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Sample records for radionuclide molecular imaging

  1. Recent Advances in Molecular Image-Guided Cancer Radionuclide Therapy.

    PubMed

    Gao, Duo; Sun, Xianlei; Gao, Liquan; Liu, Zhaofei

    2015-01-01

    Cancer-targeted radionuclide therapy is a promising approach for the treatment of a wide variety of malignancies, especially those resistant to conventional therapies. However, to improve the use of targeted radionuclide therapy for the management of cancer patients, the in vivo behaviors, dosimetry, and efficacy of radiotherapeutic agents need to be well characterized and monitored. Molecular imaging, which is a powerful tool for the noninvasive characterization and quantification of biological processes in living subjects at the cellular and molecular levels, plays an important role in the guidance of cancer radionuclide therapy. In this review, we introduce the radiotherapeutics for cancer-targeted therapy and summarize the most recent evidence supporting the use of molecular imaging to guide cancer radionuclide therapy.

  2. Personalized Dosimetry for Radionuclide Therapy Using Molecular Imaging Tools

    PubMed Central

    Ljungberg, Michael; Sjögreen Gleisner, Katarina

    2016-01-01

    For treatment of systemic malignancies, when external radiation therapy is not applicable, radionuclide therapy can be an alternative. In this form of therapy, radionuclides are administered to the patient, often in a form where the radionuclide is labelled to a molecule that plays the active part in the localization of the tumor. Since the aim is to impart lethal damage to tumor cells while maintaining possible side-effects to normal tissues at tolerable levels, a proper and accurate personalized dosimetry should be a pre-requisite. In radionuclide therapy, there is a need to measure the distribution of the radiopharmaceutical in vivo, as well as its re-distribution over time, in order estimate the total energy released in radioactive decays and subsequent charged-particle interactions, governing the absorbed dose to different organs and tumors. Measurements are usually performed by molecular imaging, more specifically planar and SPECT (Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography) imaging, combined with CT. This review describes the different parts in the dosimetry chain of radionuclide therapy. Emphasis is given to molecular imaging tools and the requirements for determining absorbed doses from quantitative planar and SPECT images. As example solutions to the different problems that need to be addressed in such a dosimetric chain, we describe our tool, Lundadose, which is a set of methods that we have developed for personalized dosimetry. PMID:28536392

  3. Recent Advances of Radionuclide-based Molecular Imaging of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Kazuma, Soraya M.; Sultan, Deborah; Zhao, Yongfeng; Detering, Lisa; You, Meng; Luehmann, Hannah P.; Abdalla, Dulcineia S.P.; Liu, Yongjian

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a systemic disease characterized by the development of multifocal plaque lesions within vessel walls and extending into the vascular lumen. The disease takes decades to develop symptomatic lesions, affording opportunities for accurate detection of plaque progression, analysis of risk factors responsible for clinical events, and planning personalized treatment. Of the available molecular imaging modalities, radionuclide-based imaging strategies have been favored due to their sensitivity, quantitative detection and pathways for translational research. This review summarizes recent advances of radiolabeled small molecules, peptides, antibodies and nanoparticles for atherosclerotic plaque imaging during disease progression. PMID:26369676

  4. Towards molecular imaging and treatment of disease with radionuclides: the role of inorganic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Blower, Phil

    2006-04-14

    Molecular imaging and radiotherapy using radionuclides is a rapidly expanding field of medicine and medical research. This article highlights the development of the role of inorganic chemistry in designing and producing the radiopharmaceuticals on which this interdisciplinary science depends.

  5. Radionuclide Therapies in Molecular Imaging and Precision Medicine.

    PubMed

    Kendi, A Tuba; Moncayo, Valeria M; Nye, Jonathon A; Galt, James R; Halkar, Raghuveer; Schuster, David M

    2017-01-01

    This article reviews recent advances and applications of radionuclide therapy. Individualized precision medicine, new treatments, and the evolving role of radionuclide therapy are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The radionuclide molecular imaging and therapy of neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuren; Beheshti, Mohsen

    2005-03-01

    clinical studies are needed. The studies using vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) for tumor angiogenesis imaging, annexin-V for imaging apoptosis and agents for hypoxia imaging are still in an early stage and the clinical role for these agents needs to be defined. In conclusion, no single imaging technique identifies all the metastatic sites of NETs. The best results may be obtained with a combination of functional imaging such as PET or/and SRS and morphologic imaging with CT and/or MR imaging. Many molecular imaging and therapy modalities fur NETs are recently under investigation or being developed, the usefulness of these modalities, however, has to be evaluated by well-designed and multicentre studies.

  7. Radionuclide imaging - A molecular key to the atherosclerotic plaque

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Harald Franz; Haubner, Roland; Pichler, Bernd Juergen; Gawaz, Meinrad

    2008-01-01

    Despite primary and secondary prevention, serious cardiovascular events like unstable angina or myocardial infarction still account for one third of all deaths worldwide. Therefore, identifying individual patients with vulnerable plaques at high risk for plaque rupture is a central challenge in cardiovascular medicine. Several non-invasive techniques, such as MRI, multislice computed tomography and electron beam tomography are currently being tested for their ability to identify such patients by morphological criteria. In contrast, molecular imaging techniques use radiolabeled molecules to detect functional aspects in atherosclerotic plaques by visualizing its biological activity. Based upon the knowledge about the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis, various studies in vitro, in vivo and the first clinical trials have used different tracers for plaque imaging studies, including radioactive labelled lipoproteins, components of the coagulation system, cytokines, mediators of the metalloproteinase system, cell adhesion receptors and even whole cells. This review gives an update on the relevant non-invasive plaque imaging approaches using nuclear imaging techniques to detect atherosclerotic vascular lesions. PMID:18582628

  8. Radionuclide probes for molecular imaging of pancreatic beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhanhong; Kandeel, Fouad

    2010-08-30

    Islet transplantation is a promising treatment option for patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D); however, the fate of the graft over time remains difficult to follow, due to the lack of available tools capable of monitoring graft rejection and inflammation prior to islet graft loss. Due to the challenges imposed by the location of the pancreas and the sparsely dispersed beta-cell population within the pancreas, currently, the clinical verification of beta-cell abnormalities can only be obtained indirectly via metabolic studies, which typically is not possible until after a significant deterioration in islet function has already occurred. The development of non-invasive imaging methods for the assessment of the pancreatic beta-cells, however, offers the potential for the early detection of beta-cell dysfunction prior to the clinical onset of T1D and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Ideal islet imaging agents would have an acceptable residence time in the human body, be capable of providing high-resolution images with minimal uptake in surrounding tissues (e.g., the liver), would not be toxic to islets, and would not require pre-treatment of islets prior to transplantation. A variety of currently available imaging techniques, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), bioluminescence imaging (BLI), and nuclear imaging have been tested for the study of beta-cell diseases. In this article, we summarize the recent advances made in nuclear imaging techniques for non-invasive imaging of pancreatic beta-cells. The use of radioactive probes for islet imaging is also discussed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Radionuclide bone imaging and densitometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mettler, F.A.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 13 selections. Some of the titles are: Radionuclides and the Normal Bone Scan; The Radionuclide Bone Scan in Malignant Disease; Pediatric Applications of Radionuclide Bone Imaging; The Radionuclide Bone Scan in Arthritis and Metabolic and Miscellaneous Disorders; and Soft Tissue Activity on the Radionuclide Bone Scan.

  10. Osteopetrosis: Radiological & Radionuclide Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sit, Cherry; Agrawal, Kanhaiyalal; Fogelman, Ignac; Gnanasegaran, Gopinath

    2015-01-01

    Osteopetrosis is a rare inherited bone disease where bones harden and become abnormally dense. While the diagnosis is clinical, it also greatly relies on appearance of the skeleton radiographically. X-ray, radionuclide bone scintigraphy and magnetic resonance imaging have been reported to identify characteristics of osteopetrosis. We present an interesting case of a 59-year-old man with a history of bilateral hip fractures. He underwent 99mTc-methylene diphosphonate whole body scan supplemented with single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography of spine, which showed increased uptake in the humeri, tibiae and femora, which were in keeping with osteopetrosis. PMID:25589808

  11. Radionuclide imaging in ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Heiss, Wolf-Dieter

    2014-11-01

    Ischemic stroke is caused by interruption or significant impairment of blood supply to the brain, which leads to a cascade of metabolic and molecular alterations resulting in functional disturbance and morphologic damage. The changes in regional cerebral blood flow and regional metabolism can be assessed by radionuclide imaging, especially SPECT and PET. SPECT and PET have broadened our understanding of flow and metabolic thresholds critical for maintenance of brain function and morphology: PET was essential in the transfer of the concept of the penumbra to clinical stroke and thereby had a great impact on developing treatment strategies. Receptor ligands can be applied as early markers of irreversible neuronal damage and can predict the size of the final infarcts, which is important for decisions on invasive therapy in large ("malignant") infarction. With SPECT and PET, the reserve capacity of the blood supply can be tested in obstructive arteriosclerosis, which is essential for planning interventions. The effect of a stroke on surrounding and contralateral primarily unaffected tissue can be investigated, helping to understand symptoms caused by disturbance in functional networks. Activation studies are useful to demonstrate alternative pathways to compensate for lesions and to test the effect of rehabilitative therapy. Radioisotope studies help to detect neuroinflammation and its effect on extension of tissue damage. Despite the limitations of broad clinical application of radionuclide imaging, this technology has a great impact on research in cerebrovascular diseases and still has various applications in the management of stroke. © 2014 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  12. Radionuclide imaging of osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Palestro, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Radionuclide procedures frequently are performed as part of the diagnostic workup of osteomyelitis. Bone scintigraphy accurately diagnoses osteomyelitis in bones not affected by underlying conditions. Degenerative joint disease, fracture, and orthopedic hardware decrease the specificity of the bone scan, making it less useful in these situations. Gallium-67 scintigraphy was often used as an adjunct to bone scintigraphy for diagnosing osteomyelitis. However, now it is used primarily for spinal infections when (18)F-FDG imaging cannot be performed. Except for the spine, in vitro-labeled leukocyte imaging is the nuclear medicine test of choice for diagnosing complicating osteomyelitis. Leukocytes accumulate in bone marrow as well as in infection. Performing complementary bone marrow imaging with (99m)Tc-sulfur colloid facilitates the differentiation between osteomyelitis and normal marrow and improves test overall accuracy. Antigranulocyte antibodies and antibody fragments, such as (99m)Tc-besilesomab and (99m)Tc-sulesomab, were developed to eliminate the disadvantages associated with in vitro-labeled leukocytes. These agents, however, have their own shortcomings and are not widely available. As biotin is used as a growth factor by certain bacteria, (111)In-biotin is useful to diagnose spinal infections. Radiolabeled synthetic fragments of ubiquicidin, a naturally occurring human antimicrobial peptide that targets bacteria, can differentiate infection from sterile inflammation and may be useful to monitor response to treatment. (18)F-FDG is extremely useful in the diagnostic workup of osteomyelitis. Sensitivity in excess of 95% and specificity ranging from 75%-99% have been reported. (18)F-FDG is the radionuclide test of choice for spinal infection. The test is sensitive, with a high negative predictive value, and reliably differentiates degenerative from infectious vertebral body end-plate abnormalities. Data on the accuracy of (18)F-FDG for diagnosing diabetic pedal

  13. Radionuclide salivary gland imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Mishkin, F.S.

    1981-10-01

    Salivary gland imaging with 99mTc as pertechnetate provides functional information concerning trapping and excretion of the parotid and submandibular glands. Anatomic information gained often adds little to clinical evaluation. On the other hand, functional information may detect subclinical involvement, which correlates well with biopsy of the minor labial salivary glands. Salivary gland abnormalities in systemic disease such as sarcoidosis, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus erythematosus, and other collagenvascular disorders may be detected before they result in the clinical manifestaions of Sjoegren's syndrome. Such glands, after initially demonstrating increased trapping in the acute phase, tend to have decreased trapping and failure to discharge pertechnetate in response to an appropriate physiologic stimulus. Increased uptake of gallium-67 citrate often accompanies these findings. Inflammatory parotitis can be suspected when increased perfusion is evident on radionuclide angiography with any agent. The ability of the salivary gland image to detect and categorize mass lesions, which result in focal areas of diminished activity such as tumors, cysts, and most other masses, is disappointing, while its ability to detect and categorize Warthin's tumor, which concentrates pertechnetate, is much more valuable, although not specific.

  14. ADAPT, a Novel Scaffold Protein-Based Probe for Radionuclide Imaging of Molecular Targets That Are Expressed in Disseminated Cancers.

    PubMed

    Garousi, Javad; Lindbo, Sarah; Nilvebrant, Johan; Åstrand, Mikael; Buijs, Jos; Sandström, Mattias; Honarvar, Hadis; Orlova, Anna; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Hober, Sophia

    2015-10-15

    Small engineered scaffold proteins have attracted attention as probes for radionuclide-based molecular imaging. One class of these imaging probes, termed ABD-Derived Affinity Proteins (ADAPT), has been created using the albumin-binding domain (ABD) of streptococcal protein G as a stable protein scaffold. In this study, we report the development of a clinical lead probe termed ADAPT6 that binds HER2, an oncoprotein overexpressed in many breast cancers that serves as a theranostic biomarker for several approved targeting therapies. Surface-exposed amino acids of ABD were randomized to create a combinatorial library enabling selection of high-affinity binders to various proteins. Furthermore, ABD was engineered to enable rapid purification, to eradicate its binding to albumin, and to enable rapid blood clearance. Incorporation of a unique cysteine allowed site-specific conjugation to a maleimido derivative of a DOTA chelator, enabling radionuclide labeling, ¹¹¹In for SPECT imaging and ⁶⁸Ga for PET imaging. Pharmacologic studies in mice demonstrated that the fully engineered molecule (111)In/⁶⁸Ga-DOTA-(HE)3-ADAPT6 was specifically bound and taken up by HER2-expressing tumors, with a high tumor-to-normal tissue ratio in xenograft models of human cancer. Unbound tracer underwent rapid renal clearance followed by high renal reabsorption. HER2-expressing xenografts were visualized by gamma-camera or PET at 1 hour after infusion. PET experiments demonstrated feasibility for discrimination of xenografts with high or low HER2 expression. Our results offer a preclinical proof of concept for the use of ADAPT probes for noninvasive in vivo imaging.

  15. Folate-receptor-targeted radionuclide imaging agents.

    PubMed

    Ke, Chun-Yen; Mathias, Carla J; Green, Mark A

    2004-04-29

    The cell-membrane folate receptor is a potential molecular target for tumor-selective drug delivery, including delivery of radiolabeled folate-chelate conjugates for diagnostic imaging. This review surveys the growing literature on tumor imaging with radionuclide agents targeted to the folate receptor. Successful folate-receptor targeting has been reported, both in vitro and in vivo, using a variety of radionuclides that are suitable for clinical diagnostic imaging (67Ga, 111In, 99mTc, 66Ga, and 64Cu). While none of these agents has, to date, been demonstrated to have clinical efficacy as a diagnostic tool, existing data indicates that it is feasible to noninvasively assess (at least qualitatively) tissue folate receptor levels by external radionuclide imaging.

  16. Radionuclide Imaging of Cardiovascular Infection.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Fozia Zahir; James, Jackie; Memmott, Matthew J; Arumugam, Parthiban

    2016-02-01

    Owing to expanding clinical indications, cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) are being increasingly used. Despite improved surgical techniques and the use of prophylactic antimicrobial therapy, the rate of CIED-related infection is also increasing. Infection is a potentially serious complication, with clinical manifestations ranging from surgical site infection and local symptoms in the region of the generator pocket to fulminant endocarditis. The utility of radionuclide imaging as a stand-alone noninvasive diagnostic imaging test in patients with suspected endocarditis has been less frequently examined. This article summarizes the recent advances in radionuclide imaging for evaluation of patients with suspected cardiovascular infections.

  17. Cell-SELEX aptamer for highly specific radionuclide molecular imaging of glioblastoma in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xidong; Liang, Huiyu; Tan, Yan; Yuan, Chao; Li, Shuji; Li, Xiaowen; Li, Guiping; Shi, Yusheng; Zhang, Xingmei

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most frequent and aggressive primary adult brain tumor with poor prognosis. Epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) is the most common and highly oncogenic EGFR mutant in GBM. With the aim to generate specific molecular probes able to target EGFRvIII with high affinity, we selected four DNA aptamers (U2, U8, U19 and U31) specifically bound to U87-EGFRvIII cells that over expressed EGFRvIII with Kd values in the nanomole range by a cell-based systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (cell-SELEX) process. U87MG cells were introduced as control cells for counter selection. We further affirmed U2 and U8 identified EGFRvIII on the surface of target cells specifically. Then we radiolabeled U2 with 188Re to serve as a molecular imaging probe and observed 188Re -labeled U2 significantly targeted EGFRvIII over-expressing glioblastoma exnografts in mice. In conclusion, aptamers obtained from whole cell-SELEX strategy have great potential as molecular imaging probes that are probably beneficial to GBM diagnoses.

  18. Cell-SELEX Aptamer for Highly Specific Radionuclide Molecular Imaging of Glioblastoma In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yan; Yuan, Chao; Li, Shuji; Li, Xiaowen; Li, Guiping; Shi, Yusheng; Zhang, Xingmei

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most frequent and aggressive primary adult brain tumor with poor prognosis. Epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) is the most common and highly oncogenic EGFR mutant in GBM. With the aim to generate specific molecular probes able to target EGFRvIII with high affinity, we selected four DNA aptamers (U2, U8, U19 and U31) specifically bound to U87-EGFRvIII cells that over expressed EGFRvIII with Kd values in the nanomole range by a cell-based systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (cell-SELEX) process. U87MG cells were introduced as control cells for counter selection. We further affirmed U2 and U8 identified EGFRvIII on the surface of target cells specifically. Then we radiolabeled U2 with 188Re to serve as a molecular imaging probe and observed 188Re -labeled U2 significantly targeted EGFRvIII over-expressing glioblastoma exnografts in mice. In conclusion, aptamers obtained from whole cell-SELEX strategy have great potential as molecular imaging probes that are probably beneficial to GBM diagnoses. PMID:24603483

  19. Radionuclide imaging in drug development.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Alan C; Frier, Malcolm

    2004-01-01

    Radioactive tracers have made an immense contribution to the understanding of human physiology and pathology. At the start of the 21st century nuclear imaging has emerged as the main metabolic imaging modality which is of growing importance in drug development and clinical pharmacology. Using techniques adapted from those undertaken in clinical radiopharmacy and nuclear medicine facilities drug molecules and carrier systems may be radiolabelled and their release, biodistribution and uptake may be visualized in human subjects. Imaging studies are capable of locating the uptake of specific receptors in the brain, the site of disintegration of a tablet in the GI tract, the penetration of a nebulized solution into the lung and the residence time of an eye drop on the cornea. The technology uses suitable gamma emitting radionuclides such as 99mTc, 111In, 123I and 153Sm, which may be imaged with a gamma camera or positron emitters such as 11C, 13N, 15O and 18F for positron emission tomography (PET). Positron emitters are more appropriate for the direct labeling of drug molecules rather than metals such a 99mTc or 111In. A particular asset of these techniques is that the in vivo distribution and kinetics of a radiolabelled pharmaceutical formulation may be quantified. In this way correlation between the observed pharmacological effects and the precise site of delivery may be made. A powerful feature of nuclear molecular imaging is the evaluation of drug delivery systems in patient groups for whom the treatment is intended. Such studies not only provide data on the nature and characteristics of a product, such as reliability and reproducibility, but can demonstrate proof of principle for the new generation of targeted therapeutics. Imaging data are increasingly being used in product registration dossiers for submission to Regulatory Authorities.

  20. Radionuclide-labeled nanostructures for In Vivo imaging of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhim, Won-Kyu; Kim, Minho; Hartman, Kevin L.; Kang, Keon Wook; Nam, Jwa-Min

    2015-05-01

    Molecular imaging plays an important role in the non-invasive diagnosis and the guiding or monitoring of disease treatment. Different imaging modalities have been developed, and each method possesses unique strengths. While a variety of molecules have been used previously in nuclear imaging, the exceptional properties of nanostructures in recent research enable the deployment of accurate and efficient diagnostic agents using radionuclide-nanostructures. This review focuses on the radionuclide labeling strategies of various nanostructures and their applications for multimodality tumor imaging.

  1. Novel Applications of Radionuclide Imaging in Peripheral Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Stacy, Mitchel R.; Sinusas, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral vascular disease (PVD) is a progressive atherosclerotic disease that leads to stenosis or occlusion of blood vessels supplying the lower extremities. Current diagnostic imaging techniques commonly focus on evaluation of anatomy or blood flow at the macrovascular level and do not permit assessment of the underlying pathophysiology associated with disease progression or treatment response. Molecular imaging with radionuclide-based approaches, such as PET and SPECT, can offer novel insight into PVD by providing non-invasive assessment of biological processes such as angiogenesis and atherosclerosis. This review discusses emerging radionuclide-based imaging approaches that have potential clinical applications in the evaluation of PVD progression and treatment. PMID:26590787

  2. Novel Applications of Radionuclide Imaging in Peripheral Vascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Stacy, Mitchel R; Sinusas, Albert J

    2016-02-01

    Peripheral vascular disease (PVD) is a progressive atherosclerotic disease that leads to stenosis or occlusion of blood vessels supplying the lower extremities. Current diagnostic imaging techniques commonly focus on evaluation of anatomy or blood flow at the macrovascular level and do not permit assessment of the underlying pathophysiology associated with disease progression or treatment response. Molecular imaging with radionuclide-based approaches can offer novel insight into PVD by providing noninvasive assessment of biological processes such as angiogenesis and atherosclerosis. This article discusses emerging radionuclide-based imaging approaches that have potential clinical applications in the evaluation of PVD progression and treatment.

  3. Radionuclide Imaging of Musculoskeletal Infection: A Review.

    PubMed

    Palestro, Christopher J

    2016-09-01

    There are numerous imaging tests for diagnosing musculoskeletal infection. Radiographs are routinely performed, because even when not diagnostic, they provide an anatomic overview of the region of interest that could influence subsequent procedure selection and interpretation. MRI is sensitive and provides superb anatomic detail. Bone scintigraphy accurately diagnoses osteomyelitis in bones not affected by underlying conditions. (67)Ga is used primarily for spondylodiskitis. Although in vitro labeled leukocyte imaging is the radionuclide test of choice for complicating osteomyelitis such as diabetic pedal osteomyelitis and prosthetic joint infection, it is not useful for spondylodiskitis. Antigranulocyte antibodies and antibody fragments have limitations and are not widely available. (111)In-biotin is useful for spondylodiskitis. Radiolabeled synthetic fragments of the antimicrobial peptide ubiquicidin are promising infection-specific agents. (18)F-FDG is the radiopharmaceutical of choice for spondylodiskitis. Its role in diabetic pedal osteomyelitis and prosthetic joint infection is not established. Preliminary data suggest (68)Ga may be useful in musculoskeletal infection. (124)I-fialuridine initially showed promise as an infection-specific radiopharmaceutical, but subsequent investigations were disappointing. The development of PET/CT and SPECT/CT imaging systems, which combine anatomic and functional imaging, has revolutionized diagnostic imaging. These hybrid systems are redefining the diagnostic workup of patients with suspected or known infection and inflammation by improving diagnostic accuracy and influencing patient management. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  4. Nanotargeted Radionuclides for Cancer Nuclear Imaging and Internal Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ting, Gann; Chang, Chih-Hsien; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Lee, Te-Wei

    2010-01-01

    Current progress in nanomedicine has exploited the possibility of designing tumor-targeted nanocarriers being able to deliver radionuclide payloads in a site or molecular selective manner to improve the efficacy and safety of cancer imaging and therapy. Radionuclides of auger electron-, α-, β-, and γ-radiation emitters have been surface-bioconjugated or after-loaded in nanoparticles to improve the efficacy and reduce the toxicity of cancer imaging and therapy in preclinical and clinical studies. This article provides a brief overview of current status of applications, advantages, problems, up-to-date research and development, and future prospects of nanotargeted radionuclides in cancer nuclear imaging and radiotherapy. Passive and active nanotargeting delivery of radionuclides with illustrating examples for tumor imaging and therapy are reviewed and summarized. Research on combing different modes of selective delivery of radionuclides through nanocarriers targeted delivery for tumor imaging and therapy offers the new possibility of large increases in cancer diagnostic efficacy and therapeutic index. However, further efforts and challenges in preclinical and clinical efficacy and toxicity studies are required to translate those advanced technologies to the clinical applications for cancer patients. PMID:20811605

  5. Radionuclide imaging of the urinary tract

    SciTech Connect

    Velchik, M.G.

    1985-11-01

    This article describes the role of nuclear medicine in the evaluation of the genitourinary tract. The technical aspects of radionuclide imaging (radiopharmaceuticals, radiation dosimetry, instrumentation, and method) are briefly presented, and each of the indications for renal scintigraphy--including the evaluation of differential renal function, hypertension, obstruction, renal transplants, masses, trauma, congenital anomalies, vesicoureteral reflux, and infection--are discussed. The relative advantages and disadvantages of radionuclide imaging with respect to alternative radiographic examinations (such as intravenous urography, ultrasonography, CT, angiography, and magnetic resonance imaging) are emphasized wherever applicable. 136 references.

  6. Radionuclide imaging of the urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Velchik, M G

    1985-11-01

    This article describes the role of nuclear medicine in the evaluation of the genitourinary tract. The technical aspects of radionuclide imaging (radiopharmaceuticals, radiation dosimetry, instrumentation, and method) are briefly presented, and each of the indications for renal scintigraphy--including the evaluation of differential renal function, hypertension, obstruction, renal transplants, masses, trauma, congenital anomalies, vesicoureteral reflux, and infection--are discussed. The relative advantages and disadvantages of radionuclide imaging with respect to alternative radiographic examinations (such as intravenous urography, ultrasonography, CT, angiography, and magnetic resonance imaging) are emphasized wherever applicable.

  7. EANM 2012 guidelines for radionuclide imaging of phaeochromocytoma and paraganglioma

    PubMed Central

    Timmers, Henri J.; Hindié, Elif; Guillet, Benjamin A.; Neumann, Hartmut P.; Walz, Martin K.; Opocher, Giuseppe; de Herder, Wouter W.; Boedeker, Carsten C.; de Krijger, Ronald R.; Chiti, Arturo; Al-Nahhas, Adil; Pacak, Karel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Radionuclide imaging of phaeochromocytomas (PCCs) and paragangliomas (PGLs) involves various functional imaging techniques and approaches for accurate diagnosis, staging and tumour characterization. The purpose of the present guidelines is to assist nuclear medicine practitioners in performing, interpreting and reporting the results of the currently available SPECT and PET imaging approaches. These guidelines are intended to present information specifically adapted to European practice. Methods Guidelines from related fields, issued by the European Association of Nuclear Medicine and the Society of Nuclear Medicine, were taken into consideration and are partially integrated within this text. The same was applied to the relevant literature, and the final result was discussed with leading experts involved in the management of patients with PCC/PGL. The information provided should be viewed in the context of local conditions, laws and regulations. Conclusion Although several radionuclide imaging modalities are considered herein, considerable focus is given to PET imaging which offers high sensitivity targeted molecular imaging approaches. PMID:22926712

  8. Advances in radionuclide imaging of cardiac sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Kouranos, V; Wells, A U; Sharma, R; Underwood, S R; Wechalekar, K

    2015-09-01

    Radionuclide imaging for the diagnosis and monitoring of cardiac involvement in sarcoidosis has advanced significantly in recent years. This article is based on published clinical guidelines, literature review and our collective clinical experience. Gallium-67 scintigraphy is among the diagnostic criteria for cardiac involvement in systemic sarcoidosis, and it is strongly associated with response to treatment. However, fluorine-18, 2-fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) is now preferred both for diagnosis and for assessing prognosis. Most data are from small observational studies that are potentially biased. Quantitative imaging to assess changes in disease activity in response to treatment may lead to FDG-PET having an important routine role in managing cardiac sarcoidosis. Larger prospective studies are required, particularly to assess the effectiveness of radionuclide imaging in improving clinical management and outcome. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Imaging Transgene Expression with Radionuclide Imaging Technologies1

    PubMed Central

    Gambhir, SS; Herschman, HR; Cherry, SR; Barrio, JR; Satyamurthy, N; Toyokuni, T; Phelps, ME; Larson, SM; Balaton, J; Finn, R; Sadelain, M; Tjuvajev, J

    2000-01-01

    Abstract A variety of imaging technologies are being investigated as tools for studying gene expression in living subjects. Noninvasive, repetitive and quantitative imaging of gene expression will help both to facilitate human gene therapy trials and to allow for the study of animal models of molecular and cellular therapy. Radionuclide approaches using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) are the most mature of the current imaging technologies and offer many advantages for imaging gene expression compared to optical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based approaches. These advantages include relatively high sensitivity, full quantitative capability (for PET), and the ability to extend small animal assays directly into clinical human applications. We describe a PET scanner (micro PET) designed specifically for studies of small animals. We review “marker/reporter gene” imaging approaches using the herpes simplex type 1 virus thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) and the dopamine type 2 receptor (D2R) genes. We describe and contrast several radiolabeled probes that can be used with the HSV1-tk reporter gene both for SPECT and for PET imaging. We also describe the advantages/disadvantages of each of the assays developed and discuss future animal and human applications. PMID:10933072

  10. Breast-Dedicated Radionuclide Imaging Systems.

    PubMed

    Hsu, David F C; Freese, David L; Levin, Craig S

    2016-02-01

    Breast-dedicated radionuclide imaging systems show promise for increasing clinical sensitivity for breast cancer while minimizing patient dose and cost. We present several breast-dedicated coincidence-photon and single-photon camera designs that have been described in the literature and examine their intrinsic performance, clinical relevance, and impact. Recent tracer development is mentioned, results from recent clinical tests are summarized, and potential areas for improvement are highlighted.

  11. Application of Monte Carlo Methods in Molecular Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann Siantar, C; Descalle, M-A; DeNardo, G L; Nigg, D W

    2002-02-19

    Targeted radionuclide therapy promises to expand the role of radiation beyond the treatment of localized tumors. This novel form of therapy targets metastatic cancers by combining radioactive isotopes with tumor-seeking molecules such as monoclonal antibodies and custom-designed synthetic agents. Ultimately, like conventional radiotherapy, the effectiveness of targeted radionuclide therapy is limited by the maximum dose that can be given to a critical, normal tissue, such as bone marrow, kidneys, and lungs. Because radionuclide therapy relies on biological delivery of radiation, its optimization and characterization are necessarily different than for conventional radiation therapy. We have initiated the development of a new, Monte Carlo transport-based treatment planning system for molecular targeted radiation therapy as part of the MINERVA treatment planning system. This system calculates patient-specific radiation dose estimates using a set of computed tomography scans to describe the 3D patient anatomy, combined with 2D (planar image) and 3D (SPECT, or single photon emission computed tomography) to describe the time-dependent radiation source. The accuracy of such a dose calculation is limited primarily by the accuracy of the initial radiation source distribution, overlaid on the patient's anatomy. This presentation provides an overview of MINERVA functionality for molecular targeted radiation therapy, and describes early validation and implementation results of Monte Carlo simulations.

  12. Radionuclide imaging of tumor angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dijkgraaf, Ingrid; Boerman, Otto C

    2009-12-01

    Angiogenesis is a multistep process regulated by pro- and antiangiogenic factors. In order to grow and metastasize, tumors need a constant supply of oxygen and nutrients. For growth beyond 1-2 mm in size, tumors are dependent on angiogenesis. Inhibition of angiogenesis is a new cancer treatment strategy that is now widely investigated clinically. Researchers have begun to search for objective measures that indicate pharmacologic responses to antiangiogenic drugs. Therefore, there is a great interest in techniques to visualize angiogenesis in growing tumors noninvasively. Several markers have been described that are preferentially expressed on newly formed blood vessels in tumors (alpha(v)beta(3) integrin, vascular endothelial growth factor, and its receptor, prostate-specific membrane antigen) and in the extracellular matrix surrounding newly formed blood vessels (extra domain B of fibronectin, Tenascin-C, matrix metalloproteinases, and Robo-4). Several ligands targeting these markers have been tested as a radiotracer for imaging angiogenesis in tumors. The potential of some of these tracers, such as radiolabeled cyclic RGD peptides and radiolabeled anti-PSMA antibodies, has already been tested in cancer patients, while for markers such as Robo-4, the ligand has not yet been identified. In this review, an overview on the currently used nuclear imaging probes for noninvasive visualization of tumor angiogenesis is given.

  13. Radionuclide imaging of bone marrow disorders

    PubMed Central

    Agool, Ali; Glaudemans, Andor W. J. M.; Boersma, Hendrikus H.; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.; Vellenga, Edo

    2010-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging techniques have been used in the past for visualization the functional activity of the bone marrow compartment. Imaging with radiolabelled compounds may allow different bone marrow disorders to be distinguished. These imaging techniques, almost all of which use radionuclide-labelled tracers, such as 99mTc-nanocolloid, 99mTc-sulphur colloid, 111In-chloride, and radiolabelled white blood cells, have been used in nuclear medicine for several decades. With these techniques three separate compartments can be recognized including the reticuloendothelial system, the erythroid compartment and the myeloid compartment. Recent developments in research and the clinical use of PET tracers have made possible the analysis of additional properties such as cellular metabolism and proliferative activity, using 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT. These tracers may lead to better quantification and targeting of different cell systems in the bone marrow. In this review the imaging of different bone marrow targets with radionuclides including PET tracers in various bone marrow diseases are discussed. PMID:20625724

  14. Radionuclide imaging of bone marrow disorders.

    PubMed

    Agool, Ali; Glaudemans, Andor W J M; Boersma, Hendrikus H; Dierckx, Rudi A J O; Vellenga, Edo; Slart, Riemer H J A

    2011-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging techniques have been used in the past for visualization the functional activity of the bone marrow compartment. Imaging with radiolabelled compounds may allow different bone marrow disorders to be distinguished. These imaging techniques, almost all of which use radionuclide-labelled tracers, such as (99m)Tc-nanocolloid, (99m)Tc-sulphur colloid, (111)In-chloride, and radiolabelled white blood cells, have been used in nuclear medicine for several decades. With these techniques three separate compartments can be recognized including the reticuloendothelial system, the erythroid compartment and the myeloid compartment. Recent developments in research and the clinical use of PET tracers have made possible the analysis of additional properties such as cellular metabolism and proliferative activity, using (18)F-FDG and (18)F-FLT. These tracers may lead to better quantification and targeting of different cell systems in the bone marrow. In this review the imaging of different bone marrow targets with radionuclides including PET tracers in various bone marrow diseases are discussed.

  15. Imaging the inside of a tumour: a review of radionuclide imaging and theranostics targeting intracellular epitopes.

    PubMed

    Cornelissen, Bart

    2014-04-01

    Molecular imaging of tumour tissue focusses mainly on extracellular epitopes such as tumour angiogenesis or signal transduction receptors expressed on the cell membrane. However, most biological processes that define tumour phenotype occur within the cell. In this mini-review, an overview is given of the various techniques to interrogate intracellular events using molecular imaging with radiolabelled compounds. Additionally, similar targeting techniques can be employed for radionuclide therapy using Auger electron emitters, and recent advances in Auger electron therapy are discussed.

  16. Nuclear imaging of molecular processes in cancer.

    PubMed

    Torres Martin de Rosales, Rafael; Arstad, Erik; Blower, Philip J

    2009-09-01

    Molecular imaging using radionuclides has brought about the possibility to image a wide range of molecular processes using radiotracers injected into the body at very low concentrations that should not perturb the processes being studied. Examples include specific peptide receptor expression, angiogenesis, multi drug resistance, hypoxia, glucose metabolism, and many others. This article presents an overview, aimed at the non-specialist in imaging, of the radionuclide imaging technologies positron emission tomography and single photon radionuclide imaging, and some of the molecules labeled with gamma- and positron-emitting radioisotopes that have been, or are being, developed for research and clinical applications in cancer.

  17. Optimizing diagnosis in Parkinson's disease: Radionuclide imaging.

    PubMed

    Arena, Julieta E; Stoessl, A Jon

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) and other disorders characterized by basal ganglia dysfunction are often associated with limited structural imaging changes that might assist in the clinical or research setting. Radionuclide imaging has been used to assess characteristic functional changes. Presynaptic dopaminergic dysfunction in PD can be revealed through the imaging of different steps in the process of dopamine synthesis and storage: L-aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) activity, Vesicular Monoamine Transporter type 2 (VMAT2) binding or its reuptake via the dopamine transporter (DAT). Postsynaptic dopamine dysfunction can also be studied with a variety of different tracers that primarily assess D2-like dopamine receptor availability. The function of other neurotransmitters such as norepinephrine, serotonin and acetylcholine can be imaged as well, giving important information about the underlying pathophysiologic process of PD and its complications. The imaging of metabolic activity and pathologic changes has also provided great advances in the field. Together, these techniques have allowed for a better understanding of PD, may be of aid for differentiating PD from other forms of parkinsonism and will undoubtedly be useful for the establishment of new therapeutic targets.

  18. Radionuclide imaging and treatment of thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiu Juan; Li, XianFeng; Ren, Yuan

    2016-06-01

    Over the past decades, the diagnostic methods and therapeutic tools for thyroid cancer (TC) have been greatly improved. In addition to the classical method of ingestion of radioactive iodine-131 (I131) and subsequent I123 and I124 positron emission tomography (PET) in therapy and examination, I124 PET-based 3-dimensional imaging, Ga68-labeled [1, 4, 7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane-1, 4, 7, 10-tetraacetic acid]-1-NaI(3)-octreotide (DOTANOC) PET/computed tomography (CT), Tc99m tetrofosmin, pre-targeted radioimmunotherapy, and peptide receptor radionuclide therapy have all been used clinically. These novel methods are useful in diagnosis and therapy of TC, but also have unavoidable adverse effects. In this review, we will discuss the development of nuclear medicine in TC examination and treatment.

  19. Radionuclide imaging of soft tissue neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Chew, F.S.; Hudson, T.M.; Enneking, W.F.

    1981-10-01

    Two classes of radiopharmaceuticals may be used for imaging tumors of the musculoskeletal system. The first is comprised of soft tissue or tumor specific agents such as gallium-67, bleomycin, and radionuclide-labeled antibodies, which may be useful for detecting and localizing these tumors. The other class of tracer is comprised of those with avidity for bone. The 99mTc-labeled-phosphate skeletal imaging compounds have been found to localize in a variety of soft tissue lesions, including benign and malignant tumors. In 1972, Enneking began to include bone scans in the preoperative evaluation of soft tissue masses. Later, he and his associates reported that these scans were useful in planning operative treatment of sarcomas by detecting involvement of bone by the tumors. Nearly all malignant soft tissue tumors take up bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals, and bone involvement was indicated in two-thirds of the scans we reviewed. About half of benign soft tissue lesions had normal scans, but the other half showed uptake within the lesion and a few also showed bone involvement. Careful, thorough imaging technique is essential to proper evaluation. Multiple, high-resolution static gamma camera images in different projections are necessary to adequately demonstrate the presence or absence of soft tissue abnormality and to define the precise relationship of the tumor to the adjacent bone.

  20. Somatostatin receptor based imaging and radionuclide therapy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Caiyun; Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Somatostatin (SST) receptors (SSTRs) belong to the typical 7-transmembrane domain family of G-protein-coupled receptors. Five distinct subtypes (termed SSTR1-5) have been identified, with SSTR2 showing the highest affinity for natural SST and synthetic SST analogs. Most neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) have high expression levels of SSTRs, which opens the possibility for tumor imaging and therapy with radiolabeled SST analogs. A number of tracers have been developed for the diagnosis, staging, and treatment of NETs with impressive results, which facilitates the applications of human SSTR subtype 2 (hSSTr2) reporter gene based imaging and therapy in SSTR negative or weakly positive tumors to provide a novel approach for the management of tumors. The hSSTr2 gene can act as not only a reporter gene for in vivo imaging, but also a therapeutic gene for local radionuclide therapy. Even a second therapeutic gene can be transfected into the same tumor cells together with hSSTr2 reporter gene to obtain a synergistic therapeutic effect. However, additional preclinical and especially translational and clinical researches are needed to confirm the value of hSSTr2 reporter gene based imaging and therapy in tumors.

  1. Somatostatin Receptor Based Imaging and Radionuclide Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Somatostatin (SST) receptors (SSTRs) belong to the typical 7-transmembrane domain family of G-protein-coupled receptors. Five distinct subtypes (termed SSTR1-5) have been identified, with SSTR2 showing the highest affinity for natural SST and synthetic SST analogs. Most neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) have high expression levels of SSTRs, which opens the possibility for tumor imaging and therapy with radiolabeled SST analogs. A number of tracers have been developed for the diagnosis, staging, and treatment of NETs with impressive results, which facilitates the applications of human SSTR subtype 2 (hSSTr2) reporter gene based imaging and therapy in SSTR negative or weakly positive tumors to provide a novel approach for the management of tumors. The hSSTr2 gene can act as not only a reporter gene for in vivo imaging, but also a therapeutic gene for local radionuclide therapy. Even a second therapeutic gene can be transfected into the same tumor cells together with hSSTr2 reporter gene to obtain a synergistic therapeutic effect. However, additional preclinical and especially translational and clinical researches are needed to confirm the value of hSSTr2 reporter gene based imaging and therapy in tumors. PMID:25879040

  2. New Trends in Radionuclide Myocardial Perfusion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Guang-Uei; Wang, Yuh-Feng; Su, Hung-Yi; Hsieh, Te-Chun; Ko, Chi-Lun; Yen, Ruoh-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has been widely used clinically as one of the major functional imaging modalities for patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) for decades. Ample evidence has supported the use of MPI as a useful and important tool in the diagnosis, risk stratification and treatment planning for CAD. Although popular in the United States, MPI has become the most frequently used imaging modality among all nuclear medicine tests in Taiwan. However, it should be acknowledged that MPI SPECT does have its limitations. These include false-positive results due to certain artifacts, false-negative due to balanced ischemia, complexity and adverse reaction arising from current pharmacological stressors, time consuming nature of the imaging procedure, no blood flow quantitation and relatively high radiation exposure. The purpose of this article was to review the recent trends in nuclear cardiology, including the utilization of positron emission tomography (PET) for MPI, new stressor, new SPECT camera with higher resolution and higher sensitivity, dynamic SPECT protocol for blood flow quantitation, new software of phase analysis for evaluation of LV dyssynchrony, and measures utilized for reducing radiation exposure of MPI. PMID:27122946

  3. Pitfalls and Limitations of Radionuclide Hepatobiliary and Gastrointestinal System Imaging.

    PubMed

    Low, Chen Sheng; Ahmed, Haseeb; Notghi, Alp

    2015-11-01

    Radionuclide imaging for the hepatobiliary and gastrointestinal system covers a wide range of different indications and imaging techniques. This wide variety allows the different functional assessments of both systems. Therefore, the understanding of each technique and its indications is essential. Cholescintigraphy is a well-established method in the assessment of acute and chronic cholecystitis. It also has a role in the detection of biliary atresia. The assessment of gastrointestinal transit is also well-established in radionuclide imaging for functional investigation of the gastrointestinal tract. Furthermore, detection of acute gastrointestinal bleeding with radionuclide imaging is also standard practice. This article aims to review the pitfalls and limitations in all of these areas.

  4. [Molecular imaging].

    PubMed

    Turetschek, K; Wunderbaldinger, P

    2002-01-01

    The disclosure of the human genoma, the progress in understanding of diseases on molecular and cellular levels, the discovery of new disease-specific targets, and the development of new medications will revolutionize our understanding of the etiology and the treatment of many disease entities. Radiologists are faced with a paradigm shift from unspecific to specific molecular imaging techniques as well as with enormous speed in the development of new methods and should be enrolled actively in this field of medicine.

  5. Basal ganglia infarction demonstrated by radionuclide brain imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, E.E.; Schacht, R.A.; Domstad, P.A.; DeLand, F.H.

    1982-11-01

    Four cases of basal ganglia infarction demonstrated by radionuclide brain imaging are presented. Bilateral basal ganglia infarctions in two patients were probably related to methanol intoxication and meningoencephalitis, and unilateral basal ganglia infarctions in two other patients were presumably due to cerebral atherosclerosis and/or hypertension. Various causes and mechanisms of basal ganglia infarction as well as positive findings of radionuclide brain imaging are briefly reviewed.

  6. Method for image reconstruction of moving radionuclide source distribution

    DOEpatents

    Stolin, Alexander V.; McKisson, John E.; Lee, Seung Joon; Smith, Mark Frederick

    2012-12-18

    A method for image reconstruction of moving radionuclide distributions. Its particular embodiment is for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging of awake animals, though its techniques are general enough to be applied to other moving radionuclide distributions as well. The invention eliminates motion and blurring artifacts for image reconstructions of moving source distributions. This opens new avenues in the area of small animal brain imaging with radiotracers, which can now be performed without the perturbing influences of anesthesia or physical restraint on the biological system.

  7. Radionuclide imaging in the diagnosis of osteoid osteoma.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong Hoon; Pahk, Kisoo; Kim, Sungeun; Lee, Soon Hyuck; Song, Sang Heon; Choe, Jae Gol

    2015-08-01

    Oseteoid osteoma is a well-known type of benign bone-forming tumor, which has previously been diagnosed using plain radiograph imaging. However, diagnosis of osteoid osteoma may be delayed due to ambiguities on plain radiograph images; despite the increasing use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), this type of misdiagnosis is not uncommon. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of radionuclide imaging scans for the diagnosis of osteoid osteoma, as this form of imaging was proposed to be a more sensitive test. The characteristics of 18 cases of osteoid osteoma were analyzed based on diagnostic imaging and the time from initial recognition of symptoms by the patient to diagnosis. Diagnostic modalities included plain radiograph, computed tomography (CT), MRI and radionuclide imaging. Among the 18 patients, 14 patients had unique positive findings in plain radiographs. The mean duration between initial cognition of symptoms to the diagnosis for these patients was 5.2 months (range, 3.8-9.3 months). A total of 4 patients exhibited no radiographic abnormalities in the initial plain radiographs and were diagnosed a mean of 18.5 months (range, 17-20 months) following the onset of symptoms. Overall, radionuclide imaging was performed on 16 patients and all of the cases demonstrated positive findings. In these cases, 28.6% of osteoid osteoma patients with clinical indications revealed no abnormal findings in plain radiographs. Therefore, in situations such as these, radionuclide imaging may be a useful indicator for diagnosis, as these results have demonstrated that it positively identified all cases of osteoid osteoma. In addition, the results of the present study indicated that if the radionuclide imaging was positive, CT scan was a more valuable diagnostic tool, whereas if the radionuclide imaging was negative, MRI should be recommended for the diagnosis of other undiscovered disease entities.

  8. Freeman and Johnson's clinical radionuclide imaging, Volume 3 update

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, L.M.

    1986-01-01

    This work presents the latest developments in nuclear medical imaging. An update of the 3rd edition text/reference published last year, it features coverage of labeled antibodies for diagnosis and treatment, labeled cellular elements, gastrointestinal function, nuclear endocrinology, and single photon emission tomography. Recent technical developments in radionuclide imaging of these specific areas are covered.

  9. Molecular and cellular radiobiological effects of Auger emitting radionuclides

    PubMed Central

    Kassis, Amin I.

    2011-01-01

    Although the general radiobiologic principles underlying external beam therapy and radionuclide therapy are similar, significant differences in the biophysical and radiobiologic effects from the two types of radiation continue to accumulate. Here, I will address the unique features that distinguish the molecular and cellular radiobiological effects of Auger electron-emitting radionuclides consequent to (1) the physical characteristics of the decaying atom and its subcellular localisation, (2) DNA topology and (3) the bystander effect. Based on these experimental findings, I postulate that the ability of track structural simulations as primary tools in modelling DNA damage and cellular survival at the molecular level would be greatly enhanced when these contributions are factored in. PMID:21106639

  10. Oncogene mRNA Imaging with Radionuclide-PNA-Peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Wickstrom, Eric

    2008-03-19

    New cancer gene hybridization probes to carry radionuclides were made. Noninvasive technetium-99m gamma imaging of CCND1 cancer gene activity in human breast cancer tumors in mice was demonstrated, followed by noninvasive technetium-99m imaging of MYC cancer gene activity. Noninvasive imaging of CCND1 cancer gene activity in human breast cancer tumors in mice was demonstrated with a positron-emitting copper-64 probe, followed by noninvasive positron imaging of IRS1 cancer gene activity.

  11. Value of radionuclide imaging techniques in assessing cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, M.R.; Boucher, C.A.

    1980-12-18

    Radionuclide imaging techniques add an important dimension to the diagnosis, classification and management of myocardial disease. The gated blood pool scan provides information allowing determination of the functional type of cardiomyopathy (congestive, restrictive or hypertrophic) as well as evaluation of ventricular performance. Myocardial perfusion imaging with thallium-201 is useful in distinguishing congestive cardiomyopathy from severe coronary artery disease and also in depicting septal abnormalities in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Radionuclide techniques also prove useful in following progression of disease and in evaluating the efficacy of therapeutic interventions.

  12. Software phantom for the synthesis of equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography images.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-de-Jesus, Oscar; Yanez-Suarez, Oscar; Jimenez-Angeles, Luis; Vallejo-Venegas, Enrique

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the novel design of a software phantom for the evaluation of equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography systems. Through singular value decomposition, the data matrix corresponding to an equilibrium image series is decomposed into both spatial and temporal fundamental components that can be parametrized. This parametric model allows for the application of user-controlled conditions related to a desired dynamic behavior. Being invertible, the decomposition is used to regenerate the radionuclide image series, which is then translated into a DICOM ventriculography file that can be read by commercial equipment.

  13. Ascites causing a false-positive radionuclide liver image

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, A.G. Jr.; Christie, J.H.; Mettler, F.A. Jr.; Wicks, J.D.

    1983-02-01

    False-positive radionuclide liver images can occur due to impingement on the liver by adjacent normal anatomic structures or adjacent pathologic masses or fluid collections. A patient with ascites in the anterior subphrenic space had an apparent cold lesion in the left lobe of the liver. Ultrasonography demonstrated a normal left lobe and localized the fluid collection.

  14. Pitfalls and Limitations of Radionuclide Renal Imaging in Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Biassoni, Lorenzo

    2015-09-01

    The article presents common pitfalls encountered in pediatric radionuclide renography, illustrated with clinical cases. It is important to recognize normal variants. A good acquisition technique is essential. Correlation with other imaging techniques, with the clinical background and symptoms, is critical. A clear clinical question is essential: based on the question and knowing the strengths and weaknesses of each test, the test which can best answer the question can be selected. Awareness of the pitfalls of radionuclide renography helps avoid errors of interpretation and allows the selection of the most helpful test for clinical management.

  15. EANM/ESC guidelines for radionuclide imaging of cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Hesse, B; Lindhardt, T B; Acampa, W; Anagnostopoulos, C; Ballinger, J; Bax, J J; Edenbrandt, L; Flotats, A; Germano, G; Stopar, T Gmeiner; Franken, P; Kelion, A; Kjaer, A; Le Guludec, D; Ljungberg, M; Maenhout, A F; Marcassa, C; Marving, J; McKiddie, F; Schaefer, W M; Stegger, L; Underwood, R

    2008-04-01

    Radionuclide imaging of cardiac function represents a number of well-validated techniques for accurate determination of right (RV) and left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF) and LV volumes. These first European guidelines give recommendations for how and when to use first-pass and equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography, gated myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, gated PET, and studies with non-imaging devices for the evaluation of cardiac function. The items covered are presented in 11 sections: clinical indications, radiopharmaceuticals and dosimetry, study acquisition, RV EF, LV EF, LV volumes, LV regional function, LV diastolic function, reports and image display and reference values from the literature of RVEF, LVEF and LV volumes. If specific recommendations given cannot be based on evidence from original, scientific studies, referral is given to "prevailing or general consensus". The guidelines are designed to assist in the practice of referral to, performance, interpretation and reporting of nuclear cardiology studies for the evaluation of cardiac performance.

  16. Complications of renal transplantation: evaluation with US and radionuclide imaging.

    PubMed

    Brown, E D; Chen, M Y; Wolfman, N T; Ott, D J; Watson, N E

    2000-01-01

    Following renal transplantation, patients are often evaluated with ultrasonography (US) or radionuclide imaging to assess renal function and the presence of possible complications. Both modalities are inexpensive, noninvasive, and nonnephrotoxic. A basic understanding of the surgical techniques commonly used for renal transplantation is useful when imaging these patients in order to recognize complications and to direct further imaging or intervention. The most frequent complications of renal transplantation include perinephric fluid collections; decreased renal function; and abnormalities of the vasculature, collecting system, and renal parenchyma. Perinephric fluid collections are common following transplantation, and their clinical significance depends on the type, location, size, and growth of the fluid collection, features that are well-evaluated with US. Causes of diminished renal function include acute tubular necrosis, rejection, and toxicity from medications. Radionuclide imaging is the most useful modality for assessing renal function. Vascular complications of transplantation include occlusion or stenosis of the arterial or venous supply, arteriovenous fistulas, and pseudoaneurysms. Although the standard for evaluating these vascular complications is angiography, US is an excellent noninvasive method for screening. Other transplant complications such as abnormalities of the collecting system and renal parenchyma are well-evaluated with both radionuclide imaging and US.

  17. Interfacial Reactivity of Radionuclides: Emerging Paradigms from Molecular Level Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Felmy, Andrew R.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Zachara, John M.

    2011-08-15

    Over the past few decades use of an increasing array of molecular-level analytical probes has provided new detailed insight into mineral and radionuclide interfacial reactivity in subsurface environments. This capability has not only helped change the way mineral surface reactivity is studied but also how field-scale contaminant migration problems are addressed and ultimately resolved. Here we overview examples of relatively new interfacial reactivity paradigms with implications for future research directions. Specific examples include understanding: the role of site-to-site electron conduction at mineral surfaces and through bulk mineral phases, effects of local chemical environment on the stability of intermediate species in oxidation/reduction reactions, and the importance of mechanistic reaction pathway for defining possible reaction products and thermodynamic driving force. The discussion also includes examples of how detailed molecular/microscopic characterization of field samples has changed the way complex contaminant migration problems were conceptualized and modeled.

  18. Radionuclide imaging of rare congenital renal fusion anomalies.

    PubMed

    Volkan, Bilge; Ceylan, Emel; Kiratli, Pinar Ozgen

    2003-03-01

    Demonstration of a congenital renal anomaly plays an important role in the treatment of patients with renal infection. These patients are prone to infections because of coexisting urinary tract anomalies such as duplicated ureter, ureter opening anomalies, and urinary stasis. Assessment of renal parenchymal damage resulting from acute or chronic renal infection is the primary indication for radionuclide imaging with Tc-99m DMSA. In addition, this technique allows congenital anomalies to be identified. The authors review congenital renal fusion anomalies identified in children through Tc-99m DMSA imaging. They conclude that Tc-99m DMSA imaging can reveal important diagnostic information about various congenital anomalies, including fusion anomalies.

  19. Radionuclide imaging of acute pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Worsley, Daniel F; Alavi, Abass

    2003-10-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a potentially fatal condition for which treatment is highly effective. The diagnosis of PE can be challenging and often requires diagnostic imaging. For many years, chest radiographs and ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) scintigraphy have been the primary imaging modalities used in the evaluation of patients with suspected acute PE. The combination of clinical assessment, plus results of V/Q scintigraphy and a noninvasive venous study of the lower extremities can provide clinicians with the information needed to direct treatment in the majority of patients with suspected PE. More recently, advances in computerized tomography (CT) angiography have allowed for the direct visualization of PE, and this technique has emerged as an important diagnostic test in the evaluation of patients with suspected PE. Proponents suggest that CT angiography should be used as the first line imaging test in patients with suspected PE. Others suggest that V/Q scanning should remain as the first line diagnostic imaging test and that CT angiography should be used in patient's in whom the diagnosis remains uncertain. The combination of CT angiography and CT venography has the potential to provide a single comprehensive study of patients with suspected venous thromboembolism.

  20. Siderophores for molecular imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Petrik, Milos; Zhai, Chuangyan; Haas, Hubertus; Decristoforo, Clemens

    2017-01-01

    This review covers publications on siderophores applied for molecular imaging applications, mainly for radionuclide-based imaging. Siderophores are low molecular weight chelators produced by bacteria and fungi to scavenge essential iron. Research on these molecules has a continuing history over the past 50 years. Many biomedical applications have been developed, most prominently the use of the siderophore desferrioxamine (DFO) to tackle iron overload related diseases. Recent research described the upregulation of siderophore production and transport systems during infection. Replacing iron in siderophores by radionuclides, the most prominent Ga-68 for PET, opens approaches for targeted imaging of infection; the proof of principle has been reported for fungal infections using (68)Ga-triacetylfusarinine C (TAFC). Additionally, fluorescent siderophores and therapeutic conjugates have been described and may be translated to optical imaging and theranostic applications. Siderophores have also been applied as bifunctional chelators, initially DFO as chelator for Ga-67 and more recently for Zr-89 where it has become the standard chelator in Immuno-PET. Improved DFO constructs and bifunctional chelators based on cyclic siderophores have recently been developed for Ga-68 and Zr-89 and show promising properties for radiopharmaceutical development in PET. A huge potential from basic biomedical research on siderophores still awaits to be utilized for clinical and translational imaging.

  1. Gallium-67 radionuclide imaging in acute pyelonephritis

    SciTech Connect

    Mendez, G.; Morillo, G.; Alonso, M.; Isikoff, M.B.

    1980-01-01

    The symptoms and clinical course of patients with acute pyelonephritis are variable; likewise, urinalysis, blood cultures, and excretory urography may be normal or equivocal. The ability of gallium-67 to accumulate in areas of active inflammation was useful in the diagnosis of acute pyelonephritis in 12 cases. A multiplane tomographic scanner was used for imaging four of these patients. Initial experience with this scanner is also discussed.

  2. Gallium-67 radionuclide imaging in acute pyelonephritis

    SciTech Connect

    Mendez, G. Jr.; Morillo, G.; Alonso, M.; Isikoff, M.B.

    1980-01-01

    The symptoms and clinical course of patients with acute pyelonephritis are variable; likewise, urinalysis, blood cultures, and excretory urography may be normal or equivocal. The ability of gallium-67 to accumulate in areas of active inflammation was useful in the diagnosis of acute pyelonephritis in 12 cases. A multiplane tomographic scanner was used for imaging four of these patients. Initial experience with this scanner is also discussed.

  3. Radionuclide bone imaging in the pediatric patient

    SciTech Connect

    Celinski, E.M.; Locko, R.C.

    1983-06-01

    This is the second of a four-part continuing education series on pediatric nuclear medicine. After reading and studying the article, the nuclear medicine technologist will be able to: (1) discuss the uptake mechanism of Tc-99m-labeled phosphate compounds used for bone imaging; (2) compare normal distribution of bone tracer in children and in adults; (3) discuss important technical considerations for performing bone scintigraphy in children; and (4) identify and discuss clinical applications of bone scintigraphy in children. Information about CEU(VOICE) credit appears immediately following this article.

  4. Radionuclide Imaging Technologies for Biological Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, Calvin R.; Reid, Chantal D.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.

    2014-05-14

    The main objective of this project is to develop technologies and experimental techniques for studying the dynamics of physiological responses of plants to changes in their interface with the local environment and to educate a new generation of scientists in an interdisciplinary environment of biology, physics and engineering. Also an important goal is to perform measurements to demonstrate the new data that can be produced and made available to the plant-biology community using the imaging technologies and experimental techniques developed in this project. The study of the plant-environment interface includes a wide range of topics in plant physiology, e.g., the root-soil interface, resource availability, impact of herbivores, influence of microbes on root surface, and responses to toxins in the air and soil. The initial scientific motivation for our work is to improve understanding of the mechanisms for physiological responses to abrupt changes in the local environment, in particular, the responses that result in short-term adjustments in resource (e.g., sugars, nutrients and water) allocations. Data of time-dependent responses of plants to environmental changes are essential in developing mechanistic models for substance intake and resource allocation. Our approach is to use radioisotope tracing techniques to study whole-plant and plant organ (e.g., leaves, stems, roots) dynamical responses to abrupt changes in environmental conditions such as concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere, nutrient availability and lighting. To this aim we are collaborating with the Radiation Detector and Imaging Group at the Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory Facility (JLab) to develop gamma-ray and beta particle imaging systems optimized for plant studies. The radioisotope tracing measurements are conducted at the Phytotron facility at Duke University. The Phytotron is a controlled environment plant research facility with a variety of plant growth chambers. One chamber

  5. Small Animal Radionuclide Imaging With Focusing Gamma-Ray Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, R; Decker, T; Epstein, M; Ziock, K; Pivovaroff, M J; Craig, W W; Jernigan, J G; Barber, W B; Christensen, F E; Funk, T; Hailey, C J; Hasegawa, B H; Taylor, C

    2004-02-27

    Significant effort currently is being devoted to the development of noninvasive imaging systems that allow in vivo assessment of biological and biomolecular interactions in mice and other small animals. While physiological function in small animals can be localized and imaged using conventional radionuclide imaging techniques such as single-photon emission tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET), these techniques inherently are limited to spatial resolutions of 1-2 mm. For this reason, we are developing a small animal radionuclide imaging system (SARIS) using grazing incidence optics to focus gamma-rays emitted by {sup 125}I and other radiopharmaceuticals. We have developed a prototype optic with sufficient accuracy and precision to focus the 27.5 keV photons from {sup 125}I onto a high-resolution imaging detector. Experimental measurements from the prototype have demonstrated that the optic can focus X-rays from a microfocus X-ray tube to a spot having physical dimensions (approximately 1500 microns half-power diameter) consistent with those predicted by theory. Our theoretical and numerical analysis also indicate that an optic can be designed and build that ultimately can achieve 100 {micro}m spatial resolution with sufficient efficiency to perform in vivo single photon emission imaging studies in small animal.

  6. Diagnosis of adrenal tumors with radionuclide imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Beierwaltes, W.H.; Sisson, J.C.; Shapiro, B.

    1984-01-01

    The development of radiolabeled cholesterols in 1969 as precursors of adrenocortical steroid production allowed the first noninvasive imaging of the adrenal cortices. FDA-NDA approval in 1984 should allow routine use of these agents in most hospitals. NP-59 is most commonly used in the diagnosis and management of Cushing syndrome; the second most common use is in the diagnosis of primary aldosteronism. It is also helpful in the differential diagnosis of adrenal and ovarian hyperandrogenism and hirsutism, and is the only noninvasive method of detecting unilateral adrenocortical hypofunction. The newest and most popular use is in the differential diagnosis of asymptomatic masses in the region of the adrenal gland discovered incidentally with CT scan (incidentalomas). In this situation, the NP-59 scan can define whether the tumor is in the adrenal gland and if it is functional or nonfunctional. The authors believe that, in the future, radiolabeled enzyme inhibitors might offer better diagnostic imaging of the adrenal cortex, although these agents will probably not be available for routine use for some time. The development of a radioiodinated guanethidine analog, /sup 131/I-MIBG, has allowed differentiation of normal adrenal medullary function from bilateral adrenal medullary hyperplasia before the development of hypertension or tachycardia, diagnostic increases in plasma or urinary catecholamines, or abnormal CT scans. The search for a pheochromocytoma should begin with /sup 131/I-MIBG scintigraphy. While over 90% of primary pheochromocytomas occur in the abdomen, neither a survey of the abdomen nor the finding of a single tumor should conclude the search.

  7. Sequential radionuclide bone imaging in avascular pediatric hip conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Minikel, J.; Sty, J.; Simons, G.

    1983-05-01

    Radionuclide bone imaging was performed on six patients with various hip conditions. Initial bone images revealed diminished uptake of isotope /sup 99m/Tc-MDP in the capital femoral epiphysis. Following therapeutic intervention, repeat bone scans revealed normal uptake of /sup 99m/Tc-MDP in the capital femoral epiphysis. Subsequent radiographs revealed that avascular necrosis had not occurred. There are two types of avascularity: the potentially reversible, and the irreversible. Attempts should be made toward early recognition of the potentially reversible avascular insult. With early recognition, surgical reconstruction prior to osteophyte death may result in revascularization. If this can be accomplished, avascular necrosis can be avoided.

  8. Radionuclide imaging of the biliary tract

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, R.E.; Daly, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    Cholescintigraphy with technetium-labeled biliary agents has great value in evaluation of the patient with suspected acute cholecystitis. Visualization of the gall bladder virtually excludes acute cholecystitis and obstruction of the cystic duct. Nonvisualization of the gall bladder, however, is not specific for acute cholecystitis and may also occur in some patients with chronic cholecystitis or pancreatitis. Interpretation of gall bladder nonvisualization, therefore, must be correlated with the clinical presentation. Biliary tract imaging is also useful in evaluation of some focal abnormalities within the liver, neonatal jaundice, detection of bile leaks or bile reflux, and biliary-enteric shunts. The role of technetium-labeled biliary agents in the evaluation of patients with jaundice is less clear. Excretion of tracer into the gut excludes complete biliary tract obstruction, but the test may be nonconclusive at higher serum bilirubin levels. If persistent common bile duct activity is observed with delayed excretion into the gut, the diagnosis of partial obstruction may be made, but this procedure will be inconclusive if the common bile duct is not visualized and/or significant hepatocellular disease is present. Ultrasonography and abdominal CT are the preferred tools for the diagnosis of biliary tract obstruction at present, but newer biliary tract agents which achieve better hepatic extraction and greater bile concentration at high serum bilirubin levels may improve the diagnostic efficacy of cholescintigraphy.

  9. Radionuclide imaging of liposomal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    van der Geest, Tessa; Laverman, Peter; Metselaar, Josbert M; Storm, Gert; Boerman, Otto C

    2016-09-01

    Ever since their discovery, liposomes have been radiolabeled to monitor their fate in vivo. Despite extensive preclinical studies, only a limited number of radiolabeled liposomal formulations have been examined in patients. Since they can play a crucial role in patient management, it is of importance to enable translation of radiolabeled liposomes into the clinic. Liposomes have demonstrated substantial advantages as drug delivery systems and can be efficiently radiolabeled. Potentially, radiolabeled drug-loaded liposomes form an elegant theranostic system, which can be tracked in vivo using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) or positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. In this review, we discuss important aspects of liposomal research with a focus on the use of radiolabeled liposomes and their potential role in drug delivery and monitoring therapeutic effects. Radiolabeled drug-loaded liposomes have been poorly investigated in patients and no radiolabeled liposomes have been approved for use in clinical practice. Evaluation of the risks, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and toxicity is necessary to meet pharmaceutical and commercial requirements. It remains to be demonstrated whether the results found in animal studies translate to humans before radiolabeled liposomes can be implemented into clinical practice.

  10. In vivo Molecular Imaging and Radionuclide (131I) Therapy of Human Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Cells Transfected with a Lentivirus Expressing Sodium Iodide Symporter

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Shuo; Zhang, Min; Guo, Rui; Miao, Ying; Hu, Jiajia; Xi, Yun; Li, Biao

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Despite recent improvements in the survival rates for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), novel treatment strategies are required to improve distant metastasis-free survival. The sodium iodine symporter (NIS) gene has been applied for in vivo imaging and cancer therapy. In this study, we examined the potential of NIS gene therapy as a therapeutic approach in NPC by performing non-invasive imaging using 125I and 131I therapy in vivo. Methods We constructed a lentiviral vector expressing NIS and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) under the control of the human elongation factor-1α (EF1α) promoter, and stably transfected the vector into CNE-2Z NPC cells to create CNE-2Z-NIS cells. CNE-2Z and CNE-2Z-NIS tumor xenografts were established in nude mice; 125I uptake, accumulation and efflux were measured using micro-SPECT/CT imaging; the therapeutic effects of treatment with 131I were assessed over 25 days by measuring tumor volume and immunohistochemical staining of the excised tumors. Results qPCR, immunofluorescence and Western blotting confirmed that CNE-2Z-NIS cells expressed high levels of NIS mRNA and protein. CNE-2Z-NIS cells and xenografts took up and accumulated significantly more 125I than CNE-2Z cells and xenografts. In vitro, 131I significantly reduced the clonogenic survival of CNE-2Z-NIS cells. In vivo, 131I effectively inhibited the growth of CNE-2Z-NIS xenografts. At the end of 131I therapy, CNE-2Z-NIS xenograft tumor cells expressed higher levels of NIS and caspase-3 and lower levels of Ki-67. Conclusion Lentiviruses effectively delivered and mediated long-lasting expression of NIS in CNE-2Z cells which enabled uptake and accumulation of radioisotopes and provided a significant therapeutic effect in an in vivo model of NPC. NIS-mediated radioiodine treatment merits further investigation as a potentially effective, low toxicity therapeutic strategy for NPC. PMID:25621996

  11. Differential diagnostic features of the radionuclide scrotal image.

    PubMed

    Mishkin, F S

    1977-01-01

    Differential diagnosis of scrotal lesions is aided by correlating radionuclide images with clinical findings. Subacute torsion is associated with peripheral hyperemia and can be mistaken for an inflammatory process; however, in a review of 128 studies, torsion and orchiectomy were the only processes encountered which had a center truly devoid of activity on the tissue phase compared to the normal side. Other lesions such as acute inflammation, abscess, hematoma, and hemorrhagic tumor may superficially appear to lack central activity but invariably contain at least as much activity when compared to the normal side.

  12. Radionuclide-Based Cancer Imaging Targeting the Carcinoembryonic Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Hao; Sun, Jiangtao; Cai, Weibo

    2008-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), highly expressed in many cancer types, is an important target for cancer diagnosis and therapy. Radionuclide-based imaging techniques (gamma camera, single photon emission computed tomography [SPECT] and positron emission tomography [PET]) have been extensively explored for CEA-targeted cancer imaging both preclinically and clinically. Briefly, these studies can be divided into three major categories: antibody-based, antibody fragment-based and pretargeted imaging. Radiolabeled anti-CEA antibodies, reported the earliest among the three categories, typically gave suboptimal tumor contrast due to the prolonged circulation life time of intact antibodies. Subsequently, a number of engineered anti-CEA antibody fragments (e.g. Fab’, scFv, minibody, diabody and scFv-Fc) have been labeled with a variety of radioisotopes for CEA imaging, many of which have entered clinical investigation. CEA-Scan (a 99mTc-labeled anti-CEA Fab’ fragment) has already been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for cancer imaging. Meanwhile, pretargeting strategies have also been developed for CEA imaging which can give much better tumor contrast than the other two methods, if the system is designed properly. In this review article, we will summarize the current state-of-the-art of radionuclide-based cancer imaging targeting CEA. Generally, isotopes with short half-lives (e.g. 18F and 99mTc) are more suitable for labeling small engineered antibody fragments while the isotopes with longer half-lives (e.g. 123I and 111In) are needed for antibody labeling to match its relatively long circulation half-life. With further improvement in tumor targeting efficacy and radiolabeling strategies, novel CEA-targeted agents may play an important role in cancer patient management, paving the way to “personalized medicine”. PMID:19578524

  13. Radionuclide imaging in the evaluation of osteomyelitis and septic arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, E.E.; Haynie, T.P.; Podoloff, D.A.; Lowry, P.A.; Harle, T.S. )

    1989-01-01

    Despite controversy over its exact role, radionuclide imaging plays an important role in the evaluation of patients suspected of having osteomyelitis. The differentiation between osteomyelitis and cellulitis is best accomplished by using a three-phase technique using Tc-99m methylene diphosphonate (MDP). Frequently, it is necessary to obtain multiple projections and magnification views to adequately assess suspected areas. It is recommended that a Ga-67 or In-111 leukocyte scan be performed in those cases where osteomyelitis is strongly suspected clinically and the routine bone scan is equivocal or normal. Repeated bone scan after 48 to 72 h may demonstrate increased radioactivity in the case of early osteomyelitis with the initial photon-deficient lesion. In-111 leukocyte imaging is useful for the evaluation of suspected osteomyelitis complicating recent fracture or operation, but must be used in conjunction with clinical and radiographic correlation. The recognition of certain imaging patterns appears helpful to separate osteomyelitis from septic arthritis or cellulitis. 83 references.

  14. Noninvasive molecular imaging using reporter genes.

    PubMed

    Brader, Peter; Serganova, Inna; Blasberg, Ronald G

    2013-02-01

    Noninvasive reporter gene imaging is a component of molecular imaging. Reporter imaging can provide noninvasive assessments of endogenous biologic processes in living subjects and can be performed using different imaging modalities. This review will focus on radionuclide-based reporter gene imaging as developed and applied in preclinical and clinical studies. Examples of different reporter systems are presented, with a focus on human reporter systems. Selected applications are discussed, including adoptive cell therapies, gene and oncoviral therapies, oncogenesis, signal pathway monitoring, and imaging drug treatment. Molecular imaging, and noninvasive reporter gene imaging in particular, are making important contributions to our understanding of disease development, progression, and treatment in our current era of molecular medicine and individualized patient care.

  15. Three-phase radionuclide bone imaging in sports medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Rupani, H.D.; Holder, L.E.; Espinola, D.A.; Engin, S.I.

    1985-07-01

    Three-phase radionuclide bone (TPB) imaging was performed on 238 patients with sports-related injuries. A wide variety of lesions was encountered, but the most frequent lesions seen were stress fractures of the lower part of the leg at the junction of the middle and distal thirds of the posterior tibial cortex (42 of 79 lesions). There were no differences in the type, location, or distribution of lesions between males and females or between competitive and noncompetitive athletes. In 110 cases, bone stress lesions were often diagnosed when radiographs were normal, whereas subacute or chronic soft-tissue abnormalities had few specific scintigraphic features. TPB imaging provides significant early diagnostic information about bone stress lesions. Normal examination results (53 cases) exclude underlying osseous pathologic conditions.

  16. The Role of Radionuclide Imaging in Epilepsy, Part 1: Sporadic Temporal and Extratemporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ajay; Chugani, Harry T

    2017-03-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common yet diverse neurologic disorders, affecting almost 1%-2% of the population. Presently, radionuclide imaging such as PET and SPECT is not used in the primary diagnosis or evaluation of recent-onset epilepsy. However, it can play a unique and important role in certain specific situations, such as in noninvasive presurgical localization of epileptogenic brain regions in intractable-seizure patients being considered for epilepsy surgery. Radionuclide imaging can be particularly useful if MR imaging is either negative for lesions or shows several lesions of which only 1 or 2 are suspected to be epileptogenic and if electroencephalogram changes are equivocal or discordant with the structural imaging. Similarly, PET and SPECT can also be useful for evaluating the functional integrity of the rest of the brain and may provide useful information on the possible pathogenesis of the neurocognitive and behavioral abnormalities frequently observed in these patients. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  17. The role of radionuclide imaging in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Vinay; Ching, Gilbert; Heller, Gary V

    2013-12-01

    The incidence of heart failure (HF) is increasing and it remains the only area in cardiovascular disease wherein hospitalization rates and mortalities have worsened in the past 25 years. This review is provided to assess the role of radionuclide imaging in HF. The focus is on three aspects: the value of nuclear imaging to distinguish ischemic from non-ischemic etiologies; risk stratification of patients with HF with evaluation of candidates for specific treatment strategies; and the role of cardiac neuronal imaging in patients with HF. Distinguishing ischemic from non-ischemic cardiomyopathy is important because patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy can potentially have dramatic improvement with revascularization. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has excellent reported sensitivity and negative predictive value in the detection of coronary artery disease in HF patients. SPECT imaging is also useful in establishing treatment strategies in patients with HF, including those with new onset CHF. Cardiac neuronal imaging of mIBG is particularly helpful in risk stratification of patients with HF. The modality can be used to monitor the response to therapy as dysfunctional mIBG uptake may show improvement with pharmacological treatment.

  18. Ultrahigh-resolution Cerenkov-light imaging system for positron radionuclides: potential applications and limitations.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Watabe, Tadashi; Ikeda, Hayato; Kanai, Yasukazu; Watabe, Hiroshi; Ogata, Yoshimune; Kato, Katsuhiko; Hatazawa, Jun

    2014-12-01

    Cerenkov-light imaging provides inherently high resolution because the light is emitted near the positron radionuclide. However, the magnitude for the high spatial resolution of Cerenkov-light imaging is unclear. Its potential molecular imaging applications also remain unclear. We developed an ultrahigh-resolution Cerenkov-light imaging system, measured its spatial resolution, and explored its applications to molecular imaging research. Our Cerenkov-light imaging system consists of a high-sensitivity charged-coupled device camera (Hamamatsu Photonics ORCA2-ER) and a bright lens (Xenon 0.95/25). An extension ring was inserted between them to magnify the subject. A ~100-μm-diameter (22)Na point source was made and imaged by the system. For applications of Cerenkov-light imaging, we conducted (18)F-FDG administered in vivo, ex vivo whole brain, and sliced brain imaging of rats. We obtained spatial resolution of ~220 μm for a (22)Na point source with our developed imaging system. The (18)F-FDG rat head images showed high light intensity in the eyes for the Cerenkov-light images, although there was no accumulation in these parts in the PET images. The sliced rat brain showed much higher spatial resolution for the Cerenkov-light images compared with CdWO4 scintillator-based autoradiography, although some contrast decrease was observed for them. Even though the Cerenkov-light images showed ultrahigh resolution of ~220 μm, their distribution and contrast were sometimes different from the actual positron accumulation in the subjects. Care must be taken when evaluating positron distribution from Cerenkov-light images. However, the ultrahigh resolution of Cerenkov-light imaging will be useful for transparent subjects including phantom studies.

  19. Radionuclide Imaging of Neurohormonal System of the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xinyu; Werner, Rudolf A.; Javadi, Mehrbod S.; Maya, Yoshifumi; Decker, Michael; Lapa, Constantin; Herrmann, Ken; Higuchi, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure is one of the growing causes of death especially in developed countries due to longer life expectancy. Although many pharmacological and instrumental therapeutic approaches have been introduced for prevention and treatment of heart failure, there are still limitations and challenges. Nuclear cardiology has experienced rapid growth in the last few decades, in particular the application of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET), which allow non-invasive functional assessment of cardiac condition including neurohormonal systems involved in heart failure; its application has dramatically improved the capacity for fundamental research and clinical diagnosis. In this article, we review the current status of applying radionuclide technology in non-invasive imaging of neurohormonal system in the heart, especially focusing on the tracers that are currently available. A short discussion about disadvantages and perspectives is also included. PMID:25825596

  20. Radionuclide imaging of neurohormonal system of the heart.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinyu; Werner, Rudolf A; Javadi, Mehrbod S; Maya, Yoshifumi; Decker, Michael; Lapa, Constantin; Herrmann, Ken; Higuchi, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure is one of the growing causes of death especially in developed countries due to longer life expectancy. Although many pharmacological and instrumental therapeutic approaches have been introduced for prevention and treatment of heart failure, there are still limitations and challenges. Nuclear cardiology has experienced rapid growth in the last few decades, in particular the application of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET), which allow non-invasive functional assessment of cardiac condition including neurohormonal systems involved in heart failure; its application has dramatically improved the capacity for fundamental research and clinical diagnosis. In this article, we review the current status of applying radionuclide technology in non-invasive imaging of neurohormonal system in the heart, especially focusing on the tracers that are currently available. A short discussion about disadvantages and perspectives is also included.

  1. Renal radionuclide imaging, an evergreen forty years old.

    PubMed

    De Palma, D; Santos, A I

    2014-07-01

    Urinary tract congenital abnormalities (UCA) and febrile infections (UTI) are, respectively, 2 of the commonest congenital and acquired health problems in childhood. In both, radionuclide imaging still represent a cornerstone of diagnostic imaging, although the involved techniques are more or less the same from the early '80 s. During the last 2 decades, published papers focused on a deep revision about the optimal use and usefulness of such imaging tools in affected children, with the aim of reducing invasiveness, radiation burden and costs without losing efficacy. This approach leads to different results. In UCA, no consensus for a diagnostic algorithm was up to now reached, whilst, about febrile UTIs, guidelines were published in 2007 by the UK's National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) and by the European Society of Paediatric Radiology (ESPR), in 2011 by the American Academy of Paediatrics (AAP), and in 2012 by the Italian Society of Paediatric Nephrology (SINP). Nevertheless, new data continuously arise and the scientific debate always revives. Every imaging tool now available has its own strengths and weaknesses, and so all published guidelines. All this body of knowledge must be critically analysed for obtaining a complete, up-to-date and flexible overview about these "always hot" topics.

  2. Clinical applications of radionuclide imaging in the evaluation and management of patients with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Partington, Sara L; Valente, Anne Marie; Landzberg, Michael; Grant, Frederick; Di Carli, Marcelo F; Dorbala, Sharmila

    2016-02-01

    Non-invasive testing of children with congenital heart disease (CHD) began in the 1950s with the introduction of radionuclide studies to assess shunt fractions, pulmonary blood flow, and ventricular contractile function. Echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging have since replaced radionuclide imaging in many of these roles. Concurrently, percutaneous and surgical repairs of complex CHD evolved, creating new roles for radionuclide imaging. In this paper on applications of radionuclide imaging in CHD, we review the multiple mechanisms for myocardial ischemia in CHD. We critically compare optimal radionuclide imaging techniques to other imaging modalities for assessing ischemia in CHD. We present the current role of nuclear imaging for assessing viability and pulmonary blood flow. We highlight the value added by advances in dedicated cardiac SPECT scanners, novel reconstruction software, and cardiac PET in performing low-dose radionuclide imaging in CHD. Finally, we discuss the emerging clinical indications for radionuclide imaging in CHD including coronary flow reserve assessment and evaluation of cardiovascular prosthesis and device infections.

  3. Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor (uPAR) Targeted Nuclear Imaging and Radionuclide Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dan; Liu, Shuanglong; Shan, Hong; Conti, Peter; Li, Zibo

    2013-01-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein. Besides regulating proteolysis, uPAR could also activate many intracellular signaling pathways that promote cell motility, invasion, proliferation, and survival through cooperating with transmembrane receptors. uPAR is overexpressed across a variety of tumors and is associated with cancer invasion and metastasis. In order to meet the demand for a rapid development and potential clinical application of anti-cancer therapy based on uPA/uPAR system, it is desirable to develop non-invasive imaging methods to visualize and quantify uPAR expression in vivo. In this review, we will discuss recent advances in the development of uPAR-targeted nuclear imaging and radionuclide therapy agents. The successful development of molecular imaging probes to visualize uPAR expression in vivo would not only assist preclinical researches on uPAR function, but also eventually impact patient management. PMID:23843898

  4. Imaging regional renal function parameters using radionuclide tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Yi

    A compartmental model is given for evaluating kidney function accurately and noninvasively. This model is cast into a parallel multi-compartment structure and each pixel region (picture element) of kidneys is considered as a single kidney compartment. The loss of radionuclide tracers from the blood to the kidney and from the kidney to the bladder are modelled in great detail. Both the uptake function and the excretion function of the kidneys can be evaluated pixel by pixel, and regional diagnostic information on renal function is obtained. Gamma Camera image data are required by this model and a screening test based renal function measurement is provided. The regional blood background is subtracted from the kidney region of interest (ROI) and the kidney regional rate constants are estimated analytically using the Kuhn-Pucker multiplier method in convex programming by considering the input/output behavior of the kidney compartments. The detailed physiological model of the peripheral compartments of the system, which is not available for most radionuclide tracers, is not required in the determination of the kidney regional rate constants and the regional blood background factors within the kidney ROI. Moreover, the statistical significance of measurements is considered to assure the improved statistical properties of the estimated kidney rate constants. The relations between various renal function parameters and the kidney rate constants are established. Multiple renal function measurements can be found from the renal compartmental model. The blood radioactivity curve and the regional (or total) radiorenogram determining the regional (or total) summed behavior of the kidneys are obtained analytically with the consideration of the statistical significance of measurements using convex programming methods for a single peripheral compartment system. In addition, a new technique for the determination of 'initial conditions' in both the blood compartment and the kidney

  5. Comparison of CT scanning and radionuclide imaging in liver disease

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, M.L.; Esposito, F.S.

    1980-01-01

    Early experience with body CT suggested its usefulness in many diagnostic problems; jaundice, renal and pancreatic masses, and in the evaluation of relatively inaccessible parts of the body, such as the retroperitineum, mediastinum, and pelvis. Investigation of hepatic disease by CT was not unexpectedly compared to radionuclide liver scanning, the major preexisting modality for imaging the liver. In the evaluation of the jaundiced patient, CT rapidly assumed a major role, providing more specific information about the liver than the RN liver scan, as well as demonstrating adjacent organs. CT differentiate obstructive from non-obstructive jaundice. With respect to mass lesions of the liver, the RN liver scan is more sensitive than CT but less specific. The abnormalities on an isotope image of the liver consist of normal variants in configuration, extrinsic compression by adjacent structures, cysts, hemangiomata, abscesses, and neoplasms. These suspected lesions may then be better delineated by the CT image, and a more precise diagnosis made. The physiologic information provided by the RN liver scan is an added facet which is helpful in the patient with diffuse hepatic disease. The CT image will be normal in many of these patients, however, hemochromatosis and fatty infiltration lend themselves especially to density evaluation by CT. The evaluation of lymphoma is more thorough with CT. Structures other than the liver, such as lymph nodes, are visualized. Gallium, however, provides additional isotopic information in patients with lymphoma, and in addition, is known to be useful in the investigation of a febrile patient with an abscess. Newer isotopic agents expand hepatic imaging in other directions, visualizing the biliary tree and evaluating the jaundiced patient.

  6. Correlation of diagnostic ultrasound and radionuclide imaging in scrotal disease

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.C.P.; Holder, L.E.; Kaplan, G.N.

    1984-01-01

    A retrospective study was performed to evaluate the usefulness of scrotal ultrasound imaging (SU) and radionuclide scrotal imaging (RSI) in 43 patients (pts), age: 16-75. Twenty-two of them complained of scrotal pain; 18 had a scrotal mass; and 4 had a history of trauma. The final diagnoses were conformed by surgery (n = 21) and long-term follow-up (n = 22) and included 4 late phase and 1 early testicular torsion (TT), 11 acute epididymitis (AE), 4 subacute epididymitis (SE), 5 malignant tumors, 3 testicular atrophy, 2 intratesticular hematomas, 10 hydroceles or other cystic lesions, and miscellaneous. In pts with scrotal pain, 3/4 with late phase TT were correctly diagnosed, while one pt with early TT and 11/15 with AE or SE were not diagnosed by SU. All of them were correctly diagnosed with RSI except one with scrotal cyst. SU was able to separate cystic masses (n = 10) from solid masses (n = 6), but cannot separate malignant from benign lesions. SU was excellent in detecting 19 hydroceles and 2 intratesticular hematomas, while 3 lesions < 1 cm. were not seen in RSI. The authors concluded that SU is useful in pts with scrotal mass to separate solid from cystic lesions. However, SU is unable to differentiate the acute epididymitis from early testicular torsion. In pts with acute scrotal pain, SU is not helpful and RSI should still be the first study performed.

  7. Molecular Imaging of the Kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, Zsolt; Alachkar, Nada; Xia, Jinsong; Mathews, William B.; Rabb, Hamid

    2010-01-01

    Radionuclide imaging of the kidneys with gamma cameras involves the use of labeled molecules seeking functionally critical molecular mechanisms in order to detect the pathophysiology of the diseased kidneys and achieve an early, sensitive and accurate diagnosis. The most recent imaging technology, PET, permits quantitative imaging of the kidney at a spatial resolution appropriate for the organ. H215O, 82RbCl, and [64Cu] ETS are the most important radiopharmaceuticals for measuring renal blood flow. The renin angiotensin system is the most important regulator of renal blood flow; this role is being interrogated by detecting angiotensin receptor subtype AT1R using in vivo PET imaging. Membrane organic anion transporters are important for the function of the tubular epithelium; therefore, Tc-99m MAG3 as well as some novel radiopharmaceuticals such as copper-64 labeled mono oxo-tetraazamacrocyclic ligands have been utilized for molecular renal imaging. Additionally, other radioligands that interact with the organic cation transporters or peptide transporters have developed. Focusing on early detection of kidney injury at the molecular level is an evolving field of great significance. Potential imaging targets are the kidney injury molecule- 1 (KIM-1) that is highly expressed in kidney injury and renal cancer but not in normal kidneys. While pelvic clearance, in addition to parenchymal transport, is an important measure in obstructive nephropathy, techniques that focus on upregulated molecules in response to tissue stress resulted from obstruction will be of great implication. Monocyte chemoattractant protein -1 (MCP-1) is a well-suited molecule in this case. The greatest advances in molecular imaging of the kidneys have been recently achieved in detecting renal cancer. In addition to the ubiquitous [18F]FDG, other radioligands such as [11C]acetate and anti-[18F]FACBC have emerged. Radioimmuno-imaging with [124I]G250 could lead to radioimmunotherapy for renal cancer

  8. Impact of functional genomics and proteomics on radionuclide imaging.

    PubMed

    Haberkorn, Uwe; Altmann, Annette; Mier, Walter; Eisenhut, Michael

    2004-01-01

    The assessment of gene function following the completion of human genome sequencing may be performed using radionuclide imaging procedures. These procedures are needed for the evaluation of genetically manipulated animals or newly designed biomolecules, which requires a thorough understanding of physiology, biochemistry, and pharmacology. The experimental approaches will involve many new technologies, including in vivo imaging with single photon emission computed tomography and positron emission tomography. Nuclear medicine procedures may be applied for the determination of gene function and regulation using established and new tracers, or using in vivo reporter genes, such as genes encoding enzymes, receptors, antigens, or transporters. Visualization of in vivo reporter gene expression can be performed using radiolabeled substrates, antibodies, or ligands. Combinations of specific promoters and in vivo reporter genes may deliver information about the regulation of the corresponding genes. Furthermore, protein-protein interactions and activation of signal transduction pathways may be visualized noninvasively. The role of radiolabeled antisense molecules for the analysis of messenger ribonucleic acid (RNA) content has to be investigated. However, possible applications are therapeutic intervention using triplex oligonucleotides with therapeutic isotopes, which can be brought near to specific deoxyribonucleic acid sequences to induce deoxyribonucleic acid strand breaks at selected loci. Imaging of labeled siRNA makes sense if these are used for therapeutic purposes to assess the delivery of these new drugs to their target tissue. Pharmacogenomics will identify new surrogate markers for therapy monitoring, which may represent potential new tracers for imaging. Drug distribution studies for new therapeutic biomolecules are needed at least during preclinical stages of drug development. New treatment modalities, such as gene therapy with suicide genes, will need

  9. [Radionuclide imaging of neurendocrine tumors: biological basis and diagnostic results].

    PubMed

    Genovese, Eugenio Annibale; Mallardo, Vania; Rossi, Michele; Vaccaro, Andrea; Raucci, Antonio; Della Vecchi, Nicoletta; Romano, Giovanna; Califano, Teresa; Schillirò, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Many radiopharmaceuticals have been successfully used in nuclear medicine to detect neuroendocrine tumors, and many of them are based on a specific mechanism of uptake, while others are non-specific probes. This "review" focuses on the clinical applications of metaiodobenzylguanidine, (111)In-pentreotide and positron emission tomography (PET) tracers. New avances in diagnostic imaging will be discussed. Molecular imaging serves these diagnostic functions and provides powerful means for non-invasively detecting disease.

  10. Prosthetic joint infections: radionuclide state-of-the-art imaging.

    PubMed

    Gemmel, Filip; Van den Wyngaert, Hans; Love, Charito; Welling, M M; Gemmel, Paul; Palestro, Christopher J

    2012-05-01

    Prosthetic joint replacement surgery is performed with increasing frequency. Overall the incidence of prosthetic joint infection (PJI) and subsequently prosthesis revision failure is estimated to be between 1 and 3%. Differentiating infection from aseptic mechanical loosening, which is the most common cause of prosthetic failure, is especially important because of different types of therapeutic management. Despite a thorough patient history, physical examination, multiple diagnostic tests and complex algorithms, differentiating PJI from aseptic loosening remains challenging. Among imaging modalities, radiographs are neither sensitive nor specific and cross-sectional imaging techniques, such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, are limited by hardware-induced artefacts. Radionuclide imaging reflects functional rather than anatomical changes and is not hampered by the presence of a metallic joint prosthesis. As a result scintigraphy is currently the modality of choice in the investigation of suspected PJI. Unfortunately, there is no true consensus about the gold standard technique since there are several drawbacks and limitations inherent to each modality. Bone scintigraphy (BS) is sensitive for identifying the failed joint replacement, but cannot differentiate between infection and aseptic loosening. Combined bone/gallium scintigraphy (BS/GS) offers modest improvement over BS alone for diagnosing PJI. However, due to a number of drawbacks, BS/GS has generally been superseded by other techniques but it still may have a role in neutropenic patients. Radiolabelled leucocyte scintigraphy remains the gold standard technique for diagnosing neutrophil-mediated processes. It seems to be that combined in vitro labelled leucocyte/bone marrow scintigraphy (LS/BMS), with an accuracy of about 90%, is currently the imaging modality of choice for diagnosing PJI. There are, however, significant limitations using in vitro labelled leucocytes and considerable effort

  11. Applications of Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Galbán, Craig; Galbán, Stefanie; Van Dort, Marcian; Luker, Gary D.; Bhojani, Mahaveer S.; Rehemtualla, Alnawaz; Ross, Brian D.

    2015-01-01

    Today molecular imaging technologies play a central role in clinical oncology. The use of imaging techniques in early cancer detection, treatment response and new therapy development is steadily growing and has already significantly impacted clinical management of cancer. In this chapter we will overview three different molecular imaging technologies used for the understanding of disease biomarkers, drug development, or monitoring therapeutic outcome. They are (1) optical imaging (bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging) (2) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and (3) nuclear imaging (e.g, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET)). We will review the use of molecular reporters of biological processes (e.g. apoptosis and protein kinase activity) for high throughput drug screening and new cancer therapies, diffusion MRI as a biomarker for early treatment response and PET and SPECT radioligands in oncology. PMID:21075334

  12. Comparative Evaluation of Affibody Molecules for Radionuclide Imaging of in Vivo Expression of Carbonic Anhydrase IX.

    PubMed

    Garousi, Javad; Honarvar, Hadis; Andersson, Ken G; Mitran, Bogdan; Orlova, Anna; Buijs, Jos; Löfblom, John; Frejd, Fredrik Y; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2016-11-07

    Overexpression of the enzyme carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) is documented for chronically hypoxic malignant tumors as well as for normoxic renal cell carcinoma. Radionuclide molecular imaging of CAIX would be useful for detection of hypoxic areas in malignant tumors, for patients' stratification for CAIX-targeted therapies, and for discrimination of primary malignant and benign renal tumors. Earlier, we have reported feasibility of in vivo radionuclide based imaging of CAIX expressing tumors using Affibody molecules, small affinity proteins based on a nonimmunoglobulin scaffold. In this study, we compared imaging properties of several anti-CAIX Affibody molecules having identical scaffold parts and competing for the same epitope on CAIX, but having different binding paratopes. Four variants were labeled using residualizing (99m)Tc and nonresidualizing (125)I labels. All radiolabeled variants demonstrated high-affinity detection of CAIX-expressing cell line SK-RC-52 in vitro and specific accumulation in SK-RC-52 xenografts in vivo. (125)I-labeled conjugates demonstrated much lower radioactivity uptake in kidneys but higher radioactivity concentration in blood compared with (99m)Tc-labeled counterparts. Although all variants cleared rapidly from blood and nonspecific compartments, there was noticeable difference in their biodistribution. The best variant for imaging of expression of CAIX in disseminated cancer was (99m)Tc-(HE)3-ZCAIX:2 providing tumor uptake of 16.3 ± 0.9% ID/g and tumor-to-blood ratio of 44 ± 7 at 4 h after injection. For primary renal cell carcinoma, the most promising imaging candidate was (125)I-ZCAIX:4 providing tumor-kidney ratio of 2.1 ± 0.5. In conclusion, several clones of scaffold proteins should be evaluated to select the best variant for development of an imaging probe with optimal sensitivity for the intended application.

  13. Pitfalls and Limitations of Radionuclide Planar and Hybrid Bone Imaging.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Kanhaiyalal; Marafi, Fahad; Gnanasegaran, Gopinath; Van der Wall, Hans; Fogelman, Ignac

    2015-09-01

    The radionuclide (99m)Tc-MDP bone scan is one of the most commonly performed nuclear medicine studies and helps in the diagnosis of different pathologies relating to the musculoskeletal system. With its increasing utility in clinical practice, it becomes more important to be aware of various limitations of this imaging modality to avoid false interpretation. It is necessary to be able to recognize various technical, radiopharmaceutical, and patient-related artifacts that can occur while carrying out a bone scan. Furthermore, several normal variations of tracer uptake may mimic pathology and should be interpreted cautiously. There is an important limitation of a bone scan in metastatic disease evaluation as the inherent mechanism of tracer uptake is not specific for tumor but primarily relies on an osteoblastic response. Thus, it is crucial to keep in mind uptake in benign lesions, which can resemble malignant pathologies. The utility of a planar bone scan in benign orthopedic diseases, especially at sites with complex anatomy, is limited owing to lack of precise anatomical information. SPECT/CT has been significantly helpful in these cases. With wider use of PET/CT and reintroduction of the (18)F-fluoride bone scan, increasing knowledge of potential pitfalls on an (18)F-fluoride bone scan and (18)F-FDG-PET/CT will help in improving the accuracy of clinical reports.

  14. Molecular imaging in endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hoetker, Michael S

    2013-01-01

    Molecular imaging focuses on the molecular signature of cells rather than morphological changes in the tissue. The need for this novel type of imaging arises from the often difficult detection and characterization especially of small and/or premalignant lesions. Molecular imaging specifically visualizes biological properties of a lesion and might thereby be able to close diagnostic gaps, e.g. when differentiating hyperplastic from neoplastic polyps or detecting the margins of intraepithelial neoplastic spread. Additionally, not only the detection and discrimination of lesions could be improved: based on the molecular features identified using molecular imaging, therapy regimens could be adjusted on the day of diagnosis to allow for personalized medicine and optimized care for each individual patient. PMID:24917945

  15. EDITORIAL: Molecular Imaging Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asai, Keisuke; Okamoto, Koji

    2006-06-01

    'Molecular Imaging Technology' focuses on image-based techniques using nanoscale molecules as sensor probes to measure spatial variations of various species (molecular oxygen, singlet oxygen, carbon dioxide, nitric monoxide, etc) and physical properties (pressure, temperature, skin friction, velocity, mechanical stress, etc). This special feature, starting on page 1237, contains selected papers from The International Workshop on Molecular Imaging for Interdisciplinary Research, sponsored by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) in Japan, which was held at the Sendai Mediatheque, Sendai, Japan, on 8 9 November 2004. The workshop was held as a sequel to the MOSAIC International Workshop that was held in Tokyo in 2003, to summarize the outcome of the 'MOSAIC Project', a five-year interdisciplinary project supported by Techno-Infrastructure Program, the Special Coordination Fund for Promotion of Science Technology to develop molecular sensor technology for aero-thermodynamic research. The workshop focused on molecular imaging technology and its applications to interdisciplinary research areas. More than 110 people attended this workshop from various research fields such as aerospace engineering, automotive engineering, radiotechnology, fluid dynamics, bio-science/engineering and medical engineering. The purpose of this workshop is to stimulate intermixing of these interdisciplinary fields for further development of molecular sensor and imaging technology. It is our pleasure to publish the seven papers selected from our workshop as a special feature in Measurement and Science Technology. We will be happy if this issue inspires people to explore the future direction of molecular imaging technology for interdisciplinary research.

  16. Dynamic radionuclide determination of regional left ventricular wall motion using a new digital imaging device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, P.; Kirch, D.

    1975-01-01

    In 47 men with arteriographically defined coronary artery disease comparative studies of left ventricular ejection fraction and segmental wall motion were made with radionuclide data obtained from the image intensifier camera computer system and with contrast cineventriculography. The radionuclide data was digitized and the images corresponding to left ventricular end-diastole and end-systole were identified from the left ventricular time-activity curve. The left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic images were subtracted to form a silhouette difference image which described wall motion of the anterior and inferior left ventricular segments. The image intensifier camera allows manipulation of dynamically acquired radionuclide data because of the high count rate and consequently improved resolution of the left ventricular image.

  17. Image guidance, treatment planning and evaluation of cancer interstitial focal therapy using liposomal radionuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ware, Steve William

    Focally ablative therapy of cancer has gained significant interest recently. Improvements in diagnostic techniques have created possibilities for treatment which were once clinically unfeasible. Imaging must be capable of allowing accurate diagnosis, staging and planning upon initiation of therapy. Recent improvements in MRI and molecular imaging techniques have made it possible to accurately localize lesions and in so doing, improve the accuracy of proposed focal treatments. Using multimodality imaging it is now possible to target, plan and evaluate interstitial focal treatment using liposome encapsulated beta emitting radionuclides in a variety of cancer types. Since most absorbed dose is deposited early and heterogeneously in beta-radionuclide therapy, investigation of the resultant molecular and cellular events during this time is important for evaluating treatment efficacy. Additionally, investigating a multifocal entity such as prostate cancer is helpful for determining whether MRI is capable of discriminating the proper lesion for therapy. Correlation of MRI findings with histopathology can further improve the accuracy of interstitial focal radionuclide therapy by providing non-invasive surrogates for tissue compartment sizes. In the application of such therapies, compartmental sizes are known to heavily influence the distribution of injected agents. This has clear dosimetric implications with the potential to significantly alter the efficacy of treatment. The hypothesis of this project was that multimodality imaging with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), autoradiography (AR), and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) could be used to target, plan, and evaluate interstitial focal therapy with non-sealed source, liposome-encapsulated 186Re beta emitting radionuclides. The specific aims of this project were to 1) Identify suitable targets for interstitial focal therapy. This was done by retrospectively analyzing MRI data to characterize the tumor

  18. Requisites for successful theranostics with radionuclide-based reporter gene imaging.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Byeong-Cheol

    2014-05-01

    Radionuclide-based theranostic strategy has been widely used in diagnosis and treatment of patients with hyperthyroidism or differentiated thyroid cancer for a long time, and sodium iodide symporter gene is the radionuclide-based reporter gene used in theranostics. Theranostics, which is a promising approach, offering the ideal combination of accurate diagnosis and successful therapy in various clinical fields, is expected to become a key area of personalized medicine. Rapid advancements in biotechnologies using theranostic reporter genes and theranostic radiochemistry have led to development of the concept of theranostics using radionuclide-based imaging reporter genes; the theranostic approach is almost ready for application in a limited arena of clinics. In order to fulfill both the diagnostic and therapeutic purposes, theranostics with radionuclide-based imaging reporter requires use of successful combinations of various components, such as radionuclide-based reporter genes, promoters/enhancers that regulate expression of reporter genes, delivery vectors/vehicles, imaging or therapeutic probes and prodrugs, transductional and transcriptional targeting strategies, transgene amplification systems, etc. In this review, overview and recent updates on theranostics using radionuclide-based imaging reporter genes will be discussed.

  19. Molecular Imaging Without Radiopharmaceuticals?

    PubMed Central

    Gore, John C.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Peterson, Todd. E.; Avison, Malcolm J.

    2009-01-01

    The limitations on the sensitivity for detecting small changes in MRI, CT, and ultrasound pulse-echo images are used to estimate the practical requirements for molecular imaging and targeted contrast enhancement for these modalities. These types of imaging are highly unlikely to approach the sensitivity for detecting molecular processes of radionuclear methods, and the prospects for achieving sufficient concentrations of appropriate agents in vivo are poor for several types of applications such as small-molecule targeting of specific receptors. However, using relatively large carrier systems such as particles and liposomes, sufficient concentrations of paramagnetic agents may be delivered to achieve MR-signal changes adequate for detection. The use of higher-resolution MR images will aid the prospects for molecular imaging in small animals. Theoretic considerations also predict that a similar approach, using rather large particles or carriers of materials with a high atomic number, may also be successful for CT, especially with additional developments such as the use of monochromatic x-rays. The prospects of molecular imaging by x-ray imaging may not be as bleak as has been predicted. For ultrasound detection, gas-filled bubbles can provide a sufficient backscattered sound intensity to be detectable at concentrations and sizes not much different from agents designed for these other modalities. PMID:19443583

  20. Radiolabeled Adenoviral Sub-unit Proteins for Molecular Imaging and Therapeutic Applications in Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.; Meinken, G.; Springer, K. Awasthi, V.; Freimuth, P.

    2004-10-06

    The objective of this project was to develop and optimize new ligand systems, based on adenoviral vectors (intact adenovirus, adeno-viral fiber protein, and the knob protein), for delivering suitable radionuclides into tumor cells for molecular imaging and combined gene/radionuclide therapy of cancer.

  1. Use of radionuclide renal imaging for clinical followup after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy of renal stones.

    PubMed

    Michaels, E K; Pavel, D G; Orellana, P; Montes, A; Olea, E

    1992-09-01

    Patients treated by extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) are usually evaluated by excretory urography within 1 month after treatment to determine the clearance of stone debris and rule out asymptomatic obstruction. In an attempt to obtain more precise functional information, we used 99mtechnetium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid and 131iodine-hippurate radionuclide renal imaging studies, and a plain abdominal radiograph as the initial followup study after ESWL of 64 kidneys in 55 patients. Of 53 kidneys studied within 60 days after ESWL 42 had abnormal radionuclide renal imaging studies demonstrating pelviocaliceal stasis, excretory delay or poor function, 8 of which required subsequent interventions for obstructing stone debris. Five patients had excretory delay after ESWL that was unexpected based on a pre-ESWL excretory urogram showing normal function without dilation. A subset of 23 patients with large stone burden or anatomical deformity from a prior operation had baseline radionuclide renal imaging studies before ESWL; function improved in 4 and worsened in 5 by radionuclide renal imaging studies after completion of treatment. A total of 19 patients had radionuclide renal imaging studies earlier (within 17 days) after ESWL because of poor function and/or large stone burden, and as expected they had evidence of obstruction from stone debris, which necessitated further followup. Our experience suggests that followup of ESWL by radionuclide renal imaging studies provides specific functional information that is of particular value in the management of patients with obstructing stone debris and/or diminished renal function. Radionuclide renal imaging studies may also reveal unsuspected obstruction or functional impairment after ESWL of uncomplicated stones, and is recommended as routine followup after ESWL.

  2. Isonitrile radionuclide complexes for labelling and imaging agents

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Alun G.; Davison, Alan; Abrams, Michael J.

    1984-06-04

    A coordination complex of an isonitrile ligand and radionuclide such as Tc, Ru, Co, Pt, Fe, Os, Ir, W, Re, Cr, Mo, Mn, Ni, Rh, Pd, Nb and Ta, is useful as a diagnostic agent for labelling liposomes or vesicles, and selected living cells containing lipid membranes, such as blood clots, myocardial tissue, gall bladder tissue, etc.

  3. Isonitrile radionuclide complexes for labelling and imaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, A.G.; Abrams, M.J.; Davison, A.

    1984-06-05

    A coordination complex of an isonitrile ligand and radionuclide such as Tc, Ru, Co, Pt, Fe, Os, Ir, W, Re, Cr, Mo, Mn, Ni, Rh, Pd, Nb and Ta, is useful as a diagnostic agent for labelling liposomes or vesicles, and selected living cells containing lipid membranes, such as blood clots, myocardial tissue, gall bladder tissue, etc.

  4. Radiolabeled nanogels for nuclear molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Singh, Smriti; Bingöl, Bahar; Morgenroth, Agnieszka; Mottaghy, Felix M; Möller, Martin; Schmaljohann, Jörn

    2013-04-12

    An efficient and simple synthesis approach to form stable (68) Ga-labeled nanogels is reported and their fundamental properties investigated. Nanogels are obtained by self-assembly of amphiphilic statistical prepolymers derivatised with chelating groups for radiometals. The resulting nanogels exhibit a well-defined spherical shape with a diameter of 290 ± 50 nm. The radionuclide (68) Ga is chelated in high radiochemical yields in an aqueous medium at room temperature. The phagocytosis assay demonstrates a highly increased internalization of nanogels by activated macrophages. Access to these (68) Ga-nanogels will allow the investigation of general behavior and clearance pathways of nanogels in vivo by nuclear molecular imaging.

  5. Comparison of radionuclide imaging and ultrasonography of the liver

    SciTech Connect

    Elyaderani, M.K.; Gabriele, O.F.

    1983-01-01

    Radionuclide liver scans and gray scale ultrasonography of the liver were compared in 456 patients with various abnormalities including normal variants, jaundice, abscesses, and metastatic diseases. In general the better resolution of sonography detected smaller and deeper focal lesions than nuclide scans, but nuclide studies were more informative in hepatocellular disorders. Nuclide studies frequently demonstrated lesions that could be further delineated by sonography as either cystic or solid. This ability was of particular significance in isolated liver lesions found during metastatic surveys.

  6. Comparison of radionuclide imaging and ultrasonography of the liver

    SciTech Connect

    Elyaderani, M.K.; Gabriele, O.F.

    1983-01-01

    Radionuclide liver scans and gray scale ultrasonography of the liver were compared in 456 patients with various abnormalities including normal variants, jaundice, abscesses, and metastatic diseases. In general the better resolution of sonography detected smaller and deeper focal lesions than nuclide scans, but nuclide studies were more informative in heptatocellular disorders. Nuclide studies frequently demonstrated lesions that could be further delineated by sonography as either cystic or solid. This ability was of particular significance in isolated liver lesions found during metastatic surveys.

  7. An experimental study on the application of radionuclide imaging in repair of the bone defect.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Weimin; Wang, Daping; Zhang, Xiaojun; Lu, Wei; Liu, Jianquan; Peng, Liangquan; Li, Hao; Han, Yun; Zeng, Yanjun

    2011-08-01

    The aim of our study was to validate the effect of radionuclide imaging in early monitoring of the bone's reconstruction, the animal model of bone defect was made on the rabbits repaired with HA artificial bone. The ability of bone defect repair was evaluated by using radionuclide bone imaging at 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks postoperatively. The results indicate that the experimental group stimulated more bone formation than that of the control group. The differences of the bone reconstruction ability were statistically significant (p<0.05). The nano-HA artificial has good bone conduction, and it can be used for the treatment of bone defects. Radionuclide imaging may be an effective and first choice method for the early monitoring of the bone's reconstruction.

  8. An experimental study on the application of radionuclide imaging in repair of the bone defect

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Weimin; Wang, Daping; Zhang, Xiaojun; Lu, Wei; Liu, Jianquan; Peng, Liangquan; Li, Hao; Han, Yun; Zeng, Yanjun

    2011-01-01

    The aim of our study was to validate the effect of radionuclide imaging in early monitoring of the bone’s reconstruction, the animal model of bone defect was made on the rabbits repaired with HA artificial bone. The ability of bone defect repair was evaluated by using radionuclide bone imaging at 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks postoperatively. The results indicate that the experimental group stimulated more bone formation than that of the control group. The differences of the bone reconstruction ability were statistically significant (p<0.05). The nano-HA artificial has good bone conduction, and it can be used for the treatment of bone defects. Radionuclide imaging may be an effective and first choice method for the early monitoring of the bone’s reconstruction. PMID:21875418

  9. Radionuclide imaging technologies and their use in evaluating asthma drug deposition in the lungs.

    PubMed

    Newman, Stephen P; Pitcairn, Gary R; Hirst, Peter H; Rankin, Lisa

    2003-07-18

    Whole lung and regional lung deposition of inhaled asthma drugs in the lungs can be quantified using either two-dimensional or three-dimensional radionuclide imaging methods. The two-dimensional method of gamma scintigraphy has been the most widely used, and is currently considered the industry standard, but the three-dimensional methods (SPECT, single photon emission computed tomography; and PET, positron emission tomography) give superior regional lung deposition data and will undoubtedly be used more frequently in future. Recent developments in radionuclide imaging are described, including an improved algorithm for assessing regional lung deposition in gamma scintigraphy, and a patent-protected radiolabelling method (TechneCoat), applicable to both gamma scintigraphy and SPECT. Radionuclide imaging data on new inhaled asthma products provide a milestone assessment, and the data form a bridge between in vitro testing and a full clinical trials program, allowing the latter to be entered with increased confidence.

  10. Testicular torsion and epididymitis demonstrated by radionuclide angiograms and static imaging.

    PubMed

    Hankins, A J

    1979-10-01

    Radionuclide testicular angiography and static images were performed using technetium 99m sodium pertechnetate in an effort to differentiate between testicular torsion and acute epididymitis in 12 patients. The diagnosis of testicular torsion was made in four cases that were confirmed at surgery. Acute epididymitis or acute epididymo-orchitis was diagnosed six times. These patients were treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics leading to a subsidence of their clinical symptomatology during therapy with no sequelae. The radionuclide angiogram and static image changes of chronic epididymitis are also discussed.Radionuclide testicular angiograms and static images can be significant benefits in addition to the clinical and physical findings to distinguish between testicular torsion and acute and chronic epididymitis.

  11. Somatostatin receptors as targets for nuclear medicine imaging and radionuclide treatment.

    PubMed

    Maecke, Helmut R; Reubi, Jean Claude

    2011-06-01

    Radiolabeled peptides have been an important class of compounds in radiopharmaceutical sciences and nuclear medicine for more than 20 years. Despite strong research efforts, only somatostatin-based radiopeptides have a real impact on patient care, diagnostically and therapeutically. [(111)In-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid(0)]octreotide is commercially available for imaging. Imaging was highly improved by the introduction of PET radionuclides such as (68)Ga, (64)Cu, and (18)F. Two peptides are successfully used in targeted radionuclide therapy when bound to DOTA and labeled with (90)Y and (177)Lu.

  12. Radiolabeling strategies for radionuclide imaging of stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wolfs, Esther; Verfaillie, Catherine M; Van Laere, Koen; Deroose, Christophe M

    2015-04-01

    The interest in the use of stem cells as a source for therapy has increased dramatically over the last decades. Different stem cell types have been tested in both in vitro and in vivo models, because of their properties such as differentiation potential, trophic effects and immune modulatory properties. To further optimize the use of different stem cell types for the treatment of disease in a clinical setting, it is necessary to know more about the in vivo behavior of these cells following engraftment. Until now, the golden standard to preclinically evaluate cell therapy was histology, which is an invasive method as the animals need to be sacrificed. This hampers the generation of dynamic information and results in only one single point in time available for analysis per animal. For more information regarding cell migration, in situ persistence, viability, proliferation and differentiation, molecular imaging can be used for imaging cells after transplantation dynamically and longitudinally, in a noninvasive way. With this technology, it becomes possible to track cells within the same subjects over a long period of time.

  13. Multimodality Cardiovascular Molecular Imaging Technology

    PubMed Central

    O’Donnell, Matthew; McVeigh, Elliot R.; Strauss, H. William; Tanaka, Atsushi; Bouma, Brett E.; Tearney, Guillermo J.; Guttman, Michael A.; Garcia, Ernest V.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular molecular imaging is a new discipline that integrates scientific advances in both functional imaging and molecular probes to improve our understanding of the molecular basis of the cardiovascular system. These advances are driven by in vivo imaging of molecular processes in animals, usually small animals, and are rapidly moving toward clinical applications. Molecular imaging has the potential to revolutionize the diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular disease. The 2 key components of all molecular imaging systems are the molecular contrast agents and the imaging system providing spatial and temporal localization of these agents within the body. They must deliver images with the appropriate sensitivity and specificity to drive clinical applications. As work in molecular contrast agents matures and highly sensitive and specific probes are developed, these systems will provide the imaging technologies required for translation into clinical tools. This is the promise of molecular medicine. PMID:20457794

  14. Synthetic copolymer kit for radionuclide blood-pool imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanov, A.A. Jr.; Callahan, R.J.; Wilkinson, R.A.

    1994-11-01

    A synthetic blood pool imaging agent labeled with {sup 99m}Tc is reported. The agent, methoxypolyethylene glycolpoly-L-Iysyl-diethylenetriaminepentaacetate monoamide was synthesized from a covalent graft copolymer of methoxypolyethylene glycol succinate (molecular weight 5.1 kD) with subsequent modification of the product with diethylenetriamineacetyl residues. The polymer was formulated into a kit that contained Sn(II) and sodium acetate for radiolabeling with {sup 99m}Tc. Biodistribution studies were performed in rats. Blood-pool imaging and blood clearance determination was carried out in rabbits and in a rhesus monkey. The {sup 99m}Tc-labeled agent [specific activity greater than 3.7 GBq/mg; radiochemical purity more than 98% by thin-layer and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)] demonstrated remarkable stability in solution (pH 5.5-6.5) with no radioactive products of degradation detectable by HPLC even at 24 hr postlabeling. The agent exhibited prolonged circulation in the blood with a half-life of 31.5 hr in rabbits. Bio-distribution in rats showed a lack of substantial accumulation of the agent in the reticuloendothelial system. Sequential acquisitions were performed in a rhesus monkey. The {sup 99m}Tc-labeled polymer kit was compared with the {sup 99m}Tc-red blood cells (RBCs) labeled in vitro. Both methods produced similar heart-to-lung ratios. The ratios remained essentially unchanged for up to 15 hr postinjection. The {sup 99m}Tc-labeled methaxypolyethylene glycol-poly-L-lysyl-diethylenetriamine pentaacetate monoamide is an attractive alternative to radiolabeled RBCs for blood pool imaging applications. 33 refs., 7 figs.

  15. Photoacoustic molecular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiser, William L., Jr.; Reinecke, Daniel; DeGrado, Timothy; Bhattacharyya, Sibaprasad; Kruger, Robert A.

    2007-02-01

    It is well documented that photoacoustic imaging has the capability to differentiate tissue based on the spectral characteristics of tissue in the optical regime. The imaging depth in tissue exceeds standard optical imaging techniques, and systems can be designed to achieve excellent spatial resolution. A natural extension of imaging the intrinsic optical contrast of tissue is to demonstrate the ability of photoacoustic imaging to detect contrast agents based on optically absorbing dyes that exhibit well defined absorption peaks in the infrared. The ultimate goal of this project is to implement molecular imaging, in which Herceptin TM, a monoclonal antibody that is used as a therapeutic agent in breast cancer patients that over express the HER2 gene, is labeled with an IR absorbing dye, and the resulting in vivo bio-distribution is mapped using multi-spectral, infrared stimulation and subsequent photoacoustic detection. To lay the groundwork for this goal and establish system sensitivity, images were collected in tissue mimicking phantoms to determine maximum detection depth and minimum detectable concentration of Indocyanine Green (ICG), a common IR absorbing dye, for a single angle photoacoustic acquisition. A breast mimicking phantom was constructed and spectra were also collected for hemoglobin and methanol. An imaging schema was developed that made it possible to separate the ICG from the other tissue mimicking components in a multiple component phantom. We present the results of these experiments and define the path forward for the detection of dye labeled Herceptin TM in cell cultures and mice models.

  16. Comparison of magnetic resonance imaging and radionuclide imaging in the evaluation of renal transplant failure

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, M.S.; Tanasescu, D.E.; Waxman, A.D.; Crues, J.V. III

    1988-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was compared with radionuclide scintigraphy (RNS) in 16 patients with renal transplants undergoing renal failure to determine which modality could best discriminate between rejection, acute tubular necrosis (ATN), and cyclosporin nephrotoxicity (CN). Although all rejecting transplants had reduced corticomedullary differentiation (CMD) on T1-weighted MR images, four of five cases of ATN had appearances that could not be distinguished from rejection. A normal CMD suggests nonrejection, but diminished CMD is nonspecific. Tc-99m DTPA/I-131 hippuran RNS was superior to MRI in differentiating rejection from ATN. Although ATN and CN have similar RNS patterns, this distinction can usually be made based on the clinical time course. Other potential uses of MRI in the evaluation of the renal transplants are discussed.

  17. The scope and potentials of functional radionuclide imaging towards advancing personalized medicine in oncology: emphasis on PET-CT.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sandip

    2012-01-01

    Behavioral heterogeneity within a given patient cohort has been a major challenge in clinical practice and is probably most prominently observed in the field of oncology. This has been the prime impetus of the cutting-edge preclinical and clinical research studies over recent times, many of which seek to further stratify patients based on patients' genetic, proteomic, and metabolic profile (the three key components of "-omics" research), in order to select the appropriate therapy according to an individual's best-fit. Data from functional radionuclide imaging particularly that obtained from PET-CT, with regard to characterization of an individual's tumor phenotype, can play a very important role in answering some of the critical decision-making questions on an individual basis. The role of molecular imaging with PET, SPECT, and planar radionuclide technologies is not confined to early response assessment of administered therapeutics (which is its major benefit compared to conventional methods), rather it has a much broader perspective and encompasses multiple steps in decision making steps of patient management. The immense impact of the radionuclide-based molecular imaging techniques on the selection of an appropriate treatment (at initial diagnosis, during therapy, or after therapy) or in defining the tumor biology has been documented and increasingly recognized through both large and small-scale studies. However, there has been relatively less systematic effort towards the development of a successful and definitive clinical model of "personalized cancer medicine" (based on accurate disease triaging on an individual basis) by the medical community that would be suitable for routine adoption. In this paper, an endeavor has been made to explore the potential of this approach and underscore the areas that would require further critical evaluation to make this a reality.

  18. Physiological considerations in radionuclide imaging of the penis during impotence therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, T.K.; Fink, S.; Burger, R.H.; Netto, I.C.; Palmer, J.D. )

    1989-01-01

    The increased use of intracorporeal drugs in the treatment of impotence has advanced our understanding of erectile physiology. Radionuclide imaging of the penis (nuclear penogram) has provided clinicians with a noninvasive, objective measure of blood flow and blood pool changes during erection and with assistance in the quantitative documentation of therapeutic effect. 39 references.

  19. In vivo Cerenkov luminescence imaging: a new tool for molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Gregory S; Gill, Ruby K; Boucher, David L; Li, Changqing; Cherry, Simon R

    2011-11-28

    Cerenkov radiation is a phenomenon where optical photons are emitted when a charged particle moves faster than the speed of light for the medium in which it travels. Recently, we and others have discovered that measurable visible light due to the Cerenkov effect is produced in vivo following the administration of β-emitting radionuclides to small animals. Furthermore, the amounts of injected activity required to produce a detectable signal are consistent with small-animal molecular imaging applications. This surprising observation has led to the development of a new hybrid molecular imaging modality known as Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI), which allows the spatial distribution of biomolecules labelled with β-emitting radionuclides to be imaged in vivo using sensitive charge-coupled device cameras. We review the physics of Cerenkov radiation as it relates to molecular imaging, present simulation results for light intensity and spatial distribution, and show an example of CLI in a mouse cancer model. CLI allows many common radiotracers to be imaged in widely available in vivo optical imaging systems, and, more importantly, provides a pathway for directly imaging β(-)-emitting radionuclides that are being developed for therapeutic applications in cancer and that are not readily imaged by existing methods.

  20. In vivo Cerenkov luminescence imaging: a new tool for molecular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Gregory S.; Gill, Ruby K.; Boucher, David L.; Li, Changqing; Cherry, Simon R.

    2011-01-01

    Cerenkov radiation is a phenomenon where optical photons are emitted when a charged particle moves faster than the speed of light for the medium in which it travels. Recently, we and others have discovered that measurable visible light due to the Cerenkov effect is produced in vivo following the administration of β-emitting radionuclides to small animals. Furthermore, the amounts of injected activity required to produce a detectable signal are consistent with small-animal molecular imaging applications. This surprising observation has led to the development of a new hybrid molecular imaging modality known as Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI), which allows the spatial distribution of biomolecules labelled with β-emitting radionuclides to be imaged in vivo using sensitive charge-coupled device cameras. We review the physics of Cerenkov radiation as it relates to molecular imaging, present simulation results for light intensity and spatial distribution, and show an example of CLI in a mouse cancer model. CLI allows many common radiotracers to be imaged in widely available in vivo optical imaging systems, and, more importantly, provides a pathway for directly imaging β−-emitting radionuclides that are being developed for therapeutic applications in cancer and that are not readily imaged by existing methods. PMID:22006909

  1. Molecular Imaging with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Hao; Gao, Ting; Cai, Weibo

    2011-01-01

    Nanoparticle-based molecular imaging has emerged as an interdisciplinary field which involves physics, chemistry, engineering, biology, and medicine. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have unique properties which make them suitable for applications in a variety of imaging modalities, such as magnetic resonance, near-infrared fluorescence, Raman spectroscopy, photoacoustic tomography, and radionuclide-based imaging. In this review, we will summarize the current state-of-the-art of SWCNTs in molecular imaging applications. Multifunctionality is the key advantage of nanoparticles over traditional approaches. Targeting ligands, imaging labels, therapeutic drugs, and many other agents can all be integrated into the nanoparticle to allow for targeted molecular imaging and molecular therapy by encompassing many biological and biophysical barriers. A multifunctional, SWCNT-based nanoplatform holds great potential for clinical applications in the future. PMID:21754949

  2. Advances in Cardiovascular Molecular Imaging for Tracking Stem Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ransohoff, Katherine J.; Wu, Joseph C.

    2010-01-01

    The high mortality rate associated with cardiovascular disease is partially due to the lack of proliferative cells in the heart. Without adequate repair following myocardial infarction, progressive dilation can lead to heart failure. Stem cell therapies present one promising option for treating cardiovascular disease, though the specific mechanisms by which they benefit the heart remain unclear. Before stem cell therapies can be used safely in human populations, their biology must be investigated using innovative technologies such as multi-modality molecular imaging. The present review will discuss the basic principles, labeling techniques, clinical applications, and drawbacks associated with four major modalities: radionuclide imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, bioluminescence imaging, and fluorescence imaging. PMID:20458434

  3. New Strategies for 0.5 mm Resolution, High Sensitivity, Multi- Radionuclide Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, Craig S.

    2015-02-28

    This project constitutes a 0.5-millimeter resolution radionuclide detector system built from CZT. (1) A novel dual-crystal photon detector module design with cross-strip electrode patterns was developed; (2) The module mechanical assembly was built; (3) A data acquisition (DAQ) chain for the module was produced; (4) A software tool was developed to incorporate novel time and energy measurement calibration techniques. (5) A small multi-detector prototype of the radionuclide imaging system was built from this module for system-level characterizations.

  4. Molecular Optical Imaging with Radioactive Probes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongguang; Ren, Gang; Miao, Zheng; Zhang, Xiaofen; Tang, Xiaodong; Han, Peizhen; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Cheng, Zhen

    2010-01-01

    Background Optical imaging (OI) techniques such as bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging have been widely used to track diseases in a non-invasive manner within living subjects. These techniques generally require bioluminescent and fluorescent probes. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of using radioactive probes for in vivo molecular OI. Methodology/Principal Findings By taking the advantages of low energy window of light (1.2–3.1 eV, 400–1000 nm) resulting from radiation, radionuclides that emit charged particles such as β+ and β− can be successfully imaged with an OI instrument. In vivo optical images can be obtained for several radioactive probes including 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose ([18F]FDG), Na18F, Na131I, 90YCl3 and a 90Y labeled peptide that specifically target tumors. Conclusions/Significance These studies demonstrate generalizability of radioactive OI technique. It provides a new molecular imaging strategy and will likely have significant impact on both small animal and clinical imaging. PMID:20208993

  5. The role of radionuclide imaging in epilepsy, Part 1: Sporadic temporal and extratemporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ajay; Chugani, Harry T

    2013-10-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common yet diverse neurologic disorders, affecting almost 1%-2% of the population. Presently, radionuclide imaging such as PET and SPECT is not used in the primary diagnosis or evaluation of recent-onset epilepsy. However, it can play a unique and important role in certain specific situations, such as in noninvasive presurgical localization of epileptogenic brain regions in intractable-seizure patients being considered for epilepsy surgery. Radionuclide imaging can be particularly useful if MR imaging is either negative for lesions or shows several lesions of which only 1 or 2 are suspected to be epileptogenic and if electroencephalogram changes are equivocal or discordant with the structural imaging. Similarly, PET and SPECT can also be useful for evaluating the functional integrity of the rest of the brain and may provide useful information on the possible pathogenesis of the neurocognitive and behavioral abnormalities frequently observed in these patients.

  6. Stress injuries of the pars interarticularis: Radiologic classification and indications for radionuclide imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Pennell, R.; Maurer, A.R.; Bonakdarpour, A.

    1984-01-01

    Lumbar spine radiographs and radionuclide images were compared and correlated with clinical histories of 20 athletes with low back pain. Radiographs were classified as: Normal (Type 0); showing a healing stress fracture (an irregular lucent line) with sclerosis (Type I); as an evolving or healed stress injury with either sclerosis, narrowing, or demineralization (Type II); and as a chronic fracture showing a large lucency with well-defined margins classically referred to as spondylolysis (Type III). Patients were grouped clinically on the basis of their pain: acute onset (Group A, n = 7), acute superimposed on chronic (Group B, n = 9), and chronic pain without an acute event (Group C, n = 4). Radiographic abnormalities were present in 95% (19/20) of the patients and radionuclide studies were positive in 60% (12/20). Scintigraphy was positive most often with Type I pars abnormalities (77%, 10/13) and negative most often with Type III abnormalities (91%, 11/12). Of all positive scintigraphy 12/14 (86%) were in pts in Groups A and B (acute symptoms). The authors' findings support theories that radiographic pars abnormalities exist which correspond to stages in the healing of stress induced fractures. With acute symptoms radionuclide imaging need not be obtained if a Type I radiographic abnormality is seen. Radionuclide imaging is indicated with either Type 0, II or III radiographs to confirm or rule out recent stress injury.

  7. Cardiac Radionuclide Imaging in Rodents: A Review of Methods, Results, and Factors at Play

    PubMed Central

    Cicone, Francesco; Viertl, David; Quintela Pousa, Ana Maria; Denoël, Thibaut; Gnesin, Silvano; Scopinaro, Francesco; Vozenin, Marie-Catherine; Prior, John O.

    2017-01-01

    The interest around small-animal cardiac radionuclide imaging is growing as rodent models can be manipulated to allow the simulation of human diseases. In addition to new radiopharmaceuticals testing, often researchers apply well-established probes to animal models, to follow the evolution of the target disease. This reverse translation of standard radiopharmaceuticals to rodent models is complicated by technical shortcomings and by obvious differences between human and rodent cardiac physiology. In addition, radionuclide studies involving small animals are affected by several extrinsic variables, such as the choice of anesthetic. In this paper, we review the major cardiac features that can be studied with classical single-photon and positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals, namely, cardiac function, perfusion and metabolism, as well as the results and pitfalls of small-animal radionuclide imaging techniques. In addition, we provide a concise guide to the understanding of the most frequently used anesthetics such as ketamine/xylazine, isoflurane, and pentobarbital. We address in particular their mechanisms of action and the potential effects on radionuclide imaging. Indeed, cardiac function, perfusion, and metabolism can all be significantly affected by varying anesthetics and animal handling conditions. PMID:28424774

  8. Vesicorectal fistula detected on direct radionuclide cystography--importance of fecal matter imaging.

    PubMed

    Aghaei, Atena; Sadeghi, Ramin; Saeedi, Parisa

    2014-01-01

    We report an 11 year old male patient with the history of imperforate anus, which was repaired surgically 4 years ago. He has been complaining of intermittent passing of urine into the rectum recently. The vesicorectal fistula in this patient was proven by imaging of the fecal matter post direct radionuclide cystography study. Our case showed that nuclear medicine imaging can be extended to unanimated objects such as patients' excrements or fluids with important diagnostic yields.

  9. Nanoparticles for molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Yang; Liao, Lun De; Thakor, Nitish V; Tan, Mei Chee

    2014-10-01

    Imaging techniques have been instrumental in the visualization of fundamental biological processes, identification and diagnosis of diseased states and the development of structure-function relationships at the cellular, tissue and anatomical levels. Together with the advancements made in imaging techniques, complementary chemical compounds, also known as imaging probes or contrast agents, are developed to improve the visibility of the image by enhancing sensitivity, and for the identification and quantitation of specific molecular species or structures. Extensive studies have been conducted to explore the use of inorganic nanoparticles which exhibit magnetic and optical properties unique to the nano regime so as to enhance the signals sensitivity for magnetic resonance and fluorescent imaging. These physical properties are tailored by controlling the size, shape and surface properties of nanoparticles. In addition, surface modification of nanoparticles is often required to improve its stability, compatibility and functionality. Surfactants, surface-active agents, have been used to engineer the surface characteristics of nanoparticles to improved particle stability and functionality. Surfactants enhance nanoparticle stability through the reduction of surface energy, and by acting as a barrier to agglomeration through either steric hindrance or repulsive electrostatic forces. Coupling of nanoparticles with biomolecules such as antibodies or tumor targeting peptides are enabled by the presence of functional groups (e.g., carboxyl or amine groups) on surfactants. This paper provides an overview of the chemistry underlying the synthesis and surface modification of nanomaterials together with a discussion on how the physical properties (e.g., magnetic, absorption and luminescent) can be controlled. The applications of these nanoparticles for magnetic resonance, fluorescent and photoacoustic imaging techniques that do not rely on ionizing radiation are also covered in

  10. Radionuclide imaging and ultrasound in liver/spleen trauma: a prospective comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Froelich, J.W.; Simeone, J.F.; McKusick, K.A.; Winzelberg, G.G.; Strauss, H.W.

    1982-11-01

    In a prospective blind study of liver/spleen trauma, 32 consecutive patients were evaluated by radionuclide imaging (/sup 99m/Tc-sulfur colloid) and gray-scale ultrasound. Six patients (19%) had inadequate sonograms due to injuries and pain. Thirteen (41%) were normal, 13 (41%) were abnormal with one technique or the other, and there was a discrepancy in 2 (6%). Of the 13 abnormal patients, 1 had a lacerated spleen, 2 had angiographic confirmation of a subcapsular hematoma, and 10 showed resolution on follow-up. Two patients with left-sided trauma had abnormal radionuclide scans of the liver; sonograms were initially normal in one of them, but subsequent imaging confirmed the abnormality. The authors feel that imaging with /sup 99m/Tc-sulfur colloid should be the primary screening examination for liver/spleen trauma.

  11. Comparison of ultrasonography, computerized tomography, and radionuclide imaging in the diagnosis of acute and chronic cholecystitis

    SciTech Connect

    Matolo, N.M.; Stadalnik, R.C.; McGahan, J.P.

    1982-12-01

    Seventy-five patients with abdominal pain in the right upper quadrant who were subsequently confirmed operatively and histologically to have acute or chronic cholecystitis underwent radionuclide imaging of the biliary tree, ultrasonography, and/or computerized tomography before operation. fifty-eight of the patients had acute cholecystitis and 17 had chronic cholecystitis and cholelithiasis. Analysis of our data indicates that ultrasonography is an accurate and better screening test than cholescintigraphy in the diagnosis of chronic cholecystitis and cholelithiasis, but it is less accurate in the detection of acute cholecystitis. On the other hand, radionuclide imaging is highly sensitive and specific in the early diagnosis of acute cholecystitis, but it is poor in the diagnosis of chronic cholecystitis and cholelithiasis unless the cystic duct is obstructed. CT scanning is more expensive than ultrasonography but may be extremely helpful in problematic cases such as the diagnosis of the cause in biliary obstruction or in imaging of the pancreas.

  12. Need for routine delayed radionuclide hepatobiliary imaging in patients with intercurrent disease

    SciTech Connect

    Drane, W.E.; Nelp, W.B.; Rudd, T.G.

    1984-06-01

    A retrospective review was made of all radionuclide hepatobiliary studies performed in a major trauma center over a 27-month period and correlated with the patients' clinical course. In a population of 42 patients (27 of whom were on total parenteral nutrition (TPN)) who had severe intercurrent illness (primarily trauma), and an additional 18 patients who had hepatocellular dysfunction, hepatobiliary imaging confirmed a patent cystic duct in 43 of 60 patients (72%). Of 17 patients who had nonvisualization of the gallbladder, four had surgically proved acute cholecystitis. The presence of gallstones, wall thickening, or sludge on sonograms did not correlate with cystic duct patency, and was not specific for acute cholecystitis. Though gallbladder function is compromised in the population with severe intercurrent disease, radionuclide hepatobiliary imaging is still valuable; it can confirm a patent systic duct in at least 72% of patients if routine imaging is continued for up to 24 hours.

  13. Noninvasive assessment of right ventricular function: will there be resurgence in radionuclide imaging techniques?

    PubMed

    Ramani, Gautam V; Gurm, Gagandeep; Dilsizian, Vasken; Park, Myung H

    2010-03-01

    Right ventricular (RV) function is increasingly being recognized as an important prognostic marker in multiple cardiopulmonary disease states, including congestive heart failure, pulmonary arterial hypertension, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Accurate and reproducible measures of RV function, although technically challenging, are highly relevant in the clinical setting. Radionuclide techniques (eg, first-pass radionuclide angiography for quantifying RV systolic function) were developed nearly 40 years ago. More recently, MRI and transthoracic echocardiography have become the diagnostic imaging techniques of choice for the noninvasive evaluation of RV function. However, developments in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), positron emission tomography (PET), and hybrid SPECT/CT and PET/CT systems have greatly improved the image quality and contrast resolution of radionuclide imaging of the heart, allowing for coregistered physiologic and anatomical information of the right ventricle in three dimensions. These improvements in cardiac imaging provide new opportunities for assessing RV myocardial perfusion, function, and anatomy in the same setting. Such imaging approaches may in the future provide assistance with proactive disease management, including early diagnosis of impending RV dysfunction in high-risk patients and for guiding decisions to initiate and/or modify treatments.

  14. Pitfalls and Limitations of Radionuclide Imaging in Endocrinology.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Kanhaiyalal; Esmail, Abdulredha A H; Gnanasegaran, Gopinath; Navalkissoor, Shaunak; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai; Fogelman, Ignac

    2015-09-01

    Several different techniques, radiopharmaceuticals, and imaging modalities are commonly used in nuclear medicine for studies of endocrine organs. Nuclear medicine is used in the management of benign and malignant thyroid, parathyroid, and neuroendocrine disorders. Thus, it is essential to acknowledge pitfalls and the limitations of nuclear medicine imaging for accurate diagnosis and patient management.

  15. Cognitive impairment in degenerative parkinsonisms: role of radionuclide brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Arnaldi, D; Morbelli, S; Morrone, E; Campus, C; Nobili, Flavio

    2012-02-01

    Cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease (PD) and atypical parkinsonian syndromes is gaining increased clinical significance. The neurochemical and neuropathological basis in the various parkinsonian forms and even in an individual patient are not fully elucidated yet and could be heterogeneous. Loss of dopaminergic, cholinergic and noradrenergic innervation has been suggested to be the underlying neurochemical deficits for cognitive impairment and dementia in PD, but the onset of cognitive impairment and the progression to dementia may not share the same underlying neurochemical basis. Similarly, pathological evidence is also heterogeneous, ranging from subcortical pathology, limbic or cortical Lewy body type degeneration, and Alzheimer's type pathology that can be found even in the same patient with PD dementia (PDD). Typically, the prototype of early cognitive deficit in PD is a dysexecutive syndrome, but other cognitive domains are more involved when dementia develops, mainly including visuospatial, language and memory dysfunction. Functional radionuclide neuroimaging, by means of single-photon emission computed tomography and positron emission tomography, are contributing to characterize the topographic cortical pattern of cognitive impairment, as well as to define the underlying neurochemical deficit. Lastly, the advent of amyloid PET may help clarifying the meaning of amyloid load in diffuse Lewy body disease and PDD. Knowing the neurochemical and pathophysiological substrate of cognitive deficit in patients with PD or other degenerative Parkinsonisms may help the clinician in understanding the clinical condition of an individual patient in order to plan pharmacological and non-pharmacological intervention. The introduction of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors for therapy of PDD is an example of information integration between clinical-neuropsychological and pathophysiological-neurochemical aspects obtained also with the key contribution of functional

  16. Nanoparticle imaging probes for molecular imaging with computed tomography and application to cancer imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roeder, Ryan K.; Curtis, Tyler E.; Nallathamby, Prakash D.; Irimata, Lisa E.; McGinnity, Tracie L.; Cole, Lisa E.; Vargo-Gogola, Tracy; Cowden Dahl, Karen D.

    2017-03-01

    Precision imaging is needed to realize precision medicine in cancer detection and treatment. Molecular imaging offers the ability to target and identify tumors, associated abnormalities, and specific cell populations with overexpressed receptors. Nuclear imaging and radionuclide probes provide high sensitivity but subject the patient to a high radiation dose and provide limited spatiotemporal information, requiring combined computed tomography (CT) for anatomic imaging. Therefore, nanoparticle contrast agents have been designed to enable molecular imaging and improve detection in CT alone. Core-shell nanoparticles provide a powerful platform for designing tailored imaging probes. The composition of the core is chosen for enabling strong X-ray contrast, multi-agent imaging with photon-counting spectral CT, and multimodal imaging. A silica shell is used for protective, biocompatible encapsulation of the core composition, volume-loading fluorophores or radionuclides for multimodal imaging, and facile surface functionalization with antibodies or small molecules for targeted delivery. Multi-agent (k-edge) imaging and quantitative molecular imaging with spectral CT was demonstrated using current clinical agents (iodine and BaSO4) and a proposed spectral library of contrast agents (Gd2O3, HfO2, and Au). Bisphosphonate-functionalized Au nanoparticles were demonstrated to enhance sensitivity and specificity for the detection of breast microcalcifications by conventional radiography and CT in both normal and dense mammary tissue using murine models. Moreover, photon-counting spectral CT enabled quantitative material decomposition of the Au and calcium signals. Immunoconjugated Au@SiO2 nanoparticles enabled highly-specific targeting of CD133+ ovarian cancer stem cells for contrast-enhanced detection in model tumors.

  17. Radionuclide Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rösch, F.; Knapp, F. F. (Russ)

    Radionuclide generator systems continue to play a key role in providing both diagnostic and therapeutic radionuclides for various applications in nuclear medicine, oncology, and interventional cardiology. Although many parent/daughter pairs have been evaluated as radionuclide generator systems, there are a relatively small number of generators, which are currently in routine clinical and research use. Essentially every conceivable approach has been used for parent/separation strategies, including sublimation, thermochromatographic separation, solvent extraction, and adsorptive column chromatography. The most widely used radionuclide generator for clinical applications is the 99Mo/99mTc generator system, but recent years have seen an enormous increase in the use of generators to provide therapeutic radionuclides, which has paralleled the development of complementary technologies for targeting agents for therapy and in the general increased interest in the use of unsealed therapeutic radioactive sources. More recently, use of the 68Ge/68Ga generator is showing great potential as a source of positron-emitting 68Ga for positron emission tomography (PET)/CT imaging. Key advantages for the use of radionuclide generators include reasonable costs, the convenience of obtaining the desired daughter radionuclide on demand, and availability of the daughter radionuclide in high specific activity, no-carrier added form.

  18. Molecular imaging applications for immunology.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, Isabel Junie; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam

    2004-05-01

    The use of multimodality molecular imaging has recently facilitated the study of molecular and cellular events in living subjects in a noninvasive and repetitive manner to improve the diagnostic capability of traditional assays. The noninvasive imaging modalities utilized for both small animal and human imaging include positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound, and computed tomography (CT). Techniques specific to small-animal imaging include bioluminescent imaging (BIm) and fluorescent imaging (FIm). Molecular imaging permits the study of events within cells, the examination of cell trafficking patterns that relate to inflammatory diseases and metastases, and the ability to rapidly screen new drug treatments for distribution and effectiveness. In this paper, we will review the current field of molecular imaging assays (especially those utilizing PET and BIm modalities) and examine how they might impact animal models and human disease in the field of clinical immunology.

  19. Hyperparathyroidism: comparison of MR imaging with radionuclide scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Peck, W.W.; Higgins, C.B.; Fisher, M.R.; Ling, M.; Okerlund, M.D.; Clark, O.H.

    1987-05-01

    Twenty-three patients with hyperparathyroidism were evaluated preoperatively with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Twenty patients also underwent thallium-201/technetium-99m scintigraphy. Of 22 patients with primary hyperparathyroidism, 12 had persistent or recurrent disease. One had secondary hyperparathyroidism due to end-stage renal disease. MR imaging allowed accurate localization of abnormal parathyroid glands in 64% evaluated prospectively and 82% evaluated retrospectively. Scintigraphy allowed localization of 60% evaluated prospectively and 70% retrospectively. The two imaging modalities together allowed detection of 68% evaluated prospectively and 91% retrospectively. MR imaging allowed detection of two of five mediastinal adenomas evaluated prospectively and four of five retrospectively. In patients who underwent both imaging studies, MR was more successful in those with previous neck surgery (73% evaluated prospectively and 91% retrospectively) than in those with no prior surgery (57% prospectively and 71% retrospectively). Scintigraphy allowed accurate localization in 64% evaluated prospectively and 64% retrospectively in patients with previous surgery versus 57% prospectively and 86% retrospectively in patients with no prior neck surgery. Four false-positive results were obtained with MR imaging and three with scintigraphy. MR imaging was useful for parathyroid localization in patients with hyperparathyroidism, particularly in patients requiring additional surgery.

  20. Molecular imaging in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Glaudemans, Andor W J M; Slart, Riemer H J A; Bozzao, Alessandro; Bonanno, Elena; Arca, Marcello; Dierckx, Rudi A J O; Signore, Alberto

    2010-12-01

    Atherosclerosis is the major cause of cardiovascular disease, which still has the leading position in morbidity and mortality in the Western world. Many risk factors and pathobiological processes are acting together in the development of atherosclerosis. This leads to different remodelling stages (positive and negative) which are both associated with plaque physiology and clinical presentation. The different remodelling stages of atherosclerosis are explained with their clinical relevance. Recent advances in basic science have established that atherosclerosis is not only a lipid storage disease, but that also inflammation has a fundamental role in all stages of the disease. The molecular events leading to atherosclerosis will be extensively reviewed and described. Further on in this review different modalities and their role in the different stages of atherosclerosis will be discussed. Non-nuclear invasive imaging techniques (intravascular ultrasound, intravascular MRI, intracoronary angioscopy and intravascular optical coherence tomography) and non-nuclear non-invasive imaging techniques (ultrasound with Doppler flow, electron-bean computed tomography, coronary computed tomography angiography, MRI and coronary artery MR angiography) will be reviewed. After that we focus on nuclear imaging techniques for detecting atherosclerotic plaques, divided into three groups: atherosclerotic lesion components, inflammation and thrombosis. This emerging area of nuclear imaging techniques can provide measures of biological activity of atherosclerotic plaques, thereby improving the prediction of clinical events. As we will see in the future perspectives, at present, there is no special tracer that can be called the diagnostic tool to diagnose prospective stroke or infarction in patients. Nevertheless, we expect such a tracer to be developed in the next few years and maybe, theoretically, it could even be used for targeted therapy (in the form of a beta-emitter) to combat

  1. Radionuclide imaging of the liver in human fascioliasis

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera, J.V.; Bermudez, R.H.

    1984-08-01

    The clinical, laboratory, and scintigraphic findings in four cases of human fascioliasis are described. Acute onset of fever, abdominal pain, and weight loss in a person who has ingested watercress constitutes the clinical syndrome often seen. Eosinophilia and alteration in liver function tests, particularly alkaline phosphatase are frequent. Tc-99m sulfur colloid images showed hepatomegaly in four patients, focal defects in two, splenomegaly in three, and increased splenic uptake in two. Gallium citrate (Ga 67) images show increased uptake in the focal lesions in two of two. Sonographic imaging showed focal lucent abnormality in one of three. Liver biopsy findings were nonspecific. The differential diagnosis from other invasive parasitic diseases is discussed. A possible role of hepatic imaging in the evaluation of fascioliasis is suggested.

  2. Flow and Transport of Radionuclides in the Rhizosphere: Imaging and Measurements in a 2D System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pales, Ashley; Darnault, Christophe; Li, Biting; Clifford, Heather; Montgomery, Dawn; Moysey, Stephen; Powell, Brian; DeVol, Tim; Erdmann, Bryan; Edayilam, Nimisha; Tharayil, Nishanth; Dogan, Mine; Martinez, Nicole

    2017-04-01

    This research aims to build upon past 2D tank light transmission methods to quantify real-time flow in unsaturated porous media, understand how exudates effect unstable flow patterns, and understand radionuclide mobility and dispersion in the subsurface. A 2D tank light transmission method was created using a transparent flow through tank coupled with a random rainfall simulator; a commercial LED light and a CMOS DSLR Nikon D5500 camera were used to capture the real-time flow images. The images were broken down from RGB into HVI and analyzed in Matlab to produce quantifiable data about finger formation and water saturation distribution. Radionuclide locations were determined via handheld gamma scanner. Water saturation along the vertical and horizontal profile (Matlab) was used to quantify the finger more objectively than by eye assessment alone. The changes in finger formation and speed of propagation between the control rain water (0.01M NaCl) and the solutions containing plant exudates illustrates that the plant exudates increased the wettability (mobility) of water moving through unsaturated porous media. This understanding of plant exudates effect on unsaturated flow is important for works studying how plants, their roots and exudates, may affect the mobility of radionuclides in unsaturated porous media. As there is an increase in exudate concentration, the mobility of the radionuclides due to changing flow pattern and available water content in porous media may be improved causing more dispersion in the porous media and intake into the plant. Changes in plant root exudation impact the distribution and density of radionuclides in the rhizosphere and vadose zone.

  3. Pitfalls and Limitations of Radionuclide Renal Imaging in Adults.

    PubMed

    Keramida, Georgia; James, Jacqueline M; Prescott, Mary C; Peters, Adrien Michael

    2015-09-01

    To understand pitfalls and limitations in adult renography, it is necessary to understand firstly the physiology of the kidney, especially the magnitude and control of renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate and tubular fluid flow rate, and secondly the pharmacokinetics and renal handling of the three most often used tracers, Tc-99m-mercaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG3), Tc-99m-diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) and Tc-99m-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA). The kidneys may be imaged dynamically with Tc-99m-MAG3 or Tc-99m-DTPA, with or without diuretic challenge, or by static imaging with Tc-99m-DMSA. Protocols are different according to whether the kidney is native or transplanted. Quantitative analysis of dynamic data includes measurement of renal vascularity (important for the transplanted kidney), absolute tracer clearance rates, differential renal function (DRF) and response to diuretic challenge. Static image reveals functional renal parenchymal damage, both focal and global, is useful in the clinical management of obstructive uropathy, renal stone disease and hypertension (under angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition), and is the preferred technique for determining DRF. Diagnosis based on morphological appearances is important in transplant management. Even though nuclear medicine is now in the era of hybrid imaging, renal imaging remains an important subspecialty in nuclear medicine and requires a sound basing in applied physiology, the classical supporting discipline of nuclear medicine.

  4. Radionuclide imaging of myocardial infarction using Tc-99m TBI

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, B.L.; Campbell, S.; Kirshenbaum, J.M.; Lister-James, J.; Jones, A.G.; Davison, A.; Antman, E.

    1985-05-01

    The cationic complex Tc-99m t-butylisonitrile (TBI) concentrates in the myocardial tissue of several animal species. Its myocardial distribution is proportional to blood flow both in zones of ischemia and in normal myocardium at rest. Planar, tomographic, and gated myocardial images have been obtained using Tc-99m TBI in the human. The authors investigated the potential application of Tc-99m TBI imaging to detect and localize myocardial infarction. Four subjects without clinical evidence of cardiovascular disease and five patients with ECG evidence of previous myocardial infarction were studied. Tc-99m TBI (10mCi) was injected intravenously with the patient in a resting state with planar imaging in the anterior, 30 and 70 degree LAO projections beginning one hr after injection. The distribution of the tracer was homogeneous throughout the left ventricular wall in the normal subjects. Regional perfusion defects were present in 4/5 of the patients with myocardial infarction. Location of the defects corresponded to the location of the infarct using ECG criteria (2 inferoposterior and 2 anterior). The patient in whom the Tc-99m TBI image appeared normal had sustained a subendocardial myocardial infarct which could not be localized by ECG; the other 4 pts had transmural infarcts. Anterior and 30 degree LAO images were of excellent quality in all cases; there was overlap of the liver on the inferior wall of the left ventricle on the 70 degree LAO views. The authors conclude that accurate perfusion imaging may be possible using Tc-99m TBI in patients with transmural myocardial infarction.

  5. Incidental vesicocolic fistula on routine bone scintigraphy: Value of additional delayed images and direct radionuclide cystography.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Myung-Hee; Tae Lim, Seok; Jin Jeong, Young; Wook Kim, Dong; Jeong, Hwan-Jeong; Yim, Chang-Yeol

    2010-09-01

    An unexpected vesicocolic fistula can be detected incidentally on routine bone scintigraphy. A 55-year-old man who had a radical colectomy for carcinoma of the sigmoid colon 1 year previously underwent bone scintigraphy to evaluate bone metastasis. Whole-body images showed an abnormal accumulation of radioactivity in the right lower quadrant of the abdomen, but the radioactivity did not precisely define a structure. Additional delayed images obtained after 15 and 24 hours of the initial image localized a vesicocolic fistula. Subsequent radionuclide cystography confirmed leakage of the radioactivity from the bladder.

  6. Breast Cancer Treatment in the Era of Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Edelhauser, Gundula; Funovics, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Summary Molecular imaging employs molecularly targeted probes to visualize and often quantify distinct disease-specific markers and pathways. Modalities like intravital confocal or multiphoton microscopy, near-infrared fluorescence combined with endoscopy, surface reflectance imaging, or fluorescence-mediated tomography, and radionuclide imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) are increasingly used for small animal high-throughput screening, drug development and testing, and monitoring gene therapy experiments. In the clinical treatment of breast cancer, PET and SPECT as well as magnetic resonance-based molecular imaging are already established for the staging of distant disease and intrathoracic nodal status, for patient selection regarding receptor-directed treatments, and to gain early information about treatment efficacy. In the near future, reporter gene imaging during gene therapy and further spatial and qualitative characterization of the disease can become clinically possible with radionuclide and optical methods. Ultimately, it may be expected that every level of breast cancer treatment will be affected by molecular imaging, including screening. PMID:21048912

  7. Molecular imaging in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lascola, Christopher

    2005-11-01

    Molecular imaging represents a new term for a long-standing quest to image cellular and molecular processes in vivo. The development of a successful molecular imaging approach starts with a well-defined diagnostic question best answered using in vivo imaging. A selective target for a particular disease state is then identified and a biocompatible probe selective for that target is developed. Many of the challenges of finding selective disease targets and probes that bind selectively to those targets in vivo are evident in the 25-year history of molecular imaging in Alzheimer's disease. This article provides a brief overview of molecular imaging in Alzheimer's disease and its potential for early diagnosis and treatment development.

  8. In Vivo Mouse Bioluminescence Tomography with Radionuclide-Based Imaging Validation

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yujie; Machado, Hidevaldo B.; Bao, Qinan; Stout, David; Herschman, Harvey

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Bioluminescence imaging, especially planar bioluminescence imaging, has been extensively applied in in vivo preclinical biological research. Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) has the potential to provide more accurate imaging information due to its 3D reconstruction compared with its planar counterpart. Methods In this work, we introduce a positron emission tomography (PET) radionuclide imaging-based strategy to validate the BLT results. X-ray computed tomography, PET, spectrally resolved bioluminescence imaging, and surgical excision were performed on a tumor xenograft mouse model expressing a bioluminescent reporter gene. Results With different spectrally resolved measured data, the BLT reconstructions were acquired based on the third-order simplified spherical harmonics (SP3) approximation and the diffusion approximation (DA). The corresponding tomographic images were obtained for validation of bioluminescence source reconstruction. Conclusion Our results show the strength of PET imaging compared with other validation methods for BLT and improved source localization accuracy based on the SP3 approximation compared with the diffusion approximation. PMID:20464517

  9. The assessment of regional skeletal metabolism: studies of osteoporosis treatments using quantitative radionuclide imaging.

    PubMed

    Blake, Glen M; Frost, Michelle L; Moore, Amelia E B; Siddique, Musib; Fogelman, Ignac

    2011-01-01

    Studies of bone remodeling using bone biopsy and biochemical markers of bone turnover play an important role in research studies to investigate the effect of new osteoporosis treatments on bone quality. Quantitative radionuclide imaging using either positron emission tomography with fluorine-18 sodium fluoride or gamma camera studies with technetium-99m methylene diphosphonate provides a novel tool for studying bone metabolism that complements conventional methods, such as bone turnover markers (BTMs). Unlike BTMs, which measure the integrated response to treatment across the whole skeleton, radionuclide imaging can distinguish the changes occurring at sites of particular clinical interest, such as the spine or proximal femur. Radionuclide imaging can be used to measure either bone uptake or (if done in conjunction with blood sampling) bone plasma clearance. Although the latter is more complicated to perform, unlike bone uptake, it provides a measurement that is specific to the bone metabolic activity at the measurement site. Treatment with risedronate was found to cause a decrease in bone plasma clearance, whereas treatment with the bone anabolic agent teriparatide caused an increase. Studies of teriparatide are of particular interest because the treatment has different effects at different sites in the skeleton, with a substantially greater response in the flat bone of the skull and cortical bone in the femur compared with the lumbar spine. Future studies should include investigations of osteonecrosis of the jaw and atypical fractures of the femur to examine the associated regional changes in bone metabolism and to throw light on the underlying pathologies.

  10. Molecular imaging with engineered physiology

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Mitul; Slusarczyk, Adrian L.; Chapin, Ashley; Barch, Mariya; Jasanoff, Alan

    2016-01-01

    In vivo imaging techniques are powerful tools for evaluating biological systems. Relating image signals to precise molecular phenomena can be challenging, however, due to limitations of the existing optical, magnetic and radioactive imaging probe mechanisms. Here we demonstrate a concept for molecular imaging which bypasses the need for conventional imaging agents by perturbing the endogenous multimodal contrast provided by the vasculature. Variants of the calcitonin gene-related peptide artificially activate vasodilation pathways in rat brain and induce contrast changes that are readily measured by optical and magnetic resonance imaging. CGRP-based agents induce effects at nanomolar concentrations in deep tissue and can be engineered into switchable analyte-dependent forms and genetically encoded reporters suitable for molecular imaging or cell tracking. Such artificially engineered physiological changes, therefore, provide a highly versatile means for sensitive analysis of molecular events in living organisms. PMID:27910951

  11. Molecular imaging with engineered physiology.

    PubMed

    Desai, Mitul; Slusarczyk, Adrian L; Chapin, Ashley; Barch, Mariya; Jasanoff, Alan

    2016-12-02

    In vivo imaging techniques are powerful tools for evaluating biological systems. Relating image signals to precise molecular phenomena can be challenging, however, due to limitations of the existing optical, magnetic and radioactive imaging probe mechanisms. Here we demonstrate a concept for molecular imaging which bypasses the need for conventional imaging agents by perturbing the endogenous multimodal contrast provided by the vasculature. Variants of the calcitonin gene-related peptide artificially activate vasodilation pathways in rat brain and induce contrast changes that are readily measured by optical and magnetic resonance imaging. CGRP-based agents induce effects at nanomolar concentrations in deep tissue and can be engineered into switchable analyte-dependent forms and genetically encoded reporters suitable for molecular imaging or cell tracking. Such artificially engineered physiological changes, therefore, provide a highly versatile means for sensitive analysis of molecular events in living organisms.

  12. Bisphosphonates as radionuclide carriers for imaging or systemic therapy.

    PubMed

    Palma, Elisa; Correia, João D G; Campello, Maria Paula C; Santos, Isabel

    2011-11-01

    Bisphosphonates (BP's), biologically stable analogs of naturally occurring pyrophosphates, became the treatment of choice for pathologic conditions characterized by increased osteoclast-mediated bone resorption, namely Paget's disease, osteoporosis and tumor bone disease. Moreover, the clinical success of BP's is also associated with their use in (99m)Tc-based radiopharmaceuticals for bone imaging. In addition to the successful delivery of (99m)Tc (γ-emitter) to bone, BP's have also been used to deliver β(-)-particle emitting radiometals (e.g.(153)Sm, (186/188)Re) for bone-pain palliation. The main goal of this Review is to update the most recent research efforts toward the synthesis, characterization and biological evaluation of novel BP-containing radiometal complexes and radiohalogenated compounds for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. The structure and in vivo properties of those compounds will be discussed and compared to the clinically available ones, namely in terms of image quality and therapeutic effect. We will also mention briefly the use of BP's as carriers of multimodal nuclear and optical imaging probes. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  13. Radionuclide thyroid imaging in the newborn with suspected hypothyroidism

    SciTech Connect

    Yoosufani, Z.; Karimeddini, M.K.; Spencer, R.P.; Ratzan, S.K.

    1985-05-01

    The authors reviewed their experience with thyroid imaging in newborns with suspected congenital hypothyroidism. The infants were selected through a hypothyroidism screening program. There were 19 infants (14 females, 5 males) from 2 to 8 weeks of age with a blood T4 <6 ..mu..g/dl. Thyroid imaging was performed with either IV or IM injection of 0.5 to 1 mCi of Tc 99m pertechnetate using a gamma camera with a pinhole collimator. Salivary glands and stomach were also imaged for assessing the presence of the transport system. In 6 infants (32%) no thyroid tissue was visualized (thyroid hypoplasia). Four infants (21%) showed ectopic thyroid tissue in the lingual or sublingual area. Two infants (10%) had evidence of goiter. The remaining 7 infants (37%) had normal appearing glands in size and position. TSH values were markedly elevated (> 100 ..mu mu../ml) in all 10 patients with hypoplastic or ectopic thyroid. Two patients were subsequently found to have normal thyroid function (one with TBG deficiency and one with transient hypothyroidism). Thyroidal as well as salivary gland trapping of the radiotracer in these two infants was clearly less than that of adults suggesting immaturity of the transport/trapping mechanism. All 4 patients with ectopic thyroid had markedly increased uptake of the radiotracer. All other patients with elevated TSH levels had increased uptake of the radiotracer as compared to the normals. They conclude that thyroid scanning is an important tool in delineating the etiology of congenital hypothyroidism.

  14. Development of gamma-photon/Cerenkov-light hybrid system for simultaneous imaging of I-131 radionuclide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Suzuki, Mayumi; Kato, Katsuhiko; Watabe, Tadashi; Ikeda, Hayato; Kanai, Yasukazu; Ogata, Yoshimune; Hatazawa, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Although iodine 131 (I-131) is used for radionuclide therapy, high resolution images are difficult to obtain with conventional gamma cameras because of the high energy of I-131 gamma photons (364 keV). Cerenkov-light imaging is a possible method for beta emitting radionuclides, and I-131 (606 MeV maximum beta energy) is a candidate to obtain high resolution images. We developed a high energy gamma camera system for I-131 radionuclide and combined it with a Cerenkov-light imaging system to form a gamma-photon/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system to compare the simultaneously measured images of these two modalities. The high energy gamma imaging detector used 0.85-mm×0.85-mm×10-mm thick GAGG scintillator pixels arranged in a 44×44 matrix with a 0.1-mm thick reflector and optical coupled to a Hamamatsu 2 in. square position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT: H12700 MOD). The gamma imaging detector was encased in a 2 cm thick tungsten shield, and a pinhole collimator was mounted on its top to form a gamma camera system. The Cerenkov-light imaging system was made of a high sensitivity cooled CCD camera. The Cerenkov-light imaging system was combined with the gamma camera using optical mirrors to image the same area of the subject. With this configuration, we simultaneously imaged the gamma photons and the Cerenkov-light from I-131 in the subjects. The spatial resolution and sensitivity of the gamma camera system for I-131 were respectively 3 mm FWHM and 10 cps/MBq for the high sensitivity collimator at 10 cm from the collimator surface. The spatial resolution of the Cerenkov-light imaging system was 0.64 mm FWHM at 10 cm from the system surface. Thyroid phantom and rat images were successfully obtained with the developed gamma-photon/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system, allowing direct comparison of these two modalities. Our developed gamma-photon/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system will be useful to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of these two

  15. Radionuclide imaging in the post-genomic era.

    PubMed

    Haberkorn, Uwe; Altmann, Annette

    2002-01-01

    The assessment of gene function, which follows the completion of human genome sequencing, may be performed using the tools of the genome program. These tools represent high-throughput methods evaluating changes in the expression of many or all genes of an organism at the same time in order to investigate genetic pathways for normal development and disease. They describe proteins on a proteome-wide scale, thereby, creating a new way of doing cell research which results in the determination of three dimensional protein structures and the description of protein networks. These descriptions may then be used for the design of new hypotheses and experiments in the traditional physiological, biochemical, and pharmacological sense. The evaluation of genetically manipulated animals or new designed biomolecules will require a thorough understanding of physiology, biochemistry, and pharmacology and the experimental approaches will involve many new technologies including in vivo imaging with SPECT and positron emission tomography (PET). Nuclear medicine procedures may be applied for the determination of gene function and regulation using established and new tracers or using in vivo reporter genes such as genes encoding enzymes, receptors, antigens, or transporters. Pharmacogenomics will identify new surrogate markers for therapy monitoring which may represent potential new tracers for imaging. Also drug distribution studies for new therapeutic biomolecules are needed at least during preclinical stages of drug development. Finally, new biomolecules will be developed by bioengineering methods, which may be used for isotope-based diagnosis and treatment of disease. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Bone-Targeted Imaging and Radionuclide Therapy in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Iagaru, Andrei H.; Mittra, Erik; Colletti, Patrick M.

    2016-01-01

    Although selective metabolic and receptor-based molecular agents will surely be included in the future of prostate cancer diagnosis and therapy, currently available inorganic compounds—such as 18F-NaF for the diagnosis of bony disease and 223RaCl2 for the therapy of bone metastases—were recently shown to be superior to standard 99mTc-phosphonates for diagnosis and 153Sm-ethylenediaminetetramethylene phosphonate or 89SrCl2 for therapy. The advantages of 18F-NaF include improved lesion detection and, when used in combination with CT, improved diagnostic confidence and specificity. In addition to being the first approved α-emitter, 223RaCl2 is the first radiopharmaceutical to show an increase in overall survival, a decrease in skeletal events, palliation of bone pain, and a low profile of adverse reactions (which are mild and manageable). The management of metastatic bone disease with 223RaCl2 is uniquely satisfying, as patients can be monitored directly during their monthly treatment visits. PMID:27694165

  17. Pulp cell tracking by radionuclide imaging for dental tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Souron, Jean-Baptiste; Petiet, Anne; Decup, Franck; Tran, Xuan Vinh; Lesieur, Julie; Poliard, Anne; Le Guludec, Dominique; Letourneur, Didier; Chaussain, Catherine; Rouzet, Francois; Opsahl Vital, Sibylle

    2014-03-01

    Pulp engineering with dental mesenchymal stem cells is a promising therapy for injured teeth. An important point is to determine the fate of implanted cells in the pulp over time and particularly during the early phase following implantation. Indeed, the potential engraftment of the implanted cells in other organs has to be assessed, in particular, to evaluate the risk of inducing ectopic mineralization. In this study, our aim was to follow by nuclear imaging the radiolabeled pulp cells after implantation in the rat emptied pulp chamber. For that purpose, indium-111-oxine (¹¹¹In-oxine)-labeled rat pulp cells were added to polymerizing type I collagen hydrogel to obtain a pulp equivalent. This scaffold was implanted in the emptied pulp chamber space in the upper first rat molar. Labeled cells were then tracked during 3 weeks by helical single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/computed tomography performed on a dual modality dedicated small animal camera. Negative controls were performed using lysed radiolabeled cells obtained in a hypotonic solution. In vitro data indicated that ¹¹¹In-oxine labeling did not affect cell viability and proliferation. In vivo experiments allowed a noninvasive longitudinal follow-up of implanted living cells for at least 3 weeks and indicated that SPECT signal intensity was related to implanted cell integrity. Notably, there was no detectable systemic release of implanted cells from the tooth. In addition, histological analysis of the samples showed mitotically active fibroblastic cells as well as neoangiogenesis and nervous fibers in pulp equivalents seeded with entire cells, whereas pulp equivalents prepared from lysed cells were devoid of cell colonization. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that efficient labeling of pulp cells can be achieved and, for the first time, that these cells can be followed up after implantation in the tooth by nuclear imaging. Furthermore, it appears that grafted cells retained the label

  18. Pulp Cell Tracking by Radionuclide Imaging for Dental Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Souron, Jean-Baptiste; Petiet, Anne; Decup, Franck; Tran, Xuan Vinh; Lesieur, Julie; Poliard, Anne; Le Guludec, Dominique; Letourneur, Didier; Chaussain, Catherine; Rouzet, Francois

    2014-01-01

    Pulp engineering with dental mesenchymal stem cells is a promising therapy for injured teeth. An important point is to determine the fate of implanted cells in the pulp over time and particularly during the early phase following implantation. Indeed, the potential engraftment of the implanted cells in other organs has to be assessed, in particular, to evaluate the risk of inducing ectopic mineralization. In this study, our aim was to follow by nuclear imaging the radiolabeled pulp cells after implantation in the rat emptied pulp chamber. For that purpose, indium-111-oxine (111In-oxine)-labeled rat pulp cells were added to polymerizing type I collagen hydrogel to obtain a pulp equivalent. This scaffold was implanted in the emptied pulp chamber space in the upper first rat molar. Labeled cells were then tracked during 3 weeks by helical single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/computed tomography performed on a dual modality dedicated small animal camera. Negative controls were performed using lysed radiolabeled cells obtained in a hypotonic solution. In vitro data indicated that 111In-oxine labeling did not affect cell viability and proliferation. In vivo experiments allowed a noninvasive longitudinal follow-up of implanted living cells for at least 3 weeks and indicated that SPECT signal intensity was related to implanted cell integrity. Notably, there was no detectable systemic release of implanted cells from the tooth. In addition, histological analysis of the samples showed mitotically active fibroblastic cells as well as neoangiogenesis and nervous fibers in pulp equivalents seeded with entire cells, whereas pulp equivalents prepared from lysed cells were devoid of cell colonization. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that efficient labeling of pulp cells can be achieved and, for the first time, that these cells can be followed up after implantation in the tooth by nuclear imaging. Furthermore, it appears that grafted cells retained the label and

  19. The potential for Cerenkov luminescence imaging of alpha-emitting radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, N L; Graves, E E

    2012-02-07

    Targeted α-emitting drugs are promising for cancer therapy, but cannot be effectively imaged by conventional techniques. Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) has previously been shown capable of imaging β(+)- and β(-)-emitting radionuclides in vivo and could have the potential to image α-emitters. Cerenkov light production from α-emitters is through Compton scattering and from farther down the decay chain. This causes the Cerenkov production to vary in time and depend on sample geometry, complicating the interpretation of CLI images. We used the simulation toolkit Geant4 to predict the Cerenkov light output from five α-emitting radionuclides that have therapeutic potential: (225)Ac, (230)U, (213)Bi, (212)Bi and (212)At. We found that (225)Ac, (213)Bi and (212)Bi produced an order of magnitude more Cerenkov light than (18)F. However, the light from (225)Ac is delayed from the initial decay, possibly decreasing the correlation of the drug and light source. This indicates that CLI will not be helpful in the development of some α-emitting drugs.

  20. The need for routine delayed radionuclide hepatobiliary imaging in patients with intercurrent disease

    SciTech Connect

    Drane, W.E.; Nelp, W.B.; Rudd, T.G.

    1984-06-01

    A retrospective review was made of all radionuclide hepatobiliary studies performed in a major trauma center over a 27-month period and correlated with the patients' clinical course. In a population of 42 patients (27 of whom were on total parenteral nutrition (TPN)) who had severe intercurrent illness (primarily trauma), and an additional 18 patients who had hepatocellular dysfunction, hepatobiliary imaging confirmed a patent cystic duct in 43 of 60 patients (72%). Fourteen of these 43 patients (33%) had gallbladder visualization at later than one hour after radiotracer administration, and seven of these 14 required imaging from four to 24 hours. Of 17 patients who had nonvisualization of the gallbladder, four had surgically proved acute cholecystitis. Images of nine of the remaining 13 patients with gallbladder nonvisualization were not obtained for 24 hours. The presence of gallstones, wall thickening, or sludge on sonograms did not correlate with cystic duct patency, and was not specific for acute cholecystitis. Though gallbladder function is compromised in the population with severe intercurrent disease, radionuclide hepatobiliary imaging is still valuable; it can confirm a patent cystic duct in at least 72% of patients if routine imaging is continued for up to 24 hours.

  1. An automated voxelized dosimetry tool for radionuclide therapy based on serial quantitative SPECT/CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Price A.; Kron, Tomas; Beauregard, Jean-Mathieu; Hofman, Michael S.; Hogg, Annette; Hicks, Rodney J.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To create an accurate map of the distribution of radiation dose deposition in healthy and target tissues during radionuclide therapy.Methods: Serial quantitative SPECT/CT images were acquired at 4, 24, and 72 h for 28 {sup 177}Lu-octreotate peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) administrations in 17 patients with advanced neuroendocrine tumors. Deformable image registration was combined with an in-house programming algorithm to interpolate pharmacokinetic uptake and clearance at a voxel level. The resultant cumulated activity image series are comprised of values representing the total number of decays within each voxel's volume. For PRRT, cumulated activity was translated to absorbed dose based on Monte Carlo-determined voxel S-values at a combination of long and short ranges. These dosimetric image sets were compared for mean radiation absorbed dose to at-risk organs using a conventional MIRD protocol (OLINDA 1.1).Results: Absorbed dose values to solid organs (liver, kidneys, and spleen) were within 10% using both techniques. Dose estimates to marrow were greater using the voxelized protocol, attributed to the software incorporating crossfire effect from nearby tumor volumes.Conclusions: The technique presented offers an efficient, automated tool for PRRT dosimetry based on serial post-therapy imaging. Following retrospective analysis, this method of high-resolution dosimetry may allow physicians to prescribe activity based on required dose to tumor volume or radiation limits to healthy tissue in individual patients.

  2. Scintillating balloon-enabled fiber-optic system for radionuclide imaging of atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed

    Zaman, Raiyan T; Kosuge, Hisanori; Carpenter, Colin; Sun, Conroy; McConnell, Michael V; Xing, Lei

    2015-05-01

    Atherosclerosis underlies coronary artery disease, the leading cause of death in the United States and worldwide. Detection of coronary plaque inflammation remains challenging. In this study, we developed a scintillating balloon-enabled fiber-optic radionuclide imaging (SBRI) system to improve the sensitivity and resolution of plaque imaging using (18)F-FDG, a marker of vascular inflammation, and tested it in a murine model. The fiber-optic system uses a Complementary Metal-Oxide Silicon (CMOS) camera with a distal ferrule terminated with a wide-angle lens. The novelty of this system is a scintillating balloon in the front of the wide-angle lens to image light from the decay of (18)F-FDG emission signal. To identify the optimal scintillating materials with respect to resolution, we calculated the modulation transfer function of yttrium-aluminum-garnet doped with cerium, anthracene, and calcium fluoride doped with europium (CaF2:Eu) phosphors using an edge pattern and a thin-line optical phantom. The scintillating balloon was then fabricated from 10 mL of silicone RTV catalyst mixed with 1 mL of base and 50 mg of CaF2:Eu per mL. The addition of a lutetium oxyorthosilicate scintillating crystal (500 μm thick) to the balloon was also investigated. The SBRI system was tested in a murine atherosclerosis model: carotid-ligated mice (n = 5) were injected with (18)F-FDG, followed by ex vivo imaging of the macrophage-rich carotid plaques and nonligated controls. Confirmatory imaging of carotid plaques and controls was also performed by an external optical imaging system and autoradiography. Analyses of the different phosphors showed that CaF2:Eu enabled the best resolution of 1.2 μm. The SBRI system detected almost a 4-fold-higher radioluminescence signal from the ligated left carotid artery than the nonligated right carotid: 1.63 × 10(2) ± 4.01 × 10(1) vs. 4.21 × 10(1) ± 2.09 × 10(0) (photon counts), P = 0.006. We found no significant benefit to adding a

  3. Advances in multimodal molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Auletta, Luigi; Gramanzini, Matteo; Gargiulo, Sara; Albanese, Sandra; Salvatore, Marco; Greco, Adelaide

    2017-03-01

    Preclinical molecular imaging is an emerging field. Improving the ability of scientists to study the molecular basis of human pathology in animals is of the utmost importance for future advances in all fields of human medicine. Moreover, the possibility of developing new imaging techniques or of implementing old ones adapted to the clinic is a significant area. Cardiology, neurology, immunology and oncology have all been studied with preclinical molecular imaging. The functional techniques of photoacoustic imaging (PAI), fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT), positron emission tomography (PET), and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in association with each other or with the anatomic reference provided by computed tomography (CT) as well as with anatomic and functional information provided by magnetic resonance (MR) have all been proficiently applied to animal models of human disease. All the above-mentioned imaging techniques have shown their ability to explore the molecular mechanisms involved in animal models of disease. The clinical translatability of most of the techniques motivates the ongoing study of their possible fields of application. The ability to combine two or more techniques allows obtaining as much information as possible on the molecular processes involved in pathologies, reducing the number of animals necessary in each experiment. Merging molecular probes compatible with various imaging technique will further expand the capability to achieve the best results.

  4. Beta camera for static and dynamic imaging of charged-particle emitting radionuclides in biologic samples.

    PubMed

    Ljunggren, K; Strand, S E

    1990-12-01

    A detection system based on microchannel plates has been constructed to image charged particles emitted by radionuclides in biomedical samples. This technique has significant advantages over conventional film autoradiography for investigating the distribution of radiolabeled compounds: shorter acquisition times due to the high sensitivity, easier sample handling, direct quantification and the ability to perform dynamic studies. The detector performance shows a spatial resolution of 0.9 mm for carbon-14 (14C) (0.156 MeV), good linearity and homogeneity. The noise level is below 50/(cm2.sec). Successful imaging with this system has been performed with beta-emitters 14C, sulfur-35 (35S), iodine-131 (131I), yttrium-90 (90Y), and positron emitters gallium-68 (68Ga), and fluorine-18 (18F). Dynamic studies of axonal transport of 35S-methionine in a nerve, and static images of 90Y-labeled monoclonal antibodies in slices of tumors are presented. The system shows promise for rapid quantitative imaging of charged-particle emitting radionuclides in small biologic samples.

  5. Use of radionuclide imaging in the early diagnosis and treatment of renal allograft rejection.

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, S R; Mattern, W D; Staab, E; Johnson, G

    1975-01-01

    Data are presented on the clinical application of radionuclide imaging to evaluate changes in cadaver transplant function in the immediate postoperative period. The method uses orthoiodohippuric acid (hippuran) administered IV, with scintillation imaging, and curve analysis by a digital computer. An initial study is always obtained 24 hours after transplantation. Serial studies are then obtained, as needed, to interpret the clinical course. Selected cases are presented which illustrate the use of this protocol in various clinical settings. In the oliguric patient serial studies have been of particular value. They have identified ATN so that over-enthusiastic treatment for rejection could be avoided. They have also identified acute rejection complicating ATN so that high dose steroid therapy could be administered appropriately. In the non-oliguric patient they have frequently contributed to the early diagnosis of acute rejection, and they have been useful in monitoring the effect and duration of treatment for severe rejection crisis. It is concluded that radionuclide imaging studies, when carefully applied and interpreted, are a valuable adjunct to the management of patients in this complex clinical setting. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 9. Fig. 10. PMID:1093490

  6. Role of radionuclide imaging for diagnosis of device and prosthetic valve infections.

    PubMed

    Sarrazin, Jean-François; Philippon, François; Trottier, Mikaël; Tessier, Michel

    2016-09-26

    Cardiovascular implantable electronic device (CIED) infection and prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) remain a diagnostic challenge. Cardiac imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and management of patients with CIED infection or PVE. Over the past few years, cardiac radionuclide imaging has gained a key role in the diagnosis of these patients, and in assessing the need for surgery, mainly in the most difficult cases. Both (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ((18)F-FDG PET/CT) and radiolabelled white blood cell single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (WBC SPECT/CT) have been studied in these situations. In their 2015 guidelines for the management of infective endocarditis, the European Society of Cardiology incorporated cardiac nuclear imaging as part of their diagnostic algorithm for PVE, but not CIED infection since the data were judged insufficient at the moment. This article reviews the actual knowledge and recent studies on the use of (18)F-FDG PET/CT and WBC SPECT/CT in the context of CIED infection and PVE, and describes the technical aspects of cardiac radionuclide imaging. It also discusses their accepted and potential indications for the diagnosis and management of CIED infection and PVE, the limitations of these tests, and potential areas of future research.

  7. Role of radionuclide imaging for diagnosis of device and prosthetic valve infections

    PubMed Central

    Sarrazin, Jean-François; Philippon, François; Trottier, Mikaël; Tessier, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular implantable electronic device (CIED) infection and prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) remain a diagnostic challenge. Cardiac imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and management of patients with CIED infection or PVE. Over the past few years, cardiac radionuclide imaging has gained a key role in the diagnosis of these patients, and in assessing the need for surgery, mainly in the most difficult cases. Both 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) and radiolabelled white blood cell single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (WBC SPECT/CT) have been studied in these situations. In their 2015 guidelines for the management of infective endocarditis, the European Society of Cardiology incorporated cardiac nuclear imaging as part of their diagnostic algorithm for PVE, but not CIED infection since the data were judged insufficient at the moment. This article reviews the actual knowledge and recent studies on the use of 18F-FDG PET/CT and WBC SPECT/CT in the context of CIED infection and PVE, and describes the technical aspects of cardiac radionuclide imaging. It also discusses their accepted and potential indications for the diagnosis and management of CIED infection and PVE, the limitations of these tests, and potential areas of future research. PMID:27721936

  8. PSMA Ligands for Radionuclide Imaging and Therapy of Prostate Cancer: Clinical Status

    PubMed Central

    Lütje, Susanne; Heskamp, Sandra; Cornelissen, Alexander S.; Poeppel, Thorsten D.; van den Broek, Sebastiaan A. M. W.; Rosenbaum-Krumme, Sandra; Bockisch, Andreas; Gotthardt, Martin; Rijpkema, Mark; Boerman, Otto C.

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common malignancy in men worldwide, leading to substantial morbidity and mortality. At present, imaging of PCa has become increasingly important for staging, restaging, and treatment selection. Until recently, choline-based positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) represented the state-of-the-art radionuclide imaging technique for these purposes. However, its application is limited to patients with high PSA levels and Gleason scores. Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a promising new target for specific imaging of PCa, because it is upregulated in the majority of PCa. Moreover, PSMA can serve as a target for therapeutic applications. Currently, several small-molecule PSMA ligands with excellent in vivo tumor targeting characteristics are being investigated for their potential in theranostic applications in PCa. Here, a review of the recent developments in PSMA-based diagnostic imaging and therapy in patients with PCa with radiolabeled PSMA ligands is provided. PMID:26681984

  9. PSMA Ligands for Radionuclide Imaging and Therapy of Prostate Cancer: Clinical Status.

    PubMed

    Lütje, Susanne; Heskamp, Sandra; Cornelissen, Alexander S; Poeppel, Thorsten D; van den Broek, Sebastiaan A M W; Rosenbaum-Krumme, Sandra; Bockisch, Andreas; Gotthardt, Martin; Rijpkema, Mark; Boerman, Otto C

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common malignancy in men worldwide, leading to substantial morbidity and mortality. At present, imaging of PCa has become increasingly important for staging, restaging, and treatment selection. Until recently, choline-based positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) represented the state-of-the-art radionuclide imaging technique for these purposes. However, its application is limited to patients with high PSA levels and Gleason scores. Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a promising new target for specific imaging of PCa, because it is upregulated in the majority of PCa. Moreover, PSMA can serve as a target for therapeutic applications. Currently, several small-molecule PSMA ligands with excellent in vivo tumor targeting characteristics are being investigated for their potential in theranostic applications in PCa. Here, a review of the recent developments in PSMA-based diagnostic imaging and therapy in patients with PCa with radiolabeled PSMA ligands is provided.

  10. Advances in molecular imaging for breast cancer detection and characterization

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Advances in our ability to assay molecular processes, including gene expression, protein expression, and molecular and cellular biochemistry, have fueled advances in our understanding of breast cancer biology and have led to the identification of new treatments for patients with breast cancer. The ability to measure biologic processes without perturbing them in vivo allows the opportunity to better characterize tumor biology and to assess how biologic and cytotoxic therapies alter critical pathways of tumor response and resistance. By accurately characterizing tumor properties and biologic processes, molecular imaging plays an increasing role in breast cancer science, clinical care in diagnosis and staging, assessment of therapeutic targets, and evaluation of responses to therapies. This review describes the current role and potential of molecular imaging modalities for detection and characterization of breast cancer and focuses primarily on radionuclide-based methods. PMID:22423895

  11. Pretargeted Molecular Imaging and Radioimmunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Goldenberg, David M.; Chang, Chien-Hsing; Rossi, Edmund A.; J, William; McBride; Sharkey, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    Pretargeting is a multi-step process that first has an unlabeled bispecific antibody (bsMAb) localize within a tumor by virtue of its anti-tumor binding site(s) before administering a small, fast-clearing radiolabeled compound that then attaches to the other portion of the bsMAb. The compound's rapid clearance significantly reduces radiation exposure outside of the tumor and its small size permits speedy delivery to the tumor, creating excellent tumor/nontumor ratios in less than 1 hour. Haptens that bind to an anti-hapten antibody, biotin that binds to streptavidin, or an oligonucleotide binding to a complementary oligonucleotide sequence have all been radiolabeled for use by pretargeting. This review will focus on a highly flexible anti-hapten bsMAb platform that has been used to target a variety of radionuclides to image (SPECT and PET) as well as treat tumors. PMID:22737190

  12. Central nervous system disorders affecting the heart-insights from radionuclide imaging.

    PubMed

    Georgakopoulos, Alexandros; Pianou, Nikoletta; Anagnostopoulos, Constantinos

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing research activity focusing on the brain heart cross-talk. A great variety of brain disorders affect the heart and recent developments in neurosciences have revealed the particular role of specific neuroanatomic sites on heart rhythm and rate, myocardial function and vascular tone. Cardiac radionuclide imaging plays a pivotal role in this setting, since not only helps elucidating underlying pathobiological mechanisms but in addition, it promises exciting possibilities for early identification of patients at risk of developing cardiovascular manifestations of certain neurological diseases.

  13. Relationship of brain imaging with radionuclides and with x-ray computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, D.E.

    1981-03-03

    Because of high sensitivity and specificity for altered local cerebral structure, x-ray computed tomography (CT) is the preferred initial diagnostic imaging study under most circumstances when cerebral disease is suspected. CT has no competitor for detecting fresh intracerebral hemorrhage. Radionuclide imaging (RN) scan is preferred when relative perfusion is to be assessed, in patients allergic to contrast media, and when an adequate CT study is not technically possible. (RN) plays an important complementary role to CT, especially for patients suspected of subacute or chronic subdura hematoma, cerebral infarction, arteriovenous malformations, meningitis, encephalitis, normal pressure hydrocephalus, or when CT findings are inconclusive. When CT is not available, RN serves as a good screening study for suspected cerebral tumor, infection, recent infarction, arteriovenous malformation, and chronic subdural hematoma. Future improvement in radionuclide imaging by means of emission composition potential. The compound plating approacl threshold for all the investigated transistors and fast neutron spectra lies within the raal. The value of the potential slightly changes with the coordinate change in this region, i.e. the charge on a collecting electrode is not practically guided up to a certain moment of time during the movement of nonequilibrium carriers.

  14. Multi-Modal Nano-Probes for Radionuclide and 5-color Near Infrared Optical Lymphatic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Hisataka; Koyama, Yoshinori; Barrett, Tristan; Hama, Yukihiro; Regino, Celeste A. S.; Shin, In Soo; Jang, Beom-Su; Le, Nhat; Paik, Chang H.; Choyke, Peter L.; Urano, Yasuteru

    2008-01-01

    Current contrast agents generally have one function and can only be imaged in monochrome, therefore, the majority of imaging methods can only impart uniparametric information. A single nano-particle has the potential to be loaded with multiple payloads. Such multi-modality probes have the ability to be imaged by more than one imaging technique, which could compensate for the weakness or even combine the advantages of each individual modality. Furthermore, optical imaging using different optical probes enables us to achieve multi-color in vivo imaging, wherein multiple parameters can be read from a single image. To allow differentiation of multiple optical signals in vivo, each probe should have a close but different near infrared emission. To this end, we synthesized nano-probes with multi-modal and multi-color potential, which employed a polyamidoamine dendrimer platform linked to both radionuclides and optical probes, permitting dual-modality scintigraphic and 5-color near infrared optical lymphatic imaging using a multiple excitation spectrally-resolved fluorescence imaging technique. PMID:19079788

  15. Radionuclide imaging of myocardial perfusion and viability in assessment of acute myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, D.S.; Kiat, H.; Maddahi, J.; Shah, P.K.

    1989-07-18

    Technical advances in radionuclide imaging have important implications for the management of patients with acute myocardial infarction. Single-photon emission computerized tomography with thallium 201 (TI-201) offers greater accuracy than planar imaging in detecting, localizing and sizing myocardial perfusion defects. Use of single-photon emission computerized tomography with TI-201 should allow for a more accurate assessment of prognosis after myocardial infarction. A new radiopharmaceutical, technetium 99-m methoxyisobutyl isonitrile, provides a number of advantages over TI-201, including higher quality images, lack of redistribution, and the ability to assess first-pass ventricular function. Applications of TI-201 and technetium 99-m methoxyisobutyl isonitrile include assessment of arterial patency and myocardial salvage immediately after thrombolytic therapy, detection of resting ischemia after thrombolytic therapy, targeting of subsets of patients for further intervention, and predischarge assessment to predict the future course of patients after an acute myocardial infarction.

  16. Nanobody: The “Magic Bullet” for Molecular Imaging?

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarty, Rubel; Goel, Shreya; Cai, Weibo

    2014-01-01

    Molecular imaging involves the non-invasive investigation of biological processes in vivo at the cellular and molecular level, which can play diverse roles in better understanding and treatment of various diseases. Recently, single domain antigen-binding fragments known as 'nanobodies' were bioengineered and tested for molecular imaging applications. Small molecular size (~15 kDa) and suitable configuration of the complementarity determining regions (CDRs) of nanobodies offer many desirable features suitable for imaging applications, such as rapid targeting and fast blood clearance, high solubility, high stability, easy cloning, modular nature, and the capability of binding to cavities and difficult-to-access antigens. Using nanobody-based probes, several imaging techniques such as radionuclide-based, optical and ultrasound have been employed for visualization of target expression in various disease models. This review summarizes the recent developments in the use of nanobody-based probes for molecular imaging applications. The preclinical data reported to date are quite promising, and it is expected that nanobody-based molecular imaging agents will play an important role in the diagnosis and management of various diseases. PMID:24578722

  17. Nuclear molecular imaging with nanoparticles: radiochemistry, applications and translation

    PubMed Central

    Abou, D S; Pickett, J E

    2015-01-01

    Molecular imaging provides considerable insight into biological processes for greater understanding of health and disease. Numerous advances in medical physics, chemistry and biology have driven the growth of this field in the past two decades. With exquisite sensitivity, depth of detection and potential for theranostics, radioactive imaging approaches have played a major role in the emergence of molecular imaging. At the same time, developments in materials science, characterization and synthesis have led to explosive progress in the nanoparticle (NP) sciences. NPs are generally defined as particles with a diameter in the nanometre size range. Unique physical, chemical and biological properties arise at this scale, stimulating interest for applications as diverse as energy production and storage, chemical catalysis and electronics. In biomedicine, NPs have generated perhaps the greatest attention. These materials directly interface with life at the subcellular scale of nucleic acids, membranes and proteins. In this review, we will detail the advances made in combining radioactive imaging and NPs. First, we provide an overview of the NP platforms and their properties. This is followed by a look at methods for radiolabelling NPs with gamma-emitting radionuclides for use in single photon emission CT and planar scintigraphy. Next, utilization of positron-emitting radionuclides for positron emission tomography is considered. Finally, recent advances for multimodal nuclear imaging with NPs and efforts for clinical translation and ongoing trials are discussed. PMID:26133075

  18. Molecular SPECT Imaging: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Magdy M.; Tremoleda, Jordi L.; Bayomy, Tamer B.; Gsell, Willy

    2011-01-01

    Molecular imaging has witnessed a tremendous change over the last decade. Growing interest and emphasis are placed on this specialized technology represented by developing new scanners, pharmaceutical drugs, diagnostic agents, new therapeutic regimens, and ultimately, significant improvement of patient health care. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) have their signature on paving the way to molecular diagnostics and personalized medicine. The former will be the topic of the current paper where the authors address the current position of the molecular SPECT imaging among other imaging techniques, describing strengths and weaknesses, differences between SPECT and PET, and focusing on different SPECT designs and detection systems. Radiopharmaceutical compounds of clinical as well-preclinical interest have also been reviewed. Moreover, the last section covers several application, of μSPECT imaging in many areas of disease detection and diagnosis. PMID:21603240

  19. Techniques for loading technetium-99m and rhenium-186/188 radionuclides into pre-formed liposomes for diagnostic imaging and radionuclide therapy.

    PubMed

    Goins, Beth; Bao, Ande; Phillips, William T

    2010-01-01

    Liposomes can serve as carriers of radionuclides for diagnostic imaging and therapeutic applications. Herein, procedures are outlined for radiolabeling liposomes with the gamma-emitting radionuclide, technetium-99m ((99m)Tc), for non-invasive detection of disease and for monitoring the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of liposomal drugs, and/or with therapeutic beta-emitting radionuclides, rhenium-186/188 ((186/188)Re), for radionuclide therapy. These efficient and practical liposome radiolabeling methods use a post-labeling mechanism to load (99m)Tc or (186/188)Re into pre-formed liposomes prepared in advance of the labeling procedure. For all liposome radiolabeling methods described, a lipophilic chelator is used to transport (99m)Tc or (186/188)Re across the lipid bilayer of the pre-formed liposomes. Once within the liposome interior, the pre-encapsulated glutathione or ammonium sulfate (pH) gradient provides for stable entrapment of the (99m)Tc and (186/188)Re within the liposomes. In the first method, (99m)Tc is transported across the lipid bilayer by the lipophilic chelator, hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (HMPAO) and (99m)Tc-HMPAO becomes trapped by interaction with the pre-encapsulated glutathione within the liposomes. In the second method, (99m)Tc or (186/188)Re is transported across the lipid bilayer by the lipophilic chelator, N,N-bis(2-mercaptoethyl)-N',N'-diethylethylenediamine (BMEDA), and (99m)Tc-BMEDA or (186/188)Re-BMEDA becomes trapped by interaction with pre-encapsulated glutathione within the liposomes. In the third method, an ammonium sulfate (pH) gradient loading technique is employed using liposomes with an extraliposomal pH of 7.4 and an interior pH of 5.1. BMEDA, which is lipophilic at pH 7.4, serves as a lipophilic chelator for (99m)Tc or (186/188)Re to transport the radionuclides across the lipid bilayer. Once within the more acidic liposome interior, (99m)Tc/(186/188)Re-BMEDA complex becomes protonated and more hydrophilic, which

  20. Techniques for Loading Technetium-99m and Rhenium-186/188 Radionuclides into Preformed Liposomes for Diagnostic Imaging and Radionuclide Therapy.

    PubMed

    Goins, Beth; Bao, Ande; Phillips, William T

    2017-01-01

    Liposomes can serve as carriers of radionuclides for diagnostic imaging and therapeutic applications. Herein, procedures are outlined for radiolabeling liposomes with the gamma-emitting radionuclide, technetium-99m ((99m)Tc), for noninvasive detection of disease and for monitoring the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of liposomal drugs, and/or with therapeutic beta-emitting radionuclides, rhenium-186/188 ((186/188)Re), for radionuclide therapy. These efficient and practical liposome radiolabeling methods use a post-labeling mechanism to load (99m)Tc or (186/188)Re into preformed liposomes prepared in advance of the labeling procedure. For all liposome radiolabeling methods described, a lipophilic chelator is used to transport (99m)Tc or (186/188)Re across the lipid bilayer of the preformed liposomes. Once within the liposome interior, the pre-encapsulated glutathione or ammonium sulfate (pH) gradient provides for stable entrapment of the (99m)Tc and (186/188)Re within the liposomes. In the first method, (99m)Tc is transported across the lipid bilayer by the lipophilic chelator, hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (HMPAO) and (99m)Tc-HMPAO becomes trapped by interaction with the pre-encapsulated glutathione within the liposomes. In the second method, (99m)Tc or (186/188)Re is transported across the lipid bilayer by the lipophilic chelator, N,N-bis(2-mercaptoethyl)-N',N'-diethylethylenediamine (BMEDA), and (99m)Tc-BMEDA or (186/188)Re-BMEDA becomes trapped by interaction with pre-encapsulated glutathione within the liposomes. In the third method, an ammonium sulfate (pH) gradient loading technique is employed using liposomes with an extraliposomal pH of 7.4 and an interior pH of 5.1. BMEDA, which is lipophilic at pH 7.4, serves as a lipophilic chelator for (99m)Tc or (186/188)Re to transport the radionuclides across the lipid bilayer. Once within the more acidic liposome interior, (99m)Tc/(186/188)Re-BMEDA complex becomes protonated and more hydrophilic, which results

  1. Design and Development of Molecular Imaging Probes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kai; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2013-01-01

    Molecular imaging, the visualization, characterization and measurement of biological processes at the cellular, subcellular level, or even molecular level in living subjects, has rapidly gained importance in the dawning era of personalized medicine. Molecular imaging takes advantage of the traditional diagnostic imaging techniques and introduces molecular imaging probes to determine the expression of indicative molecular markers at different stages of diseases and disorders. As a key component of molecular imaging, molecular imaging probe must be able to specifically reach the target of interest in vivo while retaining long enough to be detected. A desirable molecular imaging probe with clinical translation potential is expected to have unique characteristics. Therefore, design and development of molecular imaging probe is frequently a challenging endeavor for medicinal chemists. This review summarizes the general principles of molecular imaging probe design and some fundamental strategies of molecular imaging probe development with a number of illustrative examples. PMID:20388106

  2. Radionuclide imaging: Past, present and future outlook in the diagnosis of infected prosthetic joints.

    PubMed

    Brammen, Lindsay; Palestro, Christopher; Sinzinger, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    A serious complication of joint replacement surgery is infection, which results in prolonged invalidity as well as removal and subsequent re-implantation after lengthy antibiotic therapy. In terms of diagnostic imaging, nuclear medicine has presented several tracers and imaging modalities over the years to be used in prosthetic joint infection. The PubMed/MEDLINE literature database was systematically examined for publications on infection, arthroplasty, joint replacement, prosthetic joint, gallium, labeled leukocytes, sulfur colloid, antimicrobial peptides, Fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG), positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET-CT), and single-photon emission (SPET-CT). This was determined to be a comprehensive review, not a meta-analysis of prosthetic joint infection and diagnostic imaging in the field of nuclear medicine. Prosthetic joint replacement is more frequently being employed as a way of improving the quality of life in an ever-ageing population. Complications following joint replacement surgery include aseptic or mechanical loosening, as well as polyethylene wear and prosthetic joint infection. The rate of infection is estimated to be between 1%-3%. The therapeutic management of these complications lies in the ability to differentiate between infection and aseptic mechanical loosening. Given that plain radiographs are neither sensitive nor specific to infection and computer tomography, as well as magnetic resonance imaging are limited due to metal-induced artifacts, radionuclide imaging has come to aid in the diagnostic imaging in the failed joint replacement. However, each modality has its advantages and disadvantages, thus there is no gold standard technique of radionuclide imaging. Nevertheless, radiolabelled leukocyte scintigraphy has proven itself to be the gold standard in neutrophil-based infection processes. Several studies have examined the role of PET using radiotracers such as (18)F-FDG, gallium-67 and (18)F, as well

  3. Molecular imaging and therapy targeting copper metabolism in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wachsmann, Jason; Peng, Fangyu

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cancer worldwide. Significant efforts have been devoted to identify new biomarkers for molecular imaging and targeted therapy of HCC. Copper is a nutritional metal required for the function of numerous enzymatic molecules in the metabolic pathways of human cells. Emerging evidence suggests that copper plays a role in cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Increased accumulation of copper ions was detected in tissue samples of HCC and many other cancers in humans. Altered copper metabolism is a new biomarker for molecular cancer imaging with position emission tomography (PET) using radioactive copper as a tracer. It has been reported that extrahepatic mouse hepatoma or HCC xenografts can be localized with PET using copper-64 chloride as a tracer, suggesting that copper metabolism is a new biomarker for the detection of HCC metastasis in areas of low physiological copper uptake. In addition to copper modulation therapy with copper chelators, short-interference RNA specific for human copper transporter 1 (hCtr1) may be used to suppress growth of HCC by blocking increased copper uptake mediated by hCtr1. Furthermore, altered copper metabolism is a promising target for radionuclide therapy of HCC using therapeutic copper radionuclides. Copper metabolism has potential as a new theranostic biomarker for molecular imaging as well as targeted therapy of HCC. PMID:26755872

  4. Molecular imaging and therapy targeting copper metabolism in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wachsmann, Jason; Peng, Fangyu

    2016-01-07

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cancer worldwide. Significant efforts have been devoted to identify new biomarkers for molecular imaging and targeted therapy of HCC. Copper is a nutritional metal required for the function of numerous enzymatic molecules in the metabolic pathways of human cells. Emerging evidence suggests that copper plays a role in cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Increased accumulation of copper ions was detected in tissue samples of HCC and many other cancers in humans. Altered copper metabolism is a new biomarker for molecular cancer imaging with position emission tomography (PET) using radioactive copper as a tracer. It has been reported that extrahepatic mouse hepatoma or HCC xenografts can be localized with PET using copper-64 chloride as a tracer, suggesting that copper metabolism is a new biomarker for the detection of HCC metastasis in areas of low physiological copper uptake. In addition to copper modulation therapy with copper chelators, short-interference RNA specific for human copper transporter 1 (hCtr1) may be used to suppress growth of HCC by blocking increased copper uptake mediated by hCtr1. Furthermore, altered copper metabolism is a promising target for radionuclide therapy of HCC using therapeutic copper radionuclides. Copper metabolism has potential as a new theranostic biomarker for molecular imaging as well as targeted therapy of HCC.

  5. Imaging, Mapping and Monitoring Environmental Radionuclide Transport Using Compton-Geometry Gamma Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridge, J. W.; Dormand, J.; Cooper, J.; Judson, D.; Boston, A. J.; Bankhead, M.; Onda, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The legacy to-date of the nuclear disaster at Fukushima Dai-ichi, Japan, has emphasised the fundamental importance of high quality radiation measurements in soils and plant systems. Current-generation radiometers based on coded-aperture collimation are limited in their ability to locate sources of radiation in three dimensions, and require a relatively long measurement time due to the poor efficiency of the collimation system. The quality of data they can provide to support biogeochemical process models in such systems is therefore often compromised. In this work we report proof-of-concept experiments demonstrating the potential of an alternative approach in the measurement of environmentally-important radionuclides (in particular 137Cs) in quartz sand and soils from the Fukushima exclusion zone. Compton-geometry imaging radiometers harness the scattering of incident radiation between two detectors to yield significant improvements in detection efficiency, energy resolution and spatial location of radioactive sources in a 180° field of view. To our knowledge we are reporting its first application to environmentally-relevant systems at low activity, dispersed sources, with significant background radiation and, crucially, movement over time. We are using a simple laboratory column setup to conduct one-dimensional transport experiments for 139Ce and 137Cs in quartz sand and in homogenized repacked Fukushima soils. Polypropylene columns 15 cm length with internal diameter 1.6 cm were filled with sand or soil and saturated slowly with tracer-free aqueous solutions. Radionuclides were introduced as 2mL pulses (step-up step-down) at the column inlet. Data were collected continuously throughout the transport experiment and then binned into sequential time intervals to resolve the total activity in the column and its progressive movement through the sand/soil. The objective of this proof-of-concept work is to establish detection limits, optimise image reconstruction

  6. Acoustic Molecular Imaging and Targeted Drug Delivery with Perfluorocarbon Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanza, Gregory M.; Hughes, Michael. S.; Marsh, Jon N.; Scott, Michael J.; Zhang, Huiying; Lacy, Elizabeth K.; Allen, John S.; Wickline, Samuel A.

    2005-03-01

    Advances in molecular biology and cellular biochemistry are providing new opportunities for diagnostic medical imaging to "see" beyond the anatomical manifestations of disease to the earliest biochemical signatures of disease. Liquid perfluorocarbon nanoparticles provide inherent acoustic contrast when bound to targets, e.g., fibrin deposits in a thrombus, but unbound nanoparticles are undetectable. This nanoparticle platform may be further functionalized with paramagnetic metals, such as gadolinium, or radionuclides, with homing ligands, like anti-αvβ3-integrins, and therapeutic agents. Acoustic imaging of densely distributed biomarkers, e.g., fibrin epitopes, is readily accommodated with fundamental imaging, but for sparse biomarkers, e.g., integrins, we have developed and implemented novel, nonlinear imaging techniques based upon information-theoretic receivers (i.e., thermodynamic receivers). These novel receivers allow sensitive direct imaging of contrast development.

  7. Registration of serial SPECT/CT images for three-dimensional dosimetry in radionuclide therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjögreen-Gleisner, K.; Rueckert, D.; Ljungberg, M.

    2009-10-01

    For radionuclide therapy, individual patient pharmacokinetics can be measured in three dimensions by sequential SPECT imaging. Accurate registration of the time series of images is central for voxel-based calculations of the residence time and absorbed dose. In this work, rigid and non-rigid methods are evaluated for registration of 6-7 SPECT/CT images acquired over a week, in anatomical regions from the head-and-neck region down to the pelvis. A method for calculation of the absorbed dose, including a voxel mass determination from the CT images, is also described. Registration of the SPECT/CT images is based on a CT-derived spatial transformation. Evaluation is focused on the CT registration accuracy, and on its impact on values of residence time and absorbed dose. According to the CT evaluation, the non-rigid method produces a more accurate registration than the rigid one. For images of the residence time and absorbed dose, registration produces a sharpening of the images. For volumes-of-interest, the differences between rigid and non-rigid results are generally small. However, the non-rigid method is more consistent for regions where non-rigid patient movements are likely, such as in the head-neck-shoulder region.

  8. Molecular, Functional, and Structural Imaging of Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Zhu, Yunqi; Zhu, Yuankai; Wu, Shuang; Liu, Hao; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Caiyun; Zhang, Hong; Hayashi, Takuya; Tian, Mei

    2016-06-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, correlating with genetic susceptibility and environmental risk factors. Molecular, functional, and structural imaging approaches have been increasingly used to detect neurobiological changes, analyze neurochemical correlates, and parse pathophysiological mechanisms underlying MDD. We reviewed recent neuroimaging publications on MDD in terms of molecular, functional, and structural alterations as detected mainly by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography. Altered structure and function of brain regions involved in the cognitive control of affective state have been demonstrated. An abnormal default mode network, as revealed by resting-state functional MRI, is likely associated with aberrant metabolic and serotonergic function revealed by radionuclide imaging. Further multi-modal investigations are essential to clarify the characteristics of the cortical network and serotonergic system associated with behavioral and genetic variations in MDD.

  9. SIMULTANEOUS DUAL-RADIONUCLIDE MYOCARDIAL PERFUSION IMAGING WITH A SOLID-STATE DEDICATED CARDIAC CAMERA

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Haim, S.; Kacperski, K.; Hain, S.; Van Gramberg, D.; Hutton, B.F.; Waddington, W.A.; Sharir, T.; Roth, N.; Berman, D.S.; Ell, P.J.

    2011-01-01

    We compared simultaneous dual-radionuclide stress and rest myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with a novel solid-state cardiac camera and a conventional SPECT camera with separate stress and rest acquisitions. Methods 24 consecutive patients (64.5 ± 11.8 years, 16 men) were injected with 74 MBq of 201Tl (rest) and 250 MBq 99mTc-MIBI (stress). Conventional MPI acquisition times for stress and rest were 21 min and 16 min, respectively. A simultaneous dual-radionuclide (DR) 15 minute list mode gated acquisition was performed on D-SPECT (Spectrum-dynamics, Caesarea, Israel). The DR D-SPECT data were processed using a spillover and scatter correction method. We compared DR D-SPECT images with conventional SPECT images by visual analysis employing the 17-segment model and a 5-point scale (0=normal, 4=absent) to calculate the summed stress and rest scores (SSS and SRS, respectively) and the % visual perfusion defect (TPD) at stress and rest, by dividing the stress and rest scores, respectively, by 68 and multiplying by 100. TPD <5% was considered normal. Image quality was assessed on a 4-point scale (1=poor, 4=very good) and gut activity was assessed on a 4-point scale (0=none, 3=high). Results Conventional MPI was abnormal at stress in 17 patients and at rest in 9 patients. In the 17 abnormal stress studies DR D-SPECT MPI was abnormal in 113 vs. 93 abnormal segments by conventional MPI. In the nine abnormal rest studies DR D-SPECT was abnormal in 45 vs. 48 segments abnormal by conventional MPI. SSS, SRS, TPD stress and TPD rest on conventional SPECT and DR D-SPECT highly correlated (r=0.9790, 0.9694, 0.9784, 0.9710, respectively; p<0.0001 for all). In addition, 6 patients had significantly larger perfusion defects on DR D-SPECT stress images, including five of 11 patients who were imaged earlier on D-SPECT than conventional SPECT. Conclusion D-SPECT enables fast and high quality simultaneous DR MPI in a single imaging session with comparable diagnostic performance and

  10. U-SPECT-BioFluo: an integrated radionuclide, bioluminescence, and fluorescence imaging platform

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In vivo bioluminescence, fluorescence, and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging provide complementary information about biological processes. However, to date these signatures are evaluated separately on individual preclinical systems. In this paper, we introduce a fully integrated bioluminescence-fluorescence-SPECT platform. Next to an optimization in logistics and image fusion, this integration can help improve understanding of the optical imaging (OI) results. Methods An OI module was developed for a preclinical SPECT system (U-SPECT, MILabs, Utrecht, the Netherlands). The applicability of the module for bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging was evaluated in both a phantom and in an in vivo setting using mice implanted with a 4 T1-luc + tumor. A combination of a fluorescent dye and radioactive moiety was used to directly relate the optical images of the module to the SPECT findings. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) was compared to the localization of the fluorescence signal in the tumors. Results Both the phantom and in vivo mouse studies showed that superficial fluorescence signals could be imaged accurately. The SPECT and bioluminescence images could be used to place the fluorescence findings in perspective, e.g. by showing tracer accumulation in non-target organs such as the liver and kidneys (SPECT) and giving a semi-quantitative read-out for tumor spread (bioluminescence). Conclusions We developed a fully integrated multimodal platform that provides complementary registered imaging of bioluminescent, fluorescent, and SPECT signatures in a single scanning session with a single dose of anesthesia. In our view, integration of these modalities helps to improve data interpretation of optical findings in relation to radionuclide images. PMID:25386389

  11. U-SPECT-BioFluo: an integrated radionuclide, bioluminescence, and fluorescence imaging platform.

    PubMed

    van Oosterom, Matthias N; Kreuger, Rob; Buckle, Tessa; Mahn, Wendy A; Bunschoten, Anton; Josephson, Lee; van Leeuwen, Fijs Wb; Beekman, Freek J

    2014-01-01

    In vivo bioluminescence, fluorescence, and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging provide complementary information about biological processes. However, to date these signatures are evaluated separately on individual preclinical systems. In this paper, we introduce a fully integrated bioluminescence-fluorescence-SPECT platform. Next to an optimization in logistics and image fusion, this integration can help improve understanding of the optical imaging (OI) results. An OI module was developed for a preclinical SPECT system (U-SPECT, MILabs, Utrecht, the Netherlands). The applicability of the module for bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging was evaluated in both a phantom and in an in vivo setting using mice implanted with a 4 T1-luc + tumor. A combination of a fluorescent dye and radioactive moiety was used to directly relate the optical images of the module to the SPECT findings. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) was compared to the localization of the fluorescence signal in the tumors. Both the phantom and in vivo mouse studies showed that superficial fluorescence signals could be imaged accurately. The SPECT and bioluminescence images could be used to place the fluorescence findings in perspective, e.g. by showing tracer accumulation in non-target organs such as the liver and kidneys (SPECT) and giving a semi-quantitative read-out for tumor spread (bioluminescence). We developed a fully integrated multimodal platform that provides complementary registered imaging of bioluminescent, fluorescent, and SPECT signatures in a single scanning session with a single dose of anesthesia. In our view, integration of these modalities helps to improve data interpretation of optical findings in relation to radionuclide images.

  12. Molecular imaging and therapy of cancer with radiolabeled nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Hao; Zhang, Yin; Sun, Jiangtao; Cai, Weibo

    2009-01-01

    Summary This review summarizes the current state-of-the-art of radiolabeled nanoparticles for molecular imaging and internal radiotherapy applications targeting cancer. With the capacity to provide enormous flexibility, radiolabeled nanoparticles have the potential to profoundly impact disease diagnosis and patient management in the near future. Currently, the major challenges facing the research on radiolabeled nanoparticles are desirable (tumor) targeting efficacy, robust chemistry for both radionuclide encapsulation/incorporation and targeting ligand conjugation, favorable safety profile, as well as certain commercial and regulatory hurdles. PMID:20161038

  13. Optical molecular imaging in PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Soumya; Snyder, John W.; Foster, Thomas H.

    2007-02-01

    Motivated by recent successes in fluorescence imaging of whole mount tissue preparations and by rapid progress in the fields of molecular imaging and molecular biology, we are exploring a number of applications of optical fluorescence imaging in superficial murine tumor models in vivo. Imaging the PDT-induced expression of the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) in cells and in vivo is accomplished using stably transfected EMT6 cells in which the gene for GFP is under the control of the HSP70 promoter. These cells readily form solid tumors in BALB/c mice, enabling the direct imaging of the extent and time course of the activation of this promoter, with each mouse serving as its own control. Imaging of similarly transfected EMT6 cells with a HIF-1α/GFP fusion protein vector enables visualization of HIF-1α translocation to the nucleus. Recently, we have accomplished fluorescent labeling of surface antigens in vivo using intratumor and intravenous injection of fluorophore-conjugated antibodies. Injection of deep-red fluorophore-conjugated-anti-CD31 enables confocal fluorescence imaging of the tumor vasculature to depths of at least 100 microns. With the vessels rendered fluorescent in this way, a number of interesting studies become possible in the living mouse, including the direct visualization of photosensitizer distribution from perfused vessels. Using the appropriate fluorophore-conjugated antibodies, we have also been able to image infiltrating granulocytes in EMT6 tumors in response to PDT in vivo.

  14. Molecular imaging in cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Michalski, Mark H.

    2010-01-01

    The success of cancer therapy can be difficult to predict, as its efficacy is often predicated upon characteristics of the cancer, treatment, and individual that are not fully understood or are difficult to ascertain. Monitoring the response of disease to treatment is therefore essential and has traditionally been characterized by changes in tumor volume. However, in many instances, this singular measure is insufficient for predicting treatment effects on patient survival. Molecular imaging allows repeated in vivo measurement of many critical molecular features of neoplasm, such as metabolism, proliferation, angiogenesis, hypoxia, and apoptosis, which can be employed for monitoring therapeutic response. In this review, we examine the current methods for evaluating response to treatment and provide an overview of emerging PET molecular imaging methods that will help guide future cancer therapies. PMID:20661557

  15. Radionuclide scrotal imaging: further experience with 210 patients. Part I. Anatomy, pathophysiology, and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.C.P.; Holder, L.E.; Melloul, M.

    1983-08-01

    Ten years' experience with radionuclide scrotal imaging (RSI) to evaluate perfusion of the scrotal contents has confirmed the value of this examination. In 1973, Nadel et al. first proposed using sodium pertechnetate (Tc-99m) to diagnose testicular torsion. By the end of 1982, more than thirty articles have been published on this topic, with most emphasizing the usefulness of RSI in managing patients with acute scrotal pain. The present communication describes our findings in 210 patients, not previously reported. There were four groups with relatively distinct clinical presentations: (a) acute scrotal pain, (b) chronic scrotal pain, (c) scrotal injury, and (d) scrotal mass. The anatomic and pathophysiologic bases for the scan findings will be emphasized. We discuss the staging of testicular torsion; viability of the compromised testicle; variability in the presentation of acute infection; anatomy of trauma, varicocele, and inguinal hernia; and the correlation with scrotal sonography.

  16. Analysis of serial radionuclide bone images in osteosarcoma and breast carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    McNeil, B.J.; Hanley, J.

    1980-04-01

    The authors first describe and illustrate didactically the use of the Kaplan-Meier actuarial technique for serial diagnostic studies. They then present an analysis of previously published data on the results of serial radionuclide bone images in patients with osteosarcoma or breast carcinoma, using this technique. The data indicate that patients with osteosarcoma show an almost linear increase in the occurrence of bone metastates between 5 and 29 months after diagnosis; the rate is approximately 1% per month. Patients with breast cancer, on the other hand, show a biphasic rate of development, averaging only 0.5% per month during the first year after diagnosis but increasing rapidly to approximately 2% per month after 15 months.

  17. Imaging quality of (44)Sc in comparison with five other PET radionuclides using Derenzo phantoms and preclinical PET.

    PubMed

    Bunka, Maruta; Müller, Cristina; Vermeulen, Christiaan; Haller, Stephanie; Türler, Andreas; Schibli, Roger; van der Meulen, Nicholas P

    2016-04-01

    PET is the favored nuclear imaging technique because of the high sensitivity and resolution it provides, as well as the possibility for quantification of accumulated radioactivity. (44)Sc (T1/2=3.97h, Eβ(+)=632keV) was recently proposed as a potentially interesting radionuclide for PET. The aim of this study was to investigate the image quality, which can be obtained with (44)Sc, and compare it with five other, frequently employed PET nuclides using Derenzo phantoms and a small-animal PET scanner. The radionuclides were produced at the medical cyclotron at CRS, ETH Zurich ((11)C, (18)F), at the Injector II research cyclotron at CRS, PSI ((64)Cu, (89)Zr, (44)Sc), as well as via a generator system ((68)Ga). Derenzo phantoms, containing solutions of each of these radionuclides, were scanned using a GE Healthcare eXplore VISTA small-animal PET scanner. The image resolution was determined for each nuclide by analysis of the intensity signal using the reconstructed PET data of a hole diameter of 1.3mm. The image quality of (44)Sc was compared to five frequently-used PET radionuclides. In agreement with the positron range, an increasing relative resolution was determined in the sequence of (68)Ga<(44)Sc<(89)Zr<(11)C<(64)Cu<(18)F. The performance of (44)Sc was in agreement with the theoretical expectations based on the energy of the emitted positrons. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Molecular imaging in the eye.

    PubMed

    Eter, Nicole

    2010-11-01

    Molecular imaging plays an increasingly powerful role in elucidating pathophysiological pathways, in advancing drug discovery and in deciphering developmental processes. Multiple modalities, including optical imaging, ultrasound, nuclear imaging, computed tomography and various techniques of MRI are now being used to obtain fundamental new insights at the cellular and molecular level, both in basic research, using animal models and in clinical studies. In permitting unique optical access, the eye is particularly well suited for molecular imaging, for example, transgenic mice in which the fractalkine receptor is rendered intrinsically fluorescent to allow for in vivo monitoring of myeloid immune cells within the retina and choroid by scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO). Retinal cell apoptosis can be assessed by intravitreal injection of fluorescent-labelled annexin 5 in vivo using a similar SLO technique. Intravital microscopy also allows visualisation of CD11c-positive dendritic cells in transgenic mice expressing yellow-fluorescent protein in these immune cells. Adoptive transfer of fluorescent-labelled transgenic T-cells enables visualisation of infiltration by specific T-cells into various eye compartments. On the other hand, functional imaging can be provided by new MR methodologies: deuterium MRI and diffusion MRI analysis techniques permit dynamic studies of water movement in animal eyes. MRI also enables pharmacokinetic studies on ocular drug delivery and detects biomarkers for treatment efficacy in retinopathies. Undoubtedly, these and further molecular imaging techniques currently being developed will have a fundamental impact on experimental and clinical ophthalmology and thus on our understanding of eye disease and development of therapy in general.

  19. Intrathoracic splenosis: evaluation by superparamagnetic iron oxide-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and radionuclide scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Mana; Tanabe, Yoshio; Miyoshi, Hidenao; Matusue, Eiji; Kaminou, Toshio; Ogawa, Toshihide

    2009-11-01

    Splenosis represents the heterotopic autotransplantation of splenic tissue after either splenic trauma or surgery. Intrathoracic splenosis is a rare condition resulting from concomitant rupture of the spleen and the left hemidiaphragm. We report a case of splenosis in a 41-year-old male patient who had experienced severe thoracoabdominal injury including rupture of the spleen and left hemidiaphragm and post-traumatic splenectomy 20 years previously. Abnormal opacities in the cardiac region were noted on a chest radiograph at an annual checkup. Computed tomography (CT) of the chest demonstrated multiple, well-circumscribed pleura-based nodules at the posterior base of the left hemithorax and the left subdiaphragmatic area. On magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the lesions were hypointense on T1-weighted images and hyperintense on T2-weighted images. After administration of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO), the lesions showed decreased signal intensity but remained slightly hyperintense relative to liver parenchyma on T2-weighted images. (99m)Tc-labeled Sn colloid scintigraphy revealed multiple areas of increased activity consistent with the lesions on the CT and MRI scans. In addition to the history of splenic trauma and left hemothorax, SPIO-enhanced MRI and radionuclide scintigraphy, which can demonstrate phagocytic ability in the ectopic splenic tissue, were useful for confirming the diagnosis.

  20. Cancer Stratification by Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Justus; Haberkorn, Uwe; Mier, Walter

    2015-01-01

    The lack of specificity of traditional cytotoxic drugs has triggered the development of anticancer agents that selectively address specific molecular targets. An intrinsic property of these specialized drugs is their limited applicability for specific patient subgroups. Consequently, the generation of information about tumor characteristics is the key to exploit the potential of these drugs. Currently, cancer stratification relies on three approaches: Gene expression analysis and cancer proteomics, immunohistochemistry and molecular imaging. In order to enable the precise localization of functionally expressed targets, molecular imaging combines highly selective biomarkers and intense signal sources. Thus, cancer stratification and localization are performed simultaneously. Many cancer types are characterized by altered receptor expression, such as somatostatin receptors, folate receptors or Her2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2). Similar correlations are also known for a multitude of transporters, such as glucose transporters, amino acid transporters or hNIS (human sodium iodide symporter), as well as cell specific proteins, such as the prostate specific membrane antigen, integrins, and CD20. This review provides a comprehensive description of the methods, targets and agents used in molecular imaging, to outline their application for cancer stratification. Emphasis is placed on radiotracers which are used to identify altered expression patterns of cancer associated markers. PMID:25749472

  1. Clinical applications in molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Heneweer, Carola; Grimm, Jan

    2011-02-01

    Molecular imaging is aimed at the noninvasive in vivo characterization and measurement of processes at a cellular and molecular level with clinical imaging methods. Contrast agents are constructed to target markers that are specific either for certain diseases or for functional states of specialized tissues. Efforts are currently focused mainly on processes involved in angiogenesis, inflammation, and apoptosis. Cell tracking is performed for diagnostic purposes as well as for monitoring of novel cell therapies. Visualization of these processes would provide more precise information about disease expansion as well as treatment response, and could lead to a more individualized therapy for patients. Many attempts have shown promising results in preclinical studies; however, translation into the clinic remains a challenge. This applies especially to paediatrics because of more stringent safety concerns and the low prevalence of individual diseases. The most promising modalities for clinical translation are nuclear medicine methods (positron emission tomography [PET] and single photon emission CT [SPECT]) due to their high sensitivity, which allows concentrations below biological activity. However, special dose consideration is required for any application of ionizing radiation especially in children. While very little has been published on molecular imaging in a paediatric patient population beyond fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET and metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) tracers, this review will attempt to discuss approaches that we believe have promise for paediatric imaging. These will include agents that already reached clinical trials as well as preclinical developments with high potential for clinical application.

  2. Molecular imaging with theranostic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jokerst, Jesse V; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2011-10-18

    Nanoparticles (NPs) offer diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities not available with small molecules or microscale tools. As the field of molecular imaging has emerged from the blending of molecular biology with medical imaging, NP imaging is increasingly common for both therapeutic and diagnostic applications. The term theranostic describes technology with concurrent and complementary diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities. Although NPs have been FDA-approved for clinical use as transport vehicles for nearly 15 years, full translation of their theranostic potential is incomplete. However, NPs have shown remarkable success in the areas of drug delivery and magnetic resonance imaging. Emerging applications include image-guided resection, optical/photoacoustic imaging in vivo, contrast-enhanced ultrasound, and thermoablative therapy. Diagnosis with NPs in molecular imaging involves the correlation of the signal with a phenotype. The location and intensity of NP signals emanating from a living subject indicate the disease area's size, stage, and biochemical signature. Therapy with NPs uses the image for resection or delivery of a small molecule or RNA therapeutic. Ablation of the affected area is also possible via heat or radioactivity. The ideal theranostic NP includes several features: (1) it selectively and rapidly accumulates in diseased tissue; (2) it reports biochemical and morphological characteristics of the area; (3) it delivers an effective therapeutic; and (4) it is safe and biodegrades with nontoxic byproducts. Such a system contains a central imaging core surrounded by small molecule therapeutics. The system targets via ligands such as IgG and is protected from immune scavengers by a cloak of protective polymer. Although no NP has achieved all of the above criteria, many NPs possess one or more of these features. While the most clinically translatable NPs have been used in the field of magnetic resonance imaging, other types in development are quickly

  3. Radionuclide imaging of inflammation and infection in the acute care setting.

    PubMed

    Love, Charito; Palestro, Christopher J

    2013-03-01

    Although infection may be suggested by signs and symptoms such as fever, pain, general malaise, and abnormal laboratory results, imaging tests often are used to confirm its presence. Morphologic imaging tests identify structural alterations of tissues or organs that result from a combination of microbial invasion and the inflammatory response of the host. Functional imaging studies use minute quantities of radioactive material, which are taken up directly by cells, tissues, and organs, or are attached to substances that subsequently migrate to the region of interest. Bone scintigraphy is extremely sensitive and can be positive within 2 days after the onset of symptoms. With an accuracy of more than 90%, 3-phase bone scintigraphy is the radionuclide procedure of choice for diagnosing osteomyelitis in unviolated bone. In patients with acute renal failure, gallium imaging facilitates the differentiation of acute interstitial nephritis from acute tubular necrosis. Gallium imaging also is useful in the evaluation of pulmonary infections and inflammation. Many opportunistic infections affect the lungs, and a normal gallium scan of the chest excludes infection with a high degree of certainty, especially when the chest x-ray is negative. In the human immunodeficiency virus positive patient, lymph node uptake usually is associated with mycobacterial disease or lymphoma. Focal pulmonary parenchymal uptake suggests bacterial pneumonia. Diffuse pulmonary uptake suggests an opportunistic pneumonia. Gallium imaging provides useful information about other acute respiratory conditions, including radiation pneumonitis and hypersensitivity pneumonitis. In vitro labeled leukocyte imaging with indium-111 and technetium-99m labeled leukocytes is useful in various acute care situations. The test facilitates the differentiation of normal postoperative changes from infection and is useful for diagnosing prosthetic vascular graft infection. In inflammatory bowel disease, labeled leukocyte

  4. A Monte Carlo study on (223)Ra imaging for unsealed radionuclide therapy.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Akihiko; Miwa, Kenta; Sasaki, Masayuki; Baba, Shingo

    2016-06-01

    Radium-223 ((223)Ra), an α-emitting radionuclide, is used in unsealed radionuclide therapy for metastatic bone tumors. The demand for qualitative (223)Ra imaging is growing to optimize dosimetry. The authors simulated (223)Ra imaging using an in-house Monte Carlo simulation code and investigated the feasibility and utility of (223)Ra imaging. The Monte Carlo code comprises two modules, hexagon and nai. The hexagon code simulates the photon and electron interactions in the tissues and collimator, and the nai code simulates the response of the NaI detector system. A 3D numeric phantom created using computed tomography images of a chest phantom was installed in the hexagon code. (223)Ra accumulated in a part of the spine, and three x-rays and 19 γ rays between 80 and 450 keV were selected as the emitted photons. To evaluate the quality of the (223)Ra imaging, the authors also simulated technetium-99m ((99m)Tc) imaging under the same conditions and compared the results. The sensitivities of the three photopeaks were 147 counts per unit of source activity (cps MBq(-1); photopeak: 84 keV, full width of energy window: 20%), 166 cps MBq(-1) (154 keV, 15%), and 158 cps MBq(-1) (270 keV, 10%) for a low-energy general-purpose (LEGP) collimator, and those for the medium-energy general-purpose (MEGP) collimator were 33, 13, and 8.0 cps MBq(-1), respectively. In the case of (99m)Tc, the sensitivity was 55 cps MBq(-1) (141 keV, 20%) for LEGP and 52 cps MBq(-1) for MEGP. The fractions of unscattered photons of the total photons reflecting the image quality were 0.09 (84 keV), 0.03 (154 keV), and 0.02 (270 keV) for the LEGP collimator and 0.41, 0.25, and 0.50 for the MEGP collimator, respectively. Conversely, this fraction was approximately 0.65 for the simulated (99m)Tc imaging. The sensitivity with the LEGP collimator appeared very high. However, almost all of the counts were because of photons that penetrated or were scattered in the collimator; therefore, the proportions of

  5. EANM procedural guidelines for radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging with SPECT and SPECT/CT: 2015 revision.

    PubMed

    Verberne, Hein J; Acampa, Wanda; Anagnostopoulos, Constantinos; Ballinger, Jim; Bengel, Frank; De Bondt, Pieter; Buechel, Ronny R; Cuocolo, Alberto; van Eck-Smit, Berthe L F; Flotats, Albert; Hacker, Marcus; Hindorf, Cecilia; Kaufmann, Philip A; Lindner, Oliver; Ljungberg, Michael; Lonsdale, Markus; Manrique, Alain; Minarik, David; Scholte, Arthur J H A; Slart, Riemer H J A; Trägårdh, Elin; de Wit, Tim C; Hesse, Birger

    2015-11-01

    Since the publication of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) procedural guidelines for radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) in 2005, many small and some larger steps of progress have been made, improving MPI procedures. In this paper, the major changes from the updated 2015 procedural guidelines are highlighted, focusing on the important changes related to new instrumentation with improved image information and the possibility to reduce radiation exposure, which is further discussed in relation to the recent developments of new International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) models. Introduction of the selective coronary vasodilator regadenoson and the use of coronary CT-contrast agents for hybrid imaging with SPECT/CT angiography are other important areas for nuclear cardiology that were not included in the previous guidelines. A large number of minor changes have been described in more detail in the fully revised version available at the EANM home page: http://eanm.org/publications/guidelines/2015_07_EANM_FINAL_myocardial_perfusion_guideline.pdf .

  6. Advances in multimodality molecular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, Habib; Prasad, Rameshwar

    2009-01-01

    Multimodality molecular imaging using high resolution positron emission tomography (PET) combined with other modalities is now playing a pivotal role in basic and clinical research. The introduction of combined PET/CT systems in clinical setting has revolutionized the practice of diagnostic imaging. The complementarity between the intrinsically aligned anatomic (CT) and functional or metabolic (PET) information provided in a “one-stop shop” and the possibility to use CT images for attenuation correction of the PET data has been the driving force behind the success of this technology. On the other hand, combining PET with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in a single gantry is technically more challenging owing to the strong magnetic fields. Nevertheless, significant progress has been made resulting in the design of few preclinical PET systems and one human prototype dedicated for simultaneous PET/MR brain imaging. This paper discusses recent advances in PET instrumentation and the advantages and challenges of multimodality imaging systems. Future opportunities and the challenges facing the adoption of multimodality imaging instrumentation will also be addressed. PMID:20098557

  7. Spinal cerebrospinal fluid leaks detected by radionuclide cisternography and magnetic resonance imaging in patients suspected of intracranial hypotension.

    PubMed

    Ohwaki, Kazuhiro; Yano, Eiji; Shinohara, Takayuki; Watanabe, Takehiro; Ogawa, Akiko; Fujii, Norio; Nakagomi, Tadayoshi

    2014-09-01

    Although many studies have described various features of neuroimaging tests associated with intracranial hypotension, few have examined their validity and reliability. We evaluated the association between CSF leaks detected by radionuclide cisternography and abnormal MRI findings in the accurate diagnosis of intracranial hypotension. We retrospectively assessed 250 patients who were suspected of intracranial hypotension and underwent subsequent radionuclide cisternography. We obtained 159 sagittal and 153 coronal T2-weighted MRI images and 101 gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted MRI images. We assessed the CSF leaks in relation to a sagging brain, the maximum subdural space in sagittal and coronal images, and dural enhancement. Overall, 186 (74%) patients showed CSF leaks on radionuclide cisternography. A sagging brain was observed in 21 (13%) of the 159 patients with sagittal MRIs. A sagging brain was not associated with CSF leaks (14% vs. 10%; p=0.49). Compared to patients without CSF leaks, those with CSF leaks tended to have a larger maximum subdural space in both the sagittal (3.7 vs. 4.1mm) and coronal (2.5 vs. 2.8mm) images; however, the differences were not significant (p=0.18 and p=0.53, respectively). Dural enhancement was observed only in one patient, who presented with CSF leaks on radionuclide cisternography. Our study, which included a relatively large population, did not find any association between the findings of radionuclide cisternography and MRI. Future research should focus on identifying more valid neuroimaging findings to diagnose intracranial hypotension accurately. Copyright © 2014 Medical University of Bialystok. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  8. Sparse image reconstruction for molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Ting, Michael; Raich, Raviv; Hero, Alfred O

    2009-06-01

    The application that motivates this paper is molecular imaging at the atomic level. When discretized at subatomic distances, the volume is inherently sparse. Noiseless measurements from an imaging technology can be modeled by convolution of the image with the system point spread function (psf). Such is the case with magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM), an emerging technology where imaging of an individual tobacco mosaic virus was recently demonstrated with nanometer resolution. We also consider additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) in the measurements. Many prior works of sparse estimators have focused on the case when H has low coherence; however, the system matrix H in our application is the convolution matrix for the system psf. A typical convolution matrix has high coherence. This paper, therefore, does not assume a low coherence H. A discrete-continuous form of the Laplacian and atom at zero (LAZE) p.d.f. used by Johnstone and Silverman is formulated, and two sparse estimators derived by maximizing the joint p.d.f. of the observation and image conditioned on the hyperparameters. A thresholding rule that generalizes the hard and soft thresholding rule appears in the course of the derivation. This so-called hybrid thresholding rule, when used in the iterative thresholding framework, gives rise to the hybrid estimator, a generalization of the lasso. Estimates of the hyperparameters for the lasso and hybrid estimator are obtained via Stein's unbiased risk estimate (SURE). A numerical study with a Gaussian psf and two sparse images shows that the hybrid estimator outperforms the lasso.

  9. Molecular Imaging of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Irene A.; Sala, Evis; Hricak, Hedvig; Weber, Wolfgang A.; Vargas, Hebert Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common noncutaneous malignancy among men in the Western world. The natural history and clinical course of prostate cancer are markedly diverse, ranging from small indolent intraprostatic lesions to highly aggressive disseminated disease. An understanding of this biologic heterogeneity is considered a necessary requisite in the quest for the adoption of precise and personalized management strategies. Molecular imaging offers the potential for noninvasive assessment of the biologic interactions underpinning prostate carcinogenesis. Currently, numerous molecular imaging probes are in clinical use or undergoing preclinical or clinical evaluation. These probes can be divided into those that image increased cell metabolism, those that target prostate cancer–specific membrane proteins and receptor molecules, and those that bind to the bone matrix adjacent to metastases to bone. The increased metabolism and vascular changes in prostate cancer cells can be evaluated with radiolabeled analogs of choline, acetate, glucose, amino acids, and nucleotides. The androgen receptor, prostate-specific membrane antigen, and gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (ie, bombesin) are overexpressed in prostate cancer and can be targeted by specific radiolabeled imaging probes. Because metastatic prostate cancer cells induce osteoblastic signaling pathways of adjacent bone tissue, bone-seeking radiotracers are sensitive tools for the detection of metastases to bone. Knowledge about the underlying biologic processes responsible for the phenotypes associated with the different stages of prostate cancer allows an appropriate choice of methods and helps avoid pitfalls. ©RSNA, 2015 PMID:26587888

  10. Diagnostic value of radionuclide scanning and ultrasonography in thyroid developmental anomaly imaging.

    PubMed

    Ruchała, Marek; Szczepanek, Ewelina; Sowiński, Jerzy

    2011-01-01

    Thyroid is particularly prone to morphogenetic variability. Developmental failure of the thyroid gland is in 85% of cases the underlying cause of congenital hypothyroidism, diagnosed at birth with a frequency of 1:3000-1:4000 newborns. However, the incidence of less severe developmental variants of the thyroid is much higher. Determination of the aetiology of congenital hypothyroidism is crucial for predicting its severity and outcome as well as impacts dose of L-thyroxine during substitution. Thyroid imaging is necessary to establish diagnosis, and it involves mainly thyroid ultrasound examination and scintiscan. Awareness of both the advantages and limitations of sonographic and scintigraphic imaging are central to the successful interpretation of their results and reasonable recommendation of these procedures for patients with thyroid developmental anomalies of different age and clinical picture. Hence, the aim of this review is to provide the most important and up-to-date information on the place of radionuclide scanning and ultrasonography in visualization of different thyroid developmental abnormalities.

  11. Radionuclides in Diagnosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, E. D.

    1989-01-01

    Discussed is a radionuclide imaging technique, including the gamma camera, image analysis computer, radiopharmaceuticals, and positron emission tomography. Several pictures showing the use of this technique are presented. (YP)

  12. Radionuclides in Diagnosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, E. D.

    1989-01-01

    Discussed is a radionuclide imaging technique, including the gamma camera, image analysis computer, radiopharmaceuticals, and positron emission tomography. Several pictures showing the use of this technique are presented. (YP)

  13. Magnetic Resonance in the Era of Molecular Imaging of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gore, John C.; Manning, H. Charles; Quarles, C. Chad; Waddell, Kevin W.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    MRI has played an important role in the diagnosis and management of cancer since it was first developed, but other modalities also continue to advance and provide complementary information on the status of tumors. In the future there will be a major continuing role for non-invasive imaging in order to obtain information on the location and extent of cancer, as well as assessments of tissue characteristics that can monitor and predict treatment response and guide patient management. Developments are currently being undertaken that aim to provide improved imaging methods for the detection and evaluation of tumors, for identifying important characteristics of tumors such as the expression levels of cell surface receptors that may dictate what types of therapy will be effective, and for evaluating their response to treatments. Molecular imaging techniques based mainly on radionuclide imaging can depict numerous, specific, cellular and molecular markers of disease and have unique potential to address important clinical and research challenges. In this review we consider what continuing and evolving roles will be played by MRI in this era of molecular imaging. We discuss some of the challenges for MRI of detecting imaging agents that report on molecular events, but highlight also the ability of MRI to assess other features such as cell density, blood flow and metabolism which are not specific hallmarks of cancer but which reflect molecular changes. We discuss the future role of MRI in cancer and describe the use of selected quantitative imaging techniques for characterizing tumors that can be translated to clinical applications, particularly in the context of evaluating novel treatments. PMID:21524870

  14. Improved dosimetry for targeted radionuclide therapy using nonrigid registration on sequential SPECT images

    SciTech Connect

    Ao, Edwin C. I.; Mok, Greta S. P.; Wu, Nien-Yun; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Song, Na

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Voxel-level and patient-specific 3D dosimetry for targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) typically involves serial nuclear medicine scans. Misalignment of the images can result in reduced dosimetric accuracy. Since the scans are typically performed over a period of several days, there will be patient movement between scans and possible nonrigid organ deformation. This work aims to implement and evaluate the use of nonrigid image registration on a series of quantitative SPECT (QSPECT) images for TRT dosimetry. Methods: A population of 4D extended cardiac torso phantoms, comprised of three In-111 Zevalin biokinetics models and three anatomical variations, was generated based on the patient data. The authors simulated QSPECT acquisitions at five time points. At each time point, individual organ and whole-body deformation between scans were modeled by translating/rotating organs and the body up to 5°/voxels, keeping ≤5% difference in organ volume. An analytical projector was used to generate realistic noisy projections for a medium energy general purpose collimator. Projections were reconstructed using OS-EM algorithm with geometric collimator detector response, attenuation, and scatter corrections. The QSPECT images were registered using organ-based nonrigid image registration method. The cumulative activity in each voxel was obtained by integrating the activity over time. Dose distribution images were obtained by convolving the cumulative activity images with a Y-90 dose kernel. Dose volume histograms (DVHs) for organs-of-interest were analyzed. Results: After nonrigid registration, the mean differences in organ doses compared to the case without misalignment were improved from (−15.50 ± 5.59)% to (−2.12 ± 1.05)% and (−7.28 ± 2.30)% to (−0.23 ± 0.71)% for the spleen and liver, respectively. For all organs, the cumulative DVHs showed improvement after nonrigid registration and the normalized absolute error of differential DVHs ranged from 6.79% to

  15. Radionuclide Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalutsky, M. R.

    Radionuclide therapy utilizes unsealed sources of radionuclides as a treatment for cancer or other pathological conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis. Radionuclides that decay by the emission of β and α particles, as well as those that emit Auger electrons, have been used for this purpose. In this chapter, radiochemical aspects of radionuclide therapy, including criteria for radionuclide selection, radionuclide production, radiolabeling chemistry, and radiation dosimetry are discussed.

  16. Molecular Imaging of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Josef J.; Schöder, Heiko; Larson, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Prostate cancer is a complex and biologically heterogeneous disease that is not adequately assessed with conventional imaging alone. Molecular imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) is poised to fill this unmet need through noninvasive probing of the multiple molecular and cellular processes that are active in prostate cancer patients. Recent findings Several PET tracers are active in early and late stage prostate cancer in humans. F18-FDG, C11/F18-choline and F18-sodium fluoride (NaF) have been studied most extensively. There is a growing body of literature supporting to the utility of choline in early stage prostate cancer. FDG and NaF are more valuable in advanced disease, especially for assessing bone metastases, the prevalent form of metastases in this patient population. F18-Fluoro-dihydrotestosterone is active in castrate disease and is emerging as a valuable pharmacodynamic marker in the development of novel AR-targeted therapies. Anti-PSMA PET tracers are in the early stages of clinical development. Summary Multiple PET tracers are currently available to aid in the detection and management of prostate cancer across the clinical spectrum of the disease. Prospective, rigorously controlled, clinical imaging trials are needed to establish the optimal role of PET in prostate cancer. PMID:22617062

  17. Molecular imaging of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Fox, Josef J; Schöder, Heiko; Larson, Steven M

    2012-07-01

    Prostate cancer is a complex and biologically heterogeneous disease that is not adequately assessed with conventional imaging alone. Molecular imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) is poised to fill this unmet need through noninvasive probing of the multiple molecular and cellular processes that are active in prostate cancer patients. Several PET tracers are active in early-stage and late-stage prostate cancer in humans. F18-Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), C11/F18-choline and sodium F18-fluoride have been studied most extensively. There is a growing body of literature supporting the utility of choline in early-stage prostate cancer. FDG and sodium F18-fluoride are more valuable in advanced disease, especially for assessing bone metastases, the prevalent form of metastases in this patient population. F18-fluorodihydrotestosterone is active in castrate disease and is emerging as a valuable pharmacodynamic marker in the development of novel androgen receptor-targeted therapies. Prostate-specific membrane antigen PET tracers are in the early stages of clinical development. Multiple PET tracers are currently available to aid in the detection and management of prostate cancer across the clinical spectrum of the disease. Prospective, rigorously controlled, clinical imaging trials are needed to establish the optimal role of PET in prostate cancer.

  18. Scintillating Balloon-Enabled Fiber-Optic System for Radionuclide Imaging of Atherosclerotic Plaques

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Raiyan T.; Kosuge, Hisanori; Carpenter, Colin; Sun, Conroy; McConnell, Michael V.; Xing, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis underlies coronary artery disease, the leading cause of death in the United States and worldwide. Detection of coronary plaque inflammation remains challenging. In this study, we developed a scintillating balloon-enabled fiber-optic radio-nuclide imaging (SBRI) system to improve the sensitivity and resolution of plaque imaging using 18F-FDG, a marker of vascular inflammation, and tested it in a murine model. Methods The fiber-optic system uses a Complementary Metal-Oxide Silicon (CMOS) camera with a distal ferrule terminated with a wide-angle lens. The novelty of this system is a scintillating balloon in the front of the wide-angle lens to image light from the decay of 18F-FDG emission signal. To identify the optimal scintillating materials with respect to resolution, we calculated the modulation transfer function of yttrium–aluminum–garnet doped with cerium, anthracene, and calcium fluoride doped with europium (CaF2:Eu) phosphors using an edge pattern and a thin-line optical phantom. The scintillating balloon was then fabricated from 10 mL of silicone RTV catalyst mixed with 1 mL of base and 50 mg of CaF2:Eu per mL. The addition of a lutetium oxyorthosilicate scintillating crystal (500 μm thick) to the balloon was also investigated. The SBRI system was tested in a murine atherosclerosis model: carotid-ligated mice (n = 5) were injected with 18F-FDG, followed by ex vivo imaging of the macrophage-rich carotid plaques and nonligated controls. Confirmatory imaging of carotid plaques and controls was also performed by an external optical imaging system and autoradiography. Results Analyses of the different phosphors showed that CaF2:Eu enabled the best resolution of 1.2 μm. The SBRI system detected almost a 4-fold-higher radioluminescence signal from the ligated left carotid artery than the nonligated right carotid: 1.63 × 102 ± 4.01 × 101 vs. 4.21 × 101 ± 2.09 × 100 (photon counts), P = 0.006. We found no significant benefit to adding a

  19. Radiolabelled nanoparticles: novel classification of radiopharmaceuticals for molecular imaging of cancer.

    PubMed

    Mirshojaei, Seyedeh Fatemeh; Ahmadi, Amirhossein; Morales-Avila, Enrique; Ortiz-Reynoso, Mariana; Reyes-Perez, Horacio

    2016-01-01

    Nanotechnology has been used for every single modality in the molecular imaging arena for imaging purposes. Synergic advantages can be explored when multiple molecular imaging modalities are combined with respect to single imaging modalities. Multifunctional nanoparticles have large surface areas, where multiple functional moieties can be incorporated, including ligands for site-specific targeting and radionuclides, which can be detected to create 3D images. Recently, radiolabeled nanoparticles with individual properties have attracted great interest regarding their use in multimodality tumor imaging. Multifunctional nanoparticles can combine diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities for both target-specific diagnosis and the treatment of a given disease. The future of nanomedicine lies in multifunctional nanoplatforms that combine the diagnostic ability and therapeutic effects using appropriate ligands, drugs, responses and technological devices, which together are collectively called theranostic drugs. Co-delivery of radiolabeled nanoparticles is useful in multifunctional molecular imaging areas because it comprises several advantages based on nanoparticles architecture, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamic properties.

  20. [Status and advances of RGD molecular imaging in lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Yue, Ning; Yuan, Shuanghu; Yang, Guoren

    2014-12-01

    Lung cancer has been one of the most common and the highest mortality rates malignant tumors at home and abroad. Sustained angiogenesis was not only the characteristic of malignant tumors, but also the foundation of tumor proliferation, invasion, recurrence and metastasis, it was also one of the hot spots of treatments in lung cancer biology currently. Integrins played an important part in tumor angiogenesis. Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptides could combine with integrins specifically, and the application of radionuclide-labeled RGD molecular probes enabled imaging of tumor blood vessels to reflect its changes. The lung cancer imaging of RGD peptides at home and abroad in recent years was reviewed in this article.

  1. The importance of the accuracy of image registration of SPECT images for 3D targeted radionuclide therapy dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Papavasileiou, Periklis; Divoli, Antigoni; Hatziioannou, Konstantinos; Flux, Glenn D

    2007-12-21

    In this paper, the importance of the accuracy of image registration of time-sequential SPECT images for 3D targeted radionuclide therapy dosimetry is studied. Image registration of a series of SPECT scans is required to allow the computation of the 3D absorbed dose distribution for both tumour sites and normal organs. Three simulated 4D datasets, based on patient therapy studies, were generated to allow the effect of mis-registration on the absorbed dose distribution to be investigated. The tumour sites studied range in size, shape and position, relative to the centre of the 3D SPECT scan. Randomly generated transformations along the x-, y- and z-axes and rotations around the z-axis were employed and the maximum and average absorbed dose distribution statistics, for the tumour sites present, were computed. It was shown that even small mis-registrations, translation of less than 9 mm and rotation of less than 5 degrees might cause differences in the absorbed dose statistics of up to 90%, especially when the size of the tumour is comparable to the induced mis-registration or when the tumour is situated close to the edge of the 3D dataset.

  2. Radionuclide Imaging of Apoptosis in Malignancies: Promise and Pitfalls of 99mTc-Hynic-rh-Annexin V Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kartachova, M.S.; Verheij, M.; van Eck, B.L.; Hoefnagel, C.A.; Olmos, R.A. Valdes

    2008-01-01

    Radionuclide detection of apoptosis with of 99mTc-Hynic-rh-Annexin V scintigraphy is an effective tool for in vivo visualisation and monitoring of apoptosis in various malignant tumour. Early therapy-induced increase of the tumour tracer uptake correlates with favourable outcome, whereas stable or decreased uptake correlates with stable disease or tumour progression. Therefore sequential 99mTc-Hynic-rh-Annexin V scintigraphy could be used to predict therapy outcome on a patient-to-patient basis within 48 hours after the start of treatment. However, moderate tumour-to-background ratio and therapy-induced changes in normal tissues could confound image analysis. To assure accurate interpretation of Annexin V scans, the awareness of the biophysiological and biochemical properties contributing to the tracer distribution is essential. In with manuscript we discuss the patterns of Annexin V tumour uptake and illustrate the most frequent pitfalls associated with Annexin V imaging in correlation with CT and MRI imaging. PMID:21892293

  3. Emission tomography with a large-hole collimator (CACAO): a possible new way to improve radionuclide imaging.

    PubMed

    Jeanguillaume, Christian; Quartuccio, Marc; Begot, Stéphane; Douiri, Abdellah; Franck, Didier; Ricolfi, Frédéric; Ballongue, Paul; Tencé, Marcel

    2002-01-01

    This work aims to improve the quality of scintigraphy. It evaluates the use of a large-hole collimator, the Computer Aided Collimation Gamma Camera Project (CACAO), in SPECT. Acquisition data from the same object were simulated for CACAO and for a conventional collimator. Better signal-to-noise ratios were found for CACAO images, whatever the number of emitted photons. This work demonstrates that high-resolution images may be obtained with large-hole collimators. The combination of CACAO and pixilated detectors may further improve radionuclide imaging.

  4. Radionuclide imaging of drug delivery for patient selection in targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Heskamp, Sandra; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W M; van der Graaf, Winette T A; Oyen, Wim J G; Boerman, Otto C

    2014-02-01

    During the last decade, numerous antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors have been developed for cancer treatment. However, only a limited number of these agents have been shown to significantly improve survival of patients. Therefore, it is of crucial importance to identify the subset of patients who benefit from targeted therapy. Biomarkers can play an important role in selecting the right drug for the right patient. In this review, the potential role of molecular imaging of drug delivery for patient selection in targeted therapy will be discussed. The advantages and limitations of molecular imaging will be compared to those of conventional biomarkers. Moreover, we will address the factors that affect imaging of drug delivery, such as target expression, type of drug, in vivo accessibility of the receptor (e.g., vascular density, vascular permeability, interstitial pressure), enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect, receptor internalization, tracer protein dose and timing of imaging. Molecular imaging of drug delivery clearly has potential for patient selection for targeted therapy. The main advantage of this technique is that not only can antigen expression be measured noninvasively but also target accessibility is taken into account. However, up to now, most of these studies have been performed in preclinical models. Therefore, future research should focus on bringing promising tracers to the clinic, preferable in an early stage of drug development in order to test their potential role as a biomarker.

  5. Radionuclide imaging in myocardial sarcoidosis. Demonstration of myocardial uptake of /sup 99m/Tc pyrophosphate and gallium

    SciTech Connect

    Forman, M.B.; Sandler, M.P.; Sacks, G.A.; Kronenberg, M.W.; Powers, T.A.

    1983-03-01

    A patient had severe congestive cardiomyopathy secondary to myocardial sarcoidosis. The clinical diagnosis was confirmed by radionuclide ventriculography, /sup 201/Tl, /sup 67/Ga, and /sup 99m/Tc pyrophosphate (TcPYP) scintigraphy. Myocardial TcPYP uptake has not been reported previously in sarcoidosis. In this patient, TcPYP was as useful as gallium scanning and thallium imaging in documenting the myocardial process.

  6. Molecular Imaging: Current Status and Emerging Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Pysz, Marybeth A.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2011-01-01

    In vivo molecular imaging has a great potential to impact medicine by detecting diseases in early stages (screening), identifying extent of disease, selecting disease- and patient-specific therapeutic treatment (personalized medicine), applying a directed or targeted therapy, and measuring molecular-specific effects of treatment. Current clinical molecular imaging approaches primarily use PET- or SPECT-based techniques. In ongoing preclinical research novel molecular targets of different diseases are identified and, sophisticated and multifunctional contrast agents for imaging these molecular targets are developed along with new technologies and instrumentation for multimodality molecular imaging. Contrast-enhanced molecular ultrasound with molecularly-targeted contrast microbubbles is explored as a clinically translatable molecular imaging strategy for screening, diagnosing, and monitoring diseases at the molecular level. Optical imaging with fluorescent molecular probes and ultrasound imaging with molecularly-targeted microbubbles are attractive strategies since they provide real-time imaging, are relatively inexpensive, produce images with high spatial resolution, and do not involve exposure to ionizing irradiation. Raman spectroscopy/microscopy has emerged as a molecular optical imaging strategy for ultrasensitive detection of multiple biomolecules/biochemicals with both in vivo and ex vivo versatility. Photoacoustic imaging is a hybrid of optical and ultrasound modalities involving optically-excitable molecularly-targeted contrast agents and quantitative detection of resulting oscillatory contrast agent movement with ultrasound. Current preclinical findings and advances in instrumentation such as endoscopes and microcatheters suggest that these molecular imaging modalities have numerous clinical applications and will be translated into clinical use in the near future. PMID:20541650

  7. Molecular imaging for personalized cancer care.

    PubMed

    Kircher, Moritz F; Hricak, Hedvig; Larson, Steven M

    2012-04-01

    Molecular imaging is rapidly gaining recognition as a tool with the capacity to improve every facet of cancer care. Molecular imaging in oncology can be defined as in vivo characterization and measurement of the key biomolecules and molecularly based events that are fundamental to the malignant state. This article outlines the basic principles of molecular imaging as applied in oncology with both established and emerging techniques. It provides examples of the advantages that current molecular imaging techniques offer for improving clinical cancer care as well as drug development. It also discusses the importance of molecular imaging for the emerging field of theranostics and offers a vision of how molecular imaging may one day be integrated with other diagnostic techniques to dramatically increase the efficiency and effectiveness of cancer care.

  8. Potential clinical impact of radionuclide imaging technologies: highlights of the ITBS 2003 meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itti, Roland

    2004-07-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals are major determinants of progress in Nuclear Medicine. Besides 18FDG, the most common PET tracer, several other molecules are under evaluation, such as 18F-fluoride for bone studies, numerous ligands for neurotransmission, 18F-DOPA for neuro-endocrine tumors or generator produced 68Ga-peptides for various cancers. Nuclear medicine gradually changes for "molecular imaging" and medical imaging, which was at the beginning mainly anatomic, has progressed in the direction of functional and metabolic imaging. The present challenge is to achieve some degree of "in vivo" biochemistry or even histology or genetics. The importance of anatomic/functional image fusion justifies the development of combined PET-CT instrumentation, whose objectives have to be discussed in terms of anatomical landmarks and/or additional clinical information. The question of "hard" or "soft" image co-registration remains open, involving not only CT, but also SPECT or MRI. Development of dedicated imaging devices, whether single photon or positron, is of major interest for breast imaging, allowing optimal imaging conditions, with results definitely superior to classical gamma-cameras or PET. The patient population concerned with scintimammography is still controversial, as well as the imaging modalities: FDG or sestaMIBI, planar or tomographic, scintillators or semi-conductors, and the research field remains open. This is also valid for external or per-operative probe systems for tumor or lymph nodes localization.

  9. Assessment of single vessel coronary artery disease: results of exercise electrocardiography, thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging and radionuclide angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Port, S.C.; Oshima, M.; Ray, G.; McNamee, P.; Schmidt, D.H.

    1985-07-01

    The sensitivity of the commonly used stress tests for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease was analyzed in 46 patients with significant occlusion (greater than or equal to 70% luminal diameter obstruction) of only one major coronary artery and no prior myocardial infarction. In all patients, thallium-201 perfusion imaging (both planar and seven-pinhole tomographic) and 12 lead electrocardiography were performed during the same graded treadmill exercise test and radionuclide angiography was performed during upright bicycle exercise. Exercise rate-pressure (double) product was 22,307 +/- 6,750 on the treadmill compared with 22,995 +/- 5,622 on the bicycle (p = NS). Exercise electrocardiograms were unequivocally abnormal in 24 patients (52%). Qualitative planar thallium images were abnormal in 42 patients (91%). Quantitative analysis of the tomographic thallium images were abnormal in 41 patients (89%). An exercise ejection fraction of less than 0.56 or a new wall motion abnormality was seen in 30 patients (65%). Results were similar for the right (n = 11) and left anterior descending (n = 28) coronary arteries while all tests but the planar thallium imaging showed a lower sensitivity for isolated circumflex artery disease (n = 7). The specificity of the tests was 72, 83, 89 and 72% for electrocardiography, planar thallium imaging, tomographic thallium imaging and radionuclide angiography, respectively. The results suggest that exercise thallium-201 perfusion imaging is the most sensitive noninvasive stress test for the diagnosis of single vessel coronary artery disease.

  10. Nuclear medicine and radionuclide imaging: a survey of recruitment issues in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Gray, H W; Prvulovich, E; Nunan, T

    2003-04-01

    This wide ranging survey has highlighted difficulties in recruiting trained and committed individuals into nuclear medicine and radionuclide radiology. Several key factors have been recognised that reduce the attractiveness of the training. Recommendations include the rotation of medical senior house officers through nuclear medicine, reconsideration of dual accreditation in nuclear medicine and medicine, an increase in the number of consultant posts in nuclear medicine, parity of remuneration for nuclear medicine trainees and finally, an appropriate sessional provision for those providing radionuclide radiology services.

  11. Label-free molecular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junqi; Li, Qi; Fu, Rongxin; Wang, Tongzhou; Wang, Ruliang; Huang, Guoliang

    2014-03-01

    Optical microscopy technology has achieved great improvements in the 20th century. The detection limit has reached about twenty nanometers (with near-field optics, STED, PALM and STORM). But in the application areas such as life science, medical science, clinical treatment and especially in vivo dynamic measurement, mutual restrictions still exist between numeric aperture/magnification and working distance, fluorescent dependent, and between resolution and frame rate/field size, etc. This paper explores a hyperspectral scanning super-resolution label free molecules imaging method based on the white light interferometry. The vertical detection resolution was approximate to 1 nm which is the thickness of a single molecular layer and dynamic measuring range of thickness reaches to 10 μm. The spectrum-shifting algorithm is developed for robust restructure of images when the pixels are overlapped. Micro-biochip with protein binding and DNA amplification could be detected by using this spectral scanning super-resolution molecules imaging in label free. This method has several advantages as following: Firstly, the decoding and detecting steps are combined into one step. It makes tests faster and easier. Secondly, we used thickness-coded, minimized chips instead of a large microarray chip to carry the probes. This accelerates the interaction of the biomolecules. Thirdly, since only one kind of probes are attached to our thickness-coded, minimized chip, users can only pick out the probes they are interested in for a test without wasting unnecessary probes and chips.

  12. Assessment of differential pulmonary blood flow using perfusion magnetic resonance imaging: comparison with radionuclide perfusion scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Molinari, Francesco; Fink, Christian; Risse, Frank; Tuengerthal, Siegfried; Bonomo, Lorenzo; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich

    2006-08-01

    We sought to assess the agreement between lung perfusion ratios calculated from pulmonary perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and those calculated from radionuclide (RN) perfusion scintigraphy. A retrospective analysis of MR and RN perfusion scans was conducted in 23 patients (mean age, 60 +/- 14 years) with different lung diseases (lung cancer = 15, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease = 4, cystic fibrosis = 2, and mesothelioma = 2). Pulmonary perfusion was assessed by a time-resolved contrast-enhanced 3D gradient-echo pulse sequence using parallel imaging and view sharing (TR = 1.9 milliseconds; TE = 0.8 milliseconds; parallel imaging acceleration factor = 2; partition thickness = 4 mm; matrix = 256 x 96; in-plane spatial resolution = 1.87 x 3.75 mm; scan time for each 3D dataset = 1.5 seconds), using gadolinium-based contrast agents (injection flow rate = 5 mL/s, dose = 0.1 mmol/kg of body weight). The peak concentration (PC) of the contrast agent bolus, the pulmonary blood flow (PBF), and blood volume (PBV) were computed from the signal-time curves of the lung. Left-to-right ratios of pulmonary perfusion were calculated from the MR parameters and RN counts. The agreement between these ratios was assessed for side prevalence (sign test) and quantitatively (Deming-regression). MR and RN ratios agreed on side prevalence in 21 patients (91%) with PC, in 20 (87%) with PBF, and in 17 (74%) with PBV. The MR estimations of left-to-right perfusion ratios correlated significantly with those of RN perfusion scans (P < 0.01). The correlation was higher using PC (r = 0.67) and PBF (r = 0.66) than using PBV (r = 0.50). The MR ratios computed from PBF showed the highest accuracy, followed by those from PC and PBV. Independently from the MR parameter used, in some patients the quantitative difference between the MR and RN ratios was not negligible. Pulmonary perfusion MRI can be used to assess the differential blood flow of the lung. Further studies in a larger group

  13. The Role of Non-Standard PET Radionuclides in the Development of New Radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Avila-Rodriguez, M. A.; McQuarrie, S. A.

    2008-08-11

    This paper discusses the production methods of the most commonly used non-standard PET radionuclides, their decay characteristics and importance in the development of novel radiopharmaceuticals for PET-based molecular imaging and potential applications in therapy.

  14. Synthesis, radiolabeling and preliminary in vivo evaluation of multimodal radiotracers for PET imaging and targeted radionuclide therapy of pigmented melanoma.

    PubMed

    Billaud, Emilie M F; Maisonial-Besset, Aurélie; Rbah-Vidal, Latifa; Vidal, Aurélien; Besse, Sophie; Béquignat, Jean-Baptiste; Decombat, Caroline; Degoul, Françoise; Audin, Laurent; Deloye, Jean-Bernard; Dollé, Frédéric; Kuhnast, Bertrand; Madelmont, Jean-Claude; Tarrit, Sébastien; Galmier, Marie-Josèphe; Borel, Michèle; Auzeloux, Philippe; Miot-Noirault, Elisabeth; Chezal, Jean-Michel

    2015-03-06

    Melanin pigment represents an attractive target to address specific treatment to melanoma cells, such as cytotoxic radionuclides. However, less than half of the patients have pigmented metastases. Hence, specific marker is required to stratify this patient population before proceeding with melanin-targeted radionuclide therapy. In such a context, we developed fluorinated analogues of a previously studied melanin-targeting ligand, N-(2-diethylaminoethyl)-6-iodoquinoxaline-2-carboxamide (ICF01012). These latter can be labeled either with (18)F or (131)I/(125)I for positron emission tomography imaging (melanin-positive patient selection) and targeted radionuclide therapy purposes. Here we describe the syntheses, radiosyntheses and preclinical evaluations on melanoma-bearing mice model of several iodo- and fluoro(hetero)aromatic derivatives of the ICF01012 scaffold. After preliminary planar gamma scintigraphic and positron emission tomography imaging evaluations, [(125)I]- and [(18)F]-N-[2-(diethylamino)ethyl]-4-fluoro-3-iodobenzamides ([(125)I]4, [(18)F]4) were found to be chemically and biologically stable with quite similar tumor uptakes at 1 h p.i. (9.7 ± 2.6% ID/g and 6.8 ± 1.9% ID/g, respectively). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. [Radionuclide imaging in oral implantations. Personal experience in maxillary sinus elevation].

    PubMed

    Dimonte, M; Inchingolo, F; Minonne, A; Stefanelli, M

    2000-11-01

    Presently nuclear medicine techniques are not very popular in oral implantology, but they can play an interesting role in this surgical field too. In particular bone scan with 99mTc-MDP allows to evaluate the function of oral implants and the survival of bone grafts. We report our experience with skull bone scan in maxillary sinus lifting. We performed a three-year follow-up on 13 patients treated with inlay-one stage uni- or bilateral sinus lifting with a mixture composed of 90% bovine bone powder and of 10% small bone splinters and autogenous fibrin glue. We performed imaging studies and quantitated implant MDP uptake from the mean values at the surgical site to the 5th neck vertebral ratio (M/V index). The M/V index was also statistically compared with the one measured in 13 patients with severe resorption of distal upper dental arches (bone height less than 0.5 cm) and in 63 patients with normal dental status. Scintigraphic data were interpreted in the light of clinical, radiological and histologic findings. All oral implants appeared to be fixed and radiographs showed good positioning and bone adhesion; bone height exceeded 1 cm. Peri implant biopsy material was formed by normal mature bone tissue without bovine bone granules, necrotic areas and inflammatory cells. The highest bone activity (M/V index: 1.54-2.57) was observed 1-4 months after sinus lifting. Then MDP uptake decreases and 18 months after surgery radionuclide uptake in maxillary arches is homogeneous, with M/V values of 0.81-0.88. The average M/V value in the 18 surgical sites was clearly higher than in the resorbed (1.44 vs 0.64; Kruskall-Wallis ANOVA test; Dunn's method; p < 0.05) and normal (1.44 vs 0.73; p < 0.05) maxillary arches. 99mTc-MDP can show the transformation of newformed into mature bone and then allows in vivo visualization of implant osteointegration. The importance of our work lies in the use of radionuclide imaging to assess both the function of oral implants inserted by a

  16. Techniques for molecular imaging probe design.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Fred; Kelly, Kimberly A

    2011-12-01

    Molecular imaging allows clinicians to visualize disease-specific molecules, thereby providing relevant information in the diagnosis and treatment of patients. With advances in genomics and proteomics and underlying mechanisms of disease pathology, the number of targets identified has significantly outpaced the number of developed molecular imaging probes. There has been a concerted effort to bridge this gap with multidisciplinary efforts in chemistry, proteomics, physics, material science, and biology--all essential to progress in molecular imaging probe development. In this review, we discuss target selection, screening techniques, and probe optimization with the aim of developing clinically relevant molecularly targeted imaging agents.

  17. Techniques for Molecular Imaging Probe Design

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Fred; Kelly, Kimberly A.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular imaging allows clinicians to visualize disease specific molecules, thereby providing relevant information in the diagnosis and treatment of patients. With advances in genomics and proteomics and underlying mechanisms of disease pathology, the number of targets identified has significantly outpaced the number of developed molecular imaging probes. There has been a concerted effort to bridge this gap with multidisciplinary efforts in chemistry, proteomics, physics, material science, and biology; all essential to progress in molecular imaging probe development. In this review, we will discuss target selection, screening techniques and probe optimization with the aim of developing clinically relevant molecularly targeted imaging agents. PMID:22201532

  18. alpha(v)beta(3) Integrin-targeting radionuclide therapy and imaging with monomeric RGD peptide.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Mitsuyoshi; Ogawa, Kazuma; Washiyama, Kohshin; Shikano, Naoto; Mori, Hirofumi; Amano, Ryohei; Kawai, Keiichi

    2008-08-01

    The alpha(v)beta(3) integrin plays a pivotal role in angiogenesis and tumor metastasis. Angiogenic blood vessels overexpress alpha(v)beta(3) integrin, as in tumor neovascularization, and alpha(v)beta(3) integrin expression in other microvascular beds and organs is limited. Therefore, alpha(v)beta(3) integrin is a suitable receptor for tumor-targeting imaging and therapy. Recently, tetrameric and dimeric RGD peptides have been developed to enhance specificity to alpha(v)beta(3) integrin. In comparison to the corresponding monomeric peptide, however, these peptides show high levels of accumulation in kidney and liver. The purpose of this study is to evaluate tumor-targeting properties and the therapeutic potential of 111In- and 90Y-labeled monomeric RGD peptides in BALB/c nude mice with SKOV-3 human ovarian carcinoma tumors. DOTA-c(RGDfK) was labeled with 111In or 90Y and purified by HPLC. A biodistribution study and scintigraphic images revealed the specific uptake to alpha(v)beta(3) integrin and the rapid clearance from normal tissues. These peptides were renally excreted. At 10 min after injection of tracers, 111In-DOTA-c(RGDfK) and 90Y-DOTA-c(RGDfK) showed high uptake in tumors (7.3 +/- 0.6% ID/g and 4.6 +/- 0.8% ID/g, respectively) and gradually decreased over time (2.3 +/- 0.4% ID/g and 1.5 +/- 0.5% ID/g at 24 hr, respectively). High tumor-to-blood and -muscle ratios were obtained from these peptides. In radionuclide therapeutic study, multiple-dose administration of 90Y-DOTA-c(RGDfK) (3 x 11.1 MBq) suppressed tumor growth in comparison to the control group and a single-dose administration (11.1 MBq). Monomeric RGD peptides, 111In-DOTA-c(RGDfK) and (90)Y-DOTA-c(RGDfK), could be promising tracers for alpha(v)beta(3) integrin-targeting imaging and radiotherapy.

  19. Perspectives in molecular imaging through translational research, human medicine, and veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Berry, Clifford R; Garg, Predeep

    2014-01-01

    The concept of molecular imaging has taken off over the past 15 years to the point of the renaming of the Society of Nuclear Medicine (Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging) and Journals (European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging) and offering of medical fellowships specific to this area of study. Molecular imaging has always been at the core of functional imaging related to nuclear medicine. Even before the phrase molecular imaging came into vogue, radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals were developed that targeted select physiological processes, proteins, receptor analogs, antibody-antigen interactions, metabolites and specific metabolic pathways. In addition, with the advent of genomic imaging, targeted genomic therapy, and theranostics, a number of novel radiopharmaceuticals for the detection and therapy of specific tumor types based on unique biological and cellular properties of the tumor itself have been realized. However, molecular imaging and therapeutics as well as the concept of theranostics are yet to be fully realized. The purpose of this review article is to present an overview of the translational approaches to targeted molecular imaging with application to some naturally occurring animal models of human disease.

  20. Gallbladder radionuclide scan

    MedlinePlus

    Radionuclide - gallbladder; Gallbladder scan; Biliary scan; Cholescintigraphy; HIDA; Hepatobiliary nuclear imaging scan ... It will then flow with bile into the gallbladder and then the duodenum or small intestine. For ...

  1. Peptide-loaded nanoparticles and radionuclide imaging for individualized treatment of myocardial ischemia.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hyosook; Kwon, Jeongll; Oh, Phil-Sun; Lee, Tai-Kyoung; Na, Kyung-Suk; Lee, Chang-Moon; Jeong, Hwan-Seok; Lim, Seok Tae; Sohn, Myung-Hee; Jeong, Hwan-Jeong

    2014-10-01

    To determine whether chitosan hydrogel nanoparticles loaded with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) peptides (81-91 fragments) capable of targeting the ischemic myocardium enhance angiogenesis and promote therapeutic effects and whether radionuclide image-guided dosage control is feasible. Experimental procedures and protocols were approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. Rats (n = 32, eight per group) were subjected to myocardial ischemia (control group) and received chitosan hydrogel nanoparticles with VEGF165 proteins (chitosan VEGF) or VEGF81-91 peptides (chitosan peptides) via apical puncture. Ischemic hearts receiving chitosan without angiogenic factors served as the chitosan control. Myocardial perfusion was examined 7 days after surgery by using technetium 99m ((99m)Tc) tetrofosmin (37 MBq) autoradiography, and changes in vascular density with immunohistochemical staining were reviewed. Kruskal-Wallis test and Bonferroni corrected Mann-Whitney U test were used for multiple comparisons. Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to compare myocardial retention of (99m)Tc chitosan. Thirty minutes of myocardial ischemia resulted in perfusion defects (median, 54%; interquartile range [IQR], 41%-62%). Chitosan VEGF decreased perfusion defect extent (median, 68%; IQR, 63%-73%; P = .006 vs control) and increased vascular density (median, 81 vessels per high-power field; IQR, 72-100; P = .009 vs control). Administration of chitosan peptides reduced the degree of perfusion defects (median, 66%; IQR, 62%-73%; P = .006 vs control) and increased vascular density (median, 82 vessels; IQR, 78-92; P = .006 vs control). The effects of chitosan peptides on perfusion and vascular density were comparable to those seen with chitosan VEGF proteins (P = .713 and P = .833, respectively). Chitosan radiolabeled with (99m)Tc was administered twice at reperfusion with a 1-hour interval to determine whether image-guided dosage control is feasible. The hearts

  2. Molecular Imaging of Pancreatic Cancer with Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Development of novel imaging probes for cancer diagnostics remains critical for early detection of disease, yet most imaging agents are hindered by suboptimal tumor accumulation. To overcome these limitations, researchers have adapted antibodies for imaging purposes. As cancerous malignancies express atypical patterns of cell surface proteins in comparison to noncancerous tissues, novel antibody-based imaging agents can be constructed to target individual cancer cells or surrounding vasculature. Using molecular imaging techniques, these agents may be utilized for detection of malignancies and monitoring of therapeutic response. Currently, there are several imaging modalities commonly employed for molecular imaging. These imaging modalities include positron emission tomography (PET), single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, optical imaging (fluorescence and bioluminescence), and photoacoustic (PA) imaging. While antibody-based imaging agents may be employed for a broad range of diseases, this review focuses on the molecular imaging of pancreatic cancer, as there are limited resources for imaging and treatment of pancreatic malignancies. Additionally, pancreatic cancer remains the most lethal cancer with an overall 5-year survival rate of approximately 7%, despite significant advances in the imaging and treatment of many other cancers. In this review, we discuss recent advances in molecular imaging of pancreatic cancer using antibody-based imaging agents. This task is accomplished by summarizing the current progress in each type of molecular imaging modality described above. Also, several considerations for designing and synthesizing novel antibody-based imaging agents are discussed. Lastly, the future directions of antibody-based imaging agents are discussed, emphasizing the potential applications for personalized medicine. PMID:26620581

  3. [Capabilities of radionuclide imaging study in the evaluation of pulmonary hemodynamics and right ventricular function in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Zavadovskiĭ, K V; Lishmanov, Iu B; Krivonogov, N G; Sanzharovskaia, M S

    2013-01-01

    To assess the capabilities of radionuclide imaging studies in the evaluation of pulmonary hemodynamics and right ventricular function in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Twenty-one patients aged 55.8 +/- 9.7 years with COPD (forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), 37.43 +/- 15.46%; BODE index, 6.30 +/- 2.66) were examined. A comparison group included 15 patients aged 56.3 +/- 8.3 years without cardiorespiratory pathology. All the patients underwent radionuclide angiopulmonography (RAPG), equilibrium radionuclide tomoventriculography (ERTVG), external respiratory function testing, and determination of the plasma levels of endothelin-1 and stable nitric oxide metabolites. Analysis of the results of ERTVG and RAPG in the study and comparison groups has shown that the chanrades in the lesser circucr moderate. r index and smoking intensity have demonstrated the statistically significant association with the indicators of pulmonary circulation. The plasma level of endothelin-1 was higher1in the patients with COPD than in those in the comparison group. Right dysfunction is moderate in COPD as this process is preceded by structural changes in the bronchi, parenchyma, and lung vessels. To identify lesser circulatory dysfunction in COPD, one should orient to the indicators of RAPG that can verify pulmonary hemodynamic disorders and to the data of ERTVG that shows right ventricular systolic and diastolic function and right atrial dimensions.

  4. Evaluation of energy spectral information in nuclear imaging and investigation of protein binding of cationic radionuclides by lactoferrin. Comprehensive progress report, October 1, 1977-September 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffer, P. B.

    1980-06-10

    Construction of an Anger camera-computer system which allows collection of both the position and energy signals from events detected by the scintillation camera has been completed. The system allows correction of energy response non-uniformity of the detector and facilitates research related to effects of energy discrimination in radionuclide scintigraphy. The system consists of electronic hardware to transmit and digitize the energy signal, software to record and process that signal in conjunction with spatial positioning signals, and additional hardware for recording the processed images so that they can be evaluated by observers. Preliminary results indicate that the system is useful in evaluating clinical images. Assymetric (eccentric) energy windows do improve image quality and are of value in improving detection of lesions on liver scintigraphs. The mechanisms by which Ga-67 is taken up in infection and tumor has been elucidated, and the uptake of radiogallium in microorganisms as a function of its interaction with siderophores was also studied. The primary function of these low molecular weight compounds is to trap ferric ion. However, gallium may be substituted for ferric ion and becomes trapped within the microorganism. The uptake of radiogallium by neutrophils and the role that lactoferrin plays in both intracellular localization of radiogallium and subsequent deposition of the radionuclide at sites of infection were also studied. Investigation of ferric ion analogs reveals definate differences in the affinity of these metals for binding molecules which helps explain their biologic activity. While ferric ion has the strongest affinity for such molecules, gallium has very high affinity for siderophores, moderate affinity for lactoferrin, and lower affinity for transferrin. The relative affinity of indium for these molecules is in approximately the reverse order.

  5. Anatomical and molecular imaging of skin cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Hao; Sun, Jiangtao; Cai, Weibo

    2008-01-01

    Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer types. It is generally divided into two categories: melanoma (∼ 5%) and nonmelanoma (∼ 95%), which can be further categorized into basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and some rare skin cancer types. Biopsy is still the gold standard for skin cancer evaluation in the clinic. Various anatomical imaging techniques have been used to evaluate different types of skin cancer lesions, including laser scanning confocal microscopy, optical coherence tomography, high-frequency ultrasound, terahertz pulsed imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, and some other recently developed techniques such as photoacoustic microscopy. However, anatomical imaging alone may not be sufficient in guiding skin cancer diagnosis and therapy. Over the last decade, various molecular imaging techniques (in particular single photon emission computed tomography and positron emission tomography) have been investigated for skin cancer imaging. The pathways or molecular targets that have been studied include glucose metabolism, integrin αvβ3, melanocortin-1 receptor, high molecular weight melanoma-associated antigen, and several other molecular markers. Preclinical molecular imaging is thriving all over the world, while clinical molecular imaging has not lived up to the expectations because of slow bench-to-bedside translation. It is likely that this situation will change in the near future and molecular imaging will truly play an important role in personalized medicine of melanoma patients. PMID:21437135

  6. Nuclear Molecular Imaging for Vulnerable Atherosclerotic Plaques

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soo Jin

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease as well as a lipid disorder. Atherosclerotic plaque formed in vessel walls may cause ischemia, and the rupture of vulnerable plaque may result in fatal events, like myocardial infarction or stroke. Because morphological imaging has limitations in diagnosing vulnerable plaque, molecular imaging has been developed, in particular, the use of nuclear imaging probes. Molecular imaging targets various aspects of vulnerable plaque, such as inflammatory cell accumulation, endothelial activation, proteolysis, neoangiogenesis, hypoxia, apoptosis, and calcification. Many preclinical and clinical studies have been conducted with various imaging probes and some of them have exhibited promising results. Despite some limitations in imaging technology, molecular imaging is expected to be used both in the research and clinical fields as imaging instruments become more advanced. PMID:26357491

  7. Affibody molecules: new protein domains for molecular imaging and targeted tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Fredrik Y; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2007-03-01

    Molecular imaging shows promise as a useful tool to aid drug discovery and development and also to provide important prognostic and predictive diagnostic information affecting patient management in the clinic. However, the use of molecular imaging diagnostically is not widely adopted, in part due to the lack of suitable targeting agents. Affibody molecules are a class of small and very stable protein domains, which can be used to selectively address a wide range of protein targets. Their small size enables high contrast radionuclide imaging and they can be produced by conventional peptide synthesis methods. Their potential utility in molecular imaging is highlighted in a large number of animal studies using anti-HER2 Affibody tracers and has recently been validated in breast cancer patients with HER2-expressing metastases. The therapeutic efficacy of the Affibody molecules in this indication was demonstrated in preclinical models using a targeted radionuclide as the effector function. This review will focus on the recent use of Affibody molecules for molecular imaging and their application for radioimmunotherapy.

  8. Drug Discovery by Molecular Imaging and Monitoring Therapy Response in Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Kalimuthu, Senthilkumar; Jeong, Ju Hye; Oh, Ji Min; Ahn, Byeong-Cheol

    2017-07-27

    Molecular imaging allows a noninvasive assessment of biochemical and biological processes in living subjects. Treatment strategies for malignant lymphoma depend on histology and tumor stage. For the last two decades, molecular imaging has been the mainstay diagnostic test for the staging of malignant lymphoma and the assessment of response to treatment. This technology enhances our understanding of disease and drug activity during preclinical and clinical drug development. Here, we review molecular imaging applications in drug development, with an emphasis on oncology. Monitoring and assessing the efficacy of anti-cancer therapies in preclinical or clinical models are essential and the multimodal molecular imaging approach may represent a new stage for pharmacologic development in cancer. Monitoring the progress of lymphoma therapy with imaging modalities will help patients. Identifying and addressing key challenges is essential for successful integration of molecular imaging into the drug development process. In this review, we highlight the general usefulness of molecular imaging in drug development and radionuclide-based reporter genes. Further, we discuss the different molecular imaging modalities for lymphoma therapy and their preclinical and clinical applications.

  9. Drug Discovery by Molecular Imaging and Monitoring Therapy Response in Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Kalimuthu, Senthilkumar; Jeong, Ju Hye; Oh, Ji Min

    2017-01-01

    Molecular imaging allows a noninvasive assessment of biochemical and biological processes in living subjects. Treatment strategies for malignant lymphoma depend on histology and tumor stage. For the last two decades, molecular imaging has been the mainstay diagnostic test for the staging of malignant lymphoma and the assessment of response to treatment. This technology enhances our understanding of disease and drug activity during preclinical and clinical drug development. Here, we review molecular imaging applications in drug development, with an emphasis on oncology. Monitoring and assessing the efficacy of anti-cancer therapies in preclinical or clinical models are essential and the multimodal molecular imaging approach may represent a new stage for pharmacologic development in cancer. Monitoring the progress of lymphoma therapy with imaging modalities will help patients. Identifying and addressing key challenges is essential for successful integration of molecular imaging into the drug development process. In this review, we highlight the general usefulness of molecular imaging in drug development and radionuclide-based reporter genes. Further, we discuss the different molecular imaging modalities for lymphoma therapy and their preclinical and clinical applications. PMID:28749424

  10. Molecular imaging of oncolytic viral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Dana; Fong, Yuman

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses have made their mark on the cancer world as a potential therapeutic option, with the possible advantages of reduced side effects and strengthened treatment efficacy due to higher tumor selectivity. Results have been so promising, that oncolytic viral treatments have now been approved for clinical trials in several countries. However, clinical studies may benefit from the ability to noninvasively and serially identify sites of viral targeting via molecular imaging in order to provide safety, efficacy, and toxicity information. Furthermore, molecular imaging of oncolytic viral therapy may provide a more sensitive and specific diagnostic technique to detect tumor origin and, more importantly, presence of metastases. Several strategies have been investigated for molecular imaging of viral replication broadly categorized into optical and deep tissue imaging, utilizing several reporter genes encoding for fluorescence proteins, conditional enzymes, and membrane protein and transporters. Various imaging methods facilitate molecular imaging, including computer tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, single photon emission CT, gamma-scintigraphy, and photoacoustic imaging. In addition, several molecular probes are used for medical imaging, which act as targeting moieties or signaling agents. This review will explore the preclinical and clinical use of in vivo molecular imaging of replication-competent oncolytic viral therapy. PMID:27119098

  11. Future imaging of atherosclerosis: molecular imaging of coronary atherosclerosis with 18F positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Psaltis, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is characterized by the formation of complex atheroma lesions (plaques) in arteries that pose risk by their flow-limiting nature and propensity for rupture and thrombotic occlusion. It develops in the context of disturbances to lipid metabolism and immune response, with inflammation underpinning all stages of plaque formation, progression and rupture. As the primary disease process responsible for myocardial infarction, stroke and peripheral vascular disease, atherosclerosis is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality on a global scale. A precise understanding of its pathogenic mechanisms is therefore critically important. Integral to this is the role of vascular wall imaging. Over recent years, the rapidly evolving field of molecular imaging has begun to revolutionize our ability to image beyond just the anatomical substrate of vascular disease, and more dynamically assess its pathobiology. Nuclear imaging by positron emission tomography (PET) can target specific molecular and biological pathways involved in atherosclerosis, with the application of 18Fluoride PET imaging being widely studied for its potential to identify plaques that are vulnerable or high risk. In this review, we discuss the emergence of 18Fluoride PET as a promising modality for the assessment of coronary atherosclerosis, focusing on the strengths and limitations of the two main radionuclide tracers that have been investigated to date: 2-deoxy-2-(18F)fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG) and sodium 18F-fluoride (18F-NaF). PMID:27500093

  12. Radionuclide trap

    DOEpatents

    McGuire, Joseph C.

    1978-01-01

    The deposition of radionuclides manganese-54, cobalt-58 and cobalt-60 from liquid sodium coolant is controlled by providing surfaces of nickel or high nickel alloys to extract the radionuclides from the liquid sodium, and by providing surfaces of tungsten, molybdenum or tantalum to prevent or retard radionuclide deposition.

  13. In vivo Noninvasive Small Animal Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Hyewon; Hong, Kee-Jong

    2012-01-01

    The remarkable efforts that are made on molecular imaging technologies demonstrate its potential importance and range of applications. The generation of disease-specific animal models, and the developments of target-specific probes and genetically encoded reporters are another important component. Continued improvements in the instrumentation, the identification of novel targets and genes, and the availability of improved imaging probes should be made. Multimodal imaging probes should provide easier transitions between laboratory studies, including small animal studies and clinical applications. Here, we reviewed basic strategies of noninvasive in vivo imaging methods in small animals to introducing the concept of molecular imaging. PMID:24159487

  14. The Imaging Probe Development Center and the Production of Molecular Imaging Probes

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Gary L

    2008-01-01

    The Imaging Probe Development Center (IPDC), part of the NIH Roadmap for Medical Research Initiative (http://nihroadmap.nih.gov/) recently became fully operational at its newly refurbished laboratories in Rockville, MD. The IPDC (http://nihroadmap.nih.gov/molecularlibraries/ipdc/) is dedicated to the production of known and novel molecular imaging probes, with its services currently being used by the NIH intramural community, although in the future it is intended that the extramural community will also benefit from the IPDC’s resources. The Center has been set up with the belief that molecular imaging, and the probe chemistry that underpins it, will constitute key technologies going forward. As part of the larger molecular libraries and imaging initiative, it is planned that the IPDC will work closely with scientists from the molecular libraries effort. Probes produced at the IPDC include optical, radionuclide and magnetic resonance agents and may encompass any type of contrast agent. As IPDC is a trans-NIH resource it can serve each of the 27 Institutes and Centers that comprise NIH so its influence can be expected to impact widely different subjects and disease conditions spanning biological research. IPDC is expected to play a key part in interdisciplinary collaborative imaging projects and to support translational R&D from basic research through clinical development, for all of the imaging modalities. Examples of probes already prepared or under preparation are outlined to illustrate the breadth of the chemistries undertaken together with a reference outline of the diverse biological applications for which the various probes are intended. PMID:20161829

  15. Advances in Molecular Imaging with Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Gessner, Ryan; Dayton, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging has long demonstrated utility in the study and measurement of anatomic features and noninvasive observation of blood flow. Within the last decade, advances in molecular biology and contrast agents have allowed researchers to use ultrasound to detect changes in the expression of molecular markers on the vascular endothelium and other intravascular targets. This new technology, referred to as ultrasonic molecular imaging, is still in its infancy. However, in preclinical studies, ultrasonic molecular imaging has shown promise in assessing angiogenesis, inflammation, and thrombus. In this review, we discuss recent advances in microbubble-type contrast agent development, ultrasound technology, and signal processing strategies that have the potential to substantially improve the capabilities and utility of ultrasonic molecular imaging. PMID:20487678

  16. Cerebrospinal fluid circulation and associated intracranial dynamics. A radiologic investigation using MR imaging and radionuclide cisternography.

    PubMed

    Greitz, D

    1993-01-01

    AIMS OF THE PRESENT INVESTIGATION: Observations made in a preliminary study of pulsatile cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and brain motions using MR imaging called for a reconsideration of the CSF flow model currently accepted. The following questions were addressed: 1) The nature of the CSF-circulation, e.g., the magnitude and pattern of pulsatile and bulk flow; 2) The driving forces of the CSF circulation and assessment of the role of associated hemodynamics and brain motions; 3) The major routes for the absorption of CSF. CSF flow and associated hemodynamics were studied using gated MR imaging, in 26 healthy volunteers, 5 patients with communicating hydrocephalus and 10 with benign intracranial hypertension. Radionuclide cisternography was performed in 10 individuals with venous vasculitis. 1) The CSF-circulation is propelled by a pulsating flow, which causes an effective mixing. This flow is produced by the alternating pressure gradient, which is a consequence of the systolic expansion of the intracranial arteries causing expulsion of CSF into the compliant and contractable spinal subarachnoid space. 2) No bulk flow is necessary to explain the transport of tracers in the subarachnoid space. 3) The main absorption of the CSF is not through the Pacchionian granulations, but a major part of the CSF transportation to the blood-stream is likely to occur via the paravascular and extracellular spaces of the central nervous system. 4) The intracranial dynamics may be regarded as the result of an interplay between the demands for space by the four components of the intracranial content, i.e. the arterial blood, brain volume, venous blood and the CSF. This interaction is shown to have a time offset within the cerebral hemispheres in a fronto-occipital direction during the cardiac cycle (the fronto-occipital "volume wave"). 5) The outflow from the cranial cavity to the cervical subarachnoid space (SAS) is dependent in size and timing on the intracranial arterial expansion during

  17. Simultaneous Tc-99m/I-123 Dual Radionuclide Myocardial Perfusion/Innervation Imaging Using Siemens IQ-SPECT with SMARTZOOM Collimator

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yong; Bhattacharya, Manojeet; Frey, Eric. C.

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneous dual-radionuclide myocardial perfusion/innervation SPECT imaging can provide important information about mismatch between scar tissue and denervated regions. The Siemens IQ-SPECT system developed for cardiac imaging uses a multifocal SMARTZOOM collimator to achieve a four-fold sensitivity for the cardiac region compared to a typical parallel-hole low-energy high-resolution collimator but without the data truncation that can result with conventional converging-beam collimators. The increased sensitivity allows shorter image acquisition times or reduced patient dose, making IQ-SPECT ideal for simultaneous dual-radionuclide SPECT, where reduced administrated activity is desirable in order to reduce patient radiation exposure. However, crosstalk is a major factor affecting the image quality in dual-radionuclide imaging. In this work we developed a model-based method that can estimate and compensate for the crosstalk in IQ-SPECT data. The crosstalk model takes into account interactions in the object and collimator-detector system. Scatter in the object was modeled using the effective source scatter estimation technique (ESSE), previously developed to model scatter with parallel-hole collimators. The geometric collimator detector response was analytically modeled in the IQ-SPECT projector. The estimated crosstalk was then compensated for in an iterative reconstruction process. The new method was validated with data from both Monte Carlo simulation and physical phantom experiments. The results showed that the estimated crosstalk was in good agreement with simulated and measured results. After model-based compensation the images from simultaneous dual-radionuclide acquisitions were similar in quality to those from single radionuclide acquisitions that did not have crosstalk contamination. The proposed model-based method can be used to improve simultaneous dual-radionuclide images acquired using IQ-SPECT. This work also demonstrates that ESSE scatter modeling

  18. Simultaneous Tc-99m/I-123 dual-radionuclide myocardial perfusion/innervation imaging using Siemens IQ-SPECT with SMARTZOOM collimator.

    PubMed

    Du, Yong; Bhattacharya, Manojeet; Frey, Eric C

    2014-06-07

    Simultaneous dual-radionuclide myocardial perfusion/innervation SPECT imaging can provide important information about the mismatch between scar tissue and denervated regions. The Siemens IQ-SPECT system developed for cardiac imaging uses a multifocal SMARTZOOM collimator to achieve a four-fold sensitivity for the cardiac region, compared to a typical parallel-hole low-energy high-resolution collimator, but without the data truncation that can result with conventional converging-beam collimators. The increased sensitivity allows shorter image acquisition times or reduced patient dose, making IQ-SPECT ideal for simultaneous dual-radionuclide SPECT, where reduced administrated activity is desirable in order to reduce patient radiation exposure. However, crosstalk is a major factor affecting the image quality in dual-radionuclide imaging. In this work we developed a model-based method that can estimate and compensate for the crosstalk in IQ-SPECT data. The crosstalk model takes into account interactions in the object and collimator-detector system. Scatter in the object was modeled using the effective source scatter estimation technique (ESSE), previously developed to model scatter with parallel-hole collimators. The geometric collimator-detector response was analytically modeled in the IQ-SPECT projector. The estimated crosstalk was then compensated for in an iterative reconstruction process. The new method was validated with data from both Monte Carlo simulations and physical phantom experiments. The results showed that the estimated crosstalk was in good agreement with simulated and measured results. After model-based compensation the images from simultaneous dual-radionuclide acquisitions were similar in quality to those from single-radionuclide acquisitions that did not have crosstalk contamination. The proposed model-based method can be used to improve simultaneous dual-radionuclide images acquired using IQ-SPECT. This work also demonstrates that ESSE scatter

  19. Simultaneous Tc-99m/I-123 dual-radionuclide myocardial perfusion/innervation imaging using Siemens IQ-SPECT with SMARTZOOM collimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yong; Bhattacharya, Manojeet; Frey, Eric C.

    2014-06-01

    Simultaneous dual-radionuclide myocardial perfusion/innervation SPECT imaging can provide important information about the mismatch between scar tissue and denervated regions. The Siemens IQ-SPECT system developed for cardiac imaging uses a multifocal SMARTZOOM collimator to achieve a four-fold sensitivity for the cardiac region, compared to a typical parallel-hole low-energy high-resolution collimator, but without the data truncation that can result with conventional converging-beam collimators. The increased sensitivity allows shorter image acquisition times or reduced patient dose, making IQ-SPECT ideal for simultaneous dual-radionuclide SPECT, where reduced administrated activity is desirable in order to reduce patient radiation exposure. However, crosstalk is a major factor affecting the image quality in dual-radionuclide imaging. In this work we developed a model-based method that can estimate and compensate for the crosstalk in IQ-SPECT data. The crosstalk model takes into account interactions in the object and collimator-detector system. Scatter in the object was modeled using the effective source scatter estimation technique (ESSE), previously developed to model scatter with parallel-hole collimators. The geometric collimator-detector response was analytically modeled in the IQ-SPECT projector. The estimated crosstalk was then compensated for in an iterative reconstruction process. The new method was validated with data from both Monte Carlo simulations and physical phantom experiments. The results showed that the estimated crosstalk was in good agreement with simulated and measured results. After model-based compensation the images from simultaneous dual-radionuclide acquisitions were similar in quality to those from single-radionuclide acquisitions that did not have crosstalk contamination. The proposed model-based method can be used to improve simultaneous dual-radionuclide images acquired using IQ-SPECT. This work also demonstrates that ESSE scatter

  20. Molecular Imaging of Healing After Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Naresh, Nivedita K; Ben-Mordechai, Tamar; Leor, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    The progression from acute myocardial infarction (MI) to heart failure continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Potential new therapies for improved infarct healing such as stem cells, gene therapy, and tissue engineering are being investigated. Noninvasive imaging plays a central role in the evaluation of MI and infarct healing, both clinically and in preclinical research. Traditionally, imaging has been used to assess cardiac structure, function, perfusion, and viability. However, new imaging methods can be used to assess biological processes at the cellular and molecular level. We review molecular imaging techniques for evaluating the biology of infarct healing and repair. Specifically, we cover recent advances in imaging the various phases of MI and infarct healing such as apoptosis, inflammation, angiogenesis, extracellular matrix deposition, and scar formation. Significant progress has been made in preclinical molecular imaging, and future challenges include translation of these methods to clinical practice. PMID:21869911

  1. Nuclear medical imaging using β+γ coincidences from 44Sc radio-nuclide with liquid xenon as detection medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grignon, C.; Barbet, J.; Bardiès, M.; Carlier, T.; Chatal, J. F.; Couturier, O.; Cussonneau, J. P.; Faivre, A.; Ferrer, L.; Girault, S.; Haruyama, T.; Le Ray, P.; Luquin, L.; Lupone, S.; Métivier, V.; Morteau, E.; Servagent, N.; Thers, D.

    2007-02-01

    We report on a new nuclear medical imaging technique based on the measurement of the emitter location in the three dimensions with a few mm spatial resolution using β+γ emitters. Such measurement could be realized thanks to a new kind of radio-nuclides which emit a γ-ray quasi-simultaneously with the β+ decay. The most interesting radio-nuclide candidate, namely 44Sc, will be potentially produced at the Nantes cyclotron ARRONAX. The principle is to reconstruct the intersection of the classical line of response (obtained with a standard PET camera) with the direction cone defined by the third γ-ray. The emission angle measurement of this additional γ-ray involves the use of a Compton telescope for which a new generation of camera based on a liquid xenon (LXe) time projection chamber is considered. GEANT3 simulations of a large acceptance LXe Compton telescope combined with a commercial micro-PET (LSO crystals) have been performed and the obtained results will be presented. They demonstrate that a good image can be obtained from the accumulation of each three-dimensional measured position. A spatial resolution of 2.3 mm has been reached with an injected activity of 0.5 MBq for a 44Sc point source emitter.

  2. PET-based molecular imaging in neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, A H; Li, H; Winkeler, A; Hilker, R; Knoess, C; Rüger, A; Galldiks, N; Schaller, B; Sobesky, J; Kracht, L; Monfared, P; Klein, M; Vollmar, S; Bauer, B; Wagner, R; Graf, R; Wienhard, K; Herholz, K; Heiss, W D

    2003-07-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) allows non-invasive assessment of physiological, metabolic and molecular processes in humans and animals in vivo. Advances in detector technology have led to a considerable improvement in the spatial resolution of PET (1-2 mm), enabling for the first time investigations in small experimental animals such as mice. With the developments in radiochemistry and tracer technology, a variety of endogenously expressed and exogenously introduced genes can be analysed by PET. This opens up the exciting and rapidly evolving field of molecular imaging, aiming at the non-invasive localisation of a biological process of interest in normal and diseased cells in animal models and humans in vivo. The main and most intriguing advantage of molecular imaging is the kinetic analysis of a given molecular event in the same experimental subject over time. This will allow non-invasive characterisation and "phenotyping" of animal models of human disease at various disease stages, under certain pathophysiological stimuli and after therapeutic intervention. The potential broad applications of imaging molecular events in vivo lie in the study of cell biology, biochemistry, gene/protein function and regulation, signal transduction, transcriptional regulation and characterisation of transgenic animals. Most importantly, molecular imaging will have great implications for the identification of potential molecular therapeutic targets, in the development of new treatment strategies, and in their successful implementation into clinical application. Here, the potential impact of molecular imaging by PET in applications in neuroscience research with a special focus on neurodegeneration and neuro-oncology is reviewed.

  3. Molecular Imaging of Proteases in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yunan; Hong, Hao; Zhang, Yin; Cai, Weibo

    2010-01-01

    Proteases play important roles during tumor angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. Various molecular imaging techniques have been employed for protease imaging: optical (both fluorescence and bioluminescence), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and positron emission tomography (PET). In this review, we will summarize the current status of imaging proteases in cancer with these techniques. Optical imaging of proteases, in particular with fluorescence, is the most intensively validated and many of the imaging probes are already commercially available. It is generally agreed that the use of activatable probes is the most accurate and appropriate means for measuring protease activity. Molecular imaging of proteases with other techniques (i.e. MRI, SPECT, and PET) has not been well-documented in the literature which certainly deserves much future effort. Optical imaging and molecular MRI of protease activity has very limited potential for clinical investigation. PET/SPECT imaging is suitable for clinical investigation; however the optimal probes for PET/SPECT imaging of proteases in cancer have yet to be developed. Successful development of protease imaging probes with optimal in vivo stability, tumor targeting efficacy, and desirable pharmacokinetics for clinical translation will eventually improve cancer patient management. Not limited to cancer, these protease-targeted imaging probes will also have broad applications in other diseases such as arthritis, atherosclerosis, and myocardial infarction. PMID:20234801

  4. Ultrasound Molecular Imaging: Moving Towards Clinical Translation

    PubMed Central

    Abou-Elkacem, Lotfi; Bachawal, Sunitha V.; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound is a widely available, cost-effective, real-time, non-invasive and safe imaging modality widely used in the clinic for anatomical and functional imaging. With the introduction of novel molecularly-targeted ultrasound contrast agents, another dimension of ultrasound has become a reality: diagnosing and monitoring pathological processes at the molecular level. Most commonly used ultrasound molecular imaging contrast agents are micron sized, gas-containing microbubbles functionalized to recognize and attach to molecules expressed on inflamed or angiogenic vascular endothelial cells. There are several potential clinical applications currently being explored including earlier detection, molecular profiling, and monitoring of cancer, as well as visualization of ischemic memory in transient myocardial ischemia, monitoring of disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease, and assessment of arteriosclerosis. Recently, a first clinical grade ultrasound contrast agent (BR55), targeted at a molecule expressed in neoangiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor type 2; VEGFR2) has been introduced and safety and feasibility of VEGFR2-targeted ultrasound imaging is being explored in first inhuman clinical trials in various cancer types. This review describes the design of ultrasound molecular imaging contrast agents, imaging techniques, and potential future clinical applications of ultrasound molecular imaging. PMID:25851932

  5. Ultrasound molecular imaging: Moving toward clinical translation.

    PubMed

    Abou-Elkacem, Lotfi; Bachawal, Sunitha V; Willmann, Jürgen K

    2015-09-01

    Ultrasound is a widely available, cost-effective, real-time, non-invasive and safe imaging modality widely used in the clinic for anatomical and functional imaging. With the introduction of novel molecularly-targeted ultrasound contrast agents, another dimension of ultrasound has become a reality: diagnosing and monitoring pathological processes at the molecular level. Most commonly used ultrasound molecular imaging contrast agents are micron sized, gas-containing microbubbles functionalized to recognize and attach to molecules expressed on inflamed or angiogenic vascular endothelial cells. There are several potential clinical applications currently being explored including earlier detection, molecular profiling, and monitoring of cancer, as well as visualization of ischemic memory in transient myocardial ischemia, monitoring of disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease, and assessment of arteriosclerosis. Recently, a first clinical grade ultrasound contrast agent (BR55), targeted at a molecule expressed in neoangiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor type 2; VEGFR2) has been introduced and safety and feasibility of VEGFR2-targeted ultrasound imaging is being explored in first inhuman clinical trials in various cancer types. This review describes the design of ultrasound molecular imaging contrast agents, imaging techniques, and potential future clinical applications of ultrasound molecular imaging.

  6. Acoustic and photoacoustic molecular imaging of cancer.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Katheryne E; Wang, Tzu Yin; Willmann, Jürgen K

    2013-11-01

    Ultrasound and combined optical and ultrasonic (photoacoustic) molecular imaging have shown great promise in the visualization and monitoring of cancer through imaging of vascular and extravascular molecular targets. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound with molecularly targeted microbubbles can detect early-stage cancer through the visualization of targets expressed on the angiogenic vasculature of tumors. Ultrasonic molecular imaging can be extended to the imaging of extravascular targets through use of nanoscale, phase-change droplets and photoacoustic imaging, which provides further molecular information on cancer given by the chemical composition of tissues and by targeted nanoparticles that can interact with extravascular tissues at the receptor level. A new generation of targeted contrast agents goes beyond merely increasing imaging signal at the site of target expression but shows activatable and differential contrast depending on their interactions with the tumor microenvironment. These innovations may further improve our ability to detect and characterize tumors. In this review, recent developments in acoustic and photoacoustic molecular imaging of cancer are discussed.

  7. Molecular imaging of movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Lizarraga, Karlo J; Gorgulho, Alessandra; Chen, Wei; De Salles, Antonio A

    2016-03-28

    -to-rostral direction. Uptake declines prior to symptom presentation and progresses from contralateral to the most symptomatic side to bilateral, correlating with symptom severity. In progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and multiple system atrophy (MSA), striatal activity is symmetrically and diffusely decreased. The caudal-to-rostral pattern is lost in PSP, but could be present in MSA. In corticobasal degeneration (CBD), there is asymmetric, diffuse reduction of striatal activity, contralateral to the most symptomatic side. Additionally, there is hypometabolism in contralateral parieto-occipital and frontal cortices in PD; bilateral putamen and cerebellum in MSA; caudate, thalamus, midbrain, mesial frontal and prefrontal cortices in PSP; and contralateral cortices in CBD. Finally, cardiac sympathetic SPECT signal is decreased in PD. The capacity of molecular imaging to provide in vivo time courses of gene expression, protein synthesis, receptor and transporter binding, could facilitate the development and evaluation of novel medical, surgical and genetic therapies in movement disorders.

  8. Molecular imaging of movement disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lizarraga, Karlo J; Gorgulho, Alessandra; Chen, Wei; De Salles, Antonio A

    2016-01-01

    caudal-to-rostral direction. Uptake declines prior to symptom presentation and progresses from contralateral to the most symptomatic side to bilateral, correlating with symptom severity. In progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and multiple system atrophy (MSA), striatal activity is symmetrically and diffusely decreased. The caudal-to-rostral pattern is lost in PSP, but could be present in MSA. In corticobasal degeneration (CBD), there is asymmetric, diffuse reduction of striatal activity, contralateral to the most symptomatic side. Additionally, there is hypometabolism in contralateral parieto-occipital and frontal cortices in PD; bilateral putamen and cerebellum in MSA; caudate, thalamus, midbrain, mesial frontal and prefrontal cortices in PSP; and contralateral cortices in CBD. Finally, cardiac sympathetic SPECT signal is decreased in PD. The capacity of molecular imaging to provide in vivo time courses of gene expression, protein synthesis, receptor and transporter binding, could facilitate the development and evaluation of novel medical, surgical and genetic therapies in movement disorders. PMID:27029029

  9. Molecular Imaging in Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Mattison, Scott P.; Kim, Wihan; Park, Jesung; Applegate, Brian E.

    2015-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a medical imaging technique that provides tomographic images at micron scales in three dimensions and high speeds. The addition of molecular contrast to the available morphological image holds great promise for extending OCT’s impact in clinical practice and beyond. Fundamental limitations prevent OCT from directly taking advantage of powerful molecular processes such as fluorescence emission and incoherent Raman scattering. A wide range of approaches is being researched to provide molecular contrast to OCT. Here we review those approaches with particular attention to those that derive their molecular contrast directly from modulation of the OCT signal. We also provide a brief overview of the multimodal approaches to gaining molecular contrast coincident with OCT. PMID:25821718

  10. Molecular Imaging in Breast Cancer – Potential Future Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Pinker, Katja; Bogner, Wolfgang; Gruber, Stephan; Brader, Peter; Trattnig, Siegfried; Karanikas, Georgios; Helbich, Thomas H.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Molecular imaging aims to visualize and quantify biological, physiological, and pathological processes at cellular and molecular levels. Recently, molecular imaging has been introduced into breast cancer imaging. In this review, we will present a survey of the molecular imaging techniques that are either clinically available or are being introduced into clinical imaging. We will discuss nuclear imaging and multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging as well as the combined application of molecular imaging in the assessment of breast lesions. In addition, we will briefly discuss other evolving molecular imaging techniques, such as phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging and sodium imaging. PMID:21673821

  11. Fundamental considerations for multiwavelength photoacoustic molecular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemp, Roger J.; Li, Li; Wang, Lihong V.

    2006-02-01

    Photoacoustic technology offers great promise for molecular imaging in vivo since it offers significant penetration, and optical contrast with ultrasonic spatial resolution. In this article we examine fundamental technical issues impacting capabilities of photoacoustic tomography for molecular imaging. First we examine how reconstructed photoacoustic tomography images are related to true absorber distributions by studying the modulation transfer function of a circular scanning tomographic system employing a modified filtered backprojection algorithm. We then study factors influencing quantitative estimation by developing a forward model of photoacoustic signal generation, and show conditions for which the system of equations can be inverted. Errors in the estimated optical fluence are shown to be a source of bias in estimates of molecular agent concentration. Finally we discuss noise propagation through the matrix inversion procedure and discuss implications for molecular imaging sensitivity and system design.

  12. Oncological image analysis: medical and molecular image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, Michael

    2007-03-01

    This paper summarises the work we have been doing on joint projects with GE Healthcare on colorectal and liver cancer, and with Siemens Molecular Imaging on dynamic PET. First, we recall the salient facts about cancer and oncological image analysis. Then we introduce some of the work that we have done on analysing clinical MRI images of colorectal and liver cancer, specifically the detection of lymph nodes and segmentation of the circumferential resection margin. In the second part of the paper, we shift attention to the complementary aspect of molecular image analysis, illustrating our approach with some recent work on: tumour acidosis, tumour hypoxia, and multiply drug resistant tumours.

  13. Experimental Study of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Radionuclide Imaging and Therapy Using Transferred Human Sodium/Iodide Symporter Gene

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Xing; Shi, Changzheng; Gong, Jian; Guo, Bin; Li, Mingzhu; Xu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to design a method of radionuclide for imaging and therapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) using the transferred human sodium/iodide symporter (hNIS) gene. Methods A stable NPC cell line expressing hNIS was established (CNE-2-hNIS). After 131I treatment, we detected proliferation and apoptosis of NPC cells, both in vitro and vivo. In vivo, the radioactivity of different organs of nude mice was counted and 99mTc imaging using SPECT was performed. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value changes of tumor xenografts were observed by diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) within 6–24 days of 131I treatment. The correlation of ADC changes with apoptosis and proliferation was investigated. Post-treatment expression levels of P53, Bax, Bcl-2, Caspase-3, and Survivin proteins were detected by western blotting. Results 131I uptake was higher in CNE-2-hNIS than in CNE-2 cells. The proliferation and apoptosis rate decreased and increased respectively both in vitro and vivo in the experimental group after 131I treatment. The experimental group tumors accumulated 99mTc in vivo, leading to a good visualization by SPECT. DW-MRI showed that ADC values increased in the experimental group 6 days after treatment, while ADC values were positively and negatively correlated with the apoptotic and Ki-67 proliferation indices, respectively. After treatment, CNE-2-hNIS cells up-regulated the expression of P53 and Survivin proteins and activated Caspase-3, and down-regulated the expression of Bcl-2 proteins. Conclusions The radionuclide imaging and therapy technique for NPC hNIS-transfected cell lines can provide a new therapy strategy for monitoring and treatment of NPC. PMID:25615643

  14. Experimental study of nasopharyngeal carcinoma radionuclide imaging and therapy using transferred human sodium/iodide symporter gene.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xing; Shi, Changzheng; Gong, Jian; Guo, Bin; Li, Mingzhu; Xu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to design a method of radionuclide for imaging and therapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) using the transferred human sodium/iodide symporter (hNIS) gene. A stable NPC cell line expressing hNIS was established (CNE-2-hNIS). After 131I treatment, we detected proliferation and apoptosis of NPC cells, both in vitro and vivo. In vivo, the radioactivity of different organs of nude mice was counted and (99m)Tc imaging using SPECT was performed. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value changes of tumor xenografts were observed by diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) within 6-24 days of 131I treatment. The correlation of ADC changes with apoptosis and proliferation was investigated. Post-treatment expression levels of P53, Bax, Bcl-2, Caspase-3, and Survivin proteins were detected by western blotting. 131I uptake was higher in CNE-2-hNIS than in CNE-2 cells. The proliferation and apoptosis rate decreased and increased respectively both in vitro and vivo in the experimental group after 131I treatment. The experimental group tumors accumulated (99m)Tc in vivo, leading to a good visualization by SPECT. DW-MRI showed that ADC values increased in the experimental group 6 days after treatment, while ADC values were positively and negatively correlated with the apoptotic and Ki-67 proliferation indices, respectively. After treatment, CNE-2-hNIS cells up-regulated the expression of P53 and Survivin proteins and activated Caspase-3, and down-regulated the expression of Bcl-2 proteins. The radionuclide imaging and therapy technique for NPC hNIS-transfected cell lines can provide a new therapy strategy for monitoring and treatment of NPC.

  15. Molecular imaging of the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhuxian; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2017-04-01

    The tumor microenvironment plays a critical role in tumor initiation, progression, metastasis, and resistance to therapy. It is different from normal tissue in the extracellular matrix, vascular and lymphatic networks, as well as physiologic conditions. Molecular imaging of the tumor microenvironment provides a better understanding of its function in cancer biology, and thus allowing for the design of new diagnostics and therapeutics for early cancer diagnosis and treatment. The clinical translation of cancer molecular imaging is often hampered by the high cost of commercialization of targeted imaging agents as well as the limited clinical applications and small market size of some of the agents. Because many different cancer types share similar tumor microenvironment features, the ability to target these biomarkers has the potential to provide clinically translatable molecular imaging technologies for a spectrum of cancers and broad clinical applications. There has been significant progress in targeting the tumor microenvironment for cancer molecular imaging. In this review, we summarize the principles and strategies of recent advances made in molecular imaging of the tumor microenvironment, using various imaging modalities for early detection and diagnosis of cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Pharmacokinetic digital phantoms for accuracy assessment of image-based dosimetry in (177)Lu-DOTATATE peptide receptor radionuclide therapy.

    PubMed

    Brolin, Gustav; Gustafsson, Johan; Ljungberg, Michael; Gleisner, Katarina Sjögreen

    2015-08-07

    Patient-specific image-based dosimetry is considered to be a useful tool to limit toxicity associated with peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). To facilitate the establishment and reliability of absorbed-dose response relationships, it is essential to assess the accuracy of dosimetry in clinically realistic scenarios. To this end, we developed pharmacokinetic digital phantoms corresponding to patients treated with (177)Lu-DOTATATE. Three individual voxel phantoms from the XCAT population were generated and assigned a dynamic activity distribution based on a compartment model for (177)Lu-DOTATATE, designed specifically for this purpose. The compartment model was fitted to time-activity data from 10 patients, primarily acquired using quantitative scintillation camera imaging. S values for all phantom source-target combinations were calculated based on Monte-Carlo simulations. Combining the S values and time-activity curves, reference values of the absorbed dose to the phantom kidneys, liver, spleen, tumours and whole-body were calculated. The phantoms were used in a virtual dosimetry study, using Monte-Carlo simulated gamma-camera images and conventional methods for absorbed-dose calculations. The characteristics of the SPECT and WB planar images were found to well represent those of real patient images, capturing the difficulties present in image-based dosimetry. The phantoms are expected to be useful for further studies and optimisation of clinical dosimetry in (177)Lu PRRT.

  17. Pharmacokinetic digital phantoms for accuracy assessment of image-based dosimetry in 177Lu-DOTATATE peptide receptor radionuclide therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brolin, Gustav; Gustafsson, Johan; Ljungberg, Michael; Sjögreen Gleisner, Katarina

    2015-08-01

    Patient-specific image-based dosimetry is considered to be a useful tool to limit toxicity associated with peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). To facilitate the establishment and reliability of absorbed-dose response relationships, it is essential to assess the accuracy of dosimetry in clinically realistic scenarios. To this end, we developed pharmacokinetic digital phantoms corresponding to patients treated with 177Lu-DOTATATE. Three individual voxel phantoms from the XCAT population were generated and assigned a dynamic activity distribution based on a compartment model for 177Lu-DOTATATE, designed specifically for this purpose. The compartment model was fitted to time-activity data from 10 patients, primarily acquired using quantitative scintillation camera imaging. S values for all phantom source-target combinations were calculated based on Monte-Carlo simulations. Combining the S values and time-activity curves, reference values of the absorbed dose to the phantom kidneys, liver, spleen, tumours and whole-body were calculated. The phantoms were used in a virtual dosimetry study, using Monte-Carlo simulated gamma-camera images and conventional methods for absorbed-dose calculations. The characteristics of the SPECT and WB planar images were found to well represent those of real patient images, capturing the difficulties present in image-based dosimetry. The phantoms are expected to be useful for further studies and optimisation of clinical dosimetry in 177Lu PRRT.

  18. "Molecular" MR imaging at high fields.

    PubMed

    Gore, John C; Zu, Zhongliang; Wang, Ping; Li, Hua; Xu, Junzhong; Dortch, Richard; Gochberg, Daniel F

    2017-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) have contributed considerably to clinical radiology, and a variety of MR techniques have been developed to evaluate pathological processes as well as normal tissue biology at the cellular and molecular level. However, in comparison to nuclear imaging, MRI has relatively poor sensitivity for detecting true molecular changes or for detecting the presence of targeted contrast agents, though these remain under active development. In recent years very high field (7T and above) MRI systems have been developed for human studies and these provide new opportunities and technical challenges for molecular imaging. We identify 5 types of intrinsic contrast mechanisms that do not require the use of exogenous agents but which can provide molecular and cellular information. We can derive information on tissue composition by (i) imaging different nuclei, especially sodium (ii) exploiting chemical shift differences as in MRS (iii) exploiting specific relaxation mechanisms (iv) exploiting tissue differences in the exchange rates of molecular species such as amides or hydroxyls and (v) differences in susceptibility. The increased signal strength at higher fields enables higher resolution images to be acquired, along with increased sensitivity to detecting subtle effects caused by molecular changes in tissues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. In vivo tumor targeting and radionuclide imaging with self-assembled nanoparticles: mechanisms, key factors, and their implications.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yong Woo; Park, Soo Ah; Han, Tae Hee; Son, Dai Hyun; Park, Ji Sun; Oh, Seung Jun; Moon, Dae Hyuk; Cho, Kyung-Ja; Ahn, Cheol-Hee; Byun, Youngro; Kim, In-San; Kwon, Ick Chan; Kim, Sang Yoon

    2007-02-01

    The development of more selective delivery systems for cancer diagnosis and chemotherapy is one of the most important goals of current anticancer research. The purpose of this study is to evaluate various self-assembled nanoparticles as candidates to shuttle radionuclide and/or drugs into tumors and to investigate the mechanisms underlying the tumor targeting with self-assembled nanoparticles. By combining different hydrophobic moieties and hydrophilic polymer backbones, various self-assembled nanoparticles were prepared, and their in vivo distributions in tumor-bearing mice were studied by radionuclide imaging. One type of nanoparticles (fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated glycol chitosan (FGC) nanoparticles) exhibited highly selective tumoral localization. Scintigraphic images obtained 1 day after the intravenous injection of FGC nanoparticles clearly delineated the tumor against adjacent tissues. The mechanisms underlying the tumor targeting with self-assembled nanoparticles were investigated in terms of the physicochemical properties of nanoparticles and tumor microenvironments. FGC nanoparticles were preferentially localized in perivascular regions, implying their extravasation to tumors through the hyperpermeable tumor vasculature. The magnitude and pattern of tumoral distribution of self-assembled nanoparticles were influenced by several key factors--(i) in vivo colloidal stability: nanoparticles should maintain their intact nanostructures in vivo for a long period of time, (ii) particle size, (iii) intracellular uptake of nanoparticle: fast cellular uptake greatly facilitates the tumor targeting, (iv) tumor angiogenesis: pathological angiogenesis permits access of nanoparticles to tumors. We believe that this work can provide insight for the engineering of nanoparticles and be extended to cancer therapy and diagnosis, so as to deliver multiple therapeutic agents and imaging probes at high local concentrations.

  20. Molecular Imaging of Inflammation in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Wildgruber, Moritz; Swirski, Filip K.; Zernecke, Alma

    2013-01-01

    Acute rupture of vulnerable plaques frequently leads to myocardial infarction and stroke. Within the last decades, several cellular and molecular players have been identified that promote atherosclerotic lesion formation, maturation and plaque rupture. It is now widely recognized that inflammation of the vessel wall and distinct leukocyte subsets are involved throughout all phases of atherosclerotic lesion development. The mechanisms that render a stable plaque unstable and prone to rupture, however, remain unknown and the identification of the vulnerable plaque remains a major challenge in cardiovascular medicine. Imaging technologies used in the clinic offer minimal information about the underlying biology and potential risk for rupture. New imaging technologies are therefore being developed, and in the preclinical setting have enabled new and dynamic insights into the vessel wall for a better understanding of this complex disease. Molecular imaging has the potential to track biological processes, such as the activity of cellular and molecular biomarkers in vivo and over time. Similarly, novel imaging technologies specifically detect effects of therapies that aim to stabilize vulnerable plaques and silence vascular inflammation. Here we will review the potential of established and new molecular imaging technologies in the setting of atherosclerosis, and discuss the cumbersome steps required for translating molecular imaging approaches into the clinic. PMID:24312156

  1. Molecular Imaging Probe Development using Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kan; Wang, Ming-Wei; Lin, Wei-Yu; Phung, Duy Linh; Girgis, Mark D.; Wu, Anna M.; Tomlinson, James S.; Shen, Clifton K.-F.

    2012-01-01

    In this manuscript, we review the latest advancement of microfluidics in molecular imaging probe development. Due to increasing needs for medical imaging, high demand for many types of molecular imaging probes will have to be met by exploiting novel chemistry/radiochemistry and engineering technologies to improve the production and development of suitable probes. The microfluidic-based probe synthesis is currently attracting a great deal of interest because of their potential to deliver many advantages over conventional systems. Numerous chemical reactions have been successfully performed in micro-reactors and the results convincingly demonstrate with great benefits to aid synthetic procedures, such as purer products, higher yields, shorter reaction times compared to the corresponding batch/macroscale reactions, and more benign reaction conditions. Several ‘proof-of-principle’ examples of molecular imaging probe syntheses using microfluidics, along with basics of device architecture and operation, and their potential limitations are discussed here. PMID:22977436

  2. Molecular imaging by single-photon emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cusanno, F.; Accorsi, R.; Cinti, M. N.; Colilli, S.; Fortuna, A.; Garibaldi, F.; Giuliani, F.; Gricia, M.; Lanza, R. C.; Loizzo, A.; Lucentini, M.; Pani, R.; Pellegrini, R.; Santavenere, F.; Scopinaro, F.

    2004-07-01

    In vivo imaging of pharmaceuticals labeled with radionuclides has proven to be a powerful tool in human subjects. The same imaging methods have often been applied to small animal but usually only within the nuclear medicine (NM) community, and usually only to evaluate the efficacy of new radiopharmaceuticals. We have built a compact mini gamma camera, a pixellated array of NaI(Tl) crystals coupled to 3'' R2486 Hamamatsu Position Sensitive PMT; in combination with a pinhole collimator, which allows for high resolution in vivo SPECT imaging. Calculations show that reasonable counting rates are possible. The system has been tested and preliminary measurements on mice have been done. The performances of the camera are in the expectations. Improvements will be done both on the collimation technique and on the detector. Simulations have been performed to study a coded aperture collimator. The results show that the efficiency can be greatly improved without sacrificing the spatial resolution. A dedicated mask has been designed and will be used soon.

  3. Molecular Imaging of Urogenital Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Steve Y.; Szabo, Zsolt; Morgan, Russell H.

    2013-01-01

    There is an expanding and exciting repertoire of PET imaging radiotracers for urogenital diseases, particularly in prostate cancer, renal cell cancer, and renal function. Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in men. With growing therapeutics options for the treatment of metastatic and advanced prostate cancer, improved functional imaging of prostate cancer beyond the limitations of conventional computed tomography (CT) and bone scan (BS) is becoming increasingly important for both clinical management and drug development. PET radiotracers beyond 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) for prostate cancer include 18F-Sodium Fluoride, 11C-Choline and 18F-Fluorocholine and 11C-Acetate. Other emerging and promising PET radiotracers include a synthetic L-leucine amino acid analog (anti-18F-FACBC), dihydrotestosterone analog (18F-FDHT) and prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) based PET radiotracers (ex. 18F-DCFBC, 89Zr-DFO-J591, 68Ga(HBED-CC)). Larger prospective and comparison trials of these PET radiotracers are needed to establish the role of PET/CT in prostate cancer. Renal cell cancer imaging with FDG PET/CT although available can be limited, especially for detection of the primary tumor. Improved renal cell cancer detection with carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) based antibody (124I-girentuximab) and radioimmunotherapy targeting with 177Lu-cG250 appear promising. Evaluation of renal injury by imaging renal perfusion and function with novel PET radiotracers include p-18F-fluorohippurate (18F-PFH) and hippurate m-cyano-p-18F-fluorohippurate (18F-CNPFH) and Rubidium-82 chloride (typically used for myocardial perfusion imaging). Renal receptor imaging of the renal renin angiotensin system with a variety of selective PET radioligands are also becoming available for clinical translation. PMID:24484747

  4. Molecular and functional imaging of internet addiction.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yunqi; Zhang, Hong; Tian, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Maladaptive use of the Internet results in Internet addiction (IA), which is associated with various negative consequences. Molecular and functional imaging techniques have been increasingly used for analysis of neurobiological changes and neurochemical correlates of IA. This review summarizes molecular and functional imaging findings on neurobiological mechanisms of IA, focusing on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and nuclear imaging modalities including positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). MRI studies demonstrate that structural changes in frontal cortex are associated with functional abnormalities in Internet addicted subjects. Nuclear imaging findings indicate that IA is associated with dysfunction of the brain dopaminergic systems. Abnormal dopamine regulation of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) could underlie the enhanced motivational value and uncontrolled behavior over Internet overuse in addicted subjects. Further investigations are needed to determine specific changes in the Internet addictive brain, as well as their implications for behavior and cognition.

  5. Molecular imaging of Alzheimer disease pathology.

    PubMed

    Kantarci, K

    2014-06-01

    Development of molecular imaging agents for fibrillar β-amyloid positron-emission tomography during the past decade has brought molecular imaging of Alzheimer disease pathology into the spotlight. Large cohort studies with longitudinal follow-up in cognitively normal individuals and patients with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer disease indicate that β-amyloid deposition can be detected many years before the onset of symptoms with molecular imaging, and its progression can be followed longitudinally. The utility of β-amyloid PET in the differential diagnosis of Alzheimer disease is greatest when there is no pathologic overlap between 2 dementia syndromes, such as in frontotemporal lobar degeneration and Alzheimer disease. However β-amyloid PET alone may be insufficient in distinguishing dementia syndromes that commonly have overlapping β-amyloid pathology, such as dementia with Lewy bodies and vascular dementia, which represent the 2 most common dementia pathologies after Alzheimer disease. The role of molecular imaging in Alzheimer disease clinical trials is growing rapidly, especially in an era when preventive interventions are designed to eradicate the pathology targeted by molecular imaging agents.

  6. A micro-scale random-walk model for radionuclide migration based on image analysis-derived modelling grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberhard Falck, W.; Vokal, Vratko

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a random-walk transport model for the migration of radionuclides in hard-rocks at the grain scale. The physics of diffusion are reviewed and it is described how they are translated into the appropriate model algorithm. Further, the algorithm for recognising solid grain boundaries during the migration step is discussed. The model grid is derived from the analysis of images obtained by optical micro-photography and from autoradiography of hardrock samples impregnated with 14C-marked resins. Sample calculations for tracer-transport cases and simple reaction, i.e. precipitation cases are presented. It is envisaged to couple the code with a geochemical speciation code at a later stage.

  7. Radionuclide angiography and blood pool imaging to assess skin ulcer healing prognosis in patients with peripheral vascular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Alazraki, N.; Lawrence, P.F.; Syverud, J.B.

    1984-01-01

    Several non-invasive diagnostic techniques including segmental limb blood pressures, skin fluoresence, and photo plethysmography, have been evaluated as predictors of skin ulcer healing in patients with peripheral vascular disease, but none are widely used. Using 20mCi of Tc-99m phosphate compounds, four phase bone scans were obtained, including (1) radionuclide angiogram (2) blood pool image (3) 2 hour and 4-6 hour static images and (4) 24 hour static delayed images. The first two phases were used to assess vacularity to the region of distal extremity ulceration; the last two phases evaluated presence or absence of osteomyelitis. Studies were performed in 30 patients with non-healing ulcers of the lower extremities. Perfusion to the regions of ulceration on images was graded as normal, increased, or reduced with respect to the opposite (presumed normal) limb or some other normal reference area. Hypervascular response was interpreted as good prognosis for healing unless osteomyelitis was present. Clinicians followed patients for 14 days to assess limb healing with optimum care. If there was no improvement, angiography and/or surgery (reconstructive surgery, sympathectomy, or amputation) was done. Results showed: sensitivity for predicting ulcer healing was 94%, specificity 89%. Patients who failed to heal their ulcers showed reduced perfusion, no hypervascular response, or osteomyelitis. Microcirculatory adequacy for ulcer healing appear predictable by this technique.

  8. Combined Positron Emission Tomography and Cerenkov Luminescence Imaging of Sentinel Lymph Nodes Using PEGylated Radionuclide-Embedded Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Bong; Yoon, GhilSuk; Lee, Sang-Woo; Jeong, Shin Young; Ahn, Byeong-Cheol; Lim, Dong-Kwon; Lee, Jaetae; Jeon, Yong Hyun

    2016-09-01

    New imaging probes with high sensitivity and stability are urgently needed to accurately detect sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) for successful cancer diagnosis. Herein, the use of highly sensitive and stable PEGylated radionuclide-embedded gold nanoparticles (PEG-RIe-AuNPs) is reported for the detection of SLNs by combined positron emission tomography and Cerenkov luminescence imaging (PET/CLI). PEG-RIe-AuNPs show high sensitivity and stability both in vitro and in vivo, and are not toxic to normal ovarian and immune cells. In vivo PET/CLI imaging clearly reveals SLNs as early as 1 h post PEG-RIe-AuNP-injection, with peak signals achieved at 6 h postinjection, which is consistent with the biodistribution results. Taken together, the data provide strong evidence that PEG-RIe-AuNPs are promising as potential lymphatic tracers in biomedical imaging for pre and intraoperative surgical guidance. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Induced renal artery stenosis in rabbits: magnetic resonance imaging, angiography, and radionuclide determination of blood volume and blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, D.G.; Tobin, M.; LeVeen, R.; Tomaczewski, J.; Alavi, A.; Staum, M.; Kundel, H.

    1988-03-01

    To investigate the ability of MRI to detect alterations due to renal ischemia, a rabbit renal artery stenosis (RAS) model was developed. Seven rabbits had RAS induced by surgically encircling the artery with a polyethylene band which had a lumen of 1 mm, 1 to 2 weeks prior to imaging. The stenosis was confirmed by angiography, and the rabbits were then imaged in a 1.4 T research MRI unit. T1 was calculated using four inversion recovery sequences with different inversion times. Renal blood flow, using /sup 113/Sn-microspheres, and regional water content by drying were then measured. The average T1 of the inner medulla was shorter for the ischemia (1574 msec) than for the contralateral kidney (1849 msec), while no change ws noted in the cortex. Ischemic kidneys had less distinct outer medullary zones on IR images with TI = 600 msec than did contralateral or control kidneys. Blood flow to both the cortex and medulla were markedly reduced in ischemic kidneys compared with contralateral kidneys (119.5 vs. 391 ml/min/100 gm for cortex and 19.8 vs. 50.8 ml/min/100 gm for medulla). Renal water and blood content were less affected. Our rabbit model of renal artery stenosis with MRI, radionuclide, and angiographic correlation has the potential to increase our understanding of MR imaging of the rabbit kidney.

  10. Direct radionuclide cystography imaging in colovesical fistula due to inguinal hernia operation complication.

    PubMed

    Tamam, Muge; Yavuz, Hatice Sümeyye; Hacimahmutoğlu, Serafettin; Mülazimoğlu, Mehmet; Kacar, Tulay; Ozpacaci, Tevfik

    2009-09-01

    Colovesical fistula is an abnormal connection between the enteric and urinary systems, usually sigmoid colon, caused by various conditions. One cause of colovesical fistula is iatrogenic injury, such as induced by inguinal hernia surgery. We present a case of colovesical fistula. A 57-year-old male was admitted to a local hospital with complaints of dysuria and pneumaturia. He had a past history of total extraperitoneal laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair operation 7 years previously for bilateral inguinal hernia. The case was assessed with radiologic and scintigraphic techniques. Radiologic techniques (plain abdominal radiography, intravenous pyelogram, ultrasound examination, double-contrast barium enema, CT, MRI) were inadequate to determine the colovesical fistula. The colovesical fistula was visualized with direct radionuclide voiding cystography as an alternative scintigraphic method.

  11. Metal-isonitrile adducts for preparing radionuclide complexes for labelling and imaging agents

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Alun G.; Davison, Alan; Abrams, Michael J.

    1987-01-01

    A method for preparing a coordination complex of an isonitrile ligand and radionuclide such as Tc, Ru, Co, Pt, Fe, Os, Ir, W, Re, Cr, Mo, Mn, Ni, Rh, Pd, Nb and Ta is disclosed. The method comprises preparing a soluble metal adduct of said isonitrile ligand by admixing said ligand with a salt of a displaceable metal having a complete d-electron shell selected from the group consisting of Zn, Ga, Cd, In, Sn, Hg, Tl, Pb and Bi to form a soluble metal-isonitrile salt, and admixing said metal isonitrile salt with a salt comprising said radioactive metal in a suitable solvent to displace said displaceable metal with the radioactive metal thereby forming said coordination. The complex is useful as a diagnostic agent for labelling liposomes or vesicles, and selected living cells containing lipid membranes, such as blood clots, myocardial tissue, gall bladder tissue, etc.

  12. Mesenchymal Stem Cell (MSC) mediated delivery of the Sodium Iodide Symporter (NIS) supports radionuclide imaging and treatment of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dwyer, Roisin M.; Ryan, James; Havelin, Ronan J.; Morris, John C.; Miller, Brian W.; Liu, Zhonglin; Flavin, Richard; O'Flatharta, Cathal; Foley, Mark J.; Barrett, Harrison H.; Murphy, J. Mary; Barry, Frank P.; O'Brien, Timothy; Kerin, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) migrate specifically to tumors in vivo, and coupled with their capacity to bypass immune surveillance, are attractive vehicles for tumor-targeted delivery of therapeutic agents. This study aimed to introduce MSC-mediated expression of the sodium iodide symporter (NIS) for imaging and therapy of breast cancer. Tumor bearing animals received an intravenous or intratumoral injection of NIS expressing MSCs (MSC-NIS), followed by 99mTcO4- imaging 3-14Days (D) later using a BazookaSPECT γ-camera. Tissue was harvested for analysis of hNIS expression by RQPCR. Therapy animals received an intraperitoneal injection of 131I or saline 14D following injection of MSC-NIS, and tumor volume was monitored for 8 weeks. BazookaSPECT imaging following injection of MSC-NIS revealed an image of animal intestines and chest area at D3, with a weak tumor image also visible. By D14, the tumor was visible with a significant reduction in radionuclide accumulation in non-target tissue observed. hNIS gene expression was detected in the intestines, heart, lungs and tumor at early timepoints but later depleted in non-target tissues and persisted at the tumor site. Based on imaging/biodistribution data, animals received a therapeutic dose of 131I 14D following MSC-NIS injection. This resulted in a significant reduction in tumor growth (Mean ± SEM, 236 ± 62mm3 versus 665 ± 204 mm3 in controls). The ability to noninvasively track MSC migration and transgene expression in real time prior to therapy is a major advantage to this strategy. This promising data supports the feasibility of this approach as a novel therapy for breast cancer. PMID:21608083

  13. Polydopamine Coated Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes as a Versatile Platform with Radionuclide Labeling for Multimodal Tumor Imaging and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, He; Chao, Yu; Liu, Jingjing; Huang, Jie; Pan, Jian; Guo, Wanliang; Wu, Jizhi; Sheng, Mao; Yang, Kai; Wang, Jian; Liu, Zhuang

    2016-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with various unique properties have attracted great attention in cancer theranostics. Herein, SWNTs are coated with a shell of polydopamine (PDA), which is further modified by polyethylene glycol (PEG). The PDA shell in the obtained SWNT@PDA-PEG could chelate Mn2+, which together with metallic nanoparticulate impurities anchored on SWNTs offer enhanced both T1 and T2 contrasts under magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Meanwhile, also utilizing the PDA shell, radionuclide 131I could be easily labeled onto SWNT@PDA-PEG, enabling nuclear imaging and radioisotope cancer therapy. As revealed by MR & gamma imaging, efficient tumor accumulation of SWNT@PDA-131I-PEG is observed after systemic administration into mice. By further utilizing the strong near-infarared (NIR) absorbance of SWNTs, NIR-triggered photothermal therapy in combination with 131I-based radioisotope therapy is realized in our animal experiments, in which a remarkable synergistic antitumor therapeutic effect is observed compared to monotherapies. Our work not only presents a new type of theranostic nanoplatform based on SWNTs, but also suggests the promise of PDA coating as a general approach to modify nano-agents and endow them with highly integrated functionalities. PMID:27570554

  14. Polydopamine Coated Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes as a Versatile Platform with Radionuclide Labeling for Multimodal Tumor Imaging and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, He; Chao, Yu; Liu, Jingjing; Huang, Jie; Pan, Jian; Guo, Wanliang; Wu, Jizhi; Sheng, Mao; Yang, Kai; Wang, Jian; Liu, Zhuang

    2016-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with various unique properties have attracted great attention in cancer theranostics. Herein, SWNTs are coated with a shell of polydopamine (PDA), which is further modified by polyethylene glycol (PEG). The PDA shell in the obtained SWNT@PDA-PEG could chelate Mn(2+), which together with metallic nanoparticulate impurities anchored on SWNTs offer enhanced both T1 and T2 contrasts under magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Meanwhile, also utilizing the PDA shell, radionuclide (131)I could be easily labeled onto SWNT@PDA-PEG, enabling nuclear imaging and radioisotope cancer therapy. As revealed by MR & gamma imaging, efficient tumor accumulation of SWNT@PDA-(131)I-PEG is observed after systemic administration into mice. By further utilizing the strong near-infarared (NIR) absorbance of SWNTs, NIR-triggered photothermal therapy in combination with (131)I-based radioisotope therapy is realized in our animal experiments, in which a remarkable synergistic antitumor therapeutic effect is observed compared to monotherapies. Our work not only presents a new type of theranostic nanoplatform based on SWNTs, but also suggests the promise of PDA coating as a general approach to modify nano-agents and endow them with highly integrated functionalities.

  15. Functionalized gold nanorods for molecular optoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eghtedari, Mohammad; Oraevsky, Alexander; Conjusteau, Andre; Copland, John A.; Kotov, Nicholas A.; Motamedi, Massoud

    2007-02-01

    The development of gold nanoparticles for molecular optoacoustic imaging is a very promising area of research and development. Enhancement of optoacoustic imaging for molecular detection of tumors requires the engineering of nanoparticles with geometrical and molecular features that can enhance selective targeting of malignant cells while optimizing the sensitivity of optoacoustic detection. In this article, cylindrical gold nanoparticles (i.e. gold nanorods) were fabricated with a plasmon resonance frequency in the near infra-red region of the spectrum, where deep irradiation of tissue is possible using an Alexandrite laser. Gold nanorods (Au-NRs) were functionalized by covalent attachment of Poly(ethylene glycol) to enhance their biocompatibility. These particles were further functionalized with the aim of targeting breast cancer cells using monoclonal antibodies that binds to Her2/neu receptors, which are over expressed on the surface of breast cancer cells. A custom Laser Optoacoustic Imaging System (LOIS) was designed and employed to image nanoparticle-targeted cancer cells in a phantom and PEGylated Au-NRs that were injected subcutaneously into a nude mouse. The results of our experiments show that functionalized Au-NRs with a plasmon resonance frequency at near infra-red region of the spectrum can be detected and imaged in vivo using laser optoacoustic imaging system.

  16. Molecular Probes for Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sarder, Pinaki; Maji, Dolonchampa; Achilefu, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Visualization of biological processes and pathologic conditions at the cellular and tissue levels largely rely on the use of fluorescence intensity signals from fluorophores or their bioconjugates. To overcome the concentration dependency of intensity measurements, evaluate subtle molecular interactions, and determine biochemical status of intracellular or extracellular microenvironments, fluorescence lifetime (FLT) imaging has emerged as a reliable imaging method complementary to intensity measurements. Driven by a wide variety of dyes exhibiting stable or environment-responsive FLTs, information multiplexing can be readily accomplished without the need for ratiometric spectral imaging. With knowledge of the fluorescent states of the molecules, it is entirely possible to predict the functional status of biomolecules or microevironment of cells. Whereas the use of FLT spectroscopy and microscopy in biological studies is now well established, in vivo imaging of biological processes based on FLT imaging techniques is still evolving. This review summarizes recent advances in the application of the FLT of molecular probes for imaging cells and small animal models of human diseases. It also highlights some challenges that continue to limit the full realization of the potential of using FLT molecular probes to address diverse biological problems, and outlines areas of potential high impact in the future. PMID:25961514

  17. Complementary optical and nuclear imaging of caspase-3 activity using combined activatable and radio-labeled multimodality molecular probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyeran; Akers, Walter J.; Cheney, Philip P.; Edwards, W. Barry; Liang, Kexian; Culver, Joseph P.; Achilefu, Samuel

    2009-07-01

    Based on the capability of modulating fluorescence intensity by specific molecular events, we report a new multimodal optical-nuclear molecular probe with complementary reporting strategies. The molecular probe (LS498) consists of tetraazacyclododecanetetraacetic acid (DOTA) for chelating a radionuclide, a near-infrared fluorescent dye, and an efficient quencher dye. The two dyes are separated by a cleavable peptide substrate for caspase-3, a diagnostic enzyme that is upregulated in dying cells. LS498 is radiolabeled with 64Cu, a radionuclide used in positron emission tomography. In the native form, LS498 fluorescence is quenched until caspase-3 cleavage of the peptide substrate. Enzyme kinetics assay shows that LS498 is readily cleaved by caspase-3, with excellent enzyme kinetic parameters kcat and KM of 0.55+/-0.01 s-1 and 1.12+/-0.06 μM, respectively. In mice, the initial fluorescence of LS498 is ten-fold less than control. Using radiolabeled 64Cu-LS498 in a controlled and localized in-vivo model of caspase-3 activation, a time-dependent five-fold NIR fluorescence enhancement is observed, but radioactivity remains identical in caspase-3 positive and negative controls. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using radionuclide imaging for localizing and quantifying the distribution of molecular probes and optical imaging for reporting the functional status of diagnostic enzymes.

  18. Complementary optical and nuclear imaging of caspase-3 activity using combined activatable and radiolabeled multimodality molecular probe

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeran; Akers, Walter J.; Cheney, Philip P.; Edwards, W. Barry; Liang, Kexian; Culver, Joseph P.; Achilefu, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    Based on the capability of modulating fluorescence intensity by specific molecular events, we have developed a new multimodal optical-nuclear molecular probe with complementary reporting strategies. The molecular probe (LS498) consists of DOTA for chelating a radionuclide, a near infrared fluorescent dye, and an efficient quencher dye. The two dyes were separated by a cleavable peptide substrate for caspase-3, a diagnostic enzyme that is upregulated in dying cells. LS498 was radiolabeled with 64Cu, a radionuclide used in positron emission tomography. In the native form, LS498 fluorescence was quenched until caspase-3 cleavage of the peptide substrate. Enzyme kinetics assay showed that LS498 was readily cleaved by caspase-3, with excellent enzyme kinetic parameters kcat and KM of 0.55 ± 0.01 s−1 and 1.12 ± 0.06 μM, respectively. In mice, the initial fluorescence of LS498 was 10-fold less than control. Using radiolabeled 64Cu-LS498 in a controlled and localized in vivo model of caspase-3 activation, a time-dependent 5-fold NIR fluorescence enhancement was observed but radioactivity was the same in caspase-3 positive and negative controls. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using radionuclide imaging for localizing and quantifying the distribution of molecular probes and optical imaging for reporting the functional status of diagnostic enzymes. PMID:19725712

  19. A whole-body dual-modality radionuclide optical strategy for preclinical imaging of metastasis and heterogeneous treatment response in different microenvironments.

    PubMed

    Fruhwirth, Gilbert O; Diocou, Seckou; Blower, Philip J; Ng, Tony; Mullen, Greg E D

    2014-04-01

    Imaging spontaneous cancer cell metastasis or heterogeneous tumor responses to drug treatment in vivo is difficult to achieve. The goal was to develop a new highly sensitive and reliable preclinical longitudinal in vivo imaging model for this purpose, thereby facilitating discovery and validation of anticancer therapies or molecular imaging agents. The strategy is based on breast cancer cells stably expressing the human sodium iodide symporter (NIS) fused to a red fluorescent protein, thereby permitting radionuclide and fluorescence imaging. Using whole-body nano-SPECT/CT with (99m)TcO4(-), we followed primary tumor growth and spontaneous metastasis in the presence or absence of etoposide treatment. NIS imaging was used to classify organs as small as individual lymph nodes (LNs) to be positive or negative for metastasis, and results were confirmed by confocal fluorescence microscopy. Etoposide treatment efficacy was proven by ex vivo anticaspase 3 staining and fluorescence microscopy. In this preclinical model, we found that the NIS imaging strategy outperformed state-of-the-art (18)F-FDG imaging in its ability to detect small tumors (18.5-fold-better tumor-to-blood ratio) and metastases (LN, 3.6-fold) because of improved contrast in organs close to metastatic sites (12- and 8.5-fold-lower standardized uptake value in the heart and kidney, respectively). We applied the model to assess the treatment response to the neoadjuvant etoposide and found a consistent and reliable improvement in spontaneous metastasis detection. Importantly, we also found that tumor cells in different microenvironments responded in a heterogeneous manner to etoposide treatment, which could be determined only by the NIS-based strategy and not by (18)F-FDG imaging. We developed a new strategy for preclinical longitudinal in vivo cancer cell tracking with greater sensitivity and reliability than (18)F-FDG PET and applied it to track spontaneous and distant metastasis in the presence or absence

  20. A Targeting Microbubble for Ultrasound Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, James Shue-Min; Sennoga, Charles A.; McConnell, Ellen; Eckersley, Robert; Tang, Meng-Xing; Nourshargh, Sussan; Seddon, John M.; Haskard, Dorian O.; Nihoyannopoulos, Petros

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Microbubbles conjugated with targeting ligands are used as contrast agents for ultrasound molecular imaging. However, they often contain immunogenic (strept)avidin, which impedes application in humans. Although targeting bubbles not employing the biotin-(strept)avidin conjugation chemistry have been explored, only a few reached the stage of ultrasound imaging in vivo, none were reported/evaluated to show all three of the following properties desired for clinical applications: (i) low degree of non-specific bubble retention in more than one non-reticuloendothelial tissue; (ii) effective for real-time imaging; and (iii) effective for acoustic quantification of molecular targets to a high degree of quantification. Furthermore, disclosures of the compositions and methodologies enabling reproduction of the bubbles are often withheld. Objective To develop and evaluate a targeting microbubble based on maleimide-thiol conjugation chemistry for ultrasound molecular imaging. Methods and Results Microbubbles with a previously unreported generic (non-targeting components) composition were grafted with anti-E-selectin F(ab’)2 using maleimide-thiol conjugation, to produce E-selectin targeting microbubbles. The resulting targeting bubbles showed high specificity to E-selectin in vitro and in vivo. Non-specific bubble retention was minimal in at least three non-reticuloendothelial tissues with inflammation (mouse heart, kidneys, cremaster). The bubbles were effective for real-time ultrasound imaging of E-selectin expression in the inflamed mouse heart and kidneys, using a clinical ultrasound scanner. The acoustic signal intensity of the targeted bubbles retained in the heart correlated strongly with the level of E-selectin expression (|r|≥0.8), demonstrating a high degree of non-invasive molecular quantification. Conclusions Targeting microbubbles for ultrasound molecular imaging, based on maleimide-thiol conjugation chemistry and the generic composition described

  1. The stripe sign: correlation of radionuclide ventilation and perfusion with He-3 magnetic resonance lung imaging

    PubMed

    Teates; Brookeman; Daniel; Truwit; Parekh; Mugler; de Lange EE

    1999-10-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to correlate regional ventilation and perfusion images and perfusion SPECT with images made using a newly developed magnetic resonance ventilation (MRV) method. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The investigation included a single patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and a healthy control participant. Ventilation and perfusion images using Xe-133 and Tc-99m MAA, including perfusion SPECT, were compared with single-breath MRV with hyperpolarized He-3. RESULTS: Ventilation and perfusion defects correspond to areas of poor ventilation on MRV. High-resolution MRV images show preservation of bronchi and acinus units in areas of the "stripe sign" on the V/Q study. CONCLUSIONS: MRV imaging confirms that the stripe sign seen on nuclear perfusion imaging correlates with subsegmental preserved lung. MRV imaging has the potential for high-resolution innovative studies of subsegmental lung function, using either He-3 or Xe-129 hyperpolarized gases.

  2. Radionuclide cisternogram

    MedlinePlus

    ... please enable JavaScript. A radionuclide cisternogram is a nuclear scan test. It is used to diagnose problems ... damage. The amount of radiation used during the nuclear scan is very small. Almost all of the ...

  3. NAOMI: nanoparticle assisted optical molecular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faber, Dirk J.; van Velthoven, Mirjam E. J.; de Bruin, Martijn; Aalders, Maurice C. G.; Verbraak, Frank D.; Graf, Christina; van Leeuwen, Ton G.

    2006-02-01

    Our first steps towards nanoparticle assisted, optical molecular imaging (NAOMI) using OCT as the imaging modality are presented. We derive an expression to estimate the sensitivity of this technique. We propose to use nanoparticles based on biodegradable polymers, loaded with suitable dyes as contrast agent, and outline a method for establishing their desired optical properties prior to synthesis. This report presents preliminary results of our investigation on the use of nanoshells to serve as contrast agents We injected nanoshells with specific contrast features in the 800 nm wavelength region in excised porcine eyes. The nanoshells showed up as bright reflecting structures in the OCT images, which confirm their potential as contrast agents.

  4. Molecular specific optoacoustic imaging with plasmonic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallidi, Srivalleesha; Larson, Timothy; Aaron, Jesse; Sokolov, Konstantin; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2007-05-01

    Gold nanoparticles functionalized with antibodies can specifically bind to molecular biomarkers such as epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR). The molecule specific nature of the antibody-functionalized gold nanoparticles forms the basis for the developed optoacoustic imaging technique to detect cancer at an asymptotic stage. Optoacoustic imaging was performed with 532 nm and 680 nm pulsed laser irradiation on three-dimensional tissue phantoms prepared using a human keratinocyte cell line. The results of our study demonstrate that the combination of anti-EGFR gold ioconjugates and optoacoustic imaging can allow highly sensitive and selective detection of human epithelial cancer cells.

  5. Molecular Imaging in Nanotechnology and Theranostics.

    PubMed

    Andreou, Chrysafis; Pal, Suchetan; Rotter, Lara; Yang, Jiang; Kircher, Moritz F

    2017-03-27

    The fields of biomedical nanotechnology and theranostics have enjoyed exponential growth in recent years. The "Molecular Imaging in Nanotechnology and Theranostics" (MINT) Interest Group of the World Molecular Imaging Society (WMIS) was created in order to provide a more organized and focused forum on these topics within the WMIS and at the World Molecular Imaging Conference (WMIC). The interest group was founded in 2015 and was officially inaugurated during the 2016 WMIC. The overarching goal of MINT is to bring together the many scientists who work on molecular imaging approaches using nanotechnology and those that work on theranostic agents. MINT therefore represents scientists, labs, and institutes that are very diverse in their scientific backgrounds and areas of expertise, reflecting the wide array of materials and approaches that drive these fields. In this short review, we attempt to provide a condensed overview over some of the key areas covered by MINT. Given the breadth of the fields and the given space constraints, we have limited the coverage to the realm of nanoconstructs, although theranostics is certainly not limited to this domain. We will also focus only on the most recent developments of the last 3-5 years, in order to provide the reader with an intuition of what is "in the pipeline" and has potential for clinical translation in the near future.

  6. Protein-based tumor molecular imaging probes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xin; Xie, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Molecular imaging is an emerging discipline which plays critical roles in diagnosis and therapeutics. It visualizes and quantifies markers that are aberrantly expressed during the disease origin and development. Protein molecules remain to be one major class of imaging probes, and the option has been widely diversified due to the recent advances in protein engineering techniques. Antibodies are part of the immunosystem which interact with target antigens with high specificity and affinity. They have long been investigated as imaging probes and were coupled with imaging motifs such as radioisotopes for that purpose. However, the relatively large size of antibodies leads to a half-life that is too long for common imaging purposes. Besides, it may also cause a poor tissue penetration rate and thus compromise some medical applications. It is under this context that various engineered protein probes, essentially antibody fragments, protein scaffolds, and natural ligands have been developed. Compared to intact antibodies, they possess more compact size, shorter clearance time, and better tumor penetration. One major challenge of using protein probes in molecular imaging is the affected biological activity resulted from random labeling. Site-specific modification, however, allows conjugation happening in a stoichiometric fashion with little perturbation of protein activity. The present review will discuss protein-based probes with focus on their application and related site-specific conjugation strategies in tumor imaging. PMID:20232092

  7. Dose reduction in molecular breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenaar, Douglas J.; Chowdhury, Samir; Hugg, James W.; Moats, Rex A.; Patt, Bradley E.

    2011-10-01

    Molecular Breast Imaging (MBI) is the imaging of radiolabeled drugs, cells, or nanoparticles for breast cancer detection, diagnosis, and treatment. Screening of broad populations of women for breast cancer with mammography has been augmented by the emergence of breast MRI in screening of women at high risk for breast cancer. Screening MBI may benefit the sub-population of women with dense breast tissue that obscures small tumors in mammography. Dedicated breast imaging equipment is necessary to enable detection of early-stage tumors less than 1 cm in size. Recent progress in the development of these instruments is reviewed. Pixellated CZT for single photon MBI imaging of 99mTc-sestamibi gives high detection sensitivity for early-stage tumors. The use of registered collimators in a near-field geometry gives significantly higher detection efficiency - a factor of 3.6-, which translates into an equivalent dose reduction factor given the same acquisition time. The radiation dose in the current MBI procedure has been reduced to the level of a four-view digital mammography study. In addition to screening of selected sub-populations, reduced MBI dose allows for dual-isotope, treatment planning, and repeated therapy assessment studies in the era of molecular medicine guided by quantitative molecular imaging.

  8. Quantitative cardiovascular magnetic resonance for molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Winter, Patrick M; Caruthers, Shelton D; Lanza, Gregory M; Wickline, Samuel A

    2010-11-03

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) molecular imaging aims to identify and map the expression of important biomarkers on a cellular scale utilizing contrast agents that are specifically targeted to the biochemical signatures of disease and are capable of generating sufficient image contrast. In some cases, the contrast agents may be designed to carry a drug payload or to be sensitive to important physiological factors, such as pH, temperature or oxygenation. In this review, examples will be presented that utilize a number of different molecular imaging quantification techniques, including measuring signal changes, calculating the area of contrast enhancement, mapping relaxation time changes or direct detection of contrast agents through multi-nuclear imaging or spectroscopy. The clinical application of CMR molecular imaging could offer far reaching benefits to patient populations, including early detection of therapeutic response, localizing ruptured atherosclerotic plaques, stratifying patients based on biochemical disease markers, tissue-specific drug delivery, confirmation and quantification of end-organ drug uptake, and noninvasive monitoring of disease recurrence. Eventually, such agents may play a leading role in reducing the human burden of cardiovascular disease, by providing early diagnosis, noninvasive monitoring and effective therapy with reduced side effects.

  9. Molecular histopathology by nonlinear interferometric vibrational imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boppart, Stephen A.

    2011-07-01

    A rapid label-free approach for molecular histopathology is presented and reviewed. Broadband vibrational spectra are generated by nonlinear interferometric vibrational imaging (NIVI), a coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS)- based technique that uses interferometry and signal processing approaches to acquire Raman-like profiles with suppression of the non-resonant background. This allows for the generation of images that provide contrast based on quantitative chemical composition with high spatial and spectral resolution. Algorithms are demonstrated for reducing the diagnostic spectral information into color-coded composite images for the rapid identification of chemical constituents in skin, as well as differentiating normal from abnormal tissue in a pre-clinical tumor model for human breast cancer. This technology and methodology could result in an alternative method to the traditional histological staining and subjective interpretation procedure currently used in the diagnosis of disease, and has the potential for future in vivo molecular histopathology.

  10. Relative prognostic value of rest thallium-201 imaging, radionuclide ventriculography and 24 hour ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring after acute myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Hakki, A.H.; Nestico, P.F.; Heo, J.; Unwala, A.A.; Iskandrian, A.S.

    1987-07-01

    Rest thallium-201 scintigraphy, radionuclide ventriculography and 24 hour Holter monitoring are acceptable methods to assess myocardial necrosis, performance and electrical instability. This study examined the relative value of the three tests, when obtained a mean of 7 days after acute myocardial infarction, in predicting 1 year mortality in 93 patients. Planar thallium-201 images were obtained in three projections and were scored on a scale of 0 to 4 in 15 segments (normal score = 60). Patients were classified as having high risk test results as follows: thallium score less than or equal to 45 (33 patients), left ventricular ejection fraction less than or equal to 40% (51 patients) and complex ventricular arrhythmias on Holter monitoring (36 patients). During the follow-up of 6.4 +/- 3.4 months (mean +/- SD), 15 patients died of cardiac causes. All three tests were important predictors of survival by univariate Cox survival analysis; the thallium score, however, was the only important predictor by multivariate analysis. The predictive power of the thallium score was comparable with that of combined ejection fraction and Holter monitoring (chi-square = 21 versus chi-square = 22). Thus, rest thallium-201 imaging performed before hospital discharge provides important prognostic information in survivors of acute myocardial infarction which is comparable with that provided by left ventricular ejection fraction and Holter monitoring. Patients with a lower thallium score (large perfusion defects) are at high risk of cardiac death during the first year after infarction.

  11. Scatter and crosstalk corrections for {sup 99m}Tc/{sup 123}I dual-radionuclide imaging using a CZT SPECT system with pinhole collimators

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Peng; Hutton, Brian F.; Holstensson, Maria; Ljungberg, Michael; Hendrik Pretorius, P.; Prasad, Rameshwar; Liu, Chi; Ma, Tianyu; Liu, Yaqiang; Wang, Shi; Thorn, Stephanie L.; Stacy, Mitchel R.; Sinusas, Albert J.

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: The energy spectrum for a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector has a low energy tail due to incomplete charge collection and intercrystal scattering. Due to these solid-state detector effects, scatter would be overestimated if the conventional triple-energy window (TEW) method is used for scatter and crosstalk corrections in CZT-based imaging systems. The objective of this work is to develop a scatter and crosstalk correction method for {sup 99m}Tc/{sup 123}I dual-radionuclide imaging for a CZT-based dedicated cardiac SPECT system with pinhole collimators (GE Discovery NM 530c/570c). Methods: A tailing model was developed to account for the low energy tail effects of the CZT detector. The parameters of the model were obtained using {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 123}I point source measurements. A scatter model was defined to characterize the relationship between down-scatter and self-scatter projections. The parameters for this model were obtained from Monte Carlo simulation using SIMIND. The tailing and scatter models were further incorporated into a projection count model, and the primary and self-scatter projections of each radionuclide were determined with a maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) iterative estimation approach. The extracted scatter and crosstalk projections were then incorporated into MLEM image reconstruction as an additive term in forward projection to obtain scatter- and crosstalk-corrected images. The proposed method was validated using Monte Carlo simulation, line source experiment, anthropomorphic torso phantom studies, and patient studies. The performance of the proposed method was also compared to that obtained with the conventional TEW method. Results: Monte Carlo simulations and line source experiment demonstrated that the TEW method overestimated scatter while their proposed method provided more accurate scatter estimation by considering the low energy tail effect. In the phantom study, improved defect contrasts were

  12. [Redox Molecular Imaging Using ReMI].

    PubMed

    Hyodo, Fuminori; Ito, Shinji; Utsumi, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    Tissue redox status is one of the most important parameters to maintain homeostasis in the living body. Numerous redox reactions are involved in metabolic processes, such as energy production in the mitochondrial electron transfer system. A variety of intracellular molecules such as reactive oxygen species, glutathione, thioredoxins, NADPH, flavins, and ascorbic acid may contribute to the overall redox status in tissues. Breakdown of redox balance may lead to oxidative stress and can induce many pathological conditions such as cancer, neurological disorders, and aging. Therefore imaging of tissue redox status and monitoring antioxidant levels in living organisms can be useful in the diagnosis of disease states and assessment of treatment response. In vivo redox molecular imaging technology such as electron spin resonance imaging (ESRI), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-MRI (redox molecular imaging; ReMI) is emerging as a viable redox status imaging modality. This review focuses on the application of magnetic resonance technologies using MRI or DNP-MRI and redox-sensitive contrast agents.

  13. Imaging molecular geometry with electron momentum spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Enliang; Shan, Xu; Tian, Qiguo; Yang, Jing; Gong, Maomao; Tang, Yaguo; Niu, Shanshan; Chen, Xiangjun

    2016-12-22

    Electron momentum spectroscopy is a unique tool for imaging orbital-specific electron density of molecule in momentum space. However, the molecular geometry information is usually veiled due to the single-centered character of momentum space wavefunction of molecular orbital (MO). Here we demonstrate the retrieval of interatomic distances from the multicenter interference effect revealed in the ratios of electron momentum profiles between two MOs with symmetric and anti-symmetric characters. A very sensitive dependence of the oscillation period on interatomic distance is observed, which is used to determine F-F distance in CF4 and O-O distance in CO2 with sub-Ångström precision. Thus, using one spectrometer, and in one measurement, the electron density distributions of MOs and the molecular geometry information can be obtained simultaneously. Our approach provides a new robust tool for imaging molecules with high precision and has potential to apply to ultrafast imaging of molecular dynamics if combined with ultrashort electron pulses in the future.

  14. Imaging molecular geometry with electron momentum spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Enliang; Shan, Xu; Tian, Qiguo; Yang, Jing; Gong, Maomao; Tang, Yaguo; Niu, Shanshan; Chen, Xiangjun

    2016-01-01

    Electron momentum spectroscopy is a unique tool for imaging orbital-specific electron density of molecule in momentum space. However, the molecular geometry information is usually veiled due to the single-centered character of momentum space wavefunction of molecular orbital (MO). Here we demonstrate the retrieval of interatomic distances from the multicenter interference effect revealed in the ratios of electron momentum profiles between two MOs with symmetric and anti-symmetric characters. A very sensitive dependence of the oscillation period on interatomic distance is observed, which is used to determine F-F distance in CF4 and O-O distance in CO2 with sub-Ångström precision. Thus, using one spectrometer, and in one measurement, the electron density distributions of MOs and the molecular geometry information can be obtained simultaneously. Our approach provides a new robust tool for imaging molecules with high precision and has potential to apply to ultrafast imaging of molecular dynamics if combined with ultrashort electron pulses in the future. PMID:28004794

  15. Imaging molecular geometry with electron momentum spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Enliang; Shan, Xu; Tian, Qiguo; Yang, Jing; Gong, Maomao; Tang, Yaguo; Niu, Shanshan; Chen, Xiangjun

    2016-12-01

    Electron momentum spectroscopy is a unique tool for imaging orbital-specific electron density of molecule in momentum space. However, the molecular geometry information is usually veiled due to the single-centered character of momentum space wavefunction of molecular orbital (MO). Here we demonstrate the retrieval of interatomic distances from the multicenter interference effect revealed in the ratios of electron momentum profiles between two MOs with symmetric and anti-symmetric characters. A very sensitive dependence of the oscillation period on interatomic distance is observed, which is used to determine F-F distance in CF4 and O-O distance in CO2 with sub-Ångström precision. Thus, using one spectrometer, and in one measurement, the electron density distributions of MOs and the molecular geometry information can be obtained simultaneously. Our approach provides a new robust tool for imaging molecules with high precision and has potential to apply to ultrafast imaging of molecular dynamics if combined with ultrashort electron pulses in the future.

  16. Advance of Molecular Imaging Technology and Targeted Imaging Agent in Imaging and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhi-Yi; Wang, Yi-Xiang; Lin, Yan; Zhang, Jin-Shan; Yang, Feng; Zhou, Qiu-Lan; Liao, Yang-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Molecular imaging is an emerging field that integrates advanced imaging technology with cellular and molecular biology. It can realize noninvasive and real time visualization, measurement of physiological or pathological process in the living organism at the cellular and molecular level, providing an effective method of information acquiring for diagnosis, therapy, and drug development and evaluating treatment of efficacy. Molecular imaging requires high resolution and high sensitive instruments and specific imaging agents that link the imaging signal with molecular event. Recently, the application of new emerging chemical technology and nanotechnology has stimulated the development of imaging agents. Nanoparticles modified with small molecule, peptide, antibody, and aptamer have been extensively applied for preclinical studies. Therapeutic drug or gene is incorporated into nanoparticles to construct multifunctional imaging agents which allow for theranostic applications. In this review, we will discuss the characteristics of molecular imaging, the novel imaging agent including targeted imaging agent and multifunctional imaging agent, as well as cite some examples of their application in molecular imaging and therapy. PMID:24689058

  17. SYMPOSIUM ON MULTIMODALITY CARDIOVASCULAR MOLECULAR IMAGING IMAGING TECHNOLOGY - PART 2

    PubMed Central

    de Kemp, Robert A.; Epstein, Frederick H.; Catana, Ciprian; Tsui, Benjamin M.W.; Ritman, Erik L.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale The ability to trace or identify specific molecules within a specific anatomic location provides insight into metabolic pathways, tissue components and tracing of solute transport mechanisms. With the increasing use of small animals for research such imaging must have sufficiently high spatial resolution to allow anatomic localization as well as sufficient specificity and sensitivity to provide an accurate description of the molecular distribution and concentration. Methods Imaging methods based on electromagnetic radiation, such as PET, SPECT, MRI and CT, are increasingly applicable due to recent advances in novel scanner hardware, image reconstruction software and availability of novel molecules which have enhanced sensitivity in these methodologies. Results Micro-PET has been advanced by development of detector arrays that provide higher resolution and positron emitting elements that allow new molecular tracers to be labeled. Micro-MRI has been improved in terms of spatial resolution and sensitivity by increased magnet field strength and development of special purpose coils and associated scan protocols. Of particular interest is the associated ability to image local mechanical function and solute transport processes which can be directly related to the molecular information. This is further strengthened by the synergistic integration of the PET with MRI. Micro-SPECT has been improved by use of coded aperture imaging approaches as well as image reconstruction algorithms which can better deal with the photon limited scan data. The limited spatial resolution can be partially overcome by integrating the SPECT with CT. Micro-CT by itself provides exquisite spatial resolution of anatomy, but recent developments of high spatial resolution photon counting and spectrally-sensitive imaging arrays, combined with x-ray optical devices, have promise for actual molecular identification by virtue of the chemical bond lengths of molecules, especially of bio

  18. Molecular imaging to biomarker development in neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Frost, J James

    2008-11-01

    CNS drug candidates fail approval in over 90% of the cases due to poor targeting, lack of efficacy, and/or unacceptable side effects. In vivo imaging offers a pathway to derisk drug molecules at each stage of development, but more research and development is needed to fully realize this potential. The greatest activity is in the use of target biomarkers, but those for disease mechanism, efficacy, and toxicological effects are under study and urgently needed. Many of the biomarker tracers can later be developed as new diagnostic imaging agents and then used to guide individual molecular therapy. Realization of this goal will require ongoing collaborative research and development among universities, pharmaceutical companies, biotechnology, the contract research organization (CRO) industry, diagnostic companies, and producers and distributors of radiopharmaceuticals. During the past decade there has been a progressive merger of the interests of the pharmaceutical industry and academia in the area of molecular biomarker imaging in human brain disease. Historically, academia has been more focused on disease mechanisms, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment monitoring. The pharmaceutical industry has concentrated more on medication development, drug pharmacokinetics, and surrogate treatment end points. In the era of personalized medicine, these interests have evolved to a continuum where the knowledge of diagnosis and molecular mechanism of disease from imaging not only guides new medication development but also is beginning to direct individualized drug choice and dosage.

  19. Ultrasound contrast agents for ultrasound molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Tranquart, F; Arditi, M; Bettinger, T; Frinking, P; Hyvelin, J M; Nunn, A; Pochon, S; Tardy, I

    2014-11-01

    Ultrasound is a real-time imaging technique which is widely used in many clinical applications for its capacity to provide anatomic information with high spatial and temporal resolution. The advent of ultrasound contrast agents in combination with contrast-specific imaging modes has given access to perfusion assessments at an organ level, leading to an improved diagnostic accuracy. More recently, the development of biologically-targeted ultrasound contrast agents has expanded the role of ultrasound even further into molecular imaging applications. Ultrasound molecular imaging can be used to visualize the expression of intravascular markers, and to assess their local presence over time and/or during therapeutic treatment. Major applications are in the field of inflammation and neoangiogenesis due to the strictly intravascular presence of microbubbles. Various technologies have been investigated for attaching the targeting moiety to the shell from simple biotin-avidin constructs to more elaborated insertion within the shell through attachment to PEG residues. This important improvement has allowed a clinical translation of initial pre-clinical investigations, opening the way for an early detection and an accurate characterization of lesions in patients. The combination of anatomic, functional and molecular information/data provided by contrast ultrasound is a powerful tool which is still in its infancy due to the lack of agents suitable for clinical use. The advantages of ultrasound techniques combined with the molecular signature of lesions will represent a significant advance in imaging in the field of personalized medicine. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Sodium Iodide Symporter for Nuclear Molecular Imaging and Gene Therapy: From Bedside to Bench and Back

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Byeong-Cheol

    2012-01-01

    Molecular imaging, defined as the visual representation, characterization and quantification of biological processes at the cellular and subcellular levels within intact living organisms, can be obtained by various imaging technologies, including nuclear imaging methods. Imaging of normal thyroid tissue and differentiated thyroid cancer, and treatment of thyroid cancer with radioiodine rely on the expression of the sodium iodide symporter (NIS) in these cells. NIS is an intrinsic membrane protein with 13 transmembrane domains and it takes up iodide into the cytosol from the extracellular fluid. By transferring NIS function to various cells via gene transfer, the cells can be visualized with gamma or positron emitting radioisotopes such as Tc-99m, I-123, I-131, I-124 and F-18 tetrafluoroborate, which are accumulated by NIS. They can also be treated with beta- or alpha-emitting radionuclides, such as I-131, Re-186, Re-188 and At-211, which are also accumulated by NIS. This article demonstrates the diagnostic and therapeutic applications of NIS as a radionuclide-based reporter gene for trafficking cells and a therapeutic gene for treating cancers. PMID:22539935

  1. Natural Language Processing in the Molecular Imaging Domain

    PubMed Central

    Tulipano, P. Karina; Tao, Ying; Zanzonico, Pat; Kolbert, Katherine; Lussier, Yves; Friedman, Carol

    2005-01-01

    Molecular imaging represents the intersection between imaging and genomic sciences. There has been a surge in research literature and information in both sciences. Information contained within molecular imaging literature could be used to 1) link to genomic and imaging information resources and 2) to organize and index images. This research focuses on the adaptation, evaluation, and application of BioMedLEE, a natural language processing system (NLP), in the automated extraction of information from molecular imaging abstracts. PMID:16779429

  2. Molecular imaging with CARS micro-spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cicerone, Marcus

    2016-08-01

    After more than a decade of instrument and method development, broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) micro-spectroscopy is beginning to live up to its potential as a label-free imaging modality that can rapidly generate high resolution images with full vibrational spectra at each image pixel. Presently these instruments are able to obtain quantitative, spatially resolved information on lipids from the CH stretch region of the Raman spectrum, and some instrument designs facilitate acquisition of high quality fingerprint spectra, containing information on a host of molecular species including structural proteins, nucleotides, and metabolites. While most of the existing instruments are research projects themselves, it appears that the relevant technologies are maturing so that commercially available instruments may not be too far in the future, making this remarkable imaging modality widely available. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Radionuclide imaging of cardiac sympathetic innervation in heart failure: unlocking untapped potential.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shuchita; Amanullah, Aman

    2015-03-01

    Heart failure (HF) is associated with sympathetic overactivity, which contributes to disease progression and arrhythmia development. Cardiac sympathetic innervation imaging can be performed using radiotracers that are taken up in the presynaptic nerve terminal of sympathetic nerves. The commonly used radiotracers are (123)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine ((123)I-mIBG) for planar and single-photon emission computed tomography imaging, and (11)C-hydroxyephedrine for positron emission tomography imaging. Sympathetic innervation imaging has been used in assessing prognosis, response to treatment, risk of ventricular arrhythmias and sudden death and prediction of response to cardiac resynchronization therapy in patients with HF. Other potential applications of these techniques are in patients with chemotherapy-induced cardiomyopathy, predicting myocardial recovery in patients with left ventricular assist devices, and assessing reinnervation following cardiac transplantation. There is a lack of standardization with respect to technique of (123)I-mIBG imaging that needs to be overcome for the imaging modality to gain popularity in clinical practice.

  4. Three Dimensional Molecular Imaging for Lignocellulosic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bohn, Paul W.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2011-06-09

    The development of high efficiency, inexpensive processing protocols to render biomass components into fermentable substrates for the sequential processing of cell wall components into fuels and important feedstocks for the biorefinery of the future is a key goal of the national roadmap for renewable energy. Furthermore, the development of such protocols depends critically on detailed knowledge of the spatial and temporal infiltration of reagents designed to remove and separate the phenylpropenoid heteropolymer (lignin) from the processable sugar components sequestered in the rigid cell walls of plants. A detailed chemical and structural understanding of this pre-enzymatic processing in space and time was the focus of this program. We worked to develop new imaging strategies that produce real-time molecular speciation information in situ; extract sub-surface information about the effects of processing; and follow the spatial and temporal characteristics of the molecular species in the matrix and correlate this complex profile with saccharification. Spatially correlated SIMS and Raman imaging were used to provide high quality, high resolution subcellular images of Miscanthus cross sections. Furthermore, the combination of information from the mass spectrometry and Raman scattering allows specific chemical assignments of observed structures, difficult to assign from either imaging approach alone and lays the foundation for subsequent heterocorrelated imaging experiments targeted at more challenging biological systems, such as the interacting plant-microbe systems relevant to the rhizosphere.

  5. NAOMI: nanoparticle-assisted optical molecular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faber, Dirk J.; de Bruin, Martijn; Aalders, Maurice C. G.; Verbraak, Frank D.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.

    2007-02-01

    We present our first steps towards nanoparticle assisted, optical molecular imaging (NAOMI) using biodegradable nanoparticles. Our focus is on using optical coherence tomography(OCT) as the imaging modality. We propose to use nanoparticles based on biodegradable polymers, loaded with carefully selected dyes as contrast agent, and outline a method for establishing their desired optical properties prior to synthesis. Moreover, we perform a qualitative pilot study using these biodegradable nanoparticles, measuring their optical properties which are found to be in line with theoretical predictions.

  6. Molecular Imaging of Biomarkers in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ulaner, Gary A.; Riedl, Chris C.; Dickler, Maura N.; Jhaveri, Komal; Pandit-Taskar, Neeta; Weber, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    The success of breast cancer therapy is ultimately defined by clinical endpoints such as survival. It is valuable to have biomarkers that can predict the most efficacious therapies or measure response to therapy early in the course of treatment. Molecular imaging has a promising role in complementing and overcoming some of the limitations of traditional biomarkers by providing the ability to perform noninvasive, repeatable whole-body assessments. The potential advantages of imaging biomarkers are obvious and initial clinical studies have been promising, but proof of clinical utility still requires prospective multicenter clinical trials. PMID:26834103

  7. Radiological and Radionuclide Imaging of Degenerative Disease of the Facet Joints

    PubMed Central

    Shur, Natalie; Corrigan, Alexis; Agrawal, Kanhaiyalal; Desai, Amidevi; Gnanasegaran, Gopinath

    2015-01-01

    The facet joint has been increasingly implicated as a potential source of lower back pain. Diagnosis can be challenging as there is not a direct correlation between facet joint disease and clinical or radiological features. The purpose of this article is to review the diagnosis, treatment, and current imaging modality options in the context of degenerative facet joint disease. We describe each modality in turn with a pictorial review using current evidence. Newer hybrid imaging techniques such as single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) provide additional information relative to the historic gold standard magnetic resonance imaging. The diagnostic benefits of SPECT/CT include precise localization and characterization of spinal lesions and improved diagnosis for lower back pain. It may have a role in selecting patients for local therapeutic injections, as well as guiding their location with increased precision. PMID:26170560

  8. Radiological and Radionuclide Imaging of Degenerative Disease of the Facet Joints.

    PubMed

    Shur, Natalie; Corrigan, Alexis; Agrawal, Kanhaiyalal; Desai, Amidevi; Gnanasegaran, Gopinath

    2015-01-01

    The facet joint has been increasingly implicated as a potential source of lower back pain. Diagnosis can be challenging as there is not a direct correlation between facet joint disease and clinical or radiological features. The purpose of this article is to review the diagnosis, treatment, and current imaging modality options in the context of degenerative facet joint disease. We describe each modality in turn with a pictorial review using current evidence. Newer hybrid imaging techniques such as single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) provide additional information relative to the historic gold standard magnetic resonance imaging. The diagnostic benefits of SPECT/CT include precise localization and characterization of spinal lesions and improved diagnosis for lower back pain. It may have a role in selecting patients for local therapeutic injections, as well as guiding their location with increased precision.

  9. TU-F-12A-06: BEST IN PHYSICS (IMAGING) - A Novel Catheter-Based Radionuclide Imaging System to Characterize Atherosclerotic Plaque

    SciTech Connect

    Zaman, R; Kosuge, H; Carpenter, C; Pratx, G; Sun, C; McConnell, M; Xing, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Atherosclerosis underlies coronary artery diseases, the leading cause of death in the United States and worldwide. In this study, we developed a novel catheter-based radionuclide imaging (CRI) system to image 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG), a radionuclide, a marker of vascular inflammation, in murine carotid arteries and characterized the system for spatial resolution from multiple scintillating materials. Methods: The catheter system includes 35 mm and 8 mm fixed focal length lenses, which are subsequently connected to a CMOS camera and fiber holder. The distal ferrule of an image bundle is terminated with a wide-angle lens. The novelty of this system is a scintillating balloon with a crystal tip in the front of the wide angle lens to image light from the decay of 18F-FDG emission signal. The scintillating balloon is fabricated from 1mL of silicone RTV catalyst mixed with 1 mL base and 50 mg/mL calcium fluoride doped with Europium (CaF2:Eu). To identify the optimal scintillating materials with respect to resolution, we calculated modulation transfer function (MTF) of Yttrium Aluminum Garnet doped with Cerium (YAG:Ce), anthracene, and CaF2:Eu phosphors using a thin line optical phantom (Fig. 1a-1b). Macrophage-rich FVB murine atherosclerotic carotid plaque model (n = 4) was used in ex vivo experiments. Confirmatory imaging was also performed by an external optical imaging system (IVIS-200). Results: Analysis of the different phosphors (Fig 1b) showed that CaF2:Eu enabled the best resolution of 1.2μm. The CRI system visualized 18F-FDG in atherosclerotic plaques (Fig. 1d). The ligated left carotid (LR) artery exhibited 4× higher 18F-FDG signal intensity compared to the non-ligated right carotid (negative control) artery (1.65×10{sup 2} ±4.07×10{sup 1} vs. 4.44×10{sup 1}±2.17×10{sup 0}, A.U., p = 0.005) and confirmed with IVIS-200 (Fig. 1d). Conclusion: This CRI system enables high-resolution and sensitive detection of 18F-FDG uptake by murine

  10. Radionuclide imaging study of long-term pulmonary function after lobectomy in children with congenital cystic lung disease.

    PubMed

    Komori, Koji; Kamagata, Shoichiro; Hirobe, Seiichi; Toma, Miki; Okumura, Kenji; Muto, Mitsuru; Kasai, Shogo; Hayashi, Akira; Suenaga, Mayumi; Miyakawa, Tomoo

    2009-11-01

    We evaluated the long-term pulmonary function after lobectomy for congenital cystic lung disease, in both infants and children, using radionuclide imaging (RI). We performed a retrospective review of 93 patients who underwent resection of cystic lung lesions between 1974 and 2001. The results of postoperative lung volume/perfusion scintigraphy at 1 (n = 64), 5 (n = 32), and 10 years (n = 18) after surgery (V1, 5, 10/Q1, 5, 10) and mean transit time (MTT-a marker for air-trapping) at 1, 5, and 10 years after surgery (MTT1, 5, 10) were compared with respect to age at operation, preoperative infection, underlying disease, and type of surgery. Patients who were younger than 1 year at the time of surgery showed a significantly lower MTT5 (1.09 +/- 0.08) and MTT10 (1.15 +/- 0.11) than patients who were older than 1 year at the time of surgery (MTT5, 1.49 +/- 0.67; MTT10, 1.54 +/- 0.33). The noninfected group had significantly higher Q10 and lower MTT10 values (P < .05) compared to the infected group. No significant differences were observed between patients with single lobe vs multiple lobe resection. The optimal age for surgery in patients with congenital cystic lung disease appears to be less than 1 year.

  11. Molecular orbital imaging for partially aligned molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Meiyan; Zhu, Xiaosong

    2017-01-01

    We investigate molecular orbital reconstruction using high-order harmonic emissions from partially aligned molecular ensembles. By carrying out the reconstruction procedure using the harmonic sampling with or without the spectral minimum, the roles of the harmonic phase and amplitude modulation due to the partial alignment can be separately studied. It is found that with the prior knowledge of the orbital symmetry, the reconstructed result is very sensitive to the modulation of the harmonic phase for the πg orbital, while in the case of σg orbital, the reconstructed result is mainly determined by the harmonic amplitude. These results can provide an important reference for the future experiment of molecular orbital imaging.

  12. Molecular imaging probe development: a chemistry perspective

    PubMed Central

    Nolting, Donald D; Nickels, Michael L; Guo, Ning; Pham, Wellington

    2012-01-01

    Molecular imaging is an attractive modality that has been widely employed in many aspects of biomedical research; especially those aimed at the early detection of diseases such as cancer, inflammation and neurodegenerative disorders. The field emerged in response to a new research paradigm in healthcare that seeks to integrate detection capabilities for the prediction and prevention of diseases. This approach made a distinct impact in biomedical research as it enabled researchers to leverage the capabilities of molecular imaging probes to visualize a targeted molecular event non-invasively, repeatedly and continuously in a living system. In addition, since such probes are inherently compact, robust, and amenable to high-throughput production, these probes could potentially facilitate screening of preclinical drug discovery, therapeutic assessment and validation of disease biomarkers. They could also be useful in drug discovery and safety evaluations. In this review, major trends in the chemical synthesis and development of positron emission tomography (PET), optical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) probes are discussed. PMID:22943038

  13. Molecular Imaging System for Monitoring Tumor Angiogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aytac, Esra; Burcin Unlu, Mehmet

    2012-02-01

    In cancer, non-invasive imaging techniques that monitor molecular processes associated with the tumor angiogenesis could have a central role in the evaluation of novel antiangiogenic and proangiogenic therapies as well as early detection of the disease. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) can serve as specific biological targets for imaging of angiogenesis since expression of MMPs is required for angiogenesis and has been found to be upregulated in every type of human cancer and correlates with stage, invasive, metastatic properties and poor prognosis. However, for most cancers it is still unknown when, where and how MMPs are involved in the tumor angiogenesis [1]. Development of high-resolution, high sensitivity imaging techniques in parallel with the tumor models could prove invaluable for assessing the physical location and the time frame of MMP enzymatic acitivity. The goal of this study is to understand where, when and how MMPs are involved in the tumor angiogenesis. We will accomplish this goal by following two objectives: to develop a high sensitivity, high resolution molecular imaging system, to develop a virtual tumor simulator that can predict the physical location and the time frame of the MMP activity. In order to achieve our objectives, we will first develop a PAM system and develop a mathematical tumor model in which the quantitative data obtained from the PAM can be integrated. So, this work will develop a virtual tumor simulator and a molecular imaging system for monitoring tumor angiogenesis. 1.Kessenbrock, K., V. Plaks, and Z. Werb, MMP:regulators of the tumor microenvironment. Cell, 2010. 141(1)

  14. Micro-single-photon emission computed tomography image acquisition and quantification of sodium-iodide symporter-mediated radionuclide accumulation in mouse thyroid and salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Michael P; Kloos, Richard T; Shen, Daniel H; Zhang, Xiaoli; Liu, Yu-Yu; Jhiang, Sissy M

    2012-06-01

    Micro-single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) provides a noninvasive way to evaluate the effects of genetic and/or pharmacological modulation on sodium-iodide symporter (NIS)-mediated radionuclide accumulation in mouse thyroid and salivary glands. However, parameters affecting image acquisition and analysis of mouse thyroids and salivary glands have not been thoroughly investigated. In this study, we investigated the effects of region-of-interest (ROI) selection, collimation, scan time, and imaging orbit on image acquisition and quantification of thyroidal and salivary radionuclide accumulation in mice. The effects of data window minima and maxima on thyroidal and salivary ROI selection using a visual boundary method were examined in SPECT images acquired from mice injected with (123)I NaI. The effects of collimation, scan time, and imaging orbit on counting linearity and signal intensity were investigated using phantoms filled with various activities of (123)I NaI or Tc-99m pertechnetate. Spatial resolution of target organs in whole-animal images was compared between circular orbit with parallel-hole collimation and spiral orbit with five-pinhole collimation. Lastly, the inter-experimental variability of the same mouse scanned multiple times was compared with the intra-experimental variability among different mice scanned at the same time. Thyroid ROI was separated from salivary glands by empirically increasing the data window maxima. Counting linearity within the range of 0.5-14.2 μCi was validated by phantom imaging using single- or multiple-pinhole collimators with circular or spiral imaging orbit. Scanning time could be shortened to 15 minutes per mouse without compromising counting linearity despite proportionally decreased signal intensity. Whole-animal imaging using a spiral orbit with five-pinhole collimators achieved a high spatial resolution and counting linearity. Finally, the extent of inter-experimental variability of NIS

  15. Micro–Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography Image Acquisition and Quantification of Sodium-Iodide Symporter–Mediated Radionuclide Accumulation in Mouse Thyroid and Salivary Glands

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Michael P.; Kloos, Richard T.; Shen, Daniel H.; Zhang, Xiaoli; Liu, Yu-Yu

    2012-01-01

    Background Micro–single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) provides a noninvasive way to evaluate the effects of genetic and/or pharmacological modulation on sodium-iodide symporter (NIS)–mediated radionuclide accumulation in mouse thyroid and salivary glands. However, parameters affecting image acquisition and analysis of mouse thyroids and salivary glands have not been thoroughly investigated. In this study, we investigated the effects of region-of-interest (ROI) selection, collimation, scan time, and imaging orbit on image acquisition and quantification of thyroidal and salivary radionuclide accumulation in mice. Methods The effects of data window minima and maxima on thyroidal and salivary ROI selection using a visual boundary method were examined in SPECT images acquired from mice injected with 123I NaI. The effects of collimation, scan time, and imaging orbit on counting linearity and signal intensity were investigated using phantoms filled with various activities of 123I NaI or Tc-99m pertechnetate. Spatial resolution of target organs in whole-animal images was compared between circular orbit with parallel-hole collimation and spiral orbit with five-pinhole collimation. Lastly, the inter-experimental variability of the same mouse scanned multiple times was compared with the intra-experimental variability among different mice scanned at the same time. Results Thyroid ROI was separated from salivary glands by empirically increasing the data window maxima. Counting linearity within the range of 0.5–14.2 μCi was validated by phantom imaging using single- or multiple-pinhole collimators with circular or spiral imaging orbit. Scanning time could be shortened to 15 minutes per mouse without compromising counting linearity despite proportionally decreased signal intensity. Whole-animal imaging using a spiral orbit with five-pinhole collimators achieved a high spatial resolution and counting linearity. Finally, the extent of inter

  16. Breast imaging technology: Recent advances in imaging endogenous or transferred gene expression utilizing radionuclide technologies in living subjects - applications to breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Frank; Sam Gambhir, Sanjiv

    2001-01-01

    A variety of imaging technologies is being investigated as tools for studying gene expression in living subjects. Two technologies that use radiolabeled isotopes are single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET). A relatively high sensitivity, a full quantitative tomographic capability, and the ability to extend small animal imaging assays directly into human applications characterize radionuclide approaches. Various radiolabeled probes (tracers) can be synthesized to target specific molecules present in breast cancer cells. These include antibodies or ligands to target cell surface receptors, substrates for intracellular enzymes, antisense oligodeoxynucleotide probes for targeting mRNA, probes for targeting intracellular receptors, and probes for genes transferred into the cell. We briefly discuss each of these imaging approaches and focus in detail on imaging reporter genes. In a PET reporter gene system for in vivo reporter gene imaging, the protein products of the reporter genes sequester positron emitting reporter probes. PET subsequently measures the PET reporter gene dependent sequestration of the PET reporter probe in living animals. We describe and review reporter gene approaches using the herpes simplex type 1 virus thymidine kinase and the dopamine type 2 receptor genes. Application of the reporter gene approach to animal models for breast cancer is discussed. Prospects for future applications of the transgene imaging technology in human gene therapy are also discussed. Both SPECT and PET provide unique opportunities to study animal models of breast cancer with direct application to human imaging. Continued development of new technology, probes and assays should help in the better understanding of basic breast cancer biology and in the improved management of breast cancer patients. PMID:11250742

  17. Molecular Breast Imaging Using Emission Tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Gopan, O.; Gilland, D.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Kross, Brian J.; Welch, Benjamin L.

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: Tour objective is to design a novel SPECT system for molecular breast imaging (MBI) and evaluate its performance. The limited angle SPECT system, or emission tomosynthesis, is designed to achieve 3D images of the breast with high spatial resolution/sensitivity. The system uses a simplified detector motion and is conducive to on-board biopsy and mult-modal imaging with mammography. Methods: The novel feature of the proposed gamma camera is a variable-angle, slant-hole (VASH) collimator, which is well suited for limited angle SPECT of a mildly compressed breast. The collimator holes change slant angle while the camera surface remains flush against the compression paddle. This allows the camera to vary the angular view ({+-}30{degrees}, {+-}45{degrees}) for tomographic imaging while keeping the camera close to the object for high spatial resolution and/or sensitivity. Theoretical analysis and Monte Carlo simulations were performed assuming a point source and isolated breast phantom. Spatial resolution, sensitivity, contrast and SNR were measured. Results were compared to single-view, planar images and conventional SPECT. For both conventional SPECT and VASH, data were reconstructed using iterative algorithms. Finally, a proof-of-concept VASH collimator was constructed for experimental evaluation. Results: Measured spatial resolution/sensitivity with VASH showed good agreement with theory including depth-of-interaction (DOI) effects. The DOI effect diminished the depth resolution by approximately 2 mm. Increasing the slant angle range from {+-}30{degrees} to {+-}45{degrees} resulted in an approximately 1 mm improvement in the depth resolution. In the breast phantom images, VASH showed improved contrast and SNR over conventional SPECT and improved contrast over planar scintimmammography. Reconstructed images from the proof-of-concept VASH collimator demonstrated reasonable depth resolution capabilities using limited angle projection data. Conclusion: We

  18. Molecular Imaging in Synthetic Biology, and Synthetic Biology in Molecular Imaging.

    PubMed

    Gilad, Assaf A; Shapiro, Mikhail G

    2017-02-17

    Biomedical synthetic biology is an emerging field in which cells are engineered at the genetic level to carry out novel functions with relevance to biomedical and industrial applications. This approach promises new treatments, imaging tools, and diagnostics for diseases ranging from gastrointestinal inflammatory syndromes to cancer, diabetes, and neurodegeneration. As these cellular technologies undergo pre-clinical and clinical development, it is becoming essential to monitor their location and function in vivo, necessitating appropriate molecular imaging strategies, and therefore, we have created an interest group within the World Molecular Imaging Society focusing on synthetic biology and reporter gene technologies. Here, we highlight recent advances in biomedical synthetic biology, including bacterial therapy, immunotherapy, and regenerative medicine. We then discuss emerging molecular imaging approaches to facilitate in vivo applications, focusing on reporter genes for noninvasive modalities such as magnetic resonance, ultrasound, photoacoustic imaging, bioluminescence, and radionuclear imaging. Because reporter genes can be incorporated directly into engineered genetic circuits, they are particularly well suited to imaging synthetic biological constructs, and developing them provides opportunities for creative molecular and genetic engineering.

  19. Molecular Imaging of Immunotherapy Targets in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ehlerding, Emily B.; England, Christopher G.; McNeel, Douglas G.

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy has emerged as a promising alternative in the arsenal against cancer by harnessing the power of the immune system to specifically target malignant tissues. As the field of immunotherapy continues to expand, researchers will require newer methods for studying the interactions between the immune system, tumor cells, and immunotherapy agents. Recently, several noninvasive imaging strategies have been used to map the biodistribution of immune checkpoint molecules, monitor the efficacy and potential toxicities of the treatments, and identify patients who are likely to benefit from immunotherapies. In this review, we outline the current applications of noninvasive techniques for the preclinical imaging of immunotherapy targets and suggest future pathways for molecular imaging to contribute to this developing field. PMID:27469363

  20. Gastric visualization and image quality in radionuclide bone scanning: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, M.A.; Pollack, M.J.

    1981-06-01

    In a 12-mo study period, there were 14 days identified when the stomach was visualized in routine bone imaging. On these days, 44% of the 110 patients imaged demonstrated this effect. Only the quality control, binding efficiency, and scan quality differed (p less than 0.005) when the study population was compared with a reference population of 162 patients. However, on the days when this effect was noted, there was a significant (p less than 0.001) linear correlation between the presence and degree of gastric visualization and the radiopharmaceutical incubation and quality control parameters. The study suggests a sporadic phenomenon that appears to result from partial oxidation of the agent during incubation, producing (a) different species of labeled diphosphonate that display altered affinity for bone (scan quality) and (b) free pertechnetate (gastric activity).

  1. Sensitivity of radionuclide brain imaging and computerized transaxial tomography in detecting subdural hematoma

    SciTech Connect

    Razzak, M.A.; Mudarris, F.; Christie, J.H.

    1980-04-01

    In a series of 23 patients with surgically proven subdural hematoma of durations ranging between two days to seven months, the detection rate of Tc-99m-pertechnetate brain imaging was higher than computerized transaxial tomography (CT). With dynamic perfusion scanning, the detection rate was 71.5%. In contrast, CT demonstrated the hematoma in 52% of the cases. Lastly, the result of CT scanning was dependent on the size of the subdural hematoma as evaluated at the time of operation.

  2. Advantages and limitations of imaging the musculoskeletal system by conventional radiological, radionuclide, and hybrid modalities.

    PubMed

    Vijayanathan, Sanjay; Butt, Sajid; Gnanasegaran, Gopinath; Groves, Ashley M

    2009-11-01

    The endpoint of an efficient and accurate diagnosis of musculoskeletal pathology can take many different routes. Currently, conventional radiological techniques, such as plain radiography, ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging are used in the assessment of patients with benign and malignant bone disease. An understanding of the advantages and limitations of the modalities available will help expedite diagnosis, and hence treatment. In this review, we discuss the advantages and limitations of the modalities available in investigating benign and malignant musculoskeletal pathology.

  3. Gate simulation of Compton Ar-Xe gamma-camera for radionuclide imaging in nuclear medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubov, L. Yu; Belyaev, V. N.; Berdnikova, A. K.; Bolozdynia, A. I.; Akmalova, Yu A.; Shtotsky, Yu V.

    2017-01-01

    Computer simulations of cylindrical Compton Ar-Xe gamma camera are described in the current report. Detection efficiency of cylindrical Ar-Xe Compton camera with internal diameter of 40 cm is estimated as1-3%that is 10-100 times higher than collimated Anger’s camera. It is shown that cylindrical Compton camera can image Tc-99m radiotracer distribution with uniform spatial resolution of 20 mm through the whole field of view.

  4. Use of radionuclide imaging to determine gastric emptying of carbohydrate solutions during exercise.

    PubMed Central

    MacLaren, D; Miles, A; O'Neill, I; Critchley, M; Grime, S; Stockdale, H

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate the repeatability of continual assessment of the gastric emptying rates of carbohydrate solutions in exercising subjects using 99mtechnetium labelling. METHODS--Gastric emptying of a 5% glucose solution and an iso-osmotic maltodextrin solution was measured using 3 MBq of 99mtechnetium labelled diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid (DTPA) and continuous gamma camera imaging in five male subjects. The subjects performed four 1 h trials at 70% VO2 peak on a cycle ergometer. After 15 min, 200 ml of a radiolabelled solution of glucose or maltodextrin were ingested in a blind crossover protocol. The two solutions were each ingested on separate occasions (trial 1 and trial 2) to establish repeatability. RESULTS--Statistical analysis showed no differences between trial 1 and trial 2 for both solutions. There were no significant differences for the emptying rates between the two test solutions. CONCLUSIONS--Posterior imaging using a computer linked gamma camera following the ingestion of 99mtechnetium labelled DTPA mixed with carbohydrate solutions provides a repeatable method of assessing gastric emptying characteristics in exercising subjects. This technique showed no significant differences between the emptying rates of a single dose of iso-osmotic glucose or maltodextrin solution. Images Fig 1 PMID:8665111

  5. Radionuclide (131)I-labeled multifunctional dendrimers for targeted SPECT imaging and radiotherapy of tumors.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jingyi; Zhao, Lingzhou; Cheng, Yongjun; Xiong, Zhijuan; Tang, Yueqin; Shen, Mingwu; Zhao, Jinhua; Shi, Xiangyang

    2015-11-21

    We report the synthesis, characterization, and utilization of radioactive (131)I-labeled multifunctional dendrimers for targeted single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging and radiotherapy of tumors. In this study, amine-terminated poly(amidoamine) dendrimers of generation 5 (G5·NH2) were sequentially modified with 3-(4'-hydroxyphenyl)propionic acid-OSu (HPAO) and folic acid (FA) linked with polyethylene glycol (PEG), followed by acetylation modification of the dendrimer remaining surface amines and labeling of radioactive iodine-131 ((131)I). The generated multifunctional (131)I-G5·NHAc-HPAO-PEG-FA dendrimers were characterized via different methods. We show that prior to (131)I labeling, the G5·NHAc-HPAO-PEG-FA dendrimers conjugated with approximately 9.4 HPAO moieties per dendrimer are noncytotoxic at a concentration up to 20 μM and are able to target cancer cells overexpressing FA receptors (FAR), thanks to the modified FA ligands. In the presence of a phenol group, radioactive (131)I is able to be efficiently labeled onto the dendrimer platform with good stability and high radiochemical purity, and render the platform with an ability for targeted SPECT imaging and radiotherapy of an FAR-overexpressing xenografted tumor model in vivo. The designed strategy to use the facile dendrimer nanotechnology may be extended to develop various radioactive theranostic nanoplatforms for targeted SPECT imaging and radiotherapy of different types of cancer.

  6. Radionuclide 131I-labeled multifunctional dendrimers for targeted SPECT imaging and radiotherapy of tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jingyi; Zhao, Lingzhou; Cheng, Yongjun; Xiong, Zhijuan; Tang, Yueqin; Shen, Mingwu; Zhao, Jinhua; Shi, Xiangyang

    2015-10-01

    We report the synthesis, characterization, and utilization of radioactive 131I-labeled multifunctional dendrimers for targeted single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging and radiotherapy of tumors. In this study, amine-terminated poly(amidoamine) dendrimers of generation 5 (G5.NH2) were sequentially modified with 3-(4'-hydroxyphenyl)propionic acid-OSu (HPAO) and folic acid (FA) linked with polyethylene glycol (PEG), followed by acetylation modification of the dendrimer remaining surface amines and labeling of radioactive iodine-131 (131I). The generated multifunctional 131I-G5.NHAc-HPAO-PEG-FA dendrimers were characterized via different methods. We show that prior to 131I labeling, the G5.NHAc-HPAO-PEG-FA dendrimers conjugated with approximately 9.4 HPAO moieties per dendrimer are noncytotoxic at a concentration up to 20 μM and are able to target cancer cells overexpressing FA receptors (FAR), thanks to the modified FA ligands. In the presence of a phenol group, radioactive 131I is able to be efficiently labeled onto the dendrimer platform with good stability and high radiochemical purity, and render the platform with an ability for targeted SPECT imaging and radiotherapy of an FAR-overexpressing xenografted tumor model in vivo. The designed strategy to use the facile dendrimer nanotechnology may be extended to develop various radioactive theranostic nanoplatforms for targeted SPECT imaging and radiotherapy of different types of cancer.We report the synthesis, characterization, and utilization of radioactive 131I-labeled multifunctional dendrimers for targeted single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging and radiotherapy of tumors. In this study, amine-terminated poly(amidoamine) dendrimers of generation 5 (G5.NH2) were sequentially modified with 3-(4'-hydroxyphenyl)propionic acid-OSu (HPAO) and folic acid (FA) linked with polyethylene glycol (PEG), followed by acetylation modification of the dendrimer remaining surface amines and

  7. UK audit of relative lung function measurement from planar radionuclide imaging.

    PubMed

    Fleming, John S; Whalley, Dave R; Skrypniuk, John V; Jarritt, Peter H; Houston, Alex S; Cosgriff, Phil S; Bailey, Dale

    2004-09-01

    Quantitative measurements of regional lung ventilation and perfusion are useful adjuncts to image interpretation. This study investigated the accuracy and precision of the software used to carry out such measurements in the UK. Ten examples of perfusion distribution, representing the range of patterns expected in practice, were simulated on computer using a segmental model of the lung and real three-dimensional lung shapes obtained from magnetic resonance images. Pairs of anterior and posterior perfusion images were simulated and distributed to UK hospitals wishing to take part in the audit. Each centre returned analysis results and technical details. Forty centres provided data on the relative right:left lung perfusion. Thirteen also submitted data with each lung divided into three zones and four with each lung divided into two zones. All measurements were expressed by the percentage of total perfusion in a particular region. Errors were assessed as the root-mean-square (rms) deviation from the true value. Methods varied in the view used for analysis (80% geometric mean, 20% posterior) and the use of background subtraction (71% not used, 29% used). The rms error for percentage right assessment was 1.5 percentage points. This increased on two- and three-zone analysis to 3.8 and 4.3 percentage points, respectively. Differences in technique made little difference to whole-lung relative perfusion errors, but were important in zonal analysis. Quantification of whole-lung relative function is accurate and reproducible. Zonal values are determined less accurately, but still provide a useful guide to the distribution of function.

  8. The Role of Radionuclide Imaging in Epilepsy, Part 2: Epilepsy Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ajay; Chugani, Harry T

    2017-03-01

    PET and SPECT can play an important role in the evaluation of various epileptic syndromes, particularly those with unknown causes, by revealing various underlying abnormalities that may not be fully appreciated from MR imaging studies. In some cases, PET and SPECT provide crucial data that guide surgical resections of the epileptogenic zone for medically refractory epilepsy. In other cases, these neuroimaging modalities preclude a surgical option and can guide genetic studies. Longitudinal PET and SPECT studies may increase our understanding of the etiopathogenesis of epilepsy syndromes and provide a clearer picture of the natural history of neurologic progression.

  9. The role of radionuclide imaging in epilepsy, part 2: epilepsy syndromes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ajay; Chugani, Harry T

    2013-11-01

    PET and SPECT can play an important role in the evaluation of various epileptic syndromes, particularly those with unknown causes, by revealing various underlying abnormalities that may not be fully appreciated from MR imaging studies. In some cases, PET and SPECT provide crucial data that guide surgical resections of the epileptogenic zone for medically refractory epilepsy. In other cases, these neuroimaging modalities preclude a surgical option and can guide genetic studies. Longitudinal PET and SPECT studies may increase our understanding of the etiopathogenesis of epilepsy syndromes and provide a clearer picture of the natural history of neurologic progression.

  10. PET Imaging - from Physics to Clinical Molecular Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majewski, Stan

    2008-03-01

    From the beginnings many years ago in a few physics laboratories and first applications as a research brain function imager, PET became lately a leading molecular imaging modality used in diagnosis, staging and therapy monitoring of cancer, as well as has increased use in assessment of brain function (early diagnosis of Alzheimer's, etc) and in cardiac function. To assist with anatomic structure map and with absorption correction CT is often used with PET in a duo system. Growing interest in the last 5-10 years in dedicated organ specific PET imagers (breast, prostate, brain, etc) presents again an opportunity to the particle physics instrumentation community to contribute to the important field of medical imaging. In addition to the bulky standard ring structures, compact, economical and high performance mobile imagers are being proposed and build. The latest development in standard PET imaging is introduction of the well known TOF concept enabling clearer tomographic pictures of the patient organs. Development and availability of novel photodetectors such as Silicon PMT immune to magnetic fields offers an exciting opportunity to use PET in conjunction with MRI and fMRI. As before with avalanche photodiodes, particle physics community plays a leading role in developing these devices. The presentation will mostly focus on present and future opportunities for better PET designs based on new technologies and methods: new scintillators, photodetectors, readout, software.

  11. Comprehensive phantom for interventional fluorescence molecular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasopoulou, Maria; Koch, Maximilian; Gorpas, Dimitris; Karlas, Angelos; Klemm, Uwe; Garcia-Allende, Pilar Beatriz; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2016-09-01

    Fluorescence imaging has been considered for over a half-century as a modality that could assist surgical guidance and visualization. The administration of fluorescent molecules with sensitivity to disease biomarkers and their imaging using a fluorescence camera can outline pathophysiological parameters of tissue invisible to the human eye during operation. The advent of fluorescent agents that target specific cellular responses and molecular pathways of disease has facilitated the intraoperative identification of cancer with improved sensitivity and specificity over nonspecific fluorescent dyes that only outline the vascular system and enhanced permeability effects. With these new abilities come unique requirements for developing phantoms to calibrate imaging systems and algorithms. We briefly review herein progress with fluorescence phantoms employed to validate fluorescence imaging systems and results. We identify current limitations and discuss the level of phantom complexity that may be required for developing a universal strategy for fluorescence imaging calibration. Finally, we present a phantom design that could be used as a tool for interlaboratory system performance evaluation.

  12. The role of radionuclide imaging in the surgical management of primary hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Hindié, Elif; Zanotti-Fregonara, Paolo; Tabarin, Antoine; Rubello, Domenico; Morelec, Isabelle; Wagner, Tristan; Henry, Jean-François; Taïeb, David

    2015-05-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism is a frequent and potentially debilitating endocrine disorder for which surgery is the only curative treatment. The modalities of parathyroid surgery have changed over the last 2 decades, as conventional bilateral neck exploration is no longer the only surgical approach. Parathyroid scintigraphy plays a major role in defining the surgical strategy, given its ability to orient a targeted (focused) parathyroidectomy and to recognize ectopic locations or multiglandular disease. This review, which represents a collaborative effort between nuclear physicians, endocrinologists, and endocrine surgeons, emphasizes the importance of performing imaging before any surgery for primary hyperparathyroidism, even in the case of conventional bilateral neck exploration. We discuss the advantages and drawbacks of targeted parathyroidectomy and the performance of various scintigraphic protocols to guide limited surgery. We also discuss the optimal strategy to localize the offending gland before reoperation for persistent or recurrent hyperparathyroidism. Finally, we describe the potential applications of novel PET tracers, with special emphasis on (18)F-fluorocholine.

  13. Co-registered optical coherence tomography and fluorescence molecular imaging for simultaneous morphological and molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shuai; Roney, Celeste A; Wierwille, Jeremiah; Chen, Chao-Wei; Xu, Biying; Griffiths, Gary; Jiang, James; Ma, Hongzhou; Cable, Alex; Summers, Ronald M; Chen, Yu

    2010-01-07

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides high-resolution, cross-sectional imaging of tissue microstructure in situ and in real time, while fluorescence molecular imaging (FMI) enables the visualization of basic molecular processes. There is a great deal of interest in combining these two modalities so that the tissue's structural and molecular information can be obtained simultaneously. This could greatly benefit biomedical applications such as detecting early diseases and monitoring therapeutic interventions. In this research, an optical system that combines OCT and FMI was developed. The system demonstrated that it could co-register en face OCT and FMI images with a 2.4 x 2.4 mm(2) field-of-view. The transverse resolutions of OCT and FMI of the system are both approximately 10 microm. Capillary tubes filled with fluorescent dye Cy 5.5 in different concentrations under a scattering medium are used as the phantom. En face OCT images of the phantoms were obtained and successfully co-registered with FMI images that were acquired simultaneously. A linear relationship between FMI intensity and dye concentration was observed. The relationship between FMI intensity and target fluorescence tube depth measured by OCT images was also observed and compared with theoretical modeling. This relationship could help in correcting reconstructed dye concentration. Imaging of colon polyps of the APC(min) mouse model is presented as an example of biological applications of this co-registered OCT/FMI system.

  14. Combining Optical Coherence Tomography with Fluorescence Molecular Imaging: Towards Simultaneous Morphology and Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shuai; Roney, Celeste A.; Wierwille, Jerry; Chen, Chao-Wei; Xu, Biying; Jiang, James; Ma, Hongzhou; Cable, Alex; Summers, Ronald M.; Chen, Yu

    2010-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides high-resolution, cross-sectional imaging of tissue microstructure in situ and in real-time, while fluorescence molecular imaging (FMI) enables the visualization of basic molecular processes. There are great interests in combining these two modalities so that the tissue's structural and molecular information can be obtained simultaneously. This could greatly benefit biomedical applications such as detecting early diseases and monitoring therapeutic interventions. In this research, an optical system that combines OCT and FMI was developed. The system demonstrated that it could co-register en face OCT and FMI images with a 2.4 × 2.4 mm field of view. The transverse resolutions of OCT and FMI of the system are both ~10 μm. Capillary tubes filled with fluorescent dye Cy 5.5 in different concentrations under a scattering medium are used as the phantom. En face OCT images of the phantoms were obtained and successfully co-registered with FMI images that were acquired simultaneously. A linear relationship between FMI intensity and dye concentration was observed. The relationship between FMI intensity and target fluorescence tube depth measured by OCT images was also observed and compared with theoretical modeling. This relationship could help in correcting reconstructed dye concentration. Imaging of colon polyps of APCmin mouse model is presented as an example of biological applications of this co-registered OCT/FMI system. PMID:20009192

  15. Paving the way to personalized medicine: production of some theragnostic radionuclides at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava S. C.

    2011-06-06

    This paper introduces a relatively novel paradigm that involves specific individual radionuclides or radionuclide pairs that have emissions that allow pre-therapy low-dose imaging plus higher-dose therapy in the same patient. We have made an attempt to sort out and organize a number of such theragnostic radionuclides and radionuclide pairs that may potentially bring us closer to the age-long dream of personalized medicine for performing tailored low-dose molecular imaging (SPECT/CT or PET/CT) to provide the necessary pre-therapy information on biodistribution, dosimetry, the limiting or critical organ or tissue, and the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), etc. If the imaging results then warrant it, it would be possible to perform higher-dose targeted molecular therapy in the same patient with the same radiopharmaceutical. A major problem that remains yet to be fully resolved is the lack of availability, in sufficient quantities, of a majority of the best candidate theragnostic radionuclides in a no-carrier-added (NCA) form. A brief description of the recently developed new or modified methods at BNL for the production of four theragnostic radionuclides, whose nuclear, physical, and chemical characteristics seem to show great promise for personalized cancer therapy are described.

  16. Radionuclide labeling and evaluation of candidate radioligands for PET imaging of histone deacetylase in the brain.

    PubMed

    Seo, Young Jun; Muench, Lisa; Reid, Alicia; Chen, Jinzhu; Kang, Yeona; Hooker, Jacob M; Volkow, Nora D; Fowler, Joanna S; Kim, Sung Won

    2013-12-15

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) regulate gene expression by inducing conformational changes in chromatin. Ever since the discovery of a naturally occurring HDAC inhibitor, trichostatin A (TSA) stimulated the recent development of suberoylanilide (SAHA, Zolinza®), HDAC has become an important molecular target for drug development. This has created the need to develop specific in vivo radioligands to study epigenetic regulation and HDAC engagement for drug development for diseases including cancer and psychiatric disorders. 6-([(18)F]Fluoroacetamido)-1-hexanoicanilide ([(18)F]FAHA) was recently developed as a HDAC substrate and shows moderate blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability and specific signal (by metabolic trapping/or deacetylation) but rapid metabolism. Here, we report the radiosynthesis of two carbon-11 labeled candidate radiotracers (substrate- and inhibitor-based radioligand) for HDAC and their evaluation in non-human primate brain. PET studies showed very low brain uptake and rapid metabolism of both labeled compounds but revealed a surprising enhancement of brain penetration by F for H substitution when comparing one of these to [(18)F]FAHA. Further structural refinement is needed for the development of brain-penetrant, metabolically stable HDAC radiotracers and to understand the role of fluorine substitution on brain penetration.

  17. Biodistribution of the radionuclides 18F-FDG, 11C-methionine, 11C-PK11195, and 68Ga-citrate in domestic juvenile female pigs and morphological and molecular imaging of the tracers in hematogenously disseminated Staphylococcus aureus lesions

    PubMed Central

    Afzelius, Pia; Nielsen, Ole L; Alstrup, Aage KO; Bender, Dirk; Leifsson, Páll S; Jensen, Svend B; Schønheyder, Henrik C

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 5-7% of acute-care patients suffer from bacteremia. Bacteremia may give rise to bacterial spread to different tissues. Conventional imaging procedures as X-ray, Computed Tomography (CT), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), and ultrasound are often first-line imaging methods for identification and localization of infection. These methods are, however, not always successful. Early identification and localization of infection is critical for the appropriate and timely selection of therapy. The aim of this study was thus; a head to head comparison of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) to PET with tracers that potentially could improve uncovering of infectious lesions in soft tissues. We chose 11C-methionine, 11C-PK11195, and 68Ga-citrate as tracers and besides presenting their bio-distribution we validated their diagnostic utility in pigs with experimental bacterial infection. Four juvenile 14-15 weeks old female domestic pigs were scanned seven days after intra-arterial inoculation in the right femoral artery with a porcine strain of S. aureus using a sequential scanning protocol with 18F-FDG, 11C-methionine, 11C-PK11195 and 68Ga-citrate. This was followed by necropsy of the pigs consisting of gross pathology, histopathology and microbial examination. The pigs primarily developed lesions in lungs and neck muscles. 18F-FDG had higher infection to background ratios and accumulated in most infectious foci caused by S. aureus, while 11C-methionine and particularly 11C-PK11195 and 68Ga-citrate accumulated to a lesser extent in infectious foci. 18F-FDG-uptake was seen in the areas of inflammatory cells and to a much lesser extent in reparative infiltration surrounding necrotic regions. PMID:27069765

  18. Molecular imaging with targeted contrast ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Piedra, Mark; Allroggen, Achim; Lindner, Jonathan R

    2009-01-01

    Molecular imaging with contrast-enhanced ultrasound uses targeted microbubbles that are retained in diseased tissue. The resonant properties of these microbubbles produce acoustic signals in an ultrasound field. The microbubbles are targeted to diseased tissue by using certain chemical constituents in the microbubble shell or by attaching disease-specific ligands such as antibodies to the microbubble. In this review, we discuss the applications of this technique to pathological states in the cerebrovascular system including atherosclerosis, tumor angiogenesis, ischemia, intravascular thrombus, and inflammation.

  19. Engineering an antibody with picomolar affinity to DOTA chelates of multiple radionuclides for pretargeted radioimmunotherapy and imaging

    PubMed Central

    Orcutt, Kelly Davis; Slusarczyk, Adrian L; Cieslewicz, Maryelise; Ruiz-Yi, Benjamin; Bhushan, Kumar R; Frangioni, John V; Wittrup, K Dane

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT), a bifunctional antibody is administered and allowed to pre-localize to tumor cells. Subsequently, a chelated radionuclide is administered and captured by cell-bound antibody while unbound hapten clears rapidly from the body. We aim to engineer high-affinity binders to DOTA chelates for use in PRIT applications. Methods We mathematically modeled antibody and hapten pharmacokinetics to analyze hapten tumor retention as a function of hapten binding affinity. Motivated by model predictions, we used directed evolution and yeast surface display to affinity mature the 2D12.5 antibody to 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA), reformatted as a single chain variable fragment (scFv). Results Modeling predicts that for high antigen density and saturating bsAb dose, a hapten binding affinity of 100 picomolar (pM) is needed for near-maximal hapten retention. We affinity matured 2D12.5 with an initial binding constant of about 10 nanomolar (nM) to DOTA-yttrium chelates. Affinity maturation resulted in a 1000-fold affinity improvement to biotinylated DOTA-yttrium, yielding an 8.2 ± 1.9 picomolar binder. The high-affinity scFv binds DOTA complexes of lutetium and gadolinium with similar picomolar affinity and indium chelates with low nanomolar affinity. When engineered into a bispecific antibody construct targeting carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), pretargeted high-affinity scFv results in significantly higher tumor retention of a 111In-DOTA hapten compared to pretargeted wild-type scFv in a xenograft mouse model. Conclusions We have engineered a versatile, high-affinity DOTA-chelate-binding scFv. We anticipate it will prove useful in developing pretargeted imaging and therapy protocols to exploit the potential of a variety of radiometals. PMID:21315278

  20. Molecular Imaging of Extrapyramidal Movement Disorders.

    PubMed

    Frey, Kirk A

    2017-01-01

    Extrapyramidal movement disorders including Parkinson disease, multiple systems atrophy, progressive supranuclear palsy, and corticobasal degeneration are neurodegenerative syndromes with distinct neuropathological changes, indicating differing underlying etiologies. Clinical features that may distinguish among these conditions are often absent, particularly early after the onset of symptoms. Therapy is presently limited, and there are no established disease-modifying or neuroprotective interventions. Advances in therapeutics will depend on the early and accurate diagnostic classification of patients. Existing molecular imaging approaches demonstrate ability to separate several of these syndromes, but are clinically underutilized or are available only in research settings. The development of additional, specific imaging approaches targeting the misfolded protein deposits that characterize these neurodegenerative pathologies promises to advance not only the sensitive and specific endophenotyping of patients, but may also serve to measure directly potential therapeutic responses in the initial evaluations of new treatments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Radionuclide cholescintigraphic imaging: an evaluation of several 99mTc labelled hepatobiliary radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    van Aswegen, A; van Wyk, J; Roodt, J P; Lötter, M G; Otto, A C; Minnaar, P C

    1986-01-01

    Recently, much interest has been shown in the development of 99mTc labelled cholescintigraphic agents for imaging the hepatobiliary tract. In this study six cholescintigraphic agents were compared in rabbits with respect to transit efficiency through the liver and the halftime on the washout portion of the liver time-activity curve. The agents compared were p-butyl-IDA (PBIDA), diisopropyl-IDA (DISIDA), two mebrofenin (MBF) agents and two pyridoxylaminates (PDA). Best transit efficiencies were obtained with MBF (34.1 and 31.2%) followed by PDA (27.7 and 24.9%) while DISIDA (23%) and PBIDA (19.3%) were the lowest. The same phenomenon was observed regarding the washout halftime, with MBF the most rapid (6.3 and 5.9 min), PDA more prolonged (10.1 and 12.0 min) and DISIDA and PBIDA the slowest (23.0 and 23.2 min). This study confirms the difference in physiological behaviour of the various cholescintigraphic agents and shows identical flow patterns for locally produced and imported compounds.

  2. Molecular imaging of human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Narsinh, Kazim H; Cao, Feng; Wu, Joseph C

    2009-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are a renewable source of differentiated cell types that may be employed in various tissue regeneration strategies. However, clinical implementation of cell transplantation therapy is hindered by legitimate concerns regarding the in vivo teratoma formation of undifferentiated hESCs and host immune reactions to allogenic cells. Investigating in vivo hESC behaviour and the ultimate feasibility of cell transplantation therapy necessitates the development of novel molecular imaging techniques to longitudinally monitor hESC localization, proliferation, and viability in living subjects. An innovative approach to harness the respective strengths of various imaging platforms is the creation and use of a fusion reporter construct composed of red fluorescent protein (RFP), firefly luciferase (fluc), and herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk). The imaging modalities made available by use of this construct, including optical fluorescence, bioluminescence, and positron emission tomography (PET), mat be adapted to investigate a variety of physiological phenomena, including the spatio-temporal kinetics of hESC engraftment and proliferation in living subjects. This chapter describes the applications of reporter gene imaging to accelerate basic science research and clinical studies involving hESCs through (1) isolation of a homogenous hESC population, (2) noninvasive, longitudinal tracking of the location and proliferation of hESCs administered to a living subject, and (3) ablation of the hESC graft in the event of cellular misbehavior.

  3. Radionuclide removal

    SciTech Connect

    Sorg, T.J.

    1991-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency proposed new and revised regulations on radionuclide contaminants in drinking water in June 1991. During the 1980's, the Drinking Water Research Division, USEPA conducted a research program to evaluate various technologies to remove radium, uranium and radon from drinking water. The research consisted of laboratory and field studies conducted by USEPA, universities and consultants. The paper summarizes the results of the most significant projects completed. General information is also presented on the general chemistry of the three radionuclides. The information presented indicates that the most practical treatment methods for radium are ion exchange and lime-soda softening and reverse osmosis. The methods tested for radon are aeration and granular activated carbon and the methods for uranium are anion exchange and reverse osmosis.

  4. Radionuclide imaging of angiotensin II type 1 receptor upregulation after myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Takahiro; Fukushima, Kenji; Xia, Jinsong; Mathews, William B; Lautamäki, Riikka; Bravo, Paco E; Javadi, Mehrbod S; Dannals, Robert F; Szabo, Zsolt; Bengel, Frank M

    2010-12-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) mediates proapoptotic, profibrotic, and proinflammatory processes in maladaptive conditions. Activation after myocardial infarction may initialize and promote cardiac remodeling. Using a novel positron-emitting ligand, we sought to determine the presence and time course of regional myocardial upregulation of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) and the blocking efficacy of various anti-RAS agents. In male Wistar rats (n = 31), ischemia-reperfusion damage was induced by 20- to 25-min ligation of the left coronary artery. The AT1R blocker (11)C-2-butyl-5-methoxymethyl-6-(1-oxopyridin-2-yl)-3-[[2-(1H-tetrazol-5-yl)biphenyl-4-yl]methyl]-3H-imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine ((11)C-KR31173) was injected intravenously at different times until 6 mo after surgery and sacrifice. Autoradiography, histology, and immunohistochemistry were performed for ex vivo validation. Additional in vivo PET was conducted in 3 animals. A second series of experiments (n = 16) compared untreated animals with animals treated with oral valsartan (50 mg/kg/d), oral enalapril (10 mg/kg/d), and complete intravenous blockage (SK-1080, 2 mg/kg, 10 min before imaging). Transient regional AT1R upregulation was detected in the infarct area, with a peak at 1-3 wk after surgery (autoradiographic infarct-to-remote ratio, 1.07 ± 0.09, 1.68 ± 0.34, 2.54 ± 0.40, 2.98 ± 0.70, 3.16 ± 0.57, 1.86 ± 0.65, and 1.28 ± 0.27 at control, day 1, day 3, week 1, week 3, month 3, and month 6, respectively). The elevated uptake of (11)C-KR31173 in the infarct area was detectable by small-animal PET in vivo, and it was blocked completely by intravenous SK-1080. Although oral treatment with enalapril did not reduce focal tracer uptake, oral valsartan resulted in partial blockade (infarct-to-remote ratio, 2.94 ± 0.52, 2.88 ± 0.60, 2.07 ± 0.25, and 1.26 ± 0.10 for no treatment, enalapril, valsartan, and SK-1080, respectively). After ischemic myocardial damage in a rat model, transient

  5. Laboratory medicine for molecular imaging of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Mangge, Harald; Almer, Gunter; Stelzer, Ingeborg; Reininghaus, Eva; Prassl, Ruth

    2014-11-01

    Atherosclerotic plaques are the main cause of life threatening clinical endpoints like myocardial infarction and stroke. To prevent these endpoints, the improved early diagnosis and treatment of vulnerable atherosclerotic vascular lesions are essential. Although originally applied for anticancer treatment, recent advances have also showed the considerable potential of nanotechnology for atherosclerosis. Otherwise, one domain of laboratory medicine is the investigation of new biomarkers. Recent research activities have identified the usability of biomarker-targeted nanoparticles for molecular imaging and pharmacologic modification of vulnerable atherosclerotic lesions leading to myocardial infarction or stroke. These investigations have established a new research interface between laboratory medicine, nanotechnology, cardiology/neurology, and radiology. In this review, we discuss inflammatory pathophysiologic mechanisms and biomarkers associated with a vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque phenotype. Further, we will emphasize cardiovascular relevant functionalized nanoparticle biomarker constructs which were developed within the cooperation interface between Laboratory Medicine (anti-inflammatory biomarkers), Nano-Medicine (nanoparticle development), and Radiology (molecular imaging). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Single-image molecular analysis for accelerated fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan Mei

    2011-03-01

    We have developed a new single-molecule fluorescence imaging analysis method, SIMA, to improve the temporal resolution of single-molecule localization and tracking studies to millisecond timescales without compromising the nanometer range spatial resolution [1,2]. In this method, the width of the fluorescence intensity profile of a static or mobile molecule, imaged using submillisecond to milliseconds exposure time, is used for localization and dynamics analysis. We apply this method to three single-molecule studies: (1) subdiffraction molecular separation measurements, (2) axial localization precision measurements, and (3) protein diffusion coefficient measurements in free solution. Applications of SIMA in flagella IFT particle analysis, localizations of UgtP (a cell division regulator protein) in live cells, and diffusion coefficient measurement of LacI in vitro and in vivo will be discussed.

  7. Vascular targeting of nanoparticles for molecular imaging of diseased endothelium.

    PubMed

    Atukorale, Prabhani U; Covarrubias, Gil; Bauer, Lisa; Karathanasis, Efstathios

    2016-09-15

    This review seeks to highlight the enormous potential of targeted nanoparticles for molecular imaging applications. Being the closest point-of-contact, circulating nanoparticles can gain direct access to targetable molecular markers of disease that appear on the endothelium. Further, nanoparticles are ideally suitable to vascular targeting due to geometrically enhanced multivalent attachment on the vascular target. This natural synergy between nanoparticles, vascular targeting and molecular imaging can provide new avenues for diagnosis and prognosis of disease with quantitative precision. In addition to the obvious applications of targeting molecular signatures of vascular diseases (e.g., atherosclerosis), deep-tissue diseases often manifest themselves by continuously altering and remodeling their neighboring blood vessels (e.g., cancer). Thus, the remodeled endothelium provides a wide range of targets for nanoparticles and molecular imaging. To demonstrate the potential of molecular imaging, we present a variety of nanoparticles designed for molecular imaging of cancer or atherosclerosis using different imaging modalities.

  8. Renal imaging: a comparison of radionuclide, ultrasound, and computed tomographic scanning in investigation of renal space-occupying lesions.

    PubMed Central

    O'Reilly, P H; Osborn, D E; Testa, H J; Asbury, D L; Best, J J; Barnard, R J

    1981-01-01

    Two studies were carried out in which 27 and 23 patients respectively with renal space-occupying lesions were assessed by different techniques and the results compared. Instead of proceeding to renal arteriography after the lesion had been found on urography, radionuclide and ultrasound scanning were used in the first study to clarify the nature of the lesions, while in the second study computed tomography was used as well. Results were good with all three methods, although ultrasonography and radionuclide scanning cannot resolve lesions of under 2 cm in diameter and the radiation dose with computed tomography is similar to that used in renal arteriography. Probably the best method of evaluating renal space-occupying lesions after urography is to use both ultrasound and radionuclide scanning. If further information is required computed tomography or arteriography is indicated. PMID:6781661

  9. MR Molecular Imaging of Aortic Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Kejia; Caruthers, Shelton D.; Huang, Wenjing; Williams, Todd A.; Zhang, Huiying; Wickline, Samuel A.; Lanza, Gregory M.; Winter, Patrick M.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The objectives of this study were to use magnetic resonance (MR) molecular imaging to 1) characterize the aortic neovascular development in a rat model of atherosclerosis and 2) monitor the effects of an appetite suppressant on vascular angiogenesis progression. BACKGROUND The James C. Russell:LA corpulent rat strain (JCR:LA-cp) is a model of metabolic syndrome characterized by obesity, insulin resistance, hyperlipidemia, and vasculopathy, although plaque neovascularity has not been reported in this strain. MR molecular imaging with ανβ3-targeted nanoparticles can serially map angiogenesis in the aortic wall and monitor the progression of atherosclerosis. METHODS Six-week old JCR:LA-cp (+/?; lean, n = 5) and JCR:LA-cp (cp/cp; obese, n = 5) rats received standard chow, and 6 obese rats were fed the appetite suppressant benfluorex over 16 weeks. Body weight and food consumption were recorded at baseline and weeks 4, 8, 12, and 16. MR molecular imaging with ανβ3-targeted paramagnetic nanoparticles was performed at weeks 0, 8, and 16. Fasted plasma triglyceride, cholesterol, and glucose were measured immediately before MR scans. Plasma insulin and leptin levels were assayed at weeks 8 and 16. RESULTS Benfluorex reduced food consumption (p < 0.05) to the same rate as lean animals, but had no effect on serum cholesterol or triglyceride levels. MR (3-T) aortic signal enhancement with ανβ3-targeted nanoparticles was initially equivalent between groups, but increased (p < 0.05) in the untreated obese animals over 16 weeks. No signal change (p > 0.05) was observed in the benfluorex-treated or lean rat groups. MR differences paralleled adventitial microvessel counts, which increased (p < 0.05) among the obese rats and were equivalently low in the lean and benfluorex-treated animals (p > 0.05). Body weight, insulin, and leptin were decreased (p < 0.05) from the untreated obese animals by benfluorex, but not to the lean control levels (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS

  10. From atom to brain: applications of molecular imaging to neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Taghva, Alexander; Khalessi, Alexander A; Kim, Paul E; Liu, Charles Y; Apuzzo, Michael L J

    2010-05-01

    Molecular imaging is a field born out of the happy marriage of molecular biology and radiology. The first installment of this two-part series on molecular imaging demonstrated basic principles for practitioners in the field of the neurosciences. This installment seeks to provide some illustrative examples, insights, and specific applications to the neurosciences. The fields of functional neurosurgery including the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders, novel treatments and imaging of tumors, neuroregenerative medicine, and nanotechnology in vascular disorders are covered. Finally, we give some parting thoughts on the future of molecular imaging, including advances in the imaging of neurodegenerative disorders. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Molecular imaging and sensing using plasmonic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crow, Matthew James

    Noble metal nanoparticles exhibit unique optical properties that are beneficial to a variety of applications, including molecular imaging. The large scattering cross sections of nanoparticles provide high contrast necessary for biomarkers. Unlike alternative contrast agents, nanoparticles provide refractive index sensitivity revealing information regarding the local cellular environment. Altering the shape and composition of the nanoparticle shifts the peak resonant wavelength of scattered light, allowing for implementation of multiple spectrally distinct tags. In this project, nanoparticles that scatter in different spectral windows are functionalized with various antibodies recognizing extra-cellular receptors integral to cancer progression. A hyperspectral imaging system is developed, allowing for visualization and spectral characterization of cells labeled with these conjugates. Various molecular imaging and microspectroscopy applications of plasmonic nanoparticles are then investigated. First, anti-EGFR gold nanospheres are shown to quantitatively measure receptor expression with similar performance to fluorescence assays. Second, anti-EGFR gold nanorods and novel anti-IGF-1R silver nanospheres are implemented to indicate local cellular refractive indices. Third, because biosensing capabilities of nanoparticle tags may be limited by plasmonic coupling, polarization mapping is investigated as a method to discern these effects. Fourth, plasmonic coupling is tested to monitor HER-2 dimerization. Experiments reveal the interparticle conformation of proximal HER-2 bound labels, required for plasmonic coupling-enhanced dielectric sensing. Fifth, all three functionalized plasmonic tags are implemented simultaneously to indicate clinically relevant cell immunophenotype information and changes in the cellular dielectric environment. Finally, flow cytometry experiments are conducted utilizing the anti-EGFR nanorod tag to demonstrate profiling of receptor expression

  12. Molecular imaging as a tool for translating breast cancer science

    PubMed Central

    Mankoff, David A

    2008-01-01

    The ability to measure biochemical and molecular processes underlies progress in breast cancer biology and treatment. These assays have traditionally been performed by analysis of cell culture or tissue samples. More recently, functional and molecular imaging has allowed the in vivo assay of biochemistry and molecular biology, which is highly complementary to tissue-based assays. This review briefly describes different imaging modalities used in molecular imaging and then reviews applications of molecular imaging to breast cancer, with a focus on translational work. It includes sections describing work in functional and physiological tumor imaging, imaging gene product expression, imaging the tumor microenvironment, reporter gene imaging, and cell labeling. Work in both animal models and human is discussed with an eye towards studies that have relevance to breast cancer treatment in patients. PMID:19091007

  13. Molecular imaging and cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Saadatpour, Z; Bjorklund, G; Chirumbolo, S; Alimohammadi, M; Ehsani, H; Ebrahiminejad, H; Pourghadamyari, H; Baghaei, B; Mirzaei, H R; Sahebkar, A; Mirzaei, H; Keshavarzi, M

    2016-11-18

    Gene therapy is known as one of the most advanced approaches for therapeutic prospects ranging from tackling genetic diseases to combating cancer. In this approach, different viral and nonviral vector systems such as retrovirus, lentivirus, plasmid and transposon have been designed and employed. These vector systems are designed to target different therapeutic genes in various tissues and cells such as tumor cells. Therefore, detection of the vectors containing therapeutic genes and monitoring of response to the treatment are the main issues that are commonly faced by researchers. Imaging techniques have been critical in guiding physicians in the more accurate and precise diagnosis and monitoring of cancer patients in different phases of malignancies. Imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) are non-invasive and powerful tools for monitoring of the distribution of transgene expression over time and assessing patients who have received therapeutic genes. Here, we discuss most recent advances in cancer gene therapy and molecular approaches as well as imaging techniques that are utilized to detect cancer gene therapeutics and to monitor the patients' response to these therapies worldwide, particularly in Iranian Academic Medical Centers and Hospitals.Cancer Gene Therapy advance online publication, 18 November 2016; doi:10.1038/cgt.2016.62.

  14. Intraoperative molecular imaging to identify lung adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Andrew D.; Kennedy, Gregory T.; Predina, Jarrod D.; Low, Philip S.

    2016-01-01

    Intraoperative molecular imaging is a promising new technology with numerous applications in lung cancer surgery. Accurate identification of small nodules and assessment of tumor margins are two challenges in pulmonary resections for cancer, particularly with increasing use of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). One potential solution to these problems is intraoperative use of a fluorescent contrast agent to improve detection of cancer cells. This technology requires both a targeted fluorescent dye that will selectively accumulate in cancer cells and a specialized imaging system to detect the cells. In several studies, we have shown that intraoperative imaging with indocyanine green (ICG) can be used to accurately identify indeterminate pulmonary nodules. The use of a folate-tagged fluorescent molecule targeted to the folate receptor-α (FRα) further improves the sensitivity and specificity of detecting lung adenocarcinomas. We have demonstrated this technology can be used as an “optical biopsy” to differentiate adenocarcinoma versus other histological subtypes of pulmonary nodules. This strategy has potential applications in assessing bronchial stump margins, identifying synchronous or metachronous lesions, and rapidly assessing lymph nodes for lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:28066672

  15. Synthesis, radiofluorination, and in vivo evaluation of novel fluorinated and iodinated radiotracers for PET imaging and targeted radionuclide therapy of melanoma.

    PubMed

    Billaud, Emilie M F; Rbah-Vidal, Latifa; Vidal, Aurélien; Besse, Sophie; Tarrit, Sébastien; Askienazy, Serge; Maisonial, Aurélie; Moins, Nicole; Madelmont, Jean-Claude; Miot-Noirault, Elisabeth; Chezal, Jean-Michel; Auzeloux, Philippe

    2013-11-14

    Our project deals with a multimodal approach using a single fluorinated and iodinated melanin-targeting structure and offering both imaging (positron emission tomography (PET)/fluorine-18) and treatment (targeted radionuclide therapy/iodine-131) of melanoma. Six 6-iodoquinoxaline-2-carboxamide derivatives with various side chains bearing fluorine were synthesized and radiofluorinated, and their in vivo biodistribution was studied by PET imaging in B16Bl6 primary melanoma-bearing mice. Among this series, [(18)F]8 emerged as the most promising compound. [(18)F]8 was obtained by a fully automated radiosynthesis process within 57 min with an overall radiochemical yield of 21%, decay-corrected. PET imaging of [(18)F]8 demonstrated very encouraging results as early as 1 h postinjection with high tumor uptake (14.33% ± 2.11% ID/g), high contrast (11.04 ± 2.87 tumor-to-muscle ratio), and favorable clearance properties. These results, associated with the previously reported pharmacokinetic properties and dosimetry of 8, make it a potential agent for both PET imaging and targeted radionuclide therapy of melanoma.

  16. Molecular imaging in small animals--roles for micro-CT.

    PubMed

    Ritman, Erik L

    2002-01-01

    X-ray micro-CT is currently used primarily to generate 3D images of micro-architecture (and the function that can be deduced from it) and the regional distribution of administered radiopaque indicators, within intact rodent organs or biopsies from large animals and humans. Current use of X-ray micro-CT can be extended in three ways to increase the quantitative imaging of molecular transport and accumulation within such specimens. (1) By use of heavy elements, other than the usual iodine, attached to molecules of interest or to surrogates for those molecules. The accumulation of the indicator in the physiological compartments, and the transport to and from such compartments, can be quantitated from the imaged spatial distribution of these contrast agents. (2) The high spatial resolution of conventional X-ray attenuation-based CT images can be used to improve the quantitative nature of radionuclide-based tomographic images (SPECT & PET) by providing correction for attenuation of the emitted gamma rays and the accurate delineation of physiological spaces known to selectively accumulate those indicators. Similarly, other imaging modalities which also localize functions in 2D images (such as histological sections subsequently obtained from the same specimen), can provide a synergistic combination with CT-based 3D microstructure. (3) By increasing the sensitivity and specificity of X-ray CT image contrast by use of methods such as: K-edge subtraction imaging, X-ray fluorescence imaging, imaging of the various types of scattered X-ray and the consequences of the change in the speed of X-rays through different tissues, such as refraction and phase shift. These other methods of X-ray imaging can increase contrast by more than an order of magnitude over that due to conventionally-used attenuation of X-ray. To fully exploit their potentials, much development of radiopaque indicators, scanner hardware and image reconstruction and analysis software will be needed. Copyright

  17. Multi-modality molecular imaging for gastric cancer research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jimin; Chen, Xueli; Liu, Junting; Hu, Hao; Qu, Xiaochao; Wang, Fu; Nie, Yongzhan

    2011-12-01

    Because of the ability of integrating the strengths of different modalities and providing fully integrated information, multi-modality molecular imaging techniques provide an excellent solution to detecting and diagnosing earlier cancer, which remains difficult to achieve by using the existing techniques. In this paper, we present an overview of our research efforts on the development of the optical imaging-centric multi-modality molecular imaging platform, including the development of the imaging system, reconstruction algorithms and preclinical biomedical applications. Primary biomedical results show that the developed optical imaging-centric multi-modality molecular imaging platform may provide great potential in the preclinical biomedical applications and future clinical translation.

  18. The evolving role of nuclear molecular imaging in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kurdziel, KA; Ravizzini, G; Croft, BY; Tatum, JL; Choyke, PL; Kobayashi, H

    2008-01-01

    Background Novel therapies targeted to specific tumor pathways are entering the clinic. The need for in vivo monitoring of resulting molecular changes, particularly with respect to the tumor microenvironment, is growing. Molecular imaging is evolving to include a variety of imaging methods to enable in vivo monitoring of cellular and molecular processes. Objectives This article reviews the emerging role of molecular imaging in the development of improved therapeutic strategies that provide better patient selection for therapeutic personalization (i.e. determine which therapies have the greatest chance of success given the individual patient’s disease genetic, and phenotypical profile). Methods In order to illustrate the utility of integrating molecular imaging into therapy development strategies, current and emerging applications of nuclear molecular imaging strategies will be compared with conventional strategies. Proposed methods of integrating molecular imaging techniques into cancer therapeutic development and limitations of these techniques will be discussed. Results/Conclusion Molecular imaging provides a variety of new tools to accelerate the development of cancer therapies. The recent drive to develop molecular imaging probes and standardize molecular imaging techniques is creating the scaffolding for the evolving paradigm shift to personalized cancer therapy. PMID:19122861

  19. Molecular Imaging with MRI: Potential Application in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; Wu, Chang Qiang; Chen, Tian Wu; Tang, Meng Yue; Zhang, Xiao Ming

    2015-01-01

    Despite the variety of approaches that have been improved to achieve a good understanding of pancreatic cancer (PC), the prognosis of PC remains poor, and the survival rates are dismal. The lack of early detection and effective interventions is the main reason. Therefore, considerable ongoing efforts aimed at identifying early PC are currently being pursued using a variety of methods. In recent years, the development of molecular imaging has made the specific targeting of PC in the early stage possible. Molecular imaging seeks to directly visualize, characterize, and measure biological processes at the molecular and cellular levels. Among different imaging technologies, the magnetic resonance (MR) molecular imaging has potential in this regard because it facilitates noninvasive, target-specific imaging of PC. This topic is reviewed in terms of the contrast agents for MR molecular imaging, the biomarkers related to PC, targeted molecular probes for MRI, and the application of MRI in the diagnosis of PC. PMID:26579537

  20. Ultrasound Molecular Imaging and Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Caskey, Charles F

    2017-03-02

    Ultrasound is a rapidly advancing field with many emerging diagnostic and therapeutic applications. For diagnostics, new vascular targets are routinely identified and mature technologies are being translated to humans, while other recent innovations may bring about the creation of acoustic reporter genes and micron-scale resolution with ultrasound. As a cancer therapy, ultrasound is being explored as an adjuvant to immune therapies and to deliver acoustically or thermally active drugs to tumor regions. Ultrasound-enhanced delivery across the blood brain barrier (BBB) could potentially be very impactful for brain cancers and neurodegenerative diseases where the BBB often impedes the delivery of therapeutic molecules. In this minireview, we provide an overview of these topics in the field of ultrasound that are especially relevant to the interests of World Molecular Imaging Society.

  1. Coronary Computed Tomography Versus Radionuclide Myocardial Perfusion Imaging in Chest Pain Patients Admitted to Telemetry: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Levsky, Jeffrey M.; Spevack, Daniel M.; Travin, Mark I.; Menegus, Mark A.; Huang, Paul W.; Clark, Elana T.; Kim, Choo-won; Hirschhorn, Esther; Freeman, Katherine D.; Tobin, Jonathan N.; Haramati, Linda B.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Coronary computed tomography angiography plays an expanding role managing symptomatic patients with suspected coronary artery disease. Prospective intermediate-term outcomes are lacking. OBJECTIVE To compare coronary CT angiography with conventional non-invasive testing. DESIGN Randomized, controlled comparative effectiveness trial. SETTING Telemetry-monitored wards of one inner-city medical center. PATIENTS 400 acute chest pain patients (mean age 57); 63% women; 54% Hispanic, 37% African-American; low socioeconomic status. INTERVENTION Coronary CT angiography (CT) or radionuclide stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). MEASUREMENTS The primary outcome was cardiac catheterization not leading to revascularization within one year. Secondary outcomes included length of stay, resource utilization and patient experience. Safety outcomes included death, major cardiovascular events and radiation exposure. RESULTS 30(15%) CT patients and 32(16%) MPI patients underwent cardiac catheterization within one year, of which 15(7.5%) and 20(10%), respectively, were not revascularized (-2.5% difference, 95%CI −8.6%–+3.5%; hazard ratio 0.77, 95%CI 0.40–1.49, p=0.44). Median length of stay was 28.9 hours for CT and 30.4 hours for MPI (p=0.057). Median follow-up was 40.4 months. For CT and MPI, the incidences of death (0.5% vs 3%, p=0.12), non-fatal cardiovascular events (4.5% vs 4.5%), re-hospitalization (43% vs 49%), emergency visit (63% vs 58%) and outpatient cardiology visit (23% vs 21%) were not different. Long-term, all-cause radiation was lower for CT (24 vs 29 milliSieverts, p<0.001). More CT patients graded their experience favorably (p=0.001) and would undergo the exam again (p=0.003). LIMITATIONS Single site study; primary outcome dependent on clinical management decisions. CONCLUSIONS There were no significant differences between CT and MPI in outcomes or resource utilization over 40 months. CT had lower associated radiation and was more positively

  2. Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography Versus Radionuclide Myocardial Perfusion Imaging in Patients With Chest Pain Admitted to Telemetry: A Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Levsky, Jeffrey M; Spevack, Daniel M; Travin, Mark I; Menegus, Mark A; Huang, Paul W; Clark, Elana T; Kim, Choo-Won; Hirschhorn, Esther; Freeman, Katherine D; Tobin, Jonathan N; Haramati, Linda B

    2015-08-04

    The role of coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) in the management of symptomatic patients suspected of having coronary artery disease is expanding. However, prospective intermediate-term outcomes are lacking. To compare CCTA with conventional noninvasive testing. Randomized, controlled comparative effectiveness trial. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00705458). Telemetry-monitored wards of an inner-city medical center. 400 patients with acute chest pain (mean age, 57 years); 63% women; 54% Hispanic and 37% African-American; and low socioeconomic status. CCTA or radionuclide stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). The primary outcome was cardiac catheterization not leading to revascularization within 1 year. Secondary outcomes included length of stay, resource utilization, and patient experience. Safety outcomes included death, major cardiovascular events, and radiation exposure. Thirty (15%) patients who had CCTA and 32 (16%) who had MPI underwent cardiac catheterization within 1 year. Fifteen (7.5%) and 20 (10%) of these patients, respectively, did not undergo revascularization (difference, -2.5 percentage points [95% CI, -8.6 to 3.5 percentage points]; hazard ratio, 0.77 [CI, 0.40 to 1.49]; P = 0.44). Median length of stay was 28.9 hours for the CCTA group and 30.4 hours for the MPI group (P = 0.057). Median follow-up was 40.4 months. For the CCTA and MPI groups, the incidence of death (0.5% versus 3%; P = 0.12), nonfatal cardiovascular events (4.5% versus 4.5%), rehospitalization (43% versus 49%), emergency department visit (63% versus 58%), and outpatient cardiology visit (23% versus 21%) did not differ. Long-term, all-cause radiation exposure was lower for the CCTA group (24 versus 29 mSv; P < 0.001). More patients in the CCTA group graded their experience favorably (P = 0.001) and would undergo the examination again (P = 0.003). This was a single-site study, and the primary outcome depended on clinical management decisions. The CCTA and MPI groups did

  3. Current Progress of Aptamer-Based Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Andrew Z.; Farokhzad, Omid C.

    2014-01-01

    Aptamers, single-stranded oligonucleotides, are an important class of molecular targeting ligand. Since their discovery, aptamers have been rapidly translated into clinical practice. They have been approved as therapeutics and molecular diagnostics. Aptamers also possess several properties that make them uniquely suited to molecular imaging. This review aims to provide an overview of aptamers’ advantages as targeting ligands and their application in molecular imaging. PMID:24525205

  4. Computational methods for optical molecular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Duan; Wei, Guo-Wei; Cong, Wen-Xiang; Wang, Ge

    2010-01-01

    Summary A new computational technique, the matched interface and boundary (MIB) method, is presented to model the photon propagation in biological tissue for the optical molecular imaging. Optical properties have significant differences in different organs of small animals, resulting in discontinuous coefficients in the diffusion equation model. Complex organ shape of small animal induces singularities of the geometric model as well. The MIB method is designed as a dimension splitting approach to decompose a multidimensional interface problem into one-dimensional ones. The methodology simplifies the topological relation near an interface and is able to handle discontinuous coefficients and complex interfaces with geometric singularities. In the present MIB method, both the interface jump condition and the photon flux jump conditions are rigorously enforced at the interface location by using only the lowest-order jump conditions. This solution near the interface is smoothly extended across the interface so that central finite difference schemes can be employed without the loss of accuracy. A wide range of numerical experiments are carried out to validate the proposed MIB method. The second-order convergence is maintained in all benchmark problems. The fourth-order convergence is also demonstrated for some three-dimensional problems. The robustness of the proposed method over the variable strength of the linear term of the diffusion equation is also examined. The performance of the present approach is compared with that of the standard finite element method. The numerical study indicates that the proposed method is a potentially efficient and robust approach for the optical molecular imaging. PMID:20485461

  5. Molecular-genetic imaging based on reporter gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kang, Joo Hyun; Chung, June-Key

    2008-06-01

    Molecular imaging includes proteomic, metabolic, cellular biologic process, and genetic imaging. In a narrow sense, molecular imaging means genetic imaging and can be called molecular-genetic imaging. Imaging reporter genes play a leading role in molecular-genetic imaging. There are 3 major methods of molecular-genetic imaging, based on optical, MRI, and nuclear medicine modalities. For each of these modalities, various reporter genes and probes have been developed, and these have resulted in successful transitions from bench to bedside applications. Each of these imaging modalities has its unique advantages and disadvantages. Fluorescent and bioluminescent optical imaging modalities are simple, less expensive, more convenient, and more user friendly than other imaging modalities. Another advantage, especially of bioluminescence imaging, is its ability to detect low levels of gene expression. MRI has the advantage of high spatial resolution, whereas nuclear medicine methods are highly sensitive and allow data from small-animal imaging studies to be translated to clinical practice. Moreover, multimodality imaging reporter genes will allow us to choose the imaging technologies that are most appropriate for the biologic problem at hand and facilitate the clinical application of reporter gene technologies. Reporter genes can be used to visualize the levels of expression of particular exogenous and endogenous genes and several intracellular biologic phenomena, including specific signal transduction pathways, nuclear receptor activities, and protein-protein interactions. This technique provides a straightforward means of monitoring tumor mass and can visualize the in vivo distributions of target cells, such as immune cells and stem cells. Molecular imaging has gradually evolved into an important tool for drug discovery and development, and transgenic mice with an imaging reporter gene can be useful during drug and stem cell therapy development. Moreover, instrumentation

  6. Prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) from diagnostic to therapeutic target: radionuclide therapy comes of age in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Violet, John A; Hofman, Michael S

    2017-04-05

    Without doubt, molecular imaging using PET/CT directed against prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) has generated much interest for its impressive accuracy in detecting prostate cancer, particularly for biochemical recurrence[1]. PSMA expression is up regulated in advanced prostate cancer, including metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), and provides a novel therapeutic target for radionuclide therapy directed towards PSMA-avid disease. Radionuclide therapy relies on the identification of a suitable tumour associated 'target' and an appropriate 'vehicle' that can bind to this with high selectivity and specificity to allow delivery of a therapeutic radionuclide. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. The implications of cost-effectiveness analysis of medical technology. Background paper number 2: case studies of medical technologies. Case study number 13: cardiac radionuclide imaging and cost effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-05-01

    Cardiac radionuclide imaging is a new and rapidly expanding diagnostic technology that promises to make significant contributions to the diagnosis and management of heart disease. Dynamic changes are occurring in the technology at the same time diffusion is taking place. The combination of diffusion and technological development creates an imperative for careful evaluation and prospective planning. Clinical applications of cardiac imaging include the diagnosis of coronary artery disease, evaluation of cardiac function abnormalities, verification of the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (heart attack), and monitoring of patients under treatment for establishing cardiac disease. The report describes the dimensions of the technology of cardiac radionuclide imaging. Information is summarized on the industry producing radionuclide imaging equipment, on clinical applications of technology, and on the costs and efficacies of the various techniques. Finally, formulation of some of the issues involved in the assessment of the technology's cost effectiveness is presented.

  8. Molecular imaging in the era of personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kyung-Ho; Lee, Kyung-Han

    2015-01-01

    Clinical imaging creates visual representations of the body interior for disease assessment. The role of clinical imaging significantly overlaps with that of pathology, and diagnostic workflows largely depend on both fields. The field of clinical imaging is presently undergoing a radical change through the emergence of a new field called molecular imaging. This new technology, which lies at the intersection between imaging and molecular biology, enables noninvasive visualization of biochemical processes at the molecular level within living bodies. Molecular imaging differs from traditional anatomical imaging in that biomarkers known as imaging probes are used to visualize target molecules-of-interest. This ability opens up exciting new possibilities for applications in oncologic, neurological and cardiovascular diseases. Molecular imaging is expected to make major contributions to personalized medicine by allowing earlier diagnosis and predicting treatment response. The technique is also making a huge impact on pharmaceutical development by optimizing preclinical and clinical tests for new drug candidates. This review will describe the basic principles of molecular imaging and will briefly touch on three examples (from an immense list of new techniques) that may contribute to personalized medicine: receptor imaging, angiogenesis imaging, and apoptosis imaging.

  9. Molecular Ultrasound Imaging: Current Status and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Nirupama; Needles, Andrew; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2011-01-01

    Targeted contrast-enhanced ultrasound (molecular ultrasound) is an emerging imaging strategy that combines ultrasound technology with novel molecularly-targeted ultrasound contrast agents for assessing biological processes at the molecular level. Molecular ultrasound contrast agents are nano- or micro-sized particles that are targeted to specific molecular markers by adding high-affinity binding ligands onto the surface of the particles. Following intravenous administration, these targeted ultrasound contrast agents accumulate at tissue sites overexpressing specific molecular markers, thereby enhancing the ultrasound imaging signal. High spatial and temporal resolution, real-time imaging, non-invasiveness, relatively low costs, lack of ionizing irradiation and wide availability of ultrasound systems are advantages compared to other molecular imaging modalities. In this article we review current concepts and future directions of molecular ultrasound imaging, including different classes of molecular ultrasound contrast agents, ongoing technical developments of preclinical and clinical ultrasound systems , the potential of molecular ultrasound for imaging different diseases at the molecular level, and the translation of molecular ultrasound into the clinic. PMID:20541656

  10. Molecular ultrasound imaging: current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, N; Needles, A; Willmann, J K

    2010-07-01

    Targeted contrast-enhanced ultrasound (molecular ultrasound) is an emerging imaging strategy that combines ultrasound technology with novel molecularly-targeted ultrasound contrast agents for assessing biological processes at the molecular level. Molecular ultrasound contrast agents are nano- or micro-sized particles that are targeted to specific molecular markers by adding high-affinity binding ligands onto the surface of the particles. Following intravenous administration, these targeted ultrasound contrast agents accumulate at tissue sites overexpressing specific molecular markers, thereby enhancing the ultrasound imaging signal. High spatial and temporal resolution, real-time imaging, non-invasiveness, relatively low costs, lack of ionising irradiation and wide availability of ultrasound systems are advantages compared to other molecular imaging modalities. In this article we review current concepts and future directions of molecular ultrasound imaging, including different classes of molecular ultrasound contrast agents, ongoing technical developments of pre-clinical and clinical ultrasound systems, the potential of molecular ultrasound for imaging different diseases at the molecular level, and the translation of molecular ultrasound into the clinic. Copyright 2010 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Raman molecular chemical imaging: 3D Raman using deconvolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, John S.; Treado, Patrick J.

    2004-12-01

    Chemical imaging is a powerful technique combining molecular spectroscopy and digital imaging for rapid, non-invasive and reagentless analysis of materials, including biological cells and tissues. Raman chemical imaging is suited to the characterization of molecular composition and structure of biomateials at submicron spatial resolution (< 250 nm). As a result, Raman imaging has potential as a routine tool for the assessment of cells and subcellular components. In this presentation, we discuss Raman chemical imaging and spectroscopy of single human cells obtained from a culture line. Rapid three dimensional Raman imaging is shown using deconvolution to improve image quality.

  12. Molecular probes for the in vivo imaging of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alford, Raphael; Ogawa, Mikako; Choyke, Peter L.

    2012-01-01

    Advancements in medical imaging have brought about unprecedented changes in the in vivo assessment of cancer. Positron emission tomography, single photon emission computed tomography, optical imaging, and magnetic resonance imaging are the primary tools being developed for oncologic imaging. These techniques may still be in their infancy, as recently developed chemical molecular probes for each modality have improved in vivo characterization of physiologic and molecular characteristics. Herein, we discuss advances in these imaging techniques, and focus on the major design strategies with which molecular probes are being developed. PMID:19823742

  13. Correction for crosstalk contaminations in dual radionuclide /sup 99m/Tc and /sup 123/I images using artificial neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiao Ming; Zubal, I. G.; Seibyl, J. P.; King, M. A.

    2004-10-01

    Use of an artificial neural network (ANN) has been previously shown to be an effective tool in compensating scatter and crosstalk from the primary photons in simultaneous dual radionuclide imaging. Generally, a large number of input energy windows are required within the network structure while the commercial cameras have only 3-8 energy windows. It is difficult to use two input windows within the ANN structure for the crosstalk contamination corrections of /sup 99m/Tc//sup 123/I images acquired using only two photopeak energy windows. In this paper, we designed an ANN network with 24 inputs, 32 nodes in the hidden layer and two nodes in the output layer, to correct for crosstalk contamination in /sup 99m/Tc//sup 123/I images acquired using two photopeak windows. We trained the network using experimentally acquired /sup 99m/Tc and /sup 123/I spectrum data using the RSD brain phantom. The neural network package Stuttgart Neural Network Simulator (SNNSv4.2), from the University of Stuttgart, was used for the neural network training and the crosstalk corrections. Two sets of image data were tested. The first was a human activation study and the other used a cylindrical striatal phantom. Our results show a great improvement on both the human activation and the cylindrical striatal phantom images. Further work is to test our new approach on more /sup 99m/Tc//sup 123/I imaging data and apply it to other radionuclide combinations such as /sup 201/Tl//sup 99m/Tc.

  14. Targeted Molecular Imaging in Oncology: Focus on Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Ford, Eric C.; Wong, John W.; Pomper, Martin G.

    2008-01-01

    Anatomically based technologies (CT, MR, etc.) are in routine use in radiotherapy for planning and assessment purposes. Even with improvements in imaging, however, radiotherapy is still limited in efficacy and toxicity in certain applications. Further advances may be provided by technologies that image the molecular activities of tumors and normal tissues. Possible uses for molecular imaging include better localization of tumor regions and early assay for the radiation response of tumors and normal tissues. Critical to the success of this approach is the identification and validation of molecular probes that are suitable in the radiotherapy context. Recent developments in molecular imaging probes and integration of functional imaging with radiotherapy are promising. This review focuses on recent advances in molecular imaging strategies and probes that may aid in improving the efficacy of radiotherapy. PMID:18314068

  15. Clinically Approved Nanoparticle Imaging Agents

    PubMed Central

    Thakor, Avnesh S.; Jokerst, Jesse V.; Ghanouni, Pejman; Campbell, Jos L.; Mittra, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles are a new class of imaging agent used for both anatomic and molecular imaging. Nanoparticle-based imaging exploits the signal intensity, stability, and biodistribution behavior of submicron-diameter molecular imaging agents. This review focuses on nanoparticles used in human medical imaging, with an emphasis on radionuclide imaging and MRI. Newer nanoparticle platforms are also discussed in relation to theranostic and multimodal uses. PMID:27738007

  16. The Advancing Clinical Impact of Molecular Imaging in Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Osborn, Eric A; Jaffer, Farouc A

    2013-01-01

    Molecular imaging seeks to unravel critical molecular and cellular events in living subjects by providing complementary biological information to current structural clinical imaging modalities. In recent years, molecular imaging efforts have marched forward into the clinical cardiovascular arena, and are now actively illuminating new biology in a broad range of conditions, including atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction, thrombosis, vasculitis, aneurysm, cardiomyopathy, and valvular disease. Development of novel molecular imaging reporters is occurring for many clinical cardiovascular imaging modalities (PET, SPECT, MRI), as well in translational platforms such as intravascular fluorescence imaging. The ability to image, track, and quantify molecular biomarkers in organs not routinely amenable to biopsy (e.g. the heart and vasculature) open new clinical opportunities to tailor therapeutics based on a cardiovascular disease molecular profile. In addition, molecular imaging is playing an increasing role in atherosclerosis drug development in Phase II clinical trials. Here we present state-of-the-art clinical cardiovascular molecular imaging strategies, and explore promising translational approaches positioned for clinical testing in the near term. PMID:24332285

  17. Translational research of optical molecular imaging for personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Qin, C; Ma, X; Tian, J

    2013-12-01

    In the medical imaging field, molecular imaging is a rapidly developing discipline and forms many imaging modalities, providing us effective tools to visualize, characterize, and measure molecular and cellular mechanisms in complex biological processes of living organisms, which can deepen our understanding of biology and accelerate preclinical research including cancer study and medicine discovery. Among many molecular imaging modalities, although the penetration depth of optical imaging and the approved optical probes used for clinics are limited, it has evolved considerably and has seen spectacular advances in basic biomedical research and new drug development. With the completion of human genome sequencing and the emergence of personalized medicine, the specific drug should be matched to not only the right disease but also to the right person, and optical molecular imaging should serve as a strong adjunct to develop personalized medicine by finding the optimal drug based on an individual's proteome and genome. In this process, the computational methodology and imaging system as well as the biomedical application regarding optical molecular imaging will play a crucial role. This review will focus on recent typical translational studies of optical molecular imaging for personalized medicine followed by a concise introduction. Finally, the current challenges and the future development of optical molecular imaging are given according to the understanding of the authors, and the review is then concluded.

  18. Intravascular Targets for Molecular Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Moestue, Siver A.; Gribbestad, Ingrid S.; Hansen, Rune

    2012-01-01

    Molecular targeting of contrast agents for ultrasound imaging is emerging as a new medical imaging modality. It combines advances in ultrasound technology with principles of molecular imaging, thereby allowing non-invasive assessment of biological processes in vivo. Preclinical studies have shown that microbubbles, which provide contrast during ultrasound imaging, can be targeted to specific molecular markers. These microbubbles accumulate in tissue with target (over) expression, thereby significantly increasing the ultrasound signal. This concept offers safe and low-cost imaging with high spatial resolution and sensitivity. It is therefore considered to have great potential in cancer imaging, and early-phase clinical trials are ongoing. In this review, we summarize the current literature on targets that have been successfully imaged in preclinical models using molecularly targeted ultrasound contrast agents. Based on preclinical experience, we discuss the potential clinical utility of targeted microbubbles. PMID:22837657

  19. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy of Human Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gudkov, Sergey V.; Shilyagina, Natalya Yu.; Vodeneev, Vladimir A.; Zvyagin, Andrei V.

    2015-01-01

    Targeted radionuclide therapy is one of the most intensively developing directions of nuclear medicine. Unlike conventional external beam therapy, the targeted radionuclide therapy causes less collateral damage to normal tissues and allows targeted drug delivery to a clinically diagnosed neoplastic malformations, as well as metastasized cells and cellular clusters, thus providing systemic therapy of cancer. The methods of targeted radionuclide therapy are based on the use of molecular carriers of radionuclides with high affinity to antigens on the surface of tumor cells. The potential of targeted radionuclide therapy has markedly grown nowadays due to the expanded knowledge base in cancer biology, bioengineering, and radiochemistry. In this review, progress in the radionuclide therapy of hematological malignancies and approaches for treatment of solid tumors is addressed. PMID:26729091

  20. Personalized image-based radiation dosimetry for routine clinical use in peptide receptor radionuclide therapy: pretherapy experience.

    PubMed

    Celler, Anna; Grimes, Joshua; Shcherbinin, Sergey; Piwowarska-Bilska, Hanna; Birkenfeld, Bozena

    2013-01-01

    Patient-specific dose calculations are not routinely performed for targeted radionuclide therapy procedures, partly because they are time consuming and challenging to perform. However, it is becoming widely recognized that a personalized dosimetry approach can help plan treatment and improve understanding of the dose-response relationship. In this chapter, we review the procedures and essential elements of an accurate internal dose calculation and propose a simplified approach that is aimed to be practical for use in a busy nuclear medicine department.

  1. Scandium-44: benefits of a long-lived PET radionuclide available from the (44)Ti/(44)Sc generator system.

    PubMed

    Roesch, F

    2012-07-01

    (44)Ti/(44)Sc radionuclide generators are of interest for molecular imaging. The 3.97 hours half-life of (44)Sc and its high positron branching of 94.27% may stimulate the application of (44)Sc-labeled PET radiopharmaceuticals. This review describes the current status of (44)Ti production, (44)Ti/(44)Sc radionuclide generator development, post-processing of generator eluates towards medical application, identification of ligands adequate to Sc(III) co-ordination chemistry, proof-of-principle labeling of (44)Sc-DOTA-octreotides, investigation of in vitro and in vivo parameters, and initial applications for molecular imaging - both in small animals and humans.

  2. Histological skin morphology enhancement base on molecular hyperspectral imaging technology.

    PubMed

    Li, Q; Sun, Z; Wang, Y; Liu, H; Guo, F; Zhu, J

    2014-08-01

    Most traditional skin histological analysis methods are based on the light microscopy images, which can only provide limited information and low contrast results for pathology evaluation. Molecular hyperspectral imaging technology can provide both spatial and spectral information of skin sections, which is a new method for histological skin analysis. The molecular hyperspectral imaging system was developed by coupling an acousto-optic tunable filters adapter to microscopy and the molecular hyperspectral images were analyzed by home-written software with image processing algorithms. Then, the histological structures in skin sections were investigated in several locations to evaluate the potential application of the molecular hyperspectral imaging technique to dermatology. Molecular hyperspectral images of skin sections were obtained. Single-band images, false color images, virtual 3D surface view images, and color-coded spectral clustering results were produced to highlight the skin structures for histological evaluation. Unlike traditional histological analysis with light microscopy, the molecular hyperspectral imaging technology can enhance the visualization of skin structures using their spectral signatures and their gray values. This technology has potential for the diagnosis and histopathologic characterization of different kind of skin cells. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Can physicians identify inappropriate nuclear stress tests? An examination of inter-rater reliability for the 2009 appropriate use criteria for radionuclide imaging.

    PubMed

    Ye, Siqin; Rabbani, LeRoy E; Kelly, Christopher R; Kelly, Maureen R; Lewis, Matthew; Paz, Yehuda; Peck, Clara L; Rao, Shaline; Bokhari, Sabahat; Weiner, Shepard D; Einstein, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    We sought to determine inter-rater reliability of the 2009 Appropriate Use Criteria for radionuclide imaging and whether physicians at various levels of training can effectively identify nuclear stress tests with inappropriate indications. Four hundred patients were randomly selected from a consecutive cohort of patients undergoing nuclear stress testing at an academic medical center. Raters with different levels of training (including cardiology attending physicians, cardiology fellows, internal medicine hospitalists, and internal medicine interns) classified individual nuclear stress tests using the 2009 Appropriate Use Criteria. Consensus classification by 2 cardiologists was considered the operational gold standard, and sensitivity and specificity of individual raters for identifying inappropriate tests were calculated. Inter-rater reliability of the Appropriate Use Criteria was assessed using Cohen κ statistics for pairs of different raters. The mean age of patients was 61.5 years; 214 (54%) were female. The cardiologists rated 256 (64%) of 400 nuclear stress tests as appropriate, 68 (18%) as uncertain, 55 (14%) as inappropriate; 21 (5%) tests were unable to be classified. Inter-rater reliability for noncardiologist raters was modest (unweighted Cohen κ, 0.51, 95% confidence interval, 0.45-0.55). Sensitivity of individual raters for identifying inappropriate tests ranged from 47% to 82%, while specificity ranged from 85% to 97%. Inter-rater reliability for the 2009 Appropriate Use Criteria for radionuclide imaging is modest, and there is considerable variation in the ability of raters at different levels of training to identify inappropriate tests. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Click Reaction: An Applicable Radiolabeling Method for Molecular Imaging.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji Young; Lee, Byung Chul

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, the click reaction has found rapidly growing applications in the field of radiochemistry, ranging from a practical labeling method to molecular imaging of biomacromolecules. This present review details the development of highly reliable, powerful and selective click chemistry reactions for the rapid synthesis of new radiotracers for molecular imaging.

  5. Molecular Imaging and Precision Medicine in Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ceci, Francesco; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Castellucci, Paolo; Fanti, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present review is to discuss about the role of new probes for molecular imaging in the evaluation of prostate cancer (PCa). This review focuses particularly on the role of new promising radiotracers for the molecular imaging with PET/computed tomography in the detection of PCa recurrence. The role of these new imaging techniques to guide lesion-target therapies and the potential application of these molecular probes as theranostics agents is discussed. Finally, the molecular mechanisms underlying resistance to castration in PCa and the maintenance of active androgen receptor are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Molecular imaging of prostate cancer: a concise synopsis.

    PubMed

    Jadvar, Hossein

    2009-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in men and continues to be a major public health problem. Imaging of prostate cancer remains particularly challenging owing to disease heterogeneity. Molecular imaging can provide unprecedented opportunities for deciphering the molecular mechanisms that are involved in the development and natural progression of prostate cancer from a localized process to the hormone-refractory metastatic disease. Such understanding will be the key for targeted imaging and therapy and for predicting and evaluating treatment response and prognosis. In this article, we review briefly the contribution of multimodality molecular imaging methods for the in vivo characterization of the pathophysiology of prostate cancer.

  7. Biofunctionalized Prussian Blue Nanoparticles for Multimodal Molecular Imaging Applications

    PubMed Central

    Vojtech, Jennifer M.; Cano-Mejia, Juliana; Dumont, Matthieu F.; Sze, Raymond W.; Fernandes, Rohan

    2015-01-01

    Multimodal, molecular imaging allows the visualization of biological processes at cellular, subcellular, and molecular-level resolutions using multiple, complementary imaging techniques. These imaging agents facilitate the real-time assessment of pathways and mechanisms in vivo, which enhance both diagnostic and therapeutic efficacy. This article presents the protocol for the synthesis of biofunctionalized Prussian blue nanoparticles (PB NPs) - a novel class of agents for use in multimodal, molecular imaging applications. The imaging modalities incorporated in the nanoparticles, fluorescence imaging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), have complementary features. The PB NPs possess a core-shell design where gadolinium and manganese ions incorporated within the interstitial spaces of the PB lattice generate MRI contrast, both in T1 and T2-weighted sequences. The PB NPs are coated with fluorescent avidin using electrostatic self-assembly, which enables fluorescence imaging. The avidin-coated nanoparticles are modified with biotinylated ligands that confer molecular targeting capabilities to the nanoparticles. The stability and toxicity of the nanoparticles are measured, as well as their MRI relaxivities. The multimodal, molecular imaging capabilities of these biofunctionalized PB NPs are then demonstrated by using them for fluorescence imaging and molecular MRI in vitro. PMID:25993028

  8. Molecular imaging in Libman-Sacks endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Anders; Schaadt, Bente K; Santoni-Rugiu, Eric; Bruun, Niels E

    2015-04-01

    We present a 54-year-old woman with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), fever, pericardial effusion and a mitral valve vegetation. (18)F-Fluorodesoxyglucose positron emission tomography CT ((18)F-FDG-PET-CT) showed very high accumulation of the isotope at the mitral valve. The patient underwent cardiothoracic surgery and pathologic examinations showed characteristic morphology of Libman-Sacks vegetations. All microbiological examinations including blood cultures, microscopy, culture and 16s PCR of the valve were negative and the diagnosis of Libman-Sacks endocarditis was convincing. It is difficult to distinguish Libman-Sacks endocarditis from culture-negative infective endocarditis (IE). Molecular imaging techniques are being used increasingly in cases of suspected IE but no studies have previously reported the use in patients with Libman-Sacks endocarditis. In the present case, (18)F-FDG-PET-CT clearly demonstrated the increased glucose uptake caused by infiltrating white blood cells in the ongoing inflammatory process at the mitral valve. In conclusion, (18)F-FDG-PET-CT cannot be used to distinguish between IE and non-infective Libman-Sacks vegetations.

  9. Molecular imaging: spawning a new melting-pot for biomedical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, BJJ

    2006-01-01

    Predicting the future is a dangerous undertaking at best, and not meant for the faint-hearted. However, viewing the advances in molecular medicine, genomics and proteomics, it is easy to comprehend those who believe that molecular imaging methods will open up new vistas for medical imaging. The knock on effect will impact our capacity to diagnose and treat diseases. Anatomically detectable abnormalities, which have historically been the basis of the practice of radiology, will soon be replaced by molecular imaging methods that will reflect the under expression or over expression of certain genes which occur in almost every disease. Molecular imaging can then be resorted to so that early diagnosis and characterisation of disease can offer improved specificity. Given the growing importance of molecular medicine, imagers will find it profitable to educate themselves on molecular targeting, molecular therapeutics and the role of imaging in both areas. PMID:21614327

  10. Cellular and Molecular Imaging Using Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Michael T; Gilad, Assaf A

    2016-10-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) is a powerful new tool well suited for molecular imaging. This technology enables the detection of low concentration probes through selective labeling of rapidly exchanging protons or other spins on the probes. In this review, we will highlight the unique features of CEST imaging technology and describe the different types of CEST agents that are suited for molecular imaging studies, including CEST theranostic agents, CEST reporter genes, and CEST environmental sensors.

  11. Nanoparticle Functionalization and Its Potentials for Molecular Imaging.

    PubMed

    Thiruppathi, Rukmani; Mishra, Sachin; Ganapathy, Mathangi; Padmanabhan, Parasuraman; Gulyás, Balázs

    2017-03-01

    Functionalization enhances the properties and characteristics of nanoparticles through surface modification, and enables them to play a major role in the field of medicine. In molecular imaging, quality functional images are required with proper differentiation which can be seen with high contrast to obtain viable information. This review article discusses how functionalization enhances molecular imaging and enables multimodal imaging by which images with combination of functions particular to each modality can be obtained. This also explains how nanoparticles interacting at molecular level, when functionalized with molecules can target the cells of interest or substances with high specificity, reducing background signal and allowing simultaneous therapies to be carried out while imaging. Functionalization allows imaging for a prolonged period and enables to track the cells over a period of time. Recent researches and progress in functionalizing the nanoparticles to specifically enhance bioimaging with different modalities and their applications are reviewed in this article.

  12. Nanoparticle Functionalization and Its Potentials for Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Thiruppathi, Rukmani; Mishra, Sachin; Ganapathy, Mathangi

    2016-01-01

    Functionalization enhances the properties and characteristics of nanoparticles through surface modification, and enables them to play a major role in the field of medicine. In molecular imaging, quality functional images are required with proper differentiation which can be seen with high contrast to obtain viable information. This review article discusses how functionalization enhances molecular imaging and enables multimodal imaging by which images with combination of functions particular to each modality can be obtained. This also explains how nanoparticles interacting at molecular level, when functionalized with molecules can target the cells of interest or substances with high specificity, reducing background signal and allowing simultaneous therapies to be carried out while imaging. Functionalization allows imaging for a prolonged period and enables to track the cells over a period of time. Recent researches and progress in functionalizing the nanoparticles to specifically enhance bioimaging with different modalities and their applications are reviewed in this article. PMID:28331783

  13. Instrumentation and probes for molecular and cellular imaging.

    PubMed

    Lecchi, M; Ottobrini, L; Martelli, C; Del Sole, A; Lucignani, G

    2007-06-01

    Molecular and cellular imaging is a branch of biomedical sciences that combines the use of imaging instrumentation and biotechnology to characterize molecular and cellular processes in living organisms in normal and pathologic conditions. The two merging areas of research behind molecular and cellular imaging are detection technology, i.e. scanners and imaging devices, and development of tracers, contrast agents and reporter probes that make imaging with scanners and devices possible. Several in vivo imaging instruments currently used in human studies, such as computer tomography, ultrasound, magnetic resonance, positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography, have been rescaled for small animal studies, while other methods initially used for in vitro evaluation, such as bioluminescence and fluorescence, have been refined for in vivo imaging. Conventional imaging relies on the use of non specific contrast agents and classical probes; however, newly developed targeted contrast agents and activable ''smart'' imaging probes for so-called ''targeted imaging'' have demonstrated high specificity and high signal to noise ratio in small animal studies. This review focuses on basic recent findings in the technical aspects of molecular and cellular imaging modalities (equipment, targeted probe and contrast agents and applied combinations of instrumentation and probe) with particular attention to the choice of the future: the multimodal imaging approach.

  14. Non-invasive molecular imaging for preclinical cancer therapeutic development

    PubMed Central

    O'Farrell, AC; Shnyder, SD; Marston, G; Coletta, PL; Gill, JH

    2013-01-01

    Molecular and non-invasive imaging are rapidly emerging fields in preclinical cancer drug discovery. This is driven by the need to develop more efficacious and safer treatments, the advent of molecular-targeted therapeutics, and the requirements to reduce and refine current preclinical in vivo models. Such bioimaging strategies include MRI, PET, single positron emission computed tomography, ultrasound, and optical approaches such as bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging. These molecular imaging modalities have several advantages over traditional screening methods, not least the ability to quantitatively monitor pharmacodynamic changes at the cellular and molecular level in living animals non-invasively in real time. This review aims to provide an overview of non-invasive molecular imaging techniques, highlighting the strengths, limitations and versatility of these approaches in preclinical cancer drug discovery and development. PMID:23488622

  15. Ultrasound for molecular imaging and therapy in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Osamu F.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade, molecularly-targeted contrast enhanced ultrasound (ultrasound molecular imaging) has attracted significant attention in preclinical research of cancer diagnostic and therapy. Potential applications for ultrasound molecular imaging run the gamut from early detection and characterization of malignancies to monitoring treatment responses and guiding therapies. There may also be a role for ultrasound contrast agents for improved delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs and gene therapies across biological barriers. Currently, a first Phase 0 clinical trial in patients with prostate cancer assesses toxicity and feasibility of ultrasound molecular imaging using contrast agents targeted at the angiogenic marker vascular endothelial growth factor receptor type 2 (VEGFR2). This mini-review highlights recent advances and potential applications of ultrasound molecular imaging and ultrasound-guided therapy in cancer. PMID:23061039

  16. Molecular imaging in the framework of personalized cancer medicine.

    PubMed

    Belkić, Dzevad; Belkić, Karen

    2013-11-01

    With our increased understanding of cancer cell biology, molecular imaging offers a strategic bridge to oncology. This complements anatomic imaging, particularly magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, which is sensitive but not specific. Among the potential harms of false positive findings is lowered adherence to recommended surveillance post-therapy and by persons at increased cancer risk. Positron emission tomography (PET) plus computerized tomography (CT) is the molecular imaging modality most widely used in oncology. In up to 40% of cases, PET-CT leads to changes in therapeutic management. Newer PET tracers can detect tumor hypoxia, bone metastases in androgen-sensitive prostate cancer, and human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2)-expressive tumors. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy provides insight into several metabolites at the same time. Combined with MRI, this yields magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), which does not entail ionizing radiation and is thus suitable for repeated monitoring. Using advanced signal processing, quantitative information can be gleaned about molecular markers of brain, breast, prostate and other cancers. Radiation oncology has benefited from molecular imaging via PET-CT and MRSI. Advanced mathematical approaches can improve dose planning in stereotactic radiosurgery, stereotactic body radiotherapy and high dose-rate brachytherapy. Molecular imaging will likely impact profoundly on clinical decision making in oncology. Molecular imaging via MR could facilitate early detection especially in persons at high risk for specific cancers.

  17. Natural chelates for radionuclide decorporation

    DOEpatents

    Premuzic, E.T.

    1983-08-25

    This invention relates to the method and resulting chelates of desorbing a radionuclide selected from thorium, uranium, and plutonium containing cultures in a bioavailable form involving pseudomonas or other microorganisms. A preferred microorganism is Pseudomonas aeruginosa which forms multiple chelates with thorium in the range of molecular weight 1000 to 1000 and also forms chelates with uranium of molecular weight in the area of 100 to 1000 and 1000 to 2000.

  18. Tumor Immunotargeting Using Innovative Radionuclides

    PubMed Central

    Kraeber-Bodéré, Françoise; Rousseau, Caroline; Bodet-Milin, Caroline; Mathieu, Cédric; Guérard, François; Frampas, Eric; Carlier, Thomas; Chouin, Nicolas; Haddad, Ferid; Chatal, Jean-François; Faivre-Chauvet, Alain; Chérel, Michel; Barbet, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews some aspects and recent developments in the use of antibodies to target radionuclides for tumor imaging and therapy. While radiolabeled antibodies have been considered for many years in this context, only a few have reached the level of routine clinical use. However, alternative radionuclides, with more appropriate physical properties, such as lutetium-177 or copper-67, as well as alpha-emitting radionuclides, including astatine-211, bismuth-213, actinium-225, and others are currently reviving hopes in cancer treatments, both in hematological diseases and solid tumors. At the same time, PET imaging, with short-lived radionuclides, such as gallium-68, fluorine-18 or copper-64, or long half-life ones, particularly iodine-124 and zirconium-89 now offers new perspectives in immuno-specific phenotype tumor imaging. New antibody analogues and pretargeting strategies have also considerably improved the performances of tumor immunotargeting and completely renewed the interest in these approaches for imaging and therapy by providing theranostics, companion diagnostics and news tools to make personalized medicine a reality. PMID:25679452

  19. Comparison of exercise radionuclide angiography with thallium SPECT imaging for detection of significant narrowing of the left circumflex coronary artery

    SciTech Connect

    Dilsizian, V.; Perrone-Filardi, P.; Cannon, R.O. 3d.; Freedman, N.M.; Bacharach, S.L.; Bonow, R.O. )

    1991-08-01

    Although quantitation of exercise thallium tomograms has enhanced the noninvasive diagnosis and localization of coronary artery disease, the detection of stenosis of the left circumflex coronary artery remains suboptimal. Because posterolateral regional wall motion during exercise is well assessed by radionuclide angiography, this study determined whether regional dysfunction of the posterolateral wall during exercise radionuclide angiography is more sensitive in identifying left circumflex disease than thallium perfusion abnormalities assessed by single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). One hundred ten consecutive patients with CAD were studied, of whom 70 had a significant stenosis of the left circumflex coronary artery or a major obtuse marginal branch. Both regional function and segmental thallium activity of the posterolateral wall were assessed using visual and quantitative analysis. Left ventricular regional function was assessed objectively by dividing the left ventricular region of interest into 20 sectors; the 8 sectors corresponding to the posterolateral free wall were used to assess function in the left circumflex artery distribution. Similarly, using circumferential profile analysis of short-axis thallium tomograms, left ventricular myocardial activity was subdivided into 64 sectors; the 16 sectors corresponding to the posterolateral region were used to assess thallium perfusion abnormalities in the left circumflex artery territory. Qualitative posterolateral wall motion analysis detected 76% of patients with left circumflex coronary artery stenosis, with a specificity of 83%, compared with only 44% by qualitative thallium tomography (p less than 0.001) and a specificity of 92%.

  20. 124 Iodine: a longer-life positron emitter isotope-new opportunities in molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Cascini, Giuseppe Lucio; Niccoli Asabella, Artor; Notaristefano, Antonio; Restuccia, Antonino; Ferrari, Cristina; Rubini, Domenico; Altini, Corinna; Rubini, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    (124)Iodine ((124)I) with its 4.2 d half-life is particularly attractive for in vivo detection and quantification of longer-term biological and physiological processes; the long half-life of (124)I is especially suited for prolonged time in vivo studies of high molecular weight compounds uptake. Numerous small molecules and larger compounds like proteins and antibodies have been successfully labeled with (124)I. Advances in radionuclide production allow the effective availability of sufficient quantities of (124)I on small biomedical cyclotrons for molecular imaging purposes. Radioiodination chemistry with (124)I relies on well-established radioiodine labeling methods, which consists mainly in nucleophilic and electrophilic substitution reactions. The physical characteristics of (124)I permit taking advantages of the higher PET image quality. The availability of new molecules that may be targeted with (124)I represents one of the more interesting reasons for the attention in nuclear medicine. We aim to discuss all iodine radioisotopes application focusing on (124)I, which seems to be the most promising for its half-life, radiation emissions, and stability, allowing several applications in oncological and nononcological fields.

  1. 124Iodine: A Longer-Life Positron Emitter Isotope—New Opportunities in Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cascini, Giuseppe Lucio; Notaristefano, Antonio; Restuccia, Antonino; Ferrari, Cristina; Rubini, Domenico; Altini, Corinna

    2014-01-01

    124Iodine (124I) with its 4.2 d half-life is particularly attractive for in vivo detection and quantification of longer-term biological and physiological processes; the long half-life of 124I is especially suited for prolonged time in vivo studies of high molecular weight compounds uptake. Numerous small molecules and larger compounds like proteins and antibodies have been successfully labeled with 124I. Advances in radionuclide production allow the effective availability of sufficient quantities of 124I on small biomedical cyclotrons for molecular imaging purposes. Radioiodination chemistry with 124I relies on well-established radioiodine labeling methods, which consists mainly in nucleophilic and electrophilic substitution reactions. The physical characteristics of 124I permit taking advantages of the higher PET image quality. The availability of new molecules that may be targeted with 124I represents one of the more interesting reasons for the attention in nuclear medicine. We aim to discuss all iodine radioisotopes application focusing on 124I, which seems to be the most promising for its half-life, radiation emissions, and stability, allowing several applications in oncological and nononcological fields. PMID:24895600

  2. A novel high resolution, high sensitivity SPECT detector for molecular imaging of cardiovascular diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cusanno, F.; Argentieri, A.; Baiocchi, M.; Colilli, S.; Cisbani, E.; De Vincentis, G.; Fratoni, R.; Garibaldi, F.; Giuliani, F.; Gricia, M.; Lucentini, M.; Magliozzi, M. L.; Majewski, S.; Marano, G.; Musico, P.; Musumeci, M.; Santavenere, F.; Torrioli, S.; Tsui, B. M. W.; Vitelli, L.; Wang, Y.

    2010-05-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the most common cause of death in western countries. Understanding the rupture of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques and monitoring the effect of innovative therapies of heart failure is of fundamental importance. A flexible, high resolution, high sensitivity detector system for molecular imaging with radionuclides on small animal models has been designed for this aim. A prototype has been built using tungsten pinhole and LaBr3(Ce) scintillator coupled to Hamamatsu Flat Panel PMTs. Compact individual-channel readout has been designed, built and tested. Measurements with phantoms as well as pilot studies on mice have been performed, the results show that the myocardial perfusion in mice can be determined with sufficient precision. The detector will be improved replacing the Hamamatsu Flat Panel with Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs) to allow integration of the system with MRI scanners. Application of LaBr3(Ce) scintillator coupled to photosensor with high photon detection efficiency and excellent energy resolution will allow dual-label imaging to monitor simultaneously the cardiac perfusion and the molecular targets under investigation during the heart therapy.

  3. Efficient Radioisotope Energy Transfer by Gold Nanoclusters for Molecular Imaging.

    PubMed

    Volotskova, Olga; Sun, Conroy; Stafford, Jason H; Koh, Ai Leen; Ma, Xiaowei; Cheng, Zhen; Cui, Bianxiao; Pratx, Guillem; Xing, Lei

    2015-08-26

    Beta-emitting isotopes Fluorine-18 and Yttrium-90 are tested for their potential to stimulate gold nanoclusters conjugated with blood serum proteins (AuNCs). AuNCs excited by either medical radioisotope are found to be highly effective ionizing radiation energy transfer mediators, suitable for in vivo optical imaging. AuNCs synthesized with protein templates convert beta-decaying radioisotope energy into tissue-penetrating optical signals between 620 and 800 nm. Optical signals are not detected from AuNCs incubated with Technetium-99m, a pure gamma emitter that is used as a control. Optical emission from AuNCs is not proportional to Cerenkov radiation, indicating that the energy transfer between the radionuclide and AuNC is only partially mediated by Cerenkov photons. A direct Coulombic interaction is proposed as a novel and significant mechanism of energy transfer between decaying radionuclides and AuNCs. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Molecular Imaging and Therapy of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Our objective is to develop an arsenic-based radiopharmaceutical platform for IGF1R-targeted imaging and therapy of PCa. The hypothesis is that...arsenic-based, IGF1R-targeted radiopharmaceuticals can allow for PET imaging, IRT, and monitoring the therapeutic response of PCa. Specific Aims: Aim 1: To...models with PET imaging. Aim 3: To monitor the efficacy of 76As-based IRT of PCa with multimodality imaging.

  5. Molecular characterization of rheumatoid arthritis with magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jeffrey T; Nguyen, Linda; Chaudhari, Abhijit J; MacKenzie, John D

    2011-04-01

    Several recent advances in the field of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may transform the detection and monitoring of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). These advances depict both anatomic and molecular alterations from RA. Previous techniques could detect specific end products of metabolism in vitro or were limited to providing anatomic information. This review focuses on the novel molecular imaging techniques of hyperpolarized carbon-13 MRI, MRI with iron-labeled probes, and fusion of MRI with positron emission tomography. These new imaging approaches go beyond the anatomic description of RA and lend new information into the status of this disease by giving molecular information.

  6. Molecular imaging and personalized medicine: an uncertain future.

    PubMed

    Nunn, Adrian D

    2007-12-01

    The Food and Drug Administration has described their view of the role that imaging will play in the approval, and perhaps postapproval, use of new therapeutic drugs. The therapeutic drug industry and regulatory authorities have turned to imaging to help them achieve better efficiency and efficacy. We must extend this initiative by demonstrating that molecular imaging can also improve the efficiency and efficacy of routine treatment with these same drugs. The role of molecular imaging in personalized medicine, using targeted drugs in oncology, is very attractive because of the regional information that it provides (in many cases, with a functional or dynamic component), which cannot be provided by in vitro methods ("regional proteomics"). There is great potential for molecular imaging to play a major role in selecting appropriate patients and providing early proof of response, which is critical to addressing the conflict between the high price of treatment and limited reimbursement budgets. This is a new venture in both molecular imaging and targeted drugs. However, there are various regulatory, financial, and practical barriers that must be overcome to achieve this aim, in addition to the normal scientific challenges of drug discovery. There is an urgent need to reduce the cost (i.e., time and money) of developing imaging agents for routine clinical use. The mismatch between the current regulations and personalized medicine includes molecular imaging and requires the engagement of the regulatory authorities to correct. Therapeutic companies must be engaged early in the development of new targeted drugs and molecular imaging agents to improve the fit between the two drug types. Clinical trials must be performed to generate data that not only shows the efficacy of imaging plus therapy in a medical sense, but also in a financial sense. Molecular imaging must be accepted as not just good science but also as central to routine patient management in the personalized

  7. Components of a curriculum for molecular imaging scientists.

    PubMed

    Zinn, Kurt R; Anderson, Carolyn J; Bradbury, Michelle; Cutler, Cathy S; Peterson, Todd E; Morgan, Desiree E; Price, Julie C; Graham, Michael M; Contag, Christopher H; Wittstrom, Kristina; Norenberg, Jeffrey P

    2011-04-01

    Molecular imaging is the visualization, characterization, and measurement of biologic processes at the molecular and cellular levels in humans and other living systems (1). It comprises an emerging set of technologies that builds on advances in imaging procedures (e.g., PET, SPECT, MRI, ultrasound, optical, and photoacoustic), improved understanding of biology, and the development of molecularly targeted agents. These continuously expanding sets of imaging methods are often used in combination, and advances in data acquisition and analyses facilitate a more complete understanding of biology. Molecular imaging aims to improve our understanding of mammalian biology and lead to advances in patient care by providing targeted therapies that will enable personalized medicine and the imaging tools to assess outcome. Implementation of these new technologies in clinical care has many educational, technical, and regulatory challenges that must be overcome before molecular imaging reaches its full potential. The impact of molecular imaging has been significant in several disciplines, because it represents a paradigm shift in how scientists and clinicians can observe biology in real time and in a relatively noninvasive manner to enable the power of repeated measures in living organisms.

  8. Diagnosis and screening of small hepatocellular carcinomas. Comparison of radionuclide imaging, ultrasound, computed tomography, hepatic angiography, and alpha 1-fetoprotein assay

    SciTech Connect

    Takashima, T.; Matsui, O.; Suzuki, M.; Ida, M.

    1982-12-01

    Twenty-nine small (less than 5 cm) hepatocellular carcinomas in 18 patients were examined by radionuclide imaging (RN), ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT), hepatic angiography, and serum alpha 1-fetoprotein (AFP) assay. Sensitivity was 39% with RN, 50% with US, 56% with CT, and 94% with angiography, including infusion hepatic angiography (IHA). Lesions larger than 3 cm could be detected by all of these methods; those between 2 and 3 cm were generally shown by US and CT but not RN. IHA was essential for diagnosis of lesions less than 2 cm, which were otherwise difficult or impossible to detect except with angiography. As a screening method, AFP was best, followed by US and CT. The authors recommend using AFP and US to minimize expense and radiation exposure. In questionable cases, IHA should be performed.

  9. Diagnosis and screening of small hepatocellular carcinomas: comparison of radionuclide imaging, ultrasound, computed tomography, hepatic angiography, and. cap alpha. /sub 1/-fetoprotein assay

    SciTech Connect

    Takashima, T.; Matsui, O.; Suzuki, M.; Ida, M.

    1982-12-01

    Twenty-nine small (<5 cm) hepatocellular carcinomas in 18 patients were examined by radionuclide imaging (RN), ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT), hepatic angiography, and serum ..cap alpha../sub 1/-fetoprotein (AFP) assay. Sensitivity was 39% with RN, 50% with US, 56% with CT, and 94% with angiography, including infusion hepatic angiography (IHA). Lesions larger than 3 cm could be detected by all of these methods; those between 2 and 3 cm were generally shown by US and CT but not RN. IHA was essential for diagnosis of lesions less than 2 cm, which were otherwise difficult or impossible to detect except with angiography. As a screening method, AFP was best, followed by US and CT. The authors recommend using AFP and US to minimize expense and radiation exposure. In questionable cases, IHA should be performed.

  10. 100 years of radionuclide metrology.

    PubMed

    Judge, S M; Arnold, D; Chauvenet, B; Collé, R; De Felice, P; García-Toraño, E; Wätjen, U

    2014-05-01

    The discipline of radionuclide metrology at national standards institutes started in 1913 with the certification by Curie, Rutherford and Meyer of the first primary standards of radium. In early years, radium was a valuable commodity and the aim of the standards was largely to facilitate trade. The focus later changed to providing standards for the new wide range of radionuclides, so that radioactivity could be used for healthcare and industrial applications while minimising the risk to patients, workers and the environment. National measurement institutes responded to the changing demands by developing new techniques for realising primary standards of radioactivity. Looking ahead, there are likely to be demands for standards for new radionuclides used in nuclear medicine, an expansion of the scope of the field into quantitative imaging to facilitate accurate patient dosimetry for nuclear medicine, and an increasing need for accurate standards for radioactive waste management and nuclear forensics.

  11. The second insight: Radionuclide diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lentle, Brian C.; Hooper, Richard

    Nuclear medicine has been defined as the use of radionuclides (unsealed sources of radiation) in the diagnosis and treatment of disease. It is a predominantly diagnostic speciality. Of the two aspects of disease, disordered structure and disordered function, nuclear medicine or radionuclide diagnosis has been unique in consistently providing information about disordered function. The method has applications both in life ( in vivo examinations, often involving imaging radionuclide distributions in the body) and in the test-tube ( in vivo). The tracer principle has allowed insights in respect of both patient care and research across a broad spectrum of diseases. Although nuclear medicine is a specialty which continues to evolve, it already has an established role in health care, predicated on its ability to study function.

  12. Molecular Imaging of Angiogenesis and Vascular Remodeling in Cardiovascular Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Golestani, Reza; Jung, Jae-Joon; Sadeghi, Mehran M.

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis and vascular remodeling are involved in a wide array of cardiovascular diseases, from myocardial ischemia and peripheral arterial disease, to atherosclerosis and aortic aneurysm. Molecular imaging techniques to detect and quantify key molecular and cellular players in angiogenesis and vascular remodeling (e.g., vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptors, αvβ3 integrin, and matrix metalloproteinases) can advance vascular biology research and serve as clinical tools for early diagnosis, risk stratification, and selection of patients who would benefit most from therapeutic interventions. To target these key mediators, a number of molecular imaging techniques have been developed and evaluated in animal models of angiogenesis and vascular remodeling. This review of the state of the art molecular imaging of angiogenesis and vascular (and valvular) remodeling, will focus mostly on nuclear imaging techniques (positron emission tomography and single photon emission tomography) that offer high potential for clinical translation. PMID:27275836

  13. ESPMIS: Helping Young Scientists Navigate the Molecular Imaging Landscape.

    PubMed

    Zeglis, Brian M; Vugts, Danielle J

    2017-06-01

    The core mission of the Early Stage Professionals in Molecular Imaging Sciences (ESPMIS) Interest Group is to help young scientists navigate the professional landscape of molecular imaging. Since its formation in early 2015, ESPMIS has used the annual World Molecular Imaging Congress (WMIC) as a platform to provide education and guidance on three areas that are particularly critical to young scientists: networking, career development, and funding. In the coming years, ESPMIS plans to continue its focus on these topics, work with the WMIS on the creation of new digital tools for young scientists, and introduce two new areas of emphasis: the importance of mentoring and international career opportunities. We at ESPMIS sincerely believe that the future is bright for young scientists in molecular imaging, and we are here to help.

  14. Affibody molecules: potential for in vivo imaging of molecular targets for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Tolmachev, Vladimir; Orlova, Anna; Nilsson, Fredrik Y; Feldwisch, Joachim; Wennborg, Anders; Abrahmsén, Lars

    2007-04-01

    Targeting radionuclide imaging of tumor-associated antigens may help to select patients who will benefit from a particular biological therapy. Affibody molecules are a novel class of small (approximately 7 kDa) phage display-selected affinity proteins, based on the B-domain scaffold of staphylococcal protein A. A large library (3 x 10(9) variants) has enabled selection of high-affinity (up to 22 pM) binders for a variety of tumor-associated antigens. The small size of Affibody molecules provides rapid tumor localization and fast clearance from nonspecific compartments. Preclinical studies have demonstrated the potential of Affibody molecules for specific and high-contrast radionuclide imaging of HER2 in vivo, and pilot clinical data using indium-111 and gallium-68 labeled anti-HER2 Affibody tracer have confirmed its utility for radionuclide imaging in cancer patients.

  15. Molecular Imaging of Prostate Cancer: PET Radiotracers

    PubMed Central

    Jadvar, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Recent advances in the fundamental understanding of the complex biology of prostate cancer have provided an increasing number of potential targets for imaging and treatment. The imaging evaluation of prostate cancer needs to be tailored to the various phases of this remarkably heterogeneous disease. CONCLUSION In this article, I review the current state of affairs on a range of PET radiotracers for potential use in the imaging evaluation of men with prostate cancer. PMID:22826388

  16. Multimodality Molecular Imaging of Stem Cells Therapy for Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong; Tian, Mei

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells have been proposed as a promising therapy for treating stroke. While several studies have demonstrated the therapeutic benefits of stem cells, the exact mechanism remains elusive. Molecular imaging provides the possibility of the visual representation of biological processes at the cellular and molecular level. In order to facilitate research efforts to understand the stem cells therapeutic mechanisms, we need to further develop means of monitoring these cells noninvasively, longitudinally and repeatedly. Because of tissue depth and the blood-brain barrier (BBB), in vivo imaging of stem cells therapy for stroke has unique challenges. In this review, we describe existing methods of tracking transplanted stem cells in vivo, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), nuclear medicine imaging, and optical imaging (OI). Each of the imaging techniques has advantages and drawbacks. Finally, we describe multimodality imaging strategies as a more comprehensive and potential method to monitor transplanted stem cells for stroke. PMID:24222920

  17. Multimodality molecular imaging of stem cells therapy for stroke.

    PubMed

    Chao, Fangfang; Shen, Yehua; Zhang, Hong; Tian, Mei

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells have been proposed as a promising therapy for treating stroke. While several studies have demonstrated the therapeutic benefits of stem cells, the exact mechanism remains elusive. Molecular imaging provides the possibility of the visual representation of biological processes at the cellular and molecular level. In order to facilitate research efforts to understand the stem cells therapeutic mechanisms, we need to further develop means of monitoring these cells noninvasively, longitudinally and repeatedly. Because of tissue depth and the blood-brain barrier (BBB), in vivo imaging of stem cells therapy for stroke has unique challenges. In this review, we describe existing methods of tracking transplanted stem cells in vivo, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), nuclear medicine imaging, and optical imaging (OI). Each of the imaging techniques has advantages and drawbacks. Finally, we describe multimodality imaging strategies as a more comprehensive and potential method to monitor transplanted stem cells for stroke.

  18. Systems diagnostics: the systems approach to molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Daniel Y; Li, King C P

    2009-08-01

    Molecular imaging has emerged as a powerful technology that has already changed the practice of modern medicine. During this same period, the monumental genome project has sequenced man's entire genetic content. Now the postgenomic aim is to understand the dynamic interactions of the encoded components and their regulatory mechanisms. Molecular imaging is well positioned to play a major role in this massive effort as we move toward a comprehensive paradigm for assessing health and disease.

  19. Emerging diagnostic and therapeutic molecular imaging applications in vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Eraso, Luis H; Reilly, Muredach P; Sehgal, Chandra; Mohler, Emile R

    2013-01-01

    Assessment of vascular disease has evolved from mere indirect and direct measurements of luminal stenosis to sophisticated imaging methods to depict millimeter structural changes of the vasculature. In the near future, the emergence of multimodal molecular imaging strategies may enable robust therapeutic and diagnostic (‘theragnostic’) approaches to vascular diseases that comprehensively consider structural, functional, biological and genomic characteristics of the disease in individualized risk assessment, early diagnosis and delivery of targeted interventions. This review presents a summary of recent preclinical and clinical developments in molecular imaging and theragnostic applications covering diverse atherosclerosis events such as endothelial activation, macrophage infammatory activity, plaque neovascularization and arterial thrombosis. The main focus is on molecular targets designed for imaging platforms commonly used in clinical medicine including magnetic resonance, computed tomography and positron emission tomography. A special emphasis is given to vascular ultrasound applications, considering the important role this imaging platform plays in the clinical and research practice of the vascular medicine specialty. PMID:21310769

  20. Continuous-terahertz-wave molecular imaging system for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Liangliang; Wu, Tong; Wang, Ruixue; Zuo, Shasha; Wu, Dong; Zhang, Cunlin; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2016-07-01

    Molecular imaging techniques are becoming increasingly important in biomedical research and potentially in clinical practice. We present a continuous-terahertz (THz)-wave molecular imaging system for biomedical applications, in which an infrared (IR) laser is integrated into a 0.2-THz reflection-mode continuous-THz-wave imaging system to induce surface plasmon polaritons on the nanoparticles and further improve the intensity of the reflected signal from the water around the nanoparticles. A strong and rapid increment of the reflected THz signal in the nanoparticle solution upon the IR laser irradiation is demonstrated, using either gold or silver nanoparticles. This low-cost, simple, and stable continuous-THz-wave molecular imaging system is suitable for miniaturization and practical imaging applications; in particular, it shows great promise for cancer diagnosis and nanoparticle drug-delivery monitoring.

  1. Emerging concepts in functional and molecular photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Hu, Song

    2016-08-01

    Providing the specific imaging contrast of optical absorption and excellent spatial scalability across the optical and ultrasonic dimensions, photoacoustic imaging has been rapidly emerging and expanding in the past two decades. In this review, I focus on a few latest advances in this enabling technology that hold the potential to transform in vivo functional and molecular imaging at multiple length scales. Specifically, multi-parametric photoacoustic microscopy enables simultaneous high-resolution mapping of hemoglobin concentration, oxygen saturation and blood flow-opening up the possibility of quantifying the metabolic rate of oxygen at the microscopic level. The pump-probe approach harnesses a variety of photoinduced transient optical absorption as novel contrast mechanisms for high-specificity molecular imaging at depth and as nonlinear excitation strategies for high-resolution volumetric microscopy beyond the conventional limit. Novel magneto-optical and photochromic probes lead to contrast-enhanced molecular photoacoustic imaging through differential detection.

  2. Photoacoustic molecular imaging of small animals in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xueyi; Li, Meng-Lin; Oh, Jung-Taek; Ku, Geng; Wang, Wei; Li, Chun; Similache, Sergiu; Lungu, Gina F.; Stoica, George; Wang, Lihong V.

    2006-02-01

    Molecular imaging is a newly emerging field in which the modern tools of molecular and cell biology have been married to state-of-the-art technologies for noninvasive imaging. The study of molecular imaging will lead to better methods for understanding biological processes as well as diagnosing and managing disease. Here we present noninvasive in vivo spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography (PAT)-based molecular imaging of αvβ3 integrin in a nude mouse U87 brain tumor. PAT combines high optical absorption contrast and high ultrasonic resolution by employing short laser pulses to generate acoustic waves in biological tissues through thermoelastic expansion. Spectroscopic PAT-based molecular imaging offers the separation of the contributions from different absorbers based on the differences in optical absorption spectra among those absorbers. In our case, in the near infrared (NIR) range, oxy-heamoglobin (O2Hb), deoxy-heamoglobin (HHb) and the injected αvβ3-targeted peptide-ICG conjugated NIR fluorescent contrast agent are the three main absorbers. Therefore, with the excitation by multiple wavelength laser pulses, spectroscopic PAT-based molecular imaging not only provides the level of the contrast agent accumulation in the U87 glioblastoma tumor, which is related to the metabolism and angiogenesis of the tumor, but also offers the information on tumor angiogenesis and tumor hypoxia.

  3. Natural Radionuclides in Ground Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Stanley N.

    1988-01-01

    Described are the natural trace radionuclides in ground water. Indicates the geologic origin of these radionuclides. Discusses the importance of these radionuclides. Suggests future uses of a number of additional radionuclides. (CW)

  4. Natural Radionuclides in Ground Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Stanley N.

    1988-01-01

    Described are the natural trace radionuclides in ground water. Indicates the geologic origin of these radionuclides. Discusses the importance of these radionuclides. Suggests future uses of a number of additional radionuclides. (CW)

  5. Molecular Body Imaging: MR Imaging, CT, and US. Part I. Principles

    PubMed Central

    Kircher, Moritz F.

    2012-01-01

    Molecular imaging, generally defined as noninvasive imaging of cellular and subcellular events, has gained tremendous depth and breadth as a research and clinical discipline in recent years. The coalescence of major advances in engineering, molecular biology, chemistry, immunology, and genetics has fueled multi- and interdisciplinary innovations with the goal of driving clinical noninvasive imaging strategies that will ultimately allow disease identification, risk stratification, and monitoring of therapy effects with unparalleled sensitivity and specificity. Techniques that allow imaging of molecular and cellular events facilitate and go hand in hand with the development of molecular therapies, offering promise for successfully combining imaging with therapy. While traditionally nuclear medicine imaging techniques, in particular positron emission tomography (PET), PET combined with computed tomography (CT), and single photon emission computed tomography, have been the molecular imaging methods most familiar to clinicians, great advances have recently been made in developing imaging techniques that utilize magnetic resonance (MR), optical, CT, and ultrasonographic (US) imaging. In the first part of this review series, we present an overview of the principles of MR imaging-, CT-, and US-based molecular imaging strategies. © RSNA, 2012 PMID:22623690

  6. Targeted radionuclide therapy

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Lawrence E.; DeNardo, Gerald L.; Meredith, Ruby F.

    2008-01-01

    Targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) seeks molecular and functional targets within patient tumor sites. A number of agents have been constructed and labeled with beta, alpha, and Auger emitters. Radionuclide carriers spanning a broad range of sizes; e.g., antibodies, liposomes, and constructs such as nanoparticles have been used in these studies. Uptake, in percent-injected dose per gram of malignant tissue, is used to evaluate the specificity of the targeting vehicle. Lymphoma (B-cell) has been the primary clinical application. Extension to solid tumors will require raising the macroscopic absorbed dose by several-fold over values found in present technology. Methods that may effect such changes include multistep targeting, simultaneous chemotherapy, and external sequestration of the agent. Toxicity has primarily involved red marrow so that marrow replacement can also be used to enhance future TRT treatments. Correlation of toxicities and treatment efficiency has been limited by relatively poor absorbed dose estimates partly because of using standard (phantom) organ sizes. These associations will be improved in the future by obtaining patient-specific organ size and activity data with hybrid SPECT∕CT and PET∕CT scanners. PMID:18697529

  7. Natural language processing and visualization in the molecular imaging domain.

    PubMed

    Tulipano, P Karina; Tao, Ying; Millar, William S; Zanzonico, Pat; Kolbert, Katherine; Xu, Hua; Yu, Hong; Chen, Lifeng; Lussier, Yves A; Friedman, Carol

    2007-06-01

    Molecular imaging is at the crossroads of genomic sciences and medical imaging. Information within the molecular imaging literature could be used to link to genomic and imaging information resources and to organize and index images in a way that is potentially useful to researchers. A number of natural language processing (NLP) systems are available to automatically extract information from genomic literature. One existing NLP system, known as BioMedLEE, automatically extracts biological information consisting of biomolecular substances and phenotypic data. This paper focuses on the adaptation, evaluation, and application of BioMedLEE to the molecular imaging domain. In order to adapt BioMedLEE for this domain, we extend an existing molecular imaging terminology and incorporate it into BioMedLEE. BioMedLEE's performance is assessed with a formal evaluation study. The system's performance, measured as recall and precision, is 0.74 (95% CI: [.70-.76]) and 0.70 (95% CI [.63-.76]), respectively. We adapt a JAVA viewer known as PGviewer for the simultaneous visualization of images with NLP extracted information.

  8. Chelators for copper radionuclides in positron emission tomography radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhengxin; Anderson, Carolyn J

    2014-04-01

    The development of chelating agents for copper radionuclides in positron emission tomography radiopharmaceuticals has been a highly active and important area of study in recent years. The rapid evolution of chelators has resulted in highly specific copper chelators that can be readily conjugated to biomolecules and efficiently radiolabeled to form stable complexes in vivo. Chelators are not only designed for conjugation to monovalent biomolecules but also for incorporation into multivalent targeting ligands such as theranostic nanoparticles. These advancements have strengthened the role of copper radionuclides in the fields of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging. This review emphasizes developments of new copper chelators that have most greatly advanced the field of copper-based radiopharmaceuticals over the past 5 years. © 2013 The Authors. J. Label Compd. Radiopharm published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Molecular Imaging and Precision Medicine in Dementia and Movement Disorders.

    PubMed

    Mallik, Atul K; Drzezga, Alexander; Minoshima, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

    Precision medicine (PM) has been defined as "prevention and treatment strategies that take individual variability into account." Molecular imaging (MI) is an ideally suited tool for PM approaches to neurodegenerative dementia and movement disorders (MD). Here we review PM approaches and discuss how they may be applied to other associated neurodegenerative dementia and MD. With ongoing major therapeutic research initiatives that include the use of molecular imaging, we look forward to established interventions targeted to specific molecular pathophysiology and expect the potential benefit of MI PM approaches in neurodegenerative dementia and MD will only increase. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Gold nanoshell bioconjugates for molecular imaging in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loo, Christopher; Hirsch, Leon; Lee, Min-Ho; Chang, Emmanuel; West, Jennifer; Halas, Naomi; Drezek, Rebekah

    2005-05-01

    Advances in scattering-based optical imaging technologies offer a new approach to noninvasive point-of-care detection, diagnosis, and monitoring of cancer. Emerging photonics technologies provide a cost-effective means to image tissue in vivo with high resolution in real time. Advancing the clinical potential of these imaging strategies requires the development of optical contrast agents targeted to specific molecular signatures of disease. We describe the use of a novel class of contrast agents based on nanoshell bioconjugates for molecular imaging in living cells. Nanoshells offer significant advantages over conventional imaging probes including continuous and broad wavelength tunability, far greater scattering and absorption coefficients, increased chemical stability, and improved biocompatibility. We show that nanoshell bioconjugates can be used to effectively target and image human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), a clinically relevant biomarker, in live human breast carcinoma cells.

  11. Intravascular near-infrared fluorescence molecular imaging of atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Thukkani, Arun K; Jaffer, Farouc A

    2013-01-01

    Novel imaging modalities are required to better identify vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques before their dire consequences of myocardial infarction, sudden death, and stroke. Moving beyond traditional diagnostic methods, the field of molecular imaging offers an innovative approach to report upon critical in vivo biological features of high-risk plaques. Molecular imaging employs engineered, targeted imaging agents in conjunction with sophisticated, high-resolution detection systems. While various modalities have been investigated for this purpose, intravascular near infrared fluorescence imaging (NIRF) strategies are uniquely poised to provide high-resolution readouts of human coronary artery plaques. To date, preclinical animal studies have demonstrated feasibility of both standalone NIRF intravascular imaging as well as dual-modality approaches detecting inflammation and fibrin deposition in coronary-sized arteries. This translatable catheter-based approach is positioned to advance the identification of biologically vulnerable coronary plaques and coronary stents at risk of thrombosis. PMID:23638334

  12. Molecular Imaging in Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Current Perspective and Future Potential

    PubMed Central

    Sosnovik, David E.

    2008-01-01

    The development of novel imaging agents and techniques is allowing some biological events to be imaged in vivo with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at the cellular and subcellular level. In this paper, the use of novel gadolinium chelates and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for molecular MRI of the cardiovascular system is extensively reviewed. The physical properties of these imaging agents and the pulse sequences best suited to their visualization are extensively discussed. The application of molecular MRI in diseases of the vasculature and myocardium is then reviewed. The clinical experience to date, as well as the promise and potential impact of molecular MRI, is extensively discussed. PMID:18690161

  13. Radionuclide deposition control

    DOEpatents

    Brehm, William F.; McGuire, Joseph C.

    1980-01-01

    The deposition of radionuclides manganese-54, cobalt-58 and cobalt-60 from liquid sodium coolant is controlled by providing surfaces of nickel or high nickel alloys to extract the radionuclides from the liquid sodium, and by providing surfaces of tungsten, molybdenum or tantalum to prevent or retard radionuclide deposition.

  14. Molecular imaging in myeloma precursor disease.

    PubMed

    Mena, Esther; Choyke, Peter; Tan, Esther; Landgren, Ola; Kurdziel, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is consistently preceded by its pre-malignant states, monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and/or smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM). By definition, precursor conditions do not exhibit end-organ disease (anemia, hypercalcemia, renal failure, skeletal lytic lesions, or a combination of these). However, new imaging methods are demonstrating that some patients in the MGUS or SMM category are exhibiting early signs of MM. Although MGUS/SMM patients are currently defined as low-risk versus high-risk based on clinical markers, we currently lack the ability to predict the individual patient's risk of progression from MGUS/SMM to MM. Given that the presence of gross lytic bone lesions is a hallmark of MM, it is reasonable to believe that less severe bone changes defined by more sensitive imaging may be predictive of MM progression. Indeed, since bone disease is such an essential aspect of MM, imaging techniques directed at the detection of early bone lesions, have the potential to become increasingly more useful in the setting of MGUS/SMM. Current guidelines for the radiological assessment of MM still recommend the traditional skeletal survey, although its limitations are well documented, especially in early phases of the disease when radiographs can significantly underestimate the extent of bone lesions and bone marrow involvement. Newer, more advanced imaging modalities, with higher sensitivities, including whole-body low-dose computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography (PET) are being employed. Also various imaging techniques have been used to provide an assessment of bone involvement and identify extra-osseous disease. This review emphasizes the current state of the art and emerging imaging methods, which may help to better define high-risk versus low-risk MGUS/SMM. Ultimately, improved imaging could allow more tailored clinical management, and, most likely play an important role

  15. Co-targeting androgen receptor and DNA for imaging and molecular radiotherapy of prostate cancer: in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Han, Guang; Kortylewicz, Zbigniew P; Enke, Thomas; Baranowska-Kortylewicz, Janina

    2014-12-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) axis, the key growth and survival pathway in prostate cancer, remains a prime target for drug development. 5-Radioiodo-3'-O-(17β-succinyl-5α-androstan-3-one)-2'-deoxyuridin-5'-yl phosphate (RISAD-P) is the AR-seeking reagent developed for noninvasive assessment of AR and proliferative status, and for molecular radiotherapy of prostate cancer with Auger electron-emitting radionuclides. RISAD-P radiolabeled with 123I, 124I, and 125I were synthesized using a common stannylated precursor. The cellular uptake, subcellular distribution, and radiotoxicity of 123I-, 124I-, and (125) IRISAD-P were measured in LNCaP, DU145, and PC-3 cell lines expressing various levels of AR. The uptake of RISAD-P by prostate cancer cells is proportional to AR levels and independent of the radionuclide. The intracellular accumulation of radioactivity is directly proportional to the extracellular concentration of RISAD-P and the duration of exposure. Initially, RISAD-P is trapped in the cytoplasm. Within 24 hr, radioactivity is associated exclusively with DNA. The RISAD-P radiotoxicity is determined by the radionuclide; however, the cellular responses are directly proportional to the AR expression levels. LNCaP cells expressing high levels of AR are killed at the rate of up to 60% per day after a brief 1 hr RISAD-P treatment. For the first time, the AR expression in PC-3 and DU 145 cells, generally reported as AR-negative, was quantitated by the ultra sensitive RISAD-P-based method. RISAD-P is a theranostic drug, which targets AR. Its subcellular metabolite participates in DNA synthesis. RISAD-P is a promising candidate for imaging of the AR expression and tumor proliferation as well as molecular radiotherapy of prostate cancer. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Molecular imaging: interaction between basic and clinical science.

    PubMed

    Atreya, Raja; Waldner, Maximilian J; Neurath, Markus F

    2010-12-01

    One of the major proceedings in the field of gastrointestinal endoscopy has been the advent of molecular imaging, which possesses the potential to have a significant effect on the existing diagnostic and therapeutic paradigms. Molecular imaging encompasses different methods that enable the visualization of disease-specific morphologic or functional alterations of the mucosa based on the molecular signature of individual cells. This development has been made possible by advancements in basic science coupled with technological innovations in endoscopy, both facilitating the identification and characterization of mucosal lesions in vivo based on the lesions' molecular composition rather than their morphologic structure alone. Novel studies based on fluorescent antibody imaging pave the road toward clinical translation and give hope for improved diagnosis and targeted therapies in gastrointestinal diseases.

  17. Molecular imaging true-colour spectroscopic optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robles, Francisco E.; Wilson, Christy; Grant, Gerald; Wax, Adam

    2011-12-01

    Molecular imaging holds a pivotal role in medicine due to its ability to provide invaluable insight into disease mechanisms at molecular and cellular levels. To this end, various techniques have been developed for molecular imaging, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. For example, fluorescence imaging achieves micrometre-scale resolution, but has low penetration depths and is mostly limited to exogenous agents. Here, we demonstrate molecular imaging of endogenous and exogenous chromophores using a novel form of spectroscopic optical coherence tomography. Our approach consists of using a wide spectral bandwidth laser source centred in the visible spectrum, thereby allowing facile assessment of haemoglobin oxygen levels, providing contrast from readily available absorbers, and enabling true-colour representation of samples. This approach provides high spectral fidelity while imaging at the micrometre scale in three dimensions. Molecular imaging true-colour spectroscopic optical coherence tomography (METRiCS OCT) has significant implications for many biomedical applications including ophthalmology, early cancer detection, and understanding fundamental disease mechanisms such as hypoxia and angiogenesis.

  18. Osteotropic cancer diagnosis by an osteocalcin inspired molecular imaging mimetic.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Sam; Tung, Ching-Hsuan

    2013-10-01

    Although microcalcifications of hydroxyapatite can be found in both benign and malignant osteotropic tumors, they are mostly seen in proliferative lesions, including carcinoma. The aim of this present study is to develop a molecular imaging contrast agent for selective identification of hydroxyapatite calcification in human osteotropic tumor tissues ex vivo and in human osteosarcoma cells in vitro. A bioinspired biomarker, hydroxyapatite binding peptide (HABP), was designed to mimic natural protein osteocalcin property in vivo. A fluorescein isothiocyanate dye conjugated HABP (HABP-19) was utilized to characterize hydroxyapatite on human osteotropic tumor tissue sections ex vivo and to selectively image hydroxyapatite calcifications in human osteosarcoma cells in vitro. Using a HABP-19 molecular imaging probe, we have shown that it is possible to selectively image hydroxyapatite calcifications in osteotropic cancers ex vivo and in human SaOS-2 osteosarcoma cells in vitro. Hydroxyapatite calcifications were selectively detected in osteotropic tissues ex vivo and in the early stage of the calcification process of SaOS-2 human osteosarcoma in vitro using our HABP-19 molecular imaging probe. This new target-selective molecular imaging probe makes it possible to study the earliest events associated with hydroxyapatite deposition in various osteotropic cancers at the cellular and molecular levels. It potentially could be used to diagnose and treat osteotropic cancer or to anchor therapeutic agents directing the local distribution of desired therapy at calcified sites. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. In Vivo Stabilization of a Gastrin-Releasing Peptide Receptor Antagonist Enhances PET Imaging and Radionuclide Therapy of Prostate Cancer in Preclinical Studies.

    PubMed

    Chatalic, Kristell L S; Konijnenberg, Mark; Nonnekens, Julie; de Blois, Erik; Hoeben, Sander; de Ridder, Corrina; Brunel, Luc; Fehrentz, Jean-Alain; Martinez, Jean; van Gent, Dik C; Nock, Berthold A; Maina, Theodosia; van Weerden, Wytske M; de Jong, Marion

    2016-01-01

    A single tool for early detection, accurate staging, and personalized treatment of prostate cancer (PCa) would be a major breakthrough in the field of PCa. Gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) targeting peptides are promising probes for a theranostic approach for PCa overexpressing GRPR. However, the successful application of small peptides in a theranostic approach is often hampered by their fast in vivo degradation by proteolytic enzymes, such as neutral endopeptidase (NEP). Here we show for the first time that co-injection of a NEP inhibitor (phosphoramidon (PA)) can lead to an impressive enhancement of diagnostic sensitivity and therapeutic efficacy of the theranostic (68)Ga-/(177)Lu-JMV4168 GRPR-antagonist. Co-injection of PA (300 µg) led to stabilization of (177)Lu-JMV4168 in murine peripheral blood. In PC-3 tumor-bearing mice, PA co-injection led to a two-fold increase in tumor uptake of (68)Ga-/(177)Lu-JMV4168, 1 h after injection. In positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with (68)Ga-JMV4168, PA co-injection substantially enhanced PC-3 tumor signal intensity. Radionuclide therapy with (177)Lu-JMV4168 resulted in significant regression of PC-3 tumor size. Radionuclide therapy efficacy was confirmed by production of DNA double strand breaks, decreased cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. Increased survival rates were observed in mice treated with (177)Lu-JMV4168 plus PA as compared to those without PA. This data shows that co-injection of the enzyme inhibitor PA greatly enhances the theranostic potential of GRPR-radioantagonists for future application in PCa patients.

  20. In Vivo Stabilization of a Gastrin-Releasing Peptide Receptor Antagonist Enhances PET Imaging and Radionuclide Therapy of Prostate Cancer in Preclinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Chatalic, Kristell L.S.; Konijnenberg, Mark; Nonnekens, Julie; de Blois, Erik; Hoeben, Sander; de Ridder, Corrina; Brunel, Luc; Fehrentz, Jean-Alain; Martinez, Jean; van Gent, Dik C.; Nock, Berthold A.; Maina, Theodosia; van Weerden, Wytske M.; de Jong, Marion

    2016-01-01

    A single tool for early detection, accurate staging, and personalized treatment of prostate cancer (PCa) would be a major breakthrough in the field of PCa. Gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) targeting peptides are promising probes for a theranostic approach for PCa overexpressing GRPR. However, the successful application of small peptides in a theranostic approach is often hampered by their fast in vivo degradation by proteolytic enzymes, such as neutral endopeptidase (NEP). Here we show for the first time that co-injection of a NEP inhibitor (phosphoramidon (PA)) can lead to an impressive enhancement of diagnostic sensitivity and therapeutic efficacy of the theranostic 68Ga-/177Lu-JMV4168 GRPR-antagonist. Co-injection of PA (300 µg) led to stabilization of 177Lu-JMV4168 in murine peripheral blood. In PC-3 tumor-bearing mice, PA co-injection led to a two-fold increase in tumor uptake of 68Ga-/177Lu-JMV4168, 1 h after injection. In positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with 68Ga-JMV4168, PA co-injection substantially enhanced PC-3 tumor signal intensity. Radionuclide therapy with 177Lu-JMV4168 resulted in significant regression of PC-3 tumor size. Radionuclide therapy efficacy was confirmed by production of DNA double strand breaks, decreased cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. Increased survival rates were observed in mice treated with 177Lu-JMV4168 plus PA as compared to those without PA. This data shows that co-injection of the enzyme inhibitor PA greatly enhances the theranostic potential of GRPR-radioantagonists for future application in PCa patients. PMID:26722377

  1. Methods to monitor gene therapy with molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Waerzeggers, Yannic; Monfared, Parisa; Viel, Thomas; Winkeler, Alexandra; Voges, Jürgen; Jacobs, Andreas H

    2009-06-01

    Recent progress in scientific and clinical research has made gene therapy a promising option for efficient and targeted treatment of several inherited and acquired disorders. One of the most critical issues for ensuring success of gene-based therapies is the development of technologies for non-invasive monitoring of the distribution and kinetics of vector-mediated gene expression. In recent years many molecular imaging techniques for safe, repeated and high-resolution in vivo imaging of gene expression have been developed and successfully used in animals and humans. In this review molecular imaging techniques for monitoring of gene therapy are described and specific use of these methods in the different steps of a gene therapy protocol from gene delivery to assessment of therapy response is illustrated. Linking molecular imaging (MI) to gene therapy will eventually help to improve the efficacy and safety of current gene therapy protocols for human application and support future individualized patient treatment.

  2. Molecular Optical Coherence Tomography Contrast Enhancement and Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldenburg, Amy L.; Applegate, Brian E.; Tucker-Schwartz, Jason M.; Skala, Melissa C.; Kim, Jongsik; Boppart, Stephen A.

    Histochemistry began as early as the nineteenth century, with the development of synthetic dyes that provided spatially mapped chemical contrast in tissue [1]. Stains such as hematoxylin and eosin, which contrast cellular nuclei and cytoplasm, greatly aid in the interpretation of microscopy images. An analogous development is currently taking place in biomedical imaging, whereby techniques adapted for MRI, CT, and PET now provide in vivo molecular imaging over the entire human body, aiding in both fundamental research discovery and in clinical diagnosis and treatment monitoring. Because OCT offers a unique spatial scale that is intermediate between microscopy and whole-body biomedical imaging, molecular contrast OCT (MCOCT) also has great potential for providing new insight into in vivo molecular processes. The strength of MCOCT lies in its ability to isolate signals from a molecule or contrast agent from the tissue scattering background over large scan areas at depths greater than traditional microscopy techniques while maintaining high resolution.

  3. Nanomedicine strategies for molecular targets with MRI and optical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Dipanjan; Caruthers, Shelton D; Chen, Junjie; Winter, Patrick M; SenPan, Angana; Schmieder, Anne H; Wickline, Samuel A

    2010-01-01

    The science of ‘theranostics’ plays a crucial role in personalized medicine, which represents the future of patient management. Over the last decade an increasing research effort has focused on the development of nanoparticle-based molecular-imaging and drug-delivery approaches, emerging as a multidisciplinary field that shows promise in understanding the components, processes, dynamics and therapies of a disease at a molecular level. The potential of nanometer-sized agents for early detection, diagnosis and personalized treatment of diseases is extraordinary. They have found applications in almost all clinically relevant biomedical imaging modality. In this review, a number of these approaches will be presented with a particular emphasis on MRI and optical imaging-based techniques. We have discussed both established molecular-imaging approaches and recently developed innovative strategies, highlighting the seminal studies and a number of successful examples of theranostic nanomedicine, especially in the areas of cardiovascular and cancer therapy. PMID:20485473

  4. Quantum dot imaging platform for single-cell molecular profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zrazhevskiy, Pavel; Gao, Xiaohu

    2013-03-01

    Study of normal cell physiology and disease pathogenesis heavily relies on untangling the complexity of intracellular molecular mechanisms and pathways. To achieve this goal, comprehensive molecular profiling of individual cells within the context of microenvironment is required. Here we report the development of a multicolour multicycle in situ imaging technology capable of creating detailed quantitative molecular profiles for individual cells at the resolution of optical imaging. A library of stoichiometric fluorescent probes is prepared by linking target-specific antibodies to a universal quantum dot-based platform via protein A in a quick and simple procedure. Surprisingly, despite the potential for multivalent binding between protein A and antibody and the intermediate affinity of this non-covalent bond, fully assembled probes do not aggregate or exchange antibodies, facilitating highly multiplexed parallel staining. This single-cell molecular profiling technology is expected to open new opportunities in systems biology, gene expression studies, signalling pathway analysis and molecular diagnostics.

  5. (90)Y-PET/CT Imaging Quantification for Dosimetry in Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy: Analysis and Corrections of the Impairing Factors.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, Cinzia; Bartolomei, Mirco; Mattone, Vincenzo; Casi, Michela; De Lauro, Francesco; Bartolini, Nerio; Gentili, Giovanni; Amadori, Sonia; Agostini, Monica; Sarti, Graziella

    2015-06-01

    We evaluated the possibility to assess (90)Y-PET/CT imaging quantification for dosimetry in (90)Y-peptide receptor radionuclide therapy. Tests were performed by Discovery 710 Elite (GE) PET/CT equipment. A body-phantom containing radioactive-coplanar-spheres was filled with (90)Y water solution to reproduce different signal-to-background-activity-ratios (S/N). We studied minimum detectable activity (MDA) concentration, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM). Subsequently, three recovery coefficients (RC)-based correction approaches were evaluated: maximum-RC, resolution-RC, and isovolume-RC. The analysis of the volume segmentation thresholding method was also assessed to derive a relationship between the true volume of the targets and the threshold to be applied to the PET images. (90)Y-PET/CT imaging quantification was then achieved on some patients and related with preclinical tests. Moreover, the dosimetric evaluation was obtained on the target regions. CNR value was greater than 5 if the MDA was greater than 0.2 MBq/mL with no background activity and 0.5-0.7 MBq/mL with S/N ranging from 3 to 6. FWHM was equal to 7 mm. An exponential fitting of isovolume RCs-based correction technique was adopted for activity quantification. Adaptive segmentation thresholding exponential curves were obtained and applied for target volume identification in three signal-to-background-activity-ratios. The imaging quantification study and dosimetric evaluations in clinical cases was feasible and the results were coherent with those obtained in preclinical tests. (90)Y-PET/CT imaging quantification is possible both in phantoms and in patients. Absorbed dose evaluations in clinical applications are strongly related to targets activity concentration.

  6. [Radionuclide therapy of endocrine-related cancer].

    PubMed

    Kratochwil, C; Giesel, F L

    2014-10-01

    This article gives an overview of the established radionuclide therapies for endocrine-related cancer that already have market authorization or are currently under evaluation in clinical trials. Radioiodine therapy is still the gold standard for differentiated iodine-avid thyroid cancer. In patients with bone and lung metastases (near) total remission is seen in approximately 50% and the 15-year survival rate for these patients is approximately 90%. In contrast to the USA, meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) therapy has market approval in Europe. According to the current literature, in the setting of advanced stage neuroblastoma and malignant pheochromocytoma or paraganglioma, radiological remission can be achieved in >30% and symptom control in almost 80% of the treated patients. Somatostatin receptor targeted radionuclide therapies (e.g. with DOTATATE or DOTATOC) demonstrated promising results in phase 2 trials, reporting progression-free survival in the range of 24-36 months. A first phase 3 pivotal trial for intestinal carcinoids is currently recruiting and another trial for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors is planned. Radiopharmaceuticals based on glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) or minigastrins are in the early evaluation stage for application in the treatment of insulinomas and medullary thyroid cancer. In general, radiopharmaceutical therapy belongs to the group of so-called theranostics which means that therapy is tailored for individual patients based on molecular imaging diagnostics to stratify target positive or target negative tumor phenotypes.

  7. Advances of Molecular Imaging in Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Galovic, Marian; Koepp, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a neuroimaging method that offers insights into the molecular functioning of a human brain. It has been widely used to study metabolic and neurotransmitter abnormalities in people with epilepsy. This article reviews the development of several PET radioligands and their application in studying the molecular mechanisms of epilepsy. Over the last decade, tracers binding to serotonin and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors have been used to delineate the location of the epileptic focus. PET studies have examined the role of opioids, cannabinoids, acetylcholine, and dopamine in modulating neuronal hyperexcitability and seizure termination. In vivo analyses of drug transporters, e.g., P-glycoprotein, have increased our understanding of pharmacoresistance that could inform new therapeutic strategies. Finally, PET experiments targeting neuroinflammation and glutamate receptors might guide the development of novel biomarkers of epileptogenesis.

  8. Molecular Imaging in Stem Cell Therapy for Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Mei; Zhang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a serious disease of the center nervous system (CNS). It is a devastating injury with sudden loss of motor, sensory, and autonomic function distal to the level of trauma and produces great personal and societal costs. Currently, there are no remarkable effective therapies for the treatment of SCI. Compared to traditional treatment methods, stem cell transplantation therapy holds potential for repair and functional plasticity after SCI. However, the mechanism of stem cell therapy for SCI remains largely unknown and obscure partly due to the lack of efficient stem cell trafficking methods. Molecular imaging technology including positron emission tomography (PET), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), optical imaging (i.e., bioluminescence imaging (BLI)) gives the hope to complete the knowledge concerning basic stem cell biology survival, migration, differentiation, and integration in real time when transplanted into damaged spinal cord. In this paper, we mainly review the molecular imaging technology in stem cell therapy for SCI. PMID:24701583

  9. Mitochondrial-Targeted Molecular Imaging in Cardiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jinhui

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to discuss the role of mitochondrion in cardiac function and disease. The mitochondrion plays a fundamental role in cellular processes ranging from metabolism to apoptosis. The mitochondrial-targeted molecular imaging could potentially illustrate changes in global and regional cardiac dysfunction. The collective changes that occur in mitochondrial-targeted molecular imaging probes have been widely explored and developed. As probes currently used in the preclinical setting still have a lot of shortcomings, the development of myocardial metabolic activity, viability, perfusion, and blood flow molecular imaging probes holds great potential for accurately evaluating the myocardial viability and functional reserve. The advantages of molecular imaging provide a perspective on investigating the mitochondrial function of the myocardium in vivo noninvasively and quantitatively. The molecular imaging tracers of single-photon emission computed tomography and positron emission tomography could give more detailed information on myocardial metabolism and restoration. In this study, series mitochondrial-targeted 99mTc-, 123I-, and 18F-labeled tracers displayed broad applications because they could provide a direct link between mitochondrial dysfunction and cardiac disease. PMID:28638829

  10. Chlorotoxin-Conjugated Multifunctional Dendrimers Labeled with Radionuclide 131I for Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography Imaging and Radiotherapy of Gliomas.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lingzhou; Zhu, Jingyi; Cheng, Yongjun; Xiong, Zhijuan; Tang, Yueqin; Guo, Lilei; Shi, Xiangyang; Zhao, Jinhua

    2015-09-09

    Chlorotoxin-conjugated multifunctional dendrimers labeled with radionuclide 131I were synthesized and utilized for targeted single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging and radiotherapy of cancer. In this study, generation five amine-terminated poly(amidoamine) dendrimers were used as a platform to be sequentially conjugated with polyethylene glycol (PEG), targeting agent chlorotoxin (CTX), and 3-(4'-hydroxyphenyl)propionic acid-OSu (HPAO). This was followed by acetylation of the remaining dendrimer terminal amines and radiolabeling with 131I to form the targeted theranostic dendrimeric nanoplatform. We show that the dendrimer platform possessing approximately 7.7 CTX and 21.1 HPAO moieties on each dendrimer displays excellent cytocompatibility in a given concentration range (0-20 μM) and can specifically target cancer cells overexpressing matrix metallopeptidase 2 (MMP2) due to the attached CTX. With the attached HPAO moiety having the phenol group, the dendrimer platform can be effectively labeled with radioactive 131I with good stability and high radiochemical purity. Importantly, the 131I labeling renders the dendrimer platform with an ability to be used for targeted SPECT imaging and radiotherapy of an MMP2-overexpressing glioma model in vivo. The developed radiolabeled multifunctional dendrimeric nanoplatform may hold great promise to be used for targeted theranostics of human gliomas.

  11. Ultrafast molecular orbital imaging based on attosecond photoelectron diffraction.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Qin, Meiyan; Zhu, Xiaosong; Zhang, Qingbin; Lan, Pengfei; Lu, Peixiang

    2015-04-20

    We present ab initio numerical study of ultrafast ionization dynamics of H(2)(+) as well as CO(2) and N(2) exposed to linearly polarized attosecond extreme ultraviolet pulses. When the molecules are aligned perpendicular to laser polarization direction, photonionization of these molecules show clear and distinguishing diffraction patterns in molecular attosecond photoelectron momentum distributions. The internuclear distances of the molecules are related to the position of the associated diffraction patterns, which can be determined with high accuracy. Moreover, the relative heights of the diffraction fringes contain fruitful information of the molecular orbital structures. We show that the diffraction spectra can be well produced using the two-center interference model. By adopting a simple inversion algorithm which takes into account the symmetry of the initial molecular orbital, we can retrieve the molecular orbital from which the electron is ionized. Our results offer possibility for imaging of molecular structure and orbitals by performing molecular attosecond photoelectron diffraction.

  12. Molecular imaging. A new approach to nuclear cardiology.

    PubMed

    Dobrucki, L W; Sinusas, A J

    2005-03-01

    Nuclear cardiology has historically played an important role in detection of cardiovascular disease as well as risk stratification. With the growth of molecular biology have come new therapeutic interventions and the requirement for new diagnostic imaging approaches. Noninvasive targeted radiotracer based as well as transporter gene imaging strategies are evolving to meet these new needs, but require the development of an interdisciplinary approach which focuses on molecular processes, as well as the pathogenesis and progression of disease. This progress has been made possible with the availability of transgenic animal models along with many technological advances. Future adaptations of the developing experimental procedures and instrumentation will allow for the smooth translation and application to clinical practice. This review is intended as a brief overview on the subject molecular imaging. Basic concepts and historical perspective of molecular imaging will be reviewed first, followed by description of current technology, and concluding with current applications in cardiology. The emphasis will be on the use of both single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers, although other imaging modalities will be also briefly discussed. The specific approaches presented here will include receptor-based and reporter gene imaging of natural and therapeutic angiogenesis.

  13. Molecular imaging of rheumatoid arthritis: emerging markers, tools, and techniques.

    PubMed

    Put, Stéphanie; Westhovens, René; Lahoutte, Tony; Matthys, Patrick

    2014-04-15

    Early diagnosis and effective monitoring of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are important for a positive outcome. Instant treatment often results in faster reduction of inflammation and, as a consequence, less structural damage. Anatomical imaging techniques have been in use for a long time, facilitating diagnosis and monitoring of RA. However, mere imaging of anatomical structures provides little information on the processes preceding changes in synovial tissue, cartilage, and bone. Molecular imaging might facilitate more effective diagnosis and monitoring in addition to providing new information on the disease pathogenesis. A limiting factor in the development of new molecular imaging techniques is the availability of suitable probes. Here, we review which cells and molecules can be targeted in the RA joint and discuss the advances that have been made in imaging of arthritis with a focus on such molecular targets as folate receptor, F4/80, macrophage mannose receptor, E-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, phosphatidylserine, and matrix metalloproteinases. In addition, we discuss a new tool that is being introduced in the field, namely the use of nanobodies as tracers. Finally, we describe additional molecules displaying specific features in joint inflammation and propose these as potential new molecular imaging targets, more specifically receptor activator of nuclear factor κB and its ligand, chemokine receptors, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, αVβ₃ integrin, P2X7 receptor, suppression of tumorigenicity 2, dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein, and osteoclast-stimulatory transmembrane protein.

  14. Direct Imaging of Laser-driven Ultrafast Molecular Rotation.

    PubMed

    Mizuse, Kenta; Fujimoto, Romu; Mizutani, Nobuo; Ohshima, Yasuhiro

    2017-02-04

    We present a method for visualizing laser-induced, ultrafast molecular rotational wave packet dynamics. We have developed a new 2-dimensional Coulomb explosion imaging setup in which a hitherto-impractical camera angle is realized. In our imaging technique, diatomic molecules are irradiated with a circularly polarized strong laser pulse. The ejected atomic ions are accelerated perpendicularly to the laser propagation. The ions lying in the laser polarization plane are selected through the use of a mechanical slit and imaged with a high-throughput, 2-dimensional detector installed parallel to the polarization plane. Because a circularly polarized (isotropic) Coulomb exploding pulse is used, the observed angular distribution of the ejected ions directly corresponds to the squared rotational wave function at the time of the pulse irradiation. To create a real-time movie of molecular rotation, the present imaging technique is combined with a femtosecond pump-probe optical setup in which the pump pulses create unidirectionally rotating molecular ensembles. Due to the high image throughput of our detection system, the pump-probe experimental condition can be easily optimized by monitoring a real-time snapshot. As a result, the quality of the observed movie is sufficiently high for visualizing the detailed wave nature of motion. We also note that the present technique can be implemented in existing standard ion imaging setups, offering a new camera angle or viewpoint for the molecular systems without the need for extensive modification.

  15. Radionuclide imaging for the assessment of esophageal motility disorders in mixed connective tissue disease patients: relation to pulmonary impairment.

    PubMed

    Caleiro, M T C; Lage, L V; Navarro-Rodriguez, T; Bresser, A; da Costa, P A; Yoshinari, N H

    2006-01-01

    Esophageal functional abnormalities may lead to regurgitation, chronic esophagitis and life-threatening conditions such as aspiration pneumonia. In mixed connective tissue disease patients, previous reports showed that esophageal dysfunction varies according to the method employed for investigation. Our study was conceived to: (i) assess esophageal motility and mucosal aspects in patients with mixed connective tissue disease by endoscopy, cine-esophogram and scintigraphy focusing on the prevalence of each exam; and (ii) verify the association between pulmonary and esophageal dysfunctions. Twenty-four mixed connective tissue disease patients were enrolled for this study. Cine-esophogram and upper digestive endoscopy with mucosal biopsy were performed according to previous standardization. Radionuclide esophageal scintigraphy was performed with a semisolid meal with (99m)Tc. Eleven healthy individuals voluntarily submitted to scintigraphy as controls. Cine-esophogram showed esophageal delayed emptying in 90% of patients. At scintigraphy there was a significant delay in total esophageal transit time in the group of patients when compared to healthy controls (35.3 +/- 8.2 s. vs. 13.6 +/- 9.5 s.; P < 0.0001). The whole esophageal body showed dysmotility in 96% of patients. The cine-esophogram detected functional esophageal impairment similar to scintigraphic findings. Histopathologic examination found esophagitis in 95% of studied patients. Reduced lung volumes were associated with esophagitis and delayed esophageal clearance at scintigraphy, observed at the distal portion of the esophagus. Esophageal scintigraphy is easy to perform, with good acceptance by patients with low radiation exposition. It is a useful non-invasive test for follow-up and interventional studies concerning esophagus dysfunction.

  16. Molecular Imaging of Breast Cancer: Role of RGD Peptides.

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, Rubel; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Dash, Ashutosh

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths among women of all ages worldwide. With advances in molecular imaging procedures, it has been possible to detect breast cancer in its early stage, determine the extent of the disease to administer appropriate therapeutic protocol and also monitor the effects of treatment. By accurately characterizing the tumor properties and biological processes involved, molecular imaging can play a crucial role in minimizing the morbidity and mortality associated with breast cancer. The integrin αvβ3 plays an important role in breast cancer angiogenesis and is expressed on tumor endothelial cells as well as on some tumor cells. It is a receptor for the extracellular matrix proteins with the exposed arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) tripeptide sequence and therefore RGD peptides can preferentially bind to integrin αvβ3. In this context, targeting tumor vasculature or tumor cells by RGD-based probes is a promising strategy for molecular imaging of breast cancer. Using RGD-based probes, several preclinical studies have employed different imaging modalities such as positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound and optical imaging for visualization of integrin αvβ3 expression in breast cancer models. Limited clinical trials using (18)F-labeled RGD peptides have also been initiated for non-invasive detection and staging of breast cancer. Herein, we provide a comprehensive overview of the latest advances in molecular imaging of breast cancer using RGD peptide-based probes and discuss the challenges and opportunities for advancement of the field. The reported strategies for molecular imaging of breast cancer using RGD peptide-based probes holds promise for making clinically translatable advances that can positively impact the overall diagnostic and therapeutic processes and result in improved quality of life for breast cancer patients.

  17. Improved Cancer Therapy and Molecular Imaging with Multivalent, Multispecific Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Edmund A.; Chang, Chien-Hsing; Goldenberg, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Summation Antibodies are highly versatile proteins with the ability to be used to target diverse compounds, such as radionuclides for imaging and therapy, or drugs and toxins for therapy, but also can be used unconjugated to elicit therapeutically beneficial responses, usually with minimal toxicity. This update describes a new procedure for forming multivalent and/or multispecific proteins, known as the dock-and-lock (DNL) technique. Developed as a procedure for preparing bispecific antibodies capable of binding divalently to a tumor antigen and monovalently to a radiolabeled hapten-peptide for pretargeted imaging and therapy, this methodology has the flexibility to create a number of other biologic agents of therapeutic interest. A variety of constructs, based on anti-CD20 and CD22 antibodies, have been made, with results showing that multispecific antibodies have very different properties from the respective parental monospecific antibodies. The technique is not restricted to antibody combination, but other biologics, such as interferon-α2b, have been prepared. These types of constructs not only allow small biologics to be sustained in the blood longer, but also to be selectively targeted. Thus, DNL technology is a highly flexible platform that can be used to prepare many different types of agents that could further improve cancer detection and therapy. PMID:20187791

  18. Improved cancer therapy and molecular imaging with multivalent, multispecific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, Robert M; Rossi, Edmund A; Chang, Chien-Hsing; Goldenberg, David M

    2010-02-01

    Antibodies are highly versatile proteins with the ability to be used to target diverse compounds, such as radionuclides for imaging and therapy, or drugs and toxins for therapy, but also can be used unconjugated to elicit therapeutically beneficial responses, usually with minimal toxicity. This update describes a new procedure for forming multivalent and/or multispecific proteins, known as the dock-and-lock (DNL) technique. Developed as a procedure for preparing bispecific antibodies capable of binding divalently to a tumor antigen and monovalently to a radiolabeled hapten-peptide for pretargeted imaging and therapy, this methodology has the flexibility to create a number of other biologic agents of therapeutic interest. A variety of constructs, based on anti-CD20 and CD22 antibodies, have been made, with results showing that multispecific antibodies have very different properties from the respective parental monospecific antibodies. The technique is not restricted to antibody combination, but other biologics, such as interferon-alpha2b, have been prepared. These types of constructs not only allow small biologics to be sustained in the blood longer, but also to be selectively targeted. Thus, DNL technology is a highly flexible platform that can be used to prepare many different types of agents that could further improve cancer detection and therapy.

  19. Inorganic nanoparticle-based contrast agents for molecular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Eun Chul; Glaus, Charles; Chen, Jingyi; Welch, Michael J.; Xia, Younan

    2010-01-01

    Inorganic nanoparticles including semiconductor quantum dots, iron oxide nanoparticles, and gold nanoparticles have been developed as contrast agents for diagnostics by molecular imaging. Compared to traditional contrast agents, nanoparticles offer several advantages: their optical and magnetic properties can be tailored by engineering the composition, structure, size, and shape; their surfaces can be modified with ligands to target specific biomarkers of disease; the contrast enhancement provided can be equivalent to millions of molecular counterparts; and they can be integrated with a combination of different functions for multi-modal imaging. Here, we review recent advances in the development of contrast agents based on inorganic nanoparticles for molecular imaging, with a touch on contrast enhancement, surface modification, tissue targeting, clearance, and toxicity. As research efforts intensify, contrast agents based on inorganic nanoparticles that are highly sensitive, target-specific, and safe to use are expected to enter clinical applications in the near future. PMID:21074494

  20. Multimodal optical molecular image reconstruction with frequency domain measurements.

    PubMed

    Bartels, M; Chen, W; Bardhan, R; Ke, S; Halas, N J; Wareing, T; McGhee, J; Joshi, A

    2009-01-01

    Multimodality molecular imaging is becoming more and more important to understand both the structural and the functional characteristics of tissue, organs and tumors. So far, invasive nuclear methods utilizing ionizing radiation have been the "gold standard" of molecular imaging. We investigate non-contact, non-invasive, patient-tolerant and inexpensive near infrared (NIR) frequency domain optical tomography (FDOT) as a functional complement to structural X-ray computed tomography (CT) data. We show a novel multifrequency NIR FDOT approach both in transmission and reflectance mode and employ radiative transport equation (RTE) for 3D reconstruction of a target wi