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Sample records for radiology today volume

  1. Radiology today. Volume 4

    SciTech Connect

    Heuck, F.H.W.; Donner, M.W.

    1987-01-01

    The book discusses the following contents: Advances in Cardiovascular Imaging: Digital Arteriography: Ongoing Developments. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Cardiovascular System. Comparison of Vascular CT and MRI. Characterization of Vascular Lesions by Ultrasound - Progress in Vascular Interventions: Laser Angioplasty: A Review. Fibrinolytic Therapy Combined with Clot Extraction. Drugs Useful in Angioplasty. Developments in Cardiovascular Imaging: Blood Flow Measurements with Digital Arteriography. Selection of Imaging Techniques for Venous Thromboembolic Disease. Clinical Usefulness of High-Verus Low-Osmolality Contrast Agents. Developments in Angiographic and Interventional Instrumentation. Progress in Cardiovascular Interventions. Inferior Vena Cava Filters: Types, Placement, and Efficiency. Transluminal Vascular Stenting and Grafting. Venography and Sclerotherapy of Varioceles in Children and Adolescents. A New Catheter System - Important Hip Problems: Radiologic and Pathologic Correlation and Hip Disease. Comparison of Imaging Modalities in Femoral Head Necrosis. Osteoartrosis and Arthritis (Synovitis) of the Hip. Hip Anthrography.

  2. Financing radiology graduate medical education: today's challenges.

    PubMed

    Otero, Hansel J; Ondategui-Parra, Silvia; Erturk, Sukru Mehmet; Ros, Pablo R

    2006-03-01

    Radiology graduate medical education (GME) is exposed to huge financial challenges. First, there is a continuous increase in demand for imaging services by referring doctors and the general population, aggravating the staff shortage. Second, there has been an important decline in reimbursements. Third and probably most important is the progressive reduction of federal funds subsidizing GME. Medicare is the largest single contributor to GME. The Balanced Budget Act (BBA) of 1997 introduced reductions in Medicare payments to the major teaching hospitals calculated at $5.6 billion over the first 5 years after implementation. The BBA also brought other changes directly affecting GME. Financial changes in health care over the past decade have increased the pressure on academic institutions, which must preserve or improve the quality of training and the quality of care and manage an increased workload with fewer funds available and a narrow margin for errors. Yet the use of new technology promises to help simplify processes, decreasing workloads for residents and faculty members and increasing overall productivity, and new sources of funding have been suggested. By reviewing the financial challenges of radiologic training in today's academic centers, the authors reach the conclusion that there is still space for improving academic quality and the quality of care within current financial boundaries. But more reliable data about the specific benefits and drawbacks of having a residency program in a clinical radiology department are required.

  3. Current radiology. Volume 5

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, G.H.; Hanafee, W.N.

    1984-01-01

    This book contains 10 selections. They are: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Interventional Vascular Radiology, Genitourinary Radiology, Skeletal Radiology, Digital Subtraction Angiography, Neuroradiology, Computed Tomographic Evaluation of Degenerative Diseases of the Lumbar Spine, The Lung, Otolaringology and Opthalmology, and Pediatric Radiology: Cranial, Facial, Cervical, Vertebral, and Appendicular.

  4. Leisure Today: Selected Readings. Volume III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendell, Ron, Ed.

    The articles in this compilation from issues of "Leisure Today"--a membership service which appears as an insert in the "Journal of Physical Education, Recreation, and Dance"-- address the trends, realities, and futures in the development of recreational and leisure programs. Readings have been selected on: (1) population dynamics and leisure; (2)…

  5. Leisure Today: Selected Readings. Volume III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendell, Ron, Ed.

    The articles in this compilation from issues of "Leisure Today"--a membership service which appears as an insert in the "Journal of Physical Education, Recreation, and Dance"-- address the trends, realities, and futures in the development of recreational and leisure programs. Readings have been selected on: (1) population dynamics and leisure; (2)…

  6. American Indian Doctors Today. Volume Two.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beiswenger, James N., Ed.

    The Indians Into Medicine Program presents an additional 44 brief biographies of American Indian health professionals (7 women and 37 men) from 29 different tribal groups, to acquaint young Indian people with potential careers in health professions (4 of the biographies appeared in Volume One). The biographical sketches contain information on:…

  7. Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Plan. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtel Nevada

    1999-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy manages the Nevada Test Site in a manner that meets evolving DOE Missions and responds to the concerns of affected and interested individuals and agencies. This Routine Radiological Monitoring Plan addressess complicance with DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 and other drivers requiring routine effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance on the Nevada Test Site. This monitoring plan, prepared in 1998, addresses the activities conducted onsite NTS under the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision. This radiological monitoring plan, prepared on behalf of the Nevada Test Site Landlord, brings together sitewide environmental surveillance; site-specific effluent monitoring; and operational monitoring conducted by various missions, programs, and projects on the NTS. The plan provides an approach to identifying and conducting routine radiological monitoring at the NTS, based on integrated technical, scientific, and regulatory complicance data needs.

  8. MBEA Today. Volume LV. Issues 1-5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MBEA Today, 1990

    1990-01-01

    This document contains five issues of the Michigan Business Education Association (MBEA) Today newsletter. In addition to news items and conference announcements, each issue contains several articles that cover concerns in business education. Issue 1 includes "A Program for Changing Times" (Hunter, Sullivan); "State Update"…

  9. MBEA Today. Volume LVI. Issues 1-5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MBEA Today, 1991

    1991-01-01

    This packet contains five issues of "MBEA Today," the official publication of the Michigan Business Education Association, issued from September 1990 through September 1991. Articles in issue 1 include the following: "MBEA Presents Position Statements to Michigan State Board of Education" (Ann M. Remp); "Adult Education:…

  10. Biography Today: Profiles of People of Interest to Young Readers. Author Series, Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Laurie Lanzen, Ed.

    The serialized reference work "Biography Today" is initiating a "Subject Series" that in five separate volumes will encompass: authors, artists, scientists, and inventors, sports figures, and world leaders. This is the first volume in the "Author Series." There will be no duplication between the regular series and the special subject volumes. This…

  11. Biography Today: Profiles of People of Interest to Young Readers. Author Series, Volume 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbey, Cherie D., Ed.

    This special subject volume, "Biography Today Author Series," Volume 12, was designed to appeal to young readers in a format they can enjoy reading and readily understand. Each volume contains alphabetically arranged sketches; each entry provides at least one photograph of the individual profiled, and bold-faced rubrics lead the reader…

  12. Biography Today: Profiles of People of Interest to Young Readers. Author Series, Volume 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Laurie Lanzen, Ed.; Abbey, Cherie D., Ed.

    As with the regular issues of "Biography Today," this special subject volume on "Authors" was created to appeal to young readers in a format they can enjoy reading and readily understand. Each volume contains alphabetically-arranged sketches. Each entry in the volume provides at least one picture of the individual profiled, and…

  13. Radiological and material characterization of high volume fly ash concrete.

    PubMed

    Ignjatović, I; Sas, Z; Dragaš, J; Somlai, J; Kovács, T

    2017-03-01

    The main goal of research presented in this paper was the material and radiological characterization of high volume fly ash concrete (HVFAC) in terms of determination of natural radionuclide content and radon emanation and exhalation coefficients. All concrete samples were made with a fly ash content between 50% and 70% of the total amount of cementitious materials from one coal burning power plant in Serbia. Physical (fresh and hardened concrete density) and mechanical properties (compressive strength, splitting tensile strength and modulus of elasticity) of concrete were tested. The radionuclide content ((226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K) and radon massic exhalation of HVFAC samples were determined using gamma spectrometry. Determination of massic exhalation rates of HVFAC and its components using radon accumulation chamber techniques combined with a radon monitor was performed. The results show a beneficial effect of pozzolanic activity since the increase in fly ash content resulted in an increase in compressive strength of HVFAC by approximately 20% for the same mass of cement used in the mixtures. On the basis of the obtained radionuclide content of concrete components the I -indices of different HVFAC samples were calculated and compared with measured values (0.27-0.32), which were significantly below the recommended 1.0 index value. The prediction was relatively close to the measured values as the ratio between the calculated and measured I-index ranged between 0.89 and 1.14. Collected results of mechanical and radiological properties and performed calculations clearly prove that all 10 designed concretes with a certain type of fly ash are suitable for structural and non-structural applications both from a material and radiological point of view.

  14. Biography Today: Profiles of People of Interest to Young Readers. Author Series, Volume 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Laurie Lanzen, Ed.; Abbey, Cherie D., Ed.

    This is the fourth volume of the "Biography Today Author Series." Each volume contains alphabetically arranged sketches. Each entry provides at least one picture of the individual profiled with additional information about the birth, youth, early memories, education, first jobs, marriage and family, career highlights, memorable experiences,…

  15. Biography Today: Profiles of People of Interest to Young Readers. Author Series, Volume 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Laurie Lanzen, Ed.; Abbey, Cherie D., Ed.

    This is the third volume of the "Biography Today Author Series." Each volume contains alphabetically arranged sketches. Each entry provides at least one picture of the individual profiled with additional information about the birth, youth, early memories, education, first jobs, marriage and family, career highlights, memorable experiences,…

  16. Emergency radiology today between philosophy of science and the reality of "emergency care".

    PubMed

    Romano, L; Scaglione, M; Rotondo, A

    2006-03-01

    In the past 20 years, emergency care concept has substantially changed on a cultural point of view, going well beyond the boundaries of medical science. It is now a general understanding that the real enemy of the critical patient is time; thus, functional organisation and collocation of human and technological resources in the emergency department (ED) can help avoid the loss of human lives. This "cultural revolution" led to the creation and development of structural and organisational models (layouts) of EDs. Now, emergency radiology has a central role in ED organisation, and the radiologist, providing 24-h coverage in the emergency room, is crucial for the correct diagnostic approach and rapid management of trauma. If this is the cultural background to the "emergency care" concept, an overview of such care in our country shows great differences from a structural, technological and organisational point of view. The presence of the radiologist providing 24-h coverage in the emergency room is still uncommon in many EDs The qualification of emergency care must be sought by studying the needs of the population and by seeking qualified personnel with high professional skill levels. All this must be understood and pursued by politicians and health care managers whose aim should be to coordinate and check the measures and human resources applied to the system. This process necessarily involves rewarding those health care professionals who prove to be up to the job.

  17. Biography Today: Profiles of People of Interest to Young Readers. Sports Series, Volume 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbey, Cherie D., Ed.

    This ninth volume of the "Biography Today Sports" series is intended to appeal to young readers in a format they can enjoy reading and readily understand. Each alphabetically-arranged sketch provides at least one picture of the individual profiled, and bold-faced rubrics lead the reader to information on birth, youth, early memories,…

  18. Biography Today: Profiles of People of Interest to Young Readers. Scientists & Inventors Series, Volume 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbey, Cherie D., Ed.

    This book, a special volume focusing on computer-related scientists and inventors, provides 12 biographical profiles of interest to readers ages 9 and above. The Biography Today series was created to appeal to young readers in a format they can enjoy reading and readily understand. Each entry provides at least one picture of the individual…

  19. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Monitoring Manual Volume 2, Radiation Monitoring and Sampling

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Aerial Measurement Systems

    2012-07-31

    The FRMAC Monitoring and Sampling Manual, Volume 2 provides standard operating procedures (SOPs) for field radiation monitoring and sample collection activities that are performed by the Monitoring group during a FRMAC response to a radiological emergency.

  20. The radiology of joint disease. Volume 2. Third edition

    SciTech Connect

    Forrester, D.M.; Brown, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    This book explains the diagnostic criteria and radiologic appearance of joint disease - principally arthritis. It covers the soft tissues, alignment abnormalities, bony mineralization, and abnormalities of the cartilage space of the hand; arthritis from head to foot; and the differential diagnosis of arthritis.

  1. Methodology for optimizing the volume of radiological survey during NPP dismantling

    SciTech Connect

    Engovatov, I.A.; Kafelnikova, N.V.; Mashkovich, V.P.

    1993-12-31

    The optimal volume of radiological surveys must ensure an essential body of experimental information about real radiation conditions which is sufficient to forecast the further radiation situation. The goal of this work was to develop an experimental count method. The method allows one to to minimize the number of measurements and to make a further radiation forecasting.

  2. Effect of direct neuroradiologist participation in physician marketing on imaging volumes in outpatient radiology.

    PubMed

    Grignon, L; Keiper, M; Vavricek, J; Horsley, W; Murphy, R; Grignon, A; Yu, F

    2014-08-01

    Over the past several years, decreased demand for and increased supply of imaging services has increased competition among outpatient imaging centers in the United States. This study hypothesizes that using a radiology sales representative and neuroradiologist as a team in marketing and sales will increase imaging referrals in outpatient imaging. From January to December 2009, baseline monthly physician referral data of CT and MR scans of 19 referring clinicians (neurologists, neurosurgeons, and anesthesiologists) to an outpatient radiology group were collected. During that time, a nonphysician radiology sales representative visited the referring clinicians' offices every 2 weeks. From January to June 2010, the same radiology sales representative visited the referring clinicians' offices every 2 weeks but was accompanied by a neuroradiologist once a month. From July 2010 to June 2011, the same radiology sales representative visited the referring clinicians' offices twice a month without a neuroradiologist. Cross-sectional imaging referral volumes were approximately 2.5 times greater during the 6-month period using the neuroradiologist for direct physician-to-physician marketing when compared with the volumes achieved with the sales representative alone, and continued neuroradiologist involvement in marketing and sales is required to maintain referral volumes over time. The impact on imaging referral volumes during the 6-month use of the neuroradiologist for direct physician-to-physician marketing in this study supports the assertion that neuroradiologist visits are an important element in establishing and maintaining a relationship with the referring clinician's office and thereby maximizing imaging referrals. © 2014 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  3. Capricorn-A Web-Based Automatic Case Log and Volume Analytics for Diagnostic Radiology Residents.

    PubMed

    Chen, Po-Hao; Chen, Yin Jie; Cook, Tessa S

    2015-10-01

    On-service clinical learning is a mainstay of radiology education. However, an accurate and timely case log is difficult to keep, especially in the absence of software tools tailored to resident education. Furthermore, volume-related feedback from the residency program sometimes occurs months after a rotation ends, limiting the opportunity for meaningful intervention. We surveyed the residents of a single academic institution to evaluate the current state of and the existing need for tracking interpretation volume. Using the results of the survey, we created an open-source automated case log software. Finally, we evaluated the effect of the software tool on the residency in a 1-month, postimplementation survey. Before implementation of the system, 89% of respondents stated that volume is an important component of training, but 71% stated that volume data was inconvenient to obtain. Although the residency program provides semiannual reviews, 90% preferred reviewing interpretation volumes at least once monthly. After implementation, 95% of the respondents stated that the software is convenient to access, 75% found it useful, and 88% stated they would use the software at least once a month. The included analytics module, which benchmarks the user using historical aggregate average volumes, is the most often used feature of the software. Server log demonstrates that, on average, residents use the system approximately twice a week. An automated case log software system may fulfill a previously unmet need in diagnostic radiology training, making accurate and timely review of volume-related performance analytics a convenient process. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Monitoring Manual Volume 1, Operations

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Aerial Measurement Systems

    2012-07-31

    The Monitoring division is primarily responsible for the coordination and direction of: Aerial measurements to delineate the footprint of radioactive contaminants that have been released into the environment. Monitoring of radiation levels in the environment; Sampling to determine the extent of contaminant deposition in soil, water, air and on vegetation; Preliminary field analyses to quantify soil concentrations or depositions; and Environmental and personal dosimetry for FRMAC field personnel, during a Consequence Management Response Team (CMRT) and Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) response. Monitoring and sampling techniques used during CM/FRMAC operations are specifically selected for use during radiological emergencies where large numbers of measurements and samples must be acquired, analyzed, and interpreted in the shortest amount of time possible. In addition, techniques and procedures are flexible so that they can be used during a variety of different scenarios; e.g., accidents involving releases from nuclear reactors, contamination by nuclear waste, nuclear weapon accidents, space vehicle reentries, or contamination from a radiological dispersal device. The Monitoring division also provides technicians to support specific Health and Safety Division activities including: The operation of the Hotline; FRMAC facility surveys; Assistance with Health and Safety at Check Points; and Assistance at population assembly areas which require support from the FRMAC. This volume covers deployment activities, initial FRMAC activities, development and implementation of the monitoring and assessment plan, the briefing of field teams, and the transfer of FRMAC to the EPA.

  5. Biography Today: Sports Series. Profiles of People of Interest to Young Readers, Volume 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Laurie Lanzen, Ed.; Abbey, Cherie D., Ed.

    This book is the fourth in a series of biographies on today's sports figures designed for students age 9 years and older. It contains alphabetically arranged sketches of the sports figures. Each entry provides at least one picture of the individual profiled. Bold faced rubrics lead the reader to information on birth, youth, early memories,…

  6. Families Today: A Research Sampler on Families and Children. Volume 1. NIMH Science Monographs 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corfman, Eunice, Ed.

    The first of two volumes, this book consists of 17 studies of children and families. Selections are intended to provide a representative sample of current research, including case studies and less formal reports. Volume I is divided into four sections. Part One considers the family as an enduring social unit. Families in hard times, Chicano…

  7. Biography Today: Profiles of People of Interest to Young Readers. Author Series, Volume 13.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbey, Cherie D., Ed.

    This special subject volume on "Authors" was especially created to appeal to young readers in a format they can enjoy reading and readily understand. Each volume contains alphabetically arranged sketches. Each entry provides at least one picture of the individual profiled, and bold-faced rubrics lead the reader to information on birth,…

  8. Education Laws: A Compilation of Statutes in Effect Today. Fifth Edition. Volume I [and] II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thrasher, Michele, Ed.

    Informed and effective administrators must familiarize themselves with the federal education statutes that govern their activities and the federal aid they receive. These two volumes were designed to make that task easier. The volumes contain federal laws that govern programs administered by the United States Education Department, fully updated…

  9. Biography Today: Sports Series. Profiles of People of Interest to Young Readers. Volume 3, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Laurie Lanzen, Ed.; Abbey, Cherie D., Ed.

    This third volume is part of a series of biographies that profile individuals of interest to young people over the age of 9 years. The entries in this volume include Joe Dumars, basketball; Jim Harbaugh, football; Dominik Hasek, hockey; Michelle Kwan, figure skating; Rebecca Lobo, basketball; Greg Maddux, baseball; Fatuma Roba, marathon running;…

  10. Families Today: A Research Sampler on Families and Children. Volume II. NIMH Science Monographs 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corfman, Eunice, Ed.

    The second of two volumes, this book contains 21 studies of children and families. Selections, grouped into three sections, are intended to provide a representative sample of current research, including case studies and less formal reports. The first section reports on families in distress. Articles focus on adults who were antisocial children,…

  11. Biography Today: Profiles of People of Interest to Young Readers. Author Series, Volume 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Laurie Lanzen, Ed.; Abbey, Cherie D., Ed.

    This book provides biographical profiles of 11 authors of interest to readers ages 9 and above and was created to appeal to young readers in a format they can enjoy reading and readily understand. Biographies were prepared after extensive research, and each volume contains a cumulative index, a general index, a place of birth index, and a birthday…

  12. Biography Today: Profiles of People of Interest to Young Readers. Author Series, Volume 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbey, Cherie D., Ed.

    This book presents biographical profiles of 10 authors of interest to readers ages 9 and above and was created to appeal to young readers in a format they can enjoy and readily understand. Biographies were prepared after extensive research, and each volume contains a cumulative index, a general index, a place of birth index, and a birthday index.…

  13. Biography Today: Profiles of People of Interest to Young Readers. Sports Series, Volume 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbey, Cherie D., Ed.

    This volume provides biographies on sports figures. Each entry offers at least one picture of the individual profiled, and bold-faced rubrics lead to information on birth, youth, early memories, education, first jobs, marriage and family, career highlights, memorable experiences, hobbies, and honors and awards. Each entry ends with a list of…

  14. Biography Today: Profiles of People of Interest to Young Readers. Sports Series, Volume 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbey, Cherie D., Ed.

    This volume provides biographies on sports figures. Each entry offers at least one picture of the individual profiled, and bold-faced rubrics lead to information on birth, youth, early memories, education, first jobs, marriage and family, career highlights, memorable experiences, hobbies, and honors and awards. Each entry ends with a list of…

  15. Biography Today: Profiles of People of Interest to Young Readers. Author Series, Volume 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbey, Cherie D., Ed.

    This special subject volume of biographies of authors was created to appeal to young readers in a format they can enjoy reading and readily understand. Each entry provides at least one picture of the individual profiled, and bold-faced rubrics lead the reader to information on birth, youth, early memories, education, first jobs, marriage and…

  16. Task Descriptions in Diagnostic Radiology. Research Report No. 7. Volume 1, Medical Tasks: What the Radiologist Does.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilpatrick, Eleanor

    The first of four volumes in Research Report No. 7 of the Health Services Mobility Study (HSMS), this book contains 143 task descriptions covering most of the medical activities carried out by diagnostic radiologists. (The work carried out by radiologic technologists, and administrative, machine-related, and nursing-type functions are found in…

  17. Technical basis for radiological release of Grand Junction Office Building 2. Volume 2, dose assessment supporting data

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    The second volume of the Grand Junction Office Action Program Technical Basis for Radiological Release of Grand Junction Office Building 2 report includes the data quality objectives (DQO), sampling plan, collected data, and analysis used to model future radiation doses to members of the public occupying Building 2 on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) site. This volume was assembled by extracting relevant components of the Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project Building 2 Public Dose Evaluation (DOE 1996) and inserting recent additional data that was gathered and dose pathway modeling that was performed. The intent of this document is to provide all derived guidance decisions, assumptions, measured data, testing results, and pathway modeling software input and output data that supports the discussion and determinations presented in Volume 1 of this report. For constructive employment of this document, the reader is encouraged to closely follow Volume 1 for proper association with the segment of information being examined.

  18. "Schools of Tomorrow," Schools of Today: What Happened to Progressive Education. History of Schools and Schooling, Volume 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semel, Susan F., Ed.; Sadovnik, Alan R., Ed.

    This collection of 13 articles looks at past practices in education for what they can teach about today. Part 1, "Schools of Tomorrow," includes these chapters: (1) "The Francis W. Parker School: Chicago's Progressive Education Legacy" (M. K. Stone); (2) "Experimental School, Experimental Community: The Marietta Johnson…

  19. "Schools of Tomorrow," Schools of Today: What Happened to Progressive Education. History of Schools and Schooling, Volume 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semel, Susan F., Ed.; Sadovnik, Alan R., Ed.

    This collection of 13 articles looks at past practices in education for what they can teach about today. Part 1, "Schools of Tomorrow," includes these chapters: (1) "The Francis W. Parker School: Chicago's Progressive Education Legacy" (M. K. Stone); (2) "Experimental School, Experimental Community: The Marietta Johnson…

  20. Radiologic Response Assessment in Pediatric Soft Tissue Sarcoma: Computed-Assisted Volume Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Orsatti, Giovanna; Beltrame, Valeria; Crimì, Filippo; Frigo, Anna Chiara; Bisogno, Gianni; Stramare, Roberto

    2017-03-01

    To compare 3 methods of dimensional assessment, with particular attention to a new software assisted method of volume calculation, in soft tissue sarcoma, and to investigate the interobserver agreement and the intermethod agreement in chemotherapy response classification and resultant clinical repercussions. We studied 34 pediatric patients with nonmetastatic soft tissue sarcoma who had undergone only diagnostic biopsy. Tumor size was measured both at diagnosis and after induction chemotherapy by 3 observers and using 3 measurement methods: maximum axis (1 diameter), estimated volume (3 diameters), and computed volume (software-assisted volume calculation). We used overall concordance correlation coefficient and Bland-Altman statistical methods to assess interobserver agreement and overall concordance correlation coefficient and the κ Cohen coefficient to assess intermethod agreement. According to overall concordance correlation coefficient, the interobserver agreement was very high for each method, with a slight superiority of the software assisted method; this agreement was not confirmed in Bland-Altman plots for maximum axis and estimated volume methods. According to kappa coefficients, the intermethod agreement in chemotherapy response evaluation was poor. Computed volume was the most accurate method in soft tissue sarcoma tumor size assessment. One- and 3-dimensional methods are not concordant in chemotherapy response classification. In particular, the maximum axis method underestimates chemotherapy response and can lead to switching the chemotherapy regimen erroneously. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of radiologic contrast media on cell volume regulation in rabbit proximal renal tubules.

    PubMed

    Galtung, H K; Løken, M; Sakariassen, K S

    2001-05-01

    Most radiographic contrast media are hyperosmotic and able to shrink cells with which they are in contact. The authors studied cell volume control in rabbit proximal renal tubules after incubation with three contrast media: iohexol, ioxaglate, and iodixanol. Proximal renal tubules were isolated from rabbit kidneys. The tubules were exposed to Ringer solutions containing 5% vol/vol iohexol (final osmolality, 330 mOsm), ioxaglate (323 mOsm), iodixanol (305 mOsm), or mannitol (control solutions with identical osmolalities), and tubule volumes were monitored. After 2 hours of incubation, the tubules were stimulated with a hyposmotic Ringer solution (165 mOsm). Three groups of 10 experiments were performed. All solutions induced cell shrinkage (8.3%+/-3.8 [standard error] to 15.4%+/-0.5), which was completely or partly reversible in most experiments (volume increase, 44.8%+/-14.7 to 149.9%+/-107.3) but not those with iohexol and iodixanol. With exposure to the hyposmotic solution, the cells swelled by 11.0%+/-1.8 to 39.7%+/-4.8. In general, the tubules that had been exposed to the most hyperosmotic solution swelled the most. Those exposed to contrast media showed less swelling than the mannitol-exposed controls. In all control experiments, the cells exhibited a gradual shrinkage (43.6%+/-28.5 to 87.0%+/-13). This regulatory response was partly inhibited in tubules exposed to iohexol (39.9%+/-15.8 shrinkage) or iodixanol (8.9%+/-15.8) and completely inhibited in those exposed to ioxaglate. Iohexol and ioxaglate exposure also led to a decrease in water permeability. Exposure to hyperosmotic contrast medium tends to induce prolonged cell shrinkage, decrease the water permeability of the cellular plasma membranes, and compromise the ability to regulate cellular volume. These changes seem to reflect both the hyperosmolality of the solutions and their inherent chemical properties.

  2. Biography Today: Profiles of People of Interest to Young Readers. World Leaders Series: Modern African Leaders. Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Laurie Lanzen, Ed.; Abbey, Cherie D., Ed.

    This book provides biographical profiles of 16 leaders of modern Africa of interest to readers ages 9 and above and was created to appeal to young readers in a format they can enjoy reading and easily understand. Biographies were prepared after extensive research, and this volume contains a name index, a general index, a place of birth index, and…

  3. Biography Today: Profiles of People of Interest to Young Readers. World Leaders Series: Environmental Leaders 2. Volume 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillstrom, Kevin, Ed.; Hillstrom, Laurie, Ed.

    This book provides biographical profiles of 11 environmental leaders of interest to readers ages 9 and above and was created to appeal to young readers in a format they can enjoy reading and readily understand. Biographies were prepared after extensive research, and each volume contains a cumulative index, a general index, a place of birth index,…

  4. Effect of radiologic contrast media on cell volume regulatory mechanisms in human red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Galtung, Hilde Kanli; Sørlundsengen, Vibeke; Sakariassen, Kjell S; Benestad, Haakon B

    2002-08-01

    The authors performed this study to evaluate cell volume regulation in human red blood cells (RBCs) after incubation in solutions of three contrast media: iohexol (830 mOsm), ioxaglate (520 mOsm), and iodixanol (300 mOsm). Whole blood sampled from six healthy subjects was exposed to Ringer solutions containing 25% or 5% vol/vol iohexol (final osmolality, 440 or 340 mOsm, respectively), ioxaglate (final osmolality, 395 or 335 mOsm, respectively), iodixanol (final osmolality, 330 or 315 mOsm, respectively), or NaCl (control solutions with the same osmolality as that of the contrast media). In some experiments, control RBCs were subjected to a hyposmotic solution (100 mOsm). RBC volumes were obtained with a Coulter counter. The RBCs showed normal regulatory cell shrinkage after hyposmotically induced swelling. All 25% vol/vol contrast material solutions and their control solutions induced RBC shrinkage (range, 6% +/- 1 [standard error] to 22% +/- 3). The same was true for cells exposed to 5% vol/vol contrast material (range, 4% +/- 1 to 7% +/- 1). The shrinkage phase was followed by cell swelling (10% +/- 2 to 20% +/- 2 for 25% contrast material and their control solutions and 8% +/- 1 to 15% +/- 2 for 5% contrast material and their control solutions). No contrast material-exposed RBCs increased their volumes to the level reached with their control solutions. RBCs exposed to hyperosmotic iohexol, ioxaglate, or iodixanol solutions shrank and then swelled. The degree of shrinkage and subsequent swelling could not be explained simply with the osmolality of the test solutions. Physicochemical properties of the contrast media must be involved, putatively affecting electrolyte fluxes over the RBC membrane. Possible targets of these effects are the K+/Cl- symporter, K+ channels, and the Na+/K+/Cl- symporter.

  5. Using Task Data in Diagnostic Radiology. Research Report No. 8. Volume 1. Job Ladders: Assigning Tasks to Jobs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilpatrick, Eleanor

    This report on the results of the application of the Health Services Mobility Study (HSMS) task analysis method in diagnostic radiology describes several career ladders starting from the aide level in quality assurance or patient care, rising to the technician level, and then on to the radiologic technologist level, with options to continue to…

  6. Innovation and Change in American Education. Kensington Revisited: A Fifteen Year Follow-Up of an Innovative Elementary School and Its Faculty. Volume IV--The Kensington School Today: Sailing Stormy Straits, A View of Educational Policy. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dwyer, David C.; And Others

    This fourth volume of a six-volume study of a school district code-named "Milford" provides an ethnographic account of Kensington School today. Tracing the school's development through the 1979-80 school year, the study's central metaphor is of a ship on a perilous journey. Chapter 1 describes the school's opening day and "Crosscurrents in…

  7. Heredity. Today's Delinquent, Volume 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrnstein, Richard J.; Farrington, David P.

    This document presents two articles on the topic of the existence of genetic predisposition for delinquent behavior. In the first article, "The Individual Offender," Richard J. Herrnstein reviews the rich and rapidly growing body of research literature on the relationship between genes and the predisposition for certain social behaviors. He makes…

  8. Psychoanalysis today

    PubMed Central

    FONAGY, PETER

    2003-01-01

    The paper discusses the precarious position of psychoanalysis, a therapeutic approach which historically has defined itself by freedom from constraint and counted treatment length not in terms of number of sessions but in terms of years, in today's era of empirically validated treatments and brief structured interventions. The evidence that exists for the effectiveness of psychoanalysis as a treatment for psychological disorder is reviewed. The evidence base is significant and growing, but less than might meet criteria for an empirically based therapy. The author goes on to argue that the absence of evidence may be symptomatic of the epistemic difficulties that psychoanalysis faces in the context of 21st century psychiatry, and examines some of the philosophical problems faced by psychoanalysis as a model of the mind. Finally some changes necessary in order to ensure a future for psychoanalysis and psychoanalytic therapies within psychiatry are suggested. PMID:16946899

  9. Research Training in Radiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of General Medical Sciences (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    Radiology today is a major clinical specialty of medicine in terms of the number and complexity of patient examinations, and the financial resources, physician manpower, and supporting personnel required for performing its functions. It reached its present status because it provides accurate methods of diagnosis for so many diseases. However, this…

  10. A comprehensive inventory of radiological and nonradiological contaminants in waste buried or projected to be buried in the subsurface disposal area of the INEL RWMC during the years 1984-2003, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    This is the second volume of this comprehensive report of the inventory of radiological and nonradiological contaminants in waste buried or projected to be buried in the subsurface disposal area of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Appendix B contains a complete printout of contaminant inventory and other information from the CIDRA Database and is presented in volumes 2 and 3 of the report.

  11. Radiology Technician (AFSC 90370).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobczak, James

    This five-volume student text is designed for use by Air Force personnel enrolled in a self-study extension course for radiology technicians. Covered in the individual volumes are radiographic fundamentals (x-ray production; primary beams; exposure devices; film, film holders, and darkrooms; control of film quality; and environmental safety);…

  12. Task Descriptions in Diagnostic Radiology. Research Report No. 7. Volume 4, Index of Tasks by Code Number and Extended Name.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilpatrick, Eleanor

    The fourth of four volumes in Research Report No. 7 of the Health Services Mobility Study (HSMS), this book contains the extended task names of all the tasks whose descriptions can be found in the three prior volumes. It serves as an index to all the tasks by listing the volume in which each task description appears. Chapter 1 of this volume…

  13. Agrogeology today

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerek, Barbara; Kuti, Laszlo; Vatai, Jozsef

    2010-05-01

    the soil-(soil forming sediment)-parent rock-groundwater or "soil-parent rock-bedrock" system aimed at the prevention and elimination of harmful effects. 5. Investigation of the geological aspects of water regulation and irrigation as well as their impact on the environment. 6. Definition, examination and characterisation of the real soil forming geological sequence. In Hungary the actual agrogeological investigations were launched by the agricultural reambulation of geological mapping data. During the early 1980s the so-called BFK-method was elaborated to the agrogeological investigation of these areas still used today. The main aspect of this method is that apart from the common geological sampling of the boreholes samples are also taken from the top- and subsoil (horizon 1), the soil forming sediment or parent material (horizon 2), the fluctuation zone of the groundwater (horizon 3) as well as from the zone permanently below the groundwater level (horizon 4) and the groundwater itself (Figure 2). These samples undergo detailed laboratory analyses. The comparative evaluation of the derived results allows making different agrogeological conclusions. During the period elapsed from the early 1980s the survey of the pilot areas allowed us investigating among others the agrogeological relationships of salinisation, acidification, excess water risk, erosion, and trace element regime as well as vine chlorosis.

  14. Regional brain volumes distinguish PSP, MSA-P, and PD: MRI-based clinico-radiological correlations.

    PubMed

    Paviour, Dominic C; Price, Shona L; Jahanshahi, Marjan; Lees, Andrew J; Fox, Nick C

    2006-07-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and multiple system atrophy (MSA) are neurodegenerative disorders, each with a prevalence of around 5 per 100,000. Regional brain atrophy patterns differ in the two disorders, however, and magnetic resonance imaging is sometimes helpful in distinguishing them in the later stages. We measured whole brain and regional volumes, including cerebellum, pons, midbrain, superior cerebellar peduncle (SCP), and ventricular volumes as well as frontal and posterior-inferior cerebral regions in 18 subjects with PSP, 9 with MSA-P (parkinsonian phenotype), 9 with Parkinson's disease (PD), and 18 healthy controls. Associations between these volumes, cognitive profiles, and clinical measures of disease severity and motor disability were assessed. Mean midbrain volume was 30% smaller in PSP than in PD or controls (P < 0.001) and 15% smaller than in MSA-P (P = 0.009). The mean SCP volume in PSP was 30% smaller than in MSA-P, PD, or controls (P < 0.001). Mean cerebellar volumes in MSA-P were 20% smaller than in controls and PD and 18% smaller than in PSP (P = 0.01). Mean pontine volume in MSA-P was 30% smaller than in PD or controls (P < 0.001) and 25% smaller than in PSP (P = 0.01). Motor disability was most strongly associated with midbrain volume, and more severe executive dysfunction was associated with reduced frontal volume. These distinct patterns of cortical and subcortical atrophy, when considered together rather than independently, better differentiate PSP and MSA-P from each other and also from healthy controls.

  15. Effect of radiologic contrast material on cell volume regulation in proximal renal tubules from trout (Salmo trutta).

    PubMed

    Galtung, H K; Løken, M; Sakariassen, K S

    2000-11-01

    Most radiographic contrast media (CM) are hyperosmotic and pose an osmotic threat to cells they are in contact with. To study these effects at the cellular level, cell volume regulatory mechanisms were observed in proximal renal tubules following exposure to the CM iohexol, ioxaglate, and iodixanol. Isolated renal tubules from trout (Salmo trutta) were exposed to 5% vol/vol iohexol (326 mOsm), ioxaglate (314 mOsm), or iodixanol (300 mOsm) or mannitol (to achieve the same osmolalities), and cell volume changes were observed videometrically. Iohexol and ioxaglate solutions induced a rapid shrinkage (12%-13%) not followed by cell volume regulation. Without CM (same osmolality), the cells shrank 11% but then showed a 77%-88% volume recovery. This reswelling was inhibited by 55% with the Na+, K+, Cl- symporter inhibitor bumetanide (50 micromol/L). Iodixanol did not significantly affect cell volume. Tubules preincubated with CM or mannitol were then stimulated with a hypoosmotic Ringer solution (160 mOsm) resulting in a 26%-36% cellular volume increase. Compared with results of experiments without mannitol and CM, preexposure to iohexol or ioxaglate almost completely inhibited the expected regulatory shrinkage phase, while previous exposure to hyperosmotic solutions with mannitol reduced the shrinkage response by 40%-53%. In this system, the hyperosmotic iohexol and ioxaglate cause cell shrinkage followed by an impaired cell volume regulatory response. Exposure to these two CM also inhibits cell volume regulation on hypoosmotic stimulation. The isosmotic iodixanol has no such effects. These changes appear to some extent to be a result of the CM's degree of hyperosmolality, but this property alone does not explain these findings.

  16. [Forensic radiology].

    PubMed

    Stein, K M; Grünberg, K

    2009-01-01

    Forensic radiology includes both clinical and postmortem forensic radiology. Clinical forensic radiology deals with imaging of healthy people from a legal point of view, such as for determining age or to prove and document injuries in victims of crime. Postmortem forensic radiology deals with the application of modern radiological methods in order to optimise post-mortem diagnosis. X-ray examination has for decades been routinely used in postmortem diagnosis. Newer developments include the application of postmortem computer tomography and magnetic resonance imaging; these are the methods with the greatest information potential but also with the greatest deviations from diagnostics in living persons. Application of radiological methods for securing evidence in criminal procedures is still in its infancy. Radiologists' technical understanding and forensic doctors' knowledge of postmortem changes in a corpse must be synergised.

  17. How to Read Your Radiology Report

    MedlinePlus

    ... prepare a report summarizing the findings and impressions. Electronic Health Records Many patients today can access their health records — including radiology reports — electronically online. Electronic access to health records allows patients to make ...

  18. CEC Today, 1999-2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voyles, Lynda, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    The eight issues for volume 6 of the "CEC Today," a newsletter exclusively for members of the Council for Exceptional Children, include the following featured articles: (1) "How To Set up a Classroom on a Tight Budget"; (2) "Survival Tips for First-Year Teachers"; (3) Get the Training You Need To Stay Ahead of the…

  19. Chest radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, J.H.M.

    1982-01-01

    This review of chest radiology reexamines normal findings on plain chest radiographs, and presents a new plain film view for detecting metastases in the lungs, and describes new findings on acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. Various chest radiologic procedures are examined. (KRM)

  20. Orthopaedic radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Park, W.M.; Hughes, S.P.F.

    1987-01-01

    This book is an account of the principles of modern diagnostic imaging techniques and their applications in orthopedics. The aim is to show radiology as a dynamic subject. Orthopaedic Radiology is divided into two sections with the first part focusing on the principles of diagnostic imaging and interpretation and the second applying this information to practical clinical problems.

  1. In Defense of the Alien. Volume IV. U.S. Immigration Today. Proceedings of the Annual National Legal Conference (Washington, D.C., March 26-27, 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomasi, Lydio F., Ed.; And Others

    This volume presents viewpoints of government representatives, legal experts, economists, and private sector representatives on recommendations for reforms in U.S. immigration policy and legislation submitted to the President and to Congress by the Select Commission on Immigration and Refugee Policy. Included are: (1) a report of issues considered…

  2. In Defense of the Alien. Volume IV. U.S. Immigration Today. Proceedings of the Annual National Legal Conference (Washington, D.C., March 26-27, 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomasi, Lydio F., Ed.; And Others

    This volume presents viewpoints of government representatives, legal experts, economists, and private sector representatives on recommendations for reforms in U.S. immigration policy and legislation submitted to the President and to Congress by the Select Commission on Immigration and Refugee Policy. Included are: (1) a report of issues considered…

  3. Autologous Fat Grafting in Cosmetic Breast Augmentation: A Systematic Review on Radiological Safety, Complications, Volume Retention, and Patient/Surgeon Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Groen, Jan-Willem; Negenborn, Vera L; Twisk, Jos W R; Ket, Johannes C F; Mullender, Margriet G; Smit, Jan Maerten

    2016-10-01

    Autologous fat grafting (AFG) is increasingly used in cosmetic surgery. However, its efficacy and safety are still ambiguous. Both a comprehensive overview and recapitulation of the relevant literature provide current evidence on the efficacy and outcomes of AFG in cosmetic breast surgery. This review provides an up-to-date overview of the literature on AFG in cosmetic breast augmentation. A systematic review of the literature on AFG used for cosmetic breast augmentation was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) guidelines. This study included selected studies that were published between January 1996 and February 2016 and reported on 10 patients or more who had a minimal mean follow-up period of 1 year. In this study, 22 articles that reported on 3565 patients with follow-up periods ranging from 12 to 136 months were included. A complication rate of 17.2% (95% CI 15.9-18.5) was seen. Indurations were the most frequent complication (33.3%, 95% CI 20.4-46.3), followed by persistent pain (25%, 95% CI 0.5-49.5), and hematoma (16.4%, 95% CI 14.5-18.4). Mammograms revealed micro-calcifications (9.0%, 95% CI 6.4-11.5) and macro-calcifications (7.0%, 95% CI 3.8-10.2). The mean volume retention was 62.4% (range, 44.7-82.6%), with a satisfaction rate of 92% in patients and 89% in surgeons. AFG is a promising method in achieving autologous cosmetic breast augmentation with satisfactory volume retention and satisfaction rates in eight and six studies, respectively. Complications and radiological findings are comparable to those after implant augmentation. Future studies should focus on cancer occurrence and detection to further substantiate AFG safety. In addition, grafting methods and the use of auxiliary procedures to identify factors leading to better outcomes in terms of volume retention should be investigated. Finally, objective questionnaires are needed to represent patient satisfaction. 3 Therapeutic.

  4. Radiology's value chain.

    PubMed

    Enzmann, Dieter R

    2012-04-01

    A diagnostic radiology value chain is constructed to define its main components, all of which are vulnerable to change, because digitization has caused disaggregation of the chain. Some components afford opportunities to improve productivity, some add value, while some face outsourcing to lower labor cost and to information technology substitutes, raising commoditization risks. Digital image information, because it can be competitive at smaller economies of scale, allows faster, differential rates of technological innovation of components, initiating a centralization-to-decentralization technology trend. Digitization, having triggered disaggregation of radiology's professional service model, may soon usher in an information business model. This means moving from a mind-set of "reading images" to an orientation of creating and organizing information for greater accuracy, faster speed, and lower cost in medical decision making. Information businesses view value chain investments differently than do small professional services. In the former model, producing a better business product will extend image interpretation beyond a radiologist's personal fund of knowledge to encompass expanding external imaging databases. A follow-on expansion with integration of image and molecular information into a report will offer new value in medical decision making. Improved interpretation plus new integration will enrich and diversify radiology's key service products, the report and consultation. A more robust, information-rich report derived from a "systems" and "computational" radiology approach will be facilitated by a transition from a professional service to an information business. Under health care reform, radiology will transition its emphasis from volume to greater value. Radiology's future brightens with the adoption of a philosophy of offering information rather than "reads" for decision making. Staunchly defending the status quo via turf wars is unlikely to constitute a

  5. Orthopaedic radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Park, W.M.; Hughes, S.P.F.

    1985-01-01

    This book provides an account of the principles of modern diagnostic imaging techniques and their applications in orthopedics. The aim of the book is to show radiology as a dynamic subject which can help clinicians, while at the same time assisting radiologists to understand the needs of the orthopedic surgeon.

  6. Eskimo Boy Today.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fish, Byron

    "Eskimo Boy Today" provides the reader with an account of what it is like to be a young Eskimo boy living in Barrow, Alaska, today. Accounts of his life at school depict the typical curriculum and learning activities, while accounts of his home life depict typical foods, clothing, and housing. The natural resources and their relationship to the…

  7. Dental radiology.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Tony M

    2009-02-01

    Dental radiology is the core diagnostic modality of veterinary dentistry. Dental radiographs assist in detecting hidden painful pathology, estimating the severity of dental conditions, assessing treatment options, providing intraoperative guidance, and also serve to monitor success of prior treatments. Unfortunately, most professional veterinary training programs provide little or no training in veterinary dentistry in general or dental radiology in particular. Although a technical learning curve does exist, the techniques required for producing diagnostic films are not difficult to master. Regular use of dental x-rays will increase the amount of pathology detected, leading to healthier patients and happier clients who notice a difference in how their pet feels. This article covers equipment and materials needed to produce diagnostic intraoral dental films. A simplified guide for positioning will be presented, including a positioning "cheat sheet" to be placed next to the dental x-ray machine in the operatory. Additionally, digital dental radiograph systems will be described and trends for their future discussed.

  8. Trends in radiologic NDT

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, H. )

    1994-11-01

    In this article, the author tries to look ahead to see what is coming in the field of nondestructive testing (NDT) using radiation methods. Radiological NDT has changed since gamma ray and x-ray inspection came into widespread use more than 50 years ago. Even the name has changed. Instead of referring to most radiation inspection approaches as radiography as one once did, the ''umbrella'' term is now radiology, as defined by ASTM, ''the science and application of x-rays, gamma rays, neutrons and other penetrating radiations.'' Radiography refers to film or film-like methods. Radioscopy refers to electronic methods ''that follow very closely the changes with time of the object being imaged.'' In addition, radiology includes tomography, backscatter, gaging, and a host of other radiation inspection methods. All of these techniques are likely to change as we move into the 21st century. The author's favorites as radiologic methods and applications that will see much greater use in this decade and the early part of the twenty-first century can be summarized as follows: (1) x-radioscopic digital systems for manufacturing cations and in-service inspections and process control applications; (2) computerized radiological systems, radiographic, radioscopic, tomographic, and laminographic with capability for data exchange, use with NDT workstations and fully automated systems; (3) small inspection volume, low-cost CT systems; (4) x-ray image detection systems based on microfocus/image magnification; (5) small format, high sensitivity x-ray cameras; (6) large area photoconductive x-ray cameras; and (7) high output and transportable radiation sources.

  9. Radiation protection in radiologic technology: Apathy versus active involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, K.H.

    1982-11-01

    The lack of active participation in radiation protection is a serious problem in Radiologic Technology today. Underlying the problem is professional apathy. An overview of the historical changes, as well as various recent developments in radiology, accentuate the importance of necessary changes in technologists' attitudes and activities. 22 references.

  10. Life at Physics Today

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, Richard

    2004-03-01

    Being an editor at Physics Today provides a unique opportunity for me to draw on my background as a PhD physicist in a journalism environment. Editing feature articles by experts in their field and writing research news stories for the magazine, I have the opportunity to work with leading physicists around the world and to explore the full breadth of physics--from gamma-ray bursters and volcanoes to sound localization and quantum dots. In this talk, I will discuss how my career path led me to Physics Today and describe what I and the other editors do at the magazine.

  11. Battlefield radiology

    PubMed Central

    Graham, R N J

    2012-01-01

    With the increasing tempo of military conflicts in the last decade, much has been learnt about imaging battlefield casualties in the acute setting. Ultrasound in the form of focused abdominal sonography in trauma (FAST) has proven invaluable in emergency triage of patients for immediate surgery. Multidetector CT allows accurate determination of battlefield trauma injuries. It permits the surgeons and anaesthetists to plan their interventions more thoroughly and to be made aware of clinically occult injuries. There are common injury patterns associated with blast injury, gunshot wounds and blunt trauma. While this body of knowledge is most applicable to the battlefield, there are parallels with peacetime radiology, particularly in terrorist attacks and industrial accidents. This pictorial review is based on the experiences of a UK radiologist deployed in Afghanistan in 2010. PMID:22806621

  12. Decommoditizing radiology.

    PubMed

    Reiner, Bruce I; Siegel, Eliot L

    2009-03-01

    The current focus on the economic bottom line in health care creates the potential for radiology to become a commodity, devoid of qualitative differentiation. This trend toward commoditization has been accelerated by the globalization of imaging services (teleradiology), increased information exchange (eg, Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine, Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise), and new technology development (eg, picture archiving and communication systems, computer-aided diagnosis). The optimum strategy for avoiding commoditization is the creation of objective quality metrics and standards throughout the medical imaging practice, which will provide a reproducible and objective means with which to differentiate imaging service deliverables on the basis of quality and clinical outcomes. These quality measures can in turn be directly tied to economic incentives (pay for performance), providing further incentive for proactive quality assurance, qualitative differentiation, and technology development centered on quality.

  13. Discourse Analysis Today.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheu, Dagmar, Ed.; Lopez-Maestre, M. D., Ed.

    2003-01-01

    This collection of articles includes: "Introduction: Discourse Analysis Today" (Dagmar Schue and M.D. Lopez-Maestre); "The Metaphorical and Metonymic Understanding of the Trinitarian Dogma" (Antonio Barcelona); "Symmetry as Conceptual Metaphor in Walker's The Color Purple" (Elena Tapia); "And She's Like it's…

  14. Mathematics Teaching Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Tami S.; Speer, William R.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes features, consistent messages, and new components of "Mathematics Teaching Today: Improving Practice, Improving Student Learning" (NCTM 2007), an updated edition of "Professional Standards for Teaching Mathematics" (NCTM 1991). The new book describes aspects of high-quality mathematics teaching; offers a model for observing,…

  15. Mexico: Yesterday and Today.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koscielny, Mary Patrice

    This guide features Mexican history, culture, and the environment in the years past and present. This guide discusses five periods of Mexican history, including: (1) Indian Period; (2) Colonial Period; (3) Independence Movement; (4) The Revolution; and (5) Mexico Today. Each section has goals for the students, background readings, and activities…

  16. General Music Today Yearbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowman & Littlefield Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The collected 2004-2005 issues of General Music Today, the online journal of MENC's Society for General Music includes articles, research, reviews and resources of interest to general music teachers of all levels. Topics covered include working with special-needs students; emphasizing early childhood environment to enhance musical growth;…

  17. Imagining Tomorrow's Future Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. George, Art

    2007-01-01

    Today, at the end of 2007, there are evident consolidations in wireless, storage, and virtualization and the path forward seems clearer now than previously. Trends from last year continue strongly, particularly Web 2.0 and the shift to user-driven environments and Internet sites where significant data and video processing is available to those…

  18. Today's Adult Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Who are the adult students in career and technical education (CTE) today? There is not one simple answer to that question. Some are young with little life experience, while others are returning to the workforce and learning new skills to reinvent themselves. Whatever the case, educating adult students is an integral part of ACTE's mission, and the…

  19. Educational Entrepreneurship Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Frederick M., Ed.; McShane, Michael Q., Ed.

    2016-01-01

    In "Educational Entrepreneurship Today", Frederick M. Hess and Michael Q. McShane assemble a diverse lineup of high-profile contributors to examine the contexts in which new initiatives in education are taking shape. They inquire into the impact of entrepreneurship on the larger field--including the development and deployment of new…

  20. Today's Adult Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Who are the adult students in career and technical education (CTE) today? There is not one simple answer to that question. Some are young with little life experience, while others are returning to the workforce and learning new skills to reinvent themselves. Whatever the case, educating adult students is an integral part of ACTE's mission, and the…

  1. Imagining Tomorrow's Future Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. George, Art

    2007-01-01

    Today, at the end of 2007, there are evident consolidations in wireless, storage, and virtualization and the path forward seems clearer now than previously. Trends from last year continue strongly, particularly Web 2.0 and the shift to user-driven environments and Internet sites where significant data and video processing is available to those…

  2. General Music Today Yearbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowman & Littlefield Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The collected 2004-2005 issues of General Music Today, the online journal of MENC's Society for General Music includes articles, research, reviews and resources of interest to general music teachers of all levels. Topics covered include working with special-needs students; emphasizing early childhood environment to enhance musical growth;…

  3. Educational Entrepreneurship Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Frederick M., Ed.; McShane, Michael Q., Ed.

    2016-01-01

    In "Educational Entrepreneurship Today", Frederick M. Hess and Michael Q. McShane assemble a diverse lineup of high-profile contributors to examine the contexts in which new initiatives in education are taking shape. They inquire into the impact of entrepreneurship on the larger field--including the development and deployment of new…

  4. Mathematics Teaching Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Tami S.; Speer, William R.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes features, consistent messages, and new components of "Mathematics Teaching Today: Improving Practice, Improving Student Learning" (NCTM 2007), an updated edition of "Professional Standards for Teaching Mathematics" (NCTM 1991). The new book describes aspects of high-quality mathematics teaching; offers a model for observing,…

  5. The Alchemist of Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serret, Natasha

    2010-01-01

    Traditionally, alchemy has involved the power of transmuting base metals such as lead into gold or producing the "elixir of life" for those wealthy people who wanted to live forever. But what of today's developments? One hundred years ago, even breaking the four-minute mile would have been deemed "magic," which is what the alchemists of the past…

  6. The Alchemist of Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serret, Natasha

    2010-01-01

    Traditionally, alchemy has involved the power of transmuting base metals such as lead into gold or producing the "elixir of life" for those wealthy people who wanted to live forever. But what of today's developments? One hundred years ago, even breaking the four-minute mile would have been deemed "magic," which is what the alchemists of the past…

  7. Building Tomorrow's Business Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Jim

    2010-01-01

    Modern automobile maintenance, like most skilled-trades jobs, is more than simple nuts and bolts. Today, skilled-trades jobs might mean hydraulics, computerized monitoring equipment, electronic blueprints, even lasers. As chief executive officer of Grainger, a business-to-business maintenance, repair, and operating supplies company that…

  8. Today's and Tomorrow's Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heiss, Ann M.

    Today's student differs from his counterpart of the 1950's in character, aspiration, experience, and educational and family background. Generally more independent and mature, the students of the 1960's tend to involve themselves in any of 5 subcultures as a means of expressing their concern about a number of issues. The sorority or fraternity…

  9. Building Tomorrow's Business Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Jim

    2010-01-01

    Modern automobile maintenance, like most skilled-trades jobs, is more than simple nuts and bolts. Today, skilled-trades jobs might mean hydraulics, computerized monitoring equipment, electronic blueprints, even lasers. As chief executive officer of Grainger, a business-to-business maintenance, repair, and operating supplies company that…

  10. Reinventing radiology reimbursement.

    PubMed

    Marshall, John; Adema, Denise

    2005-01-01

    Lee Memorial Health System (LMHS), located in southwest Florida, consists of 5 hospitals, a home health agency, a skilled nursing facility, multiple outpatient centers, walk-in medical centers, and primary care physician offices. LMHS annually performs more than 300,000 imaging procedures with gross imaging revenues exceeding dollar 350 million. In fall 2002, LMHS received the results of an independent audit of its IR coding. The overall IR coding error rate was determined to be 84.5%. The projected net financial impact of these errors was an annual reimbursement loss of dollar 182,000. To address the issues of coding errors and reimbursement loss, LMHS implemented its clinical reimbursementspecialist (CRS) system in October 2003, as an extension of financial services' reimbursement division. LMHS began with CRSs in 3 service lines: emergency department, cardiac catheterization, and radiology. These 3 CRSs coordinate all facets of their respective areas' chargemaster, patient charges, coding, and reimbursement functions while serving as a resident coding expert within their clinical areas. The radiology reimbursement specialist (RRS) combines an experienced radiologic technologist, interventional technologist, medical records coder, financial auditor, reimbursement specialist, and biller into a single position. The RRS's radiology experience and technologist knowledge are key assets to resolving coding conflicts and handling complex interventional coding. In addition, performing a daily charge audit and an active code review are essential if an organization is to eliminate coding errors. One of the inherent effects of eliminating coding errors is the capturing of additional RVUs and units of service. During its first year, based on account level detail, the RRS system increased radiology productivity through the additional capture of just more than 3,000 RVUs and 1,000 additional units of service. In addition, the physicians appreciate having someone who "keeps up

  11. Radiology Systems of the 1990s—Meeting the Challenge of Change

    PubMed Central

    Lodwick, Gwilym S.

    1986-01-01

    Digital imaging technology, particularly reconstructed images such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, has fueled the increased demand for radiologic services but has intensified storage and communications problems. Today more than 25% of radiologic examinations are digital in origin and, with progressive replacing of film images by digital images likely through the introduction of imaging plate technology, the radiology profession is undertaking the massive effort of evolving a new system where digital images will be transmitted, stored, retrieved and displayed by a multicomponent system connected by a local area network. Through this system, images will be nearly instantly accessible to anyone who needs them. A leading hypothesis is that when the volume of digital examinations reaches 50% of the whole, cost and efficiency considerations will lead to a massive conversion to the digital image management system, which will progress spontaneously. This conversion, unless planned for in today's equipment acquisitions, could lead to great economic stress in hospitals. The 50% point may be reached by the early 1990s. PMID:3811352

  12. Milwaukee brace today.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Toru; Takeshita, Katsushi; Kitagawa, Tomoaki

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the efficacy of the Milwaukee brace and its psychological impact and to define whether its use is still acceptable today by a review of literature. A bibliographic search on PubMed and Medline database using keywords, 'scoliosis and brace' was performed. Milwaukee brace 23-hours wearing protocol was most effective for the treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. However, 23-hours wearing protocol has some drawbacks, and even the patients using thoraco-lumbo-sacral orthosis wore their brace only for around 60% of the time prescribed as their wearing protocol. Our Milwaukee brace part-time wearing treatment was effective, and by its use combined with physical therapy, better results than the natural history were obtained. With part-time wearing protocol, the Milwaukee brace can survive today as a treatment option for idiopathic scoliosis with thoracic curve or double curve.

  13. Radiological Control Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    This manual has been prepared by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements, and clarifications to the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is based on the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, DOE Order 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The topics covered are (1) excellence in radiological control, (2) radiological standards, (3) conduct of radiological work, (4) radioactive materials, (5) radiological health support operations, (6) training and qualification, and (7) radiological records.

  14. Greening radiology.

    PubMed

    Prasanna, Prasanth M; Siegel, Eliot; Kunce, Amy

    2011-11-01

    Reducing energy consumption has increased in importance with rising energy prices and funding cutbacks. With the introduction of electronic medical records on the rise in all fields of medicine, there will be a large jump in the number of computers in health care. Radiologist have the unique opportunity, as technological leaders, to direct energy efficiency measures as a means of cost savings and the reduction of airborne by-products from energy production to improve patients' lives. The aim of this study was to assess the many workstations and monitors throughout the authors' department to determine their electrical consumption and cost. Equipment was monitored using an electricity meter during both active and standby states. Cost per kilowatt-hour was calculated at $0.11, not including taxes and fees. Any given monitor left on 24/7 would annually consume between 49.5 and 1,399.84 kWh, costing from $5.45 to $153.98. A single workstation left on 24/7 would use 455.65 to 2,358.72 kWh, costing from $59.91 to $259.46. In aggregate, all workstations and monitors would use approximately 137,759.54 kWh, costing $15,153.55. If all equipment were shut down after an 8-hour workday, the department would consume about 32,633.64 kWh, costing $3,589.70 thereby saving 83,866.6 kWh and $9,225.33. Although computers in the remainder of the hospital may use less energy than workstations, this serves as a predictive model for potential energy consumption and cost. With the increasing necessity of cost savings and energy reduction, this small and simple step, implemented hospital-wide, will lead to much larger cost savings across institutions. Copyright © 2011 American College of Radiology. All rights reserved.

  15. Force protection: today's reality.

    PubMed

    Torgerson, Ron

    2004-11-11

    Most US infrastructure and major chemical manufacturing facilities as well as their supporting utility systems are inherently vulnerable to a terrorist attack. Force protection is a military and civilian term used to protect personnel and critical facilities and assets against would-be aggressors or terrorists. The war on terrorism is a 200-300-year war. Terrorist attacks on US soil could become as common-place as in the State of Israel. It is very easy to penetrate infrastructure or plants as evidenced by vulnerability assessments performed for states, cities, plants, and military facilities by Versar and others around the country. Chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and explosive weapons can be readily used to attack facilities in the US. This paper will explain some of those vulnerabilities, outline the current DoD standard as it relates to vulnerability assessments, and explain how this may be used in commercial applications to deter potential aggressors.

  16. Radiological characterization of Yankee Nuclear Power Station

    SciTech Connect

    Bellini, F.X.; Cumming, E.R.; Hollenbeck, P. )

    1993-01-01

    The Yankee nuclear power station located in Rowe, Massachusetts, permanently ceased power operations on February 26, 1992, after 31 yr of operation. Yankee has since initiated decommissioning planning activities. A significant component of these activities is the determination of the extent of radiological contamination of the Yankee site. This paper describes the site radiological characterization program that has been implemented for decommissioning the Yankee plant. Radiological scoping surveys were completed to support submittal of a decommissioning plan to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) by October 1, 1993. These surveys were designed to provide sufficient detail to estimate the extent of contamination, volume of radiological waste, activity of radiological waste, and personnel dose estimates for removal activities. Surveys were conducted both inside and on the grounds outside of the Yankee plant buildings. Survey results were combined with analytical evaluations to characterize the Yankee site.

  17. 'Hysteria' today and tomorrow.

    PubMed

    LaFrance, W Curt

    2014-01-01

    'Hysteria' (conversion disorder) remains in modern humanity and across cultures, as it has for millennia. Advances today in tools and criteria have afforded more accurate diagnosis, and advances in treatments have empowered patients and providers, resulting in a renewed interest in somatoform disorders. Future progress in understanding mechanisms may be influenced by developments in functional neuroimaging and neurophysiology. No animal model exists for somatoform symptoms or conversion disorder. Despite the absence of a known molecular mechanism, psychotherapy is helping patients with conversion disorder to take control of their symptoms and have improved quality of life, shedding light on what was once an enigma.

  18. Clean coal today

    SciTech Connect

    1990-01-01

    This is the first issue of the Clean Coal Today publication. Each issue will provide project status reports, feature articles about certain projects and highlight key events concerning the US Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program. Projects described in this publication include: Colorado-Ute Electric Association Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustor Project at Nucla, Colorado; Babcock and Wilcox coolside and limestone injection multistage burner process (dry sorbent injection); Coal Tech's Advanced Cyclone Combustor Project; and the TIDD pressurized fluidized bed combustor combined cycle facility in Brilliant, Ohio. The status of other projects is included.

  19. Reliability of tumor volume estimation from MR images in patients with malignant glioma. Results from the American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN) 6662 Trial.

    PubMed

    Ertl-Wagner, Birgit B; Blume, Jeffrey D; Peck, Donald; Udupa, Jayaram K; Herman, Benjamin; Levering, Anthony; Schmalfuss, Ilona M

    2009-03-01

    Reliable assessment of tumor growth in malignant glioma poses a common problem both clinically and when studying novel therapeutic agents. We aimed to evaluate two software-systems in their ability to estimate volume change of tumor and/or edema on magnetic resonance (MR) images of malignant gliomas. Twenty patients with malignant glioma were included from different sites. Serial post-operative MR images were assessed with two software systems representative of the two fundamental segmentation methods, single-image fuzzy analysis (3DVIEWNIX-TV) and multi-spectral-image analysis (Eigentool), and with a manual method by 16 independent readers (eight MR-certified technologists, four neuroradiology fellows, four neuroradiologists). Enhancing tumor volume and tumor volume plus edema were assessed independently by each reader. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), variance components, and prediction intervals were estimated. There were no significant differences in the average tumor volume change over time between the software systems (p > 0.05). Both software systems were much more reliable and yielded smaller prediction intervals than manual measurements. No significant differences were observed between the volume changes determined by fellows/neuroradiologists or technologists.Semi-automated software systems are reliable tools to serve as outcome parameters in clinical studies and the basis for therapeutic decision-making for malignant gliomas, whereas manual measurements are less reliable and should not be the basis for clinical or research outcome studies.

  20. Women in engineering conference: capitalizing on today`s challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Metz, S.S.; Martins, S.M.

    1996-06-01

    This document contains the conference proceedings of the Women in Engineering Conference: Capitalizing on Today`s Challenges, held June 1-4, 1996 in Denver, Colorado. Topics included engineering and science education, career paths, workplace issues, and affirmative action.

  1. Educational treasures in Radiology: The Radiology Olympics - striving for gold in Radiology education.

    PubMed

    Talanow, Roland

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on Radiology Olympics (www.RadiologyOlympics.com) - a collaboration with the international Radiology community for Radiology education, Radiolopolis (www.Radiolopolis.com). The Radiology Olympics honour the movers and shakers in Radiology education and offer an easy to use platform for educating medical professionals based on Radiology cases.

  2. Urban public transport today

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, B. )

    1994-01-01

    It is widely recognized that there are many people for whom public transport is essential, particularly among the elderly, children and teenagers. Less obvious is the dependence of our cities for their existence on high capacity public transport. Although there is still a prevalent view that local public transport is only for those who do not have a car, we are slowly beginning to realize that we need to find ways of restricting use of the private car more severely and that will involve some transfer to public transport. Urban Public Transport Today gives an honest appraisal of the pros and cons of new public transport technologies. It shows how public transport can be made a less unacceptable alternative to the private car than it is now.

  3. Nanotechnology in Dentistry Today

    PubMed Central

    Ogle, OE; Byles, N

    2014-01-01

    A review was done of nanotechnology as it applies to dentistry today. Information was gathered fro literature search, research data and material inserts in products. Nanotechnology deals with th physical, chemical and biological properties of structures and their components at nanoscale dime sions. One of the biggest contributions to restorative and aesthetic dentistry has been nanocomposite These composites are characterized by filler-particle sizes ≤ 100 nm and offer aesthetic and streng advantages over the current microfilled and hybrid resin-based composites. Nanoparticles for coatin implant surfaces and the nanopatterning of dental implants are leading to better osseointegration an improved physiologic functions of implants, while nanophase hydroxyapatite has improved i adaptation into bone graft sites. Nano-biochips are now making oral cancer screening and diagnos of diseases by saliva easier and more affordable. PMID:25429479

  4. Vitamin food fortification today

    PubMed Central

    de Lourdes Samaniego-Vaesken, Maria; Alonso-Aperte, Elena; Varela-Moreiras, Gregorio

    2012-01-01

    Historically, food fortification has served as a tool to address population-wide nutrient deficiencies such as rickets by vitamin D fortified milk. This article discusses the different policy strategies to be used today. Mandatory or voluntary fortification and fortified foods, which the consumer needs, also have to comply with nutritional, regulatory, food safety and technical issues. The ‘worldwide map of vitamin fortification’ is analysed, including differences between develop and developing countries. The vitamins, folate and vitamin D, are taken as practical examples in the review of the beneficial effect of different strategies on public health. The importance of the risk–benefit aspect, as well as how to identify the risk groups, and the food vehicles for fortification is discussed. PMID:22481896

  5. Historical Radiological Event Monitoring

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    During and after radiological events EPA's RadNet monitors the environment for radiation. EPA monitored environmental radiation levels during and after Chernobyl, Fukushima and other international and domestic radiological incidents.

  6. Mobile computing for radiology.

    PubMed

    Auffermann, William F; Chetlen, Alison L; Sharma, Arjun; Colucci, Andrew T; DeQuesada, Ivan M; Grajo, Joseph R; Kung, Justin W; Loehfelm, Thomas W; Sherry, Steven J

    2013-12-01

    The rapid advances in mobile computing technology have the potential to change the way radiology and medicine as a whole are practiced. Several mobile computing advances have not yet found application to the practice of radiology, while others have already been applied to radiology but are not in widespread clinical use. This review addresses several areas where radiology and medicine in general may benefit from adoption of the latest mobile computing technologies and speculates on potential future applications.

  7. Today’s Rifleman

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-20

    Marine Corps has transformed Marine “riflemen” from the masters of a small set of common skills into the “jack of all trades.” The table in Appendix... Marine Corps Common Skills Order Volume I that identifies what skills are to be taught and to what level of mastery. In 2005, the first wave of major...August of 2005, there was no tangible evidence that pointed to a correlation between the skills taught at Marine Combat Training and the performance of

  8. Radiology and fine art.

    PubMed

    Marinković, Slobodan; Stošić-Opinćal, Tatjana; Tomić, Oliver

    2012-07-01

    The radiologic aesthetics of some body parts and internal organs have inspired certain artists to create specific works of art. Our aim was to describe the link between radiology and fine art. We explored 13,625 artworks in the literature produced by 2049 artists and found several thousand photographs in an online image search. The examination revealed 271 radiologic artworks (1.99%) created by 59 artists (2.88%) who mainly applied radiography, sonography, CT, and MRI. Some authors produced radiologic artistic photographs, and others used radiologic images to create artful compositions, specific sculptures, or digital works. Many radiologic artworks have symbolic, metaphoric, or conceptual connotations. Radiology is clearly becoming an original and important field of modern art.

  9. Skateboarding injuries of today.

    PubMed

    Forsman, L; Eriksson, A

    2001-10-01

    Skateboarding injuries have increased with the rise in popularity of the sport, and the injury pattern can be expected to have changed with the development of both skateboard tricks and the materials used for skateboard construction. To describe the injury pattern of today. The pattern of injuries, circumstances, and severity were investigated in a study of all 139 people injured in skateboarding accidents during the period 1995-1998 inclusive and admitted to the University Hospital of Umeå. This is the only hospital in the area, serving a population of 135 000. Three of the 139 injured were pedestrians hit by a skateboard rider; the rest were riders. The age range was 7-47 years (mean 16). The severity of the injuries was minor (AIS 1) to moderate (AIS 2); fractures were classified as moderate. The annual number of injuries increased during the study period. Fractures were found in 29% of the casualties, and four children had concussion. The most common fractures were of the ankle and wrist. Older patients had less severe injuries, mainly sprains and soft tissue injuries. Most children were injured while skateboarding on ramps and at arenas; only 12 (9%) were injured while skateboarding on roads. Some 37% of the injuries occurred because of a loss of balance, and 26% because of a failed trick attempt. Falls caused by surface irregularities resulted in the highest proportion of the moderate injuries. Skateboarding should be restricted to supervised skateboard parks, and skateboarders should be required to wear protective gear. These measures would reduce the number of skateboarders injured in motor vehicle collisions, reduce the personal injuries among skateboarders, and reduce the number of pedestrians injured in collisions with skateboarders.

  10. Skateboarding injuries of today

    PubMed Central

    Forsman, L; Eriksson, A

    2001-01-01

    Background—Skateboarding injuries have increased with the rise in popularity of the sport, and the injury pattern can be expected to have changed with the development of both skateboard tricks and the materials used for skateboard construction. Objective—To describe the injury pattern of today. Methods—The pattern of injuries, circumstances, and severity were investigated in a study of all 139 people injured in skateboarding accidents during the period 1995–1998 inclusive and admitted to the University Hospital of Umeå. This is the only hospital in the area, serving a population of 135 000. Results—Three of the 139 injured were pedestrians hit by a skateboard rider; the rest were riders. The age range was 7–47 years (mean 16). The severity of the injuries was minor (AIS 1) to moderate (AIS 2); fractures were classified as moderate. The annual number of injuries increased during the study period. Fractures were found in 29% of the casualties, and four children had concussion. The most common fractures were of the ankle and wrist. Older patients had less severe injuries, mainly sprains and soft tissue injuries. Most children were injured while skateboarding on ramps and at arenas; only 12 (9%) were injured while skateboarding on roads. Some 37% of the injuries occurred because of a loss of balance, and 26% because of a failed trick attempt. Falls caused by surface irregularities resulted in the highest proportion of the moderate injuries. Conclusions—Skateboarding should be restricted to supervised skateboard parks, and skateboarders should be required to wear protective gear. These measures would reduce the number of skateboarders injured in motor vehicle collisions, reduce the personal injuries among skateboarders, and reduce the number of pedestrians injured in collisions with skateboarders. Key Words: skateboard; injury; prevention PMID:11579065

  11. [Gastrointestinal bleeding. Diagnostics and therapy by interventional radiology].

    PubMed

    Wingen, M; Günther, R W

    2006-02-01

    Modern imaging modalities such as (multislice) helical CT allow new diagnostic strategies for gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Today, interventional radiology with superselective transcatheter embolization or TIPS procedures allow minimally invasive therapeutic management which can support or replace surgery. This review is a synopsis of the possibilities and relative merits of diagnostic and therapeutic radiological procedures for gastrointestinal bleeding. Which of them to use should be decided collaboratively by gastroenterologist, surgeon, and radiologist depending on local availability, personal experience, and individual patient factors.

  12. Hygiene yesterday, today, tomorrow.

    PubMed

    Möse, Josef R

    2007-09-13

    I began my career in 1945 by tracing the footsteps of the legendary Max von Pettenkofer and Robert Koch. At that time their influence was still discernible, and continues to be.The first major innovation was the introduction of antibiotics, which some people believed would now dispense with the need for disinfection and sterilization. The next major development was the introduction of hospital hygiene as a discipline in its own right, aimed at highlighting the growing risk of nosocomial infections, albeit also against the background of the, admittedly, brilliant but unceasingly innovative armamentarium of medical paraphernalia and fittings. As regards the pathogens, viruses were seen to play an increasingly more prominent role as nosocomial pathogens, giving rise to completely novel challenges and problems in the field of disinfection and sterilization. In 1956 at Prof. Pette's institute in Hamburg it generally took weeks to produce the results to diagnose poliomyelitis. Their value was immensely important for science - but their value to the doctor and patients was questionable. The introduction of inexpensive sterile disposable syringes and other disposable equipment represented, in my opinion, the next milestone. In the meantime, there was a dramatic increase in the overall constellation of problems caused by the continuing upsurge in antibiotic bacterial resistance. And with growing awareness of environmental issues, the late 60s set in motion a new avalanche where one had to strive not only to keep abreast of matters, but also to ensure that science continued to prevail as the highest instance. Today we are facing completely different, but in principle still similar problems in consolidating the status of disinfection and sterilization, e.g. when it comes to the ultra delicate devices that in some cases are heavily contaminated after routine clinical use. Hence we elderly infection control experts still have a task to accomplish: to issue warnings again and

  13. [Liver support systems today].

    PubMed

    Rikker, Csaba

    2009-12-20

    Liver failure carries a high mortality, both the acute type with no pre-existing liver disease (acute liver failure) and the acute decompensation superimposed on a chronic liver disorder (acute on chronic liver failure). Today, liver transplantation still represents the only curative treatment for liver failure due to end-stage liver diseases. Donor organ shortage is still the major limitation and many patients die while awaiting transplantation. Due to the scarcity of donor organs, liver support technologies are being developed to support patients with severe liver failure until either an organ becomes available for transplantation or their livers recover from injury. Early devices including hemodialysis, hemoperfusion, exchange transfusion, cross-hemodialysis, cross-circulation and plasmapheresis appeared inefficient. In the present day, liver support systems' designs fall into two main categories: cell-based, so-called bioartificial and non-cell-based, also known as artificial systems. Bioartificial liver support systems use either porcine hepatocytes or human hepatoma cell lines housed within a hollow-fiber bioreactor. The system perfuses the patient's whole blood or separated plasma through the luminal space in the bioreactor. Theoretically, these methods should optimally resemble normal hepatic tissue structure and function. However, the existing bioartificial systems are far from ideal solution in terms of immunological, infectological, oncological and financial problems and must still be thought of as experimental. The artificial systems are already available for the clinicians in limited quantities. These non-cell-based devices are intended to remove protein-bound and water-soluble toxins without providing synthetic function, which can be partially replaced with substitution of the failing substances (plasma proteins, coagulation factors). These systems include the hemodiabsorption (Liver Dialysis Unit) which is commercially available in the United States

  14. ENGLISH FOR TODAY. BOOK TWO, THE WORLD WE LIVE IN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SLAGER, WILLIAM R.; AND OTHERS

    THIS SECOND VOLUME (SECOND YEAR) OF THE "ENGLISH FOR TODAY" SERIES FOLLOWS THE SAME GENERAL FIVE-UNIT FORMAT AND AUDIO-LINGUAL APPROACH AS BOOK ONE. THE 25 READINGS CONTAINED IN THIS VOLUME ARE GRADED AND CONTROLLED, DEALING WITH SUCH GEOGRAPHICAL AND SOCIAL TOPICS AS MAPS, TRAVEL, EXPLORING, FAMOUS SITES AND MONUMENTS, AND PROGRESS IN…

  15. What Is the University Today?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heaney, Conor

    2015-01-01

    What is the University today? In this paper, a Foucault and Deleuzo-Guattarian inspired approach is taken. I argue that the University is, today, a site of "neoliberal governmentality," which governs students and academics as sites of human capital. That is, students and academics are governed to self-govern themselves as sites of human…

  16. What Is the University Today?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heaney, Conor

    2015-01-01

    What is the University today? In this paper, a Foucault and Deleuzo-Guattarian inspired approach is taken. I argue that the University is, today, a site of "neoliberal governmentality," which governs students and academics as sites of human capital. That is, students and academics are governed to self-govern themselves as sites of human…

  17. Machine Learning and Radiology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shijun; Summers, Ronald M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we give a short introduction to machine learning and survey its applications in radiology. We focused on six categories of applications in radiology: medical image segmentation, registration, computer aided detection and diagnosis, brain function or activity analysis and neurological disease diagnosis from fMR images, content-based image retrieval systems for CT or MRI images, and text analysis of radiology reports using natural language processing (NLP) and natural language understanding (NLU). This survey shows that machine learning plays a key role in many radiology applications. Machine learning identifies complex patterns automatically and helps radiologists make intelligent decisions on radiology data such as conventional radiographs, CT, MRI, and PET images and radiology reports. In many applications, the performance of machine learning-based automatic detection and diagnosis systems has shown to be comparable to that of a well-trained and experienced radiologist. Technology development in machine learning and radiology will benefit from each other in the long run. Key contributions and common characteristics of machine learning techniques in radiology are discussed. We also discuss the problem of translating machine learning applications to the radiology clinical setting, including advantages and potential barriers. PMID:22465077

  18. Radiological evaluation of dysphagia

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, D.J.; Gelfand, D.W.; Wu, W.C.; Chen, Y.M.

    1986-11-21

    Dysphagia is a common complaint in patients presenting for radiological or endoscopic examination of the esophagus and is usually due to functional or structural abnormalities of the esophageal body or esophagogastric region. The authors review the radiological evaluation of the esophagus and esophagogastric region in patients with esophageal dysphagia and discuss the roentgenographic techniques used, radiological efficacy for common structural disorders, and evaluation of esophageal motor function. Comparison is made with endoscopy in assessing dysphagia, with the conclusion that the radiological examination be used initially in patients with this complaint.

  19. Managerial accounting applications in radiology.

    PubMed

    Lexa, Frank James; Mehta, Tushar; Seidmann, Abraham

    2005-03-01

    We review the core issues in managerial accounting for radiologists. We introduce the topic and then explore its application to diagnostic imaging. We define key terms such as fixed cost, variable cost, marginal cost, and marginal revenue and discuss their role in understanding the operational and financial implications for a radiology facility by using a cost-volume-profit model. Our work places particular emphasis on the role of managerial accounting in understanding service costs, as well as how it assists executive decision making.

  20. The Radiology Resident iPad Toolbox: an educational and clinical tool for radiology residents.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Emerson E; Kendrick, Michael; Strickland, Colin; Dodd, Gerald D

    2013-07-01

    Tablet computing and mobile resources are the hot topics in technology today, with that interest spilling into the medical field. To improve resident education, a fully configured iPad, referred to as the "Radiology Resident iPad Toolbox," was created and implemented at the University of Colorado. The goal was to create a portable device with comprehensive educational, clinical, and communication tools that would contain all necessary resources for an entire 4-year radiology residency. The device was distributed to a total of 34 radiology residents (8 first-year residents, 8 second-year residents, 9 third-year residents, and 9 fourth-year residents). This article describes the process used to develop and deploy the device, provides a distillation of useful applications and resources decided upon after extensive evaluation, and assesses the impact this device had on resident education. The Radiology Resident iPad Toolbox is a cost-effective, portable, educational instrument that has increased studying efficiency; improved access to study materials such as books, radiology cases, lectures, and web-based resources; and increased interactivity in educational conferences and lectures through the use of audience-response software, with questions geared toward the new ABR board format. This preconfigured tablet fully embraces the technology shift into mobile computing and represents a paradigm shift in educational strategy. Copyright © 2013 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Radiological Defense. Textbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Civil Preparedness Agency (DOD), Washington, DC.

    This textbook has been prepared under the direction of the Defense Civil Preparedness Agency (DCPA) Staff College for use as a student reference manual in radiological defense (RADEF) courses. It provides much of the basic technical information necessary for a proper understanding of radiological defense and summarizes RADEF planning and expected…

  2. Construction Management Meets Today's Realities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, C. William

    1979-01-01

    Construction management--the control of cost and time from concept through construction--grew out of a need to meet the realities of today's economy. A checklist of services a construction manager provides is presented. (Author/MLF)

  3. Today's Physicians Seek Career Direction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan-Haker, Veronica R.

    1998-01-01

    Changes in the role of the physician in today's society have made their career choices risky. Career specialists have an opportunity to assist those who do not normally seek career advice outside their own profession. (JOW)

  4. Frontiers in European Radiology: Volume 5

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, J.; Zollikofer, C.; Poos, D.; Pirschel, J.; Capesius, P.

    1987-01-01

    The contents of this book are: Angiocinedensitometry of Renal Blood Circulation by Electrocardiogram-Controlled Infection and Computer Assisted Evaluation; Experimental Basis of Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty; Ultrasound Examination of the Breast - Diagnostic Information Related to Mammography; and Computerized Tomography in Pituitary Microadenoma.

  5. OPERATION CASTLE. Radiological Safety. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    has •’ ’. /,V been detetmined to be critical military information which could reveal system te^jp-^ - or equipment vulnerabilities and is...V-V Part 11a - Radiologteal Safety • 1. Discussion A temporary washdovn system consisting of hoses and special no’zles connected to the fire...main system , like that used in IVY, was installed by a ’iuShios representative on all manned ships engaged in CASTLE, with the exception of the USS

  6. OPERATION CASTLE. Radiological Safety. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    a considerable extent by the successful application of graphical vectorial solutions to the equations and the assumption of workable empirical...UTIRIK (CONT’D) 5V FOOD flB VfllTg DATAt 11% QkTE CP PROCURPOMT 4-23-» ... DAIE or ACTIVITr ANALISIS Drinking Water-Cistern near

  7. Interventional Radiology in Paediatrics.

    PubMed

    Chippington, Samantha J; Goodwin, Susie J

    2015-01-01

    As in adult practice, there is a growing role for paediatric interventional radiology expertise in the management of paediatric pathologies. This review is targeted for clinicians who may refer their patients to paediatric interventional radiology services, or who are responsible for patients who are undergoing paediatric interventional radiology procedures. The article includes a brief overview of the indications for intervention, techniques involved and the commonest complications. Although some of the procedures described are most commonly performed in a tertiary paediatric centre, many are performed in most Children's hospitals.

  8. [Controlling instruments in radiology].

    PubMed

    Maurer, M

    2013-10-01

    Due to the rising costs and competitive pressures radiological clinics and practices are now facing, controlling instruments are gaining importance in the optimization of structures and processes of the various diagnostic examinations and interventional procedures. It will be shown how the use of selected controlling instruments can secure and improve the performance of radiological facilities. A definition of the concept of controlling will be provided. It will be shown which controlling instruments can be applied in radiological departments and practices. As an example, two of the controlling instruments, material cost analysis and benchmarking, will be illustrated.

  9. The new radiology workforce: changing expectations.

    PubMed

    Cronan, John J

    2004-05-01

    The zeitgeist of the new radiology workforce can best be described by a Bob Dylan song title: "The Times They Are A-Changin'." The new generation of physicians, although embracing the same foundations of medical practice as previous generations, places greater emphasis on personal satisfaction than its predecessors. Gone are the days when physicians operated as sole practitioners; today's workforce member is content to function in the role of "employee" in a trade-off for more lifestyle flexibility. This change has occurred not because of one specific factor but because of a change in the profession of medicine coupled with a combination of factors; familial responsibilities, avocational activities, and personal satisfaction have surfaced as motivating factors in choosing a profession. Today's workforce has a personal perception of success that may not be fulfilled solely by the contemporary practice of medicine. With the radiologist shortages that are now occurring and anticipated increased demand for staff radiologists, today's radiology workforce has helped shape the specialty into one that is altering its structure to attract and retain its workforce.

  10. American College of Radiology

    MedlinePlus

    ... Meeting & Course Calendar Where ACR Exhibits Advancing Artificial Intelligence in Medical Imaging Visit ACR DSI website to ... more ACR Radiology Coding Source™ ACR issues an analysis of the proposed MACRA/MIPS Rule May-June ...

  11. Imaging and radiology

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a branch of medicine that uses imaging technology to diagnose and treat disease. Radiology may be ... for smaller incisions (cuts). Doctors can use this technology to diagnose or treat conditions in almost any ...

  12. Radiologic Technology Program Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This publication contains statewide standards for the radiologic technology program in Georgia. The standards are divided into 12 categories; Foundations (philosophy, purpose, goals, program objectives, availability, evaluation); Admissions (admission requirements, provisional admission requirements, recruitment, evaluation and planning); Program…

  13. Interventional Radiology in China

    SciTech Connect

    Teng Gaojun Xu Ke; Ni Caifang; Li Linsun

    2008-03-15

    With more than 3000 members, the Chinese Society of Interventional Radiology (CSIR) is one of the world's largest societies for interventional radiology (IR). Nevertheless, compared to other societies such as CIRSE and SIR, the CSIR is a relatively young society. In this article, the status of IR in China is described, which includes IR history, structure and patient management, personnel, fellowship, training, modalities, procedures, research, turf battle, and insightful visions for IR from Chinese interventional radiologists.

  14. Rethinking radiology informatics.

    PubMed

    Kohli, Marc; Dreyer, Keith J; Geis, J Raymond

    2015-04-01

    Informatics innovations of the past 30 years have improved radiology quality and efficiency immensely. Radiologists are groundbreaking leaders in clinical information technology (IT), and often radiologists and imaging informaticists created, specified, and implemented these technologies, while also carrying the ongoing burdens of training, maintenance, support, and operation of these IT solutions. Being pioneers of clinical IT had advantages of local radiology control and radiology-centric products and services. As health care businesses become more clinically IT savvy, however, they are standardizing IT products and procedures across the enterprise, resulting in the loss of radiologists' local control and flexibility. Although this inevitable consequence may provide new opportunities in the long run, several questions arise. What will happen to the informatics expertise within the radiology domain? Will radiology's current and future concerns be heard and their needs addressed? What should radiologists do to understand, obtain, and use informatics products to maximize efficiency and provide the most value and quality for patients and the greater health care community? This article will propose some insights and considerations as we rethink radiology informatics.

  15. [Instruction in dental radiology].

    PubMed

    van der Sanden, W J M; Kreulen, C M; Berkhout, W E R

    2016-04-01

    The diagnostic use of oral radiology is an essential part of daily dental practice. Due to the potentially harmful nature of ionising radiation, the clinical use of oral radiology in the Netherlands is framed by clinical practice guidelines and regulatory requirements. Undergraduate students receive intensive theoretical and practical training in practical and theoretical radiology, with the aim of obtaining the 'Eindtermen Stralingshygiëne voor Tandartsen en Orthodontisten'-certificate, which is required for legal permission to use oral radiology in dental practice. It is recommended that the curriculum be expanded to include the areas of knowledge required to qualify for the 'Eindtermen Stralingshygiëne voor het gebruik van CBCT-toestellen door tandartsen' (the certificate for the use of conebeam radiology by dentists). The general dental practitioner is faced with changing laws and regulations in all areas of practice. One of the most significant legal changes in the field of dental radiology was the introduction of the new radiation protection and safety rules in 2014. Moreover, a large group of dentists is also being confronted with the transition from conventional to digital images, with all its challenges and changes in everyday practice.

  16. Your Quality Partnerships Begin Today.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, MaryLou Wendel

    This collection of materials offers information on Portland Community College's Institute for Management and Professional Development. The first information sheet, "Your Quality Partnerships Begin Today," focuses on the Total Quality Management (TQM) programs of the Institute, indicating that 8,000 to 10,000 individuals per year,…

  17. Today Is Not Yet Tomorrow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moeller, Hans

    1968-01-01

    Although computers and high-powered mass media will eventually open new vistas in education, their immediate value is overrated, and the less glamouous visual learning media are the ones that teachers and students use most often. Today the most important visual media are filmstrips, slides, overhead projectuals, 16mm films, and 8mm silent or sound…

  18. Education and Today's Older Worker.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberson, Donald N.

    New perspectives need to be gained on the roles of older adults and older workers in the new millenium. Because today's adult is healthier, policies concerning social security, retirement, and work need to be changed. There is a need for acceptance of various types of aging. Rather than mandating specific retirement, the individual should have…

  19. Euphoria, Dystopia and Practice Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Standish, Paul

    2002-01-01

    Hubert Dreyfus' "On the Internet" provides a powerful commentary on the way that the Internet has come to influence people's lives today, and a trenchant attack on the more extreme claims that are made for its benefits for education. Dreyfus has succeeded in presenting an account that is clear, accessible and concise. The book is full of vivid…

  20. CEC Today, 1998-1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voyles, Lynda C., Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This document is comprised of five issues of "CEC Today," a membership publication of the Council for Exceptional Children. Each issue usually contains a calendar of events, news items, and columns on member benefits, advocacy efforts of CEC, activities of Student CEC, CEC in Canada, activities of the CEC divisions, professional…

  1. Preparing Principals for Today's Demands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Pamela F.

    2006-01-01

    As a principal, Ms. Brown has firsthand knowledge of the pressures educational leaders face in the NCLB era. If administrators are going to perform effectively in today's school environment, she argues, the programs that prepare them will have to undergo significant reform. She urges university leadership programs to adopt four changes that will…

  2. School Counseling in China Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomason, Timothy C.; Qiong, Xiao

    2008-01-01

    This article provides a brief overview of the development of psychological thinking in China and social influences on the practice of school counseling today. Common problems of students are described, including anxiety due to pressure to perform well on exams, loneliness and social discomfort, and video game addiction. Counseling approaches used…

  3. Good Show by Today's Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowry, W. Kenneth

    1977-01-01

    Investigates whether today's students would score as well as students of the 1930-1950 era on achievement tests. Uses the Progressive Achievement Test, a test widely used in the 1930-1950 era as a barometer of student ability. (RK)

  4. Linguistic Method: Yesterday and Today.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rauch, Irmengard

    This paper introduces the reader to a brief history of the focus of linguistic method from prehistoric times, through the Classical era, the Middle Ages, to the present. The scientific orientation of linguistic method is exploited; a set of specific principles is found to unify most of today's diverse methods. The success of linguistics is…

  5. ENGLISH FOR TODAY. BOOK SIX, LITERATURE IN ENGLISH.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SLAGER, WILLIAM R.; AND OTHERS

    THE SIXTH AND LAST VOLUME IN THE "ENGLISH FOR TODAY" SERIES, "LITERATURE IN ENGLISH" PRESENTS A WIDE RANGE OF WELL-KNOWN CONTEMPORARY WRITERS FROM THE ENGLISH-SPEAKING WORLD--ENGLAND, THE UNITED STATES, AUSTRALIA, CANADA, INDIA, IRELAND, AND SCOTLAND. THE SELECTIONS INCLUDE--(I) SHORT STORIES BY SAKI, CALLAGHAN, O'CONNOR, HEMINGWAY, JOYCE,…

  6. ENGLISH FOR TODAY. BOOK SIX, LITERATURE IN ENGLISH.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SLAGER, WILLIAM R.; AND OTHERS

    THE SIXTH AND LAST VOLUME IN THE "ENGLISH FOR TODAY" SERIES, "LITERATURE IN ENGLISH" PRESENTS A WIDE RANGE OF WELL-KNOWN CONTEMPORARY WRITERS FROM THE ENGLISH-SPEAKING WORLD--ENGLAND, THE UNITED STATES, AUSTRALIA, CANADA, INDIA, IRELAND, AND SCOTLAND. THE SELECTIONS INCLUDE--(I) SHORT STORIES BY SAKI, CALLAGHAN, O'CONNOR, HEMINGWAY, JOYCE,…

  7. English for Today. Supplementary Pronunciation Drills. Books 1 and 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vietnamese American Association, Saigon (Vietnam).

    This volume contains supplementary pronunciation drills for the English for Today program, Books I and II, for Vietnamese speakers. The supplement for Book I contains exercises on the English segmental phonemes in one-word context. Commentary intended for the teacher indicates potential trouble spots for Vietnamese learning English. The supplement…

  8. Turf wars in radiology: what must academic radiology do?

    PubMed

    Rao, Vijay M; Levin, David C

    2007-09-01

    In a previous article in this series, the authors called on private practice radiology groups to better support radiology research financially but also pointed out that academic radiology must make some changes as well. In this article, the authors discuss those changes in detail. They include revising the structure of the radiology residency, changing the timing of the American Board of Radiology oral examinations, requiring that all residents receive research training, and emphasizing the value of clinical and translational research. The Society of Chairmen of Academic Radiology Departments needs to assume a leadership role in implementing these changes.

  9. Radiology interpretation process modeling.

    PubMed

    Noumeir, Rita

    2006-04-01

    Information and communication technology in healthcare promises optimized patient care while ensuring efficiency and cost-effectiveness. However, the promised results are not yet achieved; the healthcare process requires analysis and radical redesign to achieve improvements in care quality and productivity. Healthcare process reengineering is thus necessary and involves modeling its workflow. Even though the healthcare process is very large and not very well modeled yet, its sub-processes can be modeled individually, providing fundamental pieces of the whole model. In this paper, we are interested in modeling the radiology interpretation process that results in generating a diagnostic radiology report. This radiology report is an important clinical element of the patient healthcare record and assists in healthcare decisions. We present the radiology interpretation process by identifying its boundaries and by positioning it on the large healthcare process map. Moreover, we discuss an information data model and identify roles, tasks and several information flows. Furthermore, we describe standard frameworks to enable radiology interpretation workflow implementations between heterogeneous systems.

  10. Contained radiological analytical chemistry module

    DOEpatents

    Barney, David M.

    1989-01-01

    A system which provides analytical determination of a plurality of water chemistry parameters with respect to water samples subject to radiological contamination. The system includes a water sample analyzer disposed within a containment and comprising a sampling section for providing predetermined volumes of samples for analysis; a flow control section for controlling the flow through the system; and a gas analysis section for analyzing samples provided by the sampling system. The sampling section includes a controllable multiple port valve for, in one position, metering out sample of a predetermined volume and for, in a second position, delivering the material sample for analysis. The flow control section includes a regulator valve for reducing the pressure in a portion of the system to provide a low pressure region, and measurement devices located in the low pressure region for measuring sample parameters such as pH and conductivity, at low pressure. The gas analysis section which is of independent utility provides for isolating a small water sample and extracting the dissolved gases therefrom into a small expansion volume wherein the gas pressure and thermoconductivity of the extracted gas are measured.

  11. Contained radiological analytical chemistry module

    DOEpatents

    Barney, David M.

    1990-01-01

    A system which provides analytical determination of a plurality of water chemistry parameters with respect to water samples subject to radiological contamination. The system includes a water sample analyzer disposed within a containment and comprising a sampling section for providing predetermined volumes of samples for analysis; a flow control section for controlling the flow through the system; and a gas analysis section for analyzing samples provided by the sampling system. The sampling section includes a controllable multiple port valve for, in one position, metering out sample of a predetermined volume and for, in a second position, delivering the material sample for analysis. The flow control section includes a regulator valve for reducing the pressure in a portion of the system to provide a low pressure region, and measurement devices located in the low pressure region for measuring sample parameters such as pH and conductivity, at low pressure. The gas analysis section which is of independent utility provides for isolating a small water sample and extracting the dissolved gases therefrom into a small expansion volume wherein the gas pressure and thermoconductivity of the extracted gas are measured.

  12. Radiology of orthopedic procedures, problems and complications

    SciTech Connect

    Gelman, M.I.; Saunders, W.B.

    1984-01-01

    This work is volume 24 in a series on clinical radiology. Eight sections cover fractures in general, thoracolumbar spine, upper extremities, hand and wrist, trauma to pelvis, hip and femur, knee and lower leg, and ankle and foot. These sections vary from 15 to 36 pages and contain adequate text, 18 to 54 x-ray films per section, and appropriate references (306 in sum). There are 275 radiographs, most of which are well printed, some with accompanying line sketches.

  13. Advances in diagnostic radiology.

    PubMed

    Runge, Val M

    2010-12-01

    Recent advances in diagnostic radiology are discussed on the basis of current publications in Investigative Radiology. Publications in the journal during 2009 and 2010 are reviewed, evaluating developments by modality and anatomic region. Technological advances continue to play a major role in the evolution and clinical practice of diagnostic radiology, and as such constitute a major publication focus. In the past 2 years, this includes advances in both magnetic resonance and computed tomography (in particular, the advent of dual energy computed tomography). An additional major focus of publications concerns contrast media, and in particular continuing research involving nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, its etiology, and differentiation of the gadolinium chelates on the basis of in vivo stability.

  14. Organizational decentralization in radiology.

    PubMed

    Aas, I H Monrad

    2006-01-01

    At present, most hospitals have a department of radiology where images are captured and interpreted. Decentralization is the opposite of centralization and means 'away from the centre'. With a Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) and broadband communications, transmitting radiology images between sites will be far easier than before. Qualitative interviews of 26 resource persons were performed in Norway. There was a response rate of 90%. Decentralization of radiology interpretations seems less relevant than centralization, but several forms of decentralization have a role to play. The respondents mentioned several advantages, including exploitation of capacity and competence. They also mentioned several disadvantages, including splitting professional communities and reduced contact between radiologists and clinicians. With the new technology decentralization and centralization of image interpretation are important possibilities in organizational change. This will be important for the future of teleradiology.

  15. Radiological worker training

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-01

    This Handbook describes an implementation process for core training as recommended in Implementation Guide G441.12, Radiation Safety Training, and as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Standard (RCS). The Handbook is meant to assist those individuals within the Department of Energy, Managing and Operating contractors, and Managing and Integrating contractors identified as having responsibility for implementing core training recommended by the RCS. This training is intended for radiological workers to assist in meeting their job-specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835. While this Handbook addresses many requirements of 10 CFR 835 Subpart J, it must be supplemented with facility-specific information to achieve full compliance.

  16. Marketing a Radiology Practice.

    PubMed

    Levin, David C; Rao, Vijay M; Flanders, Adam E; Sundaram, Baskaran; Colarossi, Margaret

    2016-10-01

    In addition to being a profession, the practice of radiology is a business, and marketing is an important part of that business. There are many facets to marketing a radiology practice. The authors present a number of ideas on how to go about doing this. Some marketing methods can be directed to both patients and referring physicians. Others should be directed just to patients, while still others should be directed just to referring physicians. Aside from marketing, many of them provide value to both target audiences.

  17. Food Signs in Radiology

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Mehboob; Al Damegh, Saleh

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Certain diseases show classic radiological signs that resemble various types of food items like fruits, meat, vegetables, eggs, bakery, grocery and confectionary items. In this article various food signs are discussed and correlated with the various food items in a pictorial way. The objective of this pictorial essay is to provide the information and learn the characteristic radiological signs resembling various food items. These food signs are easy to recognize and allows a confident diagnosis on the basis of imaging findings alone or can narrow down the differential diagnosis. PMID:21475464

  18. Westinghouse radiological containment guide

    SciTech Connect

    Aitken, S.B.; Brown, R.L.; Cantrell, J.R.; Wilcox, D.P.

    1994-03-01

    This document provides uniform guidance for Westinghouse contractors on the implementation of radiological containments. This document reflects standard industry practices and is provided as a guide. The guidance presented herein is consistent with the requirements of the DOE Radiological Control Manual (DOE N 5480.6). This guidance should further serve to enable and encourage the use of containments for contamination control and to accomplish the following: Minimize personnel contamination; Prevent the spread of contamination; Minimize the required use of protective clothing and personal protective equipment; Minimize the generation of waste.

  19. [Radiological diagnosis of osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Issever, A S; Link, T M

    2011-02-01

    Having at their disposal a wide range of imaging techniques, radiologists play a crucial role in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with osteoporosis. The radiological tests range from dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), which is the only reference method accepted by the WHO, to conventional radiographs for fracture characterization, to more recent techniques for analyzing trabecular structure, and the findings are decisive in initiating correct management of osteoporosis patients. This review provides an overview of established radiological techniques and an outline of new diagnostic approaches.

  20. Storage media for computers in radiology

    PubMed Central

    Dandu, Ravi Varma

    2008-01-01

    The introduction and wide acceptance of digital technology in medical imaging has resulted in an exponential increase in the amount of data produced by the radiology department. There is an insatiable need for storage space to archive this ever-growing volume of image data. Healthcare facilities should plan the type and size of the storage media that they needed, based not just on the volume of data but also on considerations such as the speed and ease of access, redundancy, security, costs, as well as the longevity of the archival technology. This article reviews the various digital storage media and compares their merits and demerits. PMID:19774182

  1. Storage media for computers in radiology.

    PubMed

    Dandu, Ravi Varma

    2008-11-01

    The introduction and wide acceptance of digital technology in medical imaging has resulted in an exponential increase in the amount of data produced by the radiology department. There is an insatiable need for storage space to archive this ever-growing volume of image data. Healthcare facilities should plan the type and size of the storage media that they needed, based not just on the volume of data but also on considerations such as the speed and ease of access, redundancy, security, costs, as well as the longevity of the archival technology. This article reviews the various digital storage media and compares their merits and demerits.

  2. 324 Building Baseline Radiological Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    R.J. Reeder, J.C. Cooper

    2010-06-24

    This report documents the analysis of radiological data collected as part of the characterization study performed in 1998. The study was performed to create a baseline of the radiological conditions in the 324 Building.

  3. Radiological controls integrated into design

    SciTech Connect

    Kindred, G.W.

    1995-03-01

    Radiological controls are required by law in the design of commercial nuclear power reactor facilities. These controls can be relatively minor or significant, relative to cost. To ensure that radiological controls are designed into a project, the health physicist (radiological engineer) must be involved from the beginning. This is especially true regarding keeping costs down. For every radiological engineer at a nuclear power plant there must be fifty engineers of other disciplines. The radiological engineer cannot be an expert on every discipline of engineering. However, he must be knowledgeable to the degree of how a design will impact the facility from a radiological perspective. This paper will address how to effectively perform radiological analyses with the goal of radiological controls integrated into the design package.

  4. Paediatric musculoskeletal interventional radiology

    PubMed Central

    Paolantonio, Guglielmo; Fruhwirth, Rodolfo; Alvaro, Giuseppe; Parapatt, George K; Toma', Paolo; Rollo, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Interventional radiology technique is now well established and widely used in the adult population. Through minimally invasive procedures, it increasingly replaces surgical interventions that involve higher percentages of invasiveness and, consequently, of morbidity and mortality. For these advantageous reasons, interventional radiology in recent years has spread to the paediatric age as well. The aim of this study was to review the literature on the development, use and perspectives of these procedures in the paediatric musculoskeletal field. Several topics are covered: osteomuscle neoplastic malignant and benign pathologies treated with invasive diagnostic and/or therapeutic procedures such as radiofrequency ablation in the osteoid osteoma; invasive and non-invasive procedures in vascular malformations; treatment of aneurysmal bone cysts; and role of interventional radiology in paediatric inflammatory and rheumatic inflammations. The positive results that have been generated with interventional radiology procedures in the paediatric field highly encourage both the development of new ad hoc materials, obviously adapted to young patients, as well as the improvement of such techniques, in consideration of the fact that childrens' pathologies do not always correspond to those of adults. In conclusion, as these interventional procedures have proven to be less invasive, with lower morbidity and mortality rates as well, they are becoming a viable and valid alternative to surgery in the paediatric population. PMID:26235144

  5. Radiological Safety Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Army Ordnance Center and School, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD.

    Written to be used concurrently with the U.S. Army's Radiological Safety Course, this publication discusses the causes, sources, and detection of nuclear radiation. In addition, the transportation and disposal of radioactive materials are covered. The report also deals with the safety precautions to be observed when working with lasers, microwave…

  6. Radiological Defense Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Civil Preparedness Agency (DOD), Washington, DC.

    Originally prepared for use as a student textbook in Radiological Defense (RADEF) courses, this manual provides the basic technical information necessary for an understanding of RADEF. It also briefly discusses the need for RADEF planning and expected postattack emergency operations. There are 14 chapters covering these major topics: introduction…

  7. Radiology of spinal curvature

    SciTech Connect

    De Smet, A.A.

    1985-01-01

    This book offers the only comprehensive, concise summary of both the clinical and radiologic features of thoracic and lumbar spine deformity. Emphasis is placed on idiopathic scoliosis, which represents 85% of all patients with scoliosis, but less common areas of secondary scoliosis, kyphosis and lordosis are also covered.

  8. Practical interventional radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Von Sonnenberg, E.; Mueller, P.R.

    1988-01-01

    This book describes techniques employed in interventional radiology with emphasis on imaging leading to intervention. Includes the entire array of procedures available to the radiologist, discussing the indications, materials, technique, results, and complications for each. Covers the chest, abdomen, bone, pediatric considerations, and nursing care.

  9. Radiologic Technology Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This guide presents the standard curriculum for technical institutes in Georgia. The curriculum addresses the minimum competencies for a radiologic technology program. The guide contains four major sections. The General Information section contains an introduction giving an overview and defining purpose and objectives; a program description,…

  10. Collaborative Radiological Response Planning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    Exercise and Evaluation Guide EMS Emergency Medical Services EPA Environmental Protection Agency FBI Federal Bureau of Investigation FEMA Federal...Investigation (FBI), water regulators, food regulators, agricultural agencies, hazardous waste regulators, local environmental health agencies...FEDERAL PLANNING EFFORTS The United States Environmental Protection Agency ( EPA ) has had radiological responsibilities since 1970.18 The General

  11. Radiology in emergency medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, R.; Barsan, W.G.

    1986-01-01

    This book gives a discussion of radiologic modalities currently being used in emergency situations. Radiographs, echocardiographs, radionuclide scans and CT scans are systematically analyzed and evaluated to provide a step-by-step diagnostic process for emergency physicians to follow when a radiologist is not present.

  12. Dosimetry in diagnostic radiology.

    PubMed

    Meghzifene, Ahmed; Dance, David R; McLean, Donald; Kramer, Hans-Michael

    2010-10-01

    Dosimetry is an area of increasing importance in diagnostic radiology. There is a realisation amongst health professionals that the radiation dose received by patients from modern X-ray examinations and procedures can be at a level of significance for the induction of cancer across a population, and in some unfortunate instances, in the acute damage to particular body organs such as skin and eyes. The formulation and measurement procedures for diagnostic radiology dosimetry have recently been standardised through an international code of practice which describes the methodologies necessary to address the diverging imaging modalities used in diagnostic radiology. Common to all dosimetry methodologies is the measurement of the air kerma from the X-ray device under defined conditions. To ensure the accuracy of the dosimetric determination, such measurements need to be made with appropriate instrumentation that has a calibration that is traceable to a standards laboratory. Dosimetric methods are used in radiology departments for a variety of purposes including the determination of patient dose levels to allow examinations to be optimized and to assist in decisions on the justification of examination choices. Patient dosimetry is important for special cases such as for X-ray examinations of children and pregnant patients. It is also a key component of the quality control of X-ray equipment and procedures. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  13. Ethical problems in radiology: radiological consumerism.

    PubMed

    Magnavita, N; Bergamaschi, A

    2009-10-01

    One of the causes of the increasing request for radiological examinations occurring in all economically developed countries is the active role played by the patient-consumer. Consumerism places the radiologist in an ethical dilemma, between the principle of autonomy on the one hand and the ethical principles of beneficence, nonmaleficence and justice on the other. The choice made by radiologists in moral dilemmas is inspired by an adherence to moral principles, which in Italy and elsewhere refer to the Judaeo-Christian tradition or to neo-Darwinian relativism. Whatever the choice, the radiologist is bound to adhere to that choice and to provide the patient with all the relevant information regarding his or her state of health.

  14. Radiology residents' experience with intussusception reduction.

    PubMed

    Bateni, Cyrus; Stein-Wexler, Rebecca; Wootton-Gorges, Sandra L; Li, Chin-Shang

    2011-06-01

    Residents should be exposed to adequate procedural volume to act independently upon completion of training. Informal inquiry led us to question whether residents encounter enough intussusception reductions to become comfortable with the procedure. We sought to determine radiology residents' exposure to intussusception reductions, and whether their experiences vary by region or institution. U.S. radiology residency program directors were asked to encourage their residents to complete a 12-question online survey describing characteristics of their pediatric radiology department, experiences with intussusception reduction, and confidence in their own ability to perform the procedure. Six hundred sixty-four residents responded during the study period. Of those, 308 (46.4%) had not experienced an intussusception reduction, and 228 (34%) had experienced only one or two. Twenty-two percent of fourth-year residents had never experienced an intussusception reduction, and 21% had experienced only one. Among second- through fourth-year residents, only 99 (18.3%) felt confident that they could competently reduce an intussusception (P < 0.0001), and 336 (62.2%) thought they would benefit from a computer-assisted training model simulating intussusception reduction (P < 0.0001). Radiology residents have limited opportunity to learn intussusception reduction and therefore lack confidence. Most think they would benefit from additional training with a computer-simulation model.

  15. Poul Erik Andersen's radiological work on Osteochondrodysplasias and interventional radiology

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Poul Erik

    2011-01-01

    Poul Erik Andersen is a Professor and Interventional Radiologist at the University of Southern Denmark, Odense and Odense University Hospital, Denmark. His innovative and expertise is primarily in vascular interventions where he has introduced and developed many procedures at Odense University Hospital. His significant experience and extensive scientific work has led to many posts in the Danish Society of Interventional Radiology, the European Society of Radiology and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe, where he is a fellow and has passed the European Board of Interventional Radiology - The European qualification in Interventional Radiology. PMID:22022640

  16. Poul Erik Andersen's radiological work on Osteochondrodysplasias and interventional radiology.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Poul Erik

    2011-08-28

    Poul Erik Andersen is a Professor and Interventional Radiologist at the University of Southern Denmark, Odense and Odense University Hospital, Denmark. His innovative and expertise is primarily in vascular interventions where he has introduced and developed many procedures at Odense University Hospital. His significant experience and extensive scientific work has led to many posts in the Danish Society of Interventional Radiology, the European Society of Radiology and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe, where he is a fellow and has passed the European Board of Interventional Radiology - The European qualification in Interventional Radiology.

  17. Informatics in radiology: radiology gamuts ontology: differential diagnosis for the Semantic Web.

    PubMed

    Budovec, Joseph J; Lam, Cesar A; Kahn, Charles E

    2014-01-01

    The Semantic Web is an effort to add semantics, or "meaning," to empower automated searching and processing of Web-based information. The overarching goal of the Semantic Web is to enable users to more easily find, share, and combine information. Critical to this vision are knowledge models called ontologies, which define a set of concepts and formalize the relations between them. Ontologies have been developed to manage and exploit the large and rapidly growing volume of information in biomedical domains. In diagnostic radiology, lists of differential diagnoses of imaging observations, called gamuts, provide an important source of knowledge. The Radiology Gamuts Ontology (RGO) is a formal knowledge model of differential diagnoses in radiology that includes 1674 differential diagnoses, 19,017 terms, and 52,976 links between terms. Its knowledge is used to provide an interactive, freely available online reference of radiology gamuts ( www.gamuts.net ). A Web service allows its content to be discovered and consumed by other information systems. The RGO integrates radiologic knowledge with other biomedical ontologies as part of the Semantic Web.

  18. [Celedonio Calatayud-Costa and the birth of the specialty, the Spanish Society of Medical Radiology, and the journal: the beginning of a century of Spanish radiology].

    PubMed

    Puyalto de Pablo, P; Sánchez Fernández, J J; García Santos, J M

    2012-01-01

    Dr. Celedonio Calatayud-Costa, an eminent Spanish radiologist, electrical engineer, researcher, and co-founder of the Spanish Society of Electrical Engineering and Medical Radiology, was also the founder of the Spanish Journal of Electrical Engineering and Medical Radiology. The journal, the first journal dedicated specifically to the incipient specialty of electrology, from which radiology would later develop, was the official publication of that primordial Society, and was thus the first antecessor of Radiología, which is today the official journal of the Spanish Society of Medical Radiology. This article analyzes the figure of Dr. Calatayud, based on the scant information available about him, in the centennial of the publication of his journal. Criticized by some and eulogized by others, knowledge about this controversial figure is essential to any understanding of the beginnings of the specialty and its scientific publication in Spain.

  19. Branching out with filmless radiology.

    PubMed

    Carbajal, R; Honea, R

    1999-05-01

    Texas Children's Hospital, a 456 bed pediatric hospital located in the Texas Medical Center, has been constructing a large-scale picture archiving and communications system (PACS), including ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR), and computed radiography (CR). Until recently, filmless radiology operations have been confined to the imaging department, the outpatient treatment center, and the emergency center. As filmless services expand to other clinical services, the PACS staff must engage each service in a dialog to determine the appropriate level of support required. The number and type of image examinations, the use of multiple modalities and comparison examinations, and the relationship between viewing and direct patient care activities have a bearing on the number and type of display stations provided. Some of the information about customer services is contained in documentation already maintained by the imaging department. For example, by a custom report from the radiology information system (RIS), we were able to determine the number and type of examinations ordered by each referring physician for the previous 6 months. By compiling these by clinical service, we were able to determine our biggest customers by examination type and volume. Another custom report was used to determine who was requesting old examinations from the film library. More information about imaging usage was gathered by means of a questionnaire. Some customers view images only where patients are also seen, while some services view images independently from the patient. Some services use their conference rooms for critical image viewing such as treatment planning. Additional information was gained from geographical surveys of where films are currently produced, delivered by the film library, and viewed. In some areas, available space dictates the type and configuration of display station that can be used. Active participation in the decision process by the

  20. Research Today Volume 3, Issue 2 April 2017 Newsletter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-05-05

    Medical Research & Development Program (DMRDP); NIH; Congressionally Directed Medical Research Program (CDMRP) ; Grants; etc.] b. In Section 2, there...COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT AGREEMENT (CRADA), MATERIAL TRANSFER AGREEMENT (MTA), INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS AGREEMENT ETC.? D YES ~ NO NOTE...QIPS cell is also involved with Gateway Academy efforts to educate and develop innovative thinkers at all levels of experience both through dedicated

  1. American Indian Doctors Today. Volume 1, Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Dakota Univ., Grand Forks. School of Medicine.

    The Indians Into Medicine Program presents 20 brief biographies of American Indian/Alaska Native health professionals (17 men and 3 women) from 14 different tribal groups, to acquaint young Indian people with potential careers in health professions. The biographical sketches contain information on: age; tribal affiliation; family and educational…

  2. American Indian Doctors Today. Volume 1, Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Dakota Univ., Grand Forks. School of Medicine.

    The Indians Into Medicine Program presents 20 brief biographies of American Indian/Alaska Native health professionals (17 men and 3 women) from 14 different tribal groups, to acquaint young Indian people with potential careers in health professions. The biographical sketches contain information on: age; tribal affiliation; family and educational…

  3. RESEARCH TODAY VOLUME 3, ISSUE 3 JULY 2017 NEWSLETTER

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-07-27

    competitive medical residencies throughout the United States. He will live on the is land for the first two years of school, before returning to the United...Industrial mercury pollution was the subject of the Minamata Convention on Mercury in October of 2013. Since 200 I, the Governing Council of the United

  4. Data mining in radiology

    PubMed Central

    Kharat, Amit T; Singh, Amarjit; Kulkarni, Vilas M; Shah, Digish

    2014-01-01

    Data mining facilitates the study of radiology data in various dimensions. It converts large patient image and text datasets into useful information that helps in improving patient care and provides informative reports. Data mining technology analyzes data within the Radiology Information System and Hospital Information System using specialized software which assesses relationships and agreement in available information. By using similar data analysis tools, radiologists can make informed decisions and predict the future outcome of a particular imaging finding. Data, information and knowledge are the components of data mining. Classes, Clusters, Associations, Sequential patterns, Classification, Prediction and Decision tree are the various types of data mining. Data mining has the potential to make delivery of health care affordable and ensure that the best imaging practices are followed. It is a tool for academic research. Data mining is considered to be ethically neutral, however concerns regarding privacy and legality exists which need to be addressed to ensure success of data mining. PMID:25024513

  5. Data mining in radiology.

    PubMed

    Kharat, Amit T; Singh, Amarjit; Kulkarni, Vilas M; Shah, Digish

    2014-04-01

    Data mining facilitates the study of radiology data in various dimensions. It converts large patient image and text datasets into useful information that helps in improving patient care and provides informative reports. Data mining technology analyzes data within the Radiology Information System and Hospital Information System using specialized software which assesses relationships and agreement in available information. By using similar data analysis tools, radiologists can make informed decisions and predict the future outcome of a particular imaging finding. Data, information and knowledge are the components of data mining. Classes, Clusters, Associations, Sequential patterns, Classification, Prediction and Decision tree are the various types of data mining. Data mining has the potential to make delivery of health care affordable and ensure that the best imaging practices are followed. It is a tool for academic research. Data mining is considered to be ethically neutral, however concerns regarding privacy and legality exists which need to be addressed to ensure success of data mining.

  6. [Emphysematous pyelonephritis: radiologic diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Kably, M I; Elamraoui, F; Chikhaoui, N

    2003-10-01

    Emphysematous pyelonephritis (EPN) is a rare and severe form of acute pyelonephritis. Escherichia coli accounts for 60% of the cases. Predisposing factors are: diabetus mellitus, recent urinary tract infection and obstruction. There is a female predominance (2/1). Conventional radiography reveals the renal emphysema in 85% of the cases. Ultrasonography shows hyperechoic areas corresponding to the gaz. CT scan is the best technique, allowing the exact localization of the gaz inside the renal parenchyma. The natural course of the disease allows its radiologic classification in 4 grades. EPN has a poor prognosis if only a medical treatment is initiated. Every urinary tract infection, in a diabetic patient must be treated, and must lead to a radiologic exploration, which allows an early detection of severe forms of the disease.

  7. Radiology and Ethics Education.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Aline; Liu, Li; Yousem, David M

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess medical ethics knowledge among trainees and practicing radiologists through an online survey that included questions about the American College of Radiology Code of Ethics and the American Medical Association Code of Medical Ethics. Most survey respondents reported that they had never read the American Medical Association Code of Medical Ethics or the American College of Radiology Code of Ethics (77.2% and 67.4% of respondents, respectively). With regard to ethics education during medical school and residency, 57.3% and 70.0% of respondents, respectively, found such education to be insufficient. Medical ethics training should be highlighted during residency, at specialty society meetings, and in journals and online resources for radiologists.

  8. The academic medical center today.

    PubMed

    Rogers, D E; Blendon, R J

    1984-05-01

    Some recent circumstances, including the nation's economic difficulties, a probable physician surplus, a declining need for acute-care medical beds, and an overwhelming public perception that medical care is too expensive, are creating serious problems for academic medical centers today. To survive, many academic medical centers probably will make certain short-term adaptations that will be viewed as undesirable by many. We suggest four initiatives that may help academic centers maintain their vital national role. These initiatives include becoming major public advocates for the medical care needs of the least fortunate; a sharp reduction in the training of subspecialists; the commitment of more of their faculty practice income to academic research, teaching, and support of low-income students; and refocusing attention on the training of young persons to be the physicians of tomorrow.

  9. Disabling Radiological Dispersal Terror

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, M

    2002-11-08

    Terror resulting from the use of a radiological dispersal device (RDD) relies upon an individual's lack of knowledge and understanding regarding its significance. Disabling this terror will depend upon realistic reviews of the current conservative radiation protection regulatory standards. It will also depend upon individuals being able to make their own informed decisions merging perceived risks with reality. Preparation in these areas will reduce the effectiveness of the RDD and may even reduce the possibility of its use.

  10. Radiologic Career Ladder

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    reliable radiological support in the diagnosis, treatment , and prevention of injuries/ diseases affecting the health and welfare of USAF personnel...unit depends on the medical treatment facility it supports. The USAF Surgeon General designates categories of medical treatment facilities based upon the...staff and adequacy of medical facilities. The occupied patient bed rate further delineates medical treatment facilities, such that average ranges (as

  11. Radiological diagnosis of fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Finlay, D.B.L.; Allen, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    This book is about radiology of fractures. While it contains sections of clinical features it is not intended that readers should rely entirely upon these for the diagnosis and management of the injured patient. As in the diagnosis and treatment of all medical problems, fracture management must be carried out in a logical step-by-step fashion - namely, history, examination, investigation, differential diagnosis, diagnosis and then treatment. Each section deals with a specific anatomical area and begins with line drawings of the normal radiographs demonstrating the anatomy. Accessory views that may be requested, and the indications for these, are included. Any radiological pitfalls for the area in general are then described. The fractures in adults are then examined in turn, their radiological features described, and any pitfalls in their diagnosis discussed. A brief note of important clinical findings is included. A brief mention is made of pediatric fractures which are of significance and their differences to the adult pattern indicated. Although fractures can be classified into types with different characteristics, in life every fracture is individual. Fractures by and large follow common patterns, but many have variations.

  12. Speaking from experience: today's Cuban women and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Núñez, Marta

    2012-04-01

    Over 2200 new cases of breast cancer are diagnosed annually in Cuba, and a decade ago I became one of them. Late in 2000, I underwent breast cancer surgery at the National Oncology and Radiology Institute in the Cuban capital. My experience-both with the disease and as a sociologist at the University of Havana studying gender relations-serves as the basis for the following essay. The article characterizes today's Cuban women, particularly those of us with or at risk of breast cancer, and describes my own and others' responses to our disease. My aim is to provide insights useful to the physicians, nurses, engineers, physicists, technicians, and service and administrative workers in Cuba's health services who interact with us, whose increased awareness will make us feel more deeply understood and respected. In this context, I also reflect on the Cuban media's portrayal of cancer, with recommendations for dismantling the biases of fatalism and even pity often conveyed.

  13. Understanding fathering in Britain today.

    PubMed

    Hauari, Hanan; Hollingworth, Katie

    2012-01-01

    This research set out to investigate the parenting beliefs and practices of modern day fathers living in Britain today. The aim was to gain a better understanding of what 'being a father' means to parents and to what extent can there be said to be a 'common model' of fatherhood across Britain. Findings show that whilst fathers and mothers acknowledge the expectation of fathers to become more involved in childcare duties, many parents tend to hold more traditional views when it comes to the division of the childcare vs breadwinner responsibilities. Attitudes to fathering and actual fathering behaviours have been shown by our study to be influenced by a complex web of factors, with socio and economic life circumstances exerting the greatest influence on greater paternal involvement. The study found that there are far more similarities in the behaviours of fathers and their attitudes to fathering than there are differences. In the context of modern day Britain, fathers are facing similar challenges in their role as parents, giving rise to a common model of fathering within which fathers are facing similar challenges in achieving their ideal fathering role.

  14. Misconceptions Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow

    PubMed Central

    Kalinowski, Steven T.; Andrews, Tessa C.

    2014-01-01

    A recent essay in CBE—Life Sciences Education criticized biology education researchers’ use of the term misconceptions and recommended that, in order to be up-to-date with education research, biology education researchers should use alternative terms for students’ incorrect ideas in science. We counter that criticism by reviewing the continued use and the meaning of misconceptions in education research today, and describe two key debates that account for the controversy surrounding the term. We then identify and describe two areas of research that have real implications for tomorrow's biology education research and biology instruction: 1) hypotheses about the structure of student knowledge (coherent vs. fragmented) that gives rise to misconceptions; and 2) the “warming trend” that considers the effects of students’ motivation, beliefs about the nature of knowledge and learning (their epistemic beliefs), and learning strategies (their cognitive and metacognitive skills) on their ability to change their misconceptions in science. We conclude with a description of proposed future work in biology education research related to misconceptions. PMID:26086651

  15. Smart Radiological Dosimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Kosslow, William J.; Bandzuch, Gregory S.

    2004-07-20

    A radiation dosimeter providing an indication of the dose of radiation to which the radiation sensor has been exposed. The dosimeter contains features enabling the monitoring and evaluating of radiological risks so that a user can concentrate on the task at hand. The dosimeter provides an audible alarm indication that a predetermined time period has elapsed, an audible alarm indication reminding the user to check the dosimeter indication periodically, an audible alarm indicating that a predetermined accumulated dose has been prematurely reached, and an audible alarm indication prior or to reaching the 3/4 scale point.

  16. Radiological Toolbox User's Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Eckerman, KF

    2004-07-01

    A toolbox of radiological data has been assembled to provide users access to the physical, chemical, anatomical, physiological and mathematical data relevant to the radiation protection of workers and member of the public. The software runs on a PC and provides users, through a single graphical interface, quick access to contemporary data and the means to extract these data for further computations and analysis. The numerical data, for the most part, are stored within databases in SI units. However, the user can display and extract values using non-SI units. This is the first release of the toolbox which was developed for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

  17. Radiation dose in dental radiology.

    PubMed

    Cohnen, M; Kemper, J; Möbes, O; Pawelzik, J; Mödder, U

    2002-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare radiation exposure in panoramic radiography (PR), dental CT, and digital volume tomography (DVT). An anthropomorphic Alderson-Rando phantom and two anatomical head phantoms with thermoluminescent dosimeters fixed at appropriate locations were exposed as in a dental examination. In PR and DVT, standard parameters were used while variables in CT included mA, pitch, and rotation time. Image noise was assessed in dental CT and DVT. Radiation doses to the skin and internal organs within the primary beam and resulting from scatter radiation were measured and expressed as maximum doses in mGy. For PR, DVT, and CT, these maximum doses were 0.65, 4.2, and 23 mGy. In dose-reduced CT protocols, radiation doses ranged from 10.9 to 6.1 mGy. Effective doses calculated on this basis showed values below 0.1 mSv for PR, DVT, and dose-reduced CT. Image noise was similar in DVT and low-dose CT. As radiation exposure and image noise of DVT is similar to low-dose CT, this imaging technique cannot be recommended as a general alternative to replace PR in dental radiology.

  18. Risk communication and radiological/nuclear terrorism: a strategic view.

    PubMed

    Becker, Steven M

    2011-11-01

    It is now widely recognized that effective communication is a crucial element in radiological/nuclear terrorism preparedness. Whereas in the past, communication and information issues were sometimes viewed as secondary in comparison with technical concerns, today the need to improve risk communication, public information, and emergency messaging is seen as a high priority. The process of improving radiological/nuclear terrorism risk communication can be conceptualized as occurring in four overlapping phases. The first phase involves the recognition that communication and information issues will be pivotal in shaping how a radiological/nuclear terrorism incident unfolds and in determining its outcome. This recognition has helped shape the second phase, in which various research initiatives have been undertaken to provide an empirical basis for improved communication. In the third and most recent phase, government agencies, professional organizations and others have worked to translate research findings into better messages and informational materials. Like the first and second phases, the third phase is still unfolding. The fourth phase in risk communication for radiological/nuclear terrorism-a mature phase-is only now just beginning. Central to this phase is a developing understanding that for radiological/nuclear terrorism risk communication to be fully effective, it must go beyond crafting better messages and materials (as essential as that may be). This emerging fourth phase seeks to anchor radiological/nuclear communication in a broader approach: one that actively engages and partners with the public. In this article, each of the four stages is discussed, and future directions for improving radiological/nuclear terrorism risk communication are explored.

  19. Technology in radiology: advances in diagnostic imaging & therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Stern, S M

    1993-01-01

    Nearly 100 years from its birth, radiology continues to grow as though still in adolescence. Although some radiologic technologies have matured more than others, new applications and techniques appear regularly in the literature. Radiology has evolved from purely diagnostic devices to interventional technologies. New contrast agents in MRI, X ray and ultrasound enable physicians to make diagnoses and plan therapies with greater precision than ever before. Techniques are less and less invasive. Advances in computer technology have given supercomputer-like power to high-end nuclear medicine and MRI systems. Imaging systems in most modalities are now designed with upgrades in mind instead of "planned obsolescence." Companies routinely upgrade software and other facets of their products, sometimes at no additional charge to existing customers. Hospitals, radiology groups and imaging centers will face increasing demands to justify what they do according to patient outcomes and management criteria. Did images make the diagnosis or confirm it? Did the images determine optimal treatment strategies or confirm which strategies might be appropriate? Third-party payers, especially the government, will view radiology in those terms. The diagnostic imaging and therapy systems of today require increasingly sophisticated technical support for maintenance and repair. Hospitals, radiology groups and imaging centers will have to determine the most economic and effective ways to guarantee equipment up-time. Borrowing from the automotive industry, some radiology manufacturers have devised transtelephonic software systems to facilitate remote troubleshooting. To ensure their fiscal viability, hospitals continue to acquire new imaging and therapy technologies for competitive and access-to-services reasons.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Motivation in a multigenerational radiologic science workplace.

    PubMed

    Kalar, Traci

    2008-01-01

    For the first time in history, radiologic science (RS) workplaces consist of 4 generational cohorts. As each cohort possess their own attitudes, values, work habits, and expectations, motivating a generational diverse workplace is challenging. Through the understanding of generational differences, managers are better able to accommodate individual as well as generational needs and help create a more productive and higher performing workplace. The purpose of this paper is to assist managers in the understanding and utilization of generational differences to effectively motivate staff in an RS workplace. Generational cohorts will be defined and discussed along with an in-depth discussion on each of the generations performing in today's RS workplace. Motivators and how they impact the different generational cohorts will be addressed along with how to best motivate a multigenerational RS workplace.

  1. Contemporary medico-legal dental radiology.

    PubMed

    Wright, Brad

    2012-03-01

    The advent of extraoral radiology in general dental practice has become more widespread since 2000, particularly with digital systems. With this comes a range of medico-legal risks for dentists not adverted to previously. These risks include a higher than expected radiation dose for some surveys, and the risk of a 'loss of a chance' for a patient whereby the images may disclose pathology not diagnosed by general dental practitioners using OPG and CBVT radiology. Practitioners need to apply relevant legal principles in deciding which surveys to order and record, and also need to explain to patients the dosages of the radiation that they will likely receive. Practitioners also need to assess whether the resultant survey ought to be interpreted by a radiologist to diagnose any wider pathology with which a general practitioner may not be familiar. Extra caution needs to be used in ordering high dose radiology in paediatric patients. Dentists should not assume patients fully understand the nature of CBVT and MCT, and its risks and benefits. Consideration ought to be given to the volume of CBVT ordered dependent on factors such as patient age, symptoms, history and procedural intent. © 2012 Australian Dental Association.

  2. Patient-centered Radiology.

    PubMed

    Itri, Jason N

    2015-10-01

    Patient-centered care (ie, care organized around the patient) is a model in which health care providers partner with patients and families to identify and satisfy patients' needs and preferences. In this model, providers respect patients' values and preferences, address their emotional and social needs, and involve them and their families in decision making. Radiologists have traditionally been characterized as "doctor-to-doctor" consultants who are distanced from patients and work within a culture that does not value patient centeredness. As medicine becomes more patient driven and the trajectory of health care is toward increasing patient self-reliance, radiologists must change the perception that they are merely consultants and become more active participants in patient care by embracing greater patient interaction. The traditional business model for radiology practices, which devalues interaction between patients and radiologists, must be transformed into a patient-centered model in which radiologists are reintegrated into direct patient care and imaging processes are reorganized around patients' needs and preferences. Expanding radiology's core assets to include direct patient care may be the most effective deterrent to the threat of commoditization. As the assault on the growth of Medicare spending continues, with medical imaging as a highly visible target, radiologists must adapt to the changing landscape by focusing on their most important consumer: the patient. This may yield substantial benefits in the form of improved quality and patient safety, reduced costs, higher-value care, improved patient outcomes, and greater patient and provider satisfaction.

  3. Radiological sinonasal anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Alrumaih, Redha A.; Ashoor, Mona M.; Obidan, Ahmed A.; Al-Khater, Khulood M.; Al-Jubran, Saeed A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the prevalence of common radiological variants of sinonasal anatomy among Saudi population and compare it with the reported prevalence of these variants in other ethnic and population groups. Methods: This is a retrospective cross-sectional study of 121 computerized tomography scans of the nose and paranasal sinuses of patients presented with sinonasal symptoms to the Department of Otorhinolarngology, King Fahad Hospital of the University, Khobar, Saudi Arabia, between January 2014 and May 2014. Results: Scans of 121 patients fulfilled inclusion criteria were reviewed. Concha bullosa was found in 55.4%, Haller cell in 39.7%, and Onodi cell in 28.9%. Dehiscence of the internal carotid artery was found in 1.65%. Type-1 and type-2 optic nerve were the prevalent types. Type-II Keros classification of the depth of olfactory fossa was the most common among the sample (52.9%). Frontal cells were found in 79.3%; type I was the most common. Conclusions: There is a difference in the prevalence of some radiological variants of the sinonasal anatomy between Saudi population and other study groups. Surgeon must pay special attention in the preoperative assessment of patients with sinonasal pathology to avoid undesirable complications. PMID:27146614

  4. Early CNS neurodegeneration in radiologically isolated syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Overton, Eve; Khadka, Sankalpa; Buckley, Jessica; Liu, Shuang; Sampat, Mehul; Kantarci, Orhun; Lebrun Frenay, Christine; Siva, Aksel; Okuda, Darin T.; Pelletier, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Increasing evidence indicates that the thalamus may be a location of early neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis (MS). Our objective was to identify the presence of gray matter volume loss and thinning in patients with radiologically isolated syndrome (RIS). Methods: Sixty-three participants were included in this case-control study. Twenty-one patients with RIS were age- and sex-matched to 42 healthy controls in a 1:2 ratio. All participants underwent brain MRIs on a single 3T scanner. After lesion segmentation and inpainting, 1 mm3-isometric T1-weighted images were submitted to FreeSurfer (v5.2). Normalized cortical and deep gray matter volumes were compared between patients with RIS and controls using t tests, and thalamic volumes were correlated with white matter lesion volumes using Pearson correlation. Exploratory cortical thickness maps were created. Results: Although traditional normalized total gray and white matter volumes were not statistically different between patients with RIS and controls, normalized left (0.0046 ± 0.0005 vs 0.0049 ± 0.0004, p = 0.006), right (0.0045 ± 0.0005 vs 0.0048 ± 0.0004, p = 0.008), and mean (0.0045 ± 0.0005 vs 0.0049 ± 0.0004, p = 0.004) thalamic volumes were significantly lower in patients with RIS (n = 21, mean age 41.9 ± 12.7 years) than in controls (n = 42, mean age 41.4 ± 11.2 years). Thalamic volumes correlated modestly with white matter lesion volumes (range: r = −0.35 to −0.47). Conclusion: Our data provide novel evidence of thalamic atrophy in RIS and are consistent with previous reports in early MS stages. Thalamic volume loss is present early in CNS demyelinating disease and should be further investigated as a metric associated with neurodegeneration. PMID:25884012

  5. Radiological Worker Computer Based Training

    SciTech Connect

    Butala, Stephen W.; Cullen, James J.; Corsolini, Jams; Zach, Karen; Przyzycki, Edward

    2003-02-06

    Argonne National Laboratory has developed an interactive computer based training (CBT) version of the standardized DOE Radiological Worker training program. This CD-ROM based program utilizes graphics, animation, photographs, sound and video to train users in ten topical areas: radiological fundamentals, biological effects, dose limits, ALARA, personnel monitoring, controls and postings, emergency response, contamination controls, high radiation areas, and lessons learned.

  6. How to Read Your Radiology Report

    MedlinePlus

    ... American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), comprising physicians with expertise ... of Use | Links | Site Map Copyright © 2017 Radiological Society of North America, Inc. (RSNA). To help ensure ...

  7. Common Data Elements in Radiology.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Daniel L; Kahn, Charles E

    2017-06-01

    Diagnostic radiologists generally produce unstructured information in the form of images and narrative text reports. Although designed for human consumption, radiologic reports contain a wealth of information that could be valuable for clinical care, research, and quality improvement if that information could be extracted by automated systems. Unfortunately, the lack of structure in radiologic reports limits the ability of information systems to share information easily with other systems. A common data element (CDE)-a unit of information used in a shared, predefined fashion-can improve the ability to exchange information seamlessly among information systems. In this article, a model and a repository of radiologic CDEs is described, and three important applications are highlighted. CDEs can help advance radiologic practice, research, and performance improvement, and thus, it is crucial that CDEs be adopted widely in radiologic information systems. (©) RSNA, 2016.

  8. Radiology research and medical students.

    PubMed

    Whitworth, Pat W; Agarwal, Ankit; Colucci, Andrew; Sherry, Steven J; Subramaniam, Rathan M

    2013-12-01

    Fostering radiology research among medical students can enhance a student's interest and understanding of radiology and research. It increases the academic productivity of the mentor and the department. Radiology faculty and departments should actively seek to recruit and engage students in research. Once involved, students benefit greatly from being given clear responsibility, close supervision, timely feedback, and a degree of autonomy. At the heart of the student research process is the crucial mentor-mentee relationship, and mentors should be cognizant of their vital role and methods of encouraging and enhancing this relationship. Ultimately, the advancement of the field of radiology depends on constant innovation and improvement. Radiology research by medical students fuels both innovation and the development of future academic radiologists and physician-scientists, helping to secure future growth for our field.

  9. Standardized radiological dose evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, V.L.; Stahlnecker, E.

    1996-05-01

    Following the end of the Cold War, the mission of Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site changed from production of nuclear weapons to cleanup. Authorization baseis documents for the facilities, primarily the Final Safety Analysis Reports, are being replaced with new ones in which accident scenarios are sorted into coarse bins of consequence and frequency, similar to the approach of DOE-STD-3011-94. Because this binning does not require high precision, a standardized approach for radiological dose evaluations is taken for all the facilities at the site. This is done through a standard calculation ``template`` for use by all safety analysts preparing the new documents. This report describes this template and its use.

  10. Abdominal hernias: Radiological features

    PubMed Central

    Lassandro, Francesco; Iasiello, Francesca; Pizza, Nunzia Luisa; Valente, Tullio; Stefano, Maria Luisa Mangoni di Santo; Grassi, Roberto; Muto, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Abdominal wall hernias are common diseases of the abdomen with a global incidence approximately 4%-5%. They are distinguished in external, diaphragmatic and internal hernias on the basis of their localisation. Groin hernias are the most common with a prevalence of 75%, followed by femoral (15%) and umbilical (8%). There is a higher prevalence in males (M:F, 8:1). Diagnosis is usually made on physical examination. However, clinical diagnosis may be difficult, especially in patients with obesity, pain or abdominal wall scarring. In these cases, abdominal imaging may be the first clue to the correct diagnosis and to confirm suspected complications. Different imaging modalities are used: conventional radiographs or barium studies, ultrasonography and Computed Tomography. Imaging modalities can aid in the differential diagnosis of palpable abdominal wall masses and can help to define hernial contents such as fatty tissue, bowel, other organs or fluid. This work focuses on the main radiological findings of abdominal herniations. PMID:21860678

  11. Sexual Harassment in Radiology.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Aline; Liu, Li; Yousem, David M

    2017-08-01

    To gauge the prevalence of sexual harassment (SH) and to understand the issues regarding its disclosure among radiologists. A questionnaire on ethics and SH was sent by e-mail to 1,569 radiologists and radiology trainees in an institutional database maintained for continuing medical education purposes on three separate occasions between September 17 and October 31, 2016. The link to the survey was also posted on social media sites via the authors' divisional and institutional accounts on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Aunt Minnie, as well as on ACR and RSNA web blogs. Overall, 9.75% (39 of 400) respondents stated they had suffered SH, with more female (22 of 90 = 24.4%) than male victims (11 of 249 = 4.4%) (P < .001). Only 29.4% of SH victims said they would likely report SH (P < .001). Women (46 of 90 = 51.1%) said they were less likely to report SH than men (150 of 242 = 62.0%) (P = .03), and American medical school graduates (119 of 220 = 54.1%) were less likely than graduates from outside the United States (37 of 48 = 77.1%). Of 401 respondents to questions on SH, 28.7% (n = 115), including more women (38 of 91 = 41.8%) than men (61 of 249 = 24.5%) (P = .002), said they had witnessed SH. By percentage responding, female radiologists are more frequently victims and witnesses of sexual harassment but are less likely to report such cases. Steps need to be taken to eliminate a culture that leads radiologists to tolerate SH without addressing it. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Photoelectronic Radiology Department

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capp, M. P.; Nudelman, Sol; Fisher, Donald; Ovitt, Theron W.; Pond, Gerald D.; Frost, Meryl M.; Roehrig, Hans; Seeger, Joachim; Oimette, Donald

    1981-11-01

    The University of Arizona Department of Radiology first considered establishing a photoelectronic radiology department in 1973. It seemed clear that the technology had progressed far enough for us to investigate the possibility of total film replacement.' Data from the space program in particular indicated at that time that sophisticated television images over 1000 x 1000 lines were approaching the detail seen on the traditional x-ray film. This technology has been known over many years of research and development as "photoelectronic imaging devices (PEID) ."14 However, at that time film replacement was out of the question. What was not out of the question was the consideration of using a subtraction technique, "digital video subtraction angiography." To this end, we, and independently the University of Wisconsin,314 proceeded to develop this technology.5'6 Our intravenous video subtraction images in patients started in our research laboratory in 1977 and in March of 1980 we opened a biplane special procedures room dedicated only to photoelectronic imaging (no film).7'8 Digital video subtraction angiography has been successful and is described in much greater detail in these Proceedings by other authors. Current efforts are under way toward total replacement of film. This is an immense problem, one that will require a much greater sophistication of computers, storage devices, system analysis, and cooperation from both the radiologist and the clinician.9'10 In a theoretical study we converted our 65,000 procedures-per-year department to complete photoelectronic imaging (no film) and estimated that we would save approximately five million dollars over ten years.15 Extrapolating this to the entire United States would result in a conservative estimate of saving one billion dollars per year. Not included in these mathematics are cost-effective savings of the physicians' time and effort.

  13. Radiological anatomy - evaluation of integrative education in radiology.

    PubMed

    Dettmer, S; Schmiedl, A; Meyer, S; Giesemann, A; Pabst, R; Weidemann, J; Wacker, F K; Kirchhoff, T

    2013-09-01

    Evaluation and analysis of the integrative course "Radiological Anatomy" established since 2007 at the Medical School Hannover (MHH) in comparison with conventional education. Anatomy and radiology are usually taught separately with a considerable time lag. Interdisciplinary teaching of these associated subjects seems logical for several reasons. Therefore, the integrative course "Radiological Anatomy" was established in the second year of medical education, combining these two closely related subjects. This interdisciplinary course was retrospectively evaluated by consideration of a student questionnaire and staff observations. The advantages and disadvantages of integrative teaching in medical education are discussed. The course ratings were excellent (median 1; mean 1.3 on a scale of 1 to 6). This is significantly (p < 0.001) better than the average of all evaluated courses in the respective term (grade 2.8). The course improved the anatomical comprehension (90 %) and the students stated that the topics were relevant for their future medical education (90 %). Furthermore, interest in the subject's anatomy and radiology increased during the course (88 %). According to the students' suggestions the course was enhanced by a visitation in the Department of Radiology and the additional topic central nervous system. Integrative teaching of anatomy and radiology was well received by the students. Both, anatomical and radiological comprehension and the motivation to learn were improved. However, it should be considered, that the amount of work and time required by the teaching staff is considerably increased compared to traditional teaching. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. MO-C-BRB-03: RSNA President [Diagnostic radiology and radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Arenson, R.

    2015-06-15

    Diagnostic radiology and radiation oncology are arguably two of the most technologically advanced specialties in medicine. The imaging and radiation medicine technologies in clinical use today have been continuously improved through new advances made in the commercial and academic research arenas. This symposium explores the translational path from research through clinical implementation. Dr. Pettigrew will start this discussion by sharing his perspectives as director of the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB). The NIBIB has focused on promoting research that is technological in nature and has high clinical impact. We are in the age of precision medicine, and the technological innovations and quantitative tools developed by engineers and physicists working with physicians are providing innovative tools that increase precision and improve outcomes in health care. NIBIB funded grants lead to a very high patenting rate (per grant dollar), and these patents have higher citation rates by other patents, suggesting greater clinical impact, as well. Two examples of clinical translation resulting from NIH-funded research will be presented, in radiation therapy and diagnostic imaging. Dr. Yu will describe a stereotactic radiotherapy device developed in his laboratory that is designed for treating breast cancer with the patient in the prone position. It uses 36 rotating Cobalt-60 sources positioned in an annular geometry to focus the radiation beam at the system’s isocenter. The radiation dose is delivered throughout the target volume in the breast by constantly moving the patient in a planned trajectory relative to the fixed isocenter. With this technique, the focal spot dynamically paints the dose distribution throughout the target volume in three dimensions. Dr. Jackson will conclude this symposium by describing the RSNA Quantitative Imaging Biomarkers Alliance (QIBA), which is funded in part by NIBIB and is a synergistic collaboration

  15. MO-C-BRB-02: ASTRO President [Diagnostic radiology and radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Minsky, B.

    2015-06-15

    Diagnostic radiology and radiation oncology are arguably two of the most technologically advanced specialties in medicine. The imaging and radiation medicine technologies in clinical use today have been continuously improved through new advances made in the commercial and academic research arenas. This symposium explores the translational path from research through clinical implementation. Dr. Pettigrew will start this discussion by sharing his perspectives as director of the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB). The NIBIB has focused on promoting research that is technological in nature and has high clinical impact. We are in the age of precision medicine, and the technological innovations and quantitative tools developed by engineers and physicists working with physicians are providing innovative tools that increase precision and improve outcomes in health care. NIBIB funded grants lead to a very high patenting rate (per grant dollar), and these patents have higher citation rates by other patents, suggesting greater clinical impact, as well. Two examples of clinical translation resulting from NIH-funded research will be presented, in radiation therapy and diagnostic imaging. Dr. Yu will describe a stereotactic radiotherapy device developed in his laboratory that is designed for treating breast cancer with the patient in the prone position. It uses 36 rotating Cobalt-60 sources positioned in an annular geometry to focus the radiation beam at the system’s isocenter. The radiation dose is delivered throughout the target volume in the breast by constantly moving the patient in a planned trajectory relative to the fixed isocenter. With this technique, the focal spot dynamically paints the dose distribution throughout the target volume in three dimensions. Dr. Jackson will conclude this symposium by describing the RSNA Quantitative Imaging Biomarkers Alliance (QIBA), which is funded in part by NIBIB and is a synergistic collaboration

  16. MO-C-BRB-01: Introduction [Diagnostic radiology and radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Boone, J.

    2015-06-15

    Diagnostic radiology and radiation oncology are arguably two of the most technologically advanced specialties in medicine. The imaging and radiation medicine technologies in clinical use today have been continuously improved through new advances made in the commercial and academic research arenas. This symposium explores the translational path from research through clinical implementation. Dr. Pettigrew will start this discussion by sharing his perspectives as director of the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB). The NIBIB has focused on promoting research that is technological in nature and has high clinical impact. We are in the age of precision medicine, and the technological innovations and quantitative tools developed by engineers and physicists working with physicians are providing innovative tools that increase precision and improve outcomes in health care. NIBIB funded grants lead to a very high patenting rate (per grant dollar), and these patents have higher citation rates by other patents, suggesting greater clinical impact, as well. Two examples of clinical translation resulting from NIH-funded research will be presented, in radiation therapy and diagnostic imaging. Dr. Yu will describe a stereotactic radiotherapy device developed in his laboratory that is designed for treating breast cancer with the patient in the prone position. It uses 36 rotating Cobalt-60 sources positioned in an annular geometry to focus the radiation beam at the system’s isocenter. The radiation dose is delivered throughout the target volume in the breast by constantly moving the patient in a planned trajectory relative to the fixed isocenter. With this technique, the focal spot dynamically paints the dose distribution throughout the target volume in three dimensions. Dr. Jackson will conclude this symposium by describing the RSNA Quantitative Imaging Biomarkers Alliance (QIBA), which is funded in part by NIBIB and is a synergistic collaboration

  17. Assimilation Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, J. A.; Ramos, F. C.

    2002-12-01

    N.L. Bowen pointed out that the effect of assimilating fusible rock into a cooling magma is to increase the volume of residual liquids, not change the cotectic relations that govern the compositions of those liquids. Accurate estimation of volumes of initial and residual liquids in evolving magmatic systems remains impossible, and petrologists interested in assimilation have tended to focus instead on identifying passive chemical tracers of crustal input into volcanic systems, especially during the last ~35 years in which high-quality trace element and isotope data have been available. Much of the motivation for these studies has arisen from the desire to use basaltic magmas as probes of mantle geochemistry, which relies on stripping from the basalt any chemical changes resulting from interaction between mantle-derived magma and crust. Despite the impressive array of high quality whole rock chemical data (typically concentrations of ~40 elements, and isotopic ratios from any or all of the systems Rb/Sr, Sm/Nd, U/Th/Pb, Lu/Hf, Re/Os, O and U/Th) applied to individual cases, two different investigators can interpret the same data set to arrive at highly disparate conclusions about the amount of crustal assimilation involved in the petrogenesis of, say, lavas from a continental volcanic field. In part, this situation arises from a decoupling between the sophistication of the chemical data and the naiveté with which we view processes of magma transport and storage. Two current developments promise to greatly improve our understanding of assimilation over the 25 years until the centenary celebrations of the publication of "The Evolution of the Igneous Rocks". First, models such as energy-constrained assimilation-fractional crystallization [1] that link a physical (in this case, thermodynamic) description of a magmatic system with the evolution of trace element abundances and isotopic ratios are revealing the wide range of results that arise from interaction of basaltic

  18. Yesterday's Extraordinary Research Yields Today's Ordinary Principles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Mary Norris

    2005-01-01

    Ordinary performance improvement tips, techniques, and principles that are taken for granted today have their roots in extraordinary research. Today, the learning principle that states that things that occur together tend to be recalled together is widely accepted, and this principle of association as an instructional technique is often used. How…

  19. Communicative Language Teaching Today. Portfolio Series #13

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Jack C.

    2005-01-01

    This booklet examines the methodology known as Communicative Language Teaching or CLT and explores the assumptions it is based on, its origins and evolution since it was first proposed in the 1970s, and how it has influenced approaches to language teaching today. It serves to review what has been learned from CLT and what its relevance is today. A…

  20. "USA Today": Can the Nation's Newspaper Survive?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wicks, Robert H.

    The failure of 17 newspaper markets between 1957 and 1975 raises the question of whether the 1982 entrance of "USA Today" into the newspaper market demonstrated fiscal prudence. A 20-month advertising content analysis was conducted to assess advertising trends in "USA Today." These data were compared with industry statistics…

  1. Communicative Language Teaching Today. Portfolio Series #13

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Jack C.

    2005-01-01

    This booklet examines the methodology known as Communicative Language Teaching or CLT and explores the assumptions it is based on, its origins and evolution since it was first proposed in the 1970s, and how it has influenced approaches to language teaching today. It serves to review what has been learned from CLT and what its relevance is today. A…

  2. The Importance of Financial Education Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenspan, Alan

    2005-01-01

    Today's financial world is highly complex as compared with that of a generation ago. Twenty-five years ago, knowing how to maintain a checking and savings account at a local financial institution was sufficient for many Americans. Today's consumers, however, must be able to differentiate among a wide range of products, services, and providers of…

  3. Nutrition Education Today. A Curriculum Development Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento.

    Nutrition Education Today is a state-funded curriculum project that addresses the behavioral aspects of nutrition as well as the nutritional knowledge of secondary school students in California. The curriculum design for the Nutrition Education Today project is a result of the efforts of a statewide task force of specialists in the area of…

  4. Task Descriptions in Diagnostic Radiology. Research Report No. 7. Volume 3, Machine-Related, Patient Care and Administrative Tasks: What Radiologists, Technologists, Nurses and Physicists Do to Run Things and Look After Patients and Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilpatrick, Eleanor

    The third of four volumes in Research Report No. 7 of the Health Services Mobility Study (HSMS), this book contains 149 diagnostic radiologist task descriptions that cover activities in the area of nursing (patient care), film processing, quality assurance, radiation protection, machine maintenance, housekeeping, and administration at the…

  5. RADRELAY RADIOLOGICAL DATA LINK DEVICE

    SciTech Connect

    Harpring, L; Frank Heckendorn, F

    2007-11-06

    The RadRelay effort developed small, field appropriate, portable prototype devices that allow radiological spectra to be downloaded from field radiological detectors, like the identiFINDER-U, and transmitted to land based experts. This communications capability was designed for the U. S. Coast Guard (USCG) but is also applicable to the Customs and Border Protection (CBP) personnel working in remote locations. USCG Level II personnel currently use the identiFINDER-U Hand-Held Radioisotope ID Devices (HHRIID) to detect radiological materials during specific boarding operations. These devices will detect not only radiological emissions but will also evaluate those emissions against a table of known radiological spectra. The RadRelay has been developed to significantly improve the functionality of HHRIID, by providing the capability to download radiological spectra and then transmit them using satellite or cell phone technology. This remote wireless data transfer reduces the current lengthy delay often encountered between the shipboard detection of unknown radiological material and the evaluation of that data by technical and command personnel. That delay is reduced from hours to minutes and allows the field located personnel to remain on station during the inspection and evaluation process.

  6. Risk management in radiology departments

    PubMed Central

    Craciun, Horea; Mankad, Kshitij; Lynch, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Medical imaging and interventional radiology sustained prompt changes in the last few years, mainly as a result of technology breakthroughs, rise in workload, deficit in workforce and globalization. Risk is considered to be the chance or possibility of incurring loss or of a negative event happening that may cause injury to patients or medical practitioners. There are various causes of risks leading to harm and injury in radiology departments, and it is one of the objectives of this paper to scrutinize some of the causes. This will drive to consideration of some of the approaches that are used in managing risks in radiology. This paper aims at investigating risk management in radiology, and this will be achieved through a thorough assessment of the risk control measures that are used in the radiology department. It has been observed that the major focus of risk management in such medical setting is to reduce and eliminate harm and injury to patients through integration of various medical precautions. The field of Radiology is rapidly evolving due to technology advances and the globalization of healthcare. This ongoing development will have a great impact on the level of quality of care and service delivery. Thus, risk management in radiology is essential in protecting the patients, radiologists, and the medical organization in terms of capital and widening of the reputation of the medical organization with the patients. PMID:26120383

  7. Risk management in radiology departments.

    PubMed

    Craciun, Horea; Mankad, Kshitij; Lynch, Jeremy

    2015-06-28

    Medical imaging and interventional radiology sustained prompt changes in the last few years, mainly as a result of technology breakthroughs, rise in workload, deficit in workforce and globalization. Risk is considered to be the chance or possibility of incurring loss or of a negative event happening that may cause injury to patients or medical practitioners. There are various causes of risks leading to harm and injury in radiology departments, and it is one of the objectives of this paper to scrutinize some of the causes. This will drive to consideration of some of the approaches that are used in managing risks in radiology. This paper aims at investigating risk management in radiology, and this will be achieved through a thorough assessment of the risk control measures that are used in the radiology department. It has been observed that the major focus of risk management in such medical setting is to reduce and eliminate harm and injury to patients through integration of various medical precautions. The field of Radiology is rapidly evolving due to technology advances and the globalization of healthcare. This ongoing development will have a great impact on the level of quality of care and service delivery. Thus, risk management in radiology is essential in protecting the patients, radiologists, and the medical organization in terms of capital and widening of the reputation of the medical organization with the patients.

  8. Assessment of an integrated curriculum in radiology.

    PubMed

    Lowitt, Nancy Ryan

    2002-09-01

    To describe an interdisciplinary team's experience using a six-stage curriculum-development model to assess an integrated curriculum in radiology. In 1996 the University of Maryland School of Medicine implemented reforms of its undergraduate curriculum. A third-year required clerkship in radiology was eliminated, but an integrated curriculum was developed for first- and second-year students and for third-year students during their core clinical clerkships. A fourth-year elective was retained. In 2000 the school's Curriculum Coordinating Committee found that it lacked data regarding program performance or learner competencies in radiology since the reforms were implemented. The Committee designated an interdisciplinary team including a radiologist, an anatomist, and an internist with medical education expertise to conduct a rapid review of the adequacy of the curriculum as it is currently integrated. The team mapped the curriculum, identifying where radiology was taught, and analyzed each sub-curriculum according to a six-stage curriculum-development model. This method permitted nearly concurrent assessment of the national literature, local needs assessment, presence and adequacy of educational objectives and methods, adequacy of resources to support curriculum implementation, and the availability and adequacy of learner and program outcome measures. The team identified changes in the clinical classrooms that have been unanticipated four years earlier, including implementation of PACS systems for digital film storage and retrieval, rapid advances in clinical imaging capabilities, and diminished faculty teaching time due to increased clinical volumes. The team concluded its work in four months and issued a report recommending revisions to third-year curricula. The Curriculum Committee, the Dean's Office, and the Department of Radiology accepted the analysis and have dedicated personnel, technical, and financial resources to effect the recommended revisions, which

  9. The scope of forensic radiology.

    PubMed

    Brogdon, B G

    1998-06-01

    The use of x-ray in the solution of forensic problems commenced within days of Röntgen's discovery; indeed, most of the applications of radiology to the forensic sciences were accomplished or anticipated within the next two years. The scope of forensic radiology ranges widely and includes determination of identity, evaluation of injury and death, applications in both criminal and civil litigation and in administrative proceedings, detection of abuse, investigation of gunshot wounds, medical education and research. Newer modalities and techniques afford opportunity for the expansion of forensic radiology if problems of accessibility and cost can be resolved along with improvement in interdisciplinary cooperation and understanding.

  10. Quarterly environmental radiological survey summary

    SciTech Connect

    Mckinney, S.M.

    1996-10-28

    Routine radiological surveys are part of the near-facility environmental monitoring program which monitors and helps direct the reduction of the radiological areas at the Hanford Site. The routine radiological surveys are performed by the Southern Area Remediation Support Group and the Site Support Services Radiological Control Group as directed by Near- Field Monitoring. The surveys included in this program consist of inactive waste sites; outdoor radiological control areas; tank farm perimeters and associated diversion boxes, lift stations, and vent stations; perimeters of active or uncovered waste Bites such as burial grounds, retention basins, ponds, process trenches, and ditches; underground pipelines; and road and rail surfaces (Figures 1 through 10). This report provides a Bummary of the radiological surveys performed during the Third Quarter of 1996. The status of corrective actions required from current and past reports are also discussed. A waste site survey schedule, WHC-SP-0098-7, was developed by Near-Field Monitoring and reviewed by the Southern Area Remediation Support Group and the Site Support Services Radiological Control Group. Near-Field Monitoring reviews the radiological survey reports and files a copy for historical purposes and reference. Radiological conditions are tracked and trends noted. All sites are surveyed at least once each year. The survey frequencies for particular sites are based on site history, radiological conditions, and general maintenance. special surveys may be conducted at irregular frequencies if conditions warrant (e.g., growth of deep-rooted vegetation is noted at a waste site). Radiological surveys are conducted to detect surface contamination and document changes in vegetation growth, biological intrusion, erosion, and general site maintenance conditions. Survey data are compared with standards identified in WHC-CM-7-5, Environmental Comipliance, as well as previous surveys `to recognize possible trends, assess

  11. A comprehensive inventory of radiological and nonradiological contaminants in waste buried or projected to be buried in the subsurface disposal area of the INEL RWMC during the years 1984-2003, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    This report presents a comprehensive inventory of the radiological and nonradiological contaminants in waste buried or projected to be buried from 1984 through 2003 in the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The project to compile the inventory is referred to as the recent and projected data task. The inventory was compiled primarily for use in a baseline risk assessment under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. The compiled information may also be useful for environmental remediation activities that might be necessary at the RWMC. The information that was compiled has been entered into a database termed CIDRA-the Contaminant Inventory Database for Risk Assessment. The inventory information was organized according to waste generator and divided into waste streams for each generator. The inventory is based on waste information that was available in facility operating records, technical and programmatic reports, shipping records, and waste generator forecasts. Additional information was obtained by reviewing the plant operations that originally generated the waste, by interviewing personnel formerly employed as operators, and by performing nuclear physics and engineering calculations. In addition to contaminant inventories, information was compiled on the physical and chemical characteristics and the packaging of the 99 waste streams. The inventory information for waste projected to be buried at the SDA in the future was obtained from waste generator forecasts. The completeness of the contaminant inventories was confirmed by comparing them against inventories in previous reports and in other databases, and against the list of contaminants detected in environmental monitoring performed at the RWMC.

  12. Big Data and the Future of Radiology Informatics.

    PubMed

    Kansagra, Akash P; Yu, John-Paul J; Chatterjee, Arindam R; Lenchik, Leon; Chow, Daniel S; Prater, Adam B; Yeh, Jean; Doshi, Ankur M; Hawkins, C Matthew; Heilbrun, Marta E; Smith, Stacy E; Oselkin, Martin; Gupta, Pushpender; Ali, Sayed

    2016-01-01

    Rapid growth in the amount of data that is electronically recorded as part of routine clinical operations has generated great interest in the use of Big Data methodologies to address clinical and research questions. These methods can efficiently analyze and deliver insights from high-volume, high-variety, and high-growth rate datasets generated across the continuum of care, thereby forgoing the time, cost, and effort of more focused and controlled hypothesis-driven research. By virtue of an existing robust information technology infrastructure and years of archived digital data, radiology departments are particularly well positioned to take advantage of emerging Big Data techniques. In this review, we describe four areas in which Big Data is poised to have an immediate impact on radiology practice, research, and operations. In addition, we provide an overview of the Big Data adoption cycle and describe how academic radiology departments can promote Big Data development.

  13. Radiological design guide

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, R.A.

    1994-08-16

    The purpose of this design guide is to provide radiological safety requirements, standards, and information necessary for designing facilities that will operate without unacceptable risk to personnel, the public, or the environment as required by the US Department of Energy (DOE). This design guide, together with WHC-CM-4-29, Nuclear Criticality Safety, WHC-CM-4-46, Nonreactor Facility Safety Analysis, and WHC-CM-7-5, Environmental Compliance, covers the radiation safety design requirements at Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). This design guide applies to the design of all new facilities. The WHC organization with line responsibility for design shall determine to what extent this design guide shall apply to the modifications to existing facilities. In making this determination, consideration shall include a cost versus benefit study. Specifically, facilities that store, handle, or process radioactive materials will be covered. This design guide replaces WHC-CM-4-9 and is designated a living document. This design guide is intended for design purposes only. Design criteria are different from operational criteria and often more stringent. Criteria that might be acceptable for operations might not be adequate for design.

  14. Cardiac radiology: centenary review.

    PubMed

    de Roos, Albert; Higgins, Charles B

    2014-11-01

    During the past century, cardiac imaging technologies have revolutionized the diagnosis and treatment of acquired and congenital heart disease. Many important contributions to the field of cardiac imaging were initially reported in Radiology. The field developed from the early stages of cardiac imaging, including the use of coronary x-ray angiography and roentgen kymography, to nowadays the widely used echocardiographic, nuclear medicine, cardiac computed tomographic (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR) applications. It is surprising how many of these techniques were not recognized for their potential during their early inception. Some techniques were described in the literature but required many years to enter the clinical arena and presently continue to expand in terms of clinical application. The application of various CT and MR contrast agents for the diagnosis of myocardial ischemia is a case in point, as the utility of contrast agents continues to expand the noninvasive characterization of myocardium. The history of cardiac imaging has included a continuous process of advances in our understanding of the anatomy and physiology of the cardiovascular system, along with advances in imaging technology that continue to the present day.

  15. [Controlling in outpatient radiology].

    PubMed

    Baum, T

    2015-12-01

    Radiology is among the medical disciplines which require the highest investment costs in the healthcare system. The need to design efficient workflows to ensure maximum utilization of the equipment has long been known. In order to be able to establish a sound financial plan prior to a project or equipment purchase, the costs of an examination have to be broken down by modality and compared with the reimbursement rates. Obviously, the same holds true for operative decisions when scarce human resources have to be allocated. It is the task of controlling to review the economic viability of the different modalities and ideally, the results are incorporated into the management decision-making processes. The main section of this article looks at the recognition and allocation of direct and indirect costs in a medical center (Medizinisches Versorgungszentrum - MVZ) in the German North Rhine region. The profit contribution of each examination is determined by deducting the costs from the income generated by the treatment of patients with either private or statutory health insurance.

  16. Overview of neutron radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, H.

    1993-12-31

    Neutron radiography is a recognized method for nondestructive testing (NDT). It is one of eight established NDT methods offered for certification by ASNT. There are ASTM standards describing selected characteristics associated with neutron radiography, as discussed later in this session. Neutron radiography standards are proceeding in the international community (International Organization for Standardization, ISO). A primary advantage of using neutrons for radiologic inspection follows from the fact that the attenuation of thermal neutrons is very different from that of X-rays. A comparison of the attenuation of the elements for thermal neutrons (small dots) and 125 kV X-rays (solid line) is shown. As opposed to the increasing attenuation with increasing atomic number (Z) for X-rays, the neutron attenuation pattern is scattered. If there is a pattern for the neutrons, it tends to be the reverse of the X-ray case, namely, high neutron attenuation for light materials, such as hydrogen, lithium, and boron (H, Li, and B) and low attenuation for the heavy materials, such as lead, bismuth, and uranium (Pb, Bi, and U). The capability of thermal neutrons to image low-Z material, particularly hydrogen, in metal assemblies is in sharp contrast to that of X-rays. This opens up many practical inspection applications involving, for example, explosives, adhesives, corrosion, water intrusion, and hydriding of metals.

  17. Environmental Tools and Radiological Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation details two tools (SADA and FRAMES) available for use in environmental assessments of chemicals that can also be used for radiological assessments of the environment. Spatial Analysis and Decision Assistance (SADA) is a Windows freeware program that incorporate...

  18. The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, E.J.; Marino, S.A.

    1993-05-01

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on a 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generate a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology, radiological physics, and radiation chemistry. It is part of the Center for Radiological Research (CRR) - formerly the Radiological Research Laboratory of Columbia University, and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the US Department of Energy (DOE). As such, RARAF is available to all potential users on an equal basis and scientists outside the CRR are encouraged to submit proposals for experiments at RARAF. The operation of the Van de Graaff is supported by the DOE, but the research projects themselves must be supported separately. This report provides a listing and brief description of experiments performed at RARAF during the May 1, 1992 through April 30, 1993.

  19. Peer review in cardiothoracic radiology.

    PubMed

    Kanne, Jeffrey P

    2014-09-01

    A variety of peer review methods can be used as part of quality assurance and quality improvement in cardiothoracic radiology. Traditionally, peer review in radiology is a retrospective process relying primarily on review of previously interpreted studies at the time of follow-up or additional imaging. However, peer review can be enhanced with other methods such as double reads, focused practice review, practice audit, and correlation with operative and pathologic findings. Furthermore, feedback from referring physicians can be extremely useful in improving the quality of a radiology practice. This article discusses peer review in radiology with a focus on cardiothoracic imaging. Types of peer review, advantages and shortcomings, and future challenges are addressed.

  20. Multimedia in the radiology environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazzill, Todd M.; Huang, H. K.; Ramaswamy, Mohan R.; Arenson, Ronald L.

    1994-05-01

    Accessibility of multimedia information related to radiology in a timely manner is a key to success in practicing radiology in the future. In this paper we describe the concept of multimedia in the radiology environment and its implementation in our department at UCSF. This paper emphasizes the various types of databases related to radiology including HIS, RIS, PACS image database, digital voice dictation system, electronic mail and library information system. A method to interconnect these databases is through a comprehensive network architecture that also is described. As an application, we introduce the concept of a departmental image file server, for any of the 150 Macintosh users in the department to access this multimedia information.

  1. Negotiating the radiologically isolated syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cummings, A; Chataway, J

    2014-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis, always challenging, hands down a particular gauntlet with the concept of the radiologically isolated syndrome. This article discusses what it is, recent developments in the field and how these patients should be managed.

  2. Environmental Tools and Radiological Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation details two tools (SADA and FRAMES) available for use in environmental assessments of chemicals that can also be used for radiological assessments of the environment. Spatial Analysis and Decision Assistance (SADA) is a Windows freeware program that incorporate...

  3. The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, E.J.

    1992-05-01

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on a 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generate a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology, radiological physics, and radiation chemistry. It is part of the Center for Radiological Research (CRR) -- formerly the Radiological Research Laboratory (RRL) -- of Columbia University, and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the US Department of Energy (DOE). As such, RARAF is available to all potential users on an equal basis, and scientists outside the CRR are encouraged to submit proposals for experiments at RARAF. The operation of the Van de Graaff is supported by the DOE, but the research projects themselves must be supported separately. Experiments performed from May 1991--April 1992 are described.

  4. Self-citation: comparison between Radiología, European Radiology and Radiology for 1997-1998.

    PubMed

    Miguel, Alberto; Martí-Bonmatí, Luis

    2002-01-01

    Self-citation, considered as the number of times a paper cites other papers in the same journal, is an important criteria of journal quality. Our objective is to evaluate the self-citation in the official journal of the Spanish Society of Radiology (Radiología), and to compare it with the European Radiology and Radiology journals. Papers published in Radiología, European Radiology, and Radiology during 1997 and 1998 were analyzed. The Self Citation Index, considered as the ratio between self-references and total number of references per article, for the journals Radiología (SCIR), European Radiology (SCIER), and Radiology (SCIRY), were obtained and expressed as percentages. Also, the number of references to Radiología in European Radiology and Radiology papers were calculated. Stratification of the index per thematic area and article type was also performed. Mean SCIR, SCIER, and SCIRY values were compared with the ANOVA and the Student-Newman-Keuls tests. The self-citation index was statistically higher in Radiology (23.2%; p<0.0001) than in Radiología (1.8%) and European Radiology (0.8%). There were no statistically significant differences between SCIR and SCIER indexes ( p=0.25). In the stratification per thematic areas and article type, self-citation in Radiology was statistically higher ( p<0.0001), with the only exception of "Radioprotection" area ( p=0.2), to SCIR and SCIER. Although there were no statistically significant differences, by thematic areas SCIR was always larger than SCIER, with the only exception of the "Genitourinary imaging" area, and by article type SCIR also went greater to SCIER, except in review articles. Radiología, The Spanish official radiological journal, although not included in Index Medicus and its database Medline, had a larger number of self-citing than European Radiology in the period 1997-1998.

  5. Trends in spinal pain management injections in academic radiology departments.

    PubMed

    Freeman, J J; Kilani, R K; Lascola, C D; Gray, L; Enterline, D S

    2013-01-01

    There is a paucity of information present in the current literature with regard to the role of SPMI performance in academic radiology centers. Our aim was to evaluate the current practice patterns for the performance of SPMIs in academic radiology departments. A survey of 186 academic radiology departments in the United States was conducted between March 2009 and May 2009. The survey included questions on departmental demographics, recent trends in departmental SPMI performance, type of physicians who refer to radiology for SPMI performance, types of SPMIs offered, the fraction of total institutional SPMI volume performed by radiologists, and the current state of resident and fellow SPMI training proficiency. Forty-five of the 186 (21.4%) surveys were completed and returned. Twenty-eight of the 45 responding departments stated that they performed SPMIs; the other 17 stated that they did not. Among the 28 responding departments that perform SPMIs, 6 (21.4%), 5 (17.9%), and 8 (28.6%) stated that the number of departmental SPMIs had, respectively, increased, decreased, or remained stable during the past 5 years. SPMI referrals to radiology were made by orthopedic surgeons, neurologic surgeons, neurologists, psychiatrists, anesthesiologists, and internal medicine physicians. CESIs, SNRBs, facet injections, and synovial cyst aspirations are the most frequently performed injections. Fellows and residents become proficient in 88.5% and 51.9%, respectively, of SPMI-performing departments. Most departments perform <50% of the SPMI volume of their respective institutions. Most responding academic radiology departments perform SPMIs. Most fellows and just more than half of residents at SPMI-performing departments achieve SPMI proficiency. For the most part, the number of SPMIs performed in responding departments has been stable during the past 5 years.

  6. FDH radiological design review guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Millsap, W.J.

    1998-09-29

    These guidelines discuss in more detail the radiological design review process used by the Project Hanford Management Contractors as described in HNF-PRO-1622, Radiological Design Review Process. They are intended to supplement the procedure by providing background information on the design review process and providing a ready source of information to design reviewers. The guidelines are not intended to contain all the information in the procedure, but at points, in order to maintain continuity, they contain some of the same information.

  7. Financial accounting for radiology executives.

    PubMed

    Seidmann, Abraham; Mehta, Tushar

    2005-03-01

    The authors review the role of financial accounting information from the perspective of a radiology executive. They begin by introducing the role of pro forma statements. They discuss the fundamental concepts of accounting, including the matching principle and accrual accounting. The authors then explore the use of financial accounting information in making investment decisions in diagnostic medical imaging. The paper focuses on critically evaluating the benefits and limitations of financial accounting for decision making in a radiology practice.

  8. Radiological training for tritium facilities

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    This program management guide describes a recommended implementation standard for core training as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Manual (RCM). The standard is to assist those individuals, both within DOE and Managing and Operating contractors, identified as having responsibility for implementing the core training recommended by the RCM. This training may also be given to radiological workers using tritium to assist in meeting their job specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835.

  9. Radiology of congenital heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Amplatz, K.

    1986-01-01

    This is a text on the radiologic diagnosis of congenital heart disease and its clinical manifestations. The main thrust of the book is the logical approach which allows an understanding of the complex theory of congenital heart disease. The atlas gives a concise overview of the entire field of congenital heart disease. Emphasis is placed on the understanding of the pathophysiology and its clinical and radiological consequences. Surgical treatment is included since it provides a different viewpoint of the anatomy.

  10. Radiological imaging in endocrine hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Das, Chandan J.; Baruah, Manash P.; Baruah, Upasana M.

    2011-01-01

    While different generations of assays have played important role in elucidating causes of different endocrine disorders, radiological techniques are instrumental in localizing the pathology. This statement cannot be truer in any disease entity other than endocrine hypertension. This review makes an effort to highlight the role of different radiological modalities, especially ultrasonography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, in the evaluation of different causes of endocrine hypertension. PMID:22145144

  11. Radiological Control Manual. Revision 0, January 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    This manual has been prepared by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements, and clarifications to the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is based on the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, DOE Order 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The topics covered are (1) excellence in radiological control, (2) radiological standards, (3) conduct of radiological work, (4) radioactive materials, (5) radiological health support operations, (6) training and qualification, and (7) radiological records.

  12. Postgraduate radiology training in sub-Saharan Africa: a review of current educational resources.

    PubMed

    Rabinowitz, Deborah A; Pretorius, E Scott

    2005-02-01

    Postgraduate training programs in radiology exist in several African nations. The ability of these programs to train radiologists is necessarily affected by local availability of educational resources, including clinical case volume, radiology equipment and maintenance, number of teaching faculty, and library and computer facilities. We sought to determine the current resources of a sample of African radiology education programs. Site visits were conducted at three separate radiology training programs, one in Ghana and two in South Africa. At each site, the investigator conducted a technology census, assessed library resources, observed daily trainee activities, and interviewed trainees, faculty, and statisticians. African radiology trainees receive considerable training in fluoroscopy, ultrasound, and plain film radiography, but receive considerably less training in nuclear medicine, mammography, magnetic resonance imaging, and interventional radiology. A large amount of equipment in African teaching hospitals is inoperative because of lack of maintenance programs. Faculty to resident ratios in African teaching hospitals are much lower than in American hospitals. Needs of training programs vary greatly from hospital to hospital, and from country to country. Radiologists, radiology organizations, and radiology vendors from high-income nations are in a unique position to help Africa's postgraduate radiology training programs fulfill their mission of training Africa's next generation of radiologists. It is desirable that long-term commitments be made to teaching hospitals so that scarce donated resources may be put to the best possible use.

  13. Understanding and Motivating Today's Student Employees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knofla, Tracy A.

    2001-01-01

    The first of a three-part series for college union and student activities managers and operators, provides information to managers about how to relate better to today's college student employees and make college unions more productive. (EV)

  14. Understanding and Motivating Today's Student Employees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knofla, Tracy A.

    2001-01-01

    The first of a three-part series for college union and student activities managers and operators, provides information to managers about how to relate better to today's college student employees and make college unions more productive. (EV)

  15. Credentialing in radiology: Current practice and future challenges

    PubMed Central

    Youssef, Adam; McCoubrie, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Radiology has changed significantly in recent years. The volume of work has increased dramatically as has its complexity. Future radiologists need an adequate training and expertise in conventional practice as well as new techniques. This comes at a time when other stakeholders outside of radiology are voicing their own concerns. The rightly justified increasing focus on patient safety has placed even more emphasis on the demonstration of competent practice by all health care professionals. Credentialing has been put forward as a way to ensure a doctor is competent in specific areas. Credentialing may be an alien concept to many radiology trainees but moves are afoot in the United Kingdom to bring it to the forefront of its postgraduate medical training. Credentialing began in 20th century North America where it was linked to the process of privileging. It subsequently garnered a strong patient safety focus and has become a part of the international healthcare agenda. Not everyone agrees with credentialing, it has many criticisms including the risk of speciality “turf wars” and the stifling of medical excellence to name just a couple. Is credentialing in radiology here to stay or will it pass by quietly? This paper reviews the global credentialing movement and discusses how this may impact on future radiology training, using the United Kingdom as its case example. PMID:27247716

  16. DOE standard: Radiological control

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-07-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed this Standard to assist line managers in meeting their responsibilities for implementing occupational radiological control programs. DOE has established regulatory requirements for occupational radiation protection in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835 (10 CFR 835), ``Occupational Radiation Protection``. Failure to comply with these requirements may lead to appropriate enforcement actions as authorized under the Price Anderson Act Amendments (PAAA). While this Standard does not establish requirements, it does restate, paraphrase, or cite many (but not all) of the requirements of 10 CFR 835 and related documents (e.g., occupational safety and health, hazardous materials transportation, and environmental protection standards). Because of the wide range of activities undertaken by DOE and the varying requirements affecting these activities, DOE does not believe that it would be practical or useful to identify and reproduce the entire range of health and safety requirements in this Standard and therefore has not done so. In all cases, DOE cautions the user to review any underlying regulatory and contractual requirements and the primary guidance documents in their original context to ensure that the site program is adequate to ensure continuing compliance with the applicable requirements. To assist its operating entities in achieving and maintaining compliance with the requirements of 10 CFR 835, DOE has established its primary regulatory guidance in the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides. This Standard supplements the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides and serves as a secondary source of guidance for achieving compliance with 10 CFR 835.

  17. Informatics in radiology: automated Web-based graphical dashboard for radiology operational business intelligence.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Paul G; Warnock, Max J; Daly, Mark; Toland, Christopher; Meenan, Christopher D; Mezrich, Reuben S

    2009-11-01

    Radiology departments today are faced with many challenges to improve operational efficiency, performance, and quality. Many organizations rely on antiquated, paper-based methods to review their historical performance and understand their operations. With increased workloads, geographically dispersed image acquisition and reading sites, and rapidly changing technologies, this approach is increasingly untenable. A Web-based dashboard was constructed to automate the extraction, processing, and display of indicators and thereby provide useful and current data for twice-monthly departmental operational meetings. The feasibility of extracting specific metrics from clinical information systems was evaluated as part of a longer-term effort to build a radiology business intelligence architecture. Operational data were extracted from clinical information systems and stored in a centralized data warehouse. Higher-level analytics were performed on the centralized data, a process that generated indicators in a dynamic Web-based graphical environment that proved valuable in discussion and root cause analysis. Results aggregated over a 24-month period since implementation suggest that this operational business intelligence reporting system has provided significant data for driving more effective management decisions to improve productivity, performance, and quality of service in the department.

  18. Incorporating intelligence into structured radiology reports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahn, Charles E.

    2014-03-01

    The new standard for radiology reporting templates being developed through the Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) and DICOM organizations defines the storage and exchange of reporting templates as Hypertext Markup Language version 5 (HTML5) documents. The use of HTML5 enables the incorporation of "dynamic HTML," in which documents can be altered in response to their content. HTML5 documents can employ JavaScript, the HTML Document Object Model (DOM), and external web services to create intelligent reporting templates. Several reporting templates were created to demonstrate the use of scripts to perform in-template calculations and decision support. For example, a template for adrenal CT was created to compute contrast washout percentage from input values of precontrast, dynamic postcontrast, and delayed adrenal nodule attenuation values; the washout value can used to classify an adrenal nodule as a benign cortical adenoma. Dynamic templates were developed to compute volumes and apply diagnostic criteria, such as those for determination of internal carotid artery stenosis. Although reporting systems need not use a web browser to render the templates or their contents, the use of JavaScript creates innumerable opportunities to construct highly sophisticated HTML5 reporting templates. This report demonstrates the ability to incorporate dynamic content to enhance the use of radiology reporting templates.

  19. Teaching Communication Skills to Radiology Residents.

    PubMed

    Itri, Jason N; Yacob, Sammy; Mithqal, Ayman

    The transition of health care in the United States from volume to value requires a systems-based approach aligning clinical services across the continuum of care. The ability to communicate effectively and resolve conflict is a critical skill within the systems-based model. Recognizing the essential role of communication in medicine, the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education has designated interpersonal and communication skills a core competency for all residents regardless of specialty. Yet, communication skills are often developed through on-the-job training or not at all. Traditional educational curricula use a predominantly didactic approach without opportunities for trainees to observe, actively experiment, or reflect on what is learned as a part of the learning process. In this article, we describe a 1-day experiential communication skills workshop customized for radiology residents that consists of Myers-Briggs Type Indicator and conflict management sessions designed to develop interpersonal, communication, and conflict management skills through group discussion, role-play, and simulation. The purpose of this educational initiative was to determine the perceived value of an experiential communication skills workshop designed for radiology trainees. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Radiology of skeletal trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, L.F.

    1982-01-01

    This 1000-page book contains over 1700 illustrations, is presented in two volumes and subdivided into 23 chapters. After brief chapters of Introduction and General Anatomy, a section on Skeletal Biomechanics is presented. The Epidemiology of Fractures chapter examines, among other things, the effects of age on the frequency and distribution of fractures. In the chapter on Classifications of Fractures, the author describes the character of traumatic forces such as angulating, torsional, avulsive, and compressive, and then relates these to the resultant fracture configurations. The Fracture Treatment chapter presents an overview of treatment principles. Other chapters deal with specific problems in pediatric trauma, fracture healing and nonhealing, and fracture complications.

  1. Radiological impacts of phosphogypsum.

    PubMed

    Al Attar, Lina; Al-Oudat, Mohammad; Kanakri, Salwa; Budeir, Youssef; Khalily, Hussam; Al Hamwi, Ahmad

    2011-09-01

    This study was carried out to assess the radiological impact of Syrian phosphogypsum (PG) piles in the compartments of the surrounding ecosystem. Estimating the distribution of naturally occurring radionuclides (i.e. (226)Ra, (238)U, (232)Th, (210)Po and (210)Pb) in the raw materials, product and by-product of the Syrian phosphate fertilizer industry was essential. The data revealed that the concentrations of the radionuclides were enhanced in the treated phosphate ore. In PG, (226)Ra content had a mean activity of 318 Bq kg(-1). The uranium content in PG was low, ca. 33 Bq kg(-1), because uranium remained in the phosphoric acid produced. Over 80% of (232)Th, (210)Po and (210)Pb present partitioned in PG. The presence of PG piles did not increase significantly the concentration of (222)Rn or gamma rays exposure dose in the area studied. The annual effective dose was only 0.082 mSv y(-1). The geometric mean of total suspended air particulates (TSP) ca. 85 μg m(-3). The activity concentration of the radionuclides in filtrates and runoff waters were below the detection limits (ca. 0.15 mBq L(-1) for (238)U, 0.1 mBq L(-1) for (232)Th and 0.18 mBq L(-1) for both of (210)Po and (210)Pb); the concentration of the radionuclides in ground water samples and Qattina Lake were less than the permissible limits set for drinking water by the World Health Organisation, WHO, (10, 1 and 0.1 Bq L(-1) for (238)U, (232)Th and both of (210)Po and (210)Pb, respectively). Eastern sites soil samples of PG piles recorded the highest activity concentrations, i.e. 26, 33, 28, 61 and 40 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra, (238)U, (232)Th, (210)Po and (210)Pb, respectively, due to the prevailing western and north-western wind in the area, but remained within the natural levels reported in Syrian soil (13-32 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra, 24.9-62.2 Bq kg(-1) for (238)U and 10-32 Bq kg(-1) for (232)Th). The impact of PG piles on plants varied upon the plant species. Higher concentrations of the radionuclides were

  2. Workflow management systems in radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendler, Thomas; Meetz, Kirsten; Schmidt, Joachim

    1998-07-01

    In a situation of shrinking health care budgets, increasing cost pressure and growing demands to increase the efficiency and the quality of medical services, health care enterprises are forced to optimize or complete re-design their processes. Although information technology is agreed to potentially contribute to cost reduction and efficiency improvement, the real success factors are the re-definition and automation of processes: Business Process Re-engineering and Workflow Management. In this paper we discuss architectures for the use of workflow management systems in radiology. We propose to move forward from information systems in radiology (RIS, PACS) to Radiology Management Systems, in which workflow functionality (process definitions and process automation) is implemented through autonomous workflow management systems (WfMS). In a workflow oriented architecture, an autonomous workflow enactment service communicates with workflow client applications via standardized interfaces. In this paper, we discuss the need for and the benefits of such an approach. The separation of workflow management system and application systems is emphasized, and the consequences that arise for the architecture of workflow oriented information systems. This includes an appropriate workflow terminology, and the definition of standard interfaces for workflow aware application systems. Workflow studies in various institutions have shown that most of the processes in radiology are well structured and suited for a workflow management approach. Numerous commercially available Workflow Management Systems (WfMS) were investigated, and some of them, which are process- oriented and application independent, appear suitable for use in radiology.

  3. Radiological Work Planning and Procedure

    SciTech Connect

    KURTZ, J.E.

    2000-01-01

    Each facility is tasked with maintaining personnel radiation exposure as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). A continued effort is required to meet this goal by developing and implementing improvements to technical work documents (TWDs) and work performance. A review of selected TWDs from most facilities shows there is a need to incorporate more radiological control requirements into the TWD. The Radioactive Work Permit (RWP) provides a mechanism to place some of the requirements but does not provide all the information needed by the worker as he/she is accomplishing the steps of the TWD. Requiring the engineers, planners and procedure writers to put the radiological control requirements in the work steps would be very easy if all personnel had a strong background in radiological work planning and radiological controls. Unfortunately, many of these personnel do not have the background necessary to include these requirements without assistance by the Radiological Control organization at each facility. In addition, there seems to be confusion as to what should be and what should not be included in the TWD.

  4. White Paper: Curriculum in Interventional Radiology.

    PubMed

    Mahnken, Andreas H; Bücker, Arno; Hohl, Christian; Berlis, Ansgar

    2017-04-01

    Purpose Scope and clinical importance of interventional radiology markedly evolved over the last decades. Consequently it was acknowledged as independent subspecialty by the "European Union of Medical Specialists" (UEMS). Based on radiological imaging techniques Interventional Radiology is an integral part of Radiology. Materials und Methods In 2009 the German Society for Interventional Radiology and minimally-invasive therapy (DeGIR) developed a structured training in Interventional Radiology. In cooperation with the German Society of Neuroradiology (DGNR) this training was extended to also cover Interventional Neuroradiology in 2012. Tailored for this training in Interventional Radiology a structured curriculum was developed, covering the scope of this modular training. Results The curriculum is based on the DeGIR/DGNR modular training concept in Interventional Radiology. There is also an European Curriculum and Syllabus for Interventional Radiology developed by the "Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe" (CIRSE). The presented curriculum in Interventional Radiology is designed to provide a uniform base for the training in Interventional Radiology in Germany, based on the competencies obtained during residency. Conclusion This curriculum can be used as a basis for training in Interventional Radiology by all training sites. Key Points: · Interventional Radiology is an integral part of clinical radiology. · The German Society for Interventional Radiology and minimally-invasive therapy (DeGIR) developed a curriculum in Interventional Radiology. · This curriculum is an integrative basis for the training in interventional. Citation Format · Mahnken AH, Bücker A, Hohl C et al. White Paper: Curriculum in Interventional Radiology. Fortschr Röntgenstr 2017; 189: 309 - 311. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. How to deal with radiologically contaminated vegetation

    SciTech Connect

    Wilde, E.W.; Murphy, C.E.; Lamar, R.T.; Larson, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    This report describes the findings from a literature review conducted as part of a Department of Energy, Office of Technology Development Biomass Remediation Task. The principal objective of this project is to develop a process or group of processes to treat radiologically contaminated vegetation in a manner that minimizes handling, processing, and treatment costs. Contaminated, woody vegetation growing on waste sites at SRS poses a problem to waste site closure technologies that are being considered for these sites. It is feared that large sections of woody vegetation (logs) can not be buried in waste sites where isolation of waste is accomplished by capping the site. Logs or large piles of woody debris have the potential of decaying and leaving voids under the cap. This could lead to cap failure and entrance of water into the waste. Large solid objects could also interfere with treatments like in situ mixing of soil with grout or other materials to encapsulate the contaminated sediments and soils in the waste sites. Optimal disposal of the wood includes considerations of volume reduction, treatment of the radioactive residue resulting from volume reduction, or confinement without volume reduction. Volume reduction consists primarily of removing the carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen in the wood, leaving an ash that would contain most of the contamination. The only contaminant that would be released by volume reduction would by small amounts of the radioactive isotope of hydrogen, tritium. The following sections will describe the waste sites at SRS which contain contaminated vegetation and are potential candidates for the technology developed under this proposal. The description will provide a context for the magnitude of the problem and the logistics of the alternative solutions that are evaluated later in the review. 76 refs.

  6. Passion in today's health care leaders.

    PubMed

    Piper, Llewellyn E

    2005-01-01

    Passion in today's health care leaders is essential as health care organizations face increasing demands for survival. Leaders in health care have been educated, selected, promoted, and retained based on their analytical and creativity skills. Today's health care leaders must also have emotional intelligence. Emotional intelligence is primal for passion. Emotional intelligence, which leads to passion, is crucial to the survivability of today's health care organizations. In order for health care organizations to go from good to great, the leader must inspire followers through passion. This article encourages health care leaders to gain awareness of emotional intelligence and to use emotional intelligence as part of their leadership to inspire passion. Through passion, leaders and followers become more motivated to accomplish the health care mission of serving others.

  7. How to Start Interventional Radiology

    PubMed Central

    Ghanaati, Hossein; Firouznia, Kavous; Jalali, Amir Hossein; Shakiba, Madjid

    2013-01-01

    Interventional techniques aim to find safer and better ways to treat vascular diseases even in many instances, the interventional radiology solutions has been considered the only treatment option for the patients. Interventional radiologists are specialists who perform minimally invasive procedures instead of surgery or other treatments. These procedures apply various imaging and catheterization procedures in order to diagnose and treat diseases. In each country, interventional radiology practice establishment of varies according to local factors, but following a standard strategy seems better to set up this facility. According to above mentioned points, we decided to establish this specialty in our hospital since 2001 as the pioneer center in Iran. In this presentation we will discuss about our experience for start interventional radiology. PMID:24693402

  8. Implications Of Computer Assisted Radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemke, Heinz U.

    1989-10-01

    Within the field of radiology, assistance with computer and communication systems may be applied to generation, storing, transmission, viewing, analyzing and interpreting of images. As a result, digital image management and communication systems will be applied at various levels in the health care system. Four groups of people are somehow involved or affected by this process. These are, first of all, the patients and the medical personnel, but also the scientific-engineering community and the group of professions involved with financing and/or administering these systems. Each group approaches computer assisted radiology from a particular point of view. The paper outlines some aspects as regards the different perceptions of these groups, which need to be clarified in order to successfully realise computer assisted radiology.

  9. [Useful radiological techniques in orthodontics].

    PubMed

    Felizardo, Rufino; Thomas, Alexis; Foucart, Jean-Michel

    2012-03-01

    Specialists in dento-facial orthopedics have a large range of dental radiological techniques at their disposal to help them in their diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Peri-apical, occlusal, panoramic, and cephalometric X-Rays are two-dimensional techniques that orthodontists can complement, if necessary, with Multi slices CT scan or Cone Beam Computed Tomography. Orthodontists must apply and respect quality criteria for each type of film in order to derive the best information from every image and to avoid producing artifacts or false images that will reduce their diagnostic value and, accordingly, the service that they render to patients. Practitioners must be willing to spend the few moments it takes to position patients correctly in the radiological apparatus instead of taking multiple views to compensate for failing to scrupulously follow protocols of radiology.

  10. Radiological control manual. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kloepping, R.

    1996-05-01

    This Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Radiological Control Manual (LBNL RCM) has been prepared to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements and interpretation of the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is one methodology to implement the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835 (10 CFR 835) and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. Information given in this manual is also intended to provide demonstration of compliance to specific requirements in 10 CFR 835. The LBNL RCM (Publication 3113) and LBNL Health and Safety Manual Publication-3000 form the technical basis for the LBNL RPP and will be revised as necessary to ensure that current requirements from Rules and Orders are represented. The LBNL RCM will form the standard for excellence in the implementation of the LBNL RPP.

  11. ["Activity based costing" in radiology].

    PubMed

    Klose, K J; Böttcher, J

    2002-05-01

    The introduction of diagnosis related groups for reimbursement of hospital services in Germany (g-drg) demands for a reconsideration of utilization of radiological products and costs related to them. Traditional cost accounting as approach to internal, department related budgets are compared with the accounting method of activity based costing (ABC). The steps, which are necessary to implement ABC in radiology are developed. The introduction of a process-oriented cost analysis is feasible for radiology departments. ABC plays a central role in the set-up of decentralized controlling functions within this institutions. The implementation seems to be a strategic challenge for department managers to get more appropriate data for adequate enterprise decisions. The necessary steps of process analysis can be used for other purposes (Certification, digital migration) as well.

  12. Analysis of radiology business models.

    PubMed

    Enzmann, Dieter R; Schomer, Donald F

    2013-03-01

    As health care moves to value orientation, radiology's traditional business model faces challenges to adapt. The authors describe a strategic value framework that radiology practices can use to best position themselves in their environments. This simplified construct encourages practices to define their dominant value propositions. There are 3 main value propositions that form a conceptual triangle, whose vertices represent the low-cost provider, the product leader, and the customer intimacy models. Each vertex has been a valid market position, but each demands specific capabilities and trade-offs. The underlying concepts help practices select value propositions they can successfully deliver in their competitive environments. Copyright © 2013 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Industrial Pleuropulmonary Disorders: Radiological Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Garland, L. Henry

    1965-01-01

    Industrial pleuropulmonary disorders may result from exposure of the human respiratory tract to diverse types of dusts and fumes, visible and invisible, benign and toxic, organic and inorganic. Meticulous radiological examination, combined with history and physical examination, appropriate laboratory tests, and the exclusion of other disorders which could produce similar changes, is essential for correct diagnosis. Criteria for the radiological diagnosis of pulmonary fibrosis, of generalized emphysema, and of cor pulmonale are outlined. The commoner types of pneumoconiosis are discussed in some detail, and the possible relationship of various inhaled noxa to primary bronchial carcinoma is considered. PMID:14288143

  14. Interventional Radiology: Equipment and Techniques.

    PubMed

    Scansen, Brian A

    2016-05-01

    The breadth of small animal diseases that can now be treated by a minimally invasive, transcatheter approach continues to expand. Interventional radiology is the field of medicine that affects a therapeutic outcome via minimally invasive catheterization of peripheral blood vessels or body orifices guided by imaging. The intent of this article is to provide an overview of the equipment required for interventional radiology in veterinary medicine with a discussion of technical uses in diseases of dogs and cats. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Interventional Radiology in Liver Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Karani, John B. Yu, Dominic F.Q.C.; Kane, Pauline A.

    2005-04-15

    Radiology is a key specialty within a liver transplant program. Interventional techniques not only contribute to graft and recipient survival but also allow appropriate patient selection and ensure that recipients with severe liver decompensation, hepatocellular carcinoma or portal hypertension are transplanted with the best chance of prolonged survival. Equally inappropriate selection for these techniques may adversely affect survival. Liver transplantation is a dynamic field of innovative surgical techniques with a requirement for interventional radiology to parallel these developments. This paper reviews the current practice within a major European center for adult and pediatric transplantation.

  16. Conventional Radiology in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Llopis, Eva; Kroon, Herman M; Acosta, Jose; Bloem, Johan L

    2017-09-01

    In clinical practice, the conventional radiography is still the radiologic method for the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Moreover, it provides a quick overview of the symptomatic joints to narrow the differential diagnosis and to evaluate progression. RA is a polyarticular disease with bilateral and symmetric involvement of the peripheral joints, especially small joints, and less frequently, the cervical spine. The radiologic features are soft tissue swelling, periarticular osteoporosis, erosions, loss of joint space, and in advanced disease, osteolysis and typical subluxations or deformities, such as ulnar deviation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Teaching physics to radiology residents.

    PubMed

    Hendee, William R

    2009-04-01

    The complexity of diagnostic imaging has expanded dramatically over the past two decades. Over the same period, the time and effort devoted to teaching physics (the science and technology of the discipline) have diminished. This paradox compromises the ability of future radiologists to master imaging technologies so that they are used in an efficient, safe, and cost-effective manner. This article addresses these issues. Efforts involving many professional organizations are under way to resolve the paradox of the expanding complexity of medical imaging contrasted with the declining emphasis on physics in radiology residency programs. These efforts should help to reestablish physics education as a core value in radiology residency programs.

  18. Patient Dose in Diagnostic Radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noel, Alain

    One of the basic principles, stated explicitly in Article 4 of the EC Council Directive 97/43 Euratom, is optimization. This means that all radiological examinations should be performed with a dose that is As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA principle applied to the protection of the patient) in order to obtain the required diagnostic information. Therefore, dose needs to be determined with the relationship between image quality and dose always kept in mind. In this paper, radiation quantities and units to report patient doses in diagnostic radiology will be identified.

  19. [Radiological media and modern supporting tools in radiology].

    PubMed

    Sachs, A; Pokieser, P

    2014-01-01

    Radiology is a field with a high demand on information. Nowadays, a huge variety of electronic media and tools exists in addition to the classical media. Asynchronous and synchronous e-learning are constantly growing and support radiology with case collections, webinars and online textbooks. Various internet resources, social media and online courses have been established. Dynamic websites show a variety of interactive elements and it is easier and faster to access large amounts of data. Social media have an exponentially growing number of users and enable an efficient collaboration as well as forming professional networks. Massive open online courses (MOOCs) complete the offer of education and increase the opportunity to take part in educational activities. Apart from the existing variety of resources it is essential to focus on a critical selection for using these radiological media. It is reasonable to combine classical and electronic media instead of a one-sided use. As dynamic as the progress in the field of radiological media and its tools may be, the personal contact remains and should be maintained.

  20. RADTRAN 4: User guide. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Neuhauser, K S; Kanipe, F L

    1992-01-01

    RADTRAN 4 is used to evaluate radiological consequences of incident-free transportation, as well as the radiological risks from vehicular accidents occurring during transportation. This User Guide is Volume 3 in a series of four volume of the documentation of the RADTRAN 4 computer code for transportation risk analysis. The other three volumes are Volume 1, the Executive Summary; Volume 2, the Technical Manual; and Volume 4, the Programmer`s Manual. The theoretical and calculational basis for the operations performed by RADTRAN 4 are discussed in Volume 2. Throughout this User Guide the reader will be referred to Volume 2 for detailed discussions of certain RADTRAN features. This User Guide supersedes the document ``RADTRAN III`` by Madsen et al. (1983). This RADTRAN 4 User Guide specifies and describes the required data, control inputs, input sequences, user options, program limitations, and other activities necessary for execution of the RADTRAN 4 computer code.

  1. Radiology in Medical Education: A Pediatric Radiology Elective as a Template for Other Radiology Courses.

    PubMed

    Hilmes, Melissa A; Hyatt, Eddie; Penrod, Cody H; Fleming, Amy E; Singh, Sudha P

    2016-03-01

    Traditionally, the pediatric radiology elective for medical students and pediatric residents constituted a morning teaching session focused mainly on radiography and fluoroscopy. A more structured elective was desired to broaden the exposure to more imaging modalities, create a more uniform educational experience, and include assessment tools. In 2012, an introductory e-mail and formal syllabus, including required reading assignments, were sent to participants before the start date. A rotating weekly schedule was expanded to include cross-sectional imaging (ultrasound, CT, MR) and nuclear medicine. The schedule could accommodate specific goals of the pediatric resident or medical student, as requested. Starting in 2013, an online pre-test and post-test were developed, as well as an online end-of-rotation survey specific to the pediatric radiology elective. Taking the Image Gently pledge was required. A scavenger hunt tool, cue cards, and electronic modules were added. Pre-test and post-test scores, averaged over 2 years, showed improvement in radiology knowledge, with scores increasing by 27% for medical students and 21% for pediatric residents. Surveys at the end of the elective were overwhelmingly positive, with constructive criticism and complimentary comments. We have successfully created an elective experience in radiology that dedicates time to education while preserving the workflow of radiologists. We have developed tools to provide a customized experience with many self-directed learning opportunities. Our tools and techniques are easily translatable to a general or adult radiology elective. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Southern forests: Yesterday, today, and tomorrow

    Treesearch

    R. Neil Sampson

    2004-01-01

    In the 20th century, southern forests changed dramatically. Those changes pale, however, when compared to what happened to the people of the region. In addition to growing over fourfold in numbers, the South's population has urbanized, globalized, and intellectualized in 100 years. Rural and isolated in the 19th century, they are today urban and cosmopolitan. One...

  3. Interviewing Techniques Used in Selected Organizations Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joyce, Marguerite P.

    2008-01-01

    Businesses continue to use the job interview as a final determinant of the applicant's good fit for the company and its culture. Today, many companies are hiring less and/or are taking longer to find just the right person with the right skills for the right job. If an applicant is asked to come for an interview, the general feeling is that the…

  4. Electricity: Today's Technologies, Tomorrow's Alternatives. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA.

    This teaching guide is designed to help teachers develop lesson plans around nine chapters provided in the student textbook. Chapters focus on energy use, energy demand, energy supply, principles of electric power generation, today's generating options, future generating options, electricity storage and delivery, environmental concerns, and making…

  5. Teaching the Literature of Today's Middle East

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Allen

    2011-01-01

    Providing a gateway into the real literature emerging from the Middle East, this book shows teachers how to make the topic authentic, powerful, and relevant. "Teaching the Literature of Today's Middle East": (1) Introduces teachers to this literature and how to teach it; (2) Brings to the reader a tremendous diversity of teachable texts…

  6. Electricity: Today's Technologies, Tomorrow's Alternatives. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA.

    This teaching guide is designed to help teachers develop lesson plans around nine chapters provided in the student textbook. Chapters focus on energy use, energy demand, energy supply, principles of electric power generation, today's generating options, future generating options, electricity storage and delivery, environmental concerns, and making…

  7. Interviewing Techniques Used in Selected Organizations Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joyce, Marguerite P.

    2008-01-01

    Businesses continue to use the job interview as a final determinant of the applicant's good fit for the company and its culture. Today, many companies are hiring less and/or are taking longer to find just the right person with the right skills for the right job. If an applicant is asked to come for an interview, the general feeling is that the…

  8. What's Missing in Design Education Today?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frascara, Jorge; Noel, Guillermina

    2012-01-01

    This article begins by describing a desirable design approach that is only practiced by a few designers today. This design approach is desirable because it responds to a society that suffers from a number of illnesses due to communications and artifacts that do not satisfy the needs of people. The article then proposes the kind of design education…

  9. Who We Are: Today's Students Speak Out

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blandford, Ayoka

    2012-01-01

    Today's students have been nicknamed the "Digital Generation," "Millennials," "Net Generation" and "Generation Next." They are frequently identified by their technological prowess and seem to work well with multiple stimuli (for example, designing a web site while listening to iTunes and responding to texts). While many research studies have been…

  10. Europa Heute: Filmbegleitheft (Europe Today: Film Manual).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freudenstein, Reinhold; And Others

    This teacher's guide to the German promotional film "Europe Today", suitable for use in advanced courses, concentrates on linguistic preparation required for full appreciation. The film focuses on the role of European countries as participating members of the Common Market. The manual includes information on the German film industry, a…

  11. Unethical Scholarship Today: A Preliminary Typology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Douglas W.

    Today many signs point to an uneasy concern among scholars regarding the ethics of their peers. All too frequently the press reports cases of ethical breaches in many fields of scholarship. Over the years a few people have continued to note and study patterns of deviant and unethical behavior in scholarship. But in spite of the need to…

  12. Motivating Literacy Learners in Today's World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, J., Ed.; Parkhill, F., Ed.; Gillon, G., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Motivating Literacy Learners in Today's World" provides insights into a broad spectrum of children's literacy learning. Motivation is the key theme and the authors show how this can be achieved through reading for pleasure; in writing activities at a number of levels; and through oral language development. Chapters include: (1)…

  13. Organization Made Easy! Tools for Today's Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buck, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Meet the ever-growing organizational demands of today's changing world with the variety of tools, digital and otherwise, available to you as a teacher. In this book, organization guru Frank Buck shows you how to take expert advantage of the specific electronic and paper-based resources that will help you manage your time and stay on course as a…

  14. Recycling Today Makes for a Better Tomorrow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raze, Robert E., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Today's children must be educated about solid waste management and recycling to reduce the amount of waste that goes into landfills. The article describes what can be recycled (newspapers, corrugated cardboard, paper, glass, aluminum, textiles, motor oil, organic wastes, appliances, steel cans, and plastics). It also lists student environment…

  15. Recycling Today Makes for a Better Tomorrow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raze, Robert E., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Today's children must be educated about solid waste management and recycling to reduce the amount of waste that goes into landfills. The article describes what can be recycled (newspapers, corrugated cardboard, paper, glass, aluminum, textiles, motor oil, organic wastes, appliances, steel cans, and plastics). It also lists student environment…

  16. Identity and Diversity in Today's World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gee, James Paul

    2017-01-01

    This paper develops a thesis about identity and diversity. I first look at activity-based identities, identities like being a gardener, birder, citizen scientist or fan-fiction writer. These are freely chosen identities and they are proliferating at a great rate today thanks to participatory culture, the Maker Movement and digital and social…

  17. Using Today's Headlines for Teaching Gerontology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haber, David

    2008-01-01

    It is a challenge to attract undergraduate students into the gerontology field. Many do not believe the aging field is exciting and at the cutting edge. Students, however, can be convinced of the timeliness, relevance, and excitement of the field by, literally, bringing up today's headlines in class. The author collected over 250 articles during…

  18. The Teacher Today: Tasks, Conditions, Policies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris (France).

    This report presents some of the principal policy issues and relevant international evidence concerning teachers and teaching today. Throughout, it highlights the interplay between professional demands, competence, and recognition, drawing attention explicitly to the interconnectedness between different aspects of teaching policies. Chapter 1…

  19. Promoting Active Involvement in Today's Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conderman, Greg; Bresnahan, Val; Hedin, Laura

    2011-01-01

    In today's diverse classrooms and age of accountability, teachers need to use efficient, research-based instructional approaches that engage all students, promote interest and variety in learning and teaching, and provide immediate and continuous informal assessment data. This article presents a rationale for using active involvement techniques,…

  20. New Work: The Revolution in Today's Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Workforce Economics Trends, 1999

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. economy, workplace, and work are in the midst of historic change. New ways of organizing and managing the workplace and new ways of working are becoming increasingly common. Large companies are giving way to smaller and leaner organizations. Today, the typical business establishment employs 15 people. Across all industries, smaller…

  1. Organization Made Easy! Tools for Today's Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buck, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Meet the ever-growing organizational demands of today's changing world with the variety of tools, digital and otherwise, available to you as a teacher. In this book, organization guru Frank Buck shows you how to take expert advantage of the specific electronic and paper-based resources that will help you manage your time and stay on course as a…

  2. Teaching for Transformation in Today's Challenging Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Scott

    2005-01-01

    Transformational change, versus incremental self-improvement, is what is needed for today's most at-risk teens. This article draws upon many of the principles in Scott Larson and Larry Brendtro's newest book "The Resilience Revolution." There has been much written on the process of transformational change in the business sector over the past…

  3. Sociological Education in Today's Technical University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panina, G. V.

    2012-01-01

    In today's institution of higher learning, rating the effectiveness of the training of the future specialist is based on an individual's possession of professional, social, individual, and personal competencies, which include the ability to see the sociocultural context of his activity, to work on a team, to create a favorable social environment…

  4. Today's Majority: Faculty outside the Tenure System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gappa, Judith M.

    2008-01-01

    The work of colleges and universities is carried out each day by committed, talented faculty members. The faculty's intellectual capital, taken collectively, is every institution's principal asset. Today, as higher-education institutions are faced with new challenges that only seem to grow more difficult the importance of all faculty members in…

  5. Who We Are: Today's Students Speak Out

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blandford, Ayoka

    2012-01-01

    Today's students have been nicknamed the "Digital Generation," "Millennials," "Net Generation" and "Generation Next." They are frequently identified by their technological prowess and seem to work well with multiple stimuli (for example, designing a web site while listening to iTunes and responding to texts). While many research studies have been…

  6. Motivating Literacy Learners in Today's World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, J., Ed.; Parkhill, F., Ed.; Gillon, G., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Motivating Literacy Learners in Today's World" provides insights into a broad spectrum of children's literacy learning. Motivation is the key theme and the authors show how this can be achieved through reading for pleasure; in writing activities at a number of levels; and through oral language development. Chapters include: (1)…

  7. What Motivates Today's Information Systems Graduates?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schambach, Thomas P.; Chrisman, Carol

    Hiring is an enormous challenge in today's Information Systems (IS) organizations due to the heavy demand for graduating students. This paper reports on a study to determine what factors IS students consider important in evaluating potential employers. Initially using an open ended survey approach, 28 upper level IS students were asked to identify…

  8. PHYSICS TODAY--INTRODUCTORY PHYSICS EDUCATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1967

    THIS SPECIAL ISSUE OF "PHYSICS TODAY" REVIEWS THE STATUS OF SECONDARY SCHOOL PHYSICS, AS WELL AS COLLEGE PHYSICS AND PHYSICAL SCIENCE. SECONDARY LEVEL PROJECTS INCLUDE PHYSICAL SCIENCE STUDY COMMITTEE PHYSICS, HARVARD PROJECT PHYSICS, THE ENGINEERING CONCEPTS CURRICULUM PROJECT, AND THE NUFFIELD PROJECT. THOSE AT THE COLLEGE LEVEL…

  9. Teaching the Literature of Today's Middle East

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Allen

    2011-01-01

    Providing a gateway into the real literature emerging from the Middle East, this book shows teachers how to make the topic authentic, powerful, and relevant. "Teaching the Literature of Today's Middle East": (1) Introduces teachers to this literature and how to teach it; (2) Brings to the reader a tremendous diversity of teachable texts…

  10. The Struggle for Existence: 1859 & Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Joseph A.

    2009-01-01

    The theory that natural selection is the key to adaptive evolution, and the reasoning for his conclusions, were Darwin's contributions to science. However, only half of Americans accept the fact of evolution as true (Gallup, 2008). Walsh contends that there are three reasons that students today find life's existential struggle less apparent.…

  11. Today's Majority: Faculty outside the Tenure System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gappa, Judith M.

    2008-01-01

    The work of colleges and universities is carried out each day by committed, talented faculty members. The faculty's intellectual capital, taken collectively, is every institution's principal asset. Today, as higher-education institutions are faced with new challenges that only seem to grow more difficult the importance of all faculty members in…

  12. Applying Servant Leadership in Today's Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culver, Mary K.

    2009-01-01

    This book illustrates how the ideal of servant leadership can be applied in your school today. With real-life scenarios, discussions, and self assessments, this book gives practical suggestions to help you develop into a caring and effective servant leader. There are 52 scenarios in this book, focusing on situations as varied as: (1) Dealing with…

  13. We, John Dewey's Audience of Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    da Cunha, Marcus Vinicius

    2016-01-01

    This article suggests that John Dewey's "Democracy and Education" does not describe education in an existing society, but it conveys a utopia, in the sense coined by Mannheim: utopian thought aims at instigating actions towards the transformation of reality, intending to attain a better world in the future. Today's readers of Dewey (his…

  14. We, John Dewey's Audience of Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    da Cunha, Marcus Vinicius

    2016-01-01

    This article suggests that John Dewey's "Democracy and Education" does not describe education in an existing society, but it conveys a utopia, in the sense coined by Mannheim: utopian thought aims at instigating actions towards the transformation of reality, intending to attain a better world in the future. Today's readers of Dewey (his…

  15. The Struggle for Existence: 1859 & Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Joseph A.

    2009-01-01

    The theory that natural selection is the key to adaptive evolution, and the reasoning for his conclusions, were Darwin's contributions to science. However, only half of Americans accept the fact of evolution as true (Gallup, 2008). Walsh contends that there are three reasons that students today find life's existential struggle less apparent.…

  16. A Critique of Today's Angry Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Wu

    2011-01-01

    There is a set of people in China's cyberspace today that is called "angry youth." Angry youth, to put it nicely, are young people who are angry about something. Young people are often angry. As they enter society, they find innumerable obstacles in their way, such as, experts and specialists, rules and regulations, seniority and orders…

  17. New Work: The Revolution in Today's Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Workforce Economics Trends, 1999

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. economy, workplace, and work are in the midst of historic change. New ways of organizing and managing the workplace and new ways of working are becoming increasingly common. Large companies are giving way to smaller and leaner organizations. Today, the typical business establishment employs 15 people. Across all industries, smaller…

  18. The Geriatric Child in Today's Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamson, Frank E.

    This paper develops the premise that there is today a new "child" in our culture developed in response to expectations of daily functioning, family relationships, societal status, economic level, medical illness, emotional needs, and financial management. This new "child" is a person who has usually passed the age of 65, and has found that the…

  19. Using Today's Headlines for Teaching Gerontology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haber, David

    2008-01-01

    It is a challenge to attract undergraduate students into the gerontology field. Many do not believe the aging field is exciting and at the cutting edge. Students, however, can be convinced of the timeliness, relevance, and excitement of the field by, literally, bringing up today's headlines in class. The author collected over 250 articles during…

  20. Education Today 2010: The OECD Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing (NJ3), 2010

    2010-01-01

    What does the OECD have to say about the state of education today? What are the main OECD messages on early childhood education, teacher policies and tertiary education? What about student performance, educational spending and equity in education? OECD work on these important education topics and others have been brought together in a single…

  1. Education in the Fate of Today's Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borisenkov, V.P.; Kraevskii, V.V.; Valeev, G.Kh.; Avtonomova, N.S.; Evdokimov, A.K.; Shchedrina, T.G.; Belomestnova, N.V.; Beliaeva, M.A.; Shimina, A.N.; Karmanchikov, A.J.; Korol, A.D.; Varnavskaia, N.Ia.; Berezhnova, E.V.; Daniliuk, A.Ia.; Anua, R.G.; Sidorina, T.Iu.; Tarba, I.D.; Arlamov, A.A.

    2008-01-01

    Education in the fate of today's Russia was the topic of a scientific seminar titled "Philosophy, Education, and Society," held in the summer of 2007 in the city of Gagra by the editors of the journals "Voprosy filosofii" and "Pedagogika," the Moscow N.E. Bauman State Technical University, and the Russian Academy of…

  2. Education Today 2013: The OECD Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing (NJ3), 2012

    2012-01-01

    What does the OECD have to say about the state of education today? What are the main OECD messages on early childhood education, teacher policies and tertiary education? What about student performance, educational spending and equity in education? OECD work on these important education topics and others have been brought together in a single…

  3. DRILL: a standardized radiology-teaching knowledge base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rundle, Debra A.; Evers, K.; Seshadri, Sridhar B.; Arenson, Ronald L.

    1991-07-01

    Traditionally, radiologists have collected and saved interesting cases in their film formats to teach medical students, residents, and physicians. These cases are classified according to various coding schemes, although current schemes alone are insufficient to meet today's educational needs. Teaching methods and cases also vary among institutions, along with the manner in which instructors present information to their students. In order to address this problem, the authors developed a standardized radiology teaching knowledge database known as the Digital Radiology Image Learning Library (DRILL). DRILL is a relational image knowledge database providing access to standard mammography cases in digital image format along with a pool of clinical and radiological information on a per-case basis. The development platform chosen is a standard Apple Macintosh-II computer and the Oracle database environment. The data entry and query interfaces are implemented in HyperCard. Images are stored on magnetic disk but could be stored on optical media. Since the personal computer platform was chosen, a wide variety of course building tools are available through which a teacher can construct a course, such as authoring and multi-media systems for building computer based courses, or word processors for writing course outlines tests. The interface also provides image conversion tools which convert images into PC-compatible formats.

  4. Cloud rise model for radiological dispersal devices events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharon, Avi; Halevy, Itzhak; Sattinger, Daniel; Yaar, Ilan

    2012-07-01

    As a part of the preparedness and response to possible radiological terror events, it is important to model the evolution of the radioactive cloud immediately after its formation, as a function of time, explosive quantity and local meteorological conditions. One of the major outputs of a cloud rise models is the evaluation of cloud top height, which is an essential input for most of the succeeding atmospheric dispersion models. This parameter strongly affects the radiological consequences of the event. Most of the cloud rise models used today, have been developed according to experiments were large quantities of explosives were used, within the range of hundreds of kilograms of TNT. The majority of these models, however, fail to address Radiological Dispersion Devices (RDD) events, which are typically characterized by smaller amounts of TNT. In this paper, a new, semi-empirical model that describes the vertical evolution of the cloud up to its effective height as a function of time, explosive quantity, atmospheric stability and horizontal wind speed, is presented. The database for this model is taken from five sets of experiments done in Israel during 2006-2009 under the "Green Field" (GF) project, using 0.25-100 kg of TNT.

  5. Radiology of liver circulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hermine, C.L.

    1985-01-01

    This book proposes that careful evaluation of the arterioportogram is the cornerstone in assessing portal flow obstruction, being the most consistent of all observations including liver histology, portal venous pressure, size and number of portosystemic collaterals, and wedged hepatic venous pressure. Very brief chapters cover normal hepatic circulation and angiographic methods. Contrast volumes and flow rates for celiac, hepatic, and superior mesenteric injection are given, with the timing for venous phase radiographs. In the main body of the text, portal obstruction is divided very simply into presinusoidal (all proximal causes) and postsinusoidal (all distal causes, including Budd-Chiari). Changes are discussed regarding the splenic artery and spleen; hepatic artery and its branches; portal flow rate and direction; and arterioportal shunting and portosystemic collateral circulation in minimal, moderate, severe, and very severe portal obstruction and in recognizable entities such as prehepatic portal and hepatic venous obstructions. The major emphasis in this section is the recognition and understanding of flow changes by which level and severity of obstruction are assessed (not simply the anatomy of portosystemic collateral venous flow). Excellent final chapters discuss the question of portal hypertension without obstruction, and the contribution of arterioportography to the treatment of portal hypertension, again with an emphasis on hemodynamics before and after shunt surgery. There is a fascinating final chapter on segmental intrahepatic obstruction without portal hypertension that explains much of the unusual contrast enhancement sometimes seen in CT scanning of hepatic mass lesions.

  6. International Data on Radiological Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Martha Finck; Margaret Goldberg

    2010-07-01

    ABSTRACT The mission of radiological dispersal device (RDD) nuclear forensics is to identify the provenance of nuclear and radiological materials used in RDDs and to aid law enforcement in tracking nuclear materials and routes. The application of databases to radiological forensics is to match RDD source material to a source model in the database, provide guidance regarding a possible second device, and aid the FBI by providing a short list of manufacturers and distributors, and ultimately to the last legal owner of the source. The Argonne/Idaho National Laboratory RDD attribution database is a powerful technical tool in radiological forensics. The database (1267 unique vendors) includes all sealed sources and a device registered in the U.S., is complemented by data from the IAEA Catalogue, and is supported by rigorous in-lab characterization of selected sealed sources regarding physical form, radiochemical composition, and age-dating profiles. Close working relationships with global partners in the commercial sealed sources industry provide invaluable technical information and expertise in the development of signature profiles. These profiles are critical to the down-selection of potential candidates in either pre- or post- event RDD attribution. The down-selection process includes a match between an interdicted (or detonated) source and a model in the database linked to one or more manufacturers and distributors.

  7. 100-DR-1 radiological surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Naiknimbalkar, N.M.

    1994-01-28

    This report summarizes and documents the results of the radiological surveys conducted over the surface of the 100-DR-1 Operable Unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. In addition, this report explains the survey methodology using the Ultrasonic Ranging and Data System (USRADS). The 100-DR-1 radiological survey field task consisted of two activities: characterization of the operable unit-specific background conditions and the radiological survey of the operable unit surface area. The survey methodology was based on utilization of USRADS for automated recording of the gross gamma radiation levels at or near 6 in. and at 3 ft from the surface soil. The purpose of the survey is to identify the location of unidentified subsurface radioactive material areas and any surface contamination associated with these areas. The radiological surveys were conducted using both a digital count rate meter with a NaI detector reporting in counts per minute (CPM) and a dose rate meter reporting micro-Roentgen per hour (uR) connected to a CHEMRAD Tennessee Corp. Series 2000 USRADS. The count rate meter was set for gross counting, i.e., Window ``out``. The window setting allows detection of low, intermediate, and high energy photons. The USRADS equipment is used to record the detector readings verses the location of the readings, generate a map of the survey area, and save the data on computer storage media.

  8. Radiological Defense Officer. Student Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Civil Preparedness Agency (DOD), Washington, DC.

    This student workbook includes the necessary administrative materials, briefs, exercises and answer sheets for the quizzes and final course examination as needed by the students during the conduct of the Radiological Defense Officer course. Among the briefs included are the following: (1) Reporting Forms; (2) Forecasting Dose Rates; (3) Dose…

  9. Radiologic Technology Occupations. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reneau, Fred; And Others

    This guide delineates the tasks and performance standards for radiologic technology occupations. It includes job seeking skills, work attitudes, energy conservation practices, and safety. The guide is centered around the three domains of learning: psychomotor, cognitive, and affective. For each duty, the following are provided: task, standard of…

  10. [Radiological dose and metadata management].

    PubMed

    Walz, M; Kolodziej, M; Madsack, B

    2016-12-01

    This article describes the features of management systems currently available in Germany for extraction, registration and evaluation of metadata from radiological examinations, particularly in the digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) environment. In addition, the probable relevant developments in this area concerning radiation protection legislation, terminology, standardization and information technology are presented.

  11. Anismus, Physiology, Radiology: Is It Time for Some Pragmatism? A Comparative Study of Radiological and Anorectal Physiology Findings in Patients With Anismus

    PubMed Central

    Irvine, Lesley; Szczachor, Justina; Jawad, Ahsin; MacLeod, Andrew; Lim, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Anismus is a functional disorder featuring obstructive symptoms and paradoxical contractions of the pelvic floor. This study aims to establish diagnosis agreement between physiology and radiology, associate anismus with morphological outlet obstruction, and explore the role of sphincteric pressure and rectal volumes in the radiological diagnosis of anismus. Methods Consecutive patients were evaluated by using magnetic resonance imaging proctography/fluoroscopic defecography and anorectal physiology. Morphological radiological features were associated with physiology tests. A categorical analysis was performed using the chi-square test, and agreement was assessed via the kappa coefficient. A Mann-Whitney test was used to assess rectal volumes and sphincterial pressure distributions between groups of patients. A P-value of <0.05 was significant. Results Forty-three patients (42 female patients) underwent anorectal physiology and radiology imaging. The median age was 54 years (interquartile range, 41.5–60 years). Anismus was seen radiologically and physiologically in 18 (41.8%) and 12 patients (27.9%), respectively. The agreement between modalities was 0.298 (P = 0.04). Using physiology as a reference, radiology had positive and negative predictive values of 44% and 84%, respectively. Rectoceles, cystoceles, enteroceles and pathological pelvic floor descent were not physiologically predictive of animus (P > 0.05). The sphincterial straining pressure was 71 mmHg in the anismus group versus 12 mmHg. Radiology was likely to identify anismus when the straining pressure exceeded 50% of the resting pressure (P = 0.08). Conclusion Radiological techniques detect pelvic morphological abnormalities, but lead to overdiagnoses of anismus. No proctographic pathological feature predicts anismus reliably. A stronger pelvic floor paradoxical contraction is associated with a greater likelihood of detection by proctography. PMID:27847787

  12. Natural Language Processing Technologies in Radiology Research and Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Cai, Tianrun; Giannopoulos, Andreas A; Yu, Sheng; Kelil, Tatiana; Ripley, Beth; Kumamaru, Kanako K; Rybicki, Frank J; Mitsouras, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    The migration of imaging reports to electronic medical record systems holds great potential in terms of advancing radiology research and practice by leveraging the large volume of data continuously being updated, integrated, and shared. However, there are significant challenges as well, largely due to the heterogeneity of how these data are formatted. Indeed, although there is movement toward structured reporting in radiology (ie, hierarchically itemized reporting with use of standardized terminology), the majority of radiology reports remain unstructured and use free-form language. To effectively "mine" these large datasets for hypothesis testing, a robust strategy for extracting the necessary information is needed. Manual extraction of information is a time-consuming and often unmanageable task. "Intelligent" search engines that instead rely on natural language processing (NLP), a computer-based approach to analyzing free-form text or speech, can be used to automate this data mining task. The overall goal of NLP is to translate natural human language into a structured format (ie, a fixed collection of elements), each with a standardized set of choices for its value, that is easily manipulated by computer programs to (among other things) order into subcategories or query for the presence or absence of a finding. The authors review the fundamentals of NLP and describe various techniques that constitute NLP in radiology, along with some key applications. ©RSNA, 2016.

  13. Natural Language Processing Technologies in Radiology Research and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Tianrun; Giannopoulos, Andreas A.; Yu, Sheng; Kelil, Tatiana; Ripley, Beth; Kumamaru, Kanako K.; Rybicki, Frank J.

    2016-01-01

    The migration of imaging reports to electronic medical record systems holds great potential in terms of advancing radiology research and practice by leveraging the large volume of data continuously being updated, integrated, and shared. However, there are significant challenges as well, largely due to the heterogeneity of how these data are formatted. Indeed, although there is movement toward structured reporting in radiology (ie, hierarchically itemized reporting with use of standardized terminology), the majority of radiology reports remain unstructured and use free-form language. To effectively “mine” these large datasets for hypothesis testing, a robust strategy for extracting the necessary information is needed. Manual extraction of information is a time-consuming and often unmanageable task. “Intelligent” search engines that instead rely on natural language processing (NLP), a computer-based approach to analyzing free-form text or speech, can be used to automate this data mining task. The overall goal of NLP is to translate natural human language into a structured format (ie, a fixed collection of elements), each with a standardized set of choices for its value, that is easily manipulated by computer programs to (among other things) order into subcategories or query for the presence or absence of a finding. The authors review the fundamentals of NLP and describe various techniques that constitute NLP in radiology, along with some key applications. ©RSNA, 2016 PMID:26761536

  14. InfoToday 2002 Collected Presentations (New York, New York, May 14-16, 2002).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nixon, Carol, Comp.; Burmood, Jennifer, Comp.

    This volume contains collected presentations (papers, outlines, and visual materials) from InfoToday 2002, the Global Conference & Exhibition on Electronic Information and Knowledge Management, featuring three core conferences for information professionals and knowledge managers: NationalOnline 2002, KnowledgeNets 2002, and E-Libraries 2002.…

  15. InfoToday 2002 Collected Presentations (New York, New York, May 14-16, 2002).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nixon, Carol, Comp.; Burmood, Jennifer, Comp.

    This volume contains collected presentations (papers, outlines, and visual materials) from InfoToday 2002, the Global Conference & Exhibition on Electronic Information and Knowledge Management, featuring three core conferences for information professionals and knowledge managers: NationalOnline 2002, KnowledgeNets 2002, and E-Libraries 2002.…

  16. What Do Today's Teachers Want (and Not Want) from Teacher Leaders?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Margolis, Jason; Doring, Anne

    2013-01-01

    This article looks across six years of teacher leadership research to explore what today's teachers want (and don't want) from teacher leaders. A secondary analysis was conducted on volumes of teacher leader data, focused on teacher leader-teacher interactions, using a "justice" and "integrity"-oriented framework.…

  17. Design, implementation, and assessment of a radiology workflow management system.

    PubMed

    Halsted, Mark J; Froehle, Craig M

    2008-08-01

    The objective of this article is to describe the development, launch, and outcomes studies of a paperless workflow management system (WMS) that improves radiology workflow in a filmless and speech-recognition environment. The WMS prioritizes cases automatically on the basis of medical and operational acuity factors, automatically facilitates communication of critical radiology results, and provides permanent documentation of these results and communications. It runs in parallel with an integrated radiology information system (RIS)-PACS and speech-recognition system. Its effects on operations, staff stress and satisfaction, and patient satisfaction were studied. Despite an increase in caseload volume after the launch of the WMS, case turnaround times, defined as the time between case availability on PACS and signing of the final radiology staff interpretation, decreased for all case types. Median case turnaround time decreased by 33 minutes (22%) for emergency department, 47 minutes (37%) for inpatient, and 22 minutes (38%) for outpatient radiology cases. All reductions were significant at a p value of < 0.05. Interruptions were reduced, consuming an estimated 28% less radiology staff time, after implementation. Patient perceptions of radiology service timeliness showed modest improvement after the WMS was implemented. Staff satisfaction showed no significant change. There is room for improvement in radiology workflow even in departments with integrated RIS-PACS and speech-recognition systems. This study has shown that software tools that coordinate decentralized workflow and dynamically balance workloads can increase the efficiency and efficacy of radiologists. Operational benefits, such as reduced reading times, improvements in the timeliness of care (both actual and as perceived by patients), and reduced interruptions to radiologists, further reinforce the benefits of such a system. Secondary benefits, such as documenting communication about a case and

  18. 10 CFR 835.501 - Radiological areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Radiological areas. 835.501 Section 835.501 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Entry Control Program § 835.501 Radiological areas. (a... commensurate with existing and potential radiological hazards within the area. (c) One or more of the following...

  19. 10 CFR 835.501 - Radiological areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Radiological areas. 835.501 Section 835.501 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Entry Control Program § 835.501 Radiological areas. (a... commensurate with existing and potential radiological hazards within the area. (c) One or more of the following...

  20. 10 CFR 835.501 - Radiological areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Radiological areas. 835.501 Section 835.501 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Entry Control Program § 835.501 Radiological areas. (a... commensurate with existing and potential radiological hazards within the area. (c) One or more of the following...

  1. 10 CFR 835.501 - Radiological areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Radiological areas. 835.501 Section 835.501 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Entry Control Program § 835.501 Radiological areas. (a... commensurate with existing and potential radiological hazards within the area. (c) One or more of the following...

  2. 21 CFR 892.1980 - Radiologic table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Radiologic table. 892.1980 Section 892.1980 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1980 Radiologic table. (a) Identification. A...

  3. 21 CFR 892.1980 - Radiologic table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Radiologic table. 892.1980 Section 892.1980 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1980 Radiologic table. (a) Identification. A...

  4. 21 CFR 892.1980 - Radiologic table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Radiologic table. 892.1980 Section 892.1980 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1980 Radiologic table. (a) Identification. A...

  5. 21 CFR 892.1980 - Radiologic table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radiologic table. 892.1980 Section 892.1980 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1980 Radiologic table. (a) Identification. A...

  6. 21 CFR 892.1980 - Radiologic table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Radiologic table. 892.1980 Section 892.1980 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1980 Radiologic table. (a) Identification. A...

  7. The 1985 year book of diagnostic radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Bragg, D.G.

    1984-01-01

    This book provides reviews of 343 significant articles from 79 journals. Topics include the following: expanding use of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging; sonography and pediatric radiology; radiographic evaluation of skeletal stress injuries; cost effectiveness of radiographic procedures; radiologic manifestations of iatrogenic complications; breast cancer diagnosis; interventional radiology and underutilization; and computed tomography in diagnosis and staging of neoplasms.

  8. Radiology and social media: are private practice radiology groups more social than academic radiology departments?

    PubMed

    Glover, McKinley; Choy, Garry; Boland, Giles W; Saini, Sanjay; Prabhakar, Anand M

    2015-05-01

    This study assesses the prevalence of use of the most commonly used social media sites among private radiology groups (PRGs) and academic radiology departments (ARDs). The 50 largest PRGs and the 50 ARDs with the highest level of funding from the National Institutes of Health were assessed for presence of a radiology-specific social media account on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, YouTube, and LinkedIn. Measures of organizational activity and end-user activity were collected, including the number of posts and followers, as appropriate; between-group comparisons were performed. PRGs adopted Facebook 12 months earlier (P = .02) and Twitter 18 months earlier (P = .02) than did ARDs. A total of 76% of PRGs maintained ≥1 account on the social media sites included in the study, compared with 28% of ARDs (P < .0001). The prevalence of having an account on the social media sites for PRGs was: Facebook, 66%; LinkedIn, 56%; Twitter, 42%; YouTube, 20%; Pinterest, 4%; and Instagram, 2%. The prevalence of radiology-specific social media accounts for ARDs was: Facebook, 18%; LinkedIn, 0%; Twitter, 24%; YouTube, 6%; Pinterest, 0%; and Instagram, 0%. There was no significant difference between ARDs and PRGs in measures of end-user or organizational activity on Facebook or Twitter. Use of social media in health care is emerging as mainstream, with PRGs being early adopters of Facebook and Twitter in comparison with ARDs. Competitive environments and institutional policies may be strong factors that influence how social media is used by radiologists at the group and department levels. Copyright © 2015 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Interactive, Computer-Based Training Program for Radiological Workers

    SciTech Connect

    Trinoskey, P.A.; Camacho, P.I.; Wells, L.

    2000-01-18

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is redesigning its Computer-Based Training (CBT) program for radiological workers. The redesign represents a major effort to produce a single, highly interactive and flexible CBT program that will meet the training needs of a wide range of radiological workers--from researchers and x-ray operators to individuals working in tritium, uranium, plutonium, and accelerator facilities. The new CBT program addresses the broad diversity of backgrounds found at a national laboratory. When a training audience is homogeneous in terms of education level and type of work performed, it is difficult to duplicate the effectiveness of a flexible, technically competent instructor who can tailor a course to the express needs and concerns of a course's participants. Unfortunately, such homogeneity is rare. At LLNL, they have a diverse workforce engaged in a wide range of radiological activities, from the fairly common to the quite exotic. As a result, the Laboratory must offer a wide variety of radiological worker courses. These include a general contamination-control course in addition to radioactive-material-handling courses for both low-level laboratory (i.e., bench-top) activities as well as high-level work in tritium, uranium, and plutonium facilities. They also offer training courses for employees who work with radiation-generating devices--x-ray, accelerator, and E-beam operators, for instance. However, even with the number and variety of courses the Laboratory offers, they are constrained by the diversity of backgrounds (i.e., knowledge and experience) of those to be trained. Moreover, time constraints often preclude in-depth coverage of site- and/or task-specific details. In response to this situation, several years ago LLNL began moving toward computer-based training for radiological workers. Today, that CBT effort includes a general radiological safety course developed by the Department of Energy's Hanford facility and a

  10. Climate: how unusual is today's solar activity?

    PubMed

    Muscheler, Raimund; Joos, Fortunat; Müller, Simon A; Snowball, Ian

    2005-07-28

    To put global warming into context requires knowledge about past changes in solar activity and the role of the Sun in climate change. Solanki et al. propose that solar activity during recent decades was exceptionally high compared with that over the preceding 8,000 years. However, our extended analysis of the radiocarbon record reveals several periods during past centuries in which the strength of the magnetic field in the solar wind was similar to, or even higher than, that of today.

  11. What makes 'big data' different from 'regular data' within radiology? The easiest answer: when it no longer fits into Excel!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsköld, L.; Alvfeldt, G.; Wintell, M.

    2015-03-01

    One of the challenges of today's healthcare is that data from radiology is heterogeneous, stored and managed in silos created by PACS vendors. Also seen is a lack of coordinated use of harmonized reference information models and established healthcare standards. Radiology in Region Västra Götaland has been entering the world of "Big Data" since 2006, 34 departments split into 4 private image center, 2 small-size hospital, 4 middle-sized hospital groups and one University hospital. Using the same information infrastructure as a means of collaborating and sharing information between. As an organization building for the future we must meet the values and requirements of the stakeholders and count the patient as the major actor. Can "Big Data" analytics be a valuable asset from a regional management perspective? Our initial findings indicates that this is the case, based on three different perspectives - work practice changes, understanding data quality when sharing information and introducing new services in work practice. Going from local to enterprise workflow utilizing the power of "Big Data", not only by volume but also by combining diverse sources and aggregate the information domains, visualize new trends as well as dependencies more effectively. Building trust by the use of Big Data in healthcare involves a long and winding journey, but the persevering infrastructure-oriented organization will give new ways of collaboration for the enterprise it serves. It also involves continuous negotiation with people concerning how and why they should collaborate with new actors within the region to achieve patient centric care. This will nurture a more open-minded, hopeful and life-affirming holistic approach involving all stakeholders, newcomers' specialists and patients.

  12. Radiology education: a glimpse into the future.

    PubMed

    Scarsbrook, A F; Graham, R N J; Perriss, R W

    2006-08-01

    The digital revolution in radiology continues to advance rapidly. There are a number of interesting developments within radiology informatics which may have a significant impact on education and training of radiologists in the near future. These include extended functionality of handheld computers, web-based skill and knowledge assessment, standardization of radiological procedural training using simulated or virtual patients, worldwide videoconferencing via high-quality health networks such as Internet2 and global collaboration of radiological educational resources via comprehensive, multi-national databases such as the medical imaging resource centre initiative of the Radiological Society of North America. This article will explore the role of e-learning in radiology, highlight a number of useful web-based applications in this area, and explain how the current and future technological advances might best be incorporated into radiological training.

  13. Radiology applications of financial accounting.

    PubMed

    Leibenhaut, Mark H

    2005-03-01

    A basic knowledge of financial accounting can help radiologists analyze business opportunities and examine the potential impacts of new technology or predict the adverse consequences of new competitors entering their service area. The income statement, balance sheet, and cash flow statement are the three basic financial statements that document the current financial position of the radiology practice and allow managers to monitor the ongoing financial operations of the enterprise. Pro forma, or hypothetical, financial statements can be generated to predict the financial impact of specific business decisions or investments on the profitability of the practice. Sensitivity analysis, or what-if scenarios, can be performed to determine the potential impact of changing key revenue, investment, operating cost or financial assumptions. By viewing radiology as both a profession and a business, radiologists can optimize their use of scarce economic resources and maximize the return on their financial investments.

  14. Environmental monitoring in interventional radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Sol, S.; Garcia, R.; Sánchez, D.; Ramirez, G.; Chavarin, E. U.; Rivera, T.

    2017-01-01

    The procedures in Interventional Radiology involve long times of exposure and high number of radiographic images that bring higher radiation doses to patients, staff and environmental than those received in conventional Radiology. Currently for monitoring the dose, the thermoluminescent dosimetry use is recommended. The aim of this work was to carry out the monitoring of the environmental scattered radiation inside the IR room using two types of thermoluminescent dosimeters, TLD-100 (reference dosimeter), CaSO4:Dy (synthesized in our laboratory). The results indicate that the TLD-100 is not effective for the environmental monitoring of low-energy Rx rooms. The CaSO4:Dy presented good behaviour over the 6 months of study. The results will be specific to each room so it is recommended such studies as part of the program of quality control of each Rx room.

  15. Interventional radiology in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Katsanos, Konstantinos; Ahmad, Farhan; Dourado, Renato; Sabharwal, Tarun; Adam, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Interventional radiological percutaneous procedures are becoming all the more important in the curative or palliative management of elderly frail patients with multiple underlying comorbidities. They may serve either as alternative primary minimally invasive therapies or adjuncts to traditional surgical treatments. The present report provides a concise review of the most important interventional radiological procedures with a special focus on the treatment of the primary debilitating pathologies of the elderly population. The authors elaborate on the scientific evidence and latest developments of thermoablation of solid organ malignancies, palliative stent placement for gastrointestinal tract cancer, airway stenting for tracheobronchial strictures, endovascular management of aortic and peripheral arterial vascular disease, and cement stabilization of osteoporotic vertebral fractures. The added benefits of high technical and clinical success coupled with lower procedural mortality and morbidity are highlighted. PMID:19503761

  16. An atlas of radiological anatomy

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, J.; Abrahams, P.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains a wealth of radiologic images of normal human anatomy; plain radiographs, contrast-enhanced radiographs, and computed tomography (CT) scans. There are 18 pages of magnetic resonance (MR) images, most on the brain and spinal cord, so that there are only two pages on MR imaging of the heart and two pages on abdominal and pelvic MR imaging. Twelve pages of ultrasound (US) images are included. This book has the radiologic image paired with an explanatory drawing; the image is on the left with a paragraph or two of text, and the drawing is on the right with legends. This book includes images of the brain and spinal cord obtained with arteriography, venography, myelography, encephalography, CT, and MR imaging.

  17. A hypermedia radiological reporting system.

    PubMed

    De Simone, M; Drudi, F M; Lalle, C; Poggi, R; Ricci, F L

    1997-01-01

    Report is the main phase of a diagnostic process by images. The product of the process is the diagnostic report. We are proposing an hypermedia structure of diagnostic report in radiology, in order to facilitate exchange between radiologist and clinician (specialist in internal medicine or surgeon) on a clinical case, without anymore charge on the side of the radiologist but with an 'off-line' consultation. An hypermedia radiological report software will produce further advantages in many aspects: radiologist and clinician could access patient's data directly from DB on patients; radiologist could check DB on exemplary cases real-time; clinician could read preliminary and final reports available in network and make requests online. The proposed hyper-report system is modular. Starting from the 'report text' writing, edited by the radiologist on the basis of most significative images, it is possible to insert comments in text, drawing and 'external' images form.

  18. [Radiation protection in interventional radiology].

    PubMed

    Adamus, R; Loose, R; Wucherer, M; Uder, M; Galster, M

    2016-03-01

    The application of ionizing radiation in medicine seems to be a safe procedure for patients as well as for occupational exposition to personnel. The developments in interventional radiology with fluoroscopy and dose-intensive interventions require intensified radiation protection. It is recommended that all available tools should be used for this purpose. Besides the options for instruments, x‑ray protection at the intervention table must be intensively practiced with lead aprons and mounted lead glass. A special focus on eye protection to prevent cataracts is also recommended. The development of cataracts might no longer be deterministic, as confirmed by new data; therefore, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has lowered the threshold dose value for eyes from 150 mSv/year to 20 mSv/year. Measurements show that the new values can be achieved by applying all X‑ray protection measures plus lead-containing eyeglasses.

  19. Radiologic management of musculoskeletal tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Pettersson, H.; Springfield, D.S.; Enneking, W.F.

    1986-01-01

    The present book is written by a radiologist and two orthopedic surgeons with long experience in musculoskeletal tumors. It is based on modern pathologic and surgical principles, and from those principles the radiologic approach is discussed. The main questions ask what information can be gained by the different modalities, and which combination of modalities is the most profitable to determine the local behaviour of the tumor, diagnosis and local extent.

  20. Otologic radiology with clinical correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Ruenes, R.; De la Cruz, A.

    1986-01-01

    This manual covers developments in the radiologic diagnosis of otologic problems. To demonstrate the appearance of each disorder comprehensively, a large number of radiographs are included, many of them annotated to highlight both diagnostic signs and the subtle aspects of normal pathologic anatomy. Contents: X-ray and Imaging Techniques and Anatomy. Congenital Malformations. Middle and External Ear Infections. Otosclerosis and Otospongiosis. Temporal Bone Fractures. The Facial Nerve. Tumors of the Temporal Bone and Skull Base. Tumors of the Cerebellopontine Angle. Cochlear Implants.

  1. Increasing diversity in radiologic technology.

    PubMed

    Carwile, Laura

    2003-01-01

    Diversity is increasingly important in the radiologic technology workplace. For significant changes to occur in work force diversity, educators must first recruit and retain students from a wide variety of backgrounds. This article examines personality, race and gender as factors affecting career choice and how educators can use these factors to increase diversity in their programs. An overview of the ASRT's efforts to improve diversity within the profession is presented, along with suggestions for developing effective recruitment and retention plans to increase diversity.

  2. [Male impotence. Radiologic venous examinations].

    PubMed

    Delcour, C; Vandenbosch, G; van Bunnen, Y; Charret, F; Struyven, J

    1988-01-01

    A vascular pathology is the most common etiology of male impotence of organic origin and among these vascular problems, the most frequent are represented by the anomalies of the venous drainage. Based on a personal experience of more than 450 radiological examinations, we will describe the techniques of cavernography and cavernometry as well as the effects of intra-cavernous injections of papaverin and we will present the results from the literature.

  3. Radiologic diagnosis of gastrointestinal perforation.

    PubMed

    Rubesin, Stephen E; Levine, Marc S

    2003-11-01

    Perforations of the gastrointestinal tract have many causes. Holes in the wall of gastrointestinal organs can be created by blunt or penetrating trauma, iatrogenic injury, inflammatory conditions that penetrate the serosa or adventitia, extrinsic neoplasms that invade the gastrointestinal tract, or primary neoplasms that penetrate outside the wall of gastrointestinal organs. This article provides a radiologic approach for investigating the wide variety of gastrointestinal perforations. General principles about contrast agents and studies are reviewed, and then perforations in specific gastrointestinal organs are discussed.

  4. Application of spreadsheets to standardize transportation radiological risk assessments

    SciTech Connect

    McClure, J.D.; Neuhauser, K.S.; Smith, J.D.

    1995-12-31

    Because of the complexity, volume of data and calculations required, one preferred analytical tool to perform transportation risk assessments is the RADTRAN computer code. RADTRAN combines user-determined material, packaging, transportation, demographic and meteorological factors, with health physics data to calculate expected radiological consequences and accident risk from transporting radioactive materials by all commercial modes including truck, rail, ship, air and barge. The computer code consists of two major modules for each transport mode: the incident-free module, in which doses from normal transport are calculated; and the accident module, in which dose consequences and probabilities are evaluated to generate risk estimates. The purpose of this presentation is to describe the development of a standardized procedure to perform transportation radiological risk assessments employing conventional spreadsheet programs to automate generation of RADTRAN input files and post-processing analysis of the resulting output.

  5. Radiological Defense. Volume 4. An Introduction to Radiological Instruments for Military Use

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1950-01-01

    atomnic lbomnl explosion , increuis- applies to the (lefense establishment, has been emphalmsis and thoughlt have b~een placed upon assiniedl the name...development. anges in the electrical conduction of the sub- , se inee in which they are produced. This latter B. Explosive reactions such as benzoyl per... explosions falling over is 35 degrees. , (8) have given us some criteria for the design of Disposable transparent plastic covers have been 0 . hand-carried

  6. Understanding Mechanisms of Radiological Contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Rick Demmer; John Drake; Ryan James, PhD

    2014-03-01

    Over the last 50 years, the study of radiological contamination and decontamination has expanded significantly. This paper addresses the mechanisms of radiological contamination that have been reported and then discusses which methods have recently been used during performance testing of several different decontamination technologies. About twenty years ago the Idaho Nuclear Technology Engineering Center (INTEC) at the INL began a search for decontamination processes which could minimize secondary waste. In order to test the effectiveness of these decontamination technologies, a new simulated contamination, termed SIMCON, was developed. SIMCON was designed to replicate the types of contamination found on stainless steel, spent fuel processing equipment. Ten years later, the INL began research into methods for simulating urban contamination resulting from a radiological dispersal device (RDD). This work was sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and included the initial development an aqueous application of contaminant to substrate. Since 2007, research sponsored by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has advanced that effort and led to the development of a contamination method that simulates particulate fallout from an Improvised Nuclear Device (IND). The IND method diverges from previous efforts to create tenacious contamination by simulating a reproducible “loose” contamination. Examining these different types of contamination (and subsequent decontamination processes), which have included several different radionuclides and substrates, sheds light on contamination processes that occur throughout the nuclear industry and in the urban environment.

  7. Radiological safety and risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, P.H.; Barg, D.C.; Baird, R.D.; Card, D.H.; de Souza, F.; Elder, J.; Felthauser, K.; Jensen, C.; Winkler, V.

    1982-02-01

    A brief radiological safety and risk assessment of a nuclear power generation center with an adjacent on-site waste disposal facility at a specific site in the State of Utah is presented. The assessment was conducted to assist in determining the feasibility and practicality of developing a nuclear energy center (NEC) in Utah consisting of nine 1250 MWe nuclear pressurized water reactor (PWR) electrical generating units arranged in 3 clusters of 3 units each known as triads. The site selected for this conceptual study is in the Horse Bench area about 15 miles directly south of the town of Green River, Utah. The radiological issues included direct radiation exposures to on-site workers and the off-site population, release of radioactive material, and effects of these releases for both normal operations and accidental occurrences. The basic finding of this study is that the concept of an NEC in the Green River area, specifically at the Horse Bench site, is radiologically feasible.

  8. Telemetry of Aerial Radiological Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    H. W. Clark, Jr.

    2002-10-01

    Telemetry has been added to National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA's) Aerial Measuring System (AMS) Incident Response aircraft to accelerate availability of aerial radiological mapping data. Rapid aerial radiological mapping is promptly performed by AMS Incident Response aircraft in the event of a major radiological dispersal. The AMS airplane flies the entire potentially affected area, plus a generous margin, to provide a quick look at the extent and severity of the event. The primary result of the AMS Incident Response over flight is a map of estimated exposure rate on the ground along the flight path. Formerly, it was necessary to wait for the airplane to land before the map could be seen. Now, while the flight is still in progress, data are relayed via satellite directly from the aircraft to an operations center, where they are displayed and disseminated. This permits more timely utilization of results by decision makers and redirection of the mission to optimize its value. The current telemetry capability can cover all of North America. Extension to a global capability is under consideration.

  9. Radiology uses of the Internet.

    PubMed

    Krug, H; Cheng, D

    1995-01-01

    The Internet promises to be an essential resource for radiology administrators. In addition to offering remarkable access to colleagues all over the world, the Internet offers specialized information resources for radiology, many of which are described in this article. The Internet is many networks that communicate with each other and whose general purpose is to share information. Although there are several consortium organizations that support and regulate it, no single body or organization "owns" the Internet. Many employees and students at large teaching centers already have access to the Internet through their institution's connection. Individuals and small institutions can contract with independent service providers for Internet access. Internet functions covered in this article include: e-mail, listservs, newsgroups, file transfer protocols, Gopher, and the World Wide Web. The rapid pace of information exchange is making the world of radiology smaller and more intimate. Communication and knowledge are becoming so accessible that individuals are privy to the most minute happenings in the industry. Sharing information on the Internet will benefit not only individual users and the industry, but also patients.

  10. Radiological Evaluation of Bowel Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Dhatt, Harpreet S.; Behr, Spencer C; Miracle, Aaron; Wang, Zhen Jane; Yeh, Benjamin M.

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal ischemia, which refers to insufficient blood flow to the bowel, is a potentially catastrophic entity that may require emergent intervention or surgery in the acute setting. Although the clinical signs and symptoms of intestinal ischemia are nonspecific, CT findings can be highly suggestive in the correct clinical setting. In this chapter we review the CT diagnosis of arterial, venous, and non-occlusive intestinal ischemia. We discuss the vascular anatomy, pathophysiology of intestinal ischemia, CT techniques for optimal imaging, key and ancillary radiological findings, and differential diagnosis. In the setting of an acute abdomen, rapid evaluation is necessary to identify intraabdominal processes that require emergent surgical intervention (1). While a wide-range of intraabdominal diseases may be present from trauma to inflammation, one of the most feared disorders is mesenteric ischemia, also known as intestinal ischemia, which refers to insufficient blood flow to the bowel (2). Initial imaging evaluation for intestinal ischemia is typically obtained with CT. Close attention to technique and search for key radiologic features with relation to the CT technique is required. Accurate diagnosis depends on understanding the vascular anatomy, epidemiology, and pathophysiology of various forms of mesenteric ischemia and their corresponding radiological findings on MDCT. At imaging, not only is inspection of the bowel itself important, but evaluation of the mesenteric fat, vasculature, and surrounding peritoneal cavity also helps improves accuracy in the diagnosis of bowel ischemia. PMID:26526436

  11. Radiological Examinations in Pediatric Age.

    PubMed

    Siciliano, R

    2017-01-01

    Diagnostic radiology imaging is an essential tool for adequate clinical investigation of pathological processes and the drafting of a personalized therapy plan. However, in recent years, there has been a substantial increase of requests, mainly due to technological advances but also to social and cultural reasons, not always based on the principle of the diagnostic justification. The progress of recent years in the field of diagnostic radiology has made available to the physician a variety of sophisticated radiological examinations, which are not always used rationally and appropriately. The theme is of paramount importance, particularly in childhood or adolescence, characterized by elevated radiosensitivity (high cell turnover) and longer life expectancy; therefore, children exposed to ionizing radiation are theoretically subject to a higher risk of carcinogenesis compared to the general population. For these reasons the young patients should have greater protection and examinations must respect stringent appropriateness criteria. Far from underestimating the important diagnostic and therapeutic benefits that these procedures provide, the use of ionizing radiations must minimize the radiation-related risk in accordance with the ALARA principle (As Low As Reasonably Achievable), key principle of modern radiation protection.

  12. United States medical school graduate interest in radiology residency programs as depicted by online search tools.

    PubMed

    Haney, Nora M; Kinsella, Stuart D; Morey, José M

    2014-02-01

    Recent media publications have indicated a tough job market in medical specialty positions for medical school graduates, specifically in the field of radiology. Internet search tools, such as Google Trends, have proved useful in the prediction of certain diseases on the basis of the search volume index for a specific term. The authors hypothesized that online search tools might be useful in the prediction of US medical school graduates' interest in residency positions in radiology. Google Trends indicated an increase over time in searches for "radiology salary" and a decrease over time in searches for "radiology residency." National Resident Matching Program results for diagnostic radiology showed an increase from 2004 to 2009 in the percentage of US graduates entering radiology but a dramatic drop from 2010 to 2013. This occurred even while the total number of US graduates active in the National Resident Matching Program increased. This finding might have been foretold on the basis of online query result trends. Online search data may be a useful insight into the interests of US medical school graduates and may be predictive of unfilled radiology residency positions and eventual increased shortages of community radiologists coming from US medical schools.

  13. Renal relevant radiology: radiologic imaging in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Rahbari-Oskoui, Frederic; Mittal, Ankush; Mittal, Pardeep; Chapman, Arlene

    2014-02-01

    Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease is a systemic disorder and the most common hereditary renal disease, which is characterized by cyst growth, progressive renal enlargement, and development of renal failure. The cystic nature of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and its renal and extrarenal complications (kidney stones, cyst hemorrhage, intracerebral aneurysm, liver cysts, cardiac valve abnormalities, etc.) give radiologic imaging studies a central role in the management of these patients. This article reviews the indications, comparative use, and limitation of various imaging modalities (ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging, computerized tomography scan, Positron emission tomography scan, and renal scintigraphy) for the diagnosis and management of complications in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Finally, this work provides evidence for the value of total kidney volume to predict disease progression in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

  14. Renal Relevant Radiology: Radiologic Imaging in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rahbari-Oskoui, Frederic; Mittal, Ankush; Mittal, Pardeep

    2014-01-01

    Summary Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease is a systemic disorder and the most common hereditary renal disease, which is characterized by cyst growth, progressive renal enlargement, and development of renal failure. The cystic nature of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and its renal and extrarenal complications (kidney stones, cyst hemorrhage, intracerebral aneurysm, liver cysts, cardiac valve abnormalities, etc.) give radiologic imaging studies a central role in the management of these patients. This article reviews the indications, comparative use, and limitation of various imaging modalities (ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging, computerized tomography scan, Positron emission tomography scan, and renal scintigraphy) for the diagnosis and management of complications in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Finally, this work provides evidence for the value of total kidney volume to predict disease progression in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. PMID:24370765

  15. Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Plan, Volume 2 Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtel Nevada

    1998-12-31

    Supporting material for the plan includes: QUALITY ASSURANCE, ANALYSIS, AND SAMPLING PLAN FOR NTS AIR; QUALITY ASSURANCE, ANALYSIS, AND SAMPLING PLAN FOR WATER ON AND OFF THE NEVADA TEST SITE; QUALITY ASSURANCE, ANALYSIS, AND SAMPLING PLAN FOR NTS BIOTA; QUALITY ASSURANCE, ANALYSIS, AND SAMPLING PLAN FOR DIRECT RADIATION MONITORING; DATA QUALITY OBJECTIVES PROCESS; VADOSE ZONE MONITORING PLAN CHECKLIST.

  16. Characterization Investigation Study: Volume 3, Radiological survey of surface soils

    SciTech Connect

    Solow, A.J.; Phoenix, D.R.

    1987-12-01

    The Feed Materials Production Center was constructed to produce high purity uranium metal for use at various Department of Energy facilities. The waste products from these operations include general uncontaminated scrap and refuse, contaminated and uncontaminated metal scrap, waste oils, low-level radioactive waste, co-contaminated wastes, mixed waste, toxic waste, sludges from water treatment, and fly ash from the steam plant. This material is estimated to total more than 350,000 cubic meters. Other wastes stored in this area include laboratory chemicals and other combustible materials in the burn pit; fine waste stream sediments in the clear well; fly ash and waste oils in the two fly ash areas; lime-alum sludges and boiler plant blowdown in the lime sludge ponds; and nonradioactive sanitary waste, construction rubble, and asbestos in the sanitary landfill. A systematic survey of the surface soils throughout the Waste Storage Area, associated on-site drainages, and the fly ash piles was conducted using a Field Instrument for Detecting Low-Energy Radiation (FIDLER). Uranium is the most prevalent radioactive element in surface soil; U-238 is the principal radionuclide, ranging from 2.2 to 1790 pCi/g in the general Waste Storage Area. The maximum values for the next highest activity concentrations in the same area were 972 pCi/g for Th-230 and 298 pCi/g for U-234. Elevated activity concentrations of Th-230 were found along the K-65 slurry line, the maximum at 3010 pCi/g. U-238 had the highest value of 761 pCi/g in the drainage just south of pit no. 5. The upper fly ash area had the highest radionuclide activity concentrations in the surface soils with the maximum values for U-238 at 8600 pCi/g, U-235 at 2190 pCi/g, U-234 at 11,400 pCi/g, Tc-99 at 594 pCi/g, Ra-226 at 279 pCi/g, and Th-230 at 164 pCi/g.

  17. Operation HARDTACK. Volume 2. Radiological Safety. Extracted Version

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-10-01

    POJOA , C J~~’/𔄃( Vera )L (Levoy)e ((Oscar) * / (Re RIBAI(Tom)______ (I(Van) (Fred)R iliS~~ ~ ~ OF S;3 IE/1 NYA Avn (I(Henry) DEEP ENTRANC Radiologica...Bikini fer 75 iles and north for 3C mieae, 50 miles outo to confirm thse vstarn- ,. x sn’ o.f tie fallout patte:-n, Ve!!o-:t ara predicZ31 alo g a...Osar ’ (Ruby BIJI (L( Vera ) DEEP ENTRANCE PHOTO TOWERERONU (Osca()M) F Arin 0 /X (V n 4 TADPTE TEAK AND ORANGE EVENT OPERATION HARDTACK - In view of

  18. Gray Matter Involvement in Radiologically Isolated Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Labiano-Fontcuberta, Andrés; Mato-Abad, Virginia; Álvarez-Linera, Juan; Hernández-Tamames, Juan Antonio; Martínez-Ginés, M Luisa; Aladro, Yolanda; Ayuso, Lucía; Domingo-Santos, Ángela; Benito-León, Julián

    2016-03-01

    The unanticipated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detection in the brain of asymptomatic subjects of white matter lesions suggestive of multiple sclerosis has recently been named as radiologically isolated syndrome (RIS). The pathophysiological processes of RIS remain largely unknown and questions as to whether gray matter alterations actually occur in this entity are yet to be investigated in more detail. By means of a 3 T multimodal MRI approach, we searched for cortical and deep gray matter changes in a cohort of RIS patients. Seventeen RIS patients, 17 clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) patients (median disease duration from symptom onset = 12 months), and 17 healthy controls underwent MRI and neuropsychological testing. Normalized deep gray matter volumes and regional cortical thickness were assessed using FreeSurfer. SIENAX was used to obtain normalized global and cortical brain volumes. Voxelwise morphometry analysis was performed by using SPM8 software to localize regions of brain tissue showing significant changes of fractional anisotropy or mean diffusivity. Although no differences were observed between CIS and healthy controls groups, RIS patients showed significantly lower normalized cortical volume (673 ± 27.07 vs 641 ± 35.88 [cm³ × 10³, Tukey P test = 0.009) and mean thalamic volume (0.0051 ± 0.4 vs 0.0046 ± 0.4 mm, P = 0.014) compared with healthy controls. RIS patients also showed significant thinning in a number of cortical areas, that were primarily distributed in frontal and temporal lobes (P < 0.05, uncorrected). Strong correlations were observed between T2-white matter lesion volume and regional cortical thickness (rho spearman ranging from 0.60 to 0.80). Our data suggest that white matter lesions on T2-weighted images are not the only hallmark of RIS. Future longitudinal studies with larger samples are warranted to better clarify the effect of RIS-related white matter lesions on gray matter tissue.

  19. Gray Matter Involvement in Radiologically Isolated Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Labiano-Fontcuberta, Andrés; Mato-Abad, Virginia; Álvarez-Linera, Juan; Hernández-Tamames, Juan Antonio; Martínez-Ginés, Mª Luisa; Aladro, Yolanda; Ayuso, Lucía; Domingo-Santos, Ángela; Benito-León, Julián

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The unanticipated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detection in the brain of asymptomatic subjects of white matter lesions suggestive of multiple sclerosis has recently been named as radiologically isolated syndrome (RIS). The pathophysiological processes of RIS remain largely unknown and questions as to whether gray matter alterations actually occur in this entity are yet to be investigated in more detail. By means of a 3 T multimodal MRI approach, we searched for cortical and deep gray matter changes in a cohort of RIS patients. Seventeen RIS patients, 17 clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) patients (median disease duration from symptom onset = 12 months), and 17 healthy controls underwent MRI and neuropsychological testing. Normalized deep gray matter volumes and regional cortical thickness were assessed using FreeSurfer. SIENAX was used to obtain normalized global and cortical brain volumes. Voxelwise morphometry analysis was performed by using SPM8 software to localize regions of brain tissue showing significant changes of fractional anisotropy or mean diffusivity. Although no differences were observed between CIS and healthy controls groups, RIS patients showed significantly lower normalized cortical volume (673 ± 27.07 vs 641 ± 35.88 [cm3 × 103, Tukey P test = 0.009) and mean thalamic volume (0.0051 ± 0.4 vs 0.0046 ± 0.4 mm, P = 0.014) compared with healthy controls. RIS patients also showed significant thinning in a number of cortical areas, that were primarily distributed in frontal and temporal lobes (P < 0.05, uncorrected). Strong correlations were observed between T2-white matter lesion volume and regional cortical thickness (rho spearman ranging from 0.60 to 0.80). Our data suggest that white matter lesions on T2-weighted images are not the only hallmark of RIS. Future longitudinal studies with larger samples are warranted to better clarify the effect of RIS-related white matter lesions on gray matter

  20. Nucleating emergency radiology specialization in India.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Anjali; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2016-04-01

    Emergency radiology is being recognized as an important and distinct specialty of radiology which merits utmost attention of educators, radiology program curricula committees, and radiology practices in India. Providing an accurate but timely diagnosis requires a skilled judgement and a strong process framework, particularly in acute trauma setting or a life-threatening acute illness. However, due to a shortage of radiologists in India and lack of awareness and suitable opportunities, there has been no concerted movement towards emergency radiology subspecialty training or dedicated emergency radiology positions. It was with these gaps in mind that the Society for Emergency Radiology was envisioned in 2012 and formulated in 2013. The proposed role of the Society for Emergency Radiology is to identify deficiencies in the field, namely, lack of adequate exposure, lack of mentorship by experienced emergency radiologists, lack of suitable opportunities for emergency radiologists; establish standards of practice; and promote education and implementation research to bridge the gaps. Through collaboration with other societies and partnership with the journal Emergency Radiology, the Society for Emergency Radiology hopes to promote a free exchange of ideas, protocols, and multi-institutional trials across continents.

  1. Women in Radiology: Exploring the Gender Disparity.

    PubMed

    Zener, Rebecca; Lee, Stefanie Y; Visscher, Kari L; Ricketts, Michelle; Speer, Stacey; Wiseman, Daniele

    2016-03-01

    In 2015, only 1.5% of female Canadian medical students pursued radiology as a specialty, versus 5.6% of men. The aim of this study was to determine what factors attract and deter Canadian medical students from pursuing a career in radiology, and why fewer women than men pursue radiology as a specialty. An anonymous online survey was e-mailed to English-speaking Canadian medical schools, and 12 of 14 schools participated. Subgroup analyses for gender and radiology interest were performed using the Fisher exact test (P < .05). In total, 917 students (514 women; 403 men) responded. Direct patient contact was valued by significantly more women who were not considering specialization in radiology (87%), compared with women who were (70%; P < .0001). Physics deterred more women (47%) than it did men (21%), despite similar educational backgrounds for the two gender groups in physical sciences (P < .0001). More women who were considering radiology as a specialty rated intellectual stimulation as being important to their career choice (93%), compared with women who were not (80%; P = .002). Fewer women who were not interested in radiology had done preclinical observerships in radiology (20%), compared with men who were not interested in radiology (28%; P = .04). A perceived lack of direct patient contact dissuades medical students from pursuing radiology as a career. Women have less preclinical radiology exposure than do men. Programs that increase preclinical exposure to radiology subspecialties that have greater patient contact should be initiated, and an effort to actively recruit women to such programs should be made. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Living in poverty in America today.

    PubMed

    Holosko, Michael J; Feit, Marvin D

    2005-01-01

    No statistician, social scientist or tarot card reader is needed to attest that the gap between the rich and poor in America is increasing. Further, most Americans don't care that much about it. There are also more rich people today living in the U.S. and there are more people living in poverty. Between 2000 and 2002, the number of Americans living in poverty increased by nearly 3 million to 34.6 million. Of these, 12% (or about one half a million persons) are living extreme poverty and many are children, with 16.7% likely to be poor (National Association of Social Workers, 2003).

  3. Gasoline additive requirements for today's smaller engines

    SciTech Connect

    Udelhofen, J.H.; Zahalka, T.L

    1988-01-01

    The performance and driveability of today's smaller engines, particularly those with port fuel injectors, often are adversely affected by deposits at various places throughout the fuel induction system. These deposits can, however, be controlled by the use of optimal detergent additives, which are surface-active agents containing polar heads and hydrocarbon tails. For convenience in discussion, the gasoline detergents may be divided into two groups: low and high molecular weight. Low molecular weight detergents typically are more effective in forming protective films on metal surfaces, and high molecular weight detergents are more effective in dispersing deposit precursors.

  4. Uterine Prolapse: From Antiquity to Today

    PubMed Central

    Downing, Keith T.

    2012-01-01

    Uterine prolapse is a condition that has likely affected women for all of time as it is documented in the oldest medical literature. By looking at the watershed moments in its recorded history we are able to appreciate the evolution of urogynecology and to gain perspective on the challenges faced by today's female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgeons in their attempts to treat uterine and vaginal vault prolapse. “He who cannot render an account to himself of at least three thousand years of time, will always grope in the darkness of inexperience” —Goethe, Translation of Panebaker PMID:22262975

  5. Look at robotics and automation today

    SciTech Connect

    Flinchbaugh, D.E.

    1983-01-01

    The application of aerospace technologies to the re-industrialization of the most productive nations in the world represents a real challenge to the engineering profession today. The age of flexible automation and cognitive robot development has arrived along with computer aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM). This paper examines the terminology, types of hardware and software utilized, and illustrations of remote-controlled manipulators and robotic systems which were observed while conducting a worldwide survey of state-of-the-art robotics and automation technology. Trends in the development of new sensor systems, precision control, and artificial intelligence are also explored. 5 references.

  6. Security role in today's Joint Commission surveys.

    PubMed

    White, Donald E

    2010-01-01

    The old saying "the more it changes, the more it is the same thing," does not apply to the Joint Commission, which has changed more than it's name, according to the author. In this article, in which he gives detailed first-hand information on today's survey experience, including the pitfalls to be expected, he reports that healthcare security's roles have been expanded. Unannounced inspections now start the previous evening, thanks to surveyor drive-bys. The Life Safety surveyor has replaced the Administrator surveyor on the Joint Commission's inspection team. Two things to be prepared for are detailed questioning about security staff competency and room contents hazards for each room.

  7. Integrating IT into the radiology environment.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Andrea

    2002-01-01

    Rather than perpetuating the struggle, "who controls the PACS, Radiology or Information Technology (IT)," Community Hospital of the Monterey Peninsula (CHOMP) took the approach of incorporating IT support within the Radiology Department. CHOMP faced the challenge of staffing Radiology computer systems and networks by using a two-pronged approach; promoting and training clinical staff in IT functions and transferring an experienced IT person into the Radiology Department. Roles and responsibilities are divided. CHOMP's IT Department supports the Radiology Department's desktop devices, PCs, printers, and standard peripherals; while the department's DICOM print and archive network, specialized hardware (e.g., Merge DICOM interface computers), and applications are supported by the Radiology Department. The IT Department provides operating system support for multi-user VMS, Unix, and NT-based systems, e.g. Sun Solaris for the DICOM archive, and Windows NT for Mitra PACS Broker, the HL7/DICOM interface engine. IT also supports network communications, i.e., network electronics (routers, switches, etc.), TCP/IP communications, and network traffic analysis; and OS operations support for major Radiology systems, e.g. back-ups and off-site tape storage. Radiology staff provides applications support and troubleshooting, including analyst functions for RIS; and are the first point of contact with the Radiology systems vendors, e.g., GE Medical, or Siemens. The Radiology Department's senior IT person, the Clinical Technology Coordinator, transferred from CHOMP's IT Department after 7 years in that department. She performs analysis and design associated with Radiology's computer systems, coordinates development of the department's strategic plan, evaluates vendor proposals, and assists the department with product and application selection. Her IT experience and growing knowledge of Radiology's clinical tasks enhances communications between the Radiology and IT departments. Formal

  8. Information surety for today and tomorrow

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, S.K.

    1993-07-01

    Information Surety is the enhancement of the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of information and software systems. It is attained through sequential steps: identification of software reliability requirements and information protection needs, designing for a balanced level of risk throughout the system, and application of appropriate software and hardware technologies and procedures. The ability to apply these steps when developing systems is impaired by a general lack of understanding of surety issues by system developers, and by the fact that there are many separate areas of knowledge involved that are not currently integrated into a disciplined approach (e.g., risk assessment, information access control in computers and networks, secure messaging, trusted software development). Our best systems today are achieved by clever designers who use ad-hoc methods. In the absence of good development tools, technologies may be applied haphazardly and/or retrofitted, without yielding balanced protection. This paper will take the audience through an exploration of the elements of information surety, some common misconceptions about information surety today, and the even greater challenges on the horizon. It will end with some suggestions for research areas which will help evolve the discipline of information surety.

  9. [European curriculum for further education in radiology].

    PubMed

    Ertl-Wagner, B

    2014-11-01

    The European training curriculum for radiology of the European Society of Radiology (ESR) aims to harmonize training in radiology in Europe. Levels I and II constitute the centerpiece of the curriculum. The ESR recommends a 5-year training period in radiology with 3 years of level I and 2 years of level II training. The undergraduate (U) level curriculum is conceived as a basis for teaching radiology in medical schools and consists of a modality-oriented U1 level and an organ-based U2 level. Level III curricula provide contents for subspecialty and fellowship training after board certification in radiology. The curricular contents of all parts of the European Training Curriculum are divided into the sections knowledge, skills as well as competences and attitudes. The European training curriculum is meant to be a recommendation and a basis for the development of national curricula, but is not meant to replace existing national regulations.

  10. Computer network security for the radiology enterprise.

    PubMed

    Eng, J

    2001-08-01

    As computer networks become an integral part of the radiology practice, it is appropriate to raise concerns regarding their security. The purpose of this article is to present an overview of computer network security risks and preventive strategies as they pertain to the radiology enterprise. A number of technologies are available that provide strong deterrence against attacks on networks and networked computer systems in the radiology enterprise. While effective, these technologies must be supplemented with vigilant user and system management.

  11. [Interventional radiology: current problems and new directions].

    PubMed

    Santos Martín, E; Crespo Vallejo, E

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, vascular and interventional radiology has become one of the fastest growing diagnostic and therapeutic specialties. This growth has been based on a fundamental concept: performing minimally invasive procedures under imaging guidance. This attractive combination has led to the interest of professionals from other clinical specialties outside radiology in performing this type of intervention. The future of vascular and interventional radiology, although uncertain, must be linked to clinical practice and multidisciplinary teamwork.

  12. Mobile technology in radiology resident education.

    PubMed

    Korbage, Aiham C; Bedi, Harprit S

    2012-06-01

    The authors hypothesized that ownership of a mobile electronic device would result in more time spent learning radiology. Current trends in radiology residents' studying habits, their use of electronic and printed radiology learning resources, and how much of the funds allotted to them are being used toward printed vs electronic education tools were assessed in this study. A survey study was conducted among radiology residents across the United States from June 13 to July 5, 2011. Program directors listed in the Association of Program Directors in Radiology e-mail list server received an e-mail asking for residents to participate in an online survey. The questionnaire consisted of 12 questions and assessed the type of institution, the levels of training of the respondents, and book funds allocated to residents. It also assessed the residents' study habits, access to portable devices, and use of printed and electronic radiology resources. Radiology residents are adopters of new technologies, with 74% owning smart phones and 37% owning tablet devices. Respondents spend nearly an equal amount of time learning radiology from printed textbooks as they do from electronic resources. Eighty-one percent of respondents believe that they would spend more time learning radiology if provided with tablet devices. There is considerable use of online and electronic resources and mobile devices among the current generation of radiology residents. Benefits, such as more study time, may be obtained by radiology programs that incorporate tablet devices into the education of their residents. Copyright © 2012 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Retracted Publications Within Radiology Journals.

    PubMed

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize trends related to retracted publications within radiology journals. PubMed was queried to identify all articles with the publication type "retracted publication" or "notification of retraction." Articles published within radiology journals were identified using Journal Citation Reports' journal categories. Available versions of original articles and publication notices were accessed from journal websites. Citations to retracted publications were identified using Web of Science. Overall trends were assessed. Forty-eight retracted original research articles were identified within radiology journals since 1983, which included 1.1% of all PubMed "retracted publication" entries. Distinct PubMed entries were available for the retracted publication and retraction notification in 39 of 48 articles. The original PDF was available for 37 articles, although the articles were not watermarked as retracted in 23 cases. In six cases with a watermarked PDF, further searches identified nonwatermarked versions. Original HTML versions were available for 13 articles but 11 were not watermarked. The mean (± SD) delay between publication and retraction was 2.7 ± 2.8 years (range, 0-16 years). The mean number of citations to retracted articles was 10.9 ± 17.1 (range, 0-94 citations). Reasons for retraction included problematic or incorrect methods or results (although it typically was unclear whether these represented honest errors or misconduct) in 33.3% of cases, complete or partial duplicate publication in 33.3% of cases, plagiarism in 14.6% of cases, a permission issue in 8.3% of cases, the publisher's error in 6.3% of cases, and no identified reason in 6.3% of cases. One or no retractions occurred annually from 1986 to 2001, although two or more retractions occurred annually in nine of the 12 years from 2002 through 2013. Retraction represents an uncommon, yet potentially increasing, issue within radiology journals that publishers

  14. Online social networking for radiology.

    PubMed

    Auffermann, William F; Chetlen, Alison L; Colucci, Andrew T; DeQuesada, Ivan M; Grajo, Joseph R; Heller, Matthew T; Nowitzki, Kristina M; Sherry, Steven J; Tillack, Allison A

    2015-01-01

    Online social networking services have changed the way we interact as a society and offer many opportunities to improve the way we practice radiology and medicine in general. This article begins with an introduction to social networking. Next, the latest advances in online social networking are reviewed, and areas where radiologists and clinicians may benefit from these new tools are discussed. This article concludes with several steps that the interested reader can take to become more involved in online social networking. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Nuclear and radiological Security: Introduction.

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, James Christopher

    2016-02-24

    Nuclear security includes the prevention and detection of, and response to, theft, sabotage, unauthorized access, illegal transfer, or other malicious acts involving nuclear or other radioactive substances or their associated facilities. The presentation begins by discussing the concept and its importance, then moves on to consider threats--insider threat, sabotage, diversion of materials--with considerable emphasis on the former. The intrusion at Pelindaba, South Africa, is described as a case study. The distinction between nuclear security and security of radiological and portable sources is clarified, and the international legal framework is touched upon. The paper concludes by discussing the responsibilities of the various entities involved in nuclear security.

  16. Techniques and indications in radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Lange, S.

    1987-01-01

    The stated purpose of this book is to review modern radiologic diagnostic techniques as applied to the study of the kidney and urinary tract, and their pertinent indications. This goal is partially accomplished in the first two segments of the book, which consist of about 100 pages. These include a synoptic description of various techniques - including classic uroradiologic studies such as excretory urography and retrograde pyelography, plus sonography, computed tomography, angiography, and nuclear medicine. The diagnostic signs and the differential diagnoses are fairly well described, aided by a profusion of tables and diagrams. The overall quality of the reproduction of the illustrations is good.

  17. Ebola virus disease: radiology preparedness.

    PubMed

    Bluemke, David A; Meltzer, Carolyn C

    2015-02-01

    At present, there is a major emphasis on Ebola virus disease (EVD) preparedness training at medical facilities throughout the United States. Failure to have proper EVD procedures in place was cited as a major reason for infection of medical personnel in the United States. Medical imaging does not provide diagnosis of EVD, but patient assessment in the emergency department and treatment isolation care unit is likely to require imaging services. The purpose of this article is to present an overview of relevant aspects of EVD disease and preparedness relevant to the radiologic community.

  18. Dynamic radiology of the abdomen

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    The third edition of this book remains the only text covering radiology of the abdomen as it relates to the progression of disease within organ and from one organ to another. New to this edition are discussions of: recent advances in the understanding of the normal and variant relationship of the lobar anatomy of the liver; the structural relationship of the porta hepatis and its contents; further refinements in the precise evaluation of the extraperitoneal fascia and spaces; new developments in the understanding of the intraperitoneal spread of infection and malignancy.

  19. Essential radiology for head injury

    SciTech Connect

    Mok, D.W.H.; Kreel, L.

    1988-01-01

    The book covers the guidelines established by the Royal College of Radiologists for the radiographic evaluation of head injuries. It presents a chapter reviewing the normal radiologic anatomy of the skull in six different projections. The advantages and limitations of each projection are addressed. The third chapter, contains 43 radiographs dedicated to the calcified pineal gland and other intracranial calcifications. The book reports on specific types of fractures: linear fractures of the vault, depressed fractures of the vault, fractures in children, fractures of the base of the skull, and fractures of the facial bones.

  20. Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear Consequence Management

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear CMAD provides scientific support and technical expertise for decontamination of buildings, building contents, public infrastructure, agriculture, and associated environmental media.

  1. Implementation of a Radiological Safety Coach program

    SciTech Connect

    Konzen, K.K.; Langsted, J.M.

    1998-02-01

    The Safe Sites of Colorado Radiological Safety program has implemented a Safety Coach position, responsible for mentoring workers and line management by providing effective on-the-job radiological skills training and explanation of the rational for radiological safety requirements. This position is significantly different from a traditional classroom instructor or a facility health physicist, and provides workers with a level of radiological safety guidance not routinely provided by typical training programs. Implementation of this position presents a challenge in providing effective instruction, requiring rapport with the radiological worker not typically developed in the routine radiological training environment. The value of this unique training is discussed in perspective with cost-savings through better radiological control. Measures of success were developed to quantify program performance and providing a realistic picture of the benefits of providing one-on-one or small group training. This paper provides a description of the unique features of the program, measures of success for the program, a formula for implementing this program at other facilities, and a strong argument for the success (or failure) of the program in a time of increased radiological safety emphasis and reduced radiological safety budgets.

  2. Radiological Assistance Program Flight Planning Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Messick, C.; Pham, M.; Ridgeway, J.; Smith, R.

    2011-12-19

    The Radiological Assitance Program (RAP) is the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) first responder to radiological emergencies. RAP's mission is to identify and minimize radiological hazards, as well as provide radiological emergency response and technical advice to decision makers. One tool commonly used is aerial radiation detection equipment. During a response getting this equipment in the right place quickly is critical. The RAP Flight Planning Tool (a ArcGIS 10 Desktop addin) helps minimize this response time and provides specific customizable flight path information to the flight staff including maps, coordinates, and azimuths.

  3. Lung Volume Reduction in Pulmonary Emphysema from the Radiologist's Perspective.

    PubMed

    Doellinger, F; Huebner, R H; Kuhnigk, J M; Poellinger, A

    2015-08-01

    Pulmonary emphysema causes decrease in lung function due to irreversible dilatation of intrapulmonary air spaces, which is linked to high morbidity and mortality. Lung volume reduction (LVR) is an invasive therapeutical option for pulmonary emphysema in order to improve ventilation mechanics. LVR can be carried out by lung resection surgery or different minimally invasive endoscopical procedures. All LVR-options require mandatory preinterventional evaluation to detect hyperinflated dysfunctional lung areas as target structures for treatment. Quantitative computed tomography can determine the volume percentage of emphysematous lung and its topographical distribution based on the lung's radiodensity. Modern techniques allow for lobebased quantification that facilitates treatment planning. Clinical tests still play the most important role in post-interventional therapy monitoring, but CT is crucial in the detection of postoperative complications and foreshadows the method's high potential in sophisticated experimental studies. Within the last ten years, LVR with endobronchial valves has become an extensively researched minimally-invasive treatment option. However, this therapy is considerably complicated by the frequent occurrence of functional interlobar shunts. The presence of "collateral ventilation" has to be ruled out prior to valve implantations, as the presence of these extraanatomical connections between different lobes may jeopardize the success of therapy. Recent experimental studies evaluated the automatic detection of incomplete lobar fissures from CT scans, because they are considered to be a predictor for the existence of shunts. To date, these methods are yet to show acceptable results. Today, surgical and various minimal invasive methods of lung volume reduction are in use. Radiological and nuclear medical examinations are helpful in the evaluation of an appropriate lung area. Imaging can detect periinterventional complications. Reduction of lung

  4. Radiology Technician, 10-5. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    These five volumes of student materials for a secondary/postsecondary level course in radiology technology comprise one of a number of military-developed curriculum packages selected for adaptation to vocational instruction and curriculum development in a civilian setting. The purpose stated for the course is to provide the theory portion of…

  5. Allied Health Occupations II. Radiologic Technologist Aide Component. Student Learning Guide. Middletown Public Schools Curriculum Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middletown Public Schools, CT.

    This volume outlines the requirements and content of a second-year course in allied health occupations education that is designed to provide students with a practical understanding of the work done by the radiologic team and to enable them to acquire some basic skills used in the X-ray department. Addressed in the individual units of the course…

  6. [Aviation medicine: yesterday, today and tomorrow].

    PubMed

    Iamenskov, V V; Khafizov, N N; Morozov, A V

    2011-04-01

    The article describes the history and current state of medical support of the Air Force. On December 1, 2009 Air Force Medical Service was renamed into the service of aviation medicine of Command Air Forces, and many of the functions of medical support of the Air Force transferred to the newly formed Air Force Center of Aviation Medicine. April 29, 2011 office of Aviation Medicine of the High Command of the Air Force has stepped 95-year milestone. The changes affected all structures entrusted with the issues of medical support of the Air Force. Today, the medical service of the Air Force faces challenges--ensuring safety, the study of flight conditions and their impact on health, job performance and psychological characteristics of flight personnel.

  7. Explaining Today's Physics Through History and Biography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindley, David

    2014-03-01

    Quantum computers, string theory, holographic universes - to the general audience, today's physics can be as mystifying as it is fascinating. But modern ideas evolved from an earlier phase of physics - Newtonian mechanics, simple cause and effect - that is in principle easier for the non-expert to grasp. I have found that writing about physics from a historical and biographical perspective is an effective way to convey modern thinking by explaining where it comes from - it is a way of carrying the reader from concepts that make intuitive sense to ideas that seem, on first encounter, utterly bizarre. Smuggling explanations into stories satisfies the reader's desire for narrative - bearing in mind that narrative can include the evolution of ideas as well as tales about intriguing and original people.

  8. Academic dishonesty today, unethical practices tomorrow?

    PubMed

    LaDuke, Rebekah D

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to review the most current published literature on the topics of academic dishonesty, unethical professional practices, and research that studied the correlation between these 2 areas of interest. Literature was retrieved by utilizing key words such as academic dishonesty, cheating, workplace dishonesty, and unethical behavior. Multiple research databases were used and a reference librarian in locating relevant research studies resulting in 16 research articles reviewed and 7 articles referenced within the literature review. Upon completion, it became apparent that nursing educators should be concerned that nursing students found to be academically dishonest today may have a higher incidence of displaying unethical practices as a registered nurse tomorrow. It also became clear that the nursing profession needs to conduct its own research in this field to verify findings discovered by other professions such as engineering, business, and psychology. Finally, recommendations were given on how nursing educators should handle the topic of ethics in nursing programs.

  9. ETI, SETI and today's public opinion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinotti, Roberto

    During the last three decades the general public's initial opinions about ETI and SETI changed, turning ignorance, fear and superficiality into a gradual understanding of the importance of these concepts. After a brief analysis of this changing psycho-sociological attitude, the paper provides an "estimate of the situation" about general interest for ETI and SETI, suggesting a growing awareness in today's public opinion. Science fiction movies like Close Encounters of the Third Kind and E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial and popular interest in UFOs as visitors from outer space played a major role in the average man's acceptance of the reality of extra-terrestrial life and its meaning for mankind.

  10. [The fight against doping: today and tomorrow].

    PubMed

    Rieu, Michel

    2004-01-01

    Since Antiquity, sport persons have used doping methods to improve their performance. The methods used today are increasingly specific and professional As a corrolary, doping is becoming extremely difficult to detect: because many prohibited drugs are rapidly metabolized (short half life); it is often impossible to distinguish between the natural and recombinant hormone products; several prohibited substances are not screened for; therapeutic use authorization (TUA)--a recent recommendation from the World antidoping agency (WADA)--and advances in gene therapy are giving cheaters new possibilities. It is necessary to promote a new approach to doping detection by determining potential specific links between changes in human biological profiles (proteom, transcriptom, metabonom), and the use of a given drug. Developments in nanotechnology, and notably" labs on a chip" should prove useful in this respect.

  11. An authentication infrastructure for today and tomorrow

    SciTech Connect

    Engert, D.E.

    1996-06-01

    The Open Software Foundation`s Distributed Computing Environment (OSF/DCE) was originally designed to provide a secure environment for distributed applications. By combining it with Kerberos Version 5 from MIT, it can be extended to provide network security as well. This combination can be used to build both an inter and intra organizational infrastructure while providing single sign-on for the user with overall improved security. The ESnet community of the Department of Energy is building just such an infrastructure. ESnet has modified these systems to improve their interoperability, while encouraging the developers to incorporate these changes and work more closely together to continue to improve the interoperability. The success of this infrastructure depends on its flexibility to meet the needs of many applications and network security requirements. The open nature of Kerberos, combined with the vendor support of OSF/DCE, provides the infrastructure for today and tomorrow.

  12. Basketball Monographs: Ideas for Today's Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davenport, Joanna, Ed.; Adrian, Marlene, Ed.

    The monographs in this volume profile current information on basketball, covering a wide variety of topics regarding teaching, coaching, and playing girl's and women's basketball. Ten articles cover aspects of basketball ranging from history to nutrition and conditioning to techniques for high level competition. The titles and authors are as…

  13. Europe Today: An Atlas of Reproducible Pages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Eagle, Inc., Wellesley, MA.

    Illustrative black and white maps, tables, and graphs designed for clear reproducibility depict Europe's size, population, resources, commodities, trade, cities, schooling, jobs, energy, industry, demographic statistics, food, and agriculture. Also included are 33 United States Department of State individual country maps. This volume is intended…

  14. Transforming the radiological interpretation process: the SCAR TRIP initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriole, Katherine P.; Morin, Richard L.; Arenson, Ronald L.; Carrino, John A.; Erickson, Bradley J.; Horii, Steven C.; Piraino, David W.; Reiner, Bruce I.; Seibert, James A.; Siegel, Eliot L.

    2004-04-01

    The Society for Computer Applications in Radiology (SCAR) Transforming the Radiological Interpretation Process (TRIP) Initiative aims to spearhead research, education, and discovery of innovative solutions to address the problem of information and image data overload. The initiative will foster inter-disciplinary research on technological, environmental and human factors to better manage and exploit the massive amounts of data. TRIP will focus on the following basic objectives: improving the efficiency of interpretation of large data sets, improving the timeliness and effectiveness of communication, and decreasing medical errors. The ultimate goal of the initiative is to improve the quality and safety of patient care. Interdisciplinary research into several broad areas will be necessary to make progress in managing the ever-increasing volume of data. The six concepts involved include: human perception, image processing and computer-aided detection (CAD), visualization, navigation and usability, databases and integration, and evaluation and validation of methods and performance. The result of this transformation will affect several key processes in radiology, including image interpretation; communication of imaging results; workflow and efficiency within the health care enterprise; diagnostic accuracy and a reduction in medical errors; and, ultimately, the overall quality of care.

  15. Design of a large network for radiological image data.

    PubMed

    Ruffolo, Marisa; Daskin, Mark S; Sahakian, Alan V; Berry, Randall A

    2007-01-01

    Radiological imaging is a rapidly growing business. The field is quickly evolving from films to electronic or digital imaging. By the year 2015, the amount of radiological image data that will have been generated in the U.S. alone is projected to be between 100 and 300 000 PB. (1 PB equals 2(50) B or about 10(15) B.) As the volume of radiological data increases, the need to transmit the data over long distances also increases. For example, radiologists in Chicago, India, or Israel, working in the same medical practice, may read images taken in Chicago. Globally distributed research requires that images be transmitted around the world. Radiologists and researchers want to be able to download files containing hundreds of megabytes in seconds. This service requirement suggests that multiple copies of images should be retained in globally distributed databases to minimize access and transmission delays. Key design issues for such a database include the location of the data repositories relative to the generating and retrieval (reading) sites and the number and location of the copies of the files that are generated. In this paper, we approximate the time to retrieve images stored in city j by a radiologist in city k at time period t. Next, we formulate a model designed to minimize the average retrieval time weighted over all demands. We briefly outline a nested Lagrangian relaxation approach to the problem. Computational results are then summarized. The paper ends with conclusion and directions for future research.

  16. From Fayol's Mechanistic to Today's Organic Functions of Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamara, Daniel E.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews Fayol's original five managerial functions, demonstrates that they are still being taught in today's management courses, and offers a new set of organic management functions more applicable to today's turbulent business environment.

  17. Global public health today: connecting the dots.

    PubMed

    Lomazzi, Marta; Jenkins, Christopher; Borisch, Bettina

    2016-01-01

    Global public health today faces new challenges and is impacted by a range of actors from within and outside state boundaries. The diversity of the actors involved has created challenges and a complex environment that requires a new context-tailored global approach. The World Federation of Public Health Associations has embarked on a collaborative consultation with the World Health Organization to encourage a debate on how to adapt public health to its future role in global health. A qualitative study was undertaken. High-level stakeholders from leading universities, multilateral organizations, and other institutions worldwide participated in the study. Inductive content analyses were performed. Stakeholders underscored that global public health today should tackle the political, commercial, economic, social, and environmental determinants of health and social inequalities. A multisectoral and holistic approach should be guaranteed, engaging public health in broad dialogues and a concerted decision-making process. The connection between neoliberal ideology and public health reforms should be taken into account. The WHO must show leadership and play a supervising and technical role. More and better data are required across many programmatic areas of public health. Resources should be allocated in a sustainable and accountable way. Public health professionals need new skills that should be provided by a collaborative global education system. A common framework context-tailored to influence governments has been evaluated as useful. The study highlighted some of the main public health challenges currently under debate in the global arena, providing interesting ideas. A more inclusive integrated vision of global health in its complexity, shared and advocated for by all stakeholders involved in decision-making processes, is crucial. This vision represents the first step in innovating public health at the global level and should lead to a serious rethinking of education

  18. Global public health today: connecting the dots.

    PubMed

    Lomazzi, Marta; Jenkins, Christopher; Borisch, Bettina

    2016-01-01

    Background Global public health today faces new challenges and is impacted by a range of actors from within and outside state boundaries. The diversity of the actors involved has created challenges and a complex environment that requires a new context-tailored global approach. The World Federation of Public Health Associations has embarked on a collaborative consultation with the World Health Organization to encourage a debate on how to adapt public health to its future role in global health. Design A qualitative study was undertaken. High-level stakeholders from leading universities, multilateral organizations, and other institutions worldwide participated in the study. Inductive content analyses were performed. Results Stakeholders underscored that global public health today should tackle the political, commercial, economic, social, and environmental determinants of health and social inequalities. A multisectoral and holistic approach should be guaranteed, engaging public health in broad dialogues and a concerted decision-making process. The connection between neoliberal ideology and public health reforms should be taken into account. The WHO must show leadership and play a supervising and technical role. More and better data are required across many programmatic areas of public health. Resources should be allocated in a sustainable and accountable way. Public health professionals need new skills that should be provided by a collaborative global education system. A common framework context-tailored to influence governments has been evaluated as useful. Conclusions The study highlighted some of the main public health challenges currently under debate in the global arena, providing interesting ideas. A more inclusive integrated vision of global health in its complexity, shared and advocated for by all stakeholders involved in decision-making processes, is crucial. This vision represents the first step in innovating public health at the global level and should lead

  19. Global public health today: connecting the dots

    PubMed Central

    Lomazzi, Marta; Jenkins, Christopher; Borisch, Bettina

    2016-01-01

    Background Global public health today faces new challenges and is impacted by a range of actors from within and outside state boundaries. The diversity of the actors involved has created challenges and a complex environment that requires a new context-tailored global approach. The World Federation of Public Health Associations has embarked on a collaborative consultation with the World Health Organization to encourage a debate on how to adapt public health to its future role in global health. Design A qualitative study was undertaken. High-level stakeholders from leading universities, multilateral organizations, and other institutions worldwide participated in the study. Inductive content analyses were performed. Results Stakeholders underscored that global public health today should tackle the political, commercial, economic, social, and environmental determinants of health and social inequalities. A multisectoral and holistic approach should be guaranteed, engaging public health in broad dialogues and a concerted decision-making process. The connection between neoliberal ideology and public health reforms should be taken into account. The WHO must show leadership and play a supervising and technical role. More and better data are required across many programmatic areas of public health. Resources should be allocated in a sustainable and accountable way. Public health professionals need new skills that should be provided by a collaborative global education system. A common framework context-tailored to influence governments has been evaluated as useful. Conclusions The study highlighted some of the main public health challenges currently under debate in the global arena, providing interesting ideas. A more inclusive integrated vision of global health in its complexity, shared and advocated for by all stakeholders involved in decision-making processes, is crucial. This vision represents the first step in innovating public health at the global level and should lead

  20. Forensic aspects of maxillofacial radiology.

    PubMed

    Wood, R E

    2006-05-15

    Radiology has been used extensively in conventional dental identification, anatomically based identification and identification using maxillofacial skeletal landmarks such as the frontal sinus. Examples of these are well documented in the literature. The purpose of this paper was to revisit the methods where radiographic methods may be used to determine identity using the teeth, the root structures and the frontal sinuses. Additionally suggestions are offered for management of radiography in mass disasters and cases where age determination is required. Computer assisted tomography can be used in the assessment of the degree of fit of a weapon to a wound in cases of blunt force skull injury and plane films can assist in depicting the pattern of post mortem skull fractures. Micro-computed tomography has been used in matching weapons to wounds in sharp-force injury cases. The radiologist's role in cases of civil litigation and fraud is discussed and case examples are given. There are gaps in the science where radiological methods are used. The author offers several suggestions for possible research projects to close some of these gaps.

  1. Pediatric Interventional Radiology: Vascular Interventions.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Devasenathipathy; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Pediatric interventional radiology (PIR) comprises a range of minimally invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures that are performed using image guidance. PIR has emerged as an essential adjunct to various surgical and medical conditions. Over the years, technology has undergone dramatic and continuous evolution, making this speciality grow. In this review, the authors will discuss various vascular interventional procedures undertaken in pediatric patients. It is challenging for the interventional radiologist to accomplish a successful interventional procedure. There are many vascular interventional radiology procedures which are being performed and have changed the way the diseases are managed. Some of the procedures are life saving and have become the treatment of choice in those patients. The future is indeed bright for the practice and practitioners of pediatric vascular and non-vascular interventions. As more and more of the procedures that are currently being performed in adults get gradually adapted for use in the pediatric population, it may be possible to perform safe and successful interventions in many of the pediatric vascular lesions that are otherwise being referred for surgery.

  2. Radiation exposure in interventional radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, N. G. V.; Braz, D.; Vallim, M. A.; Filho, L. G. P.; Azevedo, F. S.; Barroso, R. C.; Lopes, R. T.

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate dose values in patients and staff involved in some interventional radiology procedures. Doses have been measured using thermoluminescent dosemeters for single procedures (such as renal and cerebral arteriography, transjungular intrahepatic portasystemic shunt (TIPS) and chemoembolization). The magnitude of doses through the hands of interventional radiologists has been studied. Dose levels were evaluated in three points for patients (eye, thyroid and gonads). The dose-area product (DAP) was also investigated using a Diamentor (PTW-M2). The dose in extremities was estimated for a professional who generally performed one TIPS, two chemoembolizations, two cerebral arteriographies and two renal arteriographies in a week. The estimated annual radiation dose was converted to effective dose as suggested by the 453-MS/Brazil norm The annual dose values were 137.25 mSv for doctors, 40.27 mSv for nurses and 51.95 mSv for auxiliary doctors, and all these annual dose values are below the limit established. The maximum values of the dose obtained for patients were 6.91, 10.92 and 15.34 mGy close to eye, thyroid and gonads, respectively. The DAP values were evaluated for patients in the same interventional radiology procedures. The dose and DAP values obtained are in agreement with values encountered in the literature.

  3. Fetal risk in diagnostic radiology.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Cheri P; Goodman, Lawrence H

    2012-02-01

    It is not uncommon to encounter situations in which radiologic examinations are necessary for accurate diagnosis and effective treatment of an expectant mother. The potential deleterious health consequences to the developing embryo and fetus from in utero irradiation include fetal death, congenital malformations, growth retardation, and carcinogenic and mutagenic effects. The likelihood of each effect is greatly dependent on the radiation dose and the gestational age of the conceptus at the time of exposure. In general, the average fetal doses from diagnostic imaging are <50 mGy (5 rad) and have not been associated with any significant adverse fetal effects. However, each case should be evaluated on an individual basis, and the risks should be explained to the patient before the examination. In addition, every effort should be made to reduce the fetal dose to as low as reasonably achievable. The biological effects of in utero radiation exposure, estimated fetal doses from various radiologic examinations, and general guidelines regarding diagnostic imaging during pregnancy will be discussed in this article. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Africa Today: An Atlas of Reproducible Pages. 1990 Revised Edition. World Eagle's Today Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Eagle, Inc., Wellesley, MA.

    A collection of reproducible black and white maps, charts, and graphs for classroom use profiles Africa today. Individual country maps were originally produced by the United Nations, U.S. Department of State, and the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency. The material depicts the continent's (1) size, (2) population, (3) resources, (4) commodities, (5)…

  5. Methods of determining the effective dose in dental radiology.

    PubMed

    Thilander-Klang, Anne; Helmrot, Ebba

    2010-01-01

    A wide variety of X-ray equipment is used today in dental radiology, including intra-oral, orthopantomographic, cephalometric, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and computed tomography (CT). This raises the question of how the radiation risks resulting from different kinds of examinations should be compared. The risk to the patient is usually expressed in terms of effective dose. However, it is difficult to determine its reliability, and it is difficult to make comparisons, especially when different modalities are used. The classification of the new CBCT units is also problematic as they are sometimes classified as CT units. This will lead to problems in choosing the best dosimetric method, especially when the examination geometry resembles more on an ordinary orthopantomographic examination, as the axis of rotation is not at the centre of the patient, and small radiation field sizes are used. The purpose of this study was to present different methods for the estimation of the effective dose from the equipment currently used in dental radiology, and to discuss their limitations. The methods are compared based on commonly used measurable and computable dose quantities, and their reliability in the estimation of the effective dose.

  6. Integrative teaching in radiology - a survey.

    PubMed

    Dettmer, S; Weidemann, J; Fischer, V; Wacker, F K

    2015-04-01

    To survey integrative teaching in radiology at German universities. A questionnaire about radiological education was sent electronically to all 37 chairpersons of university radiology departments in Germany. The questions included the course type, teaching methods, concept, perception, and advantages and disadvantages of integrative teaching. Statistical analysis was performed with nonparametric statistics and chi-square test. The survey was considered representative with a return rate of 68 %. Integrative teaching is established at 4/5 of all departments. Integrative teaching is well accepted with an acceptance rate that is significantly higher in so-called "Modellstudiengängen" [model courses of study] (100 %) compared to conventional courses of study (72 %). The advantages of integrative teaching include linking of content (92 %) and preparation for interdisciplinary work (76 %). The disadvantages include high effort (75 %) and time (67 %) for organization. Furthermore, there is a risk that basic radiological facts and knowledge cannot be conveyed and that the visibility of radiology as an independent discipline is lost. Conventional radiological teaching has a similarly high acceptance (84 %) compared to integrative courses (76 %). Integrative teaching has a high acceptance among chairpersons in radiology in Germany despite the greater effort. A good interdisciplinary collaboration is essential for integrative teaching and at the same time this can be conveyed to the students. However, the visibility of radiology as a discipline and the possibility to cover basic radiological content must be ensured. Therefore, both conventional courses and integrative teaching seems reasonable, especially in cross-disciplinary subjects such as radiology. Both integrative teaching and conventional radiological teaching are highly accepted. The advantages include the linking of multidisciplinary content and the preparation for interdisciplinary cooperation

  7. Limitations Influencing Interventional Radiology in Canada: Results of a National Survey by the Canadian Interventional Radiology Association (CIRA)

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Jeremy; Baerlocher, Mark Otto Asch, Murray R.; Hayeems, Eran; Kachura, John R.; Collingwood, Peter

    2007-09-15

    Purpose. To describe the current state and limitations to interventional radiology (IR) in Canada through a large, national survey of Canadian interventional radiologists. Methods. An anonymous online survey was offered to members of the Canadian Interventional Radiology Association (CIRA). Only staff radiologists were invited to participate. Results. Seventy-five (75) responses were received from a total of 247, giving a response rate of 30%. Respondents were split approximately equally between academic centers (47%) and community practice (53%), and the majority of interventional radiologists worked in hospitals with either 200-500 (49%) or 500-1,000 (39%) beds. Procedures listed by respondents as most commonly performed in their practice included PICC line insertion (83%), angiography and stenting (65%), and percutaneous biopsy (37%). Procedures listed as not currently performed but which interventional radiologists believed would benefit their patient population included radiofrequency ablation (36%), carotid stenting (34%), and aortic stenting (21%); the majority of respondents noted that a lack of support from referring services was the main reason for not performing these procedures (56%). Impediments to increasing scope and volume of practice in Canadian IR were most commonly related to room or equipment shortage (35%), radiologist shortage (33%), and a lack of funding or administrative support (28%). Conclusion. Interventional radiology in Canada is limited by a number of factors including funding, manpower, and referral support. A concerted effort should be undertaken by individual interventional radiologists and IR organizations to increase training capacity, funding, remuneration, and public exposure to IR in order to help advance the subspecialty.

  8. 2015 RAD-AID Conference on International Radiology for Developing Countries: The Evolving Global Radiology Landscape.

    PubMed

    Kesselman, Andrew; Soroosh, Garshasb; Mollura, Daniel J

    2016-09-01

    Radiology in low- and middle-income (developing) countries continues to make progress. Research and international outreach projects presented at the 2015 annual RAD-AID conference emphasize important global themes, including (1) recent slowing of emerging market growth that threatens to constrain the advance of radiology, (2) increasing global noncommunicable diseases (such as cancer and cardiovascular disease) needing radiology for detection and management, (3) strategic prioritization for pediatric radiology in global public health initiatives, (4) continuous expansion of global health curricula at radiology residencies and the RAD-AID Chapter Network's participating institutions, and (5) technologic innovation for recently accelerated implementation of PACS in low-resource countries. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. What makes a great radiology review course lecture: the Ottawa radiology resident review course experience

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Little objective evidence exists regarding what makes a good lecture. Our purpose was to determine qualities of radiology review course lectures that are associated with positive audience evaluation. Methods 57 presentations from the Ottawa Resident Review Course (2012) were analyzed by a PGY4 radiology resident blinded to the result of audience evaluation. Objective data extracted were: slides per minute, lines of text per text slide, words per text slide, cases per minute, images per minute, images per case, number of audience laughs, number of questions posed to the audience, number of summaries, inclusion of learning objectives, ending on time, use of pre/post-test and use of special effects. Mean audience evaluation scores for each talk from daily audience evaluations (up to 60 per talk) were standardized out of 100. Correlation coefficient was calculated between continuous variables and audience evaluation scores. Student T test was performed on categorical variables and audience evaluation scores. Results Strongest positive association with audience evaluation scores was for image quality (r = 0.57) and number of times the audience laughed (r = 0.3). Strongest negative association was between images per case and audience scores (r = -0.25). Talks with special effects were rated better (mean score 94.3 vs. 87.1, p < 0.001). Talks with the highest image quality were rated better (mean score 94.1 vs. 87.5, p < 0.001). Talks which contained a pre/post-test were rated better (mean score 92 vs. 87.8, p = 0.004). Conclusion Many factors go into making a great review course lecture. At the University of Ottawa Resident Review Course, high quality images, use of special effects, use of pre/post-test and humor were most strongly associated with high audience evaluation scores. High image volume per case may be negatively associated with audience evaluation scores. PMID:24485044

  10. INL@Work Radiological Search & Response Training

    SciTech Connect

    Turnage, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Dealing with radiological hazards is just part of the job for many INL scientists and engineers. Dodging bullets isn't. But some Department of Defense personnel may have to do both. INL employee Jennifer Turnage helps train soldiers in the art of detecting radiological and nuclear material. For more information about INL's research projects, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  11. New trends in radiology workstation design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moise, Adrian; Atkins, M. Stella

    2002-05-01

    In the radiology workstation design, the race for adding more features is now morphing into an iterative user centric design with the focus on ergonomics and usability. The extent of the list of features for the radiology workstation used to be one of the most significant factors for a Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) vendor's ability to sell the radiology workstation. Not anymore is now very much the same between the major players in the PACS market. How these features work together distinguishes different radiology workstations. Integration (with the PACS/Radiology Information System (RIS) systems, with the 3D tool, Reporting Tool etc.), usability (user specific preferences, advanced display protocols, smart activation of tools etc.) and efficiency (what is the output a radiologist can generate with the workstation) are now core factors for selecting a workstation. This paper discusses these new trends in radiology workstation design. We demonstrate the importance of the interaction between the PACS vendor (software engineers) and the customer (radiologists) during the radiology workstation design. We focus on iterative aspects of the workstation development, such as the presentation of early prototypes to as many representative users as possible during the software development cycle and present the results of a survey of 8 radiologists on designing a radiology workstation.

  12. Radiological assistance program: Region I. Part I

    SciTech Connect

    Musolino, S.V.; Kuehner, A.V.; Hull, A.P.

    1985-07-15

    The purpose of the Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) is to make DOE resources available and provide emergency assistance to state and local agencies in order to control radiological hazards, protect the public health and safety, and minimize the loss of property. This plan is an integral part of a nationwide program of radiological assistance established by the US DOE, and is implemented on a regional basis. The Brookhaven Area Office (BHO) Radiological Assistance Program is applicable to DOE Region I, which consists of the New England States, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland and the District of Columbia. The BHO RAP-1 has been developed to: (a) ensure the availability of an effective radiological assistance capability to ensure the protection of persons and property; (b) provide guidelines to RAP-1 Team personnel for the evaluation of radiological incidents and implementation of corrective actions; (c) maintain liaison with other DOE installations, Federal, State and local organizations which may become involved in radiological assistance operations in Region I; and (d) encourage development of a local capability to cope with radiological incidents.

  13. Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Radiological Control Managers' Council - Nevada Test Site

    2009-10-01

    This document supersedes DOE/NV/11718--079, “NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual,” Revision 5 issued in November 2004. Brief Description of Revision: A complete revision to reflect the recent changes in compliance requirements with 10 CFR 835, and for use as a reference document for Tenant Organization Radiological Protection Programs.

  14. Radiological Defense. Planning and Operations Guide. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Civil Defense (DOD), Washington, DC.

    This guide is a reprint of published and draft materials from the Federal Civil Defense Guide. This guide is intended to assist the student in planning, developing, implementing and operating a local, county, or state radiological defense (RADEF) system. The state and local radiological defense program objectives are to create an effective and…

  15. 10 CFR 835.4 - Radiological units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... other conventional units, such as, dpm, dpm/100 cm2 or mass units. The SI units, becquerel (Bq), gray... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Radiological units. 835.4 Section 835.4 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION General Provisions § 835.4 Radiological units. Unless...

  16. 10 CFR 835.4 - Radiological units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... other conventional units, such as, dpm, dpm/100 cm2 or mass units. The SI units, becquerel (Bq), gray... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Radiological units. 835.4 Section 835.4 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION General Provisions § 835.4 Radiological units. Unless...

  17. 10 CFR 835.4 - Radiological units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... other conventional units, such as, dpm, dpm/100 cm2 or mass units. The SI units, becquerel (Bq), gray... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Radiological units. 835.4 Section 835.4 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION General Provisions § 835.4 Radiological units. Unless...

  18. INL@Work Radiological Search & Response Training

    ScienceCinema

    Turnage, Jennifer

    2016-07-12

    Dealing with radiological hazards is just part of the job for many INL scientists and engineers. Dodging bullets isn't. But some Department of Defense personnel may have to do both. INL employee Jennifer Turnage helps train soldiers in the art of detecting radiological and nuclear material. For more information about INL's research projects, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  19. Curricular Guidelines for Dental Auxiliary Radiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1981

    1981-01-01

    AADS curricular guidelines suggest objectives for these areas of dental auxiliary radiology: physical principles of X-radiation in dentistry, related radiobiological concepts, principles of radiologic health, radiographic technique, x-ray films and intensifying screens, factors contributing to film quality, darkroom, and normal variations in…

  20. Radiology Aide. Instructor Key [and] Student Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartwein, Jon; Dunham, John

    This manual can be used independently by students in secondary health occupations programs or by persons receiving on-the-job training in a radiology department. The manual includes an instructor's key that provides answers to the activity sheets and unit evaluations. The manual consists of the following five units: (1) orientation to radiology;…

  1. Radiology Aide. Instructor Key [and] Student Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartwein, Jon; Dunham, John

    This manual can be used independently by students in secondary health occupations programs or by persons receiving on-the-job training in a radiology department. The manual includes an instructor's key that provides answers to the activity sheets and unit evaluations. The manual consists of the following five units: (1) orientation to radiology;…

  2. Curricular Guidelines for Dental Auxiliary Radiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1981

    1981-01-01

    AADS curricular guidelines suggest objectives for these areas of dental auxiliary radiology: physical principles of X-radiation in dentistry, related radiobiological concepts, principles of radiologic health, radiographic technique, x-ray films and intensifying screens, factors contributing to film quality, darkroom, and normal variations in…

  3. 10 CFR 835.4 - Radiological units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Radiological units. 835.4 Section 835.4 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION General Provisions § 835.4 Radiological units. Unless otherwise specified, the quantities used in the records required by this part shall be clearly indicated in...

  4. 10 CFR 835.4 - Radiological units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Radiological units. 835.4 Section 835.4 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION General Provisions § 835.4 Radiological units. Unless otherwise specified, the quantities used in the records required by this part shall be clearly indicated in...

  5. 76 FR 49458 - TRICARE; Hospital Outpatient Radiology Discretionary Appeal Adjustments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-10

    ... of the Secretary TRICARE; Hospital Outpatient Radiology Discretionary Appeal Adjustments AGENCY... hospitals of an opportunity for net adjusted payments for radiology services for which TRICARE payments were... radiology services specified in the regulation as being reimbursed under the allowable charge...

  6. Radiological Illustration of Spontaneous Ovarian Hyperstimulation Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Kartik; Koticha, Raj; Dey, Amit K.; Anandpara, Karan; Agrawal, Rajat; Sarvothaman, Madhva P.; Thakkar, Hemangini

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background The role of radiology is of utmost importance not only in diagnosing s-OHSS but also in ruling out other cystic ovarian diseases and to determine the underlying etiology and course of the disease. We presented a radiological algorithm for diagnosing the various causes of s-OHSS. Case Report A 26-year-old female, gravida one was referred to radiology department with history of lower abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting since 2 days which was gradual in onset and progression. The patient had no significant medical and surgical history. Conclusions This article illustrates and emphasizes that diagnosis of s-OHSS and its etiology can be completely evaluated radiologically. Biochemical markers will confirm the radiological diagnosis. PMID:25960820

  7. The Residency Review Committee for Radiology: its organization, function, and performance in diagnostic radiology.

    PubMed

    Sebring, R H; Jacobson, H G

    1984-04-01

    The accreditation process for training in radiology is managed by the Residency Review Committee for Radiology under a prescribed system. That system and the actions taken by the Committee in recent years are described. Most applications for new or continuing programs in 1975-1981 were approved. An analysis of the adverse actions of the Committee indicates the most common deficiencies were inadequate clinical experience in subspecialty areas, inadequate formal teaching, and understaffing of the clinical program. Certain trends in radiology are apparent. The numbers of programs in diagnostic and therapeutic radiology have not changed significantly over the past 5 years, whereas opportunities for training in nuclear radiology have increased greatly. The number of trainees in diagnostic radiology has increased 13% during this period; the number in radiation therapy remains unchanged. The number of women trainees in diagnostic radiology has increased from 15% to 22%, and the number of foreign graduate trainees has decreased from 19% to 11%.

  8. Vascular radiology in liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Kreel, Louis

    1970-01-01

    Vascular radiology of the liver has increased in scope and function in recent years due mainly to the application of new techniques. It is now possible to examine not only the inferior vena cava and the portal venous system, but also the hepatic veins and the coeliac axis and superior mesenteric artery. Hepatic vein occlusion, portal vein patency and collateral veins, as well as space-occupying lesions, can now be diagnosed with a fair degree of accuracy. These techniques have also helped in the understanding of the altered haemodynamics of portal hypertension and can be used for treatment by intra-arterial perfusion of chemotherapeutic substances. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 13Fig. 14 PMID:5460928

  9. The interventional radiology business plan.

    PubMed

    Beheshti, Michael V; Meek, Mary E; Kaufman, John A

    2012-09-01

    Strategic planning and business planning are processes commonly employed by organizations that exist in competitive environments. Although it is difficult to prove a causal relationship between formal strategic/business planning and positive organizational performance, there is broad agreement that formal strategic and business plans are components of successful organizations. The various elements of strategic plans and business plans are not common in the vernacular of practicing physicians. As health care becomes more competitive, familiarity with these tools may grow in importance. Herein we provide an overview of formal strategic and business planning, and offer a roadmap for an interventional radiology-specific plan that may be useful for organizations confronting competitive and financial threats.

  10. American diagnostic radiology residency and fellowship programmes.

    PubMed

    Rumack, Carol Masters

    2011-03-01

    American Diagnostic Radiology Residency and Fellowship programmes are Graduate Medical Education programmes in the United States (US) equivalent to the Postgraduate Medical Education programmes in Singapore. Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) accredited diagnostic radiology residency programmes require 5 years total with Post Graduate Year (PGY) 1 year internship in a clinical specialty, e.g. Internal Medicine following medical school. PGY Years 2 to 5 are the core years which must include Radiology Physics, Radiation Biology and rotations in 9 required subspecialty rotations: Abdominal, Breast, Cardiothoracic, Musculoskeletal, Neuroradiology, Nuclear and Paediatric Radiology, Obstetric & Vascular Ultrasound and Vascular Interventional Radiology. A core curriculum of lectures must be organised by the required 9 core subspecialty faculty. All residents (PGY 2 to 4) take a yearly American College of Radiology Diagnostic In-Training Examination based on national benchmarks of medical knowledge in each subspecialty. Because the American Board of Radiology (ABR) examinations are changing, until 2012, residents have to take 3 ABR examinations: (i) ABR physics examination in the PGY 2 to 3 years, (ii) a written examination at the start of the PGY 5 year and (iii) an oral exam at the end of the PGY 5 year. Beginning in 2013, there will be only 2 examinations: (i) the physics and written examinations after PGY 4 will become a combined core radiology examination. Beginning in 2015, the final certifying examination will be given 15 months after the completion of residency. After residency, ACGME fellowships in PGY 6 are all one-year optional programmes which focus on only one subspecialty discipline. There are 4 ACGME accredited fellowships which have a Board Certifi cation Examination: Neuroradiology, Nuclear, Paediatric and Vascular Interventional Radiology. Some ACGME fellowships do not have a certifying examination: Abdominal, Endovascular

  11. Managing a multicultural radiology staff.

    PubMed

    Davidhizar, R; Dowd, S; Giger, J

    1997-01-01

    Opportunities for minorities in healthcare increased with the Civil Rights movement in the 1960s. More recently, funds from the U.S. Public Health Service have been targeted toward disadvantaged minorities. The workforce in healthcare, and in business in general, has become increasingly multicultural. Much of the literature in healthcare management lacks practical guidelines for managing a diverse workforce. Communication, both verbal and nonverbal, and culture are closely intertwined. Managers, as they develop multicultural teams, will need to understand how culture influences communication in their organizations. Space, spatial behavior, and cultural attitudes influence people's behavior. This is a particularly important consideration for a radiology staff, which must often work in close quarters. For some cultural groups, the family as an organization has more significance than even personal, work-related or national causes. People's orientation to time, whether for the past, present or future, is usually related to the culture in which they grew up. Again, this may become an important issue for a radiology administrator whose organization must run punctually and time-efficiently. How patients feel about their environment, whether they believe they are in control or believe in an external locus of control, is of particular interest to those who attempt therapeutic changes in a patient's healthcare. Does the patient believe that illness is divine will or that suffering is intrinsic to the human condition? There is increasing research in the United States to show that people do differ biologically according to race. Such differences exist among patients as well as among staff members. It has been popular to assume that differences among races do not exist. Unfortunately such an attitude does not allow for different attributes and responses of individuals. Managing a multicultural staff presents a challenge to administrators who must be skilled in working with

  12. Instructions for Radiological Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Bannas, Peter

    2017-04-01

    Purpose This paper explains the purpose and structure of a radiological case report and provides guidance for radiologists with respect to the writing of a well-structured patient case report. Materials and Methods The current literature and the author's experience as a writer were used to create a manual that describes steps for preparing a radiological case report containing all of the important ingredients for effective communication. Results Case reports are the first line of evidence in documenting clinical observations in the literature. A case report should be written succinctly and consists of four structured main sections: introduction, description of the case, discussion and conclusion. Its structure follows the structure of an original research article, whereby the description of the case of the case report corresponds to the materials and methods section of the research article. The introduction provides the subject and merit of the case report with respect to the published literature. The case description presents the case in detail and chronological order to allow for plausibility. The discussion compares the case with the published literature and summarizes the essential features. A case report, like an original article, must provide a justified conclusion. The conclusion should be brief and be applicable to clinical practice. Conclusion The unique quality of the case, proper preparation and a clear conclusion are essential for a case report to be published. Key Points: · Case reports are the first line of evidence in documenting clinical observations in the literature. · The structure of a case report structure follows the structure of an original research article. · The unique quality of the case, proper preparation and a clear conclusion are essential for a case report to be published.. Citation Format · Bannas P. Anleitung zum Schreiben eines radiologischen Fallberichts. Fortschr Röntgenstr 2017; 189: 333 - 337. © Georg Thieme

  13. Letter to the Editors of Physics Today

    SciTech Connect

    Libby, S B; Weiss, M S

    2004-11-11

    Two points in our recent article on Edward Teller's scientific life (Physics Today, August 2004, page 45) require correction. In our description of Teller's students, we incorrectly stated that Arthur Kantrowitz's thesis was on the generation of hypersonic molecular beams. Actually, his thesis was on heat capacity lags in gas dynamics. Kantrowitz's invention of high intensity sources for molecular beams came later in his career. Maurice Goldhaber has emphasized that the situation with respect to possible nuclear resonances in ({gamma},n) or ({gamma},fission) reactions was quite unclear at the time of George C. Baldwin and G. Stanley Klaiber's papers on these reactions. This was because the rapid rise of their yield to a prominent peak with increasing energy, followed by a slower fall off was then thought to have been due to the competition between the rapidly rising density of nuclear states and the eventual domination of other reaction channels at higher energies. Goldhaber realized, however, that there could be an analogy between a possible collective nuclear resonance and the restrahl resonance (essentially the transverse optical phonon mode) in polar crystals. Goldhaber sought out Teller because of his paper with Russell Lyddane and Robert Sachs, relating the restrahl frequency to the asymptotic behavior of the crystal's dielectric function. Goldhaber and Teller, in their paper together, went on to predict universal, giant photo-nuclear resonances.

  14. Task before Indian Psychiatry Today: Commentary

    PubMed Central

    De Sousa, Avinash

    2016-01-01

    In this commentary on the article, “The Task Before Psychiatry Today Redux: STSPIR,” (Singh, 2014)[20], the author, while agreeing with most of the paper's findings, proposes a rather parallel judgment that intersects at the same paths ahead. There is a need for widespread and easily available essential mental health services in India. Health agenda must focus on spreading and scaling up psychiatric services. There is also a need to spread awareness of psychiatry and mental health and, as a psychiatrist, one must focus on making psychiatry available to a wider audience. Psychiatrists need to maintain a holistic view of psychiatric disorders while viewing them from both a neurobiological and psychosocial perspective. There is a need to revamp psychiatric training in departments with an increase in the thrust toward fostering translational research excellence in various spheres. Psychiatrists must continue to be trained in psychotherapy and practice it regularly. Psychiatric departments need to promote research excellence and focus on reducing brain drain. The practical applications of the tasks set out for psychiatry are more difficult than one can imagine, and a conscientious effort in that direction shall serve for its betterment. The future is bright and psychiatry must work toward making it brighter. PMID:28031626

  15. Freeze-drying today and tomorrow.

    PubMed

    Leary, J H; Stanford, E A

    1976-10-01

    The freeze-drying process and equipment have been improved over the years; the cycle times have shortened and the dried products have improved as a result. This talk will deal with these improvements and how we have progressed from the early systems to where we are today. Such areas of discussion will include: vacuum pumping systems, how they are sized and designed to meet the needs for general and special applications; heat transfer systems, and their use in maintaining the drying profile; condensing surface design, and what is best for certain types of dryers; controls and instrumentation, and how these have played a big part in the drying process and have made it possible to get repeatability; refrigeration systems, and the part they play in the performance of freeze-drying; and lastly the effect of internal stoppering, bottomless trays, and other items such as these have had on the present state of the art. It goes without saying that there have been many changes and there will continue to be changes and we shall endeavor to look into the future--as to what might well bo some of these changes. Included in the talk will be a number of slides and illustrations to point out the various items as they are discussed.

  16. Today's Leaders for a Sustainable Tomorrow

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Bryan

    2013-02-27

    Today's Leaders for a Sustainable Tomorrow is a collaboration of five residential environmental learning centers (Audubon Center of the North Woods, Deep Portage Learning Center, Laurentian Environmental Center, Long Lake Conservation Center and Wolf Ridge Environmental Learning Center) that together increased energy efficiency, energy conservation and renewable energy technologies through a number of different means appropriate for each unique center. For energy efficiency upgrades the centers installed envelope improvements to seal air barriers through better insulation in walls, ceilings, windows, doors as well as the installation of more energy efficient windows, doors, lighting and air ventilation systems. Through energy sub-meter monitoring the centers are able to accurately chart the usage of energy at each of their campuses and eliminate unnecessary energy usage. Facilities reduced their dependence on fossil fuel energy sources through the installation of renewable energy technologies including wood gasification, solar domestic hot water, solar photovoltaic, solar air heat, geothermal heating and wind power. Centers also installed energy education displays on the specific renewable energy technologies used at the center.

  17. Computers in biology: the future is today.

    PubMed

    Prilusky, J

    1986-01-01

    Which are the applications of microcomputers in biology today? Some areas where the work with microcomputers is becoming increasingly important are considered: laboratory applications, event simulation and word processing. Almost all laboratory computer applications can be described as one of the following functions: 1. control of experiments, including timing and synchronizing external voltages; 2. data acquisition, usually through digital conversion of analog electrical signals; 3. data storage and, 4. data analysis. Event simulation is considered both as a research tool and as an important element in the educational area. Word processing and the automatic creation of literature references lists is considered as an ignored role of the microcomputers in the laboratory field. What about the influence of biology in computer technology? As specialized magazines say, many laboratories of biotechnologist are working hard to build a molecular computer. That is, an artificially designed ultramicroscopic machine built of proteins, nucleic acids, metals and non-metals in a planned arrangement. And this is not the end. The latest application able to expand our horizon in the biological field may be starting to be used at this moment.

  18. Field primatology of today: current ethical issues.

    PubMed

    MacKinnon, K C; Riley, E P

    2010-09-01

    As members of professional organizations such as American Society of Primatologists (ASP) and the International Primatological Society (IPS), primatologists must adhere to a set of nonhuman primate-focused principles outlined in resolutions and policy statements on, for example, the ethical treatment of nonhuman primates. Those of us that work in the field must also address issues such as the protection of primate health in the wild and the conservation of wild primate populations. Moreover, we increasingly find ourselves in complex situations where we must balance human and nonhuman primate needs and interests. The selection of commentary pieces in this edition of the American Journal of Primatology originated from presentations given in the symposium, Field Primatology of Today: Navigating the Ethical Landscape, held at the 32nd Annual Meeting of the American Society of Primatologists (ASP) in September 2009. The goals of that symposium and these resulting commentary pieces are threefold: (1) to revive a discussion of key contemporary ethical issues faced by field primatologists, (2) to highlight the need for centrally placed ethical considerations in various facets of our professional lives, particularly research and teaching, and (3) to consider what a comprehensive ethical code that addresses all of these issues might look like.

  19. Today's Food System: How Healthy Is It?

    PubMed Central

    Wallinga, David

    2009-01-01

    With its focus on the quantity of production, often to the exclusion of other goals, today's food system is on an unsustainable course. The problem begins with and is driven by industrialized production of both crops and animals. Industrialization is a product of technological change, public policy, and, most recently, globalized trade. The lack of sustainability derives from reliance on the intensive use of nonrenewable and hard-to-renew resources—soil, antibiotics, fresh water, and fossil fuels, for example—but also from the waste and pollution created by the industrial model. For at least 50 years, American agriculture policies have promoted production of, and ultimately lower market prices for, commodity crops like corn, wheat, and soybeans. Over the last 3 decades in particular, these “cheap food” policies have exacerbated the negative impacts of an industrialized agriculture on the health of the agro-ecosystem, as well as on the health of the humans who must share and be sustained by it. Sustainability and health are two sides of the same food system coin. Policies that put US food production on more sustainable footing can help aid in public efforts to address the myriad crises confronting both the food and health systems. PMID:23173026

  20. Ultrasound physical principles in today's technology.

    PubMed

    Starkoff, Brian

    2014-02-01

    Introduction: New technology options are being provided on modern ultrasound machines such as tissue harmonic imaging, panoramic imaging, encoded pulses, mechanical and matrix 4D ultrasound and elastography. The increase in available features requires enhanced knowledge of the clinical benefits associated with each feature and of the additional diagnostic information in the images. However the question arises as to the necessity of understanding how these new technologies work. Also, ultrasound machines have become much more automated in recent years, with designers making it easier for users to produce excellent quality images with minimal technical input. Discussion: System presets provide adjustments to a variety of basic settings without the user requiring the knowledge of what each setting is doing. The developments in machine design and the increased level of automation pose an interesting question for sonologists and sonographers: Is there a need to know as much about the physical principles of ultrasound today as was required in the past? Conclusion: To answer this question, this article will look at just one recent advance in ultrasound - Tissue Harmonic Imaging. The various mechanisms of this technology will be discussed with reference to the underlying principles of basic ultrasound physics. The conclusion provided is that a good grounding in the physics of ultrasound remains of vital importance in understanding new technologies and enabling informed decisions to be made on their use.

  1. Today's Food System: How Healthy Is It?

    PubMed

    Wallinga, David

    2009-07-01

    With its focus on the quantity of production, often to the exclusion of other goals, today's food system is on an unsustainable course. The problem begins with and is driven by industrialized production of both crops and animals. Industrialization is a product of technological change, public policy, and, most recently, globalized trade. The lack of sustainability derives from reliance on the intensive use of nonrenewable and hard-to-renew resources-soil, antibiotics, fresh water, and fossil fuels, for example-but also from the waste and pollution created by the industrial model. For at least 50 years, American agriculture policies have promoted production of, and ultimately lower market prices for, commodity crops like corn, wheat, and soybeans. Over the last 3 decades in particular, these "cheap food" policies have exacerbated the negative impacts of an industrialized agriculture on the health of the agro-ecosystem, as well as on the health of the humans who must share and be sustained by it. Sustainability and health are two sides of the same food system coin. Policies that put US food production on more sustainable footing can help aid in public efforts to address the myriad crises confronting both the food and health systems.

  2. The transition of new technology to solve today`s problems

    SciTech Connect

    Kamin, R.A.; Martin, C.J.; Turner, L.M.

    1995-05-01

    Extensive research has been conducted in the development of methods to predict the degradation of F-44 in storage. The Low Pressure Reactor (LPR) has greatly enhanced the stability prediction capabilities necessary to make informed decisions concerning aviation fuel in storage. This technique has in the past been primarily used for research purposes. The Naval Air Warfare Center, Aircraft Division, Trenton, NJ, has used this technique successfully to assist the Defense Fuel Supply Center, Cameron Station, Alexandria, VA, in stability assessments of F-44. The High Performance Liquid Chromatography/Electrochemical Detector (HPLC/EC) antioxidant determination technique has also aided in making stability predictions by establishing the amount of inhibitor currently in the product. This paper will address two case studies in which the above new technology was used to insure the rapid detection and diagnosis of today`s field and logistic problems.

  3. Africa Today: An Atlas of Reproducible Pages. 1987 Revised Edition. World Eagle's Today Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Eagle, Inc., Wellesley, MA.

    Black and white maps that may be reproduced are contained in this volume focusing on Africa. The volume is intended to serve as a compendium of resources for classroom teachers and curriculum developers. The 53 individual country maps are reprints of maps published by the United States Department of State and by the Central Intelligence Agency. In…

  4. Variation under domestication in plants: 1859 and today.

    PubMed

    Brown, Anthony H D

    2010-08-27

    Charles Darwin began The Origin of Species with a chapter entitled variation under domestication, which encapsulated decades of his research on a diverse array of animal and plant domesticated species. Variation in these species compared with that in their wild relatives, their origins and their selection by humans, formed a paradigm for his theory of the evolutionary origin of species by means of natural selection. This chapter, its subsequent expansion into a two-volume monograph, together with the rediscovery of Mendel's laws, later became the foundation of scientific plant breeding. In the period up to the present, several advances in genetics (such as artificial mutation, polyploidy, adaptation and genetic markers) have amplified the discipline with concepts and questions, the seeds of which are in Darwin's original words. Today, we are witnessing a flowering of genomic research into the process of domestication itself, particularly the specific major and minor genes involved. In one striking way, our view of domestic diversity contrasts with that in Darwin's writing. He stressed the abundance of diversity and the diversifying power of artificial selection, whereas we are concerned about dwindling genetic diversity that attends modern agriculture and development. In this context, it is paramount to strive for a deeper understanding of how farmer selection including both deliberate selection and unconscious selection, might generate and retain diversity. This knowledge is essential for devising in situ conservation measures.

  5. Advances In Librarianship. Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voigt, Melvin J., Ed.

    The authors of this second volume provide a composite contribution to a broader understanding of some of the major topics affecting libraries and their operation today. These contributions are in keeping with the aim of the series of providing scholarly reviews of specific topics related to the rapidly changing and advancing field of…

  6. [Radiological and functional progression in silicosis].

    PubMed

    L'Abbate, N; Di Pierri, Carmelina; Nuzzaco, Alda; Caputo, Francesca; Carino, M

    2005-01-01

    The incidence of silicosis has decreased today because of a clear improvement of working conditions. According to recent data from Italian National Compensation Agency (INAIL) silicosis represents more than 5% of occupational diseases claimed for annually. Since silicosis is an evolving chronic disease, it has serious consequences on patient health, modifying the quality of life and increasing public costs. Some studies show a relationship between occupational exposure to silica and radiological and functional deterioration, but the results are not satisfactory because of the variety of clinical patterns and the interference of many risk factors. The aim of our investigation was to evaluate silicosis evolution in relation to living habits and to different occupational exposures. All admissions from 1980 to 2000 in the Occupational Medicine Unit of the Maugeri Foundation in Cassano Murge (Bari), Southern Italy, with final diagnosis of silicosis were examined. From 586 medical records gathered, subjects with double admissions were selected and their chest radiographs and FVC, FEV1 from lung function test were detected. No industrial hygiene data were available and individual exposure was estimated through calculation of a global exposure index. On the basis of data quality control, 106 consecutive male patients were recruited (age at first admission 51.7 +/- 8.3 years, occupational exposure at second admission 23.8 +/- 9.1 years). More than 50% of the subjects had an estimated high risk exposure at work. The first diagnosis of silicosis was made at first admission in 40% of the cases, 33% of the patients had been suffering from silicosis for 10 years while 27% for more than 10 years. Chest radiographs showed mostly p, q nodular pattern, and over a 4. 7 +/- 3.3 year follow-up period they appeared largely unchanged, although 8 radiographs showed confluent areas, 18 subjects showed pleural thickening, 10 calcified opacities, 17 COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary

  7. Fixing health care from the inside, today.

    PubMed

    Spear, Steven J

    2005-09-01

    Today, you are about as safe in a U.S. hospital as you would be parachuting off a bridge or a building. But it doesn't have to be that way. Right now, some hospitals are making enormous short-term improvements, with no legislation or market reconfiguration and little or no capital investment. Instead of waiting for sweeping changes in market mechanisms, these institutions are taking an operations approach to patient care. In case after detailed case, the article describes how doctors, nurses, technicians, and managers are radically increasing the effectiveness of patient care and dramatically lowering its cost by applying the same capabilities in operations design and improvement that drive the famous Toyota Production System. They are removing ambiguity in the output, responsibilities, connections, and methods of their work processes. These changes-which can be done in the course of an ordinary workday, sometimes in a matter of hours-are designed to make the following crystal clear: Which patient gets which procedure (output); Who does which aspect of the job (responsibility); Exactly which signals are used to indicate that the work should begin (connection); and Precisely how each step is carried out (method). Equally important, managers are being transformed from rescuers who arrive with ready-made solutions into problem solvers who help colleagues learn the experimental method. Thus, these hospitals are breaking free of the work-around culture that routinely obscures the root causes of so many problems, creates so much waste, and leads to so many unnecessary deaths.

  8. Ancient water supports today's energy needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Odorico, Paolo; Natyzak, Jennifer L.; Castner, Elizabeth A.; Davis, Kyle F.; Emery, Kyle A.; Gephart, Jessica A.; Leach, Allison M.; Pace, Michael L.; Galloway, James N.

    2017-05-01

    The water footprint for fossil fuels typically accounts for water utilized in mining and fuel processing, whereas the water footprint of biofuels assesses the agricultural water used by crops through their lifetime. Fossil fuels have an additional water footprint that is not easily accounted for: ancient water that was used by plants millions of years ago, before they were transformed into fossil fuel. How much water is mankind using from the past to sustain current energy needs? We evaluate the link between ancient water virtually embodied in fossil fuels to current global energy demands by determining the water demand required to replace fossil fuels with biomass produced with water from the present. Using equal energy units of wood, bioethanol, and biodiesel to replace coal, natural gas, and crude oil, respectively, the resulting water demand is 7.39 × 1013 m3 y-1, approximately the same as the total annual evaporation from all land masses and transpiration from all terrestrial vegetation. Thus, there are strong hydrologic constraints to a reliance on biofuel energy produced with water from the present because the conversion from fossil fuels to biofuels would have a disproportionate and unsustainable impact on the modern water. By using fossil fuels to meet today's energy needs, we are virtually using water from a geological past. The water cycle is insufficient to sustain the production of the fuel presently consumed by human societies. Thus, non-fuel-based renewable energy sources are needed to decrease mankind's reliance on fossil fuel energy without placing an overwhelming pressure on global freshwater resources.

  9. Student Perceptions of Online Radiologic Science Courses.

    PubMed

    Papillion, Erika; Aaron, Laura

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate student perceptions of the effectiveness of online radiologic science courses by examining various learning activities and course characteristics experienced in the online learning environment. A researcher-designed electronic survey was used to obtain results from students enrolled in the clinical portion of a radiologic science program that offers online courses. The survey consisted of elements associated with demographics, experience, and perceptions related to online radiologic science courses. Surveys were sent to 35 program directors of Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology-accredited associate and bachelor's degree programs with requests to share the survey with students. The 38 students who participated in the survey identified 4 course characteristics most important for effective online radiologic science courses: a well-organized course, timely instructor feedback, a variety of learning activities, and informative documents, such as course syllabus, calendar, and rubrics. Learner satisfaction is a successful indicator of engagement in online courses. Descriptive statistical analysis indicated that elements related to the instructor's role is one of the most important components of effectiveness in online radiologic science courses. This role includes providing an organized course with informative documents, a variety of learning activities, and timely feedback and communication. Although online courses should provide many meaningful learning activities that appeal to a wide range of learning styles, the nature of the course affects the types of learning activities used and therefore could decrease the ability to vary learning activities. ©2017 American Society of Radiologic Technologists.

  10. Estimating radiological background using imaging spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bernacki, Bruce E.; Schweppe, John E.; Stave, Sean C.; Jordan, David V.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Stewart, Trevor N.; Seifert, Carolyn E.

    2014-06-13

    Optical imaging spectroscopy is investigated as a method to estimate radiological background by spectral identification of soils, sediments, rocks, minerals and building materials derived from natural materials and assigning tabulated radiological emission values to these materials. Radiological airborne surveys are undertaken by local, state and federal agencies to identify the presence of radiological materials out of regulatory compliance. Detection performance in such surveys is determined by (among other factors) the uncertainty in the radiation background; increased knowledge of the expected radiation background will improve the ability to detect low-activity radiological materials. Radiological background due to naturally occurring radiological materials (NORM) can be estimated by reference to previous survey results, use of global 40K, 238U, and 232Th (KUT) values, reference to existing USGS radiation background maps, or by a moving average of the data as it is acquired. Each of these methods has its drawbacks: previous survey results may not include recent changes, the global average provides only a zero-order estimate, the USGS background radiation map resolutions are coarse and are accurate only to 1 km – 25 km sampling intervals depending on locale, and a moving average may essentially low pass filter the data to obscure small changes in radiation counts. Imaging spectroscopy from airborne or spaceborne platforms can offer higher resolution identification of materials and background, as well as provide imaging context information. AVIRIS hyperspectral image data is analyzed using commercial exploitation software to determine the usefulness of imaging spectroscopy to identify qualitative radiological background emissions when compared to airborne radiological survey data.

  11. Hospital preparedness for chemical and radiological disasters.

    PubMed

    Moore, Brooks L; Geller, Robert J; Clark, Charlotte

    2015-02-01

    Hospital planning for chemical or radiological events is essential but all too often treated as a low priority. Although some other types of disasters like hurricanes and tornadoes may be more frequent, chemical and radiological emergencies have the potential for major disruptions to clinical care. Thorough planning can mitigate the impact of a chemical or radiological event. Planning needs to include all 4 phases of an event: mitigation (preplanning), preparation, response, and recovery. Mitigation activities should include the performance of a hazards vulnerability analysis and identification of local subject-matter experts and team leaders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Radiologic diagnosis of a newborn with cloaca.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Steven J

    2016-04-01

    When a female is born and has only a single perineal orifice on the newborn clinical examination, a diagnosis of cloaca type of anorectal malformation is made. Along with associated malformations which may initiate the ordering of radiologic imaging, there are a finite number of radiologic tests that are performed to help in the immediate management of the patient with cloaca. The following discussion will outline the most important radiologic tests and demonstrate examples of images from newborn females with cloaca. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Justification and radiology: some ethical considerations.

    PubMed

    Sia, Santiago

    2009-07-01

    This paper, which seeks to address the issue of justification in radiology, intends firstly to comment on the current discussion of the ethical foundation of radiological practice that focuses on the move from utilitarianism to the rights-centred criterion. Secondly, and this constitutes the bulk of the paper, it aims to offer a philosophical perspective, which is hoped will lead to a consideration of certain specific areas in ethical decision-making in the attempts here to deal with the main issue of justification in radiology.

  14. Mandibular Canal Enlargement: Clinical and Radiological Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Chong Jun; Jabar, Nazimi Abd; Lan, Tan Huann; Ramli, Roszalina

    2017-01-01

    Enlargement of the mandibular canal is a rare radiological finding. Clinically, it may or may not be associated with sensory deficits. We report four cases of widening of the mandibular canal observed with various methods of imaging with different clinical characteristics. We describe this unique radiological finding and elaborate the importance of quality assessment of the imaging that is vital for accurate diagnosis and treatment planning. Clinicians should be mindful when assessing the imaging whenever the size of the mandibular canal is implicated. The case ranged from a benign tumor to malignancy, radiological errors, and artifacts. A more superior imaging or treatment modality was necessary to ascertain the diagnosis. PMID:28781925

  15. Relative radiological risks derived from different TENORM wastes in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ismail, B; Teng, I L; Muhammad Samudi, Y

    2011-11-01

    In Malaysia technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive materials (TENORM) wastes are mainly the product of the oil and gas industry and mineral processing. Among these TENORM wastes are tin tailing, tin slag, gypsum and oil sludge. Mineral processing and oil and gas industries produce large volume of TENORM wastes that has become a radiological concern to the authorities. A study was carried out to assess the radiological risk related to workers working at these disposal sites and landfills as well as to the members of the public should these areas be developed for future land use. Radiological risk was assessed based on the magnitude of radiation hazard, effective dose rates and excess cancer risks. Effective dose rates and excess cancer risks were estimated using RESRAD 6.4 computer code. All data on the activity concentrations of NORM in wastes and sludges used in this study were obtained from the Atomic Energy Licensing Board, Malaysia, and they were collected over a period of between 5 and 10 y. Results obtained showed that there was a wide range in the total activity concentrations (TAC) of nuclides in the TENORM wastes. With the exception of tin slag and tin tailing-based TENORM wastes, all other TENORM wastes have TAC values comparable to that of Malaysia's soil. Occupational Effective Dose Rates estimated in all landfill areas were lower than the 20 mSv y(-1) permissible dose limit. The average Excess Cancer Risk Coefficient was estimated to be 2.77×10(-3) risk per mSv. The effective dose rates for residents living on gypsum and oil sludge-based TENORM wastes landfills were estimated to be lower than the permissible dose limit for members of the public, and was also comparable to that of the average Malaysia's ordinary soils. The average excess cancer risk coefficient was estimated to be 3.19×10(-3) risk per mSv. Results obtained suggest that gypsum and oil sludge-based TENORM wastes should be exempted from any radiological regulatory

  16. Accelerators in our past, present, and future: A challenge to radiological protection in the twenty-first century

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, R.H. |

    1993-09-01

    The foundations of many of the subdisciplines of radiological protection laid in accelerator laboratories began with the invention of accelerators. This paper suggests that the discipline of accelerator radiological protection has played and will continue play a more significant part in our lives than is generally recognized. A brief review of some existing uses of accelerators by society is given, and a few probable future uses are described. These future applications will result in the exposure of accelerator (or {open_quotes}mixed{close_quotes}) radiation fields to an increased population. Consequently, what are perceived to be the rather specialized concerns of today`s accelerator health physicists will -- by necessity -- become of general interest to all health physicists.

  17. Architecture of next-generation information management systems for digital radiology enterprises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Stephen T. C.; Wang, Huili; Shen, Weimin; Schmidt, Joachim; Chen, George; Dolan, Tom

    2000-05-01

    Few information systems today offer a clear and flexible means to define and manage the automated part of radiology processes. None of them provide a coherent and scalable architecture that can easily cope with heterogeneity and inevitable local adaptation of applications. Most importantly, they often lack a model that can integrate clinical and administrative information to aid better decisions in managing resources, optimizing operations, and improving productivity. Digital radiology enterprises require cost-effective solutions to deliver information to the right person in the right place and at the right time. We propose a new architecture of image information management systems for digital radiology enterprises. Such a system is based on the emerging technologies in workflow management, distributed object computing, and Java and Web techniques, as well as Philips' domain knowledge in radiology operations. Our design adapts the approach of '4+1' architectural view. In this new architecture, PACS and RIS will become one while the user interaction can be automated by customized workflow process. Clinical service applications are implemented as active components. They can be reasonably substituted by applications of local adaptations and can be multiplied for fault tolerance and load balancing. Furthermore, it will provide powerful query and statistical functions for managing resources and improving productivity in real time. This work will lead to a new direction of image information management in the next millennium. We will illustrate the innovative design with implemented examples of a working prototype.

  18. National Conference on Vocational Education and Training Policy for Today and Tomorrow. Proceedings (Columbus, Ohio, March 15-16, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    These proceedings contain the texts of, panel reaction to, and panel discussions of the papers presented at the national conference on "Vocational Education and Training Policy for Today and Tomorrow." Included in the volume are the following conference presentations: "Trends and Changes in Federal, State and Local Government Roles during the…

  19. Status of SRNL radiological field lysimeter experiment-Year 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.; Roberts, K.; Bagwell, L.

    2013-10-01

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Radiological Field Lysimeter Experiment is a one-of-a-kind field facility designed to study radionuclide geochemical processes at a larger spatial scale (from grams to tens of kilograms sediment) and temporal scale (from months to 10 years) than is readily afforded through laboratory studies. The lysimeter facility is intended to capture the natural heterogeneity of moisture and temperature regimes in the vadose zone, the unsaturated subsurface region between the surface soil and the underlying aquifer. The 48 lysimeter columns, which contain various radionuclides (and stable iodine), were opened to rainfall infiltration on July 5, 2012. The objective of this report is to provide a status of the lysimeter facility operations and to compile data collected during FY13, including leachate volume, rainfall, and soil moisture and temperature in situ probe data. Radiological leachate data are not presented in this document but will be the subject of a separate document.1 Leachate samples were collected quarterly and shipped to Clemson University for radiological analyses. Rainfall, leachate volume, moisture and temperature probe data were collected continuously. During operations of the facility this year, there were four safety or technical concerns that required additional maintenance: 1) radioactivity was detected in one of the overflow bottles (captured water collected from the secondary containment that does not come in contact with the radiological source material); 2) rainwater accumulated within the sample-bottle storage sheds; 3) overflow containers collected more liquid than anticipated; and 4) significant spider infestation occurred in the sample-bottle storage sheds. To address the first three concerns, each of the lysimeter columns was re-plumbed to improve and to minimize the number of joint unions. To address the fourth concern regarding spiders, new sample-bottle water sheds were purchased and a pest control

  20. The Importance of Curriculum-Based Training and Assessment in Interventional Radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Belli, Anna-Maria; Reekers, Jim A.; Lee, Michael

    2013-10-30

    Physician performance and outcomes are being scrutinised by health care providers to improve patient safety and cost efficiency. Patients are best served by physicians who have undergone appropriate specialist training and assessment and perform large numbers of cases to maintain their skills. The Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe has put into place a curriculum for training in interventional radiology (IR) and a syllabus with an examination, the European Board of Interventional Radiology, providing evidence of attainment of an appropriate and satisfactory skill set for the safe practice of IR. This curriculum is appropriate for IR where there is a high volume of image-guided procedures in vascular and nonvascular organ systems with cross-use of minimally invasive techniques in patients with a variety of disease processes. Other specialties may require different, longer, and more focused training if their experience is “diluted” by the need to master a different skill set.

  1. Integrated residency training pathways of the future: diagnostic radiology, nuclear radiology, nuclear medicine, and molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Oates, M Elizabeth

    2012-04-01

    Following up on the recommendations of the ACR/SNM Task Force on Nuclear Medicine Training, the respective leaderships convened Task Force II. Its charge is to develop realistic residency training pathways integrating diagnostic radiology, nuclear radiology, nuclear medicine, and molecular imaging. The diagnostic radiology participants offer these "pathways of the future" that are built on a foundation of training in diagnostic radiology. It is hoped that these pathways will ensure that the traditional and emerging clinical, educational, and research domains of nuclear radiology, nuclear medicine, and molecular imaging will be sustained and will indeed flourish in the decades to come. Copyright © 2012 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Image fusion in medical radiology].

    PubMed

    Burger, C

    1996-07-20

    Image fusion supports the correlation between images of two or more studies of the same organ. First, the effect of differing geometries during image acquisitions, such as a head tilt, is compensated for. As a consequence, congruent images can easily be obtained. Instead of merely putting them side by side in a static manner and burdening the radiologist with the whole correlation task, image fusion supports him with interactive visualization techniques. This is especially worthwhile for small lesions as they can be more precisely located. Image fusion is feasible today. Easy and robust techniques are readily available, and furthermore DICOM, a rapidly evolving data exchange standard, diminishes the once severe compatibility problems for image data originating from systems of different manufacturers. However, the current solutions for image fusion are not yet established enough for a high throughput of fusion studies. Thus, for the time being image fusion is most appropriately confined to clinical research studies.

  3. Diagnostic errors in pediatric radiology.

    PubMed

    Taylor, George A; Voss, Stephan D; Melvin, Patrice R; Graham, Dionne A

    2011-03-01

    Little information is known about the frequency, types and causes of diagnostic errors in imaging children. Our goals were to describe the patterns and potential etiologies of diagnostic error in our subspecialty. We reviewed 265 cases with clinically significant diagnostic errors identified during a 10-year period. Errors were defined as a diagnosis that was delayed, wrong or missed; they were classified as perceptual, cognitive, system-related or unavoidable; and they were evaluated by imaging modality and level of training of the physician involved. We identified 484 specific errors in the 265 cases reviewed (mean:1.8 errors/case). Most discrepancies involved staff (45.5%). Two hundred fifty-eight individual cognitive errors were identified in 151 cases (mean = 1.7 errors/case). Of these, 83 cases (55%) had additional perceptual or system-related errors. One hundred sixty-five perceptual errors were identified in 165 cases. Of these, 68 cases (41%) also had cognitive or system-related errors. Fifty-four system-related errors were identified in 46 cases (mean = 1.2 errors/case) of which all were multi-factorial. Seven cases were unavoidable. Our study defines a taxonomy of diagnostic errors in a large academic pediatric radiology practice and suggests that most are multi-factorial in etiology. Further study is needed to define effective strategies for improvement.

  4. Public participation in radiological surveillance.

    PubMed

    Hanf, R W; Schreckhise, R G; Patton, G W; Poston, T M; Jaquish, R E

    1997-10-01

    In 1989, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory developed a program, for the U.S. Department of Energy, to involve local citizens in environmental surveillance at the Hanford Site. The Community-Operated Environmental Surveillance Program was patterned after similar community-involvement efforts at the Nevada Test Site and the Three Mile Island nuclear facility. Its purpose is to increase the flow of information to the public, thereby enhancing the public's awareness and understanding of surveillance activities. The program consists of two components: radiological air monitoring at nine offsite locations and agricultural product sampling at selected locations near the site. At each air-monitoring station, two local school teachers collect air particulate samples and operate equipment to monitor ambient radiation levels. Atmospheric tritium samples (as water vapor) are also collected at some locations. Four of the air-monitoring stations include large, colorful informational displays for public viewing. These displays provide details on station equipment, sample types, and sampling purposes. Instruments in the displays also monitor, record, and show real-time ambient radiation readings (measured with a pressurized ionization chamber) and meteorological conditions. Agricultural products, grown primarily by middle-school-aged students, are obtained from areas downwind of the site. Following analysis of these samples, environmental surveillance staff visit the schools to discuss the results with the students and their teachers. The data collected by these air and agricultural sampling efforts are summarized with other routinely collected sitewide surveillance data and reported annually in the Hanford Site environmental report.

  5. Agreement studies in radiology research.

    PubMed

    Farzin, B; Gentric, J-C; Pham, M; Tremblay-Paquet, S; Brosseau, L; Roy, C; Jamali, S; Chagnon, M; Darsaut, T E; Guilbert, F; Naggara, O; Raymond, J

    2017-03-01

    The goal of this study was to estimate the frequency and the quality of agreement studies published in diagnostic imaging journals. All studies published between January 2011 and December 2012 in four radiology journals were reviewed. Four trained readers evaluated agreement studies using a 24-item form that included the 15 items of the Guidelines for Reporting Reliability and Agreement Studies criteria. Of 2229 source titles, 280 studies (13%) reported agreement. The mean number of patients per study was 81±99 (SD) (range, 0-180). Justification for sample size was found in 9 studies (3%). The number of raters was≤2 in 226 studies (81%). No intra-observer study was performed in 212 (76%) articles. Confidence intervals and interpretation of statistical estimates were provided in 98 (35%) and 147 (53%) of the studies, respectively. In 168 studies (60%), the agreement study was not mentioned in the discussion section. In 8 studies (3%), reporting of the agreement study was judged to be adequate. Twenty studies (7%) were dedicated to agreement. Agreement studies are preliminary and not adequately reported. Studies dedicated to agreement are infrequent. They are research opportunities that should be promoted. Copyright © 2016 Éditions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Radiologic assessment of spinal fusion.

    PubMed

    Selby, Michael Derrick; Clark, Simon Richard; Hall, David John; Freeman, Brian J C

    2012-11-01

    Since surgical fusion of the spine was first described in 1911, multiple methods have been used to assess it. Although open surgical exploration remains the standard of care for determination of fusion, it is impractical in most clinical situations. Static radiographs have long been used as a practical method of fusion assessment, but they tend to significantly overestimate the presence of a solid fusion. Dynamic radiographs improve accuracy but limitations include measurement reliability, disagreement on allowable motion, and the two-dimensional nature of radiographs. Ultimately, lack of movement at a fused segment does not confirm fusion. Radiostereometric analysis further improves accuracy; however, methodological demands make it largely impractical for routine use. CT is now widely accepted as the standard for noninvasive assessment of spinal fusion. Fine-cut imaging, multiplanar reconstruction, and metal artifact reduction have increased the ability to assess fusion on CT. However, significant concerns remain regarding the effects of high radiation exposure. Although MRI is appealing, its utility in assessing fusion remains unproven. Understanding the limitations of each technique allows judicious use of radiology in the assessment of spinal fusion.

  7. Radiology of recreational drug abuse.

    PubMed

    Hagan, Ian G; Burney, Kashif

    2007-01-01

    Recreational drug abuse is increasing throughout the world. Use of these drugs may result in a diverse array of acute and chronic complications involving almost any body organ, and imaging frequently plays a vital role in detection and characterization of such complications. The nature of the complications depends to a large extent on the drug used, the method of administration, and the impurities associated with the drug. Radiologically demonstrable sequelae may be seen after use of opiates, cocaine, amphetamines and their derivatives such as 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine ("ecstasy"), marijuana, and inhaled volatile agents including amyl nitrite ("poppers") and industrial solvents such as toluene. Cardiovascular complications include myocardial infarction, cardiomyopathy, arterial dissection, false and mycotic aneurysms, venous thromboembolic disease, and septic thrombophlebitis. Respiratory complications may involve the upper airways, lung parenchyma, pulmonary vasculature, and pleural space. Neurologic complications are most commonly due to the cerebrovascular effects of illicit drugs. Musculoskeletal complications are dominated by soft-tissue, bone, and joint infections caused by intravenous drug use. Awareness of the imaging features of recreational drug abuse is important for the radiologist because the underlying cause may not be known at presentation and because complications affecting different body systems may coexist. Intravenous drug abuse in particular should be regarded as a multisystem disease with vascular and infective complications affecting many parts of the body, often synchronously. Discovery of one complication should prompt the radiologist to search for coexisting pathologic conditions, which may alter management. RSNA, 2007

  8. Multilingual retrieval of radiology images.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Charles E

    2009-01-01

    The multilingual search engine ARRS GoldMiner Global was created to facilitate broad international access to a richly indexed collection of more than 200,000 radiologic images. Images are indexed according to key-words and medical concepts that appear in the unstructured text of their English-language image captions. GoldMiner Global exploits the Unicode standard, which allows the accurate representation of characters and ideographs from virtually any language and which supports both left-to-right and right-to-left text directions. The user interface supports queries in Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, or Spanish. GoldMiner Global incorporates an interface to the United States National Library of Medicine that translates queries into English-language Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) terms. The translated MeSH terms are then used to search the image index and retrieve relevant images. Explanatory text, pull-down menu choices, and navigational guides are displayed in the selected language; search results are displayed in English. GoldMiner Global is freely available on the World Wide Web.

  9. Abdominal surgery. [Radiology, screening techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, C.E.; Malt, R.A.

    1983-03-31

    A new art of ''interventional radiology'' has been developed in the past few years. Major applications include postoperative instrumentation of the biliary tract, percutaneous biliary drainage, tumor biopsy, abscess drainage, and intestinal-intubation procedures. Intervention by angiography encompasses injection of such substances as Pitressin (vasopressin), and embolization. These procedures have been of immense value. Fortunately, complications, such as sepsis and bleeding, have been infrequent. Computerized body tomography has also proved extremely important, particularly in the diagnosis of subphrenic abscess and pancreatic and pelvic pathology. /sup 99m/Tc-labeled-erythrocyte scans can be used to detect gastrointestinal bleeding sites. Scans can also identify hepatobiliary disease and splenic injury or differentiate the cause of jaundice. /sup 111/Indium-labeled autologous leukocytes may be useful in differentiating a pancreatic abscess from a pseudocyst. The advantage of indium scans over /sup 67/Ga scans is that a shorter time is required for maximum resolution: gallium requires 48 hours, indium 4. Another advantage is that indium is cleared through the liver and spleen and is not secreted into the bowel. /sup 67/Ga is absorbed by lymphomas and hepatocarcinomas. Nuclear magnetic resonance has many possible uses in abdominal surgery, but so far little information is available. This technique has been used to detect an empyema of the gallbladder that was not diagnosed by ultrasound. Among hepatic lesions, it can easily differentiate tumors from cysts and in that regard is superior to both ultrasound and scan. (JMT)

  10. The Task before Psychiatry Today Redux: STSPIR*

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ajai R.

    2014-01-01

    This paper outlines six important tasks for psychiatry today, which can be put in short as: Spread and scale up services;Talk;Science,Psychotherapy;Integrate; andResearch excellence. As an acronym, STSPIR. Spread and scale up services: Spreading mental health services to uncovered areas, and increasing facilities in covered areas:Mental disorders are leading cause of ill health but bottom of health agenda;Patients face widespread discrimination, human rights violations and lack of facilities;Need to stem the brain drain from developing countries;At any given point, 10% of the adult population report having some mental or behavioural disorder;In India, serious mental disorders affect nearly 80 million people, i.e. combined population of the northern top of India, including Punjab, Haryana, Jammu and Kashmir, Uttarakhand and Himachal Pradesh;Combating imbalance between burden of demand and supply of efficient psychiatric services in all countries, especially in developing ones like India, is the first task before psychiatry today. If ever a greater role for activism were needed, this is the field;The need is to scale up effective and cost-effective treatments and preventive interventions for mental disorders.Talk: Speaking to a wider audience about positive contributions of psychiatry: Being aware of, understanding, and countering, the massive anti-psychiatry propaganda online and elsewhere;Giving a firm answer to anti-psychiatry even while understanding its transformation into mental health consumerism and opposition to reckless medicalisation;Defining normality and abnormality;Bringing about greater precision in diagnosis and care;Motivating those helped by psychiatry to speak up;Setting up informative websites and organising programmes to reduce stigma and spread mental health awareness;Setting up regular columns in psychiatry journals around the globe, called ‘Patients Speak’, or something similar, wherein those who have been helped get a chance to voice

  11. Radiological safety training for uranium facilities

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    This handbook contains recommended training materials consistent with DOE standardized core radiological training material. These materials consist of a program management guide, instructor`s guide, student guide, and overhead transparencies.

  12. Environmental Protection Agency Radiological Emergency Response Plan

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The purpose of this Plan is to describe EPA's concept of operations to implement the various actions, when responding to a threatened or actual radiological releases in emergencies and terrorist incidents.

  13. Apparatus for safeguarding a radiological source

    DOEpatents

    Bzorgi, Fariborz M

    2014-10-07

    A tamper detector is provided for safeguarding a radiological source that is moved into and out of a storage location through an access porthole for storage and use. The radiological source is presumed to have an associated shipping container approved by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission for transporting the radiological source. The tamper detector typically includes a network of sealed tubing that spans at least a portion of the access porthole. There is an opening in the network of sealed tubing that is large enough for passage therethrough of the radiological source and small enough to prevent passage therethrough of the associated shipping cask. Generally a gas source connector is provided for establishing a gas pressure in the network of sealed tubing, and a pressure drop sensor is provided for detecting a drop in the gas pressure below a preset value.

  14. Data Standards in Tele-radiology

    PubMed Central

    Fatehi, Mansoor; Safdari, Reza; Ghazisaeidi, Marjan; Jebraeily, Mohamad; Habibi-koolaee, Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Data standards play an important role to provide interoperability among different system. As other applications of telemedicine, the tele-radiology needs these standards to work properly. In this article, we conducted a review to introduce some data standards about tele-radiology. By searching PUBMED and Google Scholar database, we find more relevant articles about data standards in tele-radiology. Three categories of standards identified, including data interchange, document and terminology standards. Data interchange standards, including those which facilitate the understanding of the format of a massage between systems, such as DICOM and HL7. Document standards, including those which facilitate the contents of a massage, such as DICOM SR and HL7 CDA. And terminology standards, including those which facilitate the understanding of concepts of the domain. Since, the harmonization between different standards are important to meet interoperability, so the more effort is needed to conduct harmonization between tele-radiology standards and other domain. PMID:26236084

  15. Diagnostic radiology in paediatric palliative care.

    PubMed

    Patel, Preena; Koh, Michelle; Carr, Lucinda; McHugh, Kieran

    2014-01-01

    Palliative care is an expanding specialty within paediatrics, which has attracted little attention in the paediatric radiological literature. Paediatric patients under a palliative care team will have numerous radiological tests which we traditionally categorise under organ systems rather than under the umbrella of palliative medicine. The prevalence of children with life-limiting illness is significant. It has been estimated to be one per thousand, and this may be an underestimate. In this review, we will focus on our experience at one institution, where radiology has proven to be an invaluable partner to palliative care. We will discuss examples of conditions commonly referred to our palliative care team and delineate the crucial role of diagnostic radiology in determining treatment options.

  16. The basic radiological system experience in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Kitonyi, J M

    1993-12-01

    While Diagnostic Radiology has become increasingly indispensible in sound clinical patient management the cost and maintenance of radiological equipment has continued to soar, reaching almost unaffordable levels in developing countries. As an attempt to provide some measure of remedy to the above problem, the World Health Organization in the early 80's introduced the basic radiological system (BRS) concept. The BRS is supposed to meet such criteria as being relatively cheap, of low maintenance cost easy operability and suitable in rural areas where electrical power supply may not be constant. In addition it should be able to perform 80% of all conventional radiological examinations. In this paper the author gives a critical account of the BRS experience in Kenya. Proposals for possible future considerations and modifications in order to achieve near ideal BRS X-ray machine are also advanced.

  17. Radiological emergency: Malaysian preparedness and response.

    PubMed

    Yusof, Mohd Abd Wahab; Ali, Hamrah Mohd

    2011-07-01

    Planning and preparation in advance for radiological emergencies can help to minimise potential public health and environmental threats if and when an actual emergency occurs. During the planning process, emergency response organisations think through how they would respond to each type of incident and the resources that will be needed. In Malaysia, planning, preparation for and response to radiological emergencies involve many parties. In the event of a radiological emergency and if it is considered a disaster, the National Security Council, the Atomic Energy Licensing Board and the Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia) will work together with other federal agencies, state and local governments, first responders and international organisations to monitor the situation, contain the release, and clean up the contaminated site. Throughout the response, these agencies use their protective action guidelines. This paper discusses Malaysian preparedness for, and response to, any potential radiological emergency.

  18. Psychological effects of nuclear and radiological warfare.

    PubMed

    Salter, C A

    2001-12-01

    Not since 1945 has the world experienced nuclear warfare, although there has been the threat of nuclear terrorism and a large number of nuclear/radiological accidents. Most people fear a nuclear/radiological threat even more than a conventional explosion due both to their inability to perceive the presence of radiation with the ordinary human senses and to concerns about perceived long-lasting radiation effects. Studies of radiological accidents have found that for every actually contaminated casualty, there may be as many as 500 people who are concerned, eager to be screened for contamination, sometimes panicked, and showing psychosomatic reactions mimicking actual radiation effects. Data from the Hiroshima and Nagasaki attacks revealed widespread acute reactions such as psychic numbing, severe anxiety, and disorganized behavior, and there were later chronic effects such as survivor guilt and psychosomatic reactions. Such responses would likely be common in any future nuclear/radiological accident, terrorist attack, or warfare.

  19. Leadership and management in quality radiology

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    The practice of medical imaging and interventional radiology are undergoing rapid change in recent years due to technological advances, workload escalation, workforce shortage, globalisation, corporatisation, commercialisation and commoditisation of healthcare. These professional and economical changes are challenging the established norm but may bring new opportunities. There is an increasing awareness of and interest in the quality of care and patient safety in medical imaging and interventional radiology. Among the professional organisations, a range of quality systems are available to address individual, facility and system needs. To manage the limited resources successfully, radiologists and professional organisations must be leaders and champion for the cause of quality care and patient safety. Close collaboration with other stakeholders towards the development and management of proactive, long-term, system-based strategies and infrastructures will underpin a sustainable future in quality radiology. The International Radiology Quality Network can play a useful facilitating role in this worthwhile but challenging endeavour. PMID:21614284

  20. Data Standards in Tele-radiology.

    PubMed

    Fatehi, Mansoor; Safdari, Reza; Ghazisaeidi, Marjan; Jebraeily, Mohamad; Habibi-Koolaee, Mahdi

    2015-06-01

    Data standards play an important role to provide interoperability among different system. As other applications of telemedicine, the tele-radiology needs these standards to work properly. In this article, we conducted a review to introduce some data standards about tele-radiology. By searching PUBMED and Google Scholar database, we find more relevant articles about data standards in tele-radiology. Three categories of standards identified, including data interchange, document and terminology standards. Data interchange standards, including those which facilitate the understanding of the format of a massage between systems, such as DICOM and HL7. Document standards, including those which facilitate the contents of a massage, such as DICOM SR and HL7 CDA. And terminology standards, including those which facilitate the understanding of concepts of the domain. Since, the harmonization between different standards are important to meet interoperability, so the more effort is needed to conduct harmonization between tele-radiology standards and other domain.