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Sample records for radionuclide bone scintigraphy

  1. Radionuclide bone scintigraphy in pediatric orthopedics

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, J.J.

    1986-12-01

    Radionuclide bone scintigraphy is highly sensitive and specific for diagnosing the musculoskeletal disorders of childhood. Conditions such as neonatal osteomyelitis, septic arthritis, diskitis of childhood, Legg-Calve-Perthes disease, the osteochondroses, the toddler's fracture, sports injuries, spondylolysis, myositis ossificians, and reflex sympathetic dystrophy are readily defined. High-quality state-of-the-art scintigraphy is essential in infants and young children. 64 references.

  2. Radionuclide scintigraphy of bacterial nephritis

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, J.J.; Weiss, S.C.; Shkolnik, A.; Yogev, R.; Firlit, C.; Traisman, E.S.

    1984-01-01

    Pyelonephritis is a leading cause of renal failure and is expected to cost as much as three billion dollars in 1984. The diagnosis of urinary tract infection is usually not difficult. However, localization of the infection within the renal parenchyma as opposed to the collecting system is much more difficult. Flank pain, fever, bacteiuria and evidence of parenchymal involvement by intravenous urography may be absent or unrecognized particularly in the infant. Ultrasound and Nuclear Medicine are advocated as better methods to define parenchymal involvement. Such definition is important in the consideration of treatment since parenchymal involvement of the kidney carries a much more ominous potential outcome than infection restricted to within the collecting system. 38 children with a clinical diagnosis of urinary tract infection were studied. 26 of the patients demonstrated abnormal renal parenchymal findings with Gallium-67 Citrate or Tc-99m Glucoheptonate scintigraphy. Intravenous urography was notably ineffective with only 5 of the 20 interpreted as abnormal due to parenchymal disease or decreased function. 11 were entirely normal while only 5 demonstrated scars or hydronephrosis. Only 10 of 17 patients demonstrated intranvesicoureteral reflux on x-ray or nuclear cystography. Ultrasound depicted 6 of 20 patients as having parenchymal abnormalities. Seven were normal. Nonspecific findings such as dilitation of the renal pelvis or renal enlargement was noted in 11 of the 20 patients. Radionuclide Scintigraphy is the most efficacious modality to detect since acute bacterial nephritis.

  3. Hysterosalpingo-radionuclide scintigraphy (HERS)

    SciTech Connect

    Iturralde, M.; Venter, P.F.

    1981-10-01

    A radionuclide procedure, hysterosalpingo-radionuclide scintigraphy (HERS), was designed to evaluate the migration of a particulate radioactive tracer from the vagina to the peritoneal cavity and ovaries as well as to image and functionally outline the patency of the pathways between these two extremes of the female reproductive system. Technetium-99m human albumin microspheres (99mTc-HAM) were deposited in the posterior fornices of patients who were divided into two specific groups. Group I consisted of patients who were to undergo different elective gynecologic operations, in which besides obtaining sequential images, radioactivity levels were measured in the removed organs and tissues. Group II consisted of patients referred by the Infertility Clinic for evaluation of their reproductive system pathways patency. In this latter group, HERS was compared with contrast hysterosalpingography (HSG) and peritoneoscopy (PCP). The results obtained from measurements of radioactivity levels on the removed surgical specimens and comparison with other conventional gynecologic diagnostic procedures provide accurate evidence of the migration of 99mTc-HAM from the vagina, through the uterus and tubes, to the peritoneal cavity and ovaries, and show that HERS is a simple noninvasive method for functionally imaging and assessing the patency of the female reproductive system pathways.

  4. Radionuclide evaluation of nonmalignant bone disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Winzelberg, G.G.

    1983-02-01

    Recent advances in nuclear imaging have improved the noninvasive evaluation of patients with nonmalignant bone disorders. When bone scanning agents are combined with bone marrow scanning agents and gallium-67 scintigraphy, a more accurate diagnosis can be obtained. By selecting the appropriate imaging sequence, it is often possible to distinguish cellulitis from underlying osteomyelitis. In patients with total hip replacements, it may be possible to separate postsurgical changes from prosthetic loosening or infection. Stress fractures in joggers may be detected by radionuclide bone scintigraphy before radiographs become abnormal. These nuclear imaging procedures can be done in most hospitals.

  5. Radionuclide bone imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bassett, L.W.; Gold, R.H.; Webber, M.M.

    1981-12-01

    Radionuclide bone imaging of the skeleton, now well established as the most important diagnostic procedure in detecting bone metastases, is also a reliable method for the evaluation of the progression or regression of metastatic bone disease. The article concentrates on the technetium-99m agents and the value of these agents in the widespread application of low-dose radioisotope scanning in such bone diseases as metastasis, osteomyelitis, trauma, osteonecrosis, and other abnormal skeletal conditions.

  6. Technetium-99m bone scintigraphy and mandibular condylar hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Henderson, M J; Wastie, M L; Bromige, M; Selwyn, P; Smith, A

    1990-06-01

    Radionuclide skeletal scintigraphy has been successfully used in the assessment of mandibular condylar hyperplasia (condylar hyperplasia) causing mandibular asymmetry to identify the presence of continued active growth in the condylar region. This study reviews 14 cases of mandibular asymmetry and concludes that symmetrical radionuclide uptake in the condylar regions on the bone scintigram excludes a continuing asymmetrical growth focus. Unilateral increased radionuclide uptake may often indicate an abnormally active condylar growth focus but false positive results may be encountered in patients with associated temporo-mandibular joint disease. PMID:2383957

  7. Findings of Bone Scintigraphy After Leech Theraphy

    PubMed Central

    Özyurt, Sinem; Koca, Gökhan; Demirel, Koray; Baskın, Aylin; Korkmaz, Meliha

    2014-01-01

    In this case report, we present a 70 year old female patient who had recieved Leech therapy (hirudotherapy) on her leg without informing referring physician. In dynamic bone scintigraphy there was increased perfusion and hyperemia in her left ankle and leg, also in late static images moderate increased uptake was seen in soft tissue region and at the fracture site of ankle. We learned that she had Leech therapy applied on her leg, which could explain the increased perfusion and hyperemia in dynamic and blood pool phases of bone scintigraphy because of Leech therapy’s dilatory effects on superficial veins. Leech therapy may lead to an increase in perfusion and hyperemia in blood pool phase of bone scintigraphy, which may cause confusion in differential diagnosis. To our best knowledge this report is the first case that shows the scintigraphic findigs after Leech therapy. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:24653932

  8. Bone scintigraphy in fluoride treated osteoporosis

    SciTech Connect

    Froelich, J.W.; Kleerekoper, M.; Parker, D.A.

    1985-05-01

    Quantitative bone scintigraphy was performed on 23 white females with post-menopausal osteoporosis and vertebral compression fractures. These patients were then entered into a randomized, double-blind clinical trial or sodium fluoride therapy (NaF=14, placebo=9) which included repeat bone scintigraphy every six months. Scintigraphic images were acquired for 500K counts per image over the total body with computer acquisition over the posterior thoracic and lumbar spine. Images were obtained on a wide field-of-view gamma camera two hours after injecting 15 mCi of Tc-99m MDP. Data analysis showed a significant reduction in the activity ratio of abnormal vertebral body to normal vertebral body in those patients treated with sodium fluoride (paired t-test p=0.0095). No significant change was observed in the control group of (p=0.142). These results suggest that sodium fluoride therapy promotes more rapid healing of osteoporotic vertebral fractures. They also demonstrate the utility of serial quantitative bone scintigraphy in assessing osteoporotic patients with vertebral compression fractures.

  9. Unsuspected pregnancy during bone scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Oates, E.; Ramberg, K.; Becker, J.L. )

    1990-06-01

    Despite careful screening efforts to avoid it, nuclear medicine studies are unintentionally performed on pregnant patients. Three-phase bone scanning is a common procedure performed in women of child-bearing age. Unsuspected pregnancies have been discovered on the flow and early view of the pelvis. The authors present a case of a pregnant girl, aged 15, who had a bone scan. They explain how this occurred and how they plan to prevent a recurrence. Dosimetry for the fetus also is considered.

  10. A case of synovial sarcoma with bone metastasis identified by bone marrow scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Otsuka, N.; Morita, R.; Yamamoto, T.; Muranaka, A.; Tomomitsu, T.; Yanagimoto, S.; Sone, T.; Fukunaga, M.

    1985-04-01

    In a patient with synovial sarcoma, routine bone survey showed no abnormality, while bone marrow scintigraphy with Tc-99m sulfur colloid revealed a defect in the fifth lumbar vertebra. At surgery, tumorous invasion was noted in the fifth lumbar vertebra and the surrounding tissues. It was suggested that the bone marrow scintigraphy was particularly useful in the detection of tumorous invasion into the bone marrow at the early stage before the destruction of skeletal tissue.

  11. A significant diagnostic method in torture investigation: bone scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Ozkalipci, Onder; Unuvar, Umit; Sahin, Umit; Irencin, Sukran; Fincanci, Sebnem Korur

    2013-03-10

    Torture appears to be a permanent feature in countries, which have experienced military coups or ruled by oppressive governments in the past, such as Turkey. The Human Rights Foundation of Turkey (HRFT) was established in 1990 to serve torture victims, mainly those who were the victims of the 1980 military regime. Since then the HRFT has been providing rehabilitation and documentation for torture survivors. Bone scintigraphy can be one of the diagnostic methods to reveal trauma, particularly after several years when it is challenging to find any physical or radiological evidence. The HRFT's Istanbul Branch referred 97 of their applicants for bone scintigraphy between 1992 and 2010. In this retrospective survey of 97 cases, 17 of them were female and 80 of them were male. Several aspects were evaluated, including working conditions, change of torture methods practiced in certain time periods, time since torture and duration of exposure to torture in comparison with findings of bone scintigraphies. The torture methods varied from beating to falanga, electric shock, suspension and several other types of torture within the period of practice, although beating was a common denominator among all. The findings were classified according to time since torture and duration of exposure to torture. More than half of the cases (59%) had a detectable bone lesion on bone scintigraphy, and the detectable bone lesion on scintigraphy increased significantly with the duration of exposure to torture, particularly among cases who had been subjected to torture for a longer period (8 days and more). Bone scintigraphy should be considered as a valuable non-invasive diagnostic method to assess and document long term torture practices and/or cases with no detectable marks upon physical examination.

  12. Bone and Gallium scintigraphy in primary malignant and benign bone tumors of the extremities

    SciTech Connect

    Sepahdari, S.; Martin, W.B.; Ryan, J.; Simon, M.; Kirchner, P.

    1985-05-01

    A six yer prospective evaluation of 129 patients suspected of having a primary bone tumor included Tc-99m MDP bone scintigraphy followed by Ga-67 imaging at 48-72 hours. Blood pool images were part of bone scintigraphy in nearly half of the patients. Extent and intensity of tracer uptake in tumor and adjacent bone and joints were recorded for each tracer by two observers blind to the diagnosis. Tissue samples obtained in every patient by biopsy or tumor excision after scintigraphy, revealed 72 malignant and 57 benign bone tumors. The bone scan was positive in 95% (69/72) of malignancies. The scintigraphic intensity of benign and malignant lesions was comparable with both Tc-99m MDP and Ga-67. On the other hand, bone scintigraphy showed 72% (52/72) of bone malignancies to have abnormal proximal and distal bone/joint uptake whereas the Ga-67 images revealed this in only 6% (4/65) of malignancies. Benign lesions manifested this enhanced contiguous bone/joint uptake on only 8% (5/55) of bone and 0% of Ga-67 scans. This study concludes positive bone, blood pool, or Ga-67 images have less specificity for malignancy than the presence of increased Tc-99m MDP deposition in a contiguous bone/joint, but negative scintigraphic results strongly favor a benign lesion. Ga-67 was more accurate than Tc-99m MDP in portraying intraosseous extent of malignant tumors; however, this is now preferably done with C.T.

  13. Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy manifested with isolated calcaneal periostitis in bone scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Moralidis, Efstratios; Gerasimou, Georgios; Theodoridou, Athina; Hilidis, Ilias; Mylonaki, Efrosyni; Gotzamani-Psarrakou, Anna

    2010-05-01

    Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (HOA) is an incompletely understood syndrome characterized by digital clubbing and periosteal proliferation of long bones and it is commonly associated with primary lung tumors. Bone scintigraphy is a sensitive method in detecting HOA and characteristic findings have been reported. We present the case of a man with newly diagnosed non-small cell lung cancer, unremarkable clinical examination and blood tests and no digital clubbing. During disease staging, however, bone scintigraphy showed intense calcaneal cortical proliferation bilaterally without involvement of other parts of the skeleton. Cortical reaction of both calcanei resolved significantly after chemotherapy. This case indicates that HOA may manifest with isolated calcaneal periostitis bilaterally, which is a new addition to the literature.

  14. Bone scintigraphy of hip joint effusions in children

    SciTech Connect

    Kloiber, R.; Pavlosky, W.; Portner, O.; Gartke, K.

    1983-05-01

    Thirty-eight children with hip pain of acute onset were studied by bone scintigraphy. Nine patients had diminished radiotracer deposition involving the entire proximal femoral ossification center. This could be related to infarction or compression of blood supply by a tense joint effusion. Eight of these patients had joint aspiration confirming the presence of an effusion. Five patients had follow-up studies after aspiration, and femoral-head uptake reverted to normal in all but one which subsequently proved to be infarcted. A photopenic zone was seen on blood pool images in 10 patients, many of whom were also aspirated of fluid. Bone scintigraphy is useful in the diagnosis of joint effusions and can give information as to the state of perfusion of the femoral head. Follow-up studies after aspiration can differentiate infarction from reversible ischemia.

  15. The clinical value of bone and gallium scintigraphy for soft-tissue sarcomas of the extremities

    SciTech Connect

    Kirchner, P.T.; Simon, M.A.

    1984-03-01

    In a prospective study of forty-five patients, we evaluated the usefulness of bone and gallium scintigraphy prior to definitive surgery for a soft-tissue sarcoma in an extremity. Bone scintigraphy provides a baseline for staging and often reveals periosteal invasion that is not detected by routine radiographs. Blood-pool scintigraphy with bone tracers is very sensitive for a diagnosis of malignant disease. Gallium scintigraphy appeared to be a reliable preoperative indicator of malignant disease of soft tissue (sensitivity, 85 per cent; specificity, 92 per cent) and was useful for detecting the infrequent occult, non-pulmonary metastasis. Combined gallium and bone scintigraphy with blood-pool imaging provided a reliable prediction of the presence or absence of a malignant lesion in patients with a soft-tissue mass in an extremity. We recommend that bone and gallium scintigraphy be routinely used in the initial clinical staging of soft-tissue sarcomas.

  16. Femoroacetabular impingement mimicking avascular osteonecrosis on bone scintigraphy

    PubMed Central

    Suarez, Juan Pablo; Domínguez, María Luz; Nogareda, Zulema; Gómez, María Asunción; Muñoz, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a structural abnormality of proximal femur and/or acetabulum. It has been recently described, and there are limited reports in nuclear medicine literature because bone scintigraphy is not listed in its diagnostic protocol, but it should be included on differential diagnosis when evaluating patients, with hip-related symptoms because it may be misinterpreted as degenerative changes or avascular necrosis, and its early treatment avoid progression to osteoarthritis. We describe the case of a male who suffered from hip pain. Bone planar scintigraphic appearance mimicked avascular necrosis, but single photon emission computed tomography (CT) imaging and CT examination confirmed the diagnosis of FAI. PMID:27095871

  17. Nurse exposure doses resulted from bone scintigraphy patient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunçman, Duygu; Kovan, Bilal; Poyraz, Leyla; ćapali, Veli; Demir, Bayram; Türkmen, Cüneyt

    2016-03-01

    Bone scintigraphy is used for displaying the radiologic undiagnosed bone lesions in nuclear medicine. It's general indications are researching bone metastases, detection of radiographically occult fractures, staging and follow-up in primary bone tumors, diagnosis of paget's disease, investigation of loosening and infection in orthopedic implants. It is applied with using 99mTc labeled radiopharmaceuticals (e.g 99m Tc MDP,99mTc HEDP and 99mTc HMDP). 20 -25 mCi IV radiotracer was injected into vein and radiotracer emits gamma radiation. Patient waits in isolated room for about 3 hours then a gamma camera scans radiation area and creates an image. When some patient's situation is not good, patients are hospitalized until the scanning because of patients' close contact care need. In this study, measurements were taken from ten patients using Geiger Muller counter. After these measurements, we calculated nurse's exposure radiations from patient's routine treatment, examination and emergency station.

  18. Laxative Related Primary Hyperphosphatemic Tumoral Calcinosis Identified by Bone Scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Asokendaran, Marcus; Lenzo, Nat Patrick

    2016-09-01

    We describe a case of a 40-year-old female patient presenting with tumor calcinosis where hypertrophic pulmonary osteoarthropathy (HPOA) was suspected given her extensive history of malignancy. Plain X-rays did not show reveal the typical periarticular calcification but did show appearances consistent with HPOA. Bone scintigraphy with (99m)Tc-methylene diphosphonate (MDP) is a sensitive investigation in the detection of hypertrophic osteoarthopathy but did not show findings characteristics of HPOA like bilateral symmetrical increased uptake of the radiopharmaceutical along the cortical margins of the long bones. The final diagnosis of tumor calcinosis was only made after low dose computerized tomography chest showed a moderated sized amorphous calcified cluster in the apical segment of the right upper lobe consistent. In conclusion, bone scintigraphy continues to be a useful investigation for both common and rare conditions like tumor calcinosis. The unusual three phase bone scan finding of diffuse activity throughout both lung fields, which turned to out to be tumoral calcinosis is highlighted in this case. PMID:27651742

  19. Laxative Related Primary Hyperphosphatemic Tumoral Calcinosis Identified by Bone Scintigraphy

    PubMed Central

    Asokendaran, Marcus; Lenzo, Nat Patrick

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of a 40-year-old female patient presenting with tumor calcinosis where hypertrophic pulmonary osteoarthropathy (HPOA) was suspected given her extensive history of malignancy. Plain X-rays did not show reveal the typical periarticular calcification but did show appearances consistent with HPOA. Bone scintigraphy with 99mTc-methylene diphosphonate (MDP) is a sensitive investigation in the detection of hypertrophic osteoarthopathy but did not show findings characteristics of HPOA like bilateral symmetrical increased uptake of the radiopharmaceutical along the cortical margins of the long bones. The final diagnosis of tumor calcinosis was only made after low dose computerized tomography chest showed a moderated sized amorphous calcified cluster in the apical segment of the right upper lobe consistent. In conclusion, bone scintigraphy continues to be a useful investigation for both common and rare conditions like tumor calcinosis. The unusual three phase bone scan finding of diffuse activity throughout both lung fields, which turned to out to be tumoral calcinosis is highlighted in this case. PMID:27651742

  20. Laxative Related Primary Hyperphosphatemic Tumoral Calcinosis Identified by Bone Scintigraphy

    PubMed Central

    Asokendaran, Marcus; Lenzo, Nat Patrick

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of a 40-year-old female patient presenting with tumor calcinosis where hypertrophic pulmonary osteoarthropathy (HPOA) was suspected given her extensive history of malignancy. Plain X-rays did not show reveal the typical periarticular calcification but did show appearances consistent with HPOA. Bone scintigraphy with 99mTc-methylene diphosphonate (MDP) is a sensitive investigation in the detection of hypertrophic osteoarthopathy but did not show findings characteristics of HPOA like bilateral symmetrical increased uptake of the radiopharmaceutical along the cortical margins of the long bones. The final diagnosis of tumor calcinosis was only made after low dose computerized tomography chest showed a moderated sized amorphous calcified cluster in the apical segment of the right upper lobe consistent. In conclusion, bone scintigraphy continues to be a useful investigation for both common and rare conditions like tumor calcinosis. The unusual three phase bone scan finding of diffuse activity throughout both lung fields, which turned to out to be tumoral calcinosis is highlighted in this case.

  1. [Radionuclide therapy for bone metastases: new opportunities].

    PubMed

    Krylov, V V; Kochetova, T Yu; Voloznev, L V

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of patients with multiple bone metastases accompanied by pain syndrome is a complicated clinical task. Radionuclide therapy is one of its solutions, which is used to achieve long reduction of pain syndrome and significant improvement the quality of patients' life. However mechanism of action of bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals suggests not only pain control but antitumor effect as well. In early clinical studies of safety and efficacy of the most common bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals in single administration there were not any preferences in overall survival but individual clinical cases with extraordinary tumor regression after radionuclide therapy were reported. Repeated bone targeted therapy and combination with other treatment modalities can help to gain statistical significant increase in overall survival of patients.

  2. Malignant external otitis: The diagnostic value of bone scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Ostfeld, E.; Aviel, A.; Pelet, D.

    1981-06-01

    Technetium99m Methylene Diphosphate bone scintigraphy (BS) of the skull was performed in three patients with malignant external otitis (MEO). Pathological uptake of the radioisotope in the mastoid region was found during the early stages of MEO updating radiologic findings. The extent of the radioisotope accumulation during the early stages of MEO indicates that the actual tissue damage exceeds the clinical estimation. The follow-up BS findings correlate well with the clinical course of MEO indicating either healing or extension to the base of skull.

  3. Bone Scintigraphy in the Diagnosis of Rheumatoid Arthritis: Is There Additional Value of Bone Scintigraphy with Blood Pool Phase over Conventional Bone Scintigraphy?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the value of bone scintigraphy with additional blood pool phase (BSBP), compared with conventional bone scintigraphy (CBS), in the assessment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A total of 242 patients (43 males, 199 females; 14–78 years) with arthralgia, and underwent BSBP were retrospectively analyzed. On the first physical examination, active arthritis was found in 128 of the 242 patients. Clinical diagnosis was made by a rheumatologist on the basis of the 1987 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria, which are considered to be the gold standard. The diagnostic performances and prognostic value of BSBP and CBS were analyzed in the total patients with arthralgia and in the patients with arthritis. The sensitivity of BSBP (84.2%, 80/95) were significantly higher than that of CBS (74.8%, 72/95) in the patients with arthralgia (P = 0.039). When BSBP was interpreted with the results of elevated/positive anti-CCP antibody, its accuracy over CBS also became significantly higher (86.0%, 208/242 vs. 83.1%, 201/242 respectively, P = 0.021). The diagnostic odds ratio of BSBP positivity was higher than CBS positivity in the patients with arthralgia (26.0, 12.9-52.4 vs. 21.1, 10.8-41.3) and with arthritis (12.0, 4.9-29.4 vs. 10.0, 4.2-23.4). Both BSBP and CBS appear to provide acceptable accuracy and comparable diagnostic performance for diagnosis of RA. However, in the patients with arthralgia, BSBP was found to be more sensitive than CBS and more accurate when interpreted with the result of anti-CCP antibody. This could help physicians diagnose RA in daily clinical practice. PMID:27051232

  4. Subacute and chronic bone infections: Diagnosis using In-111, Ga-67 and Tc-99m MDP bone scintigraphy and radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Sheikh, W.; Sfakianakis, G.N.; Mnaymneh, W.; Hourani, M.; Heal, A.; Duncan, R.C.; Burnett, A.; Ashkar, F.S.; Serafini, A.N.

    1985-05-01

    The usefulness of indium-111 white blood cell scintigraphy in the diagnosis of subacute or chronic bone infection was examined in 21 orthopedic patients. In-111 WBC imaging was compared with gallium-67 and technetium-99m methylene diphosphonate skeletal scintigraphy and bone radiography, all studies being performed within 1 week. In-111 WBC scintigraphy showed no definite advantage over Ga-67 scintigraphy in the identification of chronic bone infection. The two tests had the same sensitivity and similar specificity. Bone radiography had a sensitivity of 60% and a specificity of 67%. A negative Tc-99m MDP bone scintigram ruled out infection, but because of low specific, final evaluation required performance of Ga-67 or In-111 WBC scintigraphy.

  5. Gallium scintigraphy in bone infarction. Correlation with bone imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Armas, R.R.; Goldsmith, S.J.

    1984-01-01

    The appearance of gallium-67 images in bone infarction was studied in nine patients with sickle cell disease and correlated with the bone scan findings. Gallium uptake in acute infarction was decreased or absent with a variable bone scan uptake, and normal in healing infarcts, which showed increased uptake on bone scan. The significance of these findings is discussed.

  6. Radionuclide bone scanning in giant cell tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Van Nostrand, D.; Madewell, J.E.; McNiesh, L.M.; Kyle, R.W.; Sweet, D.

    1986-03-01

    Radionuclide bone scan findings are described and correlated with pathology in 23 patients with giant cell tumor (GCT) of the bone. The degree of radionuclide activity was markedly increased in 20 (87%), minimally increased in three (13%), and decreased in none of the patients. Of the 23 patients with increased radioactivity, the pattern was diffuse in 11 (48%) and doughnut in 12 (52%). Extended patterns of radioactivity were present in 19 of 22 patients; however, none were associated with true tumor extension. Bone scanning did not aid in the detection of GCT, was nonspecific, and did not differentiate benign from malignant GCT. Although radioactivity extended beyond the radiographic abnormality in the majority of patients, this was most likely secondary to other bony abnormalities or local and/or regional hyperemia, and caution should be taken in ascribing this extension to either tumor or metastasis.

  7. Early postoperative bone scintigraphy in the evaluation of microvascular bone grafts in head and neck reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Schuepbach, Jonas; Dassonville, Olivier; Poissonnet, Gilles; Demard, Francois

    2007-01-01

    Background Bone scintigraphy was performed to monitor anastomotic patency and bone viability. Methods In this retrospective study, bone scans were carried out during the first three postoperative days in a series of 60 patients who underwent microvascular bone grafting for reconstruction of the mandible or maxilla. Results In our series, early bone scans detected a compromised vascular supply to the bone with high accuracy (p < 10-6) and a sensitivity that was superior to the sensitivity of clinical monitoring (92% and 75% respectively). Conclusion When performing bone scintigraphy during the first three postoperative days, it not only helps to detect complications with high accuracy, as described in earlier studies, but it is also an additional reliable monitoring tool to decide whether or not microvascular revision surgery should be performed. Bone scans were especially useful in buried free flaps where early postoperative monitoring depended exclusively on scans. According to our experience, we recommend bone scans as soon as possible after surgery and immediately in cases suspicious of vascularized bone graft failure. PMID:17448223

  8. Uremic Leontiasis Ossea in a Patient With Chronic Renal Insufficiency Demonstrated on Bone Scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Han, Yeon-Hee; Jeong, Hwan-Jeong; Lim, Seok Tae; Sohn, Myung-Hee

    2016-08-01

    A 37-year-old woman with chronic renal insufficiency underwent bone scintigraphy to evaluate renal osteodystrophy (ROD). Markedly increased uptakes were shown in the maxilla and the mandible, which suggested extensive maxillary and mandibular hypertrophy. CT image revealed that diffuse bony thickening and ground-glass appearance in the skull, maxilla, and mandible with poor distinction of the corticomedullary junction. Whole-body bone scintigraphy images also demonstrated various skeletal characteristics of ROD. This case emphasizes the utility of bone scintigraphy for the surveillance of the whole body in ROD. PMID:27276201

  9. Sodium 18F-Fluoride Bone Scintigraphy in Deep Ocean Diver.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jin T E; Moncayo, Valeria M; Alazraki, Naomi

    2015-07-01

    Sodium ¹⁸F-fluoride (NaF) is a diagnostic marker for new bone formation in bone scintigraphy that was approved by US FDA in 1972 but discontinued in 1984. We report a case of a US naval officer who spent time living and working in an oceanic lab, 205 feet below the surface. Plain skeletal films of femurs 4 years later demonstrate bilateral bone infarcts. Corresponding sodium ¹⁸F-fluoride bone scintigraphy demonstrates low-normal to decreased tracer activity. This rectilinear scan image is of historical interest. Other bone scintigraphic radiotracers used in the past and present will be briefly discussed.

  10. Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis: typical patterns of bone involvement in whole-body bone scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Acikgoz, Gunsel; Averill, Lauren W

    2014-08-01

    Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) is an autoinflammatory bone disease of unknown etiology. It affects children and adolescents predominantly and occurs mostly in the female population. It is characterized by the insidious onset of pain and swelling, with a fluctuating clinical course of relapses and remissions. Typically, several bones are affected, either synchronously or metachronously, and bilateral involvement is common. CRMO most commonly affects the metaphysis of long bones, especially the tibia, femur, and clavicle. The spine, pelvis, ribs, sternum, and mandible may also be affected. Although lesions are mostly multiple, patients may present with a single symptomatic focus. Radiographic findings may be negative early in the course of the disease. Bone scintigraphy is useful in determining the presence of abnormality and the extent of disease. The imaging and clinical features of CRMO overlap with those of infectious osteomyelitis, bone malignancy, and inflammatory arthritis. Nonetheless, CRMO can be confidently diagnosed with the recognition of typical imaging patterns in the appropriate clinical setting. This article reviews imaging findings with special emphasis on bone scintigraphy and specific disease sites.

  11. Clinical utility of bone scintigraphy in patients with limb pain of suspected musculoskeletal origin

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the clinical utility of bone scintigraphy in patients with limb pain of suspected musculoskeletal origin. Material and Methods All patients aged ≥18 years who were referred for diagnosis and management of limb pain were diagnosed on the basis of history, physical examination, and investigations excluding bone scintigraphy. After the presumptive diagnosis was made (the pre-test diagnosis), all subjects underwent bone scintigraphy, or if they had a previous bone scintigram for their pain condition, the results of that scintigram were reviewed. Then, the pre-test diagnosis was reviewed in light of the bone scintigraphy findings and repeat clinical assessment as needed. The post-test diagnosis was considered either as unchanged diagnosis or changed diagnosis for the region or regions of interest. Results There were 118 females (54.8%) and 97 males (45.2%). The mean age of the entire group was 36±8.1 years (range: 18–87 years). The mean duration of the symptoms was 17.4±11.2 months (range: 1–264 months). Of the 215 subjects, 212 had a bone scintigram. Of these 212 subjects, none had a changed diagnosis. Conclusion In the evaluation of limb pain of suspected musculoskeletal origin, scintigraphy is unlikely to alter the pre-test diagnosis or affect treatment decisions after history, physical examination, and non-scintigraphic investigations. The clinical utility of scinitigraphy in this setting is low. PMID:27708914

  12. Bone marrow scintigraphy and computed tomography in myloproliferative disease

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, S.J.; Gilbert, H.S.; Hermann, G.

    1985-05-01

    Peripheral bone marrow (BM) expansion in myeloproliferative disease (MPD) is demonstrated by scintigraphy (scint) with Technetium 99m sulfur colloid (TSC) or Indium III chloride (In). Computed tomography (CT) of the normal adult medullary cavity yields negative attenuation coefficients (AC) which become positive when BM fat is replaced. BM scint and CT of the medullary cavity are obtained in 23 studies in 21 pts: 6 polycythemia vera (PCV), 6 post PCV myeloid metaplasis (MyM), 4 agnogenic MyM, 3 myelodysplasia with refractory anemia, 1 acute myelocytic leukemia and 1 chronic myelocytic with acute leukemic transformation. AC were measured for BM cavity of lower extremities at each third of the femur and tibia. Values ranged from -89 to +289 Hounsfield units. The results are presented in this paper. There was agreement between SCINT and CT in 83% pts and segments. 80% of MB segments with + AC had scint identified BM. BM biopsy of the iliac crest demonstrated fibrosis or blast proliferation in pts with +AC rather than hypercellularity or osteosclerosis. The highest AC values (>200) were seen in pts with blast proliferation and fibrosis. Decreased BM scint visualization and +CT AC correlated with BM fibrosis and may reflect replacement of BM elements or decreased RES function. BM scint and CT are useful to monitor MPD and select BM sites for biopsy.

  13. Evaluation of soft tissue injury by Tc-99m bone agent scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Delpassand, E.S.; Dhekne, R.D.; Barron, B.J.; Moore, W.H. )

    1991-05-01

    Six patients with soft tissue injury secondary to different etiologic factors are presented. The degree and extent of tissue necrosis was precisely identified by scintigraphy. In two of these, radionuclide imaging helped to establish accurately the level of amputation that resulted in appropriate wound healing.

  14. Bone scintigraphy in plasma-cell myeloma: a prospective study of 70 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Bataille, R.; Chevalier, J.; Rossi, M.; Sany, J.

    1982-12-01

    Radiography and scintigraphy were correlated in 70 patients with recently diagnosed, untreated multiple myeloma, including 59 with and 11 without primary lytic bone lesions. A site-by-site comparison showed that scintigraphy was more sensitive than radiography in only 18% of cases, whereas radiography was more sensitive in 38% (p<0.001). Patients whose bone scan was as sensitive or more so than the radiograph (''hot'' myeloma) had more active disease than those with the ''cold'' form. Remission was indicated by significant regression or disappearance of scintigraphic abnormalities in 90% of cases. The authors conclude that scintigraphy is not helpful in detecting myelomatous bone lesions, but does have prognastic value for diagnosis and chemotherapy: a positive bone scan indicates initial or residual activity.

  15. Bone scintigraphy in plasma-cell myeloma. A prospective study of 70 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Bataille, R.; Chevalier, J.; Rossi, M.; Sany, J.

    1982-12-01

    Radiography and scintigraphy were correlated in 70 patients with recently diagnosed, untreated multiple myeloma, including 59 with and 11 without primary lytic bone lesions. A site-by-site comparison showed that scintigraphy was more sensitive than radiography in only 18% of cases, whereas radiography was more sensitive in 38% (p less than 0.001). Patients whose bone scan was as sensitive or more so than the radiograph (hot myeloma) had more active disease than those with the cold form. Remission was indicated by significant regression or disappearance of scintigraphic abnormalities in 90% of cases. The authors conclude that scintigraphy is not helpful in detecting myelomatous bone lesions, but does have prognostic value for diagnosis and chemotherapy: a positive bone scan indicates initial or residual activity.

  16. Acute lymphocytic leukemia presented as back pain and revealed by bone scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Gwal, Kriti; Servaes, Sabah; Zhuang, Hongming

    2013-08-01

    A previously healthy 8-year-old girl underwent MDP bone scintigraphy to evaluate possible spondylolysis due to worsening back pain. Unexpectedly, the bone scan images revealed intense activity in several thoracic and lumbar vertebrae, which was not consistent with spondylolysis. Further examinations proved that the patient had acute lymphocytic leukemia.

  17. Bone Scintigraphy SPECT/CT Evaluation of Mandibular Condylar Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhiyun; Reed, Tameron; Longino, Becky H

    2016-03-01

    Mandibular condylar hyperplasia (CH) is a complex developmental deformity resulting in asymmetries of the hyperplastic condyle. Bone scan SPECT is a sensitive and accurate method of detecting the growth activity of this disorder. This method can be used to quantitate the radionuclide uptake differences between the left and right condyles. Uptake differences of 10% or more between the left and right condyles, with increased uptake ipsilateral to the CH, are considered to be evidence of active growing CH. Quantitative assessment of CH is important to select an appropriate treatment course. Degenerative arthropathies of the temporomandibular joints may result in altered uptake, but this is mostly associated with the side contralateral to the CH. The CT portion of SPECT/CT is useful to assess the condylar dimensions and underlying bony changes. PMID:26111714

  18. Radiographic and radionuclide imaging in multiple myeloma: the role of gallium scintigraphy: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Waxman, A.D.; Siemsen, J.K.; Levine, A.M.; Holdorf, D.; Suzuki, R.; Singer, F.R.; Bateman, J.

    1981-03-01

    Eighteen patients with multiple myeloma were studied using radiographs of the skeletal system, technetium phosphate bone scans, and gallium-67 scintigraphy. A total of 94 sites were used as the basis for comparison in these 18 patients. Radiographic sensitivity on a patient basis was 94%, and was 82% on a site basis. Bone scans were positive in 78% of patients and in 46% of sites. Gallium scans were positive in 56% of patients and in 40% of sites. In five of the 18 patients, gallium scans showed activity in abnormal sites wth a greater lesion-to-nonlesion ratio than did the bone scan. In this subgroup of patients, the disease was fulminant, and all died within 3 mo of their study. The finding of high gallium uptake in osseous sites that are normal or only slightly abnormal on bone scan has served to identify a subgroup of patients with rapidly progressive disease who may benefit from alternative treatment modalities such as radiation therapy.

  19. Quantitative bone and 67Ga scintigraphy in the differentiation of necrotizing external otitis from severe external otitis

    SciTech Connect

    Uri, N.; Gips, S.; Front, A.; Meyer, S.W.; Hardoff, R. )

    1991-06-01

    Qualitative technetium Tc 99m bone scintigraphy using phosphate compounds and gallium 67 scintigraphy were described as a helpful means in diagnosing necrotizing external otitis (NEO). They were, however, claimed to be nonspecific. Quantitative Tc 99m methylene diphosphonate bone scintigraphy and gallium 67 scintigraphy were performed in eight patients with NEO and in 20 patients with severe external otitis, in order to prove usefulness of scintigraphy in the diagnosis of NEO. Ratios of lesion to nonlesion for bone scintigraphy were 1.67 {plus minus} 0.16 in patients with NEO and 1.08 {plus minus} 0.09 in patients with severe external otitis, and for gallium 67 scintigraphy they were 1.35 {plus minus} 0.24 in NEO patients and 1.05 {plus minus} 0.03 in patients with severe external otitis. There was no difference in uptake between diabetic patients with severe external otitis and nondiabetic patients. The scintigraphic studies were also evaluated using a qualitative scoring method (scores 0 to +4), according to the intensity of the radiopharmaceutical uptake. This method was found to be inferior in the diagnosis of NEO compared with the quantitative method. We conclude that lesion-to-nonlesion ratios greater than 1.5 and 1.3 on bone and gallium 67 scintigraphy, respectively, are indicative of NEO. Quantitative bone scintigraphy, which is quicker to perform, may be used as a single imaging modality for the diagnosis of NEO.

  20. Unusual appearance for urinary bladder obstruction detected with 99mTc-MDP bone scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Wright, Chadwick L; Sharma, Akash

    2015-12-01

    Unanticipated but clinically significant nonosseous findings can be detected during routine bone scintigraphy. We present a case of an 83-year-old man who presented with a pathologic fracture of the right femur. Whole-body bone scintigraphy for osseous staging revealed intense radiotracer accumulation in the kidneys and ureters but no activity within the urinary bladder. The patient had not voided for 14 hours. A Foley catheter was inserted, and more than 2000 mL of urine was drained, most consistent with urinary bladder obstruction. Subsequent repeat images demonstrated marked reduction of the renal and ureteral activity with trace activity in the urinary bladder.

  1. High protracted (99m)Tc-HDP uptake in synthetic bone implants - a potentially misleading incidental finding on bone scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Tabouret-Viaud, Claire; Mainta, Ismini; Boudabbous, Sana; Amzalag, Gaël; Ratib, Osman; Rager, Olivier; Paycha, Frédéric

    2014-12-01

    We report the case of a 56-year-old male with bilateral total knee prostheses suffering from bilateral knee pain mainly on the right side and referred for bone scintigraphy. The medical history of the patient revealed an opening wedge high tibial osteotomy performed nine years earlier, with insertion of two blocks of ceramic made of hydroxyapatite and tricalcium phosphate in a wedge configuration as synthetic bone substitutes. The porous structure of these implants is analogous to the architecture of cancellous bone and permits fibrovascular and bone ingrowth, promoting the healing process. Planar scintigraphy and SPECT/CT showed an intense uptake within those implants in the early phase as well as in the late phase of the bone scan. It also showed bilateral patellofemoral arthritis. A (99m)Tc-labeled antigranulocyte antibody scintigraphy was negative for infection or inflammation. Bilateral patellar resurfacing led to complete symptom regression, confirmed at 10 months follow-up. To the best of our knowledge, this scintigraphic pattern with such a high tracer uptake reflecting bone substitute osteointegration has not yet been published. This should be considered in patients with such bone replacement materials that are increasingly used, in order to avoid false diagnosis of inflammation or infection.

  2. Technetium-99m human immunoglobulin scintigraphy in patients with adhesive capsulitis: a correlative study with bone scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Senocak, Ozlem; Degirmenci, Berna; Ozdogan, Ozhan; Akalin, Elif; Arslan, Gülhan; Kaner, Burcu; Taşci, Cengiz; Peker, Ozlen

    2002-06-01

    Adhesive capsulitis (AC) is a disorder that is characterized by shoulder pain and progressive limitation of both active and passive shoulder motion. Although the underlying pathological mechanisms of the disease are not well understood, the inflammatory reactions depending on the stage have been demonstrated histologically. The purpose of the study is to investigate the inflammatory changes that can be demonstrated with Tc-99m HIG in AC, and to determine the presence of correlations between scintigraphic findings and the clinical assessment. Twenty-one patients (12 females and 9 males) with a mean age of 50.57+/-8.49 were included in the study. AC was diagnosed according to recognized criteria. The planar X-ray images of the affected shoulders of all patients were normal. The patients were evaluated with the Constant Scoring System, and the functional and pain assessment parts of the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons' Form (ASES). Three phase bone scans and Tc-99m HIG scintigraphy were performed at least two days apart. Bone scan and Tc-99m HIG scintigraphy were evaluated visually and HIG uptake was evaluated in comparison with the contralateral normal shoulder. Bone scan demonstrated hypervascularity in 9 of the 21 patients (43%), whereas increased osteoblastic activity was detected in 19 (90%) in the affected shoulder. Tc-99m HIG uptake was positive in 12 (57%), and negative in 9 (43%) patients. All patients with increased Tc-99m HIG accumulation in the affected shoulder, also had increased osteoblastic activity on Tc-99m bone scintigraphy. A significant correlation was found between HIG uptake and constant, functional and pain scores. The difference between these scores was also statistically significant in patients with HIG positive and negative uptake. This study indicates that there is a good correlation between Tc-99m HIG scan findings and clinical scores. Tc-99m HIG accumulation in the affected shoulder may be related to continuing inflammatory reaction

  3. Comparison of bone scintigraphy and radiography in multiple myeloma. [/sup 99m/Tc-phosphate complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Woolfenden, J.M.; Pitt, M.J.; Durie, B.G.M.; Moon, T.E.

    1980-03-01

    Radionuclide images and skeletal radiographs of 51 patients with multiple myeloma were compared to assess the sensitivity of scintigraphy in detecting radiographically evident disease. Comparable studies were available for 562 sites. The radionuclide image was relatively insensitive in detecting myeloma; it failed to show radiographically evident disease or underestimated its extent at 27% of the sites. On a limited number of serial images there were 7 sites at which a scintigraphic abnormality preceded the radiographic abnormality. No definite correlation was found between scintigraphic findings and hematologic parameters of myeloma activity. Although the radionuclide image may demonstrate a few sites of myeloma before the radiograph, radiography remains the primary method of evaluating skeletal involvement by myeloma.

  4. [Usefulness of top-hat transform processing in whole body bone scintigraphy].

    PubMed

    Kita, Akinobu; Sugimoto, Katsuya; Tsuchida, Tatsurou; Kishimoto, Takahiro; Toi, Akiko; Shimada, Masato; Adachi, Toshiki

    2013-01-01

    To assess the usefulness of top-hat transform processing in whole body bone scintigraphy, five radiological technicians interpreted both original and top-hat processed images to determine the improvement of lesion detectability and interpretation time. For the evaluation of detectability, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed. The area under the curve (AUC) calculated from the ROC curve was improved in all observers (from 0.786 to 0.864 in average), although no significant difference was observed. However, the interpretation time was improved significantly (from 24.5 to 16.2 s in average). Top-hat transform processing in whole body bone scintigraphy is thought to be useful for the improvement of lesion detectability and interpretation time.

  5. Bony expansion in skeletal metastases from carcinoma of the prostate as seen by bone scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Resnik, C.S.; Garver, P.; Resnick, D.

    1984-10-01

    Carcinoma of the prostate often metastasizes to the skeletal system, the usual radiologic pattern being widespread patchy areas of increased density without change in the contour of the involved bones. Radionuclide correlation generally shows multiple foci of increased tracer activity. Less commonly, there is bony sclerosis with expansion of the diameter of the involved bone. Several cases of expansile skeletal metastases from carcinoma of the prostate have appeared in the literature but we know of no published descriptions of the radionuclide findings. We present three patients with carcinoma of the prostate who had skeletal metastases with evidence of bony expansion on both roentgenographic and radionuclide examination. 15 references, 8 figures.

  6. Radionuclide bone scanning of osteosarcoma: falsely extended uptake patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Chew, F.S.; Hudson, T.M.

    1982-07-01

    The pathologic specimens of 18 osteosarcomas of long bones were examined to correlate histologic abnormalities with abnormalities seen on preoperative /sup 99m/Tc pyrophosphate or methylene diphosphonate bone scans. Seven scans accurately represented the extent of the tumor. Eleven scans disclosed increased activity extending beyond the radiographic abnormalities. In eight of these, there was no occult tumor extension and in the other three, the scan activity did not accurately portray the skip metastases that were present. Therefore, these 11 scans demonstrated the falsely extended pattern of uptake beyond the true limits of the tumors. Pathologic slides were available for 10 of the 11 areas of bone that exhibited extended uptake. In two instances, there was no pathologic abnormality. In the other eight cases we found marrow hyperemia, medullary reactive bone, or periosteal new bone. This is the first description of these histologic abnormalities of medullary bone in areas of extended uptake on radionuclide bone scans.

  7. [Diagnostic value of bone scintigraphy with technetium pyrophosphate. Study of 250 patients].

    PubMed

    Kuntz, D; Rain, J D; Lemaire, V; Sainte-Croix, A; Ryckewaert, A

    1975-01-01

    The authors report the results they obtained by bone scintigraphy using technetium pyrophosphate. In a study of 142 patients with cancer, the authors show, as others have done, that bone scintigraphy makes it possible to find bone metastases that are radiologically undetectable and they emphasize the importance of this discovery. In 7 patients with spondylodiscitis, of whom 1 was without radiological signs at the time the scintigraphy was carried out, the authors always observed localized vertebral hyperfixation and they noted that this examination can be valuable for distinguishing spondylodiscitis from pseudo-Pott's discarthroses and from the lesions of vertebral epiphysitis, which in their experience do not result in isotopic hyperfixation. In 7 patients with epiphyseal osteonecrosis, the authors observed isotopic hyperfixation before the appearance of radiological signs. In 12 patients with osteoporosis, the authors observed hyperfixation in bone in certain compressed vertebrae, whereas other vertebrae that had probably been compressed some considerable time earlier did not fix the isotope excessively. They never observed hyperfixation in vertebrae that were not compressed. Among 5 patients with ankylosing spondylitis with radiological signs of sacro-iliac arthritis, the authors observed sacro-iliac hyperfixation in only 3 cases. Two other patients who had signs indicating ankylosing spondylarthritis, but were without radiological signs of sacro-iliac arthritis did not show sacro-iliac hyperfixation of the isotope. Among 7 patients with Paget's disease, the authors observed hyperfixation in all the bones with radiological signs of disease; in addition, in 3 patients, there was also hyperfixation in certain bones that were radiologically clear.

  8. Changing indications for bone scintigraphy in patients with osteosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, H.; McNeil, B.J.; Zufall, E.; Jaffe, N.; Treves, S.

    1980-04-01

    Fifty-six patients with osteosarcoma were studied to determine the onset of pulmonary and bone metastases. While pulmonary metastases were always detected prior to bone metastases in the era before adjuvant chemotherapy, in this study of patients on adjuvant therapy 16% of patients with metastases showed osseous metastases prior to or without pulmonary metastases.

  9. Visualization of the liver, gallbladder, and intestine on bone scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Sherkow, L.; Ryo, U.Y.; Fabich, D.; Patel, G.C.; Pinsky, S.M.

    1984-08-01

    Images of the liver, gallbladder, and/or intestine were visualized on bone scans on several occasions. Radiopharmaceutical quality control data, including molybdenum-99 and aluminum ion content in the Tc-99m eluate, free unbound Tc-99m, and hydrolyzed reduced Tc-99m in the labeled MDP, were all satisfactory. A minor defect in the quality of the Tc-99m generator was considered to be the probable cause of the unusual localization of the bone imaging agent.

  10. Sequential radionuclide bone imaging in avascular pediatric hip conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Minikel, J.; Sty, J.; Simons, G.

    1983-05-01

    Radionuclide bone imaging was performed on six patients with various hip conditions. Initial bone images revealed diminished uptake of isotope /sup 99m/Tc-MDP in the capital femoral epiphysis. Following therapeutic intervention, repeat bone scans revealed normal uptake of /sup 99m/Tc-MDP in the capital femoral epiphysis. Subsequent radiographs revealed that avascular necrosis had not occurred. There are two types of avascularity: the potentially reversible, and the irreversible. Attempts should be made toward early recognition of the potentially reversible avascular insult. With early recognition, surgical reconstruction prior to osteophyte death may result in revascularization. If this can be accomplished, avascular necrosis can be avoided.

  11. Bone scintigraphy in the reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Kozin, F.; Soin, J.S.; Ryan, L.M.; Carrera, G.F.; Wortmann, R.L.

    1981-02-01

    Sixty-four consecutive patients were studied for possible reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome (RSDS). They were divided into five groups, based upon specific clinical criteria, and the radiographic and scintigraphic findings in each group were examined. Osteoporosis was the most common radiographic abnormality. Scintigraphic abnormalities were noted in 60% of RSDS patients but in only 7% of the others. These findings included increased blood flow and enhanced periarticular radionuclide activity in the affected extremity. The scan may reflect an active, potentially reversible disorder of local blood flow in RSDS. Furthermore, the scintigraphic patterns may be useful in the diagnosis and in predicting which patients are likely to respond to systemic steroid therapy.

  12. Radionuclide bone scanning of medullary chondrosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, T.M.; Chew, F.S.; Manaster, B.J.

    1982-12-01

    /sup 99m/Tc methylene diphosphonate bone scans of 18 medullary chondrosarcomas of bone were correlated with pathologic macrosections of the resected tumors. There was increased scan uptake by all 18 tumors, and the uptake in 15 scans corresponded accurately to the anatomic extent of the tumors. Only three scans displayed increased uptake beyond the true tumor margins; thus, the extended pattern of uptake beyond the true tumor extent is much less common in medullary chondrosarcomas than in many other primary bone tumors. Therefore, increased uptake beyond the apparent radiographic margin of the tumor suggests possible occult tumor spread. Pathologically, there was intense reactive new bone formation and hyperemia around the periphery of all 18 tumors, and there were foci of enchondral ossification, hyperemia, or calcification within the tumor itself in nearly every tumor. Three scans displayed less uptake in the center of the tumors than around their peripheries. One of these tumors was necrotic in the center, but the other two were pathologically no different from tumors that displayed homogeneous uptake on the scan.

  13. Bone scintigraphy in evaluating the viability of composite bone grafts revascularized by microvascular anastomoses, conventional autogenous bone grafts, and free non-revascularized periosteal grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Berggren, A.; Weiland, A.J.; Ostrup, L.T.

    1982-07-01

    Researchers studied the value of bone scintigraphy in the assessment of anastomotic patency and bone-cell viability in free bone grafts revascularized by microvascular anastomoses in twenty-seven dogs. The dogs were divided into three different groups, and scintigraphy was carried out using technetium-labeled methylene diphosphonate in composite bone grafts revascularized by microvascular anastomoses, conventional autogenous bone grafts, and periosteal grafts placed in different recipient beds. The viability of the grafts were evaluated by histological examination and fluorescence microscopy after triple labeling with oxytetracycline on the first postoperative day, alizarin complexone on the fourth postoperative day, and DCAF on the eleventh postoperative day. A positive scintiscan within the first week following surgery indicated patent microvascular anastomoses, and histological study and fluorescence microscopy confirmed that bone throughout the graft was viable. A positive scintiscan one week after surgery or later does not necessarily indicate microvascular patency or bone-cell survival, because new bone formed by creeping substitution on the surface of a dead bone graft can result in this finding.

  14. Insufficiency of Bone Scintigraphy in Vertebral Lesions of Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis Compared to F-18 Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography and Diagnostic Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Koç, Zehra Pınar; Şimşek, Selçuk; Akarsu, Saadet; Balcı, Tansel Ansal; Onur, Mehmet Ruhi; Kepenek, Ferat

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a benign disorder related to the histiocytes which can infiltrate bone tissue. The most effective method for demonstrating severity of this disease is PET/CT and bone scintigraphy might show bone lesions. We present a seventeen year old male patient with disseminated LCH presented with exophtalmos and having multiple vertebral lesions which were identified by F-18 FDG PET/CT scan and diagnostic CT but not in the bone scintigraphy. PMID:25800594

  15. Insufficiency of bone scintigraphy in vertebral lesions of langerhans cell histiocytosis compared to f-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography and diagnostic computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Koç, Zehra Pınar; Şimşek, Selçuk; Akarsu, Saadet; Balcı, Tansel Ansal; Onur, Mehmet Ruhi; Kepenek, Ferat

    2015-02-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a benign disorder related to the histiocytes which can infiltrate bone tissue. The most effective method for demonstrating severity of this disease is PET/CT and bone scintigraphy might show bone lesions. We present a seventeen year old male patient with disseminated LCH presented with exophtalmos and having multiple vertebral lesions which were identified by F-18 FDG PET/CT scan and diagnostic CT but not in the bone scintigraphy.

  16. Radionuclides in detecting active granuloma formation. Gallium-67 scintigraphy and histopathology with autoradiographic findings

    SciTech Connect

    van Maarsseveen, A.; Alberts, C.; van der Schoot, J.; van Royen, E.; Hens, C.; Mullink, H.; de Groot, J.

    1986-01-01

    Granuloma formation studies were performed on lungs of guinea pigs sensitized with FCA over 2 to 17 months. Prolonged time of sensitization revealed more granulomatous pulmonary tissue. An intravenous booster of FCA in the animals that had been sensitized for 3 months yielded enhanced granuloma formation within 5 days. The histopathology of these lungs was comparable with that seen in lungs of animals after 17 months of sensitization without booster. Enhanced local proliferation of macrophages, measured by (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation and autoradiography, was seen in the lungs of the animals that had received boosters. Moreover, /sup 67/Ga scintigraphy was strongly positive in these animals. Scintigraphy of cell suspensions of pulmonary tissue from these animals showed that /sup 67/Ga was predominantly taken up (quantitatively as well as qualitatively) by the alveolar macrophages. Cell suspensions of sarcoidosis patients, prepared in the same way, showed only a low level of /sup 67/Ga uptake, one comparable to that of the pulmonary cell suspensions of the sensitized animals that had not received boosters. It is suggested that a negative scintigraphy in patients with chronic pulmonary granulomatous disorders could be (partly) explained by the absence of activated macrophages.

  17. Three-phase radionuclide bone imaging in sports medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Rupani, H.D.; Holder, L.E.; Espinola, D.A.; Engin, S.I.

    1985-07-01

    Three-phase radionuclide bone (TPB) imaging was performed on 238 patients with sports-related injuries. A wide variety of lesions was encountered, but the most frequent lesions seen were stress fractures of the lower part of the leg at the junction of the middle and distal thirds of the posterior tibial cortex (42 of 79 lesions). There were no differences in the type, location, or distribution of lesions between males and females or between competitive and noncompetitive athletes. In 110 cases, bone stress lesions were often diagnosed when radiographs were normal, whereas subacute or chronic soft-tissue abnormalities had few specific scintigraphic features. TPB imaging provides significant early diagnostic information about bone stress lesions. Normal examination results (53 cases) exclude underlying osseous pathologic conditions.

  18. Endocrine radionuclide scintigraphy with fusion single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ka-Kit; Gandhi, Arpit; Viglianti, Benjamin L; Fig, Lorraine M; Rubello, Domenico; Gross, Milton D

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To review the benefits of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/computed tomography (CT) hybrid imaging for diagnosis of various endocrine disorders. METHODS: We performed MEDLINE and PubMed searches using the terms: “SPECT/CT”; “functional anatomic mapping”; “transmission emission tomography”; “parathyroid adenoma”; “thyroid cancer”; “neuroendocrine tumor”; “adrenal”; “pheochromocytoma”; “paraganglioma”; in order to identify relevant articles published in English during the years 2003 to 2015. Reference lists from the articles were reviewed to identify additional pertinent articles. Retrieved manuscripts (case reports, reviews, meta-analyses and abstracts) concerning the application of SPECT/CT to endocrine imaging were analyzed to provide a descriptive synthesis of the utility of this technology. RESULTS: The emergence of hybrid SPECT/CT camera technology now allows simultaneous acquisition of combined multi-modality imaging, with seamless fusion of three-dimensional volume datasets. The usefulness of combining functional information to depict the bio-distribution of radiotracers that map cellular processes of the endocrine system and tumors of endocrine origin, with anatomy derived from CT, has improved the diagnostic capability of scintigraphy for a range of disorders of endocrine gland function. The literature describes benefits of SPECT/CT for 99mTc-sestamibi parathyroid scintigraphy and 99mTc-pertechnetate thyroid scintigraphy, 123I- or 131I-radioiodine for staging of differentiated thyroid carcinoma, 111In- and 99mTc- labeled somatostatin receptor analogues for detection of neuroendocrine tumors, 131I-norcholesterol (NP-59) scans for assessment of adrenal cortical hyperfunction, and 123I- or 131I-metaiodobenzylguanidine imaging for evaluation of pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma. CONCLUSION: SPECT/CT exploits the synergism between the functional information from radiopharmaceutical imaging and anatomy

  19. Hematogenous pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis: diagnostic value of radionuclide bone imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Adatepe, M.H.; Powell, O.M.; Isaacs, G.H.; Nichols, K.; Cefola, R.

    1986-11-01

    Hematogenous pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis (HPVO) continues to be a diagnostic problem for clinicians due to nonspecific presentation of the disease (1,2). We reviewed our experience of the last 10 years to determine the diagnostic usefulness of radionuclide bone studies in this disease. We found 15 patients whose primary diagnosis was HPVO. Of the 15 patients, 12 had (99mTc)MDP bone scans which were all positive. Five of the 12 patients had positive (/sup 67/Ga)citrate scans and one patient with chronic active HPVO had negative /sup 67/Ga and (/sup 111/In)WBC bone images. At the same time, three patients' spine x-rays and one patient's CT scan of the vertebra were normal. Additionally, in three patients spine x-rays were interpreted as consistent with degenerative joint disease that contributed to the delay of the diagnosis. We conclude that when HPVO is suspected an abnormal (99mTc)MDP bone image increases the probability of the disease, even if the x-rays and CT scans of the spine are normal. An abnormal /sup 67/Ga image following an abnormal 99mTc bone image increases the specificity of the diagnosis. Normal (99mTc)MDP and (/sup 67/Ga)citrate bone images of the vertebra virtually exclude the diagnosis of HPVO.

  20. THE BONE SCINTIGRAPHY AS A COMPLEMENTARY EXAM IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF THE AVASCULAR NECROSIS OF THE SESAMOID

    PubMed Central

    Barral, Carlyle Marques; Félix, Arnóbio Moreira; Magalhães, Leonardo Neuenschwander; Carvalho, Luciana Araújo; Machado, Fernando Santana

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to present seven cases of avascular necrosis of the sesamoid and report the role of bone scintigraphy in the diagnosis of these patients. Methods: Seven patients with clinical suspicion of avascular necrosis of the sesamoid underwent three-phase bone scintigraphy with 30 mCi of 99mTc-MDP. Results: Most of the patients were young female adults with complaints of limiting pain in the forefoot, who were making use of inappropriate footwear and/or had a history of injury with or without fracture. There was no predominance of either of the feet or between the femoral or tibial sesamoid. Two patients (28.57%) had a bipartite tibial sesamoid and one (14.29%) had splitting of the tibial and fibular sesamoids. In 100% of the patients, three-phase bone scintigraphy, combined with other propaedeutic methods, proved to be crucial for the diagnosis. The initial procedure in all cases was conservative. In four cases (57.14%), there was no remission of symptoms, and surgical excision of the necrotized sesamoid tissue was performed. In all the patients, the therapy used was effective, with complete remission of symptoms, without complications or deformities of the forefoot. Conclusions: Three-phase bone scintigraphy becomes a cornerstone of the propaedeutics when avascular necrosis of the sesamoid is suspected, through contributing towards early and accurate diagnosis and enabling allowing appropriate specialized treatment. PMID:27042628

  1. Bone scintigraphy in the management of X-ray-negative potential scaphoid fractures.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, A W; Kurer, M H; Peggington, J L; Grant, D S; Kirk, C C

    1986-01-01

    One hundred and eleven patients with signs and symptoms of carpal scaphoid injury, but with no fracture visible on X-ray, underwent bone scintigraphy of the wrists. The first 42 patients were re-X-rayed 10 days after injury: bone scanning had identified all fractures confirmed on this X-ray; there were no false negative bone scans. Sixty-seven patients (60%) did not have increased focal uptake over the scaphoid or distal radius, and were mobilised immediately. None of these had a fracture at follow up. Twenty-nine patients with increased uptake over the scaphoid area (26%) remained in plaster of Paris for 6 weeks. All of these had clinical signs of a scaphoid injury. Bone scanning is a practical investigation for all X-ray-negative potential scaphoid injuries, and is acceptable to patient and clinician. In the presence of a normal scan, the practice of re-X-raying patients 10 days after injury may be abandoned. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:3801112

  2. Indium-111-chloride and three-phase bone scintigraphy: A comparison for imaging experimental osteomyelitis

    SciTech Connect

    Hoskinson, J.J.; Daniel, G.B.; Patton, C.S. )

    1991-01-01

    To investigate the utility of indium-111-chloride ({sup 111}In-Cl) imaging in detecting osteomyelitis complicating surgical or fracture sites, the proximal tibia of 11 dogs were experimentally infected with Staphylococcus aureus after creation of a cortical defect. The contralateral limb served as a sham-operated control. Animals were serially imaged by radiography, three-phase technetium-99m-methylene diphosphonate (99mTc-MDP) scintigraphy, and {sup 111}In-Cl scintigraphy. There was a significant difference between infected (1.93) and noninfected (1.32) limb's tibia/femur count density ratios on 24-hr (p = 0.0001) and 72-hr (p = 0.0001) {sup 111}In-Cl images. A smaller difference was found for 99mTc-MDP bone-phase tibia/femur ratios (p = 0.0199). Using receiver operator characteristic analysis of tibia/femur ratios, a sensitivity of 61%, specificity of 88%, and positive (75%) and negative (79%) predictive values were determined for the 24-hr {sup 111}In-Cl images. Indium-111-chloride was superior to 99mTc-MDP in differentiating infected and noninfected operative sites.

  3. Comparative value of bone scintigraphy and radiography in monitoring tumor response in systemially treated prostatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Levenson, R.M.; Sauerbrunn, B.J.; Bates, H.R.; Newman, R.D.; Eddy, J.L.; Ihde, D.C.

    1983-02-01

    Radionuclide bone scans and skeletal radiographs were obtained before and during combination chemotherapy or initial hormonal treatment in 46 patients with disseminated adenocarcinoma of the prostate. The purpose of the study was to determine the usefulness of these two modalities in evaluating tumor response to therapy. Prior to treatment, bone scans were positive in 44 patients (96%). In all but one patient either bone radiographs or bone marrow biopsy revealed evidence of osseous metastases. In 22 patients partial response to therapy was documented by a variety of other staging tests.Eleven of these patients showed concurrent or later improvement on bone scans; one showed improvement on a radiograph. ''Flare phenomena'' were observed relatively frequently since 23% of the scans and 50% of the radiographs showed worsening at the time of response. Bone scans revealed worsening in 79% of 33 patients with disease progression of extraosseous tumor; radiographs were equally sensitive (82% worsening). It is concluded that bone scans in particular are ueful for monitoring tumor status in systemically treated patients with prostate cancer. However, because of the lack of sensitivity for response and paradoxical worsening with tumor regression in some patients, scans are not accurate enough to be employed as the sole test in following these patients.

  4. Comparative value of bone scintigraphy and radiography in monitoring tumor response in systemically treated prostatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Levenson, R.M.; Sauerbrunn, B.J.; Bates, H.R.; Newman, R.D.; Eddy, J.L.; Ihde, DC

    1983-02-01

    Radionuclide bone scans and skeletal radiographs were obtained before and during combination chemotherapy or initial hormonal treatment in 46 patients with disseminated adenocarcinoma of the prostate. The purpose of the study was to determine the usefulness of these two modalities in evaluating tumor response to therapy. Prior to treatment, bone scans were positive in 44 patients (96%). In all but one patient either bone radiographs or bone marrow biopsy revealed evidence of osseous metastases. In 22 patients partial response to therapy was documented by a variety of other staging tests. Eleven of these patients showed concurrent or later improvement on bone scans; one showed improvement on a radiograph. Flare phenomena were observed relatively frequently since 23% of the scans and 50% of the radiographs showed worsening at the time of response. Bone scans revealed worsening in 79% of 33 patients with disease progression of extraosseous tumor; radiographs were equally sensitive (82% worsening). It is concluded that bone scans in particular are useful for monitoring tumor status in systemically treated patients with prostate cancer. However, because of the lack of sensitivity for response and paradoxical worsening with tumor regression in some patients, scans are not accurate enough to be employed as the sole test in following these patients.

  5. Osteopetrosis: radiological & radionuclide imaging.

    PubMed

    Sit, Cherry; Agrawal, Kanhaiyalal; Fogelman, Ignac; Gnanasegaran, Gopinath

    2015-01-01

    Osteopetrosis is a rare inherited bone disease where bones harden and become abnormally dense. While the diagnosis is clinical, it also greatly relies on appearance of the skeleton radiographically. X-ray, radionuclide bone scintigraphy and magnetic resonance imaging have been reported to identify characteristics of osteopetrosis. We present an interesting case of a 59-year-old man with a history of bilateral hip fractures. He underwent (99m)Tc-methylene diphosphonate whole body scan supplemented with single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography of spine, which showed increased uptake in the humeri, tibiae and femora, which were in keeping with osteopetrosis.

  6. T1-201 chloride scintigraphy for bone tumors and soft part sarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Terui, S.; Oyamada, H.; Nishikawa, K.; Beppu, Y.; Fukuma, H.

    1984-01-01

    The author investigated T1-201 chloride as a tumor scanning agent of both tumors and soft part sarcomas. Six bone tumors (2 with Ewing sarcoma, 3 with osteosarcoma and 1 with giant cell tumor) and 3 soft part sarcoma (1 with liposarcoma and 2 with malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH)) were examined. All but one MFH were untreated primary cases. The diagnosis was determined from biopsy specimen. One patient with Ewing sarcoma had bone metastases. All cases were subsequently received chemotherpeutic agents. Surgery or local irradiation were also used in treatment. T1-201 scintigraphy were performed with intravenous administration of 2 mCi of T1-201 chloride before initiation of therapy. In addition, follow-up examinations were done in 4 patients (2 with Ewing sarcoma and 2 with osteosarcoma) to study the effect of chemotherapy on T1-201 uptake by the tumor. Tc-99m bone scans were available for comparison in 6 tumor. Ga-67 citrate scans were also examined for the 3 soft part sarcomas. The untreated tumors even in the metastatic lesions of Ewing sarcoma were distinctly visualized with T1-201 in all cases. The distribution of T1-201 in the tumors was sometimes different from that of Tc-99m and similar to that of Ga-67. Of 3 out of the 4 follow-up patients, the post-therapy scan showed reduction in T1-201 uptake more markedly than Tc-99m uptake during effective chemotherapy. The other one patient had not responded to the treatment so that the scan showed no changes in T1-201 uptake. These findings indicate that the tumor imaging with T1-201 is useful in the diagnosis of these malignant tumors and may be of value in assessing the response of bone tumors to chemotherapy.

  7. (18)F-FDG PET/CT versus bone scintigraphy in the follow-up of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Sollini, M; Calabrese, L; Zangheri, B; Erba, P A; Gramaglia, A; Gasparini, M

    2016-01-01

    A 53-year-old patient underwent a positron emission tomography/computed tomography with 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose ((18)F-FDG PET/CT) in the suspicious of gastric tumor recurrence (mediastinal and abdominal lymph nodes). PET/CT identified only an area of (18)F-FDGuptake in the twelfth thoracic vertebrae. Unexpectedly, a bone scintigraphy revealed many "hot" spots changing the diagnosis (single metastasis versus plurimetastatic disease) and impacting on patient's management. PMID:26653282

  8. (18)F-FDG PET/CT versus bone scintigraphy in the follow-up of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Sollini, M; Calabrese, L; Zangheri, B; Erba, P A; Gramaglia, A; Gasparini, M

    2016-01-01

    A 53-year-old patient underwent a positron emission tomography/computed tomography with 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose ((18)F-FDG PET/CT) in the suspicious of gastric tumor recurrence (mediastinal and abdominal lymph nodes). PET/CT identified only an area of (18)F-FDGuptake in the twelfth thoracic vertebrae. Unexpectedly, a bone scintigraphy revealed many "hot" spots changing the diagnosis (single metastasis versus plurimetastatic disease) and impacting on patient's management.

  9. Hypertrophic pulmonary osteoarthropathy on bone scintigraphy and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in a patient with lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cengiz, Arzu; Eren, Mine Şencan; Polatli, Mehmet; Yürekli, Yakup

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic pulmonary osteoarthropathy (HPOA) is not an uncommon paraneoplastic syndrome that is frequently associated with lung cancer. A 54-year-old male patient with lung adenocarcinoma underwent bone scintigraphy and fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scanning for initial staging. Bone scintigraphy revealed increased periosteal activity in lower extremities. FDG PET/CT revealed hypermetabolic right lung mass, mediastinal lymph nodes, and mildly increased periosteal FDG uptake in both femurs and tibias. The findings in lower extremities on bone scan and FDG PET/CT were interpreted as HPOA. PMID:26170569

  10. Radionuclide therapy of painful bone metastases--a comparative study between consecutive radionuclide infusions, combination with chemotherapy, and radionuclide infusions alone: an in vivo comparison of their effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Sideras, Panagiotis A; Stavraka, Anastasia; Gouliamos, Athanasios; Limouris, Georgios S

    2013-12-01

    Radionuclides have been long used for the palliation of skeletal-related metastatic pain. They are almost invariably used as the last resource for pain palliation. Their use as single agents with dose escalations, in combination with biphosphonates or chemotherapy is well known in the peer-reviewed literature; however, little is known about the combination between different agents. In our study, we used consecutive administration of 2 different radionuclides such as (186)Re-1,1-hydroxyethylidenediphosphonate ((186)Re-HEDP) and (89)Strontium Chloride ((89)Sr-Cl) separated by adequate period of time to allow bone marrow recovery in patients with high chance of bone pain relapse and compared it with (89)Sr-Cl and chemotherapy group and (186)Re-HEDP with bisphosphonates. The end result was that treatment with consecutive radionuclides was much more effective and safe than the other 2 groups.

  11. Radionuclide liver and bone scanning in the evaluation of patients with endometrial carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Mettler, F.A. Jr.; Christie, J.H.; Garcia, J.F.; Baldwin, M.H.; Wicks, J.D.; Bartow, S.A.

    1981-12-01

    Staging bone scans or skeletal surveys were obtained of 97 patients with endometrial carcinoma. Of the 77 patients with Stage I or II disease, no metastases were identified at staging. Three patients in the entire series demonstrated bony metastases; all of these metastases were detectable by radionuclide bone scan and radiographic bone survey. Eighty-nine patients were examined with radionuclide liver/spleen scanning at the time of staging. Four of the 89 initial scans were interpreted as demonstrating hepatocellular disease, and all four patients had abnormal liver function studies. Only one patient demonstrated a possible hepatic metastasis at initial diagnosis. This patient also had abnormal liver function studies. Based on these results, bone surveys and radionuclide bone scans are not indicated as screening procedures in endometrial carcinoma. It is suggested that screening for liver metastases in patients with endometrial carcinoma is not warranted in patients with normal liver function studies.

  12. (99m)Tc-methylene diphosphonate bone scintigraphy findings in posttransplant distal limb syndrome.

    PubMed

    Derlin, Thorsten; Busch, Jasmin D; Bannas, Peter

    2014-07-01

    We report a case of posttransplant distal limb syndrome (PTDLS) representing a rare complication in kidney transplant recipients characterized by a pain syndrome of the distal extremities. A 68-year-old man with a history of kidney transplantation presented with symmetrical and incapacitating pain in the feet and knees and underwent whole-body Tc-methylene diphosphonate (MDP) scintigraphy for further evaluation. Planar scintigraphy demonstrated marked tracer uptake in the distal femoral and tibial epiphyses, and magnetic resonance imaging showed corresponding osteoedema. Tc-MDP scintigraphy is a valuable tool for evaluation of the etiology of musculoskeletal pain and may demonstrate typical findings in case of PTDLS.

  13. The role of tumour markers in predicting skeletal metastases in breast cancer patients with equivocal bone scintigraphy

    PubMed Central

    Nicolini, A; Ferrari, P; Sagripanti, A; Carpi, A

    1999-01-01

    Bone scintigraphy (BS) is commonly performed in the staging and postoperative monitoring of breast cancer. Nevertheless, due to low specificity it often demonstrates hot spots with equivocal interpretation, which may be misleading in the management of these patients. The aim of this study was to assess the value of a serum tumour marker panel in selecting among the patients with equivocal BS those with bone metastases. Between January 1986 and December 1995, 297 breast cancer patients were followed-up after mastectomy with serial determinations of a CEA-TPA-CA15.3 tumour marker panel, BS and liver echography. The tumour marker panel was used to select patients with equivocal BS for examination of suspicious bone areas by further imaging techniques. Up to December 1995, 158 (53%) patients showed an equivocal BS and 47 patients developed bone metastases. In the 158 patients with equivocal BS, prolonged clinical and imaging follow-up over 45 months (mean; range 12–120) was used to ascertain the presence or absence of bone metastases. In these 158 patients the negative predictive value and positive predictive value of the tumour marker panel to predict bone metastases was 97% and 75% respectively. This study shows that in breast cancer patients the CEA-TPA-CA15.3 tumour marker panel has a high value in selecting those patients with bone metastases, or at high risk of developing clinically-evident bone metastases, among the large number of subjects with equivocal BS. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10188888

  14. Radionuclide evaluation of free vascularized bone graft viability. [/sup 99m/Tc-methylene diphosphonate

    SciTech Connect

    Lisbona, R.; Rennie, W.R.J.; Daniel, R.K.

    1980-02-01

    Free vascularized bone grafting is a new technique applied to the reconstructive surgery of long bones affected by aggressive benign or malignant processes, as well as traumatic deficiencies. These bone lesions may be treated by en bloc excision and replacement with fibular segments or osteocutaneous flaps from the groin isolated on their vascular pedicle. Microvascular anastomosis of the pedicle at the recipient site is necessary. Radionuclide bone imaging is unique in the assessment of the free vascularized bone graft because postoperative graft uptake of radiopharmaceutical reflects patent anastomoses and segmental bone viability.

  15. The role of bone scintigraphy in the evaluation of the suspected abused child

    SciTech Connect

    Sty, J.R.; Starshak, R.J.

    1983-02-01

    A comparison was made of the radiographic and scintigraphic skeletal surveys of 261 children who were suspected victims of abuse. Radiography was positive in 105 children and produced false-negative results in 32; scintigraphy was positive in 120 children and produced false-negative results in two. Although radiography has traditionally been used to assess the skeletal injuries of battered children, the authors conclude that scintigraphy should be the screening procedure of choice for children suspected of having been abused.

  16. What role for radiobiphosphonates bone scintigraphy in the monitoring of an unusual bone giant cell tumor: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Oueriagli, Salah Nabih; Ghfir, Imad; Guerrouj, Hassna El; Raïs, Nouzha Ben

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of 24 years old female patient, followed since ten years ago for bone giant cell tumor (GCT) of the right knee, which was complicated by pulmonary metastases. Surgical treatment and pulmonary metastasectomies have not allowed definitive cure of this disease with the appearance of metachronous bone lesions after eight years of evolution. The literature review confirms the originality of this observation: the age of the patient, the initial and metastasis locations and the occurrence of lung metastases with unfavorable prognosis. Through this clinical case, the authors highlight the role of radiobiphosphonates bone scintigraphy in detecting synchronous or metachronous bone lesions, and in monitoring of these locations under medical treatment. PMID:27186440

  17. What role for radiobiphosphonates bone scintigraphy in the monitoring of an unusual bone giant cell tumor: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Oueriagli, Salah Nabih; Ghfir, Imad; Guerrouj, Hassna El; Raïs, Nouzha Ben

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of 24 years old female patient, followed since ten years ago for bone giant cell tumor (GCT) of the right knee, which was complicated by pulmonary metastases. Surgical treatment and pulmonary metastasectomies have not allowed definitive cure of this disease with the appearance of metachronous bone lesions after eight years of evolution. The literature review confirms the originality of this observation: the age of the patient, the initial and metastasis locations and the occurrence of lung metastases with unfavorable prognosis. Through this clinical case, the authors highlight the role of radiobiphosphonates bone scintigraphy in detecting synchronous or metachronous bone lesions, and in monitoring of these locations under medical treatment. PMID:27186440

  18. The clinical significance of radionuclide bone and gallium scanning in osteomyelitis of the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    Noyek, A.M.; Kirsh, J.C.; Greyson, N.D.; Wortzman, G.; Jazrawy, H.; Freeman, J.L.; Blair, R.L.; Chapnik, J.S.

    1984-05-01

    Osteomyelitis of the head and neck remains a difficult clinical problem both in diagnosis and treatment evaluation. The purpose of this manuscript is to review our clinical experience with 25 cases of osteomyelitis distributed evenly among the temporal bone and skull base, the paranasal sinuses, and the mandible. Radionuclide bone and gallium scan images accurately depicted the biologic activity of the disease process and permitted accurate treatment evaluation and patient monitoring. This work demonstrates the potentials and limitations of radionuclide imaging with bone and gallium scan agents and attempts to define a role for their contemporary use in the management of osteomyelitis of the head and neck.

  19. Comparative value of maximal treadmill testing, exercise thallium myocardial perfusion scintigraphy and exercise radionuclide ventriculography for distinguishing high- and low-risk patients soon after acute myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, J.; Goris, M.L.; Nash, E.; Kraemer, H.C.; DeBusk, R.F.; Berger, W.E.; Lew, H.

    1984-05-01

    The prognostic value of symptom-limited treadmill exercise electrocardiography, exercise thallium myocardial perfusion scintigraphy and rest and exercise radionuclide ventriculography was compared in 117 men, aged 54 +/- 9 years, tested 3 weeks after a clinically uncomplicated acute myocardial infarction (MI). During a mean follow-up period of 11.6 months, 8 men experienced ''hard'' medical events (cardiac death, nonfatal ventricular fibrillation or recurrent MI) and 14 were hospitalized for unstable angina pectoris, congestive heart failure or coronary bypass surgery (total of 22 combined events). By multivariate analysis (Cox proportional hazards model), peak treadmill work load and the change in left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) during exercise were significant (p less than 0.01) predictors of hard medical events; these 2 risk factors and recurrent ischemic chest pain in the coronary care unit were also significantly predictive (p less than 0.001) for combined events. A peak treadmill work load of 4 METs or less or a decrease in EF of 5% or more below the value at rest during submaximal effort distinguished 22 high-risk patients (20% of the study population) from 89 low-risk patients. The rate of hard medical events within 12 months was 23% (5 of 22 patients), vs 2% (2 of 89 patients) in the high- and low-risk patient subsets, respectively (p less than 0.001). Thus, in patients who underwent evaluation 3 weeks after a clinically uncomplicated MI, exercise radionuclide ventriculography contributed independent prognostic information to that provided by symptom-limited treadmill testing and was superior to exercise thallium scintigraphy for this purpose.

  20. Massive Pelvic Lymphadenopathy Due to Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Incidentally Revealed on a 99mTc-MDP Bone Scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianmin; Xie, Peng

    2016-06-01

    A 58-year-old man underwent Tc-MDP bone scintigraphy to evaluate the cause of diffuse bone pain. The images did not identify the exact cause of his symptoms. However, a "light bulb"-shaped urinary bladder and diffused increased activity in the scrotal region and left thigh were noted, which suggest a mass effect in the pelvis. A CT scan of the pelvis revealed soft tissue compressing the urinary bladder. A diagnosis of recurrent lymphoma was made. PMID:26828142

  1. Comparison of Diagnostic Performance Between Visual and Quantitative Assessment of Bone Scintigraphy Results in Patients With Painful Temporomandibular Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Bong-Hoi; Yoon, Seok-Ho; Song, Seung-Il; Yoon, Joon-Kee; Lee, Su Jin; An, Young-Sil

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This retrospective clinical study was performed to evaluate whether a visual or quantitative method is more valuable for assessing painful temporomandibular disorder (TMD) using bone scintigraphy results. In total, 230 patients (172 women and 58 men) with TMD were enrolled. All patients were questioned about their temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain. Bone scintigraphic data were acquired in all patients, and images were analyzed by visual and quantitative methods using the TMJ-to-skull uptake ratio. The diagnostic performances of both bone scintigraphic assessment methods for painful TMD were compared. In total, 241 of 460 TMJs (52.4%) were finally diagnosed with painful TMD. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of the visual analysis for diagnosing painful TMD were 62.8%, 59.6%, 58.6%, 63.8%, and 61.1%, respectively. The quantitative assessment showed the ability to diagnose painful TMD with a sensitivity of 58.8% and specificity of 69.3%. The diagnostic ability of the visual analysis for diagnosing painful TMD was not significantly different from that of the quantitative analysis. Visual bone scintigraphic analysis showed a diagnostic utility similar to that of quantitative assessment for the diagnosis of painful TMD. PMID:26765456

  2. Radionuclide treatment of painful bone metastases in patients with breast cancer: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Mette H; Petersen, Lars J

    2012-04-01

    Bone-seeking radionuclides, such as Sr-89, Sm-153, and Re-186, have been shown to have an effect on pain from bone metastasis in prostate cancer. The effect on bone pain in other cancer types, including breast cancer, remains unclear. The purpose of the study was to perform a systematic review of the use of radioisotopes for pain relief in metastatic breast cancer. A literature search was performed in PubMed, EMBASE, and Web of Science (1970 to September 2009) for clinical studies with a primary outcome of pain, performance status, or quality of life. Eligibility criteria were the following: (1) the trial must include at least 10 breast cancer patients with painful bone metastasis, (2) the radionuclide has been approved by regulatory authorities in Europe or the United States and is commercially available (Sr-89, Sm-153, and Re-186), (3) the dose of radionuclides must be clinically effective, (4) the primary endpoint must be pain, performance status or quality of life, and (5) separate reporting of efficacy should be available for breast cancer patients provided the trial included patients with various types of cancer. The literature search identified 189 individual studies of which 19 trials fulfilled the eligibility criteria. There were three randomized controlled trials of which two trials compared two different radionuclides, and one trial compared two doses of Sm-153. In addition, there were 16 uncontrolled trials. Reporting of trial research methodology in the randomized as well as the uncontrolled trials was low (median Jadad score of 1, range 1-2). Key trial details, such as patient recruitment, description of prior palliative therapies, baseline characteristics, follow up, and reporting of outcome was insufficient in a large proportion of the trials. According to Center of Evidence-based Medicine criteria, there is level 4 documentation for the effect of radionuclides in painful bone metastasis in breast cancer. It has been concluded that there is limited

  3. Combined gated cardiac blood pool scintigraphy and /sup 67/Ga-citrate scintigraphy for detection of cardiac lymphoproliferative disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Winzelberg, G.G.; Rapoport, F.; Boucher, C.A.

    1981-10-01

    Two cases are reported in which combined radionuclide imaging using gated cardiac blood pool scintigraphy and /sup 67/Ga-citrate scintigraphy aided in evaluating lymphomatous involvement of the heart and distinguishing tumor involvement from other cardiac disorders.

  4. Relative efficacy of radiographic and radionuclide bone surveys in the detection of the skeletal lesions of histiocytosis X

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, B.R.; Pinckney, L.; Etcubanas, E.

    1980-02-01

    Radionuclide studies have been considered a more sensitive indicator of the presence of the bony lesions of histiocytosis X in children that have radiographic bone surveys. Our results suggest that the opposite is true. Although positive correlation between bone scans and radiographs was found in eight of nine patients, only 35% of the individual lesions visible on radiographs were seen on radionuclide studies. Results of radionuclide studies did not correlate with age or sex of the patient, presence or duration of symptoms, radiographic appearance, or anatomic location of lesions. Our results suggest that the radiographic skeletal survey is more sensitive than radionuclide studies in detecting the skeletal lesions of histiocytosis X.

  5. Post-traumatic changes of the temporo-mandibular joint by bone scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Harris, S A; Rood, J P; Testa, H J

    1988-06-01

    13 patients who sustained mandibular trauma were investigated with radiographs and scintiscans. The scintiscans showed abnormal uptake of radiopharmaceutical in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). In patients with a long history of traumatic arthrosis, there was more positive correlation between the scintiscans, and clinical symptoms and histology than between radiographs, and symptoms and histology. In patients with mandibular body fractures and no TMJ symptoms, the scans showed abnormal uptake in the TMJ in 7/8 joints, in the absence of radiographic abnormality. The significance of the abnormal uptake and the value of scintigraphy is discussed.

  6. A Dosimetric Study of Radionuclide Therapy for Bone Marrow Ablation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayouth, John Ellis

    In a phase I clinical trial, six multiple myeloma patients, who were non-responsive to conventional therapy and were scheduled for bone marrow transplantation, received Holmium-166 (166Ho) labeled to a bone seeking agent, DOTMP (1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane -1,4,7,10-tetramethylene-phosphonic acid), for the purpose of bone marrow ablation. The specific aims of my research within this protocol were to evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of 166Ho DOTMP by quantifying the in vivo pharmacokinetics and radiation dosimetry, and by correlating these results to the biologic response observed. The reproducibility of pharmacokinetics from multiple injections of 166 Ho DOTMP administered to these myeloma patients was demonstrated from both blood and whole body retention. The skeletal concentration of 166 Ho DOTMP was heterogenous in all six patients: high in the ribs, pelvis, and lumbar vertebrae regions, and relatively low in the femurs, arms, and head. A novel technique was developed to calculate the radiation dose to the bone marrow in each skeletal ROI, and was applied to all six 166 Ho DOTMP patients. Radiation dose estimates for the bone marrow calculated using the standard MIRD "S" factors were compared with the average values derived from the heterogenous distribution of activity in the skeleton (i.e., the regional technique). The results from the two techniques were significantly different; the average of the dose estimates from the regional technique were typically 30% greater. Furthermore, the regional technique provided a range of radiation doses for the entire marrow volume, while the MIRD "S" factors only provided a single value. Dose volume histogram analysis of data from the regional technique indicated a range of dose estimates that varied by a factor of 10 between the high dose and low dose regions. Finally, the observed clinical response of cells and abnormal proteins measured in bone marrow aspirates and peripheral blood samples were compared with

  7. Bone marrow metastases from alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma with impressive FDG PET/CT finding but less-revealing bone scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jigang; Zhen, Lishi; Zhuang, Hongming

    2013-12-01

    An 18F-FDG PET/CT scan was performed in a 26-year-old man with a known alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma for staging. The PET/CT scan showed abnormally increased FDG activity involving almost all bones in the imaged regions. In contrast, 99mTc-MDP whole-body bone scan demonstrated only very limited bone metastases.

  8. Hybrid Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography/Computed Tomography Imaging Features of Tumoral Calcinosis in Technetium-99m Methylene Diphosphonate Bone Scintigraphy

    PubMed Central

    Kamaleshwaran, Koramadai Karuppusamy; Asokumar, Premkumar; Malaikkal, Anjali; Mohanan, Vyshakh; Shinto, Ajit Sugunan

    2015-01-01

    Tumoral calcinosis (TC) is an uncommon ectopic calcification syndrome. TC is a benign condition characterized by the presence of large calcific soft tissue deposits occurring predominantly in a periarticular location. It generally occurs as a complication of renal dialysis or trauma, and is rarely seen in familial and sporadic cases. Bone scintigraphy is a sensitive method for diagnosing TC. We report a case of year old female with. She underwent bone scintigraphy to see the sites of involvement, which showed intense foci of tracer activity in soft tissue in bilateral thigh and gluteal region. Hybrid single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography of the pelvis and thigh localized tracer uptake to the calcification in the gluteal and thigh region. PMID:26097427

  9. Hybrid Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography/Computed Tomography Imaging Features of Tumoral Calcinosis in Technetium-99m Methylene Diphosphonate Bone Scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Kamaleshwaran, Koramadai Karuppusamy; Asokumar, Premkumar; Malaikkal, Anjali; Mohanan, Vyshakh; Shinto, Ajit Sugunan

    2015-01-01

    Tumoral calcinosis (TC) is an uncommon ectopic calcification syndrome. TC is a benign condition characterized by the presence of large calcific soft tissue deposits occurring predominantly in a periarticular location. It generally occurs as a complication of renal dialysis or trauma, and is rarely seen in familial and sporadic cases. Bone scintigraphy is a sensitive method for diagnosing TC. We report a case of year old female with. She underwent bone scintigraphy to see the sites of involvement, which showed intense foci of tracer activity in soft tissue in bilateral thigh and gluteal region. Hybrid single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography of the pelvis and thigh localized tracer uptake to the calcification in the gluteal and thigh region.

  10. Combined bone scintigraphy and indium-111 leukocyte scans in neuropathic foot disease

    SciTech Connect

    Schauwecker, D.S.; Park, H.M.; Burt, R.W.; Mock, B.H.; Wellman, H.N.

    1988-10-01

    It is difficult to diagnose osteomyelitis in the presence of neurotrophic osteoarthropathy. We performed combined (99mTc)MDP bone scans and indium-111 (111In) leukocyte studies on 35 patients who had radiographic evidence of neuropathic foot disease and clinically suspected osteomyelitis. The (111In)leukocyte study determined if there was an infection and the bone scan provided the anatomic landmarks so that the infection could be localized to the bone or the adjacent soft tissue. Seventeen patients had osteomyelitis and all showed increased (111In)leukocyte activity localized to the bone, giving a sensitivity of 100%. Among the 18 patients without osteomyelitis, eight had no accumulation of (111In)leukocytes, seven had the (111In)leukocyte activity correctly localized to the soft tissue, two had (111In)leukocyte activity mistakenly attributed to the bone, and one had (111In)leukocyte accumulation in a proven neuroma which was mistakenly attributed to bone. These three false-positive results for osteomyelitis reduced the specificity to 83%. Considering only the 27 patients with a positive (111In)leukocyte study, the combined bone scan and (111In)leukocyte study correctly localized the infection to the soft tissues or bone in 89%. Uninfected neurotrophic osteoarthropathy does not accumulate (111In)leukocytes. We found the combined bone scan and (111In) leukocyte study useful for the detection and localization of infection to soft tissue or bone in patients with neuropathic foot disease.

  11. Radionuclide scanning in children with rhabdomyosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Weinblatt, M.E.; Miller, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    Radionuclide scintigraphy was performed in 46 children with rhabdomyosarcoma. Of the 63 radiologically confirmed sites of bone disease, 76% were detected by /sup 99m/Tc-labeled phosphate uptake. All 15 sites of hepatic involvement and eight of the nine cranial sites of disease exhibited isotope accumulation. Gallium 67 scans showed 57% of the 43 proven sites of disease, including four previously unsuspected areas. Twelve false-positive sites were obtained with gallium. Radionuclide scanning is a valuable aid in the diagnostic evaluation and management of childhood rhabdomyosarcoma.

  12. In vivo measurements of bone-seeking radionuclides: Final report, 1984-1987

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, N.; Laurer, G.R.

    1987-01-01

    This document describes three years effort on eight projects investigating techniques for in vivo measurements of bone-seeking radionuclides. Included are methods for estimating radiation background in human subjects; for estimating specific organ burdens; for estimating levels of plutonium in human females; for the design of a human skull phantom; and for the development of a reference spectra library for low-energy, photon-emitting nuclides. 58 refs., 46 figs., 8 tabs. (TEM)

  13. When to perform positron emission tomography/computed tomography or radionuclide bone scan in patients with recently diagnosed prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Caldarella, Carmelo; Treglia, Giorgio; Giordano, Alessandro; Giovanella, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal metastases are very common in prostate cancer and represent the main metastatic site in about 80% of prostate cancer patients, with a significant impact in patients' prognosis. Early detection of bone metastases is critical in the management of patients with recently diagnosed high-risk prostate cancer: radical treatment is recommended in case of localized disease; systemic therapy should be preferred in patients with distant secondary disease. Bone scintigraphy using radiolabeled bisphosphonates is of great importance in the management of these patients; however, its main drawback is its low overall accuracy, due to the nonspecific uptake in sites of increased bone turnover. Positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals, such as fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose, choline-derived drugs (fluorine-18-fluorocholine and carbon-11-choline) and sodium fluorine-18-fluoride, are increasingly used in clinical practice to detect metastatic spread, and particularly bone involvement, in patients with prostate cancer, to reinforce or substitute information provided by bone scan. Each radiopharmaceutical has a specific mechanism of uptake; therefore, diagnostic performances may differ from one radiopharmaceutical to another on the same lesions, as demonstrated in the literature, with variable sensitivity, specificity, and overall accuracy values in the same patients. Whether bone scintigraphy can be substituted by these new methods is a matter of debate. However, greater radiobiological burden, higher costs, and the necessity of an in-site cyclotron limit the use of these positron emission tomography methods as first-line investigations in patients with prostate cancer: bone scintigraphy remains the mainstay for the detection of bone metastases in current clinical practice. PMID:23861598

  14. [Evaluation of multiple myeloma with bone scintigraphy using Tc 99 diphosphonate. Review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Solis, O J; Gonzales, R; De Luca, S; McKusick, K A; Potsaid, M S

    1977-04-01

    Bone Scanning using 99m Tc-Diphosphonate is another diagnostic modality in the evaluation of multiple mieloma which allows the identification of bone lesions not demonstrable by conventional radiography. The use of 99m Tc-Diphosphonate is more convenient and less harmful than other radioactive isotopes utilized before. PMID:866897

  15. Gangrenous Leg in a Patient With Diabetes on MDP Bone Scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Evbuomwan, Osayande; Akinwale Ayeni, Olusegun; Dhoodhat, Shireen; Di Tamba Vangu, Mboyo

    2016-05-01

    Diabetic patients with peripheral arterial disease frequently experience gangrene of the lower limbs. It has been suggested that a bone scan is useful in differentiating viable from nonviable tissues in patients with extensive peripheral gangrene and thus can help determine the appropriate level of amputation in such patients. We present a 68-year-old diabetic woman with right breast cancer, who was referred to our facility for a bone scan as part of her metastatic workup. Bone scan findings revealed absolute photon deficiency in the distal half of her left lower limb. PMID:26828148

  16. Computed tomography and bone scintigraphy is polyostotic fibrous dysplasia. Report of a case. [Tc 99m

    SciTech Connect

    Higashi, T.; Iguchi, M.; Shimura, A.; Kruglik, G.D.

    1980-12-01

    A case of polyostotic fibrous dysplasia is presented in which the extent of bony lesions was defined on the results of the CT scan and bone scan with 99m Tc polyphosphate in addition to conventional radiography. These diagnostic procedures appear to be of considerable value in defining the extent of a variety of oral-maxillofacial bony lesions. This report describes the comparative findings from 99m Tc polyphosphate bone imaging and computed tomography (CT) in one patient with polyostotic fibrous dysplasia.

  17. Detection of degenerative disease of the temporomandibular joint by bone scintigraphy: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, H.A.; Bloom, C.Y.

    1980-10-01

    Nine patients with facial pain were evaluated with limited bone scans. The scintigrams correlated with microscopy in all patients, although radiographs correlated with microscopy in only five patients. The degenerative disease process in the temporomandibular joint was more extensive in the patients with radiographic and scintigraphic abnormalities than in those with scintigraphic abnormalities alone. The limited bone scan appears useful in detecting early degenerative changes in the temporomandibular joint.

  18. Differential diagnosis between secondary hyperparathyroidism and aluminum intoxication in uremic patients: Usefulness of /sup 99m/Tc-pyrophosphate bone scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Kinnaert, P.; Van Hooff, I.; Schoutens, A.; Bergmann, P.; Fuss, M.; Dratwa, M.; Vienne, A.; Pasteels, J.L.; van Geertruyden, J.; Vanherweghem, J.L.

    1989-03-01

    Forty-one patients in chronic end-stage renal failure and 4 patients with a functioning kidney transplant presented with spontaneous hypercalcemia or intolerance to vitamin D3 sterols and/or oral calcium supplements. Bone iliac crest biopsy with aluminum staining and Tc-pyrophosphate bone scintigraphy with determination of Fogelman score were performed in all cases. Two patients had aluminum-induced osteomalacia (AL O). Thirty-eight biopsies showed renal osteodystrophy (secondary hyperparathyroidism or various combinations of osteitis fibrosa and osteomalacia): 19 with positive staining for aluminum (RO + AL) and 19 without aluminum deposits (RO). The series also comprised 2 cases of pure osteomalacia (OM), 2 cases of osteoporosis (OP), and 1 case of osteoporosis with aluminum accumulation (OP + AL). Mean Fogelman score in RO patients (9.1 +/- 0.3) was significantly higher than in all other categories (5.9 +/- 0.5 for RO + AL, and scores ranging from 0 to 8 in the last 7 patients, p less than 0.01). Patients with massive aluminum accumulation in bone (greater than 75% of the total trabecular surface) showed no or very low uptake of the isotope by the skeleton. Fogelman scores of 9 or higher were always associated with histological secondary hyperparathyroidism. /sup 99m/Tc-pyrophosphate bone scintigraphy is helpful to distinguish aluminum intoxication from secondary hyperparathyroidism in uremic patients.

  19. SPECT bone scintigraphy in the diagnosis and management of mandibular condylar hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Hodder, S C; Rees, J I; Oliver, T B; Facey, P E; Sugar, A W

    2000-04-01

    Isotope bone scans have been used for a number of years to assess growth activity in the mandibular condyle in patients who present with facial asymmetry. The aim is to distinguish normal bone growth within the condyle from increased activity that may be the cause of the asymmetry. Previous studies have, however, relied only on planar images. SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) has been used with quantitative assessments of one mandibular condyle to clivus or lumbar spine, but we have compared one condyle with the other, which is more sensitive and accurate in detecting abnormal activity. A relative percentage uptake of 55% or more in the affected mandibular condyle is considered to be abnormal, and this has been validated by comparison with an age-matched control group. We have used SPECT as an aid to diagnosis and treatment in 18 patients with asymmetrical growth and have constructed a therapeutic algorithm to aid the treatment of these patients. PMID:10864700

  20. Detection of occult infection following total joint arthroplasty using sequential technetium-99m HDP bone scintigraphy and indium-111 WBC imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.A.; Christie, M.J.; Sandler, M.P.; Parks, P.F. Jr.; Homra, L.; Kaye, J.J.

    1988-08-01

    Preoperative exclusion or confirmation of periprosthetic infection is essential for correct surgical management of patients with suspected infected joint prostheses. The sensitivity and specificity of (/sup 111/In)WBC imaging in the diagnosis of infected total joint prostheses was examined in 28 patients and compared with sequential (/sup 99m/Tc)HDP/(/sup 111/In)WBC scintigraphy and aspiration arthrography. The sensitivity of preoperative aspiration cultures was 12%, with a specificity of 81% and an accuracy of 58%. The sensitivity of (/sup 111/In)WBC imaging alone was 100%, with a specificity of 50% and an accuracy of 65%. When correlated with the bone scintigraphy and read as sequential (/sup 99m/Tc)HDP/(/sup 111/In)WBC imaging, the sensitivity was 88%, specificity 95%, and accuracy 93%. This study demonstrates that (/sup 111/In)WBC imaging is an extremely sensitive imaging modality for the detection of occult infection of joint prostheses. It also demonstrates the necessity of correlating (/sup 111/In)WBC images with (/sup 99m/Tc)HDP skeletal scintigraphy in the detection of occult periprosthetic infection.

  1. Analysis of serial radionuclide bone images in osteosarcoma and breast carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    McNeil, B.J.; Hanley, J.

    1980-04-01

    The authors first describe and illustrate didactically the use of the Kaplan-Meier actuarial technique for serial diagnostic studies. They then present an analysis of previously published data on the results of serial radionuclide bone images in patients with osteosarcoma or breast carcinoma, using this technique. The data indicate that patients with osteosarcoma show an almost linear increase in the occurrence of bone metastates between 5 and 29 months after diagnosis; the rate is approximately 1% per month. Patients with breast cancer, on the other hand, show a biphasic rate of development, averaging only 0.5% per month during the first year after diagnosis but increasing rapidly to approximately 2% per month after 15 months.

  2. The role of laboratory animals in studying bone cancer resulting from skeletally deposited radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Boecker, B.B.; Miller, S.C.; Lloyd, R.D.; Taylor, G.N.; Griffith, W.C.; Guilmette, R.A.; Hahn, F.F.; Muggenburg, B.A.

    1994-11-01

    There is a continuing need to determine and understand the long-term health risks of internally deposited radionuclides in persons exposed medically or occupationally, or from radionuclides in the environment. A full understanding of these health risks, particularly for exposures involving low doses and dose rates, requires in-depth knowledge of both the dosimetry of a given exposure and the resulting long-term biological effects. Human data on {sup 224}Ra and {sup 226,228}Ra and their decay products are our primary sources of knowledge on the health risks of chronic alpha irradiation of the skeleton and serve as essential segments of our radiation protection practices for internally deposited radionuclides. However, we cannot obtain all of the needed information from these studies. This paper examines the role of laboratory animal studies in complementing and extending the knowledge of radiation-induced bone cancer obtained from studies of humans exposed to {sup 224}Ra or {sup 226,228}Ra.

  3. The acetabulum: A prospective study of three-phase bone and indium white blood cell scintigraphy following porous-coated hip arthroplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Oswald, S.G.; Van Nostrand, D.; Savory, C.G.; Anderson, J.H.; Callaghan, J.J. )

    1990-03-01

    Although few studies address the use of three-phase bone scanning (TPBS) and indium-111-labeled white blood cell scintigraphy ({sup 111}In-WBC) in hip arthroplasty utilizing a porous-coated prosthesis, the literature suggests that scintigraphic patterns in the uncomplicated patient may differ from that seen with the cemented prosthesis. In an attempt to determine the scintigraphic natural history, 25 uncomplicated porous-coated hip arthroplasties in 21 patients were prospectively studied with serial TPBS and {sup 111I}n-WBC at approximately 7 days, and 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 mo postoperatively. This report deals with findings related to the acetabulum. All 25 prostheses (144 of 144 scans) demonstrated increased uptake on the bone-phase images. Although this activity decreased with time, 76% had persistent uptake at 24 mo. Twenty-three of 25 prostheses (126 of 140 scans) showed increased uptake on {sup 111}In-WBC scintigraphy, invariably decreasing with time, but with 37% having significant uptake at 24 mo. Scintigraphic patterns in the uncomplicated porous-coated hip arthroplasty patient appear to differ from patterns described in cemented prostheses.

  4. Monte Carlo simulation of age-dependent radiation dose from alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides to critical trabecular bone and bone marrow targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dant, James T.; Richardson, Richard B.; Nie, Linda H.

    2013-05-01

    Alpha (α) particles and low-energy beta (β) particles present minimal risk for external exposure. While these particles can induce leukemia and bone cancer due to internal exposure, they can also be beneficial for targeted radiation therapies. In this paper, a trabecular bone model is presented to investigate the radiation dose from bone- and marrow-seeking α and β emitters to different critical compartments (targets) of trabecular bone for different age groups. Two main issues are addressed with Monte Carlo simulations. The first is the absorption fractions (AFs) from bone and marrow to critical targets within the bone for different age groups. The other issue is the application of 223Ra for the radiotherapy treatment of bone metastases. Both a static model and a simulated bone remodeling process are established for trabecular bone. The results show significantly lower AFs from radionuclide sources in the bone volume to the peripheral marrow and the haematopoietic marrow for adults than for newborns and children. The AFs from sources on the bone surface and in the bone marrow to peripheral marrow and haematopoietic marrow also varies for adults and children depending on the energy of the particles. Regarding the use of 223Ra as a radionuclide for the radiotherapy of bone metastases, the simulations show a significantly higher dose from 223Ra and its progeny in forming bone to the target compartment of bone metastases than that from two other more commonly used β-emitting radiopharmaceuticals, 153Sm and 89Sr. There is also a slightly lower dose from 223Ra in forming bone to haematopoietic marrow than that from 153Sm and 89Sr. These results indicate a higher therapy efficiency and lower marrow toxicity from 223Ra and its progeny. In conclusion, age-related changes in bone dimension and cellularity seem to significantly affect the internal dose from α and β emitters in the bone and marrow to critical targets, and 223Ra may be a more efficient

  5. Skeletal Scintigraphy (Bone Scan)

    MedlinePlus

    ... young patients, sedation is seldom necessary. Risks Allergic reactions to radiopharmaceuticals may occur but are extremely rare and are usually mild. Nevertheless, you should inform the nuclear medicine personnel of any allergies you may have ...

  6. Prevalence and pattern of abnormal myocardial perfusion in patients with isolated coronary artery ectasia: study by 99mTc-sestamibi radionuclide scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Ahmed M; Rayan, Mona; Adel, Amr; Demerdash, Salah; Atef, Mohamed; Abdallah, Mohamed; Nammas, Wail

    2014-02-01

    We explored the prevalence and pattern of abnormal myocardial perfusion in patients with isolated coronary artery ectasia (CAE), as demonstrated by (99m)Tc-sestamibi scintigraphy. Prospectively, we enrolled 35 patients with angiographically documented CAE and no significant coronary obstruction, who underwent elective coronary angiography. Patients underwent Stress-rest (99m)Tc-sestamibi scintigraphy within 4 days of coronary angiography. They were divided into 2 groups: group I: with normal perfusion scan; and group II: with reversible perfusion defects. The mean age was 49.6 ± 6.9 years; 34 (97.1 %) were males. Seventy-nine (75.2 %) arteries were affected by CAE. Among 79 arteries affected by CAE, affection was diffuse in 37 (46.8 %). Thirteen (37.1 %) patients had normal perfusion scan (group I), whereas 22 (62.9 %) had reversible perfusion defects (group II). Among 22 patients with reversible perfusion defects, 20 (90.9 %) had mild and 2 (9.1 %) had moderate ischemia. Among 49 myocardial segments with reversible perfusion defects, 22 (44.9 %) were basal, 18 (36.7 %) mid-, and 9 (18.4 %) apical segments. Diffuse CAE was significantly more prevalent in group II versus group I, in all 3 major coronary arteries (p < 0.05 for all). In patients with isolated CAE who underwent elective coronary angiography, reversible perfusion defects demonstrated by (99m)Tc-sestamibi scintigraphy were rather prevalent, mostly mild, more likely to affect the basal and mid-segments of the myocardium, and more frequently associated with diffuse ectasia.

  7. Radionuclide bone scanning in neuroblastoma: skeletal metastases and primary tumor localization of /sup 99m/Tc-MDP

    SciTech Connect

    Podrasky, A.E.; Stark, D.D.; Hattner, R.S.; Gooding, C.A.; Moss, A.A.

    1983-09-01

    Of 42 radionuclide bone scans in 35 children with neuroblastoma, 21 were abnormal for the presence of skeletal metastases. Of the 21 abnormal scans, 16 were corroborated by positive bone-marrow biopsy or clinical data. The false-negative and false-positive rates for bone scanning were 4.8% and 9.5%, respectively. Calcification of the primary tumor was seen on pretreatment computed tomographic (CT) scans in 24 (89%) of 27 cases, while only 13 (48%) of 27 were detectable by plain radiographs. Uptake of /sup 99m/Tc methylene diphosphate /sup 99m/Tc-MDP) by the primary tumor occurred in 20 of 27 cases, but correlation between tumor uptake and calcification was not statistically significant. All children with markedly elevated urinary vanillylmandelic acid exhibited primary tumor uptake. Survival was not affected independently by primary tumor uptake.

  8. Loosening of the total knee arthroplasty: detection by radionuclide bone scanning. [/sup 99m/Tc-methylene diphosphonate

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, J.C.; Hattner, R.S.; Murray, W.R.; Genant, H.K.

    1980-07-01

    Pain after total knee arthroplasty is a common clinical problem in orthopedics, and prosthetic loosening, often requiring surgical revision, is usually the etiology. Since standard clinical and radiographic diagnostic measures have not proven totally satisfactory, a study of the utility of bone scintigraphy to assess stability of the knee prosthesis was done. Thirty-five patients with 39 prostheses were studied. Seventeen patients with 21 total knee arthroplasties served as controls and were asymptomatic, were stable at surgery, or improved with conservative management. Eighteen knees in 18 symptomatic patients composed the experimental group. Of these, 11 knees were loose at surgery and seven have had surgery recommended. Scintigrams of the knees were obtained using /sup 99m/Tc-MDP, and ranked 0-3 corresponding to increasingly abnormal localization by three observers. Highly significant differences were observed between the abnormal and control groups (p<0.001). Reciprocal changes in sensitivity and specificity with increasingly stringent criteria were shown. While it is apparent that the bone scan cannot be used as the sole diagnostic method for evaluation of prosthetic stability, it does seem to be a useful adjunct along with clinical criteria and radiographic studies.

  9. Role of radionuclide imaging in the diagnosis of acute osteomyelitis

    SciTech Connect

    Demopulos, G.A.; Bleck, E.E.; McDougall, I.R.

    1988-09-01

    Over the last decade, the role of nuclear medicine studies in the diagnosis of acute osteomyelitis has been discussed in depth in the literature. Yet, the respective roles played in this setting by each of the commonly used radionuclide studies often are confusing. In an attempt to develop a cogent diagnostic strategy, we reviewed the literature published within the last 12 years pertaining to the use of radiophosphate bone scintigraphy as well as gallium and indium WBC imaging in the diagnosis of this condition. Based on our findings, we propose an alternative approach to the evaluation of a patient with suspected acute osteomyelitis. 63 references.

  10. The role of 18FDG, 18FDOPA PET/CT and 99mTc bone scintigraphy imaging in Erdheim-Chester disease.

    PubMed

    García-Gómez, F J; Acevedo-Báñez, I; Martínez-Castillo, R; Tirado-Hospital, J L; Cuenca-Cuenca, J I; Pachón-Garrudo, V M; Álvarez-Pérez, R M; García-Jiménez, R; Rivas-Infante, E; García-Morillo, J S; Borrego-Dorado, I

    2015-08-01

    Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD) is a rare non-Langerhans cell histiocitosis, characterized by multisystemic xanthogranulomatous infiltration by foamy histiocytes that stain positively for CD68 marker but not express CD1a and S100 proteins. Etiology and pathogenesis are still unknown and only about 500 cases are related in the literature. Multisystemic involvement leads to a wide variety of clinical manifestations that results in a poor prognosis although recent advances in treatment. We present the clinical, nuclear medicine findings and therapeutic aspects of a serie of 6 patients with histopathological diagnosis of ECD, who have undergone both bone scintigraphy (BS) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18FDG)-PET/CT scans in our institution. A complementary 18F-fluorodopa (18FDOPA)-PET/CT was performed in one case. Three different presentations of the disease were observed in our casuistic: most indolent form was a cutaneous confined disease, presented in only one patient. Multifocal involvement with central nervous system (CNS) preservation was observed in two patients. Most aggressive form consisted in a systemic involvement with CNS infiltration, presented in three patients. In our experience neurological involvement, among one case with isolate pituitary infiltration, was associated with mortality in all cases. 18FDG-PET/CT and BS were particularly useful in despite systemic involvement; locate the site for biopsy and the treatment response evaluation. By our knowledge, 18FDOPA-PET/CT not seems useful in the initial staging of ECD. A baseline 18FDG-PET/CT and BS may help in monitoring the disease and could be considered when patients were incidentally diagnosed and periodically 18FDG-PET/CT must be performed in the follow up to evaluate treatment response.

  11. Bayesian meta-analysis of test accuracy in the absence of a perfect reference test applied to bone scintigraphy for the diagnosis of complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Held, Ulrike; Brunner, Florian; Steurer, Johann; Wertli, Maria M

    2015-11-01

    There is conflicting evidence about the accuracy of bone scintigraphy (BS) for the diagnosis of complex regional pain syndrome 1 (CRPS 1). In a meta-analysis of diagnostic studies, the evaluation of test accuracy is impeded by the use of different imperfect reference tests. The aim of our study is to summarize sensitivity and specificity of BS for CRPS 1 and to identify factors to explain heterogeneity. We use a hierarchical Bayesian approach to model test accuracy and threshold, and we present different models accounting for the imperfect nature of the reference tests, and assuming conditional dependence between BS and the reference test results. Further, we include disease duration as explanatory variable in the model. The models are compared using summary ROC curves and the deviance information criterion (DIC). Our results show that those models which account for different imperfect reference tests with conditional dependence and inclusion of the covariate are the ones with the smallest DIC. The sensitivity of BS was 0.87 (95% credible interval 0.73-0.97) and the overall specificity was 0.87 (0.73-0.95) in the model with the smallest DIC, in which missing values of the covariate are imputed within the Bayesian framework. The estimated effect of duration of symptoms on the threshold parameter was 0.17 (-0.25 to 0.57). We demonstrate that the Bayesian models presented in this paper are useful to address typical problems occurring in meta-analysis of diagnostic studies, including conditional dependence between index test and reference test, as well as missing values in the study-specific covariates. PMID:26479506

  12. Three-phase radionuclide bone scanning in evaluation of local radiation injury. A case report

    SciTech Connect

    Mettler, F.A. Jr.; Monsein, L.; Davis, M.; Rosenberg, R.; Kelsey, C.; Listrom, M.

    1987-10-01

    The management of local radiation injuries is influenced by the degree of vascular compromise within the skin and underlying tissues. Other authors have used thermography and angiography in assessing the blood flow to radiation damaged tissues. This report describes the use of radionuclide imaging in the evaluation of a patient who developed necrosis of his distal digits following a radiation accident. In addition to determining the vascular status of the hands, imaging helped indicate an appropriate level for amputation.

  13. Clinical Value of 99Tcm-MDP SPECT Bone Scintigraphy in the Diagnosis of Unilateral Condylar Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Bing; Shen, Ying; Wang, Chang-Yin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the clinical value of 99Tcm-MDP SPECT for the diagnosis of unilateral condylar hyperplasia (UCH). Methods. One hundred forty-nine patients who underwent mandibular 99Tcm-MDP SPECT between January 2009 and December 2012 were studied, including 105 cases that were clinically suspected of UCH and 44 comparable cases without UCH as a control group. Results. Increased bone activity was observed in the affected condyles for all UCH patients. In the UCH group, the relative percentage uptake on the affected side was 59% (SD ± 4.3%), significantly higher than the 41% (SD ± 4.1%) uptake on the contralateral side (P<0.001). Similarly, the condyle/skull ratio was significantly higher for the affected side (1.66 ± 0.63) than for the contralateral side (1.34 ± 0.34, P < 0.01. No significant difference was found in the control group between the left and right condyles. Values for the sensitivity (95%), specificity (61%), positive (84.4%) and negative (84.6%) predictive values, and accuracy (84.5%) for 99Tcm-MDP SPECT in the diagnosis of UCH were calculated. However, for the hyperplastic condyle, no correlation was observed between the thickness of each cartilage layer and the relative uptake in the SPECT image. Conclusion. 99Tcm-MDP SPECT is accurate for diagnosing UCH and can provide a reference for treatment options. PMID:24901015

  14. Musculoskeletal scintigraphy of the equine athlete.

    PubMed

    Dyson, Sue

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear scintigraphic examination of equine athletes has a potentially important role in the diagnosis of lameness or poor performance, but increased radiopharmaceutical uptake (IRU) is not necessarily synonymous with pain causing lameness. Nuclear scintigraphy is highly sensitive to changes in bone turnover that may be induced by loading and knowledge of normal patterns of RU is crucial for accurate diagnosis. Blood pool images can be useful for identification of some soft tissue injuries, although acute bone injuries may also have intense IRU in blood pool images. Some muscle injuries may be associated with IRU in bone phase images. The use of scintigraphy together with other diagnostic imaging modalities has helped us to better understand the mechanisms of some musculoskeletal injuries. In immature racehorses, stress-related bone injury is a common finding and may be multifocal, whereas in mature sport horses, a very different spectrum of injuries may be identified. False-negative results are common with some injuries.

  15. Histochemical Phosphatases and Metachromasia in Murine Tumours Induced by Bone Seeking Radionuclides

    PubMed Central

    Bland, M. R.; Loutit, J. F.; Sansom, Janet M.

    1974-01-01

    Tumours induced in mice, either CBA normal and chimaerical, or C3H, by 90Sr or 226Ra or plutonium have been examined histochemically with (1) diazotate fast red violet LB salt in naphthol AS-MX phosphate buffer at pH 8·6 and 5·2, (2) 1: 9 dimethyl methylene blue (Taylor). It is concluded: (a) The diagnosis of osteosarcoma is facilitated with Taylor's Blue which stains osteoid metachromatically. Cells of osteosarcoma, like normal osteoblasts, contain alkaline phosphatase but this may be lost by mutation either in the original tumour or subsequently on passage of the tumour serially to compatible hosts. (b) Osteosarcomata may contain giant-cells of two forms, bizarre tumour cells and osteoclasts; the latter contain acid phosphatase. Osteosarcomata which retain their osteoid on serial passage have few cells containing acid phosphatases. (c) Primitive mesenchymal cell tumours of angiomatous form may occur, if the bone marrow is irradiated, e.g. by 90Sr-90Y and Pu. These tumours lack osteoid and cells interpretable as osteoblasts or osteoclasts (though they destroy bone). (d) Tumours classifiable as fibrosarcomata occur rarely, and may be truly of fibroblastic origin or be mutated osteosarcomata. (e) Lymphomata also occur when the marrow is irradiated (90Sr-90Y and Pu). They may be generalized, when their cells may contain alkaline phosphatase or lack it. They may be localized to abdominal viscera, the reticulo-sarcomatous form, in which case the cells lack alkaline phosphatase. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 3Fig. 5Fig. 8Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 2Fig. 4Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 9Fig. 12 PMID:4133784

  16. Thallium 201 Scintigraphy

    PubMed Central

    McKillop, James H.

    1980-01-01

    The radioactive isotope thallium 201 behaves physiologically as a potassium analog, and when injected intravenously accumulates rapidly within the cells of many organs. Uptake of the isotope reflects both regional perfusion and sodium-potassium pump activity. The radionuclide emits 80 keV x-rays which are suitable for scintillation camera imaging. The main clinical application of 201TI scintigraphy has been in myocardial imaging. Abnormal uptake of the isotope results in a cold spot on the myocardial image. In patients with coronary artery disease, the differentiation of ischemic and infarcted myocardium is made by comparing images obtained after injecting the radionuclide at the peak of a maximal exercise test with those obtained after injection at rest. Abnormalities due to ischemia usually are seen only on the stress image whereas fixed defects in both rest and stress studies usually indicate areas of infarction or scarring. Some investigators believe that redistribution images obtained four to six hours after stress injection (without administering further 201TI) give the same information as a separate rest study. The sensitivity of stress imaging for detecting significant coronary disease is of the order of 80 percent to 95 percent, though computer processing of the images may be necessary to achieve the higher figure. The prediction of the extent of coronary disease from 201TI images is less reliable. An abnormal 201TI image is not entirely specific for coronary artery disease and the likelihood of an abnormal image being due to this diagnosis varies according to the clinical circumstances. The main clinical value of 201TI myocardial imaging is likely to be in the noninvasive screening of patients with atypical chest pain or with ambiguous findings on stress electrocardiographic tests. It has also proved useful in studying patients with variant angina or following a coronary bypass operation. It is doubtful whether the technique is clinically helpful in most

  17. [Radioprotection and environmental pollution by the use of the radionuclides 89Sr, 186Re, and 153Sm for pain palliation in metastatic bone diseases. Related calculations].

    PubMed

    Sbonias, Evangelos

    2005-01-01

    Due to the fact that the existing commercial analgesic drugs are not able to reduce effectively the pain caused by the metastatic bone disease, the use of radiopharmaceuticals with avidity to selectively localize in the metastatic skeletal sites, such as strondium-89 chloride (89Sr-Cl2), rhenium-186-hydroxy ethylene diphosphonate (186Re-HEDP), and samarium-153-ethylene diamine tetramethylene (153Sm-EDTMP), is widely accepted. However this medical application may be dangerous for the occupied personnel and more for general public, if radioactive waste is not properly disposed. In the following article we try to estimate the degree and the significance of that risk. For that reason we discuss the physical properties of these radionuclides and their distribution in the body of the patient. We conclude that 89Sr is not harmful for the physician, the attending personnel or those who live with the patient, because it radiates beta-radiation, while its gamma-radiation is negligeable. The radionuclides 186Re and 153Sm besides beta-radiation, also emit a perceptible amount of gamma-radiation. It has been shown that the exposure to gamma-radiation from these radionuclides of the physician, the attending personnel or those who live with the patient is very low as compared to the internationally accepted radioprotection limits. However the environmental contamination per treatment by either of these three radionuclides is not negligeable in comparison to the national and international accepted limits. Patients that are not in good clinical condition may pose an additional contamination danger to those attending them. For limiting radiocontamination, the annual number of treatments by the above three previous radionuclides, should be considered according to the ALARA principle in relation with the correct handling of these patients, and also considering the fundamentals of radioprotection. PMID:16142246

  18. Radionuclide Imaging of Musculoskeletal Infection: A Review.

    PubMed

    Palestro, Christopher J

    2016-09-01

    There are numerous imaging tests for diagnosing musculoskeletal infection. Radiographs are routinely performed, because even when not diagnostic, they provide an anatomic overview of the region of interest that could influence subsequent procedure selection and interpretation. MRI is sensitive and provides superb anatomic detail. Bone scintigraphy accurately diagnoses osteomyelitis in bones not affected by underlying conditions. (67)Ga is used primarily for spondylodiskitis. Although in vitro labeled leukocyte imaging is the radionuclide test of choice for complicating osteomyelitis such as diabetic pedal osteomyelitis and prosthetic joint infection, it is not useful for spondylodiskitis. Antigranulocyte antibodies and antibody fragments have limitations and are not widely available. (111)In-biotin is useful for spondylodiskitis. Radiolabeled synthetic fragments of the antimicrobial peptide ubiquicidin are promising infection-specific agents. (18)F-FDG is the radiopharmaceutical of choice for spondylodiskitis. Its role in diabetic pedal osteomyelitis and prosthetic joint infection is not established. Preliminary data suggest (68)Ga may be useful in musculoskeletal infection. (124)I-fialuridine initially showed promise as an infection-specific radiopharmaceutical, but subsequent investigations were disappointing. The development of PET/CT and SPECT/CT imaging systems, which combine anatomic and functional imaging, has revolutionized diagnostic imaging. These hybrid systems are redefining the diagnostic workup of patients with suspected or known infection and inflammation by improving diagnostic accuracy and influencing patient management. PMID:27390160

  19. Nuclear magnetic resonance proton imaging of bone pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Atlan, H.; Sigal, R.; Hadar, H.; Chisin, R.; Cohen, I.; Lanir, A.; Soudry, M.; Machtey, Y.; Schreiber, R.; Benmair, J.

    1986-02-01

    Thirty-two patients with diversified pathology were examined with a supraconductive NMR imager using spin echo with different TR and TE to obtain T1 and T2 weighted images. They included 20 tumors (12 primary, eight metastasis), six osteomyelitis, three fractures, two osteonecrosis, and one diffuse metabolic (Gaucher) disease. In all cases except for the stress fractures, the bone pathology was clearly visualized in spite of the normal lack of signal from the compact cortical bone. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging proved to be at least as sensitive as radionuclide scintigraphy but much more accurate than all other imaging procedures including computed tomography (CT) and angiography to assess the extension of the lesions, especially in tumors extended to soft tissue. This is due both to easy acquisition of sagittal and coronal sections and to different patterns of pathologic modifications of T1 and T2 which are beginning to be defined. It is hoped that more experience in clinical use of these patterns will help to discriminate between tumor extension and soft-tissue edema. We conclude that while radionuclide scintigraphy will probably remain the most sensitive and easy to perform screening test for bone pathology, NMR imaging, among noninvasive diagnostic procedures, appears to be at least as specific as CT. In addition, where the extension of the lesions is concerned, NMR imaging is much more informative than CT. In pathology of the spine, the easy visualization of the spinal cord should decrease the need for myelography.

  20. Renal scintigraphy in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Tyson, Reid; Daniel, Gregory B

    2014-01-01

    Renal scintigraphy is performed commonly in dogs and cats and has been used in a variety of other species. In a 2012 survey of the members of the Society of Veterinary Nuclear Medicine, 95% of the respondents indicated they perform renal scintigraphy in their practice. Renal scintigraphy is primarily used to assess renal function and to evaluate postrenal obstruction. This article reviews how renal scintigraphy is used in veterinary medicine and describes the methods of analysis. Species variation is also discussed.

  1. Congenital renal anomaly: evaluation with 99mTc-dimercaptosuccinic acid renal scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Hosokawa, S.; Kawamura, J.; Tomoyoshi, T.; Yoshida, O.

    1983-05-01

    Technetium 99m-2,3, dimercaptosuccinic acid (99mTc-DMSA) preferentially accumulates in the renal cortex, demonstrating functioning cortical mass. We used 99mTc-DMSA renal scintigraphy in ten patients with horseshoe kidneys and five patients with unilateral fused kidneys. The results show that 99mTc-DMSA renal scintigraphy reliably establishes the diagnosis of horseshoe kidney and clearly shows the isthmus, which is very essential for proper management. The technique also aids in the definitive assessment of separate kidney function and of total radionuclide uptake is possible using 99mTc-DMSA scintigraphy.

  2. Radionuclide Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalutsky, M. R.

    Radionuclide therapy utilizes unsealed sources of radionuclides as a treatment for cancer or other pathological conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis. Radionuclides that decay by the emission of β and α particles, as well as those that emit Auger electrons, have been used for this purpose. In this chapter, radiochemical aspects of radionuclide therapy, including criteria for radionuclide selection, radionuclide production, radiolabeling chemistry, and radiation dosimetry are discussed.

  3. Indium-111 leukocyte scintigraphy in Wegener's granulomatosis involving the spleen

    SciTech Connect

    Morayati, S.J.; Fink-Bennett, D.

    1986-12-01

    Indium-111-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy was performed on a 44-yr-old man to exclude an occult abscess. Four- and twenty-four-hour images of the abdomen revealed splenic photopenia except for a rim of activity medially. A subsequent computed tomography (CT) study demonstrated necrosis or hemorrhage of the spleen except for a medial rim. Exploratory laparotomy demonstrated necrotizing vasculitis with granuloma formation consistent with Wegener's granulomatosis and a rim of viable splenic tissue corresponding to the radionuclide and CT studies.

  4. Hit rates and radiation doses to nuclei of bone lining cells from alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polig, E.; Jee, W. S.; Kruglikov, I. L.

    1992-01-01

    Factors relating the local concentration of a bone-seeking alpha-particle emitter to the mean hit rate have been determined for nuclei of bone lining cells using a Monte Carlo procedure. Cell nuclei were approximated by oblate spheroids with dimensions and location taken from a previous histomorphometric study. The Monte Carlo simulation is applicable for planar and diffuse labels at plane or cylindrical bone surfaces. Additionally, the mean nuclear dose per hit, the dose mean per hit, the mean track segment length and its second moment, the percentage of stoppers, and the frequency distribution of the dose have been determined. Some basic features of the hit statistics for bone lining cells have been outlined, and the consequences of existing standards of radiation protection with regard to the hit frequency to cell nuclei are discussed.

  5. Diagnosis of osteomyelitis of the foot in diabetic patients: Value of 111In-leukocyte scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Larcos, G.; Brown, M.L.; Sutton, R.T. )

    1991-09-01

    The noninvasive diagnosis of osteomyelitis of the foot in diabetic patients with currently available radiologic and radionuclide imaging techniques is often difficult. Recently, 111In-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy has been proposed as an attractive alternative. Accordingly, the authors retrospectively reviewed 51 111In-labeled leukocyte scans, 49 technetium-99m bone scans, and 49 plain radiographs obtained in 51 adults with diabetes in whom osteomyelitis of the foot was suspected. The sensitivity and specificity of these techniques were evaluated in all patients, as well as in a subgroup of 11 patients with neuroarthropathy. Results with 111In-labeled leukocyte scans were also examined in subsets of patients with soft-tissue ulcers (n = 35) and those receiving antibiotics during investigation (n = 20). Confirmation or exclusion of osteomyelitis was made surgically in 28 patients and clinically in 23. Fourteen patients had osteomyelitis. Bone scans were most sensitive (93%) but least specific (43%); plain radiographs were most specific (83%) but least sensitive (43%). 111In-labeled leukocyte scans were both sensitive (79%) and specific (78%), and remained useful in patients with neuroarthropathy, soft-tissue ulcers, and antibiotic treatment. Poor spatial resolution contributed to the false-negative and false-positive 111In-labeled leukocyte scans, suggesting that this technique should not be interpreted independent of other tests. 111In-labeled leukocyte scans are a valuable diagnostic tool for the diagnosis of pedal osteomyelitis in diabetic patients.

  6. Vesicoureteral Reflux Detected with 99mTc-DTPA Renal Scintigraphy during Evaluation of Renal Function

    PubMed Central

    Manevska, Nevena; Stojanoski, Sinisa; Majstorov, Venjamin; Pop-Gjorcheva, Daniela; Zdraveska, Nikolina; Kuzmanovska, Dafina

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Radionuclide techniques, as direct radionuclide cystography and 99mTc-DMSA scintigraphy, have been used in evaluation of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) and reflux nephropathy (RN) in children. Dynamic 99mTc-DTPA scintigraphy is reserved for evaluation of differential renal function and obstruction in children, where hydronephrosis is detected by ultrasonography (US) pre- or postnatally. CASE REPORT: Six year old boy was prenatally diagnosed with bilateral hydronephrosis. Postnatal, severe bilateral VUR was detected by voiding urethrocytography. US and 99mTc-DTPA scintigraphy performed in the first month of life showed small left kidney that participated with 2% in the global renal function. Bilateral cutaneous ureterostomy has been performed in order to obtain good renal drainage and promote optimal renal growth. Twelve months later, classic antireflux procedure was done. Control 99mTc-DTPA scintigraphy, 5 ys after antireflux surgery, revealed persisting radioactivity during the diuretic phase, in the left kidney that indicated antireflux procedure failure with VUR reappearance. CONCLUSION: 99mTc-DTPA scintigraphy is the first method of choice for long-term monitoring of individual kidney function in children with VUR and other congenital urinary tract anomalies. Additionally, it can be used as indirect radionuclide cystography when rising of radioactivity in the kidney region, during the diuretic phase can indicate presence of VUR. PMID:27275347

  7. Tc-99m polyclonal human immunoglobulin scintigraphy in brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Kadanali, A; Varoglu, E; Kerek, M; Tasyaran, M A

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of Tc-99m polyclonal human immunoglobulin (HIG) scintigraphy for the diagnosis of brucellosis, and to compare its effectiveness in the diagnosis of osteoarticular involvement in comparison with bone scanning. Of 30 patients with brucellosis, Tc-99m HIG detected osteoarticular involvement in 18 (60%) patients, in whom the sacroiliac joints were affected most commonly (n = 13; 72.2%), with statistically predominant bilateral involvement (p < 0.05). By bone scanning, the rate of osteoarticular involvement was 70% (21 of 30 patients), and the joints affected most commonly were sacroiliac (15 of 21 patients; 71.4%). Although bilateral involvement was observed mostly by bone scanning, there was no significant difference between the rate of bilateral and unilateral involvement. The anatomical distribution of osteoarticular complications, as detected by Tc-99m HIG and bone scintigraphy, did not differ significantly. With Tc-99m HIG, orchitis was detected in two patients and paravertebral abscess in one patient. Since bone scanning did not detect these soft tissue complications, Tc-99m HIG scintigraphy might be useful for the detection of both osteoarticular and soft tissue complications resulting from brucellosis.

  8. Radionuclide trap

    DOEpatents

    McGuire, Joseph C.

    1978-01-01

    The deposition of radionuclides manganese-54, cobalt-58 and cobalt-60 from liquid sodium coolant is controlled by providing surfaces of nickel or high nickel alloys to extract the radionuclides from the liquid sodium, and by providing surfaces of tungsten, molybdenum or tantalum to prevent or retard radionuclide deposition.

  9. Use of Marrow Scintigraphy to Confirm Compensatory Marrow Rather than Active Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Bartel, Twyla B; Yarbrough, Tracy L; De Blanche, Lorraine E

    2016-09-01

    We present the case of a 40-year-old male with multiple myeloma for whom bone marrow scintigraphy was utilized to help differentiate between active bony myelomatous disease versus treated lesions with compensatory marrow uptake. This case demonstrates technetium (Tc-99m) sulfur colloid imaging as an inexpensive technique to quickly distinguish between active focal bone disease and reactive marrow. PMID:27651743

  10. Use of Marrow Scintigraphy to Confirm Compensatory Marrow Rather than Active Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Bartel, Twyla B.; Yarbrough, Tracy L.; De Blanche, Lorraine E.

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 40-year-old male with multiple myeloma for whom bone marrow scintigraphy was utilized to help differentiate between active bony myelomatous disease versus treated lesions with compensatory marrow uptake. This case demonstrates technetium (Tc-99m) sulfur colloid imaging as an inexpensive technique to quickly distinguish between active focal bone disease and reactive marrow. PMID:27651743

  11. Use of Marrow Scintigraphy to Confirm Compensatory Marrow Rather than Active Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Bartel, Twyla B.; Yarbrough, Tracy L.; De Blanche, Lorraine E.

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 40-year-old male with multiple myeloma for whom bone marrow scintigraphy was utilized to help differentiate between active bony myelomatous disease versus treated lesions with compensatory marrow uptake. This case demonstrates technetium (Tc-99m) sulfur colloid imaging as an inexpensive technique to quickly distinguish between active focal bone disease and reactive marrow.

  12. Bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmberger, Thomas K.; Hoffmann, Ralf-Thorsten

    The typical clinical signs in bone tumours are pain, destruction and destabilization, immobilization, neurologic deficits, and finally functional impairment. Primary malignant bone tumours are a rare entity, accounting for about 0.2% of all malignancies. Also benign primary bone tumours are in total rare and mostly asymptomatic. The most common symptomatic benign bone tumour is osteoid osteoma with an incidence of 1:2000.

  13. Radionuclide imaging of the urinary tract

    SciTech Connect

    Velchik, M.G.

    1985-11-01

    This article describes the role of nuclear medicine in the evaluation of the genitourinary tract. The technical aspects of radionuclide imaging (radiopharmaceuticals, radiation dosimetry, instrumentation, and method) are briefly presented, and each of the indications for renal scintigraphy--including the evaluation of differential renal function, hypertension, obstruction, renal transplants, masses, trauma, congenital anomalies, vesicoureteral reflux, and infection--are discussed. The relative advantages and disadvantages of radionuclide imaging with respect to alternative radiographic examinations (such as intravenous urography, ultrasonography, CT, angiography, and magnetic resonance imaging) are emphasized wherever applicable. 136 references.

  14. Nuclear medicine imaging of bone infections.

    PubMed

    Love, C; Palestro, C J

    2016-07-01

    Osteomyelitis is a broad group of infectious diseases that involve the bone and/or bone marrow. It can arise haematogenously, via extension from a contiguous infection, or by direct inoculation during surgery or trauma. The diagnosis is not always obvious and imaging tests are frequently performed as part of the diagnostic work-up. Commonly performed radionuclide tests include technetium-99m ((99m)Tc)-diphosphonate bone scintigraphy (bone), and gallium-67 ((67)Ga) and in vitro labelled leukocyte (white blood cell; WBC) imaging. Although they are useful, each of these tests has limitations. Bone scintigraphy is sensitive but not specific, especially when underlying osseous abnormalities are present. (67)Ga accumulates in tumour, trauma, and in aseptic inflammation; furthermore, there is typically an interval of 1-3 days between radiopharmaceutical injection of and imaging. Currently, this agent is used primarily for spinal infections. Except for the spine, WBC imaging is the nuclear medicine test of choice for diagnosing complicating osteomyelitis. The in vitro leukocyte labelling process requires skilled personnel, is laborious, and is not always available. Complementary marrow imaging is usually required to maximise accuracy. Not surprisingly, alternative radiopharmaceuticals are continuously being investigated. Radiolabelled anti-granulocyte antibodies and antibody fragments, investigated as in vivo leukocyte labelling agents, have their own limitations and are not widely available. (111)In-biotin is useful for diagnosing spinal infections. Radiolabelled synthetic fragments of ubiquicidin, a naturally occurring human antimicrobial peptide that targets bacteria, have shown promise as infection specific radiopharmaceuticals. 2-[(18)F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) positron-emission tomography (PET) with or without computed tomography (CT) is very useful in musculoskeletal infection. Sensitivities of more than 95% and specificities ranging from 75-99% have been

  15. Prognostic value of radionuclide exercise testing after myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Schocken, D.D.

    1984-08-01

    Abnormal systolic ventricular function and persistent ischemia are sensitive indicators of poor prognosis following myocardial infarction. The use of exercise improves the utility of both radionuclide ventriculography and myocardial perfusion scintigraphy in the identification of postinfarction patients at high risk of subsequent cardiac events. 51 references.

  16. Liver scintigraphy in ponies

    SciTech Connect

    Theodorakis, M.C.; Bermudez, A.J.; Manning, J.P.; Koritz, G.D.; Hillidge, C.J.

    1982-09-01

    Six derivatives of ethylenediamine-N,N'-bis (alpha-2-hydroxy phenyl) acetic acid labeled with /sup 99m/Tc were prepared and their imaging qualities evaluated in ponies. The 6 agents produced good scintigraphic images of certain structures of the liver in the pony. For each agent, 13 different scans were taken. Dorsal views of the left lateral, right lateral, and quadrate lobe were obtained with dorsal scans. Left lateral and left lateral oblique (45 degrees) scans provided a left lateral view of the left lobe and a medial view of the right lateral lobe. Right lateral scans revealed the right lateral and quadrate lobes. Administration of /sup 99m/Tc-labeled colloids which are commonly used in other species for liver scintigraphy resulted in extensive lung uptake in the pony.

  17. Nuclear cardiograph and scintigraphy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclaughlin, P.

    1975-01-01

    Extensive advances in the technology of detectors, data analysis systems, and tracers used have resulted in greatly expanded applications of radioisotopes to the assessment of cardiac function and disease. The development of nuclear cardiology has proceeded along four lines: (1) radionuclide angiography, (2) myocardial perfusion imaging, (3) intracoronary microsphere imaging, and (4) regional myocardial blood flow determination using inert gases.

  18. Liver scintigraphy in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Morandi, Federica

    2014-01-01

    The most common veterinary application of liver scintigraphy is for the diagnosis of portosystemic shunts (PSSs). There has been a continual evolution of nuclear medicine techniques for diagnosis of PSS, starting in the early 1980s. Currently, transplenic portal scintigraphy using pertechnetate or (99m)Tc-mebrofenin is the technique of choice. This technique provides both anatomical and functional information about the nature of the PSS, with high sensitivity and specificity. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy has also been used in veterinary medicine for the evaluation of liver function and biliary patency. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy provides information about biliary patency that complements finding in ultrasound, which may not be able to differentiate between biliary ductal dilation from previous obstruction vs current obstruction. Hepatocellular function can also be determined by deconvolutional analysis of hepatic uptake or by measuring the clearance of the radiopharmaceutical from the plasma. Plasma clearance of the radiopharmaceutical can be directly measured from serial plasma samples, as in the horse, or by measuring changes in cardiac blood pool activity by region of interest analysis of images. The objective of this paper is to present a summary of the reported applications of hepatobiliary scintigraphy in veterinary medicine.

  19. Radionuclide cisternogram

    MedlinePlus

    ... please enable JavaScript. A radionuclide cisternogram is a nuclear scan test. It is used to diagnose problems ... damage. The amount of radiation used during the nuclear scan is very small. Almost all of the ...

  20. Radionuclide therapy beyond radioiodine.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Michael

    2012-10-01

    For decades, Iodine-131 has been used for the treatment of patients with thyroid cancer. In recent years, increasingly, other radiopharmaceuticals are in clinical use in the treatment of various malignant diseases. Although in principle these therapies-as in all applications of radionuclides-special radiation protection measures are required, a separate nuclear medicine therapy department is not necessary in many cases due to the lower or lack of gamma radiation. In the following article, four different radionuclide therapies are more closely presented which are emerging in the last years. One of them is the "Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy," the so-called PRRT in which radiolabeled somatostatin (SST)-receptor(R) ligands are used in patients with neuroendocrine tumors. On the basis of radiolabeled antibodies against CD20-positive cells, the so-called radioimmunotherapy is used in the treatment of certain forms of malignant lymphoma. In primary or secondary liver tumors, the (90)Y-labeled particles can be administered. Last but not the least, the palliative approach of bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals is noted in patients with painful bone metastases.

  1. Thyroid scintigraphy in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Gregory B; Neelis, Dana A

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid scintigraphy is performed in cats and dogs and has been used to a limited degree in other species such as the horse. Thyroid scintigraphy is most commonly used to aid in the diagnosis and treatment management of feline hyperthyroidism but is also used in the evaluation of canine hypothyroidism and canine thyroid carcinoma. This article reviews the normal scintigraphic appearance of the thyroid in the cat, the dog, and the horse and the principles of interpretation of abnormal scan results in the cat and the dog. Radioiodine is the treatment of choice for feline hyperthyroidism, and the principles of its use in the cat are reviewed.

  2. Lung scintigraphy in differential diagnosis of peripheral lung cancer and community-acquired pneumonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivonogov, Nikolay G.; Efimova, Nataliya Y.; Zavadovsky, Konstantin W.; Lishmanov, Yuri B.

    2016-08-01

    Ventilation/perfusion lung scintigraphy was performed in 39 patients with verified diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and in 14 patients with peripheral lung cancer. Ventilation/perfusion ratio, apical-basal gradients of ventilation (U/L(V)) and lung perfusion (U/L(P)), and alveolar capillary permeability of radionuclide aerosol were determined based on scintigraphy data. The study demonstrated that main signs of CAP were increases in ventilation/perfusion ratio, perfusion and ventilation gradient on a side of the diseased lung, and two-side increase in alveolar capillary permeability rate for radionuclide aerosol. Unlike this, scintigraphic signs of peripheral lung cancer comprise an increase in ventilation/perfusion ratio over 1.0 on a side of the diseased lung with its simultaneous decrease on a contralateral side, normal values of perfusion and ventilation gradients of both lungs, and delayed alveolar capillary clearance in the diseased lung compared with the intact lung.

  3. 10 CFR Appendix B to Part 20 - Annual Limits on Intake (ALIs) and Derived Air Concentrations (DACs) of Radionuclides for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    .... wall = stomach wall; Blad wall = bladder wall; and Bone surf = bone surface.) The use of the ALIs... radionuclide named, but also include contributions from the in-growth of any daughter radionuclide produced...

  4. 10 CFR Appendix B to Part 20 - Annual Limits on Intake (ALIs) and Derived Air Concentrations (DACs) of Radionuclides for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    .... wall = stomach wall; Blad wall = bladder wall; and Bone surf = bone surface.) The use of the ALIs... radionuclide named, but also include contributions from the in-growth of any daughter radionuclide produced...

  5. Gallium scintigraphy in acute panniculitis

    SciTech Connect

    Choy, D.; Murray, I.P.C.; Ford, J.C.

    1981-11-01

    Gallium scintigraphy was performed in a 27-yr-old female in search of a possible occult focus of infection; it showed an unusual diffuse superficial accumulation in the thighs and buttocks. Biopsy of an area of abnormal uptake showed lobular panniculitis which, in the clinical context, led to the diagnosis of Weber-Christian syndrome.

  6. Radionuclide evaluation of lung trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Lull, R.J.; Tatum, J.L.; Sugerman, H.J.; Hartshorne, M.F.; Boll, D.A.; Kaplan, K.A.

    1983-07-01

    Nuclear medicine imaging procedures can play a significant role in evaluating the pulmonary complications that are seen in trauma patients. A quantitative method for measuring increased pulmonary capillary permeability that uses Tc-99m HSA allows early diagnosis of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and accurately differentiates this condition from pneumonia or cardiogenic pulmonary edema. This technique may be of great value in following the response to therapy. The use of 133Xe to diagnose inhalation injury remains an important diagnostic tool, particularly at hospitals with specialized burn units. Regional decreases in ventilation-perfusion images reliably localize aspirated foreign bodies. Radionuclide techniques that are used to demonstrate gastropulmonary aspiration remain controversial and require further clinical evaluation. Pulmonary perfusion imaging, although nonspecific, may provide the earliest clue for correct diagnosis of fat embolism, air embolism, contusion, or laceration. Furthermore, the possibility of perfusion abnormality due to these uncommon conditions must be remembered whenever trauma patients are evaluated for pulmonary thromboembolism with scintigraphy. Occasionally, liver or spleen scintigraphy may be the most appropriate procedure when penetrating chest trauma also involves these subdiaphragmatic organs.

  7. Osteoid osteoma simulating osteomyelitis: differentiation with Tc-99m HIG scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Türkölmez, Seyda; Cayir, Derya; Korkmaz, Meliha

    2006-04-01

    We present a case of osteoid osteoma with a history of mild pain, local swelling and point tenderness on the right lower leg. The diagnosis of osteoid osteoma was difficult due to the atypical clinical history and misleading radiological and bone scan findings. When it is difficult to differentiate an osteoid osteoma from osteomyelitis using CT, MRI or bone scan; HIG scintigraphy can be used to exclude an infection.

  8. Radionuclide removal

    SciTech Connect

    Sorg, T.J.

    1991-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency proposed new and revised regulations on radionuclide contaminants in drinking water in June 1991. During the 1980's, the Drinking Water Research Division, USEPA conducted a research program to evaluate various technologies to remove radium, uranium and radon from drinking water. The research consisted of laboratory and field studies conducted by USEPA, universities and consultants. The paper summarizes the results of the most significant projects completed. General information is also presented on the general chemistry of the three radionuclides. The information presented indicates that the most practical treatment methods for radium are ion exchange and lime-soda softening and reverse osmosis. The methods tested for radon are aeration and granular activated carbon and the methods for uranium are anion exchange and reverse osmosis.

  9. Scintigraphy of the salivary glands in Sjögen's syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Arrago, J P; Rain, J D; Brocheriou, C; Rocher, F

    1987-01-01

    Scintigraphy of the salivary glands with technetium-sodium pertechnetate (99mTc) was undertaken on 320 patients with oral dryness or connective tissue disease using a computer assisted method that gave quantitative results about the major salivary gland function. Compared with clinical and histological data, scintigraphy provides a sensitive method, even though it is not specific, for detecting minimal injuries to salivary glands in patients suspected of having Sjögen's syndrome. Moreover, it might differentiate between the Sjögen-like syndrome and the sequelae of radiotherapy in patients with bone marrow graft. Scintigraphy of the major salivary glands could therefore form part of the routine investigation of patients with Sjögen's syndrome. PMID:2828435

  10. Exercise thallium-201 scintigraphy in the diagnosis and prognosis of coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kotler, T.S.; Diamond, G.A. )

    1990-11-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the discriminant accuracy of exercise thallium-201 myocardial perfusion scintigraphy for the diagnosis and prognosis of patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease. This is a survey of the National Library of Medicine MEDLINE database. The key medical subject headings used were coronary disease, myocardial infarction, radionuclide imaging, and thallium. A total of 122 retrieved studies were considered relevant and were reviewed in depth. Only studies reporting both the sensitivity and specificity of thallium scintigraphy were analyzed. Discriminant accuracy for diagnosis and prognosis was summarized in terms of pooled sensitivity and specificity. Exercise thallium scintigraphy is useful in the noninvasive diagnosis of coronary artery disease, especially in patients with abnormal resting electrocardiograms, restricted exercise tolerance, and intermediate probability of having disease at the time of testing as well as of defining the prognosis of patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease, especially in those with previous myocardial infarction. Because of various shortcomings in the published record, however, the marginal discriminant accuracy and cost effectiveness of thallium scintigraphy compared with conventional clinical assessment and exercise electrocardiography remain controversial. 193 references.

  11. Photon deficient bone metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma with avid gallium-67 uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Tisdale, P.L.; Collier, B.D.; Isitman, A.T.; Hellman, R.S.; Reif, L.J.

    1985-12-01

    While bone metastases producing photon deficient defects on bone scintigraphy have previously been reported, this finding has not been emphasized for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Furthermore, ''filling-in'' of such photon deficient defects with 67Ga at skeletal sites of metastatic HCC has not been described. In this case report, the combination of a photon deficient defect on bone scintigraphy and avid accumulation of 67Ga in this same area was of value in confirming the diagnosis of metastatic HCC.

  12. Joint bone radiobiology workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Tomich, P.A.

    1991-01-01

    The Joint Bone Radiobiology Workshop was held on July 12--13, 1991 in Toronto, Canada. This document contains the papers presented at the meeting. The five sections were: Dose-effects, Endogenous Cofactors, Tumorigenesis, New Methods and Medical Implications. The papers covered risk assessment, tissue distribution of radionuclides, lifetime studies, biological half-lifes, the influence of age at time of exposure, tumor induction by different radionuclides, microscopic localization of radionuclides, and nuclear medicine issues including tissue distribution in the skeleton and bone marrow transplantation. (MHB)

  13. Normal gallbladder scintigraphy in acute cholecystitis

    SciTech Connect

    Ohrt, H.J.; Posalaky, I.P.; Shafer, R.B.

    1983-03-01

    Normal gallbladder scintigraphy occurs in 2 to 5% of reported patients with acute cholecystitis. Gallbladder visualization is found in patients with acalculous cholecystitis and in those with recent relief of cystic duct obstruction but persistence of inflammation. A patient is reported who had clinical and pathologic findings of acute cholecystitis but normal gallbladder visualization. This reemphasizes that the diagnosis of acute cholecystitis cannot be excluded by normal gallbladder scintigraphy.

  14. Biliary scintigraphy in acute pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Serafini, A.N.; Al-Sheikh, W.; Barkin, J.S.; Hourani, M.; Sfakiankis, G.; Clarke, L.P.; Ashkar, F.S.

    1982-08-01

    A prospective study was carried out in 60 patients to determine the efficacy of /sup 99m/Tc-PIPIDA scintigraphy in differentiating biliary pancreatitis from nonbiliary pancreatitis. Forty patients were classified as having biliary pancreatitis and 20 patients as having the nonbiliary type. Scintigraphic scans were divided into five main types according to the time to visualization of the gallbladder and the time to excretion of /sup 99m/Tc-PIPIDA into the intestinal tract. Normal scans were obtained on 95% of patients (19/20) with nonbiliary pancreatitis; 22.5% of patients (9/40) with biliary pancreatitis had normal scans. It is concluded that elevated amylase levels together with an abnormal biliary scan, as defined by the criteria presented here, indicate biliary pancreatitis, while a normal scan largely excludes such diagnosis.

  15. Biliary scintigraphy in acute pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Serafini, A.N.; Al-Sheikh, W.; Barkin, J.S.; Hourani, M.; Sfakiankis, G.; Clarke, L.P.; Ashkar, F.S.

    1982-08-01

    A prospective study was carried out in 60 patients to determine the efficacy of /sup 99//sup m/Tc-PIPIDA scintigraphy in differentiating biliary pancreatitis from nonbiliary pancreatitis. Forty patients were classified as having biliary pancreatitis and 20 patients as having the nonbiliary type. Scintigraphic scans were divided into five main types according to the time to visualization of the gallbladder and the time to excretion of /sup 99//sup m/Tc-PIPIDA into the intestinal tract. Normal scans were obtained in 95% of patients (19/20) with nonbiliary pancreatitis; 22.5% of patients (9/40) with biliary pancreatitis had normal scans. It is concluded that elevated amylase levels together with an abnormal biliary scan, as defined by the criteria presented here, indicate biliary pancreatitis, while a normal scan largely excludes such diagnosis.

  16. Whole-body (99m)Tc-octreotide scintigraphy with SPECT/CT to detect occult tumor inducing paraneoplastic osteomalacia.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Napoleão Ramalho; Calich, Ana Luisa; Etchebehere, Mauricio; Ichiki, Wilson Andre; Pereira, Fabio Payao; Amstalden, Elaine Maria Ingrid; de Sa Etchebehere, Elba Cristina

    2015-01-01

    A 32-year-old woman presented with progressive myalgia, bone pain, fatigue, insufficiency hip fractures, high urine phosphate, and low serum phosphate and vitamin D levels. These findings were suggestive of oncogenic osteomalacia. A whole-body Tc-octreotide scintigraphy with SPECT/CT showed uptake on a sclerotic intramedullary lesion in the left medial tibia plateau. MRI depicted a solid lesion. The lesion was surgically removed; the patient became asymptomatic, and follow-up laboratory results normalized. Histopathologic examination revealed a vascular hemangiopericytoma-like tumor, positive for somatostatin receptor (SSR-2). Whole-body Tc-octreotide scintigraphy with SPECT/CT may detect occult oncogenic osteomalacia tumors.

  17. Current imaging techniques in rheumatology: MRI, scintigraphy and PET

    PubMed Central

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Ćwikła, Jarosław B.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The first-line imaging technique for diagnosis inflammation in musculo-skeletal organs in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is planar X-ray examination, which was for many years the first and the only single tool for RA diagnostics and response evaluation. Today, in the era of more aggressive RA treatment, ultrasound examination (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are also frequently used. US is used to detect early signs of inflammation within the soft tissue. MRI allows to assess the soft tissue and bone marrow involvement in case of inflammation and/or infection. MRI is capable of detecting more inflammatory lesions and erosions than US, X-ray, or CT. Standard scintigraphy plays a crucial role, and data from positron emission tomography (PET) are also promising. These functional imaging techniques are used in detection of inflammation and/or infection in case of ambiguous results being obtained by other techniques or at other clinics. In patients with RA, scintigraphy plays a key role in the differential diagnosis of hip, knee, etc. endoprosthesis disorders, including mechanical or septic loosening. PMID:24115960

  18. SU-E-T-588: Optimization of Imaging Following 223Ra Administration in Targeted Alpha-Emitting Radionuclide Therapy of Bone Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Benabdallah, N; Bernardini, M; Desbree, A; Labriolle-Vaylet, C de; Franck, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: With a growing demand of alpha-emitting radiopharmaceuticals, especially Xofigo ({sup 223}RaCl{sub 2}) which is used in the treatment of metastatic bone disease, the optimization of dosimetry becomes necessary. Indeed, in Europe, as stated on the council directive 2013/59/euratom, exposures of target volumes for radiotherapeutic purposes shall be individually planned taking into account that doses to non-target volumes and tissues shall be as low as reasonably achievable. To that aim, the possibility of imaging {sup 223}Ra was first investigated. Methods: The experiments were conducted at the Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou with an Infinia Hawkeye 4 gamma camera, equipped with a medium-energy collimator. Imaging parameters, such as sensibility, spatial resolution and energy spectrum, were determined using several physical phantoms with a source of 6 MBq of {sup 223}Ra. Bone metastases were modeled with a NEMA Body Phantom to investigate image degradation based on the concentration of {sup 223}Ra. Results: The acquired energy spectrum allowed to visualize several photon peaks: at 85, 154 and 270 keV. Camera sensitivity measured from the phantom study was 102.3 cps/MBq for the 85 keV ± 20 %, 89.9 cps/MBq for the 154 ± 20 % window and 65.4 cps/MBq for the 270 ± 10 % window. The spatial resolution (full-width at half-maximum) was respectively 1.7, 1.9 and 1.8 cm for the three energy windows. SPECT/CT images of NEMA Body Phantom without and with attenuation have permitted to determine the best reconstruction parameters. Conclusion: This study has demonstrated that it is possible to obtain clinically relevant information from images of {sup 223}Ra. All these results will be valuable to analyze biodistribution imaging of the radiopharmaceutical in the patient body and go further in the reconstruction of patient images in order to personalize the dosimetry.

  19. Hepatic anomalous lobulation demonstrated by liver and hepatobiliary scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Arakawa, K.; Hoshi, H.; Jinnouchi, S.; Ono, S.; Kihara, Y.; Takeuchi, M.; Wakuta, Y.; Kakitsubata, Y.; Watanabe, K.

    1984-10-01

    The use of liver and hepatobiliary scintigraphy for evaluation of the hepatobiliary system in patients with hepatic disease is now widespread. In the present case, the usefulness of liver and hepatobiliary scintigraphy for the diagnosis of liver malformation is described.

  20. Gallbladder radionuclide scan

    MedlinePlus

    Radionuclide - gallbladder; Gallbladder scan; Biliary scan; Cholescintigraphy: HIDA; Hepatobiliary nuclear imaging scan ... small amount of morphine. This can help the radionuclide get into the gallbladder. The morphine may cause ...

  1. Radionuclide deposition control

    DOEpatents

    Brehm, William F.; McGuire, Joseph C.

    1980-01-01

    The deposition of radionuclides manganese-54, cobalt-58 and cobalt-60 from liquid sodium coolant is controlled by providing surfaces of nickel or high nickel alloys to extract the radionuclides from the liquid sodium, and by providing surfaces of tungsten, molybdenum or tantalum to prevent or retard radionuclide deposition.

  2. Bone multicentric epithelioid hemangioendothelioma of the lower and upper extremities with pulmonary metastases: A case report

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, HUA; FU, YANBIAO; YE, ZHAOMING

    2015-01-01

    The present study reports a rare case of bone multicentric epithelioid hemangioendothelioma (EH) involving the upper and lower extremities simultaneously, with visceral involvement of the lung. Osteolytic lesions were first identified in the right distal femur and proximal tibia. Slight increased radionuclide uptake was observed in the right shoulder joint on bone scintigraphy, however, this was ignored, as no clinical symptoms were present. The patient was initially misdiagnosed with multifocal chondroblastoma, and an extra-articular curettage of lesions was performed in the proximal tibia and medial femoral condyle, which was filled with bone cement. The histopathological diagnosis was corrected post-operatively following immunohistochemical analysis, which indicated EH, and subsequently, an amputation of the right leg at thigh level was performed. In addition, multiple lytic lesions in the right shoulder joint and pulmonary metastases were identified on whole-body radiological examination. Radiotherapy was administered to the right shoulder joint, however, the patient refused chemotherapy or further surgery. At 15 months after the initial surgery, the patient currently remains alive. This case indicates that an improved understanding with regard to the clinical features of this disease may prevent misdiagnosis and improve EH treatment. PMID:26137035

  3. Incidental Warthin Tumor on Pertechnetate Scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Mukta; Shetkar, Shubhangi; Joshi, Prathamesh; Kasaliwal, Sanket; Chaudhari, Shrikant

    2016-09-01

    A 30-year-old woman underwent Tc-pertechnetate scintigraphy for evaluation of thyrotoxicosis. The scintigraphy revealed hypervascular thyroid gland with markedly increased trapping function in both the lobes suggesting diagnosis of Graves disease. Incidentally, a hypervascular and pertechnetate avid focus was seen along the lateral margin of the right parotid gland. Pertechnetate avidity and site of uptake suggested possibility of Warthin tumor. Clinical examination and ultrasonography revealed a well-defined lesion in the superficial lobe of the right parotid gland favoring diagnosis of benign lesion. Postsurgery specimen confirmed diagnosis of Warthin tumor. PMID:27405035

  4. Guidelines for radioiodinated MIBG scintigraphy in children.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Pierre; Colarinha, Paula; Fettich, Jure; Fischer, Sibylle; Frökier, Jörgen; Giammarile, Francesco; Gordon, Isky; Hahn, Klaus; Kabasakal, Levent; Mann, Mike; Mitjavila, Mercedes; Piepsz, Amy; Porn, Ute; Sixt, Rune; van Velzen, Jeannette

    2003-05-01

    These guidelines on the use of radioiodinated (99m)Tc-MIBG scintigraphy in children, which summarise the views of the Paediatric Committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine, provide a framework which may prove helpful to nuclear medicine teams in daily practice. They have been influenced by the conclusions of the "Consensus Guidelines for MIBG Scintigraphy" (Paris, November 6, 1997) of the European Neuroblastoma Group and by those of the Oncological Committee of the French Society of Nuclear Medicine. The guidelines should be taken in the context of "good practice" and any local/national rules which apply to nuclear medicine examinations. PMID:12658506

  5. Guidelines for radioiodinated MIBG scintigraphy in children.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Pierre; Colarinha, Paula; Fettich, Jure; Fischer, Sibylle; Frökier, Jörgen; Giammarile, Francesco; Gordon, Isky; Hahn, Klaus; Kabasakal, Levent; Mann, Mike; Mitjavila, Mercedes; Piepsz, Amy; Porn, Ute; Sixt, Rune; van Velzen, Jeannette

    2003-05-01

    These guidelines on the use of radioiodinated (99m)Tc-MIBG scintigraphy in children, which summarise the views of the Paediatric Committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine, provide a framework which may prove helpful to nuclear medicine teams in daily practice. They have been influenced by the conclusions of the "Consensus Guidelines for MIBG Scintigraphy" (Paris, November 6, 1997) of the European Neuroblastoma Group and by those of the Oncological Committee of the French Society of Nuclear Medicine. The guidelines should be taken in the context of "good practice" and any local/national rules which apply to nuclear medicine examinations.

  6. Automated trabecular bone histomorphometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polig, E.; Jee, W. S. S.

    1985-01-01

    The toxicity of alpha-emitting bone-seeking radionuclides and the relationship between bone tumor incidence and the local dosimetry of radionuclides in bone are investigated. The microdistributions of alpha-emitting radionuclides in the trabecular bone from the proximal humerus, distal humerus, proximal ulna, proximal femur, and distal femur of six young adult beagles injected with Am-241 (three with 2.8 micro-Ci/kg and three with 0.9 micro-Ci/kg) are estimated using a computer-controlled microscope photometer system; the components of the University of Utah Optical Track Scanner are described. The morphometric parameters for the beagles are calculated and analyzed. It is observed that the beagles injected with 0.9 micro-Ci of Am-241/kg showed an increase in the percentage of bone and trabecular bone thickness, and a reduction in the width of the bone marrow space and surface/volume ratio. The data reveal that radiation damage causes abnormal bone structure.

  7. Comparison of concurrent imaging modalities for staging of dogs with appendicular primary bone tumours.

    PubMed

    Oblak, M L; Boston, S E; Woods, J P; Nykamp, S

    2015-03-01

    This study assessed the use of whole body computed tomography (CT) for the evaluation of metastasis in dogs with primary appendicular bone tumours compared to long bone survey radiography, bone scintigraphy and thoracic radiographs. Fifteen dogs were included in this pilot study. A construct reference standard was used for detection of bone metastasis, and negative thoracic radiographs were compared against CT. Definitive lesions were only identified on bone scintigraphy. Not all lesions agreed with the construct reference standard. No definitive lesions were identified on survey radiographs or CT. Lesions were identified on thoracic CT that were not visible radiographically. Equivocal ground glass pulmonary lesions progressed in three of four cases. Whole body CT was not a suitable alternative to bone scintigraphy; however, it was useful as an adjunctive diagnostic modality. Pulmonary lesions were visible on CT that were not seen radiographically and ground glass pulmonary lesions in dogs should be considered suspicious for metastasis.

  8. Application of radionuclide ventriculography to cardiac screening

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsay, J. Jr.; Milner, M.R.; Chandeysson, P.L.; Rodman, D.J.; Okin, P.M.; Goldstein, S.A.

    1989-05-01

    Screening asymptomatic individuals for latent coronary disease often requires sequential testing because exercise electrocardiography typically produces more false positive than true positive results in a population with a low prevalence of coronary disease. Cardiac scintigraphy is a technique that may be employed as a confirmatory test in lieu of coronary arteriography to further evaluate the significance of a positive exercise electrocardiogram. Radionuclide ventriculography was employed in 98 asymptomatic individuals who were considered to be at moderate risk of heart disease after risk factor analysis and exercise electrocardiography. Seventeen (17%) patients had an abnormal study and underwent cardiac catheterization. Seven had coronary artery disease, two had cardiomyopathy, and eight were normal. Eighty-one (83%) patients had a normal study. Because the sensitivity of radionuclide ventriculography is 63-80%, it was postulated that 2 to 5 individuals with disease were missed. Thus, from a population with an 11-14% prevalence of disease, two subsets were identified. A large subset in which a prevalence of 2-6% could be estimated was separated from a much smaller one in which a prevalence of approximately 50% was demonstrated.

  9. Quantitative radionuclide angiocardiography

    SciTech Connect

    Scholz, P.M.; Rerych, S.K.; Moran, J.F.; Newman, G.E.; Douglas, J.M.; Sabiston, D.C. Jr.; Jones, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    This study introduces a new method for calculating actual left ventricular volumes and cardiac output from data recorded during a single transit of a radionuclide bolus through the heart, and describes in detail current radionuclide angiocardiography methodology. A group of 64 healthy adults with a wide age range were studied to define the normal range of hemodynamic parameters determined by the technique. Radionuclide angiocardiograms were performed in patients undergoing cardiac catherization to validate the measurements. In 33 patients studied by both techniques on the same day, a close correlation was documented for measurement of ejection fraction and end-diastolic volume. To validate the method of volumetric cardiac output calcuation, 33 simultaneous radionuclide and indocyanine green dye determinations of cardiac output were performed in 18 normal young adults. These independent comparisons of radionuclide measurements with two separate methods document that initial transit radionuclide angiocardiography accurately assesses left ventricular function.

  10. Therapeutic radionuclides: Making the right choice

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1996-08-01

    Recently, there has been a resurgence of interest in nuclear medicine therapeutic procedures. Using unsealed sources for therapy is not a new concept; it has been around since the beginnings of nuclear medicine. Treatment of thyroid disorders with radioiodine is a classic example. The availability of radionuclides with suitable therapeutic properties for specific applications, as well as methods for their selective targeting to diseased tissue have, however, remained the main obstacles for therapy to assume a more widespread role in nuclear medicine. Nonetheless, a number of new techniques that have recently emerged, (e.g., tumor therapy with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies, treatment of metastatic bone pain, etc.) appear to have provided a substantial impetus to research on production of new therapeutic radionuclides. Although there are a number of new therapeutic approaches requiring specific radionuclides, only selected broad areas will be used as examples in this article.

  11. Determination of inflammation of reflex sympathetic dystrophy at early stages with Tc-99m HIG scintigraphy: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Okudan, Berna; Celik, Canan

    2006-03-01

    The pathogenesis of reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) is not completely understood. However, an excessive regional inflammation, sensitization of primary somatosensory afferents, and sensitization of spinal neurons are considered to have a role in the pathogenesis of RSD. The underlying pathophysiology relating the clinical picture may help to determine the pharmacotherapeutic approach for an individual patient. Scintigraphy using radiolabelled human polyclonal non-specific immunoglobulin (HIG) has been recognized as a useful tool for the localization of inflammatory disorders. Thirty-six consecutive RSD patients associated with hemiplegia were included in this study. All the patients in this study had three phases bone scan and Tc-99m HIG scintigraphy. On admission, of 36 patients with positive bone scan, 30 had positive Tc-99m HIG scan. All the patients were symptomatic at the time of bone scanning. On the contrary, 24 out of 36 patients subsequently became asymptomatic at an 8-month re-evaluation period. Tc-99m HIG scintigraphy is a non-invasive complementary method for the determination of ongoing inflammatory reactions which also aids the clinicians to predict the response to anti-inflammatory therapy at the very early phase of RSD associated with hemiplegia. This preliminary study may be a source of inspiration for further studies with larger series and longer follow-up .

  12. Added Value of SPECT/CT in the Evaluation of Benign Bone Diseases of the Appendicular Skeleton.

    PubMed

    Abikhzer, Gad; Srour, Saher; Keidar, Zohar; Bar-Shalom, Rachel; Kagna, Olga; Israel, Ora; Militianu, Daniela

    2016-04-01

    Bone scintigraphy is a sensitive technique to detect altered bone mineralization but has limited specificity. The use of SPECT/CT has improved significantly the diagnostic accuracy of bone scintigraphy, in patients with cancer as well as in evaluation of benign bone disease. It provides precise localization and characterization of tracer-avid foci, shortens the diagnostic workup, and decreases patient anxiety. Through both the SPECT and the CT components, SPECT/CT has an incremental value in characterizing benign bone lesions, specifically in the appendicular skeleton, as illustrated by present case series.

  13. Unusual mediastinal lymph node uptake and peritoneopleural fistula demonstrated on Technetium-99m macro-aggregated human serum albumin (Tc-99m MAA) peritoneal scintigraphy in a patient with portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Tan, C J; Thang, S P; Lam, W W

    2016-04-01

    Peritoneal radionuclide scan is an established imaging modality for evaluating peritoneopleural communications. In this case report, unusual mediastinal lymph node radiotracer uptake is seen in a patient with portal hypertension on peritoneal scintigraphy. This was suspected to be due to marked lymphatic enlargement from longstanding portal hypertension since childhood, permitting passage of the large Tc-99m MAA particle. The nodes were morphologically benign on CT. Mediastinal lymph node uptake on peritoneal scintigraphy is rare but should not raise undue clinical concern, particularly in a patient with chronic portal hypertension. Anatomic correlation with SPECT-CT can provide reassurance. PMID:27326945

  14. Radioiodine therapy of hyperthyroidism precludes thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Orzel, J.A.; Kruyer, W.B.; Borchert, R.D.

    1987-02-01

    The authors attempted to perform Tl-201 myocardial perfusion scintigraphy in a 42-year-old man 23 and 35 days after he received 9.8 mCi of oral I-131 for documented Graves' disease. Interference from primary and scattered photons from residual thyroid I-131 made Tl-201 myocardial scintigraphy technically impossible. A series of phantom and patient studies using I-131 and Tl-201 were performed, yielding guidelines for planning Tl-201 myocardial scintigraphy following radioiodine therapy.

  15. Scintigraphic Evaluation of the Stump Region After Extremity Amputation and the Effect of Scintigraphy on Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sadic, Murat; Atilgan, Hasan Ikbal; Baskin, Aylin; Cinar, Alev; Koca, Gokhan; Demirel, Koray; Comak, Aylin; Ozyurt, Sinem; Yildirim, Sule; Korkmaz, Meliha

    2016-01-01

    Background We evaluated the stump region with scintigraphy and compared the correlation of treatment modalities and scintigraphic results. Methods Sixty-eight cases with extremity amputation were included in the study. Amputation applied cases underwent four-phase Tc-99m hydroxymethylene diphosphonate scintigraphy. Groups were performed according to the scanning time after amputation and amputation regions. After scintigraphic evaluation, results were recorded into five groups: osteomyelitis, soft-tissue infection, reactive changes secondary to surgery, chronic osteomyelitis, and normal. Post-surgical treatment modalities of the patients were determined and compared with scintigraphic results. Results In the scintigraphic evaluation of stump regions of the 68 amputated cases, 34 patients had acute osteomyelitis, one had chronic osteomyelitis, 16 had soft-tissue infection, and eight had changes secondary to the surgery. Nine of 68 cases had normal scintigraphic features. In the scintigraphic evaluation, 43 patients took antibiotic treatment and 16 had surgery. There was a strong correlation between scintigraphic results and treatment approach (P < 0.0001, r = 0.803) by means of preferred therapy and effectiveness of the therapy according to the scintigraphic results. Scintigraphy need increases with age after amputation and a negative correlation between patient age and scintigraphic need was found (P < 0.02, r = -0.339). There was no pathology in the follow-up in the cases that were scintigraphically normal. Conclusion Bone scintigraphy is a cost-effective, non-invasive, and efficient method that directs treatment in the evaluation of the stump region after amputation. PMID:26858796

  16. Role of scintigraphy in urinary tract infection

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, J.J.

    1988-10-01

    There is controversy regarding the role of radiological imaging for urinary tract infection (UTI). The gold standard has been the intravenous pyelogram (IVP). Yet, the IVP has a very limited value with only about 25% of children with pyelonephritis demonstrating abnormalities. Ultrasound (US) has recently been advocated as a replacement for the poorly sensitive and poorly specific IVP. However, comparative studies between US and IVP indicate only an equivalent sensitivity and specificity. Cortical scintigraphy with Technetium-99m glucoheptonate (99mTc GH) or 99mTc dimercaptosuccinic acid (99mTc DMSA) has also been advocated as a means of differentiating parenchymal (pyelonephritis) from nonparenchymal (lower UTI) involvement in UTI. The clinical presentation may be misleading especially in the infant and child in whom an elevated temperature, flank pain, shaking chills, or an elevated sedimentation rate are often lacking. The clinician attempts to localize the site of infection for it has a direct bearing upon the therapy. A collecting system infection can often be eradicated with a single oral dose of an appropriate antibiotic, whereas renal parenchymal involvement requires IV therapy for an extended interval. Cortical scintigraphy can localize the site of infection with a high degree of accuracy. Recent studies report a sensitivity of 86% and specificity of 81% of pyelonephritis. This is in contrast to the IVP with a sensitivity of only 24% and US with a sensitivity of only 42%. The scintigraphic appearance of parenchymal infection of the kidney is a spectrum of minimal to gross defects reflecting the degree of histologic involvement that spans from a mild infection to frank abscess. Cortical scintigraphy can be used to monitor the evolution of scarring following infection. Cortical scintigraphy with 99mTc DMSA or 99mTc GH is the method of choice for the initial evaluation of UTI. 37 references.

  17. [Radionuclide therapy and diagnostics in urology].

    PubMed

    Fendler, W P; Wenter, V; Stief, C G; Gratzke, C; Bartenstein, P

    2015-07-01

    In recent years there has been methodological improvement in established nuclear medicine procedures, such as renal and skeletal scintigraphy and new very specific probes for treatment and diagnosis of urological diseases have been introduced into the clinical routine. New diagnostic methods, such as positron emission tomography (PET) using prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) ligands for highly accurate tumor localization in recurrent prostate cancer have become available in many centers. The very high and selective accumulation of these PSMA ligands in tumor tissue has shown promising therapeutic results. Moreover, since 2013 a new radiopharmaceutical agent, radium-223 dichloride, has been approved for treatment of symptomatic bone metastases of prostate cancer. Better knowledge of indications, benefits and limitations of these procedures will help clinicians to adequately introduce them into patient management. This article summarizes the state of the art in established nuclear medicine procedures for urological disorders and also reports on new diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities.

  18. Negative radionuclide scan in osteoid osteoma. A case report

    SciTech Connect

    Fehring, T.K.; Green, N.E.

    1984-05-01

    Advances in radionuclide imaging have facilitated the accurate diagnosis and surgical excision of osteoid osteoma. While radionuclide imaging has been inconsistent in the diagnosis of certain problems, its accuracy in the diagnosis of osteoid osteoma has been frequently stressed. To date, no case of a negative bone scan in the presence of a histologically proven osteoid osteoma has been reported. The present case report emphasizes that a negative bone scan does not preclude the diagnosis of osteoid osteoma. Clinical suspicion remains the most sensitive indicator of this lesion.

  19. Stress injuries of the pars interarticularis: Radiologic classification and indications for radionuclide imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Pennell, R.; Maurer, A.R.; Bonakdarpour, A.

    1984-01-01

    Lumbar spine radiographs and radionuclide images were compared and correlated with clinical histories of 20 athletes with low back pain. Radiographs were classified as: Normal (Type 0); showing a healing stress fracture (an irregular lucent line) with sclerosis (Type I); as an evolving or healed stress injury with either sclerosis, narrowing, or demineralization (Type II); and as a chronic fracture showing a large lucency with well-defined margins classically referred to as spondylolysis (Type III). Patients were grouped clinically on the basis of their pain: acute onset (Group A, n = 7), acute superimposed on chronic (Group B, n = 9), and chronic pain without an acute event (Group C, n = 4). Radiographic abnormalities were present in 95% (19/20) of the patients and radionuclide studies were positive in 60% (12/20). Scintigraphy was positive most often with Type I pars abnormalities (77%, 10/13) and negative most often with Type III abnormalities (91%, 11/12). Of all positive scintigraphy 12/14 (86%) were in pts in Groups A and B (acute symptoms). The authors' findings support theories that radiographic pars abnormalities exist which correspond to stages in the healing of stress induced fractures. With acute symptoms radionuclide imaging need not be obtained if a Type I radiographic abnormality is seen. Radionuclide imaging is indicated with either Type 0, II or III radiographs to confirm or rule out recent stress injury.

  20. Distribution of lung blood on modified bilateral Glenn shunt evaluated by Tc-99m-MAA lung perfusion scintigraphy

    PubMed Central

    Si, Biao; Luan, Zhao-sheng; Wang, Tong-jian; Ning, Yan-song; Li, Na; Zhu, Meng; Liu, Zhong-min; Ding, Guang-hong; Qiao, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the present study was to determine the distribution of lung blood in a modified bilateral Glenn procedure designed in our institute with lung perfusion scintigraphy. Sixteen consecutive patients who underwent modified bilateral Glenn operation from 2011 to 2014 were enrolled in the study. The control group consisted of 7 patients who underwent bidirectional Glenn shunt. Radionuclide lung perfusion scintigraphy was performed using Tc-99m-macro aggregated albumin (MAA) in all patients. For the patients in modified bilateral Glenn group, the time at which the radioactivity accumulation peaked did not differ significantly between the right and left lung field (t = 0.608, P = 0.554). The incidence of perfusion abnormality in each lung lobe also did not differ significantly (P = 0.426 by Fisher exact test). The radioactive counts were higher in the right lung than in the left lung, but the difference was not statistically significant (t = 1.502, P = 0.157). Radioactive perfusion in the lower lung field was significantly greater than that in the upper field (t = 4.368, P < 0.001). Compared with that in the bidirectional Glenn group, the ratio of radioactivity in the right lung to that in left lung was significantly lower in the modified bilateral Glenn group (t = 3.686, P = 0.002). Lung perfusion scintigraphy confirmed the benefit of the modified bilateral Glenn shunt with regard to more balanced blood perfusion in both lungs. PMID:27661042

  1. Radionuclide imaging of soft tissue neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Chew, F.S.; Hudson, T.M.; Enneking, W.F.

    1981-10-01

    Two classes of radiopharmaceuticals may be used for imaging tumors of the musculoskeletal system. The first is comprised of soft tissue or tumor specific agents such as gallium-67, bleomycin, and radionuclide-labeled antibodies, which may be useful for detecting and localizing these tumors. The other class of tracer is comprised of those with avidity for bone. The 99mTc-labeled-phosphate skeletal imaging compounds have been found to localize in a variety of soft tissue lesions, including benign and malignant tumors. In 1972, Enneking began to include bone scans in the preoperative evaluation of soft tissue masses. Later, he and his associates reported that these scans were useful in planning operative treatment of sarcomas by detecting involvement of bone by the tumors. Nearly all malignant soft tissue tumors take up bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals, and bone involvement was indicated in two-thirds of the scans we reviewed. About half of benign soft tissue lesions had normal scans, but the other half showed uptake within the lesion and a few also showed bone involvement. Careful, thorough imaging technique is essential to proper evaluation. Multiple, high-resolution static gamma camera images in different projections are necessary to adequately demonstrate the presence or absence of soft tissue abnormality and to define the precise relationship of the tumor to the adjacent bone.

  2. [Targeted radionuclide therapy for castration-resistant prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Katsumasa; Ohga, Saiji; Sasaki, Tomonari; Baba, Shingo; Honda, Hiroshi

    2014-12-01

    Although patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer frequently have metastases to the bone, they have a relatively favorable prognosis. Therefore, it is important to keep or improve the level of patient's quality of life. The use of strontium-89 for the management of the pain from bone metastasis was approved in 2007 in Japan. A new bone-targeting radiopharmaceuticals using radium-223 is also promising, because a randomized trial showed an overall survival advantage of radium-223 in prostate patients with bone metastases. In this review, we summarize the role of targeted radionuclide therapy for castration-resistant prostate cancer, focusing on strontium-89 and radium-223.

  3. Diagnosis of metabolic bone disease

    SciTech Connect

    Grech, P.; Martin, T.J.; Barrington, N.A.; Ell, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents a reference on the radiologic evaluation, features, and differential diagnosis of metabolic diseases involving the whole skeleton, calcium deficiencies resulting from pharmacologic agents, and bone changes related to endocrine disturbances. It also stresses how radiology, nuclear medicine, and biochemistry - either alone or in concert - contribute to clinical diagnosis. It covers renal bone disease, Paget's disease, hyperphosphatasia, extraskeletal mineralization, metabolic bone disorders related to malnutrition, tumors, plus radionuclide studies including materials and methods.

  4. Radionuclides in US coals

    SciTech Connect

    Bisselle, C. A.; Brown, R. D.

    1984-03-01

    The current state of knowledge with respect to radionuclide concentrations in US coals is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the levels of uranium in coal (and lignite) which are considered to represent a concern resulting from coal combustion; areas of the US where such levels have been found; and possible origins of high radionuclide levels in coal. The report reviews relevant studies and presents new data derived from a computerized search of radionuclide content in about 4000 coal samples collected throughout the coterminous US. 103 references, 5 figures, 5 tables.

  5. Detection of abnormalities in febrile AIDS patients with In-111-labeled leukocyte and Ga-67 scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Fineman, D.S.; Palestro, C.J.; Kim, C.K.; Needle, L.B.; Vallabhajosula, S.; Solomon, R.W.; Goldsmith, S.J.

    1989-03-01

    Thirty-six patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), who were febrile but without localizing signs, underwent indium-111 leukocyte scintigraphy 24 hours after injection of labeled white blood cells (WBCs) and were restudied 48 hours after injection of gallium-67 citrate. Fifty-six abnormalities were identified as possible sources of the fever; 27 were confirmed with biopsy. Of these 27, 15 were identified only on In-111 WBC scans (including colitis, sinusitis, and focal bacterial pneumonia); six, only on Ga-67 scans (predominantly Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia and lymphadenopathy); and six, on both studies (predominantly pulmonary lesions). In-111 WBC scanning revealed 21 of 27 abnormalities (78%) and gallium scanning, 12 of 27 (44%). If only one scintigraphic study has been performed, particularly with Ga-67, a significant number of lesions would not have been detected. The authors believe radionuclide evaluation of the febrile AIDS patient without localizing signs should begin with In-111 WBC scintigraphy. Gallium scanning may be used depending on results of In-111 WBC scans or if there is a high index of suspicion for P carinii pneumonia.

  6. Positive indium-111 leukocyte scintigraphy in a skeletal metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Sfakianakis, G.N.; Mnaymneh, W.; Ghandur-Mnaymneh, L.; Al-Sheikh, W.; Hourani, M.; Heal, A.

    1982-09-01

    Indium-111 scintigraphy is a method proposed for specific diagnosis and localization of focal infection. It has been found that, in general, cancers did not visualize with leukocyte scintigraphy. In this article, a case of positive indium-111 leukocyte scintigrams of a foot metstasis from a mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the lung is reported. (JMT)

  7. Radionuclide imaging in myocardial sarcoidosis. Demonstration of myocardial uptake of /sup 99m/Tc pyrophosphate and gallium

    SciTech Connect

    Forman, M.B.; Sandler, M.P.; Sacks, G.A.; Kronenberg, M.W.; Powers, T.A.

    1983-03-01

    A patient had severe congestive cardiomyopathy secondary to myocardial sarcoidosis. The clinical diagnosis was confirmed by radionuclide ventriculography, /sup 201/Tl, /sup 67/Ga, and /sup 99m/Tc pyrophosphate (TcPYP) scintigraphy. Myocardial TcPYP uptake has not been reported previously in sarcoidosis. In this patient, TcPYP was as useful as gallium scanning and thallium imaging in documenting the myocardial process.

  8. Radionuclide Behavior in Containments.

    2000-02-14

    MATADOR analyzes the transport and deposition of radionuclides as vapor or aerosol through Light Water Reactor (LWR) containments during severe accidents and calculates environmental release fractions of radionuclides as a function of time. It is intended for use in system risk studies. The principal output is information on the timing and magnitude of radionuclide releases to the environment as a result of severely degraded core accidents. MATADOR considers the transport of radionuclides through the containmentmore » and their removal by natural deposition and the operation of engineered safety systems such as sprays. Input data on the source term from the primary system, the containment geometry, and thermal-hydraulic conditions are required.« less

  9. Radionuclides in Diagnosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, E. D.

    1989-01-01

    Discussed is a radionuclide imaging technique, including the gamma camera, image analysis computer, radiopharmaceuticals, and positron emission tomography. Several pictures showing the use of this technique are presented. (YP)

  10. Colon visualization on (99m)Tc-HDP whole-body bone scan due to sigmoid colon cancer-related enterovesical fistula.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Hoon; Song, Bong-Il; Won, Kyoung Sook

    2015-01-01

    An abnormally increased uptake of the bone-seeking agent is rarely observed in structures other than the bone and urinary track on bone scintigraphy. The general etiologies of soft tissue uptake can be explained by heterotopic ossification or dystrophic and metastatic calcification. We report a case of serendipitous visualization of the entire colon on bone scintigraphy. Diffuse colonic uptake was detected on the whole-body bone scan in a patient with biopsy-proven sigmoid colon cancer. Additional imaging studies clearly showed direct bladder invasion of the sigmoid colon cancer. Imaging findings with a brief review of the literature are presented in this article.

  11. Serendipitous finding of transitional cell carcinoma of the kidney on bone and gallium imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, A.J.; Toney, M.A.; Griffith, J.C.; Rodriguez, A.A.; Turnbull, G.L. )

    1991-03-01

    A 50-year-old woman presented with low back pain. Bone scintigraphy showed a focus of increased activity in the upper pole of the left kidney. Subsequent Ga-67 citrate scintigraphy demonstrated this same abnormal focus as a region of increased activity. Ultrasonography showed a renal mass in the upper pole of the left kidney. At surgery a transitional cell carcinoma of the upper pole of the left kidney was found.

  12. Pancreas transplants: Evaluation using perfusion scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Kuni, C.C.; du Cret, R.P.; Boudreau, R.J.

    1989-07-01

    To determine the value of scintigraphic perfusion studies in evaluating pancreas transplant patients, we reviewed 56 of these studies in 22 patients who had 27 transplants. Seventeen patients underwent two or more studies. The perfusion studies were performed with 20 mCi (740 MBq) of 99mTc-DTPA injected as a bolus followed by eight to 16 serial 2-sec images and a 500,000-count immediate static image. Images were evaluated for (1) the time and intensity of pancreatic peak radioactivity relative to the time and intensity of the iliac arterial peak; (2) relative pancreatic to iliac arterial intensity on the static image; and (3) size, homogeneity, and definition of the pancreas. Clinical diagnoses at the time of scintigraphy of normal function (n = 36), rejection (n = 13), pancreatitis (n = 6), or arterial thrombosis (n = 1) were based on insulin requirement, urine amylase, serum glucose, serum amylase, response to therapy, cultures, CT, MR, sonography, scintigraphy with 67Ga or 111In-WBCs, percutaneous drainage results, angiography, surgery, and pathologic examination of resected transplants. Three 99mTc-DTPA perfusion studies showed no pancreatic perfusion, four showed decreasing perfusion on serial studies, and five showed progressive loss of definition of the pancreas on serial studies. Of the three patients with no detectable perfusion, one had a normally functioning transplant, one had arterial thrombosis with transplant infarction, and one had severe rejection with minimal function. Decreasing perfusion was associated with rejection in three patients and pancreatitis in one. Decreasing definition was seen in four patients with rejection and one with pancreatitis. We conclude that perfusion scintigraphy is useful, primarily when performed serially, although nonspecific for evaluating pancreas transplants.

  13. Method and apparatus for separating radionuclides from non-radionuclides

    DOEpatents

    Harp, Richard J.

    1990-01-01

    In an apparatus for separating radionuclides from non-radionuclides in a mixture of nuclear waste, a vessel is provided wherein the mixture is heated to a temperature greater than the temperature of vaporization for the non-radionuclides but less than the temperature of vaporization for the radionuclides. Consequently the non-radionuclides are vaporized while the non-radionuclides remain the solid or liquid state. The non-radionuclide vapors are withdrawn from the vessel and condensed to produce a flow of condensate. When this flow decreases the heat is reduced to prevent temperature spikes which might otherwise vaporize the radionuclides. The vessel is removed and capped with the radioactive components of the apparatus and multiple batches of the radionuclide residue disposed therein. Thus the vessel ultimately provides a burial vehicle for all of the radioactive components of the process.

  14. Endocrine scintigraphy with hybrid SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ka Kit; Fig, Lorraine M; Youssef, Ehab; Ferretti, Alice; Rubello, Domenico; Gross, Milton D

    2014-10-01

    Nuclear medicine imaging of endocrine disorders takes advantage of unique cellular properties of endocrine organs and tissues that can be depicted by targeted radiopharmaceuticals. Detailed functional maps of biodistributions of radiopharmaceutical uptake can be displayed in three-dimensional tomographic formats, using single photon emission computed tomography (CT) that can now be directly combined with simultaneously acquired cross-sectional anatomic maps derived from CT. The integration of function depicted by scintigraphy and anatomy with CT has synergistically improved the efficacy of nuclear medicine imaging across a broad spectrum of clinical applications, which include some of the oldest imaging studies of endocrine dysfunction.

  15. Radionuclide surveillance of the allografted pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    George, E.A.; Salimi, Z.; Carney, K.; Castaneda, M.; Garvin, P.J.

    1988-04-01

    To determine the value of scintigraphy to detect posttransplantation complications of the allografted pancreas, we retrospectively reviewed 209 scintigrams obtained with /sup 99m/Tc-sulfur colloid (/sup 99m/Tc-SC) and /sup 99m/Tc-glucoheptonate (/sup 99m/Tc-GH). The scintigraphic studies were performed in 37 recipients of simultaneous renal and pancreatic allografts harvested from the same donor. /sup 99m/Tc-SC was used as an indicator of thrombotic vasculitis; pancreatic perfusion and blood-pool parameters were monitored with /sup 99m/Tc-GH. In 11 of the 37 recipients, scintigraphic abnormalities suggested posttransplantation infarction. Recurrent episodes of acute rejection of the pancreatic allograft, which always coincided with acute rejection of the renal allograft, were monitored in 24 recipients. Rejection-induced ischemic pancreatitis was suggested in 12 of the 24 recipients and persisted in 10 recipients for several weeks after improvement of renal allograft rejection. Pancreatic atrophy was suggested scintigraphically in 16 of the 24 recipients with recurrent episodes of rejection. Spontaneous pancreatic-duct obstruction and obstructive pancreatitis were associated with a scintigraphic pattern similar to that of rejection-induced ischemic pancreatitis. We concluded that the specific radionuclides used in this series are useful for the surveillance and assessment of posttransplantation pancreatic infarction, acute rejection, pancreatitis, and atrophy

  16. Radionuclide studies in postoperative evaluation of the Fontan procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Brendel, A.J.; Wynchank, S.; Choussat, A.; Barat, J.L.; Deville, C.; Ducassou, D.; Fontan, F.

    1984-10-01

    Radionuclide studies were performed on 12 patients who had had a Fontan operation for cyanotic congenital heart disease, six of whom had undergone a prior palliative Glenn procedure. The patients without prior Glenn anastomoses were studied by radionuclide first-pass angiocardiography, using a right antecubital vein injection of /sup 99m/Tc pertechnetate. The patients with Glenn anastomoses required two injections, one by femoral vein to study the Fontan procedure, using bolus injection of /sup 99m/Tc pertechnetate or microspheres, and the second by right anetcubital vein to study the Glenn anastomosis and right lung, using a bolus of microspheres. Noninvasive radionuclide methods seem to be dependable in the postoperative evaluation of patients after the Fontan procedure. First-pass angiocardiography is most helpful in evaluating the dynamics and distribution of blood flow, especially the right atrial output, and gated blood-pool scintigraphy offers a better evaluation of right atrial and left ventricular contraction, so both supply complementary information.

  17. Assessment of metabolic bone disease: review of new nuclear medicine procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Wahner, H.W.

    1985-12-01

    In the management of patients with metabolic bone disease, nuclear medicine laboratories offer two nontraumatic procedures of potential clinical importance: bone mineral measurements and bone scintigraphy. Bone mineral measurements from the radius, lumbar spine, and hip obtained with use of absorptiometry or computed tomography can be used to predict the risk of fracture at these skeletal sites, can determine the severity of bone loss for the assessment of a benefit-versus-risk ratio on which appropriate therapy can be based, and can substantiate the effectiveness of therapy over time. Bone scintigraphy with use of labeled diphosphonate allows assessment of focal and, in defined circumstances, of total skeletal bone turnover in patients with normal kidney function. Both of these techniques have been used successfully in studies of population groups for the evaluation of trends. Their application to the management of individual patients is currently being evaluated. 41 references.

  18. Therapeutic radionuclides in nuclear medicine: current and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Yeong, Chai-Hong; Cheng, Mu-hua; Ng, Kwan-Hoong

    2014-10-01

    The potential use of radionuclides in therapy has been recognized for many decades. A number of radionuclides, such as iodine-131 ((131)I), phosphorous-32 ((32)P), strontium-90 ((90)Sr), and yttrium-90 ((90)Y), have been used successfully for the treatment of many benign and malignant disorders. Recently, the rapid growth of this branch of nuclear medicine has been stimulated by the introduction of a number of new radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals for the treatment of metastatic bone pain and neuroendocrine and other malignant or non-malignant tumours. Today, the field of radionuclide therapy is enjoying an exciting phase and is poised for greater growth and development in the coming years. For example, in Asia, the high prevalence of thyroid and liver diseases has prompted many novel developments and clinical trials using targeted radionuclide therapy. This paper reviews the characteristics and clinical applications of the commonly available therapeutic radionuclides, as well as the problems and issues involved in translating novel radionuclides into clinical therapies.

  19. Therapeutic radionuclides in nuclear medicine: current and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Yeong, Chai-Hong; Cheng, Mu-hua; Ng, Kwan-Hoong

    2014-01-01

    The potential use of radionuclides in therapy has been recognized for many decades. A number of radionuclides, such as iodine-131 (131I), phosphorous-32 (32P), strontium-90 (90Sr), and yttrium-90 (90Y), have been used successfully for the treatment of many benign and malignant disorders. Recently, the rapid growth of this branch of nuclear medicine has been stimulated by the introduction of a number of new radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals for the treatment of metastatic bone pain and neuroendocrine and other malignant or non-malignant tumours. Today, the field of radionuclide therapy is enjoying an exciting phase and is poised for greater growth and development in the coming years. For example, in Asia, the high prevalence of thyroid and liver diseases has prompted many novel developments and clinical trials using targeted radionuclide therapy. This paper reviews the characteristics and clinical applications of the commonly available therapeutic radionuclides, as well as the problems and issues involved in translating novel radionuclides into clinical therapies. PMID:25294374

  20. Bioaccumulation of radionuclides in fertilized Canadian Shield lake basins.

    PubMed

    Bird, G A; Hesslein, R H; Mills, K H; Schwartz, W J; Turner, M A

    1998-07-11

    Radionuclide tracers of heavy metals (59Fe, 60Co, 65Zn, 75Se, 85Sr, 134Cs and 203Hg) representing potential contamination from nuclear power plants, industry and agriculture were added to separate basins of Lake 226, Experimental Lakes Area, northwestern Ontario. The two basins were part of a eutrophication experiment and differed in their trophic status; the north basin (L226N) was eutrophic whereas the south basin (L226S) was mesotrophic. Our objective was to determine the uptake of the radionuclides by biota and the effect of lake trophic status on their bioaccumulation. The trophic status of the lakes did not appear to have a marked effect on the accumulation of radionuclides by the biota. This may have been because of a mid-summer leakage of nutrients between the basins which enhanced primary production in L226S, because there is a time lag between primary production and the availability of the radionuclides to the fishes or because trophic status does not affect the uptake of at least some of these radionuclides. However, there was a tendency for faster uptake of the radionuclides in L226N by fish than L226S, but the differences were not significant. Concentrations in the biota generally decreased in the order: fathead minnow > pearl dace > tadpoles > slimy sculpin > leeches. Concentrations in biota generally decreased in the order. 65Zn > 203Hg > 75Se > 134Cs > 60Co > 85Sr = 59Fe. Cobalt-60 concentrations in tadpoles were greater than in the other biota. Radionuclide concentrations in the tissues of lake whitefish indicated that uptake was predominantly from food. Radionuclide concentrations were usually higher in the posterior gut, liver and kidney than in other tissues, whereas body burdens were generally high in the muscle for 75Se, 134Cs and 203Hg; kidney and gut for 60Co; and bone for 65Zn and 75Se. Mercury-203 burdens were also high in the bone and gut. PMID:9718743

  1. Bioaccumulation of radionuclides in fertilized Canadian Shield lake basins.

    PubMed

    Bird, G A; Hesslein, R H; Mills, K H; Schwartz, W J; Turner, M A

    1998-07-11

    Radionuclide tracers of heavy metals (59Fe, 60Co, 65Zn, 75Se, 85Sr, 134Cs and 203Hg) representing potential contamination from nuclear power plants, industry and agriculture were added to separate basins of Lake 226, Experimental Lakes Area, northwestern Ontario. The two basins were part of a eutrophication experiment and differed in their trophic status; the north basin (L226N) was eutrophic whereas the south basin (L226S) was mesotrophic. Our objective was to determine the uptake of the radionuclides by biota and the effect of lake trophic status on their bioaccumulation. The trophic status of the lakes did not appear to have a marked effect on the accumulation of radionuclides by the biota. This may have been because of a mid-summer leakage of nutrients between the basins which enhanced primary production in L226S, because there is a time lag between primary production and the availability of the radionuclides to the fishes or because trophic status does not affect the uptake of at least some of these radionuclides. However, there was a tendency for faster uptake of the radionuclides in L226N by fish than L226S, but the differences were not significant. Concentrations in the biota generally decreased in the order: fathead minnow > pearl dace > tadpoles > slimy sculpin > leeches. Concentrations in biota generally decreased in the order. 65Zn > 203Hg > 75Se > 134Cs > 60Co > 85Sr = 59Fe. Cobalt-60 concentrations in tadpoles were greater than in the other biota. Radionuclide concentrations in the tissues of lake whitefish indicated that uptake was predominantly from food. Radionuclide concentrations were usually higher in the posterior gut, liver and kidney than in other tissues, whereas body burdens were generally high in the muscle for 75Se, 134Cs and 203Hg; kidney and gut for 60Co; and bone for 65Zn and 75Se. Mercury-203 burdens were also high in the bone and gut.

  2. Initial Radionuclide Inventories

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, H

    2005-07-12

    The purpose of this analysis is to provide an initial radionuclide inventory (in grams per waste package) and associated uncertainty distributions for use in the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA) in support of the license application for the repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This document is intended for use in postclosure analysis only. Bounding waste stream information and data were collected that capture probable limits. For commercially generated waste, this analysis considers alternative waste stream projections to bound the characteristics of wastes likely to be encountered using arrival scenarios that potentially impact the commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) waste stream. For TSPA-LA, this radionuclide inventory analysis considers U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) high-level radioactive waste (DHLW) glass and two types of spent nuclear fuel (SNF): CSNF and DOE-owned (DSNF). These wastes are placed in two groups of waste packages: the CSNF waste package and the codisposal waste package (CDSP), which are designated to contain DHLW glass and DSNF, or DHLW glass only. The radionuclide inventory for naval SNF is provided separately in the classified ''Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Technical Support Document'' for the License Application. As noted previously, the radionuclide inventory data presented here is intended only for TSPA-LA postclosure calculations. It is not applicable to preclosure safety calculations. Safe storage, transportation, and ultimate disposal of these wastes require safety analyses to support the design and licensing of repository equipment and facilities. These analyses will require radionuclide inventories to represent the radioactive source term that must be accommodated during handling, storage and disposition of these wastes. This analysis uses the best available information to identify the radionuclide inventory that is expected at the last year of last emplacement, currently identified as

  3. Initial Radionuclide Inventories

    SciTech Connect

    H. Miller

    2004-09-19

    The purpose of this analysis is to provide an initial radionuclide inventory (in grams per waste package) and associated uncertainty distributions for use in the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA) in support of the license application for the repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This document is intended for use in postclosure analysis only. Bounding waste stream information and data were collected that capture probable limits. For commercially generated waste, this analysis considers alternative waste stream projections to bound the characteristics of wastes likely to be encountered using arrival scenarios that potentially impact the commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) waste stream. For TSPA-LA, this radionuclide inventory analysis considers U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) high-level radioactive waste (DHLW) glass and two types of spent nuclear fuel (SNF): CSNF and DOE-owned (DSNF). These wastes are placed in two groups of waste packages: the CSNF waste package and the codisposal waste package (CDSP), which are designated to contain DHLW glass and DSNF, or DHLW glass only. The radionuclide inventory for naval SNF is provided separately in the classified ''Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Technical Support Document'' for the License Application. As noted previously, the radionuclide inventory data presented here is intended only for TSPA-LA postclosure calculations. It is not applicable to preclosure safety calculations. Safe storage, transportation, and ultimate disposal of these wastes require safety analyses to support the design and licensing of repository equipment and facilities. These analyses will require radionuclide inventories to represent the radioactive source term that must be accommodated during handling, storage and disposition of these wastes. This analysis uses the best available information to identify the radionuclide inventory that is expected at the last year of last emplacement, currently identified as

  4. Targeted radionuclide therapy--an overview.

    PubMed

    Dash, Ashutosh; Knapp, F F Russ; Pillai, M R A

    2013-09-01

    Radionuclide therapy (RNT) based on the concept of delivering cytotoxic levels of radiation to disease sites is one of the rapidly growing fields of nuclear medicine. Unlike conventional external beam therapy, RNT targets diseases at the cellular level rather than on a gross anatomical level. This concept is a blend of a tracer moiety that mediates a site specific accumulation followed by induction of cytotoxicity with the short-range biological effectiveness of particulate radiations. Knowledge of the biochemical reactions taking place at cellular levels has stimulated the development of sophisticated molecular carriers, catalyzing a shift towards using more specific targeting radiolabelled agents. There is also improved understanding of factors of importance for choice of appropriate radionuclides based on availability, the types of emissions, linear energy transfer (LET), and physical half-life. This article discusses the applications of radionuclide therapy for treatment of cancer as well as other diseases. The primary objective of this review is to provide an overview on the role of radionuclide therapy in the treatment of different diseases such as polycythaemia, thyroid malignancies, metastatic bone pain, radiation synovectomy, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), neuroendocrine tumors (NETs), non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) and others. In addition, recent developments on the systematic approach in designing treatment regimens as well as recent progress, challenges and future perspectives are discussed. An examination of the progress of radionuclide therapy indicates that although a rapid stride has been made for treating hematological tumors, the development for treating solid tumors has, so far, been limited. However, the emergence of novel tumor-specific targeting agents coupled with successful characterization of new target structures would be expected to pave the way for future treatment for such tumors.

  5. Radionuclide studies in impotence

    SciTech Connect

    Hilson, A.J.; Lewis, C.A. )

    1991-04-01

    Impotence may be of physiological origin with causes including vascular or neurological pathology. Alternatively, it may be of psychogenic origin. Clinicians can distinguish between psychological and organic impotence by observing nocturnal penile tumescence. Non-radionuclide investigations for organic impotence include penile plethysmography or pulse Doppler analysis for arterial supply, cavernosometry for venous drainage, and biothesiometry or evoked potentials for neurological pathology. Radionuclide studies are primarily based on the use of technetium 99m-pertechnetate, 99mTc-red blood cells, or xenon 133 to study the blood flow, with or without pharmacological intervention, commonly papaverine. 26 references.

  6. Dynamics and transformations of radionuclides in soils and ecosystem health

    SciTech Connect

    Fellows, Robert J. ); Ainsworth, Calvin C. ); Driver, Crystal J. ); Cataldo, Dominic A. )

    1998-12-01

    The chemical behavior of radionuclides can vary widely in soil and sediment environments. Equally important, for a given radionuclide the physico-chemical properties of the solids and aqueous phase can greatly influence a radionuclides behavior. Radionuclides can conceivably occur in soils as soluble-free, inorganic-soluble-complexed, organic-soluble, complexed, adsorbed, precipitated, coprecipitated, or solid structural species. While it is clear that an assessment of a radionuclide?s soil chemistry and potential shifts in speciation will yield a considerable understanding of its behavior in the natural environment, it does not directly translate to bioavailability or its impact on ecosystems health. The soil chemical factors have to be linked to food chain considerations and other ecological parameters that directly tie to an analysis of ecosystem health. In general, the movement of radionuclides from lower to higher trophic levels diminishes with each trophic level in both aqua tic and terrestrial systems. In some cases, transfer is limited because of low absorption/assimilation by successive trophic organisms (Pu, U); for other radionuclides (Tc, H) assimilation may be high but rapid metabolic turnover and low retention greatly reduce tissue concentrations available to predator species. Still others are chemical analogs of essential elements whose concentrations are maintained under strict metabolic control in tissues (Cs) or are stored in tissues seldom consumed by other organisms (Sr storage in exoskeleton, shells, and bone). Therefore, the organisms that receive the greatest ingestion exposures are those in lower trophic positions or are in higher trophic levels but within simple, short food chains. Food source, behavior, and habitat influence the accumulation of radionuclides in animals.

  7. Detection of deep venous thrombophlebitis by gallium 67 scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.H.

    1981-07-01

    Deep venous thrombophlebitis may escape clinical detection. Three cases are reported in which whole-body gallium 67 scintigraphy was used to detect unsuspected deep venous thrombophlebitis related to indwelling catheters in three children who were being evaluated for fevers of unknown origin. Two of these children had septicemia from Candida organisms secondary to these venous lines. Gallium 67 scintigraphy may be useful in the detection of complications of indwelling venous catheters.

  8. Gallium 67 scintigraphy in glomerular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bakir, A.A.; Lopez-Majano, V.; Levy, P.S.; Rhee, H.L.; Dunea, G.

    1988-12-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic usefulness of gallium 67 scintigraphy in glomerular disease, 45 patients with various glomerulopathies, excluding lupus nephritis and renal vasculitis, were studied. Persistent renal visualization 48 hours after the gallium injection, a positive scintigram, was graded as + (less than), ++ (equal to), and +++ (greater than) the hepatic uptake. Positive scintigrams were seen in ten of 16 cases of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, six of 11 cases of proliferative glomerulonephritis, and one case of minimal change, and one of two cases of membranous nephropathy; also in three of six cases of sickle glomerulopathy, two cases of diabetic neuropathy, one of two cases of amyloidosis, and one case of mild chronic allograft rejection. The 25 patients with positive scans were younger than the 20 with negative scans (31 +/- 12 v 42 +/- 17 years; P less than 0.01), and exhibited greater proteinuria (8.19 +/- 7.96 v 2.9 +/- 2.3 S/d; P less than 0.01) and lower serum creatinine values (2 +/- 2 v 4.1 +/- 2.8 mg/dL; P less than 0.01). The amount of proteinuria correlated directly with the intensity grade of the gallium image (P less than 0.02), but there was no correlation between the biopsy diagnosis and the outcome of the gallium scan. It was concluded that gallium scintigraphy is not useful in the differential diagnosis of the glomerular diseases under discussion. Younger patients with good renal function and heavy proteinuria are likely to have a positive renal scintigram regardless of the underlying glomerulopathy.

  9. The value of radionuclide scintigraphy in patients with non-visualized gallbladders by oral cholecystography

    SciTech Connect

    Stadalnik, R.C.; Rosenquist, C.J.; Trudeau, W.L.; Hines, H.H.

    1981-11-01

    This study evaluated the clinical usefulness of Tc-99m-PyG cholescintigraphy in patients who had nonvisualization of the gallbladder after OCG. Nineteen patients with non-visualized gallbladder with OCG subsequently had Tc-99m-PyG cholescintigraphy performed. In nine patients the gallbladder visualized, whereas in ten it did not. Statistical analysis of this limited number of patients showed that Tc-99m-PyG cholescintigraphy was able to separate those patients with clinically significant gallbladder disease from those patients without significant gallbladder disease (p less than 0.05).

  10. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    SciTech Connect

    J. Prouty

    2006-07-14

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers advective transport and diffusive transport

  11. Acute effects of radiation therapy on indium-111-labeled leukocyte uptake in bone marrow

    SciTech Connect

    Palestro, C.J.; Kim, C.K.; Vega, A.; Goldsmith, S.J. )

    1989-11-01

    We recently performed ({sup 99m}Tc)MDP bone and {sup 111}In-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy on a patient receiving radiation therapy to the lower cervical and upper thoracic spine. While the bone images revealed only minimally increased activity in the radiation port, leukocyte images revealed diffuse, intensely increased uptake in this same region. Radiation therapy should be included in the differential diagnosis of increased bone marrow activity on {sup 111}In leukocyte images.

  12. Extraosseous accumulation of bone scan tracer (99m)Tc-methylene diphosphonate in a phlebolith.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Mukta; Agrawal, Archi; Zade, Anand; Purandare, Nilendu; Shah, Sneha; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2012-01-01

    Uptake in non-osseous, non-urologic tissues is occasionally found in the performance of bone scintigraphy. These uptakes reflect an atypical interaction between the radiopharmaceutical and the patient. Knowledge of the rare extraskeletal uptakes and their clinical relevance helps in better interpretation of bone scans. We report an unusual occurrence of extraosseous accumulation of (99m)Tc-methylene diphosphonate in a phlebolith in bone scan, confirmed with the aid of photon emission computed tomography and computed tomography. PMID:23599599

  13. Extraosseous accumulation of bone scan tracer 99mTc-methylene diphosphonate in a phlebolith

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Mukta; Agrawal, Archi; Zade, Anand; Purandare, Nilendu; Shah, Sneha; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2012-01-01

    Uptake in non-osseous, non-urologic tissues is occasionally found in the performance of bone scintigraphy. These uptakes reflect an atypical interaction between the radiopharmaceutical and the patient. Knowledge of the rare extraskeletal uptakes and their clinical relevance helps in better interpretation of bone scans. We report an unusual occurrence of extraosseous accumulation of 99mTc-methylene diphosphonate in a phlebolith in bone scan, confirmed with the aid of photon emission computed tomography and computed tomography. PMID:23599599

  14. Frontal and orbital bone infarctions causing periorbital swelling in patients with sickle cell anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Garty, I.; Koren, A.; Garzozi, H.

    1984-10-01

    Two cases of unilateral and bilateral periorbital hematomas occurred in patients with sickle cell anemia. The cause of periorbital swelling in these cases was found to be orbital and frontal bone infarctions, respectively, diagnosed by technetium Tc 99m medronate bone scintigraphy. To our knowledge, periorbital bone infarction, as a part of the differential diagnosis of periorbital hematoma and as part of the possible ocular manifestations in patients with sickle cell anemia, has not previously been described.

  15. Bone Grafts

    MedlinePlus

    A bone graft transplants bone tissue. Surgeons use bone grafts to repair and rebuild diseased bones in your hips, knees, ... fractures or cancers. Once your body accepts the bone graft, it provides a framework for growth of new, ...

  16. Bone Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... avoid smoking and drinking too much alcohol. Bone diseases can make bones easy to break. Different kinds ... break Osteogenesis imperfecta makes your bones brittle Paget's disease of bone makes them weak Bones can also ...

  17. Renal scintigraphy following angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition in the diagnosis of renovascular hypertension (captopril scintigraphy)

    SciTech Connect

    Sfakianakis, G.N. )

    1989-09-01

    This article describes the pathophysiology and primary causes of renovascular hypertension (RVH). No historical or physical finding is specific in the diagnosis of RVH, although onset of hypertension before the age of 30 years may suggest the possible presence of RVH. The physiology of the kidney is described along with the biochemistry of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors. The main thrust of the article is nuclear medicine techniques useful in the diagnosis of this disease. Several diagnositic methods are described but captopril scintigraphy is presented as a method that may give more optimal results in the diagnosis of RVH.

  18. Distribution of lung blood on modified bilateral Glenn shunt evaluated by Tc-99m-MAA lung perfusion scintigraphy: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Si, Biao; Luan, Zhao-Sheng; Wang, Tong-Jian; Ning, Yan-Song; Li, Na; Zhu, Meng; Liu, Zhong-Min; Ding, Guang-Hong; Qiao, Bin

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the distribution of lung blood in a modified bilateral Glenn procedure designed in our institute with lung perfusion scintigraphy. Sixteen consecutive patients who underwent modified bilateral Glenn operation from 2011 to 2014 were enrolled in the study. The control group consisted of 7 patients who underwent bidirectional Glenn shunt. Radionuclide lung perfusion scintigraphy was performed using Tc-99m-macro aggregated albumin (MAA) in all patients. For the patients in modified bilateral Glenn group, the time at which the radioactivity accumulation peaked did not differ significantly between the right and left lung field (t = 0.608, P = 0.554). The incidence of perfusion abnormality in each lung lobe also did not differ significantly (P = 0.426 by Fisher exact test). The radioactive counts were higher in the right lung than in the left lung, but the difference was not statistically significant (t = 1.502, P = 0.157). Radioactive perfusion in the lower lung field was significantly greater than that in the upper field (t = 4.368, P < 0.001). Compared with that in the bidirectional Glenn group, the ratio of radioactivity in the right lung to that in left lung was significantly lower in the modified bilateral Glenn group (t = 3.686, P = 0.002). Lung perfusion scintigraphy confirmed the benefit of the modified bilateral Glenn shunt with regard to more balanced blood perfusion in both lungs. PMID:27661042

  19. Distribution of lung blood on modified bilateral Glenn shunt evaluated by Tc-99m-MAA lung perfusion scintigraphy: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Si, Biao; Luan, Zhao-Sheng; Wang, Tong-Jian; Ning, Yan-Song; Li, Na; Zhu, Meng; Liu, Zhong-Min; Ding, Guang-Hong; Qiao, Bin

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the distribution of lung blood in a modified bilateral Glenn procedure designed in our institute with lung perfusion scintigraphy. Sixteen consecutive patients who underwent modified bilateral Glenn operation from 2011 to 2014 were enrolled in the study. The control group consisted of 7 patients who underwent bidirectional Glenn shunt. Radionuclide lung perfusion scintigraphy was performed using Tc-99m-macro aggregated albumin (MAA) in all patients. For the patients in modified bilateral Glenn group, the time at which the radioactivity accumulation peaked did not differ significantly between the right and left lung field (t = 0.608, P = 0.554). The incidence of perfusion abnormality in each lung lobe also did not differ significantly (P = 0.426 by Fisher exact test). The radioactive counts were higher in the right lung than in the left lung, but the difference was not statistically significant (t = 1.502, P = 0.157). Radioactive perfusion in the lower lung field was significantly greater than that in the upper field (t = 4.368, P < 0.001). Compared with that in the bidirectional Glenn group, the ratio of radioactivity in the right lung to that in left lung was significantly lower in the modified bilateral Glenn group (t = 3.686, P = 0.002). Lung perfusion scintigraphy confirmed the benefit of the modified bilateral Glenn shunt with regard to more balanced blood perfusion in both lungs.

  20. Fracture occurrence from radionuclides in the skeleton

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, R.D.; Taylor, G.N.; Miller, S.C.

    2000-06-01

    Because skeletal fractures were an important finding among persons contaminated with {sup 226}Ra, experience with fractures among dogs in the colony was summarized to determine the projected significance for persons contaminated with bone-seeking radionuclides. Comparison by Fisher's Exact Test of lifetime fracture occurrence in the skeletons of beagles injected as young adults suggested that for animals given {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, {sup 228}Th, or {sup 239}Pu citrate, there was probably an excess over controls in fractures of the ribs, leg bones, spinous processes, and pelvis (os coxae) plus the mandible for dogs given {sup 226}Ra and the scapulae for dogs given {sup 228}Ra or 228 Th. Regression analysis indicated that significantly elevated fracture occurrence was especially notable at the higher radiation doses, at about 50 Gy average skeletal dose for {sup 239}Pu, 140 Gy for {sup 226}Ra, about 40 Gy for {sup 228}Ra, and more than 15 Gy for {sup 228}Th. The average number of fractures per dog was significantly elevated over that noted in controls for the highest radiation doses of {sup 239}Pu and {sup 226}Ra and for the higher doses of {sup 228}Ra and {sup 228}Th. For those dogs given {sup 90}Sr citrate, there was virtually no important difference from control beagles not given radionuclides, even at group mean cumulative skeletal radiation doses up to 101 Gy. Because of a large proportion of dogs with fractures that died with bone malignancy (even at dosage levels lower than those exhibiting an excess average number of fractures per dog), they conclude that fracture would not be an important endpoint at lower levels of plutonium contamination in humans such as would be expected to occur from occupational or environmental exposure.

  1. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    SciTech Connect

    J.D. Schreiber

    2005-08-25

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA-LA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers

  2. Radionuclide Sensors for Water Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Grate, Jay W.; Egorov, Oleg B.; DeVol, Timothy A.

    2005-09-01

    Radionuclide contamination in the soil and groundwater at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites is a severe problem that requires monitoring and remediation. Radionuclide measurement techniques are needed to monitor surface waters, groundwater, and process waters. Typically, water samples are collected and transported to an analytical laboratory, where costly radiochemical analyses are performed. To date, there has been very little development of selective radionuclide sensors for alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides such as 90Sr, 99Tc, and various actinides of interest.

  3. History of medical radionuclide production.

    PubMed

    Ice, R D

    1995-11-01

    Radionuclide production for medical use originally was incidental to isotope discoveries by physicists and chemists. Once the available radionuclides were identified they were evaluated for potential medical use. Hevesy first used 32P in 1935 to study phosphorous metabolism in rats. Since that time, the development of cyclotrons, linear accelerators, and nuclear reactors have produced hundreds of radionuclides for potential medical use. The history of medical radionuclide production represents an evolutionary, interdisciplinary development of applied nuclear technology. Today the technology is represented by a mature industry and provides medical benefits to millions of patients annually.

  4. Does aspiration of bones and joints affect results of later bone scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Canale, S.T.; Harkness, R.M.; Thomas, P.A.; Massie, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    To determine the effect, if any, of needle aspiration on /sup 99m/Tc bone scanning, three different areas of 15 dogs were first aspirated and then imaged with technetium bone scintigraphy. The hip joint was aspirated, the distal femoral metaphysis was drilled and aspirated, and the tibial periosteum was scraped with an 18- or 20-gauge needle. Varying amounts of trauma were inflicted to simulate varying difficulties at aspiration. /sup 99m/Tc bone scans were obtained from 5 h to 10 days later. There was no evidence of focal technetium uptake after any hip joint aspiration. This was consistent regardless of the amount of trauma inflicted or the time from aspiration to bone scanning. Metaphyseal cortical drilling and tibial periosteal scraping occasionally caused some focal uptake when scanning was delayed greater than 2 days. When osteomyelitis or pyarthrosis is clinically suspected, joint aspiration can be performed without fear of producing a false- positive bone scan.

  5. Bone-targeting radiopharmaceuticals including radium-223.

    PubMed

    Brady, Darren; Parker, Chris C; O'Sullivan, Joe M

    2013-01-01

    Bone-seeking radionuclides including samarium-153 ethylene diamine tetramethylene phosphonate and strontium-89 have been used for decades in the palliation of pain from bone metastases especially from prostate cancer. Emerging evidence of improved survival in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) with the first-in-class α-radionuclide, radium-223 (Ra) has rekindled interest in the role of bone-seeking radionuclide therapy.We review the literature for randomized controlled trials of bone-seeking radionuclides and explore some of the issues regarding the optimal use of these agents. In particular, we discuss dose, dose rate, radiobiology, and quality of radiation and postulate on potential future directions in particular combination schedules. β-Emitting, bone-seeking radionuclides have proven ability to control pain in prostate cancer metastatic to bone with pain response rates in the order of 60% to 70% when used as single agents. Most of the published trials were underpowered to detect differences in survival; however, there is evidence of the potential for disease modification when these agents are used in combination with chemotherapy or in multiple cycles.Data from the recent phase III ALSYMPCA trial that compared Ra to placebo in symptomatic CRPC demonstrate a significant improvement in median overall survival of 3.6 months for patients with symptomatic CRPC metastatic to bone treated with 6 cycles of the α-emitting radionuclide Ra compared with placebo. The success of Ra in improving survival in CRPC will lead this agent to become part of the treatment paradigm for this disease, and with such an excellent safety profile, Ra has huge potential in combination strategies as well as for use earlier in the natural history of metastatic prostate cancer.

  6. Targeted radionuclide therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Lawrence E.; DeNardo, Gerald L.; Meredith, Ruby F.

    2008-07-15

    Targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) seeks molecular and functional targets within patient tumor sites. A number of agents have been constructed and labeled with beta, alpha, and Auger emitters. Radionuclide carriers spanning a broad range of sizes; e.g., antibodies, liposomes, and constructs such as nanoparticles have been used in these studies. Uptake, in percent-injected dose per gram of malignant tissue, is used to evaluate the specificity of the targeting vehicle. Lymphoma (B-cell) has been the primary clinical application. Extension to solid tumors will require raising the macroscopic absorbed dose by several-fold over values found in present technology. Methods that may effect such changes include multistep targeting, simultaneous chemotherapy, and external sequestration of the agent. Toxicity has primarily involved red marrow so that marrow replacement can also be used to enhance future TRT treatments. Correlation of toxicities and treatment efficiency has been limited by relatively poor absorbed dose estimates partly because of using standard (phantom) organ sizes. These associations will be improved in the future by obtaining patient-specific organ size and activity data with hybrid SPECT/CT and PET/CT scanners.

  7. Targeted radionuclide therapy

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Lawrence E.; DeNardo, Gerald L.; Meredith, Ruby F.

    2008-01-01

    Targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) seeks molecular and functional targets within patient tumor sites. A number of agents have been constructed and labeled with beta, alpha, and Auger emitters. Radionuclide carriers spanning a broad range of sizes; e.g., antibodies, liposomes, and constructs such as nanoparticles have been used in these studies. Uptake, in percent-injected dose per gram of malignant tissue, is used to evaluate the specificity of the targeting vehicle. Lymphoma (B-cell) has been the primary clinical application. Extension to solid tumors will require raising the macroscopic absorbed dose by several-fold over values found in present technology. Methods that may effect such changes include multistep targeting, simultaneous chemotherapy, and external sequestration of the agent. Toxicity has primarily involved red marrow so that marrow replacement can also be used to enhance future TRT treatments. Correlation of toxicities and treatment efficiency has been limited by relatively poor absorbed dose estimates partly because of using standard (phantom) organ sizes. These associations will be improved in the future by obtaining patient-specific organ size and activity data with hybrid SPECT∕CT and PET∕CT scanners. PMID:18697529

  8. Testis Scintigraphy in a Patient with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Şencan Eren, Mine; Koç, Murat; Ören, Hale; Özkal, Şermin; Durak, Hatice

    2014-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a pediatric malignancy associated with remissions and relapses. Common relapsing sitesare meninges, testis and ovary. Testicular scintigraphy is a highly specific modality used mainly in the differential diagnosis of testicular torsion and epidydimitis/epidydimo-orchitis. There is only one interesting image on leukemic infiltration with scrotal scintigraphy in the literature. The aim of this case presentation is to report that although the scintigraphic appearance of testicular torsion was observed in a patient with the diagnosis of ALL, testicular ALL infiltration was revealed in pathologic examination. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:24653935

  9. Metastatic calcification of the stomach imaged on a bone scan

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, R.; Ryo, U.Y.; Pinsky, S.M.

    1984-10-01

    A whole body bone scan obtained on a 21-year-old woman with sickle cell disease and chronic renal failure showed localization of the radionuclide diffusely in the stomach. The localization of the radionuclide represented metastatic calcification of the stomach caused by secondary hyperparathyroidism.

  10. The influence of internally deposited alpha ({sup 239}Pu) or beta-gamma ({sup 144}Ce) emitting radionuclides on the sensitivity of Chinese hamster bone marrow cells to {sup 60}CO induced chromosome aberrations

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, A.L.; McDonald, K.E.; Kitchin, R.M.

    1994-12-31

    The current study was designed to determine if protracted low-dose-rate exposures from either high-({sup 239}Pu) or low-({sup 144}Ce) LET radiation from internally deposited radioactive materials changes the frequency of chromosome aberrations induced by acute {sup 60}Co exposure. THe potential for interaction was evaluated 30 days after injection with either 0 or 0.85 kBq {sup 144}Ce g{sup -1} body weight or 0.0 or 2.2 Bq of {sup 239}Pu g{sup -1}. Injection with {sup 239}Pu or {sup 144}Ce resulted in few aberrations in bone marrow cells 30 days after injection. The presence of internally deposited {sup 239}Pu or {sup 144}Ce did not significantly alter the total frequency of {sup 60}Co induced aberrations. However, the frequency of {sup 60}Co induced chromatid exchanges was significantly greater (P=0.03) in bone marrow cells of animals with {sup 144}Ce body burdens (0.14{+-}0.03 chromatid exchanges/cell). Such data illustrates that changes in cellular responsiveness may be dependent on the LET of the isotope, the dose rate of the primary dose and the type of damage being evaluated.

  11. Radionuclide therapy for palliation of pain due to osteoblastic metastases.

    PubMed

    Hellman, R S; Krasnow, A Z

    1998-01-01

    Beta-emitting, bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals, administered systemically, represent a good alternative or adjuvant to external beam radiotherapy for palliation of painful osteoblastic bone metastases. The most frequently used radiopharmaceutical for this purpose is strontium 89, followed by samarium 153 ethylenediaminetetramethylene phosphonate, and infrequently phosphorus 32 orthophosphate. Prior to consideration for radionuclide therapy, recent bone scans should be evaluated in order to determine if the patient has painful osteoblastic lesions likely to respond to therapy. Approximately 70% of patients with prostate and breast cancer will have a reduction in pain in response to radionuclide therapy, beginning within 2 to 4 weeks and lasting between 2 and 6 months. Patients who are expected to live 3 or more months are more likely to benefit than patients with shorter duration life expectancy. Hematosuppression is the chief side effect of radionuclide therapy, with leukopenia and thrombocytopenia more likely to be clinically significant than anemia. Relative contraindications for treatment include osteolytic lesions, pending spinal cord compression or pathologic fracture, preexisting severe myelosuppression, urinary incontinence, inability to follow radiation safety precautions, and severe renal insufficiency. PMID:15859838

  12. Reactor-Produced Medical Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzadeh, Saed; Mausner, Leonard; Garland, Marc A

    2011-01-01

    The therapeutic use of radionuclides in nuclear medicine, oncology and cardiology is the most rapidly growing use of medical radionuclides. Since most therapeutic radionuclides are neutron rich and decay by beta emission, they are reactor-produced. This chapter deals mainly with production approaches with neutrons. Neutron interactions with matter, neutron transmission and activation rates, and neutron spectra of nuclear reactors are discussed in some detail. Further, a short discussion of the neutron-energy dependence of cross sections, reaction rates in thermal reactors, cross section measurements and flux monitoring, and general equations governing the reactor production of radionuclides are presented. Finally, the chapter is concluded by providing a number of examples encompassing the various possible reaction routes for production of a number of medical radionuclides in a reactor.

  13. Tibial stress reaction in runners. Correlation of clinical symptoms and scintigraphy with a new magnetic resonance imaging grading system.

    PubMed

    Fredericson, M; Bergman, A G; Hoffman, K L; Dillingham, M S

    1995-01-01

    Medial tibial pain in runners has traditionally been diagnosed as either a shin splint syndrome or as a stress fracture. Our work using magnetic resonance imaging suggests that a progression of injury can be identified, starting with periosteal edema, then progressive marrow involvement, and ultimately frank cortical stress fracture. Fourteen runners, with a total of 18 symptomatic legs, were evaluated and, within 10 days, referred for radiographs, a technetium bone scan, and a magnetic resonance imaging scan. In 14 of the 18 symptomatic legs, magnetic resonance imaging findings correlated with an established technetium bone scan grading system and more precisely defined the anatomic location and extent of injury. We identified clinical symptoms, such as pain with daily ambulation and physical examination findings, including localized tibial tenderness and pain with direct or indirect percussion, that correlated with more severe tibial stress injuries. When clinically warranted, we recommend magnetic resonance imaging over bone scan for grading of tibial stress lesions in runners. Magnetic resonance imaging is more accurate in correlating the degree of bone involvement with clinical symptoms, allowing for more accurate recommendations for rehabilitation and return to impact activity. Additional advantages of magnetic resonance imaging include lack of exposure to ionizing radiation and significantly less imaging time than three-phase bone scintigraphy.

  14. Pinhole collimator scintigraphy in differential diagnosis of metastasis, fracture, and infections of the spine

    SciTech Connect

    Bahk, Y.W.; Kim, O.H.; Chung, S.K.

    1987-04-01

    The informational gains obtained by the use of pinhole collimator scintigraphy (PCS) have been well documented. The present study has been undertaken to prospectively investigate its efficacy in diagnosing several commonly occurring spinal diseases. Patient material consisted of metastatic cancer (39 vertebrae), compression fractures (33 vertebrae), tuberculous spondylitis (17 vertebrae), and pyogenic spondylitis (six vertebrae). PCS findings were characterized in terms of localization, appearance, and homogeneity of abnormal radionuclide accumulation. Thus, metastatic cancer manifested as diffusely or focally homogeneous accumulation within the vertebral body or as a typical short-segmental accumulation along the end-plate, whereas compression fracture manifested as characteristic board-like accumulation along the entire length of end-plates. Tuberculous spondylitis, on the other hand, revealed homogeneous accumulation throughout the vertebral body, and pyogenic spondylitis revealed accumulation at the end-zone of opposing vertebral bodies giving sandwich-like appearance. The disk space at the affected level was not narrowed in the former two diseases but it was narrowed in the latter two. It was concluded that PCS may be useful in differentiating metastatic cancer, compression fracture, tuberculous spondylitis, and pyogenic spondylitis.

  15. Reduced incidence of bone metastases in irradiated areas after external radiation therapy of prostatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsson, H.; Naeslund, I. )

    1991-06-01

    Fourteen males, out of 380 patients, treated with radiation to the central pelvis and lumbar spine for poorly differentiated prostatic carcinoma were analyzed in retrospect. The dose of radiation to the bones of the target area was 5,000 cGy. The patients showed no signs of metastases at bone scintigraphy performed in connection with the treatment. In an average of 34 months after finishing radiotherapy, the patients developed metastases at bone scintigraphy. The pattern was similar in all patients. The treated target area appeared as a cold zone surrounded by more or less homogenously and strongly increased activity of the axial skeleton, characteristic of bone metastases. Radiography, which was performed in 11 patients, confirmed widespread metastatic disease sparing the target area. This was interpretated as bone metastasis being precluded by the irradiation. The most probable explanation of this finding is eradication in situ of distant micrometastases already present in the bone marrow at the time of treatment. An alternate explanation is a reduced implantation of later seeded blood-born metastases as an effect of the irradiation. The characteristic pattern of this phenomenon must be recognized at bone scintigraphy.

  16. APT radionuclide production experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, J.L.; Gavron, A.; King, J.D.

    1994-07-02

    Tritium ({sup 3}H, a heavy isotope of hydrogen) is produced by low energy neutron-induced reactions on various elements. One such reaction is n+{sup 3}He {yields}>{sup 3}H+{sup 1}H in which {sup 3}He is transmuted to tritium. Another reaction, which has been used in reactor production of tritium, is the n+{sup 6}Li {yields}> {sup 3}H+{sup 4}He reaction. Accelerator Production of Tritium relies on a high-energy proton beam to produce these neutrons using the spallation reaction, in which high-energy proton beam to produce these neutrons using the spallation reaction, in which high-energy protons reacting with a heavy nucleus produce a shower of low-energy neutrons and a lower-mass residual nucleus. It is important to quantify the residual radionuclides produced in the spallation target for two reasons. From an engineering point of view, one must understand short-lived isotopes that may contribute to decay heat. From a safety viewpoint, one must understand what nuclei and decay gammas are produced in order to design adequate shielding, to estimate ultimate waste disposal problems, and to predict possible effects due to accidental dispersion during operation. The authors have performed an experiment to measure the production of radioisotopes in stopping-length W and Pb targets irradiated by a 800 MeV proton beam, and are comparing the results to values obtained from calculations using LAHET and MCNP. The experiment was designed to pay particular attention to the short half-life radionuclides, which have not been previously measured. In the following, they present details of the experiment, explain how they analyzed the data and obtain the results, how they perform the calculations, and finally, how the experimental data agree with the calculations.

  17. [Radionuclide therapy of endocrine-related cancer].

    PubMed

    Kratochwil, C; Giesel, F L

    2014-10-01

    This article gives an overview of the established radionuclide therapies for endocrine-related cancer that already have market authorization or are currently under evaluation in clinical trials. Radioiodine therapy is still the gold standard for differentiated iodine-avid thyroid cancer. In patients with bone and lung metastases (near) total remission is seen in approximately 50% and the 15-year survival rate for these patients is approximately 90%. In contrast to the USA, meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) therapy has market approval in Europe. According to the current literature, in the setting of advanced stage neuroblastoma and malignant pheochromocytoma or paraganglioma, radiological remission can be achieved in >30% and symptom control in almost 80% of the treated patients. Somatostatin receptor targeted radionuclide therapies (e.g. with DOTATATE or DOTATOC) demonstrated promising results in phase 2 trials, reporting progression-free survival in the range of 24-36 months. A first phase 3 pivotal trial for intestinal carcinoids is currently recruiting and another trial for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors is planned. Radiopharmaceuticals based on glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) or minigastrins are in the early evaluation stage for application in the treatment of insulinomas and medullary thyroid cancer. In general, radiopharmaceutical therapy belongs to the group of so-called theranostics which means that therapy is tailored for individual patients based on molecular imaging diagnostics to stratify target positive or target negative tumor phenotypes.

  18. Cavernous hemangioma. Why is peripheral filling at scintigraphy so rare

    SciTech Connect

    Drane, W.E.; Weatherby, E. III

    1987-10-01

    Peripheral filling at dynamic CT occurs frequently with cavernous hemangiomas, yet this phenomenon is a rare finding on Tc-99m RBC imaging. A case of peripheral filling of a cavernous hemangioma with scintigraphy is reported and the rationale for its infrequent occurrence is discussed.

  19. /sup 123/I-metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy of ectopic intracranial retinoblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Bomanji, J.; Kingston, J.E.; Hungerford, J.L.; Britton, K.E.

    1989-01-01

    Radioiodinated metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) has been used for diagnostic purposes to image neural crest tumors. We report the uptake of /sup 123/I MIBG in a child with ectopic intracranial retinoblastoma. It is felt that /sup 123/I MIBG scintigraphy may have a role in detecting occult metastatic disease in these patients.

  20. Accuracy of Hepatobiliary Scintigraphy after Liver Transplantation and Liver Resection

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, Hanns; Bechstein, Wolf O.; Grünwald, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. Biliary complications are the most frequent complications after common liver surgeries. In this study, accuracy of hepatobiliary scintigraphy (HBS) and impact of hyperbilirubinemia were evaluated. Methods. Between November 2007 and February 2016, 131 patients underwent hepatobiliary scintigraphy after having liver surgery. 39 patients with 42 scans after LTX (n = 13) or hepatic resection (n = 26) were evaluated in the study; 27 were male, with mean age 60 years. The subjects underwent hepatobiliary scintigraphy with Tc-99m labeled Mebrofenin. The results were compared to ERCP as gold standard performed within one month after HBS. We calculated sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV. We compared LTX patients to patients with other liver surgeries. Furthermore the influence of hyperbilirubinemia on HBS scans was evaluated. Results. HBS always provided the correct diagnosis in cases of bile leak in the liver-resected group (14/14). Overall diagnostic accuracy was 76% (19/25) in this group and 54% (7/13) in the LTX group. False negative (FN) diagnoses occurred more often among LTX patients (p = 0.011). Hyperbilirubinemia (>5 mg/dL) significantly influenced the excretion function of the liver, prolonging HBS's time-activity-curve (p = 0.001). Conclusions. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy is a reliable tool to detect biliary complications, but reduced accuracy must be considered after LTX. PMID:27563464

  1. Accuracy of Hepatobiliary Scintigraphy after Liver Transplantation and Liver Resection.

    PubMed

    Eckenschwiller, Manuel; Ackermann, Hanns; Bechstein, Wolf O; Grünwald, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. Biliary complications are the most frequent complications after common liver surgeries. In this study, accuracy of hepatobiliary scintigraphy (HBS) and impact of hyperbilirubinemia were evaluated. Methods. Between November 2007 and February 2016, 131 patients underwent hepatobiliary scintigraphy after having liver surgery. 39 patients with 42 scans after LTX (n = 13) or hepatic resection (n = 26) were evaluated in the study; 27 were male, with mean age 60 years. The subjects underwent hepatobiliary scintigraphy with Tc-99m labeled Mebrofenin. The results were compared to ERCP as gold standard performed within one month after HBS. We calculated sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV. We compared LTX patients to patients with other liver surgeries. Furthermore the influence of hyperbilirubinemia on HBS scans was evaluated. Results. HBS always provided the correct diagnosis in cases of bile leak in the liver-resected group (14/14). Overall diagnostic accuracy was 76% (19/25) in this group and 54% (7/13) in the LTX group. False negative (FN) diagnoses occurred more often among LTX patients (p = 0.011). Hyperbilirubinemia (>5 mg/dL) significantly influenced the excretion function of the liver, prolonging HBS's time-activity-curve (p = 0.001). Conclusions. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy is a reliable tool to detect biliary complications, but reduced accuracy must be considered after LTX. PMID:27563464

  2. Noninvasive external cardiac pacing for thallium-201 scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, M.D.; Warren, S.E.; Gervino, E.V.; Aroesty, J.M.; Royal, H.D.; Parker, J.A.; Silverman, K.J.; Kolodny, G.M.; Zoll, P.M.; McKay, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    Improvements in noninvasive external cardiac pacing have led to a technique with reliable electrical capture and tolerable patient discomfort. To assess the use of this modality of pacing in combination with thallium scintigraphy as a noninvasive pacing stress test, we applied simultaneous noninvasive cardiac pacing, hemodynamic monitoring, and thallium-201 scintigraphy in 14 patients undergoing cardiac catheterization for chest pain syndromes. Two patients had normal coronary arteries, while the remaining 12 had significant coronary artery disease. Thallium scintigraphic responses to pacing were compared to routine exercise thallium stress testing in nine of these 14 patients. All patients were noninvasively paced to more than 85% of the age-predicted maximum heart rate. Twelve patients demonstrated reversible thallium defects, which corresponded in 11 cases to significant lesions seen on coronary angiography. Of nine patients who underwent both pacing and exercise thallium stress tests, comparable maximal rate-pressure products were achieved. Moreover, thallium imaging at peak pacing and during delayed views did not differ significantly from exercise thallium scintigraphy. A limiting factor associated with the technique was local patient discomfort, which occurred to some degree in all patients. We conclude that noninvasive external cardiac pacing together with thallium scintigraphy is capable of detecting significant coronary artery disease and may be comparable to routine exercise thallium stress testing. This new modality of stress testing could be useful in patients unable to undergo the exercise required for standard exercise tolerance testing, particularly if improvements in the technology can be found to reduce further the local discomfort.

  3. Is Brown Adipose Tissue Visualization Reliable on 99mTc-Methoxyisobutylisonitrile Diagnostic SPECT Scintigraphy?

    PubMed Central

    Haghighatafshar, Mahdi; Farhoudi, Farinaz

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The 99mTc-MIBI has been used with great value as a diagnostic technique in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism. False-positive scans may occur due to misinterpretation of the physiologic distribution of the 99mTc-MIBI. Reviewing consecutive SPECT scans, we evaluated this possibility and assessed how frequently brown adipose tissue (BAT) is seen on 99mTc-MIBI scintigraphy. Here, we retrospectively reviewed scans of consecutive patients who were evaluated for parathyroid adenomas from March 2015 to June 2015, using dual-phase (early and delayed) planar imaging and SPECT. We identified 60 patients (48 female and 12 male; mean age, 52.25 ± 15.20 years; range, 22–86 years). We detected the presence of 99mTc-MIBI uptake in BAT in 20 of 60 patients (33.33%) in the neck. Although the patients with 99mTc-MIBI uptake in BAT were younger (mean age, 48.85 ± 15.27 years, range, 26–73 years) than the patients with no 99mTc-MIBI uptake (mean age, 53.95 ± 15.07 years, range, 22–86 years), this difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.224). The percentage of female patients with BAT detection was higher (17/48 patients; 37.5%) than that of the male population (3/12 patients; 25%), this difference was not also statistically significant (P = 0.85). In patient population referred to 99mTc MIBI scintigraphy of the parathyroid glands, uptake of 99mTc-MIBI in BAT should not be misinterpreted with 99mTc-MIBI-avid-tumors. Fused SPECT/CT images (not SPECT-only) are necessary to distinguish BAT from bone, muscle, thyroid, myocardium, parathyroids, and other structures in the neck and chest. PMID:26765463

  4. Is Brown Adipose Tissue Visualization Reliable on 99mTc-Methoxyisobutylisonitrile Diagnostic SPECT Scintigraphy?

    PubMed

    Haghighatafshar, Mahdi; Farhoudi, Farinaz

    2016-01-01

    The 99mTc-MIBI has been used with great value as a diagnostic technique in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism. False-positive scans may occur due to misinterpretation of the physiologic distribution of the 99mTc-MIBI. Reviewing consecutive SPECT scans, we evaluated this possibility and assessed how frequently brown adipose tissue (BAT) is seen on 99mTc-MIBI scintigraphy. Here, we retrospectively reviewed scans of consecutive patients who were evaluated for parathyroid adenomas from March 2015 to June 2015, using dual-phase (early and delayed) planar imaging and SPECT. We identified 60 patients (48 female and 12 male; mean age, 52.25 ± 15.20 years; range, 22-86 years).We detected the presence of 99mTc-MIBI uptake in BAT in 20 of 60 patients (33.33%) in the neck. Although the patients with T99mc-MIBI uptake in BAT were younger (mean age, 48.85 ± 15.27 years, range, 26-73 years) than the patients with no 99mTc-MIBI uptake (mean age, 53.95 ± 15.07 years, range, 22-86 years), this difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.224). The percentage of female patients with BAT detection was higher (17/48 patients; 37.5%) than that of the male population (3/12 patients; 25%), this difference was not also statistically significant (P = 0.85).In patient population referred to 99mTc MIBI scintigraphy of the parathyroid glands, uptake of 99mTc-MIBI in BAT should not be misinterpreted with 99mTc-MIBI-avid-tumors. Fused SPECT/CT images (not SPECT-only) are necessary to distinguish BAT from bone, muscle, thyroid, myocardium, parathyroids, and other structures in the neck and chest. PMID:26765463

  5. Radionuclide therapy for arthritic knees

    SciTech Connect

    Doepel, L.K.

    1985-02-08

    A new radionuclide therapeutic approach for rheumatoid arthritis of the knee is described. This therapy combines a short-lived radionuclide with a carrier whose physical and chemical characteristics aid retention of the radioactive particles within the joint. Joining a radionuclide to a particulate carrier had not been explored previously as a potential method for inhibiting radiation leakage. The treatment couples the rare earth element dysprosium 165 to ferric hydroxide in macroaggregate form (size range: 3 to 10 ..mu..m). After the relatively inert iron complex penetrates the synovium, it causes cell death. Macrophages and phagocytes clear away the cellular debris, essentially eliminating the synovium.

  6. Os trigonum syndrome on bone SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianmin; Servaes, Sabah; Zhuang, Hongming

    2014-08-01

    A 16-year-old female athlete presented with increased pain in the distal left lower extremity. A possible stress fracture or shin splint of the left tibia was first considered. A 3-phase bone scintigraphy showed a very small focus of increased activity in the posterior left foot. A diagnosis of os trigonum syndrome was made after SPECT/CT images pinpointed the activity at the left os trigonum.

  7. Postradiation atrophy of mature bone

    SciTech Connect

    Erguen, H.; Howland, W.J.

    1980-01-01

    The growing number of oncological patients subjected to radiotherapy require the diagnostic radiologist to be aware of expected bone changes following irradiation and the differentiation of this entity from metastasis. The primary event of radiation damage to bone is atrophy and true necrosis of bone is uncommon. The postradiation atrophic changes of bone are the result of combined cellular and vascular damage, the former being more important. The damage to the osteoblast resulting in decreased matrix production is apparently the primary histopathologic event. Radiation damaged bone is susceptible to superimposed complications of fracture, infection, necrosis, and sarcoma. The primary radiographic evidence of atrophy, localized osteopenia, is late in appearing, mainly because of the relative insensitivity of radiographs in detecting demineralization. Contrary to former views, the mature bone is quite radiosensitive and reacts quickly to even small doses of radiation. In vivo midrodensitometric analysis and radionuclide bone and bone marrow scans can reveal early changes following irradiation. The differentiation of postirradiation atrophy and metastasis may be difficult. Biopsy should be the last resort because of the possibility of causing true necrosis in atrophic bone by trauma and infection.

  8. Postradiation atrophy of mature bone

    SciTech Connect

    Ergun, H.; Howland, W.J.

    1980-01-01

    The growing number of oncological patients subjected to radiotherapy require the diagnostic radiologist to be aware of expected bone changes following irradiation and the differentiation of this entity from metastasis. The primary event of radiation damage to bone is atrophy and true necrosis of bone is uncommon. The postradiation atrophic changes of bone are the result of combined cellular and vascular damage, the former being more important. The damage to the osteoblast resulting in decreased matrix production is apparently the primary histopathologic event. Radiation damaged bone is susceptible to superimposed complications of fracture, infection, necrosis, and sarcoma. The primary radiographic evidence of atrophy, localized osteopenia, is late in appearing, mainly because of the relative insensitivity of radiographs in detecing demineralization. Contrary to former views, the mature bone is quite radiosensitive and reacts quickly to even small doses of radiation. In vivo midrodensitometric analysis and radionuclide bone and bone marrow scans can reveal early changes following irradiation. The differentiation of postirradiation atrophy and metastasis may be difficult. Biopsy should be the last resort because of the possibility of causing true necrosis in atrophic bone by trauma and infection.

  9. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Wasteforms

    SciTech Connect

    Bovaird, Chase C.; Jansik, Danielle P.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Wood, Marcus I.

    2011-09-30

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how wasteform performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of wasteform aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of wasteform aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the wasteforms come in contact with groundwater. The information present in the report provides data that (1) measures the effect of concrete wasteform properties likely to influence radionuclide migration; and (2) quantifies the rate of carbonation of concrete materials in a simulated vadose zone repository.

  10. Drift-Scale Radionuclide Transport

    SciTech Connect

    J. Houseworth

    2004-09-22

    The purpose of this model report is to document the drift scale radionuclide transport model, taking into account the effects of emplacement drifts on flow and transport in the vicinity of the drift, which are not captured in the mountain-scale unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport models ''UZ Flow Models and Submodels'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169861]), ''Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 164500]), and ''Particle Tracking Model and Abstraction of Transport Process'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170041]). The drift scale radionuclide transport model is intended to be used as an alternative model for comparison with the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport model ''EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169868]). For that purpose, two alternative models have been developed for drift-scale radionuclide transport. One of the alternative models is a dual continuum flow and transport model called the drift shadow model. The effects of variations in the flow field and fracture-matrix interaction in the vicinity of a waste emplacement drift are investigated through sensitivity studies using the drift shadow model (Houseworth et al. 2003 [DIRS 164394]). In this model, the flow is significantly perturbed (reduced) beneath the waste emplacement drifts. However, comparisons of transport in this perturbed flow field with transport in an unperturbed flow field show similar results if the transport is initiated in the rock matrix. This has led to a second alternative model, called the fracture-matrix partitioning model, that focuses on the partitioning of radionuclide transport between the fractures and matrix upon exiting the waste emplacement drift. The fracture-matrix partitioning model computes the partitioning, between fractures and matrix, of diffusive radionuclide transport from the invert (for drifts without seepage) into the rock water. The invert is the structure constructed in a drift to provide the floor of the

  11. Radionuclide salivary gland imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Mishkin, F.S.

    1981-10-01

    Salivary gland imaging with 99mTc as pertechnetate provides functional information concerning trapping and excretion of the parotid and submandibular glands. Anatomic information gained often adds little to clinical evaluation. On the other hand, functional information may detect subclinical involvement, which correlates well with biopsy of the minor labial salivary glands. Salivary gland abnormalities in systemic disease such as sarcoidosis, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus erythematosus, and other collagenvascular disorders may be detected before they result in the clinical manifestaions of Sjoegren's syndrome. Such glands, after initially demonstrating increased trapping in the acute phase, tend to have decreased trapping and failure to discharge pertechnetate in response to an appropriate physiologic stimulus. Increased uptake of gallium-67 citrate often accompanies these findings. Inflammatory parotitis can be suspected when increased perfusion is evident on radionuclide angiography with any agent. The ability of the salivary gland image to detect and categorize mass lesions, which result in focal areas of diminished activity such as tumors, cysts, and most other masses, is disappointing, while its ability to detect and categorize Warthin's tumor, which concentrates pertechnetate, is much more valuable, although not specific.

  12. Video instrumentation for radionuclide angiocardiography.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kriss, J. P.

    1973-01-01

    Two types of videoscintiscopes for performing radioisotopic angiocardiography with a scintillation camera are described, and use of these instruments in performing clinical studies is illustrated. Radionuclide angiocardiography is a simple, quick and accurate procedure recommended as a screening test for patients with a variety of congenital and acquired cardiovascular lesions. When performed in conjunction with coronary arterial catheterization, dynamic radionuclide angiography may provide useful information about regional myocardial perfusion. Quantitative capabilities greatly enhance the potential of this diagnostic tool.

  13. Radionuclide assessment of heterotopic ossification in spinal cord injury patients

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, V.

    1983-01-01

    Whole body /sup 99m/T-pyrophosphate bone scans were obtained and correlated with skeletal radiographs for detection of heterotopic ossification in 135 spinal injury patients. There were 40 patients with recent injury (less than 6 months) and 95 with injury of over 6 months duration. Heterotopic new bone was detected on the bone scan in 33.7% of 95 patients with spinal cord injuries of more than 6 months duration and 30% of 40 patients with injuries of less than 6 months. The radionuclide scan was found to be useful in detection of heterotopic ossification at its early stage and in its differentiation from other complications in spinal cord injury patients.

  14. Anthropogenic radionuclides in the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Q; Weng, J; Wang, J

    2007-11-15

    Studies of radionuclides in the environment have entered a new era with the renaissance of nuclear energy and associated fuel reprocessing, geological disposal of high-level nuclear wastes, and concerns about national security with respect to nuclear non-proliferation. This work presents an overview of anthropogenic radionuclide contamination in the environment, as well as the salient geochemical behavior of important radionuclides. We first discuss the following major anthropogenic sources and current development that contribute to the radionuclide contamination of the environment: (1) nuclear weapons program; (2) nuclear weapons testing; (3) nuclear power plants; (4) commercial fuel reprocessing; (5) geological repository of high-level nuclear wastes, and (6) nuclear accidents. Then, we summarize the geochemical behavior for radionuclides {sup 99}Tc, {sup 129}I, and {sup 237}Np, because of their complex geochemical behavior, long half-lives, and presumably high mobility in the environment. Biogeochemical cycling and environment risk assessment must take into account speciation of these redox-sensitive radionuclides.

  15. 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine myocardial scintigraphy in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Orimo, S; Ozawa, E; Nakade, S; Sugimoto, T; Mizusawa, H

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) myocardial scintigraphy is clinically used to estimate local myocardial sympathetic nerve damage in some forms of heart disease, autonomic nerve disturbance in diabetic neuropathy, and disturbance of the autonomic nervous system in neurodegenerative disease. In the present study, examinations were performed to clarify (1) the proportion of cardiac sympathetic nerve disturbance in Parkinson's disease, (2) the usefulness of 123I-MIBG myocardial scintigraphy to detect sympathetic nerve disturbances compared with autonomic function tests, (3) cardiac function in patients who have a decreased MIBG uptake in 123I-MIBG myocardial scintigraphy, (4) the usefulness of 123I-MIBG myocardial scintigraphy to differentiate Parkinson's disease from the other neurological diseases mimicking it.
METHODS—123I-MIBG myocardial scintigraphy was performed, together with autonomic function tests and cardiac examinations in 46 patients with Parkinson's disease and 25 patients with vascular parkinsonism, essential tremor, or multiple system atrophy.
RESULTS—In an anterior image study, the average count per pixel in heart to mediastinum (H/M) ratio decreased in 80% of the patients with Parkinson's disease in the early phase and 84% in the late phase. The mean H/M ratio in Parkinson's disease was significantly lower than that in controls and the other diseases. The H/M ratio tended to decrease with the disease progression. In almost half of the patients in Hoehn and Yahr stage I, the H/M ratio was already decreased. The sympathetic skin response in upper and lower limbs, head up tilt test, and coefficient of variation of R-R interval were abnormal in 17%, 31%, 30%, and 17% of the patients, respectively. All the patients with abnormal autonomic functions were in Hoehn and Yahr stage III, IV, or V. Echocardiography showed normal left ventricular function. Twenty four hour Holter electrocardiography detected no serious arrhythmias except

  16. [Planar scintigraphy versus PET in measuring fatty acid metabolism of the heart].

    PubMed

    Kaiser, K P; Feinendegen, L E

    1987-02-01

    In addition to radionuclide ventriculography and thallium scintigraphy, already well established in nuclear medicine, assessment of myocardial metabolism is also of interest for diagnosis and follow-up observations in heart disease. Under aerobic conditions and in the fasting state, the heart muscle primarily oxidizes fatty acids; during ischemia, in contrast, there is slowing of fatty acid turnover and increased anaerobic glycolysis. With 11C-palmitic acid, in humans, reduced fatty acid uptake has been documented in infarcted myocardial regions. The analysis of 11C-palmitic acid in dogs showed a three-phased elimination curve in normal myocardium. In ischemic myocardium, there was diminished utilization of free fatty acids and the glucose utilization was concomitantly increased. After insulin-glucose infusion, as well, there was increased glucose utilization and a reduction in fatty acid utilization. Studies with 11C-palmitic acid require the equipment for positron emission tomography (PET); because of the short half-life of 20.3 minutes, the nuclide must be generated by a cyclotron in the immediate vicinity. In the search for well-suited isotopes for use in planar scintigraphy employing a gamma camera, the uptake and elimination of a variety of isotopically-marked fatty acids were measured and compared with the characteristics of 14C-palmitic acid. For 17-123I-heptadecanic acid (IHA) the elimination curve was similar to that of 14C-palmitate: disadvantage, however, was the relatively high percentage of water soluble marked catabolites which required dual parameter analysis by means of 99-m-technetium pertechnetate or 123I sodium iodide to quantify the amount of myocardial fatty acid utilization through subtraction of the externally measured water soluble catabolite from the externally measured total activity. In studies with the gamma camera in fasting patients in whom 2 to 3 mCi IHA was injected intravenously after symptom limited bicycle ergometry, in healthy

  17. Techniques for technetium scintigraphy in plants.

    PubMed

    Currie, Geoffrey; Clarke, Simon; Rogiers, Suzy; Wheat, Janelle

    2010-06-01

    The accumulation of technetium by plants has been widely studied and reported in the literature from the perspective of the incorporation of environmental (99)Tc into the food chain. Pertechnetate (TcO(4)(-)) is the most stable surface chemical form of technetium and is known to be extracted by plant roots, transported by the xylem, and reduced in the leaves; however, the mechanism of action is not entirely clear. Measuring the distribution of technetium in plants has been challenging, many questions remaining unanswered. To date, tracer studies for plant physiology (radionuclide and color dye) have relied on destructive sampling, prohibiting repeat-design experimentation. This article explores the technical issues relating to the application of scintigraphic imaging to plant physiology. The benefits and limitations of methods for introducing radiotracers to plants are outlined. Strategies for the successful labeling of various plant organs with (99m)Tc and several unanticipated artifacts are described. The relevance of these labeling experiments to the study of plant vascular transport is explained, and strategies for optimizing the scintigraphic imaging of plants are outlined. Assessing plant physiology is an emerging frontier, especially given the growing importance of water management and the increased competing demand for crops as biofuels.

  18. Bone stress lesions in ballet dancers: scintigraphic assessment.

    PubMed

    Nussbaum, A R; Treves, S T; Micheli, L

    1988-04-01

    Ballet dancers are athletes susceptible to ligamentous and bony injury. We reviewed retrospectively the bone scans (technetium-99m methylene diphosphonate) of 23 ballet dancers with pain in the back and/or lower extremities to determine the usefulness of scintigraphy in the detection of stress lesions of bone. The scintigraphic studies in 19 dancers identified multiple areas of stress injury in both symptomatic and asymptomatic locations. Thirteen dancers had 22 stress fractures (microfractures of trabeculae with associated bone repair) manifested by an intense focus of increased uptake of radiopharmaceutical, and 19 dancers had stress reactions (areas of accelerated remodeling and resorption of bone) demonstrated by diffusely increased uptake of radiotracer. Ten of the 13 dancers with stress fractures were symptomatic and six of the 19 dancers with stress reactions were symptomatic. The radiographs of 10 dancers with positive bone scans were normal or showed no distinction between acute and chronic injuries. Stress fractures were most prevalent in the feet, and stress reactions were most prevalent in the tibiae. The study confirmed that ballet dancers sustain significant bone stress in their legs and feet. Our results show that scintigraphy can be used to detect stress fractures and stress reactions at both symptomatic and asymptomatic sites in this population.

  19. Radionuclide Concentrations in Deer and Elk from Los Alamos National Laboratory: 1991-1998

    SciTech Connect

    D. H. Kraig; J. K. Ferenbaugh; J. R. Biggs; K. D. Bennett; M. A. Mullen; P. R. Fresquez

    1998-12-01

    Mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) and Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus) forage in many areas at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) that may contain radioactivity above natural and/or worldwide fallout levels. This paper summarizes radionuclide concentrations 3H, 90Sr, 137Cs, 238Pu, 239,240Pu, 241Am, and total uranium in muscle and bone tissue of deer and elk collected from LANL lands from 1991 through 1998. Also, the committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE) and the risk of excess cancer fatalities (RECF) to people who ingest muscle and bone from deer and elk collected from LANL lands were estimated. Most radionuclide concentrations in muscle and bone from individual deer and elk collected from LANL lands were either at less than detectable quantities (where the analytical result was smaller than two counting uncertainties) and/or within upper (95%) level background (BG) concentrations. As a group, most radionuclides in muscle and bone of deer and elk from LANL lands were not significantly higher (p<0.10) than in similar tissues from deer and elk collected from BG locations. Also, elk that had been radio collared and tracked for two years and spent an average time of 50% on LANL lands were not significantly different in most radionuclides from road kill elk that have been collected as part of the environmental surveillance program. Overall, the upper (95%) level net CEDES (the CEDE plus two sigma for each radioisotope minus background) at the most conservative ingestion rate (51 lbs of muscle and 13 lbs of bone) were as follows: deer muscle = 0.220, deer bone = 3.762, elk muscle = 0.117, and elk bone = 1.67 mrendy. AU CEDES were far below the International Commission on Radiological Protection guideline of 100 mrem/y, and the highest muscle plus bone CEDE (4.0 mrendy) corresponded to a RECF of 2E-06 which is far below the Environmental Protection Agency upper level guideline of 1E04.

  20. Living Bones, Strong Bones

    NASA Video Gallery

    In this classroom activity, engineering, nutrition, and physical activity collide when students design and build a healthy bone model of a space explorer which is strong enough to withstand increas...

  1. Osteogenetic activity in composite grafts of demineralized compact bone and marrow

    SciTech Connect

    Wittbjer, J.; Palmer, B.; Rohlin, M.; Thorngren, K.G.

    1983-03-01

    The effects of a composite graft of autologous marrow and demineralized autologous compact bone on the healing of a surgically created bone defect were observed in adult rabbits. A segment of the radius was bilaterally resected, demineralized, and replaced. On one side the bone graft was supplemented with autologous marrow. The new bone formation was measured 14 and 28 days after operation by roentgenography, including planimetry with scintigraphy and autoradiography using /sup 99m/Tc-labelled MDP. The composite graft, i.e., demineralized compact bone and marrow, had a significantly higher (p less than 0.01) bone formation rate 14 days after operation compared with the graft with demineralized compact bone in the opposite radius. At 28 days, however, there were no differences between the sides. Viable autologous marrow cells and demineralized autologous compact bone graft accelerate the rate of osteogenesis, but only at the beginning of the healing process.

  2. [Multifocal epithelioid angiosarcoma of bone with lung metastases].

    PubMed

    Pacheco, C; Albalá, M D; Blanco, M; Hidalgo, F J

    2014-01-01

    Angiosarcoma is a rare mesenchymal neoplasm that may arise from vascular or lymphatic tissue. Bone primary angiosarcoma is extremely rare, representing less than 1% of all angiosarcomas. It́s a very aggressive neoplasm and patients have metastatic disease at initial diagnosis in a large percentage of cases. On radiographs, these lesions are usually aggressive osteolytic lesions, commonly with soft-tissue mass extension, and tumoral enhancement on CT or MR imaging. The appearance of the bone scan is variable, describing studies with tracer uptake or low uptake. These tumours are more often found in the long bones, but spinal involvement has been reported in 10% of patients. There are a few reports in the literature of bone angiosarcoma with lung metastases. We present a patient with multifocal epithelioid angiosarcoma (spine and ribs) and multiple lung metastasis, evidenced by CT and conventional bone scintigraphy, with a fast growth.

  3. Multiple Metastasis-Like Bone Lesions in Scintigraphic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Zhao, Chunlei; Liu, Hongbiao; Hou, Haifeng; Zhang, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Multiple benign osteolytic lesions are very hard to differentiate from disseminated bone metastasis. Whole-body bone scintigraphy (WBBS) with technetium-99m methylene diphosphonate (Tc-99m MDP) demonstrates multiple lesions with increased uptake in any bone involved. Even combined with medical history and multiple imaging results, such as MRI and CT, the clinical diagnosis of metastasis lesion remains as a challenge. These clinical characteristics are similar to multiple malignant bone metastases and therefore affect the following treatment procedures. In this paper, we analyzed multiple benign osteolytic lesions, like eosinophilic granuloma (EG), multiple myeloma (MM), disseminated tuberculosis, fibrous dysplasia, or enchondroma, occurring in our daily clinical work and concluded that additional attention should be paid before giving the diagnosis of multiple bone metastases. PMID:22505821

  4. Application of rhenium-188 HEDP in bone metastases therapy.

    PubMed

    Scheffler, Justyna; Derejko, Mirosława; Bandurski, Tomasz; Romanowicz, Grzegorz

    2003-01-01

    Radionuclide bone metastases therapy is a major achievement of nuclear medicine. Development of less radiotoxic and more effective radiopharmaceuticals is therefore a challenge for radiopharmacists and industry. This paper reviews the application of rhenium-188 HEDP as a reactor- or generator-produced nuclide for bone metastases therapy. PMID:14600935

  5. Bone Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... most common types of primary bone cancer are: • Multiple myeloma. Multiple myeloma is the most common primary bone cancer. It ... Any bone can be affected by this cancer. Multiple myeloma affects approximately six people per 100,000 each ...

  6. Bone Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer that starts in a bone is uncommon. Cancer that has spread to the bone from another ... more common. There are three types of bone cancer: Osteosarcoma - occurs most often between ages 10 and ...

  7. Diagnosis of osteomyelitis in the presence of soft-tissue infection and radiologic evidence of osseous abnormalities: Value of leukocyte scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, A.F.; Harley, J.D.; Lipsky, B.A.; Pecoraro, R.E. )

    1991-10-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of 111In-leukocyte scintigraphy for identifying osteomyelitis in the presence of soft-tissue infection, the author prospectively studied 45 bone sites adjacent to soft-tissue infection in patients with abnormal findings on radiographs and 99mTc bone scans that were suggestive of osteomyelitis. 111In-leukocyte scans were analyzed in terms of the intensity of abnormal uptake and its location relative to bone. The diagnosis of osteomyelitis was established from results of percutaneous bone biopsy culture (n = 35), histologic examination of surgical specimens (n = 8), and clinical follow-up (n = 2). Osteomyelitis was present at 22 sites, including 16 of 18 sites with increased leukocyte uptake in bone, resulting in a sensitivity of 73%, specificity of 91%, and positive predictive value of 89% for this finding. Osteomyelitis was present at four of 17 sites with predominantly soft-tissue localization of leukocyte activity in the region of bone, none of seven sites with normal leukocyte scans, and two of three sites with diminished leukocyte uptake in bone. Although not helpful in distinguishing infectious from noninfectious bone abnormalities, 3- and especially 24-hr bone scans viewed in conjunction with leukocyte studies provided important correlation to aid in estimating the location of focal abnormal leukocyte uptake. The finding of soft-tissue infection with increased uptake of labeled leukocytes that extends to involve adjacent bone strongly suggests concurrent osteomyelitis. When the presence of abnormal leukocyte uptake in bone is uncertain, additional imaging and possibly biopsy may be required to establish or exclude the diagnosis of osteomyelitis.

  8. Thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy in acute myocardial infarction and ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Wackers, F.J.

    1982-04-01

    Thallium-201 scintigraphy provides a sensitive and reliable method of detecting acute myocardial infarction and ischemia when imaging is performed with understanding of the temporal characteristics and accuracy of the technique. The results of scintigraphy are related to the time interval between onset of symptoms and time of imaging. During the first 6 hr after chest pain almost all patients with acute myocardial infarction and approximately 50% of the patients with unstable angina will demonstrate /sup 201/TI pefusion defects. Delayed imaging at 2-4 hr will permit distinction between ischemia and infarction. In patients with acute myocardial infarction, the size of the perfusion defect accurately reflects the extent of the infarcted and/or jeopardized myocardium, which may be used for prognostic stratification. In view of the characteristics of /sup 201/TI scintigraphy, the most practical application of this technique is in patients in whom myocardial infarction has to be ruled out, and for early recognition of patients at high risk for complications.

  9. Current role of lung scintigraphy in pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Giordano, A; Angiolillo, D J

    2001-12-01

    The pivotal role of lung scintigraphy in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE) has been questioned in recent years due to the introduction of spiral computed tomography. However, the scintigraphic results used for comparisons are often those of the authoritative PIOPED (Prospective Investigation of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis) study, carried out in the 1980s. Pulmonary scintigraphy has progressed from those years both in the methodological and interpretative fields, although perhaps too slowly. Results better than those of PIOPED's have been presented by study groups who used: 1) perfusion-only approach, 2) SPET imaging; 3) new interpretative criteria; 4) different prediction rules to integrate clinical and scintigraphic probabilities of PE. These advances are still insufficiently recognised by the nuclear medicine community, possibly due to a sort of PIOPED-based "cultural globalisation". This paper reviews the actual advantages and limitations of nuclear medicine techniques, the diagnostic role of scintigraphy within the diagnostic algorithms proposed by international working groups and scientific societies and the results obtained from SPET imaging in the diagnosis of PE.

  10. Radionuclide injury to the lung.

    PubMed Central

    Dagle, G E; Sanders, C L

    1984-01-01

    Radionuclide injury to the lung has been studied in rats, hamsters, dogs, mice and baboons. Exposure of the lung to high dose levels of radionuclides produces a spectrum of progressively more severe functional and morphological changes, ranging from radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis to lung tumors. These changes are somewhat similar for different species. Their severity can be related to the absorbed radiation dose (measured in rads) produced by alpha, beta or gamma radiation emanating from various deposited radionuclides. The chemicophysical forms of radionuclides and spatial-temporal factors are also important variables. As with other forms of injury to the lung, repair attempts are highlighted by fibrosis and proliferation of pulmonary epithelium. Lung tumors are the principal late effect observed in experimental animals following pulmonary deposition of radionuclides at dose levels that do not result in early deaths from radiation pneumonitis or fibrosis. The predominant lung tumors described have been of epithelial origin and have been classified, in decreasing frequency of occurrence, as adenocarcinoma, bronchioloalveolar carcinoma, epidermoid carcinomas and combined epidermoid and adenocarcinoma. Mesothelioma and fibrosarcoma have been observed in rats, but less commonly in other species. Hemangiosarcomas were frequency observed in dogs exposed to beta-gamma emitters, and occasionally in rats exposed to alpha emitters. These morphologic changes in the lungs of experimental animals were reviewed and issues relevant to the prediction of human hazards discussed. PMID:6376095

  11. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Wasteforms

    SciTech Connect

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Jansik, Danielle P.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.

    2012-09-24

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how wasteform performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of wasteform aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of wasteform aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the wasteforms come in contact with groundwater. Data collected throughout the course of this work will be used to quantify the efficacy of concrete wasteforms, similar to those used in the disposal of LLW and MLLW, for the immobilization of key radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium, and iodine). Data collected will also be used to quantify the physical and chemical properties of the concrete affecting radionuclide retention.

  12. A Case of Focal Bone Marrow Reconversion Mimicking Bone Metastasis: The Value of 111Indium Chloride.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takashi; Gobara, Hideo; Inai, Ryota; Iguchi, Toshihiro; Tada, Akihiro; Sato, Shuhei; Yanai, Hiroyuki; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2016-08-01

    We present a case of a 66-year-old man with esophageal carcinoma. 18Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) for evaluating distant metastasis and staging revealed 18F-FDG uptake in the third lumbar vertebra and other vertebrae. Magnetic resonance imaging could not differentiate bone metastases from benign bone lesions. We considered the possibility of bone marrow reconversion. 111Indium chloride (111In-Cl3) scintigraphy with single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) revealed erythroid bone marrow components in the bone lesions. The diagnosis of bone marrow reconversion was pathologically confirmed by a bone biopsy of the third lumbar vertebra. The patient underwent esophagectomy and has remained disease-free in the 2 years since. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to describe the usefulness of 111In-Cl3 with SPECT/CT for the diagnosis of bone marrow reconversion. PMID:27549674

  13. Bone and bone turnover.

    PubMed

    Crofton, Patricia M

    2009-01-01

    Children with cancer are exposed to multiple influences that may adversely affect bone health. Some treatments have direct deleterious effects on bone whilst others may have indirect effects mediated through various endocrine abnormalities. Most clinical outcome studies have concentrated on survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). There is now good evidence that earlier treatment protocols that included cranial irradiation with doses of 24 Gy or greater may result in growth hormone deficiency and low bone mineral density (BMD) in the lumbar spine and femoral neck. Under current protocols, BMD decreases during intensive chemotherapy and fracture risk increases. Although total body BMD may eventually return to normal after completion of chemotherapy, lumbar spine trabecular BMD may remain low for many years. The implications for long-term fracture risk are unknown. Risk factors for low BMD include high dose methotrexate, higher cumulative doses of glucocorticoids, male gender and low physical activity. BMD outcome in non-ALL childhood cancers has been less well studied but there is evidence that survivors of childhood brain or bone tumours, and survivors of bone marrow transplants for childhood malignancy, all have a high risk of long-term osteopenia. Long-term follow-up is required, with appropriate treatment of any endocrine abnormalities identified.

  14. Radionuclides in Chesapeake Bay sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cressy, P. J., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Natural and manmade gamma-ray emitting radionuclides were measured in Chesapeake Bay sediments taken near the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant site. Samples represented several water depths, at six locations, for five dates encompassing a complete seasonal cycle. Radionuclide contents of dry sediments ranged as follows: Tl-208, 40 to 400 pCi/kg; Bi-214, 200 to 800 pCi/kg; K, 0.04 to 2.1 percent; Cs-137 5 to 1900 pCi/kg; Ru106, 40 to 1000 pCikg Co60, 1 to 27 pCi/kg. In general, radionuclide contents were positively correlated with each other and negatively correlated with sediment grain size.

  15. [Bone scanning with sodium 18F-fluoride PET and PET/CT. German guideline Version 1.0.].

    PubMed

    Hellwig, D; Krause, B-J; Schirrmeister, H; Freesmeyer, M

    2010-01-01

    In nuclear medicine, bone scanning is based on the principle of scintigraphy using bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals which accumulate in sites of increased bone formation. From a historical point of view, (18)F-fluoride was one of the first osteotropic tracers which was replaced by (99m)Tc-labelled polyphosphonates. With the development of modern PET equipment the superior diagnostic performance of (18)F-fluoride PET for the detection and characterization of osseous lesions was proven in comparison to conventional bone scanning. Recently, its importance as a substitute of conventional skeletal scintigraphy increased in a time with limited availability of (99)Mo/(99m)Tc. To ensure health care during this period, (18)F-fluoride PET currently became part of common outpatient care. This guideline comprehends recommendations on indications, protocols, interpretation and reporting of (18)F-fluoride PET and PET/CT. PMID:20838734

  16. Interpretation and classification of bone scintigraphic findings in stress fractures.

    PubMed

    Zwas, S T; Elkanovitch, R; Frank, G

    1987-04-01

    A new system for classification of stress fractures identified by bone scintigraphy was developed and divided into four grades according to lesion dimension, bone extension, and tracer accumulation. The scintigraphic findings were evaluated for severity of lesions by extent of the visualized bone response, ranging from ill-defined cortical lesions with slightly increased activity (I) to well-defined intramedullary transcortical lesions with intensely increased activity (IV). Bone scintigraphies using [99mTc]MDP were obtained in 310 military recruits suspected of having stress fractures. In 235 patients, 391 stress fractures were diagnosed. Forty percent of the lesions were asymptomatic. Most of the lesions were in the tibiae (72%), and 87% of the patients had one or two lesions, while 13% had three to five lesions. Eighty-five percent of the lesions were classified as mild and showed early and more complete resolution on follow-up studies after treatment as compared to the severe grades. Furthermore, specific scintigraphic patterns have been introduced for distinguishing inflammatory shin-splints from stress fractures, allowing for their appropriate early treatment. Thus, early recognition of mild stress fracture scintigraphic patterns representing the beginning of pathologic bone response to stress enabled a prompt and effective treatment to prevent progression of lesions, protracted disability, and complications.

  17. Extinct radionuclides. [in solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podosek, F. A.; Swindle, T. D.

    1988-01-01

    Extinct radionuclides, or radioactive isotopes with lifetimes of the order of 1 to 100 Myr that are now extinct in the solar system are discussed. Evidence is presented for the presence of such radionuclides in the early solar system, including Al-26, Mn-53, Pd-107, I-129, Pu-244, and Sm-146. It is suggested that the abundances of these species provide constraints on nucleosynthetic time scales and the history of solar system materials before they became the solar system. The shortest-lived species is Al-26, which may have been sufficiently abundant to be the major heat source for meteorite parent-body metamorphism or igneous differentiation.

  18. Can peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) be useful in radioiodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer?

    PubMed

    Campennì, Alfredo; Pignata, Salvatore A; Baldari, Sergio

    2015-11-01

    We report on a 70-year-old man affected by radioiodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) in whom metastases were treated by peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). Seven years before, patient had undergone total thyroidectomy. Pathological examination was conclusive for DTC. The patient underwent some radioiodine treatments (RaIT). The last post-therapy whole body scan (pT-WBS) performed five days after RaIT did not show abnormal radioiodine uptake but serum thyroglobulin (Tg) value was high in absence of thyroglobulin-antibodies (Tg-Ab). In-111 DTPA-pentetreotide scintigraphy showed several lung lesions with high somatostatin receptor density. Patient underwent PRRT using Lu-177 DOTATOC. pT-WBS scan confirmed the metastases already demonstrated by In-111 DTPA pentetreotide but radioiodine negative.

  19. The use of indium-111 oxine platelet scintigraphy and survival studies in pediatric patients with thrombocytopenia

    SciTech Connect

    Castle, V.P.; Shulkin, B.L.; Coates, G.; Andrew, M. )

    1989-11-01

    We have utilized {sup 111}In-labeled heterologous platelets to investigate the mechanism of thrombocytopenia in ten children. From the scintigraphic findings, platelet survival times, and clinical information, thrombocytopenia was ascribed to decreased production or to increased destruction. Two patients were found to have bone marrow production defects. Two patients with hemangiomas were studied. In one, the hemangioma was shown not to be the cause of thrombocytopenia. In the second, the hemangioma was proven the source of platelet destruction, but was much more extensive than clinically evident. In both, surgical manipulation of the hemangioma was avoided. Six additional patients had thrombocytopenia due to accelerated destruction. In four, the spleen was shown responsible. In two, however, the spleen was shown not to be responsible for the low platelet counts, and splenectomy was avoided. Thus, {sup 111}In-platelet scintigraphy and survival studies are valuable in the classification and management of childhood thrombocytopenia. We believe that this study should be performed, when possible, in any child with thrombocytopenia where the mechanism is unclear or the therapeutic intervention involves splenectomy or resection of a hemangioma.

  20. Bone scanning.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, L D; Bennett, L R

    1975-03-01

    Scanning is based on the uptake of a nuclide by the crystal lattice of bone and is related to bone blood flow. Cancer cells do not take up the tracer. Normally, the scan visualizes the highly vascular bones. Scans are useful and are indicated in metastatic bone disease, primary bone tumors, hematologic malignancies and some non-neoplastic diseases. The scan is more sensitive than x-ray in the detection of malignant diseases of the skeleton. PMID:1054210

  1. Radionuclide labeled lymphocytes for therapeutic use

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, S.C.; Fawwaz, R.A.; Richards, P.

    1983-05-03

    Lymphocytes labelled with ..beta..-emitting radionuclides are therapeutically useful, particularly for lymphoid ablation. They are prepared by incubation of the lymphocytes with the selected radionuclide-oxine complex.

  2. Conditions and processes affecting radionuclide transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simmons, Ardyth M.; Neymark, Leonid A.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding of unsaturated-zone transport is based on laboratory and field-scale experiments. Fractures provide advective transport pathways. Sorption and matrix diffusion may contribute to retardation of radionuclides. Conversely, sorption onto mobile colloids may enhance radionuclide transport.

  3. Thallium-201 scintigraphy of the suppressed thyroid: an alternative for iodine-123 scanning after TSH stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Corstens, F.; Huysmans, D.; Kloppenborg, P.

    1988-08-01

    Thallium-201 scintigraphy of the thyroid gland suppressed by autonomous nodule was compared with /sup 123/I scintigraphy after TSH stimulation. In all patients, similar images were obtained by both methods. In 20 patients, the contralateral lobe was visualized on both scans and in 14 of these, the upper pole of the ipsilateral lobe was also visualized. In one patient, neither /sup 123/I scanning after TSH nor /sup 201/TI scintigraphy showed any extranodular tissue. This study suggests that /sup 201/TI scintigraphy is a reliable alternative for scanning after TSH. It is a relatively simple method, not inducing any TSH-related allergic reactions. Iodine uptake in extranodular tissue is not stimulated and therefore, /sup 201/TI scintigraphy and radioiodine therapy can be combined on one day, without increasing the risk of radiation damage to the normal thyroid tissue with a resultant post-treatment hypothyroidism.

  4. Dosimetric characterization of radionuclides for systemic tumor therapy: Influence of particle range, photon emission, and subcellular distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Uusijaervi, Helena; Bernhardt, Peter; Ericsson, Thomas; Forssell-Aronsson, Eva

    2006-09-15

    Various radionuclides have been proposed for systemic tumor therapy. However, in most dosimetric analysis of proposed radionuclides the charged particles are taken into consideration while the potential photons are ignored. The photons will cause undesirable irradiation of normal tissue, and increase the probability of toxicity in, e.g., the bone marrow. The aim of this study was to investigate the dosimetric properties according to particle range, photon emission, and subcellular radionuclide distribution, of a selection of radionuclides used or proposed for radionuclide therapy, and to investigate the possibility of dividing radionuclides into groups according to their dosimetric properties. The absorbed dose rate to the tumors divided by the absorbed dose rate to the normal tissue (TND) was estimated for different tumor sizes in a mathematical model of the human body. The body was simulated as a 70-kg ellipsoid and the tumors as spheres of different sizes (1 ng-100 g). The radionuclides were either assumed to be uniformly distributed throughout the entire tumor and normal tissue, or located in the nucleus or the cytoplasm of the tumor cells and on the cell membrane of the normal cells. Fifty-nine radionuclides were studied together with monoenergetic electrons, positrons, and alpha particles. The tumor and normal tissue were assumed to be of water density. The activity concentration ratio between the tumor and normal tissue was assumed to be 25. The radionuclides emitting low-energy electrons combined with a low photon contribution, and the alpha emitters showed high TND values for most tumor sizes. Electrons with higher energy gave reduced TND values for small tumors, while a higher photon contribution reduced the TND values for large tumors. Radionuclides with high photon contributions showed low TND value for all tumor sizes studied. The radionuclides studied could be divided into four main groups according to their TND values: beta emitters, Auger electron

  5. Tumor immunotargeting using innovative radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Kraeber-Bodéré, Françoise; Rousseau, Caroline; Bodet-Milin, Caroline; Mathieu, Cédric; Guérard, François; Frampas, Eric; Carlier, Thomas; Chouin, Nicolas; Haddad, Ferid; Chatal, Jean-François; Faivre-Chauvet, Alain; Chérel, Michel; Barbet, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews some aspects and recent developments in the use of antibodies to target radionuclides for tumor imaging and therapy. While radiolabeled antibodies have been considered for many years in this context, only a few have reached the level of routine clinical use. However, alternative radionuclides, with more appropriate physical properties, such as lutetium-177 or copper-67, as well as alpha-emitting radionuclides, including astatine-211, bismuth-213, actinium-225, and others are currently reviving hopes in cancer treatments, both in hematological diseases and solid tumors. At the same time, PET imaging, with short-lived radionuclides, such as gallium-68, fluorine-18 or copper-64, or long half-life ones, particularly iodine-124 and zirconium-89 now offers new perspectives in immuno-specific phenotype tumor imaging. New antibody analogues and pretargeting strategies have also considerably improved the performances of tumor immunotargeting and completely renewed the interest in these approaches for imaging and therapy by providing theranostics, companion diagnostics and news tools to make personalized medicine a reality. PMID:25679452

  6. Tumor Immunotargeting Using Innovative Radionuclides

    PubMed Central

    Kraeber-Bodéré, Françoise; Rousseau, Caroline; Bodet-Milin, Caroline; Mathieu, Cédric; Guérard, François; Frampas, Eric; Carlier, Thomas; Chouin, Nicolas; Haddad, Ferid; Chatal, Jean-François; Faivre-Chauvet, Alain; Chérel, Michel; Barbet, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews some aspects and recent developments in the use of antibodies to target radionuclides for tumor imaging and therapy. While radiolabeled antibodies have been considered for many years in this context, only a few have reached the level of routine clinical use. However, alternative radionuclides, with more appropriate physical properties, such as lutetium-177 or copper-67, as well as alpha-emitting radionuclides, including astatine-211, bismuth-213, actinium-225, and others are currently reviving hopes in cancer treatments, both in hematological diseases and solid tumors. At the same time, PET imaging, with short-lived radionuclides, such as gallium-68, fluorine-18 or copper-64, or long half-life ones, particularly iodine-124 and zirconium-89 now offers new perspectives in immuno-specific phenotype tumor imaging. New antibody analogues and pretargeting strategies have also considerably improved the performances of tumor immunotargeting and completely renewed the interest in these approaches for imaging and therapy by providing theranostics, companion diagnostics and news tools to make personalized medicine a reality. PMID:25679452

  7. Natural radionuclide accumulation by raindrops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, Anatoly; Martin, Inacio; Shkevov, Rumen; Alves, Mauro

    2016-07-01

    The laboratory of environmental radiation of ITA (São José dos Campos, 23°11'11″S, 45°52'43″W, 650 MAMSL) performs simultaneous monitoring of a natural radiation background and meteorological parameters. A time resolution of up to 1 minute allows a detailed comparison of changes in meteorological parameters with those of a concentration of ambient radon progenies in the atmosphere. Results of a study of variation of a fallout of radon progenies ^{214}Pb and ^{214}Bi concomitanting rainfalls are present. The radionuclide fallout rate is reconstructed from the observed gamma rate through a simulation of the first kind Volterra integral equation with difference kernel, determined by ratio of precipitating rates of 214Pb and 214Bi and their decay half times. An original straightforward step-by-step procedure was used for the numerical solution of the equation. The radionuclide concentration in the rainwater is calculated as a ratio of the reconstructed fallout to the measured rainfall. It was observed that the radionuclide fallout rate increases as the rainfall one in approximately power 0.6, i.e. the same as the mean raindrop volume. The concentration thereafter decreases as the rainfall rate in power 0.4. A numerical simulation of the process of accumulation of the radionuclides during diffusion and coalescence drop growth and aerosol scavenging during a passage from a cloud to the ground was performed. The results of the simulations agree with the experimental data.

  8. [Management of bone metastases from breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Naoki; Yamauchi, Hideko; Nakamura, Seigo

    2012-08-01

    Bone is the most common of breast cancer metastasis. Bone metastasis causes skeletal-related events(SREs), including pain, bone fractures, spinal cord compression, and hypercalcemia. SREs significantly impair patients' quality of life. The main purpose of treatment for bone metastasis is to prevent or delay SREs and to improve patients' quality of life. Accurate diagnosis of bone metastases is important in order to choose an appropriate treatment. Treatment of bone metastasis requires a multidisciplinary approach. Analgesic medication with NSAIDs and opioids is the first choice for pain control. In addition to bisphosphonate, the receptor activator of the nuclear factor κB ligand(RANKL)inhibitor, denosumab is a novel bone-targeting agent effective in preventing SREs. Prophylactic stabilization of impending fractures provides several advantages compared with fixation of an acute fracture, in terms of short hospitalization and a quick return to baseline. In general, radiation therapy is indicated for patients for whom surgery is suitable. Radiation therapy to palliate pain from bone metastasis can reduce the intake of analgesic medications. Local radiation therapy is indicated for a limited number of bone metastases, and systemic radionuclide therapy is appropriate for multiple lesions. In summary, treatment using these modalities for bone metastasis from breast cancer should be stratified, considering the symptoms, site of bone metastasis, and patients' life expectancy and performance status.

  9. TECHNOLOGIES FOR RADON AND RADIONUCLIDE REMOVAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper provides a summary of the technologies that are currently being used to remove radionuclides from drinking water. The radionuclides that are featured are the radionuclides currently regulated by EPA; radium, radon and uranium. Tehnologies effective for removal of eac...

  10. [Role of Radionuclide Technologies in Medicine].

    PubMed

    Chernyaev, A P; Belousov, A V; Varzar, S M; Borchegovskaya, P Y; Nikolaeva, A A; Krusanov, G A

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes the role of radionuclide technologies among the nuclear-physical methods used in medicine. The condition and prospects of the development of nuclear technology with use of radionuclides in medicine, and in particular, the method of brachytherapy are analyzed. The analysis of the current state of applying radionuclide facilities in medicine is provided.

  11. Measurement of radionuclides in waste packages

    DOEpatents

    Brodzinski, Ronald L.; Perkins, Richard W.; Rieck, Henry G.; Wogman, Ned A.

    1986-01-01

    A method is described for non-destructively assaying the radionuclide content of solid waste in a sealed container by analysis of the waste's gamma-ray spectrum and neutron emissions. Some radionuclides are measured by characteristic photopeaks in the gamma-ray spectrum; transuranic nuclides are measured by neutron emission rate; other radionuclides are measured by correlation with those already measured.

  12. Measurement of radionuclides in waste packages

    DOEpatents

    Brodzinski, R.L.; Perkins, R.W.; Rieck, H.G.; Wogman, N.A.

    1984-09-12

    A method is described for non-destructively assaying the radionuclide content of solid waste in a sealed container by analysis of the waste's gamma-ray spectrum and neutron emissions. Some radionuclides are measured by characteristic photopeaks in the gamma-ray spectrum; transuranic nuclides are measured by neutron emission rate; other radionuclides are measured by correlation with those already measured.

  13. Low Bone Density

    MedlinePlus

    ... Density Exam/Testing › Low Bone Density Low Bone Density Low bone density is when your bone density ... people with normal bone density. Detecting Low Bone Density A bone density test will determine whether you ...

  14. Perfusion Scintigraphy and Patient Selection for Lung Volume Reduction Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Divay; Lipson, David A.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Hansen-Flaschen, John; Sciurba, Frank C.; DeCamp, Malcolm M.; Reilly, John J.; Washko, George R.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: It is unclear if lung perfusion can predict response to lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS). Objectives: To study the role of perfusion scintigraphy in patient selection for LVRS. Methods: We performed an intention-to-treat analysis of 1,045 of 1,218 patients enrolled in the National Emphysema Treatment Trial who were non–high risk for LVRS and had complete perfusion scintigraphy results at baseline. The median follow-up was 6.0 years. Patients were classified as having upper or non–upper lobe–predominant emphysema on visual examination of the chest computed tomography and high or low exercise capacity on cardiopulmonary exercise testing at baseline. Low upper zone perfusion was defined as less than 20% of total lung perfusion distributed to the upper third of both lungs as measured on perfusion scintigraphy. Measurements and Main Results: Among 284 of 1,045 patients with upper lobe–predominant emphysema and low exercise capacity at baseline, the 202 with low upper zone perfusion had lower mortality with LVRS versus medical management (risk ratio [RR], 0.56; P = 0.008) unlike the remaining 82 with high perfusion where mortality was unchanged (RR, 0.97; P = 0.62). Similarly, among 404 of 1,045 patients with upper lobe–predominant emphysema and high exercise capacity, the 278 with low upper zone perfusion had lower mortality with LVRS (RR, 0.70; P = 0.02) unlike the remaining 126 with high perfusion (RR, 1.05; P = 1.00). Among the 357 patients with non–upper lobe–predominant emphysema (75 with low and 282 with high exercise capacity) there was no improvement in survival with LVRS and measurement of upper zone perfusion did not contribute new prognostic information. Conclusions: Compared with optimal medical management, LVRS reduces mortality in patients with upper lobe–predominant emphysema when there is low rather than high perfusion to the upper lung. PMID:20538961

  15. [Radionuclide therapy for the treatment of skeletal metastases of urological malignancies: a forgotten therapy?].

    PubMed

    Badawi, J K

    2012-08-01

    Many patients suffering from urological or non-urological malignancies develop bone metastases. One symptom often found is severe skeletal pain which siginificantly lowers the quality of life. Further symptoms are pathological fractures, spinal cord compression and hypercalcemia. The systemic radiopharmaceutical therapy represents an important systemic treatment option, in addition to chemotherapy, hormone therapy, external beam radiation, bisphosphonates and analgesics. The radionuclide therapy is rarely used and often used in a later phase of disease, mainly known for the bone pain palliation. This review article should help remind physicians to use this interesting therapy. It focuses on the common radionuclides Strontium-89-chloride, Samarium-153-EDTMP (ethylene-diamine-tetra-methylene-phosphonate) and Rhenium-186-HEDP (hydroxyethylidene-diphosphonate), their physical characteristics and differences, contraindications of the therapy like spinal cord compression and side effects. Additionally, potential tumoricidal activity and improvement of survival are discussed when using the radionuclides repetitively or in combination. The European and German guidelines are included. Furthermore, the combination of radionuclides and bisphosphonates or chemotherapy are briefly discussed, based on available clinical studies. Additionally, alpharadin (radium-223 chloride) is discussed, an experimental radiopharmaceutical under clinical evaluation, which emits alpha-radiation. In phase III clinical trials, it was shown to significantly increase the median overall survival in patients with bone metastases from advanced prostate cancer. PMID:22875692

  16. Detection of deep venous thrombosis by indium-111 leukocyte scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    D'Alonzo, W.A. Jr.; Alavi, A.

    1986-05-01

    Indium-111-labeled leukocyte ((/sup 111/In)WBC) scintigraphy has been used successfully for detection of inflammation. Occasionally, noninflammatory collections of white blood cells such as hematomas or hemorrhage have been localized. We report a case in which unsuspected femoral deep venous thrombosis was diagnosed on an (/sup 111/In)WBC leukocyte scan performed for detection of osteomyelitis. Readers are advised to avoid interpreting all vascular (/sup 111/In)WBC localization as necessarily infectious. This may be of particular significance in patients with vascular grafts.

  17. Dynamic ventilation scintigraphy: a comparison of parameter estimation gating models.

    PubMed

    Hack, S N; Paoni, R A; Stratton, H; Valvano, M; Line, B R; Cooper, J A

    1988-11-01

    Two procedures for providing the synchronization of ventilation scintigraphic data to create dynamic displays of the pulmonary cycle are described and compared. These techniques are based on estimating instantaneous lung volume by pneumotachometry and by scintigraphy. Twenty-three patients were studied by these two techniques. The results indicate that the estimation of the times of end-inspiration and end-expiration are equivalent by the two techniques but the morphologies of the two estimated time-volume waveforms are not equivalent. Ventilation cinescintigraphy based on time division gating but not on isovolume division gating can be equivalently generated from list mode acquired data by employing either technique described.

  18. Rare case of thoracic kidney detected by renal scintigraphy

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Aravintho; Agrawal, Archi; Purandare, Nilendu; Shah, Sneha; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2016-01-01

    Intrathoracic kidney is a rare congenital abnormality with lowest frequency among all renal ectopias. Patients with thoracic kidneys are usually asymptomatic, and the condition is usually discovered incidentally during radiological evaluation for other conditions or during thoracic surgery. We report a case of a 62-year-old male who was referred to our department for renal scintigraphy for a nonvisualized left kidney on ultrasonography report. Both Tc-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid scans revealed a left thoracic kidney which was confirmed by CT scan of the thorax and abdomen. PMID:27385896

  19. Identification of CSF fistulas by radionuclide counting

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Y.; Kunishio, K.; Sunami, N.; Yamamoto, Y.; Satoh, T.; Suga, M.; Asari, S. )

    1990-07-01

    A radionuclide counting method, performed with the patient prone and the neck flexed, was used successfully to diagnose CSF rhinorrhea in two patients. A normal radionuclide ratio (radionuclide counts in pledget/radionuclide counts in 1-ml blood sample) was obtained in 11 normal control subjects. Significance was determined to be a ratio greater than 0.37. Use of radionuclide counting method of determining CSF rhinorrhea is recommended when other methods have failed to locate a site of leakage or when posttraumatic meningitis suggests subclinical CSF rhinorrhea.

  20. Application of Monte Carlo Methods in Molecular Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann Siantar, C; Descalle, M-A; DeNardo, G L; Nigg, D W

    2002-02-19

    Targeted radionuclide therapy promises to expand the role of radiation beyond the treatment of localized tumors. This novel form of therapy targets metastatic cancers by combining radioactive isotopes with tumor-seeking molecules such as monoclonal antibodies and custom-designed synthetic agents. Ultimately, like conventional radiotherapy, the effectiveness of targeted radionuclide therapy is limited by the maximum dose that can be given to a critical, normal tissue, such as bone marrow, kidneys, and lungs. Because radionuclide therapy relies on biological delivery of radiation, its optimization and characterization are necessarily different than for conventional radiation therapy. We have initiated the development of a new, Monte Carlo transport-based treatment planning system for molecular targeted radiation therapy as part of the MINERVA treatment planning system. This system calculates patient-specific radiation dose estimates using a set of computed tomography scans to describe the 3D patient anatomy, combined with 2D (planar image) and 3D (SPECT, or single photon emission computed tomography) to describe the time-dependent radiation source. The accuracy of such a dose calculation is limited primarily by the accuracy of the initial radiation source distribution, overlaid on the patient's anatomy. This presentation provides an overview of MINERVA functionality for molecular targeted radiation therapy, and describes early validation and implementation results of Monte Carlo simulations.

  1. Bone tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... physical exam. Tests that may be done include: Alkaline phosphatase blood level Bone biopsy Bone scan Chest x- ... may also be ordered to monitor the disease: Alkaline phosphatase isoenzyme Blood calcium level Parathyroid hormone Blood phosphorus ...

  2. Bone Markers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alkaline Phosphatase; Osteocalcin; P1NP; Procollagen Type 1 N-Terminal Propeptide Formal name: Biochemical Markers of Bone Remodeling ... tests for evaluating bone turnover: C-telopeptide (C-terminal telopeptide of type 1 collagen (CTx)) – a marker ...

  3. Bone Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the body, bones can get infected. The infections are usually bacterial, but can also be fungal. ... bloodstream. People who are at risk for bone infections include those with diabetes, poor circulation, or recent ...

  4. Semi-quantitative assessment of tibial blood flow and distribution in response to surgical intervention using first pass radionuclide angiography and intravascular vital dye.

    PubMed

    Field, J R; Lord, P; Maaripuu, E; Sumner-Smith, G

    1999-12-01

    The acute vascular response in bone to surgical trauma was investigated utilizing a sheep model. Blood flow and distribution were determined using two methods; perfusion of the vasculature with an intravascular vital dye (Disulphine blue) prior to euthanasia and by radionuclide angiography (RNA) before and after each surgical intervention. The pattern of Disulphine blue distribution provided a good indication of local perfusion and response to surgical trauma (drilling holes). Radionuclide angiography provided a dynamic image of the vascular response to surgical trauma. The generation of time activity curves of the first pass of radionuclide bolus enabled calculation of the relative blood flow through selected regions. For both techniques areas of ischaemia were apparent which were directly related to the location of screw holes. We conclude that factors other than bone plate contact influence the ischaemia that develops in bone subsequent to the application of bone plates.

  5. Radionuclide synovectomy - essentials for rheumatologists.

    PubMed

    Chojnowski, Marek M; Felis-Giemza, Anna; Kobylecka, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Radionuclide synovectomy is a minimally invasive method of treating persistent joint inflammation. It involves intra-articular injection of radioactive colloids which induce necrosis and fibrosis of hypertrophic synovial membrane. The most common indication for radiosynovectomy is rheumatoid arthritis, although patients with seronegative spondyloarthropathies, unclassified arthritis, haemophilic arthropathy and other less common arthropathies can also benefit from this method. Radiosynovectomy is safe, well tolerated and efficacious. About 70-80% of patients respond well to the therapy. However, the therapeutic effects are considerably worse in patients with co-existent osteoarthritis and advanced joint degeneration. Despite its advantages, radionuclide synovectomy is not performed as often as it could be, so greater knowledge and understanding of this method are needed. The authors present the most important facts about radiosynovectomy that may help rheumatologists in their daily clinical practice. PMID:27504020

  6. Indium-111 leukocyte scintigraphic detection of subclinical osteomyelitis complicating delayed and nonunion long bone fractures: a prospective study

    SciTech Connect

    Esterhai, J.L. Jr.; Goll, S.R.; McCarthy, K.E.; Velchik, M.; Alavi, A.; Brighton, C.T.; Heppenstall, R.B.

    1987-01-01

    Twenty patients were studied prospectively with indium-labeled leukocyte imaging to evaluate its effectiveness in differentiating noninfected delayed or nonunion from osteomyelitis complicating these entities. All patients underwent an open surgical procedure within 24 h of the scan. Bone specimens from the nonunion site were obtained for microbiological and histological analysis to confirm the presence or absence of osteomyelitis. In these twenty patients, the sensitivity of the indium scintigraphy was 100%, the specificity 100%, and the overall accuracy 100%. Indium-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy is significantly more accurate than /sup 99m/technetium and /sup 67/gallium imaging had been, when studied earlier, in detecting subclinical osteomyelitis complicating nonunion. Indium-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy should supplant sequential technetium and gallium studies in this patient population when the surgeon must determine whether subclinical osteomyelitis is complicating fracture management of delayed and nonunions.

  7. Natural chelates for radionuclide decorporation

    DOEpatents

    Premuzic, E.T.

    1983-08-25

    This invention relates to the method and resulting chelates of desorbing a radionuclide selected from thorium, uranium, and plutonium containing cultures in a bioavailable form involving pseudomonas or other microorganisms. A preferred microorganism is Pseudomonas aeruginosa which forms multiple chelates with thorium in the range of molecular weight 1000 to 1000 and also forms chelates with uranium of molecular weight in the area of 100 to 1000 and 1000 to 2000.

  8. Chernobyl radionuclide distribution and migration.

    PubMed

    Izrael, Yury A

    2007-11-01

    The accident at Unit No. 4 of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant on 26 April 1986 presented severe challenges in radiation protection. Early activity measurements defined the contaminated areas in order to determine what persons should be evacuated on the basis of the exposure limit at that time of 100 mSv (10 rem) for accidents. The immediate definition of these areas was accomplished with specially equipped aircraft capable of measuring external gamma-exposure rate and radionuclide spectra. Over time, maps of 137Cs contamination (the most important long-lived radionuclide) have become more and more sophisticated and have been used for further determinations of the control of the consequences of the accident. About 70% of the total release of 137Cs was deposited in Belarus, the Russian Federation, and Ukraine; but there was also widespread deposition throughout the countries of Western Europe. Two atlases of contamination throughout Europe were prepared, and the Russian atlas included data on other radionuclides and on external gamma-exposure rates. The radiocesiums behaved as volatile radionuclides because of the volatility of cesium. In contrast to the typical pattern after nuclear weapons tests, 90Sr behaved only as a refractory element, as its volatile precursors krypton and rubidium had already decayed within the reactor. Nearly all of the refractory elements (strontium, plutonium, etc.) released by the accident were confined to the 30-km zone around the reactor. A proposal is made to develop a more complete atlas of 137Cs deposition from the accident that would include the entire Northern Hemisphere. Water was not an important vector of exposure to human beings following the accident. PMID:18049217

  9. Indium-111-labeled platelet scintigraphy in carotid atherosclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Minar, E.; Ehringer, H.; Dudczak, R.; Schoefl, R.J.; Jung, M.; Koppensteiner, R.; Ahmadi, R.; Kretschmer, G.

    1989-01-01

    We evaluated platelet accumulation in carotid arteries by means of a dual-radiotracer method, using indium-111-labeled platelets and technetium-99m-labeled human serum albumin, in 123 patients (92 men, 31 women; median age 60 years). Sixty patients had symptoms of transient ischemic carotid artery disease, and 63 patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease served as controls. Antiplatelet treatment with acetylsalicylic acid was taken by 53 of the 123 patients. In 36 of the 60 symptomatic patients, platelet scintigraphy was repeated 3-4 days after carotid endarterectomy. Comparison of different scintigraphic parameters (platelet accumulation index and percent of the injected dose of labeled platelets at the carotid bifurcation) showed no significant differences between symptomatic and asymptomatic patients, and the severity of stenosis and the presence of plaque ulceration also had no influence on the parameters. There was no difference between patients with a short (less than 4 weeks) or long (greater than 4 weeks) interval from the last transient ischemic attack to scintigraphy and no difference between patients with or without antiplatelet treatment. Classifying the patients according to plaque morphology judged by high-resolution real-time ultrasonography also demonstrated no differences. No significant correlation was found between any scintigraphic parameter and other platelet function parameters such as platelet survival time, platelet turnover rate, and concentration of platelet-specific proteins. Quantification of platelet deposition after carotid endarterectomy in 36 patients demonstrated a significant increase of the median platelet accumulation index and the percent injected dose index.

  10. A sign of symptomatic chronic cholecystitis on biliary scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Sheikh, W.; Hourani, M.; Barkin, J.S.; Clarke, L.P.; Ashkar, F.S.; Serafini, A.N.

    1983-02-01

    Five hundred patients with acute right-upper-quadrant pain underwent biliary scintigraphy with /sup 99m/Tc paraisopropyliminodiacetic acid. One hundred and thirty-four studies were reported normal (both gallbladder and activity in bowel are noted in 1 hr). Of the 134 studies reported as normal, 32 showed intestinal activity before gallbladder visualization during the first hour of the study. Sonography and/or oral cholecystography revealed that 24 patients had gallstones, and eight patients had no demonstrable pathology in the biliary system. Of the 134 studies, 102 showed visualization of the gallbladder before intestinal activity during the first hour of the study. Sonography and/or oral cholecystography showed that 73 patients had normal biliary system. The remaining 29 patients had gallstones. The overall sensitivity of this finding is 45%, the specificity is 90%, and the accuracy is 73%. In this group of symptomatic patients, the appearance of intestinal activity before gallbladder activity on biliary scintigraphy warrants further evaluation of these patients by sonography and/or oral cholecystography.

  11. 131I-19-iodocholesterol scintigraphy of the adrenal cortex.

    PubMed

    Dige-Petersen, H; Munkner, T; Fogh, J; Blichert-Toft, M; Lund, J O

    1975-09-01

    131-I-19-iodocholesterol scintigraphy of the adrenal cortex has been carried out in 26 patients. In 4 patients with normal adrenocortical function the tracer was equally accumulated on the two sides. In 7 patients with untreated Cushing's syndrome, bilateral uptake was found in 4 patients with bilateral hyperplasia whereas unilateral visualization was obtained in three cases of cortisol producing adenomas. The side localization was confirmed at operation. Eight patients had been operated for Cushings syndrome prior to the scintigraphy. Remnant adrenocortical tissue with negligible or subnormal function (4 patients) could not be visualized. Normo- or hyperfunctioning remnant tissue was visualized in 3 patients. One patient had recurrent hypercorticism due to metastases from a previously removed adrenocortical carcinoma; a single pelvic accumulation was seen, whereas several metastases in the abdomen and thorax were not visualized. Four patients with aldosteronism were investigated. Three had primary aldosteronism due to an adrenocortical adenoma. In two of these, the site of the adrenal lesion was localized pre-operatively. In the third patient, equal bilateral accumulation of iodocholesterol was seen even after suppression with dexamethasone. At operation a small tumour was found. In 1 patient with indeterminate aldosteronism both glands were visualized and at a second examination the uptake was equally suppressed by dexamethasone.

  12. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy in patients receiving hepatic artery infusion chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Housholder, D.F.; Hynes, H.E.; Dakhil, S.R.; Marymont, J.H. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Two patients receiving hepatic artery infusion chemotherapy (HAIC) required cholecystectomy for both acute and chronic cholecystitis with cholelithiasis suggesting chemical cholecystitis. To evaluate the incidence of gall bladder dysfunction in patients receiving HAIC, the authors performed hepatobiliary scintigraphy using Tc-99m DISIDA or PIPIDA on eight patients receiving HAIC through an indwelling hepatic artery catheter and Infusaid (trademark) pump. In 7 of 8 patients, there was non-visualization of the gall bladder throughout the hepatobiliary study. In the eighth patient, the gall bladder visualized at 2 hr. One patient with non-visualization of the gall bladder at 4 hr developed acute symptoms requiring cholecystectomy which showed acute and chronic cholecystitis with cholethiasis. There was prominent sclerosis which was thought to be due to chemical cholecystitis as well as cholelithiasis. In all 10 patients, no evidence of cholecystitis had been observed during the surgical placement of the hepatic artery catheter and Infusaid pump. The hepatobiliary scintigraphic finding of gall bladder dysfunction in all eight patients studied is most likely due to chemical cholecystitis from HAIC. This series suggests that chemical cholecystitis is common during HAIC and can be identified by hepatobiliary scintigraphy. The authors consider elective cholecystectomy during the operative placement of the hepatic artery catheter and Infusaid pump.

  13. Radionuclide therapy for osseous metastases in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Abi-Ghanem, Alain S; McGrath, Mary A; Jacene, Heather A

    2015-01-01

    Bone metastases are associated with increased morbidity and poor prognosis in castration-resistant prostate cancer. Since 2010, 5 systemic therapies for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration based on an improvement in overall survival, offering alternatives to docetaxel, a chemotherapeutic agent with modest effect and significant toxicity. These systemic treatments belong to different classes of medication such as immunotherapy, hormonal therapy, chemotherapy, and radionuclide therapy. Radium-223 dichloride ((223)RaCl2), approved in May 2013, is a novel α-emitting radiopharmaceutical that targets areas of increased bone turnover in bone metastases, delivering densely ionizing radiation within a short tissue range and causing more severe chromosomal damage than β-emitting radiopharmaceuticals. In this article, we review the clinical development of (223)RaCl2, focusing on its effects on pain relief, skeletal events, biochemical markers, overall survival, quality of life, and safety. We also outline the differences between (223)RaCl2 and the previously developed bone-seeking β-emitters and briefly present new trials on the horizon involving (223)RaCl2.

  14. Radionuclide behavior in the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Tveten, U. )

    1991-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the results of the following task: Review for quality and consistency the available data on measurements of initial ground contamination of Chernobyl radionuclides in various parts of Norway and subsequent concentrations of these radionuclides in various environmental media as functions of time. Utilize the data obtained to verify the existing models, or to improve them, for describing radionuclide behavior in the environment. Some of the processes standard were: migration into soil; weathering; resuspension; food-chain contamination; and loss or reconcentration by run-off. The task performed within this contract has been to use post-Chernobyl data from Norway to verify or find areas for possible improvement in the chronic exposure pathway models utilized in MACCS. Work has consisted mainly of collecting and evaluating post-Chernobyl information from Norway or other countries when relevant; but has also included experimental work performed specifically for the current task. In most connections the data available show the models and data in MACCS to be appropriate. A few areas where the data indicate that the MACCS approach is faulty or inadequate are, however, pointed out in the report. These should be examined carefully, and appropriate modifications should eventually be made. 14 refs., 12 figs., 22 tabs.

  15. 123I-Metaiodobenzylguanidine Myocardial Scintigraphy in Lewy Body-Related Disorders: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Eun Joo; Kim, Sang Jin

    2015-01-01

    Lewy body-related disorders are characterized by the presence of Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites, which have abnormal aggregations of α-synuclein in the nigral and extranigral areas, including in the heart. 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy is a well-known tool to evaluate cardiac sympathetic denervation in the Lewy body-related disorders. MIBG scintigraphy showed low uptake of MIBG in the Lewy body-related disorders, including Parkinson’s disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, pure autonomic failure and rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder. This review summarizes previous results on the diagnostic applications of MIBG scintigraphy in Lewy body-related disorders. PMID:26090077

  16. Radionuclide daughter inventory generator code: DIG

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, D.E.; Sharp, R.D.

    1985-09-01

    The Daughter Inventory Generator (DIG) code accepts a tabulation of radionuclide initially present in a waste stream, specified as amounts present either by mass or by activity, and produces a tabulation of radionuclides present after a user-specified elapsed time. This resultant radionuclide inventory characterizes wastes that have undergone daughter ingrowth during subsequent processes, such as leaching and transport, and includes daughter radionuclides that should be considered in these subsequent processes or for inclusion in a pollutant source term. Output of the DIG code also summarizes radionuclide decay constants. The DIG code was developed specifically to assist the user of the PRESTO-II methodology and code in preparing data sets and accounting for possible daughter ingrowth in wastes buried in shallow-land disposal areas. The DIG code is also useful in preparing data sets for the PRESTO-EPA code. Daughter ingrowth in buried radionuclides and in radionuclides that have been leached from the wastes and are undergoing hydrologic transport are considered, and the quantities of daughter radionuclide are calculated. Radionuclide decay constants generated by DIG and included in the DIG output are required in the PRESTO-II code input data set. The DIG accesses some subroutines written for use with the CRRIS system and accesses files containing radionuclide data compiled by D.C. Kocher. 11 refs.

  17. Disturbances of bone growth and development

    SciTech Connect

    Ledesma-Medina, J.; Newman, B.; Oh, K.S.

    1988-03-01

    ''What is growth anyway. Can one talk about positive growth in childhood, neutral growth in maturity, and negative growth in old age. Our goal is to help promote normal positive growth in infants and children. To achieve this, we must be cognizant of the morphologic changes of both normal and abnormal bone formation as they are reflected in the radiographic image of the skeleton. The knowledge of the various causes and the pathophysiologic mechanisms of the disturbances of bone growth and development allows us to recognize the early radiographic manifestations. Endocrine and metabolic disorders affect the whole skeleton, but the early changes are best seen in the distal ends of the femurs, where growth rate is most rapid. In skeletal infections and in some vascular injuries two-or three-phase bone scintigraphy supercedes radiography early in the course of the disease. MRI has proved to be very helpful in the early detection of avascular bone necrosis, osteomyelitis, and tumor. Some benign bone tumors and many bone dysplasias have distinct and diagnostic radiographic findings that may preclude further studies. In constitutional diseases of bone, including chromosomal aberrations, skeletal surveys of the patient and all family members together with biochemical and cytogenetic studies are essential for both diagnosis and genetic counseling. Our role is to perform the least invasive and most informative diagnostic imaging modalities that corroborate the biochemical and histologic findings to establish the definitive diagnosis. Unrecognized, misdiagnosed, or improperly treated disturbance of bone growth can result in permanent deformity usually associated with disability. 116 references.

  18. The use of gated radionuclide angiography in the diagnosis of cardiac contusion

    SciTech Connect

    Fenner, J.E.; Knopp, R.; Lee, B.; dos Santos, P.A.; Wessel, R.J.; Dang, C.V.; Parks, S.N.

    1984-09-01

    No currently used diagnostic test is an accurate predictor of patients who will develop morbidity or mortality from cardiac contusion. In a prospective study we used gated cardiac radionuclide angiography to assess cardiac function in 30 patients with blunt chest trauma, and we compared the results of this test with those of other diagnostic studies for cardiac contusion to determine whether gated angiography is a more accurate predictor of serious cardiac injury. Diagnostic tests included the following: serial electrocardiograms (ECG), serial creatine phosphokinase muscle-brain isoenzyme (CPK-MB) and lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) isoenzymes, gated cardiac radionuclide angiography, and technetium-99m (Tc-99m) pyrophosphate scintigraphy. Abnormal studies were present in 26 patients; 22 showed abnormalities in CPK-MB, 19 on ECG, and five on gated scan. No patient demonstrated an abnormal Tc-99m pyrophosphate scan or abnormal elevation of LDH isoenzyme. Although no diagnostic test was predictive of morbidity and mortality, CPK-MB isoenzyme was the only test to correlate with morbidity and mortality. Morbidity and mortality correlated most closely with the number of associated major injuries and the presence of hypotension or hypoxia.

  19. Methods of separating short half-life radionuclides from a mixture of radionuclides

    DOEpatents

    Bray, L.A.; Ryan, J.L.

    1998-09-15

    The present invention is a method of obtaining a radionuclide product selected from the group consisting of {sup 223}Ra and {sup 225}Ac, from a radionuclide ``cow`` of {sup 227}Ac or {sup 229}Th respectively. The method comprises the steps of (a) permitting ingrowth of at least one radionuclide daughter from said radionuclide ``cow`` forming an ingrown mixture; (b) insuring that the ingrown mixture is a nitric acid ingrown mixture; (c) passing the nitric acid ingrown mixture through a first nitrate form ion exchange column which permits separating the ``cow`` from at least one radionuclide daughter; (d) insuring that the at least one radionuclide daughter contains the radionuclide product; (e) passing the at least one radionuclide daughter through a second ion exchange column and separating the at least one radionuclide daughter from the radionuclide product and (f) recycling the at least one radionuclide daughter by adding it to the ``cow``. In one embodiment the radionuclide ``cow`` is the {sup 227}Ac, the at least one daughter radionuclide is a {sup 227}Th and the product radionuclide is the {sup 223}Ra and the first nitrate form ion exchange column passes the {sup 227}Ac and retains the {sup 227}Th. In another embodiment the radionuclide ``cow`` is the {sup 229}Th, the at least one daughter radionuclide is a {sup 225}Ra and said product radionuclide is the {sup 225}Ac and the {sup 225}Ac and nitrate form ion exchange column retains the {sup 229}Th and passes the {sup 225}Ra/Ac. 8 figs.

  20. Methods of separating short half-life radionuclides from a mixture of radionuclides

    DOEpatents

    Bray, Lane A.; Ryan, Jack L.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a method of obtaining a radionuclide product selected from the group consisting of .sup.223 Ra and .sup.225 Ac, from a radionuclide "cow" of .sup.227 Ac or .sup.229 Th respectively. The method comprises the steps of a) permitting ingrowth of at least one radionuclide daughter from said radionuclide "cow" forming an ingrown mixture; b) insuring that the ingrown mixture is a nitric acid ingrown mixture; c) passing the nitric acid ingrown mixture through a first nitrate form ion exchange column which permits separating the "cow" from at least one radionuclide daughter; d) insuring that the at least one radionuclide daughter contains the radionuclide product; e) passing the at least one radionuclide daughter through a second ion exchange column and separating the at least one radionuclide daughter from the radionuclide product and f) recycling the at least one radionuclide daughter by adding it to the "cow". In one embodiment the radionuclide "cow" is the .sup.227 Ac, the at least one daughter radionuclide is a .sup.227 Th and the product radionuclide is the .sup.223 Ra and the first nitrate form ion exchange column passes the .sup.227 Ac and retains the .sup.227 Th. In another embodiment the radionuclide "cow"is the .sup.229 Th, the at least one daughter radionuclide is a .sup.225 Ra and said product radionuclide is the .sup.225 Ac and the .sup.225 Ac and nitrate form ion exchange column retains the .sup.229 Th and passes the .sup.225 Ra/Ac.

  1. Radionuclide therapy in neuroendocrine tumours: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Gulenchyn, K Y; Yao, X; Asa, S L; Singh, S; Law, C

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to investigate the effects of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals in patients with different types of advanced neuroendocrine tumour (NETs). A literature search was carried out in MEDLINE and EMBASE from January 1998 to November 2010. The Cochrane Library (to Issue 10, 2010) and the Standards and Guidelines Evidence Inventory of Cancer Guidelines, including over 1100 English-language cancer guidelines from January 2003 to June 2010, were also checked. No existing systematic reviews or clinical practice guidelines based on a systematic review or randomised controlled trials focusing on this topic were found. Twenty-four fully published articles were abstracted and summarised: 16 articles focused on five peptide receptor radionuclide therapy ((111)In-DTPAOC, (90)Y-DOTALAN, (90)Y-DOTATOC, (90)Y-DOTATATE, and (177)Lu-DOTATATE) and eight focused on (131)I-MIBG treatment. Limited evidence from a historical comparison of studies in one centre supported that (177)Lu-DOTATATE might be associated with greater clinical outcomes compared with (90)Y-DOTATOC or (111)In-DTPAOC. The severe toxicities for (177)Lu-DOTATATE included hepatic insufficiency in 0.6%, myelodysplastic syndrome in 0.8% and renal insufficiency in 0.4% of patients in this study. Insufficient evidence suggested efficacy of (131)I-MIBG in adult NET patients, but the overall tumour response rate from (131)I-MIBG was 27-75% for malignant neuroblastoma, paraganglioma or pheochromocytoma. Haematological toxicities were the main severe side-effects after (131)I-MIBG and 4% of patients developed secondary malignancies in one study. To date, peptide receptor radionuclide therapy seems to be an acceptable option and is relatively safe in adult advanced NET patients with receptor uptake positive on scintigraphy, but patients' renal function must be monitored. (131)I-MIBG may be effective for malignant neuroblastoma, paraganglioma or pheochromocytoma, but its side-effects need to be

  2. Microbial Transformations of Actinides and Other Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Francis,A.J.; Dodge, C. J.

    2009-01-07

    Microorganisms can affect the stability and mobility of the actinides and other radionuclides released from nuclear fuel cycle and from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. Under appropriate conditions, microorganisms can alter the chemical speciation, solubility and sorption properties and thus could increase or decrease the concentrations of radionuclides in solution in the environment and the bioavailability. Dissolution or immobilization of radionuclides is brought about by direct enzymatic action or indirect non-enzymatic action of microorganisms. Although the physical, chemical, and geochemical processes affecting dissolution, precipitation, and mobilization of radionuclides have been extensively investigated, we have only limited information on the effects of microbial processes and biochemical mechanisms which affect the stability and mobility of radionuclides. The mechanisms of microbial transformations of the major and minor actinides U, Pu, Cm, Am, Np, the fission products and other radionuclides such as Ra, Tc, I, Cs, Sr, under aerobic and anaerobic conditions in the presence of electron donors and acceptors are reviewed.

  3. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy of Human Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gudkov, Sergey V.; Shilyagina, Natalya Yu.; Vodeneev, Vladimir A.; Zvyagin, Andrei V.

    2015-01-01

    Targeted radionuclide therapy is one of the most intensively developing directions of nuclear medicine. Unlike conventional external beam therapy, the targeted radionuclide therapy causes less collateral damage to normal tissues and allows targeted drug delivery to a clinically diagnosed neoplastic malformations, as well as metastasized cells and cellular clusters, thus providing systemic therapy of cancer. The methods of targeted radionuclide therapy are based on the use of molecular carriers of radionuclides with high affinity to antigens on the surface of tumor cells. The potential of targeted radionuclide therapy has markedly grown nowadays due to the expanded knowledge base in cancer biology, bioengineering, and radiochemistry. In this review, progress in the radionuclide therapy of hematological malignancies and approaches for treatment of solid tumors is addressed. PMID:26729091

  4. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy of Human Tumors.

    PubMed

    Gudkov, Sergey V; Shilyagina, Natalya Yu; Vodeneev, Vladimir A; Zvyagin, Andrei V

    2015-12-28

    Targeted radionuclide therapy is one of the most intensively developing directions of nuclear medicine. Unlike conventional external beam therapy, the targeted radionuclide therapy causes less collateral damage to normal tissues and allows targeted drug delivery to a clinically diagnosed neoplastic malformations, as well as metastasized cells and cellular clusters, thus providing systemic therapy of cancer. The methods of targeted radionuclide therapy are based on the use of molecular carriers of radionuclides with high affinity to antigens on the surface of tumor cells. The potential of targeted radionuclide therapy has markedly grown nowadays due to the expanded knowledge base in cancer biology, bioengineering, and radiochemistry. In this review, progress in the radionuclide therapy of hematological malignancies and approaches for treatment of solid tumors is addressed.

  5. Chemical speciation of radionuclides migrating in groundwaters

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, D.; Schilk, A.; Abel, K.; Lepel, E.; Thomas, C.; Pratt, S.; Cooper, E.; Hartwig, P.; Killey, R.

    1994-04-01

    In order to more accurately predict the rates and mechanisms of radionuclide migration from low-level waste disposal facilities via groundwater transport, ongoing studies are being conducted at field sites at Chalk River Laboratories to identify and characterize the chemical speciation of mobile, long-lived radionuclides migrating in groundwaters. Large-volume water sampling techniques are being utilized to separate and concentrate radionuclides into particular, cationic, anionic, and nonionic chemical forms. Most radionuclides are migrating as soluble, anionic species that appear to be predominantly organoradionuclide complexes. Laboratory studies utilizing anion exchange chromatography have separated several anionically complexed radionuclides, e.g., {sup 60}Co and {sup 106}Ru, into a number of specific compounds or groups of compounds. Further identification of the anionic organoradionuclide complexes is planned utilizing high resolution mass spectrometry. Large-volume ultra-filtration experiments are characterizing the particulate forms of radionuclides being transported in these groundwaters.

  6. Colloid labelled with radionuclide and method

    DOEpatents

    Atcher, R.W.; Hines, J.J.

    1990-11-13

    A ferric hydroxide colloid having an alpha-emitting radionuclide essentially on the outer surfaces and a method of forming same. The method includes oxidizing a ferrous hydroxide to ferric hydroxide in the presence of a preselected radionuclide to form a colloid having the radionuclide on the outer surface thereof, and thereafter washing the colloid, and suspending the washed colloid in a suitable solution. The labelled colloid is useful in cancer therapy and for the treatment of inflamed joints. No Drawings

  7. Colloid labelled with radionuclide and method

    DOEpatents

    Atcher, Robert W.; Hines, John J.

    1990-01-01

    A ferric hydroxide colloid having an alpha-emitting radionuclide essentially on the outer surfaces and a method of forming same. The method includes oxidizing a ferrous hydroxide to ferric hydroxide in the presence of a preselected radionuclide to form a colloid having the radionuclide on the outer surface thereof, and thereafter washing the colloid, and suspending the washed colloid in a suitable solution. The labelled colloid is useful in cancer therapy and for the treatment of inflamed joints.

  8. Method of making colloid labeled with radionuclide

    DOEpatents

    Atcher, Robert W.; Hines, John J.

    1991-01-01

    A ferric hydroxide colloid having an alpha-emitting radionuclide essentially on the outer surfaces and a method of forming same. The method includes oxidizing a ferrous hydroxide to ferric hydroxide in the presence of a preselected radionuclide to form a colloid having the radionuclide on the outer surface thereof, and thereafter washing the colloid, and suspending the washed colloid in a suitable solution. The labelled colloid is useful in cancer therapy and for the treatment of inflamed joints.

  9. Ion binding compounds, radionuclide complexes, methods of making radionuclide complexes, methods of extracting radionuclides, and methods of delivering radionuclides to target locations

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Xiaoyuan; Wai, Chien M.; Fisher, Darrell R.

    2000-01-01

    The invention pertains to compounds for binding lanthanide ions and actinide ions. The invention further pertains to compounds for binding radionuclides, and to methods of making radionuclide complexes. Also, the invention pertains to methods of extracting radionuclides. Additionally, the invention pertains to methods of delivering radionuclides to target locations. In one aspect, the invention includes a compound comprising: a) a calix[n]arene group, wherein n is an integer greater than 3, the calix[n]arene group comprising an upper rim and a lower rim; b) at least one ionizable group attached to the lower rim; and c) an ion selected from the group consisting of lanthanide and actinide elements bound to the ionizable group. In another aspect, the invention includes a method of extracting a radionuclide, comprising: a) providing a sample comprising a radionuclide; b) providing a calix[n]arene compound in contact with the sample, wherein n is an integer greater than 3; and c) extracting radionuclide from the sample into the calix[n]arene compound. In yet another aspect, the invention includes a method of delivering a radionuclide to a target location, comprising: a) providing a calix[n]arene compound, wherein n is an integer greater than 3, the calix[n]arene compound comprising at least one ionizable group; b) providing a radionuclide bound to the calix[n]arene compound; and c) providing an antibody attached to the calix[n]arene compound, the antibody being specific for a material found at the target location.

  10. Therapy for incorporated radionuclides: scope and need

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, V.H.

    1981-03-01

    In the United States the recent termination of funding for research on therapy for incorporated radionuclides has virtually halted progress on improved or new agents and procedures for removing radioactivity from the body. Research was eliminated, but is still needed on new removal agents, improved delivery system, in vitro test systems, and the toxicology of treatments. For many radionuclides, no adequate therapy exists. The relationship between radionuclide removal and reduction in cancer risk is still unanswered. Without proper research support, needed improvements in the treatment for incorporated radionuclides in the US are uncertain.

  11. Acute gangrenous cholecystitis: radionuclide diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Brachman, M.B.; Tanasescu, D.E.; Ramanna, L.; Waxman, A.D.

    1984-04-01

    Radionuclide hepatobiliary imaging with Tc-99m IDA is a useful procedure for the diagnosis of acute cholecystitis. Visualization of the gallbladder essentially rules out acute cholecystitis. Nonvisualization suggest acute cholecystitis but may also be associated with chronic gallbladder disease or other conditions. The authors recently observed five patients in whom a rim of increased parenchymal liver activity was seen adjacent to the gallbladder fossa. All five patients had acute gangrenous cholecystitis. The rim of increased activity appears to be a useful secondary sign of acute cholecystitis.

  12. In-111 labeled leukocyte scintigraphy in a case of multifocal candidiasis

    SciTech Connect

    Palestro, C.J.; Vega, A.; Kim, C.K.; Goldsmith, S.J. )

    1990-06-01

    The value of indium-111 labeled leukocyte scintigraphy for the diagnosis of infection in the general population is well documented; there is less information available on its role in the evaluation of the immunocompromised patient. In this study, leukocyte scintigraphy was performed on a 31-year-old immunocompromised woman who had a possible intra-abdominal abscess. No abscess was detected, but intense oral, esophageal, gastric, and vaginal uptake was observed. Candida infection was histologically confirmed at all four sites.

  13. Scintigraphy for the diagnosis of testicular torsion and differential diagnosis of acute intrascrotal processes.

    PubMed

    Romics, I; Wesseler, T; Bach, D

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-five patients suffering from acute painful testicular processes were subjected to scintigraphy. Testicular torsion in the early and delayed phases were diagnosed with 100% accuracy, but one out of 7 cases of epididymitis was wrongly recognized as negative. Interoperative diagnosis in two cases of hydatid torsion proved the foregoing scintigraphic finding to have been wrong. Nevertheless, scintigraphy was found to be reliable in testicular torsion diagnosis.

  14. Tissue radionuclide concentrations in water birds and upland birds on the Hanford Site (USA) from 1971-2009.

    PubMed

    Delistraty, Damon; Van Verst, Scott

    2011-08-01

    Historical operations at the Hanford Site (Washington State, USA) have released a wide array of non-radionuclide and radionuclide contaminants into the environment. As a result, there is a need to characterize contaminant effects on site biota. Within this framework, the main purpose of our study was to evaluate radionuclide concentrations in bird tissue, obtained from the Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS). The database was sorted by avian group (water bird vs. upland bird), radionuclide (over 20 analytes), tissue (muscle, bone, liver), location (onsite vs. offsite), and time period (1971-1990 vs. 1991-2009). Onsite median concentrations in water birds were significantly higher (Bonferroni P < 0.05) than those in onsite upland birds for Cs-137 in muscle (1971-1990) and Sr-90 in bone (1991-2009), perhaps due to behavioral, habitat, or trophic species differences. Onsite median concentrations in water birds were higher (borderline significance with Bonferroni P = 0.05) than those in offsite birds for Cs-137 in muscle (1971-1990). Onsite median concentrations in the earlier time period were significantly higher (Bonferroni P < 0.05) than those in the later time period for Co-60, Cs-137, Eu-152, and Sr-90 in water bird muscle and for Cs-137 in upland bird muscle tissue. Median concentrations of Sr-90 in bone were significantly higher (Bonferroni P < 0.05) than those in muscle for both avian groups and both locations. Over the time period, 1971-2009, onsite median internal dose was estimated for each radionuclide in water bird and upland bird tissues. However, a meaningful dose comparison between bird groups was not possible, due to a dissimilar radionuclide inventory, mismatch of time periods for input radionuclides, and lack of an external dose estimate. Despite these limitations, our results contribute toward ongoing efforts to characterize ecological risk at the Hanford Site.

  15. Abnormal thallium 201 scintigraphy during low-dose vasopressin infusions

    SciTech Connect

    Davison, R.; Kaplan, K.; Bines, A.; Spies, S.; Reed, M.T.; Lesch, M.

    1986-12-01

    Thallium 201 (/sup 201/Tl) myocardial scans were obtained in 16 patients just prior to the discontinuation of a vasopressin infusion (.1 to .2 units/min) administered for the treatment of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Repeat scintigraphy was performed two to three hours after the vasopressin was stopped. Eleven of the 16 patients (69 percent) demonstrated areas of decreased myocardial /sup 201/Tl uptake that resolved after the infusion was stopped. Heart rate-blood pressure product was significantly lower at the time of the second scan. Autopsies were secured in three of 11 scan-positive patients: one had severe coronary artery obstruction, one nonsignificant disease, and another had normal coronary arteries. Vasopressin, even at low doses, can induce abnormalities in myocardial perfusion that are probably mediated by a direct effect on the coronary circulation. They are usually not detectable by routine monitoring techniques and conceivably form the basis for the cardiovascular morbidity associated with the use of this agent.

  16. Suspected acute cholecystitis. Comparison of hepatobiliary scintigraphy versus ultrasonography

    SciTech Connect

    Freitas, J.E.; Mirkes, S.H.; Fink-Bennett, D.M.; Bree, R.L.

    1982-08-01

    One hundred ninety-five patients with suspected acute cholecystitis (AC) underwent both hepatobiliary scintigraphy (HBS) and static gray-scale ultrasonography (US) to assess the relative value of each imaging modality in this clinical setting. HBS was performed after the intravenous injection of 5 mCi /sup 99m/Tc iprofenin. Abnormal HBS indicative of AC visualized the common bile duct, but not the gallbladder, within 1 to 4 hours after tracer administration. Abnormal US indicative of AC demonstrated cholelithiasis and/or gallbladder wall edema. In this series, HBS surpassed US in sensitivity (98.3% versus 81.4%), specificity (90.2% versus 60.2%), predictive value of an abnormal test (91.4% versus 51.6%), and predictive value of a normal test (100% versus 92%), HBS should be the procedure of choice for the rapid detection of AC.

  17. Spontaneous retroperitoneal hemorrhage localized by blood pool scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Lerer, Daniel B; Rozenblit, Alla M; Cynamon, Jacob; Tubman, Gary; Freeman, Leonard M

    2004-02-01

    A healthy 17-year-old girl presented to the emergency department with a 1-day history of left upper quadrant abdominal pain associated with nausea and vomiting. Her hematocrit was 22. On physical examination, she had left upper quadrant fullness and tenderness. Initial computed tomography revealed a large, loculated, left-sided retroperitoneal hematoma. Blood pool scintigraphy with labeled red cells revealed a very large photon-deficient area with 3 areas of active bleeding in the upper margin of the cold area. An angiogram showed active extravasation from the left inferior phrenic artery. The patient was felt to have had spontaneous adrenal hemorrhage, likely within a preexisting, large adrenal cyst. Spontaneous hemorrhage into an adrenal cyst is a rare entity that can be life-threatening if not treated early in its course.

  18. Renal anomalies in patients with turner syndrome: Is scintigraphy superior to ultrasound?

    PubMed

    Hamza, Rasha T; Shalaby, Mennatallah H; Hamed, Laith S; Abdulla, Dunya B A; Elfekky, Sahar M; Sultan, Omar M

    2016-02-01

    Renal anomalies are present in up to 30% of patients with Turner syndrome (TS). Renal ultrasound (U/S) detects anatomical renal anomalies only while renal scintigraphy detects anomalies, detects early renal malfunction, and estimates glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Thus, we aimed to assess frequency of renal abnormalities detected by scintigraphy in comparison to renal U/S in TS patients. Ninety TS patients were subjected to auxological assessment, measurement of serum creatinine; and renal U/S and scintigraphy. Renal U/S detected renal anomalies in 22.22% of patients versus 17.78 % detected by scintigraphy (P = 0.035). Scintigraphy detected renal functional abnormalities in 44.44% of patients in the form of subnormal total GFR, abnormal renogram curve pattern, improper tracer handling and perfusion; and difference in split renal function >10% between both kidneys. Patients with a 45,X karyotype had more renal functional abnormalities (56%) than those with mosaic karyotype (33.33%), P = 0.04. In conclusion, renal scintigraphy is not superior to U/S in detection of renal anomalies but is a reliable method for early detection of renal malfunction in TS patients especially those with 45,X to ensure early management to offer a better quality of life.

  19. Effects of acepromazine on three-phase 99mTc-MDP bone imaging in 11 horses.

    PubMed

    Solano, Mauricio; Welcome, Jeremy; Johnson, Karen

    2005-01-01

    Horses undergoing skeletal scintigraphy can have decreased radiopharmaceutical bone uptake in the limbs. This reduces the diagnostic value of the scan. The aim of the present study was to measure the changes in count density caused by vasodilatation and increased blood flow associated with intravenous injection of acepromazine during bone scintigraphy in normal horses. A three-phase bone scan was performed twice in 11 adult horses to study the effects of acepromazine on the count density of the resultant scintigrams. With acepromazine, there was a statistically significant mean difference of 12 s for initial blood flow and 21 s for peak flow. The time to initial blood flow and time to peak flow occurred earlier for the scans in which acepromazine was used. There were no significant differences in the bone to soft tissue ratios during the soft tissue and bone phases of the scan between procedures. Intravenous administration of acepromazine increases peripheral blood flow causing an earlier onset of the vascular phase during the three-phase bone scan. Acepromazine did not increase the count density of the bone phase scintigrams. As expected, the vasodilatation and increased blood flow associated with intravenous injection of acepromazine affected the count density of the vascular phase of the bone scan.

  20. Intracoronary Infusion of Autologous CD133+ Cells in Myocardial Infarction and Tracing by Tc99m MIBI Scintigraphy of the Heart Areas Involved in Cell Homing

    PubMed Central

    Kurbonov, Ubaidullo; Dustov, Abdusamad; Barotov, Alisher; Khidirov, Murtazokul; Mirojov, Giesidin; Rahimov, Zikrie; Navjuvonov, Navjuvon; Rizoev, Eraj; Olimov, Nasim; Goibov, Alijon; Karim-Zade, Bakhtovar; Rakhmatov, Mukim; Muminjonov, Suhayli; Didari, Azadeh; Irgasheva, Jamila; Bobokhojaev, Oktam; Gulmuradov, Tashpulat; Therwath, Amu; Rakhmonov, Sohibnazar; Mirshahi, Massoud

    2013-01-01

    CD133 mesenchymal cells were enriched using magnetic microbead anti-CD133 antibody from bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNCs). Flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry analysis using specific antibodies revealed that these cells were essentially 89 ± 4% CD133+ and 8 ± 5% CD34+. CD133+/CD34+ BMMNCs secrete important bioactive proteins such as cardiotrophin-1, angiogenic and neurogenic factors, morphogenetic proteins, and proinflammatory and remodeling factors in vitro. Single intracoronary infusions of autologous CD133+/CD34+ BMMNCs are effective and reduce infarct size in patients as analyzed by Tc99m MIBI myocardial scintigraphy. The majority of patients were treated via left coronary artery. Nine months after cell therapy, 5 out of 8 patients showed a net positive response to therapy in different regions of the heart. Uptake of Tc99 isotope and revitalization of the heart area in inferoseptal region are more pronounced (P = 0.016) as compared to apex and anterosptal regions after intracoronary injection of the stem cells. The cells chosen here have the properties essential for their potential use in cell therapy and their homing can be followed without major difficulty by the scintigraphy. The cell therapy proposed here is safe and should be practiced, as we found, in conjunction with scintigraphic observation of areas of heart which respond optimally to the infusion of autologous CD133+/CD34+ BMMNCs. PMID:23983717

  1. [Bone diseases].

    PubMed

    Uebelhart, Brigitte; Rizzoli, René

    2016-01-13

    Calcium intake shows a small impact on bone mineral density and fracture risk. Denosumab is a more potent inhibitor of bone resorption than zoledronate. Abaloparatide, PTHrP analog, increases bone mineral density and decreases fracture incidence. Teriparatide could be delivered via a transdermic device. Romosozumab and odanacatib improve calculated bone strength. Sequential or combined treatments with denosumab and teriparatide could be of interest, but not denosumab followed by teriparatide. Fibrous dysplasia, Paget disease and hypophosphatasia are updated, as well as atypical femoral fracture and osteonecrosis of the jaw.

  2. A large renal pelvic diverticulum, presenting incomplete excretion during tc-99m MAG-3 scintigraphy and tracer accumulation on tc-99m DMSA scintigraphy; a case report.

    PubMed

    Turgut, Bulent; Erselcan, Taner; Ozdemir, Semra; Hasbek, Zekiye; Tosun, H Bayram; Topaktas, Seher

    2004-12-01

    This case report illustrates the dynamic and static renal scintigraphic images of a patient with an unusual large diverticulum of the renal pelvis. The initial diagnosis by intravenous pyelography (IVP) and ultrasonographic (US) examination was a renal pelvic diverticulum of the left kidney, and the patient was referred to the nuclear medicine department for exploration of the effect of the pelvic diverticulum on renal functions. We performed dynamic renal scintigraphy with technetium-99m (Tc-99m) labeled mercaptoacetyl triglycine (MAG-3) and static renal scintigraphy with Tc-99m labeled dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA). In dynamic renal scintigraphy, bilaterally normal concentration function was observed. While right kidney excretion function was normal, an incomplete excretion pattern was seen on the left side. Complete urinary flow obstruction occurred approximately at the 10th minute of the acquisition, which did not seem to respond to the i.v. furosemide application. However, when only the renal cortex was included in the region of interest, the obstructive pattern disappeared. In static renal scintigraphy, a large renal pelvic diverticulum localized antero-medially was clearly visualized in the left-anterior oblique projection, most probably due to accumulation of radiopharmaceutical inside it. This case showed that a renal pelvic diverticulum should be thought of when an incomplete excretion pattern is seen on dynamic renal scintigraphy. Using only a cortical region of interest may also help to distinguish other types of obstructive pattern from diverticulum. Additionally, Tc-99m DMSA scintigraphy may show diverticulum localization with antero-oblique projections in addition to routine projections.

  3. Aspects of the dosimetry of radionuclides within the skeleton with particular emphasis on the active marrow

    SciTech Connect

    Eckerman, K.F.

    1985-01-01

    Epidemiological surveys on man and results from animal experiments have shown that two tissues associated with the skeleton are of primary concern with respect to cancer induction by ionizing radiation. These are the cells on or near endosteal surfaces of bone, from which osteosarcomas are thought to arise, and hematopoietic bone marrow, which is associated with leukemia. The complex geometry of the soft tissue-bone intermixture makes calculations of absorbed dose to these target regions a difficult problem. In the case of photon or neutron radiations, charged particle equilibrium may not exist in the vicinity of soft tissue-bone mineral interface. In this paper a general study of the dosimetry of radionuclides within the skeleton is presented. Dosimetric data consistent with the MIRD schema and reflecting the physical and anatomical parameters defining the energy deposition are tabulated for the relevant target regions. 27 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Anti-CD45 radioimmunotherapy using 211At with bone marrow transplantation prolongs survival in a disseminated murine leukemia model

    SciTech Connect

    Orozco, Johnnie J.; Back, Tom; Kenoyer, Aimee L.; Balkin, Ethan R.; Hamlin, Donald K.; Wilbur, D. Scott; Fisher, Darrell R.; Frayo, Shani; Hylarides, Mark; Green, Damian J.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Press, Oliver W.; Pagel, John M.

    2013-05-15

    Anti-CD45 Radioimmunotherapy using an Alpha-Emitting Radionuclide 211At Combined with Bone Marrow Transplantation Prolongs Survival in a Disseminated Murine Leukemia Model ABSTRACT Despite aggressive chemotherapy combined with hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT), many patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) relapse. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using antibodies (Ab) labeled primarily with beta-emitting radionuclides has been explored to reduce relapse.

  5. Real time cardiac radionuclide imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Jarkewicz, G.G.

    1986-04-29

    A data acquisition system is described for use in radionuclide cardiac imaging of a patient having been administered a myocardium specific radionuclide, comprising: (a) means for monitoring the electrical activity of the heart; (b) first temporary storage means for accumulating respective pages of data corresponding to nuclear events during each cardiac cycle; (c) means, responsive to the means for monitoring, for determining the time duration of each successive cardiac cycle; (d) means for comparing each determined duration of a cardiac cycle with a preselected time duration range; (e) second temporary storage means; and (f) means for conditionally transferring pages of data from the first temporary storage means to the second temporary storage means if the measured duration associated with each page has predetermined correspondence with the preselected duration range, whereby pages of data having the predetermined correspondence may be collated into a quasi-real time study, while pages of data having different correspondence with the preselected time duration range are discarded from the study.

  6. A large amount of microdamages in the cortical bone around fracture site in a patient of atypical femoral fracture after long-term bisphosphonate therapy.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Ken; Mashiba, Tasuku; Hitora, Toshiaki; Yamagami, Yoshiki; Yamamoto, Tetsuji

    2014-07-01

    A breast cancer patient developed an atypical femoral fracture after 9 years of bisphosphonate therapy for the treatment of multiple bone metastases. We histopathologically analyzed the femoral cortical bone at the fracture site and the iliac cancellous bone. Four months prior to the fracture, the patient had experienced pain in the right femur and underwent plain radiography and bone scintigraphy which revealed cortical thickening and radioisotope accumulation at each site, respectively. The patient had also experienced a non-traumatic fracture at the same site on the contralateral side 2 years earlier. Based on these findings, atypical femoral fracture was diagnosed and intramedullary nailing performed. A cortical bone specimen taken from near the fracture site during surgery showed marked microdamages, and analysis of the iliac cancellous bone specimen revealed severely suppressed bone turnover. These findings suggest that microdamage and severely suppressed bone turnover are associated with atypical femoral fracture reported in this patient with long-term bisphosphonate therapy.

  7. Dosimetric evaluation of 153Sm-EDTMP, 177Lu-EDTMP and 166Ho-EDTMP for systemic radiation therapy: Influence of type and energy of radiation and half-life of radionuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjbar, Hassan; Ghannadi-Maragheh, Mohammad; Bahrami-Samani, Ali; Beiki, Davood

    2015-03-01

    In radiopharmaceutical therapy, delivered doses to critical organs must be below a certain threshold therefore internal radiation dosimetry of radiopharmaceuticals is essential. Advantages and disadvantages of radionuclides with different characteristics were evaluated for selection of appropriate radionuclide. The Monte Carlo MCNPX simulation program was used to obtain radial dose and cumulative dose of 153Sm, 177Lu and 166Ho used in radiotherapy of bone metastases. A cylindrical geometry with constant density materials was supposed for simulation of femur bone. The radius of bone marrow, bone, and surrounding soft tissue was considered 0.6 cm, 1.3 cm and 4 cm, respectively. It was assumed that the radionuclides were uniformly distributed throughout the tumor. "continuous energy spectrum" of beta particle was used instead of mean beta energy. Our simulations show that absorbed dose in target organ (bone) is greater than other organs and 166Ho gives a higher dose to the critical organ of bone marrow than either 153Sm or 177Lu. Absorbed dose versus time demonstrate faster dose delivery for the short half-life radionuclides (153Sm and 166Ho). These results are in good agreement with clinical observations which show a pain relief within 1 week after intravenous administration of 153Sm-EDTMP, whereas it occurs within 2 week in the case of 177Lu-EDTMP. According to the results, combination of different radionuclides with different characteristics such as 153Sm-EDTMP and 177Lu-EDTMP could be more advantageous to patients with painful bone metastasis.

  8. Clinical utility of (18)F-fluoride PET/CT in benign and malignant bone diseases.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuxin; Schiepers, Christiaan; Lake, Ralph; Dadparvar, Simin; Berenji, Gholam R

    2012-01-01

    (18)F labeled sodium fluoride is a positron-emitting, bone seeking agent with more favorable skeletal kinetics than conventional phosphate and diphosphonate compounds. With the expanding clinical usage of PET/CT, there is renewed interest in using (18)F-fluoride PET/CT for imaging bone diseases. Growing evidence indicates that (18)F fluoride PET/CT offers increased sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy in evaluating metastatic bone disease compared to (99m)Tc based bone scintigraphy. National Oncologic PET Registry (NOPR) has expanded coverage for (18)F sodium fluoride PET scans since February 2011 for the evaluation of osseous metastatic disease. In this article, we reviewed the pharmacological characteristics of sodium fluoride, as well as the clinical utility of PET/CT using (18)F-fluoride in both benign and malignant bone disorders.

  9. Modeling Radionuclide Decay Chain Migration Using HYDROGEOCHEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, T. C.; Tsai, C. H.; Lai, K. H.; Chen, J. S.

    2014-12-01

    Nuclear technology has been employed for energy production for several decades. Although people receive many benefits from nuclear energy, there are inevitably environmental pollutions as well as human health threats posed by the radioactive materials releases from nuclear waste disposed in geological repositories or accidental releases of radionuclides from nuclear facilities. Theoretical studies have been undertaken to understand the transport of radionuclides in subsurface environments because that the radionuclide transport in groundwater is one of the main pathway in exposure scenarios for the intake of radionuclides. The radionuclide transport in groundwater can be predicted using analytical solution as well as numerical models. In this study, we simulate the transport of the radionuclide decay chain using HYDROGEOCHEM. The simulated results are verified against the analytical solution available in the literature. Excellent agreements between the numerical simulation and the analytical are observed for a wide spectrum of concentration. HYDROGECHEM is a useful tool assessing the ecological and environmental impact of the accidental radionuclide releases such as the Fukushima nuclear disaster where multiple radionuclides leaked through the reactor, subsequently contaminating the local groundwater and ocean seawater in the vicinity of the nuclear plant.

  10. The effects of early postoperative radiation on vascularized bone grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, H.B.; Brown, S.; Hurst, L.N. )

    1991-06-01

    The effects of early postoperative radiation were assessed in free nonvascularized and free vascularized rib grafts in the canine model. The mandibles of one-half of the dogs were exposed to a cobalt 60 radiation dose of 4080 cGy over a 4-week period, starting 2 weeks postoperatively. The patency of vascularized grafts was confirmed with bone scintigraphy. Histological studies, including ultraviolet microscopy with trifluorochrome labeling, and histomorphometric analyses were performed. Osteocytes persist within the cortex of the vascularized nonradiated grafts to a much greater extent than in nonvascularized, nonradiated grafts. Cortical osteocytes do not persist in either vascularized or nonvascularized grafts subjected to radiation. New bone formation is significantly retarded in radiated grafts compared with nonradiated grafts. Periosteum and endosteum remained viable in the radiated vascularized grafts, producing both bone union and increased bone turnover, neither of which were evident to any significant extent in nonvascularized grafts. Bone union was achieved in vascularized and non-vascularized nonradiated bone. In the radiated group of dogs, union was only seen in the vascularized bone grafts.

  11. Talking Bones.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jaclyn; Kassing, Sharon

    2002-01-01

    Describes cooperation with the Saint Louis Zoo to provide opportunities for elementary school students to learn about bones, how animals move, what they eat, and how much they grow. Uses biofacts which include bones, skulls, and other parts to make the laboratory a hands-on experience for students. (YDS)

  12. Skeletal status and soft tissue composition in astronauts. Tissue and fluid changes by radionuclide absorptiometry in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, J. R.; Mazess, R. B.; Wilson, C. R.

    1973-01-01

    A device has been constructed and tested which provides immediate readout of bone mineral content and bone width from absorptiometric scans with low energy radionuclides. The basis of this analog system is a logarithmic converter-integrator coupled with a precision linear ratemeter. The system provided accurate and reliable results on standards and ashed bone sections. Clinical measurements were made on about 100 patients with the direct readout system, and these were highly correlated with the results from digital scan data on the same patients. The direct readout system has been used successfully in field studies and surveys as well as for clinical observations.

  13. Inventory of radionuclides for the Great Lakes

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    This report uses a material balance approach to describe the quantities and composition of reported releases of radionuclides to air and water, and the distribution of these nuclides in atmospheric, aquatic, and biotic compartments of the Great Lakes ecosystem. The primary sources considered are discharges from nuclear fuel cycle facilities in the Great Lakes Basin. Other sources include commercial, industrial, medical, and research institutions. Radionuclide inventories are first presented by source, both natural and anthropogenic, then by geographical and environmental distribution. The concluding section discusses the adequacy of radionuclide monitoring, the need for a reassessment of environmental monitoring of nuclear facilities, radionuclide data reporting, harmonization of monitoring and data reporting, biological transfer factors for lake systems, and radionuclides of concern. A glossary is included.

  14. Detecting low levels of radionuclides in fluids

    DOEpatents

    Patch, Keith D.; Morgan, Dean T.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for detecting low levels of one or more radionuclides in a fluid sample uses a substrate that includes an ion exchange resin or other sorbent material to collect the radionuclides. A collecting apparatus includes a collecting chamber that exposes the substrate to a measured amount of the fluid sample such that radionuclides in the fluid sample are collected by the ion exchange resin. A drying apparatus, which can include a drying chamber, then dries the substrate. A measuring apparatus measures emissions from radionuclides collected on the substrate. The substrate is positioned in a measuring chamber proximate to a detector, which provides a signal in response to emissions from the radionuclides. Other analysis methods can be used to detect non-radioactive analytes, which can be collected with other types of sorbent materials.

  15. Sports nuclear medicine. Bone imaging for lower extremity pain in athletes

    SciTech Connect

    Brill, D.R.

    1983-03-01

    Increased participation in sports by the general public has led to an increase in sports-induced injuries, including stress fractures, shin splints, arthritis, and a host of musculotendinous maladies. Bone scintigraphy with Tc-99m MDP has been used with increasing frequency in detecting stress fractures, but this study can miss certain important conditions and detect other lesions of lesser clinical significance. This paper demonstrates the spectrum of findings on bone scanning in nonacute sports trauma and offers suggestions for the optimal use of Tc-99m MDP for detecting the causes of lower extremity pain in athletes.

  16. Transverse section radionuclide scanning system

    DOEpatents

    Kuhl, David E.; Edwards, Roy Q.

    1976-01-01

    This invention provides a transverse section radionuclide scanning system for high-sensitivity quantification of brain radioactivity in cross-section picture format in order to permit accurate assessment of regional brain function localized in three-dimensions. High sensitivity crucially depends on overcoming the heretofore known raster type scanning, which requires back and forth detector movement involving dead-time or partial enclosure of the scan field. Accordingly, this invention provides a detector array having no back and forth movement by interlaced detectors that enclose the scan field and rotate as an integral unit around one axis of rotation in a slip ring that continuously transmits the detector data by means of laser emitting diodes, with the advantages that increased amounts of data can be continuously collected, processed and displayed with increased sensitivity according to a suitable computer program.

  17. Radionuclides in surface and groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, Kate M.

    2009-01-01

    Unique among all the contaminants that adversely affect surface and water quality, radioactive compounds pose a double threat from both toxicity and damaging radiation. The extreme energy potential of many of these materials makes them both useful and toxic. The unique properties of radioactive materials make them invaluable for medical, weapons, and energy applications. However, mining, production, use, and disposal of these compounds provide potential pathways for their release into the environment, posing a risk to both humans and wildlife. This chapter discusses the sources, uses, and regulation of radioactive compounds in the United States, biogeochemical processes that control mobility in the environment, examples of radionuclide contamination, and current work related to contaminated site remediation.

  18. Cosmogenic radionuclides in stone meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cressy, P. J., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    This document presents the techniques and compilation of results of cosmogenic Al-26 measurements at Goddard Space Flight Center on 91 samples of 76 stone meteorites. Short-lived radionuclides, including Na-22, Sc-46, Mn-54, and Co-60, were measured in 13 of these meteorites. About one-third of these data has not previously been published. The results are discussed briefly in terms of (1) depletion of Al-26 and natural potassium due to weathering, (2) possible exposure of several chondrites to an unusually high cosmic-ray flux, (3) comparison of Al-26, Na-22, Sc-46, and Mn5-54 in chondrites with the spallation Ne-22/Ne-21 ratio as a shielding indicator, and (4) comparison of (Al-26)-(Ne-22)/Ne-21 data for achondrite classes with the chondrite trend.

  19. [A cancer of unknown primary site with diffuse metastasis to the bone marrow treated effectively with FAM combination chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Yumoto, Y; Okuda, T; Kato, Y; Tashima, M; Sawada, H; Yamagishi, M; Uchino, H

    1988-05-01

    A patient with cancer of unknown primary site suffering from diffuse bone marrow metastasis and DIC, was treated with FAM (5-fluorouracil, adriamycin and mitomycin C) combination chemotherapy. She was a 58-year-old housewife. Bone marrow biopsy revealed that her marrow tissue was completely replaced by cancer cells, and bone scintigraphy showed diffuse bone marrow metastasis in all the vertebrae, sternum, pelvic bones and skull. After 5 months administration of 3 courses of FAM therapy, the cancer cells were completely eradicated in the bone marrow upon biopsy taken at almost the same position as the previous one. The values of CEA, CA 19-9 and CA 125 were normalized, suggesting that this therapy was very effective.

  20. Metastatic Bone Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bone Disease cont. Page ( 4 ) MBD vs. Primary Bone Cancer The diagnosis of metastatic bone disease should not ... from an unknown primary carcinoma or a primary bone cancer (sarcoma). For example, if an area of bone ...

  1. Illicit Trafficking of Natural Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, Steinhaeusler; Lyudmila, Zaitseva

    2008-08-07

    Natural radionuclides have been subject to trafficking worldwide, involving natural uranium ore (U 238), processed uranium (yellow cake), low enriched uranium (<20% U 235) or highly enriched uranium (>20% U 235), radium (Ra 226), polonium (Po 210), and natural thorium ore (Th 232). An important prerequisite to successful illicit trafficking activities is access to a suitable logistical infrastructure enabling an undercover shipment of radioactive materials and, in case of trafficking natural uranium or thorium ore, capable of transporting large volumes of material. Covert en route diversion of an authorised uranium transport, together with covert diversion of uranium concentrate from an operating or closed uranium mines or mills, are subject of case studies. Such cases, involving Israel, Iran, Pakistan and Libya, have been analyzed in terms of international actors involved and methods deployed. Using international incident data contained in the Database on Nuclear Smuggling, Theft and Orphan Radiation Sources (DSTO) and international experience gained from the fight against drug trafficking, a generic Trafficking Pathway Model (TPM) is developed for trafficking of natural radionuclides. The TPM covers the complete trafficking cycle, ranging from material diversion, covert material transport, material concealment, and all associated operational procedures. The model subdivides the trafficking cycle into five phases: (1) Material diversion by insider(s) or initiation by outsider(s); (2) Covert transport; (3) Material brokerage; (4) Material sale; (5) Material delivery. An Action Plan is recommended, addressing the strengthening of the national infrastructure for material protection and accounting, development of higher standards of good governance, and needs for improving the control system deployed by customs, border guards and security forces.

  2. Illicit Trafficking of Natural Radionuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, Steinhäusler; Lyudmila, Zaitseva

    2008-08-01

    Natural radionuclides have been subject to trafficking worldwide, involving natural uranium ore (U 238), processed uranium (yellow cake), low enriched uranium (<20% U 235) or highly enriched uranium (>20% U 235), radium (Ra 226), polonium (Po 210), and natural thorium ore (Th 232). An important prerequisite to successful illicit trafficking activities is access to a suitable logistical infrastructure enabling an undercover shipment of radioactive materials and, in case of trafficking natural uranium or thorium ore, capable of transporting large volumes of material. Covert en route diversion of an authorised uranium transport, together with covert diversion of uranium concentrate from an operating or closed uranium mines or mills, are subject of case studies. Such cases, involving Israel, Iran, Pakistan and Libya, have been analyzed in terms of international actors involved and methods deployed. Using international incident data contained in the Database on Nuclear Smuggling, Theft and Orphan Radiation Sources (DSTO) and international experience gained from the fight against drug trafficking, a generic Trafficking Pathway Model (TPM) is developed for trafficking of natural radionuclides. The TPM covers the complete trafficking cycle, ranging from material diversion, covert material transport, material concealment, and all associated operational procedures. The model subdivides the trafficking cycle into five phases: (1) Material diversion by insider(s) or initiation by outsider(s); (2) Covert transport; (3) Material brokerage; (4) Material sale; (5) Material delivery. An Action Plan is recommended, addressing the strengthening of the national infrastructure for material protection and accounting, development of higher standards of good governance, and needs for improving the control system deployed by customs, border guards and security forces.

  3. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy of Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Norain, Abdullah; Dadachova, Ekaterina

    2016-05-01

    An estimated 60,000 individuals in the United States and 132,000 worldwide are yearly diagnosed with melanoma. Until recently, treatment options for patients with stages III-IV metastatic disease were limited and offered marginal, if any, improvement in overall survival. The situation changed with the introduction of B-RAF inhibitors and anti-cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 and anti-programmed cell death protein 1 immunotherapies into the clinical practice. With only some patients responding well to the immune therapies and with very serious side effects and high costs of immunotherapy, there is still room for other approaches for the treatment of metastatic melanoma. Targeted radionuclide therapy of melanoma could be divided into the domains of radioimmunotherapy (RIT), radiolabeled peptides, and radiolabeled small molecules. RIT of melanoma is currently experiencing a renaissance with the clinical trials of alpha-emitter (213)Bi-labeled and beta-emitter (188)Rhenium-labeled monoclonal antibodies in patients with metastatic melanoma producing encouraging results. The investigation of the mechanism of efficacy of melanoma RIT points at killing of melanoma stem cells by RIT and involvement of immune system such as complement-dependent cytotoxicity. The domain of radiolabeled peptides for targeted melanoma therapy has been preclinical so far, with work concentrated on radiolabeled peptide analogues of melanocyte-stimulating hormone receptor and on melanin-binding peptides. The field of radiolabeled small molecule produced radioiodinated benzamides that cross the cellular membrane and bind to the intracellular melanin. The recent clinical trial demonstrated measurable antitumor effects and no acute or midterm toxicities. We are hopeful that the targeted radionuclide therapy of metastatic melanoma would become a clinical reality as a stand-alone therapy or in combination with the immunotherapies such as anti-PD1 programmed cell death protein 1 monoclonal antibodies

  4. Theranostic Applications of Lutetium-177 in Radionuclide Therapy.

    PubMed

    Das, Tapas; Banerjee, Sharmila

    2016-01-01

    Lutetium-177 has been widely discussed as a radioisotope of choice for targeted radionuclide therapy. The simultaneous emission of imageable gamma photons [208 keV (11%) and 113 keV (6.4%)] along with particulate β(-) emission [β(max) = 497 keV] makes it a theranostically desirable radioisotope. In the present article, the possibility of using two 177Lu-based agents viz. 177Lu-EDTMP and 177Lu-DOTATATE for theranostic applications in metastatic bone pain palliation (MBPP) and peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT), have been explored. In the case of 177Lu-EDTMP, the whole-body images obtained are compared with those recorded using 99mTc-MDP in the same patient. On the other hand, pre-therapy images acquired with 177Lu-DOTA-TATE are compared with similar images obtained with standard agents, such as 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC (SPECT) and 68Ga-DOTA-TOC (PET) in the same patient. The advantage of the long physical half-life (T1/2) of 177Lu has been utilized in mapping the pharmacokinetics of two additional agents, 177Lu-labeled hydroxyapatite (HA) in radiation synovectomy of knee joints and 177Lu-HA for therapy of hepatocellular carcinoma. Results of these multiple studies conclusively document the potential of 177Lu as a theranostic radioisotope.

  5. New observations in scintigraphy of subdural and extradural hematomas

    SciTech Connect

    Smoak, W.M.; Gilson, A.J.; Janowitz, W.; Zusmer, N.; Maturo, V.

    1980-11-01

    Static radionuclide images of subacute subdural hematomas demonstrate significant variations in findings over a 3-hr period in the same patient. The lesion can appear, disappear, and reconstitute in an entirely different pattern. This transformation has not appeared in extradural hematomas, and may provide a differential diagnostic sign. In patients with a clinical history or physical findings suspicious for these intracranial hematomas, immediate and sequential delayed static imaging is recommended.

  6. Calculating Hematopoietic-Mode-Lethality Risk Avoidance Associated with Radionuclide Decorporation Countermeasures Related to a Radiological Terrorism Incident

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Bobby R.

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides theoretical health-risk-assessment tools that are designed to facilitate planning for and managing radiological terrorism incidents that involve ingestion exposure to bone-seeking radionuclides (e.g., radiostrontium nuclides). The focus is on evaluating lethality risk avoidance (RAV; i.e., the decrease in risk) that is associated with radionuclide decorporation countermeasures employed to remove ingested bone-seeking beta and/or gamma-emitting radionuclides from the body. To illustrate the application of tools presented, hypothetical radiostrontium decorporation scenarios were considered that involved evaluating the hematopoietic-mode-lethality RAV. For evaluating the efficacy of specific decorporation countermeasures, the lethality risk avoidance proportion (RAP; which is the RAV divided by the total lethality risk in the absence of protective countermeasures) is introduced. The lethality RAP is expected to be a useful tool for designing optimal radionuclide decorporation schemes and for identifying green, yellow and red dose-rate zones. For the green zone, essentially all of the lethality risk is expected to be avoided (RAP = 1) as a consequence of the radionuclide decorporation scheme used. For the yellow zone, some but not all of the lethality risk is expected to be avoided. For the red zone, none of the lethality risk (which equals 1) is expected to be avoided. PMID:20011652

  7. Effect of electrical current on the healing of mandibular freeze-dried bone allografts in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Branham, G.B.; Triplett, R.G.; Yeandle, S.; Vieras, F.

    1985-06-01

    Low levels of electrical current have been shown to affect the process of osseous repair. This study experimentally evaluated the effect of electrical stimulation on the healing of freeze-dried mandibular allogeneic bone grafts in dogs. Healing of the grafts was monitored by sequential submento-occlusal radiographs and radionuclide bone imaging at two, four, six, and eight weeks after grafting. Results indicated no significant difference in the osseous repair of stimulated and nonstimulated freeze-dried allogeneic bone grafts.

  8. 2009 LANL radionuclide air emissions report

    SciTech Connect

    Fuehne, David P.

    2010-06-01

    The emissions of radionuclides from Department of Energy Facilities such as Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are regulated by the Amendments to the Clean Air Act of 1990, National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (40 CFR 61 Subpart H). These regulations established an annual dose limit of 10 mrem to the maximally exposed member of the public attributable to emissions of radionuclides. This document describes the emissions of radionuclides from LANL and the dose calculations resulting from these emissions for calendar year 2009. This report meets the reporting requirements established in the regulations.

  9. 2008 LANL radionuclide air emissions report

    SciTech Connect

    Fuehne, David P.

    2009-06-01

    The emissions of radionuclides from Department of Energy Facilities such as Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are regulated by the Amendments to the Clean Air Act of 1990, National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (40 CFR 61 Subpart H). These regulations established an annual dose limit of 10 mrem to the maximally exposed member of the public attributable to emissions of radionuclides. This document describes the emissions of radionuclides from LANL and the dose calculations resulting from these emissions for calendar year 2008. This report meets the reporting requirements established in the regulations.

  10. 2010 LANL radionuclide air emissions report /

    SciTech Connect

    Fuehne, David P.

    2011-06-01

    The emissions of radionuclides from Department of Energy Facilities such as Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are regulated by the Amendments to the Clean Air Act of 1990, National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (40 CFR 61 Subpart H). These regulations established an annual dose limit of 10 mrem to the maximally exposed member of the public attributable to emissions of radionuclides. This document describes the emissions of radionuclides from LANL and the dose calculations resulting from these emissions for calendar year 2010. This report meets the reporting requirements established in the regulations.

  11. Conus Medullaris Syndrome following Radionuclide Cisternography.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jay Chol

    2014-01-01

    Radionuclide cisternography is generally considered to be a safe procedure without significant neurological complications. However, in this report we present a patient who developed conus medullaris syndrome following radionuclide cisternography. A 46-year-old woman underwent lumbar puncture followed by radionuclide cisternography with the diagnosis of hydrocephalus. After the cisternography, she developed voiding difficulty with perineal sensory loss. Lumbar MRI revealed a high signal intensity lesion on T2-weighted images at the level of conus medullaris. Considering its clinical course and MRI findings, a spinal cord infarction is highly suggested as a cause of the conus medullaris lesion in this patient.

  12. Prognostic significance of normal quantitative planar thallium-201 stress scintigraphy in patients with chest pain

    SciTech Connect

    Wackers, F.J.; Russo, D.J.; Russo, D.; Clements, J.P.

    1985-07-01

    The prognostic significance of normal quantitative planar thallium-201 stress scintigraphy was evaluated in patients with a chest pain syndrome. The prevalence of cardiac events during follow-up was related to the pretest (that is, before stress scintigraphy) likelihood of coronary artery disease determined on the basis of symptoms, age, sex and stress electrocardiography. In a consecutive series of 344 patients who had adequate thallium-201 stress scintigrams, 95 had unequivocally normal studies by quantitative analysis. The pretest likelihood of coronary artery disease in the 95 patients had a bimodal distribution. During a mean follow-up period of 22 +/- 3 months, no patient died. Three patients (3%) had a cardiac event: two of these patients (pretest likelihood of coronary artery disease 54 and 94%) had a nonfatal myocardial infarction 8 and 22 months, respectively, after stress scintigraphy, and one patient (pretest likelihood 98%) underwent percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty 16 months after stress scintigraphy for persisting anginal complaints. Three patients were lost to follow-up; all three had a low pretest likelihood of coronary artery disease. It is concluded that patients with chest pain and normal findings on quantitative thallium-201 scintigraphy have an excellent prognosis. Cardiac events are rare (infarction rate 1% per year) and occur in patients with a moderate to high pretest likelihood of coronary artery disease.

  13. Thallium scintigraphy during dobutamine infusion: nonexercise-dependent screening test for coronary disease

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, J.R.; Palac, R.T.; Freeman, M.L.; Virupannavar, S.; Loeb, H.S.; Kaplan, E.; Gunnar, R.M.

    1984-03-01

    Exercise thallium scintigraphy has proven to be a sensitive method for detecting coronary artery disease (CAD). However, early redistribution of thallium and inadequate exercise can reduce its sensitivity. In this study, dobutamine was infused in incremental doses (5, 10, 15, and 20 micrograms/kg/min) in 24 patients being evaluated for chest pain. Thallium scintigraphy was completed during the maximum dose of dobutamine tolerated and repeated 4 hours later. Significant CAD was present in 16 patients; the remaining eight had normal coronaries. Exercise ECG was obtained in 23 patients. During dobutamine thallium scintigraphy, reversible perfusion defects occurred in 15 of 16 CAD and in one of eight non-CAD patients, resulting in a sensitivity of 94% and a specificity of 87%. Exercise ECG had a sensitivity of 60% and a specificity of 63%. We conclude that: (1) dobutamine thallium scintigraphy appears to be a sensitive method for detecting significant CAD and provided a more sensitive screening test than exercise ECG; (2) dobutamine thallium scintigraphy is especially useful in patients who cannot exercise; and (3) because imaging occurs during dobutamine infusion, the problem of early redistribution may be mitigated.

  14. The Role of 99mTc-Annexin V Apoptosis Scintigraphy in Visualizing Early Stage Glucocorticoid-Induced Femoral Head Osteonecrosis in the Rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaolong; Liu, Yu; Wang, Xuemei; Liu, Rui; Li, Jianbo; Zhang, Guoliang; Li, Qiang; Wang, Lei; Bai, Zhigang; Zhao, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To validate the ability of 99mTc-Annexin V to visualize early stage of glucocorticoid-induced femoral head necrosis by comparing with 99mTc-MDP bone scanning. Methods. Femoral head necrosis was induced in adult New Zealand white rabbits by intramuscular injection of methylprednisolone. 99mTc-Annexin scintigraphy and 99mTc-MDP scans were performed before and 5, 6, and 8 weeks after methylprednisolone administration. Rabbits were sacrificed at various time points and conducted for TUNEL and H&E staining. Results. All methylprednisolone treated animals developed femoral head necrosis; at 8 weeks postinjection, destruction of bone structure was evident in H&E staining, and apoptosis was confirmed by the TUNEL assay. This was matched by 99mTc-Annexin V images, which showed a significant increase in signal over baseline. Serial 99mTc-Annexin V scans revealed that increased 99mTc-Annexin V uptake could be observed in 5 weeks. In contrast, there was no effect on 99mTc-MDP signal until 8 weeks. The TUNEL assay revealed that bone cell apoptosis occurred at 5 weeks. Conclusion. 99mTc-Annexin V is superior to 99mTc-MDP for the early detection of glucocorticoid-induced femoral head necrosis in the rabbit and may be a better strategy for the early detection of glucocorticoid-induced femoral head necrosis in patients. PMID:26989689

  15. Technetium-99m APD compared with technetium-99m MDP as a bone scanning agent

    SciTech Connect

    Degrossi, O.J.; Oliveri, P.; Garcia del Rio, H.; Labriola, R.; Artagaveytia, D.; Degrossi, E.B.

    1985-10-01

    The authors have investigated the possibilities of technetium-99m-(-3-aminohydroxypropylidene)-1-1-bisphosphonate ((/sup 99m/Tc)APD) as a bone scanning agent in 14 normal subjects and 28 patients. Similar studies in the same normal subjects and patients were carried out with /sup 99m/Tc-methylene-bisphosphonate ((/sup 99m/Tc)MDP). The compounds were labeled with /sup 99m/Tc by means of an electrolytical method; the free pertechnetate content was always under 1%. The (/sup 99m/Tc)APD T1/2 of the third component of the disappearance plasma curve in six normal subjects was 152 +/- 46 min (mean +/- s.d.), while the 24-hr whole-body retention (WBR) was 17.6% +/- 4.6. The (99mTc)MDP value of the 24-hr WBR was 28.6% +/- 3.9. The bone/soft-tissue ratio (B/ST) was investigated in eight control subjects on the eleventh thoracic and the fourth lumbar vertebrae. The B/ST ratios were similar for both APD and MDP studies. In 28 patients with suspected bone metastasis or primary bone disease, bone scintigraphy was carried out; both compounds showed similar findings and the same number of positive results. In five of these patients, the lesion/normal bone ratio was determined with values of 4.6 +/- 2.0 in APD studies and 4.8 +/- 2.3 with MDP. APD was also used in 126 patients; no adverse reactions were observed. The APD dose used i.v. for bone scanning was 200-fold less than those employed by mouth per day, for the treatment of bone disease for long periods. In our experience, APD appears to be an adequate agent for bone scintigraphy.

  16. Usefulness of thallium-201 scintigraphy in predicting the development of angina pectoris in hypertensive patients with left ventricular hypertrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Tubau, J.F.; Szlachcic, J.; Hollenberg, M.; Massie, B.M.

    1989-07-01

    Hypertension and left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy are independent risk factors for the development of coronary artery disease. To determine whether patients at higher risk for coronary artery disease can be identified, 40 asymptomatic hypertensive men with LV hypertrophy were prospectively studied using exercise thallium-201 scintigraphy and exercise radionuclide angiography. Endpoints indicative of coronary artery disease were defined as the subsequent development of typical angina pectoris, which occurred in 8 patients during a median follow-up of 38 months, or myocardial infarction, which did not occur. The exercise electrocardiogram was interpreted by standard ST-segment criteria and by a computerized treadmill exercise score. Abnormal ST-segment responses were present in 16 of the 40 hypertensives (40%), whereas the treadmill score was positive in 8 of those same 40 patients (20%). Scintigraphic perfusion defects assessed both visually and semiquantitatively were observed in 8 of 40 (20%) patients. An abnormal ejection fraction response to exercise was present in 40% (16 of 40) of patients, and 3 of 40 (7.5%) developed new wall motion abnormalities during exercise. Six of 8 patients with either perfusion defects or abnormal treadmill score developed typical angina during follow-up. All 5 patients with concordant positive exercise scintigrams and treadmill score developed chest pain during follow-up and had coronary artery disease confirmed by coronary angiography. However, only 7 of 16 (44%) patients with positive ST changes or abnormal ejection fraction responses during exercise developed chest pain during follow-up. In contrast, of 32 patients with negative scintigrams only 2 developed atypical chest pain syndromes, and significant coronary artery disease was excluded by angiography in 1 patient.

  17. Dexamethasone-suppression adrenal scintigraphy in hyperandrogenism: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, M.D.; Freitas, J.E.; Swanson, D.P.; Woodbury, M.C.; Schteingart, D.E.; Beierwaltes, W.H.

    1981-01-01

    To assess the contribution of adrenal-derived androgens in women with hirsutism, adrenal scintigrams under dexamethasone suppression (DS) were performed on 35 women with increasing facial or body hair and irregular or absent menses. Based upon the DS regimen chosen (8 mg/d for 2 days or 4 md/d for 7 days before the injection of 6..beta..-(/sup 131/I)iodomethylnorcholesterol), three imaging patterns were identified. The first was the absence of uptake before 3 days (8-mg DS) or before 5 days (4-mg DS) after injection. This imaging pattern was seen in 17 of the 35 patients studied and was considered normal. The second pattern was bilateral uptake earlier than 3 days (8-mg DS regimen) or 5 days (4-mg DS) after injection. This was seen in 13 of the 35 patients and was interpreted as bilateral early visualization. Adrenal-vein catheterization performed on six patients with this pattern showed increased adrenal-vein testosterone. The third pattern, observed in five patients, was unilateral early visualization, which in four cases investigated to date was the result of an adrenocortical adenoma. This study confirms the adrenal cortex as a source of androgens in women with hirsutism and hyperandrogenism and demonstrates that DS adrenal scintigraphy can be utilized to identify those women in whom adrenal-derived androgens contribute to their hyperandrogenism.

  18. Preoperative localization of parathyroid adenomas: ultrasonography, sestamibi scintigraphy, or both?

    PubMed

    Hajioff, D; Iyngkaran, T; Panagamuwa, C; Hill, D; Stearns, M P

    2004-10-01

    Minimal access techniques are increasingly used to remove parathyroid adenomas. Such surgery depends on accurate preoperative localization but the selection of imaging modality remains controversial. We have reviewed the accuracy of ultrasonography, sestamibi scintigraphy and their combination in 48 cases of primary hyperparathyroidism. Ultrasound had a sensitivity of 64.3% (95% confidence interval 44.1-81.4) and positive predictive value (PPV) of 100% (81.5-100) for correct lateralization. Sestamibi had a sensitivity of 83.3% (69.8-92.5) and PPV of 87.1% (73.7-95.1). The simple combination of ultrasound with sestamibi had a sensitivity of 82.1% (63.1-93.9) and a PPV of 92.0% (74.0-99.0): little different from sestamibi alone. However, if the sestamibi result was disregarded in favour of ultrasonography in discordant cases, the sensitivity reached 96.4% (81.7-99.9) and the PPV was 100% (87.2-100). These results were not dependant on a learning curve or the size of adenoma.

  19. Human pancreas scintigraphy using iodine-123-labeled HIPDM and SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, K.; Shibata, T.; Saji, H.; Kubo, S.; Aoki, E.; Fujita, T.; Yonekura, Y.; Konishi, J.; Yokoyama, A. )

    1990-06-01

    The pancreatic affinity of iodine-123-labeled HIPDM (N,N,N'-trimethyl-N'-(2-hydroxy-3-methyl-5-iodobenzyl)-1,3-propane diamine) (({sup 123}I)HIPDM) was studied in 18 cases (5 normal volunteers, 7 cases with pancreas cancer, and 6 with chronic pancreatitis). In the normal cases, the pancreas was visualized in the planar images as early as 3 hr, and again at 20 hr postinjection. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) performed following 3-hr planar scintigraphy, provided excellent pancreas images without an overlap of activity in the liver or spleen. The mean pancreas-to-liver (P/L) ratio was 1.26 +/- 0.22 in normal controls. With the exception of one case of massive calcification in the pancreas, the entire pancreas could be observed in the cases with chronic pancreatitis, but the P/L ratio was 0.74 +/- 0.15, significantly lower than that of normal cases. Defective areas of the distal portion of the pancreas were clearly seen in those with cancer of the pancreas. The results of our study indicate that ({sup 123}I) HIPDM may have clinical potential as a human pancreas imaging agent.

  20. Applicability of the Appropriate use Criteria for Myocardial Perfusion Scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Anderson de; Rezende, Maria Fernanda; Corrêa, Renato; Mousinho, Rodrigo; Azevedo, Jader Cunha; Miranda, Sandra Marina; Oliveira, Aline Ribeiro; Gutterres, Ricardo Fraga; Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Mesquita, Cláudio Tinoco

    2014-11-01

    Background: Appropriateness Criteria for nuclear imaging exams were created by American College of Cardiology (ACC) e American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) to allow the rational use of tests. Little is known whether these criteria have been followed in clinical practice. Objective: To evaluate whether the medical applications of myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) in a private nuclear medicine service of a tertiary cardiology hospital were suitable to the criteria of indications proposed by the American medical societies in 2005 and 2009 and compare the level of indication of both. Methods: We included records of 383 patients that underwent MPS, November 2008 up to February 2009. Demographic characteristics, patient's origin, coronary risk factors, time of medical graduation and appropriateness criteria of medical applications were studied. The criteria were evaluated by two independent physicians and, in doubtful cases, defined by a medical expert in MPS. Results: Mean age was 65 ± 12 years. Of the 367 records reviewed, 236 (64.3%) studies were performed in men and 75 (20.4%) were internee. To ACC 2005, 255 (69.5%) were considered appropriate indication and 13 (3.5%) inappropriate. With ACC 2009, 249 (67.8%) were considered appropriate indications and 13 (5.2%) inappropriate. Conclusions: We observed a high rate of adequacy of medical indications for MPS. Compared to the 2005 version, 2009 did not change the results.

  1. Applicability of the Appropriate use Criteria for Myocardial Perfusion Scintigraphy

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Anderson; Rezende, Maria Fernanda; Corrêa, Renato; Mousinho, Rodrigo; Azevedo, Jader Cunha; Miranda, Sandra Marina; Oliveira, Aline Ribeiro; Gutterres, Ricardo Fraga; Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Mesquita, Cláudio Tinoco

    2014-01-01

    Background Appropriateness Criteria for nuclear imaging exams were created by American College of Cardiology (ACC) e American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) to allow the rational use of tests. Little is known whether these criteria have been followed in clinical practice. Objective To evaluate whether the medical applications of myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) in a private nuclear medicine service of a tertiary cardiology hospital were suitable to the criteria of indications proposed by the American medical societies in 2005 and 2009 and compare the level of indication of both. Methods We included records of 383 patients that underwent MPS, November 2008 up to February 2009. Demographic characteristics, patient's origin, coronary risk factors, time of medical graduation and appropriateness criteria of medical applications were studied. The criteria were evaluated by two independent physicians and, in doubtful cases, defined by a medical expert in MPS. Results Mean age was 65 ± 12 years. Of the 367 records reviewed, 236 (64.3%) studies were performed in men and 75 (20.4%) were internee. To ACC 2005, 255 (69.5%) were considered appropriate indication and 13 (3.5%) inappropriate. With ACC 2009, 249 (67.8%) were considered appropriate indications and 13 (5.2%) inappropriate. Conclusions We observed a high rate of adequacy of medical indications for MPS. Compared to the 2005 version, 2009 did not change the results. PMID:25252163

  2. Atlas of computerized blood flow analysis in bone disease.

    PubMed

    Gandsman, E J; Deutsch, S D; Tyson, I B

    1983-11-01

    The role of computerized blood flow analysis in routine bone scanning is reviewed. Cases illustrating the technique include proven diagnoses of toxic synovitis, Legg-Perthes disease, arthritis, avascular necrosis of the hip, fractures, benign and malignant tumors, Paget's disease, cellulitis, osteomyelitis, and shin splints. Several examples also show the use of the technique in monitoring treatment. The use of quantitative data from the blood flow, bone uptake phase, and static images suggests specific diagnostic patterns for each of the diseases presented in this atlas. Thus, this technique enables increased accuracy in the interpretation of the radionuclide bone scan.

  3. A free database of radionuclide voxel S values for the dosimetry of nonuniform activity distributions.

    PubMed

    Lanconelli, N; Pacilio, M; Lo Meo, S; Botta, F; Di Dia, A; Aroche, A Torres; Pérez, M A Coca; Cremonesi, M

    2012-01-21

    The increasing availability of SPECT/CT devices with advanced technology offers the opportunity for the accurate assessment of the radiation dose to the biological target volume during radionuclide therapy. Voxel dosimetry can be performed employing direct Monte Carlo radiation transport simulations, based on both morphological and functional images of the patient. On the other hand, for voxel dosimetry calculations the voxel S value method can be considered an easier approach than patient-specific Monte Carlo simulations, ensuring a good dosimetric accuracy at least for anatomic regions which are characterized by uniform density tissue. However, this approach has been limited because of the lack of tabulated S values for different voxel dimensions and radionuclides. The aim of this work is to provide a free dataset of values which can be used for voxel dosimetry in targeted radionuclide studies. Seven different radionuclides (89Sr, 90Y, 131I, 153Sm, 177Lu, 186Re, 188Re), and 13 different voxel sizes (2.21, 2.33, 2.4, 3, 3.59, 3.9, 4, 4.42, 4.8, 5, 6, 6.8 and 9.28 mm) are considered. Voxel S values are calculated performing simulations of monochromatic photon and electron sources in two different homogeneous tissues (soft tissue and bone) with DOSXYZnrc code, and weighting the contributions on the basis of the radionuclide emission spectra. The outcomes are validated by comparison with Monte Carlo simulations obtained with other codes (PENELOPE and MCNP4c) performing direct simulation of the radionuclide emission spectra. The differences among the different Monte Carlo codes are of the order of a few per cent when considering the source voxel and the bremsstrahlung tail, whereas the highest differences are observed at a distance close to the maximum continuous slowing down approximation range of electrons. These discrepancies would negligibly affect dosimetric assessments. The dataset of voxel S values can be freely downloaded from the website www.medphys.it.

  4. A free database of radionuclide voxel S values for the dosimetry of nonuniform activity distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanconelli, N.; Pacilio, M.; Lo Meo, S.; Botta, F.; Di Dia, A.; Torres Aroche, L. A.; Coca Pérez, M. A.; Cremonesi, M.

    2012-01-01

    The increasing availability of SPECT/CT devices with advanced technology offers the opportunity for the accurate assessment of the radiation dose to the biological target volume during radionuclide therapy. Voxel dosimetry can be performed employing direct Monte Carlo radiation transport simulations, based on both morphological and functional images of the patient. On the other hand, for voxel dosimetry calculations the voxel S value method can be considered an easier approach than patient-specific Monte Carlo simulations, ensuring a good dosimetric accuracy at least for anatomic regions which are characterized by uniform density tissue. However, this approach has been limited because of the lack of tabulated S values for different voxel dimensions and radionuclides. The aim of this work is to provide a free dataset of values which can be used for voxel dosimetry in targeted radionuclide studies. Seven different radionuclides (89Sr, 90Y, 131I, 153Sm, 177Lu, 186Re, 188Re), and 13 different voxel sizes (2.21, 2.33, 2.4, 3, 3.59, 3.9, 4, 4.42, 4.8, 5, 6, 6.8 and 9.28 mm) are considered. Voxel S values are calculated performing simulations of monochromatic photon and electron sources in two different homogeneous tissues (soft tissue and bone) with DOSXYZnrc code, and weighting the contributions on the basis of the radionuclide emission spectra. The outcomes are validated by comparison with Monte Carlo simulations obtained with other codes (PENELOPE and MCNP4c) performing direct simulation of the radionuclide emission spectra. The differences among the different Monte Carlo codes are of the order of a few per cent when considering the source voxel and the bremsstrahlung tail, whereas the highest differences are observed at a distance close to the maximum continuous slowing down approximation range of electrons. These discrepancies would negligibly affect dosimetric assessments. The dataset of voxel S values can be freely downloaded from the website www.medphys.it.

  5. Radionuclide angiography for assessment of hyperthyroidism

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, V.W.; Welji, A.N.; Shapiro, J.H.; Angtuaco, E.

    1982-01-01

    A retrospective study of 66 radionuclide angiograms of the thyroid showed that a simple visual inspection of the images is highly accurate for diagnosing hyperthyroidism. Mathematical analysis with computers is not necessary.

  6. Radionuclide carriers for targeting of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sofou, Stavroula

    2008-01-01

    This review describes strategies for the delivery of therapeutic radionuclides to tumor sites. Therapeutic approaches are summarized in terms of tumor location in the body, and tumor morphology. These determine the radionuclides of choice for suggested targeting ligands, and the type of delivery carriers. This review is not exhaustive in examples of radionuclide carriers for targeted cancer therapy. Our purpose is two-fold: to give an integrated picture of the general strategies and molecular constructs currently explored for the delivery of therapeutic radionuclides, and to identify challenges that need to be addressed. Internal radiotherapies for targeting of cancer are at a very exciting and creative stage. It is expected that the current emphasis on multidisciplinary approaches for exploring such therapeutic directions should enable internal radiotherapy to reach its full potential. PMID:18686778

  7. System and method for assaying a radionuclide

    SciTech Connect

    Cadieux, James R; King, III, George S; Fugate, Glenn A

    2014-12-23

    A system for assaying a radionuclide includes a liquid scintillation detector, an analyzer connected to the liquid scintillation detector, and a delay circuit connected to the analyzer. A gamma detector and a multi-channel analyzer are connected to the delay circuit and the gamma detector. The multi-channel analyzer produces a signal reflective of the radionuclide in the sample. A method for assaying a radionuclide includes selecting a sample, detecting alpha or beta emissions from the sample with a liquid scintillation detector, producing a first signal reflective of the alpha or beta emissions, and delaying the first signal a predetermined time. The method further includes detecting gamma emissions from the sample, producing a second signal reflective of the gamma emissions, and combining the delayed first signal with the second signal to produce a third signal reflective of the radionuclide.

  8. Dosimetry and Case Studies for Selected Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Leggett, Richard Wayne

    2009-01-01

    This is a comprehensive review and analysis of biokinetic and dosimetric information for those radionuclides most likely to be involved in accidental exposures to workers or members of the public or used in radiological terrorism.

  9. Long lived gamma emitting radionuclides in incense.

    PubMed

    Alrefae, Tareq

    2013-10-01

    A study of long-lived gamma emitters in incense was performed. The incense samples originated from seven different countries, and the investigated radionuclides were Ra, Ra, and K. Gamma spectroscopy revealed the presence of all three investigated radionuclides in all samples. Interestingly, the activity concentrations revealed a clear bimodal distribution that distinguished samples that were natural incense from others that were processed incense. The activity concentrations in the latter group were found to be one order of magnitude greater than in the former group. Consequently, the estimated annual effective dose from the latter group was one order of magnitude higher than that of the former group. Nonetheless, the doses from both groups were found to be some three orders of magnitude less than the average worldwide exposure to inhaled natural radionuclides. This finding suggests the radiological safety of incense for the investigated radionuclides.

  10. Radionuclides in an underground environment

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.L.

    1996-08-01

    In the 100 years since Becquerel recognized radioactivity, mankind has been very successful in producing large amounts of radioactive materials. We have been less successful in reaching a consensus on how to dispose of the billions of curies of fission products and transuranics resulting from nuclear weapons testing, electrical power generation, medical research, and a variety of other human endeavors. Many countries, including the United States, favor underground burial as a means of disposing of radioactive wastes. There are, however, serious questions about how such buried wastes may behave in the underground environment and particularly how they might eventually contaminate water, air and soil resources on which we are dependent. This paper describes research done in the United States in the state of Nevada on the behavior of radioactive materials placed underground. During the last thirty years, a series of ``experiments`` conducted for other purposes (testing of nuclear weapons) have resulted in a wide variety of fission products and actinides being injected in rock strata both above and below the water table. Variables which seem to control the movement of these radionuclides include the physical form (occlusion versus surface deposition), the chemical oxidation state, sorption by mineral phases of the host rock, and the hydrologic properties of the medium. The information gained from these studies should be relevant to planning for remediation of nuclear facilities elsewhere in the world and for long-term storage of nuclear wastes.

  11. Biodecontamination of radionuclide contaminated concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, M.A.; Rogers, R.D.; Benson, J.

    1996-10-01

    Within the nuclear industry, there are literally hundreds of square miles of radionuclide contaminated concrete surfaces. A novel technology for biologically decontaminating concrete is being developed. The technology exploits a naturally occurring phenomenon referred to as microbially influenced degradation (MID) in which bacteria produce acids that dissolve the cement matrix of the concrete. Accelerated testing in laboratory conditions was conducted. The bacteria Thiobacillus thiooxidans, supplied from a continuous flow bioreactor, was applied to an exposed concrete surface. A control chamber exposing concrete to sterile media was operated under the same conditions. One hundred percent of surrogate cobalt contamination was recovered from the Thiobacillus treated concrete and 1 mm thickness of concrete material was removed in 60 days. Prototype chambers that can be mounted directly to concrete surfaces have been designed to allow control of environmental conditions to promote MID after inoculation of the surface with bacteria. Studies to determine optimum source and quantity of reduced sulfur, bacterial species or consortia best suited for rapid MID, and methods of application and delivery of bacteria and nutrients will be discussed.

  12. Treatment of radionuclide contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Pettis, S.A.; Kallas, A.J.; Kochen, R.L.; McGlochlin, S.C.

    1988-06-01

    Rockwell, International, Rocky Flats Plants, is committed to remediating within the scope of RCRA/CERCLA, Solid Waste Managements Units (SWMUs) at Rocky Flats found to be contaminated with hazardous substances. SWMUs fund to have radionuclide (uranium, plutonium, and/or americium) concentrations in the soils and/or groundwater that exceed background levels or regulatory limits will also be included in this remediation effort. This paper briefly summarizes past and present efforts by Rockwell International, Rocky Flats Plant, to identify treatment technologies appropriate for remediating actinide contaminated soils. Many of the promising soil treatments evaluated in Rocky Flats' laboratories during the late 1970's and early 1980's are currently being revisited. These technologies are generally directed toward substantially reducing the volume of contaminated soils, with the subsequent intention of disposing of a small remaining concentrated fraction of contaminated soil in a facility approved to receive radioactive wastes. Treatment processes currently will be treated to remove actinides, and recycled back to the process. Past investigations have included evaluations of dry screening, wet screening, scrubbing, ultrasonics, chemical oxidation, calcination, desliming, flotation, and heavy-liquid density separation. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Solubility limits on radionuclide dissolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kerrisk, J.F.

    1984-12-31

    This paper examines the effects of solubility in limiting dissolution rates of a number of important radionuclides from spent fuel and high-level waste. Two simple dissolution models were used for calculations that would be characteristics of a Yucca Mountain repository. A saturation-limited dissolution model, in which the water flowing through the repository is assumed to be saturated with each waste element, is very conservative in that it overestimates dissolution rates. A diffusion-limited dissolution model, in which element-dissolution rates are limited by diffusion of waste elements into water flowing past the waste, is more realistic, but it is subject to some uncertainty at this time. Dissolution rates of some elements (Pu, Am, Sn, Th, Zr, Sm) are always limited by solubility. Dissolution rates of other elements (Cs, Tc, Np, Sr, C, I) are never solubility limited; their release would be limited by dissolution of the bulk waste form. Still other elements (U, Cm, Ni, Ra) show solubility-limited dissolution under some conditions. 9 references, 3 tables.

  14. (Radiological assessments of radionuclide releases)

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, F.O.

    1990-12-28

    As a consequence of the Chernobyl accident, data have been obtained throughout the Northern Hemisphere on the concentrations of radionuclides in air, vegetation, soil, water, and foodstuffs that could be important means of human exposure. At the IAEA's invitation, the traveler reviewed recently published data and handbook summaries. The traveler evaluated the need for revising the default values recommended in Chapter 5, Terrestrial and Aquatic Food Chain Transport,'' of IAEA Safety Series No. 57. All attempts at revision were made to keep the mathematical complexity of the models to a minimum without substantial underestimation of dose to critical population subgroups. The traveler also served as chairman of the Multiple Pathways Working Group of the Coordinated Research Program on VAMP. This group has been established to test predictions of models assessing multiple exposure pathways potentially leading to human exposure to {sup 137}Cs. Testing is carried out for major components of assessment models that predict deposition, environmental transport, food chain bioaccumulation, and subsequent uptake and retention in the human body and dose due to exposure to external gamma radiation.

  15. Liver/spleen scintigraphy for diagnosis of splenic infarction in cirrhotic patients.

    PubMed Central

    Chin, J. K.; McCormick, P. A.; Hilson, A. J.; Burroughs, A. K.; McIntyre, N.

    1993-01-01

    Splenic infarction is rare in cirrhotic patients. The diagnosis of the condition is based on clinical findings and splenic imaging. In recent years, ultrasonography and computed tomographic scan have gained popularity over the more classical scintigraphy as the preferred investigations for the diagnosis of splenic infarction. We report three cases of splenic infarction in patients with cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Computed tomographic scan, angiography and ultrasonography failed to identify the lesions and the diagnoses were finally made with the aid of liver--spleen scintigraphy. We suggest that scintigraphy is the investigation of choice if splenic infarction is suspected in patients with congestive splenomegaly secondary to liver cirrhosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8255838

  16. Indium-111-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy in hemodialysis access-site infection

    SciTech Connect

    Palestro, C.J.; Vega, A.; Kim, C.K.; Vallabhajosula, S.; Goldsmith, S.J. )

    1990-03-01

    Bacterial sepsis, a significant complication of chronic hemodialysis, is generally the result of infection at the vascular access site. We retrospectively reviewed the utility of indium-111-(111In) labeled autologous leukocyte scintigraphy in 26 patients (30 scans) with synthetic vascular grafts, on chronic hemodialysis, in whom hemodialysis access site infection was a diagnostic consideration. Leukocyte scintigraphy correctly identified all fifteen access-site infections; there was one false-positive study, for an overall sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 93%, respectively. Of particular significance is the fact that in nine (60%) of the fifteen access-site infections, physical examination was normal. Our data indicate that 111In-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy is a useful procedure for the diagnosis of hemodialysis access-site infection, and it is especially valuable when physical examination of the access site is normal.

  17. Limitations and pitfalls of 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC (Tektrotyd) scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Garai, Ildikó; Barna, Sandor; Nagy, Gabor; Forgacs, Attila

    2016-01-01

    Tektrotyd kit was developed by Polatom company for 99mTc labeling to make an alternative tracer of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy available. Since 2005, 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-Tyr3-Octreotide has been used in clinical imaging and achieved high impact in management of patients with neuroendocrine tumors. Knowing the limitations and pitfalls is essential to provide ac-curate diagnosis. Therefore, the potential pitfalls associated with the use of 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC are reviewed on the basis of own experience. Data were analyzed of 310 patients who underwent somatostatin receptor scintigraphy with 99mTc-Tektrotyd. Pitfalls during radiolabeling process or acquisition can worsen the sensitivity of SRS (somatostatin receptor scintigraphy). Recognizing physi-ological and clinical pitfalls, the diagnostic accuracy will improve.

  18. [67Ga scintigraphy as a therapeutic marker for spinal cord and muscular sarcoidosis: A case report].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Shinichiro; Nakanishi, Hirotaka; Hirayama, Masaaki; Katsuno, Masahisa; Sobue, Gen

    2015-01-01

    A 70-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of the right limb pain and gait disturbance. (67)Ga scintigraphy showed an increased uptake in the spinal cord, mediastinal lymph node and right tibialis anterior muscle. Based on the histopathological findings of epithelioid cell granuloma in endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration of lymph node, she was diagnosed as having probable spinal cord/muscular sarcoidosis. After she was treated with oral prednisolone, her limb pain and gait disturbance improved. Furthermore, uptake in (67)Ga scintigraphy was reduced after the treatment. In conclusion, (67)Ga scintigraphy is useful not only for diagnosis, but also for estimating the efficiency of the treatment for sarcoidosis involving multiple organs such as the spinal cord and skeletal muscle.

  19. Scintigraphy with 99mTc(V)-DMSA in monitoring patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Javadi, Hamid; Amiriani, Taghi; Mirkarimi, HoneySadat; Besharat, Sima; Semnani, Shahriar; Abedi, Jamshid; Seyedabadi, Mohammad; Assadi, Majid

    2013-01-01

    The clinical significance of pentavalent technetium-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid (99mTc(V)-DMSA) scintigraphy in diagnosing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has not yet been fully elucidated. The aim of this prospective paper was to study the above. This study included 54 patients, 22 females and 32 males (mean age: 36.68±11.49; range: 18-63 years) with IBD who came to our clinics for follow-up and were examined clinically by colonoscopy and 99mTc(V)-DMSA scintigraphy. On the follow-up studies, five patients (9.25%) relapsed, and 49 (90.74%) remained at a steady condition. There was a good correlation between the scintigraphic results and the clinical and colonoscopy data of the patients (P<0.05). In conclusion, our results indicated that 99mTc(V)DMSA scintigraphy can be complementary to colonoscopy for the diagnostic evaluation of IBD.

  20. Limitations and pitfalls of 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC (Tektrotyd) scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Garai, Ildikó; Barna, Sandor; Nagy, Gabor; Forgacs, Attila

    2016-01-01

    Tektrotyd kit was developed by Polatom company for 99mTc labeling to make an alternative tracer of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy available. Since 2005, 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-Tyr3-Octreotide has been used in clinical imaging and achieved high impact in management of patients with neuroendocrine tumors. Knowing the limitations and pitfalls is essential to provide ac-curate diagnosis. Therefore, the potential pitfalls associated with the use of 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC are reviewed on the basis of own experience. Data were analyzed of 310 patients who underwent somatostatin receptor scintigraphy with 99mTc-Tektrotyd. Pitfalls during radiolabeling process or acquisition can worsen the sensitivity of SRS (somatostatin receptor scintigraphy). Recognizing physi-ological and clinical pitfalls, the diagnostic accuracy will improve. PMID:27479887

  1. Alchemy with short-lived radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Rubio, F.F.; Finn, R.D.; Gilson, A.J.

    1981-04-01

    A variety of short-lived radionuclides are produced and subsequently incorporated into radiopharmaceutical compounds in the radionuclide production program currently being conducted at the Cyclotron Facility of Mount Sinai Medical Center. The recovery of high specific activity oxygen-15 labelled water prepared by means of an inexpensive system operating in conjunction with an on-line radiogas target routinely utilized for oxygen-15 labelled carbon dioxide studies is currently receiving particular attention.

  2. Bone marrow transplant

    MedlinePlus

    Transplant - bone marrow; Stem cell transplant; Hematopoietic stem cell transplant; Reduced intensity nonmyeloablative transplant; Mini transplant; Allogenic bone marrow transplant; Autologous bone marrow transplant; Umbilical ...

  3. Is retention of zoledronic acid onto bone different in multiple myeloma and breast cancer patients with bone metastasis?

    PubMed

    Søe, Kent; Plesner, Torben; Jakobsen, Erik H; Hansen, Charlotte T; Jørgensen, Henrik B; Delaissé, Jean-Marie

    2013-08-01

    Zoledronic acid (Zol) is used to treat bone disease in both multiple myeloma (MM) and breast cancer patients with bone metastasis (BC). However, bones of MM and BC patients show a difference in retention of the bisphosphonate used for bone scintigraphy. Therefore, we hypothesized that disease-specific factors may differently influence Zol retention in MM and BC patients. We tested this hypothesis in an investigator initiated phase II clinical trial in which we compared the whole-body retention (WBrt) of Zol in a cohort of 30 multiple myeloma (MM) and 30 breast cancer (BC) (20 Zol naive and 40 with six or more previous administrations). On average, 62% of the administered Zol was retained in the skeleton of both MM and BC patients and independently of the number of treatments. WBrt of Zol did not correlate with cross-linked C-telopeptide (CTX) levels, but linear regression analyses showed that WBrt of Zol correlated with bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (bALP) levels in BC (p = 0.001), and with CTX/bALP in Zol naive MM patients (p = 0.012). Especially in BC patients, WBrt correlated with age (p = 0.014) independently of kidney function. In MM patients WBrt was found to primarily correlate with the extent of bone disease (p = 0.028). Multivariate linear regression analyses of the entire cohort pointed out that WBrt of Zol was best predicted by age (p < 0.000), osseous lesions (p < 0.001), and the preceding Zol dosing (p < 0.005) (r(2)  = 0.97). Comparing bone scintigrams with CT/X-ray images showed a poor correlation between sites of active bone disease and binding of scintigraphy bisphosphonate in 36% of MM patients and in 13% of BC patients. We conclude that WBrt of Zol is primarily determined by two non-disease related factors and only one disease related, but that there may be differences in retention or drug delivery at individual sites of bone disease between MM and BC patients. In order to find the optimal dosing of Zol, these

  4. Thallium-201 scintigraphy in the diagnosis and management of myocardial sarcoidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, C.L.; Ossorio, M.A.; Roy, T.M.; Denny, D.M.; Varga, D.W. )

    1990-03-01

    We have described three patients with clinical evidence of myocardial sarcoidosis to illustrate the utility of thallium-201 scintigraphy in demonstrating the myocardial lesions. Both the symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals studied showed the characteristic reverse redistribution phenomenon. No abnormalities were seen during the exercise phase of the thallium study, but myocardial defects were detected in each patient when repeat studies were obtained at rest six hours later. Steroid therapy resolved the defects in each case. We propose thallium-201 scintigraphy of the heart as a safe and useful tool for documenting myocardial involvement in sarcoidosis and following the effects of therapy.

  5. Sestamibi scintigraphy for parathyroid localisation: a reminder of the dangers of false positives.

    PubMed

    Whitcroft, Katherine Lisa; Sharma, Anup

    2014-03-11

    Surgical parathyroidectomy is the only curative treatment for primary hyperparathyroidism. As minimally invasive parathyroidectomy increases in popularity, so does reliance on preoperative parathyroid localisation techniques. One such technique is sestamibi scintigraphy. We report a case of false-positive sestamibi scintigraphy caused by follicular variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma. Subsequent completion thyroidectomy was not possible due to widespread postoperative fibrosis. This case, therefore, highlights the potential dangers of false-positive results due to thyroid carcinoma and encourages surgeons to consider this possibility when faced with intrathyroidal or otherwise ambiguous parathyroid localisation results.

  6. /sup 57/Co-bleomycin scintigraphy for the staging of lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nieweg, O.E.; Piers, D.A.; Beekhuis, H.; Sluiter, H.J.; van der Wal, A.M.; Woldring, M.G.

    1989-03-15

    The value of Cobalt-57 bleomycin (/sup 57/Co-BLM) scintigraphy in the detection of lymph node metastases in the hilum and mediastinum was investigated in 132 patients with peripherally located lung cancer. In one half of the patients with metastases, these were visualized. Specificity was 98%. These results were better than those obtained with chest radiography and conventional roentgen tomography. /sup 57/Co-BLM scintigraphy is routinely used in the staging of patients with lung cancer, obviating the need for mediastinoscopy.

  7. Functional fecal retention visualized by (111)In-DTPA colon transit scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Infante, Jose Rafael; Rayo, Juan I; Serrano, Justo; Dominguez, Maria L; Garcia, Lucia; Moreno, Manuel

    2015-06-01

    Constipation is an extremely common problem in children, varying from mild and short-lived to severe and chronic. Chronic constipation is a serious childhood condition and requires further investigation, including blood test, colonoscopy, radio-opaque marker study, and/or scintigraphy. We present small bowel and colon transit scintigraphy of a 14-year-old girl with history of chronic constipation, abdominal pain, weight loss, and poor response to medical treatment. After oral administration of In-DTPA in water, planar and SPECT/CT images showed normal small bowel transit time and functional fecal retention in colon transit study. PMID:25706788

  8. Complementary roles of brain scintigraphy and computed tomography in multiple sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, A.J.; Brown, J.M.; Waller, S.F.; Lundy, M.M.; Brown, T.J.

    1983-12-01

    Cerebral computed tomography, with and without iodinated contrast, revealed the appearance and evolution of lesions in a 32-year-old man with multiple sclerosis. Two areas were enhanced with contrast, with one showing a mild mass effect and rim of enhancement. Serial brain scintigraphy using technetium-/sub 99m/ glucoheptonate, following the computed tomography, showed the appearance and regression of corresponding regions of increased uptake. Computed tomography one day prior to brain scintigraphy failed to demonstrate a region of increased accumulation of radiotracer. One week later, however, evidence of a corresponding unenhanced defect was noted on computed tomography. Clinical correlation is given additionally.

  9. Technetium labelled red blood cell scintigraphy in the diagnosis of intestinal haemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, M. H.; Neoptolemos, J. P.; Watkin, E. M.; Cosgriff, P.; Barrie, W. W.

    1985-01-01

    99m-Technetium labelled red blood cell scintigraphy was used in the investigation of 15 adult patients with suspected small or large bowel bleeding requiring at least five units of blood (mean 14.3 units) and one neonate with rectal bleeding. Scintigraphy was found to be an accurate method of detecting the site of haemorrhage and was superior to angiography. This technique may be of particular value in patients with profuse colonic haemorrhage when the view at colonoscopy is poor. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:3872094

  10. Myocardial Scintigraphy in the Evaluation of Cardiac Events in Patients without Typical Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Smanio, Paola Emanuela Poggio; Silva, Juliana Horie; Holtz, João Vitor; Ueda, Leandro; Abreu, Marilia; Marques, Carlindo; Machado, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death in the world and in Brazil. Myocardial scintigraphy is an important noninvasive method for detecting ischemia in symptomatic patients, but its use in asymptomatic ones or those with atypical symptoms is yet to be defined. Objective To verify the presence of major cardiac events in asymptomatic patients or those with atypical symptoms (atypical chest pain or dyspnea) that underwent myocardial scintigraphy (MS), over a period of 8 years. Secondary objectives were to identify cardiac risk factors associated with myocardial scintigraphy abnormalities and possible predictors for major cardiac events in this group. Methods This was a retrospective, observational study using the medical records of 892 patients that underwent myocardial scintigraphy between 2005 and 2011 and who were followed until 2013 for assessment of major cardiac events and risk factors associated with myocardial scintigraphy abnormalities. Statistical analysis was performed by Fisher’s exact test, logistic regression and Kaplan-Meyer survival curves, with statistical significance being set at p ≤ 0.05. Results Of the total sample, 52.1% were men, 86.9% were hypertensive, 72.4% had hyperlipidemia, 33.6% were diabetic, and 12.2% were smokers; 44.5% had known coronary artery disease; and 70% had high Framingham score, 21.8% had moderate and 8% had low risk. Of the myocardial scintigraphies, 58.6% were normal, 26.1% suggestive of fibrosis and 15.3% suggestive of ischemia. At evolution, 13 patients (1.5%) had non-fatal myocardial infarction and six individuals (0.7%) died. The group with normal myocardial scintigraphy showed longer period of time free of major cardiac events, non-fatal myocardial infarction (p = 0.036) and death. Fibrosis in the myocardial scintigraphy determined a 2.4-fold increased risk of non-fatal myocardial infarction and five-fold higher risk of death (odds ratio: 2.4 and 5.7, respectively; p = 0.043). Conclusion The

  11. Pulmonary evaluation of patients with osteosarcoma: roles of standard radiography, tomography, CT, scintigraphy, and tomoscintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Vanel, D.; Henry-Amar, M.; Lumbroso, J.; Lemalet, E.; Couanet, D.; Piekarski, J.D.; Masselot, J.; Boddaert, A.; Kalifa, C.; Le Chevalier, T.

    1984-09-01

    Sixty-one radiologic evaluations were performed on 32 patients with possible pulmonary metastases from osteosarcoma. CT scanning was performed 61 times; standard chest radiography, 58; tomography, 36; scintigraphy, 40; and tomoscintigraphy, 33. Using CT as a reference, the sensitivities of the other examinations were 57% (32% of total metastases) for standard radiography, 88% (48%) for tomography, 21% (5%) for scintigraphy, and 41% (8%) for tomoscintigraphy. Of the 193 metastases, 98 were subpleural and 95 were parenchymatous. The authors' current evaluation of patients with metastases from osteosarcoma includes chest radiography and CT; the other three examinations are performed only before surgery.

  12. A mathematical model for predicting the probability of acute mortality in a human population exposed to accidentally released airborne radionuclides. Final report for Phase I of the project: early effects of inhaled radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Filipy, R.E.; Borst, F.J.; Cross, F.T.; Park, J.F.; Moss, O.R.

    1980-06-01

    The report presents a mathematical model for the purpose of predicting the fraction of human population which would die within 1 year of an accidental exposure to airborne radionuclides. The model is based on data from laboratory experiments with rats, dogs and baboons, and from human epidemiological data. Doses from external, whole-body irradiation and from inhaled, alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides are calculated for several organs. The probabilities of death from radiation pneumonitis and from bone marrow irradiation are predicted from doses accumulated within 30 days of exposure to the radioactive aerosol. The model is compared with existing similar models under hypothetical exposure conditions. Suggestions for further experiments with inhaled radionuclides are included.

  13. Thallium-201 scintigraphy in complete left bundle branch block.

    PubMed

    Hirzel, H O; Senn, M; Nuesch, K; Buettner, C; Pfeiffer, A; Hess, O M; Krayenbuehl, H P

    1984-03-01

    Nineteen symptomatic patients with left bundle branch block (LBBB) were examined by thallium-201 (TI-201) exercise scintigraphy and selective coronary arteriography. All elicited significant anteroseptal perfusion defects in the exercise scintigrams, but in only 4 was coronary artery disease (CAD) involving the left anterior descending coronary artery present. To further elucidate the effect of LBBB on septal TI-201 uptake in the absence of CAD, TI-201 scintigrams combined with regional myocardial blood flow measurements using radioactive microspheres were carried out in 7 dogs during right atrial and right ventricular pacing (LBBB in the ECG) at similar heart rates. During right atrial pacing, TI-201 uptake was homogeneous in the entire left ventricle, as were tissue flows. During right ventricular pacing, TI-201 activity was reduced to 69% of maximal TI-201 activity within the septum, whereas it averaged 90% in the lateral wall (p less than 0.05) in 6 dogs. Correspondingly, regional myocardial blood flow was lower within the septum as compared with that in the lateral wall, averaging 89 and 120 ml/min/100 g, respectively (p less than 0.005). In 1 dog, normal TI-201 distribution and tissue flows were found in both studies. Thus, symptomatic patients with LBBB may elicit abnormal TI-201 exercise scintigrams, suggesting anteroseptal ischemia despite normal coronary arteries. The electrical induction of LBBB in dogs results, in most instances, in a comparable reduction in septal TI-201 uptake associated with diminished septal blood flow. Therefore, exercise-induced septal perfusion defects in the presence of LBBB do not necessarily indicate CAD even in symptomatic patients, but may reflect functional ischemia due to asynchronous septal contraction. PMID:6702625

  14. Gated thallium scintigraphy in the assessment of coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, W.; Tweddel, A.C.; McGhie, A.I.; McKillop, J.H.; Hutton, I.

    1984-01-01

    This study was aimed at assessing ECG gated images to provide both perfusion and ventricular function information. 18 patients with acute myocardial infarction were studied at rest, and 12 male volunteers and 55 male patients undergoing routine coronary angiography were studied following the injection of 2 mCi (80 MBq) of thallous chloride 30s prior to termination of a symptom limited maximal exercise. Listmode data gated to the ECG were obtained in 3 projections for 6 minutes using a mobile gamma camera with a high sensitivity collimator. Three independent observers, on separate occasions analysed firstly standard reconstructed thallium scintigrams and secondly cine display of the gated image for perfusion defects and regional wall motion (RWM) using a 4 point scoring system. In addition ejection fraction (EF) was calculated from the 45/sup 0/ LAO projection. The gated thallium EF ranged from 52-65% in the volunteers, from 24-65% in the angiography patients and from 13-61% in the acute infarcts, and correlated well against the gated blood pool (r=.84) and contrast angiography (r=.78). RWM assessed for 850 segments gave interobserver disagreement of 0.9% and when compared to gated blood pool scans, disagreement occurred in 2 of 77 segments (2.8%). In the detection of significant coronary disease static thallium images provided a sensitivity of 71% and overall predictive accuracy of 75%. If the perfusion and wall motion from the gated image were considered the sensitivity was 93% at a predictive accuracy of 90%. The authors conclude that multiple view gated thallium scintigraphy gives accurate information as to ventricular function and enhances the detection of perfusion defects.

  15. NEN - the role of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy in clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Opalińska, Marta; Hubalewska-Dydejczyk, Alicja; Sowa-Staszczak, Anna; Stefańska, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Detection of neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs) and monitoring of their response to therapy is still challenging due to huge heterogeneity of that group of tumors. Actually, NENs visualization is mainly based on molecular imaging while in the past it was relied on less effective structural imaging including CT and MRI. Molecular imaging techniques in combination with structural imaging (hybrid imaging), especially in patients with well-differentiated NENs, in addition to morphological provide the functional information about tumor which benefits in a more accurate patient management, including more sensitive visualization of primary tumors, more precise staging and better therapy follow-up. Overexpression of somatostatin receptors (SSTR) on NENs' cell membrane was a basis for development of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) using single photon emission tomography SPECT, which is today a well-established standard in molecular imaging of NENs, and further imaging improvement in the field of positron emission tomography (PET). Use of hybrid imaging (SPECT/CT, PET/CT) increased sensitivity of examination, mainly resulting in better detection of small lesions. Generally, somatostatin receptor imaging with PET/CT is an emerging technique, although still with limited access, but due to several advantages over SSTR SPECT/CT, should be used if available. It is worth mentioning, that both SSTR PET/CT and SSTR SPECT/CT have some limitations, such as relatively low detection rate of benign insulinomas, poorly differentiated GEP-NETs and liver metastases. For that reason further improvement of NETs imaging is necessary. The most promising new tracers' families are based on SSTR antagonists, 64Cu-radiolabeled ligands and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) imaging. Finally, in case of poor-differentiated neuroendocrine cancers 18F-FDG PET/CT may be beneficial in comparison with molecular imaging based on somatostatin receptor modalities. PMID:27479789

  16. Leg arteritis exploration by quantitative muscle scintigraphy with 201Tl

    SciTech Connect

    Robert, J.; Thouvenot, P.; Schmidt, C.; Escanye, J.M.; Schmitt, J.

    1984-10-01

    Detection and localization of peripheral arterial disease was evaluated by an intravenous injection of 201Tl at peak exercise in 18 subjects and at rest in 6 patients. Images of the skull (S), thighs (T), knees (K), calves (C) and feet (F) were obtained at rest or after exercise and stored in a computer. Intraleg (T/K, T/C, T/F), and left to right interleg (TL/TR,...) count ratios were calculated. In addition, all patients were submitted to routine functional tests (walk perimeter, serial local arterial blood pressure measurement, Strandness test, venous occlusion plethysmography). Correlations between functional tests and the intra and interleg ratios were calculated. After exercise, there is a medium correlation between the tissular blood flow under hyperemia at the calf level and the T/C and C/K ratios. At the calf level a good correlation is obtained for CL/CR and the flux under hyperemia (r = 0.81, P 0.001). A ratio between the counting rates of limb segments after exercise and those of skull was established. The ratios T/S and C/S compared with the systolic pressure index of the most affected limb after a Strandness test give a correlation of 0.72 (P 0.02) for the thigh and of 0.86 (P 0.001) for the calf. For hyperemic flux, the correlation are 0.58 (P 0.005) with T/S and 0.75 (P 0.001) with C/S. In order to find the best quantitative scintigraphic index of the arterial illness, we compared the different ratio values with the distance walked. For T/S we found a relationship very close to a linear one and for C/S a less significant exponential one. Thus, quantitative scintigraphy using 201Tl appears as an accurate method to measure local muscular perfusion deficit in the cases of lower limb arterial disease.

  17. [Bone transplant].

    PubMed

    San Julián, M; Valentí, A

    2006-01-01

    We describe the methodology of the Bone and Soft Tissue Bank, from extraction and storage until use. Since the year 1986, with the creation of the Bone Bank in the University Clinic of Navarra, more than 3,000 grafts have been used for very different types of surgery. Bone grafts can be classified into cortical and spongy; the former are principally used in surgery to save tumour patients, in large post-traumatic reconstructions and in replacement surgery where there are massive bone defects and a structural support is required. The spongy grafts are the most used due to their numerous indications; they are especially useful in filling cavities that require a significant quantity of graft when the autograft is insufficient, or as a complement. They are also of special help in treating fractures when there is bone loss and in the treatment of delays in consolidation and pseudoarthrosis in little vascularized and atrophic zones. They are also used in prosthetic surgery against the presence of cavity type defects. Allografts of soft tissues are specially recognised in multiple ligament injuries that require reconstructions. Nowadays, the most utilised are those employed in surgery of the anterior cruciate ligament although they can be used for filling any ligament or tendon defect. The principal difficulties of the cortical allografts are in the consolidation of the ends with the bone itself and in tumour surgery, given that these are patients immunodepressed by the treatment, the incidence of infection is increased with respect to spongy grafts and soft tissues, which is irrelevant. In short, the increasingly widespread use of allografts is an essential therapeutic weapon in orthopaedic surgery and traumatology. It must be used by expert hands.

  18. [Bone transplant].

    PubMed

    San Julián, M; Valentí, A

    2006-01-01

    We describe the methodology of the Bone and Soft Tissue Bank, from extraction and storage until use. Since the year 1986, with the creation of the Bone Bank in the University Clinic of Navarra, more than 3,000 grafts have been used for very different types of surgery. Bone grafts can be classified into cortical and spongy; the former are principally used in surgery to save tumour patients, in large post-traumatic reconstructions and in replacement surgery where there are massive bone defects and a structural support is required. The spongy grafts are the most used due to their numerous indications; they are especially useful in filling cavities that require a significant quantity of graft when the autograft is insufficient, or as a complement. They are also of special help in treating fractures when there is bone loss and in the treatment of delays in consolidation and pseudoarthrosis in little vascularized and atrophic zones. They are also used in prosthetic surgery against the presence of cavity type defects. Allografts of soft tissues are specially recognised in multiple ligament injuries that require reconstructions. Nowadays, the most utilised are those employed in surgery of the anterior cruciate ligament although they can be used for filling any ligament or tendon defect. The principal difficulties of the cortical allografts are in the consolidation of the ends with the bone itself and in tumour surgery, given that these are patients immunodepressed by the treatment, the incidence of infection is increased with respect to spongy grafts and soft tissues, which is irrelevant. In short, the increasingly widespread use of allografts is an essential therapeutic weapon in orthopaedic surgery and traumatology. It must be used by expert hands. PMID:16998521

  19. Bone Marrow Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    Bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside some of your bones, such as your hip and thigh bones. ... platelets, which help the blood to clot. A bone marrow transplant is a procedure that replaces a person's ...

  20. Genetics of Bone Density

    MedlinePlus

    ... study linked 32 novel genetic regions to bone mineral density. The findings may help researchers understand why ... or treating osteoporosis. Bones are made of a mineral and protein scaffold filled with bone cells. Bone ...

  1. Bone biopsy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A bone biopsy is performed by making a small incision into the skin. A biopsy needle retrieves a sample of bone and it ... examination. The most common reasons for bone lesion biopsy are to distinguish between benign and malignant bone ...

  2. Comparison of multiple exercise radionuclide methods for detection of coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, J.; Gordon, J.; Shaffer, P.; Gibson, R.; Watson, D.; Magorien, R.; Baumert, J.; Kolibash, A.; Bashore, T.

    1985-05-01

    Five planar exercise Thallium (Tl) scintigraphy methods and four exercise radionuclide angiographic criteria were compared for the diagnosis of significant (greater than or equal to50%) angiographic coronary artery disease (CAD). The patient population consisted of 95 randomly selected patients referred for coronary angiography (CATH) for the evaluation of chest pain without other known cardiac pathology. Both Tl and RNA studies were performed on the same day within 48 hours of CATH. Medications were continued. Tl images were evaluated by visual interpretation of analog (A), 20% background subtracted (20), and interpolative background subtracted (INT) images. Quantitative analysis of horizontal profiles (Watson's method) and circumferential profiles (Garcia's method) were also performed. RNA results were classified as abnormal Ejection Fraction response (< 4% rise) (EF), abnormal wall motion (WM), either (E), and both (B). The authors conclude that while significant differences were found among the sensitivities and specificities, the overall accuracy of the methods were not different except for B. Tl and RNA remain useful despite intercurrent drug therapy.

  3. Influence of myocardial infarction size on radionuclide and Doppler echocardiographic measurements of diastolic function

    SciTech Connect

    Johannessen, K.A.; Cerqueira, M.D.; Stratton, J.R. )

    1990-03-15

    To assess the relation between myocardial infarction size and diastolic function as measured by radionuclide ventriculography and Doppler echocardiography, 83 patients (aged 58 +/- 9 years) without significant valvular disease were studied 8 to 12 weeks after an acute myocardial infarction. Myocardial infarction size was measured by resting thallium-201 tomography. Peak early filling rate (in end-diastolic volumes/s) was measured by gated blood pool scintigraphy. Doppler measures of mitral inflow were peak early (E) and atrial (A) filling velocities, slopes of E and A, percent E and A filling, E/A ratio and diastolic filling period. In univariate analyses, there was a significant inverse correlation between infarction size and the peak early filling rate (r = -0.59, p less than 0.001), and this remained significant (r = -0.63, p less than 0.0001) in an analysis that included 2 other determinants of the filling rate, age and diastolic filling period. Infarction size was directly correlated to the peak E velocity (r = 0.37, p less than 0.01), deceleration of E (r = 0.41, p less than 0.01) and percent E filling (r = 0.31, p less than 0.01), and was inversely correlated to peak A (r = -0.27, p less than 0.05) and percent A filling (r = -0.26, p less than 0.05).

  4. Response of left ventricular ejection fraction to recovery from general anesthesia: measurement by gated radionuclide angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Coriat, P.; Mundler, O.; Bousseau, D.; Fauchet, M.; Rous, A.C.; Echter, E.; Viars, P.

    1986-06-01

    To test the hypothesis that, after anesthesia for noncardiac surgical procedures, the increased cardiac work during recovery induces wall motion and ejection fraction (EF) abnormalities in patients with mild angina pectoris, gated radionuclide angiography was performed in patients undergoing simple cholecystectomy under narcotic-relaxant general anesthesia. The ejection fraction was determined during anesthesia at the end of surgery, and then determined 3 min and 3 hr after extubation. A new angiography was performed 24 hr later, and a myocardial scintigraphy (Thallium 201) was performed during infusion of the coronary vasodilator, dipyridamole. In the first part of the investigation, eight patients without coronary artery disease (CAD) (group 1) and 20 patients with mild angina (group 2) were studied. In the second part of the study, seven patients (group 3) with mild angina pectoris received an intravenous infusion of 0.4 microgram X kg-1 X min-1 of nitroglycerin started before surgery and gradually decreased 4 hr after extubation. In group 1, EF remained unchanged at recovery. In contrast in group 2, EF responded abnormally to recovery: EF decreased from 55% during anesthesia to 45% 3 min after extubation (P less than 0.001). Patients in group 3, who received intravenous nitroglycerin, showed no change of EF at recovery. This study demonstrates that recovery from general anesthesia causes abnormalities in left ventricular function in patients suffering from CAD. These abnormalities are prevented by prophylactic intravenous nitroglycerin.

  5. Effectiveness of radioisotope therapy in bone metastases, based on personal experience

    PubMed Central

    Kowalska, Teresa; Zawiła, Krystyna

    2012-01-01

    Aim of the study Metastatic bone disease is a major clinical and therapeutic problem. It is particularly marked in patients with advanced breast and prostate cancer. Taking into account the diversity of the consequences of skeletal metastases, multidisciplinary patient care should be provided. Among the available treatment methods, radionuclide therapy plays a significant role. The goal of the study was to evaluate and compare the effectiveness of treatment with radionuclides of strontium-89 and samarium-153 in patients with generalized bone metastases. Material and methods We analyzed 132 patients with poor pharmacological control of bone pain, caused by multiple metastases due to breast or prostate cancer. In this group of patients radionuclide therapy was administered in the Krakow branch of Oncology Centre between 2002 and 2010. Results In the group treated with strontium-89 and samarium-153 total analgesic response rate obtained, was 69% and 83.3%, respectively. In both groups, a significant reduction in analgesics consumption was observed, higher in the group treated with samarium-153. In 14 patients with satisfactory analgesic effect after the first administration of a radioisotope, second administration of radionuclide therapy was attempted at the time of symptoms reappearance. The positive response was achieved in 12 patients. Treatment with both radionuclides was well tolerated. Conclusions Radionuclide therapy with strontium-89 and samarium-153 is effective and well tolerated treatment of pain caused by the skeletal metastases. In some cases it is possible to obtain equally good analgesic effect with repeated radioisotopes administration. PMID:23788879

  6. Age-specific inhalation radiation dose commitment factors for selected radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Strenge, D.L.; Peloquin, R.A.; Baker, D.A.

    1982-08-01

    Inhalation dose commitment factors are presented for selected radionuclides for exposure of individuals in four age groups: infant, child, teen and adult. Radionuclides considered are /sup 35/S, /sup 36/Cl, /sup 45/Ca, /sup 67/Ga, /sup 75/Se, /sup 85/Sr, /sup 109/Cd, /sup 113/Sn, /sup 125/I, /sup 133/Ba, /sup 170/Tm, /sup 169/Yb, /sup 182/Ta, /sup 192/Ir, /sup 198/Au, /sup 201/Tl, /sup 204/Tl, and /sup 236/Pu. The calculational method is based on the human metabolic model of ICRP as defined in Publication 2 (ICRP 1959) and as used in previous age-specific dose factor calculations by Hoenes and Soldat (1977). Dose commitment factors are presented for the following organs of reference: total body, bone, liver, kidney, thyroid, lung and lower large intestine.

  7. Preparation of Radiopharmaceuticals Labeled with Metal Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, M.J.

    2012-02-16

    The overall goal of this project was to develop methods for the production of metal-based radionuclides, to develop metal-based radiopharmaceuticals and in a limited number of cases, to translate these agents to the clinical situation. Initial work concentrated on the application of the radionuclides of Cu, Cu-60, Cu-61 and Cu-64, as well as application of Ga-68 radiopharmaceuticals. Initially Cu-64 was produced at the Missouri University Research Reactor and experiments carried out at Washington University. A limited number of studies were carried out utilizing Cu-62, a generator produced radionuclide produced by Mallinckrodt Inc. (now Covidien). In these studies, copper-62-labeled pyruvaldehyde Bis(N{sup 4}-methylthiosemicarbazonato)-copper(II) was studied as an agent for cerebral myocardial perfusion. A remote system for the production of this radiopharmaceutical was developed and a limited number of patient studies carried out with this agent. Various other copper radiopharmaceuticals were investigated, these included copper labeled blood imaging agents as well as Cu-64 labeled antibodies. Cu-64 labeled antibodies targeting colon cancer were translated to the human situation. Cu-64 was also used to label peptides (Cu-64 octriatide) and this is one of the first applications of a peptide radiolabeled with a positron emitting metal radionuclide. Investigations were then pursued on the preparation of the copper radionuclides on a small biomedical cyclotron. A system for the production of high specific activity Cu-64 was developed and initially the Cu-64 was utilized to study the hypoxic imaging agent Cu-64 ATSM. Utilizing the same target system, other positron emitting metal radionuclides were produced, these were Y-86 and Ga-66. Radiopharmaceuticals were labeled utilizing both of these radionuclides. Many studies were carried out in animal models on the uptake of Cu-ATSM in hypoxic tissue. The hypothesis is that Cu-ATSM retention in vivo is dependent upon the

  8. BONE BANKS

    PubMed Central

    de Alencar, Paulo Gilberto Cimbalista; Vieira, Inácio Facó Ventura

    2015-01-01

    Bone banks are necessary for providing biological material for a series of orthopedic procedures. The growing need for musculoskeletal tissues for transplantation has been due to the development of new surgical techniques, and this has led to a situation in which a variety of hospital services have been willing to have their own source of tissue for transplantation. To increase the safety of transplanted tissues, standards for bone bank operation have been imposed by the government, which has limited the number of authorized institutions. The good performance in a bone bank depends on strict control over all stages, including: formation of well-trained harvesting teams; donor selection; conducting various tests on the tissues obtained; and strict control over the processing techniques used. Combination of these factors enables greater scope of use and numbers of recipient patients, while the incidence of tissue contamination becomes statistically insignificant, and there is traceability between donors and recipients. This paper describes technical considerations relating to how a bone bank functions, the use of grafts and orthopedic applications, the ethical issues and the main obstacles encountered. PMID:27026958

  9. Fast analysis of radionuclide decay chain migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. S.; Liang, C. P.; Liu, C. W.; Li, L.

    2014-12-01

    A novel tool for rapidly predicting the long-term plume behavior of an arbitrary length radionuclide decay chain is presented in this study. This fast tool is achieved based on generalized analytical solutions in compact format derived for a set of two-dimensional advection-dispersion equations coupled with sequential first-order decay reactions in groundwater system. The performance of the developed tool is evaluated by a numerical model using a Laplace transform finite difference scheme. The results of performance evaluation indicate that the developed model is robust and accurate. The developed model is then used to fast understand the transport behavior of a four-member radionuclide decay chain. Results show that the plume extents and concentration levels of any target radionuclide are very sensitive to longitudinal, transverse dispersion, decay rate constant and retardation factor. The developed model are useful tools for rapidly assessing the ecological and environmental impact of the accidental radionuclide releases such as the Fukushima nuclear disaster where multiple radionuclides leaked through the reactor, subsequently contaminating the local groundwater and ocean seawater in the vicinity of the nuclear plant.

  10. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Waste Forms

    SciTech Connect

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Bovaird, Chase C.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Wood, Marcus I.

    2010-09-30

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how waste form performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of waste form aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of waste form aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the waste forms come in contact with groundwater. The information presented in the report provides data that 1) quantify radionuclide retention within concrete waste form materials similar to those used to encapsulate waste in the Low-Level Waste Burial Grounds (LLBG); 2) measure the effect of concrete waste form properties likely to influence radionuclide migration; and 3) quantify the stability of uranium-bearing solid phases of limited solubility in concrete.

  11. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Wasteforms - FY13

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, Michelle MV; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Lapierre, Robert; Dage, Denomy C.; Parker, Kent E.; Cordova, Elsa A.

    2013-10-15

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how wasteform performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of wasteform aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of wasteform aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the wasteforms come in contact with groundwater. Data collected throughout the course of this work will be used to quantify the efficacy of concrete wasteforms, similar to those used in the disposal of low-level waste and mixed low-level waste, for the immobilization of key radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium, and iodine). Data collected will also be used to quantify the physical and chemical properties of the concrete affecting radionuclide retention.

  12. Radionuclide Mobility at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Q; Smith, D; Rose, T; Glascoe, L; Steefel, C; Zavarin, M

    2003-11-13

    Underground nuclear tests conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) are characterized by abundant fission product and actinide source terms. Included are {sup 99}Tc and other soluble radionuclides ({sup 3}H, {sup 14}C, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 85}Kr, and {sup 129}I), which are presumably mobile in groundwater and potentially toxic to down-gradient receptors. NTS provides the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) with an analog of the release of these radionuclides from a nuclear waste repository in the absence of engineered barriers. The investigation described in this report synthesizes a substantial body of data collected on the identity and distribution of soluble radionuclides at field scales over distances of hundreds of meters, for durations up to 40 years, and under hydrogeologic conditions very similar to the proposed geological repository at Yucca Mountain. This body of data is complemented by laboratory transport studies and a synthesis of recent modeling investigations from the NTS, with an emphasis on the ongoing Yucca Mountain Program (YMP) efforts. Overall, understanding the controls of radionuclide mobility associated with these nuclear tests will provide insight into the repository's future performance as well as bounds and calibrations for the numerical predictions of long-term radionuclide releases and migration.

  13. Idaho radionuclide exposure study: Literature review

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, E.G.; Freeman, H.D.; Hartley, J.N.

    1987-10-01

    Phosphate ores contain elevated levels of natural radioactivity, some of which is released to the environment during processing or use of solid byproducts. The effect of radionuclides from Idaho phosphate processing operations on the local communities has been the subject of much research and study. The literature is reviewed in this report. Two primary radionuclide pathways to the environment have been studied in detail: (1) airborne release of volatile radionuclides, primarily /sup 210/Po, from calciner stacks at the two elemental phosphorus plants; and (2) use of byproduct slag as an aggregate for construction in Soda Springs and Pocatello. Despite the research, there is still no clear understanding of the population dose from radionuclide emissions, effluents, and solid wastes from phosphate processing plants. Two other potential radionuclide pathways to the environment have been identified: radon exhalation from phosphogypsum and ore piles and contamination of surface and ground waters. Recommendations on further study needed to develop a data base for a complete risk assssment are given in the report.

  14. Nasal visualization on radioiodine whole-body scintigraphy due to benign abnormality.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xue; Wang, Qiao; Huang, Rui

    2015-04-01

    Nasal iodine activity can be observed on 123Iodine (123I) or 131I whole-body scintigraphy (WBS) commonly as a normal variant caused by nasal or salivary secretion of the tracer. We encountered 2 patients whose increased accumulation of 131I activity was associated with underlying abnormalities. One patient had a nasal polyp, whereas the other had an abscess.

  15. Gastric emptying scintigraphy results in children are affected by age, anthropometric factors, and study duration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A standardized 4-hour adult-based gastric emptying scintigraphy (GES) protocol is increasingly being used in children to evaluate for gastroparesis. We sought to determine the effect of age, anthropometrics, and study duration on GES results using this protocol in children. Retrospective review of c...

  16. Evaluation of Feline Renal Perfusion with Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasonography and Scintigraphy

    PubMed Central

    Vanderperren, Katrien; Bosmans, Tim; Dobbeleir, André; Duchateau, Luc; Hesta, Myriam; Lybaert, Lien; Peremans, Kathelijne; Vandermeulen, Eva; Saunders, Jimmy

    2016-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is an emerging technique to evaluate tissue perfusion. Promising results have been obtained in the evaluation of renal perfusion in health and disease, both in human and veterinary medicine. Renal scintigraphy using 99mTc-Mercaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG3) is another non-invasive technique that can be used to evaluate renal perfusion. However, no data are available on the ability of CEUS or 99mTc- MAG3 scintigraphy to detect small changes in renal perfusion in cats. Therefore, both techniques were applied in a normal feline population to evaluate detection possibilities of perfusion changes by angiotensin II (AT II). Contrast-enhanced ultrasound using a bolus injection of commercially available contrast agent and renal scintigraphy using 99mTc-MAG3 were performed in 11 healthy cats after infusion of 0,9% NaCl (control) and AT II. Angiotensin II induced changes were noticed on several CEUS parameters. Mean peak enhancement, wash-in perfusion index and wash-out rate for the entire kidney decreased significantly after AT II infusion. Moreover, a tendency towards a lower wash-in area-under-the curve was present. Renal scintigraphy could not detect perfusion changes induced by AT II. This study shows that CEUS is able to detect changes in feline renal perfusion induced by AT II infusion. PMID:27736928

  17. [Thermo- and scintigraphy with 67Ga citrate in the diagnosis of oro- and parapharyngeal tumors].

    PubMed

    Gabunov, R I; Kurbandurdyev, A G; Lenskaia, O P; Bogdasarov, Iu V

    1988-07-01

    The authors analyzed the results of thermographic and scintigraphic (using 67Ga-citrate produced in the USSR) investigations in 41 patients: 10 with tumors of the oral cavity, 12 with oropharyngeal tumors, and 19 with parapharyngeal tumors. Of the latter 10 had morphologically verified benign tumors, 5--mixed type tumors, and 4--malignant tumors (sarcoma in 2 patients, a thyroid cancer metastasis to the parapharyngeal lymph nodes in 1, malignant chemodectoma in 1). Thermography and scintigraphy positive results (the absence of hyperthermia and RP hyperfixation in a tumor) were obtained in 7 of 10 patients with benign parapharyngeal tumors. Thermography false-positive results were obtained in 3 patients, however 67Ga-citrate accumulation was undetectable in these patients' tumors making the diagnosis more accurate. Thermography and scintigraphy results were positive in all 22 patients with malignant oropharyngeal (the oral cavity and oropharynx) tumors. Thermography and scintigraphy positive results were also noted in all 5 patients with parapharyngeal mixed tumors which could be associated with raised tumor tissue biological activity. The data obtained suggested a possibility of the use of thermography and scintigraphy in the diagnosis of oro-and parapharyngeal tumors. PMID:3294558

  18. Tc-99m macro aggregated albumin scintigraphy – indications other than pulmonary embolism: A pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Sunny J; Babu, Sanjay; Subramanyam, Padma; Shanmuga Sundaram, Palaniswamy

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Tc-99m macro aggregated albumin (MAA) is synonymous for lung perfusion scintigraphy and is part of the study in the evaluation of pulmonary thromboembolism. We wanted to highlight the utilities of Tc-99m MAA other than pulmonary embolism as a pictorial assay. Materials and Methods: Patients referred for Tc-99m MAA scintigraphy under various indications were included in this pictorial essay. Commercially available TechneScan LyoMAA cold kit from Mallinckrodt Medical B.V., Holland was used. Acquisition protocols for different indications are described in this article. Different clinical indications (e.g., pulmonary artery stenosis, hepatopulmonary syndrome, FEV1 calculation in lung surgery planning, selective internal radiation therapy planning, venography for deep venous thrombosis, left to right cardiac shunts, etc.) where Tc-99m MAA scintigraphy was asked for; how it helped in different clinical scenarios and how it can be used clinically is explained with unique and interesting case examples and images. We also reviewed the literature to look for certain remote indications of MAA imaging for the sake of completion like – (shunt scintigraphy, peritoneopleural communication, etc.) Conclusion: Tc-99m MAA is a very useful radiopharmaceutical, which can be used for many other indications apart from the commonly used indication of lung perfusion scan in pulmonary embolism. It can provide useful clinical information in other indications, which we try to highlight in this article. PMID:24250023

  19. Early detection of restenosis after successful percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty by exercise-redistribution thallium scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Wijns, W.; Serruys, P.W.; Reiber, J.H.; de Feyter, P.J.; van den Brand, M.; Simoons, M.L.; Hugenholtz, P.G.

    1985-02-01

    The value of exercise testing and thallium scintigraphy in predicting recurrence of angina pectoris and restenosis after a primary successful transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) was prospectively evaluated. In 89 patients, a symptom-limited exercise electrocardiogram (ECG) and thallium scintigraphy were performed 4 weeks after they had undergone successful PTCA. Thereafter, the patients were followed for 6.4 +/- 2.5 months (mean +/- standard deviation) or until recurrence of angina. They all underwent a repeat coronary angiography at 6 months or earlier if symptoms recurred. PTCA was considered successful if the patients had no symptoms and if the stenosis was reduced to less than 50% of the luminal diameter. Restenosis was defined as an increase of the stenosis to more than 50% luminal diameter. The ability of the thallium scintigram (presence of a reversible defect) to predict recurrence of angina was 66%, vs 38% for the exercise ECG (ST-segment depression or angina at peak workload). Restenosis was predicted in 74% of patients by thallium scintigraphy, but only in 50% of patients by the exercise ECG. Thus, thallium scintigraphy was highly predictive but the exercise ECG was not (p less than 0.005). These results suggest that restenosis had occurred to some extent already at 4 weeks after the PTCA in most patients in whom it was going to occur.

  20. Value of post-therapeutic ¹³¹I scintigraphy in stimulated serum thyroglobulin-negative patients with metastatic differentiated thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chen-Tian; Wei, Wei-Jun; Qiu, Zhong-Ling; Song, Hong-Jun; Luo, Quan-Yong

    2016-02-01

    Metastatic differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) with positive (131)I scintigraphy, but negative stimulated Tg (sTg) is relatively rare in clinical practice. The clinical characteristics of these patients were analyzed in the current study. A total of 3367 consecutive histologically proven DTC patients were analyzed retrospectively from January 2007 to June 2013. Tg negativity was defined as a sTg level of <2 ng/mL without positive anti-Tg antibody (TgAb level of <100 IU/mL) under thyroid-stimulating hormone stimulation (TSH level of ≥30 mIU/L). Analyses were performed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, version 20.0 (SPSS, Chicago, IL, USA). Seventy-one patients (median age 45 years, range 17-68 years) were post-therapeutic (131)I-SPECT/CT positive and sTg negative (PTP-TN) constituting 2.1 % of all patients. Of these 71 patients, 2 (2.8 %) had bone metastasis, 11 (15.5 %) had lung metastasis, and 59 (83.1 %) had lymph node metastasis. Fifty-six patients had cervical lymph node metastasis (cLNM), and US was positive in 15 patients (26.8 %), while negative in 41 patients (73.2 %). When compared to patients with concordant positive results for sTg and (131)I scintigraphy, US showed a relatively lower positive rate in the detection of cLNM in PTP-TN patients (28.8 vs. 53.8 %; χ (2) = 6.70; P = 0.01). In conclusion, even with sTg <2 ng/mL, there is a low risk of metastatic DTC. US had limitations in PTP-TN patients, while post-therapy (131)I-SPECT/CT demonstrated an advantage in the detection of functioning metastasis despite low sTg levels in patients with metastatic DTC.

  1. Space/time quantitation of thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Garcia, E; Maddahi, J; Berman, D; Waxman, A

    1981-04-01

    A comprehensive method is described for quantitation of the spatial distribution of TI-201 in the myocardium and its changes with time. The method, applied here to 51 patients, uses bilinear interpolative background subtraction to compensate for tissue crosstalk, and circumferential profiles to quantitate the relative radionuclide activity in the myocardium as an angular function with origin at the center of the left-ventricular cavity. In addition, washout circumferential profiles are calculated as percent washout from the stress circumferential profiles. Abnormal thallium distribution or washout is identified by automatic computer comparison of each patient's profiles with the corresponding limits of normal profiles, determined from the pooled profiles of 31 normal patients. In these 31, the computer output was normal in all cases. In 20 patients with angiographically documented coronary artery disease, 19 were determined to be abnormal by this method. This new computerized treatment provides accurate objective assessment of the presence of coronary artery disease.

  2. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy with somatostatin analogues in neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Giovacchini, Giampiero; Nicolas, Guillaume; Forrer, Flavio

    2012-06-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are rare tumors with variable malignant behavior. The majority of NETs express increased levels of somatostatin (SST) receptors, particularly SST2 receptors. Radiolabeled peptides specific for the SST2 receptors may be used for diagnosis of NETs and for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). [(111)In-DTPA(0)]-octreotide has been the first peptide used for PRRT. This radiolabeled peptide, emitting Auger electrons, often induced symptomatic relief, but objective morphological responses were rarely documented. After the introduction of the chelator 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) other peptides, primarily [DOTA(0),Tyr(3)]octreotate (DOTATATE) and [DOTA(0),Tyr(3)]octreotide (DOTATOC) were labeled with (90)Y or (177)Lu and used for therapy applications. The rate of objective response obtained with these radiolabeled peptides ranges between 6% and 46%, owing to differences in inclusion criteria adopted in different studies, length and type of therapy, and criteria of evaluation of the response. The present data in the literature do not allow defining the most suitable peptide and radionuclide for the treatment of NETs. Instead emerging evidence indicates that a combination of nuclides with different physical characteristics might be more effective than the use of a single nuclide. Kidney and bone marrow toxicity are the limiting factors for PRRT. Mild toxicity is often encountered while severe toxicity is rarer. Toxicity could be reduced and therapeutic efficacy enhanced by patient-specific dosimetry. Future directions include different issues of PRRT, such as defining the most suitable treatment scheme, evaluation of new peptides with different affinity profiles to other SST receptor subtypes, and reduction of toxicity. PMID:22292758

  3. Radionuclide imaging of abomasal emptying in sheep.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, T; Stockdale, H R; Critchley, M; Grime, J S; Jones, R S; Maltby, P

    1997-01-01

    A liquid radionuclide tracer was administered to nine sheep in order to visualise the abomasum with a gamma camera computer system. The aim was to develop a method of studying gastric emptying, with minimal surgical intervention. Oral administration of the tracer gave good images of the whole complex stomach, but quantifying abomasal emptying was not possible because of the superimposition of the stomach compartments. When the reticular groove reflex was stimulated with oral copper sulphate the radionuclide bypassed the reticulorumen, allowing quantitative analysis of abomasal activity. However, the repeatability of the reflex activation was low. Radionuclide administered directly into the abomasum produced good images of abomasal outflow and provided digital data which were analysed quantitatively. A wide range of emptying rates was observed, generally with a stepped pattern.

  4. 2014 LANL Radionuclide Air Emissions Report

    SciTech Connect

    Fuehne, David Patrick

    2015-07-21

    This report describes the emissions of airborne radionuclides from operations at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for calendar year 2014, and the resulting off-site dose from these emissions. This document fulfills the requirements established by the National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants in 40 CFR 61, Subpart H – Emissions of Radionuclides other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities, commonly referred to as the Radionuclide NESHAP or Rad-NESHAP. Compliance with this regulation and preparation of this document is the responsibility of LANL’s RadNESHAP compliance program, which is part of the Environmental Protection Division. The information in this report is required under the Clean Air Act and is being submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 6.

  5. State of radionuclides in natural waters

    SciTech Connect

    Kulmatov, R.A.; Rakhmatov, U.; Kist, A.A.; Volkov, A.A.

    1987-03-01

    This work is devoted to a study of the kinetics of attainment of equilibrium between various forms of the radionuclide mercury-203 and to an evaluation of the part played by isotope exchange in this process. The radionuclide mercury-203 was added without a carrier to natural waters of the Syr-Dar'ya and Amu-Dar'ya Rivers and the Aral Sea in the cationic form (3). In order to determine the time of attainment of equilibrium between the forms of the radionuclide mercury-203 and the stable nuclide analogs, they used the methods of sorption on L-36 glass, AV-17 anion-exchanger, KU-2 cation-exchanger, extraction with chloroform plus isobutyl alcohol, and filtration.

  6. Radioimmunotherapy with alpha-particle emitting radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Zalutsky, M R; Pozzi, O R

    2004-12-01

    An important consideration in the development of effective strategies for radioimmunotherapy is the nature of the radiation emitted by the radionuclide. Radionuclides decaying by the emission of alpha-particles offer the possibility of matching the cell specific reactivity of monoclonal antibodies with radiation with a range of only a few cell diameters. Furthermore, alpha-particles have important biological advantages compared with external beam radiation and beta-particles including a higher biological effectiveness, which is nearly independent of oxygen concentration, dose rate and cell cycle position. In this review, the clinical settings most likely to benefit from alpha-particle radioimmunotherapy will be discussed. The current status of preclinical and clinical research with antibodies labeled with 3 promising alpha-particle emitting radionuclides - (213)Bi, (225)Ac, and (211)At - also will be summarized.

  7. Radioimmunotherapy with alpha-particle emitting radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Zalutsky, M R; Pozzi, O R

    2004-12-01

    An important consideration in the development of effective strategies for radioimmunotherapy is the nature of the radiation emitted by the radionuclide. Radionuclides decaying by the emission of alpha-particles offer the possibility of matching the cell specific reactivity of monoclonal antibodies with radiation with a range of only a few cell diameters. Furthermore, alpha-particles have important biological advantages compared with external beam radiation and beta-particles including a higher biological effectiveness, which is nearly independent of oxygen concentration, dose rate and cell cycle position. In this review, the clinical settings most likely to benefit from alpha-particle radioimmunotherapy will be discussed. The current status of preclinical and clinical research with antibodies labeled with 3 promising alpha-particle emitting radionuclides - (213)Bi, (225)Ac, and (211)At - also will be summarized. PMID:15640792

  8. Diffusion of Radionuclides in Concrete and Soil

    SciTech Connect

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Bovaird, Chase C.; Parker, Kent E.; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Clayton, Libby N.; Wood, Marcus I.

    2012-04-25

    One of the methods being considered for safely disposing of Category 3 low-level radioactive wastes is to encase the waste in concrete. Such concrete encasement would contain and isolate the waste packages from the hydrologic environment and would act as an intrusion barrier. Any failure of concrete encasement may result in water intrusion and consequent mobilization of radionuclides from the waste packages. The mobilized radionuclides may escape from the encased concrete by mass flow and/or diffusion and move into the surrounding subsurface environment. Therefore, it is necessary to assess the performance of the concrete encasement structure and the ability of the surrounding soil to retard radionuclide migration. The objective of our study was to measure the diffusivity of Re, Tc and I in concrete containment and the surrounding vadose zone soil. Effects of carbonation, presence of metallic iron, and fracturing of concrete and the varying moisture contents in soil on the diffusivities of Tc and I were evaluated.

  9. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy of neuroendocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Brabander, Tessa; Teunissen, Jaap J M; Van Eijck, Casper H J; Franssen, Gaston J H; Feelders, Richard A; de Herder, Wouter W; Kwekkeboom, Dik J

    2016-01-01

    In the past decades, the number of neuroendocrine tumours that are detected is increasing. A relative new and promising therapy for patients with metastasised or inoperable disease is peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). This therapy involves an infusion of somatostatin analogues linked to radionuclides like Yttrium-90 or Lutetium-177. Objective response rates are reported in 15-35%. Response rates may vary between type of tumour and radionuclide. Besides the objective response rate, overall survival and progression free survival increase significantly. Also, the quality of life improves as well. Serious side-affects are rare. PRRT is usually well tolerated, also in patients with extensive metastasised disease. Recent studies combined PRRT with other types of therapies. Unfortunately no randomised trials comparing these strategies are available. In the future, more research is needed to evaluate the best therapy combinations or sequence of therapies. PMID:26971847

  10. Data Authentication Demonstration for Radionuclide Stations

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Mark; Herrington, Pres; Miley, Harry; Ellis, J. Edward; McKinnon, David; St. Pierre, Devon

    1999-08-03

    Data authentication is required for certification of sensor stations in the International Monitoring System (IMS). Authentication capability has been previously demonstrated for continuous waveform stations (seismic and infrasound). This paper addresses data surety for the radionuclide stations in the IMS, in particular the Radionuclide Aerosol Sampler/Analyzer (RASA) system developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Radionuclide stations communicate data by electronic mail using formats defined in IMS 1.0, Formats and Protocols for Messages. An open message authentication standard exists, called S/MIME (Secure/Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions), which has been proposed for use with all IMS radionuclide station message communications. This standard specifies adding a digital signature and public key certificate as a MIME attachment to the e-mail message. It is advantageous because it allows authentication to be added to all IMS 1.0 messages in a standard format and is commercially supported in e-mail software. For command and control, the RASA system uses a networked Graphical User Interface (GUI) based upon Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) communications, which requires special authentication procedures. The authors have modified the RASA system to meet CTBTO authentication guidelines, using a FORTEZZA card for authentication functions. They demonstrated signing radionuclide data messages at the RASA, then sending, receiving, and verifying the messages at a data center. They demonstrated authenticating command messages and responses from the data center GUI to the RASA. Also, the particular authentication system command to change the private/public key pair and retrieve the new public key was demonstrated. This work shows that data surety meeting IMS guidelines may be immediately applied to IMS radionuclide systems.

  11. Myocardial perfusion scintigraphy and coronary disease risk factors in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Sella, E; Sato, E; Leite, W; Filho, J; Barbieri, A

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of myocardial perfusion abnormalities and the possible association between myocardial perfusion defects and traditional coronary artery disease (CAD) risk factors as well as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) related risk factors. Patients and methods: Female patients with SLE, disease duration >5 years, age 18–55 years, who had used steroids for at least one year were enrolled. Traditional CAD risk factors evaluated were arterial hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidaemia, postmenopausal status, smoking, obesity, and premature family CAD profile. Myocardial perfusion scintigraphy was evaluated by single photon emission computed tomography with technetium 99m-sestamibi at rest and after dipyridamole induced stress. Results: Eight two female patients with SLE without angina pectoris with mean (SD) age 37 (10) years, disease duration 127 (57) months, SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) score 6 (5), and SLICC/ACR-DI score 2 (2) were evaluated. Myocardial perfusion abnormalities were found in 23 patients (28%). The mean (SD) number of CAD risk factors was 2.2 (1.6). There was a significant positive correlation between age and number of CAD risk factors. Lower high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol level showed a significant association with abnormal scintigraphy. Logistic regression analysis showed that lower HDL cholesterol level and diabetes mellitus were associated with myocardial perfusion abnormalities. Current vasculitis was also associated with abnormal scintigraphy. Conclusions: Lower HDL cholesterol level and diabetes mellitus have a significant influence on abnormal myocardial perfusion results found in asymptomatic patients with SLE. Current vasculitis was associated with abnormal myocardial scintigraphy. These data suggest that abnormal myocardial scintigraphy may be related to subclinical atherosclerosis. PMID:14583569

  12. Microbiological Transformations of Radionuclides in the Subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Matthew J.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2010-01-04

    Microorganisms are ubiquitous in subsurface environments although their populations sizes and metabolic activities can vary considerably depending on energy and nutrient inputs. As a result of their metabolic activities and the chemical properties of their cell surfaces and the exopolymers they produce, microorganisms can directly or indirectly facilitate the biotransformation of radionuclides, thus altering their solubility and overall fate and transport in the environment. Although biosorption to cell surfaces and exopolymers can be an important factor modifying the solubility of some radionuclides under specific conditions, oxidation state is often considered the single most important factor controlling their speciation and, therefore, environmental behavior.

  13. External accumulation of radionuclide in hepatic hydrothorax

    SciTech Connect

    Albin, R.J.; Johnston, G.S.

    1989-05-01

    Hepatic hydrothorax is a complication in approximately 5% of patients with cirrhosis. Ascites is almost always present and helps to suggest the correct diagnosis. However, when ascites is absent, radionuclide imaging has proven to be helpful in establishing that the pleural effusion originated from ascitic fluid. When pleural fluid is rapidly removed, such as by thoracostomy tube drainage, the radioisotope may accumulate outside the thorax and produce a negative scan of the chest. When the radionuclide scan is nondiagnostic and the pleural space is being rapidly drained, the pleural fluid collecting system should always be imaged before rejecting a diagnosis of hepatic hydrothorax.

  14. Detection of subdural empyema with radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    McKillop, J.H.; Holtzman, D.S.; McDougall, I.R.

    1980-06-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is now the standard method of confirming a diagnosis of suspected subdural empyema. We report a case in which the radionuclide brain scan was abnormal at a time when the CT scan was normal. An /sup 111/In-labeled leukocyte scan was also performed in this patient and demonstrated abnormal uptake in the empyema. The scintigraphic findings in a second case of subdural empyema are also described. The relative roles of radionuclide studies and CT scans in the patient with suspected subdural empyema are discussed.

  15. Bone image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z Q; Liew, H L; Clement, J G; Thomas, C D

    1999-05-01

    Characteristics of microscopic structures in bone cross sections carry essential clues in age determination in forensic science and in the study of age-related bone developments and bone diseases. Analysis of bone cross sections represents a major area of research in bone biology. However, traditional approaches in bone biology have relied primarily on manual processes with very limited number of bone samples. As a consequence, it is difficult to reach reliable and consistent conclusions. In this paper we present an image processing system that uses microstructural and relational knowledge present in the bone cross section for bone image segmentation. This system automates the bone image analysis process and is able to produce reliable results based on quantitative measurements from a large number of bone images. As a result, using large databases of bone images to study the correlation between bone structural features and age-related bone developments becomes feasible.

  16. Preliminary results of automated removal of degenerative joint disease in bone scan lesion segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Gregory H.; Lo, Pechin; Kim, Hyun J.; Auerbach, Martin; Goldin, Jonathan; Henkel, Keith; Banola, Ashley; Morris, Darren; Coy, Heidi; Brown, Matthew S.

    2013-03-01

    Whole-body bone scintigraphy (or bone scan) is a highly sensitive method for visualizing bone metastases and is the accepted standard imaging modality for detection of metastases and assessment of treatment outcomes. The development of a quantitative biomarker using computer-aided detection on bone scans for treatment response assessment may have a significant impact on the evaluation of novel oncologic drugs directed at bone metastases. One of the challenges to lesion segmentation on bone scans is the non-specificity of the radiotracer, manifesting as high activity related to non-malignant processes like degenerative joint disease, sinuses, kidneys, thyroid and bladder. In this paper, we developed an automated bone scan lesion segmentation method that implements intensity normalization, a two-threshold model, and automated detection and removal of areas consistent with non-malignant processes from the segmentation. The two-threshold model serves to account for outlier bone scans with elevated and diffuse intensity distributions. Parameters to remove degenerative joint disease were trained using a multi-start Nelder-Mead simplex optimization scheme. The segmentation reference standard was constructed manually by a panel of physicians. We compared the performance of the proposed method against a previously published method. The results of a two-fold cross validation show that the overlap ratio improved in 67.0% of scans, with an average improvement of 5.1% points.

  17. Bone Scan "Hot Spot" at the Superior Lateral Orbital Margin Fronto-zygomatic Suture Uptake Characterized with Tc-99m MDP SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    Thang, S P; Tan, A E H; Goh, A S W

    2011-07-01

    Findings of a solitary "hot spot" at the superior lateral orbital margin on bone scan scintigraphy is not uncommonly seen, and is often dismissed as a benign lesion. However, the exact etiology is indeterminate. We present two cases in which hybrid single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography imaging was able to characterize and localize this uptake, demonstrating correlation to the right fronto-zygomatic suture.

  18. Assessment of Radionuclides in the Savannah River Site Environment Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Carlton, W.H.

    1999-01-26

    This document summarizes the impact of radionuclide releases from Savannah River Site (SRS) facilities from 1954 through 1996. The radionuclides reported here are those whose release resulted in the highest dose to people living near SRS.

  19. Migration of radionuclides in geologic media: Fundamental research needs

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, D.T. ); Zachara, J.M.; Wildung, R.E. ); Wobber, F.J. )

    1990-01-01

    An assessment of the fundamental research needs in understanding and predicting the migration of radionuclides in the subsurface is provided. Emphasis is on the following three technical areas: (1) aqueous speciation of radionuclides, (2) the interaction of radionuclides with substrates, and (3) intermediate-scale interaction studies. This research relates to important issues associated with environmental restoration and remediation of DOE sites contaminated with mixed radionuclide-organic wastes. 64 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  20. Bone SPECT/CT in skeletal trauma.

    PubMed

    Scharf, Stephen C

    2015-01-01

    The utility of radionuclide bone scanning in skeletal trauma has been greatly enhanced over the last decade by hybrid technology merging multislice CT with SPECT that can take advantage of CT-based correction of attenuation and scatter. The resulting images have been particularly helpful in giving us new insights into the evaluation of foot and ankle injuries and vertebral pathology both before and after surgery. The physiological information and anatomical detail allow a better understanding of the causes of patients' pain and have proven to be particularly useful in planning surgical intervention.

  1. REMOVAL OF RADIONUCLIDES BY ELECTROKINETIC SOIL PROCESSING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Electrokinetics promises to be an innovative treatment process for in-situ treatment of soils and groundwater contaminated with heavy metals and radionuclides. Electrokinetics refers to the movement of ionic liquids and charged particles relative to one another under the action ...

  2. Understanding Radionuclide Interactions with Layered Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Layered materials play an important role in nuclear waste management and environmental cleanup. Better understanding of radionuclide interactions with those materials is critical for engineering high-performance materials for various applications. This presentation will provide an overview on radionuclide interactions with two general categories of layered materials - cationic clays and anionic clays - from a perspective of nanopore confinement. Nanopores are widely present in layered materials, either as the interlayers or as inter-particle space. Nanopore confinement can significantly modify chemical reactions in those materials. This effect may cause the preferential enrichment of radionuclides in nanopores and therefore directly impact the mobility of the radionuclides. This effect also implies that conventional sorption measurements using disaggregated samples may not represent chemical conditions in actual systems. The control of material structures on ion exchange, surface complexation, and diffusion in layered materials will be systematically examined, and the related modeling approaches will be discussed. This work was performed at Sandia National Laboratories, which is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the DOE under contract DE-AC04-94AL8500.

  3. Distribution of radionuclides in Dardanelle Reservoir sediments.

    PubMed

    Forgy, J R; Epperson, C E; Swindle, D L

    1984-02-01

    Natural and reactor-discharged gamma-ray emitting radionuclides were measured in Dardanelle Reservoir surface sediments taken near the Arkansas Nuclear One Power Plant site. Samples represented several water depths and particle sizes, at 33 locations, in a field survey conducted in early September 1980. Radionuclide contents of dry sediments ranged as follows: natural radioactivity (40K as well as uranium and thorium decay products) 661-1210 Bq/kg; and reactor discharged radioactivity (137Cs, 134Cs, 60Co,, 58Co, 54Mn), no detectable activity to 237 Bq/kg. In general, radionuclide contents were positively correlated with decreasing sediment particle size. The average external whole-body and skin doses from all measurable reactor-discharged radionuclides were calculated according to the mathematical formula for determining external dose from sediment given by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Inside the discharge embayment near the reactor discharge canal, the doses were 1.7 X 10(-3) mSv/yr to the whole body and 2.0 X 10(-3) mSv/yr to the skin. Outside this area, the doses were 0.15 X 10(-3) and 0.18 X 10(-3) mSv/yr to the whole body and skin, respectively. PMID:6693264

  4. Physical and chemical properties of radionuclide therapy.

    PubMed

    Wessels, B W; Meares, C F

    2000-04-01

    As more radionuclide therapies move from laboratory feasibility studies into clinical reality, it becomes increasingly important for the labeling chemistry to produce consistently a stable radiopharmaceutical that remains intact under the challenge of human catabolism. Similarly, once proof of principle is established to bring a radionuclide conjugate into clinical therapy trials, dosimetric estimates should be made to select the appropriate radionuclide properties, which are based on animal-specific or patient-specific pharmacokinetics and match a set of specific clinical endpoints. These properties may include the radionuclide physical half-life, radiolabeled conjugate biological uptake and clearance, product-specific activity, range and type of emissions, and resultant effects on tumor and normal tissue cellular survival. The immunologist and labeling chemist have now produced a variety of strategies that have potential to increase the therapeutic ratio (tumor-to-normal tissue dose ratio). The advent of normal tissue clearing agents, fragmented or chimerized carriers to improve targeting, and the method of bispecific or two-step and three-step targeting agents has increased the need for realistic modeling of the carrier in vivo to guide prospectively the competitive development of these radiopharmaceuticals. In this article, examples have been taken from the literature to elucidate the benchmark of success that careful experimental design has fostered to bring these agents into clinical practice by creative and logical methodologies.

  5. RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT MODELS UNDER AMBIENT CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    S. Magnuson

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this model report is to document the unsaturated zone (UZ) radionuclide transport model, which evaluates, by means of three-dimensional numerical models, the transport of radioactive solutes and colloids in the UZ, under ambient conditions, from the repository horizon to the water table at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

  6. Sodium 18F-Fluoride PET/CT of Bone, Joint and Other Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Jadvar, Hossein; Desai, Bhushan; Conti, Peter S.

    2014-01-01

    The use of 18F-sodium fluoride (18F-NaF) with positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) is increasing. This resurgence of an old tracer has been fueled by several factors including superior diagnostic performance over standard 99mTc-based bone scintigraphy, growth in the availability of PET/CT imaging systems, increase in the number of regional commercial distribution centers for PET radiotracers, the recent concerns about potential chronic shortages with 99mTc based radiotracers, and the recent decision by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to reimburse for 18F-NaF PET/CT for evaluation of patients with known or suspected bone metastases through the National Oncologic PET Registry. The major goal of this article is to review the current evidence on the diagnostic utility of 18F-NaF in the imaging assessment of bone and joint in a variety of clinical conditions. PMID:25475379

  7. A deep penetrating facial congenital melanocytic tumor with bone involvement and ipsilateral eye blindness.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Reuven; Ben-Arush, Miriam W; Bar-Shalom, Rachel; Gilboa, Michael; Simon, Einav; Hershkovitz, Dov; Sabo, Edmond; Maly, Alexander; Gerami, Pedram; Goldsher, Dorith

    2015-01-01

    Bone involvement has been described in tumors with melanocytic differentiation such as melanotic neuroectodermal tumor of infancy, and very rarely in cellular blue nevi and neurocristic cutaneous hamartoma. We present an unusual case of facial congenital melanocytic tumor that involved the underlying bones and maxillary sinus and led to unilateral blindness. A newborn with a large red bluish patch with peripheral brown and black macules overlying marked swelling on the left side of his face was presented. The tumor was shown by magnetic resonance imaging, scintigraphy, and histopathology to invade the underlying bones and maxillary sinus and to compress the left eyeball resulting in blindness. Histopathology, immunohistochemistry, morphometric computerized microscopy, molecular genetic mutation analysis, and fluorescent in situ hybridization studies were more congruent with a melanocytic nevus. An 8.5-year follow-up was uneventful, with spontaneous partial shrinkage of the tumor. PMID:25222197

  8. 21 CFR 892.1390 - Radionuclide rebreathing system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Radionuclide rebreathing system. 892.1390 Section 892.1390 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1390 Radionuclide rebreathing system. (a) Identification. A radionuclide...

  9. 21 CFR 892.5750 - Radionuclide radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Radionuclide radiation therapy system. 892.5750... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5750 Radionuclide radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A radionuclide radiation therapy system is a device intended to permit...

  10. 21 CFR 892.5750 - Radionuclide radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Radionuclide radiation therapy system. 892.5750... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5750 Radionuclide radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A radionuclide radiation therapy system is a device intended to permit...

  11. 21 CFR 892.5730 - Radionuclide brachytherapy source.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radionuclide brachytherapy source. 892.5730... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5730 Radionuclide brachytherapy source. (a) Identification. A radionuclide brachytherapy source is a device that consists of...

  12. 21 CFR 892.5730 - Radionuclide brachytherapy source.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Radionuclide brachytherapy source. 892.5730... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5730 Radionuclide brachytherapy source. (a) Identification. A radionuclide brachytherapy source is a device that consists of...

  13. 21 CFR 892.5730 - Radionuclide brachytherapy source.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Radionuclide brachytherapy source. 892.5730... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5730 Radionuclide brachytherapy source. (a) Identification. A radionuclide brachytherapy source is a device that consists of...

  14. Intercomparison of radionuclide calibrator measurements in U.K. hospitals.

    PubMed

    Woods, M J

    1983-01-01

    The Life Sciences Working Group of the International Committee for Radionuclide Metrology had received various reports of users of radionuclide calibrators experiencing problems in obtaining accurate measurements of radionuclide activity. Working Group members were encouraged to initiate surveys in their own countries to assess the magnitude of these problems. The results of the survey in the United Kingdom are given.

  15. 21 CFR 892.5700 - Remote controlled radionuclide applicator system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Remote controlled radionuclide applicator system. 892.5700 Section 892.5700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... radionuclide applicator system. (a) Identification. A remote controlled radionuclide applicator system is...

  16. 21 CFR 892.5700 - Remote controlled radionuclide applicator system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Remote controlled radionuclide applicator system. 892.5700 Section 892.5700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... radionuclide applicator system. (a) Identification. A remote controlled radionuclide applicator system is...

  17. 21 CFR 892.5700 - Remote controlled radionuclide applicator system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Remote controlled radionuclide applicator system. 892.5700 Section 892.5700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... radionuclide applicator system. (a) Identification. A remote controlled radionuclide applicator system is...

  18. 21 CFR 892.5700 - Remote controlled radionuclide applicator system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Remote controlled radionuclide applicator system. 892.5700 Section 892.5700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... radionuclide applicator system. (a) Identification. A remote controlled radionuclide applicator system is...

  19. Scientific Analysis Cover Sheet for Radionuclide Screening

    SciTech Connect

    G. Ragan

    2002-08-09

    The waste forms under consideration for disposal in the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain contain scores of radionuclides (Attachments V and VI). It would be impractical and highly inefficient to model all of these radionuclides in a total system performance assessment (TSPA). Thus, the purpose of this radionuclide screening analysis is to remove from further consideration (screen out) radionuclides that are unlikely to significantly contribute to radiation dose to the public from the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The remaining nuclides (those screened in) are recommended for consideration in TSPA modeling for license application. This analysis also covers radionuclides that are not screened in based on dose, but need to be included in TSPA modeling for other reasons. For example, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations require consideration of the combined activity of Ra-226 and Ra-228 in groundwater (40 CFR 197.30, 10 CFR 63.331). Also, Cm-245, Pu-241, and U-235 decay indirectly to potentially important radionuclides, and are not identified by the screening analysis as important. The radionuclide screening analysis separately considers two different postclosure time periods: the 10,000-y regulatory period for the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain and the period after 10,000 y up to 1 million y after emplacement. The incremental effect of extending the screening for the regulatory period to 20,000 y is also addressed. Four release scenarios are considered: (1) the nominal scenario, which entails long-term degradation of disposal containers and waste forms, (2) a human-intrusion scenario, (3) an intrusive igneous event, and (4) an eruptive igneous event. Because the first three scenarios require groundwater transport, they are called groundwater scenarios below. The screening analysis considers the following waste forms: spent boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel, spent

  20. Sediment and radionuclide transport in rivers: radionuclide transport modeling for Cattaraugus and Buttermilk Creeks, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Y.; Yabusaki, S.B.; Kincaid, C.T.; Skaggs, R.L.; Walters, W.H.

    1982-12-01

    SERATRA, a transient, two-dimensional (laterally-averaged) computer model of sediment-contaminant transport in rivers, satisfactorily resolved the distribution of sediment and radionuclide concentrations in the Cattaraugus Creek stream system in New York. By modeling the physical processes of advection, diffusion, erosion, deposition, and bed armoring, SERATRA routed three sediment size fractions, including cohesive soils, to simulate three dynamic flow events. In conjunction with the sediment transport, SERATRA computed radionuclide levels in dissolved, suspended sediment, and bed sediment forms for four radionuclides (/sup 137/Cs, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu, and /sup 3/H). By accounting for time-dependent sediment-radionuclide interaction in the water column and bed, SERATA is a physically explicit model of radionuclide fate and migration. Sediment and radionuclide concentrations calculated by SERATA in the Cattaraugus Creek stream system are in reasonable agreement with measured values. SERATRA is in the field performance phase of an extensive testing program designed to establish the utility of the model as a site assessment tool. The model handles not only radionuclides but other contaminants such as pesticides, heavy metals and other toxic chemicals. Now that the model has been applied to four field sites, including the latest study of the Cattaraugus Creek stream system, it is recommended that a final model be validated through comparison of predicted results with field data from a carefully controlled tracer test at a field site. It is also recommended that a detailed laboratory flume be tested to study cohesive sediment transport, deposition, and erosion characteristics. The lack of current understanding of these characteristics is one of the weakest areas hindering the accurate assessment of the migration of radionuclides sorbed by fine sediments of silt and clay.

  1. 2006 LANL Radionuclide Air Emissions Report

    SciTech Connect

    David P. Fuehne

    2007-06-30

    This report describes the impacts from emissions of radionuclides at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for calendar year 2006. This report fulfills the requirements established by the Radionuclide National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (Rad-NESHAP). This report is prepared by LANL's Rad-NESHAP compliance team, part of the Environmental Protection Division. The information in this report is required under the Clean Air Act and is being reported to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The highest effective dose equivalent (EDE) to an off-site member of the public was calculated using procedures specified by the EPA and described in this report. LANL's EDE was 0.47 mrem for 2006. The annual limit established by the EPA is 10 mrem per year. During calendar year 2006, LANL continuously monitored radionuclide emissions at 28 release points, or stacks. The Laboratory estimates emissions from an additional 58 release points using radionuclide usage source terms. Also, LANL uses a network of air samplers around the Laboratory perimeter to monitor ambient airborne levels of radionuclides. To provide data for dispersion modeling and dose assessment, LANL maintains and operates meteorological monitoring systems. From these measurement systems, a comprehensive evaluation is conducted to calculate the EDE for the Laboratory. The EDE is evaluated as any member of the public at any off-site location where there is a residence, school, business, or office. In 2006, this location was the Los Alamos Airport Terminal. The majority of this dose is due to ambient air sampling of plutonium emitted from 2006 clean-up activities at an environmental restoration site (73-002-99; ash pile). Doses reported to the EPA for the past 10 years are shown in Table E1.

  2. Labeling of monoclonal antibodies with radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Bhargava, K.K.; Acharya, S.A. )

    1989-07-01

    Antibodies, specifically monoclonal antibodies, are potentially very useful and powerful carriers of therapeutic agents to target tissues and diagnostic agents. The loading or charging of antibodies with agents, especially radiotracers, is reviewed here. The choice of radioisotope for immunodetection and/or immunotherapy is based on its availability, half-life, nature of the radiation emitted, and the metabolic pathways of the radionuclide in the body. Most important of all are the derivatization techniques available for labeling the antibody with the given radionuclide. Isotopes of iodine and divalent metal ions are the most commonly used radionuclides. Antibodies labeled with iodine at tyrosine residues are metabolized rapidly in vivo. This leads to the incorporation of metabolized radioactive iodine into various tissues, mainly the thyroid gland and stomach, and to the accumulation of high levels of circulating iodine in the blood, which masks tumor uptake considerably. To overcome these limitations, the use of iodohippurate as an iodine-anchoring molecule to the protein should be considered. When divalent or multivalent metal ions are used as the preferred radionuclide, bifunctional chelating reagents such as EDTA or DTPA are first coupled to the protein or antibody. These chelating molecules are attached to the protein by formation of an isopeptide linkage between the carboxylate of the chelating reagent and the amino group of the protein. Several procedures are available to generate the isopeptide linkage. When the anchoring of the chelating agent through isopeptide linkage results in the inactivation of the antibody, periodate oxidation of the carbohydrate moiety of the antibody, followed by reductive coupling of chelator, could be considered as an alternative. There is still a need for better, simpler, and more direct methods for labeling antibodies with radionuclides. 78 references.

  3. Anthropogenic radionuclides in the atmosphere observed at Tsukuba: characteristics of the radionuclides derived from Fukushima.

    PubMed

    Doi, Taeko; Masumoto, Kazuyoshi; Toyoda, Akihiro; Tanaka, Atsushi; Shibata, Yasuyuki; Hirose, Katsumi

    2013-08-01

    During a serious accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP), a huge quantity of radionuclides was released into the atmosphere and ocean. We measured anthropogenic radionuclides in surface air at Tsukuba, about 170 km from the FDNPP. On March 15, 2011, we detected the radioactivity released from the Fukushima accident in air samples at Tsukuba. The major radionuclides that we observed were radioiodine ((131)I, (132)I, (133)I) and radiocesium ((134)Cs, (136)Cs, (137)Cs). This radioiodine consisted of gaseous and particulate forms; the percentage of particulate (131)I in the total (131)I ranged from 0 to 86%. The percentage of the particulate (131)I to the total (131)I increased on the arrival of the plumes from major emissions of the FDNPP. After activities of the radionuclides attained the maximum on March 15, 2011, the FDNPP-derived radionuclides decreased rapidly in surface air. The activity median aerodynamic diameter of (131)I-bearing particles was 0.7 μm, while those of (134)Cs- and (137)Cs-bearing particles were larger than 1 μm. Large variations of ratios of (131)I/(137)Cs, (132)Te/(137)Cs, and (99)Mo ((99m)Tc)/(137)Cs (all involving different elements) suggest that the behaviors of these radionuclides in the atmosphere, including the processes of their emission, differed each other.

  4. Hybrid imaging in planar scintigraphy: new implementations and historical precedents.

    PubMed

    Zuckier, Lionel S

    2012-01-01

    Fusion of tomographic radionuclide studies with anatomical examinations has become standard practice in positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. Nonetheless, fusion of planar scintigraphic images with an anatomical modality remains distinctly uncommon, although methods to do so have appeared sporadically in the literature during the past 2 decades. In this article we review several techniques that have been used to combine planar scintigraphic images with radiographs and visual (photographic) images. Rigid or affine transformations have been performed to co-register the planar images with each other using custom, commercial, or public domain software. Display of the hybrid images has been achieved primarily with nonselective color-fusion methods. Promising efforts are underway to develop a technique of fusing planar lymphoscintigraphic images with CT topograms (scout images) obtained on the SPECT-CT camera in a manner that compensates for position-dependent variation in magnification that affects the CT scout. An advantage of this approach is that both of the component images are acquired on the same gantry, without need for repositioning of the patient. It is instructive to note that techniques of fusing rectilinear scans with radiographic and visual images were first developed more than 50 years ago. The revisiting of these methods after many decades reflects a fundamental need for spatial orientation in nuclear medicine that fusion imaging can also bring to planar scintigraphic studies.

  5. PIPIDA excretory scintigraphy in the diagnosis of hepatobiliary disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Pelot, D.; Berk, J.E.; Wistow, B.W.; Morton, M.E.

    1981-01-01

    The diagnostic accuracy of hepatobiliary radionuclide imaging using /sup 99/mTC-labeled para-isopropyl acetanilido-iminodiacetic acid (/sup 99/mTc-PIPIDA) in patients with hepatobiliary disorders was assessed in 50 patients. Thirty of the study group were jaundiced; the remaining 20 had other clinical features suggestive of some hepatobiliary disorder. The findings using PIPIDA proved to be correct in 22 (73%) of the 30 jaundiced patients and in 18 (90%) of 20 patients without jaundice. There appears to be a close relationship between the diagnostic accuracy of the test and the level of serum bilirubin. Thus, the diagnosis indicated by the PIPIDA test was correct in 30 (88%) of 34 patients in whom the serum bilirubin was less than 5 mg./dl. but only in 10 (62%) of 16 patients whose serum bilirubin exceeded 5 mg./dl. It is concluded from these observations that: 1. PIPIDA is diagnostically useful in the evaluation of hepatobiliary disorders, especially when the serum bilirubin is less than 5 mg./dl. and 2. the accuracy of this test is not absolute and the findings are not always definitive.

  6. Gallium scanning in Paget's disease of bone: effect of calcitonin

    SciTech Connect

    Waxman, A.D.; McKee, D.; Siemsen, J.K.; Singer, F.R.

    1980-02-01

    Calcitonin has been used in the treatment of Paget's disease of bone, and serum alkaline phosphatase level and 24 hr urinary hydroxyproline excretion have been used to follow therapeutic response. The radionuclide bone scan has been used as a visual indicator; however, there is some uncertainty as to its value in following changes in disease activity. Four patients with both serial technetium phosphate bone scans and serial gallium studies were studied. In each case the beneficial effect of calcitonin was demonstrated more accurately with gallium than with technetium diphosphonate. Since biochemical changes in Paget's disease are believed to be mediated at the cellular level and gallium uptake depends on cellular activity, it is proposed that gallium uptake is more appropriate measure of the activity of Paget's disease than a noncellular marker such as a technetium-containing bone scan agent.

  7. Bone lesion biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Benign (noncancerous) bone tumors include: Bone cyst Fibroma Osteoblastoma Osteoid osteoma Cancerous tumors include: Ewing sarcoma Multiple myeloma Osteosarcoma Other types of cancer that may have spread to the bone Abnormal ...

  8. Smoking and Bone Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... direct relationship between tobacco use and decreased bone density. Analyzing the impact of cigarette smoking on bone ... hard to determine whether a decrease in bone density is due to smoking itself or to other ...

  9. Menopause and Bone Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... You reach your highest bone mass (size and density) at about age 30. Then, sometime between age ... your bones, your doctor may do a bone density test (DEXA scan). This test gives exact measurements ...

  10. Facts about Broken Bones

    MedlinePlus

    ... las fracturas de huesos Your bones are tough stuff — but even tough stuff can break. Like a wooden pencil, bones will ... that? Get a lot of physical activity, especially stuff like jumping and running. Feed your bones the ...

  11. Bone marrow aspiration

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003658.htm Bone marrow aspiration To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Bone marrow is the soft tissue inside bones that helps ...

  12. Can Neutrophil/Lymphocyte Ratio be a Predictor for Bone Metastases of Solid Tumors?

    PubMed Central

    Caliskan, Billur; Korkmaz, Ayşe Nurdan

    2016-01-01

    Cancer-associated inflammation has been receiving increased attention due to its role in cancer development. It is known that tumors can cause an inflammatory reaction and inflammatory cells play an important role in neoplastic growth. In this study, we aimed to investigate any relationship between bone metastases and the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR). Patients who were referred for bone scintigraphy to investigate bone metastasis were enrolled in the study. Patients’ hematological parameters were obtained from the hospital database retrospectively. Patients with a nonmetastatic bone scan were categorized as Group A (N = 171), patients who had metastatic bone disease without any other organ metastases were categorized as group B (N = 25), and patients who had metastatic bone disease with the other organ metastases were categorized as Group C (N = 48). The median NLR of the patients in Group A was 2.55 (range: 0.38–20.7), in Group B was 2.83 (range: 1.56–31.8), and in Group C was 4.12 (range: 1.79–38). NLR was significantly higher in Group C patients compared to Group A and B patients (P < 0.001). In conclusion, the NLR is significantly associated with the other organ metastases but has no significant correlation with bone metastases. PMID:27651741

  13. Can Neutrophil/Lymphocyte Ratio be a Predictor for Bone Metastases of Solid Tumors?

    PubMed

    Caliskan, Billur; Korkmaz, Ayşe Nurdan

    2016-09-01

    Cancer-associated inflammation has been receiving increased attention due to its role in cancer development. It is known that tumors can cause an inflammatory reaction and inflammatory cells play an important role in neoplastic growth. In this study, we aimed to investigate any relationship between bone metastases and the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR). Patients who were referred for bone scintigraphy to investigate bone metastasis were enrolled in the study. Patients' hematological parameters were obtained from the hospital database retrospectively. Patients with a nonmetastatic bone scan were categorized as Group A (N = 171), patients who had metastatic bone disease without any other organ metastases were categorized as group B (N = 25), and patients who had metastatic bone disease with the other organ metastases were categorized as Group C (N = 48). The median NLR of the patients in Group A was 2.55 (range: 0.38-20.7), in Group B was 2.83 (range: 1.56-31.8), and in Group C was 4.12 (range: 1.79-38). NLR was significantly higher in Group C patients compared to Group A and B patients (P < 0.001). In conclusion, the NLR is significantly associated with the other organ metastases but has no significant correlation with bone metastases. PMID:27651741

  14. Can Neutrophil/Lymphocyte Ratio be a Predictor for Bone Metastases of Solid Tumors?

    PubMed Central

    Caliskan, Billur; Korkmaz, Ayşe Nurdan

    2016-01-01

    Cancer-associated inflammation has been receiving increased attention due to its role in cancer development. It is known that tumors can cause an inflammatory reaction and inflammatory cells play an important role in neoplastic growth. In this study, we aimed to investigate any relationship between bone metastases and the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR). Patients who were referred for bone scintigraphy to investigate bone metastasis were enrolled in the study. Patients’ hematological parameters were obtained from the hospital database retrospectively. Patients with a nonmetastatic bone scan were categorized as Group A (N = 171), patients who had metastatic bone disease without any other organ metastases were categorized as group B (N = 25), and patients who had metastatic bone disease with the other organ metastases were categorized as Group C (N = 48). The median NLR of the patients in Group A was 2.55 (range: 0.38–20.7), in Group B was 2.83 (range: 1.56–31.8), and in Group C was 4.12 (range: 1.79–38). NLR was significantly higher in Group C patients compared to Group A and B patients (P < 0.001). In conclusion, the NLR is significantly associated with the other organ metastases but has no significant correlation with bone metastases.

  15. Is thyroid scintigraphy necessary before I-131 therapy for hyperthyroidism. Concise Communication

    SciTech Connect

    Ripley, S.D.; Freitas, J.E.; Nagle, C.E.

    1984-06-01

    To assess the value of routine thyroid scintigraphy in the differential diagnosis of hyperthyroidism and as a guide to I-131 therapy, the authors prospectively examined 100 consecutive hyperthyroid patients referred for a 24-hr radioiodine uptake and I-131 therapy. The nuclear medicine physician recorded his preimaging diagnostic impression and therapeutic plan for each patient. After the (/sup 99m/Tc) pertechnetate image, the patient was reassessed to determine whether the image induced any change in the diagnosis or therapeutic plan. Seventy-nine of 80 patients with diffuse goiter to palpation, had scintigrams demonstrating no discrete focal defects and were diagnosed as Graves' disease; thus the scintigram did not contribute useful information. In 17 of 20 patients with uninodular or multinodular goiters, the image was necessary to clarify the final diagnosis and therapeutic plan. Thus, selective use of thyroid scintigraphy should decrease the number of scintigrams performed before I-131 therapy for hyperthyroidism, without compromising diagnostic accuracy or therapeutic success.

  16. Detection of bladder hemangioma in a child by blood-pool scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Ken; Saitoh, Masahiko; Chida, Shoichi

    2003-06-01

    Bladder hemangioma is a rare cause of gross hematuria. A 5-year-old boy was investigated for recurrent episodes of asymptomatic gross hematuria, but no abnormalities were found. Blood-pool scintigraphy using (99m)technetium-human serum albumin combined with diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid (DTPA) revealed an area of increased activity in the right side of the bladder, which was confirmed by cystoscopy as a bladder hemangioma. Endoscopic laser therapy was used to remove two lesions successfully that were diagnosed histologically as cavernous hemangioma. The patient had no further episodes of hematuria in the 2-year period after this treatment. This case study indicates blood-pool scintigraphy may be a useful technique for detecting bladder hemangiomas.

  17. Comparison between scintigraphy with polyclonal immunoglobulin (99Tcm-HIG) and physical examination in polyarthritic disease.

    PubMed

    Vesterskiöld, L; Schnell, P O; Jacobsson, H

    1996-01-01

    99Tcm-labelled polyclonal human immunoglobulin 99Tcm-HIG scintigraphy has been suggested as a technique to detect joint inflammation in arthritic disorders. Scintigraphy was performed in fifteen patients with active polyarthritis. All joints except the hips were scored clinically for swelling and pain by a rheumatologist and scintigraphic images were obtained at 30 minutes and four hours after injection of 350MBq 99Tcm-HIG. The images were assessed by a nuclear medicine physician according to a four grade scale. The images were easy to assess. There was a highly significant correlation between swelling and scan score, but no correlation between pain and scan score. The mechanism for the accumulation of activity to inflamed synovial tissue remains unclear. The mean values of the scan score however increased significantly between 30 minutes and 4 hours, indicating an active binding mechanism. The method has a potential as an objective tool in monitoring rheumatic diseases.

  18. Atypical appearance of an hepatic hemangioma with technetium-99m red blood cell scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Larcos, G.; Farlow, D.C.; Gruenewald, S.M.; Antico, V.F. )

    1989-11-01

    Three-phase 99mTc red blood cell scintigraphy is an established technique for distinguishing hemangiomas from other focal liver lesions. The most widely recognized feature is the perfusion to blood-pool mismatch characterized by decreased or normal arterial perfusion, with lesion activity which progressively increases over 1-2 hr. Although increased arterial vascularity of hemangiomas has been described, such cases either involved small portions of the lesion only or occurred in lesions not conclusively proven to be hemangiomas. We report a case of an angiography proven hemangioma with increased arterial vascularity involving a significant portion of the lesion as well as intense early blood-pool activity similar to that seen on delayed imaging. This case emphasizes the diverse appearance of hepatic hemangiomas using 99mTc blood cell scintigraphy.

  19. (123)I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) cardiac scintigraphy in α-synucleinopathies.

    PubMed

    Orimo, Satoshi; Yogo, Makiko; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Suzuki, Masahiko; Watanabe, Hirohisa

    2016-09-01

    Cardiac meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) uptake on (123)I-MIBG cardiac scintigraphy is reduced in patients with Lewy body disease such as Parkinson's disease (PD), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and pure autonomic failure, and has been reported to be useful for differentiating PD from other parkinsonian syndromes, as well as DLB from Alzheimer disease (AD). Postmortem studies have shown that the number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-immunoreactive nerve fibers of the heart was decreased in pathologically-confirmed Lewy body disease, supporting the findings of reduced cardiac MIBG uptake in Lewy body diseases. Now, reduced cardiac MIBG uptake can be a potential biomarker for the presence of Lewy bodies in the nervous system. (123)I-MIBG cardiac scintigraphy can allow us to determine the presence of Lewy bodies. PMID:26835846

  20. Right ventricular visualization by thallium 201 myocardial scintigraphy in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    SciTech Connect

    Shuck, J.W.; Walder, J.; Oetgen, W.J.; Thomas, H.M.

    1985-12-01

    The right ventricle is not normally displayed by studies with thallium 201 in patients at rest, but it can be shown by thallium 201 myocardial scintigraphy with pressure or volume overload of the right ventricle and with right ventricular hypertrophy. We sought to determine the frequency of right ventricular demonstration by thallium 201 in 20 patients at rest, who had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease of varying severity studied at baseline. The ventricle was viewed in 11 of 20 patients (55%); these patients had significantly lower values for forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and PO/sub 2/. Eight patients had catheterization of the right side of the heart; mean pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance were significantly higher in patients with right ventricular visualization. We conclude that thallium 201 scintigraphy frequently shows the right ventricle in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and that such visualization correlates with the severity of the ventilatory defect and with pulmonary hypertension.