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Sample records for radiopharmaceutical showing pharmacokinetic

  1. Pharmacokinetics of SPECT radiopharmaceuticals for imaging hypoxic tissues.

    PubMed

    Wiebe, L I; Stypinski, D

    1996-09-01

    Although hypoxia has been known for decades to play an important role in the outcome of radiotherapy in oncology, and inspite of the contribution of hypoxia to a myriad of pathologies that involve vascular disease, the selective imaging of hypoxic tissue has attained prominence only within the past decade. Contemporary research in the hypoxia imaging field is based largely on radiosensitizer research of the 1960's and 1970's. Early sensitizer research identified a family of nitro-organic compounds, the N-1 substituted 2-nitroimidazoles as candidate drugs. The early champion, and still the reference standard for therapeutic radiosensitization of hypoxic tumor cells is misonidazole (MISO). Its peripheral neurotoxicity led to failure in clinical studies, but its biological, biophysical and biochemical properties have been investigated in detail and serve as a basis for further design, not only of sensitizers, but of diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals for imaging tissue hypoxia. Pharmacokinetic characterization of radiopharmaceuticals, specifically radiopharmaceuticals for imaging tissue hypoxia, has not been a central theme in their development. The advent of PET, through which quantitative determinations first became possible, opened the field for both descriptive and analytical radiopharmacokinetic studies. In SPECT, however, this approach is still undergoing refinement. This paper addresses some of the underlying issues in radiopharmaceutical pharmacokinetics. There is a paucity of published radiopharmacokinetic data for SPECT hypoxia imaging agents. Consequently, the pharmacokinetic issues for MISO are presented as a basis for development of pharmacokinetics for the chemically-related imaging agents. Properties of an hypoxia marker are described from a pharmacokinetic viewpoint, a theoretical model for descriptive pharmacokinetics is introduced and finally, recent pharmacokinetic studies from our laboratory are described.

  2. Radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Theobald, A.E.

    1989-01-01

    This book is a review of the latest developments in radiopharmaceuticals. It covers the development of radiopharmaceutical compounds, the theory and practice of their synthesis, and examples of their application. Also covers safe handling of radiopharmaceuticals, legislation affecting their use, radiation monitoring, radiochromatography, and computer techniques.

  3. Pharmacokinetic properties of peptidic radiopharmaceuticals: reduced uptake of (EH)3-conjugates in important organs.

    PubMed

    Eder, Matthias; Löhr, Thomas; Bauder-Wüst, Ulrike; Reber, Markus; Mier, Walter; Schäfer, Martin; Haberkorn, Uwe; Eisenhut, Michael

    2013-08-01

    The translation of radiolabeled tumor-targeting peptides into clinical routine is often hampered by an enhanced accumulation into the excreting organs. It has recently been reported that the (EH)3 purification tag is able to improve the biodistribution of Affibody molecules. Therefore, the aim of this study was to prove the positive influence of (EH)3 on the biodistribution of 2 peptidic radiopharmaceuticals, Glu-urea-Lys(Ahx)-HBED-CC and TATE-PEG2-HBED-CC (HBED-CC is N,N'-bis [2-hydroxy-5(carboxyethyl)benzyl] ethylenediamine-N,N'- diacetic acid, TATE is octreotate, and PEG2 is 8-amino-3,6-dioxaoctanoic acid spacer). Both compounds were compared with their respective (EH)3-conjugated variants in cell-based in vitro assays and organ distribution. The introduction of (EH)3 to HBED-CC significantly changed the biodistribution profiles. In both cases, the uptake in several organs was reduced whereas tumor uptake was not affected. Most importantly, (EH)3 lowered the kidney and liver uptake of the prostate-specific membrane antigen inhibitor each by a factor of 2.8 and, in the case of octreotate, the liver accumulation by a factor of 51. The biodistribution data suggest that (EH)3 is able to improve the pharmacokinetic properties of peptidic radiopharmaceuticals, leading to reduced uptake in organs such as the liver, an important site of metastatic disease.

  4. Pitfalls with radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Santos-Oliveira, Ralph; Machado, Márcio

    2011-07-01

    There is a considerable body of evidence describing that the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of radiopharmaceuticals may be changed by a variety of drugs, disease states and in some cases, surgical procedures. : To systematically search the medical literature and review the published evidence on adverse reactions to radiopharmaceuticals. MEDLINE, EMBASE, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts and Science Citation Index were searched for studies reporting adverse reactions to radiopharmaceuticals. Controlled trials, cohort studies, case-control studies and case series published in major Western languages were considered for the review. Each study included in the present review was described in a narrative way, and major components of each study were reported (ie, research design, patient characteristics, types of drugs and radiopharmaceuticals, dosing information and adverse reactions). The majority of adverse reactions to radiopharmaceuticals described in the literature required little or no treatment, and their negative effects were generally mild and self-limited. Large longitudinal greater than 5-year studies reported prevalence rates of adverse reactions due to radiopharmaceuticals ranging from 0 to 25 cases per 100,000 administrations. Case studies on the use of technetium reported mild adverse reactions; however, some led to potentially harmful complications. Similarly, studies involving fluorodeoxyglucose reported more severe adverse reactions. The literature on radiopharmaceuticals adverse effects is scarce, and just a few studies were conducted to investigate the association between radiopharmaceuticals and adverse reactions. Despite relatively mild and self-limited symptoms, the current widespread use of radiopharmaceuticals requires constant monitoring for adverse reactions.

  5. A comparative analysis of pharmacokinetics properties of diagnostic bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals on the basis of phosphonic acids and technetium-99m

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tishchenko, V. K.; Petriev, V. M.; Smoryzanova, O. A.; Zavestovskaya, I. N.

    2017-01-01

    This work is devoted to comparative research of pharmacokinetics properties of four bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals (RPP) on the basis of bi- tetra- and penta-phosphonic acids. Biodistribution studies were performed in intact rats after intravenous injections of 99mTc-hydroxyethylidenediphosphonic acid (99mTc-HEDP), 99mTc-oxabiphor (99mTc-OXB), 99mTc-ethylenediaminetetramethylenephosphonic acid (99mTc-EDTMP) or 99mTc-diethylenetriaminopentakis(methylphosphonic acid) (99mTc-PPA). In the structure of the HEDP contains two phosphonic groups, OENTMP and EDTMP – four phosphonic groups, PPA – five phosphonic groups. Radiochemical yield of labeled 99mTc HEDP, OENTMP, EDTMP, PPA is not less than 95%, the radiochemical impurities does not exceed 5%. The investigated compounds have high stability in vivo and selective accumulation in osseous tissue. The highest concentrations of labeled compounds is reached in 3–24 hours after their intravenous injections. The investigated compounds are rapidly excreted from blood and soft organs and tissues mainly through the urinary routes. So present study has showed that these RPP have properties, which making them promising candidates as a diagnostic pharmaceuticals of bone metastases.

  6. Synthesis, Radiolabeling, and Characterization of Plasma Protein-Binding Ligands: Potential Tools for Modulation of the Pharmacokinetic Properties of (Radio)Pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Müller, Cristina; Farkas, Renáta; Borgna, Francesca; Schmid, Raffaella M; Benešová, Martina; Schibli, Roger

    2017-09-12

    The development of (radio)pharmaceuticals with favorable pharmacokinetic profiles is crucial for allowing the optimization of the imaging or therapeutic potential and the minimization of undesired side effects. The aim of this study was, therefore, to evaluate and compare three different plasma protein binders (PPB-01, PPB-02, and PPB-03) that are potentially useful in combination with (radio)pharmaceuticals to enhance their half-life in the blood. The entities were functionalized with a 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) chelator via a l-lysine and β-alanine linker moiety using solid-phase peptide chemistry and labeled with (177)Lu (T1/2 = 6.65 days), a clinically established radiometal. The binding capacities of these radioligands and (177)Lu-DOTA were evaluated using human plasma and solutions of human serum albumin (HSA), human α1-acid glycoprotein (α1-AGP), and human transthyretin (hTTR) by applying an ultrafiltration assay. (177)Lu-DOTA-PPB-01 and (177)Lu-DOTA-PPB-02 bound to a high and moderate extent to human plasma proteins (>90% and ∼70%, respectively), whereas the binding to hTTR was considered negligible (<10%). (177)Lu-DOTA-PPB-03 showed almost complete binding to human plasma proteins (>90%) with a high fraction bound to hTTR (∼50%). Plasma protein binding of the (177)Lu-DOTA complex, which was used as a control, was not observed (<1%). (177)Lu-DOTA-PPB-01 and (177)Lu-DOTA-PPB-02 were both displaced (>80%) from HSA by ibuprofen, specific for Sudlow's binding site II and coherent with the aromatic structures, and >80% by their respective binding entities. (177)Lu-DOTA-PPB-03 was displaced from hTTR by the site-marker l-thyroxine (>60%) and by its binding entity PPB-03* (>80%). All three radioligands were investigated with regard to the in vivo blood clearance in normal mice. (177)Lu-DOTA-PPB-01 showed the slowest blood clearance (T1/2,β: >15 h) followed by (177)Lu-DOTA-PPB-03 (T1/2,β: ∼2.33 h) and (177)Lu

  7. Radiopharmaceutical bacteriostats

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, R.J.; Tartaglia, D.

    1993-07-13

    A radiopharmaceutical has been prepared with a composition comprising: (a) a radioactive iodine-based radiopharmaceutical; (b) an auto radiolytic decomposition-inhibiting antioxidant selected from: (i) ascorbic acid (ii) nicotinamide, (iii) nicotinic acid, and (iv) a mixture of ascorbic acid and nicotinamide; (c) a bacteriostat selected from: (i) benzalkonium chloride, and (ii) benzethonium chloride.

  8. 'Naked' radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Wallner, Paul E. . E-mail: pwallner@rtsx.com

    2006-10-01

    The term 'naked' radiopharmaceuticals, more appropriately, 'unbound' radiopharmaceuticals, refers to any radioisotope used for clinical research or clinical purposes that is not attached to a chemical or biological carrier, and that localizes in various tissues because of a physiologic or chemical propensity/affinity, or secondary to focal anatomic placement. Although they remain useful in selected clinical circumstances, the available agents (except for Iodine-131) have been relegated to an unfortunate and somewhat secondary role. The agents remain useful and worthy of consideration for new clinical investigation and clinical use.

  9. Pharmacokinetic properties of new antitumor radiopharmaceutical on the basis of diamond nanoporous composites labeled with rhenium-188

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petriev, V. M.; Tishchenko, V. K.; Kuril'chik, A. A.; Skvortsov, V. G.

    2017-01-01

    Today the development of address therapeutic radionuclide delivery systems directly to tumor tissue is of current interest. It can be achieved by the design of drug containers of specific sizes and shapes from carbon-based composite materials. It will be allowed to enhance the efficacy of anticancer therapy and avoid serious side effects. In this work we studied the pharmacokinetic properties of nanodiamond nanoporous composite labeled with rhenium-188 in rats with hepatocholangioma PC-1 after intratumoral injection. It was established that substantial part of injected radioactivity remained in tumor tissue. Within three hours after 188Re-nanoporous composites injection activity in tumor constituted 79.1-91.3% of injected dose (ID). Then activity level declined to 45.9% ID at 120 hours. No more than 1.34% ID entered the bloodstream. In soft organs and tissues, except thyroid gland, the content of compound didn’t exceed 0.3% ID/g. The highest activity in thyroid gland was 6.95% ID/g. In conclusion, received results suggest 188Re-nanoporous composites can be promising radionuclide delivery systems for cancer treatment.

  10. Organometallic Radiopharmaceuticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberto, Roger

    Although molecular imaging agents have to be synthesized ultimately from aqueous solutions, organometallic complexes are becoming more and more important as flexible yet kinetically stable building blocks for radiopharmaceutical drug discovery. The diversity of ligands, targets, and targeting molecules related to these complexes is an essential base for finding novel, noninvasive imaging agents to diagnose and eventually treat widespread diseases such as cancer. This review article covers the most important findings toward these objectives accomplished during the past 3-4 years. The two major available organometallic building blocks will be discussed in the beginning together with constraints for market introduction as imposed by science and industry. Since targeting radiopharmaceuticals are a major focus of current research in molecular imaging, attempts toward so-called technetium essential radiopharmaceuticals will be briefly touched in the beginning followed by the main discussion about the labeling of targeting molecules such as folic acid, nucleosides, vitamins, carbohydrates, and fatty acids. At the end, some new strategies for drug discovery will be introduced together with results from organometallic chemistry in water. The majority of the new results have been achieved with the [99mTc(OH2)3(CO)3]+ complex which will, though not exclusively, be a focus of this review.

  11. Uncertainty Quantification in Internal Dose Calculations for Seven Selected Radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Spielmann, Vladimir; Li, Wei Bo; Zankl, Maria; Oeh, Uwe; Hoeschen, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Dose coefficients of radiopharmaceuticals have been published by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the MIRD Committee but without information concerning uncertainties. The uncertainty information of dose coefficients is important, for example, to compare alternative diagnostic methods and choose the method that causes the lowest patient exposure with appropriate and comparable diagnostic quality. For the study presented here, an uncertainty analysis method was developed and used to calculate the uncertainty of the internal doses of 7 common radiopharmaceuticals. On the basis of the generalized schema of dose calculation recommended by the ICRP and MIRD Committee, an analysis based on propagation of uncertainty was developed and applied for 7 radiopharmaceuticals. The method takes into account the uncertainties contributed from pharmacokinetic models and the so-called S values derived from several voxel computational phantoms previously developed at Helmholtz Zentrum München. Random and Latin hypercube sampling techniques were used to sample parameters of pharmacokinetic models and S values, and the uncertainties of absorbed doses and effective doses were calculated. The uncertainty factors (square root of the ratio between 97.5th and 2.5th percentiles) for organ-absorbed doses are in the range of 1.1-3.3. Uncertainty values of effective doses are lower in comparison to absorbed doses, the maximum value being approximately 1.4. The ICRP reference values showed a deviation comparable to the effective dose calculated in this study. A general statistical method was developed for calculating the uncertainty of absorbed doses and effective doses for 7 radiopharmaceuticals. The dose uncertainties can be used to further identify the most important parameters in the dose calculation and provide reliable dose coefficients for risk analysis of the patients in nuclear medicine. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging

  12. Medicinal Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry of Metal Radiopharmaceuticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saw, Maung Maung

    2012-06-01

    Metal complexes have been used as medicinal compounds. Metals have advantageous features over organic compounds. Significant applications of metal complexes are in the field of nuclear medicine. Radiopharmaceuticals are drugs containing radioisotopes used for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. The generalized targeting strategy for molecular imaging probe consists of three essential parts: (i) reporter unit or payload, (ii) carrier, and (iii) targeting system. Medicinal radiopharmaceutical chemistry pays special consideration to radioisotopes, as a reporter unit for diagnostic application or as a payload for therapeutic application. Targeting is achieved by a few approaches but the most common is the bifunctional chelator approach. While designing a radiopharmaceutical, a range of issues needs to be considered including properties of metal radioisotopes, bifunctional chelators, linkers, and targeting molecules. Designing radiopharmaceuticals requires consideration of two key words: "compounds of biological interest" and "fit for intended use." The ultimate goal is the development of new diagnostic methods and treatment. Diagnostic metal radiopharmaceuticals are used for SPECT and PET applications. Technetium chemistry constitutes a major portion of SPECT and gallium chemistry constitutes a major portion of PET. Therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals can be constructed by using alpha-, beta minus-, or Auger electron-emitting radiometals. Special uses of medicinal radiopharmaceuticals include internal radiation therapy, brachytherapy, immunoPET, radioimmunotherapy, and peptide receptor radionuclide imaging and therapy.

  13. Applications of click chemistry in radiopharmaceutical development.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Joseph C; Kolb, Hartmuth C

    2010-01-01

    Click chemistry, a concept that employs only practical and reliable transformations for compound synthesis, has made a significant impact in several areas of chemistry, including material sciences and drug discovery. The present article describes the use of click chemistry for the development of radiopharmaceuticals. Target templated in situ click chemistry was used for lead generation. The 1,2,3-triazole moiety was found to improve the pharmacokinetic properties of certain radiopharmaceuticals. The reliable Cu(I)-catalyzed click reaction was employed for radiolabeling of peptidic compounds without the need for protecting groups. In summary, the click chemistry approach for the discovery, optimization and labeling of new radiotracers, represents a very powerful tool for radiopharmaceutical development.

  14. Dosimetry for Radiopharmaceutical Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sgouros, George; Hobbs, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Radiopharmaceutical therapy (RPT) involves the use of radionuclides that are either conjugated to tumor-targeting agents (eg, nanoscale constructs, antibodies, peptides, and small molecules) or concentrated in tissue through natural physiological mechanisms that occur predominantly in neoplastic or otherwise targeted cells (eg, Graves disease). The ability to collect pharmacokinetic data by imaging and use this to perform dosimetry calculations for treatment planning distinguishes RPT from other systemic treatment modalities. Treatment planning has not been widely adopted, in part, because early attempts to relate dosimetry to outcome were not successful. This was partially because a dosimetry methodology appropriate to risk evaluation rather than efficacy and toxicity was being applied to RPT. The weakest links in both diagnostic and therapeutic dosimetry are the accuracy of the input and the reliability of the radiobiological models used to convert dosimetric data to the relevant biologic end points. Dosimetry for RPT places a greater demand on both of these weak links. To date, most dosimetric studies have been retrospective, with a focus on tumor dose-response correlations rather than prospective treatment planning. In this regard, transarterial radioembolization also known as intra-arterial radiation therapy, which uses radiolabeled (90Y) microspheres of glass or resin to treat lesions in the liver holds much promise for more widespread dosimetric treatment planning. The recent interest in RPT with alpha-particle emitters has highlighted the need to adopt a dosimetry methodology that specifically accounts for the unique aspects of alpha particles. The short range of alpha-particle emitters means that in cases in which the distribution of activity is localized to specific functional components or cell types of an organ, the absorbed dose will be equally localized and dosimetric calculations on the scale of organs or even voxels (~5 mm) are no longer sufficient

  15. Automated dispensing and calibration of diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Nazififard, Mohammad; Mahdizadeh, Simin; Suh, Kune Y

    2013-05-01

    A real-time automatic dose dispenser (RADD) has been designed and fabricated for automatic withdrawal and calibration of diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals such as those labelled with (99m)Tc. This system enhances the accuracy and precision of activity measurements and reduces personal radiation exposure. The structure, function, user-friendliness and performance of this device are described and examined for diagnostic activities of (99m)Tc ranging from 50 to 650 MBq. The results show that the RADD minimises the likelihood of miscalibration of radiopharmaceuticals due to human error and results in significantly reduced variability (i.e. higher precision) in dispensed activities of radiopharmaceuticals.

  16. Radiopharmaceuticals in cardiology.

    PubMed

    Mikołajczak, Renata; Garnuszek, Piotr

    2012-04-24

    Myocardial perfusion studies are among the most often performed investigations in Nuclear Medicine. However, the development of radiopharmaceuticals for cardiology is an emerging discipline and several other radiotracers have been proven to be useful. Although the myocardial perfusion studies have a well established role in the management of cardiac disorders, still a number of radiopharmaceuticals are under development for a variety of specific cardiac indications and their eventual clinical role remains to be seen. The paper provides a short overview of currently used radiopharmaceuticals and potential molecular imaging radiotracers applicable in cardiology.

  17. Eleventh international symposium on radiopharmaceutical chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    This document contains abstracts of papers which were presented at the Eleventh International Symposium on Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry. Sessions included: radiopharmaceuticals for the dopaminergic system, strategies for the production and use of labelled reactive small molecules, radiopharmaceuticals for measuring metabolism, radiopharmaceuticals for the serotonin and sigma receptor systems, labelled probes for molecular biology applications, radiopharmaceuticals for receptor systems, radiopharmaceuticals utilizing coordination chemistry, radiolabelled antibodies, radiolabelling methods for small molecules, analytical techniques in radiopharmaceutical chemistry, and analytical techniques in radiopharmaceutical chemistry.

  18. [Nuclear medicine and radiopharmaceuticals].

    PubMed

    Sopena Novales, P; Plancha Mansanet, M C; Martinez Carsi, C; Sopena Monforte, R

    2014-06-01

    Nuclear Medicine is a medical specialty that allows modern diagnostics and treatments using radiopharmaceuticals original radiotracers (drugs linked to a radioactive isotope). In Europe, radiopharmaceuticals are considered a special group of drugs and thus their preparation and use are regulated by a set of policies that have been adopted by individual member countries. The radiopharmaceuticals used in diagnostic examinations are administered in very small doses. So, in general, they have no pharmacological action, side effects or serious adverse reactions. The biggest problem associated with their use are the alterations in their biodistribution that may cause diagnostic errors. Nuclear Medicine is growing considerably influenced by the appearance and development of new radiopharmaceuticals in both the diagnostic and therapeutic fields and primarily to the impact of new multimodality imaging techniques (SPECT-CT, PET-CT, PET-MRI, etc.). It's mandatory to know the limitations of these techniques, distribution and eventual physiological alterations of radiopharmaceuticals, contraindications and adverse reactions of radiological contrasts, and the possible interference of both.

  19. Radiopharmaceuticals: Progress and clinical perspectives. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Fritzberg, A.R.

    1986-01-01

    This volume examines the radiopharmaceuticals from both the clinical and pharmaceutical research viewpoints. Classes of radiopharmaceuticals are covered by organ type, including the heart, brain, liver, kidney, adrenal, blood, and bone. Also included are discussions of radiolabeled antibodies for cancer; cyclotron-produced radiopharmaceuticals; receptor agents, radiopharmaceutical design; and animal and human evaluation studies. The contents of VOLUME II include: Radiolabeled Leukocytes and Platelets, Thrombus-Localizing Radiopharmaceutical, Radiolabeled Red Blood Cells as Diagnostic Radiopharmaceuticals, Radiopharmaceuticals for Imaging Reticuloendothelial Systems, Clinical Potential of Receptor Based Radiopharmaceuticals, Clinical Potential of Positron-Emitting Radiopharmaceuticals, Bone Radiopharmaceuticals, and Index.

  20. Method for preparing radiopharmaceutical complexes

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Alun G.; Davison, Alan; Abrams, Michael J.

    1989-05-02

    A method for preparing radiopharmaceutical complexes that are substantially free of the reaction materials used to produce the radiopharmaceutical complex is disclosed. The method involves admixing in a suitable first solvent in a container a target seeking ligand or salt or metal adduct thereof, a radionuclide label, and a reducing agent for said radionuclide, thereby forming said radiopharmaceutical complex; coating the interior walls of the container with said pharmaceutical complex; discarding the solvent containing by-products and unreacted starting reaction materials; and removing the radiopharmaceutical complex from said walls by dissolving it in a second solvent, thereby obtaining said radiopharmaceutical complex substantially free of by-products and unreacted starting materials.

  1. Process for preparing radiopharmaceuticals

    DOEpatents

    Barak, Morton; Winchell, Harry S.

    1977-01-04

    A process for the preparation of technetium-99m labeled pharmaceuticals is disclosed. The process comprises initially isolating technetium-99m pertechnetate by adsorption upon an adsorbent packing in a chromatographic column. The technetium-99m is then eluted from the packing with a biological compound to form a radiopharmaceutical.

  2. Melanin-binding radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Packer, S; Fairchild, R G; Watts, K P; Greenberg, D; Hannon, S J

    1980-01-01

    The scope of this paper is limited to an analysis of the factors that are important to the relationship of radiopharmaceuticals to melanin. While the authors do not attempt to deal with differences between melanin-binding vs. melanoma-binding, a notable variance is assumed. (PSB)

  3. Audits of radiopharmaceutical formulations

    SciTech Connect

    Castronovo, F.P. Jr. )

    1992-03-01

    A procedure for auditing radiopharmaceutical formulations is described. To meet FDA guidelines regarding the quality of radiopharmaceuticals, institutional radioactive drug research committees perform audits when such drugs are formulated away from an institutional pharmacy. All principal investigators who formulate drugs outside institutional pharmacies must pass these audits before they can obtain a radiopharmaceutical investigation permit. The audit team meets with the individual who performs the formulation at the site of drug preparation to verify that drug formulations meet identity, strength, quality, and purity standards; are uniform and reproducible; and are sterile and pyrogen free. This team must contain an expert knowledgeable in the preparation of radioactive drugs; a radiopharmacist is the most qualified person for this role. Problems that have been identified by audits include lack of sterility and apyrogenicity testing, formulations that are open to the laboratory environment, failure to use pharmaceutical-grade chemicals, inadequate quality control methods or records, inadequate training of the person preparing the drug, and improper unit dose preparation. Investigational radiopharmaceutical formulations, including nonradiolabeled drugs, must be audited before they are administered to humans. A properly trained pharmacist should be a member of the audit team.

  4. Radiopharmaceuticals: Progress and clinical perspectives. Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    Fritzberg, A.R.

    1986-01-01

    This volume examines the radiopharmaceuticals from both the clinical and pharmaceutical research viewpoints. Classes of radiopharmaceuticals are covered by organ type, including the heart, brain, liver, kidney, adrenal, blood, and bone. Also included are discussions of radiolabeled antibodies for cancer; cyclotron-produced radiopharmaceuticals; receptor agents; radiopharmaceutical design; and animal and human evaluation studies. VOLUME I: Contents include: Cationic Radiotracers as Myocardial Radiopharmaceuticals, Brain Radiopharmaceuticals, Antibody imaging and Therapy in Human Cancer, Advances in Renal Radiopharmaceuticals, Advances in the Development of Hepatobiliary Radiopharmaceuticals, Radiopharmaceutical Design, The Adrenal Medulla and its Diseases, and Index.

  5. Astatine Radiopharmaceuticals: Prospects and Problems.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Zalutsky, Michael R

    2008-09-01

    For the treatment of minimum residual diseases such micrometastases and residual tumor margins that remain after debulking of the primary tumor, targeted radiotherapy using radiopharmaceuticals tagged with alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides is very attractive. In addition to the their short range in tissue, which helps minimize harmful effects on adjacent normal tissues, alpha-particles, being high LET radiation, have several radiobiological advantages. The heavy halogen, astatine-211 is one of the prominent alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides in practice. Being a halogen, it can often be incorporated into biomolecules of interest by adapting radioiodination chemistry. A wide spectrum of compounds from the simple [(211)At]astatide ion to small organic molecules, peptides, and large proteins labeled with (211)At have been investigated with at least two reaching the stage of clinical evaluation. The chemistry, cytotoxic advantages, biodistribution studies, and microdosimetry/pharmacokinetic modeling of some of these agents will be reviewed. In addition, potential problems such as the harmful effect of radiolysis on the synthesis, lack of sufficient in vivo stability of astatinated compounds, and possible adverse effects when they are systemically administered will be discussed.

  6. Astatine Radiopharmaceuticals: Prospects and Problems

    PubMed Central

    Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Zalutsky, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    For the treatment of minimum residual diseases such micrometastases and residual tumor margins that remain after debulking of the primary tumor, targeted radiotherapy using radiopharmaceuticals tagged with α-particle-emitting radionuclides is very attractive. In addition to the their short range in tissue, which helps minimize harmful effects on adjacent normal tissues, α-particles, being high LET radiation, have several radiobiological advantages. The heavy halogen, astatine-211 is one of the prominent α-particle-emitting radionuclides in practice. Being a halogen, it can often be incorporated into biomolecules of interest by adapting radioiodination chemistry. A wide spectrum of compounds from the simple [211At]astatide ion to small organic molecules, peptides, and large proteins labeled with 211At have been investigated with at least two reaching the stage of clinical evaluation. The chemistry, cytotoxic advantages, biodistribution studies, and microdosimetry/pharmacokinetic modeling of some of these agents will be reviewed. In addition, potential problems such as the harmful effect of radiolysis on the synthesis, lack of sufficient in vivo stability of astatinated compounds, and possible adverse effects when they are systemically administered will be discussed. PMID:20150978

  7. SPECT radiopharmaceuticals for dementia.

    PubMed

    Guidotti, Claudio; Farioli, Daniela; Gaeta, Maria Chiara; Giovannini, Elisabetta; Lazzeri, Patrizia; Meniconi, Martina; Ciarmiello, Andrea

    2013-12-01

    Over the last decade the interest towards functional neuroimaging has gradually increased, especially in the field of neurodegenerative diseases. At present, diagnosis of dementia is mostly clinical. Numerous modalities of neuroimaging are today available, each of them allowing a different aspect of neurodegeneration to be investigated. Although during the last period many have predicted a forthcoming disappearance of SPECT imaging in favour of the PET imaging, many new radiotracers SPECT, dual-SPECT tracers techniques and receptor targeting designed radiopharmaceuticals are currently at study. Besides, last decade has also assisted to the development of new SPECT imaging systems, most of them integrated with other imaging modalities (MRI, CT, ultrasound techniques), granting improved imaging capabilities. All these improved conditions, especially appealing for the neuroimaging, together with the new radiopharmaceuticals in development may renovate the interest for SPECT clinical applications.

  8. Radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, D.E.

    1990-06-01

    During this grant period 1 January 1988--31 December 1990, we have successfully developed a number of new approaches to fluorine-18 labeled compounds, prepared several new radiotracers for both animal studies and eventual clinical trials, and explored the utility of a high-quality industrial robot in radiopharmaceutical applications. The progress during the last grant period is summarized briefly in the following sections. Publications arising from this research are listed below and can be found in Appendix I. 1 fig.

  9. Cyclotrons and positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, A.P.; Fowler, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    The state of the art of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) technology as related to cyclotron use and radiopharmaceutical production is reviewed. The paper discusses available small cyclotrons, the positron emitters which can be produced and the yields possible, target design, and radiopharmaceutical development and application. 97 refs., 12 tabs. (ACR)

  10. Radiopharmaceuticals in Acute Porphyria.

    PubMed

    Schreuder, Nanno; Mamedova, Ilahä; Jansman, Frank G A

    2016-10-01

    The acute porphyrias are a group of rare metabolic disorders of the heme biosynthetic pathway. Carriers of the acute porphyria gene are prone to potentially fatal acute attacks, which can be precipitated by drug exposure. It is therefore important to know whether a drug is safe for carriers of the acute porphyria gene. In this study, radiopharmaceuticals were assessed on their porphyrogenicity (ie, the potential of a drug to induce an attack). The assessment was conducted by classifying the drugs according to the Thunell model. From 41 radiopharmaceuticals assessed, I-131 norcholesterol, Tc-99m mebrofenin, Tc-99m phytate, Tc-99m sestamibi, and Tl-201 chloride were classified as possibly porphyrogenic. I-131 norcholesterol, Tc-99m mebrofenin, Tc-99m phytate, Tc-99m sestamibi, and Tl-201 chloride should not be prescribed for patients experiencing acute porphyria unless an urgent indication is present and no safer alternative is available. In such cases, potential users should seek advice from a porphyria expert. Preventive measures may also be required. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Unconventional Nuclides for Radiopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Jason P.; Williamson, Matthew J.; Lewis, Jason S.

    2016-01-01

    Rapid and widespread growth in the use of nuclear medicine for both diagnosis and therapy of disease has been the driving force behind burgeoning research interests in the design of novel radiopharmaceuticals. Until recently, the majority of clinical and basic science research has focused on the development of 11C-, 13N-, 15O-, and 18F-radiopharmaceuticals for use with positron emission tomography (PET) and 99mTc-labeled agents for use with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). With the increased availability of small, low-energy cyclotrons and improvements in both cyclotron targetry and purification chemistries, the use of “nonstandard” radionuclides is becoming more prevalent. This brief review describes the physical characteristics of 60 radionuclides, including β+, β−, γ-ray, and α-particle emitters, which have the potential for use in the design and synthesis of the next generation of diagnostic and/or radiotherapeutic drugs. As the decay processes of many of the radionuclides described herein involve emission of high-energy γ-rays, relevant shielding and radiation safety issues are also considered. In particular, the properties and safety considerations associated with the increasingly prevalent PET nuclides 64Cu, 68Ga, 86Y, 89Zr, and 124I are discussed. PMID:20128994

  12. PASylated Coversin, a C5-Specific Complement Inhibitor with Extended Pharmacokinetics, Shows Enhanced Anti-Hemolytic Activity in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Nadine; Schmidt, Christoph Q; Schlapschy, Martin; Skerra, Arne

    2016-10-19

    The Ornithodoros moubata Complement Inhibitor (OmCI) binds complement component 5 (C5) with high affinity and, thus, selectively prevents proteolytic activation of the terminal lytic complement pathway. A recombinant version of OmCI (also known as Coversin and rEV576) has proven efficacious in several animal models of complement-mediated diseases and successfully completed a phase Ia clinical trial. Coversin is a small 17 kDa lipocalin protein which has a very short plasma half-life if not bound to C5; therefore, the drug requires frequent dosing. We have improved the pharmacokinetics of Coversin by N-terminal translational conjugation with a 600 residue polypeptide composed of Pro, Ala, and Ser (PAS) residues. To this end, PAS-Coversin as well as the unmodified Coversin were functionally expressed in the cytoplasm of E. coli and purified to homogeneity. Both versions showed identical affinity to human C5, as determined by surface plasmon resonance measurements, and revealed similar complement inhibitory activity, as measured in ELISAs with human serum. In line with the PEG-like biophysical properties, PASylation dramatically prolonged the plasma half-life of uncomplexed Coversin by a factor ≥50 in mice. In a clinically relevant in vitro model of the complement-mediated disease paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) both versions of Coversin effectively reduced erythrocyte lysis. Unexpectedly, while the IC50 values were comparable, PAS-Coversin reached a substantially lower plateau of residual lysis at saturating inhibitor concentrations. Taken together, our data demonstrate two clinically relevant improvements of PASylated Coversin: markedly increased plasma half-life and considerably reduced background hemolysis of erythrocytes with PNH-induced phenotype.

  13. PET Radiopharmaceuticals for Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sushil

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in the self-shielded cyclotrons, improved targets, videomonitored hot cells design, and automated PET radiopharmaceutical (RPs) synthesis modules, utilizing computer-controlled graphic user interphase (GUI) has revolutionized PET molecular imaging technology for basic biomedical research and theranostics to accomplish the ultimate goal of evidence-based personalized medicine. Particularly, [18F]HX4: (3-[18F]fluoro-2-(4-((2-nitro-1Himidazol-1-yl)methyl)-1H-1,2,3,-triazol-1- yl)-propan-1-ol), 18F-FAZA: 1-(5-[18F]Fluoro-5-deoxy-α-D-arabinofuranosyl)-2- nitroimidazole, and 18F-FMSIO: 18F-Ffluoromisonidazole to assess tumor hypoxia, [18F]FB-VAD-FMK: [18F]4-fluorobenzylcarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp(OMe)-fluoromethylketone to determine in vivo apoptosis, 64Cu-PTSM: 64Cu-Pyrualdehyde Bis-NMethylthiosemicarbazone for brain and myocardial perfusion imaging, and 68Ga-DOTATOC: 68Ga- DOTAD-Phy1-Tyr3-octreotide and 68Ga-DOTANOC: 68Ga-(1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane- N,N',N'',N'''-tetraacetic acid)-1-NaI3-octreotide for neuroendocrine and neural crest tumors have demonstrated great promise in personalized theranostics. Furthermore, multimodality imaging with 124IPET/ CT and 18FDG-PET/CT rationalizes 131I treatment in thyroid cancer patients to prevent cost and morbid toxicity. In addition to 18F-labeled PET-RPs used in clinical practice, novel discoveries of chemical reactions including transition metal-mediated cross-coupling of carbon-carbon, carbonheterocarbon, and click chemistry at ambient temperature with significantly reduced synthesis times, labeled even with short-lived radionuclides such as 11C, has facilitated development of novel PET-RPs. These innovative approaches to synthesize PET-RPs and efficient image acquisition capabilities have improved the resolution of multimodality imaging and significantly reduced the radiation exposure to patients as well as healthcare professionals. Future developments in novel PET-RPs, utilizing automated microfluidic synthesis

  14. Recent advances in copper radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Hao, Guiyang; Singh, Ajay N; Oz, Orhan K; Sun, Xiankai

    2011-04-01

    Copper has five radioisotopes ((60)Cu, (61)Cu, (62)Cu, (64)Cu, and (67)Cu) that can be used in copper radiopharmaceuticals. These radioisotopes decay by mixed emissions of β+, β-, and γ with a wide range of half-lives from 9.74 min ((62)Cu) to 2.58 d ((67)Cu), which enable the design and synthesis of a variety of radiopharmaceuticals for different biomedical applications in diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine. However, due to the availability and production cost, the research efforts in copper radiopharmaceuticals are mainly focused on the use of (64)Cu (t(1/2) = 12.7 h; 17.4% β+, 43% EC, 39% β-), a radioisotope with low positron energy (E β+max = 0.656 MeV) that is ideal for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging quantification and β- emissions along with Auger electron for radiotherapy. Driven by the ever-increasing availability of preclinical and clinical PET scanners, a considerable interest has been seen in the development of novel copper radiopharmaceuticals in the past decade for a variety of diseases as represented by PET imaging of cancer. To avoid unnecessary literature redundancy, this review focuses on the unrepresented research aspects of copper chemistry (e.g. electrochemistry) and their uses in the evaluation of novel nuclear imaging probe design and recent advances in the field towards the practical use of copper radiopharmaceuticals.

  15. Preparation of radiopharmaceuticals labeled with metal radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, M.J.

    1992-06-01

    We recently developed a useful zinc-62/copper-62 generator and are presently evaluating copper-62 radiopharmaceuticals for clinical studies. While developing these copper-62 radiopharmaceuticals, in collaboration with the University of Missouri Research Reactor, Columbia we have also explored copper-64 radiopharmaceuticals. The PET images we obtained with copper-64 tracers were of such high quality that we have developed and evaluated copper-64 labeled antibodies for PET imaging. The major research activities described herein include: the development and assessment of gallium-68 radiopharmaceuticals; the development and evaluation of a new zinc-62/copper-62 generator and the assessment of copper-62 radiopharmaceuticals; mechanistic studies on proteins labeled with metal radionuclides.

  16. Bioinorganic Activity of Technetium Radiopharmaceuticals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinkerton, Thomas C.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Technetium radiopharmaceuticals are diagnostic imaging agents used in the field of nuclear medicine to visualize tissues, anatomical structures, and metabolic disorders. Bioavailability of technetium complexes, thyroid imaging, brain imaging, kidney imaging, imaging liver function, bone imaging, and heart imaging are the major areas discussed. (JN)

  17. Bioinorganic Activity of Technetium Radiopharmaceuticals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinkerton, Thomas C.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Technetium radiopharmaceuticals are diagnostic imaging agents used in the field of nuclear medicine to visualize tissues, anatomical structures, and metabolic disorders. Bioavailability of technetium complexes, thyroid imaging, brain imaging, kidney imaging, imaging liver function, bone imaging, and heart imaging are the major areas discussed. (JN)

  18. Radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    In the period 1969-1986, this project was directed to the evolution of target-specific labeled chemicals useful for nuclear medical imaging, especially radioactive indicators suited to tracing adrenal functions and localizing tumors in the neuroendocrine system. Since 1986, this project research has focused on the chemistry of positron emission tomography (PET) ligands. This project has involved the evaluation of methods for radiochemical syntheses with fluorine-18, as well as the development and preliminary evaluation of new radiopharmaceuticals for positron emission tomography. In the radiochemistry area, the ability to predict fluorine-18 labeling yields for aromatic substitution reactions through the use of carbon-13 NMR analysis was studied. Radiochemical yields can be predicted for some structurally analogous aromatic compounds, but this correlation could not be generally applied to aromatic substrates for this reaction, particularly with changes in ring substituents or leaving groups. Importantly, certain aryl ring substituents, particularly methyl groups, appeared to have a negative effect on fluorination reactions. These observations are important in the future design of syntheses of complicated organic radiopharmaceuticals. In the radiopharmaceutical area, this project has supported the development of a new class of radiopharmaceuticals based on the monoamine vesicular uptake systems. The new radioligands, based on the tetrabenazine structure, offer a new approach to the quantification of monoaminergic neurons in the brain. Preliminary primate imaging studies support further development of these radioligands for PET studies in humans. If successful, such radiopharmaceuticals will find application in studies of the causes and treatment of neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson`s disease.

  19. Preparation of Radiopharmaceuticals Labeled with Metal Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, M.J.

    2012-02-16

    oxygen retention of the tissue and the significantly greater retention amounting in hypoxic tissue. This hypothesis was confirmed in a series of animal studies. Cu-64 can be used both as an imaging radionuclide and a therapeutic radionuclide. The therapeutic efficacy of Cu-64 ATSM was proven in hamsters bearing the CW39 human colorectal tumors. The administration of Cu-64 ATSM significantly increased the survival time of tumor-bearing animals with no acute toxicity. This copper agent therefore shows promise for radiotherapy. The flow tracer Cu-64 PTSM also demonstrates therapeutic potential by inhibiting cancer cells implanted in animal models. Again, this inhibition occurred at doses which showed no sign of toxicity to the animals. Cu-ATSM was translated to humans, under other support a series of tumors were investigated; these included head and neck cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, cervical cancer and renal cancer. Another radionuclide that was investigated was titanium 45. This radionuclide was successfully produced by radiation of a scandium foil with 15 MeV protons. The titanium 45 was processed and separated from residual scandium by high exchange chomotrophy. Titanium titanocene has been utilized as a therapeutic agent; this compound was prepared and studied in vitro and in vivo. Another project was the preparation of cyclodextrin dimers as a new pre-targeting approach for tumor uptake. Beta-cyclodextradin and two other dimers were synthesized. These dimers were studied for the in vivo application. Work continued on the application of the radionuclide already discussed. Technetium 94m, a positron emitting radionuclide of the widely used 99m Tc nuclide was also prepared. This allows the quantification of the uptake of technetium radiopharmaceuticals. In collaboration with Professor David Piwnica-Worms, technetium 94m, sestamibi was studied in animal models and in a limited number of human subjects.

  20. Prospective of 68Ga-Radiopharmaceutical Development

    PubMed Central

    Velikyan, Irina

    2014-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) experienced accelerated development and has become an established method for medical research and clinical routine diagnostics on patient individualized basis. Development and availability of new radiopharmaceuticals specific for particular diseases is one of the driving forces of the expansion of clinical PET. The future development of the 68Ga-radiopharmaceuticals must be put in the context of several aspects such as role of PET in nuclear medicine, unmet medical needs, identification of new biomarkers, targets and corresponding ligands, production and availability of 68Ga, automation of the radiopharmaceutical production, progress of positron emission tomography technologies and image analysis methodologies for improved quantitation accuracy, PET radiopharmaceutical regulations as well as advances in radiopharmaceutical chemistry. The review presents the prospects of the 68Ga-based radiopharmaceutical development on the basis of the current status of these aspects as well as wide range and variety of imaging agents. PMID:24396515

  1. Radiopharmaceuticals for imaging the heart

    DOEpatents

    Green, M.A.; Tsang, B.W.

    1994-06-28

    Radiopharmaceuticals for imaging myocardial tissues are prepared by forming lipophilic, cationic complexes of radioactive metal ions with metal chelating ligands comprising the Schiff base adducts of triamines and tetraamines with optionally substituted salicylaldehydes. The lipophilic, cationic, radioactive complexes of the invention exhibit high uptake and retention in myocardial tissues. Preferred gallium-68(III) complexes in accordance with this invention can be used to image the heart using positron emission tomography. 6 figures.

  2. Radiopharmaceuticals for imaging the heart

    DOEpatents

    Green, Mark A.; Tsang, Brenda W.

    1994-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals for imaging myocardial tissues are prepared by forming lipophilic, cationic complexes of radioactive metal ions with metal chelating ligands comprising the Schiff base adducts of triamines and tetraamines with optionally substituted salicylaldehydes. The lipophilic, cationic, radioactive complexes of the invention exhibit high uptake and retention in myocardial tissues. Preferred gallium-68(III) complexes in accordance with this invention can be used to image the heart using positron emission tomography.

  3. Radiation dose estimates for radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Stabin, M.G.; Stubbs, J.B.; Toohey, R.E.

    1996-04-01

    Tables of radiation dose estimates based on the Cristy-Eckerman adult male phantom are provided for a number of radiopharmaceuticals commonly used in nuclear medicine. Radiation dose estimates are listed for all major source organs, and several other organs of interest. The dose estimates were calculated using the MIRD Technique as implemented in the MIRDOSE3 computer code, developed by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Radiation Internal Dose Information Center. In this code, residence times for source organs are used with decay data from the MIRD Radionuclide Data and Decay Schemes to produce estimates of radiation dose to organs of standardized phantoms representing individuals of different ages. The adult male phantom of the Cristy-Eckerman phantom series is different from the MIRD 5, or Reference Man phantom in several aspects, the most important of which is the difference in the masses and absorbed fractions for the active (red) marrow. The absorbed fractions for flow energy photons striking the marrow are also different. Other minor differences exist, but are not likely to significantly affect dose estimates calculated with the two phantoms. Assumptions which support each of the dose estimates appears at the bottom of the table of estimates for a given radiopharmaceutical. In most cases, the model kinetics or organ residence times are explicitly given. The results presented here can easily be extended to include other radiopharmaceuticals or phantoms.

  4. Effect of blood activity on dosimetric calculations for radiopharmaceuticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvereva, Alexandra; Petoussi-Henss, Nina; Li, Wei Bo; Schlattl, Helmut; Oeh, Uwe; Zankl, Maria; Graner, Frank Philipp; Hoeschen, Christoph; Nekolla, Stephan G.; Parodi, Katia; Schwaiger, Markus

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate the influence of the definition of blood as a distinct source on organ doses, associated with the administration of a novel radiopharmaceutical for positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging—(S)-4-(3-18F-fluoropropyl)-L-glutamic acid (18F-FSPG). Personalised pharmacokinetic models were constructed based on clinical PET/CT images from five healthy volunteers and blood samples from four of them. Following an identifiability analysis of the developed compartmental models, person-specific model parameters were estimated using the commercial program SAAM II. Organ doses were calculated in accordance to the formalism promulgated by the Committee on Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) using specific absorbed fractions for photons and electrons previously derived for the ICRP reference adult computational voxel phantoms. Organ doses for two concepts were compared: source organ activities in organs parenchyma with blood as a separate source (concept-1); aggregate activities in perfused source organs without blood as a distinct source (concept-2). Aggregate activities comprise the activities of organs parenchyma and the activity in the regional blood volumes (RBV). Concept-1 resulted in notably higher absorbed doses for most organs, especially non-source organs with substantial blood contents, e.g. lungs (92% maximum difference). Consequently, effective doses increased in concept-1 compared to concept-2 by 3-10%. Not considering the blood as a distinct source region leads to an underestimation of the organ absorbed doses and effective doses. The pronounced influence of the blood even for a radiopharmaceutical with a rapid clearance from the blood, such as 18F-FSPG, suggests that blood should be introduced as a separate compartment in most compartmental pharmacokinetic models and blood should be considered as a distinct source in

  5. Internal dose assessment for 211At α-emitter in isotonic solution as radiopharmaceutical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuminov, O. A.; Fotina, O. V.; Priselkova, A. B.; Tultaev, A. V.; Platonov, S. Yu.; Eremenko, D. O.; Drozdov, V. A.

    2003-12-01

    The functional fitness of the α-emitter 211At for radiotherapy of the thyroid gland cancer is evaluated. Radiation doses are calculated using the MIRD method and previously obtained pharmacokinetic data for 211At in isotonic solution and for 123I as sodium iodide. Analysis of the 211At radiation dose to the thyroid gland suggests that this radiopharmaceutical may be predominantly used for the treatment of the thyroid cancer.

  6. Radioactive Ion Beams and Radiopharmaceuticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laxdal, R. E.; Morton, A. C.; Schaffer, P.

    2014-02-01

    Experiments performed at radioactive ion beam facilities shed new light on nuclear physics and nuclear structure, as well as nuclear astrophysics, materials science and medical science. The many existing facilities, as well as the new generation of facilities being built and those proposed for the future, are a testament to the high interest in this rapidly expanding field. The opportunities inherent in radioactive beam facilities have enabled the search for radioisotopes suitable for medical diagnosis or therapy. In this article, an overview of the production techniques and the current status of RIB facilities and proposals will be presented. In addition, accelerator-generated radiopharmaceuticals will be reviewed.

  7. Renal radiopharmaceuticals--an update

    SciTech Connect

    Chervu, L.R.; Blaufox, M.D.

    1982-07-01

    Noninvasive radionuclide procedures in the evaluation of renal disease have been accepted increasingly as effective and valuable alternatives to older clinical methods. The development of suitable radiopharmaceuticals labeled with high photon intensity radionuclides and with /sup 99m/Tc in particular has stimulated this modality during the last few years. Currently several nearly ideal agents are available for anatomical and functional studies of kidney imparting very low absorbed radiation doses. These include /sup 99m/Tc-GHA and /sup 99m/Tc-DMSA for renal morphology and differential function evaluation, /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA for GFR and /sup 123/I orthoiodohippurate for ERPF measurements. A suitable agent as a replacement for the latter labeled with /sup 99m/Tc is actively being sought. Computer-assisted processing of dynamic renal function studies enables the observer to obtain a wealth of information related to the renal extraction, uptake, parenchymal transit and pelvic transit parameters of the agent administered into the bloodstream. Each of these parameters either globally or differentially contributes to a detailed evaluation of renal disease states. Several of these procedures have been validated against classical techniques clinically but more detailed information is being sought with the recently introduced radiopharmaceuticals. With the detailed validation and increasing recognition of the clinical utility of several of the radionuclidic procedures at many centers, it is hoped that radionuclide assessment of renal disorders ultimately will be made available routinely at all medical facilities.

  8. Fourth international radiopharmaceutical dosimetry symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Schlafke-Stelson, A.T.; Watson, E.E.

    1986-04-01

    The focus of the Fourth International Radiopharmaceutical Dosimetry Symposium was to explore the impact of current developments in nuclear medicine on absorbed dose calculations. This book contains the proceedings of the meeting including the edited discussion that followed the presentations. Topics that were addressed included the dosimetry associated with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies and blood elements, ultrashort-lived radionuclides, and positron emitters. Some specific areas of discussion were variations in absorbed dose as a result of alterations in the kinetics, the influence of radioactive contaminants on dose, dose in children and in the fetus, available instrumentation and techniques for collecting the kinetic data needed for dose calculation, dosimetry requirements for the review and approval of new radiopharmaceuticals, and a comparison of the effect on the thyroid of internal versus external irradiation. New models for the urinary blader, skeleton including the active marrow, and the blood were presented. Several papers dealt with the validity of traditional ''average-organ'' dose estimates to express the dose from particulate radiation that has a short range in tissue. These problems are particularly important in the use of monoclonal antibodies and agents used to measure intracellular functions. These proceedings have been published to provide a resource volume for anyone interested in the calculation of absorbed radiation dose.

  9. Hot atom chemistry and radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Krohn, Kenneth A.; Moerlein, Stephen M.; Link, Jeanne M.; Welch, Michael J.

    2012-12-19

    The chemical products made in a cyclotron target are a combined result of the chemical effects of the nuclear transformation that made the radioactive atom and the bulk radiolysis in the target. This review uses some well-known examples to understand how hot atom chemistry explains the primary products from a nuclear reaction and then how radiation chemistry is exploited to set up the optimal product for radiosynthesis. It also addresses the chemical effects of nuclear decay. There are important principles that are common to hot atom chemistry and radiopharmaceutical chemistry. Both emphasize short-lived radionuclides and manipulation of high specific activity nuclides. Furthermore, they both rely on radiochromatographic separation for identification of no-carrieradded products.

  10. Hot atom chemistry and radiopharmaceuticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krohn, Kenneth A.; Moerlein, Stephen M.; Link, Jeanne M.; Welch, Michael J.

    2012-12-01

    The chemical products made in a cyclotron target are a combined result of the chemical effects of the nuclear transformation that made the radioactive atom and the bulk radiolysis in the target. This review uses some well-known examples to understand how hot atom chemistry explains the primary products from a nuclear reaction and then how radiation chemistry is exploited to set up the optimal product for radiosynthesis. It also addresses the chemical effects of nuclear decay. There are important principles that are common to hot atom chemistry and radiopharmaceutical chemistry. Both emphasize short-lived radionuclides and manipulation of high specific activity nuclides. Furthermore, they both rely on radiochromatographic separation for identification of no-carrieradded products.

  11. Radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    In this grant period we have continued our efforts in the areas of PE basic radiochemistry, radiopharmaceutical synthesis, and preclinical radiopharmaceutical evaluation. A new synthetic sequence, consisting, of no-carrier-added fluorine-18 labeling of substituted benzaldehydes followed by reductive decarbonylation, has been developed. This new methodology can be applied to the fluorine-18 labeling of a wide variety of drugs not previously accessible through existing fluorine-18 labeling methods. Following up on a literature report that the ability to radiolabel aromatic rings can be predicted by {sup 13}C-NMR chemical shifts, we have examined the generality of this correlation in aromatic rings bearing a variety of substituents. Although the original correlation holds for nitro substituted anisaldehydes, it cannot be extended to other rings substitution patterns. We have examined the relationship of in vivo localization of various fluorine-18 labeled dopamine uptake inhibitors to their in vitro binding affinities and lipophilicities. We have found that remarkably small decreases in binding affinity result in dramatic losses of in vivo binding to the desired high affinity binding sites. In order to probe the effects of endogenous neurotransmitter on the in vivo binding of radiolabeled dopamine uptake inhibitors, we have examined the in vivo regional localization of (18{sub F}) GBR 13119 after acute and chronic drug treatments which alter the endogenous levels of dopamine. We have found that acute changes in dopamine levels do not affect the binding of this radioligand, but chronic depletion of neurotransmitter results in down-regulation of the in vivo binding sites. 16 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Advancement in treatment and diagnosis of pancreatic cancer with radiopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yu-Ping; Yang, Min

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a major health problem. Conventional imaging modalities show limited accuracy for reliable assessment of the tumor. Recent researches suggest that molecular imaging techniques with tracers provide more biologically relevant information and are benefit for the diagnosis of the cancer. In addition, radiopharmaceuticals also play more important roles in treatment of the disease. This review summaries the advancement of the radiolabeled compounds in the theranostics of PC. PMID:26909131

  13. Radiopharmaceuticals in PET, Progress and Promise

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Wolf, A. P.; Fowler, J. S.

    1988-11-01

    It is the intention of this presentation to focus on the current state of radiopharmaceuticals for PET and where this is leading us. PET radiopharmaceuticals can be broken down into perhaps seven categories at present with each being applicable to a different aspect of human biochemistry. These are: metabolic probes, neurochemical probes, enzyme probes, ion channel blockers, blood flow agents, ethical drugs and other positron emitters.

  14. Radiopharmaceuticals in PET, progress and promise

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, A.P.; Fowler, J.S.

    1988-11-01

    It is the intention of this presentation to focus on the current state of radiopharmaceuticals for PET and where this is leading us. PET radiopharmaceuticals can be broken down into perhaps seven categories at present with each being applicable to a different aspect of human biochemistry. These are: metabolic probes, neurochemical probes, enzyme probes, ion channel blockers, blood flow agents, ethical drugs and other positron emitters. 7 refs.

  15. [SPECT radiopharmaceuticals -- novelties and new possibilities].

    PubMed

    Balogh, Lajos; Polyák, András; Pöstényi, Zita; Haász, Veronika; Dabasi, Gabriella; Jóba, Róbert; Bús, Katalin; Jánoki, Gergely; Thuróczy, Julianna; Zámbó, Katalin; Garai, Ildikó; Környei, József; Jánoki, Gyõzõ

    2014-12-01

    Actual state of affairs and future perspectives of SPECT radiopharmaceuticals regarding local and international data were summarized. Beyond conventional gamma-emitting radioisotopes, localization studies with beta emitting therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals hold increasing importance. Extension of hybrid (SPECT/CT) equipments has modified conventional scintigraphic and SPECT methods as well but more important changes come into the world through novel ligands for specific diagnoses and therapy.

  16. Rational Development of Radiopharmaceuticals for HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Chuen-Yen; Maldarelli, Frank; Eckelman, William C; Neumann, Ronald D

    2014-01-01

    The global battle against HIV-1 would benefit from a sensitive and specific radiopharmaceutical to localize HIV-infected cells. Ideally, this probe would be able to identify latently infected host cells containing replication competent HIV sequences. Clinical and research applications would include assessment of reservoirs, informing clinical management by facilitating assessment of burden of infection in different compartments, monitoring disease progression and monitoring response to therapy. A “rational” development approach could facilitate efficient identification of an appropriate targeted radiopharmaceutical. Rational development starts with understanding characteristics of the disease that can be effectively targeted and then engineering radiopharmaceuticals to hone in on an appropriate target, which in the case of HIV-1 (HIV) might be an HIV-specific product on or in the host cell, a differentially expressed gene product, an integrated DNA sequence specific enzymatic activity, part of the inflammatory response, or a combination of these. This is different from the current approach that starts with a radiopharmaceutical for a target associated with a disease, mostly from autopsy studies, without a strong rationale for the potential to impact patient care. At present, no targeted therapies are available for HIV latency, although a number of approaches are under study. Here we discuss requirements for a radiopharmaceutical useful in strategies targeting persistently infected cells. The radiopharmaceutical for HIV should be developed based on HIV biology, studied in an animal model and then in humans, and ultimately used in clinical and research settings. PMID:24607432

  17. Improving radiopharmaceutical supply chain safety by implementing bar code technology.

    PubMed

    Matanza, David; Hallouard, François; Rioufol, Catherine; Fessi, Hatem; Fraysse, Marc

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to describe and evaluate an approach for improving radiopharmaceutical supply chain safety by implementing bar code technology. We first evaluated the current situation of our radiopharmaceutical supply chain and, by means of the ALARM protocol, analysed two dispensing errors that occurred in our department. Thereafter, we implemented a bar code system to secure selected key stages of the radiopharmaceutical supply chain. Finally, we evaluated the cost of this implementation, from overtime, to overheads, to additional radiation exposure to workers. An analysis of the events that occurred revealed a lack of identification of prepared or dispensed drugs. Moreover, the evaluation of the current radiopharmaceutical supply chain showed that the dispensation and injection steps needed to be further secured. The bar code system was used to reinforce product identification at three selected key stages: at usable stock entry; at preparation-dispensation; and during administration, allowing to check conformity between the labelling of the delivered product (identity and activity) and the prescription. The extra time needed for all these steps had no impact on the number and successful conduct of examinations. The investment cost was reduced (2600 euros for new material and 30 euros a year for additional supplies) because of pre-existing computing equipment. With regard to the radiation exposure to workers there was an insignificant overexposure for hands with this new organization because of the labelling and scanning processes of radiolabelled preparation vials. Implementation of bar code technology is now an essential part of a global securing approach towards optimum patient management.

  18. Radiobrominated triphenylethylenes as estrogen receptor binding radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Seevers, R.H.; Meese, R.C.; Friedman, A.M.; DeSombre, E.R.

    1985-05-01

    Estrogen receptor binding radiopharmaceuticals have potential for use in the diagnosis and treatment of cancers of the female reproductive system. Tamoxifen is an antiestrogen derived from the triphenylethylene skeleton which is used in the treatment of mammary carcinoma. Hydroxytamoxifen is a metabolite of tamoxifen which binds tightly to the estrogen receptor. Two triphenylethylene derivatives based on the structure of hydroxytamoxifen have been prepared: 1-bromo-1-phenyl-2- (2-dimethylamino)-4-ethoxyphenyl -2-(4-hydroxyphenyl) ethene (1) where the ethyl group of hydroxytamoxifen has been replaced by a bromine, and 1-bromo-1-phenyl-2,2-(4-hydroxyphenyl) ethene (2) with a similar substitution and also lacking the aminoethoxy side chain believed to confer antiestrogenicity. Both 1 and 2 bind strongly to the estrogen receptor. 2 has been labeled with the Auger electron emitting nuclide Br-80m in moderate yields in high specific activity using either N-bromosuccinimide or N-bromophthalimide and shows promise as a potential radiotherapy agent.

  19. SPECT and PET radiopharmaceuticals for molecular imaging of apoptosis: from bench to clinic

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaobo; Feng, Han; Zhao, Shichao; Xu, Junling; Wu, Xinyu; Cui, Jing; Zhang, Ying; Qin, Yuhua; Liu, Zhiguo; Gao, Tang; Gao, Yongju; Zeng, Wenbin

    2017-01-01

    Owing to the central role of apoptosis in many human diseases and the wide-spread application of apoptosis-based therapeutics, molecular imaging of apoptosis in clinical practice is of great interest for clinicians, and holds great promises. Based on the well-defined biochemical changes for apoptosis, a rich assortment of probes and approaches have been developed for molecular imaging of apoptosis with various imaging modalities. Among these imaging techniques, nuclear imaging (including single photon emission computed tomography and positron emission tomography) remains the premier clinical method owing to their high specificity and sensitivity. Therefore, the corresponding radiopharmaceuticals have been a major focus, and some of them like 99mTc-Annexin V, 18F-ML-10, 18F-CP18, and 18F-ICMT-11 are currently under clinical investigations in Phase I/II or Phase II/III clinical trials on a wide scope of diseases. In this review, we summarize these radiopharmaceuticals that have been widely used in clinical trials and elaborate them in terms of radiosynthesis, pharmacokinetics and dosimetry, and their applications in different clinical stages. We also explore the unique features required to qualify a desirable radiopharmaceutical for imaging apoptosis in clinical practice. Particularly, a perspective of the impact of these clinical efforts, namely, apoptosis imaging as predictive and prognostic markers, early-response indicators and surrogate endpoints, is also the highlight of this review. PMID:28108738

  20. Improving efficiency management of radiopharmaceutical materials at a nuclear medicine department.

    PubMed

    Al Ahmed, Ali; Al-Surimi, Khaled

    2015-01-01

    The cost of radiopharmaceutical materials is highly expensive compared with other resources employed in nuclear medicine department. Hence, inefficient utilization of these costly materials will lead to waste and more financial burden on the healthcare system, increasing the patient waiting list for important diagnostic procedures, especially in those with need urgent care on time. The available data for the previous 12 months about positron emission tomography / computed tomography (PET/CT) unit at nuclear medicine departments showed that over 16% of radiopharmaceutical materials were not utilized and being wasted due to increased number of cancelled or rescheduled oncology patients. The overall financial cost for the underutilized radiopharmaceutical materials due to cancelled and rescheduled procedures for 142 patient were about 39,760 US dollar. Most of these are the oncology patients with diabetes arriving at the nuclear medicine department with high blood glucose level and so are not fit for the procedure. This project aims to improve the oncology diabetic patients preparation for PET/CT procedure to avoid wasting the radiopharmaceutical materials. After implementing the PDSA cycles on 14 oncology patients we found that the quantity of not utilized radiopharmaceuticals were significantly reduced. On the other hand, majority of oncology diabetic patients became more aware about the importance of following the required preparation instruction.

  1. Eighth international symposium on radiopharmaceutical chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Eckelman, W.C.

    1990-01-01

    The Eighth International Symposium on Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry was held on June 25--29, in Princeton, New Jersey. Topics covered in the meeting include: Technetium Chemistry; Perfusion Agents; Radionuclide Production; Synthetic Precursors; Analysis/Automation; Antibodies; Receptors; Metabolism, DOPA FDG; Receptors, D2 D1; Metabolism; and Metabolism, Cancer. Individual papers in each of these areas are abstracted separately. (MHB)

  2. In Vitro Assessment of the In Vivo Stability of Cu-64 Radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Packard, Alan B

    2011-12-15

    Benefits: The FISRE method that will be used in this project, once validated, will provide researchers with a core technology by which the stability of Cu 64 radiopharmaceuticals can be accurately measured. In the short-term, we expect to produce extensive data regarding the stability of Cu-64 complexes of ligands of radiopharmaceutical interest, primarily those that are most commonly used as BFCs (e.g., DOTA, TETA). These data will provide a quantitative basis for deciding which ligands may be best suited for use as BFCs, data that is not currently available. In the intermediate term, we expect that these results will facilitate the development of new Cu-64 radiopharmaceuticals by providing a quantitative approach to assessing the stability of Cu-64 chelates. This innovative methodology will enable investigators to quantitatively compare the ability of different BFCs to retain Cu-64 in vivo. The benefits of this approach will be best seen in the development of Cu-64-labeled monoclonal antibodies where the accumulation of antibodies in the liver obviates liver uptake as an effective surrogate measure of Cu-64 lability. In the longer-term, we anticipate an improvement in the way in which various diseases (especially cancer) are detected, diagnosed, staged, and treated. This method will also enable researchers to distinguish differences in biodistribution that may arise from differences in charge, lipophilicity, etc. from those that may arise from loss of Cu-64 from the chelator. Last, this novel quantitative tool will allow investigators to evaluate the chemical factors that determine the in vivo stability of Cu-64 radiopharmaceuticals laying the groundwork for the future development of more effective Cu-64 radiopharmaceuticals. Once the feasibility of this method is established, it can also be used to evaluate the stability of other metalloradiopharmaceuticals including those based on Ga-68, a radionuclide that is showing great promise in tumor imaging.

  3. Incorporation of radiohalogens via versatile organometallic reactions: applications in radiopharmaceutical chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, P.C.; Goodman, M.M.; Knapp, F.F. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Factors that must be considered for the design of radiohalogenated radio-pharmaceuticals include the stability and availability of the substrate, the physical half-life of the radiohalogen and the in vivo stability of the radiolabel. Vinyl and phenyl radiohalogen bonds show more in vivo stability than the alkyl radiohalogen bonds. Consequently, a variety of methods suitable for the synthesis of tissue specific radiopharmaceuticals bearing a vinyl or phenyl radiohalogen have been developed involving the synthesis and halogenation of metallovinyl and phenyl intermediates. The halogens and metallation reactions include iodine and bromine and alanation, boronation, mercuration, stannylation, and thallation, respectively. 19 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  4. Radiopharmaceuticals for oncology drug development: a pharmaceutical industry perspective.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Philip S; Bergström, Mats

    2009-01-01

    Oncology remains an increasingly important focus of therapeutic development yet there remain many scientific and operational bottlenecks to deliver optimum treatments efficiently. Radiopharmaceuticals constitute a group of methodologies able to support the many stages of drug development. Methods such as [(18)F]-FDG-PET continue to have a role, evaluating early metabolic response to treatment and supporting more conventional assessments of disease response. Improvements over such tracers (for example, use of [(18)F]-FLT) in certain settings can also widen the impact radiotracers have on clinical development. New categories of tracers able to provide molecular insight into therapeutic intervention are likely grow and aim to remove the ambiguity of how effective a new drug is. It is likely that newer tracers able to define processes such as angiogenesis and apoptosis will supplement other methods in supporting early development decision-making and de-risking expensive, late-stage programs. Labeled drugs themselves also offer the ability to study localised pharmacokinetics in vivo and study issues such as therapeutic combinations. Owing to the significant cost, resource and time investment in developing novel tracers, new opportunities need to be closely matched with emerging drug development needs.

  5. Imaging of neuroendocrine tumours with gamma-emitting radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Bombardieri, E; Coliva, A; Maccauro, M; Seregni, E; Orunesu, E; Chiti, A; Lucignani, G

    2010-02-01

    Nuclear medicine can image some tumors by means of receptor specific radiopharmaceuticals, and offers the possibility to characterize cancer through the detection of its receptor expression. This is the case of neuroendocrine tumours (NETs), that are visualized by different radiolabelled somatostatin analogues that bind 5 distinct somatostatin receptor types (named sstr1-5) that show different tissue distribution. The subtypes sstr2 and sstr5 are the most commonly expressed in NETs. Until now the most widely used radiolabelled somatostatin analogue for planar and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has been [(111)In]pentetreotide, because of its commercial availability. Other analogues labelled with gamma emitting radionuclides are [(99m)Tc]EDDA/HYNIC-TOC, [(99m)Tc]P829, [(111)In]DOTA-lanreotide, [(111)In]DOTA-NOC-ATE, [(111)In]DOTA-BOC-ATE. However, these compounds have not been successful for the routine use. Moreover, NETs express various receptors that can be depicted by different radiopharmaceuticals, such as [(123)I]VIP and [(111)In]GLP-1. Besides this, some precursors of the catecholamines metabolism, as meta-iodo-benzyl-guanidine (MIBG), labelled with (123)I or (131)I, accumulates in neuroendocrine tissues, in particular those of sympathoadrenal lineage. MIBG scintigraphy is currently indicated for neuroblastoma, paraganglioma and phaeocromocitoma. An impressive technological progress has been achieved recently with PET and, in particular, with the development of hybrid instrumentations (PET/CT) combining nuclear imaging with radiological imaging providing both functional and morphologic information. Among positron emitting tracers, the [(18)F]FDG is the most diffuse in oncology, but other more effective tracers are available for NETs, such as the analogues labelled with 68Ga. The diagnostic sensitivity and accuracy of these technology is superior to that of gamma emitting radiopharmaceuticals, but the fact that they are not still registered

  6. Simplification of Methods for PET Radiopharmaceutical Syntheses

    SciTech Connect

    Kilbourn, Michael, R.

    2011-12-27

    In an attempt to develop simplified methods for radiochemical synthesis of radiopharmaceuticals useful in Positron Emission Tomography (PET), current commercially available automated synthesis apparati were evaluated for use with solid phase synthesis, thin-film techniques, microwave-accelerated chemistry, and click chemistry approaches. Using combinations of these techniques, it was shown that these automated synthesis systems can be simply and effectively used to support the synthesis of a wide variety of carbon-11 and fluorine-18 labeled compounds, representing all of the major types of compounds synthesized and using all of the common radiochemical precursors available. These techniques are available for use to deliver clinically useful amounts of PET radiopharmaceuticals with chemical and radiochemical purities and high specific activities, suitable for human administration.

  7. Transport processes of radiopharmaceuticals and -modulators

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Radiotherapy and radiology have been indispensable components in cancer care for many years. The detection limit of small tumor foci as well as the development of radio-resistance and severe side effects towards normal tissues led to the development of strategies to improve radio-diagnostic and -therapeutic approaches by pharmaceuticals. The term "radiopharmaceutical" has been used for drugs labeled with radioactive tracers for therapy or diagnosis. In addition, drugs have been described to sensitize tumor cells to radiotherapy (radiosensitizers) or to protect normal tissues from detrimental effects of radiation (radioprotectors). The present review summarizes recent concepts on the transport of radiopharmaceuticals, radiosensitizers, and radioprotectors in cells and tissues, e.g. by ATP-binding cassette transporters such as P-glycoprotein. Strengths and weaknesses of current strategies to improve transport-based processes are discussed. PMID:21645349

  8. Dose Assessments to the Hands of Radiopharmaceutical Workers

    SciTech Connect

    Ilas, Dan; Eckerman, Keith F; Sherbini, Sami; Karagiannis, Harriet

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the characterization of radiation doses to the hands of nuclear medicine technicians resulting from the handling of radiopharmaceuticals. Radiation monitoring using ring dosimeters indicates that finger dosimeters may overestimate or underestimate the radiation doses to the skin that are used to show compliance with applicable regulations depending on the nature of the particular procedure and the radioisotope being handled. To better understand the parameters governing the absorbed dose distributions, a detailed model of the hands was created and used in Monte Carlo simulations of selected nuclear medicine procedures. Simulations on realistic configurations typical for workers handling radiopharmaceuticals were performed for a range of energies of the source photons. The lack of charged-particle equilibrium necessitated full photon-electron coupled transport calculations. The results show that the dose to different regions of the fingers can differ substantially from the dosimeters' readings when the dosimeters are located at the base of the finger. We tried to identify consistent patterns that relate the actual dose to the dosimeter readings. These patterns depend on the specific work conditions and can be used to better assess the absorbed dose to different regions of the exposed skin.

  9. Pitfalls and Limitations of SPECT, PET, and Therapeutic Radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Ballinger, James R

    2015-09-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals are widely accepted to be a very safe class of drugs, with very few adverse reactions and unexpected biodistributions. However, problems can arise because of technical issues in manufacture or reconstitution, patient preparation, or drug administration. This review presents highlights of issues that have arisen in the newer classes of radiopharmaceuticals in the last 20 years and expands the scope of the previous report to include PET and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. Variations in the "quality" of the eluate of a (99)Mo/(99m)Tc generator remain a major issue. Several of the newer (99m)Tc tracers require a heating step in preparation that can also lead to unacceptably low radiochemical purity. Radiolytic breakdown can be a problem with all classes of radiopharmaceuticals. Many of the newer radiopharmaceuticals localize by receptor- or transporter-mediated processes and thus can be affected by other drugs, making patient preparation more important than ever. Therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals may require coadministration of radioprotectant regimens, such as the use of lysine-arginine infusions with radiopeptide therapy. Extravasation can have serious consequences with therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. Adverse reactions to newer radiopharmaceuticals remain rare, though may increase because of coadministration of agents such as contrast media. However, there is known to be underreporting of minor adverse reactions. Knowledge of the pitfalls that can occur with radiopharmaceuticals is important in the interpretation of nuclear medicine images and optimal patient care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Population pharmacokinetic analysis for 10-monohydroxy derivative of oxcarbazepine in pediatric epileptic patients shows no difference between Japanese and other ethnicities.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Ikuo; Bouillon, Thomas; Yamaguchi, Masayuki; Suzuki, Hikoe; Hirota, Takashi; Fink, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Oxcarbazepine is an anti-epileptic drug, which is almost completely metabolized by cytosolic enzymes in the liver to the active 10-monohyroxy metabolite (MHD) following oral administration. The pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles of MHD were evaluated in pediatric epileptic patients and a possible ethnic difference in PK of MHD between Japanese and non-Japanese pediatric patients was assessed. A non-linear mixed effect modeling approach was used to determine the PK of MHD. A one-compartment population model with first-order absorption appropriately described the PK of MHD. No clinically relevant differences were found for using body surface area or weight to explain between-patient variability, therefore the final model included the effects of body weight on apparent clearance (CL/F) and apparent volume of distribution (V/F) of MHD, and in addition, the effect of 3 concomitant anti-epileptic drugs (carbamazepine, phenobarbital and phenytoin) on CL/F of MHD. Inclusion of ethnicity as a covariate in the final model, concluded no ethnic difference with respect to CL/F of MHD between Japanese and non-Japanese patients. Hence, oxcarbazepine can be generally applied using the same dosage and administration for the treatment of partial onset seizures in pediatric patients, regardless of ethnicity.

  11. Design of CGMP production of 18F- and 68Ga-radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Chi, Yen-Ting; Chu, Pei-Chun; Chao, Hao-Yu; Shieh, Wei-Chen; Chen, Chuck C

    2014-01-01

    Radiopharmaceutical production process must adhere to current good manufacturing process (CGMP) compliance to ensure the quality of precursor, prodrug (active pharmaceutical ingredient, API), and the final drug product that meet acceptance criteria. We aimed to develop an automated system for production of CGMP grade of PET radiopharmaceuticals. The hardware and software of the automated synthesizer that fit in the hot cell under cGMP requirement were developed. Examples of production yield and purity for (68)Ga-DOTATATE and (18)F-FDG at CGMP facility were optimized. Analytical assays and acceptance criteria for cGMP grade of (68)Ga-DOTATATE and (18)F-FDG were established. CGMP facility for the production of PET radiopharmaceuticals has been established. Radio-TLC and HPLC analyses of (68)Ga-DOTATATE and (18)F-FDG showed that the radiochemical purity was 92% and 96%, respectively. The products were sterile and pyrogenic-free. CGMP compliance of radiopharmaceuticals has been reviewed. (68)Ga-DOTATATE and (18)F-FDG were synthesized with high radiochemical yield under CGMP process.

  12. Design of CGMP Production of 18F- and 68Ga-Radiopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Pei-Chun; Chao, Hao-Yu; Shieh, Wei-Chen; Chen, Chuck C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Radiopharmaceutical production process must adhere to current good manufacturing process (CGMP) compliance to ensure the quality of precursor, prodrug (active pharmaceutical ingredient, API), and the final drug product that meet acceptance criteria. We aimed to develop an automated system for production of CGMP grade of PET radiopharmaceuticals. Methods. The hardware and software of the automated synthesizer that fit in the hot cell under cGMP requirement were developed. Examples of production yield and purity for 68Ga-DOTATATE and 18F-FDG at CGMP facility were optimized. Analytical assays and acceptance criteria for cGMP grade of 68Ga-DOTATATE and 18F-FDG were established. Results. CGMP facility for the production of PET radiopharmaceuticals has been established. Radio-TLC and HPLC analyses of 68Ga-DOTATATE and 18F-FDG showed that the radiochemical purity was 92% and 96%, respectively. The products were sterile and pyrogenic-free. Conclusion. CGMP compliance of radiopharmaceuticals has been reviewed. 68Ga-DOTATATE and 18F-FDG were synthesized with high radiochemical yield under CGMP process. PMID:25276810

  13. Possibilities of the exposure reduction of hands during the preparation and application of radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Hudzietzova, J; Fulop, M; Sabol, J

    The current routinely used methods of estimating the skin equivalent dose relies on the finger dosimetry which usually largely underestimates the real maximum exposure and thus appropriate correction factors have to be used. The group under the investigation consisted of 10 workers preparing and 5 workers administering radiopharmaceuticals labelled with 18F. The monitoring was carried out using 12 pairs of thermoluminiscent dosimeters (TLDs) placed on each hand of the worker. A total of 46 measurements were completed. The maximum exposure of the skin of hands, defined in terms of the quantity of the personal dose equivalent Hp(0.07), was related to the unit activity of radiopharmaceutical with which the worker came into the contact during the measurement. The exposure of the hands of workers handling 18F-labelled radiopharmaceuticals showed significant inhomogeneity. Out of 15 workers, in 53 % of cases, the maximum skin exposure was observed on the tip of their index finger. It was estimated that in about 60 % of the cases (during the preparation and administration of radiopharmaceuticals), the exposure may exceed the 3/10 of the annual dose limit. Moreover, in 40 % of all cases, the exposure may even be higher than this dose limit. The established relevant correction factors reached the values up to 8 (as for preparations) and 13 (as for administrations). The study resulted in the establishment of the appropriate correction factors and in the recommendations of procedures aimed at the further reduction of the exposure of extremities (Tab. 3, Fig. 2, Ref. 17).

  14. Sixth international radiopharmaceutical dosimetry symposium: Proceedings. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    S.-Stelson, A.T.; Stabin, M.G.; Sparks, R.B.; Smith, F.B.

    1999-01-01

    This conference was held May 7--10 in Gatlinburg, Tennessee. The purpose of this conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on radiopharmaceutical dosimetry. Attention is focused on the following: quantitative analysis and treatment planning; cellular and small-scale dosimetry; dosimetric models; radiopharmaceutical kinetics and dosimetry; and animal models, extrapolation, and uncertainty.

  15. Prevalence of adverse events to radiopharmaceuticals from 2007 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Silberstein, Edward B

    2014-08-01

    We studied the changing patterns of radiopharmaceutical use and the incidence of adverse events (AEs) to PET radiopharmaceuticals, non-PET radiopharmaceuticals, and adjunctive nonradioactive pharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine from 2007 to 2011. Fifteen academic institutions submitted quarterly reports of radiopharmaceutical use and AEs covering 2007-2011. 1,024,177 radiopharmaceutical administrations were monitored: 207,281 diagnostic PET, 803,696 diagnostic non-PET, and 13,200 therapeutic. In addition, 112,830 adjunctive nonradioactive pharmaceutical administrations were monitored. The annual use of bone scintigraphy and radiotracer therapies was unchanged. PET radiopharmaceutical use increased from 17% to 26% of diagnostic procedures (P < 0.01). The incidence of radiopharmaceutical AEs was 2.1/10(5) administrations, with no hospitalizations or deaths. From 2007 to 2011, PET studies increased, and therapeutic radiopharmaceutical use and bone scintigraphy were unchanged. Over 2 decades, the incidence of AEs has remained stable at 2.1-2.3/10(5) dosages. © 2014 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  16. Assessing the stability of common radiopharmaceuticals compounded and utilized outside package insert guidelines.

    PubMed

    Weatherman, Kara D; Augustine, Samuel; Christoff, Jeffrey; Galbraith, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the stability of radiopharmaceuticals compounded using activities and expiration times in excess of manufacturers' recommendations. Proof of the compounded sterile preparation quality when compounding outside of manufacturers' recommendations has become a key component of maintaining compliance with the guidelines set forth in United States Pharmacopeia General Chapter <797> Pharmaceutical Compounding-Sterile Preparations, originally released in 2008. Seven commercial nuclear pharmacies compounded various radiopharmaceuticals for patient use as part of daily pharmacy protocol. Samples of radiopharmaceuticals were tested using instant thin- layer chromatography testing to determine the radiochemical purity of the final compounded sterile preparation at t = 0, t = 6, t = 12, and t = 24 hours post compounding. Data submitted was summarized and divided into activity ranges allowing for calculation of average radiochemical purity for various activity levels at each of the four time points. Data was presented in graph form showing the average radiochemical purity values versus time with inclusion of error bars to indicate standard deviation data. The stability of each kit at different activity levels and at different time points post compounding showed that many of the radiopharmaceutical kits prepared today may have an unacceptable decrease in radiochemical purity at higher activity levels and at extended times post compounding. The data submitted provides a general guideline for the stability of radiopharmaceuticals compounded outside of manufacturer guidelines and can be used as a tool to support the practices that are being carried out at individual institutions. However, this data should be used in conjunction with in-house data review to assure that the preparations being compounded and dispensed are of the highest quality for administration to the patient.

  17. Placental transfer of radiopharmaceuticals and dosimetry in pregnancy

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, J.R.; Stabin, M.G.; Sparks, R.B.

    1999-01-01

    The calculation of radiation dose estimates to the fetus is often important in nuclear medicine. To obtain the best estimates of radiation dose to the fetus, the best biological and physical models should be employed. In this paper, after identification of radiopharmaceuticals often administered to women of childbearing age, the most recent data available on the placental crossover of these radiopharmaceuticals was used (with standard kinetic models describing the maternal distribution and retention and with the best available physical models) to obtain fetal dose estimates for these radiopharmaceuticals were identified as those most commonly administered to women of childbearing years. The literature yielded information on placental crossover of 15 radiopharmaceuticals, from animal or human data. Radiation dose estimates are presented in early pregnancy and at 3-, 6-, and 9-months gestation for these radiopharmaceuticals, as well as for many others used in nuclear medicine (the latter considering only maternal organ contributions to fetal dose). 46 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  18. Small Molecule Radiopharmaceuticals – A Review of Current Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Shubhra; Mishra, Anil K.

    2016-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals are an integral component of nuclear medicine and are widely applied in diagnostics and therapy. Though widely applied, the development of an “ideal” radiopharmaceutical can be challenging. Issues such as specificity, selectivity, sensitivity, and feasible chemistry challenge the design and synthesis of radiopharmaceuticals. Over time, strategies to address the issues have evolved by making use of new technological advances in the fields of biology and chemistry. This review presents the application of few advances in design and synthesis of radiopharmaceuticals. The topics covered are bivalent ligand approach and lipidization as part of design modifications for enhanced selectivity and sensitivity and novel synthetic strategies for optimized chemistry and radiolabeling of radiopharmaceuticals. PMID:26942181

  19. Radiopharmaceutical dosage selection for pediatric nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, R.M.; Hendee, W.R.

    1986-02-01

    To identify the most rational method for adjusting adult radiopharmaceutical dosages for children, four methods of dosage computation were examined from the perspectives of diagnostic adequacy and radiation absorbed dose. For static imaging, information density is the most important factor in study quality, and adjustment of dosage by body weight (Wt) for thick organs, and body surface area (BSA) for thin organs is recommended. Compared with adults, small children receive less radiation exposure if radiopharmaceutical dosages are adjusted by Wt, and slightly greater exposure if dosages are adjusted by BSA. For dynamic imaging studies, dosage requirements are governed by the spatial resolution needed for region of interest assignment, and the statistical reliability of the time-activity data. For dynamic renal imaging, renograms of similar quality are obtained if dosages are adjusted by height (Ht). Dynamic cardiac studies might appear to require dosages even larger than those adjusted by Ht which would result in higher radiation absorbed doses to pediatric patients. However, smaller dosages can be used in children by prolonging the imaging time and accepting lower temporal resolution. Dosage requirements for dynamic studies depend on which physiologic characteristics are measured from the time-activity data. Since the measurements of some characteristics demand higher count rates than others, dosage requirements ultimately depend on which measurements are clinically necessary. Close attention to the factors that determine these requirements may yield significant reduction in dosages, and thus in radiation exposure, for patients of all ages.

  20. The NIST radioactivity measurement assurance program for the radiopharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Cessna, Jeffrey T; Golas, Daniel B

    2012-09-01

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) maintains a program for the establishment and dissemination of activity measurement standards in nuclear medicine. These standards are disseminated through Standard Reference Materials (SRMs), Calibration Services, radionuclide calibrator settings, and the NIST Radioactivity Measurement Assurance Program (NRMAP, formerly the NEI/NIST MAP). The MAP for the radiopharmaceutical industry is described here. Consolidated results show that, for over 3600 comparisons, 96% of the participants' results differed from that of NIST by less than 10%, with 98% being less than 20%. Individual radionuclide results are presented from 214 to 439 comparisons, per radionuclide, for (67)Ga, (90)Y, (99m)Tc, (99)Mo, (111)In, (125)I, (131)I, and (201)Tl. The percentage of participants results within 10% of NIST ranges from 88% to 98%. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Predicting the success of a radiopharmaceutical for in vivo imaging of central nervous system neuroreceptor systems.

    PubMed

    Wong, Dean F; Pomper, Martin G

    2003-01-01

    In vivo imaging of the central nervous system (CNS) neuroreceptors in humans began was used in the early 1980s. Now, some twenty years later, the success of radiopharmaceutical imaging is still often one based on empiricism and serendipity. Nevertheless, a number of factors can be identified based on the robot experience in developing these radiotracers. This article will describe some of the issues that may be useful in choosing approaches to radiolabel ligands as future imaging agents of neuroreceptors, transporters and intrasynaptic measures of neurotransmitters. A description of the current process from hypothesis to radiochemical preclinical development, non-human primate imaging development of quantitative procedures finally leading to toxicology, dosimetry and eventually human applications are provided. The role of important factors including metabolism and lipophilicity, affinity and other factors for optimizing radiolabeling strategies is dealt with. Furthermore, issues involving decision making of how far to extend efforts in developing a radiotracer and when might be an appropriate stopping place are discussed. Finally some typical examples of the use of these radiotracers, especially with emphasis on stable drug design and development, are provided. These include occupancy studies and mechanism of action studies. In summary, the prediction of tracer success includes: first, identification of appropriate targets and precursors, then systematic optimization of ligands with continuous feedback from pharmacokinetics and iterative improvement based on unsuccessful tracers. This article is intended to present a pragmatic overview of the radiopharmaceutical development process with emphasis on the CNS.

  2. Radiopharmaceuticals for SPECT cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, V. I.; Medvedeva, A. A.; Zelchan, R. V.; Sinilkin, I. G.; Stasyuk, E. S.; Larionova, L. A.; Slonimskaya, E. M.; Choynzonov, E. L.

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the efficacy of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI in the detection of breast, laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers. A total of 220 patients were included into the study: 120 patients with breast lesions (100 patients with breast cancer and 20 patients with benign breast tumors) and 100 patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal diseases (80 patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer and 20 patients with benign laryngeal/hypopharyngeal lesions). No abnormal 199Tl uptake was seen in all patients with benign breast and laryngeal lesions, indicating a 100% specificity of 199Tl SPECT. In the breast cancer patients, the increased 199Tl uptake in the breast was visualized in 94.8% patients, 99mTc-MIBI—in 93.4% patients. The increased 199Tl uptake in axillary lymph nodes was detected in 60% patients, and 99mTc-MIBI—in 93.1% patients. In patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer, the sensitivity of SPECT with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI was 95%. The 199Tl SPECT sensitivity in identification of regional lymph node metastases in the patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer was 75% and the 99mTc-MIBI SPECT sensitivity was 17%. The data obtained showed that SPECT with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI can be used as one of the additional imaging methods in detection of tumors.

  3. Radiopharmaceuticals for SPECT Cancer Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, V. I.; Medvedeva, A. A.; Zelchan, R. V.; Sinilkin, I. G.; Stasyuk, E. S.; Larionova, L. A.; Slonimskaya, E. M.; Choynzonov, E. L.

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the efficacy of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI in the detection of breast, laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers. Materials and Methods: a total of 220 patients were included into the study. Of them, there were 120 patients with breast lesions (100 patients with breast cancer and 20 patients with benign breast tumors) and '00 patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal diseases (80 patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer and 20 patients with benign laryngeal/hypopharyngeal lesions). Results: no abnormal 199Tl uptake was seen in all patients with benign breast and laryngeal lesions, indicating a 100% specificity of 199Tl SPECT. In breast cancer patients, increased 199Tl uptake in the breast was visualized in 94.8% patients, 99mTc-MIBI in 93.4% patients. Increased 199Tl uptake in axillary lymph nodes was detected in 60% patients and 99mTc-MIBI in 93.1% patients. In patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer, sensitivity of SPECT with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI were 95%. The 199Tl SPECT sensitivity in identification of regional lymph node metastases in patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer was 75% and the 99mTc-MIBI SPECT sensitivity was 17%. Conclusion: the data obtained show that SPECT with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI can be used as one of the additional imaging methods in detection of tumors.

  4. Radiopharmaceuticals for SPECT cancer detection

    SciTech Connect

    Chernov, V. I. Medvedeva, A. A. Zelchan, R. V. Sinilkin, I. G.; Stasyuk, E. S.; Larionova, L. A.; Slonimskaya, E. M.; Choynzonov, E. L.

    2016-08-02

    The purpose of the study was to assess the efficacy of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with {sup 199}Tl and {sup 99}mTc-MIBI in the detection of breast, laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers. A total of 220 patients were included into the study: 120 patients with breast lesions (100 patients with breast cancer and 20 patients with benign breast tumors) and 100 patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal diseases (80 patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer and 20 patients with benign laryngeal/hypopharyngeal lesions). No abnormal {sup 199}Tl uptake was seen in all patients with benign breast and laryngeal lesions, indicating a 100% specificity of {sup 199}Tl SPECT. In the breast cancer patients, the increased {sup 199}Tl uptake in the breast was visualized in 94.8% patients, {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI—in 93.4% patients. The increased {sup 199}Tl uptake in axillary lymph nodes was detected in 60% patients, and {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI—in 93.1% patients. In patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer, the sensitivity of SPECT with {sup 199}Tl and {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI was 95%. The {sup 199}Tl SPECT sensitivity in identification of regional lymph node metastases in the patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer was 75% and the {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI SPECT sensitivity was 17%. The data obtained showed that SPECT with {sup 199}Tl and {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI can be used as one of the additional imaging methods in detection of tumors.

  5. Radionuclidic purity tests in (18)F radiopharmaceutIcals production process.

    PubMed

    Dziel, Tomasz; Tymiński, Zbigniew; Sobczyk, Katarzyna; Walęcka-Mazur, Agata; Kozanecki, Przemysław

    2016-03-01

    Radionuclidic purity tests of (18)F radiopharmaceuticals (Na(18)F and fluorodeoxyglucose [(18)F]FDG) and radionuclide composition analysis of irradiated water [(18)O]H2O were performed. The measurements were conducted using a High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector and a liquid scintillation counter. Radionuclide identification and activity measurements were performed for samples from different stages of the production process. Most of the impurities were detected on QMA (quaternary methylammonium) anion exchange columns and in liquid wastes. Using liquid scintillation counting, the activity of (3)H resulting from the (18)O[p, (3)H](16)O reaction was determined. It was shown that all of the impurities were efficiently determined and eliminated in the radiopharmaceuticals synthesis process and that the final products meet the requirements set by relevant regulations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Matching chelators to radiometals for radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Price, Eric W; Orvig, Chris

    2014-01-07

    Radiometals comprise many useful radioactive isotopes of various metallic elements. When properly harnessed, these have valuable emission properties that can be used for diagnostic imaging techniques, such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT, e.g.(67)Ga, (99m)Tc, (111)In, (177)Lu) and positron emission tomography (PET, e.g.(68)Ga, (64)Cu, (44)Sc, (86)Y, (89)Zr), as well as therapeutic applications (e.g.(47)Sc, (114m)In, (177)Lu, (90)Y, (212/213)Bi, (212)Pb, (225)Ac, (186/188)Re). A fundamental critical component of a radiometal-based radiopharmaceutical is the chelator, the ligand system that binds the radiometal ion in a tight stable coordination complex so that it can be properly directed to a desirable molecular target in vivo. This article is a guide for selecting the optimal match between chelator and radiometal for use in these systems. The article briefly introduces a selection of relevant and high impact radiometals, and their potential utility to the fields of radiochemistry, nuclear medicine, and molecular imaging. A description of radiometal-based radiopharmaceuticals is provided, and several key design considerations are discussed. The experimental methods by which chelators are assessed for their suitability with a variety of radiometal ions is explained, and a large selection of the most common and most promising chelators are evaluated and discussed for their potential use with a variety of radiometals. Comprehensive tables have been assembled to provide a convenient and accessible overview of the field of radiometal chelating agents.

  7. Radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and treatment. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, D.E.

    1991-12-31

    In this grant period we have continued our efforts in the areas of PE basic radiochemistry, radiopharmaceutical synthesis, and preclinical radiopharmaceutical evaluation. A new synthetic sequence, consisting, of no-carrier-added fluorine-18 labeling of substituted benzaldehydes followed by reductive decarbonylation, has been developed. This new methodology can be applied to the fluorine-18 labeling of a wide variety of drugs not previously accessible through existing fluorine-18 labeling methods. Following up on a literature report that the ability to radiolabel aromatic rings can be predicted by {sup 13}C-NMR chemical shifts, we have examined the generality of this correlation in aromatic rings bearing a variety of substituents. Although the original correlation holds for nitro substituted anisaldehydes, it cannot be extended to other rings substitution patterns. We have examined the relationship of in vivo localization of various fluorine-18 labeled dopamine uptake inhibitors to their in vitro binding affinities and lipophilicities. We have found that remarkably small decreases in binding affinity result in dramatic losses of in vivo binding to the desired high affinity binding sites. In order to probe the effects of endogenous neurotransmitter on the in vivo binding of radiolabeled dopamine uptake inhibitors, we have examined the in vivo regional localization of [18{sub F}] GBR 13119 after acute and chronic drug treatments which alter the endogenous levels of dopamine. We have found that acute changes in dopamine levels do not affect the binding of this radioligand, but chronic depletion of neurotransmitter results in down-regulation of the in vivo binding sites. 16 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Development of peptide and protein based radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Wynendaele, Evelien; Bracke, Nathalie; Stalmans, Sofie; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Radiolabelled peptides and proteins have recently gained great interest as theranostics, due to their numerous and considerable advantages over small (organic) molecules. Developmental procedures of these radiolabelled biomolecules start with the radiolabelling process, greatly defined by the amino acid composition of the molecule and the radionuclide used. Depending on the radionuclide selection, radiolabelling starting materials are whether or not essential for efficient radiolabelling, resulting in direct or indirect radioiodination, radiometal-chelate coupling, indirect radiofluorination or (3)H/(14)C-labelling. Before preclinical investigations are performed, quality control analyses of the synthesized radiopharmaceutical are recommended to eliminate false positive or negative functionality results, e.g. changed receptor binding properties due to (radiolabelled) impurities. Therefore, radionuclidic, radiochemical and chemical purity are investigated, next to the general peptide attributes as described in the European and the United States Pharmacopeia. Moreover, in vitro and in vivo stability characteristics of the peptides and proteins also need to be explored, seen their strong sensitivity to proteinases and peptidases, together with radiolysis and trans-chelation phenomena of the radiopharmaceuticals. In vitro biomedical characterization of the radiolabelled peptides and proteins is performed by saturation, kinetic and competition binding assays, analyzing KD, Bmax, kon, koff and internalization properties, taking into account the chemical and metabolic stability and adsorption events inherent to peptides and proteins. In vivo biodistribution can be adapted by linker, chelate or radionuclide modifications, minimizing normal tissue (e.g. kidney and liver) radiation, and resulting in favorable dosimetry analyses. Finally, clinical trials are initiated, eventually leading to the marketing of radiolabelled peptides and proteins for PET/SPECT-imaging and therapy

  9. [Reduction of radiation dose to the worker in preparing the radiopharmaceutical solution by a simple shielding equipment].

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Y; Inoue, H; Shiozaki, J; Higuchi, Y; Fujioka, M; Kawaguchi, K; Miyanaga, M; Aburano, T

    1987-01-01

    In order to reduce radiation dose to the hands of examiners who prepare and aspirate radiopharmaceuticals, we made a prototype of simplified manually-operated dispense system, which the syringe and the vial shield with lead were set in the small box made of lead and lead glass. The result showed that our dispense system allowed substantial reduction of radiation dose to the hands and rapid preparation of radiopharmaceuticals compared with the conventional lead shield syringe system, and allowed closer operation, smaller dead volume and lower cost compared with the conventional automatic system.

  10. [Current Status and Prospects on PET Radiopharmaceuticals for Radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Mitsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    18F-FDG is a most popular radiopharmaceutical for tumor diagnosis in the world. In addition, 11C-methionine, 18F-FLT and 11C-choline have been used to compensate for drawbacks of 18F-FDG. Now, novel radiopharmaceuticals are required to estimate or predict therapeutic efficacy because we have many strategies to treat tumors. Radiotherapy which damage DNA by producing free radicals is commonly used to treat various types of tumors. Hypoxia is closely associated with resistance to chemo- and/or radiotherapy and is a common feature of solid tumors. Recently, understanding of tumor hypoxia in oncology has led to development of radiopharmaceuticals for hypoxia imaging. This review provides an overview of PET radiopharmaceuticals for hypoxia imaging and 18F-FBPA which is used for boron neutron capture therapy.

  11. Investigation of the chick embryo as a potential alternative to the mouse for evaluation of radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Haller, Stephanie; Ametamey, Simon M; Schibli, Roger; Müller, Cristina

    2015-03-01

    The chick embryo is an emerging in vivo model in several areas of pre-clinical research including radiopharmaceutical sciences. Herein, it was evaluated as a potential test system for assessing the biodistribution and in vivo stability of radiopharmaceuticals. For this purpose, a number of radiopharmaceuticals labeled with (18)F, (125)I, (99m)Tc, and (177)Lu were investigated in the chick embryo and compared with the data obtained in mice. Chick embryos were cultivated ex ovo for 17-19 days before application of the radiopharmaceutical directly into the peritoneum or intravenously using a vein of the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). At a defined time point after application of radioactivity, the embryos were euthanized by shock-freezing using liquid nitrogen. Afterwards they were separated from residual egg components for post mortem imaging purposes using positron emission tomography (PET) or single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). SPECT images revealed uptake of [(99m)Tc]pertechnetate and [(125)I]iodide in the thyroid of chick embryos and mice, whereas [(177)Lu]lutetium, [(18)F]fluoride and [(99m)Tc]-methylene diphosphonate ([(99m)Tc]-MDP) were accumulated in the bones. [(99m)Tc]-dimercaptosuccinic acid ((99m)Tc-DMSA) and the somatostatin analog [(177)Lu]-DOTATOC, as well as the folic acid derivative [(177)Lu]-DOTA-folate showed accumulation in the renal tissue whereas [(99m)Tc]-mebrofenin accumulated in the gall bladder and intestine of both species. In vivo dehalogenation of [(18)F]fallypride and of the folic acid derivative [(125)I]iodo-tyrosine-folate was observed in both species. In contrast, the 3'-aza-2'-[(18)F]fluorofolic acid ([(18)F]-AzaFol) was stable in the chick embryo as well as in the mouse. Our results revealed the same tissue distribution profile and in vivo stability of radiopharmaceuticals in the chick embryo and the mouse. This observation is promising with regard to a potential use of the chick embryo as an inexpensive and simple

  12. Pharmacokinetic characterization of amrubicin cardiac safety in an ex vivo human myocardial strip model. II. Amrubicin shows metabolic advantages over doxorubicin and epirubicin.

    PubMed

    Salvatorelli, Emanuela; Menna, Pierantonio; Gonzalez Paz, Odalys; Surapaneni, Sekhar; Aukerman, Sharon L; Chello, Massimo; Covino, Elvio; Sung, Victoria; Minotti, Giorgio

    2012-05-01

    Anthracycline-related cardiotoxicity correlates with cardiac anthracycline accumulation and bioactivation to secondary alcohol metabolites or reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as superoxide anion (O₂·⁻) and hydrogen peroxide H₂O₂). We reported that in an ex vivo human myocardial strip model, 3 or 10 μM amrubicin [(7S,9S)-9-acetyl-9-amino-7-[(2-deoxy-β-D-erythro-pentopyranosyl)oxy]-7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-6,11-dihydroxy-5,12-napthacenedione hydrochloride] accumulated to a lower level compared with equimolar doxorubicin or epirubicin (J Pharmacol Exp Ther 341:464-473, 2012). We have characterized how amrubicin converted to ROS or secondary alcohol metabolite in comparison with doxorubicin (that formed both toxic species) or epirubicin (that lacked ROS formation and showed an impaired conversion to alcohol metabolite). Amrubicin and doxorubicin partitioned to mitochondria and caused similar elevations of H₂O₂, but the mechanisms of H₂O₂ formation were different. Amrubicin produced H₂O₂ by enzymatic reduction-oxidation of its quinone moiety, whereas doxorubicin acted by inducing mitochondrial uncoupling. Moreover, mitochondrial aconitase assays showed that 3 μM amrubicin caused an O₂·⁻-dependent reversible inactivation, whereas doxorubicin always caused an irreversible inactivation. Low concentrations of amrubicin therefore proved similar to epirubicin in sparing mitochondrial aconitase from irreversible inactivation. The soluble fraction of human myocardial strips converted doxorubicin and epirubicin to secondary alcohol metabolites that irreversibly inactivated cytoplasmic aconitase; in contrast, strips exposed to amrubicin failed to generate its secondary alcohol metabolite, amrubicinol, and only occasionally exhibited an irreversible inactivation of cytoplasmic aconitase. This was caused by competing pathways that favored formation and complete or near-to-complete elimination of 9-deaminoamrubicinol. These results characterize amrubicin

  13. Pharmacokinetics and dosimetry, an introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Notari, R.E.

    1981-06-01

    Classical pharmacokinetic techniques attempt to quantify the time course for drug in the body by assaying samples of blood or urine as a function of time. The mathematical descriptions that have emerged from this approach have proven extremely valuable to both drug research and drug therapy. Since the monitoring of patients' drug blood levels by obtaining a few small blood samples at key times is clinically practical, individualization of dosage regimens has become a reality. This has dramatically altered certain types of drug therapy. These improvements are limited to cases wherein biological response can be related to drug blood levels since the mathematics are capable only of describing the sampled fluids. Non-sampled fluids are considered as additional compartments or pools and described collectively using kinetic equations for mass balance. This limits progress in those areas of research which require assessment of the relationship of specific organ contents to that of the blood. The author suggests that radiopharmaceutical techniques which can provide the time course in specific organs might be coupled with classical pharmacokinetic approaches to provide insight not previously achieved.

  14. Traceability from governmental producers of radiopharmaceuticals in measuring (18)F in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, A E; Iwahara, A; Silva, C J; Cruz, P A L; Poledna, R; Silva, R L; Laranjeira, A S; Delgado, J U; Tauhata, L; Loureiro, J S; Toledo, B C; Braghirolli, A M S; Andrade, E A L; Silva, J L; Hernandes, H O K; Valente, E S; Dalle, H M; Almeida, V M; Silva, T G; Fragoso, M C F; Oliveira, M L; Nascimento, E S S; Oliveira, E M; Herrerias, R; Souza, A A; Bambalas, E; Bruzinga, W A

    2016-03-01

    Since the inception of its proficiency test program to evaluate radionuclide measurement in hospitals and clinics, the National Metrology Laboratory of Ionizing Radiation-LNMRI, that represents Brazilian National Metrology Institute (NMI) for ionizing radiation has expanded its measurement and calibration capability. Requirements from the National Health Surveillance Agency from Ministry of Health (ANVISA), to producers of radiopharmaceuticals provided an opportunity to improve the full traceability chain to the highest level. Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-(18)F) is the only radiopharmaceutical simultaneously produced by all Brazilian radiopharmaceutical production centers (RPCs). By running this proficiency test, LNMRI began to provide them with the required traceability. For evaluation, the ratio of RPC to reference value results and ISO/IEC17043:2010 criteria were used. The reference value established as calibration factor on the secondary standard ionization chamber was obtained from three absolute measurements systems, and routinely confirmed in each round of proficiency test by CIEMAT/NIST liquid scintillation counting. The γ-emitting impurities were checked using a High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector. The results show that Brazilian RPCs are in accordance with (accuracy within ±10%) the Brazilian standard for evaluation of measurements with radionuclide calibrators (CNEN NN 3.05., 2013). Nevertheless, the RPCs should improve the methodology of uncertainty estimates, essential when using the statistical criteria of ISO/IEC 17043 standard, in addition to improving accuracy to levels consistent with their position in the national traceability chain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Evolving Role of Radiopharmaceuticals in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Treatment.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lu; Shen, Feng; Xia, Yong; Yang, Ye-Fa

    2016-01-01

    The global incidence of primary liver cancer has been increased during recent decades. Among the primary liver malignancies, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is recognized as the most prevalent and aggressive. Although HCC has come to be regarded as a radioresponsive tumor during the last decade, it has also been noted that the ability to deliver destructive radioactive doses exclusively to HCC is limited with conventional external irradiation techniques. This review examines a number of radiotherapeutic techniques used to treat HCC, and the radiopharmaceuticals associated with those techniques. Selective internal radiotherapy (SIRT) is a powerful therapeutic technique developed during recent decades that is increasingly used in HCC treatment due to its superior ability to target and destroy cancer cells while sparing normal tissue. The radiopharmaceuticals used in SIRT are usually comprised of a simple ion and a complex or a carrier. Transarterial radioembolization (TARE) is a technique that is increasingly used in adjuvant or neoadjuvant therapy following the surgical treatment of HCC, as well as the treatment of unresectable or untransplantable HCC. The primary radiopharmaceuticals used in TARE include Iodine- 131-labeled Lipiodol and Yttrium-90 microspheres. Radioimmunotherapy (RAIT) is currently used as targeted procedure for adjuvant therapy and combination therapy of HCC. The primary radiopharmaceutical used in RAIT is 131I-metuximab. Interstitial brachytherapy has also been the subject of recent HCC treatment investigations. The primary radiopharmaceuticals used in interstitial brachytherapy are implanted iodine-125 seed strands. This review surveys the important milestones in the development and clinical implementation of the radiopharmaceuticals used in HCC therapy and critically examines new and emerging trends for the delivery of radiopharmaceuticals to HCC tissues.

  16. Stroma Targeting Nuclear Imaging and Radiopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Dinesh; Jeong, Jae-Min; Shim, Hyunsuk

    2012-01-01

    Malignant transformation of tumor accompanies profound changes in the normal neighboring tissue, called tumor stroma. The tumor stroma provides an environment favoring local tumor growth, invasion, and metastatic spreading. Nuclear imaging (PET/SPECT) measures biochemical and physiologic functions in the human body. In oncology, PET/SPECT is particularly useful for differentiating tumors from postsurgical changes or radiation necrosis, distinguishing benign from malignant lesions, identifying the optimal site for biopsy, staging cancers, and monitoring the response to therapy. Indeed, PET/SPECT is a powerful, proven diagnostic imaging modality that displays information unobtainable through other anatomical imaging, such as CT or MRI. When combined with coregistered CT data, [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F]FDG)-PET is particularly useful. However, [18F]FDG is not a target-specific PET tracer. This paper will review the tumor microenvironment targeting oncologic imaging such as angiogenesis, invasion, hypoxia, growth, and homing, and also therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals to provide a roadmap for additional applications of tumor imaging and therapy. PMID:22685650

  17. (Coordinated research of chemotherapeutic agents and radiopharmaceuticals)

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, P.C.

    1991-01-14

    The traveler received a United Nations Development Program (UNDP) Award for Distinguished Scientists to visit Indian Research Institutions including Central Drug Research Institute (CDRI), Lucknow, the host institution, in cooperation with the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) of India. At CDRI, the traveler had meetings to discuss progress and future directions of on-going collaborative research work on nucleosides and had the opportunity to initiate new projects with the divisions of pharmacology, biopolymers, and membrane biology. As a part of this program, the traveler also visited Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute (SGPI) of Medical Sciences, Lucknow; Board of Radiation and Isotope Technology (BRIT) and Bhabha Atomic Research Center (BARC), Bombay; Variable Energy Cyclotron Center (VECC) and Indian Institute of Chemical Biology, Calcutta. He also attended the Indo-American Society of Nuclear Medicine Meeting held in Calcutta. The traveler delivered five seminars describing various aspects of radiopharmaceutical development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and discussed the opportunities for exchange visits to ORNL by Indian scientists.

  18. Cyclotrons and positron emission tomography radiopharmaceuticals for clinical imaging.

    PubMed

    Saha, G B; MacIntyre, W J; Go, R T

    1992-07-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) requires positron-emitting radionuclides that emit 511-keV photons detectable by PET imagers. Positron-emitting radionuclides are commonly produced in charged particle accelerators, eg, linear accelerators or cyclotrons. The most widely available radiopharmaceuticals for PET imaging are carbon-11-, nitrogen-13-, and oxygen-15-labeled compounds, many of which, either in their normal state or incorporated in other compounds, serve as physiological tracers. Other useful PET radiopharmaceuticals include fluorine-18-, bromine-75-, gallium-68 (68Ga)-, rubidium-82 (82Rb)-, and copper-62 (62Cu)-labeled compounds. Many positron emitters have short half-lives and thus require on-site cyclotrons for application, and others (68Ga, 82Rb, and 62Cu) are available from radionuclides generators using relatively long-lived parent radionuclides. This review is divided into two sections: cyclotrons and PET radiopharmaceuticals for clinical imaging. In the cyclotron section, the principle of operation of the cyclotron, types of cyclotrons, medical cyclotrons, and production of radionuclides are discussed. In the section on PET radiopharmaceuticals, the synthesis and clinical use of PET radiopharmaceuticals are described.

  19. Aptamers as radiopharmaceuticals for nuclear imaging and therapy.

    PubMed

    Gijs, Marlies; Aerts, An; Impens, Nathalie; Baatout, Sarah; Luxen, André

    2016-04-01

    Today, radiopharmaceuticals belong to the standard instrumentation of nuclear medicine, both in the context of diagnosis and therapy. The majority of radiopharmaceuticals consist of targeting biomolecules which are designed to interact with a disease-related molecular target. A plethora of targeting biomolecules of radiopharmaceuticals exists, including antibodies, antibody fragments, proteins, peptides and nucleic acids. Nucleic acids have some significant advantages relative to proteinaceous biomolecules in terms of size, production, modifications, possible targets and immunogenicity. In particular, aptamers (non-coding, synthetic, single-stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides) are of interest because they can bind a molecular target with high affinity and specificity. At present, few aptamers have been investigated preclinically for imaging and therapeutic applications. In this review, we describe the use of aptamers as targeting biomolecules of radiopharmaceuticals. We also discuss the chemical modifications which are needed to turn aptamers into valuable (radio-)pharmaceuticals, as well as the different radiolabeling strategies that can be used to radiolabel oligonucleotides and, in particular, aptamers.

  20. XIIIth International Symposium on Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry. Abstracts and program [Journal issue

    SciTech Connect

    1999-06-01

    The grant (03/01/1999 through 02/29/2000) was used to partially support three meetings related to radiopharmaceuticals. A special issue of the Journal of Labelled Compounds and Radiopharmaceuticals was published.

  1. Pharmacokinetics & Neurophysiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Andrew S.; Salpekar, Jay A.

    2009-01-01

    Medications administered in clinical practice obtain their therapeutic effect only to the extent that the drug is present in the appropriate concentration at the desired site. To achieve this goal, the prescribing clinician must be aware of how a drug may interact with the physiology of the patient. Pharmacokinetics is the study of this process…

  2. Pharmacokinetics & Neurophysiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Andrew S.; Salpekar, Jay A.

    2009-01-01

    Medications administered in clinical practice obtain their therapeutic effect only to the extent that the drug is present in the appropriate concentration at the desired site. To achieve this goal, the prescribing clinician must be aware of how a drug may interact with the physiology of the patient. Pharmacokinetics is the study of this process…

  3. Auger Emitting Radiopharmaceuticals for Cancer Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falzone, Nadia; Cornelissen, Bart; Vallis, Katherine A.

    Radionuclides that emit Auger electrons have been of particular interest as therapeutic agents. This is primarily due to the short range in tissue, controlled linear paths and high linear energy transfer of these particles. Taking into consideration that ionizations are clustered within several cubic nanometers around the point of decay the possibility of incorporating an Auger emitter in close proximity to the cancer cell DNA has immense therapeutic potential thus making nuclear targeted Auger-electron emitters ideal for precise targeting of cancer cells. Furthermore, many Auger-electron emitters also emit γ-radiation, this property makes Auger emitting radionuclides a very attractive option as therapeutic and diagnostic agents in the molecular imaging and management of tumors. The first requirement for the delivery of Auger emitting nuclides is the definition of suitable tumor-selective delivery vehicles to avoid normal tissue toxicity. One of the main challenges of targeted radionuclide therapy remains in matching the physical and chemical characteristics of the radionuclide and targeting moiety with the clinical character of the tumor. Molecules and molecular targets that have been used in the past can be classified according to the carrier molecule used to deliver the Auger-electron-emitting radionuclide. These include (1) antibodies, (2) peptides, (3) small molecules, (4) oligonucleotides and peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), (5) proteins, and (6) nanoparticles. The efficacy of targeted radionuclide therapy depends greatly on the ability to increase intranuclear incorporation of the radiopharmaceutical without compromising toxicity. Several strategies to achieve this goal have been proposed in literature. The possibility of transferring tumor therapy based on the emission of Auger electrons from experimental models to patients has vast therapeutic potential, and remains a field of intense research.

  4. New radiopharmaceutical agents for the treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Maffioli, L; Florimonte, L; Costa, D C; Correia Castanheira, J; Grana, C; Luster, M; Bodei, L; Chinol, M

    2015-12-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the fourth most common cancer worldwide in terms of incidence and third among male, but is becoming the most common cancer in developed countries. In many patients the disease will progress despite of castration levels of testosterone, to become castration-resistant PCa (CRPC). Nearly all patients with CRPC show bone metastases. The treatment of patients with bony metastases has dramatically changed during the past three years because of new therapeutic approaches addressed to obtain pain control, reduced skeletal morbidity, and most importantly, increased survival rate. A possible therapy can be based also on the use of radiopharmaceuticals systemically administered to slow or reverse the bone metastatic progression. In facts bone-homing radiopharmaceuticals are taken up in areas of high bone turnover, including areas with high osteoblastic activity. Recently, a bone targeting radiopharmaceutical, Radium-223 dichloride was added to this group of drugs clearly representing a new generation of radiopharmaceutical in bone therapy. Clinical trials had shown that the treatment with Ra-223 allowed the reduction of the risk of death respect to placebo. No other radiometabolic treatment achieved such result, evidentiating the disease-modifying properties of this bone-homing radiopharmaceutical. In an effort to treat patients with disseminated PCa, who became resistant to hormonal therapy, molecular targets have been recently identified. Prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is one attractive target for diagnosis and therapy of metastasized PCa since its expression levels are directly correlated to androgen independence, metastasis, and progression. Gastrin-releasing peptide receptors (GRPr) are also highly overexpressed in PCa. Numerous studies suggest the possibility of a high PCa-specific signal with radiolabeled bombesin analogs targeting GRPr. Low molecular weight peptides directed against these molecular targets have been radiolabeled

  5. 188Re(V) Nitrido Radiopharmaceuticals for Radionuclide Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Boschi, Alessandra; Martini, Petra; Uccelli, Licia

    2017-01-01

    The favorable nuclear properties of rhenium-188 for therapeutic application are described, together with new methods for the preparation of high yield and stable 188Re radiopharmaceuticals characterized by the presence of the nitride rhenium core in their final chemical structure. 188Re is readily available from an 188W/188Re generator system and a parallelism between the general synthetic procedures applied for the preparation of nitride technetium-99m and rhenium-188 theranostics radiopharmaceuticals is reported. Although some differences between the chemical characteristics of the two metallic nitrido fragments are highlighted, it is apparent that the same general procedures developed for the labelling of biologically active molecules with technetium-99m can be applied to rhenium-188 with minor modification. The availability of these chemical strategies, that allow the obtainment, in very high yield and in physiological condition, of 188Re radiopharmaceuticals, gives a new attractive prospective to employ this radionuclide for therapeutic applications. PMID:28106830

  6. Altered biodistribution of radiopharmaceuticals used in bone scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Zuckier, Lionel S; Martineau, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Bone scintigraphy has remained a mainstay of clinical nuclear medicine for more than 4 decades. Extensive medical literature has developed surrounding the etiology and significance of alterations in distribution of bone radiopharmaceuticals. Altered biodistribution may be of a global nature, reflecting altered partition of radiopharmaceutical between bone and soft tissues, or more focal, reflecting regional abnormalities, including those related to bone or soft tissues. A third category of alterations in the distribution of bone radiopharmaceuticals is those due to errors and blunders, colloquially termed "artifactual" in the medical imaging literature. Being cognizant of these unexpected abnormalities, and understanding their etiology, will prepare the reader to more readily appreciate the significance of these findings when encountered in clinical practice.

  7. [Current trends in using PET radiopharmaceuticals for diagnostics in oncology].

    PubMed

    Adam, J; Kadeřávek, J; Kužel, F; Vašina, J; Rehák, Z

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear medicine is an important field of modern medicine, particularly thanks to its role in in vivo imaging of important processes in human organism. This is possible thanks to the use of radiopharmaceuticals, specific substances labeled by radioactive nuclide, its distribution in the body can be visualized by specialized scanners and, based on the knowledge of physiological patterns, dia-gnosis can be determined. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a modern and in many ways indispensable method of nuclear medicine. The spectrum of radiopharmaceuticals available in recent years is broadening thanks to a coordinated effort of manufacturers of synthesis equipment, chemists and potential users -  physicians. This review focuses on the development in the PET radiopharmaceutical field in the last five years, with an emphasis on oncological applications of PET.

  8. Newer positron emission tomography radiopharmaceuticals for radiotherapy planning: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) has changed cancer imaging in the last decade, for better. It can be employed for radiation treatment planning of different cancers with improved accuracy and outcomes as compared to conventional imaging methods. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose remains the most widely used though relatively non-specific cancer imaging PET tracer. A wide array of newer PET radiopharmaceuticals has been developed for targeted imaging of different cancers. PET-CT with such new PET radiopharmaceuticals has also been used for radiotherapy planning with encouraging results. In the present review we have briefly outlined the role of PET-CT with newer radiopharmaceuticals for radiotherapy planning and briefly reviewed the available literature in this regard. PMID:26904575

  9. PET/Computed Tomography Using New Radiopharmaceuticals in Targeted Therapy.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Punit; Kumar, Rakesh; Alavi, Abass

    2015-10-01

    Targeted therapy is gaining prominence in the management of different cancers. Given different mechanism of action compared with traditional chemoradiotherapy, selection of patients for targeted therapy and monitoring response to these agents is difficult with conventional imaging. Various new PET radiopharmaceuticals have been evaluated for molecular imaging of these targets to achieve specific patient selection and response monitoring. These PET/computed tomography (CT) agents target the cell surface receptors, hormone receptors, receptor tyrosine kinases, or angiogenesis components. This article reviews the established and potential role of PET/CT with new radiopharmaceuticals for guiding targeted therapy.

  10. Quinolone pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Robson, R A

    1992-12-01

    Fluoroquinolones have broad antibacterial spectra and are active against most Gram-negative and many Gram-positive species. They exhibit excellent oral bioavailability, extensive tissue penetration, low protein binding, and a long elimination half-life. This review compares and contrasts the pharmakonetics of some quinolone antibiotics - especially pefloxacin, ciprofloxacin, enoxacin, norfloxacin, ofloxacin, fleroxacin and lomefloxacin - in terms of their adsorption, distribution, metabolism, elimination, and interactions with other drugs and with food. In addition, the pharmacokinetics of these agents in the elderly and in patients with renal or hepatic impairment is discussed. The fluoroquinolones are established as a major class of antibiotics in the treatment of infections but pharmacokinetics factors should be considered when deciding on the most appropriate of these agents to use in individual patients.

  11. Preparation of radiopharmaceuticals labeled with metal radionuclides. Progress report, July 1, 1988--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, M.J.

    1992-06-01

    We recently developed a useful zinc-62/copper-62 generator and are presently evaluating copper-62 radiopharmaceuticals for clinical studies. While developing these copper-62 radiopharmaceuticals, in collaboration with the University of Missouri Research Reactor, Columbia we have also explored copper-64 radiopharmaceuticals. The PET images we obtained with copper-64 tracers were of such high quality that we have developed and evaluated copper-64 labeled antibodies for PET imaging. The major research activities described herein include: the development and assessment of gallium-68 radiopharmaceuticals; the development and evaluation of a new zinc-62/copper-62 generator and the assessment of copper-62 radiopharmaceuticals; mechanistic studies on proteins labeled with metal radionuclides.

  12. Harvard-MIT research program in short-lived radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Adelstein, S.J.

    1991-01-01

    This report presents research on radiopharmaceuticals. The following topics are discussed: antibody labeling with positron-emitting radionuclides; antibody modification for radioimmune imaging; labeling antibodies; evaluation of technetium acetlyacetonates as potential cerebral blood flow agents; and studies in technetium chemistry. (CBS)

  13. Progress in radiopharmaceutical development in the Australasia region

    SciTech Connect

    Lambrecht, R.M.; Katsifis, A.; Kassiou, M.; Smith, S.

    1994-12-31

    Recent progress in the development of reactor and cyclotron produced radionuclides, conversion to precursors, synthesis, quality control and biomedical applications are highlighted with examples of prospective radiopharmaceuticals applicable to major diseases of the Australasia region. The merits of cyclotrons and nuclear reactors for medical radioisotopes in the region are cited.

  14. Process for producing astatine-211 for radiopharmaceutical use

    DOEpatents

    Mirzadeh, S.; Lambrecht, R.M.

    1984-04-10

    A process is described for reliably and consistently producing astatine-211 in small controlled volumes of a solution, which is selected from a choice of solvents that are useful in selected radiopharmaceutical procedures in which the At-211 activities are to be applied. 4 figures, 1 table.

  15. Process for producing astatine-211 for radiopharmaceutical use

    DOEpatents

    Mirzadeh, Saed; Lambrecht, Richard M.

    1987-01-01

    A process for reliably and consistently producing astatine-211 in small controlled volumes of a solution, which is selected from a choice of solvents that are useful in selected radiopharmaceutical procedures in which the At-211 activities are to be applied.

  16. Synthesis of oncological [11C]radiopharmaceuticals for clinical PET.

    PubMed

    Lodi, Filippo; Malizia, Claudio; Castellucci, Paolo; Cicoria, Gianfranco; Fanti, Stefano; Boschi, Stefano

    2012-05-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a nuclear medicine modality which provides quantitative images of biological processes in vivo at the molecular level. Several PET radiopharmaceuticals labeled with short-lived isotopes such as (18)F and (11)C were developed in order to trace specific cellular and molecular pathways with the aim of enhancing clinical applications. Among these [(11)C]radiopharmaceuticals are N-[(11)C]methyl-choline ([(11)C]choline), l-(S-methyl-[(11)C])methionine ([(11)C]methionine) and 1-[(11)C]acetate ([(11)C]acetate), which have gained an important role in oncology where the application of 2-[(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose ([(18)F]FDG) is suboptimal. Nevertheless, the production of these radiopharmaceuticals did not reach the same level of standardization as for [(18)F]FDG synthesis. This review describes the most recent developments in the synthesis of the above-mentioned [(11)C]radiopharmaceuticals aiming to increase the availability and hence the use of [(11)C]choline, [(11)C]methionine and [(11)C]acetate in clinical practice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Radiopharmaceutical chemistry with iodine-124: a non-standard radiohalogen for positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Chacko, Ann-Marie; Divgi, Chaitanya R

    2011-09-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a powerful molecular imaging technology with the ability to image and monitor molecular events in vivo and in real time. With the increased application of PET radiopharmaceuticals for imaging physiological and pathological processes in vivo, there is a demand for versatile positron emitters with longer physical and biological half-lives. Traditional PET radionuclides, such as carbon-11 ((11)C) and fluorine-18 ((18)F), have relatively short half-lives (20 min and 110 min, respectively). Among the currently available positron emitters, the non-standard radiohalogen iodine-124 ((124)I) has the longest physical half-life at 4.2 d. This, combined with the well characterized radiochemistry of radioiodine, is contributing to the increasing utility of (124)I in investigating slow and complex pharmacokinetic processes in clinical nuclear medicine and small animal PET imaging studies. This review will summarize the progress to date on the potential of (124)I as a positron emitting nuclide for molecular imaging purposes, beginning with the production of (124)I. Particular emphasis will be placed on the basic radiochemistry as it applies to the production of various (124)I-labeled compounds, from small molecules, to biomolecules such as peptides and proteins, and finally to macromolecules like nanoparticles. The review will conclude by highlighting promising future directions in using (124)I as a positron emitter in PET radiochemistry and molecular imaging.

  18. Estrogen receptor binding radiopharmaceuticals: II. Tissue distribution of 17. cap alpha. -methylestradiol in normal and tumor-bearing rats

    SciTech Connect

    Feenstra, A.; Vaalburg, W.; Nolten, G.M.J.; Reiffers, S.; Talma, A.G.; Wiegman, T.; van der Molen, H.D.; Woldring, M.G.

    1983-06-01

    Tritiated 17..cap alpha..-methylestradiol was synthesized to investigate the potential of the carbon-11-labeled analog as an estrogen-receptor-binding radiopharmaceutical. In vitro, 17..cap alpha..-methylestradiol is bound with high affinity to the cytoplasmic estrogen receptor from rabbit uterus (K/sub d/ = 1.96 x 10/sup -10/M), and it sediments as an 8S hormone-receptor complex in sucrose gradients. The compound shows specific uptake in the uterus of the adult rat, within 1 h after injection. In female rats bearing DMBA-induced tumors, specific uterine and tumor uptakes were observed, although at 30 min the tumor uptake was only 23 to 30% of the uptake in the uterus. Tritiated 17..cap alpha..-methylestradiol with a specific activity of 6 Ci/mmole showed a similar tissue distribution. Our results indicate that a 17 ..cap alpha..-methylestradiol is promising as an estrogen-receptor-binding radiopharmaceutical.

  19. Quantitative autoradiography with radiopharmaceuticals, Part 2: Applications in radiopharmaceutical research: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Som, P.; Yonekura, Y.; Oster, Z.H.; Meyer, M.A.; Pelletteri, M.L.; Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Russell, J.A.; Wolf, A.P.; Fand, I.

    1983-03-01

    We describe the application of macroautoradiography, a relatively simple, quantifiable method for the evaluation of positron-emitting and gamma-emitting radiopharmaceuticals. We have investigated the response properties of two types of film to positron (F-18) and negatron (C-14) emitters. Variations in the response of film to increasing film-to-source distance are described, along with the effects of different intensifying screens and mounting tape. Digitization of whole-body autoradiograms (WBARG) in small animals was performed by using a videodensitometry system (videocamera interfaced to a computer). Quantitation was derived from analysis of a series of step-wedge standards that covered the range of radioactivities in the sample. By using a close-up lens on the videocamera, a 2- by 2-cm field is digitized as a 128 X 128 array, each pixel representing 156 X 156 micron. The effect of chlorpromazine (CPZ) on glucose metabolism in mice was studied by giving C-14 2DG followed by CPZ and F-18 FDG in the same animal. Muscle activity decreased and brown-fat activity increased. The high spatial resolution of this technique enables quantification in structures as small as the basal ganglia in mice. The use of dual-nuclide ARG permits each animal to be its own control, which greatly increases the utility of this method.

  20. Quantitative autoradiography with radiopharmaceuticals, Part 2: Applications in radiopharmaceutical research: concise communication.

    PubMed

    Som, P; Yonekura, Y; Oster, Z H; Meyer, M A; Pelletteri, M L; Fowler, J S; MacGregor, R R; Russell, J A; Wolf, A P; Fand, I; McNally, W P; Brill, A B

    1983-03-01

    We describe the application of macroautoradiography, a relatively simple, quantifiable method for the evaluation of positron-emitting and gamma-emitting radiopharmaceuticals. We have investigated the response properties of two types of film to positron (F-18) and negatron (C-14) emitters. Variations in the response of film to increasing film-to-source distance are described, along with the effects of different intensifying screens and mounting tape. Digitization of whole-body autoradiograms (WBARG) in small animals was performed by using a videodensitometry system (videocamera interfaced to a computer). Quantitation was derived from analysis of a series of step-wedge standards that covered the range of radioactivities in the sample. By using a close-up lens on the videocamera, a 2- by 2-cm field is digitized as a 128 X 128 array, each pixel representing 156 X 156 micron. The effect of chlorpromazine (CPZ) on glucose metabolism in mice was studied by giving C-14 2DG followed by CPZ and F-18 FDG in the same animal. Muscle activity decreased and brown-fat activity increased. The high spatial resolution of this technique enables quantification in structures as small as the basal ganglia in mice. The use of dual-nuclide ARG permits each animal to be its own control, which greatly increases the utility of this method.

  1. Current status of PET imaging of differentiated thyroid cancer with second generation radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Lauri, C; Di Traglia, S; Galli, F; Pizzichini, P; Signore, A

    2015-03-01

    Although the prognosis of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) is favorable, some histotypes show worst clinical outcome and higher risk of recurrence. Serum thyroglobulin (Tg) levels and 131I-whole-body-scan (WBS), together with neck ultrasound (US), represent the golden standard for DTC follow-up. Nevertheless, the relatively high frequency of patients with high Tg levels and negative WBS requires further investigations by using new imaging modalities. The availability of whole body positron emission tomography (PET) methods, in parallel with the advances in radiochemistry, offer a wide substrate for many solutions. To this day ¹⁸F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose (¹⁸F-FDG) PET/CT still represents the imaging of choice in follow-up of patients with high serum Tg and negative ¹³¹I-WBS but in the last decades the research has focused on finding "second generation" radiopharmaceuticals for PET imaging, with both diagnostic and prognostic purposes, aiming to change the way to image thyroid cancer. Moreover, the use of various PET radiopharmaceuticals, that offer the possibility to explore different pathways involved in thyroid cancer, could find important applications in the near future for clinical decision making in order to program tailored treatments and follow-up. It would be desirable to use the same radiopharmaceutical for both imaging and dosimetric purpose to achieve a tailored therapy. Many efforts are focused in this direction and ¹²⁴I-PET/CT is now emerging as a valid tool in restaging and therapy management of DTC with promising results. Although the preliminary data available in literature require a confirmation in larger studies with longer follow-up, we think that in next future ¹²⁴I-PET/CT could gain an important role for management of DTC. The aim of this review was to perform a systematic analysis of literature describing the state of art of "second generation" PET-radiopharmaceuticals for imaging DTC. Discussion is focused on the utility of

  2. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of frovatriptan.

    PubMed

    Negro, Andrea; Lionetto, Luana; Casolla, Barbara; Lala, Noemi; Simmaco, Maurizio; Martelletti, Paolo

    2011-11-01

    Migraine is the most common painful neurological disorder, affecting 13% of the general population. Triptans represent a powerful pharmacological tool in acute migraine treatment, however, a significant portion of treated patients cannot have access to this class due to possible adverse affects. Today, a total of seven triptan molecules are available, representing a commonly prescribed migraine treatment. Although there is a need of extensive use of triptans, only 25% of migraine patients are using triptans. This review includes triptans and evidence for the use of frovatriptan. A systematic approach is used to discuss the pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic aspects of frovatriptan, considering the emerging data on the clinical efficacy of frovatriptan in the treatment of migraine and cluster headaches. The data were obtained by searching the following key words in MEDLINE: pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, triptans, frovatriptan, migraine, menstrual migraine, relatively to the period 1988 - 2011. Frovatriptan has been developed in order to improve safety and efficacy of triptans. It shows a favorable tolerability and efficacy profile, limited to 24/48-h headache recurrence, when compared with other triptans. Preclinical data suggest that the pharmacokinetic profile of frovatriptan may differ from other available triptans. In fact, among triptans, frovatriptan showed the highest potency at the 5-HT1B receptor (8.2) and the longer half-life (26 h). These parameters determine the clinical properties of frovatriptan; in particular the lowest rate of headache recurrence in comparison with other triptans.

  3. A simple liquid detector for radiopharmaceutical processing systems

    SciTech Connect

    Alexoff, D.L.; Hallaba, K.; Schlyer, D.; Ferrieri, R.

    1995-03-01

    Sensing the presence of liquids in tubing and vessels in radiochemical processing equipment provides information important to the remote or automatic control of the production of clinical doses of radiopharmaceuticals. Although modern commercial automated radiopharmaceutical synthesis machines do not usually include liquid presence as a measured process variable, earlier more complex automated synthesis devices did; and the inclusion of such feedback can increase system reliability and simplify trouble-shooting tasks carried out by computer software or human operators. Commercial liquid level detectors are often designed for large-scale industrial processes and are therefore too large or expensive to be useful in many radiochemical hardware systems. An inexpensive miniature optical liquid detector originally by Kramer and Fuchs has been duplicated here for use in monitoring the presence of liquids in teflon tubing (1/16 in. O.D.) in an enriched oxygen-18 water recovery system.

  4. (68)Ga-labeled radiopharmaceuticals for positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Dinesh; Lee, Yun-Sang; Jeong, Jae Min

    2010-12-01

    (68)Ga is a promising emerging radionuclide for positron emission tomography (PET). It is produced using a (68)Ge/(68)Ga-generator, and thus, would enable the cyclotron-independent distribution of PET. However, new (68)Ga-labeled radiopharmaceuticals that can replace (18)F-labeled agents like [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) are needed. Most of the (68)Ga-labeled derivatives currently used are peptide agents, but the developments of other agents, such as amino acid derivatives, nitroimidazole derivatives, and glycosylated human serum albumin, are being actively pursued in many laboratories. Thus, appearance of new (68)Ga-labeled radiopharmaceuticals with high impact are expected in the near future. Here, we present an overview of (68)Ga-labeled agents in terms of their clinical significances and relevances to the management of certain tumors, and pertinent pre-clinical developments.

  5. Asialoglycoprotein receptor-targeted radiopharmaceuticals for measurement of liver function.

    PubMed

    Yang, W; Zhang, X; Liu, Y

    2014-01-01

    The number of Asialoglycoprotein (ASGP) receptors on the hepatocytes of patients with liver disease is reduced and is thus considered a good indicator for the evaluation of liver function. ASGP receptor-targeted radiopharmaceuticals permit a non-invasive way to evaluate total and regional hepatic function and hepatic functional reserve visually and quantitatively. Over the past three decades, a variety of ASGP receptor-targeted probes have been developed with different molecular backbones (albumin, polymer, small-molecular-weight ligand), different glycol-residues (galactose, lactose, N-acetyl-galactosamine) and different chelating systems suitable for radiolabeling with SPECT isotopes ((99m)Tc, (111)In, (67)Ga, (131/125)I, (153)Sm) and PET isotopes ((68)Ga, (18)F). In this review, we present an overview of ASGP receptor-targeted radiopharmaceuticals, discuss their chemistry, biodistribution, catabolism and challenge as well as application for measurement of liver function.

  6. Vectors for the delivery of radiopharmaceuticals in cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Shubhra; Mishra, Anil Kumar

    2014-08-01

    Internal radiation using radiopharmaceuticals promises efficient cancer therapeutics. The specificity and selectivity required for screening and pinpointing tumor cells for cell-kill has been made possible by targeted ligands based on 'magic bullet' and tracer principle- theories nearing a century. Overexpression of certain receptors has been exploited using biomolecules for targeting. The pragmatic analysis, however, is not as promising compared with the theoretical knowledge of available gamut of vectors and targets. The complex interplay of in vitro and in vivo parameters, and the effect of radionuclides involve a systematic assessment of radiopharmaceuticals as diagnostic and therapeutic agent. This review presents different vectors with their pros and cons, present status and recent design variations followed by a future perspective based on novel approaches.

  7. Chelators for copper radionuclides in positron emission tomography radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhengxin; Anderson, Carolyn J

    2014-04-01

    The development of chelating agents for copper radionuclides in positron emission tomography radiopharmaceuticals has been a highly active and important area of study in recent years. The rapid evolution of chelators has resulted in highly specific copper chelators that can be readily conjugated to biomolecules and efficiently radiolabeled to form stable complexes in vivo. Chelators are not only designed for conjugation to monovalent biomolecules but also for incorporation into multivalent targeting ligands such as theranostic nanoparticles. These advancements have strengthened the role of copper radionuclides in the fields of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging. This review emphasizes developments of new copper chelators that have most greatly advanced the field of copper-based radiopharmaceuticals over the past 5 years. © 2013 The Authors. J. Label Compd. Radiopharm published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Monte Carlo Assessments of Absorbed Doses to the Hands of Radiopharmaceutical Workers Due to Photon Emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Ilas, Dan; Eckerman, Keith F; Karagiannis, Harriet

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the characterization of radiation doses to the hands of nuclear medicine technicians resulting from the handling of radiopharmaceuticals. Radiation monitoring using ring dosimeters indicates that finger dosimeters that are used to show compliance with applicable regulations may overestimate or underestimate radiation doses to the skin depending on the nature of the particular procedure and the radionuclide being handled. To better understand the parameters governing the absorbed dose distributions, a detailed model of the hands was created and used in Monte Carlo simulations of selected nuclear medicine procedures. Simulations of realistic configurations typical for workers handling radiopharmaceuticals were performedfor a range of energies of the source photons. The lack of charged-particle equilibrium necessitated full photon-electron coupled transport calculations. The results show that the dose to different regions of the fingers can differ substantially from dosimeter readings when dosimeters are located at the base of the finger. We tried to identify consistent patterns that relate the actual dose to the dosimeter readings. These patterns depend on the specific work conditions and can be used to better assess the absorbed dose to different regions of the exposed skin.

  9. Limulus amebocyte lysate testing: adapting it for determination of bacterial endotoxin in 99mTc-labeled radiopharmaceuticals at a hospital radiopharmacy.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Arpit; Joshi, Sangeeta; Arjun, Chanda; Kulkarni, Savita; Rajan, Ramakrishna

    2014-12-01

    A bacterial endotoxin test (BET) is required to detect or quantify bacterial endotoxin that may be present in radiopharmaceutical preparations. The test uses Limulus amebocyte lysate, which, in the presence of bacterial endotoxin and divalent calcium ions, causes the formation of a coagulin gel. (99m)Tc-labeled radiopharmaceuticals have chelating ligands such as diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA), ethylene dicysteine (EC), L,L-ethyl cysteinate dimer (ECD), N-[2,4,6-trimethyl-3 bromoacetanilid] iminodiacetic acid (mebrofenin), dimercapto succinic acid-III (DMSA-III), dimercapto succinic acid-V (DMSA-V), and several others, which form a coordination complex with Na-(99m)Tc-O4 in the presence of reducing agents. During BET by the gel-clot method, the free sulfhydryl (-SH) and carboxyl (-COOH) in some of the chelating agents in the final (99m)Tc-labeled radiopharmaceuticals decrease the free divalent calcium ion concentration, which in turn inhibits coagulin gel formation. This study was designed using the premise that addition of calcium chloride solution to the reaction mixture would nullify this effect. We present here the data obtained from BET assay analysis of (99m)Tc-labeled radiopharmaceuticals and the cold kits from which they are made (EC, ECD, methoxyisobutylisonitrile, DTPA, mebrofenin, methylene diphosphonic acid [MDP], DMSA-III, and DMSA-V) using 2 different dilutions, maximum valid dilution (MVD) and half maximum valid dilution (MVD/2), with and without the addition of calcium chloride at a final concentration of 300 μM. It was observed that at MVD and MVD/2 all of the (99m)Tc-labeled kits exhibited interference in coagulin gel formation with the exception of (99m)Tc-methoxyisobutylisonitrile, (99m)Tc-MDP, (99m)Tc-mebrofenin, and (99m)Tc-ECD. However, only the cold kits of methoxyisobutylisonitrile and MDP did not show inhibition. An addition of calcium chloride solution nullified this interference at both MVD and MVD/2 in all of the (99m

  10. 68Ga-Based radiopharmaceuticals: production and application relationship.

    PubMed

    Velikyan, Irina

    2015-07-16

    The contribution of 68Ga to the promotion and expansion of clinical research and routine positron emission tomography (PET) for earlier better diagnostics and individualized medicine is considerable. The potential applications of 68Ga-comprising imaging agents include targeted, pre-targeted and non-targeted imaging. This review discusses the key aspects of the production of 68Ga and 68Ga-based radiopharmaceuticals in the light of the impact of regulatory requirements and endpoint pre-clinical and clinical applications.

  11. Cancer diagnosis. The role of tumor-imaging radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Silberstein, E B

    1976-02-01

    Several radiopharmaceuticals have recently been shown to have a considerable affinity for malignant tissue. All the tumor-seeking radiopharmaceuticals in current use are nonspecific and may also be picked up by benign tumors and infectious processes, including abscess and granuloma. The sensitivity of the tumor-imaging procedure depends on the radiopharmaceutical employed, the type of tumor, its size and location, and previous or current treatment. Gallium-67 citrate (67Ga), the most widely used tumor-seeking radiopharmaceutical, seems to have its greatest value in detecting bronchogenic carcinomas irrespective of cell type. The sensitivity for lung cancer in 489 studies was 93 per cent. Gallium-67 is also of great value in the staging of Hodgkin's disease, in which its sensitivity is 87 per cent. Non-Hdgkin's lymphomas are detected with only slightly lower sensitivity. There is, in fact, evidence that 67Ga is at least complemenatry, if not more sensitive than lymphangiography, in the staging of lymphoma. However, adenocarcinomas originating in the gastrointestinal tract are detected by 67Ga with a sensitivity of only about 40 per cent, whereas various chelates of bleomycin (including 111In-Bleo, 99mTc-Bleo and 57Co-Bleo) detect adenocarcinoma of the gastrointestinal tract with considerably higher sensitivity. In the few studies available comparing bleomycin chelates, 57Co-Bleo and 99mTc-Bleo appear to be more sensitive in detecting tumor than 111In-Bleo. Other tumor-seeking radiopharmaceuticasl which have been employed with somewhat less success include selenium compounds, labeled pyrimidines, several inorganic cations, lanthanide chelates and labeled proteins. Yet to be evaulated clinically is the efficacy of radiolabeled antibodies which are specific for tumor antigens, such as 131I-anti-CEA (carcinoembryonic antigen).

  12. Microfluidic preparation of radiopharmaceuticals for use in imaging studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, T. L.

    2014-05-01

    Microfluidics have revolutionized the field of radiopharmaceuticals in allowing for the rapid optimization of chemical processes and increased productivity in the preparation of radiotracers used in the development of imaging agents for clinical research and the study of biological processes. This presentation will cover the rapid preparation of radiotracers including simultaneous and sequential syntheses as well as the preparation of clinically useful amounts of radiotracers, as well as the rapid purification of such materials.

  13. [Computer simulated images of radiopharmaceutical distributions in anthropomorphic phantoms

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-05-17

    We have constructed an anatomically correct human geometry, which can be used to store radioisotope concentrations in 51 various internal organs. Each organ is associated with an index number which references to its attenuating characteristics (composition and density). The initial development of Computer Simulated Images of Radiopharmaceuticals in Anthropomorphic Phantoms (CSIRDAP) over the first 3 years has been very successful. All components of the simulation have been coded, made operational and debugged.

  14. Pharmacokinetics of levodopa.

    PubMed

    Contin, Manuela; Martinelli, Paolo

    2010-11-01

    This paper reviews the clinically relevant determinants of levodopa peripheral pharmacokinetics and main observed changes in the levodopa concentration-effect relationship with Parkinson's disease (PD) progression. Available clinically practical strategies to optimise levodopa pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics are briefly discussed. Levodopa shows particular pharmacokinetics including an extensive presystemic metabolism, overcome by the combined use of extracerebral inhibitors of the enzyme L: -amino acid decarboxylase and rapid absorption in the proximal small bowel by a saturable facilitated transport system shared with other large neutral amino acids. Drug transport from plasma to the brain is mediated by the same carriers operating in the intestinal mucosa. The main strategies to assure reproducibility of both intestinal absorption and delivery to the brain, and the clinical effect include standardization of levodopa dosing with respect to meal times and a controlled dietary protein intake. Levodopa plasma half-life is very short, resulting in marked plasma drug concentration fluctuations which are matched, as the disease progresses, to swings in the therapeutic response ("wearing-off" phenomena). "Wearing-off" phenomena can also be associated, at the more advanced disease stages, with a "negative", both parkinsonism-exacerbating and dyskinetic effect of levodopa at low, subtherapeutic plasma concentrations. Dyskinesias may also be related to high-levodopa, excessive plasma concentrations. Recognition of the different levodopa toxic response patterns can be difficult on a clinical basis alone and simultaneous monitoring of the levodopa concentration-effect relationship may prove useful to disclose the underlying mechanism and in planning the correct management. Clinically practical strategies to optimise levodopa pharmacokinetics, and possibly its therapeutic response, include liquid drug solutions, controlled release formulations and the use of inhibitors

  15. Radionuclides, radiotracers and radiopharmaceuticals for in vivo diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebe, Leonard I.

    Radioactive tracers for in vivo clinical diagnosis fall within a narrow, strictly-defined set of specifications in respect of their physical properties, chemical and biochemical characteristics, and (approved) medical applications. The type of radioactive decay and physical half-life of the radionuclide are immutable properties which, along with the demands of production and supply, limit the choice of radionuclides used in medicine to only a small fraction of those known to exist. In use, the biochemical and physiological properties of a radiotracer are dictated by the chemical form of the radionuclide. This chemical form may range from elemental, molecular or ionic, to complex compounds formed by coordinate or covalent bonding of the radionuclide to either simple organic or inorganic molecules, or complex macromolecules. Few of the radiotracers which are tested in model systems ever become radiopharmaceuticals in the strictest sense. Radionuclides, radiotracers and radiopharmaceuticals in use are reviewed. Drug legislation and regulations concerning drug manufacture, as well as hospital ethical constraints and legislation concerning unsealed sources of radiation must all be satisfied in order to translate a radiopharmaceutical from the laboratory to clinical use.

  16. ORGAN DOSES AND EFFECTIVE DOSE FOR FIVE PET RADIOPHARMACEUTICALS.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Martin; Johansson, Lennart; Mattsson, Sören; Minarik, David; Leide-Svegborn, Sigrid

    2016-06-01

    Diagnostic investigations with positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals are dominated by (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG), but other radiopharmaceuticals are also commercially available or under development. Five of them, which are all clinically important, are (18)F-fluoride, (18)F-fluoroethyltyrosine ((18)F-FET), (18)F-deoxyfluorothymidine ((18)F-FLT), (18)F-fluorocholine ((18)F-choline) and (11)C-raclopride. To estimate the potential risk of stochastic effects (mainly lethal cancer) to a population, organ doses and effective dose values were updated for all five radiopharmaceuticals. Dose calculations were performed using the computer program IDAC2.0, which bases its calculations on the ICRP/ICRU adult reference voxel phantoms and the tissue weighting factors from ICRP publication 103. The biokinetic models were taken from ICRP publication 128. For organ doses, there are substantial changes. The only significant change in effective dose compared with previous estimations was a 46 % reduction for (18)F-fluoride. The estimated effective dose in mSv MBq(-1) was 1.5E-02 for (18)F-FET, 1.5E-02 for (18)F-FLT, 2.0E-02 for (18)F-choline, 9.0E-03 for (18)F-fluoride and 4.4E-03 for (11)C-raclopride.

  17. Peptide-based radiopharmaceuticals for targeted tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Dong, C; Liu, Z; Wang, F

    2014-01-01

    A series of radiolabeled peptides have been designed and optimized for tumor-targeted peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). Pre-clinical and clinical applications of PRRT have shown promising results on tumor response, overall survival, and quality of life in patients with several kinds of tumors. (90)Y-DOTA-TOC and (177)Lu-DOTA-TATE are two of the most common radiopharmaceuticals with symptomatic improvements and complete clinical data. In addition to somatostatin analogs, radiolabeled peptides have been developed to target the relative receptors overexpressed in the tumors, such as integrin αvβ3, gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR), melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1-R), cholecystokinin (CCK) receptor, and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R). Several strategies have been designed to improve the therapeutic efficacy of PRRT. For instance, radiolabeled peptides could be optimized by the amino acid modification and radionuclide selection. Healthy tissue protective agents and multi-cycle procedures could effectively decrease the side effects of PRRT. Furthermore, combination treatments, including PRRT combined with surgery, chemotherapeutic agents, or radiosensitizing agents could be applied to increase the effectiveness of PRRT. In this review, the current progress of peptide-based radiopharmaceuticals for tumor-targeted PRRT was summarized. Radiopharmaceuticals currently under clinical investigation were also described.

  18. 18F-Labeled Silicon-Based Fluoride Acceptors: Potential Opportunities for Novel Positron Emitting Radiopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Bernard-Gauthier, Vadim; Wängler, Carmen; Wängler, Bjoern; Schirrmacher, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Background. Over the recent years, radiopharmaceutical chemistry has experienced a wide variety of innovative pushes towards finding both novel and unconventional radiochemical methods to introduce fluorine-18 into radiotracers for positron emission tomography (PET). These “nonclassical” labeling methodologies based on silicon-, boron-, and aluminium-18F chemistry deviate from commonplace bonding of an [18F]fluorine atom (18F) to either an aliphatic or aromatic carbon atom. One method in particular, the silicon-fluoride-acceptor isotopic exchange (SiFA-IE) approach, invalidates a dogma in radiochemistry that has been widely accepted for many years: the inability to obtain radiopharmaceuticals of high specific activity (SA) via simple IE. Methodology. The most advantageous feature of IE labeling in general is that labeling precursor and labeled radiotracer are chemically identical, eliminating the need to separate the radiotracer from its precursor. SiFA-IE chemistry proceeds in dipolar aprotic solvents at room temperature and below, entirely avoiding the formation of radioactive side products during the IE. Scope of Review. A great plethora of different SiFA species have been reported in the literature ranging from small prosthetic groups and other compounds of low molecular weight to labeled peptides and most recently affibody molecules. Conclusions. The literature over the last years (from 2006 to 2014) shows unambiguously that SiFA-IE and other silicon-based fluoride acceptor strategies relying on 18F− leaving group substitutions have the potential to become a valuable addition to radiochemistry. PMID:25157357

  19. Bone-targeting radiopharmaceuticals for the treatment of prostate cancer with bone metastases

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Jatinder; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) frequently have metastases to the bone, which may cause pain and lead to a deterioration in quality-of-life. Bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals are agents which, when administered systemically, localize to the site of bone metastases and deliver focal radiation there. In this review, we will summarize the current literature on bone-targeting radiopharmaceuticals for CRPC, focusing on strontium-89, samarium-153, rhenium-186 and radium-223. We will discuss their indications, clinical efficacy, and toxicities and highlight some of the challenges in optimizing treatment with these agents. Historically, clinical trials with these drugs have failed to demonstrate survival improvements, restricting their use for palliative purposes only. Radium-223 is the first agent in this class to show an overall survival advantage in CRPC patients with bone metastases. This landmark finding will likely have a considerable impact on the treatment paradigm of bone-metastatic CRPC, and will pave the way for further developments in the future. PMID:22521546

  20. Auger Radiopharmaceutical Therapy Targeting Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Kiess, Ana P.; Hobbs, Robert; Sgouros, George; Mease, Ronnie C.; Pullambhatla, Mrudula; Shen, Colette J.; Foss, Catherine A.; Pomper, Martin G.

    2015-01-01

    Auger electron emitters such as 125I have a high linear energy transfer and short range of emission (<10 μm), making them suitable for treating micrometastases while sparing normal tissues. We used a highly specific small molecule targeting the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) to deliver 125I to prostate cancer cells. Methods The PSMA-targeting Auger emitter 2-[3-[1-carboxy-5-(4-125I-iodo-benzoylamino)-pentyl]-ureido]-pentanedioic acid (125I-DCIBzL) was synthesized. DNA damage (via phosphorylated H2A histone family member X staining) and clonogenic survival were tested in PSMA-positive (PSMA+) PC3 PIP and PSMA-negative (PSMA−) PC3 flu human prostate cancer cells after treatment with 125I-DCIBzL. Subcellular drug distribution was assessed with confocal microscopy using a related fluorescent PSMA-targeting compound YC-36. In vivo antitumor efficacy was tested in nude mice bearing PSMA+ PC3 PIP or PSMA− PC3 flu flank xenografts. Animals were administered (intravenously) 111 MBq (3 mCi) of 125I-DCIBzL, 111 MBq (3 mCi) of 125I-NaI, an equivalent amount of nonradiolabeled DCIBzL, or saline. Results After treatment with 125I-DCIBzL, PSMA+ PC3 PIP cells exhibited increased DNA damage and decreased clonogenic survival when compared with PSMA− PC3 flu cells. Confocal microscopy of YC-36 showed drug distribution in the perinuclear area and plasma membrane. Animals bearing PSMA+ PC3 PIP tumors had significant tumor growth delay after treatment with 125I-DCIBzL, with only 1 mouse reaching 5 times the initial tumor volume by 60 d after treatment, compared with a median time to 5 times volume of less than 15 d for PSMA− PC3 flu tumors and all other treatment groups (P = 0.002 by log-rank test). Conclusion PSMA-targeted radiopharmaceutical therapy with the Auger emitter 125I-DCIBzL yielded highly specific antitumor efficacy in vivo, suggesting promise for treatment of prostate cancer micrometastases. PMID:26182968

  1. Auger Radiopharmaceutical Therapy Targeting Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen.

    PubMed

    Kiess, Ana P; Minn, Il; Chen, Ying; Hobbs, Robert; Sgouros, George; Mease, Ronnie C; Pullambhatla, Mrudula; Shen, Colette J; Foss, Catherine A; Pomper, Martin G

    2015-09-01

    Auger electron emitters such as (125)I have a high linear energy transfer and short range of emission (<10 μm), making them suitable for treating micrometastases while sparing normal tissues. We used a highly specific small molecule targeting the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) to deliver (125)I to prostate cancer cells. The PSMA-targeting Auger emitter 2-[3-[1-carboxy-5-(4-(125)I-iodo-benzoylamino)-pentyl]-ureido]-pentanedioic acid ((125)I-DCIBzL) was synthesized. DNA damage (via phosphorylated H2A histone family member X staining) and clonogenic survival were tested in PSMA-positive (PSMA+) PC3 PIP and PSMA-negative (PSMA-) PC3 flu human prostate cancer cells after treatment with (125)I-DCIBzL. Subcellular drug distribution was assessed with confocal microscopy using a related fluorescent PSMA-targeting compound YC-36. In vivo antitumor efficacy was tested in nude mice bearing PSMA+ PC3 PIP or PSMA- PC3 flu flank xenografts. Animals were administered (intravenously) 111 MBq (3 mCi) of (125)I-DCIBzL, 111 MBq (3 mCi) of (125)I-NaI, an equivalent amount of nonradiolabeled DCIBzL, or saline. After treatment with (125)I-DCIBzL, PSMA+ PC3 PIP cells exhibited increased DNA damage and decreased clonogenic survival when compared with PSMA- PC3 flu cells. Confocal microscopy of YC-36 showed drug distribution in the perinuclear area and plasma membrane. Animals bearing PSMA+ PC3 PIP tumors had significant tumor growth delay after treatment with (125)I-DCIBzL, with only 1 mouse reaching 5 times the initial tumor volume by 60 d after treatment, compared with a median time to 5 times volume of less than 15 d for PSMA- PC3 flu tumors and all other treatment groups (P = 0.002 by log-rank test). PSMA-targeted radiopharmaceutical therapy with the Auger emitter (125)I-DCIBzL yielded highly specific antitumor efficacy in vivo, suggesting promise for treatment of prostate cancer micrometastases. © 2015 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  2. Adsorption of (99m)Tc-radiopharmaceuticals onto injection vials and syringes.

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, Ahmad; Ur Rehman, Taj; Safdar Mansur, Muhammad; Jehangir, Mustanser

    2008-06-01

    , whereas maximum retention was noted after 5 h. Nearly 5% adsorption of activity was observed after 5 h of storage time on vials of sestamibi, mercaptoacetyltriglycine, dextran, ciprofloxacin, and dimercaptosuccinic acid (III and V). Retention of activity on needles ranged from 1% to 2% for all preparations studied. Plungers did not show any significant retention of radioactivity; in most cases, retention was less than 0.5%. The maximum retention of radioactivity on plastic syringe bodies was more than 3% for sestamibi, dimercaptosuccinic acid, dextran, pyrophosphate, and phytate. The results revealed that losses of radioactivity from (99m)Tc-radiopharmaceuticals in these objects (glass vial, rubber stopper, plastic syringes, plungers, and needles) are not alarming in our setup.

  3. Radiopharmaceutical preparation in-house vs. central radiopharmacy: a make/buy decision.

    PubMed

    Cope, R H

    1987-03-01

    Under DRG reimbursement it is essential that all operational costs be considered as targets for reduction. In this article, the author presents a methodology for determining whether to prepare radiopharmaceuticals in house or purchase them from a central radiopharmacy. By using this methodology, purchasing agents may find it possible to save up to 50% of the cost of radiopharmaceuticals.

  4. Freeware for reporting radiation dosimetry following the administration of radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Gómez Perales, Jesús Luis; García Mendoza, Antonio

    2015-09-01

    This work describes the development of a software application for reporting patient radiation dosimetry following radiopharmaceutical administration. The resulting report may be included within the patient's medical records. The application was developed in the Visual Basic programming language. The dosimetric calculations are based on the values given by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The software is available in both Spanish and English and can be downloaded at no cost from www.radiopharmacy.net. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Molecular Engineering of Technetium and Rhenium Based Radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Zubieta, J.

    2003-06-30

    The research was based on the observation that despite the extraordinarily rich coordination chemistry of technetium and rhenium and several notable successes in reagent design, the extensive investigations by numerous research groups on a variety of N{sub 2}S{sub 2} and N{sub 3}S donor type ligands and on HYNIC have revealed that the chemistries of these ligands with Tc and Re are rather complex, giving rise to considerable difficulties in the development of reliable procedures for the development of radiopharmaceutical reagents.

  6. A Peltier thermal cycling unit for radiopharmaceutical synthesis.

    PubMed

    McKinney, C J; Nader, M W

    2001-01-01

    We have investigated the use of Peltier devices to rapidly cycle the temperature of reaction vessels in a radiopharmaceutical synthesis system. Peltier devices have the advantage that they can be actively cooled as well as heated, allowing precise and rapid control of vessel temperatures. Reaction vessel temperatures of between -6 degrees C and 110 degrees C have been obtained with commercially available devices with reasonable cycle times. Two devices have been used as the basis for a general purpose, two-pot synthesis system for production of [11C] compounds such as raclopride.

  7. A comparison of radiopharmaceutical agents used for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Rizzo-Padoin, N; Farina, A; Le Pen, C; Duet, M; Mundler, O; Leverge, R

    2001-04-01

    Radioactive gas or technetium-99m aerosols are used to perform pulmonary ventilation scintigraphy. The aim of this study was to compare three radiopharmaceuticals, Kryptoscan, Technegas and Venticis II, in terms of their costs and user preferences rather than on the basis of diagnostic efficacy. For each radiopharmaceutical agent, an analysis questionnaire was sent to nuclear medicine departments setting out the criteria (and subcriteria) to be assessed: diagnosis quality: imaging quality, distribution homogeneity, examination procedures and capacity to examine particular patients (e.g. smokers); safety: for patient, paramedical and medical staff and the environment; use: availability in cases of emergency, ergonomics of the apparatus, simplicity and time of preparation. A score, ranging from 0 to 5, and a weighting (importance of one criterion with regard to the others) were assigned to each criterion. The direct cost of a ventilation (drugs, generator systems, disposable materials) was calculated for each radiopharmaceutical agent according to the number of patients examined per day (1-6) and the number of examination days per week (2-5). Fourteen questionnaires concerning at least two of the products were returned out of the 30 mailed. A 'preference score' was calculated using Pharma Decision software. The mean score of Kryptoscan was significantly higher than that of Venticis II (444 vs. 286, P < 0.001) and higher than the mean score of Technegas (444 vs. 344, P < 0.01). For Venticis II and Technegas, the changes in patient direct costs were minor and depended on the number of patients per day and the number of examination days per week. Respectively, they were: $US 117.66 (5 patients.day-1; 5 days.week-1) to $US 147.74 (2 patients.day-1; 2 days.week-1) and $US 56.60 (6 patients.day-1; 5 days.week-1) to $US 132.08 (2 patients.day-1; 2 days.week-1). The direct cost of ventilation using Kryptoscan varied only according to the number of patients examined per day

  8. Enantiopure bifunctional chelators for copper radiopharmaceuticals--does chirality matter in radiotracer design?

    PubMed

    Singh, Ajay N; Dakanali, Marianna; Hao, Guiyang; Ramezani, Saleh; Kumar, Amit; Sun, Xiankai

    2014-06-10

    It is well recognized that carbon chirality plays a critical role in the design of drug molecules. However, very little information is available regarding the effect of stereoisomerism of macrocyclic bifunctional chelators (BFC) on biological behaviors of the corresponding radiopharmaceuticals. To evaluate such effects, three enantiopure stereoisomers of a copper radiopharmaceutical BFC bearing two chiral carbon atoms were synthesized in forms of R,R-, S,S-, and R,S-. Their corresponding peptide conjugates were prepared by coupling with a model peptide sequence, c(RGDyK), which targets the αvβ3 integrin for in vitro and in vivo evaluation of their biological behaviors as compared to the racemic conjugate. Despite the chirality differences, all the conjugates showed a similar in vitro binding affinity profile to the αvβ3 integrin (106, 108, 85 and 100 nM for rac-H2-1, RR-H2-1, SS-H2-1, and RS-H2-1 respectively with all p values > 0.05) and a similar level of in vivo tumor uptake (2.72 ± 0.45, 2.60 ± 0.52, 2.45 ± 0.48 and 2.88 ± 0.59 for rac-(64)Cu-1, RR-(64)Cu-1, SS-(64)Cu-1, and RS-(64)Cu-1 at 1 h p.i. respectively). Furthermore, they demonstrated a nearly identical biodistribution pattern in major organs (e.g. 2.07 ± 0.21, 2.13 ± 0.58, 1.70 ± 0.20 and 1.90 ± 0.46 %ID/g at 24 h p.i. in liver for rac-(64)Cu-1, RR-(64)Cu-1, SS-(64)Cu-1, and RS-(64)Cu-1 respectively; 1.80 ± 0.46, 2.30 ± 1.49, 1.73 ± 0.31 and 2.23 ± 0.71 at 24 h p.i. in kidneys for rac-(64)Cu-1, RR-(64)Cu-1, SS-(64)Cu-1, and RS-(64)Cu-1 respectively). Therefore we conclude that the chirality of BFC plays a negligible role in αvβ3-targeted copper radiopharmaceuticals. However, we believe it is still worthwhile to consider the chirality effects of BFCs on other targeted imaging or therapeutic agents.

  9. Process for producing astatine-211 for radiopharmaceutical use

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzadeh, S.; Lambrecht, R.M.

    1987-07-21

    A one-step chemical manipulation is described in combination with a distillation and collection process for producing At-211 comprising; a. providing a target of irradiated Bismuth coated to a predetermined thickness of a backing member, b. providing a vapor-producing still operably connected with a condenser that has a water cooled condensate collector formed of a dry silica gel mesh maintained at a temperature above the freezing point of water, and providing an effluent gas filter that is operably connected to receive effluent gas from the condenser, c. heating the target in the still at a temperature in the range of about 630/sup 0/-680/sup 0/C for a time period in the range of 50 to 80 minutes, to evole At-211 vapor from the target, c. providing a dry carrier gas having an oxygen concentration that is sufficient to form Bi/sub 2/O/sub 3/ thereby to essentially preclude vaporization of Bi metal, passing the carrier gas through the still to carry the At-211 vapor to the condenser, and to carry effluent from the condenser to the effluent gas filter, e. eluting At-211 from the condensate collector of the condenser with a controlled volume of eluent containing predetermined solvents that are compatible with a given desired radiopharmaceutical procedure, and f. collecting the At-211 in the controlled volume of eluent for use in the given radiopharmaceutical procedure.

  10. Cyclotron targets and production technologies used for radiopharmaceuticals in NPI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fišer, M.; Kopička, K.; Hradilek, P.; Hanč, P.; Lebeda, O.; Pánek, J.; Vognar, M.

    2003-01-01

    This paper deals with some technical aspects of the development and production of cyclotronmade radiopharmaceuticals (excluding PET). In this field, nuclear chemistry and pharmacy are in a close contact; therefore, requirements of the both should be taken into account. The principles of cyclotron targetry, separation/recovery of materials and synthesis of active substances are given, as well as issues connected with formulation of pharmaceutical forms. As the radiopharmaceuticals should fulfil the requirements on in vivo preparations, there exist a variety of demands pertaining to Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) concept, which is also briefly discussed. A typical production chain is presented and practical examples of real technologies based on cyclotron-made radionuclides are given as they have been used in Nuclear Physics Institute of CAS (NPI). Special attention is devoted to the technology of enriched cyclotron targets. Frequently used medicinal products employing cyclotron-produced active substances are characterised (Rb/Kr generators, 123I-labelled MIBG, OIH and MAB's). The cyclotron produced radioactive implants for transluminal coronary angioplasty (radioactive stents) are introduced as an example of a medical device developed for therapeutic application.

  11. Nuclear medicine and imaging research (quantitative studies in radiopharmaceutical science)

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, M.D.; Beck, R.N.

    1990-09-01

    This is a report of progress in Year Two (January 1, 1990--December 31, 1990) of Grant FG02-86ER60438, Quantitative Studies in Radiopharmaceutical Science,'' awarded for the three-year period January 1, 1989--December 31, 1991 as a competitive renewal following site visit in the fall of 1988. This program addresses the problems involving the basic science and technology underlying the physical and conceptual tools of radioactive tracer methodology as they relate to the measurement of structural and functional parameters of physiologic importance in health and disease. The principal tool is quantitative radionuclide imaging. The overall objective of this program is to further the development and transfer of radiotracer methodology from basic theory to routine clinical practice in order that individual patients and society as a whole will receive the maximum net benefit from the new knowledge gained. The focus of the research is on the development of new instruments and radiopharmaceuticals, and the evaluation of these through the phase of clinical feasibility. 25 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Current Status of Radiopharmaceuticals for the Theranostics of Neuroendocrine Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Fani, Melpomeni; Kolenc Peitl, Petra; Velikyan, Irina

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear medicine plays a pivotal role in the management of patients affected by neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs). Radiolabeled somatostatin receptor analogs are by far the most advanced radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and therapy (radiotheranostics) of NENs. Their clinical success emerged receptor-targeted radiolabeled peptides as an important class of radiopharmaceuticals and it paved the way for the investigation of other radioligand-receptor systems. Besides the somatostatin receptors (sstr), other receptors have also been linked to NENs and quite a number of potential radiolabeled peptides have been derived from them. The Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor (GLP-1R) is highly expressed in benign insulinomas, the Cholecystokinin 2 (CCK2)/Gastrin receptor is expressed in different NENs, in particular medullary thyroid cancer, and the Glucose-dependent Insulinotropic Polypeptide (GIP) receptor was found to be expressed in gastrointestinal and bronchial NENs, where interestingly, it is present in most of the sstr-negative and GLP-1R-negative NENs. Also in the field of sstr targeting new discoveries brought into light an alternative approach with the use of radiolabeled somatostatin receptor antagonists, instead of the clinically used agonists. The purpose of this review is to present the current status and the most innovative strategies for the diagnosis and treatment (theranostics) of neuroendocrine neoplasms using a cadre of radiolabeled regulatory peptides targeting their receptors. PMID:28295000

  13. Peptide Based Radiopharmaceuticals: Specific Construct Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Som, P; Rhodes, B A; Sharma, S S

    1997-10-21

    The objective of this project was to develop receptor based peptides for diagnostic imaging and therapy. A series of peptides related to cell adhesion molecules (CAM) and immune regulation were designed for radiolabeling with 99mTc and evaluated in animal models as potential diagnostic imaging agents for various disease conditions such as thrombus (clot), acute kidney failure, and inflection/inflammation imaging. The peptides for this project were designed by the industrial partner, Palatin Technologies, (formerly Rhomed, Inc.) using various peptide design approaches including a newly developed rational computer assisted drug design (CADD) approach termed MIDAS (Metal ion Induced Distinctive Array of Structures). In this approach, the biological function domain and the 99mTc complexing domain are fused together so that structurally these domains are indistinguishable. This approach allows construction of conformationally rigid metallo-peptide molecules (similar to cyclic peptides) that are metabolically stable in-vivo. All the newly designed peptides were screened in various in vitro receptor binding and functional assays to identify a lead compound. The lead compounds were formulated in a one-step 99mTc labeling kit form which were studied by BNL for detailed in-vivo imaging using various animals models of human disease. Two main peptides usingMIDAS approach evolved and were investigated: RGD peptide for acute renal failure and an immunomodulatory peptide derived from tuftsin (RMT-1) for infection/inflammation imaging. Various RGD based metallopeptides were designed, synthesized and assayed for their efficacy in inhibiting ADP-induced human platelet aggregation. Most of these peptides displayed biological activity in the 1-100 µM range. Based on previous work by others, RGD-I and RGD-II were evaluated in animal models of acute renal failure. These earlier studies showed that after acute ischemic injury the renal cortex displays

  14. Palliative treatment of metastatic bone pain with radiopharmaceuticals: A perspective beyond Strontium-89 and Samarium-153.

    PubMed

    Guerra Liberal, Francisco D C; Tavares, Adriana Alexandre S; Tavares, João Manuel R S

    2016-04-01

    The present review article aims to provide an overview of the available radionuclides for palliative treatment of bone metastases beyond (89)Sr and (153)Sm. In addition, it aims to review and summarize the clinical outcomes associated with the palliative treatment of bone metastases using different radiopharmaceuticals. A literature search was conducted on Science Direct and PubMed databases (1990 - 2015). The following search terms were combined in order to obtain relevant results: "bone", "metastases", "palliative", "care", "therapy", "treatment", "radiotherapy", "review", "radiopharmaceutical", "phosphorus-32", "strontium-89", "yttrium-90", "tin-117m", "samarium-153", "holmium-166", "thulium-170", "lutetium-177", "rhenium-186", "rhenium-188" and "radium-223". Studies were included if they provided information regarding the clinical outcomes. A comparative analysis of the measured therapeutic response of different radiopharmaceuticals, based on previously published data, suggests that there is a lack of substantial differences in palliative efficacy among radiopharmaceuticals. However, when the comparative analysis adds factors such as patient's life expectancy, radionuclides' physical characteristics (e.g. tissue penetration range and half-life) and health economics to guide the rational selection of a radiopharmaceutical for palliative treatment of bone metastases, (177)Lu and (188)Re-labeled radiopharmaceuticals appear to be the most suitable radiopharmaceuticals for treatment of small and medium/large size bone lesions, respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Risk assessment and economic impact analysis of the implementation of new European legislation on radiopharmaceuticals in Italy: the case of the new monograph chapter Compounding of Radiopharmaceuticals (PHARMEUROPA, Vol. 23, No. 4, October 2011).

    PubMed

    Chitto, Giuseppe; Di Domenico, Elvira; Gandolfo, Patrizia; Ria, Francesco; Tafuri, Chiara; Papa, Sergio

    2013-12-01

    An assessment of the new monograph chapter Compounding of Radiopharmaceuticals has been conducted on the basis of the first period of implementation of Italian legislation on Good Radiopharmaceuticals Practice (NBP) in the preparation of radiopharmaceuticals, in keeping with Decree by the Italian Ministry of Health dated March 30, 2005. This approach is well grounded in the several points of similarity between the two sets of regulations. The impact on patient risk, on staff risk, and on healthcare organization risk, has been assessed. At the same time, the actual costs of coming into compliance with regulations have been estimated. A change risk analysis has been performed through the identification of healthcare-associated risks, the analysis and measurement of the likelihood of occurrence and of the potential impact in terms of patient harm and staff harm, and the determination of the healthcare organization's controlling capability. In order to evaluate the economic impact, the expenses directly related to the implementation of the activities as per ministerial decree have been estimated after calculating the overall costs unrelated to NBP implementation. The resulting costs have then been averaged over the total number of patient services delivered. NBP implementation shows an extremely positive impact on risk management for both patients receiving Nuclear Medicine services and the healthcare organization. With regard to healthcare workers, instead, the implementation of these regulations has a negative effect on the risk for greater exposure and a positive effect on the defense against litigation. The economic impact analysis of NBP implementation shows a 34% increase in the costs for a single patient service. The implementation of the ministerial decree allows for greater detectability of and control over a number of critical elements, paving the way for risk management and minimization. We, therefore, believe that the proposed tool can provide basic

  16. (99m)Tc-zolmitriptan: radiolabeling, molecular modeling, biodistribution and gamma scintigraphy as a hopeful radiopharmaceutical for lung nuclear imaging.

    PubMed

    Rashed, H M; Marzook, F A; Farag, H

    2016-12-01

    Lung imaging radiopharmaceuticals are helpful agents for measuring pulmonary blood flow and allow detection of pulmonary embolism and lung cancer. The goal of this study was to develop a novel potential radiopharmaceutical for lung imaging. Zolmitriptan (a selective serotonin receptor agonist) was successfully labeled with (99m)Tc via direct labeling method under reductive conditions studying different factors affecting the labeling efficiency. (99m)Tc-zolmitriptan was obtained with a maximum labeling yield of 92.5 ± 0.61 % and in vitro stability up to 24 h. Molecular modeling was done to predict the structure of (99m)Tc-zolmitriptan and ensure that radiolabeling did not affect binding ability of zolmitriptan to its receptor. Biodistribution studies showed that maximum lung uptake of (99m)Tc-zolmitriptan was 23.89 ± 1.2 % injected dose/g tissue at 15 min post-injection and retention in lungs remained high up to 1 h, whereas the clearance from mice appeared to proceed mainly via the renal pathway. Scintigraphic images confirmed the biodistribution results showing a high resolution lung image with low accumulation of radioactivity in other organs except kidneys and urinary bladder. (99m)Tc-zolmitriptan is not a blood product and so it is more safe than the currently available (99m)Tc-MAA, and its lung uptake is higher than that of the recently discovered (123)I-IPMPD, (99m)Tc(CO)5I and (99m)Tc-DHPM. So, (99m)Tc-zolmitriptan could be used as a hopeful radiopharmaceutical for lung scintigraphic imaging.

  17. New selenium-75 labeled radiopharmaceuticals: selenonium analogues of dopamine

    SciTech Connect

    Sadek, S.A.; Basmadjian, G.P.; Hsu, P.M.; Rieger, J.A.

    1983-07-01

    Selenium-75 labeled selenonium analogues of dopamine, (2-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)ethyl)dimethylselenonium iodide and its dihydroxy analogue, were prepared by reducing (/sup 75/Se)selenious acid with sodium borohydride at pH 6.0 and reacting the NaSeH produced with 1-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-2-(p-toluenesulfonyloxy)ethane. Tissue distribution studies in rats given the /sup 75/Se-labeled selenonium agents intravenously demonstrated high initial heart uptake. Prolonged adrenal retention and high adrenal to blood ratio of compound 4 were observed. The high uptake and adrenal to blood ratio suggest the potential use of compound 4 as a radiopharmaceutical for the adrenal gland.

  18. 86Y based PET radiopharmaceuticals: radiochemistry and biological applications

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Tapan K.; Brechbiel, Martin W.

    2011-01-01

    Development of targeted radionuclide therapy with 90Y labeled antibodies and peptides has gained momentum in the past decade due to the successes of 90Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan and 90Y-DOTA-Phe1-Tyr3-octreotide in treatment of cancer. 90Y is a pure β−-emitter and cannot be imaged for patient-specific dosimetry which is essential for pre-therapeutic treatment planning and accurate absorbed dose estimation in individual patients to mitigate radiation related risks. This review article describes the utility of 86Y, a positron emitter (33%) with a 14.7-h half-life that can be imaged by positron emission tomography and used as an isotopically matched surrogate radionuclide for 90Y radiation doses estimations. This review discusses various aspects involved in the development of 86Y labeled radiopharmaceuticals with the specific emphasis on the radiochemistry and biological applications with antibodies and peptides. PMID:21711222

  19. Oritavancin Pharmacokinetics and Bone Penetration in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Lehoux, Dario; Ostiguy, Valerie; Cadieux, Cordelia; Malouin, Mireille; Belanger, Odette; Far, Adel Rafai; Parr, Thomas R

    2015-10-01

    The pharmacokinetics and bone concentrations of oritavancin were investigated after a single intravenous dose was administered to rabbits. The pharmacokinetic profile of oritavancin in rabbits showed that it is rapidly distributed to bone tissues, with concentrations remaining stable for up to 168 h, the last measured time point. Based on these findings, further evaluation of oritavancin for the treatment of infections in bone tissues is warranted. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Oritavancin Pharmacokinetics and Bone Penetration in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Ostiguy, Valerie; Cadieux, Cordelia; Malouin, Mireille; Belanger, Odette; Far, Adel Rafai; Parr, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics and bone concentrations of oritavancin were investigated after a single intravenous dose was administered to rabbits. The pharmacokinetic profile of oritavancin in rabbits showed that it is rapidly distributed to bone tissues, with concentrations remaining stable for up to 168 h, the last measured time point. Based on these findings, further evaluation of oritavancin for the treatment of infections in bone tissues is warranted. PMID:26239977

  1. Minimizing human error in radiopharmaceutical preparation and administration via a bar code-enhanced nuclear pharmacy management system.

    PubMed

    Hakala, John L; Hung, Joseph C; Mosman, Elton A

    2012-09-01

    The objective of this project was to ensure correct radiopharmaceutical administration through the use of a bar code system that links patient and drug profiles with on-site information management systems. This new combined system would minimize the amount of manual human manipulation, which has proven to be a primary source of error. The most common reason for dosing errors is improper patient identification when a dose is obtained from the nuclear pharmacy or when a dose is administered. A standardized electronic transfer of information from radiopharmaceutical preparation to injection will further reduce the risk of misadministration. Value stream maps showing the flow of the patient dose information, as well as potential points of human error, were developed. Next, a future-state map was created that included proposed corrections for the most common critical sites of error. Transitioning the current process to the future state will require solutions that address these sites. To optimize the future-state process, a bar code system that links the on-site radiology management system with the nuclear pharmacy management system was proposed. A bar-coded wristband connects the patient directly to the electronic information systems. The bar code-enhanced process linking the patient dose with the electronic information reduces the number of crucial points for human error and provides a framework to ensure that the prepared dose reaches the correct patient. Although the proposed flowchart is designed for a site with an in-house central nuclear pharmacy, much of the framework could be applied by nuclear medicine facilities using unit doses. An electronic connection between information management systems to allow the tracking of a radiopharmaceutical from preparation to administration can be a useful tool in preventing the mistakes that are an unfortunate reality for any facility.

  2. A rapid and efficient preparation of [123I]radiopharmaceuticals using a small HPLC (Rocket) column.

    PubMed

    Katsifis, Andrew; Papazian, Vahan; Jackson, Timothy; Loc'h, Christian

    2006-01-01

    A simplified method for the rapid and efficient preparation of [(123)I]radiopharmaceuticals is described. Three radiopharmaceuticals, [(123)I]beta-CIT, [(123)I]MIBG and [(123)I]clioquinol, were synthesised and purified as model compounds. The radiotracers were labelled with iodine-123 using electrophilic oxidative conditions and purified by a compact semi-preparative reverse phase column (C-18, 3 microm, 7 x 53 mm, Alltima Rocket, Alltech) using aqueous-ethanol as HPLC solvents that were directly used for radiopharmaceutical formulation. The radiochemical purity of the radioiodinated tracers as assessed by analytical HPLC was higher than 99% with specific activity higher than 3 GBq/nmol. The total preparation time of a radiotracer ranged from 40 to 60 min and, starting from 3.7 GBq of iodine-123, more than 2.5 GBq of formulated radiopharmaceuticals were available for clinical investigations.

  3. The Role of Non-Standard PET Radionuclides in the Development of New Radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Avila-Rodriguez, M. A.; McQuarrie, S. A.

    2008-08-11

    This paper discusses the production methods of the most commonly used non-standard PET radionuclides, their decay characteristics and importance in the development of novel radiopharmaceuticals for PET-based molecular imaging and potential applications in therapy.

  4. Paediatric pharmacokinetics: key considerations

    PubMed Central

    Batchelor, Hannah Katharine; Marriott, John Francis

    2015-01-01

    A number of anatomical and physiological factors determine the pharmacokinetic profile of a drug. Differences in physiology in paediatric populations compared with adults can influence the concentration of drug within the plasma or tissue. Healthcare professionals need to be aware of anatomical and physiological changes that affect pharmacokinetic profiles of drugs to understand consequences of dose adjustments in infants and children. Pharmacokinetic clinical trials in children are complicated owing to the limitations on blood sample volumes and perception of pain in children resulting from blood sampling. There are alternative sampling techniques that can minimize the invasive nature of such trials. Population based models can also limit the sampling required from each individual by increasing the overall sample size to generate robust pharmacokinetic data. This review details key considerations in the design and development of paediatric pharmacokinetic clinical trials. PMID:25855821

  5. Paediatric pharmacokinetics: key considerations.

    PubMed

    Batchelor, Hannah Katharine; Marriott, John Francis

    2015-03-01

    A number of anatomical and physiological factors determine the pharmacokinetic profile of a drug. Differences in physiology in paediatric populations compared with adults can influence the concentration of drug within the plasma or tissue. Healthcare professionals need to be aware of anatomical and physiological changes that affect pharmacokinetic profiles of drugs to understand consequences of dose adjustments in infants and children. Pharmacokinetic clinical trials in children are complicated owing to the limitations on blood sample volumes and perception of pain in children resulting from blood sampling. There are alternative sampling techniques that can minimize the invasive nature of such trials. Population based models can also limit the sampling required from each individual by increasing the overall sample size to generate robust pharmacokinetic data. This review details key considerations in the design and development of paediatric pharmacokinetic clinical trials. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  6. Altered biodistribution of radiopharmaceuticals: role of radiochemical/pharmaceutical purity, physiological, and pharmacologic factors.

    PubMed

    Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Killeen, Ronan P; Osborne, Joseph R

    2010-07-01

    One of the most common problems associated with radiopharmaceuticals is an unanticipated or altered biodistribution, which can have a significant clinical impact on safety, scan interpretation, and diagnostic imaging accuracy. In their most extreme manifestations, unanticipated imaging results may even compromise the utility and or accuracy of nuclear medicine studies. We present here an overall summary of altered biodistribution of radiopharmaceuticals with a special emphasis on the molecular mechanisms involved. Important factors affecting the biodistribution of radiopharmaceuticals can be described in 5 major categories and include (1) radiopharmaceutical preparation and formulation problems; (2) problems caused by radiopharmaceutical administration techniques and procedures; (3) by changes in biochemical and pathophysiology; (4) previous medical procedures, such as surgery, radiation therapy and dialysis; and finally (5) by drug interactions. The altered biodistribution of (99m)Tc radiopharmaceuticals are generally associated with increased amounts of (99m)Tc radiochemical impurities, such as free (99m)TcO(4)(-) and particulate impurities, such as (99m)Tc colloids or (99m)Tc-reduced hydrolyzed species. Faulty injection, such as dose infiltration or contamination with antiseptics and aluminum during dose administration, may cause significant artifacts. The patient's own medical problems, such as abnormalities in the regulation of hormone levels; failure in the function of excretory organs and systems, such as hepatobiliary and genitourinary systems; and even simple conditions, such as excessive talking may contribute to altered biodistribution of radiopharmaceuticals. Previous medical procedures (chemotherapy, radiation therapy, dialysis) and drug interaction are the some of the nontechnical factors responsible for unanticipated biodistribution of radiotracers. This review provides a comprehensive summary of various factors and specific examples to illustrate

  7. The two faces of pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Rescigno, Aldo

    2010-01-01

    There are two main branches of Mathematics: Calculus and Geometry; in Physics there are Constructive Theories and Principle Theories. Similarly in Pharmacokinetics we can build models with two opposite approaches, the bottom-up and the top-down point of view. In this short opinion article I will try to show, with the help of a few examples, the advantages of each one of the two approaches.

  8. Use of radiopharmaceuticals in diagnostic nuclear medicine in the United States: 1960-2010.

    PubMed

    Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Brill, Aaron B; Callahan, Ronald J; Clanton, Jeffrey A; DePietro, Allegra; Goldsmith, Stanley J; Greenspan, Bennett S; Gross, Milton D; Hays, Marguerite T; Moore, Stephen C; Ponto, James A; Shreeve, Walton W; Melo, Dunstana R; Linet, Martha S; Simon, Steven L

    2015-05-01

    To reconstruct reliable nuclear medicine-related occupational radiation doses or doses received as patients from radiopharmaceuticals over the last five decades, the authors assessed which radiopharmaceuticals were used in different time periods, their relative frequency of use, and typical values of the administered activity. This paper presents data on the changing patterns of clinical use of radiopharmaceuticals and documents the range of activity administered to adult patients undergoing diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures in the U.S. between 1960 and 2010. Data are presented for 15 diagnostic imaging procedures that include thyroid scan and thyroid uptake; brain scan; brain blood flow; lung perfusion and ventilation; bone, liver, hepatobiliary, bone marrow, pancreas, and kidney scans; cardiac imaging procedures; tumor localization studies; localization of gastrointestinal bleeding; and non-imaging studies of blood volume and iron metabolism. Data on the relative use of radiopharmaceuticals were collected using key informant interviews and comprehensive literature reviews of typical administered activities of these diagnostic nuclear medicine studies. Responses of key informants on relative use of radiopharmaceuticals are in agreement with published literature. Results of this study will be used for retrospective reconstruction of occupational and personal medical radiation doses from diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals to members of the U.S. radiologic technologists' cohort and in reconstructing radiation doses from occupational or patient radiation exposures to other U.S. workers or patient populations.

  9. USE OF RADIOPHARMACEUTICALS IN DIAGNOSTIC NUCLEAR MEDICINE IN THE UNITED STATES: 1960–2010

    PubMed Central

    Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Brill, Aaron B.; Callahan, Ronald J.; Clanton, Jeffrey A.; DePietro, Allegra; Goldsmith, Stanley J.; Greenspan, Bennett S.; Gross, Milton D.; Hays, Marguerite T.; Moore, Stephen C.; Ponto, James A.; Shreeve, Walton W.; Melo, Dunstana R.; Linet, Martha S.; Simon, Steven L.

    2014-01-01

    To reconstruct reliable nuclear medicine-related occupational radiation doses or doses received as patients from radiopharmaceuticals over the last five decades, we assessed which radiopharmaceuticals were used in different time periods, their relative frequency of use, and typical values of the administered activity. This paper presents data on the changing patterns of clinical use of radiopharmaceuticals and documents the range of activity administered to adult patients undergoing diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures in the U.S. between 1960 and 2010. Data are presented for 15 diagnostic imaging procedures that include thyroid scan and thyroid uptake, brain scan, brain blood flow, lung perfusion and ventilation, bone, liver, hepatobiliary, bone marrow, pancreas, and kidney scans, cardiac imaging procedures, tumor localization studies, localization of gastrointestinal bleeding, and non-imaging studies of blood volume and iron metabolism. Data on the relative use of radiopharmaceuticals were collected using key informant interviews and comprehensive literature reviews of typical administered activities of these diagnostic nuclear medicine studies. Responses of key informants on relative use of radiopharmaceuticals are in agreement with published literature. Results of this study will be used for retrospective reconstruction of occupational and personal medical radiation doses from diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals to members of the U.S. radiologic technologist’s cohort and in reconstructing radiation doses from occupational or patient radiation exposures to other U.S. workers or patient populations. PMID:25811150

  10. [Current developments in SPECT/CT systems using 99mTc-radiopharmaceuticals].

    PubMed

    Ferro-Flores, Guillermina; de Murphy, Consuelo Arteaga

    2007-01-01

    The 3 foundations of nuclear medicine are radiation conscious personnel, specific radiopharmaceuticals and equipment. The trend in molecular radiopharmacy is to develop new radiopharmaceuticals targeting peptides and receptors. 99mTc-radiopharmaceuticals give important clinical and molecular information especially in endocrinology, oncology and cardiology. The basic equipment has relied on crystal scintillation detector gamma cameras and the obtained images represent organ function provided by the specific radiopharmaceutical. Gamma cameras for single emission computed tomography (SPECT) can be added to an X-ray computed tomography (CT) equipment to form a hybrid (SPECT/ CT). The system is coupled to computer algorithms and special software to acquire and process the separate studies and fuse the two images to give a 3-D image of organ function plus anatomy. The new semiconductor or solid state detectors are a big improvement in commercial hybrid scintillation cameras and micro-SPECT/CT. Fused images obtained with SPECT/CT have been very useful in almost all medical areas and play an important role in preclinical research. The aim of this work is to present the current status and future trends of SPECT/CT systems in the clinical practice of nuclear medicine using technetium-99m radiopharmaceuticals. The development of molecular, functional and genetic imaging tools aided by new technology and SPECT/CT image fusion will enhance accurate diagnoses, and understanding of molecular mechanisms of disease and their respective response to radiopharmaceutical therapy.

  11. Biological carrier molecules of radiopharmaceuticals for molecular cancer imaging and targeted cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Aerts, A; Impens, N R E N; Gijs, M; D'Huyvetter, M; Vanmarcke, H; Ponsard, B; Lahoutte, T; Luxen, A; Baatout, S

    2014-01-01

    Many tumors express one or more proteins that are either absent or hardly present in normal tissues, and which can be targeted by radiopharmaceuticals for either visualization of tumor cells or for targeted therapy. Radiopharmaceuticals can consist of a radionuclide and a carrier molecule that interacts with the tumor target and as such guides the attached radionuclide to the right spot. Radiopharmaceuticals hold great promise for the future of oncology by providing early, precise diagnosis and better, personalized treatment. Most advanced developments with marketed products are based on whole antibodies or antibody fragments as carrier molecules. However, a substantial number of (pre)clinical studies indicate that radiopharmaceuticals based on other carrier molecules, such as peptides, nonimmunoglobulin scaffolds, or nucleic acids may be valuable alternatives. In this review, we discuss the biological molecules that can deliver radionuclide payloads to tumor cells in terms of their structure, the selection procedure, their (pre)clinical status, and advantages or obstacles to their use in a radiopharmaceutical design. We also consider the plethora of molecular targets existing on cancer cells that can be targeted by radiopharmaceuticals, as well as how to select a radionuclide for a given diagnostic or therapeutic product.

  12. Lisdexamfetamine: A pharmacokinetic review.

    PubMed

    Comiran, Eloisa; Kessler, Félix Henrique; Fröehlich, Pedro Eduardo; Limberger, Renata Pereira

    2016-06-30

    Lisdexamfetamine (LDX) is a d-amphetamine (d-AMPH) pro-drug used to treat Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Binge Eating Disorder (BED) symptoms. The in vivo pharmacodynamics of LDX is the same as that of its active product d-AMPH, although there are a few qualitative and quantitative differences due to pharmacokinetics. Due to the specific pharmacokinetics of the long-acting stimulants, this article revises the pharmacokinetic studies on LDX, the newest amphetamine pro-drug. The Medline/Pubmed, Science Direct and Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde (Lilacs and Ibecs) (2007-2016) databases were searched for articles and their list of references. As for basic pharmacokinetics studies, since LDX is a newly developed medication, there are few results concerning biotransformation, distribution and the use of different biological matrices for analysis. This is the first robust review on this topic, gathering data from all clinical pharmacokinetics studies available in the literature. The particular pharmacokinetics of LDX plays a major role in studying this pro-drug, since this knowledge was essential to understand some reports on clinical effects in literature, e.g. the small likelihood of reducing the effect by interactions, the effect of long duration use and the still questionable reduction of the potential for abuse. In general the already well-known pharmacokinetic properties of amphetamine make LDX relatively predictable, simplifying the use of LDX in clinical practice.

  13. Finger doses for staff handling radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    Pant, Gauri S; Sharma, Sanjay K; Rath, Gaura K

    2006-09-01

    Radiation doses to the fingers of occupational workers handling 99mTc-labeled compounds and 131I for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in nuclear medicine were measured by thermoluminescence dosimetry. The doses were measured at the base of the ring finger and the index finger of both hands in 2 groups of workers. Group 1 (7 workers) handled 99mTc-labeled radiopharmaceuticals, and group 2 (6 workers) handled 131I for diagnosis and therapy. Radiation doses to the fingertips of 3 workers also were measured. Two were from group 1, and 1 was from group 2. The doses to the base of the fingers for the radiopharmacy staff and physicians from group 1 were observed to be 17+/-7.5 (mean+/-SD) and 13.4+/-6.5 microSv/GBq, respectively. Similarly, the dose to the base of the fingers for the 3 physicians in group 2 was estimated to be 82.0+/-13.8 microSv/GBq. Finger doses for the technologists in both groups could not be calculated per unit of activity because they did not handle the radiopharmaceuticals directly. Their doses were reported in millisieverts that accumulated in 1 wk. The doses to the fingertips of the radiopharmacy worker and the physician in group 1 were 74.3+/-19.8 and 53.5+/-21.9 microSv/GBq, respectively. The dose to the fingertips of the physician in group 2 was 469.9+/-267 microSv/GBq. The radiation doses to the fingers of nuclear medicine staff at our center were measured. The maximum expected annual dose to the extremities appeared to be less than the annual limit (500 mSv/y), except for a physician who handled large quantities of 131I for treatment. Because all of these workers are on rotation and do not constantly handle radioactivity throughout the year, the doses to the base of the fingers or the fingertips should not exceed the prescribed annual limit of 500 mSv.

  14. Study of Bone Surface Absorbed Dose in Treatment of Bone Metastases via Selected Radiopharmaceuticals: Using MCNP4C Code and Available Experimental Data.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Reza; Afarideh, Hossein; Maragheh, Mohammad Ghannadi; Shirmardi, Seyed Pezhman; Samani, Ali Bahrami

    2015-05-01

    Bone metastases are major clinical concern that can cause severe problems for patients. Currently, various beta emitters are used for bone pain palliation. This study, describes the process for absorbed dose prediction of selected bone surface and volume-seeking beta emitter radiopharmaceuticals such as (32)P, (89)SrCl2,(90)Y-EDTMP,(153)Sm-EDTMP, (166)Ho-DOTMP, (177)Lu-EDTMP,(186)Re-HEDP, and (188)Re-HEDP in human bone, using MCNP code. Three coaxial sub-cylinders 5 cm in height and 1.2, 2.6, and 7.6 cm in diameter were used for bone marrow, bone, and muscle simulation respectively. The *F8 tally was employed to calculate absorbed dose in the MCNP4C simulations. Results show that with injection of 1 MBq of these radiopharmaceuticals given to a 70 kg adult man, (32)P, (89)SrCl2, and (90)Y-EDTMP radiopharmaceuticals will have the highest amount of bone surface absorbed dose, where beta particles will have the greatest proportion in absorbed dose of bone surface in comparison with gamma radiation. These results demonstrate moderate agreement with available experimental data.

  15. New SPECT and PET Radiopharmaceuticals for Imaging Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sogbein, Oyebola O.; Pelletier-Galarneau, Matthieu; Schindler, Thomas H.; Wei, Lihui; Wells, R. Glenn; Ruddy, Terrence D.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear cardiology has experienced exponential growth within the past four decades with converging capacity to diagnose and influence management of a variety of cardiovascular diseases. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with technetium-99m radiotracers or thallium-201 has dominated the field; however new hardware and software designs that optimize image quality with reduced radiation exposure are fuelling a resurgence of interest at the preclinical and clinical levels to expand beyond MPI. Other imaging modalities including positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) continue to emerge as powerful players with an expanded capacity to diagnose a variety of cardiac conditions. At the forefront of this resurgence is the development of novel target vectors based on an enhanced understanding of the underlying pathophysiological process in the subcellular domain. Molecular imaging with novel radiopharmaceuticals engineered to target a specific subcellular process has the capacity to improve diagnostic accuracy and deliver enhanced prognostic information to alter management. This paper, while not comprehensive, will review the recent advancements in radiotracer development for SPECT and PET MPI, autonomic dysfunction, apoptosis, atherosclerotic plaques, metabolism, and viability. The relevant radiochemistry and preclinical and clinical development in addition to molecular imaging with emerging modalities such as cardiac MRI and PET-MR will be discussed. PMID:24901002

  16. The next generation of positron emission tomography radiopharmaceuticals in oncology.

    PubMed

    Rice, Samuel L; Roney, Celeste A; Daumar, Pierre; Lewis, Jason S

    2011-07-01

    Although (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) is still the most widely used positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer, there are a few well-known limitations to its use. The last decade has seen the development of new PET probes for in vivo visualization of specific molecular targets, along with important technical advances in the production of positron-emitting radionuclides and their related labeling methods. As such, a broad range of new PET tracers are in preclinical development or have recently entered clinical trials. The topics covered in this review include labeling methods, biological targets, and the most recent preclinical or clinical data of some of the next generation of PET radiopharmaceuticals. This review, which is by no means exhaustive, has been separated into sections related to the PET radionuclide used for radiolabeling: fluorine-18, for the labeling of agents such as FACBC, FDHT, choline, and Galacto-RGD; carbon-11, for the labeling of choline; gallium-68, for the labeling of peptides such as DOTATOC and bombesin analogs; and the long-lived radionuclides iodine-124 and zirconium-89 for the labeling of monoclonal antibodies cG250, and J591 and trastuzumab, respectively. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of SPECT quantification of radiopharmaceutical distribution in canine myocardium

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jianying; Jaszczak, R.L.; Greer, K.L.

    1995-02-01

    This study evaluates the quantitative accuracy of SPECT for in vivo distributions of {sup 99m}Tc radiopharmaceuticals using fanbeam (FB) and parallel-beam (PB) collimators and compares uniform and nouniform attenuation correction methods in terms of quantitative accuracy. SPECT quantification of canine myocardial radioactivity was performed followed by well counter measurements of extracted myocardial tissue samples. Transmission scans using a line source and an FB collimator were performed to generate nonuniform attenuation maps of the canine thorax. Emission scans with two energy windows were acquired. Images were reconstructed using a filtered backprojection algorithm, with a dual-window scatter subtraction combined with either no attenuation compensation or single iteration Chang attenuation compensation based on a uniform attenuation map {mu}=0.152 cm{sup -1} or the nonuniform transmission map. The measured mean counts from the SPECT images were converted using the well counter. The experimental results demonstrate that, compared with well counter values, the in vivo distributions of {sup 99m}Tc were most accurately determined in FB and PB SPECT reconstructions with nonuniform attenuation compensation, under-estimated without attenuation compensation and overestimated with uniform attenuation compensation. 37 refs., 9 figs., 10 tabs.

  18. AUTOMATION FOR THE SYNTHESIS AND APPLICATION OF PET RADIOPHARMACEUTICALS.

    SciTech Connect

    Alexoff, D.L.

    2001-09-21

    The development of automated systems supporting the production and application of PET radiopharmaceuticals has been an important focus of researchers since the first successes of using carbon-11 (Comar et al., 1979) and fluorine-18 (Reivich et al., 1979) labeled compounds to visualize functional activity of the human brain. These initial successes of imaging the human brain soon led to applications in the human heart (Schelbert et al., 1980), and quickly radiochemists began to see the importance of automation to support PET studies in humans (Lambrecht, 1982; Langstrom et al., 1983). Driven by the necessity of controlling processes emanating high fluxes of 511 KeV photons, and by the tedium of repetitive syntheses for carrying out these human PET investigations, academic and government scientists have designed, developed and tested many useful and novel automated systems in the past twenty years. These systems, originally designed primarily by radiochemists, not only carry out effectively the tasks they were designed for, but also demonstrate significant engineering innovation in the field of laboratory automation.

  19. The Next Generation of Positron Emission Tomography Radiopharmaceuticals in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Samuel L.; Roney, Celeste A.; Daumar, Pierre; Lewis, Jason S.

    2015-01-01

    Although 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) is still the most widely used positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer, there are a few well-known limitations to its use. The last decade has seen the development of new PET probes for in vivo visualization of specific molecular targets, along with important technical advances in the production of positron-emitting radionuclides and their related labeling methods. As such, a broad range of new PET tracers are in preclinical development or have recently entered clinical trials. The topics covered in this review include labeling methods, biological targets, and the most recent preclinical or clinical data of some of the next generation of PET radiopharmaceuticals. This review, which is by no means exhaustive, has been separated into sections related to the PET radionuclide used for radiolabeling: fluorine-18, for the labeling of agents such as FACBC, FDHT, choline, and Galacto-RGD; carbon-11, for the labeling of choline; gallium-68, for the labeling of peptides such as DOTATOC and bombesin analogs; and the long-lived radionuclides iodine-124 and zirconium-89 for the labeling of monoclonal antibodies cG250, and J591 and trastuzumab, respectively. PMID:21624561

  20. Synthesis and biological studies of positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Dischino, D.D.

    1983-01-01

    The development and clinical evaluation of two-positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals designed to image myelin in humans is reported. Carbon-11-labeled benzyl methyl ether was synthesized by the reaction of carbon-11-labeled methanol and benzyl chloride in dimethyl sulfoxide containing powdered potassium hydroxide in a radiochemical yield of 43% and a synthesis and purification time of 40 minutes. Carbon-11-labeled diphenylmethanol was synthesized by the reaction of carbon-11-labeled carbon dioxide and phenyllithium followed by the reduction of the carbon-11-labeled intermediate to diphenylmethanol via lithium aluminum hydride in a radiochemical yield of 71% and a synthesis and purification time of 38 minutes. Carbon-11-labeled benzyl methyl ether and diphenylmethanol were each evaluated as myelin imaging agents in three patients with multiple sclerosis via positron-emission tomography. In two out of three patients studied with carbon-11-labeled benzyl methyl ether, the distribution of activity in the brain was not consistent with local lipid content. A new synthesis of carbon-11-labeled-DL-phenylalanine labeled in the benzylic position and the synthesis of fluorine-18-labeled 1-(2-nitro-1-imidazolyl)-3-fluoro-2-propanol, a potential in vivo marker of hypoxic tissue, are reported.

  1. [Dalbavancin: pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters].

    PubMed

    Azanza, José Ramón; Sádaba, Belén; Reis, Joana

    2017-01-01

    Dalbavancin is a new lipoglycopeptide antibiotic whose structure influences its pharmacokinetic profile. It is not absorbed after oral administration and is therefore administered intravenously. It is distributed through intracellular fluid, reaching adequate concentrations in the skin, bone, blister fluid and synovial fluid. Plasma protein binding is very high. Concentrations in brain tissue and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are inadequate. Excretion is through non-microsomal metabolism with inactive metabolites and through the kidneys by glomerular filtration. Dalbavancin is eliminated slowly, as shown by its clearance value and its terminal elimination half-life, which exceeds 300 hours. This means that adequate concentrations of the drug remain in plasma and tissues for a prolonged period and explains the dosing regimen: a first dose of 1g followed 7 days later by a 500mg dose. The pharmacokinetics are linear and show little intra- and interindividual variability. There are no pharmacokinetic interactions. Dose adjustment is not required for patients with mild or moderate renal insufficiency (creatinine clearance ≥ 30 to 79ml/min). Dosage adjustment is not required in patients regularly receiving elective haemodialysis (3 times/week) and the drug can be administered without consideration of haemodialysis times. In patients with chronic renal insufficiency, whose creatinine clearance is < 30ml/min and who are not regularly receiving elective haemodialysis, the recommended dose should be reduced to 750mg per week, followed 1 week later by 375mg. Dosage adjustment does not seem necessary in patients with liver failure or in older patients. There is no information on the most appropriate dosage in children. The pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamics parameter that best describes the effectiveness of dalbavancin is the ratio between the area under the curve and the minimum inhibitory concentration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Organophosphorus Insecticide Pharmacokinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Timchalk, Charles

    2010-01-01

    This chapter highlights a number of current and future applications of pharmacokinetics to assess organophosphate (OP) insecticide dosimetry, biological response and risk in humans exposed to these agents. Organophosphates represent a large family of pesticides where insecticidal as well as toxicological mode of action is associated with their ability to target and inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Pharmacokinetics entails the quantitative integration of physiological and metabolic processes associated with the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) of drugs and xenobiotics. Pharmacokinetic studies provide important data on the amount of toxicant delivered to a target site as well as species-, age-, gender-specific and dose-dependent differences in biological response. These studies have been conducted with organophosphorus insecticides in multiple species, at various dose levels, and across different routes of exposure to understand their in vivo pharmacokinetics and how they contribute to the observed toxicological response. To access human exposure to organophosphorus insecticides, human pharmacokinetic studies have been conducted and used to develop biological monitoring strategies based on the quantitation of key metabolites in biological fluids. Pharmacokinetic studies with these insecticides are also useful to facilitate extrapolation of dosimetry and biological response from animals to humans and for the assessment of human health risk. In this regard, physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) models are being utilized to assess risk and understand the toxicological implications of known or suspected exposures to various insecticides. In this chapter a number of examples are presented that illustrate the utility and limitation of pharmacokinetic studies to address human health concerns associated with organophosphorus insecticides.

  3. Delivery of a Peptide Radiopharmaceutical to Brain with an IgG-Avidin Fusion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qing-Hui; Lu, Jeff Zhiqiang; Hui, Eric Ka-Wai; Boado, Ruben J.; Pardridge, William M.

    2011-01-01

    The genetic engineering, host cell expression, purity, identity, and in vivo brain drug targeting properties are described for a new IgG-fusion protein, designated the cTfRMAb-AV fusion protein. Avidin (AV) is fused to the carboxyl terminus of the heavy chain of the genetically engineered chimeric monoclonal antibody (MAb) against the mouse transferrin receptor (TfR). The TfRMAb binds the endogenous TfR on the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which triggers transport into brain from blood. The cTfRMAb-AV fusion protein is produced in stably transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells, which are grown in serum free medium under conditions of biotin starvation. Following affinity purification, the purity and identity of the cTfRMAb-AV fusion protein was verified by electrophoresis and Western blotting. The affinity of the cTfRMAb for the murine TfR is high, KI = 4.6±0.5 nM, despite fusion of avidin to the antibody heavy chain. The model peptide radiopharmaceutical used in this study is the Aβ1-40 amyloid peptide of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), which in a brain-penetrating form could be used to image the amyloid plaque in brain in AD. The BBB transport and brain uptake of the [125I]-Aβ1-40 peptide was measured in mice injected intravenously (IV) with the peptide either free or conjugated to the cTfRMAb-AV fusion protein. The brain uptake of the free Aβ1-40 peptide was very low, 0.1 % of injected dose (ID)/gram brain following IV injection, and is comparable to the brain uptake of a brain blood volume marker. However, the brain uptake of the Aβ1-40 peptide was high, 2.1 ± 0.2 % ID/gram brain, following attachment of the biotinylated peptide to the cTfRMAb-AV fusion protein. Capillary depletion analysis showed the peptide penetrated the brain parenchyma from blood. The cTfRMAb-AV fusion protein is a new drug delivery system that can target to mouse brain mono-biotinylated peptide or antisense radiopharmaceuticals. PMID:21707084

  4. Log normal distribution of cellular uptake of radioactivity: implications for biologic responses to radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Neti, Prasad V S V; Howell, Roger W

    2006-06-01

    It is widely recognized that radiopharmaceuticals are generally distributed nonuniformly in tissues. Such nonuniformities are observed over the entire range of spatial levels, ranging from organ to subcellular levels. The implications of nonuniform distributions of radioactivity for dosimetry, and ultimately for the biologic response of tissues containing radioactivity, have been investigated extensively. However, there is a paucity of experimental data on the distribution of cellular activity within a population of cells. In the present study, the distribution of activity per cell is experimentally determined and its implications for predicting biologic response are examined. Chinese hamster V79 cells were exposed to different concentrations of (210)Po-citrate. The radiolabeled cells were washed, seeded into culture dishes or glass slides, covered with photographic emulsion, and stored in an opaque container. Subsequently, the emulsion was developed, thereby resulting in observable alpha-particle tracks that were scored. The distribution of activity per cell was found to be well described by a log normal distribution function. Theoretic modeling of cell survival as a function of mean activity per cell showed that survival curves differed substantially when the activity per cell was log normally distributed versus when it was assumed conventionally that every cell in the population contained the mean activity. The present study provides experimental evidence of log normal cellular uptake of radioactivity. Theoretic calculations show that a log normal distribution of cellular activity can have a substantial impact on modeling the biologic response of cell populations.

  5. Intelligent portal monitor for fast suppression of false positives due to radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.W.; Butterfield, K.B.

    1985-01-01

    Monitoring the movement of radioactive material through secure or sensitive areas may be complicated by the existence of unanticipated sources of radiation carried by individuals passing through the area. Typical of such sources are radiopharmaceuticals prescribed for a medical procedure. We report here on an apparatus designed to quickly discriminate between in-vivo radiopharmaceuticals and other nuclear materials, based on a pattern-recognition algorithm and a microcomputer. Principles of operation are discussed, and the data base for the pattern-recognition algorithm is displayed. Operating experience with the apparatus in a trial location is also discussed. Our apparatus correctly identifies in-vivo radiopharmaceuticals in over 80% of all trials; challenges with radioisotopes other than radiopharmaceuticals have led the apparatus, without exception, to reject the challenge isotope as incompatible with medical practice. The apparatus thus rapidly discriminates between individuals bearing radiopharmaceuticals and those bearing illicit sources, such as special nuclear materials. Examples of applications are presented. 7 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  6. "The Show"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehring, John

    2004-01-01

    For the past 16 years, the blue-collar city of Huntington, West Virginia, has rolled out the red carpet to welcome young wrestlers and their families as old friends. They have come to town chasing the same dream for a spot in what many of them call "The Show". For three days, under the lights of an arena packed with 5,000 fans, the…

  7. "The Show"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehring, John

    2004-01-01

    For the past 16 years, the blue-collar city of Huntington, West Virginia, has rolled out the red carpet to welcome young wrestlers and their families as old friends. They have come to town chasing the same dream for a spot in what many of them call "The Show". For three days, under the lights of an arena packed with 5,000 fans, the…

  8. Preclinical acute toxicity, biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, radiation dosimetry and microPET imaging studies of [(18)F]fluorocholine in mice.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Marina B; Ferreira, Soraya M Z M D; Nascimento, Leonardo T C; Costa, Flávia M; Mendes, Bruno M; Ferreira, Andrea V; Malamut, Carlos; Silva, Juliana B; Mamede, Marcelo

    2016-10-01

    [(18)F]Fluorocholine ([(18)F]FCH) has been proven to be effective in prostate cancer. Since [(18)F]FCH is classified as a new radiopharmaceutical in Brazil, preclinical safety and efficacy data are required to support clinical trials and to obtain its approval. The aim of this work was to perform acute toxicity, biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, radiation dosimetry and microPET imaging studies of [(18)F]FCH. The results could support its use in nuclear medicine as an important piece of work for regulatory in Brazil.

  9. Clinical pharmacokinetic profile of modafinil.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Philmore; Hellriegel, Edward T

    2003-01-01

    modafinil has potential to affect the pharmacokinetics of drugs that are metabolised by certain CYP enzymes. Compounds that induce or inhibit CYP activity are unlikely to have major effects on the pharmacokinetics of modafinil. In summary, the results show that modafinil is a moderately long-lived drug that is well absorbed and extensively metabolised.

  10. Hepatic extraction fraction of hepatobiliary radiopharmaceuticals measured using spectral analysis.

    PubMed

    Murase, K; Tsuda, T; Mochizuki, T; Ikezoe, J

    1999-11-01

    Measuring the hepatic extraction fraction (HEF) of a hepatobiliary radiopharmaceutical helps to differentiate hepatocyte from biliary tract diseases, and it is generally performed using deconvolution analysis. In this study, we measured HEF using spectral analysis. With spectral analysis, HEF was calculated from (the sum of the spectral data obtained by spectral analysis--the highest frequency component of the spectrum) divided by (the sum of the spectral data) x 100 (%). We applied this method to dynamic liver scintigraphic data obtained from six healthy volunteers and from 46 patients with various liver diseases, using 99Tcm-N-pyridoxyl-5-methyltryptophan (PMT). We also measured HEF using deconvolution analysis, in which the modified Fourier transform technique was employed. The HEF values obtained by spectral analysis correlated closely with those obtained by deconvolution analysis (r = 0.925), suggesting our method is valid. The HEF values obtained by spectral analysis decreased as the severity of liver disease progressed. The values were 100.0 +/- 0.0%, 94.7 +/- 13.6%, 76.2 +/- 27.4%, 45.7 +/- 15.6%, 82.7 +/- 24.2% and 95.2 +/- 11.8% (mean +/- S.D.) for the normal controls (n = 6), mild liver cirrhosis (n = 16), moderate liver cirrhosis (n = 11), severe liver cirrhosis (n = 5), acute hepatitis (n = 8) and chronic hepatitis groups (n = 6), respectively. The HEF was obtained more simply and rapidly by spectral analysis than by deconvolution analysis. The results suggest that our method using spectral analysis can be used as an alternative to the conventional procedure using deconvolution analysis for measuring HEF.

  11. Lutetium-177 DOTATATE Production with an Automated Radiopharmaceutical Synthesis System.

    PubMed

    Aslani, Alireza; Snowdon, Graeme M; Bailey, Dale L; Schembri, Geoffrey P; Bailey, Elizabeth A; Pavlakis, Nick; Roach, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy (PRRT) with yttrium-90 ((90)Y) and lutetium-177 ((177)Lu)-labelled SST analogues are now therapy option for patients who have failed to respond to conventional medical therapy. In-house production with automated PRRT synthesis systems have clear advantages over manual methods resulting in increasing use in hospital-based radiopharmacies. We report on our one year experience with an automated radiopharmaceutical synthesis system. All syntheses were carried out using the Eckert & Ziegler Eurotope's Modular-Lab Pharm Tracer® automated synthesis system. All materials and methods used were followed as instructed by the manufacturer of the system (Eckert & Ziegler Eurotope, Berlin, Germany). Sterile, GMP-certified, no-carrier added (NCA) (177)Lu was used with GMP-certified peptide. An audit trail was also produced and saved by the system. The quality of the final product was assessed after each synthesis by ITLC-SG and HPLC methods. A total of 17 [(177)Lu]-DOTATATE syntheses were performed between August 2013 and December 2014. The amount of radioactive [(177)Lu]-DOTATATE produced by each synthesis varied between 10-40 GBq and was dependant on the number of patients being treated on a given day. Thirteen individuals received a total of 37 individual treatment administrations in this period. There were no issues and failures with the system or the synthesis cassettes. The average radiochemical purity as determined by ITLC was above 99% (99.8 ± 0.05%) and the average radiochemical purity as determined by HPLC technique was above 97% (97.3 ± 1.5%) for this period. The automated synthesis of [(177)Lu]-DOTATATE using Eckert & Ziegler Eurotope's Modular-Lab Pharm Tracer® system is a robust, convenient and high yield approach to the radiolabelling of DOTATATE peptide benefiting from the use of NCA (177)Lu and almost negligible radiation exposure of the operators.

  12. Targeted "bone-seeking" radiopharmaceuticals for palliative treatment of bone metastases: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    D'angelo, G; Sciuto, R; Salvatori, M; Sperduti, I; Mantini, G; Maini, C L; Mariani, G

    2012-12-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the state of the art of the use of bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals for palliation therapy of pain from bone metastases. A systematic literature search was conducted about therapy with 89Sr-chloride and 153Sm-EDTMP between 2001-2011. The primary outcomes were efficacy and toxicity. Descriptive and quantitative data were extracted from each study, calculating event rates and odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for pooled analysis. Subgroup analyses were performed. Fifty-seven studies contributed to the systematic review. Forty-six studies used radiopharmaceuticals as a single agent, 15 investigated therapeutic combinations. Most of the studies included patients with prostate cancer. The overall efficacy of bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals as single agents was 70%, whereas it was 74% when used in combination with other therapies. Complete response was reported in 27% of patients. Efficacy resulted to be 70% for prostate cancer and 79% for breast cancer. The overall toxicity of radiopharmaceuticals was 15%: the toxicity was 11% selecting only studies reporting on the use of radiopharmaceuticals as a single agent. No significant difference was found between bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals and other oncological treatments regarding efficacy or toxicity. Reports of objective response outcomes suggest that bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals have some cytotoxic activity, either alone or combination with chemotherapy. This literature analysis emphasizes multiple evidences of high efficacy and low toxicity of bone seeking radiopharmaceuticals; moreover, this therapy may have a therapeutic potential beyond simple palliation of bone pain.

  13. DOPASCAN Injection ([{sup 123}I]{beta}-CIT): A radiopharmaceutical with potential for the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Nowotnik, D. P.

    1999-06-10

    In conjunction with single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT), the radiopharmaceutical [{sup 123}I]{beta}-CIT (DOPASCAN Injection) has demonstrated significant potential for the early diagnosis and monitoring of Parkinson's Disease. Well over 2000 patients worldwide have been studied with this product, which has completed phase II clinical studies. This review summarizes the development and clinical application of this new radiopharmaceutical product.

  14. UNCERTAINTIES IN TRICHLOROETHYLENE PHARMACOKINETIC MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the pharmacokinetics of a chemical¯its absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion in humans and laboratory animals ¯ is critical to the assessment of its human health risks. For trichloroethylene (TCE), numerous physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK)...

  15. UNCERTAINTIES IN TRICHLOROETHYLENE PHARMACOKINETIC MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the pharmacokinetics of a chemical¯its absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion in humans and laboratory animals ¯ is critical to the assessment of its human health risks. For trichloroethylene (TCE), numerous physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK)...

  16. Show Code.

    PubMed

    Shalev, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    "Let's get one thing straight: there is no such thing as a show code," my attending asserted, pausing for effect. "You either try to resuscitate, or you don't. None of this halfway junk." He spoke so loudly that the two off-service consultants huddled at computers at the end of the unit looked up… We did four rounds of compressions and pushed epinephrine twice. It was not a long code. We did good, strong compressions and coded this man in earnest until the end. Toward the final round, though, as I stepped up to do compressions, my attending looked at me in a deep way. It was a look in between willing me as some object under his command and revealing to me everything that lay within his brash, confident surface but could not be spoken. © 2017 The Hastings Center.

  17. Influence of Annona muricata (soursop) on biodistribution of radiopharmaceuticals in rats.

    PubMed

    Holanda, Cecília Maria de Carvalho Xavier; Barbosa, Delianne Azevedo; Demeda, Vanessa Fávero; Bandeira, Flora Tamires Moura; Medeiros, Hilkéa Carla Souza de; Pereira, Kércia Regina Santos Gomes; Barbosa, Vanessa Santos de Arruda; Medeiros, Aldo Cunha

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of hydroalcoholic extract of A. muricata on biodistribution of two radiopharmaceuticals: sodium phytate and dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), both labeled with 99mtechnetium. Twenty four Wistar rats were divided into two treated groups and two controls groups. The controls received water and the treated received 25mg/kg/day of A. muricata by gavage for ten days. One hour after the last dose, the first treated group received 99mTc-DMSA and the second sodium 99mTc-phytate (0.66MBq each group), both via orbital plexus. Controls followed the same protocol. Forty min later, all groups were sacrificed and the blood, kidney and bladder were isolated from the first treated group and the blood, spleen and liver isolated from the second treated group. The percentage of radioactivity per gram of tissue (%ATI/g) was calculated using a gamma counter. The statistical analysis showed that there was a statistically significant decrease (p<0.05) in the uptake of %ATI/g in bladder (0.11±0.01and1.60±0.08), kidney (3.52±0.51and11.84±1.57) and blood (0.15±0.01and 0.54±0.05) between the treated group and control group, respectively. The A. muricata hydroalcoholic extract negatively influenced the uptake of 99mTc-DMSA in bladder, kidney and blood of rats.

  18. Biokinetics and dosimetry of target-specific radiopharmaceuticals for molecular imaging and therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferro-Flores, Guillermina; Torres-García, Eugenio; Gonz&Ález-v&Ázquez, Armando; de Murphy, Consuelo Arteaga

    Molecular imaging techniques directly or indirectly monitor and record the spatiotemporal distribution of molecular or cellular processes for biochemical, biologic, diagnostic or therapeutic applications. 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC has shown high stability both in vitro and in vivo and rapid detection of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors. Therapies using radiolabeled anti-CD20 have demonstrated their efficacy in patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). The aim of this study was to establish biokinetic models for 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC and 188Re-anti-CD20 and to evaluate their dosimetry as target-specific radiopharmaceuticals. The OLINDA/EXM code was used to calculate patient-specific internal radiation dose estimates. 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC images showed an average tumor/blood ratio of 4.3±0.7 in receptor-positive tumors with an average effective dose of 4.4 mSv. Dosimetric studies indicated that after administration of 5.8 to 7.5 GBq of 188Re-anti-CD20 the absorbed dose to total body would be 0.75 Gy which corresponds to the recommended dose for NHL therapies.

  19. Diagnostic and therapeutic potential of new radiopharmaceutical agents in medullary thyroid carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Troncone, L.; Rufini, V.; De Rosa, G.; Testa, A.

    1989-01-01

    Recently developed radiopharmaceuticals have been proposed for imaging medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) with some having therapeutic potential. This study compares the imaging results obtained with radioiodinated meta-iodo-benzylguanidine (MIBG), {sup 99m}Tc (V) DMSA, and {sup 131}I F(ab')2 anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (anti-CEA) in a group of MTC patients. In 23 patients {sup 131}I MIBG imaging showed a high specificity (no false-positive results) but a less satisfactory sensitivity (50%). In 12 patients {sup 99m}Tc (V) DMSA revealed a better sensitivity (77%) but a lower specificity (three false-positive results). Positive results were obtained in two of three patients studied with {sup 131}I F(ab')2 anti-CEA. These data suggest that the highly sensitive {sup 99m}Tc (V) DMSA should be considered as a first choice procedure followed by the highly specific radioiodinated MIBG to confirm the initial results. Since radioiodinated MIBG imaging may have therapeutic usefulness, {sup 131}I MIBG was evaluated in an integrated treatment protocol in four cases of proven MTC. The preliminary results obtained were encouraging.

  20. Ethnic and genetic factors in methadone pharmacokinetics: a population pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Bart, Gavin; Lenz, Scott; Straka, Robert J; Brundage, Richard C

    2014-12-01

    Treatment of opiate use disorders with methadone is complicated by wide interindividual variability in pharmacokinetics. To identify potentially contributing covariates in methadone pharmacokinetics, we used population pharmacokinetic modeling to estimate clearance (CL/F) and volume of distribution (V/F) for each methadone enantiomer in an ethnically diverse methadone maintained population. Plasma levels of the opiate-active R-methadone and opiate-inactive S-methadone were measured in 206 methadone maintained subjects approximately two and twenty-three hours after a daily oral dose of rac-methadone. A linear one-compartment population pharmacokinetic model with first-order conditional estimation with interaction (FOCE-I) was used to evaluate methadone CL/F and V/F. The influence of covariates on parameter estimates was evaluated using stepwise covariate modeling. Covariates included ethnicity, gender, weight, BMI, age, methadone dose, and 21 single nucleotide polymorphisms in genes implicated in methadone pharmacokinetics. In the final model, for each enantiomer, Hmong ethnicity reduced CL/F by approximately 30% and the rs2032582 (ABCB1 2677G>T/A) GG genotype was associated with a 20% reduction in CL/F. The presence of the rs3745274 minor allele (CYP2B6 515G>T) reduced CL/F by up to 20% for S-methadone only. A smaller effect of age was noted on CL/F for R-methadone. This is the first report showing the influence of the rs2032582 and rs3745274 variants on methadone pharmacokinetics rather than simply dose requirements or plasma levels. Population pharmacokinetics is a valuable method for identifying the influences on methadone pharmacokinetic variability. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Cyclotron Radiopharmaceuticals Production at the V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Solin, L.M.; Kudelin, B.K.; Jakovlev, V.A.; Potapova, T.S.; Gromova, E.A.

    2003-08-26

    For more than 10 years Radium Institute is producing radiopharmaceuticals for St. Petersburg (Russia) hospitals. We have developed technologies for sodium iodide, sodium iodohippurate, MIBG and BMIPP, labeled by iodine-123, and gallium-67 citrate. Radionuclidic purity of 99,98% is reached for radiopharmaceuticals labeled by iodine-123. Radionuclidic purity is over 99.9% for gallium-67 citrate on the date of delivery. Radiochemical purity of 95% and more is reached through the application of appropriate technologies for each RPH. It takes no longer than 4 hours for all technologies. Over 150,000 patients were investigated.

  2. Microfluidic module system with piezo driven microvalve for synthesis of radiopharmaceutical products.

    PubMed

    Scheuenpflug, Michael; Guenther, Daniel; Irlinger, Franz; Lueth, Tim

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a novel microfluidic module system for the synthesis of radiopharmaceutical products. As a main function a piezo-actuated diaphragm valve is produced with rapid prototyping procedures. A system for the automatic characterization of microvalves is described. The built microvalve is characterized by a very high throughput and low leakage rate even for gaseous media. The valve as other passive modules like mixer elements can be easily combined to a microfluidic system. The system makes the application of radiopharmaceutical products more effective and less costly intensive.

  3. Radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis. [Final] report, 1 January 1991--31 December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, D.E.

    1993-06-01

    Since 1987, this grant has supported the development of new radiochemical methods for use with short-lived, positron-emitting radionuclides; new laboratory techniques for radiochemical syntheses; and development of new radiopharmaceuticals which will be of use in Positron Emission Tomography. For the period 1 January 1991 to 31 December 1993, the authors have continued their efforts in all of these areas, as they feel that an integrated approach to the synthesis and characterization of new PET Radiopharmaceuticals is crucial to the continued growth and application of this imaging technique in modern medicine. Progress in a number of these areas is described in this report.

  4. Performance of a Lanthanum Bromide Detector and a New Conception Collimator for Radiopharmaceuticals Molecular Imaging in Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Pani, Roberto; Pellegrini, Rosanna; Bennati, Paolo; Cinti, Maria Nerina; Scafe, Raffaele; De Vincentis, Giuseppe; Navarria, Francesco; Moschini, Giuliano; Rossi, Paolo; Cencelli, Valentino Orsolini; De Notaristefani, Francesco

    2009-03-10

    We have realized and tested a new-design compact gamma camera for high resolution SPET (Single Photon Emission Tomography), and small animals' radio-pharmaceutical molecular imaging. The camera is based on a 'continuous' Lanthanum tri-Bromide crystal, and a new Low Energy (LE) collimator. The crystal is interfaced to a 2x2 array of Hamamatsu-H8500 position sensitive photo-multipliers. The lead collimator features parallel hexagonal 1.0 mm holes, 18 mm length, 0.2 mm septa and 10x10 cm{sup 2} detection area. It was newly designed to fully exploit the high spatial resolution a Lanthanum crystal may provide. To better evaluate its role, we have compared our camera to three other systems with similar crystals and photomultipliers, but employing traditional collimators, either pinhole or parallel. The new camera seems to be complementary to pinhole systems and shows a very attractive trade-off between spatial resolution and detection area.

  5. Lutetium-177 DOTATATE Production with an Automated Radiopharmaceutical Synthesis System

    PubMed Central

    Aslani, Alireza; Snowdon, Graeme M; Bailey, Dale L; Schembri, Geoffrey P; Bailey, Elizabeth A; Pavlakis, Nick; Roach, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy (PRRT) with yttrium-90 (90Y) and lutetium-177 (177Lu)-labelled SST analogues are now therapy option for patients who have failed to respond to conventional medical therapy. In-house production with automated PRRT synthesis systems have clear advantages over manual methods resulting in increasing use in hospital-based radiopharmacies. We report on our one year experience with an automated radiopharmaceutical synthesis system. Methods: All syntheses were carried out using the Eckert & Ziegler Eurotope’s Modular-Lab Pharm Tracer® automated synthesis system. All materials and methods used were followed as instructed by the manufacturer of the system (Eckert & Ziegler Eurotope, Berlin, Germany). Sterile, GMP-certified, no-carrier added (NCA) 177Lu was used with GMP-certified peptide. An audit trail was also produced and saved by the system. The quality of the final product was assessed after each synthesis by ITLC-SG and HPLC methods. Results: A total of 17 [177Lu]-DOTATATE syntheses were performed between August 2013 and December 2014. The amount of radioactive [177Lu]-DOTATATE produced by each synthesis varied between 10-40 GBq and was dependant on the number of patients being treated on a given day. Thirteen individuals received a total of 37 individual treatment administrations in this period. There were no issues and failures with the system or the synthesis cassettes. The average radiochemical purity as determined by ITLC was above 99% (99.8 ± 0.05%) and the average radiochemical purity as determined by HPLC technique was above 97% (97.3 ± 1.5%) for this period. Conclusions: The automated synthesis of [177Lu]-DOTATATE using Eckert & Ziegler Eurotope’s Modular-Lab Pharm Tracer® system is a robust, convenient and high yield approach to the radiolabelling of DOTATATE peptide benefiting from the use of NCA 177Lu and almost negligible radiation exposure of the operators. PMID:27408890

  6. Development of more efficacious Tc-99m organ imaging agents for use in nuclear medicine by characterization of radiopharmaceuticals. Final report, September 1, 1992--June 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Heineman, W.R.; Seliskar, C.J.

    1998-08-04

    The primary goals of this project were twofold: (1) Development of a microsensor that would demonstrate the capability for in vivo monitoring of a radiopharmaceutical after its injection into a test animal; and (2) Exploration of capillary electrophoresis (CE) as a separation technique for the analysis of radiopharmaceuticals that are mixtures of different compounds. The combination of in vivo sensors for real-time monitoring of specific chemical states of a radiopharmaceutical in individual organs and CE for analysis of radiopharmaceuticals prior to injection would provide valuable information regarding the fate of an imaging agent after administration. Such information should give insight into strategies for the development of more efficacious radiopharmaceuticals.

  7. Nanodrugs: pharmacokinetics and safety

    PubMed Central

    Onoue, Satomi; Yamada, Shizuo; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2014-01-01

    To date, various nanodrug systems have been developed for different routes of administration, which include dendrimers, nanocrystals, emulsions, liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles, micelles, and polymeric nanoparticles. Nanodrug systems have been employed to improve the efficacy, safety, physicochemical properties, and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profile of pharmaceutical substances. In particular, functionalized nanodrug systems can offer enhanced bioavailability of orally taken drugs, prolonged half-life of injected drugs (by reducing immunogenicity), and targeted delivery to specific tissues. Thus, nanodrug systems might lower the frequency of administration while providing maximized pharmacological effects and minimized systemic side effects, possibly leading to better therapeutic compliance and clinical outcomes. In spite of these attractive pharmacokinetic advantages, recent attention has been drawn to the toxic potential of nanodrugs since they often exhibit in vitro and in vivo cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation, and genotoxicity. A better understanding of the pharmacokinetic and safety characteristics of nanodrugs and the limitations of each delivery option is necessary for the further development of efficacious nanodrugs with high therapeutic potential and a wide safety margin. This review highlights the recent progress in nanodrug system development, with a focus on the pharmacokinetic advantages and safety challenges. PMID:24591825

  8. Lumping in pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Brochot, Céline; Tóth, János; Bois, Frédéric Y

    2005-12-01

    Pharmacokinetic (PK) models simplify biological complexity by dividing the body into interconnected compartments. The time course of the chemical's amount (or concentration) in each compartment is then expressed as a system of ordinary differential equations. The complexity of the resulting system of equations can rapidly increase if a precise description of the organism is needed. However, difficulties arise when the PK model contains more variables and parameters than comfortable for mathematical and computational treatment. To overcome such difficulties, mathematical lumping methods are new and powerful tools. Such methods aim at reducing a differential system by aggregating several variables into one. Typically, the lumped model is still a differential equation system, whose variables are interpretable in terms of variables of the original system. In practice, the reduced model is usually required to satisfy some constraints. For example, it may be necessary to keep state variables of interest for prediction unlumped. To accommodate such constraints, constrained lumping methods have are also available. After presenting the theory, we study, here, through practical examples, the potential of such methods in toxico/pharmacokinetics. As a tutorial, we first simplify a 2-compartment pharmacokinetic model by symbolic lumping. We then explore the reduction of a 6-compartment physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for 1,3-butadiene with numerical constrained lumping. The lumping methods presented here can be easily automated, and are applicable to first-order ordinary differential equation systems.

  9. SYMBOLS IN PHARMACOKINETICS1

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Malcolm; Tucker, Geoffrey

    1982-01-01

    To encourage uniformity in the presentation of pharmacokinetic data, a general nomenclature has been developed. The system has wide application. Flexibility is achieved through the use of general variables, constants, qualifying terms and subscripts. Yet, through the use of implied terms, the symbols describing many common variables and constants are simple.

  10. Harvard-MIT research program in short-lived radiopharmaceuticals. Technical progress report, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Adelstein, S.J.

    1991-12-31

    This report presents research on radiopharmaceuticals. The following topics are discussed: antibody labeling with positron-emitting radionuclides; antibody modification for radioimmune imaging; labeling antibodies; evaluation of technetium acetlyacetonates as potential cerebral blood flow agents; and studies in technetium chemistry. (CBS)

  11. A simple computer programme for biokinetic study of 99Tcm-radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Imran, M B; Khurshid, S J; Anwar, K

    1994-02-01

    A simple programme has been written in GW BASIC to calculate the percentage activity of 99Tcm-radiopharmaceuticals in different tissues after biodistribution. The programme is efficient, easy to handle and produces a permanent record in terms of a final report.

  12. Bifunctional chelators in the design and application of radiopharmaceuticals for oncological diseases.

    PubMed

    Sarko, D; Eisenhut, M; Haberkorn, U; Mier, W

    2012-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals constitute diagnostic and therapeutic tools for both clinical and preclinical applications. They are a blend of a tracer moiety that mediates a site specific accumulation and an effector: a radioisotope whose decay enables either molecular imaging or exhibits cytotoxic effects. Radioactive halogens and lanthanides are the most commonly used isotopes for radiopharmaceuticals. Due to their ready availability and the facile labeling metallic radionuclides offer ideal characteristics for applications in nuclear medicine. A stable link between the radionuclide and the carrier molecule is the primary prerequisite for in vivo applications. The radionuclide is selected according to its physical and chemical properties i.e. half-life, the type of decay, the energy emitted and its availability. Bifunctional chelating agents are used to stably link the radiometal to the carrier moiety of the radiopharmaceutical. The design of the bifunctional chelator has to consider the impact of the radiometal chelate on the biological properties of the target-specific pharmaceutical. Here, with an emphasis on oncology, we review applications of radiopharmaceuticals that contain bifunctional chelators, while highlighting successes and identifying the key challenges that need to be addressed for the successful translation of target binding molecules into tracers for molecular imaging and endoradiotherapy.

  13. European regulations for the introduction of novel radiopharmaceuticals in the clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Decristoforo, Clemens; Penuelas, Ivan; Patt, Marianne; Todde, Sergio

    2017-06-01

    The development of novel radiopharmaceuticals is very rapid and highly innovative both for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. The translation into the clinic, however, is hampered by the high regulatory demands in Europe. This article describes the main rules, guidelines and guidance documents in the European Union in relation to the pharmaceutical regulatory framework. Until today a great number of radiopharmaceuticals are introduced clinically using specific national pathways outside the clinical trial regulation and examples are provided. In this context, the European Pharmacopoeia with a legal status plays an important role in defining quality standards. For clinical trials the application system and regulatory framework in Europe is currently considerably changing. Whereas the current clinical trial directive requires a lengthy and complicated national application process, the new regulation 536/2014 will introduce a streamlined and unified European application process. This new regulation also takes into account the specific properties of radioactive investigational medicinal products and has introduced exceptions for good manufacturing practices (GMP) and labelling for radiopharmaceuticals. Besides the main regulatory texts, several guidelines have been published, e.g. related to toxicity testing or first in man studies. In relation to radiopharmaceuticals professional organization, in particular the EANM, have published a number of documents in relation to GMP, documentation and toxicity studies, that support professionals in the application process. All these documents are summarized and discussed.

  14. Counting Rate Characteristics and Image Distortion in Preclinical PET Imaging During Radiopharmaceutical Therapy.

    PubMed

    Mellhammar, Emma; Dahlbom, Magnus; Axelsson, Johan; Strand, Sven-Erik

    2016-12-01

    PET may provide important information on the response during radiopharmaceutical therapy (RPT). Emission of radiation from the RPT radionuclide may disturb coincidence detection and impair image resolution. In this study, we tested the feasibility of performing intratherapeutic PET on 3 preclinical PET systems.

  15. Synthesis and radioiodination of ergoline derivatives: potential in-vivo dopamine receptor site mapping radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhail, E.A.

    1985-01-01

    The need of a dopamine-receptor based radiopharmaceutical for brain imaging is apparent. If such an agent is made available to physicians, it could provide means for detecting brain tumors, and diagnose such mental disorders as parkinsonism, schizophrenia and psychosis. Currently, such agents are yet to be discovered. Procedures were developed to synthesize and label four ergoline derivatives which could potentially exhibit affinity to dopamine receptors. Labelling with /sup 125/I was accomplished in some cases by displacing a suitably positioned leaving group with /sup 125/I-anion, while in other cases iodine exchange procedures were utilized. Formulations of the labeled derivatives were achieved via the formation of their water soluble tartarate salts. Biodistribution studies in mature Sprague-Dawley rats showed that of the four radioactive compounds injected, the highest uptake in the brain and adrenals was achieved with 8 ..beta..-(I-125)-iodomethyl-6-propylergoline. In addition, high target/nontarget ratios were obtained with the above mentioned compound. On the other hand, the least brain and adrenal uptake as well as the lowest target/nontarget ratios were exhibited by 8 ..beta..-(I-125)-(p-iodobenzenesulfonyl)-lysergol presumably due to its in-vivo instability. A comparative biodistribution study for ergoline derivatives and N-isopropyl-(I-123)-p-iodoamphetamine was conducted. The biodistribution studies showed that the brain to blood ratio for the ergoline derivative 8 ..beta..-(I-125)-iodomethyl-6-propylergoline to be very close to that for /sup 125/I-IMP at 1 minute after dose administration. However after 15 minutes the brain/blood ratio of compound XLVI was half the value of /sup 123/I-IMP. Different mechanisms of brain influx and efflux are known to occur with the amphetamine and ergoline derivatives.

  16. [Current Progresses in Developing PET Radiopharmaceuticals for Patients in the Czech Republic].

    PubMed

    Adam, J; Demlová, R; Řehák, Z

    In Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute (MMCI), there is a long-running intensive joint effort of the RECAMO project and commercial entities, involving mainly clinical evaluations of state-of-the-art PET radiopharmaceuticals leading to their future availability for Czech physicians and their patients. Recently, the PET tracers [11C]methionine and [18F]fluorocholine, among others, were developed in this cooperation, both of them tracers with high importance for oncologic positron emission tomography diagnostics. [11C]methionine, labeled by carbon-11 with a half-life of 20 min, is a proteosynthesis marker used primarily for brain tumor visualization, whereas [18F]fluorocholine, labeled by fluorine-18 with a half-life of 109 min, is a marker of synthesis of cellular membranes and cell proliferation, its primary use being PET diagnostics of prostate carcinoma. The results of clinical evaluations of both PET radiopharmaceuticals, performed on the basis of parameters agreed and approved beforehand in cooperation of MMCI, RECAMO and the manufacturer of said radiopharmaceuticals, aimed to prove the efficiency and suitability of both compounds for oncologic PET diagnostics for said tumors. In both cases, the radiopharmaceuticals were evaluated in regard to their major use. The obtained results prove the benefits and efficiency of both compounds in PET diagnostics of respective tumors. The results, in the form of clinical evaluation reports, will be used as part of the documentation required for marketing authorization of these compounds for use in the Czech Republic.Key words: positron emission tomography - radiopharmaceuticals - L-methyl-11C-methionine - 18F-fluorocholineThis work was supported by the project MEYS - NPS I - LO1413.The authors declare they have no potential conflicts of interest concerning drugs, products, or services used in the study.The Editorial Board declares that the manuscript met the ICMJE recommendation for biomedical papers.Submitted: 10. 6. 2016

  17. Nano-Hydroxyapatite Doped with Ho-166 as Drug Delivery System for Bone Cancer Therapy and Diagnosis: Developing a Theragnostic Radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Franciana Maria Rosa; de Almeida, Julio Cezar; Oliveira, Elizabeth Eugenio de Mello; de Souza Albernaz, Marta; Rossi, Alexandre Malta; Santos-Oliveira, Ralph

    2017-01-01

    The use of nanobiomaterials is increasing each day. Among the immense variety of nanomaterials developed and studied the hydroxyapatite is one of the most ones. In this study we developed and tested nano-hydroxyapatite dopped with Ho-166 for bone cancer. The results showed that the nano-hydroxyapatite dopped with Ho-166 has a great affinity for the bone. The pre-clinical studies support the use as a nano-radiopharmaceuticals for bone cancer treatment and diagnosis. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  18. Harvard-MIT research program in short-lived radiopharmaceuticals. Progress report, March 1, 1983-February 29, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Adelstein, S.J.; Brownell, G.L.

    1984-02-01

    This report describes research efforts towards the achievement of a clearer understanding of the solution chemistry of technetium in order to facilitate the design of future clinical agents labeled with Tc-99m, the development of new receptor binding radiopharmaceuticals for the in vivo assessment of insulin receptors and for imaging the adrenal medulla and the brain, the examination of the utility of monoclonal antibodies and liposomes in the design of radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and therapy, and the synthesis of short-lived positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals for transverse imaging of regional physiological processes.

  19. Guidance on current good radiopharmacy practice for the small-scale preparation of radiopharmaceuticals using automated modules: a European perspective.

    PubMed

    Aerts, Joel; Ballinger, James R; Behe, Martin; Decristoforo, Clemens; Elsinga, Philip H; Faivre-Chauvet, Alain; Mindt, Thomas L; Kolenc Peitl, Petra; Todde, Sergio C; Koziorowski, Jacek

    2014-08-01

    This document is meant to complement Part B of the EANM 'Guidelines on current good radiopharmacy practice (cGRPP) in the preparation of radiopharmaceuticals' issued by the Radiopharmacy Committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine, covering small-scale in-house preparation of radiopharmaceuticals with automated modules. The aim is to provide more detailed and practice-oriented guidance to those who are involved in the small-scale preparation of radiopharmaceuticals, which are not intended for commercial purposes or distribution. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Some statistical issues in modelling pharmacokinetic data.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, J K; Jones, B; Jarvis, P

    A fundamental assumption underlying pharmacokinetic compartment modelling is that each subject has a different individual curve. To some extent this runs counter to the statistical principle that similar individuals will have similar curves, thus making inferences to a wider population possible. In population pharmacokinetics, the compromise is to use random effects. We recommend that such models also be used in data rich situations instead of independently fitting individual curves. However, the additional information available in such studies shows that random effects are often not sufficient; generally, an autoregressive process is also required. This has the added advantage that it provides a means of tracking each individual, yielding predictions for the next observation. The compartment model curve being fitted may also be distorted in other ways. A widely held assumption is that most, if not all, pharmacokinetic concentration data follow a log-normal distribution. By examples, we show that this is not generally true, with the gamma distribution often being more suitable. When extreme individuals are present, a heavy-tailed distribution, such as the log Cauchy, can often provide more robust results. Finally, other assumptions that can distort the results include a direct dependence of the variance, or other dispersion parameter, on the mean and setting non-detectable values to some arbitrarily small value instead of treating them as censored. By pointing out these problems with standard methods of statistical modelling of pharmacokinetic data, we hope that commercial software will soon make more flexible and suitable models available.

  1. Understanding radioxenon isotopical ratios originating from radiopharmaceutical facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saey, P. R. J.; Ringbom, A.; Bowyer, T. W.; Becker, A.; de Geer, L.-E.; Nikkinen, M.; Payne, R. F.

    2009-04-01

    It was recently shown that radiopharmaceutical facilities (RPF) are major contributors to the general background of 133Xe and other xenon isotopes both in the northern and southern hemisphere. To distinguish a nuclear explosion signal from releases from civil nuclear facilities, not only the activity concentrations but also the ratios of the four different CTBT relevant radioxenon isotopes (131mXe, 133mXe, 133Xe and 135Xe) have to be well understood. First measurements taken recently in and around two of the world's largest RPF's: NTP at Pelindaba, South Africa and IRE at Fleurus, Belgium have been presented. At both sites, also stack samples were taken in close cooperation with the facility operators. The radioxenon in Belgium could be classified in four classes: the normal European background (133Xe activity between 0 - 5 mBq/m3) on one hand and then the samples where all four isotopes were detected with 133mXe/131mXe > 1. In northern South Africa the Pelindaba RPF is in practice the sole source of radioxenon. It generated a background of 133Xe at the measurement site some 230 km to the west of the RPF of 0 - 5 mBq/m3. In the cases where the air from the Pelindaba facility reached the measurement site directly and in a short time period, the 133Xe was higher, also 135Xe was present and in some samples 133mXe as well. The ratios of the activity concentrations of 135Xe/133Xe vs. 133mXe/131mXe (Multiple Isotope Ratio Plot - MIRC) have been analysed. For both facilities, the possible theoretical ratio's for different scenarios were calculated with the information available and compared with the measurements. It was found that there is an excess of 131mXe present in the European samples compared to theoretical calculations. A similar excess has also been seen in samples measured in northern America. In South Africa, neither the environmental samples nor the stack ones contained 131mXe at measurable levels. This can probably be explained by different processes and

  2. Grepafloxacin: pharmacokinetics and tissue penetration.

    PubMed

    Wise, Richard

    1998-03-01

    Pharmacokinetic and tissue penetration studies of grepafloxacin, a new broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone, show that it has useful properties for the treatment of respiratory tract infections. Grepafloxacin has a volume of distribution that is larger than those of many of the other fluoroquinolones and is concentrated in alveolar macrophages, bronchial mucosa and epithelial lining fluid to a greater extent than are certain other fluoroquinolones. Grepafloxacin concentrations achieved in plasma after a 400-mg oral dose are well in excess of those required to inhibit the respiratory pathogens Staphylococcus aureus, Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis. Streptococcus pneumoniae is also covered for most of the dosing interval, but at normal dose levels grepafloxacin might not inhibit Enterococcus faecalis. The maximum plasma concentrations and area under the concentration---time curve achieved with grepafloxacin suggest that it will be effective for the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia and acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis. The pharmacokinetics of fluoroquinolones are among their most useful properties. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate whether the differences between grepafloxacin and the other fluoroquinolones are of therapeutic significance.

  3. Spectroelectrochemical and computational studies on the mechanism of hypoxia selectivity of copper radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Holland, Jason P; Barnard, Peter J; Collison, David; Dilworth, Jonathan R; Edge, Ruth; Green, Jennifer C; McInnes, Eric J L

    2008-01-01

    Detailed chemical, spectroelectrochemical and computational studies have been used to investigate the mechanism of hypoxia selectivity of a range of copper radiopharmaceuticals. A revised mechanism involving a delicate balance between cellular uptake, intracellular reduction, reoxidation, protonation and ligand dissociation is proposed. This mechanism accounts for observed differences in the reported cellular uptake and washout of related copper bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complexes. Three copper and zinc complexes have been characterised by X-ray crystallography and the redox chemistry of a series of copper complexes has been investigated by using electronic absorption and EPR spectroelectrochemistry. Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations have also been used to probe the electronic structures of intermediate species and assign the electronic absorption spectra. DFT calculations also show that one-electron oxidation is ligand-based, leading to the formation of cationic triplet species. In the absence of protons, metal-centred one-electron reduction gives the reduced anionic copper(I) species, [CuIATSM](-), and for the first time it is shown that molecular oxygen can reoxidise this anion to give the neutral, lipophilic parent complexes, which can wash out of cells. The electrochemistry is pH dependent and in the presence of stronger acids both chemical and electrochemical reduction leads to quantitative and rapid dissociation of copper(I) ions from the mono- or diprotonated complexes, [CuIATSMH] and [Cu(I)ATSMH2]+. In addition, a range of protonated intermediate species have been identified at lower acid concentrations. The one-electron reduction potential, rate of reoxidation of the copper(I) anionic species and ease of protonation are dependent on the structure of the ligand, which also governs their observed behaviour in vivo.

  4. Triamidetriamine bearing macrobicyclic and macrotricyclic ligands: potential applications in the development of copper-64 radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kel Vin; Pellegrini, Paul A; Skelton, Brian W; Hogan, Conor F; Greguric, Ivan; Barnard, Peter J

    2014-01-06

    A versatile and straightforward synthetic approach is described for the preparation of triamide bearing analogues of sarcophagine hexaazamacrobicyclic cage ligands without the need for a templating metal ion. Reaction of 1,1,1-tris(aminoethyl)ethane (tame) with 3 equiv of 2-chloroacetyl chloride, yields the tris(α-chloroamide) synthetic intermediate 6, which when treated with either 1,1,1-tris(aminoethyl)ethane or 1,4,7-triazacyclononane furnished two novel triamidetriamine cryptand ligands (7 and 8 respectively). The Co(III) and Cu(II) complexes of cryptand 7 were prepared; however, cryptand 8 could not be metalated. The cryptands and the Co(III) complex 9 have been characterized by elemental analysis, (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy, and X-ray crystallography. These studies confirm that the Co(III) complex 9 adopts an octahedral geometry with three facial deprotonated amido-donors and three facial amine donor groups. The Cu(II) complex 10 was characterized by elemental analysis, single crystal X-ray crystallography, cyclic voltammetry, and UV-visible absorption spectroscopy. In contrast to the Co(III) complex (9), the Cu(II) center adopts a square planar coordination geometry, with two amine and two deprotonated amido donor groups. Compound 10 exhibited a quasi-reversible, one-electron oxidation, which is assigned to the Cu(2+/3+) redox couple. These cryptands represent interesting ligands for radiopharmaceutical applications, and 7 has been labeled with (64)Cu to give (64)Cu-10. This complex showed good stability when subjected to L-cysteine challenge whereas low levels of decomplexation were evident in the presence of L-histidine.

  5. Antifungal pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics.

    PubMed

    Lepak, Alexander J; Andes, David R

    2014-11-10

    Successful treatment of infectious diseases requires choice of the most suitable antimicrobial agent, comprising consideration of drug pharmacokinetics (PK), including penetration into infection site, pathogen susceptibility, optimal route of drug administration, drug dose, frequency of administration, duration of therapy, and drug toxicity. Antimicrobial pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) studies consider these variables and have been useful in drug development, optimizing dosing regimens, determining susceptibility breakpoints, and limiting toxicity of antifungal therapy. Here the concepts of antifungal PK/PD studies are reviewed, with emphasis on methodology and application. The initial sections of this review focus on principles and methodology. Then the pharmacodynamics of each major antifungal drug class (polyenes, flucytosine, azoles, and echinocandins) is discussed. Finally, the review discusses novel areas of pharmacodynamic investigation in the study and application of combination therapy.

  6. Pharmacokinetic consequences of spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, L.; Cintron, N. M.

    1991-01-01

    Spaceflight induces a wide range of physiological and biochemical changes, including disruption of gastrointestinal (GI) function, fluid and electrolyte balance, circulatory dynamics, and organ blood flow, as well as hormonal and metabolic perturbations. Any of these changes can influence the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of in-flight medication. That spaceflight may alter bioavailability was proposed when drugs prescribed to alleviate space motion sickness (SMS) had little therapeutic effect. Characterization of the pharmacokinetic and/or pharmacodynamic behavior of operationally critical medications is crucial for their effective use in flight; as a first step, we sought to determine whether drugs administered in space actually reach the site of action at concentrations sufficient to elicit the therapeutic response.

  7. Pharmacokinetic consequences of spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, L.; Cintron, N. M.

    1991-01-01

    Spaceflight induces a wide range of physiological and biochemical changes, including disruption of gastrointestinal (GI) function, fluid and electrolyte balance, circulatory dynamics, and organ blood flow, as well as hormonal and metabolic perturbations. Any of these changes can influence the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of in-flight medication. That spaceflight may alter bioavailability was proposed when drugs prescribed to alleviate space motion sickness (SMS) had little therapeutic effect. Characterization of the pharmacokinetic and/or pharmacodynamic behavior of operationally critical medications is crucial for their effective use in flight; as a first step, we sought to determine whether drugs administered in space actually reach the site of action at concentrations sufficient to elicit the therapeutic response.

  8. (131)I-trazodone: preparation, quality control and in vivo biodistribution study by intranasal and intravenous routes as a hopeful brain imaging radiopharmaceutical.

    PubMed

    Motaleb, M A; Ibrahim, I T; Sayyed, M E; Awad, G A S

    2017-04-27

    The preparation of (131)I-trazodone hydrochloride and its biological evaluation as a promising brain imaging radiopharmaceutical using two routes of administration. Trazodone (TZ) was radiolabelled with (131)I using direct electrophilic substitution, and different factors affecting labelling yield were studied. Quality control of (131)I-TZ was carried out using ascending paper chromatography, paper electrophoresis, and high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). In vivo biodistribution of (131)I-TZ was evaluated in Swiss albino mice using 3 methods: intravenous (131)I-TZ solution (IVS), intranasal (131)I-TZ solution (INS), and intranasal (131)I-TZ microemulsion (INME). Optimum labelling yield of 91.23±2.12% was obtained with in vitro stability of (131)I-TZ up to 6h at room temperature. The biodistribution results showed a notably higher and sustained brain uptake for INME compared to IVS and INS at all time intervals. In addition, heart and blood uptake levels for INME were lower than those for IV solution which, in turn, could decrease the systemic side effects of trazodone. Also, the (131)I-trazodone INME brain uptake of 6.7±0.5%ID/g was higher than that of (99m)Tc-ECD and (99m)Tc-HMPAO (radiopharmaceuticals currently used for brain imaging). (131/123)I-trazodone formulated as INME could be used as a promising radiopharmaceutical for brain imaging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluation of deoxyribonucleic acid toxicity induced by the radiopharmaceutical 99mTechnetium-Methylenediphosphonic acid and by stannous chloride in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Mattos, José Carlos Pelielo De; Matos, Vanessa Coutinho de; Rodrigues, Michelle Pinheiro; Oliveira, Marcia Betânia Nunes de; Dantas, Flavio José S; Santos-Filho, Sebastião David; Bernardo-Filho, Mario; Caldeira-de-Araujo, Adriano

    2012-11-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals are employed in patient diagnostics and disease treatments. Concerning the diagnosis aspect, technetium-99m (99mTc) is utilized to label radiopharmaceuticals for single photon computed emission tomography (SPECT) due to its physical and chemical characteristics. 99mTc fixation on pharmaceuticals depends on a reducing agent, stannous chloride (SnCl(2)) being the most widely-utilized. The genotoxic, clastogenic and anegenic properties of the 99mTc-MDP(methylene diphosphonate used for bone SPECT) and SnCl(2) were evaluated in Wistar rat blood cells using the Comet assay and micronucleus test. The experimental approach was to endovenously administer NaCl 0.9% (negative control), cyclophosphamide 50 mg/kg b.w. (positive control), SnCl(2) 500 μg/mL or 99mTc-MDP to animals and blood samples taken immediately before the injection, 3, and 24 h after (in the Comet assay) and 36 h after, for micronucleus test. The data showed that both SnCl(2) and 99mTc-MDP-induced deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) strand breaks in rat total blood cells, suggesting genotoxic potential. The 99mTc-MDP was not able to induce a significant DNA strand breaks increase in in vivo assays. Taken together, the data presented here points to the formation of a complex between SnCl(2) in the radiopharmaceutical 99mTc-MDP, responsible for the decrease in cell damage, compared to both isolated chemical agents. These findings are important for the practice of nuclear medicine.

  10. Applying quality by design principles to the small-scale preparation of the bone-targeting therapeutic radiopharmaceutical rhenium-188-HEDP.

    PubMed

    Lange, Rogier; Ter Heine, Rob; van der Gronde, Toon; Selles, Suzanne; de Klerk, John; Bloemendal, Haiko; Hendrikse, Harry

    2016-07-30

    Rhenium-188-HEDP ((188)Re-HEDP) is a therapeutic radiopharmaceutical for treatment of osteoblastic bone metastases. No standard procedure for the preparation of this radiopharmaceutical is available. Preparation conditions may influence the quality and in vivo behaviour of this product. In this study we investigate the effect of critical process parameters on product quality and stability of (188)Re-HEDP. A stepwise approach was used, based on the quality by design (QbD) concept of the ICH Q8 (Pharmaceutical Development) guideline. Potential critical process conditions were identified. Variables tested were the elution volume, the freshness of the eluate, the reaction temperature and time, and the stability of the product upon dilution and storage. The impact of each variable on radiochemical purity was investigated. The acceptable ranges were established by boundary testing. With 2ml eluate, adequate radiochemical purity and stability were found. Nine ml eluate yielded a product that was less stable. Using eluate stored for 24h resulted in acceptable radiochemical purity. Complexation for 30min at room temperature, at 60°C and at 100°C generated appropriate and stable products. A complexation time of 10min at 90°C was too short, whereas heating 60min resulted in products that passed quality control and were stable. Diluting the end product and storage at 32.5°C resulted in notable decomposition. Two boundary tests, an elution volume of 9ml and a heating time of 10min, yielded products of inadequate quality or stability. The product was found to be instable after dilution or when stored above room temperature. Our findings show that our previously developed preparation method falls well within the proven acceptable ranges. Applying QbD principles is feasible and worthwhile for the small-scale preparation of radiopharmaceuticals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Population pharmacokinetics of exenatide

    PubMed Central

    Mager, Donald E.

    2016-01-01

    Aim The aim of the present analysis was to develop a core population pharmacokinetic model for the pharmacokinetic properties of immediate‐release (IR) exenatide, which can be used in subsequent analyses of novel sustained‐release formulations. Methods Data from eight clinical trials, evaluating a wide range of doses and different administration routes, were available for analysis. All modelling and simulations were conducted using the nonlinear mixed‐effect modelling program NONMEM. External model validation was performed using data from the phase III clinical trials programme through standard visual predictive checks. Results The pharmacokinetics of IR exenatide was described by a two‐compartment model, and the absorption of subcutaneous exenatide was described with a sequential zero‐order rate constant followed by a saturable nonlinear absorption process. Drug elimination was characterized by two parallel routes (linear and nonlinear), with significant relationships between renal function and the linear elimination route, and between body weight and volume of distribution. For a subject with normal renal function, the linear clearance was estimated to be 5.06 l hr−1. The nonlinear elimination was quantified with a Michaelis–Menten constant (K m) of 567 pg ml−1 and a maximum rate of metabolism (V max) of 1.6 μg h−1. For subcutaneous administration, 37% of the subcutaneous dose is absorbed via the zero‐order process, and the remaining 63% via the nonlinear pathway. Conclusions The present analysis provides a comprehensive population pharmacokinetic model for exenatide, expanding the elimination process to include both linear and nonlinear components, providing a suitable platform for a broad range of concentrations and patient conditions that can be leveraged in future modelling efforts of sustained‐release exenatide formulations. PMID:27650681

  12. Clinical pharmacokinetics of frovatriptan.

    PubMed

    Buchan, P; Keywood, C; Wade, A; Ward, C

    2002-04-01

    To review available data on the clinical pharmacokinetics of frovatriptan. Preclinical data suggest that the pharmacokinetic profile of frovatriptan may differ from that of the currently available triptans. Studies of healthy volunteers, subjects with renal or hepatic impairment, elderly subjects, and patients with migraine during and between attacks were reviewed. Oral bioavailability of frovatriptan is 22% to 30%, and although the time to maximum concentration is typically 2 to 3 hours, approximately 60% to 70% of plasma maximum concentration is achieved within 1 hour of dosing. Frovatriptan distributes into erythrocytes, with binding reversible and time dependent. The relatively long terminal elimination half-life (about 26 hours) confers good systemic exposure and may produce a long duration of therapeutic action, thus reducing migraine recurrence and the need for redosing. Systemic exposure to frovatriptan generally correlates with dose between 1 and 100 mg. Blood and plasma frovatriptan concentrations are consistently higher in females, but there is no need to adjust dose according to gender. Pharmacokinetics are essentially unaffected by food and were predictable after repeat dosing; steady state is approached in about 4 to 5 days. Pharmacokinetics were changed only slightly in subjects with renal impairment or mild-to-moderate hepatic impairment, elderly individuals, and during migraine attacks. Frovatriptan is principally metabolized by the CYP1A2 isoenzyme of cytochrome P-450 and is cleared by the kidney and liver, each having sufficient capacity to compensate for impairment of the other. Frovatriptan can be taken without regard for food intake, and because of the large therapeutic margin and shallow dose-response curve, there is no need for dosage adjustment in the elderly, in women taking a combined oral contraceptive, in patients with mild-to-severe renal impairment, mild-to-moderate hepatic impairment, or according to gender. The long duration of

  13. Obstetric Pharmacokinetic Dosing Studies are Urgently Needed

    PubMed Central

    McCormack, Shelley A.; Best, Brookie M.

    2014-01-01

    Use of pharmacotherapy during pregnancy is common and increasing. Physiologic changes during pregnancy may significantly alter the overall systemic drug exposure, necessitating dose changes. A search of PubMed for pharmacokinetic clinical trials showed 494 publications during pregnancy out of 35,921 total pharmacokinetic published studies (1.29%), from the late 1960s through August 31, 2013. Closer examination of pharmacokinetic studies in pregnant women published since 2008 (81 studies) revealed that about a third of the trials were for treatment of acute labor and delivery issues, a third included studies of infectious disease treatment during pregnancy, and the remaining third were for varied ante-partum indications. Approximately, two-thirds of these recent studies were primarily funded by government agencies worldwide, one-quarter were supported by private non-profit foundations or combinations of government and private funding, and slightly <10% were supported by pharmaceutical industry. As highlighted in this review, vast gaps exist in pharmacology information and evidence for appropriate dosing of medications in pregnant women. This lack of knowledge and understanding of drug disposition throughout pregnancy place both the mother and the fetus at risk for avoidable therapeutic misadventures – suboptimal efficacy or excess toxicity – with medication use in pregnancy. Increased efforts to perform and support obstetric dosing and pharmacokinetic studies are greatly needed. PMID:24575394

  14. Ofloxacin pharmacokinetics in mechanically ventilated patients.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, C; Lambert, D; Bruguerolle, B; Saux, P; Freney, J; Fleurette, J; Meugnier, H; Gouin, F

    1991-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of ofloxacin were studied in 12 intensive care patients, 6 of whom were under controlled mechanical ventilation. All patients had a creatinine clearance of greater than 80 ml/min per 1.73 m2. They were given 3 mg of ofloxacin per kg of body weight intravenously at a constant flow rate in 30 min twice a day for 7 days. Pharmacokinetic studies were performed on days 1 and 7. Between days 1 and 7, significant increases in the alpha (distribution) and beta (elimination) phase half-lives, the area under the serum concentration-time curve, and peak and trough levels in serum were observed, together with a marked decrease (greater than 50%) in total body clearance. Possible contributing factors for alteration of ofloxacin pharmacokinetics in ventilated patients were patient age, liver dysfunction, drug interaction, and drug accumulation in a deep compartment. This study shows that in intensive care patients the pharmacokinetics of ofloxacin differ from those reported for healthy volunteers. PMID:1929329

  15. Pharmacokinetics of melatonin in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Nazakat M; Azzopardi, Denis V; Hawwa, Ahmed F; McElnay, James C; Middleton, Benita; Arendt, J; Arichi, Tomoki; Gressens, Pierre; Edwards, A David

    2013-01-01

    Aims Preterm infants are deprived of the normal intra-uterine exposure to maternal melatonin and may benefit from replacement therapy. We conducted a pharmacokinetic study to guide potential therapeutic trials. Methods Melatonin was administered to 18 preterm infants in doses ranging from 0.04–0.6 μg kg−1 over 0.5–6 h. Pharmacokinetic profiles were analyzed individually and by population methods. Results Baseline melatonin was largely undetectable. Infants receiving melatonin at 0.1 μg kg−1 h−1 for 2 h showed a median half-life of 15.82 h and median maximum plasma concentration of 203.3 pg ml−1. On population pharmacokinetics, clearance was 0.045 l h−1, volume of distribution 1.098 l and elimination half-life 16.91 h with gender (P = 0.047) and race (P < 0.0001) as significant covariates. Conclusions A 2 h infusion of 0.1 μg kg−1 h−1 increased blood melatonin from undetectable to approximately peak adult concentrations. Slow clearance makes replacement of a typical maternal circadian rhythm problematic. The pharmacokinetic profile of melatonin in preterm infants differs from that of adults so dosage of melatonin for preterm infants cannot be extrapolated from adult studies. Data from this study can be used to guide therapeutic clinical trials of melatonin in preterm infants. PMID:23432339

  16. [Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol pharmacokinetics].

    PubMed

    Goullé, J-P; Saussereau, E; Lacroix, C

    2008-08-01

    Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta-9-THC) is the main psychoactive ingredient of cannabis. Smoking is currently most common use of cannabis. The present review focuses on the pharmacokinetics of THC. The variability of THC in plant material which has significantly increased in recent years leads to variability in tissue THC levels from smoking, which is, in itself, a highly individual process. This variability of THC content has an important impact on drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacology. After smoking THC bioavailability averages 30%. With a 3.55% THC cigarette, a peak plasma level near 160 ng/mL occurs approximately 10 min after inhalation. THC is eliminated quickly from plasma in a multiphasic manner and is widely distributed to tissues, which is responsible for its pharmacologic effects. Body fat then serves as a long-term storage site. This particular pharmacokinetics explains the noncorrelation between THC blood level and clinical effects as is observed for ethanol. A major active 11-hydroxy metabolite is formed after both inhalation and oral dosing (20 and 100% of parent, respectively). The elimination of THC and its many metabolites, mainly THC-COOH, occurs via the feces and urine for several weeks. Thus, to confirm abstinence, urine THC-COOH analysis would be a useful tool. A positive result could be checked by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry THC blood analysis, indicative of a recent cannabis exposure.

  17. Pharmacokinetics of grepafloxacin.

    PubMed

    Efthymiopoulos, C

    1997-12-01

    Grepafloxacin is a fluoroquinolone antibiotic which is rapidly absorbed in healthy volunteers following oral dosing. It reaches peak plasma levels around 2 h after administration, then declines bi-exponentially, with an extended half-life of around 12 h. Grepafloxacin is eliminated primarily through metabolism and is excreted mainly in the faeces. Renal clearance accounts for only 10-15% of the administered dose. Grepafloxacin plasma concentrations increase disproportionately with increasing doses, but this is unlikely to be of clinical significance over the range of therapeutic doses. The rate and extent of absorption are not affected by food or elevated intragastric pH. The pharmacokinetics of grepafloxacin are affected by gender, with these differences relating to variations in body weight. No effect of age on the pharmacokinetics of grepafloxacin was found. Renal impairment does not affect grepafloxacin pharmacokinetics, whereas peak plasma concentrations, areas under plasma concentration-time curves and renal excretion are increased in patients with hepatic impairment. Grepafloxacin can be co-administered with warfarin and theophylline, though reduction of the theophylline dose is necessary. Following oral administration, higher grepafloxacin concentrations are achieved in lung and genital tissues than in serum, indicating its potential in the treatment of respiratory and sexually transmitted diseases. In addition, it exceeds therapeutically effective levels in bile and gall-bladder tissues, and accumulates in polymorphonuclear leucocytes such that it may be useful against intracellular pathogens.

  18. Desirable Properties of Radiopharmaceuticals for Sentinel Node Mapping in Patients With Breast Cancer Given the Paradigm Shift in Patient Management.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chun K; Zukotynski, Katherine A

    2017-04-01

    Over the past 2 decades, lymphoscintigraphy and sentinel node biopsy have become widely accepted and are used by surgeons to stage many solid cancers, especially breast cancer. However, despite growing experience, there are a number of unresolved issues. In addition, the impact of a new radiopharmaceutical remains to be determined. The present article addresses some of these issues (either unresolved, recurrent, or newly emerged), with a focus on the properties of radiopharmaceuticals used for sentinel node mapping in breast cancer.

  19. CYP3A5 polymorphism effect on cyclosporine pharmacokinetics in living donor renal transplant recipients: analysis by population pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Song, Joohan; Kim, Myeong Gyu; Choi, Boyoon; Han, Na Young; Yun, Hwi-Yeol; Yoon, Jeong-Hyun; Oh, Jung Mi

    2012-09-01

    Cyclosporine is often used to prevent allograft rejection in renal transplant recipients. However, cyclosporine has a narrow therapeutic window and large variability in its pharmacokinetics. Individual characteristics and genetic polymorphisms can cause the variation. Hence, it is important to determine the cause(s) of the variation in cyclosporine pharmacokinetics. To our knowledge, this is the first reported population pharmacokinetic study of cyclosporine in living donor renal transplant recipients that considered the genetic polymorphism as a covariate. To build a population pharmacokinetic model of cyclosporine in living donor renal transplant recipients and identify covariates including CYP3A5*3, ABCB1 genetic polymorphisms that affect cyclosporine pharmacokinetic parameters. Clinical characteristics and cyclosporine concentration data for 69 patients who received cyclosporine-based immunosuppressive therapy after living donor renal transplantation were collected retrospectively for up to 400 postoperative days. CYP3A5*1/*3 and ABCB1C1236T, G2677T/A, C3435T geno-typing was performed. A population pharmacokinetic analysis was conducted using a NONMEM program. After building the final model, 1000 bootstrappings were performed to validate the final model. In total, 2034 blood samples were collected. A 1-compartment open model with first-order absorption and elimination was chosen to describe the pharmacokinetics of cyclosporine. A population pharmacokinetic analysis showed that postoperative days, sex, and CYP3A5 genotype significantly affected the pharmacokinetics of cyclosporine. The final estimate of mean clearance was 56 L/h, and the mean volume of distribution was 4650 L. The interindividual variability for these parameters was 22.98% and 51.48%, respectively. Using the present model to calculate the dose of cyclosporine with CYP3A5 genotyping can be possible for the patients whose cyclosporine concentration is not within the therapeutic range even with

  20. Radiopharmaceutical stannic Sn-117m chelate compositions and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, Suresh C.; Meinken, George E.

    2001-01-01

    Radiopharmaceutical compositions including .sup.117m Sn labeled stannic (Sn.sup.4+) chelates are provided. The chelates are preferably polyhydroxycarboxylate, such as oxalates, tartrates, citrates, malonates, gluconates, glucoheptonates and the like. Methods of making .sup.117m Sn-labeled (Sn.sup.4+) polyhydroxycarboxylic chelates are also provided. The foregoing pharmaceutical compositions can be used in methods of preparing bone for scintigraphical analysis, for radiopharmaceutical skeletal imaging, treatment of pain resulting from metastatic bone involvement, treatment of primary bone cancer, treatment of cancer resulting from metastatic spread to bone from other primary cancers, treatment of pain resulting from rheumatoid arthritis, treatment of bone/joint disorders and to monitor radioactively the skeletal system.

  1. Development of a modular system for the synthesis of PET [(11)C]labelled radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Boschi, Stefano; Lodi, Filippo; Cicoria, Gianfranco; Raul Ledesma, Jorge; Knopp, Roger; Rizzello, Anna; Di Pierro, Donato; Trespidi, Silvia; Marengo, Mario

    2009-10-01

    [((11))C]labelled radiopharmaceuticals as N-[(11)C]methyl-choline ([(11)C]choline), l-(S-methyl-[(11)C])methionine ([(11)C]methionine) and [(11)C]acetate have gained increasing importance in clinical PET and for the routine production of these radiopharmaceuticals, simple and reliable modules are needed to produce clinically relevant radioactivity. On the other hand, flexible devices are needed not only for the routine synthesis but also for more complex applications as the development of new tracers. The aim of this work was the adaptation of an Eckert Ziegler modular system for easy routine synthesis of [(11)C]choline, [(11)C]methionine and [(11)C]acetate using components that account for straightforward scaling up and upgrades.

  2. [Activities of administered radiopharmaceuticals and population dose from nuclear medicine in Czechoslovakia].

    PubMed

    Gushak, V; Rzhichkova, G

    1991-01-01

    The authors assessed by means of questionnaires the activities of radiopharmaceuticals administered in departments of nuclear medicine in Czechoslovakia. The mean activities of individual radiopharmaceuticals are roughly equal as in Great Britain but lower than in the Canadian province of Manitoba. The differences of activities used in different departments are approximately equal in all compared countries. In the Czech Republic the annual collective effective dose equivalent from nuclear medicine was 433 Sv in 1983 and 609 Sv in 1987. The mean effective dose equivalent per examination was 2.23 mSv in 1983 and 2.44 mSv in 1987. The mean effective dose equivalent per inhabitant of the Czech Republic was 0.042 mSv in 1983 and 0.059 mSv in 1987. The radiation dose of the Czech population from nuclear medicine amounts approximately to one tenth of the load from radiodiagnostics.

  3. Potential synergistic implications for stromal-targeted radiopharmaceuticals in bone-metastatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sartor, Oliver

    2011-01-01

    Genetic heterogeneity and chemotherapy-resistant ‘stem cells' represent two of the most pressing issues in devising new strategies for the treatment of advanced prostate cancer. Though curative strategies have long been present for men with localized disease, metastatic prostate cancer is currently incurable. Though substantial improvements in outcomes are now possible through the utilization of newly approved therapies, novel combinations are clearly needed. Herein we describe potentially synergistic interactions between bone stromal-targeted radiopharmaceuticals and other therapies for treatment of bone-metastatic prostate cancer. Radiation has long been known to synergize with cytotoxic chemotherapies and recent data also suggest the possibility of synergy when combining radiation and immune-based strategies. Combination therapies will be required to substantially improve survival for men with castrate-resistant metastatic prostate cancer and we hypothesize that bone-targeted radiopharmaceuticals will play an important role in this process. PMID:21499278

  4. Diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals for localization in target tissues exhibiting a regional PH shift relative to surrounding tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, M.; Kung, H. F.

    1984-10-02

    A radiopharmaceutical chemical compound comprising a radioactive isotope, other than an isotope of iodine, in chemical combination with at least one amine group. The compound has a lipophilicity sufficiently high at a pH of 7.6 to permit passage of the compound from the blood of a mammal into a target organ or tissue and sufficiently low at a pH of 6.6 to prevent rapid return of the compound from the target organ or tissue to the blood. The compound has a percent protein binding of less than ninety percent. A method for selectively depositing a radiopharmaceutical compound in at least one target tissue or organ of a mammal, which tissue or organ has a significantly different intracellular pH than the blood of the mammal, by introducing the compound of the invention into the bloodstream of the mammal.

  5. Quantitative studies in radiopharmaceutical science. Progress report, April 1-August 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, M.

    1986-09-01

    This report covers progress made during the first reporting period since the redirection of the project. In radiochemistry, achievements in fluorine-18 tracer studies including purification and reaction kinetics of 2-fluorodeoxyglucose and production of 6-fluoroDOPA. Radiopharmaceuticals have been prepared and tested for studies on CNS dopaminergic systems. By use of dynamic positron emission tomography the cerebral transport and metabolism of glucose continues to be studied. 6 figs.

  6. Radiation dose produced by patients during radiopharmaceutical incorporation in nuclear medicine diagnostic procedures.

    PubMed

    Morán, V; Prieto, E; García-García, B; Barbés, B; Ribelles, M J; Richter, J Á; Martí-Climent, J M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the dose received by members of the public due to close contact with patients undergoing nuclear medicine procedures during radiopharmaceutical incorporation, and comparing it with the emitted radiation dose when the test was complete, in order to establish recommendations. A prospective study was conducted on 194 patients. H*(10) dose rates were measured at 0.1, 0.5, and 1.0m after the radiopharmaceutical administration, before the image acquisition, and at the end of the nuclear medicine procedure. Effective dose for different close contact scenarios were calculated, according to 95th percentile value (bone scans) and the maximum value (remaining tests). During the radiopharmaceutical incorporation, a person who stays with another injected patient in the same waiting room may receive up to 0.59 mSv. If the patient had a medical appointment, or went to a restaurant or a coffee shop, members of the public could receive 23, 43, and 22 μSv, respectively. After finishing the procedure, these doses are reduced by a factor 3. In most of the studies, the use of private instead of public transport may reduce the dose by more than a factor 6. It is recommended to increase the distance between the patients during the radiopharmaceutical incorporation and to distribute them according to the diagnostic procedure. Patients should be encouraged to use private instead of public transport. Depending on the number of nuclear medicine outpatients per year attended by a physician, it could be necessary to apply restrictions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  7. Development new radiopharmaceutical based on 5-thio-d- glucose labeled technetium-99m

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stasyuk, E. S.; Skuridin, V. S.; Ilina, E. A.; Rogov, A. S.; Nesterov, E. A.; Sadkin, V. L.; Larionova, L. A.; Varlamova, N. V.; Zelchan, R.

    2016-06-01

    The article considers the obtaining and possibility of using 5-thio-D-glucose labeled technetium-99m for the diagnosis of malignant tumors by single photon emission computed tomography. The analysis of the level of international developments of radiopharmaceuticals based on derivatives of glucose has been carried out. Also the article provides information on of using experimental batches of lyophilisate on the basis of 5-thio-D-glucose for preliminary biomedical testing on the mice.

  8. The role of exploratory investigational new drugs for translating radiopharmaceuticals into first-in-human studies.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Sally W; Oyama, Reiko

    2015-04-01

    The Food and Drug Administration has provided a mechanism to reduce time and resources expended on new pharmaceuticals, including radiopharmaceuticals, in order to identify the most promising agents for further development. The exploratory investigational new drug guidance describes early phase 1 exploratory approaches involving microdoses of potential drug candidates that are consistent with regulatory requirements while maintaining the safety needed for human subjects, allowing sponsors to move ahead more quickly with the development of new agents.

  9. [Computer simulated images of radiopharmaceutical distributions in anthropomorphic phantoms]. Performance report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-05-17

    We have constructed an anatomically correct human geometry, which can be used to store radioisotope concentrations in 51 various internal organs. Each organ is associated with an index number which references to its attenuating characteristics (composition and density). The initial development of Computer Simulated Images of Radiopharmaceuticals in Anthropomorphic Phantoms (CSIRDAP) over the first 3 years has been very successful. All components of the simulation have been coded, made operational and debugged.

  10. Nonlinear Population Pharmacokinetics of Sirolimus in Patients With Advanced Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, K; Cohen, E E W; House, L K; Ramírez, J; Zhang, W; Ratain, M J; Bies, R R

    2012-01-01

    Sirolimus, the prototypical inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin, has substantial antitumor activity. In this study, sirolimus showed nonlinear pharmacokinetic characteristics over a wide dose range (from 1 to 60 mg/week). The objective of this study was to develop a population pharmacokinetic (PopPK) model to describe the nonlinearity of sirolimus. Whole blood concentration data, obtained from four phase I clinical trials, were analyzed using a nonlinear mixed-effects modeling (NONMEM) approach. The influence of potential covariates was evaluated. Model robustness was assessed using nonparametric bootstrap and visual predictive check approaches. The data were well described by a two-compartment model incorporating a saturable Michaelis–Menten kinetic absorption process. A covariate analysis identified hematocrit as influencing the oral clearance of sirolimus. The visual predictive check indicated that the final pharmacokinetic model adequately predicted observed concentrations. The pharmacokinetics of sirolimus, based on whole blood concentrations, appears to be nonlinear due to saturable absorption. PMID:23887441

  11. An overview of translational (radio)pharmaceutical research related to certain oncological and non-oncological applications

    PubMed Central

    Cona, Marlein Miranda; de Witte, Peter; Verbruggen, Alfons; Ni, Yicheng

    2013-01-01

    Translational medicine pursues the conversion of scientific discovery into human health improvement. It aims to establish strategies for diagnosis and treatment of diseases. Cancer treatment is difficult. Radio-pharmaceutical research has played an important role in multiple disciplines, particularly in translational oncology. Based on the natural phenomenon of necrosis avidity, OncoCiDia has emerged as a novel generic approach for treating solid malignancies. Under this systemic dual targeting strategy, a vascular disrupting agent first selectively causes massive tumor necrosis that is followed by iodine-131 labeled-hypericin (123I-Hyp), a necrosis-avid compound that kills the residual cancer cells by crossfire effect of beta radiation. In this review, by emphasizing the potential clinical applicability of OncoCiDia, we summarize our research activities including optimization of radioiodinated hypericin Hyp preparations and recent studies on the biodistribution, dosimetry, pharmacokinetic and, chemical and radiochemical toxicities of the preparations. Myocardial infarction is a global health problem. Although cardiac scintigraphy using radioactive perfusion tracers is used in the assessment of myocardial viability, searching for diagnostic imaging agents with authentic necrosis avidity is pursued. Therefore, a comparative study on the biological profiles of the necrosis avid 123I-Hyp and the commercially available 99mTc-Sestamibi was conducted and the results are demonstrated. Cholelithiasis or gallstone disease may cause gallbladder inflammation, infection and other severe complications. While studying the mechanisms underlying the necrosis avidity of Hyp and derivatives, their naturally occurring fluorophore property was exploited for targeting cholesterol as a main component of gallstones. The usefulness of Hyp as an optical imaging agent for cholelithiasis was studied and the results are presented. Multiple uses of automatic contrast injectors may reduce costs

  12. An overview of translational (radio)pharmaceutical research related to certain oncological and non-oncological applications.

    PubMed

    Cona, Marlein Miranda; de Witte, Peter; Verbruggen, Alfons; Ni, Yicheng

    2013-12-26

    Translational medicine pursues the conversion of scientific discovery into human health improvement. It aims to establish strategies for diagnosis and treatment of diseases. Cancer treatment is difficult. Radio-pharmaceutical research has played an important role in multiple disciplines, particularly in translational oncology. Based on the natural phenomenon of necrosis avidity, OncoCiDia has emerged as a novel generic approach for treating solid malignancies. Under this systemic dual targeting strategy, a vascular disrupting agent first selectively causes massive tumor necrosis that is followed by iodine-131 labeled-hypericin ((123)I-Hyp), a necrosis-avid compound that kills the residual cancer cells by crossfire effect of beta radiation. In this review, by emphasizing the potential clinical applicability of OncoCiDia, we summarize our research activities including optimization of radioiodinated hypericin Hyp preparations and recent studies on the biodistribution, dosimetry, pharmacokinetic and, chemical and radiochemical toxicities of the preparations. Myocardial infarction is a global health problem. Although cardiac scintigraphy using radioactive perfusion tracers is used in the assessment of myocardial viability, searching for diagnostic imaging agents with authentic necrosis avidity is pursued. Therefore, a comparative study on the biological profiles of the necrosis avid (123)I-Hyp and the commercially available (99m)Tc-Sestamibi was conducted and the results are demonstrated. Cholelithiasis or gallstone disease may cause gallbladder inflammation, infection and other severe complications. While studying the mechanisms underlying the necrosis avidity of Hyp and derivatives, their naturally occurring fluorophore property was exploited for targeting cholesterol as a main component of gallstones. The usefulness of Hyp as an optical imaging agent for cholelithiasis was studied and the results are presented. Multiple uses of automatic contrast injectors may reduce

  13. Synthetic techniques of radiopharmaceuticals production labeled with C-11 for PET in cardiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyubkov, V. S.; Ekaeva, I. V.; Katunina, T. A.; Rumyantsev, A. S.; Silchenkov, A. V.; Tuflina, T. V.

    2017-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and PET-Computerised Tomography (CT) are unique, non-invasive diagnostic techniques, in which the local, temporal and quantitative distributions of radioactive labelled substances are measured to investigate physiological processes. It is well known that PET centre of Bakulev Scientific Centre for Cardiovascular Surgery is the oldest one in Moscow. During more than fifteen years a large number of patients have received PET scans. Due to main stream of Scientific Centre, emphasis is placed on examining the heart functioning. For the diagnosis innervation of the heart muscle a number of radiopharmaceuticals are used, including PET radiopharmaceuticals such as 11C-CGP 12177, 11C-meta-hydroxyephedrine as well as its synthetic analogues labelled with other PET radionuclides (18F, 68Ga). 11C-meta-hydroxyephedrine is one of the most perspective radiopharmaceutical for an investigation of cardiac receptors function due to required materials availability for a radio synthesis in Russia. The main advantage of proposed 11C-meta-hydroxyephedrine synthesis technique is the use of a catalyst which allows one decrease reaction time from 5 minutes to 30 seconds. Obtained results allow one decrease reaction time of methylation and increase radiochemical and technological yields.

  14. Use of pressure-hold test for sterilizing filter membrane integrity in radiopharmaceutical manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Belanger, Anthony P; Byrne, John F; Paolino, Justin M; DeGrado, Timothy R

    2009-11-01

    The bubble point test is the de facto standard for postproduction filter membrane integrity test in the radiopharmaceutical community. However, the bubble point test depends on a subjective visual assessment of bubbling rate that can be obscured by significant diffusive gas flows below the manufacturer's prescribed bubble point. To provide a more objective means to assess filter membrane integrity, this study evaluates the pressure-hold test as an alternative to the bubble point test. In our application of the pressure-hold test, the nonsterile side of the sterilizing filter is pressurized to 85% of the predetermined bubble point with nitrogen, the filter system is closed off from the pressurizing gas and the pressure is monitored over a prescribed time interval. The drop in pressure, which has a known relationship with diffusive gas flow, is used as a quantitative measure of membrane integrity. Characterization of the gas flow vs. pressure relationship of each filter/solution combination provides an objective and quantitative means for defining a critical value of pressure drop over which the membrane is indicated to be nonintegral. The method is applied to sterilizing filter integrity testing associated with the commonly produced radiopharmaceuticals, [(18)F]FDG and [(11)C]PIB. The method is shown to be robust, practical and amenable to automation in radiopharmaceutical manufacturing environments (e.g., hot cells).

  15. Bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals as targeted agents of osteosarcoma: samarium-153-EDTMP and radium-223.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Peter M; Subbiah, Vivek; Rohren, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is a cancer characterized by formation of bone by malignant cells. Routine bone scan imaging with Tc-99m-MDP is done at diagnosis to evaluate primary tumor uptake and check for bone metastases. At time of relapse the Tc-99m-MDP bone scan also provides a specific means to assess formation of bone by malignant osteosarcoma cells and the potential for bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals to deliver radioactivity directly into osteoblastic osteosarcoma lesions. This chapter will review and compare a bone-seeking radiopharmaceutical that emits beta-particles, samarium-153-EDTMP, with an alpha-particle emitter, radium-223. The charged alpha particles from radium-223 have far more mass and energy than beta particles (electrons) from Sm-153-EDTMP. Because radium-223 has less marrow toxicity and more radiobiological effectiveness, especially if inside the bone forming cancer cell than samarium-153-EDTMP, radium-223 may have greater potential to become widely used against osteosarcoma as a targeted therapy. Radium-223 also has more potential to be used with chemotherapy against osteosarcoma and bone metastases. Because osteosarcoma makes bone and radium-223 acts like calcium, this radiopharmaceutical could possibly become a new targeted means to achieve safe and effective reduction of tumor burden as well as facilitate better surgery and/or radiotherapy for difficult to resect large, or metastatic tumors.

  16. Radiopharmaceuticals for metastatic bone pain palliation: available options in the clinical domain and their comparisons.

    PubMed

    Das, Tapas; Banerjee, Sharmila

    2017-01-01

    Bone pain arising due to skeletal metastases is one of the common complications experienced by the majority of patients suffering from prostate, breast and lung cancer at the advanced stage of the disease. These patients are subjected to palliative care in order to improve the quality of their remaining life. With the gradually increasing number of cancer cases, palliation of metastatic bone pain is gaining importance. Bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals play a pivotal role in the management of cancer pain, particularly in patients with multiple metastases, as these agents are proven to be effective in controlling the bone pain with minimum side effects. Although a plethora of such radiopharmaceuticals have been developed and evaluated in animal models, only a few are regularly used in clinics while some of these agents are at different stages of clinical evaluations. The present article describes only those bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals, which have been reported to be clinically administered till date, along with their relative merits and drawbacks.

  17. Harvard-MIT research program in short-lived radiopharmaceuticals. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Adelstein, S.J.

    1995-02-01

    The Harvard-MIT Research Program in Short-lived Radiopharmaceuticals was established in 1977 to foster interaction among groups working in radiopharmaceutical chemistry at Harvard Medical School, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the Massachusetts General Hospital. To this was added a group at The Childrens Hospital. From these collaborations and building upon the special strengths of the participating individuals, laboratories and institutions, it was hoped that original approaches would be found for the design of new, clinically useful, radiolabeled compounds. The original thrust of this proposal included: (a) examination of the coordination chemistry of technetium as a basis for rational radiopharmaceutical design, (b) development of an ultrashort-lived radionuclide generator for the diagnosis of congenital heart disease in newborns, (c) synthesis of receptor-site-directed halopharmaceuticals, (d) improved facile labeling of complex molecules with positron-emitting radionuclides. The authors` 1986 proposal was oriented toward organs and disease, emphasizing radiolabeled agents that delineate specific functions and the distribution of receptors in brain, heart, and tumors. In 1989, they further refined their purposes and focused on two major aims: (a) synthesis and utilization of neutral technetium and rhenium complexes of high specific activity, and (b) development of new approaches to the radiolabeling of proteins, peptides, immunoglobulins, and their fragments. In 1992, the authors amended this proposal to concentrate their efforts on biologically active peptides and proteins for targeted radiodiagnosis and therapy.

  18. Biokinetics and dosimetry of commonly used radiopharmaceuticals in diagnostic nuclear medicine - a review.

    PubMed

    Eberlein, Uta; Bröer, Jörn Hendrik; Vandevoorde, Charlot; Santos, Paula; Bardiès, Manuel; Bacher, Klaus; Nosske, Dietmar; Lassmann, Michael

    2011-12-01

    The impact on patients' health of radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine diagnostics has not until now been evaluated systematically in a European context. Therefore, as part of the EU-funded Project PEDDOSE.NET ( www.peddose.net ), we review and summarize the current knowledge on biokinetics and dosimetry of commonly used diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals. A detailed literature search on published biokinetic and dosimetric data was performed mostly via PubMed ( www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed ). In principle the criteria for inclusion of data followed the EANM Dosimetry Committee guidance document on good clinical reporting. Data on dosimetry and biokinetics can be difficult to find, are scattered in various journals and, especially in paediatric nuclear medicine, are very scarce. The data collection and calculation methods vary with respect to the time-points, bladder voiding, dose assessment after the last data point and the way the effective dose was calculated. In many studies the number of subjects included for obtaining biokinetic and dosimetry data was fewer than ten, and some of the biokinetic data were acquired more than 20 years ago. It would be of interest to generate new data on biokinetics and dosimetry in diagnostic nuclear medicine using state-of-the-art equipment and more uniform dosimetry protocols. For easier public access to dosimetry data for diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals, a database containing these data should be created and maintained.

  19. Preparation of gallium-68 radiopharmaceuticals for positron tomography. Progress report, November 1, 1977-October 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, M.J.

    1980-06-01

    Although the germanium-68 ..-->.. gallium-68 generator is probably the only source of positron-emitting radionuclides that could enable the widespread application of positron tomography, the commercially available /sup 68/Ga//sup 68/Ge generator system suffers from several major disadvantages. The most important of these is that the generator is eluted with EDTA, which forms a very strong chelate with gallium. In order to produce radiopharmaceuticals other than /sup 68/Ga-EDTA, it is first necessary to break the stable EDTA complex and remove all traces of EDTA. This procedure adds several steps and a significant amount of time to procedures for preparing /sup 68/Ga-radiopharmaceuticals. We have developed a new generator using a solvent extraction system which will produce /sup 68/Ga-oxine (8-hydroxyquinoline), a weak chelate. Using this agent we have synthesized several /sup 68/Ga-radiopharmaceuticals and tested them in vitro and in vivo. We have also carried out some preliminary studies to compare generator systems which produce /sup 68/Ga in an ionic form. Attempts have been made using polarographic and chromatographic techniques, and in vivo distribution data to investigate the stability of radiogallium complexes with a series of potentially lipophilic complexing agents.

  20. Clinical pharmacokinetics of levetiracetam.

    PubMed

    Patsalos, Philip N

    2004-01-01

    Since 1989, eight new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have been licensed for clinical use. Levetiracetam is the latest to be licensed and is used as adjunctive therapy for the treatment of adult patients with partial seizures with or without secondary generalisation that are refractory to other established first-line AEDs. Pharmacokinetic studies of levetiracetam have been conducted in healthy volunteers, in adults, children and elderly patients with epilepsy, and in patients with renal and hepatic impairment. After oral ingestion, levetiracetam is rapidly absorbed, with peak concentration occurring after 1.3 hours, and its bioavailability is >95%. Co-ingestion of food slows the rate but not the extent of absorption. Levetiracetam is not bound to plasma proteins and has a volume of distribution of 0.5-0.7 L/kg. Plasma concentrations increase in proportion to dose over the clinically relevant dose range (500-5000 mg) and there is no evidence of accumulation during multiple administration. Steady-state blood concentrations are achieved within 24-48 hours. The elimination half-life in adult volunteers, adults with epilepsy, children with epilepsy and elderly volunteers is 6-8, 6-8, 5-7 and 10-11 hours, respectively. Approximately 34% of a levetiracetam dose is metabolised and 66% is excreted in urine unmetabolised; however, the metabolism is not hepatic but occurs primarily in blood by hydrolysis. Autoinduction is not a feature. As clearance is renal in nature it is directly dependent on creatinine clearance. Consequently, dosage adjustments are necessary for patients with moderate to severe renal impairment. To date, no clinically relevant pharmacokinetic interactions between AEDs and levetiracetam have been identified. Similarly, levetiracetam does not interact with digoxin, warfarin and the low-dose contraceptive pill; however, adverse pharmacodynamic interactions with carbamazepine and topiramate have been demonstrated. Overall, the pharmacokinetic characteristics of

  1. Clinical pharmacokinetics of anticonvulsants.

    PubMed

    Hvidberg, E F; Dam, M

    1976-01-01

    Anticonvulsant therapy was among the first areas to benefit from clinical pharmacokinetic studies. The most important advantage is that the frequent interindividual variation in the plasma level/dose ratio for these drugs can be circumvented by plasma level monitoring. For several anticonvulsants the brain concentration is shown to parallel the plasma concentration. Phenytoin (diphenylhydantoin) is stil the most important anticonvulsant and the one for which kinetics have been thoroughly investigated in man. These investigations have revealed several reasons for the wellknown difficulties in using this drug clinically. The absorption rate and fraction are very much dependent on the pharmaceutical preparation, and changes of brand may alter the plasma level of phenytoin in spite of unaltered dose. The elimination capacity is saturable causing dose dependent kinetics, which again means disproportional changes in plasma level with changes in dose. Great individual variations exist in the rate of metabolism, and several pharmacokinetic drug interactions are known. As an optimum therapeutic plasma concentration range has been established monitoring plasma levels must be strongly advocated. Interpretation of plasma levels in uraemic patients must take into account decreased protein binding of the drug. Carbamazepine is probably as effective as phenytoin. The elimination is a first order process, but the rate of metabolism increases after a few weeks' treatment. An active metabolite (epoxide) may be the cause of some side-effects. Combined treatment with other anticonvulsant drugs decreases the half-life and more frequent dosing may be necessary. An optimum therapeutic concentration range has been suggested and plasma monitoring is advocated, along with that of the active metabolite, the epoxide. Phenobarbitone is still much used but its kinetics have been investigated to a lesser extent. The main problem is the variability in the rate of elimination. In children the half

  2. Development of a Web-Accessible Population Pharmacokinetic Service—Hemophilia (WAPPS-Hemo): Study Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Gary; Navarro-Ruan, Tamara; McEneny-King, Alanna; Edginton, Andrea N; Thabane, Lehana

    2016-01-01

    (available at www.wapps-hemo.org, version 2.4), with core functionalities allowing hemophilia treaters to obtain individual pharmacokinetic estimates on sparse data points after 1 or more infusions of a factor concentrate, was launched for use within the research network in July 2015. Conclusions The WAPPS-Hemo project and research network aims to make it easier to perform individual pharmacokinetic assessments on a reduced number of plasma samples by adoption of a population pharmacokinetics approach. The project will also gather data to substantially enhance the current knowledge about factor concentrate pharmacokinetics and sources of its variability in target populations. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02061072; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02061072 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6mRK9bKP6) PMID:27977390

  3. Development of a Web-Accessible Population Pharmacokinetic Service-Hemophilia (WAPPS-Hemo): Study Protocol.

    PubMed

    Iorio, Alfonso; Keepanasseril, Arun; Foster, Gary; Navarro-Ruan, Tamara; McEneny-King, Alanna; Edginton, Andrea N; Thabane, Lehana

    2016-12-15

    2.4), with core functionalities allowing hemophilia treaters to obtain individual pharmacokinetic estimates on sparse data points after 1 or more infusions of a factor concentrate, was launched for use within the research network in July 2015. The WAPPS-Hemo project and research network aims to make it easier to perform individual pharmacokinetic assessments on a reduced number of plasma samples by adoption of a population pharmacokinetics approach. The project will also gather data to substantially enhance the current knowledge about factor concentrate pharmacokinetics and sources of its variability in target populations. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02061072; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02061072 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6mRK9bKP6).

  4. Population pharmacokinetics of aripiprazole in healthy Korean subjects.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Ji-Young; Chae, Soo-Wan; Kim, Min-Gul

    2016-04-01

    Aripiprazole is widely used to treat schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. This study aimed to develop a combined population pharmacokinetic model for aripiprazole in healthy Korean subjects and to identify the significant covariates in the pharmacokinetic variability of aripiprazole. Aripiprazole plasma concentrations and demographic data were collected retrospectively from previous bioequivalence studies that were conducted in Chonbuk National University Hospital. Informed consent was obtained from subjects for cytochrome P450 (CYP) genotyping. The population pharmacokinetic parameters of aripiprazole were estimated using nonlinear mixed-effect modeling with first-order conditional estimation with interaction method. The effects of age, sex, weight, height, and CYP genotype were assessed as covariates. A total of 1,508 samples from 88 subjects in three bioequivalence studies were collected. The two-compartment model was adopted, and the final population model showed that the CYP2D6 genotype polymorphism, height and weight significantly affect aripiprazole disposition. The bootstrap and visual predictive check results were evaluated, showing that the accuracy of the pharmacokinetic model was acceptable. A population pharmacokinetic model of aripiprazole was developed for Korean subjects. CYP2D6 genotype polymorphism, weight, and height were included as significant factors affecting aripiprazole disposition. The population pharmacokinetic parameters of aripiprazole estimated in the present study may be useful for individualizing clinical dosages and for studying the concentration-effect relationship of the drug.

  5. Kit for preparation of multimeric receptor-specific ⁹⁹mTc-radiopharmaceuticals based on gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ocampo-García, Blanca; Ferro-Flores, Guillermina; Morales-Avila, Enrique; Ramírez, Flor de María

    2011-11-01

    mannose receptor-positive rat liver cells. Biodistribution studies were carried out in athymic mice with induced tumours (PC-3 or C6 cancer cells) or in Wistar rats (⁹⁹mTc-AuNP-mannose for sentinel lymph node detection). Images were obtained using a micro-single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography system. Radiochemical purity was 96 ± 2% for all of the multimeric radiopharmaceuticals. Far-infrared showed a characteristic band at 279 ± 1 cm⁻¹, which was assigned to the Au-S bond. ultraviolet-visible and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy also indicated that the AuNPs were functionalized with peptides or mannose. Radiopharmaceuticals showed specific recognition for receptors expressed in cancer cells or rat liver cells. Micro-single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography images showed clear tumour uptake and lymph node accumulation. The kit (i.e. vial 1 and vial 2) demonstrated excellent stability during storage at 4°C for 6 months. Multimeric systems of ⁹⁹mTc-AuNP-peptide/mannose prepared from kits exhibited properties suitable for use as target-specific agents for molecular imaging of tumours and sentinel lymph node detection.

  6. ( sup 111 In-DTPA-D-Phe sup 1 )-octreotide, a potential radiopharmaceutical for imaging of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors: Synthesis, radiolabeling and in vitro validation

    SciTech Connect

    Bakker, W.H.; Albert, R.; Bruns, C.; Breeman, W.A.P.; Hofland, L.J.; Marbach, P.; Pless, J.; Pralet, D.; Stolz, B.; Koper, J.W.; Lamberts, S.W.J.; Visser, T.J.; Krenning, E.P. Sandoz Pharma AG, Basel )

    1991-01-01

    As starting material for a potentially convenient radiopharmaceutical, a diethylenetriaminopentaacetic acid (DTPA) conjugated derivative of octreotide (SMS 201-995) was prepared. This peptide, (DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide (SDZ 215-811) binds more than 95% of added {sup 111}In in an easy, single-step labeling procedure without necessity of further purification. The specific somatostatin-like biologic effect of these analogues was proven by the inhibition of growth hormone secretion by cultured rat pituitary cells in a dose-dependent fashion by octreotide, (DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide and non-radioactive ({sup 115}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide. The binding of ({sup 111}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide to rat brain cortex membranes proved to be displaced similarly by natural somatosatin as well as by octreotide, suggesting specific binding of ({sup 111}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide to somatostatin receptors. The binding of the indium-labeled compound showed a somewhat lower affinity when compared with the iodinated (Tyr{sup 3})-octreotide, but indium-labeled (DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide still binds with nanomolar affinity. In conjunction with in vivo studies, these results suggest that ({sup 111}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide is a promising radiopharmaceutical for scintigraphic imaging of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors.

  7. SU-E-I-82: PET Radiopharmaceuticals for Prostate Cancer Imaging: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandes, F; Silva, D da; Rodrigues, L

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to review new and clinical practice PET radiopharmaceuticals for prostate cancer imaging. Methods: PET radiopharmaceuticals were reviewed on the main databases. Availability, dosimetry, accuracy and limitations were considered. Results: The following radioisotopes with respective physical half-life and mean positron energy were found: {sup 18}F (109,7 min, 249,8 keV), {sup 89}Zr (78,4 hs, 395,5 keV), {sup 11}C (20,4 min, 385,7 keV) and {sup 68}Ga (67,8 min, 836 keV). {sup 68}Ga was the only one not produced by cyclotron. Radiopharmaceuticals uptake by glucose metabolism ({sup 18}F-FDG), lipogenesis ({sup 11}C-Choline and {sup 11}C-Acetate), amino acid transport (Anti-{sup 18}F-FACBC), bone matrix ({sup 18}F-NaF), prostatespecific membrane antigen ({sup 68}Ga-PSMA and {sup 89}Zr-J591), CXCR receptors ({sup 89}Ga-Pentixafor), adrenal receptors ({sup 18}F-FDHT) and gastrin release peptide receptor (bombesin analogue). Most of radiopharmaceuticals are urinary excretion, so bladder is the critical organ. 11C-choline (pancreas), Anti-{sup 18}FFACBC (liver) and {sup 18}F-FBDC (stomach wall) are the exception. Higher effective dose was seen {sup 18}F-NaF (27 μSv/MBq) while the lowest was {sup 11}CAcetate (3,5 μSv/MBq). Conclusion: Even though {sup 18}F-FDG has a large availability its high urinary excretion and poor uptake to slow growing disease offers weak results for prostate cancer. Better accuracy is obtained when {sup 18}F-NaF is used for bone metastatic investigation although physicians tend to choose bone scintigraphy probably due to its cost and practice. Many guidelines in oncology consider {sup 11}C or {sup 18}F labeled with Choline the gold standard for biochemical relapse after radical treatment. Local, lymph node and distant metastatic relapse can be evaluated at same time with this radiopharmaceutical. There is no consensus over bigger urinary excretion for {sup 18}F labeling. Anti-{sup 18}F-FACBC, {sup 68}Ga-PSMA and {sup

  8. Adverse reactions to radiopharmaceuticals in France: analysis of the national pharmacovigilance database.

    PubMed

    Laroche, Marie-Laure; Quelven, Isabelle; Mazère, Joachim; Merle, Louis

    2015-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals are regarded as safe by the nuclear medicine community, but up to now, no survey has been conducted with from the perspective of pharmacovigilance. To describe the adverse reactions to radiopharmaceuticals (ARRPs) reported to the French Pharmacovigilance Database (FPVD). We selected and described all reports encompassing at least one radiopharmaceutical in the FPVD. The annual incidence of reported ARRPs used in diagnosis was also estimated. From 1989 to 2013, 304 reports of ARRPs were identified (43.0% serious, 12 deaths) in 54.6% women and 45.4% men; the median age was 58 years. Five therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals ((131)I-sodium iodide, (131)I-lipiodol, (89)Sr-chloride, (153)Sm-lexidronam, and (90)Y-ibritumomab-tiuxetan) were involved in 48 reports (97 adverse reactions: 86.6% serious, 9 deaths). Pulmonary disorders represented 44.3% of ARRPs used for therapy, mainly related to (131)I-lipiodol. There were 34 diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals involved in 256 reports (451 adverse reactions: 38.1% serious, 3 deaths); 8 diagnostic products ((99m)Tc-oxidronate, (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose, (99m)Tc-tin pyrophosphate, (99m)Tc-tetrofosmin, (99m)Tc-dimercaptosuccinic acid, (201)Tl-chloride, (99m)Tc-sestamibi, and (111)In-pentetate) accounted for two-thirds of ARRPs. The most frequent adverse reactions were skin (34.4%), general (18.2%), nervous (9.0%), and gastrointestinal disorders (7.0%). There were 25 cases of altered images and 10 medication errors. The annual incidence of reported adverse reactions ranged from 1.2 × 10(-5) to 3.4 × 10(-5) diagnostic administrations. Reported ARRPs occurred rarely and were more serious in the therapeutic than in the diagnostic field. The notification of ARRPs was able to provide new guidance for safe use, as was the case for (131)I-lipiodol. Therefore, it is important to report ARRPs to a pharmacovigilance system. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. Pharmacokinetics of antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Tokola, R A; Neuvonen, P J

    1983-01-01

    The rational use of antiepileptic drugs requires the consideration of their pharmacokinetics, which may be influenced by the physiological and pathological factors. Pharmacokinetic interactions between antiepileptic drugs may lead to considerable fluctuation in plasma drug concentration, and monotherapy is often preferable. The absorption of phenytoin depends on pharmaceutical formulation. Phenytoin is highly bound to plasma proteins, thus the changes in the unbound fraction are of clinical significance. The saturation kinetics of its metabolism and drug interactions have further consequences. Carbamazepine is well absorbed and largely metabolized. Due to the autoinduction its half-life shortens in chronic administration. Valproate is highly, but variably bound to plasma proteins. It is eliminated mainly by metabolism. Due to the long half-life of phenobarbital its plasma concentrations change slowly, and time to the steady-state may be up to 30 days, if no loading dose is given. Primidone is partly metabolized to phenobarbital, and at steady-state plasma concentration of phenobarbital often exceeds that of primidone. Diazepam, clonazepam and nitrazepam are largely bound to plasma proteins and extensively metabolized with the half-lives of 20 to 60 hours.

  10. [Pharmacokinetics of carbapenems].

    PubMed

    Suchánková, H; Rychlíčková, J; Urbánek, K

    2012-06-01

    Carbapenems, beta-lactam antibiotics, are ideal candidates for the treatment of serious nosocomial infections including sepsis for their exceptionally broad antibacterial spectrum and high efficiency. They are administered parenterally by intravenous infusion. Carbapenems penetrate well and rapidly into many different tissue compartments and the interstitial fluid. They are metabolized by renal dihydropeptidase-1. Therefore, imipenem must be co-administered with an inhibitor of dihydropeptidase-1. Other carbapenems registered in the Czech Republic (meropenem, ertapenem and doripenem) are more stable to this enzyme. Carbapenems are mainly eliminated via the kidneys and dose adjustment in patients with renal impairment is necessary. The elimination half-life of most carbapenems is around 1 hour with the exception of ertapenem, with 3.8-hour half-life, which allows its once-daily use. Carbapenems are a group of antibiotics with time-dependent effect. Their typical pharmaceutical property is a limited stability in solution after dilution. Administration in the prolonged infusion appears to be a convenient strategy to achieve higher efficiency. Pharmacokinetic parameters of carbapenems may vary individually, especially in critically ill patients and those treated by renal replacement therapy. Therefore, individualization of dosing regimens based on knowledge of pharmacokinetic parameters of individual patients may be useful.

  11. Improvement of pharmacokinetics of radioiodinated Tyr(3)-octreotide by conjugation with carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Schottelius, Margret; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Reubi, Jean Claude; Senekowitsch-Schmidtke, Reingard; Schwaiger, Markus

    2002-01-01

    Among a variety of other factors, the clearance kinetics and routes of excretion of radiopharmaceuticals are of crucial importance for early and high tumor/background ratios and thus signal intensity in diagnostic imaging by single photon emission tomography (SPECT) or positron emission tomography (PET). To overcome the unfavorable pharmacokinetics of radiohalogenated octreotide analogues, we evaluated three carbohydrated conjugates of Tyr(3)-octreotide (TOC). Glucose ([(125)I]Gluc-TOC), maltose ([(125)I]Malt-TOC), and maltotriose ([(125)I]Mtr-TOC) derivatives of [(125)I]TOC were synthesized via Maillard reaction and subsequent radioiodination. In cells transfected with sst1-sst5, I-Malt-TOC, and I-Mtr-TOC show sst-subtype binding profiles similar to I-TOC with high affinity for sst2. Comparative biodistribution studies 10, 30, and 60 min pi in nude mice bearing rat pancreatic tumor xenografts showed fast blood clearance for all glycosylated derivatives. Due to their markedly increased hydrophilicity, [(125)I]Gluc-TOC and [(125)I]Malt-TOC were mainly cleared via the kidneys, which led to a significant decrease in activity accumulation in liver and intestine (5.3 and 1.4 versus 10.6%ID/g for [(125)I]TOC in the liver, 1.7 and 1.0 versus 3.8%ID/g for [(125)I]TOC in the intestine 60 min pi). For all compounds, hydrophilicity and uptake in liver and intestines correlate. Uptake of the carbohydrate conjugates in the kidney was comparable. Compared to the parent compound, the accumulation of the carbohydrated compounds in sst-rich tissues (pancreas, adrenals) was increased by a factor of 1.5-3.5. While tumor uptake of [(125)I]TOC (6.7 +/- 2.6%ID/g), [(125)I]Malt-TOC (5.3 +/- 1.9%ID/g), and [(125)I]Mtr-TOC (4.9 +/- 2.2%ID/g) at 30 min postinjection was comparable, accumulation of [(125)I]Gluc-TOC was significantly increased (10.1 +/- 2.8%ID/g at 30 min pi). Somatostatin receptor specificity of tumor uptake was confirmed by pretreatment, competition, and displacement

  12. Identifying 24 h variation in the pharmacokinetics of levofloxacin: a population pharmacokinetic approach

    PubMed Central

    Kervezee, Laura; Stevens, Jasper; Birkhoff, Willem; Kamerling, Ingrid M. C.; de Boer, Theo; Dröge, Melloney; Meijer, Johanna H.

    2015-01-01

    Aim The objective of this study was to investigate whether the pharmacokinetics of orally administered levofloxacin show 24 h variation. Levofloxacin was used as a model compound for solubility and permeability independent absorption and passive renal elimination. Methods In this single centre, crossover, open label study, 12 healthy subjects received an oral dose of 1000 mg levofloxacin at six different time points equally divided over the 24 h period. Population pharmacokinetic modelling was used to identify potential 24 h variation in the pharmacokinetic parameters of this drug. Results The pharmacokinetics of levofloxacin could be described by a one compartment model with first order clearance and a transit compartment to describe drug absorption. The fit of the model was significantly improved when the absorption rate constant was described as a cosine function with a fixed period of 24 h, a relative amplitude of 47% and a peak around 08.00 h in the morning. Despite this variation in absorption rate constant, simulations of a once daily dosing regimen showed that t max, C max and the area under the curve at steady‐state were not affected by the time of drug administration. Conclusion The finding that the absorption rate constant showed considerable 24 h variation may be relevant for drugs with similar physicochemical properties as levofloxacin that have a narrower therapeutic index. Levofloxacin, however, can be dosed without taking into account the time of day, at least in terms of its pharmacokinetics. PMID:26852745

  13. Comparative pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of cardiac glycosides.

    PubMed Central

    Kelman, A W; Sumner, D J; Lonsdale, M; Lawrence, J R; Whiting, B

    1980-01-01

    1 The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of ouabain, digoxinn and beta-methyl digoxin (medigoxin) have been investigated in a crossover study in four normal healthy volunteers. 2 Pharmacokinetics were studied using [3H]-labelled glycosides and the shortening of the left ventricular ejection time (LVET) was used as a measure of the effect of the drugs. A graded exercise protocol was used to correct for the effects of heart rate on LVET. 3 In three of the four subjects, both digoxin and beta-methyl digoxin produced a shortening in the LVET, but no such change could be detected with ouabain in any of the four subjects. 4 There was a good linear correlation between the shortening of the LVET and the amounts of digoxin or beta-methyl digoxin present in the body tissues. 5 One subject who showed no drug-related LVET shortening had greatly enhanced clearances of all three drugs studied. PMID:7426275

  14. Studies of the pharmacokinetic properties of nimorazole.

    PubMed Central

    Overgaard, J.; Overgaard, M.; Timothy, A. R.

    1983-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of the hypoxic radio-sensitizer nimorazole were studied in 19 individuals after single oral doses of between 0.5-3.5 g. HPLC measurements showed, after a rapid absorption, a linear relationship between peak plasma concentration and given dose. Mean elimination half life was 3.1 h. A tendency to a dose-dependent variation in the apparent volume of distribution, total body clearance and elimination half life suggest non-linear pharmacokinetics of nimorazole. Tumour concentrations measured in 5 patients gave tumour/plasma ratios between 0.8-1.3. No toxicity was observed. The results indicate that nimorazole may have potential as a clinically useful hypoxic radiosensitizer. PMID:6871077

  15. Radiolabeled tirofiban – a potential radiopharmaceutical for detection of deep venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Darkovska-Serafimovska, Marija; Janevik-Ivanovska, Emilija; Djorgoski, Icko; Arsova-Sarafinovska, Zorica; Zdravkovska, Milka; Balkanov, Trajan; Ugresic, Nenad

    2016-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of using 99mtechnetium (99mTc)-labeled tirofiban (a reversible antagonist of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa) for detection of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in rats without causing an antiplatelet effect. Methods The ability of in vitro tirofiban to inhibit adenosine 5′-diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet aggregation was evaluated using optical aggregometer. Binding of 99mTc-tirofiban to platelets was evaluated. Serum levels of unlabeled (a validated high performance liquid chromatography method) and 99mTc-tirofiban after single intravenous injection were evaluated in male Wistar rats with or without induced DVT (femoral vein ligation model), and the rats were also subjected to whole body scintigraphy. Results Tirofiban in vitro inhibits ADP-induced aggregation of human platelets in a dose- and concentration-dependent manner (10 nM to 2 μM), but only if it is added before ADP and not after ADP. 99mTc labeling did not affect the ability of tirofiban to bind to either human or rat platelets, nor did it affect tirofiban pharmacokinetics in intact rats or in animals with induced DVT. When 99mTc-tirofiban was injected to rats after induction of DVT, at a molar dose lower than the one showing only a weak antiaggregatory effect in vitro, whole body scintigraphy indicated localization of 99mTc-tirofiban around the place of the induced DVT. Conclusion 99mTc labeling of tirofiban does not affect its ability to bind to glycoprotein IIb/IIIa or its in vivo pharmacokinetics in rats, either intact or with DVT. A low, nonantiaggregatory dose of 99mTc-tirofiban may be used to visualize DVT at an early stage. PMID:27713618

  16. Pharmacokinetics of Tyrosol Metabolites in Rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Da-Hye; Kim, Yang-Ji; Kim, Min Jung; Ahn, Jiyun; Ha, Tae-Youl; Lee, Sang Hee; Jang, Young Jin; Jung, Chang Hwa

    2016-01-21

    Tyrosol is considered a potential antioxidant; however, little is known regarding the pharmacokinetics of its metabolites. To study the pharmacokinetics of tyrosol-derived metabolites after oral administration of a single dose of tyrosol, we attempted to identify tyrosol metabolites in rat plasma by using ultra-performance liquid chromatography and quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF-MS). Two tyrosol metabolites (M1 and M2) were detected in the plasma. M1 was identified as tyrosol-4-sulfate (T4S) with an [M - H](-) ion at m/z 217. While M2 showed an [M - H](-) ion at m/z 151.0, its metabolite was not identified. Pharmacokinetic analysis of T4S and M2 showed rapid uptake after oral administration of tyrosol within 1 h. The metabolites were rapidly distributed in most organs and tissues and eliminated within 4 h. The greatest T4S deposition by tissue weight was observed in the liver, followed by the kidney and spleen, while M2 was most concentrated in the kidney followed by the liver and spleen. These findings indicate that T4S and M2 were distributed mainly in tissues with an abundant blood supply and were rapidly excreted in urine.

  17. Preparation and biological evaluation of (99m)Tc-ropinirole as a novel radiopharmaceutical for brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Motaleb, M A; Ibrahem, I T; Ayoub, V R; Geneidi, A S

    2016-04-01

    Noninvasive brain imaging is a process that allows scientists and physicians to view and monitor the areas of the brain. The aim of this study was to formulate a novel radiopharmaceutical for the detection of brain disorders at early stages in susceptible patients. (99m) Tc-ropinirole was prepared by the direct complexation of ropinirole with technetium-99m. The results showed that the radiochemical yield (99m) Tc-ropinirole was 92 ± 2.87% and the radiochemical yield was evaluated by paper chromatography and HPLC. In vitro studies showed that the formed complex was stable for up to 6 h. In vivo uptake of (99m) Tc-ropinirole in the brain was 4.87 ± 0.15% injected dose/g organ at 30 min post-injection, which cleared from the brain with time till it reaches 2.3% at 2 h post-injection indicating that the brain uptake of (99m) Tc-ropinirole is higher than that of the commercially available (99m) Tc-HMPAO, which is 2.25% at 30 min. Pre-dosing mice with cold ropinirole reduced the brain uptake to 0.26 ± 0.01% injected dose/g organ, so this confirms the high specificity and selectivity of this radiotracer for the assessment of the dopamine receptors.

  18. Development of more efficacious Tc-99m organ imaging agents for use in nuclear medicine by analytical characterization of radiopharmaceutical mixtures. Progress report, May 1, 1981-April 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Heineman, W.R.; Deutsch, E.A.

    1981-12-01

    The objectives of this year's research were to develop a method for rapidly determining TcO/sub 4//sup -/ in /sup 99/Mo//sup 99m/Tc generator eluates, to improve the ability to chromatographically determine individual Tc-HEDP complexes in radiopharmaceuticals, and to investigate the effects of TcO/sub 4//sup -/ concentration and electrochemical reduction on the types and relative amounts of Tc-HEDP complexes present in a radiopharmaceutical formulation. A rapid and sensitive high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method for the quantitative determination of pertechnetate (TcO/sub 4//sup -/) was developed. This HPLC-based analysis may be of considerable utility in assessing the history and function of /sup 99/MO/sup 99m/Tc generators as well as in the routine analysis of reduced technetium radiopharmaceuticals for the presence of undesired TcO/sub 4//sup -/. Encouraging results were obtained on a dimethyl amine column using aqueous (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ as the mobile phase. The preparation of Tc(NaBH/sub 4/) HEDP radiopharmaceutical analogues using varying concentrations of total TcO/sub 4//sup -/ shows a dramatic effect in the number and distribution of Tc-HEDP complexes over a TcO/sub 4//sup -/ concentration range of 10/sup -2/ to 10/sup -8/M. These results suggest that total TcO/sub 4//sup -/ concentration is an important parameter to be considered in the preparation of a specific Tc-HEDP complex to improve skeletal imaging. The preparation of Tc(electrode) HEDP radiopharmaceutical analogues by using electrochemical reduction was explored. The resulting solutions contain Tc-HEDP complexes that are tentatively identified as being the same complexes formed by NaBH/sub 4/ reduction, although the relative concentrations of these complexes are quite different with the two modes of reduction. Thus, electrochemical reduction shows promise as a viable route to the preparation of specific Tc-HEDP complexes for improved skeletal imaging.

  19. Pharmacokinetics of cefixime

    SciTech Connect

    Tonelli, A.P.

    1987-01-01

    The serum protein binding of cefixime, was concentration-dependent. Below 30 mcg/mL, free-fractions (fu) of cefixime in dog serum were approximately 8%. As cefixime concentrations increased, concomitant increases in free-fraction were observed. At 328 mcg/mL almost half of the cefixime in serum was not bound. To examine the effect of this concentration-dependent binding on cefixime's pharmacokinetics, four dogs were administered 50 mg/kg of the carbon 14-labeled drug by the oral and intravenous routes. The absolute bioavailability of cefixime was 48.0 +/- 17% (mean +/- SD). Absorption of radioactivity was 51.9 +/- 18%. Cefixime's elimination was a function of its free-fraction in serum and reabsorption of filtered drug by the kidney.

  20. Age and fentanyl pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Bentley, J B; Borel, J D; Nenad, R E; Gillespie, T J

    1982-12-01

    Fentanyl pharmacokinetics was compared in two groups of adult patients, one group (n = 5) aged less than 50 years, and one group (n = 4) aged greater than 60 years. Despite equivalent doses of fentanyl (10 microgram/kg IV), serum drug concentrations were significantly higher in the older patient group. This was reflected by a prolonged terminal elimination half-life in the elderly compared with the younger patients (945 versus 265 minutes, respectively, p less than 0.005). Volumes of the central compartment and volumes of drug distribution were similar in both patient groups. However, drug clearance was markedly decreased in the elderly (265 versus 991 ml/min, p less than 0.005). These data suggest that a given dose of fentanyl will be clinically effective for a longer period in older patients than in younger patients.

  1. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of pramipexole.

    PubMed

    Antonini, Angelo; Calandrella, Daniela

    2011-10-01

    Immediate-release (IR) pramipexole dihydrochloride is indicated for the treatment of signs and symptoms of idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD). It is administered alone (without levodopa) or in combination with levodopa, during the entire progress of the disease, up to an advanced stage. Currently, it is also indicated for the treatment of moderate-to-severe primary restless legs syndrome (RLS). An extended-release (ER) formulation of pramipexole has been developed to allow a once-daily administration and to provide more stable dopaminergic stimulation in PD patients. This review summarizes the overall pharmacokinetic profile of pramipexole for both the IR and ER formulations. Also discussed are the clinically relevant determinants of pramipexole peripheral pharmacokinetics and the potential role of genetic and clinical determinants in drug efficacy. Pramipexole is a non-ergot agonist with selective affinity for dopamine receptors of the D2 subfamily, in particular D3. Pramipexole has a very low affinity for serotoninergic 5-HT2A and 5-HT2B receptors, as well as D1-type receptors. Furthermore, it does not carry the risk to induce valvular heart disease or pulmonary and retroperitoneal fibrosis, seen with long-term use of the ergot-derived dopamine agonists. The recent introduction of a once-daily formulation poses significant advantages for patients, reflected by relatively stable plasma levels. The most obvious benefit is convenience of use and better adherence to treatment schedule. Additional advantages could include the opportunity to provide more continuous drug delivery in a fashion that could help minimize dyskinesia risk, if the drug is used early in the disease course.

  2. Interaction of licorice on glycyrrhizin pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed Central

    Cantelli-Forti, G; Maffei, F; Hrelia, P; Bugamelli, F; Bernardi, M; D'Intino, P; Maranesi, M; Raggi, M A

    1994-01-01

    The effects of components of aqueous licorice root extract (LE) on the pharmacokinetics of glycyrrhizin (G) and glycyrrhetic acid (GA) were investigated in rats and humans. The aim of this work was to define the role of pharmacokinetics in G toxicity. In the procedure, G and GA were detected in biological fluids by means of recently improved HPLC methods. Significantly lower G and GA plasma levels were found in rats and humans treated with LE compared to the levels obtained with those in which G alone was administered. The pharmacokinetic curves showed significant differences in the areas under the plasma-time curve (AUC), Cmax, and Tmax parameters. The data obtained from urine samples are in agreement with the above results and confirm a reduced bioavailability of G present in LE compared to pure G. This should be attributed to the interaction during intestinal absorption between the G constituent and the several components in LE. The modified bioavailability could explain the various clinical adverse effects resulting from the chronic oral administration of G alone as opposed to LE. PMID:7698088

  3. Correlating pharmacokinetics and teratogenic endpoints.

    PubMed

    Kimmel, C A; Young, J F

    1983-01-01

    The use of pharmacokinetics can improve the extrapolation of animal teratology data for human risk evaluation. Before one can extrapolate between species, however, the pharmacokinetic model must be predictable within the species for which it was developed. This article summarizes an approach being used for correlating pharmacokinetics and teratology endpoints in the same animal and predicting the teratogenic outcome for other animals of the same species. With the aid of micro-sampling procedures, and sensitive and rapid analytical techniques, blood, urine and feces samples are obtained from individual animals following dosing and the data are simulated using a hybrid computer to develop a pharmacokinetic model. The model is validated in other animals by measuring the parent compound and metabolites in various "compartments" predicted by the model. Then the pharmacokinetic model is tested by predicting the teratogenic outcome in single ani-analyses indicated the most predictive pharmacokinetic parameters to be two maternal blood concentration values. Prediction of the teratogenic outcome based on these parameters was accurate for 74% of the litters in the 95% confidence interval. This approach is discussed as it relates to its utility for other exposure routes and for extrapolation to other species.

  4. Noninvasive measurement of androgen receptor signaling with a positron-emitting radiopharmaceutical that targets prostate-specific membrane antigen

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Michael J.; Smith-Jones, Peter M.; Wongvipat, John; Navarro, Vincent; Kim, Sae; Bander, Neil H.; Larson, Steven M.; Sawyers, Charles L.

    2011-01-01

    Despite encouraging clinical results with next generation drugs (MDV3100 and abiraterone) that inhibit androgen receptor (AR) signaling in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), responses are variable and short-lived. There is an urgent need to understand the basis of resistance to optimize their future use. We reasoned that a radiopharmaceutical that measures intratumoral changes in AR signaling could substantially improve our understanding of AR pathway directed therapies. Expanding on previous observations, we first show that prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is repressed by androgen treatment in multiple models of AR-positive prostate cancer in an AR-dependent manner. Conversely, antiandrogens up-regulate PSMA expression. These expression changes, including increased PSMA expression in response to treatment with the antiandrogen MDV3100, can be quantitatively measured in vivo in human prostate cancer xenograft models through PET imaging with a fully humanized, radiolabeled antibody to PSMA, 64Cu-J591. Collectively, these results establish that relative changes in PSMA expression levels can be quantitatively measured using a human-ready imaging reagent and could serve as a biomarker of AR signaling to noninvasively evaluate AR activity in patients with CRPC. PMID:21606347

  5. Environmental effects on the structure of metal ion-DOTA complexes: An ab initio study of radiopharmaceutical metals.

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, E Y; Lightstone, F C; Colvin, M E

    2006-02-10

    Quantum mechanical calculations were performed to study the differences between the important radiopharmaceutical metals yttrium (Y) and indium (In) bound by DOTA and modified DOTA molecules. Energies were calculated at the MP2/6-31+G(d)//HF/6-31G(d) levels, using effective core potentials on the Y and In ions. Although the minimum energy structures obtained are similar for both metal ion-DOTA complexes, changes in coordination and local environment significantly affect the geometries and energies of these complexes. Coordination by a single water molecule causes a change in the coordination number and a change in the position of the metal ion in In-DOTA; but, Y-DOTA is hardly affected by water coordination. When one of the DOTA carboxylates is replaced by an amide, the coordination energy for the amide arm shows a large variation between the Y and In ions. Optimizations including water and guandinium moieties to approximate the effects of antibody binding indicate a large energy cost for the DOTA-chelated In to adopt the ideal conformation for antibody binding.

  6. Improving production of 11C to achieve high specific labelled radiopharmaceuticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savio, E.; García, O.; Trindade, V.; Buccino, P.; Giglio, J.; Balter, H.; Engler, H.

    2012-12-01

    Molecular imaging is usually based on the recognition by the radiopharmaceuticals of specific sites which are present in limited number or density in the cells or biological tissues. Thus is of high importance to label the radiopharmaceuticals with high specific activity to be able to achieve a high target to non target ratio. The presence of carbon dioxide (CO2) from the air containing 98,88% of 12C and 1,12% 13C compete with 11CO2 produced at the cyclotron. In order to minimize the presence of these isotopes along the process of irradiation, transferring and synthesis of radiopharmaceuticals labelled with 11C, we applied this method: previous to the irradiation the target was 3-4 times flushed with He (5.7) as a cold cleaning, followed by a similar conditioning of the line, from the target up to the module, and finally a hot cleaning in order to desorb 12CO2 and 13CO2, this was performed by irradiation during 1 min at 5 uA (3 times). In addition, with the aim of improving quality of gases in the target and in the modules, water traps (Agilent) were incorporated in the inlet lines of the target and modules. Target conditioning process (cold and hot flushings) as well as line cleaning, allowing the desorption of unlabelled CO2, together with the increasing of gas purity in the irradiation and in the synthesis, were critical parameters that enable to achieve 11C-radiopharamaceuticals with high specific activity, mainly in the case of 11C-PIB.

  7. Trends in the utilization of nuclear medicine and radiopharmaceuticals in an aging population.

    PubMed

    Hung, Mao-Chin; Hwang, Jeng-Jong

    2016-08-05

    To investigate the trends in the utilization of nuclear medicine procedures and radiopharmaceuticals in an aging population and to establish the prediction models. Based on Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database, a longitudinal study was conducted from 2000 to 2012. Descriptive statistics were adopted to analyze the frequencies and distributions of nuclear medicine procedures. Multiple linear regression analysis was applied to establish the prediction model for the utilization of nuclear medicine. The utilization of myocardial perfusion imaging increased most significantly, i.e. 250 per million population (pmp) increment annually, followed by the whole-body bone scan (176 pmp) and whole-body PET scan (100 pmp) in Taiwan during the period of 2000-2012. The use rate of nuclear medicine procedure which the first quartile (Q1) of age at examination above 35 years fits the regression model: Use rate expected year = 0.03 Q1 of age at examination × use rate baseline year + 14797 life expectancy expected year / life expectancy baseline year - 15030. Adversely, the use rate of procedure which Q1 of age at examination below 35 years fits the model: Use rate expected year = 0.01 Q1 of age at examination × use rate baseline year - 4565 life expectancy expected year / life expectancy baseline year + 4749. In addition, the similar models were found in the applications of radiopharmaceuticals. This study demonstrates the age at examination and life expectancy can be used to predict the utilities of nuclear medicine procedures and radiopharmaceuticals in an aging population. Nuclear medicine practice applied in the geriatrics would increase significantly with the aging of population.

  8. Quality control of 99mTc-radiopharmaceuticals. Evaluation of GCS minicolumns in routine clinical work with scintillation cameras.

    PubMed

    Darte, L; Persson, B R

    1980-12-01

    Gel chromatography columnm scanning (GCS) is a rapid and reliable method for the quality control of 99mTc-radiopharmaceuticals. With this method the labelled compound and various impurities such as free pertechnetate, hydrolyzed reduced technetium or other 99mTc-complexes are obtained in one testing procedure. Using minicolumns results can be obtained with a simple testing procedure within a few minutes after the sample is taken; this is significant in routine radiopharmaceutical work. The resolution of the recording system is important, so as to be able to utilize fully the good separation ability of the minicolumn. Minicolumns were studied with some commonly used radiopharmaceuticals. A scintillation camera was used to record minicolumn data under various conditions and the results were conpared to those obtained using a scanner to reveal optimal recording conditions for the scintillation camera.

  9. The Radiopharmaceuticals Production and Research Centre established by the Heavy Ion Laboratory of the University of Warsaw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choiński, J.; Jastrzębskia, J.; Kilian, K.; Mazur, I.; Napiorkowski, P. J.; Pękal, A.; Szczepaniak, D.

    2014-03-01

    The Radiopharmaceuticals Production and Research Centre was recently installed on the premises of the Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw. Equipped with a medical PETtrace p/d cyclotron , radiochemistry synthesis and dispensing units and a modern quality control laboratory the Centre is intended to produce regularly for commercial purposes the classic PET radiopharmaceuticals ( such -as e.g. FDG- ). Situated on the largest Warsaw scientific campus OCHOTA, an important part of the Centre's activities will also be devoted to the production of known species for preclinical studies and research into innovative radiopharmaceuticals in collaboration with other scientific units of this Campus as well as with members of the Warsaw Consortium for PET Collaboration. Research into the accelerator production route of 99mTc will also begin shortly.

  10. Radio-UHPLC: a tool for rapidly determining the radiochemical purity of technetium-99m radiopharmaceuticals?

    PubMed

    Kryza, David; Janier, Marc

    2013-08-01

    Determining the radiochemical purity (RCP) of technetium-99m ((99m)Tc) radiopharmaceuticals using the method described in the package insert is a time-consuming process, requiring particular attention in order to achieve accurate RCP results. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether radio-ultra high performance liquid chromatography (radio-UHPLC) may be an alternative method for RCP testing of (99m)Tc-tetrofosmin, (99m)Tc-MAG3 and (99m)Tc-sestamibi. Results obtained using radio-UHPLC were in excellent agreement with the standard method, with total analysis time being reduced to less than 3 min.

  11. High--valent technetium chemistry-new opportunities for radiopharmaceutical developments.

    PubMed

    Braband, Henrik

    2014-04-01

    The rich coordination chemistry of (99m) Tc distinguishes this radiometal from other radiolabels applied for single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) or positron emission tomography (PET). This potential should be used to create novel opportunities for the development of effective imaging probes. In this context, the field of high-valent technetium chemistry has received much interest. It has been shown that fac-{(99m) TcO3 }(+) complexes are potential new synthons for radiopharmaceutical developments, due to their unique physicochemical properties and unprecedented reactivity. In this article, recent developments and the 'state of the art' in this field of technetium chemistry will be reviewed comprehensively.

  12. Proliferation dangers associated with nuclear medicine: getting weapons-grade uranium out of radiopharmaceutical production.

    PubMed

    Williams, Bill; Ruff, Tilman A

    2007-01-01

    Abolishing the threat of nuclear war requires the outlawing of nuclear weapons and dismantling current nuclear weapon stockpiles, but also depends on eliminating access to fissile material (nuclear weapon fuel). The near-universal use of weapons-grade, highly enriched uranium (HEU) to produce radiopharmaceuticals is a significant proliferation hazard. Health professionals have a strategic opportunity and obligation to progress the elimination of medically-related commerce in HEU, closing one of the most vulnerable pathways to the much-feared 'terrorist bomb'.

  13. A Generator-Produced Gallium-68 Radiopharmaceutical for PET Imaging of Myocardial Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vijay; Sivapackiam, Jothilingam; Harpstrite, Scott E.; Prior, Julie L.; Gu, Hannah; Rath, Nigam P.; Piwnica-Worms, David

    2014-01-01

    Lipophilic cationic technetium-99m-complexes are widely used for myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). However, inherent uncertainties in the supply chain of molybdenum-99, the parent isotope required for manufacturing 99Mo/99mTc generators, intensifies the need for discovery of novel MPI agents incorporating alternative radionuclides. Recently, germanium/gallium (Ge/Ga) generators capable of producing high quality 68Ga, an isotope with excellent emission characteristics for clinical PET imaging, have emerged. Herein, we report a novel 68Ga-complex identified through mechanism-based cell screening that holds promise as a generator-produced radiopharmaceutical for PET MPI. PMID:25353349

  14. Refurbishing of a Freeze Drying Machine, used in Nuclear Medicine for Radiopharmaceuticals Production

    SciTech Connect

    Gaytan-Gallardo, E.; Desales-Galeana, G.

    2006-09-08

    The refurbishing of a freeze drying machine used in the radiopharmaceuticals production, applied in nuclear medicine in the Radioactive Materials Department of the Nuclear Research National Institute in Mexico (ININ in Spanish), is presented. The freeze drying machine was acquired in the 80's decade and some components started having problems. Then it was necessary to refurbish this equipment by changing old cam-type temperature controllers and outdated recording devices, developing a sophisticated software system that substitutes those devices. The system is composed by a freeze drying machine by Hull, AC output modules for improved temperature control, a commercial data acquisition card, and the software system.

  15. USCEA/NIST measurement assurance programs for the radiopharmaceutical and nuclear power industries

    SciTech Connect

    Golas, D.B.

    1993-12-31

    In cooperation with the U.S. Council for Energy Awareness (USCEA), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) supervises and administers two measurement assurance programs for radioactivity measurement traceability. One, in existence since the mid 1970s, provides traceability to suppliers of radiochemicals and radiopharmaceuticals, dose calibrators, and nuclear pharmacy services. The second program, begun in 1987, provides traceability to the nuclear power industry for utilities, source suppliers, and service laboratories. Each program is described, and the results of measurements of samples of known, but undisclosed activity, prepared at NIST and measured by the participants are presented.

  16. A generator-produced gallium-68 radiopharmaceutical for PET imaging of myocardial perfusion.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vijay; Sivapackiam, Jothilingam; Harpstrite, Scott E; Prior, Julie L; Gu, Hannah; Rath, Nigam P; Piwnica-Worms, David

    2014-01-01

    Lipophilic cationic technetium-99m-complexes are widely used for myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). However, inherent uncertainties in the supply chain of molybdenum-99, the parent isotope required for manufacturing 99Mo/99mTc generators, intensifies the need for discovery of novel MPI agents incorporating alternative radionuclides. Recently, germanium/gallium (Ge/Ga) generators capable of producing high quality 68Ga, an isotope with excellent emission characteristics for clinical PET imaging, have emerged. Herein, we report a novel 68Ga-complex identified through mechanism-based cell screening that holds promise as a generator-produced radiopharmaceutical for PET MPI.

  17. Refurbishing of a Freeze Drying Machine, used in Nuclear Medicine for Radiopharmaceuticals Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaytán-Gallardo, E.; Desales-Galeana, G.

    2006-09-01

    The refurbishing of a freeze drying machine used in the radiopharmaceuticals production, applied in nuclear medicine in the Radioactive Materials Department of the Nuclear Research National Institute in México (ININ in Spanish), is presented. The freeze drying machine was acquired in the 80's decade and some components started having problems. Then it was necessary to refurbish this equipment by changing old cam-type temperature controllers and outdated recording devices, developing a sophisticated software system that substitutes those devices. The system is composed by a freeze drying machine by Hull, AC output modules for improved temperature control, a commercial data acquisition card, and the software system.

  18. Reliability of eye lens dosimetry in workers of a positron emission tomography radiopharmaceutical production facility.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Teógenes A; Guimarães, Margarete C; Meireles, Leonardo S; Teles, Luciana L D; Lacerda, Marco Aurélio S

    2016-11-01

    A new regulatory statement was issued concerning the eye lens radiation protection of persons in planned exposures. A debate was raised on the adequacy of the dosimetric quantity and on its method of measurement. The aim of this work was to establish the individual monitoring procedure with the EYE-D™ holder and a MCP-N LiF:Mg,Cu,P thermoluminescent chip detector for measuring the personal dose equivalent Hp(3) in workers of a Positron Emission Tomography Radiopharmaceutical Production Facility.

  19. Guidance on current good radiopharmacy practice (cGRPP) for the small-scale preparation of radiopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Elsinga, Philip; Todde, Sergio; Penuelas, Ivan; Meyer, Geerd; Farstad, Brit; Faivre-Chauvet, Alain; Mikolajczak, Renata; Westera, Gerrit; Gmeiner-Stopar, Tanja

    2010-01-01

    This guidance is meant as a guidance to Part B of the EANM “Guidelines on Good Radiopharmacy Practice (GRPP)” issued by the Radiopharmacy Committee of the EANM (see www.eanm.org), covering the small-scale “in house” preparation of radiopharmaceuticals which are not kit procedures. The aim is to provide more detailed and practice-oriented guidance to those who are involved in the small-scale preparation of, for example, PET, therapeutic or other radiopharmaceuticals which are not intended for commercial purposes or distribution. PMID:20306035

  20. [The 35th Report on Survey of the Adverse Reaction to Radiopharmaceuticals (the 38th Survey in 2012)].

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Hiroshi; Arano, Yasushi; Okazawa, Hidehiko; Mizumura, Sunao; Yokoyama, Kunihiko; Yoshimura, Mana

    2014-02-01

    This survey was performed in order to investigate the incidence of adverse reactions to radiopharmaceuticals in FY2012 in Japan. It was based on responses to questionnaires sent to nuclear medicine institutions. The reply was obtained from 977 institutions among 1,251 to which the questionnaire had been sent. Eleven cases of adverse reactions were reported. A total of 1,060,526 radiopharmaceutical administrations was reported. The incidence of adverse reactions per 100,000 cases was 1.0. One case of defect products was reported, and the incidence of defect products per 100,000 cases was 0.1.

  1. Pharmacokinetics of ambroxol and clenbuterol tablets in healthy Chinese volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yong-Ge; Song, Li-Xue; Jiang, Nan; Xu, Xue-Ting; Di, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the pharmacokinetics of Ambroxol and Clenbuterol Tablets in Chinese healthy volunteers after a single or multiple dosages oral administration. Methods: A total of 9 healthy adult subjects were given Ambroxol and Clenbuterol Tablets in a single dosage or multiple dosages respectively. LC/MS/MS were used for the determination of Ambroxol and Clenbuterol of in plasma. The important pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by DAS 2.0 software (compartment model). Results: Single and multiple dosage groups of Ambroxol and Clenbuterol were all fitted two-compartment model. The pharmacokinetics fitted first order kinetics process. No difference in pharmacokinetics of Ambroxol in single and multiple dosage groups volunteers was observed, Which showed no marked changes, suggesting that multiple dosing did not influence the velocity of drug metabolism. Moreover, parameters of Clenbuterol had significant difference between the single and multiple dosage groups (P<0.05), showing there was accumulation in the body. 9 subjects had completed single or multiple dosages oral administration test, with no adverse drug reactions appeared during the test. Conclusion: There was no obvious accumulation of Ambroxol after repeated dosing. But obvious accumulation of Clenbuterol was noted in multiple-dose administration. The established method is sensitive, accurate, reliable and specific, and it can meet the requirement of clinical pharmacokinetic trial. PMID:26770490

  2. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, Lakshmi; Cintron, Nitza M.

    1990-01-01

    The Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics Panel met on 29-30 Aug. 1988 at the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston, Texas to discuss pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic implications of space flight and make recommendations for operational and research strategies. Based on the knowledge available on the physiological changes that occur during space flight, the dependence of pharmacokinetics on physiological factors, and the therapeutic requirements for future space missions, the panel made several recommendations for research. It was suggested that using medications available with a large (wide) therapeutic window will avoid unforeseen therapeutic consequences during flight. The sequence for conducting research was outlined as follows: (1) identify ground-based simulation models (e.g., antiorthostatic bed rest) for conducting pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic research; (2) estimate parametric changes in these models using pharmacologic agents that have different pharmacokinetic characteristics and a narrow therapeutic index; (3) verify these findings during flight; and (4) develop and identify appropriate and effective drug delivery systems, dosage forms, and regimens. The panel recommended gaining a thorough understanding of the pharmacokinetic deviations of medications that have a narrow therapeutic index (e.g. cardiovascular drugs and sedative hypnotics) in order to ensure safe and effective treatment during flight with these agents. It was also suggested that basic information on physiological factors such as organ blood flow, protein composition and binding, tissue distribution, and metabolism by hepatic enzymes must be accumulated by conducting ground-based animal and human studies using models of weightlessness. This information will be useful to construct and identify physiologically based pharmacokinetic models that can provide valuable information on the pharmacodynamic consequences of space flight and aid in identifying appropriate therapeutic

  3. Low energy cyclotron production and separation of yttrium-86 for evaluation of monoclonal antibody pharmacokinetics and dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Shoner, S.; Link, J.; Krohn, K.; Schlyer, D.

    1999-06-01

    Although an excellent radionuclide for application to systemic isotopic therapy when complexed to various monoclonal antibodies, the lack of photon emission from yttrium-90 makes the determination of the pharmacokinetics and dosimetry of the resultant radiopharmaceutical difficult. The introduction of the positron-emitting radionuclide yttrium-86 (T{sub 1/2}=14.7&hthinsp;h,&hthinsp;{beta}{sup +}=33{percent}) provides the non-invasive quantitation for the biodistribution of the chelated complex. The yttrium-86 radionuclide is produced at Memorial Sloan-Kettering using the CS-15 cyclotron via the (p,n) nuclear reaction on an enriched strontium-86 target. The separation is effectively achieved through a combination of solvent extraction and ion exchange chromatography. Once investigational new drug approval has been received, the mixed nuclides, Y-90 and Y-86, are to be used to formulate the HuM195 labeled monoclonal antibody, a radiopharmaceutical under active investigation against hematopoietic progenitor cells. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Microfluidic reactor geometries for radiolysis reduction in radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Rensch, Christian; Waengler, Bjoern; Yaroshenko, Andriy; Samper, Victor; Baller, Marko; Heumesser, Nicole; Ulin, Johan; Riese, Stefan; Reischl, Gerald

    2012-08-01

    Autoradiolysis describes the degradation of radioactively labeled compounds due to the activity of the labeled compounds themselves. It scales with activity concentration and is of importance for high activity and microfluidic PET tracer synthesis. This study shows that microfluidic devices can be shaped to reduce autoradiolysis by geometric exclusion of positron interaction. A model is developed and confirmed by demonstrating in-capillary storage of non-stabilized [(18)F]FDG (2-[(18)F]Fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose) at max. 23 GBq/ml while maintaining >90% radiochemical purity over 14 h. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Development of copper based drugs, radiopharmaceuticals and medical materials.

    PubMed

    Szymański, Paweł; Frączek, Tomasz; Markowicz, Magdalena; Mikiciuk-Olasik, Elżbieta

    2012-12-01

    Copper is one of the most interesting elements for various biomedical applications. Copper compounds show vast array of biological actions, including anti-inflammatory, anti-proliferative, biocidal and other. It also offers a selection of radioisotopes, suitable for nuclear imaging and radiotherapy. Quick progress in nanotechnology opened new possibilities for design of copper based drugs and medical materials. To date, copper has not found many uses in medicine, but number of ongoing research, as well as preclinical and clinical studies, will most likely lead to many novel applications of copper in the near future.

  6. Pharmacokinetics Application in Biophysics Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millet, Philippe; Lemoigne, Yves

    Among the available computerised tomography devices, the Positron Emission Tomography (PET) has the advantage to be sensitive to pico-molar concentrations of radiotracers inside living matter. Devices adapted to small animal imaging are now commercially available and allow us to study the function rather than the structure of living tissues by in vivo analysis. PET methodology, from the physics of electron-positron annihilation to the biophysics involved in tracers, is treated by other authors in this book. The basics of coincidence detection, image reconstruction, spatial resolution and sensitivity are discussed in the paper by R. Ott. The use of compartment analysis combined with pharmacokinetics is described here to illustrate an application to neuroimaging and to show how parametric imaging can bring insight on the in vivo bio-distribution of a radioactive tracer with small animal PET scanners. After reporting on the use of an intracerebral β+ radiosensitive probe (βP), we describe a small animal PET experiment used to measure the density of 5HT 1 a receptors in rat brain.

  7. Comparative evaluation of glutamate-sensitive radiopharmaceuticals: Technetium-99m-glutamic acid and technetium-99m-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-bis(glutamate) conjugate for tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Kakkar, Dipti; Tiwari, Anjani K; Chuttani, Krishna; Kaul, Ankur; Singh, Harpal; Mishra, Anil K

    2010-12-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography has become a significant imaging modality with huge potential to visualize and provide information of anatomic dysfunctions that are predictive of future diseases. This imaging tool is complimented by radiopharmaceuticals/radiosubstrates that help in imaging specific physiological aspects of the human body. The present study was undertaken to explore the utility of technetium-99m (⁹⁹(m)Tc)-labeled glutamate conjugates for tumor scintigraphy. As part of our efforts to further utilize the application of chelating agents, glutamic acid was conjugated with a multidentate ligand, diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA). The DTPA-glutamate conjugate [DTPA-bis(Glu)] was well characterized by IR, NMR, and mass spectroscopy. The biological activity of glutamic acid was compared with its DTPA conjugate by radiocomplexation with ⁹⁹(m)Tc (labeling efficiency ≥98%). In vivo studies of both the radiolabeled complexes ⁹⁹(m)Tc-Glu and ⁹⁹(m)Tc-DTPA-bis(Glu) were then carried out, followed by gamma scintigraphy in New Zealand albino rabbits. Improved serum stability of ⁹⁹(m)Tc-labeled DTPA conjugate indicated that ⁹⁹(m)Tc remained bound to the conjugate up to 24 hours. Blood clearance showed a relatively slow washout of the DTPA conjugate when compared with the labeled glutamate. Biodistribution characteristics of the conjugate in Balb/c mice revealed that DTPA conjugation of glutamic acid favors less accumulation in the liver and bone and rapid renal clearance. Tumor scintigraphy in mice showed increasing tumor accumulation, stable up to 4 hours. These preliminary studies show that ⁹⁹(m)Tc-DTPA-bis(Glu) can be a useful radiopharmaceutical for diagnostic applications in single-photon emission computed tomography imaging.

  8. Synthesis and in vitro/in vivo evaluation of novel mono- and trivalent technetium-99m labeled ghrelin peptide complexes as potential diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Koźmiński, Przemysław; Gniazdowska, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Ghrelin is an endogenous hormone present in blood. It is released from the oxyntic cells (X/A-like cells) of the stomach and fundus and can exist in two forms: as an acylated and des-acylated ghrelin. Ghrelin is an endogenous ligand of the growth hormone receptor (growth hormone secretagogue receptor, GHS-R). Overexpression of GHS-R1a receptor was identified in cells of different types of tumors (e.g. pituitary adenoma, neuroendocrine tumors of the thyroid, lung, breast, gonads, prostate, stomach, colorectal, endocrine and non-endocrine pancreatic tumors). This fact suggests that gamma radionuclide labeled ghrelin peptide may be considered as a potential diagnostic radiopharmaceutical. Ghrelin peptide labeled with mono- and trivalent technetium-99m complexes, (99m)Tc-Lys-GHR, has been prepared on the n.c.a. scale. The physicochemical (stability, charge, shape, lipophilicity) and biological (receptor affinity, biodistribution) properties of the conjugates have been studied relevant to use the conjugates as receptor-based diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals. The obtained conjugates [(99m)Tc(CO)3LN,O(CN-Lys-GHR)](+), (99m)Tc(CO)3LS,O(CN-Lys-GHR) and (99m)Tc(NS3)(CN-Lys-GHR) show different shape, charge, lipophilicity and two of them, (99m)Tc(CO)3LS,O(CN-Lys-GHR) and (99m)Tc(NS3)(CN-Lys-GHR), high stability in neutral aqueous solutions, even in the presence of excess concentration of histidine/cysteine competitive standard ligands or human serum. The in vitro binding affinity of (99m)Tc-Lys-GHR conjugates with respect to growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R1a) present on DU-145 cells was in the range of IC50 from 45 to 54 nM. The conjugate (99m)Tc(CO)3LS,O(CN-Lys-GHR) exhibited excretion route by the liver and kidney in comparable degree, while the more lipophilic conjugate (99m)Tc(NS3)(CN-Lys-GHR)-mainly by the liver. Basing on the results concerning physicochemical and biochemical properties, the conjugates (99m)Tc(CO)3LS,O(CN-Lys-GHR) and (99m)Tc(NS3)(CN

  9. Pharmacokinetic study of sulbactomax.

    PubMed

    Payasi, Anurag; Chaudhary, Manu; Gupta, Ankush; Dwivedi, Vivek Kumar; Bhatnagar, Anuj

    2010-08-01

    We have evaluated pharmacokinetics of a fixed dose combination (FDC) of ceftriaxone and sulbactam (2:1) or sulbactomax in eight healthy volunteers. A 1.5 g dose of sulbactomax, 1 g dose of ceftriaxone and 0.5 g sulbactam were given intravenously in a balanced two-ways cross-over study. Serially collected plasma sample was analyzed for ceftriaxone and sulbactam by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The mean peaks of ceftriaxone and sulbactam concentrations in plasma were 152.06+/-6.65 microg/ml and 21.32+/-1.80 microg/ml, respectively and plasma half-lives for ceftriaxone and sulbactam were 5.2+/-0.35 hr and 0.94+/-0.038 hr, respectively. The AUC0-24 for ceftriaxone and sulbactam was 760.16+/-27.68 microg.hr/ml and 20.74+/-2.34 microg.hr/ml, respectively, with elimination rate constant of 0.133+/-0.009 hr(-1) and 0.732+/-0.029 hr(-1), respectively. The kinetics of ceftriaxone and sulbactum did not change in combination as compared to the alone treatment. Also, concentration of the ceftriaxone after 24 hr is higher than the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the most of the gram positive and gram negative bacteria indicating that one dose in a day is sufficient to treat the disease caused by these organisms.

  10. Population pharmacokinetics of daptomycin.

    PubMed

    Dvorchik, Barry; Arbeit, Robert D; Chung, Julia; Liu, Susan; Knebel, William; Kastrissios, Helen

    2004-08-01

    Data from subjects in nine phase 1 (n = 153) and six phase 2/3 (n = 129) clinical trials were combined to identify factors contributing to interindividual variability in daptomycin pharmacokinetics (PK). Over 30 covariates were considered. A two-compartment model with first-order elimination provided the best fit for data on daptomycin concentrations in plasma over time. In the final population PK model, daptomycin plasma clearance (CL) was a function of renal function, body temperature, and sex. Of these factors, renal function contributed most significantly to interindividual variability. CL varied linearly with the estimated creatinine clearance. CL among dialysis subjects was approximately one-third that of healthy subjects (0.27 versus 0.81 liter/h). CL in females was 80% that in males; however, in clinical trials, the outcome was not affected by sex and therefore this effect is not considered clinically meaningful. The relationship with body temperature should be interpreted cautiously since the analysis included only a limited number of subjects who were hyperthermic. The volume of distribution of the peripheral compartment (V2) and intercompartmental clearance (Q) were linearly related to body weight. V2 increased approximately twofold in the presence of an acute infection. No factors were identified that significantly impacted V1. This analysis supports the dosing of daptomycin on a milligram-per-kilogram-of-body-weight basis and suggests that modified dosing regimens are indicated for patients with severe renal disease and for those undergoing dialysis.

  11. Evaluation of a measurement system for Uranium electrodeposition control to radiopharmaceuticals production

    SciTech Connect

    Tufic Madi Filho; Adonis Marcelo Saliba Silva; Jose Patricio Nahuel Cardenas; Maria da Conceicao Costa Pereira; Valdir Maciel Lopes; Alexandre, P. S.; Diogo, F. S.; Rafael, T. P.; Vitor, O. A; Anderson, F. L.; Lucas, R. S.; Brianna, S.; Eduardo, L. C.

    2015-07-01

    For 2016, studies by international bodies forecast a crisis in the supply of Molybdenum ({sup 99}Mo), which is the generator of {sup 99m}Tc, widely used for medical diagnoses and treatments. As a result, many countries are making efforts to prevent this crisis. Brazil is developing the Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor (RMB) project, under the responsibility of the National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN). The RMB is a nuclear reactor for research and production of radioisotopes used in the production of radiopharmaceuticals and radioactive sources, broadly used in industrial and research areas in Brazil. Electrodeposition of uranium is a common practice to create samples for alpha spectrometry and this methodology may be an alternative way to produce targets of low enriched uranium (LEU) to fabricate radiopharmaceuticals, as {sup 99}Mo, used for cancer diagnosis. To study the electrodeposition, a solution of 10 mM uranyl nitrate, in 2-propanol, containing uranium enriched to 2.4% in {sup 235}U, with pH = 1, was prepared and measurements with an alpha spectrometer were performed. These studies are justified by the need to produce {sup 99}Mo since, despite using molybdenum in bulk, Brazil is totally dependent on its import. In this project, we intend to obtain a process that may be technologically feasible to control the radiation targets for {sup 99}Mo production. (authors)

  12. Radiopharmaceuticals for radiation synovectomy: Evaluation of two yttrium-90 particulate agents

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M.A.; Chinol, M.

    1989-06-01

    Radiation synovectomy, a noninvasive therapeutic alternative to surgical synovectomy, has not gained widespread acceptance in the United States because of the lack of a suitable radiopharmaceutical. Two new radioactive particles, (/sup 90/Y)Ca oxalate and (/sup 90/Y)ferric hydroxide macroaggregates (FHMA), were developed in our laboratory and evaluated for size, stability, and joint leakage. More than 90% of the (/sup 90/Y)Ca oxalate particles were in the optimal size range of 1-10 microns, and the unbound activity in serum and synovial fluid was 3.7% to 5.0%. Following injection in rabbit knees, leakage of (/sup 90/Y)Ca oxalate was 5 +/- 2%, with localization primarily in the bone and virtually no uptake by the lymph nodes or liver. Yttrium-90 FHMA particles were larger (95% greater than 10 microns), and at least on a microscopic level, appeared to distribute homogeneously over the articular surface. Leakage of (/sup 90/Y)FHMA was initially less but eventually slightly exceeded that of (/sup 90/Y)Ca oxalate. Nevertheless, both radiopharmaceuticals can provide a satisfactory therapeutic dose to the knee with less than half the leakage and a marked reduction in absorbed dose to nontarget tissues compared to previously tested agents. Ease of preparation, physical characteristics of the /sup 90/Y beta ray, and apparent lack of substantial leakage from the joint make these agents extremely attractive for clinical evaluation in rheumatoid arthritis patients who are unresponsive to medical therapy.

  13. 11C=O Bonds Made Easily for Positron Emission Tomography Radiopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Rotstein, Benjamin H.; Liang, Steven H.; Placzek, Michael S.; Hooker, Jacob M.; Gee, Antony D.; Dollé, Frédéric; Wilson, Alan A.; Vasdev, Neil

    2016-01-01

    The positron-emitting radionuclide carbon-11 (11C, t1/2 = 20.3 minutes) possesses the unique potential for radiolabeling of any biological, naturally occurring, or synthetic organic molecule for in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Carbon-11 is most often incorporated into small molecules by methylation of alcohol, thiol, amine or carboxylic acid precursors using [11C]methyl iodide or [11C]methyl triflate (generated from [11C]CO2). Consequently, small molecules that lack an easily substituted 11C-methyl group are often considered to have non-obvious strategies for radiolabeling and require a more customized approach. [11C]Carbon dioxide, [11C]carbon monoxide, [11C]cyanide, and [11C]phosgene represent alternative carbon-11 reactants to enable 11C-carbonylation. Methodologies developed for preparation of 11C-carbonyl groups have had a tremendous impact on the development of novel PET radiopharmaceuticals and provided key tools for clinical research. 11C-Carbonyl radiopharmaceuticals based on labeled carboxylic acids, amides, carbamates, and ureas now account for a substantial number of important imaging agents that have seen translation to higher species and clinical research of previously inaccessible targets, which is a testament to the creativity, utility, and practicality of the underlying radiochemistry. PMID:27276357

  14. European regulatory framework on the use and development of pharmaceuticals and radiopharmaceuticals for pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Mensonides-Harsema, Marguérite; Otte, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    A survey in 2000 revealed that only about 30% of the prescriptions in the European pediatric population were on the basis of evidence-based medicine (EbM). Less for radiopharmaceuticals and principally for diagnostics, radiologists throughout Europe are referred to the pediatric guidelines of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM), as none of the frequently used tracers have been evaluated in clinical trials in the different pediatric subgroups. Following a resolution to address the lack of EbM in children, the European Commission published the Pediatric Regulation EC 1901/2006 and its amendment EC 1902/2006, effective from 2007. This regulation foresees the development of evidence-based medicine in the pediatric population. This is effected through a set of principles like the mandatory pediatric investigation plan (PIP) to be included with the market authorization application (MAA), and the pediatric use market authorization (PUMA) for off-patent pharmaceuticals, and to a very small part radiopharmaceuticals with funding possibilities for pediatric-specific research through the 7th Framework Programme (7FP) of the European Union.

  15. In-process 20-minute endotoxin "limit test" for positron emission tomography radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Hung, Joseph C

    2006-01-01

    To discuss various issues related to the in-process 20-minute endotoxin "limit test" (20-minute bacterial endotoxin test [BET]) per the United Stated Pharmacopeia (USP) general chapter <823>, "Radiopharmaceuticals for Positron Emission Tomography--Compounding". The online version of 2005 USP, and other relevant articles from the published biomedical literature. The minimum endotoxin level to be used for the positive controls, minimum allowable volume for administration, procedure and interpretation of the above test, and whether the 20-minute BET is required and suitable for use with any positron emission tomography (PET) radiopharmaceutical labeled with a radionuclide having a physical half-life less than 20 minutes are discussed in this article. Neither the current USP nor other publications related to the performance of the 20-minute BET provide complete detailed information or explanation with regard to the issues discussed. To allow end users to accurately and, more importantly, faithfully execute the above testing, specific information needs to be made readily available concerning the 20-minute BET.

  16. Dose rate measurements from radiopharmaceuticals: implications for nuclear medicine staff and for children with radioactive parents.

    PubMed

    Greaves, C D; Tindale, W B

    1999-02-01

    Following the introduction of a number of radiopharmaceuticals, we assessed the dose received by staff working in the nuclear medicine department and also by children who may be in close contact with a radioactive parent. We measured departure dose rates (microSv.h-1) at distances of 0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 m from the skin surface at the level of the thyroid, chest and bladder of patients undergoing the following nuclear medicine procedures: MUGA scans using 99Tcm-labelled red blood cells, myocardial perfusion scans using 99Tcm-labelled radiopharmaceuticals, lymphoscintigraphy using colloidal 99Tcm (Re) sulphide, bone scans using 99Tcm-labelled oxidronate, 111In-octreotide scans, 111In-labelled leukocyte studies and cardiac reinjection studies using 201Tl. The maximum dose rates at 0.1 m were those from MUGA studies (167.3 microSv.h-1) and myocardial perfusion studies (one-day protocol = 391.7 microSv.h-1, two-day protocol = 121.8 microSv.h-1). The implications of these dose rates on both technical and nursing staff are assessed. Also, the dose received by an infant in close contact with a parent following a nuclear medicine investigation was estimated.

  17. Relationship between lipophilicity and brain extraction of C-11-labeled radiopharmaceuticals. [Baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Dischino, D.D.; Welch, M.J.; Kilbourn, M.R.; Raichle, M.E.

    1983-11-01

    The brain extraction of fifteen C-11-labeled compounds during a single capillary transit was studied in adult baboons by external detection of these tracers after injection into the internal carotid artery. The log P/sub oct/ (partition coefficient for octanol/water) values of these compounds range from -0.7 to greater than 4.0. A parabolic relationship was found between the log P/sub oct/value of the C-11-labeled compounds and the fraction of the radiopharmaceutical entering the brain. Compounds with log P/sub oct/ values between 0.9 and 2.5 were found to pass freely across the blood-brain barrier at a cerebral blood flow of 100 ml-min/sup -1/-hg/sup -1/. An apparently decreased extraction of very lipophilic compounds was shown to be related to binding of the tracer to blood components and macromolecules (red blood cells, albumin, etc.). These data suggest that a radiopharmaceutical designed to measure blood flow should have a log P/sub oct/ value of between 0.9 and 2.5.

  18. Technetium-99m-alendronate: a new radiopharmaceutical for bone scanning.

    PubMed

    Arteaga de Murphy, C; Meléndez-Alafort, L; Montoya-Molina, C; Sepúlveda-Méndez, J

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report the preparation of a new technetium-99m-radiopharmaceutical for bone scanning. The chelating agent for 99mTc is a new bisphosphonate, alendronate, 4-amino-1-hydroxy-butylidene-1, 1-bisphosphonate (ABP) used as a treatment for osteoporosis. ABP, because of its amino group, seems to be better suited to form a strong and stable complex with technetium-99m and therefore might be better than 99mTc-etidronate (HEDP) or 99mTc-medronate (MDP) for bone scanning. A sterile dry kit containing APB, a reducing agent and a stabilizer was prepared. The parameters studied were molar concentrations, pH, shelf life, labeling efficiency and radiochemical purity. The oven dried sterile kit was formulated with 5 mg ABP, 0.25 mg stannous fluoride and 0.025 mg gentisic acid at pH 2.5-3.5. The labeling efficiency with 20-1500 MBq of pertechnetate (99mTcO4-) was over 95% at room temperature and was stable for 5 h. Technetium-99m-alendronate was tested in two rabbits and it proved to be a promising new radiopharmaceutical for bone scanning. Work is underway to study 99mTc-ABP biodistribution in a statistically significant number of laboratory animals and, later on, to determine radiopharmacokinetic parameters in normal volunteers.

  19. SPECT radiopharmaceuticals for imaging chronic inflammatory diseases in the last decade.

    PubMed

    Anzola, L K; Galli, F; Dierckx, R A

    2015-06-01

    In the recent years, many radiopharmaceuticals have been described for the diagnosis of inflammatory chronic diseases. Several peptides, receptor ligands and monoclonal antibodies have been radiolabelled, allowing in-vivo visualization of inflammatory processes at a cellular and molecular level. The labelling of cytokines such as interleukin-1, interleukin-2, interleukin-12 and MCP-1 has facilitated the identification of inflamed synovia in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, active Crohn's disease, vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques and other targets. The possibility of using monoclonal antibodies against TNF-α, CD2, CD3, CD4 and anti-selectin has not only allowed the localization of inflamed sites but had also a significant impact in helping the selection of patients who can benefit from biological therapies. Regarding radiolabelled peptides, it is important to highlight the increasing use of somatostatin analogues targeting somatostatin receptors in inflammatory diseases, particularly for rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren syndrome and autoimmune thyroid diseases. In the present review we describe the state of the art of SPECT radiopharmaceuticals to image chronic inflammatory diseases.

  20. Population pharmacokinetics. A regulatory perspective.

    PubMed

    Sun, H; Fadiran, E O; Jones, C D; Lesko, L; Huang, S M; Higgins, K; Hu, C; Machado, S; Maldonado, S; Williams, R; Hossain, M; Ette, E I

    1999-07-01

    The application of population approaches to drug development is recommended in several US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidance documents. Population pharmacokinetic (and pharmacodynamic) techniques enable identification of the sources of inter- and intra-individual variability that impinge upon drug safety and efficacy. This article briefly discusses the 2-stage approach to the estimation of population pharmacokinetic parameters, which requires serial multiple measurements on each participant, and comprehensively reviews the nonlinear mixed-effects modelling approach, which can be applied in situations where extensive sampling is not done on all or any of the participants. Certain preliminary information, such as the compartment model used in describing the pharmacokinetics of the drug, is required for a population pharmacokinetic study. The practical design considerations of the location of sampling times, number of samples/participants and the need to sample an individual more than once should be borne in mind. Simulation may be useful for choosing the study design that will best meet study objectives. The objectives of the population pharmacokinetic study can be secondary to the objectives of the primary clinical study (in which case an add-on population pharmacokinetic protocol may be needed) or primary (when a stand-alone protocol is required). Having protocols for population pharmacokinetic studies is an integral part of 'good pharmacometric practice'. Real-time data assembly and analysis permit an ongoing evaluation of site compliance with the study protocol and provide the opportunity to correct violations of study procedures. Adequate policies and procedures should be in place for study blind maintenance. Real-time data assembly creates the opportunity for detecting and correcting errors in concentration-time data, drug administration history and covariate data. Population pharmacokinetic analyses may be undertaken in 3 interwoven steps: exploratory

  1. Rabbit as an animal model for intravitreal pharmacokinetics: Clinical predictability and quality of the published data.

    PubMed

    Del Amo, Eva M; Urtti, Arto

    2015-08-01

    Intravitreal administration is the method of choice in drug delivery to the retina and/or choroid. Rabbit is the most commonly used animal species in intravitreal pharmacokinetics, but it has been criticized as being a poor model of human eye. The critique is based on some anatomical differences, properties of the vitreous humor, and observed differences in drug concentrations in the anterior chamber after intravitreal injections. We have systematically analyzed all published information on intravitreal pharmacokinetics in the rabbit and human eye. The analysis revealed major problems in the design of the pharmacokinetic studies. In this review we provide advice for study design. Overall, the pharmacokinetic parameters (clearance, volume of distribution, half-life) in the human and rabbit eye have good correlation and comparable absolute values. Therefore, reliable rabbit-to-man translation of intravitreal pharmacokinetics should be feasible. The relevant anatomical and physiological parameters in rabbit and man show only small differences. Furthermore, the claimed discrepancy between drug concentrations in the human and rabbit aqueous humor is not supported by the data analysis. Based on the available and properly conducted pharmacokinetic studies, the differences in the vitreous structure in rabbits and human patients do not lead to significant pharmacokinetic differences. This review is the first step towards inter-species translation of intravitreal pharmacokinetics. More information is still needed to dissect the roles of drug delivery systems, disease states, age and ocular manipulation on the intravitreal pharmacokinetics in rabbit and man. Anyway, the published data and the derived pharmacokinetic parameters indicate that the rabbit is a useful animal model in intravitreal pharmacokinetics. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Considerations in the selection of radiopharmaceuticals for palliation of bone pain from metastatic osseous lesions.

    PubMed

    Bouchet, L G; Bolch, W E; Goddu, S M; Howell, R W; Rao, D V

    2000-04-01

    Bone pain is a common complication for terminal patients with bone metastases from prostate, lung, breast, and other malignancies. A multidisciplinary approach in treating bone pain is generally required, 1 which includes a combination of analgesic drug therapy, radiation therapy, hormonal therapy, and chemotherapy. Over the years, treatment of bone pain using bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals has been explored extensively. Pharmaceuticals labeled with energetic 1-particle emitters such as 32p, 89Sr, 153Sm, and 186Re, in addition to the low-energy electron emitter 117mSn, have been studied for this purpose. Bone-marrow toxicity as a consequence of chronic irradiation by the energetic , particles is a general problem associated with this form of treatment. It is therefore desirable to identify radiochemicals that minimize the dose to the bone marrow and at the same time deliver therapeutic doses to the bone. New S values (mean absorbed dose per unit cumulated activity) for target regions of human bone and marrow were used to ascertain the capacity of various radiochemicals to deliver a high bone dose while minimizing the marrow dose. The relative dosimetric advantage of a given radiopharmaceutical compared with a reference radiochemical was quantitated as a dosimetric relative advantage factor (RAF). Several radionuclides that emit energetic 1 particles (32p, 89Sr, 153Sm, 186Re, and 177Lu) and radionuclides that emit low-energy electrons or beta particles (169Er, 117mSn, and 33p) were evaluated. For these calculations, ratios of the cumulated activity in the bone relative to cumulated activity in the marrow alpha equal to 10 and 100 were used. When the radiopharmaceutical was assumed to be uniformly distributed in the endosteum and alpha was taken as 100 for both the reference and test radiochemicals, the RAF values compared with the reference radionuclide 32p were 1.0, 1.2, 1.4, 1.6, 1.7, 1.9, and 2.0 for 89Sr, 186Re, 153Sm, 177Lu, 169Er, 117mSn, and 33P

  3. New calculations for internal dosimetry of beta-emitting radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Zankl, M; Petoussi-Henss, N; Janzen, T; Uusijärvi, H; Schlattl, H; Li, W B; Giussani, A; Hoeschen, C

    2010-01-01

    The calculation of absorbed dose from internally incorporated radionuclides is based on the so-called specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) which represent the fraction of energy emitted in a given source region that is absorbed per unit mass in a specific target organ. Until recently, photon SAFs were calculated using MIRD-type mathematical phantoms. For electrons, the energy released was assumed to be absorbed locally ('ICRP 30 approach'). For this work, photon and electron SAFs were derived with Monte Carlo simulations in the new male voxel-based reference computational phantom adopted by the ICRP and ICRU. The present results show that the assumption of electrons being locally absorbed is not always true at energies above 300-500 keV. For source/target organ pairs in close vicinity, high-energy electrons escaping from the source organ may result in cross-fire electron SAFs in the same order of magnitude as those from photons. Examples of organ absorbed doses per unit activity are given for (18)F-choline and (123)I-iodide. The impact of the new electron SAFs used for absorbed dose calculations compared with the previously used assumptions was found to be small. The organ dose coefficients for the two approaches differ by not more than 6 % for most organs. Only for irradiation of the urinary bladder wall by activity in the contents, the ICRP 30 approach presents an overestimation of approximately 40-50%.

  4. Examination of energy spectrum acquisition method using shielded radiopharmaceutical syringes.

    PubMed

    Uto, Tomoyuki

    2009-09-20

    I previously reported on a spectrum sampling method with shielded syringes before use, although the report included only data obtained using technetium-99m. In this study, we sampled the energy spectrum in a similar manner using thallium-201, iodine-123, and gallium-67. In spectrum sampling, a radioisotopic source in a cylindrical shield is located midway between two opposed gamma-camera detectors equipped with collimators. An unshielded syringe before use emits excessive radiation and makes count rates too high to obtain accurate photopeak values. With a shielded syringe, we can sample the spectrum of radiation leaked from the needle side of the syringe and the unshielded part of its plunger side. Consequently, the detectors are exposed to lower-dose gamma rays and probably offer count rates appropriate to measure accurate photopeak values. The study results show the general validity of spectrum sampling and photopeak acquisition in our method. However, a syringe should be located accurately perpendicular to each detector; otherwise, gamma rays did not reach the detectors in some cases, resulting in measurement failures. In addition, when low-energy collimators are used for sampling from (123)I sources, photopeak values depend on penetration. More accurate measurements require the use of high-energy collimators.

  5. Influence of GST gene polymorphisms on busulfan pharmacokinetics in children.

    PubMed

    Ansari, M; Lauzon-Joset, J-F; Vachon, M-F; Duval, M; Théoret, Y; Champagne, M A; Krajinovic, M

    2010-02-01

    Busulfan (BU) is a key compound in conditioning myeloablative regimens for children undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). There are wide interindividual differences in BU pharmacokinetics, which increase the risk of veno-occlusive disease, graft rejection and disease relapse. As BU is mainly metabolized by glutathione S-transferase (GST), it is hypothesized that functional polymorphisms in GST genes may explain in part the variability in BU pharmacokinetics. We analyzed polymorphisms in GSTA1 (C-69T, A-513G, G-631T, C-1142G), GSTM1 (deletion) and GSTP1 (A1578G, C2293T) genes in 28 children undergoing HSCT. All patients had individualized dosing based on pharmacokinetics after the first dose of intravenous BU. GSTM1-null individuals had higher drug exposure (P(Cmax)=0.008; P(AUC)=0.003; P(Css)=0.02) and lower clearance (P(CL)=0.001). Multivariate regression models showed that, other than the drug dose and age, the GSTM1 genotype was the best predictor of first-dose pharmacokinetic variability. GSTM1-null patients also received lower cumulative BU doses (P=0.02). No association was found between BU exposure and major GSTA1 or GSTP1 gene variants. In children, GSTM1 polymorphism seems to modify BU pharmacokinetics after intravenous drug administration.

  6. Harvard--MIT research program in short-lived radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-03-01

    This report describes progress on five projects. The first project showed a 1000 fold concentration of the cationic complex {sup 99m}Tc (MIBI) in heart cell mitochondria vs heart cell cytoplasm, as determined by high resolution electron probe microanalysis. Additional technetium-99m based complexes are being developed and tested. The second project involves evaluating technetium acetylacteonates as potential indicators of cerebral blood flow. An intermediate in the synthesis of a technetium porphyrin complex has been synthesized; an oxotechnetium(V)-2,4-pentanedione complex has been prepared and is currently being characterized. The third project involves using radio labelled antibodies for diagnosis and treatment of cancer. An early discovery was that chloramine-T based iodination protocols resulted in a reversal of the charge on mouse lgGs. Immunoperoxidase-labelled monoclonal antibody MOv 18 was shown to bind specifically to the most frequent ovarian aderon carcinomas, and not to healthy tissue, making this antibody a good candidate for immunotherapy or immunodetection. Work on a specific immunotherapy protocol suffered a setback when one reagent, a {sup 125}I-biotin complex, proved to be unstable in vivo. The fourth project involves labelling antibodies with positron emitting radionuclides. Radiofluorination was accomplished through reductive alkylation of {sup 18}F-aldehyde, or pentafluorophenyl esters. Radioiodination was accomplished using alkyl-tin derivation exchange. The fifth project examined antibody modification for use in radioimmune imaging. Technetium-99m-labelled lgG was shown to be biologically equivalent to Indium-III-labelled lgG for imaging focal sites of inflamation. Also, Indium III labelling of small bioactive peptides was examined as a means of imaging important physiological processes. 44 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Rhenium and technetium tricarbonyl, {M(CO)3} (+) (M = Tc, Re), binding to mammalian metallothioneins: new insights into chemical and radiopharmaceutical implications.

    PubMed

    Lecina, Joan; Palacios, Òscar; Atrian, Sílvia; Capdevila, Mercè; Suades, Joan

    2015-04-01

    This paper deals with the binding of the four mammalian metallothioneins (MTs) to the organometallic metal fragment {fac-M(CO)3}(+) (M = (99)Tc, Re), which is highly promising for the preparation of second-generation radiopharmaceuticals. The study of the transmetallation reaction between zinc and rhenium in Zn7-MT1 by means of UV-vis and CD spectroscopy demonstrated the incorporation of the {fac-Re(CO)3}(+) fragment to the MTs. This reaction should be performed at 70 °C to accelerate the reaction rate, a result that is consistent with the reported reactivity of the rhenium fragment. ESI-TOF MS demonstrated the formation of mixed-metal species as Zn6,{Re(CO)3}-MT, Zn6,{Re(CO)3}2-MT, and Zn5,{Re(CO)3}3-MT, as well as the different reactivity of the four MT isoforms. Hence, Zn-MT3 showed the highest reactivity, in agreement with its high Cu-thionein character, whereas Zn-MT2 exhibited the lowest reactivity, in line with its high Zn-thionein character. The reactivity of the Zn-loaded forms of MT1 and MT4 is intermediate between those of MT3 and MT2. The study of the binding of the {fac-(99)Tc(CO)3}(+) fragment to MTs showed a significant and very interesting different reactivity in relation to rhenium. The transmetallation reaction is much more effective with technetium than with rhenium and significant amounts of mixed Zn x ,{(99)Tc(CO)3} y -MT species were formed with the four MT isoforms whereas only MT3 rendered similar amounts of rhenium derivatives. The results obtained in this study support the possible use of technetium for labelling mammalian metallothioneins and also for possible radiopharmaceutical applications.

  8. Evaluation of bifunctional chelates for the development of gallium-based radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Cara L; Lamsa, Eric; Woods, Michael; Duan, Yin; Fernando, Pasan; Bensimon, Corinne; Kordos, Myra; Guenther, Katharina; Jurek, Paul; Kiefer, Garry E

    2010-03-17

    Ga radioisotopes, including the generator-produced positron-emitting isotope (68)Ga (t1/2 = 68 min), are of increasing interest for the development of new radiopharmaceuticals. Bifunctional chelates (BFCs) that can be efficiently radiolabeled with Ga to yield complexes with good in vivo stability are needed. To this end, we undertook a systematic comparison of four BFCs containing different chelating moieties: two novel BFCs, p-NO2-Bn-Oxo (1-oxa-4,7,10-triazacyclododecane-4,7,10-triacetic acid) and p-NO2-Bn-PCTA (3,6,9,15-tetraazabicyclo [9.3.1]pentadeca-1(15),11,13-triene-3,6,9-triacetic acid), and two more commonly used BFCs, p-NO2-Bn-DOTA (1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid) and p-NO2-Bn-NOTA (1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-triacetic acid). Each BFC was compared with respect to radiolabeling conditions, radiochemical yield, stability, and in vivo clearance properties. p-NO2-Bn-PCTA, p-NO2-Bn-Oxo, and p-NO2-Bn-NOTA were all more efficiently radiolabeled with Ga compared to p-NO2-Bn-DOTA. p-NO2-Bn-DOTA required longer reaction time, higher concentrations of BFC, or heating to obtain equivalent radiochemical yields. Better stability was observed for p-NO2-Bn-NOTA and p-NO2-Bn-PCTA compared to p-NO2-Bn-DOTA and p-NO2-Bn-Oxo, especially with respect to transmetalation to transferrin. Ga-radiolabled p-NO2-Bn-Oxo was found to be kinetically labile and therefore unstable in vivo. Ga-radiolabeled p-NO2-Bn-NOTA and p-NO2-Bn-PCTA were relatively inert, while Ga-radiolabeled p-NO2-Bn-DOTA had intermediate stability, losing >20% of Ga in less than one hour when incubated with apo-transferrin. Similar stability differences were seen when incubating at pH 2. In vivo PET imaging and biodistribution studies in mice showed that (68)Ga-radiolabeled p-NO2-Bn-PCTA, p-NO2-Bn-NOTA, and p-NO2-Bn-DOTA all cleared through the kidneys. While there was no statistical difference in the biodistribution results of (68)Ga-radiolabeled p-NO2-Bn-PCTA and p-NO2-Bn-DOTA, (68

  9. [Elements of pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics].

    PubMed

    Piette, F; Soubrie, C

    1990-05-21

    A knowledge of pharmacokinetic data is particularly important with drugs that have a narrow margin of safety. Exhaustive pre-marketing pharmacokinetic investigations and pharmacokinetic studies in populations are the two principal means of acquiring such knowledge. Although popular, the concept of half-life which decreases with age for many drugs is insufficient to calculate dosage in elderly people. Measurements of creatinine clearance provide an almost mathematical approach to the dosage of drugs that are excreted exclusively by the kidneys. In contrast, changes in hepatic metabolism with age and pathology are difficult to evaluate, and their consequences are often vaguely perceived. Our knowledge of relationships between age and pharmacodynamics is still in infancy. Owing to the wide consumption of medicine by elderly people, drug interactions are frequent at all stages, including absorption, metabolization, transport and site of action.

  10. Clinical pharmacokinetics of metformin.

    PubMed

    Graham, Garry G; Punt, Jeroen; Arora, Manit; Day, Richard O; Doogue, Matthew P; Duong, Janna K; Furlong, Timothy J; Greenfield, Jerry R; Greenup, Louise C; Kirkpatrick, Carl M; Ray, John E; Timmins, Peter; Williams, Kenneth M

    2011-02-01

    Metformin is widely used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. It is a biguanide developed from galegine, a guanidine derivative found in Galega officinalis (French lilac). Chemically, it is a hydrophilic base which exists at physiological pH as the cationic species (>99.9%). Consequently, its passive diffusion through cell membranes should be very limited. The mean ± SD fractional oral bioavailability (F) of metformin is 55 ± 16%. It is absorbed predominately from the small intestine. Metformin is excreted unchanged in urine. The elimination half-life (t(½)) of metformin during multiple dosages in patients with good renal function is approximately 5 hours. From published data on the pharmacokinetics of metformin, the population mean of its clearances were calculated. The population mean renal clearance (CL(R)) and apparent total clearance after oral administration (CL/F) of metformin were estimated to be 510 ± 130 mL/min and 1140 ± 330 mL/min, respectively, in healthy subjects and diabetic patients with good renal function. Over a range of renal function, the population mean values of CL(R) and CL/F of metformin are 4.3 ± 1.5 and 10.7 ± 3.5 times as great, respectively, as the clearance of creatinine (CL(CR)). As the CL(R) and CL/F decrease approximately in proportion to CL(CR), the dosage of metformin should be reduced in patients with renal impairment in proportion to the reduced CL(CR). The oral absorption, hepatic uptake and renal excretion of metformin are mediated very largely by organic cation transporters (OCTs). An intron variant of OCT1 (single nucleotide polymorphism [SNP] rs622342) has been associated with a decreased effect on blood glucose in heterozygotes and a lack of effect of metformin on plasma glucose in homozygotes. An intron variant of multidrug and toxin extrusion transporter [MATE1] (G>A, SNP rs2289669) has also been associated with a small increase in antihyperglycaemic effect of metformin. Overall, the effect of

  11. Chemistry and biology of Tc-99m renal function radiopharmaceuticals. Final report, May 1, 1982-January 15, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    Progress is reported on research conducted during the period May 1, 1982 to January 15, 1983. The chemistry and biology of two possible renal function radiopharmaceuticals, Tc-99m N, N'-bis (mercaptoacetyl)-2,3-diamino-propanoate (Tc-99m CO/sub 2/DADS, 1(X=OH)) and the Tc-99m complex of penicillamine. (ACR)

  12. Green approaches to late-stage fluorination: radiosyntheses of (18)F-labelled radiopharmaceuticals in ethanol and water.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Megan N; Hockley, Brian G; Scott, Peter J H

    2015-10-11

    Green strategies for late-stage fluorination with (18)F, in which ethanol and water are the only solvents used throughout the entire radiolabeling process (azeotropic drying, nucleophilic fluorination, purification and formulation), have been developed and applied to the radiosyntheses of a range of radiopharmaceuticals commonly employed in clinical PET imaging.

  13. Computational Opioid Prescribing: A Novel Application of Clinical Pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Linares, Oscar A; Linares, Annemarie L

    2011-01-01

    We implemented a pharmacokinetics-based mathematical modeling technique using algebra to assist pre-scribers with point-of-care opioid dosing. We call this technique computational opioid prescribing (COP). Because population pharmacokinetic parameter values are needed to estimate drug dosing regimen designs for individual patients using COP, and those values are not readily available to prescribers because they exist scattered in the vast pharmacology literature, we estimated the population pharmacokinetic parameter values for 12 commonly prescribed opioids from various sources using the bootstrap resampling technique. Our results show that opioid dosing regimen design, evaluation, and modification is feasible using COP. We conclude that COP is a new technique for the quantitative assessment of opioid dosing regimen design evaluation and adjustment, which may help prescribers to manage acute and chronic pain at the point-of-care. Potential benefits include opioid dose optimization and minimization of adverse opioid drug events, leading to potential improvement in patient treatment outcomes and safety. PMID:21657860

  14. Pharmacological and pharmacokinetic properties of lanthipeptides undergoing clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Ongey, Elvis Legala; Yassi, Hüseyin; Pflugmacher, Stephan; Neubauer, Peter

    2017-04-01

    The intrinsic qualities of lanthipeptides for their use as therapeutic drugs present several challenges because of their properties, which include stability, solubility and bioavailability, which, under physiological conditions, are very low. Researches have encouraged clinical evaluation of a few compounds, such as mutacin 1140, microbisporicin, actagardine and duramycin, with pharmacokinetic profiles showing rapid distribution and elimination rates, good bioavailability and fecal excretion, as well as high protein binding. Local and parenteral administration are currently suitable to minimize environmental influences on lanthipeptides and ensure efficient activity. Nevertheless, valuable improvements on pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties may also permit systemic applications via enteral routes. Understanding how rational modifications influence the desired pharmacological and pharmacokinetic properties of these biomolecules would help to answer some specific questions about their susceptibility to environmental changes, mechanism of action and how to engineer other peptides of the same group to improve their clinical relevance.

  15. Raltegravir Pharmacokinetics during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Watts, D. Heather; Stek, Alice; Best, Brookie M.; Wang, Jiajia; Capparelli, Edmund V.; Cressey, Tim R.; Aweeka, Francesca; Lizak, Patty; Kreitchmann, Regis; Burchett, Sandra K.; Shapiro, David E.; Hawkins, Elizabeth; Smith, Elizabeth; Mirochnick, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Objective We evaluated the pharmacokinetics (pk) of raltegravir in HIV-infected women during pregnancy and postpartum. Methods IMPAACT 1026s is an on-going prospective study of antiretroviral pk during pregnancy (NCT00042289). Women receiving 400 mg raltegravir twice daily in combination antiretroviral therapy had intensive steady state 12-hour pk profiles performed during pregnancy and at 6–12 weeks postpartum. Targets were trough concentration above 0.035 µg/mL, the estimated tenth percentile in non-pregnant historical controls. Results Median raltegravir AUC was 6.6 µg*hr/mL for second trimester (n= 16), 5.4 µg*hr/mL for third trimester (n=41), and 11.6 µg*hr/mL postpartum (n= 38) (p=0.03 pp vs 2nd trimester, p=0.001 pp vs third trimester). Trough concentrations were above the target in 69%, 80%, and 79% of second trimester, third trimester and postpartum subjects respectively, with wide variability (<0.010–0.917 µg/mL), and no significant difference between third trimester and postpartum trough concentrations was detected. The median ratio of cord blood/maternal raltegravir concentrations was 1.5. HIV RNA levels were < 400 copies/mL in 92% of women at delivery. Adverse events included elevated liver transaminases in one woman and vomiting in one. All infants with known status are HIV-uninfected. Conclusions Median raltegravir AUC was reduced by approximately 50% during pregnancy; trough concentrations were frequently below target both during late pregnancy and postpartum. Raltegravir readily crossed the placenta. High rates of viral suppression at delivery and the lack of a clear relationship between raltegravir concentration and virologic effect in nonpregnant adults suggest that despite the decreased exposure during pregnancy, a higher dose is not necessary. PMID:25162818

  16. Raltegravir pharmacokinetics during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Watts, D Heather; Stek, Alice; Best, Brookie M; Wang, Jiajia; Capparelli, Edmund V; Cressey, Tim R; Aweeka, Francesca; Lizak, Patty; Kreitchmann, Regis; Burchett, Sandra K; Shapiro, David E; Hawkins, Elizabeth; Smith, Elizabeth; Mirochnick, Mark

    2014-12-01

    We evaluated the pharmacokinetics (PK) of raltegravir in HIV-infected women during pregnancy and postpartum. International Maternal Pediatric Adolescent AIDS Clinical Trials 1026s is an ongoing prospective study of antiretroviral PK during pregnancy (NCT00042289). Women receiving 400 mg raltegravir twice daily in combination antiretroviral therapy had intensive steady-state 12-hour PK profiles performed during pregnancy and at 6- to 12-week postpartum. Targets were trough concentration above 0.035 μg/mL, the estimated 10th percentile in nonpregnant historical controls. Median raltegravir area under the curve was 6.6 μg·h/mL for second trimester (n = 16), 5.4 μg·h/mL for third trimester (n = 41), and 11.6 μg·h/mL postpartum (n = 38) (P = 0.03 postpartum vs second trimester, P = 0.001 pp vs third trimester). Trough concentrations were above the target in 69%, 80%, and 79% of second trimester, third trimester, and postpartum subjects, respectively, with wide variability (<0.010-0.917 μg/mL), and no significant difference between third trimester and postpartum trough concentrations was detected. The median ratio of cord blood/maternal raltegravir concentrations was 1.5. HIV RNA levels were <400 copies per milliliter in 92% of women at delivery. Adverse events included elevated liver transaminases in 1 woman and vomiting in 1. All infants with known status are HIV uninfected. Median raltegravir area under the curve was reduced by approximately 50% during pregnancy; trough concentrations were frequently below target both during late pregnancy and postpartum. Raltegravir readily crossed the placenta. High rates of viral suppression at delivery and the lack of a clear relationship between raltegravir concentration and virologic effect in nonpregnant adults suggest that despite the decreased exposure during pregnancy, a higher dose is not necessary.

  17. Population Pharmacokinetics and Therapeutic Efficacy of Febuxostat in Patients with Severe Renal Impairment.

    PubMed

    Hira, Daiki; Chisaki, Yugo; Noda, Satoshi; Araki, Hisazumi; Uzu, Takashi; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Yano, Yoshitaka; Morita, Shin-Ya; Terada, Tomohiro

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the influence of severe renal dysfunction (estimated glomerular filtration rate <30 ml/min/1.73 m(2), including hemodialysis) on the pharmacokinetics and therapeutic effects of febuxostat using a population pharmacokinetic analysis. This study recruited patients with hyperuricemia who were initially treated with allopurinol, but were switched to febuxostat, and it consists of 2 sub-studies: a pharmacokinetic study (26 patients) and retrospective efficacy evaluation study (51 patients). The demographic and clinical data of patients were collected from electronic medical records. Plasma febuxostat concentrations were obtained at each hospital visit. Population pharmacokinetic modeling was performed with NONMEM version 7.2. A total of 128 plasma febuxostat concentrations from 26 patients were used in the population pharmacokinetic analysis. The data were best described by a 1-compartment model with first order absorption. Covariate analysis revealed that renal function did not influence the pharmacokinetics of febuxostat, whereas actual body weight significantly influenced apparent clearance and apparent volume of distribution. The retrospective efficacy analysis showed the favorable therapeutic response of febuxostat switched from allopurinol in patients with moderate to severe renal impairment. No serious adverse event associated with febuxostat was observed irrespective of renal function. The population pharmacokinetic analysis and therapeutic analysis of febuxostat revealed that severe renal dysfunction had no influence on the pharmacokinetic parameters of febuxostat. These results suggest that febuxostat is tolerated well by patients with severe renal impairment. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Pharmacokinetics of mitragynine in man

    PubMed Central

    Trakulsrichai, Satariya; Sathirakul, Korbtham; Auparakkitanon, Saranya; Krongvorakul, Jatupon; Sueajai, Jetjamnong; Noumjad, Nantida; Sukasem, Chonlaphat; Wananukul, Winai

    2015-01-01

    Background Kratom, known botanically as Mitragyna speciosa (Korth.), is an indigenous tree in Southeast Asia. Kratom is currently easily available worldwide via special shops and the Internet to use as a drug of abuse, opioid alternative, or pain killer. So far, the pharmacokinetics of this plant has been studied only in animals, and there is no such study in humans. The major abundant active alkaloid in Kratom, mitragynine, is one of the promising new chemical substances to be developed as a new drug. The aim of this study was to examine the pharmacokinetics of mitragynine and assess the linearity in pharmacokinetics in chronic users. Methods Since Kratom is illegal in Thailand, studies in healthy subjects would be unethical. We therefore conducted a prospective study by enrolling ten chronic, regular, healthy users. We adjusted the steady state in each subject by giving a known amount of Kratom tea for 7 days before commencement of the experiment. We admitted and gave different oral doses to subjects to confirm linearity in pharmacokinetics. The mitragynine blood concentrations at 17 times points and the urine concentrations during the 24-hour period were collected and measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. Results Ten male subjects completed the study without adverse reactions. The median duration of abuse was 1.75 years. We analyzed one subject separately due to the abnormal behavior of blood concentration. From data of nine subjects, the pharmacokinetic parameters established were time to reach the maximum plasma concentration (0.83±0.35 hour), terminal half-life (23.24±16.07 hours), and the apparent volume of distribution (38.04±24.32 L/kg). The urine excretion of unchanged form was 0.14%. The pharmacokinetics were observed to be oral two-compartment model. Conclusion This was the first pharmacokinetic study in humans, which demonstrated linearity and was consistent with the oral two-compartment model with a terminal half

  19. Development of a rhenium-186-labeled MAG3-conjugated bisphosphonate for the palliation of metastatic bone pain based on the concept of bifunctional radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Kazuma; Mukai, Takahiro; Arano, Yasushi; Ono, Masahiro; Hanaoka, Hirofumi; Ishino, Seigo; Hashimoto, Kazuyuki; Nishimura, Hiroshi; Saji, Hideo

    2005-01-01

    Rhenium-186-1-hydroxyethylidene-1,1-diphosphonate (186Re-HEDP) has been used for the palliation of metastatic bone pain. Delayed blood clearance and high gastric uptake of radioactivity have been observed upon injection, due to the instability of (186)Re-HEDP in vivo. In this study, on the basis of the concept of bifunctional radiopharmaceuticals, we designed a stable 186Re-mercaptoacetylglycylglycylglycine (MAG3) complex-conjugated bisphosphonate, [[[[(4-hydroxy-4,4-diphosphonobutyl)carbamoylmethyl]carbamoylmethyl]carbamoylmethyl]carbamoylmethanethiolate]oxorhenium(V) (186Re-MAG3-HBP). As a precursor, [1-hydroxy-1-phosphono-4-[2-[2-[2-(2-tritylmercaptoacetylamino)acetylamino]acetylamino]acetylamino]butyl]phosphonic acid (Tr-MAG3-HBP) was synthesized by the conjugation of N-[(tritylmercapto)acetyl]glycylglycylglycine (Tr-MAG3) with the bisphosphonate analogue. After deprotection of the trityl group of Tr-MAG3-HBP, 186Re-labeling was performed by reacting 186ReO4- with SnCl2 in citrate buffer. After purification by HPLC, 186Re-MAG3-HBP showed a radiochemical purity of over 95%. To compare the stability of 186Re-MAG3-HBP and 186Re-HEDP, these (186)Re complexes were incubated in phosphate buffer. No measurable decomposition of 186Re-MAG3-HBP occurred over a 24-h period, while only approximately 30% of 186Re-HEDP remained intact 24 h postincubation. In biodistribution experiments, the radioactivity level of 186Re-MAG3-HBP in bone was significantly higher than that of (186)Re-HEDP. Blood clearance of 186Re-MAG3-HBP was faster than that of 186Re-HEDP. In addition, the gastric accumulation of 186Re-MAG3-HBP radioactivity was lower than that of 186Re-HEDP. In conclusion, 186Re-MAG3-HBP is expected to be a useful radiopharmaceutical for the palliation of metastatic bone pain.

  20. CYP2D6 phenotype-specific codeine population pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Linares, Oscar A; Fudin, Jeffrey; Schiesser, William E; Daly Linares, Annemarie L; Boston, Raymond C

    2015-03-01

    Codeine's metabolic fate in the body is complex, and detailed quantitative knowledge of it, and that of its metabolites is lacking among prescribers. We aimed to develop a codeine pharmacokinetic pathway model for codeine and its metabolites that incorporates the effects of genetic polymorphisms. We studied the phenotype-specific time courses of plasma codeine, codeine-6-glucoronide, morphine, morphine-3-glucoronide, and morphine-6-glucoronide. A codeine pharmacokinetic pathway model accurately fit the time courses of plasma codeine and its metabolites. We used this model to build a population pharmacokinetic codeine pathway model. The population model indicated that about 10% of a codeine dose was converted to morphine in poor-metabolizer phenotype subjects. The model also showed that about 40% of a codeine dose was converted to morphine in EM subjects, and about 51% was converted to morphine in ultrarapid-metabolizers. The population model further indicated that only about 4% of MO formed from codeine was converted to morphine-6-glucoronide in poor-metabolizer phenotype subjects. The model also showed that about 39% of the MO formed from codeine was converted to morphine-6-glucoronide in extensive-metabolizer phenotypes, and about 58% was converted in ultrarapid-metabolizers. We conclude, a population pharmacokinetic codeine pathway model can be useful because beyond helping to achieve a quantitative understanding the codeine and MO pathways, the model can be used for simulation to answer questions about codeine's pharmacogenetic-based disposition in the body. Our study suggests that pharmacogenetics for personalized dosing might be most effectively advanced by studying the interplay between pharmacogenetics, population pharmacokinetics, and clinical pharmacokinetics.

  1. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for lactational transfer of Na-131I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Anita Loretta

    The excretion of radionuclides in human breast milk after administration of radiopharmaceuticals is a concern as a radiation risk to nursing infants. It is not uncommon to administer radiopharmaceuticals to lactating patients due to emergency nuclear medicine investigations such as thyroid complications, kidney failure, and pulmonary embolism. There is a need to quantify the amount of radioactivity translocated into breast milk in cases of ingestion by a breast-fed infant. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model (PBPK) and a modified International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) model have been developed to predict iodine concentrations in breast milk after ingestion of radioiodine by the mother. In the PBPK model, all compartments are interconnected by blood flow and represent real anatomic tissue regions in the body. All parameters involved are measurable values with physiological or physiochemical meaning such as tissue masses, blood flow rates, partition coefficients and cardiac output. However, some of the parameters such as the partition coefficients and metabolic constants are not available for iodine and had to be inferred from other information. The structure of the PBPK model for the mother consists of the following tissue compartments: gastrointestinal tract, blood, kidney, thyroid, milk, and other tissues. With the exception of the milk compartment, the model for the nursing infant is structured similarly to the mother. The ICRP model describing iodine metabolism in a standard 70-kg man was modified to represent iodine metabolism in a lactating woman and nursing infant. The parameters involved in this model are transfer rates and biological half-lives which are based on experimental observations. The results of the PBPK model and the modified ICRP model describing the lactational transfer of iodine were compared. When administering 1 mCi of Na131I to the lactating mother, the concentration reaches a maximum of 0.1 mCi/liter in 24

  2. Current activities in the ICRP concerning estimation of radiation doses to patients from radiopharmaceuticals for diagnostic use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattsson, S.; Johansson, L.; Leide-Svegborn, S.; Liniecki, J.; Nosske, D.; Riklund, K.; Stabin, M.; Taylor, D.

    2011-09-01

    A Task Group within the ICRP Committees 2 and 3 is continuously working to improve absorbed dose estimates to patients investigated with radiopharmaceuticals. The work deals with reviews of the literature, initiation of new or complementary studies of the biokinetics of a compound and dose estimates. Absorbed dose calculations for organs and tissues have up to now been carried out using the MIRD formalism. There is still a lack of necessary biokinetic data from measurements in humans. More time series obtained by nuclear medicine imaging techniques such as whole-body planar gamma-camera imaging, SPECT or PET are highly desirable for this purpose. In 2008, a new addendum to ICRP Publication 53 was published under the name of ICRP Publication 106 containing biokinetic data and absorbed dose information to organs and tissues of patients of various ages for radiopharmaceuticals in common use. That report also covers a number of generic models and realistic maximum models covering other large groups of substances (e.g. "123I-brain receptor substances"). Together with ICRP Publication 80, most radiopharmaceuticals in clinical use at the time of publication were covered except the radioiodine labeled compounds for which the ICRP dose estimates are still found in Publication 53. There is an increasing use of new radiopharmaceuticals, especially PET-tracers and the TG has recently finished its work with biokinetic and dosimetric data for 18F-FET, 18F-FLT and 18F-choline. The work continues now with new data for 11C-raclopride, 11C-PiB and 123I-ioflupan as well as re-evaluation of published data for 82Rb-chloride, 18F-fluoride and radioiodide. This paper summarises published ICRP-information on dose to patients from radiopharmaceuticals and gives some preliminary data for substances under review.

  3. 18F-fluorodihydroxyphenylalanine vs other radiopharmaceuticals for imaging neuroendocrine tumours according to their type.

    PubMed

    Balogova, Sona; Talbot, Jean-Noël; Nataf, Valérie; Michaud, Laure; Huchet, Virginie; Kerrou, Khaldoun; Montravers, Françoise

    2013-06-01

    6-Fluoro-((18)F)-L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (FDOPA) is an amino acid analogue for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging which has been registered since 2006 in several European Union (EU) countries and by several pharmaceutical firms. Neuroendocrine tumour (NET) imaging is part of its registered indications. NET functional imaging is a very competitive niche, competitors of FDOPA being two well-established radiopharmaceuticals for scintigraphy, (123)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) and (111)In-pentetreotide, and even more radiopharmaceuticals for PET, including fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and somatostatin analogues. Nevertheless, there is no universal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) or PET tracer for NET imaging, at least for the moment. FDOPA, as the other PET tracers, is superior in diagnostic performance in a limited number of precise NET types which are currently medullary thyroid cancer, catecholamine-producing tumours with a low aggressiveness and well-differentiated carcinoid tumours of the midgut, and in cases of congenital hyperinsulinism. This article reports on diagnostic performance and impact on management of FDOPA according to the NET type, emphasising the results of comparative studies with other radiopharmaceuticals. By pooling the results of the published studies with a defined standard of truth, patient-based sensitivity to detect recurrent medullary thyroid cancer was 70 % [95 % confidence interval (CI) 62.1-77.6] for FDOPA vs 44 % (95 % CI 35-53.4) for FDG; patient-based sensitivity to detect phaeochromocytoma/paraganglioma was 94 % (95 % CI 91.4-97.1) for FDOPA vs 69 % (95 % CI 60.2-77.1) for (123)I-MIBG; and patient-based sensitivity to detect midgut NET was 89 % (95 % CI 80.3-95.3) for FDOPA vs 80 % (95 % CI 69.2-88.4) for somatostatin receptor scintigraphy with a larger gap in lesion-based sensitivity (97 vs 49 %). Previously unpublished FDOPA results from our team are reported in some rare NET, such as small cell

  4. Improved dose-volume histogram estimates for radiopharmaceutical therapy by optimizing quantitative SPECT reconstruction parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Lishui; Hobbs, Robert F.; Segars, Paul W.; Sgouros, George; Frey, Eric C.

    2013-06-01

    In radiopharmaceutical therapy, an understanding of the dose distribution in normal and target tissues is important for optimizing treatment. Three-dimensional (3D) dosimetry takes into account patient anatomy and the nonuniform uptake of radiopharmaceuticals in tissues. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) provide a useful summary representation of the 3D dose distribution and have been widely used for external beam treatment planning. Reliable 3D dosimetry requires an accurate 3D radioactivity distribution as the input. However, activity distribution estimates from SPECT are corrupted by noise and partial volume effects (PVEs). In this work, we systematically investigated OS-EM based quantitative SPECT (QSPECT) image reconstruction in terms of its effect on DVHs estimates. A modified 3D NURBS-based Cardiac-Torso (NCAT) phantom that incorporated a non-uniform kidney model and clinically realistic organ activities and biokinetics was used. Projections were generated using a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation; noise effects were studied using 50 noise realizations with clinical count levels. Activity images were reconstructed using QSPECT with compensation for attenuation, scatter and collimator-detector response (CDR). Dose rate distributions were estimated by convolution of the activity image with a voxel S kernel. Cumulative DVHs were calculated from the phantom and QSPECT images and compared both qualitatively and quantitatively. We found that noise, PVEs, and ringing artifacts due to CDR compensation all degraded histogram estimates. Low-pass filtering and early termination of the iterative process were needed to reduce the effects of noise and ringing artifacts on DVHs, but resulted in increased degradations due to PVEs. Large objects with few features, such as the liver, had more accurate histogram estimates and required fewer iterations and more smoothing for optimal results. Smaller objects with fine details, such as the kidneys, required more iterations and less

  5. Improved dose-volume histogram estimates for radiopharmaceutical therapy by optimizing quantitative SPECT reconstruction parameters.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lishui; Hobbs, Robert F; Segars, Paul W; Sgouros, George; Frey, Eric C

    2013-06-07

    In radiopharmaceutical therapy, an understanding of the dose distribution in normal and target tissues is important for optimizing treatment. Three-dimensional (3D) dosimetry takes into account patient anatomy and the nonuniform uptake of radiopharmaceuticals in tissues. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) provide a useful summary representation of the 3D dose distribution and have been widely used for external beam treatment planning. Reliable 3D dosimetry requires an accurate 3D radioactivity distribution as the input. However, activity distribution estimates from SPECT are corrupted by noise and partial volume effects (PVEs). In this work, we systematically investigated OS-EM based quantitative SPECT (QSPECT) image reconstruction in terms of its effect on DVHs estimates. A modified 3D NURBS-based Cardiac-Torso (NCAT) phantom that incorporated a non-uniform kidney model and clinically realistic organ activities and biokinetics was used. Projections were generated using a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation; noise effects were studied using 50 noise realizations with clinical count levels. Activity images were reconstructed using QSPECT with compensation for attenuation, scatter and collimator-detector response (CDR). Dose rate distributions were estimated by convolution of the activity image with a voxel S kernel. Cumulative DVHs were calculated from the phantom and QSPECT images and compared both qualitatively and quantitatively. We found that noise, PVEs, and ringing artifacts due to CDR compensation all degraded histogram estimates. Low-pass filtering and early termination of the iterative process were needed to reduce the effects of noise and ringing artifacts on DVHs, but resulted in increased degradations due to PVEs. Large objects with few features, such as the liver, had more accurate histogram estimates and required fewer iterations and more smoothing for optimal results. Smaller objects with fine details, such as the kidneys, required more iterations and less

  6. Copper-64 Radiopharmaceuticals for PET Imaging of Cancer: Advances in Preclinical and Clinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Ferdani, Riccardo

    2009-01-01

    Summation Copper-64 (T1/2 = 12.7 hours; β+, 0.653 MeV [17.8 %]; β−, 0.579 MeV [38.4 %]) has decay characteristics that allow for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging and targeted radiotherapy of cancer. The well-established coordination chemistry of copper allows for its reaction with a wide variety of chelator systems that can potentially be linked to peptides and other biologically relevant small molecules, antibodies, proteins, and nanoparticles. The 12.7-hours half-life of 64Cu provides the flexibility to image both smaller molecules and larger, slower clearing proteins and nanoparticles. In a practical sense, the radionuclide or the 64Cu-radiopharmaceuticals can be easily shipped for PET imaging studies at sites remote to the production facility. Due to the versatility of 64Cu, there has been an abundance of novel research in this area over the past 20 years, primarily in the area of PET imaging, but also for the targeted radiotherapy of cancer. The biologic activity of the hypoxia imaging agent, 60/64Cu-ATSM, has been described in great detail in animal models and in clinical PET studies. An investigational new drug application for 64Cu-ATSM was recently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the United States, paving the way for a multicenter trial to validate the utility of this agent, with the hopeful result being FDA approval for routine clinical use. This article discusses state-of-the-art cancer imaging with 64Cu radiopharmaceuticals, including 64Cu-ATSM for imaging hypoxia, 64Cu-labeled peptides for tumor-receptor targeting, 64Cu-labeled monoclonal antibodies for targeting tumor antigens, and 64Cu-labeled nanoparticles for cancer targeting. The emphasis of this article will be on the new scientific discoveries involving 64Cu radiopharmaceuticals, as well as the translation of these into human studies. PMID:19694573

  7. Fundamentals of population pharmacokinetic modelling: validation methods.

    PubMed

    Sherwin, Catherine M T; Kiang, Tony K L; Spigarelli, Michael G; Ensom, Mary H H

    2012-09-01

    Population pharmacokinetic modelling is widely used within the field of clinical pharmacology as it helps to define the sources and correlates of pharmacokinetic variability in target patient populations and their impact upon drug disposition; and population pharmacokinetic modelling provides an estimation of drug pharmacokinetic parameters. This method's defined outcome aims to understand how participants in population pharmacokinetic studies are representative of the population as opposed to the healthy volunteers or highly selected patients in traditional pharmacokinetic studies. This review focuses on the fundamentals of population pharmacokinetic modelling and how the results are evaluated and validated. This review defines the common aspects of population pharmacokinetic modelling through a discussion of the literature describing the techniques and placing them in the appropriate context. The concept of validation, as applied to population pharmacokinetic models, is explored focusing on the lack of consensus regarding both terminology and the concept of validation itself. Population pharmacokinetic modelling is a powerful approach where pharmacokinetic variability can be identified in a target patient population receiving a pharmacological agent. Given the lack of consensus on the best approaches in model building and validation, sound fundamentals are required to ensure the selected methodology is suitable for the particular data type and/or patient population. There is a need to further standardize and establish the best approaches in modelling so that any model created can be systematically evaluated and the results relied upon.

  8. Pharmacokinetic profile of fesoterodine.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, B; Guan, Z; Wood, N; Gandelman, K

    2008-11-01

    Fesoterodine is a new antimuscarinic agent for the treatment of overactive bladder. Following oral administration, fesoterodine is rapidly and extensively hydrolyzed by nonspecific esterases to its active moiety: 5-hydroxymethyl tolterodine (5-HMT). The cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes are not involved in the formation of 5-HMT; however, CYP2D6 and CYP3A4 provide 2 alternative pathways for further metabolism and inactivation of 5-HMT. Single oral doses of 4 mg, 8 mg or 12 mg of fesoterodine sustained-release tablets in the fasted state and 8 mg in a fed state. This single-center, open-label, randomized, crossover study investigated the effects of fesoterodine in healthy volunteers comprised of CYP2D6 extensive metabolizers (EMs; n = 16) and CYP2D6 poor metabolizers (PMs; n = 8) after either an overnight fast or a high-fat and high-calorie breakfast. Adverse events, vital signs, ECG recordings and laboratory tests were monitored for safety assessment. For the principal active moiety, 5-HMT, the maximum plasma concentration (Cmax), area under the concentration-time curve from time zero to time of last measurable concentration (AUC0-t) and amount excreted in urine (Ae) increased proportionally with dose in both EM and PM subjects. The mean Cmax and AUC0-t in PMs were approximately twice those observed in EMs. CYP2D6 status had no effect on time to reach Cmax (5 h), renal clearance (approximately 250 ml/min), or half-life (approximately 8 h). Fesoterodine was well tolerated at all doses. While the incidence of dry mouth increased from 8 - 12 mg, all occurrences were mild-to-moderate. Fesoterodine demonstrated a pharmacokinetic (PK) profile that was favorable for once-daily dosing. The systemic exposure to 5-HMT increased proportionally with dose and was about 2-fold higher in PMs compared with EMs. There was no clinically relevant effect of food on the PK of fesoterodine. Fesoterodine was well tolerated at all dose levels studied.

  9. Pharmacokinetics of chlorpromazine and key metabolites.

    PubMed

    Yeung, P K; Hubbard, J W; Korchinski, E D; Midha, K K

    1993-01-01

    A study was carried out in 11 healthy young men to investigate the pharmacokinetics of chlorpromazine (CPZ) after a bolus intravenous (i.v.) dose (10 mg) and three single oral doses (25, 50 and 100 mg), with a washout period of two weeks between doses. Plasma levels of CPZ, CPZ N-oxide (CPZNO), CPZ sulfoxide (CPZSO) and both free and conjugated 7-hydroxy-CPZ (7-HOCPZ) were measured by extraction radioimmunoassays. CPZ exhibited multicompartmental pharmacokinetics in most subjects. There was wide between-subject variability in half life (11.05 h), volume of distribution (1215 l), volume of distribution at steady state (642 l) and mean residence time (8.88 h), whereas systemic clearance was somewhat less variable (76.6 l.h-1). All metabolites were present in measurable concentrations in the plasma of 9 of 11 subjects after i.v. CPZ, whereas free 7-HOCPZ was not detected in the other 2 individuals. With the exception of CPZNO, the biological half lives of the primary metabolites were longer than the half life of CPZ. After oral administration, the percentage of CPZ reaching the systemic circulation intact (F%) was very low (4-38%) and dose dependent. Moreover, both within-subject and between-subject variances were very high. The maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) and area under the plasma concentration versus time curve extrapolated to infinite time (AUC) showed evidence of nonlinearity, whereas half life did not appear to be dose dependent. These data suggest that the high degree of variability in the pharmacokinetics of CPZ is a result of extensive first pass metabolism rather than variation in half life.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Clinical Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Lenalidomide.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nianhang; Zhou, Simon; Palmisano, Maria

    2017-02-01

    Lenalidomide is a lead therapeutic in multiple myeloma and deletion 5q myelodysplastic syndromes and shows promising activities in other hematologic malignancies. This article presents a comprehensive review of the clinical pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of lenalidomide. Oral lenalidomide is rapidly and highly absorbed (>90 % of dose) under fasting conditions. Food affects oral absorption, reducing area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) by 20 % and maximum concentration (C max) by 50 %. The increase in AUC and C max is dose proportional, and interindividual variability in plasma exposure is low to moderate. Lenalidomide distributes into semen but is undetectable 3 days after stopping treatment. Biotransformation of lenalidomide in humans includes chiral inversion, trivial hydroxylation, and slow non-enzymatic hydrolysis. Approximately 82 % of an oral dose is excreted as lenalidomide in urine within 24 h. Lenalidomide has a short half-life (3-4 h) and does not accumulate in plasma upon repeated dosing. Its pharmacokinetics are consistent across patient populations, regardless of the type of hematologic malignancy. Renal function is the only important factor affecting lenalidomide plasma exposure. Lenalidomide has no QT prolongation risk at approved doses, and higher plasma exposure to lenalidomide is associated with increased risk of neutropenia and thrombocytopenia. Despite being a weak substrate of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in vitro, lenalidomide does not have clinically significant pharmacokinetic interactions with P-gp substrates/inhibitors in controlled studies. The AUC-matched dose adjustment is recommended for patients with renal impairment at the start of therapy. No dose adjustment for lenalidomide is needed on the basis of age, ethnicity, mild hepatic impairment, or drug-drug interactions.

  11. Pharmacokinetics considerations for gout treatments.

    PubMed

    Richette, Pascal; Frazier, Aline; Bardin, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    Patients with gout often have comorbid conditions such as renal failure, cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome. The presence and required treatment of these conditions can make the treatment of gout challenging. Knowledge of the pharmacokinetics of the available drugs for the management of gout is mandatory. A MEDLINE PubMed search for articles published in English from January 1990 to January 2014 was completed using the terms: pharmacokinetics, colchicine, canakinumab, allopurinol, febuxostat, pegloticase, gout, toxicity, drug interaction. Colchicine is a drug with a narrow therapeutic-toxicity window. Co-prescription with strong CYP3A4 or P-glycoprotein inhibitors can greatly modify its pharmacokinetics and is to be avoided. Elimination of canakinumab mainly occurs via intracellular catabolism, following receptor mediator endocytosis. Canakinumab appears to be a good alternative for patients with contraindications to colchicine, NSAIDs and corticosteroids. For patients with renal impairment, some authors recommend that the allopurinol maximum dosage should be adjusted to creatinine clearance. If the urate target cannot be achieved, the therapy should be switched to febuxostat, which is appropriate with mild-to-moderate renal failure. Anti-pegloticase antibodies affect the pharmacokinetics of the drug because they increase its clearance, with loss of pegloticase activity.

  12. Aztreonam pharmacokinetics in burn patients.

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, L V; White, R L; Kays, M B; Brundage, D M; Yarbrough, D

    1991-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of aztreonam in eight adult patients with severe burn injuries (total body surface area burn, 49% +/- 21% [mean +/- standard deviation]) were studied. The time of initiation of study following burn injury was 7.0 +/- 1.4 days. Four patients at first dose and at steady state were studied. Aztreonam concentrations were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography, and a two-compartment model was used to fit the data. No significant differences in any pharmacokinetic parameters between first dose and steady state were observed. Volume of distribution of the central compartment after first dose (0.14 liters/kg) and volume of distribution at steady state (0.31 liters/kg) were approximately 30% higher than those reported for other patient populations. Total drug clearance and renal drug clearance when normalized to creatinine clearance (CLCR) were similar to those previously reported for other critically ill patients. CLCR was strongly correlated with renal drug clearance (r = 0.94) and total drug clearance (r = 0.95). The extent and degree of burn (percent second or third degree burn) were poorly correlated with all pharmacokinetic parameters with the exception of the volume of distribution at steady state, which was correlated with both total body surface area burn (r = 0.95) and percent second degree burn (r = 0.83). Aztreonam pharmacokinetics are altered as a result of thermal injury; however, CLCR can be used to assess the clearance of aztreonam in burn patients. PMID:2014982

  13. Generators and automated generator systems for production and on-line injections of pet radiopharmaceuticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimchuk, G.; Shimchuk, Gr; Pakhomov, G.; Avalishvili, G.; Zavrazhnov, G.; Polonsky-Byslaev, I.; Fedotov, A.; Polozov, P.

    2017-01-01

    One of the prospective directions of PET development is using generator positron radiating nuclides [1,2]. Introduction of this technology is financially promising, since it does not require expensive special accelerator and radiochemical laboratory in the medical institution, which considerably reduces costs of PET diagnostics and makes it available to more patients. POZITOM-PRO RPC LLC developed and produced an 82Sr-82Rb generator, an automated injection system, designed for automatic and fully-controlled injections of 82RbCl produced by this generator, automated radiopharmaceutical synthesis units based on generated 68Ga produced using a domestically-manufactured 68Ge-68Ga generator for preparing two pharmaceuticals: Ga-68-DOTA-TATE and Vascular Ga-68.

  14. Click-to-Chelate: development of technetium and rhenium-tricarbonyl labeled radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Kluba, Christiane A; Mindt, Thomas L

    2013-03-12

    The Click-to-Chelate approach is a highly efficient strategy for the radiolabeling of molecules of medicinal interest with technetium and rhenium-tricarbonyl cores. Reaction of azide-functionalized molecules with alkyne prochelators by the Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC; click reaction) enables the simultaneous synthesis and conjugation of tridentate chelating systems for the stable complexation of the radiometals. In many cases, the functionalization of (bio)molecules with the ligand system and radiolabeling can be achieved by convenient one-pot procedures. Since its first report in 2006, Click-to-Chelate has been applied to the development of numerous novel radiotracers with promising potential for translation into the clinic. This review summarizes the use of the Click-to-Chelate approach in radiopharmaceutical sciences and provides a perspective for future applications.

  15. Evaluation of alternative rapid thin layer chromatography systems for quality control of technetium-99m radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Mang'era, Kennedy; Wong, Derek; Douglas, David; Franz, Kellie; Biru, Taddese

    2014-04-01

    Whatman 3MM™ and Tec-Control™ systems were evaluated as ITLC-SG alternatives for 99mTc-radiopharmaceuticals. They compare well in accuracy and reproducibility, and are faster and more convenient than ITLC-SG. Tec-Control™ radiochemical purity values for 99mTc-sestamibi were more conservative than ITLC-SG. Full solvent migration was not reproduced for 99mTc-tetrofosmin in Tec-Control™, and for this Whatman 3MM™ is preferred. Developing times were 10-15 min, 7-9 min and ~1min for ITLC-SG, Whatman 3MM™ and Tec-Control™, respectively. Overall, Tec-Control™ strips are preferred due to speed and ease of use.

  16. Cage-like bifunctional chelators, copper-64 radiopharmaceuticals and PET imaging using the same

    DOEpatents

    Conti, Peter S.; Cai, Hancheng; Li, Zibo; Liu, Shuanglong

    2016-08-02

    Disclosed is a class of versatile Sarcophagine based bifunctional chelators (BFCs) containing a hexa-aza cage for labeling with metals having either imaging, therapeutic or contrast applications radiolabeling and one or more linkers (A) and (B). The compounds have the general formula ##STR00001## where A is a functional group selected from group consisting of an amine, a carboxylic acid, an ester, a carbonyl, a thiol, an azide and an alkene, and B is a functional group selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, an amine, a carboxylic acid, and ester, a carbonyl, a thiol, an azide and an alkene. Also disclosed are conjugate of the BFC and a targeting moiety, which may be a peptide or antibody. Also disclosed are metal complexes of the BFC/targeting moiety conjugates that are useful as radiopharmaceuticals, imaging agents or contrast agents.

  17. Complexation study on no-carrier-added astatine with insulin: a candidate radiopharmaceutical.

    PubMed

    Lahiri, Susanta; Roy, Kamalika; Sen, Souvik

    2008-12-01

    No-carrier-added astatine radionuclides produced in the (7)Li-irradiated lead matrix were separated from bulk lead nitrate target by complexing At with insulin, followed by dialysis. The method offers simultaneous separation of At from lead as well as its complexation with insulin. The At-insulin complex might be a potential radiopharmaceutical in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. The stability of At-insulin complex was checked by dialysis against deionized water and Ringer lactate (RL) solution. It has been found that the half-life of At-insulin complex is about approximately 12h, when dialyzed against deionized water and is only 6h, when dialyzed against RL solution having the same composition as blood serum. The 6h half-life of this Insulin-At complex is perfect for killing cancer cells from external cell surfaces as the half-life of internalization of insulin molecule inside the cell is 7-12h.

  18. Scaling animal to human biodistribution of the radiopharmaceutical [68Ga]Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC

    SciTech Connect

    Parra, Pamela Ochoa Veloza, Stella

    2016-07-07

    The radiotracer called {sup 68}Ga-labelled Glu-urea-Lys(Ahx)-HBED-CC ([68Ga]Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC) is a novel radiophar-maceutical for the detection of prostate cancer lesions by positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Setting up a cost-effective manual synthesis of this radiotracer and making its clinical translation in Colombia will require two important elements: the evaluation of the procedure to yield a consistent product, meeting standards of radio-chemical purity and low toxicity and then, the evaluation of the radiation dosimetry. In this paper a protocol to extrapolate the biokinetic model made in normal mice to humans by using the computer software for internal dose assessment OLINDA/EXM® is presented as an accurate and standardized method for the calculation of radiation dosimetry estimates.

  19. The Growing Impact of Bioorthogonal Click Chemistry on the Development of Radiopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Dexing; Zeglis, Brian M.; Lewis, Jason S.; Anderson, Carolyn J.

    2014-01-01

    Click chemistry has become a ubiquitous chemical tool with applications in nearly all areas of modern chemistry, including drug discovery, bioconjugation, and nanoscience. Radiochemistry is no exception, as the canonical Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition, strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition, inverse electron demand Diels-Alder reaction, and other types of bioorthogonal click ligations have had a significant impact on the synthesis and development of radiopharmaceuticals. This review will focus on recent applications of click chemistry ligations in the preparation of imaging agents for SPECT and PET, including small molecules, peptides, and proteins labeled with radionuclides such as 18F, 64Cu, 111In, and 99mTc. PMID:23616581

  20. Highway accident involving radiopharmaceuticals near Brookhaven, Mississippi on December 3, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Mohr, P.B.; Mount, M.E.; Schwartz, M.W.

    1985-04-01

    A rear-end collision occurred between a passenger automobile and a luggage trailer carrying 84 packages, 76 of which contained radiopharmaceuticals, on US Highway 84 near Brookhaven, Mississippi on the afternoon of December 3, 1983. The purpose of this report is to document the mechanical circumstances of the accident, confirm the nature and quantity of radioactive materials involved, and assess the nature of the physical environment to which the packages were exposed and the response of the packages. The report consists of three major sections. The first deals wth the nature and circumstances of the accident and findings of fact. The second gives an accounting and description of the materials involved and the consequences of their exposure. The third gives an assessment and analysis of the mechanisms of damage and the conclusions which may be drawn from the investigation. 4 refs., 24 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Design Features Of Microfluidic Reactor For [18F]FDG Radiopharmaceutical Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, J. H.; Lee, B. N.; Nam, K. R.; Attla, G. A.; Lee, K. C.; Cjai, J. S.

    2011-06-01

    Microfluidic reactor exhibits advantages for radiopharmaceutical synthesis. Microfluidic chips can reduce the time for radiosynthesis using tiny quantities of chemical compounds. It also has a good heat transfer, performance and provides an integrated system including synthesis, separation, and purification. These advantages make FDG production. So we have designed a microreactor chip which included the whole chemical processing; water evaporation, solvent exchange, radiofluorination and so on. It was designed by using a commercial 3D CAD modeling program CATIA V5, heat transfer performance was analyzed by ANSYS, and CFX was used for analyzing fluid performance. This paper described the design of FDG synthesis system on a microchip, the relevant locations of its parts, both heat and fluid performance efficiency analysis.

  2. In vivo nanoparticle-mediated radiopharmaceutical-excited fluorescence molecular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhenhua; Qu, Yawei; Wang, Kun; Zhang, Xiaojun; Zha, Jiali; Song, Tianming; Bao, Chengpeng; Liu, Haixiao; Wang, Zhongliang; Wang, Jing; Liu, Zhongyu; Liu, Haifeng; Tian, Jie

    2015-06-01

    Cerenkov luminescence imaging utilizes visible photons emitted from radiopharmaceuticals to achieve in vivo optical molecular-derived signals. Since Cerenkov radiation is weak, non-optimum for tissue penetration and continuous regardless of biological interactions, it is challenging to detect this signal with a diagnostic dose. Therefore, it is challenging to achieve useful activated optical imaging for the acquisition of direct molecular information. Here we introduce a novel imaging strategy, which converts γ and Cerenkov radiation from radioisotopes into fluorescence through europium oxide nanoparticles. After a series of imaging studies, we demonstrate that this approach provides strong optical signals with high signal-to-background ratios, an ideal tissue penetration spectrum and activatable imaging ability. In comparison with present imaging techniques, it detects tumour lesions with low radioactive tracer uptake or small tumour lesions more effectively. We believe it will facilitate the development of nuclear and optical molecular imaging for new, highly sensitive imaging applications.

  3. Receptor-specific positron emission tomography radiopharmaceuticals: /sup 75/Br-labeled butyrophenone neuroleptics

    SciTech Connect

    Moerlein, S.M.; Stoecklin, G.; Weinhard, K.; Pawlik, G.; Heiss, W.D.

    1985-11-01

    Cerebral dopaminergic D/sub 2/ receptors are involved in several common disease states, such as schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease, and Huntington's chorea. The use of radiolabeled D/sub 2/ receptor-binding ligands with positron emission tomography (PET) to noninvasively quantitate D/sub 2/ receptor densities thus has potential application in medicine. Butyrophenone neuroleptics have a high in vitro and in vivo binding affinity for cerebral D/sub 2/ receptors, and due to the useful chemical and nuclear decay properties of /sup 74/Br (76% ..beta../sup +/, half-life = 1.6 h), the authors have evaluated radiobrominated bromospiperone (BSP), brombenperidol (BBP), and bromperidol (BP) as radiopharmaceuticals for use with PET.

  4. Simple method to quantitate iodine-124 contamination in iodine-123 radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, D.W.; Rao, S.A.

    1985-08-01

    Iodine-123 (/sup 123/I) produced by the /sup 124/Te(p,2n)/sup 123/I reaction contains several percent /sup 124/I radionuclidic contamination at the time of imaging. Since /sup 124/I degrades the quality of the images and causes unnecessary radiation absorbed dose to the patient, it is important to know the amount present in radiopharmaceuticals at the time of administration. A simple approach is described which uses a radionuclide dose calibrator and lead shield. The sample is assayed both shielded and unshielded and the ratio of readings depends uniquely upon the percent /sup 124/I present. The technique can be adopted for any type of dose calibrator, sample container, and Pb shield, but use of the numeric constants reported here should be restricted to the specified equipment.

  5. The growing impact of bioorthogonal click chemistry on the development of radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Dexing; Zeglis, Brian M; Lewis, Jason S; Anderson, Carolyn J

    2013-06-01

    Click chemistry has become a ubiquitous chemical tool with applications in nearly all areas of modern chemistry, including drug discovery, bioconjugation, and nanoscience. Radiochemistry is no exception, as the canonical Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition, strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition, inverse electron demand Diels-Alder reaction, and other types of bioorthogonal click ligations have had a significant impact on the synthesis and development of radiopharmaceuticals. This review will focus on recent applications of click chemistry ligations in the preparation of imaging agents for SPECT and PET, including small molecules, peptides, and proteins labeled with radionuclides such as (18)F, (64)Cu, (111)In, and (99m)Tc.

  6. The role of coordination chemistry in the development of copper and rhenium radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Paul S

    2011-02-07

    There are several isotopes of copper and rhenium that are of interest in the development of new molecular imaging or radiotherapeutic agents. This perspective article highlights the role of coordination chemistry in the design of copper and rhenium radiopharmaceuticals engineered to selectively target tissue of interest such as cancer cells or pathological features associated with Alzheimer's disease. The coordination chemistry of copper bis(thiosemicarbazone) derivatives and copper macrocyclic complexes is discussed in terms of their potential application as targeted positron emission tomography tracers for non-invasive diagnostic imaging. A range of rhenium complexes with different ligands with rhenium in different oxidation states are introduced and their potential to be translated to new radiotherapeutic agents discussed.

  7. Overview and perspectives on automation strategies in (68)Ga radiopharmaceutical preparations.

    PubMed

    Boschi, Stefano; Malizia, Claudio; Lodi, Filippo

    2013-01-01

    The renaissance of (68)Ga radiopharmacy has led to great advances in automation technology. The availability of a highly efficient, reliable, long-lived (68)Ge/(68)Ga generator system along with a well-established coordination chemistry based on bifunctional chelating agents have been the bases of this development in (68)Ga radiopharmacy. Syntheses of (68)Ga peptides were originally performed by manual or semiautomated systems, but increasing clinical demand, radioprotection, and regulatory issues have driven extensive automation of their production process. Several automated systems, based on different post-processing of the (68)Ga generator eluate, on different engineering, and on fixed tubing or disposable cassette approaches, have been developed and are discussed in this chapter. Since automatic systems for preparation of radiopharmaceuticals should comply with qualification and validation protocols established by regulations such as current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMP) and local regulations, some regulatory issues and the more relevant qualification protocols are also discussed.

  8. Hydroxypyridinone Chelators: From Iron Scavenging to Radiopharmaceuticals for PET Imaging with Gallium-68

    PubMed Central

    Cusnir, Ruslan; Imberti, Cinzia; Hider, Robert C.; Blower, Philip J.; Ma, Michelle T.

    2017-01-01

    Derivatives of 3,4-hydroxypyridinones have been extensively studied for in vivo Fe3+ sequestration. Deferiprone, a 1,2-dimethyl-3,4-hydroxypyridinone, is now routinely used for clinical treatment of iron overload disease. Hexadentate tris(3,4-hydroxypyridinone) ligands (THP) complex Fe3+ at very low iron concentrations, and their high affinities for oxophilic trivalent metal ions have led to their development for new applications as bifunctional chelators for the positron emitting radiometal, 68Ga3+, which is clinically used for molecular imaging in positron emission tomography (PET). THP-peptide bioconjugates rapidly and quantitatively complex 68Ga3+ at ambient temperature, neutral pH and micromolar concentrations of ligand, making them amenable to kit-based radiosynthesis of 68Ga PET radiopharmaceuticals. 68Ga-labelled THP-peptides accumulate at target tissue in vivo, and are excreted largely via a renal pathway, providing high quality PET images. PMID:28075350

  9. Theranostic Radiopharmaceuticals Based on Gold Nanoparticles Labeled with (177)Lu and Conjugated to Peptides.

    PubMed

    Ferro-Flores, Guillermina; Ocampo-García, Blanca E; Santos-Cuevas, Clara L; de María Ramírez, Flor; Azorín-Vega, Erika P; Meléndez-Alafort, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been proposed for a variety of medical applications such as localized heat sources for cancer treatment and drug delivery systems. The conjugation of peptides to AuNPs produces stable multimeric systems with target-specific molecular recognition. Lutetium- 177 ((177)Lu) has been successfully used in peptide radionuclide therapy. Recently, (177)Lu-AuNPs conjugated to different peptides have been proposed as a new class of theranostic radiopharmaceuticals. These radioconjugates may function simultaneously as molecular imaging agents, radiotherapy systems and thermal-ablation systems. This article covers advancements in the design, synthesis, physicochemical characterization, molecular recognition assessment and preclinical therapeutic efficacy of gold nanoparticles radiolabeled with (177)Lu and conjugated to RGD (-Arg-Gly-Asp-), Lys(3)-Bombesin and Tat(49-57) peptides.

  10. Efficacy considerations for U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval of diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Gorovets, Alexander; Marzella, Louis; Rieves, Dwaine; Yang, Lucie

    2013-08-01

    The safety and efficacy expectations for U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals (DRs) are described in laws that broadly apply to all prescription drugs and biologic products. These laws also outline efficacy expectations that are unique for DRs. The FDA regulations and guidance documents elaborate on DR efficacy expectations for clinical uses of the drugs, such as the delineation of anatomy, the characterization of a physiologic process, or the diagnosis of disease. As described in the FDA regulations, the approval of a DR necessitates that the imaging drug has the ability to provide clinically useful information. Here we cite approved DRs to illustrate how the imaging performance of the drugs was characterized in clinical studies and the clinical usefulness of the imaging information described in drug labels.

  11. Radiopharmaceuticals in Tumor Hypoxia Imaging: A Review Focused on Medicinal Chemistry Aspects.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Pablo; Cerecetto, Hugo

    2017-01-01

    Since its first description in 1955, tumor hypoxia has become a central issue in cancer treatment. Since then, it is essential to diagnose accurately the tumor oxygenation degree in order to establish the appropriate treatment. In this regard, a wide diversity of radiopharmaceuticals for in vivo imaging has been developed. Special conditions of the hypoxic microenvironment are low O2 partial pressure, enhanced levels of reductases, and genetic-adaptation-expression biomolecules involved in angiogenesis, erythropoiesis, cellular proliferation, apoptosis, metabolism- and glucose-uptake, local invasion, and metastatic spread. The development of radiolabeled hypoxia markers has been based on reductase substrates, like bioreductive ligands, or on entities capable of recognizing overexpressed proteins under hypoxia conditions, i.e. HIF-1α and carbonic anhydrase IX, among others. In this review these hypoxia markers are analyzed focusing on their medicinal chemistry characteristics. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. PET Radiopharmaceuticals for Imaging Integrin Expression: Tracers in Clinical Studies and Recent Developments

    PubMed Central

    Maschauer, Simone

    2014-01-01

    Noninvasive determination of integrin expression has become an interesting approach in nuclear medicine. Since the discovery of the first 18F-labeled cyclic RGD peptide as radiotracer for imaging integrin α v β 3 expression in vivo, there have been carried out enormous efforts to develop RGD peptides for PET imaging. Moreover, in recent years, additional integrins, including α 5 β 1 and α v β 6, came into the focus of pharmaceutical radiochemistry. This review will discuss the tracers already evaluated in clinical trials and summarize the preliminary outcome. It will also give an overview on recent developments to further optimize the first-generation compounds such as [18F]Galacto-RGD. This includes recently developed 18F-labeling strategies and also new approaches in 68Ga-complex chemistry. Furthermore, the approaches to develop radiopharmaceuticals targeting integrin α 5 β 1 and α v β 6 will be summarized and discussed. PMID:25013808

  13. Radiation Dose to Patients from Radiopharmaceuticals: a Compendium of Current Information Related to Frequently Used Substances.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, S; Johansson, L; Leide Svegborn, S; Liniecki, J; Noßke, D; Riklund, K Å; Stabin, M; Taylor, D; Bolch, W; Carlsson, S; Eckerman, K; Giussani, A; Söderberg, L; Valind, S

    2015-07-01

    This report provides a compendium of current information relating to radiation dose to patients, including biokinetic models, biokinetic data, dose coefficients for organ and tissue absorbed doses, and effective dose for major radiopharmaceuticals based on the radiation protection guidance given in Publication 60(ICRP, 1991). These data were mainly compiled from Publications 53, 80, and 106(ICRP, 1987, 1998, 2008), and related amendments and corrections. This report also includes new information for 82Rb-chloride, iodide (123I, 124I, 125I, and 131I) and 123I labeled 2ß-carbomethoxy 3ß-(4-iodophenyl)-N-(3-fluoropropyl) nortropane (FPCIT).The coefficients tabulated in this publication will be superseded in due course by values calculated using new International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements/International Commission on Radiological Protection adult and paediatric reference phantoms and Publication 103 methodology (ICRP,2007). The data presented in this report are intended for diagnostic nuclear medicine and not for therapeutic applications.

  14. Hydroxypyridinone Chelators: From Iron Scavenging to Radiopharmaceuticals for PET Imaging with Gallium-68.

    PubMed

    Cusnir, Ruslan; Imberti, Cinzia; Hider, Robert C; Blower, Philip J; Ma, Michelle T

    2017-01-08

    Derivatives of 3,4-hydroxypyridinones have been extensively studied for in vivo Fe(3+) sequestration. Deferiprone, a 1,2-dimethyl-3,4-hydroxypyridinone, is now routinely used for clinical treatment of iron overload disease. Hexadentate tris(3,4-hydroxypyridinone) ligands (THP) complex Fe(3+) at very low iron concentrations, and their high affinities for oxophilic trivalent metal ions have led to their development for new applications as bifunctional chelators for the positron emitting radiometal, (68)Ga(3+), which is clinically used for molecular imaging in positron emission tomography (PET). THP-peptide bioconjugates rapidly and quantitatively complex (68)Ga(3+) at ambient temperature, neutral pH and micromolar concentrations of ligand, making them amenable to kit-based radiosynthesis of (68)Ga PET radiopharmaceuticals. (68)Ga-labelled THP-peptides accumulate at target tissue in vivo, and are excreted largely via a renal pathway, providing high quality PET images.

  15. Differential renal function in unilateral renal injury: possible effects of radiopharmaceutical choice. [Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, A. Jr.; Lallone, R.

    1985-01-01

    An abnormal filtration fraction or a significant divergence between a kidney's ability to extract Tc-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) and other function parameters, such as the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) or the effective renal plasma flow (ERPF, could lead to different estimates of relative or absolute renal function, depending on the radiopharmaceutical administered. To evaluate this possible divergence, the authors measured the relative GFR (I-125 iothalamate), ERPF (I-131 hippurate), and Tc-99m DMSA accumulation in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats with unilateral ureteral obstruction or unilateral ischemia at various times after renal injury. The relative ERPF of the obstructed kidney was significantly greater than the relative GFR at all time periods studied; significant but less dramatic differences were noted comparing DMSA with GFR in obstruction and DMSA and ERPF with GRF in ischemia.

  16. Effect of altered thyroid status on the transport of hepatobiliary radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Pahuja, D.N.; Noronha, O.P.

    1985-10-01

    The effect of induced hypothyroidism (by feeding an antithyroid drug-propylthiouracil) on the transport and clearance of the routinely used hepatobiliary radiopharmaceuticals--radioiodinated iodine- T (131I) rose bengal and technetium-99m-N-(4-n-butylphenylcarbamoylmethyl) iminodiacetate, was studied in the rats. Hypothyroidism was associated with depressed growth and retarded clearance of these radiotracers from the in vivo system. Treatment of the hypothyroid rats with thyroxine (2-5 micrograms/100 g b.w. day) for 6 wk, restored these parameters towards normal values. These data suggest that delayed clearance of these hepatobiliary tracers could be related to reduced metabolic rate accompanied with the hypotonia and hypomotility of intestine normally observed in the hypothyroid state.

  17. Scaling animal to human biodistribution of the radiopharmaceutical [68Ga]Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra, Pamela Ochoa; Veloza, Stella

    2016-07-01

    The radiotracer called 68Ga-labelled Glu-urea-Lys(Ahx)-HBED-CC ([68Ga]Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC) is a novel radiophar-maceutical for the detection of prostate cancer lesions by positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Setting up a cost-effective manual synthesis of this radiotracer and making its clinical translation in Colombia will require two important elements: the evaluation of the procedure to yield a consistent product, meeting standards of radio-chemical purity and low toxicity and then, the evaluation of the radiation dosimetry. In this paper a protocol to extrapolate the biokinetic model made in normal mice to humans by using the computer software for internal dose assessment OLINDA/EXM® is presented as an accurate and standardized method for the calculation of radiation dosimetry estimates.

  18. Radioprotective effect of the Barbados Cherry (Malpighia glabra L.) against radiopharmaceutical iodine-131 in Wistar rats in vivo.

    PubMed

    Düsman, Elisângela; Berti, Alessandra Paim; Mariucci, Rosinete Gonçalves; Lopes, Nilson Benedito; Tonin, Lilian Tatiani Düsman; Vicentini, Veronica Elisa Pimenta

    2014-01-31

    The increasing consumption of fruits and vegetables has contributed to the improvement of populational health, due in part, to the abundance of antioxidants in these foods. Antioxidants reduce the level of oxidative damage to DNA caused by free radicals and ionizing radiation, including the radioisotope iodine-131 (131I). This isotope is used for the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid injuries, such as hyperthyroidism and cancer. This study aimed to evaluate the radioprotective and cytotoxic activity of acute and subchronic treatments with Barbados Cherry (BC) (Malpighia glabra L.) fruit juice (5 mg), which is rich in potent antioxidants such as vitamin C, phenols, carotenoids, anthocyanins and yellow flavonoids and its activity against the mutagenic activity of the therapeutic dose of 25 μCi of radioiodine for hyperthyroidism. The test system used was the bone marrow cells of Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus) that were treated in vivo by gavage. BC showed radioprotective activity in acute treatments, which is most likely due to the joint action of its antioxidant components. In subchronic treatments, the continuous treatment presented an effective radioprotective activity, which was significantly different from treatment with the radiopharmaceutical only. Treatment with BC prior to (PRE) and simultaneous with (SIM) ionizing radiation decreased the number of induced chromosomal alterations, while post-treatment produced no protective effect. In addition, BC exhibited no cytotoxic activity. These data serve as evidence that BC can be used as a preventive health measure to improve public health quality by countering the action of inevitable exposure to mutagens, such as 131I.

  19. Radioprotective effect of the Barbados Cherry (Malpighia glabra L.) against radiopharmaceutical Iodine-131 in Wistar rats in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The increasing consumption of fruits and vegetables has contributed to the improvement of populational health, due in part, to the abundance of antioxidants in these foods. Antioxidants reduce the level of oxidative damage to DNA caused by free radicals and ionizing radiation, including the radioisotope iodine-131 (131I). This isotope is used for the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid injuries, such as hyperthyroidism and cancer. Methods This study aimed to evaluate the radioprotective and cytotoxic activity of acute and subchronic treatments with Barbados Cherry (BC) (Malpighia glabra L.) fruit juice (5 mg), which is rich in potent antioxidants such as vitamin C, phenols, carotenoids, anthocyanins and yellow flavonoids and its activity against the mutagenic activity of the therapeutic dose of 25 μCi of radioiodine for hyperthyroidism. The test system used was the bone marrow cells of Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus) that were treated in vivo by gavage. Results BC showed radioprotective activity in acute treatments, which is most likely due to the joint action of its antioxidant components. In subchronic treatments, the continuous treatment presented an effective radioprotective activity, which was significantly different from treatment with the radiopharmaceutical only. Treatment with BC prior to (PRE) and simultaneous with (SIM) ionizing radiation decreased the number of induced chromosomal alterations, while post-treatment produced no protective effect. In addition, BC exhibited no cytotoxic activity. Conclusions These data serve as evidence that BC can be used as a preventive health measure to improve public health quality by countering the action of inevitable exposure to mutagens, such as 131I. PMID:24479389

  20. Pharmacokinetic Studies in Neonates: The Utility of an Opportunistic Sampling Design.

    PubMed

    Leroux, Stéphanie; Turner, Mark A; Guellec, Chantal Barin-Le; Hill, Helen; van den Anker, Johannes N; Kearns, Gregory L; Jacqz-Aigrain, Evelyne; Zhao, Wei

    2015-12-01

    The use of an opportunistic (also called scavenged) sampling strategy in a prospective pharmacokinetic study combined with population pharmacokinetic modelling has been proposed as an alternative strategy to conventional methods for accomplishing pharmacokinetic studies in neonates. However, the reliability of this approach in this particular paediatric population has not been evaluated. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the performance of an opportunistic sampling strategy for a population pharmacokinetic estimation, as well as dose prediction, and compare this strategy with a predetermined pharmacokinetic sampling approach. Three population pharmacokinetic models were derived for ciprofloxacin from opportunistic blood samples (SC model), predetermined (i.e. scheduled) samples (TR model) and all samples (full model used to previously characterize ciprofloxacin pharmacokinetics), using NONMEM software. The predictive performance of developed models was evaluated in an independent group of patients. Pharmacokinetic data from 60 newborns were obtained with a total of 430 samples available for analysis; 265 collected at predetermined times and 165 that were scavenged from those obtained as part of clinical care. All datasets were fit using a two-compartment model with first-order elimination. The SC model could identify the most significant covariates and provided reasonable estimates of population pharmacokinetic parameters (clearance and steady-state volume of distribution) compared with the TR and full models. Their predictive performances were further confirmed in an external validation by Bayesian estimation, and showed similar results. Monte Carlo simulation based on area under the concentration-time curve from zero to 24 h (AUC24)/minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) using either the SC or the TR model gave similar dose prediction for ciprofloxacin. Blood samples scavenged in the course of caring for neonates can be used to estimate

  1. Implementation and validation of collapsed cone superposition for radiopharmaceutical dosimetry of photon emitters.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Garcia, Manuel; Gardin, Isabelle; Lebtahi, Rachida; Dieudonné, Arnaud

    2015-10-21

    Two collapsed cone (CC) superposition algorithms have been implemented for radiopharmaceutical dosimetry of photon emitters. The straight CC (SCC) superposition method uses a water energy deposition kernel (EDKw) for each electron, positron and photon components, while the primary and scatter CC (PSCC) superposition method uses different EDKw for primary and once-scattered photons. PSCC was implemented only for photons originating from the nucleus, precluding its application to positron emitters. EDKw are linearly scaled by radiological distance, taking into account tissue density heterogeneities. The implementation was tested on 100, 300 and 600 keV mono-energetic photons and (18)F, (99m)Tc, (131)I and (177)Lu. The kernels were generated using the Monte Carlo codes MCNP and EGSnrc. The validation was performed on 6 phantoms representing interfaces between soft-tissues, lung and bone. The figures of merit were γ (3%, 3 mm) and γ (5%, 5 mm) criterions corresponding to the computation comparison on 80 absorbed doses (AD) points per phantom between Monte Carlo simulations and CC algorithms. PSCC gave better results than SCC for the lowest photon energy (100 keV). For the 3 isotopes computed with PSCC, the percentage of AD points satisfying the γ (5%, 5 mm) criterion was always over 99%. A still good but worse result was found with SCC, since at least 97% of AD-values verified the γ (5%, 5 mm) criterion, except a value of 57% for the (99m)Tc with the lung/bone interface. The CC superposition method for radiopharmaceutical dosimetry is a good alternative to Monte Carlo simulations while reducing computation complexity.

  2. Deficiencies in product labelling instructions and quality control directions for 99mTc radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Buroni, Federica E; Lodola, Lorenzo; Persico, Marco G; Aprile, Carlo

    2014-02-01

    The aim of the study was to identify deficiencies in product labelling instructions for reconstitution and in the quality control directions detailed in the technical leaflets (TLs) or summary product characteristic (SPC) sheets of commonly used technetium labelling cold kits. The reconstitution and quality control directions in 25 TLs/SPCs were evaluated to identify deficiencies, incompleteness, restrictions, errors, impracticability, and vagueness. In addition, their congruence with the statements given in the relative European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur. VII ed.) monography and diagnostic reference levels of Directive 97/43/EURATOM was evaluated. Deficiencies in information were scored and classified into five categories: 1, absent or incomplete; 2, restrictive; 3, inconsistent or wrong; 4, impractical; and 5, vague. In the 25 documents analyzed a total of 141 deficiencies were found (corresponding to 40.2% of the total scores assigned), and more frequently they pertained to quality control procedures (70.9%), followed by those related to quantitative composition (14.9%), preparation (8.5%), and particle size (5.7%). Nearly 80% of these deficiencies were classified as type 1 - that is, absent or incomplete information. The indications in TLs and SPCs should provide useful information for maintaining the quality and purity of the radiopharmaceutical preparation and ensure the safety level and effectiveness required by law. However, the instructions are often suboptimal or even erroneous, and consequently there are countless failures or difficulties, which represent an impediment to good laboratory practice. We believe that a 'smart' review of radiopharmaceutical documentation would be beneficial in order to align these indications to the real needs of the operators involved in routine in-house nuclear medicine practice.

  3. Grepafloxacin pharmacokinetics in individuals with hepatic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Efthymiopoulos, C; Bramer, S L; Maroli, A; Flaherty, J F; Wolfe, E; Bass, N; Somberg, K

    1997-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of grepafloxacin, a new broad spectrum fluoroquinolone antibiotic, were studied in 2 trials involving 14 healthy volunteers, 10 individuals with mild (Child-Pugh Class A) impairment of liver function, and 12 with moderate (Child-Pugh Class B or C) hepatic impairment. All participants received an oral dose of grepafloxacin 400 mg, daily for 7 days, and plasma and urine grepafloxacin concentrations were measured over 7 days. The pooled data from participants with impaired liver function showed that, compared with healthy individuals, peak plasma grepafloxacin concentrations, area under the plasma concentration-time curve and proportion of the dose excreted in the urine were increased. In addition, apparent total clearance was reduced in the presence of hepatic dysfunction. Peak concentrations were increased by 36% and 48% in individuals with Class A and B disease, respectively; the corresponding reductions in clearance were 33% and 55%, respectively. Child-Pugh scores and components of the scores showed no correlation with any pharmacokinetic variables. Based on these findings, we recommend a daily grepafloxacin dose of 400 mg in patients with mild hepatic impairment, irrespective of the severity of infection. Grepafloxacin should not be used in patients with moderate or severe liver disease.

  4. [Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of ceftaroline].

    PubMed

    Grau, Santiago; Sorlí, Luisa; Luque, Sonia

    2014-03-01

    Ceftaroline is administered intravenously in the form of a prodrug, ceftaroline fosamil, which is rapidly hydrolyzed by plasma phosphatases to its active form, ceftaroline. In general, the pharmacokinetics of ceftaroline differ little from those of other cephalosporins. A proportional increase in both the peak plasma concentration (Cmax) and the area under the curve (AUC) have been observed when the drug is administered in increasing doses, which demonstrates its linear pharmacokinetics. Half the dose of ceftaroline is excreted actively through the kidneys. The pharmacokinetic parameters of ceftaroline administered through the intramuscular route in diverse animal species were similar to those observed when the drug was administered intravenously and consequently clinical research into ceftaroline administered through this alternative route would be appropriate. Patients with moderate-severe alterations of renal function and those undergoing hemodialysis require dose adjustments. There is limited experience of the pharmacokinetics of ceftaroline in children, which has given rise to several schedules stratified by age groups. The pharmacodynamics of the drug have been studied in models of animal infection and in in vitro infections caused mainly by Staphylococcus aureus (including methicillin-resistant S. aureus [MRSA], strains with intermediate vancomycin sensitivity [hVISA or hGISA]) and by Streptococcus pneumoniae strains with distinct sensitivities to penicillin. Because ceftaroline is a time-dependent antibiotic, the most widely studied pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) indicator is the time interval during which drug concentrations are maintained above the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), calculated both as total drug (T > MIC) and as free fraction of the drug (fT > MIC). The PK/PD simulations carried out in these models, developed on the basis of the concentrations obtained with routine doses in humans, have shown that ceftaroline has a good PK

  5. A Treatment Planning Method for Sequentially Combining Radiopharmaceutical Therapy and External Radiation Therapy;External beam therapy; Radiopharmaceutical therapy; Three-dimensional dosimetry; Treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, Robert F.; McNutt, Todd; Baechler, Sebastien; He Bin; Esaias, Caroline E.; Frey, Eric C.; Loeb, David M.; Wahl, Richard L.; Shokek, Ori; Sgouros, George

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Effective cancer treatment generally requires combination therapy. The combination of external beam therapy (XRT) with radiopharmaceutical therapy (RPT) requires accurate three-dimensional dose calculations to avoid toxicity and evaluate efficacy. We have developed and tested a treatment planning method, using the patient-specific three-dimensional dosimetry package 3D-RD, for sequentially combined RPT/XRT therapy designed to limit toxicity to organs at risk. Methods and Materials: The biologic effective dose (BED) was used to translate voxelized RPT absorbed dose (D{sub RPT}) values into a normalized total dose (or equivalent 2-Gy-fraction XRT absorbed dose), NTD{sub RPT} map. The BED was calculated numerically using an algorithmic approach, which enabled a more accurate calculation of BED and NTD{sub RPT}. A treatment plan from the combined Samarium-153 and external beam was designed that would deliver a tumoricidal dose while delivering no more than 50 Gy of NTD{sub sum} to the spinal cord of a patient with a paraspinal tumor. Results: The average voxel NTD{sub RPT} to tumor from RPT was 22.6 Gy (range, 1-85 Gy); the maximum spinal cord voxel NTD{sub RPT} from RPT was 6.8 Gy. The combined therapy NTD{sub sum} to tumor was 71.5 Gy (range, 40-135 Gy) for a maximum voxel spinal cord NTD{sub sum} equal to the maximum tolerated dose of 50 Gy. Conclusions: A method that enables real-time treatment planning of combined RPT-XRT has been developed. By implementing a more generalized conversion between the dose values from the two modalities and an activity-based treatment of partial volume effects, the reliability of combination therapy treatment planning has been expanded.

  6. Optimizing nanomedicine pharmacokinetics using physiologically based pharmacokinetics modelling.

    PubMed

    Moss, Darren Michael; Siccardi, Marco

    2014-09-01

    The delivery of therapeutic agents is characterized by numerous challenges including poor absorption, low penetration in target tissues and non-specific dissemination in organs, leading to toxicity or poor drug exposure. Several nanomedicine strategies have emerged as an advanced approach to enhance drug delivery and improve the treatment of several diseases. Numerous processes mediate the pharmacokinetics of nanoformulations, with the absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination (ADME) being poorly understood and often differing substantially from traditional formulations. Understanding how nanoformulation composition and physicochemical properties influence drug distribution in the human body is of central importance when developing future treatment strategies. A helpful pharmacological tool to simulate the distribution of nanoformulations is represented by physiologically based pharmacokinetics (PBPK) modelling, which integrates system data describing a population of interest with drug/nanoparticle in vitro data through a mathematical description of ADME. The application of PBPK models for nanomedicine is in its infancy and characterized by several challenges. The integration of property-distribution relationships in PBPK models may benefit nanomedicine research, giving opportunities for innovative development of nanotechnologies. PBPK modelling has the potential to improve our understanding of the mechanisms underpinning nanoformulation disposition and allow for more rapid and accurate determination of their kinetics. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge of nanomedicine distribution and the use of PBPK modelling in the characterization of nanoformulations with optimal pharmacokinetics. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  7. [Interspecies differences of noopept pharmacokinetics].

    PubMed

    Boĭko, S S; Korotkov, S A; Zherdev, V P; Gudasheva, T A; Ostrovskaia, R U; Voronina, T A

    2004-01-01

    Significant interspecific differences in the pharmacokinetics of noopept are manifested by a decrease in the drug elimination rate on the passage from rats to rabbits and humans. Very intensive metabolism of noopept was observed upon intravenous administration in rats. In these animals, presystemic elimination mechanisms lead to the formation of a specific metabolite representing a product of drug biotransformation hydroxylated at the phenyl ring. In rabbits, unchanged noopept circulates in the blood for a longer time upon both intravenous and peroral introduction, biotransformation proceeds at a much slower rate, and no metabolites analogous to that found in rats are detected. The noopept pharmacokinetics in humans differs from that in animals by still slower elimination and considerable individual variability. No drug metabolites are found in the human blood plasma, probably because of a relatively small dose and low concentration.

  8. A new approach to the analysis of radiopharmaceuticals. Final technical report, January 15, 1987--June 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, A.G.; Davison, A.; Costello, C.E.

    1998-03-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate analytical techniques that could be used in the study of both the basic chemistry and the radiopharmaceutical chemistry of {sup 99m}Tc. First funded in 1981, the work focused initially upon the use of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and various forms of mass spectrometry for the identification of technetium species. This funding allowed the authors to combine HPLC and mass spectrometry to identify radiopharmaceuticals which, although in clinical use, had not previously been characterized. Other techniques that have been examined include resonance Raman spectroscopy and, more significantly, {sup 99}Tc nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), with the latter not only being used in purely chemical experiments but also in biologic studies. In 1985 a grant to the Department of Chemistry at MIT from DOE allowed the purchase of an X-ray diffractometer and access to this instrument has enabled them to broaden the analytical base with routine structural determinations.

  9. The Medical Imaging & Technology Alliance conference on research endpoints appropriate for medicare coverage of new PET radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Hillman, Bruce J; Frank, Richard A; Abraham, Brian C

    2013-09-01

    The outcomes of a 2011 Medical Imaging & Technology Alliance (MITA) conference helped shape considerations about what might be the most appropriate pathways for the regulatory and payment considerations of new PET radiopharmaceuticals. As follow-up to that conference, MITA convened a second conference of stakeholders to advise payers on what might be acceptable endpoints for clinical trials to support the coverage of novel PET agents. The conference involved experts on imaging and clinical research, providers of PET services, as well as representatives of interested medical societies, the PET industry, and the regulatory and payer communities. The principal outcome of their deliberations was that it was unrealistic to expect trials of new PET radiopharmaceuticals to directly demonstrate a health benefit. Rather, intermediate outcomes, such as a positive change in patient management, would be more efficient and appropriate. Copyright © 2013 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Population Pharmacokinetics of Intranasal Scopolamine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, L.; Chow, D. S. L.; Putcha, L.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: An intranasal gel dosage formulation of scopolamine (INSCOP) was developed for the treatment of Space Motion Sickness (SMS).The bioavailability and pharmacokinetics (PK) was evaluated using data collected in Phase II IND protocols. We reported earlier statistically significant gender differences in PK parameters of INSCOP at a dose level of 0.4 mg. To identify covariates that influence PK parameters of INSCOP, we examined population covariates of INSCOP PK model for 0.4 mg dose. Methods: Plasma scopolamine concentrations versus time data were collected from 20 normal healthy human subjects (11 male/9 female) after a 0.4 mg dose. Phoenix NLME was employed for PK analysis of these data using gender, body weight and age as covariates for model selection. Model selection was based on a likelihood ratio test on the difference of criteria (-2LL). Statistical significance for base model building and individual covariate analysis was set at P less than 0.05{delta(-2LL)=3.84}. Results: A one-compartment pharmacokinetic model with first-order elimination best described INSCOP concentration ]time profiles. Inclusion of gender, body weight and age as covariates individually significantly reduced -2LL by the cut-off value of 3.84(P less than 0.05) when tested against the base model. After the forward stepwise selection and backward elimination steps, gender was selected to add to the final model which had significant influence on absorption rate constant (ka) and the volume of distribution (V) of INSCOP. Conclusion: A population pharmacokinetic model for INSCOP has been identified and gender was a significant contributing covariate for the final model. The volume of distribution and Ka were significantly higher in males than in females which confirm gender-dependent pharmacokinetics of scopolamine after administration of a 0.4 mg dose.

  11. Pharmacokinetics and RC Circuit Concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cock, Mieke De; Janssen, Paul

    2013-11-01

    Most introductory physics courses include a chapter on RC circuits in which the differential equations for the charging and discharging of a capacitor are derived. A number of papers in this journal describe lab experiments dealing with the measurement of different parameters in such RC circuits. In this contribution, we report on a lab experiment we developed for students majoring in pharmacy, using RC circuits to simulate a pharmacokinetic process.

  12. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of intrathecal ziconotide in chronic pain patients.

    PubMed

    Wermeling, Daniel; Drass, Michael; Ellis, David; Mayo, Martha; McGuire, Dawn; O'Connell, Damian; Hale, Victoria; Chao, Stella

    2003-06-01

    The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of ziconotide were assessed over a 48-hour period following intrathecal (i.t.) administration (1, 5, 7.5, or 10 micrograms) to 22 patients with chronic, nonmalignant pain. Plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were obtained over a 24-hour period. Analgesic efficacy was monitored using Visual Analog Scale of Pain Intensity (VASPI) and Category Pain Relief Scores (CPRS) measurements. Pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters were calculated by noncompartmental methods. Plasma ziconotide data were insufficient for PK calculations. In CSF, the median half-life of ziconotide was 4.5 hours. The median CSF clearance and volume of distribution were 0.26 mL/min and 99 mL, respectively. CSF pharmacokinetics of ziconotide were linear, based on cumulative exposure and peak CSF concentrations. A dose-related analgesia was observed. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic efficacy and safety analyses showed that higher CSF ziconotide concentrations were generally associated with analgesia and increased incidence of nervous system adverse events following a 1-hour i.t. infusion.

  13. The pharmacokinetics of oxypurinol in people with gout

    PubMed Central

    Stocker, Sophie L; McLachlan, Andrew J; Savic, Radojka M; Kirkpatrick, Carl M; Graham, Garry G; Williams, Kenneth M; Day, Richard O

    2012-01-01

    AIMS Our aim was to identify and quantify the sources of variability in oxypurinol pharmacokinetics and explore relationships with plasma urate concentrations. METHODS Non-linear mixed effects modelling was applied to concentration–time data from 155 gouty patients with demographic, medical history and renal transporter genotype information. RESULTS A one compartment pharmacokinetic model with first order absorption best described the oxypurinol concentration–time data. Renal function and concomitant medicines (diuretics and probenecid), but not transporter genotype, significantly influenced oxypurinol pharmacokinetics and reduced the between subject variability in the apparent clearance of oxypurinol (CL/Fm) from 65% to 29%. CL/Fm for patients with normal, mild, moderate and severe renal impairment was 1.8, 0.6, 0.3 and 0.18 l h−1, respectively. Model predictions showed a relationship between plasma oxypurinol and urate concentrations and failure to reach target oxypurinol concentrations using suggested allopurinol dosing guidelines. CONCLUSIONS In conclusion, this first established pharmacokinetic model provides a tool to achieve target oxypurinol plasma concentrations, thereby optimizing the effectiveness and safety of allopurinol therapy in gouty patients with various degrees of renal impairment. PMID:22300439

  14. The pharmacokinetics of intravenous fenoldopam in healthy, awake cats.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, K E; Labato, M A; Court, M H

    2016-04-01

    Fenoldopam is a selective dopamine-1 receptor agonist that improves diuresis by increasing renal blood flow and perfusion and causing peripheral vasodilation. Fenoldopam has been shown to induce diuresis and be well-tolerated in healthy cats. It is used clinically in cats with oliguric kidney injury at doses extrapolated from human medicine and canine studies. The pharmacokinetics in healthy beagle dogs has been reported; however, pharmacokinetic data in cats are lacking. The goal of this study was to determine pharmacokinetic data for healthy, awake cats receiving an infusion of fenoldopam. Six healthy, awake, client-owned cats aged 2-6 years old received a 120-min constant rate infusion of fenoldopam at 0.8 μg/kg/min followed by a 20-min washout period. Ascorbate stabilized plasma samples were collected during and after the infusion for the measurement of fenoldopam concentration by HPLC with mass spectrometry detection. This study showed that the geometric mean of the volume of distribution, clearance, and half-life (198 mL/kg, 46 mL/kg/min, and 3.0 mins) is similar to pharmacokinetic parameters for humans. No adverse events were noted. Fenoldopam at a constant rate infusion of 0.8 μg/kg per min was well tolerated in healthy cats. Based on the results, further evaluation of fenoldopam in cats with kidney disease is recommended.

  15. Dynamic 99mTc-MAG3 renography: images for quality control obtained by combining pharmacokinetic modelling, an anthropomorphic computer phantom and Monte Carlo simulated scintillation camera imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brolin, Gustav; Sjögreen Gleisner, Katarina; Ljungberg, Michael

    2013-05-01

    In dynamic renal scintigraphy, the main interest is the radiopharmaceutical redistribution as a function of time. Quality control (QC) of renal procedures often relies on phantom experiments to compare image-based results with the measurement setup. A phantom with a realistic anatomy and time-varying activity distribution is therefore desirable. This work describes a pharmacokinetic (PK) compartment model for 99mTc-MAG3, used for defining a dynamic whole-body activity distribution within a digital phantom (XCAT) for accurate Monte Carlo (MC)-based images for QC. Each phantom structure is assigned a time-activity curve provided by the PK model, employing parameter values consistent with MAG3 pharmacokinetics. This approach ensures that the total amount of tracer in the phantom is preserved between time points, and it allows for modifications of the pharmacokinetics in a controlled fashion. By adjusting parameter values in the PK model, different clinically realistic scenarios can be mimicked, regarding, e.g., the relative renal uptake and renal transit time. Using the MC code SIMIND, a complete set of renography images including effects of photon attenuation, scattering, limited spatial resolution and noise, are simulated. The obtained image data can be used to evaluate quantitative techniques and computer software in clinical renography.

  16. Dynamic (99m)Tc-MAG3 renography: images for quality control obtained by combining pharmacokinetic modelling, an anthropomorphic computer phantom and Monte Carlo simulated scintillation camera imaging.

    PubMed

    Brolin, Gustav; Gleisner, Katarina Sjögreen; Ljungberg, Michael

    2013-05-21

    In dynamic renal scintigraphy, the main interest is the radiopharmaceutical redistribution as a function of time. Quality control (QC) of renal procedures often relies on phantom experiments to compare image-based results with the measurement setup. A phantom with a realistic anatomy and time-varying activity distribution is therefore desirable. This work describes a pharmacokinetic (PK) compartment model for (99m)Tc-MAG3, used for defining a dynamic whole-body activity distribution within a digital phantom (XCAT) for accurate Monte Carlo (MC)-based images for QC. Each phantom structure is assigned a time-activity curve provided by the PK model, employing parameter values consistent with MAG3 pharmacokinetics. This approach ensures that the total amount of tracer in the phantom is preserved between time points, and it allows for modifications of the pharmacokinetics in a controlled fashion. By adjusting parameter values in the PK model, different clinically realistic scenarios can be mimicked, regarding, e.g., the relative renal uptake and renal transit time. Using the MC code SIMIND, a complete set of renography images including effects of photon attenuation, scattering, limited spatial resolution and noise, are simulated. The obtained image data can be used to evaluate quantitative techniques and computer software in clinical renography.

  17. Pharmacokinetics and radiation dosimetry of 99Tcm-labelled monoclonal antibody B43.13 in ovarian cancer patients.

    PubMed

    McQuarrie, S A; Baum, R P; Niesen, A; Madiyalakan, R; Korz, W; Sykes, T R; Sykes, C J; Hör, G; McEwan, A J; Noujaim, A A

    1997-09-01

    OVAREX MAb B43.13 is a new radiopharmaceutical based on a monoclonal antibody (MAb-B43.13) known to recognize CA 125, a tumour antigen associated with epithelial ovarian cancer. This MAb is capable of facile radiolabelling with 99Tcm and has been shown previously to localize in the tumours of ovarian cancer patients. The present study was initiated to measure the pharmacokinetics of this MAb in the serum of 10 patients with primary or metastatic ovarian cancer. A two-compartment model was found to be best at representing the biodistribution of the 99Tcm-labelled MAb, yielding a 2.6 h distribution phase half-life and a 31.3 h elimination phase half-life. The serum and renal clearances for 99Tcm-MAb-B43.13 were 121 and 53 ml h-1 respectively. These parameters were compared with a similar model developed from the serum values of the MAb itself (determined using an ELISA detection method). Based on the serum pharmacokinetics of 99Tcm-MAb-B43.13 and whole-body planar gamma camera images, an estimate of the radiation dose from 99Tcm was calculated using standard MIRD schema. The organs demonstrating significant 99Tcm uptake included the liver, kidneys, heart and spleen. The whole-body dose was similar to other 99Tcm-labelled MAbs.

  18. Pharmacokinetics of drugs in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Feghali, Maisa; Venkataramanan, Raman; Caritis, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy is a complex state where changes in maternal physiology have evolved to favor the development and growth of the placenta and the fetus. These adaptations may affect preexisting disease or result in pregnancy-specific disorders. Similarly, variations in physiology may alter the pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics that determines drug dosing and effect. It follows that detailed pharmacologic information is required to adjust therapeutic treatment strategies during pregnancy. Understanding both pregnancy physiology and the gestation-specific pharmacology of different agents is necessary to achieve effective treatment and limit maternal and fetal risk. Unfortunately, most drug studies have excluded pregnant women based on often-mistaken concerns regarding fetal risk. Furthermore, over two-thirds of women receive prescription drugs while pregnant, with treatment and dosing strategies based on data from healthy male volunteers and non-pregnant women, and with little adjustment for the complex physiology of pregnancy and its unique disease states. This review will describe basic concepts in pharmacokinetics and their clinical relevance and highlight the variations in pregnancy that may impact the pharmacokinetic properties of medications. PMID:26452316

  19. What is currently the best radiopharmaceutical for the hybrid PET/CT detection of recurrent medullary thyroid carcinoma?

    PubMed

    Slavikova, K; Montravers, F; Treglia, G; Kunikowska, J; Kaliska, L; Vereb, M; Talbot, J N; Balogova, S

    2013-06-06

    Among thyroid malignancies, medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) has some very specific features. Production and secretion of large amounts of peptides occur in malignant transformed C cells with few exceptions, leading to high serum levels of calcitonin (Ctn) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), that act after thyroidectomy as tumour markers warning for the presence of persistent or metastatic MTC. The availability of those serum biomarkers with an excellent sensitivity challenges medical imaging to localise the recurrent cancer tissue, since surgery is a major therapeutic option. The aims of this article are (i) to review literature evidence about the efficacy and tolerance of radiopharmaceuticals for 3 targets of PET/CT imaging (glucose metabolism, bioamines metabolism and somatostatin receptors) and also bone scintigraphy which is recommended in the Guidelines of European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO; (ii) to compare the availability and the costs in relation with those radiopharmaceuticals, (iii) and to discuss a possible sequence of those examinations, in order to optimise spending and to minimise the overall radiation dose. In this context of recurrent MTC suspected on rising tumour markers levels after thyroidectomy, this survey of literature confirms that FDOPA is the best radiopharmaceutical for PET/CT with significant diagnostic performance if Ctn>150 pg/mL; an early image acquisition starting during the first 15 min is advised. In negative cases, FDG should be the next PET radiopharmaceutical, in particular if Ctn and CEA levels are rapidly rising, and PET with a somatostatin analogue labelled with gallium-68 when neither FDOPA nor FDG PET are conclusive. Bone scintigraphy could complement FDG-PET/CT if FDOPA is not available.

  20. (18)F-labeled positron emission tomographic radiopharmaceuticals in oncology: an overview of radiochemistry and mechanisms of tumor localization.

    PubMed

    Vallabhajosula, Shankar

    2007-11-01

    Molecular imaging is the visualization, characterization, and measurement of biological processes at the molecular and cellular levels in a living system. At present, positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is one the most rapidly growing areas of medical imaging, with many applications in the clinical management of patients with cancer. Although [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET/CT imaging provides high specificity and sensitivity in several kinds of cancer and has many applications, it is important to recognize that FDG is not a "specific" radiotracer for imaging malignant disease. Highly "tumor-specific" and "tumor cell signal-specific" PET radiopharmaceuticals are essential to meet the growing demand of radioisotope-based molecular imaging technology. In the last 15 years, many alternative PET tracers have been proposed and evaluated in preclinical and clinical studies to characterize the tumor biology more appropriately. The potential clinical utility of several (18)F-labeled radiotracers (eg, fluoride, FDOPA, FLT, FMISO, FES, and FCH) is being reviewed by several investigators in this issue. An overview of design and development of (18)F-labeled PET radiopharmaceuticals, radiochemistry, and mechanism(s) of tumor cell uptake and localization of radiotracers are presented here. The approval of clinical indications for FDG-PET in the year 2000 by the Food and Drug Administration, based on a review of literature, was a major breakthrough to the rapid incorporation of PET into nuclear medicine practice, particularly in oncology. Approval of a radiopharmaceutical typically involves submission of a "New Drug Application" by a manufacturer or a company clearly documenting 2 major aspects of the drug: (1) manufacturing of PET drug using current good manufacturing practices and (2) the safety and effectiveness of a drug with specific indications. The potential routine clinical utility of (18)F-labeled PET radiopharmaceuticals depends also on

  1. Production and Clinical Applications of Radiopharmaceuticals and Medical Radioisotopes in Iran.

    PubMed

    Jalilian, Amir Reza; Beiki, Davood; Hassanzadeh-Rad, Arman; Eftekhari, Arash; Geramifar, Parham; Eftekhari, Mohammad

    2016-07-01

    During past 3 decades, nuclear medicine has flourished as vibrant and independent medical specialty in Iran. Since that time, more than 200 nuclear physicians have been trained and now practicing in nearly 158 centers throughout the country. In the same period, Tc-99m generators and variety of cold kits for conventional nuclear medicine were locally produced for the first time. Local production has continued to mature in robust manner while fulfilling international standards. To meet the ever-growing demand at the national level and with international achievements in mind, work for production of other Tc-99m-based peptides such as ubiquicidin, bombesin, octreotide, and more recently a kit formulation for Tc-99m TRODAT-1 for clinical use was introduced. Other than the Tehran Research Reactor, the oldest facility active in production of medical radioisotopes, there is one commercial and three hospital-based cyclotrons currently operational in the country. I-131 has been one of the oldest radioisotope produced in Iran and traditionally used for treatment of thyrotoxicosis and differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Since 2009, (131)I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine has been locally available for diagnostic applications. Gallium-67 citrate, thallium-201 thallous chloride, and Indium-111 in the form of DTPA and Oxine are among the early cyclotron-produced tracers available in Iran for about 2 decades. Rb-81/Kr-81m generator has been available for pulmonary ventilation studies since 1996. Experimental production of PET radiopharmaceuticals began in 1998. This work has culminated with development and optimization of the high-scale production line of (18)F-FDG shortly after installation of PET/CT scanner in 2012. In the field of therapy, other than the use of old timers such as I-131 and different forms of P-32, there has been quite a significant advancement in production and application of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals in recent years. Application of (131)I

  2. New rhenium complexes with ciprofloxacin as useful models for understanding the properties of [99mTc]-ciprofloxacin radiopharmaceutical.

    PubMed

    Lecina, Joan; Cortés, Pilar; Llagostera, Montserrat; Piera, Carlos; Suades, Joan

    2014-07-01

    Rhenium complexes with the antibiotic ciprofloxacin have been prepared to be studied as models of technetium radiopharmaceuticals. With this aim, the new rhenium complexes 1 {[ReO(Cpf)2]Cl}, 2 {[ReO(CpfH)2]Cl3} and 3 {fac-[Re(CO)3(H2O)(Cpf)]} with ciprofloxacin (CpfH=ciprofloxacin; Cpf=conjugated base of ciprofloxacin) have been synthesised and characterised by elemental analyses, IR, NMR ((1)H, (19)F and (13)C CP-MAS) spectroscopy, as well as MS measurements. All spectroscopic data are consistent with the coordination of ciprofloxacin in all these complexes through the carbonyl and the carboxylate oxygen atoms with the formation of a six member chelate ring. The study of a Tc-ciprofloxacin solution by ESI-MS reveals the presence of [TcO(Cpf)2](+) cations, which agrees with the hypothesis that complexes 1 and 2 can be seen as model rhenium complexes of this radiopharmaceutical. Antimicrobial and DNA gyrase inhibition studies performed with complexes 2 and 3 have shown a very similar behaviour between complex 2 and the free antibiotic, whereas complex 3 exhibit a lower antimicrobial activity. Based on a joint analysis of the data reported in the literature and the chemical and biological results obtained in this study, a tentative proposal to explain some aspects of the behaviour of Tc-ciprofloxacin radiopharmaceutical has been made. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Cardiac blood-pool scintigraphy in rats and hamsters: comparison of five radiopharmaceuticals and three pinhole collimator apertures

    SciTech Connect

    Pieri, P.; Fischman, A.J.; Ahmad, M.; Moore, R.H.; Callahan, R.J.; Strauss, H.W. )

    1991-05-01

    Preclinical evaluation of cardiac drugs may require evaluation of cardiac function in intact animals. To optimize the quality of radionuclide measurements of ventricular function in small animals, a comparison was made of gated blood-pool scans recorded with five blood-pool radiopharmaceuticals ({sup 99}mTc-labeled human polyclonal IgG, {sup 99}mTc-human serum albumin labeled by two methods, and red blood cells radiolabeled with {sup 99}mTc via in vivo and in vitro methods) in rats and three pinhole apertures in hamsters. The quality of the radiopharmaceuticals was evaluated by comparing count density ratios (LV/BACKGROUND and LV/LIVER) and ejection fractions recorded with each agent. The edge definition of the left ventricle and count rate performance of the 1-, 2-, and 3-mm apertures was evaluated in hamsters. In general, the images obtained with the radiolabeled cells were superior to those obtained with the labeled proteins and no significant differences between the protein preparations were detected. Left ventricular ejection fractions calculated with all five radiopharmaceuticals were not significantly different. The best quality images were obtained with the 1-mm pinhole collimator. Ejection fraction and acquisition time were inversely related to aperture size. A good compromise between resolution and sensitivity was obtained with the 2-mm pinhole collimator.

  4. Development of more efficacious [Tc]-99m organ imaging agents for use in nuclear medicine by analytical characterization of radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Heineman, W.R.

    1993-05-03

    This research program is detailed at development of more efficacious technetium-99m radiopharmaceuticals for use as imaging agents in diagnostic nuclear medicine. We seek to isolate and develop distinct site imaging agents to provide diagnostic information concerning a given pathological condition. Analytical techniques are being developed to enable complete analysis of radiopharmaceutical preparations so that individual complexes can be characterized with respect to imaging efficacy and to enable a radiopharmaceutical to be monitored after injection into a test animal to determine the species that actually accumulates in an organ to provide the image. Administration of the isolated, single most effective imaging complex, rather than a mixture of technetium-containing complexes, wi-11 minimize radiation exposure to the patient and maximize diagnostic information available to the clinician. This report specifically describes the development of capillary electrophoresis (CE) for characterizating diphosphonate skeletal imaging agents. Advances in the development of electrochemical and fiber optic sensors for Tc and Re imaging agents are described. These sensors will ultimately be capable of monitoring a specific chemical state of an imaging agent in vivo after injection into a test animal by implantation in the organ of interest.

  5. Synthesis of specific SPECT-radiopharmaceutical for tumor imaging based on methionine: 99mTc-DTPA-bis(methionine).

    PubMed

    Hazari, Puja Panwar; Shukla, Gauri; Goel, Vijay; Chuttani, Krishna; Kumar, Nitin; Sharma, Rajnish; Mishra, Anil Kumar

    2010-02-17

    Methionine-diethylenetriaminepentaaceticacid-methionine [DTPA-bis(Met)] was synthesized by covalently conjugating two molecules of methionine (Met) to DTPA and was labeled with (99m)Tc in high radiochemical purity and specific activity (166-296 MBq/micromol). Kinetic analysis showed K(m) of 12.95 +/- 3.8 nM and a maximal transport rate velocity (V(max)) of 80.35 +/- 0.42 pmol microg protein(-1) min(-1) of (99m)Tc-DTPA-bis(Met) in U-87MG cells. DTPA-bis(Met) had dissociation constants (K(d)) of 0.067 and 0.077 nM in U-87MG and BMG, respectively. (35)S-methionine efflux was trans-stimulated by (99m)Tc-labeled DTPA conjugate demonstrating concentrative transport. The blood kinetic studies showed fast clearance with t(1/2) (F) = 36 +/- 0.5 min and t(1/2) (S) = 5 h 55 min +/- 0.85 min. U-87MG and BMG tumors saturated at approximately 2000 +/- 280 nmol/kg of (99m)Tc-DTPA-bis(Met). Initial rate of transport of (99m)Tc-DTPA-bis(Met) in U-87MG tumor was found to be 4.68 x 10(-4) micromol/kg/min. The tumor (BMG cell line, malignant glioma) grafted in athymic mice were readily identifiable in the gamma images. Semiquantitative analysis from region of interest (ROI) placed over areas counting average counts per pixel with maximum radiotracer uptake on the tumor was found to be 11.05 +/- 3.99 and compared ROI with muscle (0.55 +/- 0.13). The tumor-to-contralateral muscle tissue ratio of (99m)Tc-DTPA-bis(Met) was found to be 23 +/- 3.3. Biodistribution revealed significant tumor uptake and good contrast in the U-87MG, BMG, and EAT tumor-bearing mice. In clinical trials, the sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive values were found to be 87.8%, 92.8%, and 96.6%, respectively. (99m)Tc-DTPA-bis(Met) showed excellent tumor targeting and has promising utility as a SPECT-radiopharmaceutical for imaging methionine-dependent human tumors and to quantify the ratio of MET(+)/HCY(-).

  6. Convenient preparation of 68Ga-based PET-radiopharmaceuticals at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Velikyan, I; Maecke, H; Langstrom, B

    2008-02-01

    A straightforward labeling using generator produced positron emitting (68)Ga, which provides high quality images, may result in kit type production of PET radiopharmaceuticals and make PET examinations possible also at centers lacking accelerators. The introduction of macrocyclic bifunctional chelators that would provide fast (68)Ga-complexation at room temperature would simplify even further tracer preparation and open wide possibilities for (68)Ga-labeling of fragile and potent macromolecules. Gallium-68 has the potential to facilitate development of clinically practical PET and to promote PET technique for individualized medicine. The macrocyclic chelator, 1,4,7-triazacyclononanetriacetic acid (NOTA), and its derivative coupled to an eight amino acid residue peptide (NODAGA-TATE, [NODAGA (0), Tyr(3)]Octreotate) were labeled with (68)Ge/(68)Ga-generator produced positron emitting (68)Ga. Formation kinetics of (68)Ga-NOTA was studied as a function of pH and formation kinetics of (68)Ga-NODAGA-TATE was studied as a function of the bioconjugate concentration. The nearly quantitative radioactivity incorporation (RAI>95%) for (68)Ga-NOTA was achieved within less than 10 min at room temperature and pH 3.5. The concentrations of NODAGA-TATE required for RAI of >90% and >95% were, respectively, 2-5 and 10 microM. In both cases the purification of the (68)Ga-labeled products was not necessary since the radiochemical purity was >95% and the preparation buffer, 4-(2-hydroxyethyl) piperazine-1-ethanesulfonic acid (HEPES) is suitable for human use. In order to confirm the identity of the products, complexes comprising (nat)Ga were synthesized and analyzed by mass spectrometry. The complex was found to be stable in the reaction mixture, phosphate buffer, and human plasma during 4.5 h incubation. Free and peptide conjugated NOTA formed stable complexes with (68)Ga at room temperature within 10 min. This might be of special interest for the labeling of fragile and potent

  7. Experimental study of radiopharmaceuticals based on technetium-99m labeled derivative of glucose for tumor diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeltchan, R.; Medvedeva, A.; Sinilkin, I.; Bragina, O.; Chernov, V.; Stasyuk, E.; Rogov, A.; Il'ina, E.; Larionova, L.; Skuridin, V.; Dergilev, A.

    2016-06-01

    Purpose: to study the potential utility of 1-thio-D-glucose labeled with 99mTc for cancer imaging in laboratory animals. Materials and method: the study was carried out in cell cultures of normal CHO (Chinese hamster ovary cells CHO) and malignant tissues MCF-7 (human breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7). To evaluate the uptake of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose in normal and tumor tissue cells, 25 MBq of 1-thio-D-glucose labeled with 99mTc was added to the vials with 3 million cells and incubated for 30 minutes at room temperature. After centrifugation of the vials with cells, the supernatant was removed. Radioactivity in vials with normal and tumor cells was then measured. In addition, the study included 40 mice of C57B 1/6j lines with tumor lesion of the right femur. For neoplastic lesions, Lewis lung carcinoma model was used. Following anesthesia, mice were injected intravenously with 25MBq of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose. Planar scintigraphy was performed 15 minutes later in a matrix of 512x512 pixels for 5 minutes. Results: when measuring the radioactivity of normal and malignant cells after incubation with 99mTc-1-thio-D- glucose, it was found that the radioactivity of malignant cells was higher than that of normal cells. The mean values of radioactivity levels in normal and malignant cells were 0.3±0.15MBq and 1.07±0.6MBq, respectively. All examined animals had increased accumulation of 99mTc-1-thio- D-glucose at the tumor site. The accumulation of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose in the tumor was on average twice as high as compared to the symmetric region. Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose is a prospective radiopharmaceutical for cancer visualization. In addition, high accumulation of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose in the culture of cancer cells and in tumor tissue of animals demonstrates tumor tropism of the radiopharmaceutical.

  8. Study of potential utility of new radiopharmaceuticals based on technetium-99m labeled derivative of glucose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeltchan, R.; Medvedeva, A.; Sinilkin, I.; Chernov, V.; Stasyuk, E.; Rogov, A.; Il'ina, E.; Larionova, L.; Skuridin, V.

    2016-08-01

    Purpose: to study the potential utility of 1-thio-D-glucose labeled with 99mTc for cancer imaging in laboratory animals. Materials and method: the study was carried out in cell cultures of normal CHO (Chinese hamster ovary cells CHO) and malignant tissues MCF-7 (human breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7). To evaluate the uptake of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose in normal and tumor tissue cells, 25 MBq of 1-thio-D-glucose labeled with 99mTc was added to the vials with 3 million cells and incubated for 30 min at room temperature. After centrifugation of the vials with cells, the supernatant was removed. The radioactivity in vials with normal and tumor cells was then measured. In addition, the study included 40 mice of C57B1/6j lines with tumor lesion of the right femur. For neoplastic lesions, Lewis lung carcinoma model was used. Following anesthesia, mice were injected intravenously with 25 MBq of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose. Planar scintigraphy was performed 15 minutes later in a matrix of 512x512 pixels for 5 min. Results: when measuring the radioactivity of normal and malignant cells after incubation with 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose, it was found that the radioactivity of malignant cells was higher than that of normal cells. The mean values of radioactivity levels in normal and malignant cells were 0.3 ± 0.15 MBq and 1.07 ± 0.6 MBq, respectively. All examined animals had increased accumulation of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose at the tumor site. The accumulation of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose in the tumor was on average twice as high as compared to the symmetric region. Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose is a prospective radiopharmaceutical for cancer visualization. In addition, high accumulation of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose in the culture of cancer cells and in tumor tissue of animals demonstrates tumor tropism of the radiopharmaceutical.

  9. Gallium-68 DOTATATE Production with Automated PET Radiopharmaceutical Synthesis System: A Three Year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Aslani, Alireza; Snowdon, Graeme M; Bailey, Dale L; Schembri, Geoffrey P; Bailey, Elizabeth A; Roach, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): Gallium-68 (Ga-68) is an ideal research and hospital-based PET radioisotope. Currently, the main form of Ga-68 radiopharmaceutical that is being synthesised in-house is Ga-68 conjugated with DOTA based derivatives. The development of automated synthesis systems has increased the reliability, reproducibility and safety of radiopharmaceutical productions. Here we report on our three year, 500 syntheses experience with an automated system for Ga-68 DOTATATE. Methods: The automated synthesis system we use is divided into three parts of a) servomotor modules, b) single use sterile synthesis cassettes and, c) a computerised system that runs the modules. An audit trail is produced by the system as a requirement for GMP production. The required reagents and chemicals are made in-. The Germanium breakthrough is determined on a weekly basis. Production yields for each synthesis are calculated to monitor the performance and efficiency of the synthesis. The quality of the final product is assessed after each synthesis by ITLC-SG and HPLC methods. Results: A total of 500 Ga-68 DOTATATE syntheses (>800 patient doses) were performed between March 2011 and February 2014. The average generator yield was 81.3±0.2% for 2011, 76.7±0.4% for 2012 and 75.0±0.3% for 2013. Ga-68 DOTATATE yields for 2011, 2012, and 2013 were 81.8±0.4%, 82.2±0.4% and 87.9±0.4%, respectively. These exceed the manufacturer's expected value of approximately 70%. Germanium breakthrough averaged 8.6×10-6% of total activity which is well below the recommended level of 0.001%. The average ITLC-measured radiochemical purity was above 98.5% and the average HPLC-measured radiochemical purity was above 99.5%. Although there were some system failures during synthesis, there were only eight occasions where the patient scans needed to be rescheduled. Conclusion: In our experience the automated synthesis system performs reliably with a relatively low incident of failures. Our system had a consistent

  10. Gallium-68 DOTATATE Production with Automated PET Radiopharmaceutical Synthesis System: A Three Year Experience.

    PubMed

    Aslani, Alireza; Snowdon, Graeme M; Bailey, Dale L; Schembri, Geoffrey P; Bailey, Elizabeth A; Roach, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    Gallium-68 (Ga-68) is an ideal research and hospital-based PET radioisotope. Currently, the main form of Ga-68 radiopharmaceutical that is being synthesised in-house is Ga-68 conjugated with DOTA based derivatives. The development of automated synthesis systems has increased the reliability, reproducibility and safety of radiopharmaceutical productions. Here we report on our three year, 500 syntheses experience with an automated system for Ga-68 DOTATATE. The automated synthesis system we use is divided into three parts of a) servomotor modules, b) single use sterile synthesis cassettes and, c) a computerised system that runs the modules. An audit trail is produced by the system as a requirement for GMP production. The required reagents and chemicals are made in-. The Germanium breakthrough is determined on a weekly basis. Production yields for each synthesis are calculated to monitor the performance and efficiency of the synthesis. The quality of the final product is assessed after each synthesis by ITLC-SG and HPLC methods. A total of 500 Ga-68 DOTATATE syntheses (>800 patient doses) were performed between March 2011 and February 2014. The average generator yield was 81.3±0.2% for 2011, 76.7±0.4% for 2012 and 75.0±0.3% for 2013. Ga-68 DOTATATE yields for 2011, 2012, and 2013 were 81.8±0.4%, 82.2±0.4% and 87.9±0.4%, respectively. These exceed the manufacturer's expected value of approximately 70%. Germanium breakthrough averaged 8.6×10(-6)% of total activity which is well below the recommended level of 0.001%. The average ITLC-measured radiochemical purity was above 98.5% and the average HPLC-measured radiochemical purity was above 99.5%. Although there were some system failures during synthesis, there were only eight occasions where the patient scans needed to be rescheduled. In our experience the automated synthesis system performs reliably with a relatively low incident of failures. Our system had a consistent and reliable Ga-68 DOTATATE output with high

  11. Study of potential utility of new radiopharmaceuticals based on technetium-99m labeled derivative of glucose

    SciTech Connect

    Zeltchan, R. Medvedeva, A.; Sinilkin, I.; Chernov, V.; Stasyuk, E.; Rogov, A.; Il’ina, E.; Larionova, L.; Skuridin, V.

    2016-08-02

    Purpose: to study the potential utility of 1-thio-D-glucose labeled with {sup 99m}Tc for cancer imaging in laboratory animals. Materials and method: the study was carried out in cell cultures of normal CHO (Chinese hamster ovary cells CHO) and malignant tissues MCF-7 (human breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7). To evaluate the uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-1-thio-D-glucose in normal and tumor tissue cells, 25 MBq of 1-thio-D-glucose labeled with {sup 99m}Tc was added to the vials with 3 million cells and incubated for 30 min at room temperature. After centrifugation of the vials with cells, the supernatant was removed. The radioactivity in vials with normal and tumor cells was then measured. In addition, the study included 40 mice of C57B1/6j lines with tumor lesion of the right femur. For neoplastic lesions, Lewis lung carcinoma model was used. Following anesthesia, mice were injected intravenously with 25 MBq of {sup 99m}Tc-1-thio-D-glucose. Planar scintigraphy was performed 15 minutes later in a matrix of 512x512 pixels for 5 min. Results: when measuring the radioactivity of normal and malignant cells after incubation with {sup 99m}Tc-1-thio-D-glucose, it was found that the radioactivity of malignant cells was higher than that of normal cells. The mean values of radioactivity levels in normal and malignant cells were 0.3 ± 0.15 MBq and 1.07 ± 0.6 MBq, respectively. All examined animals had increased accumulation of {sup 99m}Tc-1-thio-D-glucose at the tumor site. The accumulation of {sup 99m}Tc-1-thio-D-glucose in the tumor was on average twice as high as compared to the symmetric region. Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that {sup 99m}Tc-1-thio-D-glucose is a prospective radiopharmaceutical for cancer visualization. In addition, high accumulation of {sup 99m}Tc-1-thio-D-glucose in the culture of cancer cells and in tumor tissue of animals demonstrates tumor tropism of the radiopharmaceutical.

  12. Pharmacokinetics of nifedipine slow-release during sustained tocolysis.

    PubMed

    ter Laak, Maureen A; Roos, Carolien; Touw, Daan J; van Hattum, Paul R M; Kwee, Anneke; Lotgering, Frederik K; Mol, Ben Willem J; van Pampus, Mariëlle G; Porath, Martina M; Spaanderman, Marc E A; van der Post, Joris A M; Papatsonis, Dimitri N M; van 't Veer, Nils E

    2015-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of nifedipine as a tocolytic agent has not been studied in great detail in pregnant women and has instead focused on immediate release tablets and gastrointestinal therapeutic system (GITS) tablets. The aim of this study was to determine nifedipine slow-release half-life and distribution volume in pregnant women and to compare these with pharmacokinetic parameters of nifedipine in non-pregnant subjects described in the literature. This is a study parallel to a trial studying women with threatened preterm labor between 26 + 0 and 32 + 2 weeks after initial tocolysis and a completed course of corticosteroids, who were randomly allocated to maintenance nifedipine (slow-release tablets 20 mg 4 times daily) or placebo. Exclusion criteria for the pharmacokinetic study were contra-indications for nifedipine, impaired liver function, and concomitant intake of inhibitors or inducers of the cytochrome P450 3A4 isoenzyme. Blood samples for measuring nifedipine plasma concentrations were drawn at t = 0, t = 12 hours, t = 24 hours, t = 48 hours, t = 72 hours, t = 7 days, and t = 9 days. Pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated using iterative two-stage Bayesian population pharmacokinetic analysis by MWPharm© software. The study was designed to establish a correlation between body weight and nifedipine plasma level. The pharmacokinetic parameters of nifedipine slow-release tablets were determined from the data of 8 pregnant women. Nifedipine slow-release had a half-life of 2 - 5 hours, a mean distribution volume of 6.2 ± 1.9 L/kg (calculated while using a fixed biological availability of 0.45 taken from the literature due to lack of intravenous data in this population) compared to a half-life of 6 - 11 hours, and a distribution volume of 1.2 - 1.3 L/kg described in non-pregnant subjects in the literature. None of the women delivered during study medication. Study medication was continued for the duration of the pharmacokinetic study (9 days) in all women

  13. Solid-phase synthesis of peptide radiopharmaceuticals using Fmoc-N-epsilon-(hynic-Boc)-lysine, a technetium-binding amino acid: application to Tc-99m-labeled salmon calcitonin.

    PubMed

    Greenland, William E P; Howland, Kevin; Hardy, Judith; Fogelman, Ignac; Blower, Philip J

    2003-04-24

    Labeling of proteins with metallic radionuclides for use in radiopharmaceuticals involves covalently attaching a bifunctional chelator. In principle, use of smaller peptides allows this chelator to be incorporated during solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) with total site specificity. To realize the advantages of this approach, a lysine-hynic conjugate Fmoc-N-epsilon-(Hynic-Boc)-Lys was synthesized for incorporating the well-known technetium-99m-binding hydrazinonicotinamide ligand into peptides during SPPS. It was used to synthesize a technetium-99m-labeled salmon calcitonin with the hynic-linked amino acid in place of lysine-18. A trifluoroacetate group protected the hynic during alkaline oxidation to the cyclic disulfide and was readily removed by mild acid treatment. The peptide was efficiently labeled (91-98% radiochemical yield) with Tc-99m in the presence of tricine and SnCl(2) with high specific activity (>100 MBq/microg). The product showed good serum stability and specific affinity for human calcitonin receptors. Fmoc-N-epsilon-(Hynic-Boc)-Lys is a highly versatile technetium-binding amino acid for incorporation into peptides during SPPS. This allows total flexibility and control in the site of attachment and is suitable for a combinatorial approach to peptide radiopharmaceuticals.

  14. Pharmacokinetic interactions of flunixin meglumine and enrofloxacin in ICR mice.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Tomoe; Arai, Toshiro

    2007-04-01

    We examined the pharmacokinetic interactions of enrofloxacin and flunixin in male ICR mice that were subcutaneously (SC) administered with both or either one of the drugs. The experiments were performed on the following three groups: flunixin alone (2 mg/kg, SC), combination of flunixin (2 mg/kg, SC) and enrofloxacin (10 mg/kg, SC), and enrofloxacin alone (10 mg/kg, SC). Blood samples were collected at 5, 15 and 30 min, and 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 h after the drug administration, and the pharmacokinetic parameters of flunixin and enrofloxacin were evaluated from the plasma drug concentrations. Significant changes were detected in the pharmacokinetics of flunixin following its coadministration with enrofloxacin. Coadministration of flunixin and enrofloxacin resulted in a 41% increase of the area under the curve (AUC) and a 53% extension of the terminal half-life of flunixin; moreover, flunixin attained the maximum plasma drug concentration 2.75 times faster than when administered alone. The terminal rate constant and the maximum plasma drug concentration showed significant decreases of 34% and 33%, respectively, following the coadministration of enrofloxacin and flunixin as compared to those following the administration of flunixin alone. In contrast, no significant difference in the pharmacokinetics of enrofloxacin was detected following its coadministration with flunixin, as compared to those following the administration of enrofloxacin alone. Following the administration of enrofloxacin alone or its coadministration with flunixin, the plasma level of ciprofloxacin, the metabolite of enrofloxacin, was very low or undetectable. In conclusion, the pharmacokinetics of flunixin in ICR mice are altered by the coadministration of flunixin and enrofloxacin.

  15. 188Re-loaded lipid nanocapsules as a promising radiopharmaceutical carrier for internal radiotherapy of malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Allard, Emilie; Hindré, François; Passirani, Catherine; Lemaire, Laurent; Lepareur, Nicolas; Noiret, Nicolas; Menei, Philippe; Benoit, Jean-Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Lipid nanocapsules (LNC) entrapping lipophilic complexes of 188Re (188Re(S3CPh)2(S2CPh) [188Re-SSS]) were investigated as a novel radiopharmaceutical carrier for internal radiation therapy of malignant gliomas. The present study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of intracerebral administration of 188Re-SSS LNC by means of convection-enhanced delivery (CED) on a 9L rat brain tumour model. Methods Female Fischer rats with 9L glioma were treated with a single injection of 188Re-SSS LNC by CED 6 days after cell implantation. Rats were put into random groups according to the dose infused: 12, 10, 8, and 3 Gy in comparison with blank LNC, perrhenate solution (4Gy) and non-treated animals. The radionuclide brain retention level was evaluated by measuring 188Re elimination in faeces and urine over 72h after the CED injection. The therapeutic effect of 188Re-SSS LNC was assessed based on animal survival. Results CED of 188Re perrhenate solution resulted in rapid drug clearance with a brain T1/2 of 7h. In contrast, when administered in LNC, 188Re tissue retention was greatly prolonged, with only 10% of the injected dose being eliminated at 72h. Rat median survival was significantly improved for the group treated with 8Gy 188Re-SSS LNC compared to the control group and blank-LNC treated animals. The increase in the median survival time (ISTmedian) was about 80% compared to the control group; 33% of the animals were long-term survivors. The dose of 8Gy proved to be a very effective dose, between toxic (10–12Gy) and ineffective (3–4Gy) doses. Conclusions These findings show that CED of Rhenium-188-loaded lipid nanocapsules is a safe and potent antitumour system for treating malignant gliomas. Our data are the first to show the in vivo efficacy of Rhenium-188 internal radiotherapy for the treatment of brain malignancy. PMID:18465130

  16. Contribution of electrospray mass spectrometry for the characterization, design, and development of nitrido technetium and rhenium heterocomplexes as potential radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Tisato, Francesco; Bolzati, Cristina; Porchia, Marina; Refosco, Fiorenzo

    2004-01-01

    Diagnostic nuclear medicine (NM) is among the imaging procedures (together with X-ray, computerized tomography, magnetic resonance, and echography) the clinicians can routinely adopt to image organs or tissues and related disorders. (99m)Tc-based agents are the radiopharmaceuticals of election in diagnostic NM because of the ideal physical properties of the 99mTc nuclide (t1/2 6.01 hr; Egamma 142 keV), low cost, and easy availability through the commercial 99Mo/99mTc generator, and chemical versatility of the element. In the last two decades the synergistic work of clinics, pharmacologists, and coordination chemists has had a tremendous impact in the development of new 99mTc-based radiopharmaceuticals through the recognition of the structure at the molecular level of the agent utilized. This has been achieved by studying the physico-chemical properties of the long-lived 99gTc (t1/2 2.11 x 10(5) year; Ebeta 292 keV) and third-row congener Re isostructural compounds. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and collision experiments (MS/MS) represent valuable analytical techniques suitable for the characterization of both technetium and rhenium complexes relevant to NM. Unequivocal structural identification of these bioinorganic compounds, either simple coordination complexes ("essential radiopharmaceuticals") or more sophisticated structures carrying bioactive fragments ("receptor-specific" radiopharmaceuticals), can be realized in combination with multinuclear NMR spectroscopy. MS/MS experiments provide useful information on the different metal-ligand bond strength, and comparison of the fragmentation profiles of isostructural technetium and rhenium compounds give additional details on the role played by the metal in determining preferred decomposition channels. The analysis of these data contribute to design novel synthetic strategies for the obtainment of technetium and rhenium compounds relevant to NM. The chemistry underlying the production of a new

  17. Optimizing nanomedicine pharmacokinetics using physiologically based pharmacokinetics modelling

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Darren Michael; Siccardi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The delivery of therapeutic agents is characterized by numerous challenges including poor absorption, low penetration in target tissues and non-specific dissemination in organs, leading to toxicity or poor drug exposure. Several nanomedicine strategies have emerged as an advanced approach to enhance drug delivery and improve the treatment of several diseases. Numerous processes mediate the pharmacokinetics of nanoformulations, with the absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination (ADME) being poorly understood and often differing substantially from traditional formulations. Understanding how nanoformulation composition and physicochemical properties influence drug distribution in the human body is of central importance when developing future treatment strategies. A helpful pharmacological tool to simulate the distribution of nanoformulations is represented by physiologically based pharmacokinetics (PBPK) modelling, which integrates system data describing a population of interest with drug/nanoparticle in vitro data through a mathematical description of ADME. The application of PBPK models for nanomedicine is in its infancy and characterized by several challenges. The integration of property–distribution relationships in PBPK models may benefit nanomedicine research, giving opportunities for innovative development of nanotechnologies. PBPK modelling has the potential to improve our understanding of the mechanisms underpinning nanoformulation disposition and allow for more rapid and accurate determination of their kinetics. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge of nanomedicine distribution and the use of PBPK modelling in the characterization of nanoformulations with optimal pharmacokinetics. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Nanomedicine. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-17 PMID:24467481

  18. An integrated pharmacokinetics ontology and corpus for text mining.

    PubMed

    Wu, Heng-Yi; Karnik, Shreyas; Subhadarshini, Abhinita; Wang, Zhiping; Philips, Santosh; Han, Xu; Chiang, Chienwei; Liu, Lei; Boustani, Malaz; Rocha, Luis M; Quinney, Sara K; Flockhart, David; Li, Lang

    2013-02-01

    Drug pharmacokinetics parameters, drug interaction parameters, and pharmacogenetics data have been unevenly collected in different databases and published extensively in the literature. Without appropriate pharmacokinetics ontology and a well annotated pharmacokinetics corpus, it will be difficult to develop text mining tools for pharmacokinetics data collection from the literature and pharmacokinetics data integration from multiple databases. A comprehensive pharmacokinetics ontology was constructed. It can annotate all aspects of in vitro pharmacokinetics experiments and in vivo pharmacokinetics studies. It covers all drug metabolism and transportation enzymes. Using our pharmacokinetics ontology, a PK-corpus was constructed to present four classes of pharmacokinetics abstracts: in vivo pharmacokinetics studies, in vivo pharmacogenetic studies, in vivo drug interaction studies, and in vitro drug interaction studies. A novel hierarchical three level annotation scheme was proposed and implemented to tag key terms, drug interaction sentences, and drug interaction pairs. The utility of the pharmacokinetics ontology was demonstrated by annotating three pharmacokinetics studies; and the utility of the PK-corpus was demonstrated by a drug interaction extraction text mining analysis. The pharmacokinetics ontology annotates both in vitro pharmacokinetics experiments and in vivo pharmacokinetics studies. The PK-corpus is a highly valuable resource for the text mining of pharmacokinetics parameters and drug interactions.

  19. An integrated pharmacokinetics ontology and corpus for text mining

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Drug pharmacokinetics parameters, drug interaction parameters, and pharmacogenetics data have been unevenly collected in different databases and published extensively in the literature. Without appropriate pharmacokinetics ontology and a well annotated pharmacokinetics corpus, it will be difficult to develop text mining tools for pharmacokinetics data collection from the literature and pharmacokinetics data integration from multiple databases. Description A comprehensive pharmacokinetics ontology was constructed. It can annotate all aspects of in vitro pharmacokinetics experiments and in vivo pharmacokinetics studies. It covers all drug metabolism and transportation enzymes. Using our pharmacokinetics ontology, a PK-corpus was constructed to present four classes of pharmacokinetics abstracts: in vivo pharmacokinetics studies, in vivo pharmacogenetic studies, in vivo drug interaction studies, and in vitro drug interaction studies. A novel hierarchical three level annotation scheme was proposed and implemented to tag key terms, drug interaction sentences, and drug interaction pairs. The utility of the pharmacokinetics ontology was demonstrated by annotating three pharmacokinetics studies; and the utility of the PK-corpus was demonstrated by a drug interaction extraction text mining analysis. Conclusions The pharmacokinetics ontology annotates both in vitro pharmacokinetics experiments and in vivo pharmacokinetics studies. The PK-corpus is a highly valuable resource for the text mining of pharmacokinetics parameters and drug interactions. PMID:23374886

  20. Aptamer delivery of siRNA, radiopharmaceutics and chemotherapy agents in cancer.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Carlos E B; Alves, Lais Nascimento; Rocha, Henrique F; Cabral-Neto, Januário Bispo; Missailidis, Sotiris

    2017-06-20

    Aptamers are oligonucleotide reagents with high affinity and specificity, which among other therapeutic and diagnostic applications have the capability of acting as delivery agents. Thus, aptamers are capable of carrying small molecules, nanoparticles, radiopharmaceuticals or fluorescent agents as well as nucleic acid therapeutics specifically to their target cells. In most cases, the molecules may possess interesting therapeutic properties, but their lack of specificity for a particular cell type, or ability to internalise in such a cell, hinders their clinical development, or cause unwanted side effects. Thus, chemotherapy or radiotherapy agents, famous for their side effects, can be coupled to aptamers for specific delivery. Equally, siRNA have great therapeutic potential and specificity, but one of their shortcomings remain the delivery and internalisation into cells. Various methodologies have been proposed to date, including aptamers, to resolve this problem. Therapeutic or imaging reagents benefit from the adaptability and ease of chemical manipulation of aptamers, their high affinity for the specific marker of a cell type, and their internalisation ability via cell mediated endocytosis. In this review paper, we explore the potential of the aptamers as delivery agents and offer an update on current status and latest advancements. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Noninvasive measurement of radiopharmaceutical time–activity data using external thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Cheng-Chang; Dong, Shang-Lung; Lin, Hsin-Hon; Ni, Yu-Ching; Jan, Meei-Ling; Chuang, Keh-Shih

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we present a new method for estimating the time–activity data using serial timely measurements of thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). The approach is based on the combination of the measurement of surface dose using TLD and Monte Carlo (MC) simulation to estimate the radiopharmaceutical time–activity data. It involves four steps: (1) identify the source organs and outline their contours in computed tomography images; (2) compute the S values on the body surface for each source organ using a MC code; (3) obtain a serial measurement of the dose with numerous TLDs placed on the body surface; (4) solve the dose–activity equation to generate organ cumulative activity for each period of measurement. The activity of each organ at the time of measurement is simply the cumulative activity divided by the timespan between measurements. The usefulness of this method was studied using a MC simulation based on an Oak Ridge National Laboratory mathematical phantom with 18F-FDG filled in six source organs. Numerous TLDs were placed on different locations of the surface and were repeatedly read and replaced. The time–activity curves (TACs) of all organs were successfully reconstructed. Experiments on a physical phantom were also performed. Preliminary results indicate that it is an effective, robust, and simple method for assessing the TAC. The proposed method holds great potential for a range of applications in areas such as targeted radionuclide therapy, pharmaceutical research, and patient-specific dose estimation.

  2. Development of dopamine receptor radiopharmaceuticals for the study of neurological and psychiatric disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Jogeshwar Mukherjee

    2009-01-02

    Our goals in this grant application are directed towards the development of radiotracers that may allow the study of the high-affinity state (functional state) of the dopamine receptors. There have been numerous reports on the presence of two inter-convertible states of these (G-protein coupled) receptors in vitro. However, there is no report that establishes the presence of these separate affinity states in vivo. We have made efforts in this direction in order to provide such direct in vivo evidence about the presence of the high affinity state. This understanding of the functional state of the receptors is of critical significance in our overall diagnosis and treatment of diseases that implicate the G-protein coupled receptors. Four specific aims have been listed in the grant application: (1). Design and syntheses of agonists (2). Radiosyntheses of agonists (3). In vitro pharmacology of agonists (4). In vivo distribution and pharmacology of labeled derivatives. We have accomplished the syntheses and radiosyntheses of three agonist radiotracers labeled with carbon-11. In vitro and in vivo pharmacological experiments have been accomplished in rats and preliminary PET studies in non-human primates have been carried out. Various accomplishments during the funded years, briefly outlined in this document, have been disseminated by several publications in various journals and presentations in national and international meetings (Society of Nuclear Medicine, Society for Neuroscience and International Symposium on Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry).

  3. PET radiopharmaceuticals for imaging of tumor hypoxia: a review of the evidence

    PubMed Central

    Lopci, Egesta; Grassi, Ilaria; Chiti, Arturo; Nanni, Cristina; Cicoria, Gianfranco; Toschi, Luca; Fonti, Cristina; Lodi, Filippo; Mattioli, Sandro; Fanti, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia is a pathological condition arising in living tissues when oxygen supply does not adequately cover the cellular metabolic demand. Detection of this phenomenon in tumors is of the utmost clinical relevance because tumor aggressiveness, metastatic spread, failure to achieve tumor control, increased rate of recurrence, and ultimate poor outcome are all associated with hypoxia. Consequently, in recent decades there has been increasing interest in developing methods for measurement of oxygen levels in tumors. Among the image-based modalities for hypoxia assessment, positron emission tomography (PET) is one of the most extensively investigated based on the various advantages it offers, i.e., broad range of radiopharmaceuticals, good intrinsic resolution, three-dimensional tumor representation, possibility of semiquantification/quantification of the amount of hypoxic tumor burden, overall patient friendliness, and ease of repetition. Compared with the other non-invasive techniques, the biggest advantage of PET imaging is that it offers the highest specificity for detection of hypoxic tissue. Starting with the 2-nitroimidazole family of compounds in the early 1980s, a great number of PET tracers have been developed for the identification of hypoxia in living tissue and solid tumors. This paper provides an overview of the principal PET tracers applied in cancer imaging of hypoxia and discusses in detail their advantages and pitfalls. PMID:24982822

  4. Output of radiopharmaceutical nuclides of known injected doses from a municipal sewage treatment system.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Ayako; Hayabuchi, Naofumi; Osaki, Tomoe; Osaki, Susumu

    2005-02-01

    The concentrations of (99m)Tc, (123)I, (67)Ga, and (201)Tl of the discharge water and the sewage sludge from Kurume Central Sewage Treatment Plant were determined once a week for 2 mo. The radiopharmaceutical doses injected into the patients for all of four hospitals that use nuclear medicines in the service area of the plant were also surveyed. Approximately 1.5% of the (99m)Tc, 1.5% of the (123)I, 4.3% of the (67)Ga, and 0.41% of the (201)Tl of the injected doses were detected in the discharged water from the plant. The behavior of these radionuclides in the sewage treatment system was analyzed using a compartment model. The analyses suggest that the average residence times in storage tanks and drainage pipes before entering the plant were 9.5 h for (99m)Tc, 81 h for (123)I, 120 h for (67)Ga, and 480 h for (201)Tl.

  5. Sigma receptor ligands: possible application as therapeutic drugs and as radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Kenji; Ishiwata, Kiichi

    2006-01-01

    Sigma receptors are classified into sigma(1) and sigma(2) subtypes. These subtypes display a different tissue distribution and a distinct physiological and pharmacological profile in the central and peripheral nervous system. The characterization of these subtypes and the discovery of new specific sigma receptor ligands demonstrated that sigma receptors are novel targets for the therapeutic treatment of neuropsychiatric diseases (schizophrenia, depression, and cognition), brain ischemia, and cocaine addiction. Furthermore, imaging of sigma(1) receptors in the human brain using specific PET radioligands has started. In addition, the two sigma receptor subtypes are also expressed on tumor cells, where they could be of prognostic relevance. The ability of sigma(2) receptor agonists to inhibit tumor cell proliferation through mechanisms that might involve apoptosis, intracellular Ca(2+), and sphingolipids has promoted the development of sigma(2) receptor agonists as novel therapeutic drugs for treating cancer. Consequently, sigma(2) receptor ligands have been demonstrated to be potentially useful tumor imaging ligands. In this article, we focus on the sigma receptor ligands as therapeutic agents and as radiopharmaceuticals.

  6. Development of radiodetection systems towards miniaturised quality control of PET and SPECT radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Taggart, Matthew P; Tarn, Mark D; Esfahani, Mohammad M N; Schofield, Daniel M; Brown, Nathaniel J; Archibald, Stephen J; Deakin, Tom; Pamme, Nicole; Thompson, Lee F

    2016-04-26

    The ability to detect radiation in microfluidic devices is important for the on-chip analysis of radiopharmaceuticals, but previously reported systems have largely suffered from various limitations including cost, complexity of fabrication, and insufficient sensitivity and/or speed. Here, we present the use of sensitive, low cost, small-sized, commercially available silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) for the detection of radioactivity inside microfluidic channels fabricated from a range of conventional microfluidic chip substrates. We demonstrate the effects of chip material and thickness on the detection of the positron-emitting isotope, [(18)F]fluoride, and find that, while the SiPMs are light sensors, they are able to detect radiation even through opaque chip materials via direct positron and gamma (γ) ray interaction. Finally, we employed the SiPM platform for analysis of the PET (positron emission tomography) radiotracers 2-[(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose ([(18)F]FDG) and [(68)Ga]gallium-citrate, and highlight the ability to detect the γ ray emitting SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) radiotracer, [(99m)Tc]pertechnetate.

  7. Radionuclides in Nephrourology, Part 1: Radiopharmaceuticals, Quality Control, and Quantitative Indices

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Andrew T.

    2014-01-01

    Radionuclide renal scintigraphy provides important functional data to assist in the diagnosis and management of patients with a variety of suspected genitourinary tract problems, but the procedures are underutilized. Maximizing the utility of the available studies (as well as the perception of utility by referring physicians) requires a clear understanding of the clinical question, attention to quality control, acquisition of the essential elements necessary to produce an informed interpretation, and production of a report that presents a coherent impression that specifically addresses the clinical question and is supported by data contained in the report. To help achieve these goals, part 1 of this review covers information that should be provided to the patient before the scan, describes the advantages and limitations of the available radiopharmaceuticals, discusses quality control elements needed to optimize the study, summarizes approaches to the measurements of renal function, and focuses on recommended quantitative indices and their diagnostic applications. Although the primary focus is the adult patient, aspects of the review also apply to the pediatric population. PMID:24549283

  8. Trithiols and their arsenic compounds for potential use in diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    DeGraffenreid, Anthony J; Feng, Yutian; Barnes, Charles L; Ketring, Alan R; Cutler, Cathy S; Jurisson, Silvia S

    2016-05-01

    Arsenic-72 ((72)As; 2.49MeV β(+), 26h) and (77)As (0.683MeV β(-), 38.8h) have nuclear properties useful for positron emission tomography (PET) and radiotherapy applications, respectively. Their half-lives are sufficiently long for targeting tumors with antibodies, as well as peptides. Potential radiopharmaceuticals based on radioarsenic require development of suitable bifunctional chelates for stable conjugation of arsenic to vectors under in vivo conditions at high dilution. The thiophilic nature of arsenic led to the synthesis and characterization of a simple trithiol ligand and its arsenic complex, and radiolabeling studies at the no carrier added (NCA) (77)As level. (1)H- and (13)C-NMR spectroscopy, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), and single crystal X-ray diffraction were used to characterize the trithiol ligand and its arsenic(III) complex. Radiotracer studies with no carrier added (NCA) (77)As resulted in high radiolabeling yields (>96%) with high in vitro stability. The high yield and stability of a single NCA (77)As trithiol complex indicates that this framework is suitable for developing matched pair agents for non-invasive in vivo PET imaging and radiotherapy of tumors with (72,77)As. This is the first reported chelate developed for NCA radioarsenic and studies are underway for developing a trithiol bifunctional chelate conjugated to a targeting vector, such as a peptide or monoclonal antibody. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Possibilities of optical imaging of the (99m)Tc-based radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Kondakov, Anton K; Gubskiy, Ilya L; Znamenskiy, Igor A; Chekhonin, Vladimir P

    2014-04-01

    In vivo optical imaging is widely used in preclinical studies. Recently, the application of optical imaging systems for preclinical visualization of gamma-emitting isotopes has become of interest since the evaluation of various organs relies on (99m)Tc-based radiopharmaceuticals (RPs). In vitro radioluminescence of (99m)Tc-based RPs, including pertechnetate, albumin macroaggregates, dimercaptosuccinic acid, phytate colloid, and ethylenediamine tetramethylene phosphonic acid, was studied with IVIS Spectrum CT™ optical imaging system. The distribution of phytate colloid was also studied in vivo with and without scintillating materials and the results were compared with those obtained with a conventional scintigraphy. The visible light emission appeared to be due to the radioluminescence of water and luminophores contained in RPs rather than from Cherenkov radiation. Weak air luminescence affected the background. The radioluminescence of fluids induced by (99m)Tc-based tracers could be detected using charge-coupled device optical imaging systems. The radioluminescence intensity and its spectral distribution depend on the surrounding fluid and known luminophores present. Thus, in some cases the in vivo optical imaging is possible but the use of scintillator, e.g., borosilicate glass or bismuth germanate, is preferred.

  10. Production of 64Cu and 67Cu radiopharmaceuticals using zinc target irradiated with accelerator neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawabata, Masako; Hashimoto, Kazuyuki; Saeki, Hideya; Sato, Nozomi; Motoishi, Shoji; Nagai, Yasuki

    2014-09-01

    Copper radioisotopes have gained a lot of attention in radiopharmaceuticals owing to their unique decay characteristics. The longest half-life β emitter, 67Cu, is thought to be suitable for targeted radio-immunotherapy. Adequate production of 67Cu to meet the demands of clinical studies has not been fully established. Another attractive copper isotope, 64Cu has possible applications as a diagnostic imaging tracer combined with a therapeutic effect. This work proposes a production method using accelerator neutrons in which two copper radioisotopes can be produced: 1) 68Zn(n,x)67Cu and 2) 64Zn(n,p)64Cu using ~14 MeV neutrons generated by natC(d, n) reaction, both from natural or enriched zinc oxides. The generated 64,67Cu were separated from the target zinc oxide using a chelating and an anion exchange columns and were labelled with two widely studied chelators where the labelling efficiency was found to be acceptably good. The major advantage of this method is that a significant amount of 64,67Cu with a very few impurity radionuclides are produced which also makes the separation procedure simple. Provided an accelerator supplying an Ed = ~ 40 MeV, a wide application of 64,67Cu based drugs in nuclear medicine is feasible in the near future. We will present the characteristics of this production method using accelerator neutrons including the chemical separation processes.

  11. Laser stimulation of the acupoint 'Zusanli' (ST.36) on the radiopharmaceutical biodistribution in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Frederico, Éric H F F; Santos, Ailton A; Sá-Caputo, Danubia C C; Neves, Rosane F; Guimarães, Carlos A S; Chang, Shyang; Bernardo-Filho, Mario

    2016-03-01

    Laser used to stimulate acupoints is called laser acupuncture (LA). It is generally believed that similar clinical responses to manual acupuncture can be achieved. Here we analysed the effects of the laser (904 nm) at the 'Zusanli' acupoint (ST.36) of the stomach meridian on the biodistribution of the radiopharmaceutical Na(99m)TcO4. Wistar rats were divided into control (CG) and experimental groups (EG). The EG were exposed daily to the laser (904 nm) at ST.36 with 1 joule/min (40 mW/cm(2)) for 1 min. The animals of the CG were not exposed to laser at all. On the 8th day after LA, the animals were sedated and Na(99m)TcO4 was administered. After 10 min, the animals were all sacrificed and the organs removed. The radioactivity was counted in each organ to calculate the percentage of radioactivity of the injected dose per gram (%ATI/ g). Comparison of the %ATI/g in EG and CG was performed by Mann-Whitney test. The %ATI/g was significantly increased in the thyroid due to the stimulation of the ST.36 by laser. It is possible to conclude that the stimulation of ST.36 does lead to biological phenomena that interfere with the metabolism of the thyroid.

  12. Development of a radiopharmaceutical dose calculator for pediatric patients undergoing diagnostic nuclear medicine studies.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Anil Kumar; Sharma, Sanjay Kumar; Sharma, Punit; Gupta, Priyanka; Kumar, Rakesh

    2013-04-01

    It is important to ensure that as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) concept during the radiopharmaceutical (RPH) dose administration in pediatric patients. Several methods have been suggested over the years for the calculation of individualized RPH dose, sometimes requiring complex calculations and large variability exists for administered dose in children. The aim of the present study was to develop a software application that can calculate and store RPH dose along with patient record. We reviewed the literature to select the dose formula and used Microsoft Access (a software package) to develop this application. We used the Microsoft Excel to verify the accurate execution of the dose formula. The manual and computer time using this program required for calculating the RPH dose were compared. The developed application calculates RPH dose for pediatric patients based on European Association of Nuclear Medicine dose card, weight based, body surface area based, Clark, Solomon Fried, Young and Webster's formula. It is password protected to prevent the accidental damage and stores the complete record of patients that can be exported to Excel sheet for further analysis. It reduces the burden of calculation and saves considerable time i.e., 2 min computer time as compared with 102 min (manual calculation with the calculator for all seven formulas for 25 patients). The software detailed above appears to be an easy and useful method for calculation of pediatric RPH dose in routine clinical practice. This software application will help in helping the user to routinely applied ALARA principle while pediatric dose administration.

  13. Dual-Nuclide Radiopharmaceuticals for Positron Emission Tomography Based Dosimetry in Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wurzer, Alexander; Seidl, Christof; Morgenstern, Alfred; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Schwaiger, Markus; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Notni, Johannes

    2017-08-21

    Improvement of the accuracy of dosimetry in radionuclide therapy has the potential to increase patient safety and therapeutic outcomes. Although positron emission tomography (PET) is ideally suited for acquisition of dosimetric data because PET is inherently quantitative and offers high sensitivity and spatial resolution, it is not directly applicable for this purpose because common therapeutic radionuclides lack the necessary positron emission. This work reports on the synthesis of dual-nuclide labeled radiopharmaceuticals with therapeutic and PET functionality, which are based on common and widely available metal radionuclides. Dual-chelator conjugates, featuring interlinked cyclen- and triazacyclononane-based polyphosphinates DOTPI and TRAP, allow for strictly regioselective complexation of therapeutic (e.g., (177) Lu, (90) Y, or (213) Bi) and PET (e.g., (68) Ga) radiometals in the same molecular framework by exploiting the orthogonal metal ion selectivity of these chelators (DOTPI: large cations, such as lanthanide(III) ions; TRAP: small trivalent ions, such as Ga(III) ). Such DOTPI-TRAP conjugates were decorated with 3 Gly-urea-Lys (KuE) motifs for targeting prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), employing Cu-catalyzed (CuAAC) as well as strain-promoted (SPAAC) click chemistry. These were labeled with (177) Lu or (213) Bi and (68) Ga and used for in vivo imaging of LNCaP (human prostate carcinoma) tumor xenografts in SCID mice by PET, thus proving practical applicability of the concept. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. H2CHXdedpa and H4CHXoctapa-chiral acyclic chelating ligands for (67/68)Ga and (111)In radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Ramogida, Caterina F; Cawthray, Jacqueline F; Boros, Eszter; Ferreira, Cara L; Patrick, Brian O; Adam, Michael J; Orvig, Chris

    2015-02-16

    The chiral acyclic ligands H2CHXdedpa (N4O2), H2CHXdedpa-bb (N4O2), and H4CHXoctapa (N4O4) (CHX = cyclohexyl/cyclohexane, H2dedpa = 1,2-[[6-carboxy-pyridin-2-yl]-methylamino]ethane, bb = N,N'-dibenzylated, H4octapa = N,N'-bis(6-carboxy-2-pyridylmethyl)-ethylenediamine-N,N'-diacetic acid) were synthesized, complexed with Ga(III) and/or In(III), and evaluated for their potential as chelating agents in radiopharmaceutical applications. The ligands were compared to the previously studied hexadentate H2dedpa and octadentate H4octapa ligands to determine the effect adding a chiral 1R,2R-trans-cyclohexane to replace the ethylenediamine backbone would have on metal complex stability and radiolabeling kinetics. It was found that [Ga(CHXdedpa)](+) showed very similar properties to those of [Ga(dedpa)](+), with only one isomer in solution observed by NMR spectroscopy, and minimal structural changes in the solid-state X-ray structure. Like [Ga(dedpa)](+), [Ga(CHXdedpa)](+) exhibited exceptionally high thermodynamic stability constants (log KML = 28.11(8)), and the chelate retained the ability to label (67)Ga quantitatively in 10 min at room temperature at ligand concentrations of 1 × 10(-5) M. In vitro kinetic inertness assays demonstrated the [(67)Ga(CHXdedpa)](+) complex to be more stable than [(67)Ga(dedpa)](+) in a human serum competition, with 90.5% and 77.8% of (67)Ga remaining chelate-bound after 2 h, respectively. Preliminary coordination studies of H4CHXoctapa with In(III) demonstrated [In(CHXoctapa)](-) to have an equivalently high thermodynamically stable constant as [In(octapa)](-), with log KML values of 27.16(9) and 26.76(14), respectively. The [(111)In(CHXoctapa)](-) complex showed exceptionally high in vitro kinetic inertness over 120 h in human serum, comparing well with previously reported [(111)In(octapa)](-) values, and an improved stability compared to the current industry "gold standards" 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA

  15. Population pharmacokinetics of abacavir in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Fauchet, Floris; Treluyer, Jean-Marc; Préta, Laure-Helene; Valade, Elodie; Pannier, Emmanuelle; Urien, Saik; Hirt, Déborah

    2014-10-01

    For the first time, a population approach was used to describe abacavir (ABC) pharmacokinetics in HIV-infected pregnant and nonpregnant women. A total of 266 samples from 150 women were obtained. No covariate effect (from age, body weight, pregnancy, or gestational age) on ABC pharmacokinetics was found. Thus, it seems unnecessary to adapt the ABC dosing regimen during pregnancy.

  16. Applying pharmacokinetics to veterinary clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Trepanier, Lauren A

    2013-09-01

    This article describes clinical examples in which pharmacokinetic parameters can be used to optimize veterinary patient care. Specific applications include extrapolating drug dosages, optimizing therapy with therapeutic drug monitoring, interpreting pharmacokinetic information provided by drug labels and pharmaceutical companies, and adjusting drug dosages in patients with hepatic or renal failure.

  17. Drug Transport and Pharmacokinetics for Chemical Engineers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Laurent; Kanneganti, Kumud; Kim, Kwang Seok

    2010-01-01

    Experiments in continuous-stirred vessels were proposed to introduce methods in pharmacokinetics and drug transport to chemical engineering students. The activities can be incorporated into the curriculum to illustrate fundamentals learned in the classroom. An appreciation for the role of pharmacokinetics in drug discovery will also be gained…

  18. Drug Transport and Pharmacokinetics for Chemical Engineers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Laurent; Kanneganti, Kumud; Kim, Kwang Seok

    2010-01-01

    Experiments in continuous-stirred vessels were proposed to introduce methods in pharmacokinetics and drug transport to chemical engineering students. The activities can be incorporated into the curriculum to illustrate fundamentals learned in the classroom. An appreciation for the role of pharmacokinetics in drug discovery will also be gained…

  19. Investigation of an alternative generic model for predicting pharmacokinetic changes during physiological stress.

    PubMed

    Peng, Henry T; Edginton, Andrea N; Cheung, Bob

    2013-10-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic models were developed using MATLAB Simulink® and PK-Sim®. We compared the capability and usefulness of these two models by simulating pharmacokinetic changes of midazolam under exercise and heat stress to verify the usefulness of MATLAB Simulink® as a generic PBPK modeling software. Although both models show good agreement with experimental data obtained under resting condition, their predictions of pharmacokinetics changes are less accurate in the stressful conditions. However, MATLAB Simulink® may be more flexible to include physiologically based processes such as oral absorption and simulate various stress parameters such as stress intensity, duration and timing of drug administration to improve model performance. Further work will be conducted to modify algorithms in our generic model developed using MATLAB Simulink® and to investigate pharmacokinetics under other physiological stress such as trauma. © The Author(s) 2013.

  20. Absence of pharmacokinetic interaction between intravenous peramivir and oral oseltamivir or rimantadine in humans.

    PubMed

    Atiee, George; Lasseter, Kenneth; Baughman, Sharon; McCullough, Amy; Collis, Phil; Hollister, Alan; Hernandez, Jaime

    2012-09-01

    Peramivir, an intravenously administered neuraminidase inhibitor, may be used concomitantly with other influenza antivirals. Two studies were conducted to assess the potential for pharmacokinetic interactions of peramivir when coadministered with oseltamivir or rimantadine. Twenty-one healthy subjects were enrolled in each randomized, open-label, crossover study, and they received 1 intravenous dose of peramivir (600 mg), 1 oral dose of oseltamivir (75 mg) or rimantadine (100 mg), or a combination of peramivir with oseltamivir or rimantadine. Assessment of the 90% confidence interval for the geometric mean ratio of peramivir and oseltamivir carboxylate or rimantadine pharmacokinetic parameters showed no effect of oseltamivir or rimantadine on the pharmacokinetics of peramivir and no effect of peramivir on the pharmacokinetics of oseltamivir carboxylate or rimantadine. The drugs were well tolerated. These results suggest no reason to expect an effect of concomitant administration of oseltamivir or rimantadine on the safety profile of peramivir in patients with influenza.

  1. Elucidating the Plasma and Liver Pharmacokinetics of Simeprevir in Special Populations Using Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modelling.

    PubMed

    Snoeys, Jan; Beumont, Maria; Monshouwer, Mario; Ouwerkerk-Mahadevan, Sivi

    2016-11-29

    The disposition of simeprevir (SMV) in humans is characterised by cytochrome P450 3A4 metabolism and hepatic uptake by organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1/3 (OATP1B1/3). This study was designed to investigate SMV plasma and liver exposure upon oral administration in subjects infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV), in subjects of Japanese or Chinese origin, subjects with organ impairment and subjects with OATP genetic polymorphisms, using physiologically based pharmacokinetic modelling. Simulations showed that compared with healthy Caucasian subjects, SMV plasma exposure was 2.4-, 1.7-, 2.2- and 2.0-fold higher, respectively, in HCV-infected Caucasian subjects, in healthy Japanese, healthy Chinese and subjects with severe renal impairment. Further simulations showed that compared with HCV-infected Caucasian subjects, SMV plasma exposure was 1.6-fold higher in HCV-infected Japanese subjects. In subjects with OATP1B1 genetic polymorphisms, no noteworthy changes in SMV pharmacokinetics were observed. Simulations suggested that liver concentrations in Caucasians with HCV are 18 times higher than plasma concentrations.

  2. Correction Factors Applied to Finger Dosimetry: A Theoretical Assessment of Appropriate Values for Use in Handling Radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Sherbini, Sami; Ilas, Dan; Eckerman, Keith F; DeCicco, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) regulations limit the dose to the skin to 500 mSv per year. This is also the dose limit recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The operational quantity recommended by ICRP for quantifying dose to the skin is the personal dose equivalent, Hp(0.07) and is identical to NRC s shallow dose equivalent, Hs, also measured at a skin depth of 7 mg cm 2. However, whereas ICRP recommends averaging the dose to the skin over an area of 1 cm2 regardless of the size of the exposed area of skin, USNRC requires the shallow dose equivalent to be averaged over 10 cm2. To monitor dose to the skin of the hands of workers handling radioactive materials and particularly in radiopharmaceutical manufacturing facilities, which is the focus of this work, workers are frequently required to wear finger ring dosimeters. The dosimeters monitor the dose at the location of the sensitive element, but this is not the dose required to show compliance (i.e., the dose averaged over the highest exposed contiguous 10 cm2 of skin). Therefore, it may be necessary to apply a correction factor that enables estimation of the required skin dose from the dosimeter reading. This work explored the effects of finger ring placement and of the geometry of the radioactive materials being handled by the worker on the relationship between the dosimeter reading and the desired average dose. A mathematical model of the hand was developed for this purpose that is capable of positioning the fingers in any desired grasping configuration, thereby realistically modeling manipulation of any object. The model was then used with the radiation transport code MCNP to calculate the dose distribution on the skin of the hand when handling a variety of radioactive vials and syringes, as well as the dose to the dosimeter element. Correction factors were calculated using the results of these calculations and examined for any patterns that may be

  3. Obstetric analgesia. Clinical pharmacokinetic considerations.

    PubMed

    Kanto, J

    1986-01-01

    All drugs used in obstetric analgesia are more or less lipophilic, their site of action is in the central nervous system, and they have good membrane penetrability in the fetomaternal unit. Thus the dose and method of administration as well as the duration of treatment are important clinical determinants of drug effects in the fetus and newborn. In the past, too much emphasis has been placed on fetomaternal blood concentration ratios of different agents; it is now appreciated that the extent of fetal tissue distribution and the neonatal elimination rate are pharmacokinetically much more important. Extensive fetal tissue distribution is reflected in a low fetomaternal drug concentration ratio, which may be followed by prolonged neonatal elimination of the drug. Currently, the most effective and safest method for obstetric analgesia is regional epidural administration of bupivacaine or lignocaine (lidocaine); only low doses are needed and the newborn is able to handle these agents efficiently. On the basis of pharmacokinetic and neurobehavioural assessments, inhalational anaesthetic agents appear to be more attractive than pethidine (meperidine) or benzodiazepines. Intermittent administration and fast pulmonary elimination of inhalational agents ensure that long-lasting residual effects are unlikely to occur. The kinetics of epidural and intrathecal opiates explain the problems associated with their use in obstetrics. Among the newer drugs used in obstetric analgesia, the properties of meptazinol and isoflurane appear interesting and these agents warrant further study. All drugs used in obstetric analgesia have a potentially detrimental effect on the neonate and, therefore, knowledge of fetal and neonatal pharmacokinetics is of importance to the clinician.

  4. Pharmacokinetics of cefovecin in cats.

    PubMed

    Stegemann, M R; Sherington, J; Coati, N; Brown, S A; Blanchflower, S

    2006-12-01

    The pharmacokinetics of the novel cephalosporin cefovecin were investigated in a series of in vivo, ex vivo and in vitro studies following administration to adult cats at 8 mg/kg bodyweight. Bioavailability and pharmacokinetic parameters were determined in a cross-over study after intravenous (i.v.) and subcutaneous (s.c.) injections. [14C]cefovecin was used to evaluate excretion for 21 days after s.c. administration. Protein binding was determined in vitro in feline plasma and ex vivo in transudate from cats surgically implanted with tissue chambers. After s.c. administration, cefovecin was characterized by rapid absorption with mean peak plasma concentrations of 141+/-12 microg/mL being achieved within 2 h of s.c. injection with full bioavailability (99%). The mean elimination half-life was 166+/-18 h. After i.v. administration, volume of distribution was 0.09+/-0.01 L/kg and mean plasma clearance was 0.35+/-0.04 mL/h/kg. Approximately 50% of the administered radiolabelled dose was eliminated over the 21-day postdose period via urinary excretion and up to approximately 25% in faeces. In vitro and ex vivo plasma protein binding ranged from 99.8% to 99.5% over the plasma concentration range 10-100 microg/mL. Ex vivo protein binding in transudate was as low as 90.7%. From 8 h postdose, concentrations of unbound (free) cefovecin in transudate were consistently higher than in plasma, with mean unbound cefovecin concentrations being maintained above 0.06 microg/mL (MIC90 of Pasteurella multocida) in transudate for at least 14 days postdose. The slow elimination and long-lasting free concentrations in extracellular fluid are desirable pharmacokinetic attributes for an antimicrobial with a 14-day dosing interval.

  5. Single dose pharmacokinetics of trimethoprim.

    PubMed Central

    Rylance, G W; George, R H; Healing, D E; Roberts, D G

    1985-01-01

    Single oral dose trimethoprim pharmacokinetics were determined in 18 children aged 3 months to 13 years. Trimethoprim suspension was rapidly absorbed and quickly and widely distributed. The mean clearance was considerably faster and the elimination half life considerably shorter than values reported in adults. Only one third of the administered drug dose was recovered from the urine within 24 hours which is considerably less than in adults, suggesting that children may metabolise a greater proportion of the dose given. Urine trimethoprim concentrations greatly in excess of minimum inhibitory concentrations for common pathogens were rapidly achieved and sustained for at least 16 hours. PMID:3970564

  6. Single dose pharmacokinetics of trimethoprim.

    PubMed

    Rylance, G W; George, R H; Healing, D E; Roberts, D G

    1985-01-01

    Single oral dose trimethoprim pharmacokinetics were determined in 18 children aged 3 months to 13 years. Trimethoprim suspension was rapidly absorbed and quickly and widely distributed. The mean clearance was considerably faster and the elimination half life considerably shorter than values reported in adults. Only one third of the administered drug dose was recovered from the urine within 24 hours which is considerably less than in adults, suggesting that children may metabolise a greater proportion of the dose given. Urine trimethoprim concentrations greatly in excess of minimum inhibitory concentrations for common pathogens were rapidly achieved and sustained for at least 16 hours.

  7. Microdosing: the new pharmacokinetic paradigm?

    PubMed

    Zanni, Guido R; Wick, Jeannette Y

    2006-10-01

    Numerous market factors have converged to create a need for change in the drug development process. Public scrutiny, high failure rates for investigational agents, and concern about the use of animals in research, are just a few. In response, some changes in this process are being made. Microdosing--administering very small, radiolabeled doses of investigational agents to humans--is one change that has the potential to save time and money. It is used to elucidate the pharmacokinetic profile of agents. Not all experts agree that it will live up to its promise, but the potential is great.

  8. Pharmacokinetic monitoring of antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Aldaz, A; Ferriols, R; Aumente, D; Calvo, M V; Farre, M R; García, B; Marqués, R; Mas, P; Porta, B; Outeda, M; Soy, D

    2011-01-01

    Monitoring plasma levels of antiepileptic drugs for the treatment and prophylaxis of epilepsy is one of the strategies enabling clinical results to improve by reducing adverse affects and increasing effectiveness. The objective of this article is to review the basic aspects in the monitoring of antiepileptic drugs using a consensus document prepared and endorsed by the pharmacokinetics and pharmacogenetics working group (PK.gen) of the Sociedad Española de Farmacia Hospitalaria (Spanish Society of Hospital Pharmacists). Copyright © 2010 SEFH. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Agonist and antagonist bind differently to 5-HT1A receptors during Alzheimer's disease: A post-mortem study with PET radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Benjamin; Sebti, Johan; Verdurand, Mathieu; Fieux, Sylvain; Billard, Thierry; Streichenberger, Nathalie; Troakes, Claire; Newman-Tancredi, Adrian; Zimmer, Luc

    2016-10-01

    PET imaging studies using 5-HT1A receptor radiotracers show a decreased density of this receptor in hippocampi of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) at advanced stages. However, current 5-HT1A receptor radiopharmaceuticals used in neuroimaging are antagonists, thought to bind to 5-HT1A receptors in different functional states (i.e., both the one which displays high affinity for agonists and is thought to mediate receptor activation, as well as the state which has low affinity for agonists). Comparing the PET imaging obtained using an agonist radiotracer, which binds selectively to functional receptors, with the PET imaging obtained using an antagonist radiotracer would therefore provide original information on 5-HT1A receptor impairment during AD. Quantitative autoradiography using [(18)F]F13640 and [(18)F]MPPF, a 5-HT1A agonist and antagonist, respectively, was measured in hippocampi of patients with AD (n = 25, at different Braak stages) and control subjects (n = 9). The neuronal density was measured in the same tissues by NeuN immunohistochemistry. The specific binding of both radiotracers was determined by addition of WAY-100635, a selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist. The autoradiography distribution of both 5-HT1A PET radiotracers varied across hippocampus regions. The highest binding density was in the pyramidal layer of CA1. Incubation with Gpp(NH)p, a non-hydrolysable analogue of GTP, reduced significantly [(18)F]F13640 binding in hippocampal regions, confirming its preferential interaction with G-coupled receptors, and slightly increased [(18)F]MPPF binding. In the CA1 subfield, [(18)F]F13640 binding was significantly decreased at Braak stages I/II (-19%), Braak stages III/IV (-23%), and Braak stages V/VI (-36%) versus control. In contrast, [(18)F]MPPF binding was statistically reduced only at the most advanced Braak stages V/VI compared to control (-33%). Since [(18)F]F13640 and [(18)F]MPPF can be used in vivo in humans, this

  10. Modeling of Corneal and Retinal Pharmacokinetics after Periocular Drug Administration

    PubMed Central

    Amrite, Aniruddha C.; Edelhauser, Henry F.; Kompella, Uday B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To develop pharmacokinetics models to describe the disposition of small lipophilic molecules in the cornea and retina after periocular (subconjunctival or posterior subconjunctival) administration. Methods Compartmental pharmacokinetics analysis was performed on the corneal and retinal data obtained after periocular administration of 3 mg of celecoxib (a selective COX-2 inhibitor) to Brown Norway (BN) rats. Berkeley Madonna, a differential and difference equation–based modeling software, was used for the pharmacokinetics modeling. The data were fit to different compartment models with first-order input and disposition, and the best fit was selected on the basis of coefficient of regression and Akaike information criteria (AIC). The models were validated by using the celecoxib data from a prior study in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. The corneal model was also fit to the corneal data for prednisolone at a dose of 2.61 mg in albino rabbits, and the model was validated at two other doses of prednisolone (0.261 and 26.1 mg) in these rabbits. Model simulations were performed with the finalized model to understand the effect of formulation on corneal and retinal pharmacokinetics after periocular administration. Results Celecoxib kinetics in the BN rat cornea can be described by a two-compartment (periocular space and cornea, with a dissolution step for periocular formulation) model, with parallel elimination from the cornea and the periocular space. The inclusion of a distribution compartment or a dissolution step for celecoxib suspension did not lead to an overall improvement in the corneal data fit compared with the two-compartment model. The more important parameter for enhanced fit and explaining the apparent lack of an increase phase in the corneal levels is the inclusion of the initial leak-back of the dose from the periocular space into the precorneal area. The predicted celecoxib concentrations from this model also showed very good correlation (r = 0

  11. Pharmacokinetics of trimethoprim (TMP) in normal and febrile rabbits.

    PubMed

    Ladefoged, O

    1977-11-01

    The pharmacokinetics of trimethoprim (TMP) were investigated in normal and febrile rabbits. The half-life of TMP in rabbits is about 40 minutes and no differences were found between the half-life in normal and febrile rabbits. A significantly greater volume of distribution of TMP, however, was found in the febrile rabbits. Analysis according to the two-compartment model showed that the differences are due to a change in the distribution of TMP towards the peripheral compartments.

  12. Pharmacokinetics of trimethoprim in the rat.

    PubMed

    Tu, Y H; Allen, L V; Fiorica, V M; Albers, D D

    1989-07-01

    The pharmacokinetics of trimethoprim was studied in male Sprague-Dawley rats following the intravenous administration of trimethoprim at a dose of 25 mg/kg. Plasma and tissue levels of trimethoprim, as a function of time, were determined by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The disposition of trimethoprim was described by both a two-compartment open model with elimination from a central compartment and a noncompartmental method. For the compartmental analysis, the terminal elimination rate constant, elimination half-life, apparent volume of distribution in the central compartment, apparent volume of distribution in the central compartment based on the area under the plasma concentration-time curve, and volume of distribution at steady state, were determined to be 0.007 min-1, 99 min, 2059 mL/kg, 5729 mL/kg, and 2473 mL/kg, respectively. Noncompartmental pharmacokinetic parameters were obtained by the statistical moment theory. The estimates for mean residence time, clearance, and volume of distribution at steady state of trimethoprim were calculated to be 52 min, 40 mL.min-1kg-1, and 2097 mL, respectively. Tissue distribution of trimethoprim followed a biphasic phenomenon with a maximum concentration at 30 min for heart, lung, spleen, liver, kidney, seminal vesicles, and muscle, and at 45 min for testicles, 20 min for prostate gland, and less than 10 min for brain. The data show that compared with the plasma concentration, higher levels of trimethoprim were found in heart, lung, spleen, liver, kidney, prostate gland, and seminal vesicles; a similar concentration was found for muscle, but lower levels of trimethoprim were found for brain and testicles.

  13. Pharmacokinetics of fenoterol in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    von Mandach, U; Böni, R; Danko, J; Huch, R; Huch, A

    1995-02-01

    The beta 2-sympathomimetic drug fenoterol (fenoterol hydrobromide, CAS 1944-12-3, Partusisten) is routinely used to inhibit uterine contractions (tocolysis). Investigations of plasma concentrations of those receiving i.v. or oral tocolysis often show different results, both within particular groups of pregnant women and in comparison with non-pregnant persons. The aim of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetics of fenoterol in pregnant women, an important factor which so far had not been known. Four healthy pregnant women with similar weight and gestational age and all with premature labor were administered a continuous intravenous infusion of 4 micrograms fenoterol/min. During and up to 24 hours after the end of the infusion, venous blood samples were taken in order to determine the fenoterol plasma concentrations by radioimmunoassay. From a steady state concentration (css) of 2242 +/- 391 pg/ml (x +/- S.E.), a non-linear two-phased plasma elimination was seen with half-lives t1/2 of 11.40 min and 4.87 h. The area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC0-12h) was 6.27 ng/ml x h. The total clearance (Cltot) was 114.8 l/h. These data are nearly the same as the data already known for healthy non-pregnant (male) volunteers. The deviations which are seen in the plasma concentrations in pregnant women in comparison to non-pregnant persons during or after continuous i.v. infusion can therefore not be caused by differences in the pharmacokinetics. Other factors, however, such as body weight and/or gestational age, might influence the results.

  14. Species differences in pharmacokinetics and drug teratogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Nau, H.

    1986-12-01

    Interspecies differences in regard to the teratogenicity of drugs can be the result of differing pharmacokinetic processes that determine the crucial concentration-time relationships in the embryo. Maternal absorption, as well as distribution, of the drugs does not usually show great species differences. The first-pass effect after oral application is often more pronounced in animals than man (e.g., valproic acid, 13-cis-retinoic acid), although in some cases the reverse was found (e.g., hydrolysis of valpromide). Existing differences can be adjusted by appropriate choice of the administration route and measurements of drug levels. Many variables determine the placental transfer of drugs: developmental stage, type of placenta, properties of the drug. Even closely related drugs (e.g., retinoids) may differ greatly in regard to placental transfer. Maternal protein binding is an important determinant of placental transfer, since only the free concentration in maternal plasma can equilibrate with the embryo during organogenesis; this parameter differs greatly across species. Laboratory animals usually have a much higher rate of drug elimination than man. Drastic drug level fluctuations are therefore present during teratogenicity testing in animals, but not to do the same degree in human therapy. It must, therefore, be investigated if peak concentrations (such as for valproic acid and possibly caffeine) or the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) (such as for cyclophosphamide and possibly retinoids) correlate with the teratogenic response. Only then is a rational and scientific basis for interspecies comparison possible. It is concluded that the prediction of the human response based on animal studies can be improved by consideration of the appropriate pharmacokinetic determinants.

  15. Species differences in pharmacokinetics and drug teratogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Nau, H

    1986-01-01

    Interspecies differences in regard to the teratogenicity of drugs can be the result of differing pharmacokinetic processes that determine the crucial concentration-time relationships in the embryo. Maternal absorption, as well as distribution, of the drugs does not usually show great species differences. The first-pass effect after oral application is often more pronounced in animals than man (e.g., valproic acid, 13-cis-retinoic acid), although in some cases the reverse was found (e.g., hydrolysis of valpromide). Existing differences can be adjusted by appropriate choice of the administration route and measurements of drug levels. Many variables determine the placental transfer of drugs: developmental stage, type of placenta, properties of the drug. Even closely related drugs (e.g., retinoids) may differ greatly in regard to placental transfer. Maternal protein binding is an important determinant of placental transfer, since only the free concentration in maternal plasma can equilibrate with the embryo during organogenesis; this parameter differs greatly across species (e.g., valproic acid: five times higher free fractions in mouse and hamster than in monkey and man). The metabolic pattern has not yet been demonstrated to be a major cause of species differences, although recent evidence on phenytoin and thalidomide support the hypothesis that some species differences can be the result of differing activation/deactivation pathways. Laboratory animals usually have a much higher rate of drug elimination than man. Drastic drug level fluctuations are therefore present during teratogenicity testing in animals, but not to the same degree in human therapy. It must, therefore, be investigated if peak concentrations (such as for valproic acid and possibly caffeine) or the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) (such as for cyclophosphamide and possibly retinoids) correlate with the teratogenic response. Only then is a rational and scientific basis for interspecies

  16. A comprehensive physiologically based pharmacokinetic ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Published physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models from peer-reviewed articles are often well-parameterized, thoroughly-vetted, and can be utilized as excellent resources for the construction of models pertaining to related chemicals. Specifically, chemical-specific parameters and in vivo pharmacokinetic data used to calibrate these published models can act as valuable starting points for model development of new chemicals with similar molecular structures. A knowledgebase for published PBPK-related articles was compiled to support PBPK model construction for new chemicals based on their close analogues within the knowledgebase, and a web-based interface was developed to allow users to query those close analogues. A list of 689 unique chemicals and their corresponding 1751 articles was created after analysis of 2,245 PBPK-related articles. For each model, the PMID, chemical name, major metabolites, species, gender, life stages and tissue compartments were extracted from the published articles. PaDEL-Descriptor, a Chemistry Development Kit based software, was used to calculate molecular fingerprints. Tanimoto index was implemented in the user interface as measurement of structural similarity. The utility of the PBPK knowledgebase and web-based user interface was demonstrated using two case studies with ethylbenzene and gefitinib. Our PBPK knowledgebase is a novel tool for ranking chemicals based on similarities to other chemicals associated with existi

  17. A comprehensive physiologically based pharmacokinetic ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Published physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models from peer-reviewed articles are often well-parameterized, thoroughly-vetted, and can be utilized as excellent resources for the construction of models pertaining to related chemicals. Specifically, chemical-specific parameters and in vivo pharmacokinetic data used to calibrate these published models can act as valuable starting points for model development of new chemicals with similar molecular structures. A knowledgebase for published PBPK-related articles was compiled to support PBPK model construction for new chemicals based on their close analogues within the knowledgebase, and a web-based interface was developed to allow users to query those close analogues. A list of 689 unique chemicals and their corresponding 1751 articles was created after analysis of 2,245 PBPK-related articles. For each model, the PMID, chemical name, major metabolites, species, gender, life stages and tissue compartments were extracted from the published articles. PaDEL-Descriptor, a Chemistry Development Kit based software, was used to calculate molecular fingerprints. Tanimoto index was implemented in the user interface as measurement of structural similarity. The utility of the PBPK knowledgebase and web-based user interface was demonstrated using two case studies with ethylbenzene and gefitinib. Our PBPK knowledgebase is a novel tool for ranking chemicals based on similarities to other chemicals associated with existi

  18. Pharmacokinetic enhancers in HIV therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Larson, Kajal B; Wang, Kun; Delille, Cecile; Otofokun, Igho; Acosta, Edward P

    2014-10-01

    Maximal and durable viral load suppression is one of the most important goals of HIV therapy and is directly related to adequate drug exposure. Protease inhibitors (PIs), an important component of the antiretroviral armada, were historically associated with poor oral bioavailability and high pill burden. However, because the PIs are metabolized by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A enzymes, intentional inhibition of these enzymes leads to higher drug exposure, lower pill burden, and therefore simplified dosing schedules with this class of drug. This is the basis of pharmacokinetic enhancement. In HIV therapy, two pharmacokinetic enhancers or boosting agents are used: ritonavir and cobicistat. Both agents inhibit CYP3A4, with cobicistat being a more specific CYP inhibitor than ritonavir. Unlike ritonavir, cobicistat does not have antiretroviral activity. Cobicistat has been evaluated in clinical trials and was recently approved in the USA as a fixed-dose combination with the integrase inhibitor, elvitegravir and two nucleos(t)ide analogs. Additional studies are examining cobicistat in fixed-dose combinations with various PIs. In this review, we summarize current knowledge of these agents and clinically relevant drug regimens and ongoing trials. Studies with elvitegravir and the novel PI TMC319011 are also discussed.

  19. [The pharmacokinetics of monoclonal antibodies].

    PubMed

    Keizer, R J; Huitema, A D R; Damen, C W N; Schellens, J H M; Beijnen, J H

    2007-03-24

    Monoclonal antibodies (MOABs) are, due to their specificity, increasingly being deployed for therapeutic purposes. MOABs are derived from immunoglobulins and are fully or partially of murine or human origin. They are administered parenterally: mostly intravenously, but subcutaneous or intramuscular administration is also possible, in which case absorption probably occurs through the lymphatic system. The distribution of MOABs from the bloodstream into the tissues is slow and is hampered by the high molecular size of the MOABs, which is a lesser problem for fragments of antibodies (Fab fragments). MOABs are metabolised to peptides and amino acids. This process takes place in many tissues of the body, but probably predominantly in epithelial cells. As a consequence of the saturable binding of the MOAB to its target, a dose-dependent (non-linear) elimination is often observed. Immune reactions can accelerate the elimination of antibodies, partially depending on the degree ofhumanisation of the antibody. Antibodies and endogenous immunoglobulins are protected from elimination by binding to protective receptors (neonatal Fc-receptor; FcRn), which explains their long half-lives (up to 4 weeks). Metabolic pharmacokinetic interactions with other drugs have not been reported and are not expected. It is expected that in the years to come, new MOABs directed towards new targets will appear on the market, as well as existing antibodies with improved pharmacokinetic properties.

  20. Television Quiz Show Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Jonnie Lynn

    2007-01-01

    This article explores the simulation of four television quiz shows for students in China studying English as a foreign language (EFL). It discusses the adaptation and implementation of television quiz shows and how the students reacted to them.

  1. Television Quiz Show Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Jonnie Lynn

    2007-01-01

    This article explores the simulation of four television quiz shows for students in China studying English as a foreign language (EFL). It discusses the adaptation and implementation of television quiz shows and how the students reacted to them.

  2. Influence of Jiegeng on Pharmacokinetic Properties of Flavonoids and Saponins in Gancao.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yancao; Peng, Linxiu; Kang, An; Xie, Tong; Xu, Jianya; Shen, Cunsi; Ji, Jianjian; Di, Liuqing; Wu, Hao; Shan, Jinjun

    2017-09-21

    Jiegeng Gancao decoction, which is composed of Jiegeng and Gancao at a weight ratio of 1:2, was widely used for treating pharyngalgia and cough for thousands of years. Our previous work indicated that Gancao could increase the systemic exposure of platycodin D and deapio-platycodin D, two main components in Jiegeng. However, whether Jiegeng could alter the pharmacokinetics of the main compounds in Gancao is still unknown. Thus, the purpose of this study was to compare the oral pharmacokinetics of flavonoids and saponins from Gancao alone vs. after co-administration with Jiegeng. Furthermore, Caco-2 cell transport and fecal hydrolysis were investigated to explain the altered pharmacokinetic properties. Pharmacokinetics results suggested that the bioavailability of liquiritin, isoliquiritin, glycyrrhizin and its metabolite, glycyrrhetinic acid, could be improved while bioavailability of liquiritigenin and isoliquiritigenin deteriorated when co-administered with Jiegeng. The Caco-2 transport study showed no significant difference of the Papp values of the main components in Jiegeng Gancao decoction when compared with those in Gancao decoction (p > 0.05). The in vitro metabolism study suggested that saponins and flavonoids glycosides in Gancao were influenced and the metabolic characteristics of most ingredients were consistent with pharmacokinetic results, such as liquiritin and glycyrrhetinic acid. The hydrolysis of liquiritigenin and glycyrrhizin observed with fecal lysate in vitro appeared consistent with the oral pharmacokinetics. Based on experiments, the pharmacokinetic profiles of six components in Gancao were influenced by Jiegeng. The metabolic process might partially contribute to the altered pharmacokinetic behavior. The metabolism of some components of Gancao appeared to be inhibited when coadministered with Jiegeng, possibly by the Jiegeng constituent platycodin.

  3. To Apply Microdosing or Not? Recommendations to Single Out Compounds with Non-Linear Pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Bosgra, Sieto; Vlaming, Maria L H; Vaes, Wouter H J

    2016-01-01

    Microdosing studies allow clinical investigation of pharmacokinetics earlier in drug development, before all high-dose safety concerns have been sorted out. Furthermore, microdosing allows inclusion of target groups that are inadmissible in high-dose phase I trials. A potential concern when considering a microdosing study is that a particular drug candidate may display non-linear pharmacokinetics. Saturation of, for example, membrane transport or metabolism at exposure levels between the microdose and therapeutic dose may limit the predictivity of high-dose pharmacokinetics from microdose observations. Guidance on the likelihood of appreciable non-linear pharmacokinetics based on preclinical information can be helpful in staging the clinical phase and the place of microdosing in it. We present a decision tree that evaluates concerns about non-linearities raised in the preclinical phase and their potential impact on the proportionality between microdose and intended therapeutic dose as predicted from preclinical information. The expected maximum concentrations at relevant sites are estimated by non-compartmental methods. These are compared with dissolution, Michaelis constants for active or enzymatic processes, and binding protein concentrations to assess the potential saturation of the processes below therapeutic doses. The decision tree was applied to ten published cases comparing microdose and therapeutic dose pharmacokinetics, for which concerns about non-linear pharmacokinetics were raised a priori. The decision tree was able to discriminate cases showing substantial non-linearities from cases displaying dose-proportional pharmacokinetics. The recommendations described in this paper may be useful in deciding whether a microdosing study is a sensible option to gain early insight in clinical pharmacokinetics of drug candidates.

  4. Evaluation of microdosing to assess pharmacokinetic linearity in rats using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Balani, Suresh K; Nagaraja, Nelamangala V; Qian, Mark G; Costa, Arnaldo O; Daniels, J Scott; Yang, Hua; Shimoga, Prakash R; Wu, Jing-Tao; Gan, Liang-Shang; Lee, Frank W; Miwa, Gerald T

    2006-03-01

    The microdosing strategy allows for early assessment of human pharmacokinetics of new chemical entities using more limited safety assessment requirements than those requisite for a conventional phase I program. The current choice for evaluating microdosing is accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) due to its ultrasensitivity for detecting radiotracers. However, the AMS technique is still expensive to be used routinely and requires the preparation of radiolabeled compounds. This report describes a feasibility study with conventional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) technology for oral microdosing assessment in rats, a commonly used preclinical species. The nonlabeled drugs fluconazole and tolbutamide were studied because of their similar pharmacokinetics characteristics in rats and humans. We demonstrate that pharmacokinetics can be readily characterized by LC-MS/MS at a microdose of 1 microg/kg for these molecules in rats, and, hence, LC-MS/MS should be adequate in human microdosing studies. The studies also exhibit linearity in exposure between the microdose and >or=1000-fold higher doses in rats for these drugs, which are known to show a linear dose-exposure relationship in the clinic, further substantiating the potential utility of LC-MS/MS in defining pharmacokinetics from the microdose of drugs. These data should increase confidence in the use of LC-MS/MS in microdose pharmacokinetics studies of new chemical entities in humans. Application of this approach is also described for an investigational compound, MLNX, in which the pharmacokinetics in rats were determined to be nonlinear, suggesting that MLNX pharmacokinetics at microdoses in humans also might not reflect those at the therapeutic doses. These preclinical studies demonstrate the potential applicability of using traditional LC-MS/MS for microdose pharmacokinetic assessment in humans.

  5. A comprehensive insight on ocular pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Agrahari, Vibhuti; Mandal, Abhirup; Agrahari, Vivek; Trinh, Hoang M; Joseph, Mary; Ray, Animikh; Hadji, Hicheme; Mitra, Ranjana; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K

    2016-12-01

    The eye is a distinctive organ with protective anatomy and physiology. Several pharmacokinetics compartment models of ocular drug delivery have been developed for describing the absorption, distribution, and elimination of ocular drugs in the eye. Determining pharmacokinetics parameters in ocular tissues is a major challenge because of the complex anatomy and dynamic physiological barrier of the eye. In this review, pharmacokinetics of these compartments exploring different drugs, delivery systems, and routes of administration is discussed including factors affecting intraocular bioavailability. Factors such as precorneal fluid drainage, drug binding to tear proteins, systemic drug absorption, corneal factors, melanin binding, and drug metabolism render ocular delivery challenging and are elaborated in this manuscript. Several compartment models are discussed; these are developed in ocular drug delivery to study the pharmacokinetics parameters. There are several transporters present in both anterior and posterior segments of the eye which play a significant role in ocular pharmacokinetics and are summarized briefly. Moreover, several ocular pharmacokinetics animal models and relevant studies are reviewed and discussed in addition to the pharmacokinetics of various ocular formulations.

  6. Quantitative structure-pharmacokinetic relationships (QSPR) of beta blockers derived using neural networks.

    PubMed

    Gobburu, J V; Shelver, W H

    1995-07-01

    This study demonstrates the application of neural networks to predict the pharmacokinetic properties of beta-adrenoreceptor antagonists in humans. A congeneric series of 10 beta-blockers, whose critical pharmacokinetic parameters are well established, was selected for the study. An appropriate neural network system was constructed and tested for its ability to predict the pharmacokinetic parameters from the octanol/water partition coefficient (shake flask method), the pKa, or the fraction bound to plasma proteins. Neural networks successfully trained and the predicted pharmacokinetic values agreed well with the experimental values (average difference = 8%). The neural network-predicted values showed better agreement with the experimental values than those predicted by multiple regression techniques (average difference = 47%). Because the neural networks had a large number of connections, two tests were conducted to determine if the networks were memorizing rather than generalizing. The "leave-one-out" method verified the generalization of the networks by demonstrating that any of the compounds could be deleted from the training set and its value correctly predicted by the new network (average error = 19%). The second test involved the prediction of pharmacokinetic properties of compounds never seen by the network, and reasonable results were obtained for three out of four compounds tested. The results indicate neural networks can be a powerful tool in exploration of quantitative structure-pharmacokinetic relationships.

  7. Pharmacokinetic-rate images of indocyanine green for breast tumors using near-infrared optical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alacam, Burak; Yazici, Birsen; Intes, Xavier; Nioka, Shoko; Chance, Britton

    2008-02-01

    In this paper, we develop a method of forming pharmacokinetic-rate images of indocyanine green (ICG) and apply our method to in vivo data obtained from three patients with breast tumors. To form pharmacokinetic-rate images, we first obtain a sequence of ICG concentration images using the differential diffuse optical tomography technique. We next employ a two-compartment model composed of plasma, and extracellular-extravascular space (EES), and estimate the pharmacokinetic rates and concentrations in each compartment using the extended Kalman filtering framework. The pharmacokinetic-rate images of the three patient show that the rates from the tumor region and outside the tumor region are statistically different. Additionally, the ICG concentrations in plasma, and the EES compartments are higher around the tumor region agreeing with the hypothesis that around the tumor region ICG may act as a diffusible extravascular flow in compromised capillary of cancer vessels. Our study indicates that the pharmacokinetic-rate images may provide superior information than single set of pharmacokinetic rates estimated from the entire breast tissue for breast cancer diagnosis.

  8. A treatment planning methodology for sequentially combining radiopharmaceutical therapy (RPT) and external radiation therapy (XRT)

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Robert F; McNutt, Todd; Baechler, Sébastien; He, Bin; Esaias, Caroline E; Frey, Eric C; Loeb, David M; Wahl, Richard L; Shokek, Ori; Sgouros, George

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Effective cancer treatment generally requires combination therapy. The combination of external beam therapy (XRT) with radiopharmaceutical therapy (RPT) requires accurate 3-D dose calculations to avoid toxicity and evaluate efficacy. We have developed and tested a treatment planning methodology, using the patient-specific 3-dimensional dosimetry package 3D-RD, for sequentially combined RPT/XRT therapy designed to limit toxicity to organs at risk. Methods The biological effective dose (BED) was used to translate voxelized RPT absorbed dose (DRPT) values into a normalized total dose (or equivalent two-Gray-fraction XRT absorbed dose), NTDRPT map. The BED was calculated numerically using an algorithmic approach, which enabled a more accurate calculation of BED and NTDRPT. A treatment plan from the combined Samarium-153 and external beam was designed which would deliver a tumoricidal dose while delivering no more than 50 Gy of NTDsum to the spinal cord of a patient with a paraspinal tumor. Results The average voxel NTDRPT to tumor from RPT was 22.6 Gy (1-85 Gy range); the maximum spinal cord voxel NTDRPT from RPT was 6.8 Gy. The combined therapy NTDsum to tumor was 71.5 Gy (40-135 Gy range) for a maximum voxel spinal cord NTDsum equal to the maximum tolerated dose of 50 Gy. Conclusions A methodology which enables real time treatment planning of combined RPT-XRT has been developed. By implementing a more generalized conversion between the dose values from the two modalities and an activity-based treatment of partial volume effects, the reliability of combination therapy treatment planning has been expanded. PMID:20950958

  9. Theranostics: evolution of the radiopharmaceutical meta-iodobenzylguanidine in endocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Sisson, James C; Yanik, Gregory A

    2012-05-01

    Since 1981, meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), labeled with (131)I and later (123)I, has become a valuable agent in the diagnosis and therapy of a number of endocrine tumors. Initially, the agent located pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas (PGLs), both sporadic and familial, in multiple anatomic sites; surgeons were thereby guided to excisional therapies, which were previously difficult and sometimes impossible. The specificity in diagnosis has remained above 95%, but sensitivity has varied with the nature of the tumor: close to 90% for intra-adrenal pheochromocytomas but 70% or less for PGLs. For patients with neuroblastoma, carcinoid tumors, and medullary thyroid carcinoma, imaging with radiolabeled MIBG portrays important diagnostic evidence, but for these neoplasms, use has been primarily as an adjunct to therapy. Although diagnosis by radiolabeled MIBG has been supplemented and sometimes surpassed by newer scintigraphic agents, searches by this radiopharmaceutical remain indispensable for optimal care of some patients. The radiation imparted by concentrations of (131)I-MIBG in malignant pheochromocytomas, PGLs, carcinoid tumors, and medullary thyroid carcinoma has reduced tumor volumes and lessened excretions of symptom-inflicting hormones, but its value as a therapeutic agent is being fulfilled primarily in attacks on neuroblastomas, which are scourges of children. Much promise has been found in tumor disappearance and prolonged survival of treated patients. The experiences with therapeutic (131)I-MIBG have led to development of new tactics and strategies and to well-founded hopes for elimination of cancers. Radiolabeled MIBG is an exemplar of theranostics and remains a worthy agent for both diagnosis and therapy of endocrine tumors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Recent achievements in Tc-99m radiopharmaceutical direct production by medical cyclotrons.

    PubMed

    Boschi, Alessandra; Martini, Petra; Pasquali, Micol; Uccelli, Licia

    2017-09-01

    (99m)Tc is the most commonly used radionuclide in the field of diagnostic imaging, a noninvasive method intended to diagnose a disease, assess the disease state and monitor the effects of treatments. Annually, the use of (99m)Tc, covers about 85% of nuclear medicine applications. This isotope releases gamma rays at about the same wavelength as conventional X-ray diagnostic equipment, and owing to its short half-life (t½ = 6 h) is ideal for diagnostic nuclear imaging. A patient can be injected with a small amount of (99m)Tc and within 24 h almost 94% of the injected radionuclide would have decayed and left the body, limiting the patient's radiation exposure. (99m)Tc is usually supplied to hospitals through a (99)Mo/(99m)Tc radionuclide generator system where it is produced from the β decay of the parent nuclide (99)Mo (t½ = 66 h), which is produced in nuclear reactors via neutron fission. Recently, the interruption of the global supply chain of reactor-produced (99)Mo, has forced the scientific community to investigate alternative production routes for (99m)Tc. One solution was to consider cyclotron-based methods as potential replacement of reactor-based technology and the nuclear reaction (100)Mo(p,2n)(99m)Tc emerged as the most worthwhile approach. This review reports some achievements about (99m)Tc produced by medical cyclotrons. In particular, the available technologies for target design, the most efficient extraction and separation procedure developed for the purification of (99m)Tc from the irradiated targets, the preparation of high purity (99m)Tc radiopharmaceuticals and the first clinical studies carried out with cyclotron produced (99m)Tc are described.

  11. [Differential diagnosis of brain gliomas by positron emission tomography using various radiopharmaceuticals].

    PubMed

    Kostenikov, N A; Tiutin, L A; Fadeev, N P; Panfilenko, A F; Zykov, E M; Iliushchenko, Iu R; Makeeva, O Iu

    2014-01-01

    To comparatively study the diagnostic capabilities of positron emission tomography (PET) with various tumorotropic radiopharmaceuticals (TRPs) in detecting malignant brain gliomas (BG) and estimating their degree. One hundred and fourteen patients, including 47 with histologically verified glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), 27 with anaplastic astrocytoma (AA), 23 with benign astrocytoma (BA), and 17 with postoperative cysts, were examined. PET was performed using TRPs: 18F-fluorodesoxyglucose (18F-FDG), 11C-sodium butyrate (11C-SB), 11C-L-methionine (11C-MET), and 11C-choline (11C-COL). Malignant gliomas (GBM and AA) were clearly visualized by PET using 11C-MET, 11C-CHOL, and 11C-SB. 18F-FDG PET visualization of tumors was difficult because of increased RP accumulation in the cerebral cortex. WHO grades II-III gliomas were completely visualized by 11C-MET PET. Only some tumors were clearly displayed by PET with 11C-CHOL and 11C-SB. The accumulation indices (AI) obtained by 11C-CHOL PET in patients with malignant gliomas were, on average, 4.0- and 5.5-fold higher than those by 11C-MET and 11C-SB PET, respectively. Significant differences (p < 0.001) in AI obtained by "C-CHOL ("C-CHOL-AI) PET were first established between the patients with GBM (WHO grade IV) and those with AA (WHO grade III). 11C-CHOL PET is the most sensitive method to identify gliomas and estimate their grade. The advantage of 11C-MET PET is the possible imaging of the entire volume of viable tumor tissue.

  12. Development of a radiopharmaceutical dose calculator for pediatric patients undergoing diagnostic nuclear medicine studies

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Anil Kumar; Sharma, Sanjay Kumar; Sharma, Punit; Gupta, Priyanka; Kumar, Rakesh

    2013-01-01

    Objective: It is important to ensure that as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) concept during the radiopharmaceutical (RPH) dose administration in pediatric patients. Several methods have been suggested over the years for the calculation of individualized RPH dose, sometimes requiring complex calculations and large variability exists for administered dose in children. The aim of the present study was to develop a software application that can calculate and store RPH dose along with patient record. Materials and Methods: We reviewed the literature to select the dose formula and used Microsoft Access (a software package) to develop this application. We used the Microsoft Excel to verify the accurate execution of the dose formula. The manual and computer time using this program required for calculating the RPH dose were compared. Results: The developed application calculates RPH dose for pediatric patients based on European Association of Nuclear Medicine dose card, weight based, body surface area based, Clark, Solomon Fried, Young and Webster's formula. It is password protected to prevent the accidental damage and stores the complete record of patients that can be exported to Excel sheet for further analysis. It reduces the burden of calculation and saves considerable time i.e., 2 min computer time as compared with 102 min (manual calculation with the calculator for all seven formulas for 25 patients). Conclusion: The software detailed above appears to be an easy and useful method for calculation of pediatric RPH dose in routine clinical practice. This software application will help in helping the user to routinely applied ALARA principle while pediatric dose administration. PMID:24163510

  13. Plasma, urine and skin pharmacokinetics of cefepime in burns patients.

    PubMed

    Sampol, E; Jacquet, A; Viggiano, M; Bernini, V; Manelli, J C; Lacarelle, B; Durand, A

    2000-08-01

    We studied the pharmacokinetics of cefepime (2 g bd) in six burns patients. Blood, urine and skin samples were collected to measure cefepime concentrations. A two-compartment model was fitted to the data. At day 1, t(1/2beta) was 2.45 +/- 0.56 h, V(ss) 0.36 +/- 0.1 L/kg, total clearance 152 +/- 25.2 mL/min, and AUC 217 +/- 34 mg*h/L. There was no statistical difference between day 1 and day 3 for any of the pharmacokinetic parameters. We demonstrated good penetration of cefepime in skin. These results show that it is not necessary to change the standard dosage of cefepime in burns patients.

  14. Clinical pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the endothelin receptor antagonist macitentan.

    PubMed

    Sidharta, P N; Treiber, A; Dingemanse, J

    2015-05-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive disease of the lung vascular system, which leads to right-sided heart failure and ultimately death if untreated. Treatments to regulate the pulmonary vascular pressure target the prostacyclin, nitric oxide, and endothelin (ET) pathways. Macitentan, an oral, once-daily, dual ETA and ETB receptor antagonist with high affinity and sustained receptor binding is the first ET receptor antagonist to show significant reduction of the risk of morbidity and mortality in PAH patients in a large-scale phase III study with a long-term outcome. Here we present a review of the available clinical pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationship, and drug-drug interaction data of macitentan in healthy subjects, patients with PAH, and in special populations.

  15. Pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of liposomal etoposide in rats.

    PubMed

    Sistla, Anand; Smith, David J; Kobrinsky, Nathan L; Kumar, Krishna

    2009-11-01

    Precipitation of etoposide and adverse events associated with the co-solvents in intravenous solutions can be avoided by using liposomal etoposide (LE). The pharmacokinetics and distribution of the commercial formulation (ETPI) and LE were compared in rats. The pharmacokinetic profiles were biphasic and similar in the initial phase (C(max), Vd, and t(1/2alpha)). However, LE showed a 60% increase in AUC with a 35% decrease in clearance (p < 0.05). This decreased clearance resulted in a 70% increase in the MRT of etoposide. The uptake of etoposide from LE was higher in macrophage-phagocytic endowed tissues indicating that LE is superior to ETPI for targeted delivery of etoposide.

  16. Pharmacokinetics of escin Ia in rats after intravenous administration.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiu-Jun; Cui, Xiang-Yong; Tian, Lian-tian; Gao, Feng; Guan, Xin; Gu, Jing-Kai

    2014-10-28

    Escin, a natural mixture of triterpene saponins, is commonly utilized for the treatment of chronic venous insufficiency, hemorrhoids, inflammation and edema. Escin Ia is the chief active ingredient in escin and plays key role in mediating its pharmacological effects. Adequate pharmacokinetic data are essential for proper application of escin agent in clinical practice. However, pharmacokinetic properties of escin Ia are still poorly understood and this conflicts with the growing use of escin agent over the years. The goal of this study is to investigate the pharmacokinetic behavior of escin Ia in rats after low, medium and high-dose intravenous administration. Wistar rats were divided into 3 groups (n=6 per group) and escin Ia was administered via the caudal vein at doses of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 mg/kg, respectively. Subsequently, the concentrations of escin Ia and its metabolite isoescin Ia, a positional isomer of escin Ia, in rats׳ plasma were measured by an established liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method at various time points following the administration of the drug. Main pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by non-compartmental analysis using the TopFit 2.0 software package (Thomae GmbH, Germany). After intravenous administration, the Cmax and AUC of escin Ia increased in a dose-proportional manner at the dose of 0.5 mg/kg and 1.0 mg/kg, while increased in a more than dose-proportional manner at the doses of 1.0 mg/kg and 2.0 mg/kg. The t₁/₂ was significantly longer with increased intravenous doses, while other parameters such as CL and Vd also exhibit disagreement among three doses. Taken together, our data showed dose-dependent pharmacokinetic profile of escin Ia in rats after intravenous administration at the doses of 0.5-2.0 mg/kg. After intravenous administration, escin Ia was rapidly and extensively converted to isoescin Ia. The results suggested dose-dependent pharmacokinetics of escin Ia at the doses of 0.5-2.0 mg

  17. The concept of minimum detectable activity of radionuclide activity meters and their suitability for routine quality control of radiopharmaceuticals. An experimental study.

    PubMed

    Zagni, F; Cesarini, F; Lucconi, G; Cicoria, G; Pancaldi, D; Infantino, A; Vichi, S; Marengo, M

    2016-07-01

    Radionuclide activity meters ("dose calibrators") are ionization chambers designed to measure relatively high amount of activities which are normally contained in radiopharmaceuticals. However, in the current radiopharmacy practice, these radiation detectors have been proposed to be used in measurements of samples with lower activity, such as in routine quality control (QC) tests. To check the feasibility of such measurements, in this work we assessed the performance of four different devices in the lower range of detectability, by means of experimental measurements of a radioactive sample. Accuracy and precision of each device was evaluated as a function of the activity contained in the sample in order to estimate a threshold value, or minimum detectable activity (MDA), which, according to our operational definition, may be used to express the concept of Limit of Quantification (LoQ). Moreover, a generalized procedure for the estimation of the MDA was established, which, being device- and radionuclide-independent, it may be adopted by every laboratory. Our results showed a significant variability in the MDA achieved by different activity meters. Hence a single QC test may result feasible with one specific instrument, and not with another one. Moreover, feasibility depends also on the confidence level required for each test. For these reasons, each activity meter should be qualified for its MDA or LoQ by each laboratory according to a procedure such as that described in this paper. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. High Yield Production and Radiochemical Isolation of Isotopically Pure Arsenic-72 and Novel Radioarsenic Labeling Strategies for the Development of Theranostic Radiopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Ellison, Paul A.; Barnhart, Todd E.; Chen, Feng; Hong, Hao; Zhang, Yin; Theuer, Charles P.; Cai, Weibo; Nickles, Robert J.; DeJesus, Onofre T.

    2016-01-01

    Radioisotopes of arsenic are of considerable interest to the field of nuclear medicine with unique nuclear and chemical properties making them well-suited for use in novel theranostic radiopharmaceuticals. However, progress must still be made in the production of isotopically pure radioarsenic and in its stable conjugation to biological targeting vectors. This work presents the production and irradiation of isotopically enriched 72Ge(m) discs in an irrigation-cooled target system allowing for the production of isotopically pure 72As with capability on the order of 10 GBq. A radiochemical separation procedure isolated the reactive trivalent radioarsenic in a small volume buffered aqueous solution, while reclaiming 72Ge target material. The direct thiol-labeling of a monoclonal antibody resulted in a conjugate exhibiting exceptionally poor in vivo stability in a mouse model. This prompted further investigations to alternative radioarsenic labeling strategies, including the labeling of the dithiol-containing chelator dihydrolipoic acid, and thiol-modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN-SH). Radioarsenic-labeled MSN-SH showed exceptional in vivo stability toward dearsenylation. PMID:26646989

  19. 99mTc Glucarate as a Potential Radiopharmaceutical Agent for Assessment of Tumor Viability: From Bench to the Bed Side

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Partha S.; Savio, E.; Solanki, K. K.; Alonso, O.; Gupta, A.; Gambini, J. P.; Doval, Dinesh; Sharma, P.; Dondi, M.

    2012-01-01

    Several radiotracers have been used for assessing cell death, whether by necrosis or apoptosis. 99mTc glucarate, which has initially been reported to be concentrating/accumulating in myocardial infarction or zones of cerebral injury, has also shown some tumor-seeking properties in a few preliminary studies. Under International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)'s coordinated research program, we report here the standardization, quality control, and clinical evaluation (detection, evaluation of response, and comparison with 18F Fluorodeoxyglucose) of this tracer in well-characterized lung cancer and head neck malignancies in a single-arm prospective observational study. Forty-seven patients (29 inoperable lung carcinoma and 18 head and neck malignancies) were prospectively enrolled and underwent 99mTc glucarate imaging [whole body planar and single-photon emission computed tomography of the region of interest] 4-5 hours after injection of 20 mCi of the radiopharmaceutical. Excellent 99mTc glucarate concentration was noted in the target lesion in lung cancer and head and neck malignancies. The sensitivity was found to be better in lung cancer. Avid concentration of tracer was seen in the metastatic sites. During response evaluation, the glucarate concentration correlated well with the clinical and other radiological findings. 99mTc glucarate showed avid concentration of tracer in the tumor, suggesting it to be a potential tumor imaging agent which can be used for detection and assessment of therapeutic response in malignancy. PMID:23372437

  20. cGMP production of the radiopharmaceutical [(18) F]MK-6240 for PET imaging of human neurofibrillary tangles.

    PubMed

    Collier, Thomas Lee; Yokell, Daniel L; Livni, Eli; Rice, Peter A; Celen, Sofie; Serdons, Kim; Neelamegam, Ramesh; Bormans, Guy; Harris, Dawn; Walji, Abbas; Hostetler, Eric D; Bennacef, Idriss; Vasdev, Neil

    2017-05-15

    Fluorine-18-labelled 6-(fluoro)-3-(1H-pyrrolo[2,3-c]pyridin-1-yl)isoquinolin-5-amine ([(18) F]MK-6240) is a novel potent and selective positron emission tomography (PET) radiopharmaceutical for detecting human neurofibrillary tangles, which are made up of aggregated tau protein. Herein, we report the fully automated 2-step radiosynthesis of [(18) F]MK-6240 using a commercially available radiosynthesis module, GE Healthcare TRACERlab FXFN . Nucleophilic fluorination of the 5-diBoc-6-nitro precursor with potassium cryptand [(18) F]fluoride (K[(18) F]/K222 ) was performed by conventional heating, followed by acid deprotection and semipreparative high-performance liquid chromatography under isocratic conditions. The isolated product was diluted with formulation solution and sterile filtered under Current Good Manufacturing Practices, and quality control procedures were established to validate this radiopharmaceutical for human use. At the end of synthesis, 6.3 to 9.3 GBq (170-250 mCi) of [(18) F]MK-6240 was formulated and ready for injection, in an uncorrected radiochemical yield of 7.5% ± 1.9% (relative to starting [(18) F]fluoride) with a specific activity of 222 ± 67 GBq/μmol (6.0 ± 1.8 Ci/μmol) at the end of synthesis (90 minutes; n = 3). [(18) F]MK-6240 was successfully validated for human PET studies meeting all Food and Drug Administration and United States Pharmacopeia requirements for a PET radiopharmaceutical. The present method can be easily adopted for use with other radiofluorination modules for widespread clinical research use. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Cu(II) bis(thiosemicarbazone) radiopharmaceutical binding to serum albumin: further definition of species dependence and associated substituent effects.

    PubMed

    Basken, Nathan E; Green, Mark A

    2009-07-01

    The pyruvaldehyde bis(N(4)-methylthiosemicarbazonato)copper(II) (Cu-PTSM) and diacetyl bis(N(4)-methylthiosemicarbazonato)copper(II) (Cu-ATSM) radiopharmaceuticals exhibit strong, species-dependent binding to the IIA site of human serum albumin (HSA), while the related ethylglyoxal bis(thiosemicarbazonato)copper(II) (Cu-ETS) radiopharmaceutical appears to exhibit only nonspecific binding to HSA and animal serum albumins. To further probe the structural basis for the species dependence of this albumin binding interaction, we examined protein binding of these three radiopharmaceuticals in solutions of albumin and/or serum from a broader array of mammalian species (rat, sheep, donkey, rabbit, cow, pig, dog, baboon, mouse, cat and elephant). We also evaluated the albumin binding of several copper(II) bis(thiosemicarbazone) chelates offering more diverse substitution of the ligand backbone. Cu-PTSM and Cu-ATSM exhibit a strong interaction with HSA that is not apparent with the albumins of other species, while the binding of Cu-ETS to albumin is much less species dependent. The strong interaction of Cu-PTSM with HSA does not appear to simply correlate with variation, relative to the animal albumins, of a single amino acid lining HSA's IIA site. Those agents that selectively interact with HSA share the common feature of only methyl or hydrogen substitution at the carbon atoms of the diimine fragment of the ligand backbone. The interspecies variations in albumin binding of Cu-PTSM and Cu-ATSM are not simply explained by unique amino acid substitutions in the IIA binding pocket of the serum albumins. However, the specific affinity for this region of HSA is disrupted when substituents bulkier than a methyl group appear on the imine carbons of the copper bis(thiosemicarbazone) chelate.

  2. An internal radiation dosimetry computer program, IDAC 2.0, for estimation of patient doses from radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Andersson, M; Johansson, L; Minarik, D; Mattsson, S; Leide-Svegborn, S

    2014-12-01

    The internal dosimetry computer program internal dose assessment by computer (IDAC) for calculations of absorbed doses to organs and tissues as well as effective doses to patients from examinations with radiopharmaceuticals has been developed. The new version, IDAC2.0, incorporates the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP)/ICRU computational adult male and female voxel phantoms and decay data from the ICRP publication 107. Instead of only 25 source and target regions, calculation can now be made with 63 source regions to 73 target regions. The major advantage of having the new phantom is that the calculations of the effective doses can be made with the latest tissue weighting factors of ICRP publication 103. IDAC2.0 uses the ICRP human alimentary tract (HAT) model for orally administrated activity and for excretion through the gastrointestinal tract and effective doses have been recalculated for radiopharmaceuticals that are orally administered. The results of the program are consistent with published data using the same specific absorption fractions and also compared with published data from the same computational phantoms but with segmentation of organs leading to another set of specific absorption fractions. The effective dose is recalculated for all the 34 radiopharmaceuticals that are administered orally and has been published by the ICRP. Using the new HAT model, new tissue weighting factors and the new adult computational voxel phantoms lead to an average effective dose of half of its earlier estimated value. The reduction mainly depends on electron transport simulations to walled organs and the transition from the stylised phantom with unrealistic interorgan distances to more realistic voxel phantoms.

  3. Analysis of radionuclide concentration in air released through the stack of a radiopharmaceutical production facility based on a medical cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giardina, M.; Tomarchio, E.; Greco, D.

    2015-11-01

    Positron emitting radionuclides are increasingly used in medical diagnostics and the number of radiopharmaceutical production facilities have been estimated to be growing worldwide. During the process of production and/or patient administration of radiopharmaceuticals, an amount of these radionuclides might become airborne and escape into the environment. Therefore, the analysis of radionuclide concentration in the air released to the stack is a very important issue to evaluate the dose to the population living around the plant. To this end, sampling and measurement of radionuclide concentration in air released through the stack of a Nuclear Medicine Center (NMC), provided with a cyclotron for radiopharmaceuticals production, must be routinely carried out with an automatic measurement system. In this work is presented the air monitoring system realized at "San Gaetano" NMC at Bagheria (Italy) besides the analysis of the recorded stack relesead air concentration data. Sampling of air was carried out continuously and gamma-ray spectrometric measurement are made on-line and for a short time by using a shielded Marinelli beaker filled with sampled air and a gamma detector. The use of this system allows to have 1440 values of air concentration per day from 2002, year of the start of operation with the cyclotron. Therefore, the concentration values are very many and an analysis software is needed to determine the dose to the population. A comparison with the results of a simulation code based on a Gaussian Plume air dispersion modelling allow us to confirm the no-radiological significance of the stack effluent releases in terms of dose to population and to evaluate possible improvements in the plant devices to reduce the air concentration at stack.

  4. Integrating bone targeting radiopharmaceuticals into the management of patients with castrate-resistant prostate cancer with symptomatic bone metastases.

    PubMed

    Blacksburg, Seth R; Witten, Matthew R; Haas, Jonathan A

    2015-03-01

    Metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) refers to the disease state in which metastatic prostate cancer fails to respond to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). This can be manifest as a rising PSA, increase in radiographically measurable disease, or progression of clinical disease. Roughly 90 % of men with metastatic prostate cancer have bone metastases, which is a predictor of both morbidity and mortality. Historically, treatment has been palliative, consisting of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and pharmacological analgesics for pain control and osteoclast inhibitors, such as bisphosphonates and denosumab to mitigate skeletal-related events. Older radiopharmaceuticals, such as Strontium-89 and Samarium-153, are Beta-emitting agents that were found to provide palliation but were without survival benefit and carried high risks of myelosuppression. Radium-223 is an Alpha-emitting radiopharmaceutical that has demonstrated a significant overall survival benefit in men with metastatic CRPC, delay to symptomatic skeletal events (SSEs), and improvement in pain control, with a favorable toxicity profile compared with placebo. Unlike EBRT, Radium-223 has systemic uptake, with the potential to address several bone metastases concurrently and provides overall survival benefit. It is a simple administration with minimal complexity and shielding requirements in experienced hands. EBRT appears to provide a more rapid and dramatic palliative benefit to any given lesion. Because Radium-223 has limited myelosuppression, the two can be thoughtfully integrated, along with multiple agents, for the treatment of men with CRPC with symptomatic bone metastases. Given its excellent safety profile, there is interest and anecdotal safety combining Radium-223 with therapies, such as abiraterone and enzalutamide. Formal recommendations regarding combination therapies will require clinical trials. The use of Alpha-emitting radiopharmaceuticals in castrate-sensitive disease

  5. Preparation and In Vivo Pharmacokinetics of the Tongshu Suppository.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guoqiang; Dong, Leilei; Lu, Kuan; Liu, Sisi; Zheng, Yingying

    2016-01-01

    Astragalus polysaccharide (APS) (used for intestinal protection) was added to formulate the Tongshu suppository to improve the pharmacokinetics of Aceclofenac, which were assessed in New Zealand rabbits using an orthogonal experimental design. The single-agent Aceclofenac was taken as the control formulation. The concentration-time and drug release curves were drawn, and T max (min), C max (μg·mL(-1)), AUC0→∞ , and MRT were compared using a pharmacokinetic systems program. The formulated Tongshu suppository had moderate hardness, a smooth surface with uniform color, and theoretical drug-loading rate of 8%. Its release rate was in accordance with the drug preparation requirements. The concentration-time curves and drug release curves revealed that the maximum concentrations (C max) were 4.18 ± 1.03 μg·mL(-1) and 3.34 ± 0.41 μg·mL(-1) for the Tongshu and Aceclofenac suppositories, respectively, showing statistically insignificant difference, while the peak times were 34.87 ± 4.69 min and 34.76 ± 6.34 min, respectively, also showing statistically insignificant difference. Compared with the Aceclofenac suppository, the relative bioavailability of the Tongshu suppository was 104.4%, and the difference between them was statistically insignificant. In this experiment, the Tongshu suppository was prepared using the hot-melt method. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies confirmed it had higher bioavailability than the Aceclofenac suppository.

  6. Pyrimethamine nanosuspension with improved bioavailability: in vivo pharmacokinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Dhapte, Vividha; Kadam, Vivek; Pokharkar, Varsha

    2013-10-01

    Pyrimethamine is a standard antiprotozoal drug recommended for prophylaxis and treatment of malarial infections. Limited bioavailability, slow onset of action, and life-threatening side effects restrict its use. Hence, in the present study, pyrimethamine nanosuspension was prepared with the objective to improve its dissolution rate and pharmacokinetic profile. Stable pyrimethamine nanosuspension with submicron particle size was prepared by nanoprecipitation and high-pressure homogenization techniques. Nanosizing and stabilizers modified the surface characteristics of drug particles resulting in considerable increase in the dissolution rate. The in vivo pharmacokinetic studies of the prepared nanosuspension were carried out and compared with plain pyrimethamine suspension and marketed pyrimethamine suspension. The in vivo pharmacokinetic profiling of pyrimethamine nanosuspension in rats showed higher AUC0-24 h and C max compared to the plain and marketed pyrimethamine suspensions. In contrast to its plain and marketed formulation, pyrimethamine nanosuspension showed rapid onset of action (T max 0.5 h vs. 2 h). Also, the low volume of distribution and reduced elimination half-life of the developed nanosuspension can lead to reduced side effects. Thus, improved in vitro-in vivo kinetics indicated that nanosuspension proved to be a suitable strategy for elevating the therapeutic profile of pyrimethamine.

  7. Optimisation of sampling windows design for population pharmacokinetic experiments.

    PubMed

    Ogungbenro, Kayode; Aarons, Leon

    2008-08-01

    This paper describes an approach for optimising sampling windows for population pharmacokinetic experiments. Sampling windows designs are more practical in late phase drug development where patients are enrolled in many centres and in out-patient clinic settings. Collection of samples under the uncontrolled environment at these centres at fixed times may be problematic and can result in uninformative data. Population pharmacokinetic sampling windows design provides an opportunity to control when samples are collected by allowing some flexibility and yet provide satisfactory parameter estimation. This approach uses information obtained from previous experiments about the model and parameter estimates to optimise sampling windows for population pharmacokinetic experiments within a space of admissible sampling windows sequences. The optimisation is based on a continuous design and in addition to sampling windows the structure of the population design in terms of the proportion of subjects in elementary designs, number of elementary designs in the population design and number of sampling windows per elementary design is also optimised. The results obtained showed that optimal sampling windows designs obtained using this approach are very efficient for estimating population PK parameters and provide greater flexibility in terms of when samples are collected. The results obtained also showed that the generalized equivalence theorem holds for this approach.

  8. [Pharmacokinetic study of a new chewing gum dextromethorphan delivery system].

    PubMed

    Liu, Juan; Tan, Qun-you; Liu, Bi-lin; Xu, Mei-ling; Zhao, Chun-jing; Zhang, Jing-qing

    2011-01-01

    To establish an high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-based method for analysis of the pharmacokinetics and relative bioavailability of dextromethorphan chewing gum tablets in rabbits. The pharmacokinetic parameters and the relative bioavailability of dextromethorphan chewing gum preparation in rabbits were compared with those of the commercially available chewing dextromethorphan tablets using 3P97 software. Pharmacokinetic analysis of the new dextromethorphan chewing gum tablets showed a AUC of 488.76 ∓ 175.00 ng.ml(-1).h, C(max) of 95.45 ∓ 17.53 ng/ml, and t(max) of 1.83 ∓ 0.57 h as compared with the corresponding parameters of 370.13 ∓ 90.56 ng.ml(-1).h, 174.00 ∓ 47.88 ng.ml, and 1.04 ∓ 0.14 h for the commercially available chewing tablets. The relative bioavailability of the new chewing gum medicine system was (140.73 ∓ 65.91)%. The new dextromethorphan chewing gum preparation shows an increased AUC((0→)), decreased C(max), and prolonged t(max) in comparison with the commercially available chewing tablets, with also a greatly enhanced relative bioavailability.

  9. Preparation and In Vivo Pharmacokinetics of the Tongshu Suppository

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Leilei; Lu, Kuan; Liu, Sisi; Zheng, Yingying

    2016-01-01

    Astragalus polysaccharide (APS) (used for intestinal protection) was added to formulate the Tongshu suppository to improve the pharmacokinetics of Aceclofenac, which were assessed in New Zealand rabbits using an orthogonal experimental design. The single-agent Aceclofenac was taken as the control formulation. The concentration-time and drug release curves were drawn, and Tmax (min), Cmax (μg·mL−1), AUC0→∞, and MRT were compared using a pharmacokinetic systems program. The formulated Tongshu suppository had moderate hardness, a smooth surface with uniform color, and theoretical drug-loading rate of 8%. Its release rate was in accordance with the drug preparation requirements. The concentration-time curves and drug release curves revealed that the maximum concentrations (Cmax) were 4.18 ± 1.03 μg·mL−1 and 3.34 ± 0.41 μg·mL−1 for the Tongshu and Aceclofenac suppositories, respectively, showing statistically insignificant difference, while the peak times were 34.87 ± 4.69 min and 34.76 ± 6.34 min, respectively, also showing statistically insignificant difference. Compared with the Aceclofenac suppository, the relative bioavailability of the Tongshu suppository was 104.4%, and the difference between them was statistically insignificant. In this experiment, the Tongshu suppository was prepared using the hot-melt method. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies confirmed it had higher bioavailability than the Aceclofenac suppository. PMID:27610366

  10. Sildenafil does not alter nelfinavir pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Bratt, Göran; Ståhle, Lars

    2003-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate if sildenafil influences the pharmacokinetics of nelfinavir. Five HIV-infected patients on steady-state nelfinavir-containing therapy were subject to pharmacokinetic sampling for nelfinavir concentration twice: without sildenafil and with sildenafil 25 mg as a single dose. There were no differences in the AUC, T(max), or C(max) of nelfinavir. In a similar design, two patients on indinavir and two patients on ritonavir combined with saquinavir were studied. In accordance with the literature, neither of these two treatments was affected. It is concluded that nelfinavir pharmacokinetics were unaffected by concomitant intake of a single dose of sildenafil.

  11. [Pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of liposomal mitoxantrone hydrochloride].

    PubMed

    Wang, Cai-xia; Li, Chun-lei; Zhao, Xi; Yang, Han-yu; Wei, Na; Li, Yan-hui; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Lan

    2010-12-01

    This study is to compare the pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of liposomal mitoxantrone (Mit-lipo) and free mitoxantrone (Mit-free). The antineoplastic effect of Mit-lipo was evaluated on PC-3 human xenograft tumor model after repeated intravenous injection at dose levels of 1, 2 and 4 mg x kg(-1). The pharmacokinetic study of Mit-lipo and Mit-free was performed on dogs following a single intravenous injection. The tissue distribution of Mit-lipo and Mit-free was observed on S-180 bearing mice after a single intravenous injection. (1) Pharmacodynamics: Mit-lipo dose-dependently inhibited PC-3 tumor growth at a dose ranging from 1 to 4 mg x kg(-1). The antitumor effect studies showed that Mit-lipo significantly improved the therapeutic effect in comparison with free drug. (2) Pharmacokinetics: in comparison with Mit-free, the AUC and t(1/2) values of Mit-lipo at the same dose level were higher than those of Mit-free in Beagle dogs. The results showed that Mit-lipo had long circulation characteristics. (3) Tissue distribution in S-180 bearing mice: compared to Mit-free, Mit-lipo preferentially accumulated into tumor zones instead of normal tissues. Tumor AUC in Mit-lipo treated animals was 8.7 fold higher than that in mice treated with the same dose of Mit-free. The Cmax values of Mit-lipo in heart, kidney, lung, spleen and intestinal tissue in Mit-lipo were 30.2%, 161.6%, 20.2%, 27.9% and 78.3% lower than those of Mit-free, respectively. The pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of Mit-lipo changed obviously, thus increasing therapeutic effect and improving drug therapeutic index.

  12. Preclinical assessment of dopaminergic system in rats by MicroPET using three positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Lara-Camacho, V. M. Ávila-García, M. C. Ávila-Rodríguez, M. A.

    2014-11-07

    Different diseases associated with dysfunction of dopaminergic system such as Parkinson, Alzheimer, and Schizophrenia are being widely studied with positron emission tomography (PET) which is a noninvasive method useful to assess the stage of these illnesses. In our facility we have recently implemented the production of [{sup 11}C]-DTBZ, [{sup 11}C]-RAC, and [{sup 18}F]-FDOPA, which are among the most common PET radiopharmaceuticals used in neurology applications to get information about the dopamine pathways. In this study two healthy rats were imaged with each of those radiotracers in order to confirm selective striatum uptake as a proof of principle before to release them for human use.

  13. Preclinical assessment of dopaminergic system in rats by MicroPET using three positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara-Camacho, V. M.; Ávila-García, M. C.; Ávila-Rodríguez, M. A.

    2014-11-01

    Different diseases associated with dysfunction of dopaminergic system such as Parkinson, Alzheimer, and Schizophrenia are being widely studied with positron emission tomography (PET) which is a noninvasive method useful to assess the stage of these illnesses. In our facility we have recently implemented the production of [11C ]-DTBZ, [11C ]-RAC, and [18F ]-FDOPA, which are among the most common PET radiopharmaceuticals used in neurology applications to get information about the dopamine pathways. In this study two healthy rats were imaged with each of those radiotracers in order to confirm selective striatum uptake as a proof of principle before to release them for human use.

  14. Determination of 125I impurities in [ 123I]labelled radiopharmaceuticals, by liquid scintillation counting: sensitivity of the method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonardi, M. L.; Birattari, C.; Groppi, F.; Gini, L.; Mainardi, C. H. S.; Menapace, E.

    2004-01-01

    Iodine-125 is a radioisotopic impurity "always" present in iodine-123, produced by nuclear reactions induced either on natural or "highly" enriched targets. Liquid scintillation counting is a very sensitive tool to determine low level impurities of both low energy electrons and photons in aqueous and organic solutions of radiopharmaceutical compounds. With this technique it was possible to determine, on commercial samples, that the content of 125I was of the order of not less than 0.1% for 123I produced via 127I(p,5n) reactions and not less than 0.01% for 123I produced via "highly" enriched 124Xe(p,X) nuclear reactions.

  15. MIRD Pamphlet No. 26: Joint EANM/MIRD Guidelines for Quantitative 177Lu SPECT Applied for Dosimetry of Radiopharmaceutical Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ljungberg, Michael; Celler, Anna; Konijnenberg, Mark W; Eckerman, Keith F; Dewaraja, Yuni K; Sjögreen-Gleisner, Katarina; Bolch, Wesley E; Brill, A Bertrand; Fahey, Frederic; Fisher, Darrell R; Hobbs, Robert; Howell, Roger W; Meredith, Ruby F; Sgouros, George; Zanzonico, Pat; Bacher, Klaus; Chiesa, Carlo; Flux, Glenn; Lassmann, Michael; Strigari, Lidia; Walrand, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    The accuracy of absorbed dose calculations in personalized internal radionuclide therapy is directly related to the accuracy of the activity (or activity concentration) estimates obtained at each of the imaging time points. MIRD Pamphlet no. 23 presented a general overview of methods that are required for quantitative SPECT imaging. The present document is next in a series of isotope-specific guidelines and recommendations that follow the general information that was provided in MIRD 23. This paper focuses on (177)Lu (lutetium) and its application in radiopharmaceutical therapy. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  16. Rapidly Growing Chest Wall Mass in a Case of Sporadic Metastatic Paraganglioma: Imaging With 4 Different PET Radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Ingo; Xekouki, Paraskevi; Nambuba, Joan; Chen, Clara C; Herscovitch, Peter; Millo, Corina M; Schrump, David S; Pacak, Karel

    2016-05-01

    Pheochromocytomas/paragangliomas (PGLs) are rare tumors and mostly benign. We report on a 32-year-old woman with metastatic PGL who was first diagnosed with an abdominal PGL at the age of 12 years. She soon developed metastatic disease and received several treatments including external beam radiation and chemotherapy. When she was referred to our institution in 2014, her major complaint was a rapidly growing chest wall mass on the left side. The patient was imaged at our institution with 4 different PET radiopharmaceuticals.

  17. The effect of giving detailed information about intravenous radiopharmaceutical administration on the anxiety level of patients who request more information.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Eser; Ciftci, Ismail; Demirel, Reha; Cigerci, Yeliz; Gecici, Omer

    2010-02-01

    Nuclear medicine procedures use radiopharmaceuticals, which produce radiation and potential adverse reactions, albeit at a low rate. It is the patient's ethical, legal, and medical right to be informed of the potential side effects of procedures applied to them. Our purpose was to determine the effect of providing information about intravenous radiopharmaceutical administration on the anxiety level of patients who request more information. This study was completed in two separate Nuclear Medicine Departments. The study included 620 (247 M, 373 F) patients who had been referred for myocardial perfusion, bone, dynamic renal, and thyroid scintigraphic examinations. The patients were divided into two groups according to whether they requested more information or not. Group 1 consisted of 388 patients who wanted to receive more information about the procedure, while Group 2 consisted of 232 patients who did not request additional information. The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-S and STAI-T) was used to determine a patient's anxiety level. After simple information was given, state and trait anxiety levels were measured in both groups. We gave detailed information to the patients in Group 1 and then measured state anxiety again. Detailed information included an explanation of the radiopharmaceutical risk and probable side effects due to the scan procedure. There was no statistical difference between Groups 1 and 2 in STAI-T or STAI-S scores after simple information was given (p = 0.741 and p = 0.945, respectively). The mean value of STAI-S score was increased after the provision of detailed information and there was a statistically significant difference between after simple information SATI-S and after detailed information STAI-S (p < 0.001). The STAI-S score was increased in 246 patients and decreased in 110 patients after detailed information, while there was no change in 32 patients. After detailed information, the greatest increase in STAI-S score was seen in

  18. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of pegfilgrastim.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bing-Bing; Kido, Anna

    2011-05-01

    Pegfilgrastim is a sustained-duration form of filgrastim, a recombinant methionyl form of human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), to which a 20  kDa polyethylene glycol molecule is covalently bound to the N-terminal methionine residue. Similar to filgrastim, pegfilgrastim increases the proliferation and differentiation of neutrophils from committed progenitor cells, induces maturation, and enhances the survival and function of mature neutrophils, resulting in dose-dependent increases in neutrophils. After subcutaneous administration, pegfilgrastim exhibits nonlinear pharmacokinetics and exposure to pegfilgrastim increases in more than a dose-proportional manner, suggesting that the clearance of pegfilgrastim decreases with increased dosing. Filgrastim is primarily eliminated by the kidney and neutrophils/neutrophil precursors; the latter presumably involves binding of the growth factor to the G-CSF receptor on the cell surface, internalization of the growth factor-receptor complexes via endocytosis, and subsequent degradation inside the cells. Pegylation of filgrastim renders renal clearance insignificant, which was demonstrated in bilaterally nephrectomized rats and confirmed in subjects with renal impairment. As a result, the neutrophil-mediated clearance is the predominant elimination pathway for pegfilgrastim. During chemotherapy-induced neutropenia, the clearance of pegfilgrastim is significantly reduced and the concentration of pegfilgrastim is sustained until onset of neutrophil recovery. Pegfilgrastim concentrations are sustained longer in patients with profound neutropenia. Evidence supports the use of a postnadir absolute neutrophil count (ANC) of ≥ 1 × 109/L as a surrogate marker threshold for the clearance of pegfilgrastim to subtherapeutic levels. After repeated administration of pegfilgrastim, the peak concentrations of pegfilgrastim decrease, likely due to increased neutrophil and neutrophil precursor mass. A pharmacokinetic

  19. Untangling the web of European regulations for the preparation of unlicensed radiopharmaceuticals: a concise overview and practical guidance for a risk-based approach.

    PubMed

    Lange, Rogier; ter Heine, Rob; Decristoforo, Clemens; Peñuelas, Iván; Elsinga, Philip H; van der Westerlaken, Monique M L; Hendrikse, N Harry

    2015-05-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals are highly regulated, because they are controlled both as regular medicinal products and as radioactive substances. This can pose a hurdle for their development and clinical use. Radiopharmaceuticals are fundamentally different from other medicinal products and these regulations are not always adequate for their production. Strict compliance may have a huge resource impact, without further improving product quality. In this paper we give an overview of the applicable legislation and guidelines and propose a risk-based approach for their implementation. We focus on a few controversial Good Manufacturing Practice topics: cleanroom classification, air pressure regime, cleanroom qualification and microbiological monitoring. We have developed an algorithm to assess the combined risk of microbiological contamination of a radiopharmaceutical preparation process and propose corresponding Good Manufacturing Practice classification levels. In our opinion, the risk of carry-over of radiopharmaceuticals by individuals cannot be contained by pressure differences, and complicated regimes with underpressured rooms are not necessary in most situations. We propose a sterility assurance level of 10 for radiopharmaceuticals that are administered within a working day, irrespective of their use. We suggest the adoption of limits for environmental monitoring of microbial contamination, as proposed by Bruel and colleagues, on behalf of the French Society of Radiopharmacy. Recently launched regulatory documents seem to bre