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Sample records for radiography thoracic

  1. Thoracic radiography in the cat: Identification of cardiomegaly and congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Guglielmini, Carlo; Diana, Alessia

    2015-12-01

    Thoracic radiography is one of the most commonly employed diagnostic tools for the clinical evaluation of cats with suspected heart disease and is the standard diagnostic method in the confirmation of cardiogenic pulmonary edema. In the past, interpretation of feline radiographs focused on a description of the qualitative radiographic features of feline heart disease or the measurement of the cardiac silhouette in healthy cats and cats with different cardiovascular disorders. More recently, studies have begun to critically address the issue of the diagnostic accuracy of thoracic radiography in the diagnostic work-up of cats with heart disease. In these studies, qualitative and quantitative radiographic parameters were compared to echocardiographic findings to evaluate the usefulness of thoracic radiography for the identification of cardiac enlargement and pulmonary edema in the cat. Thoracic radiography is reasonably specific but has a low sensitivity when identifying cardiomegaly in cats with mild structural heart disease. Feline cardiogenic pulmonary edema has a variable radiographic presentation and several specific radiographic findings (i.e., enlargement of the left atrium and the pulmonary veins) can be absent or non-recognizable in affected cats.

  2. Utilization effect of integrating a chest radiography room into a thoracic surgery ward.

    PubMed

    Maehara, Cleo K; Jacobson, Francine; Andriole, Katherine P; Khorasani, Ramin

    2012-06-01

    Bedside chest radiography (CXR) represents a substantial fraction of the volume of medical imaging for inpatient health care facilities. However, its image quality is limited compared with posterior-anterior/lateral (PA/LAT) acquisitions taken in radiographic rooms. The aim of this study was to evaluate the utilization of bedside CXR and other chest imaging modalities before and after placing a radiography room within a thoracic surgical inpatient ward. All patient admissions (n = 3,852) to the thoracic surgical units between April 1, 2007, and December 31, 2010, were retrospectively identified. All chest imaging tests performed for these patients, including CT scans, MRI, ultrasound, and bedside and PA/LAT radiography, were counted. The primary outcome measure was chest imaging utilization, defined as the number of chest examinations per admission, before and after the establishment of the digital radiography room on January 10, 2010. Statistical analysis was performed using an independent-samples t test to evaluate changes in chest imaging utilization. A 2.61-fold increase in the number of PA/LAT CXR studies per admission (P < .01) and a 1.96-fold decrease in the number of bedside CXR studies per admission (P < .01) were observed after radiography room implementation. The number of chest CT, MRI, and ultrasound studies per admission did not change significantly. Establishing a radiography room physically within thoracic surgery units or in close proximity can significantly shift CXR utilization from bedside to PA/LAT acquisitions, which may enable opportunities for improvement in efficiency, quality, and safety in patient care. Copyright © 2012 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Thoracic limb morphology of the red panda (Ailurus fulgens) evidenced by osteology and radiography.

    PubMed

    Makungu, Modesta; Groenewald, Hermanus B; du Plessis, Wencke M; Barrows, Michelle; Koeppel, Katja N

    2015-07-15

    The red panda (Ailurus fulgens) is distributed primarily in the Himalayas and southern China. It is classified as a vulnerable species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. The aim of this study was to describe the normal osteology and radiographic anatomy of the thoracic limb of the red panda. Radiography of the right thoracic limb was performed in seven captive adult red pandas. Radiographic findings were correlated with bone specimens from three adult animals. The scapula was wide craniocaudally and presented with a large area for the origin of the teres major muscle. The square-shaped major tubercle did not extend proximal to the head of the humerus. The medial epicondyle was prominent. A supracondylar foramen was present. The radial tuberosity and sesamoid bone for the abductor digiti I longus were prominent. The accessory carpal bone was directed palmarolaterally. Metacarpal bones were widely spread. The thoracic limb morphology of the red panda evidenced by osteology and radiography indicated flexibility of the thoracic limb joints and well-developed flexor and supinator muscles, which are important in arboreal quadrupedal locomotion. Knowledge gained during this study may prove useful in identifying skeletal material or remains and diagnosing musculoskeletal diseases and injuries of the thoracic limb.

  4. Comparison of three-view thoracic radiography and computed tomography for detection of pulmonary nodules in dogs with neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Armbrust, Laura J; Biller, David S; Bamford, Aubrey; Chun, Ruthanne; Garrett, Laura D; Sanderson, Michael W

    2012-05-01

    To compare the detection of pulmonary nodules by use of 3-view thoracic radiography and CT in dogs with confirmed neoplasia. Prospective case series. 33 dogs of various breeds. 3 interpreters independently evaluated 3-view thoracic radiography images. The location and size of pulmonary nodules were recorded. Computed tomographic scans of the thorax were obtained and evaluated by a single interpreter. The location, size, margin, internal architecture, and density of pulmonary nodules were recorded. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were calculated for thoracic radiography (with CT as the gold standard). 21 of 33 (64%) dogs had pulmonary nodules or masses detected on CT. Of the dogs that had positive CT findings, 17 of 21 (81%) had pulmonary nodules or masses detected on radiographs by at least 1 interpreter. Sensitivity of radiography ranged from 71% to 95%, and specificity ranged from 67% to 92%. Radiography had a positive predictive value of 83% to 94% and a negative predictive value of 65% to 89%. The 4 dogs that were negative for nodules on thoracic radiography but positive on CT were all large-breed to giant-breed dogs with osteosarcoma. CT was more sensitive than radiography for detection of pulmonary nodules. This was particularly evident in large-breed to giant-breed dogs. Thoracic CT is recommended in large-breed to giant-breed dogs with osteosarcoma if the detection of pulmonary nodules will change treatment.

  5. Comparison of Thoracic Radiography and Computed Tomography in Calves with Naturally Occurring Respiratory Disease.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Jennifer; Stieger-Vanegas, Susanne M; Vanegas, Jorge A; Bobe, Gerd; Poulsen, Keith P

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the severity and extent of lung disease using thoracic computed radiography (CR) compared to contrast-enhanced multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) of the thorax in calves with naturally occurring respiratory disease and to evaluate the feasibility and safety of performing contrast-enhanced thoracic multi-detector MDCT examinations in sedated calves. Furthermore, to evaluate if combining CR or MDCT with respiratory scoring factors will improve prediction of the chronicity of pulmonary disease in calves. Thirty Jersey heifer calves ranging in age between 25 and 89 days with naturally occurring respiratory disease. All calves were evaluated via thoracic CR and contrast-enhanced MDCT. All calves were euthanized immediately following thoracic MDCT and submitted for necropsy. Imaging and histopathology results were compared with each other. Thoracic MDCT was superior for evaluation of pneumonia in calves due to the lack of summation in all areas of the lungs. Intravenously administered sedation provided an adequate plane of sedation for acquiring MDCT images of diagnostic quality, without the need for re-scanning. A diagnosis of pneumonia was made with equal rate on both thoracic CR and MDCT. Although mild differences in classification of lung pattern and extent of lung disease were seen when comparing an experienced and a less experienced evaluator, the overall differences were not statistically significant. The best intra- and inter-observer agreement was noted when evaluating the cranioventral aspects of the lungs in either modality. Clinical respiratory scoring is inadequate for diagnosing chronicity of pneumonia in calves with naturally occurring pneumonia. Both imaging modalities allowed diagnosis of pneumonia in calves. The cranial ventral aspects of the lungs were most commonly affected. Thoracic CR and MDCT provided similar diagnostic effectiveness in diagnosing pneumonia. However, MDCT provided better assessment of subtle details, which may

  6. Validation of thoracic injury rule out criteria as a decision instrument for screening of chest radiography in blunt thoracic trauma.

    PubMed

    Safari, Saeed; Yousefifard, Mahmoud; Baikpour, Masoud; Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa; Abiri, Samaneh; Falaki, Masoomeh; Mohammadi, Neda; Ghelichkhani, Parisa; Jafari, Ali Moghadas; Hosseini, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic injury rule out criteria (TIRC) were first introduced as a decision instrument for selective chest radiography in blunt thoracic trauma in 2014. However, the validity of this model has not been assessed in other studies. In this regard, the present survey evaluates the validity of TIRC model in a multi-center setting. In this cross-sectional study, clinical presentations and chest radiograms of multiple trauma patients referring to 6 educational hospitals in Iran were evaluated. Data were gathered prospectively during 2015. In each center, data collection and interpretation of radiograms were conducted by two different emergency medicine specialists. Measures were then taken for assessment of discriminatory power and calibration of the model. Data from 2905 patients were gathered (73.17% were male; the mean age was 33.53 ± 15.42 years). Area under the receiver operating characteristics curve of the TIRC model for detection of thoracic traumatic injuries was 0.93 (95%CI: 0.93-0.94). Sensitivity and specificity of the model were 100 (98.91-100) and 67.65 (65.76-69.45), respectively. The intercept of TIRC calibration plot was 0.08 (95%CI: 0.07-0.09), and its slope was 1.19 (95%CI: 1.15-1.24), which are indicative of the model being perfect in detecting presence or absence of lesions in chest radiograms. The findings are corroborative of external validation, good discrimination, and proper calibration of TIRC model in screening of multiple trauma patients for obtaining chest radiograms.

  7. COMPARISON OF THORACIC ULTRASONOGRAPHY AND RADIOGRAPHY FOR THE DETECTION OF INDUCED SMALL VOLUME PNEUMOTHORAX IN THE HORSE.

    PubMed

    Partlow, Jessica; David, Florent; Hunt, Luanne Michelle; Relave, Fabien; Blond, Laurent; Pinilla, Manuel; Lavoie, Jean-Pierre

    2017-05-01

    Small volume pneumothorax can be challenging to diagnose in horses. The current standard method for diagnosis is standing thoracic radiography. We hypothesized that thoracic ultrasonography would be more sensitive. Objectives of this prospective, experimental study were to describe a thoracic ultrasound method for detection of small volume pneumothorax in horses and to compare results of radiography and ultrasound in a sample of horses with induced small volume pneumothorax. Six mature healthy horses were recruited for this study. For each horse, five 50 ml air boluses were sequentially introduced via a teat cannula into the pleural space. Lateral thoracic radiographs and standardized ultrasound (2D and M-mode) examinations of both hemithoraces were performed following administration of each 50 ml air bolus. Radiographs and ultrasound images/videos were analyzed for detection of pneumothorax by four independent investigators who were unaware of treatment status. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values, negative predictive values, and agreement among investigators (Kappa test, κ) were calculated for radiography, 2D and M-mode ultrasound. Comparisons were made using a chi-squared exact test with significance set at P < 0.05. Two-dimensional (84%) and M-mode (80%) ultrasound were more sensitive than radiography (48%) for pneumothorax detection (P = 0.02 and P = 0.04, respectively). Specificity and positive predictive values were similar for all three imaging modalities (P = 1). Agreement between investigators for pneumothorax detection was excellent for 2D ultrasound (κ = 1), very good for M-mode ultrasound (κ = 0.87), and good for radiography (κ = 0.79). Findings from this experimental study supported the use of thoracic ultrasonography as a diagnostic method for detecting pneumothorax in horses. © 2017 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  8. Radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, C. G.

    1973-01-01

    Radiography is discussed as a method for nondestructive evaluation of internal flaws of solids. Gamma ray and X-ray equipment are described along with radiographic film, radiograph interpretation, and neutron radiography.

  9. Thoracic limb morphology of the red panda (Ailurus fulgens) evidenced by osteology and radiography.

    PubMed

    Makungu, Modesta; Groenewald, Hermanus B; Du Plessis, Wencke M; Barrows, Michelle; Koeppel, Katja N

    2015-07-15

    The red panda (Ailurus fulgens) is distributed primarily in the Himalayas and southern China. It is classified as a vulnerable species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. The aim of this study was to describe the normal osteology and radiographic anatomy of the thoracic limb of the red panda. Radiography of the right thoracic limb was performed in seven captive adult red pandas. Radiographic findings were correlated with bone specimens from three adult animals. The scapula was wide craniocaudally and presented with a large area for the origin of the teres major muscle. The square-shaped major tubercle did not extend proximal to the head of the humerus. The medial epicondyle was prominent. A supracondylar foramen was present. The radial tuberosity and sesamoid bone for the abductor digiti I longus were prominent. The accessory carpal bone was directed palmarolaterally. Metacarpal bones were widely spread. The thoracic limb morphology of the red panda evidenced by osteology and radiography indicated flexibility of the thoracic limb joints and well-developed flexor and supinator muscles, which are important in arboreal quadrupedal locomotion. Knowledge gained during this study may prove useful in identifying skeletal material or remains and diagnosing musculoskeletal diseases and injuries of the thoracic limb.

  10. Thoracic Limb Morphology of the Ring-tailed Lemur (Lemur catta) Evidenced by Gross Osteology and Radiography.

    PubMed

    Makungu, M; Groenewald, H B; du Plessis, W M; Barrows, M; Koeppel, K N

    2015-08-01

    There is limited information available on the morphology of the thoracic limb of the ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta). This study describes the morphology of the thoracic limb of captive ring-tailed lemurs evidenced by gross osteology and radiography as a guide for clinical use. Radiographic findings of 12 captive ring-tailed lemurs are correlated with bone specimens of three adult animals. The clavicle is well developed. The scapula has a large area for the origin of the m. teres major. The coracoid and hamate processes are well developed. The lateral supracondylar crest and medial epicondyle are prominent. The metacarpal bones are widely spread, and the radial tuberosity is prominent. These features indicate the presence of strong flexor muscles and flexibility of thoracic limb joints, which are important in arboreal quadrupedal locomotion. Furthermore, an ovoid ossicle is always seen at the inter-phalangeal joint of the first digit. Areas of increased soft tissue opacity are superimposed over the proximal half of the humerus and distal half of the antebrachium in male animals as a result of the scent gland. Knowledge of the morphology of the thoracic limb of individual species is important for accurate interpretation and diagnosis of musculoskeletal diseases.

  11. Comparison of Ultrasonography and Radiography in Detection of Thoracic Bone Fractures; a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yousefifard, Mahmoud; Baikpour, Masoud; Ghelichkhani, Parisa; Asady, Hadi; Darafarin, Abolfazl; Amini Esfahani, Mohammad Reza; Hosseini, Mostafa; Yaseri, Mehdi; Safari, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The potential benefit of ultrasonography for detection of thoracic bone fractures has been proven in various surveys but no comprehensive conclusion has been drawn yet; therefore, the present study aimed to conduct a thorough meta-analytic systematic review on this subject. Methods: Two reviewers independently carried out a comprehensive systematic search in Medline, EMBASE, ISI Web of Knowledge, Scopus, Cochrane Library, and ProQuest databases. Data were summarized as true positive, false positive, true negative and false negative and were analyzed via STATA 11.0 software using a mixed-effects binary regression model. Sources of heterogeneity were further assessed through subgroup analysis. Results: Data on 1667 patients (807 subjects with and 860 cases without thoracic fractures), whose age ranged from 0 to 92 years, were extracted from 17 surveys. Pooled sensitivity and specificity of ultrasonography in detection of thoracic bone fractures were 0.97 (95% CI: 0.90-0.99; I2= 88.88, p<0.001) and 0.94 (95% CI: 0.86-0.97; I2= 71.97, p<0.001), respectively. The same measures for chest radiography were found to be 0.77 (95% CI: 0.56-0.90; I2= 97.76, p<0.001) and 1.0 (95% CI: 0.91-1.00; I2= 97.24, p<0.001), respectively. The sensitivity of ultrasonography was higher in detection of rib fractures, compared to fractures of sternum or clavicle (97% vs. 91%). Moreover, the sensitivity was found to be higher when the procedure was carried out by a radiologist in comparison to an emergency medicine specialist (96% vs. 90%). Conclusion: Base on the findings of the present meta-analysis, screening performance characteristic of ultrasonography in detection of thoracic bone fractures was found to be higher than radiography. However, these characteristics were more prominent in detection of rib fractures and in cases where was performed by a radiologist. PMID:27274514

  12. Thoracic limb alignment in healthy labrador retrievers: evaluation of standing versus recumbent frontal plane radiography.

    PubMed

    Goodrich, Zachary J; Norby, Bo; Eichelberger, Bunita M; Friedeck, Wade O; Callis, Hollye N; Hulse, Don A; Kerwin, Sharon C; Fox, Derek B; Saunders, W Brian

    2014-10-01

    To report thoracic limb alignment values in healthy dogs; to determine if limb alignment values are significantly different when obtained from standing versus recumbent radiographic projections. Prospective cross-sectional study. Labrador Retrievers (n = 45) >15 months of age. Standing and recumbent radiographs were obtained and limb montages were randomized before analysis by a single investigator blinded to dog, limb, and limb position. Twelve limb alignment values were determined using the CORA methodology. Measurements were performed in triplicate and intra-observer variability was evaluated by intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). Limb alignment values were reported as mean ± SD and 95% confidence intervals. Linear mixed models were used to determine if significant associations existed between limb alignment values and limb, limb position, gender, age, weight, and body condition score. There were significant differences in standing and recumbent limb alignment values for all values except elbow mechanical axis deviation (eMAD). Limb, gender, age, body weight, and body condition score had no effect. ICC values ranged from 0.522 to 0.758, indicating moderate to substantial agreement for repeated measurements by a single investigator. Limb alignment values are significantly different when determined from standing versus recumbent radiographs in healthy Labrador Retrievers. © Copyright 2014 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  13. Sex determination based on a thoracic vertebra and ribs evaluation using clinical chest radiography.

    PubMed

    Tsubaki, Shun; Morishita, Junji; Usumoto, Yosuke; Sakaguchi, Kyoko; Matsunobu, Yusuke; Kawazoe, Yusuke; Okumura, Miki; Ikeda, Noriaki

    2017-07-01

    Our aim was to investigate whether sex can be determined from a combination of geometric features obtained from the 10th thoracic vertebra, 6th rib, and 7th rib. Six hundred chest radiographs (300 males and 300 females) were randomly selected to include patients of six age groups (20s, 30s, 40s, 50s, 60s, and 70s). Each group included 100 images (50 males and 50 females). A total of 14 features, including 7 lengths, 5 indices for the vertebra, and 2 types of widths for ribs, were utilized and analyzed for sex determination. Dominant features contributing to sex determination were selected by stepwise discriminant analysis after checking the variance inflation factors for multicollinearity. The accuracy of sex determination using a combination of the vertebra and ribs was evaluated from the selected features by the stepwise discriminant analysis. The accuracies in each age group were also evaluated in this study. The accuracy of sex determination based on a combination of features of the vertebra and ribs was 88.8% (533/600). This performance was superior to that of the vertebra or ribs only. Moreover, sex determination of subjects in their 20s demonstrated the highest accuracy (96.0%, 96/100). The features selected in the stepwise discriminant analysis included some features in both the vertebra and ribs. These results indicate the usefulness of combined information obtained from the vertebra and ribs for sex determination. We conclude that a combination of geometric characteristics obtained from the vertebra and ribs could be useful for determining sex. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Sensitivity, specificity, and interobserver variability of survey thoracic radiography for the detection of heart base masses in dogs.

    PubMed

    Guglielmini, Carlo; Baron Toaldo, Marco; Quinci, Manuela; Romito, Giovanni; Luciani, Alessia; Cipone, Mario; Drigo, Michele; Diana, Alessia

    2016-06-15

    OBJECTIVE To determine the sensitivity, specificity, and interobserver variability of survey thoracic radiography (STR) for the detection of heart base masses (HBMs) in dogs. DESIGN Retrospective case-control study. ANIMALS 30 dogs with an HBM and 120 breed-matched control dogs (60 healthy dogs and 60 dogs with heart disease and no HBM). PROCEDURES In a blinded manner, 2 observers (designated as A and B) evaluated STR views from each dog for a mass-like opacity cranial to the heart, tracheal deviation, cardiomegaly, findings suggestive of pericardial effusion or right-sided congestive heart failure, and soft tissue opacities suggestive of pulmonary metastases. Investigators subsequently provided a final interpretation of each dog's HBM status (definitely affected, equivocal, or definitely not affected). RESULTS Considering equivocal interpretation as negative or positive for an HBM, the sensitivity of STR for diagnosis of an HBM was 40.0% (95% confidence interval [CI], 22.5% to 57.5%) and 56.7% (95% CI, 38.9% to 74.4%), respectively, for observer A and 63% (95% CI, 46.1% to 80.6%) and 80.0% (95% CI, 65.7% to 94.3%), respectively, for observer B. The corresponding specificity was 96.7% (95% CI, 93.5% to 99.9%) and 92.5% (95% CI, 87.8% to 97.2%), respectively, for observer A and 99.2% (95% CI, 97.5% to 100%) and 92.5% (95% CI, 87.8% to 97.2%), respectively, for observer B. The presence of a mass-like opacity cranial to the heart or tracheal deviation, or both, was significantly associated with a true diagnosis of HBM. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that STR is a highly specific but not a highly sensitive predictor of HBM in dogs.

  15. Digital tomosynthesis as a problem-solving imaging technique to confirm or exclude potential thoracic lesions based on chest X-ray radiography.

    PubMed

    Quaia, Emilio; Baratella, Elisa; Poillucci, Gabriele; Kus, Sara; Cioffi, Vincenzo; Cova, Maria Assunta

    2013-05-01

    To assess the capability of digital tomosynthesis (DTS) as a problem-solving imaging technique to confirm or exclude potential thoracic lesions based on chest x-ray radiography (CXR). Four hundred and-sixty five patients (263 male, 202 female; age, 72.47 ± 11.33 years) with suspected thoracic lesion(s) after the initial onsite analysis of CXR underwent DTS. Two independent readers prospectively analyzed in consensus CXR and DTS images on a picture archiving and communications system-integrated workstation and proposed a diagnosis according to a confidence score for each lesion: 1 or 2 = definite or probable pulmonary or pleural benign lesion or pseudolesion deserving no further diagnostic work-up; 3 = indeterminate; 4 or 5 = probable or definite pulmonary lesion deserving further diagnostic work-up by computed tomography (CT). In patients who did not undergo chest CT, the DTS findings had to be confirmed by 6 to 12 months' imaging follow-up. Finally, 229 pulmonary lesions (193 thoracic and 36 pleural lesions) and 236 pseudolesions were identified. Based on DTS images, readers correctly classified all pseudolesions except for 10/236 (reader 1) or 11/236 (reader 2) pseudolesions and 7 (reader 1) or 6 (reader 2) pulmonary subpleural lesions located in the anterior or posterior lung region close to the thoracic wall. Chest CT was performed in 127/465 (27%) patients, whereas in 338/465 patients (73%) CXR doubtful findings were resolved by DTS. DTS allowed to exclude most pseudolesions initially considered as potential thoracic lesions on the preliminary onsite assessment of CXR and allowed to exclude pulmonary lesions deserving CT assessment in about three fourths of the patients. Copyright © 2013 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Diagnostic imaging costs before and after digital tomosynthesis implementation in patient management after detection of suspected thoracic lesions on chest radiography.

    PubMed

    Quaia, Emilio; Grisi, Guido; Baratella, Elisa; Cuttin, Roberto; Poillucci, Gabriele; Kus, Sara; Cova, Maria Assunta

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate diagnostic imaging costs before and after DTS implementation in patients with suspected thoracic lesions on CXR. Four hundred sixty-five patients (263 male, 202 female; age, 72.47 ± 11.33 years) with suspected thoracic lesion(s) after CXR underwent DTS. Each patient underwent CT when a pulmonary non-calcified lesion was identified by DTS while CT was not performed when a benign pulmonary or extrapulmonary lesion or pseudolesion was identified. The average per-patient imaging cost was calculated by normalising the costs before and after DTS implementation. In 229/465 patients who underwent DTS after suspicious CXR, DTS showed 193 pulmonary lesions and 36 pleural lesions, while in the remaining 236/465 patients, lesions were ruled out as pseudolesions of CXR. Chest CT examination was performed in 127/465 (27 %) patients while in the remaining 338/465 patients (73 %) CXR doubtful findings were resolved by DTS. The average per-patient costs of CXR, DTS and CT were 15.15, 41.55 and 113.66. DTS allowed an annual cost saving of 8,090.2 considering unenhanced CT and 19,298.12 considering contrast-enhanced CT. Considering a DTS reimbursement rate of 62.7 the break even point corresponds to 479 DTS examinations. Per-patient diagnostic imaging costs decreased after DTS implementation in patients with suspected thoracic lesions. • Digital tomosynthesis improves the diagnostic accuracy and confidence in chest radiography • Digital tomosynthesis reduces the need for CT for a suspected pulmonary lesion • Digital tomosynthesis requires a dose level equivalent to that of around two chest radiographies • Digital tomosynthesis produces a significant per-patient saving in diagnostic imaging costs.

  17. Thoracic spine x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Vertebral radiography; X-ray - spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films ... care provider's office. You will lie on the x-ray table in different positions. If the x-ray ...

  18. Use of radiography in combination with computed tomography for the assessment of noncardiac thoracic disease in the dog and cat.

    PubMed

    Prather, Andrew B; Berry, Clifford R; Thrall, Donald E

    2005-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the thorax was performed in 28 dogs and five cats and findings were compared with previous thoracic radiographs. The sample population included all animals that had thoracic radiographs and a CT study within 5 days of each other, where the complete imaging studies were available for review. Thoracic radiographs were considered indeterminate in 31 patients and CT examinations were done to acquire additional information. The presence of additional information from CT relating to presence of pathology, location of pathology, extent of pathology, and involvement of mediastinal structures was recorded. Whether there was a change in diagnosis based on the CT findings was also recorded. In only 4/33 animals (all dogs) did CT fail to provide any new information for the parameters evaluated when compared with survey thoracic radiographs. Additional information about the pathology that was present was gained by CT in 5/5 cats and 21/ 28 dogs. New information on compartmental location of pathology was seen in 4/5 cats and 19/28 dogs. New information on pathology extent was noted in 5/5 cats and 20/28 dogs. Additional information regarding involvement of mediastinal structures was obtained in 2/5 cats and 10/28 dogs. A change in diagnosis was made in 3/5 cats and 13/28 dogs. In conclusion, CT is a valuable tool for evaluating intrathoracic disease. CT provides additional cross-sectional anatomic information that can aid in anatomic localization and evaluation of the extent of the pathology in question.

  19. Neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, H.; Iddings, F.

    1998-08-01

    Neutron radiography is becoming a well established nondestructive testing (NDT) method. The American Society for Nondestructive Testing (ASNT) has recognized the method through its recommended practice SNT-TCIA which outlines training, knowledge, and experience necessary to obtain levels of competency in the method. Certification of nondestructive testing personnel is also covered in a military standard. Technical publications in the field of NDT and nuclear technology carry articles on neutron radiography and technical meetings include papers or even entire sessions on neutron radiography. There is an on-going series of international conferences on neutron radiography. Many books are available to provide introductory and advanced material on neutron radiographic techniques and applications. Neutron radiography as a service for hire is available, similar to that offered for other NDT services. The method is being adopted to solve NDT problems in specialty areas. The objective of this report is to provide a brief survey of the current state of the art in the use of neutron radiography. The survey will include information on the technique including principles of the method, sources of neutrons, detection methodology, standards and image quality indicators, and representative applications. An extensive reference list provides additional information for those who wish to investigate further and a Glossary is included which provides definitions for terms used in Neutron Radiography.

  20. Digital radiography.

    PubMed

    Mattoon, J S

    2006-01-01

    Digital radiography has been used in human medical imaging since the 1980s with recent and rapid acceptance into the veterinary profession. Using advanced image capture and computer technology, radiographic images are viewed on a computer monitor. This is advantageous because radiographic images can be adjusted using dedicated computer software to maximize diagnostic image quality. Digital images can be accessed at computer workstations throughout the hospital, instantly retrieved from computer archives, and transmitted via the internet for consultation or case referral. Digital radiographic data can also be incorporated into a hospital information system, making record keeping an entirely paperless process. Digital image acquisition is faster when compared to conventional screen-film radiography, improving workflow and patient throughput. Digital radiography greatly reduces the need for 'retake' radiographs because of wide latitude in exposure factors. Also eliminated are costs associated with radiographic film and x-ray film development. Computed radiography, charged coupled devices, and flat panel detectors are types of digital radiography systems currently available.

  1. Neutron Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, A. K.; Brenizer, J. S.

    Neutron radiography and its related two-dimensional (2D) neutron imaging techniques have been established as invaluable nondestructive inspection methods and quantitative measurement tools. They have been used in a wide variety of applications ranging from inspection of aircraft engine turbine blades to study of two-phase fluid flow in operating proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Neutron radiography is similar to X-ray radiography in that the method produces a 2D attenuation map of neutron radiation that has penetrated the object being examined. However, the images produced differ and are often complementary due to the differences between X-ray and neutron interaction mechanisms. The uses and types of 2D neutron imaging have expanded over the past 15 years as a result of advances in imaging technology and improvements in neutron generators/sources and computers. Still, high-intensity sources such as those from reactors and spallation neutron sources, together with conventional film radiography, remain the mainstay of high-resolution, large field-of-view neutron imaging. This chapter presents a summary of the history, methods, and related variations of neutron radiography techniques.

  2. [Digital thoracic radiology: devices, image processing, limits].

    PubMed

    Frija, J; de Géry, S; Lallouet, F; Guermazi, A; Zagdanski, A M; De Kerviler, E

    2001-09-01

    In a first part, the different techniques of digital thoracic radiography are described. Since computed radiography with phosphore plates are the most commercialized it is more emphasized. But the other detectors are also described, as the drum coated with selenium and the direct digital radiography with selenium detectors. The other detectors are also studied in particular indirect flat panels detectors and the system with four high resolution CCD cameras. In a second step the most important image processing are discussed: the gradation curves, the unsharp mask processing, the system MUSICA, the dynamic range compression or reduction, the soustraction with dual energy. In the last part the advantages and the drawbacks of computed thoracic radiography are emphasized. The most important are the almost constant good quality of the pictures and the possibilities of image processing.

  3. Digital Radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    System One, a digital radiography system, incorporates a reusable image medium (RIM) which retains an image. No film is needed; the RIM is read with a laser scanner, and the information is used to produce a digital image on an image processor. The image is stored on an optical disc. System allows the radiologist to "dial away" unwanted images to compare views on three screens. It is compatible with existing equipment and cost efficient. It was commercialized by a Stanford researcher from energy selective technology developed under a NASA grant.

  4. [Digital radiography].

    PubMed

    Haendle, J

    1983-03-01

    Digital radiography is a generally accepted term comprising all x-ray image systems producing a projected image which resembles the conventional x-ray film image, and which are linked to any type of digital image processing. Fundamental criteria of differentiation are based on the production and detection method of the x-ray image. Various systems are employed, viz. the single-detector, line-detector or fanbeam detector and the area-beam or area-detector image converters, which differ from one another mainly in the manner of conversion of the radiation produced by the x-ray tube. The article also deals with the pros and cons of the various principles, the multitude of systems employed, and the varying frequency of their use in x-ray diagnosis work.

  5. Detection of comorbidities and synchronous primary tumours via thoracic radiography and abdominal ultrasonography and their influence on treatment outcome in dogs with soft tissue sarcomas, primary brain tumours and intranasal tumours.

    PubMed

    Bigio Marcello, A; Gieger, T L; Jiménez, D A; Granger, L Abbigail

    2015-12-01

    Canine soft tissue sarcomas (STS), primary brain tumours and intranasal tumours are commonly treated with radiotherapy (RT). Given the low metastatic potential of these tumours, recommendations regarding imaging tests as staging are variable among institutions. The purpose of our study was to describe thoracic radiographic and abdominal ultrasonographic findings in dogs with these neoplasms and to investigate association of abnormal findings with alterations in recommended treatment. Medical records from 101 dogs, each having thoracic radiographs and abdominal ultrasound performed as part of their staging, were reviewed. In 98 of 101 (97%), imaging abnormalities were detected, 27% of which were further investigated with fine needle aspiration cytology or biopsy. Nine percent of the detected abnormalities were considered serious comorbidities that altered treatment recommendations, including 3 (3%) which were confirmed as synchronous primary neoplasms. These findings may influence recommendations regarding the decision to perform thoracic radiographs and abdominal ultrasound prior to initiation of RT. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. [Thoracic actinomycosis: three cases].

    PubMed

    Herrak, L; Msougar, Y; Ouadnouni, Y; Bouchikh, M; Benosmane, A

    2007-09-01

    Actinomycosis is a rare condition which, in the thoracic localisation, can mimic cancer or tuberculosis. We report a series of three case of thoracic actinomycosis treated in the Ibn Sina University Thoracic Surgery Unit in Rabat, Morocco. CASE N degrees 1: This 45-year-old patient presented a tumefaction on the left anterior aspect of the chest. Physical examination identified a parietal mass with fistulisation to the skin. Radiography demonstrated a left pulmonary mass. Transparietal puncture led to the pathological diagnosis of actinomycosis. The patient was given medical treatment and improved clinically and radiographically. CASE N degrees 2: This 68-year-old patient presented repeated episodes of hemoptysis. The chest x-ray revealed atelectasia of the middle lobe and bronchial fibroscopy demonstrated the presence of a bud in the middle lobar bronchus. Biopsies were negative. The patient underwent surgery and the histology examination of the operative specimen revealed pulmonary actinomycosis. The patient recovered well clinically and radiographically with antibiotic therapy. CASE N degrees 3: This 56-year-old patient presented cough and hemoptysis. Physical examination revealed a left condensation and destruction of the left lung was noted on the chest x-ray. Left pleuropulmonectomy was performed. Histological analysis of the surgical specimen identified associated Aspergillus and Actinomyces. The outcome was favorable with medical treatment. The purpose of this work was to recall the radiological, clinical, histological, therapeutic, outcome aspects of this condition and to relate the problems of differential diagnosis when can suggest other diseases.

  7. INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY INSTRUCTOR'S GUIDE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Adult, Vocational, and Technical Education (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC. Div. of Vocational and Technical Education.

    THIS LABORATORY GUIDE WAS DEVELOPED FOR AN 80-HOUR COURSE IN INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY FOR HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES TRAINING TO BECOME BEGINNING RADIOGRAPHERS. IT IS USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH TWO OTHER VOLUMES--(1) INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY INSTRUCTOR'S GUIDE, AND (2) INUDSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY MANUAL. THE PROGRAM WAS DEVELOPED BY A COMMITTEE OF REPRESENTATIVES…

  8. Increasing mobile radiography productivity.

    PubMed

    Wong, Edward; Lung, Ngan Tsz; Ng, Kris; Jeor, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Mobile radiography using computed radiography (CR) cassettes is a common equipment combination with a workflow bottleneck limited by location of CR readers. Advent of direct digital radiography (DDR) mobile x-ray machines removes this limitation by immediate image review and quality control. Through the use of key performance indicators (KPIs), the increase in efficiency can be quantified.

  9. Thoracic trauma.

    PubMed

    Kagan, K G

    1980-08-01

    The physiologic equilibrium of chest injury patients is frequently precarious, and mild stress during examination and treatment may precipitate acute decompensation and death. This is particularly true with the respiratory system, where the normally large respiratory reserve capacity may be rapidly lost. Accurate assessment of the nature of the thoracic injury and the severity of that injury must be determined in order to formulate a therapeutic plan. Many thoracic injuries, such as pneumothorax, pulmonary contusions, or rib fractures, will be self-limiting. Other conditions must be recognized for their potentially lethal nature and dealt with aggressively, and these include cardiac tamponade, tension pneumothorax, and esophageal perforation. By performing a systematic evaluation of the patient and confirming or denying the presence of all possible types of thoracic injury, the veterinarian may avoid overtreatment of self-limiting lesions and recognize and aggressively treat those with potentially fatal outcomes.

  10. Fleischner Society: glossary of terms for thoracic imaging.

    PubMed

    Hansell, David M; Bankier, Alexander A; MacMahon, Heber; McLoud, Theresa C; Müller, Nestor L; Remy, Jacques

    2008-03-01

    Members of the Fleischner Society compiled a glossary of terms for thoracic imaging that replaces previous glossaries published in 1984 and 1996 for thoracic radiography and computed tomography (CT), respectively. The need to update the previous versions came from the recognition that new words have emerged, others have become obsolete, and the meaning of some terms has changed. Brief descriptions of some diseases are included, and pictorial examples (chest radiographs and CT scans) are provided for the majority of terms. (c) RSNA, 2008.

  11. Tomosynthesis of the thoracic spine: added value in diagnosing vertebral fractures in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Geijer, Mats; Gunnlaugsson, Eirikur; Götestrand, Simon; Weber, Lars; Geijer, Håkan

    2017-02-01

    Thoracic spine radiography becomes more difficult with age. Tomosynthesis is a low-dose tomographic extension of radiography which may facilitate thoracic spine evaluation. This study assessed the added value of tomosynthesis in imaging of the thoracic spine in the elderly. Four observers compared the image quality of 50 consecutive thoracic spine radiography and tomosynthesis data sets from 48 patients (median age 67 years, range 55-92 years) on a number of image quality criteria. Observer variation was determined by free-marginal multirater kappa. The conversion factor and effective dose were determined from the dose-area product values. For all observers significantly more vertebrae were seen with tomosynthesis than with radiography (mean 12.4/9.3, P < 0.001) as well as significantly more fractures (mean 0.9/0.7, P = 0.017). The image quality score for tomosynthesis was significantly higher than for radiography, for all evaluated structures. Tomosynthesis took longer to evaluate than radiography. Despite this, all observers scored a clear preference for tomosynthesis. Observer agreement was substantial (mean κ = 0.73, range 0.51-0.94). The calibration or conversion factor was 0.11 mSv/(Gy cm(2)) for the combined examination. The resulting effective dose was 0.87 mSv. Tomosynthesis can increase the detection rate of thoracic vertebral fractures in the elderly, at low added radiation dose. • Tomosynthesis helps evaluate the thoracic spine in the elderly. • Observer agreement for thoracic spine tomosynthesis was substantial (mean κ = 0.73). • Significantly more vertebrae and significantly more fractures were seen with tomosynthesis. • Tomosynthesis took longer to evaluate than radiography. • There was a clear preference among all observers for tomosynthesis over radiography.

  12. Clinical feline dental radiography.

    PubMed

    Lemmons, Matthew

    2013-05-01

    Dental radiography is a necessary diagnostic modality in small animal practice. It is not possible to accurately assess and diagnose tooth resorption, periodontal disease, endodontic disease, neoplasia and injury without it. Dental radiography is also necessary for treatment and assessment of the patient postoperatively.

  13. Emergency Thoracic US: The Essentials.

    PubMed

    Wongwaisayawan, Sirote; Suwannanon, Ruedeekorn; Sawatmongkorngul, Sorravit; Kaewlai, Rathachai

    2016-01-01

    Acute thoracic symptoms are common among adults visiting emergency departments in the United States. Adults with these symptoms constitute a large burden on the overall resources used in the emergency department. The wide range of possible causes can make a definitive diagnosis challenging, even after clinical evaluation and initial laboratory testing. In addition to radiography and computed tomography, thoracic ultrasonography (US) is an alternative imaging modality that can be readily performed in real time at the patient's bedside to help diagnose many thoracic diseases manifesting acutely and in the trauma setting. Advantages of US include availability, relatively low cost, and lack of ionizing radiation. Emergency thoracic US consists of two main parts, lung and pleura US and focused cardiac US, which are closely related. Acoustic mismatches among aerated lungs, pleura, chest wall, and pathologic conditions produce artifacts useful for diagnosis of pneumothorax and pulmonary edema and help in detection of subpleural, pleural, and chest wall pathologic conditions such as pneumonia, pleural effusion, and fractures. Visual assessment of cardiac contractility and detection of right ventricular dilatation and pericardial effusion at focused cardiac US are critical in patients presenting with acute dyspnea and trauma. Additional US examinations of the inferior vena cava for noninvasive volume assessment and of the groin areas for detection of deep venous thrombosis are often performed at the same time. This multiorgan US approach can provide valuable information for emergency treatment of both traumatic and nontraumatic thoracic diseases involving the lungs, pleura, chest wall, heart, and vascular system. Online supplemental material is available for this article. (©)RSNA, 2016.

  14. Thoracic aortic aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    Aortic aneurysm - thoracic; Syphilitic aneurysm; Aneurysm - thoracic aortic ... The most common cause of a thoracic aortic aneurysm is hardening of ... high cholesterol, long-term high blood pressure, or who smoke. ...

  15. Biomedical radiography: radiation protection and safety. (latest citations from the NTIS data base). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the safety of biomedical radiography. Radiation protection methods and techniques are described for both patients and operators. Safety techniques for dental radiology, routine x-rays, radiotherapy, thoracic radiography and other radiology procedures are included. Radiation exposure limits for patients and healthcare workers are defined. (Contains a minimum of 247 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  16. High energy neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Gavron, A.; Morley, K.; Morris, C.; Seestrom, S.; Ullmann, J.; Yates, G.; Zumbro, J.

    1996-06-01

    High-energy spallation neutron sources are now being considered in the US and elsewhere as a replacement for neutron beams produced by reactors. High-energy and high intensity neutron beams, produced by unmoderated spallation sources, open potential new vistas of neutron radiography. The authors discuss the basic advantages and disadvantages of high-energy neutron radiography, and consider some experimental results obtained at the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility at Los Alamos.

  17. Phase-contrast radiography.

    PubMed

    Gao, D; Pogany, A; Stevenson, A W; Wilkins, S W

    1998-01-01

    For the past 100 years, the paradigm for radiography has been premised on absorption as the sole means of contrast formation and on ray optics as the basis for image interpretation. A new conceptual approach to radiography has been developed that includes phase (ie, refractive) contrast and requires wave optics for proper treatment. This new approach greatly increases the amount of information that can be obtained with radiographic techniques and is particularly well suited to the imaging of soft tissue and of very small features in biologic samples. A key feature of the present technique of phase-contrast radiography is the use of a microfocus x-ray source about an order of magnitude (< or = 20 microm) smaller than that used in conventional radiography. Phase-contrast radiography offers a number of improvements over conventional radiography in a clinical setting, especially in soft-tissue imaging. These improvements include increased contrast resulting in improved visualization of anatomic detail, reduced absorbed dose to the patient, inherent image magnification and high spatial resolution, use of harder x rays, and relative ease of implementation. More technologically advanced detectors are currently being developed and commercialized, which will help fully realize the considerable potential of phase-contrast imaging.

  18. 8. VIEW OF RADIOGRAPHY EQUIPMENT, TEST METHODS INCLUDED RADIOGRAPHY AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF RADIOGRAPHY EQUIPMENT, TEST METHODS INCLUDED RADIOGRAPHY AND BETA BACKSCATTERING. (7/13/56) - Rocky Flats Plant, Non-Nuclear Production Facility, South of Cottonwood Avenue, west of Seventh Avenue & east of Building 460, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  19. Thoracic transplantation.

    PubMed

    Shumway, N E

    2000-07-01

    Experimental orthotopic transplantation of the heart was accomplished in 1959. Long-term survival was achieved in 1965 with a chemical immunosuppression protocol substantially different from that used for renal and hepatic transplants. Performance characteristics of the transplanted denervated heart were found to differ only slightly from normal. It appeared by the time of the Clinical Congress of the American College of Surgeons in October 1967 that clinical heart transplantation might be justified if the concept of brain death could be legally recognized. The Stanford program in clinical heart transplantation was inaugurated on January 6, 1968 and has been in continuous operation. To date, more than 1000 patients have undergone transplantation of the heart with the 5-year survival at 75%. The first long-term success in lung transplantation occurred at Stanford in 1981, with transplantation of the heart and both lungs. In 1990 the concept of living pulmonary lobar donors was introduced and is slowly finding its clinical role. The steroid-sparing capability of cyclosporine made possible both successful lung and pediatric heart transplantation. Only the donor shortage remains as a substantial barrier to widespread thoracic transplantation. Xenotransplantation is under intense scrutiny, with some encouraging experimental results. Development of the artificial heart continues to offer some relief for patients with end-stage heart disease.

  20. Comparison of ultrasonography and radiography in diagnosis of rib fractures.

    PubMed

    Pishbin, Elham; Ahmadi, Koorosh; Foogardi, Molood; Salehi, Maryam; Seilanian Toosi, Farrokh; Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa

    2017-08-01

    Rib fractures are the most common skeletal thoracic injuries resulting from blunt chest trauma. Half of the rib fractures are not detected upon a precise physical evaluation and radiographs. Recently ultrasonography (USG) has been investigated to detect rib fractures. But based on literature the usefulness of USG varies widely. This study was conducted to investigate the role of USG in the detection of possible rib fractures in comparison with radiography. In this cross-sectional study, consecutive patients with minor blunt chest trauma and suspected rib fractures presenting in Imam Reza Hospital located in Mashhad-Iran, between April 2013 and October 2013 were assessed by USG and radiography. The radiography was performed in a posteroanterior (PA) chest projection and oblique rib view centered over the area of trauma. The time duration spent in taking USG and radiography were recorded. The prevalence and location of fractures revealed by USG and radiography were compared. Sixty-one suspected patients were assessed. The male to female ratio was 2.4:1 (43 men and 18 women) with a mean ± SD age of (44.3 ± 19.7) years. There were totally 59 rib fractures in 38 (62.3%) patients based on radiography and USG, while 23 (37.7%) patients had no diagnostic evidence of rib lesions. USG revealed 58 rib fractures in 33 (54.1%) of 61 suspected patients and radiographs revealed 32 rib fractures in 20 (32.8%) of 61 patients. A total of 58 (98.3%) rib fractures were detected by USG, whereas oblique rib view and PA chest radiography showed 27 (45.8%) and 24 (40.7%) rib fractures, respectively. The average duration of USG was (12 ± 3) min (range 7-17 min), whereas the duration of radiography was (27 ± 6) min (range 15-37 min). The kappa coefficient showed a low level of agreement between both USG and PA chest radiography (kappa coefficient = 0.28), and between USG and oblique rib view (kappa coefficient = 0.32). USG discloses more fractures than radiography in

  1. Radiography of the Paranasal Sinuses

    MedlinePlus

    ... your back or over your lap. This head. Radiography of the paranasal sinuses apron will protect your ... face, especially when lowering his or her head. Radiography of sitting and others while you are standing. ...

  2. Real-time radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Bossi, R.H.; Oien, C.T.

    1981-02-26

    Real-time radiography is used for imaging both dynamic events and static objects. Fluorescent screens play an important role in converting radiation to light, which is then observed directly or intensified and detected. The radiographic parameters for real-time radiography are similar to conventional film radiography with special emphasis on statistics and magnification. Direct-viewing fluoroscopy uses the human eye as a detector of fluorescent screen light or the light from an intensifier. Remote-viewing systems replace the human observer with a television camera. The remote-viewing systems have many advantages over the direct-viewing conditions such as safety, image enhancement, and the capability to produce permanent records. This report reviews real-time imaging system parameters and components.

  3. Multidetector CT of blunt thoracic trauma.

    PubMed

    Kaewlai, Rathachai; Avery, Laura L; Asrani, Ashwin V; Novelline, Robert A

    2008-10-01

    Thoracic injuries are significant causes of morbidity and mortality in trauma patients. These injuries account for approximately 25% of trauma-related deaths in the United States, second only to head injuries. Radiologic imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and management of blunt chest trauma. In addition to conventional radiography, multidetector computed tomography (CT) is increasingly being used, since it can quickly and accurately help diagnose a wide variety of injuries in trauma patients. Furthermore, multiplanar and volumetric reformatted CT images provide improved visualization of injuries, increased understanding of trauma-related diseases, and enhanced communication between the radiologist and the referring clinician. (c) RSNA, 2008.

  4. Traumatic rupture of the thoracic aorta

    PubMed Central

    Keen, G.; Bradbrook, R. A.; McGinn, F.

    1969-01-01

    Seven patients who had traumatic ruptures of the thoracic aorta are reported. Four of these died within a few hours of admission, allowing no opportunity for diagnosis or treatment. However, three survived long enough for elective surgery to be undertaken. A diagnosis of ruptured aorta was missed in one patient (case 2), and the difficulties of diagnosing this condition, even during thoracotomy, are emphasized. The value of serial chest radiography and forward aortography is discussed. Two of these patients underwent successful aortic repair, using left atrio-femoral bypass. Images PMID:5763507

  5. Transitioning to digital radiography.

    PubMed

    Drost, Wm Tod

    2011-04-01

    To describe the different forms of digital radiography (DR), image file formats, supporting equipment and services required for DR, storage of digital images, and teleradiology. Purchasing a DR system is a major investment for a veterinary practice. Types of DR systems include computed radiography, charge coupled devices, and direct or indirect DR. Comparison of workflow for analog and DR is presented. On the surface, switching to DR involves the purchase of DR acquisition hardware. The X-ray machine, table and grids used in analog radiography are the same for DR. Realistically, a considerable infrastructure supports the image acquisition hardware. This infrastructure includes monitors, computer workstations, a robust computer network and internet connection, a plan for storage and back up of images, and service contracts. Advantages of DR compared with analog radiography include improved image quality (when used properly), ease of use (more forgiving to the errors of radiographic technique), speed of making a complete study (important for critically ill patients), fewer repeat radiographs, less time looking for imaging studies, less physical storage space, and the ability to easily send images for consultation. With an understanding of the infrastructure requirements, capabilities and limitations of DR, an informed veterinary practice should be better able to make a sound decision about transitioning to DR. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2011.

  6. Prospective Evaluation of Thoracic Ultrasound in the Detection of Pneumothorax

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, K. W.; Hamilton, D. R.; Kirkpatrick, A. W.; Billica, R. D.; Williams, D. R.; Diebel, L. N.; Sargysan, A. E.; Dulchavsky, S. A.

    2000-01-01

    Introduction: Pneumothorax (PTX) occurs commonly in trauma patients and is confirmed by examination and radiography. Thoracic ultrasound (VIS) has been suggested as an alternative method for rapidly diagnosing PTX when X-ray is unavailable as in rural, military, or space flight settings; however, its accuracy and specificity are not known. Methods: We evaluated the accuracy of thoracic U/S detection of PTX compared to radiography in stable, emergency patients with a high suspicion of PTX at a Level-l trauma center over a 6-month period. Following University and NASA Institutional Review Board approval, informed consent was obtained from patients with penetrating or blunt chest trauma, or with a history consistent with PTX. Whenever possible, the presence or absence of the " lung sliding" sign or the "comet tail" artifact were determined by U/S in both hemithoraces by residents instructed in thoracic U/S before standard radiologic verification of PTX. Results were recorded on data sheets for comparison to standard radiography. Results: Thoracic VIS had a 94% sensitivity; two PTX could not be reliably diagnosed due to subcutaneous air; the true negative rate was 100%. In one patient, the VIS exam was positive while X ray did not confirm PTX; a follow-up film 1 hour later demonstrated a small PTX. The average time for bilateral thoracic VIS examination was 2 to 3 minutes. Conclusions: Thoracic ultrasound reliably diagnoses pneumothorax. Presence of the "lung sliding" sign conclusively excludes pneumothorax. Expansion of the FAST examination to include the thorax should be investigated.

  7. Bone Deformities as a Complication of Giant Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Ahmet; Kartal, Yiğitcan; Ayaz, Ercan; Aslan, Mine; Bulut, Safiye Sanem Dereli; Ağırbaşlı, Mehmet Ali; Oysu, Aslıhan Semiz

    2017-07-01

    The contained rupture of thoracic aortic aneurysm and related bone deformities is a rare condition. The diagnosis is critical due to potential and fatal complications. Radiologic evaluation is required to show the location, extension, and complications. Herein we present the X-ray radiography, ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance images of a giant dissected and contained rupture of the thoracic aortic aneurysm. The aneurysm destructed the adjacent vertebrae and rib, resulting in compression of dural sac and spinal cord, and obliteration of the neural foramina. Our case demonstrates a gigantic expansion of an aneurysm (14 cm) with chronic skeletal complications.

  8. Apparatus for proton radiography

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Ronald L.

    1976-01-01

    An apparatus for effecting diagnostic proton radiography of patients in hospitals comprises a source of negative hydrogen ions, a synchrotron for accelerating the negative hydrogen ions to a predetermined energy, a plurality of stations for stripping extraction of a radiography beam of protons, means for sweeping the extracted beam to cover a target, and means for measuring the residual range, residual energy, or percentage transmission of protons that pass through the target. The combination of information identifying the position of the beam with information about particles traversing the subject and the back absorber is performed with the aid of a computer to provide a proton radiograph of the subject. In an alternate embodiment of the invention, a back absorber comprises a plurality of scintillators which are coupled to detectors.

  9. Forensic radiography: an overview.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, April

    2010-01-01

    Perhaps the first instance of forensic radiography occurred in the 1890s when Professor AW Wright of Yale University tested Wilhelm Roentgen's newly discovered x-ray photography on a deceased rabbit. Of interest were small, round objects inside the rabbit that appeared as dark spots on the positive film. The objects were extracted and identified as bullets, thereby helping to determine the cause of the rabbit's death. In the years since Roentgen's discovery, the use of radiography and other medical imaging specialties to aid in investigating civil and criminal matters has increased as investigators realize how radiologic technology can yield information that otherwise is unavailable. Radiologic technologists can play a key role in forensic investigations.

  10. Quantitative film radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Devine, G.; Dobie, D.; Fugina, J.; Hernandez, J.; Logan, C.; Mohr, P.; Moss, R.; Schumacher, B.; Updike, E.; Weirup, D.

    1991-02-26

    We have developed a system of quantitative radiography in order to produce quantitative images displaying homogeneity of parts. The materials that we characterize are synthetic composites and may contain important subtle density variations not discernible by examining a raw film x-radiograph. In order to quantitatively interpret film radiographs, it is necessary to digitize, interpret, and display the images. Our integrated system of quantitative radiography displays accurate, high-resolution pseudo-color images in units of density. We characterize approximately 10,000 parts per year in hundreds of different configurations and compositions with this system. This report discusses: the method; film processor monitoring and control; verifying film and processor performance; and correction of scatter effects.

  11. Cosmic Ray Scattering Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    Cosmic ray muons are ubiquitous, are highly penetrating, and can be used to measure material densities by either measuring the stopping rate or by measuring the scattering of transmitted muons. The Los Alamos team has studied scattering radiography for a number of applications. Some results will be shown of scattering imaging for a range of practical applications, and estimates will be made of the utility of scattering radiography for nondestructive assessments of large structures and for geological surveying. Results of imaging the core of the Toshiba Nuclear Critical Assembly (NCA) Reactor in Kawasaki, Japan and simulations of imaging the damaged cores of the Fukushima nuclear reactors will be presented. Below is an image made using muons of a core configuration for the NCA reactor.

  12. Digital radiography in space.

    PubMed

    Hart, Rob; Campbell, Mark R

    2002-06-01

    With the permanent habitation of the International Space Station, the planning of longer duration exploration missions, and the possibility of space tourism, it is likely that digital radiography will be needed in the future to support medical care in space. Ultrasound is currently the medical imaging modality of choice for spaceflight. Digital radiography in space is limited because of prohibitive launch costs (in the region of $20,000/kg) that severely restrict the volume, weight, and power requirements of medical care hardware. Technological increases in radiography, a predicted ten-fold decrease in future launch costs, and an increasing clinical need for definitive medical care in space will drive efforts to expand the ability to provide medical care in space including diagnostic imaging. Normal physiological responses to microgravity, in conjunction with the high-risk environment of spaceflight, increase the risk of injury and could imply an extended recovery period for common injuries. The advantages of gravity on Earth, such as the stabilization of patients undergoing radiography and the drainage of fluids, which provide radiographic contrast, are unavailable in space. This creates significant difficulties in patient immobilization and radiographic positioning. Gravity-dependent radiological signs, such as lipohemarthrosis in knee and shoulder trauma, air or fluid levels in pneumoperitoneum, pleural effusion, or bowel obstruction, and the apical pleural edge in pneumothorax become unavailable. Impaired healing processes such as delayed callus formation following fracture will have implications on imaging, and recovery time lines are unknown. The confined nature of spacecraft and the economic impossibility of launching lead-based personal protective equipment present significant challenges to crew radiation safety. A modified, free-floating radiographic C-arm device equipped with a digital detector and utilizing teleradiology support is proposed as a

  13. Patient care in radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrlich, R.A.; McCloskey, E.D.

    1989-01-01

    This book focuses on patient care procedures for radiographers. The authors focus on the role of the radiographer as a member of the health care team. The authors report on such topics as communication in patient care: safety, medico-legal considerations, transfer and positioning; physical needs; infection control; medication; CPR standards, acute situations; examination of the GI tract; contrast media; special imaging techniques and bedside radiography.

  14. Particle Beam Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peach, Ken; Ekdahl, Carl

    2014-02-01

    Particle beam radiography, which uses a variety of particle probes (neutrons, protons, electrons, gammas and potentially other particles) to study the structure of materials and objects noninvasively, is reviewed, largely from an accelerator perspective, although the use of cosmic rays (mainly muons but potentially also high-energy neutrinos) is briefly reviewed. Tomography is a form of radiography which uses multiple views to reconstruct a three-dimensional density map of an object. There is a very wide range of applications of radiography and tomography, from medicine to engineering and security, and advances in instrumentation, specifically the development of electronic detectors, allow rapid analysis of the resultant radiographs. Flash radiography is a diagnostic technique for large high-explosive-driven hydrodynamic experiments that is used at many laboratories. The bremsstrahlung radiation pulse from an intense relativistic electron beam incident onto a high-Z target is the source of these radiographs. The challenge is to provide radiation sources intense enough to penetrate hundreds of g/cm2 of material, in pulses short enough to stop the motion of high-speed hydrodynamic shocks, and with source spots small enough to resolve fine details. The challenge has been met with a wide variety of accelerator technologies, including pulsed-power-driven diodes, air-core pulsed betatrons and high-current linear induction accelerators. Accelerator technology has also evolved to accommodate the experimenters' continuing quest for multiple images in time and space. Linear induction accelerators have had a major role in these advances, especially in providing multiple-time radiographs of the largest hydrodynamic experiments.

  15. Lower Gastrointestinal (GI) Tract X-Ray (Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Lower GI Tract Lower gastrointestinal tract radiography ... GI Tract Radiography? What is Lower GI Tract X-ray Radiography (Barium Enema)? Lower gastrointestinal (GI) tract radiography, ...

  16. Neutron Induced Beta Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Shaikh, A. M.; Shylaja, D.

    2011-07-15

    In the present paper we give a new methodology named, 'neutron induced beta radiography-NIBR' which makes use of neutron activated Dy or In foils as source of (3-radiation. Radiographs are obtained with an aluminium cassette containing image plate, a sample under inspection and the activated Dy or In foil kept in tight contact. The sensitivity of the technique to thickness was evaluated for different materials in the form of step wedges. Some radiographs are presented to demonstrate potential of method to inspect thin samples.

  17. Student Incivility in Radiography Education.

    PubMed

    Clark, Kevin R

    2017-07-01

    To examine student incivility in radiography classrooms by exploring the prevalence of uncivil behaviors along with the classroom management strategies educators use to manage and prevent classroom disruptions. A survey was designed to collect data on the severity and frequency of uncivil student behaviors, classroom management strategies used to address minor and major behavioral issues, and techniques to prevent student incivility. The participants were educators in radiography programs accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology. Findings indicated that severe uncivil student behaviors in radiography classrooms do not occur as often as behaviors classified as less severe. Radiography educators in this study used a variety of strategies and techniques to manage and prevent student incivility; however, radiography educators who received formal training in classroom management reported fewer incidents of student incivility than those who had not received formal training. The participants in this study took a proactive approach to addressing severe behavioral issues in the classroom. Many radiography educators transition from the clinical environment to the classroom setting with little to no formal training in classroom management. Radiography educators are encouraged to attend formal training sessions to learn how to manage the higher education classroom effectively. Student incivility is present in radiography classrooms. This study provides a foundation for future research on incivility. ©2017 American Society of Radiologic Technologists.

  18. Lumbosacral transitional vertebra and thoracic limb malformations in a Chihuahua puppy.

    PubMed

    Schultz, V A; Watson, A G

    1995-01-01

    A three-month-old, male Chihuahua puppy with congenital absence of the distal 40% of the right thoracic limb was examined. The limb ended as a short, rounded, skin-covered stump. Radiography revealed a 40% shortened humerus tapered to a blunt end without its distal extremity. Dissection of the left thoracic limb identified luxation of the elbow joint and absence of the fourth digital pad. Alizarin-red staining and clearing demonstrated syndactylous fourth and fifth digits in the left thoracic limb and an anomalous eighth lumbar vertebra. This additional vertebra was unilaterally sacralized and constituted a lumbosacral transitional vertebra.

  19. Repeat rates in digital chest radiography and strategies for improvement.

    PubMed

    Fintelmann, Florian; Pulli, Benjamin; Abedi-Tari, Faezeh; Trombley, Maureen; Shore, Mary-Theresa; Shepard, Jo-Anne; Rosenthal, Daniel I

    2012-05-01

    To determine the repeat rate (RR) of chest radiographs acquired with portable computed radiography (CR) and installed direct radiography (DR) and to develop and assess strategies designed to decrease the RR. The RR and reasons for repeated digital chest radiographs were documented over the course of 16 months while a task force of thoracic radiologists, technologist supervisors, technologists, and information technology specialists continued to examine the workflow for underlying causes. Interventions decreasing the RR were designed and implemented. The initial RR of digital chest radiographs was 3.6% (138/3818) for portable CR and 13.3% (476/3575) for installed DR systems. By combining RR measurement with workflow analysis, targets for technical and teaching interventions were identified. The interventions decreased the RR to 1.8% (81/4476) for portable CR and to 8.2% (306/3748) for installed DR. We found the RR of direct digital chest radiography to be significantly higher than that of computed chest radiography. We believe this is due to the ease with which repeat images can be obtained and discarded, and it suggests the need for ongoing surveillance of RR. We were able to demonstrate that strategies to lower the RR, which had been developed in the era of film-based imaging, can be adapted to the digital environment. On the basis of our findings, we encourage radiologists to assess their own departmental RRs for direct digital chest radiography and to consider similar interventions if necessary to achieve acceptable RRs for this modality.

  20. Imaging of thoracic textiloma.

    PubMed

    Ridene, Imene; Hantous-Zannad, Saoussen; Zidi, Asma; Smati, Belhassen; Baccouche, Ines; Kilani, Tarek; Ben Miled-M'rad, Khaoula

    2011-03-01

    Intrathoracic textiloma or gossypiboma, a retained surgical sponge in the thoracic cavity, is an exceptional but serious complication following thoracic or abdominal surgery. The purpose of this work is to highlight the topographic features of thoracic textiloma and to describe imaging aspects, and, particularly, computed tomography (CT) features. Eight patients have been operated in our thoracic surgery department for thoracic gossypiboma. In the past, three patients had undergone hepatic surgery and the five others had a history of thoracic surgery. All the patients had a chest radiograph, five of them had a thoracic ultrasonography, all had a chest CT, and one patient had a chest magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In patients with a history of abdominal surgery, the foreign body was located in the parenchyma of the right lower lobe. In the other patients, the foreign body was either intrapleural or mediastinal. Ultrasonography suggested the diagnosis of textiloma in three of the five patients by demonstrating a non-calcified hyperechoic mass with acoustic shadow. At CT, the gossypiboma was a low-attenuating mass containing trapped gas lucencies in six patients and it was a high-attenuating mass in two patients. MRI showed a diaphragmatic defect in one patient with an intrapulmonary gossypiboma that migrated from the abdomen. The CT aspect of thoracic gossypiboma may be different according to pleural or parenchymal location. The spongiform appearance, characteristic in abdominal gossypiboma, is not the only CT presentation of thoracic gossypiboma. The confrontation of the surgical history with the CT signs helps to have a preoperative diagnosis. Copyright © 2010 European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Digital radiography: an overview.

    PubMed

    Parks, Edwin T; Williamson, Gail F

    2002-11-15

    Since the discovery of X-rays in 1895, film has been the primary medium for capturing, displaying, and storing radiographic images. It is a technology that dental practitioners are the most familiar and comfortable with in terms of technique and interpretation. Digital radiography is the latest advancement in dental imaging and is slowly being adopted by the dental profession. Digital imaging incorporates computer technology in the capture, display, enhancement, and storage of direct radiographic images. Digital imaging offers some distinct advantages over film, but like any emerging technology, it presents new and different challenges for the practitioner to overcome. This article presents an overview of digital imaging including basic terminology and comparisons with film-based imaging. The principles of direct and indirect digital imaging modalities, intraoral and extraoral applications, image processing, and diagnostic efficacy will be discussed. In addition, the article will provide a list of questions dentists should consider prior to purchasing digital imaging systems for their practice.

  2. Radiography students' clinical learning styles.

    PubMed

    Ward, Patti; Makela, Carole

    2010-01-01

    To examine the common learning styles of radiography students during clinical practice. Descriptive research methodology, using a single self-report questionnaire, helped to identify common learning styles of radiography students during clinical practice. The results indicated that 3 learning styles predominate among radiography students during clinical practice: task oriented, purposeful and tentative. Insight into clinical practice learning styles can help students understand how they learn and allow them to recognize ways to maximize learning. It also heightens awareness among clinical instructors and technologists of the different learning styles and their relevance to clinical practice education.

  3. Thoracic Idiopathic Scoliosis Severity Is Highly Correlated with 3D Measures of Thoracic Kyphosis.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, T Barrett; Reighard, Fredrick G; Osborn, Emily J; Parvaresh, Kevin C; Newton, Peter O

    2017-06-07

    Loss of thoracic kyphosis has been associated with thoracic idiopathic scoliosis. Modern 3-dimensional (3D) imaging systems allow more accurate characterization of the scoliotic deformity than traditional radiographs. In this study, we utilized 3D calculations to characterize the association between increasing scoliosis severity and changes in the sagittal and axial planes. Patients evaluated in a scoliosis clinic and determined to have either a normal spine or idiopathic scoliosis were included in the analysis. All underwent upright, biplanar radiography with 3D reconstructions. Two-dimensional (2D) measurements of the magnitude of the thoracic major curve and the thoracic kyphosis were recorded. Image processing and MATLAB analysis were utilized to produce a 3D calculation of thoracic kyphosis and apical vertebral axial rotation. Regression analysis was performed to determine the correlation of 2D kyphosis, 3D kyphosis, and apical axial rotation with the magnitude of the thoracic major curve. The 442 patients for whom 2D and 3D data were collected had a main thoracic curve magnitude ranging from 1° to 118°. Linear regression analysis of the 2D and 3D T5-T12 kyphosis versus main thoracic curve magnitude yielded significant models (p < 0.05). The 2D model had a minimally negative slope (-0.07), a small R value (0.02), and a poor correlation coefficient (-0.14). In contrast, the 3D model had a strongly negative slope (-0.54), a high R value (0.56), and a strong correlation coefficient (-0.75). Curve magnitude also had a strong correlation with loss of 3D T1-T12 kyphosis and increasing apical axial rotation. Segmentally calculated 3D thoracic kyphosis had a strongly negative correlation with the magnitude of the main thoracic curve. With near uniformity, 3D thoracic kyphosis progressively decreased as scoliosis magnitude increased, at a rate of more than half the increase in the main thoracic curve magnitude. Analysis confirmed a surprisingly strong correlation

  4. Guide to thoracic imaging.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Sarah

    2015-08-01

    Thoracic imaging is commonly ordered in general practice. Guidelines exist for ordering thoracic imaging but few are specific for general practice. This article summarises current indications for imaging the thorax with chest X-ray and computed tomography. A simple frame-work for interpretation of the chest X-ray, suitable for trainees and practitioners providing primary care imaging in rural and remote locations, is presented. Interpretation of thoracic imaging is best done using a systematic approach. Radiological investigation is not warranted in un-complicated upper respiratory tract infections or asthma, minor trauma or acute-on-chronic chest pain.

  5. Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy

    MedlinePlus

    Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy (ETS) is surgery to treat sweating that is much heavier than normal. This condition ... hyperhidrosis . Usually the surgery is used to treat sweating in the palms or face. The sympathetic nerves ...

  6. Society of Thoracic Surgeons

    MedlinePlus

    ... STS Participant User File Research Program Videos Lung Cancer Screening Adoption How to Build Your Academic Career New Technologies in Mitral Valve Replacement Enhanced Recovery Pathways in Thoracic Surgery New STS Clinical Practice Guidelines ...

  7. Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy.

    PubMed

    Moraites, Eleni; Vaughn, Olushola Akinshemoyin; Hill, Samantha

    2014-10-01

    Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy is a surgical technique most commonly used in the treatment of severe palmar hyperhidrosis in selected patients. The procedure also has limited use in the treatment axillary and craniofacial hyperhidrosis. Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy is associated with a high rate of the development of compensatory hyperhidrosis, which may affect patient satisfaction with the procedure and quality of life. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Lower Gastrointestinal (GI) Tract X-Ray (Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Lower GI Tract Lower gastrointestinal tract radiography or lower GI ... of Lower GI Tract Radiography? What is Lower GI Tract X-ray Radiography (Barium Enema)? Lower gastrointestinal ( ...

  9. Multi-Institutional Evaluation of Digital Tomosynthesis, Dual-Energy Radiography, and Conventional Chest Radiography for the Detection and Management of Pulmonary Nodules.

    PubMed

    Dobbins, James T; McAdams, H Page; Sabol, John M; Chakraborty, Dev P; Kazerooni, Ella A; Reddy, Gautham P; Vikgren, Jenny; Båth, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To conduct a multi-institutional, multireader study to compare the performance of digital tomosynthesis, dual-energy (DE) imaging, and conventional chest radiography for pulmonary nodule detection and management. Materials and Methods In this binational, institutional review board-approved, HIPAA-compliant prospective study, 158 subjects (43 subjects with normal findings) were enrolled at four institutions. Informed consent was obtained prior to enrollment. Subjects underwent chest computed tomography (CT) and imaging with conventional chest radiography (posteroanterior and lateral), DE imaging, and tomosynthesis with a flat-panel imaging device. Three experienced thoracic radiologists identified true locations of nodules (n = 516, 3-20-mm diameters) with CT and recommended case management by using Fleischner Society guidelines. Five other radiologists marked nodules and indicated case management by using images from conventional chest radiography, conventional chest radiography plus DE imaging, tomosynthesis, and tomosynthesis plus DE imaging. Sensitivity, specificity, and overall accuracy were measured by using the free-response receiver operating characteristic method and the receiver operating characteristic method for nodule detection and case management, respectively. Results were further analyzed according to nodule diameter categories (3-4 mm, >4 mm to 6 mm, >6 mm to 8 mm, and >8 mm to 20 mm). Results Maximum lesion localization fraction was higher for tomosynthesis than for conventional chest radiography in all nodule size categories (3.55-fold for all nodules, P < .001; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.96, 4.15). Case-level sensitivity was higher with tomosynthesis than with conventional chest radiography for all nodules (1.49-fold, P < .001; 95% CI: 1.25, 1.73). Case management decisions showed better overall accuracy with tomosynthesis than with conventional chest radiography, as given by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve

  10. Industrial Radiography | Radiation Protection | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    2016-12-09

    Manufacturers use a method called industrial radiography to check for cracks or flaws in materials. Radiation is used in industrial radiography to show problems not visible from the outside without damaging the material.

  11. Accelerator system for neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Rusnak, B; Hall, J

    2000-09-21

    The field of x-ray radiography is well established for doing non-destructive evaluation of a vast array of components, assemblies, and objects. While x-rays excel in many radiography applications, their effectiveness diminishes rapidly if the objects of interest are surrounded by thick, high-density materials that strongly attenuate photons. Due to the differences in interaction mechanisms, neutron radiography is highly effective in imaging details inside such objects. To obtain a high intensity neutron source suitable for neutron imaging a 9-MeV linear accelerator is being evaluated for putting a deuteron beam into a high-pressure deuterium gas cell. As a windowless aperture is needed to transport the beam into the gas cell, a low-emittance is needed to minimize losses along the high-energy beam transport (HEBT) and the end station. A description of the HEBT, the transport optics into the gas cell, and the requirements for the linac will be presented.

  12. [Blunt thoracic injury].

    PubMed

    Miura, H; Taira, O; Hiraguri, S; Uchida, O; Hagiwara, M; Ikeda, T; Kato, H

    1998-06-01

    Of 161 patients with blunt thoracic injury, 135 were male (83.9%) and 26 were female. The most common cause of injury was traffic accidents (130 patients, 80.7%), followed by falls (22 patients), and crushing (7 patients). There were 46 third decade and 36 second decade patients. Thirty-two patients had single thoracic injury and the other had multiple organ injury. The most common associated injury was head injury (65 patients). Most traffic accidents involved motor cycle accident. Forty-four patients died, 32 within 24 hours, and 4 died to thoracic injury. These 4 patients were shock on arrival and died within 24 hours. The injury severity score, which was under 30 in 78.3% of patients, correlated to the mortality rate. Rib fracture was the most common thoracic injury in 96 patients followed by hemothorax in 91, pulmonary contusion in 79, and pneumothorax in 64. Most of the thoracic injuries were treated conservatively. Thoracotomy was performed in 6 patients. Other than one patient with rupture of the left pulmonary vein, 5 patients recovered. Continued bleeding at a rate of more than 200 ml/h from the chest drainage tube or no recovery from shock and large air leakage preventing re-expansion of the lung are indications for emergency thoracotomy. Thoracotomy should also be considered after conservative treatment in patients with continued air leakage or intrabronchial bleeding negatively affecting respiration. Indications for thoracotomy should be determined individually based on evaluating of vital sign.

  13. Image Acquisition and Quality in Digital Radiography.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Shannon

    2016-09-01

    Medical imaging has undergone dramatic changes and technological breakthroughs since the introduction of digital radiography. This article presents information on the development of digital radiography and types of digital radiography systems. Aspects of image quality and radiation exposure control are highlighted as well. In addition, the article includes related workplace changes and medicolegal considerations in the digital radiography environment. ©2016 American Society of Radiologic Technologists.

  14. Digital Radiography: A Technology Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Ben A.

    1982-12-01

    Digital radiography, a term hardly recognized two years ago, has grown to become the talk of the radiology community and the excitement of many commercial companies. M2st of this attention has been directed toward digital subtraction intravenous angiography), although during this same time period, a variety of digital radiography apparatus and image processing techniques have been under development. In November of 1980 at the RSNA Conference in Chicago, three commercial digital angiography systems were announced by Philips, Technicare and ADAC Corporations. During this same time period, the University of Arizona was discussing the concept of a photo electronic radiology department2, the University of Pittsburg and Stanford University were investigating line scan radiography3,4 and approximately five laboratories were carrying out clinical IV angiography with digital video systems.5-9 These developments followed basic research programs in digital electronic and computerized imaging at various locations around the world. 10-18 In the spring of 1981 we attempted to review the state of digital radiography, focusing on the various detector systems and image acquisition approaches.19 Since that time, rapid advancements in digital radiography have occurred. A major conference was held on digital radiography at Stanford UniversityzO, a new area detector system for digital radiography was announced by Fuji Film Corporation, clinical testing began on the Picker line scan digital chest unit21, and improvements were made in selenium detectors for digital radiography. Several additional companies announced digital video angiography systems, bringing the total now to approximately 15 companies worldwide. Digital video subtraction angiography is now well established as an important clinical diagnostic procedure and a variety of improvements and extensions of digital angiography systems are now ongoing. Digital acquisition and storage systems are increasing in both speed and

  15. Chest X-Ray (Chest Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Chest Chest x-ray uses a very ... limitations of Chest Radiography? What is a Chest X-ray (Chest Radiography)? The chest x-ray is the ...

  16. Thoracic arachnoid cyst resection.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Harel

    2014-09-01

    Arachnoid cysts in the spinal cord may be asymptomatic. In some cases arachnoid cysts may exert mass effect on the thoracic spinal cord and lead to pain and myelopathy symptoms. Arachnoid cysts may be difficult to visualize on an MRI scan because the thin walled arachnoid may not be visible. Focal displacement of the thoracic spinal cord and effacement of the spinal cord with apparent widening of the cerebrospinal fluid space is seen. This video demonstrates surgical techniques to remove a dorsal arachnoid cyst causing spinal cord compression. The surgery involves a thoracic laminectomy. The dura is opened sharply with care taken not to open the arachnoid so that the cyst can be well visualized. The thickened arachnoid walls of the cyst are removed to alleviate the compression caused by the arachnoid cyst. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/pgUrl9xvsD0.

  17. Complete thoracic ectopia cordis.

    PubMed

    Alphonso, N; Venugopal, P S; Deshpande, R; Anderson, D

    2003-03-01

    Thoracic ectopia cordis is a rare congenital defect with very few reported survivors after surgical correction. We report a case of complete thoracic ectopia cordis with double outlet right ventricle. The diagnosis was established antenatally and a repair was undertaken soon after birth. The child remained stable and was extubated on the fifth post-operative day. Forty-eight hours later the child succumbed to an unexplained respiratory arrest. Also presented is a review of the different surgical strategies for this unusual condition.

  18. Thoracic ectopia cordis

    PubMed Central

    Shad, Jimmy; Budhwani, Keshav; Biswas, Rakesh

    2012-01-01

    Ectopia cordis is defined as complete or partial displacement of the heart outside the thoracic cavity. It is a rare congenital defect in fusion of the anterior chest wall resulting in extra thoracic location of the heart. Its estimated prevalence is 5.5–7.9 per million live births. The authors had one such case of a 15-h-old full-term male neonate weighing 2.25 kg with an externally visible, beating heart over the chest wall. The neonate had difficulty in respiration with peripheral cyanosis. Patient died of cardiorespiratory arrest before any surgical intervention could be undertaken inspite of best possible resuscitative measures. PMID:23035158

  19. Thoracic ectopia cordis.

    PubMed

    Shad, Jimmy; Budhwani, Keshav; Biswas, Rakesh

    2012-09-30

    Ectopia cordis is defined as complete or partial displacement of the heart outside the thoracic cavity. It is a rare congenital defect in fusion of the anterior chest wall resulting in extra thoracic location of the heart. Its estimated prevalence is 5.5-7.9 per million live births. The authors had one such case of a 15-h-old full-term male neonate weighing 2.25 kg with an externally visible, beating heart over the chest wall. The neonate had difficulty in respiration with peripheral cyanosis. Patient died of cardiorespiratory arrest before any surgical intervention could be undertaken inspite of best possible resuscitative measures.

  20. Abdomen X-Ray (Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Abdomen Abdominal x-ray uses a very ... of an abdominal x-ray? What is abdominal x-ray? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical ...

  1. Embossed radiography utilizing energy subtraction.

    PubMed

    Osawa, Akihiro; Watanabe, Manabu; Sato, Eiichi; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Nagao, Jiro; Abderyim, Purkhet; Aizawa, Katsuo; Tanaka, Etsuro; Mori, Hidezo; Kawai, Toshiaki; Ehara, Shigeru; Sato, Shigehiro; Ogawa, Akira; Onagawa, Jun

    2009-01-01

    Currently, it is difficult to carry out refraction-contrast radiography by using a conventional X-ray generator. Thus, we developed an embossed radiography system utilizing dual-energy subtraction for decreasing the absorption contrast in unnecessary regions, and the contrast resolution of a target region was increased by use of image-shifting subtraction and a linear-contrast system in a flat panel detector (FPD). The X-ray generator had a 100-microm-focus tube. Energy subtraction was performed at tube voltages of 45 and 65 kV, a tube current of 0.50 mA, and an X-ray exposure time of 5.0 s. A 1.0-mm-thick aluminum filter was used for absorbing low-photon-energy bremsstrahlung X-rays. Embossed radiography was achieved with cohesion imaging by use of the FPD with pixel sizes of 48 x 48 microm, and the shifting dimension of an object in the horizontal direction ranged from 100 to 200 microm. At a shifting distance of 100 mum, the spatial resolutions in the horizontal and vertical directions measured with a lead test chart were both 83 microm. In embossed radiography of non-living animals, we obtained high-contrast embossed images of fine bones, gadolinium oxide particles in the kidney, and coronary arteries approximately 100 microm in diameter.

  2. European perspectives in thoracic surgery

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Europe, the old Continent, has been the cradle of thoracic surgery from the beginning of the last century. The structure and the activities of the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) activities are directed to enlighten the path, provide the tools and set the standards for a quality inspired practice in thoracic surgery. PMID:24868436

  3. Thoracic anesthesia in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Kozian, Alf; Kretzschmar, Moritz A; Schilling, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    The mean age of patients presenting for thoracic surgery is rising steadily, associated with an increased demand for thoracic surgical treatments by geriatric patients. With increasing age, physiologic changes and comorbidities have to be considered. Thoracic anesthesia for elderly patients requires greater specific knowledge. Respiratory mechanics change progressively during aging, and the pharmacology of different drugs is also altered with increasing age. This has implications for the preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative management of elderly patients scheduled for thoracic surgery. Special focus has to be placed on preoperative evaluation, the ventilation regime and general intraoperative management. Effective postoperative pain treatment after geriatric thoracic surgery requires careful pain assessment and drug titration. Considering key points of physiology and pharmacology can help to provide best possible care for the increasing number of elderly patients in thoracic surgery. Management of geriatric patients in thoracic surgery offer opportunities for anaesthetic interventions including protective ventilation, use of different anesthetics, anaesthesia monitoring, fluid management and pain therapy.

  4. Comparison of thoracic radiographs and single breath-hold helical CT for detection of pulmonary nodules in dogs with metastatic neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Nemanic, Sarah; London, Cheryl A; Wisner, Erik R

    2006-01-01

    Imaging studies in people indicate that x-ray computed tomography (CT) is a more sensitive technique than thoracic radiography for the detection of pulmonary metastasic neoplasia. Systematic studies comparing CT and thoracic radiographic techniques in veterinary patients have not been performed. The present retrospective study was designed to directly compare the efficacy of these 2 techniques in detecting pulmonary nodules in dogs. Eighteen dogs with histologically confirmed pulmonary metastatic neoplasia had contemporaneous thoracic radiographs and pulmonary CT scans compared. Quantitative analyses included estimation of pulmonary nodule size, number, and lobar distribution on thoracic radiographs and CT images. Only 9% of CT-detected pulmonary nodules were identified on thoracic radiographs (P < .003). The lower size threshold was approximately 1 mm to detect pulmonary nodules on CT images and 7-9 mm to reliably detect nodules on radiographs (P < .0001). Additionally, pulmonary nodules were detected in a significantly greater number of lung lobes using CT as compared with thoracic radiographs (P < .0001). These data indicate that CT is significantly more sensitive than thoracic radiography for detecting soft-tissue nodules in dogs. As such, thoracic CT should be considered in any patient with neoplasia that has potential for pulmonary metastasis to more reliably stage the disease, particularly when accurate characterization of the extent and distribution of pulmonary metastatic disease affects therapeutic planning.

  5. System for uncollimated digital radiography

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Han; Hall, James M.; McCarrick, James F.; Tang, Vincent

    2015-08-11

    The inversion algorithm based on the maximum entropy method (MEM) removes unwanted effects in high energy imaging resulting from an uncollimated source interacting with a finitely thick scintillator. The algorithm takes as input the image from the thick scintillator (TS) and the radiography setup geometry. The algorithm then outputs a restored image which appears as if taken with an infinitesimally thin scintillator (ITS). Inversion is accomplished by numerically generating a probabilistic model relating the ITS image to the TS image and then inverting this model on the TS image through MEM. This reconstruction technique can reduce the exposure time or the required source intensity without undesirable object blurring on the image by allowing the use of both thicker scintillators with higher efficiencies and closer source-to-detector distances to maximize incident radiation flux. The technique is applicable in radiographic applications including fast neutron, high-energy gamma and x-ray radiography using thick scintillators.

  6. Robotics in thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Kernstine, Kemp H

    2004-10-01

    Surgical use of robotics, or computer-assisted surgical systems (CAS), has evolved over the last 10 years; for the treatment of chest diseases, however, the development has really occurred in the last 3 to 4 years. This brief history means that there have been few publications in the medical literature, and those that exist are mostly case reports. Moreover, because of this modest experience, robotic thoracic procedures currently take more time than nonrobotic cases and, thus, are more expensive. The surgical learning curve appears to be steep, especially for the more complex procedures. As surgeons gain greater experience and the complexity and cost of the equipment are reduced, we should expect to see greater utility of CAS in thoracic surgery.

  7. Thoracic Blastomycosis and Empyema

    PubMed Central

    Wiesman, Irvin M.; Hernan, M. Janeen; Sekosan, Marin; Vigneswaran, Wickii T.

    1999-01-01

    Blastomycosis is endemic in river valley areas of the south-eastern and Midwestern United States. Pulmonary manifestations include chronic cough and pleuritic pain. Radiographie appearance of the infection can mimic bronchogenic lung carcinoma. Pleural effusion is rarely associated with this pulmonary infection, and empyema has not been previously reported. We report a case of pulmonary and pleural Blastomyces dermatitidis infection presenting as empyema thoracis. Diagnosis and treatment were attained with video-assisted thoracoscopic (VATS) pleural and lung biopsy and debridement. PMID:10323175

  8. Clinical radiography education across Europe.

    PubMed

    England, A; Geers-van Gemeren, S; Henner, A; Kukkes, T; Pronk-Larive, D; Rainford, L; McNulty, J P

    2017-09-01

    To establish a picture of clinical education models within radiography programmes across Europe by surveying higher education institutions registered as affiliate members of the European Federation of Radiography Societies (EFRS). An online survey was developed to ascertain data on: practical training, supervisory arrangements, placement logistics, quality assurance processes, and the assessment of clinical competencies. Responses were identifiable in terms of educational institution and country. All educational institutions who were affiliate members at the time of the study were invited to participate (n = 46). Descriptive and thematic analyses are reported. A response rate of 82.6% (n = 38) was achieved from educational institutions representing 21 countries. Over half of responding institutions (n = 21) allocated in excess of 60 European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System (ECTS) credits to practical training. In nearly three-quarters of clinical placements there was a dedicated clinical practice supervisor in place; two-thirds of these were employed directly by the hospital. Clinical practice supervisors were typically state registered radiographers, who had a number of years of clinical experience and had received specific training for the role. Typical responsibilities included monitoring student progress, providing feedback and completing paperwork, this did however vary between respondents. In almost all institutions there were support systems in place for clinical placement supervisors within their roles. Similarities exist in the provision of clinical radiography education across Europe. Clinical placements are a core component of radiography education and are supported by experienced clinical practice supervisors. Mechanisms are in place for the selection, training and support of clinical practice supervisors. Professional societies should work collaboratively to establish guidelines for effective clinical placements. Copyright © 2017 The

  9. Managment of thoracic empyema.

    PubMed

    Sherman, M M; Subramanian, V; Berger, R L

    1977-04-01

    Over a ten year period, 102 patients with thoracic empyemata were treated at Boston City Hospital. Only three patients died from the pleural infection while twenty-six succumbed to the associated diseases. Priniciples of management include: (1) thoracentesis; (2) antibiotics; (3) closed-tube thoracostomy; (4) sinogram; (5) open drainage; (6) empyemectomy and decortication in selected patients; and (7) bronchoscopy and barium swallow when the etiology is uncertain.

  10. Thoracic textilomas: CT findings*

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Dianne Melo; Zanetti, Gláucia; Araujo, Cesar Augusto; Nobre, Luiz Felipe; Meirelles, Gustavo de Souza Portes; Pereira e Silva, Jorge Luiz; Guimarães, Marcos Duarte; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Souza, Arthur Soares; Hochhegger, Bruno; Marchiori, Edson

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to analyze chest CT scans of patients with thoracic textiloma. METHODS: This was a retrospective study of 16 patients (11 men and 5 women) with surgically confirmed thoracic textiloma. The chest CT scans of those patients were evaluated by two independent observers, and discordant results were resolved by consensus. RESULTS: The majority (62.5%) of the textilomas were caused by previous heart surgery. The most common symptoms were chest pain (in 68.75%) and cough (in 56.25%). In all cases, the main tomographic finding was a mass with regular contours and borders that were well-defined or partially defined. Half of the textilomas occurred in the right hemithorax and half occurred in the left. The majority (56.25%) were located in the lower third of the lung. The diameter of the mass was ≤ 10 cm in 10 cases (62.5%) and > 10 cm in the remaining 6 cases (37.5%). Most (81.25%) of the textilomas were heterogeneous in density, with signs of calcification, gas, radiopaque marker, or sponge-like material. Peripheral expansion of the mass was observed in 12 (92.3%) of the 13 patients in whom a contrast agent was used. Intraoperatively, pleural involvement was observed in 14 cases (87.5%) and pericardial involvement was observed in 2 (12.5%). CONCLUSIONS: It is important to recognize the main tomographic aspects of thoracic textilomas in order to include this possibility in the differential diagnosis of chest pain and cough in patients with a history of heart or thoracic surgery, thus promoting the early identification and treatment of this postoperative complication. PMID:25410842

  11. A comparison of computed tomography, computed radiography, and film-screen radiography for the detection of canine pulmonary nodules.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Kate; Joly, Hugo; Blond, Laurent; D'Anjou, Marc-André; Nadeau, Marie-Ève; Olive, Julien; Beauchamp, Guy

    2012-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has become more widely available and computed radiography (CR) has replaced film-screen radiography for canine thoracic imaging in many veterinary practices. There are limited data comparing these modalities in a veterinary clinical setting to detect pulmonary nodules. We compared CT, CR, and film-screen radiography for detecting the presence, number, and characteristics of pulmonary nodules in dogs. Observer performance for a variety of experience levels was also evaluated. Twenty-one client-owned dogs with a primary neoplastic process underwent CT and CR; nine also received film-screen radiographs. Positive/negative classification by consensus agreed between the three modalities in 8/9 dogs and between CR and CT in the remaining 12. CT detected the greatest (P = 0.002) total number of nodules and no difference was seen between CR and films. The greatest number of nodules was seen in the right middle and both caudal regions, but only using CT (P < 0.0001). Significantly smaller nodules were detected with CT (P = 0.0007) and no difference in minimum size was detected between CR and films. Observer accuracy was high for all modalities; particularly for CT (90.5-100%) and for the senior radiologist (90.5-100%). CT was also characterized by the least interobserver variability. Although CT, CR, and film-screen performed similarly in determining the presence or absence of pulmonary nodules, a greater number of smaller nodules was detected with CT, and CT was associated with greater diagnostic confidence and observer accuracy and agreement. © 2012 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  12. Viroimmunotherapy of Thoracic Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Alexander S.; Patel, Manish R.

    2017-01-01

    Thoracic cancers, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), small cell lung cancer (SCLC), and malignant pleural mesothelioma (MM), cause the highest rate of cancer mortality worldwide. Most of these deaths are as a result of NSCLC; however, prognoses for the other two diseases remain as some of the poorest of any cancers. Recent advances in immunotherapy, specifically immune checkpoint inhibitors, have begun to help a small population of patients with advanced lung cancer. People who respond to these immune therapies generally have a durable response and many see dramatic decreases in their disease. However, response to immune therapies remains relatively low. Therefore, intense research is now underway to rationally develop combination therapies to expand the range of patients who will respond to and benefit from immune therapy. One promising approach is with oncolytic viruses. These oncolytic viruses (OVs) have been found to be selective for or have been engineered to preferentially infect and kill cancer cells. In pre-clinical models of different thoracic cancers, it has been found that these viruses can induce immunogenic cell death, increase the number of immune mediators brought into the tumor microenvironment and broaden the neoantigen-specific T cell response. We will review here the literature regarding the application of virotherapy toward augmenting immune responses in thoracic cancers. PMID:28536345

  13. [Surgery for thoracic tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Kilani, T; Boudaya, M S; Zribi, H; Ouerghi, S; Marghli, A; Mestiri, T; Mezni, F

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is mainly a medical disease. Surgery has been the unique therapeutic tool for a long time before the advent of specific antituberculous drugs, and the role of surgery was then confined to the treatment of the sequelae of tuberculosis and their complications. The resurgence of tuberculosis and the emergence of multidrug-resistant TB combined to immunosuppressed patients represent a new challenge for tuberculosis surgery. Surgery may be indicated for a diagnostic purpose in patients with pulmonary, pleural, mediastinal or thoracic wall involvement, or with a therapeutic purpose (drainage, resection, residual cavity obliteration). Modern imaging techniques and the advent of video-assisted thoracic surgery allowed a new approach of this pathology; the majority of diagnostic interventions and selected cases requiring lung resection can be performed through a mini-invasive approach. Patients proposed for aggressive surgery may be treated with the best results thanks to a good evaluation of the thoracic lesions, of the patients' nutritional, infectious and general status combined with a good coordination between the specialized medical team for an optimal preparation to surgery.

  14. Thoracic computed tomography in feline patients without use of chemical restraint.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Cintia R; Mitchell, Mark A; O'Brien, Robert T

    2011-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) and thoracic radiography were performed in nonsedated, nonanesthetized, cats with thoracic disease. The final diagnosis was obtained with echocardiography, cytology, histopathology, necropsy, or response to therapy. For CT imaging, cats were in a positioning device using a 16 multislice helical CT system. Fifty-four cats had CT imaging of which 50 had thoracic radiography. The most common diagnoses were lung neoplasia, lower airway disease, and cardiomyopathy (nine each). Other disease groups included mediastinal mass (eight), infection (seven), trauma (four), and hernia (three). CT provided additional correct diagnoses in 28% (14/50) and additional information in 74% (37/50) of the cats. Additional correct diagnoses achieved only with CT were most common for cats with lower airway disease. The most common additional findings with CT were lung nodules (n=4), lung masses (n=4), bronchiectasis (n=4), and mediastinal lymphadenopathy (n=3). Survey CT led to a significant different diagnosis or different prognosis in 20 of the 50 cats that were imaged both modalities. Contrast CT was performed in 19 cats, most commonly in cats with lung neoplasia (n=6), a mediastinal mass (n=4) or an infection (n=3), and provided additional correct diagnosis in two cats not achieved with survey CT. Thoracic CT using a positioning device in diseased awake cats is feasible, safe, and clinically useful.

  15. Nonintubated anesthesia for thoracic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bei

    2014-01-01

    Nonintubated thoracic surgery has been used in procedures including pleura, lungs and mediastinum. Appropriate anesthesia techniques with or without sedation allow thoracic surgery patients to avoid the potential risks of intubated general anesthesia, particularly for the high-risk patients. However, nonintubated anesthesia for thoracic surgery has some benefits as well as problems. In this review, the background, indication, perioperative anesthetic consideration and management, and advantages and disadvantages are discussed and summarized. PMID:25589994

  16. Penetrating thoracic trauma.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Renata; Baisden, Clinton E; Harker, Lori; Calhoon, John H

    2008-01-01

    The initial approach to penetrating thoracic trauma is directed towards the pathophysiologic syndrome upon presentation. Most patients are successfully treated with drainage tubes. The unstable patient may necessitate thoracotomy at the emergency room to drain cardiac tamponade, provide cardiac massage and control bleeding. The guidelines for this procedure are reviewed. Need for further work-up of potential injuries to other mediastinal organs is frequently screened by computerized tomography. Surgery might still be needed, on a less emergent basis, in order to repair injuries to the trachea/esophagus, retained hemothorax, or to rule out diaphragmatic injury. Laparoscopic and thoracoscopic procedures may be used in specific situations.

  17. Radiography of Chaotically Moving Objects

    SciTech Connect

    Vavrik, Daniel; Jandejsek, Ivan; Dammer, Jiri; Holy, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jakubek, Martin

    2007-11-26

    Radiography of moving objects is an advanced problem when the dynamic range of acquired radiograms is restricted by a limited exposition time. Exposition time has to be short to avoid image blurring due to object moving. It is possible to increase the dynamic range by summing short time radiograms set when the periodical object movement is presented as in the case of heart beating for instance. On the other hand a non periodical movement can be studied using tools of X-ray Digital Image Correlation technique. Short time radiograms are fitted into corresponding positions and consequently summed for higher data statistics as it is presented in this work.

  18. Patient risk from interproximal radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, S.J.; Pujol, A. Jr.; Chen, T.S.; Malcolm, A.W.; James, A.E. Jr.

    1984-09-01

    Computer simulation methods for determining patient dose from dental radiography have demonstrated that patient risk from a two-film interproximal examination ranges from 1.1 X 10(-8) to 3.4 X 10(-7) using 90-kVp beams, depending on film speed, projection technique, and age and sex of the patient. Further, changing from a short-cone round-beam to a long-cone technique with rectangular collimation reduces risk by a factor of 2.9, independent of other factors.

  19. Lesion detectability in digital radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagne, Robert M.; Boswell, Jonathan S.; Myers, Kyle J.; Peter, Guillaume

    2001-06-01

    The usefulness of Fourier-based measures of imaging performance has come into question for the evaluation of digital imaging systems. Figures of merit such as detective quantum efficiency are relevant for linear, shift-invariant systems with stationary noise. However, no digital imaging system is shift invariant, and realistic images do not satisfy the stationarity condition. Our methods for task- based evaluation of imaging systems, based on lesion detectability, do not require such assumptions. We have computed the performance of Hotelling and nonprewhitening matched-filter observers for the task of lesion detection in digital radiography.

  20. PROTON RADIOGRAPHY FOR AN ADVANCED HYDROTEST FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    C. MORRIS

    2000-11-01

    Analysis of data from BNL experiment 933 is presented. Results demonstrate that proton radiography can meet many of the requirements for an Advanced Hydrotest Facility (AHF). Results for background, position resolution, metrology, quantitative radiography, material identification, and edge resolution are presented.

  1. ARG portable neutron radiography. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, J.P.

    1995-04-01

    In this report all available neutron radiographic data, including results of tests run at LANL, McClellan AFB, and University of Virginia, will be combined to outline specific transportable neutron radiography systems that could achieve the desired results as a complement to x-radiography capabilities for the Accident Response Group (ARG).

  2. INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY STUDENT GUIDE AND LABORATORY EXERCISES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Adult, Vocational, and Technical Education (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC. Div. of Vocational and Technical Education.

    THIS INSTRUCTOR'S GUIDE TO AN 80-HOUR COURSE IN INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY IS COORDINATED WITH LESSONS IN THE STUDENT GUIDE AND LABORATORY EXERCISES AND IS BASED ON MATERIAL IN THE COURSE MANUAL, INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY. THE COURSE IS INTENDED TO TRAIN HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES AS BEGINNING RADIOGRAPHERS WHO ARE EXPECTED TO BE ABLE TO EXTEND THEIR…

  3. Radiological protection in equine radiography and radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yoxall, A T

    1977-10-01

    The principles of radiological protection are summarised and consideration is then given to problems, which may confront the equine practitioner, in the fulfillment of these principles during diagnostic radiography of the limbs, head, and spine of the horse. The place of anaesthesia in such procedures is discussed and the special problems associated with therapeutic radiography of the horse are considered.

  4. Thoracic damage control surgery.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Roberto; Saad, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The damage control surgery came up with the philosophy of applying essential maneuvers to control bleeding and abdominal contamination in trauma patients who are within the limits of their physiological reserves. This concept was extended to thoracic injuries, where relatively simple maneuvers can shorten operative time of in extremis patients. This article aims to revise the various damage control techniques in thoracic organs that must be known to the surgeon engaged in emergency care. RESUMO A cirurgia de controle de danos surgiu com a filosofia de se aplicar manobras essenciais para controle de sangramento e contaminação abdominal, em doentes traumatizados, nos limites de suas reservas fisiológicas. Este conceito se estendeu para as lesões torácicas, onde manobras relativamente simples, podem abreviar o tempo operatório de doentes in extremis. Este artigo tem como objetivo, revisar as diversas técnicas de controle de dano em órgãos torácicos, que devem ser de conhecimento do cirurgião que atua na emergência.

  5. Long thoracic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Wiater, J M; Flatow, E L

    1999-11-01

    Injury to the long thoracic nerve causing paralysis or weakness of the serratus anterior muscle can be disabling. Patients with serratus palsy may present with pain, weakness, limitation of shoulder elevation, and scapular winging with medial translation of the scapula, rotation of the inferior angle toward the midline, and prominence of the vertebral border. Long thoracic nerve dysfunction may result from trauma or may occur without injury. Fortunately, most patients experience a return of serratus anterior function with conservative treatment, but recovery may take as many as 2 years. Bracing often is tolerated poorly. Patients with severe symptoms in whom 12 months of conservative treatment has failed may benefit from surgical reconstruction. Although many surgical procedures have been described, the current preferred treatment is transfer of the sternal head of the pectoralis major tendon to the inferior angle of the scapula reinforced with fascia or tendon autograft. Many series have shown good to excellent results, with consistent improvement in function, elimination of winging, and reduction of pain.

  6. Process waste assessment for the Radiography Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, N.M.

    1994-07-01

    This Process Waste Assessment was conducted to evaluate the Radiography Laboratory, located in Building 923. It documents the processes, identifies the hazardous chemical waste streams generated by these processes, recommends possible ways to minimize waste, and serves as a reference for future assessments of this facility. The Radiography Laboratory provides film radiography or radioscopy (electronic imaging) of weapon and nonweapon components. The Radiography Laboratory has six x-ray machines and one gamma ray source. It also has several other sealed beta- and gamma-ray isotope sources of low microcurie ({mu}Ci) activity. The photochemical processes generate most of the Radiography Laboratory`s routinely generated hazardous waste, and most of that is generated by the DuPont film processor. Because the DuPont film processor generates the most photochemical waste, it was selected for an estimated material balance.

  7. Reference doses for dental radiography.

    PubMed

    Napier, I D

    1999-04-24

    To establish reference doses for use within dental radiography. Retrospective analysis, single centre. UK General Dental Practice, 1995-1998. A statistical analysis was performed on the results from NRPB evaluations of dental x-ray equipment within general practice. The third quartile patient entrance dose was determined from 6,344 assessments of intra-oral x-ray equipment. The third quartile dose-width product was determined from 387 assessments of panoramic x-ray equipment. The third quartile patient entrance dose for an adult mandibular molar intra-oral radiograph is 3.9 mGy. The third quartile dose-width product for a standard adult panoramic radiograph is 66.7 mGy mm. NRPB recommends the adoption of reference doses of 4 mGy for an adult mandibular molar intra-oral radiograph and 65 mGy mm for a standard adult panoramic radiograph. These reference values can be used as a guide to accepted clinical practice. Where radiography is carried out using doses above these reference values, a thorough review of radiographic practice should be made to either improve techniques, or justify keeping the current techniques. However, attainment of doses at or below the reference values cannot be construed as achievement of optimum performance; further dose reductions below the reference value are still practicable.

  8. Quality assurance in film radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Van Bellegem, L.; Vaessen, B.

    1993-12-31

    The ISO 9000 standards were originally developed during the 1980`s to provide uniform, worldwide quality assurance requirements. The EC (European Communities) adopted these standards as part of their modular approach to ``conformity assessment`` procedures, for several product categories. This includes the development of standards (specifications) which define what the purchaser wants and what the supplier agrees to provide, as well as quality system registration (certification) which increases confidence in the supplier`s ability to produce consistently. The requirements are typically most rigorous for regulated products that have a major impact on health and safety i.e film radiographic systems. This is the main reason for making available the necessary Q.C. tools in film radiography to comply with Q.A. specifications and guarantee the required consistent performance. These tools can only give satisfying support if they are dedicated, easy to use, precise and cost effective at the user`s level. The main topics for such a Q.A. package are: (1) standard for Film System classification for industrial radiography; (2) film system certification; and (3) standard for control of film processing by means of reference values i.e. pre-exposed film wedges and archiving quality control method.

  9. Long thoracic nerve paralysis associated with thoracic outlet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nakatsuchi, Y; Saitoh, S; Hosaka, M; Uchiyama, S

    1994-01-01

    Two cases of long thoracic nerve palsy associated with thoracic outlet syndrome are reported. Both patients had abnormal posture, with low-set shoulders and winged scapulae. Clinically there was weakness of the serratus anterior muscle with partial denervotion on electromyography. The diagnosis of thoracic outlet syndrome was based on positive vascular tests and brachial plexus nerve compression symptoms induced by the vascular testing positions. An orthosis that held the shoulder in an elevated position was used in both cases. Complete recovery of shoulder function and relief of the symptoms was achieved in both cases at 8 and 13 months, respectively, after application of the orthosis.

  10. Andersson lesions of whole spine magnetic resonance imaging compared with plain radiography in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong-Kyu; Shin, Kichul; Song, Yoonah; Lee, Seunghun; Kim, Tae-Hwan

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the characteristics of Andersson lesions using whole spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compared with plain radiography in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). A total of 62 patients with AS who had undergone whole spine MRI and plain radiography were retrospectively enrolled in this study. We compared the number of discovertebral units (DVUs) with Andersson lesions with clinical and radiographic indices such as erythrocyte sediment rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), and modified Stoke Ankylosing Spondylitis Spine Score (mSASSS). Fifty-three patients (85.5 %) by whole spine MRI and 23 patients (37.1 %) by plain radiography had at least one Andersson lesion. We found 129 DVUs with Andersson lesions (11.1 %) by MRI and 35 DVUs by plain radiography over all the spine levels. Andersson lesions by MRI were most commonly detected at the lower thoracic spine (from T7-8 to T12-L1). Among the 151 total Andersson lesions by whole spine MRI, 41 were identified as central disc type, 26 as anterior peripheral disc type, 44 as posterior peripheral disc type, and 40 as diffuse disc type. However, the number of Andersson lesions did not correlate with ESR, CRP, BASDAI, BASFI, or mSASSS (p > 0.05 for all). Our study indicates that the presence of Andersson lesions in patients with AS is clearly underestimated. MRI is a superior technique for detecting early Andersson lesions compared with plain radiography.

  11. Multiscale image processing and antiscatter grids in digital radiography.

    PubMed

    Lo, Winnie Y; Hornof, William J; Zwingenberger, Allison L; Robertson, Ian D

    2009-01-01

    Scatter radiation is a source of noise and results in decreased signal-to-noise ratio and thus decreased image quality in digital radiography. We determined subjectively whether a digitally processed image made without a grid would be of similar quality to an image made with a grid but without image processing. Additionally the effects of exposure dose and of a using a grid with digital radiography on overall image quality were studied. Thoracic and abdominal radiographs of five dogs of various sizes were made. Four acquisition techniques were included (1) with a grid, standard exposure dose, digital image processing; (2) without a grid, standard exposure dose, digital image processing; (3) without a grid, half the exposure dose, digital image processing; and (4) with a grid, standard exposure dose, no digital image processing (to mimic a film-screen radiograph). Full-size radiographs as well as magnified images of specific anatomic regions were generated. Nine reviewers rated the overall image quality subjectively using a five-point scale. All digitally processed radiographs had higher overall scores than nondigitally processed radiographs regardless of patient size, exposure dose, or use of a grid. The images made at half the exposure dose had a slightly lower quality than those made at full dose, but this was only statistically significant in magnified images. Using a grid with digital image processing led to a slight but statistically significant increase in overall quality when compared with digitally processed images made without a grid but whether this increase in quality is clinically significant is unknown.

  12. Image enhancement for radiography inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Wong, Brian Stephen; Guan, Tui Chen

    2005-04-01

    The x-ray radiographic testing method is often used for detecting defects as a non-destructive testing method (NDT). In many cases, NDT is used for aircraft components, welds, etc. Hence, the backgrounds are always more complex than a piece of steel. Radiographic images are low contrast, dark and high noise image. It is difficult to detect defects directly. So, image enhancement is a significant part of automated radiography inspection system. Histogram equalization and median filter are the most frequently used techniques to enhance the radiographic images. In this paper, the adaptive histogram equalization and contrast limited histogram equalization are compared with histogram equalization. The adaptive wavelet thresholding is compared with median filter. Through comparative analysis, the contrast limited histogram equalization and adaptive wavelet thresholding can enhance perception of defects better.

  13. Thoracic manifestations of Behçet disease at CT.

    PubMed

    Hiller, Nurith; Lieberman, Sivan; Chajek-Shaul, Tova; Bar-Ziv, Jacob; Shaham, Dorith

    2004-01-01

    Behçet disease is a multisystemic and chronic inflammatory disorder of unknown cause that is characterized by recurrent oral and genital ulcerations, ocular manifestations, and additional clinical manifestations in multiple organ systems. Behçet disease involving the chest can manifest as a wide spectrum of abnormalities. Although conventional chest radiography is commonly used for initial assessment, spiral computed tomography can demonstrate the entire spectrum of thoracic manifestations of Behçet disease, including abnormalities of the vessel lumen and wall, perivascular tissues, lung parenchyma, pleura, and mediastinal structures. Aneurysms of the pulmonary arteries, with or without thrombosis, are a typical manifestation of Behçet disease. Other manifestations include thrombosis, vasculitis, hemorrhage, infarction, and inflammation. Familiarity with these manifestations can be useful in the diagnosis of Behçet disease, helping to determine the cause of symptoms in patients who present with hemoptysis and guide the choice of appropriate therapy.

  14. Excision of Thoracic Chondrosarcoma: Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Wadhwa, Rishi; Theodore, Pierre; Mummaneni, Praveen

    2016-01-01

    Chondrosarcomas are cartilage-matrix-forming tumors that make up 20-27% of primary malignant bone tumors and are the third most common primary bone malignancy after multiple myelomas and osteosarcomas. Radiographic assessment of this condition includes plain radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging for tumor characterization and delineation of intraosseous and extraosseous involvement. Most chondrosarcomas are refractory to chemotherapy and radiation therapy; therefore, wide en bloc surgical excision offers the best chance for cure. Chondrosarcomas frequently affect the pelvis and upper and lower extremities. In rare instances, the chest wall can be involved, with chondrosarcomas occurring in the ribs, sternum, anterior costosternal junction, and posterior costotransverse junction. In this article, we present a patient with thoracic chondrosarcoma centered at the left T7 costotransverse joint with effacement of the left T7-T8 neuroforamen. We also detail our operative technique of wide en bloc chondrosarcoma excision and review current literature on this topic. PMID:27588229

  15. The evolution of thoracic anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Jay B

    2005-02-01

    The specialty of thoracic surgery has evolved along with the modem practice of anesthesia. This close relationship began in the 1930s and continues today. Thoracic surgery has grown from a field limited almost exclusively to simple chest wall procedures to the present situation in which complex procedures, such as lung volume reduction or lung transplantation, now can be performed on the most severely compromised patient. The great advances in thoracic surgery have followed discoveries and technical innovations in many medical fields. One of the most important reasons for the rapid escalation in the number and complexity of thoracic surgical procedures now being performed has been the evolution of anesthesia for thoracic surgery. There has been so much progress in this area that numerous books and journals are devoted entirely to this subject. The author has been privileged to work with several surgeons who specialized in noncardiac thoracic surgery. As a colleague of 25 years, the noted pulmonary surgeon James B.D. Mark wrote, "Any operation is a team effort... (but) nowhere is this team effort more important than in thoracic surgery, where near-choreography of moves by all participants is essential. Exchange of information, status and plans are mandatory". This team approach between the thoracic surgeon and the anesthesiologist reflects the history of the two specialties. With new advances in technology, such as continuous blood gas monitoring and the pharmacologic management of pulmonary circulation to maximize oxygenation during one-lung ventilation, in the future even more complex procedures may be able to be performed safely on even higher risk patients.

  16. Multi-purpose neutron radiography system

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, J.P.; Bryant, L.E.; Berry, P.

    1996-07-01

    A conceptual design is given for a low cost, multipurpose radiography system suited for the needs of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The proposed neutron source is californium-252. One purpose is to provide an in-house capability for occasional, reactor quality, neutron radiography thus replacing the recently closed Omega-West Reactor. A second purpose is to provide a highly reliable standby transportable neutron radiography system. A third purpose is to provide for transportable neutron probe gamma spectroscopy techniques. The cost is minimized by shared use of an existing x-ray facility, and by use of an existing transport cask. The achievable neutron radiography and radioscopy performance characteristics have been verified. The demonstrated image qualities range from high resolution gadolinium - SR film, with L:D = 100:1, to radioscopy using a LIXI image with L:D = 30:1 and neutron fluence 3.4 x 10{sup 5} n/cm{sup 2}.

  17. Information extraction from muon radiography data

    SciTech Connect

    Borozdin, K. N.; Asaki, T. J.; Chartrand, R.; Hengartner, N. W.; Hogan, G. E.; Morris, C. L.; Priedhorsky, W. C.; Schirato, R.C.; Schultz, L. J.; Sottile, M. J.; Vixie, K. R.; Wohlberg, B. E.; Blanpied, G.

    2004-01-01

    Scattering muon radiography was proposed recently as a technique of detection and 3-d imaging for dense high-Z objects. High-energy cosmic ray muons are deflected in matter in the process of multiple Coulomb scattering. By measuring the deflection angles we are able to reconstruct the configuration of high-Z material in the object. We discuss the methods for information extraction from muon radiography data. Tomographic methods widely used in medical images have been applied to a specific muon radiography information source. Alternative simple technique based on the counting of high-scattered muons in the voxels seems to be efficient in many simulated scenes. SVM-based classifiers and clustering algorithms may allow detection of compact high-Z object without full image reconstruction. The efficiency of muon radiography can be increased using additional informational sources, such as momentum estimation, stopping power measurement, and detection of muonic atom emission.

  18. Corrosion Inhibitors as Penetrant Dyes for Radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, Howard L.; Hall, Phillip B.

    2003-01-01

    Liquid/vapor-phase corrosion inhibitors (LVCIs) have been found to be additionally useful as penetrant dyes for neutron radiography (and perhaps also x-radiography). Enhancement of radiographic contrasts by use of LVCIs can reveal cracks, corrosion, and other defects that may be undetectable by ultrasonic inspection, that are hidden from direct optical inspection, and/or that are difficult or impossible to detect in radiographs made without dyes.

  19. Motivations for muon radiography of active volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macedonio, G.; Martini, M.

    2010-02-01

    Muon radiography represents an innovative tool for investigating the interior of active volcanoes. This method integrates the conventional geophysical techniques and provides an independent way to estimate the density of the volcano structure and reveal the presence of magma conduits. The experience from the pioneer experiments performed at Mt. Asama, Mt. West Iwate, and Showa-Shinzan (Japan) are very encouraging. Muon radiography could be applied, in principle, at any stratovolcano. Here we focus our attention on Vesuvius and Stromboli (Italy).

  20. [Optimization of digital chest radiography image post-processing in diagnosis of pneumoconiosis].

    PubMed

    Sheng, Bing-yong; Mao, Ling; Zhou, Shao-wei; Shi, Jin

    2013-11-01

    To establish the optimal image post-processing parameters for digital chest radiography as preliminary research for introducing digital radiography (DR) to pneumoconiosis diagnosis in China. A total of 204 pneumoconiosis patients and 31 dust-exposed workers were enrolled as the subjects in this research. Film-screen radiography (FSR) and DR images were taken for all subjects. DR films were printed after raw images were processed and parameters were altered using DR workstation (GE Healthcare, U.S.A.). Image gradations, lung textures, and the imaging of thoracic vertebra were evaluated by pneumoconiosis experts, and the optimal post-processing parameters were selected. Optical density was measured for both DR films and FSR films. For the DR machine used in this research, the contrast adjustment (CA) and brightness adjustment (BA) were the main parameters that determine the brightness and gray levels of images. The optimal ranges for CA and BA were 115%∼120% and 160%∼165%, respectively. The quality of DR chest films would be optimized when tissue contrast was adjusted to a maximum of 0.15, edge to a minimum of 1, and both noise reduction and tissue equalization to0.The failure rate of chest DR (0.4%) was significantly lower than that of chest FSR (17%) (P < 0.05). After appropriate image post-processing on DR machine purchased from GE Healthcare, the DR chest films can meet all requirements for the quality of chest X-ray films in the Chinese diagnostic criteria for pneumoconiosis.

  1. Digital radiography image quality: image acquisition.

    PubMed

    Williams, Mark B; Krupinski, Elizabeth A; Strauss, Keith J; Breeden, William K; Rzeszotarski, Mark S; Applegate, Kimberly; Wyatt, Margaret; Bjork, Sandra; Seibert, J Anthony

    2007-06-01

    This article on digital radiography image acquisition is the first of two articles written as part of an intersociety effort to establish image quality standards for digital and computed radiography. The topic of the other paper is digital radiography image processing and display. The articles were developed collaboratively by the ACR, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, and the Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine. Increasingly, medical imaging and patient information are being managed using digital data during acquisition, transmission, storage, display, interpretation, and consultation. Data management during each of these operations has a direct impact on the quality of patient care. These articles describe what is known to improve image quality for digital and computed radiography and make recommendations on optimal acquisition, processing, and display. The practice of digital radiography is a rapidly evolving technology that will require the timely revision of any guidelines and standards. This document provides a basis for the technologies available today in clinical practice and may be useful in guiding the future clinical practice of digital radiography.

  2. Thorium-uranium fission radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, E. L.; Weiss, J. R.; Burnett, D. S.; Woolum, D. S.

    1976-01-01

    Results are described for studies designed to develop routine methods for in-situ measurement of the abundance of Th and U on a microscale in heterogeneous samples, especially rocks, using the secondary high-energy neutron flux developed when the 650 MeV proton beam of an accelerator is stopped in a 42 x 42 cm diam Cu cylinder. Irradiations were performed at three different locations in a rabbit tube in the beam stop area, and thick metal foils of Bi, Th, and natural U as well as polished silicate glasses of known U and Th contents were used as targets and were placed in contact with mica which served as a fission track detector. In many cases both bare and Cd-covered detectors were exposed. The exposed mica samples were etched in 48% HF and the fission tracks counted by conventional transmitted light microscopy. Relative fission cross sections are examined, along with absolute Th track production rates, interaction tracks, and a comparison of measured and calculated fission rates. The practicality of fast neutron radiography revealed by experiments to data is discussed primarily for Th/U measurements, and mixtures of other fissionable nuclei are briefly considered.

  3. Proton radiography for clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talamonti, C.; Reggioli, V.; Bruzzi, M.; Bucciolini, M.; Civinini, C.; Marrazzo, L.; Menichelli, D.; Pallotta, S.; Randazzo, N.; Sipala, V.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Petterson, M.; Blumenkrantz, N.; Feldt, J.; Heimann, J.; Lucia, D.; Seiden, A.; Williams, D. C.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Bashkirov, V.; Schulte, R.

    2010-01-01

    Proton imaging is not yet applied as a clinical routine, although its advantages have been demonstrated. In the context of quality assurance in proton therapy, proton images can be used to verify the correct positioning of the patient and to control the range of protons. Proton computed tomography (pCT) is a 3D imaging method appropriate for planning and verification of proton radiation treatments, because it allows evaluating the distributions of proton stopping power within the tissues and can be directly utilized when the patient is in the actual treatment position. The aim of the PRoton IMAging experiment, supported by INFN, and the PRIN 2006 project, supported by MIUR, is to realize a proton computed radiography (pCR) prototype for reconstruction of proton images from a single projection in order to validate the technique with pre-clinical studies and, eventually, to conceive the configuration of a complete pCT system. A preliminary experiment performed at the 250 MeV proton synchrotron of Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) allowed acquisition of experimental data before the completion of PRIMA project's prototype. In this paper, the results of the LLUMC experiment are reported and the reconstruction of proton images of two phantoms is discussed.

  4. Mobile real time radiography system

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, J.; Taggart, D.; Betts, S.

    1997-11-01

    A 450-keV Mobile Real Time Radiography (RTR) System was delivered to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in January 1996. It was purchased to inspect containers of radioactive waste produced at (LANL). Since its delivery it has been used to radiograph more than 600 drums of radioactive waste at various LANL sites. It has the capability of inspecting waste containers of various sizes from <1-gal. buckets up to standard waste boxes (SWB, dimensions 54.5 in. x 71 in. x 37 in.). It has three independent x-ray acquisition formats. The primary system used is a 12- in. image intensifier, the second is a 36-in. linear diode array (LDA) and the last is an open system. It is fully self contained with on board generator, HVAC, and a fire suppression system. It is on a 53-ft long x 8-ft. wide x 14-ft. high trailer that can be moved over any highway requiring only an easily obtainable overweight permit because it weights {approximately}38 tons. It was built to conform to industry standards for a cabinet system which does not require an exclusion zone. The fact that this unit is mobile has allowed us to operate where the waste is stored, rather than having to move the waste to a fixed facility.

  5. Thorium-uranium fission radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, E. L.; Weiss, J. R.; Burnett, D. S.; Woolum, D. S.

    1976-01-01

    Results are described for studies designed to develop routine methods for in-situ measurement of the abundance of Th and U on a microscale in heterogeneous samples, especially rocks, using the secondary high-energy neutron flux developed when the 650 MeV proton beam of an accelerator is stopped in a 42 x 42 cm diam Cu cylinder. Irradiations were performed at three different locations in a rabbit tube in the beam stop area, and thick metal foils of Bi, Th, and natural U as well as polished silicate glasses of known U and Th contents were used as targets and were placed in contact with mica which served as a fission track detector. In many cases both bare and Cd-covered detectors were exposed. The exposed mica samples were etched in 48% HF and the fission tracks counted by conventional transmitted light microscopy. Relative fission cross sections are examined, along with absolute Th track production rates, interaction tracks, and a comparison of measured and calculated fission rates. The practicality of fast neutron radiography revealed by experiments to data is discussed primarily for Th/U measurements, and mixtures of other fissionable nuclei are briefly considered.

  6. [A case of long thoracic nerve palsy, with winged scapula, as a result of prolonged exertion on practicing archery].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, J; Nishiyama, K; Takeda, K; Ichiba, T; Sakuta, M

    1990-08-01

    Reports of isolated long thoracic nerve palsy are rare in Japan. We reported a case of isolated long thoracic nerve palsy, resulted from recurrent injury to the nerve. Muscle CT and electrodiagnostic study were useful for confirming diagnosis of this cases. This patient was a student aged 20 years, with nothing of importance in his family or past history. After he started practicing archery, winging of left scapula was gradually developed. Physical examination revealed weakness and atrophy of left serratus anterior muscle. There was no wasting and weakness of other should girdle muscles. Hematochemical tests were normal, except slight hyperthyroidism. Radiography and myelography of the cervical spine were normal. Muscle CT of upper thoracic level demonstrated atrophy of left serratus anterior muscle, and no abnormality were found in other muscles. Electromyogram of the left serratus anterior revealed discrete activity of reduced amplitude, and fibrillation potentials and positive sharp waves. Conduction time for left long thoracic nerve was prolonged, and amplitude of the evoked response was small and there were temporal dispersion. Muscle CT and electrodiagnostic studies were suggestive of neuroapraxia of left long thoracic nerve. Over stretching or compression during exercises may be responsible for the damage to the long thoracic nerve.

  7. Comparison of Conventional Radiography and Digital Computerized Radiography in Patients Presenting to Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Ozcete, Enver; Boydak, Bahar; Ersel, Murat; Kiyan, Selahattin; Uz, Ilhan; Cevrim, Ozgur

    2015-03-01

    To compare the differences between conventional radiography and digital computerized radiography (CR) in patients presenting to the emergency department. The study enrolled consecutive patients presenting to the emergency department who needed chest radiography. Quality score of the radiogram was assessed with visual analogue score (VAS-100 mm), measured in terms of millimeters and recorded at the end of study. Examination time, interpretation time, total time, and cost of radiograms were calculated. There were significant differences between conventional radiography and digital CR groups in terms of location unit (Care Unit, Trauma, Resuscitation), hour of presentation, diagnosis group, examination time, interpretation time, and examination quality. Examination times for conventional radiography and digital CR were 45.2 and 34.2 minutes, respectively. Interpretation times for conventional radiography and digital CR were 25.2 and 39.7 minutes, respectively. Mean radiography quality scores for conventional radiography and digital CR were 69.1 mm and 82.0 mm. Digital CR had a 1.05 TL cheaper cost per radiogram compared to conventional radiography. Since interpretation of digital radiograms is performed via terminals inside the emergency department, the patient has to be left in order to interpret the digital radiograms, which prolongs interpretation times. We think that interpretation of digital radiograms with the help of a mobile device would eliminate these difficulties. Although the initial cost of setup of digital CR and PACS service is high at the emergency department, we think that Digital CR is more cost-effective than conventional radiography for emergency departments in the long-term.

  8. Pediatric thoracic trauma: Current trends.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Erik G; Fitzgerald, Caitlin A; Santore, Matthew T

    2017-02-01

    Pediatric thoracic trauma is relatively uncommon but results in disproportionately high levels of morbidity and mortality when compared with other traumatic injuries. These injuries are often more devastating due to differences in children׳s anatomy and physiology relative to adult patients. A high index of suspicion is of utmost importance at the time of presentation because many significant thoracic injuries will have no external signs of injury. With proper recognition and management of these injuries, there is an associated improved long-term outcome. This article reviews the current literature and discusses the initial evaluation, current management practices, and future directions in pediatric thoracic trauma. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. National reference doses for dental cephalometric radiography.

    PubMed

    Holroyd, J R

    2011-12-01

    Diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) are an important tool in the optimisation of clinical radiography. Although national DRLs are provided for many diagnostic procedures including dental intra-oral radiography, there are currently no national DRLs set for cephalometric radiography. In the absence of formal national DRLs, the Health Protection Agency (HPA) has previously published National Reference Doses (NRDs) covering a wide range of diagnostic X-ray examinations. The aim of this study was to determine provisional NRDs for cephalometric radiography. Measurements made by the Dental X-ray Protection Service (DXPS) of the HPA, as part of the cephalometric X-ray equipment testing service provided to dentists and dental trade companies throughout the UK, were used to derive provisional NRDs. Dose-area product measurements were made on 42 X-ray sets. Third quartile dose-area product values for adult and child lateral cephalometric radiography were found to be 41 mGy cm² and 25 mGy cm², respectively, with individual measurements ranging from 3 mGy cm² to 108 mGy cm². This report proposes provisional NRDs of 40 mGy cm² and 25 mGy cm² for adult and child lateral cephalometric radiographs, respectively; these doses could be considered by employers when establishing their local DRLs.

  10. Muon radiography for exploration of Mars geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedar, S.; Tanaka, H. K. M.; Naudet, C. J.; Jones, C. E.; Plaut, J. P.; Webb, F. H.

    2013-06-01

    Muon radiography is a technique that uses naturally occurring showers of muons (penetrating particles generated by cosmic rays) to image the interior of large-scale geological structures in much the same way as standard X-ray radiography is used to image the interior of smaller objects. Recent developments and application of the technique to terrestrial volcanoes have demonstrated that a low-power, passive muon detector can peer deep into geological structures up to several kilometers in size, and provide crisp density profile images of their interior at ten meter scale resolution. Preliminary estimates of muon production on Mars indicate that the near horizontal Martian muon flux, which could be used for muon radiography, is as strong or stronger than that on Earth, making the technique suitable for exploration of numerous high priority geological targets on Mars. The high spatial resolution of muon radiography also makes the technique particularly suited for the discovery and delineation of Martian caverns, the most likely planetary environment for biological activity. As a passive imaging technique, muon radiography uses the perpetually present background cosmic ray radiation as the energy source for probing the interior of structures from the surface of the planet. The passive nature of the measurements provides an opportunity for a low power and low data rate instrument for planetary exploration that could operate as a scientifically valuable primary or secondary instrument in a variety of settings, with minimal impact on the mission's other instruments and operation.

  11. Muon radiography for exploration of Mars geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedar, S.; Tanaka, H. K. M.; Naudet, C. J.; Jones, C. E.; Plaut, J. P.; Webb, F. H.

    2012-10-01

    Muon radiography is a technique that uses naturally occurring showers of muons (penetrating particles generated by cosmic rays) to image the interior of large scale geological structures in much the same way as standard X-ray radiography is used to image the interior of smaller objects. Recent developments and application of the technique to terrestrial volcanoes have demonstrated that a low-power, passive muon detector can peer deep into geological structures up to several kilometers in size, and provide crisp density profile images of their interior at ten meter scale resolution. Preliminary estimates of muon production on Mars indicate that the near horizontal Martian muon flux, which could be used for muon radiography, is as strong or stronger than that on Earth, making the technique suitable for exploration of numerous high priority geological targets on Mars. The high spatial resolution of muon radiography also makes the technique particularly suited for the discovery and delineation of Martian caverns, the most likely planetary environment for biological activity. As a passive imaging technique, muon radiography uses the perpetually present background cosmic ray radiation as the energy source for probing the interior of structures from the surface of the planet. The passive nature of the measurements provides an opportunity for a low power and low data rate instrument for planetary exploration that could operate as a scientifically valuable primary or secondary instrument in a variety of settings, with minimal impact on the mission's other instruments and operation.

  12. Reformatted visceral protocol helical computed tomographic scanning allows conventional radiographs of the thoracic and lumbar spine to be eliminated in the evaluation of blunt trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, Robert; Peralta, Ruben; Rhea, James; Ptak, Thomas; Novelline, Robert

    2003-10-01

    Patients suffering high-energy injuries are at risk for occult thoracic and lumbar spine fractures, and the standard of care includes radiographic spine screening. Most such patients require computed tomographic (CT) scanning to screen for chest and/or abdominal visceral injury. Helical CT (HCT) scanning represents a major technologic change that allows data to be reformatted after the patient has left the radiology suite. We explored the possibility of using reformatted visceral protocol HCT scanning to replace radiographs of the thoracic and lumbar spine in the evaluation of seriously injured patients. A prospective evaluation of consecutive patients with thoracic and lumbar spine fractures admitted over a 12-month period to an urban Level I trauma center was completed. The ability of conventional radiography and reformatted HCT scanning to detect spine fractures was compared. Of 1,915 trauma patients admitted, 78 (4.1%), with an average Injury Severity Score of 21.3 +/- 1.2, sustained one or more thoracic (n = 35 patients) or lumbar (n = 43 patients) spine fractures. The sensitivity of reformatted HCT scanning as a screening test for spine fractures was 97% for thoracic and 95% for lumbar spine fractures, compared with a sensitivity of 62% for thoracic and 86% for lumbar conventional radiographs. Data obtained from HCT scanning performed to evaluate seriously injured multiple trauma patients for thoracic and abdominal visceral injury can be reformatted to screen for thoracic and lumbar spine fractures, providing accurate screening while eliminating the time, expense, and radiation exposure associated with conventional film radiography.

  13. Database Audit in Thoracic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Magee, Mitchell J

    2017-08-01

    Administrative data are less accurate and relevant than specialty-specific, procedure-specific, risk-adjusted data collected in voluntary registries such as the Society of Thoracic Surgeons-General Thoracic Surgery Database (GTSD). Voluntary clinical databases must be proven accurate and complete before they are accepted as credible information sources. With substantial growth of the GTSD, an annual audit was initiated in 2010 to assess the completeness, accuracy, and quality of the data collected. The audit process is essential in validating data quality and adding credibility and value to volunteer clinical registries. It serves as an important tool for improvement of patient care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Thoracic Radiculopathy due to Rare Causes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic radiculopathy represents an uncommon spinal disorder that is frequently overlooked in the evaluation of thoracic, or abdominal pain syndrome. The clinical representation of this uncommon disorder is often atypical. With many differential diagnoses to consider, it is not surprising that the cause of thoracic radiculopathy is often not discovered for months, or years, after the symptoms arise. We report two rare cases of thoracic radiculopathy; one case was caused by extraskeletal Ewing sarcoma (EES) along the thoracic paraspinal area, and the other by foraminal stenosis, due to a bony spur of the thoracic vertebra. As such, thoracic radiculopathy should be considered in the diagnosis of patients with thoracic and abdominal pain, especially if initial diagnostic studies are inconclusive. PMID:27446792

  15. Thyroid dose distribution in dental radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Bristow, R.G.; Wood, R.E.; Clark, G.M. )

    1989-10-01

    The anatomic position and proven radiosensitivity of the thyroid gland make it an organ of concern in dental radiography. A calibrated thermoluminescent dosimetry system was used to investigate the absorbed dose (microGy) to the thyroid gland resultant from a minimum irradiated volume, intraoral full-mouth radiography technique with the use of rectangular collimation with a lead-backed image receptor, and conventional panoramic radiography performed with front and rear lead aprons. Use of the minimum irradiated volume technique resulted in a significantly decreased absorbed dose over the entire thyroid region ranging from 100% to 350% (p less than 0.05). Because this intraoral technique results in radiographs with greater image quality and also exposes the thyroid gland to less radiation than the panoramic, this technique may be an alternative to the panoramic procedure.

  16. The Delphi technique in radiography education research.

    PubMed

    John-Matthews, J St; Wallace, M J; Robinson, L

    2017-09-01

    To describe and review the Delphi technique as a tool for radiographers engaged in mixed-methods research whereby agreement is required on the proficiencies needed by educational programmes for pre- and post- registration radiographers. This is achieved through a description offering a brief history of the technique. Through a literature search, radiography education research using this technique is identified. A protocol for a research project using the technique is presented. Using this worked example, advantages and disadvantages of the method are explored including sampling of participants, sample size, number of rounds and methods of feedback. There are limited examples of the use of the Delphi technique in radiography literature including considerations on how to select experts and panel size. The Delphi technique is a suitable method for establishing collective agreement in the design of radiography educational interventions. Additional research is needed to deepen this evidence-based knowledge. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. [International Relationship of Japanese General Thoracic Surgeons].

    PubMed

    Okumura, Meinoshin

    2017-01-01

    Japanese thoracic surgeons have created personal relationship with European and North American surgeons. During the last 10 years, official relation between Japanese Association for Chest Surgery(JACS) and European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) has been established besides personal interaction, and communication among the thoracic surgeons in Asia was prompted through Asia Thoracoscopic Surgery Education Program( ATEP). International relationship through academic associations is expected to contribute to encouraging general thoracic surgeons.

  18. Ruptured Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Infected with Listeria Monocytogenes: A Case Report and a Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Shigeki; Takeuchi, Nobuhiro; Takada, Masanori; Fujita, Koichi; Nishibori, Yoshiharu; Maruyama, Takao

    2013-01-01

    A 75-year-old male with a history of alcoholic liver cirrhosis, sigmoid colon cancer, and metastatic liver cancer was admitted to our institution with a complaint of a prickly feeling in his chest. On admission, a chest radiograph revealed a normal cardio-thoracic ratio of 47%. Echocardiography revealed pericardial effusion and blood chemical analyses revealed elevated C-reactive protein levels (14.7 mg/dL). On day 3, chest radiography revealed cardiomegaly with a cardio-thoracic ratio of 58% and protrusion of the left first arch. Contrast-enhanced chest computed tomography revealed a saccular aneurysm in the aortic arch with surrounding hematoma; thus, a ruptured thoracic aortic aneurysm was suspected. Emergency surgery was performed, which revealed a ruptured aortic aneurysm with extensive local inflammation. The diagnosis of an infected aortic rupture was therefore confirmed. The aneurysm and abscess were resected, followed by prosthetic graft replacement and omental packing. Histopathology of the resected aneurysm revealed gram-positive bacilli; and Listeria monocytogenes was confirmed as the causative organism by culture. Postoperative course was uneventful; on postoperative day 60, the patient was ambulatory and was discharged. Here we report the case of a male with a ruptured thoracic aortic aneurysm infected with L. monocytogenes. PMID:25512697

  19. Treatment of a perforating thoracic bite wound in a dog with negative pressure wound therapy.

    PubMed

    Nolff, Mirja C; Pieper, Korbinian; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andrea

    2016-10-01

    CASE DESCRIPTION A 4-year-old male Dachshund was examined following a bite attack that had occurred 5 days previously. The dog had acutely deteriorated despite IV antimicrobial treatment and fluid therapy. CLINICAL FINDINGS On initial examination, the patient was recumbent with signs of septic shock and a flail chest. Three penetrating wounds in the left thoracic wall with malodorous discharge were evident. The animal trauma triage score was 8 out of 18. Thoracic and abdominal radiography revealed displaced fractures of the left seventh, eighth, and ninth ribs and extensive subcutaneous emphysema. Additionally, a marked diffuse bronchointerstitial pattern, areas of alveolar pattern, and pneumothorax were present bilaterally. TREATMENT AND OUTCOME Open surgical debridement with left lateral lung lobectomy and resection of portions of the left thoracic wall were performed. Extensive soft tissue loss precluded primary reconstruction. The defect was stabilized with a polypropylene mesh implant, and negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) at -100 mm Hg was initiated. Microbial culture and susceptibility testing of tissue samples indicated the presence of multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius. The NPWT dressing was changed 2, 5, and 7 days after surgery. Treatment was well tolerated, and the mesh was completely covered with granulation tissue 10 days after surgery. On follow-up 5, 7, 12, and 19 months after surgery, the dog was clinically normal with no apparent complications. CLINICAL RELEVANCE Findings suggested that NPWT may be a valuable adjunct when treating small animal patients with severe thoracic trauma.

  20. Radiographic thoracic anatomy of the ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta).

    PubMed

    Makungu, Modesta; du Plessis, Wencke M; Barrows, Michelle; Groenewald, Hermanus B; Koeppel, Katja N

    2014-06-01

    The ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta) is a quadruped arboreal primate primarily distributed in south and south-western Madagascar. This study was carried out to describe the normal radiographic thoracic anatomy of the ring-tailed lemur as a reference for clinical use. Radiography of the thorax was performed in 15 captive ring-tailed lemurs during their annual health examinations. Normal radiographic reference ranges for thoracic structures were established and ratios were calculated, such as the vertebral heart score (VHS). The mean VHS on the right lateral and dorsoventral views was 8.92 ± 0.47 and 9.42 ± 0.52, respectively. Differences exist in the normal radiographic thoracic anatomy of primates. Knowledge of the normal radiographic thoracic anatomy of individual species is important and fundamental to assist in clinical cases and for accurate diagnosis of diseases. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Digital radiography: a survey of pediatric dentists.

    PubMed

    Russo, Julie M; Russo, James A; Guelmann, Marcio

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to: (1) determine the popularity of digital radiography among members of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD); and (2) report the most common systems in use. An AAPD-approved, voluntary, and anonymous electronic survey was developed and sent to 923 board certified pediatric dentists. Years in practice and in-office x-ray technology (digital or conventional) were inquired about initially. If negative for the use of digital radiography, future consideration for converting to digital radiography was ascertained. For positive responses, more in-depth information was requested. Information on type of system (sensor or phosphor plate), user friendliness, diagnostic ability, patient's comfort, general costs, durability, and parental and overall satisfaction was collected. For most of the questions, a 5-point assessment scale was used. Opportunity for additional comments was provided upon survey completion. Data was analyzed using descriptive statistics. A 32% (296/923) response rate was obtained. Twenty-six percent of practitioners (78/296) implemented digital radiography in their practices, whereas 71% considered future acquisition. Similar distribution for sensor and phosphor plate users was found. Sensor technology was reported to produce faster images, but was less tolerable by young children due to size and thickness. Phosphor plates were considered more children friendly, less expensive, and less durable. Parental satisfaction was very high with great marketing value. Picture quality was comparable to conventional film. Overall, digital radiography users would recommend it to other pediatric dentists. Digital radiography is not yet popular among pediatric dentists. Cost reduction and technology advancement may enhance utilization.

  2. The current status of panoramic radiography.

    PubMed

    Hirschmann, P N

    1987-03-01

    The current status of dental panoramic tomography (rotational panoramic radiography) is reviewed. This technique is based on a combination of tomography and slit-beam radiography to provide an image of both jaws on a single film. There is a greater degree of image degradation when compared with conventional radiographic techniques due to tomographic blurring, magnification and distortion, secondary images and burn-out. Meticulous patient position is essential to accommodate their jaws to the image layer determined by the manufacturers. The absorbed doses from panoramic radiography are of a similar order to that from bitewing radiography and lower than those from a full-mouth periapical series. The individual risk of 1.3 X 10(-6) is compared with that from other radiographic examinations and smoking. The collective risk, 1.04 deaths in the UK in 1981, is relatively insignificant as is the genetic dose. The risk to the dentist and his staff is also low compared to other risks. The methods of dose limitation currently available are reviewed. The clinical indications are considered in relation to the guidelines of the American Dental Association and the Dental Estimates Board in the UK. The problems associated with attempts to measure diagnostic yield are considered. In view of the world-wide public concern at the potential dangers of ionising radiation, dentists are urged to maximize the diagnostic yield from their panoramic radiography by taking such radiographs only when clinically necessary, ensuring meticulous positioning and processing, followed by scrupulous assessment of the radiography for any sign of pathological change.

  3. Statistical uncertainty in quantitative neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piegsa, Florian M.; Kaestner, Anders; Antognini, Aldo; Eggenberger, Andreas; Kirch, Klaus; Wichmann, Gunther

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrate a novel procedure to calibrate neutron detection systems commonly used in standard neutron radiography. This calibration allows determining the uncertainties due to Poisson-like neutron counting statistics for each individual pixel of a radiographic image. The obtained statistical errors are necessary in order to perform a correct quantitative analysis. This fast and convenient method is applied to data measured at the cold neutron radiography facility ICON at the Paul Scherrer Institute. Moreover, from the results the effective neutron flux at the beam line is determined.

  4. Proton Radiography: Its uses and Resolution Scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Mariam, Fesseha G.

    2012-08-09

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has used high energy protons as a probe in flash radiography for over a decade. In this time the proton radiography project has used 800 MeV protons, provided by the LANSCE accelerator facility at LANL, to diagnose over five-hundred dynamic experiments in support of stockpile stewardship programs as well as basic materials science. Through this effort significant experience has been gained in using charged particles as direct radiographic probes to diagnose transient systems. The results of this experience will be discussed through the presentation of data from experiments recently performed at the LANL pRad.

  5. Mobile waste inspection real time radiography system

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, J.; Taggart, D.; Betts, S.; Rael, C.; Martinez, F.; Mendez, J.

    1995-10-01

    The 450-KeV Mobile Real Time Radiography System was designed and purchased to inspect containers of radioactive waste produced at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The Mobile Real Time Radiography System has the capability of inspecting waste containers of various sizes from 5-gal. buckets to standard waste boxes (SWB, dimensions 54.5 in. x 71 in. x 37 in.). The fact that this unit is mobile makes it an attractive alternative to the costly road closures associated with moving waste from the waste generator to storage or disposal facilities.

  6. New developments in proton radiography at LANSCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Christopher; Proton Radiography Team

    2014-09-01

    In a new application of nuclear physics, a facility for using proton for flash radiography has been developed at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Protons have proven far superior to high energy x-rays for flash radiography. Although this facility is primarily used for studying very fast phenomena such as high explosive driven experiments, it is finding increasing application to other fields, such as tomography of static objects, phase changes in materials, and the dynamics of chemical reactions. The advantages of protons will be discussed and data from some of the recent experiments will be presented.

  7. Californium-252: A New Isotopic Source for Neutron Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Reinig, W.C.

    2001-08-29

    This report discusses a new isotopic source for neutron radiography, Californium-252. Nuclear reactors are the usual source of neutrons for radiography, primarily because of their intense neutron beams. If neutron radiography is to have widespread use, intense transportable neutron sources are required that can be used in plants, in laboratories and in the field.

  8. Digital radiography. A comparison with modern conventional imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, G J

    2006-01-01

    The development of computed radiography over the past two decades has transformed radiological imaging. The radiology departments in the 21st century will look very different from those in the preceding period. In this review, the development of digital radiography is presented with a description of its various forms and a comparison with screen film radiography. PMID:16822918

  9. Aneurysms of the thoracic aorta

    PubMed Central

    Le Roux, B. T.; Rogers, M. A.; Gotsman, M. S.

    1971-01-01

    Selected radiographs from 40 patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm serve to illustrate most of the radiographic features of this disease. Surgical techniques are outlined and were used to modify the natural course of the disease in 14 patients, with three postoperative deaths. The remaining 26 patients were either moribund on admission and died shortly afterwards or declined operations and died later. Images PMID:5144643

  10. [Japanese Board Certified Thoracic Surgeon].

    PubMed

    Chihara, Koji

    2017-01-01

    The Japanese Board of General Thoracic Surgery (JBGTS) consisted by Japanese Association of Chest Surgery (JACS) and The Japanese Association of Thoracic Surgery (JATS) has been certified Japanese Board Certified Thoracic Surgeon (JBCTS) since 2004. At present, JBCTS is obtained by being of Certified Surgeon by Japan Surgical Society( JSS), completion of minimum requirement of surgical experience, scientific papers, presentation at medical assembly, learning of postgraduate educational programs, and examination approximate 11 years after graduation of medical school. Thirteen hundreds JBCTS throughout Japan are engaged in operation for 77,000 cases/year, including 38,000 lung cancer patients/year. The operative volume has been growing lineally these 30 years, and operative mortality in lung cancer patients has been less than 1% these several years. Japanese Medical Specialty Board (JMSB) published a guideline of the new system of medical specialty certification system in Jury 2014, in which fundamental structure is consisted by basic specialties of 19 medical fields and following subspecialties and program based system rather than curriculum based system. According to this guideline, JBGTS has been collaborated with JSS in order to establish sequential programs of the 2 specialties, and proposed an improved certification system to accomplish the mission that it educates trainees to be thoracic surgical professionals who is able to perform safe and standalized procedures.

  11. Thoracic Radiation Normal Tissue Injury.

    PubMed

    Simone, Charles B

    2017-10-01

    Thoracic malignancies are often a difficult group of tumors to treat definitively as the radiation doses needed to achieve a high probability for tumor control are often associated with high rates of radiation-induced toxicities. The lungs are particularly radiosensitive and are susceptible to radiation pneumonitis in the acute and subacute settings and pulmonary fibrosis in the late setting. Acute esophagitis is common and affects patient quality of life. Beyond acute pericarditis, late cardiac toxicities are increasingly being recognized as clinically relevant when delivering thoracic radiotherapy and can affect overall survival. This review details the common and dose-limiting acute and late toxicities associated with thoracic radiation therapy. As radiation-induced toxicities are often amplified with concurrent chemotherapy, this article focuses on the toxicities associated with irradiation for lung cancer, the most common thoracic malignancy, which is often treated with multimodality therapy. The management of radiation-induced toxicities and the changing patterns of toxicities with advanced radiation delivery modalities are also described. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Pivotal results for the Medtronic Valiant Thoracic Stent Graft System in the VALOR II trial.

    PubMed

    Fairman, Ronald M; Tuchek, J Michael; Lee, W Anthony; Kasirajan, Karthikeshwar; White, Rodney; Mehta, Manish; Lyden, Sean; Mukherjee, Dipankar; Bavaria, Joseph

    2012-11-01

    We report 30-day and 12-month results of endovascular treatment with the Valiant Thoracic Stent Graft System (Medtronic Vascular, Santa Rosa, Calif) in patients with descending thoracic aortic aneurysms of degenerative etiology. The Valiant stent graft is an evolution of the Talent thoracic stent graft (Medtronic Vascular). The VALOR II (Evaluation of the Clinical Performance of the Valiant Thoracic Stent Graft System in the Treatment of Descending Thoracic Aneurysms of Degenerative Etiology in Subjects Who Are Candidates for Endovascular Repair) was a prospective, nonrandomized, pivotal trial conducted at 24 U.S. sites with enrollment between December 2006 and September 2009. Standard follow-up examinations, including physical examination, computed tomography, and chest radiography, were at 1, 6, and 12 months, and annually through 5 years. VALOR II outcomes were compared with those from the pivotal VALOR (Evaluation of the Medtronic Vascular Talent Thoracic Stent Graft System for the Treatment of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms) trial of the Talent stent graft, which enrolled 195 patients with similar enrollment criteria. VALOR II enrolled 160 patients. Compared with VALOR patients, VALOR II patients had similar age and sex distribution but higher rates of cardiovascular risk factors and significantly more severe modified Society for Vascular Surgery/American Association for Vascular Surgery risk scores. Stent graft delivery and deployment were successful in 154 patients (96.3%). Outcomes at 30 days in VALOR II were perioperative mortality, 3.1%; major adverse events, 38.1%; paraplegia, 0.6%; paraparesis, 1.9%; and stroke, 2.5%. At 12 months, after the minimum sample size was reached, 151 patients were evaluated: aneurysm-related mortality was 4.0%, stent graft migration was 2.9%, and endoleak was 13.0%. Through 12 months, there were no ruptures, conversions to open surgery, secondary procedures due to endoleak >30 days, or loss of stent graft patency. The Valiant

  13. Electrodiagnostic confirmation of long thoracic nerve palsy.

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, P E

    1980-01-01

    Long thoracic nerve latencies were measured in 25 normal subjects. The nerve was stimulated at Erb's point. Monopolar electrodes were used to record the motor evoked response from the serratus anterior muscle. The mean long thoracic nerve latency was 3.9 +/- 0.6 ms. Four athletes with unilateral, isolated long thoracic nerve palsies were compared with the control group and with the uninvolved extremities. Long thoracic nerve latency examinations may help confirm the presence of long thoracic nerve palsy and test proximal nerve conduction. Images PMID:7354356

  14. The Image Gently pediatric digital radiography safety checklist: tools for improving pediatric radiography.

    PubMed

    John, Susan D; Moore, Quentin T; Herrmann, Tracy; Don, Steven; Powers, Kevin; Smith, Susan N; Morrison, Greg; Charkot, Ellen; Mills, Thalia T; Rutz, Lois; Goske, Marilyn J

    2013-10-01

    Transition from film-screen to digital radiography requires changes in radiographic technique and workflow processes to ensure that the minimum radiation exposure is used while maintaining diagnostic image quality. Checklists have been demonstrated to be useful tools for decreasing errors and improving safety in several areas, including commercial aviation and surgical procedures. The Image Gently campaign, through a competitive grant from the FDA, developed a checklist for technologists to use during the performance of digital radiography in pediatric patients. The checklist outlines the critical steps in digital radiography workflow, with an emphasis on steps that affect radiation exposure and image quality. The checklist and its accompanying implementation manual and practice quality improvement project are open source and downloadable at www.imagegently.org. The authors describe the process of developing and testing the checklist and offer suggestions for using the checklist to minimize radiation exposure to children during radiography. Copyright © 2013 American College of Radiology. All rights reserved.

  15. Anatomical variations of the second thoracic ganglion.

    PubMed

    Singh, B; Ramsaroop, L; Partab, P; Moodley, J; Satyapal, K S

    2005-04-01

    In recent years the second thoracic ganglion has gained anatomical significance as an important conduit for sympathetic innervation of the upper extremity. Thoracoscopic excision of the second thoracic ganglion is now widely recognized as affording the most effective treatment option for palmar hyperhidrosis. This study recorded the incidence, location and associated additional neural connections of the second thoracic ganglion. Bilateral dissection of 20 adult cadavers was undertaken, and all neural connections of the second thoracic ganglion were recorded. Nineteen cadavers (95%) demonstrated additional neural connections between the first thoracic ventral ramus and second intercostal nerve. These were classified as either type A (47.5%) or type B (45%) using the intrathoracic ramus (nerve of Kuntz) between the second intercostal nerve and the ventral ramus of the first thoracic nerve as a basis on both right and left sides. The second thoracic ganglion was commonly located (92.5%) in the second intercostal space at the level of the intervertebral disc between the second and third thoracic vertebrae. Fused ganglia between the second thoracic and first thoracic (5%) and stellate (5%) ganglia were noted. These findings should assist the operating surgeon with a clear knowledge of the anatomy of the second thoracic ganglion during thoracoscopic sympathectomy with a view to improving the success rate for upper limb sympathectomy.

  16. Safety Testing of Industrial Radiography Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Trapp, D.J.

    1999-09-29

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission contracted the Savannah River Technology Center to verify the relevancy of the 10 CFR Part 34 requirements for the normal use of portable gamma radiography systems and to propose recommendations for changes or modifications to the requirements.

  17. Technique and interpretation in tree seed radiography

    Treesearch

    Howard B. Kriebel

    1966-01-01

    The study of internal seed structure by radiography requires techniques which will give good definition. To establish the best procedures, we conducted a series of experiments in which we manipulated the principal controllable variables affecting the quality of X-radiographs: namely, focus-to-film distance, film speed (grain), exposure time, kilovoltage, and...

  18. Satisfaction of Search in Chest Radiography 2015.

    PubMed

    Berbaum, Kevin S; Krupinski, Elizabeth A; Schartz, Kevin M; Caldwell, Robert T; Madsen, Mark T; Hur, Seung; Laroia, Archana T; Thompson, Brad H; Mullan, Brian F; Franken, Edmund A

    2015-11-01

    Two decades have passed since the publication of laboratory studies of satisfaction of search (SOS) in chest radiography. Those studies were performed using film. The current investigation tests for SOS effects in computed radiography of the chest. Sixty-four chest computed radiographs half demonstrating various "test" abnormalities were read twice by 20 radiologists, once with and once without the addition of a simulated pulmonary nodule. Receiver-operating characteristic detection accuracy and decision thresholds were analyzed to study the effects of adding the nodule on detecting the test abnormalities. Results of previous studies were reanalyzed using similar modern techniques. In the present study, adding nodules did not influence detection accuracy for the other abnormalities (P = .93), but did induce a reluctance to report them (P < .001). Adding nodules did not affect inspection time (P = .58) so the reluctance to report was not associated with reduced search. Reanalysis revealed a similar decision threshold shift that had not been recognized in the early studies of SOS in chest radiography (P < .01) in addition to reduced detection accuracy (P < .01). The nature of SOS in chest radiography has changed, but it is not clear why. SOS may be changing as a function of changes in radiology education and practice. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Feline dental radiography and radiology: A primer.

    PubMed

    Niemiec, Brook A

    2014-11-01

    Information crucial to the diagnosis and treatment of feline oral diseases can be ascertained using dental radiography and the inclusion of this technology has been shown to be the best way to improve a dental practice. Becoming familar with the techniques required for dental radiology and radiography can, therefore, be greatly beneficial. Novices to dental radiography may need some time to adjust and become comfortable with the techniques. If using dental radiographic film, the generally recommended 'E' or 'F' speeds may be frustrating at first, due to their more specific exposure and image development requirements. Although interpreting dental radiographs is similar to interpreting a standard bony radiograph, there are pathologic states that are unique to the oral cavity and several normal anatomic structures that may mimic pathologic changes. Determining which teeth have been imaged also requires a firm knowledge of oral anatomy as well as the architecture of dental films/digital systems. This article draws on a range of dental radiography and radiology resources, and the benefit of the author's own experience, to review the basics of taking and interpreting intraoral dental radiographs. A simplified method for positioning the tubehead is explained and classic examples of some common oral pathologies are provided. © ISFM and AAFP 2014.

  20. Film radiography -- The lone star of quality

    SciTech Connect

    Kochakian, R.

    1995-12-31

    In this year of 1995, 100 years of x-ray photography are being celebrated. The reason film radiography is still the number one NDT technique is because of its quality. In this paper the author discusses: (1) fundamentals of image quality and (2) status of new draft ASRM film system classification standard.

  1. Radiography Student Participation in Professional Organizations.

    PubMed

    Michael, Kimberly; Tran, Xuan; Keller, Shelby; Sayles, Harlan; Custer, Tanya

    2017-09-01

    To gather data on educational program requirements for student membership in a state or national professional society, organization, or association. A 10-question online survey about student involvement in professional societies was emailed to 616 directors of Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT)-accredited radiography programs. A total of 219 responses were received, for a 36% response rate. Of these, 89 respondents (41%) answered that their programs require students to join a professional organization. The society respondents most often required (70%) was a state radiography society. Sixty respondents (68%) answered that students join a society at the beginning of the radiography program (from matriculation to 3 months in). Of programs requiring student membership in professional societies, 42 (49%) reported that their students attend the state or national society annual conference; however, participation in activities at the conferences and in the society throughout the year is lower than conference attendance. Some directors stated that although their programs' policies do not allow membership mandates, they encourage students to become members, primarily so that they can access webinars and other educational materials or information related to the profession. Survey data showed that most JRCERT-accredited radiography programs support but do not require student membership in professional organizations. The data reveal that more programs have added those requirements in recent years. Increased student participation could be realized if programs mandated membership and supported it financially. ©2017 American Society of Radiologic Technologists.

  2. INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY COURSE, INSTRUCTORS' GUIDE. VOLUME 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Engineering Extension Service.

    INFORMATION RELATIVE TO THE LESSON PLANS IN "INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY COURSE, INSTRUCTOR'S GUIDE, VOLUME I" (VT 003 565) IS PRESENTED ON 52 INFORMATION SHEETS INCLUDING THE SUBJECTS SHIELDING EQUATIONS AND LOGARITHMS, METAL PROPERTIES, FIELD TRIP INSTRUCTIONS FOR STUDENTS, WELDING SYMBOLS AND SIZES, SAMPLE REPORT FORMS, AND TYPICAL SHIPPING…

  3. Comparison of computed radiography and conventional radiography in detection of small volume pneumoperitoneum.

    PubMed

    Marolf, Angela; Blaik, Margaret; Ackerman, Norman; Watson, Elizabeth; Gibson, Nicole; Thompson, Margret

    2008-01-01

    The role of digital imaging is increasing as these systems are becoming more affordable and accessible. Advantages of computed radiography compared with conventional film/screen combinations include improved contrast resolution and postprocessing capabilities. Computed radiography's spatial resolution is inferior to conventional radiography; however, this limitation is considered clinically insignificant. This study prospectively compared digital imaging and conventional radiography in detecting small volume pneumoperitoneum. Twenty cadaver dogs (15-30 kg) were injected with 0.25, 0.25, and 0.5 ml for 1 ml total of air intra-abdominally, and radiographed sequentially using computed and conventional radiographic technologies. Three radiologists independently evaluated the images, and receiver operating curve (ROC) analysis compared the two imaging modalities. There was no statistical difference between computed and conventional radiography in detecting free abdominal air, but overall computed radiography was relatively more sensitive based on ROC analysis. Computed radiographic images consistently and significantly demonstrated a minimal amount of 0.5 ml of free air based on ROC analysis. However, no minimal air amount was consistently or significantly detected with conventional film. Readers were more likely to detect free air on lateral computed images than the other projections, with no significant increased sensitivity between film/screen projections. Further studies are indicated to determine the differences or lack thereof between various digital imaging systems and conventional film/screen systems.

  4. MRI versus radiography of acromioclavicular joint dislocation.

    PubMed

    Nemec, Ursula; Oberleitner, Gerhard; Nemec, Stefan F; Gruber, Michael; Weber, Michael; Czerny, Christian; Krestan, Christian R

    2011-10-01

    Acromioclavicular joint injuries are usually diagnosed by clinical and radiographic assessment with the Rockwood classification, which is crucial for treatment planning. In view of the implementation of MRI for visualization of the acromioclavicular joint, the purpose of this study was to describe the MRI findings of acromioclavicular joint dislocation in comparison with the radiographic findings. Forty-four patients with suspected unilateral acromioclavicular joint dislocation after acute trauma were enrolled in this prospective study. All patients underwent digital radiography and 1-T MRI with a surface phased-array coil. MRI included coronal proton density-weighted turbo spin-echo and coronal 3D T1-weighted fast field-echo water-selective sequences. The Rockwood classification was used to assess acromioclavicular joint injuries at radiography and MRI. An adapted Rockwood classification was used for MRI evaluation of the acromioclavicular joint ligaments. The classifications of acromioclavicular joint dislocations diagnosed with radiography and MRI were compared. Among 44 patients with Rockwood type I-IV injuries on radiographs, classification on radiographs and MR images was concordant in 23 (52.2%) patients. At MRI, the injury was reclassified to a less severe type in 16 (36.4%) patients and to a more severe type in five (11.4%) patients. Compared with the findings according to the original Rockwood system, with the adapted system that included MRI findings, additional ligamentous lesions were found in 11 (25%) patients. In a considerable number of patients, the MRI findings change the Rockwood type determined with radiography. In addition to clinical assessment and radiography, MRI may yield important findings on ligaments that may influence management.

  5. Bedside thoracic ultrasonography of the fourth intercostal space reliably determines safe removal of tube thoracostomy after traumatic injury.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Rita O; Miraflor, Emily; Yeung, Louise; Strumwasser, Aaron; Victorino, Gregory P

    2012-12-01

    Thoracic ultrasonography is more sensitive than chest radiography (CXR) in detecting pneumothorax; however, the role of ultrasonography to determine resolution of pneumothorax after thoracostomy tube placement for traumatic injury remains unclear. We hypothesized that ultrasonography can be used to determine pneumothorax resolution and facilitate efficient thoracostomy tube removal. We sought to compare the ability of thoracic ultrasonography at the second through fifth intercostal space (ICS) to detect pneumothorax with that of CXR and determine which ICS maximizes the positive and negative predictive value of thoracic ultrasonography for detecting clinically relevant pneumothorax resolution. A prospective, blinded clinical study of trauma patients requiring tube thoracostomy placement was performed at a university-based urban trauma center. A surgeon performed daily thoracic ultrasonographies consisting of midclavicular lung evaluation for pleural sliding in ICS 2 through 5. Ultrasonography findings were compared with findings on concurrently obtained portable CXR. Of the patients, 33 underwent 119 ultrasonographies, 109 of which had concomitant portable CXR results for comparison. Ultrasonography of ICS 4 or 5 was better than ICS 2 and 3 at detecting a pneumothorax, with a positive predictive value of 100% and a negative predictive value of 92%. The positive and negative predictive values for ICS 2 were 46% and 93% and for ICS 3 were 63% and 92%, respectively. Bedside, surgeon-performed, thoracic ultrasonography of ICS 4 for pneumothorax can safely and efficiently determine clinical resolution of traumatic pneumothorax and aid in the timely removal of thoracostomy tubes. Diagnostic study, level II.

  6. Single-image hard-copy display of the spine utilizing digital radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artz, Dorothy S.; Janchar, Timothy; Milzman, David; Freedman, Matthew T.; Mun, Seong K.

    1997-04-01

    Regions of the entire spine contain a wide latitude of tissue densities within the imaged field of view presenting a problem for adequate radiological evaluation. With screen/film technology, the optimal technique for one area of the radiograph is sub-optimal for another area. Computed radiography (CR) with its inherent wide dynamic range, has been shown to be better than screen/film for lateral cervical spine imaging, but limitations are still present with standard image processing. By utilizing a dynamic range control (DRC) algorithm based on unsharp masking and signal transformation prior to gradation and frequency processing within the CR system, more vertebral bodies can be seen on a single hard copy display of the lateral cervical, thoracic, and thoracolumbar examinations. Examinations of the trauma cross-table lateral cervical spine, lateral thoracic spine, and lateral thoracolumbar spine were collected on live patient using photostimulable storage phosphor plates, the Fuji FCR 9000 reader, and the Fuji AC-3 computed radiography reader. Two images were produced from a single exposure; one with standard image processing and the second image with the standard process and the additional DRC algorithm. Both sets were printed from a Fuji LP 414 laser printer. Two different DRC algorithms were applied depending on which portion of the spine was not well visualized. One algorithm increased optical density and the second algorithm decreased optical density. The resultant image pairs were then reviewed by a panel of radiologists. Images produced with the additional DRC algorithm demonstrated improved visualization of previously 'under exposed' and 'over exposed' regions within the same image. Where lung field had previously obscured bony detail of the lateral thoracolumbar spine due to 'over exposure,' the image with the DRC applied to decrease the optical density allowed for easy visualization of the entire area of interest. For areas of the lateral cervical spine

  7. Presenting features of thoracic neuroblastoma.

    PubMed Central

    McLatchie, G R; Young, D G

    1980-01-01

    In a retrospective study carried out at the Royal Hospital for Sick Children, Glasgow, for the period 1952-79, 7 cases of primary thoracic neuroblastoma were identified. The average age at presentation was 2 years. Respiratory symptoms were the modes of presentation in 2 patients, neurological symptoms in 4, and urinary tract symptoms in 1 patient. Dilatation of the urinary tract was present in 2 cases, and a third had a normal urinary tract but previous infections. After a maximum of 27 years and a minimum of 20 months, 5 of the patients remain well. One child died as a direct result of her tumour, the other from an unrelated tumour 25 years after partial excision of his neuroblastoma. The better prognosis of primary thoracic neuroblastoma and the variability of presentation compared with neuroblastoma in other sites are stressed. PMID:7458396

  8. [Endoscopic thoracic sympatecomy for hyperhidrosis].

    PubMed

    Smati, Belhassen; Marghali, Adel; Abid, Mohamed; Bakhtri, Malek; Ben Youssef, Atef; Mestiri, Taher; Djilani, Habiba; Kilani, Tarek

    2007-06-01

    Hyperhidrosis is a benin affection representing a social and professional problems and occupational handicaps in young patient. Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy thus provides a radical treatment for severe palmar and axillary hyperhidrosis. We describe the technique used in our institut and present results From 1995 to 2002, 32 patients were operated on for hyperhidrosis. There were 17 mens and 15 women raging in age from 15 to 32 years The intervention consisting on destruction by electrocoagulation to the sympathetic trunk There was no major complication and the mean postoperative hospital stay was 2 days. The disappearance of the palmar sweating was immediately after operation. 7 patients complained of compensatory sweating Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy for hyperhidrosis is a safe effect technique for treating palmar and axillary hyperhidrosis. Compensatry sweeting represent the major that necessite a preable information

  9. Robotic Surgery for Thoracic Disease.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Shin-Ichi; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Iwasaki, Akinori

    2016-01-01

    Robotic surgeries have developed in the general thoracic field over the past decade, and publications on robotic surgery outcomes have accumulated. However, controversy remains about the application of robotic surgery, with a lack of well-established evidence. Robotic surgery has several advantages such as natural movement of the surgeon's hands when manipulating the robotic arms and instruments controlled by computer-assisted systems. Most studies have reported the feasibility and safety of robotic surgery based on acceptable morbidity and mortality compared to open or video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS). Furthermore, there are accumulated data to indicate longer operation times and shorter hospital stay in robotic surgery. However, randomized controlled trials between robotic and open or VATS procedures are needed to clarify the advantage of robotic surgery. In this review, we focused the literature about robotic surgery used to treat lung cancer and mediastinal tumor.

  10. EFFECTS OF INTRAVENOUS DEXMEDETOMIDINE ON CARDIAC CHARACTERISTICS MEASURED USING RADIOGRAPHY AND ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY IN SIX HEALTHY DOGS.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsien-Chi; Hung, Cih-Ting; Lee, Wei-Ming; Chang, Kui-Ming; Chen, Kuan-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Dexmedetomidine is a highly specific and selective α2-adrenergic receptor agonist widely used in dogs for sedation or analgesia. We hypothesized that dexmedetomidine may cause significant changes in radiographic and echocardiographic measurements. The objective of this prospective cross-sectional study was to test this hypothesis in a sample of six healthy dogs. Staff-owned dogs were recruited and received a single dose of dexmedetomidine 250 μg/m(2) intravenously. Thoracic radiography and echocardiography were performed 1 h before treatment, and repeated 10 and 30 min after treatment, respectively. One observer recorded cardiac measurements from radiographs and another observer recorded echocardiographic measurements. Vertebral heart score and cardiac size to thorax ratio on the ventrodorsal projection increased from 9.8 ± 0.6 v to 10.3 ± 0.7 v (P = 0.0007) and 0.61 ± 0.04 to 0.68 ± 0.03 (P = 0.0109), respectively. E point-to-septal separation and left ventricle internal diameter in diastole and systole increased from 2.4 ± 1.1 to 6.6 ± 1.9 mm, 32.3 ± 8.1 to 35.5 ± 8.8 mm, and 19.4 ± 6 to 27.0 ± 7.2 mm, respectively (P < 0.05). Fractional shortening and sphericity index decreased from 40.7 ± 5.8 to 24.4 ± 2.9%, and 1.81 ± 0.07 to 1.58 ± 0.04, respectively (P < 0.05). Moderate-to-severe mitral regurgitation and mild pulmonic regurgitation occurred in all dogs after dexmedetomidine administration. Findings indicated that dexmedetomidine could cause false-positive diagnoses of valvular regurgitation and cardiomegaly in dogs undergoing thoracic radiography and echocardiography.

  11. Functional shoulder radiography with use of a dynamic flat panel detector.

    PubMed

    Sakuda, Keita; Sanada, Shigeru; Tanaka, Rie; Kitaoka, Katsuhiko; Hayashi, Norio; Matsuura, Yukihiro

    2014-07-01

    Our purpose in this study was to develop a functional form of radiography and to perform a quantitative analysis for the shoulder joint using a dynamic flat panel detector (FPD) system. We obtained dynamic images at a rate of 3.75 frames per second (fps) using an FPD system. Three patients and 5 healthy controls were studied with a clinically established frontal projection, with abduction of the arms. The arm angle, glenohumeral angle (G-angle), and scapulothoracic angle (S-angle) were measured on dynamic images. The ratio of the G-angle to the S-angle (GSR) was also evaluated quantitatively. In normal subjects, the G-angle and S-angle changed gradually along with the arm angle. The G-angle was approximately twice as large as the S-angle, resulting in a GSR of 2 throughout the abduction of the shoulder. Changes in G-angle and S-angle tended to be irregular in patients with shoulder disorders. The GSR of the thoracic outlet syndrome, recurrent dislocation of the shoulder joint, and anterior serratus muscle paralysis were 3-7.5, 4-9.5, and 3.5-7.5, respectively. The GSR of the anterior serratus muscle paralysis improved to approximately 2 after orthopedic treatment. Our preliminary results indicated that functional radiography by FPD and computer-aided quantitative analysis is useful for diagnosis of some shoulder disorders, such as the thoracic outlet syndrome, recurrent dislocation of the shoulder joint, and anterior serratus muscle paralysis. The technique and procedures described comprise a simple, functional shoulder radiographic method for evaluation of the therapeutic effects of surgery and/or rehabilitation.

  12. Nanotechnology applications in thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Hofferberth, Sophie C; Grinstaff, Mark W; Colson, Yolonda L

    2016-07-01

    Nanotechnology is an emerging, rapidly evolving field with the potential to significantly impact care across the full spectrum of cancer therapy. Of note, several recent nanotechnological advances show particular promise to improve outcomes for thoracic surgical patients. A variety of nanotechnologies are described that offer possible solutions to existing challenges encountered in the detection, diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer. Nanotechnology-based imaging platforms have the ability to improve the surgical care of patients with thoracic malignancies through technological advances in intraoperative tumour localization, lymph node mapping and accuracy of tumour resection. Moreover, nanotechnology is poised to revolutionize adjuvant lung cancer therapy. Common chemotherapeutic drugs, such as paclitaxel, docetaxel and doxorubicin, are being formulated using various nanotechnologies to improve drug delivery, whereas nanoparticle (NP)-based imaging technologies can monitor the tumour microenvironment and facilitate molecularly targeted lung cancer therapy. Although early nanotechnology-based delivery systems show promise, the next frontier in lung cancer therapy is the development of 'theranostic' multifunctional NPs capable of integrating diagnosis, drug monitoring, tumour targeting and controlled drug release into various unifying platforms. This article provides an overview of key existing and emerging nanotechnology platforms that may find clinical application in thoracic surgery in the near future.

  13. Treatment of intrathoracic grass awn migration with video-assisted thoracic surgery in two dogs.

    PubMed

    Shamir, Shelly; Mayhew, Philipp D; Zwingenberger, Allison; Johnson, Lynelle R

    2016-07-15

    CASE DESCRIPTION A 17-month-old sexually intact male Vizsla and a 2-year-old spayed female mixed-breed dog were examined because of suspected intrathoracic grass awn migration. CLINICAL FINDINGS Thoracic CT revealed focal areas of pulmonary infiltration in the right caudal lung lobe in one dog and in the left caudal lung lobe in the other. In 1 patient, bronchoscopy revealed 2 grass awns in the bronchi. Results of thoracic radiography and bronchoscopy were unremarkable in the second patient; however, a grass awn was recovered from the tonsillar crypt during oropharyngeal examination. TREATMENT AND OUTCOME In both dogs, grass awns were successfully retrieved from the pleural cavity by means of video-assisted thoracic surgery during 1-lung ventilation. In one patient, a grass awn was recovered bronchoscopically from the left caudal lung lobe bronchus and another was visualized distally in an accessory lung lobe bronchus but could not be retrieved. This dog underwent accessory lung lobectomy. The second dog underwent left caudal lung lobectomy. Both patients recovered uneventfully from surgery, were discharged from the hospital, and had no apparent recurrence of clinical signs at telephone follow-up 31 months and 18 months after surgery. CLINICAL RELEVANCE With careful case selection, successful management of intrathoracic grass awn migration in dogs can be achieved by means of video-assisted thoracic surgery. Comprehensive preoperative evaluation including both computed tomography and bronchoscopy is suggested. Further investigation is necessary to evaluate whether treatment of this condition with video-assisted thoracic surgery is as effective as with traditional open thoracotomy.

  14. Endovascular Repair of Traumatic Rupture of the Thoracic Aorta: Single-Center Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Saratzis, Nikolaos A. Saratzis, Athanasios N.; Melas, Nikolaos; Ginis, Georgios; Lioupis, Athanasios; Lykopoulos, Dimitrios; Lazaridis, John; Dimitrios, Kiskinis

    2007-06-15

    Purpose. Traumatic rupture of the thoracic aorta secondary to blunt chest trauma is a life-threatening emergency and a common cause of death, usually following violent collisions. The objective of this retrospective report was to evaluate the efficacy of endovascular treatment of thoracic aortic disruptions with a single commercially available stent-graft. Methods. Nine men (mean age 29.5 years) were admitted to our institution between January 2003 and January 2006 due to blunt aortic trauma following violent motor vehicle collisions. Plain chest radiography, spiral computed tomography, aortography, and transesophageal echocardiography were used for diagnostic purposes in all cases. All patients were diagnosed with contained extramural thoracic aortic hematomas, secondary to aortic disruption. One patient was also diagnosed with a traumatic thoracic aortic dissection, secondary to blunt trauma. All subjects were poor surgical candidates, due to major injuries such as multiple bone fractures, abdominal hematomas, and pulmonary contusions. All repairs were performed using the EndoFit (LeMaitre Vascular) stent-graft. Results. Complete exclusion of the traumatic aortic disruption and pseudoaneurysm was achieved and verified at intraoperative arteriography and on CT scans, within 10 days of the repair in all patients. In 1 case the deployment of a second cuff was necessary due to a secondary endoleak. In 2 cases the left subclavian artery was occluded to achieve adequate graft fixation. No procedure-related deaths have occurred and no cardiac or peripheral vascular complications were observed within the 12 months (range 8-16 months) follow-up. Conclusions. This is the first time the EndoFit graft has been utilized in the treatment of thoracic aortic disruptions secondary to chest trauma. The repair of such pathologies is technically feasible and early follow-up results are promising.

  15. Dental radiography in New Zealand: digital versus film.

    PubMed

    Ting, N A; Broadbent, J M; Duncan, W J

    2013-09-01

    Digital x-ray systems offer advantages over conventional film systems, yet many dentists have not adopted digital technology. To assess New Zealand dental practitioners' use of--and preferences for--dental radiography systems. Cross-sectional survey. General and specialist dental practice. Postal questionnaire survey of a sample of 770 dentists (520 randomly selected general dental practitioners and all 250 specialists) listed in the 2012 NZ Dental Council Register. Type of radiography systems used by dentists. Dentists' experiences and opinions of conventional film and digital radiography. The participation rate was 55.2%. Digital radiography systems were used by 58.0% of participating dentists, most commonly among those aged 31-40 years. Users of digital radiography tended to report greater satisfaction with their radiography systems than users conventional films. Two-thirds of film users were interested in switching to digital radiography in the near future. Reasons given by conventional film users for not using digital radiography included cost, difficulty in integrating with other software systems, concern about potential technical errors, and the size and nature of the intra-oral sensors. Many dental practitioners have still not adopted digital radiography, yet its users are more satisfied with their radiography systems than are conventional film users. The latter may find changing to a digital system to be satisfying and rewarding.

  16. Doses to critical organs from dental radiography.

    PubMed

    Antoku, S; Kihara, T; Russell, W J; Beach, D R

    1976-02-01

    Participants in the jointly sponsored Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission and Japanese National Institute of Health (ABCC-JNIH) Adult Health Study, a fixed-population sample under continual observation for late effects of the atomic bombs, are also being evaluated for their exposure to other sources of ionizing radiation. In the present study, the subjects' thyroid, lens, pituitary, bone marrow, and gonadal doses acquired during dental radiography were estimated from dosimetry of simulated human material exposed according to technical factors as ascertained in previously reported surveys of patients, dental clinics and hospitals, and dosimetry with phantom human material containing lithium fluoride thermoluminescence dosimeters and ionization chambers. Dental radiography comprised a relatively small segment of the contaminating sources of ionizing radiation exposure among this population sample. Efforts should be made to improve exposure conditions, especially in view of the increasing frequency of dental x-ray examinations.

  17. Radiography Students' Learning: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Holmström, Anneli; Ahonen, Sanna-Mari

    2016-01-01

    To describe research methodology and findings concerning radiography students' learning. Health sciences databases were searched to perform a traditional narrative literature review. Thirty-five peer-reviewed articles published between 2000 and 2014 were analyzed using thematic analysis. Specific methods of learning were found to be of the most interest. The studies focused primarily on the use and usability of a method or the students' general experiences of it. The most commonly studied methods were e-learning and interprofessional learning, which students perceived as positive methods for theoretical studies and clinical training. Students' learning regarding research was the focus of only one article reporting a wide variety of students' research interests. Most studies reported quantitative research gathered from questionnaires and surveys. Additional research, especially from a qualitative point of view, is needed to deepen the evidence-based knowledge of radiography student learning.

  18. Monte Carlo calculation for microplanar beam radiography.

    PubMed

    Company, F Z; Allen, B J; Mino, C

    2000-09-01

    In radiography the scattered radiation from the off-target region decreases the contrast of the target image. We propose that a bundle of collimated, closely spaced, microplanar beams can reduce the scattered radiation and eliminate the effect of secondary electron dose, thus increasing the image dose contrast in the detector. The lateral and depth dose distributions of 20-200 keV microplanar beams are investigated using the EGS4 Monte Carlo code to calculate the depth doses and dose profiles in a 6 cm x 6 cm x 6 cm tissue phantom. The maximum dose on the primary beam axis (peak) and the minimum inter-beam scattered dose (valley) are compared at different photon energies and the optimum energy range for microbeam radiography is found. Results show that a bundle of closely spaced microplanar beams can give superior contrast imaging to a single macrobeam of the same overall area.

  19. Contrast enhancement in microplanar beam radiography.

    PubMed

    Company, F Z; Allen, B J; Mino, C

    1999-12-01

    In x-ray radiography, the target produces a useful shadow from absorption of the primary beam, while the scattered radiation into the off-target region decreases the contrast of the target image. A bundle of closely spaced microplanar beams can reduce the scattered radiation and give superior image contrast compared with a single macrobeam of the same dimensions. To further reduce the scattered radiation and increase the image contrast, we place an air gap between the tissue phantom and the detector. The primary and scattered photon flux of a single microplanar beam is measured as a function of thickness inside the phantom and in the air gap. Results show that a bundle of closely spaced, microplanar beams increase the image contrast by 22% and a 2 cm air gap decreases the scattered photon flux by about half, improving the contrast by an additional 16%. Thus an overall improvement of 41% in contrast can be achieved with microplanar beam radiography.

  20. A system for fast neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Klann, R.T.

    1996-05-01

    A system has been designed and a neutron generator installed to perform fast neutron radiography. With this sytem, objects as small as a coin or as large as a waste drum can be radiographed. The neutron source is an MF Physics A-711 neutron generator which produces 3x10{sup 10} neutrons/second with an average energy of 14.5 MeV. The radiography system uses x-ray scintillation screens and film in commercially available cassettes. The cassettes have been modified to include a thin sheet of plastic to convert neutrons to protons through elastic scattering from hydrogen and other low Z materials in the plastic. For film densities from 1.8 to 3.0, exposures range from 1.9x10{sup 7} to 3.8x10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2} depending on the type of screen and film.

  1. Analgesia for small animal thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Pavlidou, Kyriaki; Papazoglou, Lysimachos; Savvas, Ioannis; Kazakos, Georgios

    2009-09-01

    Thoracic surgery in small animals is considered a painful procedure, resulting in alterations in pulmonary function and respiratory mechanics. Modifications in surgical approach and technique and selection of the appropriate analgesic protocol may improve outcomes in dogs and cats after thoracic surgery. Systemic administration of opioids and other agents, intercostal and intrapleural blocks, and epidural analgesia are among the most common options for pain management after thoracic surgery in small animals.

  2. Digital radiography: Present detectors and future developments

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Mendez, V.

    1990-08-01

    Present detectors for digital radiography are of two classes: real time detectors and storage (non real time) types. Present real time detectors consist of image intensifier tubes with an internal cesium iodide layer x-ray converter. Non real time detectors involve linear sweep arrays or storage detectors such as film. Future detectors discussed here can be of both types utilizing new technologies such as hydrogenated amorphous silicon photodiode arrays coupled to thin film transistor arrays. 17 refs., 10 figs.

  3. Progress in thermal neutron radiography at LENS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Jack; Low Energy Neutron Source (LENS) at Indiana University Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    An end station for thermal neutron radiography and tomography is in operation at the Indiana University LENS facility. Neutrons from proton-induced nuclear reactions in Beryllium are moderated and collimated into a beam which is attenuated by a scanned object on a remotely-controlled rotating table. Neutron signal is then converted to a light signal with a ZnS scintillating screen and recorded in a cooled CCD. The author has performed diagnostics on the radiography hardware and software and has tested the system's capabilities by imaging a stack of high density polyethylene cubes with diverse inlet holes and grooves on an 80/20 aluminum base. The resolution of the radiographs are seen to be less than 1mm and 3D rending software is capable of reconstructing the internal structure of the aluminum. An end station for thermal neutron radiography and tomography is in operation at the Indiana University LENS facility. Neutrons from proton-induced nuclear reactions in Beryllium are moderated and collimated into a beam which is attenuated by a scanned object on a remotely-controlled rotating table. Neutron signal is then converted to a light signal with a ZnS scintillating screen and recorded in a cooled CCD. The author has performed diagnostics on the radiography hardware and software and has tested the system's capabilities by imaging a stack of high density polyethylene cubes with diverse inlet holes and grooves on an 80/20 aluminum base. The resolution of the radiographs are seen to be less than 1mm and 3D rending software is capable of reconstructing the internal structure of the aluminum. NSF.

  4. Digital radiography: image quality and radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Seibert, J Anthony

    2008-11-01

    Digital radiography devices, rapidly replacing analog screen-film detectors, are now common in diagnostic radiological imaging, where implementation has been accelerated by the commodity status of electronic imaging and display systems. The shift from narrow latitude, fixed-speed screen-film detectors to wide latitude, variable-speed digital detectors has created a flexible imaging system that can easily result in overexposures to the patient without the knowledge of the operator, thus potentially increasing the radiation burden of the patient population from radiographic examinations. In addition, image processing can be inappropriately applied causing inconsistent or artifactual appearance of anatomy, which can lead to misdiagnosis. On the other hand, many advantages can be obtained from the variable-speed digital detector, such as an ability to lower dose in many examinations, image post-processing for disease-specific conditions, display flexibility to change the appearance of the image and aid the physician in making a differential diagnosis, and easy access to digital images. An understanding of digital radiography is necessary to minimize the possibility of overexposures and inconsistent results, and to achieve the principle of as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) for the safe and effective care of all patients. Thus many issues must be considered for optimal implementation of digital radiography, as reviewed in this article.

  5. Dual energy scanning beam X-radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojcik, Randolph Frank

    Dual energy X-radiography is a method first developed in the mid-1970's by which one uses the information contained in the energy spectrum of the transmitted X-ray flux through an object. With this information one can distinguish the types of materials present in a radiograph and thus allow a computer to subtract them from the image enhancing the contrast of the remaining materials. Using this method, one can see details, which would have been hidden by overlying structures of other materials such as seen in radiographs of parts, made up of mixtures of metals and composites. There is also great interest in this technique for medical imaging of the chest where images of the organs are significantly improved by subtracting the bones. However, even with the enhanced capabilities realized with this technique, the majority of X-radiography systems only measures the bulk transmitted X-ray intensity and ignores the information contained in the energy spectrum. This is due to the added expense, time requirements, and registration problems incurred using standard radiographic methods to obtain dual energy radiographs. This dissertation describes a novel method which overcomes these problems and allows one to perform inexpensive, near real time, single shot dual energy X-radiography. The work of this thesis resulted in US patent #5,742,660.

  6. Proton Radiography Peers into Metal Solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Amy J.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; Cooley, Jason C.; Morris, Christopher; Merrill, Frank E.; Hollander, Brian J.; Mariam, Fesseha G.; Ott, Thomas J.; Barker, Martha R.; Tucker, Tim J.; Lee, Wah-Keat; Fezzaa, Kamel; Deriy, Alex; Patterson, Brian M.; Clarke, Kester D.; Montalvo, Joel D.; Field, Robert D.; Thoma, Dan J.; Smith, James L.; Teter, David F.

    2013-06-19

    Historically, metals are cut up and polished to see the structure and to infer how processing influences the evolution. We can now peer into a metal during processing without destroying it using proton radiography. Understanding the link between processing and structure is important because structure profoundly affects the properties of engineering materials. Synchrotron x-ray radiography has enabled real-time glimpses into metal solidification. However, x-ray energies favor the examination of small volumes and low density metals. In this study, we use high energy proton radiography for the first time to image a large metal volume (>10,000 mm3) during melting and solidification. We also show complementary x-ray results from a small volume (<1mm3), bridging four orders of magnitude. In conclusion, real-time imaging will enable efficient process development and the control of the structure evolution to make materials with intended properties; it will also permit the development of experimentally informed, predictive structure and process models.

  7. Proton Radiography Peers into Metal Solidification

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Amy; Imhoff, Seth; Gibbs, Paul; Cooley, Jason; Morris, Christopher; Merrill, Frank; Hollander, Brian; Mariam, Fesseha; Ott, Thomas; Barker, Martha; Tucker, Tim; Lee, Wah-Keat; Fezzaa, Kamel; Deriy, Alex; Patterson, Brian; Clarke, Kester; Montalvo, Joel; Field, Robert; Thoma, Dan; Smith, James; Teter, David

    2013-01-01

    Historically, metals are cut up and polished to see the structure and to infer how processing influences the evolution. We can now peer into a metal during processing without destroying it using proton radiography. Understanding the link between processing and structure is important because structure profoundly affects the properties of engineering materials. Synchrotron x-ray radiography has enabled real-time glimpses into metal solidification. However, x-ray energies favor the examination of small volumes and low density metals. Here we use high energy proton radiography for the first time to image a large metal volume (>10,000 mm3) during melting and solidification. We also show complementary x-ray results from a small volume (<1 mm3), bridging four orders of magnitude. Real-time imaging will enable efficient process development and the control of structure evolution to make materials with intended properties; it will also permit the development of experimentally informed, predictive structure and process models. PMID:23779063

  8. Assessment of cold neutron radiography capability

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, T.E. Jr.; Roberts, J.A.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The authors goals were to demonstrate and assess cold neutron radiography techniques at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), Manual Lujan Neutron Scattering Center (Lujan Center), and to investigate potential applications of the capability. The authors have obtained images using film and an amorphous silicon detector. In addition, a new technique they have developed allows neutron radiographs to be made using only a narrow range of neutron energies. Employing this approach and the Bragg cut-off phenomena in certain materials, they have demonstrated material discrimination in radiography. They also demonstrated the imaging of cracks in a sample of a fire-set case that was supplied by Sandia National Laboratory, and they investigated whether the capability could be used to determine the extent of coking in jet engine nozzles. The LANSCE neutron radiography capability appears to have applications in the DOE stockpile maintenance and science-based stockpile stewardship (SBSS) programs, and in industry.

  9. Newer imaging methods in chest radiography.

    PubMed

    Wandtke, J C

    1990-01-01

    In recent years the application of computers to chest radiography has resulted in a wide variety of innovative research. Major research efforts have resulted in the development of new types of x-ray detectors, such as storage phosphor technology, for use with computers. Storage phosphor imaging is one of the most promising new techniques, and almost 100 systems have been installed worldwide. Radiologists are quickly evaluating the image quality provided by this new detector system, which has the potential to improve image quality. It has wide latitude and is coupled with a computer to perform image processing. Another promising technology, originally studied in the form of scan equalization radiography, is now commercially available in the form of advanced multiple-beam equalization radiography. This film technique uses computers to modulate the x-ray exposure to take maximum advantage of the imaging capabilities of radiographic film. Digital solid-state detectors have been studied in conjunction with computerized image enhancement systems. These currently show improvement in nodule detection and quantification of the calcium content of a lesion. Application of large image intensifiers to a digital image system is being studied, but there are currently limitations on spatial resolution.

  10. Proton Radiography Peers into Metal Solidification

    DOE PAGES

    Clarke, Amy J.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; ...

    2013-06-19

    Historically, metals are cut up and polished to see the structure and to infer how processing influences the evolution. We can now peer into a metal during processing without destroying it using proton radiography. Understanding the link between processing and structure is important because structure profoundly affects the properties of engineering materials. Synchrotron x-ray radiography has enabled real-time glimpses into metal solidification. However, x-ray energies favor the examination of small volumes and low density metals. In this study, we use high energy proton radiography for the first time to image a large metal volume (>10,000 mm3) during melting and solidification.more » We also show complementary x-ray results from a small volume (<1mm3), bridging four orders of magnitude. In conclusion, real-time imaging will enable efficient process development and the control of the structure evolution to make materials with intended properties; it will also permit the development of experimentally informed, predictive structure and process models.« less

  11. Impact of digital radiography on clinical workflow.

    PubMed

    May, G A; Deer, D D; Dackiewicz, D

    2000-05-01

    It is commonly accepted that digital radiography (DR) improves workflow and patient throughput compared with traditional film radiography or computed radiography (CR). DR eliminates the film development step and the time to acquire the image from a CR reader. In addition, the wide dynamic range of DR is such that the technologist can perform the quality-control (QC) step directly at the modality in a few seconds, rather than having to transport the newly acquired image to a centralized QC station for review. Furthermore, additional workflow efficiencies can be achieved with DR by employing tight radiology information system (RIS) integration. In the DR imaging environment, this provides for patient demographic information to be automatically downloaded from the RIS to populate the DR Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) image header. To learn more about this workflow efficiency improvement, we performed a comparative study of workflow steps under three different conditions: traditional film/screen x-ray, DR without RIS integration (ie, manual entry of patient demographics), and DR with RIS integration. This study was performed at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation (Cleveland, OH) using a newly acquired amorphous silicon flat-panel DR system from Canon Medical Systems (Irvine, CA). Our data show that DR without RIS results in substantial workflow savings over traditional film/screen practice. There is an additional 30% reduction in total examination time using DR with RIS integration.

  12. Survey radiography and computerized tomography imaging of the thorax in female dogs with mammary tumors

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Accurate early diagnosis of lung metastases is important for establishing therapeutic measures. Therefore, the present study aimed to compare survey thoracic radiographs and computerized tomography (CT) scans to specifically identify lung metastases in female dogs with mammary tumors. Methods Twenty-one female dogs, weighing 3 to 34 kg and aged from 5 years to 14 years and 10 months, with mammary tumors were studied. In all dogs before the imaging examinations, fine-needle aspiration cytology of the mammary tumors was performed to confirm the diagnosis. Three-view thoracic radiographs were accomplished: right lateral, left lateral and ventrodorsal views. Sequential transverse images of the thorax were acquired on a spiral Scanner, before and after intravenous bolus injection of nonionic iodine contrast. Soft-tissue and lung windows were applied. All the mammary tumors were surgically removed and examined histologically. Results The correlation between the cytological and histological results regarding presence of malignancy was observed in only 17 cases. In radiographic examinations, no dog displayed signs of lung metastases or thorax chest lesions. CT detected lung metastasis in two cases, while small areas of lung atelectasis located peripherally were found in 28.57% of the dogs. Conclusion In this study population, spiral CT showed higher sensitivity than chest radiographies to detect lung metastasis; this indicates that CT should be performed on all female dogs with malignant mammary tumors. PMID:20214816

  13. Assessment and optimisation of the image quality of chest-radiography systems.

    PubMed

    Redlich, U; Hoeschen, C; Doehring, W

    2005-01-01

    A complete evaluation strategy had been developed for thoracic X-ray imaging. It has been validated by investigating five chest-radiography systems, two of these systems after optimising image processing. The systems were a screen-film combination, a selenium drum, a conventional and a transparent imaging plate and a Cs/I-based flat panel detector (the two latter ones have been optimised using different post processing). At first all detectors have been characterised using physical parameters like DQE and MTF. After that all systems have been evaluated by human observer studies using anatomy in clinical images (VGA, ICS) and added pathological structures in thoracic phantom images (ROC). The ranking of the image quality of the systems was nearly the same in all studies. There was a similar assessment of main image quality parameters like spatial resolution, dynamic range and MTF. The modification of image post processing changed the visibility of pathological structures more than the visualisation of the anatomical criteria. The assessment of the clinical image quality has to be done for anatomical structures, and the recognition of pathological structures has to be evaluated.

  14. Emergency skull radiography: the effect of restrictive criteria on skull radiography and CT use

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, S.R.; Gaylord, G.M.; Lantos, G.; Tabaddor, K.; Gallagher, E.J.

    1985-08-01

    A prospective study was performed to determine the effect of restrictive criteria on the use of emergency skull radiography and computed tomography (CT) of the head. Emergency skull radiography required the completion of a special requisition form. Emergency CT of the head was done at the request of senior consultants and was available on a full-time basis. Over 1 year, 2758 skull studies were performed, a decrease of 39.1% when compared with the year before restrictive criteria were instituted, during which 4587 skull examinations were done. In the same period, the number of emergency CT scans of the head increased by 45.7%, from 471 in the control year to 686 in the experimental year. With the use of restrictive criteria, a net savings of $164,000 was achieved. Our results suggest that the use of restrictive criteria is a cost-effective means of limiting skull radiography when CT of the head is readily available.

  15. First experimental research in low energy proton radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Tao; Yang, Guo-Jun; Li, Yi-Ding; Long, Ji-Dong; He, Xiao-Zhong; Zhang, Xiao-Ding; Jiang, Xiao-Guo; Ma, Chao-Fan; Zhao, Liang-Chao; Yang, Xing-Lin; Zhang, Zhuo; Wang, Yuan; Pang, Jian; Li, Hong; Li, Wei-Feng; Zhou, Fu-Xin; Shi, Jin-Shui; Zhang, Kai-Zhi; Li, Jin; Zhang, Lin-Wen; Deng, Jian-Jun

    2014-08-01

    Proton radiography is a new scatheless diagnostic tool providing a potential development direction for advanced hydrotesting. Recently a low energy proton radiography system has been developed at the Chinese Academy of Engineering Phyiscs (CAEP). This system has been designed to use an 11 MeV proton beam to radiograph thin static objects. This system consists of a proton cyclotron coupled to an imaging beamline, which is the first domestic beamline dedicated to proton radiography experiments. Via some demonstration experiments, the radiography system is confirmed to provide clear pictures with spatial resolution ~100 μm within 40 mm field-of-view.

  16. Doctors of Thoracic Surgery: The Division of Thoracic Surgery at Toronto General Hospital.

    PubMed

    Keshavjee, Shaf; Spatafora, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    The Division of Thoracic Surgery at Toronto General Hospital has a history of sustained excellence and commitment to patient care, research and innovation in Thoracic Surgery. Doctors of Thoracic Surgery (DOTSR) continues to be a leading thoracic division training surgeons who practice all over the world--impacting the treatment of patients with thoracic disease. Many leaders in our specialty worldwide have directly or indirectly trained in Toronto. At University Health Network and the University of Toronto, this academic division has continued to contribute and thrive in a highly supportive and productive research and clinical environment.

  17. Thoracic organ transplantation: laboratory methods.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jignesh K; Kobashigawa, Jon A

    2013-01-01

    Although great progress has been achieved in thoracic organ transplantation through the development of effective immunosuppression, there is still significant risk of rejection during the early post-transplant period, creating a need for routine monitoring for both acute antibody and cellular mediated rejection. The currently available multiplexed, microbead assays utilizing solubilized HLA antigens afford the capability of sensitive detection and identification of HLA and non-HLA specific antibodies. These assays are being used to assess the relative strength of donor specific antibodies; to permit performance of virtual crossmatches which can reduce the waiting time to transplantation; to monitor antibody levels during desensitization; and for heart transplants to monitor antibodies post-transplant. For cell mediated immune responses, the recent development of gene expression profiling has allowed noninvasive monitoring of heart transplant recipients yielding predictive values for acute cellular rejection. T cell immune monitoring in heart and lung transplant recipients has allowed individual tailoring of immunosuppression, particularly to minimize risk of infection. While the current antibody and cellular laboratory techniques have enhanced the ability to manage thoracic organ transplant recipients, future developments from improved understanding of microchimerism and graft tolerance may allow more refined allograft monitoring techniques.

  18. Bilateral internal thoracic artery grafting

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of the left internal mammary artery graft to the anterior descending coronary artery as a surgical strategy has been shown to improve the survival rate and decrease the risk of adverse cardiac events in patients undergoing coronary bypass surgery. These clinical benefits appear to be related to the superior short and long-term patency rates of the internal thoracic artery graft. Although the advantages of using of both internal thoracic arteries (ITA) for bypass grafting have taken longer to prove, recent results from multiple data sets now support these findings. The major advantage of bilateral ITA grafting appears to be improved survival rate, while the disadvantages of complex ITA grafting include the increased complexity of operation, and an increased risk of wound complications. While these short-term disadvantages have been mitigated in contemporary surgical practice, they have not eliminated. Bilateral ITA grafting should be considered the procedure of choice for patients undergoing coronary bypass surgery that have a predicted survival rate of longer than ten years. PMID:23977627

  19. The Thoracic Shape of Hominoids

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Lap Ki

    2014-01-01

    In hominoids, the broad thorax has been assumed to contribute to their dorsal scapular position. However, the dorsoventral diameter of their cranial thorax was found in one study to be longer in hominoids. There are insufficient data on thoracic shape to explain the relationship between broad thorax and dorsal scapular position. The current study presents data on multilevel cross-sectional shape and volume distribution in a range of primates. Biplanar radiographs of intact fluid-preserved cadavers were taken to measure the cross-sectional shape of ten equally spaced levels through the sternum (called decisternal levels) and the relative volume of the nine intervening thoracic segments. It was found that the cranial thorax of hominoids is larger and broader (except in the first two decisternal levels) than that of other primates. The cranial thorax of hominoids has a longer dorsoventral diameter because the increase in dorsoventral diameter caused by the increase in the volume of the cranial thorax overcompensates for the decrease caused by the broadening of the cranial thorax. The larger and broader cranial thorax in hominoids can be explained as a locomotor adaptation for scapular gliding and as a respiratory adaptation for reducing the effects of orthograde posture on ventilation-perfusion inequality. PMID:24818026

  20. Evolution of thoracic surgery in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Deslauriers, Jean; Griffith Pearson, F; Nelems, Bill

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Canada’s contributions toward the 21st century’s practice of thoracic surgery have been both unique and multilayered. Scattered throughout are tales of pioneers where none had gone before, where opportunities were greeted by creativity and where iconic figures followed one another. OBJECTIVE: To describe the numerous and important achievements of Canadian thoracic surgeons in the areas of surgery for pulmonary tuberculosis, thoracic oncology, airway surgery and lung transplantation. METHOD: Information was collected through reading of the numerous publications written by Canadian thoracic surgeons over the past 100 years, interviews with interested people from all thoracic surgery divisions across Canada and review of pertinent material form the archives of several Canadian hospitals and universities. RESULTS: Many of the developments occurred by chance. It was the early and specific focus on thoracic surgery, to the exclusion of cardiac and general surgery, that distinguishes the Canadian experience, a model that is now emerging everywhere. From lung transplantation in chimera twin calves to ex vivo organ preservation, from the removal of airways to tissue regeneration, and from intensive care research to complex science, Canadians have excelled in their commitment to research. Over the years, the influence of Canadian thoracic surgery on international practice has been significant. CONCLUSIONS: Canada spearheaded the development of thoracic surgery over the past 100 years to a greater degree than any other country. From research to education, from national infrastructures to the regionalization of local practices, it happened in Canada.

  1. Lung ultrasound versus chest radiography for the diagnosis of pneumothorax in critically ill patients: A prospective, single-blind study

    PubMed Central

    Abdalla, W; Elgendy, M; Abdelaziz, AA; Ammar, MA

    2016-01-01

    Background: Radiologic data remains the gold standard for the diagnosis of pneumothorax (PTX). The use of ultrasonography (US) has recently emerged as the method of choice with physicians who can perform bedside US. Purpose: To compare the diagnostic accuracy of lung US against bedside chest radiography (CR) for the detection of PTX using thoracic computed tomography (CT) as the gold standard. Materials and Methods: We conducted a prospective, single-blind study on 192 critically ill patients; each patient received lung US examination, bedside CR, followed by thoracic CT scan searching for PTX. Results: Of the studied patients, CT of the chest confirmed the diagnosis of PTX in 36 (18.75%) patients of which 31 were diagnosed by thoracic US while CR detected only 19 cases. Overall lung US showed a considerable higher sensitivity than bedside CR (86.1% vs. 52.7%), lung US also showed higher, negative predictive values, and diagnostic accuracy against CR (96.8% vs. 90.1%), and (95.3% vs. 90.6%), respectively. CR had a slightly higher specificity than lung US (99.4% vs. 97.4%), and higher positive predictive values (95.0% vs. 88.6%). Conclusion: Lung US is an accurate modality more than anteroposterior bedside CR in comparison with CT scanning when evaluating critically ill mechanically ventilated patients, patients underwent thoracocentesis, central venous catheter insertion, or patients with polytrauma. PMID:27375379

  2. Thoracic osteophyte: rare cause of esophageal perforation.

    PubMed

    Rathinam, S; Makarawo, T; Norton, R; Collins, F J

    2010-01-01

    Esophageal perforation is a difficult problem in thoracic surgery. Esophageal perforations can be spontaneous, iatrogenic, or malignant. We report two cases of esophageal perforations caused by thoracic osteophytes and different management strategies leading to successful outcomes. An 80-year-old male presented with chest pain and dysphagia following a fall. On endoscopy, an esophageal perforation and foreign body was noted which was confirmed as a thoracic osteophyte on computed tomography scan. He was managed conservatively as he declined surgery. A 63-year-old male was admitted with dysphagia following a food bolus obstruction. Following esophagoscopy and dilatation, there was clinical and radiological evidence of perforation. During surgery, a thoracic osteophyte was identified as the cause of perforation. The perforation was closed in layers and the osteophyte was trimmed. Both patients recovered well. Thoracic osteophytes are a rare cause of esophageal perforations and a high index of suspicion is required in patients with osteoarthritis who present with esophageal perforations.

  3. Thoracic outlet syndrome in whiplash injury.

    PubMed Central

    Capistrant, T D

    1977-01-01

    Thirty-five cases of thoracic outlet syndrome complicating whiplash or cervical strain injury were studied. Thirty cases had confirmation by the demonstration of slowed ulnar nerve conduction velocity (UNCV) through the thoracic outlet. Two distinct groups of patients were found. An acute group, seen an average of 3 1/2 months post injury, had severe neck pain with often mild or incidental thoracic outlet syndrome. A chronic group, with symptoms persisting more than 2 years after cervical injury, often had thoracic outlet symptoms as the predominant complaint. This study suggests that the arm aches and parethesias seen in association with both acute and chronic cervical strain injury are most often secondary to thoracic outlet syndrome. PMID:836089

  4. Wartime thoracic injury: perspectives in modern warfare.

    PubMed

    Propper, Brandon W; Gifford, Shaun M; Calhoon, John H; McNeil, Jeffrey D

    2010-04-01

    Thoracic injury represents a major source of combat morbidity and mortality. The overall killed-in-action rate has decreased, whereas the died-of-wounds rate has increased; the creation of the Joint Theater Trauma Registry allows for improved documentation. This report seeks to provide a realistic contemporary look at thoracic injury sustained by military forces and civilian casualties during the current wartime experience. The Joint Theater Trauma Registry was queried between 2002 and 2008. Patients receiving treatment for thoracic injuries were identified using International Classification of Diseases, 9th edition, diagnosis and procedure codes. All US soldiers, coalition forces, and local civilians were included in the analysis. There were 33,755 casualties identified during the study period, of which 1,660 patients (4.9%) sustained thoracic injury. Blast mechanism was the most prominent mode of injury, accounting for 45.8%. The mean Injury Severity Score in this cohort of patients was 14.9. A total of 4,232 procedures were performed, resulting in an average of 2.5 thoracic procedures per patient. Fifty percent of casualties were civilian, and 34% were US troops, with the remainder occurring in coalition forces. Overall mortality was 12%. This report provides a realistic account of current wartime thoracic injury. In contrast to previous wars, the majority of thoracic injury is secondary to blast injury as opposed to penetrating trauma, and the resultant mortality rate is higher. This report breaks down thoracic injuries to both US troops and civilian personal and provides realistic expectations for thoracic injury during future combat planning. Copyright (c) 2010 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Axial Tomography from Digitized Real Time Radiography

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Zolnay, A. S.; McDonald, W. M.; Doupont, P. A.; McKinney, R. L.; Lee, M. M.

    1985-01-18

    Axial tomography from digitized real time radiographs provides a useful tool for industrial radiography and tomography. The components of this system are: x-ray source, image intensifier, video camera, video line extractor and digitizer, data storage and reconstruction computers. With this system it is possible to view a two dimensional x-ray image in real time at each angle of rotation and select the tomography plane of interest by choosing which video line to digitize. The digitization of a video line requires less than a second making data acquisition relatively short. Further improvements on this system are planned and initial results are reported.

  6. Digital Radiography Qualification of Tube Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carl, Chad

    2012-01-01

    The Orion Project will be directing Lockheed Martin to perform orbital arc welding on commodities metallic tubing as part of the Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle assembly and integration process in the Operations and Checkout High bay at Kennedy Space Center. The current method of nondestructive evaluation is utilizing traditional film based x-rays. Due to the high number of welds that are necessary to join the commodities tubing (approx 470), a more efficient and expeditious method of nondestructive evaluation is desired. Digital radiography will be qualified as part of a broader NNWG project scope.

  7. Axial tomography from digitized real time radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Zolnay, A.S.; McDonald, W.M.; Doupont, P.A.; McKinney, R.L.; Lee, M.M.

    1985-01-18

    Axial tomography from digitized real time radiographs provides a useful tool for industrial radiography and tomography. The components of this system are: x-ray source, image intensifier, video camera, video line extractor and digitizer, data storage and reconstruction computers. With this system it is possible to view a two dimensional x-ray image in real time at each angle of rotation and select the tomography plane of interest by choosing which video line to digitize. The digitization of a video line requires less than a second making data acquisition relatively short. Further improvements on this system are planned and initial results are reported.

  8. Learning Styles of Radiography Students during Clinical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, L. Patrice

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and describe the common learning styles of radiography students during clinical practice. Quantitative, descriptive research methodology identified the learning styles of radiography students. A single self-report questionnaire, developed to assess learning styles in clinical practice, was administered…

  9. Diagnostics of coated fuel particles by neutron and synchrotron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Momot, G. V.; Podurets, K. M.; Pogorelyi, D. K.; Somenkov, V. A.; Yakovenko, E. V.

    2011-12-15

    The nondestructive monitoring of coated fuel particles has been performed using contact neutron radiography and refraction radiography based on synchrotron radiation. It is shown that these methods supplement each other and have a high potential for determining the sizes, densities, and isotopic composition of the particle components.

  10. 10 CFR 34.13 - Specific license for industrial radiography.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Specific license for industrial radiography. 34.13 Section 34.13 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Specific Licensing Provisions § 34.13 Specific license for...

  11. Balloon Kyphoplasty under Three-dimensional Radiography Guidance.

    PubMed

    Umebayashi, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Yu; Nakajima, Yasuhiro; Hara, Masahito

    2017-09-15

    Percutaneous balloon kyphoplasty (PBKP) is generally performed under two-dimensional (2D) radiography guidance (lateral- and anteroposterior (A-P) views) using C-arm fluoroscopy. However, 2D images taken by single-plane or bi-plane fluoroscopy cannot provide information regarding axial views, particularly the Z axis. Lack of information regarding the Z axis prevents the creation of three-dimensional (3D) images. Currently, there has been a progress in interventional X-ray systems, and they are capable of providing 3D radiographic images using a rotational angiography mode which is used to create 3D angiographies. In this report, we described the usefulness of 3D radiography guidance. Patients treated by PBKP was designed to evaluate the efficacy of 3D radiography guidance. These patients experienced osteoporotic vertebral fractures with severe pain. We retrospectively analyzed patients who underwent PBKP from February to December 2016. All patients had a single-level vertebral fracture and underwent surgery by 2D or 3D radiography guidance. We performed 16 patients in 3D radiography guidance, and 10 patients in traditional 2D radiography guidance. This 3D radiography guided PBKP increase the amount of the polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) injection compared with ordinary 2D method. As a result, postoperative vertebral height and alignment were significantly improved. Both groups have no complication. To confirm the final results and make PBKP more effective, 3D radiography guidance is feasible and safe for balloon kyphoplasty.

  12. Ossification of thoracic ligamenta flava

    SciTech Connect

    Kudo, S.; Minoru, O.; Russell, W.J.

    1983-07-01

    Although ligamentum flavum ossification (LFO) often occurs in normal persons, there are no reports of its detection on lateral chest radiographs made during screening examinations. Review of 1,744 consecutive lateral chest radiographs identified LFO in 6.2% of males and 4.8% of females. LFO occurred mainly at the intervertebral segments from T9-T10 through T12-L1. Most prevalent was the hook-shaped LFO, protruding inferoirly from the inferior facets into the projections of the intervertabral foramina. Though LFO can cause severe neurologic symptoms, none of the affected persons in this study reported such symptoms. LFO was first visualized radiographically when the subjects were 20-40 years old, and it may be a physiologic condition. The LFO in these cases existed independent of thoracic posterior longitudinal ligament ossification, diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis, and degenerative osteoarthritis.

  13. [Thoracic nocardiosis - a clinical report].

    PubMed

    Vale, Artur; Guerra, Miguel; Martins, Daniel; Lameiras, Angelina; Miranda, José; Vouga, Luís

    2014-01-01

    Nocardia genus microorganisms are ubiquitous, Gram positive aerobic bacterias, responsible for disease mainly in immunocompromised hosts, with cellular immune response commitment. Inhalation is the main form of transmition and pulmonary disease is the most frequent presentation. Dissemination may occur by contiguity and also via hematogenous. The clinical and imaging presentation is not specific, and diagnosis is obtained after identification of Nocardia bacteria in biological samples. Since there are no reliable studies that indicate the best therapeutic option, treatment should be individualized and based on antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Surgical drainage should also be considered in all patients. The authors present a clinical case of a patient with thoracic nocardiosis, and make a short literature review on the theme.

  14. [Thoracic actinomycosis versus bronchial cancer].

    PubMed

    Brombacher-Frey, I; Wöckel, W; Kreusser, T

    1992-01-01

    We report on 4 thoracic actinomycoses; in three of these four cases a bronchial carcinoma was suspected, and in case No. 2 this carcinoma had been considered to be in a very advanced and inoperable stage. A man of 51 years of age was in a generally run-down condition. He also noticed that his sputum was tinged with blood. The x-ray film showed a large space-occupying growth at the right lung hilus. Repeated perbronchial biopsies of the focus did not yield any diagnosis. Actinomycosis was identified histologically only in the tissue samples obtained via thoracotomy. After a three-month penicillin course the hilar shadow receded. A 61-year old male patient was transferred to our Pneumological Hospital, being strongly suspected of suffering from an extensive bronchial carcinoma, and having multiple intrathoracic space-occupying growths as well as pleural effusions, a pericardial effusion, and an infiltration of the left thoracic wall with fistula formation; however, histological examination of skin biopsies revealed that he was suffering from actinomycosis. Antibiotic therapy cured him completely in a six-month course. In a man of 32 years of age who had been indulging for many years in a severe abuse of nicotin, we suspected a central bronchial carcinoma on the basis of his x-ray, but histology of the tissue taken from the space-occupying growth via diagnostic thoracotomy revealed that this patient, too, suffered from actinomycosis. Complete recession occurred after several months of antibiotic treatment. A woman of 82 years had been an inpatient for several months in another hospital because of relapsing pleuropneumonias on the right side. She was transferred to us as an outpatient after a renewed relapse. We conducted a transcutaneous fine-needle biopsy of the right indurating pleural effusion. A few actinomyces filaments were seen on histological examination of the purulent exudate. Hence, actinomycosis was confirmed. After antibiotic therapy the finding receded

  15. Simulation of computed radiography with imaging plate detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Tisseur, D.; Costin, M.; Mathy, F.; Schumm, A.

    2014-02-18

    Computed radiography (CR) using phosphor imaging plate detectors is taking an increasing place in Radiography Testing. CR uses similar equipment as conventional radiography except that the classical X-ray film is replaced by a numerical detector, called image plate (IP), which is made of a photostimulable layer and which is read by a scanning device through photostimulated luminescence. Such digital radiography has already demonstrated important benefits in terms of exposure time, decrease of source energies and thus reduction of radioprotection area besides being a solution without effluents. This paper presents a model for the simulation of radiography with image plate detectors in CIVA together with examples of validation of the model. The study consists in a cross comparison between experimental and simulation results obtained on a step wedge with a classical X-ray tube. Results are proposed in particular with wire Image quality Indicator (IQI) and duplex IQI.

  16. Neutron Radiography of Irradiated Nuclear Fuel at Idaho National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craft, Aaron E.; Wachs, Daniel M.; Okuniewski, Maria A.; Chichester, David L.; Williams, Walter J.; Papaioannou, Glen C.; Smolinski, Andrew T.

    Neutron radiography of irradiated nuclear fuel provides more comprehensive information about the internal condition of irradiated nuclear fuel than any other non-destructive technique to date. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has multiple nuclear fuels research and development programs that routinely evaluate irradiated fuels using neutron radiography. The Neutron Radiography reactor (NRAD) sits beneath a shielded hot cell facility where neutron radiography and other evaluation techniques are performed on these highly radioactive objects. The NRAD currently uses the foil-film transfer technique for imaging fuel that is time consuming but provides high spatial resolution. This paper describes the NRAD and hot cell facilities, the current neutron radiography capabilities available at INL, planned upgrades to the neutron imaging systems, and new facilities being brought online at INL related to neutron imaging.

  17. Using ytterbium-169 for safe and economical industrial radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Dowalo, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    Safety has become an issue of paramount importance for industrial radiography. Many NDE facilities and suppliers are finding the cost of performing radiography Prohibitive due to heightened safety concerns for radiation area protection. The most common sources used in radiography, Iridium-192 and Cobalt-60, result in high radiation fields over a large area. Even when collimators are used large radiation fields can result from multicurie source radiography. Radiographic operations are being forced to find alternative test methods and techniques to the use of the old stand-by sources. These alternate methods are not always as comprehensive a test as full volumetric examination with radiography. Since Iridium and Cobalt are in such wide spread use, they are sometimes called upon to perform test of materials which are not in their optimum sensitivity range.

  18. Neutron radiography of irradiated nuclear fuel at Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Craft, Aaron E.; Wachs, Daniel M.; Okuniewski, Maria A.; Chichester, David L.; Williams, Walter J.; Papaioannou, Glen C.; Smolinski, Andrew T.

    2015-09-10

    Neutron radiography of irradiated nuclear fuel provides more comprehensive information about the internal condition of irradiated nuclear fuel than any other non-destructive technique to date. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has multiple nuclear fuels research and development programs that routinely evaluate irradiated fuels using neutron radiography. The Neutron Radiography reactor (NRAD) sits beneath a shielded hot cell facility where neutron radiography and other evaluation techniques are performed on these highly radioactive objects. The NRAD currently uses the foil-film transfer technique for imaging fuel that is time consuming but provides high spatial resolution. This study describes the NRAD and hot cell facilities, the current neutron radiography capabilities available at INL, planned upgrades to the neutron imaging systems, and new facilities being brought online at INL related to neutron imaging.

  19. Neutron radiography of irradiated nuclear fuel at Idaho National Laboratory

    DOE PAGES

    Craft, Aaron E.; Wachs, Daniel M.; Okuniewski, Maria A.; ...

    2015-09-10

    Neutron radiography of irradiated nuclear fuel provides more comprehensive information about the internal condition of irradiated nuclear fuel than any other non-destructive technique to date. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has multiple nuclear fuels research and development programs that routinely evaluate irradiated fuels using neutron radiography. The Neutron Radiography reactor (NRAD) sits beneath a shielded hot cell facility where neutron radiography and other evaluation techniques are performed on these highly radioactive objects. The NRAD currently uses the foil-film transfer technique for imaging fuel that is time consuming but provides high spatial resolution. This study describes the NRAD and hot cell facilities,more » the current neutron radiography capabilities available at INL, planned upgrades to the neutron imaging systems, and new facilities being brought online at INL related to neutron imaging.« less

  20. [The use of a thyroid collar for intraoral radiography].

    PubMed

    Schmidt, K; Velders, X L; van Ginkel, F C; van der Stelt, P F

    1998-06-01

    To determine whether a thyroid collar is a reasonable measure to reduce patient exposure from intraoral radiography (cost benefit analysis). In the thyroid gland of a Rando phantom dose measurements were carried out to determine the effect of a thyroid collar during intraoral radiography. Department of Oral Radiology at ACTA, Amsterdam. Dose measurements were carried out using LTDs. The average absorbed dose to the thyroid gland with and without thyroid collar from intraoral radiography was compared using an analysis of variance. For periapical radiographs the equivalent dose to the thyroid gland was significantly lower (p < 0.05) when a thyroid collar was used. For bitewing radiography there were no significant effects of the thyroid collar (p > 0.05). The cost benefit analysis showed that it takes more than 40 years before the benefits of a thyroid collar exceed the costs. Collective use of thyroid collars therefore does not seem to be a reasonable measure to optimize radiological protection during intraoral radiography.

  1. Neutron radiography of irradiated nuclear fuel at Idaho National Laboratory

    DOE PAGES

    Craft, Aaron E.; Wachs, Daniel M.; Okuniewski, Maria A.; ...

    2015-09-10

    Neutron radiography of irradiated nuclear fuel provides more comprehensive information about the internal condition of irradiated nuclear fuel than any other non-destructive technique to date. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has multiple nuclear fuels research and development programs that routinely evaluate irradiated fuels using neutron radiography. The Neutron Radiography reactor (NRAD) sits beneath a shielded hot cell facility where neutron radiography and other evaluation techniques are performed on these highly radioactive objects. The NRAD currently uses the foil-film transfer technique for imaging fuel that is time consuming but provides high spatial resolution. This study describes the NRAD and hot cell facilities,more » the current neutron radiography capabilities available at INL, planned upgrades to the neutron imaging systems, and new facilities being brought online at INL related to neutron imaging.« less

  2. Advances in digital radiography: physical principles and system overview.

    PubMed

    Körner, Markus; Weber, Christof H; Wirth, Stefan; Pfeifer, Klaus-Jürgen; Reiser, Maximilian F; Treitl, Marcus

    2007-01-01

    During the past two decades, digital radiography has supplanted screen-film radiography in many radiology departments. Today, manufacturers provide a variety of digital imaging solutions based on various detector and readout technologies. Digital detectors allow implementation of a fully digital picture archiving and communication system, in which images are stored digitally and are available anytime. Image distribution in hospitals can now be achieved electronically by means of web-based technology with no risk of losing images. Other advantages of digital radiography include higher patient throughput, increased dose efficiency, and the greater dynamic range of digital detectors with possible reduction of radiation exposure to the patient. The future of radiography will be digital, and it behooves radiologists to be familiar with the technical principles, image quality criteria, and radiation exposure issues associated with the various digital radiography systems that are currently available.

  3. Digital radiography image quality: image processing and display.

    PubMed

    Krupinski, Elizabeth A; Williams, Mark B; Andriole, Katherine; Strauss, Keith J; Applegate, Kimberly; Wyatt, Margaret; Bjork, Sandra; Seibert, J Anthony

    2007-06-01

    This article on digital radiography image processing and display is the second of two articles written as part of an intersociety effort to establish image quality standards for digital and computed radiography. The topic of the other paper is digital radiography image acquisition. The articles were developed collaboratively by the ACR, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, and the Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine. Increasingly, medical imaging and patient information are being managed using digital data during acquisition, transmission, storage, display, interpretation, and consultation. The management of data during each of these operations may have an impact on the quality of patient care. These articles describe what is known to improve image quality for digital and computed radiography and to make recommendations on optimal acquisition, processing, and display. The practice of digital radiography is a rapidly evolving technology that will require timely revision of any guidelines and standards.

  4. Positioning long lines: contrast versus plain radiography

    PubMed Central

    Reece, A; Ubhi, T; Craig, A; Newell, S

    2001-01-01

    AIM—To assess the value of contrast versus plain radiography in determining radio-opaque long line tip position in neonates.
METHODS—In a prospective study, plain radiography was performed after insertion of radio-opaque long lines. If the line tip was not visible on the plain film, a second film with contrast was obtained in an attempt to visualise the tip.
RESULTS—Sixty eight lines were inserted during the study period, 62 of which were included in the study. In 31, a second radiographic examination with contrast was necessary to determine position of the tip. In 29 of these, the line tip was clearly visualised with contrast. On two occasions, the line tip could not be seen because the contrast had filled the vein and obscured the tip from view. Eight of the lines that required a second radiograph with contrast were repositioned.
CONCLUSION—Intravenous contrast should be routinely used in the assessment of long line position in the neonate.

 PMID:11207231

  5. Utility of thyroid collars in cephalometric radiography

    PubMed Central

    Sansare, KP; Khanna, V; Karjodkar, F

    2011-01-01

    Objective A study was carried out to investigate the rationale that use of a thyroid collar (TC) in cephalometric radiography hampers the diagnostic and descriptive quality of lateral cephalogram. Methods A randomized observer blinded study was designed. The study consisted of two groups. The first group data were retrieved from the oral radiology archival system having lateral cephalogram without a TC. The second group was selected from the oral radiology department of patients where lateral cephalogram was taken using a TC. Lateral cephalogram was taken on direct digital system, the Kodak 9000 unit (Eastman Kodak, Rochester, NY). 2 observers blinded about the aim of the study were appointed to identify 15 sets of landmarks on the lateral cephalogram. Interobserver variance was also analysed for the study. Results 50 lateral cephalograms in each group were studied. Out of 15 sets of landmarks, 12 were identified consistent with the TC group. Three landmarks, namely the hyoid bone, second cervical vertebra and third cervical vertebra could not be identified on the TC group. There was no significant difference in the interobserver markings on lateral cephalogram. Conclusions TCs do mask a few landmarks on the lateral cephalogram. These landmarks are mainly used for analysis of skeletal maturity index (SMI). Lead TCs are probably the most convenient and easily available means to protect the thyroid from unwanted radiation while taking lateral cephalogram. It is therefore encouraged to use a TC during routine cephalometric radiography where SMI information is not needed. PMID:22065795

  6. Neutron Radiography Reactor Reactivity -- Focused Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Eric Woolstenhulme; Randal Damiana; Kenneth Schreck; Ann Marie Phillips; Dana Hewit

    2010-11-01

    As part of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative, the Neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) was converted from using highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. After the conversion, NRAD resumed operations and is meeting operational requirements. Radiography image quality and the number of images that can be produced in a given time frame match pre-conversion capabilities. However, following the conversion, NRAD’s excess reactivity with the LEU fuel was less than it had been with the HEU fuel. Although some differences between model predictions and actual performance are to be expected, the lack of flexibility in NRAD’s safety documentation prevented adjusting the reactivity by adding more fuel, until the safety documentation could be modified. To aid future reactor conversions, a reactivity-focused Lessons Learned meeting was held. This report summarizes the findings of the lessons learned meeting and addresses specific questions posed by DOE regarding NRAD’s conversion and reactivity.

  7. A system for fast neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Klann, R.T.

    1997-04-01

    A system has been designed and a neutron generator installed to perform fast neutron radiography. With this system, objects as small as a coin and as large as a 19 liter container have been radiographed. The neutron source is an MF Physics A-711 neutron generator which produces 3 x 10[sup 10] neutrons/second with an average energy of 14. 5 MeV. The radiography system uses x-ray scintillation screens and film in commercially available light-tight cassettes. The cassettes have been modified to include a thin sheet of plastic to produce protons from the neutron beam through elastic scattering from hydrogen and other low Z materials in the plastic. For film densities from 1.8 to 3.0, exposures range from 1.9 x 10[sup 7] n/cm[sup 2] to 3.8 x 10[sup 8] n/cm[sup 2] depending on the type of screen and film. The optimum source-to-film distance was found to be 150 cm. At this distance, the geometric unsharpness was determined to be approximately 2.2-2.3 mm and the smallest hole that could be resolved in a 1.25 cm thick sample had a diameter of 0.079 cm.

  8. Beam characterization at the Neutron Radiography Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sarah W. Morgan; Jeffrey C. King; Chad L. Pope

    2013-12-01

    The quality of a neutron-imaging beam directly impacts the quality of radiographic images produced using that beam. Fully characterizing a neutron beam, including determination of the beam's effective length-to-diameter ratio, neutron flux profile, energy spectrum, potential image quality, and beam divergence, is vital for producing quality radiographic images. This paper provides a characterization of the east neutron imaging beamline at the Idaho National Laboratory Neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD). The experiments which measured the beam's effective length-to-diameter ratio and potential image quality are based on American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards. An analysis of the image produced by a calibrated phantom measured the beam divergence. The energy spectrum measurements consist of a series of foil irradiations using a selection of activation foils, compared to the results produced by a Monte Carlo n-Particle (MCNP) model of the beamline. The NRAD has an effective collimation ratio greater than 125, a beam divergence of 0.3 +_ 0.1 degrees, and a gold foil cadmium ratio of 2.7. The flux profile has been quantified and the facility is an ASTM Category 1 radiographic facility. Based on bare and cadmium covered foil activation results, the neutron energy spectrum used in the current MCNP model of the radiography beamline over-samples the thermal region of the neutron energy spectrum.

  9. Dental digital radiography: a survey of quality aspects.

    PubMed

    Hellén-Halme, Kristina; Rohlin, Madeleine; Petersson, Arne

    2005-01-01

    The aim was to evaluate the experiences of Swedish general dental practitioners (GDPs) with digital radiography and their opinion on the same, particularly regarding quality issues. A letter was sent to all GDPs in private care in Region Skåne, Sweden, asking whether they used digital radiography (n=513). The response rate was 79%. The number of private GDPs who replied that they used digital radiography was 106. The Public Dental Service in Region Skåne listed 33 GDPs who worked with digital radiography. Based on these answers, a questionnaire was sent to the GDPs working with digital radiography (n=139). The questionnaire comprised 27 questions about the dentists, the system of intra-oral digital radiography, and the GDPs' experiences of and opinions on issues regarding image quality and quality control. The response rate to the questionnaire was 94%. Almost all, 92%, worked with charge-coupled device (CCD) and complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) sensors. Most GDPs were satisfied with their digital radiographic system. The majority (65%) experienced problems. Detector failure and trouble with the software were common. The GDPs wrote that they used lower exposure times in digital radiography than traditional film radiography. The estimated reduction in exposure time was said to be between 51% and 75%. Thirty-five per cent continued to use film parallel with digital radiography. The answers indicated that less than half of the equipment (40%) underwent quality control. Quality controls, when conducted, were undertaken once or twice a year, mainly by technicians from the companies that had sold the digital equipment. Based on the results of the questionnaire, there seems to be a need to improve the maintenance and the quality of digital radiography. It is also important that the GDPs become more aware of the problems that can occur when a new technique is introduced and that they develop the skills to handle these problems.

  10. Imaging properties of digital magnification radiography.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Sarah J; Samei, Ehsan

    2006-04-01

    Flat panel detectors exhibit improved signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and display capabilities compared to film. This improvement necessitates a new evaluation of optimal geometry for conventional projection imaging applications such as digital projection mammography as well as for advanced x-ray imaging applications including cone-beam computed tomography (CT), tomosynthesis, and mammotomography. Such an evaluation was undertaken in this study to examine the effects of x-ray source distribution, inherent detector resolution, magnification, scatter rejection, and noise characteristics including noise aliasing. A model for x-ray image acquisition was used to develop generic results applicable to flat panel detectors with similar x-ray absorption characteristics. The model assumed a Gaussian distribution for the focal spot and a rectangular distribution for a pixel. A generic model for the modulated transfer function (MTF) of indirect flat panel detectors was derived by a nonlinear fit of empirical receptor data to the Burgess model for phosphor MTFs. Noise characteristics were investigated using a generic noise power spectrum (NPS) model for indirect phosphor-based detectors. The detective quantum efficiency (DQE) was then calculated from the MTF and NPS models. The results were examined as a function of focal spot size (0.1, 0.3, and 0.6 mm) and pixel size (50, 100, 150, and 200 microm) for magnification ranges 1 to 3. Mammography, general radiography (also applicable to mammotomography), and chest radiography applications were explored using x-ray energies of 28, 74, and 120 kVp, respectively. Nodule detection was examined using the effective point source scatter model, effective DQE, and the Hotelling SNR2 efficiency. Results indicate that magnification can potentially improve the signal and noise performance of digital images. Results also show that a cross over point occurs in the spatial frequency above and below which the effects of magnification differ

  11. High Brightness Neutron Source for Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Cremer, J. T.; Piestrup, Melvin, A.; Gary, Charles, K.; Harris, Jack, L. Williams, David, J.; Jones, Glenn, E.; Vainionpaa, J. , H.; Fuller, Michael, J.; Rothbart, George, H.; Kwan, J., W.; Ludewigt, B., A.; Gough, R.., A..; Reijonen, Jani; Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2008-12-08

    This research and development program was designed to improve nondestructive evaluation of large mechanical objects by providing both fast and thermal neutron sources for radiography. Neutron radiography permits inspection inside objects that x-rays cannot penetrate and permits imaging of corrosion and cracks in low-density materials. Discovering of fatigue cracks and corrosion in piping without the necessity of insulation removal is possible. Neutron radiography sources can provide for the nondestructive testing interests of commercial and military aircraft, public utilities and petrochemical organizations. Three neutron prototype neutron generators were designed and fabricated based on original research done at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The research and development of these generators was successfully continued by LBNL and Adelphi Technology Inc. under this STTR. The original design goals of high neutron yield and generator robustness have been achieved, using new technology developed under this grant. In one prototype generator, the fast neutron yield and brightness was roughly 10 times larger than previously marketed neutron generators using the same deuterium-deuterium reaction. In another generator, we integrate a moderator with a fast neutron source, resulting in a high brightness thermal neutron generator. The moderator acts as both conventional moderator and mechanical and electrical support structure for the generator and effectively mimics a nuclear reactor. In addition to the new prototype generators, an entirely new plasma ion source for neutron production was developed. First developed by LBNL, this source uses a spiral antenna to more efficiently couple the RF radiation into the plasma, reducing the required gas pressure so that the generator head can be completely sealed, permitting the possible use of tritium gas. This also permits the generator to use the deuterium-tritium reaction to produce 14-MeV neutrons with increases

  12. Thoracic trauma: when and how to intervene.

    PubMed

    Meredith, J Wayne; Hoth, J Jason

    2007-02-01

    Trauma is the leading cause of death in patients younger than 40 years of age. Thoracic injuries are common and often can be managed by tube thoracostomy. In many patients, however, the thoracic injuries must be repaired surgically in one of three time periods: immediate, urgent, or delayed thoracotomy. In this article, we describe the general approach to effectively managing thoracic trauma patients. We review common injuries and scenarios that may be encountered by the surgeon and discuss the considerations and variables that enter into the decision-making process for operative intervention.

  13. PET-Based Thoracic Radiation Oncology.

    PubMed

    Simone, Charles B; Houshmand, Sina; Kalbasi, Anusha; Salavati, Ali; Alavi, Abass

    2016-07-01

    Fluorodeoxyglucose-PET is increasingly being integrated into multiple aspects of oncology. PET/computed tomography (PET/CT) has become especially important in radiation oncology. With the increasing use of advanced techniques like intensity-modulated radiation therapy and proton therapy, PET/CT scans have played critical roles in the target delineation of tumors for radiation oncologists delivering conformal treatment techniques. Use of PET/CT is well established in lung cancer and several other thoracic malignancies. This article details the current uses of PET/CT in thoracic radiation oncology with a focus on lung cancer and describes expected future roles of PET/CT for thoracic tumors.

  14. Thoracic ranula: an extremely rare case.

    PubMed

    Pang, Claudine Elizabeth; Lee, Tee Sin; Pang, Kenny Peter; Pang, Yoke Teen

    2005-03-01

    We present the first case of a thoracic ranula which originated from the left submandibular area extending into the subcutaneous tissue planes of the anterior chest wall. The patient had a history of surgery for a previous benign left salivary gland cyst, and presented with an enlarging mass in the anterior chest wall. This was a recurrence of a ranula, with an extension into the anterior thoracic wall. The thoracic ranula was excised, together with ipsilateral sublingual and submandibular glands, via a transcervical approach. No recurrence was detected over a 3-year post-operative follow up.

  15. Results of the VALOR II trial of the Medtronic Valiant Thoracic Stent Graft.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Mark F; Tuchek, James; Freezor, Robert; Bavaria, Joseph; White, Rodney; Fairman, Ronald

    2017-08-01

    The 1-year results of endovascular exclusion of degenerative descending thoracic aortic aneurysms (DTA) with the Valiant Thoracic Stent Graft (Medtronic Vascular, Santa Rosa, Calif) have been previously reported. With long-term follow-up now complete, the 5-year results are reported. The VALOR II trial (Evaluation of the Clinical Performance of the Valiant Thoracic Stent Graft System in the Treatment of Descending Thoracic Aneurysms of Degenerative Etiology in Subjects Who Are Candidates for Endovascular Repair) was a prospective, nonrandomized trial of the Valiant Thoracic Stent Graft system in patients with degenerative DTA. The trial involved 24 sites in the United States and enrolled patients between December 2006 and September 2009. Standard follow-up included physical examination, computed tomography, and chest radiography through 5 years. The study enrolled 160 patients. The average age was 72.2 years (range, 36-85 years), 95 (59%) were men, 150 (94%) had hypertension, and 26 (16%) had renal insufficiency. There were 50 patients (31%) who presented with symptoms; back pain was the most common (34 [68%]). The average aneurysm diameter was 57 mm (range, 32-96 mm). There were 103 patients (64%) with a fusiform aneurysm and 57 (36%) with a saccular aneurysm or penetrating ulcer. Two or more devices were implanted in 126 patients (79%), and the maximum number of grafts implanted was four. There were 54 deaths during the study. The 5-year actuarial survival was 64%. There were eight aneurysm-related deaths (5 deaths ≤30 days of implant), and the 5-year freedom from aneurysm-related death was 95%. There was one conversion to open repair at 36 months. Eleven patients underwent 13 secondary procedures (9 for endoleak, 3 for aneurysm expansion, and 1 rupture). Follow-up imaging was available at 5 years for 56 patients. The average aortic diameter decreased >5 mm in 27 patients (48%), increased >5 mm in 6 patients (11%), and remained unchanged in 23 (41

  16. Thoracic involvement in Behçet's disease: pathologic, clinical, and imaging features.

    PubMed

    Tunaci, A; Berkmen, Y M; Gökmen, E

    1995-01-01

    Behçet's disease is a rare form of vasculitis of obscure etiology. Any large or small artery, vein, or organ may be involved in an unpredictable combination. Intrathoracic manifestations of Behçet's disease consist mainly of thromboembolism of the superior vena cava and/or other mediastinal veins; aneurysms of the aorta and pulmonary arteries; pulmonary infarct and hemorrhage; pleural effusion; and, rarely, myocardial or pericardial involvement, cor pulmonale, and mediastinal or hilar lymphadenopathy. Chest radiography is the best diagnostic method for evaluating thoracic involvement in Behçet's disease. Because aneurysms may develop at the arterial puncture sites and veins may be quickly thrombosed after injection of contrast material, angiography and venography should be avoided whenever possible. Although no comparative studies are available, CT and MR angiography appear to be imaging techniques of choice for evaluating vascular involvement. Pulmonary parenchymal alterations depicted on CT scan have not been fully explored.

  17. Needlescopic video-assisted thoracic surgery for reversal of thoracic sympathectomy.

    PubMed

    Wong, Randolph H L; Ng, Calvin S H; Wong, Jasper K W; Tsang, Susanna

    2012-03-01

    Thoracic sympathectomy is a commonly performed surgical procedure for the treatment of palmar hyperhidrosis. However, one major complication of such a procedure is compensatory truncal hyperhidrosis. We describe an extreme case of compensatory truncal hyperhidrosis and anhidrosis over the head and neck region which led to a heatstroke. Bilateral reoperative needlescopic video-assisted thoracic surgery was performed for the reversal of thoracic sympathectomy with an interposition intercostal nerve graft. The patient's truncal hyperhidrosis resolved gradually over 1 month following the reversal procedure.

  18. Personal computer equipment for dental digital subtraction radiography vs. industrial computer equipment and conventional radiography.

    PubMed

    Möystad, A; Svanaes, D B; Larheim, T A

    1992-04-01

    A "low-cost" personal computer (PC) system used to digitize dental radiographs was tested by assessing the accuracy of its subtraction images versus those of "high-cost" industrial equipment and conventional radiography. Subtraction images were made of artificial lesions in human femur bone and subsequently evaluated by students and teachers. The observations were analyzed in terms of true positive and false positive reports. "Low-cost" and "high-cost" subtraction images revealed only small differences in diagnostic accuracy. Compared to conventional radiography, the diagnostic accuracy of the subtraction images with the "low-cost" PC system was significantly higher for all observers. The interexaminer variance was similar for the subtraction and the conventional images for both students and teachers, except for a significantly reduced interexaminer variance for the teachers concerning the true positive reports with the "low-cost" PC subtraction technique.

  19. Non-intubated anesthesia in thoracic surgery-technical issues.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Gabor; Castillo, Maria

    2015-05-01

    Performing awake thoracic surgery (ATS) is technically more challenging than thoracic surgery under general anesthesia (GA), but it can result in a greater benefit for the patient. Local wound infiltration and lidocaine administration in the pleural space can be considered for ATS. More invasive techniques are local wound infiltration with wound catheter insertion, thoracic wall blocks, selective intercostal nerve blockade, thoracic paravertebral blockade and thoracic epidural analgesia, offering the advantage of a catheter placement which can also be continued for postoperative analgesia.

  20. Comparison of conventional radiography and MDCT in suspected scaphoid fractures

    PubMed Central

    Behzadi, Cyrus; Karul, Murat; Henes, Frank Oliver; Laqmani, Azien; Catala-Lehnen, Philipp; Lehmann, Wolfgang; Nagel, Hans-Dieter; Adam, Gerhard; Regier, Marc

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the diagnostic accuracy and radiation dose of conventional radiography and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in suspected scaphoid fractures. METHODS: One hundred twenty-four consecutive patients were enrolled in our study who had suffered from a wrist trauma and showed typical clinical symptoms suspicious of an acute scaphoid fracture. All patients had initially undergone conventional radiography. Subsequent MDCT was performed within 10 d because of persisting clinical symptoms. Using the MDCT data as the reference standard, a fourfold table was used to classify the test results. The effective dose and impaired energy were assessed in order to compare the radiation burden of the two techniques. The Wilcoxon test was performed to compare the two diagnostic modalities. RESULTS: Conventional radiography showed 34 acute fractures of the scaphoid in 124 patients (42.2%). Subsequent MDCT revealed a total of 42 scaphoid fractures. The sensitivity of conventional radiography for scaphoid fracture detection was 42.8% and its specificity was 80% resulting in an overall accuracy of 59.6%. Conventional radiography was significantly inferior to MDCT (P < 0.01) concerning scaphoid fracture detection. The mean effective dose of MDCT was 0.1 mSv compared to 0.002 mSv of conventional radiography. CONCLUSION: Conventional radiography is insufficient for accurate scaphoid fracture detection. Regarding the almost negligible effective dose, MDCT should serve as the first imaging modality in wrist trauma. PMID:25628802

  1. Using athletic training clinical education standards in radiography.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Shelley; Harris, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    The selection of clinical education sites for radiography students is based on availability, access to radiographic examinations, and appropriate student-to-technologist ratio. Radiography program directors are not required to evaluate sites based on their educational validity (eg, the clinical instructor's knowledge of basic teaching and learning principles, how well the site communicates with the program, or the clinical instructor's involvement in professional organizations). The purpose of this study was to determine if a set of 12 clinical education standards used in athletic training would be applicable and beneficial to radiography program directors when selecting clinical sites for students. A survey concerning the applicability of the athletic training standards to radiography site selection was completed by 270 directors of radiography programs accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology. The survey results indicated the athletic training clinical education standards were considered applicable to the selection of clinical sites for radiography students and would be beneficial to radiography program directors when selecting sites.

  2. Nonintubated anesthesia in thoracic surgery: general issues

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Anesthetic management for awake thoracic surgery (ATS) is more difficult than under general anesthesia (GA), being technically extremely challenging for the anesthesiologist. Therefore, thorough preparation and vigilance are paramount for successful patient management. In this review, important considerations of nonintubated anesthesia for thoracic surgery are discussed in view of careful patient selection, anesthetic preparation, potential perioperative difficulties and the management of its complications. PMID:26046051

  3. Calcification of thoracic aorta - solar eclipse sign.

    PubMed

    Dhoble, Abhijeet; Puttarajappa, Chethan

    2008-08-29

    Calcification of thoracic aorta is very common in old people, especially ones with hypertension. This can sometime be visible on plain chest radiograph. We present a case of a male patient who had extensive deposition of calcium in the thoracic aorta. The relationship between aortic calcification and coronary atherosclerosis remains contentious. Computed tomography of the thorax can display this calcification which appears like 'solar eclipse'.

  4. Cardio-thoracic surgical experience in Gabon

    PubMed Central

    Mbamendame, Sylvestre; Ngakani Offobo, Silvère; Kaba, Mory Mamadi; Mbourou, Jean Bernard; Diané, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Our experience in cardio-thoracic surgery focuses on thoracic activity. The minimum fare for traumatisms, infectious pathology and tumoral pathology requires, for its improvement, the acquisition of a technical platform and of an adequate medical infrastructure, with a rational organisation of the care sequence. Vascular surgery calls for the training of qualified human resources, and the great demand in heart surgery calls upon the public powers for the construction of infrastructures, and the formation of necessary superstructures. PMID:27904845

  5. Idiopathic pulmonary haemosiderosis: spectrum of thoracic imaging findings in the adult patient.

    PubMed

    Khorashadi, L; Wu, C C; Betancourt, S L; Carter, B W

    2015-05-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary haemosiderosis (IPH) is a rare disease characterized by alveolar capillary haemorrhage resulting in deposition and accumulation of haemosiderin in the lungs. Although its precise pathophysiology remains unclear, several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the aetiology of the disorder, including autoimmune, environmental, allergic, and genetic theories. IPH is typically diagnosed in childhood, usually before the age of 10 years; however, this entity may be encountered in older patients given the greater awareness of the diagnosis, availability and utilization of advanced imaging techniques, and improved treatment and survival. The classic presentation of IPH consists of the triad of haemoptysis, iron-deficiency anaemia, and pulmonary opacities on chest radiography. The diagnosis is usually confirmed via bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), at which time haemosiderin-laden macrophages referred to as siderophages, considered pathognomonic for IPH, may be identified. However, lung biopsy may ultimately be necessary to exclude other disease processes. For children with IPH, the disease course is severe and the prognosis is poor. However, adults generally have a longer disease course with milder symptoms and the prognosis is more favourable. Specific imaging features, although non-specific in isolation, may be identified on thoracic imaging studies, principally chest radiography and CT, depending on the phase of disease (acute or chronic). Recognition of these findings is important to guide appropriate clinical management.

  6. Thoracic Sarcoidosis: Imaging with High Resolution Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sarvinder; Jain, Megha; Singh, Satyendra Narayan; Sharma, Rajat Kumar

    2017-01-01

    features of end stage lung disease on HRCT noted in a small subset of patients. HRCT was superior to chest radiography for evaluating the features, pattern and distribution of the parenchymal lesions and mediastinal lymph nodes, for assessing the stage and activity of the disease and in aiding detection of subtle parenchymal lesions which are liable to be missed on conventional imaging. Conclusion Thoracic sarcoidosis can have varied presentations. HRCT is superior to conventional CT for the detection and characterisation of the lung parenchymal lesions. PMID:28384959

  7. Thoracic trauma in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Keneally, Ryan; Szpisjak, Dale

    2013-05-01

    Thoracic injuries are common among civilian trauma and have a high associated mortality. The use of body armor and exposure to different mechanisms of injury in combat setting could lead to different injury patterns and incidences from those found in peacetime. Thoracic trauma incidence rates and mortality risks were calculated from data extracted from the Joint Theatre Trauma Registry. Among patients injured in military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan, 10.0% sustained thoracic injuries and had a mortality rate of 10.5%. Penetrating injuries were the most common mechanism of injury. The most common thoracic injury was pulmonary contusion. The highest mortality rate was in the subset of patients with thoracic vascular injuries or flail chest. The variables most strongly associated with mortality were number of units of blood transfused, admission base deficit, international normalization ratio, pH, Abbreviated Injury Scale scores for head and neck regions, and Injury Severity Score. Blunt injuries had the same mortality risk as penetrating injuries. Combat-related thoracic trauma is common and associated with significant mortality in Iraq and Afghanistan.

  8. Clinical innovations in Philippine thoracic surgery

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic surgery in the Philippines followed the development of thoracic surgery in the United States and Europe. With better understanding of the physiology of the open chest and refinements in thoracic anesthetic and surgical approaches, Filipino surgeons began performing thoracoplasties, then lung resections for pulmonary tuberculosis and later for lung cancer in specialty hospitals dealing with pulmonary diseases—first at the Quezon Institute (QI) and presently at the Lung Center of the Philippines although some university and private hospitals made occasional forays into the chest. Esophageal surgery began its early attempts during the post-World War II era at the Philippine General Hospital (PGH), a university hospital affiliated with the University of the Philippines. With the introduction of minimally invasive thoracic surgical approaches, Filipino thoracic surgeons have managed to keep up with their Asian counterparts although the problems of financial reimbursement typical of a developing country remain. The need for creative innovative approaches of a focused multidisciplinary team will advance the boundaries of thoracic surgery in the Philippines. PMID:27651936

  9. Accuracy of chest radiography for positioning of the umbilical venous catheter.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Adriana F M; Souza, Aline A C G de; Bouzada, Maria Cândida F; Meira, Zilda M A

    To evaluate the accuracy of the simultaneous analysis of three radiographic anatomical landmarks - diaphragm, cardiac silhouette, and vertebral bodies - in determining the position of the umbilical venous catheter distal end using echocardiography as a reference standard. This was a cross-sectional, observational study, with the prospective inclusion of data from all neonates born in a public reference hospital, between April 2012 and September 2013, submitted to umbilical venous catheter insertion as part of their medical care. The position of the catheter distal end, determined by the simultaneous analysis of three radiographic anatomical landmarks, was compared with the anatomical position obtained by echocardiography; sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy were calculated. Of the 162 newborns assessed by echocardiography, only 44 (27.16%) had the catheter in optimal position, in the thoracic portion of the inferior vena cava or at the junction of the inferior vena cava with the right atrium. The catheters were located in the left atrium and interatrial septum in 54 (33.33%) newborns, in the right atrium in 26 (16.05%), intra-hepatic in 37 (22.84%), and intra-aortic in-one newborn (0.62%). The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the radiography to detect the catheter in the target area were 56%, 71%, and 67.28%, respectively. Anteroposterior radiography of the chest alone is not able to safely define the umbilical venous catheter position. Echocardiography allows direct visualization of the catheter tip in relation to vascular structures and, whenever possible, should be considered to identify the location of the umbilical venous catheter. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  10. Computed radiography for the radiological technologist.

    PubMed

    Artz, D S

    1997-01-01

    CR has emerged as a general imaging technology for successful imaging of the chest, abdominal, musculoskeletal, and pediatric anatomy. For the general radiographer, CR is both celebrated and scorned for its complex function, and requires thorough ongoing training for the technologists to produce consistently high image quality. Digital radiography's unique separation of detector, display, and archive add a flexibility over screen-film technology for moving, storing, printing, and viewing plain radiographic images. CR technology is now a viable solution for those wishing to embrace the electronic and digital revolution in medicine. Although the system has less spatial resolution than screen-film technology, the strength of postacquisition image processing to enhance pathology and view obscured anatomy makes CR imaging attractive to technologists and radiologists. CR is a new modality for the general radiographer that, when put into the hands of a well-trained technologist, produces images of beautiful diagnostic quality.

  11. SOLAR: student oriented learning about radiography.

    PubMed

    Baird, Marilyn; Wells, Peter

    2001-07-01

    The success or otherwise of a radiographic examination is like other health-related interventions, crucially dependent upon the knowledge base of the radiographer and the quality of his/her clinical acumen. Traditional curricular approaches are limited in their ability to assist students to make vital connections between science and clinical decision making. This paper describes a computer-based case-oriented program called SOLAR (student oriented learning about radiography) that has been designed to achieve the necessary level of integration. The key feature of SOLAR is the requirement for students to construct a clinical action plan in response to a scenario provided. Upon submitting this plan, the student can then compare his/her plan to that prepared by an expert. The browsing configuration of SOLAR makes it highly attractive for other health professions as well. Student feedback indicates a high degree of approval for this approach.

  12. Digital radiography exposure indices: A review.

    PubMed

    Mothiram, Ursula; Brennan, Patrick C; Lewis, Sarah J; Moran, Bernadette; Robinson, John

    2014-06-01

    Digital radiography (DR) technologies have the advantage of a wide dynamic range compared to their film-screen predecessors, however, this poses a potential for increased patient exposure if left unchecked. Manufacturers have developed the exposure index (EI) to counter this, which provides radiographers with feedback on the exposure reaching the detector. As these EIs were manufacturer-specific, a wide variety of EIs existed. To offset this, the international standardised EI has been developed by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) and the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM). The purpose of this article is to explore the current literature relating to EIs, beginning with the historical development of the EI, the development of the standardised EI and an exploration of common themes and studies as evidenced in the research literature. It is anticipated that this review will provide radiographers with a useful guide to understanding EIs, their application in clinical practice, limitations and suggestions for further research.

  13. Reject analysis in direct digital radiography.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Eivind Richter; Jorde, Jannike; Taoussi, Nadia; Yaqoob, Sadia Halima; Konst, Bente; Seierstad, Therese

    2012-03-01

    Reject analysis can be used as a quality indicator, and is an important tool in localizing areas where optimization is required. Reducing number of rejects is important yielding reduced patient exposure and increased cost-effectiveness. To determine rejection rates and causes in direct digital radiography. Data were collected during a three-month period in spring 2010 at two direct digital laboratories in Norway. All X-ray examinations, types, numbers, and reasons for rejections were obtained using automatic reject analysis software. Thirteen causes for rejection could be selected. Out of the 27,284 acquired images, 3206 were rejected, yielding an overall rejection rate of 12%. Highest rejection rates were found for examination of knees, shoulders, and wrist. In all, 77% of the rejected images arose from positioning errors. An overall rejection rate of 12% indicates a need for optimizing radiographic practice in the department.

  14. Intraoral digital radiography: elements of effective imaging.

    PubMed

    Cederberg, Robert

    2012-10-01

    Intraoral digital imaging has evolved from an experimental and sometimes disparaged technique in the mid 1980s to a reliable and ubiquitously used technology today. There are many advantages for use of digital radiographic techniques in dentistry, one of the chief ones being patient dose reduction. However, as important as dose reduction is for safe and effective radiography, practicing dentists would also like to understand the fundamental differences between digital system configurations so they may be able to make an informed choice as to which system best fits their needs. In addition, there has been considerable debate on the following topics: sensor technology; factors associated with image display; optimum techniques for image manipulation; and image storage, retrieval, and archiving. This article provides insight into these and other elements of effective imaging in intraoral digital imaging.

  15. Measuring microfocus focal spots using digital radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, David A

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of microfocus spot size can be important for several reasons: (1) Quality assurance during manufacture of microfocus tubes; (2) Tracking performance and stability of microfocus tubes; (3) Determining magnification (especially important for digital radiography where the native spatial resolution of the digital system is not adequate for the application); (4) Knowledge of unsharpness from the focal spot alone. The European Standard EN 12543-5 is based on a simple geometrical method of calculating focal spot size from unsharpness of high magnification film radiographs. When determining microfocus focal spot dimensions using unsharpness measurements both signal-to-noise (SNR) and magnification can be important. There is a maximum accuracy that is a function of SNR and therefore an optimal magnification. Greater than optimal magnification can be used but it will not increase accuracy.

  16. Cancer imaging by scanned projection radiography.

    PubMed

    Cassel, D M; Young, S W; Brody, W R; Hall, A L

    1981-08-01

    We have evaluated scanned projection radiography (SPR) for the diagnosis of cancer. Four rabbits with V2 thigh carcinomas and nine patients with a variety of malignant neoplasms were studied with a GE CT/T 8800 scanner modified for SPR. Images were made before injection of intravenous contrast medium, and additional scans were taken after injection. Temporal subtraction was then performed on the digitized data. Rabbit thigh V2 carcinomas and human lung, liver, and extremity neoplasms were visualized. Contrast enhancement was phasic with early vessel demonstration and subsequent visualization of low density central areas of tumoral necrosis. Liver metastases appeared as poorly defined areas of low density. Because of the combination of high contrast sensitivity plus capability of imaging large tissue volumes on one scan, SPR may be valuable in cancer screening.

  17. Polarized neutron radiography with a periscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Michael; Neubauer, Andreas; Mühlbauer, Martin; Calzada, Elbio; Schillinger, Burkhard; Pfleiderer, Christian; Böni, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of the magnetic moment of the neutron with magnetic fields provides a powerful probe for spatially resolved magnetisation measurements in magnetic materials. We have tested a periscope as a new type of polarizer providing neutron beams with a high polarization and a low divergence. The observed inhomogeneity of the beam caused by the waviness of the glass substrates was quantified by means of Monte-Carlo simulations using the software package McStas. The results show that beams of high homogeneity can be produced if the waviness is reduced to below 1.0·10-5 rad. Finally, it is shown that radiography with polarized neutrons is a powerful method for measuring the spatially resolved magnetisation in optically float-zoned samples of the weak itinerant ferromagnet Ni3Al, thereby aiding the identification of the appropriate growth parameters.

  18. Digital mammography performed with computed radiography technology.

    PubMed

    Jouan, B

    1999-07-01

    Introduced by Fuji Photo Film Japan in the early 1980s, computed radiography (CR) technology has developed considerably since then to become the mature widely installed technology it is today (about 7500 systems worldwide). Various mammographic examinations require high performance results to which CR complies on demand or following some procedures such as geometrical magnification carried out during the examination. The basic CR principles and digital image processing as well as technical improvements are detailed in this study, which also includes a synthesis of the articles on CR mammographic applications referenced in the bibliography, focusing on strong points, limits and current methods of surpassing these limits. New CR technology development perspectives in mammography and computed assisted diagnosis (CAD) algorithms will allow wider use of this method in the near future.

  19. Digital radiography exposure indices: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Mothiram, Ursula; Brennan, Patrick C; Lewis, Sarah J; Moran, Bernadette; Robinson, John

    2014-06-15

    Digital radiography (DR) technologies have the advantage of a wide dynamic range compared to their film-screen predecessors, however, this poses a potential for increased patient exposure if left unchecked. Manufacturers have developed the exposure index (EI) to counter this, which provides radiographers with feedback on the exposure reaching the detector. As these EIs were manufacturer-specific, a wide variety of EIs existed. To offset this, the international standardised EI has been developed by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) and the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM). The purpose of this article is to explore the current literature relating to EIs, beginning with the historical development of the EI, the development of the standardised EI and an exploration of common themes and studies as evidenced in the research literature. It is anticipated that this review will provide radiographers with a useful guide to understanding EIs, their application in clinical practice, limitations and suggestions for further research.

  20. Direct magnification radiography of the newborn infant

    SciTech Connect

    Brasch, R.C.; Gould, R.G.

    1982-03-01

    Recent advances in technology have made direct radiographic magnification of the newborn infant clinically feasible. A microfocus radiographic tube and a rare-earth, high-speed recording system were combined to obtain more than 2,000 radiographs at magnifications of 2-2.5. Special positioning devices permitted imaging of even those infants confined to incubators and connected to life-supporting systems. When quantitatively compared with three conventional contact radiographic systems with respect to resolution, contrast, and noise, magnification radiography showed overall superiority of image characteristics. Definition of subtle abnormalities and anatomically small structures permitted diagnoses which could not be made from conventional images. Furthermore, infant radiation exposure was markedly less (15 mR (3.9 mC/kg) maximum skin exposure) as compared with conventional contact radiographic systems (24 mR (6.1 mC/kg) to 45 mR (11.6 mC/kg)).

  1. Direct magnification radiography of the newborn infant

    SciTech Connect

    Brasch, R.C.; Gould, R.G.

    1982-03-01

    Recent advances in technology have made direct radiographic magnification of the newborn infant clinically feasible. A microfocus radiographic tube and a rare-earth, high-speed recording system were combined to obtain more than 2,000 radiographs at magnifications of 2 to 2.5. Special positioning devices permitted imaging of even those infants confined to incubators and connected to life-supporting systems. When quantitatively compared with three conventional contact radiographic systems with respect to resolution, contrast, and noise, magnification radiography showed overall superiority of image characteristics. Definition of subtle abnormalities and anatomically small structures permitted diagnoses which could not be made from conventional images. Furthermore, infant radiation exposure was markedly less (15 mR (3.9 mC/kg) maximum skin exposure) as compared with conventional contact radiographic systems (24 mR(6.1 mC/kg) to 45 mR (11.6 mC/kg)).

  2. Image rejects in general direct digital radiography

    PubMed Central

    Rosanowsky, Tine Blomberg; Jensen, Camilla; Wah, Kenneth Hong Ching

    2015-01-01

    Background The number of rejected images is an indicator of image quality and unnecessary imaging at a radiology department. Image reject analysis was frequent in the film era, but comparably few and small studies have been published after converting to digital radiography. One reason may be a belief that rejects have been eliminated with digitalization. Purpose To measure the extension of deleted images in direct digital radiography (DR), in order to assess the rates of rejects and unnecessary imaging and to analyze reasons for deletions, in order to improve the radiological services. Material and Methods All exposed images at two direct digital laboratories at a hospital in Norway were reviewed in January 2014. Type of examination, number of exposed images, and number of deleted images were registered. Each deleted image was analyzed separately and the reason for deleting the image was recorded. Results Out of 5417 exposed images, 596 were deleted, giving a deletion rate of 11%. A total of 51.3% were deleted due to positioning errors and 31.0% due to error in centering. The examinations with the highest percentage of deleted images were the knee, hip, and ankle, 20.6%, 18.5%, and 13.8% respectively. Conclusion The reject rate is at least as high as the deletion rate and is comparable with previous film-based imaging systems. The reasons for rejection are quite different in digital systems. This falsifies the hypothesis that digitalization would eliminates rejects. A deleted image does not contribute to diagnostics, and therefore is an unnecessary image. Hence, the high rates of deleted images have implications for management, training, education, as well as for quality. PMID:26500784

  3. Image rejects in general direct digital radiography.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Bjørn; Rosanowsky, Tine Blomberg; Jensen, Camilla; Wah, Kenneth Hong Ching

    2015-10-01

    The number of rejected images is an indicator of image quality and unnecessary imaging at a radiology department. Image reject analysis was frequent in the film era, but comparably few and small studies have been published after converting to digital radiography. One reason may be a belief that rejects have been eliminated with digitalization. To measure the extension of deleted images in direct digital radiography (DR), in order to assess the rates of rejects and unnecessary imaging and to analyze reasons for deletions, in order to improve the radiological services. All exposed images at two direct digital laboratories at a hospital in Norway were reviewed in January 2014. Type of examination, number of exposed images, and number of deleted images were registered. Each deleted image was analyzed separately and the reason for deleting the image was recorded. Out of 5417 exposed images, 596 were deleted, giving a deletion rate of 11%. A total of 51.3% were deleted due to positioning errors and 31.0% due to error in centering. The examinations with the highest percentage of deleted images were the knee, hip, and ankle, 20.6%, 18.5%, and 13.8% respectively. The reject rate is at least as high as the deletion rate and is comparable with previous film-based imaging systems. The reasons for rejection are quite different in digital systems. This falsifies the hypothesis that digitalization would eliminates rejects. A deleted image does not contribute to diagnostics, and therefore is an unnecessary image. Hence, the high rates of deleted images have implications for management, training, education, as well as for quality.

  4. Muscle parameters estimation based on biplanar radiography.

    PubMed

    Dubois, G; Rouch, P; Bonneau, D; Gennisson, J L; Skalli, W

    2016-11-01

    The evaluation of muscle and joint forces in vivo is still a challenge. Musculo-Skeletal (musculo-skeletal) models are used to compute forces based on movement analysis. Most of them are built from a scaled-generic model based on cadaver measurements, which provides a low level of personalization, or from Magnetic Resonance Images, which provide a personalized model in lying position. This study proposed an original two steps method to access a subject-specific musculo-skeletal model in 30 min, which is based solely on biplanar X-Rays. First, the subject-specific 3D geometry of bones and skin envelopes were reconstructed from biplanar X-Rays radiography. Then, 2200 corresponding control points were identified between a reference model and the subject-specific X-Rays model. Finally, the shape of 21 lower limb muscles was estimated using a non-linear transformation between the control points in order to fit the muscle shape of the reference model to the X-Rays model. Twelfth musculo-skeletal models were reconstructed and compared to their reference. The muscle volume was not accurately estimated with a standard deviation (SD) ranging from 10 to 68%. However, this method provided an accurate estimation the muscle line of action with a SD of the length difference lower than 2% and a positioning error lower than 20 mm. The moment arm was also well estimated with SD lower than 15% for most muscle, which was significantly better than scaled-generic model for most muscle. This method open the way to a quick modeling method for gait analysis based on biplanar radiography.

  5. Local-Reference Patient Dose Evaluation in Conventional Radiography Examinations in Mazandaran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Khoshdel-Navi, D.; Shabestani-Monfared, A.; Deevband, M. R.; Abdi, R.; Nabahati, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The most efficient application of ionizing radiation is serving medical purposes and using this radiation has caused people to learn that artificial sources of radiation exposure among these resources can be of highest exposure rate. Obiective The present study is aimed at initially establishing a baseline for local-reference dose level in Mazandaran, Iran in 12 projections of the most conventional x-ray examination. Methods In this study, 13 public hospitals in Mazandaran province were selected for review and required data collected for ten adult patients with mean weight of 70±10kg in each projection. Then, information of each center was separately analyzed. Next, in order to measure x-ray output tube, the dosimeter RTI model Barracuda calibrated has been applied for measuring air karma within energy rage of 40-150kvp. ESAK and ESD parameters, usually used for monitoring DRL in conventional radiography, were calculated. Results Mean ESDs in this study has been obtained to 1.47±0.98 for skull (PA/AP), 1.01±0.79 for skull (LAT), 0.67±0.38 for cervical spine (AP), 0.79±0.37 for cervical (LAT), 0.49±0.38 for chest (PA/AP), 1.06±0.44 for chest (LAT), 2.15±0.73 for thoracic spine (AP), 3±0.87 for thoracic spine (LAT), 2.81 ±0.82 for lumbar spine (AP), 4.28±0.78 for lumbar (LAT), 2.07±1.17 for abdomen and 1.90±0.99 for pelvis, respectively. The ESDs calculated for chest examination in both projections, PA and LAT are more than values recommended by the UK (2000), Brazil and Slovenia. Conclusion The present study has determined wide variations in radiation dose of x-ray examinations among hospitals in Mazandaran, Iran. In order to reduce skin dose, an optimization procedure should be considered. Application of a reference dose (DRL) could be a practical method for this purpose. The role of optimization of radiography parameters for reducing patient dose is a significant issue. Through optimizing parameters, it would be possible to preserve image

  6. The Enhanced Workflow and Efficiency of the Wireless Local Area Network (WLAN)-Based Direct Digital Radiography (DDR) Portable Radiography.

    PubMed

    Ngan, Tsz-Lung; Wong, Edward Ting-Hei; Ng, Kris Lap-Shun; Jeor, Patrick Kwok-Shing; Lo, Gladys Goh

    2015-06-01

    With the implementation of the PACS in the hospital, there is an increasing demand from the clinicians for immediate access and display of radiological images. Recently, our hospital has installed the first wireless local area network (WLAN)-based direct digital radiography (DDR) portable radiography system. The DDR portable radiography system allows wireless retrieval of modality worklist and wireless transmission of portable X-ray image on the console to the Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS), via WLAN connection of wireless fidelity (Wi-Fi). The aim of this study was to analyze the workflow and performance between the WLAN-based DDR portable radiography system and the old practice using conventional portable X-ray machine with computed radiography (CR) system. A total of 190 portable chest X-ray examinations were evaluated and timed, using the conventional portable X-ray machine with CR from March to April of 2012 and using the new DDR portable radiography system on December of 2012 (n = 97 for old system and n = 93 for DDR portable system). The time interval of image becoming available to the PACS using the WLAN-based DDR portable radiography system was significantly shorter than that of the old practice using the conventional portable X-ray machine with CR (6.8 ± 2.6 min for DDR portable system; 23 ± 10.2 min for old system; p < 0.0001), with the efficiency improved by 70 %. The implementation of the WLAN-based DDR portable radiography system can enhance the workflow of portable radiography by reduction of procedural steps.

  7. [The future of bedside chest radiography: Comparative study of mobile flat-panels and needle-image plate storage phosphor systems].

    PubMed

    Bremicker, K; Gosch, D; Kahn, T; Borte, G

    2015-11-01

    Chest radiography is the most common diagnostic modality in intensive care units with new mobile flat-panels gaining more attention and availability in addition to the already used storage phosphor plates. Comparison of the image quality of mobile flat-panels and needle-image plate storage phosphor system in terms of bedside chest radiography. Retrospective analysis of 84 bedside chest radiographs of 42 intensive care patients (20 women, 22 men, average age: 65 years). All images were acquired during daily routine. For each patient, two images were analyzed, one from each system mentioned above. Two blinded radiologists evaluated the image quality based on ten criteria (e.g., diaphragm, heart contour, tracheal bifurcation, thoracic spine, lung structure, consolidations, foreign material, and overall impression) using a 5-point visibility scale (1 = excellent, 5 = not usable). There was no significant difference between the image quality of the two systems (p < 0.05). Overall some anatomical structures such as the diaphragm, heart, pulmonary consolidations and foreign material were considered of higher diagnostic quality compared to others, e.g., tracheal bifurcation and thoracic spine. Mobile flat-panels achieve an image quality which is as good as those of needle-image plate storage phosphor systems. In addition, they allow immediate evaluation of the image quality but in return are much more expensive in terms of purchase and maintenance.

  8. Pigmented villonodular synovitis of the thoracic spine.

    PubMed

    Roguski, Marie; Safain, Mina G; Zerris, Vasilios A; Kryzanski, James T; Thomas, Christine B; Magge, Subu N; Riesenburger, Ron I

    2014-10-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a proliferative lesion of the synovial membranes. Knees, hips, and other large weight-bearing joints are most commonly affected. PVNS rarely presents in the spine, in particular the thoracic segments. We present a patient with PVNS in the thoracic spine and describe its clinical presentation, radiographic findings, pathologic features, and treatment as well as providing the first comprehensive meta-analysis and review of the literature on this topic, to our knowledge. A total of 28 publications reporting 56 patients were found. The lumbar and cervical spine were most frequently involved (40% and 36% of patients, respectively) with infrequent involvement of the thoracic spine (24% of patients). PVNS affects a wide range of ages, but has a particular predilection for the thoracic spine in younger patients. The mean age in the thoracic group was 22.8 years and was significantly lower than the cervical and lumbar groups (42.4 and 48.6 years, respectively; p=0.0001). PVNS should be included in the differential diagnosis of osteodestructive lesions of the spine, especially because of its potential for local recurrence. The goal of treatment should be complete surgical excision. Although the pathogenesis is not clear, mechanical strain may play an important role, especially in cervical and lumbar PVNS. The association of thoracic lesions and younger age suggests that other factors, such as neoplasia, derangement of lipid metabolism, perturbations of humoral and cellular immunity, and other undefined patient factors, play a role in the development of thoracic PVNS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. 5. INTERIOR VIEW, SHOWING A CONTROL ROOM INSIDE THE RADIOGRAPHY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. INTERIOR VIEW, SHOWING A CONTROL ROOM INSIDE THE RADIOGRAPHY ROOM; PASS-THROUGH FOR EXPOSED FILM ON RIGHT - Fort McCoy, Building No. T-1031, North side of South Tenth Avenue, Block 10, Sparta, Monroe County, WI

  10. An Interdisciplinary Approach to Improving Radiation Protection in Digital Radiography.

    PubMed

    Moore, Quentin T

    2016-09-01

    To determine improvement approaches that can be routinely incorporated in digital radiography to ensure that radiation protection practices are based on current equipment capabilities. A literature review was conducted on digital radiography as it pertains to radiation protection, quality improvement, evidence-based practice, and interdisciplinary approaches. Transitioning from film-screen radiography to digital radiography has resulted in confusion in applying appropriate techniques and abiding by the as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) concept. Clinically effective research should be continually reviewed and incorporated into practice as routine. Applying quality improvement approaches and implementing practice improvement projects will help facilities achieve radiation-based benchmarks to improve imaging practices. Developing interdisciplinary quality improvement workgroups that include a variety of imaging stakeholders will allow for improvement in applying radiation protection research. ©2016 American Society of Radiologic Technologists.

  11. Radiography with the Fission Neutrons from Californium-252

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-07-01

    iftD-Ao45 3^ m-77-B1i2i TECHNICAL 7󈧖 LIBRARY lADfto^^^ RADIOGRAPHY WITH THE FISSION NEUTRONS FROM CALIFORNIUM -252 JOHN J. ANTAL and...TITLE C«id Sub(l(/«J RADIOGRAPHY WITH THE FISSION NEUTRONS FROM CALIFORNIUM -252 5. TYPE OF REPORT it PERIOD COVERED Final Report 6...Cellulose nitrate Californium -252 20. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse aide 11 necessary and identity by block number) (SEE REVERSE SIDE) DD 1

  12. Simple methods to reduce patient exposure during scoliosis radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, P.F.; Thomas, A.W.; Thompson, W.E.; Wollerton, M.A.; Rachlin, J.A.

    1986-05-01

    Radiation exposure to the breasts of adolescent females can be reduced significantly through the use of one or all of the following methods: fast, rare-earth screen-film combinations; specially designed compensating filters; and breast shielding. The importance of exposure reduction during scoliosis radiography as well as further details on the above described methods are discussed. In addition, the early results of a Center for Devices and Radiological Health study, which recorded exposure and technique data for scoliosis radiography, is presented.

  13. Quality assurance tests for digital radiography in general dental practice.

    PubMed

    Greenall, Chris; Drage, Nicholas; Ager, Matthew

    2014-03-01

    Quality assurance (QA) is essential in dental radiography. Digital radiography is becoming more common in dentistry, so it is important that appropriate QA tests are carried out on the digital equipment, including the viewing monitor. The aim of this article is to outline the tests that can be carried out in dental practice. Quality assurance for digital equipment is important to ensure consistently high quality images are produced.

  14. Sensitivity of Thoracic Digital Tomosynthesis (DTS) for the Identification of Lung Nodules.

    PubMed

    Langer, Steve G; Graner, Brian D; Schueler, Beth A; Fetterly, Kenneth A; Kofler, James M; Mandrekar, Jayawant N; Bartholmai, Brian J

    2016-02-01

    Thoracic computed tomography (CT) is considered the gold standard for detection lung pathology, yet its efficacy as a screening tool in regards to cost and radiation dose continues to evolve. Chest radiography (CXR) remains a useful and ubiquitous tool for detection and characterization of pulmonary pathology, but reduced sensitivity and specificity compared to CT. This prospective, blinded study compares the sensitivity of digital tomosynthesis (DTS), to that of CT and CXR for the identification and characterization of lung nodules. Ninety-five outpatients received a posteroanterior (PA) and lateral CXR, DTS, and chest CT at one care episode. The CXR and DTS studies were independently interpreted by three thoracic radiologists. The CT studies were used as the gold standard and read by a fourth thoracic radiologist. Nodules were characterized by presence, location, size, and composition. The agreement between observers and the effective radiation dose for each modality was objectively calculated. One hundred forty-five nodules of greatest diameter larger than 4 mm and 215 nodules less than 4 mm were identified by CT. DTS identified significantly more >4 mm nodules than CXR (DTS 32 % vs. CXR 17 %). CXR and DTS showed no significant difference in the ability to identify the smaller nodules or central nodules within 3 cm of the hilum. DTS outperformed CXR in identifying pleural nodules and those nodules located greater than 3 cm from the hilum. Average radiation dose for CXR, DTS, and CT were 0.10, 0.21, and 6.8 mSv, respectively. Thoracic digital tomosynthesis requires significantly less radiation dose than CT and nearly doubles the sensitivity of that of CXR for the identification of lung nodules greater than 4 mm. However, sensitivity and specificity for detection and characterization of lung nodules remains substantially less than CT. The apparent benefits over CXR, low cost, rapid acquisition, and minimal radiation dose of thoracic DTS suggest that it may be a

  15. Digital radiography in dentistry: a survey of Indiana dentists.

    PubMed

    Brian, J N; Williamson, G F

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the number of Indiana dental practices that utilize digital radiography and to identify the reasons for using or not using digital radiography. A questionnaire was sent to a random sample of 300 licensed dentists in the State of Indiana. Demographic, clinical and digital technology responses were obtained. The data were analysed using SPSS 12.0 (Statistical Package Social Sciences) software; t-tests and Pearson's chi(2) test were performed on several variables with significance levels set at P< 0.05. One hundred and fifty-two dental practices (51%) responded to the survey. Thirty dental practices (19.7%) used digital radiography in their office. Twenty-two (73%) of the dentists using digital radiography were general practitioners. The number of dentists in a practice was a significant factor in predicting the use of digital radiography (t=2.57, P=0.011). The results of this study indicate that digital radiography is more commonly used by general dentists in group practices.

  16. Thoracic aortic aneurysm: reading the enemy's playbook.

    PubMed

    Elefteriades, John A

    2008-05-01

    The vast database of the Yale Center for Thoracic Aortic Disease--which includes information on 3000 patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm or dissection, with 9000 catalogued images and 9000 patient-years of follow-up--has, over the last decade, permitted multiple glimpses into the "playbook" of this virulent disease. Understanding the precise behavioral features of thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection permits us more effectively to combat this disease. In this monograph, we will first review certain fundamentals--in terms of anatomy, nomenclature, imaging, diagnosis, medical, surgical, and stent treatment. After reviewing these fundamentals, we will proceed with a detailed exploration of lessons learned by peering into the operational playbook of thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection. Among the glimpses afforded in the behavioral playbook of this disease are the following: 1 Thoracic aortic aneurysm, while lethal, is indolent. Mortality usually does not occur until after years of growth. 2 The aneurysmal ascending thoracic aorta grows slowly: about 0.1 cm per year (the descending aorta grows somewhat faster). 3 Over a patient's lifetime, "hinge points" at which the likelihood of rupture or dissection skyrockets are seen at 5.5 cm for the ascending and 6.5 cm for the descending aorta. Intervening at 5 cm diameter for the ascending and 6 cm for the descending prevents most adverse events. 4 Symptomatic aneurysms require resection regardless of size. 5 The yearly rate of rupture, dissection, or death is 14.1% for a patient with a thoracic aorta of 6 cm diameter. 6 The mechanical properties of the aorta deteriorate markedly at 6 cm diameter (distensibility falls, and wall stress rises)--a finding that "dovetails" perfectly with observations of the clinical behavior of the thoracic aorta. 7 Thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection are largely inherited diseases, with a predominantly autosomal-dominant pattern. The specific genetics are being elucidated at the

  17. USE OF A NOVEL BOARD GAME IN A CLINICAL ROTATION FOR LEARNING THORACIC DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSES IN VETERINARY MEDICAL IMAGING.

    PubMed

    Ober, Christopher P

    2017-03-01

    When confronted with various findings on thoracic radiographs, fourth-year veterinary students often have difficulty generating appropriate lists of differential diagnoses. The purpose of this one-group, pretest, posttest experimental study was to determine if a game could be used as an adjunct teaching method to improve students' understanding of connections between imaging findings and differential diagnoses. A novel board game focusing on differential diagnoses in thoracic radiography was developed. One hundred fourth-year veterinary students took a brief pretest, played the board game, and took a brief posttest as a part of their respective clinical radiology rotations. Pretest results were compared to posttest results using a paired t-test to determine if playing the game impacted student understanding. Students' mean scores on the posttest were significantly higher than mean pretest scores (P < 0.0001). Thus, results indicate that playing the board game resulted in improved short-term understanding of thoracic differential diagnoses by fourth-year students, and use of the board game on a clinical rotation seems to be a beneficial part of the learning process. © 2016 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  18. Thoracic sympathectomy: a review of current indications.

    PubMed

    Hashmonai, Moshe; Cameron, Alan E P; Licht, Peter B; Hensman, Chris; Schick, Christoph H

    2016-04-01

    Thoracic sympathetic ablation was introduced over a century ago. While some of the early indications have become obsolete, new ones have emerged. Sympathetic ablation is being still performed for some odd indications thus prompting the present study, which reviews the evidence base for current practice. The literature was reviewed using the PubMed/Medline Database, and pertinent articles regarding the indications for thoracic sympathectomy were retrieved and evaluated. Old, historical articles were also reviewed as required. Currently, thoracic sympathetic ablation is indicated mainly for primary hyperhidrosis, especially affecting the palm, and to a lesser degree, axilla and face, and for facial blushing. Despite modern pharmaceutical, endovascular and surgical treatments, sympathetic ablation has still a place in the treatment of very selected cases of angina, arrhythmias and cardiomyopathy. Thoracic sympathetic ablation is indicated in several painful conditions: the early stages of complex regional pain syndrome, erythromelalgia, and some pancreatic and other painful abdominal pathologies. Although ischaemia was historically the major indication for sympathetic ablation, its use has declined to a few selected cases of thromboangiitis obliterans (Buerger's disease), microemboli, primary Raynaud's phenomenon and Raynaud's phenomenon secondary to collagen diseases, paraneoplastic syndrome, frostbite and vibration syndrome. Thoracic sympathetic ablation for hypertension is obsolete, and direct endovascular renal sympathectomy still requires adequate clinical trials. There are rare publications of sympathetic ablation for primary phobias, but there is no scientific basis to support sympathetic surgery for any psychiatric indication.

  19. Thoracic surgical resident education: a costly endeavor.

    PubMed

    Calhoon, John H; Baisden, Clint; Holler, Ben; Hicks, George L; Bove, Ed L; Wright, Cameron D; Merrill, Walter H; Fullerton, Dave A

    2014-12-01

    We sought to define an accurate measure of thoracic surgical education costs. Program directors from six distinct and differently sized and geographically located thoracic surgical training programs used a common template to provide estimates of resident educational costs. These data were reviewed, clarifying questions or discrepancies when noted and using best estimates when exact data were unavailable. Subsequently, a composite of previously published cost-estimation products was used to capture accurate cost data. Data were then compiled and averaged to provide an accurate picture of all costs associated with thoracic surgical education. Before formal accounting was performed, the estimated average for all programs was approximately $250,000 per year per resident. However, when formal evaluations by the six programs were performed, the annual cost of resident education ranged from $330,000 to $667,000 per year per resident. The average cost of $483,000 per year was almost double the initial estimates. Variability was noted by region and size of program. Faculty teaching costs varied from $208,000 to $346,000 per year. Simulation costs ranged from $0 to $80,000 per year. Resident savings to program ranged from $0 to $135,000 per year and averaged $37,000 per year per resident. Thoracic surgical education costs are considerably higher than initial estimates from program directors and probably represent an unappreciated source of financial burden for cardiothoracic surgical educational programs. Copyright © 2014 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Medical management of thoracic aortic aneurysm disease.

    PubMed

    Braverman, Alan C

    2013-03-01

    The patient with thoracic aortic aneurysm disease requires careful evaluation and management over his or her lifetime. This includes assessment for the presence of an underlying genetic disorder, such as Marfan syndrome, bicuspid aortic valve disease, or a familial aortic aneurysm syndrome. Screening family members is necessary, inasmuch as up to 20% of first-degree relatives of the patient with a thoracic aortic aneurysm will also have aneurysm disease. Medical therapy is often prescribed, and beta-blocker therapy to reduce the stress on the aortic wall is usually recommended. However, very few clinical trials of pharmacologic therapy in humans with thoracic aortic aneurysm disease have been conducted. Mouse models have led to important discoveries and insight into the pathogenesis of aneurysm syndromes, and there is hope these may lead to effective therapy in people. Several studies are ongoing that examine the role of angiotensin receptor blockers in Marfan syndrome. Lifestyle modification is also important for patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm, including restrictions on physical activity, weight lifting, and recommendations about the management of pregnancy. Long-term surveillance of the aorta, even after successful surgery, is necessary for timing of prophylactic surgery and to evaluate for late complications. Copyright © 2013 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Giant thoracic osteophyte: a distinct clinical entity.

    PubMed

    Coumans, Jean-Valery C E; Neal, Jonathan B; Grottkau, Brian E; Nahed, Brian V; Shin, John H; Walcott, Brian P

    2014-09-01

    Calcified lesions described within the neural axis are classified as either an ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament, diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis, or ossification of the ligamentum flavum. We aim to describe a unique pathologic entity: the giant thoracic osteophyte. We identified four patients who were surgically treated at the Massachusetts General Hospital from 2006 to 2012 with unusual calcified lesions in the ventral aspect of the spinal canal. In order to differentiate giant thoracic osteophytes from calcified extruded disc material, disc volumetrics were performed on actual and simulated disc spaces. All patients underwent operative resection of the calcific lesion as they had signs and/or symptoms of spinal cord compression. The lesions were found to be isolated, large calcific masses that originated from the posterior aspect of adjacent thoracic vertebral bodies. Pathological examination was negative for tumor. Adjacent disc volumes were not significantly different from the index disc (p=0.91). A simulated calculation hypothesizing that the calcific mass was extruded disc material demonstrated a significant difference (p=0.01), making this scenario unlikely. In conclusion, giant thoracic osteophyte is a unique and rare entity that can be found in the thoracic spine. The central tenant of surgical treatment is resection to relieve spinal cord compression.

  2. Neutron radiography inspection of investment castings.

    PubMed

    Richards, W J; Barrett, J R; Springgate, M E; Shields, K C

    2004-10-01

    Investment casting, also known as the lost wax process, is a manufacturing method employed to produce near net shape metal articles. Traditionally, investment casting has been used to produce structural titanium castings for aero-engine applications with wall thickness less than 1 in (2.54 cm). Recently, airframe manufacturers have been exploring the use of titanium investment casting to replace components traditionally produced from forgings. Use of titanium investment castings for these applications reduces weight, cost, lead time, and part count. Recently, the investment casting process has been selected to produce fracture critical structural titanium airframe components. These airframe components have pushed the traditional inspection techniques to their physical limits due to cross sections on the order of 3 in (7.6 cm). To overcome these inspection limitations, a process incorporating neutron radiography (n-ray) has been developed. In this process, the facecoat of the investment casting mold material contains a cocalcined mixture of yttrium oxide and gadolinium oxide. The presence of the gadolinium oxide, allows for neutron radiographic imaging (and eventual removal and repair) of mold facecoat inclusions that remain within these thick cross sectional castings. Probability of detection (POD) studies have shown a 3 x improvement of detecting a 0.050 x 0.007 in2 (1.270 x 0.178 mm2) inclusion of this cocalcined material using n-ray techniques when compared to the POD using traditional X-ray techniques. Further, it has been shown that this n-ray compatible mold facecoat material produces titanium castings of equal metallurgical quality when compared to the traditional materials. Since investment castings can be very large and heavy, the neutron radiography facilities at the University of California, Davis McClellan Nuclear Radiation Center (UCD/MNRC) were used to develop the inspection techniques. The UCD/MNRC has very unique facilities that can handle large

  3. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons and the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons general thoracic surgery databases: joint standardization of variable definitions and terminology.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Felix G; Falcoz, Pierre E; Kozower, Benjamin D; Salati, Michele; Wright, Cameron D; Brunelli, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    The European Society of Thoracic Surgery (ESTS) and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) general thoracic surgery databases collect thoracic surgical data from Europe and North America, respectively. Their objectives are similar: to measure processes and outcomes so as to improve the quality of thoracic surgical care. Future collaboration between the two databases and their integration could generate significant new knowledge. However, important discrepancies exist in terminology and definitions between the two databases. The objective of this collaboration between the ESTS and STS is to identify important differences between databases and harmonize terminology and definitions to facilitate future endeavors.

  4. An unusual case of thoracic ectopia cordis in a Toggenburg Goat and its three-dimensional images constructed with X-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Lai, Jyh-Mirn; Wu, Jui-Te; Yang, Wei-Cheng; Chao, Ming-Hsin; Nagahata, Hajime

    2016-05-01

    A two-day-old female Toggenburg goat with thoracic ectopia cordis (EC) was diagnosed via radiography and computed tomography. The goat was born with EC, defects of the sternum and a supra-umbilical abdominal wall, but without the presence of Cantrell's syndrome. Necropsy and histopathological findings indicated the affected kid had malformation of the heart with an enlarged left ventricle. The findings showed the heart (9 x 5 x 5 cm) stayed outside the thorax, and was covered by a semitransparent membrane. This report is the first to describe a case of thoracic EC in a goat whose sternum was not developed fully and was not connected to the ribs. It is also the first paper to describe three-dimensional images of this condition constructed from computed tomography scans.

  5. Change of paradigm in thoracic radionecrosis management.

    PubMed

    Dast, S; Assaf, N; Dessena, L; Almousawi, H; Herlin, C; Berna, P; Sinna, R

    2016-06-01

    Classically, muscular or omental flaps are the gold standard in the management of thoracic defects following radionecrosis debridement. Their vascular supply and antibacterial property was supposed to enhance healing compared with cutaneous flaps. The evolution of reconstructive surgery allowed us to challenge this dogma. Therefore, we present five consecutive cases of thoracic radionecrosis reconstructed with cutaneous perforator flaps. In four patients, we performed a free deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap and one patient had a thoracodorsal perforator (TDAP) flap. Median time healing was 22.6 days with satisfactory cutaneous covering and good aesthetic results. There were no flap necrosis, no donor site complications. We believe that perforator flaps are a new alternative, reliable and elegant option that questions the dogma of muscular flaps in the management of thoracic radionecrosis.

  6. National Quality Forum Metrics for Thoracic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Cipriano, Anthony; Burfeind, William R

    2017-08-01

    The National Quality Forum (NQF) is a multistakeholder, nonprofit, membership-based organization improving health care through preferential use of valid performance measures. NQF-endorsed measures are considered the gold standard for health care measurement in the United States. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons is the steward of the only six NQF-endorsed general thoracic surgery measures. These measures include one structure measure (participation in a national general thoracic surgery database), two process measures (recording of clinical stage and recording performance status before lung and esophageal resections), and three outcome measures (risk-adjusted morbidity and mortality after lung and esophageal resections and risk-adjusted length of stay greater than 14 days after lobectomy). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Thoracic Ectopia Cordis in an Ethiopian Neonate.

    PubMed

    Tadele, Henok; Chanie, Abeje

    2017-03-01

    Ectopia Cordis is defined as complete or partial displacement of the heart outside the thoracic cavity. It is a rare congenital defect with failure of fusion of the sternum with extra thoracic location of the heart. The estimated prevalence of this case is 5.5 to 7.9 per million live births. We had a case of a 16-hour-old male neonate weighing 2.9kg with externally visible, beating heart over the chest wall. Initial treatment included covering the heart with sterile-saline soaked dressing, starting systemic antibiotics and supportive care. A staged surgical approach to this defect with the initial aim of replacement of the heart to the thoracic cavity was opted. The neonate died twenty minutes after the surgical intervention due to cardiogenic shock despite adequate resuscitative measures. This case report underscores the missed opportunity of antenatal ultra-sonographic diagnosis and the challenge of Ectopia Cordis treatment in Ethiopia.

  8. A dose monitoring system for dental radiography

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chena; Kim, Jo-Eun; Symkhampha, Khanthaly; Lee, Woo-Jin; Huh, Kyung-Hoe; Yi, Won-Jin; Heo, Min-Suk; Choi, Soon-Chul; Yeom, Heon-Young

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The current study investigates the feasibility of a platform for a nationwide dose monitoring system for dental radiography. The essential elements for an unerring system are also assessed. Materials and Methods An intraoral radiographic machine with 14 X-ray generators and five sensors, 45 panoramic radiographic machines, and 23 cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) models used in Korean dental clinics were surveyed to investigate the type of dose report. A main server for storing the dose data from each radiographic machine was prepared. The dose report transfer pathways from the radiographic machine to the main sever were constructed. An effective dose calculation method was created based on the machine specifications and the exposure parameters of three intraoral radiographic machines, five panoramic radiographic machines, and four CBCTs. A viewing system was developed for both dentists and patients to view the calculated effective dose. Each procedure and the main server were integrated into one system. Results The dose data from each type of radiographic machine was successfully transferred to the main server and converted into an effective dose. The effective dose stored in the main server is automatically connected to a viewing program for dentist and patient access. Conclusion A patient radiation dose monitoring system is feasible for dental clinics. Future research in cooperation with clinicians, industry, and radiologists is needed to ensure format convertibility for an efficient dose monitoring system to monitor unexpected radiation dose. PMID:27358817

  9. Musculoskeletal magnetic resonance imaging: importance of radiography.

    PubMed

    Taljanovic, Mihra S; Hunter, Tim B; Fitzpatrick, Kimberly A; Krupinski, Elizabeth A; Pope, Thomas L

    2003-07-01

    To determine the usefulness of radiography for interpretation of musculoskeletal (MSK) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies. DESIGNS AND PATIENTS: In a 1-year period, 1,030 MSK MRI studies were performed in 1,002 patients in our institution. For each study, the interpreting radiologist completed a questionnaire regarding the availability and utility of radiographs, radiological reports and clinical information for the interpretation of the MRI study. Radiographs were essential, very important or added information in 61-75% of all MSK MRI cases. Radiographs were judged as essential for reading of MRI studies more often for trauma, infection/inflammation and tumors than for degenerative and miscellaneous/normal diagnoses (chi(2)=60.95, df=16, P<0.0001). The clinical information was rated as "essential" or "useful" significantly more often than not (chi(2)=93.07, df=16, P<0.0001). The clinical and MRI diagnoses were the same or partially concordant significantly more often for tumors than for trauma, infection/inflammation and degenerative conditions, while in the miscellaneous/normal group they were different in 64% of cases. When the diagnoses were different, there were more instances in which radiographs were not available. Radiographs are an important, and sometimes essential, initial complementary study for reading of MSK MRI examinations. It is highly recommended that radiographs are available when MSK MRI studies are interpreted.

  10. Comparison of state dental radiography safety regulations.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, Thomas F; Parashar, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare and provide an overview of state policies on occupational exposure, dosimetry, collimation, patient protection, and the use of portable handheld X-ray machines in dentistry. State government webpages containing radiation protection rules and regulations were scanned. The contents were compared against current federal regulations established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). They were further evaluated in light of current recommendations from the National Council on Radiation Protection & Measurements (NCRP) and the American Dental Association (ADA). Most states' regulations mirror the exposure limits set forth by the NRC and FDA. Nonregulatory recommendations regarding use of dental radiography are periodically put forth by the NCRP and the ADA. State and federal agencies often follow recommendations from these scientific organizations when creating regulations. Clinicians must be aware of their state's radiation protection rules, as variations among states exist. In addition, recommendations published by organizations such as the NCRP and the ADA, while not legally binding, contribute significantly to the reduction of radiation risks for operators and patients alike.

  11. Patient information extraction in digitized radiography.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsien-Huang P

    2002-03-01

    Digital imagery is gradually replacing the traditional radiograph with the development of digital radiography and film scanner. This report presents a new method to extract the patient information number (PIN) field automatically from the film-scanned image using image analysis technique. To evaluate the PIN field extraction algorithm, 2 formats of label acquired from 2 different hospitals are tested. Given the available films with no constraints on the way the labels are written and positioned, the correct extraction rates are 73% and 84%, respectively. This extracted PIN information can link with Radiology Information System (RIS) or Hospital Information System (HIS), and the image scanned from the film then can be filed into the database automatically. The efficiency this method offers can simplify greatly the image filing process and improve the user friendliness of the overall image digitization system. Moreover, compared with the bar code reader, it solves the automatic information input problem in a very economical way. The authors believe the success of this technique will benefit the development of the PACS (Picture Archiving and Communication System) and teleradiology.

  12. Evaluation and testing of computed radiography systems.

    PubMed

    Charnock, P; Connolly, P A; Hughes, D; Moores, B M

    2005-01-01

    The implementation of film replacement digital radiographic imaging systems throughout Europe is now gathering momentum. Such systems create the foundations for totally digital departments of radiology, since radiographic examinations constitute the most prevalent modality. Although this type of development will lead to improvements in the delivery and management of radiological service, such widespread implementation of new technology must be carefully monitored. The implementation of effective QA tests on installation, at periodic intervals and as part of a routine programme will aid this process. This paper presents the results of commissioning tests undertaken on a number of computed radiography imaging systems provided by different manufacturers. The aim of these tests was not only to provide baseline performance measurements against which subsequent measurements can be compared but also to explore any differences in performance, which might exist between different units. Results of measurements will be presented for (1) monitor and laser printer set-up; (2) imaging plates, including sensitivity, consistency and uniformity; (3) resolution and contrast detectability; and (4) signal and noise performance. Results from the latter are analysed in relationship with both system and quantum noise components.

  13. Applications of Cosmic Ray Muon Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guardincerri, E.; Durham, J. M.; Morris, C. L.; Rowe, C. A.; Poulson, D. C.; Bacon, J. D.; Plaud-Ramos, K.; Morley, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Dome of Santa Maria del Fiore, Florence Cathedral, was built between 1420 and 1436 by architect Filippo Brunelleschi and it is now cracking under its own weight. Engineering efforts are underway to model the dome's structure and reinforce it against further deterioration. According to some scholars, Brunelleschi might have built reinforcement structures into the dome itself; however, the only confirmed known subsurface reinforcement is a chain of iron and stone around the dome's base. Tomography with cosmic ray muons is a non-destructive imaging method that can be used to image the interior of the wall and therefore ascertain the layout and status of any iron substructure in the dome. We will show the results from a muon tomography measurement of iron hidden in a mockup of the dome's wall performed at Los Alamos National Lab in 2015. The sensitivity of this technique, and the status of this project will be also discussed. At last, we will show results on muon attenuation radiography of larger shallow targets.

  14. Portable Digital Radiography and Computed Tomography Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2007-11-01

    This user manual describes the function and use of the portable digital radiography and computed tomography (DRCT) scanner. The manual gives a general overview of x-ray imaging systems along with a description of the DRCT system. An inventory of the all the system components, organized by shipping container, is also included. In addition, detailed, step-by-step procedures are provided for all of the exercises necessary for a novice user to successfully collect digital radiographs and tomographic images of an object, including instructions on system assembly and detector calibration and system alignment. There is also a short section covering the limited system care and maintenance needs. Descriptions of the included software packages, the DRCT Digital Imager used for system operation, and the DRCT Image Processing Interface used for image viewing and tomographic data reconstruction are given in the appendixes. The appendixes also include a cheat sheet for more experienced users, a listing of known system problems and how to mitigate them, and an inventory check-off sheet suitable for copying and including with the machine for shipment purposes.

  15. Developments in digital radiography: an equipment update.

    PubMed

    James, J J; Davies, A G; Cowen, A R; O'Connor, P J

    2001-01-01

    Digital X-ray imaging technology has advanced rapidly over the past few years. This review, particularly aimed at those involved in using and purchasing such technology, is an attempt to unravel some of the complexities of this potentially confusing subject. The main groups of X-ray imaging devices that are considered are digitisers of conventional radiographs, image-intensifier-based fluorography systems, photostimulable phosphor computed radiography, amorphous selenium-based technology for thorax imaging and flat-panel systems. As well as describing these different systems, we look at ways of objectively assessing their image quality. Concepts that are used and explained include spatial resolution, grey-scale bit resolution, signal-to-noise ratio and detective quantum efficiency. An understanding of these basic parameters is vital in making a scientific assessment of a system's performance. Image processing and techniques are also briefly discussed, particularly with reference to their potential effects on image quality. This review aims to provide a basic understanding of digital X-ray imaging technology and enables the reader to make an independent and educated assessment of the relative merits of each system.

  16. Radiography and tomography with polarized neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treimer, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Neutron imaging became important when, besides providing impressive radiographic and tomographic images of various objects, physical, quantification of chemical, morphological or other parameters could be derived from 2D or 3D images. The spatial resolution of approximately 50 µm (and less) yields real space images of the bulk of specimens with more than some cm3 in volume. Thus the physics or chemistry of structures in a sample can be compared with scattering functions obtained e.g. from neutron scattering. The advantages of using neutrons become more pronounced when the neutron spin comes into play. The interaction of neutrons with magnetism is unique due to their low attenuation by matter and because their spin is sensitive to magnetic fields. Magnetic fields, domains and quantum effects such as the Meissner effect and flux trapping can only be visualized and quantified in the bulk of matter by imaging with polarized neutrons. This additional experimental tool is gaining more and more importance. There is a large number of new fields that can be investigated by neutron imaging, not only in physics, but also in geology, archeology, cultural heritage, soil culture, applied material research, magnetism, etc. One of the top applications of polarized neutron imaging is the large field of superconductivity where the Meissner effect and flux pinning can be visualized and quantified. Here we will give a short summary of the results achieved by radiography and tomography with polarized neutrons.

  17. Beam Characterization at the Neutron Radiography Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Sarah Morgan; Jeffrey King

    2013-01-01

    The quality of a neutron imaging beam directly impacts the quality of radiographic images produced using that beam. Fully characterizing a neutron beam, including determination of the beam’s effective length-to-diameter ratio, neutron flux profile, energy spectrum, image quality, and beam divergence, is vital for producing quality radiographic images. This project characterized the east neutron imaging beamline at the Idaho National Laboratory Neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD). The experiments which measured the beam’s effective length-to-diameter ratio and image quality are based on American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards. An analysis of the image produced by a calibrated phantom measured the beam divergence. The energy spectrum measurements consist of a series of foil irradiations using a selection of activation foils, compared to the results produced by a Monte Carlo n-Particle (MCNP) model of the beamline. Improvement of the existing NRAD MCNP beamline model includes validation of the model’s energy spectrum and the development of enhanced image simulation methods. The image simulation methods predict the radiographic image of an object based on the foil reaction rate data obtained by placing a model of the object in front of the image plane in an MCNP beamline model.

  18. [Wireless digital radiography detectors in the emergency area: an efficacious solution].

    PubMed

    Garrido Blázquez, M; Agulla Otero, M; Rodríguez Recio, F J; Torres Cabrera, R; Hernando González, I

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the implementation of a flat panel digital radiolography (DR) system with WiFi technology in an emergency radiology area in which a computed radiography (CR) system was previously used. We analyzed aspects related to image quality, radiation dose, workflow, and ergonomics. We analyzed the results obtained with the CR and WiFi DR systems related with the quality of images analyzed in images obtained using a phantom and after radiologists' evaluation of radiological images obtained in real patients. We also analyzed the time required for image acquisition and the workflow with the two technological systems. Finally, we analyzed the data related to the dose of radiation in patients before and after the implementation of the new equipment. Image quality improved in both the tests carried out with a phantom and in radiological images obtained in patients, which increased from 3 to 4.5 on a 5-point scale. The average time required for image acquisition decreased by 25 seconds per image. The flat panel required less radiation to be delivered in practically all the techniques carried out using automatic dosimetry, although statistically significant differences were found in only some of the techniques (chest, thoracic spine, and lumbar spine). Implementing the WiFi DR system has brought benefits. Image quality has improved and the dose of radiation to patients has decreased. The new system also has advantages in terms of functionality, ergonomics, and performance. Copyright © 2011 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Radiography, computed tomography and virtual bronchoscopy in four dogs and two cats with lung lobe torsion.

    PubMed

    Schultz, R M; Peters, J; Zwingenberger, A

    2009-07-01

    This report describes the imaging features of radiography, computed tomography and virtual bronchoscopy in dogs and cats with lung lobe torsions. The medical records, thoracic radiographs and computed tomography images of four dogs and two cats with confirmed lung lobe torsions were retrospectively reviewed. Computed tomography with virtual bronchoscopy showed bronchial narrowing, collapse or occlusion in all six animals, while this was only appreciated on one radiographic examination. A tapering terminating angle of the air-filled bronchus proximal or distal to the collapsed region was seen only on computed tomography and virtual bronchoscopy in all six animals. The vesicular emphysema pattern typical of lung lobe torsion was seen on three computed tomographies but only on one radiographic examination. The lung lobe torsion-specific findings of vesicular emphysema and a proximally narrowed or occluded bronchus were more easily recognised on computed tomography and virtual bronchoscopy than with radiographs. Computed tomography slices acquired through the bronchus and lung lobe of interest in a cat or dog with possible lung lobe torsion can be reformatted into virtual bronchoscopic images that can be utilised along with computed tomography to help make a more definitive preoperative diagnosis.

  20. Organ-specific dosimetry in spinal radiography: an analysis of genetic and somatic effects

    SciTech Connect

    Fickel, T.E.

    1988-02-01

    Radiation doses absorbed by the uterus, ovary, testicle and active bone marrow are computed for cervical, thoracic, lumbar, full spine and chest series performed under typical office conditions. Assuming a nonthreshold, linear relationship between dose and radiogenic effect, the computed tissue-specific doses are used to estimate the probability that each X-ray series might enhance the statistical probability of occurrence of an adult leukemia fatality of the irradiated patient; a childhood leukemia, mental retardation or cancer fatality as a result of fetal irradiation; or a variety of sex cell chromosomal aberrations in irradiated patients. It is concluded that the greatest hazard to active bone marrow, the uterus and the gonads is posed by lumbar and full spine radiography and that the need to adequately justify such exposure is mandatory; furthermore, in these series, irradiation of the ovary is 10 times as great as that of the testicle. Lumbar radiographic examinations can be made significantly safer by the elimination of the lumbosacral spot view.

  1. MR imaging of the thoracic aorta.

    PubMed

    Lohan, Derek G; Krishnam, Mayil; Saleh, Roya; Tomasian, Anderanik; Finn, J Paul

    2008-05-01

    MR imaging has been incorporated into the diagnostic algorithm for suspected thoracic aortic pathology, challenging CT and invasive catheter angiography as investigations of choice. Techniques, including spin echo, 3-D steady-state free precession, cardiac cine imaging, phase-contrast flow quantification, and high-resolution contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography, are poised to trump other single competitive modalities. The proliferation of 3-tesla systems has advanced the performance of magnetic resonance, aided by parallel imaging techniques, multiarray surface coils, and powerful gradient coils. This article considers the current status of MR imaging in evaluation of the thoracic aorta, with reference to common clinical indications in clinical practice.

  2. Thoracic pain in a collegiate runner.

    PubMed

    Austin, G P; Benesky, W T

    2002-08-01

    This case study describes the process of examination, re-examination, and intervention for a collegiate runner with mechanical thoracic pain preventing athletic participation and limiting daily function. Unimpaired function fully returned in less than 3 weeks with biweekly sessions to re-establish normal and painfree thoracic mechanics via postural hygiene, exercise, mobilization, and manipulation. The outcome of this case study supports the original hypothesis that the pattern of impairments was in fact responsible for the functional limitations and disability in this athlete. At the time of publication the athlete was without functional limitations and had fully returned to competitive sprinting for the university track team.

  3. Long thoracic neuropathy from athletic activity.

    PubMed

    Schultz, J S; Leonard, J A

    1992-01-01

    Four cases of long thoracic mononeuropathy associated with sports participation are presented. Each patient developed shoulder pain or dysfunction after an acute event or vigorous activity, and demonstrated scapular winging consistent with serratus anterior weakness. The diagnosis was confirmed with electromyography in each case. It is suggested that the athletic activity caused a stretch injury to the long thoracic nerve. Conservative management, consisting of range of motion exercises for the shoulder and strengthening of the serratus anterior muscle, resulted in a favorable outcome in all patients.

  4. The renal disease of thoracic asphyxiant dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Gruskin, A B; Baluarte, H J; Cote, M L; Elfenbein, I B

    1974-01-01

    In those children with thoracic asphyxiant dystrophy, a genetically determined disorder, who survive infancy, the development of renal disease may be life-threatening. This report will present data obtained in six patients from three families which deals with the renal abnormalities in thoracic asphyxiant dystrophy. Both functional and anatomic abnormalities are described. Abnormalities in solute transport in the proximal tubule may be the earliest sign of renal dysfunction in this syndrome. Early glomerular changes may be more important than previously recognized. Finally, the various phenotypic expressions of this disorder are considered.

  5. Needlescopic video-assisted thoracic surgery for reversal of thoracic sympathectomy

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Randolph H.L.; Ng, Calvin S.H.; Wong, Jasper K.W.; Tsang, Susanna

    2012-01-01

    Thoracic sympathectomy is a commonly performed surgical procedure for the treatment of palmar hyperhidrosis. However, one major complication of such a procedure is compensatory truncal hyperhidrosis. We describe an extreme case of compensatory truncal hyperhidrosis and anhidrosis over the head and neck region which led to a heatstroke. Bilateral reoperative needlescopic video-assisted thoracic surgery was performed for the reversal of thoracic sympathectomy with an interposition intercostal nerve graft. The patient's truncal hyperhidrosis resolved gradually over 1 month following the reversal procedure. PMID:22186129

  6. Genetics Home Reference: familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions familial TAAD familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... PDF Open All Close All Description Familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection ( familial TAAD ) involves problems with the ...

  7. A method to optimize the processing algorithm of a computed radiography system for chest radiography.

    PubMed

    Moore, C S; Liney, G P; Beavis, A W; Saunderson, J R

    2007-09-01

    A test methodology using an anthropomorphic-equivalent chest phantom is described for the optimization of the Agfa computed radiography "MUSICA" processing algorithm for chest radiography. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in the lung, heart and diaphragm regions of the phantom, and the "system modulation transfer function" (sMTF) in the lung region, were measured using test tools embedded in the phantom. Using these parameters the MUSICA processing algorithm was optimized with respect to low-contrast detectability and spatial resolution. Two optimum "MUSICA parameter sets" were derived respectively for maximizing the CNR and sMTF in each region of the phantom. Further work is required to find the relative importance of low-contrast detectability and spatial resolution in chest images, from which the definitive optimum MUSICA parameter set can then be derived. Prior to this further work, a compromised optimum MUSICA parameter set was applied to a range of clinical images. A group of experienced image evaluators scored these images alongside images produced from the same radiographs using the MUSICA parameter set in clinical use at the time. The compromised optimum MUSICA parameter set was shown to produce measurably better images.

  8. Mayo Clinic: An Institutional History of General Thoracic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Gillaspie, Erin A; Nichols, Francis C; Allen, Mark S

    2015-01-01

    The Mayo Clinic was started in Rochester, MN after a 1883 tornado disaster. The Mayo brothers, William and Charles began thoracic surgical procedures early in their career. Dr. Samuel Robinson is recognized as the first thoracic surgeon at Mayo. He was followed by Drs. Harrington and Claret who became famous surgeons. Many other notable surgeons have help to build the thoracic surgical practice into what is today a world renown center of excellence in thoracic surgery.

  9. Management of thoracic trauma and chest wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Spackman, C J; Caywood, D D

    1987-03-01

    This article reviews common causes and types of thoracic trauma in the dog. A triage approach for the diagnosis and immediate treatment of thoracic trauma is presented. Reconstructive procedures of the thoracic wall, which may be necessary following trauma or surgical resection of diseased tissue, are described.

  10. Effect of a combined thoracic and backward lifting exercise on the thoracic kyphosis angle and intercostal muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2017-08-01

    [Purpose] This study developed a combined thoracic and backward lifting exercise for thoracic kyphosis angle and intercostal muscle pain. [Subject and Methods] The subject was a 41-year-old man who complained of upper thoracic and intercostal pain. He performed the combined thoracic and backward lifting exercise for 15 days. [Results] The initial VAS score for the intercostal area was 4/10. The VAS score decreased to 1/10 after the thoracic exercise combined with backward lifting. The initial thoracic kyphosis angle was 38° and it decreased to 32° after the exercise period. [Conclusion] Therefore, backward lifting and thoracic extension is a good posture for activating the different layers of muscle that are attached to the ribs. The kyphosis angle is also reduced by providing sufficient resistance during the thoracic exercise.

  11. Comparison of patient specific dose metrics between chest radiography, tomosynthesis, and CT for adult patients of wide ranging body habitus

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yakun; Li, Xiang; Segars, W. Paul; Samei, Ehsan

    2014-02-15

    metrics only increased slightly for radiographic modalities and for chest tomosynthesis. Effective and organ doses normalized to mAs all illustrated an exponential decrease with increasing patient size. As a surface organ, breast doses had less correlation with body size than that of lungs or liver. Conclusions: Patient body size has a much greater impact on radiation dose of chest CT examinations than chest radiography and tomosynthesis. The size of a patient should be considered when choosing the best thoracic imaging modality.

  12. Comparison of patient specific dose metrics between chest radiography, tomosynthesis, and CT for adult patients of wide ranging body habitus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yakun; Li, Xiang; Segars, W. Paul; Samei, Ehsan

    2014-01-01

    only increased slightly for radiographic modalities and for chest tomosynthesis. Effective and organ doses normalized to mAs all illustrated an exponential decrease with increasing patient size. As a surface organ, breast doses had less correlation with body size than that of lungs or liver. Conclusions: Patient body size has a much greater impact on radiation dose of chest CT examinations than chest radiography and tomosynthesis. The size of a patient should be considered when choosing the best thoracic imaging modality. PMID:24506654

  13. Aortobronchial Fistula after Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair (TEVAR) for Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Melvan, John Nicholas; DeLaRosa, Jacob; Vasquez, Julio C

    2017-03-07

    Continued enlargement of the aneurysm sac after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) is a known risk after endovascular treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms. For this reason, periodic outpatient follow-up is required to identify situations that require repair. Here, we describe an aortobronchial fistula (ABF) in a patient lost to follow-up, that presented 3 years after an elective TEVAR done for a primary, descending thoracic aortic aneurysm. Our patient arrived in extremis and suffered massive hemoptysis leading to her demise. Computed tomography (CT) angiogram near the time of her death demonstrated a bleeding ABF immediately distal to her previous TEVAR repair. Aortic aneurysmal disease remains life threatening even after repair. Improved endovascular techniques and devices have resulted in decreased need for reintervention. However, this case demonstrates the risk of thoracic aortic disease progression and highlights the importance of establishing consistent, long-term follow-up after TEVAR.

  14. Self-perceived video-assisted thoracic surgery lobectomy proficiency by recent graduates of North American thoracic residencies.

    PubMed

    Boffa, Daniel J; Gangadharan, Sidharta; Kent, Michael; Kerendi, Faraz; Onaitis, Mark; Verrier, Edward; Roselli, Eric

    2012-06-01

    Minimally invasive surgical techniques offer several advantages over traditional open procedures, yet the pathway to minimally invasive proficiency can be difficult to navigate. As a part of an effort of the Joint Council of Thoracic Surgical Education to increase access to this skill set in the general thoracic community, recent graduates of thoracic residencies were surveyed to determine the self-reported achievement of video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) lobectomy proficiency and the merits of various educational opportunities. The objective of this study was to estimate the comfort level of recent graduates with the minimally invasive approach, as this demographic not only reflects the current status of training, but represents the future of the specialty. Surgeons graduating North American thoracic residencies between 2006 and 2008 identifying themselves as practitioners of general thoracic surgery were surveyed. A total of 271 surgeons completed training between 2006 and 2008 and indicated general thoracic to be a part of their practice (84 dedicated thoracic and 187 mixed). One hundred and forty-six surgeons completed the survey (54%) including 74 of 84 (88%) dedicated thoracic surgeons. Overall, 58% of recent graduates who perform general thoracic procedures consider themselves proficient in VATS lobectomies (86% of dedicated thoracic surgeons and 28% of surgeons with a mixed practice, P < 0.0001). Of surgeons considering themselves to be proficient at VATS lobectomies, 66% felt thoracic residency was critical or very important to achieving proficiency. Fellowships after completing board residency, animal labs, and follow-up VATS courses put on by experts were much less consistently beneficial. The vast majority of the 25 dedicated general thoracic surgeons who graduate each year consider themselves proficient in VATS lobectomies, largely due to training in their thoracic residencies. On the other hand, the minority of surgeons performing general

  15. A benchmark for comparison of dental radiography analysis algorithms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ching-Wei; Huang, Cheng-Ta; Lee, Jia-Hong; Li, Chung-Hsing; Chang, Sheng-Wei; Siao, Ming-Jhih; Lai, Tat-Ming; Ibragimov, Bulat; Vrtovec, Tomaž; Ronneberger, Olaf; Fischer, Philipp; Cootes, Tim F; Lindner, Claudia

    2016-07-01

    Dental radiography plays an important role in clinical diagnosis, treatment and surgery. In recent years, efforts have been made on developing computerized dental X-ray image analysis systems for clinical usages. A novel framework for objective evaluation of automatic dental radiography analysis algorithms has been established under the auspices of the IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging 2015 Bitewing Radiography Caries Detection Challenge and Cephalometric X-ray Image Analysis Challenge. In this article, we present the datasets, methods and results of the challenge and lay down the principles for future uses of this benchmark. The main contributions of the challenge include the creation of the dental anatomy data repository of bitewing radiographs, the creation of the anatomical abnormality classification data repository of cephalometric radiographs, and the definition of objective quantitative evaluation for comparison and ranking of the algorithms. With this benchmark, seven automatic methods for analysing cephalometric X-ray image and two automatic methods for detecting bitewing radiography caries have been compared, and detailed quantitative evaluation results are presented in this paper. Based on the quantitative evaluation results, we believe automatic dental radiography analysis is still a challenging and unsolved problem. The datasets and the evaluation software will be made available to the research community, further encouraging future developments in this field. (http://www-o.ntust.edu.tw/~cweiwang/ISBI2015/). Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Recent advances in fast neutron radiography for cargo inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowerby, B. D.; Tickner, J. R.

    2007-09-01

    Fast neutron radiography techniques are attractive for screening cargo for contraband such as narcotics and explosives. Neutrons have the required penetration, they interact with matter in a manner complementary to X-rays and they can be used to determine elemental composition. Compared to neutron interrogation techniques that measure secondary radiation (neutron or gamma-rays), neutron radiography systems are much more efficient and rapid and they are much more amenable to imaging. However, for neutron techniques to be successfully applied to cargo screening, they must demonstrate significant advantages over well-established X-ray techniques. This paper reviews recent developments and applications of fast neutron radiography for cargo inspection. These developments include a fast neutron and gamma-ray radiography system that utilizes a 14 MeV neutron generator as well as fast neutron resonance radiography systems that use variable energy quasi-monoenergetic neutrons and pulsed broad energy neutron beams. These systems will be discussed and compared with particular emphasis on user requirements, sources, detector systems, imaging ability and performance.

  17. Calibrating automatic exposure control devices for digital radiography.

    PubMed

    Doyle, P; Martin, C J

    2006-11-07

    The energy responses of digital radiography detectors differ from those of screen-film systems. To provide a consistent level of image quality at different tube potentials automatic exposure control (AEC) devices must be calibrated to suit the energy response of the image receptor with which they are intended for use. AEC calibration for digital radiography systems requires an alternative parameter to optical density, ideally one related to the quality of a digital image. Energy responses of computed radiography (CR) and indirect digital radiography (IDR) image receptors have been calculated, and compared with those for screen-film systems. Practical assessments of the relative sensitivities of a CR detector made using the detector dose indicator (DDI), pixel value and signal-to-noise ratio showed similar variations with tube potential. The DDI has been used to determine the correct kV compensation curve required to calibrate the AECs for the loss in detector sensitivity with tube potential. AECs are set up relative to a predetermined air kerma incident on the detector at 80 kV for CR and IDR systems using this curve and the method used is described. Factors influencing the calibration of AECs for digital radiography including techniques, types of phantom and contributions from scatter are reviewed, and practical methods recommended for use.

  18. Evaluation of a Noise Reduction Procedure for Chest Radiography

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Ryohei; Ishii, Rie; Kodani, Kazuhiko; Kanasaki, Yoshiko; Suyama, Hisashi; Watanabe, Masanari; Nakamoto, Masaki; Fukuoka, Yasushi

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of noise reduction procedure (NRP), a function in the new image processing for chest radiography. Methods A CXDI-50G Portable Digital Radiography System (Canon) was used for X-ray detection. Image noise was analyzed with a noise power spectrum (NPS) and a burger phantom was used for evaluation of density resolution. The usefulness of NRP was evaluated by chest phantom images and clinical chest radiography. We employed the Bureau of Radiological Health Method for scoring chest images while carrying out our observations. Results NPS through the use of NRP was improved compared with conventional image processing (CIP). The results in image quality showed high-density resolution through the use of NRP, so that chest radiography examination can be performed with a low dose of radiation. Scores were significantly higher than for CIP. Conclusion In this study, use of NRP led to a high evaluation in these so we are able to confirm the usefulness of NRP for clinical chest radiography. PMID:24574577

  19. Fractures of the Thoracic and Lumbar Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgical treatment. Fracture-dislocations of the thoracic and lumbar spine are caused by very high-energy trauma. They can be extremely unstable injuries that often result in serious spinal cord or nerve damage. These injuries require stabilization through surgery. The ...

  20. Aesthetic breast augmentation and thoracic deformities.

    PubMed

    Wolter, T P; Lorenz, S; Neuhann-Lorenz, C

    2010-10-01

    To ensure the best results from aesthetic breast augmentation, preoperative evaluation and adequate patient information are essential. However, assessment of the underlying thoracic shape often is neglected. Patients with obvious deformities are aware of the problematic reconstruction, whereas patients with mild or moderate deformities often are not aware of their condition and fail to see that standard breast augmentation will lead to unsatisfying results. The authors reviewed their charts for patients with breast augmentation and mild to moderate thoracic deformities, then compiled the therapeutic possibilities and the outcome. Of the 548 patients who underwent breast augmentation, 7.1% (n = 39) exhibited low- or midgrade thoracic wall deformities. Almost none of the patients were aware of their deformity. The patients were augmented with silicone-filled, textured round implants. Placement and volume were adapted to the anatomic situation. A reoperation was not performed in any case, and both patient and physician satisfaction was high. The percentage of patients with thoracic deformity in this group was high compared with an overall incidence of less than 2%. This emphasizes the need for cautious physical examination and preoperative documentation. By individualized surgical planning and diligent implant selection, optimal results and patient satisfaction can be achieved.

  1. Thoracic empyema caused by Campylobacter rectus.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Tomoyuki; Urata, Teruo; Nemoto, Daisuke; Hitomi, Shigemi

    2017-03-01

    We report a case of thoracic empyema caused by Campylobacter rectus, an organism considered as a periodontal pathogen but rarely recovered from extraoral specimens. The patient fully recovered through drainage of purulent pleural fluid and administration of antibiotics. The present case illustrates that C. rectus can be a cause of not only periodontal disease but also pulmonary infection.

  2. Thoracic empyema due to migrated gallstones.

    PubMed

    Flores-Franco, René Agustín

    2013-01-01

    Hepatobiliary conditions should be considered in the differential diagnosis of right pleural effusion. Here we present the illustrative images of thoracic empyema due to migrated gallstones in a woman who was treated for laparoscopic cholecystectomy one year before. The gallstones were obtained unexpectedly during a thoracentesis with aid of an Abrams needle. This rare complication is discussed under current literature review.

  3. Spectrum optimization for computed radiography mammography systems.

    PubMed

    Figl, Michael; Homolka, Peter; Semturs, Friedrich; Kaar, Marcus; Hummel, Johann

    2016-08-01

    Technical quality assurance is a key issue in breast screening protocols. While full-field digital mammography systems produce excellent image quality at low dose, it appears difficult with computed radiography (CR) systems to fulfill the requirements for image quality, and to keep the dose below the limits. However, powder plate CR systems are still widely used, e.g., they represent ∼30% of the devices in the Austrian breast cancer screening program. For these systems the selection of an optimal spectrum is a key issue. We investigated different anode/filter (A/F) combinations over the clinical range of tube voltages. The figure-of-merit (FOM) to be optimized was squared signal-difference-to-noise ratio divided by glandular dose. Measurements were performed on a Siemens Mammomat 3000 with a Fuji Profect reader (SiFu) and on a GE Senograph DMR with a Carestream reader (GECa). For 50mm PMMA the maximum FOM was found with a Mo/Rh spectrum between 27kVp and 29kVp, while with 60mm Mo/Rh at 28kVp (GECa) and W/Rh 25kVp (SiFu) were superior. For 70mm PMMA the Rh/Rh spectrum had a peak at about 31kVp (GECa). FOM increases from 10% to >100% are demonstrated. Optimization as proposed in this paper can either lead to dose reduction with comparable image quality or image quality improvement if necessary. For systems with limited A/F combinations the choice of tube voltage is of considerable importance. In this work, optimization of AEC parameters such as anode-filter combination and tube potential was demonstrated for mammographic CR systems. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Multidetector-row computed tomography of thoracic aortic anomalies in dogs and cats: Patent ductus arteriosus and vascular rings

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Diagnosis of extracardiac intrathoracic vascular anomalies is of clinical importance, but remains challenging. Traditional imaging modalities, such as radiography, echocardiography, and angiography, are inherently limited by the difficulties of a 2-dimensional approach to a 3-dimensional object. We postulated that accurate characterization of malformations of the aorta would benefit from 3-dimensional assessment. Therefore, multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) was chosen as a 3-dimensional, new, and noninvasive imaging technique. The purpose of this study was to evaluate patients with 2 common diseases of the intrathoracic aorta, either patent ductus arteriosus or vascular ring anomaly, by contrast-enhanced 64-row computed tomography. Results Electrocardiography (ECG)-gated and thoracic nongated MDCT images were reviewed in identified cases of either a patent ductus arteriosus or vascular ring anomaly. Ductal size and morphology were determined in 6 dogs that underwent ECG-gated MDCT. Vascular ring anomalies were characterized in 7 dogs and 3 cats by ECG-gated MDCT or by a nongated thoracic standard protocol. Cardiac ECG-gated MDCT clearly displayed the morphology, length, and caliber of the patent ductus arteriosus in 6 affected dogs. Persistent right aortic arch was identified in 10 animals, 8 of which showed a coexisting aberrant left subclavian artery. A mild dilation of the proximal portion of the aberrant subclavian artery near its origin of the aorta was present in 4 dogs, and a diverticulum analogous to the human Kommerell's diverticulum was present in 2 cats. Conclusions Contrast-enhanced MDCT imaging of thoracic anomalies gives valuable information about the exact aortic arch configuration. Furthermore, MDCT was able to characterize the vascular branching patterns in dogs and cats with a persistent right aortic arch and the morphology and size of the patent ductus arteriosus in affected dogs. This additional information can be of help

  5. Spiral computed tomography for the diagnosis of cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine fractures: its time has come.

    PubMed

    Brown, Carlos V R; Antevil, Jared L; Sise, Michael J; Sack, Daniel I

    2005-05-01

    Although the traditional method of diagnosing spine fractures (SF) has been plain radiography, Spiral Computed Tomography (SCT) is being used with increasing frequency. Our institution adopted SCT as the primary modality for the diagnosis of SF. The purpose of this study was to determine whether SCT scan can be used as a stand-alone diagnostic modality in the evaluation of SF. Retrospective review of all blunt trauma patients over a two year period (1/01-12/02). Patients with neck pain, back pain, or spine tenderness underwent SCT of the symptomatic region. Patients who were unconscious or intoxicated underwent screening SCT of the entire spine. SCT was performed using 5 mm axial cuts with three-dimensional reconstructions in sagittal and coronal planes. Patients with a discharge diagnosis of cervical, thoracic, or lumbar SF were identified from the trauma registry by ICD-9 codes. There were 3,537 blunt trauma patients evaluated, with 236 (7%) sustaining a cervical, thoracic, or lumbar SF. Forty-five patients (19%) sustained a SF in more than one anatomic region. SCT missed SF in two patients. The cervical SF missed by SCT was a compression fracture identified by magnetic resonance imaging and was treated with a rigid collar. The thoracic SF missed by SCT was also a compression fracture identified on plain radiographs and required no treatment. SCT of the spine identified 99.3% of all fractures of the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine, and those missed by SCT required minimal or no treatment. SCT is a sensitive diagnostic test for the identification of SF. Routine plain radiographs of the spine are not necessary in the evaluation of blunt trauma patients.

  6. Thoracic Endoscopic-Assisted Mini-Open Surgery for Thoracic and Thoracolumbar Spinal Cord Compression.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bao-Shan; Xu, Hai-Wei; Yuan, Qiu-Ming; Liu, Yue; Yang, Qiang; Jiang, Hong-Feng; Wang, Dong-Bin; Ji, Ning; Ma, Xin-Long; Zhang, Yang

    2016-11-01

    Intervertebral disc herniation is a common cause of spinal cord compression, especially for the thoracic and thoracolumbar spinal cord, which has limited buffer space in the spinal canal. Spinal cord compression usually causes decreased sensation and paralysis of limbs below the level of compression, urinary and fecal incontinence, and/or urinary retention, which brings great suffering to the patients and usually requires surgical intervention. Thoracotomy or abdominothoracic surgery is usually performed for the thoracolumbar cord compression caused by hard intervertebral disc herniation. However, there is high risk of trauma and complications with this surgery. To reduce the surgical trauma and obtain good visibility, we designed athoracic endoscopic-assisted mini-open surgery for thoracic and thoracolumbar disc herniation, and performed this procedure on 10 patients who suffered from hard thoracic or thoracolumbar spinal cord compression. During the procedure, the thoracic endoscopy provided clear vision of the surgical field with a good light source. The compression could be fully exposed and completely removed, and no nerve root injury or spinal cord damage occurred. All patients achieved obvious recovery of neurological function after this procedure. This technique possesses the merits of minimal trauma, increased safety, and good clinical results. The aim of this study is to introduce this thoracic endoscopic-assisted mini-open surgery technique, and we believe that this technique will be a good choice for the thoracic and thoracolumbar cord compression caused by hard intervertebral disc herniation.

  7. Chronic pain and the thoracic spine

    PubMed Central

    Louw, Adriaan; Schmidt, Stephen G.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years there has been an increased interest in pain neuroscience in physical therapy.1,2 Emerging pain neuroscience research has challenged prevailing models used to understand and treat pain, including the Cartesian model of pain and the pain gate.2–4 Focus has shifted to the brain's processing of a pain experience, the pain neuromatrix and more recently, cortical reorganisation of body maps.2,3,5,6 In turn, these emerging theories have catapulted new treatments, such as therapeutic neuroscience education (TNE)7–10 and graded motor imagery (GMI),11,12 to the forefront of treating people suffering from persistent spinal pain. In line with their increased use, both of these approaches have exponentially gathered increasing evidence to support their use.4,10 For example, various randomised controlled trials and systematic reviews have shown that teaching patients more about the biology and physiology of their pain experience leads to positive changes in pain, pain catastrophization, function, physical movement and healthcare utilisation.7–10 Graded motor imagery, in turn, has shown increasing evidence to help pain and disability in complex pain states such as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS).11,12 Most research using TNE and GMI has focussed on chronic low back pain (CLBP) and CRPS and none of these advanced pain treatments have been trialled on the thoracic spine. This lack of research and writings in regards to the thoracic spine is not unique to pain science, but also in manual therapy. There are, however, very unique pain neuroscience issues that skilled manual therapists may find clinically meaningful when treating a patient struggling with persistent thoracic pain. Utilising the latest understanding of pain neuroscience, three key clinical chronic thoracic issues will be discussed – hypersensitisation of intercostal nerves, posterior primary rami nerves mimicking Cloward areas and mechanical and sensitisation issues of the spinal dura in

  8. Thoracic sympathectomy for upper extremity ischemia.

    PubMed

    Hoexum, Frank; Coveliers, Hans M; Lu, Joyce J; Jongkind, Vincent; Yeung, Kakkhee K; Wisselink, Willem

    2016-12-01

    Thoracic sympathectomy is performed in the management of a variety of disorders of the upper extremity. To evaluate the contemporary results of thoracic sympathectomy for upper extremity ischemia a systematic review of the literature was conducted. We performed a PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane search of the literature written in the English language from January 1975 to December 2015. All articles presenting original patient data regarding the effect of treatment on symptoms or on the healing of ulcers were eligible for inclusion. Individual analyses for Primary Raynaud's Disease (PRD) and Secondary Raynaud's Phenomenon (SRP) were performed. We included 6 prospective and 23 retrospective series with a total of 753 patients and 1026 affected limbs. Early beneficial effects of thoracic sympathectomy were noticed in 63-100% (median 94%) of all patients, in 73-100% (median 98%) of PRD patients and in 63-100% (median 94%) of SRP patients. The beneficial effect was noted to lessen over time. Long-term beneficial effects were reported in 13-100% (median 75%) of all patients, in 22-100% (median 58%) of PRD patients, and in 13-100% (median 79%) of SRD patients. Complete or improved ulcer healing was achieved in 33-100% and 25-67% respectively, of all patients. Thoracic sympathectomy can be beneficial in the treatment of upper extremity ischemia in select patients. Although the effect in patients with PRD will lessen over time, it may still reduce the severity of symptoms. In SRD, effects are more often long-lasting. In addition, thoracic sympathectomy may maximize tissue preservation or prevent amputation in cases of digital ulceration.

  9. Thoracic outlet syndromes and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Panegyres, P K; Moore, N; Gibson, R; Rushworth, G; Donaghy, M

    1993-08-01

    The thoracic outlet syndromes encompass the diverse clinical entities affecting the branchial plexus or subclavian artery including cervical ribs or bands. Thoracic outlet syndrome are often difficult to diagnose on existing clinical and electrophysiological criteria and new diagnostic methods are necessary. This study reports our experience with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brachial plexus in 20 patients with suspected thoracic outlet syndrome. The distribution of pain and sensory disturbance varied widely, weakness and wasting usually affected C8/T1 innervated muscles, and electrophysiology showed combinations of reduced sensory nerve action potentials from the fourth and fifth digits, and prolonged F-responses or tendon reflex latencies. The MRI study was interpreted blind. Deviation of the brachial plexus was recorded in 19 out of the 24 symptomatic sides (sensitivity 79%). Absence of distortion was correctly identified in 14 out of 16 asymptomatic sides (specificity 87.5%). The false positive rate was 9.5%. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated all seven cervical ribs visible on plain cervical spine radiographs. Magnetic resonance imaging also showed a band-like structure extending from the C7 transverse process in 25 out of 33 sides; similar structures were detected in three out of 18 sides in control subjects. These MRI bands often underlay the brachial plexus distortion observed in our patients. We also observed instances of plexus distortion by post-traumatic callus of the first rib, and by a hypertrophied serratus anterior muscle. If they did not demonstrate a cervical rib, plain cervical spine radiographs had no value in predicting brachial plexus distortion. We believe MRI to be of potential value in the diagnosis of thoracic outlet syndrome by: (i) demonstrating deviation or distortion of nerves or blood vessels; (ii) suggesting the presence of radiographically invisible bands; (iii) disclosing other causes of thoracic outlet syndrome

  10. Chronic pain and the thoracic spine.

    PubMed

    Louw, Adriaan; Schmidt, Stephen G

    2015-07-01

    In recent years there has been an increased interest in pain neuroscience in physical therapy.1,2 Emerging pain neuroscience research has challenged prevailing models used to understand and treat pain, including the Cartesian model of pain and the pain gate.2-4 Focus has shifted to the brain's processing of a pain experience, the pain neuromatrix and more recently, cortical reorganisation of body maps.2,3,5,6 In turn, these emerging theories have catapulted new treatments, such as therapeutic neuroscience education (TNE)7-10 and graded motor imagery (GMI),11,12 to the forefront of treating people suffering from persistent spinal pain. In line with their increased use, both of these approaches have exponentially gathered increasing evidence to support their use.4,10 For example, various randomised controlled trials and systematic reviews have shown that teaching patients more about the biology and physiology of their pain experience leads to positive changes in pain, pain catastrophization, function, physical movement and healthcare utilisation.7-10 Graded motor imagery, in turn, has shown increasing evidence to help pain and disability in complex pain states such as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS).11,12 Most research using TNE and GMI has focussed on chronic low back pain (CLBP) and CRPS and none of these advanced pain treatments have been trialled on the thoracic spine. This lack of research and writings in regards to the thoracic spine is not unique to pain science, but also in manual therapy. There are, however, very unique pain neuroscience issues that skilled manual therapists may find clinically meaningful when treating a patient struggling with persistent thoracic pain. Utilising the latest understanding of pain neuroscience, three key clinical chronic thoracic issues will be discussed - hypersensitisation of intercostal nerves, posterior primary rami nerves mimicking Cloward areas and mechanical and sensitisation issues of the spinal dura in the

  11. Non-intubated anesthesia in thoracic surgery—technical issues

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Performing awake thoracic surgery (ATS) is technically more challenging than thoracic surgery under general anesthesia (GA), but it can result in a greater benefit for the patient. Local wound infiltration and lidocaine administration in the pleural space can be considered for ATS. More invasive techniques are local wound infiltration with wound catheter insertion, thoracic wall blocks, selective intercostal nerve blockade, thoracic paravertebral blockade and thoracic epidural analgesia, offering the advantage of a catheter placement which can also be continued for postoperative analgesia. PMID:26046050

  12. The Thoracic Surgery Service at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

    PubMed

    Rusch, Valerie W

    2015-01-01

    The development of the Thoracic Surgery Service at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center paralleled the emergence of Thoracic Surgery as a specialty, but with the unique focus on oncology and multidisciplinary cancer care characteristic of the institution. From the early post-war years treating lung cancer with new surgical techniques, through early definitive work in malignant mesothelioma, to today's translational research in cancer biology, the Thoracic Surgery Service continues to be an international leader in educating surgeons in thoracic surgical oncology, conducting clinical trials, and developing innovative therapies to treat thoracic cancers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Deterministic simulation of thermal neutron radiography and tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal Chowdhury, Rajarshi; Liu, Xin

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, thermal neutron radiography and tomography have gained much attention as one of the nondestructive testing methods. However, the application of thermal neutron radiography and tomography is hindered by their technical complexity, radiation shielding, and time-consuming data collection processes. Monte Carlo simulations have been developed in the past to improve the neutron imaging facility's ability. In this paper, a new deterministic simulation approach has been proposed and demonstrated to simulate neutron radiographs numerically using a ray tracing algorithm. This approach has made the simulation of neutron radiographs much faster than by previously used stochastic methods (i.e., Monte Carlo methods). The major problem with neutron radiography and tomography simulation is finding a suitable scatter model. In this paper, an analytic scatter model has been proposed that is validated by a Monte Carlo simulation.

  14. NEUTRON RADIOGRAPHY (NRAD) REACTOR 64-ELEMENT CORE UPGRADE

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess

    2014-03-01

    The neutron radiography (NRAD) reactor is a 250 kW TRIGA (registered) (Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics) Mark II , tank-type research reactor currently located in the basement, below the main hot cell, of the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). It is equipped with two beam tubes with separate radiography stations for the performance of neutron radiography irradiation on small test components. The interim critical configuration developed during the core upgrade, which contains only 62 fuel elements, has been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment. The final 64-fuel-element operational core configuration of the NRAD LEU TRIGA reactor has also been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment. Calculated eigenvalues differ significantly (approximately +/-1%) from the benchmark eigenvalue and have demonstrated sensitivity to the thermal scattering treatment of hydrogen in the U-Er-Zr-H fuel.

  15. [Significance of plain radiography in shoulder pain diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Botser, Itamar Busheri; Shapira, Shachar; Oran, Ariel; Avivi, Eran; Pritsch, Moshe

    2011-09-01

    Shoulder pain is a common complaint--almost 20% of the population will suffer shoulder pain during their life time. Despite the availability of newer imaging techniques for evaluation of the shoulder, the first imaging study should be radiography. Recently, ultrasonography of the shoulder has become one of the first studies performed. Sometimes, ultrasonography is conducted before radiography; moreover, many patients are being referred to a shoulder specialist without performing an X-ray. There is a plethora of pathologies that can cause shoulder pain--rotator cuff tears, impingement syndrome, calcified tendinitis, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, neoplasms and more. This review aims to show the significance of plain radiography in the diagnosis of shoulder pathologies, in order to encourage the use of this modality. In this paper we shall review the different causes of shoulder pain and their radiographic characteristics.

  16. Occupational exposure in Greek industrial radiography laboratories (1996-2003).

    PubMed

    Economides, S; Tritakis, P; Papadomarkaki, E; Carinou, E; Hourdakis, C; Kamenopoulou, V; Dimitriou, P

    2006-01-01

    More than 40 industrial radiography laboratories are operating in Greece using X-ray or gamma-ray sources and more than 250 workers occupationally exposed to ionising radiation in these facilities are monitored on a regular basis. This study presents the evolution of individual doses received by radiographers during the past years. The mean annual dose (MAD) of all workers as well as of exposed workers is estimated, and correlated to the types of laboratories and practices applied. The MAD of the exposed workers in industrial radiography is compared with the doses of workers in other specialties and with the doses of radiographers in other countries. Furthermore, the study attempts to propose dose constraints for the practices in industrial radiography, according to the BSS European directive and the relevant Greek radiation protection legislation. The proposed value was defined as the dose below which the annual doses of 75% of the exposed radiographers are expected to be included.

  17. Application of Neutron Radiography to Flow Visualization in Supercritical Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takenaka, N.; Sugimoto, K.; Takami, S.; Sugioka, K.; Tsukada, T.; Adschiri, T.; Saito, Y.

    Supercritical water is used in various chemical reaction processes including hydrothermal synthesis of metal oxide nano-particles, oxidation, chemical conversion of biomass and plastics. Density of the super critical water is much less than that of the sub-critical water. By using neutron radiography, Peterson et al. have studied salt precipitation processes in supercritical water and the flow pattern in a reverse-flow vessel for salt precipitation, and Balasko et al. have revealed the behaviour of supercritical water in a container. The nano-particles were made by mixing the super critical flow and the sub critical water solution. In the present study, neutron radiography was applied to the flow visualization of the super and sub critical water mixture in a T-junction made of stainless steel pipes for high pressure and temperature conditions to investigate their mixing process. Still images by a CCD camera were obtained by using the neutron radiography system at B4 port in KUR.

  18. Study of pipe thickness loss using a neutron radiography method

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, Abdul Aziz; Wahab, Aliff Amiru Bin; Yazid, Hafizal B.; Ahmad, Megat Harun Al Rashid B. Megat; Jamro, Rafhayudi B.; Azman, Azraf B.; Zin, Muhamad Rawi Md; Idris, Faridah Mohamad

    2014-02-12

    The purpose of this preliminary work is to study for thickness changes in objects using neutron radiography. In doing the project, the technique for the radiography was studied. The experiment was done at NUR-2 facility at TRIGA research reactor in Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Malaysia. Test samples of varying materials were used in this project. The samples were radiographed using direct technique. Radiographic images were recorded using Nitrocellulose film. The films obtained were digitized to processed and analyzed. Digital processing is done on the images using software Isee!. The images were processed to produce better image for analysis. The thickness changes in the image were measured to be compared with real thickness of the objects. From the data collected, percentages difference between measured and real thickness are below than 2%. This is considerably very low variation from original values. Therefore, verifying the neutron radiography technique used in this project.

  19. Studies of solid propellant combustion with pulsed radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godai, T.; Tanemura, T.; Fujiwara, T.; Shimizu, M.

    1987-01-01

    Pulsed radiography was applied to observe solid propellant surface regression during rocket motor operation. Using a 150 KV flash X-ray system manufactured by the Field Emission Corporation and two kinds of film suppliers, images of the propellant surface of a 5 cm diameter end burning rocket motor were recorded on film. The repetition frame rate of 8 pulses per second and the pulse train length of 10 pulses are limited by the capability of the power supply and the heat build up within the X-ray tube, respectively. The experiment demonstrated the effectiveness of pulsed radiography for observing solid propellant surface regression. Measuring the position of burning surface images on film with a microdensitometer, quasi-instantaneous burning rate as a function of pressure and the variation of characteristic velocity with pressure and gas stay time were obtained. Other research items to which pulsed radiography can be applied are also suggested.

  20. Proton Radiography as an electromagnetic field and density perturbation diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Mackinnon, A; Patel, P; Town, R; Edwards, M; Phillips, T; Lerner, S; Price, D; Hicks, D; Key, M; Hatchett, S; Wilks, S; King, J; Snavely, R; Freeman, R; Boehlly, T; Koenig, M; Martinolli, E; Lepape, S; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A; Audebert, P; Gauthier, J; Borghesi, M; Romagnani, L; Toncian, T; Pretzler, G; Willi, O

    2004-04-15

    Laser driven proton beams have been used to diagnose transient fields and density perturbations in laser produced plasmas. Grid deflectometry techniques have been applied to proton radiography to obtain precise measurements of proton beam angles caused by electromagnetic fields in laser produced plasmas. Application of proton radiography to laser driven implosions has demonstrated that density conditions in compressed media can be diagnosed with MeV protons. This data has shown that proton radiography can provide unique insight into transient electromagnetic fields in super critical density plasmas and provide a density perturbation diagnostics in compressed matter . PACS numbers: 52.50.Jm, 52.40.Nk, 52.40.Mj, 52.70.Kz

  1. Limiting the use of routine radiography for acute ankle injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Cockshott, W. P.; Jenkin, J. K.; Pui, M.

    1983-01-01

    In the diagnosis of ankle injuries routine radiography is often productive. An international survey of the average number of radiographs made of injured ankles suggested that two projections are adequate to detect fractures. This was confirmed in a prospective study of 242 patients coming to a hospital emergency department with recent ankle injuries. All the fractures could be identified on an anteroposterior or a lateral projection, although some were more obvious on an oblique view. As well, all the fractures were associated with malleolar soft-tissue swelling. Thus, radiography for acute ankle injuries could safely be restricted to patients with soft-tissue swelling, and fractures could be diagnosed using only two routine projections, though for management purposes additional projections might be needed. With a policy of limiting the use of radiography substantial cost reductions are possible. Images FIG. 1 PMID:6407744

  2. [Cost-effectiveness evaluation of a digital radiography system].

    PubMed

    Guillaume, L; Joris, T; Mandry, D; Kammacher, L; Claudon, M

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of a completely automated digital radiography (DR) unit in a pediatric radiology department on productivity. Materials and methods. Comparative evaluation of DR and computerized radiography (CR) units on 193 patients imaged in a pediatric radiology department. The time to complete each step of all examinations was recorded. Half of the exams were performed using CR and the other half was performed using DR. There was a 52% time gain for simple projection exams using DR and a 51% time gain for dual projection exams using DR (p<0.001). A workflow study performed a 9 month period showed that DR could absorb 84% of work previously performed on two conventional radiography units. DR is necessary for digital imaging departments to increase productivity, while providing added ergonomic comfort and flexibility. It is particularly well suited for pediatric imaging departments.

  3. Magnifying lens for 800 MeV proton radiography.

    PubMed

    Merrill, F E; Campos, E; Espinoza, C; Hogan, G; Hollander, B; Lopez, J; Mariam, F G; Morley, D; Morris, C L; Murray, M; Saunders, A; Schwartz, C; Thompson, T N

    2011-10-01

    This article describes the design and performance of a magnifying magnetic-lens system designed, built, and commissioned at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for 800 MeV flash proton radiography. The technique of flash proton radiography has been developed at LANL to study material properties under dynamic loading conditions through the analysis of time sequences of proton radiographs. The requirements of this growing experimental program have resulted in the need for improvements in spatial radiographic resolution. To meet these needs, a new magnetic lens system, consisting of four permanent magnet quadrupoles, has been developed. This new lens system was designed to reduce the second order chromatic aberrations, the dominant source of image blur in 800 MeV proton radiography, as well as magnifying the image to reduce the blur contribution from the detector and camera systems. The recently commissioned lens system performed as designed, providing nearly a factor of three improvement in radiographic resolution.

  4. Pressure Indication of 3013 Inner Containers Using Digital Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    HENSEL, SJ

    2004-04-15

    Plutonium bearing materials packaged for long term storage per the Department of Energy Standard 3013 (DOE-STD-3013) are required to be examined periodically in a non-destructive manner (i.e. without compromising the storage containers) for pressure buildup. Radiography is the preferred technology for performing the examinations. The concept is to measure and record the container lid position. As a can pressurizes the lid will deflect outward and thus provide an indication of the internal pressure. A radiograph generated within 30 days of creation of each storage container serves as the baseline from which future surveillance examinations will be compared. A problem with measuring the lid position was discovered during testing of a digital radiography system. The solution was to provide a distinct feature upon the lower surface of the container lid from which the digital radiography system could easily track the lid position.

  5. Comparative evaluation of digital radiography versus conventional radiography of fractured skulls.

    PubMed

    Langen, H J; Klein, H M; Wein, B; Stargardt, A; Günther, R W

    1993-08-01

    The authors assessed the relative efficacy of conventional and digital storage-phosphor radiographs for the detection of skull fractures. Fifty conventional film-screen radiographs (FSR) and 50 digital storage-phosphor radiographs (DR) with 66 fractures were compared. Five radiologists evaluated image quality and fracture detectability. The results were analyzed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. With a standard exposure, the ability to evaluate skull fractures was equally good with either technique (ROC area for DR, 0.8954; for FSR, 0.8870). Digital radiography was superior in evaluating nasal bone. For petrosal bone, the DR image simulates an underexposure. This disadvantage compared with FSR can be compensated by image postprocessing. In evaluation of skull fractures, radiologists performance with DR is equivalent to FSR.

  6. Dry needling for the management of thoracic spine pain

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Layton, Michelle; Dommerholt, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Thoracic spine pain is as disabling as neck and low back pain without receiving the same level of attention in the scientific literature. Among the different structures that can refer pain to the thoracic spine, muscles often play a relevant role. Trigger points (TrPs) from neck, shoulder and spinal muscles can induce pain in the region of the thoracic spine. There is a lack of evidence reporting the presence of TrPs in the region of the thoracic spine, but clinical evidence suggests that TrPs can be a potential source of thoracic spine pain. The current paper discusses the role of TrPs in the thoracic spine and dry needling (DN) for the management of TrPs in the thoracic multifidi and longissimus thoracis. This paper also includes a brief discussion of the application of DN in other tissues such as tendons, ligaments and scars. PMID:26309385

  7. Dry needling for the management of thoracic spine pain.

    PubMed

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Layton, Michelle; Dommerholt, Jan

    2015-07-01

    Thoracic spine pain is as disabling as neck and low back pain without receiving the same level of attention in the scientific literature. Among the different structures that can refer pain to the thoracic spine, muscles often play a relevant role. Trigger points (TrPs) from neck, shoulder and spinal muscles can induce pain in the region of the thoracic spine. There is a lack of evidence reporting the presence of TrPs in the region of the thoracic spine, but clinical evidence suggests that TrPs can be a potential source of thoracic spine pain. The current paper discusses the role of TrPs in the thoracic spine and dry needling (DN) for the management of TrPs in the thoracic multifidi and longissimus thoracis. This paper also includes a brief discussion of the application of DN in other tissues such as tendons, ligaments and scars.

  8. Evaluation of simulated external root resorptions with digital radiography and digital subtraction radiography.

    PubMed

    Ono, Evelise; Medici Filho, Edmundo; Faig Leite, Horacio; Tanaka, Jefferson Luis Oshiro; De Moraes, Mari Eli Leonelli; De Melo Castilho, Julio Cezar

    2011-03-01

    Root resorption can cause damage in orthodontic patients. Digital subtraction radiography (DSR) is a useful resource for the detection of mineral losses. The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of digital radiography (DR) and DSR in detecting simulated external root resorption. Examiner agreement between the 2 techniques was also evaluated. Root resorptions of various sizes were simulated on the apical and lingual aspects of 49 teeth from 9 dry human mandibles. The teeth were radiographed in standardized conditions. The radiographs were registered with Regeemy Image Registration and Mosaicking (version 0.2.43-RCB, DPI-INPE, São José dos Campos, São Paulo, Brazil) and subtracted with Image Tool (University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio). The subtracted images and the digital radiographs were evaluated by 3 oral radiologists. No statistically significant differences were found for the methods in the detection of apical root resorptions, independently from lesion size, and of lingual resorptions of 1.2 mm or greater. DSR was significantly better than DR for detection of lingual resorptions up to 1 mm. Resorptions less than 0.5 mm were not precisely detected by either method. DSR provided better intraexaminer and interexaminer agreement than did DR. Both methods are precise for detection of apical root resorptions as small as 0.5 mm and lingual resorptions of 1 mm or more. However, DSR frequently performed better than did DR. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Neutron radiography and tomography facility at IBR-2 reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlenko, D. P.; Kichanov, S. E.; Lukin, E. V.; Rutkauskas, A. V.; Belushkin, A. V.; Bokuchava, G. D.; Savenko, B. N.

    2016-05-01

    An experimental station for investigations using neutron radiography and tomography was developed at the upgraded high-flux pulsed IBR-2 reactor. The 20 × 20 cm neutron beam is formed by the system of collimators with the characteristic parameter L/D varying from 200 to 2000. The detector system is based on a 6LiF/ZnS scintillation screen; images are recorded using a high-sensitivity video camera based on the high-resolution CCD matrix. The results of the first neutron radiography and tomography experiments at the developed facility are presented.

  10. Quantitative radiography of magnetic fields using neutron spin phase imaging.

    PubMed

    Piegsa, F M; van den Brandt, B; Hautle, P; Kohlbrecher, J; Konter, J A

    2009-04-10

    We report on a novel neutron radiography technique that uses the Ramsey principle, a method similar to neutron spin echo. For the first time quantitative imaging measurements of magnetic objects and fields could be performed. The strength of the spin-dependent magnetic interaction is detected by a change in the Larmor precession frequency of the neutron spins. Hence, one obtains in addition to the normal attenuation radiography image a so-called neutron spin phase image, which provides a two-dimensional projection of the magnetic field integrated over the neutron flight path.

  11. Energy-selective neutron radiography and tomography at FRM.

    PubMed

    Kardjilov, Nikolay; Schillinger, Burkhard; Steichele, Erich

    2004-10-01

    At the reactor FRM at Technical University of Munich energy-selective neutron radiography and tomography experiments were performed. For an energy separation of the neutrons from the primary beam a mechanical velocity selector was used. The radiography images show a different contrast of the investigated elements for neutron energies below and above their Bragg-cutoff energy. A comparison between the standard and energy-selective neutron tomography is presented. In spite of a reduction of the neutron intensity due to the velocity selector technique a realistic experimental time in order of some hours for the tomography experiment was achieved.

  12. Subtraction Radiography for the Diagnosis of Bone Lesions in Dogs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-31

    AD-A142 726 SUBTRACTION RADIOGRAPHY FOR THE DIAGNOSIS OF BONE • LESIONS IN DOGS (U) ARMY INST OF DENTAL RESEARCH WASHINGTON DC M P RETHMRN ET AL. 31...11sk01 o -py- Rt one. Lesions in Dogs 11,4 -OG. 3(0?NUL AU THOR~q caraACT 0R GRANT NUMBER,&) * * __ M.P. Rethman, U.E. Ruttiman, R.B. O’Neal, R.I...research article titled "Subtraction Radiography for the Diagnosis of Bone Lesions in Dogs " solely to the Journal of Periodontology for review and

  13. Proton radiography, nuclear cross sections and multiple Coulomb scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Sjue, Sky K.

    2015-11-04

    The principles behind proton radiography including multiple Coulomb scattering are discussed for a purely imaginary square well nucleus in the eikonal approximation. It is found that a very crude model can reproduce the angular dependence of the cross sections measured at 24 GeV/c. The largest differences are ~3% for the 4.56 mrad data, and ~4% for the 6.68 mrad data. The prospect of understanding how to model deterministically high-energy proton radiography over a very large range of energies is promising, but it should be tested more thoroughly.

  14. Pilot study of bovine interdigital cassetteless computed radiography.

    PubMed

    El-Shafaey, El-Sayed Ahmed Awad; Aoki, Takahiro; Ishii, Mitsuo; Yamada, Kazutaka

    2013-11-01

    Twenty-one limbs of bovine cadavers (42 digits) were exposed to interdigital cassetteless imaging plate using computed radiography. The radiographic findings included exostosis, a rough planta surface, osteolysis of the apex of the distal phalanx and widening of the laminar zone between the distal phalanx and the hoof wall. All these findings were confirmed by computed tomography. The hindlimbs (19 digits) showed more changes than the forelimbs (10 digits), particularly in the lateral distal phalanx. The cassetteless computed radiography technique is expected to be an easily applicable method for the distal phalanx rather than a conventional cassette-plate and/or the film-screen cassetteless methods.

  15. Pilot Study of Bovine Interdigital Cassetteless Computed Radiography

    PubMed Central

    EL-SHAFAEY, El-Sayed Ahmed Awad; AOKI, Takahiro; ISHII, Mitsuo; YAMADA, Kazutaka

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Twenty-one limbs of bovine cadavers (42 digits) were exposed to interdigital cassetteless imaging plate using computed radiography. The radiographic findings included exostosis, a rough planta surface, osteolysis of the apex of the distal phalanx and widening of the laminar zone between the distal phalanx and the hoof wall. All these findings were confirmed by computed tomography. The hindlimbs (19 digits) showed more changes than the forelimbs (10 digits), particularly in the lateral distal phalanx. The cassetteless computed radiography technique is expected to be an easily applicable method for the distal phalanx rather than a conventional cassette-plate and/or the film-screen cassetteless methods. PMID:23782542

  16. Californium Multiplier Part I: design for neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Crosbie, K.L.; Preskitt, C.A.; John, J.; Hastings, J.D.

    1982-01-01

    The Californium Multiplier (CFX) is a subcritical assembly of enriched uranium surrounding a californium-252 neutron source. The function of the CFX is to multiply the neutrons emitted by the source to a number sufficient for neutron radiography. The CFX is designed to provide a collimated beam of thermal neutrons from which the gamma radiation is filtered, and the scattered neutrons are reduced to make it suitable for high resolution radiography. The entire system has inherent safety features, which provide for system and personnel safety, and it operates at moderate cost. In Part I, the CFX and the theory of its operation are described in detail.

  17. Phosphor plate radiography: an integral component of the filmless practice.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Scott

    2010-11-01

    The federal government has mandated that all dental and medical patient records be electronic in 3 years. Practices using film radiography will be unable to comply with this mandate. PSP radiography is not only a surprisingly convenient way to transition from film to digital imaging, it can also greatly enhance the practice's productivity, profitability, and patient satisfaction. Modern, forward-thinking practices will want to take full advantage of PSP's superiority by making this transition now rather than waiting until they are forced to.

  18. 42 CFR 37.51 - Interpreting and classifying chest radiographs-digital radiography systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...-digital radiography systems. 37.51 Section 37.51 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... of Chest Radiographs § 37.51 Interpreting and classifying chest radiographs—digital radiography systems. (a) For each chest radiograph obtained at an approved facility using a digital radiography...

  19. Measuring microfocal spots using digital radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, David A; Ewert, Uwe

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of microfocus spot size can be important for several reasons: (1) Quality assurance during manufacture of microfocus tubes; (2) Tracking performance and stability of microfocus tubes; (3) Determining magnification is especially important for digital radiography where the native spatial resolution of the digital system is not adequate for the application; and (4) Knowledge of unsharpness from the focal spot alone. The European Standard EN 12543-5 is based on a simple geometrical method of calculating focal spot size from unsharpness of high magnification film radiographs. The following equations are used for the focal spot size measurement: By similar triangles the following equations are presupposed: f/a = U/b and M = (a+b)/a. These equations can be combined to yield the well known expression: U = f(M - 1). Solving for f, f = U/(M-1). Therefore, the focal spot size, f, can be calculated by measuring the radiographic unsharpness and magnification of a known object. This is the basis for these tests. The European standard actually uses one-half of the unsharpness (which are then added together) from both sides of the object to avoid additional unsharpness contributions due to edge transmission unsharpness of the round test object (the outside of the object is measured). So the equation becomes f = (1/2 U{sub 1} + 1/2 U{sub 2})/(M-1). In practice 1/2 U is measured from the 50% to the 90% signal points on the transition profile from ''black'' to ''white,'' (positive image) or attenuated to unattenuated portion of the image. The 50% to 90% points are chosen as a best fit to an assumed Gaussian radiation distribution from the focal spot and to avoid edge transmission effects. 1/2 U{sub 1} + 1/2 U{sub 2} corresponds about to the full width at half height of a Gaussian focal spot. A highly absorbing material (Tungsten, Tungsten Alloy, or Platinum) is used for the object. Either wires or a sphere are used as the object to eliminate alignment issues. One

  20. The European educational platform on thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Massard, Gilbert; Rocco, Gaetano; Venuta, Federico

    2014-05-01

    As the largest scientific organisation world-wide exclusively dedicated to general thoracic surgery (GTS), the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) recognized that one of its priorities is education. The educational platform designed ESTS addresses not only trainees, but also confirmed thoracic surgeons. The two main aims are (I) to prepare trainees to graduation and to the certification by the European Board of Thoracic Surgery and (II) to offer opportunities for continuous medical education in the perspective of life-long learning and continuous professional development to certified thoracic surgeons. It is likely that recertification will become an obligation during the coming decade. At its inception, the platform differentiated two different events. A 6-day course emphasizing on theoretic knowledge was created in Antalya in 2007. The same year, a 2-day school oriented to practical issues with hands-on in the animal lab was launched in Antalya. These two teaching tracks need further development. In the knowledge track, we intend to organize highly specialized 2-day courses to deepen insight into theoretical questions. The skill track will be implemented by specialized courses for high technology such as tracheal surgery, ECMO, robotics or chest wall reconstruction. In order to promote tomorrows' leadership, we created an academic competence track giving an insight into medical communication, methodology and management. We also had to respond to an increasing demand from the Russian speaking countries, where colleagues may face problems to attend western meetings, and where the language bareer may be a major impediment. We initiated a Russian school with three events yearly in 2012. Contemporary teaching must be completed with an e-learning platform, which is currently under development. The school activities are organized by the educational committee, which is headed by the ESTS Director of Education, assisted by coordinators of the teaching tracks and

  1. The European educational platform on thoracic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rocco, Gaetano; Venuta, Federico

    2014-01-01

    As the largest scientific organisation world-wide exclusively dedicated to general thoracic surgery (GTS), the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) recognized that one of its priorities is education. The educational platform designed ESTS addresses not only trainees, but also confirmed thoracic surgeons. The two main aims are (I) to prepare trainees to graduation and to the certification by the European Board of Thoracic Surgery and (II) to offer opportunities for continuous medical education in the perspective of life-long learning and continuous professional development to certified thoracic surgeons. It is likely that recertification will become an obligation during the coming decade. At its inception, the platform differentiated two different events. A 6-day course emphasizing on theoretic knowledge was created in Antalya in 2007. The same year, a 2-day school oriented to practical issues with hands-on in the animal lab was launched in Antalya. These two teaching tracks need further development. In the knowledge track, we intend to organize highly specialized 2-day courses to deepen insight into theoretical questions. The skill track will be implemented by specialized courses for high technology such as tracheal surgery, ECMO, robotics or chest wall reconstruction. In order to promote tomorrows’ leadership, we created an academic competence track giving an insight into medical communication, methodology and management. We also had to respond to an increasing demand from the Russian speaking countries, where colleagues may face problems to attend western meetings, and where the language bareer may be a major impediment. We initiated a Russian school with three events yearly in 2012. Contemporary teaching must be completed with an e-learning platform, which is currently under development. The school activities are organized by the educational committee, which is headed by the ESTS Director of Education, assisted by coordinators of the teaching tracks

  2. [Applications for bronchial blockers in thoracic surgery].

    PubMed

    García-Guasch, R; Campos, J H; Granell, M; Peña, J J

    2007-11-01

    One-lung ventilation is commonly used to facilitate visualization of the field during thoracic surgery. New devices for performing this technique that have become available over the past 2 decades include the Univent bronchial blocker incorporated in a single-lumen tube, the Arndt endobronchial blocker, and the Cohen endobronchial blocker. Although insertion of a double-lumen tube is still the method used most often to isolate the lung, bronchial blockade is an increasingly common technique and, in certain clinical settings, provides advantages over the double-lumen tube. This review provides an update on new concepts in the use of bronchial blockers as a technique for lung isolation and one-lung ventilation. The literature search was performed on MEDLINE through PubMed using the keywords bronchial blockers and thoracic surgery. The search span started with 1982-the year the first modern bronchial blocker was described - and ended with February 2006.

  3. Thoracic radiology in kidney and liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Joel E; Rabkin, John M

    2002-04-01

    Renal transplantation accounts for more than half of all solid organ transplants performed in the U.S., and the liver is the second most commonly transplanted solid organ. Although abdominal imaging procedures are commonplace in these patients, there has been relatively little attention paid to thoracic imaging applications. Preoperative imaging is crucial to aid in the exclusion of infectious or malignant disease. In the perioperative time period, thoracic imaging focuses both on standard intensive care unit care, including monitoring devices and their complications, and on the early infections that can occur. Postoperative management is divided into three time periods, and the principles governing the occurrence of infections and malignancies are reviewed. Anatomic and pathologic aspects unique to kidney and liver transplantation patients are also discussed.

  4. Acute Aortic Syndromes and Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Ramanath, Vijay S.; Oh, Jae K.; Sundt, Thoralf M.; Eagle, Kim A.

    2009-01-01

    Acute and chronic aortic diseases have been diagnosed and studied by physicians for centuries. Both the diagnosis and treatment of aortic diseases have been steadily improving over time, largely because of increased physician awareness and improvements in diagnostic modalities. This comprehensive review discusses the pathophysiology and risk factors, classification schemes, epidemiology, clinical presentations, diagnostic modalities, management options, and outcomes of various aortic conditions, including acute aortic dissection (and its variants intramural hematoma and penetrating aortic ulcers) and thoracic aortic aneurysms. Literature searches of the PubMed database were conducted using the following keywords: aortic dissection, intramural hematoma, aortic ulcer, and thoracic aortic aneurysm. Retrospective and prospective studies performed within the past 20 years were included in the review; however, most data are from the past 15 years. PMID:19411444

  5. Myelopathy with syringomyelia following thoracic epidural anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Aldrete, J A; Ferrari, H

    2004-02-01

    Under general anaesthesia and muscle relaxation, a thoracic epidural catheter was inserted at the T8-T9 level in a 7-year-old boy scheduled to have a Nissen fundoplication to provide postoperative analgesia. After 4 ml of lignocaine 1.5% was injected through the catheter, hypotension resulted. Fifty-five minutes later 5 ml of bupivacaine 0.25% produced the same effect. In the recovery room a similar injection resulted in lower blood pressure and temporary apnoea. Sensory and motor deficits were noted the next day and four days later magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated spinal cord syringomyelia extending from T5 to T10. Four years later, dysaesthesia from T6 to T10 weakness of the left lower extremity and bladder and bowel dysfunction persist. The risks of inserting thoracic epidural catheters in patients under general anaesthesia and muscle relaxation are discussed, emphasising the possibility of spinal cord injury with disastrous consequences.

  6. [Thoracic ectopia cordis with tetralogy of fallot].

    PubMed

    Ben Khalfallah, A; Annabi, N; Ousji, M; Hadrich, M; Najai, A

    2003-01-01

    Ectopia cordis; very rare congenital malformation, characterized by an evisceration of the heart through a parietal defect. The thoracic localization is most frequent. We report the case of a full term baby girl without follow-up of the pregnancy, presenting a beating mass in thoracic position, expansive to the effort, covered by a translucent membrane corresponding to an ectopique position of the heart. Transthoracic echocardiography shows cardiac malformation: Fallot tetralogy. The precocious diagnosis is possible by prenatal ultrasound examination after 12th week of pregnancy. The surgical treatment remain the only hope for these neonates. It's results depends on the associated malformations and the neonatal complications especially the infections. The prognosis remains poor in spite of the progress of surgical techniques.

  7. Results of endovascular repair of the thoracic aorta with the Talent Thoracic stent graft: the Talent Thoracic Retrospective Registry.

    PubMed

    Fattori, Rossella; Nienaber, Christoph A; Rousseau, Hervé; Beregi, Jean-Paul; Heijmen, Robin; Grabenwöger, Martin; Piquet, Philippe; Lovato, Luigi; Dabbech, Chaouki; Kische, Stephan; Gaxotte, Virginia; Schepens, Marc; Ehrlich, Marek; Bartoli, Jean-Michelle

    2006-08-01

    Endovascular treatment of thoracic aortic diseases demonstrated low perioperative morbidity and mortality when compared with conventional open repair. Long-term effectiveness of this minimally invasive technique remains to be proven. The Talent Thoracic Retrospective Registry was designed to evaluate the impact of this therapy on patients treated in 7 major European referral centers over an 8-year period. Data from 457 consecutive patients (113 emergency and 344 elective cases) who underwent endovascular thoracic aortic repair with the Medtronic Talent Thoracic stent graft (Medtronic/AVE, Santa Rosa, Calif) were collected. Follow-up analysis (24 +/- 19.4 months, range 1-85.1 months) was based on clinical and imaging findings, including all adverse events. To ensure consistency of data interpretation and event reporting, one physician reviewed all adverse events and deaths for the whole cohort of patients. In the case of discrepancies, the treating physicians were queried. Among 422 patients who survived the interventional procedure (in-hospital mortality 5%, 23 patients), mortality during follow-up was 8.5% (36 patients), and in 11 of them the death was related to the aortic disease. Persistent endoleak was reported at imaging follow-up in 64 cases: 44 were primary (9.6%) and 21 occurred during follow-up (4.9%). Seven patients with persistent endoleak had aortic rupture during follow-up, at a variable time from 40 days to 35 months, and all subsequently died. A minor incidence of migration of the stent graft (7 cases), graft fabric alteration (2 cases), and modular disconnection (3 cases) was observed at imaging. Kaplan-Meier overall survival estimate at 1 year was 90.97%, at 3 years was 85.36%, and at 5 years was 77.49%. At the same intervals, freedom from a second procedure (either open conversion or endovascular) was 92.45%, 81.3%, and 70.0%, respectively. Endovascular treatment for thoracic aortic disease with the Talent stent graft is associated with low early

  8. Thoracic Spine Manipulation in Individuals With Subacromial Impingement Syndrome Does Not Immediately Alter Thoracic Spine Kinematics, Thoracic Excursion, or Scapular Kinematics: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Kardouni, Joseph R; Pidcoe, Peter E; Shaffer, Scott W; Finucane, Sheryl D; Cheatham, Seth A; Sousa, Catarina O; Michener, Lori A

    2015-07-01

    Randomized controlled trial. To determine if thoracic spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) alters thoracic kinematics, thoracic excursion, and scapular kinematics compared to a sham SMT in individuals with subacromial impingement syndrome, and also to compare changes in patient-reported outcomes between treatment groups. Prior studies indicate that thoracic SMT can improve pain and disability in individuals with subacromial impingment syndrome. However, the mechanisms underlying these benefits are not well understood. Participants with shoulder impingement symptoms (n = 52) were randomly assigned to receive a single session of thoracic SMT or sham SMT. Thoracic and scapular kinematics during active arm elevation and overall thoracic excursion were measured before and after the intervention. Patient-reported outcomes measured were pain (numeric pain-rating scale), function (Penn Shoulder Score), and global rating of change. Following the intervention, there were no significant differences in changes between groups for thoracic kinematics or excursion, scapular kinematics, and patient-reported outcomes (P>.05). Both groups showed an increase in scapular internal rotation during arm raising (mean, 0.9°; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.3°, 1.6°; P = .003) and lowering (0.8°; 95% CI: 0.0°, 1.5°; P = .041), as well as improved pain reported on the numeric pain-rating scale (1.2 points; 95% CI: 0.3, 1.8; P<.001) and function on the Penn Shoulder Score (9.1 points; 95% CI: 6.5, 11.7; P<.001). Thoracic spine extension and excursion did not change significantly following thoracic SMT. There were small but likely not clinically meaningful changes in scapular internal rotation in both groups. Patient-reported pain and function improved in both groups; however, there were no significant differences in the changes between the SMT and the sham SMT groups. Overall, patient-reported outcomes improved in both groups without meaningful changes to thoracic or scapular motion

  9. Managing Dissections of the Thoracic Aorta

    PubMed Central

    WONG, DANIEL R.; LEMAIRE, SCOTT A.; COSELLI, JOSEPH S.

    2010-01-01

    Thoracic aortic dissection is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality, and it requires timely and accurate diagnosis and treatment. Long-term antihypertensive therapy remains critical for the treatment of this disease. Surgical intervention, although still a formidable undertaking, has evolved to better address both acute and chronic dissection, and the results have improved. Basic and clinical research, as well as technological advances, have increased our understanding of this challenging disease state. PMID:18481490

  10. Thoracic kidney associated with congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Rattan, Kamal N; Rohilla, Seema; Narang, Rajat; Rattan, Simmi K; Maggu, Sarita; Dhaulakhandi, Dhara B

    2009-09-01

    We report three cases of ectopic thoracic (or superior ectopic) kidney; one in a neonate and two in 6-month-old children, associated with congenital diaphragmatic hernia. In all cases the diagnosis was made during surgery and confirmed by intravenous pyelography, sonography and magnetic resonance imaging in the postoperative period. Because of the rarity of this condition we report these cases together with a wide review of the published reports.

  11. Thoracic surgery in India: challenges and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    India has the dubitable honor of being ranked first in the world with regards to lung disease burden. A good proportion of this disease burden is amenable to surgical treatment. However, patients have limited access to quality thoracic surgical care due to a number of obstacles. This review article summarizes these obstacles and the implied opportunities that exist in this nascent surgical discipline in the world’s second most populous country. PMID:27651933

  12. Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm from Chronic Antiestrogen Therapy.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Rishi; Sainathan, Sandeep; Ziganshin, Bulat A; Elefteriades, John A

    2017-03-01

    Aortic aneurysms are a common but often undetected pathology prevalent in the population. They are often detected as incidental findings on imaging studies performed for unrelated pathologies. Estrogens have been shown to exert a protective influence on aortic tissue. Pharmacological agents blocking the actions of estrogens may thus be implicated in causing aortic pathologies. We present the case of an elderly woman with breast carcinoma treated for 18 years with antiestrogen therapy who subsequently developed acute thoracic aortic deterioration (enlargement and wall disruption).

  13. Transesophageal echocardiography evaluation of the thoracic aorta

    PubMed Central

    Patil, T. A.; Nierich, Arno

    2016-01-01

    Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) can be used to identify risk factors such as aortic atherosclerosis[2] before any sort of surgical manipulations involving aorta and its related structures. TEE has become an important noninvasive tool to diagnose acute thoracic aortic pathologies. TEE evaluation of endoleaks helps early detection and immediate corrective interventions. TEE is an invaluable imaging modality in the management of aortic pathology. TEE has to a large extent improved the patient outcomes. PMID:27762248

  14. Solitary fibrous tumor of the thoracic spine.

    PubMed

    Arantes, M; Honavar, M; Vaz, A R; Resende, M; Pereira, J R

    2009-12-01

    Intraspinal solitary fibrous tumors are rare: to our knowledge, the literature reports only 27 cases. We present a histologically and immunohistochemically confirmed solitary fibrous tumor involving the intradural extramedullary compartment of the thoracic spine. Microsurgical gross-total resection was achieved. A definitive role for adjuvant treatments in this type of tumor has not been established and therefore, they were not used. The patient was well, without clinical or radiological recurrence, 18 months after surgery.

  15. Clinical Guideline for Treatment of Symptomatic Thoracic Spinal Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhong-qiang; Sun, Chui-guo

    2015-08-01

    Thoracic spinal stenosis is a relatively common disorder causing paraplegia in the population of China. Until nowadays, the clinical management of thoracic spinal stenosis is still demanding and challenging with lots of questions remaining to be answered. A clinical guideline for the treatment of symptomatic thoracic spinal stenosis has been created by reaching the consensus of Chinese specialists using the best available evidence as a tool to aid practitioners involved with the care of this disease. In this guideline, many fundamental questions about thoracic spinal stenosis which were controversial have been explained clearly, including the definition of thoracic spinal stenosis, the standard procedure for diagnosing symptomatic thoracic spinal stenosis, indications for surgery, and so on. According to the consensus on the definition of thoracic spinal stenosis, the soft herniation of thoracic discs has been excluded from the pathological factors causing thoracic spinal stenosis. The procedure for diagnosing thoracic spinal stenosis has been quite mature, while the principles for selecting operative procedures remain to be improved. This guideline will be updated on a timely schedule and adhering to its recommendations should not be mandatory because it does not have the force of law. © 2015 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. Hodgkin's disease of the thoracic vertebrae.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Masashi; Takahashi, Jun; Hirabayashi, Hiroki; Kitahara, Jun; Kamijyo, Tetsuyoshi; Ebara, Sohei; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2013-08-01

    Hodgkin's disease rarely occurs in the spine, which is usually a setting for the advanced form of the disease. To describe an unusual case of isolated, primary spinal Hodgkin's disease and to draw attention to this disease as a possible diagnosis in patients with mixed inflammatory cell infiltrate lesions located in the thoracic spine. A case report of a 28-year-old woman who presented with back pain and progressive weakness in the lower extremities as a result of spinal cord compression from Hodgkin's disease of the thoracic vertebrae. We report a new case of spinal cord compression resulting from Hodgkin's disease of the thoracic vertebrae. Decompression surgery was performed in the patient, followed by antibiotic treatment. Antibiotic therapy temporarily improved inflammation and fever. However, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation showed that the inflammatory reaction in the lesion was not completely resolved. The disease progressed and later investigations revealed Hodgkin's disease, which improved with a course of chemotherapy and radiation. Hodgkin's disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of spinal neoplastic lesions with clinical features similar to spondylitis. Because MRI evaluation showed that the vertebral disc was maintained in this case, the presence of a tumor rather than inflammation should have been suspected. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [Thoracic sympathectomy in primary hyperhidrosis: patient satisfaction].

    PubMed

    Galbis-Caravajal, José Marcelo; Sales-Badía, J Gabriel; Cuenca-Torres, María; Miquel-Miquel, Javier; Esturi-Navarro, Rafael; Ortega-Monzó, Carmen

    2006-05-01

    To evaluate satisfaction among patients who underwent thoracic sympathectomy for primary hyperhidrosis and the possible complications after a minimum of 14 months after surgery. We performed a retrospective study in 108 patients who underwent thoracic sympathectomy and who responded to all the questions asked in a telephone interview. The sample was composed of 21 men and 87 women, with a mean age of 29.73 years. In all patients, surgery was performed with general anesthesia in a single intervention. Special emphasis was placed on the degree of satisfaction (whether patients would recommend this type of surgery) and the possible negative effects or complications experienced by patients or attributed by them to the procedure. Patients were contacted a minimum of 14 months after the intervention. The most frequent complication was compensatory sweating (81.5%). Pain at the site of trocar insertion was reported by 6.5%. There were few immediate and long-term complications. The degree of satisfaction reached 90.7%. Video-assisted thoracic sympathectomy is safe and effective. Despite compensatory sweating, overall satisfaction was very high. However, satisfaction gradually decreased in the months after the intervention. Patients with hyperhidrosis with significant or principal axillary involvement could benefit from botulinic toxin administration as the first-line therapy.

  18. [Endovascular treatment of descending thoracic aorta aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Mertens, Renato; Valdés, Francisco; Krämer, Albrecht; Mariné, Leopoldo; Irarrázaval, Manuel; Morán, Sergio; Zalaquet, Ricardo; Schwartz, Eitan; Vergara, Jeannette; Valdebenito, Magaly

    2003-06-01

    The natural history of aneurysms ends in rupture and death. In 1990 the first endovascular exclusion of an aneurysm, using an endoluminal graft implanted through the femoral arteries was performed. More recently, the same procedure has been used for aneurysms of the thoracic aorta. To report our experience with endovascular treatment of thoracic aorta aneurysms. Analysis of 14 patients (nine male), aged 30 to 79 years, treated between May 2001 and August 2002. The mean diameter of the aneurysms was 6.9 cm. The etiology was atherosclerotic in nine patients. The Excluder device (Gore) was preferentially used. There was no operative mortality or paraplegia. One patient had a transient leg monoparesis that reverted completely. No patient had type I endoleaks. Two patients had type II endoleaks on discharge, that sealed spontaneously. In a follow up, ranging from 2 to 17 months, one patient died of a bronchopneumonia and no aneurysm rupture has been detected. The short term results of endoluminal treatment of thoracic aorta aneurysms are excellent. This treatment is less invasive and has less complications than conventional surgery.

  19. The European general thoracic surgery database project.

    PubMed

    Falcoz, Pierre Emmanuel; Brunelli, Alessandro

    2014-05-01

    The European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) Database is a free registry created by ESTS in 2001. The current online version was launched in 2007. It runs currently on a Dendrite platform with extensive data security and frequent backups. The main features are a specialty-specific, procedure-specific, prospectively maintained, periodically audited and web-based electronic database, designed for quality control and performance monitoring, which allows for the collection of all general thoracic procedures. Data collection is the "backbone" of the ESTS database. It includes many risk factors, processes of care and outcomes, which are specially designed for quality control and performance audit. The user can download and export their own data and use them for internal analyses and quality control audits. The ESTS database represents the gold standard of clinical data collection for European General Thoracic Surgery. Over the past years, the ESTS database has achieved many accomplishments. In particular, the database hit two major milestones: it now includes more than 235 participating centers and 70,000 surgical procedures. The ESTS database is a snapshot of surgical practice that aims at improving patient care. In other words, data capture should become integral to routine patient care, with the final objective of improving quality of care within Europe.

  20. [Videothoracospy in thoracic trauma and penetrating injuries].

    PubMed

    Lang-Lazdunski, L; Chapuis, O; Pons, F; Jancovici, R

    2003-03-01

    Videothoracoscopy represents a valid and useful approach in some patients with blunt chest trauma or penetrating thoracic injury. This technique has been validated for the treatment of clotted hemothorax or posttraumatic empyema, traumatic chylothorax, traumatic pneumothorax, in patients with hemodynamic stability. Moreover, it is probably the most reliable technique for the diagnosis of diaphragmatic injury. It is also useful for the extraction of intrathoracic projectiles and foreign bodies. This technique might be useful in hemodynamically stable patients with continued bleeding or for the exploration of patients with penetrating injury in the cardiac area, although straightforward data are lacking to confirm those indications. Thoracotomy or median sternotomy remain indicated in patients with hemodynamic instability or those that cannot tolerate lateral decubitus position or one-lung ventilation. Performing video-surgery in the trauma setting require expertise in both video-assisted thoracic surgery and chest trauma management. The contra-indications to videothoracoscopy and indications for converting the procedure to an open thoracotomy should be perfectly known by surgeons performing video-assisted thoracic surgery in the trauma setting. Conversion to thoracotomy or median sternotomy should be performed without delay whenever needed to avoid blood loss and achieve an adequate procedure.

  1. Applications of Neutron Radiography for the Nuclear Power Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craft, Aaron E.; Barton, John P.

    The World Conference on Neutron Radiography (WCNR) and International Topical Meeting on Neutron Radiography (ITMNR) series have been running over 35 years. The most recent event, ITMNR-8, focused on industrial applications and was the first time this series was hosted in China. In China, more than twenty new nuclear power plants are under construction and plans have been announced to increase the nuclear capacity by a factor of three within fifteen years. There are additional prospects in many other nations. Neutron tests were vital during previous developments of materials and components for nuclear power applications, as reported in the WCNR and ITMNR conference series. For example a majority of the 140 papers in the Proceedings of the First WCNR are for the benefit of the nuclear power industry. Many of those techniques are being utilized and advanced to the present time. Neutron radiography of irradiated nuclear fuel provides more comprehensive information about the internal condition of irradiated nuclear fuel than any other non-destructive technique to date. Applications include examination of nuclear waste, nuclear fuels, cladding, control elements, and other critical components. In this paper, applications of neutron radiography techniques developed and applied internationally for the nuclear power industry since the earliest years are reviewed, and the question is asked whether neutron test techniques, in general, can be of value in development of the present and future generations of nuclear power plants world-wide.

  2. Neutron radiography determination of water diffusivity in fired clay brick.

    PubMed

    El Abd, A; Czachor, A; Milczarek, J

    2009-04-01

    The real time neutron and gamma radiography station at Maria reactor, Institute of Atomic Energy, Swierk, Poland, was used to investigate the isothermal water absorption into fired clay brick samples. The investigated brick is different from the bricks reported in El Abd and Milczarek [2004. Neutron radiology study of water absorption in porous building materials: anomalous diffusing analysis. J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 37, 2305-2313] in density and chemical composition. Neutron radiography images were acquired regularly as the absorption time elapses. The water content, theta, along the flow direction, x, namely the water profiles theta(x,t) and the water front position as a function of the absorption time, t, were extracted from neutron radiography images. The results were discussed in terms of the macroscopic theory of water infiltration in unsaturated porous media. It was shown that the water front position followed the square root t-scaling (x(m)=phi(m) square root t) and the profiles (theta-phi) converged to a universal one master curve. The water diffusivity was analytically determined from the experimental results. It has the so-called hypo-diffusive character, namely its gradient with respect to the water content is positive. Neutron radiography is a powerful method to distinguish among the unsaturated flow in different porous construction materials.

  3. Heavy-ion radiography and heavy-ion computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I.; Holley, W.R.; McFarland, E.W.; Tobias, C.a.

    1982-02-01

    Heavy-ion projection and CT radiography is being developed into a safe, low-dose, noninvasive radiological procedure that can quantitate and image small density differences in human tissues. The applications to heavy-ion mammography and heavy-ion CT imaging of the brain in clinical patients suggest their potential value in cancer diagnosis.

  4. Radiography Capabilities for Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes

    SciTech Connect

    Walstrom, Peter Lowell; Garnett, Robert William; Chapman, Catherine A. B; Salazar, Harry Richard; Otoole, Joseph Alfred; Barber, Ronald L.; Gomez, Tony Simon

    2015-04-28

    The Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes (MaRIE) experimental facility will be used to discover and design the advanced materials needed to meet 21st century national security and energy security challenges. This new facility will provide the new tools scientists need to develop next-generation materials that will perform predictably and on-demand for currently unattainable lifetimes in extreme environments. The MaRIE facility is based on upgrades to the existing LANSCE 800-MeV proton linac and a new 12-GeV electron linac and associated X-ray FEL to provide simultaneous multiple probe beams, and new experimental areas. In addition to the high-energy photon probe beam, both electron and proton radiography capabilities will be available at the MaRIE facility. Recently, detailed radiography system studies have been performed to develop conceptual layouts of high-magnification electron and proton radiography systems that can meet the experimental requirements for the expected first experiments to be performed at the facility. A description of the radiography systems, their performance requirements, and a proposed facility layout are presented.

  5. The value of preplacement screening radiography of the low back.

    PubMed

    Gibson, E S

    1988-01-01

    Because there has not been a randomized controlled trial on the validity of preplacement screening radiography of the low back, the author assesses this procedure indirectly by reviewing empirical evidence concerning its usefulness in industrial settings and by evaluating it against the basic requirements of a successful screening test.

  6. Common positioning errors in panoramic radiography: A review

    PubMed Central

    Rondon, Rafael Henrique Nunes; Pereira, Yamba Carla Lara

    2014-01-01

    Professionals performing radiographic examinations are responsible for maintaining optimal image quality for accurate diagnoses. These professionals must competently execute techniques such as film manipulation and processing to minimize patient exposure to radiation. Improper performance by the professional and/or patient may result in a radiographic image of unsatisfactory quality that can also lead to a misdiagnosis and the development of an inadequate treatment plan. Currently, the most commonly performed extraoral examination is panoramic radiography. The invention of panoramic radiography has resulted in improvements in image quality with decreased exposure to radiation and at a low cost. However, this technique requires careful, accurate positioning of the patient's teeth and surrounding maxillofacial bone structure within the focal trough. Therefore, we reviewed the literature for the most common types of positioning errors in panoramic radiography to suggest the correct techniques. We would also discuss how to determine if the most common positioning errors occurred in panoramic radiography, such as in the positioning of the patient's head, tongue, chin, or body. PMID:24701452

  7. Beam Physics in X-Ray Radiography Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y J; Caporaso, G J; Chambers, F W; Falabella, S; Goldin, F J; Guethlein, G; Lauer, E L; McCarrick, J F; Neurath, R; Richardson, R A; Sampayan, S; Weir, J T

    2002-12-02

    Performance of x-ray radiography facilities requires focusing the electron beams to sub-millimeter spots on the x-ray converters. Ions extracted from a converter by impact of a high intensity beam can partially neutralize the beam space charge and change the final focusing system. We will discuss these ion effects and mitigation.

  8. Point Scattered Function (PScF) for fast neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Mohamed H.

    2009-08-01

    Fast neutron radiography opened up a new range of possibilities to image extremely dense objects. The removal of the scattering effect is one of the most challenging problems in neutron imaging. Neutron scattering in fast neutron radiography did not receive much attention compared with X-ray and thermal neutron radiography. The purpose of this work is to investigate the behavior of the Point Scattered Function (PScF) as applied in fast neutron radiography. The PScF was calculated using MCNP as a spatial distribution of scattered neutrons over the detector surface for one emitting source element. Armament and explosives materials, namely, Rifle steel, brass, aluminum and trinitrotoluene (TNT) were simulated. Effect of various sample thickness and sample-to-detector distance were considered. Simulated sample geometries included a slab with varying thickness, a sphere with varying radii, and a cylinder with varying base radii. Different neutron sources, namely, Cf-252, DT as well as DD neutron sources were considered. Neutron beams with zero degree divergence angle; and beams with varying angles related to the normal to the source plane were simulated. Curve fitting of the obtained PScF, in the form of Gaussian function, were given to be used in future work using image restoration codes. Analytical representation of the height as well as the Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) of the obtained Gaussian functions eliminates the need to calculate the PScF for sample parameters that were not investigated in this study.

  9. A technique for pelvic radiography in the standing horse.

    PubMed

    Barrett, E L; Talbot, A M; Driver, A J; Barr, F J; Barr, A R S

    2006-05-01

    An alternative technique of radiographing the pelvis in the standing horse is required, to avoid the risks associated with general anaesthesia. That lateral oblique radiography in the standing horse would be a useful technique in the investigation of pelvic injury. To describe the technique of lateral oblique pelvic radiography in the standing horse and demonstrate the feasibility and usefulness of this technique. A technique for lateral oblique radiography in the standing horse was devised and retrospective review made of radiographic findings in 18 clinical cases. The caudal iliac shaft, greater trochanter of the femur, femoral head, acetabulum and coxofemoral articulation on the side under investigation were visualised consistently using this technique. Of the 18 cases, 3 iliac shaft fractures, 1 acetabular fracture, 2 coxofemoral luxations and 4 horses with new bone formation around the coxofemoral joint and/or proximal femur were identified. Lateral oblique radiography in the standing, conscious horse can be used to investigate conditions affecting the caudal iliac shaft, coxofemoral articulation and proximal femur in the horse. The technique is straightforward, noninvasive and useful in the investigation of horses with suspected pelvic injury. However, not all pelvic injuries would be identified, and normal radiographic findings do not rule out injury or fractures elsewhere in the pelvis.

  10. Method and Apparatus for Computed Imaging Backscatter Radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shedlock, Daniel (Inventor); Meng, Christopher (Inventor); Sabri, Nissia (Inventor); Dugan, Edward T. (Inventor); Jacobs, Alan M. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Systems and methods of x-ray backscatter radiography are provided. A single-sided, non-destructive imaging technique utilizing x-ray radiation to image subsurface features is disclosed, capable of scanning a region using a fan beam aperture and gathering data using rotational motion.

  11. Organ dose variability and trends in tomosynthesis and radiography.

    PubMed

    Hoye, Jocelyn; Zhang, Yakun; Agasthya, Greeshma; Sturgeon, Greg; Kapadia, Anuj; Segars, W Paul; Samei, Ehsan

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate relationships between patient attributes and organ dose for a population of computational phantoms for 20 tomosynthesis and radiography protocols. Organ dose was estimated from 54 adult computational phantoms (age: 18 to 78 years, weight 52 to 117 kg) using a validated Monte-Carlo simulation (PENELOPE) of a system capable of performing tomosynthesis and radiography. The geometry and field of view for each exam were modeled to match clinical protocols. For each protocol, the energy deposited in each organ was estimated by the simulations, converted to dose units, and then normalized by exposure in air. Dose to radiosensitive organs was studied as a function of average patient thickness in the region of interest and as a function of body mass index. For tomosynthesis, organ doses were also studied as a function of x-ray tube position. This work developed comprehensive information for organ dose dependencies across a range of tomosynthesis and radiography protocols. The results showed a protocol-dependent exponential decrease with an increasing patient size. There was a variability in organ dose across the patient population, which should be incorporated in the metrology of organ dose. The results can be used to prospectively and retrospectively estimate organ dose for tomosynthesis and radiography.

  12. Trichobezoars Detected and Treated Based on Plain Radiography.

    PubMed

    Barrows, Amy; Vachon, Tyler; Campin, Richard C; Ignacio, Romeo C

    2015-10-01

    Bezoars are conglomerations of indigestible material that become trapped in the gastrointestinal tract. We present a case of an 8-year-old female child diagnosed with a gastric bezoar solely on plain radiography and treated with abdominal surgical exploration and removal. In addition, traditional characteristic radiographic findings and treatment options for bezoars found in the current literature are reviewed.

  13. 10 CFR 34.13 - Specific license for industrial radiography.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 34.13 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY AND RADIATION SAFETY... may affirm that all individuals acting as industrial radiographers will be certified in radiation... submits a description of the applicant's overall organizational structure as it applies to the...

  14. 10 CFR 34.13 - Specific license for industrial radiography.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 34.13 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY AND RADIATION SAFETY... may affirm that all individuals acting as industrial radiographers will be certified in radiation... submits a description of the applicant's overall organizational structure as it applies to the...

  15. Quality aspects of digital radiography in general dental practice.

    PubMed

    Hellén-Halme, Kristina

    2007-01-01

    The number of dentists who have converted from conventional film radiography to digital radiography continues to grow. A digital system has numerous advantages, but there are also many new aspects to consider. The overall aim of this thesis was to study how digital radiography was used in general dental practices. The specific aims were to study how different factors affected image quality. To determine whether there were any differences in image quality between conventional film radiographs and digital radiographs, 4863 images (540 cases) were evaluated. The cases had been sent to the Swedish Dental Insurance Office for prior treatment approval. The image quality of digital radiographs was found to be significantly lower than that of film radiographs. This result led to a questionnaire study of dentists experienced in digital radiography. In 2003, a questionnaire was sent to the 139 general practice dentists who worked with digital radiography in Skine, Sweden; the response rate was 94%. Many general practice dentists had experienced several problems (65%), and less than half of the digital systems (40%) underwent some kind of quality control. One of the weaker links in the technical chain of digital radiography appeared to be the monitor. A field study to 19 dentists at their clinics found that the brightness and contrast settings of the monitors had to be adjusted to obtain the subjectively best image quality. The ambient light in the evaluation room was also found to affect the diagnostic outcome of low-contrast patterns in radiographs. To evaluate the effects of ambient light and technical adjustments of the monitor, a study using standardised set-ups was designed. Seven observers evaluated radiographs of 100 extracted human teeth for approximal caries under five different combinations of brightness and contrast settings on two different occasions with high and low ambient light levels in the evaluation room. The ability to diagnose carious lesions was found

  16. [Development of treatment of severe thoracic injuries].

    PubMed

    Le Brigand, H

    1975-11-01

    About 25 p. 100 of cases of closed trauma of the thorax may be classified as severe, for they rapidly endanger life. Their treatment has made considerable progress since the report of J. Dor and H. Le Brigand in 1960. However, when severe trauma is treated, the mortality has remained unchanged over the last ten years. The treatment of fractures of the sternum includes respiratory assistance and internal fixation of the fractured bones, these two methods together, when correctly applied, give good results. Endothoracic lesions are now better recognised. Hemothorax and pneumothorax are now treated by a well recognised method. Visceral lesions, such as bronchial rupture, or major vascular ruptures, e.g. aorta, and heart lesions may be diagnosed at an early stage and be operated on more often. On the other hand, it is now better recognised that diffuse pulmonary lesions, e.g. pulmonary contusions or "shock lung", which is usually treated by artificial respiration alone, still may have a poor prognosis in some cases. From this it results that many surgical teams have enlarged the indications for early thoracotomy in the same way as laparotomy is more often carried out in abdominal trauma. In fact, these indications require circumspection and thoracotomy should only be carried out in specialised thoracic surgery units. If this is not available, aspiration, drainage, tracheotomy, continuous extension, are still applicable, but it is also necessary for them to be carried out correctly; if not, failures and complications of these minor measures are frequent. The use of these methods has shown the existence of therapeutic failures, including major bilateral bony lesions, diffuse severe lung injuries with resistant anoxia, complex multiple injuries with thoracic involvement and, finally, combined thoracic and cranial lesions, the mortality of which is about 50 p. 100. These facts explain why treatment of severe thoracic trauma gives variable results. The mortality varies from

  17. [The internal thoracic blood vessels (internal thoracic arteries and veins) and their practical significance].

    PubMed

    Jelicić, N; Djordjević, Lj; Stosić, T

    1996-01-01

    Internal thoracic blood vessels (A. et Vv. thoracicae internae) are parietal vessels of the thoracic anterior wall. Because of their position, they are often exposed to injuries during the fracture of the ribs and the sternal bone. These facts require a general knowledge about the anatomical variations of these vessels, specifically the knowledge concerning their mutual relationship, their anastomoses and their distance from the lateral margins of the sternal bone. Due to the poor and different data in the available literature, we directed our investigations towards the study and confirmation of the described anatomical variations of the internal thoracic blood vessels. In this study we investigated the distance between the internal thoracic artery and the lateral margins of the sternal bone, the level of its bifurcation, the number of the internal thoracic veins and anastomoses between them. The investigation was carried out on 300 formalin specimens consisting of the anterior wall of the thorax (persons of different ages and sexes) by using the method of dissection and the method of contrast injection. In adults (200 specimens), the distance between the arterial trunk and the lateral margin of the sternal bone was not equal in the first fifth or sixth intercostal spaces, but in children up to five years of age (100 specimens), the distance was almost the same. In adults, the internal thoracic artery was nearest to the sternal bone in the first intercostal space, but going downward the artery was gradually more and more distant from the sternum and in the sixth intercostal space the distance measured approximately from 11 mm to 13 mm. In children, the distance of the artery from the lateral margin of the sternal bone, just in the above mentioned intercostal spaces, was from 5 mm to 10 mm. There was no difference according to sex in any of the two groups. Most frequently, the internal thoracic artery gave off its terminal branches at the level of the sixth costal

  18. Diagnostic reference levels in intraoral dental radiography in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Kyung; Han, Won-Jeong; Choi, Jin-Woo; Jung, Yun-Hoa; Yoon, Suk-Ja; Lee, Jae-Seo

    2012-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to survey the radiographic exposure parameters, to measure the patient doses for intraoral dental radiography nationwide, and thus to establish the diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) in intraoral dental X-ray examination in Korea. One hundred two intraoral dental radiographic machines from all regions of South Korea were selected for this study. Radiographic exposure parameters, size of hospital, type of image receptor system, installation duration of machine, and type of dental X-ray machine were documented. Patient entrance doses (PED) and dose-area products (DAP) were measured three times at the end of the exit cone of the X-ray unit with a DAP meter (DIAMENTOR M4-KDK, PTW, Freiburg, Germany) for adult mandibular molar intraoral dental radiography, and corrections were made for room temperature and pressure. Measured PED and DAP were averaged and compared according to the size of hospital, type of image receptor system, installation duration, and type of dental X-ray machine. The mean exposure parameters were 62.6 kVp, 7.9 mA, and 0.5 second for adult mandibular molar intraoral dental radiography. The mean patient dose was 2.11 mGy (PED) and 59.4 mGycm(2) (DAP) and the third quartile one 3.07 mGy (PED) and 87.4 mGycm(2) (DAP). Doses at university dental hospitals were lower than those at dental clinics (p<0.05). Doses of digital radiography (DR) type were lower than those of film-based type (p<0.05). We recommend 3.1 mGy (PED), 87.4 mGycm(2) (DAP) as the DRLs in adult mandibular molar intraoral dental radiography in Korea.

  19. Digital radiography: a survey of dentists in Hawai'i.

    PubMed

    Brady, Daniel T

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of digital radiography among dentists in Hawai'i and report their experiences using it. A 20-question survey was developed and used to interview dentists in Hawai'i. Approximately 500 dentists were contacted. The survey asked whether or not the dentist uses digital radiography. For those not using digital equipment, reasons were given as well as proposed future use. For users of digital equipment, further information was requested: group or solo practice, length of time with digital equipment, length of time to decide, brand of dental software, brand and type of digital equipment, how many different systems, satisfaction, would they do it again, financially worth it, advantages, disadvantages, diagnostic or not, use of special features, sensor replacement and maintenance costs, and any other comments about digital radiography. 102 dentists responded to the survey. 36 percent utilize digital radiography. Only 40 percent of nonusers have any inclination of converting to digital, cost being the most common reason not to convert. Average length of time with digital was 3.4 years and about 2 years to make the decision. Dentrix was the most popular software and Dexis the most popular equipment. The overwhelming majority are satisfied with systems, feel they are financially worth it, feel it is diagnostic, and would purchase them again. Advantages included things such as speed, no use of chemicals, and lower radiation. Disadvantages included cost, sensor-related issues, and computer issues. Digital users find special features helpful and utilize them regularly. Maintenance costs include annual software upgrades, sensor replacement, and barriers and bitetabs. Digital radiography is becoming more prevalent in Hawai'i. The big obstacle seems to be cost for most dentists, although users believe it is a good financial investment.

  20. A clinical tool to determine the necessity of spine radiography in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis presenting with back pain

    PubMed Central

    Roux, C; Priol, G; Fechtenbaum, J; Cortet, B; Liu‐Léage, S; Audran, M

    2007-01-01

    Background Vertebral fractures are underdiagnosed, although the resulting mortality and morbidity in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis is now recognised. In a population of postmenopausal women with osteoporosis and back pain, symptoms may be related to vertebral fractures or degenerative changes of the spine. Aim To evaluate a population of postmenopausal women presenting with back pain and factors associated with vertebral fractures which were assessable in a clinical setting in order to determine the necessity for spine radiography. Methods Patient questioning and physical examination were carried out and spinal radiographic data collected from 410 postmenopausal women with osteoporosis, with an average age of 74 years, who consulted a rheumatologist for back pain. Of these, 215 (52.4%) patients were diagnosed with at least one vertebral fracture. Logistic regression was used to identify the most relevant clinical features associated with existing vertebral fractures, and to derive a quantitative index of risk. Results The model included six parameters: age, back pain intensity, height loss, history of low trauma non‐vertebral fractures, thoracic localisation of back pain and sudden occurrence of back pain. The scoring system, or the quantitative index, had a maximal score of 16. For a score ⩾7, the probability of existing vertebral fracture was ⩾43%. The correlation between this quantitative index and the logistic model probability was 0.98, suggesting an excellent and highly significant approximation of the original prediction equation. Conclusions : From six clinical items, an index was built to identify women with osteoporosis and back pain who should have spine radiography. This simple tool may help clinicians to optimise vertebral fracture diagnosis and to make a proper therapeutic decision. PMID:16793842

  1. A clinical tool to determine the necessity of spine radiography in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis presenting with back pain.

    PubMed

    Roux, C; Priol, G; Fechtenbaum, J; Cortet, B; Liu-Léage, S; Audran, M

    2007-01-01

    Vertebral fractures are underdiagnosed, although the resulting mortality and morbidity in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis is now recognised. In a population of postmenopausal women with osteoporosis and back pain, symptoms may be related to vertebral fractures or degenerative changes of the spine. To evaluate a population of postmenopausal women presenting with back pain and factors associated with vertebral fractures which were assessable in a clinical setting in order to determine the necessity for spine radiography. Patient questioning and physical examination were carried out and spinal radiographic data collected from 410 postmenopausal women with osteoporosis, with an average age of 74 years, who consulted a rheumatologist for back pain. Of these, 215 (52.4%) patients were diagnosed with at least one vertebral fracture. Logistic regression was used to identify the most relevant clinical features associated with existing vertebral fractures, and to derive a quantitative index of risk. The model included six parameters: age, back pain intensity, height loss, history of low trauma non-vertebral fractures, thoracic localisation of back pain and sudden occurrence of back pain. The scoring system, or the quantitative index, had a maximal score of 16. For a score >or=7, the probability of existing vertebral fracture was >or=43%. The correlation between this quantitative index and the logistic model probability was 0.98, suggesting an excellent and highly significant approximation of the original prediction equation. From six clinical items, an index was built to identify women with osteoporosis and back pain who should have spine radiography. This simple tool may help clinicians to optimise vertebral fracture diagnosis and to make a proper therapeutic decision.

  2. Thoracic surgery associations, societies, and clubs: which organizations are right for you?

    PubMed

    Schieman, Colin; Grondin, Sean C; Gelfand, Gary A J

    2011-08-01

    Determining which organizations to join can be challenging given the wide selection of associations, societies, and clubs available to practicing thoracic surgeons. This article briefly reviews 7 important North American thoracic surgery organizations (the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, the Canadian Association of Thoracic Surgeons, the General Thoracic Surgical Club, the Society of Thoracic Surgeons, the Southern Thoracic Surgical Association, the Western Thoracic Surgical Association, and Women in Thoracic Surgery). The authors also review the criteria that may assist in deciding which organizations best meet a surgeon's career goals and personal expectations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Functional MRI of the thoracic spinal cord during vibration sensation.

    PubMed

    Kornelsen, Jennifer; Smith, Stephen D; McIver, Theresa A; Sboto-Frankenstein, Uta; Latta, Peter; Tomanek, Boguslaw

    2013-04-01

    To demonstrate that it is possible to acquire accurate functional magnetic resonance images from thoracic spinal cord neurons. The lower thoracic spinal dermatomes (T7-T11) on the right side of the body were mechanically stimulated by vibration for 15 participants. Neuronal responses to vibration sensation were measured in the thoracic spinal cord using a HASTE sequence on a 3 Tesla MRI system. Signal increases were observed in the corresponding lower thoracic spinal cord segments ipsilateral to the side of stimulation in the dorsal aspect of the spinal cord. This is the first study to provide proof of principle that functional imaging of the entire thoracic spinal cord is possible, by detecting neuronal activity in the thoracic spinal cord during sensory stimulation using spinal fMRI. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Preliminary study of visualizing membrane structures of spiculated pulmonary nodules in three-dimensional thoracic CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, Y.; Niki, N.; Ohmatsu, H.; Aokage, K.; Kusumoto, M.; Tsuchida, T.; Eguchi, K.; Kaneko, M.

    2016-03-01

    Research results from the National Lung Screening Trial revealed that screening for lung cancer with low-dose CT (LDCT) reduces lung cancer mortality in heavy smokers by 20% compared to radiography. While this study does show the efficacy of CT-based screening, radiologists often face the problem of estimating the malignant likelihoods of pulmonary nodules detected on LDCT screening for maximizing patient survival and for preserving lung function. Spiculation is considered as one of the indicators of nodule malignancy and an important feature to assess requirements on a patient-tailored follow-up procedure. However, the spiculation is also observed in some benign nodules, particularly in tuberculoma. The elucidation of the spliculation morphology in 3D thoracic CT images is an important preliminary step towards developing the malignant discrimination strategies from benign nodules. In this study, we present a visualization method to reveal a spatial configuration of spiculation of pulmonary nodules in three-dimensional thoracic CT images. Applying the method to an example of malignant nodule with the spiculated margins, the visualizing preliminary result of the spatial configuration reveals the presence of membrane structures of spiculation.

  5. THORACIC REGION SELF-MOBILIZATION: A CLINICAL SUGGESTION

    PubMed Central

    Grindstaff, Terry L.

    2012-01-01

    Limitations in thoracic spine motion may be due to restrictions in contractile or non-contractile tissues. Joint mobilizations are indicated when hypomobility of a joint (non-contractile tissue) is identified. The ability for a patient to perform self-mobilizations of the thoracic spine and ribs may help maximize intervention outcomes. The purpose of this article is to describe a low cost, portable device which can be used for thoracic spine self-mobilization techniques. PMID:22530198

  6. Chronic contained rupture of aortic aneurysm with thoracic vertebral erosion.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Iwao; Nogami, Eijiro; Higuchi, Shinya; Okazaki, Yukio; Itou, Tsuyoshi

    2015-06-01

    A 66-year-old man was transferred to our hospital with the diagnosis of a large thoracoabdominal aneurysm. Computed tomography showed thoracic vertebral erosion, suggesting a chronic contained rupture. He was hemodynamically stable with no neurological complication preoperatively. He underwent successful surgical replacement of the descending aorta. During surgery, the 6th and 7th thoracic vertebral bones adjacent to the thoracic aneurysm were found to be eroded. The postoperative course was uneventful.

  7. CT and MRI in the Evaluation of Thoracic Aortic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the most commonly used imaging examinations to evaluate thoracic aortic diseases because of their high spatial and temporal resolutions, large fields of view, and multiplanar imaging reconstruction capabilities. CT and MRI play an important role not only in the diagnosis of thoracic aortic disease but also in the preoperative assessment and followup after treatment. In this review, the CT and MRI appearances of various acquired thoracic aortic conditions are described and illustrated. PMID:24396601

  8. [Thoracic involvement in Behçet's vasculitis].

    PubMed

    Zidi, A; Ben Miled Mrad, K; Hantous, S; Nouira, K; Mestiri, I; Mrad, S

    2006-03-01

    Thoracic involvement of Behcet's disease is unusual but serious. It is related to the well known vascular tropism of the disease. It may involve the superior vena cava, pulmonary arteries, aorta and subclavian vessels. Imaging is useful for diagnosis and assess the degree of thoracic involvement. CT scan and MRI are obviously more accurate than angiography. The spectrum of thoracic manifestations of the disease is presented based on a review of 22 cases.

  9. Surface anatomy and surface landmarks for thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Sayeed, Rana A; Darling, Gail E

    2007-11-01

    A thorough knowledge of thoracic anatomy is of fundamental importance to the thoracic surgeon. Surface anatomy is an often-neglected component of traditional topographic anatomic teaching, but a proper understanding of the relationship of surface features to deeper structures is invaluable in the clinical assessment of a patient and in the interpretation of radiologic imaging. Familiarity with thoracic surgical landmarks is a prerequisite for the successful placing of a thoracic incision. Knowledge of the intrathoracic anatomy and level of the diaphragm based on surface landmarks is useful for interventional procedures, such as tube thoracostomy. Knowledge of the chest wall musculature is essential in the use of muscle flaps for reconstruction.

  10. Thoracic duct cyst of posterior mediastinum: a "challenging" differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Electra, Michalopoulou-Manoloutsiou; Evangelia, Athanasiou; Mattheos, Bobos; Dimitris, Hatzibougias I; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Tsavlis, Drosos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Charalampidis, Chralampos; Fassiadis, Nikolaos; Mparmpetakis, Nikolaos; Pavlidis, Pavlos; Andreas, Mpakas; Stamatis, Arikas; Alexandros, Kolettas; Kosmas, Tsakiridis

    2016-05-01

    Thoracic duct cysts of the mediastinum are extremely rare entities and their pathogenesis still remains unknown. Imaging methods are not specific and show a cystic mass, however the real nature of the lesion is confirmed only with the help of histopathological examination after surgical excision. Here, we present a case of thoracic cyst in a 28-year-old female, lining in posterior lower mediastinum. The cyst was removed by video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) and the histopathological findings were that of thoracic duct cyst. Through this case, we propose an ideal surgical approach and diagnostic procedure.

  11. Chiropractic Management of a Patient With Thoracic Pain and a Stable Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Neff, Shawn M; Okamoto, Casey S

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this case report was to describe chiropractic management of thoracic pain in a patient with a stable thoracic aortic aneurysm. An 89-year-old man presented with axial mid- and upper back pain localized predominantly at the T8 and T1 spinal segmental levels. A review of available imaging revealed a stable aneurysmal dilatation of the ascending aorta, which measured 4.3 cm. Because the thoracic pain was musculoskeletal in nature and the thoracic aortic aneurysm was stable, mechanical manipulation was provided using the Impulse adjusting instrument. The patient's pain was measured utilizing a numeric rating scale. The patient's thoracic pain improved over the course of treatment. This patient was successfully treated for thoracic spine pain with a course of chiropractic care using a mechanical adjusting instrument.

  12. Changes of upper thoracic curve and shoulder balance in thoracic adolescent idiopathic scoliosis treated by anterior selective thoracic fusion using VATS.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chong-Suh; Chung, Sung-Soo; Shin, Seong-Kee; Park, Yong-Serk; Park, Sung-Jun; Kang, Kyung-Chung

    2011-10-01

    A retrospective radiographic analysis. To evaluate changes of upper thoracic curve and shoulder balance in thoracic adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients treated by anterior selective thoracic fusion using video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery and to identify adequacy of earlier criteria of double thoracic (DT) curve for anterior correction. Although anterior and posterior scoliosis correction show many differences in correction mechanisms, fusion levels, loss of correction etc., the criteria of DT curve was applied without differences. There are no reports about these differences. Forty patients were followed for a minimum of 3 years (range, 3-8 y). The magnitude and flexibility of upper thoracic, lower thoracic, and the superior portion of the lower thoracic curve were measured using full length standing and side-bending radiographs before surgery, at 1 week postoperatively, and at last follow-up. The correction rate and loss of correction of these curves were calculated and preoperative and postoperative radiographic shoulder heights (RSHs) were measured. RSH was defined as balanced (shoulder height difference <10 mm), mildly imbalanced (10-20 mm), or moderately imbalanced (>20 mm). T1 tilt and coronal balance were also evaluated. Patients were divided into groups based on these factors and postoperative RSH was compared. Flexibility of the upper thoracic curve was 46% and magnitude of the upper thoracic curve was corrected spontaneously from 28.6±7.8 degrees to 17.9±7.0 degrees with a 37.4% correction rate that did not change during follow-up. On average, preoperative left shoulder was 6.3±10.5 mm lower than right shoulder and this changed to 10.4±11.8 mm and 6.0±8.2 mm higher than right shoulder at 1 week postoperatively and at last follow-up, respectively. The group with an upper thoracic curve of ≥30 degrees or a superior portion of the lower thoracic curve of ≥30 degrees preoperatively had a higher left shoulder postoperatively (P=0.016, 0

  13. Proton Radiography: Cross Section Measurements and Detector Development

    SciTech Connect

    Michael J. Longo; H. R. Gustafson: Durga Rajaram; Turgun Nigmanov

    2010-04-16

    Proton radiography has become an important tool for predicting the performance of stockpiled nuclear weapons. Current proton radiography experiments at LANSCE are confined to relatively small targets on the order of centimeters in size because of the low beam energy. LANL scientists have made radiographs with 12 and 24 GeV protons produced by the accelerator at Brookhaven National Laboratory. These energies are in the range required for hydrotest radiography. The design of a facility for hydrotest radiography requires knowledge of the cross sections for producing high-energy particles in the forward direction, which are incorporated into the Monte Carlo simulation used in designing the beam and detectors. There are few existing measurements of neutron production cross sections for proton-nuclei interactions in the 50 GeV range, and almost no data exist for forward neutron production, especially for heavy target nuclei. Thus the data from the MIPP EMCAL and HCAL, for which our group was responsible, are critical to proton radiography. Since neutrons and photons cannot be focused by magnets, they cause a background “fog” on the images. This problem can be minimized by careful design of the focusing system and detectors. The purpose of our research was to measure forward production of neutrons produced by high-energy proton beams striking a variety of targets. The forward-going particles carry most of the energy from a high-energy proton interaction, so these are the most important to proton radiography. This work was carried out in conjunction with the Fermilab E-907 (MIPP) collaboration. Our group was responsible for designing and building the E907 forward neutron and photon calorimeters. With the support of our Stewardship Science Academic Alliances grants, we were able to design, build, and commission the calorimeters on budget and ahead of schedule. The MIPP experiment accumulated a large amount of data in the first run that ended in early 2006. Our group has

  14. Effects of radiographic techniques on the low-contrast detail detectability performance of digital radiography systems.

    PubMed

    Alsleem, Haney; U, Paul; Mong, Kam Shan; Davidson, Robert

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of the radiation exposure factors kilovolt peak and tube current time (milliampere seconds) on the low-contrast detail detectability performance of 3 types of planar digital radiography systems. Detectability performance of an imaging system refers to its ability to detect and present the low-contrast details of organs in the acquired image. The authors also compare detectability performance between computed radiography, indirect digital radiography, and direct digital radiography by evaluating low-contrast details of the obtained images. A low-contrast detail phantom was inserted within 10-cm thicknesses of Perspex plastic sheets. The images were obtained with various kilovolt peak and milliampere second settings for each of the 3 digital radiography systems. Artinis CDRAD Analyser software was used to score the images and calculate the inverse image quality figure (IQFinv). The higher milliampere second levels in each kilovolt peak selection resulted in higher IQFinv in computed radiography and indirect and direct digital radiography. IQFinv values significantly increased in indirect digital radiography with increasing kilovolt peak in only 1 and 2 mAs. There were insignificant differences in IQFinv values when altering kilovolt peak in each milliampere second level in direct digital radiography. The indirect digital radiography system generally demonstrated better detectability performance than computed radiography and direct digital radiography. However, direct digital radiography demonstrated better detectability performance than indirect digital radiography at lower kilovolt peak and milliampere second settings, as did computed radiography at lower kilovolt peak settings. Higher milliampere second settings increase photon count, which results in a higher signal-to-noise ratio and thus increased detectability. Lower milliampere second settings increase noise level on images, which increases the risk of diagnostic detail loss. Changing

  15. [Treatment of thoracic disc herniation. Case report].

    PubMed

    Picado-Baca, Mauricio Leonardo; Mireles-Cano, José Nicolás; León-Meza, Víctor Manuel; García-González, Oscar Guillermo; Ramos-Trujillo, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Herniated thoracic intervertebral disc is a rare cause of spinal cord compression. Its frequency varies from 0.15% to 1.7% of all disc herniations, and produces symptoms in 0.5% to 0.8%. Case 1. A 50-year-old woman, with pain and burning sensation in left hemithorax of four months of onset. It was treated as a herpetic syndrome, with no improvement. She was seen after thirteen days of exacerbation of clinical symptoms. The physical examination showed asymmetric paraparesis, lower left pelvic limb 1/5, and right pelvic limb 3/5¸ sensory level T8, with left Babinski positive. A thoracic disc herniation in space T8-T9 was diagnosed. A 55-year-old patient with a history of presenting pain in lumbar area of 5 years onset. She also had radicular pain that radiated to the right pelvic limb, with intensity 10/10 on a Visual Analogue Scale. Her physical examination showed muscle strength 5/5, with normal sensitivity in all dermatomes and tendon reflexes, and a positive right Babinski. Thoracic disc herniation T7-T8 level was diagnosed. Due to anatomical conditions that define this type of hernia, the extracavitary posterolateral approach should be the recommended surgical procedure when the simultaneously performed anterior decompression and fixation with posterior instrumentation are the treatments proposed. Despite the different anatomical structures of this special area, it was possible to obtain satisfactory results for both clinical cases. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  16. Iatrogenic Injury to the Long Thoracic Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Bizzarri, Federico; Davoli, Giuseppe; Bouklas, Dimitri; Oricchio, Luca; Frati, Giacomo; Neri, Eugenio

    2001-01-01

    After heart surgery, complications affecting the brachial plexus have been reported in 2% to 38% of cases. The long thoracic nerve is vulnerable to damage at various levels, due to its long and superficial course. This nerve supplies the serratus anterior muscle, which has an important role in the abduction and elevation of the superior limb; paralysis of the serratus anterior causes “winged scapula,” a condition in which the arm cannot be lifted higher than 90° from the side. Unfortunately, the long thoracic nerve can be damaged by a wide variety of traumatic and nontraumatic occurrences, ranging from viral or nonviral disease to improper surgical technique, to the position of the patient during transfer to a hospital bed. Our patient, a 62-year-old man with triple-vessel disease, underwent myocardial revascularization in which right and left internal thoracic arteries and the left radial artery were grafted to the right coronary, descending anterior, and obtuse marginal arteries, respectively. Despite strong recovery and an apparently good postoperative course, the patient sued for damages due to subsequent winging of the left scapula. In this instance, the legal case has less to do with the cause of the lesion (which remains unclear) than with failure to adequately inform the patient of possible complications at the expense of the nervous system. The lesson is that each patient must receive detailed written and oral explanation of the potential benefits and all conceivable risks of a procedure. (Tex Heart Inst J 2001;28:315–7) PMID:11777160

  17. Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy for primary palmar hyperidrosis.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Arun; Ali, Mudasir; Kaul, Sunil

    2010-08-01

    Primary hyperhidrosis is a disorder that is characterized by excessive sweating in disproportion to that required for thermoregulation. In most cases, this is aggravated by emotional factors and by heat. Hyperhidrosis can be seen in the palms of the hands, armpits, soles of the feet and face. The principal characteristic of this disease is the intense discomfort of patients, which affects their social and professional life. Treatment modalities include topical application of aluminum chloride, iontophoresis, anticholinergics, botulinum toxin injection, liposuction, excision of sweat glands, and thoracic sympathectomy. Between January 1998 and August 2007, a prospective study of endoscopic thoracic sympathectomies for palmar hyperhidrosis was undertaken based on case histories and a prospective pre- and postoperative questionnaire survey. The sample comprised of 322 patients with a mean age of 24 years. At Apollo Hospital, New Delhi, India, bilateral video-assisted thoracoscopic T3 level sympathectomies were performed in all cases. All patients had immediate cessation of palmar hyperhidrosis. The mean postoperative stay was 1.1 days. A questionnaire was completed based on their response to a telephone conversation or e-mail. A paired t test and Wilcoxon test was performed on these data and it showed significant improvement in quality of life. Compensatory sweating was found to be the most troublesome side effect for all patients. It was seen in 63% of the patients. This is similar to other reports of compensatory sweating; however, the figure decreases to 29% if we disregard the percentage of patients who reported only mild compensatory sweating. In view of the low morbidity and zero mortality rate of this surgical technique, we recommend it as a method of treatment for palmar hyperhidrosis. Thoracic sympathectomy eliminates palmar hyperhidrosis with minimal recurrence (1% in our series) and produces a high rate of patient satisfaction.

  18. The reported thoracic injuries in Homer's Iliad

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Homer's Iliad is considered to be a prominent and representative work of the tradition of the ancient Greek epic poetry. In this poem Homer presents the battles which took place during the last year of the 10-year lasting Trojan War between Achaeans and Trojans. We wanted to examine the chest wounds, especially those which are described in detail, according to their localization, severity and mortality. Finally, there are reported 54 consecutive thoracic injuries in the Iliad. The mostly used weapons were the spear (63%), the stones (7.4%), the arrow (5.5%) and the sword (5.5%). We divided the injuries according to their severity in mild (those which did not cause serious injury to the victim), medium (those which cause the victim to abandon the battlefield), and severe (those which cause death of the victim). According to this classification, the reported injuries were mild in 11.11%, medium in 18.52%, and severe in the last 70.37% of the reported cases. In other words, 89% of the injuries belong to the medium or severe category of thoracic injury. As far as the mortality of the injuries is concerned, 38 out of 54 thoracic injuries include death, which makes the mortality percentage reach 70.37%. Concerning the "allocation of the roles", the Achaean were in 68% perpetrators and the Trojans in only 32%. In terms of gravity, out of 38 mortal injuries 30 involve a Trojan (78.95%) and the remaining 8 an Achaean (21.05%). The excellent and detailed description of the injuries by Homer, as well as of the symptoms, may reveal a man with knowledge of anatomy and medicine who cared for the injured warriors in the battlefield. PMID:21087529

  19. The reported thoracic injuries in Homer's Iliad.

    PubMed

    Apostolakis, Efstratios; Apostolaki, Georgia; Apostolaki, Mary; Chorti, Maria

    2010-11-19

    Homer's Iliad is considered to be a prominent and representative work of the tradition of the ancient Greek epic poetry. In this poem Homer presents the battles which took place during the last year of the 10-year lasting Trojan War between Achaeans and Trojans. We wanted to examine the chest wounds, especially those which are described in detail, according to their localization, severity and mortality. Finally, there are reported 54 consecutive thoracic injuries in the Iliad. The mostly used weapons were the spear (63%), the stones (7.4%), the arrow (5.5%) and the sword (5.5%). We divided the injuries according to their severity in mild (those which did not cause serious injury to the victim), medium (those which cause the victim to abandon the battlefield), and severe (those which cause death of the victim). According to this classification, the reported injuries were mild in 11.11%, medium in 18.52%, and severe in the last 70.37% of the reported cases. In other words, 89% of the injuries belong to the medium or severe category of thoracic injury. As far as the mortality of the injuries is concerned, 38 out of 54 thoracic injuries include death, which makes the mortality percentage reach 70.37%. Concerning the "allocation of the roles", the Achaean were in 68% perpetrators and the Trojans in only 32%. In terms of gravity, out of 38 mortal injuries 30 involve a Trojan (78.95%) and the remaining 8 an Achaean (21.05%). The excellent and detailed description of the injuries by Homer, as well as of the symptoms, may reveal a man with knowledge of anatomy and medicine who cared for the injured warriors in the battlefield.

  20. Thoracic paraplegia due to missed thoracic compressive lesions after lumbar spinal decompression surgery. Report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Akihiko; Miyamoto, Kei; Hosoe, Hideo; Shimizu, Katsuji

    2004-01-01

    The authors discuss the cases of three patients in whom thoracic paraplegia developed after lumbar spinal decompressive surgery for slight lumbar spinal canal stenosis. Careful computerized tomography myelography and magnetic resonance imaging examination of the thoracic spine revealed another compressive lesion (spinal cord tumor, disc herniation, osteophyte of vertebral body, and ossification of the ligamentum flavum). Additional thoracic decompressive surgery provided partial amelioration of each patient's neurological condition. The authors suggest that to avoid such a complication physical and radiographic examination of the thoracic spine should be performed preoperatively if the lumbar imaging is inconclusive.

  1. [Clamshell thoracotomy after thoracic knife wounds].

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Marcus; Schneider, Niko R E; Popp, Erik

    2017-01-04

    Resuscitation in the event of traumatic cardiac arrest was for a long time considered to be a less than promising technique to employ; however, current data indicate that the prospects of success need not be any poorer than for resuscitation due to cardiac distress. The targeted and rapid remedying of reversible causes can re-establish the circulatory function and the European Resuscitation Council (ERC) algorithm for traumatic cardiac arrest is a helpful guide in this respect. This case report illustrates the resolute implementation of this algorithm in the prehospital environment in the case of an attempted suicide by a thoracic knife wound.

  2. Digital subtraction angiography of the thoracic aorta

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, L.B.; Buonocore, E.; Modic, M.T.; Meaney, T.F.

    1984-02-01

    Forty-three patients with acquired and congenital abnormalities of the thoracic aorta were studied using digital subtraction angiography (DSA) after an intravenous bolus injection of 40 ml of contrast material. Abnormalities studied included coarctation, pseudocoarctation, Marfan syndrome, cervical aorta, double aortic arch, aneurysm, dissection, and tumor. Twenty-four patients also had conventional angiography. DSA was accurate in 95% of cases; in the other 5%, involving patients with acute type I dissection, the coronary arteries could not be seen. The authors concluded that in 92% of their patients, DSA could have replaced the standard aortogram.

  3. Video-Assisted Thoracic Sympathectomy for Hyperhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Milanez de Campos, Jose Ribas; Kauffman, Paulo; Gomes, Oswaldo; Wolosker, Nelson

    2016-08-01

    By the 1980s, endoscopy was in use by some groups in sympathetic denervation of the upper limbs with vascular indications. Low morbidity, cosmetic results, reduction in the incidence of Horner syndrome, and the shortened time in hospital made video-assisted thoracic sympathectomy (VATS) better accepted by those undergoing treatment for hyperhidrosis. Over the last 25 years, this surgical procedure has become routine in the treatment of hyperhidrosis, leading to a significant increase in the number of papers on the subject in the literature. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Video-assisted thoracic surgery complications

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Józef

    2014-01-01

    Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) is a miniinvasive technique commonly applied worldwide. Indications for VATS are very broad and include the diagnosis of mediastinal, lung and pleural diseases, as well as large resection procedures such as pneumonectomy. The most frequent complication is prolonged postoperative air leak. The other significant complications are bleeding, infections, postoperative pain and recurrence at the port site. Different complications of VATS procedures can occur with variable frequency in various diseases. Despite the large number of their types, such complications are rare and can be avoided through the proper selection of patients and an appropriate surgical technique. PMID:25561984

  5. Reducing complications of thoracic gunshot wounds.

    PubMed

    Martin, K

    1989-01-01

    With the persistent presence of violence in our urban areas and the availability of guns, penetrating injuries as a result of firearm use continue to be a challenge for the emergency, surgery, and operating room nurse. Because gunshot wounds may be rapidly fatal, an understanding of firearms and the injuries they produce, as well as their possible complications, can assist the critical care nurse in caring for patients with gunshot wounds to the chest. Thoracic trauma is present in 50% of all trauma patients and is the cause of death in 25% of these victims. Penetrating trauma from violent episodes accounts for approximately 50% of cases of chest trauma in the urban setting.

  6. Thoracic ectopia cordis with anatomically normal heart.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Flávio Donizete; Novaes, Fernando Rotatori; Maia, Marcelo Alves; Barros, Francisco de Assis

    2007-01-01

    Ectopia cordis is a rare congenital malformation, which is commonly associated with other intracardiac defects. At two-day-old full-term baby girl was admitted to Santa Casade Misericórdia Hospital Montes Claros, NG, Brazil, with thoracic ectopia cordis. A transthoracic echocardiographic study did not identify any associated congenital heart diseases. The infant underwent surgical treatment using a rib graft to create a neo-sternum. She was discharged after presenting a good outcome on the 20th postoperative day.

  7. Thoracic Manifestations of Klippel-Trenaunay Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Mark M; Miller, Wallace T

    2017-05-01

    Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome (KTS) is a congenital disorder characterized by venous malformations and a predisposition to pulmonary embolism. We reviewed the imaging findings of 7 adult patients with KTS who underwent thoracic CT. While the superficial manifestations of KTS predominantly affect the extremities, patients frequently develop abnormalities of the pulmonary arterial system, particularly chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. Additionally, some patients are seen to develop pulmonary arteriolar aneurysms; the physiologic significance of this finding is unknown at this time. Radiologists should be aware of these potential findings and have a high index of suspicion for chronic PE in patients with KTS.

  8. Thoracic Outlet Syndrome Following Breast Implant Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Caplash, Yugesh; Giri, Pratyush; Kearney, Daniel; Wagstaff, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    Summary: We present a patient with bilateral breast implant rupture who developed severe locoregional silicone granulomatous lymphadenopathy. Poly Implant Prothese silicone implants had been used for bilateral breast augmentation 5 years prior. Extracapsular implant rupture and bilateral axillary lymphadenopathy indicated explantation, capsulectomy, and selective lymph node excision. Histology demonstrated silicone lymphadenopathy with no evidence of malignancy. Over the subsequent 12 months, she developed progressive locoregional lymphadenopathy involving bilateral cervical, axillary, and internal mammary groups, resulting in bilateral thoracic outlet syndrome. We report the unusual presentation, progression, and the ultimate surgical management of this patient. PMID:25878942

  9. Idiopathic thoracic aortic aneurysm at pediatric age.

    PubMed

    Marín-Manzano, E; González-de-Olano, D; Haurie-Girelli, J; Herráiz-Sarachaga, J I; Bermúdez-Cañete, R; Tamariz-Martel, A; Cuesta-Gimeno, C; Pérez-de-León, J

    2009-03-01

    A 6-year-old-boy presented with epigastric pain and vomiting over 1 year. Chest X-ray and esophagogastric transit showed a mediastinal mass. A chest computerized tomography angiogram demonstrated a descending thoracic aortic aneurysm. Analytical determinations carried out were all negative. The aneurysm was surgically repaired using a Dacron patch. The anatomopathological study described atherosclerotic lesions with calcifications, compatible with an atherosclerotic aneurysm wall. Aneurysms are uncommon in the pediatric population. Usually, no pathogenesis can be determined, and thus, such cases are grouped as idiopathic. Direct repair with or without patch is a therapeutic alternative in pediatric aneurysms and can allow the growth of the aortic circumference.

  10. Thoracic epidural anaesthesia for awake thoracic surgery in severely dyspnoeic patients excluded from general anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Gabor; Claret, Antoine; Desbordes, Jacques; Porte, Henri

    2014-11-01

    General anaesthesia (GA) carries high risks of ventilator dependency with increased morbidity and mortality in patients with severe respiratory disease. It also presents an ethical dilemma if surgery remains the only treatment option for patients with advanced terminal chronic respiratory disease. Thoracic epidural anaesthesia for awake thoracic surgery (TEATS) in high-risk patients with dyspnoea at rest could avoid ventilator dependency and speed up recovery even in patients with severe dyspnoea. This retrospective observational study analysed indications, management and outcome of patients contraindicated to GA undergoing awake thoracic surgery with thoracic epidural anaesthesia. From 716 patients requiring thoracic surgery, nine were contraindicated to GA. Eight patients [American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) 4] had a maximum grade four of the modified Medical Research Council dyspnea scale (MMRC). Two patients (ASA 3, grade 1 MMRC and ASA 4, grade 4 MMRC) refused GA. Patients (female : male ratio 1.25 : 1, age 19-76 years) had the following chronic respiratory diseases: pulmonary fibrosis (n = 2), pulmonary metastases (n = 3), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (n = 1), alveolitis (n = 1) and myopathy (n = 2). Surgical indications were: thoracotomy (n = 6) for pleurectomy to treat recurring pneumothorax (n = 3), pleurostomy (n = 1), emphysema surgery (n = 1), lung biopsy (n = 1) and thoracoscopy (n = 3) for pleural/lung biopsy (n = 2), pneumothorax (n = 1). Lidocaine 20 mg/ml or ropivacaine 7.5 mg/ml was titrated to achieve an anaesthesia level T2-T12. No patient required GA [time of surgery: 46-128 min, mean = 76 min, standard deviation (SD) = 23 min]. Seven patients had light sedation with TCI propofol, remifentanyl or both and remained responsive. Fifty percent of patients received phenylephrine or ephedrine to maintain arterial pressure. Two patients went into hypercapnia, which was reversed with assisted mask ventilation. One patient suffered

  11. Aortic Arch and Thoracic Aorta Curvature Remodeling after Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair.

    PubMed

    Mestres, Gaspar; Garcia, Marvin E; Yugueros, Xavier; Urrea, Rodrigo; Tripodi, Paolo; Gomez, Fernando; Maeso, Jordi; Riambau, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the original curvature of the aortic arch and thoracic aorta, and how it is modified after the placement of a thoracic endograft. We retrospectively analyzed all patients primarily treated for thoracic aortic aneurysms and blunt traumatic aortic injuries by means of an endograft sealed into the aortic arch (zones, Z1-Z3) in 2 different centers (Vascular Surgery Division, Hospital Clinic, UB; and Vascular and Endovascular Surgery Department, Hospital Vall d'Hebron, UAB; Barcelona, Spain), between 2010 and 2015. The last preoperative and early (1-month) postoperative computed tomography angiography (CTA) was obtained for all cases, and an accurate 3-dimensional (3D) center lumen line was created, from the aortic valve to the renal arteries. Angles in 2-dimensional (2D; XY-plane) and 3D (referred to cranial-caudal Z-axis) were analyzed in: the distal ascending aorta, aortic arch, and thoracic aorta (at 5, 10, 15, and 20 cm from the brachiocephalic trunk [BCT]) and celiac trunk (CT). Changes in preoperative-postoperative CTA were compared independently for both diseases. Thirty-six cases were included (20 aneurysms, 16 blunt traumatic injuries; mean age, 69.5 and 42.5 years). After placement of an aortic endograft (sealed in Z1-Z2 in 30% of aneurysms and 75% of traumatic injuries; mean endograft length: 22.6 cm and 11.3 cm, respectively), a global left anterior displacement of the ascending aorta was observed (2D examination: -13.1° and -7.5°, P = 0.049 and 0.041, respectively). The 3D examination showed an average increase of the aortic angle at 5 and 10 cm from the BCT in the whole sample (+4.0°, +4.9° in reference to the vertical; P = 0.017, 0.001), softening the curvature of the proximal descending thoracic aorta. In addition, in traumatic injuries, a decrease in the aortic arch angle was observed (-3.5°, P = 0.030). Placement of an endograft into the aortic arch and proximal thoracic aorta engenders a

  12. Official American Thoracic Society Clinical Practice Guidelines: Diagnostic Evaluation of Infants with Recurrent or Persistent Wheezing.

    PubMed

    Ren, Clement L; Esther, Charles R; Debley, Jason S; Sockrider, Marianna; Yilmaz, Ozge; Amin, Nikhil; Bazzy-Asaad, Alia; Davis, Stephanie D; Durand, Manuel; Ewig, Jeffrey M; Yuksel, Hasan; Lombardi, Enrico; Noah, Terry L; Radford, Peggy; Ranganathan, Sarath; Teper, Alejandro; Weinberger, Miles; Brozek, Jan; Wilson, Kevin C

    2016-08-01

    Infantile wheezing is a common problem, but there are no guidelines for the evaluation of infants with recurrent or persistent wheezing that is not relieved or prevented by standard therapies. An American Thoracic Society-sanctioned guideline development committee selected clinical questions related to uncertainties or controversies in the diagnostic evaluation of wheezing infants. Members of the committee conducted pragmatic evidence syntheses, which followed the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. The evidence syntheses were used to inform the formulation and grading of recommendations. The pragmatic evidence syntheses identified few studies that addressed the clinical questions. The studies that were identified constituted very low-quality evidence, consisting almost exclusively of case series with risk of selection bias, indirect patient populations, and imprecise estimates. The committee made conditional recommendations to perform bronchoscopic airway survey, bronchoalveolar lavage, esophageal pH monitoring, and a swallowing study. It also made conditional recommendations against empiric food avoidance, upper gastrointestinal radiography, and gastrointestinal scintigraphy. Finally, the committee recommended additional research about the roles of infant pulmonary function testing and food avoidance or dietary changes, based on allergy testing. Although infantile wheezing is common, there is a paucity of evidence to guide clinicians in selecting diagnostic tests for recurrent or persistent wheezing. Our committee made several conditional recommendations to guide clinicians; however, additional research that measures clinical outcomes is needed to improve our confidence in the effects of various diagnostic interventions and to allow advice to be provided with greater confidence.

  13. Flash radiography with 24 GeV/c protons

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, C. L.; Alrick, K. R.; Buescher, K. L.; Cagliostro, D. J.; Clark, D. A.; Clark, D. J.; Espinoza, C. J.; Ferm, E. N.; Gallegos, R. A.; Gomez, J. J.; Hogan, G. E.; King, N. S. P.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Liljestrand, R. P.; Mariam, F. G.; Merrill, F. E.; Morley, K. B.; Mottershead, C. T.; Murray, M. M.; Pazuchanics, P. D.

    2011-05-15

    The accuracy of density measurements and position resolution in flash (40 ns) radiography of thick objects with 24 Gev/c protons is investigated. A global model fit to step wedge data is shown to give a good description spanning the periodic table. The parameters obtained from the step wedge data are used to predict transmission through the French Test Object (FTO), a test object of nested spheres, to a precision better than 1%. Multiple trials have been used to show that the systematic errors are less than 2%. Absolute agreement between the average radiographic measurements of the density and the known density is 1%. Spatial resolution has been measured to be 200 {mu}m at the center of the FTO. These data verify expectations of the benefits provided by high energy hadron radiography for thick objects.

  14. Study of a Loop Heat Pipe Using Neutron Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    C. Thomas Conroy; A. A. El-Ganayni; David R. Riley; John M. Cimbala; Jack S. Brenizer, Jr.; Abel Po-Ya Chuang; Shane Hanna

    2001-08-01

    An explanation is given of what a loop heat pipe (LHP) is, and how it works. It is then shown that neutron imaging (both real time neutron radioscopy and single exposure neutron radiography) is an effective experimental tool for the study of LHPs. Specifically, neutron imaging has helped to identify and correct a cooling water distribution problem in the condenser, and has enabled visualization of two-phase flow (liquid and vapor) in various components of the LHP. In addition, partial wick dry-out, a phenomenon of great importance in the effective operation of LHPs, has been identified with neutron imaging. It is anticipated that neutron radioscopy and radiography will greatly contribute to our understanding of LHP operation, and will lead to improvement of LHP modeling and design.

  15. Development of Compton Radiography Diagnostics for Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Tommasini, R; Hatchett, S P; Hey, D S; Izumi, N; Koch, J A; Landen, O L; Mackinnon, A J; Delettrez, J; Glebov, V; Stoeckl, C

    2010-11-16

    An important diagnostic tool for inertial confinement fusion will be time-resolved radiographic imaging of the dense cold fuel surrounding the hot spot. The measurement technique is based on point-projection radiography at photon energies from 60-200 keV where the Compton effect is the dominant contributor to the opacity of the fuel or pusher. We have successfully applied this novel Compton Radiography technique to the study of the final compression of directly driven plastic capsules at the OMEGA facility. The radiographs have a spatial and temporal resolution of {approx}10 {micro}m and {approx}10ps, respectively. A statistical accuracy of {approx}0.5% in transmission per resolution element is achieved, allowing localized measurements of areal mass densities to 7% accuracy. The experimental results show 3D non-uniformities and lower than 1D expected areal densities attributed to drive asymmetries and hydroinstabilities.

  16. Dental radiography exposure of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki populations

    SciTech Connect

    Antoku, S.; Hoshi, M.; Russell, W.J.; Kihara, T.; Sawada, S.; Takeshita, K.; Otake, M.; Yoshinaga, H.; Beach, D.R.

    1989-03-01

    Dental radiography doses in Hiroshima and Nagasaki were estimated on the basis of survey data from dental hospitals and clinics in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and doses were measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters and a phantom. Doses to organs, including the lens, pituitary fossa, thyroid gland, and skin were calculated from data obtained during a 2-week survey in both cities. The mean caput doses were calculated from the data indicating frequency per year and were tabulated by organs, age, teeth examined, type of examination, population, sex, and city. No significant difference was observed by age, population, sex, or city. Currently the doses incurred during dental radiography may not be sufficiently high to cause bias in the assessments for late radiation effects among atomic-bomb survivors. However, the mean caput thyroid doses of 62 mrad and 67 mrad in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, respectively, cannot be ignored from the standpoint of their potential in contributing to radiation-induced carcinogenesis.

  17. Monte Carlo Modeling of High-Energy Film Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, A.C., Jr.; Cochran, J.L.; Lamberti, V.E.

    2003-03-28

    High-energy film radiography methods, adapted in the past to performing specific tasks, must now meet increasing demands to identify defects and perform critical measurements in a wide variety of manufacturing processes. Although film provides unequaled resolution for most components and assemblies, image quality must be enhanced with much more detailed information to identify problems and qualify features of interest inside manufactured items. The work described is concerned with improving current 9 MeV nondestructive practice by optimizing the important parameters involved in film radiography using computational methods. In order to follow important scattering effects produced by electrons, the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code was used with advanced, highly parallel computer systems. The work has provided a more detailed understanding of latent image formation at high X-ray energies, and suggests that improvements can be made in our ability to identify defects and to obtain much more detail in images of fine features.

  18. Proton Radiography of a Thermal Explosion in PBX 9501

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smilowitz, Laura; Henson, Bryan; Romero, Jerry; Asay, Blaine; Sandstrom, Mary

    2007-06-01

    The understanding of thermal explosions and burn propagation lags that of detonations and shock propagation. Diagnostics such as high energy radiography have been used to image shocks, but have been previously precluded from use in thermal explosions due to their stringent timing requirements: shock propagation can be synchronized to an external diagnostic while thermal explosion can not. This issue is solved by following the evolution of the ignition volume in a thermal explosion and using a laser pulse to provide a temperature jump in that central volume during the final thermal runaway leading to ignition. Details of the laser heating which minimize the perturbation of the thermal explosion will be discussed with comparisons between auto-ignited and laser ignited tests. Thermal explosion experiments have been conducted at the Los Alamos Proton Radiography facility and have yielded images of the evolution of ignition, post-ignition burn propagation, and case failure in a radially confined cylinder of PBX 9501.

  19. Radiography and ultrasonic calculation workbooks: installation and use

    SciTech Connect

    Rikard, D; Dolan, K

    2000-03-24

    The radiography and ultrasonic calculation workbooks are intended to assist Level I, II and III NDE personnel in calculations used in routine job applications. These workbooks are an upgraded version of Microsoft Excel{reg_sign} spreadsheets, which were originally set up in October 1988, using a Macintosh Plus{reg_sign} computer and Microsoft Excel{reg_sign} version 1.5. A description of these was released as ''Computerized Calculations for Radiography and Ultrasonics'', UCRL-JC-105419 in November 1990 and published in Materials Evaluation, Volume 49/Number 4, in April 1991. Over the years as Microsoft improved the capabilities of the Excel program to include the abilities to make sketches and to have multiple tabbed pages in a document called a ''workbook'' we have now modified the calculation spreadsheets to include these enhancements. Following is a short description on how to install and use these workbooks on a Macintosh or PC.

  20. Californium Multiplier. Part I. Design for neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Crosbie, K.L.; Preskitt, C.A.; John, J.; Hastings, J.D.

    1982-04-01

    The Californium Multiplier (CFX) is a subcritical assembly of enriched uranium surrounding a californium-252 neutron source. The function of the CFX is to multiply the neutrons emitted by the source to a number sufficient for neutron radiography. The CFX is designed to provide a collimated beam of thermal neutrons from which the gamma radiation is filtered, and the scattered neutrons are reduced to make it suitable for high resolution radiography. The entire system has inherent safety features, which provide for system and personnel safety, and it operates at moderate cost. In Part I, the CFX and the theory of its operation are described in detail. Part II covers the performance of the Mound Facility CFX.

  1. Proton radiography of a shock-compressed target

    SciTech Connect

    Ravasio, A.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Loupias, B.; Ozaki, N.; Vinci, T.; Koenig, M.; Romagnani, L.; Cecchetti, C.; Borghesi, M.; Le Pape, S.; Hicks, D.; MacKinnon, A.; Park, H. S.; Patel, P.; Batani, D.; Dezulian, R.; Boehly, T.; Gremillet, L.; Henry, E.; Schiavi, A.

    2010-07-15

    In this paper we report on the radiography of a shock-compressed target using laser produced proton beams. A low-density carbon foam target was shock compressed by long pulse high-energy laser beams. The shock front was transversally probed with a proton beam produced in the interaction of a high intensity laser beam with a gold foil. We show that from radiography data, the density profile in the shocked target can be deduced using Monte Carlo simulations. By changing the delay between long and short pulse beams, we could probe different plasma conditions and structures, demonstrating that the details of the steep density gradient can be resolved. This technique is validated as a diagnostic for the investigation of warm dense plasmas, allowing an in situ characterization of high-density contrasted plasmas.

  2. Lung nodules detection in chest radiography: image components analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Tao; Mou, Xuanqin; Yang, Ying; Yan, Hao

    2009-02-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effect of different components of chest image on performances of both human observer and channelized Fisher-Hotelling model (CFH) in nodule detection task. Irrelevant and relevant components were separated from clinical chest radiography by employing Principal Component Analysis (PCA) methods. Human observer performance was evaluated in two-alternative forced-choice (2AFC) on original clinical images and anatomical structure only images obtained by PCA methods. Channelized Fisher-Hotelling model with Laguerre-Gauss basis function was evaluated to predict human performance. We show that relevant component is the primary factor influencing on nodule detection in chest radiography. There is obvious difference of detectability between human observer and CFH model for nodule detection in images only containing anatomical structure. CFH model should be used more carefully.

  3. The MU-RAY detector for muon radiography of volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasio, A.; Ambrosino, F.; Basta, D.; Bonechi, L.; Brianzi, M.; Bross, A.; Callier, S.; Caputo, A.; Ciaranfi, R.; Cimmino, L.; D'Alessandro, R.; D'Auria, L.; de La Taille, C.; Energico, S.; Garufi, F.; Giudicepietro, F.; Lauria, A.; Macedonio, G.; Martini, M.; Masone, V.; Mattone, C.; Montesi, M. C.; Noli, P.; Orazi, M.; Passeggio, G.; Peluso, R.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Raux, L.; Rubinov, P.; Saracino, G.; Scarlini, E.; Scarpato, G.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Starodubtsev, O.; Strolin, P.; Taketa, A.; Tanaka, H. K. M.; Vanzanella, A.

    2013-12-01

    The MU-RAY detector has been designed to perform muon radiography of volcanoes. The possible use on the field introduces several constraints. First the electric power consumption must be reduced to the minimum, so that the detector can be solar-powered. Moreover it must be robust and transportable, for what concerns the front-end electronics and data acquisition. A 1 m2 prototype has been constructed and is taking data at Mt. Vesuvius. The detector consists of modules of 32 scintillator bars with wave length shifting fibers and silicon photomultiplier read-out. A dedicated front-end electronics has been developed, based on the SPIROC ASIC. An introduction to muon radiography principles, the MU-RAY detector description and results obtained in laboratory will be presented.

  4. Modeling the Performance Characteristics of Computed Radiography (CR) Systems

    PubMed Central

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Karellas, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Computed radiography (CR) using storage phosphors is widely used in digital radiography and mammography. A cascaded linear systems approach wherein several parameter values were estimated using Monte Carlo methods was used to model the image formation process of a single-side read ‘flying spot’ CR system using a granular phosphor. Objective image quality metrics such as modulation transfer function (MTF) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were determined using this model and show good agreement with published empirical data. A model such as that addressed in this work could allow for improved understanding of the effect of storage phosphor physical properties and CR reader parameters on objective image quality metrics for existing and evolving CR systems. PMID:20199915

  5. Digital radiography: update for oral health care workers.

    PubMed

    Noffke, C E E; Nzima, N; Chabikuli, N J

    2004-08-01

    Digital Radiography is an imaging system that does away with the use of films. It constitutes an advance in computer technology and has made a significant impact on the field of Maxillofacial- and Dental Radiology. This paper presents an overview of the basic concepts and applications of dental digital radiography and compares it with conventional film-based imaging. In addition, it provides a thorough understanding of the direct, semi-direct and indirect dental digital imaging systems with their advantages and disadvantages. Universal acceptance of digital radiographic imaging as a diagnostic tool makes it important for oral health care workers to understand the principles thereof and to master the techniques involved in acquiring a diagnosable digital radiographic image.

  6. A new scanner for in situ digital radiography of paintings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Impallaria, Anna; Evangelisti, Federico; Petrucci, Ferruccio; Tisato, Flavia; Castelli, Lisa; Taccetti, Francesco

    2016-12-01

    X-ray radiography is one of the most widely used imaging techniques in the field of cultural heritage, both for conservation and for investigation purposes. Performing radiographies in museums, thus avoiding movements of works of art, has been recently made easy by digital acquisition of images, but when the whole scan of a large painting is required, technical solutions for a portable device are still not at hand. The inherent weight of the X-ray tube and of the high-voltage generator makes the design of a portable device very difficult. In this project, the solution of the puzzle was separating devices devoted to different tasks, in order to maintain each item under 60 kg weight, thus being transportable with reasonable effort.

  7. Development of Compton radiography of inertial confinement fusion implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Tommasini, R.; Hatchett, S. P.; Hey, D. S.; Iglesias, C.; Izumi, N.; Koch, J. A.; Landen, O. L.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Sorce, C.; Delettrez, J. A.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.

    2011-05-15

    An important diagnostic tool for inertial confinement fusion will be time-resolved radiographic imaging of the dense cold fuel surrounding the hot spot. The measurement technique is based on point-projection radiography at photon energies from 60 to 200 keV where the Compton effect is the dominant contributor to the opacity of the fuel or pusher. We have successfully applied this novel Compton radiography technique to the study of the final compression of directly driven plastic capsules at the OMEGA facility [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. The radiographs have a spatial and temporal resolution of {approx}10 {mu}m and {approx}10 ps, respectively. A statistical accuracy of {approx}0.5% in transmission per resolution element is achieved, allowing localized measurements of areal mass densities to 7% accuracy. The experimental results show 3D nonuniformities and lower than 1D expected areal densities attributed to drive asymmetries and hydroinstabilities.

  8. High-resolution computed radiography by scanned luminescent toner xeroradiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, John W.; Lubinsky, Anthony R.

    1993-09-01

    A new computed radiography system is described in which a charged selenium photoconductive plate is exposed to x-rays to create an electrostatic latent image, developed with a luminescent toner, and scanned with a stimulating laser beam to produce emitted light, which is filtered and detected. The resulting electronic signals are processed, and converted to hard copy using a laser film printer. The system is characterized by high x-ray sensitivity and by very high spatial resolution, which makes it particularly suitable for applications such as mammography and bone radiography. The image luminescence is bright and its decay time is extremely short, enabling rapid scanning with an inexpensive laser source. Also, the electronic capture of image data permits enhancement of the displayed contrast of image structures by image processing techniques.

  9. Human performance analysis of industrial radiography radiation exposure events

    SciTech Connect

    Reece, W.J.; Hill, S.G.

    1995-12-01

    A set of radiation overexposure event reports were reviewed as part of a program to examine human performance in industrial radiography for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Incident records for a seven year period were retrieved from an event database. Ninety-five exposure events were initially categorized and sorted for further analysis. Descriptive models were applied to a subset of severe overexposure events. Modeling included: (1) operational sequence tables to outline the key human actions and interactions with equipment, (2) human reliability event trees, (3) an application of an information processing failures model, and (4) an extrapolated use of the error influences and effects diagram. Results of the modeling analyses provided insights into the industrial radiography task and suggested areas for further action and study to decrease overexposures.

  10. Comparison of Digital Imaging Systems for Neutron Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugliesi, R.; Pugliesi, Fábio; Stanojev Pereira, M. A.

    2011-09-01

    The characteristics of three digital imaging systems for neutron radiography purposes have been compared. Two of them make use of films, CR-39 and Kodak AA, and the third makes use of a LiF scintillator, for image registration. The irradiations were performed in the neutron radiography facility installed at the IEA-R1 nuclear research reactor of IPEN-CNEN/SP. According to the obtained results, the system based on CR-39 is the slowest to obtain an image, and the best in terms of resolution but the worse in terms of contrast. The system based on Kodak AA is faster than the prior, exhibits good resolution and contrast. The system based on the scintillator is the fastest to obtain an image, and best in terms of contrast but the worse in terms of resolution.

  11. Study of a loop heat pipe using neutron radiography.

    PubMed

    Cimbala, John M; Brenizer, Jack S; Chuang, Abel Po-Ya; Hanna, Shane; Thomas Conroy, C; El-Ganayni, A A; Riley, David R

    2004-10-01

    An explanation is given of what a loop heat pipe (LHP) is, and how it works. It is then shown that neutron imaging (both real time neutron radioscopy and single exposure neutron radiography) is an effective experimental tool for the study of LHPs. Specifically, neutron imaging has helped to identify and correct a cooling water distribution problem in the condenser, and has enabled visualization of two-phase flow (liquid and vapor) in various components of the LHP. In addition, partial wick dry-out, a phenomenon of great importance in the effective operation of LHPs, is potentially identifiable with neutron imaging. It is anticipated that neutron radioscopy and radiography will greatly contribute to our understanding of LHP operation, and will lead to improvement of LHP modeling and design.

  12. [Development of breathing chest radiography: study of exposure timing].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Rie; Sanada, Shigeru; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Suzuki, Masayuki; Matsui, Takeshi; Inoue, Hitoshi

    2003-08-01

    The flat-panel detector (FPD) has been introduced into clinical practice. A modified FPD, which has the ability to obtain dynamic chest radiographs, was introduced into our hospital, and clinical testing is ongoing. Both the inspiratory and expiratory phases have to be included in dynamic chest radiographs. The purpose of this study was to investigate the most appropriate chest radiography signal for observation of the respiratory process. We prepared ten protocol patterns that differed in terms of respiratory phase at X-ray exposure, exposure duration, and signal multiplicity. We also performed preliminary experiments and administered several questionnaires to ten volunteers. The volunteers breathed according to vocal and visual signals, and their respiratory waves were recorded by spirometer. The most appropriate protocol was similar to the method used for conventional chest radiography.

  13. Proton radiography and tomography with application to proton therapy

    PubMed Central

    Allinson, N M; Evans, P M

    2015-01-01

    Proton radiography and tomography have long promised benefit for proton therapy. Their first suggestion was in the early 1960s and the first published proton radiographs and CT images appeared in the late 1960s and 1970s, respectively. More than just providing anatomical images, proton transmission imaging provides the potential for the more accurate estimation of stopping-power ratio inside a patient and hence improved treatment planning and verification. With the recent explosion in growth of clinical proton therapy facilities, the time is perhaps ripe for the imaging modality to come to the fore. Yet many technical challenges remain to be solved before proton CT scanners become commonplace in the clinic. Research and development in this field is currently more active than at any time with several prototype designs emerging. This review introduces the principles of proton radiography and tomography, their historical developments, the raft of modern prototype systems and the primary design issues. PMID:26043157

  14. Proton radiography and tomography with application to proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Poludniowski, G; Allinson, N M; Evans, P M

    2015-09-01

    Proton radiography and tomography have long promised benefit for proton therapy. Their first suggestion was in the early 1960s and the first published proton radiographs and CT images appeared in the late 1960s and 1970s, respectively. More than just providing anatomical images, proton transmission imaging provides the potential for the more accurate estimation of stopping-power ratio inside a patient and hence improved treatment planning and verification. With the recent explosion in growth of clinical proton therapy facilities, the time is perhaps ripe for the imaging modality to come to the fore. Yet many technical challenges remain to be solved before proton CT scanners become commonplace in the clinic. Research and development in this field is currently more active than at any time with several prototype designs emerging. This review introduces the principles of proton radiography and tomography, their historical developments, the raft of modern prototype systems and the primary design issues.

  15. An improved method for profile radiography of piping

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, M.S.; Haupt, J.D.

    1996-07-01

    The Petro-Chemical industry has used profile radiography for more than thirty years to find, and evaluate, corrosion in piping systems. The technique offers a method of ``seeing into`` a piece of pipe. This allows the inspector to see the ``whole picture``. Single point ultrasonic measurements cannot provide this degree of information. Shell`s objective for studying the use of this method centered on optimizing their profile radiography technique to improve accuracy and reproducibility of wall thickness measurements. Accuracy and reproducibility of measurements are particularly important when used to determine corrosion rates. To help achieve this objective, the authors developed an inspection procedure to minimize the more prominent sources of inaccuracies associated with this technique. Along with this procedure, they also developed an associated training program. All of Shell Oil`s Pressure Equipment inspectors and key contract employees have received this training.

  16. Leaded apron for use in panoramic dental radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Whitcher, B.L.; Gratt, B.M.; Sickles, E.A.

    1980-05-01

    The leaded aprons currently available for use during dental radiography do not protect the thyroid gland from radiation. Conventional aprons may produce artifacts when used with panoramic dental x-ray units. This study measures the dose reduction obtained with an experimental leaded apron designed for use with panoramic dental x-ray units. Skin exposures measured at the thyroid and at the sternum were reduced with the use of the apron. Films produced during the study were free from apron artifacts.

  17. Absorbed radiation by various tissues during simulated endodontic radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Torabinejad, M.; Danforth, R.; Andrews, K.; Chan, C.

    1989-06-01

    The amount of absorbed radiation by various organs was determined by placing lithium fluoride thermoluminescent chip dosimeters at selected anatomical sites in and on a human-like X-ray phantom and exposing them to radiation at 70- and 90-kV X-ray peaks during simulated endodontic radiography. The mean exposure dose was determined for each anatomical site. The results show that endodontic X-ray doses received by patients are low when compared with other radiographic procedures.

  18. X-Ray Radiography of Gas Turbine Ceramics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-10-20

    Microfocus X - ray equipment. 1a4ihe definition of equipment concepts for a computer assisted tomography (CAT) system; and 4ffthe development of a CAT...were obtained from these test coupons using Microfocus X - ray and image en- hancement techniques. A Computer Assisted Tomography (CAT) design concept...conventional ultrasonics (45 MHz), very high frequency ultrasonics (250 MHz), neutron radiography, Microfocus X - ray , image enhancement, microwave

  19. PyRAT - python radiography analysis tool (u)

    SciTech Connect

    Temple, Brian A; Buescher, Kevin L; Armstrong, Jerawan C

    2011-01-14

    PyRAT is a radiography analysis tool used to reconstruction images of unknown 1-0 objects. The tool is written in Python and developed for use on LINUX and Windows platforms. The tool is capable of performing nonlinear inversions of the images with minimal manual interaction in the optimization process. The tool utilizes the NOMAD mixed variable optimization tool to perform the optimization.

  20. Technique for Performing Lumbar Puncture in Microgravity Using Portable Radiography.

    PubMed

    Lerner, David J; Parmet, Allen J; Don, Steven; Shimony, Joshua S; Goyal, Manu S

    2016-08-01

    Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure Syndrome (VIIP) has caused symptomatology during and after long duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS). Only indirect measurements of intracranial pressure (ICP), such as ultrasound, have been performed on ISS. Discussion and interest has happened at NASA about performing lumbar puncture (LP) in microgravity. Only the "blind" palpation approach and the ultrasound-assisted approach have been discussed. This article, as proof of concept, discusses the possibility of portable radiography to assist lumbar punctures in microgravity. An anthropomorphic radiological phantom of an adult lumbar spine was made containing a fluid-filled space in the spinal canal with a latex membrane which simulated the dural sac and cerebrospinal fluid. A portable direct-digital radiography system with wireless transmitting image receptor and screen was used to perform image-guided lumbar puncture. Using the same equipment and technique, this procedure was then performed on a cadaver for final proof of concept. Technical success was achieved in all approaches on the first try without needle redirection. There was no difference between the cadaver model and the phantom model in terms of difficulty in reaching the fluid space or visually confirming needle location. Portable radiography via proof of concept has the potential to guide lumbar puncture while minimizing volume and mass of equipment. This could be ideal for assisting in performing lumbar puncture in microgravity, as this is the standard of care on Earth for difficult or failed "blind" lumbar punctures. Lerner DJ, Parmet AJ, Don S, Shimony JS, Goyal MS. Technique for performing lumbar puncture in microgravity using portable radiography. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2016; 87(8):745-747.

  1. Pediatric digital radiography education for radiologic technologists: current state.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Gregory; John, Susan D; Goske, Marilyn J; Charkot, Ellen; Herrmann, Tracy; Smith, Susan N; Culbertson, John; Carbonneau, Kira

    2011-05-01

    Digital radiography (DR) is one of several new products that have changed our work processes from hard copy to digital formats. The transition from analog screen-film radiography to DR requires thorough user education because of differences in image production, processing, storage and evaluation between the forms of radiography. Without adequate education, radiologic technologists could unknowingly expose children to higher radiation doses than necessary for adequate radiograph quality. To evaluate knowledge about image quality and dose management in pediatric DR among radiologic technologists in the U.S. This communication describes a survey of 493 radiologic technologists who are members of the American Society of Radiologic Technologists (ASRT) and who evaluated the current state of radiological technologist education in image quality and dose management in pediatric DR. The survey included 23 survey questions regarding image acquisition issues, quality assurance, radiation exposure and education in DR of infants and children. Radiologic technologists express many needs in areas of training and education in pediatric DR. Suggested improvements include better tools for immediate feedback about image quality and exposure, more information about appropriate technique settings for pediatric patients, more user-friendly vendor manuals and educational materials, more reliable measures of radiation exposure to patients, and more regular and frequent follow-up by equipment vendors. There is a clear and widespread need for comprehensive and practical education in digital image technology for radiologic technologists, especially those engaged in pediatric radiography. The creation of better educational materials and training programs, and the continuation of educational opportunities will require a broad commitment from equipment manufacturers and vendors, educational institutions, pediatric radiology specialty organizations, and individual imaging specialists.

  2. Non-damaging, portable radiography: Applications in arms control verification

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, R.A.; Butterfield, K.B.; Apt, K.E.

    1992-08-01

    The state-of-the-technology necessary to perform portable radiography in support of arms control verification is evaluated. Specific requirements, such as accurate measurements of the location of features in a treaty-limited object and the detection of deeply imbedded features, are defined in three scenarios. Sources, detectors, portability, mensuration, and safety are discussed in relation to the scenarios. Examples are given of typical radiographic systems that would be capable of addressing the inspection problems associated with the three scenarios.

  3. Advances in pulsed-power-driven radiography system design.

    SciTech Connect

    Portillo, Salvador; Hinshelwood, David D.; Rovang, Dean Curtis; Cordova, Steve Ray; Oliver, Bryan Velten; Weber, Bruce V.; Welch, Dale Robert; Shelton, Bradley Allen; Sceiford, Matthew E.; Cooperstein, Gerald; Gignac, Raymond Edward; Puetz, Elizabeth A.; Rose, David Vincent; Barker, Dennis L.; Van De Valde, David M.; Droemer, Darryl W.; Wilkins, Frank Lee; Molina, Isidro; Jaramillo, Deanna M.; Swanekamp, Stephen Brian; Commisso, Robert J.; Bailey, Vernon Leslie; Maenchen, John Eric; Johnson, David Lee; Griffin, Fawn A.; Hahn, Kelly Denise; Smith, Ian

    2004-07-01

    Flash x-ray radiography has undergone a transformation in recent years with the resurgence of interest in compact, high intensity pulsed-power-driven electron beam sources. The radiographic requirements and the choice of a consistent x-ray source determine the accelerator parameters, which can be met by demonstrated Induction Voltage Adder technologies. This paper reviews the state of the art and the recent advances which have improved performance by over an order of magnitude in beam brightness and radiographic utility.

  4. Fast neutron radiography research at ANL-W

    SciTech Connect

    Klann, R.T.; Natale, M.D.

    1996-06-01

    Thirty-seven different elements were tested for their suitability as converter screens for direct and indirect fast neutron radiography. The use of commercial X-ray scintillator screens containing YTaO{sub 4}, LaOBr:Tm, YTaO{sub 4}:Nb, YTaO{sub 4}:Tm, CaWO{sub 4}, BaSO{sub 4}:Sr, and GdO{sub 2}S:Tb was also explored for direct fast neutron radiography. For the indirect radiographic process, only one element, holmium, was found to be better than copper. Iron was also found to work as well as copper. All other elements that were tested were inferior to copper for indirect fast neutron radiography. For direct fast neutron radiography, the results were markedly different. Copper was found to be a poor material to sue, as thirty-two of the elements performed better than the copper. Tantalum was found to be the best material to use. Several other materials that also performed remarkably well include, in order of decreasing utility, gold, lutetium, germanium, dysprosium, and thulium. Several interesting results were obtained for the commercial X-ray scintillator screens. Most notably, useful radiographs were produced with all of the various scintillation screens. However, the screens containing YTaO{sub 4}:Nb offered the greatest film densities for the shortest exposure times. Screens using GdSO{sub 4}:Tb provided the best resolution and clearest images at the sacrifice of exposure time. Also, as previous researchers found, scintillator screens offered significantly shorter exposure times than activation foils.

  5. Imaging Brunelleschi's cupola wall using muon scattering radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Guardincerri, Elena

    2015-09-16

    This PowerPoint presentation describes the cupola's structure and current reinforcements, reasoning behind why muon radiography would be helpful. A demonstration project is described where a similar wall was constructed to illustrate the potential benefits to Italian authorities; Requirements and a potential plan were created and collaboration to make it happen was deemed to be possible among LANL, Toshiba, the Parma and Florence Universities and the Opera del Duomo,

  6. ADVANCEMENTS IN NEUTRON RADIOGRAPHY WITHIN THE DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-11-01

    inspection shows the next evolution in nondestructive examination that many areas within the Department of Defense (DoD) require. The NR has the...Nondestructive Testing (NDT) Inspection Constraints 1 Product Design Applications 2 Advanced Neutron Generators 6 Evolution of Neutron Radiography 6...construction of the beam ports 14 15 An image comparison of the early evolution of the beam ports 15 16 The completed assembly and the general placement of

  7. Surgical efficacy of minimally invasive thoracic discectomy.

    PubMed

    Elhadi, Ali M; Zehri, Aqib H; Zaidi, Hasan A; Almefty, Kaith K; Preul, Mark C; Theodore, Nicholas; Dickman, Curtis A

    2015-11-01

    We aimed to determine the clinical indications and surgical outcomes for thoracoscopic discectomy. Thoracic disc disease is a rare degenerative process. Thoracoscopic approaches serve to minimize tissue injury during the approach, but critics argue that this comes at the cost of surgical efficacy. Current reports in the literature are limited to small institutional patient series. We systematically identified all English language articles on thoracoscopic discectomy with at least two patients, published from 1994 to 2013 on MEDLINE, Science Direct, and Google Scholar. We analyzed 12 articles that met the inclusion criteria, five prospective and seven retrospective studies comprising 545 surgical patients. The overall complication rate was 24% (n=129), with reported complications ranging from intercostal neuralgia (6.1%), atelectasis (2.8%), and pleural effusion (2.6%), to more severe complications such as pneumonia (0.8%), pneumothorax (1.3%), and venous thrombosis (0.2%). The average reported postoperative follow-up was 20.5 months. Complete resolution of symptoms was reported in 79% of patients, improvement with residual symptoms in 10.2%, no change in 9.6%, and worsening in 1.2%. The minimally invasive endoscopic approaches to the thoracic spine among selected patients demonstrate excellent clinical efficacy and acceptable complication rates, comparable to the open approaches. Disc herniations confined to a single level, with small or no calcifications, are ideal for such an approach, whereas patients with calcified discs adherent to the dura would benefit from an open approach.

  8. Thoracic splenosis: History is the key.

    PubMed

    Ferrer Marrero, Tirsa M; Prieto-Centurion, Valentin; Jaffe, Howard A

    2017-01-01

    Splenosis is an acquired ectopic autotransplantation of splenic tissue; that occurs after traumatic splenic rupture and splenectomy [1]. Splenosis is a rare but benign disease, and the diagnosis can be challenging as the multiple incidentally found nodules could mimic malignancy [2]. Abdominopelvic Splenosis is thought to occur in as many as 65% of cases of splenic rupture [1]. However, Thoracic Splenosis is rare and usually involve the left parietal and visceral pleura [1,2]. Intraparenchymal lesions are less common but have been reported in cases of parenchymal and diaphragm laceration [1,2]. Taking a thorough history is of utmost importance, as these patients usually present more than two decades after the splenic traumatic rupture. The use of commonly available nuclear studies will further confirm the diagnosis [3]. This will help to avoid unnecessary procedures, like biopsies; and prevent the potential complications. We present a case of Thoracic Splenosis that highlights the importance of taking a detailed history; and the importance of using nuclear studies for the diagnosis. Further adding to its uniqueness, this case showed with multiple intraparenchymal nodules which is a less common presentation of Splenosis.

  9. The thoracic anterior spinal cord adhesion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, T R; Dineen, R; White, B; Jaspan, T

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This study included a series of middle-aged male and female patients who presented with chronic anterior hemicord dysfunction progressing to paraplegia. Imaging of anterior thoracic cord displacement by either a dural adhesion or a dural defect with associated cord herniation is presented. Methods This is a retrospective review of cases referred to a tertiary neuroscience centre over a 19-year period. Imaging series were classified by two experienced neuroradiologists against several criteria and correlated with clinical examination and/or findings at surgery. Results 16 cases were available for full review. Nine were considered to represent adhesions (four confirmed surgically) and four to represent true herniation (three confirmed surgically). In the three remaining cases the diagnosis was radiologically uncertain. Conclusion The authors propose “thoracic anterior spinal cord adhesion syndrome” as a novel term to describe this patient cohort and suggest appropriate clinicoradiological features for diagnosis. Several possible aetiologies are also suggested, with disc rupture and inflammation followed by disc resorption and dural pocket formation being a possible mechanism predisposing to herniation at the extreme end of a clinicopathological spectrum. PMID:22665931

  10. Video-Assisted Thoracic Surgery Study Group.

    PubMed

    LoCicero, J

    1993-09-01

    Both patients and the medical profession are quick to embrace new technology, particularly when it may replace an existing surgical procedure. Unfortunately, the rapidity of acceptance is rarely associated with careful evaluation. Laparoscopy is a recent example of such widely embraced technology. Studies of laparoscopy that yielded good comparative data to more traditional methods were slow to accrue. This led to the exposure of its shortcomings through governmental reports and the lay press. To prevent this from happening in thoracoscopy, two types of studies are required so that valid conclusions about the new technology can be drawn. The first is an accounting of the new technology as procedures evolve around it. The data collected in such a study should contain basic information, including the indications for the procedure, how it was performed, procedure length, associated complications, and patient outcome. Such information provides a broad profile of the technology, emphasizing from the outset its potential strengths and weaknesses. The second type of study involves a more detailed concurrent comparison of the specific procedures utilizing this technology to the established traditional methods. Such randomized studies help to firmly establish through scientific process the place of the new technology. The Video-Assisted Thoracic Surgery Study Group was organized in early 1992 to address these concerns. From an initial four surgeons the group has grown to include more than 41 institutions. Currently the group is collecting data in a registry and has established three clinical trials to evaluate video-assisted thoracic surgery.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Investigation of noise sources for digital radiography systems.

    PubMed

    Ergun, Lutfi; Olgar, Turan

    2017-06-01

    The performance of digital radiography systems can be evaluated in terms of spatial resolution and noise. Noise plays an important role in the achievable image quality for detecting small and low-contrast structures in digital images created by these systems. Our aim in this study was to investigate the noise sources both in the spatial and frequency domain for three digital radiography systems, one digital fluoroscopy system, and one digital mammography system, and to obtain information about the effective operating dose range of these detectors. Noise evaluation in the spatial domain was done with the relative standard deviation-detector air kerma relationship evaluation method. The characterization of the noise in the spatial domain gives information about the types of noise, but does not give information about the noise power distribution in frequency space. Therefore, noise evaluation in the frequency domain was carried out by noise power spectrum measurement. The observed dominant noise component at lower detector doses was electronic noise for the digital mammography system, whereas structured noise was observed to make up nearly half of the total noise at higher detector doses for one of the digital radiography systems. The structured noise component was increased by use of a grid in these systems, independent of the grid ratio and grid frequency, but this increase was lower for higher grid frequencies. Furthermore, the structured noise coefficient was decreased with gain and offset calibrations. The five systems which we evaluated behaved as a quantum noise limited for clinically used detector doses.

  12. [Plain-film radiography in the study of spinal pain].

    PubMed

    Ruiz Santiago, F; Guzmán Alvarez, L; Tello Moreno, M; Navarrete González, P J

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of tomographic imaging techniques, fundamentally computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, has led to a gradual decrease in the indications for plain-film radiography, resulting in fewer patients studied and fewer projections for each patient. Consequently, plain-film studies of the spine have received less attention and radiologists are less familiar with the typical findings in normal and pathologic conditions of the spine. Nevertheless, plain-film radiography continues to be widely used in both primary and specialized care. Thus, radiologists still need to be aware of the normal radiologic anatomy of the spine and of the radiologic manifestations of the diverse pathological processes that can affect the spinal column and that can cause pain. The aim of this article is to review the manifestations on plain-film radiography of a wide variety of diseases that can cause back pain, including congenital, traumatic, degenerative, tumor-related, inflammatory, and infectious diseases and processes. Copyright 2009 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Proton radiography based on near-threshold Cerenkov radiation

    DOEpatents

    van Bibber, Karl A.; Dietrich, Frank S.

    2003-01-01

    A Cerenkov imaging system for charged particle radiography that determines the energy loss of the charged particle beam passing through an object. This energy loss information provides additional detail on target densities when used with traditional radiographic techniques like photon or x-ray radiography. In this invention a probe beam of 800 MeV to 50 GeV/c charged particles is passed through an object to be imaged, an imaging magnetic spectrometer, to a silicon aerogel Cerenkov radiator where the charged particles emitted Cerenkov light proportional to their velocity. At the same beam focal plane, a particle scintillator produces a light output proportional to the incident beam flux. Optical imaging systems relay the Cerenkov and scintillator information to CCD's or other measurement equipment. A ratio between the Cerenkov and scintillator is formed, which is directly proportional to the line density of the object for each pixel measured. By rotating the object, tomographic radiography may be performed. By applying pulses of beam, discrete time-step movies of dynamic objects may be made.

  14. Radiography Inspection Technology of CPR1000 Nuclear Power Unit Pressurizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Jingyun; Deng, Dong; Wang, Jing; Wang, Shuangyin; Hua, Xiongfei

    This article takes the first in-service inspection of the 3rd Unit nuclear island pressurizer (PZR) radiography inspection of Ling Ao nuclear power station for example. It is introduced that the gamma radiographic inspection technology of CPR1000 nuclear power island PZR welds which include the cylinder weld, the tube welds and the head connection welds, the safe-end-welds of PZR tube, and the thermal sleeve, mainly focused on the exposure mode, the film layout and other content in each weld inspection. Meanwhile according to the site operating experience by the inspectors, it is summarized that the technical difficulties and key points which the PZR radiography inspection technology has. Combined with the related sections of the French design and construction rules for mechanical components of PWR nuclear Islands (the RCC-M standard) and the in-service inspection rules for mechanical components of PWR nuclear islands (the RSE-M specification), it makes analysis, calculation and discussion of the technical parameters and crucial details about the ray source selection, the identification of the film and the location markers, the focal length and the times of exposures at least, aiming the characteristics of the PZR ray inspection, which can provide reference method and the suggestion for the similar container radiography inspection.

  15. Use of dental radiography among Lithuanian general dentists.

    PubMed

    Peciuliene, Vytaute; Rimkuviene, Jurate; Maneliene, Rasma; Drukteinis, Saulius

    2009-01-01

    To gather information about the radiographic facilities and techniques used by Lithuanian general dentists. Questionnaires were sent to all 2879 Lithuanian dental practitioners registered on the Lithuanian Dental Chamber licence registry data list. The questionnaire was made with multiple-choice answers. Respondents were invited to choose the only one category of answer that best fitted their clinical attitude. Questions included in the present survey concerned general and specific information regarding peculiarities of radiographic imaging. Only answers of respondents who are licensed as general dentists were included in this study. From the 2850 questionnaires mailed 1532 were returned. The response rate was 53.8%. Of the total responses 1431 questionnaires were received from licensed general dentists. Of total 956 dentists practiced in urban and 576 dentists in rural areas. 61.6% of respondents had access to an intra-oral radiographic unit in their practice and 91.5% of them used dental radiography always or often as the diagnostic tool. To support the film packet in the patient's mouth alternatively film holder or patient's finger was used by 48% of respondents, while film holder was used only by 19.3% of dentists. Recently graduated dental practitioners more common used diagnostic radiography in endodontic pathology than dentists with a longer time from graduation. Film holder was not a popular device among general dental practitioners to perform periapical radioraphs. It is important to improve the existing dental curriculum to ensure the necessary competency when using dental radiography and film holders routinely in clinical practice.

  16. Detection of gastritis by single- and double-contrast radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Thoeni, R.F.; Goldberg, H.I.; Ominsky, S.; Cello, J.P.

    1983-09-01

    Sixty-eight patients with various types of gastritis, 23 patients with normal stomachs, and four patients with other gastric diseases were examined in a prospective study to assess the sensitivity and specificity of single-contrast (SC) and double-contrast (DC) upper gastrointestinal examinations in the evaluation of gastritis. All patients underwent endoscopy with biopsy followed first by DC and then by SC radiography. The respective sensitivities of SC and DC radiography were 58% and 72% for all examinations and 59% and 77% for adequate examinations only. The respective specificities were 59% and 55% based on all examinations. Useful radiographic features included polypoid defects and erosions detected by both methods, abnormal folds and flattened margins detected by the SC technique, and narrowed lumen and crenulated margins detected by the DC technique. In 93% of all cases, the correct diagnosis was based on two or more of these radiographic features. According to this study, the radiographic sensitivity in the detection of gastritis is reliable only in cases of moderate-to-severe disease and only when based on findings of the DC examination. Neither SC nor DC radiography should be used as the primary screening method for patients with suspected gastritis, and the radiographic diagnosis should be restricted to the terms ''erosive'' or ''nonerosive gastritis.''

  17. Reduction of radiation exposure during radiography for scoliosis

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, J.E.; Hoffman, A.D.; Peterson, H.A.

    1983-01-01

    To reduce the radiation exposure received by young scoliosis patients during treatment, six changes in technique were instituted: (1) a posteroanterior projection, (2) specially designed leaded acrylic filters, (3) a high-speed screen-film system, (4) a specially designed cassette-holder and grid, (5) a breast-shield, and (6) additional filtration in the x-ray tube the thyroid, breast, and abdominal areas were made on an Alderson phantom. They revealed an eightfold reduction in abdominal exposure for both the posteroanterior and the lateral radiographys. There was a twentyfold reduction in exposure to the thyroid for the posteroanterior radiography from 100 to less than five milliroentgens and for the lateral radiograph there was a 100-fold reduction from 618 to six milliroentgens. For the breasts there was a sixty-ninefold reduction from 344 to less than five milliroentgens for the posteroanterior radiography and a fifty-fivefold reduction from 277 to less than five milliroentgens for the lateral radiograph. These reductions in exposure were obtained without significant loss in the quality of the radiographs and in most instances with an improvement in the over-all quality of the radiograph due to the more uniform exposure.

  18. Applications of neutron radiography for the nuclear power industry

    SciTech Connect

    Craft, Aaron E.; Barton, John P.

    2016-11-01

    The World Conference on Neutron Radiography (WCNR) and International Topical Meeting on Neutron Radiography (ITMNR) series have been running over 35 years. The most recent event, ITMNR-8, focused on industrial applications and was the first time this series was hosted in China. In China, more than twenty new nuclear power plants are in construction and plans have been announced to increase the nuclear capacity further by a factor of three within fifteen years. There are additional prospects in many other nations. Neutron tests were vital during previous developments of materials and components for nuclear power applications, as reported in this conference series. For example a majority of the 140 papers in the Proceedings of the First WCNR are for the benefit of the nuclear power industry. Included are reviews of the diverse techniques being applied in Europe, Japan, the United States, and at many other centers. Many of those techniques are being utilized and advanced to the present time. Neutron radiography of irradiated nuclear fuel provides more comprehensive information about the internal condition of irradiated nuclear fuel than any other non-destructive technique to date. Applications include examination of nuclear waste, nuclear fuels, cladding, control elements, and other critical components. In this paper, the techniques developed and applied internationally for the nuclear power industry since the earliest years are reviewed, and the question is asked whether neutron test techniques can be of value in development of the present and future generations of nuclear power plants world-wide.

  19. Management of pediatric radiation dose using Agfa computed radiography.

    PubMed

    Schaetzing, R

    2004-10-01

    Radiation dose to patients and its management have become important considerations in modern radiographic imaging procedures, but they acquire particular significance in the imaging of children. Because of their longer life expectancy, children exposed to radiation are thought to have a significantly increased risk of radiation-related late sequelae compared to adults first exposed to radiation later in life. Therefore, current clinical thinking dictates that dose in pediatric radiography be minimized, while simultaneously ensuring sufficient diagnostic information in the image, and reducing the need for repeat exposures. Dose management obviously starts with characterization and control of the exposure technique. However, it extends farther through the imaging chain to the acquisition system, and even to the image processing techniques used to optimize acquired images for display. Further, other factors, such as quality control procedures and the ability to handle special pediatric procedures, like scoliosis exams, also come into play. The need for dose management in modern radiography systems has spawned a variety of different solutions, some of which are similar across different manufacturers, and some of which are unique. This paper covers the techniques used in Agfa Computed Radiography (CR) systems to manage dose in a pediatric environment.

  20. [Analysis of epidermoid carcinomas using panoramic radiography and computerized tomography].

    PubMed

    Pereira, A C; Cavalcanti, M G; Tossato, P S; Guida, F J; Duaik, M C; Kuroishi, M

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to compare radiographic findings, such as localization and extension of tumors toward the bone and soft tissues, in panoramic radiography and computed tomography (CT). Four radiologists assessed the radiographic findings of 48 patients with the histopathological diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma in different sites of the maxillofacial region. Panoramic radiographs and computed tomographs were obtained at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, at FUNDECTO-USP and at the hospital of the University of São Paulo (USP). We observed a considerable limitation of the panoramic radiography in determining the localization and extension of tumors, since it revealed unclear delimitations. Regarding CT, better results were obtained: it was possible to observe the invasion of the tumor toward adjacent soft tissues, as well as the extension of bone destruction and the depth of the lesion, which were confirmed by surgical findings. We concluded that computed tomography demonstrated to be a sensitive radiographic technique for the detection of the involvement of bone and soft tissues, contributing for a more precise diagnosis, surgical planning and intervention. On the other hand, panoramic radiography was considered less sensitive and less efficient than CT, since it shows only unclear borders of the lesions and is not able to assess the involvement of soft tissues.

  1. The implementation of digital sensors in maxillofacial radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Stelt, Paul F.

    2001-03-01

    Systems for intra-oral digital radiography in dentistry can be divided into two main groups: direct sensor systems and semi-direct or indirect sensor systems. Direct imaging is performed by a two-dimensional array of sensor elements. The size of a typical intra-oral CCD-sensor is approximately from 18 mm×24 mm to 30 mm×40 mm; the active area is somewhat smaller, because of the thickness of the packaging of the sensor. CCD-based imaging is now also available for panoramic and cephalometric radiography. Indirect (semi-direct) imaging is based on storage phosphor plates (SPP) imaging. The plate is positioned in the mouth of the patient behind the teeth, and exposed to radiation. The positioning of the sensor plate resembles very much the way conventional radiographic films are handled. SPP technology is also available for panoramic and cephalometric imaging. The purpose of radiography is to provide information to solve a particular diagnostic task. It is therefore very likely that the role of dedicated diagnostic software will become essential in the near future. The importance of dedicated software for diagnostic imaging will increase. As a result of worldwide research, more procedures will become available, for research as well as for use in general practice.

  2. Practical contour segmentation algorithm for small animal digital radiography image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Fang; Hui, Gong

    2008-12-01

    In this paper a practical, automated contour segmentation technique for digital radiography image is described. Digital radiography is an imaging mode based on the penetrability of x-ray. Unlike reflection imaging mode such as visible light camera, the pixel brightness represents the summation of the attenuations on the photon thoroughfare. It is not chromophotograph but gray scale picture. Contour extraction is of great importance in medical applications, especially in non-destructive inspection. Manual segmentation techniques include pixel selection, geometrical boundary selection and tracing. But it relies heavily on the experience of the operators, and is time-consuming. Some researchers try to find contours from the intensity jumping characters around them. However these characters also exist in the juncture of bone and soft tissue. The practical way is back to the primordial threshold algorithm. This research emphasizes on how to find the optimal threshold. A high resolution digital radiography system is used to provide the oriental gray scale image. A mouse is applied as the sample of this paper to show the feasibility of the algorithm.

  3. A New Neutron Radiography / Tomography / Imaging Station DINGO at OPAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbe, U.; Randall, T.; Hughes, C.; Davidson, G.; Pangelis, S.; Kennedy, S. J.

    A new neutron radiography / tomography / imaging instrument DINGO was built to support the area of neutron imaging research (neutron radiography/tomography) at ANSTO. The instrument is designed for an international user community and for routine quality control for defense, industrial, cultural heritage and archaeology applications. In the industrial field it provides a useful tool for studying cracking and defects in steel or other metals. The instrument construction was completed at the end of June 2013 and it is currently in the hot commissioning stage. The usable neutron flux is mainly determined by the neutron source, but it depends on the instrument position and the resolution. The instrument position for DINGO is the thermal neutron beam port HB-2 in the reactor hall. The measured flux (using gold foil) for an L/D of approximately 500 at HB-2 is 5.3*107 [n/cm2s], which is in a similar range to other facilities. A special feature of DINGO is the in-pile collimator position in front of the main shutter at HB-2. The collimator offers two pinholes with a possible L/D of 500 and 1000. A secondary collimator separates the two beams by blocking one and positions another aperture for the other beam. The whole instrument operates in two different positions, one for high resolution and one for high speed. In the current configuration DINGO measured first radiography and tomography data sets on friendly user test samples.

  4. Advances in computed radiography systems and their physical imaging characteristics.

    PubMed

    Cowen, A R; Davies, A G; Kengyelics, S M

    2007-12-01

    Radiological imaging is progressing towards an all-digital future, across the spectrum of medical imaging techniques. Computed radiography (CR) has provided a ready pathway from screen film to digital radiography and a convenient entry point to PACS. This review briefly revisits the principles of modern CR systems and their physical imaging characteristics. Wide dynamic range and digital image enhancement are well-established benefits of CR, which lend themselves to improved image presentation and reduced rates of repeat exposures. However, in its original form CR offered limited scope for reducing the radiation dose per radiographic exposure, compared with screen film. Recent innovations in CR, including the use of dual-sided image readout and channelled storage phosphor have eased these concerns. For example, introduction of these technologies has improved detective quantum efficiency (DQE) by approximately 50 and 100%, respectively, compared with standard CR. As a result CR currently affords greater scope for reducing patient dose, and provides a more substantive challenge to the new solid-state, flat-panel, digital radiography detectors.

  5. Z-petawatt driven ion beam radiography development.

    SciTech Connect

    Schollmeier, Marius; Geissel, Matthias; Rambo, Patrick K.; Schwarz, Jens; Sefkow, Adam B.

    2013-09-01

    Laser-driven proton radiography provides electromagnetic field mapping with high spatiotemporal resolution, and has been applied to many laser-driven High Energy Density Physics (HEDP) experiments. Our report addresses key questions about the feasibility of ion radiography at the Z-Accelerator (%E2%80%9CZ%E2%80%9D), concerning laser configuration, hardware, and radiation background. Charged particle tracking revealed that radiography at Z requires GeV scale protons, which is out of reach for existing and near-future laser systems. However, it might be possible to perform proton deflectometry to detect magnetic flux compression in the fringe field region of a magnetized liner inertial fusion experiment. Experiments with the Z-Petawatt laser to enhance proton yield and energy showed an unexpected scaling with target thickness. Full-scale, 3D radiation-hydrodynamics simulations, coupled to fully explicit and kinetic 2D particle-in-cell simulations running for over 10 ps, explain the scaling by a complex interplay of laser prepulse, preplasma, and ps-scale temporal rising edge of the laser.

  6. Thoracic surgery in the real world: does surgical specialty affect outcomes in patients having general thoracic operations?

    PubMed

    Ferraris, Victor A; Saha, Sibu P; Davenport, Daniel L; Zwischenberger, Joseph B

    2012-04-01

    Most general thoracic operations in the United States are performed by general surgeons. Results obtained by those identified as general surgeons are often compared with those identified as thoracic surgeons. We interrogated the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Project database over a 5-year period to compare outcomes in patients who underwent similar operations by surgeons identified as either thoracic surgeons or general surgeons. We employed propensity-score matching to minimize confounding when estimating the effect of surgeon identity on postoperative outcomes. During the study period, thoracic surgeons performed 3,263 major pulmonary or esophageal operations, and general surgeons performed 15,057 similar operations. Compared with patients operated on by general surgeons, patients operated on by thoracic surgeons had significant excess multivariate comorbidities, including insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, concurrent pneumonia, congestive heart failure, previous cardiac surgery, dialysis-dependent renal failure, disseminated cancer, prior sepsis, and previous operation within 30 days. Likewise, patients in highest risk categories had operations performed by thoracic surgeons more commonly than by general surgeons. Unadjusted comparisons for mortality and serious morbidity showed significantly worse mortality and pulmonary complications in patients operated on by thoracic surgeons. However, with propensity matching according to surgeon type, thoracic surgeons had significantly fewer serious adverse outcomes compared with general surgeons, and this decreased morbidity occurred in a higher risk cohort. Our results show that patients operated on by thoracic surgeons have higher acuity compared with patients operated on by general surgeons. When patients are matched for comorbidities and serious preoperative risk factors, thoracic surgeons have improved outcomes, especially with regard to

  7. Surface anatomy and surface landmarks for thoracic surgery: Part II.

    PubMed

    Smith, Shona E; Darling, Gail E

    2011-05-01

    Surface anatomy is an integral part of a thoracic surgeon's armamentarium to assist with the diagnosis, staging, and treatment of thoracic pathology. As reviewed in this article, the surface landmarks of the lungs, heart, great vessels, and mediastinum are critical for appropriate patient care and should be learned in conjunction with classic anatomy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Extraforaminal ligament attachments of the thoracic spinal nerves in humans.

    PubMed

    Kraan, G A; Hoogland, P V J M; Wuisman, P I J M

    2009-04-01

    An anatomical study of the extraforaminal attachments of the thoracic spinal nerves was performed using human spinal columns. The objectives of the study are to identify and describe the existence of ligamentous structures at each thoracic level that attach spinal nerves to structures at the extraforaminal region. During the last 120 years, several mechanisms have been described to protect the spinal nerve against traction. All the described structures were located inside the spinal canal proximal to the intervertebral foramen. Ligaments with a comparable function just outside the intervertebral foramen are mentioned ephemerally. No studies are available about ligamentous attachments of thoracic spinal nerves to the spine. Five embalmed human thoracic spines (Th2-Th11) were dissected. Bilaterally, the extraforaminal region was dissected to describe and measure anatomical structures and their relationships with the thoracic spinal nerves. Histology was done at the sites of attachment of the ligaments to the nerves and along the ligaments. The thoracic spinal nerves are attached to the transverse process of the vertebrae cranial and caudal to the intervertebral foramen. The ligaments consist mainly of collagenous fibers. In conclusion, at the thoracic level, direct ligamentous connections exist between extraforaminal thoracic spinal nerves and nearby structures. They may serve as a protective mechanism against traction and compression of the nerves by positioning the nerve in the intervertebral foramen.

  9. Noteworthy Literature Published in 2016 for Thoracic Organ Transplantation Anesthesiologists.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Kathirvel; Nazarnia, Soheyla

    2017-03-01

    This article is first in the series to review the published literature on perioperative issues in patients undergoing thoracic solid organ transplantations. We present recent literature from 2016 on preoperative considerations, organ preservation, intraoperative anesthesia management, surgical techniques, postoperative complications, and the impact of perioperative management on short- and long-term outcomes that are pertinent to thoracic transplantation anesthesiologists.

  10. Thoracic ultrasound recognition of competence: A position paper of the Thoracic Society of Australia and New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Jonathan P; Twaddell, Scott H; Lee, Y C Gary; Salamonsen, Matthew; Hew, Mark; Fielding, David; Nguyen, Phan; Steinfort, Daniel; Hopkins, Peter; Smith, Nicola; Grainge, Christopher

    2017-02-01

    The ability to perform bedside thoracic ultrasound is increasingly recognized as an essential skill for thoracic clinicians, extending the clinical examination and aiding diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Thoracic ultrasound reduces complications and increases success rates when used prior to thoracentesis or intercostal chest tube insertion. It is increasingly difficult to defend performing these procedures without real or near-real time image guidance. To assist thoracic physicians and others achieve and demonstrate thoracic ultrasound competence, the Interventional Pulmonology Special Interest Group (IP-SIG) of the Thoracic Society of Australia and New Zealand (TSANZ) has developed a new pathway with four components: (i) completion of an approved thoracic ultrasound theory and hands-on teaching course. (ii) A log of at least 40 relevant scans. (iii) Two formative assessments (following 5-10 scans and again after 20 scans) using the Ultrasound-Guided Thoracentesis Skills and Tasks Assessment Tool (UG-STAT). (iv) A barrier assessment (UG-STAT, pass score of 90%) by an accredited assessor not directly involved in the candidate's training. Upon completion of these requirements a candidate may apply to the TSANZ for recognition of competence. This pathway is intended to provide a regional standard for thoracic ultrasound training.

  11. Thoracic surgery training in Canada according to the residents: the thoracic surgery resident survey, of the Canadian thoracic manpower and education study (T-Med).

    PubMed

    Schieman, Colin; Kelly, Elizabeth; Gelfand, Gary; Graham, Andrew; McFadden, Sean P; Edwards, Janet; Grondin, Sean C

    2010-01-01

    The resident component of the Canadian Thoracic Manpower and Education Study (T-MED) was conducted to understand the basic demographic of Canadian thoracic surgery residents, the factors influencing their selection of training programs, current work conditions, training and competencies, and opinions in regard to the manpower needs for the specialty. A modified Delphi process was used to develop a survey applicable to thoracic surgery residents. In May and June 2009, residents completed the voluntary anonymous Internet-based survey. All Canadian residents participated in the survey, providing a 100% response rate. Most respondents were male (11/12), and the average age was 34 years old with an anticipated debt greater than $50,000 on graduation. All residents worked more than 70 hours per week, with most doing 1 : 3 or 1 : 4 on-call. Two-thirds of respondents reported being satisfied or very satisfied with their training program. Rates of anticipated competence in performing various thoracic surgeries on graduation differed between residents and program directors. Two-thirds (8/12) of residents planned to practice thoracic surgery exclusively, and hoped to practice in an academic setting. Most residents (10/12) agreed or strongly agreed that not enough jobs are available in Canada for graduating trainees and that the number of residency positions should reflect the predicted availability of jobs. This study has provided detailed information on thoracic surgery resident demographics and training programs. Most thoracic surgery residents are satisfied with their current training program but have concerns about their job prospects on graduation, and they believe that the number of training positions should reflect potential job opportunities. This survey represents the first attempt to characterize the current state of thoracic surgery training in Canada from the resident's perspective and may help in directing educational and manpower planning. Copyright © 2010

  12. Series: Practical Evaluation of Clinical Image Quality (2): Image Quality Measurements for Digital Radiography Systems.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Reiji

    In recent years, the manuals and data analysis tools to evaluate the basic imaging properties of medical imaging systems, such as digital radiography system, CT, and MRI, are easily available. For the image quality evaluation of digital radiography systems, special measurement system, such as a microdensitometer, required for the analysis of analog radiography system, is not needed. This enabled anyone to perform the evaluation of digital radiography system.On the other hand, to make accurate measurements, obtaining appropriate image data is a must. To enable this, appropriate setting of the hardware and the software is also required. In addition, we are asked to acquire sufficient knowledge to make highly reproducible measurements.

  13. Methodology for digital radiography simulation using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX for industrial applications.

    PubMed

    Souza, E M; Correa, S C A; Silva, A X; Lopes, R T; Oliveira, D F

    2008-05-01

    This work presents a methodology for digital radiography simulation for industrial applications using the MCNPX radiography tally. In order to perform the simulation, the energy-dependent response of a BaFBr imaging plate detector was modeled and introduced in the MCNPX radiography tally input. In addition, a post-processing program was used to convert the MCNPX radiography tally output into 16-bit digital images. Simulated and experimental images of a steel pipe containing corrosion alveoli and stress corrosion cracking were compared, and the results showed good agreement between both images.

  14. Outcomes of surgical paraclavicular thoracic outlet decompression.

    PubMed

    Desai, Sapan S; Toliyat, Mohammad; Dua, Anahita; Charlton-Ouw, Kristofer M; Hossain, Monir; Estrera, Anthony L; Safi, Hazim J; Azizzadeh, Ali

    2014-02-01

    Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is a constellation of signs and symptoms caused by compression of the neurovascular structures in the thoracic outlet. These structures include the brachial plexus, the subclavian vein, and the subclavian artery, resulting in neurogenic (NTOS), venous (VTOS), and arterial (ATOS) types of TOS, respectively. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of paraclavicular surgical decompression for TOS. A prospective analysis of patients who underwent surgical decompression for TOS at a newly established center was performed. Diagnosis of TOS was based on clinical history, a physical examination, and additional diagnostic studies. The indication for surgery in patients diagnosed with NTOS was the presence of persistent symptoms after a trial of physical therapy. Primary outcomes were assessed according to Derkash's classification as excellent, good, fair, and poor. Secondary outcomes included mortality, complications, and duration of hospital stay. Between August 2004 and June 2011, 40 paraclavicular decompression procedures were performed on 36 patients (16 men) with TOS. The mean age was 36.5 years (range: 15-68). Bilateral decompression was performed on 4 patients. The types were NTOS (n = 19; 48%), VTOS (n = 16; 40%), and ATOS (n = 5; 12%). In addition to pain, the most common presenting symptom was numbness in NTOS, swelling in VTOS, and coolness in ATOS. A history of trauma was present in 22.2%. Two patients suffered from recurrent symptoms after previous transaxillary first rib resection for VTOS at another institution. Diagnostic tests performed included nerve conduction studies (43%), venogram (40%), and arteriogram (20%). All patients underwent paraclavicular decompression, which included radical anterior and partial middle scalenectomy, brachial plexus neurolysis, and first rib resection. The first rib resection was partial, through a supraclavicular only approach in NTOS and ATOS patients (60%) or complete, through a

  15. Endoscopic thoracic sympathicotomy for Raynaud's phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yasushi; Ueyama, Takeshi; Endo, Masamitsu; Sasaki, Hisao; Kasashima, Fuminori; Abe, Yoshinobu; Kosugi, Ikuko

    2002-07-01

    For many years, thoracic sympathectomy via open surgery was not used to treat Raynaud's phenomenon because of the invasiveness of this procedure and the poor long-term outcomes associated with it. However, with the introduction of endoscopic surgery, thoracic sympathectomy (or sympathicotomy) has been performed by some surgeons as a less invasive surgical option for patients with Raynaud's phenomenon. The less invasive procedure has the possibility of emphasizing merits of sympathectomy. The purpose of this study was to reevaluate the efficacy of sympathicotomy for Raynaud's phenomenon with endoscopic technique and its range of applicability. Between December 1992 and August 2001, endoscopic thoracic sympathicotomy (ETS) was performed in 28 patients with Raynaud's phenomenon (of a total of 502 patients with autonomic disorders who underwent ETS) at National Kanazawa Hospital. We considered indications for surgical treatment of Raynaud's phenomenon to include severe chronic symptoms or nonhealing digital ulceration refractory to intensive medical therapy. All patients were mailed a self-assessment questionnaire after surgery to determine the immediate and long-term results of the procedure. Data from both initial and long-term follow-up examinations were obtained. Fifty-four ETS procedures were performed in 28 patients. No operative mortality was seen, and no occurrence of major complications necessitated open surgery. Initial resolution or improvement of symptoms was achieved in 26 of 28 patients (92.9%). However, later in the postoperative period, symptoms recurred in 23 of 28 patients (82.1%), although no recurrence of digital ulceration was seen throughout our observation. At the final follow-up examination (median follow-up period, 62.5 months), 25 patients (89.3%) reported overall improvement of the frequency and severity of their symptoms. Despite the high rate of recurrence, ETS clearly produced a high rate of initial relief. ETS did indeed promote healing

  16. Reflecting the thoracic fellowship in Canada as a Japanese thoracic surgeon: is there anything we should follow?

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Teruya

    2011-01-01

    In Japanese surgical society, there have been urgent discussions as to the decrease in the number of junior doctors who want to be surgical specialists. This problem seems to have originated from the loss of attractiveness of surgery. One of the counter-measures to regain the attractiveness of surgical specialties might be a well-organized training system, for which the Japanese Board of General Thoracic Surgery (JBGTS), as well as those of other surgical subspecialties, has struggled. Fortunately, I had an opportunity of general thoracic surgery training in Canada, and had a chance to reflect on the thoracic training programs of both countries. Based on my experience as a thoracic fellow in Canada, I would like to introduce the Canadian way of thoracic surgery training, referring to the differences between each program.

  17. Thoracic endovascular aortic repair for blunt thoracic aortic injuries in complex aortic arch vessels anatomies.

    PubMed

    Piffaretti, Gabriele; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Ierardi, Anna Maria; Mariscalco, Giovanni; Macchi, Edoardo; Castelli, Patrizio; Tozzi, Matteo; Franchin, Marco

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study is to report the use of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in blunt thoracic aortic injuries (BTAIs) presenting with complex anatomies of the aortic arch vessels. Two patients were admitted to our hospital for the management of BTAI. Anomalies were as follow: aberrant right subclavian artery (n = 1) and right-sided aortic arch with 5 vessels anatomy variant (n = 1). TEVAR was accomplished using parallel graft with periscope configuration in the patient with the aberrant right subclavian artery. At 12-month follow-up, computed tomography angiographies confirmed the exclusion of the BTAI, the stability of the endograft, the resolution of the pseudoaneurysm, and the patency of the parallel endograft. Aortic arch vessels variants and anomalies are not rare, and should be recognized and studied precisely to plan the most appropriate operative treatment. TEVAR proved to be effective even in complex anatomies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Non-intubated thoracic surgery—A survey from the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Sorge, Roberto; Akopov, Andrej; Congregado, Miguel; Grodzki, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Background A survey amongst the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) members has been performed to investigate the currents trends, rates of adoption as well as potential for future expansion of non-intubated thoracic surgery (NITS) performed under spontaneous ventilation. Methods A 14-question-based questionnaire has been e-mailed to ESTS members. To facilitate the completion of the questionnaire, questions entailed either quantitative or multiple-choice answers. Investigated issues included previous experience with NITS and number of procedures performed, preferred types of anesthesia protocols (i.e., thoracic epidural anesthesia, intercostal or paravertebral blocks, laryngeal mask, use of additional sedation), type of procedures, ideal candidates for NITS, main advantages and technical disadvantages. Non-univocal answer to multiple-choice questions was permitted. Results Out of 105 responders, 62 reported an experience with NITS. The preferred types of anesthesia were intercostal blocks with (59%) or without (50%) sedation, followed by laryngeal mask with sedation (43%) and thoracic epidural anesthesia with sedation (20%). The most frequently performed procedures included thoracoscopic management of recurrent pleural effusion (98%), pleural decortication for empyema thoracis and lung biopsy for interstitial lung disease (26% each); pericardial window and mediastinal biopsy (20% each). More complex procedures such as lobectomy, lung volume reduction surgery and thymectomy have been performed by a minority of responders (2% each). Poor-risk patients due to co-morbidities (70%) and patients with poor pulmonary function (43%) were considered the ideal candidates. Main advantages included faster, recovery (67%), reduced morbidity (59%) and shorter hospital stay with decreased costs (43% each). Reported technical disadvantages included coughing (59%) and poor maneuverability due to diaphragmatic and lung movements (56%). Overall, 69% of responders indicated

  19. Endovascular treatment of thoracic aortic fistulas.

    PubMed

    Léobon, Bertrand; Roux, Daniel; Mugniot, Antoine; Rousseau, Hervé; Cérene, Alain; Glock, Yves; Fournial, Gérard

    2002-07-01

    Aortoesophageal and aortobronchial fistulas constitute a problem in therapy because of the high rates of morbidity and mortality associated with operation. From May 1996 to March 2000, we treated by an endovascular procedure one aortoesophageal and three aortobronchial fistulas. There was no postoperative death. We noted one peripheral vascular complication that required a surgical procedure, one postoperative confusion, and one inflammatory syndrome. In one case, because of a persistent leakage after 21 months, we had to implant a second endovascular stent graft. A few weeks later the reopening of this patient's esophageal fistula led to his death by mediastinitis 25 months after the first procedure. The few cases published seem to bear out the interest, observed in our 4 patients, of an endovascular approach to treat complex lesions such as fistulas of the thoracic aorta especially in emergency or palliative cases.

  20. Thoracic spinal cord compression by a tophus.

    PubMed

    Ntsiba, Honoré; Makosso, Edouard; Moyikoua, Armand

    2010-03-01

    We report a case of thoracic (T10) spinal cord compression by a tophus in a patient with known chronic gout. Spastic paraplegia developed gradually over 6 months in this 43-year-old man with hypertension, alcohol abuse, and chronic gouty arthritis with tophi. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography visualized an intradural nodule measuring 1.5cm in diameter at the level of T10, as well as geodes in the left T10 lamina and left T9-T10 articular processes. The nodule was removed surgically and shown by histological examination to be a tophus. The neurological impairments resolved rapidly and completely. We found about 60 similar cases in the literature. Spinal cord compression in a patient with chronic gout can be caused by a tophus. Copyright 2010 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.