Science.gov

Sample records for radioinduced damage repair

  1. Interactions between DNA damage, repair, and transcription.

    PubMed

    Khobta, Andriy; Epe, Bernd

    2012-08-01

    This review addresses a variety of mechanisms by which DNA repair interacts with transcription and vice versa. Blocking of transcriptional elongation is the best studied of these mechanisms. Transcription recovery after damage therefore has often been used as a surrogate marker of DNA repair in cells. However, it has become evident that relationships between DNA damage, repair, and transcription are more complex due to various indirect effects of DNA damage on gene transcription. These include inhibition of transcription by DNA repair intermediates as well as regulation of transcription and of the epigenetic status of the genes by DNA repair-related mechanisms. In addition, since transcription is emerging as an important endogenous source of DNA damage in cells, we briefly summarise recent advances in understanding the nature of co-transcriptionally induced DNA damage and the DNA repair pathways involved. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. DNA Damage and Repair in Vascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Uryga, Anna; Gray, Kelly; Bennett, Martin

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage affecting both genomic and mitochondrial DNA is present in a variety of both inherited and acquired vascular diseases. Multiple cell types show persistent DNA damage and a range of lesions. In turn, DNA damage activates a variety of DNA repair mechanisms, many of which are activated in vascular disease. Such DNA repair mechanisms either stall the cell cycle to allow repair to occur or trigger apoptosis or cell senescence to prevent propagation of damaged DNA. Recent evidence has indicated that DNA damage occurs early, is progressive, and is sufficient to impair function of cells composing the vascular wall. The consequences of persistent genomic and mitochondrial DNA damage, including inflammation, cell senescence, and apoptosis, are present in vascular disease. DNA damage can thus directly cause vascular disease, opening up new possibilities for both prevention and treatment. We review the evidence for and the causes, types, and consequences of DNA damage in vascular disease.

  3. Oxidative DNA damage & repair: An introduction.

    PubMed

    Cadet, Jean; Davies, Kelvin J A

    2017-06-01

    This introductory article should be viewed as a prologue to the Free Radical Biology & Medicine Special Issue devoted to the important topic of Oxidatively Damaged DNA and its Repair. This special issue is dedicated to Professor Tomas Lindahl, co-winner of the 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his seminal discoveries in the area repair of oxidatively damaged DNA. In the past several years it has become abundantly clear that DNA oxidation is a major consequence of life in an oxygen-rich environment. Concomitantly, survival in the presence of oxygen, with the constant threat of deleterious DNA mutations and deletions, has largely been made possible through the evolution of a vast array of DNA repair enzymes. The articles in this Oxidatively Damaged DNA & Repair special issue detail the reactions by which intracellular DNA is oxidatively damaged, and the enzymatic reactions and pathways by which living organisms survive such assaults by repair processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Repair of radiation damage in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Setlow, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    The responses, such as survival, mutation, and carcinogenesis, of mammalian cells and tissues to radiation are dependent not only on the magnitude of the damage to macromolecular structures - DNA, RNA, protein, and membranes - but on the rates of macromolecular syntheses of cells relative to the half-lives of the damages. Cells possess a number of mechanisms for repairing damage to DNA. If the repair systems are rapid and error free, cells can tolerate much larger doses than if repair is slow or error prone. It is important to understand the effects of radiation and the repair of radiation damage because there exist reasonable amounts of epidemiological data that permits the construction of dose-response curves for humans. The shapes of such curves or the magnitude of the response will depend on repair. Radiation damage is emphasized because: (a) radiation dosimetry, with all its uncertainties for populations, is excellent compared to chemical dosimetry; (b) a number of cancer-prone diseases are known in which there are defects in DNA repair and radiation results in more chromosomal damage in cells from such individuals than in cells from normal individuals; (c) in some cases, specific radiation products in DNA have been correlated with biological effects, and (d) many chemical effects seem to mimic radiation effects. A further reason for emphasizing damage to DNA is the wealth of experimental evidence indicating that damages to DNA can be initiating events in carcinogenesis.

  5. Repair of chemical damage in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Setlow, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    The repair of chemical damage to DNA differs in many ways from the repair of radiation damage and its interpretation is often more complicated. For example, most chemicals of environmental concern do not react directly with cellular macromolecules but must first be activated to nucleophiles. Hence the dosimetry of chemicals is complicated and may vary markedly from tissue to tissue, organelle to organelle or from linker to the core region of DNA. The different reactivities between agents reacting directly and those that react indirectly may give rise to products whose yields as a function of dose are completely different even though the products themselves may be the same. Nucleotide excision measurements of DNA repair are used extensively to detect agents that react with DNA and such measurements help identify DNA adducts that are dangerous. The chemical damages that mimic uv are repaired by nucleotide excision, and the chemicals are those that give rise to bulky adducts. Although the excision repair of bulky DNA adducts mimics the repair of uv damage in many ways, the identity of the repair pathways is a subject of controversy.

  6. Aging processes, DNA damage, and repair.

    PubMed

    Gilchrest, B A; Bohr, V A

    1997-04-01

    The second triennial FASEB Summer Research Conference on "Clonal Senescence and Differentiation" (August 17-22, 1996) focused on the interrelationships between aging processes and DNA damage and repair. The attendees represented a cross section of senior and junior investigators working in fields ranging from classic cellular gerontology to yeast and nematode models of aging to basic mechanisms of DNA damage and repair. The meeting opened with a keynote address by Dr. Bruce Ames that emphasized the documented relationships between oxidative damage, cancer, and aging. This was followed by eight platform sessions, one poster discussion, one featured presentation, and an after-dinner address. The following sections highlight the key points discussed.

  7. Mechanisms of DNA damage, repair, and mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Nimrat; Walker, Graham C

    2017-06-01

    Living organisms are continuously exposed to a myriad of DNA damaging agents that can impact health and modulate disease-states. However, robust DNA repair and damage-bypass mechanisms faithfully protect the DNA by either removing or tolerating the damage to ensure an overall survival. Deviations in this fine-tuning are known to destabilize cellular metabolic homeostasis, as exemplified in diverse cancers where disruption or deregulation of DNA repair pathways results in genome instability. Because routinely used biological, physical and chemical agents impact human health, testing their genotoxicity and regulating their use have become important. In this introductory review, we will delineate mechanisms of DNA damage and the counteracting repair/tolerance pathways to provide insights into the molecular basis of genotoxicity in cells that lays the foundation for subsequent articles in this issue. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 58:235-263, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Analysis and Repair of Impact Damaged Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    Manager/Librarian (2 copies) Ansett Airlines of Australia, Library Australian Airlines, Library Qantas Airways Limited Civil Aviation Authority...VICTORIA Aircraft Structures Report 435 ANALYSIS AND REPAIR OF IMPACT DAMAGED COMPOSITES (U) by J. PAUL and R. JONES Approved for Public Release s DTICn...ACT 2601 I AR-005-570 EEPARDIP CIF EEFENCE IE I SCIENE AND 7Y CANISArION AEE rICAL EMSEACH LABRM AIRCRAFT STRUCTURES REPORT 435 ANALYSI AND REPAIR OF

  9. DNA Repair by Reversal of DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Chengqi; He, Chuan

    2013-01-01

    Endogenous and exogenous factors constantly challenge cellular DNA, generating cytotoxic and/or mutagenic DNA adducts. As a result, organisms have evolved different mechanisms to defend against the deleterious effects of DNA damage. Among these diverse repair pathways, direct DNA-repair systems provide cells with simple yet efficient solutions to reverse covalent DNA adducts. In this review, we focus on recent advances in the field of direct DNA repair, namely, photolyase-, alkyltransferase-, and dioxygenase-mediated repair processes. We present specific examples to describe new findings of known enzymes and appealing discoveries of new proteins. At the end of this article, we also briefly discuss the influence of direct DNA repair on other fields of biology and its implication on the discovery of new biology. PMID:23284047

  10. Repairing the damage to Atlantis' External Tank

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-03-07

    Technicians in the Vehicle Assembly Building prepare materials that will be used during repair of the nose cone on Atlantis' external tank. A severe thunderstorm with golf ball-sized hail caused visible divots in the giant tank's foam insulation and minor surface damage to about 26 heat shield tiles on the shuttle's left wing. Further evaluation of the tank is necessary to get an accurate accounting of foam damage and determine the type of repair required and the time needed for that work. A new target launch date has not been determined, but teams will focus on preparing Atlantis for liftoff in late April on mission STS-117.

  11. DNA Damage, DNA Repair, Aging, and Neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Maynard, Scott; Fang, Evandro Fei; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Croteau, Deborah L; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2015-09-18

    Aging in mammals is accompanied by a progressive atrophy of tissues and organs, and stochastic damage accumulation to the macromolecules DNA, RNA, proteins, and lipids. The sequence of the human genome represents our genetic blueprint, and accumulating evidence suggests that loss of genomic maintenance may causally contribute to aging. Distinct evidence for a role of imperfect DNA repair in aging is that several premature aging syndromes have underlying genetic DNA repair defects. Accumulation of DNA damage may be particularly prevalent in the central nervous system owing to the low DNA repair capacity in postmitotic brain tissue. It is generally believed that the cumulative effects of the deleterious changes that occur in aging, mostly after the reproductive phase, contribute to species-specific rates of aging. In addition to nuclear DNA damage contributions to aging, there is also abundant evidence for a causative link between mitochondrial DNA damage and the major phenotypes associated with aging. Understanding the mechanistic basis for the association of DNA damage and DNA repair with aging and age-related diseases, such as neurodegeneration, would give insight into contravening age-related diseases and promoting a healthy life span.

  12. DNA Damage, DNA Repair, Aging, and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Maynard, Scott; Fang, Evandro Fei; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Croteau, Deborah L.; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    2015-01-01

    Aging in mammals is accompanied by a progressive atrophy of tissues and organs, and stochastic damage accumulation to the macromolecules DNA, RNA, proteins, and lipids. The sequence of the human genome represents our genetic blueprint, and accumulating evidence suggests that loss of genomic maintenance may causally contribute to aging. Distinct evidence for a role of imperfect DNA repair in aging is that several premature aging syndromes have underlying genetic DNA repair defects. Accumulation of DNA damage may be particularly prevalent in the central nervous system owing to the low DNA repair capacity in postmitotic brain tissue. It is generally believed that the cumulative effects of the deleterious changes that occur in aging, mostly after the reproductive phase, contribute to species-specific rates of aging. In addition to nuclear DNA damage contributions to aging, there is also abundant evidence for a causative link between mitochondrial DNA damage and the major phenotypes associated with aging. Understanding the mechanistic basis for the association of DNA damage and DNA repair with aging and age-related diseases, such as neurodegeneration, would give insight into contravening age-related diseases and promoting a healthy life span. PMID:26385091

  13. Chromatin Remodeling, DNA Damage Repair and Aging

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Baohua; Yip, Raymond KH; Zhou, Zhongjun

    2012-01-01

    Cells are constantly exposed to a variety of environmental and endogenous conditions causing DNA damage, which is detected and repaired by conserved DNA repair pathways to maintain genomic integrity. Chromatin remodeling is critical in this process, as the organization of eukaryotic DNA into compact chromatin presents a natural barrier to all DNA-related events. Studies on human premature aging syndromes together with normal aging have suggested that accumulated damages might lead to exhaustion of resources that are required for physiological functions and thus accelerate aging. In this manuscript, combining the present understandings and latest findings, we focus mainly on discussing the role of chromatin remodeling in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and regulation of aging. PMID:23633913

  14. Repairing the damage to Atlantis' External Tank

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-03-07

    On an upper level of high bay 1 of the Vehicle Assembly Building, technicians secure protective material around the base of the nose cone of Atlantis' external tank. The nose cone will undergo repair for hail damage. A severe thunderstorm with golf ball-sized hail caused visible divots in the giant tank's foam insulation and minor surface damage to about 26 heat shield tiles on the shuttle's left wing. Further evaluation of the tank is necessary to get an accurate accounting of foam damage and determine the type of repair required and the time needed for that work. A new target launch date has not been determined, but teams will focus on preparing Atlantis for liftoff in late April on mission STS-117.

  15. Repairing the damage to Atlantis' External Tank

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-03-07

    On an upper level of high bay 1 of the Vehicle Assembly Building, technicians prepare the area around the nose cone (foreground) of Atlantis' external tank that will undergo repair for hail damage. A severe thunderstorm with golf ball-sized hail caused visible divots in the giant tank's foam insulation and minor surface damage to about 26 heat shield tiles on the shuttle's left wing. Further evaluation of the tank is necessary to get an accurate accounting of foam damage and determine the type of repair required and the time needed for that work. A new target launch date has not been determined, but teams will focus on preparing Atlantis for liftoff in late April on mission STS-117.

  16. Repairing the damage to Atlantis' External Tank

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-03-07

    On an upper level of high bay 1 of the Vehicle Assembly Building, technicians place protective material around the nose cone of Atlantis' external tank. The nose cone will undergo repair for hail damage. A severe thunderstorm with golf ball-sized hail caused visible divots in the giant tank's foam insulation and minor surface damage to about 26 heat shield tiles on the shuttle's left wing. Further evaluation of the tank is necessary to get an accurate accounting of foam damage and determine the type of repair required and the time needed for that work. A new target launch date has not been determined, but teams will focus on preparing Atlantis for liftoff in late April on mission STS-117.

  17. Repairing the damage to Atlantis' External Tank

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-03-07

    On an upper level of high bay 1 of the Vehicle Assembly Building, technicians prepare the area around the nose cone (left) of Atlantis' external tank that will undergo repair for hail damage. A severe thunderstorm with golf ball-sized hail caused visible divots in the giant tank's foam insulation and minor surface damage to about 26 heat shield tiles on the shuttle's left wing. Further evaluation of the tank is necessary to get an accurate accounting of foam damage and determine the type of repair required and the time needed for that work. A new target launch date has not been determined, but teams will focus on preparing Atlantis for liftoff in late April on mission STS-117.

  18. Repairing the damage to Atlantis' External Tank

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-03-07

    On an upper level of high bay 1 of the Vehicle Assembly Building, technicians move protective material toward the nose cone (foreground) of Atlantis' external tank. The nose cone will undergo repair for hail damage. A severe thunderstorm with golf ball-sized hail caused visible divots in the giant tank's foam insulation and minor surface damage to about 26 heat shield tiles on the shuttle's left wing. Further evaluation of the tank is necessary to get an accurate accounting of foam damage and determine the type of repair required and the time needed for that work. A new target launch date has not been determined, but teams will focus on preparing Atlantis for liftoff in late April on mission STS-117.

  19. Repairing the damage to Atlantis' External Tank

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-03-07

    On an upper level of high bay 1 of the Vehicle Assembly Building, technicians secure protective material around Atlantis' external tank. The preparations are for future repair work of the hail damage that happened Feb. 27. A severe thunderstorm with golf ball-sized hail caused visible divots in the giant tank's foam insulation and minor surface damage to about 26 heat shield tiles on the shuttle's left wing. Further evaluation of the tank is necessary to get an accurate accounting of foam damage and determine the type of repair required and the time needed for that work. A new target launch date has not been determined, but teams will focus on preparing Atlantis for liftoff in late April on mission STS-117.

  20. Evaluation of Vibratory Rollers for Bomb Damage Repair.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    Repair Base Course Bomb Damage Repair Crushed Stone Vibratory Rollers\\ Soil Compaction Unsurfaced Repairs 0. ABSTRACT (Continue on reveres aide if...3 Test Areas ....... ............. ............ 3 Vibratory Rollers............................... 3 Soils ...Roller Evaluation Tests ................. 16 Soil Preparation and Placement ................ 16 Compaction .................................... 16

  1. Compressive strength of damaged and repaired composite plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finn, Scott R.; Springer, George S.

    1992-01-01

    Tests were performed assessing the effectiveness of repair in restoring the mechanical properties of damaged, solid composite plates made of Fiberite T300/976 graphite-epoxy. Some (75%) or all (100%) of the damaged zone was cut out, and the plate was repaired by plugging and patching the hole. The effectiveness of the repair was evaluated by measuring the compressive strengths of undamaged plates, damaged plates with no cutout, damaged plates with a cutout, and plates that had been repaired.

  2. 75 FR 11734 - Damage Tolerance Data for Repairs and Alterations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    ... TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 26 RIN 2120-AI32 Damage Tolerance Data for Repairs and... make damage tolerance data for repairs and alterations to fatigue critical airplane structure available... of design approvals to make available to operators damage tolerance (DT) data for repairs and...

  3. Repair and completion of damaged cooling tower

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, P.L. . Dept. of Civil Engineering); Guedelhoefer, O.C. )

    1989-03-01

    This paper reports on a large hyperbolic cooling tower, under construction and nearly completed, struck by a falling tower crane during a tornado. Damage occurred at the upper edge where a V-shaped notch was gouged. Also, considerable cracking beneath the notch was observed. The extent of the damage was documented by precision survey techniques and visual inspection. A comprehensive analytical study was performed to insure that the completed tower would meet the design criteria. The repair plan involved repairing the cracks, sawing back the notch in a step fashion, refurbishing the scaffolding, rebuilding the gouged region, and then carrying the construction to completion. Also, two circumferential stiffening rings were added to the shell.

  4. Repairing the damage to Atlantis' External Tank

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-03-07

    In high bay 1 of the Vehicle Assembly Building, a technician marks off an area for inspection on Atlantis' external tank. A severe thunderstorm with golf ball-sized hail caused visible divots in the giant tank's foam insulation and minor surface damage to about 26 heat shield tiles on the shuttle's left wing. Further evaluation of the tank is necessary to get an accurate accounting of foam damage and determine the type of repair required and the time needed for that work. A new target launch date has not been determined, but teams will focus on preparing Atlantis for liftoff in late April on mission STS-117.

  5. Repair of UV damage in Halobacterium salinarum.

    PubMed

    McCready, S; Marcello, L

    2003-06-01

    Halobacterium is one of the few known Archaea that tolerates high levels of sunlight in its natural environment. Photoreactivation is probably its most important strategy for surviving UV irradiation and we have shown that both of the major UV photoproducts, cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and (6-4) photoproducts, can be very efficiently repaired by photoreactivation in this organism. There are two putative photolyase gene homologues in the published genome sequence of Halobacterium sp. NRC-1. We have made a mutant deleted in one of these, phr2, and confirmed that this gene codes for a CPD photolyase. (6-4) photoproducts are still photoreactivated in the mutant so we are currently establishing whether the other homologue, phr1, codes for a (6-4) photolyase. We have also demonstrated an excision repair capacity that operates in the absence of visible light but the nature of this pathway is not yet known. There is probably a bacteria-type excision-repair mechanism, since homologues of uvrA, uvrB, uvrC and uvrD have been identified in the Halobacterium genome. However, there are also homologues of eukaryotic nucleotide-excision-repair genes ( Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD3, RAD25 and RAD2 ) so there may be multiple repair mechanisms for UV damage in Halobacterium.

  6. Situation-dependent repair of DNA damage in yeast

    SciTech Connect

    von Borstel, R.C.; Hastings, P.J.

    1985-01-01

    The concept of channelling of lesions in DNA into defined repair systems has been used to explain many aspects of induced and spontaneous mutation. The channelling hypothesis states that lesions excluded from one repair process will be taken up by another repair process. This is a simplification. The three known modes of repair of damage induced by radiation are not equivalent modes of repair; they are, instead, different solutions to the problem of replacement of damaged molecules with new molecules which have the same informational content as those that were damaged. The mode of repair that is used is the result of the response to the situation in which the damage takes place. Thus, when the most likely mode of repair does not take place, then the situation changes with respect to the repair of the lesion; the lesion may enter the replication fork and be reparable by another route.

  7. Repair of Oxidative DNA Damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Chalissery, Jisha; Jalal, Deena; Al-Natour, Zeina; Hassan, Ahmed H

    2017-03-01

    Malfunction of enzymes that detoxify reactive oxygen species leads to oxidative attack on biomolecules including DNA and consequently activates various DNA repair pathways. The nature of DNA damage and the cell cycle stage at which DNA damage occurs determine the appropriate repair pathway to rectify the damage. Oxidized DNA bases are primarily repaired by base excision repair and nucleotide incision repair. Nucleotide excision repair acts on lesions that distort DNA helix, mismatch repair on mispaired bases, and homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining on double stranded breaks. Post-replication repair that overcomes replication blocks caused by DNA damage also plays a crucial role in protecting the cell from the deleterious effects of oxidative DNA damage. Mitochondrial DNA is also prone to oxidative damage and is efficiently repaired by the cellular DNA repair machinery. In this review, we discuss the DNA repair pathways in relation to the nature of oxidative DNA damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Prevention of radioinduced cystitis by orgotein: a randomized study.

    PubMed

    Sanchiz, F; Millá, A; Artola, N; Julià, J C; Moya, L M; Pedro, A; Vila, A

    1996-01-01

    On the basis of previous experiences indicating that the anti-oxidant agent Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) is an effective drug in reducing acute and late radiation-induced tissue injury, in the Center of Radiotherapy and Oncology of Catalonia, Barcelona, Spain in 1990 we implemented a randomized prospective study to analyze the incidence and grade of side effects in a group of bladder cancer patients. After surgery patients were randomly allocated to receive either: Option A: Radiotherapy or Option B: Radiotherapy + SOD 8 mgr/IM/day, after each radiotherapeutic application. Between January 1990 and January 1995 a total of 448 patients were included (226 A/ 222 B). Apart from cutaneous side effects, a highly significant incidence of radioinduced acute cystitis and rectitis was detected in patients not treated by SOD. Which was similar to the delayed side effects. From our data we can conclude that SOD is effective in decreasing acute radioinduced damage, and also in preventing the appearance of more delayed disorders.

  9. Biological consequences of formation and repair of complex DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Magnander, Karin; Elmroth, Kecke

    2012-12-31

    Endogenous processes or genotoxic agents can induce many types of single DNA damage (single-strand breaks, oxidized bases and abasic sites). In addition, ionizing radiation induces complex lesions such as double-strand breaks and clustered damage. To preserve the genomic stability and prevent carcinogenesis, distinct repair pathways have evolved. Despite this, complex DNA damage can cause severe problems and is believed to contribute to the biological consequences observed in cells exposed to genotoxic stress. In this review, the current knowledge of formation and repair of complex DNA damage is summarized and the risks and biological consequences associated with their repair are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. 49 CFR 1242.42 - Administration, repair and maintenance, machinery repair, equipment damaged, dismantling retired...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... repair, equipment damaged, dismantling retired property, fringe benefits, other casualties and insurance, lease rentals, joint facility rents, other rents, depreciation, joint facility, repairs billed to others... PASSENGER SERVICE FOR RAILROADS 1 Operating Expenses-Equipment § 1242.42 Administration, repair and...

  11. Compressive strength of damaged and repaired composite plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finn, Scott R.; He, Yi-Fei; Springer, George S.; Lee, Hung-Joo

    1992-01-01

    Tests were performed assessing the effectiveness of repair in restoring the mechanical properties of damaged, solid composite plates made either of Fiberite T300/976 graphite-epoxy, Fiberite IM7/977-2 graphite-toughened epoxy, or ICI APC-2 graphite-PEEK. The plate length, the layup and the amount of damage were also varied. Damage was introduced in the plates either by impacting them with a solid projectile or by applying a transverse static load. Some (75 percent) or all (100 percent) of the damaged zone was then cut out, and the plate was repaired by plugging and patching the hole. The effectiveness of the repair was evaluated by measuring the compressive strengths of undamaged plates, damaged plates with no cutout, damaged plates with a cutout, and repaired plates. The data at an intermediate stage of repair provide information on the effect of each repair step on the compressive strength. The results indicated that for the solid plates used in these tests, the repair methods used herein did not improve the compressive strength of already damaged plates.

  12. Oxidatively induced DNA damage and its repair in cancer.

    PubMed

    Dizdaroglu, Miral

    2015-01-01

    Oxidatively induced DNA damage is caused in living organisms by endogenous and exogenous reactive species. DNA lesions resulting from this type of damage are mutagenic and cytotoxic and, if not repaired, can cause genetic instability that may lead to disease processes including carcinogenesis. Living organisms possess DNA repair mechanisms that include a variety of pathways to repair multiple DNA lesions. Mutations and polymorphisms also occur in DNA repair genes adversely affecting DNA repair systems. Cancer tissues overexpress DNA repair proteins and thus develop greater DNA repair capacity than normal tissues. Increased DNA repair in tumors that removes DNA lesions before they become toxic is a major mechanism for development of resistance to therapy, affecting patient survival. Accumulated evidence suggests that DNA repair capacity may be a predictive biomarker for patient response to therapy. Thus, knowledge of DNA protein expressions in normal and cancerous tissues may help predict and guide development of treatments and yield the best therapeutic response. DNA repair proteins constitute targets for inhibitors to overcome the resistance of tumors to therapy. Inhibitors of DNA repair for combination therapy or as single agents for monotherapy may help selectively kill tumors, potentially leading to personalized therapy. Numerous inhibitors have been developed and are being tested in clinical trials. The efficacy of some inhibitors in therapy has been demonstrated in patients. Further development of inhibitors of DNA repair proteins is globally underway to help eradicate cancer.

  13. Repair of damaged DNA in vivo: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Hanawalt, P.C.

    1987-09-01

    This contract was initiated in 1962 with the US Atomic Energy Commission to carry out basic research on the effects of radiation on the process of DNA replication in bacteria. Within the first contract year we discovered repair replication at the same time that Setlow and Carrier discovered pyrimidine dimer excision. These discoveries led to the elucidation of the process of excision-repair, one of the most important mechanisms by which living systems, including humans, respond to structural damage in their genetic material. We improved methodology for distinguishing repair replication from semiconservative replication and instructed others in these techniques. Painter then was the first to demonstrate repair replication in ultraviolet irradiated human cells. He, in turn, instructed James Cleaver who discovered that skin fibroblasts from patients with xeroderma pigmentosum were defective in excision-repair. People with this genetic defect are extremely sensitive to sunlight and they develop carcinomas and melanomas of the skin with high frequency. The existence of this hereditary disease attests to the importance of DNA repair in man. We certainly could not survive in the normal ultraviolet flux from the sun if our DNA were not continuously monitored for damage and repaired. Other hereditary diseases such as ataxia telangiectasia, Cockayne's syndrome, Blooms syndrome and Fanconi's anemia also involve deficiencies in DNA damage processing. The field of DNA repair has developed rapidly as we have learned that most environmental chemical carcinogens as well as radiation produce repairable damage in DNA. 251 refs.

  14. Repair of damaged supraglottic airway devices: A novel method

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Damage of laryngeal mask airway and other supraglottic airway devices has always been a matter of concern. Although manufacturer recommends maximum 40 uses of LMA (and its congeners) but damage before 40 uses needs to be evaluated. We hereby, describe a novel method of repair of supraglottic devices when damage occurs at mask inflation line or pilot balloon valve assembly. PMID:20565731

  15. 6. 'ROCKFILLED CRIB 350 FEET LONG, REPAIRING DAMAGES CAUSED BY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. 'ROCK-FILLED CRIB 350 FEET LONG, REPAIRING DAMAGES CAUSED BY FLOODS DURING SEASON OF 1927 TO THE DRY GULCH CANAL HEADING.' 1928 - Irrigation Canals in the Uinta Basin, Duchesne, Duchesne County, UT

  16. DNA damage and repair in human skin in situ

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, B.M.; Gange, R.W.; Freeman, S.E.; Sutherland, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    Understanding the molecular and cellular origins of sunlight-induced skin cancers in man requires knowledge of the damages inflicted on human skin during sunlight exposure, as well as the ability of cells in skin to repair or circumvent such damage. Although repair has been studied extensively in procaryotic and eucaryotic cells - including human cells in culture - there are important differences between repair by human skin cells in culture and human skin in situ: quantitative differences in rates of repair, as well as qualitative differences, including the presence or absence of repair mechanisms. Quantitation of DNA damage and repair in human skin required the development of new approaches for measuring damage at low levels in nanogram quantities of non-radioactive DNA. The method allows for analysis of multiple samples and the resulting data should be related to behavior of the DNA molecules by analytic expressions. Furthermore, it should be possible to assay a variety of lesions using the same methodology. The development of new analysis methods, new technology, and new biochemical probes for the study of DNA damage and repair are described. 28 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Choreography of oxidative damage repair in mammalian genomes.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Sankar; Izumi, Tadahide; Boldogh, Istvan; Bhakat, Kishor K; Hill, Jeff W; Hazra, Tapas K

    2002-07-01

    The lesions induced by reactive oxygen species in both nuclear and mitochondrial genomes include altered bases, abasic (AP) sites, and single-strand breaks, all repaired primarily via the base excision repair (BER) pathway. Although the basic BER process (consisting of five sequential steps) could be reconstituted in vitro with only four enzymes, it is now evident that repair of oxidative damage, at least in mammalian cell nuclei, is more complex, and involves a number of additional proteins, including transcription- and replication-associated factors. These proteins may be required in sequential repair steps in concert with other cellular changes, starting with nuclear targeting of the early repair enzymes in response to oxidative stress, facilitation of lesion recognition, and access by chromatin unfolding via histone acetylation, and formation of metastable complexes of repair enzymes and other accessory proteins. Distinct, specific subclasses of protein complexes may be formed for repair of oxidative lesions in the nucleus in transcribed vs. nontranscribed sequences in chromatin, in quiescent vs. cycling cells, and in nascent vs. parental DNA strands in replicating cells. Characterizing the proteins for each repair subpathway, their signaling-dependent modifications and interactions in the nuclear as well as mitochondrial repair complexes, will be a major focus of future research in oxidative damage repair.

  18. Advanced Technology Composite Fuselage - Repair and Damage Assessment Supporting Maintenance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, B. W.; Bodine, J. B.; Dopker, B.; Finn, S. R.; Griess, K. H.; Hanson, C. T.; Harris, C. G.; Nelson, K. M.; Walker, T. H.; Kennedy, T. C.; hide

    1997-01-01

    Under the NASA-sponsored contracts for Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures (ATCAS) and Materials Development Omnibus Contract (MDOC), Boeing is studying the technologies associated with the application of composite materials to commercial transport fuselage structure. Included in the study is the incorporation of maintainability and repairability requirements of composite primary structure into the design. This contractor report describes activities performed to address maintenance issues in composite fuselage applications. A key aspect of the study was the development of a maintenance philosophy which included consideration of maintenance issues early in the design cycle, multiple repair options, and airline participation in design trades. Fuselage design evaluations considered trade-offs between structural weight, damage resistance/tolerance (repair frequency), and inspection burdens. Analysis methods were developed to assess structural residual strength in the presence of damage, and to evaluate repair design concepts. Repair designs were created with a focus on mechanically fastened concepts for skin/stringer structure and bonded concepts for sandwich structure. Both a large crown (skintstringer) and keel (sandwich) panel were repaired. A compression test of the keel panel indicated the demonstrated repairs recovered ultimate load capability. In conjunction with the design and manufacturing developments, inspection methods were investigated for their potential to evaluate damaged structure and verify the integrity of completed repairs.

  19. Inducible repair of oxidative DNA damage in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Demple, B; Halbrook, J

    Hydrogen peroxide is lethal to many cell types, including the bacterium Escherichia coli. Peroxides yield transient radical species that can damage DNA and cause mutations. Such partially reduced oxygen species are occasionally released during cellular respiration and are generated by lethal and mutagenic ionizing radiation. Because cells live in an environment where the threat of oxidative DNA damage is continual, cellular mechanisms may have evolved to avoid and repair this damage. Enzymes are known which evidently perform these functions. We report here that resistance to hydrogen peroxide toxicity can be induced in E. coli, that this novel induction is specific and occurs, in part, at the level of DNA repair.

  20. Connecting the Dots: From DNA Damage and Repair to Aging

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Mei-Ren; Li, Kaiyi; Lin, Shiaw-Yih; Hung, Wen-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian cells evolve a delicate system, the DNA damage response (DDR) pathway, to monitor genomic integrity and to prevent the damage from both endogenous end exogenous insults. Emerging evidence suggests that aberrant DDR and deficient DNA repair are strongly associated with cancer and aging. Our understanding of the core program of DDR has made tremendous progress in the past two decades. However, the long list of the molecules involved in the DDR and DNA repair continues to grow and the roles of the new “dots” are under intensive investigation. Here, we review the connection between DDR and DNA repair and aging and discuss the potential mechanisms by which deficient DNA repair triggers systemic effects to promote physiological or pathological aging. PMID:27164092

  1. Damage tolerance of bonded composite aircraft repairs for metallic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Randal John

    This thesis describes the development and validation of methods for damage tolerance substantiation of bonded composite repairs applied to cracked plates. This technology is used to repair metal aircraft structures, offering improvements in fatigue life, cost, manufacturability, and inspectability when compared to riveted repairs. The work focuses on the effects of plate thickness and bending on repair life, and covers fundamental aspects of fracture and fatigue of cracked plates and bonded joints. This project falls under the UBC Bonded Composite Repair Program, which has the goal of certification and widespread use of bonded repairs in civilian air transportation. This thesis analyses the plate thickness and transverse stress effects on fracture of repaired plates and the related problem of induced geometrically nonlinear bending in unbalanced (single-sided) repairs. The author begins by developing a classification scheme for assigning repair damage tolerance substantiation requirements based upon stress-based adhesive fracture/fatigue criteria and the residual strength of the original structure. The governing equations for bending of cracked plates are then reformulated and line-spring models are developed for linear and nonlinear coupled bending and extension of reinforced cracks. The line-spring models were used to correct the Wang and Rose energy method for the determination of the long-crack limit stress intensity, and to develop a new interpolation model for repaired cracks of arbitrary length. The analysis was validated using finite element models and data from mechanical tests performed on hybrid bonded joints and repair specimens that are representative of an in-service repair. This work will allow designers to evaluate the damage tolerance of the repaired plate, the adhesive, and the composite patch, which is an airworthiness requirement under FAR (Federal Aviation Regulations) 25.571. The thesis concludes by assessing the remaining barriers to

  2. Airfield Damage Repair - The Future Now (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    materials and methods, placing crushed stone is slow and strenuous. ERDC has been researching quick-setting flowable fill , a controlled low...can produce about five tons of HMA every 30 minutes. When paired with the rapid setting flowable fill this becomes a formidable repair technique...runway assessment, rapid setting, concrete, pellitized asphalt, expanding foam, back fill materials U U U UU 5 R. Craig Mellerski Reset The New Face of

  3. Repair of ultraviolet-light-induced damage

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, B.M.

    1981-01-01

    Studies are reviewed which present three major new findings in the photobiology of skin. First, detectable numbers of dimers are formed even at sub-erythymal doses. Second, excision of dimers is much more rapid than would be predicted from results obtained in cell culture. Third, comparison of the rates of excision and photoreactivation in skin indicates that in normal sunlight exposure, photoreactivation may well be the predominant repair pathway in skin. (ACR)

  4. DNA damage in Fabry patients: An investigation of oxidative damage and repair.

    PubMed

    Biancini, Giovana Brondani; Moura, Dinara Jaqueline; Manini, Paula Regina; Faverzani, Jéssica Lamberty; Netto, Cristina Brinckmann Oliveira; Deon, Marion; Giugliani, Roberto; Saffi, Jenifer; Vargas, Carmen Regla

    2015-06-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a lysosomal storage disorder associated with loss of activity of the enzyme α-galactosidase A. In addition to accumulation of α-galactosidase A substrates, other mechanisms may be involved in FD pathophysiology, such as inflammation and oxidative stress. Higher levels of oxidative damage to proteins and lipids in Fabry patients were previously reported. However, DNA damage by oxidative species in FD has not yet been studied. We investigated basal DNA damage, oxidative DNA damage, DNA repair capacity, and reactive species generation in Fabry patients and controls. To measure oxidative damage to purines and pyrimidines, the alkaline version of the comet assay was used with two endonucleases, formamidopyrimidine DNA-glycosylase (FPG) and endonuclease III (EndoIII). To evaluate DNA repair, a challenge assay with hydrogen peroxide was performed. Patients presented significantly higher levels of basal DNA damage and oxidative damage to purines. Oxidative DNA damage was induced in both DNA bases by H2O2 in patients. Fabry patients presented efficient DNA repair in both assays (with and without endonucleases) as well as significantly higher levels of oxidative species (measured by dichlorofluorescein content). Even if DNA repair be induced in Fabry patients (as a consequence of continuous exposure to oxidative species), the repair is not sufficient to reduce DNA damage to control levels.

  5. Repairing Damaged Power-Cable Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, G. E.

    1984-01-01

    Simple method saves time, money, and material. In new method cable remains in place while new insulation is applied to damaged portion. Method results in new terminations with safety factor equal to that of any portion of cable.

  6. DNA Damage Repair in the Context of Plant Chromatin1

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The integrity of DNA molecules is constantly challenged. All organisms have developed mechanisms to detect and repair multiple types of DNA lesions. The basic principles of DNA damage repair (DDR) in prokaryotes and unicellular and multicellular eukaryotes are similar, but the association of DNA with nucleosomes in eukaryotic chromatin requires mechanisms that allow access of repair enzymes to the lesions. This is achieved by chromatin-remodeling factors, and their necessity for efficient DDR has recently been demonstrated for several organisms and repair pathways. Plants share many features of chromatin organization and DNA repair with fungi and animals, but they differ in other, important details, which are both interesting and relevant for our understanding of genome stability and genetic diversity. In this Update, we compare the knowledge of the role of chromatin and chromatin-modifying factors during DDR in plants with equivalent systems in yeast and humans. We emphasize plant-specific elements and discuss possible implications. PMID:26089404

  7. Structural Durability of Damaged Metallic Panel Repaired with Composite Patches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon; Chamis, Christos C.

    1997-01-01

    Structural durability/damage tolerance characteristics of an aluminum tension specimen possessing a short crack and repaired by applying a fiber composite surface patch is investigated via computational simulation. The composite patch is made of graphite/epoxy plies with various layups. An integrated computer code that accounts for all possible failure modes is utilized for the simulation of combined fiber-composite/aluminum structural degradation under loading. Damage initiation, growth, accumulation, and propagation to structural fracture are included in the simulation. Results show the structural degradation stages due to tensile loading and illustrate the use of computational simulation for the investigation of a composite patch repaired cracked metallic panel.

  8. (Induction and repair of uv damage)

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, J.D.

    1987-08-07

    The traveler attended the 8th International Congress on Radiation Research and presented a paper entitled Xeroderma pigmentosum variant cells do not remove a uv-induced photosensitive lesion from their DNA.'' Approximately 1400 scientists participated in the Congress. There were five days of presentations with usually six simultaneous sessions taking place. The traveler was particularly impressed with the numerous presentations on irradiation of small molecules. There were many papers on different aspects of DNA repair. The presentations and the traveler's discussions with scientists at the Congress will be beneficial to the traveler's research program at ORNL.

  9. Base Excision Repair and Lesion-Dependent Subpathways for Repair of Oxidative DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Svilar, David; Goellner, Eva M.; Almeida, Karen H.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Nuclear and mitochondrial genomes are under continuous assault by a combination of environmentally and endogenously derived reactive oxygen species, inducing the formation and accumulation of mutagenic, toxic, and/or genome-destabilizing DNA lesions. Failure to resolve these lesions through one or more DNA-repair processes is associated with genome instability, mitochondrial dysfunction, neurodegeneration, inflammation, aging, and cancer, emphasizing the importance of characterizing the pathways and proteins involved in the repair of oxidative DNA damage. This review focuses on the repair of oxidative damage–induced lesions in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA mediated by the base excision repair (BER) pathway in mammalian cells. We discuss the multiple BER subpathways that are initiated by one of 11 different DNA glycosylases of three subtypes: (a) bifunctional with an associated β-lyase activity; (b) monofunctional; and (c) bifunctional with an associated β,δ-lyase activity. These three subtypes of DNA glycosylases all initiate BER but yield different chemical intermediates and hence different BER complexes to complete repair. Additionally, we briefly summarize alternate repair events mediated by BER proteins and the role of BER in the repair of mitochondrial DNA damage induced by ROS. Finally, we discuss the relation of BER and oxidative DNA damage in the onset of human disease. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 14, 2491–2507. PMID:20649466

  10. Repair Machinery for Radiation-Induced DNA Damage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-07-01

    significant defect in the repair of certain DNA damages, but of which damages needs to be determined. We have selected Chinese Hamster Ovary ( CHO ) as...chromosome (BAC) genomic fragment, which we isolated from a CHO BAC library, revealed that APE1 exists as a single copy gene in AA8 (see Appendix, Figure... cells , we first determined the APE1 gene copy number in the CHO AA8 cell line. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with an APE1 bacterial artificial

  11. Oxidative DNA damage and repair in teratogenesis and neurodevelopmental deficits.

    PubMed

    Wells, Peter G; McCallum, Gordon P; Lam, Kyla C H; Henderson, Jeffrey T; Ondovcik, Stephanie L

    2010-06-01

    Several teratogenic agents, including ionizing radiation and xenobiotics such as phenytoin, benzo[a]pyrene, thalidomide, and methamphetamine, can initiate the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that oxidatively damage cellular macromolecules including DNA. Oxidative DNA damage, and particularly the most prevalent 8-oxoguanine lesion, may adversely affect development, likely via alterations in gene transcription rather than via a mutational mechanism. Contributions from oxidative DNA damage do not exclude roles for alternative mechanisms of initiation like receptor-mediated processes or the formation of covalent xenobiotic-macromolecular adducts, damage to other macromolecular targets like proteins and lipids, and other effects of ROS like altered signal transduction. Even in the absence of teratogen exposure, endogenous developmental oxidative stress can have embryopathic consequences in the absence of key pathways for detoxifying ROS or repairing DNA damage. Critical proteins in pathways for DNA damage detection/repair signaling, like p53 and ataxia telangiectasia mutated, and DNA repair itself, like oxoguanine glycosylase 1 and Cockayne syndrome B, can often, but not always, protect the embryo from ROS-initiating teratogens. Protection may be variably dependent upon such factors as the nature of the teratogen and its concentration within the embryo, the stage of development, the species, strain, gender, target tissue and cell type, among other factors.

  12. DNA damage and repair after high LET radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, Peter; Cucinotta, Francis; Anderson, Jennifer

    Predictions from biophysical models of interactions of radiation tracks with cellular DNA indicate that clustered DNA damage sites, defined as two or more lesions formed within one or two helical turns of the DNA by passage of a single radiation track, are formed in mammalian cells. These complex DNA damage sites are regarded as a signature of ionizing radiation exposure particularly as the likelihood of clustered damage sites arising endogenously is low. For instance, it was predicted from biophysical modelling that 30-40% of low LET-induced double strand breaks (DSB), a form of clustered damage, are complex with the yield increasing to >90% for high LET radiation, consistent with the reduced reparability of DSB with increasing ionization density of the radiation. The question arises whether the increased biological effects such as mutagenesis, carcinogenesis and lethality is in part related to DNA damage complexity and/or spatial distribution of the damage sites, which may lead to small DNA fragments. With particle radiation it is also important to consider not only delta-rays which may cause clustered damaged sites and may be highly mutagenic but the non-random spatial distribution of DSB which may lead to deletions. In this overview I will concentrate on the molecular aspects of the variation of the complexity of DNA damage on radiation quality and the challenges this complexity presents the DNA damage repair pathways. I will draw on data from micro-irradiations which indicate that the repair of DSBs by non-homologous end joining is highly regulated with pathway choice and kinetics of repair dependent on the chemical complexity of the DSB. In summary the aim is to emphasis the link between the spatial distribution of energy deposition events related to the track, the molecular products formed and the consequence of damage complexity contributing to biological effects and to present some of the outstanding molecular challenges with particle radiation.

  13. Glenn Refractory Adhesive for Bonding and Exterior Repair (GRABER) Developed for Repairing Shuttle Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Mrityunjay; Shpargel, Tarah P.

    2005-01-01

    Advanced in-space repair technologies for reinforced carbon/carbon composite (RCC) thermal protection system (TPS) structures are critically needed for the space shuttle Return To Flight (RTF) efforts. These technologies are also critical for the repair and refurbishment of thermal protection system structures of future Crew Exploration Vehicles of space exploration programs. The Glenn Refractory Adhesive for Bonding and Exterior Repair (GRABER) material developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center has demonstrated capabilities for repair of small cracks and damage in RCC leading-edge material. The concept consists of preparing an adhesive paste of desired ceramic in a polymer/phenolic resin matrix with appropriate additives, such as surfactants, and then applying the paste into the damaged or cracked area of the RCC composite components with caulking guns. The adhesive paste cures at 100 to 120 C and transforms into a high-temperature ceramic during simulated vehicle reentry testing conditions.

  14. Glenn Refractory Adhesive for Bonding and Exterior Repair (GRABER) Developed for Repairing Shuttle Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Mrityunjay; Shpargel, Tarah P.

    2005-01-01

    Advanced in-space repair technologies for reinforced carbon/carbon composite (RCC) thermal protection system (TPS) structures are critically needed for the space shuttle Return To Flight (RTF) efforts. These technologies are also critical for the repair and refurbishment of thermal protection system structures of future Crew Exploration Vehicles of space exploration programs. The Glenn Refractory Adhesive for Bonding and Exterior Repair (GRABER) material developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center has demonstrated capabilities for repair of small cracks and damage in RCC leading-edge material. The concept consists of preparing an adhesive paste of desired ceramic in a polymer/phenolic resin matrix with appropriate additives, such as surfactants, and then applying the paste into the damaged or cracked area of the RCC composite components with caulking guns. The adhesive paste cures at 100 to 120 C and transforms into a high-temperature ceramic during simulated vehicle reentry testing conditions.

  15. Sunscreens promote repair of ultraviolet radiation-induced dermal damage.

    PubMed

    Kligman, L H; Akin, F J; Kligman, A M

    1983-08-01

    Chronic UV irradiation profoundly damages the dermis of human and animal skin. These alterations were thought to be irreversible. Recently, we showed that substantial repair occurred in hairless mice after stopping UV exposure. A band of new connective tissue was laid down subepidermally. The present study focussed on whether repair would occur if animals were protected by sunscreens after dermal damage was induced and irradiation was continued. Albino hairless mice were exposed to Westinghouse FS20 sunlamps thrice weekly for 30 weeks. The daily dose of UV (UVB + UVA) was 0.17 J/cm2. Sunscreens of sun protection factors (SPF) 6 and 15 were applied after 10 and 20 weeks of irradiation. Biopsies were taken at 10, 20, 30, and 45 weeks of the experiment. With both sunscreens, especially SPF-15, previously damaged dermis was repaired during continued irradiation. Repair occurred in situ and, in severely damaged skin, in the novel form of subepidermal reconstruction zones of new connective tissue with parallel collagen bundles and a network of fine elastic fibers.

  16. UV Radiation Damage and Bacterial DNA Repair Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zion, Michal; Guy, Daniel; Yarom, Ruth; Slesak, Michaela

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on a simple hands-on laboratory procedure for high school students in studying both radiation damage and DNA repair systems in bacteria. The sensitivity to ultra-violet (UV) radiation of both "Escherichia coli" and "Serratia marcescens" is tested by radiating them for varying time periods. Two growth temperatures are used in…

  17. Damage Tolerant Repair Techniques for Pressurized Aircraft Fuselages

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    34Don’t fight forces, use them.’ R. Buckminster Fuller , Shelter (1932) The finite element analysis method was chosen to complement traditional direct...the model. 32 Damage Tolerant Repair Techniques for Pressurized Aircraft Fuselages 2.4.5 Finite Element Analysis Results The results give a fuller

  18. UV Radiation Damage and Bacterial DNA Repair Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zion, Michal; Guy, Daniel; Yarom, Ruth; Slesak, Michaela

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on a simple hands-on laboratory procedure for high school students in studying both radiation damage and DNA repair systems in bacteria. The sensitivity to ultra-violet (UV) radiation of both "Escherichia coli" and "Serratia marcescens" is tested by radiating them for varying time periods. Two growth temperatures are used in…

  19. p53 in the DNA damage repair process

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Ashley B.; Schumacher, Björn

    2016-01-01

    The cells in the human body are continuously challenged by a variety of genotoxic attacks. Erroneous repair of the DNA can lead to mutations and chromosomal aberrations that can alter the functions of tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes, thus causing cancer development. As a central tumor suppressor, p53 guards the genome by orchestrating a variety of DNA damage response (DDR) mechanisms. Already early in metazoan evolution, p53 started controlling the apoptotic demise of genomically compromised cells. p53 plays a prominent role as a facilitator of DNA repair by halting the cell cycle to allow time for the repair machineries to restore genome stability. In addition, p53 took on diverse roles to also directly impact the activity of various DNA repair systems. It thus appears as if p53 is multitasking in protecting from cancer development by maintaining genome stability. PMID:27048304

  20. Space Shuttle Atlantis' external tank repairs from Hail Damage

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-04-09

    In the Vehicle Assembly Building, United Space Alliance technician Brenda Morris examines the surface on Space Shuttle Atlantis' external tank where hail damage has been repaired. At the top of the photo is a white/translucent square mold where the foam has been applied and the foam has risen and cured against the mold surface. In late February, Atlantis' external tank received hail damage during a severe thunderstorm that passed through the Kennedy Space Center Launch Complex 39 area. The hail caused visible divots in the giant tank's foam insulation as well as minor surface damage to about 26 heat shield tiles on the shuttle's left wing. The March launch was postponed and has not yet been rescheduled due to the repair process.

  1. DNA damage and repair in telomeres: relation to aging.

    PubMed Central

    Kruk, P A; Rampino, N J; Bohr, V A

    1995-01-01

    We have established a method for the detection of DNA damage and its repair in human telomeres, the natural ends of chromosomes which are necessary for replication and critical for chromosomal stability. We find that ultraviolet light-induced pyrimidine dimers in telomeric DNA are repaired less efficiently than endogenous genes but more efficiently than inactive, noncoding regions. We have also measured telomeric length, telomeric DNA damage, and its repair in relation to the progression of aging. Telomeres are shorter in fibroblasts from an old donor compared to fibroblasts from a young donor, shortest in cells from a patient with the progeroid disorder Werner syndrome, and relatively long in fibroblasts from a patient with Alzheimer disease. Telomeric DNA repair efficiency is lower in cells from an old donor than in cells from a young donor, normal in Alzheimer cells, and slightly lower in Werner cells. It is possible that this decline in telomeric repair with aging is of functional significance to an age-related decline in genomic stability. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7816828

  2. β2-spectrin depletion impairs DNA damage repair

    PubMed Central

    Horikoshi, Nobuo; Pandita, Raj K.; Mujoo, Kalpana; Hambarde, Shashank; Sharma, Dharmendra; Mattoo, Abid R.; Chakraborty, Sharmistha; Charaka, Vijaya; Hunt, Clayton R.; Pandita, Tej K.

    2016-01-01

    β2-Spectrin (β2SP/SPTBN1, gene SPTBN1) is a key TGF-β/SMAD3/4 adaptor and transcriptional cofactor that regulates TGF-β signaling and can contribute to liver cancer development. Here we report that cells deficient in β2-Spectrin (β2SP) are moderately sensitive to ionizing radiation (IR) and extremely sensitive to agents that cause interstrand cross-links (ICLs) or replication stress. In response to treatment with IR or ICL agents (formaldehyde, cisplatin, camptothecin, mitomycin), β2SP deficient cells displayed a higher frequency of cells with delayed γ-H2AX removal and a higher frequency of residual chromosome aberrations. Following hydroxyurea (HU)-induced replication stress, β2SP-deficient cells displayed delayed disappearance of γ-H2AX foci along with defective repair factor recruitment (MRE11, CtIP, RAD51, RPA, and FANCD2) as well as defective restart of stalled replication forks. Repair factor recruitment is a prerequisite for initiation of DNA damage repair by the homologous recombination (HR) pathway, which was also defective in β2SP deficient cells. We propose that β2SP is required for maintaining genomic stability following replication fork stalling, whether induced by either ICL damage or replicative stress, by facilitating fork regression as well as DNA damage repair by homologous recombination. PMID:27248179

  3. UV exposed electronically activated damage and photoreactivation repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohr, Henrik; Malik, Bary

    2007-03-01

    An investigation of the possible physics underlying the damage caused to DNA by UV radiation and its subsequent repair via a photoreactivation mechanism is presented in this study. An electronic pathway starting from the initial damage to the final repair process is proposed. UV radiation is absorbed to create a hole-excited thymine or other pyrimidine that subsequently is responsible for the formation of the thymine dimer. The negative-ion of the cofactor riboflavin, FADH-, formed by the exposure of the photolyase protein to visible light interacts with the hole-excited electronic orbital of the thymine dimer inducing a photon-less Auger transition, which restores the two thymines to the ground state, thereby detaching the lesion and repairing the DNA. Due to energy balance, the process has to involve an electronic excited state (s). The mechanism involves the least amount of energy dissipation and is charge neutral. It also avoids radiation damage in the repair process, that is, is a radiationless process.

  4. Protein damage and repair controlling seed vigor and longevity.

    PubMed

    Ogé, Laurent; Broyart, Caroline; Collet, Boris; Godin, Béatrice; Jallet, Denis; Bourdais, Gildas; Job, Dominique; Grappin, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    The formation of abnormal isoaspartyl residues derived from aspartyl or asparaginyl residues is a major source of spontaneous protein misfolding in cells. The repair enzyme protein L: -isoaspartyl methyltransferase (PIMT) counteracts such damage by catalyzing the conversion of abnormal isoaspartyl residues to their normal aspartyl forms. Thus, this enzyme contributes to the survival of many organisms, including plants. Analysis of the accumulation of isoaspartyl-containing proteins and its modulation by the PIMT repair pathway, using germination tests, immunodetection, enzymatic assays, and HPLC analysis, gives new insights in understanding controlling mechanisms of seed longevity and vigor.

  5. Chromosome territories reposition during DNA damage-repair response

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Local higher-order chromatin structure, dynamics and composition of the DNA are known to determine double-strand break frequencies and the efficiency of repair. However, how DNA damage response affects the spatial organization of chromosome territories is still unexplored. Results Our report investigates the effect of DNA damage on the spatial organization of chromosome territories within interphase nuclei of human cells. We show that DNA damage induces a large-scale spatial repositioning of chromosome territories that are relatively gene dense. This response is dose dependent, and involves territories moving from the nuclear interior to the periphery and vice versa. Furthermore, we have found that chromosome territory repositioning is contingent upon double-strand break recognition and damage sensing. Importantly, our results suggest that this is a reversible process where, following repair, chromosome territories re-occupy positions similar to those in undamaged control cells. Conclusions Thus, our report for the first time highlights DNA damage-dependent spatial reorganization of whole chromosomes, which might be an integral aspect of cellular damage response. PMID:24330859

  6. The nucleosome: orchestrating DNA damage signaling and repair within chromatin.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Poonam; Miller, Kyle M

    2016-10-01

    DNA damage occurs within the chromatin environment, which ultimately participates in regulating DNA damage response (DDR) pathways and repair of the lesion. DNA damage activates a cascade of signaling events that extensively modulates chromatin structure and organization to coordinate DDR factor recruitment to the break and repair, whilst also promoting the maintenance of normal chromatin functions within the damaged region. For example, DDR pathways must avoid conflicts between other DNA-based processes that function within the context of chromatin, including transcription and replication. The molecular mechanisms governing the recognition, target specificity, and recruitment of DDR factors and enzymes to the fundamental repeating unit of chromatin, i.e., the nucleosome, are poorly understood. Here we present our current view of how chromatin recognition by DDR factors is achieved at the level of the nucleosome. Emerging evidence suggests that the nucleosome surface, including the nucleosome acidic patch, promotes the binding and activity of several DNA damage factors on chromatin. Thus, in addition to interactions with damaged DNA and histone modifications, nucleosome recognition by DDR factors plays a key role in orchestrating the requisite chromatin response to maintain both genome and epigenome integrity.

  7. Simulated microgravity influenced the expression of DNA damage repair genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Meng; Sun, Yeqing; Jiawei, Liu; Wang, Ting

    2016-07-01

    Ionizing radiation and microgravity were considered to be the most important stress factors of space environmental the respective study of the biological effects of the radiation and microgravity carried out earlier, but the interaction of the effects of radiation with microgravity started later, and due to difference of the materials and methods the result of this experiment were not consistent. To further investigate the influence of microgravity on the expression of the radiation damage repair genes, the seed of Arabidopsis (Col) and its gravity-insensitive mutant (PIN2) were exposed to 0.1Gy of the dose of energetic carbon-ion beam radiation (LET = 30KeV / μm), and the germinated seed were than fixed in the 3D random positioning apparatus immediately for a 10-day simulated microgravity. By measuring the deflection angle of root tip and the changes of the expression of Ku70 and RAD51 protein, we investigated the impact of microgravity effect on radiation damage repair systems. The results shown that radiation, microgravity and microgravity with radiation could increase the angle of the root of the Col significantly, but no obvious effect on PIN2 type. The radiation could increase the expression of Ku70 significantly in both Col and PIN2, microgravity does not affect the expression, but the microgravity with radiation could decrease the expression of Ku70. This result shown that the microgravity could influence the radiation damage repair systems in molecular level. Moreover, our findings were important to understand the molecular mechanism of the impact of microgravity effect on radiation damage repair systems in vivo.

  8. Characterization of Oxidative Guanine Damage and Repair in Mammalian Telomeres

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhilong; Rhee, David B.; Lu, Jian; Bohr, Christina T.; Zhou, Fang; Vallabhaneni, Haritha; de Souza-Pinto, Nadja C.; Liu, Yie

    2010-01-01

    8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG) and 2,6-diamino-4-hydroxy-5-formamidopyrimidine (FapyG) are among the most common oxidative DNA lesions and are substrates for 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1)–initiated DNA base excision repair (BER). Mammalian telomeres consist of triple guanine repeats and are subject to oxidative guanine damage. Here, we investigated the impact of oxidative guanine damage and its repair by OGG1 on telomere integrity in mice. The mouse cells were analyzed for telomere integrity by telomere quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization (telomere–FISH), by chromosome orientation–FISH (CO–FISH), and by indirect immunofluorescence in combination with telomere–FISH and for oxidative base lesions by Fpg-incision/Southern blot assay. In comparison to the wild type, telomere lengthening was observed in Ogg1 null (Ogg1−/−) mouse tissues and primary embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) cultivated in hypoxia condition (3% oxygen), whereas telomere shortening was detected in Ogg1−/− mouse hematopoietic cells and primary MEFs cultivated in normoxia condition (20% oxygen) or in the presence of an oxidant. In addition, telomere length abnormalities were accompanied by altered telomere sister chromatid exchanges, increased telomere single- and double-strand breaks, and preferential telomere lagging- or G-strand losses in Ogg1−/− mouse cells. Oxidative guanine lesions were increased in telomeres in Ogg1−/− mice with aging and primary MEFs cultivated in 20% oxygen. Furthermore, oxidative guanine lesions persisted at high level in Ogg1−/− MEFs after acute exposure to hydrogen peroxide, while they rapidly returned to basal level in wild-type MEFs. These findings indicate that oxidative guanine damage can arise in telomeres where it affects length homeostasis, recombination, DNA replication, and DNA breakage repair. Our studies demonstrate that BER pathway is required in repairing oxidative guanine damage in telomeres and maintaining

  9. Kinetic Modeling of Damage Repair, Genome Instability, and Neoplastic Transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Robert D

    2007-03-17

    Inducible repair and pathway interactions may fundamentally alter the shape of dose-response curves because different mechanisms may be important under low- and high-dose exposure conditions. However, the significance of these phenomena for risk assessment purposes is an open question. This project developed new modeling tools to study the putative effects of DNA damage induction and repair on higher-level biological endpoints, including cell killing, neoplastic transformation and cancer. The project scope included (1) the development of new approaches to simulate the induction and base excision repair (BER) of DNA damage using Monte Carlo methods and (2) the integration of data from the Monte Carlo simulations with kinetic models for higher-level biological endpoints. Methods of calibrating and testing such multiscale biological simulations were developed. We also developed models to aid in the analysis and interpretation of data from experimental assays, such as the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) assay used to quantity the amount of DNA damage caused by ionizing radiation.

  10. DNA damage, oxidative mutagen sensitivity, and repair of oxidative DNA damage in nonmelanoma skin cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Bendesky, Andrés; Michel, Alejandra; Sordo, Monserrat; Calderón-Aranda, Emma S; Acosta-Saavedra, Leonor C; Salazar, Ana M; Podoswa, Nancy; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia

    2006-08-01

    Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most frequent type of cancer in humans. Exposure to UV radiation is a major risk factor for NMSC, and oxidative DNA damage, caused either by UV radiation itself or by other agents, may be involved in its induction. Increased sensitivity to oxidative damage and an altered DNA repair capacity (DRC) increase the risk of many types of cancer; however, sensitivity to oxidizing agents has not been evaluated for NMSC, and results regarding DRC in NMSC are inconclusive. In the present study, we evaluated DNA damage and repair in leukocytes from 41 NMSC patients and 45 controls. The Comet assay was used to measure basal and H(2)O(2)-induced DNA damage, as well as the DRC, while the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay was used to measure the basal level of chromosome damage. Although basal DNA damage was higher for the controls than for the patients, this finding was mainly due to sampling more controls in the summer, which was associated with longer comet tails. In contrast, H(2)O(2)-induced DNA damage was significantly higher in cases than in controls, and this parameter was not influenced by the season of the year. The DRC for the H(2)O(2)-induced damage was similar for cases and controls and unrelated to seasonality. Finally, the frequency of binucleated lymphocytes with micronuclei was similar for cases and controls. The results of this study indicate that NMSC patients are distinguished from controls by an increased sensitivity to oxidative DNA damage.

  11. HDAC inhibitors: roles of DNA damage and repair.

    PubMed

    Robert, Carine; Rassool, Feyruz V

    2012-01-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis) increase gene expression through induction of histone acetylation. However, it remains unclear whether specific gene expression changes determine the apoptotic response following HDACis administration. Herein, we discuss evidence that HDACis trigger in cancer and leukemia cells not only widespread histone acetylation but also actual increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA damage that are further increased following treatment with DNA-damaging chemotherapies. While the origins of ROS production are not completely understood, mechanisms, including inflammation and altered antioxidant signaling, have been reported. While the generation of ROS is an explanation, at least in part, for the source of DNA damage observed with HDACi treatment, DNA damage can also be independently induced by changes in the DNA repair activity and chromatin remodeling factors. Recent development of sirtuin inhibitors (SIRTis) has shown that, similar to HDACis, these drugs induce increases in ROS and DNA damage used singly, or in combination with HDACis and other drugs. Thus, induction of apoptosis by HDACis/SIRTis may result through oxidative stress and DNA damage mechanisms in addition to direct activation of apoptosis-inducing genes. Nevertheless, while DNA damage and stress responses could be of interest as markers for clinical responses, they have yet to be validated as markers for responses to HDACi treatment in clinical trials, alone, and in combination.

  12. Torin2 Suppresses Ionizing Radiation-Induced DNA Damage Repair.

    PubMed

    Udayakumar, Durga; Pandita, Raj K; Horikoshi, Nobuo; Liu, Yan; Liu, Qingsong; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Hunt, Clayton R; Gray, Nathanael S; Minna, John D; Pandita, Tej K; Westover, Kenneth D

    2016-05-01

    Several classes of inhibitors of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) have been developed based on its central role in sensing growth factor and nutrient levels to regulate cellular metabolism. However, its ATP-binding site closely resembles other phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related kinase (PIKK) family members, resulting in reactivity with these targets that may also be therapeutically useful. The ATP-competitive mTOR inhibitor, Torin2, shows biochemical activity against the DNA repair-associated proteins ATM, ATR and DNA-PK, which raises the possibility that Torin2 and related compounds might radiosensitize cancerous tumors. In this study Torin2 was also found to enhance ionizing radiation-induced cell killing in conditions where ATM was dispensable, confirming the requirement for multiple PIKK targets. Moreover, Torin2 did not influence the initial appearance of γ-H2AX foci after irradiation but significantly delayed the disappearance of radiation-induced γ-H2AX foci, indicating a DNA repair defect. Torin2 increased the number of radiation-induced S-phase specific chromosome aberrations and reduced the frequency of radiation-induced CtIP and Rad51 foci formation, suggesting that Torin2 works by blocking homologous recombination (HR)-mediated DNA repair resulting in an S-phase specific DNA repair defect. Accordingly, Torin2 reduced HR-mediated repair of I-Sce1-induced DNA damage and contributed to replication fork stalling. We conclude that radiosensitization of tumor cells by Torin2 is associated with disrupting ATR- and ATM-dependent DNA damage responses. Our findings support the concept of developing combination cancer therapies that incorporate ionizing radiation therapy and Torin2 or compounds with similar properties.

  13. Space Shuttle Atlantis' external tank repairs from Hail Damage

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-04-09

    In the Vehicle Assembly Building, United Space Alliance technicians Brenda Morris and Brian Williams are applying foam and molds on Space Shuttle Atlantis' external tank to areas damaged by hail. The white hole with a red circle around it (upper right) is a hole prepared for molding and material application. The red material is sealant tape so the mold doesn't leak when the foam rises against the mold. The white/ translucent square mold is an area where the foam has been applied and the foam has risen and cured against the mold surface. In late February, Atlantis' external tank received hail damage during a severe thunderstorm that passed through the Kennedy Space Center Launch Complex 39 area. The hail caused visible divots in the giant tank's foam insulation as well as minor surface damage to about 26 heat shield tiles on the shuttle's left wing. The March launch was postponed and has not yet been rescheduled due to the repair process.

  14. Probing and repairing damaged surfaces with nanoparticle-containing microcapsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kratz, Katrina; Narasimhan, Amrit; Tangirala, Ravisubhash; Moon, Sungcheal; Revanur, Ravindra; Kundu, Santanu; Kim, Hyun Suk; Crosby, Alfred J.; Russell, Thomas P.; Emrick, Todd; Kolmakov, German; Balazs, Anna C.

    2012-02-01

    Nanoparticles have useful properties, but it is often important that they only start working after they are placed in a desired location. The encapsulation of nanoparticles allows their function to be preserved until they are released at a specific time or location, and this has been exploited in the development of self-healing materials and in applications such as drug delivery. Encapsulation has also been used to stabilize and control the release of substances, including flavours, fragrances and pesticides. We recently proposed a new technique for the repair of surfaces called `repair-and-go'. In this approach, a flexible microcapsule filled with a solution of nanoparticles rolls across a surface that has been damaged, stopping to repair any defects it encounters by releasing nanoparticles into them, then moving on to the next defect. Here, we experimentally demonstrate the repair-and-go approach using droplets of oil that are stabilized with a polymer surfactant and contain CdSe nanoparticles. We show that these microcapsules can find the cracks on a surface and selectively deliver the nanoparticle contents into the crack, before moving on to find the next crack. Although the microcapsules are too large to enter the cracks, their flexible walls allow them to probe and adhere temporarily to the interior of the cracks. The release of nanoparticles is made possible by the thin microcapsule wall (comparable to the diameter of the nanoparticles) and by the favourable (hydrophobic-hydrophobic) interactions between the nanoparticle and the cracked surface.

  15. DNA damage repair and genetic polymorphisms: Assessment of individual sensitivity and repair capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Cornetta, Tommaso; Festa, Fabiola; Testa, Antonella; Cozzi, Renata Prof. . E-mail: cozzi@uniroma3.it

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: To study the repair capacity after X-ray irradiation in human peripheral blood cells of healthy subjects, in relation to their genotypes. Methods and Materials: The peripheral blood of 50 healthy subjects was irradiated in vitro with 2 Gy of X rays and the induced DNA damage was measured by Comet assay immediately after irradiation. DNA repair was detected by analyzing the cells at defined time intervals after the exposure. Furthermore, all subjects were genotyped for XRCC1, OGG1, and XPC genes. Results: After X-ray irradiation, persons bearing XRCC1 homozygous variant (codon 399) genotype exhibited significantly lower Tail DNA values than those bearing wild-type and heterozygous genotypes. These results are also confirmed at 30 and 60 min after irradiation. Furthermore, XPC heterozygous subjects (variant codon 939) showed lower residual DNA damage 60 min after irradiation compared with wild-type and homozygous genotypes. Conclusion: The results of the present study show that polymorphisms in DNA repair genes could influence individual DNA repair capacity.

  16. DNA damage and repair in Stylonychia lemnae (Ciliata, Protozoa)

    SciTech Connect

    Ammermann, D.

    1988-05-01

    Irradiation with X rays, UV irradiation after incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine (BU) into the DNA, and cis-platinum (cis-Pt) treatment each cause the loss of micronuclei of Stylonychia lemnae while the macronuclei are not severely affected. The abilities of both nuclei to repair DNA were investigated. Unscheduled DNA synthesis could not be demonstrated after X-ray irradiation, but it was found after treatment with BU/UV and cis-Pt in macro- and micronuclei. The extent of the repair process in the micro- and macronuclei was alike, as indicated by grain counts of (6-/sup 3/H)thymidine-treated cells. One reason for the different sensitivity of both nuclei to DNA-damaging treatment may be the different number of gene copies in the macro- and micronuclei.

  17. Space Shuttle Atlantis' external tank repairs from Hail Damage

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-04-09

    In the Vehicle Assembly Building, markers show the hail damage being repaired on the external tank of Space Shuttle Atlantis. The white hole with a red circle around it is a hole prepared for molding and material application. The red material is sealant tape so the mold doesn't leak when the foam rises against the mold. The white/ translucent square mold is an area where the foam has been applied and the foam has risen and cured against the mold surface. The area will be de-molded and sanded flush the with adjacent area. In late February, Atlantis' external tank received hail damage during a severe thunderstorm that passed through the Kennedy Space Center Launch Complex 39 area. The hail caused visible divots in the giant tank's foam insulation as well as minor surface damage to about 26 heat shield tiles on the shuttle's left wing. The March launch was postponed and has not yet been rescheduled due to the repair process.

  18. Pathophysiology of Bronchoconstriction: Role of Oxidatively Damaged DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Bacsi, Attila; Pan, Lang; Ba, Xueqing; Boldogh, Istvan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review To provide an overview on the present understanding of roles of oxidative DNA damage repair in cell signaling underlying bronchoconstriction common to, but not restricted to various forms of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease Recent findings Bronchoconstriction is a tightening of smooth muscle surrounding the bronchi and bronchioles with consequent wheezing and shortness of breath. Key stimuli include air pollutants, viral infections, allergens, thermal and osmotic changes, and shear stress of mucosal epithelium, triggering a wide range of cellular, vascular and neural events. Although activation of nerve fibers, the role of G-proteins, protein kinases and Ca++, and molecular interaction within contracting filaments of muscle are well defined, the overarching mechanisms by which a wide range of stimuli initiate these events are not fully understood. Many, if not all, stimuli increase levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are signaling and oxidatively modifying macromolecules, including DNA. The primary ROS target in DNA is guanine, and 8-oxoguanine is one of the most abundant base lesions. It is repaired by 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase1 (OGG1) during base excision repair processes. The product, free 8-oxoG base, is bound by OGG1 with high affinity, and the complex then functions as an activator of small GTPases, triggering pathways for inducing gene expression and contraction of intracellular filaments in mast and smooth muscle cells. Summary Oxidative DNA damage repair-mediated cell activation signaling result in gene expression that “primes” the mucosal epithelium and submucosal tissues to generate mediators of airway smooth muscle contractions. PMID:26694039

  19. Extra lethal damage due to residual incompletely repaired sublethal damage in hyperfractionated and continuous radiation treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; van de Geijn, J.; Goffman, T. )

    1991-05-01

    In the conventional linear--quadratic model of single-dose response, the {alpha} and {beta} terms reflect lethal damage created {ital during} the delivery of a dose, from two different presumed molecular processes, one linear with dose, the other quadratic. With the conventional one-fraction-per-day (or less) regimens, the sublethal damage (SLD), presumably repairing exponentially over time, is essentially completely fixed by the time of the next dose of radiation. If this assumption is true, the effects of subsequent fractions of radiation should be independent, that is, there should be little, if any, reversible damage left from previous fractions, at the time of the next dose. For multiple daily fractions, or for the limiting case, continuous radiation, this simplification may overlook damaged cells that have had insufficient time for repair. A generalized method is presented for accounting for extra lethal damage (ELD) arising from such residual SLD for hyperfractionation and continuous irradiation schemes. It may help to predict differences in toxicity and tumor control, if any, obtained with unconventional'' treatment regimens. A key element in the present model is the finite size and the dynamic character of the pool of sublethal damage. Besides creating the usual linear and quadratic components of lethal damage, each new fraction converts a certain fraction of the existing SLD into ELD, and creates some new SLD.

  20. Tyndall AFB Bomb Damage Repair Field Test, Documentation and Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-10-01

    was not tested, as bping Irrele- vant to these tests. Simulation of this event was not attempted because it would have provided little or no...Richardson, Texas, Report No. AFWL-TR-71-42, October 1971. 11. Bussone, P.S., B.J. Bottomley, and G.C. Hoff , Rapid Repair of Bomb- Damaged Runways...Airfield Runways, Air Force Weapons Laboratory, Klrtland AFB, New Mexico, Report No. AFWL-TR-73-214, February 1974. 19. Hoff , George C, Investigation of

  1. [GammaH2AX-mediated repair of DNA damaged sperm in the zygote].

    PubMed

    Liu, Wan-Min; Liu, Rong-Ju; Li, Zhi-Ling

    2010-04-01

    Male germ cells are particularly susceptible to DNA damage by genotoxic agents during spermiogenesis and spermatozoal maturation, and meanwhile lack an effective repair system to eliminate the lesions. Because the DNA damaged sperm still has fertilizability and developmental potentiality, damage repair may occur after fertilization, but its mechanism remains unknown. Histone H2AX phosphorylation (gammaH2AX) is reportedly involved in the repair of damaged sperm DNA after fertilization. This review aims to summarize the present knowledge on the mechanism of gammaH2AX-mediated repair of DNA damaged sperm in the zygote.

  2. DNA mismatch repair and the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhongdao; Pearlman, Alexander H.; Hsieh, Peggy

    2015-01-01

    This review discusses the role of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) in the DNA damage response (DDR) that triggers cell cycle arrest and, in some cases, apoptosis. Although the focus is on findings from mammalian cells, much has been learned from studies in other organisms including bacteria and yeast [1,2]. MMR promotes a DDR mediated by a key signaling kinase, ATM and Rad3-related (ATR), in response to various types of DNA damage including some encountered in widely used chemotherapy regimes. An introduction to the DDR mediated by ATR reveals its immense complexity and highlights the many biological and mechanistic questions that remain. Recent findings and future directions are highlighted. PMID:26704428

  3. Functions of PARylation in DNA Damage Repair Pathways.

    PubMed

    Wei, Huiting; Yu, Xiaochun

    2016-06-01

    Protein poly ADP-ribosylation (PARylation) is a widespread post-translational modification at DNA lesions, which is catalyzed by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs). This modification regulates a number of biological processes including chromatin reorganization, DNA damage response (DDR), transcriptional regulation, apoptosis, and mitosis. PARP1, functioning as a DNA damage sensor, can be activated by DNA lesions, forming PAR chains that serve as a docking platform for DNA repair factors with high biochemical complexity. Here, we highlight molecular insights into PARylation recognition, the expanding role of PARylation in DDR pathways, and the functional interaction between PARylation and ubiquitination, which will offer us a better understanding of the biological roles of this unique post-translational modification. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. DNA mismatch repair and the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhongdao; Pearlman, Alexander H; Hsieh, Peggy

    2016-02-01

    This review discusses the role of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) in the DNA damage response (DDR) that triggers cell cycle arrest and, in some cases, apoptosis. Although the focus is on findings from mammalian cells, much has been learned from studies in other organisms including bacteria and yeast [1,2]. MMR promotes a DDR mediated by a key signaling kinase, ATM and Rad3-related (ATR), in response to various types of DNA damage including some encountered in widely used chemotherapy regimes. An introduction to the DDR mediated by ATR reveals its immense complexity and highlights the many biological and mechanistic questions that remain. Recent findings and future directions are highlighted. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Pattern Learning, Damage and Repair within Biological Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siu, Theodore; Fitzgerald O'Neill, Kate; Shinbrot, Troy

    2015-03-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes damage to neural networks, potentially leading to disability or even death. Nearly one in ten of these patients die, and most of the remainder suffer from symptoms ranging from headaches and nausea to convulsions and paralysis. In vitro studies to develop treatments for TBI have limited in vivo applicability, and in vitro therapies have even proven to worsen the outcome of TBI patients. We propose that this disconnect between in vitro and in vivo outcomes may be associated with the fact that in vitro tests assess indirect measures of neuronal health, but do not investigate the actual function of neuronal networks. Therefore in this talk, we examine both in vitro and in silico neuronal networks that actually perform a function: pattern identification. We allow the networks to execute genetic, Hebbian, learning, and additionally, we examine the effects of damage and subsequent repair within our networks. We show that the length of repaired connections affects the overall pattern learning performance of the network and we propose therapies that may improve function following TBI in clinical settings.

  6. DNA damage repair in breast cancer and its therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Ali, Reem; Rakha, Emad A; Madhusudan, Srinivasan; Bryant, Helen E

    2017-02-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) involves the activation of numerous cellular activities that repair DNA lesions and maintain genomic integrity, and is critical in preventing tumorigenesis. Inherited or acquired mutations in specific genes involved in the DNA damage response, for example the breast cancer susceptibility genes 1/2 (BRCA1/2), phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) and P53 are associated with various subtypes of breast cancer. Such changes can render breast cancer cells particularly sensitive to specific DNA damage response inhibitors, for example BRCA1/2 germline mutated cells are sensitive to poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. The aims of this review are to discuss specific DNA damage response defects in breast cancer and to present the current stage of development of various DDR inhibitors (namely PARP, ATM/ATR, DNA-PK, PARG, RECQL5, FEN1 and APE1) for breast cancer mono- and combination therapy. Copyright © 2016 Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Regulatory players of DNA damage repair mechanisms: Role in Cancer Chemoresistance.

    PubMed

    Sakthivel, Kunnathur Murugesan; Hariharan, Sreedharan

    2017-09-01

    DNA damaging agents are most common in chemotherapeutic molecules that act against cancer. However, cancer cells possess inherent biological features to overcome DNA damages by activating various distinct repair mechanisms and pathways. Importantly, various oncogenes, cancer stem cells (CSCs), hypoxic environment, transcription factors and bystander signaling that are activated in the cancer cells influence DNA repair, thereby effectively repairing the DNA damage. Repaired cancer cells often become more resistance to further therapy and results in disease recurrence. In this review, we summarize how the various signaling pathways in cancer cells regulates DNA repair and induce chemoresistance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparative DNA damage and repair induced by misonidazole, CB 1954 and RSU 1069.

    PubMed

    Dale, L D; Widdick, D A; Edwards, D I; Biol, G I

    1989-04-01

    We have studied the ability of CB 1954, misonidazole, and RSU 1069 to induce biologically relevant DNA damage in single- and double-stranded phi X174 DNA under oxic, anoxic, and anoxic reductive conditions using a double transfection technique. In addition, the ability of the three drugs to induce the SOS repair response in E. coli under the same conditions was measured. Whereas the relative order of DNA damage was RSU 1069 greater than CB 1954 greater than misonidazole the order in inducing SOS repair was RSU 1069 greater than misonidazole greater than CB 1954. Drug-induced damage by RSU 1069 involves enhanced damage by endonuclease III suggesting drug-induced pyrimidine damage. There appears to be no correlation between drug-induced damage and the degree of SOS repair induction. Thus it appears that enzymes other than, or in addition to, those of the SOS repair system are involved in the repair of DNA damage induced by these drugs.

  9. Impaired DNA damage repair as a common feature of neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Shiwaku, H; Okazawa, H

    2015-01-01

    Impaired DNA damage repair is a common pathological endophenotype of some types of neurodegenerative diseases, intellectual disabilities, and psychiatric diseases. Dysfunctional DNA repair and DNA damage, including DNA double-stranded breaks, are linked to transcriptional dysfunction and abnormal DNA methylation. Impaired DNA repair in neural stem cells leads to microcephaly or cerebellar ataxia. Furthermore, DNA repair defects and DNA damage in mature neurons lead to progressive cognitive impairment, which might be a common feature of Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, and other polyglutamine diseases. Oxidative DNA damage and altered DNA repair gene expression are observed in GABAergic neurons in schizophrenia. These findings indicate that impaired DNA repair is a common pathological endophenotype of neurological diseases, and that DNA damage might lead to diverse disease symptoms dependent on timing and the affected cell type.

  10. International congress on DNA damage and repair: Book of abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This document contains the abstracts of 105 papers presented at the Congress. Topics covered include the Escherichia coli nucleotide excision repair system, DNA repair in malignant transformations, defective DNA repair, and gene regulation. (TEM)

  11. The distribution of DNA damage is defined by region-specific susceptibility to DNA damage formation rather than repair differences.

    PubMed

    Strand, Janne M; Scheffler, Katja; Bjørås, Magnar; Eide, Lars

    2014-06-01

    The cellular genomes are continuously damaged by reactive oxygen species (ROS) from aerobic processes. The impact of DNA damage depends on the specific site as well as the cellular state. The steady-state level of DNA damage is the net result of continuous formation and subsequent repair, but it is unknown to what extent heterogeneous damage distribution is caused by variations in formation or repair of DNA damage. Here, we used a restriction enzyme/qPCR based method to analyze DNA damage in promoter and coding regions of four nuclear genes: the two house-keeping genes Gadph and Tbp, and the Ndufa9 and Ndufs2 genes encoding mitochondrial complex I subunits, as well as mt-Rnr1 encoded by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). The distribution of steady-state levels of damage varied in a site-specific manner. Oxidative stress induced damage in nDNA to a similar extent in promoter and coding regions, and more so in mtDNA. The subsequent removal of damage from nDNA was efficient and comparable with recovery times depending on the initial damage load, while repair of mtDNA was delayed with subsequently slower repair rate. The repair was furthermore found to be independent of transcription or the transcription-coupled repair factor CSB, but dependent on cellular ATP. Our results demonstrate that the capacity to repair DNA is sufficient to remove exogenously induced damage. Thus, we conclude that the heterogeneous steady-state level of DNA damage in promoters and coding regions is caused by site-specific DNA damage/modifications that take place under normal metabolism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. DNA Damage, Homology-Directed Repair, and DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Angrisano, Tiziana; Morano, Annalisa; Lee, Bongyong; Pardo, Alba Di; Messina, Samantha; Iuliano, Rodolfo; Fusco, Alfredo; Santillo, Maria R; Muller, Mark T; Chiariotti, Lorenzo; Gottesman, Max E; Avvedimento, Enrico V

    2007-01-01

    To explore the link between DNA damage and gene silencing, we induced a DNA double-strand break in the genome of Hela or mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells using I-SceI restriction endonuclease. The I-SceI site lies within one copy of two inactivated tandem repeated green fluorescent protein (GFP) genes (DR-GFP). A total of 2%–4% of the cells generated a functional GFP by homology-directed repair (HR) and gene conversion. However, ~50% of these recombinants expressed GFP poorly. Silencing was rapid and associated with HR and DNA methylation of the recombinant gene, since it was prevented in Hela cells by 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine. ES cells deficient in DNA methyl transferase 1 yielded as many recombinants as wild-type cells, but most of these recombinants expressed GFP robustly. Half of the HR DNA molecules were de novo methylated, principally downstream to the double-strand break, and half were undermethylated relative to the uncut DNA. Methylation of the repaired gene was independent of the methylation status of the converting template. The methylation pattern of recombinant molecules derived from pools of cells carrying DR-GFP at different loci, or from an individual clone carrying DR-GFP at a single locus, was comparable. ClustalW analysis of the sequenced GFP molecules in Hela and ES cells distinguished recombinant and nonrecombinant DNA solely on the basis of their methylation profile and indicated that HR superimposed novel methylation profiles on top of the old patterns. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and RNA analysis revealed that DNA methyl transferase 1 was bound specifically to HR GFP DNA and that methylation of the repaired segment contributed to the silencing of GFP expression. Taken together, our data support a mechanistic link between HR and DNA methylation and suggest that DNA methylation in eukaryotes marks homologous recombined segments. PMID:17616978

  13. SUMO-mediated regulation of DNA damage repair and responses

    PubMed Central

    Sarangi, Prabha; Zhao, Xiaolan

    2015-01-01

    Sumoylation plays important roles during DNA damage repair and responses. Recent broad-scope and substrate-based studies have shed light on the regulation and significance of sumoylation during these processes. An emerging paradigm is that sumoylation of many DNA metabolism proteins is controlled by DNA engagement. Such “on-site modification” can explain low substrate modification levels and has important implications in sumoylation mechanisms and effects. New studies also suggest that sumoylation can regulate a process through an ensemble effect or via major substrates. Additionally, we describe new trends in the functional effects of sumoylation, such as bi-directional changes in biomolecule binding and multi-level coordination with other modifications. These emerging themes and models will stimulate our thinking and research in sumoylation and genome maintenance. PMID:25778614

  14. Shuttle/Centaur G-prime composite adapters damage tolerance/repair test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sollars, Teresa A.

    1987-01-01

    The Space Shuttle/Centaur Composite Adapters Damage Tolerance/Repair Test program had as its goals the determination of probable and potentially critical defects or damages on the adapters' strength and stability, as well as the adequacy of repairs on significantly damaged areas and the generation of NDT data for the upgrading of acceptance criteria. Such rational accept/reject criteria and repair methods reduce both engineering liason costs and any unnecessary parts-scrapping. Successful 'damage tolerant' design ensures that degradations of strength and stability due to undetected defects or damage will not be catastrophic.

  15. Chromatin dynamics after DNA damage: the legacy of the Access-Repair-Restore model

    PubMed Central

    Polo, Sophie E.; Almouzni, Geneviève

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are packaged into chromatin, which is the physiological substrate for all DNA transactions, including DNA damage and repair. Chromatin organization imposes major constraints on DNA damage repair and thus undergoes critical rearrangements during the repair process. These rearrangements have been integrated into the “Access-Repair-Restore” (ARR) model, which provides a molecular framework for chromatin dynamics in response to DNA damage. Here, we take a historical perspective on the elaboration of this model and describe the molecular players involved in damaged chromatin reorganization in human cells. In particular, we present our current knowledge of chromatin assembly coupled to DNA damage repair, focusing on the role of histone variants and their dedicated chaperones. Finally, we discuss the impact of chromatin rearrangements after DNA damage on chromatin function and epigenome maintenance. PMID:26429064

  16. Chromatin dynamics after DNA damage: The legacy of the access-repair-restore model.

    PubMed

    Polo, Sophie E; Almouzni, Geneviève

    2015-12-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are packaged into chromatin, which is the physiological substrate for all DNA transactions, including DNA damage and repair. Chromatin organization imposes major constraints on DNA damage repair and thus undergoes critical rearrangements during the repair process. These rearrangements have been integrated into the "access-repair-restore" (ARR) model, which provides a molecular framework for chromatin dynamics in response to DNA damage. Here, we take a historical perspective on the elaboration of this model and describe the molecular players involved in damaged chromatin reorganization in human cells. In particular, we present our current knowledge of chromatin assembly coupled to DNA damage repair, focusing on the role of histone variants and their dedicated chaperones. Finally, we discuss the impact of chromatin rearrangements after DNA damage on chromatin function and epigenome maintenance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Isoaspartyl Protein Damage and Repair in Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Zhenxia; Yang, Jing; Klassen, Henry J.; Aswad, Dana W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the propensity of retinal proteins for spontaneous damage via formation of isoaspartyl sites, a common type of protein damage that could contribute to retinal disease. Methods. Tissue extracts were obtained from retinas and brains of control mice and from mice in which the gene for protein L-isoaspartate O-methyltransferase (PIMT; an enzyme that repairs isoaspartyl protein damage) was knocked out. PIMT expression in these extracts was measured by Western blot, and its specific activity was assayed by monitoring the rate of [3H]methyl transfer from S-adenosyl-[methyl-3H]L-methionine to γ-globulin. Isoaspartate levels in extracts were measured by their capacity to accept [3H]methyl groups via the PIMT-catalyzed methylation reaction. To compare molecular weight distributions of isoaspartyl-rich proteins in retina versus brain, proteins from PIMT knockout (KO) and control mice were separated by SDS-PAGE and transferred to polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF). Isoaspartyl proteins were 3H-labeled on-blot using a PIMT overlay and imaged by autoradiography. Results. When normalized to the β-actin content of each tissue, retina was found to be nearly identical to brain with regard to expression and activity of PIMT and its propensity to accumulate isoaspartyl sites when PIMT is absent. The two tissues show distinct differences in the molecular weight distribution of isoaspartyl proteins. Conclusions. The retina is rich in PIMT activity and contains a wide range of proteins that are highly susceptible to this type of protein damage. Recoverin may be one such protein. Isoaspartate formation, along with oxidation, should be considered as a potential source of protein dysfunction and autoimmunity in retinal disease. PMID:24550364

  18. Repair of uv damaged DNA: Genes and proteins of yeast and human

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, L.

    1992-04-01

    Our objectives are to determine the molecular mechanism of the incision step of excision repair of ultraviolet (UV) light damaged DNA in eukaryotic organisms, using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system, and to study the human homologs of yeast excision repair and postreplication repair proteins progress is described.

  19. Dynamic maps of UV damage formation and repair for the human genome.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jinchuan; Adebali, Ogun; Adar, Sheera; Sancar, Aziz

    2017-06-27

    Formation and repair of UV-induced DNA damage in human cells are affected by cellular context. To study factors influencing damage formation and repair genome-wide, we developed a highly sensitive single-nucleotide resolution damage mapping method [high-sensitivity damage sequencing (HS-Damage-seq)]. Damage maps of both cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and pyrimidine-pyrimidone (6-4) photoproducts [(6-4)PPs] from UV-irradiated cellular and naked DNA revealed that the effect of transcription factor binding on bulky adducts formation varies, depending on the specific transcription factor, damage type, and strand. We also generated time-resolved UV damage maps of both CPDs and (6-4)PPs by HS-Damage-seq and compared them to the complementary repair maps of the human genome obtained by excision repair sequencing to gain insight into factors that affect UV-induced DNA damage and repair and ultimately UV carcinogenesis. The combination of the two methods revealed that, whereas UV-induced damage is virtually uniform throughout the genome, repair is affected by chromatin states, transcription, and transcription factor binding, in a manner that depends on the type of DNA damage.

  20. Lighting up individual DNA damage sites by in vitro repair synthesis.

    PubMed

    Zirkin, Shahar; Fishman, Sivan; Sharim, Hila; Michaeli, Yael; Don, Jeremy; Ebenstein, Yuval

    2014-05-28

    DNA damage and repair are linked to fundamental biological processes such as metabolism, disease, and aging. Single-strand lesions are the most abundant form of DNA damage; however, methods for characterizing these damage lesions are lacking. To avoid double-strand breaks and genomic instability, DNA damage is constantly repaired by efficient enzymatic machinery. We take advantage of this natural process and harness the repair capacity of a bacterial enzymatic cocktail to repair damaged DNA in vitro and incorporate fluorescent nucleotides into damage sites as part of the repair process. We use single-molecule imaging to detect individual damage sites in genomic DNA samples. When the labeled DNA is extended on a microscope slide, damage sites are visualized as fluorescent spots along the DNA contour, and the extent of damage is easily quantified. We demonstrate the ability to quantitatively follow the damage dose response to different damaging agents as well as repair dynamics in response to UV irradiation in several cell types. Finally, we show the modularity of this single-molecule approach by labeling DNA damage in conjunction with 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in genomic DNA extracted from mouse brain tissue.

  1. Spermatogenesis, DNA damage and DNA repair mechanisms in male infertility.

    PubMed

    Gunes, Sezgin; Al-Sadaan, Maha; Agarwal, Ashok

    2015-09-01

    Spermatogenesis is a complex process of proliferation and differentiation during male germ cell development involving mitosis, meiosis and spermiogenesis. Endogenous and exogenous physical, chemical and biological sources modify the genome of spermatozoa. The genomic integrity and stability of the sperm is protected by DNA repair mechanisms. In the male germline cells, DNA repair mechanisms include nucleotide excision repair, base excision repair, DNA mismatch repair, double strand break repair and post-replication repair. Defects in repair mechanisms cause arrest of spermatogenesis and abnormal recombination, ultimately resulting in male infertility. This review focuses on molecular mechanisms of the DNA repair pathways, DNA repair defects and male infertility. Copyright © 2015 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Psoralen-plus-light damage and repair in transforming DNA of Bacillus subtilis

    SciTech Connect

    Hadden, C.T.

    1981-01-01

    The relative contributions of excision and recombination in the repair of damage by 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) plus black light to Bacillus subtilis were studied. The results indicate that the pyrimidine dimer excision system and a recombination pathway are probably both involved in repair of lethal damage to cells exposed in vivo to 8-MOP plus black light, but repair is not very efficient. Transforming DNA exposed in vitro to 8-MOP plus black light was inactivated mainly by crosslinks rather than by monoadducts, and was repaired predominantly by an incision-dependent process. There was very little demonstrable damage-induced recombination in transforming DNA.

  3. A radiation damage repair model for normal tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partridge, Mike

    2008-07-01

    A cellular Monte Carlo model describing radiation damage and repair in normal epithelial tissues is presented. The deliberately simplified model includes cell cycling, cell motility and radiation damage response (cell cycle arrest and cell death) only. Results demonstrate that the model produces a stable equilibrium system for mean cell cycle times in the range 24-96 h. Simulated irradiation of these stable equilibrium systems produced a range of responses that are shown to be consistent with experimental and clinical observation, including (i) re-epithelialization of radiation-induced lesions by a mixture of cell migration into the wound and repopulation at the periphery; (ii) observed radiosensitivity that is quantitatively consistent with both rate of induction of irreparable DNA lesions and, independently, with the observed acute oral and pharyngeal mucosal reactions to radiotherapy; (iii) an observed time between irradiation and maximum toxicity that is consistent with experimental data for skin; (iv) quantitatively accurate predictions of low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity; (v) Gomperzian repopulation for very small lesions (~2000 cells) and (vi) a linear rate of re-epithelialization of 5-10 µm h-1 for large lesions (>15 000 cells).

  4. 49 CFR 192.713 - Transmission lines: Permanent field repair of imperfections and damages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Transmission lines: Permanent field repair of imperfections and damages. 192.713 Section 192.713 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... Maintenance § 192.713 Transmission lines: Permanent field repair of imperfections and damages. (a)...

  5. 49 CFR 192.713 - Transmission lines: Permanent field repair of imperfections and damages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Transmission lines: Permanent field repair of imperfections and damages. 192.713 Section 192.713 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... Maintenance § 192.713 Transmission lines: Permanent field repair of imperfections and damages. (a)...

  6. DNA-damage repair; the good, the bad, and the ugly.

    PubMed

    Hakem, Razqallah

    2008-02-20

    Organisms have developed several DNA-repair pathways as well as DNA-damage checkpoints to cope with the frequent challenge of endogenous and exogenous DNA insults. In the absence or impairment of such repair or checkpoint mechanisms, the genomic integrity of the organism is often compromised. This review will focus on the functional consequences of impaired DNA-repair pathways. Although each pathway is addressed individually, it is essential to note that cross talk exists between repair pathways, and that there are instances in which a DNA-repair protein is involved in more than one pathway. It is also important to integrate DNA-repair process with DNA-damage checkpoints and cell survival, to gain a better understanding of the consequences of compromised DNA repair at both cellular and organismic levels. Functional consequences associated with impaired DNA repair include embryonic lethality, shortened life span, rapid ageing, impaired growth, and a variety of syndromes, including a pronounced manifestation of cancer.

  7. Mystery of DNA repair: the role of the MRN complex and ATM kinase in DNA damage repair.

    PubMed

    Czornak, Kamila; Chughtai, Sanaullah; Chrzanowska, Krystyna H

    2008-01-01

    Genomes are subject to a number of exogenous or endogenous DNA-damaging agents that cause DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). These critical DNA lesions can result in cell death or a wide variety of genetic alterations, including deletions, translocations, loss of heterozygosity, chromosome loss, or chromosome fusions, which enhance genome instability and can trigger carcinogenesis. The cells have developed an efficient mechanism to cope with DNA damages by evolving the DNA repair machinery. There are 2 major DSB repair mechanisms: nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). One element of the repair machinery is the MRN complex, consisting of MRE11, RAD50 and NBN (previously described as NBS1), which is involved in DNA replication, DNA repair, and signaling to the cell cycle checkpoints. A number of kinases, like ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated), ATR (ataxia-telangiectasia and Rad-3-related), and DNA PKcs (DNA protein kinase catalytic subunit), phosphorylate various protein targets in order to repair the damage. If the damage cannot be repaired, they direct the cell to apoptosis. The MRN complex as well as repair kinases are also involved in telomere maintenance and genome stability. The dysfunction of particular elements involved in the repair mechanisms leads to genome instability disorders, like ataxia telangiectasia (A-T), A-T-like disorder (ATLD) and Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS). The mutated genes responsible for these disorders code for proteins that play key roles in the process of DNA repair. Here we present a detailed review of current knowledge on the MRN complex, kinases engaged in DNA repair, and genome instability disorders.

  8. Performance Evaluation of Pre-Cast Slabs for Contingency Rigid Airfield Pavement Damage Repair

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    AFRL-RX-TY-TP-2010-0079 PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF PRE-CAST SLABS FOR CONTINGENCY RIGID AIRFIELD PAVEMENT DAMAGE REPAIR Reza Ashtiani...pre-cast concrete, concrete panels, airfield pavement damage, airfield repair, airfield rigid pavements U U U UU 37 Thomas, Troy Reset 1 Repair...NUMBER (Include area code) 13-OCT-2010 Presentation (PREPRINT) 01-JAN-2010 -- 01-OCT-2010 Performance Evaluation of Pre-Cast Slabs for Contingency Rigid

  9. A matter of life or death: modeling DNA damage and repair in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Karschau, Jens; de Almeida, Camila; Richard, Morgiane C; Miller, Samantha; Booth, Ian R; Grebogi, Celso; de Moura, Alessandro P S

    2011-02-16

    DNA damage is a hazard all cells must face, and evolution has created a number of mechanisms to repair damaged bases in the chromosome. Paradoxically, many of these repair mechanisms can create double-strand breaks in the DNA molecule which are fatal to the cell. This indicates that the connection between DNA repair and death is far from straightforward, and suggests that the repair mechanisms can be a double-edged sword. In this report, we formulate a mathematical model of the dynamics of DNA damage and repair, and we obtain analytical expressions for the death rate. We predict a counterintuitive relationship between survival and repair. We can discriminate between two phases: below a critical threshold in the number of repair enzymes, the half-life decreases with the number of repair enzymes, but becomes independent of the number of repair enzymes above the threshold. We are able to predict quantitatively the dependence of the death rate on the damage rate and other relevant parameters. We verify our analytical results by simulating the stochastic dynamics of DNA damage and repair. Finally, we also perform an experiment with Escherichia coli cells to test one of the predictions of our model.

  10. Repair and misrepair of heavy-ion-induced chromosomal damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, E.; Blakely, E.; Ivery, G.; Tobias, C.

    The premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique was used to investigate chromosomal damage, repair, and misrepair in the G1 phase of a human/hamster hybrid cell line that contains a single human chromosome. Plateau-phase cell cultures were exposed to either x-rays or a 425 MeV/u beam of neon ions near the Bragg peak where the LET is 183 keV/μm. An in situ hybridization technique coupled to fluorescent staining of PCC spreads confirmed the linearity of the dose response for initial chromatin breakage in the human chromosome to high doses (1600 cGy x-ray or 1062 cGy Ne). On Giemsa-stained slides, initial chromatin breakage in the total genome and the rejoining kinetics of these breaks were determined. As a measure of chromosomal misrepair, ring PCC aberrations were also scored. Ne ions were about 1.5 x more effective per unit dose compared to x-rays at producing the initially measured chromatin breakage. 90% of the x-ray-induced breaks rejoined in cells incubated at 37°C after exposure. In contrast, only 50% of Ne-ion-induced breaks rejoined. In the irradiated G1 cells, ring PCC aberrations increased with time apparently by first order kinetics after either x-ray or Ne exposures. However, far fewer rings formed in Ne-irradiated cells after a dose giving a comparable initial number of chromatin breaks. Following x-ray exposures, the yield of rings formed after long repair times (6 to 9 hrs) fit a quadratic dose-response curve. These results indicate quantitative and qualitative differences in the chromosomal lesions induced by low- and high-LET radiations.

  11. VRPD Novel Combinatory Approaches to Repair Visual System After Optic Nerve Damage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0319 TITLE: VRPD Novel Combinatory Approaches to Repair Visual System After Optic Nerve Damage PRINCIPAL...Novel Combinatory Approaches to Repair Visual System After Optic Nerve Damage 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0319 5c. PROGRAM... nerve damage, which occurs in battlefield and post- combat in a delayed manner. In our studies, we have discovered that combining genetic modulations

  12. The production and repair of aflatoxin B sub 1 -induced DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Leadon, S.A.

    1990-05-01

    To investigate the influence of function or activity of a DNA sequence on its repair, we have studied excision repair of aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1})-induced damage in the nontranscribed, heterochromatic alpha DNA of monkey cells and in the metallothionein genes of human cells. In confluent cells, AFB{sub 1} adducts are produced in similar frequencies in alpha and in the rest of the DNA, but removal from alpha DNA is severely deficient, however, removal of AFB{sub 1} adducts from alpha DNA is enhanced by small doses of UV. The repair deficiencies are not observed in actively growing cells. We have also shown that there is preferential repair of AFB{sub 1} damage in active genes. AFB{sub 1} damage is efficiently repaired in the active human metallothionein (hMT) genes, but deficiently repaired in inactive hMT genes. 51 refs., 3 tabs.

  13. Breast Cancer Susceptibility and DNA Damage/Repair

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-06-01

    greater breast cancer risk. Polymorphisms in base excision repair (xRCCl), nucleotide excision repair (XPD, XPC), double-strand break repair ( XRCC3 ...than those who were wild type. The XRCC3 Thr24l-Met substitution also showed a suggestive association with breast cancer risk.

  14. Gene specific damage and repair after treatment of cells with UV and chemotherapeutical agents

    SciTech Connect

    Bohr, V.A. )

    1991-01-01

    The authors have previously demonstrated preferential DNA repair of active genes in mammalian cells. The methodology involves the use of a specific endonuclease or other more direct approaches to create nicks at sites of damage followed by quantitative Southern analysis and probing for specific genes. Initially, they used pyrimidine dimer specific endonuclease to detect pyrimidine dimers after UV irradiation. They now also use the bacterial enzyme ABC excinuclease to examine the DNA damage and repair of a number of adducts other than pyrimidine dimers in specific genes. They can detect gene specific alkylation damage by creating nicks via depurination and alkaline hydrolysis. In our assay for preferential repair, they compare the efficiency of repair in the DHFR gene to that in the 3{prime} flanking, non-coding region to the gene. In CHO cells, UV induced pyrimidine dimers are efficiently repaired from the active DHFR gene, but not from the inactive region. They have demonstrated that the 6-4 photoproducts are also preferentially repaired and that they are removed faster from the regions studied than pyrimidine dimers. Using similar approaches, they find that DNA adducts and crosslinks caused by cisplatinum are preferentially repaired in the active gene compared to the inactive regions and to the inactive c-fos oncogene. Also, nitrogen mustard and methylnitrosurea damage is preferentially repaired whereas dimethylsulphate damage is not. NAAAF adducts do not appear to be preferentially repaired in this system. 32 refs.

  15. RNase H enables efficient repair of R-loop induced DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Amon, Jeremy D; Koshland, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    R-loops, three-stranded structures that form when transcripts hybridize to chromosomal DNA, are potent agents of genome instability. This instability has been explained by the ability of R-loops to induce DNA damage. Here, we show that persistent R-loops also compromise DNA repair. Depleting endogenous RNase H activity impairs R-loop removal in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, causing DNA damage that occurs preferentially in the repetitive ribosomal DNA locus (rDNA). We analyzed the repair kinetics of this damage and identified mutants that modulate repair. We present a model that the persistence of R-loops at sites of DNA damage induces repair by break-induced replication (BIR). This R-loop induced BIR is particularly susceptible to the formation of lethal repair intermediates at the rDNA because of a barrier imposed by RNA polymerase I. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20533.001 PMID:27938663

  16. TSAR (Theater Simulation of Airbase Resources) ABDR (Aircraft Battle Damage Repair) Database Dictionary A-10 with Off-Equipment/Intermediate Repair.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-24

    involves studies of readiness, survivability, a4 sustainability . Several methodologies have been used over the years. The current state.of-the-art...the aircraft is damaged and can be repaired, those tasks, for which repair is not feasible or the damage sustained is minimal were not included in the...aircraft is repaired. It is, however, necessary to distinguish between damage probabilities for different parts of the aircraft when damage is sustained in

  17. The interaction between polynucleotide kinase phosphatase and the DNA repair protein XRCC1 is critical for repair of DNA alkylation damage and stable association at DNA damage sites.

    PubMed

    Della-Maria, Julie; Hegde, Muralidhar L; McNeill, Daniel R; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Ellenberger, Tom; Wilson, David M; Mitra, Sankar; Tomkinson, Alan E

    2012-11-09

    XRCC1 plays a key role in the repair of DNA base damage and single-strand breaks. Although it has no known enzymatic activity, XRCC1 interacts with multiple DNA repair proteins and is a subunit of distinct DNA repair protein complexes. Here we used the yeast two-hybrid genetic assay to identify mutant versions of XRCC1 that are selectively defective in interacting with a single protein partner. One XRCC1 mutant, A482T, that was defective in binding to polynucleotide kinase phosphatase (PNKP) not only retained the ability to interact with partner proteins that bind to different regions of XRCC1 but also with aprataxin and aprataxin-like factor whose binding sites overlap with that of PNKP. Disruption of the interaction between PNKP and XRCC1 did not impact their initial recruitment to localized DNA damage sites but dramatically reduced their retention there. Furthermore, the interaction between PNKP and the DNA ligase IIIα-XRCC1 complex significantly increased the efficiency of reconstituted repair reactions and was required for complementation of the DNA damage sensitivity to DNA alkylation agents of xrcc1 mutant cells. Together our results reveal novel roles for the interaction between PNKP and XRCC1 in the retention of XRCC1 at DNA damage sites and in DNA alkylation damage repair.

  18. The Interaction between Polynucleotide Kinase Phosphatase and the DNA Repair Protein XRCC1 Is Critical for Repair of DNA Alkylation Damage and Stable Association at DNA Damage Sites*

    PubMed Central

    Della-Maria, Julie; Hegde, Muralidhar L.; McNeill, Daniel R.; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Ellenberger, Tom; Wilson, David M.; Mitra, Sankar; Tomkinson, Alan E.

    2012-01-01

    XRCC1 plays a key role in the repair of DNA base damage and single-strand breaks. Although it has no known enzymatic activity, XRCC1 interacts with multiple DNA repair proteins and is a subunit of distinct DNA repair protein complexes. Here we used the yeast two-hybrid genetic assay to identify mutant versions of XRCC1 that are selectively defective in interacting with a single protein partner. One XRCC1 mutant, A482T, that was defective in binding to polynucleotide kinase phosphatase (PNKP) not only retained the ability to interact with partner proteins that bind to different regions of XRCC1 but also with aprataxin and aprataxin-like factor whose binding sites overlap with that of PNKP. Disruption of the interaction between PNKP and XRCC1 did not impact their initial recruitment to localized DNA damage sites but dramatically reduced their retention there. Furthermore, the interaction between PNKP and the DNA ligase IIIα-XRCC1 complex significantly increased the efficiency of reconstituted repair reactions and was required for complementation of the DNA damage sensitivity to DNA alkylation agents of xrcc1 mutant cells. Together our results reveal novel roles for the interaction between PNKP and XRCC1 in the retention of XRCC1 at DNA damage sites and in DNA alkylation damage repair. PMID:22992732

  19. GENETIC AND MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF DNA DAMAGE REPAIR AND TOLERANCE PATHWAYS.

    SciTech Connect

    SUTHERLAND, B.M.

    2001-07-26

    Radiation can damage cellular components, including DNA. Organisms have developed a panoply of means of dealing with DNA damage. Some repair paths have rather narrow substrate specificity (e.g. photolyases), which act on specific pyrimidine photoproducts in a specific type (e.g., DNA) and conformation (double-stranded B conformation) of nucleic acid. Others, for example, nucleotide excision repair, deal with larger classes of damages, in this case bulky adducts in DNA. A detailed discussion of DNA repair mechanisms is beyond the scope of this article, but one can be found in the excellent book of Friedberg et al. [1] for further detail. However, some DNA damages and paths for repair of those damages important for photobiology will be outlined below as a basis for the specific examples of genetic and molecular analysis that will be presented below.

  20. Effects of moisture-damage repairs on microbial exposure and symptoms in schoolchildren.

    PubMed

    Meklin, T; Potus, T; Pekkanen, J; Hyvärinen, A; Hirvonen, M-R; Nevalainen, A

    2005-01-01

    Effects of renovation on symptom prevalence and microbial status were studied in two moisture-damaged schools and in two non-damaged schools with longitudinal cross-sectional surveys before and after repairs. Over 1300 schoolchildren aged 6-17 returned questionnaires before and after repairs. After full renovation in one of the damaged schools, elevated concentrations and increased frequencies of indoor air fungi normalized and a significant decrease in the prevalence of 10 symptoms of 12 studied was observed among schoolchildren. No change in microbial conditions was seen after partial repairs in the other damaged school, and only slight improvement was observed in symptom prevalence. The change in the prevalence of symptoms in the reference schools was minor. The results suggest that increased symptom prevalence among schoolchildren in moisture-damaged schools can be managed with proper repair of the moisture damage. This longitudinal intervention study showed the positive effects of the moisture and mold damage repairs of a school building on children's health. The success necessitates however, a thorough renovation including appropriate ventilation. Monitoring of airborne viable microbes revealed the damage status of the building and thus could be used as a tool in evaluating the quality of repairs.

  1. Loss of Urokinase Receptor Sensitizes Cells to DNA Damage and Delays DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Narayanaswamy, Pavan B.; Hodjat, Mahshid; Haller, Hermann; Dumler, Inna; Kiyan, Yulia

    2014-01-01

    DNA damage induced by numerous exogenous or endogenous factors may have irreversible consequences on the cell leading to cell cycle arrest, senescence and cell death. The DNA damage response (DDR) is powerful signaling machinery triggered in response to DNA damage, to provide DNA damage recognition, signaling and repair. Most anticancer drugs induce DNA damage, and DNA repair in turn attenuates therapeutic efficiency of those drugs. Approaches delaying DNA repair are often used to increase efficiency of treatment. Recent data show that ubiquitin-proteasome system is essential for signaling and repair of DNA damage. However, mechanisms providing regulation of proteasome intracellular localization, activity, and recruitment to DNA damage sites are elusive. Even less investigated are the roles of extranuclear signaling proteins in these processes. In this study, we report the involvement of the serine protease urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) in DDR-associated regulation of proteasome. We show that in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) uPAR activates DNA single strand break repair signaling pathway. We provide evidence that uPAR is essential for functional assembly of the 26S proteasome. We further demonstrate that uPAR mediates DNA damage-induced phosphorylation, nuclear import, and recruitment of the regulatory subunit PSMD6 to proteasome. We found that deficiency of uPAR and PSMD6 delays DNA repair and leads to decreased cell survival. These data may offer new therapeutic approaches for diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24987841

  2. Differential repair of DNA damage in specific nucleotide sequences in monkey cells.

    PubMed Central

    Leadon, S A

    1986-01-01

    An immunological method was developed that isolates DNA fragments containing bromouracil in repair patches from unrepaired DNA using a monoclonal antibody that recognizes bromouracil. Cultured monkey cells were exposed to either UV light or the activated carcinogen aflatoxin B1 and excision repair of damage in DNA fragments containing the integrated and transcribed E. coli gpt gene was compared to that in the genome overall. A more rapid repair, of both UV and AFB1 damage was observed in the DNA fragments containing the E. coli gpt genes. The more efficient repair of UV damage was not due to a difference in the initial level of pyrimidine dimers as determined with a specific UV endonuclease. Consistent with previous observations using different methodology, repair of UV damage in the alpha sequences was found to occur at the same rate as that in the genome overall, while repair of AFB1 damage was deficient in alpha DNA. The preferential repair of damage in the gpt gene may be related to the functional state of the sequence and/or to alterations produced in the chromatin conformation by the integration of plasmid sequences carrying the gene. Images PMID:3786142

  3. Rapid repair techniques for severely earthquake-damaged circular bridge piers with flexural failure mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhiguo; Li, Hongnan; Bi, Kaiming; Si, Bingjun; Wang, Dongsheng

    2017-04-01

    In this study, three rapid repair techniques are proposed to retrofit circular bridge piers that are severely damaged by the flexural failure mode in major earthquakes. The quasi-static tests on three 1:2.5 scaled circular pier specimens are conducted to evaluate the efficiency of the proposed repair techniques. For the purpose of rapid repair, the repair procedure for all the specimens is conducted within four days, and the behavior of the repaired specimens is evaluated and compared with the original ones. A finite element model is developed to predict the cyclic behavior of the repaired specimens and the numerical results are compared with the test data. It is found that all the repaired specimens exhibit similar or larger lateral strength and deformation capacity than the original ones. The initial lateral stiffness of all the repaired specimens is lower than that of the original ones, while they show a higher lateral stiffness at the later stage of the test. No noticeable difference is observed for the energy dissipation capacity between the original and repaired pier specimens. It is suggested that the repair technique using the early-strength concrete jacket confined by carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) sheets can be an optimal method for the rapid repair of severely earthquake-damaged circular bridge piers with flexural failure mode.

  4. Regulation of DNA Repair Mechanisms: How the Chromatin Environment Regulates the DNA Damage Response.

    PubMed

    Stadler, Jens; Richly, Holger

    2017-08-05

    Cellular DNA is constantly challenged by damage-inducing factors derived from exogenous or endogenous sources. In order to maintain genome stability and integrity, cells have evolved a wide variety of DNA repair pathways which counteract different types of DNA lesions, also referred to as the DNA damage response (DDR). However, DNA in eukaryotes is highly organized and compacted into chromatin representing major constraints for all cellular pathways, including DNA repair pathways, which require DNA as their substrate. Therefore, the chromatin configuration surrounding the lesion site undergoes dramatic remodeling to facilitate access of DNA repair factors and subsequent removal of the DNA lesion. In this review, we focus on the question of how the cellular DNA repair pathways overcome the chromatin barrier, how the chromatin environment is rearranged to facilitate efficient DNA repair, which proteins mediate this re-organization process and, consequently, how the altered chromatin landscape is involved in the regulation of DNA damage responses.

  5. Defective repair of ionizing radiation damage in Cockayne`s syndrome and xeroderma pigmentosum group G

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, P.K.; Leadon, S.A.

    1994-12-31

    Damage produced by ultraviolet light (UV) or certain chemical carcinogens is repaired more rapidly in transcriptionally active DNA than in the genome as a whole by an evolutionarily conserved process coupled to transcription and involving preferential repair of transcribed strands. The generality of strand-specific repair for damage other than UV has not been well-established, but it has generally been assumed to involve the nucleotide excision repair pathway for bulky lesions. There is little overlap in the spectrum of lesions induced by ionizing radiation and UV; consistent with the idea that to a large extent, the repair processes for these two types of damage are separable, there are very few mammalian cell mutants that are hypersensitive to the lethal effects of both.

  6. Nicotinamide enhances repair of ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage in primary melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Benjamin C; Surjana, Devita; Halliday, Gary M; Damian, Diona L

    2014-07-01

    Cutaneous melanoma is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Nicotinamide is a safe, widely available vitamin that reduces the immune suppressive effects of UV, enhances DNA repair in keratinocytes and has shown promise in the chemoprevention of non-melanoma skin cancer. Here, we report the effect of nicotinamide on DNA damage and repair in primary human melanocytes. Nicotinamide significantly enhanced the repair of oxidative DNA damage (8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine) and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers induced by UV exposure. It also enhanced the repair of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine induced by the culture conditions in unirradiated melanocytes. A significant increase in the percentage of melanocytes undergoing unscheduled but not scheduled DNA synthesis was observed, confirming that nicotinamide enhances DNA repair in human melanocytes. In summary, nicotinamide, by enhancing DNA repair in melanocytes, is a potential agent for the chemoprevention of cutaneous melanoma.

  7. Using Arabidopsis cell extracts to monitor repair of DNA base damage in vitro.

    PubMed

    Córdoba-Cañero, Dolores; Roldán-Arjona, Teresa; Ariza, Rafael R

    2012-01-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is a major pathway for the removal of endogenous and exogenous DNA damage. This repair mechanism is initiated by DNA glycosylases that excise the altered base, and continues through alternative routes that culminate in DNA resynthesis and ligation. In contrast to the information available for microbes and animals, our knowledge about this important DNA repair pathway in plants is very limited, partially due to a lack of biochemical approaches. Here we describe an in vitro assay to monitor BER in cell-free extracts from the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The assay uses labeled DNA substrates containing a single damaged base within a restriction site, and allows detection of fully repaired molecules as well as DNA repair intermediates. The method is easily applied to measure the repair activity of purified proteins and can be successfully used in combination with the extensive array of biological resources available for Arabidopsis.

  8. Damage Avoidance and DNA Repair Mechanisms of Extremophiles to Ionizing Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, C. K.; Diruggiero, J.

    2010-04-01

    The results presented here support the idea that the radiation resistance of the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium salinarum is the product of mechanisms for cellular protection and detoxification and for the repair of oxidative damage to cellular macromolecules.

  9. DNA repair mechanisms and the bypass of DNA damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Boiteux, Serge; Jinks-Robertson, Sue

    2013-04-01

    DNA repair mechanisms are critical for maintaining the integrity of genomic DNA, and their loss is associated with cancer predisposition syndromes. Studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have played a central role in elucidating the highly conserved mechanisms that promote eukaryotic genome stability. This review will focus on repair mechanisms that involve excision of a single strand from duplex DNA with the intact, complementary strand serving as a template to fill the resulting gap. These mechanisms are of two general types: those that remove damage from DNA and those that repair errors made during DNA synthesis. The major DNA-damage repair pathways are base excision repair and nucleotide excision repair, which, in the most simple terms, are distinguished by the extent of single-strand DNA removed together with the lesion. Mistakes made by DNA polymerases are corrected by the mismatch repair pathway, which also corrects mismatches generated when single strands of non-identical duplexes are exchanged during homologous recombination. In addition to the true repair pathways, the postreplication repair pathway allows lesions or structural aberrations that block replicative DNA polymerases to be tolerated. There are two bypass mechanisms: an error-free mechanism that involves a switch to an undamaged template for synthesis past the lesion and an error-prone mechanism that utilizes specialized translesion synthesis DNA polymerases to directly synthesize DNA across the lesion. A high level of functional redundancy exists among the pathways that deal with lesions, which minimizes the detrimental effects of endogenous and exogenous DNA damage.

  10. DNA Repair Mechanisms and the Bypass of DNA Damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Boiteux, Serge; Jinks-Robertson, Sue

    2013-01-01

    DNA repair mechanisms are critical for maintaining the integrity of genomic DNA, and their loss is associated with cancer predisposition syndromes. Studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have played a central role in elucidating the highly conserved mechanisms that promote eukaryotic genome stability. This review will focus on repair mechanisms that involve excision of a single strand from duplex DNA with the intact, complementary strand serving as a template to fill the resulting gap. These mechanisms are of two general types: those that remove damage from DNA and those that repair errors made during DNA synthesis. The major DNA-damage repair pathways are base excision repair and nucleotide excision repair, which, in the most simple terms, are distinguished by the extent of single-strand DNA removed together with the lesion. Mistakes made by DNA polymerases are corrected by the mismatch repair pathway, which also corrects mismatches generated when single strands of non-identical duplexes are exchanged during homologous recombination. In addition to the true repair pathways, the postreplication repair pathway allows lesions or structural aberrations that block replicative DNA polymerases to be tolerated. There are two bypass mechanisms: an error-free mechanism that involves a switch to an undamaged template for synthesis past the lesion and an error-prone mechanism that utilizes specialized translesion synthesis DNA polymerases to directly synthesize DNA across the lesion. A high level of functional redundancy exists among the pathways that deal with lesions, which minimizes the detrimental effects of endogenous and exogenous DNA damage. PMID:23547164

  11. The role of DNA damage repair in aging of adult stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kenyon, Jonathan; Gerson, Stanton L

    2007-01-01

    DNA repair maintains genomic stability and the loss of DNA repair capacity results in genetic instability that may lead to a decline of cellular function. Adult stem cells are extremely important in the long-term maintenance of tissues throughout life. They regenerate and renew tissues in response to damage and replace senescent terminally differentiated cells that no longer function. Oxidative stress, toxic byproducts, reduced mitochondrial function and external exposures all damage DNA through base modification or mis-incorporation and result in DNA damage. As in most cells, this damage may limit the survival of the stem cell population affecting tissue regeneration and even longevity. This review examines the hypothesis that an age-related loss of DNA damage repair pathways poses a significant threat to stem cell survival and longevity. Normal stem cells appear to have strict control of gene expression and DNA replication whereas stem cells with loss of DNA repair may have altered patterns of proliferation, quiescence and differentiation. Furthermore, stem cells with loss of DNA repair may be susceptible to malignant transformation either directly or through the emergence of cancer-prone stem cells. Human diseases and animal models of loss of DNA repair provide longitudinal analysis of DNA repair processes in stem cell populations and may provide links to the physiology of aging.

  12. Repair of corrosion-damaged columns using FRP wraps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baiyasi, Mohamad Imad

    Many bridge columns in Michigan are damaged by chloride contamination resulting in the corrosion of the steel reinforcement, and swelling and spalling of the concrete and use of the bridges is typically continued. This in itself may not be a serious problem since most columns in Michigan are over-designed and the loss of strength is not a significant issue. However, the lack of any method to minimize or prevent corrosion of the steel results in continued deterioration and unsightly columns. Polymer composite (also known as fiber-reinforced polymer or FRP) jackets offer a possible remedy to this problem. They offer a rapid repair technique with the potential to enhance the longterm durability and compression strength of damaged columns due to the confinement that is provided when fibers are oriented in the hoop direction. Fibers oriented in the vertical direction can enhance the bending strength. Experiments were conducted to assess the effects of using FRP wraps with fibers oriented in the hoop direction for rehabilitating corrosion-damaged columns. Issues that were explored are: (1) effect of freeze-thaw and wet-dry cycles on the properties of FRP panels; (2) freeze-thaw durability of concrete square and cylindrical specimens wrapped with glass and carbon FRP and subjected to an internal expansive force; and (3) effect of wrapping on the rate of corrosion in an accelerated corrosion test. The results of the freeze-thaw experiment indicate that freeze-thaw cycles have no statistically significant effect on the compressive strength of glass and carbon wrapped specimens. For round specimens, glass and carbon wraps increased the strength by a factor of about 2.3 and 2.6, respectively. For square specimens, glass and carbon wraps increased the strength by a factor of 1.4--1.5. Freeze-thaw conditioning generally reduced the longitudinal failure strain of wrapped specimens. The square wrapped specimens had lower compressive strength compared to the round specimens, even

  13. The multifaceted influence of histone deacetylases on DNA damage signalling and DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Roos, Wynand Paul; Krumm, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Histone/protein deacetylases play multiple roles in regulating gene expression and protein activation and stability. Their deregulation during cancer initiation and progression cause resistance to therapy. Here, we review the role of histone deacetylases (HDACs) and the NAD+ dependent sirtuins (SIRTs) in the DNA damage response (DDR). These lysine deacetylases contribute to DNA repair by base excision repair (BER), nucleotide excision repair (NER), mismatch repair (MMR), non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), homologous recombination (HR) and interstrand crosslink (ICL) repair. Furthermore, we discuss possible mechanisms whereby these histone/protein deacetylases facilitate the switch between DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathways, how SIRTs play a central role in the crosstalk between DNA repair and cell death pathways due to their dependence on NAD+, and the influence of small molecule HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) on cancer cell resistance to genotoxin based therapies. Throughout the review, we endeavor to identify the specific HDAC targeted by HDACi leading to therapy sensitization. PMID:27738139

  14. Photo-induced DNA damage, DNA repair and cell lethality

    SciTech Connect

    Cool, B.L.

    1982-01-01

    DNA lesion induction and repair was measured in DNA repair proficient and deficient cells after exposures to far-UV, mid-UV, near-UV and visible light and an attempt was made to relate these molecular phenomena to the biological endpoint of cell lethality. Pyrimidine dimer and strand break induction, DNA repair and cell killing were measured after cell exposure to polychromatic but narrow bandwidth light sources with peak emissions at 254, 305, 353, 369, and 445 nm. Pyrimidine dimers were detected using specific endonuclease that nicks DNA adjacent to dimers, while strand breaks were measured using an alkaline unwinding assay. The induction efficiencies of both lesions declined with increasing wavelength; however, the decrease in strand break induction was not as rapid as that of dimer induction. The ratio of strand breaks to dimers following cell exposure to 254 or 369 nm radiation was, respectively, 1.8 x 10/sup -4/ or 0.19. The kinetics of dimer repair as well as the size of repair synthesized patches remained constant with increasing wavelength, indicating a similar repair mechanism for dimers induced by all wavelengths tested. However, consistent with the detected decline in dimer induction with increasing wavelength the proportion of dimer repair to total DNA repair decreased with increasing wavelength. The efficiency of cell killing, determined using chlonagenic survival assays, dropped rapidly, but not as rapidly as that of dimer induction, with increasing wavelength. In addition, dimer repair deficient xeroderma pigmentosum cells became less lethally hypersensitive with increasing wavelength. These data suggest a decline in dimer induced cell lethality and the existence of non-dimer lethal lesions at longer wavelengths.

  15. Non-DBS DNA Repair Genes Regulate Radiation-induced Cytogenetic Damage Repair and Cell Cycle Progression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry H.; Emami, Kamal; Casey, Rachael; Wu, Honglu

    2008-01-01

    Changes of gene expression profile are one of the most important biological responses in living cells after ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. Although some studies have shown that genes up-regulated by IR may play important roles in DNA damage repair, the relationship between the regulation of gene expression by IR, particularly genes not known for their roles in DSB repair, and its impact on cytogenetic responses has not been systematically studied. In the present study, the expression of 25 genes selected on the basis of their transcriptional changes in response to IR was individually knocked down by transfection with small interfering RNA in human fibroblast cells. The purpose of this study is to identify new roles of these selected genes on regulating DSB repair and cell cycle progression , as measured in the micronuclei formation and chromosome aberration. In response to IR, the formation of MN was significantly increased by suppressed expression of 5 genes: Ku70 in the DSB repair pathway, XPA in the NER pathway, RPA1 in the MMR pathway, and RAD17 and RBBP8 in cell cycle control. Knocked-down expression of 4 genes (MRE11A, RAD51 in the DSB pathway, SESN1, and SUMO1) significantly inhibited cell cycle progression, possibly because of severe impairment of DNA damage repair. Furthermore, loss of XPA, P21, or MLH1 expression resulted in both significantly enhanced cell cycle progression and increased yields of chromosome aberrations, indicating that these gene products modulate both cell cycle control and DNA damage repair. Most of the 11 genes that affected cytogenetic responses are not known to have clear roles influencing DBS repair. Nine of these 11 genes were up-regulated in cells exposed to gamma radiation, suggesting that genes transcriptionally modulated by IR were critical to regulate the biological consequences after IR.

  16. Non-DBS DNA Repair Genes Regulate Radiation-induced Cytogenetic Damage Repair and Cell Cycle Progression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry H.; Emami, Kamal; Casey, Rachael; Wu, Honglu

    2008-01-01

    Changes of gene expression profile are one of the most important biological responses in living cells after ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. Although some studies have shown that genes up-regulated by IR may play important roles in DNA damage repair, the relationship between the regulation of gene expression by IR, particularly genes not known for their roles in DSB repair, and its impact on cytogenetic responses has not been systematically studied. In the present study, the expression of 25 genes selected on the basis of their transcriptional changes in response to IR was individually knocked down by transfection with small interfering RNA in human fibroblast cells. The purpose of this study is to identify new roles of these selected genes on regulating DSB repair and cell cycle progression , as measured in the micronuclei formation and chromosome aberration. In response to IR, the formation of MN was significantly increased by suppressed expression of 5 genes: Ku70 in the DSB repair pathway, XPA in the NER pathway, RPA1 in the MMR pathway, and RAD17 and RBBP8 in cell cycle control. Knocked-down expression of 4 genes (MRE11A, RAD51 in the DSB pathway, SESN1, and SUMO1) significantly inhibited cell cycle progression, possibly because of severe impairment of DNA damage repair. Furthermore, loss of XPA, P21, or MLH1 expression resulted in both significantly enhanced cell cycle progression and increased yields of chromosome aberrations, indicating that these gene products modulate both cell cycle control and DNA damage repair. Most of the 11 genes that affected cytogenetic responses are not known to have clear roles influencing DBS repair. Nine of these 11 genes were up-regulated in cells exposed to gamma radiation, suggesting that genes transcriptionally modulated by IR were critical to regulate the biological consequences after IR.

  17. The role of DNA damage and repair in atherosclerosis: A review.

    PubMed

    Shah, Nikunj R; Mahmoudi, Michael

    2015-09-01

    The global burden of cardiovascular disease is increasing despite therapeutic advances in medication and interventional technologies. Accumulated deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage and subsequent repair pathways are now increasingly recognised as a causal factor in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. These molecular alterations have been shown to occur within affected vasculature, plaque microenvironment as well as in circulating cells. The DNA damage response (DDR) pathway is reliant on post-translational modification of sensing proteins which activate a signalling cascade to repair, if possible, DNA damaged sites in response to various environmental and physiological insults. This review summarises the current evidence for DNA damage in atherosclerosis, the key steps involved in the DDR pathway, DNA repair and their subsequent effects on atherosclerotic plaques, as well as the therapeutic options in managing DNA damage-induced atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Aircraft Battle Damage Repair for the 90’s and Beyond

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-01

    Battle Danrge Repair, 2. 26. Lt Col Tony L Dedmond, ’Joining Forces to Survive Tomorrow’s Battles," Aerospaw.e Ameri’ca, August 1902, 37. 27. AYR 66...17-18. 15. Fit Lt E. Bittel , Fit Lt W. A. Brown, and P. F. Jowitt, Aircraft Battle Damage Repair Studies (Farnborough, U.K.: Royal Aircraft...Establishment, June 1981), 4. 16. 1992 US Air Force-wide Aircraft Battle Damage Repair Conference Minutes, March 1992,4. 17. Ibid. 18. Ibid. 19. Bittel , Brown

  19. DNA Damage Signalling and Repair Inhibitors: The Long-Sought-After Achilles’ Heel of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Velic, Denis; Couturier, Anthony M.; Ferreira, Maria Tedim; Rodrigue, Amélie; Poirier, Guy G.; Fleury, Fabrice; Masson, Jean-Yves

    2015-01-01

    For decades, radiotherapy and chemotherapy were the two only approaches exploiting DNA repair processes to fight against cancer. Nowadays, cancer therapeutics can be a major challenge when it comes to seeking personalized targeted medicine that is both effective and selective to the malignancy. Over the last decade, the discovery of new targeted therapies against DNA damage signalling and repair has offered the possibility of therapeutic improvements in oncology. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of DNA damage signalling and repair inhibitors, their molecular and cellular effects, and future therapeutic use. PMID:26610585

  20. Strategies for the evaluation of DNA damage and repair mechanisms in cancer.

    PubMed

    Figueroa-González, Gabriela; Pérez-Plasencia, Carlos

    2017-06-01

    DNA lesions and the repair mechanisms that maintain the integrity of genomic DNA are important in preventing carcinogenesis and its progression. Notably, mutations in DNA repair mechanisms are associated with cancer predisposition syndromes. Additionally, these mechanisms maintain the genomic integrity of cancer cells. The majority of therapies established to treat cancer are genotoxic agents that induce DNA damage, promoting cancer cells to undergo apoptotic death. Effective methods currently exist to evaluate the diverse effects of genotoxic agents and the underlying molecular mechanisms that repair DNA lesions. The current study provides an overview of a number of methods that are available for the detection, analysis and quantification of underlying DNA repair mechanisms.

  1. Toll-like receptor 3 activation is required for normal skin barrier repair following UV damage

    PubMed Central

    Borkowski, Andrew W.; Kuo, I-Hsin; Bernard, Jamie J.; Yoshida, Takeshi; Williams, Michael R.; Hung, Nai-Jung; Yu, Benjamin D.; Beck, Lisa A.; Gallo, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) damage to the skin leads to the release of noncoding RNA (ncRNA) from necrotic keratinocytes that activates toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3). This release of ncRNA triggers inflammation in the skin following UV damage. Recently, TLR3 activation was also shown to aid wound repair and increase expression of genes associated with permeability barrier repair. Here, we sought to test if skin barrier repair after UVB damage is dependent on the activation of TLR3. We observed that multiple ncRNAs induced expression of skin barrier repair genes, that the TLR3 ligand Poly (I:C) also induced expression and function of tight junctions, and that the ncRNA U1 acts in a TLR3-dependent manner to induce expression of skin barrier repair genes. These observations were shown to have functional relevance as Tlr3−/− mice displayed a delay in skin barrier repair following UVB damage. Combined, these data further validate the conclusion that recognition of endogenous RNA by TLR3 is an important step in the program of skin barrier repair. PMID:25118157

  2. Toll-like receptor 3 activation is required for normal skin barrier repair following UV damage.

    PubMed

    Borkowski, Andrew W; Kuo, I-Hsin; Bernard, Jamie J; Yoshida, Takeshi; Williams, Michael R; Hung, Nai-Jung; Yu, Benjamin D; Beck, Lisa A; Gallo, Richard L

    2015-02-01

    UV damage to the skin leads to the release of noncoding RNA (ncRNA) from necrotic keratinocytes that activates Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3). This release of ncRNA triggers inflammation in the skin following UV damage. Recently, TLR3 activation was also shown to aid wound repair and increase the expression of genes associated with permeability barrier repair. Here, we sought to test whether skin barrier repair after UVB damage is dependent on the activation of TLR3. We observed that multiple ncRNAs induced expression of skin barrier repair genes, that the TLR3 ligand Poly (I:C) also induced expression and function of tight junctions, and that the ncRNA U1 acts in a TLR3-dependent manner to induce expression of skin barrier repair genes. These observations were shown to have functional relevance as Tlr3-/- mice displayed a delay in skin barrier repair following UVB damage. Combined, these data further validate the conclusion that recognition of endogenous RNA by TLR3 is an important step in the program of skin barrier repair.

  3. Repair of gamma-ray-induced DNA base damage in xeroderma pigmentosum cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fornace, A.J. Jr.; Dobson, P.P.; Kinsella, T.J.

    1986-04-01

    The repair of DNA damage produced by /sup 137/Cs gamma irradiation was measured with a preparation from Micrococcus luteus containing DNA damage-specific endonucleases in combination with alkaline elution. The frequency of these endonuclease sensitive sites (ESS) was determined after 54 or 110 Gy of oxic irradiation in normal and xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) fibroblasts from complementation groups A, C, D, and G. Repair was rapid in all cell strains with greater than 50% repair after 1.5 h of repair incubation. At later repair times, 12-17 h, more ESS remained in XP than in normal cells. The frequency of excess ESS in XP cells was approximately 0.04 per 10(9) Da of DNA per Gy which was equivalent to 10% of the initial ESS produced. The removal of ESS was comparable in XP cells with normal radiosensitivity and XP3BR cells which have been reported to be moderately radiosensitive.

  4. DNA repair and damage pathways in breast cancer development and therapy.

    PubMed

    Majidinia, Maryam; Yousefi, Bahman

    2017-06-01

    DNA damage/repair constitutes several key pathways working in concert to eliminate DNA lesions and maintain genome stability and integrity. Defective components in DNA damage and repair machinery are an underlying cause for the development and progression of different types of cancers, and breast cancer is no exception. In this paper, we will briefly explain the importance of DNA damage and repair, introduce the current classification schemes for breast cancer, and review the known defects in the repair machinery that have been associated with the risk of breast cancer. Finally, we discuss how the understanding of these pathways can help to design therapeutics for specific targeting of breast cancer tumors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Rapid repair of severely earthquake-damaged bridge piers with flexural-shear failure mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhiguo; Wang, Dongsheng; Du, Xiuli; Si, Bingjun

    2011-12-01

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the feasibility of a proposed rapid repair technique for severely earthquake-damaged bridge piers with flexural-shear failure mode. Six circular pier specimens were first tested to severe damage in flexural-shear mode and repaired using early-strength concrete with high-fluidity and carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRP). After about four days, the repaired specimens were tested to failure again. The seismic behavior of the repaired specimens was evaluated and compared to the original specimens. Test results indicate that the proposed repair technique is highly effective. Both shear strength and lateral displacement of the repaired piers increased when compared to the original specimens, and the failure mechanism of the piers shifted from flexural-shear failure to ductile flexural failure. Finally, a simple design model based on the Seible formulation for post-earthquake repair design was compared to the experimental results. It is concluded that the design equation for bridge pier strengthening before an earthquake could be applicable to seismic repairs after an earthquake if the shear strength contribution of the spiral bars in the repaired piers is disregarded and 1.5 times more FRP sheets is provided.

  6. Repair of UVB-induced DNA damage is reduced in melanoma due to low XPC and global genome repair

    PubMed Central

    Budden, Timothy; Davey, Ryan J.; Vilain, Ricardo E.; Ashton, Katie A.; Braye, Stephen G.; Beveridge, Natalie J.; Bowden, Nikola A.

    2016-01-01

    UVB exposure leads to DNA damage, which when unrepaired induces C>T transitions. These mutations are found throughout the melanoma genome, particularly in non-transcribed regions. The global genome repair (GGR) branch of nucleotide excision repair (NER) is responsible for repairing UV-induced DNA damage across non-transcribed and silent regions of the genome. This study aimed to examine the relationship between UVB and GGR in melanoma. DNA repair capacity and relative expression of NER in melanocytes and melanoma cell lines before and after treatment with UVB was quantified. Transcript expression from 196 melanomas was compared to clinical parameters including solar elastosis and whole transcriptome data collected. Melanoma cell lines showed significantly reduced DNA repair when compared to melanocytes, most significantly in the S phase of the cell cycle. Expression of GGR components XPC, DDB1 and DDB2 was significantly lower in melanoma after UVB. In the melanoma tumours, XPC expression correlated with age of diagnosis and low XPC conferred significantly poorer survival. The same trend was seen in the TCGA melanoma dataset. Reduced GGR in melanoma may contribute to the UV mutation spectrum of the melanoma genome and adds further to the growing evidence of the link between UV, NER and melanoma. PMID:27487145

  7. DNA damage and repair in mouse embryos following treatment transplacentally with methylnitrosourea and methylmethanesulfonate

    SciTech Connect

    Jirakulsomchok, S.; Yielding, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    Mouse embryos were labeled in vivo at 10 1/2-12 1/2 days of gestation with (/sup 3/H)-thymidine and subjected to DNA damage using x-ray, methylmethanesulfonate, or methylnitrosourea. DNA damage and its repair were assessed in specific cell preparations from embryos isolated at intervals thereafter using the highly sensitive method of nucleoid sedimentation, which evaluates the supercoiled state of the DNA. Repair of x-ray damage was demonstrated using trypsin-dispersed cells from whole embryos and from homogenized embryonic liver to show the validity of the analytical approach. The effects of the highly teratogenic methylnitrosourea and the much less teratogenic methylmethanesulfonate were compared in the targeted limb buds using equitoxic doses of the two alkylating agents. DNA supercoiling was fully restored after 24 hr in limb bud cells damaged with methylmethanesulfonate, while as much as 48 hr were required for full repair of methylnitrosourea damage. These results demonstrated the feasibility of studying DNA repair in embryonic tissues after damage in vivo and suggest that the potency of methylnitrosourea as a teratogen may be correlated with a prolonged period required for complete repair of DNA.

  8. Curcumin Triggers DNA Damage and Inhibits Expression of DNA Repair Proteins in Human Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Ting, Chien-Yi; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Yu, Chien-Chih; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Liu, Yu-Chang; Chiang, I-Tsang

    2015-07-01

    The study goal was to evaluate the effects of curcumin on DNA damage and expression of DNA-repair proteins in human lung cancer. Thus, NCI-H460 cells were used to study the effects of curcumin on DNA damage and repair in vitro. We investigated curcumin induces DNA damage by comet the assay and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining. The DNA damage/repair-related protein levels were examined and monitored by western blotting and confocal microscopy. Curcumin significantly increased the length of comet tails and DNA condensation in NCI-H460 cells. Curcumin reduced expression of DNA-repair proteins such as 14-3-3 protein sigma (14-3-3σ), O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1), and mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 (MDC1). Curcumin also increased phosphorylation of p53 and Histone H2A.X (S140) in the nuclei of NCI-H460 cells. Taken together, our findings indicated that curcumin triggered DNA damage and inhibited expression of DNA-repair-associated proteins in NCI-H460 cells. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  9. DNA Repair Decline During Mouse Spermiogenesis Results in the Accumulation of Heritable DNA Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, Francesco; Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2007-12-01

    The post-meiotic phase of mouse spermatogenesis (spermiogenesis) is very sensitive to the genomic effects of environmental mutagens because as male germ cells form mature sperm they progressively lose the ability to repair DNA damage. We hypothesized that repeated exposures to mutagens during this repair-deficient phase result in the accumulation of heritable genomic damage in mouse sperm that leads to chromosomal aberrations in zygotes after fertilization. We used a combination of single or fractionated exposures to diepoxybutane (DEB), a component of tobacco smoke, to investigate how differential DNA repair efficiencies during the three weeks of spermiogenesis affected the accumulation of DEB-induced heritable damage in early spermatids (21-15 days before fertilization, dbf), late spermatids (14-8 dbf) and sperm (7-1 dbf). Analysis of chromosomal aberrations in zygotic metaphases using PAINT/DAPI showed that late spermatids and sperm are unable to repair DEB-induced DNA damage as demonstrated by significant increases (P<0.001) in the frequencies of zygotes with chromosomal aberrations. Comparisons between single and fractionated exposures suggested that the DNA repair-deficient window during late spermiogenesis may be less than two weeks in the mouse and that during this repair-deficient window there is accumulation of DNA damage in sperm. Finally, the dose-response study in sperm indicated a linear response for both single and repeated exposures. These findings show that the differential DNA repair capacity of post-meioitic male germ cells has a major impact on the risk of paternally transmitted heritable damage and suggest that chronic exposures that may occur in the weeks prior to fertilization because of occupational or lifestyle factors (i.e, smoking) can lead to an accumulation of genetic damage in sperm and result in heritable chromosomal aberrations of paternal origin.

  10. DNA repair decline during mouse spermiogenesis results in the accumulation of heritable DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, Francesco; Marchetti, Francesco; Wryobek, Andrew J

    2008-02-21

    The post-meiotic phase of mouse spermatogenesis (spermiogenesis) is very sensitive to the genomic effects of environmental mutagens because as male germ cells form mature sperm they progressively lose the ability to repair DNA damage. We hypothesized that repeated exposures to mutagens during this repair-deficient phase result in the accumulation of heritable genomic damage in mouse sperm that leads to chromosomal aberrations in zygotes after fertilization. We used a combination of single or fractionated exposures to diepoxybutane (DEB), a component of tobacco smoke, to investigate how differential DNA repair efficiencies during the three weeks of spermiogenesis affected the accumulation of DEB-induced heritable damage in early spermatids (21-15 days before fertilization, dbf), late spermatids (14-8 dbf) and sperm (7- 1 dbf). Analysis of chromosomalaberrations in zygotic metaphases using PAINT/DAPI showed that late spermatids and sperm are unable to repair DEB-induced DNA damage as demonstrated by significant increases (P<0.001) in the frequencies of zygotes with chromosomal aberrations. Comparisons between single and fractionated exposures suggested that the DNA repair-deficient window during late spermiogenesis may be less than two weeks in the mouse and that during this repair-deficient window there is accumulation of DNA damage in sperm. Finally, the dose-response study in sperm indicated a linear response for both single and repeated exposures. These findings show that the differential DNA repair capacity of post-meioitic male germ cells has a major impact on the risk of paternally transmitted heritable damage and suggest that chronic exposures that may occur in the weeks prior to fertilization because of occupational or lifestyle factors (i.e, smoking) can lead to an accumulation of genetic damage in sperm and result in heritable chromosomal aberrations of paternal origin.

  11. Hurricane-damaged Gulf of Mexico pipeline repaired with cold forging

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, G. ); DeGruy, P. ); Avery, L. )

    1993-05-03

    Damage to Texaco Pipeline Inc.'s Eugene Island Pipeline System (EIPS) in last year's Hurricane Andrew prompted a complex repair project unique for the Gulf of Mexico. Damage, suffered when the anchor of a runaway semisubmersible drilling rig crashed into the 20-in. EPIS during the height of the storm, caused the pipeline to fail under pressure within 48 hr. after start-up following the storm. The paper describes the importance of the EIPS; system safety; Andrew's damage; locating the leak; repair options; the chosen system; mechanical bonding; end connectors and ball flanges; and diving operations.

  12. Development of a Remote External Repair Tool for Damaged or Defective Polyethylene Pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth H. Green; Willie E. Rochefort; Nick Wannenmacher; John A. Clark; Kevin Harris

    2006-06-30

    Current procedures for repairing polyethylene (PE) gas pipe require excavation, isolation, and removal of the damaged section of pipe followed by fusing a new section of pipe into place. These techniques are costly and very disruptive. An alternative repair method was developed at Timberline Tool with support from Oregon State University (OSU) and funding by the U. S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL). This project was undertaken to design, develop and test a tool and method for repairing damaged PE pipe remotely and externally in situ without squeezing off the flow of gas, eliminating the need for large-scale excavations. Through an iterative design and development approach, a final engineered prototype was developed that utilizes a unique thermo-chemical and mechanical process to apply a permanent external patch to repair small nicks, gouges and punctures under line pressure. The project identified several technical challenges during the design and development process. The repair tool must be capable of being installed under live conditions and operate in an 18-inch keyhole. This would eliminate the need for extensive excavations thus reducing the cost of the repair. Initially, the tool must be able to control the leak by encapsulating the pipe and apply slight pressure at the site of damage. Finally, the repair method must be permanent at typical operating pressures. The overall results of the project have established a permanent external repair method for use on damaged PE gas pipe in a safe and cost-effective manner. The engineered prototype was subjected to comprehensive testing and evaluation to validate the performance. Using the new repair tool, samples of 4-inch PE pipe with simulated damage were successfully repaired under line pressure to the satisfaction of DOE/NETL and the following natural gas companies: Northwest Natural; Sempra Energy, Southwest Gas Corporation, Questar, and Nicor. However, initial results of

  13. Repair of radiation-induced DNA damage in nondividing populations of human diploid fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Kantor, G.J.; Petty, R.S.; Warner, C.; Phillips, D.J.H.; Hull, D.R.

    1980-06-01

    The occurrence of DNA repair in uv- (254 nm) and x-irradiated normal human diploid fibroblasts maintained in a quiescent, nondividing state using low serum (0.5%) medium was ascertained. Techniques that detect different steps of the excision repair process were used so that the extent of completion of repair at single sites could be determined. These included measuring the disappearance of pyrimidine dimers by chromatography, detecting repair synthesis by density-gradient and autoradiographic methods and detecting the rejoining of repaired regions and repair of x-ray-induced single-strand DNA breaks using alkaline sucrose gradients. Results show that dimer excision occurs and the subsequent steps of repair synthesis and ligation are completed. About 50% of the dimers formed by exposure to 20 J/m/sup 2/ is excised in the initial 24-h post-uv period. DNA repair (unscheduled DNA synthesis) can be detected through a 5-d post-uv period. The fraction of damaged sites eventually repaired is not known. X-ray-induced single-strand DNA breaks are repaired rapidly.

  14. A 3D Lattice Modelling Study of Drying Shrinkage Damage in Concrete Repair Systems.

    PubMed

    Luković, Mladena; Šavija, Branko; Schlangen, Erik; Ye, Guang; van Breugel, Klaas

    2016-07-14

    Differential shrinkage between repair material and concrete substrate is considered to be the main cause of premature failure of repair systems. The magnitude of induced stresses depends on many factors, for example the degree of restraint, moisture gradients caused by curing and drying conditions, type of repair material, etc. Numerical simulations combined with experimental observations can be of great use when determining the influence of these parameters on the performance of repair systems. In this work, a lattice type model was used to simulate first the moisture transport inside a repair system and then the resulting damage as a function of time. 3D simulations were performed, and damage patterns were qualitatively verified with experimental results and cracking tendencies in different brittle and ductile materials. The influence of substrate surface preparation, bond strength between the two materials, and thickness of the repair material were investigated. Benefits of using a specially tailored fibre reinforced material, namely strain hardening cementitious composite (SHCC), for controlling the damage development due to drying shrinkage in concrete repairs was also examined.

  15. A 3D Lattice Modelling Study of Drying Shrinkage Damage in Concrete Repair Systems

    PubMed Central

    Luković, Mladena; Šavija, Branko; Schlangen, Erik; Ye, Guang; van Breugel, Klaas

    2016-01-01

    Differential shrinkage between repair material and concrete substrate is considered to be the main cause of premature failure of repair systems. The magnitude of induced stresses depends on many factors, for example the degree of restraint, moisture gradients caused by curing and drying conditions, type of repair material, etc. Numerical simulations combined with experimental observations can be of great use when determining the influence of these parameters on the performance of repair systems. In this work, a lattice type model was used to simulate first the moisture transport inside a repair system and then the resulting damage as a function of time. 3D simulations were performed, and damage patterns were qualitatively verified with experimental results and cracking tendencies in different brittle and ductile materials. The influence of substrate surface preparation, bond strength between the two materials, and thickness of the repair material were investigated. Benefits of using a specially tailored fibre reinforced material, namely strain hardening cementitious composite (SHCC), for controlling the damage development due to drying shrinkage in concrete repairs was also examined. PMID:28773696

  16. Nick translation - a new assay for monitoring DNA damage and repair in cultured human fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, R.D.; Matheson, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    An in vitro assay has been developed to detect DNA damage and repair following chemical treatment of human diploid fibroblasts. DNA damage is measured by following the Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I-catalyzed incorporation of radiolabeled deoxycytidine triphosphate (dCTP) into the DNA of lysolecithin-permeabilized cells. DNA strand breaks with free 3' OH termini serve as template sites for incorporation, and decrease of this incorporation with time, following removal of the test chemical, indicates loss (repair) of initial damage. Inhibition of the DNA excision repair process by the addition of the repair inhibitors arabinofuranosyl cytosine (ara-C) and hydroxyurea (HU) during the incubation period gives rise to an increased number of template sites, manifesting itself in increased incorporation and indicating the induction of long-patch excision repair. Results presented demonstrate that all 14 direct-acting carcinogens tested and 8 of 14 carcinogens requiring metabolic activation give positive indication of DNA damage, repair, or both. Eleven of 14 noncarcinogens tested were scored as negative, the other 3 having previously been shown to interact with cellular DNA. This assay is shown to have predictive capability at least equal to that of UDS assays but to allow a broader spectrum of genotoxic effects to be analyzed.

  17. Involvement of oxidatively damaged DNA and repair in cancer development and aging

    PubMed Central

    Tudek, Barbara; Winczura, Alicja; Janik, Justyna; Siomek, Agnieszka; Foksinski, Marek; Oliński, Ryszard

    2010-01-01

    DNA damage and DNA repair may mediate several cellular processes, like replication and transcription, mutagenesis and apoptosis and thus may be important factors in the development and pathology of an organism, including cancer. DNA is constantly damaged by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) directly and also by products of lipid peroxidation (LPO), which form exocyclic adducts to DNA bases. A wide variety of oxidatively-generated DNA lesions are present in living cells. 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoGua) is one of the best known DNA lesions due to its mutagenic properties. Among LPO-derived DNA base modifications the most intensively studied are ethenoadenine and ethenocytosine, highly miscoding DNA lesions considered as markers of oxidative stress and promutagenic DNA damage. Although at present it is impossible to directly answer the question concerning involvement of oxidatively damaged DNA in cancer etiology, it is likely that oxidatively modified DNA bases may serve as a source of mutations that initiate carcinogenesis and are involved in aging (i.e. they may be causal factors responsible for these processes). To counteract the deleterious effect of oxidatively damaged DNA, all organisms have developed several DNA repair mechanisms. The efficiency of oxidatively damaged DNA repair was frequently found to be decreased in cancer patients. The present work reviews the basis for the biological significance of DNA damage, particularly effects of 8-oxoGua and ethenoadduct occurrence in DNA in the aspect of cancer development, drawing attention to the multiplicity of proteins with repair activities. PMID:20589166

  18. The interplay between inflammation, oxidative stress, DNA damage, DNA repair and mitochondrial dysfunction in depression.

    PubMed

    Czarny, Piotr; Wigner, Paulina; Galecki, Piotr; Sliwinski, Tomasz

    2017-06-29

    A growing body of evidence suggests that inflammation, mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidant-antioxidant imbalance may play a significant role in the development and progression of depression. Elevated levels of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species - a result of oxidant-antioxidant imbalance - may lead to increased damage of biomolecules, including DNA. This was confirmed in depressed patients in a research study conducted by our team and other scientists. 8-oxoguanine - a marker of oxidative DNA damage - was found in the patients' lymphocytes, urine and serum. These results were confirmed using a comet assay on lymphocytes. Furthermore, it was shown that the patients' cells repaired peroxide-induced DNA damage less efficiently than controls' cells and that some single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) of the genes involved in oxidative DNA damage repair may modulate the risk of depression. Lastly, less efficient DNA damage repair observed in the patients can be, at least partly, attributed to the presence of specific SNP variants, as it was revealed through a genotype-phenotype analysis. In conclusion, the available literature shows that both oxidative stress and less efficient DNA damage repair may lead to increased DNA damage in depressed patients. A similar mechanism may result in mitochondrial dysfunction, which is observed in depression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Indentation Damage and Crack Repair in Human Enamel*

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, C.; Arola, D.; Ossa, A.

    2013-01-01

    Tooth enamel is the hardest and most highly mineralized tissue in the human body. While there have been a number of studies aimed at understanding the hardness and crack growth resistance behavior of this tissue, no study has evaluated if cracks in this tissue undergo repair. In this investigation the crack repair characteristics of young human enamel were evaluated as a function of patient gender and as a function of the distance from the Dentin Enamel Junction (DEJ). Cracks were introduced via microindentation along the prism direction and evaluated as a function of time after the indentation. Microscopic observations indicated that the repair of cracks began immediately after crack initiation and reaches saturation after approximately 48 hours. During this process he crack length decreased up to 10% of the initial length, and the largest degree of reduction occurred in the deep enamel, nearest the DEJ. In addition, it was found that the degree of repair was significantly greater in the enamel of female patients. PMID:23541701

  20. MOF and H4 K16 Acetylation Play Important Roles in DNA Damage Repair by Modulating Recruitment of DNA Damage Repair Protein Mdc1 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiangzhi; Corsa, Callie Ann Sprunger; Pan, Patricia W.; Wu, Lipeng; Ferguson, David; Yu, Xiaochun; Min, Jinrong; Dou, Yali

    2010-01-01

    MOF (MYST1) is the major enzyme to catalyze acetylation of histone H4 lysine 16 (K16) and is highly conserved through evolution. Using a conditional knockout mouse model and the derived mouse embryonic fibroblast cell lines, we showed that loss of Mof led to a global reduction of H4 K16 acetylation, severe G2/M cell cycle arrest, massive chromosome aberration, and defects in ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage repair. We further showed that although early DNA damage sensing and signaling by ATM were normal in Mof-null cells, the recruitment of repair mediator protein Mdc1 and its downstream signaling proteins 53bp1 and Brca1 to DNA damage foci was completely abolished. Mechanistic studies suggested that Mof-mediated H4 K16 acetylation and an intact acidic pocket on H2A.X were essential for the recruitment of Mdc1. Removal of Mof and its associated proteins phenocopied a charge-neutralizing mutant of H2A.X. Given the well-characterized H4-H2A trans interactions in regulating higher-order chromatin structure, our study revealed a novel chromatin-based mechanism that regulates the DNA damage repair process. PMID:20837706

  1. MOF and H4 K16 acetylation play important roles in DNA damage repair by modulating recruitment of DNA damage repair protein Mdc1.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangzhi; Corsa, Callie Ann Sprunger; Pan, Patricia W; Wu, Lipeng; Ferguson, David; Yu, Xiaochun; Min, Jinrong; Dou, Yali

    2010-11-01

    MOF (MYST1) is the major enzyme to catalyze acetylation of histone H4 lysine 16 (K16) and is highly conserved through evolution. Using a conditional knockout mouse model and the derived mouse embryonic fibroblast cell lines, we showed that loss of Mof led to a global reduction of H4 K16 acetylation, severe G(2)/M cell cycle arrest, massive chromosome aberration, and defects in ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage repair. We further showed that although early DNA damage sensing and signaling by ATM were normal in Mof-null cells, the recruitment of repair mediator protein Mdc1 and its downstream signaling proteins 53bp1 and Brca1 to DNA damage foci was completely abolished. Mechanistic studies suggested that Mof-mediated H4 K16 acetylation and an intact acidic pocket on H2A.X were essential for the recruitment of Mdc1. Removal of Mof and its associated proteins phenocopied a charge-neutralizing mutant of H2A.X. Given the well-characterized H4-H2A trans interactions in regulating higher-order chromatin structure, our study revealed a novel chromatin-based mechanism that regulates the DNA damage repair process.

  2. Repair of ionizing radiation DNA base damage in ataxia-telangiectasia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fornace, A.J. Jr.; Kinsella, T.J.; Dobson, P.P.; Mitchell, J.B.

    1986-04-01

    Micrococcus luteus endonuclease sensitive sites were measured by alkaline elution in normal human and ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) fibroblasts after ionizing radiation. Due to the sensitivity of this assay, repair of base damage after 3 to 6 kilorads has been measured after oxic or hypoxic radiation. With 5.5 kilorads of oxic radiation, more than 50% of the base damage was removed after 1.5 h of repair incubation in all cells, including exr+ and exr- AT cells, and approximately 75% was removed by 4 h. After 3 or 4.5 kilorads of hypoxic X-irradiation, repair was equivalent in normal and exr- AT cells. This study included three exr- AT strains which have been reported to be deficient in the removal of gamma-ray base damage at higher doses. Since these strains repaired ionizing radiation base damage normally at lower doses, which are more relevant to survival, it is concluded that the X-ray hypersensitivity of AT cells is probably not related to the repair of base damage.

  3. Nucleotide Excision Repair and Transcription-coupled DNA Repair Abrogate the Impact of DNA Damage on Transcription*

    PubMed Central

    Nadkarni, Aditi; Burns, John A.; Gandolfi, Alberto; Chowdhury, Moinuddin A.; Cartularo, Laura; Berens, Christian; Geacintov, Nicholas E.; Scicchitano, David A.

    2016-01-01

    DNA adducts derived from carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons like benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and benzo[c]phenanthrene (B[c]Ph) impede replication and transcription, resulting in aberrant cell division and gene expression. Global nucleotide excision repair (NER) and transcription-coupled DNA repair (TCR) are among the DNA repair pathways that evolved to maintain genome integrity by removing DNA damage. The interplay between global NER and TCR in repairing the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-derived DNA adducts (+)-trans-anti-B[a]P-N6-dA, which is subject to NER and blocks transcription in vitro, and (+)-trans-anti-B[c]Ph-N6-dA, which is a poor substrate for NER but also blocks transcription in vitro, was tested. The results show that both adducts inhibit transcription in human cells that lack both NER and TCR. The (+)-trans-anti-B[a]P-N6-dA lesion exhibited no detectable effect on transcription in cells proficient in NER but lacking TCR, indicating that NER can remove the lesion in the absence of TCR, which is consistent with in vitro data. In primary human cells lacking NER, (+)-trans-anti-B[a]P-N6-dA exhibited a deleterious effect on transcription that was less severe than in cells lacking both pathways, suggesting that TCR can repair the adduct but not as effectively as global NER. In contrast, (+)-trans-anti-B[c]Ph-N6-dA dramatically reduces transcript production in cells proficient in global NER but lacking TCR, indicating that TCR is necessary for the removal of this adduct, which is consistent with in vitro data showing that it is a poor substrate for NER. Hence, both global NER and TCR enhance the recovery of gene expression following DNA damage, and TCR plays an important role in removing DNA damage that is refractory to NER. PMID:26559971

  4. Nucleotide Excision Repair and Transcription-coupled DNA Repair Abrogate the Impact of DNA Damage on Transcription.

    PubMed

    Nadkarni, Aditi; Burns, John A; Gandolfi, Alberto; Chowdhury, Moinuddin A; Cartularo, Laura; Berens, Christian; Geacintov, Nicholas E; Scicchitano, David A

    2016-01-08

    DNA adducts derived from carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons like benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and benzo[c]phenanthrene (B[c]Ph) impede replication and transcription, resulting in aberrant cell division and gene expression. Global nucleotide excision repair (NER) and transcription-coupled DNA repair (TCR) are among the DNA repair pathways that evolved to maintain genome integrity by removing DNA damage. The interplay between global NER and TCR in repairing the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-derived DNA adducts (+)-trans-anti-B[a]P-N(6)-dA, which is subject to NER and blocks transcription in vitro, and (+)-trans-anti-B[c]Ph-N(6)-dA, which is a poor substrate for NER but also blocks transcription in vitro, was tested. The results show that both adducts inhibit transcription in human cells that lack both NER and TCR. The (+)-trans-anti-B[a]P-N(6)-dA lesion exhibited no detectable effect on transcription in cells proficient in NER but lacking TCR, indicating that NER can remove the lesion in the absence of TCR, which is consistent with in vitro data. In primary human cells lacking NER, (+)-trans-anti-B[a]P-N(6)-dA exhibited a deleterious effect on transcription that was less severe than in cells lacking both pathways, suggesting that TCR can repair the adduct but not as effectively as global NER. In contrast, (+)-trans-anti-B[c]Ph-N(6)-dA dramatically reduces transcript production in cells proficient in global NER but lacking TCR, indicating that TCR is necessary for the removal of this adduct, which is consistent with in vitro data showing that it is a poor substrate for NER. Hence, both global NER and TCR enhance the recovery of gene expression following DNA damage, and TCR plays an important role in removing DNA damage that is refractory to NER.

  5. Unbalanced oxidant-induced DNA damage and repair in COPD: a link towards lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Caramori, Gaetano; Adcock, Ian M; Casolari, Paolo; Ito, Kazuhiro; Jazrawi, Elen; Tsaprouni, Loukia; Villetti, Gino; Civelli, Maurizio; Carnini, Chiara; Chung, Kian Fan; Barnes, Peter J; Papi, Alberto

    2011-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterised by oxidative stress and increased risk of lung carcinoma. Oxidative stress causes DNA damage which can be repaired by DNA-dependent protein kinase complex. To investigate DNA damage/repair balance and DNA-dependent protein kinase complex in COPD lung and in an animal model of smoking-induced lung damage and to evaluate the effects of oxidative stress on Ku expression and function in human bronchial epithelial cells. Protein expression was quantified using immunohistochemistry and/or western blotting. DNA damage/repair was measured using colorimetric assays. 8-OH-dG, a marker of oxidant-induced DNA damage, was statistically significantly increased in the peripheral lung of smokers (with and without COPD) compared with non-smokers, while the number of apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites (DNA damage and repair) was increased in smokers compared with non-smokers (p = 0.0012) and patients with COPD (p < 0.0148). Nuclear expression of Ku86, but not of DNA-PKcs, phospho-DNA-PKcs, Ku70 or γ-H2AFX, was reduced in bronchiolar epithelial cells from patients with COPD compared with normal smokers and non-smokers (p < 0.039). Loss of Ku86 expression was also observed in a smoking mouse model (p < 0.012) and prevented by antioxidants. Oxidants reduced (p < 0.0112) Ku86 expression in human bronchial epithelial cells and Ku86 knock down modified AP sites in response to oxidative stress. Ineffective DNA repair rather than strand breakage per se accounts for the reduced AP sites observed in COPD and this is correlated with a selective decrease of the expression of Ku86 in the bronchiolar epithelium. DNA damage/repair imbalance may contribute to increased risk of lung carcinoma in COPD.

  6. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis of multicellular DNA double-strand break damage and repair.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Nina; Grant, Stephen G

    2014-01-01

    This assay quantifies the extent of double-strand break (DSB) DNA damage in cell populations embedded in agarose and analyzed for migratory DNA using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis with ethidium bromide staining. The assay can measure preexisting damage as well as induction of DSB by chemical (e.g., bleomycin), physical (e.g., X-irradiation), or biological (e.g., restriction enzymes) agents. By incubating the cells under physiological conditions prior to processing, the cells can be allowed to repair DSB, primarily via the process of nonhomologous end joining. The amount of repair, corresponding to the repair capacity of the treated cells, is then quantified by determining the ratio of the fractions of activity released in the lanes in comparison to the total amount of DNA fragmentation following determination of an optimal exposure for maximum initial fragmentation. Repair kinetics can also be analyzed through a time-course regimen.

  7. Eukaryotic damaged DNA-binding proteins: DNA repair proteins or transcription factors?

    SciTech Connect

    Protic, M.

    1994-12-31

    Recognition and removal of structural defects in the genome, caused by diverse physical and chemical agents, are among the most important cell functions. Proteins that recognize and bind to modified DNA, and thereby initiate damage-induced recovery processes, have been identified in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Damaged DNA-binding (DDB) proteins from prokaryotes are either DNA repair enzymes or noncatalytic subunits of larger DNA repair complexes that participate in excision repair, or in recombinational repair and SOS-mutagenesis. Although the methods employed may not have allowed detection of all eukaryotic DDB proteins and identification of their functions, it appears that during evolution cells have developed a wide array of DDB proteins that can discriminate among the diversity of DNA conformations found in the eukaryotic nucleus, as well as a gene-sharing feature found in DDB proteins that also act as transcription factors.

  8. Repair of Topoisomerase I-Mediated DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Pommier, Yves; Barcelo, Juana; Rao, V. Ashutosh; Sordet, Olivier; Jobson, Andrew G.; Thibaut, Laurent; Miao, Zheyong; Seiler, Jennifer; Zhang, Hongliang; Marchand, Christophe; Agama, Keli; Redon, Christophe

    2008-01-01

    Topoisomerase I (Top1) is an abundant and essential enzyme. Top1 is the selective target of camptothecins, which are effective anticancer agents. Top1-DNA cleavage complexes can also be trapped by various endogenous and exogenous DNA lesions including mismatches, abasic sites and carcinogenic adducts. Tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase (Tdp1) is one of the repair enzymes for Top1-DNA covalent complexes. Tdp1 forms a multiprotein complex that includes poly(ADP) ribose polymerase (PARP). PARP-deficient cells are hypersensitive to camptothecins and functionally deficient for Tdp1. We will review recent developments in several pathways involved in the repair of Top1 cleavage complexes and the role of Chk1 and Chk2 checkpoint kinases in the cellular responses to Top1 inhibitors. The genes conferring camptothecin hypersensitivity are compiled for humans, budding yeast and fission yeast. PMID:16891172

  9. Living with cracks: Damage and repair in human bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, David; Hazenberg, Jan G.; Lee, T. Clive

    2007-04-01

    Our bones are full of cracks, which form and grow as a result of daily loading activities. Bone is the major structural material in our bodies. Although weaker than many engineering materials, it has one trick that keeps it ahead - it can repair itself. Small cracks, which grow under cyclic stresses by the mechanism of fatigue, can be detected and removed before they become long enough to be dangerous. This article reviews the work that has been done to understand how cracks form and grow in bone, and how they can be detected and repaired in a timely manner. This is truly an interdisciplinary research field, requiring the close cooperation of materials scientists, biologists and engineers.

  10. Estimating the effect of human base excision repair protein variants on the repair of oxidative DNA base damage.

    PubMed

    Sokhansanj, Bahrad A; Wilson, David M

    2006-05-01

    Epidemiologic studies have revealed a complex association between human genetic variance and cancer risk. Quantitative biological modeling based on experimental data can play a critical role in interpreting the effect of genetic variation on biochemical pathways relevant to cancer development and progression. Defects in human DNA base excision repair (BER) proteins can reduce cellular tolerance to oxidative DNA base damage caused by endogenous and exogenous sources, such as exposure to toxins and ionizing radiation. If not repaired, DNA base damage leads to cell dysfunction and mutagenesis, consequently leading to cancer, disease, and aging. Population screens have identified numerous single-nucleotide polymorphism variants in many BER proteins and some have been purified and found to exhibit mild kinetic defects. Epidemiologic studies have led to conflicting conclusions on the association between single-nucleotide polymorphism variants in BER proteins and cancer risk. Using experimental data for cellular concentration and the kinetics of normal and variant BER proteins, we apply a previously developed and tested human BER pathway model to (i) estimate the effect of mild variants on BER of abasic sites and 8-oxoguanine, a prominent oxidative DNA base modification, (ii) identify ranges of variation associated with substantial BER capacity loss, and (iii) reveal nonintuitive consequences of multiple simultaneous variants. Our findings support previous work suggesting that mild BER variants have a minimal effect on pathway capacity whereas more severe defects and simultaneous variation in several BER proteins can lead to inefficient repair and potentially deleterious consequences of cellular damage.

  11. The Cartography of UV-induced DNA Damage Formation and DNA Repair.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jinchuan; Adar, Sheera

    2017-01-01

    DNA damage presents a barrier to DNA-templated biochemical processes, including gene expression and faithful DNA replication. Compromised DNA repair leads to mutations, enhancing the risk for genetic diseases and cancer development. Conventional experimental approaches to study DNA damage required a researcher to choose between measuring bulk damage over the entire genome, with little or no resolution regarding a specific location, and obtaining data specific to a locus of interest, without a global perspective. Recent advances in high-throughput genomic tools overcame these limitations and provide high-resolution measurements simultaneously across the genome. In this review, we discuss the available methods for measuring DNA damage and their repair, focusing on genomewide assays for pyrimidine photodimers, the major types of damage induced by ultraviolet irradiation. These new genomic assays will be a powerful tool in identifying key components of genome stability and carcinogenesis. © 2016 The American Society of Photobiology.

  12. Maintenance and Preservation of Concrete Structures. Report 2. Repair of Erosion-Damaged Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    stilling basin were based on computed theoretical determinations, on the results of model studies of the struc- ture, and on the results of operating...found to be free on one end and bent upward from the slab. In addition to the damaged still- ing basin slab, a considerable amount of riprap was also...repair concepts were proposed. Based on an exhaustive investigation and study, a plan to repair the basin with modules of steel plate anchored and grouted

  13. The DNA damage/repair cascade in glioblastoma cell lines after chemotherapeutic agent treatment

    PubMed Central

    ANNOVAZZI, LAURA; CALDERA, VALENTINA; MELLAI, MARTA; RIGANTI, CHIARA; BATTAGLIA, LUIGI; CHIRIO, DANIELA; MELCARNE, ANTONIO; SCHIFFER, DAVIDE

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic resistance in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) has been linked to a subpopulation of cells with stem cell-like properties, the glioma stem cells (GSCs), responsible for cancer progression and recurrence. This study investigated the in vitro cytotoxicity of three chemotherapeutics, temozolomide (TMZ), doxorubicin (Dox) and paclitaxel (PTX) on glioma cell lines, by analyzing the molecular mechanisms leading to DNA repair and cell resistance, or to cell death. The drugs were tested on 16 GBM cell lines, grown as neurospheres (NS) or adherent cells (AC), by studying DNA damage occurrence by Comet assay, the expression by immunofluorescence and western blotting of checkpoint/repair molecules and apoptosis. The three drugs were able to provoke a genotoxic injury and to inhibit dose- and time-dependently cell proliferation, more evidently in AC than in NS. The first cell response to DNA damage was the activation of the damage sensors (p-ATM, p-53BP1, γ-H2AX), followed by repair effectors; the expression of checkpoint/repair molecules appeared higher in NS than in AC. The non-homologous repair pathway (NHEJ) seemed more involved than the homologous one (HR). Apoptosis occurred after long treatment times, but only a small percentage of cells in NS underwent death, even at high drug concentration, whereas most cells survived in a quiescent state and resumed proliferation after drug removal. In tumor specimens, checkpoint/repair proteins were constitutively expressed in GBMs, but not in low-grade gliomas. PMID:25892134

  14. Optical modulation study of repaired damage morphologies of fused silica by scalar diffraction theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo; Zhou, Qingyan; Jiang, Yong; Xiang, Xia; Liao, Wei; Jiang, Xiaolong; Wang, Haijun; Luan, Xiaoyu; Zheng, Wanguo; Yuan, Xiaodong

    2017-01-01

    The cone and Gaussian repaired damage craters are two typical morphologies induced by CO2 laser evaporation and nonevaporation technologies. The mathematical models are built for these two types of repaired craters, and the light modulation at 355 nm induced by the millimeter-scale repaired damage morphology is studied by scalar diffraction theory. The results show that the modulation of the Gaussian repaired morphology has one peak and then decreases with the increasing distance from 0 to 30 cm. While the modulation for cone repaired morphology remains stable after decreasing quickly with the increasing distance. When the horizontal radius increases, the modulation looks like a saw-tooth. However, the modulation has irregular variations for two kinds of morphologies with the increasing vertical depth. The simulated results agree well with experimental results. The horizontal and vertical dimensions, and downstream distance have different influences on the modulation. The risk of damage to downstream optical components can be suppressed to improve the stability of the optical system if the shape and size of repaired craters are well controlled and the positions of downstream optical components are selected appropriately.

  15. Regulation of oxidized base damage repair by chromatin assembly factor 1 subunit A

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chunying; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Hegde, Pavana M.; Mitra, Joy; Jiang, Shuai; Holey, Brooke; Sarker, Altaf H.; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Hegde, Muralidhar L.; Mitra, Sankar

    2017-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), generated both endogenously and in response to exogenous stress, induce point mutations by mis-replication of oxidized bases and other lesions in the genome. Repair of these lesions via base excision repair (BER) pathway maintains genomic fidelity. Regulation of the BER pathway for mutagenic oxidized bases, initiated by NEIL1 and other DNA glycosylases at the chromatin level remains unexplored. Whether single nucleotide (SN)-BER of a damaged base requires histone deposition or nucleosome remodeling is unknown, unlike nucleosome reassembly which is shown to be required for other DNA repair processes. Here we show that chromatin assembly factor (CAF)-1 subunit A (CHAF1A), the p150 subunit of the histone H3/H4 chaperone, and its partner anti-silencing function protein 1A (ASF1A), which we identified in human NEIL1 immunoprecipitation complex, transiently dissociate from chromatin bound NEIL1 complex in G1 cells after induction of oxidative base damage. CHAF1A inhibits NEIL1 initiated repair in vitro. Subsequent restoration of the chaperone-BER complex in cell, presumably after completion of repair, suggests that histone chaperones sequester the repair complex for oxidized bases in non-replicating chromatin, and allow repair when oxidized bases are induced in the genome. PMID:27794043

  16. CUX2 protein functions as an accessory factor in the repair of oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Pal, Ranjana; Ramdzan, Zubaidah M; Kaur, Simran; Duquette, Philippe M; Marcotte, Richard; Leduy, Lam; Davoudi, Sayeh; Lamarche-Vane, Nathalie; Iulianella, Angelo; Nepveu, Alain

    2015-09-11

    CUX1 and CUX2 proteins are characterized by the presence of three highly similar regions called Cut repeats 1, 2, and 3. Although CUX1 is ubiquitously expressed, CUX2 plays an important role in the specification of neuronal cells and continues to be expressed in postmitotic neurons. Cut repeats from the CUX1 protein were recently shown to stimulate 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (OGG1), an enzyme that removes oxidized purines from DNA and introduces a single strand break through its apurinic/apyrimidinic lyase activity to initiate base excision repair. Here, we investigated whether CUX2 plays a similar role in the repair of oxidative DNA damage. Cux2 knockdown in embryonic cortical neurons increased levels of oxidative DNA damage. In vitro, Cut repeats from CUX2 increased the binding of OGG1 to 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine-containing DNA and stimulated both the glycosylase and apurinic/apyrimidinic lyase activities of OGG1. Genetic inactivation in mouse embryo fibroblasts or CUX2 knockdown in HCC38 cells delayed DNA repair and increased DNA damage. Conversely, ectopic expression of Cut repeats from CUX2 accelerated DNA repair and reduced levels of oxidative DNA damage. These results demonstrate that CUX2 functions as an accessory factor that stimulates the repair of oxidative DNA damage. Neurons produce a high level of reactive oxygen species because of their dependence on aerobic oxidation of glucose as their source of energy. Our results suggest that the persistent expression of CUX2 in postmitotic neurons contributes to the maintenance of genome integrity through its stimulation of oxidative DNA damage repair. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. (Studies on the repair of damaged DNA in bacteriophage, bacterial and mammalian systems): Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Friedberg, E.C.

    1987-08-01

    This study sought to exploit the use of uv radiation as a source of genomic damage. We explored the molecular mechanism of the repair of DNA damage at a number of different levels of biological organization, by investigating bacteriophage, bacterial, yeast and mammalian cells. Not only have observations obtained in one biological system suggested specific experimental approaches in others, but we have also learned that some biochemical pathways for DNA repair are unique to specific organisms. Our studies are summarized in terms of 4 major areas of research activity that span the past 16 years. 86 refs.

  18. Comet assays to assess DNA damage and repair in grass shrimp embryos exposed to phototoxicants.

    PubMed

    Lee, R; Kim, G B

    2002-01-01

    Exposure of grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio) embryos to four compounds (anthracene, pyrene, alpha-terthienyl, methylene blue) along with solar exposure resulted in extensive DNA strand damage using the comet assay. DNA tail moments of embryos exposed to these chemicals in the dark ranged from 1.8 to 4.3, while exposure to chemicals and solar resulted in tail moments of 14.3-15.3. Reduction of DNA tail moments when solar exposed embryos were transferred to the dark, suggested DNA repair systems were active. The comet assay can be used to follow both DNA damage and repair following exposure to phototoxic chemicals.

  19. Two familial ALS proteins function in prevention/repair of transcription-associated DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Hill, Sarah J; Mordes, Daniel A; Cameron, Lisa A; Neuberg, Donna S; Landini, Serena; Eggan, Kevin; Livingston, David M

    2016-11-29

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive motor neuron dysfunction disease that leads to paralysis and death. There is currently no established molecular pathogenesis pathway. Multiple proteins involved in RNA processing are linked to ALS, including FUS and TDP43, and we propose a disease mechanism in which loss of function of at least one of these proteins leads to an accumulation of transcription-associated DNA damage contributing to motor neuron cell death and progressive neurological symptoms. In support of this hypothesis, we find that FUS or TDP43 depletion leads to increased sensitivity to a transcription-arresting agent due to increased DNA damage. Thus, these proteins normally contribute to the prevention or repair of transcription-associated DNA damage. In addition, both FUS and TDP43 colocalize with active RNA polymerase II at sites of DNA damage along with the DNA damage repair protein, BRCA1, and FUS and TDP43 participate in the prevention or repair of R loop-associated DNA damage, a manifestation of aberrant transcription and/or RNA processing. Gaining a better understanding of the role(s) that FUS and TDP43 play in transcription-associated DNA damage could shed light on the mechanisms underlying ALS pathogenesis.

  20. Alleviation of Aflatoxin B1-Induced Genomic Damage by Proanthocyanidins via Modulation of DNA Repair.

    PubMed

    Bakheet, Saleh A; Alhuraishi, Ahmed M; Al-Harbi, Naif O; Al-Hosaini, Khaled A; Al-Sharary, Shakir D; Attia, Mohammed M; Alhoshani, Ali R; Al-Shabanah, Othman A; Al-Harbi, Mohammed M; Imam, Faisal; Ahmad, Sheikh F; Attia, Sabry M

    2016-11-01

    In order to study the mechanisms underlying the alleviation of aflatoxin B1-induced genomic damage by proanthocyanidins (PAs), we examined the modulation of oxidative DNA damage induced by aflatoxin B1 in PAs-pretreated animals. The effects of PAs on changes in the expression of DNA damage and repair genes induced by aflatoxin B1 were also evaluated in rat marrow cells. Administration of PAs before aflatoxin B1 significantly mitigated aflatoxin B1-induced oxidative DNA damage in a dose-dependent manner. Aflatoxin B1 treatment induced significant alterations in the expression of specific DNA repair genes, and the pre-treatment of rats with PAs ameliorated the altered expression of these genes. Conclusively, PAs protect against aflatoxin B1-induced oxidative DNA damage in rats. These protective effects are attributed to the antioxidant effects of PA and enhanced DNA repair through modulation of DNA repair gene expression. Therefore, PAs are a promising chemoprotective agent for averting genotoxic risks associated with aflatoxin B1 exposure.

  1. Both DNA global deformation and repair enzyme contacts mediate flipping of thymine dimer damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knips, Alexander; Zacharias, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The photo-induced cis-syn-cyclobutane pyrimidine (CPD) dimer is a frequent DNA lesion. In bacteria photolyases efficiently repair dimers employing a light-driven reaction after flipping out the CPD damage to the active site. How the repair enzyme identifies a damaged site and how the damage is flipped out without external energy is still unclear. Employing molecular dynamics free energy calculations, the CPD flipping process was systematically compared to flipping undamaged nucleotides in various DNA global states and bound to photolyase enzyme. The global DNA deformation alone (without protein) significantly reduces the flipping penalty and induces a partially looped out state of the damage but not undamaged nucleotides. Bound enzyme further lowers the penalty for CPD damage flipping with a lower free energy of the flipped nucleotides in the active site compared to intra-helical state (not for undamaged DNA). Both the reduced penalty and partial looping by global DNA deformation contribute to a significantly shorter mean first passage time for CPD flipping compared to regular nucleotides which increases the repair likelihood upon short time encounter between repair enzyme and DNA.

  2. The clinical value of aberrant epigenetic changes of DNA damage repair genes in human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Dan; Herman, James G.; Guo, Mingzhou

    2016-01-01

    The stability and integrity of the human genome are maintained by the DNA damage repair (DDR) system. Unrepaired DNA damage is a major source of potentially mutagenic lesions that drive carcinogenesis. In addition to gene mutation, DNA methylation occurs more frequently in DDR genes in human cancer. Thus, DNA methylation may play more important roles in DNA damage repair genes to drive carcinogenesis. Aberrant methylation patterns in DNA damage repair genes may serve as predictive, diagnostic, prognostic and chemosensitive markers of human cancer. MGMT methylation is a marker for poor prognosis in human glioma, while, MGMT methylation is a sensitive marker of glioma cells to alkylating agents. Aberrant epigenetic changes in DNA damage repair genes may serve as therapeutic targets. Treatment of MLH1-methylated colon cancer cell lines with the demethylating agent 5′-aza-2′-deoxycytidine induces the expression of MLH1 and sensitizes cancer cells to 5-fluorouracil. Synthetic lethality is a more exciting approach in patients with DDR defects. PARP inhibitors are the most effective anticancer reagents in BRCA-deficient cancer cells. PMID:26967246

  3. Both DNA global deformation and repair enzyme contacts mediate flipping of thymine dimer damage

    PubMed Central

    Knips, Alexander; Zacharias, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The photo-induced cis-syn-cyclobutane pyrimidine (CPD) dimer is a frequent DNA lesion. In bacteria photolyases efficiently repair dimers employing a light-driven reaction after flipping out the CPD damage to the active site. How the repair enzyme identifies a damaged site and how the damage is flipped out without external energy is still unclear. Employing molecular dynamics free energy calculations, the CPD flipping process was systematically compared to flipping undamaged nucleotides in various DNA global states and bound to photolyase enzyme. The global DNA deformation alone (without protein) significantly reduces the flipping penalty and induces a partially looped out state of the damage but not undamaged nucleotides. Bound enzyme further lowers the penalty for CPD damage flipping with a lower free energy of the flipped nucleotides in the active site compared to intra-helical state (not for undamaged DNA). Both the reduced penalty and partial looping by global DNA deformation contribute to a significantly shorter mean first passage time for CPD flipping compared to regular nucleotides which increases the repair likelihood upon short time encounter between repair enzyme and DNA. PMID:28128222

  4. Mismatch repair proteins recruit DNA methyltransferase 1 to sites of oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ning; Bonham, Emily M; Hannon, Brooke E; Amick, Thomas R; Baylin, Stephen B; O'Hagan, Heather M

    2016-06-01

    At sites of chronic inflammation, epithelial cells are exposed to high levels of reactive oxygen species and undergo cancer-associated DNA methylation changes, suggesting that inflammation may initiate epigenetic alterations. Previously, we demonstrated that oxidative damage causes epigenetic silencing proteins to become part of a large complex that is localized to GC-rich regions of the genome, including promoter CpG islands that are epigenetically silenced in cancer. However, whether these proteins were recruited directly to damaged DNA or during the DNA repair process was unknown. Here we demonstrate that the mismatch repair protein heterodimer MSH2-MSH6 participates in the oxidative damage-induced recruitment of DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) to chromatin. Hydrogen peroxide treatment induces the interaction of MSH2-MSH6 with DNMT1, suggesting that the recruitment is through a protein-protein interaction. Importantly, the reduction in transcription for genes with CpG island-containing promoters caused by oxidative damage is abrogated by knockdown of MSH6 and/or DNMT1. Our findings provide evidence that the role of DNMT1 at sites of oxidative damage is to reduce transcription, potentially preventing transcription from interfering with the repair process. This study uniquely brings together several factors that are known to contribute to colon cancer, namely inflammation, mismatch repair proteins, and epigenetic changes. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Journal of Molecular Cell Biology, IBCB, SIBS, CAS. All rights reserved.

  5. E2F-7 couples DNA damage-dependent transcription with the DNA repair process.

    PubMed

    Zalmas, Lykourgos-Panagiotis; Coutts, Amanda S; Helleday, Thomas; La Thangue, Nicholas B

    2013-09-15

    The cellular response to DNA damage, mediated by the DNA repair process, is essential in maintaining the integrity and stability of the genome. E2F-7 is an atypical member of the E2F family with a role in negatively regulating transcription and cell cycle progression under DNA damage. Surprisingly, we found that E2F-7 makes a transcription-independent contribution to the DNA repair process, which involves E2F-7 locating to and binding damaged DNA. Further, E2F-7 recruits CtBP and HDAC to the damaged DNA, altering the local chromatin environment of the DNA lesion. Importantly, the E2F-7 gene is a target for somatic mutation in human cancer and tumor-derived mutant alleles encode proteins with compromised transcription and DNA repair properties. Our results establish that E2F-7 participates in 2 closely linked processes, allowing it to directly couple the expression of genes involved in the DNA damage response with the DNA repair machinery, which has relevance in human malignancy.

  6. Smart building materials which prevent damage or repair themselves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dry, Carolyn

    We developed designs in which hollow porous fibers filled with chemicals release them into a matrix over time. A coating covering the fibers is degraded by chemicals, pH change, or broken by structural loading, thus, releasing the chemicals. These stimuli for release are the very agents of environmental attack. The design to alleviate cracking consists of hollow porous fiberglass fibers containing crack-closing chemicals. The chemicals are released from the fibers when the outer sheath cracks or the fibers flex due to loading. This is the ideal situation in which the agent of environmental degradation, namely loading, is the stimulus to release the repair chemical. The design to prevent corrosion consists of an anticorrosion chemical in hollow porous polypropylene fibers. Change in chloride ion concentration dissolves the polyol coating and allows the chemical to be released from the fiber wall. The cause of deterioration, change in chloride level which causes corrosion, is the sensor (coating deterioration) and also the activator for the remedial or preventive action (release of anticorrosion chemical). These are distributed systems responding to environmental stimuli for sensing and repairing when and where they are needed. The control of the amount of chemical released is being researched mainly as a function of coating design and also fiber type. type.

  7. Inactivation and repair of double-stranded DNA damaged by the aziridinyl nitroimidazole RSU 1069.

    PubMed

    Lafleur, M V; Westmijze, E J; Visser, O J; Wagenaar, N; Soetekouw, R; Loman, H; Retel, J

    1992-03-01

    Incubation of RSU 1069 in the presence of biologically active double-stranded phi X174 DNA resulted in, depending on pH, ionic strength and concentration of drug, inactivation of the DNA. A variety of lesions are induced including a high number of single-strand breaks and alkali-labile lesions, which are at most partly lethal. The main inactivating damage consists probably of base damage, induced by alkylation. A considerable part of the damage induced by RSU 1069 can be repaired by the various repair enzymes of the bacterial host of the phi X174 DNA. Finally the damage (pattern) depends considerably on the ionic composition of the reaction solution, which can be explained by an equilibrium model presented in this paper.

  8. Structural and Mechanical Repair of Diffuse Damage in Cortical Bone in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Seref-Ferlengez, Zeynep; Basta-Pljakic, Jelena; Kennedy, Oran D.; Philemon, Claudy J.; Schaffler, Mitchell B.

    2014-01-01

    Physiological wear and tear causes bone microdamage at several hierarchical levels, and these have different biological consequences. Bone remodeling is widely held to be the mechanism by which bone microdamage is repaired. However, recent studies showed that unlike typical linear microcracks, small crack damage, the clusters of submicron-sized matrix cracks also known as diffuse damage (Dif.Dx), does not activate remodeling. Thus, the fate of diffuse damage in vivo is not known. To examine this, we induced selectively Dif.Dx in rat ulnae in vivo by using end-load ulnar bending creep model. Changes in damage content were assessed by histomorphometry and mechanical testing immediately after loading (i.e., acute loaded) or at 14 days after damage induction (i.e., survival ulnae). Dif.Dx area was markedly reduced over the 14-day survival period after loading (p<0.02). We did not observe any intracortical resorption and there was no increase in cortical bone area in survival ulnae. The reduction in whole bone stiffness in acute loaded ulnae was restored to baseline levels in survival ulnae (p>0.6). Microindentation studies showed that Dif.Dx caused a highly localized reduction in elastic modulus in diffuse damage regions of the ulnar cortex. Moduli in these previously damaged bone areas were restored to control values by 14 days after loading. Our current findings indicate that small crack damage in bone can be repaired without bone remodeling, and suggest that alternative repair mechanisms exist in bone to deal with submicron-sized matrix cracks. Those mechanisms are currently unknown and further investigations are needed to elucidate the mechanisms by which this direct repair occurs. PMID:25042459

  9. Repair of uv damaged DNA: Genes and proteins of yeast and human. Progress report, November 1, 1991--April 15, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, L.

    1992-04-01

    Our objectives are to determine the molecular mechanism of the incision step of excision repair of ultraviolet (UV) light damaged DNA in eukaryotic organisms, using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system, and to study the human homologs of yeast excision repair and postreplication repair proteins progress is described.

  10. Low-Dose Formaldehyde Delays DNA Damage Recognition and DNA Excision Repair in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Luch, Andreas; Frey, Flurina C. Clement; Meier, Regula; Fei, Jia; Naegeli, Hanspeter

    2014-01-01

    Objective Formaldehyde is still widely employed as a universal crosslinking agent, preservative and disinfectant, despite its proven carcinogenicity in occupationally exposed workers. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to understand the possible impact of low-dose formaldehyde exposures in the general population. Due to the concomitant occurrence of multiple indoor and outdoor toxicants, we tested how formaldehyde, at micromolar concentrations, interferes with general DNA damage recognition and excision processes that remove some of the most frequently inflicted DNA lesions. Methodology/Principal Findings The overall mobility of the DNA damage sensors UV-DDB (ultraviolet-damaged DNA-binding) and XPC (xeroderma pigmentosum group C) was analyzed by assessing real-time protein dynamics in the nucleus of cultured human cells exposed to non-cytotoxic (<100 μM) formaldehyde concentrations. The DNA lesion-specific recruitment of these damage sensors was tested by monitoring their accumulation at local irradiation spots. DNA repair activity was determined in host-cell reactivation assays and, more directly, by measuring the excision of DNA lesions from chromosomes. Taken together, these assays demonstrated that formaldehyde obstructs the rapid nuclear trafficking of DNA damage sensors and, consequently, slows down their relocation to DNA damage sites thus delaying the excision repair of target lesions. A concentration-dependent effect relationship established a threshold concentration of as low as 25 micromolar for the inhibition of DNA excision repair. Conclusions/Significance A main implication of the retarded repair activity is that low-dose formaldehyde may exert an adjuvant role in carcinogenesis by impeding the excision of multiple mutagenic base lesions. In view of this generally disruptive effect on DNA repair, we propose that formaldehyde exposures in the general population should be further decreased to help reducing cancer risks. PMID:24722772

  11. Low-dose formaldehyde delays DNA damage recognition and DNA excision repair in human cells.

    PubMed

    Luch, Andreas; Frey, Flurina C Clement; Meier, Regula; Fei, Jia; Naegeli, Hanspeter

    2014-01-01

    Formaldehyde is still widely employed as a universal crosslinking agent, preservative and disinfectant, despite its proven carcinogenicity in occupationally exposed workers. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to understand the possible impact of low-dose formaldehyde exposures in the general population. Due to the concomitant occurrence of multiple indoor and outdoor toxicants, we tested how formaldehyde, at micromolar concentrations, interferes with general DNA damage recognition and excision processes that remove some of the most frequently inflicted DNA lesions. The overall mobility of the DNA damage sensors UV-DDB (ultraviolet-damaged DNA-binding) and XPC (xeroderma pigmentosum group C) was analyzed by assessing real-time protein dynamics in the nucleus of cultured human cells exposed to non-cytotoxic (<100 μM) formaldehyde concentrations. The DNA lesion-specific recruitment of these damage sensors was tested by monitoring their accumulation at local irradiation spots. DNA repair activity was determined in host-cell reactivation assays and, more directly, by measuring the excision of DNA lesions from chromosomes. Taken together, these assays demonstrated that formaldehyde obstructs the rapid nuclear trafficking of DNA damage sensors and, consequently, slows down their relocation to DNA damage sites thus delaying the excision repair of target lesions. A concentration-dependent effect relationship established a threshold concentration of as low as 25 micromolar for the inhibition of DNA excision repair. A main implication of the retarded repair activity is that low-dose formaldehyde may exert an adjuvant role in carcinogenesis by impeding the excision of multiple mutagenic base lesions. In view of this generally disruptive effect on DNA repair, we propose that formaldehyde exposures in the general population should be further decreased to help reducing cancer risks.

  12. DNA Damage and Repair in Schizophrenia and Autism: Implications for Cancer Comorbidity and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Markkanen, Enni; Meyer, Urs; Dianov, Grigory L

    2016-06-01

    Schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are multi-factorial and multi-symptomatic psychiatric disorders, each affecting 0.5%-1% of the population worldwide. Both are characterized by impairments in cognitive functions, emotions and behaviour, and they undermine basic human processes of perception and judgment. Despite decades of extensive research, the aetiologies of schizophrenia and ASD are still poorly understood and remain a significant challenge to clinicians and scientists alike. Adding to this unsatisfactory situation, patients with schizophrenia or ASD often develop a variety of peripheral and systemic disturbances, one prominent example of which is cancer, which shows a direct (but sometimes inverse) comorbidity in people affected with schizophrenia and ASD. Cancer is a disease characterized by uncontrolled proliferation of cells, the molecular origin of which derives from mutations of a cell's DNA sequence. To counteract such mutations and repair damaged DNA, cells are equipped with intricate DNA repair pathways. Oxidative stress, oxidative DNA damage, and deficient repair of oxidative DNA lesions repair have been proposed to contribute to the development of schizophrenia and ASD. In this article, we summarize the current evidence of cancer comorbidity in these brain disorders and discuss the putative roles of oxidative stress, DNA damage and DNA repair in the aetiopathology of schizophrenia and ASD.

  13. DNA Damage and Repair in Schizophrenia and Autism: Implications for Cancer Comorbidity and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Markkanen, Enni; Meyer, Urs; Dianov, Grigory L.

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are multi-factorial and multi-symptomatic psychiatric disorders, each affecting 0.5%–1% of the population worldwide. Both are characterized by impairments in cognitive functions, emotions and behaviour, and they undermine basic human processes of perception and judgment. Despite decades of extensive research, the aetiologies of schizophrenia and ASD are still poorly understood and remain a significant challenge to clinicians and scientists alike. Adding to this unsatisfactory situation, patients with schizophrenia or ASD often develop a variety of peripheral and systemic disturbances, one prominent example of which is cancer, which shows a direct (but sometimes inverse) comorbidity in people affected with schizophrenia and ASD. Cancer is a disease characterized by uncontrolled proliferation of cells, the molecular origin of which derives from mutations of a cell’s DNA sequence. To counteract such mutations and repair damaged DNA, cells are equipped with intricate DNA repair pathways. Oxidative stress, oxidative DNA damage, and deficient repair of oxidative DNA lesions repair have been proposed to contribute to the development of schizophrenia and ASD. In this article, we summarize the current evidence of cancer comorbidity in these brain disorders and discuss the putative roles of oxidative stress, DNA damage and DNA repair in the aetiopathology of schizophrenia and ASD. PMID:27258260

  14. Recombinational Repair of DNA Damage in Escherichia coli and Bacteriophage λ

    PubMed Central

    Kuzminov, Andrei

    1999-01-01

    Although homologous recombination and DNA repair phenomena in bacteria were initially extensively studied without regard to any relationship between the two, it is now appreciated that DNA repair and homologous recombination are related through DNA replication. In Escherichia coli, two-strand DNA damage, generated mostly during replication on a template DNA containing one-strand damage, is repaired by recombination with a homologous intact duplex, usually the sister chromosome. The two major types of two-strand DNA lesions are channeled into two distinct pathways of recombinational repair: daughter-strand gaps are closed by the RecF pathway, while disintegrated replication forks are reestablished by the RecBCD pathway. The phage λ recombination system is simpler in that its major reaction is to link two double-stranded DNA ends by using overlapping homologous sequences. The remarkable progress in understanding the mechanisms of recombinational repair in E. coli over the last decade is due to the in vitro characterization of the activities of individual recombination proteins. Putting our knowledge about recombinational repair in the broader context of DNA replication will guide future experimentation. PMID:10585965

  15. Sublethal and potentially lethal damage repair on thermal neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Utsumi, H.; Ichihashi, M.; Kobayashi, T.; Elkind, M.M. )

    1989-07-01

    Tonicity shock or caffeine postirradiation treatment makes evident fast-type potentially lethal damage (PLD). Caffeine expresses fast-type PLD more efficiently than tonicity shock in X-irradiated B-16 mouse melanoma cells, compared with V79 Chinese hamster cells. The survival curves of thermal neutrons for either V79 or B-16 cells exhibit no shoulder. Neither V79 nor B-16 cells show the sublethal damage (SLD) repair of thermal neutrons. Caffeine-sensitive fast-type PLD repairs exist in X-irradiated B-16 cells, as well as V79 cells. The fast-type PLD repair of B-16 cells exposed to thermal neutrons alone is rather less than that of X-irradiated cells. Furthermore, an extremely low level of fast-type PLD repair of B-16 cells with 10B1-paraboronophenylalanine (BPA) preincubation (20 hours) followed by thermal neutron irradiation indicated that 10B(n,alpha)7Li reaction effectively eradicates actively growing melanoma cells. The plateau-phase B-16 cells are well able to repair the slow-type PLD of X-rays. However, cells can not repair the slow-type PLD induced by thermal neutron irradiation with or without 10B1-BPA preincubation. These results suggest that thermal neutron capture therapy can effectively kill radioresistant melanoma cells in both proliferating and quiescent phases.

  16. Fructose-Rich Diet Affects Mitochondrial DNA Damage and Repair in Rats.

    PubMed

    Cioffi, Federica; Senese, Rosalba; Lasala, Pasquale; Ziello, Angela; Mazzoli, Arianna; Crescenzo, Raffaella; Liverini, Giovanna; Lanni, Antonia; Goglia, Fernando; Iossa, Susanna

    2017-03-24

    Evidence indicates that many forms of fructose-induced metabolic disturbance are associated with oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Mitochondria are prominent targets of oxidative damage; however, it is not clear whether mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage and/or its lack of repair are events involved in metabolic disease resulting from a fructose-rich diet. In the present study, we evaluated the degree of oxidative damage to liver mtDNA and its repair, in addition to the state of oxidative stress and antioxidant defense in the liver of rats fed a high-fructose diet. We used male rats feeding on a high-fructose or control diet for eight weeks. Our results showed an increase in mtDNA damage in the liver of rats fed a high-fructose diet and this damage, as evaluated by the expression of DNA polymerase γ, was not repaired; in addition, the mtDNA copy number was found to be significantly reduced. A reduction in the mtDNA copy number is indicative of impaired mitochondrial biogenesis, as is the finding of a reduction in the expression of genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis. In conclusion, a fructose-rich diet leads to mitochondrial and mtDNA damage, which consequently may have a role in liver dysfunction and metabolic diseases.

  17. Self-repairing control for damaged robotic manipulators

    SciTech Connect

    Eisler, G.R.; Robinett, R.D.; Dohrmann, C.R.; Driessen, B.J.

    1997-03-01

    Algorithms have been developed allowing operation of robotic systems under damaged conditions. Specific areas addressed were optimal sensor location, adaptive nonlinear control, fault-tolerant robot design, and dynamic path-planning. A seven-degree-of-freedom, hydraulic manipulator, with fault-tolerant joint design was also constructed and tested. This report completes this project which was funded under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program.

  18. Induction and repair of HZE induced cytogenetic damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, A. L.; Bao, S.; Rithidech, K.; Chrisler, W. B.; Couch, L. A.; Braby, L. A.

    2001-01-01

    Wistar rats were exposed to high-mass, high energy (HZE) 56Fe particles (1000 GeV/AMU) using the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS). The animals were sacrificed at 1-5 hours or after a 30-day recovery period. The frequency of micronuclei in the tracheal and the deep lung epithelial cells were evaluated. The relative effectiveness of 56Fe, for the induction of initial chromosome damage in the form of micronuclei, was compared to damage produced in the same biological system exposed to other types of high and low-LET radiation. It was demonstrated that for animals sacrificed at short times after exposure, the tracheal and lung epithelial cells, the 56Fe particles were 3.3 and 1.3 times as effective as 60Co in production of micronuclei, respectively. The effectiveness was also compared to that for exposure to inhaled radon. With this comparison, the 56Fe exposure of the tracheal epithelial cells and the lung epithelial cells were only 0.18 and 0.20 times as effective as radon in the production of the initial cytogenetic damage. It was suggested that the low relative effectiveness was related to potential for 'wasted energy' from the core of the 56Fe particles. When the animals were sacrificed after 30 days, the slopes of the dose-response relationships, which reflect the remaining level of damage, decreased by a factor of 10 for both the tracheal and lung epithelial cells. In both cases, the slope of the dose-response lines were no longer significantly different from zero, and the r2 values were very high. Lung epithelial cells, isolated from the animals sacrificed hours after exposure, were maintained in culture, and the micronuclei frequency evaluated after 4 and 6 subcultures. These cells were harvested at 24 and 36 days after the exposure. There was no dose-response detected in these cultures and no signs of genomic instability at either sample time.

  19. Induction and repair of HZE induced cytogenetic damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, A. L.; Bao, S.; Rithidech, K.; Chrisler, W. B.; Couch, L. A.; Braby, L. A.

    2001-01-01

    Wistar rats were exposed to high-mass, high energy (HZE) 56Fe particles (1000 GeV/AMU) using the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS). The animals were sacrificed at 1-5 hours or after a 30-day recovery period. The frequency of micronuclei in the tracheal and the deep lung epithelial cells were evaluated. The relative effectiveness of 56Fe, for the induction of initial chromosome damage in the form of micronuclei, was compared to damage produced in the same biological system exposed to other types of high and low-LET radiation. It was demonstrated that for animals sacrificed at short times after exposure, the tracheal and lung epithelial cells, the 56Fe particles were 3.3 and 1.3 times as effective as 60Co in production of micronuclei, respectively. The effectiveness was also compared to that for exposure to inhaled radon. With this comparison, the 56Fe exposure of the tracheal epithelial cells and the lung epithelial cells were only 0.18 and 0.20 times as effective as radon in the production of the initial cytogenetic damage. It was suggested that the low relative effectiveness was related to potential for 'wasted energy' from the core of the 56Fe particles. When the animals were sacrificed after 30 days, the slopes of the dose-response relationships, which reflect the remaining level of damage, decreased by a factor of 10 for both the tracheal and lung epithelial cells. In both cases, the slope of the dose-response lines were no longer significantly different from zero, and the r2 values were very high. Lung epithelial cells, isolated from the animals sacrificed hours after exposure, were maintained in culture, and the micronuclei frequency evaluated after 4 and 6 subcultures. These cells were harvested at 24 and 36 days after the exposure. There was no dose-response detected in these cultures and no signs of genomic instability at either sample time.

  20. Arrest of irradiated G1, S, or G2 cells at mitosis using nocodazole promotes repair of potentially lethal damage

    SciTech Connect

    Iliakis, G.; Nuesse, M.

    1984-08-01

    The ability of synchronized Ehrlich ascites tumor cells, irradiated in G1, S, and G2 phases, to repair potentially lethal damage when arrested at mitosis by using 0.4 ..mu..g/ml nocodazole, a specific inhibitor of microtubule polymerization, has been studied. Cells irradiated in these phases were found to repair potentially lethal damage at mitosis. The extent of this repair was similar to that observed for cells irradiated at the same stages in the cell cycle but allowed to repair potentially lethal damage by incubating in balanced salt solution for 6 hr after X irradiation.

  1. Attenuated DNA damage repair delays therapy-related myeloid neoplasms in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Kit I; Ota, Kazushige; Komuro, Akiyoshi; Ueda, Takeshi; Ito, Akihiko; Anne Koch, C; Okada, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Therapy-related cancers are potentially fatal late life complications for patients who received radio- or chemotherapy. So far, the mouse model showing reduction or delay of these diseases has not been described. We found that the disruption of Aplf in mice moderately attenuated DNA damage repair and, unexpectedly, impeded myeloid neoplasms after exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). Irradiated mutant mice showed higher rates of p53-dependent cell death, fewer chromosomal translocations, and a delay in malignancy-induce;/– mice. Depletion of APLF in non-tumorigenic human cells also markedly reduced the risk of radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations. We therefore conclude that proficient DNA damage repair may promote chromosomal aberrations in normal tissues after irradiation and induce malignant evolution, thus illustrating the potential benefit in sensitizing p53 function by manipulating DNA repair efficiency in cancer patients undergoing genotoxic therapies. PMID:27711078

  2. Interaction of FUS and HDAC1 Regulates DNA Damage Response and Repair in Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen-Yuan; Pan, Ling; Su, Susan C.; Quinn, Emma J.; Sasaki, Megumi; Jimenez, Jessica C.; Mackenzie, Ian R.A.; Huang, Eric J.; Tsai, Li-Huei

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARY Defects in DNA repair have been extensively linked to neurodegenerative diseases, but the exact mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we report that FUS, a RNA/DNA binding protein linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), plays a pivotal role in DNA damage response (DDR). We show that the function of FUS in DDR involves a direct interaction with histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1), and that the recruitment of FUS to double stranded break (DSB) sites is important for proper DDR signaling. Remarkably, FUS proteins carrying familial ALS (fALS) mutations are defective in DDR and DNA repair, and show a diminished interaction with HDAC1. Moreover, increased DNA damage was also observed in human ALS patients harboring FUS mutations. Our findings suggest that an impaired DDR and DNA repair may contribute to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases linked to FUS mutations. PMID:24036913

  3. The Fanconi anemia DNA damage repair pathway in the spotlight for germline predisposition to colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Esteban-Jurado, Clara; Franch-Expósito, Sebastià; Muñoz, Jenifer; Ocaña, Teresa; Carballal, Sabela; López-Cerón, Maria; Cuatrecasas, Miriam; Vila-Casadesús, Maria; Lozano, Juan José; Serra, Enric; Beltran, Sergi; Brea-Fernández, Alejandro; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Castells, Antoni; Bujanda, Luis; Garre, Pilar; Caldés, Trinidad; Cubiella, Joaquín; Balaguer, Francesc; Castellví-Bel, Sergi

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common neoplasms in the world. Fanconi anemia (FA) is a very rare genetic disease causing bone marrow failure, congenital growth abnormalities and cancer predisposition. The comprehensive FA DNA damage repair pathway requires the collaboration of 53 proteins and it is necessary to restore genome integrity by efficiently repairing damaged DNA. A link between FA genes in breast and ovarian cancer germline predisposition has been previously suggested. We selected 74 CRC patients from 40 unrelated Spanish families with strong CRC aggregation compatible with an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance and without mutations in known hereditary CRC genes and performed germline DNA whole-exome sequencing with the aim of finding new candidate germline predisposition variants. After sequencing and data analysis, variant prioritization selected only those very rare alterations, producing a putative loss of function and located in genes with a role compatible with cancer. We detected an enrichment for variants in FA DNA damage repair pathway genes in our familial CRC cohort as 6 families carried heterozygous, rare, potentially pathogenic variants located in BRCA2/FANCD1, BRIP1/FANCJ, FANCC, FANCE and REV3L/POLZ. In conclusion, the FA DNA damage repair pathway may play an important role in the inherited predisposition to CRC. PMID:27165003

  4. DNA DAMAGE REPAIR AND CELL CYCLE CONTROL: A NATURAL BIO-DEFENSE MECHANISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    DNA DAMAGE REPAIR AND CELL CYCLE CONTROL: A natural bio-defense mechanism
    Anuradha Mudipalli.

    Maintenance of genetic information, including the correct sequence of nucleotides in DNA, is essential for replication, gene expression, and protein synthesis. DNA lesions onto...

  5. Pre-Cast Concrete Panels for Contingency Rigid Airfield Pavement Damage Repairs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    Figure 16. Swift-Lift Installation into Precast Concrete Panel ..................................................... 14 Figure 17. Wall -Saw Cutting... Wall -saw and walk-behind concrete saw). Table 6 is a precast concrete panel fabrication timeline and Table 7 is precast panel placement timeline...AFRL-RX-TY-TR-2010-0095 PRECAST CONCRETE PANELS FOR CONTINGENCY RIGID AIRFIELD PAVEMENT DAMAGE REPAIRS Reza S. Ashtiani, Christopher J

  6. DNA DAMAGE REPAIR AND CELL CYCLE CONTROL: A NATURAL BIO-DEFENSE MECHANISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    DNA DAMAGE REPAIR AND CELL CYCLE CONTROL: A natural bio-defense mechanism
    Anuradha Mudipalli.

    Maintenance of genetic information, including the correct sequence of nucleotides in DNA, is essential for replication, gene expression, and protein synthesis. DNA lesions onto...

  7. 48 CFR 452.237-70 - Loss, Damage, Destruction or Repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Loss, Damage, Destruction or Repair. 452.237-70 Section 452.237-70 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses...

  8. New discoveries linking transcription to DNA repair and damage tolerance pathways.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Susan E; Walker, Graham C

    2011-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the transcription elongation factor NusA is associated with all elongating RNA polymerases where it functions in transcription termination and antitermination. Here, we review our recent results implicating NusA in the recruitment of DNA repair and damage tolerance mechanisms to sites of stalled transcription complexes.

  9. 49 CFR 1242.36 - Machinery repair and equipment damaged (accounts XX-26-40 and XX-26-48).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Machinery repair and equipment damaged (accounts XX-26-40 and XX-26-48). 1242.36 Section 1242.36 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... FOR RAILROADS 1 Operating Expenses-Equipment § 1242.36 Machinery repair and equipment damaged...

  10. 25 CFR 170.922 - How can States get Emergency Relief Program funds to repair IRR System damage?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false How can States get Emergency Relief Program funds to repair IRR System damage? 170.922 Section 170.922 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE....922 How can States get Emergency Relief Program funds to repair IRR System damage? States can...

  11. 25 CFR 170.922 - How can States get Emergency Relief Program funds to repair IRR System damage?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How can States get Emergency Relief Program funds to repair IRR System damage? 170.922 Section 170.922 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE....922 How can States get Emergency Relief Program funds to repair IRR System damage? States can...

  12. 25 CFR 170.922 - How can States get Emergency Relief Program funds to repair IRR System damage?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false How can States get Emergency Relief Program funds to repair IRR System damage? 170.922 Section 170.922 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE....922 How can States get Emergency Relief Program funds to repair IRR System damage? States can request...

  13. 25 CFR 170.922 - How can States get Emergency Relief Program funds to repair IRR System damage?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false How can States get Emergency Relief Program funds to repair IRR System damage? 170.922 Section 170.922 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE....922 How can States get Emergency Relief Program funds to repair IRR System damage? States can request...

  14. 25 CFR 170.922 - How can States get Emergency Relief Program funds to repair IRR System damage?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true How can States get Emergency Relief Program funds to repair IRR System damage? 170.922 Section 170.922 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE....922 How can States get Emergency Relief Program funds to repair IRR System damage? States can request...

  15. Influence of XRCC1 Genetic Polymorphisms on Ionizing Radiation-Induced DNA Damage and Repair

    PubMed Central

    Sterpone, Silvia; Cozzi, Renata

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that ionizing radiation (IR) can damage DNA through a direct action, producing single- and double-strand breaks on DNA double helix, as well as an indirect effect by generating oxygen reactive species in the cells. Mammals have evolved several and distinct DNA repair pathways in order to maintain genomic stability and avoid tumour cell transformation. This review reports important data showing a huge interindividual variability on sensitivity to IR and in susceptibility to developing cancer; this variability is principally represented by genetic polymorphisms, that is, DNA repair gene polymorphisms. In particular we have focussed on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of XRCC1, a gene that encodes for a scaffold protein involved basically in Base Excision Repair (BER). In this paper we have reported and presented recent studies that show an influence of XRCC1 variants on DNA repair capacity and susceptibility to breast cancer. PMID:20798883

  16. Repair synthesis by human cell extracts in DNA damaged by cis- and trans-diamminedichloroplatinum(II).

    PubMed Central

    Hansson, J; Wood, R D

    1989-01-01

    DNA damage was induced in closed circular plasmid DNA by treatment with cis- or trans-diamminedichloroplatinum(II). These plasmids were used as substrates in reactions to give quantitative measurements of DNA repair synthesis mediated by cell free extracts from human lymphoid cell lines. Adducts induced by both drugs stimulated repair synthesis in a dose dependent manner by an ATP-requiring process. Measurements by an isopycnic gradient sedimentation method gave an upper limit for the average patch sizes in this in vitro system of around 140 nucleotides. It was estimated that up to 3% of the drug adducts induce the synthesis of a repair patch. The repair synthesis is due to repair of a small fraction of frequent drug adducts, rather than extensive repair of a rare subclass of lesions. Nonspecific DNA synthesis in undamaged plasmids, caused by exonucleolytic degradation and resynthesis, was reduced by repeated purification of intact circular forms. An extract made from cells belonging to xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A was deficient in repair synthesis in response to the presence of cis- or trans-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) adducts in DNA. Images PMID:2554251

  17. Repair of base damage and genome maintenance in the nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Redrejo-Rodríguez, Modesto; Salas, María L

    2014-01-22

    Among the DNA viruses, the so-called nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDV) constitute a monophyletic group that currently consists of seven families of viruses infecting a very broad variety of eukaryotes, from unicellular marine protists to humans. Many recent papers have analyzed the sequence and structure of NCLDV genomes and their phylogeny, providing detailed analysis about their genomic structure and evolutionary history and proposing their inclusion in a new viral order named Megavirales that, according to some authors, should be considered as a fourth domain of life, aside from Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya. The maintenance of genetic information protected from environmental attacks and mutations is essential not only for the survival of cellular organisms but also viruses. In cellular organisms, damaged DNA bases are removed in two major repair pathways: base excision repair (BER) and nucleotide incision repair (NIR) that constitute the major pathways responsible for repairing most endogenous base lesions and abnormal bases in the genome by precise repair procedures. Like cells, many NCLDV encode proteins that might constitute viral DNA repair pathways that would remove damages through BER/NIR pathways. However, the molecular mechanisms and, specially, the biological roles of those viral repair pathways have not been deeply addressed in the literature so far. In this paper, we review viral-encoded BER proteins and the genetic and biochemical data available about them. We propose and discuss probable viral-encoded DNA repair mechanisms and pathways, as compared with the functional and molecular features of known homologs proteins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The Paradoxical Effects of Different Hepatitis C Viral Loads on Host DNA Damage and Repair Abilities

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chia-Yang; Chiang, Chi-Shiun; Yu, Guann-Yi; Sakamoto, Naoya; Tu, Wen-Yu; Hsieh, Meng-Hsuan; Huang, Jee-Fu; Chuang, Wan-Long; Dai, Chia-Yen

    2017-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV)-induced hepatic stress is associated with increased oxidative DNA damage and has been implicated in hepatic inflammation. However, HCV infection and replication are uneven and vary among individual hepatocytes. To investigate the effect of the viral load on host DNA damage, we used an Enhanced Yellow Fluorescent Protein gene (EYFP)-tagged HCV virus to distinguish between HCV intracellular high viral load (HVL) cells and low viral load (LVL) cells. The cell sorting efficiency was confirmed by the high expression of the HCV polyprotein. We found DNA damage γ-H2AX foci in the HVL population. Comet assays demonstrated that HVL was related to the extent of the DNA strand breaks. Surprisingly, the DNA qPCR arrays and western blotting showed that the damage-related genes GPX2, MRE11, phospho-ATM, and OGG1 were significantly up-regulated in LVL cells but inversely down-regulated or consistently expressed in HVL cells. The colony survival assay to examine the repair abilities of these cells in response to irradiation showed that the LVL cells were more resistant to irradiation and had an increased ability to repair radiation-induced damage. This study found that intracellular viral loads drove cellular DNA damage levels but suppressed damage-related gene expression. However, the increase in damage-related gene expression in the LVL cells may be affected by ROS from the HVL cells. These findings provide new insights into the distinct DNA damage and repair responses resulting from different viral loads in HCV-infected cells. PMID:28052067

  19. The Paradoxical Effects of Different Hepatitis C Viral Loads on Host DNA Damage and Repair Abilities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu-Chi; Lai, Kuan-Ru; Li, Chia-Yang; Chiang, Chi-Shiun; Yu, Guann-Yi; Sakamoto, Naoya; Tu, Wen-Yu; Hsieh, Meng-Hsuan; Huang, Jee-Fu; Chuang, Wan-Long; Dai, Chia-Yen; Yu, Ming-Lung

    2017-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV)-induced hepatic stress is associated with increased oxidative DNA damage and has been implicated in hepatic inflammation. However, HCV infection and replication are uneven and vary among individual hepatocytes. To investigate the effect of the viral load on host DNA damage, we used an Enhanced Yellow Fluorescent Protein gene (EYFP)-tagged HCV virus to distinguish between HCV intracellular high viral load (HVL) cells and low viral load (LVL) cells. The cell sorting efficiency was confirmed by the high expression of the HCV polyprotein. We found DNA damage γ-H2AX foci in the HVL population. Comet assays demonstrated that HVL was related to the extent of the DNA strand breaks. Surprisingly, the DNA qPCR arrays and western blotting showed that the damage-related genes GPX2, MRE11, phospho-ATM, and OGG1 were significantly up-regulated in LVL cells but inversely down-regulated or consistently expressed in HVL cells. The colony survival assay to examine the repair abilities of these cells in response to irradiation showed that the LVL cells were more resistant to irradiation and had an increased ability to repair radiation-induced damage. This study found that intracellular viral loads drove cellular DNA damage levels but suppressed damage-related gene expression. However, the increase in damage-related gene expression in the LVL cells may be affected by ROS from the HVL cells. These findings provide new insights into the distinct DNA damage and repair responses resulting from different viral loads in HCV-infected cells.

  20. DNA damage and repair capacity in workers exposed to low concentrations of benzene.

    PubMed

    Lovreglio, Piero; Doria, Denise; Fracasso, Maria Enrica; Barbieri, Anna; Sabatini, Laura; Drago, Ignazio; Violante, Francesco S; Soleo, Leonardo

    2016-03-01

    DNA damage and cellular repair capacity were studied in 18 male fuel tanker drivers and 13 male filling-station attendants exposed to low and very low concentrations of benzene, respectively, and compared to 20 males with no occupational exposure (controls). Exposure to airborne benzene was measured using passive personal samplers, and internal doses were assayed through the biomarkers t,t-muconic acid, S-phenylmercapturic acid and urinary benzene. DNA damage was evaluated using tail intensity (TI) determined by the comet assay in peripheral lymphocytes. Urinary 7-hydro-8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) was measured as a biomarker of oxidative damage. DNA repair kinetics were assessed using the comet assay in lymphocytes sampled 20 and 60 min post H2O2 exposure. Benzene exposure differed significantly between the drivers (median 246.3 µg/m(3)), attendants (median 13.8 µg/m(3)), and controls (median 4.1 µg/m(3)). There were no differences in TI and 8-oxodG among the three groups, or between smokers and non-smokers. DNA repair kinetics were similar among the drivers, attendants and controls, although the comet assay on H2 O2 -damaged lymphocytes after 60 min revealed significantly lower levels of TI only in drivers. The DNA repair process in smokers was similar to that observed in drivers. In conclusion, this study found no relationship between low levels of benzene exposure and DNA damage, although there was evidence that exposure interferes with DNA repair kinetics. The biological impact of this finding on the onset of genotoxic effects in exposed workers has still to be ascertained.

  1. Risk factors for injuries associated with damage claims following groin hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Nordin, P; Ahlberg, J; Johansson, H; Holmberg, H; Hafström, L

    2017-04-01

    Surgical repair of groin hernia should be carried out with minimal complication rates, and it is important to have regular quality control and accurate means of assessment. The Swedish healthcare system has a mutual insurance company (LÖF) that receives claims from patients who have suffered healthcare-related damage or malpractice. The Swedish Hernia Register (SHR) currently covers around 98% of all Swedish groin hernia operations. The aim of this study was to analyse damage claims following groin hernia repair surgery and link these with entries in the SHR, in order to identify risk factors and causes of injuries and malpractice associated with hernia repair. Data on all 48,574 groin hernia operations registered in the SHR between 2008 and 2010 were compared and linked with data on claims made to the Swedish National Patient Injury Insurance (LÖF). Of the 130 damage claims received by LÖF, 26 dealt with bleeding, 20 with testicular injury and 7 with intestinal lesions. Eighty (62%) of the complications were considered malpractice according to the Swedish Patient Injury Act. Acute and recurrent surgery, sutured repair and general anaesthesia were associated with a significantly increased risk for a damage claim independently the patients were compensated or not. Females filed claims in greater proportion than males. There was no significant difference in background factors between claims accepted by LÖF and compensated and those who were rejected compensation. Risk factors for filing a damage claim included acute surgery, operation for recurrence, sutured repair and general anaesthesia, whereas local anaesthesia reduced the risk.

  2. Solar UVB-induced DNA damage and photoenzymatic DNA repair in antarctic zooplankton

    SciTech Connect

    Malloy, K.D.; Holman, M.A.; Mitchell, D.

    1997-02-18

    The detrimental effects of elevated intensities of mid-UV radiation (UVB), a result of stratospheric ozone depletion during the austral spring, on the primary producers of the Antarctic marine ecosystem have been well documented. Here we report that natural populations of Antarctic zooplankton also sustain significant DNA damage [measured as cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs)] during periods of increased UVB flux. This is the first direct evidence that increased solar UVB may result in damage to marine organisms other than primary producers in Antarctica. The extent of DNA damage in pelagic icefish eggs correlated with daily incident UVB irradiance, reflecting the difference between acquisition and repair of CPDs. Patterns of DNA damage in fish larvae did not correlated with daily UVB flux, possibly due to different depth distributions and/or different capacities for DNA repair. Clearance of CPDs by Antarctic fish and krill was mediated primarily by the photoenzymatic repair system. Although repair rates were large for all species evaluated, they were apparently inadequate to prevent the transient accumulation of substantial CPD burdens. The capacity for DNA repair in Antarctic organisms was highest in those species whose early life history stages occupy the water column during periods of ozone depletion (austral spring) and lowest in fish species whose eggs and larvae are abundant during winter. Although the potential reduction in fitness of Antarctic zooplankton resulting from DNA damage is unknown, we suggest that increased solar UV may reduce recruitment and adversely affect trophic transfer of productivity by affecting heterotrophic species as well as primary producers. 54 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Oxidative DNA damage background estimated by a system model of base excision repair

    SciTech Connect

    Sokhansanj, B A; Wilson, III, D M

    2004-05-13

    Human DNA can be damaged by natural metabolism through free radical production. It has been suggested that the equilibrium between innate damage and cellular DNA repair results in an oxidative DNA damage background that potentially contributes to disease and aging. Efforts to quantitatively characterize the human oxidative DNA damage background level based on measuring 8-oxoguanine lesions as a biomarker have led to estimates varying over 3-4 orders of magnitude, depending on the method of measurement. We applied a previously developed and validated quantitative pathway model of human DNA base excision repair, integrating experimentally determined endogenous damage rates and model parameters from multiple sources. Our estimates of at most 100 8-oxoguanine lesions per cell are consistent with the low end of data from biochemical and cell biology experiments, a result robust to model limitations and parameter variation. Our results show the power of quantitative system modeling to interpret composite experimental data and make biologically and physiologically relevant predictions for complex human DNA repair pathway mechanisms and capacity.

  4. Oxidative DNA damage background estimated by a system model of base excision repair.

    PubMed

    Sokhansanj, Bahrad A; Wilson, David M

    2004-08-01

    Human DNA can be damaged by natural metabolism through free radical production. It has been suggested that the equilibrium between innate damage and cellular DNA repair results in an oxidative DNA damage background that potentially contributes to disease and aging. Efforts to quantitatively characterize the human oxidative DNA damage background level, based on measuring 8-oxoguanine lesions as a biomarker, have led to estimates that vary over three to four orders of magnitude, depending on the method of measurement. We applied a previously developed and validated quantitative pathway model of human DNA base excision repair, integrating experimentally determined endogenous damage rates and model parameters from multiple sources. Our estimates of at most 100 8-oxoguanine lesions per cell are consistent with the low end of data from biochemical and cell biology experiments, a result robust to model limitations and parameter variation. Our findings show the power of quantitative system modeling to interpret composite experimental data and make biologically and physiologically relevant predictions for complex human DNA repair pathway mechanisms and capacity.

  5. Leukemic survival factor SALL4 contributes to defective DNA damage repair

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Gao, Chong; Lu, Jiayun; Tatetsu, Hiro; Williams, David A.; Müller, Lars U; Cui, Wei; Chai, Li

    2016-01-01

    SALL4 is aberrantly expressed in human myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We have generated a SALL4 transgenic (SALL4B Tg) mouse model with pre-leukemic MDS-like symptoms that transform to AML over time. This makes our mouse model applicable for studying human MDS/AML diseases. Characterization of the leukemic initiation population in this model leads to the discovery that Fancl (Fanconi anemia, complementation group L) is down-regulated in SALL4B Tg leukemic and pre-leukemic cells. Similar to the reported Fanconi anemia (FA) mouse model, chromosomal instability with radial changes that can be detected in pre-leukemic SALL4B Tg bone marrow (BM) cells after DNA damage challenge. Results from additional studies using DNA damage repair reporter assays support a role of SALL4 in inhibiting the homologous recombination pathway. Intriguingly, unlike the FA mouse model, after DNA damage challenge, SALL4B Tg BM cells can survive and generate hematopoietic colonies. We further elucidated that the mechanism by which SALL4 promotes cell survival is through Bcl2 activation. Overall, our studies demonstrate for the first time that SALL4 has a negative impact in DNA damage repair, and support the model of dual functional properties of SALL4 in leukemogenesis through inhibiting DNA damage repair and promoting cell survival. PMID:27132514

  6. DNA replication meets genetic exchange: chromosomal damage and its repair by homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Kuzminov, A

    2001-07-17

    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Colloquium on the roles of homologous recombination in DNA replication are summarized. Current findings in experimental systems ranging from bacteriophages to mammalian cell lines substantiate the idea that homologous recombination is a system supporting DNA replication when either the template DNA is damaged or the replication machinery malfunctions. There are several lines of supporting evidence: (i) DNA replication aggravates preexisting DNA damage, which then blocks subsequent replication; (ii) replication forks abandoned by malfunctioning replisomes become prone to breakage; (iii) mutants with malfunctioning replisomes or with elevated levels of DNA damage depend on homologous recombination; and (iv) homologous recombination primes DNA replication in vivo and can restore replication fork structures in vitro. The mechanisms of recombinational repair in bacteriophage T4, Escherichia coli, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae are compared. In vitro properties of the eukaryotic recombinases suggest a bigger role for single-strand annealing in the eukaryotic recombinational repair.

  7. Repair Mechanism of UV-damaged DNA in Xeroderma Pigmentosum | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare, inherited disorder characterized by extreme skin sensitivity to ultraviolet (UV) rays from sunlight. XP is caused by mutations in genes involved in nucleotide excision repair (NER) of damaged DNA. Normal cells are usually able to fix this damage before it leads to problems; however, the DNA damage is not repaired normally in patients with XP. As more abnormalities form in DNA, cells malfunction and eventually become cancerous or die. XP patients have more than a 10,000-fold increased risk of developing skin cancer. Kenneth Kraemer, M.D., in CCR’s Dermatology Branch, has been studying XP patients at the Clinical Center for more than 40 years.

  8. Damage control: DNA repair, transcription, and the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

    PubMed

    Daulny, Anne; Tansey, William P

    2009-04-05

    The presence of DNA damage within an actively transcribed gene poses an immediate threat to cellular viability. Bulky DNA adducts, such as those induced by ultraviolet light, can profoundly influence patterns of gene expression by causing the irreversible arrest of RNA polymerase II at sites of DNA damage. It is critical that processes exist to either specifically repair transcribed genes or clear stalled RNA polymerase, so that general repair can occur and transcription resume. A growing body of evidence indicates that clearance of stalled polymerase is achieved, in part, by ubiquitin-mediated destruction of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II. In this review, we shall discuss how an intimate connection between RNA polymerase II and the ubiquitylation machinery acts to restore normal transcription after DNA damage, and other forms of transcriptional arrest, has occurred.

  9. Myelin damage and repair in pathologic CNS: challenges and prospects

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Arsalan; Dyck, Scott M.; Karimi-Abdolrezaee, Soheila

    2015-01-01

    CNS repair. PMID:26283909

  10. Interspecies comparisons of tissue DNA damage, repair, fixation, and replication.

    PubMed Central

    Slaga, T J

    1988-01-01

    The many anatomical, physiological, and biochemical differences among various mammalian species make it difficult to extrapolate carcinogenic potency data from animals to humans. The process is further complicated by the multistep origin of most malignant tumors in animals and humans due to the interaction of target cells with both endogenous and exogenous factors. Species differences in these aspects of carcinogenesis must also be considered when attempting to evaluate the carcinogenic risks of chemicals to humans. Cancer development in animals involves at least three distinct stages: initiation, promotion, and progression. Intra- and interspecies differences in susceptibility to carcinogenesis may be related to any one or a combination of these stages. Variation in species susceptibility to tumor initiation may result from differences in the abilities of various species to metabolize a potential carcinogen to an ultimate carcinogenic form and/or to detoxify the carcinogen. Most comparative studies among species have only revealed subtle differences in metabolism. DNA adducts from several activated carcinogens have been found to be the same in a number of tissues from various species, including humans. Capacity for DNA repair is apparently a critical factor in the initiation of carcinogenesis in target cells of different species but is less critical among mice that differ in susceptibility to two-stage carcinogenesis of the skin and liver. Susceptibility variations among stocks and strains to such carcinogenesis appear to be related to alterations in tumor promotion. Additional comparative studies are critically needed on all aspects of carcinogenesis to permit effective extrapolation of carcinogenic potency data from animals to humans. PMID:3289910

  11. Interspecies comparisons of tissues DNA damage, repair, fixation, and replication

    SciTech Connect

    Slaga, T.J.

    1988-04-01

    The many anatomical, physiological, and biochemical differences among various mammalian species make it difficult to extrapolate carcinogenic potency data from animals to humans. The process is further complicated by the multistep origin of most malignant tumors in animals and humans due to the interaction of target cells with both endogenous and exogenous factors. Species differences in these aspects of carcinogenesis must also be considered when attempting to evaluate the carcinogenic risks of chemicals to humans. Cancer development in animals involves at least three distinct stages: initiation, promotion, and progression. Intra- and interspecies differences in susceptibility to carcinogenesis may be related to any one or a combination of these stages. Variation in species susceptibility to tumor initiation may result from differences in the abilities of various species to metabolize a potential carcinogen to an ultimate carcinogenic form and/or to detoxify the carcinogen. Most comparative studies among species have only revealed subtle differences in metabolism. DNA adducts from several activated carcinogens have been found to be the same in a number of tissues from various species, including humans. Capacity for DNA repair is apparently a critical factor in the initiation of carcinogenesis in target cells of different species but is less critical among mice that differ in susceptibility to two-stage carcinogenesis of the skin and liver. Susceptibility variations among stocks and strains to such carcinogenesis appear to be related to alterations in tumor promotion. Additional comparative studies are critically needed on all aspects of carcinogenesis to permit effective extrapolation of carcinogenic potency data from animals to humans.

  12. Repairing of N-mustard derivative BO-1055 induced DNA damage requires NER, HR, and MGMT-dependent DNA repair mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Ching-Ying; Chou, Wen-Cheng; Wu, Chin-Chung; Wong, Teng-Song; Kakadiya, Rajesh; Lee, Te-Chang; Su, Tsann-Long; Wang, Hui-Chun

    2015-09-22

    Alkylating agents are frequently used as first-line chemotherapeutics for various newly diagnosed cancers. Disruption of genome integrity by such agents can lead to cell lethality if DNA lesions are not removed. Several DNA repair mechanisms participate in the recovery of mono- or bi-functional DNA alkylation. Thus, DNA repair capacity is correlated with the therapeutic response. Here, we assessed the function of novel water-soluble N-mustard BO-1055 (ureidomustin) in DNA damage response and repair mechanisms. As expected, BO-1055 induces ATM and ATR-mediated DNA damage response cascades, including downstream Chk1/Chk2 phosphorylation, S/G2 cell-cycle arrest, and cell death. Further investigation revealed that cell survival sensitivity to BO-1055 is comparable to that of mitomycin C. Both compounds require nucleotide excision repair and homologous recombination, but not non-homologous end-joining, to repair conventional cross-linking DNA damage. Interestingly and unlike mitomycin C and melphalan, MGMT activity was also observed in BO-1055 damage repair systems, which reflects the occurrence of O-alkyl DNA lesions. Combined treatment with ATM/ATR kinase inhibitors significantly increases BO-1055 sensitivity. Our study pinpoints that BO-1055 can be used for treating tumors that with deficient NER, HR, and MGMT DNA repair genes, or for synergistic therapy in tumors that DNA damage response have been suppressed.

  13. Characterization of repair of bleomycin-induced DNA damage in human chromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Sidik, K.

    1989-01-01

    The characteristics of bleomycin-induced DNA damage and repair in intact human fibroblasts, and in fibroblasts that were reversibly permeabilized by short exposure to lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), were examined. LPC treatment dramatically increases the dose effectiveness of bleomycin (BLM). Sufficient levels of single- and double-strand breaks were introduced into the DNA of permeabilized cells to yield a nucleosomal DNA pattern. We demonstrated that BLM is a short patch agent, since excision repair of BLM induced strand breaks involved the removal and reinsertion of less than 10 bases, as compared to >20 bases for long patch agents (e.g., UV radiation and bulky chemicals). Measurements of the initial nuclease sensitivity and subsequent nucleosome rearrangement of newly repaired regions of chromatin in intact and permeabilized cells following treatment with BLM were done in the presence and absence of aphidicolin (APC), an inhibitor of polymerase {alpha}. In intact cells, nucleosome rearrangement was not observed in the presence of APC. In the absence of APC, nucleosome rearrangement was also not observed if hydroxyurea (HU) was present after the insertion of repair patches (chased). If HU was absent during the chase period, rearrangement of chromatin structure at repair sites was observed. However, the rate of rearrangement was considerably slower than that observed for repair of long-patch agents. The slow rate of nucleosome rearrangement was also observed during repair induced by 1 {mu}g/ml BLM in the permeabilized cells. However, when higher concentrations of BLM were used, the rapid phase of nucleosome rearrangement was observed in permeabilized cells indicating nucleosome unfolding had taken place. These results suggest that, unlike long patch repair, significant nucleosome rearrangement does not occur during short-patch repair when the lesions are located primarily in linker regions of nucleosomes.

  14. Repair of potentially lethal radiation damage in human squamous carcinoma cells after chronic hypoxia

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, Tim Tak; Sutherland, R.M. )

    1994-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine the repair of radiation-induced potentially lethal damage in A431 and CaSki cells after chronic hypoxia. Cells in exponential phase are subjected to hypoxia (<10 ppm oxygen) for up to 12 h and then are allowed to reoxygenate in air for up to 4 h. Cells are then irradiated with [gamma] rays. Cell survivals are measured by clonogenic assay immediately and at different times after irradiation. Compared to aerobic controls, an increase in the level of potentially lethal damage repair (PLDR) is demonstrated in A431 cells reoxygenated for 10 min after >4 h of hypoxia. The repair returned to aerobic control level by 3 h of reoxygenation. PLDR of A431 cells reached maximum at about 9 h after irradiation in cells reoxygenated for 10 min after hypoxia. However, the repair is maximum at 6 h in cells reoxygenated for 3 h after hypoxia and in aerobic cells not previously exposed to hypoxia. Reoxygenation after chronic hypoxia did not affect the PLDR capacity and repair kinetics of CaSki cells. The results suggest that radiosensitization by reoxygenation after chronic hypoxia is not related to inhibition of PLDR. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Base excision repair of oxidative DNA damage: from mechanism to disease

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker, Amy M.; Schaich, Matthew A.; Smith, Mallory S.; Flynn, Tony S.; Freudenthal, Bret. D.

    2017-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species continuously assault the structure of DNA resulting in oxidation and fragmentation of the nucleobases. Both oxidative DNA damage itself and its repair mediate the progression of many prevalent human maladies. The major pathway tasked with removal of oxidative DNA damage, and hence maintaining genomic integrity, is base excision repair (BER). The aphorism that structure often dictates function has proven true, as numerous recent structural biology studies have aided in clarifying the molecular mechanisms used by key BER enzymes during the repair of damaged DNA. This review focuses on the mechanistic details of the individual BER enzymes and the association of these enzymes during the development and progression of human diseases, including cancer and neurological diseases. Expanding on these structural and biochemical studies to further clarify still elusive BER mechanisms, and focusing our efforts toward gaining an improved appreciation of how these enzymes form co-complexes to facilitate DNA repair is a crucial next step toward understanding how BER contributes to human maladies and how it can be manipulated to alter patient outcomes. PMID:28199214

  16. Repair of X-Irradiation Damage in TRIBOLIUM CASTANEUM Strains Selected for Differences in Developmental Rates

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, M. Hani

    1974-01-01

    Lines previously selected for different speed of development were found to differ in their spontaneous and induced wing abnormalities after single exposure to X-ray (10 KR) in Tribolium castaneum at 33° and 70% relative humidity. At the time of irradiation the mean developmental time (from egg to first day pupa) was 16.9, 18.8, 22.8 and 18.4 days for fast, intermediate, slow and unselected lines, respectively. There was no difference between males and females in their responses. The spontaneous rate (angular values) of wing abnormalities was 5.3%, 11.2%, 3.5% and 7.2%, and the corresponding induced values were 16.7%, 20.5%, 11.7% and 25.2% for fast, intermediate, slow and unselected lines, respectively. The difference between the spontaneous (due to selection) and the induced (due to selection and irradiation) rates indicates that slowing down development will probably increase the efficiency of the repair of the irradiation damage. This difference (angular values) was 11.4%, 9.4% and 8.1% for fast, intermediate and slow lines, respectively. Increasing developmental time by one day resulted in repairing 0.56% of the radiation damage. These results indicate that both the genetic and the developmental state of the line influence both induction and repair of the X-irradiation damage. The relationship between development, cell cycle, protein synthesis and repair is discussed. PMID:4452475

  17. Comparative Analysis of Interaction of Human and Yeast DNA Damage Recognition Complexes with Damaged DNA in Nucleotide Excision Repair*

    PubMed Central

    Krasikova, Yuliya S.; Rechkunova, Nadejda I.; Maltseva, Ekaterina A.; Pestryakov, Pavel E.; Petruseva, Irina O.; Sugasawa, Kaoru; Chen, Xuejing; Min, Jung-Hyun; Lavrik, Olga I.

    2013-01-01

    The human XPC-RAD23B complex and its yeast ortholog, Rad4-Rad23, are the primary initiators of global genome nucleotide excision repair. The interaction of these proteins with damaged DNA was analyzed using model DNA duplexes containing a single fluorescein-substituted dUMP analog as a lesion. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed similarity between human and yeast proteins in DNA binding. Quantitative analyses of XPC/Rad4 binding to the model DNA structures were performed by fluorescent depolarization measurements. XPC-RAD23B and Rad4-Rad23 proteins demonstrate approximately equal binding affinity to the damaged DNA duplex (KD ∼ (0.5 ± 0.1) and (0.6 ± 0.3) nm, respectively). Using photoreactive DNA containing 5-iodo-dUMP in defined positions, XPC/Rad4 location on damaged DNA was shown. Under conditions of equimolar binding to DNA both proteins exhibited the highest level of cross-links to 5I-dUMP located exactly opposite the damaged nucleotide. The positioning of the XPC and Rad4 proteins on damaged DNA by photocross-linking footprinting is consistent with x-ray analysis of the Rad4-DNA crystal complex. The identity of the XPC and Rad4 location illustrates the common principles of structure organization of DNA damage-scanning proteins from different Eukarya organisms. PMID:23443653

  18. Gene-specific repair of benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide DNA damage in human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Denisenko, M.F.; Venkatachalam, S.; Wani, A.A.

    1995-11-01

    Gene-specific preferential repair of UV damage has been well documented in a variety of organisms. Less is known about many other types of critical DNA lesions, the data available being not numerous and contradictory. To date, the majority of observations with UV were obtained by using T4 endonuclease V system. Recent report questions the applicability of UvrABC nuclease incision method for detecting gene-specific repair. This has stimulated our search for simple and sensitive approach based on a different principle. We have employed the idea of detection by the Southern hybridization of restriction cleavage inhibition at rare sites and developed a method for the analysis of benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide (anti-BPDE) DNA damage in human H-ras proto-oncogene. Damage-dependent induction of individual facultative bands resulting from cleavage inhibition was observed in in vitro modified (4-50 adducts/10{sup 3}kb) p220-ras plasmid DNA digested with EcoRI/NotI, Xhol/Xbal/PstI, and SstI/XbaI/Pst/I. In vivo lesion formation and removal was monitored at several PstI sites distributed along the 6.4 kb single copy ras sequence. Rapid gene-specific repair was seen in primary culture of normal human fibroblasts and in SV40 transformed GM00637 cells. Surprisingly, SV40 transformed XP12BE (complementation group A) GM4429 fibroblasts also repaired anti-BPDE DNA damage at comparable levels. All investigated sites within ras sequence were repaired faster than the genome overall. The results show the utility of the above approach for fine mapping of anti-BPDE DNA lesions. Data suggests that the xeroderma pigmentosum (group A) fibroblasts have a capacity of removing these bulky adducts at least from the active genes.

  19. Human Telomeres Are Hypersensitive to UV-Induced DNA Damage and Refractory to Repair

    PubMed Central

    Rochette, Patrick J.; Brash, Douglas E.

    2010-01-01

    Telomeric repeats preserve genome integrity by stabilizing chromosomes, a function that appears to be important for both cancer and aging. In view of this critical role in genomic integrity, the telomere's own integrity should be of paramount importance to the cell. Ultraviolet light (UV), the preeminent risk factor in skin cancer development, induces mainly cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) which are both mutagenic and lethal. The human telomeric repeat unit (5′TTAGGG/CCCTAA3′) is nearly optimal for acquiring UV-induced CPD, which form at dipyrimidine sites. We developed a ChIP–based technique, immunoprecipitation of DNA damage (IPoD), to simultaneously study DNA damage and repair in the telomere and in the coding regions of p53, 28S rDNA, and mitochondrial DNA. We find that human telomeres in vivo are 7-fold hypersensitive to UV-induced DNA damage. In double-stranded oligonucleotides, this hypersensitivity is a property of both telomeric and non-telomeric repeats; in a series of telomeric repeat oligonucleotides, a phase change conferring UV-sensitivity occurs above 4 repeats. Furthermore, CPD removal in the telomere is almost absent, matching the rate in mitochondria known to lack nucleotide excision repair. Cells containing persistent high levels of telomeric CPDs nevertheless proliferate, and chronic UV irradiation of cells does not accelerate telomere shortening. Telomeres are therefore unique in at least three respects: their biophysical UV sensitivity, their prevention of excision repair, and their tolerance of unrepaired lesions. Utilizing a lesion-tolerance strategy rather than repair would prevent double-strand breaks at closely-opposed excision repair sites on opposite strands of a damage-hypersensitive repeat. PMID:20442874

  20. Metabolic processes involved in repair of Escherichia coli cells damaged by exposure to acid mine water

    SciTech Connect

    Wortman, A.T.; Bissonnette, G.K.

    1988-08-01

    Escherichia coli was stressed by exposure to filter-sterilized acid mine water. Synthetic processes required for repair of sublethally injured survivors were studied by the addition of specific metabolic inhibitors to a resuscitation broth. Inhibitors of protein, RNA, DNA, lipid, and peptidoglycan synthesis as well as uncouplers and inhibitors of electron transport and ATPase activity were used. Acid mine water injury was severe, causing damage to the outer and cytoplasmic membranes. Repair of sublethally injured cells required protein, RNA, and lipid synthesis as well as a proton motive force.

  1. The Comet-FISH assay for the analysis of DNA damage and repair.

    PubMed

    Spivak, Graciela

    2010-01-01

    In this chapter, I describe the alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis (Comet assay) combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technology, used in our laboratory, to study the incidence and repair of lesions induced in human cells by ultraviolet light. The Comet-FISH method permits the simultaneous and comparative analysis of DNA damage and its repair throughout the genome and in defined chromosomal regions. This very sensitive approach can be applied to any lesion, such as those induced by chemical carcinogens and products of cellular metabolism that can be converted to DNA single- or double-strand breaks. The unique advantages and limitations of the method for particular applications are discussed.

  2. Functional interplay between ATM/ATR-mediated DNA damage response and DNA repair pathways in oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Sorrell, Melanie; Berman, Zachary

    2014-01-01

    To maintain genome stability, cells have evolved various DNA repair pathways to deal with oxidative DNA damage. DNA damage response (DDR) pathways, including ATM-Chk2 and ATR-Chk1 checkpoints, are also activated in oxidative stress to coordinate DNA repair, cell cycle progression, transcription, apoptosis, and senescence. Several studies demonstrate that DDR pathways can regulate DNA repair pathways. On the other hand, accumulating evidence suggests that DNA repair pathways may modulate DDR pathway activation as well. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of how various DNA repair and DDR pathways are activated in response to oxidative DNA damage primarily from studies in eukaryotes. In particular, we analyze the functional interplay between DNA repair and DDR pathways in oxidative stress. A better understanding of cellular response to oxidative stress may provide novel avenues of treating human diseases, such as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24947324

  3. Neuromuscular Damage and Repair after Dry Needling in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Domingo, Ares; Mayoral, Orlando; Monterde, Sonia; Santafé, Manel M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Some dry needling treatments involve repetitive and rapid needle insertions into myofascial trigger points. This type of treatment causes muscle injury and can also damage nerve fibers. The aim of this study is to determine the injury caused by 15 repetitive punctures in the muscle and the intramuscular nerves in healthy mouse muscle and its ulterior regeneration. Methods. We repeatedly needled the levator auris longus muscle of mice, and then the muscles were processed with immunohistochemistry, methylene blue, and electron microscopy techniques. Results. Three hours after the dry needling procedure, the muscle fibers showed some signs of an inflammatory response, which progressed to greater intensity 24 hours after the procedure. Some inflammatory cells could still be seen when the muscle regeneration was almost complete seven days after the treatment. One day after the treatment, some changes in the distribution of receptors could be observed in the denervated postsynaptic component. Reinnervation was complete by the third day after the dry needling procedure. We also saw very fine axonal branches reinnervating all the postsynaptic components and some residual sprouts the same day. Conclusion. Repeated dry needling punctures in muscle do not perturb the different stages of muscle regeneration and reinnervation. PMID:23662122

  4. Nuclear localization of Beclin 1 promotes radiation-induced DNA damage repair independent of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fei; Fang, Yixuan; Yan, Lili; Xu, Lan; Zhang, Suping; Cao, Yan; Xu, Li; Zhang, Xiaoying; Xie, Jialing; Jiang, Gaoyue; Ge, Chaorong; An, Ni; Zhou, Daohong; Yuan, Na; Wang, Jianrong

    2017-03-27

    Beclin 1 is a well-established core mammalian autophagy protein that is embryonically indispensable and has been presumed to suppress oncogenesis via an autophagy-mediated mechanism. Here, we show that Beclin 1 is a prenatal primary cytoplasmic protein but rapidly relocated into the nucleus during postnatal development in mice. Surprisingly, deletion of beclin1 in in vitro human cells did not block an autophagy response, but attenuated the expression of several DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair proteins and formation of repair complexes, and reduced an ability to repair DNA in the cells exposed to ionizing radiation (IR). Overexpressing Beclin 1 improved the repair of IR-induced DSB, but did not restore an autophagy response in cells lacking autophagy gene Atg7, suggesting that Beclin 1 may regulate DSB repair independent of autophagy in the cells exposed to IR. Indeed, we found that Beclin 1 could directly interact with DNA topoisomerase IIβ and was recruited to the DSB sites by the interaction. These findings reveal a novel function of Beclin 1 in regulation of DNA damage repair independent of its role in autophagy particularly when the cells are under radiation insult.

  5. Effects of inhibitors of radiation-induced potentially lethal damage repair on chemotherapy in murine tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Nakatsugawa, S.; Sugahara, T.

    1982-09-01

    Enhancement of various antitumor drugs effects by inhibitors of radiation-induced potentially lethal damage (PLD) repair was studied in three murine tumors (EMT-6, RIF-1 and SQ-1). In EMT-6 tumors, PLD repair inhibitors, 3'-deoxyguanosine (3'dG) and 7904 (a derivative of 3'-deoxyadenosine) showed a marked enhancement of tumor growth inhibition by anticancerous drugs (FT-207 (a derivative of 5-FU), bleomycin, Ara-C, ACNU). However, the effects of mitomycin-C and vincristine were not potentiated by the inhibitors. In SQ-1 carcinomas, another repair inhibitor, ara-A (1-..beta..-D-arabinofuranosyladenine) (32 mg/kg) potentiated the effect of ACNU. In RIF-1 sarcomas, in which a low PLD repair function has been reported after ionizing radiation exposure, the potentiation was not so marked as in EMT-6 or SQ-1 tumors. Thus, as a possibility, the potentiation by inhibitors of radiation-induced PLD repair might be a result of the inhibition of chemical-induced PLD repair. The study of this field may contribute to the improvement of cancer treatment not only by radiotherapy but also by chemotherapy.

  6. Nuclear localization of Beclin 1 promotes radiation-induced DNA damage repair independent of autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Fei; Fang, Yixuan; Yan, Lili; Xu, Lan; Zhang, Suping; Cao, Yan; Xu, Li; Zhang, Xiaoying; Xie, Jialing; Jiang, Gaoyue; Ge, Chaorong; An, Ni; Zhou, Daohong; Yuan, Na; Wang, Jianrong

    2017-01-01

    Beclin 1 is a well-established core mammalian autophagy protein that is embryonically indispensable and has been presumed to suppress oncogenesis via an autophagy-mediated mechanism. Here, we show that Beclin 1 is a prenatal primary cytoplasmic protein but rapidly relocated into the nucleus during postnatal development in mice. Surprisingly, deletion of beclin1 in in vitro human cells did not block an autophagy response, but attenuated the expression of several DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair proteins and formation of repair complexes, and reduced an ability to repair DNA in the cells exposed to ionizing radiation (IR). Overexpressing Beclin 1 improved the repair of IR-induced DSB, but did not restore an autophagy response in cells lacking autophagy gene Atg7, suggesting that Beclin 1 may regulate DSB repair independent of autophagy in the cells exposed to IR. Indeed, we found that Beclin 1 could directly interact with DNA topoisomerase IIβ and was recruited to the DSB sites by the interaction. These findings reveal a novel function of Beclin 1 in regulation of DNA damage repair independent of its role in autophagy particularly when the cells are under radiation insult. PMID:28345663

  7. Beyond xeroderma pigmentosum: DNA damage and repair in an ecological context. A tribute to James E. Cleaver.

    PubMed

    Karentz, Deneb

    2015-01-01

    The ability to repair DNA is a ubiquitous characteristic of life on Earth and all organisms possess similar mechanisms for dealing with DNA damage, an indication of a very early evolutionary origin for repair processes. James E. Cleaver's career (initiated in the early 1960s) has been devoted to the study of mammalian ultraviolet radiation (UVR) photobiology, specifically the molecular genetics of xeroderma pigmentosum and other human diseases caused by defects in DNA damage recognition and repair. This work by Jim and others has influenced the study of DNA damage and repair in a variety of taxa. Today, the field of DNA repair is enhancing our understanding of not only how to treat and prevent human disease, but is providing insights on the evolutionary history of life on Earth and how natural populations are coping with UVR-induced DNA damage from anthropogenic changes in the environment such as ozone depletion. © 2014 The American Society of Photobiology.

  8. Repair of Damaged M-Chromium-Aluminum-Yttrium Coatings Targeting Petroleum Industry Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, Rabab

    The increase in efficiency of furnace and refinery components in petroleum industries has been the target of many studies. However, the repair technology for damaged pieces is still to be developed. During prolonged service, a degradation of developed coatings occurs as a result of the harsh environment. Therefore, a repair technology, which can extend the life of the coatings, is now under consideration. In this work, electrospark deposition (ESD) has been investigated to understand the solidification behavior and its possibility to repair damaged MCrAlY coatings. Ni-based alloys with different compositions were deposited on Ni substrate using ESD to understand crystal structure of the solidified deposit and the effect of the dissimilar weld composition on dilution. The electrode samples were prepared by spark plasma sintering (SPS). Firstly, different coatings with single and bi-phase microstructure were deposited on pure Ni substrate. Secondly, NiCoCrAlY and CoNiCrAlY were deposited on the damaged spot of the oxidized NiCoCrAlY and CoNiCrAlY respectively. A fine microstructure of metastable phases obtained from each deposit. Also, it was found that an epitaxial growth of NiCoCrAlY and CoNiCrAlY were obtained on the damaged spots. In addition, α-Al 2O3 was obtained on the surface of the deposit after 24hr oxidation at 1000°C.

  9. DNA damage action spectroscopy and DNA repair in intact organisms: Alfalfa seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, B.M.; Quaite, F.E.; Sutherland, J.C.

    1993-12-31

    Understanding the effects of UV, and increased levels of UV, on DNA in living organisms requires knowledge of both the frequency of damages induced by the quantities and quality (wavelength composition) of the damaging radiation, and of the capacity of the organisms to carry out efficient and accurate repair. The major levels of uncertainty in understanding the responses of intact organisms, both plant and animal, to UV indicates that we cannot assess accurately the impact of stratospheric ozone depletion without major increases in knowledge of DNA damage and repair. What repair paths does alfalfa use for dealing with UV damages? The rate of pyrimidine dimers induced at a low exposure of 280 nm radiation to alfalfa seedlings, was observed to be about 8 dimers/million bases. After UV exposure, the seedlings were kept in the dark or exposed to blue light filtered by a yellow. filter which excluded wavelengths shorter than about 405 nm. Seedlings so exposed carry out photorepair, but do not seem to remove dimers by excision.

  10. Initiation of the ATM-Chk2 DNA damage response through the base excision repair pathway.

    PubMed

    Chou, Wen-Cheng; Hu, Ling-Yueh; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Shen, Chen-Yang

    2015-08-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is activated by various genotoxic stresses. Base lesions, which are structurally simple and predominantly fixed by base excision repair (BER), can trigger the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-checkpoint kinase 2 (Chk2) pathway, a DDR component. How these lesions trigger DDR remains unclear. Here we show that, for alkylation damage, methylpurine-DNA glycosylase (MPG) and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1, both of which function early in BER, are required for ATM-Chk2-dependent DDR. In addition, other DNA glycosylases, including uracil-DNA glycosylase and 8-oxoguanine glycosylase, which are involved in repairing deaminated bases and oxidative damage, also induced DDR. The early steps of BER therefore play a vital role in modulating the ATM-Chk2 DDR in response to base lesions, facilitating downstream BER processing for repair, in which the formation of a single-strand break was shown to play a critical role. Moreover, MPG knockdown rescued cell lethality, its overexpression led to cell death triggered by DNA damage and, more interestingly, higher MPG expression in breast and ovarian cancers corresponded with a greater probability of relapse-free survival after chemotherapy, underscoring the importance of glycosylase-dependent DDR. This study highlights the crosstalk between BER and DDR that contributes to maintaining genomic integrity and may have clinical applications in cancer therapy.

  11. Relationship between the repair of radiation-induced DNA damage and recovery from potentially lethal damage in 9L rat brain tumor cells. [Gamma radiation

    SciTech Connect

    vanAnkeren, S.C.; Wheeler, K.T.

    1984-03-01

    The kinetics of repair of radiation-induced DNA damage and recovery from radiation-induced potentially lethal damage (PLD) for fed plateau-phase 9L/Ro rat brain tumor cells were compared after single doses of gamma-radiation and after combined treatment with 3 micrograms of 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU)/ml given 16 hr prior to irradiation. DNA damage and repair were assayed using alkaline filter elution, while cell survival was assayed by colony formation. Repair of radiation-induced DNA damage and recovery from radiation-induced PLD followed statistically identical biphasic kinetics; the fast-phase half-times were 4.1 +/- 0.3 (S.D.) min and 4.0 +/- 0.8 min, while the slow-phase half-times were 59.7 +/- 11.2 min and 78.7 +/- 34.1 min, respectively. Treatment with BCNU prior to irradiation resulted in both additional DNA damage and increased cell kill. When DNA damage and cell survival after the combined treatment were corrected for the contribution from BCNU given alone, no inhibition of either repair of radiation-induced DNA damage or of recovery from radiation-induced PLD was observed. However, postirradiation hypertonic treatment inhibited both DNA repair and recovery from radiation-induced PLD. These correlations between the kinetics of the molecular and cellular repair processes support a role for repair of radiation-induced DNA damage in recovery from radiation-induced PLD. The lack of inhibition by BCNU of both repair of radiation-induced DNA damage and of recovery from radiation-induced PLD also demonstrates that these are not the mechanisms by which BCNU enhances radiation-induced cytotoxicity in 9L cells.

  12. Delayed repair of radiation induced clustered DNA damage: Friend or foe?

    PubMed Central

    Eccles, Laura J.; O’Neill, Peter; Lomax, Martine E.

    2011-01-01

    A signature of ionizing radiation exposure is the induction of DNA clustered damaged sites, defined as two or more lesions within one to two helical turns of DNA by passage of a single radiation track. Clustered damage is made up of double strand breaks (DSB) with associated base lesions or abasic (AP) sites, and non-DSB clusters comprised of base lesions, AP sites and single strand breaks. This review will concentrate on the experimental findings of the processing of non-DSB clustered damaged sites. It has been shown that non-DSB clustered damaged sites compromise the base excision repair pathway leading to the lifetime extension of the lesions within the cluster, compared to isolated lesions, thus the likelihood that the lesions persist to replication and induce mutation is increased. In addition certain non-DSB clustered damaged sites are processed within the cell to form additional DSB. The use of E. coli to demonstrate that clustering of DNA lesions is the major cause of the detrimental consequences of ionizing radiation is also discussed. The delayed repair of non-DSB clustered damaged sites in humans can be seen as a “friend”, leading to cell killing in tumour cells or as a “foe”, resulting in the formation of mutations and genetic instability in normal tissue. PMID:21130102

  13. DNA repair and the evolution of transformation in Bacillus subtilis. 3. Sex with damaged DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Hoelzer, M.A.; Michod, R.E. )

    1991-06-01

    Natural genetic transformation in the bacterium Bacillus subtilis provides an experimental system for studying the evolutionary function of sexual recombination. The repair hypothesis proposes that during transformation the exogenous DNA taken up by cells is used as template for recombinational repair of damages in the recipient cell's genome. Earlier results demonstrated that the population density of transformed cells (i.e., sexual cells) increases, relative to nontransformed cells (primarily asexual cells), with increasing dosage of ultraviolet irradiation, provided that the cells are transformed with undamaged homologous DNA after they have become damaged. In nature, however, donor DNA for transformation is likely to come from cells that are as damaged as the recipient cells. In order to better simulate the effects of transformation in natural populations we conducted similar experiments as those just described using damaged donor DNA. The authors document in this report that transformants continue to increase in relative density even if they are transformed with damaged donor DNA. These results suggest that sites of transformation are often damaged sites in the recipient cell's genome.

  14. DNA damage and repair in a model of rat vascular injury.

    PubMed

    Forte, Amalia; Finicelli, Mauto; Grossi, Mario; Vicchio, Mariano; Alessio, Nicola; Santé, Pasquale; De Feo, Marisa; Cotrufo, Maurizio; Berrino, Liberato; Rossi, Francesco; Galderisi, Umberto; Cipollaro, Marilena

    2010-04-01

    Restenosis rate following vascular interventions still limits their long-term success. Oxidative stress plays a relevant role in this pathophysiological phenomenon, but less attention has been devoted to its effects on DNA damage and to the subsequent mechanisms of repair. We analysed in a model of arteriotomy-induced stenosis in rat carotids the time-dependent expression of DNA damage markers and of DNA repair genes, together with the assessment of proliferation and apoptosis indexes. The expression of the oxidative DNA damage marker 7,8-dihydro-8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine was increased at 3 and 7 days after arteriotomy, with immunostaining distributed in the injured vascular wall and in perivascular tissue. The expression of the DNA damage marker phospho-H2A.X was less relevant but increasing from 4 hrs to 7 days after arteriotomy, with immunostaining prevalently present in the adventitia and, to a lesser extent, in medial smooth muscle cells at the injury site. RT-PCR indicated a decrease of 8 out of 12 genes of the DNA repair machinery we selected from 4 hrs to 7 days after arteriotomy with the exception of increased Muyth and Slk genes (p<0.05). Western Blot revealed a decrease of p53 and catalase at 3 days after arteriotomy (p<0.05). A maximal 7% of BrdU-positive cells in endothelium and media occurred at 7 days after arteriotomy, while the apoptotic index peaked at 3 days after injury (p<0.05). Our results highlight a persistent DNA damage presumably related to a temporary decreased expression of the DNA repair machinery and of the antioxidant enzyme catalase, playing a role in stenosis progression.

  15. Correlation between radio-induced lymphocyte apoptosis measurements obtained from two French centres.

    PubMed

    Mirjolet, C; Merlin, J L; Dalban, C; Maingon, P; Azria, D

    2016-07-01

    In the era of modern treatment delivery, increasing the dose delivered to the target to improve local control might be modulated by the patient's intrinsic radio-sensitivity. A predictive assay based on radio-induced lymphocyte apoptosis quantification highlighted the significant correlation between CD4 and CD8 T-lymphocyte apoptosis and grade 2 or 3 radiation-induced late toxicities. By conducting this assay at several technical platforms, the aim of this study was to demonstrate that radio-induced lymphocyte apoptosis values obtained from two different platforms were comparable. For 25 patients included in the PARATOXOR trial running in Dijon the radio-induced lymphocyte apoptosis results obtained from the laboratory of Montpellier (IRCM, Inserm U1194, France), considered as the reference (referred to as Lab 1), were compared with those from the laboratory located at the Institut de cancérologie de Lorraine (ICL, France), referred to as Lab 2. Different statistical methods were used to measure the agreement between the radio-induced lymphocyte apoptosis data from the two laboratories (quantitative data). The Bland-Altman plot was used to identify potential bias. All statistical tests demonstrated good agreement between radio-induced lymphocyte apoptosis values obtained from both sites and no major bias was identified. Since radio-induced lymphocyte apoptosis values, which predict tolerance to radiotherapy, could be assessed by two laboratories and showed a high level of robustness and consistency, we can suggest that this assay be extended to any laboratories that use the same technique. Copyright © 2016 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Accessing DNA damage in chromatin: Preparing the chromatin landscape for base excision repair.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Yesenia; Hinz, John M; Smerdon, Michael J

    2015-08-01

    DNA damage in chromatin comes in many forms, including single base lesions that induce base excision repair (BER). We and others have shown that the structural location of DNA lesions within nucleosomes greatly influences their accessibility to repair enzymes. Indeed, a difference in the location of uracil as small as one-half turn of the DNA backbone on the histone surface can result in a 10-fold difference in the time course of its removal in vitro. In addition, the cell has evolved several interdependent processes capable of enhancing the accessibility of excision repair enzymes to DNA lesions in nucleosomes, including post-translational modification of histones, ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling and interchange of histone variants in nucleosomes. In this review, we focus on different factors that affect accessibility of BER enzymes to nucleosomal DNA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Oxidative Stress, DNA Damage and DNA Repair in Female Patients with Diabetes Mellitus Type 2.

    PubMed

    Grindel, Annemarie; Guggenberger, Bianca; Eichberger, Lukas; Pöppelmeyer, Christina; Gschaider, Michaela; Tosevska, Anela; Mare, George; Briskey, David; Brath, Helmut; Wagner, Karl-Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus type 2 (T2DM) is associated with oxidative stress which in turn can lead to DNA damage. The aim of the present study was to analyze oxidative stress, DNA damage and DNA repair in regard to hyperglycemic state and diabetes duration. Female T2DM patients (n = 146) were enrolled in the MIKRODIAB study and allocated in two groups regarding their glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level (HbA1c≤7.5%, n = 74; HbA1c>7.5%, n = 72). In addition, tertiles according to diabetes duration (DD) were created (DDI = 6.94±3.1 y, n = 49; DDII = 13.35±1.1 y, n = 48; DDIII = 22.90±7.3 y, n = 49). Oxidative stress parameters, including ferric reducing ability potential, malondialdehyde, oxidized and reduced glutathione, reduced thiols, oxidized LDL and F2-Isoprostane as well as the activity of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase were measured. Damage to DNA was analyzed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and whole blood with single cell gel electrophoresis. DNA base excision repair capacity was tested with the modified comet repair assay. Additionally, mRNA expressions of nine genes related to base excision repair were analyzed in a subset of 46 matched individuals. No significant differences in oxidative stress parameters, antioxidant enzyme activities, damage to DNA and base excision repair capacity, neither between a HbA1c cut off />7.5%, nor between diabetes duration was found. A significant up-regulation in mRNA expression was found for APEX1, LIG3 and XRCC1 in patients with >7.5% HbA1c. Additionally, we observed higher total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, LDL/HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, Framingham risk score, systolic blood pressure, BMI and lower HDL-cholesterol in the hyperglycemic group. BMI, blood pressure and blood lipid status were worse in hyperglycemic individuals. However, no major disparities regarding oxidative stress, damage to DNA and DNA repair were present which might be due to good medical treatment

  18. Persistent damaged bases in DNA allow mutagenic break repair in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Jessica M.; Correa, Raul; Rosenberg, Susan M.

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria, yeast and human cancer cells possess mechanisms of mutagenesis upregulated by stress responses. Stress-inducible mutagenesis potentially accelerates adaptation, and may provide important models for mutagenesis that drives cancers, host pathogen interactions, antibiotic resistance and possibly much of evolution generally. In Escherichia coli repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs) becomes mutagenic, using low-fidelity DNA polymerases under the control of the SOS DNA-damage response and RpoS general stress response, which upregulate and allow the action of error-prone DNA polymerases IV (DinB), II and V to make mutations during repair. Pol IV is implied to compete with and replace high-fidelity DNA polymerases at the DSB-repair replisome, causing mutagenesis. We report that up-regulated Pol IV is not sufficient for mutagenic break repair (MBR); damaged bases in the DNA are also required, and that in starvation-stressed cells, these are caused by reactive-oxygen species (ROS). First, MBR is reduced by either ROS-scavenging agents or constitutive activation of oxidative-damage responses, both of which reduce cellular ROS levels. The ROS promote MBR other than by causing DSBs, saturating mismatch repair, oxidizing proteins, or inducing the SOS response or the general stress response. We find that ROS drive MBR through oxidized guanines (8-oxo-dG) in DNA, in that overproduction of a glycosylase that removes 8-oxo-dG from DNA prevents MBR. Further, other damaged DNA bases can substitute for 8-oxo-dG because ROS-scavenged cells resume MBR if either DNA pyrimidine dimers or alkylated bases are induced. We hypothesize that damaged bases in DNA pause the replisome and allow the critical switch from high fidelity to error-prone DNA polymerases in the DSB-repair replisome, thus allowing MBR. The data imply that in addition to the indirect stress-response controlled switch to MBR, a direct cis-acting switch to MBR occurs independently of DNA breakage, caused by ROS

  19. Persistent damaged bases in DNA allow mutagenic break repair in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jessica M; Correa, Raul; Rosenberg, Susan M; Hastings, P J

    2017-07-01

    Bacteria, yeast and human cancer cells possess mechanisms of mutagenesis upregulated by stress responses. Stress-inducible mutagenesis potentially accelerates adaptation, and may provide important models for mutagenesis that drives cancers, host pathogen interactions, antibiotic resistance and possibly much of evolution generally. In Escherichia coli repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs) becomes mutagenic, using low-fidelity DNA polymerases under the control of the SOS DNA-damage response and RpoS general stress response, which upregulate and allow the action of error-prone DNA polymerases IV (DinB), II and V to make mutations during repair. Pol IV is implied to compete with and replace high-fidelity DNA polymerases at the DSB-repair replisome, causing mutagenesis. We report that up-regulated Pol IV is not sufficient for mutagenic break repair (MBR); damaged bases in the DNA are also required, and that in starvation-stressed cells, these are caused by reactive-oxygen species (ROS). First, MBR is reduced by either ROS-scavenging agents or constitutive activation of oxidative-damage responses, both of which reduce cellular ROS levels. The ROS promote MBR other than by causing DSBs, saturating mismatch repair, oxidizing proteins, or inducing the SOS response or the general stress response. We find that ROS drive MBR through oxidized guanines (8-oxo-dG) in DNA, in that overproduction of a glycosylase that removes 8-oxo-dG from DNA prevents MBR. Further, other damaged DNA bases can substitute for 8-oxo-dG because ROS-scavenged cells resume MBR if either DNA pyrimidine dimers or alkylated bases are induced. We hypothesize that damaged bases in DNA pause the replisome and allow the critical switch from high fidelity to error-prone DNA polymerases in the DSB-repair replisome, thus allowing MBR. The data imply that in addition to the indirect stress-response controlled switch to MBR, a direct cis-acting switch to MBR occurs independently of DNA breakage, caused by ROS

  20. Involvement of DNA polymerase beta in repairing oxidative damages induced by antitumor drug adriamycin

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Shukun; Wu Mei; Zhang Zunzhen

    2010-08-01

    Adriamycin (ADM) is a widely used antineoplastic drug. However, the increasing cellular resistance has become a serious limitation to ADM clinical application. The most important mechanism related to ADM-induced cell death is oxidative DNA damage mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Base excision repair (BER) is a major pathway in the repair of DNA single strand break (SSB) and oxidized base. In this study, we firstly applied the murine embryo fibroblasts wild-type (pol {beta} +/+) and homozygous pol {beta} null cell (pol {beta} -/-) as a model to investigate ADM DNA-damaging effects and the molecular basis underlying these effects. Here, cellular sensitivity to ADM was examined using colorimetric assay and colony forming assay. ADM-induced cellular ROS level and the alteration of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were measured by commercial kits. Further, DNA strand break, chromosomal damage and gene mutation were assessed by comet assay, micronucleus test and hprt gene mutation assay, respectively. The results showed that pol {beta} -/- cells were more sensitive to ADM compared with pol {beta} +/+ cells and more severe SSB and chromosomal damage as well as higher hprt gene mutation frequency were observed in pol {beta} -/- cells. ROS level in pol {beta} -/- cells increased along with decreased activity of SOD. These results demonstrated that pol {beta} deficiency could enable ROS accumulation with SOD activity decrease, further elevate oxidative DNA damage, and subsequently result in SSB, chromosome cleavage as well as gene mutation, which may be partly responsible for the cytotoxicity of ADM and the hypersensitivity of pol {beta} -/- cells to ADM. These findings suggested that pol {beta} is vital for repairing oxidative damage induced by ADM.

  1. Arsenic Biotransformation as a Cancer Promoting Factor by Inducing DNA Damage and Disruption of Repair Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Victor D.; Vucic, Emily A.; Adonis, Marta; Gil, Lionel; Lam, Wan L.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic exposure to arsenic in drinking water poses a major global health concern. Populations exposed to high concentrations of arsenic-contaminated drinking water suffer serious health consequences, including alarming cancer incidence and death rates. Arsenic is biotransformed through sequential addition of methyl groups, acquired from s-adenosylmethionine (SAM). Metabolism of arsenic generates a variety of genotoxic and cytotoxic species, damaging DNA directly and indirectly, through the generation of reactive oxidative species and induction of DNA adducts, strand breaks and cross links, and inhibition of the DNA repair process itself. Since SAM is the methyl group donor used by DNA methyltransferases to maintain normal epigenetic patterns in all human cells, arsenic is also postulated to affect maintenance of normal DNA methylation patterns, chromatin structure, and genomic stability. The biological processes underlying the cancer promoting factors of arsenic metabolism, related to DNA damage and repair, will be discussed here. PMID:22091411

  2. From chemistry of DNA damage to repair and biological significance. Comprehending the future.

    PubMed

    Georgakilas, Alexandros G

    2011-06-03

    Knowledge of the chemistry behind induction of DNA damage and processing mechanisms is considered very important not only for the understanding of the biological significance but also for clinical applications. In this Special Issue, we have compiled a number of succinct reviews and original research articles, by top experts in their fields. The articles discuss and/or explore the current status of knowledge and new advances in the chemical and molecular pathways related to the induction of high oxidative stress, DNA damage and its repair in human cells and tissues. Experimental and theoretical insights are provided of how the DNA repair processes maybe modulated by gene mutations and other factors like temperature and radiation quality. 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Repair work begins on the external tank of Space Shuttle Discovery after damage from hail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    United Space Alliance technician Don Pataky repairs hail- inflicted damage in the foam insulation on the external tank of Space Shuttle Discovery. The Shuttle was rolled back from Pad 39B to the Vehicle Assemby Building for repairs because access to all of the damaged areas was not possible at the pad. The work is expected to take two to three days, allowing Discovery to roll back to the pad late this week for launch of mission STS-96, the 94th launch in the Space Shuttle Program. Liftoff will occur no earlier than May 27. STS-96 is a logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-shared experiment.

  4. Repair work begins on the external tank of Space Shuttle Discovery after damage from hail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    United Space Alliance technician Don Pataky prepares to enter a tented area around the external tank of Space Shuttle Discovery in order to repair hail-inflicted damage in the foam insulation. The Shuttle was rolled back from Pad 39B to the Vehicle Assemby Building for repairs because access to all of the damaged areas was not possible at the pad. The work is expected to take two to three days, allowing Discovery to roll back to the pad late this week for launch of mission STS-96, the 94th launch in the Space Shuttle Program. Liftoff will occur no earlier than May 27. STS- 96 is a logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student- shared experiment.

  5. Repair work continues on the external tank of Space Shuttle Discovery after damage from hail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB), United Space Alliance technician Robert Williams sands the repaired areas near the top of Space Shuttle Discovery's external tank. Repairs were required for damage caused by hail during recent storms. Because access to all of the damaged areas was not possible at the pad, the Shuttle was rolled back from Pad 39B to the VAB. The work is expected to take two to three days, allowing Discovery to roll back to the pad late this week for launch of mission STS-96, the 94th launch in the Space Shuttle Program. Liftoff will occur no earlier than May 27. STS-96 is a logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-shared experiment.

  6. DNA damage and repair in tumour and non-tumour tissues of mice induced by nicotinamide.

    PubMed Central

    Olsson, A. R.; Sheng, Y.; Pero, R. W.; Chaplin, D. J.; Horsman, M. R.

    1996-01-01

    In vivo DNA damage and repair was induced by nicotinamide (NAM) in adenotype 12 virus-induced mouse sarcoma A12B3 and sarcoma F inoculated into CBA mice. DNA damage, NAM and NAD concentrations were measured after in vivo exposure to NAM, in tumours and spleens by alkaline elution and by HPLC analysis. Our results indicate that NAM between 100-1000 mg kg-1 causes a high level of in vivo DNA strand breaks in tumours and normal tissues in mice bearing the immunogenic sarcoma A12B3 but not in the non-immunogenic sarcoma F. The repair process was also delayed by the NAM treatment probably owing to inhibition of the DNA repair enzyme, poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase, as evidenced by accumulation of NAM and NAD. These data are consistent with NAM having a mechanism of action as a radiosensitiser at least in part by DNA repair inhibition. In addition, it should also be considered that high doses of NAM might cause considerable complications to normal tissue in tumour-bearing individuals. PMID:8695350

  7. Mismatch Repair Proteins Are Activators of Toxic Responses to Chromium-DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Peterson-Roth, Elizabeth; Reynolds, Mindy; Quievryn, George; Zhitkovich, Anatoly

    2005-01-01

    Chromium(VI) is a toxic and carcinogenic metal that causes the formation of DNA phosphate-based adducts. Cr-DNA adducts are genotoxic in human cells, although they do not block replication in vitro. Here, we report that induction of cytotoxicity in Cr(VI)-treated human colon cells and mouse embryonic fibroblasts requires the presence of all major mismatch repair (MMR) proteins. Cr-DNA adducts lost their ability to block replication of Cr-modified plasmids in human colon cells lacking MLH1 protein. The presence of functional mismatch repair caused induction of p53-independent apoptosis associated with activation of caspases 2 and 7. Processing of Cr-DNA damage by mismatch repair resulted in the extensive formation of γ-H2AX foci in G2 phase, indicating generation of double-stranded breaks as secondary toxic lesions. Induction of γ-H2AX foci was observed at 6 to 12 h postexposure, which was followed by activation of apoptosis in the absence of significant G2 arrest. Our results demonstrate that mismatch repair system triggers toxic responses to Cr-DNA backbone modifications through stress mechanisms that are significantly different from those for other forms of DNA damage. Selection for Cr(VI) resistant, MMR-deficient cells may explain the very high frequency of lung cancers with microsatellite instability among chromate workers. PMID:15831465

  8. Inhibiting the repair of DNA damage induced by gamma irradiation in rat thymocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Smit, J.A.; Stark, J.H.

    1994-01-01

    This study assessed the ability of 11 established and potential radiosensitizing agents to retard the repair of radiation-induced DNA damage with a view to enhancing the immunosuppressive effects of in vivo lymphoid irradiation. The capability of irradiated rat thymocytes to repair DNA damage was assessed by an adaptation of the fluorimetric unwinding method. Three compounds, 3-aminobenzamide (3-AB), novobiocin and flavone-8-acetic acid (FAA), inhibited repair significantly. We also report the effect of low-dose irradiation combined with repair inhibitors on the relationship between DNA strand breaks, fragmentation, cell viability and use of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD). DNA fragmentation was increased by 1 mM/l FAA, 1 mM/l novobiocin and 50 {mu}M/l RS-61443 within 3 h of incubation. The latter two compounds also proved cytotoxic. All three drugs augmented the effect of ionizing radiation on the use of NAD. Of the agents investigated, FAA showed the most promise for augmenting the immunosuppressive action of irradiation at nontoxic, pharmacokinetically achievable concentrations. 33 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  9. New approaches to DNA damage and repair: the ultraviolet light example

    SciTech Connect

    Haseltine, W.A.; Gordon, L.K.; Lindan, C.; Lippke, J.; Brash, D.; Lo, K.M.; Royer-Pokora, B.

    1982-01-01

    DNA fragments of defined sequence are used as probes to study DNA damage and repair. The case of ultraviolet light is presented and includes the following: (a) Description of the distribution of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers within defined DNA sequences. Considerations of the effect of neighboring base composition, dose rate, and double- or single-stranded property of the DNA are discussed. (b) Dissection of the anatomy of the incision event and subsequent repair steps. A three-step incision model for repair of cyclobutane dimers by the Micrococcus luteus repair enzymes will be presented. The steps are (1) recognition of the lesion and N-glycosylase scission, (2) cleavage of the phosphodiester bond 3' to the newly created apyrimidinic site, and (3) scission of the apyrimidinic sugar on the 5' side. (c) Use of human alphoid sequences as indicators of DNA damage in intact human cells. (d) Biological significance of a novel ultraviolet light-induced photoproduct. This photoproduct occurs at pyrimidine-cytosine sequences and may have a significant biological role.

  10. Distinct Roles of FANCO/RAD51C Protein in DNA Damage Signaling and Repair

    PubMed Central

    Somyajit, Kumar; Subramanya, Shreelakshmi; Nagaraju, Ganesh

    2012-01-01

    RAD51C, a RAD51 paralog, has been implicated in homologous recombination (HR), and germ line mutations in RAD51C are known to cause Fanconi anemia (FA)-like disorder and breast and ovarian cancers. The role of RAD51C in the FA pathway of DNA interstrand cross-link (ICL) repair and as a tumor suppressor is obscure. Here, we report that RAD51C deficiency leads to ICL sensitivity, chromatid-type errors, and G2/M accumulation, which are hallmarks of the FA phenotype. We find that RAD51C is dispensable for ICL unhooking and FANCD2 monoubiquitination but is essential for HR, confirming the downstream role of RAD51C in ICL repair. Furthermore, we demonstrate that RAD51C plays a vital role in the HR-mediated repair of DNA lesions associated with replication. Finally, we show that RAD51C participates in ICL and double strand break-induced DNA damage signaling and controls intra-S-phase checkpoint through CHK2 activation. Our analyses with pathological mutants of RAD51C that were identified in FA and breast and ovarian cancers reveal that RAD51C regulates HR and DNA damage signaling distinctly. Together, these results unravel the critical role of RAD51C in the FA pathway of ICL repair and as a tumor suppressor. PMID:22167183

  11. Mammalian cell DNA damage and repair kinetics of monohaloacetic acid drinking water disinfection by-products.

    PubMed

    Komaki, Yukako; Pals, Justin; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Mariñas, Benito J; Plewa, Michael J

    2009-11-01

    Haloacetic acids (HAAs) are the second most common class of chlorinated water disinfection by-products (DBPs). The single cell gel electrophoresis genotoxicity assay using Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells was modified to include liquid holding recovery time to measure genomic DNA damage and repair kinetics of three monoHAAs: chloroacetic acid (CAA), bromoacetic acid (BAA), and iodoacetic acid (IAA). The rank order of genotoxic potency was IAA > BAA > CAA from previous research. The concentration of each HAA was chosen to generate approximately the same level of genotoxic damage. No cytotoxicity was expressed during the 24 h liquid holding period. Nuclei from CHO cells treated with BAA showed the lowest rate of DNA repair (t(50) = 296 min) compared to that of CAA or IAA (t(50) = 134 and 84 min, respectively). The different rates of genomic repair expressed by IAA or CAA versus BAA suggest that different distributions of DNA lesions are induced. The use of DNA repair coupled with genomic technologies may lead to the understanding of the biological and genetic mechanisms involved in toxic responses induced by DBPs.

  12. Rotator Interval Lesion and Damaged Subscapularis Tendon Repair in a High School Baseball Player

    PubMed Central

    Muto, Tomoyuki; Ninomiya, Hiroki; Inui, Hiroaki; Komai, Masahiko; Nobuhara, Katsuya

    2015-01-01

    In 2013, a 16-year-old baseball pitcher visited Nobuhara Hospital complaining of shoulder pain and limited range of motion in his throwing shoulder. High signal intensity in the rotator interval (RI) area (ball sign), injured subscapularis tendon, and damage to both the superior and middle glenohumeral ligaments were identified using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Repair of the RI lesion and partially damaged subscapularis tendon was performed in this pitcher. During surgery, an opened RI and dropping of the subscapularis tendon were observed. The RI was closed in a 90° externally rotated and abducted position. To reconfirm the exact repaired state of the patient, arthroscopic examination was performed from behind. However, suture points were not visible in the >30° externally rotated position, which indicates that the RI could not be correctly repaired with the arthroscopic procedure. One year after surgery, the patient obtained full function of the shoulder and returned to play at a national convention. Surgical repair of the RI lesion should be performed in exactly the correct position of the upper extremity. PMID:26618017

  13. Use of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to measure DNA damage and repair

    SciTech Connect

    Scicchitano, D.A. New York Univ., New York )

    1991-03-11

    A method is described here for the analysis of single-strand break formation and repair in genomic DNA. The procedure involves exposing cells to a DNA-damaging agent, allowing time for recovery, and embedding the cells in agarose. After lysis and digestion with a protease, the DNA, which remains in the agarose plug, is denatured with glyoxal and separated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The DNA in the gel is then transferred to a support membrane and quantitated with a radioanalytic imaging system to determine the average size of the DNA at each time point of recovery. The results indicate that the repair of methyl-induced breaks in total genomic DNA is approximately 80% complete in 48 hr in CHO B11 and ARL 14 cells exposed to dimethyl sulfate. These results are in agreement with those obtained by using other techniques like alkaline sucrose sedimentation. The method developed and described here has several advantages over existing techniques for repair measurements: It can be used to monitor genotoxic agents that nick DNA, to study the removal of breaks from genomic DNA, and to test for repair of damage in specific domains of chromatin that would be too large to examine by conventional electrophoresis.

  14. DNA Damage Response and DNA Repair in Skeletal Myocytes From a Mouse Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy.

    PubMed

    Fayzullina, Saniya; Martin, Lee J

    2016-09-01

    We studied DNA damage response (DDR) and DNA repair capacities of skeletal muscle cells from a mouse model of infantile spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) caused by loss-of-function mutation of survival of motor neuron (Smn). Primary myocyte cultures derived from skeletal muscle satellite cells of neonatal control and mutant SMN mice had similar myotube length, myonuclei, satellite cell marker Pax7 and differentiated myotube marker myosin, and acetylcholine receptor clustering. DNA damage was induced in differentiated skeletal myotubes by γ-irradiation, etoposide, and methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). Unexposed control and SMA myotubes had stable genome integrity. After γ-irradiation and etoposide, myotubes repaired most DNA damage equally. Control and mutant myotubes exposed to MMS exhibited equivalent DNA damage without repair. Control and SMA myotube nuclei contained DDR proteins phospho-p53 and phospho-H2AX foci that, with DNA damage, dispersed and then re-formed similarly after recovery. We conclude that mouse primary satellite cell-derived myotubes effectively respond to and repair DNA strand-breaks, while DNA alkylation repair is underrepresented. Morphological differentiation, genome stability, genome sensor, and DNA strand-break repair potential are preserved in mouse SMA myocytes; thus, reduced SMN does not interfere with myocyte differentiation, genome integrity, and DNA repair, and faulty DNA repair is unlikely pathogenic in SMA. © 2016 American Association of Neuropathologists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. DNA Damage Response and DNA Repair in Skeletal Myocytes From a Mouse Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Fayzullina, Saniya

    2016-01-01

    We studied DNA damage response (DDR) and DNA repair capacities of skeletal muscle cells from a mouse model of infantile spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) caused by loss-of-function mutation of survival of motor neuron (Smn). Primary myocyte cultures derived from skeletal muscle satellite cells of neonatal control and mutant SMN mice had similar myotube length, myonuclei, satellite cell marker Pax7 and differentiated myotube marker myosin, and acetylcholine receptor clustering. DNA damage was induced in differentiated skeletal myotubes by γ-irradiation, etoposide, and methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). Unexposed control and SMA myotubes had stable genome integrity. After γ-irradiation and etoposide, myotubes repaired most DNA damage equally. Control and mutant myotubes exposed to MMS exhibited equivalent DNA damage without repair. Control and SMA myotube nuclei contained DDR proteins phospho-p53 and phospho-H2AX foci that, with DNA damage, dispersed and then re-formed similarly after recovery. We conclude that mouse primary satellite cell-derived myotubes effectively respond to and repair DNA strand-breaks, while DNA alkylation repair is underrepresented. Morphological differentiation, genome stability, genome sensor, and DNA strand-break repair potential are preserved in mouse SMA myocytes; thus, reduced SMN does not interfere with myocyte differentiation, genome integrity, and DNA repair, and faulty DNA repair is unlikely pathogenic in SMA. PMID:27452406

  16. Low velocity impact response and damage evolution in unreinforced resin systems and self-repairing polymer matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motuku, Molefi

    The low velocity impact response and damage evolution in unreinforced polymer matrices, conventional polymer matrix composites, and self-repairing polymer matrix composites was investigated. The impact response study of unreinforced matrices and conventional laminates was undertaken because the failure initiation energies, threshold energy levels, failure characteristics and damage evolution in both the matrix material (unreinforced resin plaques) and the composite are intrinsic to proper design of a self-repairing composite. The self-repairing concept was investigated due to its attractive potential to alleviate damage problems in polymer matrix composites. Self-repairing composites, which fall under the category of passive smart polymer composites, have the potential to self repair both micro- and macro-damage resulting from impacts as well as non-impact loading. The self-repairing mechanism is achieved through the incorporation of hollow fibers in addition to the normal solid reinforcing fibers. The hollow fibers store the damage-repairing solution or chemicals that are released into the matrix or damaged zone upon fiber failure to repair and/or arrest damage progression. The room temperature low velocity impact response and damage evolution in DERAKANE 411-350 and 411-C50 vinyl ester unreinforced resin systems was investigated as a function of impact energy level, sample thickness, matrix material and catalyst system. The low velocity impact response of conventional and self-repairing glass reinforced polymer composites was investigated by addressing the fabrication and some of the parameters that influence their response to low velocity impact loading. Specific issues addressed by this study include developing a process to fabricate self-repairing laminates, processing quality; selection of storage material for the repairing solution; release and transportation of repairing solution; the effect of the number, type and spatial distribution of the repairing

  17. Estimation of oxidative DNA damage in man from urinary excretion of repair products.

    PubMed

    Loft, S; Poulsen, H E

    1998-01-01

    DNA is constantly damaged and repaired in living cells. The repair products of the oxidative DNA lesions, i.e. oxidised nucleosides and bases, are poor substrates for the enzymes involved in nucleotide synthesis, are fairly water soluble, and generally excreted into the urine without further metabolism. Among the possible products, 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine, 8-oxoguanine, thymine glycol, thymidine glycol and, 5-hydroxymethyluracil have so far been identified in urine. It should be emphasised that the excretion of the repair products in urine represents the average rate of damage in the total body whereas the level of oxidised bases in nuclear DNA is a concentration measurement in that specific tissue/cells in the moment of sampling. The rate of oxidative DNA modifications has been studied in humans by means of the repair products as urinary biomarkers, particularly with respect to 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine. The data obtained so far indicate that the important determinants of the oxidative damage rate include tobacco smoking, oxygen consumption and some inflammatory diseases whereas diet composition, energy restriction and antioxidant supplements have but a minimal influence, possibly with the exception of yet unidentified phytochemicals, e.g. from cruciferous vegetables. The data are consistent with the experimentally based notion that oxidative DNA damage is an important mutagenic and apparently carcinogenic factor. However, the proof of a causal relationship in humans is still warranted. In the future the use of biomarkers may provide this evidence and allow further investigations on the qualitative and quantitative importance of oxidative DNA modification and carcinogenesis in man, as well as elucidate possible preventive measures.

  18. Current Procedures for Assessment of Battle-Damage Repair of Fixed-Wing Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    addition of ABDR Engineering training which focuses on thin-walled structural analysis and fastened joint design. ABDR engineers are typically assigned...Sheet metal thickness gauge – necessary for accurate measurement of skin panels. • Blind rivet depth gauge – necessary to prescribe the proper...Further damage  Accomplish Designated Missions  Contribute to the Battle  Deferment of Repairs for a “One Time” Flight or Self Recovery

  19. Measurement of oxidatively induced DNA damage and its repair, by mass spectrometric techniques.

    PubMed

    Dizdaroglu, M; Coskun, E; Jaruga, P

    2015-05-01

    Oxidatively induced damage caused by free radicals and other DNA-damaging agents generate a plethora of products in the DNA of living organisms. There is mounting evidence for the involvement of this type of damage in the etiology of numerous diseases including carcinogenesis. For a thorough understanding of the mechanisms, cellular repair, and biological consequences of DNA damage, accurate measurement of resulting products must be achieved. There are various analytical techniques, with their own advantages and drawbacks, which can be used for this purpose. Mass spectrometric techniques with isotope dilution, which include gas chromatography (GC) and liquid chromatography (LC), provide structural elucidation of products and ascertain accurate quantification, which are absolutely necessary for reliable measurement. Both gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) or liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), in single or tandem versions, have been used for the measurement of numerous DNA products such as sugar and base lesions, 8,5'-cyclopurine-2'-deoxynucleosides, base-base tandem lesions, and DNA-protein crosslinks, in vitro and in vivo. This article reviews these techniques and their applications in the measurement of oxidatively induced DNA damage and its repair.

  20. DNA Damage and Repair in Plants under Ultraviolet and Ionizing Radiations

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Sarvajeet S.; Gill, Ritu; Jha, Manoranjan; Tuteja, Narendra

    2015-01-01

    Being sessile, plants are continuously exposed to DNA-damaging agents present in the environment such as ultraviolet (UV) and ionizing radiations (IR). Sunlight acts as an energy source for photosynthetic plants; hence, avoidance of UV radiations (namely, UV-A, 315–400 nm; UV-B, 280–315 nm; and UV-C, <280 nm) is unpreventable. DNA in particular strongly absorbs UV-B; therefore, it is the most important target for UV-B induced damage. On the other hand, IR causes water radiolysis, which generates highly reactive hydroxyl radicals (OH•) and causes radiogenic damage to important cellular components. However, to maintain genomic integrity under UV/IR exposure, plants make use of several DNA repair mechanisms. In the light of recent breakthrough, the current minireview (a) introduces UV/IR and overviews UV/IR-mediated DNA damage products and (b) critically discusses the biochemistry and genetics of major pathways responsible for the repair of UV/IR-accrued DNA damage. The outcome of the discussion may be helpful in devising future research in the current context. PMID:25729769

  1. DNA damage and repair in plants under ultraviolet and ionizing radiations.

    PubMed

    Gill, Sarvajeet S; Anjum, Naser A; Gill, Ritu; Jha, Manoranjan; Tuteja, Narendra

    2015-01-01

    Being sessile, plants are continuously exposed to DNA-damaging agents present in the environment such as ultraviolet (UV) and ionizing radiations (IR). Sunlight acts as an energy source for photosynthetic plants; hence, avoidance of UV radiations (namely, UV-A, 315-400 nm; UV-B, 280-315 nm; and UV-C, <280 nm) is unpreventable. DNA in particular strongly absorbs UV-B; therefore, it is the most important target for UV-B induced damage. On the other hand, IR causes water radiolysis, which generates highly reactive hydroxyl radicals (OH(•)) and causes radiogenic damage to important cellular components. However, to maintain genomic integrity under UV/IR exposure, plants make use of several DNA repair mechanisms. In the light of recent breakthrough, the current minireview (a) introduces UV/IR and overviews UV/IR-mediated DNA damage products and (b) critically discusses the biochemistry and genetics of major pathways responsible for the repair of UV/IR-accrued DNA damage. The outcome of the discussion may be helpful in devising future research in the current context.

  2. SUMOylation of xeroderma pigmentosum group C protein regulates DNA damage recognition during nucleotide excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Akita, Masaki; Tak, Yon-Soo; Shimura, Tsutomu; Matsumoto, Syota; Okuda-Shimizu, Yuki; Shimizu, Yuichiro; Nishi, Ryotaro; Saitoh, Hisato; Iwai, Shigenori; Mori, Toshio; Ikura, Tsuyoshi; Sakai, Wataru; Hanaoka, Fumio; Sugasawa, Kaoru

    2015-01-01

    The xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XPC) protein complex is a key factor that detects DNA damage and initiates nucleotide excision repair (NER) in mammalian cells. Although biochemical and structural studies have elucidated the interaction of XPC with damaged DNA, the mechanism of its regulation in vivo remains to be understood in more details. Here, we show that the XPC protein undergoes modification by small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) proteins and the lack of this modification compromises the repair of UV-induced DNA photolesions. In the absence of SUMOylation, XPC is normally recruited to the sites with photolesions, but then immobilized profoundly by the UV-damaged DNA-binding protein (UV-DDB) complex. Since the absence of UV-DDB alleviates the NER defect caused by impaired SUMOylation of XPC, we propose that this modification is critical for functional interactions of XPC with UV-DDB, which facilitate the efficient damage handover between the two damage recognition factors and subsequent initiation of NER. PMID:26042670

  3. Autophagy confers DNA damage repair pathways to protect the hematopoietic system from nuclear radiation injury

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Weiwei; Yuan, Na; Wang, Zhen; Cao, Yan; Fang, Yixuan; Li, Xin; Xu, Fei; Song, Lin; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Han; Yan, Lili; Xu, Li; Zhang, Xiaoying; Zhang, Suping; Wang, Jianrong

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is essentially a metabolic process, but its in vivo role in nuclear radioprotection remains unexplored. We observed that ex vivo autophagy activation reversed the proliferation inhibition, apoptosis, and DNA damage in irradiated hematopoietic cells. In vivo autophagy activation improved bone marrow cellularity following nuclear radiation exposure. In contrast, defective autophagy in the hematopoietic conditional mouse model worsened the hematopoietic injury, reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and DNA damage caused by nuclear radiation exposure. Strikingly, in vivo defective autophagy caused an absence or reduction in regulatory proteins critical to both homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) DNA damage repair pathways, as well as a failure to induce these proteins in response to nuclear radiation. In contrast, in vivo autophagy activation increased most of these proteins in hematopoietic cells. DNA damage assays confirmed the role of in vivo autophagy in the resolution of double-stranded DNA breaks in total bone marrow cells as well as bone marrow stem and progenitor cells upon whole body irradiation. Hence, autophagy protects the hematopoietic system against nuclear radiation injury by conferring and intensifying the HR and NHEJ DNA damage repair pathways and by removing ROS and inhibiting apoptosis. PMID:26197097

  4. ATM-dependent chromatin remodeler Rsf-1 facilitates DNA damage checkpoints and homologous recombination repair.

    PubMed

    Min, Sunwoo; Jo, Sujin; Lee, Ho-Soo; Chae, Sunyoung; Lee, Jong-Soo; Ji, Jae-Hoon; Cho, Hyeseong

    2014-01-01

    As a member of imitation switch (ISWI) family in ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factors, RSF complex consists of SNF2h ATPase and Rsf-1. Although it has been reported that SNF2h ATPase is recruited to DNA damage sites (DSBs) in a poly(ADP-ribosyl) polymerase 1 (PARP1)-dependent manner in DNA damage response (DDR), the function of Rsf-1 is still elusive. Here we show that Rsf-1 is recruited to DSBs confirmed by various cellular analyses. Moreover, the initial recruitment of Rsf-1 and SNF2h to DSBs shows faster kinetics than that of γH2AX after micro-irradiation. Signals of Rsf-1 and SNF2h are retained over 30 min after micro-irradiation, whereas γH2AX signals are gradually reduced at 10 min. In addition, Rsf-1 is accumulated at DSBs in ATM-dependent manner, and the putative pSQ motifs of Rsf-1 by ATM are required for its accumulation at DSBs. Furtheremore, depletion of Rsf-1 attenuates the activation of DNA damage checkpoint signals and cell survival upon DNA damage. Finally, we demonstrate that Rsf-1 promotes homologous recombination repair (HRR) by recruiting resection factors RPA32 and Rad51. Thus, these findings reveal a new function of chromatin remodeler Rsf-1 as a guard in DNA damage checkpoints and homologous recombination repair.

  5. Rhein Inhibits AlkB Repair Enzymes and Sensitizes Cells to Methylated DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Huang, Yue; Liu, Xichun; Gan, Jianhua; Chen, Hao; Yang, Cai-Guang

    2016-05-20

    The AlkB repair enzymes, including Escherichia coli AlkB and two human homologues, ALKBH2 and ALKBH3, are iron(II)- and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases that efficiently repair N(1)-methyladenine and N(3)-methylcytosine methylated DNA damages. The development of small molecule inhibitors of these enzymes has seen less success. Here we have characterized a previously discovered natural product rhein and tested its ability to inhibit AlkB repair enzymes in vitro and to sensitize cells to methyl methane sulfonate that mainly produces N(1)-methyladenine and N(3)-methylcytosine lesions. Our investigation of the mechanism of rhein inhibition reveals that rhein binds to AlkB repair enzymes in vitro and promotes thermal stability in vivo In addition, we have determined a new structural complex of rhein bound to AlkB, which shows that rhein binds to a different part of the active site in AlkB than it binds to in fat mass and obesity-associated protein (FTO). With the support of these observations, we put forth the hypothesis that AlkB repair enzymes would be effective pharmacological targets for cancer treatment.

  6. The Ino80 chromatin-remodeling complex restores chromatin structure during UV DNA damage repair

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Sovan; Kiely, Rhian

    2010-01-01

    Chromatin structure is modulated during deoxyribonucleic acid excision repair, but how this is achieved is unclear. Loss of the yeast Ino80 chromatin-remodeling complex (Ino80-C) moderately sensitizes cells to ultraviolet (UV) light. In this paper, we show that INO80 acts in the same genetic pathway as nucleotide excision repair (NER) and that the Ino80-C contributes to efficient UV photoproduct removal in a region of high nucleosome occupancy. Moreover, Ino80 interacts with the early NER damage recognition complex Rad4–Rad23 and is recruited to chromatin by Rad4 in a UV damage–dependent manner. Using a modified chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, we find that chromatin disruption during UV lesion repair is normal, whereas the restoration of nucleosome structure is defective in ino80 mutant cells. Collectively, our work suggests that Ino80 is recruited to sites of UV lesion repair through interactions with the NER apparatus and is required for the restoration of chromatin structure after repair. PMID:21135142

  7. DNA damage and repair in white blood cells at occupational exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgieva, R. T.; Zaharieva, E. K.; Rupova, I. M.; Acheva, A. R.; Nikolov, V. N.

    2008-02-01

    : The present work was aimed at finding appropriate biomarkers applicable in molecular epidemiological surveys of occupationally exposed individuals and/or population in order to prove low dose effects. Blood samples were taken from NPP workers, in the 'strict regimen' area (exposed group) and from the administration staff (control group). The spontaneous and induced (exposed to a challenge dose of 2,0 Gy gamma irradiation) DNA repair synthesis in leucocytes, the level of DNA damage by single cell gel-electrophoresis in lymphocytes and the concentration of malonedialdehyde in blood serum, were analyzed. A significant decrease of potentially lethal damage in leucocytes as well as reduction of DNA double strand breaks level in lymphocytes of persons with 'mean annual dose' lower or equal to 5 mSv/a was found, compared to the control group. A higher repair capacity corresponding to elevated protein synthesis after a challenging dose of 2,0 Gy gamma rays and a significant decrease in the level of oxidative stress in the blood plasma were established in persons from the same group. The present investigation showed that annual doses not higher than twice the natural radiation background exert positive effects on DNA damage and repair, increase cellular resistance and decrease oxidative stress.

  8. Enhanced nucleotide excision repair capacity in lung cancer cells by preconditioning with DNA-damaging agents.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji Ye; Park, Jeong-Min; Yi, Joo Mi; Leem, Sun-Hee; Kang, Tae-Hong

    2015-09-08

    The capacity of tumor cells for nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a major determinant of the efficacy of and resistance to DNA-damaging chemotherapeutics, such as cisplatin. Here, we demonstrate that using lesion-specific monoclonal antibodies, NER capacity is enhanced in human lung cancer cells after preconditioning with DNA-damaging agents. Preconditioning of cells with a nonlethal dose of UV radiation facilitated the kinetics of subsequent cisplatin repair and vice versa. Dual-incision assay confirmed that the enhanced NER capacity was sustained for 2 days. Checkpoint activation by ATR kinase and expression of NER factors were not altered significantly by the preconditioning, whereas association of XPA, the rate-limiting factor in NER, with chromatin was accelerated. In preconditioned cells, SIRT1 expression was increased, and this resulted in a decrease in acetylated XPA. Inhibition of SIRT1 abrogated the preconditioning-induced predominant XPA binding to DNA lesions. Taking these data together, we conclude that upregulated NER capacity in preconditioned lung cancer cells is caused partly by an increased level of SIRT1, which modulates XPA sensitivity to DNA damage. This study provides some insights into the molecular mechanism of chemoresistance through acquisition of enhanced DNA repair capacity in cancer cells.

  9. Repair of Alkylation Damage in Eukaryotic Chromatin Depends on Searching Ability of Alkyladenine DNA Glycosylase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaru; O'Brien, Patrick J

    2015-11-20

    Human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) initiates the base excision repair pathway by excising alkylated and deaminated purine lesions. In vitro biochemical experiments demonstrate that AAG uses facilitated diffusion to efficiently search DNA to find rare sites of damage and suggest that electrostatic interactions are critical to the searching process. However, it remains an open question whether DNA searching limits the rate of DNA repair in vivo. We constructed AAG mutants with altered searching ability and measured their ability to protect yeast from alkylation damage in order to address this question. Each of the conserved arginine and lysine residues that are near the DNA binding interface were mutated, and the functional impacts were evaluated using kinetic and thermodynamic analysis. These mutations do not perturb catalysis of N-glycosidic bond cleavage, but they decrease the ability to capture rare lesion sites. Nonspecific and specific DNA binding properties are closely correlated, suggesting that the electrostatic interactions observed in the specific recognition complex are similarly important for DNA searching complexes. The ability of the mutant proteins to complement repair-deficient yeast cells is positively correlated with the ability of the proteins to search DNA in vitro, suggesting that cellular resistance to DNA alkylation is governed by the ability to find and efficiently capture cytotoxic lesions. It appears that chromosomal access is not restricted and toxic sites of alkylation damage are readily accessible to a searching protein.

  10. Single-hit potentially lethal damage: evidence of its repair in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Utsumi, H.; Hill, C.K.; Ben-Hur, E.; Elkind, M.M.

    1981-09-01

    Following mid to large doses of X rays, or of fission spectrum neutrons, the repair of potentially lethal damage in V79 Chinese hamster cells can be inhibited by anisotonic phosphate-buffered saline or by medium containing 90% D/sub 2/O. The foregoing post-treatments do not affect the viability of unirradiated cells. Using single synchronized cells irradiated in late S-phase, the most resistant phase of the cell cycle, repair of potentially lethal damage in late S-phase, the most resistant phase of the cell cycle, repair of potentially lethal damage in the single-hit, initially exponential, or small-dose part of the survival curve was examined. The use of synchronized cells avoids misinterpretations due to population heterogeneity. The slope of the small-dose, exponential region of the neutron survival curve is much steeper than that of the x-ray survival curve. Even so, it is demonstrated with post-treatments consisting of hypertonic phosphate-buffered saline, medium containing D/sub 2/O,adiation is connected with their proliferation but not with the migration out from lymphoid organs.

  11. Comparative DNA damage and repair in echinoderm coelomocytes exposed to genotoxicants.

    PubMed

    El-Bibany, Ameena H; Bodnar, Andrea G; Reinardy, Helena C

    2014-01-01

    The capacity to withstand and repair DNA damage differs among species and plays a role in determining an organism's resistance to genotoxicity, life history, and susceptibility to disease. Environmental stressors that affect organisms at the genetic level are of particular concern in ecotoxicology due to the potential for chronic effects and trans-generational impacts on populations. Echinoderms are valuable organisms to study the relationship between DNA repair and resistance to genotoxic stress due to their history and use as ecotoxicological models, little evidence of senescence, and few reported cases of neoplasia. Coelomocytes (immune cells) have been proposed to serve as sensitive bioindicators of environmental stress and are often used to assess genotoxicity; however, little is known about how coelomocytes from different echinoderm species respond to genotoxic stress. In this study, DNA damage was assessed (by Fast Micromethod) in coelomocytes of four echinoderm species (sea urchins Lytechinus variegatus, Echinometra lucunter lucunter, and Tripneustes ventricosus, and a sea cucumber Isostichopus badionotus) after acute exposure to H2O2 (0-100 mM) and UV-C (0-9999 J/m2), and DNA repair was analyzed over a 24-hour period of recovery. Results show that coelomocytes from all four echinoderm species have the capacity to repair both UV-C and H2O2-induced DNA damage; however, there were differences in repair capacity between species. At 24 hours following exposure to the highest concentration of H2O2 (100 mM) and highest dose of UV-C (9999 J/m2) cell viability remained high (>94.6 ± 1.2%) but DNA repair ranged from 18.2 ± 9.2% to 70.8 ± 16.0% for H2O2 and 8.4 ± 3.2% to 79.8 ± 9.0% for UV-C exposure. Species-specific differences in genotoxic susceptibility and capacity for DNA repair are important to consider when evaluating ecogenotoxicological model organisms and assessing overall impacts of genotoxicants in the environment.

  12. Comparative DNA Damage and Repair in Echinoderm Coelomocytes Exposed to Genotoxicants

    PubMed Central

    El-Bibany, Ameena H.; Bodnar, Andrea G.; Reinardy, Helena C.

    2014-01-01

    The capacity to withstand and repair DNA damage differs among species and plays a role in determining an organism's resistance to genotoxicity, life history, and susceptibility to disease. Environmental stressors that affect organisms at the genetic level are of particular concern in ecotoxicology due to the potential for chronic effects and trans-generational impacts on populations. Echinoderms are valuable organisms to study the relationship between DNA repair and resistance to genotoxic stress due to their history and use as ecotoxicological models, little evidence of senescence, and few reported cases of neoplasia. Coelomocytes (immune cells) have been proposed to serve as sensitive bioindicators of environmental stress and are often used to assess genotoxicity; however, little is known about how coelomocytes from different echinoderm species respond to genotoxic stress. In this study, DNA damage was assessed (by Fast Micromethod) in coelomocytes of four echinoderm species (sea urchins Lytechinus variegatus, Echinometra lucunter lucunter, and Tripneustes ventricosus, and a sea cucumber Isostichopus badionotus) after acute exposure to H2O2 (0–100 mM) and UV-C (0–9999 J/m2), and DNA repair was analyzed over a 24-hour period of recovery. Results show that coelomocytes from all four echinoderm species have the capacity to repair both UV-C and H2O2-induced DNA damage; however, there were differences in repair capacity between species. At 24 hours following exposure to the highest concentration of H2O2 (100 mM) and highest dose of UV-C (9999 J/m2) cell viability remained high (>94.6±1.2%) but DNA repair ranged from 18.2±9.2% to 70.8±16.0% for H2O2 and 8.4±3.2% to 79.8±9.0% for UV-C exposure. Species-specific differences in genotoxic susceptibility and capacity for DNA repair are important to consider when evaluating ecogenotoxicological model organisms and assessing overall impacts of genotoxicants in the environment. PMID:25229547

  13. Targeted detection of in vivo endogenous DNA base damage reveals preferential base excision repair in the transcribed strand

    PubMed Central

    Reis, António M. C.; Mills, Wilbur K.; Ramachandran, Ilangovan; Friedberg, Errol C.; Thompson, David; Queimado, Lurdes

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous DNA damage is removed mainly via base excision repair (BER), however, whether there is preferential strand repair of endogenous DNA damage is still under intense debate. We developed a highly sensitive primer-anchored DNA damage detection assay (PADDA) to map and quantify in vivo endogenous DNA damage. Using PADDA, we documented significantly higher levels of endogenous damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells in stationary phase than in exponential phase. We also documented that yeast BER-defective cells have significantly higher levels of endogenous DNA damage than isogenic wild-type cells at any phase of growth. PADDA provided detailed fingerprint analysis at the single-nucleotide level, documenting for the first time that persistent endogenous nucleotide damage in CAN1 co-localizes with previously reported spontaneous CAN1 mutations. To quickly and reliably quantify endogenous strand-specific DNA damage in the constitutively expressed CAN1 gene, we used PADDA on a real-time PCR setting. We demonstrate that wild-type cells repair endogenous damage preferentially on the CAN1 transcribed strand. In contrast, yeast BER-defective cells accumulate endogenous damage preferentially on the CAN1 transcribed strand. These data provide the first direct evidence for preferential strand repair of endogenous DNA damage and documents the major role of BER in this process. PMID:21911361

  14. Water extracts of tree Hypericum sps. protect DNA from oxidative and alkylating damage and enhance DNA repair in colon cells.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Alice A; Marques, Filipe; Fernandes-Ferreira, Manuel; Pereira-Wilson, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Diet may induce colon carcinogenesis through oxidative or alkylating DNA damage. However, diet may also contain anticarcinogenic compounds that contribute to cancer prevention. DNA damage prevention and/or induction of repair are two important mechanisms involved in cancer chemoprevention by dietary compounds. Hypericum sps. are widely used in traditional medicine to prepare infusions due to their beneficial digestive and neurologic effects. In this study, we investigated the potential of water extracts from three Hypericum sps. and some of their main phenolic compounds to prevent and repair oxidative and alkylating DNA damage in colon cells. The results showed that water extracts of Hypericum perforatum, Hypericum androsaemum, Hypericum undulatum, quercetin and rutin have protective effect against oxidative DNA damage in HT29 cells. Protective effect was also observed against alkylating DNA damage induced by methyl-methanesulfonate, except for H. androsaemum. With regard to alkylating damage repair H. perforatum, H. androsaemum and chlorogenic acid increased repair of alkylating DNA damage by base excision repair pathway. No effect was observed on nucleotide excision repair pathway. Antigenotoxic effects of Hypericum sps. may contribute to colon cancer prevention and the high amount of phenolic compounds present in Hypericum sps. play an important role in DNA protective effects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Repair of DNA Damage Induced by the Cytidine Analog Zebularine Requires ATR and ATM in Arabidopsis[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chun-Hsin; Finke, Andreas; Díaz, Mariana; Rozhon, Wilfried; Poppenberger, Brigitte; Baubec, Tuncay; Pecinka, Ales

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage repair is an essential cellular mechanism that maintains genome stability. Here, we show that the nonmethylable cytidine analog zebularine induces a DNA damage response in Arabidopsis thaliana, independent of changes in DNA methylation. In contrast to genotoxic agents that induce damage in a cell cycle stage-independent manner, zebularine induces damage specifically during strand synthesis in DNA replication. The signaling of this damage is mediated by additive activity of ATAXIA TELANGIECTASIA MUTATED AND RAD3-RELATED and ATAXIA TELANGIECTASIA MUTATED kinases, which cause postreplicative cell cycle arrest and increased endoreplication. The repair requires a functional STRUCTURAL MAINTENANCE OF CHROMOSOMES5 (SMC5)-SMC6 complex and is accomplished predominantly by synthesis-dependent strand-annealing homologous recombination. Here, we provide insight into the response mechanism for coping with the genotoxic effects of zebularine and identify several components of the zebularine-induced DNA damage repair pathway. PMID:26023162

  16. DNA damage and repair in plants – from models to crops

    PubMed Central

    Manova, Vasilissa; Gruszka, Damian

    2015-01-01

    The genomic integrity of every organism is constantly challenged by endogenous and exogenous DNA-damaging factors. Mutagenic agents cause reduced stability of plant genome and have a deleterious effect on development, and in the case of crop species lead to yield reduction. It is crucial for all organisms, including plants, to develop efficient mechanisms for maintenance of the genome integrity. DNA repair processes have been characterized in bacterial, fungal, and mammalian model systems. The description of these processes in plants, in contrast, was initiated relatively recently and has been focused largely on the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Consequently, our knowledge about DNA repair in plant genomes - particularly in the genomes of crop plants - is by far more limited. However, the relatively small size of the Arabidopsis genome, its rapid life cycle and availability of various transformation methods make this species an attractive model for the study of eukaryotic DNA repair mechanisms and mutagenesis. Moreover, abnormalities in DNA repair which proved to be lethal for animal models are tolerated in plant genomes, although sensitivity to DNA damaging agents is retained. Due to the high conservation of DNA repair processes and factors mediating them among eukaryotes, genes and proteins that have been identified in model species may serve to identify homologous sequences in other species, including crop plants, in which these mechanisms are poorly understood. Crop breeding programs have provided remarkable advances in food quality and yield over the last century. Although the human population is predicted to “peak” by 2050, further advances in yield will be required to feed this population. Breeding requires genetic diversity. The biological impact of any mutagenic agent used for the creation of genetic diversity depends on the chemical nature of the induced lesions and on the efficiency and accuracy of their repair. More recent targeted mutagenesis

  17. Short dysfunctional telomeres impair the repair of arsenite-induced oxidative damage in mouse cells.

    PubMed

    Newman, Jennifer P A; Banerjee, Birendranath; Fang, Wanru; Poonepalli, Anuradha; Balakrishnan, Lakshmidevi; Low, Grace Kah Mun; Bhattacharjee, Rabindra N; Akira, Shizuo; Jayapal, Manikandan; Melendez, Alirio J; Baskar, Rajamanickam; Lee, Han-Woong; Hande, M Prakash

    2008-03-01

    Telomeres and telomerase appear to participate in the repair of broken DNA ends produced by oxidative damage. Arsenite is an environmental contaminant and a potent human carcinogen, which induces oxidative stress on cells via the generation of reactive oxygen species affecting cell viability and chromosome stability. It promotes telomere attrition and reduces cell survival by apoptosis. In this study, we used mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from mice lacking telomerase RNA component (mTERC(-/-) mice) with long (early passage or EP) and short (late passage or LP) telomeres to investigate the extent of oxidative damage by comparing the differences in DNA damage, chromosome instability, and cell survival at 24 and 48 h of exposure to sodium arsenite (As3+; NaAsO2). There was significantly high level of DNA damage in mTERC(-/-) cells with short telomeres as determined by alkaline comet assay. Consistent with elevated DNA damage, increased micronuclei (MN) induction reflecting gross genomic instability was also observed. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis revealed that increasing doses of arsenite augmented the chromosome aberrations, which contributes to genomic instability leading to possibly apoptotic cell death and cell cycle arrest. Microarray analysis has revealed that As3+ treatment altered the expression of 456 genes of which 20% of them have known functions in cell cycle and DNA damage signaling and response, cell growth, and/or maintenance. Results from our studies imply that short dysfunctional telomeres impair the repair of oxidative damage caused by arsenite. The results will have implications in risk estimation as well as cancer chemotherapy. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. [Study on repair capacity of DNA damage associated with chronic benzene poisoning].

    PubMed

    Xing, Cai-hong; Ji, Zhi-ying; Li, Gui-lan; Yin, Song-nian

    2006-07-01

    To explore the repair capacity of DNA damage associated with chronic benzene poisonings. 63 workers suffered from chronic benzene poisonings and 45 workers exposed to benzene, who were engaged in the same job title, were investigated. Comet assay and cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) detection were used to evaluate gamma-radiation-induced DNA and chromosomal damage and repair capacity in peripheral blood lymphocyte. The comet tail length difference of the benzene poisoning group (4.64 +/- 1.57 microm) was significantly higher than that of the control group (3.77 +/- 1.30 microm) (P = 0.0029). There was no significant difference of the 3AB index between the poisoning group and the control group. The relative risk of benzene poisoning in the subject with comet tail length difference > 3.81 was significantly higher than that in the subject with comet tail length difference < or = 3.81 microm (OR = 2.490, 95% CI:1.068 - 5.806, P = 0.0346). The relative risk increased along with the comet tail length difference, and the trend was significant (P = 0.0024). There was no significant difference between the relative risk of benzene poisoning in the subject with 3AB index < 0.20 and that in the subject with 3AB index > or = 0.20. DNA repair capacity on DNA-strand level might tightly associate with chronic benzene poisoning. The DNA repair capacity on DNA-strand level would be worse, and the benzene poisoning risk could be higher. There was no clear relation between the DNA repair capacity on chromosome level and the benzene poisoning risk.

  19. Elevated level of acetylation of APE1 in tumor cells modulates DNA damage repair

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Shiladitya; Mantha, Anil K.; Song, Heyu; Roychoudhury, Shrabasti; Nath, Somsubhra; Ray, Sutapa; Bhakat, Kishor K.

    2016-01-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites are frequently generated in the genome by spontaneous depurination/depyrimidination or after removal of oxidized/modified bases by DNA glycosylases during the base excision repair (BER) pathway. Unrepaired AP sites are mutagenic and block DNA replication and transcription. The primary enzyme to repair AP sites in mammalian cells is AP endonuclease (APE1), which plays a key role in this repair pathway. Although overexpression of APE1 in diverse cancer types and its association with chemotherapeutic resistance are well documented, alteration of posttranslational modification of APE1 and modulation of its functions during tumorigenesis are largely unknown. Here, we show that both classical histone deacetylase HDAC1 and NAD+-dependent deacetylase SIRT1 regulate acetylation level of APE1 and acetylation of APE1 enhances its AP-endonuclease activity both in vitro and in cells. Modulation of APE1 acetylation level in cells alters AP site repair capacity of the cell extracts in vitro. Primary tumor tissues of diverse cancer types have higher level of acetylated APE1 (AcAPE1) compared to adjacent non-tumor tissue and exhibit enhanced AP site repair capacity. Importantly, in the absence of APE1 acetylation, cells accumulate AP sites in the genome and show increased sensitivity to DNA damaging agents. Together, our study demonstrates that elevation of acetylation level of APE1 in tumor could be a novel mechanism by which cells handle the elevated levels of DNA damages in response to genotoxic stress and maintain sustained proliferation. PMID:27655688

  20. SNF2H interacts with XRCC1 and is involved in repair of H2O2-induced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Yoshiko; Shimizu, Shinji; Yasuhira, Shinji; Horiuchi, Saburo

    2016-07-01

    The protein XRCC1 has no inherent enzymatic activity, and is believed to function in base excision repair as a dedicated scaffold component that coordinates other DNA repair factors. Repair foci clearly represent the recruitment and accumulation of DNA repair factors at sites of damage; however, uncertainties remain regarding their organization in the context of nuclear architecture and their biological significance. Here we identified the chromatin remodeling factor SNF2H/SMARCA5 as a novel binding partner of XRCC1, with their interaction dependent on the casein kinase 2-mediated constitutive phosphorylation of XRCC1. The proficiency of repairing H2O2-induced damage was strongly impaired by SNF2H knock-down, and similar impairment was observed with knock-down of both XRCC1 and SNF2H simultaneously, suggesting their role in a common repair pathway. Most SNF2H exists in the nuclear matrix fraction, forming salt extraction-resistant foci-like structures in unchallenged nuclei. Remarkably, damage-induced formation of both PAR and XRCC1 foci depended on SNF2H, and the PAR and XRCC1 foci co-localized with the SNF2H foci. We propose a model in which a base excision repair complex containing damaged chromatin is recruited to specific locations in the nuclear matrix for repair, with this recruitment mediated by XRCC1-SNF2H interaction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. DNA Damage Follows Repair Factor Depletion and Portends Genome Variation in Cancer Cells after Pore Migration.

    PubMed

    Irianto, Jerome; Xia, Yuntao; Pfeifer, Charlotte R; Athirasala, Avathamsa; Ji, Jiazheng; Alvey, Cory; Tewari, Manu; Bennett, Rachel R; Harding, Shane M; Liu, Andrea J; Greenberg, Roger A; Discher, Dennis E

    2017-01-23

    Migration through micron-size constrictions has been seen to rupture the nucleus, release nuclear-localized GFP, and cause localized accumulations of ectopic 53BP1-a DNA repair protein. Here, constricted migration of two human cancer cell types and primary mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) increases DNA breaks throughout the nucleoplasm as assessed by endogenous damage markers and by electrophoretic "comet" measurements. Migration also causes multiple DNA repair proteins to segregate away from DNA, with cytoplasmic mis-localization sustained for many hours as is relevant to delayed repair. Partial knockdown of repair factors that also regulate chromosome copy numbers is seen to increase DNA breaks in U2OS osteosarcoma cells without affecting migration and with nucleoplasmic patterns of damage similar to constricted migration. Such depletion also causes aberrant levels of DNA. Migration-induced nuclear damage is nonetheless reversible for wild-type and sub-cloned U2OS cells, except for lasting genomic differences between stable clones as revealed by DNA arrays and sequencing. Gains and losses of hundreds of megabases in many chromosomes are typical of the changes and heterogeneity in bone cancer. Phenotypic differences that arise from constricted migration of U2OS clones are further illustrated by a clone with a highly elongated and stable MSC-like shape that depends on microtubule assembly downstream of the transcription factor GATA4. Such changes are consistent with reversion to a more stem-like state upstream of cancerous osteoblastic cells. Migration-induced genomic instability can thus associate with heritable changes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A biophysical model of cell evolution after cytotoxic treatments: Damage, repair and cell response.

    PubMed

    Tomezak, M; Abbadie, C; Lartigau, E; Cleri, F

    2016-01-21

    We present a theoretical agent-based model of cell evolution under the action of cytotoxic treatments, such as radiotherapy or chemotherapy. The major features of cell cycle and proliferation, cell damage and repair, and chemical diffusion are included. Cell evolution is based on a discrete Markov chain, with cells stepping along a sequence of discrete internal states from 'normal' to 'inactive'. Probabilistic laws are introduced for each type of event a cell can undergo during its life: duplication, arrest, senescence, damage, reparation, or death. We adjust the model parameters on a series of cell irradiation experiments, carried out in a clinical LINAC, in which the damage and repair kinetics of single- and double-strand breaks are followed. Two showcase applications of the model are then presented. In the first one, we reconstruct the cell survival curves from a number of published low- and high-dose irradiation experiments. We reobtain a very good description of the data without assuming the well-known linear-quadratic model, but instead including a variable DSB repair probability. The repair capability of the model spontaneously saturates to an exponential decay at increasingly high doses. As a second test, we attempt to simulate the two extreme possibilities of the so-called 'bystander' effect in radiotherapy: the 'local' effect versus a 'global' effect, respectively activated by the short-range or long-range diffusion of some factor, presumably secreted by the irradiated cells. Even with an oversimplified simulation, we could demonstrate a sizeable difference in the proliferation rate of non-irradiated cells, the proliferation acceleration being much larger for the global than the local effect, for relatively small fractions of irradiated cells in the colony.

  3. RAD54 forms DNA repair foci in response to DNA damage in living plant cells.

    PubMed

    Hirakawa, Takeshi; Hasegawa, Junko; White, Charles I; Matsunaga, Sachihiro

    2017-02-02

    Plants have various defense mechanisms against environmental stresses that induce DNA damage. Genetic and biochemical analyses have revealed the sensing and signaling of DNA damage, but little is known about subnuclear dynamics in response to DNA damage in living plant cells. Here, we observed that the chromatin remodeling factor RAD54, which is involved in DNA repair via the homologous recombination pathway, formed subnuclear foci (termed RAD54 foci) in Arabidopsis thaliana after induction of DNA double-strand breaks. The appearance of RAD54 foci was dependent on the ATAXIA-TELANGIECTASIA MUTATED-SUPPRESSOR OF GAMMA RESPONSE 1 pathway, and RAD54 foci were co-localized with γH2AX signals. Laser irradiation of a subnuclear area demonstrated that in living cells RAD54 was specifically accumulated at the damaged site. In addition, the formation of RAD54 foci showed specificity for cell type and region. We conclude that RAD54 foci correspond to DNA repair foci in A. thaliana.

  4. An immunochemical approach to the study of DNA damage and repair

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, S.S. . Dept. of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics); Erlanger, B.F. . Dept. of Microbiology)

    1992-05-01

    The overall objective of this project has been to develop immunochemical methods to quantitate unique DNA base damages in order to facilitate studies on radiation-induced damage production and repair. Specifically, we have been using antibodies raised to damaged bases to quantitate unique lesions in model systems in order to evaluate their potential biological consequences. Our approach has been to synthesize modified nucleotides or nucleosides, conjugate them to protein carriers, and use the conjugates as immunogens in rabbits or to prepare monoclonal antibodies. We have been studying damages that are stable radiolysis products found in X-irradiated DNA and thus of potential biological consequence. Our aim is to build an in vitro and in vivo data base on the interactions between model DNA lesions and such cellular enzymes as DNA polymerases and repair endonucleases. Initial studies have focused on pyrimidine ring saturation products (thymine glycol.and dihydrothymine), products resulting from ring fragmentation or base loss (urea, {Beta}-ureidoisobutyric acid, abasic sites), 7-hydro-8-oxopurines, and more recently, cytosine radiolysis products. These modified bases serve as useful models for examining the potential lethal and/or mutagenic (carcinogenic) effects of the products of DNA radiolysis.

  5. Oxidative damage to RPA limits the nucleotide excision repair capacity of human cells

    PubMed Central

    Guven, Melisa; Brem, Reto; Macpherson, Peter; Peacock, Matthew; Karran, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) protects against sunlight-induced skin cancer. Defective NER is associated with photosensitivity and a high skin cancer incidence. Some clinical treatments that cause photosensitivity can also increase skin cancer risk. Among these, the immunosuppressant azathioprine and the fluoroquinolone antibiotics ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin, interact with UVA radiation to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) that diminish NER capacity by causing protein damage. The RPA DNA binding protein plays a pivotal role in DNA metabolism and is an essential component of NER. The relationship between protein oxidation and NER inhibition was investigated in cultured human cells expressing different levels of RPA. We show here that RPA is limiting for NER and that oxidative damage to RPA compromises NER capability. Our findings reveal that cellular RPA is surprisingly vulnerable to oxidation and we identify oxidized forms of RPA that are associated with impaired NER. The vulnerability of NER to inhibition by oxidation provides a connection between cutaneous photosensitivity, protein damage and increased skin cancer risk. Our findings emphasize that damage to DNA repair proteins, as well as to DNA itself is likely to be an important contributor to skin cancer risk. PMID:26134950

  6. The role of DNA damage and repair in decitabine-mediated apoptosis in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Maes, Ken; Smedt, Eva De; Lemaire, Miguel; Raeve, Hendrik De; Menu, Eline; Van Valckenborgh, Els; McClue, Steve

    2014-01-01

    DNA methyltransferase inhibitors (DNMTi) and histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are under investigation for the treatment of cancer, including the plasma cell malignancy multiple myeloma (MM). Evidence exists that DNA damage and repair contribute to the cytotoxicity mediated by the DNMTi decitabine. Here, we investigated the DNA damage response (DDR) induced by decitabine in MM using 4 human MM cell lines and the murine 5T33MM model. In addition, we explored how the HDACi JNJ-26481585 affects this DDR. Decitabine induced DNA damage (gamma-H2AX foci formation), followed by a G0/G1- or G2/M-phase arrest and caspase-mediated apoptosis. JNJ-26481585 enhanced the anti-MM effect of decitabine both in vitro and in vivo. As JNJ-26481585 did not enhance decitabine-mediated gamma-H2AX foci formation, we investigated the DNA repair response towards decitabine and/or JNJ-26481585. Decitabine augmented RAD51 foci formation (marker for homologous recombination (HR)) and/or 53BP1 foci formation (marker for non-homologous end joining (NHEJ)). Interestingly, JNJ-26481585 negatively affected basal or decitabine-induced RAD51 foci formation. Finally, B02 (RAD51 inhibitor) enhanced decitabine-mediated apoptosis. Together, we report that decitabine-induced DNA damage stimulates HR and/or NHEJ. JNJ-26481585 negatively affects RAD51 foci formation, thereby providing an additional explanation for the combinatory effect between decitabine and JNJ-26481585. PMID:24833108

  7. The structural basis of damaged DNA recognition and endonucleolytic cleavage for very short patch repair endonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Tsutakawa, Susan E.; Morikawa, Kosuke

    2001-01-01

    Endonucleases in DNA repair must be able to recognize damaged DNA as well as cleave the phosphodiester backbone. These functional prerequisites are manifested in very short patch repair (Vsr) endonuclease through a common endonuclease topology that has been tailored for recognition of TG mismatches. Structural and biochemical comparison with type II restriction enzymes illustrates how Vsr resembles these endonucleases in overall topology but also how Vsr diverges in terms of the detailed catalytic mechanism. A histidine and two metal–water clusters catalyze the phosphodiester cleavage. The mode of DNA damage recognition is also unique to Vsr. All other structurally characterized DNA damage-binding enzymes employ a nucleotide flipping mechanism for substrate recognition and for catalysis. Vsr, on the other hand, recognizes the TG mismatch as a wobble base pair and penetrates the DNA with three aromatic residues on one side of the mismatch. Thus, Vsr endonuclease provides important counterpoints in our understanding of endonucleolytic mechanisms and of damaged DNA recognition. PMID:11557809

  8. Proteasome inhibition enhances resistance to DNA damage via upregulation of Rpn4-dependent DNA repair genes.

    PubMed

    Karpov, Dmitry S; Spasskaya, Daria S; Tutyaeva, Vera V; Mironov, Alexander S; Karpov, Vadim L

    2013-09-17

    The 26S proteasome is an ATP-dependent multi-subunit protease complex and the major regulator of intracellular protein turnover and quality control. However, its role in the DNA damage response is controversial. We addressed this question in yeast by disrupting the transcriptional regulation of the PRE1 proteasomal gene. The mutant strain has decreased proteasome activity and is hyper-resistant to various DNA-damaging agents. We found that Rpn4-target genes MAG1, RAD23, and RAD52 are overexpressed in this strain due to Rpn4 stabilisation. These genes represent three different pathways of base excision, nucleotide excision and double strand break repair by homologous recombination (DSB-HR). Consistently, the proteasome mutant displays increased DSB-HR activity. Our data imply that the proteasome may have a negative role in DNA damage response.

  9. Actualities on molecular pathogenesis and repairing processes of cerebral damage in perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Distefano, Giuseppe; Praticò, Andrea D

    2010-09-16

    Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is the most important cause of cerebral damage and long-term neurological sequelae in the perinatal period both in term and preterm infant. Hypoxic-ischemic (H-I) injuries develop in two phases: the ischemic phase, dominated by necrotic processes, and the reperfusion phase, dominated by apoptotic processes extending beyond ischemic areas. Due to selective ischemic vulnerability, cerebral damage affects gray matter in term newborns and white matter in preterm newborns with the typical neuropathological aspects of laminar cortical necrosis in the former and periventricular leukomalacia in the latter. This article summarises the principal physiopathological and biochemical processes leading to necrosis and/or apoptosis of neuronal and glial cells and reports recent insights into some endogenous and exogenous cellular and molecular mechanisms aimed at repairing H-I cerebral damage.

  10. Actualities on molecular pathogenesis and repairing processes of cerebral damage in perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is the most important cause of cerebral damage and long-term neurological sequelae in the perinatal period both in term and preterm infant. Hypoxic-ischemic (H-I) injuries develop in two phases: the ischemic phase, dominated by necrotic processes, and the reperfusion phase, dominated by apoptotic processes extending beyond ischemic areas. Due to selective ischemic vulnerability, cerebral damage affects gray matter in term newborns and white matter in preterm newborns with the typical neuropathological aspects of laminar cortical necrosis in the former and periventricular leukomalacia in the latter. This article summarises the principal physiopathological and biochemical processes leading to necrosis and/or apoptosis of neuronal and glial cells and reports recent insights into some endogenous and exogenous cellular and molecular mechanisms aimed at repairing H-I cerebral damage. PMID:20846380

  11. Anhydrobiosis-Associated Nuclear DNA Damage and Repair in the Sleeping Chironomid: Linkage with Radioresistance

    PubMed Central

    Vanyagina, Veronica; Malutina, Ludmila; Cornette, Richard; Sakashita, Tetsuya; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Kikawada, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Okuda, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    Anhydrobiotic chironomid larvae can withstand prolonged complete desiccation as well as other external stresses including ionizing radiation. To understand the cross-tolerance mechanism, we have analyzed the structural changes in the nuclear DNA using transmission electron microscopy and DNA comet assays in relation to anhydrobiosis and radiation. We found that dehydration causes alterations in chromatin structure and a severe fragmentation of nuclear DNA in the cells of the larvae despite successful anhydrobiosis. Furthermore, while the larvae had restored physiological activity within an hour following rehydration, nuclear DNA restoration typically took 72 to 96 h. The DNA fragmentation level and the recovery of DNA integrity in the rehydrated larvae after anhydrobiosis were similar to those of hydrated larvae irradiated with 70 Gy of high-linear energy transfer (LET) ions (4He). In contrast, low-LET radiation (gamma-rays) of the same dose caused less initial damage to the larvae, and DNA was completely repaired within within 24 h. The expression of genes encoding the DNA repair enzymes occurred upon entering anhydrobiosis and exposure to high- and low-LET radiations, indicative of DNA damage that includes double-strand breaks and their subsequent repair. The expression of antioxidant enzymes-coding genes was also elevated in the anhydrobiotic and the gamma-ray-irradiated larvae that probably functions to reduce the negative effect of reactive oxygen species upon exposure to these stresses. Indeed the mature antioxidant proteins accumulated in the dry larvae and the total activity of antioxidants increased by a 3–4 fold in association with anhydrobiosis. We conclude that one of the factors explaining the relationship between radioresistance and the ability to undergo anhydrobiosis in the sleeping chironomid could be an adaptation to desiccation-inflicted nuclear DNA damage. There were also similarities in the molecular response of the larvae to damage caused by

  12. Dietary phytochemicals, HDAC inhibition, and DNA damage/repair defects in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Genomic instability is a common feature of cancer etiology. This provides an avenue for therapeutic intervention, since cancer cells are more susceptible than normal cells to DNA damaging agents. However, there is growing evidence that the epigenetic mechanisms that impact DNA methylation and histone status also contribute to genomic instability. The DNA damage response, for example, is modulated by the acetylation status of histone and non-histone proteins, and by the opposing activities of histone acetyltransferase and histone deacetylase (HDAC) enzymes. Many HDACs overexpressed in cancer cells have been implicated in protecting such cells from genotoxic insults. Thus, HDAC inhibitors, in addition to unsilencing tumor suppressor genes, also can silence DNA repair pathways, inactivate non-histone proteins that are required for DNA stability, and induce reactive oxygen species and DNA double-strand breaks. This review summarizes how dietary phytochemicals that affect the epigenome also can trigger DNA damage and repair mechanisms. Where such data is available, examples are cited from studies in vitro and in vivo of polyphenols, organosulfur/organoselenium compounds, indoles, sesquiterpene lactones, and miscellaneous agents such as anacardic acid. Finally, by virtue of their genetic and epigenetic mechanisms, cancer chemopreventive agents are being redefined as chemo- or radio-sensitizers. A sustained DNA damage response coupled with insufficient repair may be a pivotal mechanism for apoptosis induction in cancer cells exposed to dietary phytochemicals. Future research, including appropriate clinical investigation, should clarify these emerging concepts in the context of both genetic and epigenetic mechanisms dysregulated in cancer, and the pros and cons of specific dietary intervention strategies. PMID:22247744

  13. Promyelocytic leukaemia protein links DNA damage response and repair to hepatitis B virus-related hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yih-Lin; Wu, Mei-Ling

    2013-08-01

    DNA damage response and repair pathways are important barriers to carcinogenesis. Here, we show that promyelocytic leukaemia (PML, also known as TRIM19), involved in sensing DNA damage and executing homologous recombination repair, is down-regulated in non-tumour liver cells surrounding hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). No PML mutation or deletion was found in HBV-infected liver or HCC cells. Immunohistochemical analysis of liver biopsies from patients with breast or liver cancer and HBV reactivation after chemotherapy revealed PML up-regulation and HBV exacerbation in normal liver tissue in response to DNA damage (functional PML), PML down-regulation in HCC peritumour cells associated with high HBsAg accumulation and low HBV replication activity (suppressive PML), and heterogeneous nuclear PML expression in HCC cells that lost HBV DNA and HBsAg and were non-reactive to DNA damage (dysregulated PML). Loss of PML in HBsAg-transgenic mice promoted chromosome breaks in liver cells and accelerated the accumulation of body and liver fat and the development of a liver steatosis-dysplasia-adenoma-carcinoma sequence in an inflammation-independent and male-predominant manner, compared to PML knock-out or HBsAg-transgenic mice during the same time period. These results indicate that PML deficiency facilitates genomic instability and promotes HBsAg-related hepatocarcinogenesis, which also involves androgen and lipid metabolism. These findings uncover a novel PML link between HBV-related tumourigenesis, DNA repair, and metabolism. Copyright © 2013 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Repair of skin damage during fractionated irradiation with gamma rays and low-LET carbon ions.

    PubMed

    Ando, Koichi; Koike, Sachiko; Uzawa, Akiko; Takai, Nobuhiko; Fukawa, Takeshi; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Aoki, Mizuho; Hirayama, Ryoichi

    2006-06-01

    In clinical use of carbon-ion beams, a deep-seated tumor is irradiated with a Spread-Out Bragg peak (SOBP) with a high-LET feature, whereas surface skin is irradiated with an entrance plateau, the LET of which is lower than that of the peak. The repair kinetics of murine skin damage caused by an entrance plateau of carbon ions was compared with that caused by photons using a scheme of daily fractionated doses followed by a top-up dose. Right hind legs received local irradiations with either 20 keV/microm carbon ions or gamma rays. The skin reaction of the irradiated legs was scored every other day up to Day 35 using a scoring scale that consisted of 10 steps, ranging from 0.5 to 5.0. An isoeffect dose to produce a skin reaction score of 3.0 was used to obtain a total dose and a top-up dose for each fractionation. Dependence on a preceding dose and on the time interval of a top-up dose was examined using gamma rays. For fractionated gamma rays, the total dose linearly increased while the top-up dose linearly decreased with an increase in the number of fractions. The magnitude of damage repair depended on the size of dose per fraction, and was larger for 5.2 Gy than 12.5 Gy. The total dose of carbon ions with 5.2 Gy per fraction did not change till 2 fractions, but abruptly increased at the 3rd fraction. Factors such as rapid repopulation, induced repair and cell cycle synchronization are possible explanations for the abrupt increase. As an abrupt increase/decrease of normal tissue damage could be caused by changing the number of fractions in carbon-ion radiotherapy, we conclude that, unlike photon therapy, skin damage should be carefully studied when the number of fractions is changed in new clinical trials.

  15. Anhydrobiosis-associated nuclear DNA damage and repair in the sleeping chironomid: linkage with radioresistance.

    PubMed

    Gusev, Oleg; Nakahara, Yuichi; Vanyagina, Veronica; Malutina, Ludmila; Cornette, Richard; Sakashita, Tetsuya; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Kikawada, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Okuda, Takashi

    2010-11-16

    Anhydrobiotic chironomid larvae can withstand prolonged complete desiccation as well as other external stresses including ionizing radiation. To understand the cross-tolerance mechanism, we have analyzed the structural changes in the nuclear DNA using transmission electron microscopy and DNA comet assays in relation to anhydrobiosis and radiation. We found that dehydration causes alterations in chromatin structure and a severe fragmentation of nuclear DNA in the cells of the larvae despite successful anhydrobiosis. Furthermore, while the larvae had restored physiological activity within an hour following rehydration, nuclear DNA restoration typically took 72 to 96 h. The DNA fragmentation level and the recovery of DNA integrity in the rehydrated larvae after anhydrobiosis were similar to those of hydrated larvae irradiated with 70 Gy of high-linear energy transfer (LET) ions ((4)He). In contrast, low-LET radiation (gamma-rays) of the same dose caused less initial damage to the larvae, and DNA was completely repaired within within 24 h. The expression of genes encoding the DNA repair enzymes occurred upon entering anhydrobiosis and exposure to high- and low-LET radiations, indicative of DNA damage that includes double-strand breaks and their subsequent repair. The expression of antioxidant enzymes-coding genes was also elevated in the anhydrobiotic and the gamma-ray-irradiated larvae that probably functions to reduce the negative effect of reactive oxygen species upon exposure to these stresses. Indeed the mature antioxidant proteins accumulated in the dry larvae and the total activity of antioxidants increased by a 3-4 fold in association with anhydrobiosis. We conclude that one of the factors explaining the relationship between radioresistance and the ability to undergo anhydrobiosis in the sleeping chironomid could be an adaptation to desiccation-inflicted nuclear DNA damage. There were also similarities in the molecular response of the larvae to damage caused by

  16. New Paradigms in the Repair of Oxidative Damage in Human Genome

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Arijit; Yang, Chunying; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Mitra, Sankar; Hegde, Muralidhar L.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidized bases in the mammalian genome, which are invariably mutagenic due to their mis-pairing property, are continuously induced by endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS) and more abundantly after oxidative stress. Unlike bulky base adducts induced by UV and other environmental mutagens in the genome that block replicative DNA polymerases, oxidatively damaged bases such as 5-hydoxyuracil (5-OHU), produced by oxidative deamination of cytosine in the template strand, do not block replicative polymerases and thus need to be repaired prior to replication in order to prevent mutation. Following up our earlier studies, which showed that the Nei endonuclease VIII like 1 (NEIL1) DNA glycosylase, one of five base excision repair (BER)-initiating enzymes in mammalian cells, has enhanced expression during the S-phase and higher affinity for replication fork-mimicking single-stranded (ss) DNA substrates, we recently provided direct experimental evidence for NEIL1’s role in replicating template-strand repair. The key requirement for this event, which we named as the ‘cow-catcher’ mechanism of pre-replicative BER, is NEIL1’s non-productive binding (substrate binding without product formation) to the lesion base in ss DNA template to stall DNA synthesis, causing fork regression. Repair of the lesion in re-annealed duplex is then carried out by NEIL1 in association with the DNA replication proteins. NEIL1 (and other BER-initiating enzymes) also interact with several accessory and non-canonical proteins including the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U (hnRNP-U) and Y-box-binding protein 1 (YB-1) as well as high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), whose precise roles in BER are still obscure. In this review, we have discussed the recent advances in our understanding of oxidative genome damage repair pathways with particular focus on the pre-replicative template strand repair and the role of scaffold factors like X-ray repair cross-complementing protein 1 (XRCC1

  17. Saturation Diving Alters Folate Status and Biomarkers of DNA Damage and Repair

    PubMed Central

    Zwart, Sara R.; Jessup, J. Milburn; Ji, Jiuping; Smith, Scott M.

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to oxygen-rich environments can lead to oxidative damage, increased body iron stores, and changes in status of some vitamins, including folate. Assessing the type of oxidative damage in these environments and determining its relationships with changes in folate status are important for defining nutrient requirements and designing countermeasures to mitigate these effects. Responses of humans to oxidative stressors were examined in participants undergoing a saturation dive in an environment with increased partial pressure of oxygen, a NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations mission. Six participants completed a 13-d saturation dive in a habitat 19 m below the ocean surface near Key Largo, FL. Fasting blood samples were collected before, twice during, and twice after the dive and analyzed for biochemical markers of iron status, oxidative damage, and vitamin status. Body iron stores and ferritin increased during the dive (P<0.001), with a concomitant decrease in RBC folate (P<0.001) and superoxide dismutase activity (P<0.001). Folate status was correlated with serum ferritin (Pearson r = −0.34, P<0.05). Peripheral blood mononuclear cell poly(ADP-ribose) increased during the dive and the increase was significant by the end of the dive (P<0.001); γ-H2AX did not change during the mission. Together, the data provide evidence that when body iron stores were elevated in a hyperoxic environment, a DNA damage repair response occurred in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, but double-stranded DNA damage did not. In addition, folate status decreases quickly in this environment, and this study provides evidence that folate requirements may be greater when body iron stores and DNA damage repair responses are elevated. PMID:22347427

  18. Saturation diving alters folate status and biomarkers of DNA damage and repair.

    PubMed

    Zwart, Sara R; Jessup, J Milburn; Ji, Jiuping; Smith, Scott M

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to oxygen-rich environments can lead to oxidative damage, increased body iron stores, and changes in status of some vitamins, including folate. Assessing the type of oxidative damage in these environments and determining its relationships with changes in folate status are important for defining nutrient requirements and designing countermeasures to mitigate these effects. Responses of humans to oxidative stressors were examined in participants undergoing a saturation dive in an environment with increased partial pressure of oxygen, a NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations mission. Six participants completed a 13-d saturation dive in a habitat 19 m below the ocean surface near Key Largo, FL. Fasting blood samples were collected before, twice during, and twice after the dive and analyzed for biochemical markers of iron status, oxidative damage, and vitamin status. Body iron stores and ferritin increased during the dive (P<0.001), with a concomitant decrease in RBC folate (P<0.001) and superoxide dismutase activity (P<0.001). Folate status was correlated with serum ferritin (Pearson r = -0.34, P<0.05). Peripheral blood mononuclear cell poly(ADP-ribose) increased during the dive and the increase was significant by the end of the dive (P<0.001); γ-H2AX did not change during the mission. Together, the data provide evidence that when body iron stores were elevated in a hyperoxic environment, a DNA damage repair response occurred in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, but double-stranded DNA damage did not. In addition, folate status decreases quickly in this environment, and this study provides evidence that folate requirements may be greater when body iron stores and DNA damage repair responses are elevated.

  19. RNA damage in biological conflicts and the diversity of responding RNA repair systems

    PubMed Central

    Burroughs, A. Maxwell; Aravind, L.

    2016-01-01

    RNA is targeted in biological conflicts by enzymatic toxins or effectors. A vast diversity of systems which repair or ‘heal’ this damage has only recently become apparent. Here, we summarize the known effectors, their modes of action, and RNA targets before surveying the diverse systems which counter this damage from a comparative genomics viewpoint. RNA-repair systems show a modular organization with extensive shuffling and displacement of the constituent domains; however, a general ‘syntax’ is strongly maintained whereby systems typically contain: a RNA ligase (either ATP-grasp or RtcB superfamilies), nucleotidyltransferases, enzymes modifying RNA-termini for ligation (phosphatases and kinases) or protection (methylases), and scaffold or cofactor proteins. We highlight poorly-understood or previously-uncharacterized repair systems and components, e.g. potential scaffolding cofactors (Rot/TROVE and SPFH/Band-7 modules) with their respective cognate non-coding RNAs (YRNAs and a novel tRNA-like molecule) and a novel nucleotidyltransferase associating with diverse ligases. These systems have been extensively disseminated by lateral transfer between distant prokaryotic and microbial eukaryotic lineages consistent with intense inter-organismal conflict. Components have also often been ‘institutionalized’ for non-conflict roles, e.g. in RNA-splicing and in RNAi systems (e.g. in kinetoplastids) which combine a distinct family of RNA-acting prim-pol domains with DICER-like proteins. PMID:27536007

  20. Oxidative stress-induced CREB upregulation promotes DNA damage repair prior to neuronal cell death protection.

    PubMed

    Pregi, Nicolás; Belluscio, Laura María; Berardino, Bruno Gabriel; Castillo, Daniela Susana; Cánepa, Eduardo Tomás

    2017-01-01

    cAMP response element-binding (CREB) protein is a cellular transcription factor that mediates responses to different physiological and pathological signals. Using a model of human neuronal cells we demonstrate herein, that CREB is phosphorylated after oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide. This phosphorylation is largely independent of PKA and of the canonical phosphoacceptor site at ser-133, and is accompanied by an upregulation of CREB expression at both mRNA and protein levels. In accordance with previous data, we show that CREB upregulation promotes cell survival and that its silencing results in an increment of apoptosis after oxidative stress. Interestingly, we also found that CREB promotes DNA repair after treatment with hydrogen peroxide. Using a cDNA microarray we found that CREB is responsible for the regulation of many genes involved in DNA repair and cell survival after oxidative injury. In summary, the neuroprotective effect mediated by CREB appears to follow three essential steps following oxidative injury. First, the upregulation of CREB expression that allows sufficient level of activated and phosphorylated protein is the primordial event that promotes the induction of genes of the DNA Damage Response. Then and when the DNA repair is effective, CREB induces detoxification and survival genes. This kinetics seems to be important to completely resolve oxidative-induced neuronal damages.

  1. The nucleotide excision repair system of Borrelia burgdorferi is the sole pathway involved in repair of DNA damage by UV light.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Pierre-Olivier; Chaconas, George

    2013-05-01

    To survive and avoid accumulation of mutations caused by DNA damage, the genomes of prokaryotes encode a variety of DNA repair pathways most well characterized in Escherichia coli. Some of these are required for the infectivity of various pathogens. In this study, the importance of 25 DNA repair/recombination genes for Borrelia burgdorferi survival to UV-induced DNA damage was assessed. In contrast to E. coli, where 15 of these genes have an effect on survival of UV irradiation, disruption of recombinational repair, transcription-coupled repair, methyl-directed mismatch correction, and repair of arrested replication fork pathways did not decrease survival of B. burgdorferi exposed to UV light. However, the disruption of the B. burgdorferi nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway (uvrA, uvrB, uvrC, and uvrD) resulted in a 10- to 1,000-fold increase in sensitivity to UV light. A functional NER pathway was also shown to be required for B. burgdorferi resistance to nitrosative damage. Finally, disruption of uvrA, uvrC, and uvrD had only a minor effect upon murine infection by increasing the time required for dissemination.

  2. Dynamics and pathway of electron tunneling in repair of damaged DNA by photolyase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zheyun; Guo, Xunmin; Tan, Chuang; Li, Jiang; Kao, Ya-Ting; Wang, Lijuan; Sancar, Aziz; Zhong, Dongping

    2013-03-01

    Through electron tunneling, photolyase, a photoenzyme, restores damaged DNA into normal bases. Here, we report our systematic characterization and analyses of three electron transfer processes in thymine dimer restoration by following the entire dynamical evolution during enzymatic repair with femtosecond resolution. Using (deoxy)uracil and thymine as dimer substrates, we unambiguously determined the electron tunneling pathways for the forward electron transfer to initiate repairing and for the final electron return to restore the active cofactor and complete the repair photocycle. Significantly, we found that the adenine moiety of the unusual bent cofactor is essential to mediating all electron-transfer dynamics through a super-exchange mechanism, leading to a delicate balance of time scales. The active-site structural integrity, unique electron tunneling pathways and the critical role of adenine assure these elementary dynamics in synergy in this complex photorepair machinery to achieve the maximum repair efficiency close to unity. The authors thank Drs. Chaitanya Sexana, Yi Yang, and Chen Zang for the initial help with experiment, and Prof. Sherwin Singer and Dr. Ali Hassanali for discussion.

  3. Electron Tunneling Pathway and Role of Adenine in Repair of Damaged DNA by Photolyase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zheyun; Tan, Chuang; Guo, Xunmin; Kao, Ya-Ting; Li, Jiang; Wang, Lijuan; Zhong, Dongping

    2012-06-01

    Through electron tunneling, photolyase, a photoenzyme, restores damaged DNA into normal bases. Here, we report our systematic characterization and analyses of three electron transfer processes in thymine dimer restoration by following the entire dynamical evolution during enzymatic repair with femtosecond resolution. We observed the complete dynamics of the reactants, all intermediates and final products, and determined their reaction time scales. Using (deoxy)uracil and thymine as dimer substrates, we unambiguously determined the electron tunneling pathways for the forward electron transfer to initiate repairing and for the final electron return to restore the active cofactor and complete the repair photocycle. Significantly, we found that the adenine moiety of the unusual bent cofactor is essential to mediating all electron transfer dynamics through a super-exchange mechanism, leading to a delicate balance of time scales. The active-site structural integrity, unique electron tunneling pathways and the critical role of adenine assure these elementary dynamics in synergy in this complex photorepair machinery to achieve the maximum repair efficiency close to unity. Z. Liu, C. Tan, X. Guo, Y.-T. Kao, J. Li, L. Wang, A. Sancar, and D. Zhong, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 108, 14831 (2011) J. Li, Z. Liu, C. Tan, X. Guo, L. Wang, A. Sancar, and D. Zhong, Nature 466, 887 (2010)

  4. Processing of a complex multiply damaged DNA site by human cell extracts and purified repair proteins

    PubMed Central

    Eot-Houllier, Grégory; Eon-Marchais, Séverine; Gasparutto, Didier; Sage, Evelyne

    2005-01-01

    Clustered DNA lesions, possibly induced by ionizing radiation, constitute a trial for repair processes. Indeed, recent studies suggest that repair of such lesions may be compromised, potentially leading to the formation of lethal double-strand breaks (DSBs). A complex multiply damaged site (MDS) composed of 8-oxoguanine and 8-oxoadenine on one strand, 5-hydroxyuracil, 5-formyluracil and a 1 nt gap on the other strand, within 17 bp was built and used to challenge several steps of base excision repair (BER) pathway with human whole-cell extracts and purified repair enzymes as well. We show a hierarchy in the processing of lesions within the MDS, in particular at the base excision step. In the present configuration, efficient excision of 5-hydroxyuracil and low cleavage at 8-oxoguanine prevent DSB formation and generate a short single-stranded region carrying the 8-oxoguanine. On the other hand, rejoining of the 1 nt gap occurs by the short-patch BER pathway, but is slightly retarded by the presence of the oxidized bases. Taken together, our results suggest a hierarchy in the processing of the lesions within the MDS, which prevents the formation of DSB, but would dramatically enhance mutagenesis. They also indicate that the mutagenic (or lethal) consequences of a complex MDS will largely depend on the first event in the processing of the MDS. PMID:15647508

  5. Having a direct look: analysis of DNA damage and repair mechanisms by next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Meier, Bettina; Gartner, Anton

    2014-11-15

    Genetic information is under constant attack from endogenous and exogenous sources, and the use of model organisms has provided important frameworks to understand how genome stability is maintained and how various DNA lesions are repaired. The advance of high throughput next generation sequencing (NGS) provides new inroads for investigating mechanisms needed for genome maintenance. These emerging studies, which aim to link genetic toxicology and mechanistic analyses of DNA repair processes in vivo, rely on defining mutational signatures caused by faulty replication, endogenous DNA damaging metabolites, or exogenously applied genotoxins; the analysis of their nature, their frequency and distribution. In contrast to classical studies, where DNA repair deficiency is assessed by reduced cellular survival, the localization of DNA repair factors and their interdependence as well as limited analysis of single locus reporter assays, NGS based approaches reveal the direct, quantal imprint of mutagenesis genome-wide, at the DNA sequence level. As we will show, such investigations require the analysis of DNA derived from single genotoxin treated cells, or DNA from cell populations regularly passaged through single cell bottlenecks when naturally occurring mutation accumulation is investigated. We will argue that the life cycle of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, its genetic malleability combined with whole genome sequencing provides an exciting model system to conduct such analysis. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Having a direct look: Analysis of DNA damage and repair mechanisms by next generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Bettina; Gartner, Anton

    2014-01-01

    Genetic information is under constant attack from endogenous and exogenous sources, and the use of model organisms has provided important frameworks to understand how genome stability is maintained and how various DNA lesions are repaired. The advance of high throughput next generation sequencing (NGS) provides new inroads for investigating mechanisms needed for genome maintenance. These emerging studies, which aim to link genetic toxicology and mechanistic analyses of DNA repair processes in vivo, rely on defining mutational signatures caused by faulty replication, endogenous DNA damaging metabolites, or exogenously applied genotoxins; the analysis of their nature, their frequency and distribution. In contrast to classical studies, where DNA repair deficiency is assessed by reduced cellular survival, the localization of DNA repair factors and their interdependence as well as limited analysis of single locus reporter assays, NGS based approaches reveal the direct, quantal imprint of mutagenesis genome-wide, at the DNA sequence level. As we will show, such investigations require the analysis of DNA derived from single genotoxin treated cells, or DNA from cell populations regularly passaged through single cell bottlenecks when naturally occurring mutation accumulation is investigated. We will argue that the life cycle of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, its genetic malleability combined with whole genome sequencing provides an exciting model system to conduct such analysis. PMID:25131498

  7. Preferential repair of UV damage in highly transcribed DNA diminishes UV-induced intrachromosomal recombination in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Deng, W P; Nickoloff, J A

    1994-01-01

    The relationships among transcription, recombination, DNA damage, and repair in mammalian cells were investigated. We monitored the effects of transcription on UV-induced intrachromosomal recombination between neomycin repeats including a promoterless allele and an inducible heteroallele regulated by the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter. Although transcription and UV light separately stimulated recombination, increasing transcription levels reduced UV-induced recombination. Preferential repair of UV damage in transcribed strands was shown in highly transcribed DNA, suggesting that recombination is stimulated by unrepaired UV damage and that increased DNA repair in highly transcribed alleles removes recombinogenic lesions. This study indicates that the genetic consequences of DNA damage depend on transcriptional states and provides a basis for understanding tissue- and gene-specific responses to DNA-damaging agents. Images PMID:8264606

  8. Day and night variations in the repair of ionizing-radiation-induced DNA damage in mouse splenocytes.

    PubMed

    Palombo, Philipp; Moreno-Villanueva, Maria; Mangerich, Aswin

    2015-04-01

    In mammals, biological rhythms synchronize physiological and behavioral processes to the 24-h light-dark (LD) cycle. At the molecular level, self-sustaining processes, such as oscillations of transcription-translation feedback loops, control the circadian clock, which in turn regulates a wide variety of cellular processes, including gene expression and cell cycle progression. Furthermore, previous studies reported circadian oscillations in the repair capacity of DNA lesions specifically repaired by nucleotide excision repair (NER). However, it is so far only poorly understood if DNA repair pathways other than NER are under circadian control, in particular base excision and DNA strand break repair. In the present study, we analyzed potential day and night variations in the repair of DNA lesions induced by ionizing radiation (i.e., mainly oxidative damage and DNA strand breaks) in living mouse splenocytes using a modified protocol of the automated FADU assay. Our results reveal that splenocytes isolated from mice during the light phase (ZT06) displayed higher DNA repair activity than those of the dark phase (ZT18). As analyzed by highly sensitive and accurate qPCR arrays, these alterations were accompanied by significant differences in expression profiles of genes involved in the circadian clock and DNA repair. Notably, the majority of the DNA repair genes were expressed at higher levels during the light phase (ZT06). This included genes of all major DNA repair pathways with the strongest differences observed for genes of base excision and DNA double strand break repair. In conclusion, here we provide novel evidence that mouse splenocytes exhibit significant differences in the repair of IR-induced DNA damage during the LD cycle, both on a functional and on a gene expression level. It will be interesting to test if these findings could be exploited for therapeutic purposes, e.g. time-of-the-day-specific application of DNA-damaging treatments used against blood

  9. An Integrated Approach for Analysis of the DNA Damage Response in Mammalian Cells: NUCLEOTIDE EXCISION REPAIR, DNA DAMAGE CHECKPOINT, AND APOPTOSIS.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jun-Hyuk; Kim, So-Young; Kim, Sook-Kyung; Kemp, Michael G; Sancar, Aziz

    2015-11-27

    DNA damage by UV and UV-mimetic agents elicits a set of inter-related responses in mammalian cells, including DNA repair, DNA damage checkpoints, and apoptosis. Conventionally, these responses are analyzed separately using different methodologies. Here we describe a unified approach that is capable of quantifying all three responses in parallel using lysates from the same population of cells. We show that a highly sensitive in vivo excision repair assay is capable of detecting nucleotide excision repair of a wide spectrum of DNA lesions (UV damage, chemical carcinogens, and chemotherapeutic drugs) within minutes of damage induction. This method therefore allows for a real-time measure of nucleotide excision repair activity that can be monitored in conjunction with other components of the DNA damage response, including DNA damage checkpoint and apoptotic signaling. This approach therefore provides a convenient and reliable platform for simultaneously examining multiple aspects of the DNA damage response in a single population of cells that can be applied for a diverse array of carcinogenic and chemotherapeutic agents.

  10. Repair work begins on the external tank of Space Shuttle Discovery after damage from hail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    United Space Alliance technician Don Pataky repairs one of the hail-created divots in the foam insulation on the external tank of Space Shuttle Discovery. The Shuttle was rolled back from Pad 39B to the Vehicle Assemby Building for repairs because access to all of the damaged areas was not possible at the pad. The work is expected to take two to three days, allowing Discovery to roll back to the pad late this week for launch of mission STS-96, the 94th launch in the Space Shuttle Program. Liftoff will occur no earlier than May 27. STS-96 is a logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-shared experiment.

  11. Repair work begins on the external tank of Space Shuttle Discovery after damage from hail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Standing inside a protective tent around the external tank of Space Shuttle Discovery in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB), United Space Alliance technician Don Pataky repairs divots caused by hail storms. The Shuttle was rolled back from Pad 39B to the VAB for repairs because access to all of the damaged areas was not possible at the pad. The work is expected to take two to three days, allowing Discovery to roll back to the pad late this week for launch of mission STS-96, the 94th launch in the Space Shuttle Program. Liftoff will occur no earlier than May 27. STS- 96 is a logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student- shared experiment.

  12. Oxidative Genome Damage and Its Repair in Neurodegenerative Diseases: Function of Transition Metals as a Double-Edged Sword

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Muralidhar L.; Hegde, Pavana M.; Rao, K.S.J.; Mitra, Sankar

    2013-01-01

    The neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) with high O2 consumption and prolonged life span are chronically exposed to high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Accumulation of ROS-induced genome damage in the form of oxidized bases and single-strand breaks (SSBs) as well as their defective or reduced repair in the brain has been implicated in the etiology of various neurological disorders including Alzheimer’s/Parkinson’s diseases (AD/PD). Although inactivating mutations in some DNA repair genes have been linked to hereditary neurodegenerative diseases, the underlying mechanisms of repair deficiencies for the sporadic diseases is not understood. The ROS-induced DNA damages are predominantly repaired via highly conserved and regulated base excision/SSB repair (BER/SSBR) pathway. We recently made an interesting discovery that transition metals iron (Fe) and copper (Cu) which accumulate excessively in the brains of AD, PD and other neurodegenerative diseases, act as a ‘double-edged sword’ by inducing genotoxic ROS and inhibiting DNA damage repair at the same time. These metals inhibit the base excision activity of NEIL family DNA glycosylases by oxidizing them, changing their structure, and inhibiting their binding to downstream repair proteins. Metal chelators and reducing agents partially reverse the inhibition, while curcumin with both chelating and reducing activities reverses the inhibition nearly completely. In this review, we have discussed the possible etiological linkage of BER/SSBR defects to neurodegenerative diseases and therapeutic potential of metal chelators in restoring DNA repair capacity. PMID:21441656

  13. Prenatal exposure to testosterone impairs oxidative damage repair efficiency in the domestic chicken (Gallus gallus).

    PubMed

    Treidel, L A; Whitley, B N; Benowitz-Fredericks, Z M; Haussmann, M F

    2013-10-23

    Elevated levels of maternal androgens in avian eggs affect numerous traits, including oxidative stress. However, current studies disagree as to whether prenatal androgen exposure enhances or ameliorates oxidative stress. Here, we tested how prenatal testosterone exposure affects oxidative stress in female domestic chickens (Gallus gallus) during the known oxidative challenge of an acute stressor. Prior to incubation, eggs were either injected with an oil vehicle or 5 ng testosterone. At either 17 or 18 days post-hatch, several oxidative stress markers were assessed from blood taken before and after a 20 min acute stressor, as well as following a 25 min recovery from the stressor. We found that, regardless of yolk treatment, during both stress and recovery all individuals were in a state of oxidative stress, with elevated levels of oxidative damage markers accompanied by a reduced total antioxidant capacity. In addition, testosterone-exposed individuals exhibited poorer DNA damage repair efficiencies in comparison with control individuals. Our work suggests that while yolk androgens do not alter oxidative stress directly, they may impair mechanisms of oxidative damage repair.

  14. Effect of the repaired damage morphology of fused silica on the modulation of incident laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, X.; Jiang, Y.; Qiu, R.; Zhou, Q.; Zuo, R.; Zhou, G. R.; Yao, K.

    2017-02-01

    Local CO2 laser treatment has proved to be the most promising method to extend the life-time of fused silica. However, previous experimental data show that some raised rims are observed around the mitigated sites left from the mitigation process, which will result in hazardous light modulation to the downstream optics. In this work, the morphology features of mitigated sites on the surface of fused silica optics were analyzed in detail. According to measured morphology features, a 3D analytical model for simulating the modulation value induced by mitigated site has been developed based on the scalar diffraction theory. The diffraction patterns at a discrete distance downstream from each mitigated site are measured. The influences of geometry, laser wavelength and refractive index of substrates on the modulation by repaired damage morphology at different distances are discussed, respectively. The analytical model is usable and representative to evaluate the hazardous modulation induced by repaired damage morphology to downstream optics. Results on this research suggest that the downstream intensification can be suppressed by controlling the morphology features of mitigated sites, which provides a direction for the development and improvement of the mitigated techniques of damage optics.

  15. Brain-peripheral cell crosstalk in white matter damage and repair.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Kazuhide; Lo, Eng H

    2016-05-01

    White matter damage is an important part of cerebrovascular disease and may be a significant contributing factor in vascular mechanisms of cognitive dysfunction and dementia. It is well accepted that white matter homeostasis involves multifactorial interactions between all cells in the axon-glia-vascular unit. But more recently, it has been proposed that beyond cell-cell signaling within the brain per se, dynamic crosstalk between brain and systemic responses such as circulating immune cells and stem/progenitor cells may also be important. In this review, we explore the hypothesis that peripheral cells contribute to damage and repair after white matter damage. Depending on timing, phenotype and context, monocyte/macrophage can possess both detrimental and beneficial effects on oligodendrogenesis and white matter remodeling. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) can be activated after CNS injury and the response may also influence white matter repair process. These emerging findings support the hypothesis that peripheral-derived cells can be both detrimental or beneficial in white matter pathology in cerebrovascular disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia, edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock.

  16. Loss of DNA mismatch repair facilitates reactivation of a reporter plasmid damaged by cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    Cenni, B; Kim, H-K; Bubley, G J; Aebi, S; Fink, D; Teicher, B A; Howell, S B; Christen, R D

    1999-01-01

    In addition to recognizing and repairing mismatched bases in DNA, the mismatch repair (MMR) system also detects cisplatin DNA adducts and loss of MMR results in resistance to cisplatin. A comparison was made of the ability of MMR-proficient and -deficient cells to remove cisplatin adducts from their genome and to reactivate a transiently transfected plasmid that had previously been inactivated by cisplatin to express the firefly luciferase enzyme. MMR deficiency due to loss of hMLH1 function did not change the extent of platinum (Pt) accumulation or kinetics of removal from total cellular DNA. However, MMR-deficient cells, lacking either hMLH1 or hMSH2, generated twofold more luciferase activity from a cisplatin-damaged reporter plasmid than their MMR-proficient counterparts. Thus, detection of the cisplatin adducts by the MMR system reduced the efficiency of reactivation of the damaged luciferase gene compared to cells lacking this detector. The twofold reduction in reactivation efficiency was of the same order of magnitude as the difference in cisplatin sensitivity between the MMR-proficient and -deficient cells. We conclude that although MMR-proficient and -deficient cells remove Pt from their genome at equal rates, the loss of a functional MMR system facilitates the reactivation of a cisplatin-damaged reporter gene. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10360646

  17. Molecular mechanisms of DNA damage recognition for mammalian nucleotide excision repair.

    PubMed

    Sugasawa, Kaoru

    2016-08-01

    For faithful DNA repair, it is crucial for cells to locate lesions precisely within the vast genome. In the mammalian global genomic nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway, this difficult task is accomplished through multiple steps, in which the xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XPC) protein complex plays a central role. XPC senses the presence of oscillating 'normal' bases in the DNA duplex, and its binding properties contribute to the extremely broad substrate specificity of NER. Unlike XPC, which acts as a versatile sensor of DNA helical distortion, the UV-damaged DNA-binding protein (UV-DDB) is more specialized, recognizing UV-induced photolesions and facilitating recruitment of XPC. Recent single-molecule analyses and structural studies have advanced our understanding of how UV-DDB finds its targets, particularly in the context of chromatin. After XPC binds DNA, it is necessary to verify the presence of damage in order to avoid potentially deleterious incisions at damage-free sites. Accumulating evidence suggests that XPA and the helicase activity of transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) cooperate to verify abnormalities in DNA chemistry. This chapter reviews recent findings about the mechanisms underlying the efficiency, versatility, and accuracy of NER. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Space Transportation System (STS)-117 External Tank (ET)-124 Hail Damage Repair Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Timmy R.; Gentz, Steven J.; Barth, Timothy S.; Minute, Stephen A.; Flowers, Cody P.; Hamilton, David A.; Null, Cynthia H.; Schafer, Charles F.

    2009-01-01

    Severe thunderstorms with associated hail and high winds struck the STS-117 stack on February 26, 2007. Peak winds were recorded at 62 knots with hail sizes ranging from 0.3 inch to 0.8 inch in diameter. As a result of the storm, the North Carolina Foam Institute (NCFI) type 24-124 Thermal Protection System (TPS) foam on the liquid oxygen (LO2) ogive acreage incurred significant impact damage. The NCFI on the ET intertank and the liquid hydrogen (LH2) acreage sustained hail damage. The Polymer Development Laboratory (PDL)-1034 foam of the LO2 ice frost ramps (IFRs) and the Super-Lightweight Ablator (SLA) of the LO2 cable tray also suffered minor damage. NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) was asked to assess the technical feasibility of repairing the ET TPS, the reasonableness of conducting those repairs with the vehicle in a vertical, integrated configuration at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Vehicle Assemble Building (VAB), and to address attendant human factors considerations including worker fatigue and the potential for error. The outcome of the assessment is recorded in this document.

  19. Assessment of okadaic acid effects on cytotoxicity, DNA damage and DNA repair in human cells.

    PubMed

    Valdiglesias, Vanessa; Méndez, Josefina; Pásaro, Eduardo; Cemeli, Eduardo; Anderson, Diana; Laffon, Blanca

    2010-07-07

    Okadaic acid (OA) is a phycotoxin produced by several types of dinoflagellates causing diarrheic shellfish poisoning (DSP) in humans. Symptoms induced by DSP toxins are mainly gastrointestinal, but the intoxication does not appear to be fatal. Despite this, this toxin presents a potential threat to human health even at concentrations too low to induce acute toxicity, since previous animal studies have shown that OA has very potent tumour promoting activity. However, its concrete action mechanism has not been described yet and the results reported with regard to OA cytotoxicity and genotoxicity are often contradictory. In the present study, the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of OA on three different types of human cells (peripheral blood leukocytes, HepG2 hepatoma cells, and SHSY5Y neuroblastoma cells) were evaluated. Cells were treated with a range of OA concentrations in the presence and absence of S9 fraction, and MTT test and Comet assay were performed in order to evaluate cytotoxicity and genotoxicity, respectively. The possible effects of OA on DNA repair were also studied by means of the DNA repair competence assay, using bleomycin as DNA damage inductor. Treatment with OA in absence of S9 fraction induced not statistically significant decrease in cell viability and significant increase in DNA damage in all cell types at the highest concentrations investigated. However, only SHSY5Y cells showed OA induced genotoxic and cytotoxic effects in presence of S9 fraction. Furthermore, we found that OA can induce modulations in DNA repair processes when exposure was performed prior to BLM treatment, in co-exposure, or during the subsequent DNA repair process. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Repair of damaged connectors of tunneled cuffed catheters with a two-piece adaptor for peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Letachowicz, Krzysztof; Letachowicz, Waldemar; Weyde, Waclaw; Gołębiowski, Tomasz; Kusztal, Mariusz; Wątorek, Ewa; Klinger, Marian

    2012-01-01

    Although catheter use exposes the patient to several complications, tunneled cuffed catheters are widely applied for temporary or long-term vascular access. The aim of the study was to establish the rate of tunneled dialysis catheter damage and report our experience with breakage repair. All 363 cuffed tunneled hemodialysis catheters inserted into 309 patients from May 2000 to December 2008 were followed up. When connector damage was encountered, repair with a two-piece adaptor for peritoneal dialysis was attempted. Mechanical breakage occurred in 33 (9.1%) of catheters with an incidence of 0.36/1000 catheter-days. The most frequent was connector damage, found in 25 cases (67.6%). Catheter repair using a peritoneal dialysis Luer adaptor was performed with good early and long-term outcome. Tunneled catheter breakage is a relatively rare complication. Catheter repair using the adaptor for peritoneal dialysis is easy to perform, safe, and cost-effective.

  1. Effect of polyamine depletion on DNA damage and repair following UV irradiation of HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Snyder, R D; Sunkara, P S

    1990-09-01

    Treatment of HeLa cells with the polyamine biosynthesis inhibitors, methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG), difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) or a combination of the two, resulted in reduction in cellular polyamine levels. Analysis of UV light-induced DNA damage and repair in these polyamine depleted cells revealed distinct differences in the repair process relative to that seen in cells possessing a normal polyamine complement. Initial yield of thymine dimers and rate of removal of these lesions from cellular DNA appeared normal in polyamine-depleted cells. However, depleted cells exhibited retarded sealing of DNA strand breaks resulting from cellular repair processes, reduced repair synthesis and an increased sensitivity to UV killing. Incision at damaged sites was not affected since ara-C repair-dependent breaks accumulated in a normal fashion. Molecular analysis of inhibited repair sites by exonuclease III and T4 DNA ligase probes suggest that the strand interruptions consist of gaps rather than ligatable nicks, consistent with an interpretation of the repair defect being at the gap-filling stage rather than the ligation step. Observed patterns of differential polyamine depletion by DFMO and MGBG, and partial reversal of repair inhibition by polyamine supplementation, suggests that polyamine depletion per se, rather than some secondary effect of inhibitor treatment, is responsible for the inhibition of repair.

  2. DNA repair efficiency in germ cells and early mouse embryos and consequences for radiation-induced transgenerational genomic damage

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2009-01-18

    Exposure to ionizing radiation and other environmental agents can affect the genomic integrity of germ cells and induce adverse health effects in the progeny. Efficient DNA repair during gametogenesis and the early embryonic cycles after fertilization is critical for preventing transmission of DNA damage to the progeny and relies on maternal factors stored in the egg before fertilization. The ability of the maternal repair machinery to repair DNA damage in both parental genomes in the fertilizing egg is especially crucial for the fertilizing male genome that has not experienced a DNA repair-competent cellular environment for several weeks prior to fertilization. During the DNA repair-deficient period of spermatogenesis, DNA lesions may accumulate in sperm and be carried into the egg where, if not properly repaired, could result in the formation of heritable chromosomal aberrations or mutations and associated birth defects. Studies with female mice deficient in specific DNA repair genes have shown that: (i) cell cycle checkpoints are activated in the fertilized egg by DNA damage carried by the sperm; and (ii) the maternal genotype plays a major role in determining the efficiency of repairing genomic lesions in the fertilizing sperm and directly affect the risk for abnormal reproductive outcomes. There is also growing evidence that implicates DNA damage carried by the fertilizing gamete as a mediator of postfertilization processes that contribute to genomic instability in subsequent generations. Transgenerational genomic instability most likely involves epigenetic mechanisms or error-prone DNA repair processes in the early embryo. Maternal and embryonic DNA repair processes during the early phases of mammalian embryonic development can have far reaching consequences for the genomic integrity and health of subsequent generations.

  3. DNA Damage Response Factors from Diverse Pathways, Including DNA Crosslink Repair, Mediate Alternative End Joining

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Sean M.; Yanez, Diana A.; Stark, Jeremy M.

    2015-01-01

    Alternative end joining (Alt-EJ) chromosomal break repair involves bypassing classical non-homologous end joining (c-NHEJ), and such repair causes mutations often with microhomology at the repair junction. Since the mediators of Alt-EJ are not well understood, we have sought to identify DNA damage response (DDR) factors important for this repair event. Using chromosomal break reporter assays, we surveyed an RNAi library targeting known DDR factors for siRNAs that cause a specific decrease in Alt-EJ, relative to an EJ event that is a composite of Alt-EJ and c-NHEJ (Distal-EJ between two tandem breaks). From this analysis, we identified several DDR factors that are specifically important for Alt-EJ relative to Distal-EJ. While these factors are from diverse pathways, we also found that most of them also promote homologous recombination (HR), including factors important for DNA crosslink repair, such as the Fanconi Anemia factor, FANCA. Since bypass of c-NHEJ is likely important for both Alt-EJ and HR, we disrupted the c-NHEJ factor Ku70 in Fanca-deficient mouse cells and found that Ku70 loss significantly diminishes the influence of Fanca on Alt-EJ. In contrast, an inhibitor of poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) causes a decrease in Alt-EJ that is enhanced by Ku70 loss. Additionally, the helicase/nuclease DNA2 appears to have distinct effects from FANCA and PARP on both Alt-EJ, as well as end resection. Finally, we found that the proteasome inhibitor Bortezomib, a cancer therapeutic that has been shown to disrupt FANC signaling, causes a significant reduction in both Alt-EJ and HR, relative to Distal-EJ, as well as a substantial loss of end resection. We suggest that several distinct DDR functions are important for Alt-EJ, which include promoting bypass of c-NHEJ and end resection. PMID:25629353

  4. DNA damage and repair in oncogenic transformation by heavy ion radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, T. C.; Mei, M.; George, K. A.; Craise, L. M.

    Energetic heavy ions are present in galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events. One of the most important late effects in risk assessment is carcinogenesis. We have studied the carcinogenic effects of heavy ions at the cellular and molecular levels and have obtained quantitative data on dose-response curves and on the repair of oncogenic lesions for heavy particles with various charges and energies. Studies with repair inhibitors and restriction endonucleases indicated that for oncogenic transformation DNA is the primary target. Results from heavy ion experiments showed that the cross section increased with LET and reached a maximum value of about 0.02 mum^2 at about 500 keV/mum. This limited size of cross section suggests that only a fraction of cellular genomic DNA is important in radiogenic transformation. Free radical scavengers, such as DMSO, do not give any effect on induction of oncogenic transformation by 600 MeV/u iron particles, suggesting most oncogenic damage induced by high-LET heavy ions is through direct action. Repair studies with stationary phase cells showed that the amount of reparable oncogenic lesions decreased with an increase of LET and that heavy ions with LET greater than 200 keV/mum produced only irreparable oncogenic damage. An enhancement effect for oncogenic transformation was observed in cells irradiated by low-dose-rate argon ions (400 MeV/u; 120 keV/mum). Chromosomal aberrations, such as translocation and deletion, but not sister chromatid exchange, are essential for heavy-ion-induced oncogenic transformation. The basic mechanism(s) of misrepair of DNA damage, which form oncogenic lesions, is unknown.

  5. DNA damage and repair in oncogenic transformation by heavy ion radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T. C.; Mei, M.; George, K. A.; Craise, L. M.

    1996-01-01

    Energetic heavy ions are present in galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events. One of the most important late effects in risk assessment is carcinogenesis. We have studied the carcinogenic effects of heavy ions at the cellular and molecular levels and have obtained quantitative data on dose-response curves and on the repair of oncogenic lesions for heavy particles with various charges and energies. Studies with repair inhibitors and restriction endonucleases indicated that for oncogenic transformation DNA is the primary target. Results from heavy ion experiments showed that the cross section increased with LET and reached a maximum value of about 0.02 micrometer2 at about 500 keV/micrometer. This limited size of cross section suggests that only a fraction of cellular genomic DNA is important in radiogenic transformation. Free radical scavengers, such as DMSO, do not give any effect on induction of oncogenic transformation by 600 MeV/u iron particles, suggesting most oncogenic damage induced by high-LET heavy ions is through direct action. Repair studies with stationary phase cells showed that the amount of reparable oncogenic lesions decreased with an increase of LET and that heavy ions with LET greater than 200 keV/micrometer produced only irreparable oncogenic damage. An enhancement effect for oncogenic transformation was observed in cells irradiated by low-dose-rate argon ions (400 MeV/u; 120 keV/micrometer). Chromosomal aberrations, such as translocation and deletion, but not sister chromatid exchange, are essential for heavy-ion-induced oncogenic transformation. The basic mechanism(s) of misrepair of DNA damage, which form oncogenic lesions, is unknown.

  6. DNA damage and repair in oncogenic transformation by heavy ion radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T. C.; Mei, M.; George, K. A.; Craise, L. M.

    1996-01-01

    Energetic heavy ions are present in galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events. One of the most important late effects in risk assessment is carcinogenesis. We have studied the carcinogenic effects of heavy ions at the cellular and molecular levels and have obtained quantitative data on dose-response curves and on the repair of oncogenic lesions for heavy particles with various charges and energies. Studies with repair inhibitors and restriction endonucleases indicated that for oncogenic transformation DNA is the primary target. Results from heavy ion experiments showed that the cross section increased with LET and reached a maximum value of about 0.02 micrometer2 at about 500 keV/micrometer. This limited size of cross section suggests that only a fraction of cellular genomic DNA is important in radiogenic transformation. Free radical scavengers, such as DMSO, do not give any effect on induction of oncogenic transformation by 600 MeV/u iron particles, suggesting most oncogenic damage induced by high-LET heavy ions is through direct action. Repair studies with stationary phase cells showed that the amount of reparable oncogenic lesions decreased with an increase of LET and that heavy ions with LET greater than 200 keV/micrometer produced only irreparable oncogenic damage. An enhancement effect for oncogenic transformation was observed in cells irradiated by low-dose-rate argon ions (400 MeV/u; 120 keV/micrometer). Chromosomal aberrations, such as translocation and deletion, but not sister chromatid exchange, are essential for heavy-ion-induced oncogenic transformation. The basic mechanism(s) of misrepair of DNA damage, which form oncogenic lesions, is unknown.

  7. Effects of. beta. -arabinofuranosyladenine on the growth and repair of potentially lethal damage in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Iliakis, G.

    1980-09-01

    ..beta..-D-Arabinofuranosyladenine (..beta..-araA) inhibit the growth of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells by selective inhibition of DNA polymerases. RNA and protein synthesis are not significantly affected. Addition of ..beta..-araA to the cells after irradiation resulted in a concentration-dependent decrease in survival, presumably due to the inhibition of the repair of potentially lethal damage. Since ..beta..-araA selectively inhibits DNA polymerases it is suggested that repair of potentially lethal damage involves steps at the DNA level which require some polymerization. These repair steps take place in the DNA with a velocity comparable to that of the repair of potentially lethal damage. The inhibition of the repair of potentially lethal damage by ..beta..-araA was modified by the addition of deoxyadenosine; this supports the finding that ..beta..-araA acts competitively against dATP at the molecular level. The inhibition of the repair of potentially lethal damage by ..beta..-araA, which is partly reversible, resulted in a concentration-dependent modification of the survival curve. At low concentrations of ..beta..-araA a dose-modifying decrease in survival was observed. At higher concentrations (more than 12 ..mu..M) the decrease in survival resulted in a decrease of the shoulder width of the survival curve. Eventually an exponential curve was obtained. We suggest therefore that the shoulder of the survival curve results from some repair or potentially lethal damage. Preliminary information has been obtained on the time course of this repair.

  8. Coupling of human DNA excision repair and the DNA damage checkpoint in a defined in vitro system.

    PubMed

    Lindsey-Boltz, Laura A; Kemp, Michael G; Reardon, Joyce T; DeRocco, Vanessa; Iyer, Ravi R; Modrich, Paul; Sancar, Aziz

    2014-02-21

    DNA repair and DNA damage checkpoints work in concert to help maintain genomic integrity. In vivo data suggest that these two global responses to DNA damage are coupled. It has been proposed that the canonical 30 nucleotide single-stranded DNA gap generated by nucleotide excision repair is the signal that activates the ATR-mediated DNA damage checkpoint response and that the signal is enhanced by gap enlargement by EXO1 (exonuclease 1) 5' to 3' exonuclease activity. Here we have used purified core nucleotide excision repair factors (RPA, XPA, XPC, TFIIH, XPG, and XPF-ERCC1), core DNA damage checkpoint proteins (ATR-ATRIP, TopBP1, RPA), and DNA damaged by a UV-mimetic agent to analyze the basic steps of DNA damage checkpoint response in a biochemically defined system. We find that checkpoint signaling as measured by phosphorylation of target proteins by the ATR kinase requires enlargement of the excision gap generated by the excision repair system by the 5' to 3' exonuclease activity of EXO1. We conclude that, in addition to damaged DNA, RPA, XPA, XPC, TFIIH, XPG, XPF-ERCC1, ATR-ATRIP, TopBP1, and EXO1 constitute the minimum essential set of factors for ATR-mediated DNA damage checkpoint response.

  9. In Vivo PET Imaging of Myelin Damage and Repair in the Spinal Cord

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    content in vivo. To date, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been the primary tool for diagnosing and monitoring the demyelinating conditions in MS...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In Vivo PET Imaging of Myelin Damage and Repair in the Spinal Cord 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1-0843... spinal cord and data acquisition PET imaging of [11C]MeDAS was performed using a Siemens Inveon microPET/CT scanner in the Case Center for Imaging

  10. Probing the molecular structures of plasma-damaged and surface-repaired low-k dielectrics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoxian; Myers, John N; Lin, Qinghuang; Bielefeld, Jeffery D; Chen, Zhan

    2015-10-21

    Fully understanding the effect and the molecular mechanisms of plasma damage and silylation repair on low dielectric constant (low-k) materials is essential to the design of low-k dielectrics with defined properties and the integration of low-k dielectrics into advanced interconnects of modern electronics. Here, analytical techniques including sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), contact angle goniometry (CA) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) have been employed to provide a comprehensive characterization of the surface and bulk structure changes of poly(methyl)silsesquioxane (PMSQ) low-k thin films before and after O2 plasma treatment and silylation repair. O2 plasma treatment altered drastically both the molecular structures and water structures at the surfaces of the PMSQ film while no bulk structural change was detected. For example, ∼34% Si-CH3 groups were removed from the PMSQ surface, and the Si-CH3 groups at the film surface tilted toward the surface after the O2 plasma treatment. The oxidation by the O2 plasma made the PMSQ film surface more hydrophilic and thus enhanced the water adsorption at the film surface. Both strongly and weakly hydrogen bonded water were detected at the plasma-damaged film surface during exposure to water with the former being the dominate component. It is postulated that this enhancement of both chemisorbed and physisorbed water after the O2 plasma treatment leads to the degradation of low-k properties and reliability. The degradation of the PMSQ low-k film can be recovered by repairing the plasma-damaged surface using a silylation reaction. The silylation method, however, cannot fully recover the plasma induced damage at the PMSQ film surface as evidenced by the existence of hydrophilic groups, including C-O/C[double bond, length as m-dash]O and residual Si-OH groups. This work provides a molecular level picture on the surface structural changes of low

  11. Emerging roles of Jab1/CSN5 in DNA damage response, DNA repair, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yunbao; Yang, Huiling; Claret, Francois X

    2014-03-01

    Jab1/CSN5 is a multifunctional protein that plays an important role in integrin signaling, cell proliferation, apoptosis, and the regulation of genomic instability and DNA repair. Dysregulation of Jab1/CSN5 activity has been shown to contribute to oncogenesis by functionally inactivating several key negative regulatory proteins and tumor suppressors. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of the relationship between Jab1/CSN5 and DNA damage and summarize recent findings regarding opportunities for and challenges to therapeutic intervention.

  12. Slow repair of x-ray-induced DNA damage in rat 9L cells in vitro analyzed by viscoelastometry

    SciTech Connect

    Shafer, R.H.; Chase, E.S.; Eisenach, J.

    1981-01-01

    DNA damage and repair were measured in rat 9L brain tumor cells in vitro using viscoelastometry. Cells were irradiated in saline (no repair) or medium (with repair) and lysed. Following lysis, the viscoelastic retardation time, tau, was determined. In experiments without repair, tau showed an initial increase (0 to 200 rad ..gamma.. rays) followed by a sharp decrease (200 to 1000 rad). When cells were exposed to 1000 rad x rays and allowed postirradiation incubation prior to lysis, the retardation time showed a similar maximum as a function of repair time. These results are discussed in terms of formation and repair of single-strand breaks in conformationally constrained chromosomal DNA, in analogy to results obtained in alkaline sucrose gradient sedimentation studies.

  13. Correction of the DNA repair defect in xeroderma pigmentosum group E by injection of a DNA damage-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Keeney, S.; Brody, T.; Linn, S.; Eker, A.P.M.; Vermeulen, W.; Bootsma, D.; Hoeijmakers, J.H.J.

    1994-04-26

    Cells from a subset of patients with the DNA-repair-defective disease xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group E (XP-E) are known to lack a DNA damage-binding (DDB) activity. Purified human DDB protein was injected into XP-E cells to test whether the DNA-repair defect in these cells is caused by a defect in DDB activity. Injected DDB protein stimulated DNA repair to normal levels in those strains that lack the DDB activity but did not stimulate repair in cells from other xeroderma pigmentosum groups or in XP-E cells that contain the activity. These results provide direct evidence that defective DDB activity causes the repair defect in a subset of XP-E patients, which in turn establishes a role for this activity in nucleotide-excision repair in vivo.

  14. miR-638 suppresses DNA damage repair by targeting SMC1A expression in terminally differentiated cells

    PubMed Central

    He, Mingyang; Lin, Yi; Tang, Yunlan; Liu, Yi; Zhou, Weiwei; Li, Chuang; Sun, Guihong; Guo, Mingxiong

    2016-01-01

    The reduction of DNA damage repair capacity in terminally differentiated cells may be involved in sensitivity to cancer chemotherapy drugs; however, the underlying molecular mechanism is still not fully understood. Herein, we evaluated the role of miR-638 in the regulation of DNA damage repair in terminally differentiated cells. Our results show that miR-638 expression was up-regulated during cellular terminal differentiation and involved in mediating DNA damage repair processes. Results from a luciferase reporting experiment show that structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC)1A was a potential target of miR-638; this was verified by western blot assays during cell differentiation and DNA damage induction. Overexpression of miR-638 enhanced the sensitivity of cancer cells to cisplatin, thus reducing cell viability in response to chemotherapy drug treatment. Furthermore, miR-638 overexpression affected DNA damage repair processes by interfering with the recruitment of the DNA damage repair-related protein, γH2AX, to DNA break sites. These findings indicate that miR-638 might act as a sensitizer in cancer chemotherapy and accompany chemotherapy drugs to enhance chemotherapeutic efficacy and to improve the chance of recovery from cancer. PMID:27405111

  15. Mutational strand asymmetries in cancer genomes reveal mechanisms of DNA damage and repair

    PubMed Central

    Haradhvala, Nicholas J.; Polak, Paz; Stojanov, Petar; Covington, Kyle R.; Shinbrot, Eve; Hess, Julian; Rheinbay, Esther; Kim, Jaegil; Maruvka, Yosef; Braunstein, Lior Z.; Kamburov, Atanas; Hanawalt, Philip C.; Wheeler, David A.; Koren, Amnon; Lawrence, Michael S.; Getz, Gad

    2016-01-01

    Mutational processes constantly shape the somatic genome, leading to immunity, aging, and other diseases. When cancer is the outcome, we are afforded a glimpse into these processes by the clonal expansion of the malignant cell. Here, we characterize a less explored layer of the mutational landscape of cancer: mutational asymmetries between the two DNA strands. Analyzing whole genome sequences of 590 tumors from 14 different cancer types, we reveal widespread asymmetries across mutagenic processes, with transcriptional (“T-class”) asymmetry dominating UV-, smoking-, and liver-cancer-associated mutations, and replicative (“R-class”) asymmetry dominating POLE-, APOBEC-, and MSI-associated mutations. We report a striking phenomenon of Transcription-Coupled Damage (TCD) on the non-transcribed DNA strand, and provide evidence that APOBEC mutagenesis occurs on the lagging-strand template during DNA replication. As more genomes are sequenced, studying and classifying their asymmetries will illuminate the underlying biological mechanisms of DNA damage and repair. PMID:26806129

  16. Oxidative DNA damage and its repair in rat spleen following subchronic exposure to aniline

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Huaxian; Wang Jianling; Abdel-Rahman, Sherif Z.; Boor, Paul J.; Khan, M. Firoze

    2008-12-01

    The mechanisms by which aniline exposure elicits splenotoxic response, especially the tumorigenic response, are not well-understood. Splenotoxicity of aniline is associated with iron overload and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which can cause oxidative damage to DNA, proteins and lipids (oxidative stress). 8-Hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) is one of the most abundant oxidative DNA lesions resulting from ROS, and 8-oxoguanine glycosylase 1 (OGG1), a specific DNA glycosylase/lyase enzyme, plays a key role in the removal of 8-OHdG adducts. This study focused on examining DNA damage (8-OHdG) and repair (OGG1) in the spleen in an experimental condition preceding a tumorigenic response. To achieve that, male Sprague-Dawley rats were subchronically exposed to aniline (0.5 mmol/kg/day via drinking water for 30 days), while controls received drinking water only. Aniline treatment led to a significant increase in splenic oxidative DNA damage, manifested as a 2.8-fold increase in 8-OHdG levels. DNA repair activity, measured as OGG1 base excision repair (BER) activity, increased by {approx} 1.3 fold in the nuclear protein extracts (NE) and {approx} 1.2 fold in the mitochondrial protein extracts (ME) of spleens from aniline-treated rats as compared to the controls. Real-time PCR analysis for OGG1 mRNA expression in the spleen revealed a 2-fold increase in expression in aniline-treated rats than the controls. Likewise, OGG1 protein expression in the NEs of spleens from aniline-treated rats was {approx} 1.5 fold higher, whereas in the MEs it was {approx} 1.3 fold higher than the controls. Aniline treatment also led to stronger immunostaining for both 8-OHdG and OGG1 in the spleens, confined to the red pulp areas. It is thus evident from our studies that aniline-induced oxidative stress is associated with increased oxidative DNA damage. The BER pathway was also activated, but not enough to prevent the accumulation of oxidative DNA damage (8-OHdG). Accumulation of

  17. Oxidative DNA damage and its repair in rat spleen following subchronic exposure to aniline

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Huaxian; Wang, Jianling; Abdel-Rahman, Sherif Z.; Boor, Paul J.; Khan, M. Firoze

    2008-01-01

    The mechanisms by which aniline exposure elicits splenotoxic response, especially the tumorigenic response, are not well-understood. Splenotoxicity of aniline is associated with iron overload and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which can cause oxidative damage to DNA, proteins and lipids (oxidative stress). 8-Hydroxy-2’-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) is one of the most abundant oxidative DNA lesions resulting from ROS, and 8-oxoguanine glycosylase 1 (OGG1), a specific DNA glycosylase/lyase enzyme, plays a key role in the removal of 8-OHdG adducts. This study focused on examining DNA damage (8-OHdG) and repair (OGG1) in the spleen in an experimental condition preceding a tumorigenic response. To achieve that, male Sprague-Dawley rats were subchronically exposed to aniline (0.5 mmol/kg/day via drinking water for 30 days), while controls received drinking water only. Aniline treatment led to a significant increase in splenic oxidative DNA damage, manifested as a 2.8-fold increase in 8-OHdG levels. DNA repair activity, measured as OGG1 base excision repair (BER) activity, increased by ~1.3 fold in the nuclear protein extracts (NE) and ~1.2 fold in the mitochondrial protein extracts (ME) of spleens from aniline-treated rats as compared to the controls. Real-time PCR analysis for OGG1 mRNA expression in the spleen revealed a 2-fold increase in expression in aniline-treated rats than the controls. Likewise, OGG1 protein expression in the NEs of spleens from aniline-treated rats was ~1.5 fold higher, whereas in the MEs it was ~1.3 fold higher than the controls. Aniline treatment also led to stronger immunostaining for both 8-OHdG and OGG1 in the spleens, confined to the red pulp areas. It is thus evident from our studies that aniline-induced oxidative stress is associated with increased oxidative DNA damage. The BER pathway was also activated, but not enough to prevent the accumulation of oxidative DNA damage (8-OHdG). Accumulation of mutagenic oxidative DNA lesions

  18. Spatiotemporal dynamics of DNA repair proteins following laser microbeam induced DNA damage - when is a DSB not a DSB?

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Pamela; Botchway, Stanley W; Parker, Anthony W; O'Neill, Peter

    2013-08-30

    The formation of DNA lesions poses a constant threat to cellular stability. Repair of endogenously and exogenously produced lesions has therefore been extensively studied, although the spatiotemporal dynamics of the repair processes has yet to be fully understood. One of the most recent advances to study the kinetics of DNA repair has been the development of laser microbeams to induce and visualize recruitment and loss of repair proteins to base damage in live mammalian cells. However, a number of studies have produced contradictory results that are likely caused by the different laser systems used reflecting in part the wavelength dependence of the damage induced. Additionally, the repair kinetics of laser microbeam induced DNA lesions have generally lacked consideration of the structural and chemical complexity of the DNA damage sites, which are known to greatly influence their reparability. In this review, we highlight the key considerations when embarking on laser microbeam experiments and interpreting the real time data from laser microbeam irradiations. We compare the repair kinetics from live cell imaging with biochemical and direct quantitative cellular measurements for DNA repair.

  19. Discovery of Novel Small Molecules that Activate Satellite Cell Proliferation and Enhance Repair of Damaged Muscle.

    PubMed

    Billin, Andrew N; Bantscheff, Marcus; Drewes, Gerard; Ghidelli-Disse, Sonja; Holt, Jason A; Kramer, Henning F; McDougal, Alan J; Smalley, Terry L; Wells, Carrow I; Zuercher, William J; Henke, Brad R

    2016-02-19

    Skeletal muscle progenitor stem cells (referred to as satellite cells) represent the primary pool of stem cells in adult skeletal muscle responsible for the generation of new skeletal muscle in response to injury. Satellite cells derived from aged muscle display a significant reduction in regenerative capacity to form functional muscle. This decrease in functional recovery has been attributed to a decrease in proliferative capacity of satellite cells. Hence, agents that enhance the proliferative abilities of satellite cells may hold promise as therapies for a variety of pathological settings, including repair of injured muscle and age- or disease-associated muscle wasting. Through phenotypic screening of isolated murine satellite cells, we identified a series of 2,4-diaminopyrimidines (e.g., 2) that increased satellite cell proliferation. Importantly, compound 2 was effective in accelerating repair of damaged skeletal muscle in an in vivo mouse model of skeletal muscle injury. While these compounds were originally prepared as c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK-1) inhibitors, structure-activity analyses indicated JNK-1 inhibition does not correlate with satellite cell activity. Screening against a broad panel of kinases did not result in identification of an obvious molecular target, so we conducted cell-based proteomics experiments in an attempt to identify the molecular target(s) responsible for the potentiation of the satellite cell proliferation. These data provide the foundation for future efforts to design improved small molecules as potential therapeutics for muscle repair and regeneration.

  20. Understanding the role of the Q338H MUTYH variant in oxidative damage repair.

    PubMed

    Turco, Eleonora; Ventura, Ilenia; Minoprio, Anna; Russo, Maria Teresa; Torreri, Paola; Degan, Paolo; Molatore, Sara; Ranzani, Guglielmina Nadia; Bignami, Margherita; Mazzei, Filomena

    2013-04-01

    The MUTYH DNA-glycosylase is indirectly engaged in the repair of the miscoding 7,8-dihydro-8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanine (8-oxodG) lesion by removing adenine erroneously incorporated opposite the oxidized purine. Inherited biallelic mutations in the MUTYH gene are responsible for a recessive syndrome, the MUTYH-associated polyposis (MAP), which confers an increased risk of colorectal cancer. In this study, we functionally characterized the Q338H variant using recombinant proteins, as well as cell-based assays. This is a common variant among human colorectal cancer genes, which is generally considered, unrelated to the MAP phenotype but recently indicated as a low-penetrance allele. We demonstrate that the Q338H variant retains a wild-type DNA-glycosylase activity in vitro, but it shows a reduced ability to interact with the replication sensor RAD9:RAD1:HUS1 (9-1-1) complex. In comparison with Mutyh(-)(/)(-) mouse embryo fibroblasts expressing a wild-type MUTYH cDNA, the expression of Q338H variant was associated with increased levels of DNA 8-oxodG, hypersensitivity to oxidant and accumulation of the population in the S phase of the cell cycle. Thus, an inefficient interaction of MUTYH with the 9-1-1 complex leads to a repair-defective phenotype, indicating that a proper communication between MUTYH enzymatic function and the S phase checkpoint is needed for effective repair of oxidative damage.

  1. Repair of Alkylation Damage: Stability of Methyl Groups in Bacillus subtilis Treated with Methyl Methanesulfonate

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Louise; Strauss, Bernard

    1970-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis was not inactivated and was able to replicate even though approximately 3 × 104 methyl groups added by methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) were bound to the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of each organism. No significant loss of methyl groups from the DNA occurred for several generations upon incubation of methylated wild-type or MMS-sensitive cells. Single-strand breaks were not observed in the DNA from cells treated at this low MMS dose. Higher doses of MMS resulted in significant killing of both wild-type and MMS-sensitive strains, and the DNA extracted from such treated cells sedimented more slowly than control DNA through alkaline sucrose gradients, indicating the presence of breaks or apurinic sites (or both). These breaks were repaired upon incubation of wild-type but not of MMS-sensitive strains. Repair of damage induced by alkylating agents is probably the repair of breaks which occur as a consequence of high levels of alkylation. PMID:4988041

  2. DNA repair in cells sensitive and resistant to cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II): Host cell reactivation of damaged plasmid DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Sheibani, N.; Jennerwein, M.M.; Eastman, A. )

    1989-04-04

    cis-Diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (cis-DDP) has a broad clinical application as an effective anticancer drug. However, development of resistance to the cytotoxic effects is a limiting factor. In an attempt to understand the mechanism of resistance, the authors have employed a host cell reactivation assay of DNA repair using a cis-DDP-damaged plasmid vector. The efficiency of DNA repair was assayed by measuring the activity of an enzyme coded for by the plasmid vector. The plasmid expression vector pRSV cat contains the bacterial gene coding for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) in a configuration which permits expression in mammalian cells. The plasmid was transfected into repair-proficient and -deficient Chinese hamster ovary cells, and CAT activity was subsequently measured in cell lysates. In the repair-deficient cells, one cis-DDP adduct per cat gene was sufficient to eliminate expression. An equivalent inhibition of CAT expression in the repair-proficient cells did not occur until about 8 times the amount of damage was introduced into the plasmid. These results implicate DNA intrastrand cross-links as the lesions responsible for the inhibition of CAT expression. This assay was used to investigate the potential role of DNA repair in mediating cis-DDP resistance in murine leukemia L1210 cells. The assay readily detects the presence or absence of repair and confirms that these resistant L1210 cells have an enhanced capacity for repair of cis-DDP-induced intrastrand cross-links.

  3. Real-time fluorescence imaging of the DNA damage repair response during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Miwa, Shinji; Yano, Shuya; Yamamoto, Mako; Matsumoto, Yasunori; Uehara, Fuminari; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Toneri, Makoto; Murakami, Takashi; Kimura, Hiroaki; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Yamamoto, Norio; Efimova, Elena V; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-04-01

    The response to DNA damage during mitosis was visualized using real-time fluorescence imaging of focus formation by the DNA-damage repair (DDR) response protein 53BP1 linked to green fluorescent protein (GFP) (53BP1-GFP) in the MiaPaCa-2(Tet-On) pancreatic cancer cell line. To observe 53BP1-GFP foci during mitosis, MiaPaCa-2(Tet-On) 53BP1-GFP cells were imaged every 30 min by confocal microscopy. Time-lapse imaging demonstrated that 11.4 ± 2.1% of the mitotic MiaPaCa-2(Tet-On) 53BP1-GFP cells had increased focus formation over time. Non-mitotic cells did not have an increase in 53BP1-GFP focus formation over time. Some of the mitotic MiaPaCa-2(Tet-On) 53BP1-GFP cells with focus formation became apoptotic. The results of the present report suggest that DNA strand breaks occur during mitosis and undergo repair, which may cause some of the mitotic cells to enter apoptosis in a phenomenon possibly related to mitotic catastrophe.

  4. Methotrexate induces DNA damage and inhibits homologous recombination repair in choriocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Lisha; Zhao, Tiancen; Cai, Jing; Su, You; Wang, Zehua; Dong, Weihong

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the mechanism of sensitivity to methotrexate (MTX) in human choriocarcinoma cells regarding DNA damage response. Methods Two choriocarcinoma cancer cell lines, JAR and JEG-3, were utilized in this study. An MTX-sensitive osteosarcoma cell line MG63, an MTX-resistant epithelial ovarian cancer cell line A2780 and an MTX-resistant cervical adenocarcinoma cell line Hela served as controls. Cell viability assay was carried out to assess MTX sensitivity of cell lines. MTX-induced DNA damage was evaluated by comet assay. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was used to detect the mRNA levels of BRCA1, BRCA2, RAD51 and RAD52. The protein levels of γH2AX, RAD 51 and p53 were analyzed by Western blot. Results Remarkable DNA strand breaks were observed in MTX-sensitive cell lines (JAR, JEG-3 and MG63) but not in MTX-resistant cancer cells (A2780 and Hela) after 48 h of MTX treatment. Only in the choriocarcinoma cells, the expression of homologous recombination (HR) repair gene RAD51 was dramatically suppressed by MTX in a dose- and time-dependent manner, accompanied with the increase in p53. Conclusion The MTX-induced DNA strand breaks accompanied by deficiencies in HR repair may contribute to the hypersensitivity to chemotherapy in choriocarcinoma. PMID:27895503

  5. Repair of clustered DNA damage caused by high LET radiation in human fibroblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rydberg, B.; Lobrich, M.; Cooper, P. K.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    It has recently been demonstrated experimentally that DNA damage induced by high LET radiation in mammalian cells is non-randomly distributed along the DNA molecule in the form of clusters of various sizes. The sizes of such clusters range from a few base-pairs to at least 200 kilobase-pairs. The high biological efficiency of high LET radiation for induction of relevant biological endpoints is probably a consequence of this clustering, although the exact mechanisms by which the clustering affects the biological outcome is not known. We discuss here results for induction and repair of base damage, single-strand breaks and double-strand breaks for low and high LET radiations. These results are discussed in the context of clustering. Of particular interest is to determine how clustering at different scales affects overall rejoining and fidelity of rejoining of DNA double-strand breaks. However, existing methods for measuring repair of DNA strand breaks are unable to resolve breaks that are close together in a cluster. This causes problems in interpretation of current results from high LET radiation and will require new methods to be developed.

  6. Repair of clustered DNA damage caused by high LET radiation in human fibroblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rydberg, B.; Lobrich, M.; Cooper, P. K.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    It has recently been demonstrated experimentally that DNA damage induced by high LET radiation in mammalian cells is non-randomly distributed along the DNA molecule in the form of clusters of various sizes. The sizes of such clusters range from a few base-pairs to at least 200 kilobase-pairs. The high biological efficiency of high LET radiation for induction of relevant biological endpoints is probably a consequence of this clustering, although the exact mechanisms by which the clustering affects the biological outcome is not known. We discuss here results for induction and repair of base damage, single-strand breaks and double-strand breaks for low and high LET radiations. These results are discussed in the context of clustering. Of particular interest is to determine how clustering at different scales affects overall rejoining and fidelity of rejoining of DNA double-strand breaks. However, existing methods for measuring repair of DNA strand breaks are unable to resolve breaks that are close together in a cluster. This causes problems in interpretation of current results from high LET radiation and will require new methods to be developed.

  7. A novel endonuclease that may be responsible for damaged DNA base repair in Pyrococcus furiosus

    PubMed Central

    Shiraishi, Miyako; Ishino, Sonoko; Yamagami, Takeshi; Egashira, Yuriko; Kiyonari, Shinichi; Ishino, Yoshizumi

    2015-01-01

    DNA is constantly damaged by endogenous and environmental influences. Deaminated adenine (hypoxanthine) tends to pair with cytosine and leads to the A:T→G:C transition mutation during DNA replication. Endonuclease V (EndoV) hydrolyzes the second phosphodiester bond 3′ from deoxyinosine in the DNA strand, and was considered to be responsible for hypoxanthine excision repair. However, the downstream pathway after EndoV cleavage remained unclear. The activity to cleave the phosphodiester bond 5′ from deoxyinosine was detected in a Pyrococcus furiosus cell extract. The protein encoded by PF1551, obtained from the mass spectrometry analysis of the purified fraction, exhibited the corresponding cleavage activity. A putative homolog from Thermococcus kodakarensis (TK0887) showed the same activity. Further biochemical analyses revealed that the purified PF1551 and TK0887 proteins recognize uracil, xanthine and the AP site, in addition to hypoxanthine. We named this endonuclease Endonuclease Q (EndoQ), as it may be involved in damaged base repair in the Thermococcals of Archaea. PMID:25694513

  8. Role of the immune system in cardiac tissue damage and repair following myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Saparov, Arman; Ogay, Vyacheslav; Nurgozhin, Talgat; Chen, William C W; Mansurov, Nurlan; Issabekova, Assel; Zhakupova, Jamilya

    2017-09-01

    The immune system plays a crucial role in the initiation, development, and resolution of inflammation following myocardial infarction (MI). The lack of oxygen and nutrients causes the death of cardiomyocytes and leads to the exposure of danger-associated molecular patterns that are recognized by the immune system to initiate inflammation. At the initial stage of post-MI inflammation, the immune system further damages cardiac tissue to clear cell debris. The excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by immune cells and the inability of the anti-oxidant system to neutralize ROS cause oxidative stress that further aggravates inflammation. On the other hand, the cells of both innate and adaptive immune system and their secreted factors are critically instrumental in the very dynamic and complex processes of regulating inflammation and mediating cardiac repair. It is important to decipher the balance between detrimental and beneficial effects of the immune system in MI. This enables us to identify better therapeutic targets for reducing the infarct size, sustaining the cardiac function, and minimizing the likelihood of heart failure. This review discusses the role of both innate and adaptive immune systems in cardiac tissue damage and repair in experimental models of MI.

  9. Histone deacetylase inhibitors mediate DNA damage repair in ameliorating hemorrhagic cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Haldar, Subhash; Dru, Christopher; Mishra, Rajeev; Tripathi, Manisha; Duong, Frank; Angara, Bryan; Fernandez, Ana; Arditi, Moshe; Bhowmick, Neil A.

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic cystitis is an inflammatory and ulcerative bladder condition associated with systemic chemotherapeutics, like cyclophosphomide. Earlier, we reported reactive oxygen species resulting from cyclophosphamide metabolite, acrolein, causes global methylation followed by silencing of DNA damage repair genes. Ogg1 (8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase) is one such silenced base excision repair enzyme that can restore DNA integrity. The accumulation of DNA damage results in subsequent inflammation associated with pyroptotic death of bladder smooth muscle cells. We hypothesized that reversing inflammasome-induced imprinting in the bladder smooth muscle could prevent the inflammatory phenotype. Elevated recruitment of Dnmt1 and Dnmt3b to the Ogg1 promoter in acrolein treated bladder muscle cells was validated by the pattern of CpG methylation revealed by bisulfite sequencing. Knockout of Ogg1 in detrusor cells resulted in accumulation of reactive oxygen mediated 8-Oxo-dG and spontaneous pyroptotic signaling. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), restored Ogg1 expression in cells treated with acrolein and mice treated with cyclophosphamide superior to the standard of care, mesna or nicotinamide-induced DNA demethylation. SAHA restored cyclophosphamide-induced bladder pathology to that of untreated control mice. The observed epigenetic imprinting induced by inflammation suggests a new therapeutic target for the treatment of hemorrhagic cystitis. PMID:27995963

  10. Conserved ram seminal plasma proteins bind to the sperm membrane and repair cryopreservation damage.

    PubMed

    Bernardini, A; Hozbor, F; Sanchez, E; Fornés, M W; Alberio, R H; Cesari, A

    2011-08-01

    Whole seminal plasma (SP) enhances the function and fertility of frozen/thawed ram sperm. The objective of the current study was to investigate whether SP proteins capable of binding to molecules from the sperm plasma membrane were conserved among ram breeds, and whether these proteins were sufficient to overcome cryopreservation-induced reductions in sperm quality. Whole ram SP, obtained from rams of various breeds, improved progressive motility of frozen/thawed sperm at all times evaluated (P < 0.05); however, it did not improve total motility (15 min, P = 0.480; 30 min, P = 0.764; and 45 min, P = 0.795). To identify SP proteins responsible for this effect, a new method was developed to retain SP proteins that bound specifically to the sperm membrane by immobilization of sperm membrane proteins. These proteins specifically bound to the sperm surface, especially the acrosomal region. Lactotransferrin, epididymal secretory protein E1, Synaptosomal-associated protein 29, and RSVP-20 were identified (mass spectrometry) in this fraction. The retained SP proteins fraction repaired ultrastructural damage of frozen/thawed sperm and, with the addition of fructose, significantly improved motility of frozen/thawed sperm. We concluded that SP proteins that bound to the sperm membrane were conserved among ram breeds, and that when added to frozen/thawed semen (along with an energy source), they repaired ram sperm damage and enhanced sperm motility. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Dynamic Changes in DNA Damage and Repair Biomarkers with Employment Length among Nickel Smelting Workers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shan; Bai, Ya Na; Pu, Hong Quan; He, Jie; Zheng, Tong Zhang; Li, Hai Yan; Dai, Min; Cheng, Ning

    2015-09-01

    Our study explored the dynamic changes in and the relationship between the DNA damage marker 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and the DNA repair marker 8-hydroxyguanine DNA glycosidase 1 (hOGG1) according to the length of occupational employment in nickel smelting workers. One hundred forty nickel-exposed smelting workers and 140 age-matched unexposed office workers were selected from the Jinchang cohort. The 8-OHdG levels in smelting workers was significantly higher than in office workers (Z=-8.688, P<0.05) and the 8-OHdG levels among nickel smelting workers in the 10-14 y employment length category was significantly higher than among all peers. The hOGG1 levels among smelting workers were significantly lower than those of non-exposed workers (Z=-8.948, P<0.05). There were significant differences between employment length and hOGG1 levels, with subjects employed in nickel smelting for 10-14 y showing the highest levels of hOGG1. Correlation analysis showed positive correlations between 8-OHdG and hOGG1 levels (r=0.413; P<0.01). DNA damage was increased with employment length among nickel smelting workers and was related to the inhibition of hOGG1 repair capacity.

  12. Histone deacetylase inhibitors mediate DNA damage repair in ameliorating hemorrhagic cystitis.

    PubMed

    Haldar, Subhash; Dru, Christopher; Mishra, Rajeev; Tripathi, Manisha; Duong, Frank; Angara, Bryan; Fernandez, Ana; Arditi, Moshe; Bhowmick, Neil A

    2016-12-20

    Hemorrhagic cystitis is an inflammatory and ulcerative bladder condition associated with systemic chemotherapeutics, like cyclophosphomide. Earlier, we reported reactive oxygen species resulting from cyclophosphamide metabolite, acrolein, causes global methylation followed by silencing of DNA damage repair genes. Ogg1 (8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase) is one such silenced base excision repair enzyme that can restore DNA integrity. The accumulation of DNA damage results in subsequent inflammation associated with pyroptotic death of bladder smooth muscle cells. We hypothesized that reversing inflammasome-induced imprinting in the bladder smooth muscle could prevent the inflammatory phenotype. Elevated recruitment of Dnmt1 and Dnmt3b to the Ogg1 promoter in acrolein treated bladder muscle cells was validated by the pattern of CpG methylation revealed by bisulfite sequencing. Knockout of Ogg1 in detrusor cells resulted in accumulation of reactive oxygen mediated 8-Oxo-dG and spontaneous pyroptotic signaling. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), restored Ogg1 expression in cells treated with acrolein and mice treated with cyclophosphamide superior to the standard of care, mesna or nicotinamide-induced DNA demethylation. SAHA restored cyclophosphamide-induced bladder pathology to that of untreated control mice. The observed epigenetic imprinting induced by inflammation suggests a new therapeutic target for the treatment of hemorrhagic cystitis.

  13. ATR suppresses endogenous DNA damage and allows completion of homologous recombination repair.

    PubMed

    Brown, Adam D; Sager, Brian W; Gorthi, Aparna; Tonapi, Sonal S; Brown, Eric J; Bishop, Alexander J R

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication fork stalling or collapse that arises from endogenous damage poses a serious threat to genome stability, but cells invoke an intricate signaling cascade referred to as the DNA damage response (DDR) to prevent such damage. The gene product ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR) responds primarily to replication stress by regulating cell cycle checkpoint control, yet it's role in DNA repair, particularly homologous recombination (HR), remains unclear. This is of particular interest since HR is one way in which replication restart can occur in the presence of a stalled or collapsed fork. Hypomorphic mutations in human ATR cause the rare autosomal-recessive disease Seckel syndrome, and complete loss of Atr in mice leads to embryonic lethality. We recently adapted the in vivo murine pink-eyed unstable (pun) assay for measuring HR frequency to be able to investigate the role of essential genes on HR using a conditional Cre/loxP system. Our system allows for the unique opportunity to test the effect of ATR loss on HR in somatic cells under physiological conditions. Using this system, we provide evidence that retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells lacking ATR have decreased density with abnormal morphology, a decreased frequency of HR and an increased level of chromosomal damage.

  14. Repair of DNA Damage Induced by Bile Salts in Salmonella enterica

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, Ana I.; Ramos-Morales, Francisco; Casadesús, Josep

    2006-01-01

    Exposure of Salmonella enterica to sodium cholate, sodium deoxycholate, sodium chenodeoxycholate, sodium glychocholate, sodium taurocholate, or sodium glycochenodeoxycholate induces the SOS response, indicating that the DNA-damaging activity of bile resides in bile salts. Bile increases the frequency of GC → AT transitions and induces the expression of genes belonging to the OxyR and SoxRS regulons, suggesting that bile salts may cause oxidative DNA damage. S. enterica mutants lacking both exonuclease III (XthA) and endonuclease IV (Nfo) are bile sensitive, indicating that S. enterica requires base excision repair (BER) to overcome DNA damage caused by bile salts. Bile resistance also requires DinB polymerase, suggesting the need of SOS-associated translesion DNA synthesis. Certain recombination functions are also required for bile resistance, and a key factor is the RecBCD enzyme. The extreme bile sensitivity of RecB−, RecC−, and RecA− RecD− mutants provides evidence that bile-induced damage may impair DNA replication. PMID:16888329

  15. Regulation of ATRIP protein abundance by RAD9 in the DNA damage repair pathway.

    PubMed

    Peng, X-J; Liu, S-J; Bao, C-M; Liu, Y-Z; Xie, H-W; Cai, Y-H; Li, B-M; Hang, H-Y; Ding, X

    2015-12-09

    Genotoxic stress activates checkpoint signaling pathways that activate the checkpoint kinases ATM and ATR, halt cell cycle progression, and promote DNA repair. A number of proteins act in concert with ATR to phosphorylate Chk1, including RAD17, the RAD9-RAD1-HUS1 complex, ATR/ATRIP and TopBp1. However, how these proteins involved act in concert with one another to propagate and maintain the checkpoint response is not well understood. Here, we reported that upregulation of RAD9 protein increased the quantity of ATRIP, suggesting that RAD9 activation will induce more efficient accumulation of ATRIP in vivo. Furthermore, the DNA damage-induced ATRIP foci formation was faster in the mRad9-/- ES cells. Also, ATRIP interacts specifically with RAD9, but not HUS1 and RAD1. Taken together, we suggested that RAD9 could affect both the ATRIP protein levels and DNA damage-induced ATRIP foci formation. Thus, we propose a role of RAD9 in the ATR-Chk1 pathway that is necessary for successful formation of the damage-sensing complex and DNA damage checkpoint signaling.

  16. A stochastic model for tumour control probability that accounts for repair from sublethal damage.

    PubMed

    Ponce Bobadilla, Ana Victoria; Maini, Philip K; Byrne, Helen

    2017-02-26

    The tumour control probability (TCP) is the probability that a treatment regimen of radiation therapy (RT) eradicates all tumour cells in a given tissue. To decrease the toxic effects on healthy cells, RT is usually delivered over a period of weeks in a series of fractions. This allows tumour cells to repair sublethal damage (RSD) caused by radiation. In this article, we introduce a stochastic model for tumour response to radiotherapy which accounts for the effects of RSD. The tumour is subdivided into two cell types: 'affected' cells which have been damaged by RT and 'unaffected' cells which have not. The model is formulated as a birth-death process for which we can derive an explicit formula for the TCP. We apply our model to prostate cancer, and find that the radiosensitivity parameters and the probability of sublethal damage during radiation are the parameters to which the TCP predictions are most sensitive. We compare our TCP predictions to those given by Zaider and Minerbo's one-class model (Zaider & Minerbo, 2000) and Dawson and Hillen's two-class model (Dawson & Hillen, 2006) and find that for low doses of radiation, our model predicts a lower TCP. Finally, we find that when the probability of sublethal damage during radiation is large, the mean field assumption overestimates the TCP. © The authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications. All rights reserved.

  17. The Molecular Mechanisms and the Role of hnRNP K Protein Post- Translational Modification in DNA Damage Repair.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Gao, Feng-Hou

    2017-01-01

    DNA damage repair is a kind of cellular self-protection mechanism in which some relevant proteins are activated when DNA damage response occurs in order to maintain the intracellular function stability and structure integrity. Post-translational modifications (PTMs) of proteins can rapidly confer to them more complicated structure and sophisticated function by covalently combining different small molecules with target proteins, which in turn plays an important regulatory role in DNA damage repair. It was reported that heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) could be involved in DNA damage repair process under the regulation of its many post-translational modifications, including methylation, ubiquitination, sumoylation and phosphorylation. Here, we reviewed molecular mechanisms of hnRNP K protein post-translational modifications and their role in DNA damage repair, which will promote our understanding of how hnRNP K participating in the repair process to maintain the normal operation of biological activities in the cells. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  18. DNA damage induced by boron neutron capture therapy is partially repaired by DNA ligase IV.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Natsuko; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Hirota, Yuki; Tanaka, Hiroki; Watanabe, Tsubasa; Nakagawa, Yosuke; Narabayashi, Masaru; Kinashi, Yuko; Miyatake, Shin-ichi; Hasegawa, Masatoshi; Suzuki, Minoru; Masunaga, Shin-ichiro; Ohnishi, Takeo; Ono, Koji

    2016-03-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a particle radiation therapy that involves the use of a thermal or epithermal neutron beam in combination with a boron ((10)B)-containing compound that specifically accumulates in tumor. (10)B captures neutrons and the resultant fission reaction produces an alpha ((4)He) particle and a recoiled lithium nucleus ((7)Li). These particles have the characteristics of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation and therefore have marked biological effects. High-LET radiation is a potent inducer of DNA damage, specifically of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The aim of the present study was to clarify the role of DNA ligase IV, a key player in the non-homologous end-joining repair pathway, in the repair of BNCT-induced DSBs. We analyzed the cellular sensitivity of the mouse embryonic fibroblast cell lines Lig4-/- p53-/- and Lig4+/+ p53-/- to irradiation using a thermal neutron beam in the presence or absence of (10)B-para-boronophenylalanine (BPA). The Lig4-/- p53-/- cell line had a higher sensitivity than the Lig4+/+ p53-/-cell line to irradiation with the beam alone or the beam in combination with BPA. In BNCT (with BPA), both cell lines exhibited a reduction of the 50 % survival dose (D 50) by a factor of 1.4 compared with gamma-ray and neutron mixed beam (without BPA). Although it was found that (10)B uptake was higher in the Lig4+/+ p53-/- than in the Lig4-/- p53-/- cell line, the latter showed higher sensitivity than the former, even when compared at an equivalent (10)B concentration. These results indicate that BNCT-induced DNA damage is partially repaired using DNA ligase IV.

  19. Enzyme plus light therapy to repair DNA damage in ultraviolet-B-irradiated human skin

    PubMed Central

    Stege, Helger; Roza, Len; Vink, Arie A.; Grewe, Markus; Ruzicka, Thomas; Grether-Beck, Susanne; Krutmann, Jean

    2000-01-01

    Ultraviolet-B (UVB) (290–320 nm) radiation-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers within the DNA of epidermal cells are detrimental to human health by causing mutations and immunosuppressive effects that presumably contribute to photocarcinogenesis. Conventional photoprotection by sunscreens is exclusively prophylactic in nature and of no value once DNA damage has occurred. In this paper, we have therefore assessed whether it is possible to repair UVB radiation-induced DNA damage through topical application of the DNA-repair enzyme photolyase, derived from Anacystis nidulans, that specifically converts cyclobutane dimers into their original DNA structure after exposure to photoreactivating light. When a dose of UVB radiation sufficient to induce erythema was administered to the skin of healthy subjects, significant numbers of dimers were formed within epidermal cells. Topical application of photolyase-containing liposomes to UVB-irradiated skin and subsequent exposure to photoreactivating light decreased the number of UVB radiation-induced dimers by 40–45%. No reduction was observed if the liposomes were not filled with photolyase or if photoreactivating exposure preceded the application of filled liposomes. The UVB dose administered resulted in suppression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), a molecule required for immunity and inflammatory events in the epidermis. In addition, in subjects hypersensitive to nickel sulfate, elicitation of the hypersensitivity reaction in irradiated skin areas was prevented. Photolyase-induced dimer repair completely prevented these UVB radiation-induced immunosuppressive effects as well as erythema and sunburn-cell formation. These studies demonstrate that topical application of photolyase is effective in dimer reversal and thereby leads to immunoprotection. PMID:10660687

  20. DNA excision repair in cell extracts from human cell lines exhibiting hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    Hansson, J.; Keyse, S.M.; Lindahl, T.; Wood, R.D. )

    1991-07-01

    Whole cell extracts from human lymphoid cell lines can perform in vitro DNA repair synthesis in plasmids damaged by agents including UV or cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (cis-DDP). Extracts from xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cells are defective in repair synthesis. We have now studied in vitro DNA repair synthesis using extracts from lymphoblastoid cell lines representing four human hereditary syndromes with increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. Extracts of cell lines from individuals with the sunlight-sensitive disorders dysplastic nevus syndrome or Cockayne's syndrome (complementation groups A and B) showed normal DNA repair synthesis in plasmids with UV photoproducts. This is consistent with in vivo measurements of the overall DNA repair capacity in such cell lines. A number of extracts were prepared from two cell lines representing the variant form of XP (XP-V). Half of the extracts prepared showed normal levels of in vitro DNA repair synthesis in plasmids containing UV lesions, but the remainder of the extracts from the same cell lines showed deficient repair synthesis, suggesting the possibility of an unusually labile excision repair protein in XP-V. Fanconi's anemia (FA) cells show cellular hypersensitivity to cross-linking agents including cis-DDP. Extracts from cell lines belonging to two different complementation groups of FA showed normal DNA repair synthesis in plasmids containing cis-DDP or UV adducts. Thus, there does not appear to be an overall excision repair defect in FA, but the data do not exclude a defect in the repair of interstrand DNA cross-links.

  1. Normal and defective repair of damaged DNA in human cells: a sensitive assay utilizing the photolysis of bromodeoxyuridine.

    PubMed

    Regan, J D; Setlow, R B; Ley, R D

    1971-04-01

    A new technique has been developed for studying the extent of repair of UV-radiation damage to DNA in human cells. It is easy to use, has excellent sensitivity, and provides rapid quantitative estimates of repair. UV-irradiated cells whose DNA has been previously labeled with a radioisotope are grown after irradiation in non-radioactive bromodeoxyuridine, which is incorporated at the breaks induced by repair enzymes. After a period of growth in the thymidine analog the cells are exposed to a large flux of 313 nm radiation and then lysed on top of an alkaline sucrose gradient. Bromodeoxyuridine-containing sections of the DNA are thus selectively photolysed. Sedimentation in the alkaline gradient reveals the average molecular weight of disrupted segments and gives a measure of the number of breaks induced by repair enzymes over the whole period allowed for repair. The large change in average molecular weight observed upon exposure of normal repairing cells to 313 nm radiation is not observed in the repair-deficient cells from patients with xeroderma pigmentosum. The quantitative aspects of this assay for repair and its sensitivity should make it applicable to the study of repair induced by agents other than UV radiation.

  2. Magnetic Zenith Enhancement of HF Radio-Induced Airglow Production at HAARP

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-02-22

    Magnetic zenith enhancement of HF radio-induced airglow production at HAARP T. R. Pedersen,1 M. McCarrick,2 E. Gerken,3 C. Selcher,4 D. Sentman,5 H ...E. Gerken, C. Selcher, D. Sentman, H . C. Carlson, and A. Gurevich, Magnetic zenith enhancement of HF radio- induced airglow production at HAARP...Unambiguous evidence of HF pump-enhanced airglow at auroral latitudes, Geophys. Res. Lett., 26(23), 2561–3564, 1999. Gurevich, A., H . Carlson, M. Kelley, T

  3. Rapamycin‐induced autophagy sensitizes A549 cells to radiation associated with DNA damage repair inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong; Liu, Fen; Wang, Yong; Li, Donghai; Guo, Fei; Xu, Liyao; Zeng, Zhengguo; Zhong, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Autophagy has been reported to increase in cancer cells after radiation. However, it remains unknown whether increased autophagy as a result of radiation affects DNA damage repair and sensitizes cancer cells. In this study, the radiosensitization effect of rapamycin, a mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor that induces autophagy, on human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells was investigated. Methods A549 cells were treated with different concentrations of rapamycin. Cell viability was evaluated by methyl‐thiazolyl‐tetrazolium assay. Survival fraction values of A549 cells after radiotherapy were detected by colony formation assay. Autophagosome was observed by a transmission electron microscope. Furthermore, Western blot was employed to examine alterations in autophagy protein LC3 and p62, DNA damage protein γ–H2AX, and DNA damage repair proteins Rad51, Ku70, and Ku80. Rad51, Ku70, and Ku80 messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression levels were examined by real‐time polymerase chain reaction. Results Rapamycin suppressed A549 cell proliferation in dose and time‐dependent manners. An inhibitory concentration (IC) 10 dose of rapamycin could induce autophagy in A549 cells. Rapamycin combined with radiation significantly decreased the colony forming ability of cells, compared with rapamycin or radiation alone. Rapamycin and radiation combined increased γ–H2AX expression levels and decreased Rad51 and Ku80 expression levels, compared with single regimens. However, rapamycin treatment did not induce any change in Rad51, Ku70, and Ku80 mRNA levels, regardless of radiation. Conclusions These findings indicate that increasing autophagy sensitizes lung cancer cells to radiation. PMID:27385978

  4. Effects of chronic low-dose ultraviolet B radiation on DNA damage and repair in mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, D L; Greinert, R; de Gruijl, F R; Guikers, K L; Breitbart, E W; Byrom, M; Gallmeier, M M; Lowery, M G; Volkmer, B

    1999-06-15

    Chronic exposure to sunlight causes skin cancer in humans, yet little is known about how habitual exposure to low doses of ultraviolet B radiation (UVB) affects DNA damage in the skin. We treated Skh-1 hairless mice with daily doses of suberythemal UVB for 40 days and analyzed the amount and distribution of DNA photodamage using RIAs and immunofluorescence micrography. We found that DNA damage accumulated in mouse skin as a result of chronic irradiation and that this damage persisted in the dermis and epidermis for several weeks after the chronic treatment was terminated. Although the persistent damage was evenly distributed throughout the dermis, it remained in the epidermis as a small number of heavily damaged cells at the dermal-epidermal boundary. Rates of DNA damage induction and repair were determined at different times over the course of chronic treatment in response to a higher challenge dose of UVB light. The amount of damage induced by the challenge dose increased in response to chronic exposure, and excision repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and pyrimidine(6-4)pyrimidone dimers was significantly reduced. The sensitization of mouse epidermal DNA to photoproduct induction, the reduction in excision repair, and the accumulation of nonrepairable DNA damage in the dermis and epidermis suggest that chronic low-dose exposure to sunlight may significantly enhance the predisposition of mammalian skin to sunlight-induced carcinogenesis.

  5. Defective DNA strand break repair after DNA damage in prostate cancer cells: implications for genetic instability and prostate cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Fan, Rong; Kumaravel, Tirukalikundram S; Jalali, Farid; Marrano, Paula; Squire, Jeremy A; Bristow, Robert G

    2004-12-01

    Together with cell cycle checkpoint control, DNA repair plays a pivotal role in protecting the genome from endogenous and exogenous DNA damage. Although increased genetic instability has been associated with prostate cancer progression, the relative role of DNA double-strand break repair in malignant versus normal prostate epithelial cells is not known. In this study, we determined the RNA and protein expression of a series of DNA double-strand break repair genes in both normal (PrEC-epithelial and PrSC-stromal) and malignant (LNCaP, DU-145, and PC-3) prostate cultures. Expression of genes downstream of ATM after ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage reflected the p53 status of the cell lines. In the malignant prostate cell lines, mRNA and protein levels of the Rad51, Xrcc3, Rad52, and Rad54 genes involved in homologous recombination were elevated approximately 2- to 5-fold in comparison to normal PrEC cells. The XRCC1, DNA polymerase-beta and -delta proteins were also elevated. There were no consistent differences in gene expression relating to the nonhomologous end-joining pathway. Despite increased expression of DNA repair genes, malignant prostate cancer cells had defective repair of DNA breaks, alkali-labile sites, and oxidative base damage. Furthermore, after ionizing radiation and mitomycin C treatment, chromosomal aberration assays confirmed that malignant prostate cells had defective DNA repair. This discordance between expression and function of DNA repair genes in malignant prostate cancer cells supports the hypothesis that prostate tumor progression may reflect aberrant DNA repair. Our findings support the development of novel treatment strategies designed to reinstate normal DNA repair in prostate cancer cells.

  6. Can Youthful Students be Encouraged to Self-repair Damaged Vision Using Elementary Mathematics and Physics Principles?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Nadja; McLeod, Roger

    2006-03-01

    Safe and easy self-repair of damaged vision in youth, detected from squinted eyes, motivated by simple applied math and physics, and over-stretched elastics. Parental permission and participation, with math skills of numerical cancellation, bring physics understanding to students. They recognize pupil diameter changes with light intensity. Ideas of focal surfaces and wavelength dependence can be achieved by burning paper with a magnifying glass, and dispersing light with a prism. Safeness of eye and head movements required are like those of the mother in applying makeup, or of a father in shaving. Easily defined, performed and monitored visual tasks can complete the repair(s).

  7. The EMSY threonine 207 phospho-site is required for EMSY-driven suppression of DNA damage repair

    PubMed Central

    Jelinic, Petar; Eccles, Laura A.; Tseng, Jill; Cybulska, Paulina; Wielgos, Monicka; Powell, Simon N.; Levine, Douglas A.

    2017-01-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 are essential for the repair of double-strand DNA breaks, and alterations in these genes are a hallmark of breast and ovarian carcinomas. Other functionally related genes may also play important roles in carcinogenesis. Amplification of EMSY, a putative BRCAness gene, has been suggested to impair DNA damage repair by suppressing BRCA2 function. We employed direct repeat GFP (DR-GFP) and RAD51 foci formation assays to show that EMSY overexpression impairs the repair of damaged DNA, suggesting that EMSY belongs to the family of BRCAness proteins. We also identified a novel phospho-site at threonine 207 (T207) and demonstrated its role in EMSY-driven suppression of DNA damage repair. In vitro kinase assays established that protein kinase A (PKA) directly phosphorylates the T207 phospho-site. Immunoprecipitation experiments suggest that EMSY-driven suppression of DNA damage repair is a BRCA2-independent process. The data also suggest that EMSY amplification is a BRCAness feature, and may help to expand the population of patients who could benefit from targeted therapies that are also effective in BRCA1/2-mutant cancers. PMID:28099152

  8. The human Werner syndrome protein stimulates repair of oxidative DNA base damage by the DNA glycosylase NEIL1.

    PubMed

    Das, Aditi; Boldogh, Istvan; Lee, Jae Wan; Harrigan, Jeanine A; Hegde, Muralidhar L; Piotrowski, Jason; de Souza Pinto, Nadja; Ramos, William; Greenberg, Marc M; Hazra, Tapas K; Mitra, Sankar; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2007-09-07

    The mammalian DNA glycosylase, NEIL1, specific for repair of oxidatively damaged bases in the genome via the base excision repair pathway, is activated by reactive oxygen species and prevents toxicity due to radiation. We show here that the Werner syndrome protein (WRN), a member of the RecQ family of DNA helicases, associates with NEIL1 in the early damage-sensing step of base excision repair. WRN stimulates NEIL1 in excision of oxidative lesions from bubble DNA substrates. The binary interaction between NEIL1 and WRN (K(D) = 60 nM) involves C-terminal residues 288-349 of NEIL1 and the RecQ C-terminal (RQC) region of WRN, and is independent of the helicase activity WRN. Exposure to oxidative stress enhances the NEIL-WRN association concomitant with their strong nuclear co-localization. WRN-depleted cells accumulate some prototypical oxidized bases (e.g. 8-oxoguanine, FapyG, and FapyA) indicating a physiological function of WRN in oxidative damage repair in mammalian genomes. Interestingly, WRN deficiency does not have an additive effect on in vivo damage accumulation in NEIL1 knockdown cells suggesting that WRN participates in the same repair pathway as NEIL1.

  9. The comet assay, DNA damage, DNA repair and cytotoxicity: hedgehogs are not always dead.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, Yolanda; Costa, Solange; Collins, Andrew R; Azqueta, Amaya

    2013-07-01

    DNA damage is commonly measured at the level of individual cells using the so-called comet assay (single-cell gel electrophoresis). As the frequency of DNA breaks increases, so does the fraction of the DNA extending towards the anode, forming the comet tail. Comets with almost all DNA in the tail are often referred to as 'hedgehog' comets and are widely assumed to represent apoptotic cells. We review the literature and present theoretical and empirical arguments against this interpretation. The level of DNA damage in these comets is far less than the massive fragmentation that occurs in apoptosis. 'Hedgehog' comets are formed after moderate exposure of cells to, for example, H2O2, but if the cells are incubated for a short period, 'hedgehogs' are no longer seen. We confirm that this is not because DNA has degraded further and been lost from the gel, but because the DNA is repaired. The comet assay may detect the earliest stages of apoptosis, but as it proceeds, comets disappear in a smear of unattached DNA. It is clear that 'hedgehogs' can correspond to one level on a continuum of genotoxic damage, are not diagnostic of apoptosis and should not be regarded as an indicator of cytotoxicity.

  10. Structural performance of notch damaged steel beams repaired with composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Taly, Boshra

    2016-06-01

    An experimental program and an analytical model using ANSYS program were employed to estimate the structural performance of repaired damaged steel beams using fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composite materials. The beams were artificially notched in the tension flanges at mid-spans and retrofitted by FRP flexible sheets on the tension flanges and the sheets were extended to cover parts of the beams webs with different heights. Eleven box steel beams, including one intact beam, one notch damaged beam and nine notches damaged beam and retrofitted with composite materials, were tested in two-point loading up to failure. The parameters considered were the FRP type (GFRP and CFRP) and number of layers. The results indicated that bonding CFRP sheets to both of the tension steel flange and part of the webs, instead of the tension flange only, enhances the ultimate load of the retrofitted beams, avoids the occurrence of the debonding and increases the beam ductility. Also the numerical models give acceptable results in comparison with the experimental results.

  11. Damage, Repair, and Mutagenesis in Nuclear Genes after Mouse Forebrain Ischemia–Reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Philip K.; Hsu, Chung Y.; Dizdaroglu, Miral; Floyd, Robert A.; Kow, Yoke W.; Karakaya, Asuman; Rabow, Lois E.; Cui, Jian-K.

    2009-01-01

    To determine whether oxidative stress after cerebral ischemia–reperfusion affects genetic stability in the brain, we studied mutagenesis after forebrain ischemia–reperfusion in Big Blue transgenic mice (male C57BL/6 strain) containing a reporter lacI gene, which allows detection of mutation frequency. The frequency of mutation in this reporter lacI gene increased from 1.5 to 7.7 (per 100,000) in cortical DNA after 30 min of forebrain ischemia and 8 hr of reperfusion and remained elevated at 24 hr reperfusion. Eight DNA lesions that are characteristic of DNA damage mediated by free radicals were detected. Four mutagenic lesions (2,6-diamino-4-hydroxy-5-formamidopyrimidine, 8-hydroxyadenine, 5-hydroxycytosine, and 8-hydroxyguanine) examined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and one corresponding 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine by a method of HPLC with electrochemical detection increased in cortical DNA two- to fourfold (p < 0.05) during 10–20 min of reperfusion. The damage to γ-actin and DNA polymerase-β genes was detected within 20 min of reperfusion based on the presence of formamidopyrimidine DNA N-glycosylase-sensitive sites. These genes became resistant to the glycosylase within 4–6 hr of reperfusion, suggesting a reduction in DNA damage and presence of DNA repair in nuclear genes. These results suggest that nuclear genes could be targets of free radicals. PMID:8824320

  12. Factors that influence telomeric oxidative base damage and repair by DNA glycosylase OGG1.

    PubMed

    Rhee, David B; Ghosh, Avik; Lu, Jian; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Liu, Yie

    2011-01-02

    Telomeres are nucleoprotein complexes at the ends of linear chromosomes in eukaryotes, and are essential in preventing chromosome termini from being recognized as broken DNA ends. Telomere shortening has been linked to cellular senescence and human aging, with oxidative stress as a major contributing factor. 7,8-Dihydro-8-oxogaunine (8-oxodG) is one of the most abundant oxidative guanine lesions, and 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1) is involved in its removal. In this study, we examined if telomeric DNA is particularly susceptible to oxidative base damage and if telomere-specific factors affect the incision of oxidized guanines by OGG1. We demonstrated that telomeric TTAGGG repeats were more prone to oxidative base damage and repaired less efficiently than non-telomeric TG repeats in vivo. We also showed that the 8-oxodG-incision activity of OGG1 is similar in telomeric and non-telomeric double-stranded substrates. In addition, telomere repeat binding factors TRF1 and TRF2 do not impair OGG1 incision activity. Yet, 8-oxodG in some telomere structures (e.g., fork-opening, 3'-overhang, and D-loop) were less effectively excised by OGG1, depending upon its position in these substrates. Collectively, our data indicate that the sequence context of telomere repeats and certain telomere configurations may contribute to telomere vulnerability to oxidative DNA damage processing.

  13. Review of spaceflight and hindlimb suspension unloading induced sarcomere damage and repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, D. A.; Thompson, J. L.; Krippendorf, B. B.; Slocum, G. R.

    1995-01-01

    Hindlimb suspension unloading (HSU) and spaceflight microgravity induce atrophy of the slow adductor longus muscle fibers which, following reloading, exhibit eccentric contraction (EC)-like lesions (abnormal widening of sarcomeres with A band disruption and excessively wavy, extracted Z lines). These lesions are similar morphologically to those produced in normal muscles after strenuous eccentric exercise. It appears that atrophic muscles exhibit increased susceptibility to eccentric damage because lesions are produced during nonstressful voluntary movements upon return to weightbearing. The EC-like lesions are absent in the unweighted conditions, but appear in HSU rats 15-60 minutes after reloading and in space-flown rates about 4 hrs after landing. By 12 hours, many EC-like lesioned sarcomeres are fully covered by longitudinal patches of Z line-like material which increases in density by 48 hours, producing the so-called "Z line streaming" morphology. In this case, Z line streaming is indicative of rapid repair of damaged sarcomeres rather than the onset of sarcomere breakdown. Immunoelectron microscopy is necessary to determine the composition of this dense material. By 9 days of reloading at 1 gravity, sarcomeres have regained normal structure, except for very rare persistence of faint Z patches. The morphological data indicate that Z patches serve at least two functions: 1) to permit contractile force to be transmitted across the damaged sarcomeres and 2) to provide a scaffold upon which sarcomeres are reconstructed in an active functional muscle.

  14. G9a coordinates with the RPA complex to promote DNA damage repair and cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qiaoyan; Zhu, Qian; Lu, Xiaopeng; Du, Yipeng; Cao, Linlin; Shen, Changchun; Hou, Tianyun; Li, Meiting; Li, Zhiming; Liu, Chaohua; Wu, Di; Xu, Xingzhi; Wang, Lina; Wang, Haiying; Zhao, Ying; Yang, Yang; Zhu, Wei-Guo

    2017-01-01

    Histone methyltransferase G9a has critical roles in promoting cancer-cell growth and gene suppression, but whether it is also associated with the DNA damage response is rarely studied. Here, we report that loss of G9a impairs DNA damage repair and enhances the sensitivity of cancer cells to radiation and chemotherapeutics. In response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), G9a is phosphorylated at serine 211 by casein kinase 2 (CK2) and recruited to chromatin. The chromatin-enriched G9a can then directly interact with replication protein A (RPA) and promote loading of the RPA and Rad51 recombinase to DSBs. This mechanism facilitates homologous recombination (HR) and cell survival. We confirmed the interaction between RPA and G9a to be critical for RPA foci formation and HR upon DNA damage. Collectively, our findings demonstrate a regulatory pathway based on CK2–G9a–RPA that permits HR in cancer cells and provide further rationale for the use of G9a inhibitors as a cancer therapeutic. PMID:28698370

  15. Repair of DNA damaged by ionizing radiation and other oxidative agents in yeast and human

    SciTech Connect

    Louise Prakash

    2000-01-15

    Treatment of cells with oxidative DNA damaging agents such as ionizing radiation and hydrogen peroxide produces .OH radicals which attack DNA, producing single strand breaks and double strand breaks that have a 3'-blocked terminus with a phosphoglycolate or a phosphate group attached to the 3'-terminus. While DNA strand breaks with 3'-blocked termini are the hallmark of oxidative DNA damage, the mechanisms by which such blocked 3'-termini are removed in eukaryotes remain poorly understood. The goals of this project were to identify the various genes that function in cleaning the blocked 3'-ends from DNA strand breaks generated by treatments with ionizing radiation and hydrogen peroxide, to purify the proteins encoded by these genes and to characterize their biochemical activities, and to determine the biological consequences when such damage is not repaired. Because of the high degree of conservation of DNA repair proteins between yeast and humans, and because of the ease of genetic manipulations, initial studies were to be carried out in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The homologous genes and proteins would then be studied in humans. One aspect of our proposed research was to purify the Apn2 protein from yeast cells and to examine its AP endonuclease and 3'-phosphodiesterase activities. Apn2-like proteins have been identified in eukaryotes other than yeast, including humans, and these proteins form a distinct subfamily within the ExoIII/Ape1/Apn2 family of proteins. We purified the Apn2 protein from yeast and showed that it is a class II AP endonuclease. (Class II AP endonucleases cleave the phosphodiester backbone on the 5'-side of the AP site and produce a 3'-OH group and a 5'-baseless deoxyribose 5'-phosphate residue). Yeast Apn2 and its orthologs in higher eukaryotes differ from E. coli ExoIII and human Ape1 in possessing a C terminus that is absent from the ExoIII/Ape1 subfamily. We found that deletion of the carboxyl-terminus of yeast Apn2 protein does not affect

  16. Repair of DNA damaged by ionizing radiation and other oxidative agents in yeast and human

    SciTech Connect

    Louisek Prakash

    2000-01-15

    OAK B202 Treatment of cells with oxidative DNA damaging agents such as ionizing radiation and hydrogen peroxide produces .OH radicals which attack DNA, producing single strand breaks and double strand breaks that have a 3'-blocked terminus with a phosphoglycolate or a phosphate group attached to the 3'-terminus. While DNA strand breaks with 3'-blocked termini are the hallmark of oxidative DNA damage, the mechanisms by which such blocked 3'-termini are removed in eukaryotes remain poorly understood. The goals of this project were to identify the various genes that function in cleaning the blocked 3'ends from DNA strand breaks generated by treatments with ionizing radiation and hydrogen peroxide, to purify the proteins encoded by these genes and to characterize their biochemical activities, and to determine the biological consequences when such damage is not repaired. Because of the high degree of conservation of DNA repair proteins between yeast and humans, and because of the ease of genetic manipulations, initial studies were to be carried out in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The homologous genes and proteins would then be studied in humans. One aspect of our proposed research was to purify the Apn2 protein from yeast cells and to examine its AP endonuclease and 3'-phosphodiesterase activities. Apn2-like proteins have been identified in eukaryotes other than yeast, including humans, and these proteins form a distinct subfamily within the ExoIII/Ape1/Apn2 family of proteins. We purified the Apn2 protein from yeast and showed that it is a class II AP endonuclease. (Class II AP endonucleases cleave the phosphodiester backbone on the 5'-side of the AP site and produce a 3'-OH group and a 5'-baseless deoxyribose 5'-phosphate residue). Yeast Apn2 and its orthologs in higher eukaryotes differ from E. coli ExoIII and human Ape1 in possessing a C terminus that is absent from the ExoIII/Ape1 subfamily. We found that deletion of the carboxyl-terminus of yeast Apn2 protein does

  17. Chromatin Modifications during Repair of Environmental Exposure-Induced DNA Damage: A Potential Mechanism for Stable Epigenetic Alterations

    PubMed Central

    O’Hagan, Heather M.

    2014-01-01

    Exposures to environmental toxicants and toxins cause epigenetic changes that likely play a role in the development of diseases associated with exposure. The mechanism behind these exposure-induced epigenetic changes is currently unknown. One commonality between most environmental exposures is that they cause DNA damage either directly or through causing an increase in reactive oxygen species, which can damage DNA. Like transcription, DNA damage repair must occur in the context of chromatin requiring both histone modifications and ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling. These chromatin changes aid in DNA damage accessibility and signaling. Several proteins and complexes involved in epigenetic silencing during both development and cancer have been found to be localized to sites of DNA damage. The chromatin-based response to DNA damage is considered a transient event, with chromatin being restored to normal as DNA damage repair is completed. However, in individuals chronically exposed to environmental toxicants or with chronic inflammatory disease, repeated DNA damage-induced chromatin rearrangement may ultimately lead to permanent epigenetic alterations. Understanding the mechanism behind exposure-induced epigenetic changes will allow us to develop strategies to prevent or reverse these changes. This review focuses on epigenetic changes and DNA damage induced by environmental exposures, the chromatin changes that occur around sites of DNA damage, and how these transient chromatin changes may lead to heritable epigenetic alterations at sites of chronic exposure. PMID:24259318

  18. Perspectives in radiation biophysics: From radiation track structure simulation to mechanistic models of DNA damage and repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikjoo, H.; Taleei, R.; Liamsuwan, T.; Liljequist, D.; Emfietzoglou, D.

    2016-11-01

    In radiation targeted therapy and genetic risk estimation of low dose radiation protection there is a crucial need for full description of DNA damage response and repair (DDR) leading to cell death and cell mutation. We propose such a description can be arrived through realistic track-structure simulations together with mechanistic mathematical formulation of DDR and the availability of experimental data for testing the proof of principle. In this paper we review briefly first the state of the art in DNA damage and repair, and then the recent advances in the physics of track structure which represents an essential tool in radiation biophysics.

  19. Alpha-phellandrene-induced DNA damage and affect DNA repair protein expression in WEHI-3 murine leukemia cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jen-Jyh; Wu, Chih-Chung; Hsu, Shu-Chun; Weng, Shu-Wen; Ma, Yi-Shih; Huang, Yi-Ping; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-11-01

    Although there are few reports regarding α-phellandrene (α-PA), a natural compound from Schinus molle L. essential oil, there is no report to show that α-PA induced DNA damage and affected DNA repair associated protein expression. Herein, we investigated the effects of α-PA on DNA damage and repair associated protein expression in murine leukemia cells. Flow cytometric assay was used to measure the effects of α-PA on total cell viability and the results indicated that α-PA induced cell death. Comet assay and 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride staining were used for measuring DNA damage and condensation, respectively, and the results indicated that α-PA induced DNA damage and condensation in a concentration-dependent manner. DNA gel electrophoresis was used to examine the DNA damage and the results showed that α-PA induced DNA damage in WEHI-3 cells. Western blotting assay was used to measure the changes of DNA damage and repair associated protein expression and the results indicated that α-PA increased p-p53, p-H2A.X, 14-3-3-σ, and MDC1 protein expression but inhibited the protein of p53, MGMT, DNA-PK, and BRCA-1.

  20. Bisdemethoxycurcumin induces DNA damage and inhibits DNA repair associated protein expressions in NCI-H460 human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chien-Chih; Yang, Su-Tso; Huang, Wen-Wen; Peng, Shu-Fen; Huang, An-Cheng; Tang, Nou-Ying; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Yang, Mei-Due; Lai, Kuang-Chi; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-08-30

    Nonsmall cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) is a devastating primary lung tumor resistant to conventional therapies. Bisdemethoxycurcumin (BDMC) is one of curcumin derivate from Turmeric and has been shown to induce NSCLC cell death. Although there is one report to show BDMC induced DNA double strand breaks, however, no available information to show BDMC induced DNA damage action with inhibited DNA repair protein in lung cancer cells in detail. In this study, we tested BDMC-induced DNA damage and condensation in NCI-H460 cells by using Comet assay and DAPI staining examinations, respectively and we found BDMC induced DNA damage and condension. Western blotting was used to examine the effects of BDMC on protein expression associated with DNA damage and repair and results indicated that BDMC suppressed the protein levels associated with DNA damage and repair, such as 14-3-3σ (an important checkpoint keeper of DDR), O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase, DNA repair proteins breast cancer 1, early onset, mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 but activate phosphorylated p53 and p-H2A.X (phospho Ser140) in NCI-H460 cells. Confocal laser systems microscopy was used for examining the protein translocation and results show that BDMC increased the translocation of p-p53 and p-H2A.X (phospho Ser140) from cytosol to nuclei in NCI-H460 cells. In conclusion, BDMC induced DNA damage and condension and affect DNA repair proteins in NCI-H460 cells in vitro. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol, 2015.

  1. XPC is essential for nucleotide excision repair of zidovudine-induced DNA damage in human hepatoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Qiangen; Beland, Frederick A.; Chang, Ching-Wei; Fang Jialong

    2011-03-01

    Zidovudine (3'-azido-3'-dexoythymidine, AZT), a nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, can be incorporated into DNA and cause DNA damage. The mechanisms underlying the repair of AZT-induced DNA damage are unknown. To investigate the pathways involved in the recognition and repair of AZT-induced DNA damage, human hepatoma HepG2 cells were incubated with AZT for 2 weeks and the expression of DNA damage signaling pathways was determined using a pathway-based real-time PCR array. Compared to control cultures, damaged DNA binding and nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathways showed significantly increased gene expression. Further analysis indicated that AZT treatment increased the expression of genes associated with NER, including XPC, XPA, RPA1, GTF2H1, and ERCC1. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the protein levels of XPC and GTF2H1 were also significantly up-regulated. To explore further the function of XPC in the repair of AZT-induced DNA damage, XPC expression was stably knocked down by 71% using short hairpin RNA interference. In the XPC knocked-down cells, 100 {mu}M AZT treatment significantly increased [{sup 3}H]AZT incorporation into DNA, decreased the total number of viable cells, increased the release of lactate dehydrogenase, induced apoptosis, and caused a more extensive G2/M cell cycle arrest when compared to non-transfected HepG2 cells or HepG2 cells transfected with a scrambled short hairpin RNA sequence. Overall, these data indicate that XPC plays an essential role in the NER repair of AZT-induced DNA damage.

  2. Autophagy Promotes the Repair of Radiation-Induced DNA Damage in Bone Marrow Hematopoietic Cells via Enhanced STAT3 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fei; Li, Xin; Yan, Lili; Yuan, Na; Fang, Yixuan; Cao, Yan; Xu, Li; Zhang, Xiaoying; Xu, Lan; Ge, Chaorong; An, Ni; Jiang, Gaoyue; Xie, Jialing; Zhang, Han; Jiang, Jiayi; Li, Xiaotian; Yao, Lei; Zhang, Suping; Zhou, Daohong; Wang, Jianrong

    2017-03-01

    Autophagy protects hematopoietic cells from radiation damage in part by promoting DNA damage repair. However, the molecular mechanisms by which autophagy regulates DNA damage repair remain largely elusive. Here, we report that this radioprotective effect of autophagy depends on STAT3 signaling in murine bone marrow mononuclear cells (BM-MNCs). Specifically, we found that STAT3 activation and nuclear translocation in BM-MNCs were increased by activation of autophagy with an mTOR inhibitor and decreased by knockout of the autophagy gene Atg7. The autophagic regulation of STAT3 activation is likely mediated by induction of KAP1 degradation, because we showed that KAP1 directly interacted with STAT3 in the cytoplasm and knockdown of KAP1 increased the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of STAT3. Subsequently, activated STAT3 transcriptionally upregulated the expression of BRCA1, which increased the ability of BM-MNCs to repair radiation-induced DNA damage. This novel finding that activation of autophagy can promote DNA damage repair in BM-MNCs via the ATG-KAP1-STAT3-BRCA1 pathway suggests that autophagy plays an important role in maintaining genomic integrity of BM-MNCs and its activation may confer protection of BM-MNCs against radiation-induced genotoxic stress.

  3. Topical retinoic acid enhances the repair of ultraviolet damaged dermal connective tissue.

    PubMed

    Kligman, L H; Duo, C H; Kligman, A M

    1984-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation induces excessive accumulations of elastic fibers in animal and human skin. Collagen is damaged and glycosaminoglycans are vastly increased. Formerly considered an irreversible change, we recently showed, post-irradiation, that a band of normal connective tissue was laid down subepidermally . Because of its ability to stimulate fibroblasts and enhance healing of wounds, we thought it likely that retinoic acid (RA) would promote the formation of this subepidermal zone of reconstruction. Hairless mice were irradiated for 10 weeks with Westinghouse FS20 sunlamps for a total UV dose of 7 J/cm2. Then, 0.05% RA was applied for 5 and 10 weeks. Observations were made by light and electron microscopy. In contrast to controls treated with vehicle, the reconstruction zone was significantly wider in RA-treated mice. The enhanced repair was dose related. Histochemically and ultrastructurally, collagen was normal, fibroblasts were numerous and in a configuration of high metabolic activity.

  4. Impact of Alternative DNA Structures on DNA Damage, DNA Repair, and Genetic Instability

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guliang; Vasquez, Karen M.

    2014-01-01

    Repetitive genomic sequences can adopt a number of alternative DNA structures that differ from the canonical B-form duplex (i.e. non-B DNA). These non-B DNA-forming sequences have been shown to have many important biological functions related to DNA metabolic processes; for example, they may have regulatory roles in DNA transcription and replication. In addition to these regulatory functions, non-B DNA can stimulate genetic instability in the presence or absence of DNA damage, via replication-dependent and/or replication-independent pathways. This review focuses on the interactions of non-B DNA conformations with DNA repair proteins and how these interactions impact genetic instability. PMID:24767258

  5. Shuttle Damage/Repair from the Perspective of Hypersonic Boundary Layer Transition - Experimental Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horvath, Thomas J.; Berry, Scott A.; Merski, N. Ronald; Berger, Karen T.; Buck, Gregory M.; Liechty, Derek S.; Schneider, Steven P.

    2006-01-01

    An overview is provided of the experimental wind tunnel program conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center Aerothermodynamics Laboratory in support of an agency-wide effort to prepare the Shuttle Orbiter for Return-to-Flight. The effect of an isolated protuberance and an isolated rectangular cavity on hypersonic boundary layer transition onset on the windward surface of the Shuttle Orbiter has been experimentally characterized. These experimental studies were initiated to provide a protuberance and cavity effects database for developing hypersonic transition criteria to support on-orbit disposition of thermal protection system damage or repair. In addition, a synergistic experimental investigation was undertaken to assess the impact of an isolated mass-flow entrainment source (simulating pyrolysis/outgassing from a proposed tile repair material) on boundary layer transition. A brief review of the relevant literature regarding hypersonic boundary layer transition induced from cavities and localized mass addition from ablation is presented. Boundary layer transition results were obtained using 0.0075-scale Orbiter models with simulated tile damage (rectangular cavities) of varying length, width, and depth and simulated tile damage or repair (protuberances) of varying height. Cavity and mass addition effects were assessed at a fixed location (x/L = 0.3) along the model centerline in a region of near zero pressure gradient. Cavity length-to-depth ratio was systematically varied from 2.5 to 17.7 and length-to-width ratio of 1 to 8.5. Cavity depth-to-local boundary layer thickness ranged from 0.5 to 4.8. Protuberances were located at several sites along the centerline and port/starboard attachment lines along the chine and wing leading edge. Protuberance height-to-boundary layer thickness was varied from approximately 0.2 to 1.1. Global heat transfer images and heating distributions of the Orbiter windward surface using phosphor thermography were used to infer the

  6. Inhibition of Topoisomerase (DNA) I (TOP1): DNA Damage Repair and Anticancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yang; Her, Chengtao

    2015-01-01

    Most chemotherapy regimens contain at least one DNA-damaging agent that preferentially affects the growth of cancer cells. This strategy takes advantage of the differences in cell proliferation between normal and cancer cells. Chemotherapeutic drugs are usually designed to target rapid-dividing cells because sustained proliferation is a common feature of cancer [1,2]. Rapid DNA replication is essential for highly proliferative cells, thus blocking of DNA replication will create numerous mutations and/or chromosome rearrangements—ultimately triggering cell death [3]. Along these lines, DNA topoisomerase inhibitors are of great interest because they help to maintain strand breaks generated by topoisomerases during replication. In this article, we discuss the characteristics of topoisomerase (DNA) I (TOP1) and its inhibitors, as well as the underlying DNA repair pathways and the use of TOP1 inhibitors in cancer therapy. PMID:26287259

  7. Theoretical study of fast repair of DNA damage by cistanoside C and analogs: mechanism and docking.

    PubMed

    Sperandio, O; Fan, B T; Zakrzewska, K; Jia, Z J; Zheng, R L; Panaye, A; Doucet, J P; El Fassi, N

    2002-03-01

    Experiments show that the natural substances phenylpropanoid glycosides (PPGs) extracted from pelicularis spicata are capable of repairing DNA damaged by oxygen radicals. Based on kinetic measurements and experiments on tumor cells, a theoretical study of the interaction between PPG molecules and isolated DNA bases, as well as a DNA fragment has been performed. An interaction mechanism reported early has been refined. The docking calculations performed using junction minimization of nucleic acids (JUMNA) software showed that the PPG molecules can be docked into the minor groove of DNA and form complexes with the geometry suitable for an electron transfer between guanine radical and the ligand. Such complexes can be formed without major distortions of DNA structure and are further stabilized by the interaction with the rhamnosyl side-groups.

  8. DNA damage, repair monitoring and epigenetic DNA methylation changes in seedlings of Chernobyl soybeans.

    PubMed

    Georgieva, Mariyana; Rashydov, Namik M; Hajduch, Martin

    2017-02-01

    This pilot study was carried out to assess the effect of radio-contaminated Chernobyl environment on plant genome integrity 27 years after the accident. For this purpose, nuclei were isolated from root tips of the soybean seedlings harvested from plants grown in the Chernobyl area for seven generations. Neutral, neutral-alkaline, and methylation-sensitive comet assays were performed to evaluate the induction and repair of primary DNA damage and the epigenetic contribution to stress adaptation mechanisms. An increased level of single and double strand breaks in the radio-contaminated Chernobyl seedlings at the stage of primary root development was detected in comparison to the controls. However, the kinetics of the recovery of DNA breaks of radio-contaminated Chernobyl samples revealed that lesions were efficiently repaired at the stage of cotyledon. Methylation-sensitive comet assay revealed comparable levels in the CCGG methylation pattern between control and radio-contaminated samples with a slight increase of approximately 10% in the latter ones. The obtained preliminary data allow us to speculate about the onset of mechanisms providing an adaptation potential to the accumulated internal irradiation after the Chernobyl accident. Despite the limitations of this study, we showed that comet assay is a sensitive and flexible technique which can be efficiently used for genotoxic screening of plant specimens in natural and human-made radio-contaminated areas, as well as for safety monitoring of agricultural products.

  9. Endogenous erythropoietin signaling facilitates skeletal muscle repair and recovery following pharmacologically induced damage

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yi; Suzuki, Norio; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Gassmann, Max; Noguchi, Constance Tom

    2012-01-01

    Erythropoietin acts by binding to its cell surface receptor on erythroid progenitor cells to stimulate erythrocyte production. Erythropoietin receptor expression in nonhematopoietic tissue, including skeletal muscle progenitor cells, raises the possibility of a role for erythropoietin beyond erythropoiesis. Mice with erythropoietin receptor restricted to hematopoietic tissue were used to assess contributions of endogenous erythropoietin to promote skeletal myoblast proliferation and survival and wound healing in a mouse model of cardiotoxin induced muscle injury. Compared with wild-type controls, these mice had fewer skeletal muscle Pax-7+ satellite cells and myoblasts that do not proliferate in culture, were more susceptible to skeletal muscle injury and reduced maximum load tolerated by isolated muscle. In contrast, mice with chronic elevated circulating erythropoietin had more Pax-7+ satellite cells and myoblasts with increased proliferation and survival in culture, decreased muscle injury, and accelerated recovery of maximum load tolerated by isolated muscle. Skeletal muscle myoblasts also produced endogenous erythropoietin that increased at low O2. Erythropoietin promoted proliferation, survival, and wound recovery in myoblasts via the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT pathway. Therefore, endogenous and exogenous erythropoietin contribute to increasing satellite cell number following muscle injury, improve myoblast proliferation and survival, and promote repair and regeneration in this mouse induced muscle injury model independent of its effect on erythrocyte production.—Jia, Y., Suzuki, N., Yamamoto, M., Gassmann, M., Noguchi, C. T. Endogenous erythropoietin signaling facilitates skeletal muscle repair and recovery following pharmacologically induced damage. PMID:22490927

  10. Harnessing neural activity to promote repair of the damaged corticospinal system after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Martin, John H.

    2016-01-01

    As most spinal cord injuries (SCIs) are incomplete, an important target for promoting neural repair and recovery of lost motor function is to promote the connections of spared descending spinal pathways with spinal motor circuits. Among the pathways, the corticospinal tract (CST) is most associated with skilled voluntary functions in humans and many animals. CST loss, whether at its origin in the motor cortex or in the white matter tracts subcortically and in the spinal cord, leads to movement impairments and paralysis. To restore motor function after injury will require repair of the damaged CST. In this review, I discuss how knowledge of activity-dependent development of the CST—which establishes connectional specificity through axon pruning, axon outgrowth, and synaptic competition among CST terminals—informed a novel activity-based therapy for promoting sprouting of spared CST axons after injur in mature animals. This therapy, which comprises motor cortex electrical stimulation with and without concurrent trans-spinal direct current stimulation, leads to an increase in the gray matter axon length of spared CST axons in the rat spinal cord and, after a pyramidal tract lesion, restoration of skilled locomotor movements. I discuss how this approach is now being applied to a C4 contusion rat model. PMID:27857728

  11. Tai chi improves oxidative stress response and DNA damage/repair in young sedentary females.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xing-Yu; Eungpinichpong, Wichai; Silsirivanit, Atit; Nakmareong, Saowanee; Wu, Xiu-Hua

    2014-06-01

    [Purpose] This study was to examine the effects of 12 weeks of Tai Chi (TC) exercise on antioxidant capacity, and DNA damage/repair in young females who did not perform regular physical exercise. [Subjects and Methods] Ten female students from a Chinese university voluntarily participated in this program. All of them practiced the 24-form simplified Tai Chi, 5 times weekly, for 12 weeks. Plasma levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), hydroxyl radical inhibiting capacity (OH·-IC), 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), and 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1) were measured at 0, 8, and 12 weeks. Heart rate (HR) was monitored during the last set of the training session at 4, 8, and 12 weeks. [Results] Plasma SOD and OH·-IC levels were increased at 8 and 12 weeks compared to the baseline (0 weeks). Gpx and GSH levels did not change significantly throughout the study period. The plasma MDA level was decreased significantly at 8 weeks but not at 12 weeks compared to the baseline value. While the plasma 8-OHdG level did not change throughout the study period, the plasma OGG1 level was significantly increased at 8 and 12 weeks compared to the baseline value. [Conclusion] TC practice for 12 weeks efficiently improved the oxidative stress response in young females who did not perform regular physical exercise. The TC exercise also increased the DNA repairing capacity.

  12. DNA polymerase III requirement for repair of DNA damage caused by methyl methanesulfonate and hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Hagensee, M.E.; Bryan, S.K.; Moses, R.E.

    1987-10-01

    The pcbA1 mutation allows DNA replication dependent on DNA polymerase I at the restrictive temperature in polC(Ts) strains. Cells which carry pcbA1, a functional DNA polymerase I, and a temperature-sensitive DNA polymerase III gene were used to study the role of DNA polymerase III in DNA repair. At the restrictive temperature for DNA polymerase III, these strains were more sensitive to the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and hydrogen peroxide than normal cells. The same strains showed no increase in sensitivity to bleomycin, UV light, or psoralen at the restrictive temperature. The sensitivity of these strains to MMS and hydrogen peroxide was not due to the pcbAl allele, and normal sensitivity was restored by the introduction of a chromosomal or cloned DNA polymerase III gene, verifying that the sensitivity was due to loss of DNA polymerase III alpha-subunit activity. A functional DNA polymerase III is required for the reformation of high-molecular-weight DNA after treatment of cells with MMS or hydrogen peroxide, as demonstrated by alkaline sucrose sedimentation results. Thus, it appears that a functional DNA polymerase III is required for the optimal repair of DNA damage by MMS or hydrogen peroxide.

  13. Repair of radiation-induced damage to the cell division mechanism of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Adler, H I; Fisher, W D; Hardigree, A A; Stapleton, G E

    1966-02-01

    Adler, Howard I. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tenn.), William D. Fisher, Alice A. Hardigree, and George E. Stapleton. Repair of radiation-induced damage to the cell division mechanism of Escherichia coli. J. Bacteriol. 91:737-742. 1966.-Microscopic observations of irradiated populations of filamentous Escherichia coli cells indicated that filaments can be induced to divide by a substance donated by neighboring cells. We have made this observation the basis for a quantitative technique in which filaments are incubated in the presence of nongrowing donor cells. The presence of "donor" organisms promotes division and subsequent colony formation in filaments. "Donor" bacteria do not affect nonfilamentous cells. An extract of "donor" cells retains the division-promoting activity. The extract has been partially fractionated, and consists of a heat-stable and a heat-labile component. The heat-stable component is inactive in promoting cell division, but enhances the activity of the heat-labile component. The division-promoting system is discussed as a radiation repair mechanism and as a normal component of the cell division system in E. coli.

  14. Neuron Growth on Carbon Nanotube Thread Bio-Scaffolds for Repair of Central Nervous System Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mast, David; Pixley, Sarah; Schulz, Mark; Shanov, Vessilin

    2012-02-01

    Approximately 11,000 new spinal cord injuries occur each year. Repairing such central nervous system (CNS) damage has proven to be very difficult. We report on in vitro experiments using carbon nanotube (CNT) threads as a bio-scaffold for promoting CNS repair via directed neuron regrowth along the CNT material. Mouse brain neurospheres, containing neuronal stem cells, neurons and support glia, were observed to attach to and grow along laminin-coated CNT threads in vitro. However, due to their limited mobility, only neurospheres close to the threads attach. To increase cellular attachment to the threads, we exploit the fact that these cells can exhibit enhanced, directed migration along an externally applied electric field. Recent in vitro cell growth was carried out in chambers containing several parallel CNT threads with electrical connections extending out of the incubator so that a voltage applied across adjacent threads established an appropriate electric field. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy, Cyclic Voltammetry and dc and ac IV measurements were used to monitor cell growth and attachment as a function of applied electric field and time. Cell migration and attachment were also investigated using time lapse photography in a separate growth chamber mounted on the stage of an optical microscope.

  15. Imbalance between Endothelial Damage and Repair: A Gateway to Cardiovascular Disease in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is accelerated in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and it leads to excessive cardiovascular complications in these patients. Despite the improved awareness of cardiovascular disease and advent of clinical diagnostics, the process of atherogenesis in most patients remains clinically silent until symptoms and signs of cardiovascular complications develop. As evidence has demonstrated that vascular damage is already occurring before clinically overt cardiovascular disease develops in lupus patients, intervention at the preclinical stage of atherogenesis would be plausible. Indeed, endothelial dysfunction, one of the earliest steps of atherogenesis, has been demonstrated to occur in lupus patients even when they are naïve for cardiovascular disease. Currently known “endothelium-toxic” factors including type 1 interferon, proinflammatory cytokines, inflammatory cells, immune complexes, costimulatory molecules, neutrophils extracellular traps, lupus-related autoantibodies, oxidative stress, and dyslipidemia, coupled with the aberrant functions of the endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) which are crucial to vascular repair, likely tip the balance towards endothelial dysfunction and propensity to develop cardiovascular disease in lupus patients. In this review, altered physiology of the endothelium, factors leading to perturbed vascular repair contributed by lupus EPC and the impact of proatherogenic factors on the endothelium which potentially lead to atherosclerosis in lupus patients will be discussed. PMID:24790989

  16. The role of Holliday junction resolvases in the repair of spontaneous and induced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Agmon, Neta; Yovel, Moran; Harari, Yaniv; Liefshitz, Batia; Kupiec, Martin

    2011-09-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and other lesions occur frequently during cell growth and in meiosis. These are often repaired by homologous recombination (HR). HR may result in the formation of DNA structures called Holliday junctions (HJs), which need to be resolved to allow chromosome segregation. Whereas HJs are present in most HR events in meiosis, it has been proposed that in vegetative cells most HR events occur through intermediates lacking HJs. A recent screen in yeast has shown HJ resolution activity for a protein called Yen1, in addition to the previously known Mus81/Mms4 complex. Yeast strains deleted for both YEN1 and MMS4 show a reduction in growth rate, and are very sensitive to DNA-damaging agents. In addition, we investigate the genetic interaction of yen1 and mms4 with mutants defective in different repair pathways. We find that in the absence of Yen1 and Mms4 deletion of RAD1 or RAD52 have no further effect, whereas additional sensitivity is seen if RAD51 is deleted. Finally, we show that yeast cells are unable to carry out meiosis in the absence of both resolvases. Our results show that both Yen1 and Mms4/Mus81 play important (although not identical) roles during vegetative growth and in meiosis.

  17. The role of Holliday junction resolvases in the repair of spontaneous and induced DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Agmon, Neta; Yovel, Moran; Harari, Yaniv; Liefshitz, Batia; Kupiec, Martin

    2011-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and other lesions occur frequently during cell growth and in meiosis. These are often repaired by homologous recombination (HR). HR may result in the formation of DNA structures called Holliday junctions (HJs), which need to be resolved to allow chromosome segregation. Whereas HJs are present in most HR events in meiosis, it has been proposed that in vegetative cells most HR events occur through intermediates lacking HJs. A recent screen in yeast has shown HJ resolution activity for a protein called Yen1, in addition to the previously known Mus81/Mms4 complex. Yeast strains deleted for both YEN1 and MMS4 show a reduction in growth rate, and are very sensitive to DNA-damaging agents. In addition, we investigate the genetic interaction of yen1 and mms4 with mutants defective in different repair pathways. We find that in the absence of Yen1 and Mms4 deletion of RAD1 or RAD52 have no further effect, whereas additional sensitivity is seen if RAD51 is deleted. Finally, we show that yeast cells are unable to carry out meiosis in the absence of both resolvases. Our results show that both Yen1 and Mms4/Mus81 play important (although not identical) roles during vegetative growth and in meiosis. PMID:21609961

  18. Ongoing evolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 sublines complicates studies of DNA damage repair and tolerance.

    PubMed

    Sidorenko, Julia; Jatsenko, Tatjana; Kivisaar, Maia

    2017-03-01

    Sublines of the major P. aeruginosa reference strain PAO1 are derivatives of the original PAO1 isolate, which are maintained in laboratories worldwide. These sublines display substantial genomic and phenotypic variation due to ongoing microevolution. Here, we examined four sublines, MPAO1, PAO1-L, PAO1-DSM and PAO1-UT, originated from different laboratories, and six DNA polymerase-deficient mutants from the P. aeruginosa MPAO1 transposon library for their employment in elucidation of DNA damage repair and tolerance mechanisms in P. aeruginosa. We found that PAO1 subline PAO1-UT carries a large deletion encompassing the DNA damage inducible imuA-imuB-imuC cassette (PA0669-PA0671), which is implied in mutagenesis in several species. Furthermore, the genetic changes leading to variation in the functionality of the MexEF-OprN efflux system contributed largely to the phenotypic discordance between P. aeruginosa PAO1 sublines. Specifically, we identified multiple mutations in the mexT gene, which encodes a transcriptional regulator of the mexEF-oprN genes, mutations in the mexF, and complete absence of these genes. Of the four tested sublines, MPAO1 was the only subline with the functional MexEF-OprN multidrug efflux system. Active efflux through MexEF-OprN rendered MPAO1 highly resistant to chloramphenicol and ciprofloxacin. Moreover, the functions of specialized DNA polymerase IV and nucleotide excision repair (NER) in 4-NQO-induced DNA damage tolerance appeared to be masked in MPAO1, while were easily detectable in other sublines. Finally, the frequencies of spontaneous and MMS-induced Rif(r) mutations were also significantly lower in MPAO1 in comparison to the PAO1 sublines with impaired MexEF-OprN efflux system. The MexEF-OprN-attributed differences were also observed between MPAO1 and MPAO1-derived transposon mutants from the two-allele transposon mutant collection. Thus, the accumulating mutations and discordant phenotypes of the PAO1 derivatives challenge the

  19. BCL10 is recruited to sites of DNA damage to facilitate DNA double-strand break repair

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Ismail Hassan; Dronyk, Ashley; Hu, Xiuying; Hendzel, Michael J.; Shaw, Andrew R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recent studies have found BCL10 can localize to the nucleus and that this is linked to tumor aggression and poorer prognosis. These studies suggest that BCL10 localization plays a novel role in the nucleus that may contribute to cellular transformation and carcinogenesis. In this study, we show that BCL10 functions as part of the DNA damage response (DDR). We found that BCL10 facilitates the rapid recruitment of RPA, BRCA1 and RAD51 to sites of DNA damage. Furthermore, we also found that ATM phosphorylates BCL10 in response to DNA damage. Functionally, BCL10 promoted DNA double-strand breaks repair, enhancing cell survival after DNA damage. Taken together our results suggest a novel role for BCL10 in the repair of DNA lesions. PMID:26771713

  20. Alpha particle induced DNA damage and repair in normal cultured thyrocytes of different proliferation status.

    PubMed

    Lyckesvärd, Madeleine Nordén; Delle, Ulla; Kahu, Helena; Lindegren, Sture; Jensen, Holger; Bäck, Tom; Swanpalmer, John; Elmroth, Kecke

    2014-07-01

    Childhood exposure to ionizing radiation increases the risk of developing thyroid cancer later in life and this is suggested to be due to higher proliferation of the young thyroid. The interest of using high-LET alpha particles from Astatine-211 ((211)At), concentrated in the thyroid by the same mechanism as (131)I [1], in cancer treatment has increased during recent years because of its high efficiency in inducing biological damage and beneficial dose distribution when compared to low-LET radiation. Most knowledge of the DNA damage response in thyroid is from studies using low-LET irradiation and much less is known of high-LET irradiation. In this paper we investigated the DNA damage response and biological consequences to photons from Cobolt-60 ((60)Co) and alpha particles from (211)At in normal primary thyrocytes of different cell cycle status. For both radiation qualities the intensity levels of γH2AX decreased during the first 24h in both cycling and stationary cultures and complete repair was seen in all cultures but cycling cells exposed to (211)At. Compared to stationary cells alpha particles were more harmful for cycling cultures, an effect also seen at the pChk2 levels. Increasing ratios of micronuclei per cell nuclei were seen up to 1Gy (211)At. We found that primary thyrocytes were much more sensitive to alpha particle exposure compared with low-LET photons. Calculations of the relative biological effectiveness yielded higher RBE for cycling cells compared with stationary cultures at a modest level of damage, clearly demonstrating that cell cycle status influences the relative effectiveness of alpha particles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The tumor suppressor PML specifically accumulates at RPA/Rad51-containing DNA damage repair foci but is nonessential for DNA damage-induced fibroblast senescence.

    PubMed

    Münch, Sandra; Weidtkamp-Peters, Stefanie; Klement, Karolin; Grigaravicius, Paulius; Monajembashi, Shamci; Salomoni, Paolo; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Weißhart, Klaus; Hemmerich, Peter

    2014-05-01

    The PML tumor suppressor has been functionally implicated in DNA damage response and cellular senescence. Direct evidence for such a role based on PML knockdown or knockout approaches is still lacking. We have therefore analyzed the irradiation-induced DNA damage response and cellular senescence in human and mouse fibroblasts lacking PML. Our data show that PML nuclear bodies (NBs) nonrandomly associate with persistent DNA damage foci in unperturbed human skin and in high-dose-irradiated cell culture systems. PML bodies do not associate with transient γH2AX foci after low-dose gamma irradiation. Superresolution microscopy reveals that all PML bodies within a nucleus are engaged at Rad51- and RPA-containing repair foci during ongoing DNA repair. The lack of PML (i) does not majorly affect the DNA damage response, (ii) does not alter the efficiency of senescence induction after DNA damage, and (iii) does not affect the proliferative potential of primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts during serial passaging. Thus, while PML NBs specifically accumulate at Rad51/RPA-containing lesions and senescence-derived persistent DNA damage foci, they are not essential for DNA damage-induced and replicative senescence of human and murine fibroblasts.

  2. Coordination of altered DNA repair and damage pathways in arsenite-exposed keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Hamadeh, Hisham K; Trouba, Kevin J; Amin, Rupesh P; Afshari, Cynthia A; Germolec, Dori

    2002-10-01

    Human exposure to arsenic, a ubiquitous and toxic environmental pollutant, is associated with an increased incidence of skin cancer. However, the mechanism(s) associated with AsIII-mediated toxicity and carcinogenesis at low levels of exposure remains elusive. Aberrations in cell proliferation, oxidative damage, and DNA-repair fidelity have been implicated in sodium arsenite (AsIII)-mediated carcinogenicity and toxicity, but these events have been examined in isolation in the majority of biological models of arsenic exposure. We hypothesized that the simultaneous interaction of these effects may be important in arsenic-mediated neoplasia in the skin. To evaluate this, normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) were exposed to nontoxic doses (0.005-5 micro M) of AsIII and monitored for several physiological endpoints at the times when cells were harvested for gene expression measurements (1-24 h). Two-fluor cDNA microarray analyses indicated that AsIII treatment decreased the expression of genes associated with DNA repair (e.g., p53 and Damage-specific DNA-binding protein 2) and increased the expression of genes indicative of the cellular response to oxidative stress (e.g., Superoxide dismutase 1, NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase, and Serine/threonine kinase 25). AsIII also modulated the expression of certain transcripts associated with increased cell proliferation (e.g., Cyclin G1, Protein kinase C delta), oncogenes, and genes associated with cellular transformation (e.g., Gro-1 and V-yes). These observations correlated with measurements of cell proliferation and mitotic measurements as AsIII treatment resulted in a dose-dependent increase in cellular mitoses at 24 h and an increase in cell proliferation at 48 h of exposure. Data in this manuscript demonstrates that AsIII exposure simultaneously modulates DNA repair, cell proliferation, and redox-related gene expression in nontransformed, normal NHEK. It is anticipated that data in this report will serve as a

  3. Induction of a novel damage-specific DNA binding protein correlates with enhanced DNA repair in primate cells

    SciTech Connect

    Protic, M.; Hirschfeld, S.; Tsang, A.P.; Wagner, M.; Dixon, K.; Levine, A.S. )

    1989-10-01

    Pretreatment of mammalian cell with DNA-damaging agents, such as UV light or mitomycin C, but not the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA), results in the enhanced repair of subsequently transfected UV-damaged expression vectors. To determine the cellular factors that are responsible for this enhancement, the authors have used a modified gel retardation assay to detect the proteins that interact with damaged DNA. They have identified a constitutive DNA binding protein in extracts from primate cells that has a high affinity for UV-irradiated double-stranded DNA. Cells pretreated with UV light, mitomycin C, or aphidicolin, but not TPA or serum starvation, have higher levels of this damage-specific DNA binding (DDB) protein. These results suggest that the signal for induction of DDB protein can either be damage to the DNA or interference with cellular DNA replication. The induction of DDB protein varies among primate cells with different phenotypes: (1) virus-transformed repair-proficient cells have partially or fully lost the ability to induce DDB protein above constitutive levels; (2) primary cells from repair-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) group C, and transformed XP groups A and D, show constitutive DDB protein, but do not show induced levels of this protein 48 h after UV; and (3) primary and transformed repair-deficient cells from one XP E patient are lacking both the constitutive and the induced DDB activity. The correlation between the induction of the DDB protein and the enhanced repair of UV-damaged expression vectors implies the involvement of the DDB protein in this inducible cellular response.

  4. Radiation-induced DNA damage and repair in cells of a radiosensitive human malignant glioma cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Allalunis-Turner, M.J.; Zia, P.K.Y.; Barron, G.M.

    1995-12-01

    The induction and repair of DNA double-strand breaks were studied in cells of two isogenic human malignant glioma cell lines which vary in their SF2 values by a factor of {approximately}30.M059J cells are radiosensitive (SF2 = 0.02) and lack the p350 component of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK); M059K cells are radioresistant (SF2 = 0.64) and express normal levels of DNA-PK. Zero integrated field gel electrophoresis and alkaline sucrose gradient experiments indicated that equivalent numbers of DNA lesions were produced by ionizing radiation in M059J and M059K cells. To compare the capacity of both lines to repair sublethal damage, the split-dose recovery experiment after exposure to equitoxic doses of radiation was carried out. Significant sublethal damage repair was shown for M059K cells, with a 5.8-fold increase in relative survival peaking at 4 h, whereas M059J cells showed little repair activity. Electrophoresis studies indicated that more double-strand breaks were repaired by 30 min in M059K cells than in M059J cells. These results suggest that deficient DNA repair processes may be a major determinant of radiosensitivity in M059J cells. 24 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Assessment of the repair and damage of DNA induced by parent and reduced RSU-1069, a 2-nitroimidazole-aziridine.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, P; Cunniffe, S M

    1989-04-01

    The cellular repair and damage of DNA induced by parent and reduced RSU-1069, a 2-nitroimidazole-aziridine, was assessed at both the molecular and cellular level. At the molecular level, after in vitro incubation with parent or reduced RSU-1069, plasmid DNA was transfected into Escherichia coli (AB1157) with subsequent selection for gene expression. For equivalent levels of DNA strand breakage following such treatment it is evident from the relative transformation frequencies that interactions with reduced RSU-1069 lead to DNA damage consistent with bifunctional action of a metabolite(s). At the cellular level, the cytoxicity of RSU-1069 was determined for a series of repair deficient mutants of E. coli under both aerobic and hypoxic conditions. The differential aerobic:hypoxic cytotoxicity ratio is approximately 3. We conclude that the repair of cellular DNA damage induced by RSU-1069 involves activation of the gene products under the control of the recA gene and not those under the control of the ada gene. The ability of cellular systems to repair damage induced by RSU-1069 may play a significant role in determining its efficiency to act as a hypoxic cell radiosensitizer and a hypoxia selective cytotoxin.

  6. New Perspectives on Oxidized Genome Damage and Repair Inhibition by Pro-Oxidant Metals in Neurological Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Joy; Guerrero, Erika N.; Hegde, Pavana M.; Wang, Haibo; Boldogh, Istvan; Rao, Kosagi Sharaf; Mitra, Sankar; Hegde, Muralidhar L.

    2014-01-01

    The primary cause(s) of neuronal death in most cases of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, are still unknown. However, the association of certain etiological factors, e.g., oxidative stress, protein misfolding/aggregation, redox metal accumulation and various types of damage to the genome, to pathological changes in the affected brain region(s) have been consistently observed. While redox metal toxicity received major attention in the last decade, its potential as a therapeutic target is still at a cross-roads, mostly because of the lack of mechanistic understanding of metal dyshomeostasis in affected neurons. Furthermore, previous studies have established the role of metals in causing genome damage, both directly and via the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), but little was known about their impact on genome repair. Our recent studies demonstrated that excess levels of iron and copper observed in neurodegenerative disease-affected brain neurons could not only induce genome damage in neurons, but also affect their repair by oxidatively inhibiting NEIL DNA glycosylases, which initiate the repair of oxidized DNA bases. The inhibitory effect was reversed by a combination of metal chelators and reducing agents, which underscore the need for elucidating the molecular basis for the neuronal toxicity of metals in order to develop effective therapeutic approaches. In this review, we have focused on the oxidative genome damage repair pathway as a potential target for reducing pro-oxidant metal toxicity in neurological diseases. PMID:25036887

  7. DNA mismatch repair and the DNA damage response to ionizing radiation: making sense of apparently conflicting data.

    PubMed

    Martin, Lynn M; Marples, Brian; Coffey, Mary; Lawler, Mark; Lynch, Thomas H; Hollywood, Donal; Marignol, Laure

    2010-11-01

    The DNA mismatch repair (MMR) pathway detects and repairs DNA replication errors. While DNA MMR-proficiency is known to play a key role in the sensitivity to a number of DNA damaging agents, its role in the cytotoxicity of ionizing radiation (IR) is less well characterized. Available literature to date is conflicting regarding the influence of MMR status on radiosensitivity, and this has arisen as a subject of controversy in the field. The aim of this paper is to provide the first comprehensive overview of the experimental data linking MMR proteins and the DNA damage response to IR. A PubMed search was conducted using the key words "DNA mismatch repair" and "ionizing radiation". Relevant articles and their references were reviewed for their association between DNA MMR and IR. Recent data suggest that radiation dose and the type of DNA damage induced may dictate the involvement of the MMR system in the cellular response to IR. In particular, the literature supports a role for the MMR system in DNA damage recognition, cell cycle arrest, DNA repair and apoptosis. In this review we discuss our current understanding of the impact of MMR status on the cellular response to radiation in mammalian cells gained from past and present studies and attempt to provide an explanation for how MMR may determine the response to radiation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. HMGB1 facilitates repair of mitochondrial DNA damage and extends the lifespan of mutant ataxin-1 knock-in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Hikaru; Fujita, Kyota; Tagawa, Kazuhiko; Chen, Xigui; Homma, Hidenori; Sasabe, Toshikazu; Shimizu, Jun; Shimizu, Shigeomi; Tamura, Takuya; Muramatsu, Shin-ichi; Okazawa, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Mutant ataxin-1 (Atxn1), which causes spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1), binds to and impairs the function of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a crucial nuclear protein that regulates DNA architectural changes essential for DNA damage repair and transcription. In this study, we established that transgenic or virus vector-mediated complementation with HMGB1 ameliorates motor dysfunction and prolongs lifespan in mutant Atxn1 knock-in (Atxn1-KI) mice. We identified mitochondrial DNA damage repair by HMGB1 as a novel molecular basis for this effect, in addition to the mechanisms already associated with HMGB1 function, such as nuclear DNA damage repair and nuclear transcription. The dysfunction and the improvement of mitochondrial DNA damage repair functions are tightly associated with the exacerbation and rescue, respectively, of symptoms, supporting the involvement of mitochondrial DNA quality control by HMGB1 in SCA1 pathology. Moreover, we show that the rescue of Purkinje cell dendrites and dendritic spines by HMGB1 could be downstream effects. Although extracellular HMGB1 triggers inflammation mediated by Toll-like receptor and receptor for advanced glycation end products, upregulation of intracellular HMGB1 does not induce such side effects. Thus, viral delivery of HMGB1 is a candidate approach by which to modify the disease progression of SCA1 even after the onset. PMID:25510912

  9. In situ repair of vagus nerve stimulator lead damage: technical note.

    PubMed

    Ralston, Ashley; Ogden, Patti; Kohrman, Michael H; Frim, David M

    2016-12-01

    Vagus nerve stimulators (VNSs) are currently an accepted treatment for intractable epilepsy not amenable to ablative surgery. Battery death and lead damage are the main reasons for reoperation in patients with VNSs. In general, any damage to the lead requires revision surgery to remove the helical electrodes from the vagus nerve and replace the electrode array and wire. The electrodes are typically scarred and difficult to remove from the vagus nerve without injury. The authors describe 6 patients with VNSs who presented with low lead impedance on diagnostic testing, leading to the intraoperative finding of lead insulation disruption, or who were found incidentally at the time of implantable pulse generator battery replacement to have a tear in the outer insulation of the electrode wire. Instead of replacement, the wire insulation was repaired and reinforced in situ, leading to normal impedance testing. All 6 devices remained functional over a follow-up period of up to 87 months, with 2 of the 6 patients having a relatively shorter follow-up of only 12 months. This technique, applicable in a subset of patients with VNSs requiring lead exploration, obviates the need for lead replacement with its attendant risks.

  10. The alteration of chromatin domains during damage repair induced by ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cress, A.E.; Olson, K.M.; Olson, G.B.

    1995-12-31

    Several groups previously have reported the ability of chromatin structure to influence the production of damage induced by ionizing radiation. The authors` interest has been to determine whether chromatin structural alterations exist after ionizing radiation during a repair interval. The earlier work investigated this question using biochemical techniques. The crosslinking of nuclear structural proteins to DNA after ionizing radiation was observed. In addition, they found that the chromatin structure in vitro as measured by sucrose density gradient sedimentation, was altered after ionizing radiation. These observations added to earlier studies in which digital imaging techniques showed an alteration in feulgen-positive DNA after irradiation prompted the present study. The object of this study was to detect whether the higher order structure of DNA into chromatin domains within interphase human cells was altered in interphase cells in response to a radiation induced damage. The present study takes advantage of the advances in the detection of chromatin domains in situ using DNA specific dyes and digital image processing of established human T and B cell lines.

  11. Non-repair Pathways for Minimizing Protein Isoaspartyl Damage in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae*

    PubMed Central

    Patananan, Alexander N.; Capri, Joseph; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Clarke, Steven G.

    2014-01-01

    The spontaneous degradation of asparaginyl and aspartyl residues to isoaspartyl residues is a common type of protein damage in aging organisms. Although the protein-l-isoaspartyl (d-aspartyl) O-methyltransferase (EC 2.1.1.77) can initiate the repair of l-isoaspartyl residues to l-aspartyl residues in most organisms, no gene homolog or enzymatic activity is present in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Therefore, we used biochemical approaches to elucidate how proteins containing isoaspartyl residues are metabolized in this organism. Surprisingly, the level of isoaspartyl residues in yeast proteins (50–300 pmol of isoaspartyl residues/mg of protein extract) is comparable with organisms with protein-l-isoaspartyl (d-aspartyl) O-methyltransferase, suggesting a novel regulatory pathway. Interfering with common protein quality control mechanisms by mutating and inhibiting the proteasomal and autophagic pathways in vivo did not increase isoaspartyl residue levels compared with wild type or uninhibited cells. However, the inhibition of metalloproteases in in vitro aging experiments by EDTA resulted in an ∼3-fold increase in the level of isoaspartyl-containing peptides. Characterization by mass spectrometry of these peptides identified several proteins involved in metabolism as targets of isoaspartyl damage. Further analysis of these peptides revealed that many have an N-terminal isoaspartyl site and originate from proteins with short half-lives. These results suggest that one or more metalloproteases participate in limiting isoaspartyl formation by robust proteolysis. PMID:24764295

  12. Non-repair pathways for minimizing protein isoaspartyl damage in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Patananan, Alexander N; Capri, Joseph; Whitelegge, Julian P; Clarke, Steven G

    2014-06-13

    The spontaneous degradation of asparaginyl and aspartyl residues to isoaspartyl residues is a common type of protein damage in aging organisms. Although the protein-l-isoaspartyl (d-aspartyl) O-methyltransferase (EC 2.1.1.77) can initiate the repair of l-isoaspartyl residues to l-aspartyl residues in most organisms, no gene homolog or enzymatic activity is present in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Therefore, we used biochemical approaches to elucidate how proteins containing isoaspartyl residues are metabolized in this organism. Surprisingly, the level of isoaspartyl residues in yeast proteins (50-300 pmol of isoaspartyl residues/mg of protein extract) is comparable with organisms with protein-l-isoaspartyl (d-aspartyl) O-methyltransferase, suggesting a novel regulatory pathway. Interfering with common protein quality control mechanisms by mutating and inhibiting the proteasomal and autophagic pathways in vivo did not increase isoaspartyl residue levels compared with wild type or uninhibited cells. However, the inhibition of metalloproteases in in vitro aging experiments by EDTA resulted in an ∼3-fold increase in the level of isoaspartyl-containing peptides. Characterization by mass spectrometry of these peptides identified several proteins involved in metabolism as targets of isoaspartyl damage. Further analysis of these peptides revealed that many have an N-terminal isoaspartyl site and originate from proteins with short half-lives. These results suggest that one or more metalloproteases participate in limiting isoaspartyl formation by robust proteolysis.

  13. Carbon uptake in a marine diatom during acute exposure to ultraviolet B radiation: Relative importance of damage and repair

    SciTech Connect

    Lesser, M. P. ); Cullen, J.J. Dalhousie Univ., Halifax, Nova Scotia ); Neale, P.J. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA )

    1994-04-01

    Experiments on a marine diatom, Thalassiosira pseudonana (Hustedt) clone 3H, demonstrate that under moderate photon flux densities (75 [mu]mol quanta [center dot] m[sup [minus]2][center dot]s[sup [minus]1]) of visible light inhibition of photosynthesis by supplemental ultraviolet (UV) radiation (UV-B: 280-320 nm) is well described as a hyperbolic function of UV-B irradiance for time scales of 0.5-4 h. Results are consistent with predictions of a recently developed model of photosynthesis under the influence of UV and visible irradiance. Although net destruction of chlorophyll occurs during a 4-h exposure to UV-B, and the effect is a function of exposure, the principal effect of UV-B is a decrease in chlorophyll-specific photosynthetic rate. The dependence of photoinhibition on dosage rate, rather than cumulative dose, and the hyperbolic shape of the relationship are consistent with net photoinhibition being an equilibrium between damage and repair. The ratio of damage to repair is estimated by a mathematical analysis of the inhibition of photosynthesis during exposures to UV-B. A nitrate-limited culture was much more sensitive to UV-B than were the nutrient-replete cultures, but the kinetics of photoinhibition were similar. The analysis suggests that the nutrient-limited culture was much more sensitive than the nutrient-replete cultures because repair or turnover of critical proteins associated with photosynthesis is inhibited. An inhibitor of chloroplast protein synthesis was used to suppress repair processes. Photoinhibition by UV-B was enhanced, and inhibition was a function of cumulative dose, as expected if damage were not countered by repair. The fundamental importance of repair processes should be considered in the design of field experiments and models of UV-B effects in the environment, especially in the context of vertical mixing. Repair processes must also be considered whenever biological weighting functions are developed. 69 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Quantifying clustered DNA damage induction and repair by gel electrophoresis, electronic imaging and number average length analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutherland, Betsy M.; Georgakilas, Alexandros G.; Bennett, Paula V.; Laval, Jacques; Sutherland, John C.; Gewirtz, A. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Assessing DNA damage induction, repair and consequences of such damages requires measurement of specific DNA lesions by methods that are independent of biological responses to such lesions. Lesions affecting one DNA strand (altered bases, abasic sites, single strand breaks (SSB)) as well as damages affecting both strands (clustered damages, double strand breaks) can be quantified by direct measurement of DNA using gel electrophoresis, gel imaging and number average length analysis. Damage frequencies as low as a few sites per gigabase pair (10(9)bp) can be quantified by this approach in about 50ng of non-radioactive DNA, and single molecule methods may allow such measurements in DNA from single cells. This review presents the theoretical basis, biochemical requirements and practical aspects of this approach, and shows examples of their applications in identification and quantitation of complex clustered damages.

  15. Quantifying clustered DNA damage induction and repair by gel electrophoresis, electronic imaging and number average length analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutherland, Betsy M.; Georgakilas, Alexandros G.; Bennett, Paula V.; Laval, Jacques; Sutherland, John C.; Gewirtz, A. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Assessing DNA damage induction, repair and consequences of such damages requires measurement of specific DNA lesions by methods that are independent of biological responses to such lesions. Lesions affecting one DNA strand (altered bases, abasic sites, single strand breaks (SSB)) as well as damages affecting both strands (clustered damages, double strand breaks) can be quantified by direct measurement of DNA using gel electrophoresis, gel imaging and number average length analysis. Damage frequencies as low as a few sites per gigabase pair (10(9)bp) can be quantified by this approach in about 50ng of non-radioactive DNA, and single molecule methods may allow such measurements in DNA from single cells. This review presents the theoretical basis, biochemical requirements and practical aspects of this approach, and shows examples of their applications in identification and quantitation of complex clustered damages.

  16. Repair of oxidative DNA base damage in the host genome influences the HIV integration site sequence preference.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Geoffrey R; Peters, Ryan; Wang, Xiao-hong; Hanne, Jeungphill; Sobol, Robert W; Bundschuh, Ralf; Fishel, Richard; Yoder, Kristine E

    2014-01-01

    Host base excision repair (BER) proteins that repair oxidative damage enhance HIV infection. These proteins include the oxidative DNA damage glycosylases 8-oxo-guanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1) and mutY homolog (MYH) as well as DNA polymerase beta (Polβ). While deletion of oxidative BER genes leads to decreased HIV infection and integration efficiency, the mechanism remains unknown. One hypothesis is that BER proteins repair the DNA gapped integration intermediate. An alternative hypothesis considers that the most common oxidative DNA base damages occur on guanines. The subtle consensus sequence preference at HIV integration sites includes multiple G:C base pairs surrounding the points of joining. These observations suggest a role for oxidative BER during integration targeting at the nucleotide level. We examined the hypothesis that BER repairs a gapped integration intermediate by measuring HIV infection efficiency in Polβ null cell lines complemented with active site point mutants of Polβ. A DNA synthesis defective mutant, but not a 5'dRP lyase mutant, rescued HIV infection efficiency to wild type levels; this suggested Polβ DNA synthesis activity is not necessary while 5'dRP lyase activity is required for efficient HIV infection. An alternate hypothesis that BER events in the host genome influence HIV integration site selection was examined by sequencing integration sites in OGG1 and MYH null cells. In the absence of these 8-oxo-guanine specific glycosylases the chromatin elements of HIV integration site selection remain the same as in wild type cells. However, the HIV integration site sequence preference at G:C base pairs is altered at several positions in OGG1 and MYH null cells. Inefficient HIV infection in the absence of oxidative BER proteins does not appear related to repair of the gapped integration intermediate; instead oxidative damage repair may participate in HIV integration site preference at the sequence level.

  17. Protein expression of DNA damage repair proteins dictates response to topoisomerase and PARP inhibitors in triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Boerner, Julie L; Nechiporchik, Nicole; Mueller, Kelly L; Polin, Lisa; Heilbrun, Lance; Boerner, Scott A; Zoratti, Gina L; Stark, Karri; LoRusso, Patricia M; Burger, Angelika

    2015-01-01

    Patients with metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) have a poor prognosis. New approaches for the treatment of TNBC are needed to improve patient survival. The concept of synthetic lethality, brought about by inactivating complementary DNA repair pathways, has been proposed as a promising therapeutic option for these tumors. The TNBC tumor type has been associated with BRCA mutations, and inhibitors of Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), a family of proteins that facilitates DNA repair, have been shown to effectively kill BRCA defective tumors by preventing cells from repairing DNA damage, leading to a loss of cell viability and clonogenic survival. Here we present preclinical efficacy results of combining the PARP inhibitor, ABT-888, with CPT-11, a topoisomerase I inhibitor. CPT-11 binds to topoisomerase I at the replication fork, creating a bulky adduct that is recognized as damaged DNA. When DNA damage was stimulated with CPT-11, protein expression of the nucleotide excision repair enzyme ERCC1 inversely correlated with cell viability, but not clonogenic survival. However, 4 out of the 6 TNBC cells were synergistically responsive by cell viability and 5 out of the 6 TNBC cells were synergistically responsive by clonogenic survival to the combination of ABT-888 and CPT-11. In vivo, the BRCA mutant cell line MX-1 treated with CPT-11 alone demonstrated significant decreased tumor growth; this decrease was enhanced further with the addition of ABT-888. Decrease in tumor growth correlated with an increase in double strand DNA breaks as measured by γ-H2AX phosphorylation. In summary, inhibiting two arms of the DNA repair pathway simultaneously in TNBC cell lines, independent of BRCA mutation status, resulted in un-repairable DNA damage and subsequent cell death.

  18. Nicotinamide enhances repair of ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage in human keratinocytes and ex vivo skin.

    PubMed

    Surjana, Devita; Halliday, Gary M; Damian, Diona L

    2013-05-01

    Nicotinamide (vitamin B3) protects from ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced carcinogenesis in mice and from UV-induced immunosuppression in mice and humans. Recent double-blinded randomized controlled Phase 2 studies in heavily sun-damaged individuals have shown that oral nicotinamide significantly reduces premalignant actinic keratoses, and may reduce new non-melanoma skin cancers. Nicotinamide is a precursor of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)), an essential coenzyme in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production. Previously, we showed that nicotinamide prevents UV-induced ATP decline in HaCaT keratinocytes. Energy-dependent DNA repair is a key determinant of cellular survival after exposure to DNA-damaging agents such as UV radiation. Hence, in this study we investigated whether nicotinamide protection from cellular energy loss influences DNA repair. We treated HaCaT keratinocytes with nicotinamide and exposed them to low-dose solar-simulated UV (ssUV). Excision repair was quantified using an assay of unscheduled DNA synthesis. Nicotinamide increased both the proportion of cells undergoing excision repair and the repair rate in each cell. We then investigated ssUV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8oxoG) formation and repair by comet assay in keratinocytes and with immunohistochemistry in human skin. Nicotinamide reduced CPDs and 8oxoG in both models and the reduction appeared to be due to enhancement of DNA repair. These results show that nicotinamide enhances two different pathways for repair of UV-induced photolesions, supporting nicotinamide's potential as an inexpensive, convenient and non-toxic agent for skin cancer chemoprevention.

  19. Assessment of primary, oxidative and excision repaired DNA damage in hospital personnel handling antineoplastic drugs.

    PubMed

    Villarini, Milena; Dominici, Luca; Piccinini, Renza; Fatigoni, Cristina; Ambrogi, Maura; Curti, Gianluca; Morucci, Piero; Muzi, Giacomo; Monarca, Silvano; Moretti, Massimo

    2011-05-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer has classified several antineoplastic drugs in Group 1 (human carcinogens), among which chlorambucil, cyclophosphamide (CP) and tamoxifen, Group 2A (probable human carcinogens), among which cisplatin, etoposide, N-ethyl- and N-methyl-N-nitrosourea, and Group 2B (possible human carcinogens), among which bleomycins, merphalan and mitomycin C. The widespread use of these mutagenic/carcinogenic drugs in the treatment of cancer has led to anxiety about possible genotoxic hazards to medical personnel handling these drugs. The aim of the present study was to evaluate work environment contamination by antineoplastic drugs in a hospital in Central Italy and to assess the genotoxic risks associated with antineoplastic drug handling. The study group comprised 52 exposed subjects and 52 controls. Environmental contamination was assessed by taking wipe samples from different surfaces in preparation and administration rooms and nonwoven swabs were used as pads for the surrogate evaluation of dermal exposure, 5-fluorouracil and cytarabine were chosen as markers of exposure to antineoplastic drugs in the working environment. The actual exposure to antineoplastic drugs was evaluated by determining the urinary excretion of CP. The extent of primary, oxidative and excision repaired DNA damage was measured in peripheral blood leukocytes with the alkaline comet assay. To evaluate the role, if any, of genetic variants in the extent of genotoxic effects related to antineoplastic drug occupational exposure, the study subjects were genotyped for GSTM1, GSTT1, GSTP1 and TP53 polymorphisms. Primary DNA damage significantly increased in leukocytes of exposed nurses compared to controls. The use of personal protective equipment (i.e. gloves and/mask) was associated with a decrease in the extent of primary DNA damage.

  20. Protein energy-malnutrition: does the in vitro zinc sulfate supplementation improve chromosomal damage repair?

    PubMed

    Padula, Gisel; González, Horacio F; Varea, Ana; Seoane, Analía I

    2014-12-01

    Protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) is originated by a cellular imbalance between nutrient/energy supply and body's demand. Induction of genetic damage by PEM was reported. The purpose of this study was to determine the genetic effect of the in vitro zinc sulfate (ZnSO4) supplementation of cultured peripheral blood lymphocytes from children with PEM. Twenty-four samples from 12 children were analyzed. Anthropometric and biochemical diagnosis was made. For the anthropometric assessment, height-for-age index, weight-for-age index, and weight-for-height index were calculated (WHO, 2005). Micronutrient status was evaluated. A survey for assessed previous exposure to potentially genotoxic agents was applied. Results were statistically evaluated using paired sample t test and χ (2) test. Each sample was fractionated and cultured in two separate flasks to performed two treatments. One was added with 180 μg/dl of ZnSO4 (PEMs/ZnSO4) and the other remains non-supplemented (PEMs). Cytotoxic effects and chromosomal damage were assessed using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay (CBMN). All participants have at least one type of malnutrition and none have anemia, nor iron, folate, vitamin A, and zinc deficiency. All PEMs/ZnSO4 samples have a significant reduction in the micronucleus (MNi) frequency compared with PEMs (t = 6.25685; p < 0.001). Nuclear division index (NDI) increase in PEMs/ZnSO4 (t = -17.4226; p < 0.001). Nucleoplasmic bridge (NPBs) frequency was four times smaller in PEMs/ZnSO4 (χ (2) = 40.82; p < 0.001). No nuclear buds (NBuds) were observed. Cytotoxic effects and chromosomal damage observed in children suffering from PEM can be repaired in vitro with zinc sulfate supplementation.

  1. DNA damage and efficacy of DNA repair in patients with type 2 diabetes and coexisting colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Szymczak, Izabela; Sliwińska, Agnieszka; Drzewoski, Józef

    2014-01-01

     Numerous epidemiological studies have indicated that the frequency of developing certain types of cancer, including colorectal cancer (CRC), is higher in patients with type 2 diabetes. The possible causes of this association have not been fully clarified. It has been suggested that chronic hyperglycemia‑related oxidative stress leading to oxidative DNA damage and impaired DNA repair may contribute to increased risk of cancer in type 2 diabetes.  The aim of the study was to evaluate the level of DNA damage and efficacy of DNA repair in patients with CRC with and without type 2 diabetes in comparison with healthy controls.  The alkaline comet assay was used to assess the level of endogenous oxidative and H2O2‑induced DNA damage and the efficacy of DNA repair in the lymphocytes of patients with type 2 diabetes, with CRC, with type 2 diabetes and CRC, and of healthy people (a total of 32 patients).  The highest levels of endogenous oxidative and H2O2‑induced DNA damage were found in the lymphocytes of patients with type 2 diabetes and CRC. Additionally, the capacity of DNA repair was significantly decreased in patients with CRC with and without type 2 diabetes.  Our findings support the hypothesis that an increased risk of cancer in type 2 diabetes may be associated with oxidative DNA damage; however, impaired DNA repair seems to play a major role in carcinogenesis in people with and without type 2 diabetes.  

  2. Characterization of environmental chemicals with potential for DNA damage using isogenic DNA repair-deficient chicken DT40 cell lines.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kimiyo N; Hirota, Kouji; Kono, Koichi; Takeda, Shunichi; Sakamuru, Srilatha; Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Austin, Christopher P; Witt, Kristine L; Tice, Raymond R

    2011-08-01

    Included among the quantitative high throughput screens (qHTS) conducted in support of the US Tox21 program are those being evaluated for the detection of genotoxic compounds. One such screen is based on the induction of increased cytotoxicity in seven isogenic chicken DT40 cell lines deficient in DNA repair pathways compared to the parental DNA repair-proficient cell line. To characterize the utility of this approach for detecting genotoxic compounds and identifying the type(s) of DNA damage induced, we evaluated nine of 42 compounds identified as positive for differential cytotoxicity in qHTS (actinomycin D, adriamycin, alachlor, benzotrichloride, diglycidyl resorcinol ether, lovastatin, melphalan, trans-1,4-dichloro-2-butene, tris(2,3-epoxypropyl)isocyanurate) and one non-cytotoxic genotoxic compound (2-aminothiamine) for (1) clastogenicity in mutant and wild-type cells; (2) the comparative induction of γH2AX positive foci by melphalan; (3) the extent to which a 72-hr exposure duration increased assay sensitivity or specificity; (4) the use of 10 additional DT40 DNA repair-deficient cell lines to better analyze the type(s) of DNA damage induced; and (5) the involvement of reactive oxygen species in the induction of DNA damage. All compounds but lovastatin and 2-aminothiamine were more clastogenic in at least one DNA repair-deficient cell line than the wild-type cells. The differential responses across the various DNA repair-deficient cell lines provided information on the type(s) of DNA damage induced. The results demonstrate the utility of this DT40 screen for detecting genotoxic compounds, for characterizing the nature of the DNA damage, and potentially for analyzing mechanisms of mutagenesis.

  3. DNA Damage Repair Factors have a Tumor Promoting Role in MLL-fusion Leukemia | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Cancers develop when cells accumulate DNA mutations that allow them to grow and divide inappropriately. Thus, proteins involved in repairing DNA damage are generally suppressors of cancer formation, and their expression is often lost in the early stages of cancer initiation. In contrast, cancer stem cells, like their normal counterparts, must retain their ability to self-renew, which necessitates maintenance of DNA integrity. In hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), for example, double strand breaks and oxidative damage exhaust their regenerative ability. André Nussenzweig, Ph.D., Chief of CCR’s Laboratory of Genome Integrity and his colleagues wondered whether leukemic stem cells might be similarly constrained by DNA damage.

  4. Ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage and its repair in human cells. Final performance report, July 1992--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Dizdaroglu, M.

    1995-12-31

    The studies of DNA damage in living cells in vitro and in vivo were continued. A variety of systems including cultured mammalian cells, animals, and human tissues were used to conduct these studies. In addition, enzymatic repair of DNA base damage was studied using several DNA glycosylases. To this end, substrate specificities of these enzymes were examined in terms of a large number of base lesions in DNA. In the first phase of the studies, the author sought to introduce improvements to his methodologies for measurement of DNA damage using the technique of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). In particular, the quantitative measurement of DNA base damage and DNA-protein crosslinks was improved by incorporation of isotope-dilution mass spectrometry into the methodologies. This is one of the most accurate techniques for quantification of organic compounds. Having improved the measurement technique, studies of DNA damage in living cells and DNA repair by repair enzymes were pursued. This report provides a summary of these studies with references to the original work.

  5. A DNA2 Homolog Is Required for DNA Damage Repair, Cell Cycle Regulation, and Meristem Maintenance in Plants.

    PubMed

    Jia, Ning; Liu, Xiaomin; Gao, Hongbo

    2016-05-01

    Plant meristem cells divide and differentiate in a spatially and temporally regulated manner, ultimately giving rise to organs. In this study, we isolated the Arabidopsis jing he sheng 1 (jhs1) mutant, which exhibited retarded growth, an abnormal pattern of meristem cell division and differentiation, and morphological defects such as fasciation, an irregular arrangement of siliques, and short roots. We identified JHS1 as a homolog of human and yeast DNA Replication Helicase/Nuclease2, which is known to be involved in DNA replication and damage repair. JHS1 is strongly expressed in the meristem of Arabidopsis. The jhs1 mutant was sensitive to DNA damage stress and had an increased DNA damage response, including increased expression of genes involved in DNA damage repair and cell cycle regulation, and a higher frequency of homologous recombination. In the meristem of the mutant plants, cell cycle progression was delayed at the G2 or late S phase and genes essential for meristem maintenance were misregulated. These results suggest that JHS1 plays an important role in DNA replication and damage repair, meristem maintenance, and development in plants. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Yeast DNA-repair gene RAD14 encodes a zinc metalloprotein with affinity for ultraviolet-damaged DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Guzder, S.N.; Sung, P.; Prakash, S. ); Prakash, L. )

    1993-06-15

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients suffer from a high incidence of skin cancers due to a defect in excision repair of UV light-damaged DNA. Of the seven XP complementation groups, A--G, group A represents a severe and frequent form of the disease. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD14 gene is a homolog of the XP-A correcting (XPAC) gene. Like XP-A cells, rad14-null mutants are defective in the incision step of excision repair of UV-damaged DNA. The authors have purified RAD14 protein to homogeneity from extract of a yeast strain genetically tailored to overexpress RAD14. As determined by atomic emission spectroscopy, RAD14 contains one zinc atom. They also show in vitro that RAD14 binds zinc but does not bind other divalent metal ions. In DNA mobility-shift assays, RAD14 binds specifically to UV-damaged DNA. Removal of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers from damaged DNA by enzymatic photoreactivation has no effect on binding, strongly suggesting that RAD14 recognizes pyrimidine(6-4)pyrimidone photoproduct sites. These findings indicate that RAD14 functions in damage recognition during excision repair. 37 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Rat MYH, a glycosylase for repair of oxidatively damaged DNA, has brain-specific isoforms that localize to neuronal mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Englander, Ella W; Hu, Zhaoyong; Sharma, Abha; Lee, Heung-Man; Wu, Zhao-Hui; Greeley, George H

    2002-12-01

    Mitochondrial genomes are exposed to a heavy load of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that damage DNA. Since in neurons, mitochondrial DNA integrity must be maintained over the entire mammalian life span, neuronal mitochondria most likely repair oxidatively damaged DNA. We show that the Escherichia coli MutY DNA glycosylase homolog (MYH) in rat (rMYH) involved in repair of oxidative damage is abundantly expressed in the rat brain, with isoforms that are exclusive to brain tissue. Confocal microscopy and western analyses reveal localization of rMYH in neuronal mitochondria. To assess involvement of MYH in the neuronal response to oxidative DNA damage, we used a rat model of respiratory hypoxia, in which acutely reduced blood oxygenation leads to generation of superoxide, and formation and subsequent removal of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8OHdG). Removal of 8OHdG is accompanied by a spatial increase in rMYH immunoreactivity in the brain and an increase in levels of one of the three mitochondrial MYH isoforms, suggesting that inducible and non-inducible MYH isoforms exist in the brain. The mitochondrial localization of oxidative DNA damage repair enzymes in neurons may represent a specialized neuronal mechanism that safeguards mitochondrial genomes in the face of routine and accidental exposures to heavy loads of injurious ROS.

  8. Beryllium chloride-induced oxidative DNA damage and alteration in the expression patterns of DNA repair-related genes.

    PubMed

    Attia, Sabry M; Harisa, Gamaleldin I; Hassan, Memy H; Bakheet, Saleh A

    2013-09-01

    Beryllium metal has physical properties that make its use essential for very specific applications, such as medical diagnostics, nuclear/fusion reactors and aerospace applications. Because of the widespread human exposure to beryllium metals and the discrepancy of the genotoxic results in the reported literature, detail assessments of the genetic damage of beryllium are warranted. Mice exposed to beryllium chloride at an oral dose of 23mg/kg for seven consecutive days exhibited a significant increase in the level of DNA-strand breaking and micronuclei formation as detected by a bone marrow standard comet assay and micronucleus test. Whereas slight beryllium chloride-induced oxidative DNA damage was detected following formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase digestion, digestion with endonuclease III resulted in considerable increases in oxidative DNA damage after the 11.5 and 23mg/kg/day treatment as detected by enzyme-modified comet assays. Increased 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine was also directly correlated with increased bone marrow micronuclei formation and DNA strand breaks, which further confirm the involvement of oxidative stress in the induction of bone marrow genetic damage after exposure to beryllium chloride. Gene expression analysis on the bone marrow cells from beryllium chloride-exposed mice showed significant alterations in genes associated with DNA damage repair. Therefore, beryllium chloride may cause genetic damage to bone marrow cells due to the oxidative stress and the induced unrepaired DNA damage is probably due to the down-regulation in the expression of DNA repair genes, which may lead to genotoxicity and eventually cause carcinogenicity.

  9. Effects of motexafin gadolinium on DNA damage and X-ray-induced DNA damage repair, as assessed by the Comet assay

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, Erling T.; Liu Yanfeng; Paul, Tracy K.; Rockwell, Sara . E-mail: sara.rockwell@yale.edu

    2005-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of motexafin gadolinium (MGd) on the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), glutathione (GSH), and DNA damage in EMT6 mouse mammary carcinoma cells. The ability of MGd to alter radiosensitivity and to inhibit DNA damage repair after X-ray irradiation was also evaluated. Methods and Materials: Reactive oxygen species and GSH levels were assessed by 2,7-dichlorofluorescein fluorescence flow cytometry and the Tietze method, respectively. Cellular radiosensitivity was assessed by clonogenic assays. Deoxyribonucleic acid damage and DNA damage repair were assessed in plateau-phase EMT6 cells by the Comet assay and clonogenic assays. Results: Cells treated with 100 {mu}mol/L MGd plus equimolar ascorbic acid (AA) had significantly increased levels of ROS and a 58.9% {+-} 3.4% decrease in GSH levels, relative to controls. Motexafin gadolinium plus AA treatment increased the hypoxic, but not the aerobic, radiosensitivity of EMT6 cells. There were increased levels of single-strand breaks in cells treated with 100 {mu}mol/L MGd plus equimolar AA, as evidenced by changes in the alkaline tail moment (MGd + AA, 6 h: 14.7 {+-} 1.8; control: 2.8 {+-} 0.9). The level of single-strand breaks was dependent on the length of treatment. Motexafin gadolinium plus AA did not increase double-strand breaks. The repair of single-strand breaks at 2 h, but not at 4 h and 6 h, after irradiation was altered significantly in cells treated with MGd plus AA (MGd + AA, 2 h: 15.8 {+-} 3.4; control: 5.8 {+-} 0.6). Motexafin gadolinium did not alter the repair of double-strand breaks at any time after irradiation with 10 Gy. Conclusions: Motexafin gadolinium plus AA generated ROS, which in turn altered GSH homeostasis and induced DNA strand breaks. The MGd plus AA-mediated alteration of GSH levels increased the hypoxic, but not aerobic, radiosensitivity of EMT6 cells. Motexafin gadolinium altered the kinetics of single-strand break repair soon after irradiation but

  10. Misregulation of DNA damage repair pathways in HPV-positive head and neck squamous cell carcinoma contributes to cellular radiosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Nickson, Catherine M.; Moori, Parisa; Carter, Rachel J.; Rubbi, Carlos P.; Parsons, Jason L.

    2017-01-01

    Patients with human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV)-associated oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OPSCC) display increased sensitivity to radiotherapy and improved survival rates in comparison to HPV-negative forms of the disease. However the cellular mechanisms responsible for this characteristic difference are unclear. Here, we have investigated the contribution of DNA damage repair pathways to the in vitro radiosensitivity of OPSCC cell lines. We demonstrate that two HPV-positive OPSCC cells are indeed more radiosensitive than two HPV-negative OPSCC cells, which correlates with reduced efficiency for the repair of ionising radiation (IR)-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSB). Interestingly, we show that HPV-positive OPSCC cells consequently have upregulated levels of the proteins XRCC1, DNA polymerase β, PNKP and PARP-1 which are involved in base excision repair (BER) and single strand break (SSB) repair. This translates to an increased capacity and efficiency for the repair of DNA base damage and SSBs in these cells. In addition, we demonstrate that HPV-positive but interestingly more so HPV-negative OPSCC display increased radiosensitivity in combination with the PARP inhibitor olaparib. This suggests that PARP inhibition in combination with radiotherapy may be an effective treatment for both forms of OPSCC, particularly for HPV-negative OPSCC which is relatively radioresistant. PMID:28415784

  11. Preferential repair of ionizing radiation-induced damage in the transcribed strand of an active human gene is defective in Cockayne syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Leadon, S.A. ); Copper, P.K. )

    1993-11-15

    Cells from patients with Cockayne syndrome (CS), which are sensitive to killing by UV although overall damage removal appears normal, are specifically defective in repair of UV damage in actively transcribe genes. Because several CS strains display cross-sensitivity to killing by ionizing radiation, the authors examined whether ionizing radiation-induced damage in active genes is preferentially repaired by normal cells and whether the radiosensitivity of CS cells can be explained by a defect in this process. They found that ionizing radiation-induced damage was repaired more rapidly in the transcriptionally active metallothionein IIA (MTIIA) gene than in the inactive MTIIB gene or in the genome overall in normal cells as a result of faster repair on the transcribed strand of MTIIA. Cells of the radiosensitive CS strain CS1AN are completely defective in this strand-selective repair of ionizing radiation-induced damage, although their overall repair rate appears normal. CS3BE cells, which are intermediate in radiosensitivity, do exhibit more rapid repair of the transcribed strand but at a reduced rate compared to normal cells. Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A cells, which are hypersensitive to UV light because of a defect in the nucleotide excision repair pathway but do not show increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation, preferentially repair ionizing radiation-induced damage on the transcribed strand of MTIIA. Thus, the ability to rapidly repair ionizing radiation-induced damage in actively transcribing genes correlates with cell survival. The results extend the generality of preferential repair in active genes to include damage other than bulky lesions.

  12. Assessment of DNA Damage and Repair in Adults Consuming AllylIsothiocyanate or Brassica Vegetables

    PubMed Central

    Charron, Craig S.; Clevidence, Beverly A.; Albaugh, George A.; Kramer, Matthew H.; Vinyard, Bryan T.; Milner, John A.; Novotny, Janet A.

    2012-01-01

    Allylisothiocyanate (AITC) is a dietary component with possible anti-cancer effects, though much information about AITC and cancer has been obtained from cell studies. To investigate the effect of AITC on DNA integrity in vivo, a crossover study was conducted. Adults (n=46) consumed AITC, AITC-rich vegetables (mustard and cabbage), or a control treatment with a controlled diet for 10 days each. On day 11, volunteers provided blood and urine before and after consuming treatments. Volunteers were characterized for genotype for GSTM1 and GSTT1 (glutathione S-transferases) and XPD (DNA repair). DNA integrity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was assessed by single cell gel electrophoresis. Urine was analyzed for 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2’-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) and creatinine. Ten day intake of neither AITC nor mustard/cabbage(M/C) resulted in statistically significant differences in DNA strand breaks (LS mean % DNA in tail ± SEM: 4.8 ± 0.6 for control, 5.7 ± 0.7 for AITC, 5.3 ± 0.6 for M/C) or urinary 8-oxodG (LS mean µg 8-oxodG/g creatinine ± SEM: 2.95 ± 0.09 for control, 2.88 ± 0.09 for AITC, 3.06 ± 0.09 for M/C). Both AITC and M/C increased DNA strand breaks 3h post-consumption (LS mean % DNA in tail ± SEM: 3.2 ± 0.7 for control, 8.3 ± 1.7 for AITC, 8.0 ± 1.7 for M/C), and this difference disappeared at 6h (4.2 ± 0.9 for control, 5.7 ± 1.2 for AITC, 5.5 ± 1.2 for M/C). Genotypes for GSTM1, GSTT1, and XPD were not associated with treatment effects. In summary, DNA damage appeared to be induced in the short term by AITC and AITC-rich products, but that damage disappeared quickly, and neither AITC nor AITC-rich products affected DNA base excision repair. PMID:22902324

  13. Does a role for selenium in DNA damage repair explain apparent controversies in its use in chemoprevention?

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, Alan M.

    2013-01-01

    The trace element selenium is an essential micronutrient that has received considerable attention for its potential use in the prevention of cancer. In spite of this interest, the mechanism(s) by which selenium might function as a chemopreventive remain to be determined. Considerable experimental evidence indicates that one possible mechanism by which selenium supplementation may exert its benefits is by enhancing the DNA damage repair response, and this includes data obtained using cultured cells, animal models as well as in human clinical studies. In these studies, selenium supplementation has been shown to be beneficial in reducing the frequency of DNA adducts and chromosome breaks, consequentially reducing the likelihood of detrimental mutations that ultimately contribute to carcinogenesis. The benefits of selenium can be envisioned as being due, at least in part, to it being a critical constituent of selenoproteins such as glutathione peroxidases and thioredoxin reductases, proteins that play important roles in antioxidant defence and maintaining the cellular reducing environment. Selenium, therefore, may be protective by preventing DNA damage from occurring as well as by increasing the activity of repair enzymes such as DNA glycosylases and DNA damage repair pathways that involve p53, BRCA1 and Gadd45. An improved understanding of the mechanism of selenium’s impact on DNA repair processes may help to resolve the apparently contradicting data obtained from decades of animal work, human epidemiology and more recently, clinical supplementation studies. PMID:23204505

  14. NDR1 modulates the UV-induced DNA-damage checkpoint and nucleotide excision repair

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jeong-Min; Choi, Ji Ye; Yi, Joo Mi; Chung, Jin Woong; Leem, Sun-Hee; Koh, Sang Seok; Kang, Tae-Hong

    2015-06-05

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is the sole mechanism of UV-induced DNA lesion repair in mammals. A single round of NER requires multiple components including seven core NER factors, xeroderma pigmentosum A–G (XPA–XPG), and many auxiliary effector proteins including ATR serine/threonine kinase. The XPA protein helps to verify DNA damage and thus plays a rate-limiting role in NER. Hence, the regulation of XPA is important for the entire NER kinetic. We found that NDR1, a novel XPA-interacting protein, modulates NER by modulating the UV-induced DNA-damage checkpoint. In quiescent cells, NDR1 localized mainly in the cytoplasm. After UV irradiation, NDR1 accumulated in the nucleus. The siRNA knockdown of NDR1 delayed the repair of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in both normal cells and cancer cells. It did not, however, alter the expression levels or the chromatin association levels of the core NER factors following UV irradiation. Instead, the NDR1-depleted cells displayed reduced activity of ATR for some set of its substrates including CHK1 and p53, suggesting that NDR1 modulates NER indirectly via the ATR pathway. - Highlights: • NDR1 is a novel XPA-interacting protein. • NDR1 accumulates in the nucleus in response to UV irradiation. • NDR1 modulates NER (nucleotide excision repair) by modulating the UV-induced DNA-damage checkpoint response.

  15. Effects of different light conditions on repair of UV-B-induced damage in carpospores of Chondrus ocellatus Holm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Qing; Xiao, Hui; Wang, You; Tang, Xuexi

    2015-05-01

    We evaluated the effects of ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation and different light conditions on the repair of UV-B-induced damage in carpospores of Chondrus ocellatus Holm (Rhodophyta) in laboratory experiments. Carpospores were treated daily with different doses of UV-B radiation for 48 days, when vertical branches had formed in all treatments; after each daily treatment, the carpospores were subjected to photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), darkness, red light, or blue light during a 2-h repair stage. Carpospore diameters were measured every 4 days. We measured the growth and cellular contents of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), chlorophyll a, phycoerythrin, and UV-B-absorbing mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) in carpospores on Day 48. Low doses of UV-B radiation (36 and 72 J/m2) accelerated the growth of C. ocellatus. However, as the amount of UV-B radiation increased, the growth rate decreased and morphological changes occurred. UV-B radiation significant damaged DNA and photosynthetic pigments and induced three kind of MAAs, palythine, asterina-330, and shinorine. PAR conditions were best for repairing UV-B-induced damage. Darkness promoted the activity of the DNA darkrepair mechanism. Red light enhanced phycoerythrin synthesis but inhibited light repair of DNA. Although blue light, increased the activity of DNA photolyase, greatly improving remediation efficiency, the growth and development of C. ocellatus carpospores were slower than in other light treatments.

  16. Requirement for human Mps1/TTK in oxidative DNA damage repair and cell survival through MDM2 phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zheng-Cheng; Huang, Yi-Fu; Shieh, Sheau-Yann

    2016-01-01

    Human Mps1 (hMps1) is a protein kinase essential for mitotic checkpoints and the DNA damage response. Here, we present new evidence that hMps1 also participates in the repair of oxidative DNA lesions and cell survival through the MDM2-H2B axis. In response to oxidative stress, hMps1 phosphorylates MDM2, which in turn promotes histone H2B ubiquitination and chromatin decompaction. These events facilitate oxidative DNA damage repair and ATR-CHK1, but not ATM-CHK2 signaling. Depletion of hMps1 or MDM2 compromised H2B ubiquitination, DNA repair and cell survival. The impairment could be rescued by re-expression of WT but not the phospho-deficient MDM2 mutant, supporting the involvement of hMps1-dependent MDM2 phosphorylation in the oxidative stress response. In line with these findings, localization of RPA and base excision repair proteins to damage foci also requires MDM2 and hMps1. Significantly, like MDM2, hMps1 is upregulated in human sarcoma, suggesting high hMps1 and MDM2 expression may be beneficial for tumors constantly challenged by an oxidative micro-environment. Our study therefore identified an hMps1-MDM2-H2B signaling axis that likely plays a relevant role in tumor progression. PMID:26531827

  17. Mechanism of Cluster DNA Damage Repair in Response to High-Atomic Number and Energy Particles Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Asaithamby, Aroumougame; Chen, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation (i.e., γ- and X-rays) induces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that are rapidly repaired (rejoined). In contrast, DNA damage induced by the dense ionizing track of high-atomic number and energy (HZE) particles are slowly repaired or are irreparable. These unrepaired and/or misrepaired DNA lesions may contribute to the observed higher relative biological effectiveness for cell killing, chromosomal aberrations, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis in HZE particle irradiated cells compared to those treated with low-LET radiation. The types of DNA lesions induced by HZE particles have been characterized in vitro and usually consist of two or more closely spaced strand breaks, abasic sites, or oxidized bases on opposing strands. It is unclear why these lesions are difficult to repair. In this review, we highlight the potential of a new technology allowing direct visualization of different types of DNA lesions in human cells and document the emerging significance of live-cell imaging for elucidation of the spatio-temporal characterization of complex DNA damage. We focus on the recent insights into the molecular pathways that participate in the repair of HZE particle-induced DSBs. We also discuss recent advances in our understanding of how different end-processing nucleases aid in repair of DSBs with complicated ends generated by HZE particles. Understanding the mechanism underlying the repair of DNA damage induced by HZE particles will have important implications for estimating the risks to human health associated with HZE particle exposure. PMID:21126526

  18. Genome-wide analysis of human global and transcription-coupled excision repair of UV damage at single-nucleotide resolution

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jinchuan; Adar, Sheera; Selby, Christopher P.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a method for genome-wide mapping of DNA excision repair named XR-seq (excision repair sequencing). Human nucleotide excision repair generates two incisions surrounding the site of damage, creating an ∼30-mer. In XR-seq, this fragment is isolated and subjected to high-throughput sequencing. We used XR-seq to produce stranded, nucleotide-resolution maps of repair of two UV-induced DNA damages in human cells: cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and (6-4) pyrimidine–pyrimidone photoproducts [(6-4)PPs]. In wild-type cells, CPD repair was highly associated with transcription, specifically with the template strand. Experiments in cells defective in either transcription-coupled excision repair or general excision repair isolated the contribution of each pathway to the overall repair pattern and showed that transcription-coupled repair of both photoproducts occurs exclusively on the template strand. XR-seq maps capture transcription-coupled repair at sites of divergent gene promoters and bidirectional enhancer RNA (eRNA) production at enhancers. XR-seq data also uncovered the repair characteristics and novel sequence preferences of CPDs and (6-4)PPs. XR-seq and the resulting repair maps will facilitate studies of the effects of genomic location, chromatin context, transcription, and replication on DNA repair in human cells. PMID:25934506

  19. 46 CFR Sec. 17 - Performance of work resulting from damage sustained while undergoing repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 17 Performance of work resulting... performance of repairs under the NSA Master Contract, negotiations for accomplishment of work necessary to...

  20. 46 CFR Sec. 17 - Performance of work resulting from damage sustained while undergoing repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 17 Performance of work resulting... performance of repairs under the NSA Master Contract, negotiations for accomplishment of work necessary to...

  1. The dual roles of neutrophils and macrophages in inflammation: a critical balance between tissue damage and repair.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Timothy A; Best, Thomas M; Merrick, Mark A

    2006-01-01

    To discuss the acute phase of inflammatory response with a focus on the neutrophilic response and its role in inflammation. We discuss the relative balance between the need for inflammation to stimulate repair and the need to limit inflammation because of the additional damage it causes. We conducted a MEDLINE search from 1966 to 2005 for literature related to acute inflammation, muscle injury, and repair using combinations of the key words inflammation, neutrophil, macrophage, and cytokines. Additional literature was acquired through cross-referencing of bibliographies of articles obtained through the MEDLINE searches. We reviewed more than 200 relevant articles. Although neutrophils are an important cell population in acute inflammation, few athletic trainers are familiar with the neutrophil's actions or its dichotomous role as both perpetrator of tissue damage and initiator of repair. Neutrophils dominate the early stages of inflammation and set the stage for repair of tissue damage by macrophages. These actions are orchestrated by numerous cytokines and the expression of their receptors, which represent a potential means for inhibiting selective aspects of inflammation. Neutrophils infiltrate injured tissues but can also be present after noninjurious exercise. These cells have both specific and nonspecific defensive immune system functions that can cause tissue damage in isolation or as sequelae to other tissue injury. It might seem that limiting the action of neutrophils would be clinically beneficial, but these cells are also responsible for initiating the reparative process that is later managed by macrophages. Although achieving a therapeutic balance between limiting inflammation and stimulating repair is important, the duplicitous roles of neutrophils and macrophages in both the inflammation and healing processes create a physiologic paradox for clinicians whose goals are to limit inflammation and to stimulate healing after acute soft tissue injury.

  2. BRCA1-associated exclusion of 53BP1 from DNA damage sites underlies temporal control of DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, J. Ross; Sossick, Alex J.; Boulton, Simon J.; Jackson, Stephen P.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Following irradiation, numerous DNA-damage-responsive proteins rapidly redistribute into microscopically visible subnuclear aggregates, termed ionising-radiation-induced foci (IRIF). How the enrichment of proteins on damaged chromatin actually relates to DNA repair remains unclear. Here, we use super-resolution microscopy to examine the spatial distribution of BRCA1 and 53BP1 proteins within single IRIF at subdiffraction-limit resolution, yielding an unprecedented increase in detail that was not previously apparent by conventional microscopy. Consistent with a role for 53BP1 in promoting DNA double-strand break repair by non-homologous end joining, 53BP1 enrichment in IRIF is most prominent in the G0/G1 cell cycle phases, where it is enriched in dense globular structures. By contrast, as cells transition through S phase, the recruitment of BRCA1 into the core of IRIF is associated with an exclusion of 53BP1 to the focal periphery, leading to an overall reduction of 53BP1 occupancy at DNA damage sites. Our data suggest that the BRCA1-associated IRIF core corresponds to chromatin regions associated with repair by homologous recombination, and the enrichment of BRCA1 in IRIF represents a temporal switch in the DNA repair program. We propose that BRCA1 antagonises 53BP1-dependent DNA repair in S phase by inhibiting its interaction with chromatin proximal to damage sites. Furthermore, the genomic instability exhibited by BRCA1-deficient cells might result from a failure to efficiently exclude 53BP1 from such regions during S phase. PMID:22553214

  3. Evaluation and Repair of War-Damaged Port Facilities. Report 4. Concepts for Expedient War-Damage Repair of Pier and Wharf Support Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-10-01

    Materials Following hostile action on a port, there will be substantial debris to be disposed of and repairs to be made. If repairs must be done...wwovtf w itofrt and stacking or pHing on süt lor ramoval st ground *yal. 3 For disposal up to fiv» Mies, us* t.S man-hours per cubic yard...tor salvage of materials (cleaning, pulling naKs . etc.) is included In this Table 3-14. Hand Excavation MAN-NOURS WORK ELEMENT DESCRIPTION UNIT

  4. Overexpression of PCNA Attenuates Oxidative Stress-Caused Delay of Gap-Filling during Repair of UV-Induced DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi-Hsiang

    2017-01-01

    UVC irradiation-caused DNA lesions are repaired in mammalian cells solely by nucleotide excision repair (NER), which consists of sequential events including initial damage recognition, dual incision of damage site, gap-filling, and ligation. We have previously shown that gap-filling during the repair of UV-induced DNA lesions may be delayed by a subsequent treatment of oxidants or prooxidants such as hydrogen peroxide, flavonoids, and colcemid. We considered the delay as a result of competition for limiting protein/enzyme factor(s) during repair synthesis between NER and base excision repair (BER) induced by the oxidative chemicals. In this report, using colcemid as oxidative stress inducer, we showed that colcemid-caused delay of gap-filling during the repair of UV-induced DNA lesions was attenuated by overexpression of PCNA but not ligase-I. PCNA knockdown, as expected, delayed the gap-filling of NER but also impaired the repair of oxidative DNA damage. Fen-1 knockdown, however, did not affect the repair of oxidative DNA damage, suggesting repair of oxidative DNA damage is not of long patch BER. Furthermore, overexpression of XRCC1 delayed the gap-filling, and presumably increase of XRCC1 pulls PCNA away from gap-filling of NER for BER, consistent with our hypothesis that delay of gap-filling of NER attributes the competition between NER and BER. PMID:28116145

  5. [Association between nucleotide excision repair gene polymorphisms and chromosomal damage in coke-oven workers].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Juan; Leng, Shu-Guang; Dai, Yu-Fei; Pan, Zu-Fei; Niu, Yong; Li, Bin; Zheng, Yu-Xin

    2006-11-01

    To investigate the association of polymorphisms of nucleotide excision repair genes and chromosomal damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes among coke-oven workers. The genotypes of ERCC1 C19007T, ERCC2 C22541A, ERCC2 G23591A, ERCC2 A35931C, ERCC4 T30028C, ERCC5 G3507C and ERCC6 A3368G among 140 coke-oven workers and 66 non-coke-oven controls were determined by PCR-PFLP methods. Chromosomal damage was detected by cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay. Multivariate analysis of covariance revealed that in coke-oven workers, the ERCC1 19007 CC genotype exhibited significantly higher CBMN frequency [(1.05 +/- 0.68)%] than did the CT [(0.81 +/- 0.66)%] (P = 0.01) or TT [(0.66 +/- 0.37)%] (P = 0.05) or CT + TT genotypes [(0.75 +/- 0.63)%] (P = 0.004). For the ERCC6 A3368G polymorphism, AA genotype exhibited significantly higher CBMN frequency [(1.00 +/- 0.69)%] than did the AG [(0.67 +/- 0.42)%] (P = 0.05) or AG + GG genotypes [(0.66 +/- 0.41)%] (P = 0.02). Stratification analysis found the significant association between the two polymorphisms, ERCC1 C19007T and ERCC6 A3368G, and the CBMN frequencies were most pronounced in older workers. In addition, for the polymorphism of ERCC2 G23591A, GA carriers had significantly higher CBMN frequencies [(1.40 +/- 0.63)%] than those GG carriers [(0.98 +/- 0.59)%] (P = 0.01) in older workers. Our results suggested that polymorphisms of ERCC1 C19007T, ERCC6 A3368G and ERCC2 G23591A were associated with the CBMN frequencies in coke-oven workers.

  6. Phosphoramide mustard exposure induces DNA adduct formation and the DNA damage repair response in rat ovarian granulosa cells

    PubMed Central

    Ganesan, Shanthi; Keating, Aileen F.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphoramide mustard (PM), the ovotoxic metabolite of the anti-cancer agent cyclophosphamide (CPA), destroys rapidly dividing cells by forming NOR-G-OH, NOR-G and G-NOR-G adducts with DNA, potentially leading to DNA damage. A previous study demonstrated that PM induces ovarian DNA damage in rat ovaries. To investigate whether PM induces DNA adduct formation, DNA damage and induction of the DNA repair response, rat spontaneously immortalized granulosa cells (SIGCs) were treated with vehicle control (1% DMSO) or PM (3 or 6 μM) for 24 or 48 h. Cell viability was reduced (P < 0.05) after 48 h of exposure to 3 or 6 μM PM. The NOR-G-OH DNA adduct was detected after 24 h of 6 μM PM exposure, while the more cytotoxic G-NOR-G DNA adduct was formed after 48 h by exposure to both PM concentrations. Phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX), a marker of DNA double stranded break occurrence, was also increased by PM exposure, coincident with DNA adduct formation. Additionally, induction of genes (Atm, Parp1, Prkdc, Xrcc6, and Brca1) and proteins (ATM, γH2AX, PARP-1, PRKDC, XRCC6, and BRCA1) involved in DNA repair were observed in both a time- and dose-dependent manner. These data support that PM induces DNA adduct formation in ovarian granulosa cells, induces DNA damage and elicits the ovarian DNA repair response. PMID:25497287

  7. Long non-coding RNAs as novel expression signatures modulate DNA damage and repair in cadmium toxicology

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhiheng; Liu, Haibai; Wang, Caixia; Lu, Qian; Huang, Qinhai; Zheng, Chanjiao; Lei, Yixiong

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are involved in a variety of physiological and pathophysiological processes. Our study was to investigate whether lncRNAs as novel expression signatures are able to modulate DNA damage and repair in cadmium(Cd) toxicity. There were aberrant expression profiles of lncRNAs in 35th Cd-induced cells as compared to untreated 16HBE cells. siRNA-mediated knockdown of ENST00000414355 inhibited the growth of DNA-damaged cells and decreased the expressions of DNA-damage related genes (ATM, ATR and ATRIP), while increased the expressions of DNA-repair related genes (DDB1, DDB2, OGG1, ERCC1, MSH2, RAD50, XRCC1 and BARD1). Cadmium increased ENST00000414355 expression in the lung of Cd-exposed rats in a dose-dependent manner. A significant positive correlation was observed between blood ENST00000414355 expression and urinary/blood Cd concentrations, and there were significant correlations of lncRNA-ENST00000414355 expression with the expressions of target genes in the lung of Cd-exposed rats and the blood of Cd exposed workers. These results indicate that some lncRNAs are aberrantly expressed in Cd-treated 16HBE cells. lncRNA-ENST00000414355 may serve as a signature for DNA damage and repair related to the epigenetic mechanisms underlying the cadmium toxicity and become a novel biomarker of cadmium toxicity. PMID:26472689

  8. An improved method for the detection of nucleotide excision repair factors at local UV DNA damage sites.

    PubMed

    Dutto, Ilaria; Cazzalini, Ornella; Stivala, Lucia Anna; Prosperi, Ennio

    2017-03-01

    Among different DNA repair processes that cells use to face with DNA damage, nucleotide excision repair (NER) is particularly important for the removal of a high variety of lesions, including those generated by some antitumor drugs. A number of factors participating in NER, such as the TFIIH complex and the endonuclease XPG are also involved in basal processes, e.g. transcription. For this reason, localization of these factors at DNA damage sites may be difficult. Here we have applied a mild digestion of chromatin with DNase I to improve the in situ extraction necessary to detect chromatin-bound proteins by immunofluorescence. We have compared this method with different extraction protocols and investigated its application on different cell types, and with different antibodies. Our results show that a short DNase I treatment before the immunoreaction, enhances the fluorescence signal of NER proteins, such as XPG, DDB2 and XPC. In addition, our findings indicate that the antibody choice is a critical factor for accurate localization of DNA repair proteins at DNA damage sites. In conclusion, a mild DNA digestion with DNase I improves the immunofluorescence detection of the recruitment of NER factors at local DNA damage sites by enhancing accessibility to the antibodies, independently of the cell type. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Long non-coding RNAs as novel expression signatures modulate DNA damage and repair in cadmium toxicology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhiheng; Liu, Haibai; Wang, Caixia; Lu, Qian; Huang, Qinhai; Zheng, Chanjiao; Lei, Yixiong

    2015-10-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are involved in a variety of physiological and pathophysiological processes. Our study was to investigate whether lncRNAs as novel expression signatures are able to modulate DNA damage and repair in cadmium(Cd) toxicity. There were aberrant expression profiles of lncRNAs in 35th Cd-induced cells as compared to untreated 16HBE cells. siRNA-mediated knockdown of ENST00000414355 inhibited the growth of DNA-damaged cells and decreased the expressions of DNA-damage related genes (ATM, ATR and ATRIP), while increased the expressions of DNA-repair related genes (DDB1, DDB2, OGG1, ERCC1, MSH2, RAD50, XRCC1 and BARD1). Cadmium increased ENST00000414355 expression in the lung of Cd-exposed rats in a dose-dependent manner. A significant positive correlation was observed between blood ENST00000414355 expression and urinary/blood Cd concentrations, and there were significant correlations of lncRNA-ENST00000414355 expression with the expressions of target genes in the lung of Cd-exposed rats and the blood of Cd exposed workers. These results indicate that some lncRNAs are aberrantly expressed in Cd-treated 16HBE cells. lncRNA-ENST00000414355 may serve as a signature for DNA damage and repair related to the epigenetic mechanisms underlying the cadmium toxicity and become a novel biomarker of cadmium toxicity.

  10. Nuclear TRADD prevents DNA damage-mediated death by facilitating non-homologous end-joining repair.

    PubMed

    Koo, Gi-Bang; Ji, Jae-Hoon; Cho, Hyeseong; Morgan, Michael J; Kim, You-Sun

    2017-06-13

    TNF receptor-associated death domain (TRADD) is an essential mediator of TNF receptor signaling, and serves as an adaptor to recruit other effectors. TRADD has been shown to cycle between the cytoplasm and nucleus due to its nuclear localization (NLS) and export sequences (NES). However, the underlying function of nuclear TRADD is poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that cytoplasmic TRADD translocates to DNA double-strand break sites (DSBs) during the DNA damage response (DDR). Deficiency of TRADD or its sequestration in cytosol leads to accumulation of γH2AX-positive foci in response to DNA damage, which is reversed by nuclear TRADD expression. TRADD facilitates non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) by recruiting NHEJ repair factors 53BP1 and Ku70/80 complex, whereas TRADD is dispensable for homologous recombination (HR) repair. Finally, an impaired nuclear localization of TRADD triggers cell death through the persistent activation of JNK and accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Thus, our findings suggest that translocation of TRADD to DSBs into the nucleus contributes to cell survival in response to DNA damage through an activation of DNA damage repair.

  11. Chromatin relaxation-mediated induction of p19INK4d increases the ability of cells to repair damaged DNA.

    PubMed

    Ogara, María F; Sirkin, Pablo F; Carcagno, Abel L; Marazita, Mariela C; Sonzogni, Silvina V; Ceruti, Julieta M; Cánepa, Eduardo T

    2013-01-01

    The maintenance of genomic integrity is of main importance to the survival and health of organisms which are continuously exposed to genotoxic stress. Cells respond to DNA damage by activating survival pathways consisting of cell cycle checkpoints and repair mechanisms. However, the signal that triggers the DNA damage response is not necessarily a direct detection of the primary DNA lesion. In fact, chromatin defects may serve as initiating signals to activate those mechanisms. If the modulation of chromatin structure could initiate a checkpoint response in a direct manner, this supposes the existence of specific chromatin sensors. p19INK4d, a member of the INK4 cell cycle inhibitors, plays a crucial role in regulating genomic stability and cell viability by enhancing DNA repair. Its expression is induced in cells injured by one of several genotoxic treatments like cis-platin, UV light or neocarzinostatin. Nevertheless, when exogenous DNA damaged molecules are introduced into the cell, this induction is not observed. Here, we show that p19INK4d is enhanced after chromatin relaxation even in the absence of DNA damage. This induction was shown to depend upon ATM/ATR, Chk1/Chk2 and E2F activity, as is the case of p19INK4d induction by endogenous DNA damage. Interestingly, p19INK4d improves DNA repair when the genotoxic damage is caused in a relaxed-chromatin context. These results suggest that changes in chromatin structure, and not DNA damage itself, is the actual trigger of p19INK4d induction. We propose that, in addition to its role as a cell cycle inhibitor, p19INK4d could participate in a signaling network directed to detecting and eventually responding to chromatin anomalies.

  12. XRCC1 Arg399Gln was associated with repair capacity for DNA damage induced by occupational chromium exposure

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Occupational chromium exposure may induce DNA damage and lead to lung cancer and other work-related diseases. DNA repair gene polymorphisms, which may alter the efficiency of DNA repair, thus may contribute to genetic susceptibility of DNA damage. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the genetic variations of 9 major DNA repair genes could modulate the hexavalent chromium (Cr (VI))-induced DNA damage. Findings The median (P25-P75) of Olive tail moment was 0.93 (0.58–1.79) for individuals carrying GG genotype of XRCC1 Arg399Gln (G/A), 0.73 (0.46–1.35) for GA heterozygote and 0.50 (0.43–0.93) for AA genotype. Significant difference was found among the subjects with three different genotypes (P = 0.048) after adjusting the confounding factors. The median of Olive tail moment of the subjects carrying A allele (the genotypes of AA and GA) was 0.66 (0.44–1.31), which was significantly lower than that of subjects with GG genotype (P = 0.043). The A allele conferred a significantly reduced risk of DNA damage with the OR of 0.39 (95% CI: 0.15–0.99, P = 0.048). No significant association was found between the XRCC1Arg194Trp, ERCC1 C8092A, ERCC5 His1104Asp, ERCC6 Gly399Asp, GSTP1 Ile105Val, OGG1 Ser326Cys, XPC Lys939Gln, XPD Lys751Gln and DNA damage. Conclusion The polymorphism of Arg399Gln in XRCC1 was associated with the Cr (VI)- induced DNA damage. XRCC1 Arg399Gln may serve as a genetic biomarker of susceptibility for Cr (VI)- induced DNA damage. PMID:22642904

  13. Chromatin Relaxation-Mediated Induction of p19INK4d Increases the Ability of Cells to Repair Damaged DNA

    PubMed Central

    Carcagno, Abel L.; Marazita, Mariela C.; Sonzogni, Silvina V.; Ceruti, Julieta M.; Cánepa, Eduardo T.

    2013-01-01

    The maintenance of genomic integrity is of main importance to the survival and health of organisms which are continuously exposed to genotoxic stress. Cells respond to DNA damage by activating survival pathways consisting of cell cycle checkpoints and repair mechanisms. However, the signal that triggers the DNA damage response is not necessarily a direct detection of the primary DNA lesion. In fact, chromatin defects may serve as initiating signals to activate those mechanisms. If the modulation of chromatin structure could initiate a checkpoint response in a direct manner, this supposes the existence of specific chromatin sensors. p19INK4d, a member of the INK4 cell cycle inhibitors, plays a crucial role in regulating genomic stability and cell viability by enhancing DNA repair. Its expression is induced in cells injured by one of several genotoxic treatments like cis-platin, UV light or neocarzinostatin. Nevertheless, when exogenous DNA damaged molecules are introduced into the cell, this induction is not observed. Here, we show that p19INK4d is enhanced after chromatin relaxation even in the absence of DNA damage. This induction was shown to depend upon ATM/ATR, Chk1/Chk2 and E2F activity, as is the case of p19INK4d induction by endogenous DNA damage. Interestingly, p19INK4d improves DNA repair when the genotoxic damage is caused in a relaxed-chromatin context. These results suggest that changes in chromatin structure, and not DNA damage itself, is the actual trigger of p19INK4d induction. We propose that, in addition to its role as a cell cycle inhibitor, p19INK4d could participate in a signaling network directed to detecting and eventually responding to chromatin anomalies. PMID:23593412

  14. Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms of Genes Involved in Repair of Oxidative DNA Damage and the Risk of Recurrent Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Czarny, Piotr; Kwiatkowski, Dominik; Toma, Monika; Gałecki, Piotr; Orzechowska, Agata; Bobińska, Kinga; Bielecka-Kowalska, Anna; Szemraj, Janusz; Berk, Michael; Anderson, George; Śliwiński, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Background Depressive disorder, including recurrent type (rDD), is accompanied by increased oxidative stress and activation of inflammatory pathways, which may induce DNA damage. This thesis is supported by the presence of increased levels of DNA damage in depressed patients. Such DNA damage is repaired by the base excision repair (BER) pathway. BER efficiency may be influenced by polymorphisms in BER-related genes. Therefore, we genotyped nine single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in six genes encoding BER proteins. Material/Methods Using TaqMan, we selected and genotyped the following SNPs: c.-441G>A (rs174538) of FEN1, c.2285T>C (rs1136410) of PARP1, c.580C>T (rs1799782) and c.1196A>G (rs25487) of XRCC1, c.*83A>C (rs4796030) and c.*50C>T (rs1052536) of LIG3, c.-7C>T (rs20579) of LIG1, and c.-468T>G (rs1760944) and c.444T>G (rs1130409) of APEX1 in 599 samples (288 rDD patients and 311 controls). Results We found a strong correlation between rDD and both SNPs of LIG3, their haplotypes, as well as a weaker association with the c.-468T>G of APEXI which diminished after Nyholt correction. Polymorphisms of LIG3 were also associated with early onset versus late onset depression, whereas the c.-468T>G polymorphism showed the opposite association. Conclusions The SNPs of genes involved in the repair of oxidative DNA damage may modulate rDD risk. Since this is an exploratory study, the results should to be treated with caution and further work needs to be done to elucidate the exact involvement of DNA damage and repair mechanisms in the development of this disease. PMID:27866211

  15. Phosphoramide mustard exposure induces DNA adduct formation and the DNA damage repair response in rat ovarian granulosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ganesan, Shanthi Keating, Aileen F.

    2015-02-01

    Phosphoramide mustard (PM), the ovotoxic metabolite of the anti-cancer agent cyclophosphamide (CPA), destroys rapidly dividing cells by forming NOR-G-OH, NOR-G and G-NOR-G adducts with DNA, potentially leading to DNA damage. A previous study demonstrated that PM induces ovarian DNA damage in rat ovaries. To investigate whether PM induces DNA adduct formation, DNA damage and induction of the DNA repair response, rat spontaneously immortalized granulosa cells (SIGCs) were treated with vehicle control (1% DMSO) or PM (3 or 6 μM) for 24 or 48 h. Cell viability was reduced (P < 0.05) after 48 h of exposure to 3 or 6 μM PM. The NOR-G-OH DNA adduct was detected after 24 h of 6 μM PM exposure, while the more cytotoxic G-NOR-G DNA adduct was formed after 48 h by exposure to both PM concentrations. Phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX), a marker of DNA double stranded break occurrence, was also increased by PM exposure, coincident with DNA adduct formation. Addit