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Sample records for radiopharmaceutical showing pharmacokinetic

  1. Radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Theobald, A.E.

    1989-01-01

    This book is a review of the latest developments in radiopharmaceuticals. It covers the development of radiopharmaceutical compounds, the theory and practice of their synthesis, and examples of their application. Also covers safe handling of radiopharmaceuticals, legislation affecting their use, radiation monitoring, radiochromatography, and computer techniques.

  2. 'Naked' radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Wallner, Paul E. . E-mail: pwallner@rtsx.com

    2006-10-01

    The term 'naked' radiopharmaceuticals, more appropriately, 'unbound' radiopharmaceuticals, refers to any radioisotope used for clinical research or clinical purposes that is not attached to a chemical or biological carrier, and that localizes in various tissues because of a physiologic or chemical propensity/affinity, or secondary to focal anatomic placement. Although they remain useful in selected clinical circumstances, the available agents (except for Iodine-131) have been relegated to an unfortunate and somewhat secondary role. The agents remain useful and worthy of consideration for new clinical investigation and clinical use.

  3. The novel AKT inhibitor afuresertib shows favorable safety, pharmacokinetics, and clinical activity in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Andrew; Yoon, Sung-Soo; Harrison, Simon J.; Morris, Shannon R.; Smith, Deborah A.; Brigandi, Richard A.; Gauvin, Jennifer; Kumar, Rakesh; Opalinska, Joanna B.

    2014-01-01

    The PI3K/AKT pathway is constitutively active in hematologic malignancies, providing proliferative and antiapoptotic signals and possibly contributing to drug resistance. We conducted an open-label phase 1 study to evaluate the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), safety, pharmacokinetics, and clinical activity of afuresertib—an oral AKT inhibitor—in patients with advanced hematologic malignancies. Seventy-three patients were treated at doses ranging from 25 to 150 mg per day. The MTD was established at 125 mg per day because of 2 dose-limiting toxicities in the 150-mg cohort (liver function test abnormalities). The most frequent adverse events were nausea (35.6%), diarrhea (32.9%), and dyspepsia (24.7%). Maximum plasma concentrations and area under the plasma concentration-time curves from time 0 to 24 hours were generally dose proportional at >75-mg doses; the median time to peak plasma concentrations was 1.5 to 2.5 hours post dose, with a half-life of approximately 1.7 days. Three multiple myeloma patients attained partial responses; an additional 3 attained minimal responses. Clinical activity was also observed in non-Hodgkin lymphoma, Langerhan's cell histiocytosis, and Hodgkin disease. Single-agent afuresertib showed a favorable safety profile and demonstrated clinical activity against hematologic malignancies, including multiple myeloma. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00881946. PMID:25075128

  4. Organometallic Radiopharmaceuticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberto, Roger

    Although molecular imaging agents have to be synthesized ultimately from aqueous solutions, organometallic complexes are becoming more and more important as flexible yet kinetically stable building blocks for radiopharmaceutical drug discovery. The diversity of ligands, targets, and targeting molecules related to these complexes is an essential base for finding novel, noninvasive imaging agents to diagnose and eventually treat widespread diseases such as cancer. This review article covers the most important findings toward these objectives accomplished during the past 3-4 years. The two major available organometallic building blocks will be discussed in the beginning together with constraints for market introduction as imposed by science and industry. Since targeting radiopharmaceuticals are a major focus of current research in molecular imaging, attempts toward so-called technetium essential radiopharmaceuticals will be briefly touched in the beginning followed by the main discussion about the labeling of targeting molecules such as folic acid, nucleosides, vitamins, carbohydrates, and fatty acids. At the end, some new strategies for drug discovery will be introduced together with results from organometallic chemistry in water. The majority of the new results have been achieved with the [99mTc(OH2)3(CO)3]+ complex which will, though not exclusively, be a focus of this review.

  5. Medicinal Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry of Metal Radiopharmaceuticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saw, Maung Maung

    2012-06-01

    Metal complexes have been used as medicinal compounds. Metals have advantageous features over organic compounds. Significant applications of metal complexes are in the field of nuclear medicine. Radiopharmaceuticals are drugs containing radioisotopes used for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. The generalized targeting strategy for molecular imaging probe consists of three essential parts: (i) reporter unit or payload, (ii) carrier, and (iii) targeting system. Medicinal radiopharmaceutical chemistry pays special consideration to radioisotopes, as a reporter unit for diagnostic application or as a payload for therapeutic application. Targeting is achieved by a few approaches but the most common is the bifunctional chelator approach. While designing a radiopharmaceutical, a range of issues needs to be considered including properties of metal radioisotopes, bifunctional chelators, linkers, and targeting molecules. Designing radiopharmaceuticals requires consideration of two key words: "compounds of biological interest" and "fit for intended use." The ultimate goal is the development of new diagnostic methods and treatment. Diagnostic metal radiopharmaceuticals are used for SPECT and PET applications. Technetium chemistry constitutes a major portion of SPECT and gallium chemistry constitutes a major portion of PET. Therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals can be constructed by using alpha-, beta minus-, or Auger electron-emitting radiometals. Special uses of medicinal radiopharmaceuticals include internal radiation therapy, brachytherapy, immunoPET, radioimmunotherapy, and peptide receptor radionuclide imaging and therapy.

  6. Dosimetry for Radiopharmaceutical Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sgouros, George; Hobbs, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Radiopharmaceutical therapy (RPT) involves the use of radionuclides that are either conjugated to tumor-targeting agents (eg, nanoscale constructs, antibodies, peptides, and small molecules) or concentrated in tissue through natural physiological mechanisms that occur predominantly in neoplastic or otherwise targeted cells (eg, Graves disease). The ability to collect pharmacokinetic data by imaging and use this to perform dosimetry calculations for treatment planning distinguishes RPT from other systemic treatment modalities. Treatment planning has not been widely adopted, in part, because early attempts to relate dosimetry to outcome were not successful. This was partially because a dosimetry methodology appropriate to risk evaluation rather than efficacy and toxicity was being applied to RPT. The weakest links in both diagnostic and therapeutic dosimetry are the accuracy of the input and the reliability of the radiobiological models used to convert dosimetric data to the relevant biologic end points. Dosimetry for RPT places a greater demand on both of these weak links. To date, most dosimetric studies have been retrospective, with a focus on tumor dose-response correlations rather than prospective treatment planning. In this regard, transarterial radioembolization also known as intra-arterial radiation therapy, which uses radiolabeled (90Y) microspheres of glass or resin to treat lesions in the liver holds much promise for more widespread dosimetric treatment planning. The recent interest in RPT with alpha-particle emitters has highlighted the need to adopt a dosimetry methodology that specifically accounts for the unique aspects of alpha particles. The short range of alpha-particle emitters means that in cases in which the distribution of activity is localized to specific functional components or cell types of an organ, the absorbed dose will be equally localized and dosimetric calculations on the scale of organs or even voxels (~5 mm) are no longer sufficient

  7. Eleventh international symposium on radiopharmaceutical chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    This document contains abstracts of papers which were presented at the Eleventh International Symposium on Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry. Sessions included: radiopharmaceuticals for the dopaminergic system, strategies for the production and use of labelled reactive small molecules, radiopharmaceuticals for measuring metabolism, radiopharmaceuticals for the serotonin and sigma receptor systems, labelled probes for molecular biology applications, radiopharmaceuticals for receptor systems, radiopharmaceuticals utilizing coordination chemistry, radiolabelled antibodies, radiolabelling methods for small molecules, analytical techniques in radiopharmaceutical chemistry, and analytical techniques in radiopharmaceutical chemistry.

  8. Astatine Radiopharmaceuticals: Prospects and Problems.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Zalutsky, Michael R

    2008-09-01

    For the treatment of minimum residual diseases such micrometastases and residual tumor margins that remain after debulking of the primary tumor, targeted radiotherapy using radiopharmaceuticals tagged with alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides is very attractive. In addition to the their short range in tissue, which helps minimize harmful effects on adjacent normal tissues, alpha-particles, being high LET radiation, have several radiobiological advantages. The heavy halogen, astatine-211 is one of the prominent alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides in practice. Being a halogen, it can often be incorporated into biomolecules of interest by adapting radioiodination chemistry. A wide spectrum of compounds from the simple [(211)At]astatide ion to small organic molecules, peptides, and large proteins labeled with (211)At have been investigated with at least two reaching the stage of clinical evaluation. The chemistry, cytotoxic advantages, biodistribution studies, and microdosimetry/pharmacokinetic modeling of some of these agents will be reviewed. In addition, potential problems such as the harmful effect of radiolysis on the synthesis, lack of sufficient in vivo stability of astatinated compounds, and possible adverse effects when they are systemically administered will be discussed. PMID:20150978

  9. Astatine Radiopharmaceuticals: Prospects and Problems.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Zalutsky, Michael R

    2008-09-01

    For the treatment of minimum residual diseases such micrometastases and residual tumor margins that remain after debulking of the primary tumor, targeted radiotherapy using radiopharmaceuticals tagged with alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides is very attractive. In addition to the their short range in tissue, which helps minimize harmful effects on adjacent normal tissues, alpha-particles, being high LET radiation, have several radiobiological advantages. The heavy halogen, astatine-211 is one of the prominent alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides in practice. Being a halogen, it can often be incorporated into biomolecules of interest by adapting radioiodination chemistry. A wide spectrum of compounds from the simple [(211)At]astatide ion to small organic molecules, peptides, and large proteins labeled with (211)At have been investigated with at least two reaching the stage of clinical evaluation. The chemistry, cytotoxic advantages, biodistribution studies, and microdosimetry/pharmacokinetic modeling of some of these agents will be reviewed. In addition, potential problems such as the harmful effect of radiolysis on the synthesis, lack of sufficient in vivo stability of astatinated compounds, and possible adverse effects when they are systemically administered will be discussed.

  10. Astatine Radiopharmaceuticals: Prospects and Problems

    PubMed Central

    Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Zalutsky, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    For the treatment of minimum residual diseases such micrometastases and residual tumor margins that remain after debulking of the primary tumor, targeted radiotherapy using radiopharmaceuticals tagged with α-particle-emitting radionuclides is very attractive. In addition to the their short range in tissue, which helps minimize harmful effects on adjacent normal tissues, α-particles, being high LET radiation, have several radiobiological advantages. The heavy halogen, astatine-211 is one of the prominent α-particle-emitting radionuclides in practice. Being a halogen, it can often be incorporated into biomolecules of interest by adapting radioiodination chemistry. A wide spectrum of compounds from the simple [211At]astatide ion to small organic molecules, peptides, and large proteins labeled with 211At have been investigated with at least two reaching the stage of clinical evaluation. The chemistry, cytotoxic advantages, biodistribution studies, and microdosimetry/pharmacokinetic modeling of some of these agents will be reviewed. In addition, potential problems such as the harmful effect of radiolysis on the synthesis, lack of sufficient in vivo stability of astatinated compounds, and possible adverse effects when they are systemically administered will be discussed. PMID:20150978

  11. Dithiocarbamate-thiourea hybrids useful as vaginal microbicides also show reverse transcriptase inhibition: design, synthesis, docking and pharmacokinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Bala, Veenu; Jangir, Santosh; Mandalapu, Dhanaraju; Gupta, Sonal; Chhonker, Yashpal S; Lal, Nand; Kushwaha, Bhavana; Chandasana, Hardik; Krishna, Shagun; Rawat, Kavita; Maikhuri, Jagdamba P; Bhatta, Rabi S; Siddiqi, Mohammad I; Tripathi, Rajkamal; Gupta, Gopal; Sharma, Vishnu L

    2015-02-15

    Prophylactic prevention is considered as the most promising strategy to tackle STI/HIV. Twenty-five dithiocarbamate-thiourea hybrids (14-38) were synthesized as woman controlled topical vaginal microbicides to counter Trichomonas vaginalis and sperm along with RT inhibition potential. The four promising compounds (18, 26, 28 and 33) were tested for safety through cytotoxic assay against human cervical cell line (HeLa) and compatibility with vaginal flora, Lactobacillus. Docking study of most promising vaginal microbicide (33) revealed that it docked in a position and orientation similar to known reverse transcriptase inhibitor Nevirapine. The preliminary in vivo pharmacokinetics of compound 33 was performed in NZ-rabbits to evaluate systemic toxicity in comparison to Nonoxynol-9. PMID:25592712

  12. Method for preparing radiopharmaceutical complexes

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Alun G.; Davison, Alan; Abrams, Michael J.

    1989-05-02

    A method for preparing radiopharmaceutical complexes that are substantially free of the reaction materials used to produce the radiopharmaceutical complex is disclosed. The method involves admixing in a suitable first solvent in a container a target seeking ligand or salt or metal adduct thereof, a radionuclide label, and a reducing agent for said radionuclide, thereby forming said radiopharmaceutical complex; coating the interior walls of the container with said pharmaceutical complex; discarding the solvent containing by-products and unreacted starting reaction materials; and removing the radiopharmaceutical complex from said walls by dissolving it in a second solvent, thereby obtaining said radiopharmaceutical complex substantially free of by-products and unreacted starting materials.

  13. Process for preparing radiopharmaceuticals

    DOEpatents

    Barak, Morton; Winchell, Harry S.

    1977-01-04

    A process for the preparation of technetium-99m labeled pharmaceuticals is disclosed. The process comprises initially isolating technetium-99m pertechnetate by adsorption upon an adsorbent packing in a chromatographic column. The technetium-99m is then eluted from the packing with a biological compound to form a radiopharmaceutical.

  14. Audits of radiopharmaceutical formulations

    SciTech Connect

    Castronovo, F.P. Jr. )

    1992-03-01

    A procedure for auditing radiopharmaceutical formulations is described. To meet FDA guidelines regarding the quality of radiopharmaceuticals, institutional radioactive drug research committees perform audits when such drugs are formulated away from an institutional pharmacy. All principal investigators who formulate drugs outside institutional pharmacies must pass these audits before they can obtain a radiopharmaceutical investigation permit. The audit team meets with the individual who performs the formulation at the site of drug preparation to verify that drug formulations meet identity, strength, quality, and purity standards; are uniform and reproducible; and are sterile and pyrogen free. This team must contain an expert knowledgeable in the preparation of radioactive drugs; a radiopharmacist is the most qualified person for this role. Problems that have been identified by audits include lack of sterility and apyrogenicity testing, formulations that are open to the laboratory environment, failure to use pharmaceutical-grade chemicals, inadequate quality control methods or records, inadequate training of the person preparing the drug, and improper unit dose preparation. Investigational radiopharmaceutical formulations, including nonradiolabeled drugs, must be audited before they are administered to humans. A properly trained pharmacist should be a member of the audit team.

  15. Melanin-binding radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Packer, S; Fairchild, R G; Watts, K P; Greenberg, D; Hannon, S J

    1980-01-01

    The scope of this paper is limited to an analysis of the factors that are important to the relationship of radiopharmaceuticals to melanin. While the authors do not attempt to deal with differences between melanin-binding vs. melanoma-binding, a notable variance is assumed. (PSB)

  16. Pharmacovigilance in radiopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rishi; Kalaiselvan, Vivekanandan; Kumar, Rakesh; Verma, Ravendra; Singh, Gyanendra Nath

    2016-01-01

    Indian Pharmacopoeia Commission is Committed for maintaining the standards of drugs including Radiopharmaceuticals (RPs) by publishing Indian Pharmacopoeia. These RPs are being used in India for diagnostic or therapeutic purpose. RPs though contain relatively small quantities of active ingredient and administered in small volumes could cause some adverse reactions to the patients. The objective of presenting this article is to introduce the system of adverse drug reaction reporting to the nuclear medicine fraternity who are dealing with RPs. PMID:27095855

  17. Radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, D.E.

    1990-06-01

    During this grant period 1 January 1988--31 December 1990, we have successfully developed a number of new approaches to fluorine-18 labeled compounds, prepared several new radiotracers for both animal studies and eventual clinical trials, and explored the utility of a high-quality industrial robot in radiopharmaceutical applications. The progress during the last grant period is summarized briefly in the following sections. Publications arising from this research are listed below and can be found in Appendix I. 1 fig.

  18. The development of new radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Britton, K E

    1990-01-01

    The development of new radiopharmaceuticals is the basis of the continuing growth of nuclear medicine. Chemical interactions of electron clouds in their three-dimensional conformations bring together, in the process of molecular recognition, the reaction of antibody and antigen, receptor and ligand, enzyme and substrate, hormone and response site. This convergence enables the computer design of molecules such as ligands to fit computer-displayed conformational models showing active centres, positive and negative charges and other interactions. Indeed, given a particular molecule, a complementary binding structure can be devised. The hybridoma approach to monoclonal antibody production is being superceded by the bacterial bioengineer. The gene for the hypervariable region from the spleen cells of immunized mouse can be coupled with the myeloma gene. The polymerase chain reaction can duplicate the DNA a million times over in 20 min and the result transfected into a bacterial plasmid to produce the antibody. These scientific problems are soluble in principle and are being solved. However, so much damage to this developing biological field is being done by regulatory authorities that one must ask who should or can regulate the regulators. These problems have to be overcome in order to provide the new radiopharmaceuticals that are the food and wine of nuclear medicine.

  19. Cyclotrons and positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, A.P.; Fowler, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    The state of the art of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) technology as related to cyclotron use and radiopharmaceutical production is reviewed. The paper discusses available small cyclotrons, the positron emitters which can be produced and the yields possible, target design, and radiopharmaceutical development and application. 97 refs., 12 tabs. (ACR)

  20. Recent advances in copper radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Hao, Guiyang; Singh, Ajay N; Oz, Orhan K; Sun, Xiankai

    2011-04-01

    Copper has five radioisotopes ((60)Cu, (61)Cu, (62)Cu, (64)Cu, and (67)Cu) that can be used in copper radiopharmaceuticals. These radioisotopes decay by mixed emissions of β+, β-, and γ with a wide range of half-lives from 9.74 min ((62)Cu) to 2.58 d ((67)Cu), which enable the design and synthesis of a variety of radiopharmaceuticals for different biomedical applications in diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine. However, due to the availability and production cost, the research efforts in copper radiopharmaceuticals are mainly focused on the use of (64)Cu (t(1/2) = 12.7 h; 17.4% β+, 43% EC, 39% β-), a radioisotope with low positron energy (E β+max = 0.656 MeV) that is ideal for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging quantification and β- emissions along with Auger electron for radiotherapy. Driven by the ever-increasing availability of preclinical and clinical PET scanners, a considerable interest has been seen in the development of novel copper radiopharmaceuticals in the past decade for a variety of diseases as represented by PET imaging of cancer. To avoid unnecessary literature redundancy, this review focuses on the unrepresented research aspects of copper chemistry (e.g. electrochemistry) and their uses in the evaluation of novel nuclear imaging probe design and recent advances in the field towards the practical use of copper radiopharmaceuticals.

  1. Radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, D.E.

    1992-01-01

    We report on our efforts in PET basic radiochemistry, radiopharmaceutical synthesis, and preclinical radiopharmaceutical evaluation. These efforts are focused on three fronts. First predictive abilities in nucleophilic aromatic substitution with [[sup 18]F]fluorination of substituted aromatic rings. Although radiochemical yields can be predicted within a very similar group of compounds with similar leaving groups and substituent patterns, generalization to all nucleophilic substitutions with [[sup 18]F] fluoride is not warranted. Kinetic studies indicate significantly different rates of reactions, depending on ring substituents. Second, preclinical evaluation of new radiopharmaceuticals. We have synthesized and begun the preclinical evaluation of [[sup 11]C]tetrabenazine, a new radioligand based on the vesicular monoamine transport system. Third, our work, on [[sup 18]F]fluorination/decarbonylation reactions, structure-activity relationships in dopamine uptake inhibitors and effects of chronic drugs on radioligand binding is described.

  2. Preparation of radiopharmaceuticals labeled with metal radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, M.J.

    1992-06-01

    We recently developed a useful zinc-62/copper-62 generator and are presently evaluating copper-62 radiopharmaceuticals for clinical studies. While developing these copper-62 radiopharmaceuticals, in collaboration with the University of Missouri Research Reactor, Columbia we have also explored copper-64 radiopharmaceuticals. The PET images we obtained with copper-64 tracers were of such high quality that we have developed and evaluated copper-64 labeled antibodies for PET imaging. The major research activities described herein include: the development and assessment of gallium-68 radiopharmaceuticals; the development and evaluation of a new zinc-62/copper-62 generator and the assessment of copper-62 radiopharmaceuticals; mechanistic studies on proteins labeled with metal radionuclides.

  3. Bioinorganic Activity of Technetium Radiopharmaceuticals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinkerton, Thomas C.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Technetium radiopharmaceuticals are diagnostic imaging agents used in the field of nuclear medicine to visualize tissues, anatomical structures, and metabolic disorders. Bioavailability of technetium complexes, thyroid imaging, brain imaging, kidney imaging, imaging liver function, bone imaging, and heart imaging are the major areas discussed. (JN)

  4. Internal dose assessment for 211At α-emitter in isotonic solution as radiopharmaceutical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuminov, O. A.; Fotina, O. V.; Priselkova, A. B.; Tultaev, A. V.; Platonov, S. Yu.; Eremenko, D. O.; Drozdov, V. A.

    2003-12-01

    The functional fitness of the α-emitter 211At for radiotherapy of the thyroid gland cancer is evaluated. Radiation doses are calculated using the MIRD method and previously obtained pharmacokinetic data for 211At in isotonic solution and for 123I as sodium iodide. Analysis of the 211At radiation dose to the thyroid gland suggests that this radiopharmaceutical may be predominantly used for the treatment of the thyroid cancer.

  5. Radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    In the period 1969-1986, this project was directed to the evolution of target-specific labeled chemicals useful for nuclear medical imaging, especially radioactive indicators suited to tracing adrenal functions and localizing tumors in the neuroendocrine system. Since 1986, this project research has focused on the chemistry of positron emission tomography (PET) ligands. This project has involved the evaluation of methods for radiochemical syntheses with fluorine-18, as well as the development and preliminary evaluation of new radiopharmaceuticals for positron emission tomography. In the radiochemistry area, the ability to predict fluorine-18 labeling yields for aromatic substitution reactions through the use of carbon-13 NMR analysis was studied. Radiochemical yields can be predicted for some structurally analogous aromatic compounds, but this correlation could not be generally applied to aromatic substrates for this reaction, particularly with changes in ring substituents or leaving groups. Importantly, certain aryl ring substituents, particularly methyl groups, appeared to have a negative effect on fluorination reactions. These observations are important in the future design of syntheses of complicated organic radiopharmaceuticals. In the radiopharmaceutical area, this project has supported the development of a new class of radiopharmaceuticals based on the monoamine vesicular uptake systems. The new radioligands, based on the tetrabenazine structure, offer a new approach to the quantification of monoaminergic neurons in the brain. Preliminary primate imaging studies support further development of these radioligands for PET studies in humans. If successful, such radiopharmaceuticals will find application in studies of the causes and treatment of neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson`s disease.

  6. Preparation of Radiopharmaceuticals Labeled with Metal Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, M.J.

    2012-02-16

    oxygen retention of the tissue and the significantly greater retention amounting in hypoxic tissue. This hypothesis was confirmed in a series of animal studies. Cu-64 can be used both as an imaging radionuclide and a therapeutic radionuclide. The therapeutic efficacy of Cu-64 ATSM was proven in hamsters bearing the CW39 human colorectal tumors. The administration of Cu-64 ATSM significantly increased the survival time of tumor-bearing animals with no acute toxicity. This copper agent therefore shows promise for radiotherapy. The flow tracer Cu-64 PTSM also demonstrates therapeutic potential by inhibiting cancer cells implanted in animal models. Again, this inhibition occurred at doses which showed no sign of toxicity to the animals. Cu-ATSM was translated to humans, under other support a series of tumors were investigated; these included head and neck cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, cervical cancer and renal cancer. Another radionuclide that was investigated was titanium 45. This radionuclide was successfully produced by radiation of a scandium foil with 15 MeV protons. The titanium 45 was processed and separated from residual scandium by high exchange chomotrophy. Titanium titanocene has been utilized as a therapeutic agent; this compound was prepared and studied in vitro and in vivo. Another project was the preparation of cyclodextrin dimers as a new pre-targeting approach for tumor uptake. Beta-cyclodextradin and two other dimers were synthesized. These dimers were studied for the in vivo application. Work continued on the application of the radionuclide already discussed. Technetium 94m, a positron emitting radionuclide of the widely used 99m Tc nuclide was also prepared. This allows the quantification of the uptake of technetium radiopharmaceuticals. In collaboration with Professor David Piwnica-Worms, technetium 94m, sestamibi was studied in animal models and in a limited number of human subjects.

  7. Prospective of 68Ga-Radiopharmaceutical Development

    PubMed Central

    Velikyan, Irina

    2014-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) experienced accelerated development and has become an established method for medical research and clinical routine diagnostics on patient individualized basis. Development and availability of new radiopharmaceuticals specific for particular diseases is one of the driving forces of the expansion of clinical PET. The future development of the 68Ga-radiopharmaceuticals must be put in the context of several aspects such as role of PET in nuclear medicine, unmet medical needs, identification of new biomarkers, targets and corresponding ligands, production and availability of 68Ga, automation of the radiopharmaceutical production, progress of positron emission tomography technologies and image analysis methodologies for improved quantitation accuracy, PET radiopharmaceutical regulations as well as advances in radiopharmaceutical chemistry. The review presents the prospects of the 68Ga-based radiopharmaceutical development on the basis of the current status of these aspects as well as wide range and variety of imaging agents. PMID:24396515

  8. Radiopharmaceuticals for imaging the heart

    DOEpatents

    Green, M.A.; Tsang, B.W.

    1994-06-28

    Radiopharmaceuticals for imaging myocardial tissues are prepared by forming lipophilic, cationic complexes of radioactive metal ions with metal chelating ligands comprising the Schiff base adducts of triamines and tetraamines with optionally substituted salicylaldehydes. The lipophilic, cationic, radioactive complexes of the invention exhibit high uptake and retention in myocardial tissues. Preferred gallium-68(III) complexes in accordance with this invention can be used to image the heart using positron emission tomography. 6 figures.

  9. Radiopharmaceuticals for imaging the heart

    DOEpatents

    Green, Mark A.; Tsang, Brenda W.

    1994-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals for imaging myocardial tissues are prepared by forming lipophilic, cationic complexes of radioactive metal ions with metal chelating ligands comprising the Schiff base adducts of triamines and tetraamines with optionally substituted salicylaldehydes. The lipophilic, cationic, radioactive complexes of the invention exhibit high uptake and retention in myocardial tissues. Preferred gallium-68(III) complexes in accordance with this invention can be used to image the heart using positron emission tomography.

  10. Radiation dose estimates for radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Stabin, M.G.; Stubbs, J.B.; Toohey, R.E.

    1996-04-01

    Tables of radiation dose estimates based on the Cristy-Eckerman adult male phantom are provided for a number of radiopharmaceuticals commonly used in nuclear medicine. Radiation dose estimates are listed for all major source organs, and several other organs of interest. The dose estimates were calculated using the MIRD Technique as implemented in the MIRDOSE3 computer code, developed by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Radiation Internal Dose Information Center. In this code, residence times for source organs are used with decay data from the MIRD Radionuclide Data and Decay Schemes to produce estimates of radiation dose to organs of standardized phantoms representing individuals of different ages. The adult male phantom of the Cristy-Eckerman phantom series is different from the MIRD 5, or Reference Man phantom in several aspects, the most important of which is the difference in the masses and absorbed fractions for the active (red) marrow. The absorbed fractions for flow energy photons striking the marrow are also different. Other minor differences exist, but are not likely to significantly affect dose estimates calculated with the two phantoms. Assumptions which support each of the dose estimates appears at the bottom of the table of estimates for a given radiopharmaceutical. In most cases, the model kinetics or organ residence times are explicitly given. The results presented here can easily be extended to include other radiopharmaceuticals or phantoms.

  11. Nitroimidazole radiopharmaceuticals in bioimaging: part I: synthesis and imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rakesh

    2011-10-01

    The paper is review on synthesis of nitroimidazole radiosensitizers useful in imaging of tumor cells. Nitroimidazole compounds are radiolabeled probes for specific use in imaging such as 18F for positron emission tomography; 99mTc for single photon emission computed tomography; 123I, or 131I for computer assisted tomography and 19F for magnetic resonance imaging. In synthesis of radiopharmaceutical compounds, parent nitroimidazole is modified to thiopyranosyl nucleosides, neuraminic acid derivatives followed by nitro group deprotection-substitution and radiolabeling by specific isotopes. Commercial attempts have been made to radiolabel the nitroimidazole by [18F]fluorine, [131I or 123I]iodine, [99mTc]technicium and [64Cu]copper on modified side chain of nitroimidazole compounds to design multimodal and multifunctional imaging techniques to detect and monitor the tumor hypoxia by measuring distribution of radiatiolabel or radiation. Nitroimidazole initially showed poor diffusion and poor stability in tissues with neurotoxicity concern limited its use as radiosensitizer. In last decade, several nitroimidazole derivatives were developed as potent less toxic and highly stable radiopharmaceuticals with optimized radiolabel concentration with high detectability of tumor oxygen or hypoxia. Currently, nitroimidazole based radiopharmaceuticals have emerged as multimodal and multifunctional hypoxia reporters with antitumor, anti-ischemic, anti-inflammatory and tumor targeting properties. In conclusion, nitroimidazole based radiopharmaceuticals are a new generation hypoxia biosensors for localized theradiagnostic utility in clinical medicine.

  12. Renal radiopharmaceuticals--an update

    SciTech Connect

    Chervu, L.R.; Blaufox, M.D.

    1982-07-01

    Noninvasive radionuclide procedures in the evaluation of renal disease have been accepted increasingly as effective and valuable alternatives to older clinical methods. The development of suitable radiopharmaceuticals labeled with high photon intensity radionuclides and with /sup 99m/Tc in particular has stimulated this modality during the last few years. Currently several nearly ideal agents are available for anatomical and functional studies of kidney imparting very low absorbed radiation doses. These include /sup 99m/Tc-GHA and /sup 99m/Tc-DMSA for renal morphology and differential function evaluation, /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA for GFR and /sup 123/I orthoiodohippurate for ERPF measurements. A suitable agent as a replacement for the latter labeled with /sup 99m/Tc is actively being sought. Computer-assisted processing of dynamic renal function studies enables the observer to obtain a wealth of information related to the renal extraction, uptake, parenchymal transit and pelvic transit parameters of the agent administered into the bloodstream. Each of these parameters either globally or differentially contributes to a detailed evaluation of renal disease states. Several of these procedures have been validated against classical techniques clinically but more detailed information is being sought with the recently introduced radiopharmaceuticals. With the detailed validation and increasing recognition of the clinical utility of several of the radionuclidic procedures at many centers, it is hoped that radionuclide assessment of renal disorders ultimately will be made available routinely at all medical facilities.

  13. Hot atom chemistry and radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Krohn, Kenneth A.; Moerlein, Stephen M.; Link, Jeanne M.; Welch, Michael J.

    2012-12-19

    The chemical products made in a cyclotron target are a combined result of the chemical effects of the nuclear transformation that made the radioactive atom and the bulk radiolysis in the target. This review uses some well-known examples to understand how hot atom chemistry explains the primary products from a nuclear reaction and then how radiation chemistry is exploited to set up the optimal product for radiosynthesis. It also addresses the chemical effects of nuclear decay. There are important principles that are common to hot atom chemistry and radiopharmaceutical chemistry. Both emphasize short-lived radionuclides and manipulation of high specific activity nuclides. Furthermore, they both rely on radiochromatographic separation for identification of no-carrieradded products.

  14. Radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    In this grant period we have continued our efforts in the areas of PE basic radiochemistry, radiopharmaceutical synthesis, and preclinical radiopharmaceutical evaluation. A new synthetic sequence, consisting, of no-carrier-added fluorine-18 labeling of substituted benzaldehydes followed by reductive decarbonylation, has been developed. This new methodology can be applied to the fluorine-18 labeling of a wide variety of drugs not previously accessible through existing fluorine-18 labeling methods. Following up on a literature report that the ability to radiolabel aromatic rings can be predicted by {sup 13}C-NMR chemical shifts, we have examined the generality of this correlation in aromatic rings bearing a variety of substituents. Although the original correlation holds for nitro substituted anisaldehydes, it cannot be extended to other rings substitution patterns. We have examined the relationship of in vivo localization of various fluorine-18 labeled dopamine uptake inhibitors to their in vitro binding affinities and lipophilicities. We have found that remarkably small decreases in binding affinity result in dramatic losses of in vivo binding to the desired high affinity binding sites. In order to probe the effects of endogenous neurotransmitter on the in vivo binding of radiolabeled dopamine uptake inhibitors, we have examined the in vivo regional localization of (18{sub F}) GBR 13119 after acute and chronic drug treatments which alter the endogenous levels of dopamine. We have found that acute changes in dopamine levels do not affect the binding of this radioligand, but chronic depletion of neurotransmitter results in down-regulation of the in vivo binding sites. 16 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Advancement in treatment and diagnosis of pancreatic cancer with radiopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yu-Ping; Yang, Min

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a major health problem. Conventional imaging modalities show limited accuracy for reliable assessment of the tumor. Recent researches suggest that molecular imaging techniques with tracers provide more biologically relevant information and are benefit for the diagnosis of the cancer. In addition, radiopharmaceuticals also play more important roles in treatment of the disease. This review summaries the advancement of the radiolabeled compounds in the theranostics of PC. PMID:26909131

  16. Radiopharmaceuticals in PET, Progress and Promise

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Wolf, A. P.; Fowler, J. S.

    1988-11-01

    It is the intention of this presentation to focus on the current state of radiopharmaceuticals for PET and where this is leading us. PET radiopharmaceuticals can be broken down into perhaps seven categories at present with each being applicable to a different aspect of human biochemistry. These are: metabolic probes, neurochemical probes, enzyme probes, ion channel blockers, blood flow agents, ethical drugs and other positron emitters.

  17. Radiopharmaceuticals in PET, progress and promise

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, A.P.; Fowler, J.S.

    1988-11-01

    It is the intention of this presentation to focus on the current state of radiopharmaceuticals for PET and where this is leading us. PET radiopharmaceuticals can be broken down into perhaps seven categories at present with each being applicable to a different aspect of human biochemistry. These are: metabolic probes, neurochemical probes, enzyme probes, ion channel blockers, blood flow agents, ethical drugs and other positron emitters. 7 refs.

  18. Improving radiopharmaceutical supply chain safety by implementing bar code technology.

    PubMed

    Matanza, David; Hallouard, François; Rioufol, Catherine; Fessi, Hatem; Fraysse, Marc

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to describe and evaluate an approach for improving radiopharmaceutical supply chain safety by implementing bar code technology. We first evaluated the current situation of our radiopharmaceutical supply chain and, by means of the ALARM protocol, analysed two dispensing errors that occurred in our department. Thereafter, we implemented a bar code system to secure selected key stages of the radiopharmaceutical supply chain. Finally, we evaluated the cost of this implementation, from overtime, to overheads, to additional radiation exposure to workers. An analysis of the events that occurred revealed a lack of identification of prepared or dispensed drugs. Moreover, the evaluation of the current radiopharmaceutical supply chain showed that the dispensation and injection steps needed to be further secured. The bar code system was used to reinforce product identification at three selected key stages: at usable stock entry; at preparation-dispensation; and during administration, allowing to check conformity between the labelling of the delivered product (identity and activity) and the prescription. The extra time needed for all these steps had no impact on the number and successful conduct of examinations. The investment cost was reduced (2600 euros for new material and 30 euros a year for additional supplies) because of pre-existing computing equipment. With regard to the radiation exposure to workers there was an insignificant overexposure for hands with this new organization because of the labelling and scanning processes of radiolabelled preparation vials. Implementation of bar code technology is now an essential part of a global securing approach towards optimum patient management. PMID:25144560

  19. Improving radiopharmaceutical supply chain safety by implementing bar code technology.

    PubMed

    Matanza, David; Hallouard, François; Rioufol, Catherine; Fessi, Hatem; Fraysse, Marc

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to describe and evaluate an approach for improving radiopharmaceutical supply chain safety by implementing bar code technology. We first evaluated the current situation of our radiopharmaceutical supply chain and, by means of the ALARM protocol, analysed two dispensing errors that occurred in our department. Thereafter, we implemented a bar code system to secure selected key stages of the radiopharmaceutical supply chain. Finally, we evaluated the cost of this implementation, from overtime, to overheads, to additional radiation exposure to workers. An analysis of the events that occurred revealed a lack of identification of prepared or dispensed drugs. Moreover, the evaluation of the current radiopharmaceutical supply chain showed that the dispensation and injection steps needed to be further secured. The bar code system was used to reinforce product identification at three selected key stages: at usable stock entry; at preparation-dispensation; and during administration, allowing to check conformity between the labelling of the delivered product (identity and activity) and the prescription. The extra time needed for all these steps had no impact on the number and successful conduct of examinations. The investment cost was reduced (2600 euros for new material and 30 euros a year for additional supplies) because of pre-existing computing equipment. With regard to the radiation exposure to workers there was an insignificant overexposure for hands with this new organization because of the labelling and scanning processes of radiolabelled preparation vials. Implementation of bar code technology is now an essential part of a global securing approach towards optimum patient management.

  20. Peptide targeted copper-64 radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Ma, Michelle T; Donnelly, Paul S

    2011-01-01

    Peptide targeted ⁶⁴Cu-labelled diagnostic agents for positron emission tomography are viable candidates for molecular imaging of cancer. In a clinical setting, optimal image quality relies on selective tumor uptake of the ⁶⁴Cu-labelled radiotracer. The three components of the radiotracer construct--the chelate group, linker and targeting peptide--all influence the biodistribution of the ⁶⁴Cu-labelled radiotracer in vivo. Low or moderate Cu complex stability in vivo results in transmetallation of ⁶⁴Cu to endogenous proteins, giving rise to high background activity. The length and the nature of the linker group affect the affinity of the ⁶⁴Cu-labelled radiotracer for the target receptor. Variations in the peptide sequence can impact on the metabolic stability and therefore the bioavailability and tumor retention of the ⁶⁴Cu-labelled radiotracer in vivo. Lastly, the hydrophilicity of the construct can influence radiotracer metabolism and clearance pathways. Recent advances in the field of peptide targeted ⁶⁴Cu-labelled radiopharmaceuticals involve GRPR-targeted and αvβ3 integrin receptor-targeted constructs. These constructs are based on the bombesin peptide sequence and the RGD recognition motif respectively. These examples are reviewed as case studies in the optimisation of ⁶⁴Cu radiotracer design.

  1. Pharmacokinetics & Neurophysiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Andrew S.; Salpekar, Jay A.

    2009-01-01

    Medications administered in clinical practice obtain their therapeutic effect only to the extent that the drug is present in the appropriate concentration at the desired site. To achieve this goal, the prescribing clinician must be aware of how a drug may interact with the physiology of the patient. Pharmacokinetics is the study of this process…

  2. Radiobrominated triphenylethylenes as estrogen receptor binding radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Seevers, R.H.; Meese, R.C.; Friedman, A.M.; DeSombre, E.R.

    1985-05-01

    Estrogen receptor binding radiopharmaceuticals have potential for use in the diagnosis and treatment of cancers of the female reproductive system. Tamoxifen is an antiestrogen derived from the triphenylethylene skeleton which is used in the treatment of mammary carcinoma. Hydroxytamoxifen is a metabolite of tamoxifen which binds tightly to the estrogen receptor. Two triphenylethylene derivatives based on the structure of hydroxytamoxifen have been prepared: 1-bromo-1-phenyl-2- (2-dimethylamino)-4-ethoxyphenyl -2-(4-hydroxyphenyl) ethene (1) where the ethyl group of hydroxytamoxifen has been replaced by a bromine, and 1-bromo-1-phenyl-2,2-(4-hydroxyphenyl) ethene (2) with a similar substitution and also lacking the aminoethoxy side chain believed to confer antiestrogenicity. Both 1 and 2 bind strongly to the estrogen receptor. 2 has been labeled with the Auger electron emitting nuclide Br-80m in moderate yields in high specific activity using either N-bromosuccinimide or N-bromophthalimide and shows promise as a potential radiotherapy agent.

  3. Radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and treatment. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, D.E.

    1992-12-01

    We report on our efforts in PET basic radiochemistry, radiopharmaceutical synthesis, and preclinical radiopharmaceutical evaluation. These efforts are focused on three fronts. First predictive abilities in nucleophilic aromatic substitution with [{sup 18}F]fluorination of substituted aromatic rings. Although radiochemical yields can be predicted within a very similar group of compounds with similar leaving groups and substituent patterns, generalization to all nucleophilic substitutions with [{sup 18}F] fluoride is not warranted. Kinetic studies indicate significantly different rates of reactions, depending on ring substituents. Second, preclinical evaluation of new radiopharmaceuticals. We have synthesized and begun the preclinical evaluation of [{sup 11}C]tetrabenazine, a new radioligand based on the vesicular monoamine transport system. Third, our work, on [{sup 18}F]fluorination/decarbonylation reactions, structure-activity relationships in dopamine uptake inhibitors and effects of chronic drugs on radioligand binding is described.

  4. Modeling Pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Bois, Frederic Y; Brochot, Céline

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacokinetics is the study of the fate of xenobiotics in a living organism. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models provide realistic descriptions of xenobiotics' absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion processes. They model the body as a set of homogeneous compartments representing organs, and their parameters refer to anatomical, physiological, biochemical, and physicochemical entities. They offer a quantitative mechanistic framework to understand and simulate the time-course of the concentration of a substance in various organs and body fluids. These models are well suited for performing extrapolations inherent to toxicology and pharmacology (e.g., between species or doses) and for integrating data obtained from various sources (e.g., in vitro or in vivo experiments, structure-activity models). In this chapter, we describe the practical development and basic use of a PBPK model from model building to model simulations, through implementation with an easily accessible free software. PMID:27311461

  5. In Vitro Assessment of the In Vivo Stability of Cu-64 Radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Packard, Alan B

    2011-12-15

    Benefits: The FISRE method that will be used in this project, once validated, will provide researchers with a core technology by which the stability of Cu 64 radiopharmaceuticals can be accurately measured. In the short-term, we expect to produce extensive data regarding the stability of Cu-64 complexes of ligands of radiopharmaceutical interest, primarily those that are most commonly used as BFCs (e.g., DOTA, TETA). These data will provide a quantitative basis for deciding which ligands may be best suited for use as BFCs, data that is not currently available. In the intermediate term, we expect that these results will facilitate the development of new Cu-64 radiopharmaceuticals by providing a quantitative approach to assessing the stability of Cu-64 chelates. This innovative methodology will enable investigators to quantitatively compare the ability of different BFCs to retain Cu-64 in vivo. The benefits of this approach will be best seen in the development of Cu-64-labeled monoclonal antibodies where the accumulation of antibodies in the liver obviates liver uptake as an effective surrogate measure of Cu-64 lability. In the longer-term, we anticipate an improvement in the way in which various diseases (especially cancer) are detected, diagnosed, staged, and treated. This method will also enable researchers to distinguish differences in biodistribution that may arise from differences in charge, lipophilicity, etc. from those that may arise from loss of Cu-64 from the chelator. Last, this novel quantitative tool will allow investigators to evaluate the chemical factors that determine the in vivo stability of Cu-64 radiopharmaceuticals laying the groundwork for the future development of more effective Cu-64 radiopharmaceuticals. Once the feasibility of this method is established, it can also be used to evaluate the stability of other metalloradiopharmaceuticals including those based on Ga-68, a radionuclide that is showing great promise in tumor imaging.

  6. Incorporation of radiohalogens via versatile organometallic reactions: applications in radiopharmaceutical chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, P.C.; Goodman, M.M.; Knapp, F.F. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Factors that must be considered for the design of radiohalogenated radio-pharmaceuticals include the stability and availability of the substrate, the physical half-life of the radiohalogen and the in vivo stability of the radiolabel. Vinyl and phenyl radiohalogen bonds show more in vivo stability than the alkyl radiohalogen bonds. Consequently, a variety of methods suitable for the synthesis of tissue specific radiopharmaceuticals bearing a vinyl or phenyl radiohalogen have been developed involving the synthesis and halogenation of metallovinyl and phenyl intermediates. The halogens and metallation reactions include iodine and bromine and alanation, boronation, mercuration, stannylation, and thallation, respectively. 19 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  7. Positron emission tomography radiopharmaceuticals for imaging brain Beta-amyloid.

    PubMed

    Vallabhajosula, Shankar

    2011-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is defined histologically by the presence of extracellular β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques and intraneuronal neurofibrillary tangles in the cerebral cortex. The diagnosis of dementia, along with the prediction of who will develop dementia, has been assisted by magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography (PET) by using [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). These techniques, however, are not specific for AD. Based on the chemistry of histologic staining dyes, several Aβ-specific positron-emitting radiotracers have been developed to image neuropathology of AD. Among these, [(11)C]PiB is the most studied Aβ-binding PET radiopharmaceutical in the world. The histologic and biochemical specificity of PiB binding across different regions of the AD brain was demonstrated by showing a direct correlation between Aβ-containing amyloid plaques and in vivo [(11)C]PiB retention measured by PET imaging. Because (11)C is not ideal for commercialization, several (18)F-labeled tracers have been developed. At this time, [(18)F]3'-F-PiB (Flutemetamol), (18)F-AV-45 (Florbetapir), and (18)F-AV-1 (Florbetaben) are undergoing extensive phase II and III clinical trials. This article provides a brief review of the amyloid biology and chemistry of Aβ-specific (11)C and (18)F-PET radiopharmaceuticals. Clinical trials have clearly documented that PET radiopharmaceuticals capable of assessing Aβ content in vivo in the brains of AD subjects and subjects with mild cognitive impairment will be important as diagnostic agents to detect in vivo amyloid brain pathology. In addition, PET amyloid imaging will also help test the amyloid cascade hypothesis of AD and as an aid to assess the efficacy of antiamyloid therapeutics currently under development in clinical trials.

  8. Simplification of Methods for PET Radiopharmaceutical Syntheses

    SciTech Connect

    Kilbourn, Michael, R.

    2011-12-27

    In an attempt to develop simplified methods for radiochemical synthesis of radiopharmaceuticals useful in Positron Emission Tomography (PET), current commercially available automated synthesis apparati were evaluated for use with solid phase synthesis, thin-film techniques, microwave-accelerated chemistry, and click chemistry approaches. Using combinations of these techniques, it was shown that these automated synthesis systems can be simply and effectively used to support the synthesis of a wide variety of carbon-11 and fluorine-18 labeled compounds, representing all of the major types of compounds synthesized and using all of the common radiochemical precursors available. These techniques are available for use to deliver clinically useful amounts of PET radiopharmaceuticals with chemical and radiochemical purities and high specific activities, suitable for human administration.

  9. Pharmacokinetics and molecular detoxication.

    PubMed Central

    Cashman, J R; Perotti, B Y; Berkman, C E; Lin, J

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive overview of the pharmacokinetic parameters used from in vivo and in vitro studies that are important in order to understand the major conceptual approaches of toxicokinetics and the disposition of environmental chemicals. In vitro biochemical information concerning the detoxication of environmental chemicals is also presented. The discussion leads to a more complete appreciation for the use of in vitro measurements for in vivo correlations. The concept of interspecies scaling in the interpolation and extrapolation of fundamental biochemical metabolic processes is illustrated with a number of examples. Additional examples of in vitro-in vivo correlations are presented in the evaluation of the impact of chemical exposure to humans. Finally, several important metabolic detoxication enzymes are presented, including the mammalian microsomal cytochrome P450 and flavin-containing monooxygenases as well as carboxylesterases and glucuronosyltransferases, to provide insight into the processes of chemical detoxication in mammalian tissue and blood. Because interspecies scaling and the pharmacokinetics of chemical disposition have already shown their usefulness in understanding some examples of chemical disposition, our summary focuses on showing the usefulness of the pharmacokinetic equations and providing confidence in using the approach for in vitro-in vivo correlations. Ultimately, the presentation may provide the reader with a conceptual framework for future evaluation of the human health risks associated with environmental toxicants. PMID:8722108

  10. Clinical pharmacokinetics of mirtazapine.

    PubMed

    Timmer, C J; Sitsen, J M; Delbressine, L P

    2000-06-01

    Mirtazapine is the first noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressant ('NaSSA'). It is rapidly and well absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract after single and multiple oral administration, and peak plasma concentrations are reached within 2 hours. Mirtazapine binds to plasma proteins (85%) in a nonspecific and reversible way. The absolute bioavailability is approximately 50%, mainly because of gut wall and hepatic first-pass metabolism. Mirtazapine shows linear pharmacokinetics over a dose range of 15 to 80mg. The presence of food has a minor effect on the rate, but does not affect the extent, of absorption. The pharmacokinetics of mirtazapine are dependent on gender and age: females and the elderly show higher plasma concentrations than males and young adults. The elimination half-life of mirtazapine ranges from 20 to 40 hours, which is in agreement with the time to reach steady state (4 to 6 days). Total body clearance as determined from intravenous administration to young males amounts to 31 L/h. Liver and moderate renal impairment cause an approximately 30% decrease in oral mirtazapine clearance; severe renal impairment causes a 50% decrease in clearance. There were no clinically or statistically significant differences between poor (PM) and extensive (EM) metabolisers of debrisoquine [a cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D6 substrate] with regard to the pharmacokinetics of the racemate. The pharmacokinetics of mirtazapine appears to be enantioselective, resulting in higher plasma concentrations and longer half-life of the (R)-(-)-enantiomer (18.0 +/-2.5h) compared with that of the (S)-(+)-enantiomer (9.9+/-3. lh). Genetic CYP2D6 polymorphism has different effects on the enantiomers. For the (R)-(-)-enantiomer there are no differences between EM and PM for any of the kinetic parameters; for (S)-(+)-mirtazapine the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) is 79% larger in PM than in EM, and a corresponding longer half-life was found. Approximately 100% of

  11. Design of CGMP Production of 18F- and 68Ga-Radiopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Pei-Chun; Chao, Hao-Yu; Shieh, Wei-Chen; Chen, Chuck C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Radiopharmaceutical production process must adhere to current good manufacturing process (CGMP) compliance to ensure the quality of precursor, prodrug (active pharmaceutical ingredient, API), and the final drug product that meet acceptance criteria. We aimed to develop an automated system for production of CGMP grade of PET radiopharmaceuticals. Methods. The hardware and software of the automated synthesizer that fit in the hot cell under cGMP requirement were developed. Examples of production yield and purity for 68Ga-DOTATATE and 18F-FDG at CGMP facility were optimized. Analytical assays and acceptance criteria for cGMP grade of 68Ga-DOTATATE and 18F-FDG were established. Results. CGMP facility for the production of PET radiopharmaceuticals has been established. Radio-TLC and HPLC analyses of 68Ga-DOTATATE and 18F-FDG showed that the radiochemical purity was 92% and 96%, respectively. The products were sterile and pyrogenic-free. Conclusion. CGMP compliance of radiopharmaceuticals has been reviewed. 68Ga-DOTATATE and 18F-FDG were synthesized with high radiochemical yield under CGMP process. PMID:25276810

  12. Labelled compounds and radiopharmaceuticals applied in nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Balaban, A.; Galateanu, I.; Geogescu, G.; Simionescu, L.

    1986-01-01

    This book includes material on radiopharmacy and nuclear medicine with a section on in vitro assays. Contents are divided into four parts: radioisotopes, labelled compounds and radiopharmaceuticals; radiopharmaceuticals used for diagnostic purposes; in vitro methods of analysis with labelled compounds and applications of radioimmunoassay to medicine.

  13. Consequences of electroplated targets on radiopharmaceutical preparations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, R. D.; Tirelli, S.; Sheh, Y.; Knott, A.; Gelbard, A. S.; Larson, S. M.; Dahl, J. R.

    1991-05-01

    The staff of the cyclotron facility at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center is involved in a comprehensive radionuclide preparation program which culminates with the formulation of numerous requested short-lived, positron-emitting radiopharmaceutical agents for clinical investigation. Both the produced radionuclide as well as the final radiolabeled compound are subjected to stringent quality control standards including assays for radiochemical and chemical purity. The subtle chemical consequences resulting from the irradiation of a nickel-plated target for 13N production serve to emphasize some of these potential technical difficulties.

  14. Placental transfer of radiopharmaceuticals and dosimetry in pregnancy

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, J.R.; Stabin, M.G.; Sparks, R.B.

    1999-01-01

    The calculation of radiation dose estimates to the fetus is often important in nuclear medicine. To obtain the best estimates of radiation dose to the fetus, the best biological and physical models should be employed. In this paper, after identification of radiopharmaceuticals often administered to women of childbearing age, the most recent data available on the placental crossover of these radiopharmaceuticals was used (with standard kinetic models describing the maternal distribution and retention and with the best available physical models) to obtain fetal dose estimates for these radiopharmaceuticals were identified as those most commonly administered to women of childbearing years. The literature yielded information on placental crossover of 15 radiopharmaceuticals, from animal or human data. Radiation dose estimates are presented in early pregnancy and at 3-, 6-, and 9-months gestation for these radiopharmaceuticals, as well as for many others used in nuclear medicine (the latter considering only maternal organ contributions to fetal dose). 46 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  15. Small Molecule Radiopharmaceuticals – A Review of Current Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Shubhra; Mishra, Anil K.

    2016-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals are an integral component of nuclear medicine and are widely applied in diagnostics and therapy. Though widely applied, the development of an “ideal” radiopharmaceutical can be challenging. Issues such as specificity, selectivity, sensitivity, and feasible chemistry challenge the design and synthesis of radiopharmaceuticals. Over time, strategies to address the issues have evolved by making use of new technological advances in the fields of biology and chemistry. This review presents the application of few advances in design and synthesis of radiopharmaceuticals. The topics covered are bivalent ligand approach and lipidization as part of design modifications for enhanced selectivity and sensitivity and novel synthetic strategies for optimized chemistry and radiolabeling of radiopharmaceuticals. PMID:26942181

  16. Radiopharmaceuticals for SPECT Cancer Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, V. I.; Medvedeva, A. A.; Zelchan, R. V.; Sinilkin, I. G.; Stasyuk, E. S.; Larionova, L. A.; Slonimskaya, E. M.; Choynzonov, E. L.

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the efficacy of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI in the detection of breast, laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers. Materials and Methods: a total of 220 patients were included into the study. Of them, there were 120 patients with breast lesions (100 patients with breast cancer and 20 patients with benign breast tumors) and '00 patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal diseases (80 patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer and 20 patients with benign laryngeal/hypopharyngeal lesions). Results: no abnormal 199Tl uptake was seen in all patients with benign breast and laryngeal lesions, indicating a 100% specificity of 199Tl SPECT. In breast cancer patients, increased 199Tl uptake in the breast was visualized in 94.8% patients, 99mTc-MIBI in 93.4% patients. Increased 199Tl uptake in axillary lymph nodes was detected in 60% patients and 99mTc-MIBI in 93.1% patients. In patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer, sensitivity of SPECT with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI were 95%. The 199Tl SPECT sensitivity in identification of regional lymph node metastases in patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer was 75% and the 99mTc-MIBI SPECT sensitivity was 17%. Conclusion: the data obtained show that SPECT with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI can be used as one of the additional imaging methods in detection of tumors.

  17. Radiopharmaceuticals for SPECT cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, V. I.; Medvedeva, A. A.; Zelchan, R. V.; Sinilkin, I. G.; Stasyuk, E. S.; Larionova, L. A.; Slonimskaya, E. M.; Choynzonov, E. L.

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the efficacy of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI in the detection of breast, laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers. A total of 220 patients were included into the study: 120 patients with breast lesions (100 patients with breast cancer and 20 patients with benign breast tumors) and 100 patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal diseases (80 patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer and 20 patients with benign laryngeal/hypopharyngeal lesions). No abnormal 199Tl uptake was seen in all patients with benign breast and laryngeal lesions, indicating a 100% specificity of 199Tl SPECT. In the breast cancer patients, the increased 199Tl uptake in the breast was visualized in 94.8% patients, 99mTc-MIBI—in 93.4% patients. The increased 199Tl uptake in axillary lymph nodes was detected in 60% patients, and 99mTc-MIBI—in 93.1% patients. In patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer, the sensitivity of SPECT with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI was 95%. The 199Tl SPECT sensitivity in identification of regional lymph node metastases in the patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer was 75% and the 99mTc-MIBI SPECT sensitivity was 17%. The data obtained showed that SPECT with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI can be used as one of the additional imaging methods in detection of tumors.

  18. Cyclophosphamide pharmacokinetics in children.

    PubMed

    Yule, S M; Boddy, A V; Cole, M; Price, L; Wyllie, R; Tasso, M J; Pearson, A D; Idle, J R

    1996-01-01

    1. Cyclophosphamide pharmacokinetics were measured in 38 children with cancer. 2. A high degree of inter-patient variation was seen in all pharmacokinetic parameters. Cyclophosphamide half-life varied between 1.1 and 16.8 h, clearance varied between 1.2 and 10.61 h-1 m-2 and volume of distribution varied between 0.26 and 1.48 1 kg-1. 3. The half-life of cyclophosphamide was prolonged at high dose levels (P = 0.008). 4. Children who had received prior treatment with dexamethasone showed a mean increase in clearance of 2.51 h-1 m-2 (P = 0.001) presumably as a result of CYP450 enzyme induction. 5. Treatment with allopurinol or chlorpromazine was associated with a significant increase in cyclophosphamide half-life (P < 0.001 in both cases). 6. Dose and concurrent treatment may influence cyclophosphamide metabolism in vivo and thus potentially alter the drugs therapeutic effect.

  19. Development of peptide and protein based radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Wynendaele, Evelien; Bracke, Nathalie; Stalmans, Sofie; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Radiolabelled peptides and proteins have recently gained great interest as theranostics, due to their numerous and considerable advantages over small (organic) molecules. Developmental procedures of these radiolabelled biomolecules start with the radiolabelling process, greatly defined by the amino acid composition of the molecule and the radionuclide used. Depending on the radionuclide selection, radiolabelling starting materials are whether or not essential for efficient radiolabelling, resulting in direct or indirect radioiodination, radiometal-chelate coupling, indirect radiofluorination or (3)H/(14)C-labelling. Before preclinical investigations are performed, quality control analyses of the synthesized radiopharmaceutical are recommended to eliminate false positive or negative functionality results, e.g. changed receptor binding properties due to (radiolabelled) impurities. Therefore, radionuclidic, radiochemical and chemical purity are investigated, next to the general peptide attributes as described in the European and the United States Pharmacopeia. Moreover, in vitro and in vivo stability characteristics of the peptides and proteins also need to be explored, seen their strong sensitivity to proteinases and peptidases, together with radiolysis and trans-chelation phenomena of the radiopharmaceuticals. In vitro biomedical characterization of the radiolabelled peptides and proteins is performed by saturation, kinetic and competition binding assays, analyzing KD, Bmax, kon, koff and internalization properties, taking into account the chemical and metabolic stability and adsorption events inherent to peptides and proteins. In vivo biodistribution can be adapted by linker, chelate or radionuclide modifications, minimizing normal tissue (e.g. kidney and liver) radiation, and resulting in favorable dosimetry analyses. Finally, clinical trials are initiated, eventually leading to the marketing of radiolabelled peptides and proteins for PET/SPECT-imaging and therapy

  20. Radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and treatment. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, D.E.

    1991-12-31

    In this grant period we have continued our efforts in the areas of PE basic radiochemistry, radiopharmaceutical synthesis, and preclinical radiopharmaceutical evaluation. A new synthetic sequence, consisting, of no-carrier-added fluorine-18 labeling of substituted benzaldehydes followed by reductive decarbonylation, has been developed. This new methodology can be applied to the fluorine-18 labeling of a wide variety of drugs not previously accessible through existing fluorine-18 labeling methods. Following up on a literature report that the ability to radiolabel aromatic rings can be predicted by {sup 13}C-NMR chemical shifts, we have examined the generality of this correlation in aromatic rings bearing a variety of substituents. Although the original correlation holds for nitro substituted anisaldehydes, it cannot be extended to other rings substitution patterns. We have examined the relationship of in vivo localization of various fluorine-18 labeled dopamine uptake inhibitors to their in vitro binding affinities and lipophilicities. We have found that remarkably small decreases in binding affinity result in dramatic losses of in vivo binding to the desired high affinity binding sites. In order to probe the effects of endogenous neurotransmitter on the in vivo binding of radiolabeled dopamine uptake inhibitors, we have examined the in vivo regional localization of [18{sub F}] GBR 13119 after acute and chronic drug treatments which alter the endogenous levels of dopamine. We have found that acute changes in dopamine levels do not affect the binding of this radioligand, but chronic depletion of neurotransmitter results in down-regulation of the in vivo binding sites. 16 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  1. [Current Status and Prospects on PET Radiopharmaceuticals for Radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Mitsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    18F-FDG is a most popular radiopharmaceutical for tumor diagnosis in the world. In addition, 11C-methionine, 18F-FLT and 11C-choline have been used to compensate for drawbacks of 18F-FDG. Now, novel radiopharmaceuticals are required to estimate or predict therapeutic efficacy because we have many strategies to treat tumors. Radiotherapy which damage DNA by producing free radicals is commonly used to treat various types of tumors. Hypoxia is closely associated with resistance to chemo- and/or radiotherapy and is a common feature of solid tumors. Recently, understanding of tumor hypoxia in oncology has led to development of radiopharmaceuticals for hypoxia imaging. This review provides an overview of PET radiopharmaceuticals for hypoxia imaging and 18F-FBPA which is used for boron neutron capture therapy.

  2. [Current Status and Prospects on PET Radiopharmaceuticals for Radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Mitsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    18F-FDG is a most popular radiopharmaceutical for tumor diagnosis in the world. In addition, 11C-methionine, 18F-FLT and 11C-choline have been used to compensate for drawbacks of 18F-FDG. Now, novel radiopharmaceuticals are required to estimate or predict therapeutic efficacy because we have many strategies to treat tumors. Radiotherapy which damage DNA by producing free radicals is commonly used to treat various types of tumors. Hypoxia is closely associated with resistance to chemo- and/or radiotherapy and is a common feature of solid tumors. Recently, understanding of tumor hypoxia in oncology has led to development of radiopharmaceuticals for hypoxia imaging. This review provides an overview of PET radiopharmaceuticals for hypoxia imaging and 18F-FBPA which is used for boron neutron capture therapy. PMID:26753391

  3. Oritavancin Pharmacokinetics and Bone Penetration in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Ostiguy, Valerie; Cadieux, Cordelia; Malouin, Mireille; Belanger, Odette; Far, Adel Rafai; Parr, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics and bone concentrations of oritavancin were investigated after a single intravenous dose was administered to rabbits. The pharmacokinetic profile of oritavancin in rabbits showed that it is rapidly distributed to bone tissues, with concentrations remaining stable for up to 168 h, the last measured time point. Based on these findings, further evaluation of oritavancin for the treatment of infections in bone tissues is warranted. PMID:26239977

  4. Paediatric pharmacokinetics: key considerations

    PubMed Central

    Batchelor, Hannah Katharine; Marriott, John Francis

    2015-01-01

    A number of anatomical and physiological factors determine the pharmacokinetic profile of a drug. Differences in physiology in paediatric populations compared with adults can influence the concentration of drug within the plasma or tissue. Healthcare professionals need to be aware of anatomical and physiological changes that affect pharmacokinetic profiles of drugs to understand consequences of dose adjustments in infants and children. Pharmacokinetic clinical trials in children are complicated owing to the limitations on blood sample volumes and perception of pain in children resulting from blood sampling. There are alternative sampling techniques that can minimize the invasive nature of such trials. Population based models can also limit the sampling required from each individual by increasing the overall sample size to generate robust pharmacokinetic data. This review details key considerations in the design and development of paediatric pharmacokinetic clinical trials. PMID:25855821

  5. Pregnancy influences the plasma pharmacokinetics but not the cerebrospinal fluid pharmacokinetics of raltegravir: a preclinical investigation.

    PubMed

    Mahat, Mahamad Yunnus A; Thippeswamy, B S; Khan, Farhin R; Edunuri, Ramya; Nidhyanandan, Saranya; Chaudhary, Shilpee

    2014-12-18

    Alterations in antiretroviral pharmacokinetics during pregnancy must be understood for the drugs to be used safely and effectively. Present study is an attempt to understand the potential changes in raltegravir plasma and cerebrospinal fluid pharmacokinetics during pregnancy in late pregnant and non-pregnant rats. In vitro plasma protein binding, metabolic stability, intravenous blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability and oral pharmacokinetic studies were performed. Raltegravir concentrations in different matrices were measured using LC-MS/MS. Raltegravir plasma protein binding remained similar in both groups, whereas, metabolic stability was significantly lower in pregnant rats than the non-pregnant rats liver microsomes. In oral pharmacokinetic study, peak plasma concentrations and systemic exposures were significantly lower (∼37%) and clearance was significantly higher (∼61%) in late pregnant rats compared to non-pregnant rats. However, unlike plasma pharmacokinetics, CSF pharmacokinetic profile of raltegravir was similar in both pregnant and non-pregnant rats. Following intravenous administration, raltegravir showed higher BBB permeability in pregnant rats compared to non-pregnant rats. But the mean CSF-to-plasma ratio was significantly higher in pregnant rats compared to non-pregnant rats suggesting higher brain penetration in pregnant rats. In conclusion, pregnancy significantly affected the plasma pharmacokinetics, whereas cerebrospinal fluid pharmacokinetics remained fairly similar in pregnant and non-pregnant rats. Although current plasma pharmacokinetic data is in contradiction to the reported human data, pregnancy-specific pharmacokinetic changes observed in the current study emphasize the need for close therapeutic monitoring while treating the pregnant population and also warrants the need for additional clinical data with larger group of patients.

  6. Traceability from governmental producers of radiopharmaceuticals in measuring (18)F in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, A E; Iwahara, A; Silva, C J; Cruz, P A L; Poledna, R; Silva, R L; Laranjeira, A S; Delgado, J U; Tauhata, L; Loureiro, J S; Toledo, B C; Braghirolli, A M S; Andrade, E A L; Silva, J L; Hernandes, H O K; Valente, E S; Dalle, H M; Almeida, V M; Silva, T G; Fragoso, M C F; Oliveira, M L; Nascimento, E S S; Oliveira, E M; Herrerias, R; Souza, A A; Bambalas, E; Bruzinga, W A

    2016-03-01

    Since the inception of its proficiency test program to evaluate radionuclide measurement in hospitals and clinics, the National Metrology Laboratory of Ionizing Radiation-LNMRI, that represents Brazilian National Metrology Institute (NMI) for ionizing radiation has expanded its measurement and calibration capability. Requirements from the National Health Surveillance Agency from Ministry of Health (ANVISA), to producers of radiopharmaceuticals provided an opportunity to improve the full traceability chain to the highest level. Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-(18)F) is the only radiopharmaceutical simultaneously produced by all Brazilian radiopharmaceutical production centers (RPCs). By running this proficiency test, LNMRI began to provide them with the required traceability. For evaluation, the ratio of RPC to reference value results and ISO/IEC17043:2010 criteria were used. The reference value established as calibration factor on the secondary standard ionization chamber was obtained from three absolute measurements systems, and routinely confirmed in each round of proficiency test by CIEMAT/NIST liquid scintillation counting. The γ-emitting impurities were checked using a High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector. The results show that Brazilian RPCs are in accordance with (accuracy within ±10%) the Brazilian standard for evaluation of measurements with radionuclide calibrators (CNEN NN 3.05., 2013). Nevertheless, the RPCs should improve the methodology of uncertainty estimates, essential when using the statistical criteria of ISO/IEC 17043 standard, in addition to improving accuracy to levels consistent with their position in the national traceability chain. PMID:26688362

  7. Stroma Targeting Nuclear Imaging and Radiopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Dinesh; Jeong, Jae-Min; Shim, Hyunsuk

    2012-01-01

    Malignant transformation of tumor accompanies profound changes in the normal neighboring tissue, called tumor stroma. The tumor stroma provides an environment favoring local tumor growth, invasion, and metastatic spreading. Nuclear imaging (PET/SPECT) measures biochemical and physiologic functions in the human body. In oncology, PET/SPECT is particularly useful for differentiating tumors from postsurgical changes or radiation necrosis, distinguishing benign from malignant lesions, identifying the optimal site for biopsy, staging cancers, and monitoring the response to therapy. Indeed, PET/SPECT is a powerful, proven diagnostic imaging modality that displays information unobtainable through other anatomical imaging, such as CT or MRI. When combined with coregistered CT data, [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F]FDG)-PET is particularly useful. However, [18F]FDG is not a target-specific PET tracer. This paper will review the tumor microenvironment targeting oncologic imaging such as angiogenesis, invasion, hypoxia, growth, and homing, and also therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals to provide a roadmap for additional applications of tumor imaging and therapy. PMID:22685650

  8. (Coordinated research of chemotherapeutic agents and radiopharmaceuticals)

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, P.C.

    1991-01-14

    The traveler received a United Nations Development Program (UNDP) Award for Distinguished Scientists to visit Indian Research Institutions including Central Drug Research Institute (CDRI), Lucknow, the host institution, in cooperation with the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) of India. At CDRI, the traveler had meetings to discuss progress and future directions of on-going collaborative research work on nucleosides and had the opportunity to initiate new projects with the divisions of pharmacology, biopolymers, and membrane biology. As a part of this program, the traveler also visited Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute (SGPI) of Medical Sciences, Lucknow; Board of Radiation and Isotope Technology (BRIT) and Bhabha Atomic Research Center (BARC), Bombay; Variable Energy Cyclotron Center (VECC) and Indian Institute of Chemical Biology, Calcutta. He also attended the Indo-American Society of Nuclear Medicine Meeting held in Calcutta. The traveler delivered five seminars describing various aspects of radiopharmaceutical development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and discussed the opportunities for exchange visits to ORNL by Indian scientists.

  9. Radiopharmaceutical stem cell tracking for neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Rosado-de-Castro, Paulo Henrique; Pimentel-Coelho, Pedro Moreno; Gutfilen, Bianca; Lopes de Souza, Sergio Augusto; de Freitas, Gabriel Rodriguez; Mendez-Otero, Rosalia; Barbosa da Fonseca, Lea Mirian

    2014-01-01

    Although neurological ailments continue to be some of the main causes of disease burden in the world, current therapies such as pharmacological agents have limited potential in the restoration of neural functions. Cell therapies, firstly applied to treat different hematological diseases, are now being investigated in preclinical and clinical studies for neurological illnesses. However, the potential applications and mechanisms for such treatments are still poorly comprehended and are the focus of permanent research. In this setting, noninvasive in vivo imaging allows better understanding of several aspects of stem cell therapies. Amongst the various methods available, radioisotope cell labeling has become one of the most promising since it permits tracking of cells after injection by different routes to investigate their biodistribution. A significant increase in the number of studies utilizing this method has occurred in the last years. Here, we review the different radiopharmaceuticals, imaging techniques, and findings of the preclinical and clinical reports published up to now. Moreover, we discuss the limitations and future applications of radioisotope cell labeling in the field of cell transplantation for neurological diseases. PMID:24982880

  10. Lisdexamfetamine: A pharmacokinetic review.

    PubMed

    Comiran, Eloisa; Kessler, Félix Henrique; Fröehlich, Pedro Eduardo; Limberger, Renata Pereira

    2016-06-30

    Lisdexamfetamine (LDX) is a d-amphetamine (d-AMPH) pro-drug used to treat Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Binge Eating Disorder (BED) symptoms. The in vivo pharmacodynamics of LDX is the same as that of its active product d-AMPH, although there are a few qualitative and quantitative differences due to pharmacokinetics. Due to the specific pharmacokinetics of the long-acting stimulants, this article revises the pharmacokinetic studies on LDX, the newest amphetamine pro-drug. The Medline/Pubmed, Science Direct and Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde (Lilacs and Ibecs) (2007-2016) databases were searched for articles and their list of references. As for basic pharmacokinetics studies, since LDX is a newly developed medication, there are few results concerning biotransformation, distribution and the use of different biological matrices for analysis. This is the first robust review on this topic, gathering data from all clinical pharmacokinetics studies available in the literature. The particular pharmacokinetics of LDX plays a major role in studying this pro-drug, since this knowledge was essential to understand some reports on clinical effects in literature, e.g. the small likelihood of reducing the effect by interactions, the effect of long duration use and the still questionable reduction of the potential for abuse. In general the already well-known pharmacokinetic properties of amphetamine make LDX relatively predictable, simplifying the use of LDX in clinical practice. PMID:27125257

  11. Lisdexamfetamine: A pharmacokinetic review.

    PubMed

    Comiran, Eloisa; Kessler, Félix Henrique; Fröehlich, Pedro Eduardo; Limberger, Renata Pereira

    2016-06-30

    Lisdexamfetamine (LDX) is a d-amphetamine (d-AMPH) pro-drug used to treat Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Binge Eating Disorder (BED) symptoms. The in vivo pharmacodynamics of LDX is the same as that of its active product d-AMPH, although there are a few qualitative and quantitative differences due to pharmacokinetics. Due to the specific pharmacokinetics of the long-acting stimulants, this article revises the pharmacokinetic studies on LDX, the newest amphetamine pro-drug. The Medline/Pubmed, Science Direct and Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde (Lilacs and Ibecs) (2007-2016) databases were searched for articles and their list of references. As for basic pharmacokinetics studies, since LDX is a newly developed medication, there are few results concerning biotransformation, distribution and the use of different biological matrices for analysis. This is the first robust review on this topic, gathering data from all clinical pharmacokinetics studies available in the literature. The particular pharmacokinetics of LDX plays a major role in studying this pro-drug, since this knowledge was essential to understand some reports on clinical effects in literature, e.g. the small likelihood of reducing the effect by interactions, the effect of long duration use and the still questionable reduction of the potential for abuse. In general the already well-known pharmacokinetic properties of amphetamine make LDX relatively predictable, simplifying the use of LDX in clinical practice.

  12. Aptamers as radiopharmaceuticals for nuclear imaging and therapy.

    PubMed

    Gijs, Marlies; Aerts, An; Impens, Nathalie; Baatout, Sarah; Luxen, André

    2016-04-01

    Today, radiopharmaceuticals belong to the standard instrumentation of nuclear medicine, both in the context of diagnosis and therapy. The majority of radiopharmaceuticals consist of targeting biomolecules which are designed to interact with a disease-related molecular target. A plethora of targeting biomolecules of radiopharmaceuticals exists, including antibodies, antibody fragments, proteins, peptides and nucleic acids. Nucleic acids have some significant advantages relative to proteinaceous biomolecules in terms of size, production, modifications, possible targets and immunogenicity. In particular, aptamers (non-coding, synthetic, single-stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides) are of interest because they can bind a molecular target with high affinity and specificity. At present, few aptamers have been investigated preclinically for imaging and therapeutic applications. In this review, we describe the use of aptamers as targeting biomolecules of radiopharmaceuticals. We also discuss the chemical modifications which are needed to turn aptamers into valuable (radio-)pharmaceuticals, as well as the different radiolabeling strategies that can be used to radiolabel oligonucleotides and, in particular, aptamers. PMID:26746572

  13. Predicting neonatal pharmacokinetics from prior data using population pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Edginton, Andrea N; Avant, Debbie; Burckart, Gilbert J

    2015-10-01

    Selection of the first dose for neonates in clinical trials is very challenging. The objective of this analysis was to assess if a population pharmacokinetic (PK) model developed with data from infants to adults is predictive of neonatal clearance and to evaluate what age range of prior PK data is needed for informative modeling to predict neonate exposure. Two sources of pharmacokinetic data from 8 drugs were used to develop population models: (1) data from all patients > 2 years of age, and (2) data from all nonneonatal patients aged > 28 days. The prediction error based on the models using data from subjects > 2 years of age showed bias toward overprediction, with median average fold error (AFE) for CL predicted/CLobserved greater than 1.5. The bias for predicting neonatal PK was improved when using all prior PK data including infants as opposed to an assessment without infant PK data, with the median AFE 0.91. As an increased number of pediatric trials are conducted in neonates under the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act, dose selection should be based on the best estimates of neonatal pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics prior to conducting efficacy and safety studies in neonates. PMID:25907280

  14. Auger Emitting Radiopharmaceuticals for Cancer Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falzone, Nadia; Cornelissen, Bart; Vallis, Katherine A.

    Radionuclides that emit Auger electrons have been of particular interest as therapeutic agents. This is primarily due to the short range in tissue, controlled linear paths and high linear energy transfer of these particles. Taking into consideration that ionizations are clustered within several cubic nanometers around the point of decay the possibility of incorporating an Auger emitter in close proximity to the cancer cell DNA has immense therapeutic potential thus making nuclear targeted Auger-electron emitters ideal for precise targeting of cancer cells. Furthermore, many Auger-electron emitters also emit γ-radiation, this property makes Auger emitting radionuclides a very attractive option as therapeutic and diagnostic agents in the molecular imaging and management of tumors. The first requirement for the delivery of Auger emitting nuclides is the definition of suitable tumor-selective delivery vehicles to avoid normal tissue toxicity. One of the main challenges of targeted radionuclide therapy remains in matching the physical and chemical characteristics of the radionuclide and targeting moiety with the clinical character of the tumor. Molecules and molecular targets that have been used in the past can be classified according to the carrier molecule used to deliver the Auger-electron-emitting radionuclide. These include (1) antibodies, (2) peptides, (3) small molecules, (4) oligonucleotides and peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), (5) proteins, and (6) nanoparticles. The efficacy of targeted radionuclide therapy depends greatly on the ability to increase intranuclear incorporation of the radiopharmaceutical without compromising toxicity. Several strategies to achieve this goal have been proposed in literature. The possibility of transferring tumor therapy based on the emission of Auger electrons from experimental models to patients has vast therapeutic potential, and remains a field of intense research.

  15. Organophosphorus Insecticide Pharmacokinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Timchalk, Charles

    2010-01-01

    This chapter highlights a number of current and future applications of pharmacokinetics to assess organophosphate (OP) insecticide dosimetry, biological response and risk in humans exposed to these agents. Organophosphates represent a large family of pesticides where insecticidal as well as toxicological mode of action is associated with their ability to target and inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Pharmacokinetics entails the quantitative integration of physiological and metabolic processes associated with the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) of drugs and xenobiotics. Pharmacokinetic studies provide important data on the amount of toxicant delivered to a target site as well as species-, age-, gender-specific and dose-dependent differences in biological response. These studies have been conducted with organophosphorus insecticides in multiple species, at various dose levels, and across different routes of exposure to understand their in vivo pharmacokinetics and how they contribute to the observed toxicological response. To access human exposure to organophosphorus insecticides, human pharmacokinetic studies have been conducted and used to develop biological monitoring strategies based on the quantitation of key metabolites in biological fluids. Pharmacokinetic studies with these insecticides are also useful to facilitate extrapolation of dosimetry and biological response from animals to humans and for the assessment of human health risk. In this regard, physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) models are being utilized to assess risk and understand the toxicological implications of known or suspected exposures to various insecticides. In this chapter a number of examples are presented that illustrate the utility and limitation of pharmacokinetic studies to address human health concerns associated with organophosphorus insecticides.

  16. Applications of quantitative whole body autoradiographic technique in radiopharmaceutical research

    SciTech Connect

    Som, P.; Oster, Z.H.; Yonekura, Y.; Meyer, M.A.; Fand, I.; Brill, A.B.

    1982-01-01

    The routine evaluation of radiopharmaceuticals involves dissecting tissue distribution studies (DTDS) and gamma or positron imaging. DTDS have the following disadvantages: since not all tissues can always be sampled, sites of radiopharmaceutical uptake may be missed and because the procedure involves weighing of dissected tissue samples, the spatial resolution of this method is low and determined by the smallest amount that can be weighed accurately. Gamma camera imaging and positron emission tomography though more comprehensive in evaluating the global distribution of a compound, have relative low spatial resolution. Whole body autoradiography of small animals has a much higher spatial resolution as compared to the above and depicts the global distribution of radiopharmaceuticals. A computer-assisted quantification method of WBARG applied to positron, beta, and gamma emitters will complement the method by producing quantitative values comparable to those obtained by dissection and direct tissue counting, with the advantages of depicting the global distribution at high spatial resolution.

  17. Newer positron emission tomography radiopharmaceuticals for radiotherapy planning: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) has changed cancer imaging in the last decade, for better. It can be employed for radiation treatment planning of different cancers with improved accuracy and outcomes as compared to conventional imaging methods. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose remains the most widely used though relatively non-specific cancer imaging PET tracer. A wide array of newer PET radiopharmaceuticals has been developed for targeted imaging of different cancers. PET-CT with such new PET radiopharmaceuticals has also been used for radiotherapy planning with encouraging results. In the present review we have briefly outlined the role of PET-CT with newer radiopharmaceuticals for radiotherapy planning and briefly reviewed the available literature in this regard. PMID:26904575

  18. [Current trends in using PET radiopharmaceuticals for diagnostics in oncology].

    PubMed

    Adam, J; Kadeřávek, J; Kužel, F; Vašina, J; Rehák, Z

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear medicine is an important field of modern medicine, particularly thanks to its role in in vivo imaging of important processes in human organism. This is possible thanks to the use of radiopharmaceuticals, specific substances labeled by radioactive nuclide, its distribution in the body can be visualized by specialized scanners and, based on the knowledge of physiological patterns, dia-gnosis can be determined. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a modern and in many ways indispensable method of nuclear medicine. The spectrum of radiopharmaceuticals available in recent years is broadening thanks to a coordinated effort of manufacturers of synthesis equipment, chemists and potential users -  physicians. This review focuses on the development in the PET radiopharmaceutical field in the last five years, with an emphasis on oncological applications of PET. PMID:24945550

  19. Preparation of radiopharmaceuticals labeled with metal radionuclides. Progress report, July 1, 1988--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, M.J.

    1992-06-01

    We recently developed a useful zinc-62/copper-62 generator and are presently evaluating copper-62 radiopharmaceuticals for clinical studies. While developing these copper-62 radiopharmaceuticals, in collaboration with the University of Missouri Research Reactor, Columbia we have also explored copper-64 radiopharmaceuticals. The PET images we obtained with copper-64 tracers were of such high quality that we have developed and evaluated copper-64 labeled antibodies for PET imaging. The major research activities described herein include: the development and assessment of gallium-68 radiopharmaceuticals; the development and evaluation of a new zinc-62/copper-62 generator and the assessment of copper-62 radiopharmaceuticals; mechanistic studies on proteins labeled with metal radionuclides.

  20. UNCERTAINTIES IN TRICHLOROETHYLENE PHARMACOKINETIC MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the pharmacokinetics of a chemical¯its absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion in humans and laboratory animals ¯ is critical to the assessment of its human health risks. For trichloroethylene (TCE), numerous physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK)...

  1. Harvard-MIT research program in short-lived radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Adelstein, S.J.

    1991-01-01

    This report presents research on radiopharmaceuticals. The following topics are discussed: antibody labeling with positron-emitting radionuclides; antibody modification for radioimmune imaging; labeling antibodies; evaluation of technetium acetlyacetonates as potential cerebral blood flow agents; and studies in technetium chemistry. (CBS)

  2. Process for producing astatine-211 for radiopharmaceutical use

    DOEpatents

    Mirzadeh, Saed; Lambrecht, Richard M.

    1987-01-01

    A process for reliably and consistently producing astatine-211 in small controlled volumes of a solution, which is selected from a choice of solvents that are useful in selected radiopharmaceutical procedures in which the At-211 activities are to be applied.

  3. Process for producing astatine-211 for radiopharmaceutical use

    DOEpatents

    Mirzadeh, S.; Lambrecht, R.M.

    1984-04-10

    A process is described for reliably and consistently producing astatine-211 in small controlled volumes of a solution, which is selected from a choice of solvents that are useful in selected radiopharmaceutical procedures in which the At-211 activities are to be applied. 4 figures, 1 table.

  4. Ethnic and genetic factors in methadone pharmacokinetics: A population pharmacokinetic study☆

    PubMed Central

    Bart, Gavin; Lenz, Scott; Straka, Robert J.; Brundage, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Treatment of opiate use disorders with methadone is complicated by wide interindividual variability in pharmacokinetics. To identify potentially contributing covariates in methadone pharmacokinetics, we used population pharmacokinetic modeling to estimate clearance (CL/F) and volume of distribution (V/F) for each methadone enantiomer in an ethnically diverse methadone maintained population. Methods Plasma levels of the opiate-active R-methadone and opiate-inactive S-methadone were measured in 206 methadone maintained subjects approximately two and twenty-three hours after a daily oral dose of racmethadone. A linear one-compartment population pharmacokinetic model with first-order conditional estimation with interaction (FOCE-I) was used to evaluate methadone CL/F and V/F. The influence of covariates on parameter estimates was evaluated using stepwise covariate modeling. Covariates included ethnicity, gender, weight, BMI, age, methadone dose, and 21 single nucleotide polymorphisms in genes implicated in methadone pharmacokinetics. Results In the final model, for each enantiomer, Hmong ethnicity reduced CL/F by approximately 30% and the rs2032582 (ABCB1 2677G > T/A) GG genotype was associated with a 20% reduction in CL/F. The presence of the rs3745274 minor allele (CYP2B6 515G > T) reduced CL/F by up to 20% for S-methadone only. A smaller effect of age was noted on CL/F for R-methadone. Conclusion This is the first report showing the influence of the rs2032582 and rs3745274 variants on methadone pharmacokinetics rather than simply dose requirements or plasma levels. Population pharmacokinetics is a valuable method for identifying the influences on methadone pharmacokinetic variability. PMID:25456329

  5. [Advances on pharmacokinetics of traditional Chinese medicine under disease states].

    PubMed

    Gong, Zi-peng; Chen, Ying; Zhang, Rui-jie; Yang, Qing; Zhu, Xiao-xin

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, more and more research shows that the pharmacokinetic parameter of traditional Chinese medicine can be affected by the disease states. It's possible that drug metabolic enzymes, transporters, cell membrane permeability and the change of microbes group could be interfered with physiological and pathological changes, which enables the pharmacokinetics of traditional Chinese medicine in the body to be altered, including the process of absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion, and then the pharmacokinetic parameters of traditional chinese medicine are altered. It's found that investigating the pharmacokinetic of traditional Chinese medicine in the pathological state is more useful than that of in normal state because the great part of traditional Chinese medicine is mainly used to treat disease. This article reflects the latest research on the pharmacokinetic of traditional Chinese medicine in the disease state such as diabete, cerebral ischemia, liver injury, inflammatory disease, nervous system disorders and fever in order to provide certain reference for clinicians designing reasonable administration dose.

  6. Estrogen receptor binding radiopharmaceuticals: II. Tissue distribution of 17. cap alpha. -methylestradiol in normal and tumor-bearing rats

    SciTech Connect

    Feenstra, A.; Vaalburg, W.; Nolten, G.M.J.; Reiffers, S.; Talma, A.G.; Wiegman, T.; van der Molen, H.D.; Woldring, M.G.

    1983-06-01

    Tritiated 17..cap alpha..-methylestradiol was synthesized to investigate the potential of the carbon-11-labeled analog as an estrogen-receptor-binding radiopharmaceutical. In vitro, 17..cap alpha..-methylestradiol is bound with high affinity to the cytoplasmic estrogen receptor from rabbit uterus (K/sub d/ = 1.96 x 10/sup -10/M), and it sediments as an 8S hormone-receptor complex in sucrose gradients. The compound shows specific uptake in the uterus of the adult rat, within 1 h after injection. In female rats bearing DMBA-induced tumors, specific uterine and tumor uptakes were observed, although at 30 min the tumor uptake was only 23 to 30% of the uptake in the uterus. Tritiated 17..cap alpha..-methylestradiol with a specific activity of 6 Ci/mmole showed a similar tissue distribution. Our results indicate that a 17 ..cap alpha..-methylestradiol is promising as an estrogen-receptor-binding radiopharmaceutical.

  7. Nanodrugs: pharmacokinetics and safety

    PubMed Central

    Onoue, Satomi; Yamada, Shizuo; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2014-01-01

    To date, various nanodrug systems have been developed for different routes of administration, which include dendrimers, nanocrystals, emulsions, liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles, micelles, and polymeric nanoparticles. Nanodrug systems have been employed to improve the efficacy, safety, physicochemical properties, and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profile of pharmaceutical substances. In particular, functionalized nanodrug systems can offer enhanced bioavailability of orally taken drugs, prolonged half-life of injected drugs (by reducing immunogenicity), and targeted delivery to specific tissues. Thus, nanodrug systems might lower the frequency of administration while providing maximized pharmacological effects and minimized systemic side effects, possibly leading to better therapeutic compliance and clinical outcomes. In spite of these attractive pharmacokinetic advantages, recent attention has been drawn to the toxic potential of nanodrugs since they often exhibit in vitro and in vivo cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation, and genotoxicity. A better understanding of the pharmacokinetic and safety characteristics of nanodrugs and the limitations of each delivery option is necessary for the further development of efficacious nanodrugs with high therapeutic potential and a wide safety margin. This review highlights the recent progress in nanodrug system development, with a focus on the pharmacokinetic advantages and safety challenges. PMID:24591825

  8. Low energy cyclotron production and separation of yttrium-86 for evaluation of monoclonal antibody pharmacokinetics and dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, R. D.; McDevitt, M.; Ma, D.; Jurcic, J.; Scheinberg, D.; Larson, S.; Shoner, S.; Link, J.; Krohn, K.; Schlyer, D.

    1999-06-10

    Although an excellent radionuclide for application to systemic isotopic therapy when complexed to various monoclonal antibodies, the lack of photon emission from yttrium-90 makes the determination of the pharmacokinetics and dosimetry of the resultant radiopharmaceutical difficult. The introduction of the positron-emitting radionuclide yttrium-86 (T{sub 1/2}=14.7 h, {beta}{sup +}=33%) provides the non-invasive quantitation for the biodistribution of the chelated complex. The yttrium-86 radionuclide is produced at Memorial Sloan-Kettering using the CS-15 cyclotron via the (p,n) nuclear reaction on an enriched strontium-86 target. The separation is effectively achieved through a combination of solvent extraction and ion exchange chromatography. Once investigational new drug approval has been received, the mixed nuclides, Y-90 and Y-86, are to be used to formulate the HuM195 labeled monoclonal antibody, a radiopharmaceutical under active investigation against hematopoietic progenitor cells.

  9. Low energy cyclotron production and separation of yttrium-86 for evaluation of monoclonal antibody pharmacokinetics and dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, R. D.; McDevitt, M.; Ma, D.; Jurcic, J.; Scheinberg, D.; Larson, S.; Shoner, S.; Link, J.; Krohn, K.; Schlyer, D.

    1999-06-01

    Although an excellent radionuclide for application to systemic isotopic therapy when complexed to various monoclonal antibodies, the lack of photon emission from yttrium-90 makes the determination of the pharmacokinetics and dosimetry of the resultant radiopharmaceutical difficult. The introduction of the positron-emitting radionuclide yttrium-86 (T1/2=14.7 h, β+=33%) provides the non-invasive quantitation for the biodistribution of the chelated complex. The yttrium-86 radionuclide is produced at Memorial Sloan-Kettering using the CS-15 cyclotron via the (p,n) nuclear reaction on an enriched strontium-86 target. The separation is effectively achieved through a combination of solvent extraction and ion exchange chromatography. Once investigational new drug approval has been received, the mixed nuclides, Y-90 and Y-86, are to be used to formulate the HuM195 labeled monoclonal antibody, a radiopharmaceutical under active investigation against hematopoietic progenitor cells.

  10. Cerenkov Luminescence Tomography for In Vivo Radiopharmaceutical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jianghong; Qin, Chenghu; Yang, Xin; Zhu, Shuping; Zhang, Xing; Tian, Jie

    2011-01-01

    Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) is a cost-effective molecular imaging tool for biomedical applications of radiotracers. The introduction of Cerenkov luminescence tomography (CLT) relative to planar CLI can be compared to the development of X-ray CT based on radiography. With CLT, quantitative and localized analysis of a radiopharmaceutical distribution becomes feasible. In this contribution, a feasibility study of in vivo radiopharmaceutical imaging in heterogeneous medium is presented. Coupled with a multimodal in vivo imaging system, this CLT reconstruction method allows precise anatomical registration of the positron probe in heterogeneous tissues and facilitates the more widespread application of radiotracers. Source distribution inside the small animal is obtained from CLT reconstruction. The experimental results demonstrated that CLT can be employed as an available in vivo tomographic imaging of charged particle emitters in a heterogeneous medium. PMID:21747821

  11. [Computer simulated images of radiopharmaceutical distributions in anthropomorphic phantoms

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-05-17

    We have constructed an anatomically correct human geometry, which can be used to store radioisotope concentrations in 51 various internal organs. Each organ is associated with an index number which references to its attenuating characteristics (composition and density). The initial development of Computer Simulated Images of Radiopharmaceuticals in Anthropomorphic Phantoms (CSIRDAP) over the first 3 years has been very successful. All components of the simulation have been coded, made operational and debugged.

  12. Radionuclides, radiotracers and radiopharmaceuticals for in vivo diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebe, Leonard I.

    Radioactive tracers for in vivo clinical diagnosis fall within a narrow, strictly-defined set of specifications in respect of their physical properties, chemical and biochemical characteristics, and (approved) medical applications. The type of radioactive decay and physical half-life of the radionuclide are immutable properties which, along with the demands of production and supply, limit the choice of radionuclides used in medicine to only a small fraction of those known to exist. In use, the biochemical and physiological properties of a radiotracer are dictated by the chemical form of the radionuclide. This chemical form may range from elemental, molecular or ionic, to complex compounds formed by coordinate or covalent bonding of the radionuclide to either simple organic or inorganic molecules, or complex macromolecules. Few of the radiotracers which are tested in model systems ever become radiopharmaceuticals in the strictest sense. Radionuclides, radiotracers and radiopharmaceuticals in use are reviewed. Drug legislation and regulations concerning drug manufacture, as well as hospital ethical constraints and legislation concerning unsealed sources of radiation must all be satisfied in order to translate a radiopharmaceutical from the laboratory to clinical use.

  13. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of fosaprepitant dimeglumine

    PubMed Central

    Colon-Gonzalez, Francheska; Kraft, Walter K.

    2011-01-01

    Importance of the field Chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is a common complication in the treatment of patients with cancer. The introduction of the first in class neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist aprepitant provided additive control on CINV in combination to existing antiemetics. Due to formulation issues, aprepitant is only available for oral administration. Fosaprepitant, a prodrug of aprepitant, was introduced to the market in 2008 as an intravenous bioequivalent to aprepitant. Areas covered in this review This review examines the chemical development of fosaprepitant, its pharmacokinetic properties, approved uses, and potential applications. What the reader will gain The reader will get up-to-date information on the pharmacology and clinical uses of fosaprepitant. Clinical studies have demonstrated pharmacokinetic bioequivalence of aprepitant 125-mg to fosaprepitant 115-mg, as well as comparable efficacy in prevention of acute and delayed emesis following the first day of chemotherapy regimens. Take home message Fosaprepitant is an IV pro-drug of aprepitant that offers a new alternative to patients with CINV. Currently, fosaprepitant can substitute oral aprepitant in the first day of a 3-day regimen. Current studies show that a single-day fosaprepitant regimen is also bioequivalent to the 3-day aprepitant regimen, this could significantly simplify the care for CINV patients in the future. PMID:20795794

  14. Bone-targeting radiopharmaceuticals for the treatment of prostate cancer with bone metastases

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Jatinder; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) frequently have metastases to the bone, which may cause pain and lead to a deterioration in quality-of-life. Bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals are agents which, when administered systemically, localize to the site of bone metastases and deliver focal radiation there. In this review, we will summarize the current literature on bone-targeting radiopharmaceuticals for CRPC, focusing on strontium-89, samarium-153, rhenium-186 and radium-223. We will discuss their indications, clinical efficacy, and toxicities and highlight some of the challenges in optimizing treatment with these agents. Historically, clinical trials with these drugs have failed to demonstrate survival improvements, restricting their use for palliative purposes only. Radium-223 is the first agent in this class to show an overall survival advantage in CRPC patients with bone metastases. This landmark finding will likely have a considerable impact on the treatment paradigm of bone-metastatic CRPC, and will pave the way for further developments in the future. PMID:22521546

  15. 18F-Labeled Silicon-Based Fluoride Acceptors: Potential Opportunities for Novel Positron Emitting Radiopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Bernard-Gauthier, Vadim; Wängler, Carmen; Wängler, Bjoern; Schirrmacher, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Background. Over the recent years, radiopharmaceutical chemistry has experienced a wide variety of innovative pushes towards finding both novel and unconventional radiochemical methods to introduce fluorine-18 into radiotracers for positron emission tomography (PET). These “nonclassical” labeling methodologies based on silicon-, boron-, and aluminium-18F chemistry deviate from commonplace bonding of an [18F]fluorine atom (18F) to either an aliphatic or aromatic carbon atom. One method in particular, the silicon-fluoride-acceptor isotopic exchange (SiFA-IE) approach, invalidates a dogma in radiochemistry that has been widely accepted for many years: the inability to obtain radiopharmaceuticals of high specific activity (SA) via simple IE. Methodology. The most advantageous feature of IE labeling in general is that labeling precursor and labeled radiotracer are chemically identical, eliminating the need to separate the radiotracer from its precursor. SiFA-IE chemistry proceeds in dipolar aprotic solvents at room temperature and below, entirely avoiding the formation of radioactive side products during the IE. Scope of Review. A great plethora of different SiFA species have been reported in the literature ranging from small prosthetic groups and other compounds of low molecular weight to labeled peptides and most recently affibody molecules. Conclusions. The literature over the last years (from 2006 to 2014) shows unambiguously that SiFA-IE and other silicon-based fluoride acceptor strategies relying on 18F− leaving group substitutions have the potential to become a valuable addition to radiochemistry. PMID:25157357

  16. Pharmacokinetic consequences of spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, L.; Cintron, N. M.

    1991-01-01

    Spaceflight induces a wide range of physiological and biochemical changes, including disruption of gastrointestinal (GI) function, fluid and electrolyte balance, circulatory dynamics, and organ blood flow, as well as hormonal and metabolic perturbations. Any of these changes can influence the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of in-flight medication. That spaceflight may alter bioavailability was proposed when drugs prescribed to alleviate space motion sickness (SMS) had little therapeutic effect. Characterization of the pharmacokinetic and/or pharmacodynamic behavior of operationally critical medications is crucial for their effective use in flight; as a first step, we sought to determine whether drugs administered in space actually reach the site of action at concentrations sufficient to elicit the therapeutic response.

  17. Obstetric Pharmacokinetic Dosing Studies are Urgently Needed

    PubMed Central

    McCormack, Shelley A.; Best, Brookie M.

    2014-01-01

    Use of pharmacotherapy during pregnancy is common and increasing. Physiologic changes during pregnancy may significantly alter the overall systemic drug exposure, necessitating dose changes. A search of PubMed for pharmacokinetic clinical trials showed 494 publications during pregnancy out of 35,921 total pharmacokinetic published studies (1.29%), from the late 1960s through August 31, 2013. Closer examination of pharmacokinetic studies in pregnant women published since 2008 (81 studies) revealed that about a third of the trials were for treatment of acute labor and delivery issues, a third included studies of infectious disease treatment during pregnancy, and the remaining third were for varied ante-partum indications. Approximately, two-thirds of these recent studies were primarily funded by government agencies worldwide, one-quarter were supported by private non-profit foundations or combinations of government and private funding, and slightly <10% were supported by pharmaceutical industry. As highlighted in this review, vast gaps exist in pharmacology information and evidence for appropriate dosing of medications in pregnant women. This lack of knowledge and understanding of drug disposition throughout pregnancy place both the mother and the fetus at risk for avoidable therapeutic misadventures – suboptimal efficacy or excess toxicity – with medication use in pregnancy. Increased efforts to perform and support obstetric dosing and pharmacokinetic studies are greatly needed. PMID:24575394

  18. Auger Radiopharmaceutical Therapy Targeting Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Kiess, Ana P.; Hobbs, Robert; Sgouros, George; Mease, Ronnie C.; Pullambhatla, Mrudula; Shen, Colette J.; Foss, Catherine A.; Pomper, Martin G.

    2015-01-01

    Auger electron emitters such as 125I have a high linear energy transfer and short range of emission (<10 μm), making them suitable for treating micrometastases while sparing normal tissues. We used a highly specific small molecule targeting the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) to deliver 125I to prostate cancer cells. Methods The PSMA-targeting Auger emitter 2-[3-[1-carboxy-5-(4-125I-iodo-benzoylamino)-pentyl]-ureido]-pentanedioic acid (125I-DCIBzL) was synthesized. DNA damage (via phosphorylated H2A histone family member X staining) and clonogenic survival were tested in PSMA-positive (PSMA+) PC3 PIP and PSMA-negative (PSMA−) PC3 flu human prostate cancer cells after treatment with 125I-DCIBzL. Subcellular drug distribution was assessed with confocal microscopy using a related fluorescent PSMA-targeting compound YC-36. In vivo antitumor efficacy was tested in nude mice bearing PSMA+ PC3 PIP or PSMA− PC3 flu flank xenografts. Animals were administered (intravenously) 111 MBq (3 mCi) of 125I-DCIBzL, 111 MBq (3 mCi) of 125I-NaI, an equivalent amount of nonradiolabeled DCIBzL, or saline. Results After treatment with 125I-DCIBzL, PSMA+ PC3 PIP cells exhibited increased DNA damage and decreased clonogenic survival when compared with PSMA− PC3 flu cells. Confocal microscopy of YC-36 showed drug distribution in the perinuclear area and plasma membrane. Animals bearing PSMA+ PC3 PIP tumors had significant tumor growth delay after treatment with 125I-DCIBzL, with only 1 mouse reaching 5 times the initial tumor volume by 60 d after treatment, compared with a median time to 5 times volume of less than 15 d for PSMA− PC3 flu tumors and all other treatment groups (P = 0.002 by log-rank test). Conclusion PSMA-targeted radiopharmaceutical therapy with the Auger emitter 125I-DCIBzL yielded highly specific antitumor efficacy in vivo, suggesting promise for treatment of prostate cancer micrometastases. PMID:26182968

  19. Preclinical acute toxicity, biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, radiation dosimetry and microPET imaging studies of [(18)F]fluorocholine in mice.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Marina B; Ferreira, Soraya M Z M D; Nascimento, Leonardo T C; Costa, Flávia M; Mendes, Bruno M; Ferreira, Andrea V; Malamut, Carlos; Silva, Juliana B; Mamede, Marcelo

    2016-10-01

    [(18)F]Fluorocholine ([(18)F]FCH) has been proven to be effective in prostate cancer. Since [(18)F]FCH is classified as a new radiopharmaceutical in Brazil, preclinical safety and efficacy data are required to support clinical trials and to obtain its approval. The aim of this work was to perform acute toxicity, biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, radiation dosimetry and microPET imaging studies of [(18)F]FCH. The results could support its use in nuclear medicine as an important piece of work for regulatory in Brazil.

  20. Preclinical acute toxicity, biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, radiation dosimetry and microPET imaging studies of [(18)F]fluorocholine in mice.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Marina B; Ferreira, Soraya M Z M D; Nascimento, Leonardo T C; Costa, Flávia M; Mendes, Bruno M; Ferreira, Andrea V; Malamut, Carlos; Silva, Juliana B; Mamede, Marcelo

    2016-10-01

    [(18)F]Fluorocholine ([(18)F]FCH) has been proven to be effective in prostate cancer. Since [(18)F]FCH is classified as a new radiopharmaceutical in Brazil, preclinical safety and efficacy data are required to support clinical trials and to obtain its approval. The aim of this work was to perform acute toxicity, biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, radiation dosimetry and microPET imaging studies of [(18)F]FCH. The results could support its use in nuclear medicine as an important piece of work for regulatory in Brazil. PMID:27509594

  1. "The Show"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehring, John

    2004-01-01

    For the past 16 years, the blue-collar city of Huntington, West Virginia, has rolled out the red carpet to welcome young wrestlers and their families as old friends. They have come to town chasing the same dream for a spot in what many of them call "The Show". For three days, under the lights of an arena packed with 5,000 fans, the state's best…

  2. (177) Lu-5-Fluorouracil a potential theranostic radiopharmaceutical: radiosynthesis, quality control, biodistribution, and scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Rasheed, Rashid; Tariq, Saleha; Naqvi, Syed Ali Raza; Gillani, Syed Jawad Hussain; Rizvi, Faheem Askari; Sajid, Muhammad; Rasheed, Shahid

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to develop (177) Lu-5-Flourouracil as a potential cancer therapeutic radiopharmaceutical. 5-Flourouracil (5-FU) is widely accepted as an anticancer drug of broad spectrum fame. The labeling of 5-FU was carried out at different set of experimental conditions using high specific activity of (177) LuCl3 . The optimum conditions for maximum radiochemical yield was set: 5-FU (5 mg), (177) LuCl3 (185 MBq), diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (10 µg), reaction volume (2 mL), pH (5.5), temperature (80°C), and reaction time (20 min). The radiochemical labeling was assessed with Whatman No. 2 paper, instant thin layer chromatographic, and radio-HPLC, which revealed >94% labeling results with sufficient stability up to 6 h. Serum stability study also showed (177) Lu-5-FU promising stability. Biodistribution study in normal rats and rabbits showed liver, stomach, kidney, and heart as area of increased tracer accumulation just after injection, which decreased to 1.4%, 0.4%, 0.2%, and 0.39% ID/g, respectively, after 72 h. Glomerular filtration rate and cytotoxicity study results of (177) Lu-5-FU showed it had no adverse effect on renal function and nontoxic to blood cells. The promising characteristics of (177) Lu-5-FU, that is, clever elimination from kidney and nontoxic nature toward blood cells make it the radiopharmaceutical for further testing in patients for therapeutic purposes. PMID:27444959

  3. Enantiopure bifunctional chelators for copper radiopharmaceuticals--does chirality matter in radiotracer design?

    PubMed

    Singh, Ajay N; Dakanali, Marianna; Hao, Guiyang; Ramezani, Saleh; Kumar, Amit; Sun, Xiankai

    2014-06-10

    It is well recognized that carbon chirality plays a critical role in the design of drug molecules. However, very little information is available regarding the effect of stereoisomerism of macrocyclic bifunctional chelators (BFC) on biological behaviors of the corresponding radiopharmaceuticals. To evaluate such effects, three enantiopure stereoisomers of a copper radiopharmaceutical BFC bearing two chiral carbon atoms were synthesized in forms of R,R-, S,S-, and R,S-. Their corresponding peptide conjugates were prepared by coupling with a model peptide sequence, c(RGDyK), which targets the αvβ3 integrin for in vitro and in vivo evaluation of their biological behaviors as compared to the racemic conjugate. Despite the chirality differences, all the conjugates showed a similar in vitro binding affinity profile to the αvβ3 integrin (106, 108, 85 and 100 nM for rac-H2-1, RR-H2-1, SS-H2-1, and RS-H2-1 respectively with all p values > 0.05) and a similar level of in vivo tumor uptake (2.72 ± 0.45, 2.60 ± 0.52, 2.45 ± 0.48 and 2.88 ± 0.59 for rac-(64)Cu-1, RR-(64)Cu-1, SS-(64)Cu-1, and RS-(64)Cu-1 at 1 h p.i. respectively). Furthermore, they demonstrated a nearly identical biodistribution pattern in major organs (e.g. 2.07 ± 0.21, 2.13 ± 0.58, 1.70 ± 0.20 and 1.90 ± 0.46 %ID/g at 24 h p.i. in liver for rac-(64)Cu-1, RR-(64)Cu-1, SS-(64)Cu-1, and RS-(64)Cu-1 respectively; 1.80 ± 0.46, 2.30 ± 1.49, 1.73 ± 0.31 and 2.23 ± 0.71 at 24 h p.i. in kidneys for rac-(64)Cu-1, RR-(64)Cu-1, SS-(64)Cu-1, and RS-(64)Cu-1 respectively). Therefore we conclude that the chirality of BFC plays a negligible role in αvβ3-targeted copper radiopharmaceuticals. However, we believe it is still worthwhile to consider the chirality effects of BFCs on other targeted imaging or therapeutic agents.

  4. Nuclear medicine and imaging research (quantitative studies in radiopharmaceutical science)

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, M.D.; Beck, R.N.

    1990-09-01

    This is a report of progress in Year Two (January 1, 1990--December 31, 1990) of Grant FG02-86ER60438, Quantitative Studies in Radiopharmaceutical Science,'' awarded for the three-year period January 1, 1989--December 31, 1991 as a competitive renewal following site visit in the fall of 1988. This program addresses the problems involving the basic science and technology underlying the physical and conceptual tools of radioactive tracer methodology as they relate to the measurement of structural and functional parameters of physiologic importance in health and disease. The principal tool is quantitative radionuclide imaging. The overall objective of this program is to further the development and transfer of radiotracer methodology from basic theory to routine clinical practice in order that individual patients and society as a whole will receive the maximum net benefit from the new knowledge gained. The focus of the research is on the development of new instruments and radiopharmaceuticals, and the evaluation of these through the phase of clinical feasibility. 25 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Process for producing astatine-211 for radiopharmaceutical use

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzadeh, S.; Lambrecht, R.M.

    1987-07-21

    A one-step chemical manipulation is described in combination with a distillation and collection process for producing At-211 comprising; a. providing a target of irradiated Bismuth coated to a predetermined thickness of a backing member, b. providing a vapor-producing still operably connected with a condenser that has a water cooled condensate collector formed of a dry silica gel mesh maintained at a temperature above the freezing point of water, and providing an effluent gas filter that is operably connected to receive effluent gas from the condenser, c. heating the target in the still at a temperature in the range of about 630/sup 0/-680/sup 0/C for a time period in the range of 50 to 80 minutes, to evole At-211 vapor from the target, c. providing a dry carrier gas having an oxygen concentration that is sufficient to form Bi/sub 2/O/sub 3/ thereby to essentially preclude vaporization of Bi metal, passing the carrier gas through the still to carry the At-211 vapor to the condenser, and to carry effluent from the condenser to the effluent gas filter, e. eluting At-211 from the condensate collector of the condenser with a controlled volume of eluent containing predetermined solvents that are compatible with a given desired radiopharmaceutical procedure, and f. collecting the At-211 in the controlled volume of eluent for use in the given radiopharmaceutical procedure.

  6. HPLC-MS technique for radiopharmaceuticals analysis and quality control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macášek, F.; Búriová, E.; Brúder, P.; Vera-Ruiz, H.

    2003-01-01

    Potentialities of liquid chromatography with mass spectrometric detector (MSD) were investigated with the objective of quality control of radiopharmaceuticals; 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) being an example. Screening of suitable MSD analytical lines is presented. Mass-spectrometric monitoring of acetonitrile— aqueous ammonium formate eluant by negatively charged FDG.HCO2 - ions enables isotope analysis (specific activity) of the radiopharmaceutical at m/z 227 and 226. Kryptofix® 222 provides an intense MSD signal of the positive ion associated with NH4 + at m/z 394. Expired FDG injection samples contain decomposition products from which at least one labelled by 18F and characterised by signal of negative ions at m/z 207 does not correspond to FDG fragments but to C5 decomposition products. A glucose chromatographic peak, characterised by m/z 225 negative ion is accompanied by a tail of a component giving a signal of m/z 227, which can belong to [18O]glucose; isobaric sorbitol signals were excluded but FDG-glucose association occurs in the co-elution of separation of model mixtures. The latter can actually lead to a convoluted chromatographic peak, but the absence of 18F makes this inconsistent. Quantification and validation of the FDG component analysis is under way.

  7. Cyclotron targets and production technologies used for radiopharmaceuticals in NPI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fišer, M.; Kopička, K.; Hradilek, P.; Hanč, P.; Lebeda, O.; Pánek, J.; Vognar, M.

    2003-01-01

    This paper deals with some technical aspects of the development and production of cyclotronmade radiopharmaceuticals (excluding PET). In this field, nuclear chemistry and pharmacy are in a close contact; therefore, requirements of the both should be taken into account. The principles of cyclotron targetry, separation/recovery of materials and synthesis of active substances are given, as well as issues connected with formulation of pharmaceutical forms. As the radiopharmaceuticals should fulfil the requirements on in vivo preparations, there exist a variety of demands pertaining to Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) concept, which is also briefly discussed. A typical production chain is presented and practical examples of real technologies based on cyclotron-made radionuclides are given as they have been used in Nuclear Physics Institute of CAS (NPI). Special attention is devoted to the technology of enriched cyclotron targets. Frequently used medicinal products employing cyclotron-produced active substances are characterised (Rb/Kr generators, 123I-labelled MIBG, OIH and MAB's). The cyclotron produced radioactive implants for transluminal coronary angioplasty (radioactive stents) are introduced as an example of a medical device developed for therapeutic application.

  8. Pharmacokinetics of tilmicosin in beef cattle following intravenous and subcutaneous administration.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, K R; Portillo, T; Hassfurther, R; Hunter, R P

    2011-12-01

    The intravenous pharmacokinetic profile of tilmicosin is yet to be achieved because of the cardiovascular effects of tilmicosin. This study summarizes two pharmacokinetic studies that provided complete pharmacokinetic profile of tilmicosin in cattle. The first study was a pharmacokinetic study of tilmicosin in beef calves dosed by i.v. infusion over 5 h. The second study was a subcutaneous (s.c.) pharmacokinetic study comparing the pharmacokinetic profile of tilmicosin in light (approximately 170 kg) and heavy (approximately 335 kg) beef cattle and comparing the labeled dose range of 10 or 20 mg/kg dose. The data from the two different studies were used to calculate bioavailability values, which support the assumption that tilmicosin is 100% bioavailable in cattle. The results from the second study showed that the weight of an animal when administered tilmicosin does not have a significant effect on exposure, but did demonstrate that doubling the dose of tilmicosin administered doubles the systemic exposure to tilmicosin.

  9. Pharmacokinetics of norfloxacin in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Lepage, J Y; Caillon, J; Malinowsky, J M; Lequerré, S; Cozian, A; Le Normand, Y; Potel, G; Drugeon, H; Baron, D

    1991-01-01

    9 elderly and 9 younger adult patients, with proven post-operative lower urinary tract infection were treated with 400 mg of norfloxacin twice daily for 5 days. Pharmacokinetics of norfloxacin were measured on days 1 and 5. Compared to the younger adult patients, the elderly showed a decreased creatinine clearance and, following the last dose on day 5, an increased maximum plasma concentration of norfloxacin, an increased area under the concentration-time curve and a decreased total body clearance of norfloxacin. These results confirm that in elderly, as in younger adult patients, the pharmacokinetics of norfloxacin can be described by a linear model and accumulation of the drug during repetitive multiple doses is predictable. The differences between the two groups cannot be considered as clinically significant so that no dose change would be required in elderly patients within the range of creatinine clearance studied.

  10. Studies of the pharmacokinetic properties of nimorazole.

    PubMed Central

    Overgaard, J.; Overgaard, M.; Timothy, A. R.

    1983-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of the hypoxic radio-sensitizer nimorazole were studied in 19 individuals after single oral doses of between 0.5-3.5 g. HPLC measurements showed, after a rapid absorption, a linear relationship between peak plasma concentration and given dose. Mean elimination half life was 3.1 h. A tendency to a dose-dependent variation in the apparent volume of distribution, total body clearance and elimination half life suggest non-linear pharmacokinetics of nimorazole. Tumour concentrations measured in 5 patients gave tumour/plasma ratios between 0.8-1.3. No toxicity was observed. The results indicate that nimorazole may have potential as a clinically useful hypoxic radiosensitizer. PMID:6871077

  11. Peptide Based Radiopharmaceuticals: Specific Construct Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Som, P; Rhodes, B A; Sharma, S S

    1997-10-21

    The objective of this project was to develop receptor based peptides for diagnostic imaging and therapy. A series of peptides related to cell adhesion molecules (CAM) and immune regulation were designed for radiolabeling with 99mTc and evaluated in animal models as potential diagnostic imaging agents for various disease conditions such as thrombus (clot), acute kidney failure, and inflection/inflammation imaging. The peptides for this project were designed by the industrial partner, Palatin Technologies, (formerly Rhomed, Inc.) using various peptide design approaches including a newly developed rational computer assisted drug design (CADD) approach termed MIDAS (Metal ion Induced Distinctive Array of Structures). In this approach, the biological function domain and the 99mTc complexing domain are fused together so that structurally these domains are indistinguishable. This approach allows construction of conformationally rigid metallo-peptide molecules (similar to cyclic peptides) that are metabolically stable in-vivo. All the newly designed peptides were screened in various in vitro receptor binding and functional assays to identify a lead compound. The lead compounds were formulated in a one-step 99mTc labeling kit form which were studied by BNL for detailed in-vivo imaging using various animals models of human disease. Two main peptides usingMIDAS approach evolved and were investigated: RGD peptide for acute renal failure and an immunomodulatory peptide derived from tuftsin (RMT-1) for infection/inflammation imaging. Various RGD based metallopeptides were designed, synthesized and assayed for their efficacy in inhibiting ADP-induced human platelet aggregation. Most of these peptides displayed biological activity in the 1-100 µM range. Based on previous work by others, RGD-I and RGD-II were evaluated in animal models of acute renal failure. These earlier studies showed that after acute ischemic injury the renal cortex displays

  12. Pharmacokinetics of cefixime

    SciTech Connect

    Tonelli, A.P.

    1987-01-01

    The serum protein binding of cefixime, was concentration-dependent. Below 30 mcg/mL, free-fractions (fu) of cefixime in dog serum were approximately 8%. As cefixime concentrations increased, concomitant increases in free-fraction were observed. At 328 mcg/mL almost half of the cefixime in serum was not bound. To examine the effect of this concentration-dependent binding on cefixime's pharmacokinetics, four dogs were administered 50 mg/kg of the carbon 14-labeled drug by the oral and intravenous routes. The absolute bioavailability of cefixime was 48.0 +/- 17% (mean +/- SD). Absorption of radioactivity was 51.9 +/- 18%. Cefixime's elimination was a function of its free-fraction in serum and reabsorption of filtered drug by the kidney.

  13. [A new radiopharmaceutical for bone imaging: experimental study of 99mTc-HEDTMP].

    PubMed

    Hu, Shu; Deng, Houfu; Jiang, Shubin; Luo, Shunzhong; Lei, Yong

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to prepare 99mTc-HEDTMP [N-(2-hydroxyethyl) ethlenediamine-1,1,2-tri (methylene phosphonic acid), a new kind of bone seeking compound; to investigate its biological properties; and to explore the possibility of using it as a potential radiopharmaceutical for skeleton scintigraphy. HEDTMP was labeled with 99mTc by "pretinning" method, the radiochemical purity was 97.00% +/- 0.34%. 99mTc-HEDTMP was found to be stable in 5 hours in vitro with the radiochemical purity over 95% even after being diluted by physiological saline with the factor of dilution 100. The plane bone scanning of rabbits showed that 99mTc-HEDTMP was principally absorbed by skeletal system. Skull, spine and legs could be observed clearly, and were more legible than the images of 99mTc-MDP. Mice trial also indicated the high bone seeking of 99mTc-HEDTMP. The skeletal uptake was 11.92% ID/g, 13.19% ID/g, 10.14% ID/g, 10.04% ID/g, 7.71% ID/g separately at 30 minutes, 1 hour, 3 hours, 6 hours and 24 hours after the injection. Kidney seemed to be the major excretory organ. The clearance of blood was quick and the retaining amount in non-target organs was small. These results indicate that 99mTc-HEDTMP can be prepared easily, and its biological properties can be compared favorably with the commonly used bone imaging agent, and it is well worth further researching as a promising potential radiopharmaceutical in nuclide diagnosis for skeleton diseases. PMID:20842850

  14. Pharmacokinetic interactions with thiazolidinediones.

    PubMed

    Scheen, André J

    2007-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a complex disease combining defects in insulin secretion and insulin action. New compounds called thiazolidinediones or glitazones have been developed for reducing insulin resistance. After the withdrawal of troglitazone because of liver toxicity, two compounds are currently used in clinical practice, rosiglitazone and pioglitazone. These compounds are generally used in combination with other pharmacological agents. Because they are metabolised via cytochrome P450 (CYP), glitazones are exposed to numerous pharmacokinetic interactions. CYP2C8 and CYP3A4 are the main isoenzymes catalysing biotransformation of pioglitazone (as with troglitazone), whereas rosiglitazone is metabolised by CYP2C9 and CYP2C8. For both rosiglitazone and pioglitazone, the most relevant interactions have been described in healthy volunteers with rifampicin (rifampin), which results in a significant decrease of area under the plasma concentration-time curve [AUC] (54-65% for rosiglitazone, p<0.001; 54% for pioglitazone, p<0.001), and with gemfibrozil, which results in a significant increase of AUC (130% for rosiglitazone, p<0.001; 220-240% for pioglitazone, p<0.001). The relevance of such drug-drug interactions in patients with type 2 diabetes remains to be evaluated. However, in the absence of clinical data, it is prudent to reduce the dosage of each glitazone by half in patients treated with gemfibrozil. Conversely, rosiglitazone and pioglitazone do not seem to significantly affect the pharmacokinetics of other compounds. Although some food components have also been shown to potentially interfere with drugs metabolised with the CYP system, no published study deals specifically with these possible CYP-mediated food-drug interactions with glitazones.

  15. A method to assess safety and resilience in radiopharmaceuticals production process.

    PubMed

    Grecco, Cláudio H S; Vidal, Mario C R; Santos, Isaac J A L; Carvalho, Paulo V R

    2012-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals are radiation-emitting substances used in medicine for radiotherapy and imaging diagnosis. A Research Institute, located in Rio de Janeiro, produces three radiopharmaceuticals: the sodium iodate is used in the diagnosis of thyroid dysfunctions, the meta-iodo-benzylguanidine is used in the diagnosis of cardiac diseases, and the fluordesoxyglucose is used in diagnosis in cardiology, oncology, neurology and neuropsychiatry. This paper presents a method to access safety and resilience in radiopharmaceuticals production processes. The method uses resilience indicators in order to proactively evaluate and manage the safety.

  16. Pharmacokinetics of pantoprazole in man.

    PubMed

    Huber, R; Hartmann, M; Bliesath, H; Lühmann, R; Steinijans, V W; Zech, K

    1996-05-01

    The proton pump inhibitor pantoprazole is a substituted benzimidazole sulphoxide for the treatment of acid-related gastrointestinal diseases such as reflux esophagitis, duodenal and gastric ulcers. Pantoprazole, administered as a 40 mg enteric coated tablet, is quantitatively absorbed. Its absolute bioavailability is 77% and does not change upon multiple dosing. Following a single oral dose of 40 mg, Cmax is approximately 2.5 mg/l, with a tmax of 2-3 h. The AUC(0,inf.) is approximately 5 mgxh/l. Pantoprazole shows linear pharmacokinetics after both i.v. and oral administration. Pantoprazole is extensively metabolized in the liver, has a total serum clearance of 0.1 l/h/kg, a serum elimination half-life of about 1.1 h, and an apparent volume of distribution of 0.15 l/kg. 98% of pantoprazole is bound to serum proteins. Elimination half-life, clearance and volume of distribution are independent of the dose. The main serum metabolite is formed by demethylation at the 4-position of the pyridine ring, followed by conjugation with sulphate. Almost 80% of an oral or intravenous dose is excreted as metabolites in urine; the remainder is found in feces and originates from biliary secretion. The pharmacokinetics of pantoprazole are unaltered in patients with renal failure. In patients with severe liver cirrhosis, the decreased rate of metabolism results in a half-life of 7-9 h. The clearance of pantoprazole is only slightly affected by age, its half-life being approximately 1.25 h in the elderly. Concomitant intake of food had no influence on the bioavailability of pantoprazole. Pantoprazole showed lack of cytochrome P450 interaction with concomitantly administered drugs in any of the studies conducted to date. Lack of interaction was also demonstrated with a coadministered antacid. The absence of inductive effects on metabolism after chronic administration was first shown by using antipyrine as a probe for mixed functional oxidative cytochrome P450 enzymes. Absence of CYP1A2

  17. Pharmacokinetics of pantoprazole in man.

    PubMed

    Huber, R; Hartmann, M; Bliesath, H; Lühmann, R; Steinijans, V W; Zech, K

    1996-05-01

    The proton pump inhibitor pantoprazole is a substituted benzimidazole sulphoxide for the treatment of acid-related gastrointestinal diseases such as reflux esophagitis, duodenal and gastric ulcers. Pantoprazole, administered as a 40 mg enteric coated tablet, is quantitatively absorbed. Its absolute bioavailability is 77% and does not change upon multiple dosing. Following a single oral dose of 40 mg, Cmax is approximately 2.5 mg/l, with a tmax of 2-3 h. The AUC(O,inf.) is approximately 5 mgxh/l. Pantoprazole shows linear pharmacokinetics after both i.v. and oral administration. Pantoprazole is extensively metabolized in the liver, has a total serum clearance of 0.1 l/h/kg, a serum elimination halflife of about 1.1 h, and an apparent volume of distribution of 0.15 l/kg. 98% of pantoprazole is bound to serum proteins. Elimination half-life, clearance and volume of distribution are independent of the dose. The main serum metabolite is formed by demethylation at the 4-position of the pyridine ring, followed by conjugation with sulphate. Almost 80% of an oral or intravenous dose is excreted as metabolites in urine; the remainder is found in feces and originates from biliary secretion. The pharmacokinetics of pantoprazole are unaltered in patients with renal failure. In patients with severe liver cirrhosis, the decreased rate of metabolism results in a half-life of 7-9 h. The clearance of pantoprazole is only slightly affected by age, its half-life being approximately 1.25 h in the elderly. Concomitant intake of food had no influence on the bioavailability of pantoprazole. Pantoprazole showed lack of cytochrome P450 interaction with concomitantly administered drugs in any of the studies conducted to date. Lack of interaction was also demonstrated with a coadministered antacid. The absence of inductive effects on metabolism after chronic administration was first shown by using antipyrine as a probe for mixed functional oxidative cytochrome P450 enzymes. Absence of CYP1A2

  18. New selenium-75 labeled radiopharmaceuticals: selenonium analogues of dopamine

    SciTech Connect

    Sadek, S.A.; Basmadjian, G.P.; Hsu, P.M.; Rieger, J.A.

    1983-07-01

    Selenium-75 labeled selenonium analogues of dopamine, (2-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)ethyl)dimethylselenonium iodide and its dihydroxy analogue, were prepared by reducing (/sup 75/Se)selenious acid with sodium borohydride at pH 6.0 and reacting the NaSeH produced with 1-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-2-(p-toluenesulfonyloxy)ethane. Tissue distribution studies in rats given the /sup 75/Se-labeled selenonium agents intravenously demonstrated high initial heart uptake. Prolonged adrenal retention and high adrenal to blood ratio of compound 4 were observed. The high uptake and adrenal to blood ratio suggest the potential use of compound 4 as a radiopharmaceutical for the adrenal gland.

  19. Symbol-and-Arrow Diagrams in Teaching Pharmacokinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayton, William L.

    1990-01-01

    Symbol-and-arrow diagrams are helpful adjuncts to equations derived from pharmacokinetic models. Both show relationships among dependent and independent variables. Diagrams show only qualitative relationships, but clearly show which variables are dependent and which are independent, helping students understand complex but important functional…

  20. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, Lakshmi; Cintron, Nitza M.

    1990-01-01

    The Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics Panel met on 29-30 Aug. 1988 at the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston, Texas to discuss pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic implications of space flight and make recommendations for operational and research strategies. Based on the knowledge available on the physiological changes that occur during space flight, the dependence of pharmacokinetics on physiological factors, and the therapeutic requirements for future space missions, the panel made several recommendations for research. It was suggested that using medications available with a large (wide) therapeutic window will avoid unforeseen therapeutic consequences during flight. The sequence for conducting research was outlined as follows: (1) identify ground-based simulation models (e.g., antiorthostatic bed rest) for conducting pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic research; (2) estimate parametric changes in these models using pharmacologic agents that have different pharmacokinetic characteristics and a narrow therapeutic index; (3) verify these findings during flight; and (4) develop and identify appropriate and effective drug delivery systems, dosage forms, and regimens. The panel recommended gaining a thorough understanding of the pharmacokinetic deviations of medications that have a narrow therapeutic index (e.g. cardiovascular drugs and sedative hypnotics) in order to ensure safe and effective treatment during flight with these agents. It was also suggested that basic information on physiological factors such as organ blood flow, protein composition and binding, tissue distribution, and metabolism by hepatic enzymes must be accumulated by conducting ground-based animal and human studies using models of weightlessness. This information will be useful to construct and identify physiologically based pharmacokinetic models that can provide valuable information on the pharmacodynamic consequences of space flight and aid in identifying appropriate therapeutic

  1. Pharmacokinetics of ambroxol and clenbuterol tablets in healthy Chinese volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yong-Ge; Song, Li-Xue; Jiang, Nan; Xu, Xue-Ting; Di, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the pharmacokinetics of Ambroxol and Clenbuterol Tablets in Chinese healthy volunteers after a single or multiple dosages oral administration. Methods: A total of 9 healthy adult subjects were given Ambroxol and Clenbuterol Tablets in a single dosage or multiple dosages respectively. LC/MS/MS were used for the determination of Ambroxol and Clenbuterol of in plasma. The important pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by DAS 2.0 software (compartment model). Results: Single and multiple dosage groups of Ambroxol and Clenbuterol were all fitted two-compartment model. The pharmacokinetics fitted first order kinetics process. No difference in pharmacokinetics of Ambroxol in single and multiple dosage groups volunteers was observed, Which showed no marked changes, suggesting that multiple dosing did not influence the velocity of drug metabolism. Moreover, parameters of Clenbuterol had significant difference between the single and multiple dosage groups (P<0.05), showing there was accumulation in the body. 9 subjects had completed single or multiple dosages oral administration test, with no adverse drug reactions appeared during the test. Conclusion: There was no obvious accumulation of Ambroxol after repeated dosing. But obvious accumulation of Clenbuterol was noted in multiple-dose administration. The established method is sensitive, accurate, reliable and specific, and it can meet the requirement of clinical pharmacokinetic trial. PMID:26770490

  2. Altered biodistribution of radiopharmaceuticals: role of radiochemical/pharmaceutical purity, physiological, and pharmacologic factors.

    PubMed

    Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Killeen, Ronan P; Osborne, Joseph R

    2010-07-01

    One of the most common problems associated with radiopharmaceuticals is an unanticipated or altered biodistribution, which can have a significant clinical impact on safety, scan interpretation, and diagnostic imaging accuracy. In their most extreme manifestations, unanticipated imaging results may even compromise the utility and or accuracy of nuclear medicine studies. We present here an overall summary of altered biodistribution of radiopharmaceuticals with a special emphasis on the molecular mechanisms involved. Important factors affecting the biodistribution of radiopharmaceuticals can be described in 5 major categories and include (1) radiopharmaceutical preparation and formulation problems; (2) problems caused by radiopharmaceutical administration techniques and procedures; (3) by changes in biochemical and pathophysiology; (4) previous medical procedures, such as surgery, radiation therapy and dialysis; and finally (5) by drug interactions. The altered biodistribution of (99m)Tc radiopharmaceuticals are generally associated with increased amounts of (99m)Tc radiochemical impurities, such as free (99m)TcO(4)(-) and particulate impurities, such as (99m)Tc colloids or (99m)Tc-reduced hydrolyzed species. Faulty injection, such as dose infiltration or contamination with antiseptics and aluminum during dose administration, may cause significant artifacts. The patient's own medical problems, such as abnormalities in the regulation of hormone levels; failure in the function of excretory organs and systems, such as hepatobiliary and genitourinary systems; and even simple conditions, such as excessive talking may contribute to altered biodistribution of radiopharmaceuticals. Previous medical procedures (chemotherapy, radiation therapy, dialysis) and drug interaction are the some of the nontechnical factors responsible for unanticipated biodistribution of radiotracers. This review provides a comprehensive summary of various factors and specific examples to illustrate

  3. Applied Pharmacokinetics: Course Description and Retrospective Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Diane E.

    1984-01-01

    An applied course designed to allow students to formulate pharmacokinetic recommendations individually for actual patient data and compare their recommendations to those of a pharmacokinetic consulting service is described and evaluated, and an objective student evaluation method is outlined. (MSE)

  4. USE OF RADIOPHARMACEUTICALS IN DIAGNOSTIC NUCLEAR MEDICINE IN THE UNITED STATES: 1960–2010

    PubMed Central

    Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Brill, Aaron B.; Callahan, Ronald J.; Clanton, Jeffrey A.; DePietro, Allegra; Goldsmith, Stanley J.; Greenspan, Bennett S.; Gross, Milton D.; Hays, Marguerite T.; Moore, Stephen C.; Ponto, James A.; Shreeve, Walton W.; Melo, Dunstana R.; Linet, Martha S.; Simon, Steven L.

    2014-01-01

    To reconstruct reliable nuclear medicine-related occupational radiation doses or doses received as patients from radiopharmaceuticals over the last five decades, we assessed which radiopharmaceuticals were used in different time periods, their relative frequency of use, and typical values of the administered activity. This paper presents data on the changing patterns of clinical use of radiopharmaceuticals and documents the range of activity administered to adult patients undergoing diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures in the U.S. between 1960 and 2010. Data are presented for 15 diagnostic imaging procedures that include thyroid scan and thyroid uptake, brain scan, brain blood flow, lung perfusion and ventilation, bone, liver, hepatobiliary, bone marrow, pancreas, and kidney scans, cardiac imaging procedures, tumor localization studies, localization of gastrointestinal bleeding, and non-imaging studies of blood volume and iron metabolism. Data on the relative use of radiopharmaceuticals were collected using key informant interviews and comprehensive literature reviews of typical administered activities of these diagnostic nuclear medicine studies. Responses of key informants on relative use of radiopharmaceuticals are in agreement with published literature. Results of this study will be used for retrospective reconstruction of occupational and personal medical radiation doses from diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals to members of the U.S. radiologic technologist’s cohort and in reconstructing radiation doses from occupational or patient radiation exposures to other U.S. workers or patient populations. PMID:25811150

  5. Use of radiopharmaceuticals in diagnostic nuclear medicine in the United States: 1960-2010.

    PubMed

    Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Brill, Aaron B; Callahan, Ronald J; Clanton, Jeffrey A; DePietro, Allegra; Goldsmith, Stanley J; Greenspan, Bennett S; Gross, Milton D; Hays, Marguerite T; Moore, Stephen C; Ponto, James A; Shreeve, Walton W; Melo, Dunstana R; Linet, Martha S; Simon, Steven L

    2015-05-01

    To reconstruct reliable nuclear medicine-related occupational radiation doses or doses received as patients from radiopharmaceuticals over the last five decades, the authors assessed which radiopharmaceuticals were used in different time periods, their relative frequency of use, and typical values of the administered activity. This paper presents data on the changing patterns of clinical use of radiopharmaceuticals and documents the range of activity administered to adult patients undergoing diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures in the U.S. between 1960 and 2010. Data are presented for 15 diagnostic imaging procedures that include thyroid scan and thyroid uptake; brain scan; brain blood flow; lung perfusion and ventilation; bone, liver, hepatobiliary, bone marrow, pancreas, and kidney scans; cardiac imaging procedures; tumor localization studies; localization of gastrointestinal bleeding; and non-imaging studies of blood volume and iron metabolism. Data on the relative use of radiopharmaceuticals were collected using key informant interviews and comprehensive literature reviews of typical administered activities of these diagnostic nuclear medicine studies. Responses of key informants on relative use of radiopharmaceuticals are in agreement with published literature. Results of this study will be used for retrospective reconstruction of occupational and personal medical radiation doses from diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals to members of the U.S. radiologic technologists' cohort and in reconstructing radiation doses from occupational or patient radiation exposures to other U.S. workers or patient populations.

  6. Intratumoral Pharmacokinetics: Challenges to Nanobiomaterials.

    PubMed

    Al-Abd, Ahmed M; Al-Abbasi, Fahad A; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2015-01-01

    Resistance of solid tumors to treatment is significantly attributed to pharmacokinetic reasons at both cellular and multi-cellular levels. Anticancer agent must be bio-available at the site of action in a cytotoxic concentration to exert its proposed activity. Solid tumor tissue is characterized by high density of vascular bed however; the vast majority of these blood vessels are not functioning. The vast majority of solid tumors can be described as poorly perfused with blood; and anticancer agents need to penetrate/distribute avascularly within solid tumor micro-milieu. Classic pharmacokinetic parameters correlate drug status within central compartment (blood) to all perfused body tissues according to their degree of perfusion. Yet, these classic pharmacokinetic parameters cannot fully elucidate the intratumoral drug penetration/distribution status of anticancer drugs due to the great discrepancies in perfusion between normal and solid tumor tissues. Herein, we will discuss the recently proposed pharmacokinetic parameters that might accurately portray the distribution of anticancer agents within solid tumor micro-milieu. In addition, we will present the new challenges attributed to these new pharmacokinetic parameters towards designing nanobiomaterial drug delivery system. PMID:26027565

  7. Rabbit as an animal model for intravitreal pharmacokinetics: Clinical predictability and quality of the published data.

    PubMed

    Del Amo, Eva M; Urtti, Arto

    2015-08-01

    Intravitreal administration is the method of choice in drug delivery to the retina and/or choroid. Rabbit is the most commonly used animal species in intravitreal pharmacokinetics, but it has been criticized as being a poor model of human eye. The critique is based on some anatomical differences, properties of the vitreous humor, and observed differences in drug concentrations in the anterior chamber after intravitreal injections. We have systematically analyzed all published information on intravitreal pharmacokinetics in the rabbit and human eye. The analysis revealed major problems in the design of the pharmacokinetic studies. In this review we provide advice for study design. Overall, the pharmacokinetic parameters (clearance, volume of distribution, half-life) in the human and rabbit eye have good correlation and comparable absolute values. Therefore, reliable rabbit-to-man translation of intravitreal pharmacokinetics should be feasible. The relevant anatomical and physiological parameters in rabbit and man show only small differences. Furthermore, the claimed discrepancy between drug concentrations in the human and rabbit aqueous humor is not supported by the data analysis. Based on the available and properly conducted pharmacokinetic studies, the differences in the vitreous structure in rabbits and human patients do not lead to significant pharmacokinetic differences. This review is the first step towards inter-species translation of intravitreal pharmacokinetics. More information is still needed to dissect the roles of drug delivery systems, disease states, age and ocular manipulation on the intravitreal pharmacokinetics in rabbit and man. Anyway, the published data and the derived pharmacokinetic parameters indicate that the rabbit is a useful animal model in intravitreal pharmacokinetics.

  8. Raltegravir Pharmacokinetics during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Watts, D. Heather; Stek, Alice; Best, Brookie M.; Wang, Jiajia; Capparelli, Edmund V.; Cressey, Tim R.; Aweeka, Francesca; Lizak, Patty; Kreitchmann, Regis; Burchett, Sandra K.; Shapiro, David E.; Hawkins, Elizabeth; Smith, Elizabeth; Mirochnick, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Objective We evaluated the pharmacokinetics (pk) of raltegravir in HIV-infected women during pregnancy and postpartum. Methods IMPAACT 1026s is an on-going prospective study of antiretroviral pk during pregnancy (NCT00042289). Women receiving 400 mg raltegravir twice daily in combination antiretroviral therapy had intensive steady state 12-hour pk profiles performed during pregnancy and at 6–12 weeks postpartum. Targets were trough concentration above 0.035 µg/mL, the estimated tenth percentile in non-pregnant historical controls. Results Median raltegravir AUC was 6.6 µg*hr/mL for second trimester (n= 16), 5.4 µg*hr/mL for third trimester (n=41), and 11.6 µg*hr/mL postpartum (n= 38) (p=0.03 pp vs 2nd trimester, p=0.001 pp vs third trimester). Trough concentrations were above the target in 69%, 80%, and 79% of second trimester, third trimester and postpartum subjects respectively, with wide variability (<0.010–0.917 µg/mL), and no significant difference between third trimester and postpartum trough concentrations was detected. The median ratio of cord blood/maternal raltegravir concentrations was 1.5. HIV RNA levels were < 400 copies/mL in 92% of women at delivery. Adverse events included elevated liver transaminases in one woman and vomiting in one. All infants with known status are HIV-uninfected. Conclusions Median raltegravir AUC was reduced by approximately 50% during pregnancy; trough concentrations were frequently below target both during late pregnancy and postpartum. Raltegravir readily crossed the placenta. High rates of viral suppression at delivery and the lack of a clear relationship between raltegravir concentration and virologic effect in nonpregnant adults suggest that despite the decreased exposure during pregnancy, a higher dose is not necessary. PMID:25162818

  9. Pharmacokinetics of mitragynine in man

    PubMed Central

    Trakulsrichai, Satariya; Sathirakul, Korbtham; Auparakkitanon, Saranya; Krongvorakul, Jatupon; Sueajai, Jetjamnong; Noumjad, Nantida; Sukasem, Chonlaphat; Wananukul, Winai

    2015-01-01

    Background Kratom, known botanically as Mitragyna speciosa (Korth.), is an indigenous tree in Southeast Asia. Kratom is currently easily available worldwide via special shops and the Internet to use as a drug of abuse, opioid alternative, or pain killer. So far, the pharmacokinetics of this plant has been studied only in animals, and there is no such study in humans. The major abundant active alkaloid in Kratom, mitragynine, is one of the promising new chemical substances to be developed as a new drug. The aim of this study was to examine the pharmacokinetics of mitragynine and assess the linearity in pharmacokinetics in chronic users. Methods Since Kratom is illegal in Thailand, studies in healthy subjects would be unethical. We therefore conducted a prospective study by enrolling ten chronic, regular, healthy users. We adjusted the steady state in each subject by giving a known amount of Kratom tea for 7 days before commencement of the experiment. We admitted and gave different oral doses to subjects to confirm linearity in pharmacokinetics. The mitragynine blood concentrations at 17 times points and the urine concentrations during the 24-hour period were collected and measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. Results Ten male subjects completed the study without adverse reactions. The median duration of abuse was 1.75 years. We analyzed one subject separately due to the abnormal behavior of blood concentration. From data of nine subjects, the pharmacokinetic parameters established were time to reach the maximum plasma concentration (0.83±0.35 hour), terminal half-life (23.24±16.07 hours), and the apparent volume of distribution (38.04±24.32 L/kg). The urine excretion of unchanged form was 0.14%. The pharmacokinetics were observed to be oral two-compartment model. Conclusion This was the first pharmacokinetic study in humans, which demonstrated linearity and was consistent with the oral two-compartment model with a terminal half

  10. Population Pharmacokinetics and Therapeutic Efficacy of Febuxostat in Patients with Severe Renal Impairment.

    PubMed

    Hira, Daiki; Chisaki, Yugo; Noda, Satoshi; Araki, Hisazumi; Uzu, Takashi; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Yano, Yoshitaka; Morita, Shin-Ya; Terada, Tomohiro

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the influence of severe renal dysfunction (estimated glomerular filtration rate <30 ml/min/1.73 m(2), including hemodialysis) on the pharmacokinetics and therapeutic effects of febuxostat using a population pharmacokinetic analysis. This study recruited patients with hyperuricemia who were initially treated with allopurinol, but were switched to febuxostat, and it consists of 2 sub-studies: a pharmacokinetic study (26 patients) and retrospective efficacy evaluation study (51 patients). The demographic and clinical data of patients were collected from electronic medical records. Plasma febuxostat concentrations were obtained at each hospital visit. Population pharmacokinetic modeling was performed with NONMEM version 7.2. A total of 128 plasma febuxostat concentrations from 26 patients were used in the population pharmacokinetic analysis. The data were best described by a 1-compartment model with first order absorption. Covariate analysis revealed that renal function did not influence the pharmacokinetics of febuxostat, whereas actual body weight significantly influenced apparent clearance and apparent volume of distribution. The retrospective efficacy analysis showed the favorable therapeutic response of febuxostat switched from allopurinol in patients with moderate to severe renal impairment. No serious adverse event associated with febuxostat was observed irrespective of renal function. The population pharmacokinetic analysis and therapeutic analysis of febuxostat revealed that severe renal dysfunction had no influence on the pharmacokinetic parameters of febuxostat. These results suggest that febuxostat is tolerated well by patients with severe renal impairment.

  11. Radiopharmaceutical Therapy in the Era of Precision Medicine*

    PubMed Central

    Sgouros, George; Goldenberg, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Precision medicine is the selection of a treatment modality that is specifically tailored to the genetic and phenotypic characteristics of a particular patient’s disease. In cancer, the objective is to treat with agents that inhibit cell signaling pathways that drive uncontrolled proliferation and dissemination of the disease. To overcome the eventual resistance to pathway inhibition therapy, this treatment modality has been combined with chemotherapy. We propose that pathway inhibition therapy is more rationally combined with radiopharmaceutical therapy (RPT), a cytotoxic treatment that is also targeted. RPT exploits pharmaceuticals that either bind specifically to tumors or accumulate by a broad array of physiological mechanisms indigenous to the neoplastic cells to deliver radiation specifically to these cells. Consistent with pathway inhibition therapy and in contrast to chemotherapy, RPT is well tolerated. However, the potential of RPT has not been fully exploited; for the most part, treatment has been implemented without using the ability to customize RPT by imaging and deriving individual patient tumor and normal organ radiation absorbed doses. These are more closely related to biological response and their determination should enable RPT treatment administration to maximum therapeutic benefit by treating to normal organ tolerance or demonstrating futility via tumor dosimetry. This is the essence of precision medicine. PMID:24953565

  12. Clinically proven radiopharmaceuticals for infection imaging: mechanisms and applications.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, Stanley J; Vallabhajosula, Shankar

    2009-01-01

    Gallium-67 ((67)Ga)-citrate was initially introduced as a tumor imaging agent in the early 1970s, but it was soon recognized that it was useful in the identification of both acute and chronic inflammation. Because of its physical characteristics (multiple gamma photons energy; long half life) and binding to the plasma protein transferrin (resulting in relatively high background and therefore reduced lesion-to-background contrast), it was less than ideal as an imaging agent. Several years later, it became possible to radiolabel leukocytes, which had the advantage of greater specificity for acute infections characterized by a granulocytic response, but had the disadvantage of requiring the removal of blood and isolation of the leukocyte component. Several radiolabeled antibody preparations and a radiolabeled antibacterial agent have been introduced and evaluated, but none of these have been used widely. Most recently, it has been recognized that the use of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose can be used to identify infection/inflammation, probably based on the focal increase in anaerobic glucose metabolism associated with the cellular response. In this work, we review the features of each of these agents and discuss the issues involved in their use as radiopharmaceuticals for the identification of inflammation and/or infection.

  13. Synthesis and biological studies of positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Dischino, D.D.

    1983-01-01

    The development and clinical evaluation of two-positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals designed to image myelin in humans is reported. Carbon-11-labeled benzyl methyl ether was synthesized by the reaction of carbon-11-labeled methanol and benzyl chloride in dimethyl sulfoxide containing powdered potassium hydroxide in a radiochemical yield of 43% and a synthesis and purification time of 40 minutes. Carbon-11-labeled diphenylmethanol was synthesized by the reaction of carbon-11-labeled carbon dioxide and phenyllithium followed by the reduction of the carbon-11-labeled intermediate to diphenylmethanol via lithium aluminum hydride in a radiochemical yield of 71% and a synthesis and purification time of 38 minutes. Carbon-11-labeled benzyl methyl ether and diphenylmethanol were each evaluated as myelin imaging agents in three patients with multiple sclerosis via positron-emission tomography. In two out of three patients studied with carbon-11-labeled benzyl methyl ether, the distribution of activity in the brain was not consistent with local lipid content. A new synthesis of carbon-11-labeled-DL-phenylalanine labeled in the benzylic position and the synthesis of fluorine-18-labeled 1-(2-nitro-1-imidazolyl)-3-fluoro-2-propanol, a potential in vivo marker of hypoxic tissue, are reported.

  14. The Next Generation of Positron Emission Tomography Radiopharmaceuticals in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Samuel L.; Roney, Celeste A.; Daumar, Pierre; Lewis, Jason S.

    2015-01-01

    Although 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) is still the most widely used positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer, there are a few well-known limitations to its use. The last decade has seen the development of new PET probes for in vivo visualization of specific molecular targets, along with important technical advances in the production of positron-emitting radionuclides and their related labeling methods. As such, a broad range of new PET tracers are in preclinical development or have recently entered clinical trials. The topics covered in this review include labeling methods, biological targets, and the most recent preclinical or clinical data of some of the next generation of PET radiopharmaceuticals. This review, which is by no means exhaustive, has been separated into sections related to the PET radionuclide used for radiolabeling: fluorine-18, for the labeling of agents such as FACBC, FDHT, choline, and Galacto-RGD; carbon-11, for the labeling of choline; gallium-68, for the labeling of peptides such as DOTATOC and bombesin analogs; and the long-lived radionuclides iodine-124 and zirconium-89 for the labeling of monoclonal antibodies cG250, and J591 and trastuzumab, respectively. PMID:21624561

  15. The next generation of positron emission tomography radiopharmaceuticals in oncology.

    PubMed

    Rice, Samuel L; Roney, Celeste A; Daumar, Pierre; Lewis, Jason S

    2011-07-01

    Although (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) is still the most widely used positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer, there are a few well-known limitations to its use. The last decade has seen the development of new PET probes for in vivo visualization of specific molecular targets, along with important technical advances in the production of positron-emitting radionuclides and their related labeling methods. As such, a broad range of new PET tracers are in preclinical development or have recently entered clinical trials. The topics covered in this review include labeling methods, biological targets, and the most recent preclinical or clinical data of some of the next generation of PET radiopharmaceuticals. This review, which is by no means exhaustive, has been separated into sections related to the PET radionuclide used for radiolabeling: fluorine-18, for the labeling of agents such as FACBC, FDHT, choline, and Galacto-RGD; carbon-11, for the labeling of choline; gallium-68, for the labeling of peptides such as DOTATOC and bombesin analogs; and the long-lived radionuclides iodine-124 and zirconium-89 for the labeling of monoclonal antibodies cG250, and J591 and trastuzumab, respectively.

  16. AUTOMATION FOR THE SYNTHESIS AND APPLICATION OF PET RADIOPHARMACEUTICALS.

    SciTech Connect

    Alexoff, D.L.

    2001-09-21

    The development of automated systems supporting the production and application of PET radiopharmaceuticals has been an important focus of researchers since the first successes of using carbon-11 (Comar et al., 1979) and fluorine-18 (Reivich et al., 1979) labeled compounds to visualize functional activity of the human brain. These initial successes of imaging the human brain soon led to applications in the human heart (Schelbert et al., 1980), and quickly radiochemists began to see the importance of automation to support PET studies in humans (Lambrecht, 1982; Langstrom et al., 1983). Driven by the necessity of controlling processes emanating high fluxes of 511 KeV photons, and by the tedium of repetitive syntheses for carrying out these human PET investigations, academic and government scientists have designed, developed and tested many useful and novel automated systems in the past twenty years. These systems, originally designed primarily by radiochemists, not only carry out effectively the tasks they were designed for, but also demonstrate significant engineering innovation in the field of laboratory automation.

  17. New SPECT and PET Radiopharmaceuticals for Imaging Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sogbein, Oyebola O.; Pelletier-Galarneau, Matthieu; Schindler, Thomas H.; Wei, Lihui; Wells, R. Glenn; Ruddy, Terrence D.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear cardiology has experienced exponential growth within the past four decades with converging capacity to diagnose and influence management of a variety of cardiovascular diseases. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with technetium-99m radiotracers or thallium-201 has dominated the field; however new hardware and software designs that optimize image quality with reduced radiation exposure are fuelling a resurgence of interest at the preclinical and clinical levels to expand beyond MPI. Other imaging modalities including positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) continue to emerge as powerful players with an expanded capacity to diagnose a variety of cardiac conditions. At the forefront of this resurgence is the development of novel target vectors based on an enhanced understanding of the underlying pathophysiological process in the subcellular domain. Molecular imaging with novel radiopharmaceuticals engineered to target a specific subcellular process has the capacity to improve diagnostic accuracy and deliver enhanced prognostic information to alter management. This paper, while not comprehensive, will review the recent advancements in radiotracer development for SPECT and PET MPI, autonomic dysfunction, apoptosis, atherosclerotic plaques, metabolism, and viability. The relevant radiochemistry and preclinical and clinical development in addition to molecular imaging with emerging modalities such as cardiac MRI and PET-MR will be discussed. PMID:24901002

  18. A broad overview of positron emission tomography radiopharmaceuticals and clinical applications: what is new?

    PubMed

    Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Solnes, Lilja; Vallabhajosula, Brigitte

    2011-07-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) is a rapidly expanding imaging modality, thanks to the availability of compact medical cyclotrons and automated chemistry synthesis modules for the production of PET radiopharmaceuticals. Despite the availability of many radiotracers, [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is currently the most widely used radiopharmaceutical in PET, and the field of molecular imaging is anxiously awaiting the introduction of new PET radiopharmaceuticals for routine clinical use. During the last five years, several proprietary PET radiopharmaceuticals have been developed by major companies, and these new agents are in different stages of clinical evaluation. These new PET drugs are designed for imaging brain beta amyloid, myocardial perfusion, amino acid transport, angiogenesis, and tumor antigen expression. In addition, the National Cancer Institute, Society of Nuclear Medicine Clinical Trials Network, and the American College of Radiology Imaging Network have been conducting multicenter clinical trials with several nonproprietary PET drugs such as sodium [(18)F]fluoride, [(18)F]fluorothymidine, [(18)F]fluoromisonidazole, and (64)Cu-labeled diacetyl-bis (N(4)-methylthiosemicarbazone. All new PET radiopharmaceuticals, like any other drugs, must be manufactured under current good manufacturing practices as required by the Food and Drug Administration before clinical evaluation (phases I, II, and III) and submission of new drug application. This review briefly describes the chemistry, mechanisms(s) of localization, and clinical application of both proprietary and nonproprietary new PET drugs under multicenter clinical evaluation.

  19. Diagnostic and therapeutic potential of new radiopharmaceutical agents in medullary thyroid carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Troncone, L.; Rufini, V.; De Rosa, G.; Testa, A.

    1989-01-01

    Recently developed radiopharmaceuticals have been proposed for imaging medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) with some having therapeutic potential. This study compares the imaging results obtained with radioiodinated meta-iodo-benzylguanidine (MIBG), {sup 99m}Tc (V) DMSA, and {sup 131}I F(ab')2 anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (anti-CEA) in a group of MTC patients. In 23 patients {sup 131}I MIBG imaging showed a high specificity (no false-positive results) but a less satisfactory sensitivity (50%). In 12 patients {sup 99m}Tc (V) DMSA revealed a better sensitivity (77%) but a lower specificity (three false-positive results). Positive results were obtained in two of three patients studied with {sup 131}I F(ab')2 anti-CEA. These data suggest that the highly sensitive {sup 99m}Tc (V) DMSA should be considered as a first choice procedure followed by the highly specific radioiodinated MIBG to confirm the initial results. Since radioiodinated MIBG imaging may have therapeutic usefulness, {sup 131}I MIBG was evaluated in an integrated treatment protocol in four cases of proven MTC. The preliminary results obtained were encouraging.

  20. Biokinetics and dosimetry of target-specific radiopharmaceuticals for molecular imaging and therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferro-Flores, Guillermina; Torres-García, Eugenio; Gonz&Ález-v&Ázquez, Armando; de Murphy, Consuelo Arteaga

    Molecular imaging techniques directly or indirectly monitor and record the spatiotemporal distribution of molecular or cellular processes for biochemical, biologic, diagnostic or therapeutic applications. 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC has shown high stability both in vitro and in vivo and rapid detection of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors. Therapies using radiolabeled anti-CD20 have demonstrated their efficacy in patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). The aim of this study was to establish biokinetic models for 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC and 188Re-anti-CD20 and to evaluate their dosimetry as target-specific radiopharmaceuticals. The OLINDA/EXM code was used to calculate patient-specific internal radiation dose estimates. 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC images showed an average tumor/blood ratio of 4.3±0.7 in receptor-positive tumors with an average effective dose of 4.4 mSv. Dosimetric studies indicated that after administration of 5.8 to 7.5 GBq of 188Re-anti-CD20 the absorbed dose to total body would be 0.75 Gy which corresponds to the recommended dose for NHL therapies.

  1. DOPASCAN Injection ([{sup 123}I]{beta}-CIT): A radiopharmaceutical with potential for the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Nowotnik, D. P.

    1999-06-10

    In conjunction with single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT), the radiopharmaceutical [{sup 123}I]{beta}-CIT (DOPASCAN Injection) has demonstrated significant potential for the early diagnosis and monitoring of Parkinson's Disease. Well over 2000 patients worldwide have been studied with this product, which has completed phase II clinical studies. This review summarizes the development and clinical application of this new radiopharmaceutical product.

  2. Pharmacokinetics of sevoflurane uptake into the brain.

    PubMed

    Turner, M J; McCulloch, T J; Kennedy, R R; Baker, A B

    2004-12-01

    Two recent studies have examined the pharmacokinetics of sevoflurane in adults. Lu et al.(Pharmacokinetics of sevoflurane uptake into the brain and body, Anaesthesia 2003; 58: 951-6) observed that jugular bulb sevoflurane concentration initially rose unexpectedly rapidly and then approached arterial concentrations unexpectedly slowly, suggesting that a blood-brain diffusion barrier exists. They also observed a large alveolar-arterial sevoflurane gradient, suggesting that an alveolar-arterial diffusion barrier exists. Nakamura et al. (Predicted sevoflurane partial pressure in the brain with an uptake and distribution model: Comparison with the measured value in internal jugular vein blood. Journal of Clinical Monitoring and Computing 1999; 15: 299-305) found no diffusion barriers. We used a computer model to analyse both data sets and show that the observations of Lu et al. can be explained by contamination of jugular samples with extracerebral blood. It is possible that the alveolar-arterial gradients observed by Lu et al. are due to discrepancies in conversions between blood concentrations and gas partial pressures. Our study suggests that there is no blood-brain diffusion barrier for sevoflurane and that the data of Lu et al. must be interpreted with caution.

  3. [Interspecies differences of noopept pharmacokinetics].

    PubMed

    Boĭko, S S; Korotkov, S A; Zherdev, V P; Gudasheva, T A; Ostrovskaia, R U; Voronina, T A

    2004-01-01

    Significant interspecific differences in the pharmacokinetics of noopept are manifested by a decrease in the drug elimination rate on the passage from rats to rabbits and humans. Very intensive metabolism of noopept was observed upon intravenous administration in rats. In these animals, presystemic elimination mechanisms lead to the formation of a specific metabolite representing a product of drug biotransformation hydroxylated at the phenyl ring. In rabbits, unchanged noopept circulates in the blood for a longer time upon both intravenous and peroral introduction, biotransformation proceeds at a much slower rate, and no metabolites analogous to that found in rats are detected. The noopept pharmacokinetics in humans differs from that in animals by still slower elimination and considerable individual variability. No drug metabolites are found in the human blood plasma, probably because of a relatively small dose and low concentration. PMID:15079908

  4. Radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis. [Final] report, 1 January 1991--31 December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, D.E.

    1993-06-01

    Since 1987, this grant has supported the development of new radiochemical methods for use with short-lived, positron-emitting radionuclides; new laboratory techniques for radiochemical syntheses; and development of new radiopharmaceuticals which will be of use in Positron Emission Tomography. For the period 1 January 1991 to 31 December 1993, the authors have continued their efforts in all of these areas, as they feel that an integrated approach to the synthesis and characterization of new PET Radiopharmaceuticals is crucial to the continued growth and application of this imaging technique in modern medicine. Progress in a number of these areas is described in this report.

  5. Pharmacokinetics and RC Circuit Concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cock, Mieke De; Janssen, Paul

    2013-11-01

    Most introductory physics courses include a chapter on RC circuits in which the differential equations for the charging and discharging of a capacitor are derived. A number of papers in this journal describe lab experiments dealing with the measurement of different parameters in such RC circuits. In this contribution, we report on a lab experiment we developed for students majoring in pharmacy, using RC circuits to simulate a pharmacokinetic process.

  6. Population Pharmacokinetics of Intranasal Scopolamine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, L.; Chow, D. S. L.; Putcha, L.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: An intranasal gel dosage formulation of scopolamine (INSCOP) was developed for the treatment of Space Motion Sickness (SMS).The bioavailability and pharmacokinetics (PK) was evaluated using data collected in Phase II IND protocols. We reported earlier statistically significant gender differences in PK parameters of INSCOP at a dose level of 0.4 mg. To identify covariates that influence PK parameters of INSCOP, we examined population covariates of INSCOP PK model for 0.4 mg dose. Methods: Plasma scopolamine concentrations versus time data were collected from 20 normal healthy human subjects (11 male/9 female) after a 0.4 mg dose. Phoenix NLME was employed for PK analysis of these data using gender, body weight and age as covariates for model selection. Model selection was based on a likelihood ratio test on the difference of criteria (-2LL). Statistical significance for base model building and individual covariate analysis was set at P less than 0.05{delta(-2LL)=3.84}. Results: A one-compartment pharmacokinetic model with first-order elimination best described INSCOP concentration ]time profiles. Inclusion of gender, body weight and age as covariates individually significantly reduced -2LL by the cut-off value of 3.84(P less than 0.05) when tested against the base model. After the forward stepwise selection and backward elimination steps, gender was selected to add to the final model which had significant influence on absorption rate constant (ka) and the volume of distribution (V) of INSCOP. Conclusion: A population pharmacokinetic model for INSCOP has been identified and gender was a significant contributing covariate for the final model. The volume of distribution and Ka were significantly higher in males than in females which confirm gender-dependent pharmacokinetics of scopolamine after administration of a 0.4 mg dose.

  7. Pharmacokinetics of drugs in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Feghali, Maisa; Venkataramanan, Raman; Caritis, Steve

    2015-11-01

    Pregnancy is a complex state where changes in maternal physiology have evolved to favor the development and growth of the placenta and the fetus. These adaptations may affect preexisting disease or result in pregnancy-specific disorders. Similarly, variations in physiology may alter the pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics that determines drug dosing and effect. It follows that detailed pharmacologic information is required to adjust therapeutic treatment strategies during pregnancy. Understanding both pregnancy physiology and the gestation-specific pharmacology of different agents is necessary to achieve effective treatment and limit maternal and fetal risk. Unfortunately, most drug studies have excluded pregnant women based on often-mistaken concerns regarding fetal risk. Furthermore, over two-thirds of women receive prescription drugs while pregnant, with treatment and dosing strategies based on data from healthy male volunteers and non-pregnant women, and with little adjustment for the complex physiology of pregnancy and its unique disease states. This review will describe basic concepts in pharmacokinetics and their clinical relevance and highlight the variations in pregnancy that may impact the pharmacokinetic properties of medications.

  8. Studying the General Toxicity and Cumulative Properties of a Radiopharmaceutical Nanocolloid, (99m)Tc-Al2O3.

    PubMed

    Varlamova, N V; Churin, A A; Fomina, T I; Ermolaeva, L A; Vetoshkina, T V; Dubskaya, T Yu; Lamzina, T Yu; Fedorova, E P; Neupokoeva, O V; Skuridin, V S; Nesterov, E A; Larionova, L A; Chernov, V I

    2016-07-01

    We studied toxicity of a new Russian radiopharmaceutical Nanocolloid, (99m)Tc-Al2O3. Tests for acute toxicity showed that this agent belongs to a class of moderate-toxicity substances and does not have cumulative properties. The evaluation of subchronic toxicity after subcutaneous injection of this product to rats (0.04, 0.2, and 0.4 ml/kg) and rabbits (0.02 and 0.2 ml/kg) for 7 days did not reveal changes in the general state, temperature, body weight, indices of the peripheral blood and bone marrow, functions of the heart, liver, kidneys, and nervous system, and morphological characteristics of the internal organs in animals. The drug does not produce a local irritant effect. PMID:27502539

  9. Performance of a Lanthanum Bromide Detector and a New Conception Collimator for Radiopharmaceuticals Molecular Imaging in Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Pani, Roberto; Pellegrini, Rosanna; Bennati, Paolo; Cinti, Maria Nerina; Scafe, Raffaele; De Vincentis, Giuseppe; Navarria, Francesco; Moschini, Giuliano; Rossi, Paolo; Cencelli, Valentino Orsolini; De Notaristefani, Francesco

    2009-03-10

    We have realized and tested a new-design compact gamma camera for high resolution SPET (Single Photon Emission Tomography), and small animals' radio-pharmaceutical molecular imaging. The camera is based on a 'continuous' Lanthanum tri-Bromide crystal, and a new Low Energy (LE) collimator. The crystal is interfaced to a 2x2 array of Hamamatsu-H8500 position sensitive photo-multipliers. The lead collimator features parallel hexagonal 1.0 mm holes, 18 mm length, 0.2 mm septa and 10x10 cm{sup 2} detection area. It was newly designed to fully exploit the high spatial resolution a Lanthanum crystal may provide. To better evaluate its role, we have compared our camera to three other systems with similar crystals and photomultipliers, but employing traditional collimators, either pinhole or parallel. The new camera seems to be complementary to pinhole systems and shows a very attractive trade-off between spatial resolution and detection area.

  10. Performance of a Lanthanum Bromide Detector and a New Conception Collimator for Radiopharmaceuticals Molecular Imaging in Oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, Roberto; Pellegrini, Rosanna; Bennati, Paolo; Cinti, Maria Nerina; Scafè, Raffaele; De Vincentis, Giuseppe; Navarria, Francesco; Moschini, Giuliano; Cencelli, Valentino Orsolini; De Notaristefani, Francesco; Rossi, Paolo

    2009-03-01

    We have realized and tested a new-design compact gamma camera for high resolution SPET (Single Photon Emission Tomography), and small animals' radio-pharmaceutical molecular imaging. The camera is based on a "continuous" Lanthanum tri-Bromide crystal, and a new Low Energy (LE) collimator. The crystal is interfaced to a 2×2 array of Hamamatsu-H8500 position sensitive photo-multipliers. The lead collimator features parallel hexagonal 1.0 mm holes, 18 mm length, 0.2 mm septa and 10×10 cm2 detection area. It was newly designed to fully exploit the high spatial resolution a Lanthanum crystal may provide. To better evaluate its role, we have compared our camera to three other systems with similar crystals and photomultipliers, but employing traditional collimators, either pinhole or parallel. The new camera seems to be complementary to pinhole systems and shows a very attractive trade-off between spatial resolution and detection area.

  11. Pharmacokinetic interactions of cimetidine 1987.

    PubMed

    Somogyi, A; Muirhead, M

    1987-05-01

    The number of studies on drug interactions with cimetidine has increased at a rapid rate over the past 5 years, with many of the interactions being solely pharmacokinetic in origin. Very few studies have investigated the clinical relevance of such pharmacokinetic interactions by measuring pharmacodynamic responses or clinical endpoints. Apart from pharmacokinetic studies, invariably conducted in young, healthy subjects, there have been a large number of in vitro and in vivo animal studies, case reports, clinical observations and general reviews on the subject, which is tending to develop an industry of its own accord. Nevertheless, where specific mechanisms have been considered, these have undoubtedly increased our knowledge on the way in which humans eliminate xenobiotics. There is now sufficient information to predict the likelihood of a pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction with cimetidine and to make specific clinical recommendations. Pharmacokinetic drug interactions with cimetidine occur at the sites of gastrointestinal absorption and elimination including metabolism and excretion. Cimetidine has been found to reduce the plasma concentrations of ketoconazole, indomethacin and chlorpromazine by reducing their absorption. In the case of ketoconazole the interaction was clinically important. Cimetidine does not inhibit conjugation mechanisms including glucuronidation, sulphation and acetylation, or deacetylation or ethanol dehydrogenation. It binds to the haem portion of cytochrome P-450 and is thus an inhibitor of phase I drug metabolism (i.e. hydroxylation, dealkylation). Although generally recognised as a nonspecific inhibitor of this type of metabolism, cimetidine does demonstrate some degree of specificity. To date, theophylline 8-oxidation, tolbutamide hydroxylation, ibuprofen hydroxylation, misonidazole demethylation, carbamazepine epoxidation, mexiletine oxidation and steroid hydroxylation have not been shown to be inhibited by cimetidine in humans but

  12. Lutetium-177 DOTATATE Production with an Automated Radiopharmaceutical Synthesis System

    PubMed Central

    Aslani, Alireza; Snowdon, Graeme M; Bailey, Dale L; Schembri, Geoffrey P; Bailey, Elizabeth A; Pavlakis, Nick; Roach, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy (PRRT) with yttrium-90 (90Y) and lutetium-177 (177Lu)-labelled SST analogues are now therapy option for patients who have failed to respond to conventional medical therapy. In-house production with automated PRRT synthesis systems have clear advantages over manual methods resulting in increasing use in hospital-based radiopharmacies. We report on our one year experience with an automated radiopharmaceutical synthesis system. Methods: All syntheses were carried out using the Eckert & Ziegler Eurotope’s Modular-Lab Pharm Tracer® automated synthesis system. All materials and methods used were followed as instructed by the manufacturer of the system (Eckert & Ziegler Eurotope, Berlin, Germany). Sterile, GMP-certified, no-carrier added (NCA) 177Lu was used with GMP-certified peptide. An audit trail was also produced and saved by the system. The quality of the final product was assessed after each synthesis by ITLC-SG and HPLC methods. Results: A total of 17 [177Lu]-DOTATATE syntheses were performed between August 2013 and December 2014. The amount of radioactive [177Lu]-DOTATATE produced by each synthesis varied between 10-40 GBq and was dependant on the number of patients being treated on a given day. Thirteen individuals received a total of 37 individual treatment administrations in this period. There were no issues and failures with the system or the synthesis cassettes. The average radiochemical purity as determined by ITLC was above 99% (99.8 ± 0.05%) and the average radiochemical purity as determined by HPLC technique was above 97% (97.3 ± 1.5%) for this period. Conclusions: The automated synthesis of [177Lu]-DOTATATE using Eckert & Ziegler Eurotope’s Modular-Lab Pharm Tracer® system is a robust, convenient and high yield approach to the radiolabelling of DOTATATE peptide benefiting from the use of NCA 177Lu and almost negligible radiation exposure of the operators. PMID:27408890

  13. Development of more efficacious Tc-99m organ imaging agents for use in nuclear medicine by characterization of radiopharmaceuticals. Final report, September 1, 1992--June 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Heineman, W.R.; Seliskar, C.J.

    1998-08-04

    The primary goals of this project were twofold: (1) Development of a microsensor that would demonstrate the capability for in vivo monitoring of a radiopharmaceutical after its injection into a test animal; and (2) Exploration of capillary electrophoresis (CE) as a separation technique for the analysis of radiopharmaceuticals that are mixtures of different compounds. The combination of in vivo sensors for real-time monitoring of specific chemical states of a radiopharmaceutical in individual organs and CE for analysis of radiopharmaceuticals prior to injection would provide valuable information regarding the fate of an imaging agent after administration. Such information should give insight into strategies for the development of more efficacious radiopharmaceuticals.

  14. Low energy cyclotron production and separation of yttrium-86 for evaluation of monoclonal antibody pharmacokinetics and dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Shoner, S.; Link, J.; Krohn, K.; Schlyer, D.

    1999-06-01

    Although an excellent radionuclide for application to systemic isotopic therapy when complexed to various monoclonal antibodies, the lack of photon emission from yttrium-90 makes the determination of the pharmacokinetics and dosimetry of the resultant radiopharmaceutical difficult. The introduction of the positron-emitting radionuclide yttrium-86 (T{sub 1/2}=14.7&hthinsp;h,&hthinsp;{beta}{sup +}=33{percent}) provides the non-invasive quantitation for the biodistribution of the chelated complex. The yttrium-86 radionuclide is produced at Memorial Sloan-Kettering using the CS-15 cyclotron via the (p,n) nuclear reaction on an enriched strontium-86 target. The separation is effectively achieved through a combination of solvent extraction and ion exchange chromatography. Once investigational new drug approval has been received, the mixed nuclides, Y-90 and Y-86, are to be used to formulate the HuM195 labeled monoclonal antibody, a radiopharmaceutical under active investigation against hematopoietic progenitor cells. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Optimizing nanomedicine pharmacokinetics using physiologically based pharmacokinetics modelling

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Darren Michael; Siccardi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The delivery of therapeutic agents is characterized by numerous challenges including poor absorption, low penetration in target tissues and non-specific dissemination in organs, leading to toxicity or poor drug exposure. Several nanomedicine strategies have emerged as an advanced approach to enhance drug delivery and improve the treatment of several diseases. Numerous processes mediate the pharmacokinetics of nanoformulations, with the absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination (ADME) being poorly understood and often differing substantially from traditional formulations. Understanding how nanoformulation composition and physicochemical properties influence drug distribution in the human body is of central importance when developing future treatment strategies. A helpful pharmacological tool to simulate the distribution of nanoformulations is represented by physiologically based pharmacokinetics (PBPK) modelling, which integrates system data describing a population of interest with drug/nanoparticle in vitro data through a mathematical description of ADME. The application of PBPK models for nanomedicine is in its infancy and characterized by several challenges. The integration of property–distribution relationships in PBPK models may benefit nanomedicine research, giving opportunities for innovative development of nanotechnologies. PBPK modelling has the potential to improve our understanding of the mechanisms underpinning nanoformulation disposition and allow for more rapid and accurate determination of their kinetics. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge of nanomedicine distribution and the use of PBPK modelling in the characterization of nanoformulations with optimal pharmacokinetics. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Nanomedicine. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-17 PMID:24467481

  16. Harvard-MIT research program in short-lived radiopharmaceuticals. Technical progress report, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Adelstein, S.J.

    1991-12-31

    This report presents research on radiopharmaceuticals. The following topics are discussed: antibody labeling with positron-emitting radionuclides; antibody modification for radioimmune imaging; labeling antibodies; evaluation of technetium acetlyacetonates as potential cerebral blood flow agents; and studies in technetium chemistry. (CBS)

  17. Rhenium-188 and copper-67 radiopharmaceuticals for the treatment of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Frier, Malcolm

    2004-01-01

    The favourable nuclear properties of copper-67 and rhenium-188 for therapeutic application are described, together with methods for the chemical synthesis of a number of derivatives. Survival from invasive bladder cancer has changed little over the past 20 years. The intravesicular administration of Cu-67 or Re-188 radiopharmaceuticals in the treatment of bladder cancer offers some promise for improvement in this situation.

  18. Systemic metabolic radiopharmaceutical therapy in the treatment of metastatic bone pain.

    PubMed

    Paes, Fabio M; Serafini, Aldo N

    2010-03-01

    Bone pain due to skeletal metastases constitutes the most common type of chronic pain among patients with cancer. It significantly decreases the patient's quality of life and is associated with comorbidities, such as hypercalcemia, pathologic fractures and spinal cord compression. Approximately 65% of patients with prostate or breast cancer and 35% of those with advanced lung, thyroid, and kidney cancers will have symptomatic skeletal metastases. The management of bone pain is extremely difficult and involves a multidisciplinary approach, which usually includes analgesics, hormone therapies, bisphosphonates, external beam radiation, and systemic radiopharmaceuticals. In patients with extensive osseous metastases, systemic radiopharmaceuticals should be the preferred adjunctive therapy for pain palliation. In this article, we review the current approved radiopharmaceutical armamentarium for bone pain palliation, focusing on indications, patient selection, efficacy, and different biochemical characteristics and toxicity of strontium-89 chloride, samarium-153 lexidronam, and rhenium-186 etidronate. A brief discussion on the available data on rhenium-188 is presented focusing on its major advantages and disadvantages. We also perform a concise appraisal of the other available treatment options, including pharmacologic and hormonal treatment modalities, external beam radiation, and bisphosphonates. Finally, the available data on combination therapy of radiopharmaceuticals with bisphosphonates or chemotherapy are discussed. PMID:20113678

  19. Synthesis and radioiodination of ergoline derivatives: potential in-vivo dopamine receptor site mapping radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhail, E.A.

    1985-01-01

    The need of a dopamine-receptor based radiopharmaceutical for brain imaging is apparent. If such an agent is made available to physicians, it could provide means for detecting brain tumors, and diagnose such mental disorders as parkinsonism, schizophrenia and psychosis. Currently, such agents are yet to be discovered. Procedures were developed to synthesize and label four ergoline derivatives which could potentially exhibit affinity to dopamine receptors. Labelling with /sup 125/I was accomplished in some cases by displacing a suitably positioned leaving group with /sup 125/I-anion, while in other cases iodine exchange procedures were utilized. Formulations of the labeled derivatives were achieved via the formation of their water soluble tartarate salts. Biodistribution studies in mature Sprague-Dawley rats showed that of the four radioactive compounds injected, the highest uptake in the brain and adrenals was achieved with 8 ..beta..-(I-125)-iodomethyl-6-propylergoline. In addition, high target/nontarget ratios were obtained with the above mentioned compound. On the other hand, the least brain and adrenal uptake as well as the lowest target/nontarget ratios were exhibited by 8 ..beta..-(I-125)-(p-iodobenzenesulfonyl)-lysergol presumably due to its in-vivo instability. A comparative biodistribution study for ergoline derivatives and N-isopropyl-(I-123)-p-iodoamphetamine was conducted. The biodistribution studies showed that the brain to blood ratio for the ergoline derivative 8 ..beta..-(I-125)-iodomethyl-6-propylergoline to be very close to that for /sup 125/I-IMP at 1 minute after dose administration. However after 15 minutes the brain/blood ratio of compound XLVI was half the value of /sup 123/I-IMP. Different mechanisms of brain influx and efflux are known to occur with the amphetamine and ergoline derivatives.

  20. An integrated pharmacokinetics ontology and corpus for text mining

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Drug pharmacokinetics parameters, drug interaction parameters, and pharmacogenetics data have been unevenly collected in different databases and published extensively in the literature. Without appropriate pharmacokinetics ontology and a well annotated pharmacokinetics corpus, it will be difficult to develop text mining tools for pharmacokinetics data collection from the literature and pharmacokinetics data integration from multiple databases. Description A comprehensive pharmacokinetics ontology was constructed. It can annotate all aspects of in vitro pharmacokinetics experiments and in vivo pharmacokinetics studies. It covers all drug metabolism and transportation enzymes. Using our pharmacokinetics ontology, a PK-corpus was constructed to present four classes of pharmacokinetics abstracts: in vivo pharmacokinetics studies, in vivo pharmacogenetic studies, in vivo drug interaction studies, and in vitro drug interaction studies. A novel hierarchical three level annotation scheme was proposed and implemented to tag key terms, drug interaction sentences, and drug interaction pairs. The utility of the pharmacokinetics ontology was demonstrated by annotating three pharmacokinetics studies; and the utility of the PK-corpus was demonstrated by a drug interaction extraction text mining analysis. Conclusions The pharmacokinetics ontology annotates both in vitro pharmacokinetics experiments and in vivo pharmacokinetics studies. The PK-corpus is a highly valuable resource for the text mining of pharmacokinetics parameters and drug interactions. PMID:23374886

  1. Population Pharmacokinetics of Abacavir in Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Treluyer, Jean-Marc; Préta, Laure-Helene; Valade, Elodie; Pannier, Emmanuelle; Urien, Saik; Hirt, Déborah

    2014-01-01

    For the first time, a population approach was used to describe abacavir (ABC) pharmacokinetics in HIV-infected pregnant and nonpregnant women. A total of 266 samples from 150 women were obtained. No covariate effect (from age, body weight, pregnancy, or gestational age) on ABC pharmacokinetics was found. Thus, it seems unnecessary to adapt the ABC dosing regimen during pregnancy. PMID:25070097

  2. COMPUTATIONAL PHARMACOKINETICS DURING DEVELOPMENTAL WINDOWS OF SUSPECTIBILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    Computational modeling has an increasing role in analyses of biological effects including how the body handles chemicals (i.e. pharmacokinetics or toxicokinetics) and how the body responds to chemicals (i.e. pharmacodynamics or toxicodynamics). Pharmacokinetic mo...

  3. Drug Transport and Pharmacokinetics for Chemical Engineers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Laurent; Kanneganti, Kumud; Kim, Kwang Seok

    2010-01-01

    Experiments in continuous-stirred vessels were proposed to introduce methods in pharmacokinetics and drug transport to chemical engineering students. The activities can be incorporated into the curriculum to illustrate fundamentals learned in the classroom. An appreciation for the role of pharmacokinetics in drug discovery will also be gained…

  4. Pharmaceutical and clinical development of phosphonate-based radiopharmaceuticals for the targeted treatment of bone metastases.

    PubMed

    Lange, Rogier; Ter Heine, Rob; Knapp, Russ Ff; de Klerk, John M H; Bloemendal, Haiko J; Hendrikse, N Harry

    2016-10-01

    Therapeutic phosphonate-based radiopharmaceuticals radiolabeled with beta, alpha and conversion electron emitting radioisotopes have been investigated for the targeted treatment of painful bone metastases for >35years. We performed a systematic literature search and focused on the pharmaceutical development, preclinical research and early human studies of these radiopharmaceuticals. The characteristics of an ideal bone-targeting therapeutic radiopharmaceutical are presented and compliance with these criteria by the compounds discussed is verified. The importance of both composition and preparation conditions for the stability and biodistribution of several agents is discussed. Very few studies have described the characterization of these products, although knowledge on the molecular structure is important with respect to in vivo behavior. This review discusses a total of 91 phosphonate-based therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals, of which only six agents have progressed to clinical use. Extensive clinical studies have only been described for (186)Re-HEDP, (188)Re-HEDP and (153)Sm-EDTMP. Of these, (153)Sm-EDTMP represents the only compound with worldwide marketing authorization. (177)Lu-EDTMP has recently received approval for clinical use in India. This review illustrates that a thorough understanding of the radiochemistry of these agents is required to design simple and robust preparation and quality control methods, which are needed to fully exploit the potential benefits of these theranostic radiopharmaceuticals. Extensive biodistribution and dosimetry studies are indispensable to provide the portfolios that are required for assessment before human administration is possible. Use of the existing knowledge collected in this review should guide future research efforts and may lead to the approval of new promising agents. PMID:27496068

  5. Pharmaceutical and clinical development of phosphonate-based radiopharmaceuticals for the targeted treatment of bone metastases.

    PubMed

    Lange, Rogier; Ter Heine, Rob; Knapp, Russ Ff; de Klerk, John M H; Bloemendal, Haiko J; Hendrikse, N Harry

    2016-10-01

    Therapeutic phosphonate-based radiopharmaceuticals radiolabeled with beta, alpha and conversion electron emitting radioisotopes have been investigated for the targeted treatment of painful bone metastases for >35years. We performed a systematic literature search and focused on the pharmaceutical development, preclinical research and early human studies of these radiopharmaceuticals. The characteristics of an ideal bone-targeting therapeutic radiopharmaceutical are presented and compliance with these criteria by the compounds discussed is verified. The importance of both composition and preparation conditions for the stability and biodistribution of several agents is discussed. Very few studies have described the characterization of these products, although knowledge on the molecular structure is important with respect to in vivo behavior. This review discusses a total of 91 phosphonate-based therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals, of which only six agents have progressed to clinical use. Extensive clinical studies have only been described for (186)Re-HEDP, (188)Re-HEDP and (153)Sm-EDTMP. Of these, (153)Sm-EDTMP represents the only compound with worldwide marketing authorization. (177)Lu-EDTMP has recently received approval for clinical use in India. This review illustrates that a thorough understanding of the radiochemistry of these agents is required to design simple and robust preparation and quality control methods, which are needed to fully exploit the potential benefits of these theranostic radiopharmaceuticals. Extensive biodistribution and dosimetry studies are indispensable to provide the portfolios that are required for assessment before human administration is possible. Use of the existing knowledge collected in this review should guide future research efforts and may lead to the approval of new promising agents.

  6. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for lactational transfer of Na-131I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Anita Loretta

    The excretion of radionuclides in human breast milk after administration of radiopharmaceuticals is a concern as a radiation risk to nursing infants. It is not uncommon to administer radiopharmaceuticals to lactating patients due to emergency nuclear medicine investigations such as thyroid complications, kidney failure, and pulmonary embolism. There is a need to quantify the amount of radioactivity translocated into breast milk in cases of ingestion by a breast-fed infant. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model (PBPK) and a modified International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) model have been developed to predict iodine concentrations in breast milk after ingestion of radioiodine by the mother. In the PBPK model, all compartments are interconnected by blood flow and represent real anatomic tissue regions in the body. All parameters involved are measurable values with physiological or physiochemical meaning such as tissue masses, blood flow rates, partition coefficients and cardiac output. However, some of the parameters such as the partition coefficients and metabolic constants are not available for iodine and had to be inferred from other information. The structure of the PBPK model for the mother consists of the following tissue compartments: gastrointestinal tract, blood, kidney, thyroid, milk, and other tissues. With the exception of the milk compartment, the model for the nursing infant is structured similarly to the mother. The ICRP model describing iodine metabolism in a standard 70-kg man was modified to represent iodine metabolism in a lactating woman and nursing infant. The parameters involved in this model are transfer rates and biological half-lives which are based on experimental observations. The results of the PBPK model and the modified ICRP model describing the lactational transfer of iodine were compared. When administering 1 mCi of Na131I to the lactating mother, the concentration reaches a maximum of 0.1 mCi/liter in 24

  7. [Amikacin pharmacokinetics in adults: a variability that question the dose calculation based on weight].

    PubMed

    Bourguignon, Laurent; Goutelle, Sylvain; Gérard, Cécile; Guillermet, Anne; Burdin de Saint Martin, Julie; Maire, Pascal; Ducher, Michel

    2009-01-01

    The use of amikacin is difficult because of its toxicity and its pharmacokinetic variability. This variability is almost ignored in adult standard dosage regimens since only the weight is used in the dose calculation. Our objective is to test if the pharmacokinetic of amikacin can be regarded as homogenous, and if the method for calculating the dose according to patients' weight is appropriate. From a cohort of 580 patients, five groups of patients were created by statistical data partitioning. A population pharmacokinetic analysis was performed in each group. The adult population is not homogeneous in term of pharmacokinetics. The doses required to achieve a maximum concentration of 60 mg/L are strongly different (585 to 1507 mg) between groups. The exclusive use of the weight to calculate the dose of amikacine appears inappropriate for 80% of the patients, showing the limits of the formulae for calculating doses of aminoglycosides.

  8. Pharmacokinetics of oxfendazole in sheep.

    PubMed

    Marriner, S E; Bogan, J A

    1981-07-01

    Pharmacokinetics of oxfendazole and its sulfone metabolite were determined in 6 sheep. Oxfendazole achieved mean peak plasma concentrations of 0.76 micrograms/ml at 30 hours after oral administration of oxfendazole (10 mg/kg of body weight), and concentrations were detectable for up to 7 days after administration. Mean peak abomasal concentrations of 3.55 micrograms/ml occurred 20 hours after administration and were detectable up to 9 days after administration. Concentrations of sulfone in plasma and abomasal fluid were generally lower than were those of oxfendazole.

  9. Effect of cyclodextrin complexation on the in vivo disposition of the brain imaging radiopharmaceutical 99mTechnetium ethyl cysteinate dimer (99mTc-ECD).

    PubMed

    Oliver, D W; Dormehl, I C; Louw, W; Kilian, E; de Beco, V; Morretti, J L

    2000-08-01

    The brain imaging radiopharmaceutical, 99mTechnetium ethyl cysteinate dimer (99mTc-ECD, 99mTc-bicisate) is the most recent addition to the available set of radiopharmaceuticals for measuring cerebral blood flow. Ideally radiotracers should be trapped in the brain long enough so that their distribution can be quantitated and should demonstrate good spatial resolution. Furthermore, the stability (chemical and metabolic) and bioavailability of radiopharmaceuticals have in general proved to be a challenge during development and clinical administration. In view of these challenges and background, this study with 99mTc-ECD is presented. The aims of this research program were to develop novel approaches to improve the chemical and metabolic stability and the bioavailability of 99mTc-ECD across the blood brain barrier for cerebral blood flow determinations, using the well known non-human primate in vivo baboon model. These aims were addressed by investigating the influence of cyclodextrin--99mTc-ECD complexation on normal cerebral blood flow patterns, using two different cyclodextrins, i.e., gamma-cyclodextrin (CAS 17465-86-0) and beta-trimethylcyclodextrin (CAS 55216-11-0). The effect of incubation of 99mTc-ECD (with or without cyclodextrin complexation) in plasma, on metabolic esterase action, was also investigated. Possible protection against plasma esterase by acetylcholine (CAS 51-84-3) of 99mTc-ECD was further determined. The current study has shown that cyclodextrin complexation of 99mTc-ECD indeed offers a useful approach to improve the stability of the radiopharmaceutical against peripheral metabolism. The acetylcholine shows also potential to protect 99mTc-ECD. However, it is clear from the current data that the choice of cyclodextrin is of utmost importance, as has been observed from significantly reduced the bioavailability of 99mTc-ECD when complexed with beta-trimethylcyclodextrin. The plasma incubation procedures showed that gamma-cyclodextrin offers

  10. Nuclear medicine imaging in tuberculosis using commercially available radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Sathekge, Mike; Maes, Alex; D'Asseler, Yves; Vorster, Mariza; Van de Wiele, Christophe

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, data available on nuclear medicine imaging using commercially available radiopharmaceuticals for the differentiation, staging, and prediction or assessment of the response to treatment in tuberculosis (TB) are reviewed. Limited available studies suggest that single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using either 201Tl, 99mTc-sestamibi, or 99mTc-tetrofosmin is accurate (≥85%) and has a high negative predictive value (≥90%) for the differentiation of TB from carcinoma in patients presenting with a solitary pulmonary nodule (SPN). The criteria for detection of TB on 201Tl SPECT are nondepiction of the suspicious lesion in the delayed image or a negative retention index [washout on the delayed images (3–4 h postinjection) vs. the early image (5–15 min postinjection)] and a comparable-to-background uptake on 99mTc-sestamibi or 99mTc-tetrofosmin SPECT. Another SPECT tracer of potential interest for the differentiation of TB from malignant SPN that warrants further exploration, is N-isopropyl-p-[123I]iodoamphetamine (123I-IMP). In contrast, 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET is unable to differentiate malignancy from TB and thus cannot be used as a tool to reduce futile biopsy/thoracotomy in these patients. A limited number of studies have reported on the potential of nuclear medicine imaging in assessment of the extent of disease in patients with extrapulmonary TB using 67Ga-citrate SPECT and 18F-FDG PET, respectively. 67Ga-citrate SPECT was shown to be as sensitive as bone scintigraphy for the detection of bone infection and was found to be complementary to computed tomography (CT) imaging. 18F-FDG PET was found to be significantly more efficient when compared with CT, respectively, in over half of patients for the identification of sites of lymph node involvement that were missed by CT and often the only sites of extrapulmonary TB identified. Unfortunately, 18F-FDG PET findings did not lead to alterations in treatment planning in any

  11. Nuclear medicine imaging in tuberculosis using commercially available radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Sathekge, Mike; Maes, Alex; D'Asseler, Yves; Vorster, Mariza; Van de Wiele, Christophe

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, data available on nuclear medicine imaging using commercially available radiopharmaceuticals for the differentiation, staging, and prediction or assessment of the response to treatment in tuberculosis (TB) are reviewed. Limited available studies suggest that single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using either 201Tl, 99mTc-sestamibi, or 99mTc-tetrofosmin is accurate (≥85%) and has a high negative predictive value (≥90%) for the differentiation of TB from carcinoma in patients presenting with a solitary pulmonary nodule (SPN). The criteria for detection of TB on 201Tl SPECT are nondepiction of the suspicious lesion in the delayed image or a negative retention index [washout on the delayed images (3–4 h postinjection) vs. the early image (5–15 min postinjection)] and a comparable-to-background uptake on 99mTc-sestamibi or 99mTc-tetrofosmin SPECT. Another SPECT tracer of potential interest for the differentiation of TB from malignant SPN that warrants further exploration, is N-isopropyl-p-[123I]iodoamphetamine (123I-IMP). In contrast, 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET is unable to differentiate malignancy from TB and thus cannot be used as a tool to reduce futile biopsy/thoracotomy in these patients. A limited number of studies have reported on the potential of nuclear medicine imaging in assessment of the extent of disease in patients with extrapulmonary TB using 67Ga-citrate SPECT and 18F-FDG PET, respectively. 67Ga-citrate SPECT was shown to be as sensitive as bone scintigraphy for the detection of bone infection and was found to be complementary to computed tomography (CT) imaging. 18F-FDG PET was found to be significantly more efficient when compared with CT, respectively, in over half of patients for the identification of sites of lymph node involvement that were missed by CT and often the only sites of extrapulmonary TB identified. Unfortunately, 18F-FDG PET findings did not lead to alterations in treatment planning in any

  12. Understanding radioxenon isotopical ratios originating from radiopharmaceutical facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saey, P. R. J.; Ringbom, A.; Bowyer, T. W.; Becker, A.; de Geer, L.-E.; Nikkinen, M.; Payne, R. F.

    2009-04-01

    It was recently shown that radiopharmaceutical facilities (RPF) are major contributors to the general background of 133Xe and other xenon isotopes both in the northern and southern hemisphere. To distinguish a nuclear explosion signal from releases from civil nuclear facilities, not only the activity concentrations but also the ratios of the four different CTBT relevant radioxenon isotopes (131mXe, 133mXe, 133Xe and 135Xe) have to be well understood. First measurements taken recently in and around two of the world's largest RPF's: NTP at Pelindaba, South Africa and IRE at Fleurus, Belgium have been presented. At both sites, also stack samples were taken in close cooperation with the facility operators. The radioxenon in Belgium could be classified in four classes: the normal European background (133Xe activity between 0 - 5 mBq/m3) on one hand and then the samples where all four isotopes were detected with 133mXe/131mXe > 1. In northern South Africa the Pelindaba RPF is in practice the sole source of radioxenon. It generated a background of 133Xe at the measurement site some 230 km to the west of the RPF of 0 - 5 mBq/m3. In the cases where the air from the Pelindaba facility reached the measurement site directly and in a short time period, the 133Xe was higher, also 135Xe was present and in some samples 133mXe as well. The ratios of the activity concentrations of 135Xe/133Xe vs. 133mXe/131mXe (Multiple Isotope Ratio Plot - MIRC) have been analysed. For both facilities, the possible theoretical ratio's for different scenarios were calculated with the information available and compared with the measurements. It was found that there is an excess of 131mXe present in the European samples compared to theoretical calculations. A similar excess has also been seen in samples measured in northern America. In South Africa, neither the environmental samples nor the stack ones contained 131mXe at measurable levels. This can probably be explained by different processes and

  13. Spectroelectrochemical and computational studies on the mechanism of hypoxia selectivity of copper radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Holland, Jason P; Barnard, Peter J; Collison, David; Dilworth, Jonathan R; Edge, Ruth; Green, Jennifer C; McInnes, Eric J L

    2008-01-01

    Detailed chemical, spectroelectrochemical and computational studies have been used to investigate the mechanism of hypoxia selectivity of a range of copper radiopharmaceuticals. A revised mechanism involving a delicate balance between cellular uptake, intracellular reduction, reoxidation, protonation and ligand dissociation is proposed. This mechanism accounts for observed differences in the reported cellular uptake and washout of related copper bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complexes. Three copper and zinc complexes have been characterised by X-ray crystallography and the redox chemistry of a series of copper complexes has been investigated by using electronic absorption and EPR spectroelectrochemistry. Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations have also been used to probe the electronic structures of intermediate species and assign the electronic absorption spectra. DFT calculations also show that one-electron oxidation is ligand-based, leading to the formation of cationic triplet species. In the absence of protons, metal-centred one-electron reduction gives the reduced anionic copper(I) species, [CuIATSM](-), and for the first time it is shown that molecular oxygen can reoxidise this anion to give the neutral, lipophilic parent complexes, which can wash out of cells. The electrochemistry is pH dependent and in the presence of stronger acids both chemical and electrochemical reduction leads to quantitative and rapid dissociation of copper(I) ions from the mono- or diprotonated complexes, [CuIATSMH] and [Cu(I)ATSMH2]+. In addition, a range of protonated intermediate species have been identified at lower acid concentrations. The one-electron reduction potential, rate of reoxidation of the copper(I) anionic species and ease of protonation are dependent on the structure of the ligand, which also governs their observed behaviour in vivo. PMID:18494010

  14. Pharmacokinetics in the infant.

    PubMed

    Milsap, R L; Jusko, W J

    1994-12-01

    Processes controlling the absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and pharmacologic effects of drugs are likely to be immature or altered in neonates and infants. Absorption may be affected by differences in gastric pH and stomach emptying rate. Low serum protein concentrations and higher body water composition can change drug distribution. Drug metabolism enzyme activity is typically reduced in the neonate, but rapidly develops over the first year of life. Renal excretion mechanisms are low at birth, but mature over a few months. Limited data are available on the pharmacodynamics of drugs; infants show greater sensitivity to d-tubocurarine. Developmental changes are rapid during the first weeks and months of life, thus requiring continual modification of drug dosage regimens designed for treating pediatric patients.

  15. [Influence of systemic inflammatory response syndrome on the pharmacokinetics of vancomycin].

    PubMed

    Irikuchi, Jinshi; Imai, Toru; Yoshida, Yoshikazu; Orii, Takao

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of vancomycin (VCM) is recommended to minimize its nephrotoxicity and maximize efficacy. Recently, the concept of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) has been introduced to describe a clinical state resulting from the actions of complex intrinsic mediators in an acute-phase systemic response. However, there are few reports on the pharmacokinetics of VCM in patients with SIRS. This study investigated the effect of SIRS on the pharmacokinetics of VCM by analyzing the predictability of TDM and pharmacokinetic parameters in 31 non-SIRS patients and 52 SIRS patients, with stratification by SIRS score. The mean prediction error (ME) and mean absolute prediction error in SIRS score 2 and 3 patients differed from those in non-SIRS patients. The ME in the score 4 group showed a negative value. In the comparison of pharmacokinetic parameters by SIRS score, a significantly lower CL(vcm) value was observed at score 4 compared with scores 2 and 3, a higher Vd value was observed at score 4 compared with non-SIRS and at score 3, and a longer T1/2 was observed at score 2. In the comparison of patient characteristics by SIRS score, albumin, aspartate aminotransferase, and alanine aminotransferase levels showed differences among the scores. However, no correlation was observed between VCM pharmacokinetics and these three laboratory parameters. These findings suggest that the pharmacokinetics of VCM may be affected by the pathology of SIRS rather than by patient characteristics.

  16. A Systems Approach for Tumor Pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Greg Michael; Weissleder, Ralph

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in genome inspired target discovery, small molecule screens, development of biological and nanotechnology have led to the introduction of a myriad of new differently sized agents into the clinic. The differences in small and large molecule delivery are becoming increasingly important in combination therapies as well as the use of drugs that modify the physiology of tumors such as anti-angiogenic treatment. The complexity of targeting has led to the development of mathematical models to facilitate understanding, but unfortunately, these studies are often only applicable to a particular molecule, making pharmacokinetic comparisons difficult. Here we develop and describe a framework for categorizing primary pharmacokinetics of drugs in tumors. For modeling purposes, we define drugs not by their mechanism of action but rather their rate-limiting step of delivery. Our simulations account for variations in perfusion, vascularization, interstitial transport, and non-linear local binding and metabolism. Based on a comparison of the fundamental rates determining uptake, drugs were classified into four categories depending on whether uptake is limited by blood flow, extravasation, interstitial diffusion, or local binding and metabolism. Simulations comparing small molecule versus macromolecular drugs show a sharp difference in distribution, which has implications for multi-drug therapies. The tissue-level distribution differs widely in tumors for small molecules versus macromolecular biologic drugs, and this should be considered in the design of agents and treatments. An example using antibodies in mouse xenografts illustrates the different in vivo behavior. This type of transport analysis can be used to aid in model development, experimental data analysis, and imaging and therapeutic agent design. PMID:21935441

  17. A systems approach for tumor pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Greg Michael; Weissleder, Ralph

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in genome inspired target discovery, small molecule screens, development of biological and nanotechnology have led to the introduction of a myriad of new differently sized agents into the clinic. The differences in small and large molecule delivery are becoming increasingly important in combination therapies as well as the use of drugs that modify the physiology of tumors such as anti-angiogenic treatment. The complexity of targeting has led to the development of mathematical models to facilitate understanding, but unfortunately, these studies are often only applicable to a particular molecule, making pharmacokinetic comparisons difficult. Here we develop and describe a framework for categorizing primary pharmacokinetics of drugs in tumors. For modeling purposes, we define drugs not by their mechanism of action but rather their rate-limiting step of delivery. Our simulations account for variations in perfusion, vascularization, interstitial transport, and non-linear local binding and metabolism. Based on a comparison of the fundamental rates determining uptake, drugs were classified into four categories depending on whether uptake is limited by blood flow, extravasation, interstitial diffusion, or local binding and metabolism. Simulations comparing small molecule versus macromolecular drugs show a sharp difference in distribution, which has implications for multi-drug therapies. The tissue-level distribution differs widely in tumors for small molecules versus macromolecular biologic drugs, and this should be considered in the design of agents and treatments. An example using antibodies in mouse xenografts illustrates the different in vivo behavior. This type of transport analysis can be used to aid in model development, experimental data analysis, and imaging and therapeutic agent design. PMID:21935441

  18. Modeling of Corneal and Retinal Pharmacokinetics after Periocular Drug Administration

    PubMed Central

    Amrite, Aniruddha C.; Edelhauser, Henry F.; Kompella, Uday B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To develop pharmacokinetics models to describe the disposition of small lipophilic molecules in the cornea and retina after periocular (subconjunctival or posterior subconjunctival) administration. Methods Compartmental pharmacokinetics analysis was performed on the corneal and retinal data obtained after periocular administration of 3 mg of celecoxib (a selective COX-2 inhibitor) to Brown Norway (BN) rats. Berkeley Madonna, a differential and difference equation–based modeling software, was used for the pharmacokinetics modeling. The data were fit to different compartment models with first-order input and disposition, and the best fit was selected on the basis of coefficient of regression and Akaike information criteria (AIC). The models were validated by using the celecoxib data from a prior study in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. The corneal model was also fit to the corneal data for prednisolone at a dose of 2.61 mg in albino rabbits, and the model was validated at two other doses of prednisolone (0.261 and 26.1 mg) in these rabbits. Model simulations were performed with the finalized model to understand the effect of formulation on corneal and retinal pharmacokinetics after periocular administration. Results Celecoxib kinetics in the BN rat cornea can be described by a two-compartment (periocular space and cornea, with a dissolution step for periocular formulation) model, with parallel elimination from the cornea and the periocular space. The inclusion of a distribution compartment or a dissolution step for celecoxib suspension did not lead to an overall improvement in the corneal data fit compared with the two-compartment model. The more important parameter for enhanced fit and explaining the apparent lack of an increase phase in the corneal levels is the inclusion of the initial leak-back of the dose from the periocular space into the precorneal area. The predicted celecoxib concentrations from this model also showed very good correlation (r = 0

  19. Pharmacokinetics interactions of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Nicola; Bellosta, Stefano; Baldessin, Ludovico; Boccia, Donatella; Racagni, Giorgi; Corsini, Alberto

    2016-09-01

    The clearance of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) typically does not involve cytochrome P450 (CYP450)-mediated metabolism or interaction with cell membrane transporters, therefore the pharmacokinetics interactions of mAbs and small molecule drugs are limited. However, a drug may affect the clearance of mAbs through the modulation of immune response (e.g., methotrexate reduces the clearance of infliximab, adalimumab, and golimumab, possibly due to methotrexate's inhibitory effect on the formation of antibodies against the mAbs). In addition, mAbs that are cytokine modulators may modify the metabolism of drugs through their effects on P450 enzymes expression. For example, cytokine modulators such as tocilizumab (anti-IL-6 receptor antibody) may reverse the "inhibitory" effect of IL-6 on CYP substrates, resulting in a "normalization" of CYP activities. Finally, a drug may alter the clearance of mAbs by either increasing or reducing the levels of expression of targets of mAbs on the cell surface. For instance, statins and fibrates induce PCSK9 expression and therefore increase cellular uptake and clearance of alirocumab and evolocumab, anti-PCSK9 antibodies. In the present review, we will provide an overview on the pharmacokinetics properties of mAbs as related to the most relevant examples of mAbs-small molecule drug interaction. PMID:27438459

  20. Pharmacokinetics interactions of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Nicola; Bellosta, Stefano; Baldessin, Ludovico; Boccia, Donatella; Racagni, Giorgi; Corsini, Alberto

    2016-09-01

    The clearance of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) typically does not involve cytochrome P450 (CYP450)-mediated metabolism or interaction with cell membrane transporters, therefore the pharmacokinetics interactions of mAbs and small molecule drugs are limited. However, a drug may affect the clearance of mAbs through the modulation of immune response (e.g., methotrexate reduces the clearance of infliximab, adalimumab, and golimumab, possibly due to methotrexate's inhibitory effect on the formation of antibodies against the mAbs). In addition, mAbs that are cytokine modulators may modify the metabolism of drugs through their effects on P450 enzymes expression. For example, cytokine modulators such as tocilizumab (anti-IL-6 receptor antibody) may reverse the "inhibitory" effect of IL-6 on CYP substrates, resulting in a "normalization" of CYP activities. Finally, a drug may alter the clearance of mAbs by either increasing or reducing the levels of expression of targets of mAbs on the cell surface. For instance, statins and fibrates induce PCSK9 expression and therefore increase cellular uptake and clearance of alirocumab and evolocumab, anti-PCSK9 antibodies. In the present review, we will provide an overview on the pharmacokinetics properties of mAbs as related to the most relevant examples of mAbs-small molecule drug interaction.

  1. An overview of translational (radio)pharmaceutical research related to certain oncological and non-oncological applications

    PubMed Central

    Cona, Marlein Miranda; de Witte, Peter; Verbruggen, Alfons; Ni, Yicheng

    2013-01-01

    Translational medicine pursues the conversion of scientific discovery into human health improvement. It aims to establish strategies for diagnosis and treatment of diseases. Cancer treatment is difficult. Radio-pharmaceutical research has played an important role in multiple disciplines, particularly in translational oncology. Based on the natural phenomenon of necrosis avidity, OncoCiDia has emerged as a novel generic approach for treating solid malignancies. Under this systemic dual targeting strategy, a vascular disrupting agent first selectively causes massive tumor necrosis that is followed by iodine-131 labeled-hypericin (123I-Hyp), a necrosis-avid compound that kills the residual cancer cells by crossfire effect of beta radiation. In this review, by emphasizing the potential clinical applicability of OncoCiDia, we summarize our research activities including optimization of radioiodinated hypericin Hyp preparations and recent studies on the biodistribution, dosimetry, pharmacokinetic and, chemical and radiochemical toxicities of the preparations. Myocardial infarction is a global health problem. Although cardiac scintigraphy using radioactive perfusion tracers is used in the assessment of myocardial viability, searching for diagnostic imaging agents with authentic necrosis avidity is pursued. Therefore, a comparative study on the biological profiles of the necrosis avid 123I-Hyp and the commercially available 99mTc-Sestamibi was conducted and the results are demonstrated. Cholelithiasis or gallstone disease may cause gallbladder inflammation, infection and other severe complications. While studying the mechanisms underlying the necrosis avidity of Hyp and derivatives, their naturally occurring fluorophore property was exploited for targeting cholesterol as a main component of gallstones. The usefulness of Hyp as an optical imaging agent for cholelithiasis was studied and the results are presented. Multiple uses of automatic contrast injectors may reduce costs

  2. Radiolabeled tirofiban – a potential radiopharmaceutical for detection of deep venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Darkovska-Serafimovska, Marija; Janevik-Ivanovska, Emilija; Djorgoski, Icko; Arsova-Sarafinovska, Zorica; Zdravkovska, Milka; Balkanov, Trajan; Ugresic, Nenad

    2016-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of using 99mtechnetium (99mTc)-labeled tirofiban (a reversible antagonist of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa) for detection of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in rats without causing an antiplatelet effect. Methods The ability of in vitro tirofiban to inhibit adenosine 5′-diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet aggregation was evaluated using optical aggregometer. Binding of 99mTc-tirofiban to platelets was evaluated. Serum levels of unlabeled (a validated high performance liquid chromatography method) and 99mTc-tirofiban after single intravenous injection were evaluated in male Wistar rats with or without induced DVT (femoral vein ligation model), and the rats were also subjected to whole body scintigraphy. Results Tirofiban in vitro inhibits ADP-induced aggregation of human platelets in a dose- and concentration-dependent manner (10 nM to 2 μM), but only if it is added before ADP and not after ADP. 99mTc labeling did not affect the ability of tirofiban to bind to either human or rat platelets, nor did it affect tirofiban pharmacokinetics in intact rats or in animals with induced DVT. When 99mTc-tirofiban was injected to rats after induction of DVT, at a molar dose lower than the one showing only a weak antiaggregatory effect in vitro, whole body scintigraphy indicated localization of 99mTc-tirofiban around the place of the induced DVT. Conclusion 99mTc labeling of tirofiban does not affect its ability to bind to glycoprotein IIb/IIIa or its in vivo pharmacokinetics in rats, either intact or with DVT. A low, nonantiaggregatory dose of 99mTc-tirofiban may be used to visualize DVT at an early stage. PMID:27713618

  3. Clinical pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the endothelin receptor antagonist macitentan.

    PubMed

    Sidharta, P N; Treiber, A; Dingemanse, J

    2015-05-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive disease of the lung vascular system, which leads to right-sided heart failure and ultimately death if untreated. Treatments to regulate the pulmonary vascular pressure target the prostacyclin, nitric oxide, and endothelin (ET) pathways. Macitentan, an oral, once-daily, dual ETA and ETB receptor antagonist with high affinity and sustained receptor binding is the first ET receptor antagonist to show significant reduction of the risk of morbidity and mortality in PAH patients in a large-scale phase III study with a long-term outcome. Here we present a review of the available clinical pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationship, and drug-drug interaction data of macitentan in healthy subjects, patients with PAH, and in special populations.

  4. Preparation and In Vivo Pharmacokinetics of the Tongshu Suppository.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guoqiang; Dong, Leilei; Lu, Kuan; Liu, Sisi; Zheng, Yingying

    2016-01-01

    Astragalus polysaccharide (APS) (used for intestinal protection) was added to formulate the Tongshu suppository to improve the pharmacokinetics of Aceclofenac, which were assessed in New Zealand rabbits using an orthogonal experimental design. The single-agent Aceclofenac was taken as the control formulation. The concentration-time and drug release curves were drawn, and T max (min), C max (μg·mL(-1)), AUC0→∞ , and MRT were compared using a pharmacokinetic systems program. The formulated Tongshu suppository had moderate hardness, a smooth surface with uniform color, and theoretical drug-loading rate of 8%. Its release rate was in accordance with the drug preparation requirements. The concentration-time curves and drug release curves revealed that the maximum concentrations (C max) were 4.18 ± 1.03 μg·mL(-1) and 3.34 ± 0.41 μg·mL(-1) for the Tongshu and Aceclofenac suppositories, respectively, showing statistically insignificant difference, while the peak times were 34.87 ± 4.69 min and 34.76 ± 6.34 min, respectively, also showing statistically insignificant difference. Compared with the Aceclofenac suppository, the relative bioavailability of the Tongshu suppository was 104.4%, and the difference between them was statistically insignificant. In this experiment, the Tongshu suppository was prepared using the hot-melt method. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies confirmed it had higher bioavailability than the Aceclofenac suppository. PMID:27610366

  5. Preparation and In Vivo Pharmacokinetics of the Tongshu Suppository

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Leilei; Lu, Kuan; Liu, Sisi; Zheng, Yingying

    2016-01-01

    Astragalus polysaccharide (APS) (used for intestinal protection) was added to formulate the Tongshu suppository to improve the pharmacokinetics of Aceclofenac, which were assessed in New Zealand rabbits using an orthogonal experimental design. The single-agent Aceclofenac was taken as the control formulation. The concentration-time and drug release curves were drawn, and Tmax (min), Cmax (μg·mL−1), AUC0→∞, and MRT were compared using a pharmacokinetic systems program. The formulated Tongshu suppository had moderate hardness, a smooth surface with uniform color, and theoretical drug-loading rate of 8%. Its release rate was in accordance with the drug preparation requirements. The concentration-time curves and drug release curves revealed that the maximum concentrations (Cmax) were 4.18 ± 1.03 μg·mL−1 and 3.34 ± 0.41 μg·mL−1 for the Tongshu and Aceclofenac suppositories, respectively, showing statistically insignificant difference, while the peak times were 34.87 ± 4.69 min and 34.76 ± 6.34 min, respectively, also showing statistically insignificant difference. Compared with the Aceclofenac suppository, the relative bioavailability of the Tongshu suppository was 104.4%, and the difference between them was statistically insignificant. In this experiment, the Tongshu suppository was prepared using the hot-melt method. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies confirmed it had higher bioavailability than the Aceclofenac suppository. PMID:27610366

  6. Dynamic 99mTc-MAG3 renography: images for quality control obtained by combining pharmacokinetic modelling, an anthropomorphic computer phantom and Monte Carlo simulated scintillation camera imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brolin, Gustav; Sjögreen Gleisner, Katarina; Ljungberg, Michael

    2013-05-01

    In dynamic renal scintigraphy, the main interest is the radiopharmaceutical redistribution as a function of time. Quality control (QC) of renal procedures often relies on phantom experiments to compare image-based results with the measurement setup. A phantom with a realistic anatomy and time-varying activity distribution is therefore desirable. This work describes a pharmacokinetic (PK) compartment model for 99mTc-MAG3, used for defining a dynamic whole-body activity distribution within a digital phantom (XCAT) for accurate Monte Carlo (MC)-based images for QC. Each phantom structure is assigned a time-activity curve provided by the PK model, employing parameter values consistent with MAG3 pharmacokinetics. This approach ensures that the total amount of tracer in the phantom is preserved between time points, and it allows for modifications of the pharmacokinetics in a controlled fashion. By adjusting parameter values in the PK model, different clinically realistic scenarios can be mimicked, regarding, e.g., the relative renal uptake and renal transit time. Using the MC code SIMIND, a complete set of renography images including effects of photon attenuation, scattering, limited spatial resolution and noise, are simulated. The obtained image data can be used to evaluate quantitative techniques and computer software in clinical renography.

  7. Diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals for localization in target tissues exhibiting a regional PH shift relative to surrounding tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, M.; Kung, H. F.

    1984-10-02

    A radiopharmaceutical chemical compound comprising a radioactive isotope, other than an isotope of iodine, in chemical combination with at least one amine group. The compound has a lipophilicity sufficiently high at a pH of 7.6 to permit passage of the compound from the blood of a mammal into a target organ or tissue and sufficiently low at a pH of 6.6 to prevent rapid return of the compound from the target organ or tissue to the blood. The compound has a percent protein binding of less than ninety percent. A method for selectively depositing a radiopharmaceutical compound in at least one target tissue or organ of a mammal, which tissue or organ has a significantly different intracellular pH than the blood of the mammal, by introducing the compound of the invention into the bloodstream of the mammal.

  8. Radiopharmaceutical stannic Sn-117m chelate compositions and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, Suresh C.; Meinken, George E.

    2001-01-01

    Radiopharmaceutical compositions including .sup.117m Sn labeled stannic (Sn.sup.4+) chelates are provided. The chelates are preferably polyhydroxycarboxylate, such as oxalates, tartrates, citrates, malonates, gluconates, glucoheptonates and the like. Methods of making .sup.117m Sn-labeled (Sn.sup.4+) polyhydroxycarboxylic chelates are also provided. The foregoing pharmaceutical compositions can be used in methods of preparing bone for scintigraphical analysis, for radiopharmaceutical skeletal imaging, treatment of pain resulting from metastatic bone involvement, treatment of primary bone cancer, treatment of cancer resulting from metastatic spread to bone from other primary cancers, treatment of pain resulting from rheumatoid arthritis, treatment of bone/joint disorders and to monitor radioactively the skeletal system.

  9. Fluconazole Pharmacokinetics in Burn Patients

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, Bradley A.; King, Stephen R.; Wandschneider, Heidi L.; Hickerson, William L.; Hanes, Scott D.; Herring, Vanessa L.; Canada, Todd W.; Hess, Mary M.

    1998-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of fluconazole in nine adult patients with severe (30 to 95% total body surface area) burns were studied. There was no significant difference in half-life (t1/2), clearance (CL), or volume of distribution (V) over time in five patients on days 3 and 8 of the study (P > 0.05). Combined parameter estimates (means ± standard deviations) for all nine patients for the two study periods were as follows: t1/2, 24.4 ± 5.8 h; CL, 0.36 ± 0.09 ml/min/kg; and V, 0.72 ± 0.12 liters/kg. These estimates of t1/2 and CL in burn patients were approximately 13% shorter and 30% more rapid, respectively, than the most extreme estimates reported for other populations. PMID:9559811

  10. Pharmacokinetics of sulfamethazine in buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Khan, F H; Nawaz, M; Anwar-Ul-Hassan, S

    1980-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic parameters which describe distribution and elimination of sulfamethazine were determined in buffaloes. Following intravenous administration of a single dose (100 mg/kg), disposition of the drug was described in terms of biexponential expression: Cp = Ae alpha t + Be-beta t. Based on total (free and bound) sulfonamide levels in the plasma, pseudo-distribution equilibrium was rapidly attained and the half-life value of 5.54 +/- 0.41 h (mean +/- S.D., n = 8) was recorded. Body clearance was 56 +/- 7 ml x kg-1 x h-1. Based on this study we suggest an intravenous dosage regimen consisting of 38.4 mg sulfamethazine/kg body-weight repeated at 12 h inrervals. With this dosage level the predicted plasma concentrations will oscillate between 125 and 25 micrograms/ml during the steady-state. The influence of febrile states and bacterial diseases on predicted levels remains to be verified experimentally. PMID:7436332

  11. Data sharing for pharmacokinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Brian J; Merry, Alan F

    2009-10-01

    Pooling data from different pediatric studies can provide a single robust pharmacokinetic analysis that allows covariate analysis and hypothesis testing. Data sharing should be driven by the altruistic purpose of improving drug understanding to the clinical benefit of children. Electronic communications have rendered the sharing of data relatively easy, and data sharing within the wider scientific community has become commonplace. Data sharing allows verification of results, save costs and time, allows new interpretation of old data, and can fulfill teaching benefits. It may stimulate cooperative competition between researchers and allow individual researchers to concentrate on unique aspects of the scientific puzzle. However, there is occasionally a reluctance to share, in part because of fear of others stealing the hard work of a research group, which may not be recognized in subsequent publications that reuse data. Providing data may require additional effort for presentation in a suitable format. Data may be abused or used for purposes other than those for which they were collected. Propriety claims may limit access to industry-sponsored drug research. The question of who has ownership of data is contentious. Investigators often consider data they have collected to be their own property. Reputations and grants may be hinge on ownership of a data set. However, other team members, institutions, funding agencies, and the public also have a stake. The difficulties identified in the general scientific community also apply to data sharing for pediatric pharmacokinetic studies. There are few clearly established rules at present, and consideration of the issues hinges on ethical and philosophical arguments. The development of databases will depend on collaboration and cooperation and greater clarity and consensus over appropriate processes and procedures. PMID:19558615

  12. [Computer simulated images of radiopharmaceutical distributions in anthropomorphic phantoms]. Performance report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-05-17

    We have constructed an anatomically correct human geometry, which can be used to store radioisotope concentrations in 51 various internal organs. Each organ is associated with an index number which references to its attenuating characteristics (composition and density). The initial development of Computer Simulated Images of Radiopharmaceuticals in Anthropomorphic Phantoms (CSIRDAP) over the first 3 years has been very successful. All components of the simulation have been coded, made operational and debugged.

  13. Quantitative studies in radiopharmaceutical science. Progress report, January 1-December 31, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, R.N.; Cooper, M.

    1985-09-01

    This program, during the past 30 years, has developed with the constant awareness of the close interrelationships and interdependence between clinical needs, radiopharmaceutical and instrument developments, and clinical feasibility studies. This is a year of transition for this contract with two of the responsible investigators, Katherine Lathrop and Paul Harper, reaching the age of mandatory retirement. This report focuses on the completion and write-up of current research projects by Dr. Harper and Mrs. Lathrop. 4 refs.

  14. Development new radiopharmaceutical based on 5-thio-d- glucose labeled technetium-99m

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stasyuk, E. S.; Skuridin, V. S.; Ilina, E. A.; Rogov, A. S.; Nesterov, E. A.; Sadkin, V. L.; Larionova, L. A.; Varlamova, N. V.; Zelchan, R.

    2016-06-01

    The article considers the obtaining and possibility of using 5-thio-D-glucose labeled technetium-99m for the diagnosis of malignant tumors by single photon emission computed tomography. The analysis of the level of international developments of radiopharmaceuticals based on derivatives of glucose has been carried out. Also the article provides information on of using experimental batches of lyophilisate on the basis of 5-thio-D-glucose for preliminary biomedical testing on the mice.

  15. Chiral Pesticide Pharmacokinetics: A Range of Values

    EPA Science Inventory

    Approximately 30% of pesticides are chiral and used as mixtures of two or more stereoisomers. In biological systems, these stereoisomers can exhibit significantly different pharmacokinetics (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination). In spite of these differences, th...

  16. Opioid pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Overholser, Brian R; Foster, David R

    2011-09-01

    Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions (DDIs) involving opioid analgesics can be problematic. Opioids are widely used, have a narrow therapeutic index, and can be associated with severe toxicity. The purpose of this review is to describe pharmacokinetic DDIs associated with opioids frequently encountered in managed care settings (morphine, codeine, oxycodone, oxymorphone, hydrocodone, hydromorphone, fentanyl, tramadol, and methadone). An introduction to the pharmacokinetic basis of DDIs is provided, and potential DDIs associated with opioids are reviewed. Opioids metabolized by the drug metabolizing enzymes of the cytochrome P450 (CYP450) system (codeine, oxycodone, hydrocodone, fentanyl, tramadol, and methadone) are associated with numerous DDIs that can result in either a reduction in opioid effect or excess opioid effects. Conversely, opioids that are not metabolized by that system (morphine, oxymorphone, and hydromorphone) tend to be involved in fewer CYP450-associated pharmacokinetic DDIs.

  17. A PHARMACOKINETIC PROGRAM (PKFIT) FOR R

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this study was to create a nonlinear regression (including a genetic algorithm) program (R script) to deal with data fitting for pharmacokinetics (PK) in R environment using its available packages. We call this tool as PKfit.

  18. Bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals as targeted agents of osteosarcoma: samarium-153-EDTMP and radium-223.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Peter M; Subbiah, Vivek; Rohren, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is a cancer characterized by formation of bone by malignant cells. Routine bone scan imaging with Tc-99m-MDP is done at diagnosis to evaluate primary tumor uptake and check for bone metastases. At time of relapse the Tc-99m-MDP bone scan also provides a specific means to assess formation of bone by malignant osteosarcoma cells and the potential for bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals to deliver radioactivity directly into osteoblastic osteosarcoma lesions. This chapter will review and compare a bone-seeking radiopharmaceutical that emits beta-particles, samarium-153-EDTMP, with an alpha-particle emitter, radium-223. The charged alpha particles from radium-223 have far more mass and energy than beta particles (electrons) from Sm-153-EDTMP. Because radium-223 has less marrow toxicity and more radiobiological effectiveness, especially if inside the bone forming cancer cell than samarium-153-EDTMP, radium-223 may have greater potential to become widely used against osteosarcoma as a targeted therapy. Radium-223 also has more potential to be used with chemotherapy against osteosarcoma and bone metastases. Because osteosarcoma makes bone and radium-223 acts like calcium, this radiopharmaceutical could possibly become a new targeted means to achieve safe and effective reduction of tumor burden as well as facilitate better surgery and/or radiotherapy for difficult to resect large, or metastatic tumors.

  19. Harvard-MIT research program in short-lived radiopharmaceuticals. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Adelstein, S.J.

    1995-02-01

    The Harvard-MIT Research Program in Short-lived Radiopharmaceuticals was established in 1977 to foster interaction among groups working in radiopharmaceutical chemistry at Harvard Medical School, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the Massachusetts General Hospital. To this was added a group at The Childrens Hospital. From these collaborations and building upon the special strengths of the participating individuals, laboratories and institutions, it was hoped that original approaches would be found for the design of new, clinically useful, radiolabeled compounds. The original thrust of this proposal included: (a) examination of the coordination chemistry of technetium as a basis for rational radiopharmaceutical design, (b) development of an ultrashort-lived radionuclide generator for the diagnosis of congenital heart disease in newborns, (c) synthesis of receptor-site-directed halopharmaceuticals, (d) improved facile labeling of complex molecules with positron-emitting radionuclides. The authors` 1986 proposal was oriented toward organs and disease, emphasizing radiolabeled agents that delineate specific functions and the distribution of receptors in brain, heart, and tumors. In 1989, they further refined their purposes and focused on two major aims: (a) synthesis and utilization of neutral technetium and rhenium complexes of high specific activity, and (b) development of new approaches to the radiolabeling of proteins, peptides, immunoglobulins, and their fragments. In 1992, the authors amended this proposal to concentrate their efforts on biologically active peptides and proteins for targeted radiodiagnosis and therapy.

  20. Preparation of gallium-68 radiopharmaceuticals for positron tomography. Progress report, November 1, 1977-October 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, M.J.

    1980-06-01

    Although the germanium-68 ..-->.. gallium-68 generator is probably the only source of positron-emitting radionuclides that could enable the widespread application of positron tomography, the commercially available /sup 68/Ga//sup 68/Ge generator system suffers from several major disadvantages. The most important of these is that the generator is eluted with EDTA, which forms a very strong chelate with gallium. In order to produce radiopharmaceuticals other than /sup 68/Ga-EDTA, it is first necessary to break the stable EDTA complex and remove all traces of EDTA. This procedure adds several steps and a significant amount of time to procedures for preparing /sup 68/Ga-radiopharmaceuticals. We have developed a new generator using a solvent extraction system which will produce /sup 68/Ga-oxine (8-hydroxyquinoline), a weak chelate. Using this agent we have synthesized several /sup 68/Ga-radiopharmaceuticals and tested them in vitro and in vivo. We have also carried out some preliminary studies to compare generator systems which produce /sup 68/Ga in an ionic form. Attempts have been made using polarographic and chromatographic techniques, and in vivo distribution data to investigate the stability of radiogallium complexes with a series of potentially lipophilic complexing agents.

  1. Use of pressure-hold test for sterilizing filter membrane integrity in radiopharmaceutical manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Belanger, Anthony P; Byrne, John F; Paolino, Justin M; DeGrado, Timothy R

    2009-11-01

    The bubble point test is the de facto standard for postproduction filter membrane integrity test in the radiopharmaceutical community. However, the bubble point test depends on a subjective visual assessment of bubbling rate that can be obscured by significant diffusive gas flows below the manufacturer's prescribed bubble point. To provide a more objective means to assess filter membrane integrity, this study evaluates the pressure-hold test as an alternative to the bubble point test. In our application of the pressure-hold test, the nonsterile side of the sterilizing filter is pressurized to 85% of the predetermined bubble point with nitrogen, the filter system is closed off from the pressurizing gas and the pressure is monitored over a prescribed time interval. The drop in pressure, which has a known relationship with diffusive gas flow, is used as a quantitative measure of membrane integrity. Characterization of the gas flow vs. pressure relationship of each filter/solution combination provides an objective and quantitative means for defining a critical value of pressure drop over which the membrane is indicated to be nonintegral. The method is applied to sterilizing filter integrity testing associated with the commonly produced radiopharmaceuticals, [(18)F]FDG and [(11)C]PIB. The method is shown to be robust, practical and amenable to automation in radiopharmaceutical manufacturing environments (e.g., hot cells).

  2. Population pharmacokinetics of oxaliplatin in patients with metastatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Bastian, G; Barrail, A; Urien, S

    2003-11-01

    Our aim was to develop a population pharmacokinetic model of ultrafilterable oxaliplatin in metastatic cancer patients. Oxaliplatin was administered by 2- or 4-h infusions, 50, 65, 75, 85, 100 or 130 mg/m2 to 56 patients. Blood samples were collected over 28 h. Plasma concentrations of ultrafilterable oxaliplatin were determined by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Population pharmacokinetic analysis was performed using a non-linear mixed-effects modeling method. Ultrafilterable oxaliplatin concentration-time profiles showed a secondary peak or a shoulder aspect post-infusion, attributed to the existence of an enterohepatic recirculation (EHR). They were best described by a two-compartment model incorporating an EHR component. Plasma clearance (CL) was related positively to body weight (BW) and negatively to serum creatinine (SCr), and was greater in male patients than in female patients. This covariate modeling resulted in a decrease in the interindividual variability for CL from 104 to 62%. The central distribution volume (V1) and inter-compartmental clearance (Q) were related to BW. Typical population estimates of CL, central distribution volume (V1), input rate constant into gallbladder (k1B) and lag time for drug reabsorption (TLAG) were 14.1 or 8.5 l/h (male or female patients), 24.9 l, 1.8 h-1 and 2.0 h, respectively. The final pharmacokinetic model was validated using 200 bootstrap samples of the original data. We conclude that a two-compartment with EHR model adequately described ultrafilterable oxaliplatin pharmacokinetics, explaining a secondary transient increase in concentration. This study identified combined-covariate-effects ultrafilterable oxaliplatin clearance, supporting dose adjustment of oxaliplatin based on BW, gender and corrected for SCr level, if drug exposure is thought to be related to therapeutic or toxic issues.

  3. Population pharmacokinetics of oxaliplatin in patients with metastatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Bastian, G; Barrail, A; Urien, S

    2003-11-01

    Our aim was to develop a population pharmacokinetic model of ultrafilterable oxaliplatin in metastatic cancer patients. Oxaliplatin was administered by 2- or 4-h infusions, 50, 65, 75, 85, 100 or 130 mg/m2 to 56 patients. Blood samples were collected over 28 h. Plasma concentrations of ultrafilterable oxaliplatin were determined by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Population pharmacokinetic analysis was performed using a non-linear mixed-effects modeling method. Ultrafilterable oxaliplatin concentration-time profiles showed a secondary peak or a shoulder aspect post-infusion, attributed to the existence of an enterohepatic recirculation (EHR). They were best described by a two-compartment model incorporating an EHR component. Plasma clearance (CL) was related positively to body weight (BW) and negatively to serum creatinine (SCr), and was greater in male patients than in female patients. This covariate modeling resulted in a decrease in the interindividual variability for CL from 104 to 62%. The central distribution volume (V1) and inter-compartmental clearance (Q) were related to BW. Typical population estimates of CL, central distribution volume (V1), input rate constant into gallbladder (k1B) and lag time for drug reabsorption (TLAG) were 14.1 or 8.5 l/h (male or female patients), 24.9 l, 1.8 h-1 and 2.0 h, respectively. The final pharmacokinetic model was validated using 200 bootstrap samples of the original data. We conclude that a two-compartment with EHR model adequately described ultrafilterable oxaliplatin pharmacokinetics, explaining a secondary transient increase in concentration. This study identified combined-covariate-effects ultrafilterable oxaliplatin clearance, supporting dose adjustment of oxaliplatin based on BW, gender and corrected for SCr level, if drug exposure is thought to be related to therapeutic or toxic issues. PMID:14597876

  4. Pharmacokinetic model-predicted anticancer drug concentrations in human tumors.

    PubMed

    Gallo, James M; Vicini, Paolo; Orlansky, Amy; Li, Shaolan; Zhou, Feng; Ma, Jianguo; Pulfer, Sharon; Bookman, Michel A; Guo, Ping

    2004-12-01

    In an era when molecular and targeted anticancer therapeutics is a major focus and when understanding drug dynamics in tumor is critical, it seems advantageous to be able to relate drug concentrations in tumors to corresponding biological end points. To that end, a novel method, based on physiologically based hybrid pharmacokinetic models, is presented to predict human tumor drug concentrations. Such models consist of a forcing function, describing the plasma drug concentration-time profile, which is linked to a model describing drug disposition in tumors. The hybrid models are originally derived from preclinical data and then scaled to humans. Integral to the scale-up procedure is the ability to derive human forcing functions directly from clinical pharmacokinetic data. Three examples of this approach are presented based on preclinical investigations with carboplatin, topotecan, and temozolomide. Translation of these preclinical hybrid models to humans used a Monte Carlo simulation technique that accounted for intrasubject and intersubject variability. Different pharmacokinetic end points, such as the AUC tumor, were extracted from the simulated human tumor drug concentrations to show how the predicted drug concentrations might be used to select drug-dosing regimens. It is believed that this modeling strategy can be used as an aid in the drug development process by providing key insights into drug disposition in tumors and by offering a foundation to optimize drug regimen design. PMID:15585640

  5. A model to resolve organochlorine pharmacokinetics in migrating humpback whales.

    PubMed

    Cropp, Roger; Nash, Susan Bengtson; Hawker, Darryl

    2014-07-01

    Humpback whales are iconic mammals at the top of the Antarctic food chain. Their large reserves of lipid-rich tissues such as blubber predispose them to accumulation of lipophilic contaminants throughout their lifetime. Changes in the volume and distribution of lipids in humpback whales, particularly during migration, could play an important role in the pharmacokinetics of lipophilic contaminants such as the organochlorine pesticide hexachlorobenzene (HCB). Previous models have examined constant feeding and nonmigratory scenarios. In the present study, the authors develop a novel heuristic model to investigate HCB dynamics in a humpback whale and its environment by coupling an ecosystem nutrient-phytoplankton-zooplankton-detritus (NPZD) model, a dynamic energy budget (DEB) model, and a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. The model takes into account the seasonal feeding pattern of whales, their energy requirements, and fluctuating contaminant burdens in the supporting plankton food chain. It is applied to a male whale from weaning to maturity, spanning 20 migration and feeding cycles. The model is initialized with environmental HCB burdens similar to those measured in the Southern Ocean and predicts blubber HCB concentrations consistent with empirical concentrations observed in a southern hemisphere population of male, migrating humpback whales. Results show for the first time some important details of the relationship between energy budgets and organochlorine pharmacokinetics. PMID:24733631

  6. A model to resolve organochlorine pharmacokinetics in migrating humpback whales.

    PubMed

    Cropp, Roger; Nash, Susan Bengtson; Hawker, Darryl

    2014-07-01

    Humpback whales are iconic mammals at the top of the Antarctic food chain. Their large reserves of lipid-rich tissues such as blubber predispose them to accumulation of lipophilic contaminants throughout their lifetime. Changes in the volume and distribution of lipids in humpback whales, particularly during migration, could play an important role in the pharmacokinetics of lipophilic contaminants such as the organochlorine pesticide hexachlorobenzene (HCB). Previous models have examined constant feeding and nonmigratory scenarios. In the present study, the authors develop a novel heuristic model to investigate HCB dynamics in a humpback whale and its environment by coupling an ecosystem nutrient-phytoplankton-zooplankton-detritus (NPZD) model, a dynamic energy budget (DEB) model, and a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. The model takes into account the seasonal feeding pattern of whales, their energy requirements, and fluctuating contaminant burdens in the supporting plankton food chain. It is applied to a male whale from weaning to maturity, spanning 20 migration and feeding cycles. The model is initialized with environmental HCB burdens similar to those measured in the Southern Ocean and predicts blubber HCB concentrations consistent with empirical concentrations observed in a southern hemisphere population of male, migrating humpback whales. Results show for the first time some important details of the relationship between energy budgets and organochlorine pharmacokinetics.

  7. Effect of gemfibrozil and fenofibrate on the pharmacokinetics of atorvastatin.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, Lloyd R; Porcari, Anthony R; Alvey, Christine; Abel, Robert; Bullen, William; Hartman, Daniel

    2011-03-01

    Coadministration of statins and fibrates is beneficial in some patients by allowing simultaneous reduction of triglycerides and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol alongside elevation of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. However, the potential for drug interactions must be taken into consideration. Gemfibrozil increases systemic exposure to various different statins, whereas similar effects are not observed with fenofibrate, suggesting it may be a more appropriate choice for coadministration with statins. Gemfibrozil is reported to cause a moderate increase in the area under the curve (AUC) of atorvastatin, but the effect of fenofibrate on atorvastatin pharmacokinetics has not been described. This study compared the effects of multiple-dose administration of gemfibrozil and fenofibrate on the single-dose pharmacokinetics of atorvastatin. Gemfibrozil coadministration led to significant increases in the AUC of atorvastatin, 2-hydroxyatorvastatin, 2-hydroxyatorvastatin lactone, and 4-hydroxyatorvastatin lactone. In contrast, fenofibrate administration did not lead to clinically meaningful changes in the AUC for atorvastatin, atorvastatin lactone, 2-hydroxyatorvastatin, or 2-hydroxyatorvastatin lactone. The absence of a significant pharmacokinetic interaction between fenofibrate and atorvastatin is consistent with recent results showing no difference in safety profile between atorvastatin as monotherapy or in combination with fenofibric acid. Together, these data suggest that atorvastatin-fenofibrate combination therapy is unlikely to pose a risk to patients. PMID:20413454

  8. A decade of experience with a clinical pharmacokinetics service.

    PubMed

    Ambrose, P J; Smith, W E; Palarea, E R

    1988-09-01

    The development, operation, and functions of the pharmacokinetics service at Memorial Medical Center of Long Beach (MMCLB) are described, and the data used to determine the quality and cost-effectiveness of the service are presented. Current functions of the pharmacokinetics service at MMCLB include making brief written comments about the interpretations of serum drug concentrations (SDCs) and oral recommendations to physicians on dosage adjustment; provision of written consultations with dosage recommendations; provision of drug information, education, and research; and development of drug dosing guidelines for the pharmacy and medical staff. During the 10-year existence of this service, costs have been justified on the basis of not only revenue generated by the service (in the form of "drug concentration scheduling" and "drug concentration evaluation" fees charged to patients) but also by cost savings resulting from the prevention of inappropriate, misleading, and potentially dangerous SDCs. An audit conducted in 1986 showed that the policy of having pharmacists schedule the sampling times for SDCs saves about $500,000 annually. Quality assurance has been documented by auditing compliance with and therapeutic effectiveness of dosing guidelines and by working with laboratory personnel to identify and prevent spurious SDC results and assay errors. The methods used by the pharmacokinetics service at MMCLB to document the benefits of the service have been vital in proving both its cost-effectiveness and its positive effect on patient care. PMID:3147596

  9. ( sup 111 In-DTPA-D-Phe sup 1 )-octreotide, a potential radiopharmaceutical for imaging of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors: Synthesis, radiolabeling and in vitro validation

    SciTech Connect

    Bakker, W.H.; Albert, R.; Bruns, C.; Breeman, W.A.P.; Hofland, L.J.; Marbach, P.; Pless, J.; Pralet, D.; Stolz, B.; Koper, J.W.; Lamberts, S.W.J.; Visser, T.J.; Krenning, E.P. Sandoz Pharma AG, Basel )

    1991-01-01

    As starting material for a potentially convenient radiopharmaceutical, a diethylenetriaminopentaacetic acid (DTPA) conjugated derivative of octreotide (SMS 201-995) was prepared. This peptide, (DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide (SDZ 215-811) binds more than 95% of added {sup 111}In in an easy, single-step labeling procedure without necessity of further purification. The specific somatostatin-like biologic effect of these analogues was proven by the inhibition of growth hormone secretion by cultured rat pituitary cells in a dose-dependent fashion by octreotide, (DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide and non-radioactive ({sup 115}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide. The binding of ({sup 111}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide to rat brain cortex membranes proved to be displaced similarly by natural somatosatin as well as by octreotide, suggesting specific binding of ({sup 111}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide to somatostatin receptors. The binding of the indium-labeled compound showed a somewhat lower affinity when compared with the iodinated (Tyr{sup 3})-octreotide, but indium-labeled (DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide still binds with nanomolar affinity. In conjunction with in vivo studies, these results suggest that ({sup 111}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide is a promising radiopharmaceutical for scintigraphic imaging of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors.

  10. SU-E-I-82: PET Radiopharmaceuticals for Prostate Cancer Imaging: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandes, F; Silva, D da; Rodrigues, L

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to review new and clinical practice PET radiopharmaceuticals for prostate cancer imaging. Methods: PET radiopharmaceuticals were reviewed on the main databases. Availability, dosimetry, accuracy and limitations were considered. Results: The following radioisotopes with respective physical half-life and mean positron energy were found: {sup 18}F (109,7 min, 249,8 keV), {sup 89}Zr (78,4 hs, 395,5 keV), {sup 11}C (20,4 min, 385,7 keV) and {sup 68}Ga (67,8 min, 836 keV). {sup 68}Ga was the only one not produced by cyclotron. Radiopharmaceuticals uptake by glucose metabolism ({sup 18}F-FDG), lipogenesis ({sup 11}C-Choline and {sup 11}C-Acetate), amino acid transport (Anti-{sup 18}F-FACBC), bone matrix ({sup 18}F-NaF), prostatespecific membrane antigen ({sup 68}Ga-PSMA and {sup 89}Zr-J591), CXCR receptors ({sup 89}Ga-Pentixafor), adrenal receptors ({sup 18}F-FDHT) and gastrin release peptide receptor (bombesin analogue). Most of radiopharmaceuticals are urinary excretion, so bladder is the critical organ. 11C-choline (pancreas), Anti-{sup 18}FFACBC (liver) and {sup 18}F-FBDC (stomach wall) are the exception. Higher effective dose was seen {sup 18}F-NaF (27 μSv/MBq) while the lowest was {sup 11}CAcetate (3,5 μSv/MBq). Conclusion: Even though {sup 18}F-FDG has a large availability its high urinary excretion and poor uptake to slow growing disease offers weak results for prostate cancer. Better accuracy is obtained when {sup 18}F-NaF is used for bone metastatic investigation although physicians tend to choose bone scintigraphy probably due to its cost and practice. Many guidelines in oncology consider {sup 11}C or {sup 18}F labeled with Choline the gold standard for biochemical relapse after radical treatment. Local, lymph node and distant metastatic relapse can be evaluated at same time with this radiopharmaceutical. There is no consensus over bigger urinary excretion for {sup 18}F labeling. Anti-{sup 18}F-FACBC, {sup 68}Ga-PSMA and {sup

  11. Clinical pharmacokinetics of the salicylates.

    PubMed

    Needs, C J; Brooks, P M

    1985-01-01

    -order kinetics. The serum half-life of salicylic acid is dose-dependent; thus, the larger the dose employed, the longer it will take to reach steady-state. There is also evidence that enzyme induction of salicyluric acid formation occurs. No significant differences exist between the pharmacokinetics of the salicylates in the elderly or in children when compared with young adults. Apart from differences in free versus albumin-bound salicylate in various disease states and physiological conditions associated with low serum albumin, pharmacokinetic parameters in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, chronic renal failure or liver disease are essentially the same.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:3888490

  12. Population pharmacokinetic modeling and simulation of huperzine A in elderly Chinese subjects

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Lei; Qu, Yi; Yan, Jing; Liu, Gang-yi; Wang, Wei-liang; Wang, Yi-jun; Wang, Hong-yi; Zhang, Meng-qi; Lu, Chuan; Liu, Yun; Jia, Jing-yin; Hu, Chao-ying; Li, Xue-ning; Yu, Chen; Xu, Hong-rong

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Our preliminary results show that huperzine A, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor used to treat Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients in China, exhibits different pharmacokinetic features in elderly and young healthy subjects. However, its pharmacokinetic data in elderly subjects remains unavailable to date. Thus, we developed a population pharmacokinetic (PPK) model of huperzine A in elderly Chinese people, and identified the covariate affecting its pharmacokinetics for optimal individual administration. Methods: A total of 341 serum huperzine A concentration records was obtained from 2 completed clinical trials (14 elderly healthy subjects in a phase I pharmacokinetic study; 35 elderly AD patients in a phase II study). Population pharmacokinetic analysis was performed using the non-linear mixed-effect modeling software Phoenix NLME1.1.1. The effects of age, gender, body weight, height, creatinine, endogenous creatinine clearance rate as well as drugs administered concomitantly were analyzed. Bootstrap and visual predictive checks were used simultaneously to validate the final population pharmacokinetics models. Results: The plasma concentration-time profile of huperzine A was best described by a one-compartment model with first-order absorption and elimination. Age was identified as the covariate having significant influence on huperzine A clearance. The final PPK model of huperzine A was: CL (L/h)=2.4649*(age/86)(−3.3856), Ka=0.6750 h−1, V (L)=104.216. The final PPK model was demonstrated to be suitable and effective by the bootstrap and visual predictive checks. Conclusion: A PPK model of huperzine A in elderly Chinese subjects is established, which can be used to predict PPK parameters of huperzine A in the treatment of elderly AD patients. PMID:27180987

  13. Pharmacokinetics of marbofloxacin in horses.

    PubMed

    Bousquet-Melou, A; Bernard, S; Schneider, M; Toutain, P L

    2002-07-01

    Marbofloxacin is a fluoroquinolone antibiotic expected to be effective in the treatment of infections involving gram-negative and some gram-positive bacteria in horses. In order to design a rational dosage regimen for the substance in horses, the pharmacokinetic properties of marbofloxacin were investigated in 6 horses after i.v., subcutaneous and oral administration of a single dose of 2 mg/kg bwt and the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) assessed for bacteria isolated from equine infectious pathologies. The clearance of marbofloxacin was mean +/- s.d. 0.25 +/- 0.05 l/kg/h and the terminal half-life 756 +/- 1.99 h. The marbofloxacin absolute bioavailabilities after subcutaneous and oral administration were 98 +/- 11% and 62 +/- 8%, respectively. The MIC required to inhibit 90% of isolates (MIC90) was 0.027 microg/ml for enterobacteriaceae and 0.21 microg/ml for Staphylococcus aureus. The values of surrogate markers of antimicrobial efficacy (AUIC, Cmax/MIC ratio, time above MIC90) were calculated and the marbofloxacin concentration profiles simulated for repeated administrations. These data were used to determine rational dosage regimens for target bacteria. Considering the breakpoint values of efficacy indices for fluoroquinolones, a marbofloxacin dosage regimen of 2 mg/kg bwt/24 h by i.v., subcutaneous or oral routes was more appropriate for enterobacteriaceae than for S. aureus.

  14. Modeling of pharmacokinetic systems using stochastic deconvolution.

    PubMed

    Kakhi, Maziar; Chittenden, Jason

    2013-12-01

    In environments where complete mechanistic knowledge of the system dynamics is not available, a synergy of first-principle concepts, stochastic methods and statistical approaches can provide an efficient, accurate, and insightful strategy for model development. In this work, a system of ordinary differential equations describing system pharmacokinetics (PK) was coupled to a Wiener process for tracking the absorption rate coefficient, and was embedded in a nonlinear mixed effects population PK formalism. The procedure is referred to as "stochastic deconvolution" and it is proposed as a diagnostic tool to inform on a mapping function between the fraction of the drug absorbed and the fraction of the drug dissolved when applying one-stage methods to in vitro-in vivo correlation modeling. The goal of this work was to show that stochastic deconvolution can infer an a priori specified absorption profile given dense observational (simulated) data. The results demonstrate that the mathematical model is able to accurately reproduce the simulated data in scenarios where solution strategies for linear, time-invariant systems would assuredly fail. To this end, PK systems that are representative of Michaelis-Menten kinetics and enterohepatic circulation were investigated. Furthermore, the solution times are manageable using a modest computer hardware platform.

  15. Bench to bedside development of GMP grade Rhenium-188-HEDP, a radiopharmaceutical for targeted treatment of painful bone metastases.

    PubMed

    ter Heine, Rob; Lange, Rogier; Breukels, Oscar B; Bloemendal, Haiko J; Rummenie, Rob G; Wakker, Antoinette M; de Graaf, Hilly; Beekman, Freek J; van der Westerlaken, Monique M L; Malingré, Mirte M; Wielders, Jos P M; van den Berg, Leo; Hendrikse, N Harry; de Klerk, John M H

    2014-04-25

    Bone-targeting therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals are effective agents for treatment of painful bone metastases. Rhenium-188-HEDP is such a therapeutic radiopharmaceutical and has advantages over commercially available alternatives in terms of efficacy, safety and the ability to be produced on-site, allowing rapid treatment upon presentation of patients with pain. Unlike many other radiopharmaceuticals, there are no standardized preparation methods for Rhenium-188-HEDP. It is known, however, that drug composition may not only affect stability of the final drug product, but it may also influence bone affinity and, thus, efficacy. Furthermore, for support of clinical studies with Rhenium-188-HEDP as an investigational medicinal product, preparation of this radiopharmaceutical has to be performed under GMP conditions. To our knowledge, no group has reported on the preparation of Rhenium-188-HEDP under GMP conditions or on stock production of sterile non-radioactive starting materials. We present the production of GMP grade Rhenium-188-HEDP for application of this therapeutic radiopharmaceutical in routine clinical practice and for support of clinical studies. In addition, bio-distribution data of Rhenium-188-HEDP in mice and in patients with bone metastases originating from prostate cancer are presented.

  16. The influence of weightlessness on pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Gandia, Peggy; Saivin, Sylvie; Houin, Georges

    2005-12-01

    The primary hostile factor during a spaceflight is the lack of gravity, which can induce space motion sickness and act on bones, muscles and the cardiovascular system. These physiological effects may modify the pharmacokinetics of the drugs administered during the flight producing reduced pharmacological activity or appearance of adverse effects. Given the small number of spaceflights and the difficulties of conducting experiments during missions, pharmacokinetic data obtained in flight are insufficient to determine if drug monitoring is necessary for the drugs present in the onboard medical kit. Therefore, validated earthbound models like tail-suspension performed with animals and long-term bedrest performed with human volunteers are used to simulate weightlessness and to study the pharmacokinetic variations of either absorption, distribution, or elimination of drugs. As a result of these studies, it is possible to make some dosing recommendations but more information is necessary to predict with precision all of the pharmacokinetic variations occurring in spaceflight. To collect more pharmacokinetic information, head-down bedrest studies are still the best solution and as saliva is an appropriate substitution for plasma for some drugs, salivary sampling can be planned during flights.

  17. Pharmacokinetic modeling in aquatic animals. 1. Models and concepts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barron, M.G.; Stehly, Guy R.; Hayton, W.L.

    1990-01-01

    While clinical and toxicological applications of pharmacokinetics have continued to evolve both conceptually and experimentally, pharmacokinetics modeling in aquatic animals has not progressed accordingly. In this paper we present methods and concepts of pharmacokinetic modeling in aquatic animals using multicompartmental, clearance-based, non-compartmental and physiologically-based pharmacokinetic models. These models should be considered as alternatives to traditional approaches, which assume that the animal acts as a single homogeneous compartment based on apparent monoexponential elimination.

  18. Environmental effects on the structure of metal ion-DOTA complexes: An ab initio study of radiopharmaceutical metals.

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, E Y; Lightstone, F C; Colvin, M E

    2006-02-10

    Quantum mechanical calculations were performed to study the differences between the important radiopharmaceutical metals yttrium (Y) and indium (In) bound by DOTA and modified DOTA molecules. Energies were calculated at the MP2/6-31+G(d)//HF/6-31G(d) levels, using effective core potentials on the Y and In ions. Although the minimum energy structures obtained are similar for both metal ion-DOTA complexes, changes in coordination and local environment significantly affect the geometries and energies of these complexes. Coordination by a single water molecule causes a change in the coordination number and a change in the position of the metal ion in In-DOTA; but, Y-DOTA is hardly affected by water coordination. When one of the DOTA carboxylates is replaced by an amide, the coordination energy for the amide arm shows a large variation between the Y and In ions. Optimizations including water and guandinium moieties to approximate the effects of antibody binding indicate a large energy cost for the DOTA-chelated In to adopt the ideal conformation for antibody binding.

  19. In vitro-in vivo Pharmacokinetic correlation model for quality assurance of antiretroviral drugs

    PubMed Central

    Restrepo Valencia, Piedad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The in vitro-in vivo pharmacokinetic correlation models (IVIVC) are a fundamental part of the drug discovery and development process. The ability to accurately predict the in vivo pharmacokinetic profile of a drug based on in vitro observations can have several applications during a successful development process. Objective: To develop a comprehensive model to predict the in vivo absorption of antiretroviral drugs based on permeability studies, in vitro and in vivo solubility and demonstrate its correlation with the pharmacokinetic profile in humans. Methods: Analytical tools to test the biopharmaceutical properties of stavudine, lamivudine y zidovudine were developed. The kinetics of dissolution, permeability in caco-2 cells and pharmacokinetics of absorption in rabbits and healthy volunteers were evaluated. Results: The cumulative areas under the curve (AUC) obtained in the permeability study with Caco-2 cells, the dissolution study and the pharmacokinetics in rabbits correlated with the cumulative AUC values in humans. These results demonstrated a direct relation between in vitro data and absorption, both in humans and in the in vivo model. Conclusions: The analytical methods and procedures applied to the development of an IVIVC model showed a strong correlation among themselves. These IVIVC models are proposed as alternative and cost/effective methods to evaluate the biopharmaceutical properties that determine the bioavailability of a drug and their application includes the development process, quality assurance, bioequivalence studies and pharmacosurveillance. PMID:26600625

  20. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and toxicology of theranostic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Homan; Mintri, Shrutika; Menon, Archita Venugopal; Lee, Hea Yeon; Choi, Hak Soo; Kim, Jonghan

    2015-11-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are considered a promising tool in both diagnosis and therapeutics. Theranostic NPs possess the combined properties of targeted imaging and drug delivery within a single entity. While the categorization of theranostic NPs is based on their structure and composition, the pharmacokinetics of NPs are significantly influenced by the physicochemical properties of theranostic NPs as well as the routes of administration. Consequently, altered pharmacokinetics modify the pharmacodynamic efficacy and toxicity of NPs. Although theranostic NPs hold great promise in nanomedicine and biomedical applications, a lack of understanding persists on the mechanisms of the biodistribution and adverse effects of NPs. To better understand the diagnostic and therapeutic functions of NPs, this review discusses the factors that influence the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and toxicology of theranostic NPs, along with several strategies for developing novel diagnostic and therapeutic modalities.

  1. Copper-64 radiopharmaceuticals for PET imaging of cancer: advances in preclinical and clinical research.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Carolyn J; Ferdani, Riccardo

    2009-08-01

    Copper-64 (T(1/2) = 12.7 hours; beta(+), 0.653 MeV [17.8 %]; beta(-), 0.579 MeV [38.4 %]) has decay characteristics that allow for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging and targeted radiotherapy of cancer. The well-established coordination chemistry of copper allows for its reaction with a wide variety of chelator systems that can potentially be linked to peptides and other biologically relevant small molecules, antibodies, proteins, and nanoparticles. The 12.7-hours half-life of 64Cu provides the flexibility to image both smaller molecules and larger, slower clearing proteins and nanoparticles. In a practical sense, the radionuclide or the 64Cu-radiopharmaceuticals can be easily shipped for PET imaging studies at sites remote to the production facility. Due to the versatility of 64Cu, there has been an abundance of novel research in this area over the past 20 years, primarily in the area of PET imaging, but also for the targeted radiotherapy of cancer. The biologic activity of the hypoxia imaging agent, 60/64Cu-ATSM, has been described in great detail in animal models and in clinical PET studies. An investigational new drug application for 64Cu-ATSM was recently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the United States, paving the way for a multicenter trial to validate the utility of this agent, with the hopeful result being FDA approval for routine clinical use. This article discusses state-of-the-art cancer imaging with 64Cu radiopharmaceuticals, including 64Cu-ATSM for imaging hypoxia, 64Cu-labeled peptides for tumor-receptor targeting, (64)Cu-labeled monoclonal antibodies for targeting tumor antigens, and 64Cu-labeled nanoparticles for cancer targeting. The emphasis of this article will be on the new scientific discoveries involving (64)Cu radiopharmaceuticals, as well as the translation of these into human studies.

  2. Radio-UHPLC: a tool for rapidly determining the radiochemical purity of technetium-99m radiopharmaceuticals?

    PubMed

    Kryza, David; Janier, Marc

    2013-08-01

    Determining the radiochemical purity (RCP) of technetium-99m ((99m)Tc) radiopharmaceuticals using the method described in the package insert is a time-consuming process, requiring particular attention in order to achieve accurate RCP results. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether radio-ultra high performance liquid chromatography (radio-UHPLC) may be an alternative method for RCP testing of (99m)Tc-tetrofosmin, (99m)Tc-MAG3 and (99m)Tc-sestamibi. Results obtained using radio-UHPLC were in excellent agreement with the standard method, with total analysis time being reduced to less than 3 min.

  3. High--valent technetium chemistry-new opportunities for radiopharmaceutical developments.

    PubMed

    Braband, Henrik

    2014-04-01

    The rich coordination chemistry of (99m) Tc distinguishes this radiometal from other radiolabels applied for single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) or positron emission tomography (PET). This potential should be used to create novel opportunities for the development of effective imaging probes. In this context, the field of high-valent technetium chemistry has received much interest. It has been shown that fac-{(99m) TcO3 }(+) complexes are potential new synthons for radiopharmaceutical developments, due to their unique physicochemical properties and unprecedented reactivity. In this article, recent developments and the 'state of the art' in this field of technetium chemistry will be reviewed comprehensively.

  4. ACR-ASTRO practice guideline for the performance of therapy with unsealed radiopharmaceutical sources.

    PubMed

    Henkin, Robert E; Del Rowe, John D; Grigsby, Perry W; Hartford, Alan C; Jadvar, Hossein; Macklis, Roger M; Parker, J Anthony; Wong, Jeffrey Y C; Rosenthal, Seth A

    2011-08-01

    This guideline is intended to guide appropriately trained and licensed physicians performing therapy with unsealed radiopharmaceutical sources. Adherence to this guideline should help to maximize the efficacious use of these procedures, maintain safe conditions, and ensure compliance with applicable regulations. The topics dealt with in this guideline include indications for the use of iodine-131, both for the treatment of hyperthyroidism and thyroid carcinoma. In addition, indications for other less common procedures include those for the use of phosphorous-32 in its liquid and colloidal forms, strontium-89, samarium-153, and the use of Y-90 antibodies.

  5. USCEA/NIST measurement assurance programs for the radiopharmaceutical and nuclear power industries

    SciTech Connect

    Golas, D.B.

    1993-12-31

    In cooperation with the U.S. Council for Energy Awareness (USCEA), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) supervises and administers two measurement assurance programs for radioactivity measurement traceability. One, in existence since the mid 1970s, provides traceability to suppliers of radiochemicals and radiopharmaceuticals, dose calibrators, and nuclear pharmacy services. The second program, begun in 1987, provides traceability to the nuclear power industry for utilities, source suppliers, and service laboratories. Each program is described, and the results of measurements of samples of known, but undisclosed activity, prepared at NIST and measured by the participants are presented.

  6. Proliferation dangers associated with nuclear medicine: getting weapons-grade uranium out of radiopharmaceutical production.

    PubMed

    Williams, Bill; Ruff, Tilman A

    2007-01-01

    Abolishing the threat of nuclear war requires the outlawing of nuclear weapons and dismantling current nuclear weapon stockpiles, but also depends on eliminating access to fissile material (nuclear weapon fuel). The near-universal use of weapons-grade, highly enriched uranium (HEU) to produce radiopharmaceuticals is a significant proliferation hazard. Health professionals have a strategic opportunity and obligation to progress the elimination of medically-related commerce in HEU, closing one of the most vulnerable pathways to the much-feared 'terrorist bomb'.

  7. A Generator-Produced Gallium-68 Radiopharmaceutical for PET Imaging of Myocardial Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vijay; Sivapackiam, Jothilingam; Harpstrite, Scott E.; Prior, Julie L.; Gu, Hannah; Rath, Nigam P.; Piwnica-Worms, David

    2014-01-01

    Lipophilic cationic technetium-99m-complexes are widely used for myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). However, inherent uncertainties in the supply chain of molybdenum-99, the parent isotope required for manufacturing 99Mo/99mTc generators, intensifies the need for discovery of novel MPI agents incorporating alternative radionuclides. Recently, germanium/gallium (Ge/Ga) generators capable of producing high quality 68Ga, an isotope with excellent emission characteristics for clinical PET imaging, have emerged. Herein, we report a novel 68Ga-complex identified through mechanism-based cell screening that holds promise as a generator-produced radiopharmaceutical for PET MPI. PMID:25353349

  8. [Research progress studies on pharmacology and pharmacokinetics of ligustilide].

    PubMed

    Zuo, Ai-Hua; Wang, Li; Xiao, Hong-Bin

    2012-11-01

    Ligustilide is contained highly or around 1% in such umbelliferous plants as Angelica sinensis and Ligusticum chuanxiong, is one of main bioactive constituents. It shows many pharmacological activities related to their efficacy. At present, ligustilide has attracted extensive attention and more and more studies have been reported, indicating that it is a promising compound. This essay summarizes the progress of pharmacological effects of ligustilide on neuroprotection, vasodilatation, anti-caner and anti-tumor, analgesia and anti-inflammation, and pharmacokinetics including absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion, providing basis for further studies and development of ligustilide. PMID:23373200

  9. Clinical pharmacokinetics and metabolism of bevantolol.

    PubMed

    Latts, J R

    1986-03-01

    Bevantolol (the hydrochloride salt) has pharmacokinetic properties that are clinically advantageous. Bevantolol is well absorbed orally (greater than 70%); and the systemic bioavailability is 60%. Peak plasma concentrations are achieved 1 to 2 hours following an oral dose. Elimination is first-order with an average elimination half-life of 1.5 hours. Bevantolol exhibits linear pharmacokinetics within the therapeutic range (100 to 400 mg) with no change in half-life with chronic dosing. These properties result in predictable plasma levels and predictable drug response.

  10. Bioelectrical impedance modelling of gentamicin pharmacokinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Zarowitz, B J; Pilla, A M; Peterson, E L

    1989-10-01

    1. Bioelectrical impedance analysis was used to develop descriptive models of gentamicin pharmacokinetic parameters in 30 adult in-patients receiving therapy with gentamicin. 2. Serial blood samples obtained from each subject at steady state were analyzed and used to derive gentamicin pharmacokinetic parameters. 3. Multiple regression equations were developed for clearance, elimination rate constant and volume of distribution at steady state and were all statistically significant at P less than 0.05. 4. Clinical validation of this innovative technique is warranted before clinical use is recommended.

  11. Single-cell and subcellular pharmacokinetic imaging allows insight into drug action in vivo.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Greg M; Yang, Katy S; Reiner, Thomas; Kohler, Rainer H; Sorger, Peter; Mitchison, Tim; Weissleder, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic analysis at the organ level provides insight into how drugs distribute throughout the body, but cannot explain how drugs work at the cellular level. Here we demonstrate in vivo single-cell pharmacokinetic imaging of PARP-1 inhibitors and model drug behaviour under varying conditions. We visualize intracellular kinetics of the PARP-1 inhibitor distribution in real time, showing that PARP-1 inhibitors reach their cellular target compartment, the nucleus, within minutes in vivo both in cancer and normal cells in various cancer models. We also use these data to validate predictive finite element modelling. Our theoretical and experimental data indicate that tumour cells are exposed to sufficiently high PARP-1 inhibitor concentrations in vivo and suggest that drug inefficiency is likely related to proteomic heterogeneity or insensitivity of cancer cells to DNA-repair inhibition. This suggests that single-cell pharmacokinetic imaging and derived modelling improve our understanding of drug action at single-cell resolution in vivo. PMID:23422672

  12. Single-cell and subcellular pharmacokinetic imaging allows insight into drug action in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Greg M.; Yang, Katy S.; Reiner, Thomas; Kohler, Rainer H.; Sorger, Peter; Mitchison, Tim; Weissleder, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic analysis at the organ level provides insight into how drugs distribute throughout the body but cannot explain how drugs work at the cellular level. Here we demonstrate in vivo single cell pharmacokinetic imaging of PARP-1 inhibitors (PARPi) and model drug behavior under varying conditions. We visualize intracellular kinetics of PARPi distribution in real time, showing that PARPi reaches its cellular target compartment, the nucleus, within minutes in vivo both in cancer and normal cells in various cancer models. We also use these data to validate predictive finite element modeling. Our theoretical and experimental data indicate that tumor cells are exposed to sufficiently high PARPi concentrations in vivo and suggest that drug inefficiency is likely related to proteomic heterogeneity or insensitivity of cancer cells to DNA repair inhibition. This suggests that single cell pharmacokinetic imaging and derived modeling improves our understanding of drug action at single cell resolution in vivo. PMID:23422672

  13. A Population Pharmacokinetic Model for Vancomycin in Adult Patients Receiving Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Moore, J N; Healy, J R; Thoma, B N; Peahota, M M; Ahamadi, M; Schmidt, L; Cavarocchi, N C; Kraft, W K

    2016-09-01

    The literature on the pharmacokinetics of vancomycin in patients undergoing extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) therapy is sparse. A population pharmacokinetic (PK) model for vancomycin in ECMO patients was developed using a nonlinear mixed effects modeling on the concentration-time profiles of 14 ECMO patients who received intravenous vancomycin. Model selection was based on log-likelihood criterion, goodness of fit plots, and scientific plausibility. Identification of covariates was done using a full covariate model approach. The pharmacokinetics of vancomycin was adequately described with a two-compartment model. Parameters included clearance of 2.83 L/hr, limited central volume of distribution 24.2 L, and low residual variability 0.67%. Findings from the analysis suggest that standard dosing recommendations for vancomycin in non-ECMO patients are adequate to achieve therapeutic trough concentrations in ECMO patients. This further shows that ECMO minimally affects the PK of vancomycin in adults including in higher-weight patients. PMID:27639260

  14. A Population Pharmacokinetic Model for Vancomycin in Adult Patients Receiving Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Healy, JR; Thoma, BN; Peahota, MM; Ahamadi, M; Schmidt, L; Cavarocchi, NC; Kraft, WK

    2016-01-01

    The literature on the pharmacokinetics of vancomycin in patients undergoing extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) therapy is sparse. A population pharmacokinetic (PK) model for vancomycin in ECMO patients was developed using a nonlinear mixed effects modeling on the concentration–time profiles of 14 ECMO patients who received intravenous vancomycin. Model selection was based on log‐likelihood criterion, goodness of fit plots, and scientific plausibility. Identification of covariates was done using a full covariate model approach. The pharmacokinetics of vancomycin was adequately described with a two‐compartment model. Parameters included clearance of 2.83 L/hr, limited central volume of distribution 24.2 L, and low residual variability 0.67%. Findings from the analysis suggest that standard dosing recommendations for vancomycin in non‐ECMO patients are adequate to achieve therapeutic trough concentrations in ECMO patients. This further shows that ECMO minimally affects the PK of vancomycin in adults including in higher‐weight patients. PMID:27639260

  15. The pharmacokinetics in mice and dogs of nitroimidazole radiosensitizers and chemosensitizers more lipophilic than misonidazole

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.; Workman, P.; Owen, L.

    1982-03-01

    The pharmacokinetic properties of nitroimidazole radiosensitizers and chemosensitizers more lipophilic than misonidazole (MISO) were examined. In dogs, 2 analogues showed comparable peak plasma concentrations with considerable shorter half-lives (t1/2) and reduced areas under curves (AUC). Benznidazole (R0 07-1051) had a much longer t1/2, a higher AUC, and somewhat higher peak concentrations. In mice tumor/plasma, brain/plasma, and tumor/brain ratios were generally similar to MISO, as was penetration of brain and peripheral nerve by benznidazole in dogs. Selection of lipophilic analogues with appropriate pharmacokinetic properties may facilitate accommodation of the potentially different requirements for improved radiosensitization or chemosensitization.

  16. Inhalation pharmacokinetics of isoprene in rats and mice.

    PubMed Central

    Peter, H; Wiegand, H J; Filser, J G; Bolt, H M; Laib, R J

    1990-01-01

    Studies on inhalation pharmacokinetics of isoprene were conducted in rats (Wistar) and mice (B6C3F1) to investigate possible species differences in metabolism of this compound. Pharmacokinetic analysis of isoprene inhaled by rats and mice revealed saturation kinetics of isoprene metabolism in both species. For rats and mice, linear pharmacokinetics apply at exposure concentrations below 300 ppm isoprene. Saturation of isoprene metabolism is practically complete at atmospheric concentrations of about 1000 ppm in rats and about 2000 ppm in mice. In the lower concentration range where first-order metabolism applies, metabolic clearance (related to the concentration in the atmosphere) of inhaled isoprene per kilogram body weight was 6200 mL/hr for rats and 12,000 mL/hr for mice. The estimated maximal metabolic elimination rates were 130 mumole/hr/kg for rats and 400 mumole/hr/kg for mice. This shows that the rate of isoprene metabolism in mice is about two or three times that in rats. When the untreated animals are kept in a closed all-glass exposure system, the exhalation of isoprene into the system can be measured. This shows that the isoprene endogenously produced by the animals is systemically available within the animal organism. From such experiments the endogenous production rate of isoprene was calculated to be 1.9 mumole/hr/kg for rats and 0.4 mumole/hr/kg for mice. Our data indicate that the endogenous production of isoprene should be accounted for when discussing a possible carcinogenic or mutagenic risk of this compound. PMID:2401276

  17. Comparative evaluation of glutamate-sensitive radiopharmaceuticals: Technetium-99m-glutamic acid and technetium-99m-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-bis(glutamate) conjugate for tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Kakkar, Dipti; Tiwari, Anjani K; Chuttani, Krishna; Kaul, Ankur; Singh, Harpal; Mishra, Anil K

    2010-12-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography has become a significant imaging modality with huge potential to visualize and provide information of anatomic dysfunctions that are predictive of future diseases. This imaging tool is complimented by radiopharmaceuticals/radiosubstrates that help in imaging specific physiological aspects of the human body. The present study was undertaken to explore the utility of technetium-99m (⁹⁹(m)Tc)-labeled glutamate conjugates for tumor scintigraphy. As part of our efforts to further utilize the application of chelating agents, glutamic acid was conjugated with a multidentate ligand, diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA). The DTPA-glutamate conjugate [DTPA-bis(Glu)] was well characterized by IR, NMR, and mass spectroscopy. The biological activity of glutamic acid was compared with its DTPA conjugate by radiocomplexation with ⁹⁹(m)Tc (labeling efficiency ≥98%). In vivo studies of both the radiolabeled complexes ⁹⁹(m)Tc-Glu and ⁹⁹(m)Tc-DTPA-bis(Glu) were then carried out, followed by gamma scintigraphy in New Zealand albino rabbits. Improved serum stability of ⁹⁹(m)Tc-labeled DTPA conjugate indicated that ⁹⁹(m)Tc remained bound to the conjugate up to 24 hours. Blood clearance showed a relatively slow washout of the DTPA conjugate when compared with the labeled glutamate. Biodistribution characteristics of the conjugate in Balb/c mice revealed that DTPA conjugation of glutamic acid favors less accumulation in the liver and bone and rapid renal clearance. Tumor scintigraphy in mice showed increasing tumor accumulation, stable up to 4 hours. These preliminary studies show that ⁹⁹(m)Tc-DTPA-bis(Glu) can be a useful radiopharmaceutical for diagnostic applications in single-photon emission computed tomography imaging.

  18. 62Zn-EDDA: a radiopharmaceutical for pancreatic functional diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Fujibayashi, Y; Saji, H; Yomoda, I; Kawai, K; Horiuchi, K; Adachi, H; Torizuka, K; Yokoyama, A

    1986-01-01

    As Zn is closely associated with the exocrine and endocrine functions of the pancreas, exploitation of Zn metabolism for anatomical and functional diagnosis was conceived, namely with the recent availability of positron emitting 62Zn (t1/2 = 9 h). In the present paper, response changes in Zn biodistribution (mice) and Zn excretion through the pancreatic duct (rats) due to the stimulation of gastro-intestinal hormones like secretin, CCK-PZ (exocrine stimulation) and glucose (endocrine stimulation) were studied. Under these stimuli, the pancreatic secretion of radioactive Zn through cannulated pancreatic duct showed increased Zn secretion only under the CCK-PZ effect, 3 h post 65Zn (t1/2 = 270 d) injection. Tissue biodistribution in mice pre-injected with 65Zn showed pancreas specific decrease of radioactive Zn whenever a gastro-intestinal hormone was post-administered, whereas the glucose effect was negligible. Thus, the effective mobilization of the injected radioactive Zn, upon exocrine stimulation, represented by CCK-PZ, favored the exploration of a functional study of the pancreas with the positron computed tomograph (PCT) using short lived nuclide labeled 62Zn-EDDA in dog. Evidence of the applicability of this system in regional function studies of the pancreas was obtained. Demonstration of Zn participation in the exocrine function of the pancreas in-vivo holds considerable promise for diagnosis of pancreatic diseases. PMID:3086246

  19. A strategy for the study of cerebral amino acid transport using iodine-123-labeled amino acid radiopharmaceutical: 3-iodo-alpha-methyl-L-tyrosine

    SciTech Connect

    Kawai, K.; Fujibayashi, Y.; Saji, H.; Yonekura, Y.; Konishi, J.; Kubodera, A.; Yokoyama, A. )

    1991-05-01

    We examined the brain accumulation of iodine-123-iodo-alpha-methyl-L-tyrosine ({sup 123}I-L-AMT) in mice and rats. I-L-AMT showed high brain accumulation in mice, and in rats; rat brain uptake index exceeded that of {sup 14}C-L-tyrosine. The brain uptake index and the brain slice studies indicated the affinity of I-L-AMT for carrier-mediated and stereoselective active transport systems, respectively; both operating across the blood-brain barrier and cell membranes of the brain. The tissue homogenate analysis revealed that most of the accumulated radioactivity belonged to intact I-L-AMT, an indication of its stability. Thus, {sup 123}I-L-AMT appears to be a useful radiopharmaceutical for the selective measurement of cerebral amino acid transport.

  20. {sup 99m}Tc radiopharmaceuticals for brain perfusion imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Deutsch, E.; Volkert, W.A.

    1991-12-31

    It is well established that small, neutral, lipophilic technetium complexes can diffuse into the brain and then be trapped intracellularly by a variety of mechanisms. A more detailed understanding of the structural and chemical parameters which promote efficient diffusion into the brain, and which underlie the trapping mechanisms, will be necessary to delineate the clinical relevance of current agents, and to design improved technetium 99 pharmaceuticals. Current technetium 99 brain-perfusion imaging agents do not show ideal characteristics of brain uptake and retention. Furthermore, significant fractions of the technetium 99 complexes are lost between site of injection and the brain. Thus, it is difficult to use these current agents to quantitate regional cerebral blood flow. Nevertheless, these agents are proving extremely valuable for the SPECT evaluation of abnormalities in brain perfusion patients with neurological disorders.

  1. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Grotenhermen, Franjo

    2003-01-01

    Delta(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the main source of the pharmacological effects caused by the consumption of cannabis, both the marijuana-like action and the medicinal benefits of the plant. However, its acid metabolite THC-COOH, the non-psychotropic cannabidiol (CBD), several cannabinoid analogues and newly discovered modulators of the endogenous cannabinoid system are also promising candidates for clinical research and therapeutic uses. Cannabinoids exert many effects through activation of G-protein-coupled cannabinoid receptors in the brain and peripheral tissues. Additionally, there is evidence for non-receptor-dependent mechanisms. Natural cannabis products and single cannabinoids are usually inhaled or taken orally; the rectal route, sublingual administration, transdermal delivery, eye drops and aerosols have only been used in a few studies and are of little relevance in practice today. The pharmacokinetics of THC vary as a function of its route of administration. Pulmonary assimilation of inhaled THC causes a maximum plasma concentration within minutes, psychotropic effects start within seconds to a few minutes, reach a maximum after 15-30 minutes, and taper off within 2-3 hours. Following oral ingestion, psychotropic effects set in with a delay of 30-90 minutes, reach their maximum after 2-3 hours and last for about 4-12 hours, depending on dose and specific effect. At doses exceeding the psychotropic threshold, ingestion of cannabis usually causes enhanced well-being and relaxation with an intensification of ordinary sensory experiences. The most important acute adverse effects caused by overdosing are anxiety and panic attacks, and with regard to somatic effects increased heart rate and changes in blood pressure. Regular use of cannabis may lead to dependency and to a mild withdrawal syndrome. The existence and the intensity of possible long-term adverse effects on psyche and cognition, immune system, fertility and pregnancy remain controversial

  2. Measurement and control of the air contamination generated in a medical cyclotron facility for PET radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Calandrino, R; del Vecchio, A; Todde, S; Fazio, F

    2007-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to report the data concerning the contamination of the exhausted air from the hot cells dedicated to the large-scale synthesis of positron emission tomography (PET) radiopharmaceuticals. Two cyclotrons are currently operating in Ospedale San Raffaele for the routine production of C and F. They are linked with four radiochemistry laboratories by means of shielded radioisotope delivery lines. The above labs are dedicated both to the large scale preparation and to the research and development of PET radiopharmaceuticals. The department hosts four CT-PET scanners, which operate with a mean patient workload of 40 per day. Radiosyntheses are performed using automated modules located in 10 hot cells. The air outlets are monitored online by a 2-inch NaI(Tl) counter in a Marinelli geometry counting volume. Contamination values up to 10(5) Bq L(-1) have been measured at the hot cell exit point during the synthesis. The corresponding concentrations at the point of release in atmosphere are largely above the threshold of 1.29 Bq L(-1), defined by national regulations as the limit for free environmental release. A shielded gas storage system controlled by a dedicated, customized software program has thus been installed to prevent the potentially hazardous release of gaseous radioactive contaminants. The system has allowed us to maintain the effective dose to neighboring population groups below the limit of 10 muSv y(-1).

  3. Dose rate measurements from radiopharmaceuticals: implications for nuclear medicine staff and for children with radioactive parents.

    PubMed

    Greaves, C D; Tindale, W B

    1999-02-01

    Following the introduction of a number of radiopharmaceuticals, we assessed the dose received by staff working in the nuclear medicine department and also by children who may be in close contact with a radioactive parent. We measured departure dose rates (microSv.h-1) at distances of 0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 m from the skin surface at the level of the thyroid, chest and bladder of patients undergoing the following nuclear medicine procedures: MUGA scans using 99Tcm-labelled red blood cells, myocardial perfusion scans using 99Tcm-labelled radiopharmaceuticals, lymphoscintigraphy using colloidal 99Tcm (Re) sulphide, bone scans using 99Tcm-labelled oxidronate, 111In-octreotide scans, 111In-labelled leukocyte studies and cardiac reinjection studies using 201Tl. The maximum dose rates at 0.1 m were those from MUGA studies (167.3 microSv.h-1) and myocardial perfusion studies (one-day protocol = 391.7 microSv.h-1, two-day protocol = 121.8 microSv.h-1). The implications of these dose rates on both technical and nursing staff are assessed. Also, the dose received by an infant in close contact with a parent following a nuclear medicine investigation was estimated.

  4. Radiopharmaceuticals for radiation synovectomy: Evaluation of two yttrium-90 particulate agents

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M.A.; Chinol, M.

    1989-06-01

    Radiation synovectomy, a noninvasive therapeutic alternative to surgical synovectomy, has not gained widespread acceptance in the United States because of the lack of a suitable radiopharmaceutical. Two new radioactive particles, (/sup 90/Y)Ca oxalate and (/sup 90/Y)ferric hydroxide macroaggregates (FHMA), were developed in our laboratory and evaluated for size, stability, and joint leakage. More than 90% of the (/sup 90/Y)Ca oxalate particles were in the optimal size range of 1-10 microns, and the unbound activity in serum and synovial fluid was 3.7% to 5.0%. Following injection in rabbit knees, leakage of (/sup 90/Y)Ca oxalate was 5 +/- 2%, with localization primarily in the bone and virtually no uptake by the lymph nodes or liver. Yttrium-90 FHMA particles were larger (95% greater than 10 microns), and at least on a microscopic level, appeared to distribute homogeneously over the articular surface. Leakage of (/sup 90/Y)FHMA was initially less but eventually slightly exceeded that of (/sup 90/Y)Ca oxalate. Nevertheless, both radiopharmaceuticals can provide a satisfactory therapeutic dose to the knee with less than half the leakage and a marked reduction in absorbed dose to nontarget tissues compared to previously tested agents. Ease of preparation, physical characteristics of the /sup 90/Y beta ray, and apparent lack of substantial leakage from the joint make these agents extremely attractive for clinical evaluation in rheumatoid arthritis patients who are unresponsive to medical therapy.

  5. Relationship between lipophilicity and brain extraction of C-11-labeled radiopharmaceuticals. [Baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Dischino, D.D.; Welch, M.J.; Kilbourn, M.R.; Raichle, M.E.

    1983-11-01

    The brain extraction of fifteen C-11-labeled compounds during a single capillary transit was studied in adult baboons by external detection of these tracers after injection into the internal carotid artery. The log P/sub oct/ (partition coefficient for octanol/water) values of these compounds range from -0.7 to greater than 4.0. A parabolic relationship was found between the log P/sub oct/value of the C-11-labeled compounds and the fraction of the radiopharmaceutical entering the brain. Compounds with log P/sub oct/ values between 0.9 and 2.5 were found to pass freely across the blood-brain barrier at a cerebral blood flow of 100 ml-min/sup -1/-hg/sup -1/. An apparently decreased extraction of very lipophilic compounds was shown to be related to binding of the tracer to blood components and macromolecules (red blood cells, albumin, etc.). These data suggest that a radiopharmaceutical designed to measure blood flow should have a log P/sub oct/ value of between 0.9 and 2.5.

  6. Pharmacokinetics of Drug Entry into Cochlear Fluids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salt, Alec N.

    2005-01-01

    The inner ear is exposed to aminoglycosides or other drugs either intentionally or as a side effect of clinical treatments directed at other regions of the body. An understanding of the effects of drugs on the inner ear requires knowledge of the pharmacokinetics of the drug once it reaches the cochlear fluids, specifically how much of it reaches…

  7. Population pharmacokinetics of imipenem in burn patients.

    PubMed

    Dailly, Eric; Kergueris, Marie France; Pannier, Michel; Jolliet, Pascale; Bourin, Michel

    2003-12-01

    The interindividual variability of imipenem pharmacokinetic parameters in burn patients suggest that these parameters have to be estimated with a large number of patients. The aim of this study is (i) to estimate these parameters with a population pharmacokinetic approach, and (ii) to test the influence of factors on pharmacokinetics parameters. Data are provided by therapeutic drug monitoring (n = 47,118 samples) and analysed by a nonlinear mixed effect modelling method. Among the tested covariates (age, gender, body weight, height, size of burn and creatinine plasma level) creatinine plasma level affects imipenem pharmacokinetic parameters substantially. The best fit is obtained with a two-compartment model integrating a linear-inverse relationship between imipenem clearance and creatinine plasma level. The estimates of imipenem clearance (16.37 +/- 0.204 L/h) and of the distribution volume of the central compartment (0.376 +/- 0.039 L/kg) are higher in the population of burn patients than the estimates in healthy subjects. This result is connected with high values of glomerule filtration rate and confirms the interest of therapeutic drug monitoring of imipenem in burn patients and particularly for patients with extreme values of creatinine clearance.

  8. FIRST REPORTS OF CLINICAL PHARMACOKINETICS IN NIGERIA

    PubMed Central

    Michael, O.S.

    2015-01-01

    The German Friedrich Hartmut Dost (1910-1985) introduced the word Pharmacokinetics. Clinical pharmacokinetics is the direct application of knowledge regarding a drug's pharmacokinetics to a therapeutic situation in an individual or a population. It is the basis of therapeutic drug monitoring with the ultimate goal of keeping drugs safe. This branch of pharmacology has become the most relevant to the sub-specialty of clinical pharmacology. First reports of Clinical Pharmacokinetics in Nigeria can be credited to two gifted Nigerians, Prof Ayodele O. Iyun and Prof Lateef A. Salako, both of whom were affiliated to the great institutions- University of Ibadan (UI) and the Teaching Hospital, University College Hospital (UCH). Prof A.O Iyun was Nigeria's first home-trained Clinical Pharmacologist, while Prof L.A. Salako played a most significant role in the creation of the Department of Clinical Pharmacology, UCH. This edition of the Chronicles highlights a few of the first reports of this exciting branch of pharmacology in Nigeria. This historical review is based on publications listed on the United States National Library of Medicine database (PUBMED). PMID:26807087

  9. Microcomputer-Based Programs for Pharmacokinetic Simulations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Ronald C.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Microcomputer software that simulates drug-concentration time profiles based on user-assigned pharmacokinetic parameters such as central volume of distribution, elimination rate constant, absorption rate constant, dosing regimens, and compartmental transfer rate constants is described. The software is recommended for use in undergraduate…

  10. A Terminal Pharmaceutics Course in Clinical Pharmacokinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reuning, Richard H.; Krautheim, Daniel

    1978-01-01

    At Ohio State University, an undergraduate course extends the course sequence in biopharmaceutics and pharmacokinetics to application to problems in optimizing drug therapy. Course content, structure, instructional methods, and student term projects are described, and a course outline, typical projects, and some behavioral objectives are appended.…

  11. Pharmacokinetics and Bioequivalence Evaluation of Cyclobenzaprine Tablets

    PubMed Central

    Brioschi, Tatiane Maria de Lima Souza; Schramm, Simone Grigoleto; Kano, Eunice Kazue; Koono, Eunice Emiko Mori; Ching, Ting Hui; Serra, Cristina Helena dos Reis

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate cyclobenzaprine pharmacokinetics and to evaluate bioequivalence between two different tablet formulations containing the drug. An open, randomized, crossover, single-dose, two-period, and two-sequence design was employed. Tablets were administered to 23 healthy subjects after an overnight fasting and blood samples were collected up to 240 hours after drug administration. Plasma cyclobenzaprine was quantified by means of an LC-MS/MS method. Pharmacokinetic parameters related to absorption, distribution, and elimination were calculated. Cyclobenzaprine plasma profiles for the reference and test products were similar, as well as absorption pharmacokinetic parameters AUC (reference: 199.4 ng∗h/mL; test: 201.6 ng∗h/mL), Cmax (reference: 7.0 ng/mL; test: 7.2 ng/mL), and Tmax (reference: 4.5 h; test: 4.6 h). Bioequivalence was evaluated by means of 90% confidence intervals for the ratio of AUC (93%–111%) and Cmax (93%–112%) values for test and reference products, which were within the 80%–125% interval proposed by FDA. Cyclobenzaprine pharmacokinetics can be described by a multicompartment open model with an average rapid elimination half-life (t(1/2)β) of 3.1 hours and an average terminal elimination half-life (t(1/2)γ) of 31.9 hours. PMID:24151591

  12. Television Quiz Show Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Jonnie Lynn

    2007-01-01

    This article explores the simulation of four television quiz shows for students in China studying English as a foreign language (EFL). It discusses the adaptation and implementation of television quiz shows and how the students reacted to them.

  13. Rhenium and technetium tricarbonyl, {M(CO)3} (+) (M = Tc, Re), binding to mammalian metallothioneins: new insights into chemical and radiopharmaceutical implications.

    PubMed

    Lecina, Joan; Palacios, Òscar; Atrian, Sílvia; Capdevila, Mercè; Suades, Joan

    2015-04-01

    This paper deals with the binding of the four mammalian metallothioneins (MTs) to the organometallic metal fragment {fac-M(CO)3}(+) (M = (99)Tc, Re), which is highly promising for the preparation of second-generation radiopharmaceuticals. The study of the transmetallation reaction between zinc and rhenium in Zn7-MT1 by means of UV-vis and CD spectroscopy demonstrated the incorporation of the {fac-Re(CO)3}(+) fragment to the MTs. This reaction should be performed at 70 °C to accelerate the reaction rate, a result that is consistent with the reported reactivity of the rhenium fragment. ESI-TOF MS demonstrated the formation of mixed-metal species as Zn6,{Re(CO)3}-MT, Zn6,{Re(CO)3}2-MT, and Zn5,{Re(CO)3}3-MT, as well as the different reactivity of the four MT isoforms. Hence, Zn-MT3 showed the highest reactivity, in agreement with its high Cu-thionein character, whereas Zn-MT2 exhibited the lowest reactivity, in line with its high Zn-thionein character. The reactivity of the Zn-loaded forms of MT1 and MT4 is intermediate between those of MT3 and MT2. The study of the binding of the {fac-(99)Tc(CO)3}(+) fragment to MTs showed a significant and very interesting different reactivity in relation to rhenium. The transmetallation reaction is much more effective with technetium than with rhenium and significant amounts of mixed Zn x ,{(99)Tc(CO)3} y -MT species were formed with the four MT isoforms whereas only MT3 rendered similar amounts of rhenium derivatives. The results obtained in this study support the possible use of technetium for labelling mammalian metallothioneins and also for possible radiopharmaceutical applications.

  14. Developmental pharmacokinetics of propylene glycol in preterm and term neonates

    PubMed Central

    De Cock, Roosmarijn F W; Knibbe, Catherijne A J; Kulo, Aida; de Hoon, Jan; Verbesselt, Rene; Danhof, Meindert; Allegaert, Karel

    2013-01-01

    AIM Propylene glycol (PG) is often applied as an excipient in drug formulations. As these formulations may also be used in neonates, the aim of this study was to characterize the pharmacokinetics of propylene glycol, co-administered intravenously with paracetamol (800 mg PG/1000 mg paracetamol) or phenobarbital (700 mg PG/200 mg phenobarbital) in preterm and term neonates. METHODS A population pharmacokinetic analysis was performed based on 372 PG plasma concentrations from 62 (pre)term neonates (birth weight (bBW) 630–3980 g, postnatal age (PNA) 1–30 days) using NONMEM 6.2. The model was subsequently used to simulate PG exposure upon administration of paracetamol or phenobarbital in neonates (gestational age 24–40 weeks). RESULTS In a one compartment model, birth weight and PNA were both identified as covariates for PG clearance using an allometric function (CLi= 0.0849 × {(bBW/2720)1.69× (PNA/3)0.201}). Volume of distribution scaled allometrically with current bodyweight (Vi= 0.967 × {(BW/2720)1.45}) and was estimated 1.77 times higher when co-administered with phenobarbital compared with paracetamol. By introducing these covariates a large part of the interindividual variability on clearance (65%) as well as on volume of distribution (53%) was explained. The final model shows that for commonly used dosing regimens, the population mean PG peak and trough concentrations range between 33–144 and 28–218 mg l−1 (peak) and 19–109 and 6–112 mg l−1 (trough) for paracetamol and phenobarbital formulations, respectively, depending on birth weight and age of the neonates. CONCLUSION A pharmacokinetic model was developed for PG co-administered with paracetamol or phenobarbital in neonates. As such, large variability in PG exposure may be expected in neonates which is dependent on birth weight and PNA. PMID:22536830

  15. Harvard--MIT research program in short-lived radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-03-01

    This report describes progress on five projects. The first project showed a 1000 fold concentration of the cationic complex {sup 99m}Tc (MIBI) in heart cell mitochondria vs heart cell cytoplasm, as determined by high resolution electron probe microanalysis. Additional technetium-99m based complexes are being developed and tested. The second project involves evaluating technetium acetylacteonates as potential indicators of cerebral blood flow. An intermediate in the synthesis of a technetium porphyrin complex has been synthesized; an oxotechnetium(V)-2,4-pentanedione complex has been prepared and is currently being characterized. The third project involves using radio labelled antibodies for diagnosis and treatment of cancer. An early discovery was that chloramine-T based iodination protocols resulted in a reversal of the charge on mouse lgGs. Immunoperoxidase-labelled monoclonal antibody MOv 18 was shown to bind specifically to the most frequent ovarian aderon carcinomas, and not to healthy tissue, making this antibody a good candidate for immunotherapy or immunodetection. Work on a specific immunotherapy protocol suffered a setback when one reagent, a {sup 125}I-biotin complex, proved to be unstable in vivo. The fourth project involves labelling antibodies with positron emitting radionuclides. Radiofluorination was accomplished through reductive alkylation of {sup 18}F-aldehyde, or pentafluorophenyl esters. Radioiodination was accomplished using alkyl-tin derivation exchange. The fifth project examined antibody modification for use in radioimmune imaging. Technetium-99m-labelled lgG was shown to be biologically equivalent to Indium-III-labelled lgG for imaging focal sites of inflamation. Also, Indium III labelling of small bioactive peptides was examined as a means of imaging important physiological processes. 44 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Population Pharmacokinetics of Ciprofloxacin in Neonates and Young Infants Less than Three Months of Age

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wei; Hill, Helen; Le Guellec, Chantal; Neal, Tim; Mahoney, Sarah; Paulus, Stephane; Castellan, Charlotte; Kassai, Behrouz; van den Anker, Johannes N.; Kearns, Gregory L.; Turner, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Ciprofloxacin is used in neonates with suspected or documented Gram-negative serious infections. Currently, its use is off-label partly because of lack of pharmacokinetic studies. Within the FP7 EU project TINN (Treat Infection in NeoNates), our aim was to evaluate the population pharmacokinetics of ciprofloxacin in neonates and young infants <3 months of age and define the appropriate dose in order to optimize ciprofloxacin treatment in this vulnerable population. Blood samples were collected from neonates treated with ciprofloxacin and concentrations were quantified by high-pressure liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry. Population pharmacokinetic analysis was performed using NONMEM software. The data from 60 newborn infants (postmenstrual age [PMA] range, 24.9 to 47.9 weeks) were available for population pharmacokinetic analysis. A two-compartment model with first-order elimination showed the best fit with the data. A covariate analysis identified that gestational age, postnatal age, current weight, serum creatinine concentration, and use of inotropes had a significant impact on ciprofloxacin pharmacokinetics. Monte Carlo simulation demonstrated that 90% of hypothetical newborns with a PMA of <34 weeks treated with 7.5 mg/kg twice daily and 84% of newborns with a PMA ≥34 weeks and young infants receiving 12.5 mg/kg twice daily would reach the AUC/MIC target of 125, using the standard EUCAST MIC susceptibility breakpoint of 0.5 mg/liter. The associated risks of overdose for the proposed dosing regimen were <8%. The population pharmacokinetics of ciprofloxacin was evaluated in neonates and young infants <3 months old, and a dosing regimen was established based on simulation. PMID:25155587

  17. Population pharmacokinetics of ciprofloxacin in neonates and young infants less than three months of age.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Hill, Helen; Le Guellec, Chantal; Neal, Tim; Mahoney, Sarah; Paulus, Stephane; Castellan, Charlotte; Kassai, Behrouz; van den Anker, Johannes N; Kearns, Gregory L; Turner, Mark A; Jacqz-Aigrain, Evelyne

    2014-11-01

    Ciprofloxacin is used in neonates with suspected or documented Gram-negative serious infections. Currently, its use is off-label partly because of lack of pharmacokinetic studies. Within the FP7 EU project TINN (Treat Infection in NeoNates), our aim was to evaluate the population pharmacokinetics of ciprofloxacin in neonates and young infants <3 months of age and define the appropriate dose in order to optimize ciprofloxacin treatment in this vulnerable population. Blood samples were collected from neonates treated with ciprofloxacin and concentrations were quantified by high-pressure liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Population pharmacokinetic analysis was performed using NONMEM software. The data from 60 newborn infants (postmenstrual age [PMA] range, 24.9 to 47.9 weeks) were available for population pharmacokinetic analysis. A two-compartment model with first-order elimination showed the best fit with the data. A covariate analysis identified that gestational age, postnatal age, current weight, serum creatinine concentration, and use of inotropes had a significant impact on ciprofloxacin pharmacokinetics. Monte Carlo simulation demonstrated that 90% of hypothetical newborns with a PMA of <34 weeks treated with 7.5 mg/kg twice daily and 84% of newborns with a PMA ≥34 weeks and young infants receiving 12.5 mg/kg twice daily would reach the AUC/MIC target of 125, using the standard EUCAST MIC susceptibility breakpoint of 0.5 mg/liter. The associated risks of overdose for the proposed dosing regimen were <8%. The population pharmacokinetics of ciprofloxacin was evaluated in neonates and young infants <3 months old, and a dosing regimen was established based on simulation. PMID:25155587

  18. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic crisis in the elderly.

    PubMed

    ElDesoky, Ehab S

    2007-01-01

    Aging is characterized by a progressive loss of functional capacities of most if not all organs, a reduction in homeostatic mechanisms, and a response to receptor stimulation. Also, loss of water content and an increase of fat content in the body are reported. Therefore, understanding the influence of age-dependent changes in composition and function of the body on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of drugs is important before prescribing drugs to elderly patients. In this study, a Medline search for articles published in the period between 1975 and June 2006 was conducted with use of the key words aging, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics to review data related to alteration in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in elderly patients. Analysis of data revealed that the most important pharmacokinetic changes in old age include a decrease in the excretory capacity of the kidney more than the decline in the rate of hepatic drug metabolism. On the other hand, pharmacodynamic changes in the elderly are frequent and commonly ascribed to alteration in the sensitivity to drugs, irrespective of changes in drug disposition. For instance, the sensitivity of the cardiovascular system to beta-adrenergic agonists and antagonists decreases in old age, and the incidence of orthostatic episodes in response to drugs that lower blood pressure increases. However, the central nervous system becomes vulnerable in the elderly to agents that affect brain function (eg, opioids, benzodiazepines, and psychotropic drugs). Therefore, these drugs must be used very cautiously in this age group. In conclusion, the complexity of the interactions between polypharmacy, comorbidity, altered pharmacodynamic sensitivity, and even modest changes in pharmacokinetics in elderly necessitate the medical approach "start low and go slow" for aged subjects, especially if drug therapy is considered beneficial or absolutely necessary for them.

  19. Population pharmacokinetic model of THC integrates oral, intravenous, and pulmonary dosing and characterizes short- and long-term pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Heuberger, Jules A A C; Guan, Zheng; Oyetayo, Olubukayo-Opeyemi; Klumpers, Linda; Morrison, Paul D; Beumer, Tim L; van Gerven, Joop M A; Cohen, Adam F; Freijer, Jan

    2015-02-01

    Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannobinol (THC), the main psychoactive compound of Cannabis, is known to have a long terminal half-life. However, this characteristic is often ignored in pharmacokinetic (PK) studies of THC, which may affect the accuracy of predictions in different pharmacologic areas. For therapeutic use for example, it is important to accurately describe the terminal phase of THC to describe accumulation of the drug. In early clinical research, the THC challenge test can be optimized through more accurate predictions of the dosing sequence and the wash-out between occasions in a crossover setting, which is mainly determined by the terminal half-life of the compound. The purpose of this study is to better quantify the long-term pharmacokinetics of THC. A population-based PK model for THC was developed describing the profile up to 48 h after an oral, intravenous, and pulmonary dose of THC in humans. In contrast to earlier models, the current model integrates all three major administration routes and covers the long terminal phase of THC. Results show that THC has a fast initial and intermediate half-life, while the apparent terminal half-life is long (21.5 h), with a clearance of 38.8 L/h. Because the current model characterizes the long-term pharmacokinetics, it can be used to assess the accumulation of THC in a multiple-dose setting and to forecast concentration profiles of the drug under many different dosing regimens or administration routes. Additionally, this model could provide helpful insights into the THC challenge test used for the development of (novel) compounds targeting the cannabinoid system for different therapeutic applications and could improve decision making in future clinical trials.

  20. The Pharmacokinetics of Potassium in Humans Is Unusual.

    PubMed

    Hinderling, Peter H

    2016-10-01

    Potassium is critical for maintaining cellular tonicity, propagation of nerve impulses, contraction of cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscles, and normal renal function. The focus of this review is on the pharmacokinetics of potassium, K(+) , after administration of liquid and solid formulations of potassium chloride, KCl, to healthy subjects. Potassium can be considered an endogenous and exogenous compound. The amounts of endogenous K(+) are kept constant by balancing intake and loss of exogenous K(+) . Food and ingestion of KCl-containing medicines are sources for exogenous K(+) . In the pharmacokinetic context exogenous K(+) from KCl-containing medicines, K(+) exo,dose , is of primary interest. The distinction between the different K(+) entities is critical for obtaining unbiased estimates of the kinetic parameters for K(+) exo,dose . A literature search using prespecified acceptance criteria was performed. Publications were selected that reported plasma and urine data of K(+) exo,dose directly or provided information allowing their determination. Additional criteria applied included that the studies used a randomized design and controlled for the important covariates. Most of the selected publications reported urinary excretion data. Only 2 publications also reported plasma concentrations. The excursions of the plasma concentrations of K(+) exo,dose were considered too small to be of use by most investigators. The aggregate results indicate that urinary recovery data have the potential for providing reliable estimates for bioavailability and bioequivalence of K(+) exo,dose with KCl-containing formulations. Absorption efficiency, peak rates, and corresponding times of K(+) exo,dose with liquid formulations are fairly consistent among studies. The mean absorption efficiency of K(+) exo,dose with solid and liquid formulations of KCl ranges between 70% and 90%. The absorption rate of liquid formulations is rapid, whereas the solid formulations show extended release

  1. Inferring biochemical reaction pathways: the case of the gemcitabine pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    minimal a priori knowledge. In fact, the inference model presented in this paper is completely unsupervised. It takes as input the time series of the concetrations of the parent drug and its metabolites. The method, applied to the case study of the gemcitabine pharmacokinetics, shows good accuracy and sensitivity. PMID:22640931

  2. Pharmacokinetic drug interaction profiles of proton pump inhibitors: an update.

    PubMed

    Wedemeyer, Ralph-Steven; Blume, Henning

    2014-04-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are used extensively for the treatment of gastric acid-related disorders, often over the long term, which raises the potential for clinically significant drug interactions in patients receiving concomitant medications. These drug-drug interactions have been previously reviewed. However, the current knowledge is likely to have advanced, so a thorough review of the literature published since 2006 was conducted. This identified new studies of drug interactions that are modulated by gastric pH. These studies showed the effect of a PPI-induced increase in intragastric pH on mycophenolate mofetil pharmacokinetics, which were characterised by a decrease in the maximum exposure and availability of mycophenolic acid, at least at early time points. Post-2006 data were also available outlining the altered pharmacokinetics of protease inhibitors with concomitant PPI exposure. New data for the more recently marketed dexlansoprazole suggest it has no impact on the pharmacokinetics of diazepam, phenytoin, theophylline and warfarin. The CYP2C19-mediated interaction that seems to exist between clopidogrel and omeprazole or esomeprazole has been shown to be clinically important in research published since the 2006 review; this effect is not seen as a class effect of PPIs. Finally, data suggest that coadministration of PPIs with methotrexate may affect methotrexate pharmacokinetics, although the mechanism of interaction is not well understood. As was shown in the previous review, individual PPIs differ in their propensities to interact with other drugs and the extent to which their interaction profiles have been defined. The interaction profiles of omeprazole and pantoprazole sodium (pantoprazole-Na) have been studied most extensively. Several studies have shown that omeprazole carries a considerable potential for drug interactions because of its high affinity for CYP2C19 and moderate affinity for CYP3A4. In contrast, pantoprazole-Na appears to have

  3. A Holographic Road Show.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkpatrick, Larry D.; Rugheimer, Mac

    1979-01-01

    Describes the viewing sessions and the holograms of a holographic road show. The traveling exhibits, believed to stimulate interest in physics, include a wide variety of holograms and demonstrate several physical principles. (GA)

  4. Current activities in the ICRP concerning estimation of radiation doses to patients from radiopharmaceuticals for diagnostic use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattsson, S.; Johansson, L.; Leide-Svegborn, S.; Liniecki, J.; Nosske, D.; Riklund, K.; Stabin, M.; Taylor, D.

    2011-09-01

    A Task Group within the ICRP Committees 2 and 3 is continuously working to improve absorbed dose estimates to patients investigated with radiopharmaceuticals. The work deals with reviews of the literature, initiation of new or complementary studies of the biokinetics of a compound and dose estimates. Absorbed dose calculations for organs and tissues have up to now been carried out using the MIRD formalism. There is still a lack of necessary biokinetic data from measurements in humans. More time series obtained by nuclear medicine imaging techniques such as whole-body planar gamma-camera imaging, SPECT or PET are highly desirable for this purpose. In 2008, a new addendum to ICRP Publication 53 was published under the name of ICRP Publication 106 containing biokinetic data and absorbed dose information to organs and tissues of patients of various ages for radiopharmaceuticals in common use. That report also covers a number of generic models and realistic maximum models covering other large groups of substances (e.g. "123I-brain receptor substances"). Together with ICRP Publication 80, most radiopharmaceuticals in clinical use at the time of publication were covered except the radioiodine labeled compounds for which the ICRP dose estimates are still found in Publication 53. There is an increasing use of new radiopharmaceuticals, especially PET-tracers and the TG has recently finished its work with biokinetic and dosimetric data for 18F-FET, 18F-FLT and 18F-choline. The work continues now with new data for 11C-raclopride, 11C-PiB and 123I-ioflupan as well as re-evaluation of published data for 82Rb-chloride, 18F-fluoride and radioiodide. This paper summarises published ICRP-information on dose to patients from radiopharmaceuticals and gives some preliminary data for substances under review.

  5. Improved dose-volume histogram estimates for radiopharmaceutical therapy by optimizing quantitative SPECT reconstruction parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Lishui; Hobbs, Robert F.; Segars, Paul W.; Sgouros, George; Frey, Eric C.

    2013-06-01

    In radiopharmaceutical therapy, an understanding of the dose distribution in normal and target tissues is important for optimizing treatment. Three-dimensional (3D) dosimetry takes into account patient anatomy and the nonuniform uptake of radiopharmaceuticals in tissues. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) provide a useful summary representation of the 3D dose distribution and have been widely used for external beam treatment planning. Reliable 3D dosimetry requires an accurate 3D radioactivity distribution as the input. However, activity distribution estimates from SPECT are corrupted by noise and partial volume effects (PVEs). In this work, we systematically investigated OS-EM based quantitative SPECT (QSPECT) image reconstruction in terms of its effect on DVHs estimates. A modified 3D NURBS-based Cardiac-Torso (NCAT) phantom that incorporated a non-uniform kidney model and clinically realistic organ activities and biokinetics was used. Projections were generated using a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation; noise effects were studied using 50 noise realizations with clinical count levels. Activity images were reconstructed using QSPECT with compensation for attenuation, scatter and collimator-detector response (CDR). Dose rate distributions were estimated by convolution of the activity image with a voxel S kernel. Cumulative DVHs were calculated from the phantom and QSPECT images and compared both qualitatively and quantitatively. We found that noise, PVEs, and ringing artifacts due to CDR compensation all degraded histogram estimates. Low-pass filtering and early termination of the iterative process were needed to reduce the effects of noise and ringing artifacts on DVHs, but resulted in increased degradations due to PVEs. Large objects with few features, such as the liver, had more accurate histogram estimates and required fewer iterations and more smoothing for optimal results. Smaller objects with fine details, such as the kidneys, required more iterations and less

  6. Effect of Catnip Charcoal on the In Vivo Pharmacokinetics of the Main Alkaloids of Rhizoma Coptidis.

    PubMed

    He, Yanfei; Chen, Siyu; Yu, Hai; Zhu, Long; Liu, Yayun; Han, Chunyang; Liu, Cuiyan

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to explore the effect of catnip Nepeta cataria (CNC) charcoal on the pharmacokinetics of the main alkaloids of Rhizoma Coptidis in vivo. Twenty-four rabbits were randomly divided into four groups and given oral administration of an aqueous extract of Rhizoma Coptidis (RCAE), RCAE plus CNC, RCAE plus activated carbon (AC), or distilled water, respectively. Plasma samples were collected after administration. The concentrations of berberine, coptisine, palmatine, and epiberberine in plasma were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The pharmacokinetics data were calculated using pharmacokinetic DAS 2.0 software. The results showed that the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) of berberine increased, while the AUC of coptisine, palmatine, and epiberberine decreased in the rabbits that received RCAE plus CNC. Meanwhile, the AUC of berberine, coptisine, palmatine, and epiberberine decreased in the group given RCAE plus AC. The difference of main pharmacokinetics parameters among the four groups was significant (P < 0.05). This study showed that CNC improved the bioavailability of berberine in comparison to AC and prolonged its release in comparison to RCAE alone. However, it decreased the bioavailability of coptisine, palmatine, and epiberberine. In comparison, AC uniformly declined the bioavailability of berberine, coptisine, palmatine, and epiberberine.

  7. Effect of Catnip Charcoal on the In Vivo Pharmacokinetics of the Main Alkaloids of Rhizoma Coptidis.

    PubMed

    He, Yanfei; Chen, Siyu; Yu, Hai; Zhu, Long; Liu, Yayun; Han, Chunyang; Liu, Cuiyan

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to explore the effect of catnip Nepeta cataria (CNC) charcoal on the pharmacokinetics of the main alkaloids of Rhizoma Coptidis in vivo. Twenty-four rabbits were randomly divided into four groups and given oral administration of an aqueous extract of Rhizoma Coptidis (RCAE), RCAE plus CNC, RCAE plus activated carbon (AC), or distilled water, respectively. Plasma samples were collected after administration. The concentrations of berberine, coptisine, palmatine, and epiberberine in plasma were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The pharmacokinetics data were calculated using pharmacokinetic DAS 2.0 software. The results showed that the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) of berberine increased, while the AUC of coptisine, palmatine, and epiberberine decreased in the rabbits that received RCAE plus CNC. Meanwhile, the AUC of berberine, coptisine, palmatine, and epiberberine decreased in the group given RCAE plus AC. The difference of main pharmacokinetics parameters among the four groups was significant (P < 0.05). This study showed that CNC improved the bioavailability of berberine in comparison to AC and prolonged its release in comparison to RCAE alone. However, it decreased the bioavailability of coptisine, palmatine, and epiberberine. In comparison, AC uniformly declined the bioavailability of berberine, coptisine, palmatine, and epiberberine. PMID:27313645

  8. Effect of Catnip Charcoal on the In Vivo Pharmacokinetics of the Main Alkaloids of Rhizoma Coptidis

    PubMed Central

    He, Yanfei; Chen, Siyu; Yu, Hai; Zhu, Long; Liu, Yayun; Han, Chunyang; Liu, Cuiyan

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to explore the effect of catnip Nepeta cataria (CNC) charcoal on the pharmacokinetics of the main alkaloids of Rhizoma Coptidis in vivo. Twenty-four rabbits were randomly divided into four groups and given oral administration of an aqueous extract of Rhizoma Coptidis (RCAE), RCAE plus CNC, RCAE plus activated carbon (AC), or distilled water, respectively. Plasma samples were collected after administration. The concentrations of berberine, coptisine, palmatine, and epiberberine in plasma were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The pharmacokinetics data were calculated using pharmacokinetic DAS 2.0 software. The results showed that the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) of berberine increased, while the AUC of coptisine, palmatine, and epiberberine decreased in the rabbits that received RCAE plus CNC. Meanwhile, the AUC of berberine, coptisine, palmatine, and epiberberine decreased in the group given RCAE plus AC. The difference of main pharmacokinetics parameters among the four groups was significant (P < 0.05). This study showed that CNC improved the bioavailability of berberine in comparison to AC and prolonged its release in comparison to RCAE alone. However, it decreased the bioavailability of coptisine, palmatine, and epiberberine. In comparison, AC uniformly declined the bioavailability of berberine, coptisine, palmatine, and epiberberine. PMID:27313645

  9. Pharmacokinetics of ertapenem in patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    van Rijn, Sander P; van Altena, Richard; Akkerman, Onno W; van Soolingen, Dick; van der Laan, Tridia; de Lange, Wiel C M; Kosterink, Jos G W; van der Werf, Tjip S; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C

    2016-04-01

    Treatment of multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis (TB) is becoming more challenging because of increased levels of drug resistance against second-line TB drugs. One promising group of antimicrobial drugs is carbapenems. Ertapenem is an attractive carbapenem for the treatment of MDR- and XDR-TB because its relatively long half-life enables once-daily dosing.A retrospective study was performed for all patients with suspected MDR-TB at the Tuberculosis Center Beatrixoord of the University Medical Center Groningen (Haren, the Netherlands) who received ertapenem as part of their treatment regimen between December 1, 2010 and March 1, 2013. Safety and pharmacokinetics were evaluated.18 patients were treated with 1000 mg ertapenem for a mean (range) of 77 (5-210) days. Sputum smear and culture were converted in all patients. Drug exposure was evaluated in 12 patients. The mean (range) area under the concentration-time curve up to 24 h was 544.9 (309-1130) h·mg·L(-1) The mean (range) maximum observed plasma concentration was 127.5 (73.9-277.9) mg·L(-1)In general, ertapenem treatment was well tolerated during MDR-TB treatment and showed a favourable pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profile in MDR-TB patients. We conclude that ertapenem is a highly promising drug for the treatment of MDR-TB that warrants further investigation. PMID:26743484

  10. Cocaine, norcocaine, ecgonine methylester and benzoylecgonine pharmacokinetics in the rat.

    PubMed

    Mets, B; Diaz, J; Soo, E; Jamdar, S

    1999-01-01

    We have compared the pharmacokinetics of bolus dose cocaine administration with that of its three most important metabolites; norcocaine, ecgonine methylester, and benzoylecgonine and assessed whether kinetics are dose dependent at two equimolar doses equivalent to cocaine hydrochloride 2.5 and 5 mg/kg respectively. Forty-nine male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 8 groups to receive i.v. either high (14.7 umol/kg) (HI) or low (7.3 umol/kg) (LO) bolus doses of cocaine or one of its metabolites. Arterial blood samples for cocaine and metabolite analysis were taken repetitively over the next 3 h. Equimolar bolus doses of these congeners showed biexponential plasma concentration decay curves which were fitted to a two compartment model and subjected to noncompartmental analysis. The plasma concentration time profiles were significantly different for the HI and LO doses administered for each congener. The elimination half-lives of cocaine and norcocaine were similar (28-33 min), that for ecgonine methylester (60-71 min) was approximately twice this and for benzoylecgonine was 40-44 min. Cocaine clearance (155-158 ml/kg/min) was found to be in the range found in other rat studies. Ecgonine methylester clearance and benzoylecgonine clearance were found to be one quarter and one eighth of this value respectively. The pharmacokinetic profile of these congeners was not dose dependent when the two doses administered were compared.

  11. Synthetic cannabinoids pharmacokinetics and detection methods in biological matrices.

    PubMed

    Castaneto, Marisol S; Wohlfarth, Ariane; Desrosiers, Nathalie A; Hartman, Rebecca L; Gorelick, David A; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2015-05-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids (SC), originally developed as research tools, are now highly abused novel psychoactive substances. We present a comprehensive systematic review covering in vivo and in vitro animal and human pharmacokinetics and analytical methods for identifying SC and their metabolites in biological matrices. Of two main phases of SC research, the first investigated therapeutic applications, and the second abuse-related issues. Administration studies showed high lipophilicity and distribution into brain and fat tissue. Metabolite profiling studies, mostly with human liver microsomes and human hepatocytes, structurally elucidated metabolites and identified suitable SC markers. In general, SC underwent hydroxylation at various molecular sites, defluorination of fluorinated analogs and phase II metabolites were almost exclusively glucuronides. Analytical methods are critical for documenting intake, with different strategies applied to adequately address the continuous emergence of new compounds. Immunoassays have different cross-reactivities for different SC classes, but cannot keep pace with changing analyte targets. Gas chromatography and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry assays - first for a few, then numerous analytes - are available but constrained by reference standard availability, and must be continuously updated and revalidated. In blood and oral fluid, parent compounds are frequently present, albeit in low concentrations; for urinary detection, metabolites must be identified and interpretation is complex due to shared metabolic pathways. A new approach is non-targeted HRMS screening that is more flexible and permits retrospective data analysis. We suggest that streamlined assessment of new SC's pharmacokinetics and advanced HRMS screening provide a promising strategy to maintain relevant assays.

  12. Enantioselective Pharmacokinetics of α-Lipoic Acid in Rats.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Ryota; Okamoto, Hinako; Ikuta, Naoko; Terao, Keiji; Hirota, Takashi

    2015-09-21

    α-Lipoic acid (LA) is widely used for nutritional supplements as a racemic mixture, even though the R enantiomer is biologically active. After oral administration of the racemic mixture (R-α-lipoic acid (RLA) and S-α-lipoic acid (SLA) mixed at the ratio of 50:50) to rats, RLA showed higher plasma concentration than SLA, and its area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time zero to the last (AUC) was significantly about 1.26 times higher than that of SLA. However, after intravenous administration of the racemic mixture, the pharmacokinetic profiles, initial concentration (C₀), AUC, and half-life (T1/2) of the enantiomers were not significantly different. After oral and intraduodenal administration of the racemic mixture to pyrolus-ligated rats, the AUCs of RLA were significantly about 1.24 and 1.32 times higher than that of SLA, respectively. In addition, after intraportal administration the AUC of RLA was significantly 1.16 times higher than that of SLA. In conclusion, the enantioselective pharmacokinetics of LA in rats arose from the fraction absorbed multiplied by gastrointestinal availability (FaFg) and hepatic availability (Fh), and not from the total clearance.

  13. Pharmacokinetics of pyridostigmine in a child with postural tachycardia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Filler, Guido; Gow, Robert M; Nadarajah, Renisha; Jacob, Pierre; Johnson, Gillian; Zhang, Yan-Ling; Christians, Uwe

    2006-11-01

    Pyridostigmine has been proposed for the treatment of postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome in adults at a dose of 60 mg twice daily, but no dosing recommendation exists for children. With the approval of our local ethics board, we tested the pharmacokinetics of pyridostigmine in 6 children with myasthenia and a pediatric index patient with severe postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome whose condition failed all conventional therapy and who had developed significant postural hypertension. Pyridostigmine was quantified by using a validated, semiautomated, and specific high-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry assay in combination with online column-switching extraction and turbo electrospray ionization. The patient with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome showed a dose-dependent favorable response to oral pyridostigmine. Pharmacokinetic evaluation revealed a short half-life of 2.29 hours, similar to the 2.0 +/- 0.63 hours in the patients with myasthenia. The patient with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome has subsequently been treated at a dose of 45 mg in the morning, 30 mg at lunchtime, and 15 mg at bedtime; after 9 months, there has been persistent positive effect and without additional blood pressure medication. No major adverse effects occurred. Pyridostigmine has been a safe and effective treatment modality for this child with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome. The short half-life suggests that dosing 3 times per day is preferable.

  14. Enantioselective Pharmacokinetics of α-Lipoic Acid in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Ryota; Okamoto, Hinako; Ikuta, Naoko; Terao, Keiji; Hirota, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    α-Lipoic acid (LA) is widely used for nutritional supplements as a racemic mixture, even though the R enantiomer is biologically active. After oral administration of the racemic mixture (R-α-lipoic acid (RLA) and S-α-lipoic acid (SLA) mixed at the ratio of 50:50) to rats, RLA showed higher plasma concentration than SLA, and its area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time zero to the last (AUC) was significantly about 1.26 times higher than that of SLA. However, after intravenous administration of the racemic mixture, the pharmacokinetic profiles, initial concentration (C0), AUC, and half-life (T1/2) of the enantiomers were not significantly different. After oral and intraduodenal administration of the racemic mixture to pyrolus-ligated rats, the AUCs of RLA were significantly about 1.24 and 1.32 times higher than that of SLA, respectively. In addition, after intraportal administration the AUC of RLA was significantly 1.16 times higher than that of SLA. In conclusion, the enantioselective pharmacokinetics of LA in rats arose from the fraction absorbed multiplied by gastrointestinal availability (FaFg) and hepatic availability (Fh), and not from the total clearance. PMID:26402669

  15. Pharmacokinetics and biodegradation performance of a hydroxypropyl chitosan derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Kai; Han, Baoqin; Dong, Wen; Song, Fulai; Liu, Weizhi; Liu, Wanshun

    2015-10-01

    Hydroxypropyl chitosan (HP-chitosan) has been shown to have promising applications in a wide range of areas due to its biocompatibility, biodegradability and various biological activities, especially in the biomedical and pharmaceutical fields. However, it is not yet known about its pharmacokinetics and biodegradation performance, which are crucial for its clinical applications. In order to lay a foundation for its further applications and exploitations, here we carried out fluorescence intensity and GPC analyses to determine the pharmacokinetics mode of fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled HP-chitosan (FITC-HP-chitosan) and its biodegradability. The results showed that after intraperitoneal administration at a dose of 10 mg per rat, FITC-HP-chitosan could be absorbed rapidly and distributed to liver, kidney and spleen through blood. It was indicated that FITC-HP-chitosan could be utilized effectively, and 88.47% of the FITC-HP-chitosan could be excreted by urine within 11 days with a molecular weight less than 10 kDa. Moreover, our data indicated that there was an obvious degradation process occurred in liver (< 10 kDa at 24 h). In summary, HP-chitosan has excellent bioavailability and biodegradability, suggesting the potential applications of hydroxypropyl-modified chitosan as materials in drug delivery, tissue engineering and biomedical area.

  16. Sex- and dose-dependency in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of (+)-methamphetamine and its metabolite (+)-amphetamine in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Milesi-Halle, Alessandra; Hendrickson, Howard P.; Laurenzana, Elizabeth M.; Gentry, W. Brooks; Owens, S. Michael . E-mail: mowens@uams.edu

    2005-12-15

    These studies investigated how (+)-methamphetamine (METH) dose and rat sex affect the pharmacological response to METH in Sprague-Dawley rats. The first set of experiments determined the pharmacokinetics of METH and its pharmacologically active metabolite (+)-amphetamine (AMP) in male and female Sprague-Dawley rats after 1.0 and 3.0 mg/kg METH doses. The results showed significant sex-dependent changes in METH pharmacokinetics, and females formed significantly lower amounts of AMP. While the area under the serum concentration-time curve in males increased proportionately with the METH dose, the females showed a disproportional increase. The sex differences in systemic clearance, renal clearance, volume of distribution, and percentage of unchanged METH eliminated in the urine suggested dose-dependent pharmacokinetics in female rats. The second set of studies sought to determine the behavioral implications of these pharmacokinetic differences by quantifying locomotor activity in male and female rats after saline, 1.0, and 3.0 mg/kg METH. The results showed sex- and dose-dependent differences in METH-induced locomotion, including profound differences in the temporal profile of effects at higher dose. These findings show that the pharmacokinetic and metabolic profile of METH (slower METH clearance and lower AMP metabolite formation) plays a significant role in the differential pharmacological response to METH in male and female rats.

  17. Pharmacokinetics-pharmacology disconnection of herbal medicines and its potential solutions with cellular pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic strategy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingwei; Zhou, Fang; Lu, Meng; Ji, Wei; Niu, Fang; Zha, Weibin; Wu, Xiaolan; Hao, Haiping; Wang, Guangji

    2012-06-01

    Recently, there is a global trend of using herbal medicines to treat various chronic diseases and promote health. But the controversy over the safety and efficacy of herbal medicines is a focus of attention, primarily because of the many unknown and unrevealed natures of herbal medicines, which strongly restricts their application and development. Pharmacokinetics is a bridge linking the herbal medicines and their pharmacological responses. It is assumed in traditional pharmacokinetics that an excellent drug should have appropriate pharmacokinetic behaviours and its pharmacological effect is related with plasma drug concentrations. However, most herbal medicines exhibit excellent pharmacological responses despite poor pharmacokinetic behaviours. As most drugs are intracellulartargeted, we put forward cellular pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic strategy, which is focused on the intracellular fate of drugs. This strategy could partially explain the marked pharmacological activities of herbal medicines from their intracellular pharmacokinetic behaviours, rather than their plasma concentrations. It is a helpful complementarity to traditional pharmacokinetics, and takes a potential role in the research and development of new herb-origined drugs. In this review, the pharmacokinetics-pharmacology disconnections of herbal medicines (such as ginseng, berberine and danshen) are retrospected. Then our proposed cellular pharmacokineticpharmacodynamic strategy, its characteristics, as well as its research procedures are described, followed by the subcellular distributions of drug transporters and metabolic enzymes which are the determinants of cellular pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics. Finally, our successful applications of cellular pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic strategy in elucidating ginsenoside Rh2 as an adjuvant agent and tanshinone IIA as an anticancer agent are illustrated.

  18. A simple pharmacokinetics subroutine for modeling double peak phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Mirfazaelian, Ahmad; Mahmoudian, Massoud

    2006-04-01

    Double peak absorption has been described with several orally administered drugs. Numerous reasons have been implicated in causing the double peak. DRUG-KNT--a pharmacokinetic software developed previously for fitting one and two compartment kinetics using the iterative curve stripping method--was modified and a revised subroutine was incorporated to solve double-peak models. This subroutine considers the double peak as two hypothetical doses administered with a time gap. The fitting capability of the presented model was verified using four sets of data showing double peak profiles extracted from the literature (piroxicam, ranitidine, phenazopyridine and talinolol). Visual inspection and statistical diagnostics showed that the present algorithm provided adequate curve fit disregarding the mechanism involved in the emergence of the secondary peaks. Statistical diagnostic parameters (RSS, AIC and R2) generally showed good fitness in the plasma profile prediction by this model. It was concluded that the algorithm presented herein provides adequate predicted curves in cases of the double peak phenomenon.

  19. Radioprotective effect of the Barbados Cherry (Malpighia glabra L.) against radiopharmaceutical Iodine-131 in Wistar rats in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The increasing consumption of fruits and vegetables has contributed to the improvement of populational health, due in part, to the abundance of antioxidants in these foods. Antioxidants reduce the level of oxidative damage to DNA caused by free radicals and ionizing radiation, including the radioisotope iodine-131 (131I). This isotope is used for the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid injuries, such as hyperthyroidism and cancer. Methods This study aimed to evaluate the radioprotective and cytotoxic activity of acute and subchronic treatments with Barbados Cherry (BC) (Malpighia glabra L.) fruit juice (5 mg), which is rich in potent antioxidants such as vitamin C, phenols, carotenoids, anthocyanins and yellow flavonoids and its activity against the mutagenic activity of the therapeutic dose of 25 μCi of radioiodine for hyperthyroidism. The test system used was the bone marrow cells of Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus) that were treated in vivo by gavage. Results BC showed radioprotective activity in acute treatments, which is most likely due to the joint action of its antioxidant components. In subchronic treatments, the continuous treatment presented an effective radioprotective activity, which was significantly different from treatment with the radiopharmaceutical only. Treatment with BC prior to (PRE) and simultaneous with (SIM) ionizing radiation decreased the number of induced chromosomal alterations, while post-treatment produced no protective effect. In addition, BC exhibited no cytotoxic activity. Conclusions These data serve as evidence that BC can be used as a preventive health measure to improve public health quality by countering the action of inevitable exposure to mutagens, such as 131I. PMID:24479389

  20. The Ozone Show.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathieu, Aaron

    2000-01-01

    Uses a talk show activity for a final assessment tool for students to debate about the ozone hole. Students are assessed on five areas: (1) cooperative learning; (2) the written component; (3) content; (4) self-evaluation; and (5) peer evaluation. (SAH)

  1. Show What You Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eccleston, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    Big things come in small packages. This saying came to the mind of the author after he created a simple math review activity for his fourth grade students. Though simple, it has proven to be extremely advantageous in reinforcing math concepts. He uses this activity, which he calls "Show What You Know," often. This activity provides the perfect…

  2. Showing What They Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cech, Scott J.

    2008-01-01

    Having students show their skills in three dimensions, known as performance-based assessment, dates back at least to Socrates. Individual schools such as Barrington High School--located just outside of Providence--have been requiring students to actively demonstrate their knowledge for years. The Rhode Island's high school graduating class became…

  3. Stage a Water Show

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frasier, Debra

    2008-01-01

    In the author's book titled "The Incredible Water Show," the characters from "Miss Alaineus: A Vocabulary Disaster" used an ocean of information to stage an inventive performance about the water cycle. In this article, the author relates how she turned the story into hands-on science teaching for real-life fifth-grade students. The author also…

  4. What Do Maps Show?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geological Survey (Dept. of Interior), Reston, VA.

    This curriculum packet, appropriate for grades 4-8, features a teaching poster which shows different types of maps (different views of Salt Lake City, Utah), as well as three reproducible maps and reproducible activity sheets which complement the maps. The poster provides teacher background, including step-by-step lesson plans for four geography…

  5. Obesity in show cats.

    PubMed

    Corbee, R J

    2014-12-01

    Obesity is an important disease with a high prevalence in cats. Because obesity is related to several other diseases, it is important to identify the population at risk. Several risk factors for obesity have been described in the literature. A higher incidence of obesity in certain cat breeds has been suggested. The aim of this study was to determine whether obesity occurs more often in certain breeds. The second aim was to relate the increased prevalence of obesity in certain breeds to the official standards of that breed. To this end, 268 cats of 22 different breeds investigated by determining their body condition score (BCS) on a nine-point scale by inspection and palpation, at two different cat shows. Overall, 45.5% of the show cats had a BCS > 5, and 4.5% of the show cats had a BCS > 7. There were significant differences between breeds, which could be related to the breed standards. Most overweight and obese cats were in the neutered group. It warrants firm discussions with breeders and cat show judges to come to different interpretations of the standards in order to prevent overweight conditions in certain breeds from being the standard of beauty. Neutering predisposes for obesity and requires early nutritional intervention to prevent obese conditions. PMID:24612018

  6. Show Me the Way

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dicks, Matthew J.

    2005-01-01

    Because today's students have grown up steeped in video games and the Internet, most of them expect feedback, and usually gratification, very soon after they expend effort on a task. Teachers can get quick feedback to students by showing them videotapes of their learning performances. The author, a 3rd grade teacher describes how the seemingly…

  7. The Art Show

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scolarici, Alicia

    2004-01-01

    This article describes what once was thought to be impossible--a formal art show extravaganza at an elementary school with 1,000 students, a Department of Defense Dependent School (DODDS) located overseas, on RAF Lakenheath, England. The dream of this this event involved the transformation of the school cafeteria into an elegant art show…

  8. Honored Teacher Shows Commitment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratte, Kathy

    1987-01-01

    Part of the acceptance speech of the 1985 National Council for the Social Studies Teacher of the Year, this article describes the censorship experience of this honored social studies teacher. The incident involved the showing of a videotape version of the feature film entitled "The Seduction of Joe Tynan." (JDH)

  9. Scaling animal to human biodistribution of the radiopharmaceutical [68Ga]Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra, Pamela Ochoa; Veloza, Stella

    2016-07-01

    The radiotracer called 68Ga-labelled Glu-urea-Lys(Ahx)-HBED-CC ([68Ga]Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC) is a novel radiophar-maceutical for the detection of prostate cancer lesions by positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Setting up a cost-effective manual synthesis of this radiotracer and making its clinical translation in Colombia will require two important elements: the evaluation of the procedure to yield a consistent product, meeting standards of radio-chemical purity and low toxicity and then, the evaluation of the radiation dosimetry. In this paper a protocol to extrapolate the biokinetic model made in normal mice to humans by using the computer software for internal dose assessment OLINDA/EXM® is presented as an accurate and standardized method for the calculation of radiation dosimetry estimates.

  10. The growing impact of bioorthogonal click chemistry on the development of radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Dexing; Zeglis, Brian M; Lewis, Jason S; Anderson, Carolyn J

    2013-06-01

    Click chemistry has become a ubiquitous chemical tool with applications in nearly all areas of modern chemistry, including drug discovery, bioconjugation, and nanoscience. Radiochemistry is no exception, as the canonical Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition, strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition, inverse electron demand Diels-Alder reaction, and other types of bioorthogonal click ligations have had a significant impact on the synthesis and development of radiopharmaceuticals. This review will focus on recent applications of click chemistry ligations in the preparation of imaging agents for SPECT and PET, including small molecules, peptides, and proteins labeled with radionuclides such as (18)F, (64)Cu, (111)In, and (99m)Tc.

  11. Highway accident involving radiopharmaceuticals near Brookhaven, Mississippi on December 3, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Mohr, P.B.; Mount, M.E.; Schwartz, M.W.

    1985-04-01

    A rear-end collision occurred between a passenger automobile and a luggage trailer carrying 84 packages, 76 of which contained radiopharmaceuticals, on US Highway 84 near Brookhaven, Mississippi on the afternoon of December 3, 1983. The purpose of this report is to document the mechanical circumstances of the accident, confirm the nature and quantity of radioactive materials involved, and assess the nature of the physical environment to which the packages were exposed and the response of the packages. The report consists of three major sections. The first deals wth the nature and circumstances of the accident and findings of fact. The second gives an accounting and description of the materials involved and the consequences of their exposure. The third gives an assessment and analysis of the mechanisms of damage and the conclusions which may be drawn from the investigation. 4 refs., 24 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Click-to-Chelate: development of technetium and rhenium-tricarbonyl labeled radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Kluba, Christiane A; Mindt, Thomas L

    2013-03-12

    The Click-to-Chelate approach is a highly efficient strategy for the radiolabeling of molecules of medicinal interest with technetium and rhenium-tricarbonyl cores. Reaction of azide-functionalized molecules with alkyne prochelators by the Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC; click reaction) enables the simultaneous synthesis and conjugation of tridentate chelating systems for the stable complexation of the radiometals. In many cases, the functionalization of (bio)molecules with the ligand system and radiolabeling can be achieved by convenient one-pot procedures. Since its first report in 2006, Click-to-Chelate has been applied to the development of numerous novel radiotracers with promising potential for translation into the clinic. This review summarizes the use of the Click-to-Chelate approach in radiopharmaceutical sciences and provides a perspective for future applications.

  13. Evaluation of alternative rapid thin layer chromatography systems for quality control of technetium-99m radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Mang'era, Kennedy; Wong, Derek; Douglas, David; Franz, Kellie; Biru, Taddese

    2014-04-01

    Whatman 3MM™ and Tec-Control™ systems were evaluated as ITLC-SG alternatives for 99mTc-radiopharmaceuticals. They compare well in accuracy and reproducibility, and are faster and more convenient than ITLC-SG. Tec-Control™ radiochemical purity values for 99mTc-sestamibi were more conservative than ITLC-SG. Full solvent migration was not reproduced for 99mTc-tetrofosmin in Tec-Control™, and for this Whatman 3MM™ is preferred. Developing times were 10-15 min, 7-9 min and ~1min for ITLC-SG, Whatman 3MM™ and Tec-Control™, respectively. Overall, Tec-Control™ strips are preferred due to speed and ease of use.

  14. Cage-like bifunctional chelators, copper-64 radiopharmaceuticals and PET imaging using the same

    DOEpatents

    Conti, Peter S.; Cai, Hancheng; Li, Zibo; Liu, Shuanglong

    2016-08-02

    Disclosed is a class of versatile Sarcophagine based bifunctional chelators (BFCs) containing a hexa-aza cage for labeling with metals having either imaging, therapeutic or contrast applications radiolabeling and one or more linkers (A) and (B). The compounds have the general formula ##STR00001## where A is a functional group selected from group consisting of an amine, a carboxylic acid, an ester, a carbonyl, a thiol, an azide and an alkene, and B is a functional group selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, an amine, a carboxylic acid, and ester, a carbonyl, a thiol, an azide and an alkene. Also disclosed are conjugate of the BFC and a targeting moiety, which may be a peptide or antibody. Also disclosed are metal complexes of the BFC/targeting moiety conjugates that are useful as radiopharmaceuticals, imaging agents or contrast agents.

  15. Receptor-specific positron emission tomography radiopharmaceuticals: /sup 75/Br-labeled butyrophenone neuroleptics

    SciTech Connect

    Moerlein, S.M.; Stoecklin, G.; Weinhard, K.; Pawlik, G.; Heiss, W.D.

    1985-11-01

    Cerebral dopaminergic D/sub 2/ receptors are involved in several common disease states, such as schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease, and Huntington's chorea. The use of radiolabeled D/sub 2/ receptor-binding ligands with positron emission tomography (PET) to noninvasively quantitate D/sub 2/ receptor densities thus has potential application in medicine. Butyrophenone neuroleptics have a high in vitro and in vivo binding affinity for cerebral D/sub 2/ receptors, and due to the useful chemical and nuclear decay properties of /sup 74/Br (76% ..beta../sup +/, half-life = 1.6 h), the authors have evaluated radiobrominated bromospiperone (BSP), brombenperidol (BBP), and bromperidol (BP) as radiopharmaceuticals for use with PET.

  16. Copper complexes of bis(thiosemicarbazones): from chemotherapeutics to diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Brett M; Donnelly, Paul S

    2011-05-01

    The molecules known as bis(thiosemicarbazones) derived from 1,2-diones can act as tetradentate ligands for Cu(II), forming stable, neutral complexes. As a family, these complexes possess fascinating biological activity. This critical review presents an historical perspective of their progression from potential chemotherapeutics through to more recent applications in nuclear medicine. Methods of synthesis are presented followed by studies focusing on their potential application as anti-cancer agents and more recent investigations into their potential as therapeutics for Alzheimer's disease. The Cu(II) complexes are of sufficient stability to be used to coordinate copper radioisotopes for application in diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. Detailed understanding of the coordination chemistry has allowed careful manipulation of the metal based properties to engineer specific biological activities. Perhaps the most promising complex radiolabelled with copper radioisotopes to date is Cu(II)(atsm), which has progressed to clinical trials in humans (162 references).

  17. Development of specific radiopharmaceuticals for infection imaging by targeting infectious micro-organisms.

    PubMed

    Ferro-Flores, Guillermina; Ocampo-Garcia, Blanca E; Melendez-Alafort, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Infectious diseases remain a major health problem and cause of death worldwide. A variety of radiopharmaceuticals are used for the imaging of infections and inflammation in the practice of nuclear medicine. Long-term clinical use has shown that the majority of radiolabeled probes cannot distinguish between inflammation and infection. Gallium-67-citrate binds to bacteria, but also to proteins accumulating at both sterile inflammation and bacterial infection sites. Other agents are used to interact with receptors or domains on circulating and infiltrating leukocytes or to label them directly. However, these probes cannot distinguish between infection and inflammation because they are not specific to infectious micro-organisms. This review examines the recent developments and applications of radiolabeled specific agents, such as antiviral drugs, antifungal, antibiotics and antimicrobial peptides, to visualize infectious foci by targeting viruses, fungi or bacteria.

  18. Design Features Of Microfluidic Reactor For [18F]FDG Radiopharmaceutical Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, J. H.; Lee, B. N.; Nam, K. R.; Attla, G. A.; Lee, K. C.; Cjai, J. S.

    2011-06-01

    Microfluidic reactor exhibits advantages for radiopharmaceutical synthesis. Microfluidic chips can reduce the time for radiosynthesis using tiny quantities of chemical compounds. It also has a good heat transfer, performance and provides an integrated system including synthesis, separation, and purification. These advantages make FDG production. So we have designed a microreactor chip which included the whole chemical processing; water evaporation, solvent exchange, radiofluorination and so on. It was designed by using a commercial 3D CAD modeling program CATIA V5, heat transfer performance was analyzed by ANSYS, and CFX was used for analyzing fluid performance. This paper described the design of FDG synthesis system on a microchip, the relevant locations of its parts, both heat and fluid performance efficiency analysis.

  19. Copper complexes of bis(thiosemicarbazones): from chemotherapeutics to diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Brett M; Donnelly, Paul S

    2011-05-01

    The molecules known as bis(thiosemicarbazones) derived from 1,2-diones can act as tetradentate ligands for Cu(II), forming stable, neutral complexes. As a family, these complexes possess fascinating biological activity. This critical review presents an historical perspective of their progression from potential chemotherapeutics through to more recent applications in nuclear medicine. Methods of synthesis are presented followed by studies focusing on their potential application as anti-cancer agents and more recent investigations into their potential as therapeutics for Alzheimer's disease. The Cu(II) complexes are of sufficient stability to be used to coordinate copper radioisotopes for application in diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. Detailed understanding of the coordination chemistry has allowed careful manipulation of the metal based properties to engineer specific biological activities. Perhaps the most promising complex radiolabelled with copper radioisotopes to date is Cu(II)(atsm), which has progressed to clinical trials in humans (162 references). PMID:21409228

  20. Differential renal function in unilateral renal injury: possible effects of radiopharmaceutical choice. [Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, A. Jr.; Lallone, R.

    1985-01-01

    An abnormal filtration fraction or a significant divergence between a kidney's ability to extract Tc-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) and other function parameters, such as the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) or the effective renal plasma flow (ERPF, could lead to different estimates of relative or absolute renal function, depending on the radiopharmaceutical administered. To evaluate this possible divergence, the authors measured the relative GFR (I-125 iothalamate), ERPF (I-131 hippurate), and Tc-99m DMSA accumulation in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats with unilateral ureteral obstruction or unilateral ischemia at various times after renal injury. The relative ERPF of the obstructed kidney was significantly greater than the relative GFR at all time periods studied; significant but less dramatic differences were noted comparing DMSA with GFR in obstruction and DMSA and ERPF with GRF in ischemia.

  1. Complexation study on no-carrier-added astatine with insulin: a candidate radiopharmaceutical.

    PubMed

    Lahiri, Susanta; Roy, Kamalika; Sen, Souvik

    2008-12-01

    No-carrier-added astatine radionuclides produced in the (7)Li-irradiated lead matrix were separated from bulk lead nitrate target by complexing At with insulin, followed by dialysis. The method offers simultaneous separation of At from lead as well as its complexation with insulin. The At-insulin complex might be a potential radiopharmaceutical in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. The stability of At-insulin complex was checked by dialysis against deionized water and Ringer lactate (RL) solution. It has been found that the half-life of At-insulin complex is about approximately 12h, when dialyzed against deionized water and is only 6h, when dialyzed against RL solution having the same composition as blood serum. The 6h half-life of this Insulin-At complex is perfect for killing cancer cells from external cell surfaces as the half-life of internalization of insulin molecule inside the cell is 7-12h.

  2. In vivo nanoparticle-mediated radiopharmaceutical-excited fluorescence molecular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhenhua; Qu, Yawei; Wang, Kun; Zhang, Xiaojun; Zha, Jiali; Song, Tianming; Bao, Chengpeng; Liu, Haixiao; Wang, Zhongliang; Wang, Jing; Liu, Zhongyu; Liu, Haifeng; Tian, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Cerenkov luminescence imaging utilizes visible photons emitted from radiopharmaceuticals to achieve in vivo optical molecular-derived signals. Since Cerenkov radiation is weak, non-optimum for tissue penetration and continuous regardless of biological interactions, it is challenging to detect this signal with a diagnostic dose. Therefore, it is challenging to achieve useful activated optical imaging for the acquisition of direct molecular information. Here we introduce a novel imaging strategy, which converts γ and Cerenkov radiation from radioisotopes into fluorescence through europium oxide nanoparticles. After a series of imaging studies, we demonstrate that this approach provides strong optical signals with high signal-to-background ratios, an ideal tissue penetration spectrum and activatable imaging ability. In comparison with present imaging techniques, it detects tumour lesions with low radioactive tracer uptake or small tumour lesions more effectively. We believe it will facilitate the development of nuclear and optical molecular imaging for new, highly sensitive imaging applications. PMID:26123615

  3. Overview and perspectives on automation strategies in (68)Ga radiopharmaceutical preparations.

    PubMed

    Boschi, Stefano; Malizia, Claudio; Lodi, Filippo

    2013-01-01

    The renaissance of (68)Ga radiopharmacy has led to great advances in automation technology. The availability of a highly efficient, reliable, long-lived (68)Ge/(68)Ga generator system along with a well-established coordination chemistry based on bifunctional chelating agents have been the bases of this development in (68)Ga radiopharmacy. Syntheses of (68)Ga peptides were originally performed by manual or semiautomated systems, but increasing clinical demand, radioprotection, and regulatory issues have driven extensive automation of their production process. Several automated systems, based on different post-processing of the (68)Ga generator eluate, on different engineering, and on fixed tubing or disposable cassette approaches, have been developed and are discussed in this chapter. Since automatic systems for preparation of radiopharmaceuticals should comply with qualification and validation protocols established by regulations such as current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMP) and local regulations, some regulatory issues and the more relevant qualification protocols are also discussed.

  4. Theranostic Radiopharmaceuticals Based on Gold Nanoparticles Labeled with (177)Lu and Conjugated to Peptides.

    PubMed

    Ferro-Flores, Guillermina; Ocampo-García, Blanca E; Santos-Cuevas, Clara L; de María Ramírez, Flor; Azorín-Vega, Erika P; Meléndez-Alafort, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been proposed for a variety of medical applications such as localized heat sources for cancer treatment and drug delivery systems. The conjugation of peptides to AuNPs produces stable multimeric systems with target-specific molecular recognition. Lutetium- 177 ((177)Lu) has been successfully used in peptide radionuclide therapy. Recently, (177)Lu-AuNPs conjugated to different peptides have been proposed as a new class of theranostic radiopharmaceuticals. These radioconjugates may function simultaneously as molecular imaging agents, radiotherapy systems and thermal-ablation systems. This article covers advancements in the design, synthesis, physicochemical characterization, molecular recognition assessment and preclinical therapeutic efficacy of gold nanoparticles radiolabeled with (177)Lu and conjugated to RGD (-Arg-Gly-Asp-), Lys(3)-Bombesin and Tat(49-57) peptides.

  5. Effect of altered thyroid status on the transport of hepatobiliary radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Pahuja, D.N.; Noronha, O.P.

    1985-10-01

    The effect of induced hypothyroidism (by feeding an antithyroid drug-propylthiouracil) on the transport and clearance of the routinely used hepatobiliary radiopharmaceuticals--radioiodinated iodine- T (131I) rose bengal and technetium-99m-N-(4-n-butylphenylcarbamoylmethyl) iminodiacetate, was studied in the rats. Hypothyroidism was associated with depressed growth and retarded clearance of these radiotracers from the in vivo system. Treatment of the hypothyroid rats with thyroxine (2-5 micrograms/100 g b.w. day) for 6 wk, restored these parameters towards normal values. These data suggest that delayed clearance of these hepatobiliary tracers could be related to reduced metabolic rate accompanied with the hypotonia and hypomotility of intestine normally observed in the hypothyroid state.

  6. The role of coordination chemistry in the development of copper and rhenium radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Paul S

    2011-02-01

    There are several isotopes of copper and rhenium that are of interest in the development of new molecular imaging or radiotherapeutic agents. This perspective article highlights the role of coordination chemistry in the design of copper and rhenium radiopharmaceuticals engineered to selectively target tissue of interest such as cancer cells or pathological features associated with Alzheimer's disease. The coordination chemistry of copper bis(thiosemicarbazone) derivatives and copper macrocyclic complexes is discussed in terms of their potential application as targeted positron emission tomography tracers for non-invasive diagnostic imaging. A range of rhenium complexes with different ligands with rhenium in different oxidation states are introduced and their potential to be translated to new radiotherapeutic agents discussed.

  7. Theranostic Radiopharmaceuticals Based on Gold Nanoparticles Labeled with (177)Lu and Conjugated to Peptides.

    PubMed

    Ferro-Flores, Guillermina; Ocampo-García, Blanca E; Santos-Cuevas, Clara L; de María Ramírez, Flor; Azorín-Vega, Erika P; Meléndez-Alafort, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been proposed for a variety of medical applications such as localized heat sources for cancer treatment and drug delivery systems. The conjugation of peptides to AuNPs produces stable multimeric systems with target-specific molecular recognition. Lutetium- 177 ((177)Lu) has been successfully used in peptide radionuclide therapy. Recently, (177)Lu-AuNPs conjugated to different peptides have been proposed as a new class of theranostic radiopharmaceuticals. These radioconjugates may function simultaneously as molecular imaging agents, radiotherapy systems and thermal-ablation systems. This article covers advancements in the design, synthesis, physicochemical characterization, molecular recognition assessment and preclinical therapeutic efficacy of gold nanoparticles radiolabeled with (177)Lu and conjugated to RGD (-Arg-Gly-Asp-), Lys(3)-Bombesin and Tat(49-57) peptides. PMID:25771363

  8. Pharmacokinetics of subcutaneous fentanyl in Greyhounds.

    PubMed

    KuKanich, Butch

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of the study was to describe the pharmacokinetics of subcutaneous fentanyl (15μg/kg) in six healthy Greyhound dogs. Fentanyl plasma concentrations were determined by a liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry method. Non-compartmental pharmacokinetic analysis was used. Fentanyl was rapidly absorbed with a mean peak concentration (C(MAX)) of 3.56ng/mL at 0.24h. The mean terminal half-life, volume of distribution per bioavailability, and clearance per bioavailability were 2.97h, 7.09L/kg, 27.60mL/min/kg, respectively. Pain occurred on injection in all six dogs, but addition of 8.4% sodium bicarbonate (1mL per 20mL fentanyl) resulted in no pain on injection in 3/3 dogs but similar C(MAX) values. The subcutaneous route may be an alternative route of fentanyl administration if intravenous administration is not practical.

  9. Acute pharmacokinetics of memantine in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Saab, Bechara J; Roder, John C

    2011-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of memantine, a widely prescribed medication in the United States and the European Union for the treatment of moderate-to-severe Alzheimer's disease (AD), have not been well explored in the mouse. Memantine is a highly unspecific blocker of many channels and how memantine may be of benefit in AD remains a mystery. Therefore, the investigation of memantine in the mouse, the most commonly chosen subject for modeling AD, has strong potential to lead to better therapies. Here, we present an acute pharmacokinetic analysis of memantine in mouse brain tissue and blood serum for a variety of experimentally relevant doses. The data help shed light on the mechanism of memantine action in vivo, and demonstrate that subcutaneous doses above 10 mg/kg in the mouse are most likely not therapeutically relevant to the human.

  10. Pharmacokinetics and prescribing in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Swift, C G

    1994-08-01

    The use of prescribed medication in general is higher in the elderly than in the young and it is possible that existing patterns of antimicrobial agent prescribing may predispose to suboptimal response, certain adverse drug reactions (ADR) and the emergence of resistant strains of organisms. Age is an important variable affecting the pharmacokinetics of drugs, including many antimicrobials. Changes which may affect Cmax/MIC ratios and/or the time above MIC include reduced first-pass metabolism, altered distribution volume, reduced binding to albumin, reduced metabolic biotransformation and reduced renal elimination. Application of a knowledge of antimicrobial agent pharmacokinetic changes with age and their implications for response may enable more precise determination of dose regimens for older patients, which is probably desirable for the prevention of both ADR and bacterial resistance. PMID:7844071

  11. Recommended reading in population pharmacokinetic pharmacodynamics.

    PubMed

    Bonate, Peter L

    2005-01-01

    Developing the skills or expertise to create useful population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic models can be a daunting task-the level of mathematical and statistical complexity is such that newcomers to the field are frequently overwhelmed. A good place to start in learning the field is to read articles in the literature. However, the number of articles dealing with population pharmacokinetic pharmacodynamics is exponentially increasing on a yearly basis, so choosing which articles to read can be difficult. The purpose of this review is to provide a recommended reading list for newcomers to the field. The list was chosen based on perceived impact of the article in the field, the quality of the article, or to highlight some important detail contained within the article. After reading the articles in the list, it is believed that the reader will have a broad overview of the field and have a sound foundation for more-detailed reading of the literature.

  12. Implementation and validation of collapsed cone superposition for radiopharmaceutical dosimetry of photon emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Garcia, Manuel; Gardin, Isabelle; Lebtahi, Rachida; Dieudonné, Arnaud

    2015-10-01

    Two collapsed cone (CC) superposition algorithms have been implemented for radiopharmaceutical dosimetry of photon emitters. The straight CC (SCC) superposition method uses a water energy deposition kernel (EDKw) for each electron, positron and photon components, while the primary and scatter CC (PSCC) superposition method uses different EDKw for primary and once-scattered photons. PSCC was implemented only for photons originating from the nucleus, precluding its application to positron emitters. EDKw are linearly scaled by radiological distance, taking into account tissue density heterogeneities. The implementation was tested on 100, 300 and 600 keV mono-energetic photons and 18F, 99mTc, 131I and 177Lu. The kernels were generated using the Monte Carlo codes MCNP and EGSnrc. The validation was performed on 6 phantoms representing interfaces between soft-tissues, lung and bone. The figures of merit were γ (3%, 3 mm) and γ (5%, 5 mm) criterions corresponding to the computation comparison on 80 absorbed doses (AD) points per phantom between Monte Carlo simulations and CC algorithms. PSCC gave better results than SCC for the lowest photon energy (100 keV). For the 3 isotopes computed with PSCC, the percentage of AD points satisfying the γ (5%, 5 mm) criterion was always over 99%. A still good but worse result was found with SCC, since at least 97% of AD-values verified the γ (5%, 5 mm) criterion, except a value of 57% for the 99mTc with the lung/bone interface. The CC superposition method for radiopharmaceutical dosimetry is a good alternative to Monte Carlo simulations while reducing computation complexity.

  13. Implementation and validation of collapsed cone superposition for radiopharmaceutical dosimetry of photon emitters.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Garcia, Manuel; Gardin, Isabelle; Lebtahi, Rachida; Dieudonné, Arnaud

    2015-10-21

    Two collapsed cone (CC) superposition algorithms have been implemented for radiopharmaceutical dosimetry of photon emitters. The straight CC (SCC) superposition method uses a water energy deposition kernel (EDKw) for each electron, positron and photon components, while the primary and scatter CC (PSCC) superposition method uses different EDKw for primary and once-scattered photons. PSCC was implemented only for photons originating from the nucleus, precluding its application to positron emitters. EDKw are linearly scaled by radiological distance, taking into account tissue density heterogeneities. The implementation was tested on 100, 300 and 600 keV mono-energetic photons and (18)F, (99m)Tc, (131)I and (177)Lu. The kernels were generated using the Monte Carlo codes MCNP and EGSnrc. The validation was performed on 6 phantoms representing interfaces between soft-tissues, lung and bone. The figures of merit were γ (3%, 3 mm) and γ (5%, 5 mm) criterions corresponding to the computation comparison on 80 absorbed doses (AD) points per phantom between Monte Carlo simulations and CC algorithms. PSCC gave better results than SCC for the lowest photon energy (100 keV). For the 3 isotopes computed with PSCC, the percentage of AD points satisfying the γ (5%, 5 mm) criterion was always over 99%. A still good but worse result was found with SCC, since at least 97% of AD-values verified the γ (5%, 5 mm) criterion, except a value of 57% for the (99m)Tc with the lung/bone interface. The CC superposition method for radiopharmaceutical dosimetry is a good alternative to Monte Carlo simulations while reducing computation complexity. PMID:26406778

  14. Implementation and validation of collapsed cone superposition for radiopharmaceutical dosimetry of photon emitters.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Garcia, Manuel; Gardin, Isabelle; Lebtahi, Rachida; Dieudonné, Arnaud

    2015-10-21

    Two collapsed cone (CC) superposition algorithms have been implemented for radiopharmaceutical dosimetry of photon emitters. The straight CC (SCC) superposition method uses a water energy deposition kernel (EDKw) for each electron, positron and photon components, while the primary and scatter CC (PSCC) superposition method uses different EDKw for primary and once-scattered photons. PSCC was implemented only for photons originating from the nucleus, precluding its application to positron emitters. EDKw are linearly scaled by radiological distance, taking into account tissue density heterogeneities. The implementation was tested on 100, 300 and 600 keV mono-energetic photons and (18)F, (99m)Tc, (131)I and (177)Lu. The kernels were generated using the Monte Carlo codes MCNP and EGSnrc. The validation was performed on 6 phantoms representing interfaces between soft-tissues, lung and bone. The figures of merit were γ (3%, 3 mm) and γ (5%, 5 mm) criterions corresponding to the computation comparison on 80 absorbed doses (AD) points per phantom between Monte Carlo simulations and CC algorithms. PSCC gave better results than SCC for the lowest photon energy (100 keV). For the 3 isotopes computed with PSCC, the percentage of AD points satisfying the γ (5%, 5 mm) criterion was always over 99%. A still good but worse result was found with SCC, since at least 97% of AD-values verified the γ (5%, 5 mm) criterion, except a value of 57% for the (99m)Tc with the lung/bone interface. The CC superposition method for radiopharmaceutical dosimetry is a good alternative to Monte Carlo simulations while reducing computation complexity.

  15. Pharmacokinetic Profile of Spectinomycin in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Madhura, Dora Babu; Lee, Richard; Meibohm, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Short Summary Following intravenous (IV) administration, the pharmacokinetics of spectinomycin in rats was found to be on par with its profile in other mammalian species including humans with respect to its overall excretion and half-life at effective concentrations. This study, however, indicates that a small fraction of the spectinomycin dose is retained in peripheral tissues for a prolonged period of time at low concentrations. PMID:24020122

  16. Pharmacokinetics of Tenofovir During Pregnancy and Postpartum

    PubMed Central

    Best, Brookie M.; Burchett, Sandra; Li, Hong; Stek, Alice; Hu, Chengcheng; Wang, Jiajia; Hawkins, Elizabeth; Byroads, Mark; Watts, D. Heather; Smith, Elizabeth; Fletcher, Courtney V.; Capparelli, Edmund V.; Mirochnick, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Tenofovir disoproxol fumarate (TDF) is increasingly used in HAART regimens of pregnant women, but limited data exist on pregnancy pharmacokinetics of chronically-dosed TDF. This study described tenofovir pharmacokinetics during pregnancy and postpartum. Methods IMPAACT P1026s is a prospective, non-blinded pharmacokinetic study of HIV-infected pregnant women that included a cohort receiving 300 mg TDF once daily. Steady-state 24-hour pharmacokinetic profiles were measured at 2nd and 3rd trimester and postpartum, with maternal and umbilical cord samples at delivery. Tenofovir was measured by LC-MS. The target AUC was ≥ 1.99 mcg•hr/mL (non-pregnant historical control 10th percentile). Results Median tenofovir AUC was decreased during the 2nd (1.9 mcg•hr/mL) and 3rd (2.4 mcg•hr/mL, p=0.005) trimesters versus postpartum (3.0 mcg•hr/mL). Tenofovir AUC exceeded the target for 2/4 (50%) 2nd trimester; 27/37 (73%; 95% CI: 56%, 86%) 3rd trimester; and 27/32 (84%; 95% CI: 67%, 95%) postpartum women (p>0.05). Median 2nd/3rd trimester troughs were lower (39/54 ng/mL) than postpartum (61 ng/mL). Median 3rd trimester weight was heavier for subjects below target AUC versus those above target (97.9 vs. 74.2 kg, p = 0.006). Median ratio of cord blood to maternal concentrations was 0.88. No infants were HIV infected. Conclusions This study found lower tenofovir AUC and troughs during pregnancy. Transplacental passage with chronic TDF use during pregnancy was high. Standard TDF doses appear appropriate for most HIV-infected pregnant women but therapeutic drug monitoring with dose adjustment should be considered in pregnant women with high weight (> 90kg) or inadequate HIV RNA response. PMID:25959631

  17. Pharmacokinetics of Oral Taurine in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Ghandforoush-Sattari, Mohammadreza; Mashayekhi, Siminozar; Krishna, Channarayapatna V.; Thompson, John P.; Routledge, Philipp A.

    2010-01-01

    Taurine, a sulfur-containing amino acid, is a normal constituent of the human diet. Little is known of the pharmacokinetics of taurine in man after oral administration. We studied the pharmacokinetics of 4 g taurine in eight healthy male volunteers (median age 27.5, range 22–45) following orally administration in the fasting state in the morning. Blood samples were taken at regular intervals and plasma taurine concentration was measured by a modified HPLC method. Data were subjected to noncompartmental analysis. Maximum plasma taurine concentration (Cmax) was measured at 1.5 ± 0.6 hr after administration as 86.1 ± 19.0 mg/L (0.69 ± 0.15 mmol). Plasma elimination half-life (T1/2) and the ratio of clearance/bioavailability (Cl/F) were 1.0 ± 0.3 hr and 21.1 ± 7.8 L/hr, respectively. Since taurine is occasionally used in therapeutics as a medicine, the pharmacokinetics and effects of oral taurine in healthy volunteers would be useful in the future studies of taurine in pharmacology and nutrition. PMID:22331997

  18. Pharmacokinetics of oral rufinamide in dogs.

    PubMed

    Wright, H M; Chen, A V; Martinez, S E; Davies, N M

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetic properties and short-term adverse effect profile of single-dose oral rufinamide in healthy dogs. Six healthy adult dogs were included in the study. The pharmacokinetics of rufinamide were calculated following administration of a single mean oral dose of 20.0 mg/kg (range 18.6-20.8 mg/kg). Plasma rufinamide concentrations were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography, and pharmacokinetic data were analyzed using commercial software. No adverse effects were observed. The mean terminal half-life was 9.86 ± 4.77 h. The mean maximum plasma concentration was 19.6 ± 5.8 μg/mL, and the mean time to maximum plasma concentration was 9.33 ± 4.68 h. Mean clearance was 1.45 ± 0.70 L/h. The area under the curve (to infinity) was 411 ± 176 μg · h/mL. Results of this study suggest that rufinamide given orally at 20 mg/kg every 12 h in healthy dogs should result in a plasma concentration and half-life sufficient to achieve the therapeutic level extrapolated from humans without short-term adverse effects. Further investigation into the efficacy and long-term safety of rufinamide in the treatment of canine epilepsy is warranted. PMID:22132708

  19. Ethanol Pharmacokinetics in Neonates and Infants

    PubMed Central

    Marek, Elizabeth; Kraft, Walter K.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Ethanol has been used for years in neonatal and infant liquid medications, yet the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety of ethanol in this vulnerable population have not been well characterized. The purpose of this review is to raise awareness of ethanol use as an excipient in neonatal and infant medications and to provide insight, based on the available evidence, into clearance rates of ethanol in babies. We also discuss ethanol pharmacokinetics in adults, theoretical pharmacokinetic changes in neonates and infants as it may apply to ethanol disposition, and case reports involving ethanol exposure in neonates and infants. Materials and methods This study was a narrative review in which relevant papers were selected using databases and scientific search engines such as PubMed with the key words ethanol, infant, and newborninfant. Results It remains unclear what ethanol exposure is safe for neonates and infants. The Food and Drug Administration and American Academy of Pediatrics have both taken action, by either setting limits of ethanol content in over-the-counter medications or by recommending restricted exposure to ethanol-containing pediatric formulations. Conclusions Until the short- and long-term health effects of chronic ethanol administration can be further characterized, ethanol-containing medications should be used with caution. PMID:25379066

  20. Pharmacokinetics of ketoprofen syrup in small children.

    PubMed

    Kokki, H; Le Liboux, A; Jekunen, A; Montay, G; Heikkinen, M

    2000-04-01

    Ketoprofen is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug with analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antipyretic properties. Its pharmacokinetics has not been determined in small children. The objective here was to determine the pharmacokinetics of ketoprofen syrup, 0.5 mg/kg, in two groups of 10 children. Group 1 was from ages 6 months up to 2 years (7/10 younger than 1 year), and Group 2 was from ages 2 to 7 years. Venous blood samples were collected before drug administration and 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 12 hours after. A validated HPLC method was used to determine plasma levels of ketoprofen. The lower limit of quantification was 0.02 microgram/ml of plasma. Ketoprofen syrup was absorbed rapidly, the plasma level reaching its maximum at 0.5 hours, with C0.5 hours = 3 micrograms/ml. The pharmacokinetics was similar between the two groups of children. The elimination half-life, 2.0 hours in Group 1 or 1.9 hours in Group 2, was similar to that reported in adults. PMID:10761162

  1. Dose dependent pharmacokinetics of naproxen in man.

    PubMed

    Niazi, S K; Alam, S M; Ahmad, S I

    1996-05-01

    The pharmacokinetics of one of the most widely used non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs, naproxen, were studied in 28 healthy human volunteers at the two most commonly used dose levels, viz., 250 mg and 500 mg, in a cross-over design. The plasma levels of naproxen were analysed by a modified high-pressure liquid chromatography method. The plasma concentrations at higher doses were not proportional to dose, indicating a non-linearity in the pharmacokinetics at the dose levels studied; this finding is new since earlier studies had studied only higher doses and assumed that at lower doses the pharmacokinetics would be linear. There was, however, no significant difference in the elimination half-life (rate constant), time to reach peak concentration (Cmax), mean residence time (MRT), or area under first moment curve (AUMC). The clearance and distribution volume of naproxen were substantially increased at higher dose resulting in statistically lower proportional concentration and the total area under the curve (AUC). These observations are explained on the basis of a change in the plasma protein binding resulting in more free naproxen available for quicker clearance and wider penetration into tissues. These findings have several important clinical implications for the long-term use of naproxen as an antiarthritic drug. It is proposed that the clinical efficacy of naproxen can be increased and side-effects reduced by giving it in small divided doses instead of large doses.

  2. Predictive Performance of Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic and Population Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Renally Cleared Drugs in Children

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, W; Johnson, TN; Xu, H; Cheung, SYA; Bui, KH; Li, J; Al‐Huniti, N

    2016-01-01

    Predictive performance of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) and population pharmacokinetic (PopPK) models of drugs predominantly eliminated through kidney in the pediatric population was evaluated. After optimization using adult clinical data, the verified PBPK models can predict 33 of 34 drug clearance within twofold of the observed values in children 1 month and older. More specifically, 10 of 11 of predicted clearance values were within 1.5‐fold of those observed in children between 1 month and 2 years old. The PopPK approach also predicted 19 of 21 drug clearance within twofold of the observed values in children. In summary, our analysis demonstrated both PBPK and PopPK adult models, after verification with additional adult pharmacokinetic (PK) studies and incorporation of known ontogeny of renal filtration, could be applied for dosing regimen recommendation in children 1 month and older for renally eliminated drugs in a first‐in‐pediatric study. PMID:27566992

  3. Taking in a Show.

    PubMed

    Boden, Timothy W

    2016-01-01

    Many medical practices have cut back on education and staff development expenses, especially those costs associated with conventions and conferences. But there are hard-to-value returns on your investment in these live events--beyond the obvious benefits of acquired knowledge and skills. Major vendors still exhibit their services and wares at many events, and the exhibit hall is a treasure-house of information and resources for the savvy physician or administrator. Make and stick to a purposeful plan to exploit the trade show. You can compare products, gain new insights and ideas, and even negotiate better deals with representatives anxious to realize returns on their exhibition investments. PMID:27249887

  4. Taking in a Show.

    PubMed

    Boden, Timothy W

    2016-01-01

    Many medical practices have cut back on education and staff development expenses, especially those costs associated with conventions and conferences. But there are hard-to-value returns on your investment in these live events--beyond the obvious benefits of acquired knowledge and skills. Major vendors still exhibit their services and wares at many events, and the exhibit hall is a treasure-house of information and resources for the savvy physician or administrator. Make and stick to a purposeful plan to exploit the trade show. You can compare products, gain new insights and ideas, and even negotiate better deals with representatives anxious to realize returns on their exhibition investments.

  5. Pharmacokinetic equivalence of 5(ethyl(/sup 2/H)5)- and unlabelled phenobarbitone

    SciTech Connect

    Benchekroun, Y.; Ribon, B.; Falconnet, J.B.; Cherrah, Y.; Brazier, J.L.

    1989-02-01

    The present study shows the absence of in vivo pharmacokinetic isotope effect on phenobarbitone (PB) C5-ethyl deuteration (PBd5) following oral administration to man of equimolar PB/PBd5 mixtures (0.40 mmol each). Plasma PB and PBd5 (17 days) and urine PB, PBd5 and parahydroxy-metabolites (PBOH, PBHOd5) levels were determined by GC-MS. Isotope effect research includes comparison of pharmacokinetic parameters, study of time-dependence of isotope ratios (IRs) in plasma and urine (linearity test), comparison of IRs between samples and administered mixtures (Mann Whitney's test) and comparison of PBOH/PBOHd5 ratios before and after urine enzymatic hydrolysis (Student's two tailed t-test). No significant isotope effect was observed on pharmacokinetic parameters, PB hydroxylation or PBOH conjugation (x less than or equal to 5%); which the absence of pentadeuteration-induced alteration in PB's HSA binding parameters (binding mode, Ka, N) corroborates (x less than or equal to 5%). These results establish bioequivalence of PB and PBd5; the latter can be used with benefit in stable-isotope clinical pharmacology (steady state pharmacokinetics, drug interactions...) investigations as well as bioavailability studies of PB preparations.

  6. Riociguat (BAY 63-2521) and aspirin: a randomized, pharmacodynamic, and pharmacokinetic interaction study

    PubMed Central

    Reber, Michael; Krätzschmar, Jörn; Unger, Sigrun; Mück, Wolfgang; Wensing, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In preclinical studies, drugs that increase cyclic guanosine monophosphate levels have been shown to influence platelet function/aggregation; however, the effect of riociguat on human platelets is unclear. Aspirin, a platelet inhibitor, is likely to be given concomitantly in patients receiving riociguat. It is therefore important to establish clinically whether (1) riociguat affects platelet function and (2) aspirin and riociguat interact. This randomized, open-label, crossover study investigated potential pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic interactions between these drugs in healthy male volunteers (N = 18). There were 3 treatment regimens: a single morning dose of riociguat 2.5 mg, aspirin 500 mg on 2 consecutive mornings, and both treatments together, with riociguat given on the second morning. Fifteen participants were available for pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic analysis. There was no effect of riociguat alone on bleeding time, platelet aggregation, and serum thromboxane B2 levels. The effects of aspirin on these parameters were not influenced by concomitant administration of riociguat. The pharmacokinetic profile of riociguat showed interindividual variability, which was independent of aspirin coadministration. Six of 17 participants available for safety evaluation reported at least 1 treatment-emergent adverse event. All adverse events were of mild severity, apart from 1 report of moderate headache. No serious adverse events occurred. In conclusion, riociguat demonstrated no clinically relevant pharmacodynamic or pharmacokinetic interactions with aspirin at the doses used in this study in healthy men; coadministration of riociguat and aspirin should therefore not require any dose adjustment for either drug. PMID:27162625

  7. Obesity in show dogs.

    PubMed

    Corbee, R J

    2013-10-01

    Obesity is an important disease with a growing incidence. Because obesity is related to several other diseases, and decreases life span, it is important to identify the population at risk. Several risk factors for obesity have been described in the literature. A higher incidence of obesity in certain breeds is often suggested. The aim of this study was to determine whether obesity occurs more often in certain breeds. The second aim was to relate the increased prevalence of obesity in certain breeds to the official standards of that breed. To this end, we investigated 1379 dogs of 128 different breeds by determining their body condition score (BCS). Overall, 18.6% of the show dogs had a BCS >5, and 1.1% of the show dogs had a BCS>7. There were significant differences between breeds, which could be correlated to the breed standards. It warrants firm discussions with breeders and judges in order to come to different interpretations of the standards to prevent overweight conditions from being the standard of beauty. PMID:22882163

  8. A Treatment Planning Method for Sequentially Combining Radiopharmaceutical Therapy and External Radiation Therapy;External beam therapy; Radiopharmaceutical therapy; Three-dimensional dosimetry; Treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, Robert F.; McNutt, Todd; Baechler, Sebastien; He Bin; Esaias, Caroline E.; Frey, Eric C.; Loeb, David M.; Wahl, Richard L.; Shokek, Ori; Sgouros, George

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Effective cancer treatment generally requires combination therapy. The combination of external beam therapy (XRT) with radiopharmaceutical therapy (RPT) requires accurate three-dimensional dose calculations to avoid toxicity and evaluate efficacy. We have developed and tested a treatment planning method, using the patient-specific three-dimensional dosimetry package 3D-RD, for sequentially combined RPT/XRT therapy designed to limit toxicity to organs at risk. Methods and Materials: The biologic effective dose (BED) was used to translate voxelized RPT absorbed dose (D{sub RPT}) values into a normalized total dose (or equivalent 2-Gy-fraction XRT absorbed dose), NTD{sub RPT} map. The BED was calculated numerically using an algorithmic approach, which enabled a more accurate calculation of BED and NTD{sub RPT}. A treatment plan from the combined Samarium-153 and external beam was designed that would deliver a tumoricidal dose while delivering no more than 50 Gy of NTD{sub sum} to the spinal cord of a patient with a paraspinal tumor. Results: The average voxel NTD{sub RPT} to tumor from RPT was 22.6 Gy (range, 1-85 Gy); the maximum spinal cord voxel NTD{sub RPT} from RPT was 6.8 Gy. The combined therapy NTD{sub sum} to tumor was 71.5 Gy (range, 40-135 Gy) for a maximum voxel spinal cord NTD{sub sum} equal to the maximum tolerated dose of 50 Gy. Conclusions: A method that enables real-time treatment planning of combined RPT-XRT has been developed. By implementing a more generalized conversion between the dose values from the two modalities and an activity-based treatment of partial volume effects, the reliability of combination therapy treatment planning has been expanded.

  9. Personalized therapeutics for levofloxacin: a focus on pharmacokinetic concerns

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Chu-Han; Yu, Lu-Shan; Zeng, Su; Huang, Yu-Wen; Zhou, Quan

    2014-01-01

    pharmacokinetics of LVX, which might be associated with sample size and administration route. Children younger than 5 years cleared LVX nearly twice as fast as adults. Patients in intensive care receiving LVX therapy showed significant pharmacokinetic differences compared with healthy subjects. Creatinine clearance explained most of the population variance in the plasma clearance of LVX. Switching from intravenous to oral delivery of LVX had economic benefits. Addition of tamsulosin to the LVX regimen was beneficial for patients with bacterial prostatitis because tamsulosin could increase the maximal concentration of LVX in prostatic tissue. Coadministration of multivalent cation-containing drugs and LVX should be avoided. For patients receiving warfarin and LVX concomitantly, caution is needed regarding potential changes in the international normalized ratio; however, it is unnecessary to seek alternatives to LVX for the sake of avoiding drug interaction with warfarin. It is unnecessary to proactively reduce the dose of cyclosporin or tacrolimus when comedicated with LVX. Transporters such as organic anion-transporting polypeptide 1A2, P-glycoprotein, human organic cation transporter 1, and multidrug and toxin extrusion protein 1 are involved in the pharmacokinetics of LVX. Conclusion Personalized LVX therapeutics are necessary for the sake of better safety, clinical success, and avoidance of resistance. New findings regarding individual dosing of LVX in special patient populations and active transport mechanisms in vivo are opening up new horizons in clinical practice. PMID:24707182

  10. Not a "reality" show.

    PubMed

    Wrong, Terence; Baumgart, Erica

    2013-01-01

    The authors of the preceding articles raise legitimate questions about patient and staff rights and the unintended consequences of allowing ABC News to film inside teaching hospitals. We explain why we regard their fears as baseless and not supported by what we heard from individuals portrayed in the filming, our decade-long experience making medical documentaries, and the full un-aired context of the scenes shown in the broadcast. The authors don't and can't know what conversations we had, what documents we reviewed, and what protections we put in place in each televised scene. Finally, we hope to correct several misleading examples cited by the authors as well as their offhand mischaracterization of our program as a "reality" show. PMID:23631336

  11. Not a "reality" show.

    PubMed

    Wrong, Terence; Baumgart, Erica

    2013-01-01

    The authors of the preceding articles raise legitimate questions about patient and staff rights and the unintended consequences of allowing ABC News to film inside teaching hospitals. We explain why we regard their fears as baseless and not supported by what we heard from individuals portrayed in the filming, our decade-long experience making medical documentaries, and the full un-aired context of the scenes shown in the broadcast. The authors don't and can't know what conversations we had, what documents we reviewed, and what protections we put in place in each televised scene. Finally, we hope to correct several misleading examples cited by the authors as well as their offhand mischaracterization of our program as a "reality" show.

  12. Application of back-propagation artificial neural network and curve estimation in pharmacokinetics of losartan in rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Bin; Lin, Gaotong; Liu, Xianyun; Ma, Jianshe; Wang, Xianchuan; Lin, Feiyan; Hu, Lufeng

    2015-01-01

    In order to develop pharmacokinetic model, a well-known multilayer feed-forward algorithm back-propagation artificial neural networks (BP-ANN) was applied to the pharmacokinetics of losartan in rabbit. The plasma concentrations of losartan in twelve rabbits, which were divided into two groups and given losartan 2 mg/kg by intravenous (Iv) and intragastrical (Ig) administration, were determined by LC-MS. The BP-ANN model included one input layer, hidden layers, and one output layer was constructed and compared with curve estimation based on the time-concentration data of losartan. The results showed the BP-ANN model had high goodness of fit index and good coherence (R > 0.99) between forecasted concentration and measured concentration both in Iv and Ig administration. The residuals of each concentrations generated by BP-ANN model were all smaller than Curve estimation. The pharmacokinetic result showed there was no significant difference between measured and simulated pharmacokinetic parameters including AUC(0-t), AUC(0-∞), MRT(0-t), MRT(0-∞), T1/2 V and Cmax (P > 0.05). In conclusion, the BP-ANN model has remarkably accurate predictions ability, which better than Curve estimation, and can be used as a utility tool in pharmacokinetic experiment. PMID:26885213

  13. Public medical shows.

    PubMed

    Walusinski, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    In the second half of the 19th century, Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-1893) became famous for the quality of his teaching and his innovative neurological discoveries, bringing many French and foreign students to Paris. A hunger for recognition, together with progressive and anticlerical ideals, led Charcot to invite writers, journalists, and politicians to his lessons, during which he presented the results of his work on hysteria. These events became public performances, for which physicians and patients were transformed into actors. Major newspapers ran accounts of these consultations, more like theatrical shows in some respects. The resultant enthusiasm prompted other physicians in Paris and throughout France to try and imitate them. We will compare the form and substance of Charcot's lessons with those given by Jules-Bernard Luys (1828-1897), Victor Dumontpallier (1826-1899), Ambroise-Auguste Liébault (1823-1904), Hippolyte Bernheim (1840-1919), Joseph Grasset (1849-1918), and Albert Pitres (1848-1928). We will also note their impact on contemporary cinema and theatre. PMID:25273491

  14. The Great Cometary Show

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-01-01

    its high spatial and spectral resolution, it was possible to zoom into the very heart of this very massive star. In this innermost region, the observations are dominated by the extremely dense stellar wind that totally obscures the underlying central star. The AMBER observations show that this dense stellar wind is not spherically symmetric, but exhibits a clearly elongated structure. Overall, the AMBER observations confirm that the extremely high mass loss of Eta Carinae's massive central star is non-spherical and much stronger along the poles than in the equatorial plane. This is in agreement with theoretical models that predict such an enhanced polar mass-loss in the case of rapidly rotating stars. ESO PR Photo 06c/07 ESO PR Photo 06c/07 RS Ophiuchi in Outburst Several papers from this special feature focus on the later stages in a star's life. One looks at the binary system Gamma 2 Velorum, which contains the closest example of a star known as a Wolf-Rayet. A single AMBER observation allowed the astronomers to separate the spectra of the two components, offering new insights in the modeling of Wolf-Rayet stars, but made it also possible to measure the separation between the two stars. This led to a new determination of the distance of the system, showing that previous estimates were incorrect. The observations also revealed information on the region where the winds from the two stars collide. The famous binary system RS Ophiuchi, an example of a recurrent nova, was observed just 5 days after it was discovered to be in outburst on 12 February 2006, an event that has been expected for 21 years. AMBER was able to detect the extension of the expanding nova emission. These observations show a complex geometry and kinematics, far from the simple interpretation of a spherical fireball in extension. AMBER has detected a high velocity jet probably perpendicular to the orbital plane of the binary system, and allowed a precise and careful study of the wind and the shockwave

  15. Clinical pharmacokinetics of new-generation antiepileptic drugs at the extremes of age: an update.

    PubMed

    Italiano, Domenico; Perucca, Emilio

    2013-08-01

    Epilepsies occur across the entire age range, and their incidence peaks in the first years of life and in the elderly. Therefore, antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are commonly used at the extremes of age. Rational prescribing in these age groups requires not only an understanding of the drugs' pharmacodynamic properties, but also careful consideration of potential age-related changes in their pharmacokinetic profile. The present article, which updates a review published in 2006 in this journal, focuses on recent findings on the pharmacokinetics of new-generation AEDs in neonates, infants, children, and the elderly. Significant new information on the pharmacokinetics of new AEDs in the perinatal period has been acquired, particularly for lamotrigine and levetiracetam. As a result of slow maturation of the enzymes involved in glucuronide conjugation, lamotrigine elimination occurs at a particularly slow rate in neonates, and becomes gradually more efficient during the first months of life. In the case of levetiracetam, elimination occurs primarily by renal excretion and is also slow at birth, but drug clearance increases rapidly thereafter and can even double within 1 week. In general, infants older than 2-3 months and children show higher drug clearance (normalized for body weight) than adults. This pattern was confirmed in recent studies that investigated the pediatric pharmacokinetics of several new AEDs, including levetiracetam, rufinamide, stiripentol, and eslicarbazepine acetate. At the other extreme of age, in the elderly, drug clearance is generally reduced compared with younger adults because of less efficient drug-metabolizing activity, decreased renal function, or both. This general pattern, described previously for several AEDs, was confirmed in recent studies on the effect of old age on the clearance of felbamate, levetiracetam, pregabalin, lacosamide, and retigabine. For those drugs which are predominantly eliminated by renal excretion, aging

  16. Population pharmacokinetic modelling of NS2330 (tesofensine) and its major metabolite in patients with Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Lehr, Thorsten; Staab, Alexander; Tillmann, Christiane; Trommeshauser, Dirk; Raschig, Andreas; Schaefer, Hans Guenter; Kloft, Charlotte

    2007-01-01

    What is already known about this subject Several studies in predominantly healthy subjects have investigated the pharmacokinetics of NS2330 and its major metabolite M1. However, its pharmacokinetics have not been characterized in Alzheimer's disease patients, the target population for NS2330. In addition, no covariates have previously been found to influence the plasma concentration-time profiles of NS2330 and/or M1. What this study adds A descriptive and predictive population pharmacokinetic model for NS2330 and its metabolite was successfully developed in a population of patients with Alzheimer's disease. A covariate analysis elucidated sex and creatinine clearance as having an influence on the plasma concentration-time profiles of NS2330 after long-term treatment. Aims To develop a population pharmacokinetic model for NS2330 and its major metabolite M1 based on data from a 14 week proof of concept study in patients with Alzheimer's disease, and to identify covariates that might influence the pharmacokinetic characteristics of the drug and/or its metabolite. Methods Plasma data from 320 subjects undergoing multiple oral dosing, and consisting of 1969 NS2330 and 1714 metabolite concentrations were fitted simultaneously using NONMEM. Results Plasma concentration-time profiles of NS2330 and M1 were best described by one-compartment models with first-order elimination for both compounds. Absorption of NS2330 was best modelled by a first-order process. Low apparent clearances together with large apparent volumes of distribution resulted in long half-lives of 234 h (NS2330) and 374 h (M1). The covariate analysis identified weight, sex, CLCR, BMI and age as influencing the pharmacokinetics of NS2330 and/or M1. However, simulations performed revealed that only CLCR and sex had a significant effect on the steady-state plasma concentration-time profiles. Females with a creatinine clearance of 35.6 ml min−1 showed a 62% increased exposure compared with males without renal

  17. The pharmacokinetics of 8-methoxypsoralen following i.v. administration in humans.

    PubMed

    Billard, V; Gambus, P L; Barr, J; Minto, C F; Corash, L; Tessman, J W; Stickney, J L; Shafer, S L

    1995-10-01

    1. 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) is a naturally occurring photoreactive substance which, in the presence of u.v. light, forms covalent adducts with pyrimidine bases in nucleic acids. For many years, 8-MOP has been used in PUVA therapy for treatment of psoriasis. Recently, the drug has been found to inactivate effectively bacteria spiked into platelet concentrates. The purpose of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetics and safety of 8-MOP administered intravenously in the bactericidal dosage range. 2. Eighteen volunteers were divided into three treatment groups to receive, respectively, 5, 10, and 15 mg 8-MOP infused over 60 min. Frequent arterial samples were gathered, and the blood and plasma were assayed for 8-MOP concentration. The pharmacokinetic parameters were determined by moment and compartmental population analysis, the latter performed with the program NONMEM. Haemodynamics, ventilatory pattern, and subjective effects were recorded throughout the study. 3. The intravenously administered 8-MOP was well tolerated in all individuals, and no acute toxicity was observed. 4. The pharmacokinetics of 8-MOP were best described by a three-compartment mammillary model in which the volumes and clearances were proportional to weight. The mean pharmacokinetic parameters for the plasma concentrations were: V1 = 0.045 1 kg-1, V2 = 0.57 1 kg-1, V3 = 0.15 1 kg-1, CL1 (systemic) = 0.010 1 kg-1 min-1, CL2 = 0.0067 1 kg-1 min-1, CL3 = 0.012 1 kg-1 min-1. The mean pharmacokinetic parameters for the blood concentrations were: V1 = 0.061 1 kg-1, V2 = 1.15 1 kg-1, V3 = 0.21 1 kg-1, CL1 (systemic) = 0.015 1 kg-1 min-1, CL2 = 0.011 1 kg-1 min-1 and CL3 = 0.015 1 kg-1 min-1. 5. The plasma pharmacokinetic model described the observations with a median absolute error of 17%, and the blood pharmacokinetic model described the observations with a median absolute error of 18%. Analysis of the relative concentration of 8-MOP between plasma and red blood cells suggested concentration

  18. Stretched View Showing 'Victoria'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Stretched View Showing 'Victoria'

    This pair of images from the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity served as initial confirmation that the two-year-old rover is within sight of 'Victoria Crater,' which it has been approaching for more than a year. Engineers on the rover team were unsure whether Opportunity would make it as far as Victoria, but scientists hoped for the chance to study such a large crater with their roving geologist. Victoria Crater is 800 meters (nearly half a mile) in diameter, about six times wider than 'Endurance Crater,' where Opportunity spent several months in 2004 examining rock layers affected by ancient water.

    When scientists using orbital data calculated that they should be able to detect Victoria's rim in rover images, they scrutinized frames taken in the direction of the crater by the panoramic camera. To positively characterize the subtle horizon profile of the crater and some of the features leading up to it, researchers created a vertically-stretched image (top) from a mosaic of regular frames from the panoramic camera (bottom), taken on Opportunity's 804th Martian day (April 29, 2006).

    The stretched image makes mild nearby dunes look like more threatening peaks, but that is only a result of the exaggerated vertical dimension. This vertical stretch technique was first applied to Viking Lander 2 panoramas by Philip Stooke, of the University of Western Ontario, Canada, to help locate the lander with respect to orbiter images. Vertically stretching the image allows features to be more readily identified by the Mars Exploration Rover science team.

    The bright white dot near the horizon to the right of center (barely visible without labeling or zoom-in) is thought to be a light-toned outcrop on the far wall of the crater, suggesting that the rover can see over the low rim of Victoria. In figure 1, the northeast and southeast rims are labeled

  19. Pharmacokinetics, intestinal absorption and microbial metabolism of single platycodin D in comparison to Platycodi radix extract

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Jinjun; Zou, Jiashuang; Xie, Tong; Kang, An; Zhou, Wei; Deng, Haishan; Mao, Yancao; Di, Liuqing; Wang, Shouchuan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Platycodi radix, the dried root of Platycodon grandiflorum A. DC, has been widely used as food and herb medicine for treating cough, cold and other respiratory ailments, and platycodin D (PD) is one of the most important compounds in Platycodi Radix. Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare the pharmacokinetic characteristics, intestinal absorption and microbial metabolism of PD in monomer with that in Platycodi radix extract (PRE). Materials and Methods: In the pharmacokinetic study, the concentrations of PD in rat plasma were determined by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and the main pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by data analysis software (DAS). Besides, in vitro Caco-2 cells and fecal lysate were performed to investigate the intestinal absorption and metabolism, respectively. Results: The results from pharmacokinetics showed that the area under the curve, the peak concentration the time to reach peak concentration and mean residence time of PD in PRE were enhanced significantly compared with that in single PD. Caco-2 cells transport study indicated that the absorption of PD both in monomer and in PRE were poor owning that the permeability of PD were <1/106 cm/s. The hydrolysis degree of PD in PRE was significantly lower than that in monomer PD in fecal lysate, which might be illustrated by the other ingredients in PRE influenced the hydrolysis of PD via gut microbiota. Conclusion: These findings indicated that the difference of microbial metabolism, not apparent absorption in intestine for PD between in monomer and in PRE contributed to their pharmacokinetic difference. PMID:26600720

  20. A new approach to the analysis of radiopharmaceuticals. Final technical report, January 15, 1987--June 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, A.G.; Davison, A.; Costello, C.E.

    1998-03-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate analytical techniques that could be used in the study of both the basic chemistry and the radiopharmaceutical chemistry of {sup 99m}Tc. First funded in 1981, the work focused initially upon the use of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and various forms of mass spectrometry for the identification of technetium species. This funding allowed the authors to combine HPLC and mass spectrometry to identify radiopharmaceuticals which, although in clinical use, had not previously been characterized. Other techniques that have been examined include resonance Raman spectroscopy and, more significantly, {sup 99}Tc nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), with the latter not only being used in purely chemical experiments but also in biologic studies. In 1985 a grant to the Department of Chemistry at MIT from DOE allowed the purchase of an X-ray diffractometer and access to this instrument has enabled them to broaden the analytical base with routine structural determinations.

  1. [Effect of enoxacin on pharmacokinetics of theophylline in rats].

    PubMed

    Kuang, X; Liu, D; Bao, D

    1999-09-01

    In order to obtain an experimental evidence for Enoxacin(ENX) to be correctly used in clinical treatment, we studied the effect of ENX on the pharmacokinetic parameters of theophylline(TP). A single oral dose of TP 20 mg/kg was given to rats and ENX(300 mg/kg, 450 mg/kg) was co-administered orally three times to those rats. The plasma concentrations of TP were determined by HPLC after TP was administered 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 12 and 24 hrs. The results showed that TP was eliminated by one compartment model. TP plasma concentrations and AUC were significantly increased. T1/2 beta of TP was prolonged. The total clearance of TP was decreased when compared with the control. This interaction was dose-dependent. It was concluded that the interaction between ENX and TP existed. Concomitant use of ENX with TP should be avoided.

  2. New peptide deformylase inhibitors design, synthesis and pharmacokinetic assessment.

    PubMed

    Lv, Fengping; Chen, Chen; Tang, Yang; Wei, Jianhai; Zhu, Tong; Hu, Wenhao

    2016-08-01

    The docking approach for the screening of designed small molecule ligands, led to the identification of a critical arginine residue in peptide deformylase for spiro cyclopropyl PDF inhibitor's extra hydrophobic binding, providing us a useful tool for searching more efficient PDF inhibitors to fight for horrifying antibiotics resistance. Further synthetic modification was undertaken to optimize the potency of amide compounds. To lower metabolic susceptibility and in turn reduce unwanted metabolic toxicity that was observed clinically, while retaining desired antibacterial activity, the use of azoles as amide bioisosteres had also been investigated. After the completion of chemical synthesis, all the compounds were evaluated through in vitro antibacterial activity assay, some of which were further subject to in vivo rat pharmacokinetic assessment. Those findings in this letter showed that spiro cyclopropyl proline N-formyl hydroxylamines, and especially the bioisosteric azoles, can represent a promising class of PDF inhibitors. PMID:27293070

  3. What is currently the best radiopharmaceutical for the hybrid PET/CT detection of recurrent medullary thyroid carcinoma?

    PubMed

    Slavikova, K; Montravers, F; Treglia, G; Kunikowska, J; Kaliska, L; Vereb, M; Talbot, J N; Balogova, S

    2013-06-01

    Among thyroid malignancies, medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) has some very specific features. Production and secretion of large amounts of peptides occur in malignant transformed C cells with few exceptions, leading to high serum levels of calcitonin (Ctn) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), that act after thyroidectomy as tumour markers warning for the presence of persistent or metastatic MTC. The availability of those serum biomarkers with an excellent sensitivity challenges medical imaging to localise the recurrent cancer tissue, since surgery is a major therapeutic option. The aims of this article are (i) to review literature evidence about the efficacy and tolerance of radiopharmaceuticals for 3 targets of PET/CT imaging (glucose metabolism, bioamines metabolism and somatostatin receptors) and also bone scintigraphy which is recommended in the Guidelines of European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO; (ii) to compare the availability and the costs in relation with those radiopharmaceuticals, (iii) and to discuss a possible sequence of those examinations, in order to optimise spending and to minimise the overall radiation dose. In this context of recurrent MTC suspected on rising tumour markers levels after thyroidectomy, this survey of literature confirms that FDOPA is the best radiopharmaceutical for PET/CT with significant diagnostic performance if Ctn>150 pg/mL; an early image acquisition starting during the first 15 min is advised. In negative cases, FDG should be the next PET radiopharmaceutical, in particular if Ctn and CEA levels are rapidly rising, and PET with a somatostatin analogue labelled with gallium-68 when neither FDOPA nor FDG PET are conclusive. Bone scintigraphy could complement FDG-PET/CT if FDOPA is not available.

  4. (18)F-labeled positron emission tomographic radiopharmaceuticals in oncology: an overview of radiochemistry and mechanisms of tumor localization.

    PubMed

    Vallabhajosula, Shankar

    2007-11-01

    Molecular imaging is the visualization, characterization, and measurement of biological processes at the molecular and cellular levels in a living system. At present, positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is one the most rapidly growing areas of medical imaging, with many applications in the clinical management of patients with cancer. Although [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET/CT imaging provides high specificity and sensitivity in several kinds of cancer and has many applications, it is important to recognize that FDG is not a "specific" radiotracer for imaging malignant disease. Highly "tumor-specific" and "tumor cell signal-specific" PET radiopharmaceuticals are essential to meet the growing demand of radioisotope-based molecular imaging technology. In the last 15 years, many alternative PET tracers have been proposed and evaluated in preclinical and clinical studies to characterize the tumor biology more appropriately. The potential clinical utility of several (18)F-labeled radiotracers (eg, fluoride, FDOPA, FLT, FMISO, FES, and FCH) is being reviewed by several investigators in this issue. An overview of design and development of (18)F-labeled PET radiopharmaceuticals, radiochemistry, and mechanism(s) of tumor cell uptake and localization of radiotracers are presented here. The approval of clinical indications for FDG-PET in the year 2000 by the Food and Drug Administration, based on a review of literature, was a major breakthrough to the rapid incorporation of PET into nuclear medicine practice, particularly in oncology. Approval of a radiopharmaceutical typically involves submission of a "New Drug Application" by a manufacturer or a company clearly documenting 2 major aspects of the drug: (1) manufacturing of PET drug using current good manufacturing practices and (2) the safety and effectiveness of a drug with specific indications. The potential routine clinical utility of (18)F-labeled PET radiopharmaceuticals depends also on

  5. Pharmacometric Models for Characterizing the Pharmacokinetics of Orally Inhaled Drugs.

    PubMed

    Borghardt, Jens Markus; Weber, Benjamin; Staab, Alexander; Kloft, Charlotte

    2015-07-01

    During the last decades, the importance of modeling and simulation in clinical drug development, with the goal to qualitatively and quantitatively assess and understand mechanisms of pharmacokinetic processes, has strongly increased. However, this increase could not equally be observed for orally inhaled drugs. The objectives of this review are to understand the reasons for this gap and to demonstrate the opportunities that mathematical modeling of pharmacokinetics of orally inhaled drugs offers. To achieve these objectives, this review (i) discusses pulmonary physiological processes and their impact on the pharmacokinetics after drug inhalation, (ii) provides a comprehensive overview of published pharmacokinetic models, (iii) categorizes these models into physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) and (clinical data-derived) empirical models, (iv) explores both their (mechanistic) plausibility, and (v) addresses critical aspects of different pharmacometric approaches pertinent for drug inhalation. In summary, pulmonary deposition, dissolution, and absorption are highly complex processes and may represent the major challenge for modeling and simulation of PK after oral drug inhalation. Challenges in relating systemic pharmacokinetics with pulmonary efficacy may be another factor contributing to the limited number of existing pharmacokinetic models for orally inhaled drugs. Investigations comprising in vitro experiments, clinical studies, and more sophisticated mathematical approaches are considered to be necessary for elucidating these highly complex pulmonary processes. With this additional knowledge, the PBPK approach might gain additional attractiveness. Currently, (semi-)mechanistic modeling offers an alternative to generate and investigate hypotheses and to more mechanistically understand the pulmonary and systemic pharmacokinetics after oral drug inhalation including the impact of pulmonary diseases.

  6. PHARMACOKINETIC/PHARMACODYNAMIC MODELING OF PERMETHRIN IN THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was used to describe pharmacokinetics of permethrin and calibrated using experimental data on the concentration time-course of cis- and trans-permethrin in rat blood and brain tissues following oral administration...

  7. Multiple-Dose Pharmacokinetics of Fluvoxamine in Children and Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labellarte, Michael; Biederman, Joseph; Emslie, Graham; Ferguson, James; Khan, Arifulla; Ruckle, Jon; Sallee, Randy; Riddle, Mark

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the pharmacokinetics of fluvoxamine in children and adolescents and to compare pharmacokinetic data from adolescents to adults from a previous study. Method: Fluvoxamine was titrated to a target dose of 100 mg b.i.d. in children (6-11 years) and 150 mg b.i.d. in adolescents (12-17 years) with obsessive-compulsive disorder…

  8. PHARMACOKINETIC MODELING FOR PERFLUORINATED CHEMICALS USED IN HOUSEHOLD CONSUMER PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    PHARMACOKINETIC MODELING FOR PERFLUORONATED CHEMICALS USED IN HOUSEHOLD CONSUMER PRODUCTS
    Leona H. Clark and Hugh A. Barton
    US Environmental Protection Agency, ORD, NHEERL, ETD, Research Triangle Park, NC

    The physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model to be presente...

  9. KINPLOT: An Interactive Pharmacokinetics Graphics Program for Digital Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Robert C.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Inability to see the relevance of mathematics to understanding the time course of drugs in the body may discourage interest in pharmacokinetics. A UNC-developed computer graphics simulation program helps visualize the nature of pharmacokinetic-patient interactions, generates classroom handouts, and is used in the pharmaceuticals industry to…

  10. Dynamic Contrast-enhanced MR Imaging in Renal Cell Carcinoma: Reproducibility of Histogram Analysis on Pharmacokinetic Parameters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai-Yi; Su, Zi-Hua; Xu, Xiao; Sun, Zhi-Peng; Duan, Fei-Xue; Song, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Lu; Wang, Ying-Wei; Ma, Xin; Guo, Ai-Tao; Ma, Lin; Ye, Hui-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic parameters derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) have been increasingly used to evaluate the permeability of tumor vessel. Histogram metrics are a recognized promising method of quantitative MR imaging that has been recently introduced in analysis of DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters in oncology due to tumor heterogeneity. In this study, 21 patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) underwent paired DCE-MRI studies on a 3.0 T MR system. Extended Tofts model and population-based arterial input function were used to calculate kinetic parameters of RCC tumors. Mean value and histogram metrics (Mode, Skewness and Kurtosis) of each pharmacokinetic parameter were generated automatically using ImageJ software. Intra- and inter-observer reproducibility and scan-rescan reproducibility were evaluated using intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) and coefficient of variation (CoV). Our results demonstrated that the histogram method (Mode, Skewness and Kurtosis) was not superior to the conventional Mean value method in reproducibility evaluation on DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters (K( trans) &Ve) in renal cell carcinoma, especially for Skewness and Kurtosis which showed lower intra-, inter-observer and scan-rescan reproducibility than Mean value. Our findings suggest that additional studies are necessary before wide incorporation of histogram metrics in quantitative analysis of DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters. PMID:27380733

  11. Dynamic Contrast-enhanced MR Imaging in Renal Cell Carcinoma: Reproducibility of Histogram Analysis on Pharmacokinetic Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hai-yi; Su, Zi-hua; Xu, Xiao; Sun, Zhi-peng; Duan, Fei-xue; Song, Yuan-yuan; Li, Lu; Wang, Ying-wei; Ma, Xin; Guo, Ai-tao; Ma, Lin; Ye, Hui-yi

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic parameters derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) have been increasingly used to evaluate the permeability of tumor vessel. Histogram metrics are a recognized promising method of quantitative MR imaging that has been recently introduced in analysis of DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters in oncology due to tumor heterogeneity. In this study, 21 patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) underwent paired DCE-MRI studies on a 3.0 T MR system. Extended Tofts model and population-based arterial input function were used to calculate kinetic parameters of RCC tumors. Mean value and histogram metrics (Mode, Skewness and Kurtosis) of each pharmacokinetic parameter were generated automatically using ImageJ software. Intra- and inter-observer reproducibility and scan–rescan reproducibility were evaluated using intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) and coefficient of variation (CoV). Our results demonstrated that the histogram method (Mode, Skewness and Kurtosis) was not superior to the conventional Mean value method in reproducibility evaluation on DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters (K trans & Ve) in renal cell carcinoma, especially for Skewness and Kurtosis which showed lower intra-, inter-observer and scan-rescan reproducibility than Mean value. Our findings suggest that additional studies are necessary before wide incorporation of histogram metrics in quantitative analysis of DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters. PMID:27380733

  12. Preparation, pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of baicalin-loaded liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yumeng; Guo, Jianmin; Zheng, Xiaoli; Wu, Jun; Zhou, Yang; Yu, Yu; Ye, Yun; Zhang, Liangke; Zhao, Ling

    2014-01-01

    Baicalin (BA) is a major constituent of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, a medicinal herb. Previous pharmacokinetic studies of BA showed its low oral bioavailability. The aim of the present study was to develop a novel BA-loaded liposome (BA-LP) to enhance oral bioavailability. BA-LP, composed of BA, Tween® 80, Phospholipon® 90H, and citric acid at weight ratio of 96/50/96/50, respectively, was prepared by the effervescent dispersion technique and characterized in terms of morphology, size, zeta potential, encapsulation efficiency, and the in vitro release. Pharmacokinetics and biodistribution studies were carried out in rats after oral administration of BA-LP and a carboxymethyl cellulose suspension containing BA (BA-CMC) as a control. BA-LP exhibited a spherical shape by transmission electron microscopy observation. BA-LP had a mean particle size of 373±15.5 nm, zeta potential of −20.1±0.22 mV, and encapsulation efficiency of 82.7%±0.59%. The BA-LP showed a sustained-release behavior, and the in vitro drug-release kinetic model fit well with the Weibull distribution equation: lnln (1/(1−Q)) =0.609 lnt −1.230 (r=0.995). The oral bioavailability and the peak concentration of the BA-LP was threefold and 2.82-fold that of BA-CMC, respectively. The in vivo distribution results indicated that drug concentrations were significantly increased in the liver, kidney, and lung in the case of BA-LP, which were 5.59-fold, 2.33-fold, and 1.25-fold higher than those of BA-CMC, respectively. In conclusion, the study suggested that BA-LP might be a potential oral drug delivery system to improve bioavailability of BA. PMID:25120360

  13. Production and Clinical Applications of Radiopharmaceuticals and Medical Radioisotopes in Iran.

    PubMed

    Jalilian, Amir Reza; Beiki, Davood; Hassanzadeh-Rad, Arman; Eftekhari, Arash; Geramifar, Parham; Eftekhari, Mohammad

    2016-07-01

    During past 3 decades, nuclear medicine has flourished as vibrant and independent medical specialty in Iran. Since that time, more than 200 nuclear physicians have been trained and now practicing in nearly 158 centers throughout the country. In the same period, Tc-99m generators and variety of cold kits for conventional nuclear medicine were locally produced for the first time. Local production has continued to mature in robust manner while fulfilling international standards. To meet the ever-growing demand at the national level and with international achievements in mind, work for production of other Tc-99m-based peptides such as ubiquicidin, bombesin, octreotide, and more recently a kit formulation for Tc-99m TRODAT-1 for clinical use was introduced. Other than the Tehran Research Reactor, the oldest facility active in production of medical radioisotopes, there is one commercial and three hospital-based cyclotrons currently operational in the country. I-131 has been one of the oldest radioisotope produced in Iran and traditionally used for treatment of thyrotoxicosis and differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Since 2009, (131)I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine has been locally available for diagnostic applications. Gallium-67 citrate, thallium-201 thallous chloride, and Indium-111 in the form of DTPA and Oxine are among the early cyclotron-produced tracers available in Iran for about 2 decades. Rb-81/Kr-81m generator has been available for pulmonary ventilation studies since 1996. Experimental production of PET radiopharmaceuticals began in 1998. This work has culminated with development and optimization of the high-scale production line of (18)F-FDG shortly after installation of PET/CT scanner in 2012. In the field of therapy, other than the use of old timers such as I-131 and different forms of P-32, there has been quite a significant advancement in production and application of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals in recent years. Application of (131)I

  14. Molecular imaging of cancer with copper-64 radiopharmaceuticals and positron emission tomography (PET).

    PubMed

    Shokeen, Monica; Anderson, Carolyn J

    2009-07-21

    Molecular imaging has evolved over the past several years into an important tool for diagnosing, understanding, and monitoring disease. Molecular imaging has distinguished itself as an interdisciplinary field, with contributions from chemistry, biology, physics, and medicine. The cross-disciplinary impetus has led to significant achievements, such as the development of more sensitive imaging instruments and robust, safer radiopharmaceuticals, thereby providing more choices to fit personalized medical needs. Molecular imaging is making steadfast progress in the field of cancer research among others. Cancer is a challenging disease, characterized by heterogeneity, uncontrolled cell division, and the ability of cancer cells to invade other tissues. Researchers are addressing these challenges by aggressively identifying and studying key cancer-specific biomarkers such as growth factor receptors, protein kinases, cell adhesion molecules, and proteases, as well as cancer-related biological processes such as hypoxia, apoptosis, and angiogenesis. Positron emission tomography (PET) is widely used by clinicians in the United States as a diagnostic molecular imaging tool. Small-animal PET systems that can image rodents and generate reconstructed images in a noninvasive manner (with a resolution as low as 1 mm) have been developed and are used frequently, facilitating radiopharmaceutical development and drug discovery. Currently, [(18)F]-labeled 2-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is the only PET radiotracer used for routine clinical evaluation (primarily for oncological imaging). There is now increasing interest in nontraditional positron-emitting radionuclides, particularly those of the transition metals, for imaging with PET because of increased production and availability. Copper-based radionuclides are currently being extensively evaluated because they offer a varying range of half-lives and positron energies. For example, the half-life (12.7 h) and decay properties (beta(+), 0

  15. Cardiac blood-pool scintigraphy in rats and hamsters: comparison of five radiopharmaceuticals and three pinhole collimator apertures

    SciTech Connect

    Pieri, P.; Fischman, A.J.; Ahmad, M.; Moore, R.H.; Callahan, R.J.; Strauss, H.W. )

    1991-05-01

    Preclinical evaluation of cardiac drugs may require evaluation of cardiac function in intact animals. To optimize the quality of radionuclide measurements of ventricular function in small animals, a comparison was made of gated blood-pool scans recorded with five blood-pool radiopharmaceuticals ({sup 99}mTc-labeled human polyclonal IgG, {sup 99}mTc-human serum albumin labeled by two methods, and red blood cells radiolabeled with {sup 99}mTc via in vivo and in vitro methods) in rats and three pinhole apertures in hamsters. The quality of the radiopharmaceuticals was evaluated by comparing count density ratios (LV/BACKGROUND and LV/LIVER) and ejection fractions recorded with each agent. The edge definition of the left ventricle and count rate performance of the 1-, 2-, and 3-mm apertures was evaluated in hamsters. In general, the images obtained with the radiolabeled cells were superior to those obtained with the labeled proteins and no significant differences between the protein preparations were detected. Left ventricular ejection fractions calculated with all five radiopharmaceuticals were not significantly different. The best quality images were obtained with the 1-mm pinhole collimator. Ejection fraction and acquisition time were inversely related to aperture size. A good compromise between resolution and sensitivity was obtained with the 2-mm pinhole collimator.

  16. Development of more efficacious [Tc]-99m organ imaging agents for use in nuclear medicine by analytical characterization of radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Heineman, W.R.

    1993-05-03

    This research program is detailed at development of more efficacious technetium-99m radiopharmaceuticals for use as imaging agents in diagnostic nuclear medicine. We seek to isolate and develop distinct site imaging agents to provide diagnostic information concerning a given pathological condition. Analytical techniques are being developed to enable complete analysis of radiopharmaceutical preparations so that individual complexes can be characterized with respect to imaging efficacy and to enable a radiopharmaceutical to be monitored after injection into a test animal to determine the species that actually accumulates in an organ to provide the image. Administration of the isolated, single most effective imaging complex, rather than a mixture of technetium-containing complexes, wi-11 minimize radiation exposure to the patient and maximize diagnostic information available to the clinician. This report specifically describes the development of capillary electrophoresis (CE) for characterizating diphosphonate skeletal imaging agents. Advances in the development of electrochemical and fiber optic sensors for Tc and Re imaging agents are described. These sensors will ultimately be capable of monitoring a specific chemical state of an imaging agent in vivo after injection into a test animal by implantation in the organ of interest.

  17. New rhenium complexes with ciprofloxacin as useful models for understanding the properties of [99mTc]-ciprofloxacin radiopharmaceutical.

    PubMed

    Lecina, Joan; Cortés, Pilar; Llagostera, Montserrat; Piera, Carlos; Suades, Joan

    2014-07-01

    Rhenium complexes with the antibiotic ciprofloxacin have been prepared to be studied as models of technetium radiopharmaceuticals. With this aim, the new rhenium complexes 1 {[ReO(Cpf)2]Cl}, 2 {[ReO(CpfH)2]Cl3} and 3 {fac-[Re(CO)3(H2O)(Cpf)]} with ciprofloxacin (CpfH=ciprofloxacin; Cpf=conjugated base of ciprofloxacin) have been synthesised and characterised by elemental analyses, IR, NMR ((1)H, (19)F and (13)C CP-MAS) spectroscopy, as well as MS measurements. All spectroscopic data are consistent with the coordination of ciprofloxacin in all these complexes through the carbonyl and the carboxylate oxygen atoms with the formation of a six member chelate ring. The study of a Tc-ciprofloxacin solution by ESI-MS reveals the presence of [TcO(Cpf)2](+) cations, which agrees with the hypothesis that complexes 1 and 2 can be seen as model rhenium complexes of this radiopharmaceutical. Antimicrobial and DNA gyrase inhibition studies performed with complexes 2 and 3 have shown a very similar behaviour between complex 2 and the free antibiotic, whereas complex 3 exhibit a lower antimicrobial activity. Based on a joint analysis of the data reported in the literature and the chemical and biological results obtained in this study, a tentative proposal to explain some aspects of the behaviour of Tc-ciprofloxacin radiopharmaceutical has been made.

  18. Population Pharmacokinetics of Pyronaridine in Pediatric Malaria Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ayyoub, Amal; Methaneethorn, Janthima; Ramharter, Michael; Djimde, Abdoulaye A.; Tekete, Mamadou; Duparc, Stephan; Borghini-Fuhrer, Isabelle; Shin, Jang-Sik

    2015-01-01

    Pyramax is a pyronaridine (PYR)-artesunate (PA) combination for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria in adult and pediatric patients. A granule formulation of this combination is being developed for treatment of uncomplicated P. falciparum and P. vivax malaria in pediatric patients. The aims of this study were to describe the pharmacokinetics of PYR using a total of 1,085 blood PYR concentrations available from 349 malaria patients younger than 16 years of age with mild to moderate uncomplicated malaria and to confirm the dosing regimen for the pediatric granule formulation. Nonlinear mixed-effects modeling using NONMEM software was used to obtain the pharmacokinetic and inter- and intraindividual variability parameter estimates. The population pharmacokinetics of PYR were described by a two-compartment model with first-order absorption and elimination. Allometric scaling was implemented to address the effect of body weight on clearance and volume parameters. The final parameter estimates of PYR apparent clearance (CL/F), central volume of distribution (V2/F), peripheral volume of distribution (V3/F), intercompartmental clearance (Q/F), and absorption rate constant (Ka) were 377 liters/day, 2,230 liters, 3,230 liters, 804 liters/day and 17.9 day−1, respectively. Covariate model building conducted using forward addition (P < 0.05) followed by backward elimination (P < 0.001) yielded two significant covariate-parameter relationships, i.e., age on V2/F and formulation on Ka. Evaluation of bootstrapping, visual predictive check, and condition number indicated that the final model displayed satisfactory robustness, predictive power, and stability. Simulations of PYR concentration-time profiles generated from the final model show similar exposures across pediatric weight ranges, supporting the proposed labeling for weight-based dosing of Pyramax granules. (These studies have been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00331136 [phase II study] and

  19. Pharmacokinetic characteristics and anticancer effects of 5-Fluorouracil loaded nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Li, Su; Wang, Anxun; Jiang, Wenqi; Guan, Zhongzhen

    2008-01-01

    Background It is expected that prolonged circulation of anticancer drugs will increase their anticancer activity while decreasing their toxic side effects. The purpose of this study was to prepare 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) loaded block copolymers, with poly(γ-benzyl-L-glutamate) (PBLG) as the hydrophobic block and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) as the hydrophilic block, and then examine the 5-FU release characteristics, pharmacokinetics, and anticancer effects of this novel compound. Methods 5-FU loaded PEG-PBLG (5-FU/PEG-PBLG) nanoparticles were prepared by dialysis and then scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to observe the shape and size of the nanoparticles, and ultraviolet spectrophotometry was used to evaluate the 5-FU in vitro release characteristics. The pharmacokinetic parameters of 5-FU/PEG-PBLG nanoparticles in rabbit plasma were determined by measuring the 5-FUby high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). To study in vivo effects, LoVo cells (human colon cancer cell line) or Tca8113 cells (human oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line) were implanted in BALB/c nude mice that were subsequently treated with 5-FU or 5-FU/PEG-PBLG nanospheres. Results 5-FU/PEG-PBLG nanoparticles had a core-shell spherical structure with a diameter of 200 nm and a shell thickness of 30 nm. The drug loading capacity was 27.1% and the drug encapsulation was 61.5%. Compared with 5-FU, 5-FU/PEG-PBLG nanoparticles had a longer elimination half-life (t1/2, 33.3 h vs. 5 min), lower peak concentration (C, 4563.5 μg/L vs. 17047.3 μg/L), and greater distribution volume (VD, 0.114 L vs. 0.069 L). Compared with a blank control, LoVo cell xenografts and Tca8113 cell xenografts treated with 5-FU or 5-FU/PEG-PBLG nanoparticles grew slower and had prolonged tumor doubling times. 5-FU/PEG-PBLG nanoparticles showed greater inhibition of tumor growth than 5-FU (p < 0.01). In the PEG-PBLG nanoparticle control group, there was no tumor

  20. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of intravenous inotropic agents.

    PubMed

    Lehtonen, Lasse A; Antila, Saila; Pentikäinen, Pertti J

    2004-01-01

    Positive inotropic drugs have various mechanisms of action. Long-term use of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent drugs has adverse effects on the prognosis of heart failure patients, whereas digoxin has neutral effect on mortality. There are, however, little data on the effects of intravenous inotropic drugs on the outcome of patients. Intravenous inotropic agents are used to treat cardiac emergencies and refractory heart failure. beta-Adrenergic agonists are rapid acting and easy to titrate, with short elimination half-life. However, they increase myocardial oxygen consumption and are thus hazardous during myocardial ischaemia. Furthermore they may promote myocyte apoptosis. Phosphodiesterase (PDE) III inhibiting drugs (amrinone, milrinone and enoximone) increase contractility by reducing the degradation of cAMP. In addition, they reduce both preload and afterload via vasodilation. Short-term use of intravenous milrinone is not associated with increased mortality, and some symptomatic benefit may be obtained when it is used in refractory heart failure. Furthermore, PDE III inhibitors facilitate weaning from the cardiopulmonary bypass machine after cardiac surgery. Levosimendan belongs to a new group of positive inotropic drugs, the calcium sensitisers. It has complex pharmacokinetics and long-lasting haemodynamic effects as a result of its active metabolites. In comparative trials, it has been better tolerated than the most widely used beta-agonist inotropic drug, dobutamine. The pharmacokinetics of the intravenous inotropic drugs might sometimes greatly modify and prolong the response to the therapy, for example because of long-acting active metabolites. These drugs display considerable differences in their pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, and the selection of the most appropriate inotropic drug for each patient should be based on careful consideration of the clinical status of the patient and on the pharmacology of the drug.

  1. Pharmacokinetics of a nicotine polacrilex lozenge.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae H; Dresler, Carolyn M; Norton, Michele R; Strahs, Kenneth R

    2003-10-01

    To evaluate the pharmacokinetic characteristics of the 2-mg and 4-mg nicotine polacrilex lozenges, the following four separate studies were conducted in healthy adult smokers: (a) A single-dose, four-way crossover (replicate design) study to compare the 4-mg lozenge and the 4-mg nicotine polacrilex gum, (b) a single-dose, two-way crossover study to compare the 2-mg lozenge and the 2-mg gum, (c) a multiple-dose, four-way crossover study to compare the lozenges administered every 90 min and the gums administered every 60 min at 2- and 4-mg dose levels, and (d) a single-dose, three-way crossover study to compare the pharmacokinetic profiles of the 4-mg lozenge when administered in three different ways: (i) Used as directed, (ii) chewed and immediately swallowed, and (iii) chewed, retained in the mouth for 5 min, and then swallowed. The single-dose studies consistently demonstrated 8%-10% higher maximal plasma concentrations and 25%-27% higher AUC values (area under the concentration-time curve) from the lozenges compared with the gums at the 2- and 4-mg dose levels, probably owing to the residual nicotine retained in the gum. The multiple-dose study applying different dosing intervals (i.e., every 90 min for the lozenges and every 60 min for the gums) resulted in approximately 30% lower AUC(0-t) values for the lozenges compared with those for the gums. Administration of the lozenge contrary to the label-specified instructions for use did not lead to a faster or higher absorption of nicotine. These pharmacokinetic characteristics should allow the lozenge to become an effective and safe therapeutic alternative for smoking cessation.

  2. The pharmacokinetics of meloxicam in vultures.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, V; Wolter, K; Cromarty, A D; Bartels, P; Bekker, L; McGaw, L; Taggart, M A; Cuthbert, R; Swan, G E

    2008-04-01

    Vulture populations across the Asian subcontinent have declined dramatically in the last 15 years and are now on the verge of extinction. Although the cause of the population decline was initially unknown, the decrease has recently been conclusively linked to the use of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac in cattle that inadvertently ended up in the vulture food chain. With the vulture numbers continuing to decline by up to 48% a year, the Indian, Nepali and Pakistan governments have recently banned the manufacture and importation of veterinary diclofenac. They have also suggested meloxicam as an alternate anti-inflammatory for use in cattle. This recommendation was based on extensive acute safety studies in the African White-backed vulture (Gyps africanus), which evaluated worst case scenarios of maximum intake based on a once in three day feeding pattern. However, the possible cumulative pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects in vultures receiving multiple daily doses of meloxicam over time were not assessed. At present very little pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic information is available to add further support for the safety of meloxicam in this animal species. This article discusses the oral and intramuscular pharmacokinetics of meloxicam in Cape Griffon vultures (Gyps coprotheres). Therapeutic drug monitoring was also undertaken in White-backed, Egyptian (Neophron pernopterus) and one Lappet Faced vulture (Torgos tracheliotos). In all these species, meloxicam was characterized by a short half-life of elimination. The rapid metabolism of meloxicam in combination with a short duration of effect in the studied species Gyps vultures shown in this study makes it unlikely that the drug could accumulate. This confirms the safety of repeated exposure to meloxicam in vultures of this genus.

  3. Pharmacokinetics of a nicotine polacrilex lozenge.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae H; Dresler, Carolyn M; Norton, Michele R; Strahs, Kenneth R

    2003-10-01

    To evaluate the pharmacokinetic characteristics of the 2-mg and 4-mg nicotine polacrilex lozenges, the following four separate studies were conducted in healthy adult smokers: (a) A single-dose, four-way crossover (replicate design) study to compare the 4-mg lozenge and the 4-mg nicotine polacrilex gum, (b) a single-dose, two-way crossover study to compare the 2-mg lozenge and the 2-mg gum, (c) a multiple-dose, four-way crossover study to compare the lozenges administered every 90 min and the gums administered every 60 min at 2- and 4-mg dose levels, and (d) a single-dose, three-way crossover study to compare the pharmacokinetic profiles of the 4-mg lozenge when administered in three different ways: (i) Used as directed, (ii) chewed and immediately swallowed, and (iii) chewed, retained in the mouth for 5 min, and then swallowed. The single-dose studies consistently demonstrated 8%-10% higher maximal plasma concentrations and 25%-27% higher AUC values (area under the concentration-time curve) from the lozenges compared with the gums at the 2- and 4-mg dose levels, probably owing to the residual nicotine retained in the gum. The multiple-dose study applying different dosing intervals (i.e., every 90 min for the lozenges and every 60 min for the gums) resulted in approximately 30% lower AUC(0-t) values for the lozenges compared with those for the gums. Administration of the lozenge contrary to the label-specified instructions for use did not lead to a faster or higher absorption of nicotine. These pharmacokinetic characteristics should allow the lozenge to become an effective and safe therapeutic alternative for smoking cessation. PMID:14577980

  4. The pharmacokinetics of meloxicam in vultures.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, V; Wolter, K; Cromarty, A D; Bartels, P; Bekker, L; McGaw, L; Taggart, M A; Cuthbert, R; Swan, G E

    2008-04-01

    Vulture populations across the Asian subcontinent have declined dramatically in the last 15 years and are now on the verge of extinction. Although the cause of the population decline was initially unknown, the decrease has recently been conclusively linked to the use of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac in cattle that inadvertently ended up in the vulture food chain. With the vulture numbers continuing to decline by up to 48% a year, the Indian, Nepali and Pakistan governments have recently banned the manufacture and importation of veterinary diclofenac. They have also suggested meloxicam as an alternate anti-inflammatory for use in cattle. This recommendation was based on extensive acute safety studies in the African White-backed vulture (Gyps africanus), which evaluated worst case scenarios of maximum intake based on a once in three day feeding pattern. However, the possible cumulative pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects in vultures receiving multiple daily doses of meloxicam over time were not assessed. At present very little pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic information is available to add further support for the safety of meloxicam in this animal species. This article discusses the oral and intramuscular pharmacokinetics of meloxicam in Cape Griffon vultures (Gyps coprotheres). Therapeutic drug monitoring was also undertaken in White-backed, Egyptian (Neophron pernopterus) and one Lappet Faced vulture (Torgos tracheliotos). In all these species, meloxicam was characterized by a short half-life of elimination. The rapid metabolism of meloxicam in combination with a short duration of effect in the studied species Gyps vultures shown in this study makes it unlikely that the drug could accumulate. This confirms the safety of repeated exposure to meloxicam in vultures of this genus. PMID:18307504

  5. Pharmacokinetic parameters of bevantolol in volunteers.

    PubMed

    Vermeij, P; van Brummelen, P

    1986-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of the new beta-adrenoceptor blocking drug bevantolol and some aspects of its beta-blocking effect have been studied in healthy volunteers. Bevantolol had a short serum half-life (86 +/- 33 min) and high systemic availability after oral administration. The observed changes in heart rate, systolic blood pressure during exercise and plasma renin activity were all compatible with beta-adrenoceptor blockade. After 200 mg p.o. in the morning, the effects lasted for less than 24 h.

  6. Moclobemide: evolution, pharmacodynamic, and pharmacokinetic properties.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Udo

    2002-01-01

    The benzamide moclobemide is a reversible inhibitor of monoamine-oxidase-A (RIMA). It has been extensively evaluated in the treatment of a wide spectrum of depressive disorders and less extensively in anxiety disorders. While clinical aspects will be presented in a subsequent review, this article focuses primarily on moclobemide's evolution, pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties. In particular, the effects on neurotransmission and intracellular signal transduction, the neuroendocrine system, the tyramine pressure response and animal models of depression are surveyed. In addition, other CNS effects are reviewed with special respect to experimental serotonergic syndrome, anxiolytic and antinociceptive activity, sleep, cognition and driving performance, neuroprotection and seizures.

  7. MEGen: A Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model Generator

    PubMed Central

    Loizou, George; Hogg, Alex

    2011-01-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic models are being used in an increasing number of different areas. However, they are perceived as complex, data hungry, resource intensive, and time consuming. In addition, model validation and verification are hindered by the relative complexity of the equations. To begin to address these issues a web application called MEGen for the rapid construction and documentation of bespoke deterministic PBPK model code is under development. MEGen comprises a parameter database and a model code generator that produces code for use in several commercial software packages and one that is freely available. Here we present an overview of the current capabilities of MEGen, and discuss future developments. PMID:22084631

  8. Experimental study of radiopharmaceuticals based on technetium-99m labeled derivative of glucose for tumor diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeltchan, R.; Medvedeva, A.; Sinilkin, I.; Bragina, O.; Chernov, V.; Stasyuk, E.; Rogov, A.; Il'ina, E.; Larionova, L.; Skuridin, V.; Dergilev, A.

    2016-06-01

    Purpose: to study the potential utility of 1-thio-D-glucose labeled with 99mTc for cancer imaging in laboratory animals. Materials and method: the study was carried out in cell cultures of normal CHO (Chinese hamster ovary cells CHO) and malignant tissues MCF-7 (human breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7). To evaluate the uptake of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose in normal and tumor tissue cells, 25 MBq of 1-thio-D-glucose labeled with 99mTc was added to the vials with 3 million cells and incubated for 30 minutes at room temperature. After centrifugation of the vials with cells, the supernatant was removed. Radioactivity in vials with normal and tumor cells was then measured. In addition, the study included 40 mice of C57B 1/6j lines with tumor lesion of the right femur. For neoplastic lesions, Lewis lung carcinoma model was used. Following anesthesia, mice were injected intravenously with 25MBq of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose. Planar scintigraphy was performed 15 minutes later in a matrix of 512x512 pixels for 5 minutes. Results: when measuring the radioactivity of normal and malignant cells after incubation with 99mTc-1-thio-D- glucose, it was found that the radioactivity of malignant cells was higher than that of normal cells. The mean values of radioactivity levels in normal and malignant cells were 0.3±0.15MBq and 1.07±0.6MBq, respectively. All examined animals had increased accumulation of 99mTc-1-thio- D-glucose at the tumor site. The accumulation of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose in the tumor was on average twice as high as compared to the symmetric region. Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose is a prospective radiopharmaceutical for cancer visualization. In addition, high accumulation of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose in the culture of cancer cells and in tumor tissue of animals demonstrates tumor tropism of the radiopharmaceutical.

  9. Study of potential utility of new radiopharmaceuticals based on technetium-99m labeled derivative of glucose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeltchan, R.; Medvedeva, A.; Sinilkin, I.; Chernov, V.; Stasyuk, E.; Rogov, A.; Il'ina, E.; Larionova, L.; Skuridin, V.

    2016-08-01

    Purpose: to study the potential utility of 1-thio-D-glucose labeled with 99mTc for cancer imaging in laboratory animals. Materials and method: the study was carried out in cell cultures of normal CHO (Chinese hamster ovary cells CHO) and malignant tissues MCF-7 (human breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7). To evaluate the uptake of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose in normal and tumor tissue cells, 25 MBq of 1-thio-D-glucose labeled with 99mTc was added to the vials with 3 million cells and incubated for 30 min at room temperature. After centrifugation of the vials with cells, the supernatant was removed. The radioactivity in vials with normal and tumor cells was then measured. In addition, the study included 40 mice of C57B1/6j lines with tumor lesion of the right femur. For neoplastic lesions, Lewis lung carcinoma model was used. Following anesthesia, mice were injected intravenously with 25 MBq of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose. Planar scintigraphy was performed 15 minutes later in a matrix of 512x512 pixels for 5 min. Results: when measuring the radioactivity of normal and malignant cells after incubation with 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose, it was found that the radioactivity of malignant cells was higher than that of normal cells. The mean values of radioactivity levels in normal and malignant cells were 0.3 ± 0.15 MBq and 1.07 ± 0.6 MBq, respectively. All examined animals had increased accumulation of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose at the tumor site. The accumulation of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose in the tumor was on average twice as high as compared to the symmetric region. Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose is a prospective radiopharmaceutical for cancer visualization. In addition, high accumulation of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose in the culture of cancer cells and in tumor tissue of animals demonstrates tumor tropism of the radiopharmaceutical.

  10. Convenient preparation of 68Ga-based PET-radiopharmaceuticals at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Velikyan, I; Maecke, H; Langstrom, B

    2008-02-01

    A straightforward labeling using generator produced positron emitting (68)Ga, which provides high quality images, may result in kit type production of PET radiopharmaceuticals and make PET examinations possible also at centers lacking accelerators. The introduction of macrocyclic bifunctional chelators that would provide fast (68)Ga-complexation at room temperature would simplify even further tracer preparation and open wide possibilities for (68)Ga-labeling of fragile and potent macromolecules. Gallium-68 has the potential to facilitate development of clinically practical PET and to promote PET technique for individualized medicine. The macrocyclic chelator, 1,4,7-triazacyclononanetriacetic acid (NOTA), and its derivative coupled to an eight amino acid residue peptide (NODAGA-TATE, [NODAGA (0), Tyr(3)]Octreotate) were labeled with (68)Ge/(68)Ga-generator produced positron emitting (68)Ga. Formation kinetics of (68)Ga-NOTA was studied as a function of pH and formation kinetics of (68)Ga-NODAGA-TATE was studied as a function of the bioconjugate concentration. The nearly quantitative radioactivity incorporation (RAI>95%) for (68)Ga-NOTA was achieved within less than 10 min at room temperature and pH 3.5. The concentrations of NODAGA-TATE required for RAI of >90% and >95% were, respectively, 2-5 and 10 microM. In both cases the purification of the (68)Ga-labeled products was not necessary since the radiochemical purity was >95% and the preparation buffer, 4-(2-hydroxyethyl) piperazine-1-ethanesulfonic acid (HEPES) is suitable for human use. In order to confirm the identity of the products, complexes comprising (nat)Ga were synthesized and analyzed by mass spectrometry. The complex was found to be stable in the reaction mixture, phosphate buffer, and human plasma during 4.5 h incubation. Free and peptide conjugated NOTA formed stable complexes with (68)Ga at room temperature within 10 min. This might be of special interest for the labeling of fragile and potent

  11. Evaluation of Oral and IntravenousRoute Pharmacokinetics, Plasma Protein Binding and Uterine Tissue Dose Metrics of Bisphenol A: A Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Teeguarden, Justin G.; Waechter, John M.; Clewell, III, H. J.; Covington, Tammie R.; Barton, H. A.

    2005-06-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a weakly estrogenic monomer used in the production of polycarbonate plastic and epoxy resins, both of which are used in food contact and other applications. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of BPA pharmacokinetics in rats and humans was developed to provide a physiological context in which the processes controlling BPA pharmacokinetics (e.g. plasma protein binding, enterohepatic recirculation of the glucuronide (BPAG)) could be incorporated. A uterine tissue compartment was included to allow the correlation of simulated ER binding of BPA with increases in uterine wet weight (UWW) in rats. Intravenous and oral-route blood kinetics of BPA in rats and oral-route plasma and urinary elimination kinetics in humans were well described by the model. Simulations of rat oral-route BPAG pharmacokinetics were less exact, most likely the result of oversimplification of the GI tract compartment. Comparison of metabolic clearance rates derived from fitting rat i.v. and oral-route data implied that intestinal glucuronidation of BPA is significant. In rats but not humans, terminal elimination rates were strongly influenced by enterohepatic recirculation. In the absence of BPA binding to plasma proteins, simulations showed high ER occupancy at doses without uterine effects. Restricting free BPA to the measured unbound amount demonstrated the importance of including plasma binding in BPA kinetic models: the modeled relationship between ER occupancy and UWW increases was consistent with expectations for a receptor mediated response with low ER occupancy at doses with no response and increasing occupancy with larger increases in UWW.

  12. Simulation of differential drug pharmacokinetics under heat and exercise stress using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Pardeep; Peng, Henry T; Cheung, Bob; Edginton, Andrea

    2011-05-01

    Under extreme conditions of heat exposure and exercise stress, the human body undergoes major physiological changes. Perturbations in organ blood flows, gastrointestinal properties, and vascular physiology may impact the body's ability to absorb, distribute, and eliminate drugs. Clinical studies on the effect of these stressors on drug pharmacokinetics demonstrate that the likelihood of pharmacokinetic alteration is dependent on drug properties and the intensity of the stressor. The objectives of this study were to use literature data to quantify the correlation between exercise and heat exposure intensity to changing physiological parameters and further, to use this information for the parameterization of a whole-body, physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for the purposes of determining those drug properties most likely to demonstrate altered drug pharmacokinetics under stress. Cardiac output and most organ blood flows were correlated with heart rate using regression analysis. Other altered parameters included hematocrit and intravascular albumin concentration. Pharmacokinetic simulations of intravenous and oral administration of hypothetical drugs with either a low or high value of lipophilicity, unbound fraction in plasma, and unbound intrinsic hepatic clearance demonstrated that the area under the curve of those drugs with a high unbound intrinsic clearance was most affected (up to a 130% increase) following intravenous administration, whereas following oral administration, pharmacokinetic changes were smaller (<40% increase in area under the curve) for all hypothetical compounds. A midazolam physiologically based pharmacokinetic model was also used to demonstrate that simulated changes in pharmacokinetic parameters under exercise and heat stress were generally consistent with those reported in the literature.

  13. [The enantioselective pharmacokinetic study of desvenlafaxine sustained release tablet in Chinese healthy male volunteers after oral administration].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yin-xia; Du, Jiang-bo; Zhang, Yi-fan; Chen, Xiao-yan; Zhong, Da-fang

    2015-04-01

    A chiral LC-MS/MS method for the simultaneous analysis of desvenlafaxine (DVS) enantiomers in human plasma was developed and applied to a pharmacokinetic study on 12 Chinese healthy volunteers. d6-Desvenlafaxine was used as internal standard (IS). Chromatographic separation was performed on the Astec Chirobiotic V chiral column (150 mm x 4.6 mm, 5 μm). The assay was linear over the concentration range of 0.500-150 ng x mL(-1) for both enantiomers (r2 > 0.99). The method was successfully applied to a stereoselective pharmacokinetic study of 100 mg desvenlafaxine sustained release tablets on 12 Chinese healthy volunteers under fasting conditions. The results showed that the pharmacokinetic parameters were similar to both enantiomers in Chinese healthy volunteers. The AUC(0-t), and C(max) of the two enantiomers were about 1.5 times higher than those of blacks and whites reported in the literature.

  14. The Holy Grail of Polymer Therapeutics for Cancer Therapy: An Overview on the Pharmacokinetics and Bio Distribution.

    PubMed

    Dyawanapelly, Sathish; Junnuthula, Vijayabhaskar Reddy; Singh, AkhileshVikram

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, multifaceted clinical benefits of polymeric therapeutics have been reported. Over the past decades, cancer has been one of the leading causes of mortality in the world. Many clinically approved chemotherapeutics encounter potential challenges against deadly cancer. Moreover, safety and efficacy of anticancer agents have been limited by undesirable pharmacokinetics and biodistribution. To address these limitations, various polymer drug conjugates are being studied and developed to improve the antitumor efficacy. Among other therapeutics, polymer therapeutics are well established platforms that circumvent anticancer therapeutics from enzymatic metabolism via direct conjugation to therapeutic molecules. Interestingly, polymer therapeutics meets an unmet need of small molecules. Further clinical study showed that polymer-drug conjugation can achieve desired pharmacokinetics and biodistribution properties of several anticancer drugs. The present retrospective review mainly enlightens the most recent preclinical and clinical studies include safety, stability, pharmacokinetic behavior and distribution of polymer therapeutics.

  15. Effect of SLCO1B1 Polymorphisms on Rifabutin Pharmacokinetics in African HIV-Infected Patients with Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Hennig, Stefanie; Naiker, Suhashni; Reddy, Tarylee; Egan, Deirdre; Kellerman, Tracy; Wiesner, Lubbe; Owen, Andrew; McIlleron, Helen; Pym, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Rifabutin, used to treat HIV-infected tuberculosis, shows highly variable drug exposure, complicating dosing. Effects of SLCO1B1 polymorphisms on rifabutin pharmacokinetics were investigated in 35 African HIV-infected tuberculosis patients after multiple doses. Nonlinear mixed-effects modeling found that influential covariates for the pharmacokinetics were weight, sex, and a 30% increased bioavailability among heterozygous carriers of SLCO1B1 rs1104581 (previously associated with low rifampin concentrations). Larger studies are needed to understand the complex interactions of host genetics in HIV-infected tuberculosis patients. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00640887.). PMID:26482301

  16. Effect of SLCO1B1 Polymorphisms on Rifabutin Pharmacokinetics in African HIV-Infected Patients with Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Naiker, Suhashni; Reddy, Tarylee; Egan, Deirdre; Kellerman, Tracy; Wiesner, Lubbe; Owen, Andrew; McIlleron, Helen; Pym, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Rifabutin, used to treat HIV-infected tuberculosis, shows highly variable drug exposure, complicating dosing. Effects of SLCO1B1 polymorphisms on rifabutin pharmacokinetics were investigated in 35 African HIV-infected tuberculosis patients after multiple doses. Nonlinear mixed-effects modeling found that influential covariates for the pharmacokinetics were weight, sex, and a 30% increased bioavailability among heterozygous carriers of SLCO1B1 rs1104581 (previously associated with low rifampin concentrations). Larger studies are needed to understand the complex interactions of host genetics in HIV-infected tuberculosis patients. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00640887.) PMID:26482301

  17. [Pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of memantine].

    PubMed

    Wesemann, W; Sontag, K H; Maj, J

    1983-01-01

    The adamantane derivative memantine (1-amino-3,5-dimethylaminoadamantane, D-145, Akatinol) is clinically used as well in the therapy of neurogenic motor diseases (e.g. spasticity) as in the treatment of cerebral disorders like coma, cerebrovascular and geronto-psychiatric disturbances. The aim of the paper is to summarize experimental evidences that may help to explain the clinical observations. Biochemical, pharmacological, and electrophysiological studies show that memantine interferes with the metabolism of the transmitters dopamine, noradrenaline (norepinephrine), and serotonin and modulates synaptic transMission. In order to explain the antispastic activity of memantine, a spinal action must be assumed in addition to the supraspinal effect on transmitter systems. Since memantine reduces the membrane resistance as well as the membrane conductance of sodium, potassium, and chloride ions, it is very likely that memantine Is directly involved in the generation of action potentials.

  18. Nelfinavir suspension obtained from nelfinavir tablets has equivalent pharmacokinetic profile.

    PubMed

    Regazzi, M B; Seminari, E; Villani, P; Carriero, P L; Montagna, M; Marubbi, F; Maserati, R

    2001-10-01

    The pharmacokinetics of nelfinavir tablets (A) and an oral simplified nelfinavir suspension (B) were studied. Twelve healthy volunteers randomly received either five 250-mg nelfinavir tablets or a simplified oral suspension obtained from tablets dissolved in water (nelfinavir 1250 mg in 100 mL of water) in a single dose before being crossed over to the second treatment after a one-week washout period. Blood samples were drawn up to 24 h after drug administration. Nelfinavir concentrations in plasma were analyzed by a specific and validated reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography assay (HPLC) with UV detection, and pharmacokinetic values were determined. For the AUC(0-infinity) with means+/-SD of 31.71+/-7.85, 30.88+/-10.28 (microg/L) respectively for treatments B and A, the ratio (F(B/A)) was of 1.1 with a C.I. of 0.90-1.24. For Cmax with means+/-SD of 3.1+/-0.6 (treatment B) and 3.2+/-0.8 mg/mL (treatment A), the ratio was 1.0. with C.I. of 0.92-1.08. The two treatments evidenced no significant differences in AUC(0-inifnity) and Cmax values and the two-one sided t-test showed that the two preparations are bioequivalent. There was no significant difference in Tmax between the liquid and tablets. Nelfinavir suspension might be a option for treating HIV-infected patients with swallowing disturbances or compliance problems.

  19. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of boosted once-daily darunavir.

    PubMed

    Kakuda, Thomas N; Brochot, Anne; Tomaka, Frank L; Vangeneugden, Tony; Van De Casteele, Tom; Hoetelmans, Richard M W

    2014-10-01

    The ability to dose antiretroviral agents once daily simplifies the often complex therapeutic regimens required for the successful treatment of HIV infection. Thus, once-daily dosing can lead to improved patient adherence to medication and, consequently, sustained virological suppression and reduction in the risk of emergence of drug resistance. Several trials have evaluated once-daily darunavir/ritonavir in combination with other antiretrovirals (ARTEMIS and ODIN trials) or as monotherapy (MONET, MONOI and PROTEA trials) in HIV-1-infected adults. Data from ARTEMIS and ODIN demonstrate non-inferiority of once-daily darunavir/ritonavir against a comparator and, together with pharmacokinetic data, have established the suitability of once-daily darunavir/ritonavir for treatment-naive and treatment-experienced patients with no darunavir resistance-associated mutations. The findings of ARTEMIS and ODIN have led to recent updates to treatment guidelines, whereby once-daily darunavir/ritonavir, given with other antiretrovirals, is now a preferred treatment option for antiretroviral-naive adult patients and a simplified treatment option for antiretroviral-experienced adults who have no darunavir resistance-associated mutations. Once-daily dosing with darunavir/ritonavir is an option for treatment-naive and for treatment-experienced paediatric patients with no darunavir resistance-associated mutations based on the findings of the DIONE trial and ARIEL substudy. This article reviews the pharmacokinetics, efficacy, safety and tolerability of once-daily boosted darunavir. The feasibility of darunavir/ritonavir monotherapy as a treatment approach for some patients is also discussed. Finally, data on a fixed-dose combination of 800/150 mg of darunavir/cobicistat once daily are presented, showing comparable darunavir bioavailability to that obtained with 800/100 mg of darunavir/ritonavir once daily. PMID:24951533

  20. Pharmacokinetic studies of the fragrance compound 1,8-cineol in humans during inhalation.

    PubMed

    Jäger, W; Nasel, B; Nasel, C; Binder, R; Stimpfl, T; Vycudilik, W; Buchbauer, G

    1996-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the pharmacokinetics of 1,8-cineol in human subjects during prolonged inhalation. The results showed that 1,8-cineol is well absorbed from breathing air, with a peak plasma concentration after approximately 18 min. The elimination of this fragrance compound from the blood is biphasic, with a mean distribution half-life of 6.7 min and an elimination half-life of 104.6 min.

  1. [Pharmacokinetics and interactions of raltegravir].

    PubMed

    Placeres Alsina, Maria Mercè; Tuset Creus, Montse; Miró, José M

    2008-11-01

    Raltegravir is the first integrase inhibitor approved for the treatment of HIV-1 infection in pretreated adults with evidence of viral replication despite receiving antiretroviral therapy. Raltegravir is administered orally at a dose of 400 mg every 12 hours, with or without food. This drug is mainly eliminated through UGT1A1-mediated glucuronidation and is not an inhibitor or inducer of the main liver cytochrome P450 isoenzymes; consequently there is virtually no risk of pharmacological interactions with most commonly used drugs such as methadone, azole antifungal agents or drugs used to treat erectile dysfunction. Studies of interaction with other antiretroviral agents show that raltegravir can be used in combination with tenofovir, efavirenz, atazanavir, ritonavir or tipranavir/ritonavir without the need for dose adjustments. When combined with rifampicin, the dose of raltegravir should be increased to 800 mg/12 h. Proton pump inhibitors increase plasma levels of raltegravir (a 3-fold increase in exposure or AUC levels), and consequently their combined use should be avoided as far as posible. Raltegravir is well tolerated and does not require dose adjustments in patients with severe renal impairment or mild-to-moderate liver impairment. There are no studies in patients with severe liver impairment. PMID:19572422

  2. Pharmacokinetics of oral ivabradine in healthy cats.

    PubMed

    Riesen, S C; Ni, W; Carnes, C A; Lindsey, K J; Phelps, M A; Schober, K E

    2011-10-01

    A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analytical method for the measurement of the novel heart rate-lowering drug ivabradine and its major metabolite, S-18982, was cross-validated in the plasma of eight healthy cats. Plasma concentrations were then determined after single and repeated oral administration of ivabradine. Individual plasma concentrations versus time from each cat were used in compartmental analysis using the commercially available software WinNonlin. Both ivabradine and S-18982 reached their maximum concentrations of 103.33 and 3.86 ng/mL within 1 h. Following repeated administration, areas under the plasma concentration-time curves for ivabradine and S-18982 did not significantly increase. Two-compartmental and one-compartmental models with first-order input and elimination provided the best fit to the data for ivabradine and S-18982, respectively. Both models were combined to produce a single 4-compartment model characterizing ivabradine and S-18982 pharmacokinetics. The results of this study indicate that repeated oral doses of ivabradine produced plasma drug concentrations suitable for 12-h dosing intervals in healthy cats. Furthermore, the analytical assay and combined ivabradine/S-18982 model provide tools for further evaluation of ivabradine pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in future studies in cats.

  3. Salicylate pharmacokinetics in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Owen, S G; Roberts, M S; Friesen, W T; Francis, H W

    1989-01-01

    1. The pharmacokinetics of salicylic acid (SA) and its major metabolite salicyluric acid (SU) were studied in nine patients with rheumatoid arthritis following a 900 mg oral dose of acetylsalicylic acid and during 6 weeks of chronic administration of enteric coated aspirin (3,900 mg day). Response to therapy was also monitored. 2. The various pharmacokinetic parameters determined in the study were similar to those observed in other single dose salicylate studies amongst healthy volunteers but were not predictive of salicylate concentration in the chronic dose study. 3. Plasma concentrations of SA (total and unbound) were found to decline significantly over the 6 weeks and plasma SU concentrations increased. 4. During the chronic dosing study, there was a significant increase in the Vmax (total and unbound) for the formation of SU, whilst the Km and SU clearance remained constant. Also, the elimination rate constant (k) for salicylate was not significantly affected. 5. Therapeutic response to salicylate therapy was not significantly affected by the decline in SA concentrations. PMID:2590603

  4. Virtual modelling of compartmental pharmacokinetic systems.

    PubMed

    Prado, Manuel; Roa, Laura

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of different methodologies for modelling pharmacokinetic systems under the context of a telemedicine system oriented to the on-line and personalized knowledge generation. We use a simplified 3-pool kinetic system for a better clarification of several relevant modelling formalisms. A more complete 3-pool urea kinetic model is built simply connecting EL components pertaining to a pharmacokinetic library previously developed. The evolution of the urea concentration during the dialysis of a patient provided by this model was compared successfully to the evolution computed by a 2-pool model experimentally validated. The 3-pool model provides more information regarding the interstice and a high capacity to be modified for attending to the knowledge needs of physicians, as well as biomedicine advances. As a major conclusion, our outcomes suggest that virtual modelling is an excellent methodology in biomedical engineering to support the on-line generation of personalized health knowledge for telemedicine systems. This is due to its capacity for reusing components at horizontal and vertical level, and for implementing multiformalism and multidomain models, what simplifies the task to represent complex physiological and artificial systems. PMID:17282097

  5. The Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Iron Preparations

    PubMed Central

    Geisser, Peter; Burckhardt, Susanna

    2011-01-01

    Standard approaches are not appropriate when assessing pharmacokinetics of iron supplements due to the ubiquity of endogenous iron, its compartmentalized sites of action, and the complexity of the iron metabolism. The primary site of action of iron is the erythrocyte, and, in contrast to conventional drugs, no drug-receptor interaction takes place. Notably, the process of erythropoiesis, i.e., formation of new erythrocytes, takes 3–4 weeks. Accordingly, serum iron concentration and area under the curve (AUC) are clinically irrelevant for assessing iron utilization. Iron can be administered intravenously in the form of polynuclear iron(III)-hydroxide complexes with carbohydrate ligands or orally as iron(II) (ferrous) salts or iron(III) (ferric) complexes. Several approaches have been employed to study the pharmacodynamics of iron after oral administration. Quantification of iron uptake from radiolabeled preparations by the whole body or the erythrocytes is optimal, but alternatively total iron transfer can be calculated based on known elimination rates and the intrinsic reactivity of individual preparations. Degradation kinetics, and thus the safety, of parenteral iron preparations are directly related to the molecular weight and the stability of the complex. High oral iron doses or rapid release of iron from intravenous iron preparations can saturate the iron transport system, resulting in oxidative stress with adverse clinical and subclinical consequences. Appropriate pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics analyses will greatly assist our understanding of the likely contribution of novel preparations to the management of anemia. PMID:24310424

  6. Pharmacokinetics of subcutaneous fentanyl in Greyhounds.

    PubMed

    KuKanich, Butch

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of the study was to describe the pharmacokinetics of subcutaneous fentanyl (15μg/kg) in six healthy Greyhound dogs. Fentanyl plasma concentrations were determined by a liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry method. Non-compartmental pharmacokinetic analysis was used. Fentanyl was rapidly absorbed with a mean peak concentration (C(MAX)) of 3.56ng/mL at 0.24h. The mean terminal half-life, volume of distribution per bioavailability, and clearance per bioavailability were 2.97h, 7.09L/kg, 27.60mL/min/kg, respectively. Pain occurred on injection in all six dogs, but addition of 8.4% sodium bicarbonate (1mL per 20mL fentanyl) resulted in no pain on injection in 3/3 dogs but similar C(MAX) values. The subcutaneous route may be an alternative route of fentanyl administration if intravenous administration is not practical. PMID:21388844

  7. Pharmacokinetic study of copper (II) acetylsalicylate.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Mohammad S; Sher, Muhammad; Pervez, Humayun; Saeed, Maryiam

    2008-09-01

    This study was aimed at determination of pharmacokinetic parameters of copper (II) acetylsalicylate (CAS). Ten volunteers received a 60-mg dose of CAS. Blood samples were collected just before and after 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0, 1.5, 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, 4.0, 4.5, 5.5, 7.0, 10, and 12.0 h of administration of the drug. The plasma samples were analyzed for CAS and its metabolites by a validated high-performance liquid chromatography method having a suitable lower limit of quantification. The dose of 60 mg was well tolerated without any adverse effect. The maximum plasma concentration of CAS was found to be 0.38 mg L(-1) with t (max) of 0.72 h. The plasma half-life, clearance, and volume of distribution of CAS were 8.67 h, 66.30 L h(-1) and 829 L kg(-1), respectively. The elimination of CAS, acetylsalicylic acid, copper salicylate, and salicylic acid follows the first order kinetics with r (2) 0.979, 0.880, 0.991, and 0.998, respectively. The study provided for the first time the pharmacokinetic data for CAS after oral administration of CAS. The data were found to be useful in understanding the claimed enhanced anti-inflammatory activity of the drug as compared with that of acetylsalicylic acid. PMID:18478192

  8. Formulation, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of topical microbicides.

    PubMed

    Adams, Jessica L; Kashuba, Angela D M

    2012-08-01

    The development of safe topical microbicides that effectively prevent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is a major goal in curbing the human immunodeficiency virus pandemic. A number of past failures resulting from mucosal toxicity or lack of efficacy have informed the field. Products that caused toxicity to the female genital tract mucosa, and thereby increased the likelihood of HIV acquisition, included nonoxynol 9, cellulose sulfate, and C31 G vaginal gel Savvy. Topical products that were ineffective in preventing HIV infection include BufferGel, Carraguard, and PRO 2000. Antiretroviral drugs such as tenofovir and dapivirine formulated into microbicide products have shown promise, but there is much to learn about ideal product formulation and acceptability, and drug distribution and disposition (pharmacokinetics). Current formulations for water-soluble molecules include vaginally or rectally applied gels, vaginal rings, films and tablets. Dosing strategies (e.g. coitally dependent or independent) will be based on the pharmacokinetics of the active ingredient and the tolerance for less than perfect adherence. PMID:22306523

  9. Drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics: Technological considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; Volkow, N.D.; Wolf, A.P.

    1992-12-31

    Additionally, the use of PET to examine drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacadynamics and the relationship of these properties to the behavioral, therapeutic and toxic properties of drugs and substances of abuse is emerging as a powerful new scientific tool. The pharmacokinetic properties of a drug, which comprises all of the biological processes which determine the fraction of the drug available, can be measured using the labeled drug itself. For example, the labeled drug can be used to measure the absolute uptake, regional distribution and kinetics of a drug at its site of action in the body. Additionally the labeled drug and whole body its labeled metabolites and thus provide information an potential toxic effects as well as tissue half lives. On the other hand, different labeled tracers can be used to assess drug pharmacodynamics which include the biological Processes involved in the drug`s effects. For example, with appropriate radiotracers, the effects of a drug on metabolism, neurotransmitter activity, blood flew, enzyme activity or other processes can be probed.

  10. Drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics: Technological considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; Volkow, N.D.; Wolf, A.P.

    1992-01-01

    Additionally, the use of PET to examine drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacadynamics and the relationship of these properties to the behavioral, therapeutic and toxic properties of drugs and substances of abuse is emerging as a powerful new scientific tool. The pharmacokinetic properties of a drug, which comprises all of the biological processes which determine the fraction of the drug available, can be measured using the labeled drug itself. For example, the labeled drug can be used to measure the absolute uptake, regional distribution and kinetics of a drug at its site of action in the body. Additionally the labeled drug and whole body its labeled metabolites and thus provide information an potential toxic effects as well as tissue half lives. On the other hand, different labeled tracers can be used to assess drug pharmacodynamics which include the biological Processes involved in the drug's effects. For example, with appropriate radiotracers, the effects of a drug on metabolism, neurotransmitter activity, blood flew, enzyme activity or other processes can be probed.

  11. Intravenous buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine pharmacokinetics in humans

    PubMed Central

    Huestis, M.A.; Cone, E.J.; Pirnay, S.O.; Umbricht, A.; Preston, K.L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Prescribed sublingual (SL) buprenorphine is sometimes diverted for intravenous (IV) abuse, but no human pharmacokinetic data are available following high-dose IV buprenorphine. Methods Plasma was collected for 72 h after administration of placebo or 2, 4, 8, 12, or 16 mg IV buprenorphine in escalating order (single-blind, double-dummy) in 5 healthy male non-dependent opioid users. Buprenorphine and its primary active metabolite, norbuprenorphine, were quantified by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry with limits of quantitation of 0.1 μg/L. Results Maximum buprenorphine concentrations (mean ± SE) were detected 10 min after 2, 4, 8, 12, 16 mg IV: 19.3±1.0, 44.5±4.8, 85.2±7.7, 124.6±16.6, and 137.7±18.8 μg/L, respectively. Maximum norbuprenorphine concentrations occurred 10–15 min (3.7±0.7 μg/L) after 16 mg IV administration. Conclusions Buprenorphine concentrations increased in a significantly linear dose-dependent manner up to 12 mg IV buprenorphine. Thus, previously demonstrated pharmacodynamic ceiling effects (over 2–16 mg) are not due to pharmacokinetic adaptations within this range, although they may play a role at doses higher than 12 mg. PMID:23246635

  12. Colistin: understanding and applying recent pharmacokinetic advances.

    PubMed

    Ortwine, Jessica K; Kaye, Keith S; Li, Jian; Pogue, Jason M

    2015-01-01

    Colistin, the most widely used polymyxin antibiotic, was originally introduced in the late 1950s before the establishment of the present-day drug approval process. Originally shelved due to toxicity concerns, colistin, in the form of its inactive prodrug colistin methanesulfonate, has undergone a renaissance in the past 15 years. Unfortunately, this is not because of an improved adverse-effect profile but because colistin is among the only remaining antibiotics with activity against multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacilli. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data are limited to guide the appropriate use of colistin; however, important advances have occurred over the past 5 years. Since its reintroduction, published reports regarding colistin have produced discordant results in terms of both efficacy and safety. Because the efficacy and toxicity of colistin are dose dependent, the impact of discordant dosing recommendations cannot be understated. This review highlights the issues leading to differing and often conflicting dosing recommendations, reviews the recent pharmacokinetic advances, and provides recommendations for the optimal use of colistin.

  13. Physiologically based pharmacokinetics and cancer risk assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, M E; Krishnan, K

    1994-01-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling involves mathematically describing the complex interplay of the critical physicochemical and biological determinants involved in the disposition of chemicals. In this approach, the body is divided into a number of biologically relevant tissue compartments, arranged in an anatomically accurate manner, and defined with appropriate physiological characteristics. The extrapolation of pharmacokinetic behavior of chemicals from high dose to low dose for various exposure routes and species is possible with this approach because these models are developed by integrating quantitative information on the critical determinants of chemical disposition under a biological modeling framework. The principal application of PBPK models is in the prediction of tissue dosimetry of toxic moiety (e.g., parent chemical, reactive metabolite, macromolecular adduct) of a chemical. Such an application has been demonstrated with dichloromethane, a liver and lung carcinogen in the B6C3F1 mouse. The PBPK model-based risk assessment approach estimated a cancer risk to people of 3.7 x 10(-8) for a lifetime inhalation exposure of 1 micrograms/m3, which is lower by more than two orders of magnitude than that calculated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency using the linearized multistage model (for low-dose extrapolation) and body surface correction factor (for interspecies scaling). The capability of predicting the target tissue exposure to toxic moiety in people with PBPK models should help reduce the uncertainty associated with the extrapolation procedures adopted in conventional dose-response assessment. PMID:8187697

  14. Physiologic and pharmacokinetic changes in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Costantine, Maged M

    2014-01-01

    Physiologic changes in pregnancy induce profound alterations to the pharmacokinetic properties of many medications. These changes affect distribution, absorption, metabolism, and excretion of drugs, and thus may impact their pharmacodynamic properties during pregnancy. Pregnant women undergo several adaptations in many organ systems. Some adaptations are secondary to hormonal changes in pregnancy, while others occur to support the gravid woman and her developing fetus. Some of the changes in maternal physiology during pregnancy include, for example, increased maternal fat and total body water, decreased plasma protein concentrations, especially albumin, increased maternal blood volume, cardiac output, and blood flow to the kidneys and uteroplacental unit, and decreased blood pressure. The maternal blood volume expansion occurs at a larger proportion than the increase in red blood cell mass, which results in physiologic anemia and hemodilution. Other physiologic changes include increased tidal volume, partially compensated respiratory alkalosis, delayed gastric emptying and gastrointestinal motility, and altered activity of hepatic drug metabolizing enzymes. Understating these changes and their profound impact on the pharmacokinetic properties of drugs in pregnancy is essential to optimize maternal and fetal health. PMID:24772083

  15. Pharmacokinetics of Antiretrovirals in Mucosal Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Cottrell, M.L.; Srinivas, N.; Kashuba, A.D.M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In the absence of an HIV vaccine or cure, antiretroviral (ARV) based prevention strategies are being investigated to reduce HIV incidence. These prevention strategies depend on achieving effective drug concentrations at the site HIV exposure which is most commonly the mucosal tissues of the lower gastrointestinal tract and the female genital tract. Areas covered This article collates all known data regarding drug exposure in these vulnerable mucosal tissues, and reviews important mechanisms of ARV drug distribution. Research papers and abstracts describing antiretroviral pharmacokinetics in the female genital tract and lower gastrointestinal mucosal tissues available in MEDLINE® or presented at scientific conferences prior to December 2014 are reviewed in detail. Important influences on ARV mucosal tissue distribution, including protein binding, active drug transport, and endogenous hormones, are also reviewed. Expert opinion ARVs exhibit highly variable pharmacokinetics in mucosal tissues. In general, antiretroviral exposure is higher in the lower gastrointestinal tract compared to the female genital tract, but concentrations required for protective efficacy are largely unknown. The expected site of HIV exposure represents an important consideration when designing and optimizing antiretroviral based prevention strategies. PMID:25797064

  16. Direct solid-phase synthesis of octreotide conjugates: precursors for use as tumor-targeted radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, H P; Wu, Y T; Chen, S T; Wang, K T

    1999-09-01

    Somatostatin analogues, such as octreotide, are useful for the visualization and treatment of tumors. Unfortunately, these compounds were produced synthetically using complex and inefficient procedures. Here, we describe a novel approach for the synthesis of octreotide and its analogues using p-carboxybenzaldehyde to anchor Fmoc-threoninol to solid phase resins. The reaction of the two hydroxyl groups of Fmoc-threoninol with p-carboxybenzaldehyde was catalyzed with p-toluenesulphonic acid in chloroform using a Dean-Stark apparatus to form Fmoc-threoninol p-carboxybenzacetal in 91% yield. The Fmoc-threoninol p-carboxybenzacetal acted as an Fmoc-amino acid derivative and the carboxyl group of Fmoc-threoninol p-carboxybenzacetal was coupled to an amine-resin via a DCC coupling reaction. The synthesis of protected octreotide and its conjugates were carried out in their entirety using a conventional Fmoc protocol and an autosynthesizer. The acetal was stable during the stepwise elongation of each Fmoc-amino acid as shown by the averaged coupling yield (> 95%). Octreotide (74 to 78% yield) and five conjugated derivatives were synthesized with high yields using this procedure, including three radiotherapy octreotides (62 to 75% yield) and two cellular markers (72 to 76% yield). This novel approach provides a strategy for the rapid and efficient large-scale synthesis of octreotide and its analogues for radiopharmaceutical and tagged conjugates.

  17. Kinetic sensitivity of a receptor-binding radiopharmaceutical: Technetium-99m galactosyl-neoglycoalbumin

    SciTech Connect

    Vera, D.R.; Woodle, E.S.; Stadalnik, R.C. )

    1989-09-01

    Kinetic sensitivity is the ability of a physiochemical parameter to alter the time-activity curve of a radiotracer. The kinetic sensitivity of liver and blood time-activity data resulting from a single bolus injection of ({sup 99m}Tc)galactosyl-neoglycoalbumin (( Tc)NGA) into healthy pigs was examined. Three parameters, hepatic plasma flow scaled as flow per plasma volume, ligand-receptor affinity, and total receptor concentration, were tested using (Tc)NGA injections of various molar doses and affinities. Simultaneous measurements of plasma volume (iodine-125 human serum albumin dilution), and hepatic plasma flow (indocyanine green extraction) were performed during 12 (Tc)NGA studies. Paired data sets demonstrated differences (P(chi v2) less than 0.01) in liver and blood time-activity curves in response to changes in each of the tested parameters. We conclude that the (Tc)NGA radiopharmacokinetic system is therefore sensitive to hepatic plasma flow, ligand-receptor affinity, and receptor concentration. In vivo demonstration of kinetic sensitivity permits delineation of the physiologic parameters that determine the biodistribution of a radiopharmaceutical. This delineation is a prerequisite to a valid analytic assessment of receptor biochemistry via kinetic modeling.

  18. Development of dopamine receptor radiopharmaceuticals for the study of neurological and psychiatric disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Jogeshwar Mukherjee

    2009-01-02

    Our goals in this grant application are directed towards the development of radiotracers that may allow the study of the high-affinity state (functional state) of the dopamine receptors. There have been numerous reports on the presence of two inter-convertible states of these (G-protein coupled) receptors in vitro. However, there is no report that establishes the presence of these separate affinity states in vivo. We have made efforts in this direction in order to provide such direct in vivo evidence about the presence of the high affinity state. This understanding of the functional state of the receptors is of critical significance in our overall diagnosis and treatment of diseases that implicate the G-protein coupled receptors. Four specific aims have been listed in the grant application: (1). Design and syntheses of agonists (2). Radiosyntheses of agonists (3). In vitro pharmacology of agonists (4). In vivo distribution and pharmacology of labeled derivatives. We have accomplished the syntheses and radiosyntheses of three agonist radiotracers labeled with carbon-11. In vitro and in vivo pharmacological experiments have been accomplished in rats and preliminary PET studies in non-human primates have been carried out. Various accomplishments during the funded years, briefly outlined in this document, have been disseminated by several publications in various journals and presentations in national and international meetings (Society of Nuclear Medicine, Society for Neuroscience and International Symposium on Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry).

  19. Monte Carlo determination of emerging energy spectra for diagnostically realistic radiopharmaceutical distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubal, L. G.; Harrell, C. R.; Esser, P. D.

    1990-12-01

    In order to realistically define the internal organs of a representative human, 150 transverse CT scans of an (average) male patient were acquired from head to mid-thigh on the GE 9800 Quick scanner. The reconstructed transverse slices were read into a microVAX 3500 and members of the medical staff outlined 42 separate internal organs contained in the transverse slice. This digitized human phantom serves as an input to a Monte Carlo program which models photoelectric absorption and scatter processes of gamma-rays in matter. The organs can be "filled" with variable amounts of radiopharmaceuticals and the simulation computes the emerging energy spectra for a given source distribution and detector position. The simulation follows gamma-ray histories out to a maximum of 32 scatter events. Scatter spectra are histogrammed into energy distributions of gamma-rays which have undergone a specific number of scatter events before emerging from the phantom. A sum of all these scatter spectra yields the simulated total spectra. Simulated total spectra of diagnostically relevant human distributions are compared to spectra acquired from nuclear medicine clinical patients.

  20. Complexation study on no-carrier-added astatine with insulin: a candidate radiopharmaceutical.

    PubMed

    Lahiri, Susanta; Roy, Kamalika; Sen, Souvik

    2008-12-01

    No-carrier-added astatine radionuclides produced in the (7)Li-irradiated lead matrix were separated from bulk lead nitrate target by complexing At with insulin, followed by dialysis. The method offers simultaneous separation of At from lead as well as its complexation with insulin. The At-insulin complex might be a potential radiopharmaceutical in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. The stability of At-insulin complex was checked by dialysis against deionized water and Ringer lactate (RL) solution. It has been found that the half-life of At-insulin complex is about approximately 12h, when dialyzed against deionized water and is only 6h, when dialyzed against RL solution having the same composition as blood serum. The 6h half-life of this Insulin-At complex is perfect for killing cancer cells from external cell surfaces as the half-life of internalization of insulin molecule inside the cell is 7-12h. PMID:18674921

  1. A Concise Radiosynthesis of the Tau Radiopharmaceutical, [18F]T807

    PubMed Central

    Shoup, Timothy M.; Yokell, Daniel L.; Rice, Peter A.; Jackson, Raul N.; Livni, Eli; Johnson, Keith A.; Brady, Thomas J.; Vasdev, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Fluorine-18 labelled 7-(6-fluoropyridin-3-yl)-5H-pyrido[4,3-b]indole ([18F]T807) is a potent and selective agent for imaging paired helical filaments of tau (PHF-tau) and is among the most promising PET radiopharmaceuticals for this target in early clinical trials. The present study reports a simplified one-step method for the synthesis of [18F]T807 that is broadly applicable for routine clinical production using a GE Tracerlab™ FXFN radiosynthesis module. Key facets of our optimized radiosynthesis include development and use of a more soluble protected precursor, tert-butyl 7-(6-nitropyridin-3-yl)-5H-pyrido[4,3-b]indole-5-carboxylate, as well as new HPLC separation conditions that enable a facile one-step synthesis. During the nucleophilic fluorinating reaction with potassium cryptand [18F]fluoride (K[18F]/K222) in DMSO at 130 °C over 10 min, the precursor is concurrently deprotected. Formulated [18F]T807 was prepared in an uncorrected radiochemical yield of 14 ± 3%, with a specific activity of 216 ± 60 GBq/μmol (5837 ± 1621 mCi/μmol) at the end of synthesis (60 min; n = 3) and validated for human use. This methodology offers the advantage of faster synthesis in fewer steps, with simpler automation which we anticipate will facilitate widespread clinical use of [18F]T807. PMID:24339014

  2. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of biokinetic models for radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    Li, W B; Hoeschen, C

    2010-01-01

    Mathematical models for kinetics of radiopharmaceuticals in humans were developed and are used to estimate the radiation absorbed dose for patients in nuclear medicine by the International Commission on Radiological Protection and the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) Committee. However, due to the fact that the residence times used were derived from different subjects, partially even with different ethnic backgrounds, a large variation in the model parameters propagates to a high uncertainty of the dose estimation. In this work, a method was developed for analysing the uncertainty and sensitivity of biokinetic models that are used to calculate the residence times. The biokinetic model of (18)F-FDG (FDG) developed by the MIRD Committee was analysed by this developed method. The sources of uncertainty of all model parameters were evaluated based on the experiments. The Latin hypercube sampling technique was used to sample the parameters for model input. Kinetic modelling of FDG in humans was performed. Sensitivity of model parameters was indicated by combining the model input and output, using regression and partial correlation analysis. The transfer rate parameter of plasma to other tissue fast is the parameter with the greatest influence on the residence time of plasma. Optimisation of biokinetic data acquisition in the clinical practice by exploitation of the sensitivity of model parameters obtained in this study is discussed. PMID:20185457

  3. Production of 64Cu and 67Cu radiopharmaceuticals using zinc target irradiated with accelerator neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawabata, Masako; Hashimoto, Kazuyuki; Saeki, Hideya; Sato, Nozomi; Motoishi, Shoji; Nagai, Yasuki

    2014-09-01

    Copper radioisotopes have gained a lot of attention in radiopharmaceuticals owing to their unique decay characteristics. The longest half-life β emitter, 67Cu, is thought to be suitable for targeted radio-immunotherapy. Adequate production of 67Cu to meet the demands of clinical studies has not been fully established. Another attractive copper isotope, 64Cu has possible applications as a diagnostic imaging tracer combined with a therapeutic effect. This work proposes a production method using accelerator neutrons in which two copper radioisotopes can be produced: 1) 68Zn(n,x)67Cu and 2) 64Zn(n,p)64Cu using ~14 MeV neutrons generated by natC(d, n) reaction, both from natural or enriched zinc oxides. The generated 64,67Cu were separated from the target zinc oxide using a chelating and an anion exchange columns and were labelled with two widely studied chelators where the labelling efficiency was found to be acceptably good. The major advantage of this method is that a significant amount of 64,67Cu with a very few impurity radionuclides are produced which also makes the separation procedure simple. Provided an accelerator supplying an Ed = ~ 40 MeV, a wide application of 64,67Cu based drugs in nuclear medicine is feasible in the near future. We will present the characteristics of this production method using accelerator neutrons including the chemical separation processes.

  4. PET radiopharmaceuticals for imaging of tumor hypoxia: a review of the evidence

    PubMed Central

    Lopci, Egesta; Grassi, Ilaria; Chiti, Arturo; Nanni, Cristina; Cicoria, Gianfranco; Toschi, Luca; Fonti, Cristina; Lodi, Filippo; Mattioli, Sandro; Fanti, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia is a pathological condition arising in living tissues when oxygen supply does not adequately cover the cellular metabolic demand. Detection of this phenomenon in tumors is of the utmost clinical relevance because tumor aggressiveness, metastatic spread, failure to achieve tumor control, increased rate of recurrence, and ultimate poor outcome are all associated with hypoxia. Consequently, in recent decades there has been increasing interest in developing methods for measurement of oxygen levels in tumors. Among the image-based modalities for hypoxia assessment, positron emission tomography (PET) is one of the most extensively investigated based on the various advantages it offers, i.e., broad range of radiopharmaceuticals, good intrinsic resolution, three-dimensional tumor representation, possibility of semiquantification/quantification of the amount of hypoxic tumor burden, overall patient friendliness, and ease of repetition. Compared with the other non-invasive techniques, the biggest advantage of PET imaging is that it offers the highest specificity for detection of hypoxic tissue. Starting with the 2-nitroimidazole family of compounds in the early 1980s, a great number of PET tracers have been developed for the identification of hypoxia in living tissue and solid tumors. This paper provides an overview of the principal PET tracers applied in cancer imaging of hypoxia and discusses in detail their advantages and pitfalls. PMID:24982822

  5. Modulation of the pharmacokinetics of zinc oxide nanoparticles and their fates in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paek, Hee-Jeong; Lee, Youn-Joung; Chung, Hea-Eun; Yoo, Nan-Hui; Lee, Jeong-A.; Kim, Mi-Kyung; Lee, Jong Kwon; Jeong, Jayoung; Choi, Soo-Jin

    2013-11-01

    In the present study, the effects of particle size (20 nm or 70 nm) and surface charge (negative or positive) on the pharmacokinetics, tissue distributions, and excretion of ZnO nanoparticles were examined following the administration of a single oral dose to rats. Pharmacokinetic profiles and biodistributions were not affected by particle size or gender. However, ZnO (-) particles were markedly more absorbed by the systemic circulation than ZnO (+) particles. Furthermore, the kinetic behaviors of ZnO nanoparticles differed from those of zinc ions, as evidenced by the low dissolution (13-14%) of ZnO nanoparticles under gastric conditions. The kidneys, liver, and lungs were found to be target organs. However, the major biological fate of ZnO nanoparticles in tissues was the ionic form, not the particulate form, and this was independent of exposure routes (oral and intravenous). Particle size was only found to affect excretion kinetics, and 20 nm particles were more rapidly eliminated. Most nanoparticles were excreted via the biliary and fecal routes, but a small amount of the nanoparticles was excreted via urine. The study shows that surface charge, rather than particle size or gender, is the critical modulator of the pharmacokinetic behavior of ZnO nanoparticles.In the present study, the effects of particle size (20 nm or 70 nm) and surface charge (negative or positive) on the pharmacokinetics, tissue distributions, and excretion of ZnO nanoparticles were examined following the administration of a single oral dose to rats. Pharmacokinetic profiles and biodistributions were not affected by particle size or gender. However, ZnO (-) particles were markedly more absorbed by the systemic circulation than ZnO (+) particles. Furthermore, the kinetic behaviors of ZnO nanoparticles differed from those of zinc ions, as evidenced by the low dissolution (13-14%) of ZnO nanoparticles under gastric conditions. The kidneys, liver, and lungs were found to be target organs. However

  6. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modeling to predict the clinical pharmacokinetics of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Glassman, Patrick M; Balthasar, Joseph P

    2016-08-01

    Accurate prediction of the clinical pharmacokinetics of new therapeutic entities facilitates decision making during drug discovery, and increases the probability of success for early clinical trials. Standard strategies employed for predicting the pharmacokinetics of small-molecule drugs (e.g., allometric scaling) are often not useful for predicting the disposition monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), as mAbs frequently demonstrate species-specific non-linear pharmacokinetics that is related to mAb-target binding (i.e., target-mediated drug disposition, TMDD). The saturable kinetics of TMDD are known to be influenced by a variety of factors, including the sites of target expression (which determines the accessibility of target to mAb), the extent of target expression, the rate of target turnover, and the fate of mAb-target complexes. In most cases, quantitative information on the determinants of TMDD is not available during early phases of drug discovery, and this has complicated attempts to employ mechanistic mathematical models to predict the clinical pharmacokinetics of mAbs. In this report, we introduce a simple strategy, employing physiologically-based modeling, to predict mAb disposition in humans. The approach employs estimates of inter-antibody variability in rate processes of extravasation in tissues and fluid-phase endocytosis, estimates for target concentrations in tissues derived through use of categorical immunohistochemical scores, and in vitro measures of the turnover of target and target-mAb complexes. Monte Carlo simulations were performed for four mAbs (cetuximab, figitumumab, dalotuzumab, trastuzumab) directed against three targets (epidermal growth factor receptor, insulin-like growth factor receptor 1, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2). The proposed modeling strategy was able to predict well the pharmacokinetics of cetuximab, dalotuzumab, and trastuzumab at a range of doses, but trended towards underprediction of figitumumab concentrations

  7. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacogenetic predictive markers of irinotecan activity and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Di Paolo, Antonello; Bocci, Guido; Polillo, Marialuisa; Del Re, Marzia; Di Desidero, Teresa; Lastella, Marianna; Danesi, Romano

    2011-12-01

    After the rapid development of new classes of antineoplastic drugs, research activities have focused their efforts to the identification of predictive markers of drug activity and tolerability. Irinotecan (CPT-11) may induce severe toxicities (diarrhea, neutropenia) that limit its clinical use, but the increasing knowledge of its pharmacokinetics offered a potential approach to treatment optimization. Pharmacokinetics, the first area of investigation, has identified markers such as biliary index, the relative extent of conversion and the glucuronidation ratio, which are capable to define the risk for severe adverse effects. Because of the existence of some issues concerning the adoption of pharmacokinetic strategies to optimize CPT-11 dose and schedule, analyses of genetic polymorphisms seemed to offer a more reliable and safer approach for the identification of patients at risk than pharmacokinetics. In this view, the uridine diphosphate glucuronosil transferase isoform 1A1 (UGT1A1) was associated with significant changes in disposition of CPT-11 and its metabolites, and consequently with treatment-induced toxicities. However, the complex pharmacokinetics of irinotecan and the involvement of several enzymes other than UGT (i.e., carboxyl estherases, CYP450 isoforms), and transmembrane transporters (ABCB1, ABCC1, ABCG2, SLCO1B1) make difficult the identification of patients with an optimal sensitivity and specificity, and a large part of variability among patients still remains unexplained. Furthermore, prospective clinical studies that should demonstrate the reliability of those pharmacokinetic and pharmacogenetic markers are still lacking. In the present review, pharmacokinetic and pharmacogenetic markers will be discussed. PMID:21787264

  8. Discovery of a potent class I selective ketone histone deacetylase inhibitor with antitumor activity in vivo and optimized pharmacokinetic properties.

    PubMed

    Kinzel, Olaf; Llauger-Bufi, Laura; Pescatore, Giovanna; Rowley, Michael; Schultz-Fademrecht, Carsten; Monteagudo, Edith; Fonsi, Massimiliano; Gonzalez Paz, Odalys; Fiore, Fabrizio; Steinkühler, Christian; Jones, Philip

    2009-06-11

    The optimization of a potent, class I selective ketone HDAC inhibitor is shown. It possesses optimized pharmacokinetic properties in preclinical species, has a clean off-target profile, and is negative in a microbial mutagenicity (Ames) test. In a mouse xenograft model it shows efficacy comparable to that of vorinostat at a 10-fold reduced dose.

  9. Agonist and antagonist bind differently to 5-HT1A receptors during Alzheimer's disease: A post-mortem study with PET radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Benjamin; Sebti, Johan; Verdurand, Mathieu; Fieux, Sylvain; Billard, Thierry; Streichenberger, Nathalie; Troakes, Claire; Newman-Tancredi, Adrian; Zimmer, Luc

    2016-10-01

    PET imaging studies using 5-HT1A receptor radiotracers show a decreased density of this receptor in hippocampi of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) at advanced stages. However, current 5-HT1A receptor radiopharmaceuticals used in neuroimaging are antagonists, thought to bind to 5-HT1A receptors in different functional states (i.e., both the one which displays high affinity for agonists and is thought to mediate receptor activation, as well as the state which has low affinity for agonists). Comparing the PET imaging obtained using an agonist radiotracer, which binds selectively to functional receptors, with the PET imaging obtained using an antagonist radiotracer would therefore provide original information on 5-HT1A receptor impairment during AD. Quantitative autoradiography using [(18)F]F13640 and [(18)F]MPPF, a 5-HT1A agonist and antagonist, respectively, was measured in hippocampi of patients with AD (n = 25, at different Braak stages) and control subjects (n = 9). The neuronal density was measured in the same tissues by NeuN immunohistochemistry. The specific binding of both radiotracers was determined by addition of WAY-100635, a selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist. The autoradiography distribution of both 5-HT1A PET radiotracers varied across hippocampus regions. The highest binding density was in the pyramidal layer of CA1. Incubation with Gpp(NH)p, a non-hydrolysable analogue of GTP, reduced significantly [(18)F]F13640 binding in hippocampal regions, confirming its preferential interaction with G-coupled receptors, and slightly increased [(18)F]MPPF binding. In the CA1 subfield, [(18)F]F13640 binding was significantly decreased at Braak stages I/II (-19%), Braak stages III/IV (-23%), and Braak stages V/VI (-36%) versus control. In contrast, [(18)F]MPPF binding was statistically reduced only at the most advanced Braak stages V/VI compared to control (-33%). Since [(18)F]F13640 and [(18)F]MPPF can be used in vivo in humans, this

  10. Development of safety profile evaluating pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and toxicity of a combination of pioglitazone and olmesartan medoxomil in Wistar albino rats.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Pinaki; Nandi, Utpal; Pal, Tapan Kumar

    2012-02-01

    Pioglitazone (PIO), an antidiabetic drug and olmesartan medoxomil (OLM), an antihypertensive drug were administered orally alone and in combination to Wistar albino rats for evaluation of pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity of individual drugs and their combination. Pharmacokinetic study was performed by orally administering PIO and OLM at single dose of 3 and 2mg/kg, respectively alone and in combination analyzing the plasma samples using LC-MS/MS. Antidiabetic activity evaluation was done in type-2 diabetes mellitus induced animals at same dose level as in pharmacokinetic study daily for 30 days. PIO and/or OLM were administered orally to animals at daily doses of 50, 100 and 150 mg/kg for 28 days for toxicity study. There was no significant alteration in the pharmacokinetic parameters of either drug indicating absence of any pharmacokinetic interaction when co-administered. Positive pharmacodynamic interaction between PIO and OLM was established in this study. Two drugs in combination showed no evidence of potentiation of 28-day repeated dose toxicity in animals. Again, drugs, alone and in combination, caused only minor changes in clinical-laboratory tests and histopathological change was not found in the experiment performed. In conclusion, PIO and OLM combination can primarily be stated as safe in terms of present toxicity and pharmacokinetics findings.

  11. Random sparse sampling strategy using stochastic simulation and estimation for a population pharmacokinetic study

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiao-hui; Wang, Kun; Huang, Ji-han; Xu, Ling; Li, Lu-jin; Sheng, Yu-cheng; Zheng, Qing-shan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use the stochastic simulation and estimation method to evaluate the effects of sample size and the number of samples per individual on the model development and evaluation. The pharmacokinetic parameters and inter- and intra-individual variation were obtained from a population pharmacokinetic model of clinical trials of amlodipine. Stochastic simulation and estimation were performed to evaluate the efficiencies of different sparse sampling scenarios to estimate the compartment model. Simulated data were generated a 1000 times and three candidate models were used to fit the 1000 data sets. Fifty-five kinds of sparse sampling scenarios were investigated and compared. The results showed that, 60 samples with three points and 20 samples with five points are recommended, and the quantitative methodology of stochastic simulation and estimation is valuable for efficiently estimating the compartment model and can be used for other similar model development and evaluation approaches. PMID:24493975

  12. Pre-treatment with puerarin affects pharmacokinetics of warfarin, but not clopidogrel, in experimental rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, An-Chang; Zhao, Li-Xia; Yu, Shu-Wen; Lou, Hong-Xiang

    2015-04-01

    The present study was designed to determine the effects of puerarin pre-treatment on the pharmacokinetics of the oral anticoagulant agent warfarin and the antiplatelet agent clopidogrel in rats. In the treatment group, rats was gavaged with warfarin or clopidogrel after repeated treatment with puerarin at intraperitoneal doses of 20, 60, or 200 mg·kg(-1) for 7 days, while rats in the control group were administrated only with the same dose warfarin or clopidogrel. Plasma samples were obtained at the prescribed times and analyzed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The results showed that rats treated with puerarin at all the test doses of 20, 60 and 200 mg·kg(-1) were found to affect the pharmacokinetics of warfarin, but not clopidogrel, suggesting a potential herb-drug interaction between puerarin and warfarin. PMID:25908622

  13. The Impact of Team-Based Learning on a Foundational Pharmacokinetics Course

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To assess the impact of team-based learning (TBL) in a foundational pharmacokinetics course. Design. The course was arranged into 5 modules based on the TBL format. Each module contained preclass preparation; readiness-assurance process; and in-class, clinical cases. Survey instruments on professionalism and attitudes of team learning were administered pre- and post-course. Assessment. Examination grades focused at the evaluation/creation level were significantly higher in the TBL format compared with the previous year. Professionalism scores increased over the course of the semester, particularly in altruism and honesty. Other measures of team-learning attitudes significantly increased over time, although there was no change in major subscales. End-of-semester course evaluations showed improvements in active engagement and in various areas of skill development. Conclusion. The TBL format can be used successfully in a foundational pharmacokinetics course to increase higher levels of learning, team-learning skills, and professionalism in pharmacy students. PMID:22438603

  14. Cyclosporine pharmacokinetics in pancreas transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Munda, R; Schroeder, T J; Pedersen, S A; Clardy, C W; Wadhwa, N K; Myre, S A; Stephens, G W; Pesce, A J; Alexander, J W; First, M R

    1988-04-01

    Ten CsA pharmacokinetic studies were performed on five pancreas transplant recipients to determine proper doses and dosing intervals. These cadaver pancreas transplants were performed with exocrine ductal drainage into the urinary tract through a bladder anastomosis in four cases and into the bowel in one case. Four CsA pharmacokinetic studies were performed on diabetic renal transplant recipients and an additional six studies were performed while with pancreas transplant patients taking metoclopramide in an effort to enhance absorption of CsA. Mean CsA dose was 3.7 mg/kg/dose (range 2.1 to 7.5 mg/kg/dose). All patients but one were on twice daily dosing intervals yielding an average daily dose of 7.4 mg/kg/d. Noncompartmental pharmacokinetic analyses were used. The adequacy of a 1-, 2-, or 3-exponential model was determined by breakpoint analysis of the log concentration v time curve using the F statistic. The terminal rate constant was calculated by nonlinear regression analysis. The AUC and AUMC were calculated by the trapezoidal method with exponential extrapolation and these were used to calculate the MRT and Vdss. The unknown fractional absorption, F, was used to correct the oral data. The average CsA concentration maximum (Cmax) was 528 ng/mL with an average time to maximum concentration (Tmax) of 4.7 hours, a mean residence time of 7.75 hours, with a Vdss/%F of 9.61 L/kg in the pancreas transplant recipients. Additional studies of six patients receiving metoclopramide with CsA revealed an average Cmax of 723 ng/mL, an average Tmax of 2.3 hours, an average MRT of 6.08 hours, and an average Vdss/%F of 5.7% L/kg. These results indicate that coexistent gastroparesis in diabetic recipients of either pancreatic or renal transplants may result in reduced bioavailability of CsA. PMID:3284095

  15. Covariates of intravenous paracetamol pharmacokinetics in adults

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pharmacokinetic estimates for intravenous paracetamol in individual adult cohorts are different to a certain extent, and understanding the covariates of these differences may guide dose individualization. In order to assess covariate effects of intravenous paracetamol disposition in adults, pharmacokinetic data on discrete studies were pooled. Methods This pooled analysis was based on 7 studies, resulting in 2755 time-concentration observations in 189 adults (mean age 46 SD 23 years; weight 73 SD 13 kg) given intravenous paracetamol. The effects of size, age, pregnancy and other clinical settings (intensive care, high dependency, orthopaedic or abdominal surgery) on clearance and volume of distribution were explored using non-linear mixed effects models. Results Paracetamol disposition was best described using normal fat mass (NFM) with allometric scaling as a size descriptor. A three-compartment linear disposition model revealed that the population parameter estimates (between subject variability,%) were central volume (V1) 24.6 (55.5%) L/70 kg with peripheral volumes of distribution V2 23.1 (49.6%) L/70 kg and V3 30.6 (78.9%) L/70 kg. Clearance (CL) was 16.7 (24.6%) L/h/70 kg and inter-compartment clearances were Q2 67.3 (25.7%) L/h/70 kg and Q3 2.04 (71.3%) L/h/70 kg. Clearance and V2 decreased only slightly with age. Sex differences in clearance were minor and of no significance. Clearance, relative to median values, was increased during pregnancy (FPREG = 1.14) and decreased during abdominal surgery (FABDCL = 0.715). Patients undergoing orthopaedic surgery had a reduced V2 (FORTHOV = 0.649), while those in intensive care had increased V2 (FICV = 1.51). Conclusions Size and age are important covariates for paracetamol pharmacokinetics explaining approximately 40% of clearance and V2 variability. Dose individualization in adult subpopulations would achieve little benefit in the scenarios explored. PMID:25342929

  16. Enantioselective pharmacokinetics of doxazosin and pharmacokinetic interaction between the isomers in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Kong, Dezhi; Du, Qian; Zhao, Jing; Zhen, Yaqin; Li, Tonghui; Ren, Leiming

    2015-10-01

    In this study, the stereoselective pharmacokinetics of doxazosin enantiomers and their pharmacokinetic interaction were studied in rats. Enantiomer concentrations in plasma were measured using chiral high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescence detection after oral or intravenous administration of (-)-(R)-doxazosin 3.0 mg/kg, (+)-(S)-doxazosin 3.0 mg/kg, and rac-doxazosin 6.0 mg/kg. AUC values of (+)-(S)-doxazosin were always larger than those of (-)-(R)-doxazosin, regardless of oral or intravenous administration. The maximum plasma concentration (Cmax ) value of (-)-(R)-doxazosin after oral administration was significantly higher when given alone (110.5 ± 46.4 ng/mL) versus in racemate (53.2 ± 19.7 ng/mL), whereas the Cmax value of (+)-(S)-doxazosin did not change significantly. The area under the curve (AUC) and Cmax values for (+)-(S)-doxazosin after intravenous administration were significantly lower, and its Cl value significantly higher, when given alone versus in racemate. We speculate that (-)-(R)-doxazosin increases (+)-(S)-doxazosin exposure probably by inhibiting the elimination of (+)-(S)-doxazosin, and the enantiomers may be competitively absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract. In conclusion, doxazosin pharmacokinetics are substantially stereospecific and enantiomer-enantiomer interaction occurs after rac-administration.

  17. The influence of cardiovascular physiology on dose/pharmacokinetic and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationships.

    PubMed

    Fagiolino, Pietro; Eiraldi, Rosa; Vázquez, Marta

    2006-01-01

    Inter- and intraindividual variability in the relationship between dose and clinical--or pharmacodynamic--response of a drug can be analysed in two steps: firstly, by considering the plasma pharmacokinetic response to a given dose and, secondly, by the connection between both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic responses. As the cardiovascular system is the means of transport of endogenous and exogenous substances, blood flow fraction destined to each organ determines the relative mass of solute in plasma, which is constantly in contact with the tissue. Hence, not only the rate but also the extent of drug transfer would be increased when tissues are irrigated by a higher fraction of cardiac output. Aging and circadian rhythms present similar cardiac output distribution patterns when moving from young to aged adult and from nocturnal to diurnal hours. These two changes lead to an increased blood flow delivery to the extra-splanchnic-renal region in the elderly and in the morning, but with a decreased cardiac output in aged individuals and an increased one during the day. This scenario allows us to forecast substance concentrations outside the blood vessels, which are responsible for the extent of drug elimination and the intensity of drug effect. So available data on disposition and pharmacodynamics of drugs might be explained from another point of view that challenges current knowledge. Furthermore, the administration of cardiovascular active drugs might reverse the chronological sequence between pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic responses, since they could modify blood flow distribution.

  18. Pharmacokinetics and interactions of headache medications, part I: introduction, pharmacokinetics, metabolism and acute treatments.

    PubMed

    Sternieri, Emilio; Coccia, Ciro Pio Rosario; Pinetti, Diego; Ferrari, Anna

    2006-12-01

    Recent progress in the treatment of primary headaches has made available specific, effective and safe medications for these disorders, which are widely spread among the general population. One of the negative consequences of this undoubtedly positive progress is the risk of drug-drug interactions. This review is the first in a two-part series on pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions of headache medications. Part I addresses acute treatments. Part II focuses on prophylactic treatments. The overall aim of this series is to increase the awareness of physicians, either primary care providers or specialists, regarding this topic. Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions of major severity involving acute medications are a minority among those reported in literature. The main drug combinations to avoid are: i) NSAIDs plus drugs with a narrow therapeutic range (i.e., digoxin, methotrexate, etc.); ii) sumatriptan, rizatriptan or zolmitriptan plus monoamine oxidase inhibitors; iii) substrates and inhibitors of CYP2D6 (i.e., chlorpromazine, metoclopramide, etc.) and -3A4 (i.e., ergot derivatives, eletriptan, etc.), as well as other substrates or inhibitors of the same CYP isoenzymes. The risk of having clinically significant pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions seems to be limited in patients with low frequency headaches, but could be higher in chronic headache sufferers with medication overuse. PMID:17125411

  19. Influence of cerebral fluid drainage on the pharmacokinetics of vancomycin in neurosurgical patients.

    PubMed

    Ichie, T; Urano, K; Suzuki, D; Okada, T; Kobayashi, N; Hayashi, H; Sugiura, Y; Yamamura, K; Sugiyama, T

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to retrospectively investigate the influence of cerebral fluid drainage on the serum concentrations and pharmacokinetic parameters of vancomycin (VCM). We analyzed 55 patients with normal renal function who had been hospitalized in the neurosurgical ward and received intravenous infusions of VCM. We compared the daily doses of VCM, serum VCM concentrations, serum concentration/dose ratio (C/D ratio), and pharmacokinetic parameters calculated using the Sawchuk-Zaske method between patients who underwent cerebral fluid drainage (drainage group) and controls (non-drainage group). The patients in the drainage group showed a significantly lower trough concentration of VCM (5.8 ± 3.3 μg/mL) than that shown by the non-drainage group (9.9 ± 5.4 μg/mL, p = 0.017). Further, the patients in the drainage group showed a significantly lower trough C/D ratio (0.32 ± 0.17) than that shown by the non-drainage group (0.50 ± 0.31, p = 0.047). In conclusion, cerebral fluid drainage may influence VCM pharmacokinetics. Our findings strongly suggest that a high dose of VCM is required to maintain optimal serum concentrations of VCM in patients managed with cerebral fluid drainage.

  20. Re-introduction of a novel approach to the use of stable isotopes in pharmacokinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Parr, Alan; Gupta, Manish; Montague, Timothy H; Hoke, Frank

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to evaluate the scientific benefits of a novel approach in using stable isotopes to reduce the number of subjects needed to perform relative bioavailability and bioequivalence pharmacokinetic studies for formulations that are qualitatively and quantitatively the same and quality by design (QbD) pharmacokinetic studies. The stable isotope approach was investigated using simulations to determine the impact this approach would have on the estimation of variability and, subsequently, the sample size for a bioequivalence study. A biostudy was conducted in dogs in a two period crossover to explore the viability of the stable isotope approach. For a drug product with within-subject variability (CV(w)) of 50% and assuming a correlation of 0.95 between the enriched and non-enriched pharmacokinetics (PK), simulations showed that the variability can be reduced by 70% and the required sample size can be reduced by 90% while maintaining 90% power to demonstrate bioequivalence. The dog study showed a strong correlation (R(2), > 0.99) between the enriched and non-enriched area under the curve and maximum observed concentration, and a significant reduction in the variability (reduction in % coefficient of variation from 79.9% to 6.3%). Utilization of a stable isotope approach can markedly improve the efficiency and accuracy of bioavailability and bioequivalence studies particularly for highly variable drugs in formulations that are qualitatively and quantitatively the same and for studies designed for QbD investigations.

  1. [Study on the absorption of environmental contaminants in low-level exposure by pharmacokinetic analysis].

    PubMed

    Hao, S; Yin, S; Li, G; Cui, J

    2000-03-30

    A dynamic generating toxic gas system and a nose-only exposure system were used for the pharmacokinetic study of inhaled environmental contaminants for benzene, toluene, xylene, ethylbenzene, chlorobenzene, styrene, isopropyl benzene, tetrachloroethylene, nonane and methylcyclohexane in male guinea pig. The change of these substances in blood with time was determined simultaneously by solid phase micro-extraction(SPME) gas chromatography (GC). The results showed that the fraction of absorption of benzene at low (121 micrograms/m3) exposure was 4.8 times higher than that at high(12.1 mg/m3) exposure. The pharmacokinetics of these substances were evaluated by using linear compartment models. The data showed that more styrene was absorbed than tetrachloroethylene at low-exposure. The metabolic elimination of these compounds at various exposure concentrations was extrapolated by using estimated pharmacokinetic parameters. Moreover, not only should the differences in absorption quantities be considered in evaluation of potential risk assessment, the metabolic elimination rates should also be considered although the exposure concentrations in gas for all chemicals were equal. The data presented in this paper was fundamental data used for risk assessment.

  2. Intrasubject variation in children of ifosfamide pharmacokinetics and metabolism during repeated administration.

    PubMed

    Boddy, A V; Yule, S M; Wyllie, R; Price, L; Pearson, A D; Idle, J R

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate intrasubject variability in ifosfamide (IFO) pharmacokinetics and metabolism which may influence clinical effect, since the pharmacology of this drug is dependent on metabolism. A group of 11 patients (ages 1-16 years) were studied on at least two occasions. IFO, 9 gm-2 was administered as a continuous infusion over 72 h. Plasma and urine samples were collected and concentrations of IFO and its metabolites were determined. Comparisons were made between courses in the same subject, allowing for differences in age and prior IFO treatment. There was a wide variation in drug (twofold) and metabolite (up to tenfold) AUCs between courses in the same patient. Although some patients did show an increase in clearance between courses (up to threefold), there was no significant consistent change in overall pharmacokinetics among the different courses studied in the same patient. There was a significant decrease (up to 63%) in the AUC of the inactive metabolite 3-dechloroethylifosfamide (3-DCI) in later courses compared with the first course studied (P = 0.032, paired t-test). This was matched by an increase in the AUC of the total dechloroethylated metabolites with course (P = 0.015, paired t-test). None of the other metabolites measured showed any consistent change in plasma or urine levels between courses. Overall, the AUC of parent drug correlated with age (r2 = 0.86, P = 0.011), and postinfusion half-life correlated with plasma bilirubin (r2 = 0.89, P = 0.007). This study demonstrated large and seemingly unpredictable intrasubject variability in IFO pharmacokinetics and metabolism during repeated administrations. Investigations relating the clinical effects of IFO to pharmacokinetics and metabolism must take this variation into account.

  3. Pharmacokinetics of chlorogenic acid and corydaline in DA-9701, a new botanical gastroprokinetic agent, in rats.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ji Won; Kim, Ju Myung; Jeong, Jin Seok; Son, Miwon; Lee, Hye Suk; Lee, Myung Gull; Kang, Hee Eun

    2014-07-01

    1.Few studies describing the pharmacokinetic properties of chlorogenic acid (CA) and corydaline (CRD) which are marker compounds of a new prokinetic botanical agent, DA-9701, have been reported. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the pharmacokinetic properties CA and CRD following intravenous and oral administration of pure CA (1-8 mg/kg) or CRD (1.1-4.5 mg/kg) and their equivalent dose of DA-9701 to rats. 2.  Dose-proportional AUC and dose-independent clearance (10.3-12.1 ml/min/kg) of CA were observed following its administration. Oral administration of CA as DA-9701 did not influence the oral pharmacokinetic parameters of CA. Incomplete absorption of CA, its decomposition in the gastrointestinal tract, and/or pre-systemic metabolism resulted in extremely low oral bioavailability (F) of CA (0.478-0.899%). 3.  CRD showed greater dose-normalized AUC in the higher dose group than that in lower dose group(s) after its administration due to saturation of its metabolism via decreased non-renal clearance (by 51.3%) and first-pass extraction. As a result, the F of CRD following 4.5 mg/kg oral CRD (21.1%) was considerably greater than those of the lower dose groups (9.10 and 13.8%). However, oral administration of CRD as DA-9701 showed linear pharmacokinetics as a result of increased AUC and F in lower-dose groups (by 182% and 78.5%, respectively) compared to those of pure CRD. The greater oral AUC of CRD for DA-9701 than for pure CRD could be due to decreased hepatic and/or GI first-pass extraction of CRD by other components in DA-9701.

  4. Preliminary pharmacokinetics of a new pyridopyrimidine derivative.

    PubMed

    Pérez, M J; Roch, M J; Ochoa, M C

    1991-06-01

    This paper describes the preliminary pharmacokinetic studies of 4-anilino-2-methylthiopyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidine (MD-39-AM) following a single administration of the compound to male rats via different routes (intravenous and oral) in the dose range of 6-24 mg.kg-1. The plasma level versus time plots after intravenous and oral administration to male rats can well be described by an open two-compartment model. The product was rapidly absorbed and peak concentrations in plasma were reached before 1 h after a single oral administration whatever the dose studied. The absolute bioavailability calculated on the basis of AUC0-infinity after intravenous and oral administration was estimated to be about 90%. Plasma levels found at higher doses than 6 mg/kg suggest that the product kinetics is dose dependent.

  5. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacogenomics in gastric cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Masahiko; Eguchi, Hidetaka

    2009-05-20

    Despite extensive efforts, treatment of gastric cancer by chemotherapy, the globally accepted standard, is yet undetermined, and uncertainty remains regarding the optimal regimen. Recent introduction of active "new generation agents" offers hope for improving patient outcomes. Current chemotherapeutic trials provided several regimens that may become a possible standard treatment, including docetaxel/cisplatin/5-FU (TCF) and cisplatin/S-1 for advanced and metastatic cancer and S-1 monotherapy in the adjuvant setting. Along with the development of novel active regimens, individual optimization of cancer chemotherapy has been attempted in order to reduce toxicity and enhance tumor response. Unlike the rare and limited contribution of pharmacokinetic studies, pharmacogenomic studies are increasing the potential to realize the therapeutics against gastric cancer. Despite the limited data, pharmacogenomics in gastric cancer have provided a number of putative biomarkers for the prediction of tumor response to chemotherapies and of toxicity.

  6. Application of queueing theory to pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Brill, P H; Moon, R E

    1980-05-01

    This paper considers the steady-state plasma drug concentration in a one-compartment, open pharmacokinetic model with multiple doses and first-order kinetics using a classical deterministic technique as well as a queueing theoretical stochastic analysis. The stochastic analysis employs a new method for obtaining the steady-state probability distribution of the content of a dam with compound Poisson input and a general release rule. It is shown that if the deterministic steady-state average concentration exists, it is equal to the mean value of the steady-state concentration, the probability distribution of which is obtained using the stochastic model. Moreover, the steady-state probability distribution of the concentration and its mean always exist in the stochastic model. Ramifications of the stochastic method of analysis are discussed.

  7. Influence of liver cirrhosis on sertraline pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    DÉMOLIS, JEAN-LOUIS; ANGEBAUD, PASCAL; GRANGÉ, JEAN-DIDIER; COATES, PETER; FUNCK-BRENTANO, CHRISTIAN; JAILLON, PATRICE

    1996-01-01

    Sertraline is a serotonin reuptake inhibitor. The enhancement of serotoninergic transmission is associated with antidepressant activity. In order to determine the pharmacokinetics of sertraline in patients with chronic stable hepatic insufficiency, 10 patients were matched (age, weight, sex) with 10 healthy subjects in an open study. Each participant received a single capsule containing the equivalent of 100 mg sertraline base. Blood samples were taken during 264 h after administration for measurement of plasma concentrations of sertraline. The results confirm that the oral clearance of sertraline is reduced with a 1.7-fold increase in Cmax and a significant prolongation in elimination half-life in hepatically impaired patients PMID:8877033

  8. Sex Differences in Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Soldin, OP; Mattison, DR

    2013-01-01

    Males and females differ in their response to drug treatment. These differences can be critical in response to drug treatment. It is therefore essential to understand those differences to appropriately conduct risk assessment and to design safe and effective treatments. Even from that modest perspective, how and when we use drugs can result in unwanted and unexpected outcomes. We summarize the sex differences that impact pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics and include a general comparison of clinical pharmacology as it applies to men, pregnant and non-pregnant women. Since this is an area rapidly evolving, it is essential for the practitioner to review drug prescribing information and recent literature to understand fully the impact of sex differences in clinical therapeutics. PMID:19385708

  9. Pharmacokinetics of intrarectal omeprazole in alpacas.

    PubMed

    Marmulak, T; Stanley, S; Kass, P H; Wiebe, V; McKemie, D; Pusterla, N

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of omeprazole in three different vehicles when administered rectally to six alpacas. Alpacas were given single doses of omeprazole (4 mg/kg) in a double-blinded, randomized cross-over design with a 1 week washout period. Omeprazole formulations consisted of (1) Treatment A: omeprazole paste mixed in surgical lubricant (2) Treatment B: omeprazole capsule contents in 8.4% sodium bicarbonate and (3) Treatment C: omeprazole capsule contents in surgical lubricant and 8.4% sodium bicarbonate solution. Plasma samples were drawn at 0, 5, 10, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, 180, 300 and 480 min. Omeprazole plasma concentrations were determined by high-pressure liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Pharmacokinetic results demonstrated median peak plasma concentrations (C(max)) of 7.35 (3.2-15.2), 7.30 (1.7-10.9) and 8.65 (1.8-19.3) ng/mL and median area under the concentration curve (AUC((0-180))) of 747 (237-1681) min x ng/mL, 552.9 (39-1063) min x ng/mL, and 972 (107-1841) min x ng/mL for treatments A, B and C, respectively. The median half-lives were similar between groups: 38, 50, and 53 min. As a result of the low measured omeprazole plasma concentrations, it is assumed that rectal absorption of omeprazole is poor in alpacas and not an effective route of administration. PMID:20646199

  10. Pharmacokinetics and residues of enrofloxacin in chickens.

    PubMed

    Anadón, A; Martínez-Larrañaga, M R; Díaz, M J; Bringas, P; Martínez, M A; Fernàndez-Cruz, M L; Fernández, M C; Fernández, R

    1995-04-01

    The pharmacokinetic properties of enrofloxacin were determined in broiler chickens after single IV and orally administered doses of 10 mg/kg of body weight. After IV and oral administrations, the plasma concentration-time graph was characteristic of a two-compartment open model. The elimination half-life and the mean +/- SEM residence time of enrofloxacin for plasma were 10.29 +/- 0.45 and 9.65 +/- 0.48 hours, respectively, after IV administration and 14.23 +/- 0.46 and 15.30 +/- 0.53 hours, respectively, after oral administration. After single oral administration, enrofloxacin was absorbed slowly, with time to reach maximal plasma concentration of 1.64 +/- 0.04 hours. Maximal plasma concentration was 2.44 +/- 0.06 micrograms/ml. Oral bioavailability was found to be 64.0 +/- 0.2%. Statistically significant differences between the 2 routes of administration were found for the pharmacokinetic variables--half-lives of the distribution and elimination phase and apparent volume of distribution and volume of distribution at steady state. In chickens, enrofloxacin was extensively metabolized into ciprofloxacin. Residues of enrofloxacin and the major metabolite ciprofloxacin in fat, kidney, liver, lungs, muscles, and skin were measured in chickens that received an orally administered dose of 10 mg/kg once daily for 4 days. The results indicate that enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin residues were cleared slowly. Mean muscle, liver, and kidney concentrations of the metabolite ciprofloxacin ranging between 0.020 and 0.075 micrograms/g persisted on day 12 in chickens after dosing. However, at the time of slaughter (12 days), enrofloxacin residues were only detected in liver and mean +/- SEM concentration was 0.025 +/- 0.003 micrograms/g.

  11. Pharmacokinetics of Intranasal Scopolamine Gel Formulation (Inscop)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Jason L.; Du, Brian; Daniels, Vernie; Simmons, Rita; Buckey, Jay; Putcha, Lakshmi

    2009-01-01

    Space Motion Sickness (SMS) is commonly experienced by astronauts and often requires treatment with medications during early flight days of space missions. Orally administered scopolamine is commonly used by astronauts to prevent SMS. Bioavailability of oral (PO) SMS medications is often low and highly variable. Intranasal (IN) administration of medications achieves higher and more reliable bioavailability than from an equivalent PO dose. Methods: To test the safety and reliability of INSCOP, two clinical studies were performed, a dose escalation study and a comparison study administering INSCOP during normal ambulation and head down tilt bedrest. Efficacy was evaluated by testing INSCOP with two, different motion sickness inducing paradigms. Results: Preliminary results indicate that INSCOP demonstrates linear pharmacokinetics and a low side effect profile. In head down tilt bedrest, relative bioavailability of INSCOP was increased for females at both doses (0.2 and 0.4 mg) and for males at the higher dose (0.4 mg) but is reduced at the lower dose (0.2 mg) compared to normal ambulation. INSCOP displays gender specific differences during ABR. One of the treatment efficacy trials conducted at Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center demonstrated that INSCOP is efficacious at both doses (0.2 and 0.4 mg) in suppressing motion sickness symptoms as indicated by longer chair ride times with INSCOP administration than with placebo, and efficacy increases with dose. Similar results were seen using another motion sickness simulator, the motion simulator dome, at the Naval Aerospace Medical Research Laboratory, with significantly increased time in the dome in motion-susceptible subjects when using INSCOP compared to untreated controls. Conclusion: Higher bioavailability, linear pharmacokinetics, a low incidence of side effects, and a favorable efficacy profile make INSCOP a desirable formulation for prophylactic and rescue treatment of astronauts in space and military personnel on

  12. PREDICTIVE PHARMACOKINETICS OF TRAMADOL HYDROCHLORIDE FLOATING TABLETS.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianming; Zhang, Yanzhen; Guo, Zhiling; Tao, Qingwen; Wang, Yongjun; Zhou, Wei; Ma, Xiao; Li, Zhihong

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to propose the effectiveness of convolution approach to predict pharmacokinetics of tramadol hydrochloride floating tablets, prepared by using various ratios of carbopol, HPMC K100M, and Hibiscus rosa Sinensis as excipient. The in vitro dissolution test was conducted using paddle method in 900 mL of HCl buffer with pH 1.2 to simulate the gastric condition. The stirring speed of paddles was set at 70 rpm. Temperature of dissolution medium was adjusted at 37 ± 5 °C. At predetermined time points, 5 mL of dissolution samples were taken with a replacement of same volume using fresh medium. The obtained samples were analyzed at 271 nm using UV visible spectrophotometer. The values of predicted pharmacokinetic parameters like Cmax (maximum blood drug level), Tmax (time required to attain maximum blood drug level), and AUC (area under blood drug concentration curve) ranged between 80.8 ± 3.2-119.6 ± 4.7 ng/mL, 11.4 ± 0.2-12.2 ± 0.2 h, and 1430.5 ± 209.5-1970.6 ± 287.4 ng.h/mL, respectively. This certainly is a desired feature required at the formulation development step, where the formulator requires the development of a formulation using desired in vivo features on the basis of only accessible in vitro data. It can be concluded from the results that convolution method is a practical method for the prediction of drug concentration in blood and for quality control. PMID:27476294

  13. Reporting guidelines for population pharmacokinetic analyses.

    PubMed

    Dykstra, Kevin; Mehrotra, Nitin; Tornøe, Christoffer Wenzel; Kastrissios, Helen; Patel, Bela; Al-Huniti, Nidal; Jadhav, Pravin; Wang, Yaning; Byon, Wonkyung

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop a consolidated set of guiding principles for the reporting of population pharmacokinetic (PK) analyses based on input from a survey of practitioners as well as discussions between industry, consulting, and regulatory scientists. The survey found that identification of population covariate effects on drug exposure and support for dose selection (in which population PK frequently serves as preparatory analysis for exposure-response modeling) are the main areas of influence for population PK analysis. The proposed guidelines consider 2 main purposes of population PK reports: (1) to present key analysis findings and their impact on drug development decisions, and (2) as documentation of the analysis methods for the dual purpose of enabling review of the analysis and facilitating future use of the models. This work also identified 2 main audiences for the reports: (1) a technically competent group responsible for in-depth review of the data, methodology, and results; and (2) a scientifically literate but not technically adept group, whose main interest is in the implications of the analysis for the broader drug development program. We recommend a generalized question-based approach with 6 questions that need to be addressed throughout the report. We recommend 8 sections (Synopsis, Introduction, Data, Methods, Results, Discussion, Conclusions, Appendix) with suggestions for the target audience and level of detail for each section. A section providing general expectations regarding population PK reporting from a regulatory perspective is also included. We consider this an important step toward industrialization of the field of pharmacometrics such that a nontechnical audience also understands the role of pharmacometric analyses in decision making. Population PK reports were chosen as representative reports to derive these recommendations; however, the guiding principles presented here are applicable for all pharmacometric reports

  14. Clinical Pharmacokinetics of Alamifovir and Its Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Clark; Abu-Raddad, Eyas; Golor, Georg; Watanabe, Hikari; Sasaki, Akira; Yeo, Kwee Poo; Soon, Danny; Sinha, Vikram P.; Flanagan, Shawn D.; He, Minxia M.; Wise, Stephen D.

    2005-01-01

    Alamifovir, a purine nucleotide analogue prodrug, and its hydrolyzed derivatives have shown preclincal efficacy activity against wild-type and lamivudine-resistant hepatitis B virus. Two studies were conducted to examine the single- and multiple-dose alamifovir pharmacokinetics after oral administration in healthy males. In study 1, subjects were given single doses (0.2 to 80 mg), with a subset receiving 20 mg in a fed state. Study 2 subjects were dosed with 2.5 to 15 mg twice daily for 15 days. Plasma samples were collected over 72 h in study 1 and over 24 h on days 1 and 15 in study 2. Concentrations of alamifovir and its major metabolites were determined using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry methods. The data were analyzed using a noncompartmental technique. Although alamifovir was rapidly absorbed, there was limited systemic exposure due to its rapid hydrolysis and formation of at least three metabolites, suggesting that alamifovir acts as a prodrug. The major metabolites detected were 602074 and 602076, with 602075 detectable only in higher-dose groups. Maximum 602074 plasma concentration was achieved at approximately 0.5 h (Tmax) and declined with a 1- to 2-h terminal half-life (t1/2). Maximum concentrations of 602076 (Cmax) averaged 10% of the 602074 Cmax and reached Tmax in 2.5 h with a 4-h t1/2. Food appeared to decrease the extent of absorption of the compound. Multiple dosing resulted in minimal accumulation, and the concentrations following multiple doses could be predicted using the single-dose data. Alamifovir was well tolerated and the pharmacokinetics were characterized in these studies. PMID:15855501

  15. Clinical population pharmacokinetics and toxicodynamics of linezolid.

    PubMed

    Boak, Lauren M; Rayner, Craig R; Grayson, M Lindsay; Paterson, David L; Spelman, Denis; Khumra, Sharmila; Capitano, Blair; Forrest, Alan; Li, Jian; Nation, Roger L; Bulitta, Jurgen B

    2014-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia is a common side effect of linezolid, an oxazolidinone antibiotic often used to treat multidrug-resistant Gram-positive bacterial infections. Various risk factors have been suggested, including linezolid dose and duration of therapy, baseline platelet counts, and renal dysfunction; still, the mechanisms behind this potentially treatment-limiting toxicity are largely unknown. A clinical study was conducted to investigate the relationship between linezolid pharmacokinetics and toxicodynamics and inform strategies to prevent and manage linezolid-associated toxicity. Forty-one patients received 42 separate treatment courses of linezolid (600 mg every 12 h). A new mechanism-based, population pharmacokinetic/toxicodynamic model was developed to describe the time course of plasma linezolid concentrations and platelets. A linezolid concentration of 8.06 mg/liter (101% between-patient variability) inhibited the synthesis of platelet precursor cells by 50%. Simulations predicted treatment durations of 5 and 7 days to carry a substantially lower risk than 10- to 28-day therapy for platelet nadirs of <100 ×10(9)/liter. The risk for toxicity did not differ noticeably between 14 and 28 days of therapy and was significantly higher for patients with lower baseline platelet counts. Due to the increased risk of toxicity after longer durations of linezolid therapy and large between-patient variability, close monitoring of patients for development of toxicity is important. Dose individualization based on plasma linezolid concentration profiles and platelet counts should be considered to minimize linezolid-associated thrombocytopenia. Overall, oxazolidinone therapy over 5 to 7 days even at relatively high doses was predicted to be as safe as 10-day therapy of 600 mg linezolid every 12 h. PMID:24514086

  16. Clinical use of bone-targeting radiopharmaceuticals with focus on alpha-emitters

    PubMed Central

    Wieder, Hinrich A; Lassmann, Michael; Allen-Auerbach, Martin S; Czernin, Johannes; Herrmann, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Various single or multi-modality therapeutic options are available to treat pain of bone metastasis in patients with prostate cancer. Different radionuclides that emit β-rays such as 153Samarium and 89Strontium and achieve palliation are commercially available. In contrast to β-emitters, 223Radium as a α-emitter has a short path-length. The advantage of the α-emitter is thus a highly localized biological effect that is caused by radiation induced DNA double-strand breaks and subsequent cell killing and/or limited effectiveness of cellular repair mechanisms. Due to the limited range of the α-particles the bone surface to red bone marrow dose ratio is also lower for 223Radium which is expressed in a lower myelotoxicity. The α emitter 223Radium dichloride is the first radiopharmaceutical that significantly prolongs life in castrate resistant prostate cancer patients with wide-spread bone metastatic disease. In a phase III, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study 921 patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer and bone metastases were randomly assigned. The analysis confirmed the 223Radium survival benefit compared to the placebo (median, 14.9 mo vs 11.3 mo; P < 0.001). In addition, the treatment results in pain palliation and thus, improved quality of life and a delay of skeletal related events. At the same time the toxicity profile of 223Radium was favourable. Since May 2013, 223Radium dichloride (Xofigo®) is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. PMID:25071888

  17. Applications of a Pharmacokinetic Simulation Program in Pharmacy Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingram, D.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Presents a multicompartment model which illustrates aspects of drug absorption, distribution, and elimination in the human body for a course in pharmacokinetics. The course work consists of the interpretation of computer generated simulated data. (Author/CMV)

  18. Explicit Pharmacokinetic Modeling: Tools for Documentation, Verification, and Portability

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantitative estimates of tissue dosimetry of environmental chemicals due to multiple exposure pathways require the use of complex mathematical models, such as physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models. The process of translating the abstract mathematics of a PBPK mode...

  19. Analysis of radionuclide concentration in air released through the stack of a radiopharmaceutical production facility based on a medical cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giardina, M.; Tomarchio, E.; Greco, D.

    2015-11-01

    Positron emitting radionuclides are increasingly used in medical diagnostics and the number of radiopharmaceutical production facilities have been estimated to be growing worldwide. During the process of production and/or patient administration of radiopharmaceuticals, an amount of these radionuclides might become airborne and escape into the environment. Therefore, the analysis of radionuclide concentration in the air released to the stack is a very important issue to evaluate the dose to the population living around the plant. To this end, sampling and measurement of radionuclide concentration in air released through the stack of a Nuclear Medicine Center (NMC), provided with a cyclotron for radiopharmaceuticals production, must be routinely carried out with an automatic measurement system. In this work is presented the air monitoring system realized at "San Gaetano" NMC at Bagheria (Italy) besides the analysis of the recorded stack relesead air concentration data. Sampling of air was carried out continuously and gamma-ray spectrometric measurement are made on-line and for a short time by using a shielded Marinelli beaker filled with sampled air and a gamma detector. The use of this system allows to have 1440 values of air concentration per day from 2002, year of the start of operation with the cyclotron. Therefore, the concentration values are very many and an analysis software is needed to determine the dose to the population. A comparison with the results of a simulation code based on a Gaussian Plume air dispersion modelling allow us to confirm the no-radiological significance of the stack effluent releases in terms of dose to population and to evaluate possible improvements in the plant devices to reduce the air concentration at stack.

  20. Design of site specific radiopharmaceuticals for tumor imaging. (Parts I and II)

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dort, M.E.

    1983-01-01

    Part I. Synthetic methods were developed for the preparation of several iodinated benzoic acid hydrazides as labeling moieties for indirect tagging of carbonyl-containing bio-molecules and potential tumor-imaging agents. Biodistribution studies conducted in mice on the derivatives having the I-125 label ortho to a phenolic OH demonstrated a rapid in vivo deiodination. Part II. The reported high melanin binding affinity of quinoline and other heterocyclic antimalarial drugs led to the development of many analogues of such molecules as potential melanoma-imaging agents. Once such analogue iodochloroquine does exhibit high melanin binding, but has found limited clinical use due to appreciable accumulation in non-target tissues such as the adrenal cortex and inner ear. This project developed a new series of candidate melanoma imaging agents which would be easier to radio-label, could yield higher specific activity product, and which might demonstrate more favorable pharmacokinetic and dosimetric characteristics compared to iodochloroquine.

  1. Radiolabelled nanoparticles: novel classification of radiopharmaceuticals for molecular imaging of cancer.

    PubMed

    Mirshojaei, Seyedeh Fatemeh; Ahmadi, Amirhossein; Morales-Avila, Enrique; Ortiz-Reynoso, Mariana; Reyes-Perez, Horacio

    2016-01-01

    Nanotechnology has been used for every single modality in the molecular imaging arena for imaging purposes. Synergic advantages can be explored when multiple molecular imaging modalities are combined with respect to single imaging modalities. Multifunctional nanoparticles have large surface areas, where multiple functional moieties can be incorporated, including ligands for site-specific targeting and radionuclides, which can be detected to create 3D images. Recently, radiolabeled nanoparticles with individual properties have attracted great interest regarding their use in multimodality tumor imaging. Multifunctional nanoparticles can combine diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities for both target-specific diagnosis and the treatment of a given disease. The future of nanomedicine lies in multifunctional nanoplatforms that combine the diagnostic ability and therapeutic effects using appropriate ligands, drugs, responses and technological devices, which together are collectively called theranostic drugs. Co-delivery of radiolabeled nanoparticles is useful in multifunctional molecular imaging areas because it comprises several advantages based on nanoparticles architecture, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamic properties.

  2. Radiolabelled nanoparticles: novel classification of radiopharmaceuticals for molecular imaging of cancer.

    PubMed

    Mirshojaei, Seyedeh Fatemeh; Ahmadi, Amirhossein; Morales-Avila, Enrique; Ortiz-Reynoso, Mariana; Reyes-Perez, Horacio

    2016-01-01

    Nanotechnology has been used for every single modality in the molecular imaging arena for imaging purposes. Synergic advantages can be explored when multiple molecular imaging modalities are combined with respect to single imaging modalities. Multifunctional nanoparticles have large surface areas, where multiple functional moieties can be incorporated, including ligands for site-specific targeting and radionuclides, which can be detected to create 3D images. Recently, radiolabeled nanoparticles with individual properties have attracted great interest regarding their use in multimodality tumor imaging. Multifunctional nanoparticles can combine diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities for both target-specific diagnosis and the treatment of a given disease. The future of nanomedicine lies in multifunctional nanoplatforms that combine the diagnostic ability and therapeutic effects using appropriate ligands, drugs, responses and technological devices, which together are collectively called theranostic drugs. Co-delivery of radiolabeled nanoparticles is useful in multifunctional molecular imaging areas because it comprises several advantages based on nanoparticles architecture, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamic properties. PMID:26061297

  3. Bioappearance and pharmacokinetics of bioactives upon coffee consumption.

    PubMed

    Lang, Roman; Dieminger, Natalie; Beusch, Anja; Lee, Yu-Mi; Dunkel, Andreas; Suess, Barbara; Skurk, Thomas; Wahl, Anika; Hauner, Hans; Hofmann, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    Habitual consumption of medium amounts of coffee over the whole life-span is hypothesized to reduce the risk to develop diabetes type 2 (DM2) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). To identify putative bioactive coffee-derived metabolites, first, pooled urine from coffee drinkers and non-coffee drinkers were screened by UPLC-HDMS. After statistical data analysis, trigonelline, dimethylxanthines and monomethylxanthines, and ferulic acid conjugates were identified as the major metabolites found after coffee consumption. For quantitative analysis of these markers in body fluids, targeted methods based on stable-isotope dilution and UPLC-MS/MS were developed and applied to plasma samples from a coffee intervention study (n = 13 volunteers) who consumed a single cup of caffeinated coffee brew after a 10-day washout period. Chlorogenic acid-derived metabolites were found to be separated into two groups showing different pharmacokinetic properties. The first group comprised, e.g., ferulic acid and feruloyl sulfate and showed early appearance in the plasma (~1 h). The second group contained particularly chlorogenic acid metabolites formed by the intestinal microflora, appearing late and persisting in the plasma (>6 h). Trigonelline appeared early but persisted with calculated half-life times ~5 h. The plasma levels of caffeine metabolites significantly and progressively increased 2-4 h after coffee consumption and did not reach c max within the time frame of the study. The pharmacokinetic profiles suggest that particularly trigonelline, caffeine, its metabolites, as well as late appearing dihydroferulic acid, feruloylglycine and dihydroferulic acid sulfate formed from chlorogenic acid by the intestinal microflora accumulate in the plasma due to their long half-life times during habitual consumption of several cups of coffee distributed over the day. Since some of these metabolites have been reported to show antioxidant effects in vivo, antioxidant-response-element activating

  4. Bioappearance and pharmacokinetics of bioactives upon coffee consumption.

    PubMed

    Lang, Roman; Dieminger, Natalie; Beusch, Anja; Lee, Yu-Mi; Dunkel, Andreas; Suess, Barbara; Skurk, Thomas; Wahl, Anika; Hauner, Hans; Hofmann, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    Habitual consumption of medium amounts of coffee over the whole life-span is hypothesized to reduce the risk to develop diabetes type 2 (DM2) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). To identify putative bioactive coffee-derived metabolites, first, pooled urine from coffee drinkers and non-coffee drinkers were screened by UPLC-HDMS. After statistical data analysis, trigonelline, dimethylxanthines and monomethylxanthines, and ferulic acid conjugates were identified as the major metabolites found after coffee consumption. For quantitative analysis of these markers in body fluids, targeted methods based on stable-isotope dilution and UPLC-MS/MS were developed and applied to plasma samples from a coffee intervention study (n = 13 volunteers) who consumed a single cup of caffeinated coffee brew after a 10-day washout period. Chlorogenic acid-derived metabolites were found to be separated into two groups showing different pharmacokinetic properties. The first group comprised, e.g., ferulic acid and feruloyl sulfate and showed early appearance in the plasma (~1 h). The second group contained particularly chlorogenic acid metabolites formed by the intestinal microflora, appearing late and persisting in the plasma (>6 h). Trigonelline appeared early but persisted with calculated half-life times ~5 h. The plasma levels of caffeine metabolites significantly and progressively increased 2-4 h after coffee consumption and did not reach c max within the time frame of the study. The pharmacokinetic profiles suggest that particularly trigonelline, caffeine, its metabolites, as well as late appearing dihydroferulic acid, feruloylglycine and dihydroferulic acid sulfate formed from chlorogenic acid by the intestinal microflora accumulate in the plasma due to their long half-life times during habitual consumption of several cups of coffee distributed over the day. Since some of these metabolites have been reported to show antioxidant effects in vivo, antioxidant-response-element activating

  5. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of a novel Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitor, DMNG-3.

    PubMed

    Xin-Guo, Zhang; Kou, Fei; Guo-Di, Ma; Tang, Peng; Zhong-Duo, Yang

    2016-01-01

    DMNG-3(3β-Methyl-[2-(4-nitrophenoxy)ethyl]-amino]con-5-enine), is a new and the potentially most potent acetylcholinesterase inhibitor recently obtained from conessine by N-demethylation and nucleophilic substitution reaction. In the present study, a step-down passive avoidance test was used to investigate whether DMNG-3 could modulate impairment of learning and memory induced by scopolamine, and a high performance liquid chromatography(HPLC) method for the determination of DMNG-3 in biological samples was applied to study its pharmacokinetics and tissues distribution. Separation was achieved on C18 column using a mobile phase consisting methanol-water (70:30, v/v) at a flow rate of 1.0ml/min. The intra- and inter-day precisions were good and the RSD was all lower than 1.30%. The mean absolute recovery of DMNG-3 in plasma ranged from 88.55 to 96.45 %. Our results showed oral administration of DMNG-3(10,25,50 mg/kg/day) can significantly improve the latency and number of errors and had a positive effect of improvement of learning and memory in mice in passive avoidance tests. The elimination half-life (T1/2) was 14.07±1.29, 15.87±1.03h, and the total clearance (CL) values were 0.70±0.11, 0.78±0.13 L/h/kg, respectively. The pharmacokinetic studies showed that DMNG-3 has a slowly clearance and large distribution volume in experimental animals, and its disposition is linear over the range of doses tested. The liver, small intestine, stomach, and large intestine were the major distribution tissues of DMNG-3 in mice. It was found that DMNG-3 could be detected in brain, suggesting that DMNG-3 can cross the blood-brain barrier. The present study shows that DMNG-3 can be possible developed as a new drug for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease in the future. PMID:27373949

  6. Development of a Pediatric Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model for Sirolimus: Applying Principles of Growth and Maturation in Neonates and Infants.

    PubMed

    Emoto, C; Fukuda, T; Johnson, T N; Adams, D M; Vinks, A A

    2015-02-01

    This study describes the maturation of sirolimus clearance in a cohort of very young pediatric patients with vascular anomalies. The relationship between allometrically scaled in vivo clearance and age was described by the Emax model in patients aged 1 month to 2 years. Consistent with the observed increase, in vitro intrinsic clearance of sirolimus using pediatric liver microsomes showed a similar age-dependent increase. In children older than 2 years, allometrically scaled sirolimus clearance did not show further maturation. Simulated clearance estimates with a sirolimus physiologically based pharmacokinetic model that included CYP3A4/5/7 and CYP2C8 maturation profiles were in close agreement with observed in vivo clearance values. In addition, physiologically based pharmacokinetic model-simulated sirolimus pharmacokinetic profiles predicted the actual observations well. These results demonstrate the utility of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling approach for the prediction of the developmental trajectory of sirolimus metabolic activity and its effects on total body clearance in neonates and infants. PMID:26225230

  7. Application of a Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model to Study Theophylline Metabolism and Its Interactions With Ciprofloxacin and Caffeine.

    PubMed

    Navid, A; Ng, D M; Wong, S E; Lightstone, F C

    2016-02-01

    Theophylline is a commonly used bronchodilator. However, due to its narrow therapeutic range, moderate elevation of serum concentration can result in adverse drug reactions (ADRs). ADRs occur because of interhuman pharmacokinetic variability and interactions with coprescribed medicines. We developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of theophylline, caffeine, and ciprofloxacin metabolisms to: examine theophylline pharmacokinetic variability, and predict population-level outcomes of drug-drug interactions (DDIs). A simulation-based equation for personalized dosing of theophylline was derived. Simulations of DDI show that calculated personalized doses are safe even after cotreatment with large doses of strong inhibitors. Simulations of adult populations indicate that the elderly are most susceptible to ADRs stemming from theophylline-ciprofloxacin and theophylline-caffeine interactions. Females, especially Asians, due to their smaller average size, are more susceptible to DDI-induced ADRs following typical dosing practices. Our simulations also show that the higher adipose and lower muscle fractions in females significantly alter the pharmacokinetics of theophylline or ciprofloxacin.

  8. Preclinical assessment of dopaminergic system in rats by MicroPET using three positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Lara-Camacho, V. M. Ávila-García, M. C. Ávila-Rodríguez, M. A.

    2014-11-07

    Different diseases associated with dysfunction of dopaminergic system such as Parkinson, Alzheimer, and Schizophrenia are being widely studied with positron emission tomography (PET) which is a noninvasive method useful to assess the stage of these illnesses. In our facility we have recently implemented the production of [{sup 11}C]-DTBZ, [{sup 11}C]-RAC, and [{sup 18}F]-FDOPA, which are among the most common PET radiopharmaceuticals used in neurology applications to get information about the dopamine pathways. In this study two healthy rats were imaged with each of those radiotracers in order to confirm selective striatum uptake as a proof of principle before to release them for human use.

  9. Preclinical assessment of dopaminergic system in rats by MicroPET using three positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara-Camacho, V. M.; Ávila-García, M. C.; Ávila-Rodríguez, M. A.

    2014-11-01

    Different diseases associated with dysfunction of dopaminergic system such as Parkinson, Alzheimer, and Schizophrenia are being widely studied with positron emission tomography (PET) which is a noninvasive method useful to assess the stage of these illnesses. In our facility we have recently implemented the production of [11C ]-DTBZ, [11C ]-RAC, and [18F ]-FDOPA, which are among the most common PET radiopharmaceuticals used in neurology applications to get information about the dopamine pathways. In this study two healthy rats were imaged with each of those radiotracers in order to confirm selective striatum uptake as a proof of principle before to release them for human use.

  10. MIRD Pamphlet No. 26: Joint EANM/MIRD Guidelines for Quantitative 177Lu SPECT Applied for Dosimetry of Radiopharmaceutical Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ljungberg, Michael; Celler, Anna; Konijnenberg, Mark W; Eckerman, Keith F; Dewaraja, Yuni K; Sjögreen-Gleisner, Katarina; Bolch, Wesley E; Brill, A Bertrand; Fahey, Frederic; Fisher, Darrell R; Hobbs, Robert; Howell, Roger W; Meredith, Ruby F; Sgouros, George; Zanzonico, Pat; Bacher, Klaus; Chiesa, Carlo; Flux, Glenn; Lassmann, Michael; Strigari, Lidia; Walrand, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    The accuracy of absorbed dose calculations in personalized internal radionuclide therapy is directly related to the accuracy of the activity (or activity concentration) estimates obtained at each of the imaging time points. MIRD Pamphlet no. 23 presented a general overview of methods that are required for quantitative SPECT imaging. The present document is next in a series of isotope-specific guidelines and recommendations that follow the general information that was provided in MIRD 23. This paper focuses on (177)Lu (lutetium) and its application in radiopharmaceutical therapy. PMID:26471692

  11. MIRD Pamphlet No. 26: Joint EANM/MIRD Guidelines for Quantitative 177Lu SPECT Applied for Dosimetry of Radiopharmaceutical Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ljungberg, Michael; Celler, Anna; Konijnenberg, Mark W; Eckerman, Keith F; Dewaraja, Yuni K; Sjögreen-Gleisner, Katarina; Bolch, Wesley E; Brill, A Bertrand; Fahey, Frederic; Fisher, Darrell R; Hobbs, Robert; Howell, Roger W; Meredith, Ruby F; Sgouros, George; Zanzonico, Pat; Bacher, Klaus; Chiesa, Carlo; Flux, Glenn; Lassmann, Michael; Strigari, Lidia; Walrand, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    The accuracy of absorbed dose calculations in personalized internal radionuclide therapy is directly related to the accuracy of the activity (or activity concentration) estimates obtained at each of the imaging time points. MIRD Pamphlet no. 23 presented a general overview of methods that are required for quantitative SPECT imaging. The present document is next in a series of isotope-specific guidelines and recommendations that follow the general information that was provided in MIRD 23. This paper focuses on (177)Lu (lutetium) and its application in radiopharmaceutical therapy.

  12. Dose Assessment of Cefquinome by Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Modeling in Mouse Model of Staphylococcus aureus Mastitis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yang; Zhou, Yu-Feng; Li, Xiao; Chen, Mei-Ren; Qiao, Gui-Lin; Sun, Jian; Liao, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Ya-Hong

    2016-01-01

    This work aimed to characterize the mammary gland pharmacokinetics of cefquinome after an intramammary administration and integrate pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model. The pharmacokinetic profiles of cefquinome in gland tissue were measured using high performance liquid chromatograph. Therapeutic regimens covered various dosages ranging from 25 to 800 μg/gland and multiple dosing intervals of 8, 12, and 24 h. The in vivo bacterial killing activity elevated when dosage increased or when dosing intervals were shortened. The best antibacterial effect was demonstrated by a mean 1.5 log10CFU/gland visible count reduction. On the other hand, the results showed that the percentage of time duration of drug concentration exceeding the MIC during a dose interval (%T > MIC) was generally 100% because of the influence of drug distribution caused by the blood-milk barrier. Therefore, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic parameter of the ratio of area under the concentration-time curve over 24 h to the MIC (AUC0-24/MIC) was used to describe the efficacy of cefquinome instead of %T > MIC. When the magnitude of AUC0-24/MIC exceeding 16571.55 h⋅mL/g, considerable activity of about 1.5 log10CFU/g gland bacterial count reduction was observed in vivo. Based on the Monte Carlo simulation, the clinical recommended regimen of three infusions of 75 mg per quarter every 12 h can achieve a 76.67% cure rate in clinical treatment of bovine mastitis caused by Staphylococcus aureus infection. PMID:27774090

  13. Pharmacokinetics of a new 10% intravenous immunoglobulin in patients receiving replacement therapy for primary immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, Richard L; Church, Joseph A; Peter, Hans H; Sleasman, John W; Melamed, Isaac; Stein, Mark R; Bichler, Johann

    2009-06-28

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) is used in treating immunodeficiencies and autoimmune or inflammatory disorders. As manufacturing processes and storage can alter IgG molecules, pharmacokinetic assessments are important for new preparations. Thus, we studied pharmacokinetics of IgPro10, a new 10% liquid IVIg product stabilised with l-proline, in patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) and X-linked agammaglobulinaemia (XLA). Patients received IgPro10 for >or=4 months (median dose of 444mg/kg, at 3- or 4-week intervals). Median total IgG serum concentrations increased from 10.2g/l pre-infusion to 23.2g/l at infusion end. Serum IgG concentrations decreased in a biphasic manner; median terminal half-life was 36.6 days. Median half-lives were 33.2 for IgG(1), 36.3 for IgG(2), 25.9 for IgG(3) and 36.4 days for IgG(4). Specific antibody concentrations (anti-CMV, anti-Hemophilus influenzae type B, anti-tetanus toxoid and anti-Streptococcus pneumoniae) decreased with median half-lives of 22.3-30.5 days. IgPro10 pharmacokinetics were similar in patients with CVID and XLA, although patients with CVID showed higher levels of anti-tetanus and anti-S. pneumoniae antibodies than patients with XLA, suggesting residual specific antibody production. IgPro10 pharmacokinetics fulfilled expectations for and were similar to intact IgG products. Administration of IgPro10 at 3- or 4-week intervals achieved sufficient plasma concentrations of total IgG, IgG subclasses and antibodies specific to important pathogens.

  14. Fentanyl Pharmacokinetics in Pregnant Sheep after Intravenous and Transdermal Administration to the Ewe.

    PubMed

    Heikkinen, Emma M; Voipio, Hanna-Marja; Laaksonen, Sakari; Haapala, Linnea; Räsänen, Juha; Acharya, Ganesh; Erkinaro, Tiina; Haapsamo, Mervi; Hautajärvi, Heidi; Kokki, Hannu; Kokki, Merja; Heikkinen, Aki T

    2015-09-01

    Fentanyl is used for pain treatment during pregnancy in human beings and animals. However, fentanyl pharmacokinetics during pregnancy has not been fully established. The aim of this study was to characterize fentanyl pharmacokinetics in pregnant sheep after intravenous and transdermal dosing during surgical procedure performed to ewe and foetus. Pharmacokinetic parameters reported for non-pregnant sheep and nominal transdermal dose rate were utilized for a priori calculation to achieve analgesic fentanyl concentration (0.5-2 ng/ml) in maternal plasma. A total of 20 Aland landrace ewes at 118-127 gestational days were used. In the first protocol, 1 week before surgery, 10 animals received 2 μg/kg fentanyl intravenous bolus, and on the operation day, transdermal fentanyl patches at nominal dose rate of 2 μg/kg/hr were applied to antebrachium, and ewes were then given a 2 μg/kg intravenous bolus followed by an intra-operative 2.5 μg/kg/hr infusion. In the second protocol, 10 animals received fentanyl only as transdermal patches on the operation day and oxycodone for rescue analgesia. The data were analysed with population pharmacokinetic modelling. Intra- and post-operative fentanyl concentrations were similar and slightly lower than the a priori predictions, and elimination and distribution clearances appeared slower during than before or after the surgery. Transdermal patches provided sustained fentanyl absorption for up to 5 days, but the absorption rate was slower than the nominal dose rate and showed a high interindividual variability. Further research is warranted to evaluate the clinical relevance of the observations made in sheep.

  15. Pharmacokinetic profile that reduces nephrotoxicity of gentamicin in a perfused kidney-on-a-chip.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sejoong; LesherPerez, Sasha Cai; Kim, Byoung Choul C; Yamanishi, Cameron; Labuz, Joseph M; Leung, Brendan; Takayama, Shuichi

    2016-03-01

    Nephrotoxicity is often underestimated because renal clearance in animals is higher compared to in humans. This paper aims to illustrate the potential to fill in such pharmacokinetic gaps between animals and humans using a microfluidic kidney model. As an initial demonstration, we compare nephrotoxicity of a drug, administered at the same total dosage, but using different pharmacokinetic regimens. Kidney epithelial cell, cultured under physiological shear stress conditions, are exposed to gentamicin using regimens that mimic the pharmacokinetics of bolus injection or continuous infusion in humans. The perfusion culture utilized is important both for controlling drug exposure and for providing cells with physiological shear stress (1.0 dyn cm(-2)). Compared to static cultures, perfusion culture improves epithelial barrier function. We tested two drug treatment regimens that give the same gentamycin dose over a 24 h period. In one regimen, we mimicked drug clearance profiles for human bolus injection by starting cell exposure at 19.2 mM of gentamicin and reducing the dosage level by half every 2 h over a 24 h period. In the other regimen, we continuously infused gentamicin (3 mM for 24 h). Although junctional protein immunoreactivity was decreased with both regimens, ZO-1 and occludin fluorescence decreased less with the bolus injection mimicking regimen. The bolus injection mimicking regimen also led to less cytotoxicity and allowed the epithelium to maintain low permeability, while continuous infusion led to an increase in cytotoxicity and permeability. These data show that gentamicin disrupts cell-cell junctions, increases membrane permeability, and decreases cell viability particularly with prolonged low-level exposure. Importantly a bolus injection mimicking regimen alleviates much of the nephrotoxicity compared to the continuous infused regimen. In addition to potential relevance to clinical gentamicin administration regimens, the results are important in

  16. Novel endogenous glycan therapy for retinal diseases: safety, in vitro stability, ocular pharmacokinetic modeling, and biodistribution.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Shankar; Li, Huiling; Palamoor, Mallika; de Obarrio, Walter T Luchsinger; Madhura, Dorababu; Meibohm, Bernd; Jablonski, Monica M

    2014-03-01

    Asialo, tri-antennary oligosaccharide (NA3 glycan) is an endogenous compound, which supports proper folding of outer segment membranes, promotes normal ultrastructure, and maintains protein expression patterns of photoreceptors and Müller cells in the absence of retinal pigment epithelium support. It is a potential new therapeutic for atrophic age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and other retinal degenerative disorders. Herein, we evaluate the safety, in vitro stability, ocular pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of NA3. NA3 was injected into the vitreous of New Zealand white rabbits at two concentrations viz. 1 nM (minimum effective concentration (MEC)) and 100 nM (100XMEC) at three time points. Safety was evaluated using routine clinical and laboratory tests. Ocular pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of [(3)H]NA3 were estimated using scintillation counting in various parts of the eye, multiple peripheral organs, and plasma. Pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated by non-compartmental modeling. A 2-aminobenzamide labeling and hydrophilic interaction liquid interaction chromatography were used to assess plasma and vitreous stability. NA3 was well tolerated by the eye. The concentration of NA3 in eye tissues was in the order: vitreous > retina > sclera/choroid > aqueous humor > cornea > lens. Area under the curve (0 to infinity) (AUC∞) was the highest in the vitreous thereby providing a positive concentration gradient for NA3 to reach the retina. Half-lives in critical eye tissues ranged between 40 and 60 h. NA3 concentrations were negligible in peripheral organs. Radioactivity from [(3)H]NA3 was excreted via urine and feces. NA3 was stable at 37°C in vitreous over a minimum of 6 days, while it degraded rapidly in plasma. Collectively, these results document that NA3 shows a good safety profile and favorable ocular pharmacokinetics.

  17. Vatalanib population pharmacokinetics in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome: CALGB 10105 (Alliance)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Owzar, Kouros; Gupta, Pankaj; Larson, Richard A; Mulkey, Flora; Miller, Antonius A; Lewis, Lionel D; Hurd, David; Vij, Ravi; Ratain, Mark J; Murry, Daryl J

    2014-01-01

    Aims Vatalanib is an oral anti-angiogenesis agent that inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases, which in patients showed auto induction of metabolism and variability in pharmacokinetic (PK) disposition. The objective was to characterize the population PK and time-dependent change in vatalanib clearance and assess exposure–toxicity relationship in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Methods This was an open-label phase II study of vatalanib in MDS patients receiving 750–1250 mg once daily in 28-day cycles. Serial blood samples were obtained and plasma vatalanib concentrations measured by HPLC. Population PK analysis was performed using nonmem 7.2 with FO estimation since FOCE failed. The final model was evaluated using goodness-of-fit plots, bootstrap analysis, and visual predictive check. Results Pharmacokinetic data were complete for 137 patients (86 M, 51 F), of median age 70 years (range 20–91). A one-compartment model with lagged first-order absorption and time-dependent change in oral clearance was fitted to the vatalanib plasma concentration versus time data. The population means for pre-induction and post-induction oral clearance were 24.1 l h–1 (range: 9.6–45.5) and 54.9 l h–1 (range: 39.8–75.6), respectively. The apparent oral clearance increased 2.3-fold, (range: 1.7–4.1-fold) from first dose to steady state. Our data did not identify a significant relationship of the predefined covariates with vatalanib pharmacokinetics, although power to detect such a relationship was limited. Conclusions Vatalanib pharmacokinetics were highly variable and the extent of auto induction was not determined to correlate with any of the pre-defined covariates. PMID:24838014

  18. Comparative Pharmacokinetic Properties and Antitumor Activity of the Marine HDACi Largazole and Largazole Peptide Isostere

    PubMed Central

    Pilon, John L.; Clausen, Dane J.; Hansen, Ryan J.; Lunghofer, Paul J.; Charles, Brad; Rose, Barbara J.; Thamm, Douglas H.; Gustafson, Daniel L.; Bradner, James E.; Williams, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Largazole is a potent class I selective HDACi natural product isolated from the marine cyanobacteria Symploca sp. The purpose of this study was to test synthetic analogs of Largazole to identify potential scaffold structural modifications that would improve the drug-like properties of this clinically relevant natural product. Methods The impact of Largazole scaffold replacements on in vitro growth inhibition, cell cycle arrest, induction of apoptosis, pharmacokinetic properties, and in vivo activity using a xenograft model were investigated. Results In vitro studies in colon, lung, and pancreatic cancer cell lines showed that pyridyl substituted Largazole analogs had low nanomolar/high-picomolar activity on cell proliferation, and induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at concentrations equivalent to or lower than the parent compound Largazole. Using IV bolus delivery at 5mg/kg, two compartmental pharmacokinetic modeling on the peptide isostere analog of Largazole indicated improved pharmacokinetics including AUC, CL, and Vss. In the A549 non-small cell lung carcinoma xenograft model using a dosage of 5 mg/kg administered intraperitoneally every other day, Largazole, Largazole thiol, and Largazole peptide isostere demonstrated tumor growth inhibition (TGI%) of 32, 44, and 66 percent respectively. Moreover, the decreased tumor growth rate for Largazole peptide isostere was statistically significant compared to control (p=0.002) and superior to Largazole (p=0.006). Surprisingly tumor growth inhibition in this system and treatment regimen was not observed with the potent pyridyl-based analogs. Conclusions Our results establish that replacing the depsipepitde linkage in Largazole with an amide may impart pharmacokinetic advantage and that alternative prodrug forms of largazole are feasible. PMID:25616967

  19. Population Pharmacokinetics and Dosing Optimization of Vancomycin in Children with Malignant Hematological Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Daolun; Fakhoury, May; Fahd, Mony; Duquesne, Frédérique; Storme, Thomas; Baruchel, André

    2014-01-01

    An increase in vancomycin dose has been proposed in adults with malignant hematological disease. As pediatric data are limited, our aim was to evaluate the population pharmacokinetics of vancomycin in order to define the appropriate dosing regimen in children with malignant hematological disease. Vancomycin concentrations were collected prospectively during therapeutic monitoring. Population pharmacokinetic analysis was performed using NONMEM software. Seventy children (age range, 0.3 to 17.7 years) were included. With the current recommended dosing regimen of 40 to 60 mg/kg/day, 53 children (76%) had subtherapeutic steady-state trough concentrations (Css/min of <10 mg/liter). A one-compartment model with first-order elimination was developed. Systematic covariate analysis identified that weight significantly influenced clearance (CL) and volume of distribution (V) with power functions of 0.677 for CL and 0.838 for V. Vancomycin CL also significantly increased with increases in creatinine clearance and seemed to be higher in children with malignant hematological disease than in the general pediatric population. The model was validated internally. Its predictive performance was further confirmed in an external validation by Bayesian estimation. A patient-tailored dosing regimen was developed based on the final pharmacokinetic model and showed that a higher proportion of patients reached the target Css/min than with the traditional mg/kg-basis dose (60% versus 49%) and that the risks associated with underdosing or overdosing were reduced. This is the first population pharmacokinetic study of vancomycin in children with malignant hematological disease. An optimized dosing regimen, taking into account patient weight, creatinine clearance, and susceptibility of the pathogens involved, could routinely be used to individualize vancomycin therapy in this vulnerable population. PMID:24663023

  20. Liver fibrosis impairs hepatic pharmacokinetics of liver transplant drugs in the rat model.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yu-Hong; Liu, Xin; Khlentzos, Alexander M; Asadian, Peyman; Li, Peng; Thorling, Camilla A; Robertson, Thomas A; Fletcher, Linda M; Crawford, Darrell H G; Roberts, Michael S

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to investigate hepatic pharmacokinetics of the four most common drugs (metoprolol, omeprazole, spironolactone, and furosemide) given to patients undergoing liver transplantation before surgery. The investigation was carried out in CCl(4)-induced fibrotic perfused rat livers and the results were compared to those in normal rat liver. Drug outflow fraction-time profiles were obtained after bolus injection into a single-pass-perfused normal or fibrotic rat liver. The pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated using previously developed barrier-limited and space-distributed models. The results showed a marked increase in the liver fibrosis index for CCl(4)-treated rats compared to controls (p<0.05). The extraction ratios (E) for all drugs were significantly lower (p<0.05) in fibrotic than in normal livers and the decrease in E was consistent with the decrease in intrinsic clearance and permeability-surface area product. In addition, other than for furosemide, the mean transit times for all drugs were significantly longer (p<0.01) in the fibrotic livers than in normal livers. Pharmacokinetic model and stepwise regression analyses suggest that these differences arise from a reduction in both the transport of drugs across the basolateral membrane and their metabolic clearance and were in a manner similar to those previously found for another group of drugs.

  1. [Pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of domestic fixed-dose combination of antituberculosis drugs].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weijie; Li, Huiwen; Duan, Lianshan; Liang, Guifang; Zhang, Tongqun; Lu, Yu

    2002-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To study the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of domestic fixed-dose of antituberculosis drugs and to evaluate its quality and activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis both in vitro and in vivo. METHODS The MIC was determined by the tube doubling dilution method, and the effect of the drugs was assessed by half survival time of the mice. A single oral dose of domestic and imported fixed-dose combination of antituberculosis drugs was given to healthy volunteers, and the drug concentration in serum was determined by HPLC. The pharmacokinetic parameters and the relative bioavailability were calculated. RESULTS The MIC of each composition in the compound (INH, RFP, PZA) against Mycobacterium tuberculosis was lower than that of each composition used by single-dose. In a murine tuberculosis model, the antituberculosis activity of this compound drug was superior to that of each agent used alone with the same dose. No significant difference was found as compared to the imported drug, Refater; The major pharmacokinetic parameters of the domestic and the imported drugs, t (1/2), C (max), AUC, and t(max), were not significantly different. Statistical analysis showed the two formulations were bioequivalent. CONCLUSION The three compositions in the combination had synergistic effect, and the domestic and the imported drugs were bioequivalent.

  2. Pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution and safety of cinnarizine delivered in lipid emulsion.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shuai; Chen, Hao; Lin, Xia; Tang, Xing

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the potential of cinnarizine loaded in lipid emulsion to modify the pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution and safety of cinnarizine. The cinnarizine-loaded emulsion (CLE) which can remain stable over 18-month storage at 4+/-2 degrees C was prepared by high-pressure homogenization. Nicomp 380 particle sizing system and HPLC were used to evaluate CLE in vitro, while UPLC/MS/MS for pharmacokinetic and tissue distribution study. The pharmacokinetics and tissue distributions of CLE were assessed by comparing with the solution form after intravenous administration to rats at a dose of 2mg/kg. The CLE showed significant higher AUC and lower clearance and distribution volume than those of solution form. This helped cinnarizine to reach higher level in vessel, and circulate in the blood stream for a longer time resulting in better therapeutic effect. The tissue distribution exhibited significant lower uptake of CLE emulsion in lung and brain, indicating the advantage of CLE over the solution form in reducing drug precipitation in vivo and toxicity in CNS. Drug safety assessment studies including hemolysis test, intravenous stimulation and injection anaphylaxis revealed that the CLE was safe for intravenous injection. PMID:19770029

  3. Pharmacokinetics of 2 Formulations of Transdermal Fentanyl in Cynomolgus Macaques (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Carlson, Amy M; Kelly Iii, Richard; Fetterer, David P; Rico, Pedro J; Bailey, Emily J

    2016-01-01

    Fentanyl is a μ-opioid agonist that often is used as the analgesic component for balanced anesthesia in both human and veterinary patients. Minimal information has been published regarding appropriate dosing, and the pharmacokinetics of fentanyl are unknown in NHP. The pharmacokinetic properties of 2 transdermal fentanyl delivery methods, a solution (2.6 and 1.95 mg/kg) and a patch (25 μg/h), were determined when applied topically to the dorsal scapular area of cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis). Serum fentanyl concentrations were analyzed by using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Compared with the patch, the transdermal fentanyl solution generated higher drug concentrations over longer time. Adverse reactions occurred in the macaques that received the transdermal fentanyl solution at 2.6 mg/kg. Both preparations showed significant interanimal variability in the maximal serum drug levels, time to achieve maximal fentanyl levels, elimination half-life, and AUC values. Both the maximal concentration and the time at which this concentration occurred were increased in macaques compared with most other species after application of the transdermal fentanyl patch and compared with dogs after application of the transdermal fentanyl solution. The pharmacokinetic properties of transdermal fentanyl in macaques are markedly different from those in other veterinary species and preclude its use as a long-acting analgesic drug in NHP. PMID:27423151

  4. Ginkgo biloba extracts: a review of the pharmacokinetics of the active ingredients.

    PubMed

    Ude, Christian; Schubert-Zsilavecz, Manfred; Wurglics, Mario

    2013-09-01

    Ginkgo biloba is among the most favourite and best explored herbal drugs. Standardized extracts of Ginkgo biloba represent the only herbal alternative to synthetic antidementia drugs in the therapy of cognitive decline and Alzheimer's diseases. The clinical efficiency of such standardized Ginkgo biloba extracts (GBE) is still controversial, but authors of numerous international clinical studies recommended the use of GBE in the described therapies.Extracts of Ginkgo biloba are a mixture of substances with a wide variety of physical and chemical properties and activities. Numerous pharmacological investigations lead to the conclusion that the terpene trilactones (TTL) and the flavonoids of GBE are responsible for the main pharmacological effects of the extract in the therapy of cognitive decline. Therefore, the quality of GBE products must be oriented on a defined quantity of TTL and flavonoids. Furthermore, because of their toxic potential the amount of ginkgolic acid should be less than 5 ppm.However, data on pharmacokinetics and bioavailability, especially related to the central nervous system (CNS), which is the target tissue, are relatively rare. A few investigations characterize the TTL and flavonoids of Ginkgo biloba pharmacokinetically in plasma and in the brain. Recent investigations show that significant levels of TTL and Ginkgo biloba flavonoids cross the blood-brain barrier and enter the CNS of rats after oral application of GBE. Knowledge about the pharmacokinetic behaviour of these substances is necessary to discuss the pharmacological results on a more realistic basis.

  5. Pharmacokinetic strategies to improve drug penetration and entrapment within solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Al-Abd, Ahmed M; Aljehani, Zekra K; Gazzaz, Rana W; Fakhri, Sarah H; Jabbad, Aisha H; Alahdal, Abdulrahman M; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2015-12-10

    Despite the discovery of a large number of anticancer agents, cancer still remains among the leading causes of death since the middle of the twentieth century. Solid tumors possess a high degree of genetic instability and emergence of treatment resistance. Tumor resistance has emerged for almost all approved anticancer drugs and will most probably emerge for newly discovered anticancer agents as well. The use of pharmacokinetic approaches to increase anticancer drug concentrations within the solid tumor compartment and prolong its entrapment might diminish the possibility of resistance emergence at the molecular pharmacodynamic level and might even reverse tumor resistance. Several novel treatment modalities such as metronomic therapy, angiogenesis inhibitors, vascular disrupting agents and tumor priming have been introduced to improve solid tumor treatment outcomes. In the current review we will discuss the pharmacokinetic aspect of these treatment modalities in addition to other older treatment modalities, such as extracellular matrix dissolving agents, extracellular matrix synthesis inhibitors, chemoembolization and cellular efflux pump inhibition. Many of these strategies showed variable degrees of success/failure; however, reallocating these modalities based on their influence on the intratumoral pharmacokinetics might improve their understanding and treatment outcomes. PMID:26342660

  6. The effect of stealth liposomes on pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution and anti-tumor activity of oridonin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chuanjin; Wei, Yunyang; Yu, Li; Zhang, Liang

    2009-01-01

    High-purity oridonin was isolated and identified from Rabdosia rubescens hemsl by preparative high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Stealth liposomes of oridonin were prepared by thin-film ultrasonic dispersion using polyethylene glycol-distearoylphosphatidyleth-anolamine(PEG2000-DSPE) as the surface-coating material. A reversed-phase HPLC method was developed and validated to determine the concentrations of oridonin in the serum and tissues of mice. The tissue distribution and pharmacokinetics of oridonin stealth liposomes and oridonin solution in mice were investigated. The results showed that the distribution and pharmacokinetics of oridonin stealth liposomes in mice were changed as compared to the distribution and pharmacokinetics of oridonin solution. The levels of stealth liposomal oridonin in the heart tissues were reduced, while the levels of stealth liposomal oridonin in the blood were increased. The stealth liposomes were very effective at inhibiting the rate of solid tumor growth. The PEG2000-DSPE of liposomes prolonged the circulation time of oridonin in mouse blood, reduced accumulation in the reticuloendothelial system and increased the anti-tumor activity of oridonin.

  7. Comparative pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic evaluation of branded and generic formulations of meloxicam in healthy male volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Tacca, Mario Del; Pasqualetti, Giuseppe; Gori, Giovanni; Pepe, Pasquale; Di Paolo, Antonello; Lastella, Marianna; De Negri, Ferdinando; Blandizzi, Corrado

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The primary aim of the present study was to assess the pharmacokinetic bioequivalence between a generic formulation of meloxicam 15 mg tablets (Meloxicam Hexal) and its respective brand product (Mobic), in order to verify whether the generic product conforms to the regulatory standards of bioequivalence in the postmarketing setting. As a secondary exploratory aim, the pharmacodynamic effects of the two formulations were also evaluated by means of rating scales following hyperalgesia induced by cutaneous freeze injury. Subjects and methods A single 15 mg dose of generic or branded meloxicam tablets was administered to 24 healthy male volunteers in a crossover fashion. Plasma samples, collected for 24 hours after dosing, were assayed for meloxicam concentration by a validated highperformance liquid chromatography method. Results The analysis of pharmacokinetic parameters did not show any significant difference between the two meloxicam formulations: the 90% confidence intervals fell within the acceptance range of 80%–125% (0.84–1.16 for area under the curve [0–24], and 0.89–1.23 for peak concentration). No difference in the pharmacodynamic end point was observed between the two groups. Conclusion The pharmacokinetic profiles of the two meloxicam formulations confirm the regulatory criteria for bioequivalence; pharmacodynamic data indicate a similar antihyperalgesic effect. The two formulations can be used interchangeably in the clinical setting. PMID:23901278

  8. Pharmacokinetics of enrofloxacin and marbofloxacin in Japanese quails and common pheasants.

    PubMed

    Lashev, L D; Dimitrova, D J; Milanova, A; Moutafchieva, R G

    2015-04-01

    The pharmacokinetics of enrofloxacin and marbofloxacin was studied in Japanese quails and common pheasants. Healthy mature birds from both species and both genders were treated intravenously and orally with enrofloxacin (10 mg/kg) and marbofloxacin (5 mg/kg). After intravenous administration enrofloxacin was extensively metabolised to ciprofloxacin. Metabolites of marbofloxacin were not detected. Values of volume of distribution were respectively 4.63 l/kg and 3.67 l/kg for enrofloxacin and 1.56 l/kg and 1.43 l/kg for marbofloxacin. In quails, total body clearance values were higher than those in pheasants and other avian species. After oral application enrofloxacin was rapidly absorbed in quails, more rapidly than marbofloxacin. Pheasants absorbed both antimicrobials at a lower rate. Higher bioavailability was observed for marbofloxacin (118%). Relatively low bioavailability was established in quails for enrofloxacin (26.4%), accompanied by extensive conversion to ciprofloxacin. Generally, quails absorbed and eliminated both fluoroquinolones more rapidly than pheasants; the latter showed pharmacokinetics similar to poultry. Because of favourable pharmacokinetic properties, marbofloxacin should be preferred for oral administration in Japanese quails and pheasants for treatment of infections caused by equally susceptible pathogens.

  9. Pharmacokinetics of a multicomponent herbal preparation in healthy Chinese and African volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Alolga, Raphael N.; Fan, Yong; Zhang, Gang; Li, Jin; Zhao, Yi-Jing; Lelu Kakila, Jimmy; Chen, Yan; Li, Ping; Qi, Lian-Wen

    2015-01-01

    K-601 is an herbal formulation for influenza consisting of Lonicera japonica, Isatis indigotica, Rheum palmatum, Phellodendron chinense, and Scutellaria baicalensis. In this work, we characterized the chemical constituents in K-601, identified the absorbed compounds and determined their pharmacokinetics in 6 Chinese and African volunteers by liquid chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Similarity evaluation for chromatographic fingerprint of nine different batches showed values above 0.983. Totally, 50 components were identified in K-601. Then, 15 major prototype compounds and 17 metabolites were identified in human plasma. Major metabolic pathways included glucuronidation, sulfation, methylation, demethylation, and reduction. The pharmacokinetics of the most abundant prototype compounds, berberine, jatrorrhizine, palmatine and magnoflorine were determined. Significant pharmacokinetic differences were observed between the African and Chinese subjects. The AUCs of the African is about 4–10 fold higher than that of the Chinese for the three benzylisoquinoline alkaloids. Magnoflorine, an aporphine alkaloid, was absorbed better in the Chinese than in the African. The biotransformation of K-601 by human intestinal microflora was also investigated. The major reactions included hydroxylation, methylation, demethylation, acetylation and reduction. Glucuronidation and sulfation were not observed with fecal flora. These results may be important and useful in linking data from pharmacological assays and clinical effects. PMID:26268432

  10. Pharmacokinetics of a multicomponent herbal preparation in healthy Chinese and African volunteers.

    PubMed

    Alolga, Raphael N; Fan, Yong; Zhang, Gang; Li, Jin; Zhao, Yi-Jing; Lelu Kakila, Jimmy; Chen, Yan; Li, Ping; Qi, Lian-Wen

    2015-01-01

    K-601 is an herbal formulation for influenza consisting of Lonicera japonica, Isatis indigotica, Rheum palmatum, Phellodendron chinense, and Scutellaria baicalensis. In this work, we characterized the chemical constituents in K-601, identified the absorbed compounds and determined their pharmacokinetics in 6 Chinese and African volunteers by liquid chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Similarity evaluation for chromatographic fingerprint of nine different batches showed values above 0.983. Totally, 50 components were identified in K-601. Then, 15 major prototype compounds and 17 metabolites were identified in human plasma. Major metabolic pathways included glucuronidation, sulfation, methylation, demethylation, and reduction. The pharmacokinetics of the most abundant prototype compounds, berberine, jatrorrhizine, palmatine and magnoflorine were determined. Significant pharmacokinetic differences were observed between the African and Chinese subjects. The AUCs of the African is about 4-10 fold higher than that of the Chinese for the three benzylisoquinoline alkaloids. Magnoflorine, an aporphine alkaloid, was absorbed better in the Chinese than in the African. The biotransformation of K-601 by human intestinal microflora was also investigated. The major reactions included hydroxylation, methylation, demethylation, acetylation and reduction. Glucuronidation and sulfation were not observed with fecal flora. These results may be important and useful in linking data from pharmacological assays and clinical effects. PMID:26268432

  11. Pharmacokinetic Study and Optimal Formulation of New Anti-Parkinson Natural Compound Schisantherin A

    PubMed Central

    Sa, Fei; Guo, Bao Jian; Li, Sai; Zhang, Zai Jun; Chan, Hok Man; Zheng, Ying; Lee, Simon Ming Yuen

    2015-01-01

    Our recent studies showed that schisantherin A (StA) is a promising candidate for PD treatment, but the pharmacokinetic profile of StA is largely unknown. The effects of different formulations on the pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of StA were investigated by HPLC equipped with a vacuum degasser, a quaternary pump, a manual sampler, and an ultraviolet detector. The absolute bioavailability of StA in nanoemulsion formulation was significantly increased from 4.3% to 47.3%. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of absolute bioavailability for StA in rats and successful increase of bioavailability of StA by nanoemulsion formulation. The pharmacokinetic profiles of StA could be significantly improved by a safe nanoemulsion formulation. This study provides a successful example of advanced delivery system for improving the bioavailability of potential central nervous system (CNS) drug candidate with poor solubility. This novel approach could be an effective alternative solution to overcome the shortcomings of conventional poor drug delivery of CNS drugs. The results of present study not only indicate that StA has potential to be developed as a promising oral therapeutic agent for the management of PD but also shed light on novel way to improve bioavailability of PD drugs. PMID:26075137

  12. Pharmacokinetics of a multicomponent herbal preparation in healthy Chinese and African volunteers.

    PubMed

    Alolga, Raphael N; Fan, Yong; Zhang, Gang; Li, Jin; Zhao, Yi-Jing; Lelu Kakila, Jimmy; Chen, Yan; Li, Ping; Qi, Lian-Wen

    2015-08-13

    K-601 is an herbal formulation for influenza consisting of Lonicera japonica, Isatis indigotica, Rheum palmatum, Phellodendron chinense, and Scutellaria baicalensis. In this work, we characterized the chemical constituents in K-601, identified the absorbed compounds and determined their pharmacokinetics in 6 Chinese and African volunteers by liquid chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Similarity evaluation for chromatographic fingerprint of nine different batches showed values above 0.983. Totally, 50 components were identified in K-601. Then, 15 major prototype compounds and 17 metabolites were identified in human plasma. Major metabolic pathways included glucuronidation, sulfation, methylation, demethylation, and reduction. The pharmacokinetics of the most abundant prototype compounds, berberine, jatrorrhizine, palmatine and magnoflorine were determined. Significant pharmacokinetic differences were observed between the African and Chinese subjects. The AUCs of the African is about 4-10 fold higher than that of the Chinese for the three benzylisoquinoline alkaloids. Magnoflorine, an aporphine alkaloid, was absorbed better in the Chinese than in the African. The biotransformation of K-601 by human intestinal microflora was also investigated. The major reactions included hydroxylation, methylation, demethylation, acetylation and reduction. Glucuronidation and sulfation were not observed with fecal flora. These results may be important and useful in linking data from pharmacological assays and clinical effects.

  13. PKSolver: An add-in program for pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data analysis in Microsoft Excel.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Huo, Meirong; Zhou, Jianping; Xie, Shaofei

    2010-09-01

    This study presents PKSolver, a freely available menu-driven add-in program for Microsoft Excel written in Visual Basic for Applications (VBA), for solving basic problems in pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) data analysis. The program provides a range of modules for PK and PD analysis including noncompartmental analysis (NCA), compartmental analysis (CA), and pharmacodynamic modeling. Two special built-in modules, multiple absorption sites (MAS) and enterohepatic circulation (EHC), were developed for fitting the double-peak concentration-time profile based on the classical one-compartment model. In addition, twenty frequently used pharmacokinetic functions were encoded as a macro and can be directly accessed in an Excel spreadsheet. To evaluate the program, a detailed comparison of modeling PK data using PKSolver and professional PK/PD software package WinNonlin and Scientist was performed. The results showed that the parameters estimated with PKSolver were satisfactory. In conclusion, the PKSolver simplified the PK and PD data analysis process and its output could be generated in Microsoft Word in the form of an integrated report. The program provides pharmacokinetic researchers with a fast and easy-to-use tool for routine and basic PK and PD data analysis with a more user-friendly interface.

  14. Pharmacokinetic analysis and optimization of hydroxycamptothecin-loaded nanoparticles for liver targeting.

    PubMed

    Li, Yimu; Wei, Pei; Li, Jin; Li, Lingbing

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, a pharmacokinetic model to describe the tissue distribution process of nanoparticles was established. To test the possibility of the model, nanoparticles composed of poly(butylcyanoacrylate) and hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrins (HP-β-CD) was prepared with a poorly soluble anticancer drug, hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT). Characteristics were determined including particle's size, morphology and in vitro release. The tissue distribution of nanoparticles was also studied. Further, mathematical equation was fitted to the curve of drug concentration-time in liver of hydroxycamptothecin-loaded nanoparticles and the pharmacokinetic parameters of liver were obtained. The effectiveness of hydroxycamptothecin-loaded nanoparticles for liver targeting was evaluated. The results showed that nanoparticles composed of poly(butylcyanoacrylate) and hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrins (HP-β-CD) exhibited enhanced liver targeting in rats after i.v. injection. More importantly, the pharmacokinetic parameters (transport constant from blood to target organ KT, drug release rate from nanoparticles Kr and drug elimination constant in target organ Ke) provided some quantitative measure of liver distribution and were useful guidelines for development of targeted drug delivery systems.

  15. Untangling the web of European regulations for the preparation of unlicensed radiopharmaceuticals: a concise overview and practical guidance for a risk-based approach.

    PubMed

    Lange, Rogier; ter Heine, Rob; Decristoforo, Clemens; Peñuelas, Iván; Elsinga, Philip H; van der Westerlaken, Monique M L; Hendrikse, N Harry

    2015-05-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals are highly regulated, because they are controlled both as regular medicinal products and as radioactive substances. This can pose a hurdle for their development and clinical use. Radiopharmaceuticals are fundamentally different from other medicinal products and these regulations are not always adequate for their production. Strict compliance may have a huge resource impact, without further improving product quality. In this paper we give an overview of the applicable legislation and guidelines and propose a risk-based approach for their implementation. We focus on a few controversial Good Manufacturing Practice topics: cleanroom classification, air pressure regime, cleanroom qualification and microbiological monitoring. We have developed an algorithm to assess the combined risk of microbiological contamination of a radiopharmaceutical preparation process and propose corresponding Good Manufacturing Practice classification levels. In our opinion, the risk of carry-over of radiopharmaceuticals by individuals cannot be contained by pressure differences, and complicated regimes with underpressured rooms are not necessary in most situations. We propose a sterility assurance level of 10 for radiopharmaceuticals that are administered within a working day, irrespective of their use. We suggest the adoption of limits for environmental monitoring of microbial contamination, as proposed by Bruel and colleagues, on behalf of the French Society of Radiopharmacy. Recently launched regulatory documents seem to breathe a more liberal spirit than current legislation and recognize the need for the use of risk assessment. We argue that future legislation be further harmonized and state risk assessment as the gold standard for implementation of drug quality regulations for the preparation of unlicensed radiopharmaceuticals.

  16. Population Pharmacokinetics of Peramivir in Healthy Volunteers and Influenza Patients

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Yumiko; Ishibashi, Toru; Hollister, Alan S.

    2015-01-01

    Peramivir is an intravenous anti-influenza agent that inhibits viral growth by selectively inhibiting neuraminidase in human influenza A and B viruses. To characterize its pharmacokinetics, a population pharmacokinetic analysis of peramivir was performed using 3,199 plasma concentration data samples from 332 subjects in six clinical studies in Japan and the United States, including studies with renal impairment subjects, elderly subjects, and influenza patients. A three-compartment model well described the plasma concentration data for peramivir, and creatinine clearance was found to be the most important factor influencing clearance. Age and body weight were also found to be covariates for clearance and the volume of distribution, respectively. No difference in pharmacokinetics was found between genders or between Japanese and U.S. subjects. Small differences in pharmacokinetics were observed between uninfected subjects and influenza patients (clearance was 18% higher and the volume of distribution was 6% lower in influenza patients). Monte Carlo simulations indicated that single adjusted doses of 1/3- and 1/6-fold for patients with moderate and severe renal impairment, respectively, would give areas under the curve comparable to those for patients with normal renal function. The population pharmacokinetic model developed for peramivir should be useful for understanding its pharmacokinetic characteristics and for dose adjustment on the basis of renal function. PMID:26282420

  17. Population Pharmacokinetics of Benznidazole in Adult Patients with Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aldasoro, E.; Guerrero, L.; Posada, E.; Serret, N.; Mejía, T.; Urbina, J. A.; Gascón, J.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to build a population pharmacokinetic (popPK) model to characterize benznidazole (BNZ) pharmacokinetics in adults with chronic Chagas disease. This study was a prospective, open-label, single-center clinical trial approved by the local ethics committee. Patients received BNZ at 2.5 mg/kg of body weight/12 h (Abarax, Elea Laboratory, Argentina) for 60 days. Plasma BNZ samples were taken several times during the study and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography with UV-visible detection (HPLC-UV). The popPK analysis was done with NONMEMv.7.3. Demographic and biological data were tested as covariates. Intraindividual, interoccasion, and residual variabilities were modeled. Internal and external validations were completed to assess the robustness of the model. Later on, simulations were performed to generate BNZ concentration-time course profiles for different dosage regimens. A total of 358 plasma BNZ concentrations from 39 patients were included in the analysis. A one-compartment PK model characterized by clearance (CL/F) and the apparent volume of distribution (V/F), with first-order absorption (Ka) and elimination, adequately described the data (CL/F, 1.73 liters/h; V/F, 89.6 liters; and Ka, 1.15 h−1). No covariates were found to be significant for CL/F and V/F. Internal and external validations of the final model showed adequate results. Data from simulations revealed that a dose of 2.5 mg/kg/12 h might lead to overexposure in most patients. A lower dose (2.5 mg/kg/24 h) was able to achieve trough BNZ plasma concentrations within the accepted therapeutic range of 3 to 6 mg/liter. In summary, we developed a population PK model for BNZ in adults with chronic Chagas disease. Dosing simulations showed that a BNZ dose of 2.5 mg/kg/24 h will adequately keep BNZ trough plasma concentrations within the recommended target range for the majority of patients. (This study has been registered at EudraCT under number 2011

  18. Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Modeling of GLP-1 in Healthy Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yanguang; Gao, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To provide a mechanism-based model to quantitatively describe GLP-1 pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) in rats. Methods Intravenous (IV), infusion (IF), subcutaneous (SC), and intraperitoneal (IP) doses of GLP-1 were administered after glucose challenge in healthy Sprague–Dawley rats. Blood was analyzed for GLP-1, glucose, and insulin. The PK-PD modeling was performed with ADAPT 5. The concentration-response curve was generated and analyzed in comparison with other incretin-related therapeutics. Results The PK of GLP-1 was described using a two-compartment model with a zero-order input accounting for endogenous GLP-1 synthesis. For SC and IP dosing, sequential zero-order and first-order absorption models reasonably described the rapid absorption process and flip-flop kinetics. In dynamics, GLP-1 showed insulinotropic effects (3-fold increase) after IV glucose challenge in a dose-dependent manner. The concentration-response curve was bell-shaped, which was captured using a biphasic two-binding site Adair model. Receptor binding of GLP-1 exhibited high capacity and low affinity kinetics for both binding sites (KD=09.94×103 pM, K2=1.56×10−4 pM−1). Conclusions The PK of GLP-1 was linear and bi-exponential and its PD showed glucose-dependent insulinotropic effects. All profiles were captured by the present mechanistic model and the dynamic analysis yields several implications for incretin-related therapies. PMID:22179928

  19. Preparation and pharmacokinetic evaluation of Tashinone IIA solid lipid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianping; Zhu, Jiabi; Du, Zhiyong; Qin, Bin

    2005-07-01

    Tashinone IIA loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (TA-SLN) coated with poloxamer 188 was prepared by emulsification/evaporation. The TA-SLN was characterized by transmission electron microscope and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The results showed that the TA-SLN had an average diameter of 98.7 nm with a zeta potential of - 31.6 mv and the drug loading of 4.6% and entrapment efficiency of 87.7%. In vitro release experiment showed that the release of Tashinone IIA from TA-SLN was in accordance with the Weibull equation. The best model fitting experimental data was a two-compartment open model with first-order. The area under curve of plasma concentration-time (AUC) and mean residence time (MRT) of TA-SLN were much higher than those of Tashinone IIA control solution (TA-SOL). The results of pharmacokinetic studies in rabbits indicated that the formulation of TA-SLN was successful in providing a delivery of slow release of Tashinone IIA. PMID:16109628

  20. Pharmacokinetic Screening of Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Inhibitors in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Hsing-Ju; Hwang, Sung Hee; Morisseau, Christophe; Yang, Jun; Jones, Paul D.; Kasagami, Takeo; Kim, In-Hae; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2012-01-01

    Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids that have anti-hypertensive and anti-inflammatory properties are mainly metabolized by soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH, EC 3.3.2.3). Therefore, sEH has emerged as a therapeutic target for treating various cardiovascular diseases and inflammatory pain. N,N’-Disubstituted ureas are potent sEH inhibitors in vitro. However, in vivo usage of early sEH inhibitors has been limited by their low bioavailability and poor physiochemical properties. Therefore, a group of highly potent compounds with more drug-like physiochemical properties were evaluated by monitoring their plasma profiles in dogs treated orally with sEH inhibitors. Urea compounds with an adamantyl or a 4-trifluoromethoxyphenyl group on one side and a piperidyl or a cyclohexyl ether group on the other side of the urea function showed pharmacokinetic profiles with high plasma concentrations and long half lives. In particular, the inhibitor trans-4-[4-(3-adamantan-1-yl-ureido)-cyclohexyloxy]-benzoic acid (t-AUCB) not only is very potent with good physiochemical properties, but also shows high oral bioavailability for doses ranging from 0.01 to 1 mg/kg. This compound is also very potent against the sEH of several mammals, suggesting that t-AUCB will be an excellent tool to evaluate the biology of sEH in multiple animal models. Such compounds may also be a valuable lead for the development of veterinary therapeutics. PMID:20359531

  1. Application of a novel liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry method for the determination of antazoline in human plasma: Result of ELEPHANT-I [ELEctrophysiological, pharmacokinetic and hemodynamic effects of PHenazolinum (ANTazoline mesylate)] human pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Giebułtowicz, Joanna; Piotrowski, Roman; Baran, Jakub; Kułakowski, Piotr; Wroczyński, Piotr

    2016-05-10

    Antazoline is a first-generation antihistaminic agent with antiarrhythmic quinidine-like properties. In some countries, it is widely used for termination of cardiac arrhythmias, especially atrial fibrillation (AF). However, no human pharmacokinetic studies have been conducted with intravenous antazoline. The aim of our study was to develop and validate a novel liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for the determination of antazoline in human plasma: the ELEPHANT-I [ELEctrophysiological, pharmacokinetic and hemodynamic effects of PHenazolinum (ANTazoline mesylate)] human pharmacokinetic study. Antazoline was extracted from plasma using liquid-liquid extraction. The concentration of the analyte was measured by LC-MS/MS with xylometazoline as an internal standard. The method was validated for linearity, precision, accuracy, stability (freeze/thaw stability, stability in autosampler, short and long term stability), dilution integrity and matrix effect. The analyzed validation criteria were fulfilled. The method was applied to a pharmacokinetic study involving 10 healthy volunteers. Following a single intravenous dose of antazoline mesylate (100 mg), the plasma concentration profile showed a relative fast elimination with a terminal elimination half-life of 2.29 h. A relatively high volume of distribution was observed (Vss=315 L). The values of mean residence time (MRT∞), area under the curve (AUC∞) and clearance were 3.45 h, 0.91 mg h L(-1) and 80.5 L h(-1), respectively. One volunteer showed significant differences in pharmacokinetic parameters. In conclusion, the proposed new LC-MS/MS method was successfully used for the first time for the determination of antazoline in human plasma. PMID:26895496

  2. Pharmacokinetics of a new ivermectin/praziquantel oil suspension after intramuscular administration in pigs.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shusheng; Chen, Linlin; Guo, Zhaoxu; Hu, Xiuzhi; He, Jiakang; Wang, Gang; Zhao, Tingting; Xiao, Xilong

    2012-04-30

    A new oil suspension containing 0.15% ivermectin and 15% praziquantel for intramuscular injection was developed, and corresponding pharmacokinetics studies were conducted in swine. The combination product is a white- to cream-colored oil suspension and its physical properties such as settling volume ratio, redispersibility, syringeability and flowability are well consistent with the Technical Standards by the Ministry of Agriculture of the People's Republic of China. The pharmacokinetic study consists of two parts. First, the experiments were carried out to compare the pharmacokinetic parameters of the combination product and those same products with praziquantel or ivermectin removed merely. The results showed that no significant change in the major pharmacokinetic parameters (t(1/2z), T(max), C(max), AUC(INF), TimeDur) was observed when either of the component was removed from the combination product, indicating that ivermectin and praziquantel do not interfere with each other when being used together. Second, the pharmacokinetics of the combination product were compared with those of their respective single product. The results showed that the C(max) (15.94 ng/mL) of ivermectin in combination product was 9.01 times higher than the single product, while the AUC(INF) (1925.61 ng h/mL) was 6.02 times higher. Meanwhile, the C(max) (1.48 μg/mL), AUC(INF) (17.08μgh/mL), t(1/2z) (20.25 h), TimeDur3 (42.01 h) and TimeDur4 (16.60 h) of praziquantel in combination product were improved with a factor of 5.48, 13.66, 8.58, 10.10 and 7.31 times when compared with the single product, respectively. Therefore, the efficacy of the combination product was significantly prolonged, especially for praziquantel, so that comprehensive efficacy of controlling parasites sensitive to ivermectin and praziquantel can be achieved with one-single use of it. PMID:22075041

  3. Synthesis and evaluation of Lys¹(α,γ-Folate)Lys³(¹⁷⁷Lu-DOTA)-Bombesin(1-14) as a potential theranostic radiopharmaceutical for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Aranda-Lara, Liliana; Ferro-Flores, Guillermina; Azorín-Vega, Erika; Ramírez, Flor de María; Jiménez-Mancilla, Nallely; Ocampo-García, Blanca; Santos-Cuevas, Clara; Isaac-Olivé, Keila

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to synthesize Lys(1)(α,γ-Folate)-Lys(3)((177)Lu-DOTA)-Bombesin (1-14) ((177)Lu-Folate-BN), as well as to assess its potential for molecular imaging and targeted radiotherapy of breast tumors expressing folate receptors (FR) and gastrin-releasing peptide receptors (GRPR). Radiation absorbed doses of (177)Lu-Folate-BN (74 MBq, i.v.) estimated in athymic mice with T47D-induced breast tumors (positive to FR and GRPR), showed tumor doses of 23.9±2.1 Gy. T47D-tumors were clearly visible (Micro-SPECT/CT images). (177)Lu-Folate-BN demonstrated properties suitable as a theranostic radiopharmaceutical. PMID:26545016

  4. Synthesis and evaluation of Lys¹(α,γ-Folate)Lys³(¹⁷⁷Lu-DOTA)-Bombesin(1-14) as a potential theranostic radiopharmaceutical for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Aranda-Lara, Liliana; Ferro-Flores, Guillermina; Azorín-Vega, Erika; Ramírez, Flor de María; Jiménez-Mancilla, Nallely; Ocampo-García, Blanca; Santos-Cuevas, Clara; Isaac-Olivé, Keila

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to synthesize Lys(1)(α,γ-Folate)-Lys(3)((177)Lu-DOTA)-Bombesin (1-14) ((177)Lu-Folate-BN), as well as to assess its potential for molecular imaging and targeted radiotherapy of breast tumors expressing folate receptors (FR) and gastrin-releasing peptide receptors (GRPR). Radiation absorbed doses of (177)Lu-Folate-BN (74 MBq, i.v.) estimated in athymic mice with T47D-induced breast tumors (positive to FR and GRPR), showed tumor doses of 23.9±2.1 Gy. T47D-tumors were clearly visible (Micro-SPECT/CT images). (177)Lu-Folate-BN demonstrated properties suitable as a theranostic radiopharmaceutical.

  5. Comparison of normal tissue pharmacokinetics with {sup 111}In/{sup 9}Y monoclonal antibody m170 for breast and prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lehmann, Joerg; O'Donnell, Robert T.; Richman, Carol M. . E-mail: sjdenardo@ucdavis.edu

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: Radioactivity deposition in normal tissues limits the dose deliverable by radiopharmaceuticals (RP) in radioimmunotherapy (RIT). This study investigated the absorbed radiation dose in normal tissues for prostate cancer patients in comparison to breast cancer patients for 2 RPs using the monoclonal antibody (MAb) m170. Methods and Materials: {sup 111}In-DOTA-glycylglycylglycyl-L-p-isothiocyanatophenylalanine amide (GGGF)-m170 and {sup 111}In-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N',N'',N'''-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) 2-iminothiolane (2IT)-m170, representing the same MAb and chelate with and without a cleavable linkage, were studied in 13 breast cancer and 26 prostate cancer patients. Dosimetry for {sup 9}Y was calculated using {sup 111}In MAb pharmacokinetics from the initial imaging study for each patient, using reference man- and patient-specific masses. Results: The reference man-specific radiation doses (cGy/MBq) were not significantly different for the breast and the prostate cancer patients for both RPs in all but one tissue-RP combination (liver, DOTA-2IT). The patient-specific doses had differences between the groups most of which can be related to weight differences. Conclusions: Similar normal tissue doses were calculated for two groups of patients having different cancers and genders. This similarity combined with continued careful analysis of the imaging data might allow the use of higher starting doses in early phase RIT studies.

  6. Population pharmacokinetic analysis of voriconazole from a pharmacokinetic study with immunocompromised Japanese pediatric subjects.

    PubMed

    Muto, Chieko; Shoji, Satoshi; Tomono, Yoshiro; Liu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    A population pharmacokinetic (PK) analysis was conducted to characterize the voriconazole pharmacokinetic profiles in immunocompromised Japanese pediatric subjects and to compare them to those in immunocompromised non-Japanese pediatric subjects. A previously developed two-compartment pharmacokinetic model with first-order absorption and mixed linear and nonlinear elimination adequately described the voriconazole intravenous and oral data from Japanese pediatric subjects with few modifications. Bayesian priors were applied to this analysis by using the NONMEM routine NWPRI, which allowed priors for the fixed-effect parameter vector and variance matrix of the random-effect parameters to be a normal distribution and an inverse Wishart distribution, respectively. Large intersubject variabilities in oral bioavailability and voriconazole exposure were observed in these pediatric subjects. The mean oral bioavailability estimated in Japanese pediatric subjects was 73% (range, 17% to 99%), which is consistent with the reported estimates of 64% in the previous model and less than what was originally estimated for healthy adults-96%. Voriconazole exposures in Japanese pediatric subjects were generally comparable to those in non-Japanese pediatric subjects receiving the same dosing regimens, given the large intersubject variability. Consistent with the previous findings, the CYP2C19 genotyping status did not have a clinically relevant effect on voriconazole exposure in Japanese pediatric subjects, although it was identified as a covariate in the model to help explain the intersubject variability in voriconazole exposure. The CYP2C19 genotyping status alone does not warrant dose adjustment of voriconazole. No other factors besides age and weight were identified to explain the PK variability of voriconazole. PMID:25801557

  7. Population pharmacokinetic analysis of voriconazole from a pharmacokinetic study with immunocompromised Japanese pediatric subjects.

    PubMed

    Muto, Chieko; Shoji, Satoshi; Tomono, Yoshiro; Liu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    A population pharmacokinetic (PK) analysis was conducted to characterize the voriconazole pharmacokinetic profiles in immunocompromised Japanese pediatric subjects and to compare them to those in immunocompromised non-Japanese pediatric subjects. A previously developed two-compartment pharmacokinetic model with first-order absorption and mixed linear and nonlinear elimination adequately described the voriconazole intravenous and oral data from Japanese pediatric subjects with few modifications. Bayesian priors were applied to this analysis by using the NONMEM routine NWPRI, which allowed priors for the fixed-effect parameter vector and variance matrix of the random-effect parameters to be a normal distribution and an inverse Wishart distribution, respectively. Large intersubject variabilities in oral bioavailability and voriconazole exposure were observed in these pediatric subjects. The mean oral bioavailability estimated in Japanese pediatric subjects was 73% (range, 17% to 99%), which is consistent with the reported estimates of 64% in the previous model and less than what was originally estimated for healthy adults-96%. Voriconazole exposures in Japanese pediatric subjects were generally comparable to those in non-Japanese pediatric subjects receiving the same dosing regimens, given the large intersubject variability. Consistent with the previous findings, the CYP2C19 genotyping status did not have a clinically relevant effect on voriconazole exposure in Japanese pediatric subjects, although it was identified as a covariate in the model to help explain the intersubject variability in voriconazole exposure. The CYP2C19 genotyping status alone does not warrant dose adjustment of voriconazole. No other factors besides age and weight were identified to explain the PK variability of voriconazole.

  8. Modulation of Cytochrome P450 Activity by 18β-Glycyrrhetic Acid and its Consequence on Buspirone Pharmacokinetics in Rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Bum; Cho, Hyun-Jong; Kim, Yeong Shik; Kim, Dae-Duk; Yoon, In-Soo

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the inhibition mechanism of 18β-glycyrrhetic acid (GLY) on cytochrome P450 (CYP) activity and in vivo pharmacokinetic consequences of single GLY dose in rats. An in vitro CYP inhibition study in rat liver microsomes (RLM) was conducted using probe substrates for CYPs. Then, an in vivo pharmacokinetics of intravenous and oral buspirone (BUS), a probe substrate for CYP3A, was studied with the concurrent administration of oral GLY in rats. In the in vitro CYP inhibition study, CYP3A was involved in the metabolism of GLY. Moreover, GLY inhibited CYP3A activity with an IC50 of 20.1 ± 10.7 μM via a mixed inhibition mechanism. In the in vivo rat pharmacokinetic study, single oral GLY dose enhanced the area under plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) of intravenous and oral BUS, but the extent of increase in AUC was only minimal (1.12-1.45 fold). These results indicate that GLY can inhibit the in vitro CYP3A-mediated drug metabolism in RLM via a mixed inhibition mechanism. However, the impact of single oral GLY dose on the pharmacokinetics of BUS in rats was limited, showing that GLY could function as merely a weak inhibitor for CYP3A-mediated drug metabolism in vivo. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Pharmacokinetic herb-drug interactions with traditional Chinese medicine: progress, causes of conflicting results and suggestions for future research.

    PubMed

    Ma, Bing-Liang; Ma, Yue-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has a long history of medical use in China and is still used worldwide. Unexpected herb-drug interactions (HDIs) may lead to adverse drug reactions or loss of therapeutic efficacy of the victim drug. Here, based on searches of Medline, EBSCO, Science Direct and Web of Science using various keywords, we summarize the TCM-derived pharmacokinetic HDIs that were reported from 1990 to 2015 and discuss the underlying mechanisms. In general, many pre-clinical and clinical pharmacokinetic HDIs have been reported. Our searches show that TCMs cause pharmacokinetic interactions with therapeutic drugs mainly by inhibiting or inducing drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters. However, most of the interactions result from a small number of prescription medications and the actual potential for harm is low. Moreover, such HDIs can be avoided by discontinuing the TCMs. Despite the extensive number of reports on TCM-derived HDIs, the findings are frequently conflicting and can be confusing. The causes of the conflicts vary, but we classified them into three basic categories as follows: (1) complicated nature and poor quality control of TCMs, (2) different responses of various test systems to TCM exposure and (3) diverse study designs. Accordingly, we propose rational study designs for future HDI research. We also propose that a specific authoritative guide be established that provides recommendations for HDI studies. This review provides insights into the progress and challenges in TCM-derived pharmacokinetic HDI research.

  10. Radiation absorbed dose estimates for oxygen-15 radiopharmaceuticals (H2( V)O, C VO, O VO) in newborn infants

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, W.J.; Stabin, M.; Howse, D.; Eichling, J.O.; Herscovitch, P.

    1988-12-01

    In preparation for measurement of regional cerebral oxygen metabolism by positron emission tomography, radiation absorbed dose estimates for 19 internal organs, blood, and total body were calculated for newborn infants following bolus intravenous administration of H2( V)O and brief inhalation of C VO and O VO. Cumulated activity for each radiopharmaceutical was calculated from a compartmental model based on the known biologic behavior of the compound. Values for mean absorbed dose/unit cumulated activity (S) for internal organs and total body were based on a newborn phantom. S was separately calculated for blood. Total radiopharmaceutical absorbed dose estimates necessary to measure cerebral oxygen metabolism in a 3.51-kg infant based on 0.7 mCi/kg H2( V)O and 1 mCi/kg C VO and O VO were determined to be 1.6 rad to the lung (maximum organ dose), 0.28 rad to the marrow, 0.46 rad to the gonads, and 0.22 rad to total body. These values are similar to those for current clinical nuclear medicine procedures employing /sup 99m/Tc in newborn infants.

  11. The effect of radiopharmaceutical choice on the determination of relative renal function in rats with unilateral renal obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, A.; Lallone, R.

    1984-01-01

    A significant divergence of GFR and ERPF within a single kidney could lead to different estimates of relative renal function depending on which radiopharmaceutical is administered. To address this question, the authors studied adult male Sprague-Dawley rats with unilateral ureteral obstruction by giving each animal an intravenous injection of 10 ..mu..Ci of I-125 iothalamate (GFR), I-131 hippurate (ERPF), and TC-99m DMSA and measuring the 30 minute clearance (renal uptake and urine excretion) of each agent. Normal control animals were sham operated; 25 experimental animals were subjected to permanent unilateral ureteral occlusion and studied at 6 hours, 1, 3, 7 and 14 days. Acute ureteral obstruction impaired the clearance of iothalamate to a much greater degree than OIH or DMSA at 6 hours and 1 day (rho<.005) and 3 days (rho<.05). The decline in DMSA clearance reflected ERPF more closely than GFR. In evaluating renal disease, one should consider the functional parameter reflected by the radiopharmaceutical as well as the underlying disease state.

  12. Pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of percutaneous ibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Kleinbloesem, C H; Ouwerkerk, M; Spitznagel, W; Wilkinson, F E; Kaiser, R R

    1995-10-01

    The absorption, pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of ibuprofen (CAS 15687-27-1) were investigated for an ibuprofen gel preparation (ibugel) for percutaneous application, and compared to a standard oral ibuprofen tablet preparation. The monocentric, randomised, 2-way cross-over study with 7-day wash-out period was performed on 18 healthy female volunteers with an average age of 26.3 +/- 4.8 years (range: 20-38 years), average weight 60.4 +/- 7.6 kg, and average height 164.7 +/- 5.9 cm. Blood samples were taken from the volunteers before administration of the tablet or gel, and periodically during 24 h after administration. The ibuprofen content in these samples was determined using a validated HPLC method. Main pharmacokinetic parameters derived from individual plasma concentration-time courses included: Cmax, tmax, AUCO-->24, AUCO-->infinity, MRTO-->infinity, t1/2 and Frel. For percutaneous application of 500 mg ibuprofen (10 g 5% gel on the back, area of 20 x 20 cm) with occlusion for 2 h, a Cmax of 7.1 +/- 4.4 micrograms/ml (95% confidence interval (CI): 5.0-9.1) was obtained at 2.4 +/- 0.8 h (95% CI: 2.0-2.8). For oral administration of 400 mg, Cmax was 36.7 +/- 7.5 micrograms/ml (95% CI: 33.2-40.1) at 1.1 +/- 0.8 h (95% CI: 0.7-1.5). The (dose-corrected) relative bioavailability of the topical ibuprofen was found to be 22 +/- 12% (95% CI: 14-30%) of that after oral administration. The plasma elimination half-life was 2.5 +/- 1.4 h (95% CI: 1.9-3.2) for topical administration, and 1.8 +/- 0.5 h (95% CI: 1.6-2.1) after oral administration (not significant, p > 0.05). The surprisingly high levels of ibuprofen found in the plasma after percutaneous application are still below the threshold where systemic side effects might be expected (10 micrograms/ml). The high peak plasma concentration and relative bioavailability of percutaneous ibuprofen are likely due to the galenical formation of the gel preparation, which contains isopropyl alcohol and propylene glycol

  13. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the nitroimidazole antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Lamp, K C; Freeman, C D; Klutman, N E; Lacy, M K

    1999-05-01

    Metronidazole, the prototype nitroimidazole antimicrobial, was originally introduced to treat Trichomonas vaginalis, but is now used for the treatment of anaerobic and protozoal infections. The nitroimidazoles are bactericidal through toxic metabolites which cause DNA strand breakage. Resistance, both clinical and microbiological, has been described only rarely. Metronidazole given orally is absorbed almost completely, with bioavailability > 90% for tablets; absorption is unaffected by infection. Rectal and intravaginal absorption are 67 to 82%, and 20 to 56%, of the dose, respectively. Metronidazole is distributed widely and has low protein binding (< 20%). The volume of distribution at steady state in adults is 0.51 to 1.1 L/kg. Metronidazole reaches 60 to 100% of plasma concentrations in most tissues studied, including the central nervous system, but does not reach high concentrations in placental tissue. Metronidazole is extensively metabolised by the liver to 5 metabolites. The hydroxy metabolite has biological activity of 30 to 65% and a longer elimination half-life than the parent compound. The majority of metronidazole and its metabolites are excreted in urine and faeces, with less than 12% excreted unchanged in urine. The pharmacokinetics of metronidazole are unaffected by acute or chronic renal failure, haemodialysis, continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis, age, pregnancy or enteric disease. Renal dysfunction reduces the elimination of metronidazole metabolites; however, no toxicity has been documented and dosage alterations are unnecessary. Liver disease leads to a decreased clearance of metronidazole and dosage reduction is recommended. Recent pharmacodynamic studies of metronidazole have demonstrated activity for 12 to 24 hours after administration of metronidazole 1 g. The post-antibiotic effect of metronidazole extends beyond 3 hours after the concentration falls below the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). The concentration

  14. Plan Showing Cross Bracing Under Upper Stringers, Typical Section Showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Plan Showing Cross Bracing Under Upper Stringers, Typical Section Showing End Framing, Plan Showing Cross Bracing Under Lower Stringers, End Elevation - Covered Bridge, Spanning Contoocook River, Hopkinton, Merrimack County, NH

  15. Synthesis, activity and pharmacokinetics of novel antibacterial 15-membered ring macrolones.

    PubMed

    Fajdetić, Andrea; Vinter, Adrijana; Paljetak, Hana Čipčić; Padovan, Jasna; Jakopović, Ivana Palej; Kapić, Samra; Alihodžić, Sulejman; Filić, Darko; Modrić, Marina; Košutić-Hulita, Nada; Antolović, Roberto; Schoenfeld, Zrinka Ivezić; Mutak, Stjepan; Eraković Haber, Vesna; Spaventi, Radan

    2011-08-01

    Synthesis, antibacterial activity and pharmacokinetic properties of a novel class of macrolide antibiotics-macrolones-derived from azithromycin, comprising oxygen atom(s) in the linker and either free or esterified quinolone 3-carboxylic group, are reported. Selected compounds showed excellent antibacterial potency towards key erythromycin resistant respiratory pathogens. However, the majority of compounds lacked good bioavailability. The isopropyl ester, compound 35, and a macrolone derivative with an elongated linker 29 showed the best oral bioavailability in rats, both accompanied with an excellent overall microbiology profile addressing inducible and constitutive MLSb as well as efflux mediated macrolide resistance in streptococci, while compound 29 is more potent against staphylococci.

  16. Virtual pharmacokinetic model of human eye.

    PubMed

    Kotha, Sreevani; Murtomäki, Lasse

    2014-07-01

    A virtual pharmacokinetic 3D model of the human eye is built using Comsol Multiphysics® software, which is based on the Finite Element Method (FEM). The model considers drug release from a polymer patch placed on sclera. The model concentrates on the posterior part of the eye, retina being the target tissue, and comprises the choroidal blood flow, partitioning of the drug between different tissues and active transport at the retina pigment epithelium (RPE)-choroid boundary. Although most straightforward, in order to check the mass balance, no protein binding or metabolism is yet included. It appeared that the most important issue in obtaining reliable simulation results is the finite element mesh, while time stepping has hardly any significance. Simulations were extended to 100,000 s. The concentration of a drug is shown as a function of time at various points of retina, as well as its average value, varying several parameters in the model. This work demonstrates how anybody with basic knowledge of calculus is able to build physically meaningful models of quite complex biological systems.

  17. Pharmacokinetic interaction of intravenous fentanyl with ketoconazole.

    PubMed

    Ziesenitz, Victoria C; König, Sonja K; Mahlke, Nina S; Skopp, Gisela; Haefeli, Walter E; Mikus, Gerd

    2015-06-01

    Fentanyl is primarily metabolized by CYP3A, but has also been suggested to act as a weak inhibitor of CYP3A. We investigated the influence of CYP3A inhibition by ketoconazole on the pharmacokinetics of intravenously administered fentanyl and the effect of fentanyl on CYP3A activity. A prospective, open-label, randomized, monocentre, crossover study was conducted in 16 healthy volunteers. They received fentanyl alone (5 microgram per kilogram) or fentanyl plus ketoconazole (200 milligram orally B.I.D. over 2 days). Naloxone (2 × 0.2 milligram i.v.) was given simultaneously with fentanyl to mitigate any opioid effect. Midazolam was administered as a CYP3A probe drug. Fentanyl and its metabolites were quantified by LC/MS/MS in blood and urine samples obtained over 24 hour. Exposure of fentanyl (AUC0- ∞ ) was significantly increased to 133% and systemic clearance was reduced to 78% by ketoconazole, norfentanyl formation was significantly delayed and partial metabolic clearance decreased to 18%. Fentanyl had no influence on midazolam exposure and CYP3A activity whereas ketoconazole decreased CYP3A activity to 13%. Although fentanyl N-dealkylation is substantially inhibited by ketoconazole, exposure of fentanyl itself increased by one third only. Clinically fentanyl dosage adjustments may become necessary when ketoconazole or other strong CYP3A inhibitors are given simultaneously. Fentanyl itself does not influence CYP3A activity.

  18. Pharmacokinetics and biodegradation of chitosan in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Jiang, Zhiwen; Han, Baoqin; Niu, Shuyi; Dong, Wen; Liu, Wanshun

    2015-10-01

    Chitosan, an excellent biomedical material, has received a widespread in vivo application. In contrast, its metabolism and distribution once being implanted were less documented. In this study, the pharmacokinetics and biodegradation of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled and muscle implantation administrated chitosan in rats were investigated with fluorescence spectrophotometry, histological assay and gel chromatography. After implantation, chitosan was degraded gradually during its distribution to diverse organs. Among the tested organs, liver and kidney were found to be the first two highest in chitosan content, which was followed by heart, brain and spleen. Urinary excretion was believed to be the major pathway of chitosan elimination, yet 80% of chitosan administered to rats was not trackable in their urine. This indicated that the majority of chitosan was degraded in tissues. In average, the molecular weight of the degradation products of chitosan in diverse organs and urine was found to be <65 kDa. This further confirmed the in vivo degradation of chitosan. Our findings provided new evidences for the intensive and safe application of chitosan as a biomedical material.

  19. Virtual pharmacokinetic model of human eye.

    PubMed

    Kotha, Sreevani; Murtomäki, Lasse

    2014-07-01

    A virtual pharmacokinetic 3D model of the human eye is built using Comsol Multiphysics® software, which is based on the Finite Element Method (FEM). The model considers drug release from a polymer patch placed on sclera. The model concentrates on the posterior part of the eye, retina being the target tissue, and comprises the choroidal blood flow, partitioning of the drug between different tissues and active transport at the retina pigment epithelium (RPE)-choroid boundary. Although most straightforward, in order to check the mass balance, no protein binding or metabolism is yet included. It appeared that the most important issue in obtaining reliable simulation results is the finite element mesh, while time stepping has hardly any significance. Simulations were extended to 100,000 s. The concentration of a drug is shown as a function of time at various points of retina, as well as its average value, varying several parameters in the model. This work demonstrates how anybody with basic knowledge of calculus is able to build physically meaningful models of quite complex biological systems. PMID:24721554

  20. Pattern Recognition in Pharmacokinetic Data Analysis.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsson, Johan; Meibohm, Bernd; Weiner, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Pattern recognition is a key element in pharmacokinetic data analyses when first selecting a model to be regressed to data. We call this process going from data to insight and it is an important aspect of exploratory data analysis (EDA). But there are very few formal ways or strategies that scientists typically use when the experiment has been done and data collected. This report deals with identifying the properties of a kinetic model by dissecting the pattern that concentration-time data reveal. Pattern recognition is a pivotal activity when modeling kinetic data, because a rigorous strategy is essential for dissecting the determinants behind concentration-time courses. First, we extend a commonly used relationship for calculation of the number of potential model parameters by simultaneously utilizing all concentration-time courses. Then, a set of points to consider are proposed that specifically addresses exploratory data analyses, number of phases in the concentration-time course, baseline behavior, time delays, peak shifts with increasing doses, flip-flop phenomena, saturation, and other potential nonlinearities that an experienced eye catches in the data. Finally, we set up a series of equations related to the patterns. In other words, we look at what causes the shapes that make up the concentration-time course and propose a strategy to construct a model. By practicing pattern recognition, one can significantly improve the quality and timeliness of data analysis and model building. A consequence of this is a better understanding of the complete concentration-time profile.