstruction of proton images from a single projection in order to validate the technique with pre-clinical studies and, eventually, to conceive the configuration of a complete pCT system. A preliminary experiment performed at the 250 MeV proton synchrotron of Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) allowed acquisition of experimental data before the completion of PRIMA project's prototype. In this paper, the results of the LLUMC experiment are reported and the reconstruction of proton images of two phantoms is discussed.

  3. Thorium-uranium fission radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, E. L.; Weiss, J. R.; Burnett, D. S.; Woolum, D. S.

    1976-01-01

    Results are described for studies designed to develop routine methods for in-situ measurement of the abundance of Th and U on a microscale in heterogeneous samples, especially rocks, using the secondary high-energy neutron flux developed when the 650 MeV proton beam of an accelerator is stopped in a 42 x 42 cm diam Cu cylinder. Irradiations were performed at three different locations in a rabbit tube in the beam stop area, and thick metal foils of Bi, Th, and natural U as well as polished silicate glasses of known U and Th contents were used as targets and were placed in contact with mica which served as a fission track detector. In many cases both bare and Cd-covered detectors were exposed. The exposed mica samples were etched in 48% HF and the fission tracks counted by conventional transmitted light microscopy. Relative fission cross sections are examined, along with absolute Th track production rates, interaction tracks, and a comparison of measured and calculated fission rates. The practicality of fast neutron radiography revealed by experiments to data is discussed primarily for Th/U measurements, and mixtures of other fissionable nuclei are briefly considered.

  4. Comparison of Conventional Radiography and Digital Computerized Radiography in Patients Presenting to Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Ozcete, Enver; Boydak, Bahar; Ersel, Murat; Kiyan, Selahattin; Uz, Ilhan; Cevrim, Ozgur

    2015-03-01

    To compare the differences between conventional radiography and digital computerized radiography (CR) in patients presenting to the emergency department. The study enrolled consecutive patients presenting to the emergency department who needed chest radiography. Quality score of the radiogram was assessed with visual analogue score (VAS-100 mm), measured in terms of millimeters and recorded at the end of study. Examination time, interpretation time, total time, and cost of radiograms were calculated. There were significant differences between conventional radiography and digital CR groups in terms of location unit (Care Unit, Trauma, Resuscitation), hour of presentation, diagnosis group, examination time, interpretation time, and examination quality. Examination times for conventional radiography and digital CR were 45.2 and 34.2 minutes, respectively. Interpretation times for conventional radiography and digital CR were 25.2 and 39.7 minutes, respectively. Mean radiography quality scores for conventional radiography and digital CR were 69.1 mm and 82.0 mm. Digital CR had a 1.05 TL cheaper cost per radiogram compared to conventional radiography. Since interpretation of digital radiograms is performed via terminals inside the emergency department, the patient has to be left in order to interpret the digital radiograms, which prolongs interpretation times. We think that interpretation of digital radiograms with the help of a mobile device would eliminate these difficulties. Although the initial cost of setup of digital CR and PACS service is high at the emergency department, we think that Digital CR is more cost-effective than conventional radiography for emergency departments in the long-term.

  5. Digital Radiography Using Digital Detector Arrays Fulfills Critical Applications for Offshore Pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, EdsonVasques; Barbosa Rabello, JoséMaurício; Pereira, MarcelodosSantos; Lopes, RicardoTadeu; Zscherpel, Uwe

    2010-12-01

    Digital radiography in the inspection of welded pipes to be installed under deep water offshore gas and oil pipelines, like a presalt in Brazil, in the paper has been investigated. The aim is to use digital radiography for nondestructive testing of welds as it is already in use in the medical, aerospace, security, automotive, and petrochemical sectors. Among the current options, the DDA (Digital Detector Array) is considered as one of the best solutions to replace industrial films, as well as to increase the sensitivity to reduce the inspection cycle time. This paper shows the results of this new technique, comparing it to radiography with industrial films systems. In this paper, 20 test specimens of longitudinal welded pipe joints, specially prepared with artificial defects like cracks, lack of fusion, lack of penetration, and porosities and slag inclusions with varying dimensions and in 06 different base metal wall thicknesses, were tested and a comparison of the techniques was made. These experiments verified the purposed rules for parameter definitions and selections to control the required digital radiographic image quality as described in the draft international standard ISO/DIS 10893-7. This draft is first standard establishing the parameters for digital radiography on weld seam of welded steel pipes for pressure purposes to be used on gas and oil pipelines.

  6. National reference doses for dental cephalometric radiography.

    PubMed

    Holroyd, J R

    2011-12-01

    Diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) are an important tool in the optimisation of clinical radiography. Although national DRLs are provided for many diagnostic procedures including dental intra-oral radiography, there are currently no national DRLs set for cephalometric radiography. In the absence of formal national DRLs, the Health Protection Agency (HPA) has previously published National Reference Doses (NRDs) covering a wide range of diagnostic X-ray examinations. The aim of this study was to determine provisional NRDs for cephalometric radiography. Measurements made by the Dental X-ray Protection Service (DXPS) of the HPA, as part of the cephalometric X-ray equipment testing service provided to dentists and dental trade companies throughout the UK, were used to derive provisional NRDs. Dose-area product measurements were made on 42 X-ray sets. Third quartile dose-area product values for adult and child lateral cephalometric radiography were found to be 41 mGy cm² and 25 mGy cm², respectively, with individual measurements ranging from 3 mGy cm² to 108 mGy cm². This report proposes provisional NRDs of 40 mGy cm² and 25 mGy cm² for adult and child lateral cephalometric radiographs, respectively; these doses could be considered by employers when establishing their local DRLs.

  7. Muon radiography for exploration of Mars geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedar, S.; Tanaka, H. K. M.; Naudet, C. J.; Jones, C. E.; Plaut, J. P.; Webb, F. H.

    2013-06-01

    Muon radiography is a technique that uses naturally occurring showers of muons (penetrating particles generated by cosmic rays) to image the interior of large-scale geological structures in much the same way as standard X-ray radiography is used to image the interior of smaller objects. Recent developments and application of the technique to terrestrial volcanoes have demonstrated that a low-power, passive muon detector can peer deep into geological structures up to several kilometers in size, and provide crisp density profile images of their interior at ten meter scale resolution. Preliminary estimates of muon production on Mars indicate that the near horizontal Martian muon flux, which could be used for muon radiography, is as strong or stronger than that on Earth, making the technique suitable for exploration of numerous high priority geological targets on Mars. The high spatial resolution of muon radiography also makes the technique particularly suited for the discovery and delineation of Martian caverns, the most likely planetary environment for biological activity. As a passive imaging technique, muon radiography uses the perpetually present background cosmic ray radiation as the energy source for probing the interior of structures from the surface of the planet. The passive nature of the measurements provides an opportunity for a low power and low data rate instrument for planetary exploration that could operate as a scientifically valuable primary or secondary instrument in a variety of settings, with minimal impact on the mission's other instruments and operation.

  8. Muon radiography for exploration of Mars geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedar, S.; Tanaka, H. K. M.; Naudet, C. J.; Jones, C. E.; Plaut, J. P.; Webb, F. H.

    2012-10-01

    Muon radiography is a technique that uses naturally occurring showers of muons (penetrating particles generated by cosmic rays) to image the interior of large scale geological structures in much the same way as standard X-ray radiography is used to image the interior of smaller objects. Recent developments and application of the technique to terrestrial volcanoes have demonstrated that a low-power, passive muon detector can peer deep into geological structures up to several kilometers in size, and provide crisp density profile images of their interior at ten meter scale resolution. Preliminary estimates of muon production on Mars indicate that the near horizontal Martian muon flux, which could be used for muon radiography, is as strong or stronger than that on Earth, making the technique suitable for exploration of numerous high priority geological targets on Mars. The high spatial resolution of muon radiography also makes the technique particularly suited for the discovery and delineation of Martian caverns, the most likely planetary environment for biological activity. As a passive imaging technique, muon radiography uses the perpetually present background cosmic ray radiation as the energy source for probing the interior of structures from the surface of the planet. The passive nature of the measurements provides an opportunity for a low power and low data rate instrument for planetary exploration that could operate as a scientifically valuable primary or secondary instrument in a variety of settings, with minimal impact on the mission's other instruments and operation.

  9. Thyroid dose distribution in dental radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Bristow, R.G.; Wood, R.E.; Clark, G.M. )

    1989-10-01

    The anatomic position and proven radiosensitivity of the thyroid gland make it an organ of concern in dental radiography. A calibrated thermoluminescent dosimetry system was used to investigate the absorbed dose (microGy) to the thyroid gland resultant from a minimum irradiated volume, intraoral full-mouth radiography technique with the use of rectangular collimation with a lead-backed image receptor, and conventional panoramic radiography performed with front and rear lead aprons. Use of the minimum irradiated volume technique resulted in a significantly decreased absorbed dose over the entire thyroid region ranging from 100% to 350% (p less than 0.05). Because this intraoral technique results in radiographs with greater image quality and also exposes the thyroid gland to less radiation than the panoramic, this technique may be an alternative to the panoramic procedure.

  10. The Delphi technique in radiography education research.

    PubMed

    John-Matthews, J St; Wallace, M J; Robinson, L

    2017-09-01

    To describe and review the Delphi technique as a tool for radiographers engaged in mixed-methods research whereby agreement is required on the proficiencies needed by educational programmes for pre- and post- registration radiographers. This is achieved through a description offering a brief history of the technique. Through a literature search, radiography education research using this technique is identified. A protocol for a research project using the technique is presented. Using this worked example, advantages and disadvantages of the method are explored including sampling of participants, sample size, number of rounds and methods of feedback. There are limited examples of the use of the Delphi technique in radiography literature including considerations on how to select experts and panel size. The Delphi technique is a suitable method for establishing collective agreement in the design of radiography educational interventions. Additional research is needed to deepen this evidence-based knowledge. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Development of a Logging Tool for Muon Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suenaga, H.; Kiho, K.; Miyakawa, K.; Tanaka, H.

    2012-04-01

    A research for high level radioactive waste disposal should investigate geological structure and saturation change of rock mass around a disposal cavern. In the CO2 geological storage and the underground storage of crude oil, natural gas or liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), it is necessary to monitor an upward migration of a gaseous fluid which is stored in underground. For an investigation of slope stability, it is effective to evaluate a high saturation area in the ground's pore space as the area should be the same as that of a rainfall infiltration. Since these phenomena could be evaluated by a measurement of a density variation in underground rock, an application of muon radiography is highly prospective. The Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) has a plan to conduct a field experiment to evaluate an applicability of the muon radiography to engineering geology in cooperation with Electric Power Development Co., Ltd. (J-POWER). The field experiment will be performed this year in slope topography. If the applicability will be revealed as a result of the field experiment, CRIEPI will start a research on development of a logging tool which can measure muon in a borehole. We plan to build a prototype of the logging tool in around three years and will put it into practical use in around five years.

  12. Toward practical 3D radiography of pipeline girth welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wassink, Casper; Hol, Martijn; Flikweert, Arjan; van Meer, Philip

    2015-03-01

    Digital radiography has made its way into in-the-field girth weld testing. With recent generations of detectors and x-ray tubes it is possible to reach the image quality desired in standards as well as the speed of inspection desired to be competitive with film radiography and automated ultrasonic testing. This paper will show the application of these technologies in the RTD Rayscan system. The method for achieving an image quality that complies with or even exceeds prevailing industrial standards will be presented, as well as the application on pipeline girth welds with CRA layers. A next step in development will be to also achieve a measurement of weld flaw height to allow for performing an Engineering Critical Assessment on the weld. This will allow for similar acceptance limits as currently used with Automated Ultrasonic Testing of pipeline girth welds. Although a sufficient sizing accuracy was already demonstrated and qualified in the TomoCAR system, testing in some applications is restricted to time limits. The paper will present some experiments that were performed to achieve flaw height approximation within these time limits.

  13. Toward practical 3D radiography of pipeline girth welds

    SciTech Connect

    Wassink, Casper

    2015-03-31

    Digital radiography has made its way into in-the-field girth weld testing. With recent generations of detectors and x-ray tubes it is possible to reach the image quality desired in standards as well as the speed of inspection desired to be competitive with film radiography and automated ultrasonic testing. This paper will show the application of these technologies in the RTD Rayscan system. The method for achieving an image quality that complies with or even exceeds prevailing industrial standards will be presented, as well as the application on pipeline girth welds with CRA layers. A next step in development will be to also achieve a measurement of weld flaw height to allow for performing an Engineering Critical Assessment on the weld. This will allow for similar acceptance limits as currently used with Automated Ultrasonic Testing of pipeline girth welds. Although a sufficient sizing accuracy was already demonstrated and qualified in the TomoCAR system, testing in some applications is restricted to time limits. The paper will present some experiments that were performed to achieve flaw height approximation within these time limits.

  14. DETECTION OF LACK OF FUSION WELD DEFECTS BY RADIOGRAPHY

    SciTech Connect

    Souza, M. P.; Almeida, R. M.; Rebello, J. M. A.

    2009-03-03

    In this work, radiography was employed as the NDT technique for detection of flaws in circumferential girth welds of steel pipelines used in offshore installations in the petroleum industry. The kind of defect specifically focused was lack of fusion. It is currently accepted in the literature that radiography is not as sensitive as ultrasonics to detect lack of fusion defects. Unfortunately, the radiographic inspection can barely detect lack of fusion and only when it is associated to inclusions and voids of considerable size. However, in a previous article ('Reliability of radiographic inspection of steel pipeline girth welds', QNDE Conference, 2007), the authors showed that it is possible to detect lack of fusion defects if, in the radiographic tests, the angle of incidence is the same angle that the weld bevel makes with the test piece surface, which means lowering the angle of disorientation between the flaw and the radiographic beam. However, no concerns were made to sizing the defects. Computational simulation was used with XRSIM software to establish the optimal radiographic parameters to reach the lower limit for detection for this kind of defect.

  15. Digital radiography: a survey of pediatric dentists.

    PubMed

    Russo, Julie M; Russo, James A; Guelmann, Marcio

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to: (1) determine the popularity of digital radiography among members of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD); and (2) report the most common systems in use. An AAPD-approved, voluntary, and anonymous electronic survey was developed and sent to 923 board certified pediatric dentists. Years in practice and in-office x-ray technology (digital or conventional) were inquired about initially. If negative for the use of digital radiography, future consideration for converting to digital radiography was ascertained. For positive responses, more in-depth information was requested. Information on type of system (sensor or phosphor plate), user friendliness, diagnostic ability, patient's comfort, general costs, durability, and parental and overall satisfaction was collected. For most of the questions, a 5-point assessment scale was used. Opportunity for additional comments was provided upon survey completion. Data was analyzed using descriptive statistics. A 32% (296/923) response rate was obtained. Twenty-six percent of practitioners (78/296) implemented digital radiography in their practices, whereas 71% considered future acquisition. Similar distribution for sensor and phosphor plate users was found. Sensor technology was reported to produce faster images, but was less tolerable by young children due to size and thickness. Phosphor plates were considered more children friendly, less expensive, and less durable. Parental satisfaction was very high with great marketing value. Picture quality was comparable to conventional film. Overall, digital radiography users would recommend it to other pediatric dentists. Digital radiography is not yet popular among pediatric dentists. Cost reduction and technology advancement may enhance utilization.

  16. The current status of panoramic radiography.

    PubMed

    Hirschmann, P N

    1987-03-01

    The current status of dental panoramic tomography (rotational panoramic radiography) is reviewed. This technique is based on a combination of tomography and slit-beam radiography to provide an image of both jaws on a single film. There is a greater degree of image degradation when compared with conventional radiographic techniques due to tomographic blurring, magnification and distortion, secondary images and burn-out. Meticulous patient position is essential to accommodate their jaws to the image layer determined by the manufacturers. The absorbed doses from panoramic radiography are of a similar order to that from bitewing radiography and lower than those from a full-mouth periapical series. The individual risk of 1.3 X 10(-6) is compared with that from other radiographic examinations and smoking. The collective risk, 1.04 deaths in the UK in 1981, is relatively insignificant as is the genetic dose. The risk to the dentist and his staff is also low compared to other risks. The methods of dose limitation currently available are reviewed. The clinical indications are considered in relation to the guidelines of the American Dental Association and the Dental Estimates Board in the UK. The problems associated with attempts to measure diagnostic yield are considered. In view of the world-wide public concern at the potential dangers of ionising radiation, dentists are urged to maximize the diagnostic yield from their panoramic radiography by taking such radiographs only when clinically necessary, ensuring meticulous positioning and processing, followed by scrupulous assessment of the radiography for any sign of pathological change.

  17. Statistical uncertainty in quantitative neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piegsa, Florian M.; Kaestner, Anders; Antognini, Aldo; Eggenberger, Andreas; Kirch, Klaus; Wichmann, Gunther

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrate a novel procedure to calibrate neutron detection systems commonly used in standard neutron radiography. This calibration allows determining the uncertainties due to Poisson-like neutron counting statistics for each individual pixel of a radiographic image. The obtained statistical errors are necessary in order to perform a correct quantitative analysis. This fast and convenient method is applied to data measured at the cold neutron radiography facility ICON at the Paul Scherrer Institute. Moreover, from the results the effective neutron flux at the beam line is determined.

  18. Proton Radiography: Its uses and Resolution Scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Mariam, Fesseha G.

    2012-08-09

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has used high energy protons as a probe in flash radiography for over a decade. In this time the proton radiography project has used 800 MeV protons, provided by the LANSCE accelerator facility at LANL, to diagnose over five-hundred dynamic experiments in support of stockpile stewardship programs as well as basic materials science. Through this effort significant experience has been gained in using charged particles as direct radiographic probes to diagnose transient systems. The results of this experience will be discussed through the presentation of data from experiments recently performed at the LANL pRad.

  19. Mobile waste inspection real time radiography system

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, J.; Taggart, D.; Betts, S.; Rael, C.; Martinez, F.; Mendez, J.

    1995-10-01

    The 450-KeV Mobile Real Time Radiography System was designed and purchased to inspect containers of radioactive waste produced at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The Mobile Real Time Radiography System has the capability of inspecting waste containers of various sizes from 5-gal. buckets to standard waste boxes (SWB, dimensions 54.5 in. x 71 in. x 37 in.). The fact that this unit is mobile makes it an attractive alternative to the costly road closures associated with moving waste from the waste generator to storage or disposal facilities.

  20. New developments in proton radiography at LANSCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Christopher; Proton Radiography Team

    2014-09-01

    In a new application of nuclear physics, a facility for using proton for flash radiography has been developed at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Protons have proven far superior to high energy x-rays for flash radiography. Although this facility is primarily used for studying very fast phenomena such as high explosive driven experiments, it is finding increasing application to other fields, such as tomography of static objects, phase changes in materials, and the dynamics of chemical reactions. The advantages of protons will be discussed and data from some of the recent experiments will be presented.

  1. Californium-252: A New Isotopic Source for Neutron Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Reinig, W.C.

    2001-08-29

    This report discusses a new isotopic source for neutron radiography, Californium-252. Nuclear reactors are the usual source of neutrons for radiography, primarily because of their intense neutron beams. If neutron radiography is to have widespread use, intense transportable neutron sources are required that can be used in plants, in laboratories and in the field.

  2. Digital radiography. A comparison with modern conventional imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, G J

    2006-01-01

    The development of computed radiography over the past two decades has transformed radiological imaging. The radiology departments in the 21st century will look very different from those in the preceding period. In this review, the development of digital radiography is presented with a description of its various forms and a comparison with screen film radiography. PMID:16822918

  3. The Image Gently pediatric digital radiography safety checklist: tools for improving pediatric radiography.

    PubMed

    John, Susan D; Moore, Quentin T; Herrmann, Tracy; Don, Steven; Powers, Kevin; Smith, Susan N; Morrison, Greg; Charkot, Ellen; Mills, Thalia T; Rutz, Lois; Goske, Marilyn J

    2013-10-01

    Transition from film-screen to digital radiography requires changes in radiographic technique and workflow processes to ensure that the minimum radiation exposure is used while maintaining diagnostic image quality. Checklists have been demonstrated to be useful tools for decreasing errors and improving safety in several areas, including commercial aviation and surgical procedures. The Image Gently campaign, through a competitive grant from the FDA, developed a checklist for technologists to use during the performance of digital radiography in pediatric patients. The checklist outlines the critical steps in digital radiography workflow, with an emphasis on steps that affect radiation exposure and image quality. The checklist and its accompanying implementation manual and practice quality improvement project are open source and downloadable at www.imagegently.org. The authors describe the process of developing and testing the checklist and offer suggestions for using the checklist to minimize radiation exposure to children during radiography. Copyright © 2013 American College of Radiology. All rights reserved.

  4. Technique and interpretation in tree seed radiography

    Treesearch

    Howard B. Kriebel

    1966-01-01

    The study of internal seed structure by radiography requires techniques which will give good definition. To establish the best procedures, we conducted a series of experiments in which we manipulated the principal controllable variables affecting the quality of X-radiographs: namely, focus-to-film distance, film speed (grain), exposure time, kilovoltage, and...

  5. Satisfaction of Search in Chest Radiography 2015.

    PubMed

    Berbaum, Kevin S; Krupinski, Elizabeth A; Schartz, Kevin M; Caldwell, Robert T; Madsen, Mark T; Hur, Seung; Laroia, Archana T; Thompson, Brad H; Mullan, Brian F; Franken, Edmund A

    2015-11-01

    Two decades have passed since the publication of laboratory studies of satisfaction of search (SOS) in chest radiography. Those studies were performed using film. The current investigation tests for SOS effects in computed radiography of the chest. Sixty-four chest computed radiographs half demonstrating various "test" abnormalities were read twice by 20 radiologists, once with and once without the addition of a simulated pulmonary nodule. Receiver-operating characteristic detection accuracy and decision thresholds were analyzed to study the effects of adding the nodule on detecting the test abnormalities. Results of previous studies were reanalyzed using similar modern techniques. In the present study, adding nodules did not influence detection accuracy for the other abnormalities (P = .93), but did induce a reluctance to report them (P < .001). Adding nodules did not affect inspection time (P = .58) so the reluctance to report was not associated with reduced search. Reanalysis revealed a similar decision threshold shift that had not been recognized in the early studies of SOS in chest radiography (P < .01) in addition to reduced detection accuracy (P < .01). The nature of SOS in chest radiography has changed, but it is not clear why. SOS may be changing as a function of changes in radiology education and practice. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Feline dental radiography and radiology: A primer.

    PubMed

    Niemiec, Brook A

    2014-11-01

    Information crucial to the diagnosis and treatment of feline oral diseases can be ascertained using dental radiography and the inclusion of this technology has been shown to be the best way to improve a dental practice. Becoming familar with the techniques required for dental radiology and radiography can, therefore, be greatly beneficial. Novices to dental radiography may need some time to adjust and become comfortable with the techniques. If using dental radiographic film, the generally recommended 'E' or 'F' speeds may be frustrating at first, due to their more specific exposure and image development requirements. Although interpreting dental radiographs is similar to interpreting a standard bony radiograph, there are pathologic states that are unique to the oral cavity and several normal anatomic structures that may mimic pathologic changes. Determining which teeth have been imaged also requires a firm knowledge of oral anatomy as well as the architecture of dental films/digital systems. This article draws on a range of dental radiography and radiology resources, and the benefit of the author's own experience, to review the basics of taking and interpreting intraoral dental radiographs. A simplified method for positioning the tubehead is explained and classic examples of some common oral pathologies are provided. © ISFM and AAFP 2014.

  7. Film radiography -- The lone star of quality

    SciTech Connect

    Kochakian, R.

    1995-12-31

    In this year of 1995, 100 years of x-ray photography are being celebrated. The reason film radiography is still the number one NDT technique is because of its quality. In this paper the author discusses: (1) fundamentals of image quality and (2) status of new draft ASRM film system classification standard.

  8. Radiography Student Participation in Professional Organizations.

    PubMed

    Michael, Kimberly; Tran, Xuan; Keller, Shelby; Sayles, Harlan; Custer, Tanya

    2017-09-01

    To gather data on educational program requirements for student membership in a state or national professional society, organization, or association. A 10-question online survey about student involvement in professional societies was emailed to 616 directors of Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT)-accredited radiography programs. A total of 219 responses were received, for a 36% response rate. Of these, 89 respondents (41%) answered that their programs require students to join a professional organization. The society respondents most often required (70%) was a state radiography society. Sixty respondents (68%) answered that students join a society at the beginning of the radiography program (from matriculation to 3 months in). Of programs requiring student membership in professional societies, 42 (49%) reported that their students attend the state or national society annual conference; however, participation in activities at the conferences and in the society throughout the year is lower than conference attendance. Some directors stated that although their programs' policies do not allow membership mandates, they encourage students to become members, primarily so that they can access webinars and other educational materials or information related to the profession. Survey data showed that most JRCERT-accredited radiography programs support but do not require student membership in professional organizations. The data reveal that more programs have added those requirements in recent years. Increased student participation could be realized if programs mandated membership and supported it financially. ©2017 American Society of Radiologic Technologists.

  9. Low-voltage radiography on aircraft composite doublers

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, D.G.; Murray, J.D.

    1997-11-01

    Composite doublers are gaining popularity for their ability to repair and reinforce commercial aircraft structures and it is anticipated that the potential cost savings may spur wider use of this technology. But before composite doublers can be accepted by the civil aviation industry, inspection techniques must be developed to verify the integrity of the doubler and the parent material under the doubler. The Federal Aviation Administration Airworthiness Assurance NDI Validation Center (AANC) is currently developing test methods to inspect aircraft structures under composite doublers using low kilovoltage radiography. This paper documents the radiographic techniques developed by the AANC which have been found to give the best contrast of the radiographic image with reduced image distortion.

  10. Comparison of computed radiography and conventional radiography in detection of small volume pneumoperitoneum.

    PubMed

    Marolf, Angela; Blaik, Margaret; Ackerman, Norman; Watson, Elizabeth; Gibson, Nicole; Thompson, Margret

    2008-01-01

    The role of digital imaging is increasing as these systems are becoming more affordable and accessible. Advantages of computed radiography compared with conventional film/screen combinations include improved contrast resolution and postprocessing capabilities. Computed radiography's spatial resolution is inferior to conventional radiography; however, this limitation is considered clinically insignificant. This study prospectively compared digital imaging and conventional radiography in detecting small volume pneumoperitoneum. Twenty cadaver dogs (15-30 kg) were injected with 0.25, 0.25, and 0.5 ml for 1 ml total of air intra-abdominally, and radiographed sequentially using computed and conventional radiographic technologies. Three radiologists independently evaluated the images, and receiver operating curve (ROC) analysis compared the two imaging modalities. There was no statistical difference between computed and conventional radiography in detecting free abdominal air, but overall computed radiography was relatively more sensitive based on ROC analysis. Computed radiographic images consistently and significantly demonstrated a minimal amount of 0.5 ml of free air based on ROC analysis. However, no minimal air amount was consistently or significantly detected with conventional film. Readers were more likely to detect free air on lateral computed images than the other projections, with no significant increased sensitivity between film/screen projections. Further studies are indicated to determine the differences or lack thereof between various digital imaging systems and conventional film/screen systems.

  11. Dynamic radiography using a carbon-nanotube-based field-emission x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Y.; Zhang, J.; Lee, Y.Z.; Gao, B.; Dike, S.; Lin, W.; Lu, J.P.; Zhou, O.

    2004-10-01

    We report a dynamic radiography system with a carbon nanotube based field-emission microfocus x-ray source. The system can readily generate x-ray radiation with continuous variation of temporal resolution as short as nanoseconds. Its potential applications for dynamic x-ray imaging are demonstrated. The performance characteristics of this compact and versatile system are promising for noninvasive imaging in biomedical research and industrial inspection.

  12. Monte Carlo Simulation for Designing Collimator of the Neutron Radiography Facility in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamro, Rafhayudi; Kardjilov, Nikolay; HairieRabir, Mohamad; Zain, Mohamed Rawi Mohd; Mohamed, Abdul Aziz; Ali, NurSazwani Mohd; Idris, Faridah; Ahmad, Megat Harun Al Rashid Megat; Yazid, Khairiah; Yazid, Hafizal; Azman, Azraf; Mamat, Mohd Rizal

    Neutron collimator is the most important component in a neutron radiography facility set-up, which defines the neutron beam characteristic at the object plane. The neutron radiography facility in Malaysia was built at one of the radial beam ports of TRIGA MARK II PUSPATI research reactor (RTP). At present, the facility has low thermal neutron intensity at the sample position, which leads to long irradiation times; it gives many limitations for the industrial applications. The collimator used for this facility is based on step divergent collimator type. The aim of this research is to design the best geometry and to choose materials for thermal neutron collimator so as to obtain a uniform beam, high L/D ratio and a maximum thermal neutron flux at the object plane. In order to achieve this aim new collimator geometry has been designed to improve the existing radiography facility by using Monte-Carlo simulation codes of SIMRES and MCNPX. The new design results are compared with those of the existing facility. Our simulation result may be of help in the design of new collimator for neutron radiography facility.

  13. MRI versus radiography of acromioclavicular joint dislocation.

    PubMed

    Nemec, Ursula; Oberleitner, Gerhard; Nemec, Stefan F; Gruber, Michael; Weber, Michael; Czerny, Christian; Krestan, Christian R

    2011-10-01

    Acromioclavicular joint injuries are usually diagnosed by clinical and radiographic assessment with the Rockwood classification, which is crucial for treatment planning. In view of the implementation of MRI for visualization of the acromioclavicular joint, the purpose of this study was to describe the MRI findings of acromioclavicular joint dislocation in comparison with the radiographic findings. Forty-four patients with suspected unilateral acromioclavicular joint dislocation after acute trauma were enrolled in this prospective study. All patients underwent digital radiography and 1-T MRI with a surface phased-array coil. MRI included coronal proton density-weighted turbo spin-echo and coronal 3D T1-weighted fast field-echo water-selective sequences. The Rockwood classification was used to assess acromioclavicular joint injuries at radiography and MRI. An adapted Rockwood classification was used for MRI evaluation of the acromioclavicular joint ligaments. The classifications of acromioclavicular joint dislocations diagnosed with radiography and MRI were compared. Among 44 patients with Rockwood type I-IV injuries on radiographs, classification on radiographs and MR images was concordant in 23 (52.2%) patients. At MRI, the injury was reclassified to a less severe type in 16 (36.4%) patients and to a more severe type in five (11.4%) patients. Compared with the findings according to the original Rockwood system, with the adapted system that included MRI findings, additional ligamentous lesions were found in 11 (25%) patients. In a considerable number of patients, the MRI findings change the Rockwood type determined with radiography. In addition to clinical assessment and radiography, MRI may yield important findings on ligaments that may influence management.

  14. Shortened processing time technique for color industrial radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapinski, N. P.

    1969-01-01

    Improved processing method reduces time required to generate a color radiograph. Prior to, or after exposure to penetrating radiation, the emulsion side of the film is flashed to a colored light which produces the hue changes in the processed radiograph. Agitation of the film during processing assures uniformity of results.

  15. Dental radiography in New Zealand: digital versus film.

    PubMed

    Ting, N A; Broadbent, J M; Duncan, W J

    2013-09-01

    Digital x-ray systems offer advantages over conventional film systems, yet many dentists have not adopted digital technology. To assess New Zealand dental practitioners' use of--and preferences for--dental radiography systems. Cross-sectional survey. General and specialist dental practice. Postal questionnaire survey of a sample of 770 dentists (520 randomly selected general dental practitioners and all 250 specialists) listed in the 2012 NZ Dental Council Register. Type of radiography systems used by dentists. Dentists' experiences and opinions of conventional film and digital radiography. The participation rate was 55.2%. Digital radiography systems were used by 58.0% of participating dentists, most commonly among those aged 31-40 years. Users of digital radiography tended to report greater satisfaction with their radiography systems than users conventional films. Two-thirds of film users were interested in switching to digital radiography in the near future. Reasons given by conventional film users for not using digital radiography included cost, difficulty in integrating with other software systems, concern about potential technical errors, and the size and nature of the intra-oral sensors. Many dental practitioners have still not adopted digital radiography, yet its users are more satisfied with their radiography systems than are conventional film users. The latter may find changing to a digital system to be satisfying and rewarding.

  16. Doses to critical organs from dental radiography.

    PubMed

    Antoku, S; Kihara, T; Russell, W J; Beach, D R

    1976-02-01

    Participants in the jointly sponsored Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission and Japanese National Institute of Health (ABCC-JNIH) Adult Health Study, a fixed-population sample under continual observation for late effects of the atomic bombs, are also being evaluated for their exposure to other sources of ionizing radiation. In the present study, the subjects' thyroid, lens, pituitary, bone marrow, and gonadal doses acquired during dental radiography were estimated from dosimetry of simulated human material exposed according to technical factors as ascertained in previously reported surveys of patients, dental clinics and hospitals, and dosimetry with phantom human material containing lithium fluoride thermoluminescence dosimeters and ionization chambers. Dental radiography comprised a relatively small segment of the contaminating sources of ionizing radiation exposure among this population sample. Efforts should be made to improve exposure conditions, especially in view of the increasing frequency of dental x-ray examinations.

  17. Radiography Students' Learning: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Holmström, Anneli; Ahonen, Sanna-Mari

    2016-01-01

    To describe research methodology and findings concerning radiography students' learning. Health sciences databases were searched to perform a traditional narrative literature review. Thirty-five peer-reviewed articles published between 2000 and 2014 were analyzed using thematic analysis. Specific methods of learning were found to be of the most interest. The studies focused primarily on the use and usability of a method or the students' general experiences of it. The most commonly studied methods were e-learning and interprofessional learning, which students perceived as positive methods for theoretical studies and clinical training. Students' learning regarding research was the focus of only one article reporting a wide variety of students' research interests. Most studies reported quantitative research gathered from questionnaires and surveys. Additional research, especially from a qualitative point of view, is needed to deepen the evidence-based knowledge of radiography student learning.

  18. Monte Carlo calculation for microplanar beam radiography.

    PubMed

    Company, F Z; Allen, B J; Mino, C

    2000-09-01

    In radiography the scattered radiation from the off-target region decreases the contrast of the target image. We propose that a bundle of collimated, closely spaced, microplanar beams can reduce the scattered radiation and eliminate the effect of secondary electron dose, thus increasing the image dose contrast in the detector. The lateral and depth dose distributions of 20-200 keV microplanar beams are investigated using the EGS4 Monte Carlo code to calculate the depth doses and dose profiles in a 6 cm x 6 cm x 6 cm tissue phantom. The maximum dose on the primary beam axis (peak) and the minimum inter-beam scattered dose (valley) are compared at different photon energies and the optimum energy range for microbeam radiography is found. Results show that a bundle of closely spaced microplanar beams can give superior contrast imaging to a single macrobeam of the same overall area.

  19. Contrast enhancement in microplanar beam radiography.

    PubMed

    Company, F Z; Allen, B J; Mino, C

    1999-12-01

    In x-ray radiography, the target produces a useful shadow from absorption of the primary beam, while the scattered radiation into the off-target region decreases the contrast of the target image. A bundle of closely spaced microplanar beams can reduce the scattered radiation and give superior image contrast compared with a single macrobeam of the same dimensions. To further reduce the scattered radiation and increase the image contrast, we place an air gap between the tissue phantom and the detector. The primary and scattered photon flux of a single microplanar beam is measured as a function of thickness inside the phantom and in the air gap. Results show that a bundle of closely spaced, microplanar beams increase the image contrast by 22% and a 2 cm air gap decreases the scattered photon flux by about half, improving the contrast by an additional 16%. Thus an overall improvement of 41% in contrast can be achieved with microplanar beam radiography.

  20. A system for fast neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Klann, R.T.

    1996-05-01

    A system has been designed and a neutron generator installed to perform fast neutron radiography. With this sytem, objects as small as a coin or as large as a waste drum can be radiographed. The neutron source is an MF Physics A-711 neutron generator which produces 3x10{sup 10} neutrons/second with an average energy of 14.5 MeV. The radiography system uses x-ray scintillation screens and film in commercially available cassettes. The cassettes have been modified to include a thin sheet of plastic to convert neutrons to protons through elastic scattering from hydrogen and other low Z materials in the plastic. For film densities from 1.8 to 3.0, exposures range from 1.9x10{sup 7} to 3.8x10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2} depending on the type of screen and film.

  1. Industrial Analytics Corporation

    SciTech Connect

    Industrial Analytics Corporation

    2004-01-30

    The lost foam casting process is sensitive to the properties of the EPS patterns used for the casting operation. In this project Industrial Analytics Corporation (IAC) has developed a new low voltage x-ray instrument for x-ray radiography of very low mass EPS patterns. IAC has also developed a transmitted visible light method for characterizing the properties of EPS patterns. The systems developed are also applicable to other low density materials including graphite foams.

  2. Digital radiography: Present detectors and future developments

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Mendez, V.

    1990-08-01

    Present detectors for digital radiography are of two classes: real time detectors and storage (non real time) types. Present real time detectors consist of image intensifier tubes with an internal cesium iodide layer x-ray converter. Non real time detectors involve linear sweep arrays or storage detectors such as film. Future detectors discussed here can be of both types utilizing new technologies such as hydrogenated amorphous silicon photodiode arrays coupled to thin film transistor arrays. 17 refs., 10 figs.

  3. Progress in thermal neutron radiography at LENS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Jack; Low Energy Neutron Source (LENS) at Indiana University Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    An end station for thermal neutron radiography and tomography is in operation at the Indiana University LENS facility. Neutrons from proton-induced nuclear reactions in Beryllium are moderated and collimated into a beam which is attenuated by a scanned object on a remotely-controlled rotating table. Neutron signal is then converted to a light signal with a ZnS scintillating screen and recorded in a cooled CCD. The author has performed diagnostics on the radiography hardware and software and has tested the system's capabilities by imaging a stack of high density polyethylene cubes with diverse inlet holes and grooves on an 80/20 aluminum base. The resolution of the radiographs are seen to be less than 1mm and 3D rending software is capable of reconstructing the internal structure of the aluminum. An end station for thermal neutron radiography and tomography is in operation at the Indiana University LENS facility. Neutrons from proton-induced nuclear reactions in Beryllium are moderated and collimated into a beam which is attenuated by a scanned object on a remotely-controlled rotating table. Neutron signal is then converted to a light signal with a ZnS scintillating screen and recorded in a cooled CCD. The author has performed diagnostics on the radiography hardware and software and has tested the system's capabilities by imaging a stack of high density polyethylene cubes with diverse inlet holes and grooves on an 80/20 aluminum base. The resolution of the radiographs are seen to be less than 1mm and 3D rending software is capable of reconstructing the internal structure of the aluminum. NSF.

  4. Digital radiography: image quality and radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Seibert, J Anthony

    2008-11-01

    Digital radiography devices, rapidly replacing analog screen-film detectors, are now common in diagnostic radiological imaging, where implementation has been accelerated by the commodity status of electronic imaging and display systems. The shift from narrow latitude, fixed-speed screen-film detectors to wide latitude, variable-speed digital detectors has created a flexible imaging system that can easily result in overexposures to the patient without the knowledge of the operator, thus potentially increasing the radiation burden of the patient population from radiographic examinations. In addition, image processing can be inappropriately applied causing inconsistent or artifactual appearance of anatomy, which can lead to misdiagnosis. On the other hand, many advantages can be obtained from the variable-speed digital detector, such as an ability to lower dose in many examinations, image post-processing for disease-specific conditions, display flexibility to change the appearance of the image and aid the physician in making a differential diagnosis, and easy access to digital images. An understanding of digital radiography is necessary to minimize the possibility of overexposures and inconsistent results, and to achieve the principle of as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) for the safe and effective care of all patients. Thus many issues must be considered for optimal implementation of digital radiography, as reviewed in this article.

  5. Dual energy scanning beam X-radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojcik, Randolph Frank

    Dual energy X-radiography is a method first developed in the mid-1970's by which one uses the information contained in the energy spectrum of the transmitted X-ray flux through an object. With this information one can distinguish the types of materials present in a radiograph and thus allow a computer to subtract them from the image enhancing the contrast of the remaining materials. Using this method, one can see details, which would have been hidden by overlying structures of other materials such as seen in radiographs of parts, made up of mixtures of metals and composites. There is also great interest in this technique for medical imaging of the chest where images of the organs are significantly improved by subtracting the bones. However, even with the enhanced capabilities realized with this technique, the majority of X-radiography systems only measures the bulk transmitted X-ray intensity and ignores the information contained in the energy spectrum. This is due to the added expense, time requirements, and registration problems incurred using standard radiographic methods to obtain dual energy radiographs. This dissertation describes a novel method which overcomes these problems and allows one to perform inexpensive, near real time, single shot dual energy X-radiography. The work of this thesis resulted in US patent #5,742,660.

  6. Proton Radiography Peers into Metal Solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Amy J.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; Cooley, Jason C.; Morris, Christopher; Merrill, Frank E.; Hollander, Brian J.; Mariam, Fesseha G.; Ott, Thomas J.; Barker, Martha R.; Tucker, Tim J.; Lee, Wah-Keat; Fezzaa, Kamel; Deriy, Alex; Patterson, Brian M.; Clarke, Kester D.; Montalvo, Joel D.; Field, Robert D.; Thoma, Dan J.; Smith, James L.; Teter, David F.

    2013-06-19

    Historically, metals are cut up and polished to see the structure and to infer how processing influences the evolution. We can now peer into a metal during processing without destroying it using proton radiography. Understanding the link between processing and structure is important because structure profoundly affects the properties of engineering materials. Synchrotron x-ray radiography has enabled real-time glimpses into metal solidification. However, x-ray energies favor the examination of small volumes and low density metals. In this study, we use high energy proton radiography for the first time to image a large metal volume (>10,000 mm3) during melting and solidification. We also show complementary x-ray results from a small volume (<1mm3), bridging four orders of magnitude. In conclusion, real-time imaging will enable efficient process development and the control of the structure evolution to make materials with intended properties; it will also permit the development of experimentally informed, predictive structure and process models.

  7. Proton Radiography Peers into Metal Solidification

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Amy; Imhoff, Seth; Gibbs, Paul; Cooley, Jason; Morris, Christopher; Merrill, Frank; Hollander, Brian; Mariam, Fesseha; Ott, Thomas; Barker, Martha; Tucker, Tim; Lee, Wah-Keat; Fezzaa, Kamel; Deriy, Alex; Patterson, Brian; Clarke, Kester; Montalvo, Joel; Field, Robert; Thoma, Dan; Smith, James; Teter, David

    2013-01-01

    Historically, metals are cut up and polished to see the structure and to infer how processing influences the evolution. We can now peer into a metal during processing without destroying it using proton radiography. Understanding the link between processing and structure is important because structure profoundly affects the properties of engineering materials. Synchrotron x-ray radiography has enabled real-time glimpses into metal solidification. However, x-ray energies favor the examination of small volumes and low density metals. Here we use high energy proton radiography for the first time to image a large metal volume (>10,000 mm3) during melting and solidification. We also show complementary x-ray results from a small volume (<1 mm3), bridging four orders of magnitude. Real-time imaging will enable efficient process development and the control of structure evolution to make materials with intended properties; it will also permit the development of experimentally informed, predictive structure and process models. PMID:23779063

  8. Newer imaging methods in chest radiography.

    PubMed

    Wandtke, J C

    1990-01-01

    In recent years the application of computers to chest radiography has resulted in a wide variety of innovative research. Major research efforts have resulted in the development of new types of x-ray detectors, such as storage phosphor technology, for use with computers. Storage phosphor imaging is one of the most promising new techniques, and almost 100 systems have been installed worldwide. Radiologists are quickly evaluating the image quality provided by this new detector system, which has the potential to improve image quality. It has wide latitude and is coupled with a computer to perform image processing. Another promising technology, originally studied in the form of scan equalization radiography, is now commercially available in the form of advanced multiple-beam equalization radiography. This film technique uses computers to modulate the x-ray exposure to take maximum advantage of the imaging capabilities of radiographic film. Digital solid-state detectors have been studied in conjunction with computerized image enhancement systems. These currently show improvement in nodule detection and quantification of the calcium content of a lesion. Application of large image intensifiers to a digital image system is being studied, but there are currently limitations on spatial resolution.

  9. Proton Radiography Peers into Metal Solidification

    DOE PAGES

    Clarke, Amy J.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; ...

    2013-06-19

    Historically, metals are cut up and polished to see the structure and to infer how processing influences the evolution. We can now peer into a metal during processing without destroying it using proton radiography. Understanding the link between processing and structure is important because structure profoundly affects the properties of engineering materials. Synchrotron x-ray radiography has enabled real-time glimpses into metal solidification. However, x-ray energies favor the examination of small volumes and low density metals. In this study, we use high energy proton radiography for the first time to image a large metal volume (>10,000 mm3) during melting and solidification.more » We also show complementary x-ray results from a small volume (<1mm3), bridging four orders of magnitude. In conclusion, real-time imaging will enable efficient process development and the control of the structure evolution to make materials with intended properties; it will also permit the development of experimentally informed, predictive structure and process models.« less

  10. Impact of digital radiography on clinical workflow.

    PubMed

    May, G A; Deer, D D; Dackiewicz, D

    2000-05-01

    It is commonly accepted that digital radiography (DR) improves workflow and patient throughput compared with traditional film radiography or computed radiography (CR). DR eliminates the film development step and the time to acquire the image from a CR reader. In addition, the wide dynamic range of DR is such that the technologist can perform the quality-control (QC) step directly at the modality in a few seconds, rather than having to transport the newly acquired image to a centralized QC station for review. Furthermore, additional workflow efficiencies can be achieved with DR by employing tight radiology information system (RIS) integration. In the DR imaging environment, this provides for patient demographic information to be automatically downloaded from the RIS to populate the DR Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) image header. To learn more about this workflow efficiency improvement, we performed a comparative study of workflow steps under three different conditions: traditional film/screen x-ray, DR without RIS integration (ie, manual entry of patient demographics), and DR with RIS integration. This study was performed at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation (Cleveland, OH) using a newly acquired amorphous silicon flat-panel DR system from Canon Medical Systems (Irvine, CA). Our data show that DR without RIS results in substantial workflow savings over traditional film/screen practice. There is an additional 30% reduction in total examination time using DR with RIS integration.

  11. Emergency skull radiography: the effect of restrictive criteria on skull radiography and CT use

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, S.R.; Gaylord, G.M.; Lantos, G.; Tabaddor, K.; Gallagher, E.J.

    1985-08-01

    A prospective study was performed to determine the effect of restrictive criteria on the use of emergency skull radiography and computed tomography (CT) of the head. Emergency skull radiography required the completion of a special requisition form. Emergency CT of the head was done at the request of senior consultants and was available on a full-time basis. Over 1 year, 2758 skull studies were performed, a decrease of 39.1% when compared with the year before restrictive criteria were instituted, during which 4587 skull examinations were done. In the same period, the number of emergency CT scans of the head increased by 45.7%, from 471 in the control year to 686 in the experimental year. With the use of restrictive criteria, a net savings of $164,000 was achieved. Our results suggest that the use of restrictive criteria is a cost-effective means of limiting skull radiography when CT of the head is readily available.

  12. First experimental research in low energy proton radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Tao; Yang, Guo-Jun; Li, Yi-Ding; Long, Ji-Dong; He, Xiao-Zhong; Zhang, Xiao-Ding; Jiang, Xiao-Guo; Ma, Chao-Fan; Zhao, Liang-Chao; Yang, Xing-Lin; Zhang, Zhuo; Wang, Yuan; Pang, Jian; Li, Hong; Li, Wei-Feng; Zhou, Fu-Xin; Shi, Jin-Shui; Zhang, Kai-Zhi; Li, Jin; Zhang, Lin-Wen; Deng, Jian-Jun

    2014-08-01

    Proton radiography is a new scatheless diagnostic tool providing a potential development direction for advanced hydrotesting. Recently a low energy proton radiography system has been developed at the Chinese Academy of Engineering Phyiscs (CAEP). This system has been designed to use an 11 MeV proton beam to radiograph thin static objects. This system consists of a proton cyclotron coupled to an imaging beamline, which is the first domestic beamline dedicated to proton radiography experiments. Via some demonstration experiments, the radiography system is confirmed to provide clear pictures with spatial resolution ~100 μm within 40 mm field-of-view.

  13. Digital Radiography Qualification of Tube Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carl, Chad

    2012-01-01

    The Orion Project will be directing Lockheed Martin to perform orbital arc welding on commodities metallic tubing as part of the Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle assembly and integration process in the Operations and Checkout High bay at Kennedy Space Center. The current method of nondestructive evaluation is utilizing traditional film based x-rays. Due to the high number of welds that are necessary to join the commodities tubing (approx 470), a more efficient and expeditious method of nondestructive evaluation is desired. Digital radiography will be qualified as part of a broader NNWG project scope.

  14. Learning Styles of Radiography Students during Clinical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, L. Patrice

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and describe the common learning styles of radiography students during clinical practice. Quantitative, descriptive research methodology identified the learning styles of radiography students. A single self-report questionnaire, developed to assess learning styles in clinical practice, was administered…

  15. Diagnostics of coated fuel particles by neutron and synchrotron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Momot, G. V.; Podurets, K. M.; Pogorelyi, D. K.; Somenkov, V. A.; Yakovenko, E. V.

    2011-12-15

    The nondestructive monitoring of coated fuel particles has been performed using contact neutron radiography and refraction radiography based on synchrotron radiation. It is shown that these methods supplement each other and have a high potential for determining the sizes, densities, and isotopic composition of the particle components.

  16. Balloon Kyphoplasty under Three-dimensional Radiography Guidance.

    PubMed

    Umebayashi, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Yu; Nakajima, Yasuhiro; Hara, Masahito

    2017-09-15

    Percutaneous balloon kyphoplasty (PBKP) is generally performed under two-dimensional (2D) radiography guidance (lateral- and anteroposterior (A-P) views) using C-arm fluoroscopy. However, 2D images taken by single-plane or bi-plane fluoroscopy cannot provide information regarding axial views, particularly the Z axis. Lack of information regarding the Z axis prevents the creation of three-dimensional (3D) images. Currently, there has been a progress in interventional X-ray systems, and they are capable of providing 3D radiographic images using a rotational angiography mode which is used to create 3D angiographies. In this report, we described the usefulness of 3D radiography guidance. Patients treated by PBKP was designed to evaluate the efficacy of 3D radiography guidance. These patients experienced osteoporotic vertebral fractures with severe pain. We retrospectively analyzed patients who underwent PBKP from February to December 2016. All patients had a single-level vertebral fracture and underwent surgery by 2D or 3D radiography guidance. We performed 16 patients in 3D radiography guidance, and 10 patients in traditional 2D radiography guidance. This 3D radiography guided PBKP increase the amount of the polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) injection compared with ordinary 2D method. As a result, postoperative vertebral height and alignment were significantly improved. Both groups have no complication. To confirm the final results and make PBKP more effective, 3D radiography guidance is feasible and safe for balloon kyphoplasty.

  17. Simulation of computed radiography with imaging plate detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Tisseur, D.; Costin, M.; Mathy, F.; Schumm, A.

    2014-02-18

    Computed radiography (CR) using phosphor imaging plate detectors is taking an increasing place in Radiography Testing. CR uses similar equipment as conventional radiography except that the classical X-ray film is replaced by a numerical detector, called image plate (IP), which is made of a photostimulable layer and which is read by a scanning device through photostimulated luminescence. Such digital radiography has already demonstrated important benefits in terms of exposure time, decrease of source energies and thus reduction of radioprotection area besides being a solution without effluents. This paper presents a model for the simulation of radiography with image plate detectors in CIVA together with examples of validation of the model. The study consists in a cross comparison between experimental and simulation results obtained on a step wedge with a classical X-ray tube. Results are proposed in particular with wire Image quality Indicator (IQI) and duplex IQI.

  18. Neutron Radiography of Irradiated Nuclear Fuel at Idaho National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craft, Aaron E.; Wachs, Daniel M.; Okuniewski, Maria A.; Chichester, David L.; Williams, Walter J.; Papaioannou, Glen C.; Smolinski, Andrew T.

    Neutron radiography of irradiated nuclear fuel provides more comprehensive information about the internal condition of irradiated nuclear fuel than any other non-destructive technique to date. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has multiple nuclear fuels research and development programs that routinely evaluate irradiated fuels using neutron radiography. The Neutron Radiography reactor (NRAD) sits beneath a shielded hot cell facility where neutron radiography and other evaluation techniques are performed on these highly radioactive objects. The NRAD currently uses the foil-film transfer technique for imaging fuel that is time consuming but provides high spatial resolution. This paper describes the NRAD and hot cell facilities, the current neutron radiography capabilities available at INL, planned upgrades to the neutron imaging systems, and new facilities being brought online at INL related to neutron imaging.

  19. Neutron radiography of irradiated nuclear fuel at Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Craft, Aaron E.; Wachs, Daniel M.; Okuniewski, Maria A.; Chichester, David L.; Williams, Walter J.; Papaioannou, Glen C.; Smolinski, Andrew T.

    2015-09-10

    Neutron radiography of irradiated nuclear fuel provides more comprehensive information about the internal condition of irradiated nuclear fuel than any other non-destructive technique to date. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has multiple nuclear fuels research and development programs that routinely evaluate irradiated fuels using neutron radiography. The Neutron Radiography reactor (NRAD) sits beneath a shielded hot cell facility where neutron radiography and other evaluation techniques are performed on these highly radioactive objects. The NRAD currently uses the foil-film transfer technique for imaging fuel that is time consuming but provides high spatial resolution. This study describes the NRAD and hot cell facilities, the current neutron radiography capabilities available at INL, planned upgrades to the neutron imaging systems, and new facilities being brought online at INL related to neutron imaging.

  20. Neutron radiography of irradiated nuclear fuel at Idaho National Laboratory

    DOE PAGES

    Craft, Aaron E.; Wachs, Daniel M.; Okuniewski, Maria A.; ...

    2015-09-10

    Neutron radiography of irradiated nuclear fuel provides more comprehensive information about the internal condition of irradiated nuclear fuel than any other non-destructive technique to date. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has multiple nuclear fuels research and development programs that routinely evaluate irradiated fuels using neutron radiography. The Neutron Radiography reactor (NRAD) sits beneath a shielded hot cell facility where neutron radiography and other evaluation techniques are performed on these highly radioactive objects. The NRAD currently uses the foil-film transfer technique for imaging fuel that is time consuming but provides high spatial resolution. This study describes the NRAD and hot cell facilities,more » the current neutron radiography capabilities available at INL, planned upgrades to the neutron imaging systems, and new facilities being brought online at INL related to neutron imaging.« less

  1. [The use of a thyroid collar for intraoral radiography].

    PubMed

    Schmidt, K; Velders, X L; van Ginkel, F C; van der Stelt, P F

    1998-06-01

    To determine whether a thyroid collar is a reasonable measure to reduce patient exposure from intraoral radiography (cost benefit analysis). In the thyroid gland of a Rando phantom dose measurements were carried out to determine the effect of a thyroid collar during intraoral radiography. Department of Oral Radiology at ACTA, Amsterdam. Dose measurements were carried out using LTDs. The average absorbed dose to the thyroid gland with and without thyroid collar from intraoral radiography was compared using an analysis of variance. For periapical radiographs the equivalent dose to the thyroid gland was significantly lower (p < 0.05) when a thyroid collar was used. For bitewing radiography there were no significant effects of the thyroid collar (p > 0.05). The cost benefit analysis showed that it takes more than 40 years before the benefits of a thyroid collar exceed the costs. Collective use of thyroid collars therefore does not seem to be a reasonable measure to optimize radiological protection during intraoral radiography.

  2. Neutron radiography of irradiated nuclear fuel at Idaho National Laboratory

    DOE PAGES

    Craft, Aaron E.; Wachs, Daniel M.; Okuniewski, Maria A.; ...

    2015-09-10

    Neutron radiography of irradiated nuclear fuel provides more comprehensive information about the internal condition of irradiated nuclear fuel than any other non-destructive technique to date. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has multiple nuclear fuels research and development programs that routinely evaluate irradiated fuels using neutron radiography. The Neutron Radiography reactor (NRAD) sits beneath a shielded hot cell facility where neutron radiography and other evaluation techniques are performed on these highly radioactive objects. The NRAD currently uses the foil-film transfer technique for imaging fuel that is time consuming but provides high spatial resolution. This study describes the NRAD and hot cell facilities,more » the current neutron radiography capabilities available at INL, planned upgrades to the neutron imaging systems, and new facilities being brought online at INL related to neutron imaging.« less

  3. Advances in digital radiography: physical principles and system overview.

    PubMed

    Körner, Markus; Weber, Christof H; Wirth, Stefan; Pfeifer, Klaus-Jürgen; Reiser, Maximilian F; Treitl, Marcus

    2007-01-01

    During the past two decades, digital radiography has supplanted screen-film radiography in many radiology departments. Today, manufacturers provide a variety of digital imaging solutions based on various detector and readout technologies. Digital detectors allow implementation of a fully digital picture archiving and communication system, in which images are stored digitally and are available anytime. Image distribution in hospitals can now be achieved electronically by means of web-based technology with no risk of losing images. Other advantages of digital radiography include higher patient throughput, increased dose efficiency, and the greater dynamic range of digital detectors with possible reduction of radiation exposure to the patient. The future of radiography will be digital, and it behooves radiologists to be familiar with the technical principles, image quality criteria, and radiation exposure issues associated with the various digital radiography systems that are currently available.

  4. Digital radiography image quality: image processing and display.

    PubMed

    Krupinski, Elizabeth A; Williams, Mark B; Andriole, Katherine; Strauss, Keith J; Applegate, Kimberly; Wyatt, Margaret; Bjork, Sandra; Seibert, J Anthony

    2007-06-01

    This article on digital radiography image processing and display is the second of two articles written as part of an intersociety effort to establish image quality standards for digital and computed radiography. The topic of the other paper is digital radiography image acquisition. The articles were developed collaboratively by the ACR, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, and the Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine. Increasingly, medical imaging and patient information are being managed using digital data during acquisition, transmission, storage, display, interpretation, and consultation. The management of data during each of these operations may have an impact on the quality of patient care. These articles describe what is known to improve image quality for digital and computed radiography and to make recommendations on optimal acquisition, processing, and display. The practice of digital radiography is a rapidly evolving technology that will require timely revision of any guidelines and standards.

  5. Positioning long lines: contrast versus plain radiography

    PubMed Central

    Reece, A; Ubhi, T; Craig, A; Newell, S

    2001-01-01

    AIM—To assess the value of contrast versus plain radiography in determining radio-opaque long line tip position in neonates.
METHODS—In a prospective study, plain radiography was performed after insertion of radio-opaque long lines. If the line tip was not visible on the plain film, a second film with contrast was obtained in an attempt to visualise the tip.
RESULTS—Sixty eight lines were inserted during the study period, 62 of which were included in the study. In 31, a second radiographic examination with contrast was necessary to determine position of the tip. In 29 of these, the line tip was clearly visualised with contrast. On two occasions, the line tip could not be seen because the contrast had filled the vein and obscured the tip from view. Eight of the lines that required a second radiograph with contrast were repositioned.
CONCLUSION—Intravenous contrast should be routinely used in the assessment of long line position in the neonate.

 PMID:11207231

  6. Utility of thyroid collars in cephalometric radiography

    PubMed Central

    Sansare, KP; Khanna, V; Karjodkar, F

    2011-01-01

    Objective A study was carried out to investigate the rationale that use of a thyroid collar (TC) in cephalometric radiography hampers the diagnostic and descriptive quality of lateral cephalogram. Methods A randomized observer blinded study was designed. The study consisted of two groups. The first group data were retrieved from the oral radiology archival system having lateral cephalogram without a TC. The second group was selected from the oral radiology department of patients where lateral cephalogram was taken using a TC. Lateral cephalogram was taken on direct digital system, the Kodak 9000 unit (Eastman Kodak, Rochester, NY). 2 observers blinded about the aim of the study were appointed to identify 15 sets of landmarks on the lateral cephalogram. Interobserver variance was also analysed for the study. Results 50 lateral cephalograms in each group were studied. Out of 15 sets of landmarks, 12 were identified consistent with the TC group. Three landmarks, namely the hyoid bone, second cervical vertebra and third cervical vertebra could not be identified on the TC group. There was no significant difference in the interobserver markings on lateral cephalogram. Conclusions TCs do mask a few landmarks on the lateral cephalogram. These landmarks are mainly used for analysis of skeletal maturity index (SMI). Lead TCs are probably the most convenient and easily available means to protect the thyroid from unwanted radiation while taking lateral cephalogram. It is therefore encouraged to use a TC during routine cephalometric radiography where SMI information is not needed. PMID:22065795

  7. Neutron Radiography Reactor Reactivity -- Focused Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Eric Woolstenhulme; Randal Damiana; Kenneth Schreck; Ann Marie Phillips; Dana Hewit

    2010-11-01

    As part of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative, the Neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) was converted from using highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. After the conversion, NRAD resumed operations and is meeting operational requirements. Radiography image quality and the number of images that can be produced in a given time frame match pre-conversion capabilities. However, following the conversion, NRAD’s excess reactivity with the LEU fuel was less than it had been with the HEU fuel. Although some differences between model predictions and actual performance are to be expected, the lack of flexibility in NRAD’s safety documentation prevented adjusting the reactivity by adding more fuel, until the safety documentation could be modified. To aid future reactor conversions, a reactivity-focused Lessons Learned meeting was held. This report summarizes the findings of the lessons learned meeting and addresses specific questions posed by DOE regarding NRAD’s conversion and reactivity.

  8. A system for fast neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Klann, R.T.

    1997-04-01

    A system has been designed and a neutron generator installed to perform fast neutron radiography. With this system, objects as small as a coin and as large as a 19 liter container have been radiographed. The neutron source is an MF Physics A-711 neutron generator which produces 3 x 10[sup 10] neutrons/second with an average energy of 14. 5 MeV. The radiography system uses x-ray scintillation screens and film in commercially available light-tight cassettes. The cassettes have been modified to include a thin sheet of plastic to produce protons from the neutron beam through elastic scattering from hydrogen and other low Z materials in the plastic. For film densities from 1.8 to 3.0, exposures range from 1.9 x 10[sup 7] n/cm[sup 2] to 3.8 x 10[sup 8] n/cm[sup 2] depending on the type of screen and film. The optimum source-to-film distance was found to be 150 cm. At this distance, the geometric unsharpness was determined to be approximately 2.2-2.3 mm and the smallest hole that could be resolved in a 1.25 cm thick sample had a diameter of 0.079 cm.

  9. Beam characterization at the Neutron Radiography Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sarah W. Morgan; Jeffrey C. King; Chad L. Pope

    2013-12-01

    The quality of a neutron-imaging beam directly impacts the quality of radiographic images produced using that beam. Fully characterizing a neutron beam, including determination of the beam's effective length-to-diameter ratio, neutron flux profile, energy spectrum, potential image quality, and beam divergence, is vital for producing quality radiographic images. This paper provides a characterization of the east neutron imaging beamline at the Idaho National Laboratory Neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD). The experiments which measured the beam's effective length-to-diameter ratio and potential image quality are based on American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards. An analysis of the image produced by a calibrated phantom measured the beam divergence. The energy spectrum measurements consist of a series of foil irradiations using a selection of activation foils, compared to the results produced by a Monte Carlo n-Particle (MCNP) model of the beamline. The NRAD has an effective collimation ratio greater than 125, a beam divergence of 0.3 +_ 0.1 degrees, and a gold foil cadmium ratio of 2.7. The flux profile has been quantified and the facility is an ASTM Category 1 radiographic facility. Based on bare and cadmium covered foil activation results, the neutron energy spectrum used in the current MCNP model of the radiography beamline over-samples the thermal region of the neutron energy spectrum.

  10. Dental digital radiography: a survey of quality aspects.

    PubMed

    Hellén-Halme, Kristina; Rohlin, Madeleine; Petersson, Arne

    2005-01-01

    The aim was to evaluate the experiences of Swedish general dental practitioners (GDPs) with digital radiography and their opinion on the same, particularly regarding quality issues. A letter was sent to all GDPs in private care in Region Skåne, Sweden, asking whether they used digital radiography (n=513). The response rate was 79%. The number of private GDPs who replied that they used digital radiography was 106. The Public Dental Service in Region Skåne listed 33 GDPs who worked with digital radiography. Based on these answers, a questionnaire was sent to the GDPs working with digital radiography (n=139). The questionnaire comprised 27 questions about the dentists, the system of intra-oral digital radiography, and the GDPs' experiences of and opinions on issues regarding image quality and quality control. The response rate to the questionnaire was 94%. Almost all, 92%, worked with charge-coupled device (CCD) and complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) sensors. Most GDPs were satisfied with their digital radiographic system. The majority (65%) experienced problems. Detector failure and trouble with the software were common. The GDPs wrote that they used lower exposure times in digital radiography than traditional film radiography. The estimated reduction in exposure time was said to be between 51% and 75%. Thirty-five per cent continued to use film parallel with digital radiography. The answers indicated that less than half of the equipment (40%) underwent quality control. Quality controls, when conducted, were undertaken once or twice a year, mainly by technicians from the companies that had sold the digital equipment. Based on the results of the questionnaire, there seems to be a need to improve the maintenance and the quality of digital radiography. It is also important that the GDPs become more aware of the problems that can occur when a new technique is introduced and that they develop the skills to handle these problems.

  11. Imaging properties of digital magnification radiography.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Sarah J; Samei, Ehsan

    2006-04-01

    Flat panel detectors exhibit improved signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and display capabilities compared to film. This improvement necessitates a new evaluation of optimal geometry for conventional projection imaging applications such as digital projection mammography as well as for advanced x-ray imaging applications including cone-beam computed tomography (CT), tomosynthesis, and mammotomography. Such an evaluation was undertaken in this study to examine the effects of x-ray source distribution, inherent detector resolution, magnification, scatter rejection, and noise characteristics including noise aliasing. A model for x-ray image acquisition was used to develop generic results applicable to flat panel detectors with similar x-ray absorption characteristics. The model assumed a Gaussian distribution for the focal spot and a rectangular distribution for a pixel. A generic model for the modulated transfer function (MTF) of indirect flat panel detectors was derived by a nonlinear fit of empirical receptor data to the Burgess model for phosphor MTFs. Noise characteristics were investigated using a generic noise power spectrum (NPS) model for indirect phosphor-based detectors. The detective quantum efficiency (DQE) was then calculated from the MTF and NPS models. The results were examined as a function of focal spot size (0.1, 0.3, and 0.6 mm) and pixel size (50, 100, 150, and 200 microm) for magnification ranges 1 to 3. Mammography, general radiography (also applicable to mammotomography), and chest radiography applications were explored using x-ray energies of 28, 74, and 120 kVp, respectively. Nodule detection was examined using the effective point source scatter model, effective DQE, and the Hotelling SNR2 efficiency. Results indicate that magnification can potentially improve the signal and noise performance of digital images. Results also show that a cross over point occurs in the spatial frequency above and below which the effects of magnification differ

  12. Fast neutron radiography scanner for the detection of contraband in air cargo containers.

    PubMed

    Eberhardt, J E; Rainey, S; Stevens, R J; Sowerby, B D; Tickner, J R

    2005-08-01

    There is a growing need to rapidly scan bulk air cargo for contraband such as illicit drugs and explosives. The Commonwealth Science and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) have been working with Australian Customs Service to develop a scanner capable of directly scanning airfreight containers in 1--2 minutes without unpacking. The scanner combines fast neutron and gamma-ray radiography to provide high-resolution images that include information on material composition. A full-scale prototype scanner has been successfully tested in the laboratory and a commercial-scale scanner is due to be installed at Brisbane airport in 2005.

  13. High contrast neutron radiography with optical devices in Kyoto University reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawabata, Y.; Nakano, T.; Hino, M.; Sunohara, H.; Matsushima, U.; Takenaka, N.

    2004-08-01

    The high-contrast neutron radiography has been performed at a VCN guide (VCN) and a supermirror cold neutron guide (CN-3) in Kyoto University Reactor. The large absorption cross-section of very low-energy neutrons can show a slight change of sample which thermal neutrons can not show. The effectiveness is shown in the fields of botany, agriculture and industrial researches. A new spectrum change option using high Qc supermirror ( m=4) is attached. It can change the upper limit of the energy of exposure neutrons by reflections, and gives a high flexibility of the experimental condition.

  14. Comparison of conventional radiography and MDCT in suspected scaphoid fractures

    PubMed Central

    Behzadi, Cyrus; Karul, Murat; Henes, Frank Oliver; Laqmani, Azien; Catala-Lehnen, Philipp; Lehmann, Wolfgang; Nagel, Hans-Dieter; Adam, Gerhard; Regier, Marc

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the diagnostic accuracy and radiation dose of conventional radiography and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in suspected scaphoid fractures. METHODS: One hundred twenty-four consecutive patients were enrolled in our study who had suffered from a wrist trauma and showed typical clinical symptoms suspicious of an acute scaphoid fracture. All patients had initially undergone conventional radiography. Subsequent MDCT was performed within 10 d because of persisting clinical symptoms. Using the MDCT data as the reference standard, a fourfold table was used to classify the test results. The effective dose and impaired energy were assessed in order to compare the radiation burden of the two techniques. The Wilcoxon test was performed to compare the two diagnostic modalities. RESULTS: Conventional radiography showed 34 acute fractures of the scaphoid in 124 patients (42.2%). Subsequent MDCT revealed a total of 42 scaphoid fractures. The sensitivity of conventional radiography for scaphoid fracture detection was 42.8% and its specificity was 80% resulting in an overall accuracy of 59.6%. Conventional radiography was significantly inferior to MDCT (P < 0.01) concerning scaphoid fracture detection. The mean effective dose of MDCT was 0.1 mSv compared to 0.002 mSv of conventional radiography. CONCLUSION: Conventional radiography is insufficient for accurate scaphoid fracture detection. Regarding the almost negligible effective dose, MDCT should serve as the first imaging modality in wrist trauma. PMID:25628802

  15. Using athletic training clinical education standards in radiography.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Shelley; Harris, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    The selection of clinical education sites for radiography students is based on availability, access to radiographic examinations, and appropriate student-to-technologist ratio. Radiography program directors are not required to evaluate sites based on their educational validity (eg, the clinical instructor's knowledge of basic teaching and learning principles, how well the site communicates with the program, or the clinical instructor's involvement in professional organizations). The purpose of this study was to determine if a set of 12 clinical education standards used in athletic training would be applicable and beneficial to radiography program directors when selecting clinical sites for students. A survey concerning the applicability of the athletic training standards to radiography site selection was completed by 270 directors of radiography programs accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology. The survey results indicated the athletic training clinical education standards were considered applicable to the selection of clinical sites for radiography students and would be beneficial to radiography program directors when selecting sites.

  16. Computed radiography for the radiological technologist.

    PubMed

    Artz, D S

    1997-01-01

    CR has emerged as a general imaging technology for successful imaging of the chest, abdominal, musculoskeletal, and pediatric anatomy. For the general radiographer, CR is both celebrated and scorned for its complex function, and requires thorough ongoing training for the technologists to produce consistently high image quality. Digital radiography's unique separation of detector, display, and archive add a flexibility over screen-film technology for moving, storing, printing, and viewing plain radiographic images. CR technology is now a viable solution for those wishing to embrace the electronic and digital revolution in medicine. Although the system has less spatial resolution than screen-film technology, the strength of postacquisition image processing to enhance pathology and view obscured anatomy makes CR imaging attractive to technologists and radiologists. CR is a new modality for the general radiographer that, when put into the hands of a well-trained technologist, produces images of beautiful diagnostic quality.

  17. SOLAR: student oriented learning about radiography.

    PubMed

    Baird, Marilyn; Wells, Peter

    2001-07-01

    The success or otherwise of a radiographic examination is like other health-related interventions, crucially dependent upon the knowledge base of the radiographer and the quality of his/her clinical acumen. Traditional curricular approaches are limited in their ability to assist students to make vital connections between science and clinical decision making. This paper describes a computer-based case-oriented program called SOLAR (student oriented learning about radiography) that has been designed to achieve the necessary level of integration. The key feature of SOLAR is the requirement for students to construct a clinical action plan in response to a scenario provided. Upon submitting this plan, the student can then compare his/her plan to that prepared by an expert. The browsing configuration of SOLAR makes it highly attractive for other health professions as well. Student feedback indicates a high degree of approval for this approach.

  18. Digital radiography exposure indices: A review.

    PubMed

    Mothiram, Ursula; Brennan, Patrick C; Lewis, Sarah J; Moran, Bernadette; Robinson, John

    2014-06-01

    Digital radiography (DR) technologies have the advantage of a wide dynamic range compared to their film-screen predecessors, however, this poses a potential for increased patient exposure if left unchecked. Manufacturers have developed the exposure index (EI) to counter this, which provides radiographers with feedback on the exposure reaching the detector. As these EIs were manufacturer-specific, a wide variety of EIs existed. To offset this, the international standardised EI has been developed by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) and the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM). The purpose of this article is to explore the current literature relating to EIs, beginning with the historical development of the EI, the development of the standardised EI and an exploration of common themes and studies as evidenced in the research literature. It is anticipated that this review will provide radiographers with a useful guide to understanding EIs, their application in clinical practice, limitations and suggestions for further research.

  19. Reject analysis in direct digital radiography.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Eivind Richter; Jorde, Jannike; Taoussi, Nadia; Yaqoob, Sadia Halima; Konst, Bente; Seierstad, Therese

    2012-03-01

    Reject analysis can be used as a quality indicator, and is an important tool in localizing areas where optimization is required. Reducing number of rejects is important yielding reduced patient exposure and increased cost-effectiveness. To determine rejection rates and causes in direct digital radiography. Data were collected during a three-month period in spring 2010 at two direct digital laboratories in Norway. All X-ray examinations, types, numbers, and reasons for rejections were obtained using automatic reject analysis software. Thirteen causes for rejection could be selected. Out of the 27,284 acquired images, 3206 were rejected, yielding an overall rejection rate of 12%. Highest rejection rates were found for examination of knees, shoulders, and wrist. In all, 77% of the rejected images arose from positioning errors. An overall rejection rate of 12% indicates a need for optimizing radiographic practice in the department.

  20. Intraoral digital radiography: elements of effective imaging.

    PubMed

    Cederberg, Robert

    2012-10-01

    Intraoral digital imaging has evolved from an experimental and sometimes disparaged technique in the mid 1980s to a reliable and ubiquitously used technology today. There are many advantages for use of digital radiographic techniques in dentistry, one of the chief ones being patient dose reduction. However, as important as dose reduction is for safe and effective radiography, practicing dentists would also like to understand the fundamental differences between digital system configurations so they may be able to make an informed choice as to which system best fits their needs. In addition, there has been considerable debate on the following topics: sensor technology; factors associated with image display; optimum techniques for image manipulation; and image storage, retrieval, and archiving. This article provides insight into these and other elements of effective imaging in intraoral digital imaging.

  1. Measuring microfocus focal spots using digital radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, David A

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of microfocus spot size can be important for several reasons: (1) Quality assurance during manufacture of microfocus tubes; (2) Tracking performance and stability of microfocus tubes; (3) Determining magnification (especially important for digital radiography where the native spatial resolution of the digital system is not adequate for the application); (4) Knowledge of unsharpness from the focal spot alone. The European Standard EN 12543-5 is based on a simple geometrical method of calculating focal spot size from unsharpness of high magnification film radiographs. When determining microfocus focal spot dimensions using unsharpness measurements both signal-to-noise (SNR) and magnification can be important. There is a maximum accuracy that is a function of SNR and therefore an optimal magnification. Greater than optimal magnification can be used but it will not increase accuracy.

  2. Cancer imaging by scanned projection radiography.

    PubMed

    Cassel, D M; Young, S W; Brody, W R; Hall, A L

    1981-08-01

    We have evaluated scanned projection radiography (SPR) for the diagnosis of cancer. Four rabbits with V2 thigh carcinomas and nine patients with a variety of malignant neoplasms were studied with a GE CT/T 8800 scanner modified for SPR. Images were made before injection of intravenous contrast medium, and additional scans were taken after injection. Temporal subtraction was then performed on the digitized data. Rabbit thigh V2 carcinomas and human lung, liver, and extremity neoplasms were visualized. Contrast enhancement was phasic with early vessel demonstration and subsequent visualization of low density central areas of tumoral necrosis. Liver metastases appeared as poorly defined areas of low density. Because of the combination of high contrast sensitivity plus capability of imaging large tissue volumes on one scan, SPR may be valuable in cancer screening.

  3. Polarized neutron radiography with a periscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Michael; Neubauer, Andreas; Mühlbauer, Martin; Calzada, Elbio; Schillinger, Burkhard; Pfleiderer, Christian; Böni, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of the magnetic moment of the neutron with magnetic fields provides a powerful probe for spatially resolved magnetisation measurements in magnetic materials. We have tested a periscope as a new type of polarizer providing neutron beams with a high polarization and a low divergence. The observed inhomogeneity of the beam caused by the waviness of the glass substrates was quantified by means of Monte-Carlo simulations using the software package McStas. The results show that beams of high homogeneity can be produced if the waviness is reduced to below 1.0·10-5 rad. Finally, it is shown that radiography with polarized neutrons is a powerful method for measuring the spatially resolved magnetisation in optically float-zoned samples of the weak itinerant ferromagnet Ni3Al, thereby aiding the identification of the appropriate growth parameters.

  4. Digital mammography performed with computed radiography technology.

    PubMed

    Jouan, B

    1999-07-01

    Introduced by Fuji Photo Film Japan in the early 1980s, computed radiography (CR) technology has developed considerably since then to become the mature widely installed technology it is today (about 7500 systems worldwide). Various mammographic examinations require high performance results to which CR complies on demand or following some procedures such as geometrical magnification carried out during the examination. The basic CR principles and digital image processing as well as technical improvements are detailed in this study, which also includes a synthesis of the articles on CR mammographic applications referenced in the bibliography, focusing on strong points, limits and current methods of surpassing these limits. New CR technology development perspectives in mammography and computed assisted diagnosis (CAD) algorithms will allow wider use of this method in the near future.

  5. Digital radiography exposure indices: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Mothiram, Ursula; Brennan, Patrick C; Lewis, Sarah J; Moran, Bernadette; Robinson, John

    2014-06-15

    Digital radiography (DR) technologies have the advantage of a wide dynamic range compared to their film-screen predecessors, however, this poses a potential for increased patient exposure if left unchecked. Manufacturers have developed the exposure index (EI) to counter this, which provides radiographers with feedback on the exposure reaching the detector. As these EIs were manufacturer-specific, a wide variety of EIs existed. To offset this, the international standardised EI has been developed by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) and the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM). The purpose of this article is to explore the current literature relating to EIs, beginning with the historical development of the EI, the development of the standardised EI and an exploration of common themes and studies as evidenced in the research literature. It is anticipated that this review will provide radiographers with a useful guide to understanding EIs, their application in clinical practice, limitations and suggestions for further research.

  6. Direct magnification radiography of the newborn infant

    SciTech Connect

    Brasch, R.C.; Gould, R.G.

    1982-03-01

    Recent advances in technology have made direct radiographic magnification of the newborn infant clinically feasible. A microfocus radiographic tube and a rare-earth, high-speed recording system were combined to obtain more than 2,000 radiographs at magnifications of 2-2.5. Special positioning devices permitted imaging of even those infants confined to incubators and connected to life-supporting systems. When quantitatively compared with three conventional contact radiographic systems with respect to resolution, contrast, and noise, magnification radiography showed overall superiority of image characteristics. Definition of subtle abnormalities and anatomically small structures permitted diagnoses which could not be made from conventional images. Furthermore, infant radiation exposure was markedly less (15 mR (3.9 mC/kg) maximum skin exposure) as compared with conventional contact radiographic systems (24 mR (6.1 mC/kg) to 45 mR (11.6 mC/kg)).

  7. Direct magnification radiography of the newborn infant

    SciTech Connect

    Brasch, R.C.; Gould, R.G.

    1982-03-01

    Recent advances in technology have made direct radiographic magnification of the newborn infant clinically feasible. A microfocus radiographic tube and a rare-earth, high-speed recording system were combined to obtain more than 2,000 radiographs at magnifications of 2 to 2.5. Special positioning devices permitted imaging of even those infants confined to incubators and connected to life-supporting systems. When quantitatively compared with three conventional contact radiographic systems with respect to resolution, contrast, and noise, magnification radiography showed overall superiority of image characteristics. Definition of subtle abnormalities and anatomically small structures permitted diagnoses which could not be made from conventional images. Furthermore, infant radiation exposure was markedly less (15 mR (3.9 mC/kg) maximum skin exposure) as compared with conventional contact radiographic systems (24 mR(6.1 mC/kg) to 45 mR (11.6 mC/kg)).

  8. Image rejects in general direct digital radiography

    PubMed Central

    Rosanowsky, Tine Blomberg; Jensen, Camilla; Wah, Kenneth Hong Ching

    2015-01-01

    Background The number of rejected images is an indicator of image quality and unnecessary imaging at a radiology department. Image reject analysis was frequent in the film era, but comparably few and small studies have been published after converting to digital radiography. One reason may be a belief that rejects have been eliminated with digitalization. Purpose To measure the extension of deleted images in direct digital radiography (DR), in order to assess the rates of rejects and unnecessary imaging and to analyze reasons for deletions, in order to improve the radiological services. Material and Methods All exposed images at two direct digital laboratories at a hospital in Norway were reviewed in January 2014. Type of examination, number of exposed images, and number of deleted images were registered. Each deleted image was analyzed separately and the reason for deleting the image was recorded. Results Out of 5417 exposed images, 596 were deleted, giving a deletion rate of 11%. A total of 51.3% were deleted due to positioning errors and 31.0% due to error in centering. The examinations with the highest percentage of deleted images were the knee, hip, and ankle, 20.6%, 18.5%, and 13.8% respectively. Conclusion The reject rate is at least as high as the deletion rate and is comparable with previous film-based imaging systems. The reasons for rejection are quite different in digital systems. This falsifies the hypothesis that digitalization would eliminates rejects. A deleted image does not contribute to diagnostics, and therefore is an unnecessary image. Hence, the high rates of deleted images have implications for management, training, education, as well as for quality. PMID:26500784

  9. Image rejects in general direct digital radiography.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Bjørn; Rosanowsky, Tine Blomberg; Jensen, Camilla; Wah, Kenneth Hong Ching

    2015-10-01

    The number of rejected images is an indicator of image quality and unnecessary imaging at a radiology department. Image reject analysis was frequent in the film era, but comparably few and small studies have been published after converting to digital radiography. One reason may be a belief that rejects have been eliminated with digitalization. To measure the extension of deleted images in direct digital radiography (DR), in order to assess the rates of rejects and unnecessary imaging and to analyze reasons for deletions, in order to improve the radiological services. All exposed images at two direct digital laboratories at a hospital in Norway were reviewed in January 2014. Type of examination, number of exposed images, and number of deleted images were registered. Each deleted image was analyzed separately and the reason for deleting the image was recorded. Out of 5417 exposed images, 596 were deleted, giving a deletion rate of 11%. A total of 51.3% were deleted due to positioning errors and 31.0% due to error in centering. The examinations with the highest percentage of deleted images were the knee, hip, and ankle, 20.6%, 18.5%, and 13.8% respectively. The reject rate is at least as high as the deletion rate and is comparable with previous film-based imaging systems. The reasons for rejection are quite different in digital systems. This falsifies the hypothesis that digitalization would eliminates rejects. A deleted image does not contribute to diagnostics, and therefore is an unnecessary image. Hence, the high rates of deleted images have implications for management, training, education, as well as for quality.

  10. Muscle parameters estimation based on biplanar radiography.

    PubMed

    Dubois, G; Rouch, P; Bonneau, D; Gennisson, J L; Skalli, W

    2016-11-01

    The evaluation of muscle and joint forces in vivo is still a challenge. Musculo-Skeletal (musculo-skeletal) models are used to compute forces based on movement analysis. Most of them are built from a scaled-generic model based on cadaver measurements, which provides a low level of personalization, or from Magnetic Resonance Images, which provide a personalized model in lying position. This study proposed an original two steps method to access a subject-specific musculo-skeletal model in 30 min, which is based solely on biplanar X-Rays. First, the subject-specific 3D geometry of bones and skin envelopes were reconstructed from biplanar X-Rays radiography. Then, 2200 corresponding control points were identified between a reference model and the subject-specific X-Rays model. Finally, the shape of 21 lower limb muscles was estimated using a non-linear transformation between the control points in order to fit the muscle shape of the reference model to the X-Rays model. Twelfth musculo-skeletal models were reconstructed and compared to their reference. The muscle volume was not accurately estimated with a standard deviation (SD) ranging from 10 to 68%. However, this method provided an accurate estimation the muscle line of action with a SD of the length difference lower than 2% and a positioning error lower than 20 mm. The moment arm was also well estimated with SD lower than 15% for most muscle, which was significantly better than scaled-generic model for most muscle. This method open the way to a quick modeling method for gait analysis based on biplanar radiography.

  11. The Enhanced Workflow and Efficiency of the Wireless Local Area Network (WLAN)-Based Direct Digital Radiography (DDR) Portable Radiography.

    PubMed

    Ngan, Tsz-Lung; Wong, Edward Ting-Hei; Ng, Kris Lap-Shun; Jeor, Patrick Kwok-Shing; Lo, Gladys Goh

    2015-06-01

    With the implementation of the PACS in the hospital, there is an increasing demand from the clinicians for immediate access and display of radiological images. Recently, our hospital has installed the first wireless local area network (WLAN)-based direct digital radiography (DDR) portable radiography system. The DDR portable radiography system allows wireless retrieval of modality worklist and wireless transmission of portable X-ray image on the console to the Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS), via WLAN connection of wireless fidelity (Wi-Fi). The aim of this study was to analyze the workflow and performance between the WLAN-based DDR portable radiography system and the old practice using conventional portable X-ray machine with computed radiography (CR) system. A total of 190 portable chest X-ray examinations were evaluated and timed, using the conventional portable X-ray machine with CR from March to April of 2012 and using the new DDR portable radiography system on December of 2012 (n = 97 for old system and n = 93 for DDR portable system). The time interval of image becoming available to the PACS using the WLAN-based DDR portable radiography system was significantly shorter than that of the old practice using the conventional portable X-ray machine with CR (6.8 ± 2.6 min for DDR portable system; 23 ± 10.2 min for old system; p < 0.0001), with the efficiency improved by 70 %. The implementation of the WLAN-based DDR portable radiography system can enhance the workflow of portable radiography by reduction of procedural steps.

  12. 5. INTERIOR VIEW, SHOWING A CONTROL ROOM INSIDE THE RADIOGRAPHY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. INTERIOR VIEW, SHOWING A CONTROL ROOM INSIDE THE RADIOGRAPHY ROOM; PASS-THROUGH FOR EXPOSED FILM ON RIGHT - Fort McCoy, Building No. T-1031, North side of South Tenth Avenue, Block 10, Sparta, Monroe County, WI

  13. An Interdisciplinary Approach to Improving Radiation Protection in Digital Radiography.

    PubMed

    Moore, Quentin T

    2016-09-01

    To determine improvement approaches that can be routinely incorporated in digital radiography to ensure that radiation protection practices are based on current equipment capabilities. A literature review was conducted on digital radiography as it pertains to radiation protection, quality improvement, evidence-based practice, and interdisciplinary approaches. Transitioning from film-screen radiography to digital radiography has resulted in confusion in applying appropriate techniques and abiding by the as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) concept. Clinically effective research should be continually reviewed and incorporated into practice as routine. Applying quality improvement approaches and implementing practice improvement projects will help facilities achieve radiation-based benchmarks to improve imaging practices. Developing interdisciplinary quality improvement workgroups that include a variety of imaging stakeholders will allow for improvement in applying radiation protection research. ©2016 American Society of Radiologic Technologists.

  14. Comparison of ultrasonography and radiography in diagnosis of rib fractures.

    PubMed

    Pishbin, Elham; Ahmadi, Koorosh; Foogardi, Molood; Salehi, Maryam; Seilanian Toosi, Farrokh; Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa

    2017-08-01

    Rib fractures are the most common skeletal thoracic injuries resulting from blunt chest trauma. Half of the rib fractures are not detected upon a precise physical evaluation and radiographs. Recently ultrasonography (USG) has been investigated to detect rib fractures. But based on literature the usefulness of USG varies widely. This study was conducted to investigate the role of USG in the detection of possible rib fractures in comparison with radiography. In this cross-sectional study, consecutive patients with minor blunt chest trauma and suspected rib fractures presenting in Imam Reza Hospital located in Mashhad-Iran, between April 2013 and October 2013 were assessed by USG and radiography. The radiography was performed in a posteroanterior (PA) chest projection and oblique rib view centered over the area of trauma. The time duration spent in taking USG and radiography were recorded. The prevalence and location of fractures revealed by USG and radiography were compared. Sixty-one suspected patients were assessed. The male to female ratio was 2.4:1 (43 men and 18 women) with a mean ± SD age of (44.3 ± 19.7) years. There were totally 59 rib fractures in 38 (62.3%) patients based on radiography and USG, while 23 (37.7%) patients had no diagnostic evidence of rib lesions. USG revealed 58 rib fractures in 33 (54.1%) of 61 suspected patients and radiographs revealed 32 rib fractures in 20 (32.8%) of 61 patients. A total of 58 (98.3%) rib fractures were detected by USG, whereas oblique rib view and PA chest radiography showed 27 (45.8%) and 24 (40.7%) rib fractures, respectively. The average duration of USG was (12 ± 3) min (range 7-17 min), whereas the duration of radiography was (27 ± 6) min (range 15-37 min). The kappa coefficient showed a low level of agreement between both USG and PA chest radiography (kappa coefficient = 0.28), and between USG and oblique rib view (kappa coefficient = 0.32). USG discloses more fractures than radiography in

  15. Radiography with the Fission Neutrons from Californium-252

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-07-01

    iftD-Ao45 3^ m-77-B1i2i TECHNICAL 7󈧖 LIBRARY lADfto^^^ RADIOGRAPHY WITH THE FISSION NEUTRONS FROM CALIFORNIUM -252 JOHN J. ANTAL and...TITLE C«id Sub(l(/«J RADIOGRAPHY WITH THE FISSION NEUTRONS FROM CALIFORNIUM -252 5. TYPE OF REPORT it PERIOD COVERED Final Report 6...Cellulose nitrate Californium -252 20. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse aide 11 necessary and identity by block number) (SEE REVERSE SIDE) DD 1

  16. Simple methods to reduce patient exposure during scoliosis radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, P.F.; Thomas, A.W.; Thompson, W.E.; Wollerton, M.A.; Rachlin, J.A.

    1986-05-01

    Radiation exposure to the breasts of adolescent females can be reduced significantly through the use of one or all of the following methods: fast, rare-earth screen-film combinations; specially designed compensating filters; and breast shielding. The importance of exposure reduction during scoliosis radiography as well as further details on the above described methods are discussed. In addition, the early results of a Center for Devices and Radiological Health study, which recorded exposure and technique data for scoliosis radiography, is presented.

  17. Quality assurance tests for digital radiography in general dental practice.

    PubMed

    Greenall, Chris; Drage, Nicholas; Ager, Matthew

    2014-03-01

    Quality assurance (QA) is essential in dental radiography. Digital radiography is becoming more common in dentistry, so it is important that appropriate QA tests are carried out on the digital equipment, including the viewing monitor. The aim of this article is to outline the tests that can be carried out in dental practice. Quality assurance for digital equipment is important to ensure consistently high quality images are produced.

  18. Digital radiography in dentistry: a survey of Indiana dentists.

    PubMed

    Brian, J N; Williamson, G F

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the number of Indiana dental practices that utilize digital radiography and to identify the reasons for using or not using digital radiography. A questionnaire was sent to a random sample of 300 licensed dentists in the State of Indiana. Demographic, clinical and digital technology responses were obtained. The data were analysed using SPSS 12.0 (Statistical Package Social Sciences) software; t-tests and Pearson's chi(2) test were performed on several variables with significance levels set at P< 0.05. One hundred and fifty-two dental practices (51%) responded to the survey. Thirty dental practices (19.7%) used digital radiography in their office. Twenty-two (73%) of the dentists using digital radiography were general practitioners. The number of dentists in a practice was a significant factor in predicting the use of digital radiography (t=2.57, P=0.011). The results of this study indicate that digital radiography is more commonly used by general dentists in group practices.

  19. Neutron radiography inspection of investment castings.

    PubMed

    Richards, W J; Barrett, J R; Springgate, M E; Shields, K C

    2004-10-01

    Investment casting, also known as the lost wax process, is a manufacturing method employed to produce near net shape metal articles. Traditionally, investment casting has been used to produce structural titanium castings for aero-engine applications with wall thickness less than 1 in (2.54 cm). Recently, airframe manufacturers have been exploring the use of titanium investment casting to replace components traditionally produced from forgings. Use of titanium investment castings for these applications reduces weight, cost, lead time, and part count. Recently, the investment casting process has been selected to produce fracture critical structural titanium airframe components. These airframe components have pushed the traditional inspection techniques to their physical limits due to cross sections on the order of 3 in (7.6 cm). To overcome these inspection limitations, a process incorporating neutron radiography (n-ray) has been developed. In this process, the facecoat of the investment casting mold material contains a cocalcined mixture of yttrium oxide and gadolinium oxide. The presence of the gadolinium oxide, allows for neutron radiographic imaging (and eventual removal and repair) of mold facecoat inclusions that remain within these thick cross sectional castings. Probability of detection (POD) studies have shown a 3 x improvement of detecting a 0.050 x 0.007 in2 (1.270 x 0.178 mm2) inclusion of this cocalcined material using n-ray techniques when compared to the POD using traditional X-ray techniques. Further, it has been shown that this n-ray compatible mold facecoat material produces titanium castings of equal metallurgical quality when compared to the traditional materials. Since investment castings can be very large and heavy, the neutron radiography facilities at the University of California, Davis McClellan Nuclear Radiation Center (UCD/MNRC) were used to develop the inspection techniques. The UCD/MNRC has very unique facilities that can handle large

  20. Musculoskeletal magnetic resonance imaging: importance of radiography.

    PubMed

    Taljanovic, Mihra S; Hunter, Tim B; Fitzpatrick, Kimberly A; Krupinski, Elizabeth A; Pope, Thomas L

    2003-07-01

    To determine the usefulness of radiography for interpretation of musculoskeletal (MSK) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies. DESIGNS AND PATIENTS: In a 1-year period, 1,030 MSK MRI studies were performed in 1,002 patients in our institution. For each study, the interpreting radiologist completed a questionnaire regarding the availability and utility of radiographs, radiological reports and clinical information for the interpretation of the MRI study. Radiographs were essential, very important or added information in 61-75% of all MSK MRI cases. Radiographs were judged as essential for reading of MRI studies more often for trauma, infection/inflammation and tumors than for degenerative and miscellaneous/normal diagnoses (chi(2)=60.95, df=16, P<0.0001). The clinical information was rated as "essential" or "useful" significantly more often than not (chi(2)=93.07, df=16, P<0.0001). The clinical and MRI diagnoses were the same or partially concordant significantly more often for tumors than for trauma, infection/inflammation and degenerative conditions, while in the miscellaneous/normal group they were different in 64% of cases. When the diagnoses were different, there were more instances in which radiographs were not available. Radiographs are an important, and sometimes essential, initial complementary study for reading of MSK MRI examinations. It is highly recommended that radiographs are available when MSK MRI studies are interpreted.

  1. Comparison of state dental radiography safety regulations.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, Thomas F; Parashar, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare and provide an overview of state policies on occupational exposure, dosimetry, collimation, patient protection, and the use of portable handheld X-ray machines in dentistry. State government webpages containing radiation protection rules and regulations were scanned. The contents were compared against current federal regulations established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). They were further evaluated in light of current recommendations from the National Council on Radiation Protection & Measurements (NCRP) and the American Dental Association (ADA). Most states' regulations mirror the exposure limits set forth by the NRC and FDA. Nonregulatory recommendations regarding use of dental radiography are periodically put forth by the NCRP and the ADA. State and federal agencies often follow recommendations from these scientific organizations when creating regulations. Clinicians must be aware of their state's radiation protection rules, as variations among states exist. In addition, recommendations published by organizations such as the NCRP and the ADA, while not legally binding, contribute significantly to the reduction of radiation risks for operators and patients alike.

  2. Patient information extraction in digitized radiography.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsien-Huang P

    2002-03-01

    Digital imagery is gradually replacing the traditional radiograph with the development of digital radiography and film scanner. This report presents a new method to extract the patient information number (PIN) field automatically from the film-scanned image using image analysis technique. To evaluate the PIN field extraction algorithm, 2 formats of label acquired from 2 different hospitals are tested. Given the available films with no constraints on the way the labels are written and positioned, the correct extraction rates are 73% and 84%, respectively. This extracted PIN information can link with Radiology Information System (RIS) or Hospital Information System (HIS), and the image scanned from the film then can be filed into the database automatically. The efficiency this method offers can simplify greatly the image filing process and improve the user friendliness of the overall image digitization system. Moreover, compared with the bar code reader, it solves the automatic information input problem in a very economical way. The authors believe the success of this technique will benefit the development of the PACS (Picture Archiving and Communication System) and teleradiology.

  3. Evaluation and testing of computed radiography systems.

    PubMed

    Charnock, P; Connolly, P A; Hughes, D; Moores, B M

    2005-01-01

    The implementation of film replacement digital radiographic imaging systems throughout Europe is now gathering momentum. Such systems create the foundations for totally digital departments of radiology, since radiographic examinations constitute the most prevalent modality. Although this type of development will lead to improvements in the delivery and management of radiological service, such widespread implementation of new technology must be carefully monitored. The implementation of effective QA tests on installation, at periodic intervals and as part of a routine programme will aid this process. This paper presents the results of commissioning tests undertaken on a number of computed radiography imaging systems provided by different manufacturers. The aim of these tests was not only to provide baseline performance measurements against which subsequent measurements can be compared but also to explore any differences in performance, which might exist between different units. Results of measurements will be presented for (1) monitor and laser printer set-up; (2) imaging plates, including sensitivity, consistency and uniformity; (3) resolution and contrast detectability; and (4) signal and noise performance. Results from the latter are analysed in relationship with both system and quantum noise components.

  4. Applications of Cosmic Ray Muon Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guardincerri, E.; Durham, J. M.; Morris, C. L.; Rowe, C. A.; Poulson, D. C.; Bacon, J. D.; Plaud-Ramos, K.; Morley, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Dome of Santa Maria del Fiore, Florence Cathedral, was built between 1420 and 1436 by architect Filippo Brunelleschi and it is now cracking under its own weight. Engineering efforts are underway to model the dome's structure and reinforce it against further deterioration. According to some scholars, Brunelleschi might have built reinforcement structures into the dome itself; however, the only confirmed known subsurface reinforcement is a chain of iron and stone around the dome's base. Tomography with cosmic ray muons is a non-destructive imaging method that can be used to image the interior of the wall and therefore ascertain the layout and status of any iron substructure in the dome. We will show the results from a muon tomography measurement of iron hidden in a mockup of the dome's wall performed at Los Alamos National Lab in 2015. The sensitivity of this technique, and the status of this project will be also discussed. At last, we will show results on muon attenuation radiography of larger shallow targets.

  5. Portable Digital Radiography and Computed Tomography Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2007-11-01

    This user manual describes the function and use of the portable digital radiography and computed tomography (DRCT) scanner. The manual gives a general overview of x-ray imaging systems along with a description of the DRCT system. An inventory of the all the system components, organized by shipping container, is also included. In addition, detailed, step-by-step procedures are provided for all of the exercises necessary for a novice user to successfully collect digital radiographs and tomographic images of an object, including instructions on system assembly and detector calibration and system alignment. There is also a short section covering the limited system care and maintenance needs. Descriptions of the included software packages, the DRCT Digital Imager used for system operation, and the DRCT Image Processing Interface used for image viewing and tomographic data reconstruction are given in the appendixes. The appendixes also include a cheat sheet for more experienced users, a listing of known system problems and how to mitigate them, and an inventory check-off sheet suitable for copying and including with the machine for shipment purposes.

  6. Developments in digital radiography: an equipment update.

    PubMed

    James, J J; Davies, A G; Cowen, A R; O'Connor, P J

    2001-01-01

    Digital X-ray imaging technology has advanced rapidly over the past few years. This review, particularly aimed at those involved in using and purchasing such technology, is an attempt to unravel some of the complexities of this potentially confusing subject. The main groups of X-ray imaging devices that are considered are digitisers of conventional radiographs, image-intensifier-based fluorography systems, photostimulable phosphor computed radiography, amorphous selenium-based technology for thorax imaging and flat-panel systems. As well as describing these different systems, we look at ways of objectively assessing their image quality. Concepts that are used and explained include spatial resolution, grey-scale bit resolution, signal-to-noise ratio and detective quantum efficiency. An understanding of these basic parameters is vital in making a scientific assessment of a system's performance. Image processing and techniques are also briefly discussed, particularly with reference to their potential effects on image quality. This review aims to provide a basic understanding of digital X-ray imaging technology and enables the reader to make an independent and educated assessment of the relative merits of each system.

  7. Radiography and tomography with polarized neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treimer, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Neutron imaging became important when, besides providing impressive radiographic and tomographic images of various objects, physical, quantification of chemical, morphological or other parameters could be derived from 2D or 3D images. The spatial resolution of approximately 50 µm (and less) yields real space images of the bulk of specimens with more than some cm3 in volume. Thus the physics or chemistry of structures in a sample can be compared with scattering functions obtained e.g. from neutron scattering. The advantages of using neutrons become more pronounced when the neutron spin comes into play. The interaction of neutrons with magnetism is unique due to their low attenuation by matter and because their spin is sensitive to magnetic fields. Magnetic fields, domains and quantum effects such as the Meissner effect and flux trapping can only be visualized and quantified in the bulk of matter by imaging with polarized neutrons. This additional experimental tool is gaining more and more importance. There is a large number of new fields that can be investigated by neutron imaging, not only in physics, but also in geology, archeology, cultural heritage, soil culture, applied material research, magnetism, etc. One of the top applications of polarized neutron imaging is the large field of superconductivity where the Meissner effect and flux pinning can be visualized and quantified. Here we will give a short summary of the results achieved by radiography and tomography with polarized neutrons.

  8. Beam Characterization at the Neutron Radiography Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Sarah Morgan; Jeffrey King

    2013-01-01

    The quality of a neutron imaging beam directly impacts the quality of radiographic images produced using that beam. Fully characterizing a neutron beam, including determination of the beam’s effective length-to-diameter ratio, neutron flux profile, energy spectrum, image quality, and beam divergence, is vital for producing quality radiographic images. This project characterized the east neutron imaging beamline at the Idaho National Laboratory Neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD). The experiments which measured the beam’s effective length-to-diameter ratio and image quality are based on American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards. An analysis of the image produced by a calibrated phantom measured the beam divergence. The energy spectrum measurements consist of a series of foil irradiations using a selection of activation foils, compared to the results produced by a Monte Carlo n-Particle (MCNP) model of the beamline. Improvement of the existing NRAD MCNP beamline model includes validation of the model’s energy spectrum and the development of enhanced image simulation methods. The image simulation methods predict the radiographic image of an object based on the foil reaction rate data obtained by placing a model of the object in front of the image plane in an MCNP beamline model.

  9. Quantitative studies on inner interfaces in conical metal joints using hard x-ray inline phase contrast radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabler, S.; Rack, T.; Rack, A.; Nelson, K.

    2010-10-01

    Quantitative investigation of micrometer and submicrometer gaps between joining metal surfaces is applied to conical plug-socket connections in dental titanium implants. Microgaps of widths well beyond the resolving power of industrial x-ray systems are imaged by synchrotron phase contrast radiography. Furthermore, by using an analytical model for the relatively simple sample geometry and applying it to numerical forward simulations of the optical Fresnel propagation, we show that quantitative measurements of the microgap width down to 0.1 μm are possible. Image data recorded at the BAMline (BESSY-II light source, Germany) are presented, with the resolving power of the imaging system being 4 μm in absorption mode and ˜14 μm in phase contrast mode (z2=0.74 m). Thus, phase contrast radiography, combined with numerical forward simulations, is capable of measuring the widths of gaps that are two orders of magnitude thinner than the conventional detection limit.

  10. A method to optimize the processing algorithm of a computed radiography system for chest radiography.

    PubMed

    Moore, C S; Liney, G P; Beavis, A W; Saunderson, J R

    2007-09-01

    A test methodology using an anthropomorphic-equivalent chest phantom is described for the optimization of the Agfa computed radiography "MUSICA" processing algorithm for chest radiography. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in the lung, heart and diaphragm regions of the phantom, and the "system modulation transfer function" (sMTF) in the lung region, were measured using test tools embedded in the phantom. Using these parameters the MUSICA processing algorithm was optimized with respect to low-contrast detectability and spatial resolution. Two optimum "MUSICA parameter sets" were derived respectively for maximizing the CNR and sMTF in each region of the phantom. Further work is required to find the relative importance of low-contrast detectability and spatial resolution in chest images, from which the definitive optimum MUSICA parameter set can then be derived. Prior to this further work, a compromised optimum MUSICA parameter set was applied to a range of clinical images. A group of experienced image evaluators scored these images alongside images produced from the same radiographs using the MUSICA parameter set in clinical use at the time. The compromised optimum MUSICA parameter set was shown to produce measurably better images.

  11. Quantitative NDE in the nuclear industry

    SciTech Connect

    Clough, R.B.

    1983-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on the use of nondestructive testing in the nuclear industry. Topics considered at the conference included probabilistic risk assessment, nondestructive tests of reactor pressure vessels, international safeguard implementation, the nondestructive testing of steam generators, the nondestructive testing of fuel materials, the nondestructive testing of primary pressure piping, applications of nondestructive testing technology to fuel materials safeguards and quality control, industrial radiography, and advanced nondestructive testing applications programs.

  12. A benchmark for comparison of dental radiography analysis algorithms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ching-Wei; Huang, Cheng-Ta; Lee, Jia-Hong; Li, Chung-Hsing; Chang, Sheng-Wei; Siao, Ming-Jhih; Lai, Tat-Ming; Ibragimov, Bulat; Vrtovec, Tomaž; Ronneberger, Olaf; Fischer, Philipp; Cootes, Tim F; Lindner, Claudia

    2016-07-01

    Dental radiography plays an important role in clinical diagnosis, treatment and surgery. In recent years, efforts have been made on developing computerized dental X-ray image analysis systems for clinical usages. A novel framework for objective evaluation of automatic dental radiography analysis algorithms has been established under the auspices of the IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging 2015 Bitewing Radiography Caries Detection Challenge and Cephalometric X-ray Image Analysis Challenge. In this article, we present the datasets, methods and results of the challenge and lay down the principles for future uses of this benchmark. The main contributions of the challenge include the creation of the dental anatomy data repository of bitewing radiographs, the creation of the anatomical abnormality classification data repository of cephalometric radiographs, and the definition of objective quantitative evaluation for comparison and ranking of the algorithms. With this benchmark, seven automatic methods for analysing cephalometric X-ray image and two automatic methods for detecting bitewing radiography caries have been compared, and detailed quantitative evaluation results are presented in this paper. Based on the quantitative evaluation results, we believe automatic dental radiography analysis is still a challenging and unsolved problem. The datasets and the evaluation software will be made available to the research community, further encouraging future developments in this field. (http://www-o.ntust.edu.tw/~cweiwang/ISBI2015/). Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Recent advances in fast neutron radiography for cargo inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowerby, B. D.; Tickner, J. R.

    2007-09-01

    Fast neutron radiography techniques are attractive for screening cargo for contraband such as narcotics and explosives. Neutrons have the required penetration, they interact with matter in a manner complementary to X-rays and they can be used to determine elemental composition. Compared to neutron interrogation techniques that measure secondary radiation (neutron or gamma-rays), neutron radiography systems are much more efficient and rapid and they are much more amenable to imaging. However, for neutron techniques to be successfully applied to cargo screening, they must demonstrate significant advantages over well-established X-ray techniques. This paper reviews recent developments and applications of fast neutron radiography for cargo inspection. These developments include a fast neutron and gamma-ray radiography system that utilizes a 14 MeV neutron generator as well as fast neutron resonance radiography systems that use variable energy quasi-monoenergetic neutrons and pulsed broad energy neutron beams. These systems will be discussed and compared with particular emphasis on user requirements, sources, detector systems, imaging ability and performance.

  14. Calibrating automatic exposure control devices for digital radiography.

    PubMed

    Doyle, P; Martin, C J

    2006-11-07

    The energy responses of digital radiography detectors differ from those of screen-film systems. To provide a consistent level of image quality at different tube potentials automatic exposure control (AEC) devices must be calibrated to suit the energy response of the image receptor with which they are intended for use. AEC calibration for digital radiography systems requires an alternative parameter to optical density, ideally one related to the quality of a digital image. Energy responses of computed radiography (CR) and indirect digital radiography (IDR) image receptors have been calculated, and compared with those for screen-film systems. Practical assessments of the relative sensitivities of a CR detector made using the detector dose indicator (DDI), pixel value and signal-to-noise ratio showed similar variations with tube potential. The DDI has been used to determine the correct kV compensation curve required to calibrate the AECs for the loss in detector sensitivity with tube potential. AECs are set up relative to a predetermined air kerma incident on the detector at 80 kV for CR and IDR systems using this curve and the method used is described. Factors influencing the calibration of AECs for digital radiography including techniques, types of phantom and contributions from scatter are reviewed, and practical methods recommended for use.

  15. Evaluation of a Noise Reduction Procedure for Chest Radiography

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Ryohei; Ishii, Rie; Kodani, Kazuhiko; Kanasaki, Yoshiko; Suyama, Hisashi; Watanabe, Masanari; Nakamoto, Masaki; Fukuoka, Yasushi

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of noise reduction procedure (NRP), a function in the new image processing for chest radiography. Methods A CXDI-50G Portable Digital Radiography System (Canon) was used for X-ray detection. Image noise was analyzed with a noise power spectrum (NPS) and a burger phantom was used for evaluation of density resolution. The usefulness of NRP was evaluated by chest phantom images and clinical chest radiography. We employed the Bureau of Radiological Health Method for scoring chest images while carrying out our observations. Results NPS through the use of NRP was improved compared with conventional image processing (CIP). The results in image quality showed high-density resolution through the use of NRP, so that chest radiography examination can be performed with a low dose of radiation. Scores were significantly higher than for CIP. Conclusion In this study, use of NRP led to a high evaluation in these so we are able to confirm the usefulness of NRP for clinical chest radiography. PMID:24574577

  16. Spectrum optimization for computed radiography mammography systems.

    PubMed

    Figl, Michael; Homolka, Peter; Semturs, Friedrich; Kaar, Marcus; Hummel, Johann

    2016-08-01

    Technical quality assurance is a key issue in breast screening protocols. While full-field digital mammography systems produce excellent image quality at low dose, it appears difficult with computed radiography (CR) systems to fulfill the requirements for image quality, and to keep the dose below the limits. However, powder plate CR systems are still widely used, e.g., they represent ∼30% of the devices in the Austrian breast cancer screening program. For these systems the selection of an optimal spectrum is a key issue. We investigated different anode/filter (A/F) combinations over the clinical range of tube voltages. The figure-of-merit (FOM) to be optimized was squared signal-difference-to-noise ratio divided by glandular dose. Measurements were performed on a Siemens Mammomat 3000 with a Fuji Profect reader (SiFu) and on a GE Senograph DMR with a Carestream reader (GECa). For 50mm PMMA the maximum FOM was found with a Mo/Rh spectrum between 27kVp and 29kVp, while with 60mm Mo/Rh at 28kVp (GECa) and W/Rh 25kVp (SiFu) were superior. For 70mm PMMA the Rh/Rh spectrum had a peak at about 31kVp (GECa). FOM increases from 10% to >100% are demonstrated. Optimization as proposed in this paper can either lead to dose reduction with comparable image quality or image quality improvement if necessary. For systems with limited A/F combinations the choice of tube voltage is of considerable importance. In this work, optimization of AEC parameters such as anode-filter combination and tube potential was demonstrated for mammographic CR systems. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Deterministic simulation of thermal neutron radiography and tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal Chowdhury, Rajarshi; Liu, Xin

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, thermal neutron radiography and tomography have gained much attention as one of the nondestructive testing methods. However, the application of thermal neutron radiography and tomography is hindered by their technical complexity, radiation shielding, and time-consuming data collection processes. Monte Carlo simulations have been developed in the past to improve the neutron imaging facility's ability. In this paper, a new deterministic simulation approach has been proposed and demonstrated to simulate neutron radiographs numerically using a ray tracing algorithm. This approach has made the simulation of neutron radiographs much faster than by previously used stochastic methods (i.e., Monte Carlo methods). The major problem with neutron radiography and tomography simulation is finding a suitable scatter model. In this paper, an analytic scatter model has been proposed that is validated by a Monte Carlo simulation.

  18. NEUTRON RADIOGRAPHY (NRAD) REACTOR 64-ELEMENT CORE UPGRADE

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess

    2014-03-01

    The neutron radiography (NRAD) reactor is a 250 kW TRIGA (registered) (Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics) Mark II , tank-type research reactor currently located in the basement, below the main hot cell, of the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). It is equipped with two beam tubes with separate radiography stations for the performance of neutron radiography irradiation on small test components. The interim critical configuration developed during the core upgrade, which contains only 62 fuel elements, has been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment. The final 64-fuel-element operational core configuration of the NRAD LEU TRIGA reactor has also been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment. Calculated eigenvalues differ significantly (approximately +/-1%) from the benchmark eigenvalue and have demonstrated sensitivity to the thermal scattering treatment of hydrogen in the U-Er-Zr-H fuel.

  19. [Significance of plain radiography in shoulder pain diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Botser, Itamar Busheri; Shapira, Shachar; Oran, Ariel; Avivi, Eran; Pritsch, Moshe

    2011-09-01

    Shoulder pain is a common complaint--almost 20% of the population will suffer shoulder pain during their life time. Despite the availability of newer imaging techniques for evaluation of the shoulder, the first imaging study should be radiography. Recently, ultrasonography of the shoulder has become one of the first studies performed. Sometimes, ultrasonography is conducted before radiography; moreover, many patients are being referred to a shoulder specialist without performing an X-ray. There is a plethora of pathologies that can cause shoulder pain--rotator cuff tears, impingement syndrome, calcified tendinitis, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, neoplasms and more. This review aims to show the significance of plain radiography in the diagnosis of shoulder pathologies, in order to encourage the use of this modality. In this paper we shall review the different causes of shoulder pain and their radiographic characteristics.

  20. Application of Neutron Radiography to Flow Visualization in Supercritical Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takenaka, N.; Sugimoto, K.; Takami, S.; Sugioka, K.; Tsukada, T.; Adschiri, T.; Saito, Y.

    Supercritical water is used in various chemical reaction processes including hydrothermal synthesis of metal oxide nano-particles, oxidation, chemical conversion of biomass and plastics. Density of the super critical water is much less than that of the sub-critical water. By using neutron radiography, Peterson et al. have studied salt precipitation processes in supercritical water and the flow pattern in a reverse-flow vessel for salt precipitation, and Balasko et al. have revealed the behaviour of supercritical water in a container. The nano-particles were made by mixing the super critical flow and the sub critical water solution. In the present study, neutron radiography was applied to the flow visualization of the super and sub critical water mixture in a T-junction made of stainless steel pipes for high pressure and temperature conditions to investigate their mixing process. Still images by a CCD camera were obtained by using the neutron radiography system at B4 port in KUR.

  1. Study of pipe thickness loss using a neutron radiography method

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, Abdul Aziz; Wahab, Aliff Amiru Bin; Yazid, Hafizal B.; Ahmad, Megat Harun Al Rashid B. Megat; Jamro, Rafhayudi B.; Azman, Azraf B.; Zin, Muhamad Rawi Md; Idris, Faridah Mohamad

    2014-02-12

    The purpose of this preliminary work is to study for thickness changes in objects using neutron radiography. In doing the project, the technique for the radiography was studied. The experiment was done at NUR-2 facility at TRIGA research reactor in Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Malaysia. Test samples of varying materials were used in this project. The samples were radiographed using direct technique. Radiographic images were recorded using Nitrocellulose film. The films obtained were digitized to processed and analyzed. Digital processing is done on the images using software Isee!. The images were processed to produce better image for analysis. The thickness changes in the image were measured to be compared with real thickness of the objects. From the data collected, percentages difference between measured and real thickness are below than 2%. This is considerably very low variation from original values. Therefore, verifying the neutron radiography technique used in this project.

  2. Studies of solid propellant combustion with pulsed radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godai, T.; Tanemura, T.; Fujiwara, T.; Shimizu, M.

    1987-01-01

    Pulsed radiography was applied to observe solid propellant surface regression during rocket motor operation. Using a 150 KV flash X-ray system manufactured by the Field Emission Corporation and two kinds of film suppliers, images of the propellant surface of a 5 cm diameter end burning rocket motor were recorded on film. The repetition frame rate of 8 pulses per second and the pulse train length of 10 pulses are limited by the capability of the power supply and the heat build up within the X-ray tube, respectively. The experiment demonstrated the effectiveness of pulsed radiography for observing solid propellant surface regression. Measuring the position of burning surface images on film with a microdensitometer, quasi-instantaneous burning rate as a function of pressure and the variation of characteristic velocity with pressure and gas stay time were obtained. Other research items to which pulsed radiography can be applied are also suggested.

  3. Proton Radiography as an electromagnetic field and density perturbation diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Mackinnon, A; Patel, P; Town, R; Edwards, M; Phillips, T; Lerner, S; Price, D; Hicks, D; Key, M; Hatchett, S; Wilks, S; King, J; Snavely, R; Freeman, R; Boehlly, T; Koenig, M; Martinolli, E; Lepape, S; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A; Audebert, P; Gauthier, J; Borghesi, M; Romagnani, L; Toncian, T; Pretzler, G; Willi, O

    2004-04-15

    Laser driven proton beams have been used to diagnose transient fields and density perturbations in laser produced plasmas. Grid deflectometry techniques have been applied to proton radiography to obtain precise measurements of proton beam angles caused by electromagnetic fields in laser produced plasmas. Application of proton radiography to laser driven implosions has demonstrated that density conditions in compressed media can be diagnosed with MeV protons. This data has shown that proton radiography can provide unique insight into transient electromagnetic fields in super critical density plasmas and provide a density perturbation diagnostics in compressed matter . PACS numbers: 52.50.Jm, 52.40.Nk, 52.40.Mj, 52.70.Kz

  4. Limiting the use of routine radiography for acute ankle injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Cockshott, W. P.; Jenkin, J. K.; Pui, M.

    1983-01-01

    In the diagnosis of ankle injuries routine radiography is often productive. An international survey of the average number of radiographs made of injured ankles suggested that two projections are adequate to detect fractures. This was confirmed in a prospective study of 242 patients coming to a hospital emergency department with recent ankle injuries. All the fractures could be identified on an anteroposterior or a lateral projection, although some were more obvious on an oblique view. As well, all the fractures were associated with malleolar soft-tissue swelling. Thus, radiography for acute ankle injuries could safely be restricted to patients with soft-tissue swelling, and fractures could be diagnosed using only two routine projections, though for management purposes additional projections might be needed. With a policy of limiting the use of radiography substantial cost reductions are possible. Images FIG. 1 PMID:6407744

  5. [Cost-effectiveness evaluation of a digital radiography system].

    PubMed

    Guillaume, L; Joris, T; Mandry, D; Kammacher, L; Claudon, M

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of a completely automated digital radiography (DR) unit in a pediatric radiology department on productivity. Materials and methods. Comparative evaluation of DR and computerized radiography (CR) units on 193 patients imaged in a pediatric radiology department. The time to complete each step of all examinations was recorded. Half of the exams were performed using CR and the other half was performed using DR. There was a 52% time gain for simple projection exams using DR and a 51% time gain for dual projection exams using DR (p<0.001). A workflow study performed a 9 month period showed that DR could absorb 84% of work previously performed on two conventional radiography units. DR is necessary for digital imaging departments to increase productivity, while providing added ergonomic comfort and flexibility. It is particularly well suited for pediatric imaging departments.

  6. Magnifying lens for 800 MeV proton radiography.

    PubMed

    Merrill, F E; Campos, E; Espinoza, C; Hogan, G; Hollander, B; Lopez, J; Mariam, F G; Morley, D; Morris, C L; Murray, M; Saunders, A; Schwartz, C; Thompson, T N

    2011-10-01

    This article describes the design and performance of a magnifying magnetic-lens system designed, built, and commissioned at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for 800 MeV flash proton radiography. The technique of flash proton radiography has been developed at LANL to study material properties under dynamic loading conditions through the analysis of time sequences of proton radiographs. The requirements of this growing experimental program have resulted in the need for improvements in spatial radiographic resolution. To meet these needs, a new magnetic lens system, consisting of four permanent magnet quadrupoles, has been developed. This new lens system was designed to reduce the second order chromatic aberrations, the dominant source of image blur in 800 MeV proton radiography, as well as magnifying the image to reduce the blur contribution from the detector and camera systems. The recently commissioned lens system performed as designed, providing nearly a factor of three improvement in radiographic resolution.

  7. Pressure Indication of 3013 Inner Containers Using Digital Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    HENSEL, SJ

    2004-04-15

    Plutonium bearing materials packaged for long term storage per the Department of Energy Standard 3013 (DOE-STD-3013) are required to be examined periodically in a non-destructive manner (i.e. without compromising the storage containers) for pressure buildup. Radiography is the preferred technology for performing the examinations. The concept is to measure and record the container lid position. As a can pressurizes the lid will deflect outward and thus provide an indication of the internal pressure. A radiograph generated within 30 days of creation of each storage container serves as the baseline from which future surveillance examinations will be compared. A problem with measuring the lid position was discovered during testing of a digital radiography system. The solution was to provide a distinct feature upon the lower surface of the container lid from which the digital radiography system could easily track the lid position.

  8. An on-line video image processing system for real-time neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujine, Shigenori; Yoneda, Kenji; Kanda, Keiji

    1983-09-01

    The neutron radiography system installed at the E-2 experimental hole of the KUR (Kyoto University Reactor) has been used for some NDT applications in the nuclear field. The on-line video image processing system of this facility is introduced in this paper. A 0.5 mm resolution in images was obtained by using a super high quality TV camera developed for X-radiography viewing a NE-426 neutron-sensitive scintillator. The image of the Ne-426 on a CRT can be observed directly and visually, thus many test samples can be sequentially observed when necessary for industrial purposes. The video image signals from the TV camera are digitized, with a 33 ms delay, through a video A/D converter (ADC) and can be stored in the image bufer (32KB DRAM) of a microcomputer (Z-80) system. The digitized pictures are taken with 16 levels of gray scale and resolved to 240×256 picture elements (pixels) on a monochrome CRT, with the capability also to display 16 distinct colors on a RGB video display. The direct image of this system could be satisfactory for penetrating the side plates to test MTR type reactor fuels and for the investigation of moving objects.

  9. A dynamic material discrimination algorithm for dual MV energy X-ray digital radiography.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Li, Ruizhe; Zhang, Siyuan; Zhao, Tiao; Chen, Zhiqiang

    2016-08-01

    Dual-energy X-ray radiography has become a well-established technique in medical, industrial, and security applications, because of its material or tissue discrimination capability. The main difficulty of this technique is dealing with the materials overlapping problem. When there are two or more materials along the X-ray beam path, its material discrimination performance will be affected. In order to solve this problem, a new dynamic material discrimination algorithm is proposed for dual-energy X-ray digital radiography, which can also be extended to multi-energy X-ray situations. The algorithm has three steps: α-curve-based pre-classification, decomposition of overlapped materials, and the final material recognition. The key of the algorithm is to establish a dual-energy radiograph database of both pure basis materials and pair combinations of them. After the pre-classification results, original dual-energy projections of overlapped materials can be dynamically decomposed into two sets of dual-energy radiographs of each pure material by the algorithm. Thus, more accurate discrimination results can be provided even with the existence of the overlapping problem. Both numerical and experimental results that prove the validity and effectiveness of the algorithm are presented.

  10. Upgrade of the DIANE: Performance improvement in thermalization of fast neutrons for radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cluzeau, S.; Le Tourneur, P.; Dance, W. E.

    1997-02-01

    In a small neutron radiography system such as DIANE, which is based on a sealed-tube neutron generator, the maximum possible efficiency of fast neutron thermalization must be achieved, consistent with realistic industrial and manufacturing practices. To this end, MCNP simulations and experiments have been performed for further enhancing the performance of the moderator/collimator assembly* in the DIANE. These calculations and experiments have shown that a fast neutron reflector/multiplier can be useful in increasing the number of fast neutrons entering the moderator. Various heavy metals with high inelastic cross sections for fast neutrons and low capture cross sections have been tested. Results indicate that the best moderating materials for this application are beryllium, zirconium hydride, and high-density polyethylene, and the best reflector/multiplier material for this use is tungsten. The MCNP calculations indicate that for a fast neutron output of 4×1011n s-1 in 4π steradians, a DIANE can be fabricated which produces a thermal neutron beam for radiography having a flux of approximately 2.1×105n cm-2 s-1 at an effective collimator ratio of 30, or about 7.5×104n cm-2 s-1 at a collimator ratio of 50.

  11. Comparative evaluation of digital radiography versus conventional radiography of fractured skulls.

    PubMed

    Langen, H J; Klein, H M; Wein, B; Stargardt, A; Günther, R W

    1993-08-01

    The authors assessed the relative efficacy of conventional and digital storage-phosphor radiographs for the detection of skull fractures. Fifty conventional film-screen radiographs (FSR) and 50 digital storage-phosphor radiographs (DR) with 66 fractures were compared. Five radiologists evaluated image quality and fracture detectability. The results were analyzed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. With a standard exposure, the ability to evaluate skull fractures was equally good with either technique (ROC area for DR, 0.8954; for FSR, 0.8870). Digital radiography was superior in evaluating nasal bone. For petrosal bone, the DR image simulates an underexposure. This disadvantage compared with FSR can be compensated by image postprocessing. In evaluation of skull fractures, radiologists performance with DR is equivalent to FSR.

  12. Evaluation of simulated external root resorptions with digital radiography and digital subtraction radiography.

    PubMed

    Ono, Evelise; Medici Filho, Edmundo; Faig Leite, Horacio; Tanaka, Jefferson Luis Oshiro; De Moraes, Mari Eli Leonelli; De Melo Castilho, Julio Cezar

    2011-03-01

    Root resorption can cause damage in orthodontic patients. Digital subtraction radiography (DSR) is a useful resource for the detection of mineral losses. The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of digital radiography (DR) and DSR in detecting simulated external root resorption. Examiner agreement between the 2 techniques was also evaluated. Root resorptions of various sizes were simulated on the apical and lingual aspects of 49 teeth from 9 dry human mandibles. The teeth were radiographed in standardized conditions. The radiographs were registered with Regeemy Image Registration and Mosaicking (version 0.2.43-RCB, DPI-INPE, São José dos Campos, São Paulo, Brazil) and subtracted with Image Tool (University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio). The subtracted images and the digital radiographs were evaluated by 3 oral radiologists. No statistically significant differences were found for the methods in the detection of apical root resorptions, independently from lesion size, and of lingual resorptions of 1.2 mm or greater. DSR was significantly better than DR for detection of lingual resorptions up to 1 mm. Resorptions less than 0.5 mm were not precisely detected by either method. DSR provided better intraexaminer and interexaminer agreement than did DR. Both methods are precise for detection of apical root resorptions as small as 0.5 mm and lingual resorptions of 1 mm or more. However, DSR frequently performed better than did DR. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Neutron radiography and tomography facility at IBR-2 reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlenko, D. P.; Kichanov, S. E.; Lukin, E. V.; Rutkauskas, A. V.; Belushkin, A. V.; Bokuchava, G. D.; Savenko, B. N.

    2016-05-01

    An experimental station for investigations using neutron radiography and tomography was developed at the upgraded high-flux pulsed IBR-2 reactor. The 20 × 20 cm neutron beam is formed by the system of collimators with the characteristic parameter L/D varying from 200 to 2000. The detector system is based on a 6LiF/ZnS scintillation screen; images are recorded using a high-sensitivity video camera based on the high-resolution CCD matrix. The results of the first neutron radiography and tomography experiments at the developed facility are presented.

  14. Quantitative radiography of magnetic fields using neutron spin phase imaging.

    PubMed

    Piegsa, F M; van den Brandt, B; Hautle, P; Kohlbrecher, J; Konter, J A

    2009-04-10

    We report on a novel neutron radiography technique that uses the Ramsey principle, a method similar to neutron spin echo. For the first time quantitative imaging measurements of magnetic objects and fields could be performed. The strength of the spin-dependent magnetic interaction is detected by a change in the Larmor precession frequency of the neutron spins. Hence, one obtains in addition to the normal attenuation radiography image a so-called neutron spin phase image, which provides a two-dimensional projection of the magnetic field integrated over the neutron flight path.

  15. Energy-selective neutron radiography and tomography at FRM.

    PubMed

    Kardjilov, Nikolay; Schillinger, Burkhard; Steichele, Erich

    2004-10-01

    At the reactor FRM at Technical University of Munich energy-selective neutron radiography and tomography experiments were performed. For an energy separation of the neutrons from the primary beam a mechanical velocity selector was used. The radiography images show a different contrast of the investigated elements for neutron energies below and above their Bragg-cutoff energy. A comparison between the standard and energy-selective neutron tomography is presented. In spite of a reduction of the neutron intensity due to the velocity selector technique a realistic experimental time in order of some hours for the tomography experiment was achieved.

  16. Subtraction Radiography for the Diagnosis of Bone Lesions in Dogs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-31

    AD-A142 726 SUBTRACTION RADIOGRAPHY FOR THE DIAGNOSIS OF BONE • LESIONS IN DOGS (U) ARMY INST OF DENTAL RESEARCH WASHINGTON DC M P RETHMRN ET AL. 31...11sk01 o -py- Rt one. Lesions in Dogs 11,4 -OG. 3(0?NUL AU THOR~q caraACT 0R GRANT NUMBER,&) * * __ M.P. Rethman, U.E. Ruttiman, R.B. O’Neal, R.I...research article titled "Subtraction Radiography for the Diagnosis of Bone Lesions in Dogs " solely to the Journal of Periodontology for review and

  17. Proton radiography, nuclear cross sections and multiple Coulomb scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Sjue, Sky K.

    2015-11-04

    The principles behind proton radiography including multiple Coulomb scattering are discussed for a purely imaginary square well nucleus in the eikonal approximation. It is found that a very crude model can reproduce the angular dependence of the cross sections measured at 24 GeV/c. The largest differences are ~3% for the 4.56 mrad data, and ~4% for the 6.68 mrad data. The prospect of understanding how to model deterministically high-energy proton radiography over a very large range of energies is promising, but it should be tested more thoroughly.

  18. Pilot study of bovine interdigital cassetteless computed radiography.

    PubMed

    El-Shafaey, El-Sayed Ahmed Awad; Aoki, Takahiro; Ishii, Mitsuo; Yamada, Kazutaka

    2013-11-01

    Twenty-one limbs of bovine cadavers (42 digits) were exposed to interdigital cassetteless imaging plate using computed radiography. The radiographic findings included exostosis, a rough planta surface, osteolysis of the apex of the distal phalanx and widening of the laminar zone between the distal phalanx and the hoof wall. All these findings were confirmed by computed tomography. The hindlimbs (19 digits) showed more changes than the forelimbs (10 digits), particularly in the lateral distal phalanx. The cassetteless computed radiography technique is expected to be an easily applicable method for the distal phalanx rather than a conventional cassette-plate and/or the film-screen cassetteless methods.

  19. Pilot Study of Bovine Interdigital Cassetteless Computed Radiography

    PubMed Central

    EL-SHAFAEY, El-Sayed Ahmed Awad; AOKI, Takahiro; ISHII, Mitsuo; YAMADA, Kazutaka

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Twenty-one limbs of bovine cadavers (42 digits) were exposed to interdigital cassetteless imaging plate using computed radiography. The radiographic findings included exostosis, a rough planta surface, osteolysis of the apex of the distal phalanx and widening of the laminar zone between the distal phalanx and the hoof wall. All these findings were confirmed by computed tomography. The hindlimbs (19 digits) showed more changes than the forelimbs (10 digits), particularly in the lateral distal phalanx. The cassetteless computed radiography technique is expected to be an easily applicable method for the distal phalanx rather than a conventional cassette-plate and/or the film-screen cassetteless methods. PMID:23782542

  20. Californium Multiplier Part I: design for neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Crosbie, K.L.; Preskitt, C.A.; John, J.; Hastings, J.D.

    1982-01-01

    The Californium Multiplier (CFX) is a subcritical assembly of enriched uranium surrounding a californium-252 neutron source. The function of the CFX is to multiply the neutrons emitted by the source to a number sufficient for neutron radiography. The CFX is designed to provide a collimated beam of thermal neutrons from which the gamma radiation is filtered, and the scattered neutrons are reduced to make it suitable for high resolution radiography. The entire system has inherent safety features, which provide for system and personnel safety, and it operates at moderate cost. In Part I, the CFX and the theory of its operation are described in detail.

  1. Phosphor plate radiography: an integral component of the filmless practice.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Scott

    2010-11-01

    The federal government has mandated that all dental and medical patient records be electronic in 3 years. Practices using film radiography will be unable to comply with this mandate. PSP radiography is not only a surprisingly convenient way to transition from film to digital imaging, it can also greatly enhance the practice's productivity, profitability, and patient satisfaction. Modern, forward-thinking practices will want to take full advantage of PSP's superiority by making this transition now rather than waiting until they are forced to.

  2. X-radiography of trace fossils in limestones and dolostones from the Jurassic Smackover Formation, south Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Esposito, R.A.; Castleman, S.P.; King, D.T. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    X-radiography has been useful in studying biogenic sedimentary structures in unconsolidated sediments but the technique has not been applied often to the study of hard carbonate rock. The authors have applied x-radiography to the study of the lower part of the Smackover to enhance the complete petrologic description of the rock. The lower Smackover has many dense micrite intervals and intervals of monotonous, thin graded beds. Parts of the lower Smackover is also dolomitized. None of the above rocks contains significant amount of skeletal debris and trace fossils are not generally obvious in an etched slab of core. In limestone, they have detected well-preserved trace fossils by x-radiography, however. The dolostones show no traces using our method. In limestones, the traces are marked by minute amounts of finely divided iron sulfides. This causes a slight density difference resulting in greater x-ray absorption. They recognize two main trace-fossil types: a Thalassinoides best seen in slabs cut parallel to bedding and a Zoophycos best seen in slabs cut perpendicular to bedding. The technique requires a slab cut 8 mm thick with parallel flat surfaces and a medical x-ray unit using accelerating voltages of 66 kV and 10 mas. Traces are most successfully imaged on industrial-quality films.

  3. 42 CFR 37.51 - Interpreting and classifying chest radiographs-digital radiography systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...-digital radiography systems. 37.51 Section 37.51 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... of Chest Radiographs § 37.51 Interpreting and classifying chest radiographs—digital radiography systems. (a) For each chest radiograph obtained at an approved facility using a digital radiography...

  4. Measuring microfocal spots using digital radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, David A; Ewert, Uwe

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of microfocus spot size can be important for several reasons: (1) Quality assurance during manufacture of microfocus tubes; (2) Tracking performance and stability of microfocus tubes; (3) Determining magnification is especially important for digital radiography where the native spatial resolution of the digital system is not adequate for the application; and (4) Knowledge of unsharpness from the focal spot alone. The European Standard EN 12543-5 is based on a simple geometrical method of calculating focal spot size from unsharpness of high magnification film radiographs. The following equations are used for the focal spot size measurement: By similar triangles the following equations are presupposed: f/a = U/b and M = (a+b)/a. These equations can be combined to yield the well known expression: U = f(M - 1). Solving for f, f = U/(M-1). Therefore, the focal spot size, f, can be calculated by measuring the radiographic unsharpness and magnification of a known object. This is the basis for these tests. The European standard actually uses one-half of the unsharpness (which are then added together) from both sides of the object to avoid additional unsharpness contributions due to edge transmission unsharpness of the round test object (the outside of the object is measured). So the equation becomes f = (1/2 U{sub 1} + 1/2 U{sub 2})/(M-1). In practice 1/2 U is measured from the 50% to the 90% signal points on the transition profile from ''black'' to ''white,'' (positive image) or attenuated to unattenuated portion of the image. The 50% to 90% points are chosen as a best fit to an assumed Gaussian radiation distribution from the focal spot and to avoid edge transmission effects. 1/2 U{sub 1} + 1/2 U{sub 2} corresponds about to the full width at half height of a Gaussian focal spot. A highly absorbing material (Tungsten, Tungsten Alloy, or Platinum) is used for the object. Either wires or a sphere are used as the object to eliminate alignment issues. One

  5. Brighter Screens for Nondestructive Digital X-ray Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Jr., A. C.; Bell, Z. W.; Carpenter, D. A.

    2003-09-15

    Fine resolution, bright X-ray screens are needed for digital radiography and material characterization at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12). Current technology is simply not adequate for transferring high-energy X-ray images to visible light for demanding digital applications. Low energy radiography and especially emerging tomographic technologies are severely hampered for Y-12 nondestructive evaluation (NDE) applications by dim screens with poor resolution. Also, the development of more advanced materials characterization techniques, such as electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), is driven by a design agency desire for tighter specifications and more uniform materials. Brighter screens would allow us to probe materials on a finer scale, leading to a better understanding of material behavior. A number of X-ray screen materials were studied that would be suitable for direct replacement in existing digital imaging systems. Spectroscopic evaluations were first made for a several candidates and indicated that lutetium orthosilicate (LSO) would be a promising candidate for MeV images. A relative comparison of brightness at various energies was then completed which showed that cesium iodide (CsI) could increase brightness by over an order of magnitude. Since image quality is also important for better screens, the resolving capabilities of candidate materials were measured. Resolution measurements were completed at X-ray peak energies up to 420KeV with magnified optical imaging systems, and indicated that LSO and Industrial Quality Incorporated glass (IQI) exhibited higher resolution than the CsI screen. The results give a choice of materials that can be tailored to the particular test under consideration. If high-speed images are necessary and some resolution can be sacrificed, the CsI screen will be a good choice. The screen can be replaced by an IQI or LSO unit if higher resolution is needed later, for instance to focus in on a region of interest. A number of

  6. Neutron radiography determination of water diffusivity in fired clay brick.

    PubMed

    El Abd, A; Czachor, A; Milczarek, J

    2009-04-01

    The real time neutron and gamma radiography station at Maria reactor, Institute of Atomic Energy, Swierk, Poland, was used to investigate the isothermal water absorption into fired clay brick samples. The investigated brick is different from the bricks reported in El Abd and Milczarek [2004. Neutron radiology study of water absorption in porous building materials: anomalous diffusing analysis. J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 37, 2305-2313] in density and chemical composition. Neutron radiography images were acquired regularly as the absorption time elapses. The water content, theta, along the flow direction, x, namely the water profiles theta(x,t) and the water front position as a function of the absorption time, t, were extracted from neutron radiography images. The results were discussed in terms of the macroscopic theory of water infiltration in unsaturated porous media. It was shown that the water front position followed the square root t-scaling (x(m)=phi(m) square root t) and the profiles (theta-phi) converged to a universal one master curve. The water diffusivity was analytically determined from the experimental results. It has the so-called hypo-diffusive character, namely its gradient with respect to the water content is positive. Neutron radiography is a powerful method to distinguish among the unsaturated flow in different porous construction materials.

  7. Heavy-ion radiography and heavy-ion computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I.; Holley, W.R.; McFarland, E.W.; Tobias, C.a.

    1982-02-01

    Heavy-ion projection and CT radiography is being developed into a safe, low-dose, noninvasive radiological procedure that can quantitate and image small density differences in human tissues. The applications to heavy-ion mammography and heavy-ion CT imaging of the brain in clinical patients suggest their potential value in cancer diagnosis.

  8. Radiography Capabilities for Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes

    SciTech Connect

    Walstrom, Peter Lowell; Garnett, Robert William; Chapman, Catherine A. B; Salazar, Harry Richard; Otoole, Joseph Alfred; Barber, Ronald L.; Gomez, Tony Simon

    2015-04-28

    The Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes (MaRIE) experimental facility will be used to discover and design the advanced materials needed to meet 21st century national security and energy security challenges. This new facility will provide the new tools scientists need to develop next-generation materials that will perform predictably and on-demand for currently unattainable lifetimes in extreme environments. The MaRIE facility is based on upgrades to the existing LANSCE 800-MeV proton linac and a new 12-GeV electron linac and associated X-ray FEL to provide simultaneous multiple probe beams, and new experimental areas. In addition to the high-energy photon probe beam, both electron and proton radiography capabilities will be available at the MaRIE facility. Recently, detailed radiography system studies have been performed to develop conceptual layouts of high-magnification electron and proton radiography systems that can meet the experimental requirements for the expected first experiments to be performed at the facility. A description of the radiography systems, their performance requirements, and a proposed facility layout are presented.

  9. Common positioning errors in panoramic radiography: A review

    PubMed Central

    Rondon, Rafael Henrique Nunes; Pereira, Yamba Carla Lara

    2014-01-01

    Professionals performing radiographic examinations are responsible for maintaining optimal image quality for accurate diagnoses. These professionals must competently execute techniques such as film manipulation and processing to minimize patient exposure to radiation. Improper performance by the professional and/or patient may result in a radiographic image of unsatisfactory quality that can also lead to a misdiagnosis and the development of an inadequate treatment plan. Currently, the most commonly performed extraoral examination is panoramic radiography. The invention of panoramic radiography has resulted in improvements in image quality with decreased exposure to radiation and at a low cost. However, this technique requires careful, accurate positioning of the patient's teeth and surrounding maxillofacial bone structure within the focal trough. Therefore, we reviewed the literature for the most common types of positioning errors in panoramic radiography to suggest the correct techniques. We would also discuss how to determine if the most common positioning errors occurred in panoramic radiography, such as in the positioning of the patient's head, tongue, chin, or body. PMID:24701452

  10. Beam Physics in X-Ray Radiography Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y J; Caporaso, G J; Chambers, F W; Falabella, S; Goldin, F J; Guethlein, G; Lauer, E L; McCarrick, J F; Neurath, R; Richardson, R A; Sampayan, S; Weir, J T

    2002-12-02

    Performance of x-ray radiography facilities requires focusing the electron beams to sub-millimeter spots on the x-ray converters. Ions extracted from a converter by impact of a high intensity beam can partially neutralize the beam space charge and change the final focusing system. We will discuss these ion effects and mitigation.

  11. Point Scattered Function (PScF) for fast neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Mohamed H.

    2009-08-01

    Fast neutron radiography opened up a new range of possibilities to image extremely dense objects. The removal of the scattering effect is one of the most challenging problems in neutron imaging. Neutron scattering in fast neutron radiography did not receive much attention compared with X-ray and thermal neutron radiography. The purpose of this work is to investigate the behavior of the Point Scattered Function (PScF) as applied in fast neutron radiography. The PScF was calculated using MCNP as a spatial distribution of scattered neutrons over the detector surface for one emitting source element. Armament and explosives materials, namely, Rifle steel, brass, aluminum and trinitrotoluene (TNT) were simulated. Effect of various sample thickness and sample-to-detector distance were considered. Simulated sample geometries included a slab with varying thickness, a sphere with varying radii, and a cylinder with varying base radii. Different neutron sources, namely, Cf-252, DT as well as DD neutron sources were considered. Neutron beams with zero degree divergence angle; and beams with varying angles related to the normal to the source plane were simulated. Curve fitting of the obtained PScF, in the form of Gaussian function, were given to be used in future work using image restoration codes. Analytical representation of the height as well as the Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) of the obtained Gaussian functions eliminates the need to calculate the PScF for sample parameters that were not investigated in this study.

  12. A technique for pelvic radiography in the standing horse.

    PubMed

    Barrett, E L; Talbot, A M; Driver, A J; Barr, F J; Barr, A R S

    2006-05-01

    An alternative technique of radiographing the pelvis in the standing horse is required, to avoid the risks associated with general anaesthesia. That lateral oblique radiography in the standing horse would be a useful technique in the investigation of pelvic injury. To describe the technique of lateral oblique pelvic radiography in the standing horse and demonstrate the feasibility and usefulness of this technique. A technique for lateral oblique radiography in the standing horse was devised and retrospective review made of radiographic findings in 18 clinical cases. The caudal iliac shaft, greater trochanter of the femur, femoral head, acetabulum and coxofemoral articulation on the side under investigation were visualised consistently using this technique. Of the 18 cases, 3 iliac shaft fractures, 1 acetabular fracture, 2 coxofemoral luxations and 4 horses with new bone formation around the coxofemoral joint and/or proximal femur were identified. Lateral oblique radiography in the standing, conscious horse can be used to investigate conditions affecting the caudal iliac shaft, coxofemoral articulation and proximal femur in the horse. The technique is straightforward, noninvasive and useful in the investigation of horses with suspected pelvic injury. However, not all pelvic injuries would be identified, and normal radiographic findings do not rule out injury or fractures elsewhere in the pelvis.

  13. Method and Apparatus for Computed Imaging Backscatter Radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shedlock, Daniel (Inventor); Meng, Christopher (Inventor); Sabri, Nissia (Inventor); Dugan, Edward T. (Inventor); Jacobs, Alan M. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Systems and methods of x-ray backscatter radiography are provided. A single-sided, non-destructive imaging technique utilizing x-ray radiation to image subsurface features is disclosed, capable of scanning a region using a fan beam aperture and gathering data using rotational motion.

  14. Organ dose variability and trends in tomosynthesis and radiography.

    PubMed

    Hoye, Jocelyn; Zhang, Yakun; Agasthya, Greeshma; Sturgeon, Greg; Kapadia, Anuj; Segars, W Paul; Samei, Ehsan

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate relationships between patient attributes and organ dose for a population of computational phantoms for 20 tomosynthesis and radiography protocols. Organ dose was estimated from 54 adult computational phantoms (age: 18 to 78 years, weight 52 to 117 kg) using a validated Monte-Carlo simulation (PENELOPE) of a system capable of performing tomosynthesis and radiography. The geometry and field of view for each exam were modeled to match clinical protocols. For each protocol, the energy deposited in each organ was estimated by the simulations, converted to dose units, and then normalized by exposure in air. Dose to radiosensitive organs was studied as a function of average patient thickness in the region of interest and as a function of body mass index. For tomosynthesis, organ doses were also studied as a function of x-ray tube position. This work developed comprehensive information for organ dose dependencies across a range of tomosynthesis and radiography protocols. The results showed a protocol-dependent exponential decrease with an increasing patient size. There was a variability in organ dose across the patient population, which should be incorporated in the metrology of organ dose. The results can be used to prospectively and retrospectively estimate organ dose for tomosynthesis and radiography.

  15. Trichobezoars Detected and Treated Based on Plain Radiography.

    PubMed

    Barrows, Amy; Vachon, Tyler; Campin, Richard C; Ignacio, Romeo C

    2015-10-01

    Bezoars are conglomerations of indigestible material that become trapped in the gastrointestinal tract. We present a case of an 8-year-old female child diagnosed with a gastric bezoar solely on plain radiography and treated with abdominal surgical exploration and removal. In addition, traditional characteristic radiographic findings and treatment options for bezoars found in the current literature are reviewed.

  16. Quality aspects of digital radiography in general dental practice.

    PubMed

    Hellén-Halme, Kristina

    2007-01-01

    The number of dentists who have converted from conventional film radiography to digital radiography continues to grow. A digital system has numerous advantages, but there are also many new aspects to consider. The overall aim of this thesis was to study how digital radiography was used in general dental practices. The specific aims were to study how different factors affected image quality. To determine whether there were any differences in image quality between conventional film radiographs and digital radiographs, 4863 images (540 cases) were evaluated. The cases had been sent to the Swedish Dental Insurance Office for prior treatment approval. The image quality of digital radiographs was found to be significantly lower than that of film radiographs. This result led to a questionnaire study of dentists experienced in digital radiography. In 2003, a questionnaire was sent to the 139 general practice dentists who worked with digital radiography in Skine, Sweden; the response rate was 94%. Many general practice dentists had experienced several problems (65%), and less than half of the digital systems (40%) underwent some kind of quality control. One of the weaker links in the technical chain of digital radiography appeared to be the monitor. A field study to 19 dentists at their clinics found that the brightness and contrast settings of the monitors had to be adjusted to obtain the subjectively best image quality. The ambient light in the evaluation room was also found to affect the diagnostic outcome of low-contrast patterns in radiographs. To evaluate the effects of ambient light and technical adjustments of the monitor, a study using standardised set-ups was designed. Seven observers evaluated radiographs of 100 extracted human teeth for approximal caries under five different combinations of brightness and contrast settings on two different occasions with high and low ambient light levels in the evaluation room. The ability to diagnose carious lesions was found

  17. Diagnostic reference levels in intraoral dental radiography in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Kyung; Han, Won-Jeong; Choi, Jin-Woo; Jung, Yun-Hoa; Yoon, Suk-Ja; Lee, Jae-Seo

    2012-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to survey the radiographic exposure parameters, to measure the patient doses for intraoral dental radiography nationwide, and thus to establish the diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) in intraoral dental X-ray examination in Korea. One hundred two intraoral dental radiographic machines from all regions of South Korea were selected for this study. Radiographic exposure parameters, size of hospital, type of image receptor system, installation duration of machine, and type of dental X-ray machine were documented. Patient entrance doses (PED) and dose-area products (DAP) were measured three times at the end of the exit cone of the X-ray unit with a DAP meter (DIAMENTOR M4-KDK, PTW, Freiburg, Germany) for adult mandibular molar intraoral dental radiography, and corrections were made for room temperature and pressure. Measured PED and DAP were averaged and compared according to the size of hospital, type of image receptor system, installation duration, and type of dental X-ray machine. The mean exposure parameters were 62.6 kVp, 7.9 mA, and 0.5 second for adult mandibular molar intraoral dental radiography. The mean patient dose was 2.11 mGy (PED) and 59.4 mGycm(2) (DAP) and the third quartile one 3.07 mGy (PED) and 87.4 mGycm(2) (DAP). Doses at university dental hospitals were lower than those at dental clinics (p<0.05). Doses of digital radiography (DR) type were lower than those of film-based type (p<0.05). We recommend 3.1 mGy (PED), 87.4 mGycm(2) (DAP) as the DRLs in adult mandibular molar intraoral dental radiography in Korea.

  18. Repeat rates in digital chest radiography and strategies for improvement.

    PubMed

    Fintelmann, Florian; Pulli, Benjamin; Abedi-Tari, Faezeh; Trombley, Maureen; Shore, Mary-Theresa; Shepard, Jo-Anne; Rosenthal, Daniel I

    2012-05-01

    To determine the repeat rate (RR) of chest radiographs acquired with portable computed radiography (CR) and installed direct radiography (DR) and to develop and assess strategies designed to decrease the RR. The RR and reasons for repeated digital chest radiographs were documented over the course of 16 months while a task force of thoracic radiologists, technologist supervisors, technologists, and information technology specialists continued to examine the workflow for underlying causes. Interventions decreasing the RR were designed and implemented. The initial RR of digital chest radiographs was 3.6% (138/3818) for portable CR and 13.3% (476/3575) for installed DR systems. By combining RR measurement with workflow analysis, targets for technical and teaching interventions were identified. The interventions decreased the RR to 1.8% (81/4476) for portable CR and to 8.2% (306/3748) for installed DR. We found the RR of direct digital chest radiography to be significantly higher than that of computed chest radiography. We believe this is due to the ease with which repeat images can be obtained and discarded, and it suggests the need for ongoing surveillance of RR. We were able to demonstrate that strategies to lower the RR, which had been developed in the era of film-based imaging, can be adapted to the digital environment. On the basis of our findings, we encourage radiologists to assess their own departmental RRs for direct digital chest radiography and to consider similar interventions if necessary to achieve acceptable RRs for this modality.

  19. Digital radiography: a survey of dentists in Hawai'i.

    PubMed

    Brady, Daniel T

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of digital radiography among dentists in Hawai'i and report their experiences using it. A 20-question survey was developed and used to interview dentists in Hawai'i. Approximately 500 dentists were contacted. The survey asked whether or not the dentist uses digital radiography. For those not using digital equipment, reasons were given as well as proposed future use. For users of digital equipment, further information was requested: group or solo practice, length of time with digital equipment, length of time to decide, brand of dental software, brand and type of digital equipment, how many different systems, satisfaction, would they do it again, financially worth it, advantages, disadvantages, diagnostic or not, use of special features, sensor replacement and maintenance costs, and any other comments about digital radiography. 102 dentists responded to the survey. 36 percent utilize digital radiography. Only 40 percent of nonusers have any inclination of converting to digital, cost being the most common reason not to convert. Average length of time with digital was 3.4 years and about 2 years to make the decision. Dentrix was the most popular software and Dexis the most popular equipment. The overwhelming majority are satisfied with systems, feel they are financially worth it, feel it is diagnostic, and would purchase them again. Advantages included things such as speed, no use of chemicals, and lower radiation. Disadvantages included cost, sensor-related issues, and computer issues. Digital users find special features helpful and utilize them regularly. Maintenance costs include annual software upgrades, sensor replacement, and barriers and bitetabs. Digital radiography is becoming more prevalent in Hawai'i. The big obstacle seems to be cost for most dentists, although users believe it is a good financial investment.

  20. Proton Radiography: Cross Section Measurements and Detector Development

    SciTech Connect

    Michael J. Longo; H. R. Gustafson: Durga Rajaram; Turgun Nigmanov

    2010-04-16

    Proton radiography has become an important tool for predicting the performance of stockpiled nuclear weapons. Current proton radiography experiments at LANSCE are confined to relatively small targets on the order of centimeters in size because of the low beam energy. LANL scientists have made radiographs with 12 and 24 GeV protons produced by the accelerator at Brookhaven National Laboratory. These energies are in the range required for hydrotest radiography. The design of a facility for hydrotest radiography requires knowledge of the cross sections for producing high-energy particles in the forward direction, which are incorporated into the Monte Carlo simulation used in designing the beam and detectors. There are few existing measurements of neutron production cross sections for proton-nuclei interactions in the 50 GeV range, and almost no data exist for forward neutron production, especially for heavy target nuclei. Thus the data from the MIPP EMCAL and HCAL, for which our group was responsible, are critical to proton radiography. Since neutrons and photons cannot be focused by magnets, they cause a background “fog” on the images. This problem can be minimized by careful design of the focusing system and detectors. The purpose of our research was to measure forward production of neutrons produced by high-energy proton beams striking a variety of targets. The forward-going particles carry most of the energy from a high-energy proton interaction, so these are the most important to proton radiography. This work was carried out in conjunction with the Fermilab E-907 (MIPP) collaboration. Our group was responsible for designing and building the E907 forward neutron and photon calorimeters. With the support of our Stewardship Science Academic Alliances grants, we were able to design, build, and commission the calorimeters on budget and ahead of schedule. The MIPP experiment accumulated a large amount of data in the first run that ended in early 2006. Our group has

  1. Effects of radiographic techniques on the low-contrast detail detectability performance of digital radiography systems.

    PubMed

    Alsleem, Haney; U, Paul; Mong, Kam Shan; Davidson, Robert

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of the radiation exposure factors kilovolt peak and tube current time (milliampere seconds) on the low-contrast detail detectability performance of 3 types of planar digital radiography systems. Detectability performance of an imaging system refers to its ability to detect and present the low-contrast details of organs in the acquired image. The authors also compare detectability performance between computed radiography, indirect digital radiography, and direct digital radiography by evaluating low-contrast details of the obtained images. A low-contrast detail phantom was inserted within 10-cm thicknesses of Perspex plastic sheets. The images were obtained with various kilovolt peak and milliampere second settings for each of the 3 digital radiography systems. Artinis CDRAD Analyser software was used to score the images and calculate the inverse image quality figure (IQFinv). The higher milliampere second levels in each kilovolt peak selection resulted in higher IQFinv in computed radiography and indirect and direct digital radiography. IQFinv values significantly increased in indirect digital radiography with increasing kilovolt peak in only 1 and 2 mAs. There were insignificant differences in IQFinv values when altering kilovolt peak in each milliampere second level in direct digital radiography. The indirect digital radiography system generally demonstrated better detectability performance than computed radiography and direct digital radiography. However, direct digital radiography demonstrated better detectability performance than indirect digital radiography at lower kilovolt peak and milliampere second settings, as did computed radiography at lower kilovolt peak settings. Higher milliampere second settings increase photon count, which results in a higher signal-to-noise ratio and thus increased detectability. Lower milliampere second settings increase noise level on images, which increases the risk of diagnostic detail loss. Changing

  2. Automating quality assurance for digital radiography.

    PubMed

    Reiner, Bruce I

    2009-07-01

    The existing practice of quality assurance (QA) in medical imaging is problematic because of the subjective manner in which it is performed, the lack of community and industry-wide QA standards, a paucity of supporting technology, and an overall lack of accountability. The solution for optimizing QA lies in the creation of objective and reproducible QA metrics, whose analysis can be automated through the creation of computerized QA software algorithms. The QA data derived from these computerized programs would in turn create the infrastructure for a comprehensive QA database, which can serve as a valuable resource for QA education and training, research, decision support, and technology innovation. The ability to objectively track and analyze QA practice across the wide spectrum of imaging providers creates a mechanism for the creation and refinement of objective QA standards and "best practice" guidelines.

  3. Flash radiography with 24 GeV/c protons

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, C. L.; Alrick, K. R.; Buescher, K. L.; Cagliostro, D. J.; Clark, D. A.; Clark, D. J.; Espinoza, C. J.; Ferm, E. N.; Gallegos, R. A.; Gomez, J. J.; Hogan, G. E.; King, N. S. P.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Liljestrand, R. P.; Mariam, F. G.; Merrill, F. E.; Morley, K. B.; Mottershead, C. T.; Murray, M. M.; Pazuchanics, P. D.

    2011-05-15

    The accuracy of density measurements and position resolution in flash (40 ns) radiography of thick objects with 24 Gev/c protons is investigated. A global model fit to step wedge data is shown to give a good description spanning the periodic table. The parameters obtained from the step wedge data are used to predict transmission through the French Test Object (FTO), a test object of nested spheres, to a precision better than 1%. Multiple trials have been used to show that the systematic errors are less than 2%. Absolute agreement between the average radiographic measurements of the density and the known density is 1%. Spatial resolution has been measured to be 200 {mu}m at the center of the FTO. These data verify expectations of the benefits provided by high energy hadron radiography for thick objects.

  4. Study of a Loop Heat Pipe Using Neutron Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    C. Thomas Conroy; A. A. El-Ganayni; David R. Riley; John M. Cimbala; Jack S. Brenizer, Jr.; Abel Po-Ya Chuang; Shane Hanna

    2001-08-01

    An explanation is given of what a loop heat pipe (LHP) is, and how it works. It is then shown that neutron imaging (both real time neutron radioscopy and single exposure neutron radiography) is an effective experimental tool for the study of LHPs. Specifically, neutron imaging has helped to identify and correct a cooling water distribution problem in the condenser, and has enabled visualization of two-phase flow (liquid and vapor) in various components of the LHP. In addition, partial wick dry-out, a phenomenon of great importance in the effective operation of LHPs, has been identified with neutron imaging. It is anticipated that neutron radioscopy and radiography will greatly contribute to our understanding of LHP operation, and will lead to improvement of LHP modeling and design.

  5. Development of Compton Radiography Diagnostics for Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Tommasini, R; Hatchett, S P; Hey, D S; Izumi, N; Koch, J A; Landen, O L; Mackinnon, A J; Delettrez, J; Glebov, V; Stoeckl, C

    2010-11-16

    An important diagnostic tool for inertial confinement fusion will be time-resolved radiographic imaging of the dense cold fuel surrounding the hot spot. The measurement technique is based on point-projection radiography at photon energies from 60-200 keV where the Compton effect is the dominant contributor to the opacity of the fuel or pusher. We have successfully applied this novel Compton Radiography technique to the study of the final compression of directly driven plastic capsules at the OMEGA facility. The radiographs have a spatial and temporal resolution of {approx}10 {micro}m and {approx}10ps, respectively. A statistical accuracy of {approx}0.5% in transmission per resolution element is achieved, allowing localized measurements of areal mass densities to 7% accuracy. The experimental results show 3D non-uniformities and lower than 1D expected areal densities attributed to drive asymmetries and hydroinstabilities.

  6. Dental radiography exposure of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki populations

    SciTech Connect

    Antoku, S.; Hoshi, M.; Russell, W.J.; Kihara, T.; Sawada, S.; Takeshita, K.; Otake, M.; Yoshinaga, H.; Beach, D.R.

    1989-03-01

    Dental radiography doses in Hiroshima and Nagasaki were estimated on the basis of survey data from dental hospitals and clinics in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and doses were measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters and a phantom. Doses to organs, including the lens, pituitary fossa, thyroid gland, and skin were calculated from data obtained during a 2-week survey in both cities. The mean caput doses were calculated from the data indicating frequency per year and were tabulated by organs, age, teeth examined, type of examination, population, sex, and city. No significant difference was observed by age, population, sex, or city. Currently the doses incurred during dental radiography may not be sufficiently high to cause bias in the assessments for late radiation effects among atomic-bomb survivors. However, the mean caput thyroid doses of 62 mrad and 67 mrad in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, respectively, cannot be ignored from the standpoint of their potential in contributing to radiation-induced carcinogenesis.

  7. Monte Carlo Modeling of High-Energy Film Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, A.C., Jr.; Cochran, J.L.; Lamberti, V.E.

    2003-03-28

    High-energy film radiography methods, adapted in the past to performing specific tasks, must now meet increasing demands to identify defects and perform critical measurements in a wide variety of manufacturing processes. Although film provides unequaled resolution for most components and assemblies, image quality must be enhanced with much more detailed information to identify problems and qualify features of interest inside manufactured items. The work described is concerned with improving current 9 MeV nondestructive practice by optimizing the important parameters involved in film radiography using computational methods. In order to follow important scattering effects produced by electrons, the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code was used with advanced, highly parallel computer systems. The work has provided a more detailed understanding of latent image formation at high X-ray energies, and suggests that improvements can be made in our ability to identify defects and to obtain much more detail in images of fine features.

  8. Proton Radiography of a Thermal Explosion in PBX 9501

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smilowitz, Laura; Henson, Bryan; Romero, Jerry; Asay, Blaine; Sandstrom, Mary

    2007-06-01

    The understanding of thermal explosions and burn propagation lags that of detonations and shock propagation. Diagnostics such as high energy radiography have been used to image shocks, but have been previously precluded from use in thermal explosions due to their stringent timing requirements: shock propagation can be synchronized to an external diagnostic while thermal explosion can not. This issue is solved by following the evolution of the ignition volume in a thermal explosion and using a laser pulse to provide a temperature jump in that central volume during the final thermal runaway leading to ignition. Details of the laser heating which minimize the perturbation of the thermal explosion will be discussed with comparisons between auto-ignited and laser ignited tests. Thermal explosion experiments have been conducted at the Los Alamos Proton Radiography facility and have yielded images of the evolution of ignition, post-ignition burn propagation, and case failure in a radially confined cylinder of PBX 9501.

  9. Radiography and ultrasonic calculation workbooks: installation and use

    SciTech Connect

    Rikard, D; Dolan, K

    2000-03-24

    The radiography and ultrasonic calculation workbooks are intended to assist Level I, II and III NDE personnel in calculations used in routine job applications. These workbooks are an upgraded version of Microsoft Excel{reg_sign} spreadsheets, which were originally set up in October 1988, using a Macintosh Plus{reg_sign} computer and Microsoft Excel{reg_sign} version 1.5. A description of these was released as ''Computerized Calculations for Radiography and Ultrasonics'', UCRL-JC-105419 in November 1990 and published in Materials Evaluation, Volume 49/Number 4, in April 1991. Over the years as Microsoft improved the capabilities of the Excel program to include the abilities to make sketches and to have multiple tabbed pages in a document called a ''workbook'' we have now modified the calculation spreadsheets to include these enhancements. Following is a short description on how to install and use these workbooks on a Macintosh or PC.

  10. Californium Multiplier. Part I. Design for neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Crosbie, K.L.; Preskitt, C.A.; John, J.; Hastings, J.D.

    1982-04-01

    The Californium Multiplier (CFX) is a subcritical assembly of enriched uranium surrounding a californium-252 neutron source. The function of the CFX is to multiply the neutrons emitted by the source to a number sufficient for neutron radiography. The CFX is designed to provide a collimated beam of thermal neutrons from which the gamma radiation is filtered, and the scattered neutrons are reduced to make it suitable for high resolution radiography. The entire system has inherent safety features, which provide for system and personnel safety, and it operates at moderate cost. In Part I, the CFX and the theory of its operation are described in detail. Part II covers the performance of the Mound Facility CFX.

  11. Proton radiography of a shock-compressed target

    SciTech Connect

    Ravasio, A.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Loupias, B.; Ozaki, N.; Vinci, T.; Koenig, M.; Romagnani, L.; Cecchetti, C.; Borghesi, M.; Le Pape, S.; Hicks, D.; MacKinnon, A.; Park, H. S.; Patel, P.; Batani, D.; Dezulian, R.; Boehly, T.; Gremillet, L.; Henry, E.; Schiavi, A.

    2010-07-15

    In this paper we report on the radiography of a shock-compressed target using laser produced proton beams. A low-density carbon foam target was shock compressed by long pulse high-energy laser beams. The shock front was transversally probed with a proton beam produced in the interaction of a high intensity laser beam with a gold foil. We show that from radiography data, the density profile in the shocked target can be deduced using Monte Carlo simulations. By changing the delay between long and short pulse beams, we could probe different plasma conditions and structures, demonstrating that the details of the steep density gradient can be resolved. This technique is validated as a diagnostic for the investigation of warm dense plasmas, allowing an in situ characterization of high-density contrasted plasmas.

  12. Lung nodules detection in chest radiography: image components analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Tao; Mou, Xuanqin; Yang, Ying; Yan, Hao

    2009-02-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effect of different components of chest image on performances of both human observer and channelized Fisher-Hotelling model (CFH) in nodule detection task. Irrelevant and relevant components were separated from clinical chest radiography by employing Principal Component Analysis (PCA) methods. Human observer performance was evaluated in two-alternative forced-choice (2AFC) on original clinical images and anatomical structure only images obtained by PCA methods. Channelized Fisher-Hotelling model with Laguerre-Gauss basis function was evaluated to predict human performance. We show that relevant component is the primary factor influencing on nodule detection in chest radiography. There is obvious difference of detectability between human observer and CFH model for nodule detection in images only containing anatomical structure. CFH model should be used more carefully.

  13. The MU-RAY detector for muon radiography of volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasio, A.; Ambrosino, F.; Basta, D.; Bonechi, L.; Brianzi, M.; Bross, A.; Callier, S.; Caputo, A.; Ciaranfi, R.; Cimmino, L.; D'Alessandro, R.; D'Auria, L.; de La Taille, C.; Energico, S.; Garufi, F.; Giudicepietro, F.; Lauria, A.; Macedonio, G.; Martini, M.; Masone, V.; Mattone, C.; Montesi, M. C.; Noli, P.; Orazi, M.; Passeggio, G.; Peluso, R.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Raux, L.; Rubinov, P.; Saracino, G.; Scarlini, E.; Scarpato, G.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Starodubtsev, O.; Strolin, P.; Taketa, A.; Tanaka, H. K. M.; Vanzanella, A.

    2013-12-01

    The MU-RAY detector has been designed to perform muon radiography of volcanoes. The possible use on the field introduces several constraints. First the electric power consumption must be reduced to the minimum, so that the detector can be solar-powered. Moreover it must be robust and transportable, for what concerns the front-end electronics and data acquisition. A 1 m2 prototype has been constructed and is taking data at Mt. Vesuvius. The detector consists of modules of 32 scintillator bars with wave length shifting fibers and silicon photomultiplier read-out. A dedicated front-end electronics has been developed, based on the SPIROC ASIC. An introduction to muon radiography principles, the MU-RAY detector description and results obtained in laboratory will be presented.

  14. Modeling the Performance Characteristics of Computed Radiography (CR) Systems

    PubMed Central

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Karellas, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Computed radiography (CR) using storage phosphors is widely used in digital radiography and mammography. A cascaded linear systems approach wherein several parameter values were estimated using Monte Carlo methods was used to model the image formation process of a single-side read ‘flying spot’ CR system using a granular phosphor. Objective image quality metrics such as modulation transfer function (MTF) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were determined using this model and show good agreement with published empirical data. A model such as that addressed in this work could allow for improved understanding of the effect of storage phosphor physical properties and CR reader parameters on objective image quality metrics for existing and evolving CR systems. PMID:20199915

  15. Digital radiography: update for oral health care workers.

    PubMed

    Noffke, C E E; Nzima, N; Chabikuli, N J

    2004-08-01

    Digital Radiography is an imaging system that does away with the use of films. It constitutes an advance in computer technology and has made a significant impact on the field of Maxillofacial- and Dental Radiology. This paper presents an overview of the basic concepts and applications of dental digital radiography and compares it with conventional film-based imaging. In addition, it provides a thorough understanding of the direct, semi-direct and indirect dental digital imaging systems with their advantages and disadvantages. Universal acceptance of digital radiographic imaging as a diagnostic tool makes it important for oral health care workers to understand the principles thereof and to master the techniques involved in acquiring a diagnosable digital radiographic image.

  16. A new scanner for in situ digital radiography of paintings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Impallaria, Anna; Evangelisti, Federico; Petrucci, Ferruccio; Tisato, Flavia; Castelli, Lisa; Taccetti, Francesco

    2016-12-01

    X-ray radiography is one of the most widely used imaging techniques in the field of cultural heritage, both for conservation and for investigation purposes. Performing radiographies in museums, thus avoiding movements of works of art, has been recently made easy by digital acquisition of images, but when the whole scan of a large painting is required, technical solutions for a portable device are still not at hand. The inherent weight of the X-ray tube and of the high-voltage generator makes the design of a portable device very difficult. In this project, the solution of the puzzle was separating devices devoted to different tasks, in order to maintain each item under 60 kg weight, thus being transportable with reasonable effort.

  17. Development of Compton radiography of inertial confinement fusion implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Tommasini, R.; Hatchett, S. P.; Hey, D. S.; Iglesias, C.; Izumi, N.; Koch, J. A.; Landen, O. L.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Sorce, C.; Delettrez, J. A.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.

    2011-05-15

    An important diagnostic tool for inertial confinement fusion will be time-resolved radiographic imaging of the dense cold fuel surrounding the hot spot. The measurement technique is based on point-projection radiography at photon energies from 60 to 200 keV where the Compton effect is the dominant contributor to the opacity of the fuel or pusher. We have successfully applied this novel Compton radiography technique to the study of the final compression of directly driven plastic capsules at the OMEGA facility [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. The radiographs have a spatial and temporal resolution of {approx}10 {mu}m and {approx}10 ps, respectively. A statistical accuracy of {approx}0.5% in transmission per resolution element is achieved, allowing localized measurements of areal mass densities to 7% accuracy. The experimental results show 3D nonuniformities and lower than 1D expected areal densities attributed to drive asymmetries and hydroinstabilities.

  18. High-resolution computed radiography by scanned luminescent toner xeroradiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, John W.; Lubinsky, Anthony R.

    1993-09-01

    A new computed radiography system is described in which a charged selenium photoconductive plate is exposed to x-rays to create an electrostatic latent image, developed with a luminescent toner, and scanned with a stimulating laser beam to produce emitted light, which is filtered and detected. The resulting electronic signals are processed, and converted to hard copy using a laser film printer. The system is characterized by high x-ray sensitivity and by very high spatial resolution, which makes it particularly suitable for applications such as mammography and bone radiography. The image luminescence is bright and its decay time is extremely short, enabling rapid scanning with an inexpensive laser source. Also, the electronic capture of image data permits enhancement of the displayed contrast of image structures by image processing techniques.

  19. Comparison of Digital Imaging Systems for Neutron Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugliesi, R.; Pugliesi, Fábio; Stanojev Pereira, M. A.

    2011-09-01

    The characteristics of three digital imaging systems for neutron radiography purposes have been compared. Two of them make use of films, CR-39 and Kodak AA, and the third makes use of a LiF scintillator, for image registration. The irradiations were performed in the neutron radiography facility installed at the IEA-R1 nuclear research reactor of IPEN-CNEN/SP. According to the obtained results, the system based on CR-39 is the slowest to obtain an image, and the best in terms of resolution but the worse in terms of contrast. The system based on Kodak AA is faster than the prior, exhibits good resolution and contrast. The system based on the scintillator is the fastest to obtain an image, and best in terms of contrast but the worse in terms of resolution.

  20. Study of a loop heat pipe using neutron radiography.

    PubMed

    Cimbala, John M; Brenizer, Jack S; Chuang, Abel Po-Ya; Hanna, Shane; Thomas Conroy, C; El-Ganayni, A A; Riley, David R

    2004-10-01

    An explanation is given of what a loop heat pipe (LHP) is, and how it works. It is then shown that neutron imaging (both real time neutron radioscopy and single exposure neutron radiography) is an effective experimental tool for the study of LHPs. Specifically, neutron imaging has helped to identify and correct a cooling water distribution problem in the condenser, and has enabled visualization of two-phase flow (liquid and vapor) in various components of the LHP. In addition, partial wick dry-out, a phenomenon of great importance in the effective operation of LHPs, is potentially identifiable with neutron imaging. It is anticipated that neutron radioscopy and radiography will greatly contribute to our understanding of LHP operation, and will lead to improvement of LHP modeling and design.

  1. [Development of breathing chest radiography: study of exposure timing].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Rie; Sanada, Shigeru; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Suzuki, Masayuki; Matsui, Takeshi; Inoue, Hitoshi

    2003-08-01

    The flat-panel detector (FPD) has been introduced into clinical practice. A modified FPD, which has the ability to obtain dynamic chest radiographs, was introduced into our hospital, and clinical testing is ongoing. Both the inspiratory and expiratory phases have to be included in dynamic chest radiographs. The purpose of this study was to investigate the most appropriate chest radiography signal for observation of the respiratory process. We prepared ten protocol patterns that differed in terms of respiratory phase at X-ray exposure, exposure duration, and signal multiplicity. We also performed preliminary experiments and administered several questionnaires to ten volunteers. The volunteers breathed according to vocal and visual signals, and their respiratory waves were recorded by spirometer. The most appropriate protocol was similar to the method used for conventional chest radiography.

  2. Proton radiography and tomography with application to proton therapy

    PubMed Central

    Allinson, N M; Evans, P M

    2015-01-01

    Proton radiography and tomography have long promised benefit for proton therapy. Their first suggestion was in the early 1960s and the first published proton radiographs and CT images appeared in the late 1960s and 1970s, respectively. More than just providing anatomical images, proton transmission imaging provides the potential for the more accurate estimation of stopping-power ratio inside a patient and hence improved treatment planning and verification. With the recent explosion in growth of clinical proton therapy facilities, the time is perhaps ripe for the imaging modality to come to the fore. Yet many technical challenges remain to be solved before proton CT scanners become commonplace in the clinic. Research and development in this field is currently more active than at any time with several prototype designs emerging. This review introduces the principles of proton radiography and tomography, their historical developments, the raft of modern prototype systems and the primary design issues. PMID:26043157

  3. Proton radiography and tomography with application to proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Poludniowski, G; Allinson, N M; Evans, P M

    2015-09-01

    Proton radiography and tomography have long promised benefit for proton therapy. Their first suggestion was in the early 1960s and the first published proton radiographs and CT images appeared in the late 1960s and 1970s, respectively. More than just providing anatomical images, proton transmission imaging provides the potential for the more accurate estimation of stopping-power ratio inside a patient and hence improved treatment planning and verification. With the recent explosion in growth of clinical proton therapy facilities, the time is perhaps ripe for the imaging modality to come to the fore. Yet many technical challenges remain to be solved before proton CT scanners become commonplace in the clinic. Research and development in this field is currently more active than at any time with several prototype designs emerging. This review introduces the principles of proton radiography and tomography, their historical developments, the raft of modern prototype systems and the primary design issues.

  4. Leaded apron for use in panoramic dental radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Whitcher, B.L.; Gratt, B.M.; Sickles, E.A.

    1980-05-01

    The leaded aprons currently available for use during dental radiography do not protect the thyroid gland from radiation. Conventional aprons may produce artifacts when used with panoramic dental x-ray units. This study measures the dose reduction obtained with an experimental leaded apron designed for use with panoramic dental x-ray units. Skin exposures measured at the thyroid and at the sternum were reduced with the use of the apron. Films produced during the study were free from apron artifacts.

  5. Absorbed radiation by various tissues during simulated endodontic radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Torabinejad, M.; Danforth, R.; Andrews, K.; Chan, C.

    1989-06-01

    The amount of absorbed radiation by various organs was determined by placing lithium fluoride thermoluminescent chip dosimeters at selected anatomical sites in and on a human-like X-ray phantom and exposing them to radiation at 70- and 90-kV X-ray peaks during simulated endodontic radiography. The mean exposure dose was determined for each anatomical site. The results show that endodontic X-ray doses received by patients are low when compared with other radiographic procedures.

  6. X-Ray Radiography of Gas Turbine Ceramics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-10-20

    Microfocus X - ray equipment. 1a4ihe definition of equipment concepts for a computer assisted tomography (CAT) system; and 4ffthe development of a CAT...were obtained from these test coupons using Microfocus X - ray and image en- hancement techniques. A Computer Assisted Tomography (CAT) design concept...conventional ultrasonics (45 MHz), very high frequency ultrasonics (250 MHz), neutron radiography, Microfocus X - ray , image enhancement, microwave

  7. PyRAT - python radiography analysis tool (u)

    SciTech Connect

    Temple, Brian A; Buescher, Kevin L; Armstrong, Jerawan C

    2011-01-14

    PyRAT is a radiography analysis tool used to reconstruction images of unknown 1-0 objects. The tool is written in Python and developed for use on LINUX and Windows platforms. The tool is capable of performing nonlinear inversions of the images with minimal manual interaction in the optimization process. The tool utilizes the NOMAD mixed variable optimization tool to perform the optimization.

  8. Technique for Performing Lumbar Puncture in Microgravity Using Portable Radiography.

    PubMed

    Lerner, David J; Parmet, Allen J; Don, Steven; Shimony, Joshua S; Goyal, Manu S

    2016-08-01

    Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure Syndrome (VIIP) has caused symptomatology during and after long duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS). Only indirect measurements of intracranial pressure (ICP), such as ultrasound, have been performed on ISS. Discussion and interest has happened at NASA about performing lumbar puncture (LP) in microgravity. Only the "blind" palpation approach and the ultrasound-assisted approach have been discussed. This article, as proof of concept, discusses the possibility of portable radiography to assist lumbar punctures in microgravity. An anthropomorphic radiological phantom of an adult lumbar spine was made containing a fluid-filled space in the spinal canal with a latex membrane which simulated the dural sac and cerebrospinal fluid. A portable direct-digital radiography system with wireless transmitting image receptor and screen was used to perform image-guided lumbar puncture. Using the same equipment and technique, this procedure was then performed on a cadaver for final proof of concept. Technical success was achieved in all approaches on the first try without needle redirection. There was no difference between the cadaver model and the phantom model in terms of difficulty in reaching the fluid space or visually confirming needle location. Portable radiography via proof of concept has the potential to guide lumbar puncture while minimizing volume and mass of equipment. This could be ideal for assisting in performing lumbar puncture in microgravity, as this is the standard of care on Earth for difficult or failed "blind" lumbar punctures. Lerner DJ, Parmet AJ, Don S, Shimony JS, Goyal MS. Technique for performing lumbar puncture in microgravity using portable radiography. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2016; 87(8):745-747.

  9. Pediatric digital radiography education for radiologic technologists: current state.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Gregory; John, Susan D; Goske, Marilyn J; Charkot, Ellen; Herrmann, Tracy; Smith, Susan N; Culbertson, John; Carbonneau, Kira

    2011-05-01

    Digital radiography (DR) is one of several new products that have changed our work processes from hard copy to digital formats. The transition from analog screen-film radiography to DR requires thorough user education because of differences in image production, processing, storage and evaluation between the forms of radiography. Without adequate education, radiologic technologists could unknowingly expose children to higher radiation doses than necessary for adequate radiograph quality. To evaluate knowledge about image quality and dose management in pediatric DR among radiologic technologists in the U.S. This communication describes a survey of 493 radiologic technologists who are members of the American Society of Radiologic Technologists (ASRT) and who evaluated the current state of radiological technologist education in image quality and dose management in pediatric DR. The survey included 23 survey questions regarding image acquisition issues, quality assurance, radiation exposure and education in DR of infants and children. Radiologic technologists express many needs in areas of training and education in pediatric DR. Suggested improvements include better tools for immediate feedback about image quality and exposure, more information about appropriate technique settings for pediatric patients, more user-friendly vendor manuals and educational materials, more reliable measures of radiation exposure to patients, and more regular and frequent follow-up by equipment vendors. There is a clear and widespread need for comprehensive and practical education in digital image technology for radiologic technologists, especially those engaged in pediatric radiography. The creation of better educational materials and training programs, and the continuation of educational opportunities will require a broad commitment from equipment manufacturers and vendors, educational institutions, pediatric radiology specialty organizations, and individual imaging specialists.

  10. Non-damaging, portable radiography: Applications in arms control verification

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, R.A.; Butterfield, K.B.; Apt, K.E.

    1992-08-01

    The state-of-the-technology necessary to perform portable radiography in support of arms control verification is evaluated. Specific requirements, such as accurate measurements of the location of features in a treaty-limited object and the detection of deeply imbedded features, are defined in three scenarios. Sources, detectors, portability, mensuration, and safety are discussed in relation to the scenarios. Examples are given of typical radiographic systems that would be capable of addressing the inspection problems associated with the three scenarios.

  11. Advances in pulsed-power-driven radiography system design.

    SciTech Connect

    Portillo, Salvador; Hinshelwood, David D.; Rovang, Dean Curtis; Cordova, Steve Ray; Oliver, Bryan Velten; Weber, Bruce V.; Welch, Dale Robert; Shelton, Bradley Allen; Sceiford, Matthew E.; Cooperstein, Gerald; Gignac, Raymond Edward; Puetz, Elizabeth A.; Rose, David Vincent; Barker, Dennis L.; Van De Valde, David M.; Droemer, Darryl W.; Wilkins, Frank Lee; Molina, Isidro; Jaramillo, Deanna M.; Swanekamp, Stephen Brian; Commisso, Robert J.; Bailey, Vernon Leslie; Maenchen, John Eric; Johnson, David Lee; Griffin, Fawn A.; Hahn, Kelly Denise; Smith, Ian

    2004-07-01

    Flash x-ray radiography has undergone a transformation in recent years with the resurgence of interest in compact, high intensity pulsed-power-driven electron beam sources. The radiographic requirements and the choice of a consistent x-ray source determine the accelerator parameters, which can be met by demonstrated Induction Voltage Adder technologies. This paper reviews the state of the art and the recent advances which have improved performance by over an order of magnitude in beam brightness and radiographic utility.

  12. Fast neutron radiography research at ANL-W

    SciTech Connect

    Klann, R.T.; Natale, M.D.

    1996-06-01

    Thirty-seven different elements were tested for their suitability as converter screens for direct and indirect fast neutron radiography. The use of commercial X-ray scintillator screens containing YTaO{sub 4}, LaOBr:Tm, YTaO{sub 4}:Nb, YTaO{sub 4}:Tm, CaWO{sub 4}, BaSO{sub 4}:Sr, and GdO{sub 2}S:Tb was also explored for direct fast neutron radiography. For the indirect radiographic process, only one element, holmium, was found to be better than copper. Iron was also found to work as well as copper. All other elements that were tested were inferior to copper for indirect fast neutron radiography. For direct fast neutron radiography, the results were markedly different. Copper was found to be a poor material to sue, as thirty-two of the elements performed better than the copper. Tantalum was found to be the best material to use. Several other materials that also performed remarkably well include, in order of decreasing utility, gold, lutetium, germanium, dysprosium, and thulium. Several interesting results were obtained for the commercial X-ray scintillator screens. Most notably, useful radiographs were produced with all of the various scintillation screens. However, the screens containing YTaO{sub 4}:Nb offered the greatest film densities for the shortest exposure times. Screens using GdSO{sub 4}:Tb provided the best resolution and clearest images at the sacrifice of exposure time. Also, as previous researchers found, scintillator screens offered significantly shorter exposure times than activation foils.

  13. Imaging Brunelleschi's cupola wall using muon scattering radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Guardincerri, Elena

    2015-09-16

    This PowerPoint presentation describes the cupola's structure and current reinforcements, reasoning behind why muon radiography would be helpful. A demonstration project is described where a similar wall was constructed to illustrate the potential benefits to Italian authorities; Requirements and a potential plan were created and collaboration to make it happen was deemed to be possible among LANL, Toshiba, the Parma and Florence Universities and the Opera del Duomo,

  14. ADVANCEMENTS IN NEUTRON RADIOGRAPHY WITHIN THE DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-11-01

    inspection shows the next evolution in nondestructive examination that many areas within the Department of Defense (DoD) require. The NR has the...Nondestructive Testing (NDT) Inspection Constraints 1 Product Design Applications 2 Advanced Neutron Generators 6 Evolution of Neutron Radiography 6...construction of the beam ports 14 15 An image comparison of the early evolution of the beam ports 15 16 The completed assembly and the general placement of

  15. Investigation of noise sources for digital radiography systems.

    PubMed

    Ergun, Lutfi; Olgar, Turan

    2017-06-01

    The performance of digital radiography systems can be evaluated in terms of spatial resolution and noise. Noise plays an important role in the achievable image quality for detecting small and low-contrast structures in digital images created by these systems. Our aim in this study was to investigate the noise sources both in the spatial and frequency domain for three digital radiography systems, one digital fluoroscopy system, and one digital mammography system, and to obtain information about the effective operating dose range of these detectors. Noise evaluation in the spatial domain was done with the relative standard deviation-detector air kerma relationship evaluation method. The characterization of the noise in the spatial domain gives information about the types of noise, but does not give information about the noise power distribution in frequency space. Therefore, noise evaluation in the frequency domain was carried out by noise power spectrum measurement. The observed dominant noise component at lower detector doses was electronic noise for the digital mammography system, whereas structured noise was observed to make up nearly half of the total noise at higher detector doses for one of the digital radiography systems. The structured noise component was increased by use of a grid in these systems, independent of the grid ratio and grid frequency, but this increase was lower for higher grid frequencies. Furthermore, the structured noise coefficient was decreased with gain and offset calibrations. The five systems which we evaluated behaved as a quantum noise limited for clinically used detector doses.

  16. [Plain-film radiography in the study of spinal pain].

    PubMed

    Ruiz Santiago, F; Guzmán Alvarez, L; Tello Moreno, M; Navarrete González, P J

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of tomographic imaging techniques, fundamentally computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, has led to a gradual decrease in the indications for plain-film radiography, resulting in fewer patients studied and fewer projections for each patient. Consequently, plain-film studies of the spine have received less attention and radiologists are less familiar with the typical findings in normal and pathologic conditions of the spine. Nevertheless, plain-film radiography continues to be widely used in both primary and specialized care. Thus, radiologists still need to be aware of the normal radiologic anatomy of the spine and of the radiologic manifestations of the diverse pathological processes that can affect the spinal column and that can cause pain. The aim of this article is to review the manifestations on plain-film radiography of a wide variety of diseases that can cause back pain, including congenital, traumatic, degenerative, tumor-related, inflammatory, and infectious diseases and processes. Copyright 2009 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Proton radiography based on near-threshold Cerenkov radiation

    DOEpatents

    van Bibber, Karl A.; Dietrich, Frank S.

    2003-01-01

    A Cerenkov imaging system for charged particle radiography that determines the energy loss of the charged particle beam passing through an object. This energy loss information provides additional detail on target densities when used with traditional radiographic techniques like photon or x-ray radiography. In this invention a probe beam of 800 MeV to 50 GeV/c charged particles is passed through an object to be imaged, an imaging magnetic spectrometer, to a silicon aerogel Cerenkov radiator where the charged particles emitted Cerenkov light proportional to their velocity. At the same beam focal plane, a particle scintillator produces a light output proportional to the incident beam flux. Optical imaging systems relay the Cerenkov and scintillator information to CCD's or other measurement equipment. A ratio between the Cerenkov and scintillator is formed, which is directly proportional to the line density of the object for each pixel measured. By rotating the object, tomographic radiography may be performed. By applying pulses of beam, discrete time-step movies of dynamic objects may be made.

  18. Radiography Inspection Technology of CPR1000 Nuclear Power Unit Pressurizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Jingyun; Deng, Dong; Wang, Jing; Wang, Shuangyin; Hua, Xiongfei

    This article takes the first in-service inspection of the 3rd Unit nuclear island pressurizer (PZR) radiography inspection of Ling Ao nuclear power station for example. It is introduced that the gamma radiographic inspection technology of CPR1000 nuclear power island PZR welds which include the cylinder weld, the tube welds and the head connection welds, the safe-end-welds of PZR tube, and the thermal sleeve, mainly focused on the exposure mode, the film layout and other content in each weld inspection. Meanwhile according to the site operating experience by the inspectors, it is summarized that the technical difficulties and key points which the PZR radiography inspection technology has. Combined with the related sections of the French design and construction rules for mechanical components of PWR nuclear Islands (the RCC-M standard) and the in-service inspection rules for mechanical components of PWR nuclear islands (the RSE-M specification), it makes analysis, calculation and discussion of the technical parameters and crucial details about the ray source selection, the identification of the film and the location markers, the focal length and the times of exposures at least, aiming the characteristics of the PZR ray inspection, which can provide reference method and the suggestion for the similar container radiography inspection.

  19. Use of dental radiography among Lithuanian general dentists.

    PubMed

    Peciuliene, Vytaute; Rimkuviene, Jurate; Maneliene, Rasma; Drukteinis, Saulius

    2009-01-01

    To gather information about the radiographic facilities and techniques used by Lithuanian general dentists. Questionnaires were sent to all 2879 Lithuanian dental practitioners registered on the Lithuanian Dental Chamber licence registry data list. The questionnaire was made with multiple-choice answers. Respondents were invited to choose the only one category of answer that best fitted their clinical attitude. Questions included in the present survey concerned general and specific information regarding peculiarities of radiographic imaging. Only answers of respondents who are licensed as general dentists were included in this study. From the 2850 questionnaires mailed 1532 were returned. The response rate was 53.8%. Of the total responses 1431 questionnaires were received from licensed general dentists. Of total 956 dentists practiced in urban and 576 dentists in rural areas. 61.6% of respondents had access to an intra-oral radiographic unit in their practice and 91.5% of them used dental radiography always or often as the diagnostic tool. To support the film packet in the patient's mouth alternatively film holder or patient's finger was used by 48% of respondents, while film holder was used only by 19.3% of dentists. Recently graduated dental practitioners more common used diagnostic radiography in endodontic pathology than dentists with a longer time from graduation. Film holder was not a popular device among general dental practitioners to perform periapical radioraphs. It is important to improve the existing dental curriculum to ensure the necessary competency when using dental radiography and film holders routinely in clinical practice.

  20. Detection of gastritis by single- and double-contrast radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Thoeni, R.F.; Goldberg, H.I.; Ominsky, S.; Cello, J.P.

    1983-09-01

    Sixty-eight patients with various types of gastritis, 23 patients with normal stomachs, and four patients with other gastric diseases were examined in a prospective study to assess the sensitivity and specificity of single-contrast (SC) and double-contrast (DC) upper gastrointestinal examinations in the evaluation of gastritis. All patients underwent endoscopy with biopsy followed first by DC and then by SC radiography. The respective sensitivities of SC and DC radiography were 58% and 72% for all examinations and 59% and 77% for adequate examinations only. The respective specificities were 59% and 55% based on all examinations. Useful radiographic features included polypoid defects and erosions detected by both methods, abnormal folds and flattened margins detected by the SC technique, and narrowed lumen and crenulated margins detected by the DC technique. In 93% of all cases, the correct diagnosis was based on two or more of these radiographic features. According to this study, the radiographic sensitivity in the detection of gastritis is reliable only in cases of moderate-to-severe disease and only when based on findings of the DC examination. Neither SC nor DC radiography should be used as the primary screening method for patients with suspected gastritis, and the radiographic diagnosis should be restricted to the terms ''erosive'' or ''nonerosive gastritis.''

  1. Reduction of radiation exposure during radiography for scoliosis

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, J.E.; Hoffman, A.D.; Peterson, H.A.

    1983-01-01

    To reduce the radiation exposure received by young scoliosis patients during treatment, six changes in technique were instituted: (1) a posteroanterior projection, (2) specially designed leaded acrylic filters, (3) a high-speed screen-film system, (4) a specially designed cassette-holder and grid, (5) a breast-shield, and (6) additional filtration in the x-ray tube the thyroid, breast, and abdominal areas were made on an Alderson phantom. They revealed an eightfold reduction in abdominal exposure for both the posteroanterior and the lateral radiographys. There was a twentyfold reduction in exposure to the thyroid for the posteroanterior radiography from 100 to less than five milliroentgens and for the lateral radiograph there was a 100-fold reduction from 618 to six milliroentgens. For the breasts there was a sixty-ninefold reduction from 344 to less than five milliroentgens for the posteroanterior radiography and a fifty-fivefold reduction from 277 to less than five milliroentgens for the lateral radiograph. These reductions in exposure were obtained without significant loss in the quality of the radiographs and in most instances with an improvement in the over-all quality of the radiograph due to the more uniform exposure.

  2. Management of pediatric radiation dose using Agfa computed radiography.

    PubMed

    Schaetzing, R

    2004-10-01

    Radiation dose to patients and its management have become important considerations in modern radiographic imaging procedures, but they acquire particular significance in the imaging of children. Because of their longer life expectancy, children exposed to radiation are thought to have a significantly increased risk of radiation-related late sequelae compared to adults first exposed to radiation later in life. Therefore, current clinical thinking dictates that dose in pediatric radiography be minimized, while simultaneously ensuring sufficient diagnostic information in the image, and reducing the need for repeat exposures. Dose management obviously starts with characterization and control of the exposure technique. However, it extends farther through the imaging chain to the acquisition system, and even to the image processing techniques used to optimize acquired images for display. Further, other factors, such as quality control procedures and the ability to handle special pediatric procedures, like scoliosis exams, also come into play. The need for dose management in modern radiography systems has spawned a variety of different solutions, some of which are similar across different manufacturers, and some of which are unique. This paper covers the techniques used in Agfa Computed Radiography (CR) systems to manage dose in a pediatric environment.

  3. [Analysis of epidermoid carcinomas using panoramic radiography and computerized tomography].

    PubMed

    Pereira, A C; Cavalcanti, M G; Tossato, P S; Guida, F J; Duaik, M C; Kuroishi, M

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to compare radiographic findings, such as localization and extension of tumors toward the bone and soft tissues, in panoramic radiography and computed tomography (CT). Four radiologists assessed the radiographic findings of 48 patients with the histopathological diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma in different sites of the maxillofacial region. Panoramic radiographs and computed tomographs were obtained at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, at FUNDECTO-USP and at the hospital of the University of São Paulo (USP). We observed a considerable limitation of the panoramic radiography in determining the localization and extension of tumors, since it revealed unclear delimitations. Regarding CT, better results were obtained: it was possible to observe the invasion of the tumor toward adjacent soft tissues, as well as the extension of bone destruction and the depth of the lesion, which were confirmed by surgical findings. We concluded that computed tomography demonstrated to be a sensitive radiographic technique for the detection of the involvement of bone and soft tissues, contributing for a more precise diagnosis, surgical planning and intervention. On the other hand, panoramic radiography was considered less sensitive and less efficient than CT, since it shows only unclear borders of the lesions and is not able to assess the involvement of soft tissues.

  4. The implementation of digital sensors in maxillofacial radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Stelt, Paul F.

    2001-03-01

    Systems for intra-oral digital radiography in dentistry can be divided into two main groups: direct sensor systems and semi-direct or indirect sensor systems. Direct imaging is performed by a two-dimensional array of sensor elements. The size of a typical intra-oral CCD-sensor is approximately from 18 mm×24 mm to 30 mm×40 mm; the active area is somewhat smaller, because of the thickness of the packaging of the sensor. CCD-based imaging is now also available for panoramic and cephalometric radiography. Indirect (semi-direct) imaging is based on storage phosphor plates (SPP) imaging. The plate is positioned in the mouth of the patient behind the teeth, and exposed to radiation. The positioning of the sensor plate resembles very much the way conventional radiographic films are handled. SPP technology is also available for panoramic and cephalometric imaging. The purpose of radiography is to provide information to solve a particular diagnostic task. It is therefore very likely that the role of dedicated diagnostic software will become essential in the near future. The importance of dedicated software for diagnostic imaging will increase. As a result of worldwide research, more procedures will become available, for research as well as for use in general practice.

  5. Practical contour segmentation algorithm for small animal digital radiography image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Fang; Hui, Gong

    2008-12-01

    In this paper a practical, automated contour segmentation technique for digital radiography image is described. Digital radiography is an imaging mode based on the penetrability of x-ray. Unlike reflection imaging mode such as visible light camera, the pixel brightness represents the summation of the attenuations on the photon thoroughfare. It is not chromophotograph but gray scale picture. Contour extraction is of great importance in medical applications, especially in non-destructive inspection. Manual segmentation techniques include pixel selection, geometrical boundary selection and tracing. But it relies heavily on the experience of the operators, and is time-consuming. Some researchers try to find contours from the intensity jumping characters around them. However these characters also exist in the juncture of bone and soft tissue. The practical way is back to the primordial threshold algorithm. This research emphasizes on how to find the optimal threshold. A high resolution digital radiography system is used to provide the oriental gray scale image. A mouse is applied as the sample of this paper to show the feasibility of the algorithm.

  6. Advances in computed radiography systems and their physical imaging characteristics.

    PubMed

    Cowen, A R; Davies, A G; Kengyelics, S M

    2007-12-01

    Radiological imaging is progressing towards an all-digital future, across the spectrum of medical imaging techniques. Computed radiography (CR) has provided a ready pathway from screen film to digital radiography and a convenient entry point to PACS. This review briefly revisits the principles of modern CR systems and their physical imaging characteristics. Wide dynamic range and digital image enhancement are well-established benefits of CR, which lend themselves to improved image presentation and reduced rates of repeat exposures. However, in its original form CR offered limited scope for reducing the radiation dose per radiographic exposure, compared with screen film. Recent innovations in CR, including the use of dual-sided image readout and channelled storage phosphor have eased these concerns. For example, introduction of these technologies has improved detective quantum efficiency (DQE) by approximately 50 and 100%, respectively, compared with standard CR. As a result CR currently affords greater scope for reducing patient dose, and provides a more substantive challenge to the new solid-state, flat-panel, digital radiography detectors.

  7. Z-petawatt driven ion beam radiography development.

    SciTech Connect

    Schollmeier, Marius; Geissel, Matthias; Rambo, Patrick K.; Schwarz, Jens; Sefkow, Adam B.

    2013-09-01

    Laser-driven proton radiography provides electromagnetic field mapping with high spatiotemporal resolution, and has been applied to many laser-driven High Energy Density Physics (HEDP) experiments. Our report addresses key questions about the feasibility of ion radiography at the Z-Accelerator (%E2%80%9CZ%E2%80%9D), concerning laser configuration, hardware, and radiation background. Charged particle tracking revealed that radiography at Z requires GeV scale protons, which is out of reach for existing and near-future laser systems. However, it might be possible to perform proton deflectometry to detect magnetic flux compression in the fringe field region of a magnetized liner inertial fusion experiment. Experiments with the Z-Petawatt laser to enhance proton yield and energy showed an unexpected scaling with target thickness. Full-scale, 3D radiation-hydrodynamics simulations, coupled to fully explicit and kinetic 2D particle-in-cell simulations running for over 10 ps, explain the scaling by a complex interplay of laser prepulse, preplasma, and ps-scale temporal rising edge of the laser.

  8. Developments in radiography and tomography of waste containers at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Roney, T.J.; Allemeier, R.T.; Galbraith, S.G.; Tow, D.M.

    1995-01-01

    oThe Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has been inspecting containers (boxes and drums) of nuclear waste materials using real-time radiography (RTR) for the past ten years. Requirements governing characterization of containerized waste for short-term storage, treatment, transportation, and disposal have become more stringent. These new requirements, and the need to reduce inspection times to increase throughput, necessitate improvements in the information obtained by radiographic methods. RTR provides a qualitative view of container contents, whereas quantitative information is often required. Two projects at the INEL are converting the present qualitative radiographic inspection to the more quantitative digital radiography (DR) and computed tomography (CT) methods, while retaining the RTR function. The first project is modifying, the RTR hardware at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) to allow rapid processing of analog RTR images. The digital RTR (DRTR) system described here can digitize, process, and redisplay RTR images at video frame rates allowing for real-time image improvement features such as edge detection, contrast enhancement, frame subtraction, frame averaging, and a variety of digital filtering options. The second project is developing a complete radiographic and tomographic capability that allows for greater sophistication in data acquisition and processing as the operator and/or requirements demand. The approach involves modification of an industrial CT scanner with the capability to acquire radiographic and tomographic data in several modes, including conventional RTR, DR, and CT with a linear detector for high spatial resolution, and DR and CT with an area detector for high throughput. Improvements in image quality and quantitative digital radiographic capabilities of the DRTR system are shown. Status and plans for the modified CT scanner (presently under development) are also presented.

  9. Characterization of HANARO neutron radiography facility in accordance with ASTM standard E545-91/E803-91 for KOLAS/ISO17025.

    PubMed

    Cheul-Muu, Sim; Ki-Yong, Nam; In-Cheol, Lim; Chang-Hee, Lee; Ha-Lim, Choi

    2004-10-01

    As neutron radiography is even more in demand for industrial applications of aircraft, turbine blade, automobile, explosive igniters, etc, it is necessary to review the standards which are the most appropriate for preparing the procedures for setting up the QA system. Recently, Korea Of Lab Accreditation Scheme (KOLAS) was originated from ISO 17025. It is widely recognized by research peer groups for conducting valid tests. The neutron radiography facility (NRF) of High Flux Advanced Neutron Application Reactor (HANARO), which started ion 1996, is the preliminary stages of KOLAS. The HANARO NRF is not only characterized using ASTM standards E545-91/E803-91 to satisfy the requirements of KOLAS, but in the design phase of the tomography system.

  10. Series: Practical Evaluation of Clinical Image Quality (2): Image Quality Measurements for Digital Radiography Systems.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Reiji

    In recent years, the manuals and data analysis tools to evaluate the basic imaging properties of medical imaging systems, such as digital radiography system, CT, and MRI, are easily available. For the image quality evaluation of digital radiography systems, special measurement system, such as a microdensitometer, required for the analysis of analog radiography system, is not needed. This enabled anyone to perform the evaluation of digital radiography system.On the other hand, to make accurate measurements, obtaining appropriate image data is a must. To enable this, appropriate setting of the hardware and the software is also required. In addition, we are asked to acquire sufficient knowledge to make highly reproducible measurements.

  11. Characterization of non-tuberculosis mycobacteria by neutron radiography.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Jaqueline M; Crispim, Verginia Reis; da Silva, Marlei Gomes; Furtado, Vanessa Rodrigues; Duarte, Rafael Da Silva

    2013-07-01

    The genus Mycobacterium shares many characteristics with Corynebacterium and Actinomyces genera, among which the genomic guanine plus cytosine content and the production of long branched-chain fatty acids, known as mycolic acids are enhanced. Growth rate and optimal temperature of mycobacteria are variable. The genus comprises more than 140 known species; however Mycobacterium fortuitum, a fast growing nontuberculous mycobacterium, is clinically significant, because it has been associated to several lesions following surgery procedures such as liposuction, silicone breast and pacemaker implants, exposure to prosthetic materials besides sporadic lesions in the skin, soft tissues and rarely lungs. The objective of the present study is to reduce the time necessary for M. fortuitum characterization based on its morphology and the use of the neutron radiography technique substituting the classical biochemical assays. We also aim to confirm the utility of dendrimers as boron carriers. The samples were sterilized through conventional protocols using 10% formaldehyde. In the incubation process, two solutions with different molar ratios (10:1 and 20:1) of sodium borate and PAMAM G4 dendrimer and also pure sodium borate were used. After doping and sterilization procedures, the samples were deposited on CR-39 sheets, irradiated with a 4.6×10(5) n/cm(2)s thermal neutron flux for 30 min, from the J-9 irradiation channel of the Argonauta IEN/CNEN reactor. The images registered in the CR-39 were visualized in a Nikon E400 optical transmission microscope and captured by a Nikon Coolpix 995 digital camera. Developing the nuclear tracks registered in the CR-39 allowed a 1000× enlargement of mycobacterium images, facilitating their characterization, the use of more sophisticated equipment not being necessary. The use of neutron radiography technique reduced the time necessary for characterization. Doping with PAMAM dendrimer improved the visualization of NTM in neutron radiography

  12. Average Soil Water Retention Curves Measured by Neutron Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Chu-Lin; Perfect, Edmund; Kang, Misun; Voisin, Sophie; Bilheux, Hassina Z; Horita, Juske; Hussey, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Water retention curves are essential for understanding the hydrologic behavior of partially-saturated porous media and modeling flow transport processes within the vadose zone. In this paper we report direct measurements of the main drying and wetting branches of the average water retention function obtained using 2-dimensional neutron radiography. Flint sand columns were saturated with water and then drained under quasi-equilibrium conditions using a hanging water column setup. Digital images (2048 x 2048 pixels) of the transmitted flux of neutrons were acquired at each imposed matric potential (~10-15 matric potential values per experiment) at the NCNR BT-2 neutron imaging beam line. Volumetric water contents were calculated on a pixel by pixel basis using Beer-Lambert s law after taking into account beam hardening and geometric corrections. To remove scattering effects at high water contents the volumetric water contents were normalized (to give relative saturations) by dividing the drying and wetting sequences of images by the images obtained at saturation and satiation, respectively. The resulting pixel values were then averaged and combined with information on the imposed basal matric potentials to give average water retention curves. The average relative saturations obtained by neutron radiography showed an approximate one-to-one relationship with the average values measured volumetrically using the hanging water column setup. There were no significant differences (at p < 0.05) between the parameters of the van Genuchten equation fitted to the average neutron radiography data and those estimated from replicated hanging water column data. Our results indicate that neutron imaging is a very effective tool for quantifying the average water retention curve.

  13. The role of postoperative chest radiography in pediatric tracheotomy.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, J S; Sulek, M; de Jong, A; Friedman, E M

    2001-07-30

    A postoperative chest radiograph has traditionally been obtained after tracheotomies to evaluate for the presence of a pneumothorax and to assess tube position. Several recent studies in adults have questioned the usefulness of routine postoperative chest radiography in uncomplicated cases, but the role of post-operative chest radiography in pediatric patients has not been previously reviewed. We performed this study to examine the clinical utility of post-tracheotomy chest radiography in pediatric patients and determine if this routine practice impacts patient management enough to merit continued usage. A retrospective review was performed of 200 consecutive pediatric patients who underwent tracheotomies by the otolaryngology service in a tertiary care pediatric hospital from January 1994 to June 1999. All patients received postoperative chest radiographs. Five of 200 patients had a new postoperative radiographic finding, with three requiring interventions. Two patients required chest tube placement for pneumothorax, and one patient required tracheostomy tube change for repositioning. Fifty-one patients, including both pneumothoraces, exhibited clinical signs of pneumothorax (decreased breath sounds or oxygen saturation) in the immediate postoperative period. Chest X-ray ruled out a pneumothorax in the remaining 49 patients. The majority of these 51 patients were less than 2 years old (94%, P=0.002) or weighed less than 17 kg (89%, P=0.004). Postoperative chest X-rays yielded clinically relevant information in 168 patients that fell into one or more of four high risk categories: age less than 2, weight less than 17 kg, emergent procedures, or concomitant central line placement. Avoiding chest X-rays in the remaining 32 patients would have resulted in potential savings of $5000, which does not reflect the actuarial cost of a missed complication. Since the majority of our patients (84%) fell into a high-risk category, we feel it would be prudent to continue

  14. Spectroscopic neutron radiography for a cargo scanning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahon, Jill; Danagoulian, Areg; MacDonald, Thomas D.; Hartwig, Zachary S.; Lanza, Richard C.

    2016-06-01

    Detection of cross-border smuggling of illicit materials and contraband is a challenge that requires rapid, low-dose, and efficient radiographic technology. The work we describe here is derived from a technique which uses monoenergetic gamma rays from low energy nuclear reactions, such as 11B(d,nγ)12C, to perform radiographic analysis of shipping containers. Transmission ratios of multiple monoenergetic gamma lines resulting from several gamma producing nuclear reactions can be employed to detect materials of high atomic number (Z), the details of which will be described in a separate paper. Inherent in this particular nuclear reaction is the production of fast neutrons which could enable neutron radiography and further characterization of the effective-Z of the cargo, especially within the range of lower Z. Previous research efforts focused on the use of total neutron counts in combination with X-ray radiography to characterize the hydrogenous content of the cargo. We present a technique of performing transmitted neutron spectral analysis to reconstruct the effective Z and potentially the density of the cargo. This is made possible by the large differences in the energy dependence of neutron scattering cross-sections between hydrogenous materials and those of higher Z. These dependencies result in harder transmission spectra for hydrogenous cargoes than those of non-hydrogenous cargoes. Such observed differences can then be used to classify the cargo based on its hydrogenous content. The studies presented in this paper demonstrate that such techniques are feasible and can provide a contribution to cargo security, especially when used in concert with gamma radiography.

  15. Antepartum dental radiography and infant low birth weight.

    PubMed

    Hujoel, Philippe P; Bollen, Anne-Marie; Noonan, Carolyn J; del Aguila, Michael A

    2004-04-28

    Both high- and low-dose radiation exposures in women have been associated with low-birth-weight offspring. It is unclear if radiation affects the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis and thereby indirectly birth weight, or if the radiation directly affects the reproductive organs. To investigate whether antepartum dental radiography is associated with low-birth-weight offspring. A population-based case-control study. Enrollees of a dental insurance plan with live singleton births in Washington State between January 1993 and December 2000. Cases were 1117 women with low-birth-weight infants (<2500 g), of whom 336 were term low-birth-weight infants (1501-2499 g and gestation > or =37 weeks). Four control pregnancies resulting in normal-birth-weight infants (> or =2500 g) were randomly selected for each case (n = 4468). Odds of low birth weight and term low birth weight by dental radiographic dose during gestation. An exposure higher than 0.4 milligray (mGy) during gestation occurred in 21 (1.9%) mothers of low-birth-weight infants and, when compared with women who had no known dental radiography, was associated with an adjusted odds ratio (OR) for a low-birth-weight infant of 2.27 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.11-4.66, P =.03). Exposure higher than 0.4 mGy occurred in 10 (3%) term low-birth-weight pregnancies and was associated with an adjusted OR for a term low-birth-weight infant of 3.61 (95% CI, 1.46-8.92, P =.005). Dental radiography during pregnancy is associated with low birth weight, specifically with term low birth weight.

  16. BBU design of linear induction accelerator cells for radiography application

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, C.C.; Chen, Y.J.; Gaporaso, G.J.; Houck, T.L.; Molau, N.E.; Focklen, J.; Gregory, S.

    1997-05-06

    There is an ongoing effort to develop accelerating modules for high-current electron accelerators for advanced radiography application. Accelerating modules with low beam-cavity coupling impedances along with gap designs with acceptable field stresses comprise a set of fundamental design criteria. We examine improved cell designs which have been developed for accelerator application in several radiographic operating regimes. We evaluate interaction impedances, analyze the effects of beam structure coupling on beam dynamics (beam break-up instability and corkscrew motion). We also provide estimates of coupling through interesting new high-gradient insulators and evaluate their potential future application in induction cells.

  17. Radiography for a Shock-accelerated Liquid Layer

    SciTech Connect

    Meekunnasombat, P.; Oakley, J. G.; Anderson, M. H.; Bonazza, R.

    2005-07-22

    A flash X-ray radiography technique is employed to measure the volume fraction of a shock accelerated liquid layer in a large vertical shock tube. A series of the fragmented liquid layer X-ray snap-shots are taken at different post-shock times and pieced together to reconstruct the entire volume fraction field of the shock-induced breakup at Mach 2.12. A rapid development of the gas-liquid mixing layer is found as water layer that is initially 12.8 mm thick spreads to 22.5 cm in 3.2 ms.

  18. Computers in dental radiography: a scenario for the future

    SciTech Connect

    Webber, R.L.

    1985-09-01

    The recent emergence of cost-effective computing power makes it possible to integrate sophisticated data-sampling and image-interpretation techniques into dental radiography for the first time. A prototype system is being developed to permit clinical information expressed in three dimensions--plus time--to be made visible almost instantly. The associated X-ray dose for a complete three-dimensional survey of a selected dental region is predicted to be less than that required for a single conventional periapical radiograph exposed on D-speed film.

  19. X-ray vector radiography imaging for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potdevin, Guillaume; Malecki, Andreas; Biernath, Thomas; Bech, Martin; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2012-07-01

    The non-invasive estimation of fracture risk in osteoporosis remains a challenge in the clinical routine and is mainly based on an assessment of bone density by dual X-ray absorption (DXA) although bone micro-architecture is known to play an important role for bone fragility. Here we report on 'X-ray vector Radiography' measurements able to provide a direct bone microstructure diagnostics on human bone samples, which we compare qualitatively and quantitatively with numerical analysis of high resolution radiographs.

  20. X-ray vector radiography imaging for biomedical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Potdevin, Guillaume; Malecki, Andreas; Biernath, Thomas; Bech, Martin; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2012-07-31

    The non-invasive estimation of fracture risk in osteoporosis remains a challenge in the clinical routine and is mainly based on an assessment of bone density by dual X-ray absorption (DXA) although bone micro-architecture is known to play an important role for bone fragility. Here we report on 'X-ray vector Radiography' measurements able to provide a direct bone microstructure diagnostics on human bone samples, which we compare qualitatively and quantitatively with numerical analysis of high resolution radiographs.

  1. Excretory urography using dual-energy scanned projection radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Soomer, F.G.; Brody, W.R.; Gross, D.; Macovski, A.; Hall, A.; Pelc, N.

    1981-11-01

    Excretory urograms of 10 patients were obtained using a GE 8800 CT scanner with Scout View which had been modified for dual-kVp scanned projection radiography. Using this system, it is possible to combine images obtained simultaneously at 85 and 135 kVp to create subtraction images from which substances of desired mean atomic number have been removed. This permits improved visualization of the genitourinary system on urograms by (a) eliminating obscuring bowel gas shadows and (b) enhancement of both iodinated contrast media and retroperitoneal fat planes.

  2. DIGITAL RADIOGRAPHY OF SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL TEST PACKAGES

    SciTech Connect

    HOWARD, BOYD

    2006-02-02

    The purpose of this document is to provide a brief introduction to digital radiography (DR), and a description of the DR configuration that was used to radiographically image the Special Nuclear Material (SNM) Test Packages before and after function tests that have been conducted. Also included are (1) Attachment 1, a comprehensive index that describes at which phase of the certification process that digital radiographic images were acquired, (2) digital radiographic images of each of the six packages at various stages of the certification process, and (3) Attachment 2, imaging instructions, that specify the setup procedures and detailed parameters of the DR imaging methodology that were used.

  3. Panoramic radiography for temporomandibular joint arthrography: a description of arthropanoramograms.

    PubMed

    Abramovitch, K; Langlais, R P; Dolwick, M F

    1989-06-01

    TMJ arthrograms done with panoramic radiography, i.e., arthropanoramography, can demonstrate intracapsular disk displacement and perforation pathoses. These views are very practical for inferior synovial cavity arthrograms performed in the dental operatory since panoramic radiographic machines have become common in modern dental practices. Specific advantages of arthropanoramography include the decreased financial cost and decreased radiation exposure to the patient. Arthropanoramography does not replace tomography or videofluoroscopy in TMJ arthrography. It is, however, described as a simple alternative to the more conventional forms of arthrography.

  4. [A scientometric radiography of Revista Médica de Chile].

    PubMed

    Krauskopf, M

    1997-07-01

    In the context of a festschrift to commemorate the 125th anniversary of the Revista Médica de Chile, "radiography" of the journal has been depicted using several scientometric indicators. Among the mainstream journals in the category of Medicine, General & Internal and taking into account the wide editorial coverage and the language of the publication that fulfills the need for the required social appropriation of science that the country requires, the Revista Médica de Chile portrays healthy and quite relevant. Among the articles published between 1981 and 1995, some concerning public health have reached, particularly, an impact which surpasses their mean expected citation rate.

  5. Quantitative studies on inner interfaces in conical metal joints using hard x-ray inline phase contrast radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Zabler, S.; Rack, T.; Nelson, K.; Rack, A.

    2010-10-15

    Quantitative investigation of micrometer and submicrometer gaps between joining metal surfaces is applied to conical plug-socket connections in dental titanium implants. Microgaps of widths well beyond the resolving power of industrial x-ray systems are imaged by synchrotron phase contrast radiography. Furthermore, by using an analytical model for the relatively simple sample geometry and applying it to numerical forward simulations of the optical Fresnel propagation, we show that quantitative measurements of the microgap width down to 0.1 {mu}m are possible. Image data recorded at the BAMline (BESSY-II light source, Germany) are presented, with the resolving power of the imaging system being 4 {mu}m in absorption mode and {approx}14 {mu}m in phase contrast mode (z{sub 2}=0.74 m). Thus, phase contrast radiography, combined with numerical forward simulations, is capable of measuring the widths of gaps that are two orders of magnitude thinner than the conventional detection limit.

  6. 75 FR 57080 - In the Matter of Aerotest Operations, Inc. (Aerotest Radiography and Research Reactor); Order...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-17

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Aerotest Operations, Inc. (Aerotest Radiography and Research Reactor); Order... Aerotest Operations, Inc., (Aerotest, the licensee) is the holder of Facility Operating License No. R-98 which authorizes the possession, use, and operation of the Aerotest Radiography and Research Reactor...

  7. 75 FR 27368 - Aerotest Operations, Inc., Aerotest Radiography and Research Reactor; Notice of Consideration of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-14

    ... COMMISSION Aerotest Operations, Inc., Aerotest Radiography and Research Reactor; Notice of Consideration of... INFORMATION CONTACT: Cindy Montgomery, Project Manager, Research and Test Reactors Licensing Branch, Division... Operating License No. R-98 for the Aerotest Radiography and Research Reactor (ARRR), currently held by...

  8. Dual Use Corrosion Inhibitor and Penetrant for Anomaly Detection in Neutron/X Radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Phillip B. (Inventor); Novak, Howard L. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A dual purpose corrosion inhibitor and penetrant composition sensitive to radiography interrogation is provided. The corrosion inhibitor mitigates or eliminates corrosion on the surface of a substrate upon which the corrosion inhibitor is applied. In addition, the corrosion inhibitor provides for the attenuation of a signal used during radiography interrogation thereby providing for detection of anomalies on the surface of the substrate.

  9. 42 CFR 37.51 - Interpreting and classifying chest radiographs-digital radiography systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...-digital radiography systems. 37.51 Section 37.51 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH..., and Submission of Chest Radiographs § 37.51 Interpreting and classifying chest radiographs—digital radiography systems. (a) For each chest radiograph obtained at an approved facility using a...

  10. Implementation of a PACS for radiography training and clinical service in a university setting through a multinational effort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Fuk-hay; Law, Yuen Y.; Zhang, Jianguo; Liu, Hai L.; Chang, Tony; Matsuda, Koyo; Cao, Fei

    2001-08-01

    The Hong Kong Polytechnic University has a Radiography Division under the Development of Optometry and Radiography. The Division trains both diagnostic and therapeutic radiographers with 60 students/year and offers a B.Sc. degree. In addition the Division together with the University Health Service operates a radiography clinic with radiology consultation from radiologists from other hospitals and clinics. This paper describers the implementation of a PACS in the Division for radiography training, and for clinical service.

  11. A comparison of computed tomography, computed radiography, and film-screen radiography for the detection of canine pulmonary nodules.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Kate; Joly, Hugo; Blond, Laurent; D'Anjou, Marc-André; Nadeau, Marie-Ève; Olive, Julien; Beauchamp, Guy

    2012-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has become more widely available and computed radiography (CR) has replaced film-screen radiography for canine thoracic imaging in many veterinary practices. There are limited data comparing these modalities in a veterinary clinical setting to detect pulmonary nodules. We compared CT, CR, and film-screen radiography for detecting the presence, number, and characteristics of pulmonary nodules in dogs. Observer performance for a variety of experience levels was also evaluated. Twenty-one client-owned dogs with a primary neoplastic process underwent CT and CR; nine also received film-screen radiographs. Positive/negative classification by consensus agreed between the three modalities in 8/9 dogs and between CR and CT in the remaining 12. CT detected the greatest (P = 0.002) total number of nodules and no difference was seen between CR and films. The greatest number of nodules was seen in the right middle and both caudal regions, but only using CT (P < 0.0001). Significantly smaller nodules were detected with CT (P = 0.0007) and no difference in minimum size was detected between CR and films. Observer accuracy was high for all modalities; particularly for CT (90.5-100%) and for the senior radiologist (90.5-100%). CT was also characterized by the least interobserver variability. Although CT, CR, and film-screen performed similarly in determining the presence or absence of pulmonary nodules, a greater number of smaller nodules was detected with CT, and CT was associated with greater diagnostic confidence and observer accuracy and agreement. © 2012 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  12. Investigating the use of an antiscatter grid in chest radiography for average adults with a computed radiography imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Wood, T J; Avery, G; Balcam, S; Needler, L; Smith, A; Saunderson, J R; Beavis, A W

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate via simulation a proposed change to clinical practice for chest radiography. The validity of using a scatter rejection grid across the diagnostic energy range (60–125 kVp), in conjunction with appropriate tube current–time product (mAs) for imaging with a computed radiography (CR) system was investigated. Methods: A digitally reconstructed radiograph algorithm was used, which was capable of simulating CR chest radiographs with various tube voltages, receptor doses and scatter rejection methods. Four experienced image evaluators graded images with a grid (n = 80) at tube voltages across the diagnostic energy range and varying detector air kermas. These were scored against corresponding images reconstructed without a grid, as per current clinical protocol. Results: For all patients, diagnostic image quality improved with the use of a grid, without the need to increase tube mAs (and therefore patient dose), irrespective of the tube voltage used. Increasing tube mAs by an amount determined by the Bucky factor made little difference to image quality. Conclusion: A virtual clinical trial has been performed with simulated chest CR images. Results indicate that the use of a grid improves diagnostic image quality for average adults, without the need to increase tube mAs, even at low tube voltages. Advances in knowledge: Validated with images containing realistic anatomical noise, it is possible to improve image quality by utilizing grids for chest radiography with CR systems without increasing patient exposure. Increasing tube mAs by an amount determined by the Bucky factor is not justified. PMID:25571914

  13. Correlation of the clinical and physical image quality in chest radiography for average adults with a computed radiography imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Wood, T J; Beavis, A W; Saunderson, J R

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation between the quality of visually graded patient (clinical) chest images and a quantitative assessment of chest phantom (physical) images acquired with a computed radiography (CR) imaging system. Methods: The results of a previously published study, in which four experienced image evaluators graded computer-simulated postero-anterior chest images using a visual grading analysis scoring (VGAS) scheme, were used for the clinical image quality measurement. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and effective dose efficiency (eDE) were used as physical image quality metrics measured in a uniform chest phantom. Although optimal values of these physical metrics for chest radiography were not derived in this work, their correlation with VGAS in images acquired without an antiscatter grid across the diagnostic range of X-ray tube voltages was determined using Pearson’s correlation coefficient. Results: Clinical and physical image quality metrics increased with decreasing tube voltage. Statistically significant correlations between VGAS and CNR (R=0.87, p<0.033) and eDE (R=0.77, p<0.008) were observed. Conclusion: Medical physics experts may use the physical image quality metrics described here in quality assurance programmes and optimisation studies with a degree of confidence that they reflect the clinical image quality in chest CR images acquired without an antiscatter grid. Advances in knowledge: A statistically significant correlation has been found between the clinical and physical image quality in CR chest imaging. The results support the value of using CNR and eDE in the evaluation of quality in clinical thorax radiography. PMID:23568362

  14. In situ studies of mass transport in liquid alloys by means of neutron radiography.

    PubMed

    Kargl, F; Engelhardt, M; Yang, F; Weis, H; Schmakat, P; Schillinger, B; Griesche, A; Meyer, A

    2011-06-29

    When in situ techniques became available in recent years this led to a breakthrough in accurately determining diffusion coefficients for liquid alloys. Here we discuss how neutron radiography can be used to measure chemical diffusion in a ternary AlCuAg alloy. Neutron radiography hereby gives complementary information to x-ray radiography used for measuring chemical diffusion and to quasielastic neutron scattering used mainly for determining self-diffusion. A novel Al(2)O(3) based furnace that enables one to study diffusion processes by means of neutron radiography is discussed. A chemical diffusion coefficient of Ag against Al around the eutectic composition Al(68.6)Cu(13.8)Ag(17.6) at.% was obtained. It is demonstrated that the in situ technique of neutron radiography is a powerful means to study mass transport properties in situ in binary and ternary alloys that show poor x-ray contrast.

  15. Free-focus radiography using conventional films: Radiation exposures in a simulated clinical study

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, T.W.; Randall, G.J.; Goldberg, A.J.

    1980-07-01

    This study compared air exposures during conventional dental and maxillofacial radiography and similar views using free-focus radiography with conventional image receptors. The results show that periapical type surveys on nonscreen film placed extraorally or in the buccal fold may be carried out with an exposure to the surface tissues, which is similar to or less than conventional dental radiography. Extraoral survey type radiographs of the jaws may be carried out with significantly less surface exposure than lateral oblique views of the jaws. The least exposure was required, when the film was placed in the buccla fold instead of against the face during free-focus radiography. The exposures with film screen combinations were reduced by an order of magnitude when compared to the nonscreen techniques. Proper filtration of the beam of the miniaturized x-ray machines radiography in dentistry may thus be desirable and applications in other parts of the body encouraged.

  16. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The following section... individual State licensure processes, all of which include assessment of competence in dental radiography....

  17. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The following section... individual State licensure processes, all of which include assessment of competence in dental radiography....

  18. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The following section... individual State licensure processes, all of which include assessment of competence in dental radiography....

  19. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The following section... individual State licensure processes, all of which include assessment of competence in dental radiography....

  20. Accuracy of direct digital radiography for detecting occlusal caries in primary teeth compared with conventional radiography and visual inspection: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Dias da Silva, P R; Martins Marques, M; Steagall, W; Medeiros Mendes, F; Lascala, C A

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The diagnosis of caries lesions is still a matter of concern in dentistry. The diagnosis of dental caries by digital radiography has a number of advantages over conventional radiography; however, this method has not been explored fully in the field of paediatric dentistry. This in vitro research evaluated the accuracy of direct digital radiography compared with visual inspection and conventional radiography in the diagnosis of occlusal caries lesions in primary molars. Methods 50 molars were selected and evaluated under standardized conditions by 2 previously calibrated examiners according to 3 diagnostic methods (visual inspection, conventional radiography and direct digital radiography). Direct digital radiographs were obtained with the Dixi3 system (Planmeca, Helsinki, Finland) and the conventional radiographs with InSight film (Kodak Eastman Co., Rochester, NY). The images were scored and a reference standard was obtained histologically. The interexaminer reliability was calculated using Cohen's kappa test and the specificity, sensitivity and accuracy of the methods were calculated. Results Examiner reliability was good. For lesions limited to the enamel, visual inspection showed significantly higher sensitivity and accuracy than both radiographic methods, but no significant difference was found in specificity. For teeth with dentinal caries, no significant differences were found for any parameter when comparing visual and radiographic evaluation. Conclusions Although less accurate than the visual method for detecting caries lesions confined to the enamel, the direct digital radiographic method is as effective as conventional radiographic examination and visual inspection of primary teeth with occlusal caries when the dentine is involved. PMID:20729186

  1. Inverse-collimated proton radiography for imaging thin materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Matthew S.; Allison, Jason; Andrews, Malcolm; Ferm, Eric; Goett, John J.; Kwiatkowski, Kris; Lopez, Julian; Mariam, Fesseha; Marr-Lyon, Mark; Martinez, Michael; Medina, Jason; Medina, Patrick; Merrill, Frank E.; Morris, Chris L.; Murray, Matthew M.; Nedrow, Paul; Neukirch, Levi P.; Prestridge, Katherine; Rigg, Paolo; Saunders, Alexander; Schurman, Tamsen; Tainter, Amy; Trouw, Frans; Tupa, Dale; Tybo, Josh; Vogan-McNeil, Wendy; Wilde, Carl

    2017-01-01

    Relativistic, magnetically focused proton radiography was invented at Los Alamos National Laboratory using the 800 MeV LANSCE beam and is inherently well-suited to imaging dense objects, at areal densities >20 g cm-2. However, if the unscattered portion of the transmitted beam is removed at the Fourier plane through inverse-collimation, this system becomes highly sensitive to very thin media, of areal densities <100 mg cm-2. Here, this inverse-collimation scheme is described in detail and demonstrated by imaging Xe gas with a shockwave generated by an aluminum plate compressing the gas at Mach 8.8. With a 5-mrad inverse collimator, an areal density change of just 49 mg cm-2 across the shock front is discernible with a contrast-to-noise ratio of 3. Geant4 modeling of idealized and realistic proton transports can guide the design of inverse-collimators optimized for specific experimental conditions and show that this technique performs better for thin targets with reduced incident proton beam emittance. This work increases the range of areal densities to which the system is sensitive to span from ˜25 mg cm-2 to 100 g cm-2, exceeding three orders of magnitude. This enables the simultaneous imaging of a dense system as well as thin jets and ejecta material that are otherwise difficult to characterize with high-energy proton radiography.

  2. Plausible scenarios for the radiography profession in Sweden in 2025.

    PubMed

    Björkman, B; Fridell, K; Tavakol Olofsson, P

    2017-11-01

    Radiography is a healthcare speciality with many technical challenges. Advances in engineering and information technology applications may continue to drive and be driven by radiographers. The world of diagnostic imaging is changing rapidly and radiographers must be proactive in order to survive. To ensure sustainable development, organisations have to identify future opportunities and threats in a timely manner and incorporate them into their strategic planning. Hence, the aim of this study was to analyse and describe plausible scenarios for the radiography profession in 2025. The study has a qualitative design with an inductive approach based on focus group interviews. The interviews were inspired by the Scenario-Planning method. Of the seven trends identified in a previous study, the radiographers considered two as the most uncertain scenarios that would have the greatest impact on the profession should they occur. These trends, labelled "Access to career advancement" and "A sufficient number of radiographers", were inserted into the scenario cross. The resulting four plausible future scenarios were: The happy radiographer, the specialist radiographer, the dying profession and the assembly line. It is suggested that "The dying profession" scenario could probably be turned in the opposite direction by facilitating career development opportunities for radiographers within the profession. Changing the direction would probably lead to a profession composed of "happy radiographers" who are specialists, proud of their profession and competent to carry out advanced tasks, in contrast to being solely occupied by "the assembly line". Copyright © 2017 The College of Radiographers. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Assessing The Impact Of Computed Radiography And PACS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedgcock, Marcus W.; Kehr, Katherine

    1989-05-01

    Our institution (San Francisco VA Medical Center) is a VA pilot center for total digital imaging and PACS. Quantitative information about PACS impact on health care is limited, because no centers have done rigorous preimplementation studies. We are gathering quantitative service delivery and cost data before, during, and after stepwise implementation of computed radiography and PACS at our institution to define the impact on imaging service delivery. We designed a simple audit method using the x-ray request and time clocks to determine patient waiting time, imaging time, film use, image availability to the radiologist, matching of current with previous images, image availability to clinicians, and time to final interpretation. Our department model is a multichannel, mulitserver patient queue. Our current radiograph file is space limited, containing only one year of images; older images are kept in a remote file area in another building. In addition, there are 16 subfile areas within the Radiology Service and the medical center. Our preimplementation audit showed some long waiting times (40 minutes, average 20) and immediate retrieval of prior films in only 42% of cases, with an average retrieval time of 22 hours. Computed radiography and the optical archive have the potential to improve these figures. The audit will be ongoing and automated as implementation of PACS progresses, to measure service improvement and learning curve with the new equipment. We present the audit format and baseline preimplementation figures.

  4. A note on digital dental radiography in forensic odontology

    PubMed Central

    Chiam, Sher-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Digital dental radiography, intraoral and extraoral, is becoming more popular in dental practice. It offers convenience, such as lower exposure to radiation, ease of storing of images, and elimination of chemical processing. However, it also has disadvantages and drawbacks. One of these is the potential for confusion of the orientation of the image. This paper outlines one example of this, namely, the lateral inversion of the image. This source of confusion is partly inherent in the older model of phosphor storage plates (PSPs), as they allow both sides to be exposed without clue to the fact that the image is acquired on the wrong side. The native software allows digital manipulation of the X-ray image, permitting both rotation and inversion. Attempts to orientate the X-ray according to the indicator incorporated on the plate can then sometimes lead to inadvertent lateral inversion of the image. This article discusses the implications of such mistakes in dental digital radiography to forensic odontology and general dental practice. PMID:25177144

  5. A note on digital dental radiography in forensic odontology.

    PubMed

    Chiam, Sher-Lin

    2014-09-01

    Digital dental radiography, intraoral and extraoral, is becoming more popular in dental practice. It offers convenience, such as lower exposure to radiation, ease of storing of images, and elimination of chemical processing. However, it also has disadvantages and drawbacks. One of these is the potential for confusion of the orientation of the image. This paper outlines one example of this, namely, the lateral inversion of the image. This source of confusion is partly inherent in the older model of phosphor storage plates (PSPs), as they allow both sides to be exposed without clue to the fact that the image is acquired on the wrong side. The native software allows digital manipulation of the X-ray image, permitting both rotation and inversion. Attempts to orientate the X-ray according to the indicator incorporated on the plate can then sometimes lead to inadvertent lateral inversion of the image. This article discusses the implications of such mistakes in dental digital radiography to forensic odontology and general dental practice.

  6. Using Digital Radiography To Image Liquid Nitrogen in Voids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Dwight; Blevins, Elana

    2007-01-01

    Digital radiography by use of (1) a field-portable x-ray tube that emits low-energy x rays and (2) an electronic imaging x-ray detector has been found to be an effective technique for detecting liquid nitrogen inside voids in thermal-insulation panels. The technique was conceived as a means of investigating cryopumping (including cryoingestion) as a potential cause of loss of thermal insulation foam from space-shuttle external fuel tanks. The technique could just as well be used to investigate cryopumping and cryoingestion in other settings. In images formed by use of low-energy x-rays, one can clearly distinguish between voids filled with liquid nitrogen and those filled with gaseous nitrogen or other gases. Conventional film radiography is of some value, but yields only non-real-time still images that do not show time dependences of levels of liquids in voids. In contrast, the present digital radiographic technique yields a succession of images in real time at a rate of about 10 frames per second. The digitized images can be saved for subsequent analysis to extract data on time dependencies of levels of liquids and, hence, of flow paths and rates of filling and draining. The succession of images also amounts to a real-time motion picture that can be used as a guide to adjustment of test conditions.

  7. Grating Based, Phase Contrast Radiography with Bremsstrahlung Source

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher Goldin and Shaun Hampton

    2009-09-11

    Phase-contrast radiography (PCR) generates an image from gradients in the phase of the probing X-radiation induced by the radiographic object, and can therefore make visible features difficult or impossible to see with conventional, absorption-contrast (ACR) radiography. For any particular object, variations in either the real or imaginary parts of the index of refraction could be greater. Most practical difficulties of PCR arise from the very small deviation from unity (~10-5-10-6, depending of material and energy) of the real part of the index of refraction. In principal, straightforward shadowgraphy would provide a phase-contrast image, but in practice this is usually overwhelmed by the zero-order (bright field) signal. Eliminating this sets the phase-contrast signal against a dark field (as in Schlieren photography with visible light). One way to do this with X-rays is with a grating that produces a Talbot interference pattern. Minute variations in optical path lengths through the radiographic object can significantly shift the Talbot fringes, and these shifts constitute a dark-field signal separate from the zero-order wave. This technique has recently been investigated up to ~20keV [1-3]; this work addresses what sets the practical upper limit, and where that limit is. These appear to be grating fabrication, and ~60keV, respectively.

  8. Building a cost efficient digital radiography system for educational purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Chris

    Due to the growing need for Medical Physicists, many universities are implementing a Medical Physics program into their academic catalog. To help establish a new program, feasible equipment may be needed to help academic departments provide a hands-on experience for students and help teach the basic concepts of Medical Physics. For example, clinical Digital Radiography Systems (DRS) are used to help teach the basic concepts of digital imaging. However, such systems can cost in excess of 100,000, creating a financial obstacle that will be difficult to overcome. Hence, the development of a cost efficient digital radiography system may be desired in order to eliminate the financial obstacle and give students a hands-on learning experience. This DRS uses three main components to develop an image, an x-ray source, an intensifying plate, and a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. All three components are housed in a lead-lined box. The purpose of this project is to find the limitations of our DRS and compare the price between our DRS and commercially available DRSs. At optimal settings, a SNR of 25 is shown across the intensifying screen that can identify objects as small as 0.42mm. A Contrast-detail phantom shows the ability to decipher the varying thickness of foam rubber squares. The total cost of our DRS comes to 17,000.00, a fractional price tag compared to a commercially available DRS.

  9. The sensitivity of radiography of the postoperative stomach

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, D.J.; Munitz, H.A.; Gelfand, D.W.; Lane, T.G.; Wu, W.C.

    1982-09-01

    The results of radiology and endoscopy were compared in 140 patients who had undergone gastric surgery for ulcer disease. Of 74 patients who were examined with single-contrast radiography, 37 had abnormalities that were demonstrated endoscopically. The radiographic sensitivities in these patients were: gastritis 2/22 (9%); ulcer 3/5 (60%); obstruction 8/8 (100%); and miscellaneous abnormalities 2/2 (100%). The predictive accuracy of a diagnois of ulcer was 38%. Of the 66 patients who were examined with double-contrast radiography, 33 abnormalities were found with endoscopy. The radiographic sensitivities were: gastritis 3/13 (23%); ulcer 7/10 (70%); obstruction 4/4 (100%); and miscellaneous abnormalities 6/6 (100%). The predictive accuracy of a diagnosis of ulcer was 44%. Radiology appears to be unreliable in diagnosing gastritis and recurrent ulceration in the post-operation stomach. The double-contrast technique does not offer significant improvement over the single-contrast method in evaluating these postoperative problems.

  10. Optimisation of patient doses in programmable dental panoramic radiography.

    PubMed

    Lecomber, A R; Downes, S L; Mokhtari, M; Faulkner, K

    2000-03-01

    To estimate the radiation-related risk associated with twelve imaging programs available on the Orthophos (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) dental panoramic radiography unit. Organ absorbed doses for each program were measured using a Rando anthropomorphic phantom loaded with thermoluminescent dosemeters. Effective dose (E) was calculated in two ways; first, using the method recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection, which excludes the salivary glands (designated Eexc), and second, with its inclusion (designated Einc). Organ and effective doses were both used to compare the various imaging programs. In 11 of the 12 programs studied the salivary glands received the highest individual organ dose, and Einc was found to be up to double Eexc. When the image was restricted to the dentition (program 2) organ doses were lower than for the complete jaws (program 1) by up to 85%, and Eexc and Einc reduced by about one half. When programs 2 and 6 (to image the temporomandibular joints) are used in place of program 1, the former combination provides more image information at an equivalent risk. The value of E in panoramic radiography depends on the inclusion of the salivary glands in the calculation and the magnitude of the dose.

  11. Inverse-collimated proton radiography for imaging thin materials.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Matthew S; Allison, Jason; Andrews, Malcolm; Ferm, Eric; Goett, John J; Kwiatkowski, Kris; Lopez, Julian; Mariam, Fesseha; Marr-Lyon, Mark; Martinez, Michael; Medina, Jason; Medina, Patrick; Merrill, Frank E; Morris, Chris L; Murray, Matthew M; Nedrow, Paul; Neukirch, Levi P; Prestridge, Katherine; Rigg, Paolo; Saunders, Alexander; Schurman, Tamsen; Tainter, Amy; Trouw, Frans; Tupa, Dale; Tybo, Josh; Vogan-McNeil, Wendy; Wilde, Carl

    2017-01-01

    Relativistic, magnetically focused proton radiography was invented at Los Alamos National Laboratory using the 800 MeV LANSCE beam and is inherently well-suited to imaging dense objects, at areal densities >20 g cm(-2). However, if the unscattered portion of the transmitted beam is removed at the Fourier plane through inverse-collimation, this system becomes highly sensitive to very thin media, of areal densities <100 mg cm(-2). Here, this inverse-collimation scheme is described in detail and demonstrated by imaging Xe gas with a shockwave generated by an aluminum plate compressing the gas at Mach 8.8. With a 5-mrad inverse collimator, an areal density change of just 49 mg cm(-2) across the shock front is discernible with a contrast-to-noise ratio of 3. Geant4 modeling of idealized and realistic proton transports can guide the design of inverse-collimators optimized for specific experimental conditions and show that this technique performs better for thin targets with reduced incident proton beam emittance. This work increases the range of areal densities to which the system is sensitive to span from ∼25 mg cm(-2) to 100 g cm(-2), exceeding three orders of magnitude. This enables the simultaneous imaging of a dense system as well as thin jets and ejecta material that are otherwise difficult to characterize with high-energy proton radiography.

  12. Parental knowledge and attitudes towards dental radiography for children.

    PubMed

    Chiri, R; Awan, S; Archibald, S; Abbott, P V

    2013-06-01

    Radiographs are an essential part of most clinical dental examinations and diagnoses. The aim of the study was to assess the knowledge and attitudes of parents towards dental radiographs for their children. A 21-item questionnaire, covering parental level of radiation knowledge and socio-demographics was applied. Sliding scales were used to assess attitude towards dental radiographs. There were 1467 questionnaires distributed between five primary schools in the Perth (Western Australia) metropolitan area, with 309 surveys (21%) returned for collection. Most parents displayed a low level of knowledge, but had a positive attitude towards dental radiographs. Parents with children who have previously had dental radiographs perceived dental radiographs as 'good', 'useful' and 'pleasant'. A higher level of education and parents with children who have previously had radiographs were significantly associated with a higher level of knowledge about dental radiography. Parents who had higher scores on questions assessing radiation knowledge were more likely to perceive dental radiographs as 'safe' and 'beneficial'. Most parents have a positive attitude towards dental radiographs on their children. However, the majority of parents lack knowledge regarding dental radiography, especially regarding the risks involved. © 2013 Australian Dental Association.

  13. X-ray vector radiography of a human hand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jud, Christoph; Braig, Eva; Dierolf, Martin; Eggl, Elena; Günther, Benedikt; Achterhold, Klaus; Gleich, Bernhard; Rummeny, Ernst; Noël, Peter; Pfeiffer, Franz; Münzel, Daniela

    2017-03-01

    Grating based x-ray phase-contrast reveals differential phase-contrast (DPC) and dark-field contrast (DFC) on top of the conventional absorption image. X-ray vector radiography (XVR) exploits the directional dependence of the DFC and yields the mean scattering strength, the degree of anisotropy and the orientation of scattering structures by combining several DFC-projections. Here, we perform an XVR of an ex vivo human hand specimen. Conventional attenuation images have a good contrast between the bones and the surrounding soft tissue. Within the bones, trabecular structures are visible. However, XVR detects subtler differences within the trabecular structure: there is isotropic scattering in the extremities of the phalanx in contrast to anisotropic scattering in its body. The orientation changes as well from relatively random in the extremities to an alignment along the longitudinal trabecular orientation in the body. In the other bones measured, a similar behavior was found. These findings indicate a deeper insight into the anatomical configuration using XVR compared to conventional radiography. Since microfractures cause a discontinuous trabecular structure, XVR could help to detect so-called radiographically occult fractures of the trabecular bones.

  14. Intense X-ray machine for penetrating radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucht, Roy A.; Eckhouse, Shimon

    Penetrating radiography has been used for many years in the nuclear weapons research programs. Infrequently penetrating radiography has been used in conventional weapons research programs. For example the Los Alamos PHERMEX machine was used to view uranium rods penetrating steel for the GAU-8 program, and the Ector machine was used to see low density regions in forming metal jets. The armor/anti-armor program at Los Alamos has created a need for an intense flash X-ray machine that can be dedicated to conventional weapons research. The Balanced Technology Initiative, through DARPA, has funded the design and construction of such a machine at Los Alamos. It will be an 8- to 10-MeV diode machine capable of delivering a dose of 500 R at 1 m with a spot size of less than 5 mm. The machine used an 87.5-stage low inductance Marx generator that charges up a 7.4-(Omega), 32-ns water line. The water line is discharged through a self-breakdown oil switch into a 12.4-(Omega) water line that rings up the voltage into the high impendance X-ray diode. A long (233-cm) vacuum drift tube is used to separate the large diameter oil-insulated diode region from the X-ray source area that may be exposed to high overpressures by the explosive experiments. The electron beam is selffocused at the target area using a low pressure background gas.

  15. ASSESSMENT OF PATELLAR HEIGHT MEASUREMENT METHODS FROM DIGITAL RADIOGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    Gracitelli, Guilherme Conforto; Pierami, Rafael; Tonelli, Thomaz Antonio; Falótico, Guilherme Guadagnini; Silva, Flavio Duarte; Nakama, Gilberto Yoshinobu; da Silveira Franciozi, Carlos Eduardo; de Queiroz, Antonio Altenor Bessa; Filho, Mario Carneiro

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the most common methods for measuring patellar height and the impact of observer experience in correlations with the other observers using digital radiography. Methods: Sixty digital radiographs of the knee in lateral view were analyzed by four observers: a physician in the second year of medical residence in orthopedics (R2); a physician in the third year of medical residence in orthopedics (R3); an orthopedic surgeon who was a specialist in knee surgery (SK); and a radiologist who was a specialist in musculoskeletal radiology (SR). The indices used were: Insall-Salvati (IS), Blackburne-Peel (BP), Caton-Deschamps (CD) and modified Insall-Salvati (ISM). The interobserver agreement was calculated using the kappa coefficient (κ). Results: The highest correlation coefficients were found when using the IS method followed by the CD method. The worst correlation was observed in the ISM method. The highest interobserver agreement was found between the orthopedic surgeon specializing in knee surgery and the radiologist specializing in musculoskeletal radiology, for the four measurement methods used. Conclusion: Using digital radiography, the Insall-Salvati and Caton-Deschamps indexes presented the highest interobserver agreement, and this was also positively influenced by the observer's level of experience. PMID:27042623

  16. Sensitivity of plain radiography for pediatric cervical spine injury.

    PubMed

    Cui, Li W; Probst, Marc A; Hoffman, Jerome R; Mower, William R

    2016-10-01

    Pediatric patients with suspected cervical spine injuries (CSI) often receive a computed tomography (CT) scan as an initial diagnostic imaging test. While sensitive, CT of the cervical spine carries significant radiation and risk of lethal malignant transformation later in life. Plain radiographs carry significantly less radiation and could serve as the preferred screening tool, provided they have a high functional sensitivity in detecting pediatric patients with CSI. We hypothesize that plain cervical spine radiographs can reliably detect pediatric patients with CSI and seek to quantify the functional sensitivity of plain radiography as compared to CT. We analyzed data from the NEXUS cervical spine study to assess the sensitivity of plain radiographs in the evaluation of CSI. We identified all pediatric patients who underwent plain radiographic imaging, and all pediatric patients found to have CSI. We then determined the sensitivity of plain radiographs in detecting pediatric patients with CSI. We identified 44 pediatric patients with CSI in the dataset with age ranging from 2 to 18 years old. Thirty-two of the 44 pediatric patients received cervical spine plain films as a part of their workup. Plain films were able to identify all 32 pediatric patients with CSI to yield a sensitivity of 100 % in detecting injury victims (95 % confidence interval 89.1-100.0 %). Plain radiography was highly sensitive for the identification of CSI in our cohort of pediatric patients and is useful as a screening tool in the evaluation of pediatric CSI.

  17. Value of radiography in the management of possible fishbone ingestion.

    PubMed

    Sundgren, P C; Burnett, A; Maly, P V

    1994-08-01

    A retrospective study was performed on 42 consecutive patients to examine the value of radiography in the management of complaints of fishbone ingestion. All patients underwent an oral examination followed by radiographic examination with plain films, barium swallows, barium and water swallows, and an endoscopic examination. All radiographs were reviewed by two unbiased, experienced radiologists. Of the 7 cases with fishbone found at endoscopic examination, only two (29%) bones were seen by the primary radiologist and 5 (71%) by the reviewing radiologists. Except for one case in which all three radiologists detected a fishbone that passed during the examination, and thereby was not found on endoscopy, no fishbones were found at the radiographic examination that were not seen on the endoscopic examination. Thus, radiography added no valuable information but only delayed the endoscopic examination with ensuing removal of the foreign body, which had to be performed regardless of the outcome of the radiographic examination. Therefore, we suggest that patients with a short history of complaints of fishbone ingestion, ie, 48 hours or less, should first be evaluated with oral and endoscopic examination.

  18. Methods for teaching effective patient communication techniques to radiography students.

    PubMed

    Makely, S

    1990-07-01

    Teaching students to communicate effectively with patients has always been part of the radiography curriculum in the USA. However, developing these skills has become even more important in recent times due to several factors. Patients who have been well versed in what to expect from the examination being conducted are in a better position to co-operate with the radiographer. This increases the chances of producing optimal results from an examination at the first attempt, thus reducing radiation exposure, patient discomfort and the overall cost of conducting the procedure. Also, increased competition among health care providers has resulted in more emphasis being placed on patient, or customer, satisfaction. Radiographers are in the 'front line' of patient care. Patients often have more interaction with radiographers than with physicians or other medical specialists. Radiographers who practise effective communication techniques with their patients can alleviate anxiety and make an important contribution to the overall satisfaction of the patient with respect to the quality of service and care they receive. This article describes instructional methods being used in the USA to help develop effective patient communication techniques, and reports the findings of a study among radiography educators as to which of these methods are thought to be most successful.

  19. Dose measurements in intraoral radiography using thermoluminescent dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azorín, C.; Azorín, J.; Aguirre, F.; Rivera, T.

    2015-01-01

    The use of X-ray in medicine demands to expose the patient and the professional to the lowest radiation doses available in agreement with ALARA philosophy. The reference level for intraoral dental radiography is 7 mGy and, in Mexico, a number of examinations of this type are performed annually. It is considered that approximately 25% of all the X-rays examinations carried out in our country correspond to intraoral radiographies. In other hand, most of the intraoral X-ray equipment correspond to conventional radiological systems using film, which are developed as much manual as automatically. In this work the results of determining the doses received by the patients in intraoral radiological examinations made with different radiological systems using LiF:Mg,Cu,P+PTFE thermoluminescent dosimeters are presented. In some conventional radiological systems using film, when films are developed manual or automatically, incident kerma up to 10.61 ± 0.74 mGv were determined. These values exceed that reference level suggested by the IAEA and in the Mexican standards for intraoral examinations.

  20. The need for skull radiography in patients presenting for CT

    SciTech Connect

    Tress, B.M.

    1983-01-01

    One thousand patients had both CT of the head and a conventional skull series of radiographs. Radiographic findings were abnormal in 250 patients (25%), but only 64 patients (6.4%) had diagnostically significant abnormalities at radiography that were not detected by CT. If the 163 patients who presented after acute trauma were excluded from the series, only 39 (4.7%) of the remaining patients had radiographically significant abnormal findings that were not seen at CT, and only two (0.2%) of these abnormalities could not be diagnosed by a lateral skull radiograph alone. In only five patients (0.5%) was the management actively changed because an abnormaltiy that was detected at skull radiography was not detected at CT. Thus, in nontrauma patients who have stroke, epilepsy, dementia, or non-specific symptoms without focal signs, or have recently undergone craniotomy, and who have been referred for CT, skull radiographs are not justified. In the patient with a history and findings that are strongly suggestive of a pathological disorder anywhere other than in the sella turcica, cerebello-pontine angle, and paranasal sinuses, only the lateral skull radiograph should be obtained after CT, and only if CT is equivocal.

  1. Low material budget floating strip Micromegas for ion transmission radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortfeldt, J.; Biebel, O.; Flierl, B.; Hertenberger, R.; Klitzner, F.; Lösel, Ph.; Magallanes, L.; Müller, R.; Parodi, K.; Schlüter, T.; Voss, B.; Zibell, A.

    2017-02-01

    Floating strip Micromegas are high-accuracy and discharge insensitive gaseous detectors, able to track single particles at fluxes of 7 MHz/cm2 with 100 μm resolution. We developed low-material-budget detectors with one-dimensional strip readout, suitable for tracking at highest particle rates as encountered in medical ion transmission radiography or inner tracker applications. Recently we additionally developed Kapton-based floating strip Micromegas with two-dimensional strip readout, featuring an overall thickness of 0.011 X0. These detectors were tested in high-rate proton and carbon-ion beams at the tandem accelerator in Garching and the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center, operated with an optimized Ne:CF4 gas mixture. By coupling the Micromegas detectors to a new scintillator based range detector, ion transmission radiographies of PMMA and tissue-equivalent phantoms were acquired. The range detector with 18 layers is read out via wavelength shifting fibers, coupled to a multi-anode photomultiplier. We present the performance of the Micromegas detectors with respect to timing and single plane track reconstruction using the μTPC method. We discuss the range resolution of the scintillator range telescope and present the image reconstruction capabilities of the combined system.

  2. Multiple-Image Radiography for Human Soft Tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Muehleman,C.; Li, J.; Zhong, Z.; Brankov, J.; Wernick, M.

    2006-01-01

    Conventional radiography only provides a measure of the X-ray attenuation caused by an object; thus, it is insensitive to other inherent informative effects, such as refraction. Furthermore, conventional radiographs are degraded by X-ray scatter that can obscure important details of the object being imaged. The novel X-ray technology diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI) has recently allowed the visualization of nearly scatter-free images displaying both attenuation and refraction properties. A new method termed multiple-image radiography (MIR) is a significant improvement over DEI, corrects errors in DEI, is more robust to noise and produces an additional image that is entirely new to medical imaging. This new image, which portrays ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering (USAXS) conveys the presence of microstructure in the object, thus differentiating homogeneous tissues from tissues that are irregular on a scale of micrometers. The aim of this study was to examine the use of MIR for evaluation of soft tissue, and in particular to conduct a preliminary investigation of the USAXS image, which has not previously been used in tissue imaging.

  3. Genotoxicity of digital panoramic radiography on oral epithelial tissues.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Soheyl; Pallagatti, Shambulingappa; Grewal, Harshaminder; Kalucha, Aman; Kaur, Harkamal

    2012-09-01

    To evaluate the genotoxic effects of x-rays on gingival and buccal epithelial cells during panoramic dental radiography using the micronucleus test. Eighty otherwise healthy subjects who required a diagnostic panoramic radiograph and met the selection criteria were included in the study. Epithelial cells were obtained from the maxillary anterior gingiva and buccal mucosa by gentle scraping with a wooden spatula immediately before exposure and again 10 days after exposure. Cytologic preparations were made according to the Papanicolaou staining method and analyzed under a light microscope for micronucleus count. The mean ± SD micronucleus count of gingival epithelial cells was 1.08 ± 0.76 before radiographic exposure and 1.6 ± 0.93 after exposure. This increase was statistically significant (P < .05). Similarly, there was an increase in the postexposure micronucleus count in the buccal mucosa, but this increase was not significant (P > .05). A significant correlation was observed between the age of subjects and micronucleus count, although no such correlation was found between sex and micronucleus count. Although radiation-related effects from panoramic radiography were reduced compared with full-mouth intraoral periapical radiographs or radiotherapy, the results of this study show that genotoxic effects do take place. Thus, radiographs should be taken with adequate protection measures and only when the potential benefit outweighs the potential risk.

  4. Neutron Radiographic Inspection of Industrial Components using Kamini Neutron Source Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Raghu, N.; Anandaraj, V.; Kasiviswanathan, K. V.; Kalyanasundaram, P.

    2008-03-17

    Kamini (Kalpakkam Mini) reactor is a U{sup 233} fuelled, demineralised light water moderated and cooled, beryllium oxide reflected, low power (30 kW) nuclear research reactor. This reactor functions as a neutron source with a flux of 10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2} s{sup -1} at core centre with facilitates for carrying out neutron radiography, neutron activation analysis and neutron shielding experiments. There are two beam tubes for neutron radiography. The length/diameter ratio of the collimators is about 160 and the aperture size is 220 mmx70 mm. Flux at the outer end of the beam tube is {approx}10{sup 6}-10{sup 7} n/cm{sup 2} s. The north end beam tube is for radiography of inactive object while the south side beam tube is for radiography of radioactive objects. The availability of high neutron flux coupled with good collimated beam provides high quality radiographs with short exposure time. The reactor being a unique national facility for neutron radiography has been utilized in the examination of irradiated components, aero engine turbine blades, riveted plates, automobile chain links and for various types of pyro devices used in the space programme. In this paper, an overview of the salient features of this reactor facility for neutron radiography and our experience in the inspection of a variety of industrial components will be given.

  5. Neutron Radiographic Inspection of Industrial Components using Kamini Neutron Source Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghu, N.; Anandaraj, V.; Kasiviswanathan, K. V.; Kalyanasundaram, P.

    2008-03-01

    Kamini (Kalpakkam Mini) reactor is a U233 fuelled, demineralised light water moderated and cooled, beryllium oxide reflected, low power (30 kW) nuclear research reactor. This reactor functions as a neutron source with a flux of 1012 n/cm2 s-1 at core centre with facilitates for carrying out neutron radiography, neutron activation analysis and neutron shielding experiments. There are two beam tubes for neutron radiography. The length/diameter ratio of the collimators is about 160 and the aperture size is 220 mm×70 mm. Flux at the outer end of the beam tube is ˜106-107 n/cm2 s. The north end beam tube is for radiography of inactive object while the south side beam tube is for radiography of radioactive objects. The availability of high neutron flux coupled with good collimated beam provides high quality radiographs with short exposure time. The reactor being a unique national facility for neutron radiography has been utilized in the examination of irradiated components, aero engine turbine blades, riveted plates, automobile chain links and for various types of pyro devices used in the space programme. In this paper, an overview of the salient features of this reactor facility for neutron radiography and our experience in the inspection of a variety of industrial components will be given.

  6. High-ratio grid considerations in mobile chest radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Alexander W.; Gauntt, David M.; Yester, Michael V.; Barnes, Gary T.

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: Grids are often not used in mobile chest radiography, and when used, they have a low ratio and are often inaccurately aligned. Recently, a mobile radiography automatic grid alignment system (MRAGA) was developed that accurately and automatically aligns the focal spot with the grid. The objective of this study is to investigate high-ratio grid tradeoffs in mobile chest radiography at fixed patient dose when the focal spot lies on the focal axis of the grid. Methods: The chest phantoms (medium and large) used in this study were modifications of the ANSI (American National Standards Institute) chest phantom and consisted of layers of Lucite Trade-Mark-Sign , aluminum, and air. For the large chest phantom, the amount of Lucite and aluminum was increased by 50% over the medium phantom. Further modifications included a mediastinum insert and the addition of contrast targets in the lung and mediastinum regions. Five high-ratio grids were evaluated and compared to the nongrid results at x-ray tube potentials of 80, 90, 100, and 110 kVp for both phantoms. The grids investigated were from two manufacturers: 12:1 and 15:1 aluminum interspace grids from one and 10:1, 13:1, and 15:1 fiber interspace grids from another. MRAGA was employed to align the focal spot with the grid. All exposures for a given kVp and phantom size were made using the same current-time product (CTP). The phantom images were acquired using computed radiography, and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) and CNR improvement factors (k{sub CNR}) were determined from the resultant images. The noise in the targets and the contrast between the targets and their backgrounds were calculated using a local detrending correction, and the CNR was calculated as the ratio of the target contrast to the background noise. k{sub CNR} was defined as the ratio of the CNR imaged with the grid divided by the CNR imaged without a grid. Results: The CNR values obtained with a high-ratio grid were 4%-65% higher than those

  7. Is radiography justified for the evaluation of patients presenting with cervical spine trauma?

    SciTech Connect

    Theocharopoulos, Nicholas; Chatzakis, Georgios; Damilakis, John

    2009-10-15

    Conventional radiography has been for decades the standard method of evaluation for cervical spine trauma patients. However, currently available helical multidetector CT scanners allow multiplanar reconstruction of images, leading to increased diagnostic accuracy. The purpose of this study was to determine the relative benefit/risk ratio between cervical spine CT and cervical spine radiography and between cervical spine CT and cervical spine radiography, followed by CT as an adjunct for positive findings. A decision analysis model for the determination of the optimum imaging technique was developed. The sensitivity and specificity of CT and radiography were obtained by dedicated meta-analysis. Lifetime attributable risk of mortal cancer from CT and radiography was calculated using updated organ-specific risk coefficients and organ-absorbed doses. Patient organ doses from radiography were calculated using Monte Carlo techniques, simulated exposures performed on an anthropomorphic phantom, and thermoluminescence dosimetry. A prospective patient study was performed regarding helical CT scans of the cervical spine. Patient doses were calculated based on the dose-length-product values and Monte Carlo-based CT dosimetry software program. Three groups of patient risk for cervical spine fracture were incorporated in the decision model on the basis of hypothetical trauma mechanism and clinical findings. Radiation effects were assessed separately for males and females for four age groups (20, 40, 60, and 80 yr old). Effective dose from radiography amounts to 0.050 mSv and from a typical CT scan to 3.8 mSv. The use of CT in a hypothetical cohort of 10{sup 6} patients prevents approximately 130 incidents of paralysis in the low risk group (a priori fracture probability of 0.5%), 500 in the moderate risk group (a priori fracture probability of 2%), and 5100 in the high risk group (a priori fracture probability of 20%). The expense of this CT-based prevention is 15-32 additional

  8. Multi-Institutional Evaluation of Digital Tomosynthesis, Dual-Energy Radiography, and Conventional Chest Radiography for the Detection and Management of Pulmonary Nodules.

    PubMed

    Dobbins, James T; McAdams, H Page; Sabol, John M; Chakraborty, Dev P; Kazerooni, Ella A; Reddy, Gautham P; Vikgren, Jenny; Båth, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To conduct a multi-institutional, multireader study to compare the performance of digital tomosynthesis, dual-energy (DE) imaging, and conventional chest radiography for pulmonary nodule detection and management. Materials and Methods In this binational, institutional review board-approved, HIPAA-compliant prospective study, 158 subjects (43 subjects with normal findings) were enrolled at four institutions. Informed consent was obtained prior to enrollment. Subjects underwent chest computed tomography (CT) and imaging with conventional chest radiography (posteroanterior and lateral), DE imaging, and tomosynthesis with a flat-panel imaging device. Three experienced thoracic radiologists identified true locations of nodules (n = 516, 3-20-mm diameters) with CT and recommended case management by using Fleischner Society guidelines. Five other radiologists marked nodules and indicated case management by using images from conventional chest radiography, conventional chest radiography plus DE imaging, tomosynthesis, and tomosynthesis plus DE imaging. Sensitivity, specificity, and overall accuracy were measured by using the free-response receiver operating characteristic method and the receiver operating characteristic method for nodule detection and case management, respectively. Results were further analyzed according to nodule diameter categories (3-4 mm, >4 mm to 6 mm, >6 mm to 8 mm, and >8 mm to 20 mm). Results Maximum lesion localization fraction was higher for tomosynthesis than for conventional chest radiography in all nodule size categories (3.55-fold for all nodules, P < .001; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.96, 4.15). Case-level sensitivity was higher with tomosynthesis than with conventional chest radiography for all nodules (1.49-fold, P < .001; 95% CI: 1.25, 1.73). Case management decisions showed better overall accuracy with tomosynthesis than with conventional chest radiography, as given by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve

  9. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2001-01-01

    An overview of the industrial diamond industry is provided. More than 90 percent of the industrial diamond consumed in the U.S. and the rest of the world is manufactured diamond. Ireland, Japan, Russia, and the U.S. produce 75 percent of the global industrial diamond output. In 2000, the U.S. was the largest market for industrial diamond. Industrial diamond applications, prices for industrial diamonds, imports and exports of industrial diamonds, the National Defense Stockpile of industrial diamonds, and the outlook for the industrial diamond market are discussed.

  10. Fusion of multi-voltage digital radiography images based on nonsubsampled contourlet transform.

    PubMed

    Yanjie, Qi; Liming, Wang

    2016-01-01

    In order to increase the single digital radiography (DR) image information of the composite component in the industry, the different DR images are captured at different voltages so as to get the structural information at different thickness region firstly. Secondly, the original DR images are decomposed by nonsubsampled contourlet transform (NSCT), and the low-frequency subbands are fused by the role of principle component analysis (PCA), and the modified central energy role is used to carry out the high-frequency directional subbands fusion. The false edges are extracted, and the values of the high-frequency subband coefficients of the false edges are set to be a small value so as to reduce the false edges in the fusion image. Finally, the output image can be obtained by inverse nonsubsampled contourlet transform. The experimental results show that the fused DR image brings more detailed information, and the structure of the component can be seen clearly, so it is useful to the fast and accurate quality judgements of the component.

  11. Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Mobile Real Time Radiography System

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, J.; Taggart, D.; Betts, S.; Mendez, J.; Rael, C.; Martinez, F.

    1997-01-01

    A 450-KeV Mobile Real Time Radiography (RTR) System was delivered to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in January 1996. It was purchased to inspect containers of radioactive waste produced at (LANL). Since its delivery it has been used to radiograph greater than 600 drums of radioactive waste at various LANL sites. It has the capability of inspecting waste containers of various sizes. It has three independent X-Ray acquisition formats. The primary system used is a 12 in. image intensifier, the second is a 36 in. linear diode array (LDA) and the last is an open system. It is fully self contained with on board generator, HVAC and a fire suppression system. It is on a 53 ft long X 8 ft. wide X 14 ft. high trailer that can be moved over any highway requiring only a easily obtainable overweight permit because it weighs approximately 38 tons. It was built to conform to industry standards for a cabinet system which does not require an exclusion zone. The fact that this unit is mobile has allowed us to operate where the waste is stored, rather than having to move the waste to a fixed facility.

  12. A comparison of conventional and grid techniques for chest radiography in field surveys

    PubMed Central

    Washington, J. S.; Dick, J. A.; Jacobsen, M.; Prentice, W. M.

    1973-01-01

    Washington, J. S., Dick, J. A., Jacobsen, M., and Prentice, W. M. (1973).British Journal of Industrial Medicine,30, 365-374. A comparison of conventional and grid techniques for chest radiography in field surveys. The effect on the quality of chest radiographs using a reciprocating grid with a moderately high kilovoltage (96 to 105 kV) has been studied. A total of 1 710 mineworkers had two postero-anterior chest radiographs taken at the same visit to a linked pair of mobile ϰ-ray units. One film was taken with conventional exposure factors and the other with moderately high kilovoltage and a reciprocating grid. The grid was exchanged between the two units according to a randomized plan so that the first radiograph was not always taken with the same technique. The 3 420 films so produced were subsequently assessed for quality by five doctors experienced in reading chest films. The films were examined singly in random order and the reader did not know which technique had been used for a given film. Four of the readers recorded improved quality using the grid technique for films from men whose antero-posterior chest measurements exceeded 254 mm (10 in), but they preferred the conventional exposure technique for films from men whose chest measurements were less than 254 mm. Results from all film pairs where a difference in quality was recorded showed no overall advantage for either technique. PMID:4753720

  13. Sonography as an alternative to radiography for nasogastric feeding tube location.

    PubMed

    Vigneau, Cécile; Baudel, Jean-Luc; Guidet, Bertrand; Offenstadt, Georges; Maury, Eric

    2005-11-01

    To evaluate bedside sonographic confirmation of weighted-tip nasogastric feeding tube position, by comparison to radiography. Single-center, double-blind prospective study in a 14-bed medical intensive care unit (ICU) in a 780-bed teaching hospital. Thirty-three ICU patients undergoing nasogastric tube insertion for enteral feeding. The tip of the nasogastric tube was located both by sonography and standard radiography. The accuracy and procedure times of sonography and radiography for nasogastric tube tip location were compared during 35 procedures in 33 patients. The nasogastric tube tip was visualized by sonography in 34 of 35 procedures (sensitivity 97%) and by radiography in all procedures. The median length of the entire procedure was 24 min and 180 min with sonography and radiography, respectively. Bedside sonography performed by nonradiologists is a sensitive method for confirming the position of weighted-tip feeding nasogastric feeding tubes. It is more rapid than conventional radiography and can easily be taught to ICU physicians. Conventional radiography could be reserved for cases in which sonography is inconclusive.

  14. Dose audit for patients undergoing two common radiography examinations with digital radiology systems.

    PubMed

    İnal, Tolga; Ataç, Gökçe

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to determine the radiation doses delivered to patients undergoing general examinations using computed or digital radiography systems in Turkey. Radiographs of 20 patients undergoing posteroanterior chest X-ray and of 20 patients undergoing anteroposterior kidney-ureter-bladder radiography were evaluated in five X-ray rooms at four local hospitals in the Ankara region. Currently, almost all radiology departments in Turkey have switched from conventional radiography systems to computed radiography or digital radiography systems. Patient dose was measured for both systems. The results were compared with published diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) from the European Union and International Atomic Energy Agency. The average entrance surface doses (ESDs) for chest examinations exceeded established international DRLs at two of the X-ray rooms in a hospital with computed radiography. All of the other ESD measurements were approximately equal to or below the DRLs for both examinations in all of the remaining hospitals. Improper adjustment of the exposure parameters, uncalibrated automatic exposure control systems, and failure of the technologists to choose exposure parameters properly were problems we noticed during the study. This study is an initial attempt at establishing local DRL values for digital radiography systems, and will provide a benchmark so that the authorities can establish reference dose levels for diagnostic radiology in Turkey.

  15. Dose audit for patients undergoing two common radiography examinations with digital radiology systems

    PubMed Central

    İnal, Tolga; Ataç, Gökçe

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to determine the radiation doses delivered to patients undergoing general examinations using computed or digital radiography systems in Turkey. MATERIALS AND METHODS Radiographs of 20 patients undergoing posteroanterior chest X-ray and of 20 patients undergoing anteroposterior kidney-ureter-bladder radiography were evaluated in five X-ray rooms at four local hospitals in the Ankara region. Currently, almost all radiology departments in Turkey have switched from conventional radiography systems to computed radiography or digital radiography systems. Patient dose was measured for both systems. The results were compared with published diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) from the European Union and International Atomic Energy Agency. RESULTS The average entrance surface doses (ESDs) for chest examinations exceeded established international DRLs at two of the X-ray rooms in a hospital with computed radiography. All of the other ESD measurements were approximately equal to or below the DRLs for both examinations in all of the remaining hospitals. Improper adjustment of the exposure parameters, uncalibrated automatic exposure control systems, and failure of the technologists to choose exposure parameters properly were problems we noticed during the study. CONCLUSION This study is an initial attempt at establishing local DRL values for digital radiography systems, and will provide a benchmark so that the authorities can establish reference dose levels for diagnostic radiology in Turkey. PMID:24317331

  16. Series: Practical Evaluation of Clinical Image Quality (4): Determination of Image Quality in Digital Radiography System.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Reiji

    Recently, for medical imaging, digital radiography systems are widely used in clinical practices. However, a study in the past reported that a patient radiation exposure level by digital radiography is in fact not lower than that by analog radiography system. High level of attention needs to be paid for over-exposure when using the conventional analog radiography with a screen and a film, as it results in high density of the film. However, for digital radiography systems, since the automatic adjusting function of image density is equipped with them, no attention for radiation dose need to be paid. Thus technologists tend to be careless and results in higher chance for over-exposure. Current digital radiography systems are high-performance in the image properties and capable of patient dose reduction. Especially, the image quality of the flat panel detector system is recognized, higher than that of the computed radiography system by imaging plates, in both objective and subjective evaluations. Therefore, we technologists are responsible for optimizing the balance between the image quality of the digital radiogram and the radiation dose required for each case. Moreover, it is also required for us as medical technologists to make effective use of such evaluation result of medical images for patients.

  17. Assessment of medial elbow laxity by gravity stress radiography: comparison of valgus stress radiography with gravity and a Telos stress device.

    PubMed

    Harada, Mikio; Takahara, Masatoshi; Maruyama, Masahiro; Nemoto, Tadanobu; Koseki, Kazuhiko; Kato, Yoshihiro

    2014-04-01

    Valgus instability was reported to be higher with the elbow in 60° of flexion, rather than in 30° of flexion, although there are no studies using valgus stress radiography by gravity (gravity radiography) with the elbow in 60° of flexion. Fifty-seven patients with medial elbow pain participated. For both elbows, valgus stress radiography by use of a Telos device (Telos radiography) and gravity radiography, with the elbow in 60° of flexion, were performed for the assessment of medial elbow laxity. In both radiographs, the medial elbow joint space (MJS) on the affected side was compared with that on the opposite side, and the increase in the MJS on the affected side was assessed. For the Telos radiographs, the mean MJS was 4.7 mm on the affected side and 4.0 mm on the opposite side, with the mean increase in the MJS on the affected side being 0.7 mm. For the gravity radiographs, the mean MJS was 5.0 mm on the affected side and 4.2 mm on the opposite side, with the mean increase in the MJS on the affected side being 0.8 mm. There were significant correlations between the Telos and gravity radiographs in the MJS on the affected side, the MJS on the opposite side, and the increase in the MJS on the affected side (respectively, P < .0001). There was also a high level of intraobserver and interobserver reliability for the assessment of the gravity radiographs. Gravity radiography is useful for assessment of medial elbow laxity, similar to Telos radiography. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Dosimetry and image quality assessment in a direct radiography system

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Bruno Beraldo; de Oliveira, Marcio Alves; Paixão, Lucas; Teixeira, Maria Helena Araújo; Nogueira, Maria do Socorro

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the mean glandular dose with a solid state detector and the image quality in a direct radiography system, utilizing phantoms. Materials and Methods Irradiations were performed with automatic exposure control and polymethyl methacrylate slabs with different thicknesses to calculate glandular dose values. The image quality was evaluated by means of the structures visualized on the images of the phantoms. Results Considering the uncertainty of the measurements, the mean glandular dose results are in agreement with the values provided by the equipment and with internationally adopted reference levels. Results obtained from images of the phantoms were in agreement with the reference values. Conclusion The present study contributes to verify the equipment conformity as regards dose values and image quality. PMID:25741119

  19. Measurement Of Gas Bubbles In Mercury Using Proton Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Riemer, Bernie; Bingham, Philip R; Mariam, Fesseha G; Merrill, Frank E

    2007-01-01

    An experiment using proton radiography on a small mercury loop for testing gas bubble injection was conducted at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) in December 2006. Small gas bubble injection is one of the approaches under development to reduce cavitation damage in the U.S. Spallation Neutron Source mercury target vessel. Several hundred radiograph images were obtained as the test loop was operated over range of conditions that included two jet type bubble generators, two needle type bubble generators, various mercury flow speeds and gas injection rates, and use of helium, argon and xenon. This paper will describe the analysis of the radiograph images and present the obtained bubble measurement data.

  20. Digital neutron radiography using plane converters with multiwire proportional chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, S.N.; Director, B.A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Valentine, K.H.

    1981-12-01

    The work described here was completed more than three years ago, and represents, in large part the PhD and MS thesis research of two of the present authors. Much of it has been reported previously elsewhere. It constitutes an effort to develop and study a moderately low cost, moderate resolution, high sensitivity, on-line method for digital neutron radiography, intended for use where neutron fluence was limited by source strength, or received dose. The basic imaging system consisted of a position-sensitive gas proportional chamber together with its associated imaging electronics, and a plane neutron converter. Enriched-boron, gadolinium, and polyethylene (for fast neutrons) converters were analyzed and tested. Some work was done on digital data enhancement, and efforts to improve spatial resolution included pressurizing the proportional-chamber gas to reduce the track lengths of the neutron-interaction products.

  1. Bone Texture Characterization for Osteoporosis Diagnosis using Digital Radiography

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Keni; Makrogiannis, Sokratis

    2017-01-01

    We introduce texture classification techniques to effectively diagnose osteoporosis in bone radiography data. Osteoporosis is an age-related systemic bone skeletal disorder characterized by low bone mass and bone structure deterioriation that results in increased bone fragility and higher fracture risk. Therefore, early diagnosis can effectively predict fracture risk and prevent the disease. Automated diagnosis from digital radiographs is very challenging since the scans of healthy and osteoporotic subjects show little or no visual differences, and their density histograms mostly overlap. We designed a system to separate healthy from osteoporotic subjects using high-dimensional textural feature representations computed from radiographs. These features were then reduced using feature selection to obtain the more discriminant subset that was finally classified by our methods. The top performing approach yields 79.3% accuracy and 81% area under the ROC over 116 bone radiographs. PMID:28268501

  2. Computed radiography printing problems: a quantitative, observer-independent solution.

    PubMed

    Hildestad, C A; Morin, R L

    2000-05-01

    Even though facilities using computed radiography (CR) operate in an electronic environment, the production of hard-copy films is still necessary during the transition period, as well as for particular needs following complete implementation. We have implemented a quantitative technique to match the response of printed CR film with that of previous screen/film combinations. A stepwedge is radiographed using the conventional system. The same stepwedge is then radiographed (same geometry and technique) using the CR system. Following processing and printing, the plot of optical density versus step for the CR system is compared with that of the screen/film system. Adjustments are made to the printing parameters until the response curves are identical. All other translation tables in the system are set to be linear. This has proven to be a valuable technique for us and provides CR printed image quality that is equivalent to that of our previous screen/film combinations.

  3. The scrounge-atron: a proton radiography demonstration accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Alford, O J; Barnes, P D; Chargin, A K; Hartouni, E F; Hockman, J N; Moore, T L; Pico, R E; Ruggiero, A G

    1998-12-18

    The Scrounge-atron is a concept that could provide a demonstration accelerator for proton radiography. As discussed here, the Scrounge-atron would be capable of providing a 20 GeV beam of ten pulses, 10{sup 11} protons each, spaced 250 ns apart. This beam could be delivered once every minute to a single-axis radiographic station centered at the BEEF facility of the Nevada Test Site. These parameters would be sufficient to demonstrate, in five years, the capabilities of a proton-based Advanced Hydrotest Facility, and could return valuable information to the stockpile program, information that could not be obtained in any other way. The Scrounge-atron could be built in two to three years for $50-100 million. To meet this schedule and cost, the Scrounge-atron would rely heavily on the availability of components from the decommissioned Fermilab Main Ring.

  4. Inspection of an artificial heart by the neutron radiography technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugliesi, R.; Geraldo, L. P.; Andrade, M. L. G.; Menezes, M. O.,; Pereira, M. A. S.; Maizato, M. J. S.

    1999-11-01

    The neutron radiography technique was employed to inspect an artificial heart prototype which is being developed to provide blood circulation for patients expecting heart transplant surgery. The radiographs have been obtained by the direct method with a gadolinium converter screen along with the double coated Kodak-AA emulsion film. The artificial heart consists of a flexible plastic membrane located inside a welded metallic cavity, which is employed for blood pumping purposes. The main objective of the present inspection was to identify possible damages in this plastic membrane, produced during the welding process of the metallic cavity. The obtained radiographs were digitized as well as analysed in a PC and the improved images clearly identify several damages in the plastic membrane, suggesting changes in the welding process.

  5. Practical guidelines for radiographers to improve computed radiography image quality.

    PubMed

    Pongnapang, N

    2005-10-01

    Computed Radiography (CR) has become a major digital imaging modality in a modern radiological department. CR system changes workflow from the conventional way of using film/screen by employing photostimulable phosphor plate technology. This results in the changing perspectives of technical, artefacts and quality control issues in radiology departments. Guidelines for better image quality in digital medical enterprise include professional guidelines for users and the quality control programme specifically designed to serve the best quality of clinical images. Radiographers who understand technological shift of the CR from conventional method can employ optimization of CR images. Proper anatomic collimation and exposure techniques for each radiographic projection are crucial steps in producing quality digital images. Matching image processing with specific anatomy is also important factor that radiographers should realise. Successful shift from conventional to fully digitised radiology department requires skilful radiographers who utilise the technology and a successful quality control program from teamwork in the department.

  6. Personalized body segment parameters from biplanar low-dose radiography.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Raphaël; Aissaoui, Rachid; Mitton, David; Skalli, Wafa; de Guise, Jacques A

    2005-10-01

    Body segment parameters are essential data in biomechanics. They are usually computed with population-specific predictive equations from literature. Recently, medical imaging and video-based methods were also reported for personalized computation. However, these methods present limitations: some of them provide only two-dimensional measurements or external measurements, others require a lot of tomographic images for a three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction. Therefore, an original method is proposed to compute personalized body segment parameters from biplanar radiography. Simultaneous low-dose frontal and sagittal radiographs were obtained with EOS system. The upper leg segments of eight young males and eight young females were studied. The personalized parameters computed from the biplanar radiographic 3-D reconstructions were compared to literature. The biplanar radiographic method was consistent with predictive equations based on gamma-ray scan and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry.

  7. Radiography image detector capability in MCNP4B{trademark}

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, E.C.; Court, J.D.

    1998-12-31

    For some time now, people have been interested in adding a capability to the MCNP code to provide computational simulations of imagery such as x-ray images or pinhole projections of an object from an internal or external source. The main focus of these interests are in the ability to generate the direct or source contribution to the image, in addition to the total image obtained from both scattered and direct contributions. With this ability, simulations can be done to determine methods for image enhancement or to extract a direct image from one composed of direct, scattered, and background contributions. A patch extending the existing point detector capabilities in MCNP has been created to provide radiography-type imagery as a tally option in MCNP. In addition to the patch available to MCNP4B, this feature is being considered for permanent inclusion in MCNPX, the high-energy transport version of MCNP.

  8. [Information technologies for scanning X-ray radiography].

    PubMed

    Kretov, V V; Ukraintsev, Iu G

    2005-01-01

    Digital technologies have been widely used in X-rays diagnostics, including computer tomography, magnetic-resonance tomography, digital radiography etc. Digital technologies for image analysis essentially change all arrangements and procedures of preventive examinations made at patient-care facilities. As for digital fluorography, the basic principles of fluorography diagnostic room are standard but for one arrangement-the unit is controlled via a computer-assisted working place (CAWP) by the radiologist assistant; the room of radiologist is also equipped with CAWP. Admittedly, a key issue in general fluorographic examinations is registration of patients and preparation of them for the procedure. Contemplated in the paper are new potentialities of digital fluorography of big number of patients by low-dose fluorography (LDF, equipment manufacturer/Orel, Russia) which enhance the rate and quality of diagnostics.

  9. Wrist rhythm during wrist joint motion evaluated by dynamic radiography.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Hiroki; Tada, Kaoru; Suganuma, Seigo; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Sanada, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesized that wrist joint motion involves a "wrist rhythm" similar to the scapulohumeral rhythm. Therefore, we used a flat-panel detector to evaluate the ratio of radiolunate and capitolunate joint motions during wrist joint motion by dynamic radiography. The subjects were 20 healthy men. Dynamic imaging of the wrist joint was performed during active exercise for a total of ten seconds. In this study, we defined the radiocarpal (RL angle) and midcarpal joint angle (CL angle) as the wrist joint angle in the obtained images and measured the variation of these angles. The average curve was plotted and regression lines calculated from the average curve. The ratio was calculated from the slopes of the regression lines of the RL CL angles. These findings indicated that the ratio of the RL and CL angle motions was approximately 1:4 during palmar flexion and approximately 2:1 during dorsiflexion.

  10. Reduction of absorbed doses in radiography of the facial skeleton

    SciTech Connect

    Julin, P.; Kraepelien, T.

    1984-11-01

    Radiation absorbed doses from radiography of the paranasal sinuses and the facial skeleton were measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) on a phantom head using high-sensitivity screens in an Orbix stand. The entrance doses to the skin of the head ranged from 0.31 to 2.9 mGy per exposure. The absorbed dose from a full series of sinus exposures averaged 0.33 mGy for the oral mucous membrane, 0.33 mGy for the maxillary sinus mucous membrane, 0.11 MgY for the parotid gland, 0.15 MgY for the submandibular gland, 0.61 mGy for the eye lens, and 0.75 mGy for the thyroid gland region. A leaded soft collar adapted to the thyroid region reduced the thyroid doses by more than one order of magnitude, but also reduced the image field.

  11. 10 CFR 34.20 - Performance requirements for industrial radiography equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... by an applicant or licensee to demonstrate the applicability of previously performed testing on... acceptable alternative to actual testing of the component pursuant to the above referenced standard. (b) In... in American National Standards Institute N432-1980, if the prototype equipment has been tested...

  12. Developing a Massively Parallel Forward Projection Radiography Model for Large-Scale Industrial Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bauerle, Matthew

    2014-08-01

    This project utilizes Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) to compute radiograph simulations for arbitrary objects. The generation of radiographs, also known as the forward projection imaging model, is computationally intensive and not widely utilized. The goal of this research is to develop a massively parallel algorithm that can compute forward projections for objects with a trillion voxels (3D pixels). To achieve this end, the data are divided into blocks that can each t into GPU memory. The forward projected image is also divided into segments to allow for future parallelization and to avoid needless computations.

  13. Accelerator driven gamma and fast neutron radiography test-bed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, V.; Rusnak, B.; Falabella, S.; Hawkins, S.; McCarrick, J. F.; Wang, H.; Hall, J. M.; Ellsworth, J.

    2013-04-19

    Accelerator driven fusion gammas and fast neutrons could provide unique radiography capabilities due to their ability to produce both high and low energy mono-energetic gammas and neutrons compared with broadband bremsstrahlung based x-ray sources. The possibility of simultaneously obtaining both gamma and neutron radiographs using one source could allow complex objects composed of a large range of low to high Z materials to be imaged. In this paper we review a 4 MV RFQ accelerator driven radiography test-bed at LLNL designed to study the physics involved in applying these dual output fusion reactions for radiography applications. First experimental neutron images from a carbon target are presented.

  14. Analyzing the effect of geometric factors on designing neutron radiography system.

    PubMed

    Amini, Moharam; Fadaei, Amir Hosein; Gharib, Morteza

    2015-11-01

    Neutron radiography is one of the main applications of research reactors. It is a powerful tool to conduct nondestructive testing of materials. The parameters that affect the quality of a radiographic image must be considered during the design of a neutron radiography system. Hence, this study aims to investigate the effect of geometric factors on the quality of the neutron radiography system. The results show that the performance of the mentioned system can be increased by regulating the geometric factors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Diagnostic radiography and adult acute myeloid leukaemia: an interview and medical chart review study

    PubMed Central

    Pogoda, J M; Nichols, P W; Ross, R K; Stram, D O; Thomas, D C; Preston-Martin, S

    2011-01-01

    Background: Aetiology of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is not well understood, perhaps because of its distinct subtypes. High-dose ionising radiation is a known risk factor, but less is known about risk from low-dose exposure such as from diagnostic radiography. Methods: Subjects were 412 matched case-control pairs. Ten-year subject histories of diagnostic radiography were based on interview and medical records. Results: There was no convincing association between AML risk and ionising radiation exposure from diagnostic imaging procedures, either for AML overall or for any AML subtype. Conclusion: The association between diagnostic radiography and AML risk remains uncertain. PMID:21522150

  16. Technical Specifications for the Neutron Radiography Facility (TRIGA Mark 1 Reactor). Revision 6

    SciTech Connect

    Tomlinson, R.L.; Perfect, J.F.

    1988-04-01

    These Technical Specifications state the limits under which the Neutron Radiography Facility, with its associated TRIGA Mark I Reactor, is operated by the Westinghouse Hanford Company for the US Department of Energy. These specifications cover operation of the Facility for the purpose of examination of specimens (including contained fissile material) by neutron radiography, for the irradiation of specimens in the pneumatic transfer system and approved in-core or in-pool irradiation facilities and operator training. The Final Safety Analysis Report (TC-344) and its supplements, and these Technical Specifications are the basic safety documents of the Neutron Radiography Facility.

  17. Retrospective comparison of abdominal ultrasonography and radiography in the investigation of feline abdominal disease

    PubMed Central

    Won, Wylen Wade; Sharma, Ajay; Wu, Wenbo

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal radiography and ultrasonography are commonly used as part of the initial diagnostic plan for cats with nonspecific signs of abdominal disease. This retrospective study compared the clinical usefulness of abdominal radiography and ultrasonography in 105 feline patients with signs of abdominal disease. The final diagnosis was determined more commonly with ultrasonography (59%) compared to radiography (25.7%). Ultrasonography was also able to provide additional clinically relevant information in 76% of cases, and changed or refined the diagnosis in 47% of cases. Based on these findings, ultrasonography may be sufficient as an initial diagnostic test for the investigation of feline abdominal disease. PMID:26483582

  18. Retrospective comparison of abdominal ultrasonography and radiography in the investigation of feline abdominal disease.

    PubMed

    Won, Wylen Wade; Sharma, Ajay; Wu, Wenbo

    2015-10-01

    Abdominal radiography and ultrasonography are commonly used as part of the initial diagnostic plan for cats with nonspecific signs of abdominal disease. This retrospective study compared the clinical usefulness of abdominal radiography and ultrasonography in 105 feline patients with signs of abdominal disease. The final diagnosis was determined more commonly with ultrasonography (59%) compared to radiography (25.7%). Ultrasonography was also able to provide additional clinically relevant information in 76% of cases, and changed or refined the diagnosis in 47% of cases. Based on these findings, ultrasonography may be sufficient as an initial diagnostic test for the investigation of feline abdominal disease.

  19. Pulmonary evaluation of patients with osteosarcoma: roles of standard radiography, tomography, CT, scintigraphy, and tomoscintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Vanel, D.; Henry-Amar, M.; Lumbroso, J.; Lemalet, E.; Couanet, D.; Piekarski, J.D.; Masselot, J.; Boddaert, A.; Kalifa, C.; Le Chevalier, T.

    1984-09-01

    Sixty-one radiologic evaluations were performed on 32 patients with possible pulmonary metastases from osteosarcoma. CT scanning was performed 61 times; standard chest radiography, 58; tomography, 36; scintigraphy, 40; and tomoscintigraphy, 33. Using CT as a reference, the sensitivities of the other examinations were 57% (32% of total metastases) for standard radiography, 88% (48%) for tomography, 21% (5%) for scintigraphy, and 41% (8%) for tomoscintigraphy. Of the 193 metastases, 98 were subpleural and 95 were parenchymatous. The authors' current evaluation of patients with metastases from osteosarcoma includes chest radiography and CT; the other three examinations are performed only before surgery.

  20. Plasma-flash radiography utilizing a molybdenum target in dentistry

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Mariko; Takabe, Akihito; Sakamaki, Kimio

    1995-12-31

    The construction and the radiographic characteristics of a plasma flash x-ray generator having a molybdenum-target (anode tip) triode are described. This generator was primarily designed in order to perform soft radiography in dental medicine and employed the following essential components: a high-voltage power supply, a low-impedance coaxial transmission line with a gap switch, a coaxial oil condenser of 0.2 {micro}F, a turbo-molecular pump, a Krytron pulser as a trigger device, and a flash x-ray tube. The high-voltage main condenser of 0.2 {micro}F was charged from 40 to 60 kV by the power supply, and the electric charges in the condenser were discharged to the tube after closing the gap switch. Because this tube employed a long target, the plasma x-ray source which consists of molybdenum ions and electrons was easily produced by the target evaporating. The maximum tube voltage was nearly equivalent to the initial charging voltage of the main condenser, and the maximum current had a value of about 25 kA with a charging voltage of 60 kV. The average width of flash x rays was less than 1 {micro}s, and the time-integrated x-ray intensity with a charging voltage of 60 kV was approximately 20 {micro}C/kg at 1.0 m per pulse. The characteristic K-series intensity substantially increased according to increases in the charging voltage. High-speed dental radiography was performed by using a laser timing switch and a trigger-delay device.

  1. PEM Water Electrolysis: Preliminary Investigations Using Neutron Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Beer, Frikkie; van der Merwe, Jan-Hendrik; Bessarabov, Dmitri

    The quasi-dynamic water distribution and performance of a proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolyzer at both a small fuel cell's anode and cathode was observed and quantitatively measured in the in-plane imaging geometry direction(neutron beam parallel to membrane and with channels parallel to the beam) by applying the neutron radiography principle at the neutron imaging facility (NIF) of NIST, Gaithersburg, USA. The test section had 6 parallel channels with an active area of 5 cm2 and in-situ neutron radiography observation entails the liquid water content along the total length of each of the channels. The acquisition was made with a neutron cMOS-camera system with performance of 10 sec per frame to achieve a relatively good pixel dynamic range and at a pixel resolution of 10 x 10 μm2. A relatively high S/N ratio was achieved in the radiographs to observe in quasi real time the water management as well as quantification of water / gas within the channels. The water management has been observed at increased steps (0.2A/cm2) of current densities until 2V potential has been achieved. These observations were made at 2 different water flow rates, at 3 temperatures for each flow rate and repeated for both the vertical and horizontal electrolyzer orientation geometries. It is observed that there is water crossover from the anode through the membrane to the cathode. A first order quantification (neutron scattering correction not included) shows that the physical vertical and horizontal orientation of the fuel cell as well as the temperature of the system up to 80 °C has no significant influence on the percentage water (∼18%) that crossed over into the cathode. Additionally, a higher water content was observed in the Gas Diffusion Layer at the position of the channels with respect to the lands.

  2. Single-exposure dual-energy computed radiography.

    PubMed

    Stewart, B K; Huang, H K

    1990-01-01

    This paper focuses on analysis and development of a single-exposure dual-energy digital radiographic method using computed radiography (Fuji FCR-101 storage phosphor system). A detector sandwich consisting of storage phosphor imaging plates and an interdetector filter is used. The goal of this process is to provide a simple dual-energy method using typical plane-projection radiographic equipment and techniques. This approach exploits the transparency of the storage phosphor plates, using radiographic information that would be otherwise lost, to provide energy selective information essentially as a by-product of the radiographic examination. In order to effectively make use of the large dynamic range of the storage phosphor imaging plates (10,000:1), a computed radiography image reading mode of fixed analog-to-digital converter gain and variable photomultiplier sensitivity provides image data which can be related to relative incident exposure for export to the decomposition algorithm. Scatter rejection requirements necessitated crossed 12:1 grids for a field size of 36 x 36 cm. Optimal technique parameters obtained from computer simulation through minimization of the aluminum and Plexiglas equivalent image uncertainty under conditions of constant absorbed does resulted as: 100 kVp using a 0.15-mm-thick tin (Sn) interdetector filter for the lung field. This yields a surface exposure of 23 mR and a surface absorbed dose of 0.26 mGy for a 23-cm-thick chest. Clinical application in evaluation of the solitary pulmonary nodule is discussed, along with an image set demonstrating this application.

  3. Paediatric entrance doses from exposure index in computed radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vano, E.; Martinez, D.; Fernandez, J. M.; Ordiales, J. M.; Prieto, C.; Floriano, A.; Ten, J. I.

    2008-06-01

    Over the last two years we have evaluated paediatric patient doses in projection radiography derived from exposure level (EL) in computed radiography (CR) in a large university hospital. Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) for 3501 paediatric examinations was calculated from the EL, which is a dose index parameter related to the light emitted by the phosphor-stimulable plate, archived in the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) header of the images and automatically transferred to a database using custom-built dedicated software. Typical mean thicknesses for several age bands of paediatric patients was estimated to calculate ESAK from the EL values, using results of experimental measurements with phantoms for the typical x-ray beam qualities used in paediatric examinations. Mean/median ESAK values (in µGy) for the age bands of <1 year, 1-5 years, 6-10 years and 11-15 years have been obtained for chest without a bucky: 51/41, 57/34, 91/54 and 122/109; chest with a bucky (for only the last three age bands): 114/87, 129/105 and 219/170; abdomen: 119/91, 291/225, 756/600 and 1960/1508 and pelvis: 65/48, 455/314, 943/707 and 2261/1595. Sample sizes of clinical images used for the (indirect) measurements were 1724 for chest without a bucky, 799 for chest with a bucky, 337 for abdomen and 641 for pelvis. The methodology we describe could be applicable to other centres using CR as an imaging modality for paediatrics. Presently, this method is the only practical approach to automatically extract parameters contained in the DICOM header, for the calculation of patient dose values for the CR modality.

  4. Fast Gate: Subnanosecond Gate Detectors for Laser Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Trebes, J.; Feit, M.; Hatchett, S.; Key, M.; Phillips, T.; Sefcik, J.; Snavely, R.; Weber, M.

    2000-02-25

    X-ray radiography is used as a principal diagnostic in a wide range of hydrodynamic tests relevant to the weapons program and also for basic materials and equation-of-state science studies. The quality of the x-ray radiograph can be significantly degraded by the scattering of x-rays within the object and by components of the test system itself. Elimination of these scattered x-rays from the recorded images can either substantially improve the image contrast and signal-to-noise or allow smaller, lower-cost x-ray sources to be used. The scattered x-rays could be minimized through the use of a much shorter-duration x-ray pulse and a fast, gated detector. The short duration x-ray pulse and the fast gated detector allow detection of only those x-rays which pass through the object being radiographed. X-rays which are the result of scattering have longer path lengths and take longer to reach the target. Most of these can be eliminated if the detector if gated off before they arrive at the detector. Until recently there were no sources of high energy x-rays (1-10 MeV) with short duration (sub 100 picosecond) pulses. Now the Petawatt Laser Facility (ref 1) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has been able to produce 0.1 rads at 1 meter of MeV energy x-rays in 1-0 picoseconds. Efforts are underway to significantly increase this x-ray output. The combination of the existing short-duration, Petawatt-produced x-ray pulses and an x-ray detector with sub-100-ps gate times could eliminate most of the scattered x-rays from the radiograph image and allow highly improved radiography particularly for larger, high density test objects.

  5. Plasma-flash radiography utilizing a molybdenum target in dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Mariko; Takabe, Akihito; Sakamaki, Kimio; Sato, Eiichi; Takahashi, Kei; Sagae, Michiaki; Oizumi, Teiji; Hayasi, Yasuomi; Sasaki, Katsuaki; Tamakawa, Yoshiharu; Yanagisawa, Toru

    1995-09-01

    The construction and the radiographic characteristics of a plasma flash x-ray generator having a molybdenum-target (anode tip) triode are described. This generator was primarily designed in order to perform soft radiography in dental medicine and employed the following essential components: a high-voltage power supply, a low-impedance coaxial transmission line with a gap switch, a coaxial oil condenser of 0.2 (mu) F, a turbo-molecular pump, a Krytron pulser as a trigger device, and a flash x-ray tube. The high-voltage main condenser of 0.2 (mu) F was charged from 40 to 60 kV by the power supply, and the electric charges in the condenser were discharged to the tube after closing the gap switch. Because this tube employed a long target, the plasma x-ray source which consists of molybdenum ions and electrons was easily produced by the target evaporating. The maximum tube voltage was nearly equivalent to the initial charge voltage of the main condenser, and the maximum current had a value of about 25 kA with a charging voltage of 60 kV. The average width of flash x rays was less than 1 microsecond(s) , and the time-integrated x-ray intensity with a charging voltage of 60 kV was approximately 20 (mu) C/kg at 1.0 m per pulse. The characteristic K-series intensity substantially increased according to increases in the charged voltage. High-speed dental radiography was performed using a laser timing switch and a trigger-delay device.

  6. Evaluation of digital radiography practice using exposure index tracking.

    PubMed

    Scott, Alexander W; Zhou, Yifang; Allahverdian, Janet; Nute, Jessica L; Lee, Christina

    2016-11-08

    Some digital radiography (DR) detectors and software allow for remote download of exam statistics, including image reject status, body part, projection, and exposure index (EI). The ability to have automated data collection from multiple DR units is conducive to a quality control (QC) program monitoring institutional radiographic exposures. We have implemented such a QC program with the goal to identify outliers in machine radiation output and opportunities for improvement in radiation dose levels. We studied the QC records of four digital detectors in greater detail on a monthly basis for one year. Although individual patient entrance skin exposure varied, the radiation dose levels to the detectors were made to be consistent via phototimer recalibration. The exposure data stored on each digital detector were periodically downloaded in a spreadsheet format for analysis. EI median and stan-dard deviation were calculated for each protocol (by body part) and EI histograms were created for torso protocols. When histograms of EI values for different units were compared, we observed differences up to 400 in average EI (representing 60% difference in radiation levels to the detector) between units nominally cali-brated to the same EI. We identified distinct components of the EI distributions, which in some cases, had mean EI values 300 apart. Peaks were observed at the current calibrated EI, a previously calibrated EI, and an EI representing computed radiography (CR) techniques. Our findings in this ongoing project have allowed us to make useful interventions, from emphasizing the use of phototimers instead of institutional memory of manual techniques to improvements in our phototimer calibration. We believe that this QC program can be implemented at other sites and can reveal problems with radiation levels in the aggregate that are difficult to identify on a case-by-case basis.

  7. Strut analyses for detecting osteoporosis using dental panoramic radiography.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae Joon; Lee, Jeong-Hee; Kim, Young Hyun; Jeong, Ho-Gul; Choi, Yoon Jeong; Park, Wonse; Han, Sang-Sun

    2017-07-14

    The aim of this study was to identify variables that can be used for osteoporosis detection using strut analysis, fractal dimension (FD), and the gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) using multiple regions of interest (ROIs) and to develop an osteoporosis detection model based on panoramic radiography. A total of 454 panoramic radiographs from oral examinations in our dental hospital from 2012 to 2015 were randomly selected, equally distributed among osteoporotic and non-osteoporotic patients (n=227 in each group). The radiographs were classified by bone mineral density (T-score). After 3 marrow regions and the endosteal margin area were selected, strut features, FD, and GLCM were analyzed using a customized image processing program. Image upsampling was used to obtain the optimal binarization for calculating strut features and FD. The independent-samples t-test was used to assess statistical differences between the 2 groups. A decision tree and support vector machine (SVM) were used to create and verify an osteoporosis detection model. The endosteal margin area showed statistically significant differences in FD, GLCM, and strut variables between the osteoporotic and non-osteoporotic patients, whereas the medullary portions showed few distinguishing features. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the strut variables in the endosteal margin area were 97.1%, 95.7%, and 96.25 using the decision tree and 97.2%, 97.1%, and 96.9% using SVM, and these were the best results obtained among the 3 methods. Strut variables with FD and/or GLCM did not increase the diagnostic accuracy. The analysis of strut features in the endosteal margin area showed potential for the development of an osteoporosis detection model based on panoramic radiography.

  8. EOS imaging versus current radiography: A health technology assessment study.

    PubMed

    Mahboub-Ahari, Alireza; Hajebrahimi, Sakineh; Yusefi, Mahmoud; Velayati, Ashraf

    2016-01-01

    EOS is a 2D/3D muscle skeletal diagnostic imaging system. The device has been developed to produce a high quality 2D, full body radiographs in standing, sitting and squatting positions. Three dimensional images can be reconstructed via sterEOS software. This Health Technology Assessment study aimed to investigate efficacy, effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of new emerged EOS imaging system in comparison with conventional x-ray radiographic techniques. All cost and outcome data were assessed from Iran's Ministry of Health Perspective. Data for clinical effectiveness was extracted using a rigorous systematic review. As clinical outcomes the rate of x-ray emission and related quality of life were compared with Computed Radiography (CR) and Digital Radiography (DR). Standard costing method was conducted to find related direct medical costs. In order to examine robustness of the calculated Incremental Cost Effectiveness Ratios (ICERs) we used two-way sensitivity analysis. GDP Per capita of Islamic Republic of Iran (2012) adopted as cost-effectiveness threshold. Review of related literature highlighted the lack of rigorous evidence for clinical outcomes. Ultra low dose EOS imaging device is known as a safe intervention because of FDA, CE and CSA certificates. The rate of emitted X-ray was 2 to 18 fold lower for EOS compared to the conventional techniques (p<0.001). The Incremental Cost Effectiveness Ratio for EOS relative to CR calculated $50706 in baseline analysis (the first scenario) and $50714, $9446 respectively for the second and third scenarios. Considering the value of neither $42146 as upper limit, nor the first neither the second scenario could pass the cost-effectiveness threshold for Iran. EOS imaging technique might not be considered as a cost-effective intervention in routine practice of health system, especially within in-patient wards. Scenario analysis shows that, only in an optimum condition such as lower assembling costs and higher utilization rates

  9. Multiscale image processing and antiscatter grids in digital radiography.

    PubMed

    Lo, Winnie Y; Hornof, William J; Zwingenberger, Allison L; Robertson, Ian D

    2009-01-01

    Scatter radiation is a source of noise and results in decreased signal-to-noise ratio and thus decreased image quality in digital radiography. We determined subjectively whether a digitally processed image made without a grid would be of similar quality to an image made with a grid but without image processing. Additionally the effects of exposure dose and of a using a grid with digital radiography on overall image quality were studied. Thoracic and abdominal radiographs of five dogs of various sizes were made. Four acquisition techniques were included (1) with a grid, standard exposure dose, digital image processing; (2) without a grid, standard exposure dose, digital image processing; (3) without a grid, half the exposure dose, digital image processing; and (4) with a grid, standard exposure dose, no digital image processing (to mimic a film-screen radiograph). Full-size radiographs as well as magnified images of specific anatomic regions were generated. Nine reviewers rated the overall image quality subjectively using a five-point scale. All digitally processed radiographs had higher overall scores than nondigitally processed radiographs regardless of patient size, exposure dose, or use of a grid. The images made at half the exposure dose had a slightly lower quality than those made at full dose, but this was only statistically significant in magnified images. Using a grid with digital image processing led to a slight but statistically significant increase in overall quality when compared with digitally processed images made without a grid but whether this increase in quality is clinically significant is unknown.

  10. Industrial garnet

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2001-01-01

    A general overview of the industrial garnet industry is provided. About 20 percent of global industrial garnet production takes place in the U.S. During 2000, an estimated 300 kt of industrial garnets were produced worldwide. The U.S. is the world's largest consumer of industrial garnet, consuming 56.9 kt in 2000.

  11. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2003-01-01

    Statistics on the production, consumption, cost, trade, and government stockpile of natural and synthetic industrial diamond are provided. The outlook for the industrial diamond market is also considered.

  12. Federal laboratory nondestructive testing research and development applicable to industry

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.A.; Moore, N.L.

    1987-02-01

    This document presents the results of a survey of nondestructive testing (NDT) and related sensor technology research and development (R and D) at selected federal laboratories. Objective was to identify and characterize NDT activities that could be applied to improving energy efficiency and overall productivity in US manufacturing. Numerous federally supported R and D programs were identified in areas such as acoustic emissions, eddy current, radiography, computer tomography and ultrasonics. A Preliminary Findings Report was sent to industry representatives, which generated considerable interest.

  13. A technique for estimating one-dimensional diffusion coefficients in low-permeability sedimentary rock using X-ray radiography: Comparison with through-diffusion measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavé, Lisa; Al, Tom; Xiang, Yan; Vilks, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The measurement of diffusive properties of low-permeability rocks is of interest to the nuclear power industry, which is considering the option of deep geologic repositories for management of radioactive waste. We present a simple, non-destructive, constant source in-diffusion method for estimating one-dimensional pore diffusion coefficients ( Dp) in geologic materials based on X-ray radiography. Changes in X-ray absorption coefficient (Δ μ) are used to quantify changes in relative concentration ( C/ C0) of an X-ray attenuating iodide tracer as the tracer solution diffuses through the rock pores. Estimated values of Dp are then obtained by fitting an analytical solution to the measured concentration profiles over time. Measurements on samples before and after saturation with iodide can also be used to determine iodide-accessible porosity (ϕ I). To evaluate the radiography method, results were compared with traditional steady-state through-diffusion measurements on two rock types: shale and limestone. Values of Dp of (4.8 ± 2.5) × 10 - 11 m 2·s - 1 (mean ± standard deviation) were measured for samples of Queenston Formation shale and (2.6 ± 1.0) × 10 - 11 m 2·s - 1 for samples of Cobourg Formation limestone using the radiography method. The range of results for each rock type agree well with Dp values of (4.6 ± 2.0) × 10 - 11 m 2·s - 1 for shale and (3.5 ± 1.8) × 10 - 11 m 2·s - 1 for limestone, calculated from through-diffusion experiments on adjacent rock samples. Low porosity (0.01 to 0.03) and heterogeneous distribution of porosity in the Cobourg Formation may be responsible for the slightly poorer agreement between radiography and through-diffusion results for limestones. Mean values of ϕ I for shales (0.060) and limestones (0.028) were close to mean porosity measurements made on bulk samples by the independent water loss technique (0.062 and 0.020 for shales and limestones, respectively). Radiography measurements offer the advantage of time

  14. A technique for estimating one-dimensional diffusion coefficients in low-permeability sedimentary rock using X-ray radiography: comparison with through-diffusion measurements.

    PubMed

    Cavé, Lisa; Al, Tom; Xiang, Yan; Vilks, Peter

    2009-01-07

    The measurement of diffusive properties of low-permeability rocks is of interest to the nuclear power industry, which is considering the option of deep geologic repositories for management of radioactive waste. We present a simple, non-destructive, constant source in-diffusion method for estimating one-dimensional pore diffusion coefficients (D(p)) in geologic materials based on X-ray radiography. Changes in X-ray absorption coefficient (Deltamicro) are used to quantify changes in relative concentration (C/C(0)) of an X-ray attenuating iodide tracer as the tracer solution diffuses through the rock pores. Estimated values of D(p) are then obtained by fitting an analytical solution to the measured concentration profiles over time. Measurements on samples before and after saturation with iodide can also be used to determine iodide-accessible porosity (phi(I)). To evaluate the radiography method, results were compared with traditional steady-state through-diffusion measurements on two rock types: shale and limestone. Values of D(p) of (4.8+/-2.5)x10(-11) m(2).s(-1) (mean+/-standard deviation) were measured for samples of Queenston Formation shale and (2.6+/-1.0)x10(-11) m(2).s(-1) for samples of Cobourg Formation limestone using the radiography method. The range of results for each rock type agree well with D(p) values of (4.6+/-2.0)x10(-11) m(2).s(-1) for shale and (3.5+/-1.8)x10(-11) m(2).s(-1) for limestone, calculated from through-diffusion experiments on adjacent rock samples. Low porosity (0.01 to 0.03) and heterogeneous distribution of porosity in the Cobourg Formation may be responsible for the slightly poorer agreement between radiography and through-diffusion results for limestones. Mean values of phi(I) for shales (0.060) and limestones (0.028) were close to mean porosity measurements made on bulk samples by the independent water loss technique (0.062 and 0.020 for shales and limestones, respectively). Radiography measurements offer the advantage of time

  15. Two-frame flash x-radiography system for target implosion studies

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, J.; Fehl, D.L.

    1980-01-01

    A two-frame flash x-radiography system has been developed to study target implosion dynamics. It is capable of taking two time separated 3 ns exposure x-ray shadowgrams of a particle beam driven target implosion.

  16. Relationship Between the Number of Clinical Sites in Radiography Programs and Job Placement Rates of Graduates.

    PubMed

    Harrell, Angela; Matthews, Eric

    2016-07-01

    To determine whether a relationship exists between the number of clinical sites available in radiography programs accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology and the job placement rates of graduates. We performed a secondary analysis of data on job placement rates and the number of clinical sites available in 438 degree-granting radiography programs from January 2015 to March 2015. A weak, negative, nonsignificant correlation existed between the number of clinical sites and the job placement rate (Spearman's rho = -.113, n = 438, P = .018). The coefficient of determination was 1.28%.Discussion Research evaluating factors contributing to graduate employability is limited but indicates no need for radiography program administrators to adjust clinical site numbers solely on the basis of improving graduate employability. The number of clinical sites available in a radiography program is not related to the job placement rate of its graduates. ©2016 American Society of Radiologic Technologists.

  17. Progress on Converting a NIF Quad to Eight, Petawatt Beams for Advanced Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, J K

    2009-10-19

    We are converting a quad of NIF beamlines into eight, short-pulse (1-50 ps), petawatt-class beams for advanced radiography and fast ignition experiments. This paper describes progress toward completing this project.

  18. 42 CFR 37.42 - Chest radiograph specifications-digital radiography systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... radiograph specifications—digital radiography systems. (a) Miners must be disrobed from the waist up at the... maximum pixel pitch of 200µm, with a minimum bit depth of 10. Spatial resolution must be at least 2.5 line...

  19. 42 CFR 37.42 - Chest radiograph specifications-digital radiography systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... specifications—digital radiography systems. (a) Miners must be disrobed from the waist up at the time the... 200µm, with a minimum bit depth of 10. Spatial resolution must be at least 2.5 line pairs per millimeter...

  20. A comparative assessment of entrance surface doses in analogue and digital radiography during common radiographic examinations.

    PubMed

    Seo, Deoknam; Jang, Seogoo; Kim, Jungmin; Kim, Jungsu; Sung, Dongwook; Kim, HyunJi; Yoon, Yongsu

    2014-01-01

    Digital radiography is often performed at a higher dose rate than analogue radiography for image acquisition. The authors measured the Entrance Surface Dose (ESD) of analogue and digital radiography techniques for 14 radiographic examinations from randomly selected medical centres in the central district of Korea. It was that the mean ESD of the digital examinations was 2.84 mGy (range, 0.37-6.38 mGy) and that of the analogue examinations was 1.83 mGy (range, 0.38-4.74 mGy), resulting in a 55.25 % higher ESD for digital technique. Although this survey is not completely representative of Korea, findings of this study indicate a need for closer exposure management in digital radiography to minimise patient dose.

  1. Clinical applications of digital 2-D and 3-D radiography for the periodontist.

    PubMed

    Eshraghi, Thomas; McAllister, Nicole; McAllister, Brad

    2012-09-01

    Although there has been rapid development of imaging technology within dentistry, there has been limited evidence-based research documenting the benefits of digital radiography. We searched MEDLINE for relevant studies and review papers demonstrating clinical applications, limitations, and advancements within digital radiography. Two-dimensional (2-D) and 3-D digital radiography has become a powerful diagnostic tool for simple and complex procedures, including implant reconstruction. Recent advancements have reduced radiation exposure, increased resolution, and improved detection capabilities of complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) sensors. The current review summarizes such advances and outlines advanced CBCT implant-planning techniques. While evidence-based research grows, the logistic, diagnostic, and planning improvements of 2-D and 3-D digital radiography are irrefutable with the potential to supplant conventional techniques. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The use of radiography in the diagnosis of oral conditions in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Fogarty, W P; Drummond, B K; Brosnan, M G

    2015-12-01

    Radiography can serve as a useful aid in the diagnosis of numerous oral conditions, with a place in nearly all of the disciplines of dentistry. As such it can have a beneficial role in caring for the oral health of children and adolescents. The following review discusses the use of radiography in the diagnosis of oral conditions in children and adolescents, with particular reference to the diagnosis of dental caries, dental trauma, growth and development and in other dental scenarios, along with the importance of incidental findings. The risks associated with radiation exposure from the use of radiography are discussed, how these need to be balanced with the possible benefits associated with such use, as well as how risks could be minimised. Summary recommendations are also presented, providing an overview of the use of radiography for oral diagnosis in various clinical scenarios for children and adolescents.

  3. Novel joint source-channel coding for wireless transmission of radiography images.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Katsuhiro; Takizawa, Kenichi; Ikegami, Tetsushi

    2010-01-01

    A wireless technology is required to realize robust transmission of medical images like a radiography image over noisy environment. The use of error correction technique is essential for realizing such a reliable communication, in which a suitable channel coding is introduced to correct erroneous bits caused by passing through a noisy channel. However, the use of a channel code decreases its efficiency because redundancy bits are also transmitted with information bits. This paper presents a joint source-channel coding which maintains the channel efficiency during transmission of medical images like a radiography image. As medical images under the test, we use typical radiography images in this paper. The joint coding technique enjoys correlations between pixels of the radiography image. The results show that the proposed joint coding provides capability to correcting erroneous bits without increasing the redundancy of the codeword.

  4. A survey of digital radiography practice in four South African teaching hospitals: an illuminative study

    PubMed Central

    Nyathi, T; Chirwa, TF; van der Merwe, DG

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess radiographer familiarity and preferences with digital radiography in four teaching hospitals and thereafter make recommendations in line with the migration from screen film to digital radiography. Materials and methods: A questionnaire was designed to collect data from either qualified or student radiographers from four teaching hospitals. From the four teaching hospitals, there were a total of 205 potential respondents. Among other things, responses regarding experiences and preferences with digital radiography, quality control procedures, patient dose, advantages and disadvantages of digital radiography were sought. The information collected was based on self-reporting by the participants. The study is exploratory in nature and descriptive statistics were generated from the collected data using Microsoft Excel 2007 and StatsDirect software. Results: Sixty-three out of 205 (31%) radiographers from all the four radiology centers responded to the circulated questionnaire. Only 15% (8) of the qualified radiographers had 4 or more years of experience with digital radiography compared to 68% (36) for the same amount of experience with screen-film radiography. Sixty-one percent (38) of the participants had been exposed to digital radiography during their lectures while at university. A small proportion, 16% (10) of the respondents underwent formal training in quality control procedures on the digital X-ray units they were using. Slightly more than half (55%) of the participants felt it was easier for them to retake an image in digital radiography than in screen film radiography. Conclusion: The results of this survey showed that the participants are familiar with digital radiography and have embraced this relatively new technology as shown by the fact that they can identify both its advantages and disadvantages as applied to clinical practice. However, there are minimal quality control procedures specific to digital

  5. Time resolved analysis of water drainage in porous asphalt concrete using neutron radiography.

    PubMed

    Poulikakos, L D; Sedighi Gilani, M; Derome, D; Jerjen, I; Vontobel, P

    2013-07-01

    Porous asphalt as a road surface layer controls aquaplaning as rain water can drain through its highly porous structure. The process of water drainage through this permeable layer is studied using neutron radiography. Time-resolved water configuration and distribution within the porous structure are reported. It is shown that radiography depicts the process of liquid water transport within the complex geometry of porous asphalt, capturing water films, filled dead end pores and water islands. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Biomedical radiography: radiation protection and safety. (latest citations from the NTIS data base). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the safety of biomedical radiography. Radiation protection methods and techniques are described for both patients and operators. Safety techniques for dental radiology, routine x-rays, radiotherapy, thoracic radiography and other radiology procedures are included. Radiation exposure limits for patients and healthcare workers are defined. (Contains a minimum of 247 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  7. Comparison of radiography and ultrasonography for the diagnosis of osteochondritis dissecans in the equine femoropatellar joint.

    PubMed

    Bourzac, C; Alexander, K; Rossier, Y; Laverty, S

    2009-09-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) lesions of the femoropatellar (FP) joint are diagnosed routinely by radiography, but lesions located in the trochlear groove or without accompanying subchondral bone changes can be difficult to visualise. Ultrasonography allows evaluation of articular cartilage and subchondral bone in the FPjoint. To document the radiographic and ultrasonographic appearance of OCD lesions in the equine FP joint, grade ultrasonographic lesions and compare their accuracy in the diagnosis of these lesions. The medical records of all horses diagnosed with FP OCD between 1995 and 2006 were assessed. Inclusion criteria included availability of both radiographic and ultrasonographic images. Lesion characteristics were evaluated in each trochlear ridge and trochlear groove. For assessment of the accuracy (sensitivity and specificity) of both imaging techniques in the diagnosis of OCD, only cases with an arthroscopic or necropsy examination were studied. Twenty-one horses were included. OCD lesions were diagnosed by radiography (30/32 joints) and ultrasound (32/32 joints). The lateral trochlear ridge (LTR, 91%) and the medial trochlear ridge (MTR, 17%) were involved on radiography. The localisation on ultrasound examination was similar (97% LTR, 25% MTR). All but one lesion seen on radiography were also detected with ultrasound; 2 LTR and 3 MTR lesions, not seen on radiography were diagnosed by ultrasound and confirmed at arthroscopy or necropsy. The specificity was 100% regardless of the site and imaging procedure except for the distal third of the MTR (94% for ultrasound). The sensitivity varied, depending on lesion site. Ultrasonography is a valuable diagnostic tool to diagnose OCD lesions in the FP joint and more sensitive than radiography for lesions affecting the MTR of the distal femur. Ultrasound should be considered as a useful adjunct to radiography for diagnosing equine FP OCD, especially in cases of high clinical suspicion but equivocal

  8. Digital Radiography and X-ray Computed Tomography Slice Inspection of an Aluminum Truss Section

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    3. Results The DR and XCT scans of the specimen were done using the 225-keV microfocus x - ray tube and II/CCD camera setup in centered rotate-only...Digital Radiography and X - ray Computed Tomography Slice Inspection of an Aluminum Truss Section by William H. Green ARL-MR-791 September...Digital Radiography and X - ray Computed Tomography Slice Inspection of an Aluminum Truss Section William H. Green Weapons and Materials

  9. Dichotomy between theory and practice in chest radiography and its impact on students.

    PubMed

    Botwe, Benard O; Arthur, Lawrence; Tenkorang, Michael K K; Anim-Sampong, Samuel

    2017-06-01

    It is important that theory is synchronous with clinical practices that students engage in. Lack of congruence between theory and practice presents serious problems to students. This study was therefore conducted to determine if there was a theory-practice gap in chest radiography during clinical rotations, and any associated causes and effects on radiography students. A descriptive survey design was used to conduct this study from 2 February to 27 July 2014. A semi-structured questionnaire consisting of open- and close-ended questions was used to purposively collect data from 26 radiography students in Ghana who had completed theory lessons in chest radiography and had either completed or were undertaking clinical rotations in chest radiography. Twenty-five (96%) respondents indicated the presence of theory-practice gap in chest radiography during clinical rotations, where differences between theory and clinical practice were observed. Lack of working materials 16 (62%), heavy workload 14 (54%), equipment breakdowns 14 (54%) and supervisory factors 11 (43%) were identified as the causes. Many students (81%) experienced diverse adverse effects such as confusion 10 (38%), poor performance during clinical examinations 6 (23%) and entire loss of interest in the professional training 1 (4%) of this dichotomy. Dichotomy between theory and practice found in chest radiography has diverse adverse effects on students. Regular feedback on the quality of clinical practice received by students should be encouraged to determine the existence of any gaps between theory and practice in order to promote effective clinical rotation programmes in radiography. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Medical Radiation Sciences published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australian Society of Medical Imaging and Radiation Therapy and New Zealand Institute of Medical Radiation Technology.

  10. Application of Digital Radiography to Weld Inspection for the Space Shuttle External Fuel Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ussery, Warren

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews NASA's use of digital radiography to inspect the welds of the external tanks used to hold the cryogenic fuels for the Space Shuttle Main Engines. NASA has had a goal of replacing a significant portion of film used to inspect the welds, with digital radiography. The presentation reviews the objectives for converting to a digital system from film, the characteristics of the digital system, the Probability of detection study, the qualification and implementation of the system.

  11. Tomosynthesis of the wrist and hand in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: comparison with radiography and MRI.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Takatoshi; Fujii, Masami; Yamashita, Yoshiko; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Oki, Hodaka; Hayashida, Yoshiko; Saito, Kazuyoshi; Tanaka, Yoshiya; Korogi, Yukunori

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to compare tomosynthesis with radiography and MRI of the wrist and hand for evaluating bone erosion in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Twenty consecutive patients with an established diagnosis of RA and five control patients were included in this study. They underwent radiography, tomosynthesis, and MRI of the bilateral hand and wrist within a week. The mean total dose of radiography and tomosynthesis was 0.13 and 0.25 mGy, respectively. MRI evaluation was performed according to the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Clinical Trials recommendations. Bone erosion on images from the three modalities was independently reviewed by two certificated radiologists with a 4-point scale (0, normal; 1, discrete erosion; 2, < 50% of the joint surface; and 3, ≥ 50% of the joint surface). The detection rates of bone erosion for radiography, tomosynthesis, and MRI were 26.5%, 36.1%, and 36.7%, respectively. Significantly more bone erosions were revealed with tomosynthesis and MRI than with radiography (p < 0.01). When MRI was used as the reference standard, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 68.1%, 97.5%, and 86.7%, respectively, for radiography and 94.8%, 97.8%, and 96.7%, respectively, for tomosynthesis. Interobserver agreement (kappa value) for bone erosion was good to excellent on tomosynthesis and MRI for all joints (0.65-1.00 and 0.68-1.00, respectively), whereas it was slight to fair on radiography for some carpal bones and bases of metacarpal bones (0.22-0.56). Tomosynthesis is superior to radiography and almost comparable to MRI for the detection of bone erosion in patients with RA.

  12. Fast neutron (14.5 MeV) radiography: a comparative study

    SciTech Connect

    Klann, R.T.

    1996-07-01

    Fast neutron (14.5 MeV) radiography is a type of non-destructive analysis tool that offers its own benefits and drawbacks. Because cross-sections vary with energy, a different range of materials can be examined with fast neutrons than can be studied with thermal neutrons, epithermal neutrons, or x-rays. This paper details these differences through a comparative study of fast neutron radiography to the other types of radiography available. The most obvious difference among the different types of radiography is in the penetrability of the sources. Fast neutrons can probe much deeper and can therefore obtain details of the internals of thick objects. Good images have been obtained through as much as 15 cm of steel, 10 cm of water, and 15 cm of borated polyethylene. In addition, some objects were identifiable through as much as 25 cm of water or 30 cm of borated polyethylene. The most notable benefit of fast neutron radiography is in the types of materials that can be tested. Fast neutron radiography can view through materials that simply cannot be viewed by X rays, thermal neutrons, or epithermal neutrons due to the high cross-sections or linear attenuation coefficients involved. Cadmium was totally transparent to the fast neutron source. Fast neutron radiography is not without drawbacks. The most pronounced drawback has been in the quality of radiograph produced. The image resolution is only about 0.8 mm for a 1.25 cm thick object, whereas, other forms of radiography have much better resolution.

  13. Chest radiography in dust-exposed miners: Promise and problems, potential and imperfections

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, G.R.; Attfield, M.D.; Parker, J.E. )

    1993-01-01

    Since the early 1900s, it was recognized that many dust-exposed workers developed abnormal radiographs during life. Chest radiography remains the primary means of determining the presence and extent of dust-induced pneumoconiosis, although it is ineffective for detecting airways obstructions from mine dust exposure. This chapter reviews the uses and limitations of chest radiography in the study, surveillance, screening, clinical diagnosis, and disability determinations of occupational lung diseases in dust-exposed workers. 70 refs.

  14. Impact of Chest Radiography for Children with Lower Respiratory Tract Infection: A Propensity Score Approach

    PubMed Central

    Ecochard-Dugelay, Emmanuelle; Beliah, Muriel; Boisson, Caroline; Perreaux, Francis; de Laveaucoupet, Jocelyne; Labrune, Philippe; Epaud, Ralph; Ducou-Lepointe, Hubert; Bouyer, Jean; Gajdos, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Background Management of acute respiratory tract infection varies substantially despite this being a condition frequently encountered in pediatric emergency departments. Previous studies have suggested that the use of antibiotics was higher when chest radiography was performed. However none of these analyses had considered the inherent indication bias of observational studies. Objective The aim of this work was to assess the relationship between performing chest radiography and prescribing antibiotics using a propensity score analysis to address the indication bias due to non-random radiography assignment. Methods We conducted a prospective study of 697 children younger than 2 years of age who presented during the winter months of 2006–2007 for suspicion of respiratory tract infection at the Pediatric Emergency Department of an urban general hospital in France (Paris suburb). We first determined the individual propensity score (probability of having a chest radiography according to baseline characteristics). Then we assessed the relation between radiography and antibiotic prescription using two methods: adjustment and matching on the propensity score. Results We found that performing a chest radiography lead to more frequent antibiotic prescription that may be expressed as OR = 2.3, CI [1.3–4.1], or as an increased use of antibiotics of 18.6% [0.08–0.29] in the group undergoing chest radiography. Conclusion Chest radiography has a significant impact on the management of infants admitted for suspicion of respiratory tract infection in a pediatric emergency department and may lead to unnecessary administration of antibiotics. PMID:24788944

  15. The usage of digital radiography and cone beam computed tomography among Turkish dentists

    PubMed Central

    Dölekoğlu, S; Fişekçioğlu, E; İlgüy, M; İlgüy, D

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of the use of digital radiography and report how it was used by Turkish dentists. Methods The survey was based on 383 dentists who were present at the sixteenth International Congress organized by the Turkish Dental Association. A questionnaire which consisted of 19 questions was given to the dentists who participated in the study. Data were assessed according to frequency distribution and the χ2 test was used to determine the significance of differences between two independent groups. Results 376 questionnaires were analysed. The mean age of the dentists who participated in the study was 37.14 ± 9.6 years (range: 20–63 years). The distribution of the dentists according to the 7 regions of Turkey were: Marmara 58%, Aegean 13% and Mediterranean 10%, Central Anatolia 8%, Black Sea 7%, Southeastern Anatolia 3%, Eastern Anatolia 1%. 124 dentists (33%) said they did not work with digital radiography. 95 dentists indicated that they did not use digital radiography owing to cost (60%). 252 dentists (67%) said they used digital radiography. 40% of the participants noted that the repetition of periapical radiographs was due to digital radiography. 166 dentists (55.9%) and 79.1% academicians had knowledge about cone beam CT (CBCT). Conclusion Digital radiography users are increasing in Turkey and levels of knowledge of CBCT and awareness of radiation safety has also increased. PMID:21831978

  16. The usage of digital radiography and cone beam computed tomography among Turkish dentists.

    PubMed

    Dölekoğlu, Semanur; Fişekçioğlu, E; İlgüy, M; İlgüy, D

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of the use of digital radiography and report how it was used by Turkish dentists. The survey was based on 383 dentists who were present at the sixteenth International Congress organized by the Turkish Dental Association. A questionnaire which consisted of 19 questions was given to the dentists who participated in the study. Data were assessed according to frequency distribution and the χ(2) test was used to determine the significance of differences between two independent groups. 376 questionnaires were analysed. The mean age of the dentists who participated in the study was 37.14 ± 9.6 years (range: 20-63 years). The distribution of the dentists according to the 7 regions of Turkey were: Marmara 58%, Aegean 13% and Mediterranean 10%, Central Anatolia 8%, Black Sea 7%, Southeastern Anatolia 3%, Eastern Anatolia 1%. 124 dentists (33%) said they did not work with digital radiography. 95 dentists indicated that they did not use digital radiography owing to cost (60%). 252 dentists (67%) said they used digital radiography. 40% of the participants noted that the repetition of periapical radiographs was due to digital radiography. 166 dentists (55.9%) and 79.1% academicians had knowledge about cone beam CT (CBCT). Digital radiography users are increasing in Turkey and levels of knowledge of CBCT and awareness of radiation safety has also increased.

  17. A transportable neutron radiography system based on a SbBe neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantidis, J. G.; Nicolaou, G. E.; Tsagas, N. F.

    2009-07-01

    A transportable neutron radiography system, incorporating a SbBe neutron source, has been simulated using the MCNPX code. Design provisions have allowed two radiography systems to be utilised using the same SbBe neutron source. In this respect, neutron radiographies can be carried out using the photoneutrons produced when the 124Sb is surrounded by the Be target. Alternatively, γ-radiography can be utilised with the photons from the 124Sb with the target removed. Appropriate collimators were simulated for each of the radiography modes. Apart from Be, the materials considered were compatible with the European Union Directive on 'Restriction of Hazardous Substances' (RoHS) 2002/95/EC, hence excluding the use of cadmium and lead. Bismuth was chosen as the material for γ-radiation shielding and the proposed system allowed a maximum activity of the 124Sb up to 1.85×1013 Bq. The system simulated allows different object sizes to be studied with a wide range of radiography parameters.

  18. Dynamic chest radiography: flat-panel detector (FPD) based functional X-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Rie

    2016-07-01

    Dynamic chest radiography is a flat-panel detector (FPD)-based functional X-ray imaging, which is performed as an additional examination in chest radiography. The large field of view (FOV) of FPDs permits real-time observation of the entire lungs and simultaneous right-and-left evaluation of diaphragm kinetics. Most importantly, dynamic chest radiography provides pulmonary ventilation and circulation findings as slight changes in pixel value even without the use of contrast media; the interpretation is challenging and crucial for a better understanding of pulmonary function. The basic concept was proposed in the 1980s; however, it was not realized until the 2010s because of technical limitations. Dynamic FPDs and advanced digital image processing played a key role for clinical application of dynamic chest radiography. Pulmonary ventilation and circulation can be quantified and visualized for the diagnosis of pulmonary diseases. Dynamic chest radiography can be deployed as a simple and rapid means of functional imaging in both routine and emergency medicine. Here, we focus on the evaluation of pulmonary ventilation and circulation. This review article describes the basic mechanism of imaging findings according to pulmonary/circulation physiology, followed by imaging procedures, analysis method, and diagnostic performance of dynamic chest radiography.

  19. The quality assessment of radial and tangential neutron radiography beamlines of TRR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choopan Dastjerdi, M. H.; Movafeghi, A.; Khalafi, H.; Kasesaz, Y.

    2017-07-01

    To achieve a quality neutron radiographic image in a relatively short exposure time, the neutron radiography beam must be of good quality and relatively high neutron flux. Characterization of a neutron radiography beam, such as determination of the image quality and the neutron flux, is vital for producing quality radiographic images and also provides a means to compare the quality of different neutron radiography facilities. This paper provides a characterization of the radial and tangential neutron radiography beamlines at the Tehran research reactor. This work includes determination of the facilities category according to the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards, and also uses the gold foils to determine the neutron beam flux. The radial neutron beam is a Category I neutron radiography facility, the highest possible quality level according to the ASTM. The tangential beam is a Category IV neutron radiography facility. Gold foil activation experiments show that the measured neutron flux for radial beamline with length-to-diameter ratio (L/D) =150 is 6.1× 106 n cm-2 s-1 and for tangential beamline with (L/D)=115 is 2.4× 104 n cm-2 s-1.

  20. Industry Employment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This article illustrates projected employment change by industry and industry sector over 2010-20 decade. Workers are grouped into an industry according to the type of good produced or service provided by the establishment for which they work. Industry employment projections are shown in terms of numeric change (growth or decline in the total…

  1. Industrial Minerals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradbury, James C.

    1978-01-01

    The past year is seen as not particularly good for industrial minerals and for industry in general. Environmental concerns continued to trouble the industry with unacceptable asbestos concentrations and chlorofluorocarbon effects on ozone. A halting U.S. economy also affected industrial progress. (MA)

  2. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2000-01-01

    Part of the 1999 Industrial Minerals Review. A review of the state of the global industrial diamond industry in 1999 is presented. World consumption of industrial diamond has increased annually in recent years, with an estimated 500 million carats valued between $650 million and $800 million consumed in 1999. In 1999, the U.S. was the world's largest market for industrial diamond and was also one of the world's main producers; the others were Ireland, Russia, and South Africa. Uses of industrial diamonds are discussed, and prices of natural and synthetic industrial diamond are reported.

  3. Neutron Computed Tomography Using Real-Time Neutron Radiography.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulcoski, Mark Francis

    Conventional neutron radiography of an object records a two-dimensional distribution of the neutron beam intensity after it has passed through an object. The neutron radiograph, whether static film or real-time, may be considered a "shadow graph" of the object. In a shadow graph, internal structures in an object may mask one another making it difficult or impossible to precisely define the internals of the object. This problem can be solved by tomographic imaging. A real-time neutron radiography facility was constructed including the capability of neutron tomography. The neutron beam was measured for total neutron flux ((1.0 (+OR-) 0.2) x 10('11) n/(m('2)-sec)), gold cadmium ratio (52 (+OR-) 3) and effective neutron temperature (83(DEGREES)C (+OR -) 8(DEGREES)C). The angular divergence or nonparallelism of the neutron beam was measured to be \\2.3(DEGREES) (+OR -) 0.1(DEGREES) thereby providing a means of quantifying the collimator effectiveness. The resolution capabilities of both static film and real-time neutron radiographs were quantified using a Fourier transform algorithm to calculate the modulation transfer function of both types of radiographs. The contrast sensitivity of both types of radiographs was measured as 3.1% for film and 4.0% for real-time radiographs. Two tomography algorithms, the simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique (SIRT) and the convolution method, were programmed on an Intellect 100 Image Processing System. The SIRT algorithm was found to be too large and slow on the Intellect 100 to produce useful tomographs. The convolution method produced results near the theoretical resolution limits for a given number of projections. A tomographic resolution of at least 1.3 mm was demonstrated using 200 projections. Computer running time for the convolution method was found to be (TURN)30 seconds for each projection used. A series of experiments were conducted using the convolution method investigating the effect of high and low pass

  4. EOS imaging versus current radiography: A health technology assessment study

    PubMed Central

    Mahboub-Ahari, Alireza; Hajebrahimi, Sakineh; Yusefi, Mahmoud; Velayati, Ashraf

    2016-01-01

    Background: EOS is a 2D/3D muscle skeletal diagnostic imaging system. The device has been developed to produce a high quality 2D, full body radiographs in standing, sitting and squatting positions. Three dimensional images can be reconstructed via sterEOS software. This Health Technology Assessment study aimed to investigate efficacy, effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of new emerged EOS imaging system in comparison with conventional x-ray radiographic techniques. Methods: All cost and outcome data were assessed from Iran's Ministry of Health Perspective. Data for clinical effectiveness was extracted using a rigorous systematic review. As clinical outcomes the rate of x-ray emission and related quality of life were compared with Computed Radiography (CR) and Digital Radiography (DR). Standard costing method was conducted to find related direct medical costs. In order to examine robustness of the calculated Incremental Cost Effectiveness Ratios (ICERs) we used two-way sensitivity analysis. GDP Per capita of Islamic Republic of Iran (2012) adopted as cost-effectiveness threshold. Results: Review of related literature highlighted the lack of rigorous evidence for clinical outcomes. Ultra low dose EOS imaging device is known as a safe intervention because of FDA, CE and CSA certificates. The rate of emitted X-ray was 2 to 18 fold lower for EOS compared to the conventional techniques (p<0.001). The Incremental Cost Effectiveness Ratio for EOS relative to CR calculated $50706 in baseline analysis (the first scenario) and $50714, $9446 respectively for the second and third scenarios. Considering the value of neither $42146 as upper limit, nor the first neither the second scenario could pass the cost-effectiveness threshold for Iran. Conclusion: EOS imaging technique might not be considered as a cost-effective intervention in routine practice of health system, especially within in-patient wards. Scenario analysis shows that, only in an optimum condition such as lower

  5. The value of thyroid shielding in intraoral radiography

    PubMed Central

    Hazenoot, Bart; Sanderink, Gerard C H; Berkhout, W Erwin R

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the utility of the application of a thyroid shield in intraoral radiography when using rectangular collimation. Methods: Experimental data were obtained by measuring the absorbed dose at the position of the thyroid gland in a RANDO® (The Phantom Laboratory, Salem, NY) male phantom with a dosemeter. Four protocols were tested: round collimation and rectangular collimation, both with and without thyroid shield. Five exposure positions were deployed: upper incisor (Isup), upper canine (Csup), upper premolar (Psup), upper molar (Msup) and posterior bitewing (BW). Exposures were made with 70 kV and 7 mA and were repeated 10 times. The exposure times were as recommended for the exposure positions for the respective collimator type by the manufacturer for digital imaging. The data were statistically analyzed with a three-way ANOVA test. Significance was set at p < 0.01. Results: The ANOVA test revealed that the differences between mean doses of all protocols and geometries were statistically significant, p < 0.001. For the Isup, thyroid dose levels were comparable with both collimators at a level indicating primary beam exposure. Thyroid shield reduced this dose with circa 75%. For the Csup position, round collimation also revealed primary beam exposure, and thyroid shield yield was 70%. In Csup with rectangular collimation, the thyroid dose was reduced with a factor 4 compared with round collimation and thyroid shield yielded an additional 42% dose reduction. The thyroid dose levels for the Csup, Psup, Msup and BW exposures were lower with rectangular collimation without thyroid shield than with round collimation with thyroid shield. With rectangular collimation, the thyroid shield in Psup, Msup and BW reduced the dose 10% or less, where dose levels were already low, implying no clinical significance. Conclusions: For the exposures in the upper anterior region, thyroid shield results in an important dose reduction for the thyroid. For

  6. Advances in Neutron Radiography: Application to Additive Manufacturing Inconel 718

    DOE PAGES

    Bilheux, Hassina Z; Song, Gian; An, Ke; ...

    2016-01-01

    Reactor-based neutron radiography is a non-destructive, non-invasive characterization technique that has been extensively used for engineering materials such as inspection of components, evaluation of porosity, and in-operando observations of engineering parts. Neutron radiography has flourished at reactor facilities for more than four decades and is relatively new to accelerator-based neutron sources. Recent advances in neutron source and detector technologies, such as the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, TN, and the microchannel plate (MCP) detector, respectively, enable new contrast mechanisms using the neutron scattering Bragg features for crystalline information such as averagemore » lattice strain, crystalline plane orientation, and identification of phases in a neutron radiograph. Additive manufacturing (AM) processes or 3D printing have recently become very popular and have a significant potential to revolutionize the manufacturing of materials by enabling new designs with complex geometries that are not feasible using conventional manufacturing processes. However, the technique lacks standards for process optimization and control compared to conventional processes. Residual stresses are a common occurrence in materials that are machined, rolled, heat treated, welded, etc., and have a significant impact on a component s mechanical behavior and durability. They may also arise during the 3D printing process, and defects such as internal cracks can propagate over time as the component relaxes after being removed from its build plate (the base plate utilized to print materials on). Moreover, since access to the AM material is possible only after the component has been fully manufactured, it is difficult to characterize the material for defects a priori to minimize expensive re-runs. Currently, validation of the AM process and materials is mainly through expensive trial-and-error experiments at the

  7. Advances in Neutron Radiography: Application to Additive Manufacturing Inconel 718

    SciTech Connect

    Bilheux, Hassina Z; Song, Gian; An, Ke; Bilheux, Jean-Christophe; Kirka, Michael M; Dehoff, Ryan R; Santodonato, Louis J; Gorti, Sarma B; Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam; Xie, Qingge

    2016-01-01

    Reactor-based neutron radiography is a non-destructive, non-invasive characterization technique that has been extensively used for engineering materials such as inspection of components, evaluation of porosity, and in-operando observations of engineering parts. Neutron radiography has flourished at reactor facilities for more than four decades and is relatively new to accelerator-based neutron sources. Recent advances in neutron source and detector technologies, such as the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, TN, and the microchannel plate (MCP) detector, respectively, enable new contrast mechanisms using the neutron scattering Bragg features for crystalline information such as average lattice strain, crystalline plane orientation, and identification of phases in a neutron radiograph. Additive manufacturing (AM) processes or 3D printing have recently become very popular and have a significant potential to revolutionize the manufacturing of materials by enabling new designs with complex geometries that are not feasible using conventional manufacturing processes. However, the technique lacks standards for process optimization and control compared to conventional processes. Residual stresses are a common occurrence in materials that are machined, rolled, heat treated, welded, etc., and have a significant impact on a component s mechanical behavior and durability. They may also arise during the 3D printing process, and defects such as internal cracks can propagate over time as the component relaxes after being removed from its build plate (the base plate utilized to print materials on). Moreover, since access to the AM material is possible only after the component has been fully manufactured, it is difficult to characterize the material for defects a priori to minimize expensive re-runs. Currently, validation of the AM process and materials is mainly through expensive trial-and-error experiments at the component

  8. Location of mental foramen using digital panoramic Radiography

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Ajmal; Nataraj, Kannan; Mathew, Vinod B.; Varma, Beena; Mohamed, Shamil; Valappila, Nidhin J.; Meena, Aravind S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Comparative evaluation of the location of mental foramen in different age groups. Determine the variation in position of mental foramen with gender using digital panoramic radiography. Materials and Methods: Digital panoramic radiographs of 250 patients were reviewed. The study population was divided into five age groups with 50 patients each. Radiographic position of mental foramen was evaluated in each radiograph based on three parameters. Measurements were taken in each radiograph using Planmeca Dimaxis pro version 4.4.0 (Helsinki, Finland). The collected data were subjected to statistical analysis using paired Student's t-test. Results: The mean distance of position of mental foramen showed a significant variation within the five age groups. In the first group, female patients showed an increase in mean distance of mental foramen position in relation to three parameters. From the second to fifth groups, male patient showed an increase in the mean distance of mental foramen position. The first and fifth group showed a reduced mean distance of mental foramen position when compared to other age groups. Conclusion: This study concluded that the position of mental foramen varies with age. There was a gender-related variation in position of mental foramen within the population too. PMID:27555723

  9. Detection of fissionable materials in cargoes using monochromatic photon radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danagoulian, Areg; Lanza, Richard; O'Day, Buckley; LNSP Team

    2015-04-01

    The detection of Special Nuclear Materials (e.g. Pu and U) and nuclear devices in the commercial cargo traffic is one of the challenges posed by the threat of nuclear terrorism. Radiography and active interrogation of heavily loaded cargoes require ~ 1 - 10MeV photons for penetration. In a proof-of-concept system under development at MIT, the interrogating monochromatic photon beam is produced via a 11B(d , nγ) 12C reaction. To achieve this, a boron target is used along with the 3 MeV d+ RFQ accelerator at MIT-Bates. The reactions results in the emission of very narrow 4.4 MeV and 15.1 MeV gammas lines. The photons, after traversing the cargo, are detected by an array of NaI(Tl) detectors. A spectral analysis of the transmitted gammas allows to independently determine the areal density and the atomic number (Z) of the cargo. The proposed approach could revolutionize cargo inspection, which, in its current fielded form has to rely on simple but high dose bremsstrahlung sources. Use of monochromatic sources would significantly reduce the necessary dose and allow for better determination of the cargo's atomic number. The general methodology will be described and the preliminary results from the proof-of-concept system will be presented and discussed. Supported by NSF/DNDO Collaborative Research ARI-LA Award ECCS-1348328.

  10. Embossed radiography utilizing an image-shifting subtraction program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Osawa, Akihiro; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Manabu; Takahashi, Kiyomi; Sato, Shigehiro; Ogawa, Akira; Onagawa, Jun

    2010-07-01

    We developed an image-shifting subtraction program and carried out embossed radiography (ER) utilizing single- and dual-energy subtractions. In particular, dual-energy subtraction was carried out to decrease the absorption contrast of unnecessary regions. The contrast resolution of a target region was increased using the subtraction program and a linear-contrast system in a flat panel detector (FPD). The X-ray generator had a 100 μm-focus tube, and the subtractions were performed at tube voltages of 40 and 70 kV, a tube current of 0.50 mA, and an X-ray exposure time of 5.0 s. ER was achieved with cohesion imaging using the FPD with pixel sizes of 48×48 μm 2, and the shifting dimension of an object in the horizontal and vertical directions ranged from 48 to 96 μm. At a shifting distance of 96 μm, the spatial resolutions in the horizontal and vertical directions measured with a lead test chart were both 83 μm. In ER of animal phantoms, we obtained high-contrast embossed images of fine bones, gadolinium oxide particles in blood vessels, iodine-based microspheres in coronary arteries approximately 100 μm in diameter.

  11. Magnification Embossed Radiography Utilizing Image-Shifting Subtraction Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osawa, Akihiro; Watanabe, Manabu; Sato, Eiichi; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Nagao, Jiro; Abderyim, Purkhet; Aizawa, Katsuo; Tanaka, Etsuro; Mori, Hidezo; Kawai, Toshiaki; Ogawa, Akira; Takahashi, Kiyomi; Sato, Shigehiro; Onagawa, Jun

    2010-03-01

    We developed an image-shifting subtraction program and carried out magnification embossed radiography (MER) utilizing single- and dual-energy subtractions. In particular, dual-energy subtraction was carried out to decrease the absorption contrast of unnecessary regions. The contrast resolution of the target region was increased by the use of subtraction software and a linear-contrast system in a flat-panel detector (FPD). The X-ray generator had a 100-µm-focus tube, and the subtractions were performed at tube voltages of 40 and 70 kV, a tube current of 0.50 mA, and an X-ray exposure time of 5.0 s. MER images with threefold magnification were obtained using the FPD with a pixel size of 48×48 µm2, and the shifting dimensions of the imaged object in the horizontal and vertical directions ranged from 48 to 192 µm. At a shifting distance ranging from 48 to 144 µm, the spatial resolutions in the horizontal and vertical directions measured with a lead test chart were both 50 µm. In the MER of nonliving animals, we obtained high-contrast embossed images of fine bones, gadolinium oxide particles in blood vessels, and iodine-based microspheres in coronary arteries of approximately 100 µm diameter.

  12. Magnification Embossed Radiography Utilizing Image-Shifting Subtraction Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akihiro Osawa,; Manabu Watanabe,; Eiichi Sato,; Hiroshi Matsukiyo,; Toshiyuki Enomoto,; Jiro Nagao,; Purkhet Abderyim,; Katsuo Aizawa,; Etsuro Tanaka,; Hidezo Mori,; Toshiaki Kawai,; Akira Ogawa,; Kiyomi Takahashi,; Shigehiro Sato,; Jun Onagawa,

    2010-03-01

    We developed an image-shifting subtraction program and carried out magnification embossed radiography (MER) utilizing single- and dual-energy subtractions. In particular, dual-energy subtraction was carried out to decrease the absorption contrast of unnecessary regions. The contrast resolution of the target region was increased by the use of subtraction software and a linear-contrast system in a flat-panel detector (FPD). The X-ray generator had a 100-μm-focus tube, and the subtractions were performed at tube voltages of 40 and 70 kV, a tube current of 0.50 mA, and an X-ray exposure time of 5.0 s. MER images with threefold magnification were obtained using the FPD with a pixel size of 48× 48 μm2, and the shifting dimensions of the imaged object in the horizontal and vertical directions ranged from 48 to 192 μm. At a shifting distance ranging from 48 to 144 μm, the spatial resolutions in the horizontal and vertical directions measured with a lead test chart were both 50 μm. In the MER of nonliving animals, we obtained high-contrast embossed images of fine bones, gadolinium oxide particles in blood vessels, and iodine-based microspheres in coronary arteries of approximately 100 μm diameter.

  13. Modeling and measurement of root canal using stereo digital radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Analoui, Mostafa; Krisnamurthy, Satthya; Brown, Cecil

    2000-04-01

    Determining root canal length is a crucial step in success of root canal treatment. Root canal length is commonly estimated based on pre-operation intraoral radiography. 2D depiction of a 3D object is the primary source of error in this approach. Techniques based on impedance measurement are more accurate than radiographic approaches, but do not offer a method for depicting the shape of canal. In this study, we investigated a stererotactic approach for modeling and measurement of root canal of human dentition. A weakly perspective model approximated the projectional geometry. A series of computer-simulated objects was used to test accuracy of this model as the first step. The, to assess the clinical viability of such an approach, endodontic files inserted in the root canal phantoms were fixed on an adjustable platform between a radiographic cone and an image receptor. Parameters of projection matrix were computed based on the relative positions of image receptors, focal spot, and test objects. Rotating the specimen platform from 0 to 980 degrees at 5-degree intervals set relative angulations for stereo images. Root canal is defined as the intersection of two surfaces defined by each projection. Computation of error for length measurement indicates that for angulations greater than 40 degrees the error is within clinically acceptable ranges.

  14. Long line positioning in neonates: does computed radiography improve visibility?

    PubMed Central

    Evans, A; Natarajan, J; Davies, C

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the use of soft copy reporting of computed radiography (CR) images in determining intravenous long line tip position in neonates and compare visibility rates with hard copy printed images. Method: A retrospective study of all long lines inserted on the neonatal unit over a period of one year was performed. Forty five lines were inserted in 30 neonates over this time. Assessment of the CR images was made by three independent observers by reviewing the films on the viewing console and as hard copy printed films. Results: Accurate identification of the line tip could be made in 66.7% of cases (κ = 0.9) using hard copy images and 95.6% cases (κ = 1.0) using soft copy reporting (significant difference: p = 0.002). The difference in percentage visibility using the two techniques was 28.9% (95% confidence interval 10.2% to 36.7%). Conclusion: The use of soft copy review of CR image improves the visibility of the line tip position compared with hard copy films and reduces the need for repeat radiographs with/without intravenous contrast. PMID:14711855

  15. Patient exposure trends in medical and dental radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.W.; Goetz, W.A.

    1986-01-01

    Patient exposure to medical and dental x rays has long been of interest to the radiological health community. With the cooperation of state and local agencies and professional groups, the Center for Devices and Radiological Health has conducted three major surveys of patient exposure to x rays. The latest of these surveys, the Nationwide Evaluation of X-ray Trends (NEXT), collected x-ray exposure data for each year starting in 1972. Two earlier studies, the 1964 and 1970 X-ray Exposure Studies collected x-ray data during the years these surveys were conducted. Exposure trends presented are based on results of all three studies. Major improvements in beam limitation are seen for medical and dental radiography. Since 1964, when the first nationwide survey was conducted, dental exposures have decreased about 75%. Decreases of up to one-third occurred in exposures for medical examinations. The current exposure data presented continue to show a wide variation in medical exposures. Also presented are organ doses for four organs (ovaries, testes, thyroid and active bone marrow).

  16. Scale analysis using X-ray microfluorescence and computed radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candeias, J. P.; de Oliveira, D. F.; dos Anjos, M. J.; Lopes, R. T.

    2014-02-01

    Scale deposits are the most common and most troublesome damage problems in the oil field and can occur in both production and injection wells. They occur because the minerals in produced water exceed their saturation limit as temperatures and pressures change. Scale can vary in appearance from hard crystalline material to soft, friable material and the deposits can contain other minerals and impurities such as paraffin, salt and iron. In severe conditions, scale creates a significant restriction, or even a plug, in the production tubing. This study was conducted to qualify the elements present in scale samples and quantify the thickness of the scale layer using synchrotron radiation micro-X-ray fluorescence (SRμXRF) and computed radiography (CR) techniques. The SRμXRF results showed that the elements found in the scale samples were strontium, barium, calcium, chromium, sulfur and iron. The CR analysis showed that the thickness of the scale layer was identified and quantified with accuracy. These results can help in the decision making about removing the deposited scale.

  17. Linear inductive voltage adders (IVA) for advanced hydrodynamic radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Mazarakis, M.G.; Boyes, J.D.; Johnson, D.L.

    1998-09-01

    The electron beam which drifts through the multiple cavities of conventional induction linacs (LIA) is replaced in an IVA by a cylindrical metal conductor which extends along the entire length of the device and effectuates the addition of the accelerator cavity voltages. In the approach to radiography, the linear inductive voltage adder drives a magnetically immersed electron diode with a millimeter diameter cathode electrode and a planar anode/bremsstrahlung converter. Both anode and cathode electrodes are immersed in a strong (15--50 T) solenoidal magnetic field. The electron beam cross section is approximately of the same size as the cathode needle and generates a similar size, very intense x-ray beam when it strikes the anode converter. An IVA driven diode can produce electron beams of equal size and energy as a LIA but with much higher currents (40--50 kA versus 4--5 kA), simpler hardware and thus lower cost. The authors present here first experimental validations of the technology utilizing HERMES 3 and SABRE IVA accelerators. The electron beam voltage and current were respectively of the order of 10 MV and 40 kA. X-ray doses of up to 1 kR {at} 1 m and spot sizes as small as 1.7 mm (at 200 R doses) were measured.

  18. Micro-radiography of biological samples with medical contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dammer, J.; Weyda, F.; Benes, J.; Sopko, V.; Gelbic, I.

    2013-12-01

    Micro-radiography is an imaging technique that uses X-rays to study the internal structures of objects. This fast and easy imaging tool is based on differential X-ray attenuation by various tissues and structures within biological samples. The experimental setup described is based on the semiconductor pixel X-ray detector Medipix2 and X-ray micro-focus tube. Our micro-radiographic system has been recently used not only for the examination of internal structures of various arthropods and other biological objects but also for tracing some processes in selected model species (we used living larvae of mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus). Low concentrations of iodine, lanthanum or gold particles were used as a tracer (contrast agent). Such contrast agents increase the absorption of X-rays and allow a better visibility of internal structures of model organisms (especially the various cavities, pores, etc.). In addition, the movement of tracers in selected timing experiments demonstrates some physiological functions of digestive and excretory system.

  19. Current status of computed radiography in emergency departments.

    PubMed

    Huda, W; Smith, D A; Staab, E V

    1997-11-01

    This study reports the findings of a computed radiography (CR) imaging experience questionnaire sent to 35 emergency departments (ED) in North America. A total of 25 responses to the questionnaire were received corresponding to a return rate of 71%. The median daily workload was 71 patient examinations and the average number of films per patient examination for the 21 facilities was 3.0 +/- 0.8. A total of 91% of respondents printed to film all ED trauma images obtained with CR with only one ED claiming to be filmless. CR in the ED was easy to use and had significant benefits of reducing examination repeat rates, permitting a prompt availability of radiographic images, improving image quality, providing improved operational efficiency, and eliminating lost films. Major limitations of CR were deemed to be limited viewing stations, CR costs, and inefficient patient ID entry. Radiology departments were very happy with the introduction of CR into the ED setting with approximately half being highly satisfied and half somewhat satisfied. The degree of satisfaction by ED personnel was similar with about half being highly satisfied, 40% somewhat satisfied, and the remainder neutral. The fact that not a single respondent was in any way dissatisfied shows that CR can play a useful role in the ED setting.

  20. Image quality evaluation of a desktop computed radiography system.

    PubMed

    Fetterly, K A; Hangiandreou, N J

    2000-12-01

    The modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of the Lumisys ACR-2000 desktop computed radiography (CR) reader were measured and compared to equivalent measurements acquired from a Fuji AC-3 CR system. The one-dimensional (1D) MTF was measured from an image of a sharp edge and the 1D NPS was derived from a 2D NPS measured from a uniform field exposure. The energy dependent ideal input signal to noise ratio of the incident x-ray beams was estimated using published x-ray spectra and attenuation coefficients. Measurements were acquired using Agfa, Fuji, and Kodak storage phosphor plates and it was concluded that use of the Fuji plates resulted in the highest system DQE for the ACR-2000. The DQE was measured using exposures of 0.10, 1.0, and 10.0 mR from 70 and 120 kVp x-ray beams filtered with aluminum. The DQE of the Lumisys ACR-2000 was lower than that of the Fuji AC-3.

  1. Photon counting detector for the personal radiography inspection system "SIBSCAN"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babichev, E. A.; Baru, S. E.; Grigoriev, D. N.; Leonov, V. V.; Oleynikov, V. P.; Porosev, V. V.; Savinov, G. A.

    2017-02-01

    X-ray detectors operating in the energy integrating mode are successfully used in many different applications. Nevertheless the direct photon counting detectors, having the superior parameters in comparison with the integrating ones, are rarely used yet. One of the reasons for this is the low value of the electrical signal generated by a detected photon. Silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) based scintillation counters have a high detection efficiency, high electronic gain and compact dimensions. This makes them a very attractive candidate to replace routinely used detectors in many fields. More than 10 years ago the digital scanning radiography system based on multistrip ionization chamber (MIC) was suggested at Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics. The detector demonstrates excellent radiation resistance and parameter stability after 5 year operations and an imaging of up to 1000 persons per day. Currently, the installations operate at several Russian airports and at subway stations in some cities. At the present time we design a new detector operating in the photon counting mode, having superior parameters than the gas one, based on scintillator - SiPM assemblies. This detector has close to zero noise, higher quantum efficiency and a count rate capability of more than 5 MHz per channel (20% losses), which leads to better image quality and improved detection capability. The suggested detector technology could be expanded to medical applications.

  2. PARAMETERS IN PANORAMIC RADIOGRAPHY FOR DIFFERENTIATION OF RADIOLUCENT LESIONS

    PubMed Central

    Raitz, Ricardo; Assunção, José Narciso Rosa; Correa, Luciana; Fenyo-Pereira, Marlene

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The aims of this study were to establish parameters in panoramic radiography for interpretation of unilocular radiolucent lesions, and to compare the accuracy of diagnoses given by examiners before and after using these parameters. Material and Methods: In Part I, 12 specialists analyzed 24 images and the diagnostic criteria used by each examiner to make correct diagnoses were used to build a list of basic radiographic parameters for each pathology (ameloblastoma, keratocystic odontogenic tumor, dentigerous cyst, and idiopathic bone cavity). In Part II, this list was used by 6 undergraduate students (Un), 8 recently graduated dentists (D), 3 oral pathologists, 3 stomatologists, 3 oral radiologists, and 3 oral surgeons to diagnose the corresponding pathologies in the other set of 24 panoramic radiographs (T2). The same analysis occurred without using this list (T1). The method of generalized estimating equations (GEE) was used in order to estimate the probability of making a correct diagnosis depending on the specialty of the examiner, type of lesion, and moment of the evaluation, T1 or T2 (before or after they had access to the list of parameters, respectively). Results: Higher values were obtained for the probability (GEE) of making a correct diagnosis on T2; the group Un presented the highest improvement (14.6 %); no differences between the probabilities were observed either between Un and D, or among the different groups of specialists. Conclusions: The use of panoramic radiographic parameters did allow improving the diagnostic accuracy for all groups of examiners. PMID:19936512

  3. Performance characterization of computed radiography based mammography systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Abhinav; Desai, Nikunj; Valentino, Daniel J.

    2010-04-01

    Computed Radiography (CR) is a cost-effective technology for digital mammography. In order to optimize the quality of images obtained using CR Mammography, we characterized the effect on image quality of the electrooptical components of the CR imaging chain. The metrics used to assess the image quality included the Contrast to Noise Ratio (CNR), Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), Noise Power Spectrum (NPS), Detective Quantum Efficiency (DQE) and Contrast Detail Response Phantom (CDMAM 3.4 Artinis Medical Systems). An 18×24 cm high-resolution granular phosphor imaging plate (AGFA MM3.0) was used to acquire the images. Contrast detail was measured using a GUI developed for the CDMAM phantom that was scored by independent observers. The range of theoretically acceptable values measured for the CR laser was (5-36) mW and voltage range for PMT's was (4-8) V. The light detection amplifier was investigated, and the optimal Laser Power and PMT gain used for scanning was measured. The tools that we used (CNR, MTF, NPS, DQE and Contrast-detail phantom) provided an effective means of selecting optimal values for the electro-optical components of the system. The procedure enabled us to obtain good quality CR mammograms that have less noise and improved contrast.

  4. Femoral neck radiography: effect of flexion on visualization.

    PubMed

    Garry, Steven C; Jhangri, Gian S; Lambert, Robert G W

    2005-06-01

    To determine whether flexion improves radiographic visualization of the femoral neck when the femur is externally rotated. Five human femora, with varying neck-shaft and anteversion angles, were measured and immobilized. Degree of flexion required to bring the femoral neck horizontal was measured, varying the rotation. Next, one bone was radiographed in 16 positions, varying rotation in 15 degrees and flexion in 10 degrees increments. Radiographs were presented in randomized blinded fashion to 15 staff radiologists for scoring of femoral neck visualization. Following this, all 5 bones were radiographed in 4 positions of rotation and at 0 degree and 20 degrees flexion, and blinded randomized review of radiographs was repeated. Comparisons between angles and rotations were made using the Mann-Whitney test. The flexion angle required to bring the long axis of the femoral neck horizontal correlated directly with the degree of external rotation (p < 0.05). Visualization of the femoral neck in the extended position progressively deteriorated from 15 degrees internal rotation to 30 degrees external rotation (p < 0.01). However, when 20 degrees flexion was applied to bones in external rotation, visualization significantly improved at 15 degrees (p < 0.05) and 30 degrees (p < 0.01). Flexion of the externally rotated femur can bring the femoral neck into horizontal alignment, and a relatively small amount (20 degrees) of flexion can significantly improve radiographic visualization. This manoeuvre could be useful for radiography of the femoral neck when initial radiographs are inadequate because of external rotation of the leg.

  5. Abdominal radiography is not necessary in children with intussusception.

    PubMed

    Tareen, Farhan; Mc Laughlin, Danielle; Cianci, Fiona; Hoare, Siobhan M; Sweeney, Brian; Mortell, Alan; Puri, Prem

    2016-01-01

    Children with intussusception require rapid and accurate diagnosis to enable timely intervention for satisfactory outcome. Ultrasonography is the recommended standard diagnostic modality; however, abdominal radiography (AR) is still used as an initial investigation. The aim of this study was to investigate the benefit of AR in intussusception by determining diagnostic accuracy and analysing correlation of AR findings with outcome. Index cases of intussusception presenting over 15 years (1998-2013) were analysed. Those who had AR performed were allocated into groups with positive or normal findings. Outcome of pneumatic reduction of intussusception (PRI) between these groups was compared. Six hundred and forty-four cases of intussusception treated with PRI were identified, 412 (64 %) had AR performed and 232 (36 %) did not. 303 (74 %) radiographs had positive findings and 109 (26 %) were normal. The success rate of PRI did not differ between AR positive (82 %) and AR normal (84 %). Occult pneumoperitoneum was not detected in any patient by AR in our cohort. AR is not recommended for the diagnosis of intussusception in children, for the prediction of the outcome of PRI or for the detection of occult pneumoperitoneum. AR should always be performed when clinical peritonism is present but is not otherwise necessary in children with suspected or confirmed intussusception.

  6. Quantitative shadowgraphy and proton radiography for large intensity modulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasim, Muhammad Firmansyah; Ceurvorst, Luke; Ratan, Naren; Sadler, James; Chen, Nicholas; Sävert, Alexander; Trines, Raoul; Bingham, Robert; Burrows, Philip N.; Kaluza, Malte C.; Norreys, Peter

    2017-02-01

    Shadowgraphy is a technique widely used to diagnose objects or systems in various fields in physics and engineering. In shadowgraphy, an optical beam is deflected by the object and then the intensity modulation is captured on a screen placed some distance away. However, retrieving quantitative information from the shadowgrams themselves is a challenging task because of the nonlinear nature of the process. Here, we present a method to retrieve quantitative information from shadowgrams, based on computational geometry. This process can also be applied to proton radiography for electric and magnetic field diagnosis in high-energy-density plasmas and has been benchmarked using a toroidal magnetic field as the object, among others. It is shown that the method can accurately retrieve quantitative parameters with error bars less than 10%, even when caustics are present. The method is also shown to be robust enough to process real experimental results with simple pre- and postprocessing techniques. This adds a powerful tool for research in various fields in engineering and physics for both techniques.

  7. Digital Radiography and Computed Tomography (DRCT) Product Improvement Plan (PIP)

    SciTech Connect

    Tim Roney; Bob Pink; Karen Wendt; Robert Seifert; Mike Smith

    2010-12-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been developing and deploying x-ray inspection systems for chemical weapons containers for the past 12 years under the direction of the Project Manager for Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel (PMNSCM). In FY-10 funding was provided to advance the capabilities of these systems through the DRCT (Digital Radiography and Computed Tomography) Product Improvement Plan (PIP), funded by the PMNSCM. The DRCT PIP identified three research tasks; end user study, detector evaluation and DRCT/PINS integration. Work commenced in February, 2010. Due to the late start and the schedule for field inspection of munitions at various sites, it was not possible to spend sufficient field time with operators to develop a complete end user study. We were able to interact with several operators, principally Mr. Mike Rowan who provided substantial useful input through several discussions and development of a set of field notes from the Pueblo, CO field mission. We will be pursuing ongoing interactions with field personnel as opportunities arise in FY-11.

  8. Quantitative shadowgraphy and proton radiography for large intensity modulations.

    PubMed

    Kasim, Muhammad Firmansyah; Ceurvorst, Luke; Ratan, Naren; Sadler, James; Chen, Nicholas; Sävert, Alexander; Trines, Raoul; Bingham, Robert; Burrows, Philip N; Kaluza, Malte C; Norreys, Peter

    2017-02-01

    Shadowgraphy is a technique widely used to diagnose objects or systems in various fields in physics and engineering. In shadowgraphy, an optical beam is deflected by the object and then the intensity modulation is captured on a screen placed some distance away. However, retrieving quantitative information from the shadowgrams themselves is a challenging task because of the nonlinear nature of the process. Here, we present a method to retrieve quantitative information from shadowgrams, based on computational geometry. This process can also be applied to proton radiography for electric and magnetic field diagnosis in high-energy-density plasmas and has been benchmarked using a toroidal magnetic field as the object, among others. It is shown that the method can accurately retrieve quantitative parameters with error bars less than 10%, even when caustics are present. The method is also shown to be robust enough to process real experimental results with simple pre- and postprocessing techniques. This adds a powerful tool for research in various fields in engineering and physics for both techniques.

  9. Optimization of the radiological protection of patients undergoing digital radiography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Menglong; Chu, Cunkun

    2012-02-01

    Because of a much higher dynamic range of flat panel detectors, patient dose can vary without change of image quality being perceived by radiologists. This condition makes optimization (OT) of radiation protection undergoing digital radiography (DR) more complex, while a chance to reduced patient dose also exists. In this study, we evaluated the difference of patient radiation and image rejection before and after OT to identify if it is necessary to carry out an OT procedure in a routine task with DR. The study consisted of a measurement of the dose area product (DAP) and entrance surface dose (ESD) received by a reference group of patients for eight common radiographic procedures using the DR system before and after OT. Meanwhile image rejection data during two 2-month periods were collected and sorted according to reason. For every radiographic procedure, t tests showed significant difference in average ESD and DAP before and after OT (p < 0.005). The ESDs from most examinations before OT were three times higher than that after OT. For DAPs, the difference is more significant. Image rejection rate after OT is significantly lower than that before OT (χ (2) = 36.5, p < 0.005). The substantial reductions of dose after OT resulted from appropriate mAs and exposure field. For DR patient dose, less than recommended diagnostic reference level can meet quality criteria and clinic diagnosis.

  10. Evaluation of entrance surface air kerma in pediatric chest radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porto, L.; Lunelli, N.; Paschuk, S.; Oliveira, A.; Ferreira, J. L.; Schelin, H.; Miguel, C.; Denyak, V.; Kmiecik, C.; Tilly, J.; Khoury, H.

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the entrance surface air kerma in pediatric chest radiography. An evaluation of 301 radiographical examinations in anterior-posterior (AP) and posterior-anterior (PA) (166 examinations) and lateral (LAT) (135 examinations) projections was performed. The analyses were performed on patients grouped by age; the groups included ages 0-1 y, 1-5 y, 5-10 y, and 10-15 y. The entrance surface air kerma was determined with DoseCal software (Radiological Protection Center of Saint George's Hospital, London) and thermoluminescent dosimeters. Two different exposure techniques were compared. The doses received by patients who had undergone LAT examinations were 40% higher, on average, those in AP/PA examinations because of the difference in tube voltage. A large high-dose “tail” was observed for children up to 5 y old. An increase in tube potential and corresponding decrease in current lead to a significant dose reduction. The difference between the average dose values for different age ranges was not practically observed, implying that the exposure techniques are still not optimal. Exposure doses received using the higher tube voltage and lower current-time product correspond to the international diagnostic reference levels.

  11. A conceptual optimisation strategy for radiography in a digital environment.

    PubMed

    Båth, Magnus; Håkansson, Markus; Hansson, Jonny; Månsson, Lars Gunnar

    2005-01-01

    Using a completely digital environment for the entire imaging process leads to new possibilities for optimisation of radiography since many restrictions of screen/film systems, such as the small dynamic range and the lack of possibilities for image processing, do not apply any longer. However, at the same time these new possibilities lead to a more complicated optimisation process, since more freedom is given to alter parameters. This paper focuses on describing an optimisation strategy that concentrates on taking advantage of the conceptual differences between digital systems and screen/film systems. The strategy can be summarised as: (a) always include the anatomical background during the optimisation, (b) perform all comparisons at a constant effective dose and (c) separate the image display stage from the image collection stage. A three-step process is proposed where the optimal setting of the technique parameters is determined at first, followed by an optimisation of the image processing. In the final step the optimal dose level-given the optimal settings of the image collection and image display stages-is determined.

  12. Reduction of absorbed doses in radiography of the facial skeleton

    SciTech Connect

    Julin, P.; Kraepelien, T.

    1984-11-01

    Radiation absorbed doses from radiography of the paranasal sinuses and the facial skeleton were measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) on a phantom head using high-sensitivity screens in an Orbix stand. The entrance doses to the skin of the head ranged from 0.31 to 2.9 mGy per exposure. The absorbed dose from a full series of sinus exposures averaged 0.33 mGy for the oral mucous membrane, 0.33 mGy for the maxillary sinus mucous membrane, 0.11 mGy for the parotid gland, 0.15 mGy for the submandibular gland, 0.61 mGy for the eye lens, and 0.75 mGy for the thyroid gland region. A leaded soft collar adapted to the thyroid region reduced the thyroid doses by more than one order of magnitude, but also reduced the image field. The mean energy imparted from a full series of paranasal sinus projections was 4.8 mJ and from a total series of the facial skeleton, 7.9 mJ.

  13. Micro-pattern gas detectors for digital radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altunbas, Mustafa Cem

    The gas proportional counter technology has seen vast changes in the last decade and has lead to the introduction of micro-pattern gas detectors that offer much more improved x-ray counting rate capability and better position resolution than traditional wire chambers. In this study, we investigated the Gas Electron Multiplier, a member of micro-pattern gas detector generation, as an energy sensitive, single photon-counting x-ray detector for digital radiography. We built a high pressure detector with two cascaded Gas Electron Multipliers to evaluate its performance characteristics in Neon, Argon, Krypton and Xenon mixtures. The determination of detector gain as a function of pressure and the filling gas formed the major part of this evaluation. In the second part of the study, we employed position sensitive electronics to demonstrate the imaging capability of the detector. For the first time, we acquired 2D images and examined the spatial resolution of the detector for Krypton and Xenon mixtures as a function of gas pressure using double and quadruple GEM configurations up to 7 atmospheres gas pressure. Besides the experimental studies, we constructed a theoretical model based on the Cascaded Linear Systems approach to study the imaging performance of single photon counting gas detectors. In the model, we gave the emphasis to the intrinsic properties of the gas absorber; therefore we considered the contribution of quantum efficiency, primary electron range and reabsorption of K fluorescence photons on detector MTF and DQE.

  14. Portable 1,5 MeV X-Band Linac For Non-destructive Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saversky, A. J.; Rodionov, A. E.; Shaltyrev, A. P.; Shchedrin, I. S.

    1997-05-01

    Portable linear electron accelerator Y-34 developed in Small Accelerator Laboratory of MEPhI for non-destructive industrial radiography. This Linac is a fully self-contained device with the exception of external electric power 220Vx50Gz, 1 phase, 5 kVA. Full mass of Linac Y-34 - less than 300 kg. The Radiographic parameters: Nominal Energy - 1,5 MeV; Energy Range - 0,7...1,8 MeV; Maximum pulse current - 100 mA; Maximum Intensity - 15 R/min@m; Focal spot size - less than 2 mm. The Linac is comprised of 4 subassemblies. The X-ray head with weight less than 100 kg, dimensions: 0,7x0,7x1,0 m contains the traveling-wave accelerating structure with lens 0,4 m, electron gun, vacuum pump, tungsten target and RF-system with 500-kW magnetron. The permanent magnets focusing system provides focal spot less than 2 mm. The high voltage power unit consist of a line-type magnetron/electron gun modulator 2 kW power supply, the weight is equal 70 kg. The self-contained cooling water supply provides temperature controlled water for accelerator structure and magnetron. The control console allows convenient monitoring of critical system and Linac parameters by manual or remote computer. Portable X-band Linac Y-34 is the effective X - ray and/or electron beam source for such applications as non-destructive examination of nuclear reactor systems, solid rocket motors, technology research.

  15. The new neutron radiography/tomography/imaging station DINGO at OPAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbe, U.; Randall, T.; Hughes, C.

    2011-09-01

    A new neutron imaging instrument will be built to support the area of neutron imaging research (neutron radiography/tomography) at ANSTO. The instrument will be designed for an international user community and for routine quality control for defence, industrial, mining, space and aircraft applications. It will also be a useful tool for assessing oil and water flow in sedimentary rock reservoirs (like the North West Shelf), assessing water damage in aircraft components, and the study of hydrogen distribution and cracking in steel. The instrument is planned to be completed by the end of June 2013 and is currently in the design stage. The usable neutron flux is mainly determined by the neutron source, but it also depends on the instrument position and the resolution. The designated instrument position for DINGO is the beam port HB-2 in the reactor hall. The estimated flux for an L/ D of approximately 250 at HB-2 is calculated by Mcstas simulation in a range of 4.75×10 7 n/cm 2 s, which is in the same range of other facilities like ANSTARES (FRM II; Schillinger et al., 2004 [1]) or BT2 (NIST; Hussey et al., 2005 [2]). A special feature of DINGO is the in-pile collimator place in front of the main shutter at HB-2. The collimator offers two pinholes with a possible L/ D of 250 and 1000. A secondary collimator will separate the two beams and block one. The whole instrument will operate in two different positions, one for high resolution and the other for high speed.

  16. Reliability of overcoverage parameters with varying morphologic pincer features: comparison of EOS® and radiography.

    PubMed

    Monazzam, Shafagh; Agashe, Mandar; Hosalkar, Harish S

    2013-08-01

    Multiple radiographic parameters used for diagnosis and quantification of morphologic pincer features have emerged, but the degree to which pelvic tilt or rotation affects conventional radiography and EOS(®) is unknown. We asked: (1) What is the reliability of EOS(®) and conventional radiography at increasing sizes of morphologic pincer features with varying degrees of tilt and rotation? (2) What is the effect of tilt and rotation on acetabular overcoverage measurements? Using a dry cadaveric pelvis, AP conventional radiographs and EOS(®) images were taken at intervals of increasing modeled pincer size with 0° to 15° varying tilt and rotation. Lateral center-edge angle, Sharp angle, Tönnis angle, crossover sign, and retroversion index were measured on all images. Statistical analysis was conducted. The intermodality intraclass correlation coefficients for conventional radiography and EOS(®) radiography across all pincer sizes, rotations, and tilts were excellent (0.93-0.98). Crossover sign was in perfect agreement in conventional radiography and EOS(®). Rotation of the hip away from the beam source and/or increased anterior tilt falsely increased all overcoverage parameters except for Tönnis angle. Rotation away from the beam of 10° or greater or anterior tilt of 5° or greater produced a false-positive crossover sign. EOS(®) radiography maintained excellent reliability in comparison to conventional radiography but both were equally vulnerable to the effects of tilt and rotation for quantification of hip parameters used in acetabular overcoverage assessment. A standardized pelvic radiograph ensuring that the pelvis is not excessively tilted or rotated should be used for assessing acetabular overcoverage parameters.

  17. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2004-01-01

    Part of the 2003 industrial minerals review. Supply and demand data for industrial diamond are provided. Topics discussed are consumption, prices, imports and exports, government stockpiles, and the outlook for 2004.

  18. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2012-01-01

    Estimated 2011 world production of natural and synthetic industrial diamond was about 4.45 billion carats. During 2011, natural industrial diamonds were produced in more than 20 countries, and synthetic industrial diamond was produced in at least 13 countries. About 98 percent of the combined natural and synthetic global output was produced in China, Ireland, Japan, Russia, South Africa and the United States. China is the world's leading producer of synthetic industrial diamond followed by Russia and the United States.

  19. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2011-01-01

    Estimated world production of natural and synthetic industrial diamond was about 4.44 billion carats in 2010. Natural industrial diamond deposits have been found in more than 35 countries, and synthetic industrial diamond is produced in at least 15 countries.

  20. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, estimated world production of natural and synthetic industrial diamond was 630 million carats. Natural industrial diamond deposits were found in more than 35 countries. Synthetic industrial diamond is produced in at least 15 countries. More than 81% of the combined natural and synthetic global output was produced in Ireland, Japan, Russia, South Africa and the United States.