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Sample records for radiotherapy radio neurosurgery

  1. Comparison of EBT and EBT3 RadioChromic Film Usage in Parotid Cancer Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bahreyni Toossi, M.T.; Khorshidi, F.; Ghorbani, M.; Mohamadian, N.; Davenport, D.

    2016-01-01

    Background EBT and EBT3 radioChromic films have been used in radiotherapy dosimetry for years. Objective The aim of the current study is to compare EBT and EBT3 radioChromic films in dosimetry of radiotherapy fields for treatment of parotid cancer. Methods Calibrations of EBT and EBT3 films were performed with identical setups using a 6 MV photon beam of a Siemens Primus linac. Skin dose was measured at different points in the right anterior oblique (RAO) and right posterior oblique (RPO) fields by EBT and EBT3 films on a RANDO phantom. Results While dosimetry was performed with the same conditions for the two film types for calibration and in phantom in parotid cancer radiotherapy, the measured net optical density (NOD) in EBT film was found to be higher than that from EBT3 film. The minimum difference between these two films under calibration conditions was about 2.9% (for 0.2 Gy) with a maximum difference of 35.5% (for 0.5 Gy). In the therapeutic fields of parotid cancer radiotherapy at different points, the measured dose from EBT film was higher than the EBT3 film. In these fields the minimum and maximum measured dose differences were 16.0% and 25.5%, respectively. Conclusion EBT film demonstrates higher NOD than EBT3 film. This effect may be related to the higher sensitivity of EBT film over EBT3 film. However, the obtained dose differences between these two films in low dose range can be due to the differences in fitting functions applied following the calibration process. PMID:27026949

  2. Benefit of Carbon Ion Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Radio-resistant Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamada, Tadashi; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Yanagi, Tsuyoshi; Imai, Reiko; Mizoe, Jun-etsu; Miyamoto, Tadaaki; Kato, Hirotoshi; Yamada, Shigeru; Kato, Shingo; Yoshikawa, Kyousan; Kandatsu, Susumu

    2003-08-01

    The Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) is the world's first heavy ion accelerator complex dedicated to medical use in a hospital environment. Heavy ions have superior depth-dose distribution and greater cell-killing ability. In June 1994, clinical research for the treatment of cancer was begun using carbon ions generated by HIMAC. Until August 2002, a total of 1,297 patients were enrolled in clinical trials. Most of the patients had locally advanced and/or medically inoperable tumors. Tumors radio-resistant and/or located near critical organs were also included. The clinical trials revealed that carbon ion radiotherapy provided definite local control and offered a survival advantage without unacceptable morbidity in a variety of tumors that were hard to cure by other modalities.

  3. Benefit of Carbon Ion Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Radio-resistant Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Kamada, Tadashi; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Yanagi, Tsuyoshi; Imai, Reiko; Mizoe, Jun-etsu; Miyamoto, Tadaaki; Kato, Hirotoshi; Yamada, Shigeru; Kato, Shingo; Yoshikawa, Kyousan; Kandatsu, Susumu

    2003-08-26

    The Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) is the world's first heavy ion accelerator complex dedicated to medical use in a hospital environment. Heavy ions have superior depth-dose distribution and greater cell-killing ability. In June 1994, clinical research for the treatment of cancer was begun using carbon ions generated by HIMAC. Until August 2002, a total of 1,297 patients were enrolled in clinical trials. Most of the patients had locally advanced and/or medically inoperable tumors. Tumors radio-resistant and/or located near critical organs were also included. The clinical trials revealed that carbon ion radiotherapy provided definite local control and offered a survival advantage without unacceptable morbidity in a variety of tumors that were hard to cure by other modalities.

  4. Computers and neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Shaikhouni, Ammar; Elder, J Bradley

    2012-11-01

    At the turn of the twentieth century, the only computational device used in neurosurgical procedures was the brain of the surgeon. Today, most neurosurgical procedures rely at least in part on the use of a computer to help perform surgeries accurately and safely. The techniques that revolutionized neurosurgery were mostly developed after the 1950s. Just before that era, the transistor was invented in the late 1940s, and the integrated circuit was invented in the late 1950s. During this time, the first automated, programmable computational machines were introduced. The rapid progress in the field of neurosurgery not only occurred hand in hand with the development of modern computers, but one also can state that modern neurosurgery would not exist without computers. The focus of this article is the impact modern computers have had on the practice of neurosurgery. Neuroimaging, neuronavigation, and neuromodulation are examples of tools in the armamentarium of the modern neurosurgeon that owe each step in their evolution to progress made in computer technology. Advances in computer technology central to innovations in these fields are highlighted, with particular attention to neuroimaging. Developments over the last 10 years in areas of sensors and robotics that promise to transform the practice of neurosurgery further are discussed. Potential impacts of advances in computers related to neurosurgery in developing countries and underserved regions are also discussed. As this article illustrates, the computer, with its underlying and related technologies, is central to advances in neurosurgery over the last half century.

  5. Computers and neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Shaikhouni, Ammar; Elder, J Bradley

    2012-11-01

    At the turn of the twentieth century, the only computational device used in neurosurgical procedures was the brain of the surgeon. Today, most neurosurgical procedures rely at least in part on the use of a computer to help perform surgeries accurately and safely. The techniques that revolutionized neurosurgery were mostly developed after the 1950s. Just before that era, the transistor was invented in the late 1940s, and the integrated circuit was invented in the late 1950s. During this time, the first automated, programmable computational machines were introduced. The rapid progress in the field of neurosurgery not only occurred hand in hand with the development of modern computers, but one also can state that modern neurosurgery would not exist without computers. The focus of this article is the impact modern computers have had on the practice of neurosurgery. Neuroimaging, neuronavigation, and neuromodulation are examples of tools in the armamentarium of the modern neurosurgeon that owe each step in their evolution to progress made in computer technology. Advances in computer technology central to innovations in these fields are highlighted, with particular attention to neuroimaging. Developments over the last 10 years in areas of sensors and robotics that promise to transform the practice of neurosurgery further are discussed. Potential impacts of advances in computers related to neurosurgery in developing countries and underserved regions are also discussed. As this article illustrates, the computer, with its underlying and related technologies, is central to advances in neurosurgery over the last half century. PMID:22985531

  6. History of Korean Neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Sung-nam

    2015-08-01

    The year 2012 was the 50th anniversary of the Korean Neurosurgical Society, and in 2013, the 15th World Congress of Neurosurgery took place in Seoul, Korea. Thus, it is an appropriate occasion to introduce the world to the history of the Korean Neurosurgical Society and the foundation, development, and growth of Korean neurosurgery. Historical materials and pictures were collected and reviewed from the history book and photo albums of the Korean Neurosurgical Society. During the last 50 years, the Korean Neurosurgical Society and Korean neurosurgery have developed and grown enormously not only in quantity but also in quality. In every aspect, the turning point from the old to the new era of the Korean Neurosurgical Society and Korean neurosurgery was the year 1980.

  7. Chronic Pain in Neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Grodofsky, Samuel

    2016-09-01

    This review includes a summary of contemporary theories of pain processing and advocates a multimodal analgesia approach for providing perioperative care. A summary of various medication classes and anesthetic techniques is provided that highlights evidence emerging from neurosurgical literature. This summary covers opioid management, acetaminophen, nonsteroidal antiinflammatories, ketamine, lidocaine, dexmedetomidine, corticosteroids, gabapentin, and regional anesthesia for neurosurgery. At present, there is not enough investigation into these areas to describe best practices for treating or preventing chronic pain in neurosurgery; but providers can identify a wider range of options available to personalize perioperative care strategies. PMID:27521193

  8. Neurosurgery in India: an overview.

    PubMed

    Ganapathy, Krishnan

    2013-01-01

    This overview of neurosurgery in India during the last six decades gives a holistic perspective of the phenomenal advances made. Neurosurgical education, the change in clinical spectrum of diseases and their presentation, evolution of various subspecialties and societies, the state of research, the issues peculiar to India, including the urban-rural health divide, the increasing role of information and communication technology in neurosurgery, and the gradual but definite global recognition of Indian neurosurgery will be addressed.

  9. NASA Robotic Neurosurgery Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mah, Robert

    1997-01-01

    The detection of tissue interface (e.g., normal tissue, cancer, tumor) has been limited clinically to tactile feedback, temperature monitoring, and the use of a miniature ultrasound probe for tissue differentiation during surgical operations, In neurosurgery, the needle used in the standard stereotactic CT or MRI guided brain biopsy provides no information about the tissue being sampled. The tissue sampled depends entirely upon the accuracy with which the localization provided by the preoperative CT or MRI scan is translated to the intracranial biopsy site. In addition, no information about the tissue being traversed by the needle (e.g., a blood vessel) is provided. Hemorrhage due to the biopsy needle tearing a blood vessel within the brain is the most devastating complication of stereotactic CT/MRI guided brain biopsy. A robotic neurosurgery testbed has been developed at NASA Ames Research Center as a spin-off of technologies from space, aeronautics and medical programs. The invention entitled "Robotic Neurosurgery Leading to Multimodality Devices for Tissue Identification" is nearing a state ready for commercialization. The devices will: 1) improve diagnostic accuracy and precision of general surgery, with near term emphasis on stereotactic brain biopsy, 2) automate tissue identification, with near term emphasis on stereotactic brain biopsy, to permit remote control of the procedure, and 3) reduce morbidity for stereotactic brain biopsy. The commercial impact from this work is the potential development of a whole new generation of smart surgical tools to increase the safety, accuracy and efficiency of surgical procedures. Other potential markets include smart surgical tools for tumor ablation in neurosurgery, general exploratory surgery, prostate cancer surgery, and breast cancer surgery.

  10. NASA Robotic Neurosurgery Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mah, Robert

    1997-01-01

    The detection of tissue interface (e.g., normal tissue, cancer, tumor) has been limited clinically to tactile feedback, temperature monitoring, and the use of a miniature ultrasound probe for tissue differentiation during surgical operations. In neurosurgery, the needle used in the standard stereotactic CT (Computational Tomography) or MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) guided brain biopsy provides no information about the tissue being sampled. The tissue sampled depends entirely upon the accuracy with which the localization provided by the preoperative CT or MRI scan is translated to the intracranial biopsy site. In addition, no information about the tissue being traversed by the needle (e.g., a blood vessel) is provided. Hemorrhage due to the biopsy needle tearing a blood vessel within the brain is the most devastating complication of stereotactic CT/MRI guided brain biopsy. A robotic neurosurgery testbed has been developed at NASA Ames Research Center as a spin-off of technologies from space, aeronautics and medical programs. The invention entitled 'Robotic Neurosurgery Leading to Multimodality Devices for Tissue Identification' is nearing a state ready for commercialization. The devices will: 1) improve diagnostic accuracy and precision of general surgery, with near term emphasis on stereotactic brain biopsy, 2) automate tissue identification, with near term emphasis on stereotactic brain biopsy, to permit remote control of the procedure, and 3) reduce morbidity for stereotactic brain biopsy. The commercial impact from this work is the potential development of a whole new generation of smart surgical tools to increase the safety, accuracy and efficiency of surgical procedures. Other potential markets include smart surgical tools for tumor ablation in neurosurgery, general exploratory surgery, prostate cancer surgery, and breast cancer surgery.

  11. Robotics in neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    McBeth, Paul B; Louw, Deon F; Rizun, Peter R; Sutherland, Garnette R

    2004-10-01

    Technological developments in imaging guidance, intraoperative imaging, and microscopy have pushed neurosurgeons to the limits of their dexterity and stamina. The introduction of robotically assisted surgery has provided surgeons with improved ergonomics and enhanced visualization, dexterity, and haptic capabilities. This article provides a historical perspective on neurosurgical robots, including image-guided stereotactic and microsurgery systems. The future of robot-assisted neurosurgery, including the use of surgical simulation tools and methods to evaluate surgeon performance, is discussed.

  12. Robotics in child neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Giorgi, C; Sala, R; Riva, D; Cossu, A; Eisenberg, H

    2000-11-01

    We felt there was a need for a new device with "minimal invasive" tracking hardware, to be used in image-guided neurosurgery, and the system we designed to fill this need is now presented. It combines precision of movement, stability and self-positioning capabilities together with optically tracked registration and procedural control within the structure of a surgical microscope. The results are reduced setup time and minimal "distraction" from the procedure itself, factors of special relevance in child neurosurgery. The system is composed of a six-axis industrial robot suitable for use in the operating room, carrying a surgical microscope. Three progressive scan-synchronized infrared cameras mounted around the lenses of the scope are used to register the patient's position and track surgical instruments with reference to the registered space. Orientation of the microscope during surgery is obtained with a six-axis joystick used as a microscope handle. The system has been clinically used in 14 cases, and it has proven itself to be reliable, providing the expected performance advantages. The implementation of a tracked ultrasound or endoscope intraoperative imaging source is also described.

  13. Discovering neurosurgery: new frontiers.

    PubMed

    Rutka, James T

    2011-12-01

    Over the centuries, discoveries of lands unknown, treasures lost and buried, and formulas to delineate physicochemical processes have led to advancements in our understanding of how the world is structured and governed. In science and medicine, discoveries are frequently made following deliberate periods of observation and experimentation to test hypotheses. However, in some instances, discoveries may arise either following a "eureka moment" that transcends rigorous scientific experimentation or following a serendipitous observation. In many instances, scientific discoveries will lead to new inventions that are aimed at improving the manner in which tasks or operations are performed. In this address, some of the key discoveries in science and medicine that have impacted significantly on the field of neurosurgery are described. Some of these include discoveries in neuroanatomy, anesthesiology, infectious diseases, antisepsis, and radiology. Discoveries in the field of molecular science, from the discovery of DNA to next-generation DNA sequencing, which have helped improve the diagnosis and prognosis of neurosurgical patients with conditions such as brain tumors, are also described. In the end, these discoveries have led us to new frontiers in the subspecialty practice of neurosurgery. Navigating our way through these new frontiers will undoubtedly lead to additional discoveries that are unimaginable at present but bound to improve the future care of neurosurgical patients. PMID:22132699

  14. [Importance of local skin treatments during radiotherapy for prevention and treatment of radio-induced epithelitis].

    PubMed

    Chargari, C; Fromantin, I; Kirova, Y M

    2009-07-01

    Radio-epithelitis represents a common problem, for which treatments are characterized by a great heterogeneity. The present review of literature focuses on data referenced in Pubmed((c))/Medline((c)) and published in French/English. Despite a real preclinical rationale, aloe vera and trolamine failed to demonstrate any benefit in the prophylactic settings. In a prospective assessment phase III assessment, Calendula Officinalis was shown to be superior to trolamine for the prevention of radio-epithelitis. In the curative settings, sucrafalte failed to demonstrate any benefit. The benefit of dermocorticoids was suggested in terms of erythema and itching. Promising clinical results are available with hyaluronic acid (MA S065D and Ialugen) and silver leaf may reduce the intensity of cutaneous radio-induced side effects. Data from the literature are conflicting, making real the difficulty to adopt from clinical trials any proof-of-principle strategy. Considering these uncertainties, several strategies are allowed. New topics are under investigation. Present data from the literature highlight the need for further trials, in order to propose evidence-based treatments and to harmonize clinical practice.

  15. Laser applications in neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerullo, Leonard J.

    1985-09-01

    The "false start" of the laser in neurosurgery should not be misconstrued as a denial of the inherent advantages of precision and gentleness in dealing with neural tissue. Rather, early investigators were frustrated by unrealistic expectations, cumbersome equipment, and a general ignorance of microtechnique. By the early 70s, microneurosurgery was well established, surgical laser equipment for free hand and microlinked application had been developed, and a more realistic view of the limitations of the laser had been established. Consequently, the late 70s really heralded the renaissance of the laser in neurosurgery. Since then, there has been an overwhelming acceptance of the tool in a variety of clinical situations, broadly categorized in five groups. 1)|Perhaps the most generally accepted area is in the removal of extra-axial tumors of the brain and spinal cord. These tumors, benign by histology but treacherous by location, do not present until a significant amount of neurological compensation has already occurred. The application of additional trauma to the neural tissue, whether by further tumor growth or surgical manipulation, frequently results in irreversible damage. Here, the ability of the laser to vaporize tissue, in a fairly hemostatic fashion, without mechanical or thermal damage to sensitive surrounding tissues, is essential. 2)|The ability to incise delicate neural tissue with minimal spread of thermal destruction to adjacent functioning tissue makes the laser the ideal instrument when tumors deep under the surface are encountered in the brain or spinal cord. Thus, the second group of applications is in the transgression of normal neural structures to arrive at deeper pathological tissue. 3)|The third area of benefit for the laser in neurosurgery has been in the performance of neuroablative procedures, calling for deliberate destruction of functioning neural tissue in a controlled fashion. Again, the precision and shape confinement of the destructive

  16. Actualities and Perspectives in Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Iencean, SM; Brehar, FM

    2008-01-01

    In the field of neurosurgery, like in other surgical specialties, the last decades have brought major achievements. The series of revolutionary discoveries has started during the last century in the fifties, with stereotactic radiosurgery, then continued with the implementation of operative microscope (during the seventies), the endovascular embolisation in the nineties and finally with the major improvement in robotic neurosurgery and molecular neurosurgery at the beginning of this century. The major innovation has been brought not only in the field of therapeutical measures but also in the field of neuro– imaging. Thus, the modern MRI with more than 3 Tesla, can reveal to the neurosurgeon the most intimate structures of the nervous system. Several important areas in neurosurgery like: vascular neurosurgery, functional neurosurgery and brain tumors pathology, benefit from the modern technology and from the latest discoveries from genetic and molecular biology. In conclusion, summarizing the discoveries of the last decade, we emphasize that the related areas like genetics, molecular biology, computer technology become more and more important in the future progress of the neurosurgery. PMID:20108475

  17. Single agent nanoparticle for radiotherapy and radio-photothermal therapy in anaplastic thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Min; Chen, Yunyun; Adachi, Makoto; Wen, Xiaoxia; Erwin, Bill; Mawlawi, Osama; Lai, Stephen Y; Li, Chun

    2015-07-01

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) is one of the most aggressive human malignancies. The aggressive behavior of ATC and its resistance to traditional treatment limit the efficacy of radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and surgery. The purpose of this study is aimed at enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of radiotherapy (RT) combined with photothermal therapy (PTT) in murine orthotopic model of ATC, based on our developed single radioactive copper sulfide (CuS) nanoparticle platform. We prepare a new dual-modality therapy for ATC consisting of a single-compartment nanoplatform, polyethylene glycol-coated [(64)Cu]CuS NPs, in which the radiotherapeutic property of (64)Cu is combined with the plasmonic properties of CuS NPs. Mice with Hth83 ATC were treated with PEG-[(64)Cu]CuS NPs and/or near infrared laser. Antitumor effects were assessed by tumor growth and animal survival. We found that in mice bearing orthotopic human Hth83 ATC tumors, micro-PET/CT imaging and biodistribution studies showed that about 50% of the injected dose of PEG-[(64)Cu]CuS NPs was retained in tumor 48 h after intratumoral injection. Human absorbed doses were calculated from biodistribution data. In antitumor experiments, tumor growth was delayed by PEG-[(64)Cu]CuS NP-mediated RT, PTT, and combined RT/PTT, with combined RT/PTT being most effective. In addition, combined RT/PTT significantly prolonged the survival of Hth83 tumor-bearing mice compared to no treatment, laser treatment alone, or NP treatment alone without producing acute toxic effects. These findings indicate that this single-compartment multifunctional NPs platform merits further development as a novel therapeutic agent for ATC.

  18. Single Agent Nanoparticle for Radiotherapy and Radio-Photothermal Therapy in Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Min; Chen, Yunyun; Adachi, Makoto; Wen, Xiaoxia; Erwin, Bill; Mawlawi, Osama; Lai, Stephen Y.; Li, Chun

    2015-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) is one of the most aggressive human malignancies. The aggressive behavior of ATC and its resistance to traditional treatment limit the efficacy of radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and surgery. The purpose of this study is aimed at enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of radiotherapy (RT) combined with photothermal therapy (PTT) in murine orthotopic model of ATC, based on our developed single radioactive copper sulfide (CuS) nanoparticle platform. We prepare a new dual-modality therapy for ATC consisting of a single-compartment nanoplatform, polyethylene glycol-coated [64Cu]CuS NPs, in which the radiotherapeutic property of 64Cu is combined with the plasmonic properties of CuS NPs. Mice with Hth83 ATC were treated with PEG[64Cu]CuS NPs and/or near infrared laser. Antitumor effects were assessed by tumor growth and animal survival. We found that in mice bearing orthotopic human Hth83 ATC tumors, micro-PET/CT imaging and biodistribution studies showed that about 50% of the injected dose of PEG-[64Cu]CuS NPs was retained in tumor 48 h after intratumoral injection. Human absorbed doses were calculated from biodistribution data. In antitumor experiments, tumor growth was delayed by PEG-[64Cu]CuS NP-mediated RT, PTT, and combined RT/PTT, with combined RT/PTT being most effective. In addition, combined RT/PTT significantly prolonged the survival of Hth83 tumor-bearing mice compared to no treatment, laser treatment alone, or NP treatment alone without producing acute toxic effects. These findings indicate that this single-compartment multifunctional NPs platform merits further development as a novel therapeutic agent for ATC. PMID:25913249

  19. Mythology and Neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Ökten, Ali İhsan

    2016-06-01

    Myths are the keystone of mythology. They are interpretations of events that have been told as stories and legends for thousands of years, inherited from generation to generation, and have reached the present day. Although most myths are considered figments of the imagination or fictitious legends, all of them contain references to facts from the time they occurred. Mythology, which is a collection of figments of imagination concerning nature and human beings, is a product of human effort to perceive, explain, and interpret the universe and the world, much like science. The interaction between mythology and science dates back to the early days of civilization. Mythology, a reflection of human creativity, is extensively used in modern science, particularly in a terminological context. This article aims to reveal the texture of mythology in neurosurgery, by analyzing the birth of medicine in mythology; heroes such as Apollo and Asklepios, the gods of healing and medicine, as well as Hygieia, the goddess of health and hygiene; and mythological terms and phrases such as Achilles tendon, atlas vertebra, gigantism, priapism syndrome, hippocampus, lethargy, syrinx, and arachnoid. Through the use of symbols, mythology has attempted to explain several subjects, such as human nature, disease, birth, and death. In this respect, mythology and medicine dance arm in arm, and this dance has been going on for centuries. As a result, mythology has manifested itself in many fields within medicine, either anatomically or by giving names to various diseases.

  20. Mythology and Neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Ökten, Ali İhsan

    2016-06-01

    Myths are the keystone of mythology. They are interpretations of events that have been told as stories and legends for thousands of years, inherited from generation to generation, and have reached the present day. Although most myths are considered figments of the imagination or fictitious legends, all of them contain references to facts from the time they occurred. Mythology, which is a collection of figments of imagination concerning nature and human beings, is a product of human effort to perceive, explain, and interpret the universe and the world, much like science. The interaction between mythology and science dates back to the early days of civilization. Mythology, a reflection of human creativity, is extensively used in modern science, particularly in a terminological context. This article aims to reveal the texture of mythology in neurosurgery, by analyzing the birth of medicine in mythology; heroes such as Apollo and Asklepios, the gods of healing and medicine, as well as Hygieia, the goddess of health and hygiene; and mythological terms and phrases such as Achilles tendon, atlas vertebra, gigantism, priapism syndrome, hippocampus, lethargy, syrinx, and arachnoid. Through the use of symbols, mythology has attempted to explain several subjects, such as human nature, disease, birth, and death. In this respect, mythology and medicine dance arm in arm, and this dance has been going on for centuries. As a result, mythology has manifested itself in many fields within medicine, either anatomically or by giving names to various diseases. PMID:26970479

  1. Progress of women in neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Spetzler, Robert F

    2011-01-01

    Despite advances in issues related to gender equity, barriers to recruiting and retaining women in neurosurgery continue to exist. At the same time, the overall projected shortage of neurosurgeons suggests that women will be vital to the long-term success of the field. Attracting women to neurosurgery can capitalize on strategies, such as mentoring, teaching leadership and negotiating skills, and job sharing or dual training tracks to name a few, that would benefit both men and women passionate about pursuing neurosurgery. Ultimately, personal and institutional accountability must be evaluated to ensure that the best and brightest candidates, regardless of gender, are recruited to neurosurgical programs to promote the health of our challenging but most satisfying profession. PMID:22059098

  2. History of Neurosurgery in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    RAFFIQ, Azman; ABDULLAH, Jafri Malin; HASPANI, Saffari; ADNAN, Johari Siregar

    2015-01-01

    The development of neurosurgical services and training in Malaysia began in 1963, with the first centre established in its capital city at Hospital Kuala Lumpur, aimed to provide much needed neurosurgical services and training in the field of neurology and neurosurgery. This center subsequently expanded in 1975 with the establishment of the Tunku Abdul Rahman Neuroscience Institute (IKTAR); which integrated the three allied interdependent disciplines of neurosurgery, neurology and psychiatry. The establishment of this institute catalysed the rapid expansion of neurosurgical services in Malaysia and paved the way for development of comprehensive training for doctors, nurses, and paramedics. This culminated in the establishments of a local comprehensive neurosurgery training program for doctors in 2001; followed by a training program for nurses and paramedics in 2006. To date, there are more than 60 neurosurgeons providing expert care in 11 centers across Malaysia, along with trained personnel in the field of neurosciences. PMID:27006632

  3. History of Neurosurgery in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Raffiq, Azman; Abdullah, Jafri Malin; Haspani, Saffari; Adnan, Johari Siregar

    2015-12-01

    The development of neurosurgical services and training in Malaysia began in 1963, with the first centre established in its capital city at Hospital Kuala Lumpur, aimed to provide much needed neurosurgical services and training in the field of neurology and neurosurgery. This center subsequently expanded in 1975 with the establishment of the Tunku Abdul Rahman Neuroscience Institute (IKTAR); which integrated the three allied interdependent disciplines of neurosurgery, neurology and psychiatry. The establishment of this institute catalysed the rapid expansion of neurosurgical services in Malaysia and paved the way for development of comprehensive training for doctors, nurses, and paramedics. This culminated in the establishments of a local comprehensive neurosurgery training program for doctors in 2001; followed by a training program for nurses and paramedics in 2006. To date, there are more than 60 neurosurgeons providing expert care in 11 centers across Malaysia, along with trained personnel in the field of neurosciences. PMID:27006632

  4. History of Neurosurgery in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Raffiq, Azman; Abdullah, Jafri Malin; Haspani, Saffari; Adnan, Johari Siregar

    2015-12-01

    The development of neurosurgical services and training in Malaysia began in 1963, with the first centre established in its capital city at Hospital Kuala Lumpur, aimed to provide much needed neurosurgical services and training in the field of neurology and neurosurgery. This center subsequently expanded in 1975 with the establishment of the Tunku Abdul Rahman Neuroscience Institute (IKTAR); which integrated the three allied interdependent disciplines of neurosurgery, neurology and psychiatry. The establishment of this institute catalysed the rapid expansion of neurosurgical services in Malaysia and paved the way for development of comprehensive training for doctors, nurses, and paramedics. This culminated in the establishments of a local comprehensive neurosurgery training program for doctors in 2001; followed by a training program for nurses and paramedics in 2006. To date, there are more than 60 neurosurgeons providing expert care in 11 centers across Malaysia, along with trained personnel in the field of neurosciences.

  5. Progress of women in neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Spetzler, Robert F.

    2011-01-01

    Despite advances in issues related to gender equity, barriers to recruiting and retaining women in neurosurgery continue to exist. At the same time, the overall projected shortage of neurosurgeons suggests that women will be vital to the long-term success of the field. Attracting women to neurosurgery can capitalize on strategies, such as mentoring, teaching leadership and negotiating skills, and job sharing or dual training tracks to name a few, that would benefit both men and women passionate about pursuing neurosurgery. Ultimately, personal and institutional accountability must be evaluated to ensure that the best and brightest candidates, regardless of gender, are recruited to neurosurgical programs to promote the health of our challenging but most satisfying profession. PMID:22059098

  6. [New simulation technologies in neurosurgery].

    PubMed

    Byvaltsev, V A; Belykh, E G; Konovalov, N A

    2016-01-01

    The article presents a literature review on the current state of simulation technologies in neurosurgery, a brief description of the basic technology and the classification of simulation models, and examples of simulation models and skills simulators used in neurosurgery. Basic models for the development of physical skills, the spectrum of available computer virtual simulators, and their main characteristics are described. It would be instructive to include microneurosurgical training and a cadaver course of neurosurgical approaches in neurosurgery training programs and to extend the use of three-dimensional imaging. Technologies for producing three-dimensional anatomical models and patient-specific computer simulators as well as improvement of tactile feedback systems and display quality of virtual models are promising areas. Continued professional education necessitates further research for assessing the validity and practical use of simulators and physical models. PMID:27331235

  7. Defining excellence in vascular neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Sanai, Nader; Spetzler, Robert F

    2010-01-01

    Success as a vascular neurosurgeon almost always begins with passion, an inherent love for the work that drives an insatiable desire for personal improvement. A personal definition of excellence in vascular neurosurgery includes several fundamental qualities: mastery of the basics, refinement of technique, advancement of technology, investigative study, advanced decision making, microsurgical innovation, a well-rounded surgical armamentarium, and a lifelong commitment to teaching. Ultimately, the reward for these efforts is the ability to influence generations to come, particularly as one follows the rising careers of former trainees, each redefining the term "excellence" in vascular neurosurgery.

  8. [Evolution of Egyptian neurosurgery: an overview].

    PubMed

    Orief, Tamer

    2010-02-01

    This article describes the evolution of Egyptian neurosurgery. It highlights the experiences of the ancient Egyptians in treatment of the central nervous system diseases. These experiences were documented through their papyrus writings and their drawings over the walls in ancient temples. The aim of this article is not only to search for the roots of neurosurgery in Egypt but also to showcase the present and future status of neurosurgery. Neurosurgery developed as a specialty earlier in Egypt and has led the development of this specialty in Africa and the Middle East. It is worthwhile tracing the history of neurosurgery of past civilizations, ancient medicine, and the work of pioneers. PMID:20166531

  9. Artificial neural networks in neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Azimi, Parisa; Mohammadi, Hasan Reza; Benzel, Edward C; Shahzadi, Sohrab; Azhari, Shirzad; Montazeri, Ali

    2015-03-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANNs) effectively analyze non-linear data sets. The aimed was A review of the relevant published articles that focused on the application of ANNs as a tool for assisting clinical decision-making in neurosurgery. A literature review of all full publications in English biomedical journals (1993-2013) was undertaken. The strategy included a combination of key words 'artificial neural networks', 'prognostic', 'brain', 'tumor tracking', 'head', 'tumor', 'spine', 'classification' and 'back pain' in the title and abstract of the manuscripts using the PubMed search engine. The major findings are summarized, with a focus on the application of ANNs for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. Finally, the future of ANNs in neurosurgery is explored. A total of 1093 citations were identified and screened. In all, 57 citations were found to be relevant. Of these, 50 articles were eligible for inclusion in this review. The synthesis of the data showed several applications of ANN in neurosurgery, including: (1) diagnosis and assessment of disease progression in low back pain, brain tumours and primary epilepsy; (2) enhancing clinically relevant information extraction from radiographic images, intracranial pressure processing, low back pain and real-time tumour tracking; (3) outcome prediction in epilepsy, brain metastases, lumbar spinal stenosis, lumbar disc herniation, childhood hydrocephalus, trauma mortality, and the occurrence of symptomatic cerebral vasospasm in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage; (4) the use in the biomechanical assessments of spinal disease. ANNs can be effectively employed for diagnosis, prognosis and outcome prediction in neurosurgery.

  10. Radiotherapy Accidents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mckenzie, Alan

    A major benefit of a Quality Assurance system in a radiotherapy centre is that it reduces the likelihood of an accident. For over 20 years I have been the interface in the UK between the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine and the media — newspapers, radio and TV — and so I have learned about radiotherapy accidents from personal experience. In some cases, these accidents did not become public and so the hospital cannot be identified. Nevertheless, lessons are still being learned.

  11. Stereotactic neurosurgery for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Giller, C A; Dewey, R B

    1995-03-01

    The Council on Scientific Affairs of the California Medical Association presents the following epitomes of progress in neurosurgery. Each item, in the judgment of a panel of knowledgeable physicians, has recently become reasonably firmly established, both as to scientific fact and clinical importance. The items are presented in simple epitome, and an authoritative reference, both to the item itself and to the subject as a whole, is generally given for those who may be unfamiliar with a particular item. The purpose is to assist busy practitioners, students, researchers, and scholars to stay abreast of progress in medicine, whether in their own field of special interest or another. The epitomes included here were selected by the Advisory Panel to the Section on Neurosurgery of the California Medical Association, and the summaries were prepared under the direction of John H. Neal, MD, and the panel.

  12. The status quo of neurosurgery in China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ji-Zong; Zhou, Liang-Fu; Zhou, Ding-Biao; Tang, Jie; Zhang, Dong

    2008-02-01

    With the application of great effort, much progress has been made to date in each specialty of neurosurgery in mainland China. In this article, we briefly review the present status of neurosurgery in China. The components and function of the Chinese Neurosurgical Society, the national organization for neurosurgery in China, are discussed. Neurosurgeons' acceptance of the concept of minimally invasive procedures has marked the start of an era of minimally invasive neurosurgery in China. Progress is evident in clinics, basic research, infrastructure, resident training, and multidisciplinary collaboration. Some weaknesses that need improvement are also mentioned. The current program offers a good basic foundation for development to meet future demands.

  13. [A short history of endoscopic neurosurgery].

    PubMed

    Wang, Long; Song, Zhi-Bin; Gao, Jian-Wei; Li, Xu-Guangl

    2013-11-01

    Since 1910, rigid cystoscopy was first applied in the lateral ventricular choroid plexus cauterization for the treatment of congenital hydrocephalus, thus, opening up a new window in the endoscopic neurosurgery, but poor surgical outcome and high mortality made the application of endoscopic neurosurgery in question. Latterly, because of the appearance of new microscope and optical fiber endoscope, neuroendoscopy has been applied adequately in neurosurgery, with the increase of its clinical indications. Along with it, the concept of neuroendoscopy in surgery has changed, as well as the expansion of clinical indications. At present, neuroendoscopy technology has become a significant branch of modern neurosurgery. PMID:24524639

  14. Challenges in contemporary academic neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Black, Peter M

    2006-03-01

    Traditionally, the ideal academic neurosurgeon has been a "quadruple threat," with excellence in clinical work, teaching, research, and administration. This tradition was best exemplified in Harvey Cushing, who developed the field of neurosurgery 90 years ago. This paradigm will probably have to change as academic neurosurgeons face major challenges. In patient care, these include increasing regulatory control, increasing malpractice costs, consolidation of expensive care in academic centers, and decreasing reimbursement; in resident teaching, work hour limitations and a changing resident culture; in research, the increasing dominance of basic scientists in governmental funding decisions and decreased involvement of neurosurgeons in scientific review committees; and in administration, problems of relationships in the workplace, patient safety, and employment compliance in an increasingly bureaucratic system. To meet these challenges, the new academic neurosurgeon will probably not be a quadruple threat personally but will be part of a quadruple threat in a department and institution. Neurosurgeons in such a setting will have to work with hospital, medical school, and national and international groups to address malpractice, reimbursement, subspecialization, and training problems; find supplemental sources of income through grants, development funds, and hospital support; lead in the development of multidisciplinary centers for neuroscience, brain tumor, spine, and other initiatives; and focus on training leaders for hospital, regional, and national groups to reconfigure neurosurgery. Collaboration, flexibility, and leadership will be characteristic of the academic neurosurgeon in this new era.

  15. An international randomised controlled trial to compare TARGeted Intraoperative radioTherapy (TARGIT) with conventional postoperative radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery for women with early-stage breast cancer (the TARGIT-A trial).

    PubMed Central

    Vaidya, Jayant S; Wenz, Frederik; Bulsara, Max; Tobias, Jeffrey S; Joseph, David J; Saunders, Christobel; Brew-Graves, Chris; Potyka, Ingrid; Morris, Stephen; Vaidya, Hrisheekesh J; Williams, Norman R; Baum, Michael

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Based on our laboratory work and clinical trials we hypothesised that radiotherapy after lumpectomy for breast cancer could be restricted to the tumour bed. In collaboration with the industry we developed a new radiotherapy device and a new surgical operation for delivering single-dose radiation to the tumour bed - the tissues at highest risk of local recurrence. We named it TARGeted Intraoperative radioTherapy (TARGIT). From 1998 we confirmed its feasibility and safety in pilot studies. OBJECTIVE To compare TARGIT within a risk-adapted approach with whole-breast external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) over several weeks. DESIGN The TARGeted Intraoperative radioTherapy Alone (TARGIT-A) trial was a pragmatic, prospective, international, multicentre, non-inferiority, non-blinded, randomised (1 : 1 ratio) clinical trial. Originally, randomisation occurred before initial lumpectomy (prepathology) and, if allocated TARGIT, the patient received it during the lumpectomy. Subsequently, the postpathology stratum was added in which randomisation occurred after initial lumpectomy, allowing potentially easier logistics and a more stringent case selection, but which needed a reoperation to reopen the wound to give TARGIT as a delayed procedure. The risk-adapted approach meant that, in the experimental arm, if pre-specified unsuspected adverse factors were found postoperatively after receiving TARGIT, EBRT was recommended. Pragmatically, this reflected how TARGIT would be practised in the real world. SETTING Thirty-three centres in 11 countries. PARTICIPANTS Women who were aged ≥ 45 years with unifocal invasive ductal carcinoma preferably ≤ 3.5 cm in size. INTERVENTIONS TARGIT within a risk-adapted approach and whole-breast EBRT. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES The primary outcome measure was absolute difference in local recurrence, with a non-inferiority margin of 2.5%. Secondary outcome measures included toxicity and breast cancer-specific and non

  16. Renaissance Neurosurgery: Italy's Iconic Contributions.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Anil; Khan, Imad Saeed; Apuzzo, Michael L

    2016-03-01

    Various changes in the sociopolitical milieu of Italy led to the increasing tolerance of the study of cadavers in the late Middle Ages. The efforts of Mondino de Liuzzi (1276-1326) and Guido da Vigevano (1280-1349) led to an explosion of cadaver-centric studies in centers such as Bologna, Florence, and Padua during the Renaissance period. Legendary scientists from this era, including Leonardo Da Vinci, Andreas Vesalius, Bartolomeo Eustachio, and Costanzo Varolio, furthered the study of neuroanatomy. The various texts produced during this period not only helped increase the understanding of neuroanatomy and neurophysiology but also led to the formalization of medical education. With increased understanding came new techniques to address various neurosurgical problems from skull fractures to severed peripheral nerves. The present study aims to review the major developments in Italy during the vibrant Renaissance period that led to major progress in the field of neurosurgery.

  17. Renaissance Neurosurgery: Italy's Iconic Contributions.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Anil; Khan, Imad Saeed; Apuzzo, Michael L

    2016-03-01

    Various changes in the sociopolitical milieu of Italy led to the increasing tolerance of the study of cadavers in the late Middle Ages. The efforts of Mondino de Liuzzi (1276-1326) and Guido da Vigevano (1280-1349) led to an explosion of cadaver-centric studies in centers such as Bologna, Florence, and Padua during the Renaissance period. Legendary scientists from this era, including Leonardo Da Vinci, Andreas Vesalius, Bartolomeo Eustachio, and Costanzo Varolio, furthered the study of neuroanatomy. The various texts produced during this period not only helped increase the understanding of neuroanatomy and neurophysiology but also led to the formalization of medical education. With increased understanding came new techniques to address various neurosurgical problems from skull fractures to severed peripheral nerves. The present study aims to review the major developments in Italy during the vibrant Renaissance period that led to major progress in the field of neurosurgery. PMID:26585723

  18. A history of neurosurgery in Canada.

    PubMed

    Weir, Bryce

    2011-03-01

    Canada existed for more than half a century before there were glimmerings of modern neurosurgical activity. Neurosurgery had advanced significantly in Europe and the United States prior to its being brought to Toronto and Montreal from American centers. The pioneers responsible for the rapid evolution in practice, teaching and research are described. The interplay of scientific, professional, demographic and economic forces with general historical trends has produced dramatic changes in the way that neurosurgery is now practiced.

  19. Neurosurgery: A legacy of excellence.

    PubMed

    Rajshekhar, Vedantam

    2015-01-01

    Neurosurgeons are often identified with traits such as arrogance and hubris. However, the true legacy of neurosurgeons is excellence. Harvey Cushing, the pioneering neurosurgeon of the United States, is largely responsible for this legacy of excellence. Eminent personalities have agreed that sincere and hard work is necessary to achieve excellence. Excellence in neurosurgery in the domains of surgical work and research will be discussed in the article. Excellence in surgical work should be measured comprehensively and over long follow-up periods using tools such as functional outcomes and quality of life instruments besides morbidity and mortality. For excellence in neurosurgical research, one can use the help of indices such as the h-index and i10 index. No single measure, whether for surgical excellence or excellence in research, however, incorporates a measure of qualities such as empathy, integrity and mentorship. These intangible qualities should be an integral part of the assessment of a neurosurgeon and his/her work. Cushing's attributes of meticulous record keeping, attention to detail, and maximal utilization of opportunities should guide us in our pursuit of excellence. In recent years, it has been suggested that excellence is not the result of an innate talent but can be aspired to by anyone willing to adopt a work ethic that involves several hours of "deliberate practice," feedback and passion. Neurosurgeons should continue to pursue the legacy of Cushing especially in present times when medical professionals are frequently depicted as being driven more by avarice than by Hippocratic principles. PMID:26238874

  20. Neurosurgery: A legacy of excellence.

    PubMed

    Rajshekhar, Vedantam

    2015-01-01

    Neurosurgeons are often identified with traits such as arrogance and hubris. However, the true legacy of neurosurgeons is excellence. Harvey Cushing, the pioneering neurosurgeon of the United States, is largely responsible for this legacy of excellence. Eminent personalities have agreed that sincere and hard work is necessary to achieve excellence. Excellence in neurosurgery in the domains of surgical work and research will be discussed in the article. Excellence in surgical work should be measured comprehensively and over long follow-up periods using tools such as functional outcomes and quality of life instruments besides morbidity and mortality. For excellence in neurosurgical research, one can use the help of indices such as the h-index and i10 index. No single measure, whether for surgical excellence or excellence in research, however, incorporates a measure of qualities such as empathy, integrity and mentorship. These intangible qualities should be an integral part of the assessment of a neurosurgeon and his/her work. Cushing's attributes of meticulous record keeping, attention to detail, and maximal utilization of opportunities should guide us in our pursuit of excellence. In recent years, it has been suggested that excellence is not the result of an innate talent but can be aspired to by anyone willing to adopt a work ethic that involves several hours of "deliberate practice," feedback and passion. Neurosurgeons should continue to pursue the legacy of Cushing especially in present times when medical professionals are frequently depicted as being driven more by avarice than by Hippocratic principles.

  1. Potential use of radiolabeled glucuronide prodrugs with auger and/or alpha emitters in combined chemo- and radio-therapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Unak, T

    2000-07-01

    Nowadays, the scientists from different disciplines have focused their attentions to new anticancer drug design for cancer chemotherapy. An effective anticancer drug should ensure the selective drug incorporation into the targeted tumor cells without principally incorporation into the normal cells. So, the targeted tumor cells can selectively be damaged by the cytotoxic effectiveness of the drug. The basic principles of drug design have involved "prodrug" concept, which means a chemical agent which is not itself active as an anticancer drug, but it can be transformed to an active form after its administration. Prodrugs can finally be activated onto the tumor cells by some kind of enzymes. In this context, the activation of glucuronide prodrugs by b-glucuronidase have a large potential applications in cancer chemotherapy. On the other hand, combined chemo- and radio-therapy of cancer (CCRTC) concept aims to combine the cytotoxicity of an aglycone with the radiotoxicity of an appropriate radionuclide on the same prodrug. So, the cytotoxic and radiotoxic effectiveness' will be able to be concentrated into the same tumor cell to increase obviously its damage. For experimental realization of this concept an effective anticancer prodrug should be radiolabeled with a radionuclide having high level of radiotoxic effectiveness such as Auger and/or alpha-emitter radionuclides. Iodine-125 and astatine-211 are very interesting radionuclides as being effective Auger and/or alpha-emitters. Briefly, the glucuronide prodrugs radiolabeled with iodine-125 or astatine-211 promise to be designed very effective anticancer agents in the future applications of cancer chemotherapy. PMID:10903386

  2. [FRACTIONATED STEREOTACTIC RADIOSURGERY: A GAME CHANGER FOR NEUROSURGERY].

    PubMed

    Nissim, Ouzi; Spiegelmann, Roberto

    2016-05-01

    The article by Dr. Cohen-Inbar published in this issue of Harefuah is a timely review that brings to the general medical community the recent important developments in the field of radiosurgery--the evolution of multi-session radiosurgery [or "FSR", standing for Fractionated Stereotactic Radiation]. Radiosurgery and FSR continue to have a tremendous impact on modern neurosurgery. Sharing sub-millimetric accuracy in radiation delivery made possible by real-time-imaging positioning, frameless single and multisession radiosurgery have become two faces of a therapeutic technique with wide application in the field of intracranial pathology. Blending dose fractionation with delivery precision, FSR is a hybrid tool that can be implemented safely and effectively for practically any intra-cranial pathology without restrictions of volume or location. Dr. Cohen Inbar reviews the available data regarding doses, fractionation schemes, and results for the different pathologies in which FSR is being increasingly applied. FSR, as single-dose radiosurgery since the late 1980s, has changed the practice of neurosurgery. Radical microsorgical tumor removal at any cost in demanding intracranial locations has been replaced by upfront conservative volume-reduction surgery, leaving the more complicated part of those tumors to safer elimination by precise irradiation in single or multiple sessions. In Israel, further to the first unit operative since 1993 at the Sheba Medical Center, 3 new active LINAC based treatment sites have been added in recent years, with facilities either planned or under construction in the remaining major medical centers with neurosurgical and radiotherapy resources. They are evidence of the central role this modality has captured in the management of intracranial pathology. PMID:27526561

  3. Simulation and resident education in spinal neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Bohm, Parker E.; Arnold, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: A host of factors have contributed to the increasing use of simulation in neurosurgical resident education. Although the number of simulation-related publications has increased exponentially over the past two decades, no studies have specifically examined the role of simulation in resident education in spinal neurosurgery. Methods: We performed a structured search of several databases to identify articles detailing the use of simulation in spinal neurosurgery education in an attempt to catalogue potential applications for its use. Results: A brief history of simulation in medicine is given, followed by current trends of spinal simulation utilization in residency programs. General themes from the literature are identified that are integral for implementing simulation into neurosurgical residency curriculum. Finally, various applications are reported. Conclusion: The use of simulation in spinal neurosurgery education is not as ubiquitous in comparison to other neurosurgical subspecialties, but many promising methods of simulation are available for augmenting resident education. PMID:25745588

  4. Review of Robotic Technology for Stereotactic Neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Faria, Carlos; Erlhagen, Wolfram; Rito, Manuel; De Momi, Elena; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Bicho, Estela

    2015-01-01

    The research of stereotactic apparatus to guide surgical devices began in 1908, yet a major part of today's stereotactic neurosurgeries still rely on stereotactic frames developed almost half a century ago. Robots excel at handling spatial information, and are, thus, obvious candidates in the guidance of instrumentation along precisely planned trajectories. In this review, we introduce the concept of stereotaxy and describe a standard stereotactic neurosurgery. Neurosurgeons' expectations and demands regarding the role of robots as assistive tools are also addressed. We list the most successful robotic systems developed specifically for or capable of executing stereotactic neurosurgery. A critical review is presented for each robotic system, emphasizing the differences between them and detailing positive features and drawbacks. An analysis of the listed robotic system features is also undertaken, in the context of robotic application in stereotactic neurosurgery. Finally, we discuss the current perspective, and future directions of a robotic technology in this field. All robotic systems follow a very similar and structured workflow despite the technical differences that set them apart. No system unequivocally stands out as an absolute best. The trend of technological progress is pointing toward the development of miniaturized cost-effective solutions with more intuitive interfaces. PMID:25955851

  5. Review of Robotic Technology for Stereotactic Neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Faria, Carlos; Erlhagen, Wolfram; Rito, Manuel; De Momi, Elena; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Bicho, Estela

    2015-01-01

    The research of stereotactic apparatus to guide surgical devices began in 1908, yet a major part of today's stereotactic neurosurgeries still rely on stereotactic frames developed almost half a century ago. Robots excel at handling spatial information, and are, thus, obvious candidates in the guidance of instrumentation along precisely planned trajectories. In this review, we introduce the concept of stereotaxy and describe a standard stereotactic neurosurgery. Neurosurgeons' expectations and demands regarding the role of robots as assistive tools are also addressed. We list the most successful robotic systems developed specifically for or capable of executing stereotactic neurosurgery. A critical review is presented for each robotic system, emphasizing the differences between them and detailing positive features and drawbacks. An analysis of the listed robotic system features is also undertaken, in the context of robotic application in stereotactic neurosurgery. Finally, we discuss the current perspective, and future directions of a robotic technology in this field. All robotic systems follow a very similar and structured workflow despite the technical differences that set them apart. No system unequivocally stands out as an absolute best. The trend of technological progress is pointing toward the development of miniaturized cost-effective solutions with more intuitive interfaces.

  6. The 2012 AANS Presidential Address. We are neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Paul C

    2012-12-01

    The theme of the 80th Annual Meeting of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons and the title of this presidential address, "We are neurosurgery," is a simple 3-word affirmation of who neurosurgeons are, what they have achieved, and how much there is yet to accomplish. Recent advances in neurobiology and the clinical neurosciences have brought an unprecedented understanding of the human nervous system in both health and disease. As a specialty, neurosurgery has translated knowledge, expanded techniques, and incorporated technology to exponentially expand the science and scope of neurosurgical practice. However, the rapidly advancing, divergently evolving growth of neurosurgery has had profound effects on all aspects of neurosurgery. In this address, the author examines the contemporary meaning of the annual meeting's theme as it relates to the science, practice, specialty, and profession of neurosurgery, as well as the neurosurgeon. In doing so, the author reveals his interpretation of "We are neurosurgery," which he hopes will have an effect on others.

  7. The history of neurosurgery in Bolivia and pediatric neurosurgery in Santa Cruz de la Sierra

    PubMed Central

    Dabdoub, Carlos F.; Dabdoub, Carlos B.

    2013-01-01

    The practice of neurosurgery in Bolivia began thousands of years ago with skull trepanation. This procedure dates from the earliest period of the Tiwanaku culture, a preInca civilization. Neurosurgical development in Bolivia has its origins in the late 19th century and can be divided in two stages. At the beginning, before the advent of neurosurgery as a discipline, some general surgeons performed procedures on the skull and brain. Formal neurosurgery in Bolivia was developed with the arrival of neurosurgeons trained in the United States and some countries of South America. The Bolivian Neurosurgical Society was created in 1975. Nowadays, our national society has 74 members. It is affiliated with the World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies and the Latin American Federation of Neurosurgical Societies. Presently, neurosurgery in Bolivia is similar to that seen in developed countries. In this sense, government programs should dedicate more financial support to establish specialized healthcare centers where the management of complex central nervous system lesions could be offered. In contrast, we believe that encouraging the local training of young neurosurgeons is one of the most important factors in the development of neurosurgery in Bolivia or any other country. PMID:24232440

  8. Advances in neurosurgery: The Fujita Health University experience

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ashish

    2011-01-01

    In a world with rapidly changing technologies in the field of neurosurgery, Japan leads the world in many subspecialities like vascular neurosurgery. Apart from this, neuro-oncology and spinal surgeries are also among the premium quality operations performed in the region. I would like to share my experience of spending 3 months at the Fujita Health University, Nagoya, Japan, and the rich expertise and technologies encountered during the period, which made me understand Neurosurgery in a better way. PMID:22059102

  9. Atlas-based system for functional neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowinski, Wieslaw L.; Yeo, Tseng T.; Yang, Guo L.; Dow, Douglas E.

    1997-05-01

    This paper addresses the development of an atlas-based system for preoperative functional neurosurgery planning and training, intraoperative support and postoperative analysis. The system is based on Atlas of Stereotaxy of the Human Brain by Schaltenbrand and Wahren used for interactive segmentation and labeling of clinical data in 2D/3D, and for assisting stereotactic targeting. The atlas microseries are digitized, enhanced, segmented, labeled, aligned and organized into mutually preregistered atlas volumes 3D models of the structures are also constructed. The atlas may be interactively registered with the actual patient's data. Several other features are also provided including data reformatting, visualization, navigation, mensuration, and stereotactic path display and editing in 2D/3D. The system increases the accuracy of target definition, reduces the time of planning and time of the procedure itself. It also constitutes a research platform for the construction of more advanced neurosurgery supporting tools and brain atlases.

  10. Neurosurgery: A profession or a technical trade?

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Clark

    2014-01-01

    The American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS), 11 years ago converted its Internal Revenue Code (IRC) tax status from a 501 (c) (3) to a 501 (c) (6) entity. By doing so, the professional medical association, now a trade association, was able to more aggressively lobby, support political campaigns, and pursue business opportunities for its members. In the following decade, major changes were seen in the practice of neurosurgery, especially as it relates to spine surgery. With the majority of neurosurgeons limiting themselves to a spine practice, an increased number of spinal procedures, most noted in the Medicare population, was recorded. For example, a 15-fold increase in complex spinal fusions for spinal stenosis was seen between 2002 and 2007. While the basis for this increase was not readily apparent, it was associated with a reduction in reimbursement per case of about 50%, fueling the belief that the increase in complexity of surgery permitted recovery of fees in complex cases to off-set the loss of reimbursement for simpler cases. Considering the growth of spinal surgery within neurosurgery, and decrease funding for spine surgery, in the future there may be too many surgeons chasing too few dollars. There appears to be within neurosurgery a crisis developing where future manpower projections do not realistically match future anticipated specialty funding. PMID:25558426

  11. [The origins of the French neurosurgery].

    PubMed

    Brunon, J

    2016-06-01

    Modern French neurosurgery starts at the beginning of the XXth century under the motivation of Joseph Babinski. He submitted his patients to Thierry de Martel who had learned this new specialized area of medicine with H. Cushing in the États-Unis and V. Horsey in Great Britain. His first successfully treated case of an intracranial tumor was published in 1909. But the true founding father was Clovis Vincent, initially a neurologist and collaborator of de Martel, who became the first chairman in 1933 of the neurosurgical department at the Pitié hospital of Paris and the first professor of neurosurgery in 1938. After the Second World War, many departments were created outside of Paris. Neurosurgery was definitively recognized as a specialized area in medicine in 1948. Currently, more than 400 neurosurgeons work in France. Because I had the very great privilege to be present at the birth of this society in 1970 and to still be in contact with some of the second and third generation of French neurosurgeons who led it to its high international recognition, the Chairman of the French Neurosurgical Society asked me to write this short historical vignette. PMID:27234912

  12. [The origins of the French neurosurgery].

    PubMed

    Brunon, J

    2016-06-01

    Modern French neurosurgery starts at the beginning of the XXth century under the motivation of Joseph Babinski. He submitted his patients to Thierry de Martel who had learned this new specialized area of medicine with H. Cushing in the États-Unis and V. Horsey in Great Britain. His first successfully treated case of an intracranial tumor was published in 1909. But the true founding father was Clovis Vincent, initially a neurologist and collaborator of de Martel, who became the first chairman in 1933 of the neurosurgical department at the Pitié hospital of Paris and the first professor of neurosurgery in 1938. After the Second World War, many departments were created outside of Paris. Neurosurgery was definitively recognized as a specialized area in medicine in 1948. Currently, more than 400 neurosurgeons work in France. Because I had the very great privilege to be present at the birth of this society in 1970 and to still be in contact with some of the second and third generation of French neurosurgeons who led it to its high international recognition, the Chairman of the French Neurosurgical Society asked me to write this short historical vignette.

  13. Art, passion, and neurosurgery: the role of the Society of Neurological Surgeons in academic neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, Robert J

    2011-11-01

    Neurosurgery is at a crossroads in a time of economic uncertainty. It is also a time of remarkable potential for innovation resulting in dramatic improvement in the way neurosurgeons care for patients and the quality of outcomes. Analysis of this key time point of neurosurgical history is drawn from reflections for a presidential address to the Society of Neurological Surgeons. It is the author's opinion that the best of academic neurosurgery must and will accept this challenge by developing not only the research but also the creativity and art of what neurosurgeons do for maximal patient benefit in research, educational, and clinical missions.

  14. Herbert Olivecrona: founder of Swedish neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Ljunggren, B

    1993-01-01

    Herbert Olivecrona (1891-1980) singlehandedly founded Swedish neurosurgery. At the International Congress in Neurology in Bern in August, 1931, Harvey Cushing invited the cream of the world's medical society to a private banquet. Among the 28 specially invited guests was Herbert Olivecrona. At 40 years old, Olivecrona took his seat with pioneers such as Otfrid Foerster, Percival Bailey, Hugh Cairns, Geoffrey Jefferson, and Sir Charles Sherrington. This suggests that Cushing was impressed by the Swedish aristocrat's didactic deeds when he visited the Serafimer Hospital in Stockholm 2 years earlier. During the mid-1920's, the radiologist Erik Lysholm greatly improved the technique of ventriculography and, challenged by Olivecrona, his diagnostic neuroradiology became of superior quality. In the early 1930's, utilizing technical innovations of his own, Lysholm became a master at demonstrating and localizing posterior fossa tumors, which Olivecrona then operated on. Olivecrona's clinic became the mecca to which many scholars, thirsting for more knowledge, went on a pilgrimage. The international reputation of the clinic was founded, not on epoch-making discoveries, but by the resolute and practical application of methods already launched elsewhere and the exemplary organization that Olivecrona had established in collaboration with Lysholm. In spite of hardships and primitive working conditions, the clinic at the Serafimer Hospital gradually developed into the ideal prototype for a modern neurosurgical department. Olivecrona trained many colorful personalities who later were to lay the foundation for neurosurgery in their home countries; these included Wilhelm Tönnis of Germany, Edvard Busch of Denmark, and Aarno Snellman of Finland. Olivecrona was a true pioneer who made major contributions in practically all fields of conventional neurosurgery.

  15. Neurosurgery for mental disorders: a review.

    PubMed

    Heeramun-Aubeeluck, A; Lu, Z

    2013-05-01

    Neurosurgical interventions date back to ancient civilization, 5100 BC through a practice known as trephination. Due to past abuse and ethical considerations, neurosurgical interventions in psychiatry remain a controversial issue. This article aims to review the different surgical techniques and their current application in the treatment of psychiatric disorders. The U.S Food and Drug Administration (FDA) gave its approval for vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) for the management of treatment-resistant depression in 2005 and deep brain stimulation (DBS) for refractory obsessive-compulsive disorders (OCD) in 2009. These invasive but non destructive techniques represent the future of neurosurgery for mental disorder. PMID:23739819

  16. Mythological and Prehistorical Origins of Neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Anil; Filis, Andreas; Kalakoti, Piyush

    2016-05-01

    Mythology has a cultural appeal, and the description of some neurosurgical procedures in the Hindu, Greek, Egyptian, and Chinese mythology has a bearing to the origins of our professions. The traces to some of our modern-day practices also can be linked back to the ancient prehistoric eras of the Siberian, Persian, and the Andean region. In this historical perspective, we briefly dwell into individual accounts through the prism of different cultures to highlight the development of neurosurgery in mythology and prehistoric era.

  17. Harvey Cushing: a founding father of neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Harold

    2009-10-01

    Harvey Cushing died 70 years ago, on 7 October, 1939, in his 71st year, of a myocardial infarction. He founded a school of neurosurgery whose disciples spread throughout the world, introduced the meticulous documentation of the clinical and pathological details of cerebral tumours, developed techniques of operative surgery which are now standard practice, has an endocrine disease which bears his name and even produced one of the best known medical biographies, the two-volume Life of Sir William Osler, which won the Pulitzer Prize for 1926. PMID:19966711

  18. Mythological and Prehistorical Origins of Neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Anil; Filis, Andreas; Kalakoti, Piyush

    2016-05-01

    Mythology has a cultural appeal, and the description of some neurosurgical procedures in the Hindu, Greek, Egyptian, and Chinese mythology has a bearing to the origins of our professions. The traces to some of our modern-day practices also can be linked back to the ancient prehistoric eras of the Siberian, Persian, and the Andean region. In this historical perspective, we briefly dwell into individual accounts through the prism of different cultures to highlight the development of neurosurgery in mythology and prehistoric era. PMID:26947728

  19. Harvey Cushing: a founding father of neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Harold

    2009-10-01

    Harvey Cushing died 70 years ago, on 7 October, 1939, in his 71st year, of a myocardial infarction. He founded a school of neurosurgery whose disciples spread throughout the world, introduced the meticulous documentation of the clinical and pathological details of cerebral tumours, developed techniques of operative surgery which are now standard practice, has an endocrine disease which bears his name and even produced one of the best known medical biographies, the two-volume Life of Sir William Osler, which won the Pulitzer Prize for 1926.

  20. Depression and neurosurgery: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Nicolaidis, Stylianos

    2005-05-01

    Neurosurgery has been used to treat depression since 1935, when open surgery was first used to isolate relatively large areas of the limbic system from the rest of the brain. Soon thereafter, more selective leucotomies were performed based on a growing knowledge of the role played by brain limbic circuitry in processing the emotions. Subsequent discovery of the effectiveness in depression of both electroconvulsive therapy and various pharmacotherapies raised serious doubts about "psychosurgical" treatments, but the introduction of stereotactic techniques revived interest in the selective-lesion, neurobiology-based approach. However, neurosurgery has only come to be regarded as an appropriate treatment of severe depression since Benabid introduced the frequency-dependent chronic electric stimulation technique. Because of its nondestructive nature, this procedure will undoubtedly be favored in the future. One can anticipate that, eventually, frequency-dependent chronic electric stimulation will be complemented by newer techniques such as microdialysis and reverse dialysis, with concomitant functional magnetic resonance imaging and/or positron emission tomography scanning, and the use of chemodes for microinfusion or for in situ insertion of reactivated-stem cells. To optimize success, these modern methods will require a new taxonomy of "depressions" based on up-to-date neurobiological criteria.

  1. History of Neurosurgery in Democratic People's Republic of Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Kee B; Roh, Young Han; Lee-Park, Owen; Park, Sophie

    2015-09-01

    Neurosurgery in Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) has undergone remarkable progress since its beginning in the 1950s. With the initial support from socialist countries of the Soviet bloc, especially Professor Constantin Arseni of Romania, the nation has consistently produced a number of its own neurosurgeons each year and fostered further advancement by establishing the Korean Neurosurgery Association (DPRK). Despite the recent international collaborative activity for North Korean neurosurgery-namely with Foundation for International Education in Neurological Surgery, World Federation of Neurological Surgeons, and Korean American Medical Association-the sparse exchange of information, knowledge, and surgical skills still remains largely inadequate.

  2. Virtual neurosurgery, training for the future.

    PubMed

    Vloeberghs, M; Glover, A; Benford, S; Jones, A; Wang, P; Becker, Adib

    2007-06-01

    Virtual reality (VR) simulators have been created for various surgical specialties. The common theme is extensive use of graphics, confined spaces, limited functionality and limited tactile feedback. A development team at the University of Nottingham, UK, consisting of computer scientists, mechanical engineers, graphic designers and a neurosurgeon, set out to develop a haptic, e.g. tactile simulator for neurosurgery making use of boundary elements (BE). The relative homogeneity of the brain, allows boundary elements, e.g. 'surface only' rendering, to simulate the brain structure. A boundary element simplifies the computing equations saves computing time, by assuming the properties of the surface equal the properties of the body. A limited audit was done by neurosurgical users confirming the potential of the simulator as a training tool. This paper focuses on the application of the computational method and refers to the underlying mathematical structure. Full references are included regarding the mathematical methodology.

  3. Options for perioperative pain management in neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Vadivelu, Nalini; Kai, Alice M; Tran, Daniel; Kodumudi, Gopal; Legler, Aron; Ayrian, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    Moderate-to-severe pain following neurosurgery is common but often does not get attention and is therefore underdiagnosed and undertreated. Compounding this problem is the traditional belief that neurosurgical pain is inconsequential and even dangerous to treat. Concerns about problematic effects associated with opioid analgesics such as nausea, vomiting, oversedation, and increased intracranial pressure secondary to elevated carbon dioxide tension from respiratory depression have often led to suboptimal postoperative analgesic strategies in caring for neurosurgical patients. Neurosurgical patients may have difficulty or be incapable of communicating their need for analgesics due to neurologic deficits, which poses an additional challenge. Postoperative pain control should be a priority, because pain adversely affects recovery and patient outcomes. Inconsistent practices and the quality of current analgesic strategies for neurosurgical patients still leave room for improvement. Given the complexity of postoperative pain management for these patients, multimodal strategies are often required to optimize pain control and at the same time limit undesired side effects. PMID:26929661

  4. Interstitial laser thermotherapy in neurosurgery: a review.

    PubMed

    Menovsky, T; Beek, J F; van Gemert, M J; Roux, F X; Bown, S G

    1996-01-01

    One of the most recent laser treatment modalities in neurosurgery is interstitial laser thermotherapy (ILTT). In this review, experimental and clinical studies concerning intracranial ILTT are discussed. Two methods for intra-operative control of the laser induced lesions are described; i.e., computer-controlled power delivery, using a thermocouple that is positioned interstitially at the periphery of the tumour to maintain the desired temperature at that point, and MRI, to visualise the extent of the thermal lesions induced by ILTT. The results show that ILTT using a Nd: YAG laser is easy and relatively effective in the treatment of small deep-seated brain tumours with minimal risk and complications. This review is concluded with suggestions for further improvement of this treatment modality.

  5. Comprehensive review on rhino-neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Hosemann, Werner; Schroeder, Henry W.S.

    2015-01-01

    In the past 2 decades, an innovative and active field of surgical collaboration has been evolved and established combining the expertise of neurosurgery and rhinosurgery in the endonasal treatment of different lesions affecting the anterior skull base together with the adjacent intranasal and intradural areas. Important prerequisites for this development were improvements of technical devices, definitions of transnasal surgical corridors, and approvements in endonasal reconstructions, e.g. by use of pedicled nasal mucosal flaps. Due to these improvements, the rate of perioperative infectious complications remained acceptable. Interdisciplinary surgical teams (4-hands-2-minds) have been established constituting specialized centers of “rhino-neurosurgery”. With growing expertise of these groups, it could be shown that oncological results and perioperative complications were comparable to traditional surgery while at the same time the patients’ morbidity could be reduced. The present review encompasses the recent literature focusing on the development, technical details, results, and complications of “rhino-neurosurgery”. PMID:26770276

  6. [Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring improves outcome in neurosurgery].

    PubMed

    Sarnthein, J; Krayenbühl, N; Actor, B; Bozinov, O; Bernays, R

    2012-01-18

    Intraoperative Neurophysiological Mo-nitoring (IONM) identifies eloquent areas or nerves fibers during neurosurgical interventions and monitors their function. For several interventions IONM has become mandatory in neurosurgery. IONM increases patient safety during surgery as the risk of neurological deficits is reduced. Safer surgery reduces the time needed for the intervention and thereby reduces risk. IONM contributes to complete resection of tumors, which in turn prolongs patients' survival. Complicated surgical interventions associated with an elevated risk of neurological deficits have only become possible due to IONM. IONM comprises a variety of procedures that are selected for a particular intervention. With appropriate selection of the procedures IONM has been shown to improve neurological and functional outcome after neurosurgical interventions. PMID:22252591

  7. The 2015 AANS Presidential Address: Neurosurgery's founding principles.

    PubMed

    Harbaugh, Robert E

    2015-12-01

    These are turbulent times for American neurosurgery. It is important to look ahead and prepare for the future but it is also important to look back-for it is memory and tradition that prevent the tyranny of the present. It is impossible to know where we are going if we don't remember where we were. In this paper I want to discuss the founding principles of neurosurgery-the principles that have allowed neurosurgery to prosper in its first century-and to stress the importance of adhering to these principles in times of change. I also want to talk to you about how the American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) is helping neurosurgeons honor our founding principles, while preparing neurosurgery for its second century. PMID:26620322

  8. Simulation in neurosurgery: Past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Suri, Ashish; Patra, Devi Prasad; Meena, Rajesh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Neurosurgery is one of the most technically demanding medical professions that warrants a high level of expertise. In the present context of competitive medical practice, high societal expectations regarding quality of patient care and medicolegal and financial constraints, there are fewer opportunities for a trainee to achieve competency in standard neurosurgical, microsurgical, and operative techniques. Practice on simulation models like cadavers has been a trend since antiquity; however, recent development of newer models with their strategic modifications has given simulation education a new dimension. It has allowed trainees to acquire and improve surgical skills and knowledge in specifically fabricated and controlled settings with no risk to real patients. Simulation also offers the opportunity for deliberate practice and repetition unlimited number of times so that psychomotor skills can be automated. There is ever-growing evidence showing the positive impact of simulation on resident training in various areas of health care. Advances in computer technology and imaging, development of sophisticated virtual reality simulators with haptic feedback and the recent addition of three-dimensional printing technology, have opened a wide arena for the development of high-fidelity patient-specific models to complement current neurosurgical training. Simulation training in neurosurgery in India is still elementary since its inception at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi. A structured modular training program has been developed which is yet to be implemented at a multi-institutional level. Stringent efforts are needed to establish a uniform resident training curriculum where simulators can be used to complement current neurosurgical training. PMID:27147144

  9. Medieval neurosurgery: contributions from the Middle East, Spain, and Persia.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Scott Y; McDonnell, Dennis E; Ahmadian, Amir; Vender, John R

    2007-01-01

    Modern neurological and spinal surgical techniques have been developed on the foundations established by predecessors. Modern 21st century neurosurgery begins in the Babylonian period, with the Edwin Smith papyrus. Throughout history, periods of enlightenment have resulted in advances in knowledge and understanding that have served as stepping stones for generations to come. As in other fields, in neurosurgery these periods of "enlightenment" have occurred in a variety of civilizations and time periods. PMID:17961054

  10. The 2012 AANS Presidential Address. We are neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Paul C

    2012-12-01

    The theme of the 80th Annual Meeting of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons and the title of this presidential address, "We are neurosurgery," is a simple 3-word affirmation of who neurosurgeons are, what they have achieved, and how much there is yet to accomplish. Recent advances in neurobiology and the clinical neurosciences have brought an unprecedented understanding of the human nervous system in both health and disease. As a specialty, neurosurgery has translated knowledge, expanded techniques, and incorporated technology to exponentially expand the science and scope of neurosurgical practice. However, the rapidly advancing, divergently evolving growth of neurosurgery has had profound effects on all aspects of neurosurgery. In this address, the author examines the contemporary meaning of the annual meeting's theme as it relates to the science, practice, specialty, and profession of neurosurgery, as well as the neurosurgeon. In doing so, the author reveals his interpretation of "We are neurosurgery," which he hopes will have an effect on others. PMID:23198859

  11. Radio Galaxies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Ann

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information on radio galaxies. Topic areas addressed include: what produces the radio emission; radio telescopes; locating radio galaxies; how distances to radio galaxies are found; physics of radio galaxies; computer simulations of radio galaxies; and the evolution of radio galaxies with cosmic time. (JN)

  12. Introduction: military neurosurgery, past and present.

    PubMed

    Klimo, Paul; Ragel, Brian T

    2010-05-01

    For a physician has the worth of many other warriors, both for the excision of arrows and for the administration of soothing drugs. Homer, Iliad XI.514-515 Ever since armed conflict has been used as a means to settle disputes among men, there have been those who have been tasked to mend the wounds that ravage a soldier's body from the weapons of war. The Iliad portrays the pivotal 10th year of the legendary Trojan War, during which a schism in the Greek leadership prolongs the extended siege of the city of Troy. In the midst of this martial epic come the lines quoted above, quietly attesting to the value of the military physician, even under the crude conditions of the Greek Dark Age. They are uttered by Idomeneus, one of the foremost Greeks, when he is enjoining one of his comrades, Nestor, to rescue the injured Greek physician Machaon and take him back from the line to treat his wounds. He is afraid that Machaon will be captured by the Trojans, a loss far greater than that of any other single warrior. Duty to country has helped shape the careers of many neurosurgeons, including iconic US figures such as Harvey Cushing and Donald Matson. This issue of Neurosurgical Focus celebrates the rich history of military neurosurgery from the wars of yesterday to the conflicts of today. We have been humbled by the tremendous response to this topic. The 25 articles within this issue will provide the reader with both a broad and an in-depth look at the many facets of military neurosurgery. We have attempted to group articles based on their predominant topic. We also encourage our audience to read other recently published articles. The first 8 articles relate to the current conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq. The lead article, written by Randy Bell and colleagues from the National Naval Medical Center and Walter Reed Army Medical Center, discusses what is arguably one of the most important contributions by military neurosurgeons from these 2 conflicts: the rapid and aggressive

  13. Neurosurgery in rural Nigeria: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Rabiu, Taopheeq Bamidele; Komolafe, Edward Oluwole

    2016-01-01

    Background: Africa has very few neurosurgeons. These are almost exclusively in urban centers. Consequently, people in rural areas, most of the African population, have poor or no access to neurosurgical care. We have recently pioneered rural neurosurgery in Nigeria. Objectives: This report details our initial experiences and the profile of neurosurgical admissions in our center. Methods: A prospective observational study of all neurosurgical patients managed at a rural tertiary health institution in Nigeria from December 2010 to May 2012 was done. Simple descriptive data analysis was performed. Results: A total of 249 males (75.2%) and 82 females (24.8%) were managed. The median age was 37 years (range: Day of birth – 94 years). Trauma was the leading cause of presentation with 225 (68.0%) and 35 (10.6%) having sustained head and spinal injuries, respectively. Operative intervention was performed in 54 (16.3%). Twenty-four (7.2%) patients discharged against medical advice, mostly for economic reasons. Most patients (208, 63.4%) had satisfactory outcome while 30 (9.1%) died. Conclusion: Trauma is the leading cause of rural neurosurgical presentations. There is an urgent need to improve access to adequate neurosurgical care in the rural communities.

  14. Surveillance and management of ventriculitis following neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, H; Jenks, P J

    2015-04-01

    Ventriculitis is an important complication following neurosurgery and is often associated with the use of an external ventricular drain (EVD). The incidence varies from <5% to 20%, partly due to variations in the definitions used for diagnosis. Staphylococci are the most important causes but the isolation of coagulase-negative staphylococci from a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) sample needs to be interpreted with caution as it may represent contamination. Risk factors for ventriculitis include advanced age, the duration of EVD placement, the number of manipulations and the presence of intraventricular haemorrhage. Prevention strategies increasingly focus on the implementation of a care bundle that includes aseptic technique at the time of insertion and during any manipulations, skin preparation, prophylactic antibiotics, and appropriate dressings at the site of the EVD. The use of EVDs impregnated with antimicrobial agents is increasing but, whereas some studies show that these are effective, it is not clear whether they provide added benefit when there is compliance with other measures. Antimicrobial treatment is challenging as many widely used agents do not penetrate into the CSF and causative bacteria are increasingly multidrug resistant. Often a combination of high-dose intravenous and intraventricular agents is required, especially for Gram-negative infections. Large trials in this area are challenging to conduct; therefore, to better inform preventive strategies and to optimize management of this important condition, ongoing national surveillance and pooling of data on treatment approaches and outcomes are needed. PMID:25687249

  15. Navigation system for neurosurgery with PC platform.

    PubMed

    Akatsuka, Y; Shibasaki, T; Saito, A; Kosaka, A; Matsuzaki, H; Asano, T; Furuhashi, Y

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a navigation system for a surgical microscope and an endoscope which can be used for neurosurgery. In this system, a wireframe model of a target tumor and other significant anatomical landmarks are superimposed in real-time onto live video images taken from the microscope and the endoscope. The wireframe model is generated from a CT/MRI slice images. Overlaid images are simultaneously displayed in the same monitor using the picture-in-picture function so that the surgeon can concentrate on the single monitor during the surgery. The system measures the position and orientation of the patient using specially designed non-contact sensing devices mounted on the microscope and the endoscope. Based on this real-time measurement, the system displays other useful information about the navigation as well as the rendered wireframe. The accuracy of registration between the wireframe model and the actual live view is less than 2 mm. We tested this system in actual surgery several times, and verified its performance and effectiveness.

  16. Neurosurgery in rural Nigeria: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Rabiu, Taopheeq Bamidele; Komolafe, Edward Oluwole

    2016-01-01

    Background: Africa has very few neurosurgeons. These are almost exclusively in urban centers. Consequently, people in rural areas, most of the African population, have poor or no access to neurosurgical care. We have recently pioneered rural neurosurgery in Nigeria. Objectives: This report details our initial experiences and the profile of neurosurgical admissions in our center. Methods: A prospective observational study of all neurosurgical patients managed at a rural tertiary health institution in Nigeria from December 2010 to May 2012 was done. Simple descriptive data analysis was performed. Results: A total of 249 males (75.2%) and 82 females (24.8%) were managed. The median age was 37 years (range: Day of birth – 94 years). Trauma was the leading cause of presentation with 225 (68.0%) and 35 (10.6%) having sustained head and spinal injuries, respectively. Operative intervention was performed in 54 (16.3%). Twenty-four (7.2%) patients discharged against medical advice, mostly for economic reasons. Most patients (208, 63.4%) had satisfactory outcome while 30 (9.1%) died. Conclusion: Trauma is the leading cause of rural neurosurgical presentations. There is an urgent need to improve access to adequate neurosurgical care in the rural communities. PMID:27695224

  17. Role of computer technology in neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Abdelwahab, M G; Cavalcanti, D D; Preul, M C

    2010-08-01

    In the clinical office, during surgical planning, or in the operating room, neurosurgeons have been surrounded by the digital world either recreating old tools or introducing new ones. Technological refinements, chiefly based on the use of computer systems, have altered the modus operandi for neurosurgery. In the emergency room or in the office, patient data are entered, digitally dictated, or gathered from electronic medical records. Images from every modality can be examined on a Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) or can be seen remotely on cell phones. Surgical planning is based on high-resolution reconstructions, and microsurgical or radiosurgical approaches can be assessed precisely using stereotaxy. Tumor resection, abscess or hematoma evacuation, or the management of vascular lesions can be assisted intraoperatively by new imaging resources integrated into the surgical microscope. Mathematical models can dictate how a lesion may recur as well as how often a particular patient should be followed. Finally, virtual reality is being developed as a training tool for residents and surgeons by preoperatively simulating complex surgical scenarios. Altogether, computerization at each level of patient care has been affected by digital technology to help enhance the safety of procedures and thereby improve outcomes of patients undergoing neurosurgical procedures.

  18. The history of neurosurgery at the University of Rochester.

    PubMed

    Kimmell, Kristopher T; Petraglia, Anthony L; Bakos, Robert; Rodenhouse, Thomas; Maurer, Paul K; Pilcher, Webster H

    2014-10-01

    The Department of Neurosurgery at the University of Rochester has a long legacy of excellent patient care and innovation in the neurosciences. The department's founder, Dr. William Van Wagenen, was a direct pupil of Harvey Cushing and the first president of the Harvey Cushing Society. His successor, Dr. Frank P. Smith, was also a leader in organized neurosurgery and helped to permanently memorialize his mentor with an endowed fellowship that today is one of the most prestigious training awards in neurosurgery. The first 2 chiefs are honored every year by the department with memorial invited lectureships in their names. The department is home to a thriving multidisciplinary research program that fulfills the lifelong vision of its founder, Dr. Van Wagenen. PMID:25105700

  19. Landmark papers in cerebrovascular neurosurgery 2015.

    PubMed

    Moore, Justin M; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Gupta, Raghav; Adeeb, Nimer; Patel, Apar S; Ogilvy, Christopher S; Thomas, Ajith J

    2016-09-01

    The management of cerebrovascular disease has advanced considerably in 2015. Five randomized control trials have firmly established the role of endovascular thrombectomy for ischemic strokes due to large vessel occlusion. The randomized trial of intraarterial treatment for acute ischemic stroke (MR CLEAN) (Berkhemer et al. NEJM 2015;372:11-20) was the first of a series on the topic. There was a total of 5 randomized controlled trials published showing benefit in terms of functional outcomes at 90days for mechanical thrombectomy including the Endovascular Therapy for Ischemic stroke with perfusion-imaging selection (EXTEND IA) (Campbell et al. NEJM 2015;372:1009-18), the Randomized assessment of rapid endovascular treatment of ischemic stroke (ESCAPE) (Goyal et al. NEJM 2015;372:1019-30) trials, the stent-retriever thrombectomy after IV t-PA is t-PA alone in stroke (SWIFT-PRIME) (Saver et al. NEJM 2015;372:2285-95), and the thrombectomy within 8h after symptom onset in Ischemic stroke (REVASCAT) trial (Jovin et al. NEJM 2015; 372:2296-306). Six-year results from randomized controlled Barrow Ruptured Aneurysm Trial (BRAT) found no significant difference in functional outcomes in patients ruptured aneurysms treated surgically clippings versus endovascular treatment (Spetzler et al. JNS 2015;123:609-17. The 10-year results of the International Subarachnoid Aneurysm trial (ISAT) reported similar mortality rates and good functional outcomes between clipped and coiled patients (Molyneux et al. Lancet 2015;385:691-7). We also discuss the impact of genome wide sequencing studies in familial aneurysms, the largest publication on stent assisted coiling and flow diverter for aneurysms and noteworthy papers relevant to Moyamoya and cavernous malformations (Yang et al. Neurosurgery 2015;77:241-7). PMID:27366977

  20. The legacy of nanotechnology: revolution and prospects in neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Khawaja, Ayaz Mahmood

    2011-01-01

    Nanotechnology has been an ever-growing field since the discovery of carbon fullerenes, and is being assimilated progressively into a variety of other disciplines including medical science. The association with neurosurgery had initially been less well characterized compared to other organ systems, but has recently offered promising future potential for a wide range of utilities including new therapeutic options for Glioblastoma Multiforme, neurprotection against oxidative stress, nerve nanorepair, nanodiagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, nanoimaging with nanoparticles and quantum dots, nanomanipulation of CNS with surgical nanobots, and nanoneuromodulation with nanofibres & nanowires. This article examines such potentials as well as others, of the utility of nanotechnology in Neurosurgery.

  1. The Co-evolution of Neuroimaging and Psychiatric Neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Dyster, Timothy G; Mikell, Charles B; Sheth, Sameer A

    2016-01-01

    The role of neuroimaging in psychiatric neurosurgery has evolved significantly throughout the field's history. Psychiatric neurosurgery initially developed without the benefit of information provided by modern imaging modalities, and thus lesion targets were selected based on contemporary theories of frontal lobe dysfunction in psychiatric disease. However, by the end of the 20th century, the availability of structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) allowed for the development of mechanistic theories attempting to explain the anatamofunctional basis of these disorders, as well as the efficacy of stereotactic neuromodulatory treatments. Neuroimaging now plays a central and ever-expanding role in the neurosurgical management of psychiatric disorders, by influencing the determination of surgical candidates, allowing individualized surgical targeting and planning, and identifying network-level changes in the brain following surgery. In this review, we aim to describe the coevolution of psychiatric neurosurgery and neuroimaging, including ways in which neuroimaging has proved useful in elucidating the therapeutic mechanisms of neuromodulatory procedures. We focus on ablative over stimulation-based procedures given their historical precedence and the greater opportunity they afford for post-operative re-imaging, but also discuss important contributions from the deep brain stimulation (DBS) literature. We conclude with a discussion of how neuroimaging will transition the field of psychiatric neurosurgery into the era of precision medicine. PMID:27445706

  2. Franc D. Ingraham and the genesis of pediatric neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Lohani, Subash; Cohen, Alan R

    2013-06-01

    In 1929, Franc D. Ingraham, Harvey Cushing's protégé, established the first pediatric neurosurgical unit in the world at Boston Children's Hospital and dedicated his career to the neurosurgical care of children. He trained with both Cushing and Dandy and spent 1 year working in Oxford with Sherrington, who considered Ingraham to be the finest operative surgeon ever to work in his laboratory. Ingraham was instrumental in developing novel treatments, which he compiled in his classic book, Neurosurgery of Infancy and Childhood. Although he was modest and shy, Ingraham loved to entertain children with magic and enjoyed photography in and out of the operating room. Unfortunately, his career was plagued by personal illness, and he died young in 1965 at the age of 67. Despite his prolific 36-year neurosurgical career, Ingraham remained an associate professor at Harvard at his retirement. To recognize his remarkable contributions, Harvard established an endowed chair in his name in 1967. Ingraham was a pioneer and a leader in the development of pediatric neurosurgery by virtue of his imagination, intelligence, and ability to lead and inspire others. Cushing has come to be regarded as the founder of neurosurgery. It is fair to conclude that Ingraham, his disciple, is the founder of pediatric neurosurgery. PMID:23601016

  3. Battling blood loss in neurosurgery: Harvey Cushing's embrace of electrosurgery.

    PubMed

    Voorhees, Jennifer R; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A; Laws, Edward R; Spencer, Dennis D

    2005-04-01

    For his pioneering spirit, definitive work, and unparalleled devotion to conquering neurosurgery's toughest obstacles, Harvey Williams Cushing inarguably has earned the title, "The Father of Neurosurgery." His revolutionary incorporation of electrosurgical techniques in neurosurgery was not exceptional, but part of a pattern of recognizing, embracing, and establishing the use of medical technologies with great potential. Until 1910, Cushing had systematically reduced neurosurgery's primary complications--infection and the effects of intracranial pressure--to decrease mortality rates. Hemostasis had always been a concern of William Halsted's surgical protégé, but only after 1910 could Cushing primarily focus on it. In fact, Cushing's crucial collaboration with William T. Bovie and his electrosurgical apparatus conquered this major obstacle in 1926. The nature of their collaboration--two experts in their respective fields who were passionate about their work, working side by side in the operating room--resulted in progress that surpassed all predecessors in the field. Cushing never did learn the physics behind one of the most important advances of his career. Nonetheless, he did know that by greatly reducing blood loss, electrosurgery allowed him to operate in patients whose tumors had been previously deemed inoperable and on the entire spectrum of neurosurgical patients more safely.

  4. The Co-evolution of Neuroimaging and Psychiatric Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Dyster, Timothy G.; Mikell, Charles B.; Sheth, Sameer A.

    2016-01-01

    The role of neuroimaging in psychiatric neurosurgery has evolved significantly throughout the field’s history. Psychiatric neurosurgery initially developed without the benefit of information provided by modern imaging modalities, and thus lesion targets were selected based on contemporary theories of frontal lobe dysfunction in psychiatric disease. However, by the end of the 20th century, the availability of structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) allowed for the development of mechanistic theories attempting to explain the anatamofunctional basis of these disorders, as well as the efficacy of stereotactic neuromodulatory treatments. Neuroimaging now plays a central and ever-expanding role in the neurosurgical management of psychiatric disorders, by influencing the determination of surgical candidates, allowing individualized surgical targeting and planning, and identifying network-level changes in the brain following surgery. In this review, we aim to describe the coevolution of psychiatric neurosurgery and neuroimaging, including ways in which neuroimaging has proved useful in elucidating the therapeutic mechanisms of neuromodulatory procedures. We focus on ablative over stimulation-based procedures given their historical precedence and the greater opportunity they afford for post-operative re-imaging, but also discuss important contributions from the deep brain stimulation (DBS) literature. We conclude with a discussion of how neuroimaging will transition the field of psychiatric neurosurgery into the era of precision medicine. PMID:27445706

  5. Analysis of Electronic Densities and Integrated Doses in Multiform Glioblastomas Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Baron-Aznar, C.; Moreno-Jimenez, S.; Celis, M. A.; Ballesteros-Zebadua, P.; Larraga-Gutierrez, J. M.

    2008-08-11

    Integrated dose is the total energy delivered in a radiotherapy target. This physical parameter could be a predictor for complications such as brain edema and radionecrosis after stereotactic radiotherapy treatments for brain tumors. Integrated Dose depends on the tissue density and volume. Using CT patients images from the National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery and BrainScan(c) software, this work presents the mean density of 21 multiform glioblastomas, comparative results for normal tissue and estimated integrated dose for each case. The relationship between integrated dose and the probability of complications is discussed.

  6. Analysis of Electronic Densities and Integrated Doses in Multiform Glioblastomas Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barón-Aznar, C.; Moreno-Jiménez, S.; Celis, M. A.; Lárraga-Gutiérrez, J. M.; Ballesteros-Zebadúa, P.

    2008-08-01

    Integrated dose is the total energy delivered in a radiotherapy target. This physical parameter could be a predictor for complications such as brain edema and radionecrosis after stereotactic radiotherapy treatments for brain tumors. Integrated Dose depends on the tissue density and volume. Using CT patients images from the National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery and BrainScansoftware, this work presents the mean density of 21 multiform glioblastomas, comparative results for normal tissue and estimated integrated dose for each case. The relationship between integrated dose and the probability of complications is discussed.

  7. Perfluorocarbons: recent developments and implications for neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Sakas, D E; Whittaker, K W; Crowell, R M; Zervas, N T

    1996-08-01

    Over the last 30 years, perfluorocarbons (PFCs) have been extensively investigated as oxygen carriers. Early studies indicated that these compounds could be used as blood substitutes or protective agents against ischemia. Adverse characteristics such as instability, short intravascular half-life, and uncertainties concerning possible toxicity precluded wide clinical application. However, advances in PFC technology have led to the development of improved second-generation oxygen carriers that incorporate well-tolerated emulsifiers (egg-yolk phospholipids). The authors review recent developments in this field and consider the potential role of PFCs in future neurosurgical practice. Diagnostic applications could include their use to assess cerebral blood flow, local oxygen tension, and brain metabolism or to achieve enhanced imaging and precise staging of inflammatory, neoplastic, or vascular disease processes by means of computerized tomography, ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance studies. Therapeutic applications could include cerebral protection, an adjunctive role in radiotherapy of malignant brain tumors, protection against air embolism, the preservation of organs for transplantation, and ventilatory support in head-injured patients with compromised lung function. In addition, PFCs have been used successfully as a tool in ophthalmic microsurgery and potentially they could fulfill a similar role in microneurosurgery. PMID:8755753

  8. Compact multi-spectral imaging system for dermatology and neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noordmans, Herke Jan; de Roode, Rowland; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf

    2007-03-01

    A compact multi-spectral imaging system is presented as diagnostic tool in dermatology and neurosurgery. Using an electronically tunable filter, a sensitive high resolution digital camera, 140 spectral images from 400 nm up to 720 nm are acquired in 40 s. Advanced image processing algorithms are used to enable interactive acquisition, viewing, image registration and image analysis. Experiments in the department of dermatology and neurosurgery show that multispectral imaging reveals much more detail than conventional medical photography or a surgical microscope, as images can be reprocessed to enhance the view on e.g. tumor boundaries. Using a hardware-based interactive registration algorithm, multi-spectral images can be aligned to correct for motion occurred during image acquisition or to compare acquisitions from different moments in time. The system shows to be a powerful diagnostics tool for medical imaging in the visual and near IR range.

  9. Opportunities and dangers for neurosurgery in the current NHS.

    PubMed

    Bell, B Anthony

    2015-01-01

    The NHS is entering a third decade of administrative turbulence and cost pressures and many view the new NHS structure and systems as complex and confusing. Health and social care budgets are being merged in some geographical areas and large efficiency savings are needed by 2020. There are risks that lie ahead for neurosurgery and our patients if the specialty becomes further fragmented and opportunities for positive change are missed. One of the new care models proposed in the NHS five year plan is specialist care provided across multiple hospital sites by a single overarching specialist trust, mirroring ophthalmology where the Moorfields trust provides specialist eye services in over 20 locations in London and the South East. This model lends itself to adoption by neurosurgery and has the potential to increase standards, efficiency, training and research. PMID:26488224

  10. Cerenkov and radioluminescence imaging of brain tumor specimens during neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinelli, Antonello Enrico; Schiariti, Marco P.; Grana, Chiara M.; Ferrari, Mahila; Cremonesi, Marta; Boschi, Federico

    2016-05-01

    We presented the first example of Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) and radioluminescence imaging (RLI) of human tumor specimens. A patient with a brain meningioma localized in the left parietal region was injected with 166 MBq of Y90-DOTATOC the day before neurosurgery. The specimens of the tumor removed during surgery were imaged using both CLI and RLI using an optical imager prototype developed in our laboratory. The system is based on a cooled electron multiplied charge coupled device coupled with an f/0.95 17-mm C-mount lens. We showed for the first time the possibility of obtaining CLI and RLI images of fresh human brain tumor specimens removed during neurosurgery.

  11. Cerenkov and radioluminescence imaging of brain tumor specimens during neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinelli, Antonello Enrico; Schiariti, Marco P.; Grana, Chiara M.; Ferrari, Mahila; Cremonesi, Marta; Boschi, Federico

    2016-05-01

    We presented the first example of Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) and radioluminescence imaging (RLI) of human tumor specimens. A patient with a brain meningioma localized in the left parietal region was injected with 166 MBq of Y90-DOTATOC the day before neurosurgery. The specimens of the tumor removed during surgery were imaged using both CLI and RLI using an optical imager prototype developed in our laboratory. The system is based on a cooled electron multiplied charge coupled device coupled with an f/0.95 17-mm C-mount lens. We showed for the first time the possibility of obtaining CLI and RLI images of fresh human brain tumor specimens removed during neurosurgery.

  12. The influence of war on the development of neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Dowdy, Justin; Pait, T Glenn

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of craniospinal war wounds proved to be a significant driving force in the early growth of neurosurgery as a specialty. This publication explores the historical relationship between the evolution of combat methodology from antiquity through modern conflicts as it dovetails with and drives corresponding advancements in the field of neurosurgery. Whether it's the basic management principles for intracranial projectile wounds derived from World War I experiences, the drastic improvement in the outcomes and management of spinal cord injuries observed in World War II, or the fact that both of these wars played a crucial role in the development of a training system that is the origin of modern residency programs, the influence of wartime experiences is pervasive.

  13. Historical perspective on neurosurgery in Germany after World War II.

    PubMed

    Collmann, Hartmut; Vitzthum, Hans-Ekkehart

    2008-11-01

    AFTER THE COLLAPSE of the Third Reich, the specialty of neurosurgery in Germany, although well developed in the late 1930s, had to start anew, and for decades to come, had to deal with the physical and political consequences of World War II. Because of the division of the country, neurosurgery developed separately in the two independent states. In West Germany, the evolution was promoted by a few personalities who represented different schools according to their own training: these "surgical neurologists" emphasized the neurological basis of neurosurgery and were represented by Traugott Riechert and the students of Otfrid Foerster, such as Arist Stender and Hans Kuhlendahl. In contrast, the "neurological surgeons" stressed their origins in general surgery. Their main proponent was Wilhelm Tönnis, who gained particular merit for promoting neurosurgical teaching, the development of new neurosurgical units, and the recognition of neurosurgery as an autonomous specialty. In East Germany, progress was delayed by a weak economy and a repressive political system. Yet several excellent neurosurgeons won international recognition, predominantly Georg Merrem, who came from the school of Fedor Krause. Following a worldwide trend, the number of neurosurgical units in West Germany increased dramatically from 18 in 1950 to 85 in 1988. In 2006, in the unified nation, 1200 certified neurosurgeons in 138 hospital departments and 75 private practices served 82 million people. Since its founding in 1949, the German Neurosurgical Society has promoted the idea of reconciliation and has focused on international collaboration in both science and education. This idea, shared by other European nations, eventually gave rise to the European Association of Neurosurgical Societies. At present, escalating costs in the health sector pose a problem to neurosurgical services and have led to reconsiderations about their structure and financing.

  14. [Changing the teaching of neurosurgery with information technology].

    PubMed

    Moreau, Jean-Jacques; Caire, François; Kalamarides, Michel; Mireau, Etienne; Dauger, Frédéric; Coignac, Marie-Jo; Charlin, Bernard

    2009-10-01

    A digital campus is a distance learning site that uses the potential of information and communication technologies to disseminate and improve educational services. This website, with open and free access, is built from free software with Web 2.0 technology. It is hosted at the University of Limoges. It functions as a digital library, containing scanned books, slide shows, more than 200 hours of recorded courses and round tables accessible by streaming video. The site is indexed according to the users' needs, by level of knowledge, specialty, keywords, and supplementary MeSH terms. The campus is organized as the College of Neurosurgery (http://college.neurochirurgie.fr). The durability of this type of training (in existence for 9 years now) is made possible by a powerful and committed consortium: the French Society of Neurosurgery, which has created high-quality intellectual and scientific resources, the University of Limoges, the Dupuytren University Hospital Center in Limoges, the region of Limousin, and the French-language Virtual Medical University, which have provided logistic and financial support. To target appropriate levels at various users, we distinguished four groups: medical students, neurosurgery students, neurosurgeons (continuing medical education), and students in allied health fields. All areas of neurosurgery are concerned. All the courses, including tests for self-evaluation and scientific meetings (organized with information and communication technologies) are digitally recorded for the site. The principles that make it possible for a medical discipline to organize around an online project are: a pedagogical conception of projects built in the form of models reusable by other health specialties; a stronghold within professional societies of the relevant specialties able to create high-quality intellectual and scientific resources; an organization by educational levels that can be extended transversally to other health disciplines; and free

  15. Radio Journalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bittner, John R.; Bittner, Denise A.

    This book, a how-to-do-it guide for the novice and the professional alike, deals with several aspects of radio journalism: producing documentaries, preparing and announcing radio news, ethics and responsibility, regulation of radio journalism, and careers. It traces the history and growth of radio news, shows its impact on the public, and…

  16. Neurosurgery at the Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford: a history.

    PubMed

    Aziz, T Z; Adams, C B

    1995-09-01

    Neurosurgery started in Oxford in 1938. In this article, we commence the story of Oxford neurosurgery with Thomas Willis and trace the historical thread through William Osler, Charles Sherrington, John Fulton, and Harvey Cushing to Hugh Cairns. The department in Oxford is renowned for the training of neurosurgeons. The initial stimulus for this was the abundance of neurosurgical and neurological expertise in Oxford during World War II with Cairns, and this tradition continued with Joe Pennybacker and his successors. The large and ever increasing work load ensures trainees a wide exposure to challenging neurosurgical problems. An increasing emphasis placed on research has resulted in the creation of two posts; each consists of half-time clinical neurosurgery and half-time research. Hugh Cairns organized the department along "Cushing lines." This organization still exists, allowing us to treat a large number of patients with relatively few beds and an average length of patient stay less than 6 days. We look to the future with confidence.

  17. The role of imaging in the development of neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Kirkman, Matthew A

    2015-01-01

    The development of modern neurosurgery was, and remains, intimately associated with developments in radiology. Neuroimaging advances have been instrumental in improving patient care and reducing both morbidity and mortality for neurosurgical patients. The purpose of this narrative review is to provide the contemporary neurosurgeon with an overview of the history of the development of radiology as applied to neurosurgery. The focus is on cranial imaging but the spine is also discussed. This article demonstrates the remarkable advancements that have shaped our modern surgical specialty. Today, almost 120 years after the discovery of the X-ray, the neurosurgeon has a wide array of neuroimaging tools at their disposal, that have led to better knowledge to inform diagnosis and management, selection of appropriate patients and surgical targets, as well as optimal surgical approaches. Modern neurosurgery is based on the appropriate use of these investigations. The pace of neuroimaging and neurosurgical advances continues and the future promises to be as, if not more, exciting as the past and present described in this paper. PMID:25150767

  18. Topical antibiotics and neurosurgery: Have we forgotten to study it?

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Raphael Vicente; Godoy, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Background: For neurosurgery, the last decades have been a time of incredible improvement in areas such as imaging, microscopy, endoscopy, stereotactic guidance, navigation, radiosurgery and endovascular techniques. However, the efficacy of topical antibiotic prophylaxis in neurological operations remains to be established by neurosurgeons. Methods: The authors did an historical review of the literature regarding the utilization of topical antibiotic prophylaxis in neurological operations. The Pub Med database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine / National Institutes of Health was utilized as the primary source of the literature. The authors performed the search by using the following Mesh terms: “neurosurgery” or “neurosurgical procedures” and “administration, topical” and “antibiotic prophylaxis”; “neurosurgery” or “neurosurgical procedures” and “administration, topical” and “antibacterial agents.” Results: In the last 70 years, we have poorly studied the use of topical antibiotics in neurosurgery. All the papers reported were Class III evidence. Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, there is no publication that provided Class I or II evidence about topical antibiotic prophylaxis in neurosurgery. PMID:20882106

  19. 21 CFR 882.4800 - Self-retaining retractor for neurosurgery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Self-retaining retractor for neurosurgery. 882.4800 Section 882.4800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4800 Self-retaining retractor for neurosurgery....

  20. Dr. Lenke Horvath (1917-1991): Creator of Pediatric Neurosurgery in Romania.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Dumitru; Moisa, Horatiu Alexandru; Nica, Dan Aurel; Ciurea, Alexandru Vlad

    2016-04-01

    The development of neurosurgery as an independent specialty took place with great difficulty in Romania. In this respect, the most revered personalities are those of Professor Alexandru Moruzzi (1900-1957) (in Iasi) and Professor Dimitrie Bagdasar (1893-1946) (in Bucharest), who are the fathers of modern neurosurgery in Romania. Professor Bagdasar was schooled in Professor Harvey Cushing's clinic in Boston and is credited with creating the first completely independent neurosurgical unit in Romania. His legacy was carried on with honor by Professor Constantin Arseni (1912-1994), who, in 1975, tasked Dr. Lenke Horvath (1917-1991) with creating the first autonomous pediatric neurosurgery unit in Bucharest. This article is a small tribute to the founder of pediatric neurosurgery in Romania and one of the female pioneer neurosurgeons, who, by personal example of dedication and hard work, radically changed medical thinking and neurosurgery in Romania.

  1. Highly cited publications in pediatric neurosurgery: part 2

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Nickalus R.; Auschwitz, Tyler; McAbee, Joseph H.; Boop, Frederick A.; Klimo, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Citation counting can be used to evaluate the impact an article has made on its discipline. This study characterizes the most cited articles related to clinical pediatric neurosurgery as of July 2013. Methods A list of search terms was computed using Thomson Reuters Web of Science® (WOS) to capture the 100 most cited articles in the overall literature and the top 50 articles from 2002 to 2012 related to clinical pediatric neurosurgery from non-dedicated pediatric neurosurgical journals. The following information was recorded for each article: number of authors, country of origin, citation count adjusted for number of years in print, topic, and level of evidence. Results The 100 most cited articles appeared in 44 journals. Publication dates ranged from 1986 to 2008; two were class 1 evidence, nine class 2, 26 class 3, and 52 class 4. Citations ranged from 90 to 321 (mean=131); average time-adjusted citation count was 10. The 50 most cited articles from 2002 to 2012 appeared in 31 journals; four were class 2 evidence, 15 class 3, and 21 class 4. Citations ranged from 68 to 245 (mean=103); average time-adjusted citation count was 13. Conclusion Overall, papers from non-pediatric neurosurgical journals had higher citation counts and improved level of evidence grades compared to articles from pediatric neurosurgical periodicals. An original paper related to clinical pediatric neurosurgery in a non-pediatric neurosurgical journal having a total citation count of 100–150 or more and an average citation count of 10–15 per year or more can be considered a high-impact publication. PMID:24113776

  2. Eloquent Brain, Ethical Challenges: Functional Brain Mapping in Neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Klein, Eran

    2015-06-01

    Functional brain mapping is an increasingly relied upon tool in presurgical planning and intraoperative decision making. Mapping allows personalization of structure-function relationships when surgical or other treatment of pathology puts eloquent functioning like language or vision at risk. As an innovative technology, functional brain mapping holds great promise but also raises important ethical questions. In this article, recent work in neuroethics on functional imaging and functional neurosurgery is explored and applied to functional brain mapping. Specific topics discussed in this article are incidental findings, responsible innovation, and informed consent.

  3. Publication misrepresentation among neurosurgery residency applicants: an increasing problem.

    PubMed

    Kistka, Heather M; Nayeri, Arash; Wang, Li; Dow, Jamie; Chandrasekhar, Rameela; Chambless, Lola B

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT Misrepresentation of scholarly achievements is a recognized phenomenon, well documented in numerous fields, yet the accuracy of reporting remains dependent on the honor principle. Therefore, honest self-reporting is of paramount importance to maintain scientific integrity in neurosurgery. The authors had observed a trend toward increasing numbers of publications among applicants for neurosurgery residency at Vanderbilt University and undertook this study to determine whether this change was a result of increased academic productivity, inflated reporting, or both. They also aimed to identify application variables associated with inaccurate citations. METHODS The authors retrospectively reviewed the residency applications submitted to their neurosurgery department in 2006 (n = 148) and 2012 (n = 194). The applications from 2006 were made via SF Match and those from 2012 were made using the Electronic Residency Application Service. Publications reported as "accepted" or "in press" were verified via online search of Google Scholar, PubMed, journal websites, and direct journal contact. Works were considered misrepresented if they did not exist, incorrectly listed the applicant as first author, or were incorrectly listed as peer reviewed or published in a printed journal rather than an online only or non-peer-reviewed publication. Demographic data were collected, including applicant sex, medical school ranking and country, advanced degrees, Alpha Omega Alpha membership, and USMLE Step 1 score. Zero-inflated negative binomial regression was used to identify predictors of misrepresentation. RESULTS Using univariate analysis, between 2006 and 2012 the percentage of applicants reporting published works increased significantly (47% vs 97%, p < 0.001). However, the percentage of applicants with misrepresentations (33% vs 45%) also increased. In 2012, applicants with a greater total of reported works (p < 0.001) and applicants from unranked US medical schools (those not

  4. Position statement from the Italian Society of Neurosurgery on the ARUBA Study.

    PubMed

    Cenzato, Marco; Delitala, Alberto; Delfini, Roberto; Pasqualin, Alberto; Maira, Giulio; Esposito, Vincenzo; Tomasello, Francesco; Boccardi, Edoardo

    2016-03-01

    As the conclusions of the ARUBA Study are strongly oriented towards therapeutic abstention, we think it is appropriate to express the concern of the Italian Society of Neurosurgery for the impact that this study might have on the health of patients, if not properly evaluated. The vast majority of patients (76-81%) included in the study was treated with endovascular or radiotherapy treatments, alone or in combination. Only 18 patients (19%) had surgery. It is well known that a partial treatment of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), as is often the case with endovascular therapy, may increase the risk of bleeding. The primary endpoint (death or symptomatic stroke) in the treated group was reached in 30.7%, i.e. almost one-third of the subjects. This has no comparison in the current surgical literature. Considering permanent and transient neurological deficits along with headaches and seizures all together in the same outcome evaluation parameter may be inappropriate and misleading. The graph with all results from the ARUBA Study, which claims to be the demonstration that natural history is better that treatment, clearly shows that what is assumed to be treated has not actually been treated. If death or stroke occur a few years from treatment, it only means that the disease was not cured and patients received a partial - therefore ineffective, if not dangerous - treatment. An effective treatment, as surgery is, must have a flat follow-up curve. The ARUBA Study shows that incomplete treatment leads to negative outcome, confirming that an integrated multidisciplinary strategy has to be plotted out before starting any treatment and that a complete exclusion of the AVM must be achieved.

  5. Neurosurgery Education and Development program to treat hydrocephalus and to develop neurosurgery in Africa using mobile neuroendoscopic training.

    PubMed

    Piquer, José; Qureshi, Mubashir Mahmood; Young, Paul H; Dempsey, Robert J

    2015-06-01

    OBJECT A shortage of neurosurgeons and a lack of knowledge of neuroendoscopic management of hydrocephalus limits modern care in sub-Saharan Africa. Hence, a mobile teaching project for endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) procedures and a subsequent program to develop neurosurgery as a permanent specialty in Kenya and Zanzibar were created and sponsored by the Neurosurgery Education and Development (NED) Foundation and the Foundation for International Education in Neurological Surgery. The objective of this work was to evaluate the results of surgical training and medical care in both projects from 2006 to 2013. METHODS Two portable neuroendoscopy systems were purchased and a total of 38 ETV workshops were organized in 21 hospitals in 7 different countries. Additionally, 49 medical expeditions were dispatched to the Coast General Hospital in Mombasa, Kenya, and to the Mnazi Moja Hospital in Zanzibar. RESULTS From the first project, a total of 376 infants with hydrocephalus received surgery. Six-month follow-up was achieved in 22%. In those who received follow-up, ETV efficacy was 51%. The best success rates were achieved with patients 1 year of age or older with aqueductal stenosis (73%). The main causes of hydrocephalus were infection (56%) and spina bifida (23%). The mobile education program interacted with 72 local surgeons and 122 nurses who were trained in ETV procedures. The second project involved 49 volunteer neurosurgeons who performed a total of 360 nonhydrocephalus neurosurgical operations since 2009. Furthermore, an agreement with the local government was signed to create the Mnazi Mmoja NED Institute in Zanzibar. CONCLUSIONS Mobile endoscopic treatment of hydrocephalus in East Africa results in reasonable success rates and has also led to major developments in medicine, particularly in the development of neurosurgery specialty care sites.

  6. Interrupted time-series analysis: studying trends in neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ricky H; Smieliauskas, Fabrice; Pan, I-Wen; Lam, Sandi K

    2015-12-01

    OBJECT Neurosurgery studies traditionally have evaluated the effects of interventions on health care outcomes by studying overall changes in measured outcomes over time. Yet, this type of linear analysis is limited due to lack of consideration of the trend's effects both pre- and postintervention and the potential for confounding influences. The aim of this study was to illustrate interrupted time-series analysis (ITSA) as applied to an example in the neurosurgical literature and highlight ITSA's potential for future applications. METHODS The methods used in previous neurosurgical studies were analyzed and then compared with the methodology of ITSA. RESULTS The ITSA method was identified in the neurosurgical literature as an important technique for isolating the effect of an intervention (such as a policy change or a quality and safety initiative) on a health outcome independent of other factors driving trends in the outcome. The authors determined that ITSA allows for analysis of the intervention's immediate impact on outcome level and on subsequent trends and enables a more careful measure of the causal effects of interventions on health care outcomes. CONCLUSIONS ITSA represents a significant improvement over traditional observational study designs in quantifying the impact of an intervention. ITSA is a useful statistical procedure to understand, consider, and implement as the field of neurosurgery evolves in sophistication in big-data analytics, economics, and health services research. PMID:26621420

  7. Virtual reality simulation in neurosurgery: technologies and evolution.

    PubMed

    Chan, Sonny; Conti, François; Salisbury, Kenneth; Blevins, Nikolas H

    2013-01-01

    Neurosurgeons are faced with the challenge of learning, planning, and performing increasingly complex surgical procedures in which there is little room for error. With improvements in computational power and advances in visual and haptic display technologies, virtual surgical environments can now offer potential benefits for surgical training, planning, and rehearsal in a safe, simulated setting. This article introduces the various classes of surgical simulators and their respective purposes through a brief survey of representative simulation systems in the context of neurosurgery. Many technical challenges currently limit the application of virtual surgical environments. Although we cannot yet expect a digital patient to be indistinguishable from reality, new developments in computational methods and related technology bring us closer every day. We recognize that the design and implementation of an immersive virtual reality surgical simulator require expert knowledge from many disciplines. This article highlights a selection of recent developments in research areas related to virtual reality simulation, including anatomic modeling, computer graphics and visualization, haptics, and physics simulation, and discusses their implication for the simulation of neurosurgery. PMID:23254804

  8. [Robotics in neurosurgery: current status and future prospects].

    PubMed

    Benabid, A L; Hoffmann, D; Ashraf, A; Koudsie, A; Esteve, F; Le Bas, J F

    1998-02-01

    Neurosurgery is in essence a field of application development for robots, based on multimodal image guidance. Specific motorized tools have already been developed and routinely applied in stereotaxy to position a probe holder or in conventional neurosurgery to hold a microscope oriented towards a given target. The potentialities of these approaches have triggered industrial developments which are now commercially available. These systems use databases, primarily coming from multimodal numerical images from X-ray radiology to magnetic resonance imaging. These spatially encoded data are transferred through digital networks to workstations where images can be processed and surgical procedures are pre-planned, then transferred to the robotic systems to which they are connected. We have been using a stereotaxic robot since 1989 and a microscope robot since 1995 in various surgical routine procedures. The future of these applications rely mainly on the technical progress in informatics, about image recognition to adapt the pre-planning to the actual surgical situation, to correct brain shifts (for instance), about image fusion, integrated knowledge such as brain atlases, as well as virtual reality. The future developments, covering surgical procedure, research and teaching, are sure to be far beyond our wildest expectations.

  9. Interrupted time-series analysis: studying trends in neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ricky H; Smieliauskas, Fabrice; Pan, I-Wen; Lam, Sandi K

    2015-12-01

    OBJECT Neurosurgery studies traditionally have evaluated the effects of interventions on health care outcomes by studying overall changes in measured outcomes over time. Yet, this type of linear analysis is limited due to lack of consideration of the trend's effects both pre- and postintervention and the potential for confounding influences. The aim of this study was to illustrate interrupted time-series analysis (ITSA) as applied to an example in the neurosurgical literature and highlight ITSA's potential for future applications. METHODS The methods used in previous neurosurgical studies were analyzed and then compared with the methodology of ITSA. RESULTS The ITSA method was identified in the neurosurgical literature as an important technique for isolating the effect of an intervention (such as a policy change or a quality and safety initiative) on a health outcome independent of other factors driving trends in the outcome. The authors determined that ITSA allows for analysis of the intervention's immediate impact on outcome level and on subsequent trends and enables a more careful measure of the causal effects of interventions on health care outcomes. CONCLUSIONS ITSA represents a significant improvement over traditional observational study designs in quantifying the impact of an intervention. ITSA is a useful statistical procedure to understand, consider, and implement as the field of neurosurgery evolves in sophistication in big-data analytics, economics, and health services research.

  10. Susceptibility artefact correction using dynamic graph cuts: application to neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Daga, Pankaj; Pendse, Tejas; Modat, Marc; White, Mark; Mancini, Laura; Winston, Gavin P; McEvoy, Andrew W; Thornton, John; Yousry, Tarek; Drobnjak, Ivana; Duncan, John S; Ourselin, Sebastien

    2014-10-01

    Echo Planar Imaging (EPI) is routinely used in diffusion and functional MR imaging due to its rapid acquisition time. However, the long readout period makes it prone to susceptibility artefacts which results in geometric and intensity distortions of the acquired image. The use of these distorted images for neuronavigation hampers the effectiveness of image-guided surgery systems as critical white matter tracts and functionally eloquent brain areas cannot be accurately localised. In this paper, we present a novel method for correction of distortions arising from susceptibility artefacts in EPI images. The proposed method combines fieldmap and image registration based correction techniques in a unified framework. A phase unwrapping algorithm is presented that can efficiently compute the B0 magnetic field inhomogeneity map as well as the uncertainty associated with the estimated solution through the use of dynamic graph cuts. This information is fed to a subsequent image registration step to further refine the results in areas with high uncertainty. This work has been integrated into the surgical workflow at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery and its effectiveness in correcting for geometric distortions due to susceptibility artefacts is demonstrated on EPI images acquired with an interventional MRI scanner during neurosurgery.

  11. A critical analysis of the current state of neurosurgery training in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Shamim, M. Shahzad; Tahir, M. Zubair; Godil, Saniya Siraj; Kumar, Rajesh; Siddiqui, Arshad Ali

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To observe interdepartmental variation in the availability of resources and academic activities within the various neurosurgery programs of Pakistan. Methods: This was a proforma-based survey of neurosurgery trainees and young neurosurgeons of Pakistan, looking at the academic infrastructure and output of their programs. The proforma was filled by 36 respondents from 11 neurosurgery centers of the country. All these centers were accredited for neurosurgery training in Pakistan. Results: Out of the 36 respondents, 30 were completing a Fellowship training (FCPS) and six were enrolled for a Master in Surgery (MS) program. About 80% of the participants used the Youman's Textbook of Neurosurgery as a reference book. Only 40% of the candidates had access to more than one indexed neurosurgery journal. Structured academic sessions (e.g., journal clubs and neuropathology meetings) were lacking in a majority of the training institutes, 95% of the trainees had no microsurgical laboratory experience, and modern neurosurgical tools (frameless neuronavigation system, neuroendoscopy) were in use at a few centers only. Conclusion: Neurosurgery training in Pakistan is not uniform and wide variations exist between the programs at the centers evaluated. We recommend exchange programs between centers at national and international levels, to allow trainees to gain first-hand exposure to training components not available in their own center. PMID:22276237

  12. Radio wave.

    PubMed

    Elkin, V

    1992-01-01

    In developing countries with high rates of poverty and illiteracy, radio is emerging as an excellent medium for delivering information on health issues, family planning, nutrition, and agricultural development. Since radio does not require wired electricity, it can reach remote rural populations. Surveys have found that between 50-75% of poor rural households in developing countries own radios, and the majority listen to educational radio at least once a week. A program that reaches the urban poor outside of Lima, Peru, has been instrumental in controlling the spread of cholera. A Bolivian station broadcasts 8 hours of literacy, health, agricultural, and cultural programming a day to an audience of more than 2 million Aymara Indians. Small village radio stations with a broadcast range of 15 miles can be established for under US$400 and can generally achieve sustainability through local fundraising events such as raffles. In many cases, listeners have become broadcasters at their local radio stations.

  13. Radio sociology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, George W., Jr.

    1996-04-01

    A work was conducted, using radio telemetry, to locate a migrating, radio-tagged, sharp-shinned hawk. The hawk was monitored through the noise radiation it created. The hawk was found. During this study, it was found that the concentration of population corresponds with areas of increased noise temperature. Through this study, a bigger study was planned. The study would involved the relationship between a place's radiation signature and its other attributes, such as economic type, population, geographic concentration. The method of radio sociology would be used to track the sources of radio noise.

  14. Experimental and clinical standards, and evolution of lasers in neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Devaux, B C; Roux, F X

    1996-01-01

    From initial experiments of ruby, argon and CO2 lasers on the nervous system so far, dramatic progress was made in delivery systems technology as well as in knowledge of laser-tissue interaction effects and hazards through various animal experiments and clinical experience. Most surgical effects of laser light on neural tissue and the central nervous system (CNS) are thermal lesions. Haemostasis, cutting and vaporization depend on laser emission parameters--wavelength, fluence and mode--and on the exposed tissues optical and thermal properties--water and haemoglobin content, thermal conductivity and specific heat. CO2 and Nd-YAG lasers have today a large place in the neurosurgical armamentarium, while new laser sources such as high power diode lasers will have one in the near future. Current applications of these lasers derive from their respective characteristics, and include CNS tumour and vascular malformation surgery, and stereotactic neurosurgery. Intracranial, spinal cord and intra-orbital meningiomas are the best lesions for laser use for haemostasis, dissection and tissue vaporization. Resection of acoustic neuromas, pituitary tumours, spinal cord neuromas, intracerebral gliomas and metastases may also benefit from lasers as accurate, haemostatic, non-contact instruments which reduce surgical trauma to the brain and eloquent structures such as brain stem and cranial nerves. Coagulative lasers (1.06 microns and 1.32 microns Nd-YAG, argon, or diode laser) will find an application for arteriovenous malformations and cavernomas. Any fiberoptic-guided laser will find a use during stereotactic neurosurgical procedures, including image-guided resection of tumours and vascular malformations and endoscopic tumour resection and cysts or entry into a ventricle. Besides these routine applications of lasers, laser interstitial thermotherapy (LITT) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) of brain tumours are still in the experimental stage. The choice of a laser in a

  15. New laser technologies in the clinic of neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stupak, V. V.; Fomichev, N. G.; Tsvetovsky, S. B.; Dmitriev, A. B.; Kobosev, V. V.; Bagaev, S. N.; Mayorov, A. P.; Struts, S. G.

    2005-08-01

    In report summarized more then 10 experience of authors in Novosibirsk Traumatology and orthopedics research institute Neurosurgery clinic on usage of laser technologies in treatment of central nervous system tumors. On the basis of ND-YAG laser application original technologies have been developed and used in surgical treatment of patients with various neurosurgical pathology and protected by 8 Patents of the Russian Federation. 427 patients were operated on with the use of YAG:Nd3+ laser. Out of them 152 patients had extracerebral tumors of various volume and localization, 135 patients - spinal cord tumors, 74 patients - a pathology of cerebrospinal transition (Amold-Chiari syndrome of 1-2 types), and 66 patients - intramedullary tumors of deep localization. Results showed good results of laser technologies usage for central nervous system tumors removal.

  16. [Intraoperative monitoring of oxygen tissue pressure: Applications in vascular neurosurgery].

    PubMed

    Arikan, Fuat; Vilalta, Jordi; Torne, Ramon; Chocron, Ivette; Rodriguez-Tesouro, Ana; Sahuquillo, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic lesions related to surgical procedures are a major cause of postoperative morbidity in patients with cerebral vascular disease. There are different systems of neuromonitoring to detect intraoperative ischemic events, including intraoperative monitoring of oxygen tissue pressure (PtiO2). The aim of this article was to describe, through the discussion of 4 cases, the usefulness of intraoperative PtiO2 monitoring during vascular neurosurgery. In presenting these cases, we demonstrate that monitoring PtiO2 is a reliable way to detect early ischemic events during surgical procedures. Continuous monitoring of PtiO2 in an area at risk allows the surgeon to resolve the cause of the ischemic event before it evolves to an established cerebral infarction. PMID:24934513

  17. Neurosurgery and the dawning age of Brain-Machine Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Nathan C.; Breshears, Jonathan; Chang, Edward F.

    2013-01-01

    Brain–machine interfaces (BMIs) are on the horizon for clinical neurosurgery. Electrocorticography-based platforms are less invasive than implanted microelectrodes, however, the latter are unmatched in their ability to achieve fine motor control of a robotic prosthesis capable of natural human behaviors. These technologies will be crucial to restoring neural function to a large population of patients with severe neurologic impairment – including those with spinal cord injury, stroke, limb amputation, and disabling neuromuscular disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. On the opposite end of the spectrum are neural enhancement technologies for specialized applications such as combat. An ongoing ethical dialogue is imminent as we prepare for BMI platforms to enter the neurosurgical realm of clinical management. PMID:23653884

  18. Neurosurgery and the dawning age of Brain-Machine Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Nathan C; Breshears, Jonathan; Chang, Edward F

    2013-01-01

    Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) are on the horizon for clinical neurosurgery. Electrocorticography-based platforms are less invasive than implanted microelectrodes, however, the latter are unmatched in their ability to achieve fine motor control of a robotic prosthesis capable of natural human behaviors. These technologies will be crucial to restoring neural function to a large population of patients with severe neurologic impairment - including those with spinal cord injury, stroke, limb amputation, and disabling neuromuscular disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. On the opposite end of the spectrum are neural enhancement technologies for specialized applications such as combat. An ongoing ethical dialogue is imminent as we prepare for BMI platforms to enter the neurosurgical realm of clinical management. PMID:23653884

  19. Challenges to neurosurgery service delivery. Who moved my cheese?

    PubMed

    Palmer, J D

    2007-04-01

    The change programme in the National Health Service has moved the Acute Trusts providing neurosurgical services to very different ways of delivering healthcare. The process of reform has been supported by investment but the next few years will see far less additional money, and success and failure of services will be dependent upon the approach to those reforms. The 'payment by results' system of funding through tariff, the 'plurality of providers' policy of forcing commissioners to purchase activity from independent providers, the 'patient choice' process of encouraging patients to select treatment from a number of providers, and the '18-week wait' target of bringing down referral to treatment times are all major shifts in the way services are delivered and developed. The reforms have not been made with neurosurgery in mind, how will they affect the way this small specialty is delivered? PMID:17453785

  20. Simulation and augmented reality in endovascular neurosurgery: lessons from aviation.

    PubMed

    Mitha, Alim P; Almekhlafi, Mohammed A; Janjua, Major Jameel J; Albuquerque, Felipe C; McDougall, Cameron G

    2013-01-01

    Endovascular neurosurgery is a discipline strongly dependent on imaging. Therefore, technology that improves how much useful information we can garner from a single image has the potential to dramatically assist decision making during endovascular procedures. Furthermore, education in an image-enhanced environment, especially with the incorporation of simulation, can improve the safety of the procedures and give interventionalists and trainees the opportunity to study or perform simulated procedures before the intervention, much like what is practiced in the field of aviation. Here, we examine the use of simulators in the training of fighter pilots and discuss how similar benefits can compensate for current deficiencies in endovascular training. We describe the types of simulation used for endovascular procedures, including virtual reality, and discuss the relevant data on its utility in training. Finally, the benefit of augmented reality during endovascular procedures is discussed, along with future computerized image enhancement techniques.

  1. Harvey Cushing and "birth hemorrhage": early pediatric neurosurgery at The Johns Hopkins Hospital.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Vivek A; Wijesekera, Olindi; Pendleton, Courtney; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Jallo, George I; Ahn, Edward S

    2011-12-01

    Of Harvey Cushing's many contributions to neurosurgery, one of the least documented is his early surgical intervention in children and his pioneering efforts to establish pediatric neurosurgery as a subspecialty. Between 1896 and 1912 Cushing conducted nearly 200 operations in children at The Johns Hopkins Hospital. A review of his records suggests that the advances he made in neurosurgery were significantly influenced by his experience with children. In this historical article, the authors describe Cushing's treatment of 6 children, in all of whom Cushing established a diagnosis of "birth hemorrhage." By reviewing Cushing's operative indications, techniques, and outcomes, the authors aim to understand the philosophy of his pediatric neurosurgical management and how this informed his development of neurosurgery as a new specialty. PMID:22132925

  2. Radio stars.

    PubMed

    Hjellming, R M; Wade, C M

    1971-09-17

    Up to the present time six classes of radio stars have been established. The signals are almost always very faint and drastically variable. Hence their discovery has owed as much to serendipity as to the highly sophisticated equipment and techniques that have been used. When the variations are regular, as with the pulsars, this characteristic can be exploited very successfully in the search for new objects as well as in the detailed study of those that are already known. The detection of the most erratically variable radio stars, the flare stars and the x-ray stars, is primarily a matter of luck and patience. In the case of the novas, one at least knows where and oughly when to look for radio emission. A very sensitive interferometer is clearly the best instrument to use in the initial detection of a radio star. The fact that weak background sources are frequently present makes it essential to prove that the position of a radio source agrees with that of a star to within a few arc seconds. The potential of radio astronomy for the study of radio stars will not be realized until more powerful instruments than those that are available today can be utilized. So far, we have been able to see only the most luminous of the radio stars. PMID:17836594

  3. College Radio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauls, Samuel J.

    As with commercial stations, the underlying premise of the college radio station is to serve the community, whether it be the campus community or the community at large, but in unique ways often geared to underserved niches of the population. Much of college radio's charm lies in its unpredictable nature and constant mutations. The stations give…

  4. Radio Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaffer, R. D.; Wolken, P. R.; Niell, A. E.

    1981-01-01

    The activities of the DSN in support of Radio and Radar Astronomy Operations during September through December 1980 are described. Emphasis is on a report of an experiment selected for use of the DSN by the radio Astronomy Experiment Selection Panel: that of VLBI observations of the energetic galactic object SS-433.

  5. Radio astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolken, P. R.; Schaffer, R. D.; Gorenstein, M. V.

    1981-01-01

    The activities of the Deep Space Network in support of Radio Astronomy Operations during April and May 1981 are reported. Work in progres in support of an experiment selected for use of the DSN by the Radio Astronomy Experiment Selection Panel, Twin Quasi-Stellar Object VLBI, is reported.

  6. Radio astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaffer, R. D.; Wolken, P. R.; Gulkis, S.

    1981-01-01

    The activities of the Deep Space Network in support of radio astronomy operations during the first quarter of 1981 are reported. Results of the use of a low noise maser are presented, as well as updates in DSN support of experiments sanctioned by the Radio Astronomy Experiment Selection Panel.

  7. Radio astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. M.; Manchester, R. N.

    1980-01-01

    The activities of the Deep Space Network in support of radio and radar astronomy operations during July and August 1980 are reported. A brief update on the OSS-sponsored planetary radio astronomy experiment is provided. Also included are two updates, one each from Spain and Australia on current host country activities.

  8. Radio stars.

    PubMed

    Hjellming, R M; Wade, C M

    1971-09-17

    Up to the present time six classes of radio stars have been established. The signals are almost always very faint and drastically variable. Hence their discovery has owed as much to serendipity as to the highly sophisticated equipment and techniques that have been used. When the variations are regular, as with the pulsars, this characteristic can be exploited very successfully in the search for new objects as well as in the detailed study of those that are already known. The detection of the most erratically variable radio stars, the flare stars and the x-ray stars, is primarily a matter of luck and patience. In the case of the novas, one at least knows where and oughly when to look for radio emission. A very sensitive interferometer is clearly the best instrument to use in the initial detection of a radio star. The fact that weak background sources are frequently present makes it essential to prove that the position of a radio source agrees with that of a star to within a few arc seconds. The potential of radio astronomy for the study of radio stars will not be realized until more powerful instruments than those that are available today can be utilized. So far, we have been able to see only the most luminous of the radio stars.

  9. In vivo porcine training model for cranial neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Regelsberger, Jan; Eicker, Sven; Siasios, Ioannis; Hänggi, Daniel; Kirsch, Matthias; Horn, Peter; Winkler, Peter; Signoretti, Stefano; Fountas, Kostas; Dufour, Henry; Barcia, Juan A; Sakowitz, Oliver; Westermaier, Thomas; Sabel, Michael; Heese, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Supplemental education is desirable for neurosurgical training, and the use of human cadaver specimen and virtual reality models is routine. An in vivo porcine training model for cranial neurosurgery was introduced in 2005, and our recent experience with this unique model is outlined here. For the first time, porcine anatomy is illustrated with particular respect to neurosurgical procedures. The pros and cons of this model are described. The aim of the course was to set up a laboratory scenery imitating an almost realistic operating room in which anatomy of the brain and neurosurgical techniques in a mentored environment free from time constraints could be trained. Learning objectives of the course were to learn about the microsurgical techniques in cranial neurosurgery and the management of complications. Participants were asked to evaluate the quality and utility of the programme via standardized questionnaires by a grading scale from A (best) to E (worst). In total, 154 residents have been trained on the porcine model to date. None of the participants regarded his own residency programme as structured. The bleeding and complication management (97%), the realistic laboratory set-up (89%) and the working environment (94%) were favoured by the vast majority of trainees and confirmed our previous findings. After finishing the course, the participants graded that their skills in bone drilling, dissecting the brain and preserving cerebral vessels under microscopic magnification had improved to level A and B. In vivo hands-on courses, fully equipped with microsurgical instruments, offer an outstanding training opportunity in which bleeding management on a pulsating, vital brain represents a unique training approach. Our results have shown that education programmes still lack practical training facilities in which in vivo models may act as a complementary approach in surgical training.

  10. The history of neurosurgery in Anatolia and Turkey: the Turkish Neurosurgical Society.

    PubMed

    Solaroglu, Ihsan; Acar, Feridun; Bavbek, Murad; Ture, Ugur; Beskonakli, Ethem

    2013-01-01

    Although the history of neurosurgery in Anatolia goes back ten thousand years, modern surgery began in Turkey in 1890. Neurosurgery in Turkey began in the first half of the 20th century. However, general surgeons began applying neurosurgical techniques back in the late 19th century. Most of these applications included procedures for craniocerebral traumas and infections. Dr. Cemil Topuzlu (1868-1958) is the founder of modern surgery in Turkey. Dr. Abdulkadir Cahit Tuner became the first neurosurgeon with a degree in Turkey in 1923. The first neurosurgery department was established in Istanbul in 1923, and the first training program began in the late 1940s. Currently there are almost 1200 neurosurgeons in Turkey and 75 training clinics at university hospitals and Training and Research Hospitals of the Ministry of Health provide neurosurgery training. The current state of neurosurgery in Turkey is parallel to that of the advanced Western countries. Apart from the application of neurosurgical procedures, there have been many scientific studies from Turkish neurosurgeons contributing to the total body of literature in neurosurgery.

  11. Radio Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekers, Ron; Wilson, Thomas L.

    ``Radio Telescopes" starts with a brief historical introduction from Jansky's1931 discovery of radio emission from the Milky Way through the development ofradio telescope dishes and arrays to aperture synthesis imaging. It includessufficient basics of electromagnetic radiation to provide some understanding of thedesign and operation of radio telescopes. The criteria such as frequencyrange, sensitivity, survey speed, angular resolution, and field of view thatdetermine the design of radio telescopes are introduced. Because it is soeasy to manipulate the electromagnetic waves at radio frequencies, radiotelescopes have evolved into many different forms, sometimes with "wire"structures tuned to specific wavelengths, which look very different from anykind of classical telescope. To assist astronomers more familiar with otherwavelength domains, the appendix A.1. includes a comparison of radioand optical terminology. Some of the different types of radio telescopesincluding the filled aperture dishes, electronically steered phased arrays, andaperture synthesis radio telescopes are discussed, and there is a sectioncomparing the differences between dishes and arrays. Some of the morerecent developments including hierarchical beam forming, phased arrayfeeds, mosaicing, rotation measure synthesis, digital receivers, and longbaseline interferometers are included. The problem of increasing radiofrequency interference is discussed, and some possible mitigation strategies areoutlined.

  12. Osteoradionecrosis Following Carbon Ion Radiotherapy: Case History Report of a Soft Palate Defect.

    PubMed

    Oki, Meiko; Kanazaki, Ayako; Taniguchi, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Carbon ion radiotherapy, a form of charged particle radiotherapy that has been used to treat various inoperable and radio-resistant tumors, has been associated with less severe late effects than conventional radiotherapy. A 63-year-old woman with a soft palate defect received carbon ion radiotherapy (total dose: 64 Gray equivalents). Several late effects were observed, and osteoradionecrosis was observed not only on the tumor side but also on the other side and gradually expanded during maxillofacial prosthetic rehabilitation. While the definitive prosthesis improved her speech and eating ability, careful adjustments and close follow-up should continue with respect to postradiation effects. PMID:27611746

  13. Radio Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolken, P. R.; Shaffer, R. D.

    1983-01-01

    Deep Space Network (DSN) 26- and 64-meter antenna stations were utilized in support of Radio Astronomy Experiment Selection Panel experiments. Within a time span of 10 days, in May 1983 (267.75 hours total), nine RAES experiments were supported. Most of these experiments involved multifacility interferometry using Mark 3 data recording terminals and as many as six non-DSN observatories. Investigations of black holes, quasars, galaxies, and radio sources are discussed.

  14. History and current state of neurosurgery at the Medical University of South Carolina.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Vibhor; Rauf, Yasmeen; Patel, Sunil; Glazier, Steve; Perot, Phanor; Ellegala, Dilantha B

    2011-07-01

    We review the development of neurosurgery at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) and the emergence of MUSC as a leading academic neurosurgical center in South Carolina. Historical records from the Waring Historical Library were studied, former and current faculty members were interviewed, and the personal records of Dr Phanor J Perot were examined. Dr Frederick E Kredel was the first to perform cerebral revascularization in stroke patients using omental flaps and the first to culture glioma cells in artificial media. The MUSC Neurosurgery residency program was established in 1964 by its first formally trained neurosurgeon, Julian Youmans, MD. The first graduate of the program, Dr Russell Travis, went on to become the President of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons. In 1968, the longest serving chairman, Dr Perot, joined the department and conducted significant research in spinal cord injury, receiving a continuous, 20-year award from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. A major change in the neurosurgery program occurred in 2004 when Dr Sunil Patel accepted the chairmanship. He integrated neurosurgery, neurology, and basic neuroscience departments into a comprehensive Department of Neurosciences to provide integrated clinical care. This department now ranks second in the country in National Institutes of Health research funding. Recently, the Center for Global Health and Global Neurosurgery was established with a vision of caring for patients beyond national borders. Neurosurgery at MUSC has been influenced by Drs Kredel and Perot and the current leadership is moving forward with a uniquely integrated department with novel areas such as global neurosurgery. PMID:21368698

  15. [Radiotherapy for Thyroid Cancer].

    PubMed

    Jingu, Keiichi; Maruoka, Shin; Umezawa, Rei; Takahashi, Noriyoshi

    2015-06-01

    Radioactive 131I therapy for differentiated thyroid cancer has been used since the 1940s and is an established and effective treatment. In contrast, external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) was considered to be effective for achieving local control but not for prolonging survival. Although clinicians were hesitant to administer EBRT owing to the potential radiation-induced adverse effects of 2 dimensional (2D)-radiotherapy until 2000, it is expected that adverse effects will be reduced and treatment efficacy improved through the introduction of more advanced techniques for delivering radiation (eg, 3D-radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiotherapy [IMRT]). The prognosis of undifferentiated thyroid cancer is known to be extremely bad, although in very rare cases, multimodality therapy (total or subtotal resection, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy) has allowed long-term survival. Here, we report the preliminary results of using hypofractionated radiotherapy for undifferentiated thyroid cancer in our institution. PMID:26199238

  16. Radiotherapy of Cervical Cancer.

    PubMed

    Vordermark, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Curative-intent radical radiotherapy of cervical cancer consists of external-beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy, and concomitant chemotherapy with cisplatin. For each element, new developments aim to improve tumor control rates or treatment tolerance. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has been shown to reduce gastrointestinal toxicity and can be used to selectively increase the radiotherapy dose. Individualized, image-guided brachytherapy enables better adaptation of high-dose volumes to the tumor extension. Intensification of concomitant or sequential systemic therapy is under evaluation. PMID:27614991

  17. The future of practice science: challenges and opportunities for neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Selden, Nathan R; Ghogawala, Zoher; Harbaugh, Robert E; Litvack, Zachary N; McGirt, Matthew J; Asher, Anthony L

    2013-01-01

    Outcomes-directed approaches to quality improvement have been adopted by diverse industries and are increasingly the focus of government-mandated reforms to health care education and delivery. The authors identify and review current reform initiatives originating from agencies regulating and funding graduate medical education and health care delivery. These reforms use outcomes-based methodologies and incorporate principles of lifelong learning and patient centeredness. Important new initiatives include the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Milestones; the pending adoption by the American Board of Neurological Surgery of new requirements for Maintenance of Certification that are in part outcomes based; initiation by health care systems and consortia of public reporting of patient outcomes data; institution by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services of requirements for comparative effectiveness research and the physician quality reporting system; and linking of health care reimbursement in part to patient outcomes data and quality measures. Opportunities exist to coordinate and unify patient outcomes measurement throughout neurosurgical training and practice, enabling effective patient-centered improvements in care delivery as well as efficient compliance with regulatory mandates. Coordination will likely require the development of a new science of practice based in the daily clinical environment and utilizing clinical data registries. A generation of outcomes science and quality experts within neurosurgery should be trained to facilitate attainment of these goals.

  18. Clinical Characteristics of Patients with Trigeminal Neuralgia Referred to Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Siqueira, Silvia RDT; Teixeira, Manoel J; Siqueira, José TT

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the clinical characteristics of patients with trigeminal neuralgia referred to surgery in a center of reference. Methods We evaluated the general characteristics of 395 patients with trigeminal neuralgia referred to neurosurgery as treatment. They corresponded to 2 samples of 1984 and 2004. The EDOF-HC protocol (Orofacial Pain Questionnaire) and the medical profile were used. Results In the first study (1984), with 290 patients, the higher prevalence was: women (57.3%), white (95.5%), with mean age of 62.5. The most affected trigeminal branches were the maxillary and/or mandibular branches (65.5%), and the right side was the most affected (57.6%). From the second study (2004), with 105 patients, 57.1% were women, 75.2% white, with a mean age of 60.8. The maxillary and/or mandibular branches (79.0%) and the right side (69.5%) were the most affected. Both samples had neurological abnormalities and systemic diseases (mainly cardiovascular). Conclusions General characteristics of these patients were similar to other samples of trigeminal neuralgia. Neurological findings were also present in patients with no previous surgical treatment for TN. Hypertension and cardiac diseases were also frequent and make the monitoring of the patients during crises necessary. PMID:19756195

  19. Stereotactic Neurosurgery Planning On A PC Based Workstation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Terence M.; Clark, John A.; Pike, Gordon; Henri, Christopher J.; Collins, D. L.; Leksell, Dan; Jeppsson, Ola

    1989-05-01

    Stereotactic surgery requires knowledge of cerebral structures derived from more than one image source. We have developed a PC-AT based workstation which accepts patient images, made with the stereotactic frame in place, from CT, MRI and DSA modalities. Reference markers on the frame are identified in the images to establish the coordinate geometry for each modality. Target points may be identified on each image type and trajectories of probe paths to these points defined. Targets identified on one set of images may be transferred automatically to other images of the same patient, in order, for example, to guarantee a vascular free path of approach to a target point deep within the brain. To date several hundred patients have had stereotactic surgery performed on the basis of plans using this system. Procedures included biopsy and aspiration of lesions, implantation of electrodes for the recording of deep EEG signals, and radiosurgical techniques based on the use of a high energy linear accelerator. We present clinical examples of the use of this system in typical stereotactic neurosurgery procedures, address stereoscopic applications, and discuss the results of inter-modality tests to establish the accuracy of the technique.

  20. Using Electronic Noses to Detect Tumors During Neurosurgery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homer, Margie L.; Ryan, Margaret A.; Lara, Liana M.; Kateb, Babak; Chen, Mike

    2008-01-01

    It has been proposed to develop special-purpose electronic noses and algorithms for processing the digitized outputs of the electronic noses for determining whether tissue exposed during neurosurgery is cancerous. At present, visual inspection by a surgeon is the only available intraoperative technique for detecting cancerous tissue. Implementation of the proposal would help to satisfy a desire, expressed by some neurosurgeons, for an intraoperative technique for determining whether all of a brain tumor has been removed. The electronic-nose technique could complement multimodal imaging techniques, which have also been proposed as means of detecting cancerous tissue. There are also other potential applications of the electronic-nose technique in general diagnosis of abnormal tissue. In preliminary experiments performed to assess the viability of the proposal, the problem of distinguishing between different types of cultured cells was substituted for the problem of distinguishing between normal and abnormal specimens of the same type of tissue. The figure presents data from one experiment, illustrating differences between patterns that could be used to distinguish between two types of cultured cancer cells. Further development can be expected to include studies directed toward answering questions concerning not only the possibility of distinguishing among various types of normal and abnormal tissue but also distinguishing between tissues of interest and other odorous substances that may be present in medical settings.

  1. [Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome in pediatric neurosurgery: a hemostasis problem].

    PubMed

    Bocquet, R; Blanot, S; Dautzenberg, M D; Pierre-Kahn, A; Carli, P

    1999-11-01

    The case of a 11-year-old boy under anticoagulant therapy for a familial antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (SAAPF), who underwent surgery for a cerebrovascular malformation responsible for an intracerebral haematoma, is reported. Antivitamins K (AVK) were changed for unfractioned heparin (HNF), three days before. Heparin was discontinued two hours prior to surgery to obtain a normal peroperative coagulation. A vascular dural fistula was removed without any haemostatic problem. The neurological status rapidly returned to normal and tomodensitometry at day 1 showed a normal intracranial status. Heparin was readministered at h 16. Thrombocytopenia occurred at day 4 of heparin treatment. The change for a low weight molecular heparinoid, danaparoid (Orgaran), normalized the platelet count. The platelets aggregation tests were negative during thrombopenia. However, the test for antibodies against the PF4-heparin complex with the Elisa technique, was in favour of a heparin induced thrombocytopenia (TIH). In spite of its anecdotic occurrence due to cumulative thrombotic risks from the association of immunologic disorders (TIH and SAAPF), this case report underlines the value but also the risks of anticoagulant therapy in neurosurgery, when patients are at high risk for thrombosis.

  2. Intraoperative Image Guidance in Neurosurgery: Development, Current Indications, and Future Trends

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Chris; Waldeck, Stephan; Mauer, Uwe Max

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. As minimally invasive surgery becomes the standard of care in neurosurgery, it is imperative that surgeons become skilled in the use of image-guided techniques. The development of image-guided neurosurgery represents a substantial improvement in the microsurgical treatment of tumors, vascular malformations, and other intracranial lesions. Objective. There have been numerous advances in neurosurgery which have aided the neurosurgeon to achieve accurate removal of pathological tissue with minimal disruption of surrounding healthy neuronal matter including the development of microsurgical, endoscopic, and endovascular techniques. Neuronavigation systems and intraoperative imaging should improve success in cranial neurosurgery. Additional functional imaging modalities such as PET, SPECT, DTI (for fiber tracking), and fMRI can now be used in order to reduce neurological deficits resulting from surgery; however the positive long-term effect remains questionable for many indications. Method. PubMed database search using the search term “image guided neurosurgery.” More than 1400 articles were published during the last 25 years. The abstracts were scanned for prospective comparative trials. Results and Conclusion. 14 comparative trials are published. To date significant data amount show advantages in intraoperative accuracy influencing the perioperative morbidity and long-term outcome only for cerebral glioma surgery. PMID:22655196

  3. Neurosurgery value and quality in the context of the Affordable Care Act: a policy perspective.

    PubMed

    Menger, Richard P; Guthikonda, Bharat; Storey, Christopher M; Nanda, Anil; McGirt, Matthew; Asher, Anthony

    2015-12-01

    Neurosurgeons provide direct individualized care to patients. However, the majority of regulations affecting the relative value of patient-related care are drafted by policy experts whose focus is typically system- and population-based. A central, prospectively gathered, national outcomes-related database serves as neurosurgery's best opportunity to bring patient-centered outcomes to the policy arena. In this study the authors analyze the impact of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) on the determination of quality and value in neurosurgery care through the scope, language, and terminology of policy experts. The methods by which the ACA came into law and the subsequent quality implications this legislation has for neurosurgery will be discussed. The necessity of neurosurgical patient-oriented clinical registries will be discussed in the context of imminent and dramatic reforms related to medical cost containment. In the policy debate moving forward, the strength of neurosurgery's argument will rest on data, unity, and proactiveness. The National Neurosurgery Quality and Outcomes Database (N(2)QOD) allows neurosurgeons to generate objective data on specialty-specific value and quality determinations; it allows neurosurgeons to bring the patient-physician interaction to the policy debate.

  4. Robotics in neurosurgery: state of the art and future technological challenges.

    PubMed

    Zamorano, L; Li, Q; Jain, S; Kaur, G

    2004-06-01

    The use of robotic technologies to assist surgeons was conceptually described almost thirty years ago but has only recently become feasible. In Neurosurgery, medical robots have been applied to neurosurgery for over 19 years. Nevertheless this field remains unknown to most neurosurgeons. The intrinsic characteristics of robots, such as high precision, repeatability and endurance make them ideal surgeon's assistants. Unfortunately, limitations in the current available systems make its use limited to very few centers in the world. During the last decade, important efforts have been made between academic and industry partnerships to develop robots suitable for use in the operating room environment. Although some applications have been successful in areas of laparoscopic surgery and orthopaedics, Neurosurgery has presented a major challenge due to the eloquence of the surrounding anatomy. This review focuses on the application of medical robotics in neurosurgery. The paper begins with an overview of the development of the medical robotics, followed by the current clinical applications in neurosurgery and an analysis of current limitations. We discuss robotic applications based in our own experience in the field. Next, we discuss the technological challenges and research areas to overcome those limitations, including some of our current research approaches for future progress in the field.

  5. Neurosurgery value and quality in the context of the Affordable Care Act: a policy perspective.

    PubMed

    Menger, Richard P; Guthikonda, Bharat; Storey, Christopher M; Nanda, Anil; McGirt, Matthew; Asher, Anthony

    2015-12-01

    Neurosurgeons provide direct individualized care to patients. However, the majority of regulations affecting the relative value of patient-related care are drafted by policy experts whose focus is typically system- and population-based. A central, prospectively gathered, national outcomes-related database serves as neurosurgery's best opportunity to bring patient-centered outcomes to the policy arena. In this study the authors analyze the impact of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) on the determination of quality and value in neurosurgery care through the scope, language, and terminology of policy experts. The methods by which the ACA came into law and the subsequent quality implications this legislation has for neurosurgery will be discussed. The necessity of neurosurgical patient-oriented clinical registries will be discussed in the context of imminent and dramatic reforms related to medical cost containment. In the policy debate moving forward, the strength of neurosurgery's argument will rest on data, unity, and proactiveness. The National Neurosurgery Quality and Outcomes Database (N(2)QOD) allows neurosurgeons to generate objective data on specialty-specific value and quality determinations; it allows neurosurgeons to bring the patient-physician interaction to the policy debate. PMID:26621419

  6. Radio astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellermann, Kenneth I.; Heeschen, David; Backer, Donald C.; Cohen, Marshall H.; Davis, Michael; Depater, Imke; Deyoung, David; Dulk, George A.; Fisher, J. R.; Goss, W. Miller

    1991-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: (1) scientific opportunities (millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelength astronomy; meter to hectometer astronomy; the Sun, stars, pulsars, interstellar masers, and extrasolar planets; the planets, asteroids, and comets; radio galaxies, quasars, and cosmology; and challenges for radio astronomy in the 1990's); (2) recommendations for new facilities (the millimeter arrays, medium scale instruments, and small-scale projects); (3) continuing activities and maintenance, upgrading of telescopes and instrumentation; (4) long range programs and technology development; and (5) social, political, and organizational considerations.

  7. [Radiotherapy of skin cancers].

    PubMed

    Hennequin, C; Rio, E; Mahé, M-A

    2016-09-01

    The indications of radiotherapy for skin cancers are not clearly defined because of the lack of randomised trials or prospective studies. For basal cell carcinomas, radiotherapy frequently offers a good local control, but a randomized trial showed that surgery is more efficient and less toxic. Indications of radiotherapy are contra-indications of surgery for patients older than 60, non-sclerodermiform histology and occurring in non-sensitive areas. Adjuvant radiotherapy could be proposed to squamous cell carcinomas, in case of poor prognostic factors. Dose of 60 to 70Gy are usually required, and must be modulated to the size of the lesions. Adjuvant radiotherapy seems beneficial for desmoplastic melanomas but not for the other histological types. Prophylactic nodal irradiation (45 to 50Gy), for locally advanced tumours (massive nodal involvement), decreases the locoregional failure rate but do not increase survival. Adjuvant radiotherapy (50 to 56Gy) for Merckel cell carcinomas increases also the local control rate, as demonstrated by meta-analysis and a large epidemiological study. Nodal areas must be included, if there is no surgical exploration (sentinel lymph node dissection). Kaposi sarcomas are radiosensitive and could be treated with relatively low doses (24 to 30Gy). Also, cutaneous lymphomas are good indications for radiotherapy: B lymphomas are electively treated with limited fields. The role of total skin electron therapy for T-lymphomas is still discussed; but palliative radiotherapy is very efficient in case of cutaneous nodules. PMID:27522189

  8. Planning National Radiotherapy Services

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblatt, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Countries, states, and island nations often need forward planning of their radiotherapy services driven by different motives. Countries without radiotherapy services sponsor patients to receive radiotherapy abroad. They often engage professionals for a feasibility study in order to establish whether it would be more cost-beneficial to establish a radiotherapy facility. Countries where radiotherapy services have developed without any central planning, find themselves in situations where many of the available centers are private and thus inaccessible for a majority of patients with limited resources. Government may decide to plan ahead when a significant exodus of cancer patients travel to another country for treatment, thus exposing the failure of the country to provide this medical service for its citizens. In developed countries, the trigger has been the existence of highly visible waiting lists for radiotherapy revealing a shortage of radiotherapy equipment. This paper suggests that there should be a systematic and comprehensive process of long-term planning of radiotherapy services at the national level, taking into account the regulatory infrastructure for radiation protection, planning of centers, equipment, staff, education programs, quality assurance, and sustainability aspects. Realistic budgetary and cost considerations must also be part of the project proposal or business plan. PMID:25505730

  9. Neurosurgery in Turkish poetry: three poets, two poems and two neurosurgeons.

    PubMed

    Kahilogullari, Gokmen

    2015-01-01

    Poems are essential in art and vital organs in literature. Similarly, surgery (and neurosurgery) is also regarded to be an art in medicine. From Hippocrates to nowadays, there is a debate on whether medicine -especially surgery- is a kind of an art or a field of science or a combination of both. This close relation becomes clearer during the practice of surgery, especially in neurosurgery. Herein, the relation between Turkish poetry and Turkish neurosurgery is being presented by researching the interesting and exciting stories about three poets (Can Yücel, Hasan Hüseyin Korkmazgil, Nazım Hikmet), their poems; and two Turkish neurosurgeons (Gazi Yaşargil, Yücel Kanpolat). PMID:26037173

  10. Central trigeminocardiac reflex in pediatric neurosurgery: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Trigeminocardiac reflex is a well-known phenomenon in neurosurgery, craniofacial surgery, ophthalmology and interventional neuroradiology. Even though the trigeminocardiac reflex has become an important factor in skull base surgery and neurosurgery, the central form of trigeminocardiac reflex has only been described in adult subpopulations until now. Case presentation We present a clear form of repetitive trigeminocardiac reflex expressed during revision surgery of a giant (110×61mm) right temporoparietal meningioma in an 18-month-old male Caucasian patient. After cessation of the surgical stimulus, his heart rate and mean arterial blood pressure returned to normal physiological levels. The further follow-up was uneventful. Conclusion Our case demonstrates that the central trigeminocardiac reflex also exists in pediatric patients, especially if manipulating trigeminal innervated structures or around the nerve itself. Whether the incidence and the behavior of the trigeminocardiac reflex is similar in pediatric neurosurgery compared with adult patients has to be shown in further studies. PMID:23110862

  11. Dosimetry for electron Intra-Operative RadioTherapy: Comparison of output factors obtained through alanine/EPR pellets, ionization chamber and Monte Carlo-GEANT4 simulations for IORT mobile dedicate accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrale, Maurizio; Longo, Anna; Russo, Giorgio; Casarino, Carlo; Candiano, Giuliana; Gallo, Salvatore; Carlino, Antonio; Brai, Maria

    2015-09-01

    In this work a comparison between the response of alanine and Markus ionization chamber was carried out for measurements of the output factors (OF) of electron beams produced by a linear accelerator used for Intra-Operative Radiation Therapy (IORT). Output factors (OF) for conventional high-energy electron beams are normally measured using ionization chamber according to international dosimetry protocols. However, the electron beams used in IORT have characteristics of dose per pulse, energy spectrum and angular distribution quite different from beams usually used in external radiotherapy, so the direct application of international dosimetry protocols may introduce additional uncertainties in dosimetric determinations. The high dose per pulse could lead to an inaccuracy in dose measurements with ionization chamber, due to overestimation of ks recombination factor. Furthermore, the electron fields obtained with IORT-dedicated applicators have a wider energy spectrum and a wider angular distribution than the conventional fields, due to the presence of electrons scattered by the applicator's wall. For this reason, a dosimetry system should be characterized by a minimum dependence from the beam energy and from angle of incidence of electrons. This become particularly critical for small and bevelled applicators. All of these reasons lead to investigate the use of detectors different from the ionization chamber for measuring the OFs. Furthermore, the complete characterization of the radiation field could be accomplished also by the use of Monte Carlo simulations which allows to obtain detailed information on dose distributions. In this work we compare the output factors obtained by means of alanine dosimeters and Markus ionization chamber. The comparison is completed by the Monte Carlo calculations of OFs determined through the use of the Geant4 application "iort _ therapy" . The results are characterized by a good agreement of response of alanine pellets and Markus

  12. Functional neurosurgery for movement disorders: a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Benabid, Alim Louis; Chabardes, Stephan; Torres, Napoleon; Piallat, Brigitte; Krack, Paul; Fraix, Valerie; Pollak, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Since the 1960s, deep brain stimulation and spinal cord stimulation at low frequency (30 Hz) have been used to treat intractable pain of various origins. For this purpose, specific hardware have been designed, including deep brain electrodes, extensions, and implantable programmable generators (IPGs). In the meantime, movement disorders, and particularly parkinsonian and essential tremors, were treated by electrolytic or mechanic lesions in various targets of the basal ganglia, particularly in the thalamus and in the internal pallidum. The advent in the 1960s of levodopa, as well as the side effects and complications of ablative surgery (e.g., thalamotomy and pallidotomy), has sent functional neurosurgery of movement disorders to oblivion. In 1987, the serendipitous discovery of the effect of high-frequency stimulation (HFS), mimicking lesions, allowed the revival of the surgery of movement disorders by stimulation of the thalamus, which treated tremors with limited morbidity, and adaptable and reversible results. The stability along time of these effects allowed extending it to new targets suggested by basic research in monkeys. The HFS of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) has profoundly challenged the practice of functional surgery as the effect on the triad of dopaminergic symptoms was very significant, allowing to decrease the drug dosage and therefore a decrease of their complications, the levodopa-induced dyskinesias. In the meantime, based on the results of previous basic research in various fields, HFS has been progressively extended to potentially treat epilepsy and, more recently, psychiatric disorders, such as obsessive-compulsive disorders, Gilles de la Tourette tics, and severe depression. Similarly, suggested by the observation of changes in PET scan, applications have been extended to cluster headaches by stimulation of the posterior hypothalamus and even more recently, to obesity and drug addiction. In the field of movement disorders, it has become

  13. Robotic System for MRI-Guided Stereotactic Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Cole, Gregory A.; Shang, Weijian; Harrington, Kevin; Camilo, Alex; Pilitsis, Julie G.; Fischer, Gregory S.

    2015-01-01

    Stereotaxy is a neurosurgical technique that can take several hours to reach a specific target, typically utilizing a mechanical frame and guided by preoperative imaging. An error in any one of the numerous steps or deviations of the target anatomy from the preoperative plan such as brain shift (up to 20 mm), may affect the targeting accuracy and thus the treatment effectiveness. Moreover, because the procedure is typically performed through a small burr hole opening in the skull that prevents tissue visualization, the intervention is basically “blind” for the operator with limited means of intraoperative confirmation that may result in reduced accuracy and safety. The presented system is intended to address the clinical needs for enhanced efficiency, accuracy, and safety of image-guided stereotactic neurosurgery for Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) lead placement. The work describes a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided, robotically actuated stereotactic neural intervention system for deep brain stimulation procedure, which offers the potential of reducing procedure duration while improving targeting accuracy and enhancing safety. This is achieved through simultaneous robotic manipulation of the instrument and interactively updated in situ MRI guidance that enables visualization of the anatomy and interventional instrument. During simultaneous actuation and imaging, the system has demonstrated less than 15% signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) variation and less than 0.20% geometric distortion artifact without affecting the imaging usability to visualize and guide the procedure. Optical tracking and MRI phantom experiments streamline the clinical workflow of the prototype system, corroborating targeting accuracy with 3-axis root mean square error 1.38 ± 0.45 mm in tip position and 2.03 ± 0.58° in insertion angle. PMID:25376035

  14. Strategic design for pediatric neurosurgery missions across the Western Hemisphere

    PubMed Central

    Hambrecht, Amanda; Duenas, Matthew J.; Hahn, Edward J.; Aryan, Henry E.; Hughes, Samuel A.; Waters, Dawn; Levy, Michael L.; Jandial, Rahul

    2013-01-01

    Background: With growing interest in global health, surgeons have created outreach missions to improve health care disparities in less developed countries. These efforts are mainly episodic with visiting surgeons performing the operations and minimal investment in local surgeon education. To create real and durable advancement in surgical services in disciplines that require urgent patient care, such as pediatric neurosurgery, improving the surgical armamentarium of the local surgeons must be the priority. Methods: We propose a strategic design for extending surgical education missions throughout the Western Hemisphere in order to transfer modern surgical skills to local neurosurgeons. A selection criteria and structure for targeted missions is a derivative of logistical and pedagogical lessons ascertained from previous missions by our teams in Peru and Ukraine. Results: Outreach programs should be applied to hospitals in capital cities to serve as a central referral center for maximal impact with fiscal efficiency. The host country should fulfill several criteria, including demonstration of geopolitical stability in combination with lack of modern neurosurgical care and equipment. The mission strategy is outlined as three to four 1-week visits with an initial site evaluation to establish a relationship with the hospital administration and host surgeons. Each visit should be characterized by collaboration between visiting and host surgeons on increasingly complex cases, with progressive transfer of skills over time. Conclusion: A strategic approach for surgical outreach missions should be built on collaboration and camaraderie between visiting and local neurosurgeons, with the mutual objective of cost-effective targeted renovation of their surgical equipment and skill repertoire. PMID:23772332

  15. Sensors management in robotic neurosurgery: the ROBOCAST project.

    PubMed

    Vaccarella, Alberto; Comparetti, Mirko Daniele; Enquobahrie, Andinet; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; De Momi, Elena

    2011-01-01

    Robot and computer-aided surgery platforms bring a variety of sensors into the operating room. These sensors generate information to be synchronized and merged for improving the accuracy and the safety of the surgical procedure for both patients and operators. In this paper, we present our work on the development of a sensor management architecture that is used is to gather and fuse data from localization systems, such as optical and electromagnetic trackers and ultrasound imaging devices. The architecture follows a modular client-server approach and was implemented within the EU-funded project ROBOCAST (FP7 ICT 215190). Furthermore it is based on very well-maintained open-source libraries such as OpenCV and Image-Guided Surgery Toolkit (IGSTK), which are supported from a worldwide community of developers and allow a significant reduction of software costs. We conducted experiments to evaluate the performance of the sensor manager module. We computed the response time needed for a client to receive tracking data or video images, and the time lag between synchronous acquisition with an optical tracker and ultrasound machine. Results showed a median delay of 1.9 ms for a client request of tracking data and about 40 ms for US images; these values are compatible with the data generation rate (20-30 Hz for tracking system and 25 fps for PAL video). Simultaneous acquisitions have been performed with an optical tracking system and US imaging device: data was aligned according to the timestamp associated with each sample and the delay was estimated with a cross-correlation study. A median value of 230 ms delay was calculated showing that realtime 3D reconstruction is not feasible (an offline temporal calibration is needed), although a slow exploration is possible. In conclusion, as far as asleep patient neurosurgery is concerned, the proposed setup is indeed useful for registration error correction because the brain shift occurs with a time constant of few tens of minutes.

  16. Sensors management in robotic neurosurgery: the ROBOCAST project.

    PubMed

    Vaccarella, Alberto; Comparetti, Mirko Daniele; Enquobahrie, Andinet; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; De Momi, Elena

    2011-01-01

    Robot and computer-aided surgery platforms bring a variety of sensors into the operating room. These sensors generate information to be synchronized and merged for improving the accuracy and the safety of the surgical procedure for both patients and operators. In this paper, we present our work on the development of a sensor management architecture that is used is to gather and fuse data from localization systems, such as optical and electromagnetic trackers and ultrasound imaging devices. The architecture follows a modular client-server approach and was implemented within the EU-funded project ROBOCAST (FP7 ICT 215190). Furthermore it is based on very well-maintained open-source libraries such as OpenCV and Image-Guided Surgery Toolkit (IGSTK), which are supported from a worldwide community of developers and allow a significant reduction of software costs. We conducted experiments to evaluate the performance of the sensor manager module. We computed the response time needed for a client to receive tracking data or video images, and the time lag between synchronous acquisition with an optical tracker and ultrasound machine. Results showed a median delay of 1.9 ms for a client request of tracking data and about 40 ms for US images; these values are compatible with the data generation rate (20-30 Hz for tracking system and 25 fps for PAL video). Simultaneous acquisitions have been performed with an optical tracking system and US imaging device: data was aligned according to the timestamp associated with each sample and the delay was estimated with a cross-correlation study. A median value of 230 ms delay was calculated showing that realtime 3D reconstruction is not feasible (an offline temporal calibration is needed), although a slow exploration is possible. In conclusion, as far as asleep patient neurosurgery is concerned, the proposed setup is indeed useful for registration error correction because the brain shift occurs with a time constant of few tens of minutes

  17. MINOP: development of a miniaturized endoscopic operation system for neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guber, Andreas E.; Wieneke, Paul

    1996-04-01

    Within the framework of R&D activities in the field of microsystems technology, the Institute for Microstructure Technology of Karlsruhe Research Center among others has started to improve the functionality of existing medicotechnical instruments by increased integration of microtechnical components. On the basis of microsystems fabrication techniques, completely novel medical endoscope systems have become feasible. In cooperation with clinical, technical and industrial partners, a novel endoscopic operation system based on microsystems technology is being developed by the Institute for Microstructure Technology and the Aesculap AG company, Tuttlingen within the framework of the MINOP joint project. This new system shall be applied above all in the field of neurosurgery. This newly conceived endosystem is characterized by a multitude of novelties. It can perform a number of both sensor and actor functions. Due to its extremely small outer diameter, it can be applied through minute openings. As a result of the integrated microfluidic control system, the flexible endoscope can be moved to the actual site of operation on a previously specified path. This will allow future bi- and triportal neuro-endoscopic interventions for critical operations in the brain area. The different lumina of the flexible endoscope fulfill various functions. Via the optical fibers, laser radiation may be led to the distal end of the endoscope. Using microtechnical fabrication methods, special plastic microlenses have been produced. The working channel can be applied for rinsing and removal. Furthermore, the cleaning of the optics or the taking of tissue samples are possible. If required, another laser fiber can be driven forward through the working channel for selective therapy. For the first time, high-performance microinstruments have been developed on the basis of novel materials. These instruments can be applied either through the working channel or through an additional trocar.

  18. Consensus on guidelines for stereotactic neurosurgery for psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Nuttin, Bart; Wu, Hemmings; Mayberg, Helen; Hariz, Marwan; Gabriëls, Loes; Galert, Thorsten; Merkel, Reinhard; Kubu, Cynthia; Vilela-Filho, Osvaldo; Matthews, Keith; Taira, Takaomi; Lozano, Andres M; Schechtmann, Gastón; Doshi, Paresh; Broggi, Giovanni; Régis, Jean; Alkhani, Ahmed; Sun, Bomin; Eljamel, Sam; Schulder, Michael; Kaplitt, Michael; Eskandar, Emad; Rezai, Ali; Krauss, Joachim K; Hilven, Paulien; Schuurman, Rick; Ruiz, Pedro; Chang, Jin Woo; Cosyns, Paul; Lipsman, Nir; Voges, Juergen; Cosgrove, Rees; Li, Yongjie; Schlaepfer, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Background For patients with psychiatric illnesses remaining refractory to ‘standard’ therapies, neurosurgical procedures may be considered. Guidelines for safe and ethical conduct of such procedures have previously and independently been proposed by various local and regional expert groups. Methods To expand on these earlier documents, representative members of continental and international psychiatric and neurosurgical societies, joined efforts to further elaborate and adopt a pragmatic worldwide set of guidelines. These are intended to address a broad range of neuropsychiatric disorders, brain targets and neurosurgical techniques, taking into account cultural and social heterogeneities of healthcare environments. Findings The proposed consensus document highlights that, while stereotactic ablative procedures such as cingulotomy and capsulotomy for depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder are considered ‘established’ in some countries, they still lack level I evidence. Further, it is noted that deep brain stimulation in any brain target hitherto tried, and for any psychiatric or behavioural disorder, still remains at an investigational stage. Researchers are encouraged to design randomised controlled trials, based on scientific and data-driven rationales for disease and brain target selection. Experienced multidisciplinary teams are a mandatory requirement for the safe and ethical conduct of any psychiatric neurosurgery, ensuring documented refractoriness of patients, proper consent procedures that respect patient's capacity and autonomy, multifaceted preoperative as well as postoperative long-term follow-up evaluation, and reporting of effects and side effects for all patients. Interpretation This consensus document on ethical and scientific conduct of psychiatric surgery worldwide is designed to enhance patient safety. PMID:24444853

  19. Constantin N. Arseni (1912-1994) centenary: the birth of modern neurosurgery in Romania.

    PubMed

    Dinca, Eduard B; Banu, Matei; Ciurea, Alexandru V

    2014-01-01

    Prof. Dr. Constantin N. Arseni and his mentor, Prof. Dr. D. Bagdasar, are revered by later generations of doctors as the forefathers of Romanian neurosurgery. In 2012, we have celebrated 100 years since Prof. Arseni's birth in a small village within a deprived area of the country. Through his talents and perseveration, he rose to be a neurosurgical school creator and one of the most prominent figures in 20th-century Eastern European neurosurgery. This historical vignette is a modest tribute to his legacy and tells the story of his titanic endeavor.

  20. Applications of Nanomaterials in Radiotherapy for Malignant Tumors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanchao; Liang, Ruichao; Fang, Fang

    2015-08-01

    Malignant tumors are tremendous heath problems facing by the medical world. In order to achieve the purpose of curing malignant tumor, numerous therapeutic strategies have been developed. Radiotherapy is one of the main therapeutic strategies for malignant tumors. Current imaging strategies cannot display exact infiltrating margins, radio-resistance generated by irradiated tissue, and intercurrent damage to healthy tissues during radiotherapy. Therefore, novel strategies to solve these problems are urgently needed. Nanomaterials have specific physical and biological properties that can help clinician to distinguish margins of infiltrating tumors as a novel contrast agent. Besides, nanoparticles can significantly enhance the effect of radiotherapy by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS) or influence cell cycle. In addition, nanomaterials can also help in diminishing the intercurrent damage caused by radiotherapy. So nanomaterials have very promising prospect in the radiotherapy of malignant tumors. This review mainly focuses on the applications of nanomaterials in radiotherapy for malignant tumors; especially it applies to lesion imaging and their radiosensitizing effects. PMID:26369108

  1. The Radio JOVE Project - Shoestring Radio Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thieman, J.; Flagg, R.; Greenman, W.; Higgins, C.; Reyes, F.; Sky, J.

    2010-01-01

    Radio JOVE is an education and outreach project intended to give students and other interested individuals hands-on experience in learning radio astronomy. They can do this through building a radio telescope from a relatively inexpensive kit that includes the parts for a receiver and an antenna as well as software for a computer chart recorder emulator (Radio Skypipe) and other reference materials

  2. Space Telecommunications Radio System STRS Cognitive Radio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briones, Janette C.; Handler, Louis M.

    2013-01-01

    Radios today are evolving from awareness toward cognition. A software defined radio (SDR) provides the most capability for integrating autonomic decision making ability and allows the incremental evolution toward a cognitive radio. This cognitive radio technology will impact NASA space communications in areas such as spectrum utilization, interoperability, network operations, and radio resource management over a wide range of operating conditions. NASAs cognitive radio will build upon the infrastructure being developed by Space Telecommunication Radio System (STRS) SDR technology. This paper explores the feasibility of inserting cognitive capabilities in the NASA STRS architecture and the interfaces between the cognitive engine and the STRS radio. The STRS architecture defines methods that can inform the cognitive engine about the radio environment so that the cognitive engine can learn autonomously from experience, and take appropriate actions to adapt the radio operating characteristics and optimize performance.

  3. Recruitment in Radiotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deeley, T. J.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    The Faculty Board of Radiotherapy and Oncology of the Royal College of Radiobiologists surveyed the factors thought to influence recruitment into the specialty. Possible factors listed in replies of 36 questionnaires are offered. (LBH)

  4. The sitting position in neurosurgery: a critical appraisal.

    PubMed

    Porter, J M; Pidgeon, C; Cunningham, A J

    1999-01-01

    The potential for serious complications after venous air embolism and successful malpractice liability claims are the principle reasons for the dramatic decline in the use of the sitting position in neurosurgical practice. Although there have been several studies substantiating the relative safety compared with the prone or park bench positions, its use will continue to decline as neurosurgeons abandon its application and trainees in neurosurgery are not exposed to its relative merits. How can individual surgeons continue to use this position? Will individual, difficult surgical access cases be denied the obvious technical advantages of the sitting position? Limited use of the sitting position should remain in the neurosurgeon's armamentarium. However, several caveats must be emphasized. Assessment of the relative risk-benefit, based on the individual patient's physical status and surgical implications for the particular intracranial pathology, is of paramount importance. The patient should be informed of the specific risks of venous air embolism, quadriparesis and peripheral nerve palsies. Appropriate charting of patient information provided and special consent issues are essential. An anaesthetic input into the decision to use the sitting position is a sine qua non. The presence of a patient foramen ovale is an absolute contraindication. Preoperative contrast echocardiography should be used as a screening technique to detect the population at risk of paradoxical air embolism caused by the presence of a patent foramen ovale. The technique involves i.v. injection of saline agitated with air and a Valsalva manoeuvre is applied and released. Use of this position necessitates supplementary monitoring to promptly detect and treat venous air embolism. Doppler ultrasonography is the most sensitive of the generally available monitors to detect intracardiac air. The use of a central venous catheter is recommended, with the tip positioned close to the superior vena cava

  5. History of the Department of Neurosurgery at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital.

    PubMed

    Chalouhi, Nohra; Osterholm, Jewell; Jabbour, Pascal; Dumont, Aaron S; Gonzalez, L Fernando; Harrop, James; Sharan, Ashwini; Rosenwasser, Robert; Tjoumakaris, Stavropoula

    2013-10-01

    The neurosurgical tradition at Jefferson Medical College began in the 19th century with Samuel Gross. In his textbook entitled A System of Surgery, Gross revealed his knowledge of the disorders of the nervous system at a time when innovations were practically inexistent. Gross' work paved the way for William Williams Keen, "America's first brain surgeon." In 1887, Keen became the first surgeon in the nation to successfully remove a primary brain tumor. In 1893, Keen operated secretly on President Grover Cleveland for removal of an intraoral sarcoma and later served as a consultant to Franklin Roosevelt after he contracted poliomyelitis. The neurosurgery division was established in 1943 by J. Rudolph Jaeger. It was Philip Gordy who created a distinct Department of Neurosurgery in 1969. Jewell L. Osterholm became chairman of the Department of Neurosurgery in 1974. Since 2004, Robert Rosenwasser has served as chairman, and the Department of Neurosurgery at Jefferson has grown to include 26 faculty members. The residency has expanded to include 3 residents per academic year since 2007.

  6. The Mathematics of Three N-Localizers Used Together for Stereotactic Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The N-localizer enjoys widespread use in image-guided stereotactic neurosurgery and radiosurgery. This article derives the mathematical equations that are used with three N-localizers and provides analogies, explanations, and appendices in order to promote a deeper understanding of the mathematical principles that govern the N-localizer. PMID:26594605

  7. RADIO ALTIMETERS

    DOEpatents

    Bogle, R.W.

    1960-11-22

    A radio ranging device is described which utilizes a superregenerative oscillator having alternate sending and receiving phases with an intervening ranging interval between said phases, means for varying said ranging interval, means responsive to an on-range noise reduction condition for stopping said means for varying the ranging interval and indicating means coupled to the ranging interval varying means and calibrated in accordance with one-half the product of the ranging interval times the velocity of light whereby the range is indicated.

  8. Radio Jove: Jupiter Radio Astronomy for Citizens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Charles; Thieman, J. R.; Flagg, R.; Reyes, F. J.; Sky, J.; Greenman, W.; Brown, J.; Typinski, D.; Ashcraft, T.; Mount, A.

    2014-01-01

    Radio JOVE is a hands-on educational activity that brings the radio sounds of the Sun, Jupiter, the Milky Way Galaxy, and terrestrial radio noise to students, teachers, and the general public. Participants may build a simple radio telescope kit, make scientific observations, and interact with professional radio observatories in real-time over the Internet. Our website (http://radiojove.gsfc.nasa.gov) includes science information, construction manuals, observing guides, and education resources for teachers and students. Radio Jove is continually expanding its participants with over 1800 kits sold to more than 70 countries worldwide. Recently some of our most dedicated observers have upgraded their Radio Jove antennas to semi-professional observatories. We have spectrographs and wide band antennas, some with 8 MHz bandwidth and some with dual polarization capabilities. In an effort to add to the science literature, these observers are coordinating their efforts to pursue some basic questions about Jupiter’s radio emissions (radio source locations, spectral structure, long term changes, etc.). We can compare signal and ionosphere variations using the many Radio Jove observers at different locations. Observers are also working with members of the Long Wavelength Array Station 1 (LWA1) radio telescope to coordinate observations of Jupiter; Radio Jove is planning to make coordinated observations while the Juno Mission is active beginning in 2015. The Radio Jove program is overviewed, its hardware and software are highlighted, recent sample observations are shown, and we demonstrate that we are capable of real citizen science.

  9. [Radiotherapy of larynx cancers].

    PubMed

    Pointreau, Y; Lafond, C; Legouté, F; Trémolières, P; Servagi-Vernat, S; Giraud, P; Maingon, P; Calais, G; Lapeyre, M

    2016-09-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy is the gold standard in the treatment of larynx cancers (except T1 glottic tumour). Early T1 and T2 tumours may be treated by exclusive radiation or surgery. For tumours requiring total laryngectomy (T2 or T3), induction chemotherapy followed by exclusive radiotherapy or concurrent chemoradiotherapy is possible. For T4 tumour, surgery must be proposed. The treatment of lymph nodes is based on the initial treatment of the primary tumour. In non-surgical procedure, in case of sequential radiotherapy, the curative dose is 70Gy and the prophylactic dose is 50Gy. An integrated simultaneous boost radiotherapy is allowed (70Gy in 2Gy per fraction and 56Gy in 1.8Gy per fraction or 70Gy in 2.12Gy per fraction). Postoperatively, radiotherapy is used in locally advanced cancer with dose levels based on pathologic criteria (66Gy for R1 resection, 50 to 54Gy for complete resection). Volume delineation was based on guidelines. PMID:27521037

  10. [Prostate cancer external beam radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    de Crevoisier, R; Pommier, P; Latorzeff, I; Chapet, O; Chauvet, B; Hennequin, C

    2016-09-01

    The prostate external beam radiotherapy techniques are described, when irradiating the prostate or after prostatectomy, with and without pelvic lymph nodes. The following parts are presented: indications of radiotherapy, total dose and fractionation, planning CT image acquisition, volume of interest delineation (target volumes and organs at risk) and margins, Intensity modulated radiotherapy planning and corresponding dose-volume constraints, and finally Image guided radiotherapy. PMID:27516051

  11. Learning radio astronomy by doing radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaquerizo Gallego, J. A.

    2011-11-01

    PARTNeR (Proyecto Académico con el Radio Telescopio de NASA en Robledo, Academic Project with the NASA Radio Telescope at Robledo) is an educational program that allows high school and undergraduate students to control a 34 meter radio telescope and conduct radio astronomical observations via the internet. High-school teachers who join the project take a course to learn about the science of radio astronomy and how to use the antenna as an educational resource. Also, teachers are provided with learning activities they can do with their students and focused on the classroom implementation of the project within an interdisciplinary framework. PARTNeR provides students with firsthand experience in radio astronomy science. Thus, remote radio astronomical observations allow students to learn with a first rate scientific equipment the basics of radio astronomy research, aiming to arouse scientific careers and positive attitudes toward science. In this contribution we show the current observational programs and some recent results.

  12. Radiotherapy of inoperable lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Namer, M.; Lalanne, C.M.; Boublil, J.L.; Hery, M.; Chauvel, P.; Verschoore, J.; Aubanel, J.M.; Bruneton, J.N.

    1980-08-01

    Evaluation of loco-regional results obtained by radiotherapy for 31 patients with inoperable epidermoid lung cancer revealed objective remission (over 50%) in only 25% of patients. These results emphasize the limited effectiveness of radiotherapy in such cases and point out the need for increased research in radiotherapy techniques if survival rates are to be improved.

  13. [Radiotherapy for brain metastases].

    PubMed

    Latorzeff, I; Antoni, D; Gaudaire-Josset, S; Feuvret, L; Tallet-Richard, A; Truc, G; Noël, G

    2016-09-01

    Radiotherapy for brain metastases has become more multifaceted. Indeed, with the improvement of the patient's life expectancy, side effects must be undeniably avoided and the retreatments or multiple treatments are common. The cognitive side effects should be warned and the most modern techniques of radiation therapy are used regularly to reach this goal. The new classifications of patients with brain metastases help guiding treatment more appropriately. Stereotactic radiotherapy has supplanted whole brain radiation therapy both for patients with metastases in place and for those who underwent surgery. Hippocampus protection is possible with intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Its relevance in terms of cognitive functioning should be more clearly demonstrated but the requirement, for using it, is increasingly strong. While addressing patients in palliative phase, the treatment of brain metastases is one of the localisations where technical thinking is the most challenging. PMID:27523410

  14. [Radiotherapy in Europe].

    PubMed

    Verheij, M; Slotman, B J

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy plays an important part in the curing of cancer patients and is an effective treatment for tumour-related symptoms. However, in many countries the level of access to this treatment modality is unacceptably low due to shortage of infrastructure, modern apparatus and trained staff. In Europe it is mainly the Eastern European countries that are behind in the provision of and accessibility to radiotherapy. Worldwide investment to narrow the gap would put an end to these undesirable differences. In addition, these investments would deliver economic benefits, especially in low-to-middle income countries. In this article, on the basis of a number of recently published reports, we discuss the differences that exist in the geographical spread of radiotherapy departments and the availability of apparatus within Europe. In conclusion we also take a short look at the Dutch situation. PMID:27334085

  15. The history of neurosurgery in Memphis: the Semmes-Murphey Clinic and the Department of Neurosurgery at the University of Tennessee College of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Canale, Dee J; Watridge, Clarence B; Fuehrer, Tyler S; Robertson, Jon H

    2010-01-01

    Neurological surgery was defined as a separate surgical specialty by Harvey Cushing and a few other surgeons, most of whom were trained and influenced by Cushing. One of these, Raphael Eustace Semmes, became the first neurosurgeon in Memphis, Tennessee, in 1912. After World War II, Semmes and his first associate, Francis Murphey, incorporated the Semmes-Murphey Clinic, which has been primarily responsible for the growth of the Department of Neurosurgery at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center in Memphis, as well as the development of select neurosurgical subspecialties in Memphis area hospitals. PMID:19522575

  16. An abrupt reduction in end-tidal carbon-dioxide during neurosurgery is not always due to venous air embolism: a capnograph artefact.

    PubMed

    Vinay, Byrappa; Sriganesh, Kamath; Gopala Krishna, Kadarapura Nanjundaiah

    2014-04-01

    Venous air embolism (VAE) is a well recognized complication during neurosurgery. Pre-cordial doppler and trans-esophageal echocardiography are sensitive monitors for the detection of VAE. A sudden, abrupt reduction in the end-tidal carbondioxide (ETCO2) pressure with associated hypotension during neurosurgery might suggest VAE, when more sensitive monitors are not available. We describe an unusual cause for sudden reduction in ETCO2 during neurosurgery and discuss the mechanism for such presentation. PMID:23996497

  17. Microelectromechanical systems and neurosurgery: a new era in a new millennium.

    PubMed

    Roy, S; Ferrara, L A; Fleischman, A J; Benzel, E C

    2001-10-01

    MICROMACHINES AND MICROELECTROMECHANICAL SYSTEMS (MEMS) are terms that are new to neurosurgeons but certain to become "household terms" in neurosurgery in the near future. These new terms serve as an introduction to a new world of sensors, actuators, and "smart systems" that will change the ways in which neurosurgeons interact with their environment. Through the use of microelectronics and micromachining technologies, MEMS will allow neurosurgeons to perform familiar tasks with greater precision, perform tasks that previously were not done at all, and monitor physiological and biochemical parameters more accurately and with greater safety. This review provides the information necessary to understand the fundamental concepts of MEMS and their application to the neurosurgical arena. It defines the relevant terms and describes the history behind the "micromachine revolution," the capabilities and limitations of MEMS technology, and how this revolution is germane to neurosurgery and to neurosurgeons.

  18. Impact of 20th Century Wars on the Development of Neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Dowdy, Justin; Pait, T Glenn

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of neurosurgical casualties suffered during the wars of the 20th century had a significant impact on the formation and early growth of neurosurgery as a specialty. This chapter explores how the evolution of military tactics and weaponry along with the circumstances surrounding the wars themselves profoundly influenced the field. From the crystallization of intracranial projectile wound management and the formal recognition of the specialty itself arising from World War I experiences to the radical progress made in the outcomes of spinal-cord-injured soldiers in World War II or the fact that the neurosurgical training courses commissioned for these wars proved to be the precursors to modern neurosurgical training programs, the impact of the 20th century wars on the development of the field of neurosurgery is considerable.

  19. 100 Years of British military neurosurgery: on the shoulders of giants.

    PubMed

    Roberts, S A G

    2015-01-01

    Death from head injuries has been a feature of conflicts throughout the world for centuries. The burden of mortality has been variously affected by the evolution in weaponry from war-hammers to explosive ordnance, the influence of armour on survivability and the changing likelihood of infection as a complicating factor. Surgery evolved from haphazard trephination to valiant, yet disjointed, neurosurgery by a variety of great historical surgeons until the Crimean War of 1853-1856. However, it was events initiated by the Great War of 1914-1918 that not only marked the development of modern neurosurgical techniques, but our approach to military surgery as a whole. Here the author describes how 100 years of conflict and the input and intertwining relationships between the 20th century's great neurosurgeons established neurosurgery in the United Kingdom and beyond. PMID:26292388

  20. Propionibacterium Acnes Brain Abscess in an Immunocompetent Man in the Absence of Prior Neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Odunukan, Olufunso W; Masannat, Fares; Baka, J Jeff

    2016-02-01

    Propionibacterium acnes is a rare, but established, cause of intracranial abscesses. We describe a case of P. acnes brain abscess in an immunocompetent man without prior neurosurgery. A 49-year old man with mild psoriasis presented with a two-week history of gait changes, generalized weakness and a two-day history of headaches, aphasia and confusion. Imaging revealed a left thalamic mass and surgical biopsy suggested a pyogenic abscess. Cultures of biopsy samples of the abscess grew P. acnes alone. MRI and serial neurological exam showed marked clinical improvement with intravenous antibiotics. The significant reduction in the abscess was sustained on MRI obtained at six weeks after completion of antibiotic therapy. In conclusion, P. acnes must be considered as a differential diagnosis in individuals presenting with features suggestive of a brain abscess even in the absence of immunosuppression or previous neurosurgery. PMID:26999913

  1. The present and future of quality measures and public reporting in neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Bekelis, Kimon; McGirt, Matthew J; Parker, Scott L; Holland, Christopher M; Davies, Jason; Devin, Clinton J; Atkins, Tyler; Knightly, Jack; Groman, Rachel; Zyung, Irene; Asher, Anthony L

    2015-12-01

    Quality measurement and public reporting are intended to facilitate targeted outcome improvement, practice-based learning, shared decision making, and effective resource utilization. However, regulatory implementation has created a complex network of reporting requirements for physicians and medical practices. These include Medicare's Physician Quality Reporting System, Electronic Health Records Meaningful Use, and Value-Based Payment Modifier programs. The common denominator of all these initiatives is that to avoid penalties, physicians must meet "generic" quality standards that, in the case of neurosurgery and many other specialties, are not pertinent to everyday clinical practice and hold specialists accountable for care decisions outside of their direct control. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has recently authorized alternative quality reporting mechanisms for the Physician Quality Reporting System, which allow registries to become subspecialty-reporting mechanisms under the Qualified Clinical Data Registry (QCDR) program. These programs further give subspecialties latitude to develop measures of health care quality that are relevant to the care provided. As such, these programs amplify the power of clinical registries by allowing more accurate assessment of practice patterns, patient experiences, and overall health care value. Neurosurgery has been at the forefront of these developments, leveraging the experience of the National Neurosurgery Quality and Outcomes Database to create one of the first specialty-specific QCDRs. Recent legislative reform has continued to change this landscape and has fueled optimism that registries (including QCDRs) and other specialty-driven quality measures will be a prominent feature of federal and private sector quality improvement initiatives. These physician- and patient-driven methods will allow neurosurgery to underscore the value of interventions, contribute to the development of sustainable health care

  2. Neurosurgery in the realm of 10(-9), part 1: stardust and nanotechnology in neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Elder, James B; Liu, Charles Y; Apuzzo, Michael L J

    2008-01-01

    Nanotechnology as a science has evolved from notions and speculation to emerge as a prominent combination of science and engineering that stands to impact innumerable aspects of technology. Medicine in general and neurosurgery in particular will benefit greatly in terms of improved diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities. The recent explosion in nanotechnology products, including diverse applications such as beauty products and medical contrast agents, has been accompanied by an ever increasing volume of literature. Recent articles from our institution provided an historical and scientific background of nanotechnology, with a purposeful focus on nanomedicine. Future applications of nanotechnology to neuroscience and neurosurgery were briefly addressed. The present article is the first of two that will further this discussion by providing specific details of current nanotechnology applications and research related to neuroscience and clinical neurosurgery. This article also provides relevant perspective in scale, history, economics, and toxicology. Topics of specific importance to developments or advances of technologies used by neuroscientists and neurosurgeons are presented. In addition, advances in the field of microelectromechanical systems technology are discussed. Although larger than nanoscale, microelectromechanical systems technologies will play an important role in the future of medicine and neurosurgery. The second article will discuss current nanotechnologies that are being, or will be in the near future, incorporated into the armamentarium of the neurosurgeon. The goal of these articles is to keep the neuroscience community abreast of current developments in nanotechnology, nanomedicine, and, in particular, nanoneurosurgery, and to present possibilities for future applications of nanotechnology. As applications of nanotechnology permeate all forms of scientific and medical research, clinical applications will continue to emerge. Physicians of the

  3. Diabetes insipidus following neurosurgery at a university hospital in Western Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Qari, Faiza A.; AbuDaood, Elaff A.; Nasser, Tariq A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To review the incidence, spectrum of clinical manifestation, course, risk factors, as well as treatment of diabetes insipidus (DI) following neurosurgery of the pituitary gland. Methods: The files of 24 patients that underwent neurosurgery for sellar lesions, or tumor near the hypothalamus or pituitary gland at the Department of Neurosurgery, King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia were retrospectively reviewed between January 2011 to December 2014. A total of 24 patients were studied, and were divided into 2 groups namely; DI and non-DI. Patient characteristics were studied using descriptive statistics. The differences in proportion between the 2 groups were found out using Z-test for proportion in 2 populations. The mean differences in the hormonal abnormalities for the 2 groups were assessed using independent t-test. All statistics are considered statistically significant when p<0.05. Results: During hospitalization, 13 (54.2%) out of 24 patient that underwent neurosurgery had manifestations of DI, which was transient in 5 (38.8%) and permanent in 8 (61.2%). The DI subgroup contained higher prevalence of prolactinoma, craniopharyngioma, pre-operative panhypopituitarism, and macroadenoma in MRI imaging and transphenoidal surgery. Furthermore, urine osmolality was significantly lower in the DI group post-operatively with a significant p=0.023. It was recognized that the permanent DI documented more significant numbers than other studies. Conclusion: In our study group, it was recognized that permanent DI meant that our patients needed desmopressin for more than 3 months, which documented a more significant number than other studies. PMID:26837398

  4. The present and future of quality measures and public reporting in neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Bekelis, Kimon; McGirt, Matthew J; Parker, Scott L; Holland, Christopher M; Davies, Jason; Devin, Clinton J; Atkins, Tyler; Knightly, Jack; Groman, Rachel; Zyung, Irene; Asher, Anthony L

    2015-12-01

    Quality measurement and public reporting are intended to facilitate targeted outcome improvement, practice-based learning, shared decision making, and effective resource utilization. However, regulatory implementation has created a complex network of reporting requirements for physicians and medical practices. These include Medicare's Physician Quality Reporting System, Electronic Health Records Meaningful Use, and Value-Based Payment Modifier programs. The common denominator of all these initiatives is that to avoid penalties, physicians must meet "generic" quality standards that, in the case of neurosurgery and many other specialties, are not pertinent to everyday clinical practice and hold specialists accountable for care decisions outside of their direct control. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has recently authorized alternative quality reporting mechanisms for the Physician Quality Reporting System, which allow registries to become subspecialty-reporting mechanisms under the Qualified Clinical Data Registry (QCDR) program. These programs further give subspecialties latitude to develop measures of health care quality that are relevant to the care provided. As such, these programs amplify the power of clinical registries by allowing more accurate assessment of practice patterns, patient experiences, and overall health care value. Neurosurgery has been at the forefront of these developments, leveraging the experience of the National Neurosurgery Quality and Outcomes Database to create one of the first specialty-specific QCDRs. Recent legislative reform has continued to change this landscape and has fueled optimism that registries (including QCDRs) and other specialty-driven quality measures will be a prominent feature of federal and private sector quality improvement initiatives. These physician- and patient-driven methods will allow neurosurgery to underscore the value of interventions, contribute to the development of sustainable health care

  5. Neurosurgery at All India Institute of Medical Sciences, a center of excellence: A success story.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manmohan; Sawarkar, Dattaraj; Sharma, Bhawani S

    2015-01-01

    The department of neurosurgery at All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS) started its humble beginning in 1965. With the untiring and selfless hard work of Prof. P N Tandon and Prof. A K Banerji, the department progressed over time to become a center of excellence in the subcontinent. To establish a neurosciences center at AIIMS was an uphill task, which was accomplished with great efforts. The department has established itself as one of the highest centers of learning in the country with its vast infrastructure and diversity in all fields of neurosurgery. AIIMS, New Delhi was established by an act of the parliament in 1956. It was started with a grant from the Government of New Zealand under the "Colombo Plan." It was the vision of Rajkumari Amrita Kaur, the first Health Minister of India, that led to the establishment of a medical institute of international repute in India. AIIMS, New Delhi is an autonomous institute and is governed by the AIIMS Act, 1956. The department of neurosurgery at AIIMS was started in March 1965 with Prof. P.N. Tandon as the Head of the Department. Prof. A.K. Banerji joined him a few months later. The Department celebrated its golden jubilee in the year 2015, and has tremendously grown in stature from its humble beginnings to being a center of excellence with world-wide recognition. PMID:26238896

  6. Atrial natriuretic factor: is it responsible for hyponatremia and natriuresis in neurosurgery?

    PubMed Central

    Gasparotto, Ana Paula Devite Cardoso; Falcão, Antonio Luis Eiras; Kosour, Carolina; Araújo, Sebastião; Cintra, Eliane Araújo; de Oliveira, Rosmari Aparecida Rosa Almeida; Martins, Luiz Claudio; Dragosavac, Desanka

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the presence of hyponatremia and natriuresis and their association with atrial natriuretic factor in neurosurgery patients. Methods The study included 30 patients who had been submitted to intracranial tumor resection and cerebral aneurism clipping. Both plasma and urinary sodium and plasma atrial natriuretic factor were measured during the preoperative and postoperative time periods. Results Hyponatremia was present in 63.33% of the patients, particularly on the first postoperative day. Natriuresis was present in 93.33% of the patients, particularly on the second postoperative day. Plasma atrial natriuretic factor was increased in 92.60% of the patients in at least one of the postoperative days; however, there was no statistically significant association between the atrial natriuretic factor and plasma sodium and between the atrial natriuretic factor and urinary sodium. Conclusion Hyponatremia and natriuresis were present in most patients after neurosurgery; however, the atrial natriuretic factor cannot be considered to be directly responsible for these alterations in neurosurgery patients. Other natriuretic factors are likely to be involved. PMID:27410411

  7. The legacy of Prof. Constantin Arseni. The medical architect behind the Romanian School of Neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Mohan, D; Husti, I Luca; Moisa, H; Ciurea, Av; Mult, H C

    2014-01-01

    The personality of Prof. Dr. Constantin Arseni (1912-1994) is without any doubt a key point in any discussion regarding the history of the Romanian School of Neurosurgery. Now at two decades since the regretted passing-away of Prof. Arseni the authors present several pieces of data regarding the early beginnings of neurosurgery in Romania and how this discipline has evolved over time in our country. Driven by an incredible tenacity Professor Constantin Arseni managed not only to create the first completely independent clinic of neurosurgery in Romania, but also to keep it continuously updated with the latest bibliographic and technological resources available at the time. Professor Arseni's masterpiece, the largest neurosurgical hospital in Europe (at the time of its construction)was supposed to be a completely autonomous institute dedicated to surgery on the human central nervous system. As the Iron Curtain fell and Europe was marked by continuous reforms, the idea of an institute dedicated to the brain was abandoned by the authorities and a multidisciplinary hospital dedicated to neurosurgical emergencies and trauma was born. PMID:25375064

  8. Laser speckle contrast imaging of cerebral blood flow in humans during neurosurgery: a pilot clinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, Ashwin B.; Weber, Erica L.; Richards, Lisa M.; Fox, Douglas J.; Dunn, Andrew K.

    2010-11-01

    Monitoring cerebral blood flow (CBF) during neurosurgery can provide important physiological information for a variety of surgical procedures. CBF measurements are important for assessing whether blood flow has returned to presurgical baseline levels and for assessing postsurgical tissue viability. Existing techniques for intraoperative monitoring of CBF based on magnetic resonance imaging are expensive and often impractical, while techniques such as indocyanine green angiography cannot produce quantitative measures of blood flow. Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) is an optical technique that has been widely used to quantitatively image relative CBF in animal models in vivo. In a pilot clinical study, we adapted an existing neurosurgical operating microscope to obtain LSCI images in humans in real time during neurosurgery under baseline conditions and after bipolar cautery. Simultaneously recorded ECG waveforms from the patient were used to develop a filter that helped reduce measurement variabilities due to motion artifacts. Results from this study demonstrate the feasibility of using LSCI to obtain blood flow images during neurosurgeries and its capability to produce full field CBF image maps with excellent spatial resolution in real-time with minimal disruption to the surgical procedure.

  9. Intra-operative micro-electrode recording in functional neurosurgery: Past, present, future.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Tanmoy K; Konar, Subhas; Bir, Shyamal; Kalakoti, Piyush; Nanda, Anil

    2016-10-01

    The field of functional neurosurgery has experienced a rise, fall and lastly a renaissance over the past 75years. Micro-electrode recording (MER) played a key role during this eventful journey. However, as the intra-operative MRI continues to evolve, a pertinent question about the utility of MER has been raised in recent years. In this article, we critically review these current controversies. The English literature is reviewed and the complex technique of MER is discussed in a simplified manner. The improvement of neuroimaging and its application in functional neurosurgery, especially in deep brain stimulation, is discussed. Finally, the current controversies and technical advances which can direct the future are reviewed. The results of existing meta-analyses addressing the controversies are summarized. Wide variations of pre-operative and intra-operative targeting methods have been described in the literature. Though functional neurosurgery is generally safe, complications do occur and multiple passes during MER can certainly add to the risk of inadvertent hemorrhage and infection. Additionally, the recent introduction of newer MRI modalities has ensured better delineation of the target. However, MER is still useful to address brain shift, for mapping of newer targets, for ablative surgeries and in centers without an intra-operative imaging facility. In the current scenario, it is nearly impossible to conduct a prospective study to decide the utility of MER. The importance of MER may further diminish in the future as a routine procedure, but its role as a gold standard procedure may still persist.

  10. The National Neurosurgery Quality and Outcomes Database Qualified Clinical Data Registry: 2015 measure specifications and rationale.

    PubMed

    Parker, Scott L; McGirt, Matthew J; Bekelis, Kimon; Holland, Christopher M; Davies, Jason; Devin, Clinton J; Atkins, Tyler; Knightly, Jack; Groman, Rachel; Zyung, Irene; Asher, Anthony L

    2015-12-01

    Meaningful quality measurement and public reporting have the potential to facilitate targeted outcome improvement, practice-based learning, shared decision making, and effective resource utilization. Recent developments in national quality reporting programs, such as the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Qualified Clinical Data Registry (QCDR) reporting option, have enhanced the ability of specialty groups to develop relevant quality measures of the care they deliver. QCDRs will complete the collection and submission of Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS) quality measures data on behalf of individual eligible professionals. The National Neurosurgery Quality and Outcomes Database (N(2)QOD) offers 21 non-PQRS measures, initially focused on spine procedures, which are the first specialty-specific measures for neurosurgery. Securing QCDR status for N(2)QOD is a tremendously important accomplishment for our specialty. This program will ensure that data collected through our registries and used for PQRS is meaningful for neurosurgeons, related spine care practitioners, their patients, and other stakeholders. The 2015 N(2)QOD QCDR is further evidence of neurosurgery's commitment to substantively advancing the health care quality paradigm. The following manuscript outlines the measures now approved for use in the 2015 N(2)QOD QCDR. Measure specifications (measure type and descriptions, related measures, if any, as well as relevant National Quality Strategy domain[s]) along with rationale are provided for each measure. PMID:26621418

  11. Bulgarian military neurosurgery: from Warsaw Pact to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.

    PubMed

    Enchev, Yavor; Eftimov, Tihomir

    2010-05-01

    After 45 years as a closest ally of the Soviet Union in the Warsaw Pact, founded mainly against the US and the Western Europe countries, and 15 years of democratic changes, since 2004 Bulgaria has been a full member of NATO and an equal and trusted partner of its former enemies. The unprecedented transformation has affected all aspects of the Bulgarian society. As a function of the Bulgarian Armed Forces, Bulgarian military medicine and in particular Bulgarian military neurosurgery is indivisibly connected with their development. The history of Bulgarian military neurosurgery is the history of the transition from the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics military system and military medicine to NATO standards in every aspect. The career of the military neurosurgeon in Bulgaria is in many ways similar to that of the civilian neurosurgeon, but there are also many peculiarities. The purpose of this study was to outline the background and the history of Bulgarian military neurosurgery as well as its future trends in the conditions of world globalization.

  12. Aura of technology and the cutting edge: a history of lasers in neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Robert W; Spetzler, Robert F; Preul, Mark C

    2009-09-01

    In this historical review the authors examine the important developments that have led to the availability of laser energy to neurosurgeons as a unique and sometimes invaluable tool. They review the physical science behind the function of lasers, as well as how and when various lasers based on different lasing mediums were discovered. They also follow the close association between advances in laser technology and their application in biomedicine, from early laboratory experiments to the first clinical experiences. Because opinions on the appropriate role of lasers in neurosurgery vary widely, the historical basis for some of these views is explored. Initial enthusiasm for a technology that appears to have innate advantages for safe resections has often given way to the strict limitations and demands of the neurosurgical operating theater. However, numerous creative solutions to improve laser delivery, power, safety, and ergonomics demonstrate the important role that technological advances in related scientific fields continue to offer neurosurgery. Benefiting from the most recent developments in materials science, current CO(2) laser delivery systems provide a useful addition to the neurosurgical armamentarium when applied in the correct circumstances and reflect the important historical advances that come about from the interplay between neurosurgery and technology.

  13. Intra-operative micro-electrode recording in functional neurosurgery: Past, present, future.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Tanmoy K; Konar, Subhas; Bir, Shyamal; Kalakoti, Piyush; Nanda, Anil

    2016-10-01

    The field of functional neurosurgery has experienced a rise, fall and lastly a renaissance over the past 75years. Micro-electrode recording (MER) played a key role during this eventful journey. However, as the intra-operative MRI continues to evolve, a pertinent question about the utility of MER has been raised in recent years. In this article, we critically review these current controversies. The English literature is reviewed and the complex technique of MER is discussed in a simplified manner. The improvement of neuroimaging and its application in functional neurosurgery, especially in deep brain stimulation, is discussed. Finally, the current controversies and technical advances which can direct the future are reviewed. The results of existing meta-analyses addressing the controversies are summarized. Wide variations of pre-operative and intra-operative targeting methods have been described in the literature. Though functional neurosurgery is generally safe, complications do occur and multiple passes during MER can certainly add to the risk of inadvertent hemorrhage and infection. Additionally, the recent introduction of newer MRI modalities has ensured better delineation of the target. However, MER is still useful to address brain shift, for mapping of newer targets, for ablative surgeries and in centers without an intra-operative imaging facility. In the current scenario, it is nearly impossible to conduct a prospective study to decide the utility of MER. The importance of MER may further diminish in the future as a routine procedure, but its role as a gold standard procedure may still persist. PMID:27396672

  14. Neurosurgery at All India Institute of Medical Sciences, a center of excellence: A success story.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manmohan; Sawarkar, Dattaraj; Sharma, Bhawani S

    2015-01-01

    The department of neurosurgery at All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS) started its humble beginning in 1965. With the untiring and selfless hard work of Prof. P N Tandon and Prof. A K Banerji, the department progressed over time to become a center of excellence in the subcontinent. To establish a neurosciences center at AIIMS was an uphill task, which was accomplished with great efforts. The department has established itself as one of the highest centers of learning in the country with its vast infrastructure and diversity in all fields of neurosurgery. AIIMS, New Delhi was established by an act of the parliament in 1956. It was started with a grant from the Government of New Zealand under the "Colombo Plan." It was the vision of Rajkumari Amrita Kaur, the first Health Minister of India, that led to the establishment of a medical institute of international repute in India. AIIMS, New Delhi is an autonomous institute and is governed by the AIIMS Act, 1956. The department of neurosurgery at AIIMS was started in March 1965 with Prof. P.N. Tandon as the Head of the Department. Prof. A.K. Banerji joined him a few months later. The Department celebrated its golden jubilee in the year 2015, and has tremendously grown in stature from its humble beginnings to being a center of excellence with world-wide recognition.

  15. Radiotherapy for craniopharyngioma.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Ajay; Fersht, Naomi; Brada, Michael

    2013-03-01

    Radiotherapy remains the mainstay of multidisciplinary management of patients with incompletely resected and recurrent craniopharyngioma. Advances in imaging and radiotherapy technology offer new alternatives with the principal aim of improving the accuracy of treatment and reducing the volume of normal brain receiving significant radiation doses. We review the available technologies, their technical advantages and disadvantages and the published clinical results. Fractionated high precision conformal radiotherapy with image guidance remains the gold standard; the results of single fraction treatment are disappointing and hypofractionation should be used with caution as long term results are not available. There is insufficient data on the use of protons to assess the comparative efficacy and toxicity. The precision of treatment delivery needs to be coupled with experienced infrastructure and more intensive quality assurance to ensure best treatment outcome and this should be carried out within multidisciplinary teams experienced in the management of craniopharyngioma. The advantages of the combined skills and expertise of the team members may outweigh the largely undefined clinical gain from novel radiotherapy technologies.

  16. [Radiotherapy of cerebral metastases].

    PubMed

    Soffietti, R

    1984-05-31

    Radiotherapy of brain metastases is almost always palliative, as histologically documented cures are exceptional. Radiotherapy alone improves neurological symptoms in two-thirds of cases, but median survivals do not generally exceed 6 months. Whole brain radiation is mandatory as the lesions are often multiple, even when they escape clinical demonstration. There is no definite difference in prognosis after conventional rather than concentrated treatments. The role of steroids in the prevention and/or control of the acute effects of radiotherapy is controversial. Favorable prognostic factors are a good neurological and performance status, a solitary brain metastasis of a primary tumor under control, some histological types (i.e.: metastases from "oat" cell carcinomas, breast carcinomas, non-Hodgkin lymphomas are more responsive). Surgical excision before radiotherapy improves survival (6-12 months), especially in solitary metastases from melanomas, colon and renal tumors. Reirradiation can be useful, but the risk of delayed damage to the normal tissue in patients with longer survival (solitary operated and irradiated metastases) must be considered. The search for new radiotherapeutic modalities must be based on a deeper understanding of the biological factors involved in the response to radiation through controlled anatomo-clinical studies and biological research on experimental models.

  17. [Radiotherapy of lymphomas].

    PubMed

    Barillot, I; Mahé, M A; Antoni, D; Hennequin, C

    2016-09-01

    Radiotherapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma has evolved over time but retains a dominant position in the treatment of early stage tumours. Its indications are more limited for non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, but the techniques follow the same principles whatever the histological type. This review presents the French recommendations in terms of preparation and choice of irradiation techniques. PMID:27521031

  18. [Radiotherapy of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Hennequin, C; Barillot, I; Azria, D; Belkacémi, Y; Bollet, M; Chauvet, B; Cowen, D; Cutuli, B; Fourquet, A; Hannoun-Lévi, J M; Leblanc, M; Mahé, M A

    2016-09-01

    In breast cancer, radiotherapy is an essential component of the treatment. After conservative surgery for an infiltrating carcinoma, radiotherapy must be systematically performed, regardless of the characteristics of the disease, because it decreases the rate of local recurrence and by this way, specific mortality. Partial breast irradiation could not be proposed routinely but only in very selected and informed patients. For ductal carcinoma in situ, adjuvant radiotherapy must be also systematically performed after lumpectomy. After mastectomy, chest wall irradiation is required for pT3-T4 tumours and if there is an axillary nodal involvement, whatever the number of involved lymph nodes. After neo-adjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy, in case of pN0 disease, chest wall irradiation is recommended if there is a clinically or radiologically T3-T4 or node positive disease before chemotherapy. Axillary irradiation is recommended only if there is no axillary surgical dissection and a positive sentinel lymph node. Supra and infra-clavicular irradiation is advised in case of positive axillary nodes. Internal mammary irradiation must be discussed case by case, according to the benefit/risk ratio (cardiac toxicity). Dose to the chest wall or the breast must be between 45-50Gy with a conventional fractionation. A boost dose over the tumour bed is required if the patient is younger than 60 years old. Hypofractionation (42.5 Gy in 16 fractions, or 41.6 Gy en 13 or 40 Gy en 15) is possible after tumorectomy and if a nodal irradiation is not mandatory. Delineation of the breast, the chest wall and the nodal areas are based on clinical and radiological evaluations. 3D-conformal irradiation is the recommended technique, intensity-modulated radiotherapy must be proposed only in case of specific clinical situations. Respiratory gating could be useful to decrease the cardiac dose. Concomitant administration of chemotherapy in unadvised, but hormonal treatment could be start with

  19. Radio frequency detection assembly and method for detecting radio frequencies

    DOEpatents

    Cown, Steven H.; Derr, Kurt Warren

    2010-03-16

    A radio frequency detection assembly is described and which includes a radio frequency detector which detects a radio frequency emission produced by a radio frequency emitter from a given location which is remote relative to the radio frequency detector; a location assembly electrically coupled with the radio frequency detector and which is operable to estimate the location of the radio frequency emitter from the radio frequency emission which has been received; and a radio frequency transmitter electrically coupled with the radio frequency detector and the location assembly, and which transmits a radio frequency signal which reports the presence of the radio frequency emitter.

  20. Intensified autophagy compromises the efficacy of radiotherapy against prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Koukourakis, Michael I.

    2015-05-29

    Introduction: Radiotherapy is an equivalent alternative or complement to radical prostatectomy, with high therapeutic efficacy. High risk patients, however, experience high relapse rates, so that research on radio-sensitization is the most evident route to improve curability of this common disease. Materials and methods: In the current study we investigated the autophagic activity in a series of patients with localized prostate tumors treated with radical radiotherapy, using the LC3A and the LAMP2a proteins as markers of autophagosome and lysosome cellular content, respectively. The role of autophagy on prostate cancer cell line resistance to radiation was also examined. Results: Using confocal microscopy on tissue biopsies, we showed that prostate cancer cells have, overall, high levels of LC3A and low levels of LAMP2a compared to normal prostate glands. Tumors with a ‘highLC3A/lowLAMP2a’ phenotype, suggestive of intensified lysosomal consumption, had a significantly poorer biochemical relapse free survival. The PC3 radioresistant cell line sustained remarkably its autophagic flux ability after radiation, while the DU145 radiosensitive one experiences a prolonged blockage of the autophagic process. This was assessed with aggresome accumulation detection and LC3A/LAMP2a double immunofluorescence, as well as with sequestrosome/p62 protein detection. By silencing the LC3A or LAMP2a expression, both cell lines became more sensitive to escalated doses of radiation. Conclusions: High base line autophagy activity and cell ability to sustain functional autophagy define resistance of prostate cancer cells to radiotherapy. This can be reversed by blocking up-regulated components of the autophagy pathway, which may prove of importance in the field of clinical radiotherapy. - Highlights: • High LC3A and low LAMP2a levels is a frequent expression pattern of prostate carcinoma. • This pattern of intensified autophagic flux relates with high relapse rates after

  1. Radiotherapy of early glottic cancer.

    PubMed

    Harwood, A R; Hawkins, N V; Keane, T; Cummings, B; Beale, F A; Rider, W D; Bryce, D P

    1980-03-01

    Patients (383) with stage Tis, Tla and Tlb NoMo glottic cancer are reviewed. Radiotherapy cured 93% of Tis patients and 86% of Tla and Tlb cases. Of all recurrences, 63% were cured. No patient with stage Tis died as a result of tumor and only 5% of stage Tla and Tlb died from tumor. Involvement of the anterior commissure or both vocal cords did not influence control rates by radiotherapy. Mobility of the vocal cord and size of radiotherapy field were significant factors influencing control by radiotherapy. Late recurrences and/or second primaries in the larynx following radiotherapy are rare. Second primaries in the respiratory tract (especially lung) are common and are as important a cause of death as laryngeal cancer in T1 cases. It is concluded that moderate dose radiotherapy with surgery for salvage is a highly effective method of management for early glottic cancer. PMID:7359967

  2. Metals as radio-enhancers in oncology: The industry perspective.

    PubMed

    Pottier, Agnés; Borghi, Elsa; Levy, Laurent

    2015-12-18

    Radio-enhancers, metal-based nanosized agents, could play a key role in oncology. They may unlock the potential of radiotherapy by enhancing the radiation dose deposit within tumors when the ionizing radiation source is 'on', while exhibiting chemically inert behavior in cellular and subcellular systems when the radiation beam is 'off'. Important decision points support the development of these new type of therapeutic agents originated from nanotechnology. Here, we discuss from an industry perspective, the interest of developing radio-enhancer agents to improve tumor control, the relevance of nanotechnology to achieve adequate therapeutic attributes, and present some considerations for their development in oncology. PMID:26362175

  3. Risk-adaptive radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yusung

    Currently, there is great interest in integrating biological information into intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment planning with the aim of boosting high-risk tumor subvolumes. Selective boosting of tumor subvolumes can be accomplished without violating normal tissue complication constraints using information from functional imaging. In this work we have developed a risk-adaptive optimization-framework that utilizes a nonlinear biological objective function. Employing risk-adaptive radiotherapy for prostate cancer, it is possible to increase the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) by up to 35.4 Gy in tumor subvolumes having the highest risk classification without increasing normal tissue complications. Subsequently, we have studied the impact of functional imaging accuracy, and found on the one hand that loss in sensitivity had a large impact on expected local tumor control, which was maximal when a low-risk classification for the remaining low risk PTV was chosen. While on the other hand loss in specificity appeared to have a minimal impact on normal tissue sparing. Therefore, it appears that in order to improve the therapeutic ratio a functional imaging technique with a high sensitivity, rather than specificity, is needed. Last but not least a comparison study between selective boosting IMRT strategies and uniform-boosting IMRT strategies yielding the same EUD to the overall PTV was carried out, and found that selective boosting IMRT considerably improves expected TCP compared to uniform-boosting IMRT, especially when lack of control of the high-risk tumor subvolumes is the cause of expected therapy failure. Furthermore, while selective boosting IMRT, using physical dose-volume objectives, did yield similar rectal and bladder sparing when compared its equivalent uniform-boosting IMRT plan, risk-adaptive radiotherapy, utilizing biological objective functions, did yield a 5.3% reduction in NTCP for the rectum. Hence, in risk-adaptive radiotherapy the

  4. Developments in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Hans; Möller, Torgil R

    2003-01-01

    A systematic assessment of radiotherapy for cancer was conducted by The Swedish Council on Technology Assessment in Health Care (SBU) in 2001. The assessment included a review of future developments in radiotherapy and an estimate of the potential benefits of improved radiotherapy in Sweden. The conclusions reached from this review can be summarized as: Successively better knowledge is available on dose-response relationships for tumours and normal tissues at different fractionation schedules and treated volumes. Optimization of dose levels and fractionation schedules should improve the treatment outcome. Improved treatment results may be expected with even more optimized fractionation schedules. The radiosensitivity of the tumour is dependent on the availability of free oxygen in the cells. The oxygen effect has been studied for a long time and new knowledge has emerged, but there is still no consensus on the best way to minimize its negative effect in the treatment of hypoxic tumours. Development in imaging techniques is rapid, improving accuracy in outlining targets and organs at risk. This is a prerequisite for advanced treatment planning. More accurate treatment can be obtained using all the computer techniques that are successively made available for calculating dose distributions, controlling the accelerator and multileaf collimator (MLC) and checking patient set-up. Optimized treatment plans can be achieved using inverse dose planning and intensity modulation radiation therapy (IMRT). Optimization algorithms based on biological data from clinical trials could be a part of future dose planning. New genetic markers might be developed that give a measure of the radiation responsiveness of tumours and normal tissue. This could lead to more individualized treatments. New types of radiation sources may be expected: protons, light ions, and improved beams (and compounds) for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Proton accelerators with scanned-beam systems and

  5. Current Applications and Future Perspectives of the Use of 3D Printing in Anatomical Training and Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Baskaran, Vivek; Štrkalj, Goran; Štrkalj, Mirjana; Di Ieva, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    3D printing is a form of rapid prototyping technology, which has led to innovative new applications in biomedicine. It facilitates the production of highly accurate three dimensional objects from substrate materials. The inherent accuracy and other properties of 3D printing have allowed it to have exciting applications in anatomy education and surgery, with the specialty of neurosurgery having benefited particularly well. This article presents the findings of a literature review of the Pubmed and Web of Science databases investigating the applications of 3D printing in anatomy and surgical education, and neurosurgery. A number of applications within these fields were found, with many significantly improving the quality of anatomy and surgical education, and the practice of neurosurgery. They also offered advantages over existing approaches and practices. It is envisaged that the number of useful applications will rise in the coming years, particularly as the costs of this technology decrease and its uptake rises. PMID:27445707

  6. Current Applications and Future Perspectives of the Use of 3D Printing in Anatomical Training and Neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Baskaran, Vivek; Štrkalj, Goran; Štrkalj, Mirjana; Di Ieva, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    3D printing is a form of rapid prototyping technology, which has led to innovative new applications in biomedicine. It facilitates the production of highly accurate three dimensional objects from substrate materials. The inherent accuracy and other properties of 3D printing have allowed it to have exciting applications in anatomy education and surgery, with the specialty of neurosurgery having benefited particularly well. This article presents the findings of a literature review of the Pubmed and Web of Science databases investigating the applications of 3D printing in anatomy and surgical education, and neurosurgery. A number of applications within these fields were found, with many significantly improving the quality of anatomy and surgical education, and the practice of neurosurgery. They also offered advantages over existing approaches and practices. It is envisaged that the number of useful applications will rise in the coming years, particularly as the costs of this technology decrease and its uptake rises.

  7. Current Applications and Future Perspectives of the Use of 3D Printing in Anatomical Training and Neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Baskaran, Vivek; Štrkalj, Goran; Štrkalj, Mirjana; Di Ieva, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    3D printing is a form of rapid prototyping technology, which has led to innovative new applications in biomedicine. It facilitates the production of highly accurate three dimensional objects from substrate materials. The inherent accuracy and other properties of 3D printing have allowed it to have exciting applications in anatomy education and surgery, with the specialty of neurosurgery having benefited particularly well. This article presents the findings of a literature review of the Pubmed and Web of Science databases investigating the applications of 3D printing in anatomy and surgical education, and neurosurgery. A number of applications within these fields were found, with many significantly improving the quality of anatomy and surgical education, and the practice of neurosurgery. They also offered advantages over existing approaches and practices. It is envisaged that the number of useful applications will rise in the coming years, particularly as the costs of this technology decrease and its uptake rises. PMID:27445707

  8. The Head Injury Transportation Straight to Neurosurgery (HITS-NS) randomised trial: a feasibility study.

    PubMed Central

    Lecky, Fiona; Russell, Wanda; Fuller, Gordon; McClelland, Graham; Pennington, Elspeth; Goodacre, Steve; Han, Kyee; Curran, Andrew; Holliman, Damien; Freeman, Jennifer; Chapman, Nathan; Stevenson, Matt; Byers, Sonia; Mason, Suzanne; Potter, Hugh; Coats, Tim; Mackway-Jones, Kevin; Peters, Mary; Shewan, Jane; Strong, Mark

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Reconfiguration of trauma services, with direct transport of traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients to neuroscience centres (NCs), bypassing non-specialist acute hospitals (NSAHs), could potentially improve outcomes. However, delays in stabilisation of airway, breathing and circulation (ABC) and the difficulties in reliably identifying TBI at scene may make this practice deleterious compared with selective secondary transfer from nearest NSAH to NC. National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidance and systematic reviews suggested equipoise and poor-quality evidence - with regard to 'early neurosurgery' in this cohort - which we sought to address. METHODS Pilot cluster randomised controlled trial of bypass to NC conducted in two ambulance services with the ambulance station (n = 74) as unit of cluster [Lancashire/Cumbria in the North West Ambulance Service (NWAS) and the North East Ambulance Service (NEAS)]. Adult patients with signs of isolated TBI [Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of < 13 in NWAS, GCS score of < 14 in NEAS] and stable ABC, injured nearest to a NSAH were transported either to that hospital (control clusters) or bypassed to the nearest NC (intervention clusters). PRIMARY OUTCOMES recruitment rate, protocol compliance, selection bias as a result of non-compliance, accuracy of paramedic TBI identification (overtriage of study inclusion criteria) and pathway acceptability to patients, families and staff. 'Open-label' secondary outcomes: 30-day mortality, 6-month Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOSE) and European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions. RESULTS Overall, 56 clusters recruited 293 (169 intervention, 124 control) patients in 12 months, demonstrating cluster randomised pre-hospital trials as viable for heath service evaluations. Overall compliance was 62%, but 90% was achieved in the control arm and when face-to-face paramedic training was possible. Non-compliance appeared to be driven by proximity of the nearest hospital

  9. Resonance and Radio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starrett, Malin J.

    2008-01-01

    The science and technology of radio receives little attention in contemporary education. This article discusses ways to explore the basic operating principles of radio. (Contains 4 figures, 3 footnotes, and 2 notes.)

  10. Emergence and early development of Russian neurosurgery (1890s-1930s).

    PubMed

    Lichterman, Boleslav

    2007-01-01

    This paper is a case study of specialization in clinical medicine - it is a story of the difficult and complicated birth of a neurosurgery clinic in Russia and the Soviet Union. It demonstrates the futile attempt to institute a new specialty as surgical neurology advocated by neuro(patho)logist V.M. Bekhterev (1857-1927) and implemented by his pupils L.M. Pussep (1875-1942) and A.G. Molotkov (1874-1950). However, surgical neurology was gradually replaced by neurological surgery performed by general surgeons N.N. Burdenko (1875-1946), A.L. Polenov (1871-1947), and V.N. Shamov (1882-1962). Part of my paper is dedicated to the institutional history (emergence of the Institute of Surgical Neurology in Leningrad (in 1926) and the Central Institute of Neurosurgery in Moscow (in 1934). The Moscow Neurosurgical School was focused on lesions of the central nervous system whereas the Leningrad neurosurgical school dealt primarily with peripheral nerve surgery. In the 1930s neurosurgical clinics were established beyond the two capitals - in Rostov-on-Don, Kharkov, and Gorky. Similar to the centralized five-year planning in the Soviet economy, a new discipline of neurosurgery was also centralized and planned from Moscow in the 1930s. It was characterized by kompleksnost' - concentration of several auxiliary disciplines (neuroradiology, neuroophthalmology, neurophysiology, etc.) within neurosurgical research institutions in Leningrad and Moscow. Particular stress was made on the experimental nature of a new discipline, which was viewed as a sort of applied neurophysiology.

  11. German Emergency Care in Neurosurgery and Military Neurology during World War II, 1939-1945.

    PubMed

    Stahnisch, Frank W

    2016-01-01

    A critical analysis of the historical involvement of neurology and neurosurgery in military emergency care services enables us to better contextualize and appreciate the development of modern neurology at large. Wartime neurosurgery and civil brain science during the German Nazi period tightly coalesced in examining the specific injury types, which military neurosurgeons such as Wilhelm Toennis, Klaus Joachim Zuelch, and Georg Merrem encountered and treated based on their neurophysiological understanding gained from earlier peacetime research. Collaborative associations with Dr. Toennis in particular proved to be highly beneficial to other military neurologists and neurosurgeons during World War II and beyond. This article also discusses the prewar developments and considers the fate of German neurosurgeons and military neurologists after the war. The envisaged dynamic concepts of fast action, reaction, and recycling, which contemporary physicians had intensively studied in the preceding scientific experiments in their neurophysiological laboratories, had already been introduced into neurological surgery during the interwar period. In retrospect, World War II emergency rescue units greatly strengthened military operations through an active process of 'recycling' indispensable army personnel. Neurosurgical emergency chains thereby introduced another decisive step in the modernization of warfare, in that they increased the momentum of military mobility in the field. Notwithstanding the violence of warfare and the often inhumane ways in which such knowledge in the field of emergency neurology was gained, the protagonists among the group of experts in military neurology and neurosurgery strongly contributed to the postwar clinical neuroscience community in Germany. In differing political pretexts, this became visible in both East Germany and West Germany after the war, while the specific military and political conditions under which this knowledge of emergency medicine

  12. German Emergency Care in Neurosurgery and Military Neurology during World War II, 1939-1945.

    PubMed

    Stahnisch, Frank W

    2016-01-01

    A critical analysis of the historical involvement of neurology and neurosurgery in military emergency care services enables us to better contextualize and appreciate the development of modern neurology at large. Wartime neurosurgery and civil brain science during the German Nazi period tightly coalesced in examining the specific injury types, which military neurosurgeons such as Wilhelm Toennis, Klaus Joachim Zuelch, and Georg Merrem encountered and treated based on their neurophysiological understanding gained from earlier peacetime research. Collaborative associations with Dr. Toennis in particular proved to be highly beneficial to other military neurologists and neurosurgeons during World War II and beyond. This article also discusses the prewar developments and considers the fate of German neurosurgeons and military neurologists after the war. The envisaged dynamic concepts of fast action, reaction, and recycling, which contemporary physicians had intensively studied in the preceding scientific experiments in their neurophysiological laboratories, had already been introduced into neurological surgery during the interwar period. In retrospect, World War II emergency rescue units greatly strengthened military operations through an active process of 'recycling' indispensable army personnel. Neurosurgical emergency chains thereby introduced another decisive step in the modernization of warfare, in that they increased the momentum of military mobility in the field. Notwithstanding the violence of warfare and the often inhumane ways in which such knowledge in the field of emergency neurology was gained, the protagonists among the group of experts in military neurology and neurosurgery strongly contributed to the postwar clinical neuroscience community in Germany. In differing political pretexts, this became visible in both East Germany and West Germany after the war, while the specific military and political conditions under which this knowledge of emergency medicine

  13. Computational Modeling for Enhancing Soft Tissue Image Guided Surgery: An Application in Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Miga, Michael I.

    2016-01-01

    With the recent advances in computing, the opportunities to translate computational models to more integrated roles in patient treatment are expanding at an exciting rate. One area of considerable development has been directed towards correcting soft tissue deformation within image guided neurosurgery applications. This review captures the efforts that have been undertaken towards enhancing neuronavigation by the integration of soft tissue biomechanical models, imaging and sensing technologies, and algorithmic developments. In addition, the review speaks to the evolving role of modeling frameworks within surgery and concludes with some future directions beyond neurosurgical applications. PMID:26354118

  14. Innovation in Neurosurgery: Intellectual Property Strategy and Academia/Industrial Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Yuichi

    2016-09-15

    Neurosurgery has tremendous possibilities for development of innovative medical devices. However, most of the neurosurgical devices used in Japan are imported products. Promotion and development of domestic medical devices is highly encouraged and it is one of the pillars of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's growth strategy of Japanese economy. Innovative "Made in Japan" medical devices can be developed by interdisciplinary collaboration between industries and academic institutions. Proper orientation of medical and engineering education, social and administrative awareness of the need of facilitating the medical devices creative process with corresponding regulatory changes, and appropriate medical and technological infrastructure establishment are needed for stimulating medical device innovation.

  15. [The processing of point clouds for brain deformation existing in image guided neurosurgery system].

    PubMed

    Yao, Xufeng; Lin, Yixun; Song, Zhijian

    2008-08-01

    The finite element method (FEM) plays an important role in solving the brain deformation problem in the image guided neurosurgery system. The position of the brain cortex during the surgery provides the boundary condition for the FEM model. In this paper, the information of brain cortex is represented by the unstructured points and the boundary condition is achieved by the processing of unstructured points. The processing includes the mapping of texture, segmentation, simplification and denoising. The method of k-nearest clustering based on local surface properties is used to simplify and denoise the unstructured point clouds. The results of experiment prove the efficiency of point clouds processing.

  16. Innovation in Neurosurgery: Intellectual Property Strategy and Academia/Industrial Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Yuichi

    2016-09-15

    Neurosurgery has tremendous possibilities for development of innovative medical devices. However, most of the neurosurgical devices used in Japan are imported products. Promotion and development of domestic medical devices is highly encouraged and it is one of the pillars of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's growth strategy of Japanese economy. Innovative "Made in Japan" medical devices can be developed by interdisciplinary collaboration between industries and academic institutions. Proper orientation of medical and engineering education, social and administrative awareness of the need of facilitating the medical devices creative process with corresponding regulatory changes, and appropriate medical and technological infrastructure establishment are needed for stimulating medical device innovation. PMID:27298262

  17. Innovation in Neurosurgery: Intellectual Property Strategy and Academia/Industrial Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    MURAYAMA, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Neurosurgery has tremendous possibilities for development of innovative medical devices. However, most of the neurosurgical devices used in Japan are imported products. Promotion and development of domestic medical devices is highly encouraged and it is one of the pillars of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s growth strategy of Japanese economy. Innovative “Made in Japan” medical devices can be developed by interdisciplinary collaboration between industries and academic institutions. Proper orientation of medical and engineering education, social and administrative awareness of the need of facilitating the medical devices creative process with corresponding regulatory changes, and appropriate medical and technological infrastructure establishment are needed for stimulating medical device innovation. PMID:27298262

  18. Kenneth Grant Jamieson (1925-1976): his life and contributions to neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Mortazavi, Martin; Deep, Aman; Tubbs, R Shane; Fisher, Wink S

    2012-02-01

    Manuscript submitted May 23, 2011. Accepted September 25, 2011. Kenneth Grant Jamieson is celebrated as one of Australia's top neurosurgeons. His most notable contributions to neurosurgery included novel treatments of aneurysms and pineal tumors and studies of head injury. Jamieson was also an innovator for the development of new neurosurgical instruments and renowned for his teaching abilities, prolificacy, and mentorship. This preeminent neurosurgeon's life was cut short at the age of 51. Our current understanding and knowledge of treatments of various neurosurgical diseases is based on pioneers such as Kenneth Grant Jamieson.

  19. Extragalactic Radio Sources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellerman, Kenneth I.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses new problems arising from the growing observational data through radio telescope arrays, involving the origin of radio sources, apparent superluminal velocities, conversion of radio sources to relativistic particles, and the nature of compact opaque and extended transparent sources. New physics may be needed to answer these cosmological…

  20. [Juvenile angiofibroma. Results of radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Rosset, A; Korzeniowski, S

    1990-01-01

    8 patients with the nasofibromata were treated by radiotherapy in Oncologic Center in Kraków. In most part of these patients tumors exceeded the nasopharynx or gave the massive postoperational recurrencies. Complete regression was obtained in 6 out of 8 cases. The radiation changes are described. The radiotherapy is effective in more advanced and recurrent stages of the juvenile nasofibroma.

  1. [Epoetin alfa in radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Trodella, L; Balducci, M; Gambacorta, M A; Mantini, G

    1998-01-01

    Sixty per cent of oncologic patients need radiation therapy for cure or palliation. In fact, in most neoplastic diseases, a better local control positively impacts on disease-free survival and overall survival. The efficacy of radiotherapy depends on several factors: while some are tumor-related, others are host-related. Radiobiological phenomena are also important: ionizing radiation is responsible for cell damage (double rupture of DNA chains), mostly an indirect mechanism with the formation of free radicals. Their toxic action is enhanced by the oxygen partial pressure at the cellular level. A number of studies have confirmed that good tissue oxygenation is a function of a high hemoglobin level in the peripheral blood (Hb > or = 13 g/dL). Unfortunately, these values are rarely present in oncologic patients due to the disease-related toxicosis as well as to the therapy induced hematologic toxicity. The treatment of anemia is free of risk for the recent developments in technology which with gene cloning and the technique of recombinant DNA has allowed the production of human recombinant erythropoietin. Erythropoietin is produced by the interstitial cells of renal tubules in response to hypoxia. It prevents apoptosis and promotes erythroid proliferation and differentiation with consequent reticulocyte release and hemoglobin synthesis. It is not completely understood whether the efficacy of radiotherapy depends on hemoglobin values present at the start of irradiation (often less than 12-13 g/dL) or on the higher ones observed during and at the end of radiotherapy. Therefore, preventive systemic erythropoietin therapy in non anemic patients in terms of costs/benefits is at present non sustainable. To the contrary, in patients undergoing radiotherapy to extended fields or aggressive multimodal treatments, for the higher risk of anemia, the early use of this treatment can be hypothesized in case of initial anemia to improve therapy compliance and prevent negative

  2. [Suspected case of postoperative malignant hyperthermia treated with dantrolene one week after neurosurgery].

    PubMed

    Itoh, Kazushi; Nishibe, Shinichi; Usuda, Yutaka; Kitamura, Akira

    2014-10-01

    We report the case of a 16-year-old man who presented with hyperthermia (>40°C), an elevated creatine kinase level (>64,000 IU · l-1), and myoglobinuria one week after undergoing two successive neurosurgeries for a brain hemorrhage under sevoflurane anesthesia. After having been diagnosed with suspicious atypical postoperative malignant hyperthermia, he was treated with dantrolene and his symptoms disappeared on the day of dantrolene administration. Central hyperthermia is defined as hyperthermia associated with thermoregulatory dysfunction after brainstem injury. Postoperative malignant hyperthermia can sometimes be difficult to distinguish from central hyperthermia, especially after neurosurgery. We could not eliminate the possibility of central hyperthermia as a cause of hyperthermia in the present patient If marked postoperative hyperthermia must be addressed immediately and managed appropriately in neurosurgical patients and dantrolene having few serious side effects, we were able to control his symptoms immediately after the infusion of dantrolene. Therefore, the administration of dantrolene should be considered when treating unidentified postoperative hyperthermia after a neurosurgical procedure. PMID:25693350

  3. Effects of intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging on the neuromuscular blockade of vecuronium bromide in neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ying; Zhang, Hong; Sun, Li

    2013-01-01

    The effects of intraoperative magnetic resonance (iMR) imaging on the neuromuscular blockade of vecuronium bromide were investigated in neurosurgery. Fifty patients with American Society of Anesthesiologists grades I-II scheduled for craniotomy operation were divided into two groups (n = 25 each) with no difference in demographic data: the iMR imaging group and control group. Train-of-four (TOF) stimulation through an accelerometer was used to monitor onset, maintenance, and recovery of muscle relaxation caused by vecuronium. Vecuronium bromide was intravenously injected after anesthesia induction. The dosage of vecuronium bromide in the iMR imaging group was larger than in the control group, but not significantly. Duration of vecuronium bromide administration and operation time were significantly longer in the iMR imaging group than in the control group. Time from drug discontinuation to operation termination, and to return to neurosurgery intensive care unit were not different. Time taken by first twitch (T1) in response to TOF stimulation to recover by 25%, and muscle relaxant recovery index were significantly greater in the control group than in the iMR imaging group. The body temperature of the patients increased gradually in the iMR imaging group but decreased in the control group. iMR imaging can prolong the operation time, increase the body temperature of the patient, and remarkably shorten the clinical action time and muscle relaxation recovery index of vecuronium.

  4. The beginnings of neurosurgery in California during the pre-Cushing era: 1850-1900.

    PubMed

    Keller, T M

    1998-11-01

    The end of the present millennium marks the centennial of Harvey Cushing's European study year, after the completion of his surgical residency under William Stewart Halsted at the Johns Hopkins Hospital and just before beginning his surgical practice in Baltimore, Maryland. The year 2000 marks the sesquicentennial of California's admission to the Union as the 31st state. This report documents a number of the events and achievements that occurred during this "pre-Cushing era" (1850-1900) that contributed to the ultimate development of neurological surgery in California. The historical milestones of the California gold rush, the completion of the Transcontinental Railroad across the Sierra Nevada Mountains, and the careers of early California physicians and educators, including those of Hugh Toland and Levi Cooper Lane, were instrumental in building a foundation for the modern discipline of neurosurgery in the Golden State. This foundation would serve as a cornerstone for surgeons trained by Harvey Cushing (including Howard Naffziger, Carl Rand, and Edward Towne) who would arrive in California early in the 20th century and would define the specialty of neurosurgery. The legacy left by these physicians enhances the celebration of the closure of the millennium.

  5. da Vinci robot-assisted keyhole neurosurgery: a cadaver study on feasibility and safety.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Hani J; Hughes-Hallett, Archie; Cundy, Thomas P; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Darzi, Ara; Nandi, Dipankar

    2015-04-01

    The goal of this cadaver study was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of da Vinci robot-assisted keyhole neurosurgery. Several keyhole craniotomies were fashioned including supraorbital subfrontal, retrosigmoid and supracerebellar infratentorial. In each case, a simple durotomy was performed, and the flap was retracted. The da Vinci surgical system was then used to perform arachnoid dissection towards the deep-seated intracranial cisterns. It was not possible to simultaneously pass the 12-mm endoscope and instruments through the keyhole craniotomy in any of the approaches performed, limiting visualization. The articulated instruments provided greater dexterity than existing tools, but the instrument arms could not be placed in parallel through the keyhole craniotomy and, therefore, could not be advanced to the deep cisterns without significant clashing. The da Vinci console offered considerable ergonomic advantages over the existing operating room arrangement, allowing the operating surgeon to remain non-sterile and seated comfortably throughout the procedure. However, the lack of haptic feedback was a notable limitation. In conclusion, while robotic platforms have the potential to greatly enhance the performance of transcranial approaches, there is strong justification for research into next-generation robots, better suited to keyhole neurosurgery.

  6. da Vinci robot-assisted keyhole neurosurgery: a cadaver study on feasibility and safety.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Hani J; Hughes-Hallett, Archie; Cundy, Thomas P; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Darzi, Ara; Nandi, Dipankar

    2015-04-01

    The goal of this cadaver study was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of da Vinci robot-assisted keyhole neurosurgery. Several keyhole craniotomies were fashioned including supraorbital subfrontal, retrosigmoid and supracerebellar infratentorial. In each case, a simple durotomy was performed, and the flap was retracted. The da Vinci surgical system was then used to perform arachnoid dissection towards the deep-seated intracranial cisterns. It was not possible to simultaneously pass the 12-mm endoscope and instruments through the keyhole craniotomy in any of the approaches performed, limiting visualization. The articulated instruments provided greater dexterity than existing tools, but the instrument arms could not be placed in parallel through the keyhole craniotomy and, therefore, could not be advanced to the deep cisterns without significant clashing. The da Vinci console offered considerable ergonomic advantages over the existing operating room arrangement, allowing the operating surgeon to remain non-sterile and seated comfortably throughout the procedure. However, the lack of haptic feedback was a notable limitation. In conclusion, while robotic platforms have the potential to greatly enhance the performance of transcranial approaches, there is strong justification for research into next-generation robots, better suited to keyhole neurosurgery. PMID:25516094

  7. [The robotization of neurosurgery: state of the art and future outlook].

    PubMed

    Benabid, A L; Hoffmann, D; Ashraf, A; Koudsie, A; Esteve, F; Le-Bas, J F

    1997-11-01

    Neurosurgery is by excellence a field of application for robots, based on multimodal image guidance. Specific motorized tools have been already developed and routinely applied in stereotaxy to position a probe holder or in conventional neurosurgery to hold a microscope oriented towards a given target. The potentialities of these approaches have triggered industrial developments currently commercially available. These systems use data bases, primarily coming from multimodal numerical images from X-ray radiology to magnetic resonance imaging. These spatially encoded data are transferred through digital networks to workstations where images can be processed and surgical procedures are preplanned, then transferred to the robotic systems to which they are connected. We have been using a stereotactic robot since 1989 and a microscope robot since 1995 in various surgical routine procedures. The future of these applications mainly rely on the technical progress in informatics, about image recognition to adapt the preplanning to the actual surgical situation, to correct brain shifts for instance, about image fusion, integrated knowledge such such as brain atlases, as well as virtual reality. The future developments, covering surgical procedure, research and teaching, will sure be far beyond our wildest expectations.

  8. From the Idea to Its Realization: The Evolution of Minimally Invasive Techniques in Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Grunert, P.

    2013-01-01

    Minimally invasive techniques in neurosurgery evolved in two steps. Many minimally invasive concepts like neuronavigation, endoscopy, or frame based stereotaxy were developed by the pioneers of neurosurgery, but it took decades till further technical developments made the realization and broad clinical application of these early ideas safe and possible. This thesis will be demonstrated by giving examples of the evolution of four minimally invasive techiques: neuronavigation, transsphenoidal pituitary surgery, neuroendoscopy and stereotaxy. The reasons for their early failure and also the crucial steps for the rediscovery of these minimally invasive techniques will be analysed. In the 80th of the 20th century endoscopy became increasingly applied in different surgical fields. The abdominal surgeons coined as first for their endoscopic procedures the term minimally invasive surgery in contrast to open surgery. In neurrosurgery the term minimally invasive surgery stood not in opposiotion to open procedures but was understood as a general concept and philosophy using the modern technology such as neuronavigation, endoscopy and planing computer workstations with the aim to make the procedures less traumatic. PMID:24455231

  9. Sir Victor Horsley (1857-1916) and the birth of English neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Hughes, J

    2007-02-01

    Modern surgery developed in the second half of the 19th century, at the end of which neurosurgery was established as a profitable region of operative intervention. In the British Isles, the first exponent was Sir William Macewen (1848-1924) in Glasgow. But neuroscience had advanced in London due to the excellence of the neurologists in the several hospitals there. Foremost among English neurosurgeons was Victor Horsley whose career had a worldwide influence on the speciality. Initially, operations were carried out for cranial trauma, the removal of displaced bone or blood clot, and the drainage of abscesses arising from infection of the middle ears and air sinuses. The diagnosis of brain and spinal tumours by neurologists encouraged removal by surgeons, of which Horsley was among the earliest. Horsley performed many operations on animals, experiments opposed by the anti-vivisectionists whose campaigns Horsley countered. Horsley had many other interests, some of which displeased the establishment, and in World War I his experience in neurosurgery was not used. He served as a general surgeon, visiting Egypt, India and Mesopotamia where, in Amara, he died from hyperpyrexia complicating bacillary dysentery. PMID:17356729

  10. Development of computer-aided functions in clinical neurosurgery with PACS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukasa, Minoru; Aoki, Makoto; Satoh, Minoru; Kowada, Masayoshi; Kikuchi, K.

    1991-07-01

    The introduction of the "Picture Archiving and Communications System (known as PACS)," provides many benefits, including the application of C.A.D., (Computer Aided Diagnosis). Clinically, this allows for the measurement and design of an operation to be easily completed with the CRT monitors of PACS rather than with film, as has been customary in the past. Under the leadership of the Department of Neurosurgery, Akita University School of Medicine, and Southern Tohoku Research Institute for Neuroscience, Koriyama, new computer aided functions with EFPACS (Fuji Electric's PACS) have been developed for use in clinical neurosurgery. This image processing is composed of three parts as follows: (1) Automatic mapping of small lesions depicted on Magnetic Resonance (or MR) images on the brain atlas. (2) Superimposition of two angiographic films onto a single synthesized image. (3) Automatic mapping of the lesion's position (as shown on the. CT images) on the processing image referred to in the foregoing clause 2. The processing in the clause (1) provides a reference for anatomical estimation. The processing in the clause (2) is used for general analysis of the condition of a disease. The processing in the clause (3) is used to design the operation. This image processing is currently being used with good results.

  11. Current state-of-the-art and future perspectives of robotic technology in neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Mattei, Tobias A; Rodriguez, Abraham Hafiz; Sambhara, Deepak; Mendel, Ehud

    2014-07-01

    Neurosurgery is one of the most demanding surgical specialties in terms of precision requirements and surgical field limitations. Recent advancements in robotic technology have generated the possibility of incorporating advanced technological tools to the neurosurgical operating room. Although previous studies have addressed the specific details of new robotic systems, there is very little literature on the strengths and drawbacks of past attempts, currently available platforms and prototypes in development. In this review, the authors present a critical historical analysis of the development of robotic technology in neurosurgery as well as a comprehensive summary of the currently available systems that can be expected to be incorporated to the neurosurgical armamentarium in the near future. Finally, the authors present a critical analysis of the main technical challenges in robotic technology development at the present time (such as the design of improved systems for haptic feedback and the necessity of incorporating intraoperative imaging data) as well as the benefits which robotic technology is expected to bring to specific neurosurgical subspecialties in the near future.

  12. Fertility impairment in radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kuźba-Kryszak, Tamara; Nowikiewicz, Tomasz; Żyromska, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Infertility as a result of antineoplastic therapy is becoming a very important issue due to the growing incidence of neoplastic diseases. Routinely applied antineoplastic treatments and the illness itself lead to fertility disorders. Therapeutic methods used in antineoplastic treatment may cause fertility impairment or sterilization due to permanent damage to reproductive cells. The risk of sterilization depends on the patient's sex, age during therapy, type of neoplasm, radiation dose and treatment area. It is known that chemotherapy and radiotherapy can lead to fertility impairment and the combination of these two gives an additive effect. The aim of this article is to raise the issue of infertility in these patients. It is of growing importance due to the increase in the number of children and young adults who underwent radiotherapy in the past. The progress in antineoplastic therapy improves treatment results, but at the same time requires a deeper look at existential needs of the patient. Reproductive function is an integral element of self-esteem and should be taken into account during therapy planning. PMID:27647982

  13. Imaging in radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calandrino, R.; Del Maschio, A.; Cattaneo, G. M.; Castiglioni, I.

    2009-09-01

    The diagnostic methodologies used for the radiotherapy planning have undergone great developments in the last 30 years. Since the 1980s, after the introduction of the CT scanner, the modality for the planning moved beyond the planar 2D assessment to approach a real and more realistic volumetric 3D definition. Consequently the dose distribution, previously obtained by means of an overly simple approximation, became increasingly complex, better tailoring the true shape of the tumour. The final therapeutic improvement has been obtained by a parallel increase in the complexity of the irradiating units: the Linacs for therapy have, in fact, been equipped with a full accessory set capable to modulate the fluence (IMRT) and to check the correct target position continuously during the therapy session (IMRT-IGRT). The multimodal diagnostic approach, which integrates diagnostic information, from images of the patient taken with CT, NMR, PET and US, further improves the data for a biological and topological optimization of the radiotherapy plan and consequently of the dose distribution in the Planning Target Volume. Proteomic and genomic analysis will be the next step in tumour diagnosis. These methods will provide the planners with further information, for a true personalization of the treatment regimen and the assessment of the predictive essays for each tumour and each patient.

  14. Fertility impairment in radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kuźba-Kryszak, Tamara; Nowikiewicz, Tomasz; Żyromska, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Infertility as a result of antineoplastic therapy is becoming a very important issue due to the growing incidence of neoplastic diseases. Routinely applied antineoplastic treatments and the illness itself lead to fertility disorders. Therapeutic methods used in antineoplastic treatment may cause fertility impairment or sterilization due to permanent damage to reproductive cells. The risk of sterilization depends on the patient's sex, age during therapy, type of neoplasm, radiation dose and treatment area. It is known that chemotherapy and radiotherapy can lead to fertility impairment and the combination of these two gives an additive effect. The aim of this article is to raise the issue of infertility in these patients. It is of growing importance due to the increase in the number of children and young adults who underwent radiotherapy in the past. The progress in antineoplastic therapy improves treatment results, but at the same time requires a deeper look at existential needs of the patient. Reproductive function is an integral element of self-esteem and should be taken into account during therapy planning.

  15. Fertility impairment in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Biedka, Marta; Kuźba-Kryszak, Tamara; Nowikiewicz, Tomasz; Żyromska, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Infertility as a result of antineoplastic therapy is becoming a very important issue due to the growing incidence of neoplastic diseases. Routinely applied antineoplastic treatments and the illness itself lead to fertility disorders. Therapeutic methods used in antineoplastic treatment may cause fertility impairment or sterilization due to permanent damage to reproductive cells. The risk of sterilization depends on the patient's sex, age during therapy, type of neoplasm, radiation dose and treatment area. It is known that chemotherapy and radiotherapy can lead to fertility impairment and the combination of these two gives an additive effect. The aim of this article is to raise the issue of infertility in these patients. It is of growing importance due to the increase in the number of children and young adults who underwent radiotherapy in the past. The progress in antineoplastic therapy improves treatment results, but at the same time requires a deeper look at existential needs of the patient. Reproductive function is an integral element of self-esteem and should be taken into account during therapy planning. PMID:27647982

  16. South Asian Medicinal Compounds as Modulators of Resistance to Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, N. Rajendra; Muthusamy, Ganesan; Shanmugam, Mohana; Ambudkar, Suresh V.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a hyperproliferative disorder that involves transformation, dysregulation of apoptosis, proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis and metastasis. During the last 30 years, extensive research has revealed much about the biology of cancer. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy are the mainstays of cancer treatment, particularly for patients who do not respond to surgical resection. However, cancer treatment with drugs or radiation is seriously limited by chemoresistance and radioresistance. Various approaches and strategies are employed to overcome resistance to chemotherapy and radiation treatment. Many plant-derived phytochemicals have been investigated for their chemo- and radio-sensitizing properties. The peoples of South Asian countries such as India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Bangladesh and Bhutan have a large number of medicinal plants from which they produce various pharmacologically potent secondary metabolites. The medicinal properties of these compounds have been extensively investigated and many of them have been found to sensitize cancer cells to chemo- and radio-therapy. This review focuses on the role of South Asian medicinal compounds in chemo- and radio-sensitizing properties in drug- and radio-resistant cancer cells. Also discussed is the role of South Asian medicinal plants in protecting normal cells from radiation, which may be useful during radiotherapy of tumors to spare surrounding normal cells. PMID:26959063

  17. [External radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Girard, N; Mornex, F

    2011-02-01

    For a long time radiotherapy has been excluded from the therapeutic strategy for hepatocellular carcinoma, given its significant toxicity on the non-tumoral liver parenchyma. Conformal radiation is a recent advance in the field of radiotherapy, allowing dose escalation and combination with other therapeutic options for hepatocellular carcinoma, including trans-arterial chemo-embolization. Conformal radiotherapy is associated with interesting features, especially in cirrhotic patients: wide availability, non-invasiveness, possibility to target multiple localizations anywhere within the liver parenchyma, and favorable tolerance profile even in patients with cirrhosis and/or in a poor medical condition. Recently, radiation delivery has been optimized through several technical developments: respiratory gating and intensity-modulated radiotherapy, which allow a better focalization of the ballistics, stereotactic techniques and proton-beam radiotherapy, whose availability is currently limited in Europe. Given the high response rates of hepatocellular carcinoma to radiation, conformal radiotherapy may be regarded as a curative-intent treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma, similar to surgery and per-cutaneous techniques. Yet the impact of radiotherapy has to be evaluated in randomized trials to better integrate in the complex therapeutic algorithm of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  18. Experimental new automatic tools for robotic stereotactic neurosurgery: towards "no hands" procedure of leads implantation into a brain target.

    PubMed

    Mazzone, P; Arena, P; Cantelli, L; Spampinato, G; Sposato, S; Cozzolino, S; Demarinis, P; Muscato, G

    2016-07-01

    The use of robotics in neurosurgery and, particularly, in stereotactic neurosurgery, is becoming more and more adopted because of the great advantages that it offers. Robotic manipulators easily allow to achieve great precision, reliability, and rapidity in the positioning of surgical instruments or devices in the brain. The aim of this work was to experimentally verify a fully automatic "no hands" surgical procedure. The integration of neuroimaging to data for planning the surgery, followed by application of new specific surgical tools, permitted the realization of a fully automated robotic implantation of leads in brain targets. An anthropomorphic commercial manipulator was utilized. In a preliminary phase, a software to plan surgery was developed, and the surgical tools were tested first during a simulation and then on a skull mock-up. In such a way, several tools were developed and tested, and the basis for an innovative surgical procedure arose. The final experimentation was carried out on anesthetized "large white" pigs. The determination of stereotactic parameters for the correct planning to reach the intended target was performed with the same technique currently employed in human stereotactic neurosurgery, and the robotic system revealed to be reliable and precise in reaching the target. The results of this work strengthen the possibility that a neurosurgeon may be substituted by a machine, and may represent the beginning of a new approach in the current clinical practice. Moreover, this possibility may have a great impact not only on stereotactic functional procedures but also on the entire domain of neurosurgery. PMID:27194228

  19. Experimental new automatic tools for robotic stereotactic neurosurgery: towards "no hands" procedure of leads implantation into a brain target.

    PubMed

    Mazzone, P; Arena, P; Cantelli, L; Spampinato, G; Sposato, S; Cozzolino, S; Demarinis, P; Muscato, G

    2016-07-01

    The use of robotics in neurosurgery and, particularly, in stereotactic neurosurgery, is becoming more and more adopted because of the great advantages that it offers. Robotic manipulators easily allow to achieve great precision, reliability, and rapidity in the positioning of surgical instruments or devices in the brain. The aim of this work was to experimentally verify a fully automatic "no hands" surgical procedure. The integration of neuroimaging to data for planning the surgery, followed by application of new specific surgical tools, permitted the realization of a fully automated robotic implantation of leads in brain targets. An anthropomorphic commercial manipulator was utilized. In a preliminary phase, a software to plan surgery was developed, and the surgical tools were tested first during a simulation and then on a skull mock-up. In such a way, several tools were developed and tested, and the basis for an innovative surgical procedure arose. The final experimentation was carried out on anesthetized "large white" pigs. The determination of stereotactic parameters for the correct planning to reach the intended target was performed with the same technique currently employed in human stereotactic neurosurgery, and the robotic system revealed to be reliable and precise in reaching the target. The results of this work strengthen the possibility that a neurosurgeon may be substituted by a machine, and may represent the beginning of a new approach in the current clinical practice. Moreover, this possibility may have a great impact not only on stereotactic functional procedures but also on the entire domain of neurosurgery.

  20. A neurologist in the origin of European and International neurosurgery: Clovis-Julien-Désiré Vincent (1879-1947).

    PubMed

    Androutsos, G; Karamanou, M; Lymberi, M; Zambelis, T; Stamboulis, E

    2011-01-01

    Vincent Clovis began his carrier as a neurologist and finally became neurosurgeon at an advanced age. He is considered the founder of French neurosurgery, and after Harvey Williams Cushing, Europe's first neurosurgeon. He was mainly interested in pituitary tumors, in cerebral abscesses and in cerebral oedema. PMID:22165053

  1. Development of targeted radiotherapy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferro, Guillermina; Murphy, Consuelo A.; Villarreal, José E.; Pedraza, Martha; García, Laura; Tendilla, José I.; Paredes, Lydia

    2001-10-01

    Conventional or external beam radiotherapy, has been a viable alternative for cancer treatment. Although this technique is effective, its use is limited if the patient has multiple malignant lesions (metastases). An alternative approach is based on the design of radiopharmaceuticals that, to be administered in the patient, are directed specifically toward the target cell producing a selective radiation delivery. This treatment is known as targeted radiotherapy. We have summarized and discussed some results related to our investigations on the development of targeted radiotherapy systems, including aspects of internal dosimetry.

  2. [Task sharing with radiotherapy technicians in image-guided radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Diaz, O; Lorchel, F; Revault, C; Mornex, F

    2013-10-01

    The development of accelerators with on-board imaging systems now allows better target volumes reset at the time of irradiation (image-guided radiotherapy [IGRT]). However, these technological advances in the control of repositioning led to a multiplication of tasks for each actor in radiotherapy and increase the time available for the treatment, whether for radiotherapy technicians or radiation oncologists. As there is currently no explicit regulatory framework governing the use of IGRT, some institutional experiments show that a transfer is possible between radiation oncologists and radiotherapy technicians for on-line verification of image positioning. Initial training for every technical and drafting procedures within institutions will improve audit quality by reducing interindividual variability. PMID:24007955

  3. VERO® radiotherapy for low burden cancer: 789 patients with 957 lesions

    PubMed Central

    Orecchia, R; Surgo, A; Muto, M; Ferrari, A; Piperno, G; Gerardi, MA; Comi, S; Garibaldi, C; Ciardo, D; Bazani, A; Golino, F; Pansini, F; Fodor, C; Romanelli, P; Maestri, D; Scroffi, V; Mazza, S; Jereczek-Fossa, BA

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this retrospective study is to evaluate patient profile, feasibility, and acute toxicity of RadioTherapy (RT) delivered by VERO® in the first 20 months of clinical activity. Methods Inclusion criteria: 1) adult patients; 2) limited volume cancer (M0 or oligometastatic); 3) small extracranial lesions; 4) treatment between April 2012 and December 2013 and 5) written informed consent. Two techniques were employed: intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Toxicity was evaluated using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (RTOG/EORTC) criteria. Results Between April 2012 and December 2013, 789 consecutive patients (957 lesions) were treated. In 84% of them one lesion was treated and in 16% more than one lesion were treated synchronously/metachronously; first radiotherapy course in 85%, re-irradiation in 13%, and boost in 2% of cases. The treated region included pelvis 46%, thorax 38%, upper abdomen 15%, and neck 1%. Radiotherapy schedules included <5 and >5 fractions in 75% and 25% respectively. All patients completed the planned treatment and an acceptable acute toxicity was observed. Conclusions RT delivered by VERO® was administrated predominantly to thoracic and pelvic lesions (lung and urologic tumours) using hypofractionation. It is a feasible approach for limited burden cancer offering short and well accepted treatment with favourable acute toxicity profile. Further investigation including dose escalation and other available VERO® functionalities such as real-time dynamic tumour tracking is warranted in order to fully evaluate this innovative radiotherapy system. PMID:27729942

  4. Radio source evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perucho, M.

    2016-02-01

    Baldwin (1982) wrote that {``the distribution of sources in the radio luminosity, P, overall physical size, D, diagram''} could be considered as {``the radio astronomer's H-R diagram''}. However, unlike the case of stars, not only the intrinsic properties of the jets, but also those of the host galaxy and the intergalactic medium are relevant to explain the evolutionary tracks of radio radio sources. In this contribution I review the current status of our understanding of the evolution of radio sources from a theoretical and numerical perspective, using the P-D diagram as a framework. An excess of compact (linear size {≤ 10} kpc) sources could be explained by low-power jets being decelerated within the host galaxy, as shown by recent numerical simulations. Finally, I discuss the possible tracks that radio sources may follow within this diagram, and the physical processes that can explain the different tracks.

  5. The Sardinia Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grueff, G.; Alvito, G.; Ambrosini, R.; Bolli, P.; D'Amico, N.; Maccaferri, A.; Maccaferri, G.; Morsiani, M.; Mureddu, L.; Natale, V.; Olmi, L.; Orfei, A.; Pernechele, C.; Poma, A.; Porceddu, I.; Rossi, L.; Zacchiroli, G.

    We describe the Sardinia Radio Telescope (SRT), a new general purpose, fully steerable antenna of the National Institute for Astrophysics. The radio telescope is under construction near Cagliari (Sardinia). With its large aperture (64m diameter) and its active surface, SRT is capable of operations up to ˜100GHz, it will contribute significantly to VLBI networks and will represent a powerful single-dish radio telescope for many science fields. The radio telescope has a Gregorian optical configuration with a supplementary beam-waveguide (BWG), which provides additional focal points. The Gregorian surfaces are shaped to minimize the spill-over and standing wave. After the start of the contract for the radio telescope structural and mechanical fabrication in 2003, in the present year the foundation construction will be completed. The schedule foresees the radio telescope inauguration in late 2006.

  6. [Hepatic tumors and radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Rio, E; Mornex, F; Peiffert, D; Huertas, A

    2016-09-01

    Recent technological developments led to develop the concept of focused liver radiation therapy. We must distinguish primary and secondary tumors as the indications are restricted and must be discussed as an alternative to surgical or medical treatments. For hepatocellular carcinoma 5 to 10cm (or more), a conformational radiation with or without intensity modulation is performed. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is being evaluated and is increasingly proposed as an alternative to radiofrequency ablative treatment for primary or secondary tumors (typically less than 5cm). Tumor (and liver) movements induced by respiratory motions must be taken into account. Strict dosimetric criteria must be met with particular attention to the dose-volume histograms to liver and the hollow organs, including cases of SBRT. PMID:27521035

  7. Medical Applications: Proton Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keppel, Cynthia

    2009-05-01

    Proton therapy is a highly advanced and precise form of radiation treatment for cancer. Due to the characteristic Bragg peak associated with ion energy deposition, proton therapy provides the radiation oncologist with an improved method of treatment localization within a patient, as compared with conventional radiation therapy using X-rays or electrons. Controlling disease and minimizing side effects are the twin aims of radiation treatment. Proton beams enhance the opportunity for both by facilitating maximal dose to tumor and minimal dose to surrounding tissue. In the United States, five proton radiotherapy centers currently treat cancer patients, with more in the construction phase. New facilities and enabling technologies abound. An overview of the treatment modality generally, as well as of the capabilities and research planned for the field and for the Hampton University Proton Therapy Institute in particular, will be presented.

  8. STEM on the radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-10-01

    Looking for an Internet radio station focusing on programing about science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM)? The U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) announced on 26 September the launch of Science360 Radio, which it says is the first Internet radio stream dedicated to STEM programing. Science360 includes more than 100 radio shows and podcasts that are available on the Web as well as on iPhone and Android devices. The shows originate from a variety of sources, including NSF, other U.S. government agencies, science organizations, universities, and media outlets. For more information, see http://science360.gov/files/.

  9. From Structure to Circuits: The Contribution of MEG Connectivity Studies to Functional Neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Pang, Elizabeth W; Snead Iii, O C

    2016-01-01

    New advances in structural neuroimaging have revealed the intricate and extensive connections within the brain, data which have informed a number of ambitious projects such as the mapping of the human connectome. Elucidation of the structural connections of the brain, at both the macro and micro levels, promises new perspectives on brain structure and function that could translate into improved outcomes in functional neurosurgery. The understanding of neuronal structural connectivity afforded by these data now offers a vista on the brain, in both healthy and diseased states, that could not be seen with traditional neuroimaging. Concurrent with these developments in structural imaging, a complementary modality called magnetoencephalography (MEG) has been garnering great attention because it too holds promise for being able to shed light on the intricacies of functional brain connectivity. MEG is based upon the elemental principle of physics that an electrical current generates a magnetic field. Hence, MEG uses highly sensitive biomagnetometers to measure extracranial magnetic fields produced by intracellular neuronal currents. Put simply then, MEG is a measure of neurophysiological activity, which captures the magnetic fields generated by synchronized intraneuronal electrical activity. As such, MEG recordings offer exquisite resolution in the time and oscillatory domain and, as well, when co-registered with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), offer excellent resolution in the spatial domain. Recent advances in MEG computational and graph theoretical methods have led to studies of connectivity in the time-frequency domain. As such, MEG can elucidate a neurophysiological-based functional circuitry that may enhance what is seen with MRI connectivity studies. In particular, MEG may offer additional insight not possible by MRI when used to study complex eloquent function, where the precise timing and coordination of brain areas is critical. This article will review the

  10. From Structure to Circuits: The Contribution of MEG Connectivity Studies to Functional Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Elizabeth W.; Snead III, O. C.

    2016-01-01

    New advances in structural neuroimaging have revealed the intricate and extensive connections within the brain, data which have informed a number of ambitious projects such as the mapping of the human connectome. Elucidation of the structural connections of the brain, at both the macro and micro levels, promises new perspectives on brain structure and function that could translate into improved outcomes in functional neurosurgery. The understanding of neuronal structural connectivity afforded by these data now offers a vista on the brain, in both healthy and diseased states, that could not be seen with traditional neuroimaging. Concurrent with these developments in structural imaging, a complementary modality called magnetoencephalography (MEG) has been garnering great attention because it too holds promise for being able to shed light on the intricacies of functional brain connectivity. MEG is based upon the elemental principle of physics that an electrical current generates a magnetic field. Hence, MEG uses highly sensitive biomagnetometers to measure extracranial magnetic fields produced by intracellular neuronal currents. Put simply then, MEG is a measure of neurophysiological activity, which captures the magnetic fields generated by synchronized intraneuronal electrical activity. As such, MEG recordings offer exquisite resolution in the time and oscillatory domain and, as well, when co-registered with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), offer excellent resolution in the spatial domain. Recent advances in MEG computational and graph theoretical methods have led to studies of connectivity in the time-frequency domain. As such, MEG can elucidate a neurophysiological-based functional circuitry that may enhance what is seen with MRI connectivity studies. In particular, MEG may offer additional insight not possible by MRI when used to study complex eloquent function, where the precise timing and coordination of brain areas is critical. This article will review the

  11. From Structure to Circuits: The Contribution of MEG Connectivity Studies to Functional Neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Pang, Elizabeth W; Snead Iii, O C

    2016-01-01

    New advances in structural neuroimaging have revealed the intricate and extensive connections within the brain, data which have informed a number of ambitious projects such as the mapping of the human connectome. Elucidation of the structural connections of the brain, at both the macro and micro levels, promises new perspectives on brain structure and function that could translate into improved outcomes in functional neurosurgery. The understanding of neuronal structural connectivity afforded by these data now offers a vista on the brain, in both healthy and diseased states, that could not be seen with traditional neuroimaging. Concurrent with these developments in structural imaging, a complementary modality called magnetoencephalography (MEG) has been garnering great attention because it too holds promise for being able to shed light on the intricacies of functional brain connectivity. MEG is based upon the elemental principle of physics that an electrical current generates a magnetic field. Hence, MEG uses highly sensitive biomagnetometers to measure extracranial magnetic fields produced by intracellular neuronal currents. Put simply then, MEG is a measure of neurophysiological activity, which captures the magnetic fields generated by synchronized intraneuronal electrical activity. As such, MEG recordings offer exquisite resolution in the time and oscillatory domain and, as well, when co-registered with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), offer excellent resolution in the spatial domain. Recent advances in MEG computational and graph theoretical methods have led to studies of connectivity in the time-frequency domain. As such, MEG can elucidate a neurophysiological-based functional circuitry that may enhance what is seen with MRI connectivity studies. In particular, MEG may offer additional insight not possible by MRI when used to study complex eloquent function, where the precise timing and coordination of brain areas is critical. This article will review the

  12. Radio data transmission for SCADA

    SciTech Connect

    Frasier, W.E. )

    1989-09-01

    Enron has used such wireless systems as meteor burst radio, 952 MHz multiple address radio, VSAT and L-band satellite, cellular radio and ACSB radio. The company's experience with meteor burst radio communications is discussed in this paper. It indicates good system reliability and consequently all back-up telephone lines have been removed from sites using this system.

  13. Surgical management of combined intramedullary arteriovenous malformation and perimedullary arteriovenous fistula within the hybrid operating room after five years of performing focus fractionated radiotherapy: case report.

    PubMed

    Gekka, Masayuki; Seki, Toshitaka; Hida, Kazutoshi; Osanai, Toshiya; Houkin, Kiyohiro

    2014-01-01

    Perimedullary arteriovenous fistula (AVF) shunts occur on the spinal cord surface and can be treated surgically or by endovascular embolization. In contrast, the nidus of an intramedullary arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is located in the spinal cord and is difficult to treat surgically or by endovascular techniques. The benefits of radiotherapy for treating intramedullary AVM have been published, but are anecdotal and consist largely of case reports. We present a case of combined cervical intramedullary AVM and perimedullary AVF which received surgical treatment within a hybrid operating room (OR) after 5 years of focus fractionated radiotherapy. A 37-year-old male presented with stepwise worsening myelopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging and spinal angiography revealed intramedullary AVM and perimedullary AVF at the C3 to C5 levels. In order to reduce nidus size and blood flow, we first performed focal fractionated radiotherapy. Five years later, the lesion volume was reduced. Following this, direct surgery was performed by an anterior approach using corpectomy in the hybrid OR. The spinal cord was monitored by motor-evoked potential throughout the surgery. Complete obliteration of the fistulous connection was confirmed by intraoperative indocyanine green video-angiography and intraoperative angiography, preserving the anterior spinal artery. We conclude that surgical treatment following focal fractionated radiotherapy may become one strategy for patients who are initially deemed ineligible for endovascular embolization and surgical treatment. Furthermore, the hybrid OR enables safe and precise treatment for spinal vascular disorders in the fields of endovascular treatment and neurosurgery.

  14. Magnetic neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Howard, M A; Grady, M S; Ritter, R C; Gillies, G T; Broaddus, W C; Dacey, R G

    1996-01-01

    Because of the complex shape of many brain structures, the ideal brain probe would be highly flexible and give the neurosurgeon the ability to independently and precisely control movement of the probe tip. A magnetic surgery system has been developed that implements this concept. Flexible brain probes with small permanent magnetic tips are placed on the brain surface through a small burr hole and then magnetically manipulated within the brain. Drive forces are produced by an array of six superconducting magnets suspended within a cryostatic helmet. They produce a maximum force of 3 times the threshold needed to move the probe through the parenchymal tissues at its normal speed of 1 mm/s. Computer-controlled magnetic impulses precisely direct the probe movement in any direction desired with movement accuracy of 0.47 mm in phantom gels. Probe position is monitored 3 times per second with orthogonally oriented microchannel plate X-ray systems, X-ray dose from a 3-hour simulated procedure is comparable to that of a chest X-ray. In vivo and in vitro feasibility studies have been carried out in dog and pig brains. Preclinical trials are planned for clinical applications including implantation of flexible brachytherapy threads.

  15. Multiple sclerosis in Mexico: hospital cases at the National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Corona, T; Rodrigues, J L; Otero, E; Stopp, L

    1996-05-01

    The frequency and clinical features of multiple sclerosis (MS) at the National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery in Mexico City for the period spanning 1984-1993 is presented. Hospital records of patients with clinically diagnosed MS were selected, the frequency and cumulative frequency of this diagnosis were determined and demographic information and clinical features were recorded. It was found that 70% of the patients were women, 25% were professionals, and 95% were of mixed race. The clinical features of our patients and their neuroimages were consistent with those of MS patients in other populations. Importantly, we found that the frequency of MS has almost doubled over the last 10 years. The reason for this phenomenon is discussed as resulting from better health screening, the availability of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, and the cultural, demographic and dietary changes that have occurred due to the rapid urbanization of our country.

  16. System and methods for wide-field quantitative fluorescence imaging during neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Valdes, Pablo A; Jacobs, Valerie L; Wilson, Brian C; Leblond, Frederic; Roberts, David W; Paulsen, Keith D

    2013-08-01

    We report an accurate, precise and sensitive method and system for quantitative fluorescence image-guided neurosurgery. With a low-noise, high-dynamic-range CMOS array, we perform rapid (integration times as low as 50 ms per wavelength) hyperspectral fluorescence and diffuse reflectance detection and apply a correction algorithm to compensate for the distorting effects of tissue absorption and scattering. Using this approach, we generated quantitative wide-field images of fluorescence in tissue-simulating phantoms for the fluorophore PpIX, having concentrations and optical absorption and scattering variations over clinically relevant ranges. The imaging system was tested in a rodent model of glioma, detecting quantitative levels down to 20 ng/ml. The resulting performance is a significant advance on existing wide-field quantitative imaging techniques, and provides performance comparable to a point-spectroscopy probe that has previously demonstrated significant potential for improved detection of malignant brain tumors during surgical resection. PMID:23903142

  17. An Intelligent Robotic Hospital Bed for Safe Transportation of Critical Neurosurgery Patients Along Crowded Hospital Corridors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Savkin, Andrey V; Clout, Ray; Nguyen, Hung T

    2015-09-01

    We present a novel design of an intelligent robotic hospital bed, named Flexbed, with autonomous navigation ability. The robotic bed is developed for fast and safe transportation of critical neurosurgery patients without changing beds. Flexbed is more efficient and safe during the transportation process comparing to the conventional hospital beds. Flexbed is able to avoid en-route obstacles with an efficient easy-to-implement collision avoidance strategy when an obstacle is nearby and to move towards its destination at maximum speed when there is no threat of collision. We present extensive simulation results of navigation of Flexbed in the crowded hospital corridor environments with moving obstacles. Moreover, results of experiments with Flexbed in the real world scenarios are also presented and discussed.

  18. Paediatric day-case neurosurgery in a resource challenged setting: Pattern and practice

    PubMed Central

    Owojuyigbe, Afolabi Muyiwa; Komolafe, Edward O.; Adenekan, Anthony T.; Dada, Muyiwa A.; Onyia, Chiazor U.; Ogunbameru, Ibironke O.; Owagbemi, Oluwafemi F.; Talabi, Ademola O.; Faponle, Fola A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: It has been generally observed that children achieve better convalescence in the home environment especially if discharged same day after surgery. This is probably due to the fact that children generally tend to feel more at ease in the home environment than in the hospital setting. Only few tertiary health institutions provide routine day-case surgery for paediatric neurosurgical patients in our sub-region. Objective: To review the pattern and practice of paediatric neurosurgical day-cases at our hospital. Patients and Methods: A prospective study of all paediatric day-case neurosurgeries carried out between June 2011 and June 2014. Results: A total of 53 patients (34 males and 19 females) with age ranging from 2 days to 14 years were seen. Majority of the patients (77.4%) presented with congenital lesions, and the most common procedure carried out was spina bifida repair (32%) followed by ventriculoperitoneal shunt insertion (26.4%) for hydrocephalus. Sixty-eight percentage belonged to the American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status class 2, whereas the rest (32%) belonged to class 1. General anaesthesia was employed in 83% of cases. Parenteral paracetamol was used for intra-operative analgesia for most of the patients. Two patients had post-operative nausea and vomiting and were successfully managed. There was no case of emergency re-operation, unplanned admission, cancellation or mortality. Conclusion: Paediatric day-case neurosurgery is feasible in our environment. With careful patient selection and adequate pre-operative preparation, good outcome can be achieved. PMID:27251657

  19. A Patient Registry to Improve Patient Safety: Recording General Neurosurgery Complications

    PubMed Central

    Sarnthein, Johannes; Stieglitz, Lennart; Clavien, Pierre-Alain; Regli, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Background To improve the transparency of the local health care system, treatment cost was recently referenced to disease related groups. Treatment quality must be legally documented in a patient registry, in particular for the highly specialized treatments provided by neurosurgery departments. Methods In 2013 we have installed a patient registry focused on cranial neurosurgery. Surgeries are characterized by indication, treatment, location and other specific neurosurgical parameters. Preoperative state and postoperative outcome are recorded prospectively using neurological and sociological scales. Complications are graded by their severity in a therapy-oriented complication score system (Clavien-Dindo-Grading system, CDG). Results are presented at the monthly clinical staff meeting. Results Data acquisition compatible with the clinic workflow permitted to include all eligible patients into the registry. Until December 2015, we have registered 2880 patients that were treated in 3959 surgeries and 8528 consultations. Since the registry is fully operational (August 2014), we have registered 325 complications on 1341 patient discharge forms (24%). In 64% of these complications, no or only pharmacological treatment was required. At discharge, there was a clear correlation of the severity of the complication and the Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS, ρ = -0.3, slope -6 KPS percentage points per increment of CDG) and the length of stay (ρ = 0.4, slope 1.5 days per increment of CDG). Conclusions While the therapy-oriented complication scores correlate reasonably well with outcome and length of stay, they do not account for new deficits that cannot be treated. Outcome grading and complication severity grading thus serve a complimentary purpose. Overall, the registry serves to streamline and to complete information flow in the clinic, to identify complication rates and trends early for the internal quality monitoring and communication with patients. Conversely, the

  20. Integrating risk management data in quality improvement initiatives within an academic neurosurgery department.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Nancy; Garrett, Matthew C; Emami, Leila; Foss, Sarah K; Klohn, Johanna L; Martin, Neil A

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT While malpractice litigation has had many negative impacts on health care delivery systems, information extracted from lawsuits could potentially guide toward venues to improve care. The authors present a comprehensive review of lawsuits within a tertiary academic neurosurgical department and report institutional and departmental strategies to mitigate liability by integrating risk management data with quality improvement initiatives. METHODS The Comprehensive Risk Intelligence Tool database was interrogated to extract claims/suits abstracts concerning neurosurgical cases that were closed from January 2008 to December 2012. Variables included demographics of the claimant, type of procedure performed (if any), claim description, insured information, case outcome, clinical summary, contributing factors and subfactors, amount incurred for indemnity and expenses, and independent expert opinion in regard to whether the standard of care was met. RESULTS During the study period, the Department of Neurosurgery received the most lawsuits of all surgical specialties (30 of 172), leading to a total incurred payment of $4,949,867. Of these lawsuits, 21 involved spinal pathologies and 9 cranial pathologies. The largest group of suits was from patients with challenging medical conditions who underwent uneventful surgeries and postoperative courses but filed lawsuits when they did not see the benefits for which they were hoping; 85% of these claims were withdrawn by the plaintiffs. The most commonly cited contributing factors included clinical judgment (20 of 30), technical skill (19 of 30), and communication (6 of 30). CONCLUSIONS While all medical and surgical subspecialties must deal with the issue of malpractice and liability, neurosurgery is most affected both in terms of the number of suits filed as well as monetary amounts awarded. To use the suits as learning tools for the faculty and residents and minimize the associated costs, quality initiatives addressing the

  1. Application of underwater shock wave and laser-induced liquid jet to neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tominaga, T.; Nakagawa, A.; Hirano, T.; Sato, J.; Kato, K.; Hosseini, S. H. R.; Takayama, K.

    2006-03-01

    Paper deals with applications of underwater shock waves to medicine. A historical development of underwater shock wave generation by using pulsed Ho:YAG laser beam irradiation in water is briefly described and an overview is given regarding potential applications of shock waves to neuro-surgery. The laser beam irradiation in a liquid-filled catheter produces water vapor bubble and shock waves intermittently produces micro-liquid jets in a controlled fashion from the exit of the catheter. Correlations between shock dynamics and bubble dynamics are emphasized. To optimize the jet motion, results of basic parametric studies are briefly presented. The liquid jet discharged from the catheter exit has an impulse high enough to clearly exhibit effectiveness for various medical purposes. In liquid jets we observed reasonably strong shock waves and hence invented a compact shock generator aiming to apply to microsurgery. We applied it to a rat's bone window and developed an effective method of brain protection against shock loading. The insertion of Gore-Tex® sheet is found to attenuate shock waves drastically even for very short stand off distance and its physical mechanism is clarified. The laser-induced liquid jet (LILJ) is successfully applied to soft tissue dissection. Animal experiments were performed and results of histological observations are presented in details. Results of animal experiments revealed that LILJ can sharply dissect soft tissue with a minimum amount of liquid consumption, while blood vessels larger than 0.2 mm in diameter are preserved. Shock waves and LILJ have a potential to be indispensable tools in neuro-surgery.

  2. An American medical student's experience in global neurosurgery: both in their infancy.

    PubMed

    Magarik, Jordan; Kavolus, Joseph; Louis, Robert

    2012-01-01

    There are only three fully trained neurosurgeons to care for Tanzania's population of more than 41 million people. Madaktari was founded in 2006 to serve as a physician training partnership to establish more self-sufficient health care through education and training. Medical students play a valuable role in Madaktari as they are primarily responsible for collecting postneurosurgical outcome data on operations performed by Tanzanian physicians trained by our organization. In addition, medical students represent the future of global medicine. Thus, it is important to determine the extent that Madaktari has affected student interest in global health. Our purpose in this article is to explore one student's experience working in global neurosurgery while working with Madaktari. In addition we attempted to determine the effect Madaktari may play on the future medical careers of eight medical student volunteers. To determine that effect we conducted a six-question online survey of medical student volunteers. We received responses from four of our eight medical student volunteers, all of whom stated they had a good or excellent experience volunteering with Madaktari and that their experience further increased their desire to incorporate global health into their careers. After working with Madaktari nearly half of the medical student volunteers have pursued or will be pursuing year-long funded global health research during their medical school careers. Madaktari is not only pioneering a path toward increased and more independent neurosurgical capabilities in Tanzania, but it is also helping foster increased interest and participation among U.S. medical students in global neurosurgery. PMID:22079820

  3. The Radio Jove Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thieman, J. R.

    2010-01-01

    The Radio love Project is a hands-on education and outreach project in which students, or any other interested individuals or groups build a radio telescope from a kit, operate the radio telescope, transmit the resulting signals through the internet if desired, analyze the results, and share the results with others through archives or general discussions among the observers. Radio love is intended to provide an introduction to radio astronomy for the observer. The equipment allows the user to observe radio signals from Jupiter, the Sun, the galaxy, and Earth-based radiation both natural and man-made. The project was started through a NASA Director's Discretionary Fund grant more than ten years ago. it has continued to be carried out through the dedicated efforts of a group of mainly volunteers. Dearly 1500 kits have been distributed throughout the world. Participation can also be done without building a kit. Pre-built kits are available. Users can also monitor remote radio telescopes through the internet using free downloadable software available through the radiosky.com website. There have been many stories of prize-winning projects, inspirational results, collaborative efforts, etc. We continue to build the community of observers and are always open to new thoughts about how to inspire the observers to still greater involvement in the science and technology associated with Radio Jove.

  4. Film, Radio, and Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardesty, Carolyn, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This journal issue covers the history of film, radio, and television in Iowa. The first article, "When Pictures and Sound Came to Iowa," summarizes the origin of movies and radio and their early beginnings in Iowa. Using old photographs and measurement charts, the viewing, reading, and listening habits of young people in 1950 and 1958 are…

  5. Writing for Radio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tupper, Marianna S.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a 24-hour commercial radio station simulation class project for eighth-grade language arts. Students wrote their own scripts, chose music and were disc jockeys on their own music and talk shows, and prepared news and traffic reports. Guest speakers from actual commercial radio came in to discuss issues such as advertising, censorship,…

  6. Frequencies for radio astronomy.

    PubMed

    Smith, F G

    1970-10-31

    At present the scope of research in radio astronomy is limited by the allocation of frequencies, some of which have to be shared with other radio services. When the International Telecommunications Union reconsiders all frequency allocations next year, astronomers are hoping for an improvement.

  7. Stabilized radio frequency quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, H.D.; Fugitt, J.A.; Howard, D.R.

    1984-12-25

    Disclosed is a long-vane stabilized radio frequency resonator for accelerating charged particles and including means defining a radio frequency resonator cavity, a plurality of long vanes mounted in the defining means for dividing the cavity into sections, and means interconnecting opposing ones of the plurality of vanes for stabilizing the resonator. 5 figs.

  8. Stabilized radio frequency quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, Henry D.; Fugitt, Jock A.; Howard, Donald R.

    1984-01-01

    A long-vane stabilized radio frequency resonator for accelerating charged particles and including means defining a radio frequency resonator cavity, a plurality of long vanes mounted in the defining means for dividing the cavity into sections, and means interconnecting opposing ones of the plurality of vanes for stabilizing the resonator.

  9. Radio efficiency of pulsars

    SciTech Connect

    Szary, Andrzej; Melikidze, George I.; Gil, Janusz; Zhang, Bing; Xu, Ren-Xin E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu

    2014-03-20

    We investigate radio emission efficiency, ξ, of pulsars and report a near-linear inverse correlation between ξ and the spin-down power, E-dot , as well as a near-linear correlation between ξ and pulsar age, τ. This is a consequence of very weak, if any, dependences of radio luminosity, L, on pulsar period, P, and the period derivative, P-dot , in contrast to X-ray or γ-ray emission luminosities. The analysis of radio fluxes suggests that these correlations are not due to a selection effect, but are intrinsic to the pulsar radio emission physics. We have found that, although with a large variance, the radio luminosity of pulsars is ≈10{sup 29} erg s{sup –1}, regardless of the position in the P-- P-dot diagram. Within such a picture, a model-independent statement can be made that the death line of radio pulsars corresponds to an upper limit in the efficiency of radio emission. If we introduce the maximum value for radio efficiency into the Monte Carlo-based population syntheses we can reproduce the observed sample using the random luminosity model. Using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test on a synthetic flux distribution reveals a high probability of reproducing the observed distribution. Our results suggest that the plasma responsible for generating radio emission is produced under similar conditions regardless of pulsar age, dipolar magnetic field strength, and spin-down rate. The magnetic fields near the pulsar surface are likely dominated by crust-anchored, magnetic anomalies, which do not significantly differ among pulsars, leading to similar conditions for generating electron-positron pairs necessary to power radio emission.

  10. Beyond conservatism and the boundaries of a medical discipline: a short history of the department of neurosurgery at kyoto university graduate school of medicine.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Nobuo; Handa, Hajime; Kikuchi, Haruhiko

    2002-10-01

    CONSTANT CHANGE AND the occasional fusion of two different entities can result in the creation of masterpieces, not only in art but also in neurosurgery. Chisato Araki is one of the pioneers of neurosurgery in Japan; his 2-year sojourn in the United States and Europe provided him with an extraordinary amount of experience. He traveled throughout the world at a time when it took 30 days to journey from Yokohama to New York, and he visited with most of the leading contemporary neurosurgeons and observed their operations, never abandoning his highly honed critical insights. Driven by passion and a deep sense of duty to pass on his knowledge and perspective, he became a beacon of hope and encouragement for young physicians working in a country devastated by war. His successor, Hajime Handa, established neurosurgery as one of the branches of neuroscience and fostered the collaborations and exchanges among different disciplines that have become a tradition and hallmark of our Department of Neurosurgery. Through anecdotes and glimpses of the evolution of neurosurgery at our institution, we offer insights into the unique nature of Japanese neurosurgery that may illuminate the path toward the resolution of some of the recent and enduring problems encountered in our specialty.

  11. Complications from radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dhermain, Frédéric; Barani, Igor J

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) of the brain is associated with significant stigma in the neuro-oncology community. This is primarily because of the potentially severe complications with which it may be associated. These complications, especially in subacute and latent settings, are often unpredictable, potentially progressive, and irreversible. The onset of complications may start from the first fraction of 2 Gy, continuing over several months after end of RT with persistent drowsiness and apathy. It may also extend over many years with progressive onset of neurocognitive impairments such as memory decline, and diminished focus/attention. For long-term survivors, such as young patients irradiated for a favorable low-grade glioma, quality of life can be seriously impacted by RT. It is essential, as in the pediatric field, to propose patient-specific regimens from the very outset of therapy. The use of molecular biomarkers to better predict survival, control of comorbidities along with judicious use of medications such as steroids and antiepileptics, improved targeting with the help of modern imaging and RT techniques, modulation of the dose, and fractionation aimed at limiting integral dose to the healthy brain all have the potential to minimize treatment-related complications while maintaining the therapeutic efficacy for which RT is known. Sparing "radiosensitive" areas such as hippocampi could have a modest but measurable impact with regard to cognitive preservation, an effect that can possibly be enhanced when used in conjunction with memantine and/or donepezil. PMID:26948357

  12. [Adaptative radiotherapy: The case for MRI-guided radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Maingon, P

    2016-10-01

    The concept of image-guided radiotherapy benefits from the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) associated with different capacities of tissue analyses such as spectroscopy or diffusion analysis. The production of devices allowing the repositioning of patients through MRI represents a strong added value without delivering any additional dose to the patient while the optimization of the adaptative strategies are facilitated by a better contrast of the soft tissues compared to the scanner. The advantages of MRI are well demonstrated for brain tumours, head and neck carcinomas, pelvic tumors, mediastinal malignancies, gastrointestinal tract diseases. Adaptative radiotherapy inaugurates a new area of radiotherapy with different modalities. Several technological solutions are provided or discussed allowing the patients to benefit from thses new technologies as soon as possible.

  13. [Adaptative radiotherapy: The case for MRI-guided radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Maingon, P

    2016-10-01

    The concept of image-guided radiotherapy benefits from the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) associated with different capacities of tissue analyses such as spectroscopy or diffusion analysis. The production of devices allowing the repositioning of patients through MRI represents a strong added value without delivering any additional dose to the patient while the optimization of the adaptative strategies are facilitated by a better contrast of the soft tissues compared to the scanner. The advantages of MRI are well demonstrated for brain tumours, head and neck carcinomas, pelvic tumors, mediastinal malignancies, gastrointestinal tract diseases. Adaptative radiotherapy inaugurates a new area of radiotherapy with different modalities. Several technological solutions are provided or discussed allowing the patients to benefit from thses new technologies as soon as possible. PMID:27599686

  14. Evidence-based neurosurgery. Basic concepts for the appraisal and application of scientific information to patient care (Part II).

    PubMed

    Esene, Ignatius N; Baeesa, Saleh S; Ammar, Ahmed

    2016-07-01

    Medical evidence is obtainable from approaches, which might be descriptive, analytic and integrative and ranked into levels of evidence, graded according to quality and summarized into strengths of recommendation. Sources of evidence range from expert opinions through well-randomized control trials to meta-analyses. The conscientious, explicit, and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions related to the care of individual patients defines the concept of evidence-based neurosurgery (EBN). We reviewed reference books of clinical epidemiology, evidence-based practice and other previously related articles addressing principles of evidence-based practice in neurosurgery. Based on existing theories and models and our cumulative years of experience and expertise conducting research and promoting EBN, we have synthesized and presented a holistic overview of the concept of EBN. We have also underscored the importance of clinical research and its relationship to EBN. Useful electronic resources are provided. The concept of critical appraisal is introduced. PMID:27356649

  15. Radio broadcasting via satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helm, Neil R.; Pritchard, Wilbur L.

    1990-10-01

    Market areas offering potential for future narrowband broadcast satellites are examined, including international public diplomacy, government- and advertising-supported, and business-application usages. Technical issues such as frequency allocation, spacecraft types, transmission parameters, and radio receiver characteristics are outlined. Service and system requirements, advertising revenue, and business communications services are among the economic issues discussed. The institutional framework required to provide an operational radio broadcast service is studied, and new initiatives in direct broadcast audio radio systems, encompassing studies, tests, in-orbit demonstrations of, and proposals for national and international commercial broadcast services are considered.

  16. Voice following radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Stoicheff, M L

    1975-04-01

    This study was undertaken to provide information on the voice of patients following radiotherapy for glottic cancer. Part I presents findings from questionnaires returned by 227 of 235 patients successfully irradiated for glottic cancer from 1960 through 1971. Part II presents preliminary findings on the speaking fundamental frequencies of 22 irradiated patients. Normal to near-normal voice was reported by 83 percent of the 227 patients; however, 80 percent did indicate persisting vocal difficulties such as fatiguing of voice with much usage, inability to sing, reduced loudness, hoarse voice quality and inability to shout. Amount of talking during treatments appeared to affect length of time for voice to recover following treatments in those cases where it took from nine to 26 weeks; also, with increasing years since treatment, patients rated their voices more favorably. Smoking habits following treatments improved significantly with only 27 percent smoking heavily as compared with 65 percent prior to radiation therapy. No correlation was found between smoking (during or after treatments) and vocal ratings or between smoking and length of time for voice to recover. There was no relationship found between reported vocal ratings and stage of the disease. Data on mean speaking fundamental frequency seem to indicate a trend toward lower frequencies in irradiated patients as compared with normals. A trend was also noted in both irradidated and control groups for lower speaking fundamental frequencies in heavy smokers compared with non-smokers or previous smokers. These trends would indicate some vocal cord thickening or edema in irradiated patients and in heavy smokers. It is suggested that the study of irradiated patients' voices before, during and following treatments by means of audio, aerodynamic and acoustic instrumentation would yield additional information of diagnostic value on recovery of laryngeal function. It is also suggested that the voice pathologist could

  17. Introduction to suspension levels: radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Horton, P; Lillicrap, S; Lamm, I-L; Lehmann, W

    2013-02-01

    In 2007, the European Commission (EC) commissioned a group of experts to undertake the revision of Report Radiation Protection (RP 91) 'Criteria for acceptability of radiological (including radiotherapy) and nuclear medicine installations' written in 1997. The revised draft report was submitted to the EC in 2010, who issued it for public consultation. The EC has commissioned the same group of experts to consider the comments of the public consultation for further improvement of the revised report. The EC intends to publish the final report under its Radiation Report Series as RP 162. This paper describes the background to the selection of the key performance parameters for radiotherapy equipment and sets out the sources of their criteria of acceptability including suspension levels for a wide range of radiotherapy equipment.

  18. Expanding global access to radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Atun, Rifat; Jaffray, David A; Barton, Michael B; Bray, Freddie; Baumann, Michael; Vikram, Bhadrasain; Hanna, Timothy P; Knaul, Felicia M; Lievens, Yolande; Lui, Tracey Y M; Milosevic, Michael; O'Sullivan, Brian; Rodin, Danielle L; Rosenblatt, Eduardo; Van Dyk, Jacob; Yap, Mei Ling; Zubizarreta, Eduardo; Gospodarowicz, Mary

    2015-09-01

    Radiotherapy is a critical and inseparable component of comprehensive cancer treatment and care. For many of the most common cancers in low-income and middle-income countries, radiotherapy is essential for effective treatment. In high-income countries, radiotherapy is used in more than half of all cases of cancer to cure localised disease, palliate symptoms, and control disease in incurable cancers. Yet, in planning and building treatment capacity for cancer, radiotherapy is frequently the last resource to be considered. Consequently, worldwide access to radiotherapy is unacceptably low. We present a new body of evidence that quantifies the worldwide coverage of radiotherapy services by country. We show the shortfall in access to radiotherapy by country and globally for 2015-35 based on current and projected need, and show substantial health and economic benefits to investing in radiotherapy. The cost of scaling up radiotherapy in the nominal model in 2015-35 is US$26·6 billion in low-income countries, $62·6 billion in lower-middle-income countries, and $94·8 billion in upper-middle-income countries, which amounts to $184·0 billion across all low-income and middle-income countries. In the efficiency model the costs were lower: $14·1 billion in low-income, $33·3 billion in lower-middle-income, and $49·4 billion in upper-middle-income countries-a total of $96·8 billion. Scale-up of radiotherapy capacity in 2015-35 from current levels could lead to saving of 26·9 million life-years in low-income and middle-income countries over the lifetime of the patients who received treatment. The economic benefits of investment in radiotherapy are very substantial. Using the nominal cost model could produce a net benefit of $278·1 billion in 2015-35 ($265·2 million in low-income countries, $38·5 billion in lower-middle-income countries, and $239·3 billion in upper-middle-income countries). Investment in the efficiency model would produce in the same period an even

  19. Expanding global access to radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Atun, Rifat; Jaffray, David A; Barton, Michael B; Bray, Freddie; Baumann, Michael; Vikram, Bhadrasain; Hanna, Timothy P; Knaul, Felicia M; Lievens, Yolande; Lui, Tracey Y M; Milosevic, Michael; O'Sullivan, Brian; Rodin, Danielle L; Rosenblatt, Eduardo; Van Dyk, Jacob; Yap, Mei Ling; Zubizarreta, Eduardo; Gospodarowicz, Mary

    2015-09-01

    Radiotherapy is a critical and inseparable component of comprehensive cancer treatment and care. For many of the most common cancers in low-income and middle-income countries, radiotherapy is essential for effective treatment. In high-income countries, radiotherapy is used in more than half of all cases of cancer to cure localised disease, palliate symptoms, and control disease in incurable cancers. Yet, in planning and building treatment capacity for cancer, radiotherapy is frequently the last resource to be considered. Consequently, worldwide access to radiotherapy is unacceptably low. We present a new body of evidence that quantifies the worldwide coverage of radiotherapy services by country. We show the shortfall in access to radiotherapy by country and globally for 2015-35 based on current and projected need, and show substantial health and economic benefits to investing in radiotherapy. The cost of scaling up radiotherapy in the nominal model in 2015-35 is US$26·6 billion in low-income countries, $62·6 billion in lower-middle-income countries, and $94·8 billion in upper-middle-income countries, which amounts to $184·0 billion across all low-income and middle-income countries. In the efficiency model the costs were lower: $14·1 billion in low-income, $33·3 billion in lower-middle-income, and $49·4 billion in upper-middle-income countries-a total of $96·8 billion. Scale-up of radiotherapy capacity in 2015-35 from current levels could lead to saving of 26·9 million life-years in low-income and middle-income countries over the lifetime of the patients who received treatment. The economic benefits of investment in radiotherapy are very substantial. Using the nominal cost model could produce a net benefit of $278·1 billion in 2015-35 ($265·2 million in low-income countries, $38·5 billion in lower-middle-income countries, and $239·3 billion in upper-middle-income countries). Investment in the efficiency model would produce in the same period an even

  20. [Head and neck adaptive radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Graff, P; Huger, S; Kirby, N; Pouliot, J

    2013-10-01

    Onboard volumetric imaging systems can provide accurate data of the patient's anatomy during a course of head and neck radiotherapy making it possible to assess the actual delivered dose and to evaluate the dosimetric impact of complex daily positioning variations and gradual anatomic changes such as geometric variations of tumors and normal tissues or shrinkage of external contours. Adaptive radiotherapy is defined as the correction of a patient's treatment planning to adapt for individual variations observed during treatment. Strategies are developed to selectively identify patients that require replanning because of an intolerable dosimetric drift. Automated tools are designed to limit time consumption. Deformable image registration algorithms are the cornerstones of these strategies, but a better understanding of their limits of validity is required before adaptive radiotherapy can be safely introduced to daily practice. Moreover, strict evaluation of the clinical benefits is yet to be proven.

  1. Clinical quality standards for radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Aim of the study The technological progress that is currently being witnessed in the areas of diagnostic imaging, treatment planning systems and therapeutic equipment has caused radiotherapy to become a high-tech and interdisciplinary domain involving staff of various backgrounds. This allows steady improvement in therapy results, but at the same time makes the diagnostic, imaging and therapeutic processes more complex and complicated, requiring every stage of those processes to be planned, organized, controlled and improved so as to assure high quality of services provided. The aim of this paper is to present clinical quality standards for radiotherapy as developed by the author. Material and methods In order to develop the quality standards, a comparative analysis was performed between European and Polish legal acts adopted in the period of 1980-2006 and the universal industrial ISO 9001:2008 standard, defining requirements for quality management systems, and relevant articles published in 1984-2009 were reviewed, including applicable guidelines and recommendations of American, international, European and Polish bodies, such as the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), the European Society for Radiotherapy & Oncology (ESTRO), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and the Organisation of European Cancer Institutes (OECI) on quality assurance and management in radiotherapy. Results As a result, 352 quality standards for radiotherapy were developed and categorized into the following three groups: 1 – organizational standards; 2 – physico-technical standards and 3 – clinical standards. Conclusion Proposed clinical quality standards for radiotherapy can be used by any institution using ionizing radiation for medical purposes. However, standards are of value only if they are implemented, reviewed, audited and improved, and if there is a clear mechanism in place to monitor and address failure to meet agreed standards. PMID:23788854

  2. Eratosthenes via Ham Radio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koser, John F.

    1975-01-01

    A secondary geology class used Eratosthenes' method for measuring the circumference of the earth by comparing their measurements of the shadow of a vertical rod to the measurements made by another person contacted by ham radio. (MLH)

  3. The Sardinia Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amico, Nichi

    2011-08-01

    We present the status of the Sardinia Radio Telescope (SRT) project, a new general purpose, fully steerable 64 m diameter parabolic radio telescope under construction in Sardinia. The instrument is funded by Italian Ministry of University and Research (MIUR), by the Sardinia Regional Government (RAS), and by the Italian Space Agency (ASI), and it is charge to three research structures of the National Institute for Astrophysics (INAF): the Institute of Radio Astronomy of Bologna, the Cagliari Astronomical Observatory (in Sardinia), and the Arcetri Astrophysical Observatory in Florence. The radio telescope has a shaped Gregorian optical configuration with a 8 m diameter secondary mirror and additional Beam-Wave Guide (BWG) mirrors. One of the most challenging feature of SRT is the active surface of the primary reflector which provides good efficiency up to about 100 GHz. This paper reports on the most recent advances of the construction.

  4. Dedicated Linac for Radioneurosurgery at the National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celis-López, Miguel A.; Lárraga-Gutiérrez, José M.

    2003-09-01

    The objective is to present a description and the main clinical applications of this dedicated Linac for benign and malignant tumors in the central nervous system. The Novalis (BrainLab, Germany) is a 6 MV dedicated linac for a single high dose Radiosurgery (RS) and for fractionated doses in Stereotactic Radiotherapy with a high level of precision at the isocenter.

  5. Second Malignant Neoplasms Following Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sanath

    2012-01-01

    More than half of all cancer patients receive radiotherapy as a part of their treatment. With the increasing number of long-term cancer survivors, there is a growing concern about the risk of radiation induced second malignant neoplasm [SMN]. This risk appears to be highest for survivors of childhood cancers. The exact mechanism and dose-response relationship for radiation induced malignancy is not well understood, however, there have been growing efforts to develop strategies for the prevention and mitigation of radiation induced cancers. This review article focuses on the incidence, etiology, and risk factors for SMN in various organs after radiotherapy. PMID:23249860

  6. Conceptual Background to Radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponsonby, J. E. B.

    2004-06-01

    The International Telecommunications Union (ITU) conceives the radio spectrum as primarily a resource for telecommunications. Indeed most applications of radio are for communications and other radio services, particularly the Radio Astronomy Service, are deemed to be `pretend'communication serviceas for spectrum amnagement purposes. The language of Radio Spectrum Management is permeated by the terminology ofcommunications, some derived from the physics of radio and some from aspects of information theory. This contribution touches on all the essential concepts of radiocommunications which the author thinks should be the common mental equipment of the Spectrum Manager. The fundamental capacity of a communication channel is discussed in terms of the degrees of freedom and bandwidth of a signal, and the signal to noise ratio. It is emphasized that an information bearing signal is inherently unpredictable, and must, at some level, be discontinuous. This has important consequences for the form of its power spectrum. The effect of inserting filters is discussed particularly with regard to constant amplitude signals and, in the context of non-linear power amplifiers, the phenomenon of`sideband recovery'. All the common generic forms of modulation are discussed including the very different case of `no-modulation' which applies in all forms of passive remote sensing. Whilst all are agreed that the radio spectrum should be used `efficiently', there is no quantitative measure of spectral efficiency which embraces all relevant aspects of spectral usage. These various aspects are dicussed. Finally a brief outline of some aspects of antennae are reviewed. It is pointed out that the recent introduction of so-called `active antennnae', which have properties unlike traditional passive antennae, has confused the interpretation of those ITU Radio Regulations which refer to antennae.

  7. The Radio JOVE Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, L.; Thieman, J.; Higgins, C.

    1999-09-01

    Radio JOVE is an interactive educational activity which brings the radio sounds of Jupiter and the Sun to students, teachers, and the general public. This is accomplished through the construction of a simple radio telescope kit and the use of a real-time radio observatory on the Internet. Our website (http://radiojove.gsfc.nasa.gov/) will contain science information, instruction manuals, observing guides, and education resources for students and teachers. Our target audience is high school science classes, but subjects can be tailored to college undergraduate physics and astronomy courses or even to middle school science classes. The goals of the project are: 1) Educate people about planetary and solar radio astronomy, space physics, and the scientific method 2) Provide teachers and students with a hands-on radio astronomy exercise as a science curriculum support activity by building and using a simple radio telescope receiver/antenna kit 3) Create the first ever online radio observatory which provides real-time data for those with internet access 4) Allow interactions among participating schools by facilitating exchanges of ideas, data, and observing experiences. Our current funding will allow us to impact 100 schools by partially subsidizing their participation in the program. We expect to expand well beyond this number as publicity and general interest increase. Additional schools are welcome to fully participate, but we will not be able to subsidize their kit purchases. We hope to make a wide impact among the schools by advertising through appropriate newsletters, space grant consortia, the INSPIRE project (http://image.gsfc.nasa.gov/poetry/inspire/), electronic links, and science and education meetings. We would like to acknoledge support from the NASA/GSFC Director's Discretionary Fund, the STScI IDEAS grant program and the NASA/GSFC Space Science Data Operations Office.

  8. Changes in Pulmonary Function After Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy, or Proton Beam Therapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez Guerra, Jose L.; Gomez, Daniel R.; Zhuang Yan; Levy, Lawrence B.; Eapen, George; Liu, Hongmei; Mohan, Radhe; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Liao Zhongxing

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the extent of change in pulmonary function over time after definitive radiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with modern techniques and to identify predictors of changes in pulmonary function according to patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics. Patients and Methods: We analyzed 250 patients who had received {>=}60 Gy radio(chemo)therapy for primary NSCLC in 1998-2010 and had undergone pulmonary function tests before and within 1 year after treatment. Ninety-three patients were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, 97 with intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and 60 with proton beam therapy. Postradiation pulmonary function test values were evaluated among individual patients compared with the same patient's preradiation value at the following time intervals: 0-4 (T1), 5-8 (T2), and 9-12 (T3) months. Results: Lung diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO) was reduced in the majority of patients along the three time periods after radiation, whereas the forced expiratory volume in 1 s per unit of vital capacity (FEV1/VC) showed an increase and decrease after radiation in a similar percentage of patients. There were baseline differences (stage, radiotherapy dose, concurrent chemotherapy) among the radiation technology groups. On multivariate analysis, the following features were associated with larger posttreatment declines in DLCO: pretreatment DLCO, gross tumor volume, lung and heart dosimetric data, and total radiation dose. Only pretreatment DLCO was associated with larger posttreatment declines in FEV1/VC. Conclusions: Lung diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide is reduced in the majority of patients after radiotherapy with modern techniques. Multiple factors, including gross tumor volume, preradiation lung function, and dosimetric parameters, are associated with the DLCO decline. Prospective studies are needed to better understand whether new radiation technology, such as proton beam therapy or

  9. Continuous and noninvasive hemoglobin monitoring reduces red blood cell transfusion during neurosurgery: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Awada, Wael N; Mohmoued, Maher F; Radwan, Tarek M; Hussien, Gomaa Z; Elkady, Hany W

    2015-12-01

    Continuous, noninvasive hemoglobin (SpHb) monitoring provides clinicians with the trending of changes in hemoglobin, which has the potential to alter red blood cell transfusion decision making. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of SpHb monitoring on blood transfusions in high blood loss surgery. In this prospective cohort study, eligible patients scheduled for neurosurgery were enrolled into either a Control Group or an intervention group (SpHb Group). The Control Group received intraoperative hemoglobin monitoring by intermittent blood sampling when there was an estimated 15% blood loss. If the laboratory value indicated a hemoglobin level of ≤10 g/dL, a red blood cell transfusion was started and continued until the estimated blood loss was replaced and a laboratory hemoglobin value was >l0 g/dL. In the SpHb Group patients were monitored with a Radical-7 Pulse CO-Oximeter for continuous noninvasive hemoglobin values. Transfusion was started when the SpHb value fell to ≤l0 g/dL and was continued until the SpHb was ≥l0 g/dL. Blood samples were taken pre and post transfusion. Percent of patients transfused, average amount of blood transfused in those who received transfusions and the delay time from the hemoglobin reading of <10 g/dL to the start of transfusion (transfusion delay) were compared between groups. The trending ability of SpHb, and the bias and precision of SpHb compared to the laboratory hemoglobin were calculated. Compared to the Control Group, the SpHb Group had fewer units of blood transfused (1.0 vs 1.9 units for all patients; p ≤ 0.001, and 2.3 vs 3.9 units in patients receiving transfusions; p ≤ 0.0 l), fewer patients receiving >3 units (32 vs 73%; p ≤ 0.01) and a shorter time to transfusion after the need was established (9.2 ± 1.7 vs 50.2 ± 7.9 min; p ≤ 0.00 l). The absolute accuracy of SpHb was 0.0 ± 0.8 g/dL and trend accuracy yielded a coefficient of determination of 0.93. Adding SpHb monitoring to

  10. Parental Evaluation of a Nurse Practitioner-Developed Pediatric Neurosurgery Website

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Tina Kovacs; Kleib, Manal; Davidson, Sandra J

    2016-01-01

    Background Parents often turn to the Internet to seek health information about their child’s diagnosis and condition. Information, support, and resources regarding pediatric neurosurgery are scarce, hard to find, and difficult to comprehend. To address this gap, a pediatric nurse practitioner designed a website called the Neurosurgery Kids Fund (NKF). Analyzing the legitimacy of the NKF website for parents seeking health information and fulfilling their social and resource needs is critical to the website’s future development and success. Objective To explore parental usage of the NKF website, track visitor behavior, evaluate usability and design, establish ways to improve user experience, and identify ways to redesign the website. The aim of this study was to assess and evaluate whether a custom-designed health website could meet parents’ health information, support, and resource needs. Methods A multimethod approach was used. Google Analytic usage reports were collected and analyzed for the period of April 23, 2013, to November 30, 2013. Fifty-two online questionnaires that targeted the website’s usability were collected between June 18, 2014, and July 30, 2014. Finally, a focus group was conducted on August 20, 2014, to explore parents’ perceptions and user experiences. Findings were analyzed using an inductive content analysis approach. Results There were a total of 2998 sessions and 8818 page views, with 2.94 pages viewed per session, a 56.20% bounce rate, an average session duration of 2 minutes 24 seconds, and a 56.24% new sessions rate. Results from 52 eligible surveys included that the majority of NKF users were Caucasian (90%), females (92%), aged 36-45 years (48%), with a university or college degree or diploma (69%). Half plan to use the health information. Over half reported turning to the Internet for health information and spending 2 to 4 hours a day online. The most common reasons for using the NKF website were to (1) gather information

  11. Continuous and noninvasive hemoglobin monitoring reduces red blood cell transfusion during neurosurgery: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Awada, Wael N; Mohmoued, Maher F; Radwan, Tarek M; Hussien, Gomaa Z; Elkady, Hany W

    2015-12-01

    Continuous, noninvasive hemoglobin (SpHb) monitoring provides clinicians with the trending of changes in hemoglobin, which has the potential to alter red blood cell transfusion decision making. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of SpHb monitoring on blood transfusions in high blood loss surgery. In this prospective cohort study, eligible patients scheduled for neurosurgery were enrolled into either a Control Group or an intervention group (SpHb Group). The Control Group received intraoperative hemoglobin monitoring by intermittent blood sampling when there was an estimated 15% blood loss. If the laboratory value indicated a hemoglobin level of ≤10 g/dL, a red blood cell transfusion was started and continued until the estimated blood loss was replaced and a laboratory hemoglobin value was >l0 g/dL. In the SpHb Group patients were monitored with a Radical-7 Pulse CO-Oximeter for continuous noninvasive hemoglobin values. Transfusion was started when the SpHb value fell to ≤l0 g/dL and was continued until the SpHb was ≥l0 g/dL. Blood samples were taken pre and post transfusion. Percent of patients transfused, average amount of blood transfused in those who received transfusions and the delay time from the hemoglobin reading of <10 g/dL to the start of transfusion (transfusion delay) were compared between groups. The trending ability of SpHb, and the bias and precision of SpHb compared to the laboratory hemoglobin were calculated. Compared to the Control Group, the SpHb Group had fewer units of blood transfused (1.0 vs 1.9 units for all patients; p ≤ 0.001, and 2.3 vs 3.9 units in patients receiving transfusions; p ≤ 0.0 l), fewer patients receiving >3 units (32 vs 73%; p ≤ 0.01) and a shorter time to transfusion after the need was established (9.2 ± 1.7 vs 50.2 ± 7.9 min; p ≤ 0.00 l). The absolute accuracy of SpHb was 0.0 ± 0.8 g/dL and trend accuracy yielded a coefficient of determination of 0.93. Adding SpHb monitoring to

  12. Astrometry of southern radio sources.

    PubMed

    White, G L; Jauncey, D L; Harvey, B R; Savage, A; Gulkis, S; Preston, R A; Peterson, B A; Reynolds, J E; Nicolson, G D; Malin, D F

    1991-01-01

    An overview is presented of a number of astrometry and astrophysics programs based on radio sources from the Parkes 2.7 GHz catalogues. The programs cover the optical identification and spectroscopy of flat-spectrum Parkes sources and the determination of their milliarc-second radio structures and positions. Work is also in progress to tie together the radio and Hipparcos positional reference frames. A parallel program of radio and optical astrometry of southern radio stars is also under way.

  13. [Which rules apply to hypofractionated radiotherapy?].

    PubMed

    Supiot, S; Clément-Colmou, K; Paris, F; Corre, I; Chiavassa, S; Delpon, G

    2015-10-01

    Hypofractionated radiotherapy is now more widely prescribed due to improved targeting techniques (intensity modulated radiotherapy, image-guided radiotherapy and stereotactic radiotherapy). Low dose hypofractionated radiotherapy is routinely administered mostly for palliative purposes. High or very high dose hypofractionated irradiation must be delivered according to very strict procedures since every minor deviation can lead to major changes in dose delivery to the tumor volume and organs at risk. Thus, each stage of the processing must be carefully monitored starting from the limitations and the choice of the hypofractionation technique, tumour contouring and dose constraints prescription, planning and finally dose calculation and patient positioning verification.

  14. Intraoperative radiotherapy: the Japanese experience. [Betatron

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, M.; Takahashi, M.

    1981-07-01

    Clinical results of intraoperative radiotherapy (IOR) which have been obtained since 1964 in Japan were reviewed. In this radiotherapy a cancerocidal dose can be delivered safely to the lesions, since critical organs are shifted from the field so that the lesions may be exposed directly to radiation. Intraoperative radiotherapy has spread in Japan and the number of institutions in which this radiotherapy is performed has continued to increase to a total of 26 in 1979. The total number of patients treated was 717. It has been demonstrated that intraoperative radiotherapy has definite effects on locally advanced abdominal neoplasms and unresectable radioresistant tumors.

  15. Radiotherapy of chondrosarcoma of bone

    SciTech Connect

    Harwood, A.R.; Krajbich, J.I.; Fornasier, V.L.

    1980-06-01

    A retrospective analysis of 31 cases of chondrosarcoma of bone treated by radiotherapy is presented. In comparison with other large series, our group of patients were found to have been unfavourably selected with respect to the known prognostic factors: histology site, adequacy of operative treatment, and presenting symptoms. Twelve patients with primary chondrosarcoma were radically irradiated; 6 of these 12 have been alive and well without tumor for periods ranging from three and a half to 16 years and 3 of these are alive and well for 15 years or more following radiotherapy. The other 6 patients responded or desease stabilized following radiotherapy for periods ranging from 16 months to eight years. One poorly differentiated tumor was radically irradiated and did not respond. Eleven patients were irradiated palliatively, generally with low doses of irradiation, and only 4 responded transiently for periods ranging from three to 12 months. Seven patients with mesenchymal and dedifferentiated tumors were radically irradiated. Four responded or disease stabilized, and 1 of these patients was alive and well at 3 years; 3 did not respond. Six died with distant metastasis. It is concluded that chondrosarcoma of bone is a radioresponsive tumor and the place of radiotherapy in the treatment of this disease and the reason for its being labelled a radioresistant tumor are discussed. The problems of assessing response of chondrosarcoma to therapy are also discussed. It is suggested that chemotherapy may have a role in the management of mesenchymal and dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma.

  16. Pancreatic cancer: chemotherapy and radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Andrén-Sandberg, Åke

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer in many cases appears in a non-curatively resectable stage when the diagnosis is made. Palliative treatment become an option in the patients with advanced stage. The present article reviewed chemotherapy and radiotherapy in various advanced stage of pancreatic cancer. PMID:22540056

  17. Radiotherapy T1 glottic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zablow, A.I.; Erba, P.S.; Sanfillippo, L.J.

    1989-11-01

    From 1970 to 1985, curative radiotherapy was administered to 63 patients with stage I carcinoma of the true vocal cords. Precision radiotherapeutic technique yields cure rates comparable to surgical results. Good voice quality was preserved in a high percentage of patients.

  18. [Conformal radiotherapy: principles and classification].

    PubMed

    Rosenwald, J C; Gaboriaud, G; Pontvert, D

    1999-01-01

    'Conformal radiotherapy' is the name fixed by usage and given to a new form of radiotherapy resulting from the technological improvements observed during, the last ten years. While this terminology is now widely used, no precise definition can be found in the literature. Conformal radiotherapy refers to an approach in which the dose distribution is more closely 'conformed' or adapted to the actual shape of the target volume. However, the achievement of a consensus on a more specific definition is hampered by various difficulties, namely in characterizing the degree of 'conformality'. We have therefore suggested a classification scheme be established on the basis of the tools and the procedures actually used for all steps of the process, i.e., from prescription to treatment completion. Our classification consists of four levels: schematically, at level 0, there is no conformation (rectangular fields); at level 1, a simple conformation takes place, on the basis of conventional 2D imaging; at level 2, a 3D reconstruction of the structures is used for a more accurate conformation; and level 3 includes research and advanced dynamic techniques. We have used our personal experience, contacts with colleagues and data from the literature to analyze all the steps of the planning process, and to define the tools and procedures relevant to a given level. The corresponding tables have been discussed and approved at the European level within the Dynarad concerted action. It is proposed that the term 'conformal radiotherapy' be restricted to procedures where all steps are at least at level 2.

  19. Radio emission from supernovae.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiler, K. W.; Panagia, N.; Sramek, R. A.; Van Dyk, S. D.; Stockdale, C. J.; Williams, C. L.

    Study of radio supernovae over the past 30 years includes more than three dozen detected objects and more than 150 upper limits. From this work it is possible to identify classes of radio properties, demonstrate conformance to and deviations from existing models, estimate the density and structure of the circumstellar material and, by inference, the evolution of the presupernova stellar wind, and reveal the last stages of stellar evolution before explosion. Along with reviewing these general properties of the radio emission from supernovae, we present our extensive observations of the radio emission from supernova (SN) 1993J in M 81 (NGC 3031) made with the Very Large Array and other radio telescopes. The SN 1993J radio emission evolves regularly in both time and frequency, and the usual interpretation in terms of shock interaction with a circumstellar medium (CSM) formed by a pre-supernova stellar wind describes the observations rather well considering the complexity of the phenomenon. However: 1) The highest frequency measurements at 85 - 110 GHz at early times (<40 days) are not well fitted by the parameterization which describes the cm wavelength measurements. 2) At a time ˜3100 days after shock breakout, the decline rate of the radio emission steepens from (t+beta ) beta ˜ -0.7 to beta ˜ -2.7 without change in the spectral index (nu +alpha ; alpha ˜ -0.81). This decline is best described not as a power-law, but as an exponential decay with an e-folding time of ˜ 1100 days. 3) The best overall fit to all of the data is a model including both non-thermal synchrotron self-absorption (SSA) and a thermal free-free absorbing (FFA) components at early times, evolving to a constant spectral index, optically thin decline rate, until a break in that decline rate at day ˜3100, as mentioned above.

  20. Complex haemostatic abnormalities as a cause of bleeding after neurosurgery in a patient with Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Mitrovic, Mirjana; Elezovic, Ivo; Grujicic, Danica; Miljic, Predrag; Suvajdzic, Nada

    2015-01-01

    We report a treatment-naïve patient with Gaucher disease (GD) who experienced repeated bleeding after three neurosurgeries for a brain tumour, identified as an oligoastrocytoma. The patient had normal values on basic haemostatic tests: prothrombin time, 75-105%; activated partial thromboplastin time, 30.3-34 s; and mild thrombocytopaenia, 96-115 × 10(9 )cells/l. However, additional tests showed mild von Willebrand factor (vWF) deficiency (vWF antigen, 56%; vWF ristocetin cofactor, 49%; factor VIII [FVIII], 54%) and abnormal collagen-mediated platelet aggregation (0.45-0.55). Bleeding control was achieved after vWF/FVIII concentrate and platelet transfusions. This case raises questions about the safe platelet count and basic haemostatic tests for assessing bleeding risk in patients with GD prior to surgery. In patients with GD, a minimum haemostatic evaluation should include platelet count and basic haemostatic tests such as fibrinogen, prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time as well as platelet function tests and assessing vWF and FVIII levels. Specific coagulation factors or platelet function deficiencies should be corrected with factor concentrates or platelet transfusions.

  1. A comparison of rectal and intramuscular codeine phosphate in children following neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    McEwan, A; Sigston, P E; Andrews, K A; Hack, H A; Jenkins, A M; May, L; Llewelyn, N; MacKersie, A

    2000-01-01

    Codeine is frequently used for postoperative analgesia in children. Intramuscular injections are not ideal and the rectal route may be preferable. We compared rectal and intramuscular codeine administered following neurosurgery. 20 children (over 3 months) undergoing elective neurosurgical procedures, were randomized to receive either rectal or intramuscular codeine phospate (1 mg.kg-1) at the end of the procedure. Serum levels of codeine and morphine were assayed at intervals following administration (0, 30, 60, 120, 240 min). Fentanyl was the intraoperative analgesic and postoperative rescue analgesia was paracetamol, diclofenac and intramuscular codeine. The Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Pain Scale was used to assess analgesia. Peak codeine levels in both groups were observed at 30 min and morphine levels were consistently low. The plasma codeine levels were significantly greater at 30 and 60 min following intramuscular injection, and were associated with slightly better analgesia scores, but did not reach statistical significance. However, the peak plasma level occurred at similar times in both groups. Codeine is absorbed as rapidly via the rectal route compared with the intramuscular route but the peak levels are lower.

  2. A computational model for tracking subsurface tissue deformation during stereotactic neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, K D; Miga, M I; Kennedy, F E; Hoopes, P J; Hartov, A; Roberts, D W

    1999-02-01

    Recent advances in the field of stereotactic neurosurgery have made it possible to coregister preoperative computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) images with instrument locations in the operating field. However, accounting for intraoperative movement of brain tissue remains a challenging problem. While intraoperative CT and MR scanners record concurrent tissue motion, there is motivation to develop methodologies which would be significantly lower in cost and more widely available. The approach we present is a computational model of brain tissue deformation that could be used in conjunction with a limited amount of concurrently obtained operative data to estimate subsurface tissue motion. Specifically, we report on the initial development of a finite element model of brain tissue adapted from consolidation theory. Validations of the computational mathematics in two and three dimensions are shown with errors of 1%-2% for the discretizations used. Experience with the computational strategy for estimating surgically induced brain tissue motion in vivo is also presented. While the predicted tissue displacements differ from measured values by about 15%, they suggest that exploiting a physics-based computational framework for updating preoperative imaging databases during the course of surgery has considerable merit. However, additional model and computational developments are needed before this approach can become a clinical reality. PMID:9932343

  3. "Extremely minimally invasive": recent advances in nanotechnology research and future applications in neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Mattei, Tobias A; Rehman, Azeem A

    2015-01-01

    The term "nanotechnology" refers to the development of materials and devices that have been designed with specific properties at the nanometer scale (10(-9) m), usually being less than 100 nm in size. Recent advances in nanotechnology have promised to enable visualization and intervention at the subcellular level, and its incorporation to future medical therapeutics is expected to bring new avenues for molecular imaging, targeted drug delivery, and personalized interventions. Although the central nervous system presents unique challenges to the implementation of new therapeutic strategies involving nanotechnology (such as the heterogeneous molecular environment of different CNS regions, the existence of multiple processing centers with different cytoarchitecture, and the presence of the blood-brain barrier), numerous studies have demonstrated that the incorporation of nanotechnology resources into the armamentarium of neurosurgery may lead to breakthrough advances in the near future. In this article, the authors present a critical review on the current 'state-of-the-art' of basic research in nanotechnology with special attention to those issues which present the greatest potential to generate major therapeutic progresses in the neurosurgical field, including nanoelectromechanical systems, nano-scaffolds for neural regeneration, sutureless anastomosis, molecular imaging, targeted drug delivery, and theranostic strategies.

  4. Thermal Model to Investigate the Temperature in Bone Grinding for Skull Base Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lihui; Tai, Bruce L.; Wang, Guangjun; Zhang, Kuibang; Sullivan, Stephen; Shih, Albert J.

    2013-01-01

    This study develops a thermal model utilizing the inverse heat transfer method (IHTM) to investigate the bone grinding temperature created by a spherical diamond tool used for skull base neurosurgery. Bone grinding is a critical procedure in the expanded endonasal approach to remove the cranial bone and access to the skull base tumor via nasal corridor. The heat is generated during grinding and could damage the nerve or coagulate the blood in the carotid artery adjacent to the bone. The finite element analysis is adopted to investigate the grinding-induced bone temperature rise. The heat source distribution is defined by the thermal model, and the temperature distribution is solved using the IHTM with experimental inputs. Grinding experiments were conducted on a bovine cortical bone with embedded thermocouples. Results show significant temperature rise in bone grinding. Using 50°C as the threshold, the thermal injury can propagate about 3 mm in the traverse direction, and 3 mm below the ground surface under the dry grinding condition. The presented methodology demonstrated the capability of being a thermal analysis tool for bone grinding study. PMID:23683875

  5. Automatic identification of various nuclei in the basal ganglia for Parkinson's disease neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Pinzon-Morales, Ruben-Dario; Garces-Arboleda, Maribel; Orozco-Gutierrez, Alvaro-Angel

    2009-01-01

    Stereotactic neurosurgery for Parkinson's disease (PD) is one of the most used treatments for relief symptoms of this degenerative disorder. Current methods include ablation and deep brain stimulation (DBS) that can be applied to the various nuclei in the basal ganglia (BG), for instance to the Subthalamic nucleus (STN) or the Ventral medial nucleus (Vim). Identification of thus regions must be rigorous and within a minimum position error. Usually, skilled specialist identifies the brain area by comparing and listening to the rhythm created by the temporal and spatial aggregation of action potentials presented in microelectrode recordings (MER). We present a novel system for automatic identification of the various nuclei in the BG which addresses the limitations of the subjectivity and the non-stationary nature of MER signals. This system incorporates the time-frequency analysis using the Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT), which is a recent tool for processing nonlinear and non-stationary data, with a dynamic classifier based on Hidden Markov Models (HMM). Classification accuracy in two different databases is compared to validate the performance of the proposed method. Results show that system can recognize selected nuclei with a mean accuracy of 90%.

  6. Recording stereoscopic 3D neurosurgery with a head-mounted 3D camera system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Brian; Chen, Brian R; Chen, Beverly B; Lu, James Y; Giannotta, Steven L

    2015-06-01

    Stereoscopic three-dimensional (3D) imaging can present more information to the viewer and further enhance the learning experience over traditional two-dimensional (2D) video. Most 3D surgical videos are recorded from the operating microscope and only feature the crux, or the most important part of the surgery, leaving out other crucial parts of surgery including the opening, approach, and closing of the surgical site. In addition, many other surgeries including complex spine, trauma, and intensive care unit procedures are also rarely recorded. We describe and share our experience with a commercially available head-mounted stereoscopic 3D camera system to obtain stereoscopic 3D recordings of these seldom recorded aspects of neurosurgery. The strengths and limitations of using the GoPro(®) 3D system as a head-mounted stereoscopic 3D camera system in the operating room are reviewed in detail. Over the past several years, we have recorded in stereoscopic 3D over 50 cranial and spinal surgeries and created a library for education purposes. We have found the head-mounted stereoscopic 3D camera system to be a valuable asset to supplement 3D footage from a 3D microscope. We expect that these comprehensive 3D surgical videos will become an important facet of resident education and ultimately lead to improved patient care.

  7. A meningioma and its consequences for American history and the rise of neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Shaheryar F; Gianaris, Nicholas G; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2011-12-01

    The case of General Leonard Wood is notable both for its contribution to the field of neurosurgery and its historical significance. As one of Harvey Cushing's first successful brain tumor operations in 1910, Wood's surgery was part of the case series that culminated in Cushing's monograph Meningioma. This case was important to the rise of Cushing's career and his recognition as a member of the next generation of neurosurgeons who did not settle for mere bony decompression to taper intracranial tension but who dared to pursue intradural resections-operations that had been performed by surgeons for decades but were frowned upon because of the attendant risks. Cushing's operation to remove a recurrent brain tumor ended Wood's life in 1927. The authors discuss the effects the tumor may have had on Wood's life and career, explore an alternate explanation for the cause of Wood's death, and provide a brief account of the life of General Wood, highlighting events in his military and administrative career juxtaposed against the progression of his illness. Furthermore, the case history of the General is reviewed, using information drawn from the original patient notes and recently discovered images from the Cushing Brain Tumor Registry that elucidate more details about General Wood's story, from the injury that caused his first tumor to his final surgery, leading to his demise. PMID:21854120

  8. Rivaling paradigms in psychiatric neurosurgery: adjustability versus quick fix versus minimal-invasiveness

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Sabine; Riedmüller, Rita; van Oosterhout, Ansel

    2015-01-01

    In the wake of deep brain stimulation (DBS) development, ablative neurosurgical procedures are seeing a comeback, although they had been discredited and nearly completely abandoned in the 1970s because of their unethical practice. Modern stereotactic ablative procedures as thermal or radiofrequency ablation, and particularly radiosurgery (e.g., Gamma Knife) are much safer than the historical procedures, so that a re-evaluation of this technique is required. The different approaches of modern psychiatric neurosurgery refer to different paradigms: microsurgical ablative procedures is based on the paradigm ‘quick fix,’ radiosurgery on the paradigm ‘minimal-invasiveness,’ and DBS on the paradigm ‘adjustability.’ From a mere medical perspective, none of the procedures is absolutely superior; rather, they have different profiles of advantages and disadvantages. Therefore, individual factors are crucial in decision-making, particularly the patients’ social situation, individual preferences, and individual attitudes. The different approaches are not only rivals, but also enriching mutually. DBS is preferable for exploring new targets, which may become candidates for ablative microsurgery or radiosurgery. PMID:25883557

  9. Cost analysis of a project to digitize classic articles in neurosurgery*

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Kathleen

    2002-01-01

    In summer 2000, the Cushing/Whitney Medical Library at Yale University began a demonstration project to digitize classic articles in neurosurgery from the late 1800s and early 1900s. The objective of the first phase of the project was to measure the time and costs involved in digitization, and those results are reported here. In the second phase, metadata will be added to the digitized articles, and the project will be publicized. Thirteen articles were scanned using optical character recognition (OCR) software, and the resulting text files were carefully proofread. Time for photocopying, scanning, and proofreading were recorded. This project achieved an average cost per item (total pages plus images) of $4.12, a figure at the high end of average costs found in other studies. This project experienced high costs for two reasons. First, the articles contained many images, which required extra processing. Second, the older fonts and the poor condition of many of these articles complicated the OCR process. The average article cost $84.46 to digitize. Although costs were high, the selection of historically important articles maximized the benefit gained from the investment in digitization. PMID:11999182

  10. Fiber-based tissue identification for electrode placement in deep brain stimulation neurosurgery (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DePaoli, Damon T.; Lapointe, Nicolas; Goetz, Laurent; Parent, Martin; Prudhomme, Michel; Cantin, Léo.; Galstian, Tigran; Messaddeq, Younès.; Côté, Daniel C.

    2016-03-01

    Deep brain stimulation's effectiveness relies on the ability of the stimulating electrode to be properly placed within a specific target area of the brain. Optical guidance techniques that can increase the accuracy of the procedure, without causing any additional harm, are therefore of great interest. We have designed a cheap optical fiber-based device that is small enough to be placed within commercially available DBS stimulating electrodes' hollow cores and that is capable of sensing biological information from the surrounding tissue, using low power white light. With this probe we have shown the ability to distinguish white and grey matter as well as blood vessels, in vitro, in human brain samples and in vivo, in rats. We have also repeated the in vitro procedure with the probe inserted in a DBS stimulating electrode and found the results were in good agreement. We are currently validating a second fiber optic device, with micro-optical components, that will result in label free, molecular level sensing capabilities, using CARS spectroscopy. The final objective will be to use this data in real time, during deep brain stimulation neurosurgery, to increase the safety and accuracy of the procedure.

  11. Neurosurgery Simulation Using Non-linear Finite Element Modeling and Haptic Interaction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Huai-Ping; Audette, Michel; Joldes, Grand Roman; Enquobahrie, Andinet

    2012-02-23

    Real-time surgical simulation is becoming an important component of surgical training. To meet the real-time requirement, however, the accuracy of the biomechancial modeling of soft tissue is often compromised due to computing resource constraints. Furthermore, haptic integration presents an additional challenge with its requirement for a high update rate. As a result, most real-time surgical simulation systems employ a linear elasticity model, simplified numerical methods such as the boundary element method or spring-particle systems, and coarse volumetric meshes. However, these systems are not clinically realistic. We present here an ongoing work aimed at developing an efficient and physically realistic neurosurgery simulator using a non-linear finite element method (FEM) with haptic interaction. Real-time finite element analysis is achieved by utilizing the total Lagrangian explicit dynamic (TLED) formulation and GPU acceleration of per-node and per-element operations. We employ a virtual coupling method for separating deformable body simulation and collision detection from haptic rendering, which needs to be updated at a much higher rate than the visual simulation. The system provides accurate biomechancial modeling of soft tissue while retaining a real-time performance with haptic interaction. However, our experiments showed that the stability of the simulator depends heavily on the material property of the tissue and the speed of colliding objects. Hence, additional efforts including dynamic relaxation are required to improve the stability of the system.

  12. Long-Term Results of Targeted Intraoperative Radiotherapy (Targit) Boost During Breast-Conserving Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Vaidya, Jayant S.; Baum, Michael; Tobias, Jeffrey S.; Wenz, Frederik; Massarut, Samuele; Keshtgar, Mohammed; Hilaris, Basil; Saunders, Christobel; Williams, Norman R.; Brew-Graves, Chris; Corica, Tammy; Roncadin, Mario; Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta; Suetterlin, Marc; Bulsara, Max; Joseph, David

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: We have previously shown that delivering targeted radiotherapy to the tumour bed intraoperatively is feasible and desirable. In this study, we report on the feasibility, safety, and long-term efficacy of TARGeted Intraoperative radioTherapy (Targit), using the Intrabeam system. Methods and Materials: A total of 300 cancers in 299 unselected patients underwent breast-conserving surgery and Targit as a boost to the tumor bed. After lumpectomy, a single dose of 20 Gy was delivered intraoperatively. Postoperative external beam whole-breast radiotherapy excluded the usual boost. We also performed a novel individualized case control (ICC) analysis that computed the expected recurrences for the cohort by estimating the risk of recurrence for each patient using their characteristics and follow-up period. Results: The treatment was well tolerated. The median follow up was 60.5 months (range, 10-122 months). Eight patients have had ipsilateral recurrence: 5-year Kaplan Meier estimate for ipsilateral recurrence is 1.73% (SE 0.77), which compares well with that seen in the boosted patients in the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer study (4.3%) and the UK STAndardisation of breast RadioTherapy study (2.8%). In a novel ICC analysis of 242 of the patients, we estimated that there should be 11.4 recurrences; in this group, only 6 recurrences were observed. Conclusions: Lumpectomy and Targit boost combined with external beam radiotherapy results in a low local recurrence rate in a standard risk patient population. Accurate localization and the immediacy of the treatment that has a favorable effect on tumour microenvironment may contribute to this effect. These long-term data establish the long-term safety and efficacy of the Targit technique and generate the hypothesis that Targit boost might be superior to an external beam boost in its efficacy and justifies a randomized trial.

  13. An Introduction to Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Bernard F.; Graham-Smith, Francis

    2009-09-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. The nature of the radio signal; 3. Signals, noise, radiometers and spectrometers; 4. Single-aperture radio telescopes; 5. The two-element interferometer; 6. Aperture synthesis; 7. Radiation, propagation and absorption of radio waves; 8. The local universe; 9. The interstellar medium; 10. Galactic dynamics; 11. Stars; 12. Pulsars; 13. Radio galaxies and quasars; 14. Cosmology fundamentals; 15. The angular structure of the CMB; 16. Cosmology: discrete radio sources and gravitational lensing; 17. The future of radio astronomy; Appendixes; References; Index.

  14. An Introduction to Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Bernard F.; Graham-Smith, Francis

    2014-02-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. The nature of the radio signal; 3. Signals, noise, radiometers and spectrometers; 4. Single-aperture radio telescopes; 5. The two-element interferometer; 6. Aperture synthesis; 7. Radiation, propagation and absorption of radio waves; 8. The local universe; 9. The interstellar medium; 10. Galactic dynamics; 11. Stars; 12. Pulsars; 13. Radio galaxies and quasars; 14. Cosmology fundamentals; 15. The angular structure of the CMB; 16. Cosmology: discrete radio sources and gravitational lensing; 17. The future of radio astronomy; Appendixes; References; Index.

  15. Saturn's variable radio period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurth, W. S.; Lecacheux, A.; Zarka, P.; Gurnett, D. A.; Cecconi, B.

    Temporal modulations in radio emissions are often used to determine the rotation rate of the emitting body. The rotation period (presumably) of Jupiter's interior was established in this way [Burke et al., 1962] and has recently been refined by Higgins et al. [1997]. Rotation periods for the remainder of the outer planet gas giants were determined from Voyager planetary radio astronomy observations. Similar techniques have been applied to astrophysical objects, including pulsars, for which the radio period is assumed to be the rotation period of the neutron star. In 2001, however, this simple relation between the radio period and rotation period became suspect, at least for the case of Saturn. Galopeau and Lecacheux [2001] reported that the radio period of Saturn had changed by as much as 1% from that determined by Voyager and, further, exhibited variations on time scales of years. More recently, Cassini observations indicate that the Saturn kilometric radiation is modulated with a period longer than that observed by Voyager and that this period is variable on a time scale of a year or less. The recent Higgins et al. result suggests that Jupiter's period is steady, within measurement accuracy. There are no additional measurements from Uranus or Neptune with which to look for time variations in their radio periods. For conservation of energy and angular momentum reasons, true variations of the rotation period of Saturn's deep interior are not believed to be a viable explanation for the variation in radio period, hence, it would appear that there is some disconnection of the radio period from the rotation period in the case of Saturn. One possible contributing factor may be that since Saturn's magnetic field is very accurately aligned with its rotational axis, there is no first-order beaming effect caused by the wobbling of the magnetic field, contrary to the situation at the other magnetized planets. Another explanation suggested by Galopeau and Lecacheux [2001] and

  16. Planetary radio waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goertz, C. K.

    1986-01-01

    Three planets, the earth, Jupiter and Saturn are known to emit nonthermal radio waves which require coherent radiation processes. The characteristic features (frequency spectrum, polarization, occurrence probability, radiation pattern) are discussed. Radiation which is externally controlled by the solar wind is distinguished from internally controlled radiation which only originates from Jupiter. The efficiency of the externally controlled radiation is roughly the same at all three planets (5 x 10 to the -6th) suggesting that similar processes are active there. The maser radiation mechanism for the generation of the radio waves and general requirements for the mechanism which couples the power generator to the region where the radio waves are generated are briefly discussed.

  17. Comets at radio wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crovisier, Jacques; Bockelée-Morvan, Dominique; Colom, Pierre; Biver, Nicolas

    2016-11-01

    Comets are considered as the most primitive objects in the Solar System. Their composition provides information on the composition of the primitive solar nebula, 4.6 Gyr ago. The radio domain is a privileged tool to study the composition of cometary ices. Observations of the OH radical at 18 cm wavelength allow us to measure the water production rate. A wealth of molecules (and some of their isotopologues) coming from the sublimation of ices in the nucleus have been identified by observations in the millimetre and submillimetre domains. We present an historical review on radio observations of comets, focusing on the results from our group, and including recent observations with the Nançay radio telescope, the IRAM antennas, the Odin satellite, the Herschel space observatory, ALMA, and the MIRO instrument aboard the Rosetta space probe. xml:lang="fr"

  18. Radio coverage statistics.

    PubMed

    Lynn, W

    1984-01-01

    The Clearinghouse on Development Communication surveyed 135 countries in Asia, Africa, Europe, North and South America, for U.S.A.I.D., to determine the number of radio and television broadcast stations and receivers. Some of the data were obtained from the World Factbook, the World Radio and TV Handbook, and the World Radio and T.V. Facts and Figures, from 1979 to 1981. In those countries where stations are privately owned, audience surveys are often available. In 2 out of 3 developing countries, however, stations are government owned, and no such information is available. Numbers of receivers can sometimes be ascertained from receiver license applications. There is a need for more complete information on broadcast demographics, listening and viewing patterns by the community of world development program personnel.

  19. High redshift radio galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarthy, Patrick J.

    1993-01-01

    High redshift galaxies that host powerful radio sources are examined. An overview is presented of the content of radio surveys: 3CR and 3CRR, 4C and 4C/USS, B2/1 Jy, MG, MRC/1Jy, Parkes/PSR, B3, and ESO Key-Project. Narrow-line radio galaxies in the visible and UV, the source of ionization and excitation of the emission lines, emission-line luminosities, morphology of the line-emitting gas, physical properties and energetics, kinematics of the line-emitting gas, and implications from the emission lines are discussed. The morphologies and environments of the host galaxies, the alignment effect, and spectral energy distributions and ages are also examined.

  20. Radiotherapy systems using proton and carbon beams.

    PubMed

    Jongen, Y

    2008-01-01

    Radiotherapy using proton beams (proton therapy) is rapidly taking an important role among the techniques used in cancer therapy. At the end of 2007, 65.000 patients had been treated for cancer by proton beams in one of the 34 proton therapy facilities operating in the world. When compared to the now classical IMRT, and for a similar dose to the tumor, proton therapy provides a lower integral dose to the healthy organs surrounding the tumor. It is generally accepted that any reduction of the dose to healthy organs reduces the probability of radiation induced complications and of secondary malignancies. Proton therapy equipment can be obtained today from well established medical equipment companies such as Varian, Hitachi or Mitsubishi. But it is a Belgian company, Ion Beam Applications of Louvain-la-Neuve that is the undisputed leader in this market, with more than 55% of the world installed base. In addition to the now classical proton therapy equipments, using synchrotrons or cyclotrons as accelerators, new solutions have been proposed, claiming to be more compact and less expensive. A small startup company from Boston (Still Rivers) is proposing a very high magnetic field, gantry mounted superconducting synchrocyclotron. The us Company Tomotherapy is working to develop a new accelerator concept invented at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: the Dielectric Wall Accelerator. Besides proton beam therapy, which is progressively becoming an accepted part of radiation therapy, interest is growing for another form of radiotherapy using ions heavier than protons. Carbon ions have, even to a higher degree, the ballistic selectivity of protons. In addition, carbon ions stopping in the body exhibit a very high Linear Energy Transfer (LET). From this high LET results a very high Relative Biological Efficiency (RBE). This high RBE allows carbon ions to treat efficiently tumors who are radio-resistant and which are difficult to treat with photons or protons. The largest

  1. Sensors Locate Radio Interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    After receiving a NASA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract from Kennedy Space Center, Soneticom Inc., based in West Melbourne, Florida, created algorithms for time difference of arrival and radio interferometry, which it used in its Lynx Location System (LLS) to locate electromagnetic interference that can disrupt radio communications. Soneticom is collaborating with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to install and test the LLS at its field test center in New Jersey in preparation for deploying the LLS at commercial airports. The software collects data from each sensor in order to compute the location of the interfering emitter.

  2. Radio astronomy with microspacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, D.

    2001-01-01

    A dynamic constellation of microspacecraft in lunar orbit can carry out valuable radio astronomy investigations in the frequency range of 30kHz--30MHz, a range that is difficult to explore from Earth. In contrast to the radio astronomy ivestigations that have flown on individual spacecraft, the four microspacecraft together with a carrier spacecraft, which transported them to lunar orbit, form an interferometer with far superior angular resolution. Use of microspacecraft allows the entire constellation to be launched with a Taurus-class vehicle. Also distinguishing this approach is that the Moon is used as needed to shield the constellation from RF interference from the Earth and Sun.

  3. Radio Emission from Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiler, Kurt W.; Panagia, Nino; Sramek, Richard A.; van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Williams, Christopher L.; Stockdale, Christopher J.; Kelley, Matthew T.

    2007-10-01

    Study of radio supernovae over the past 27 years includes more than three dozen detected objects and more than 150 upper limits. From this work it is possible to identify classes of radio properties, demonstrate conformance to and deviations from existing models, estimate the density and structure of the circumstellar material and, by inference, the evolution of the presupernova stellar wind, and reveal the last stages of stellar evolution before explosion. It is also possible to detect ionized hydrogen along the line of sight, to demonstrate binary properties of the presupernova stellar system, and to detect clumpiness of the circumstellar material. Along with reviewing these general properties of the radio emission from supernovae, we present our extensive observations of the radio emission from supernova (SN) 1993J in M 81 (NGC 3031) made with the Very Large Array and other radio telescopes. The SN 1993J radio emission evolves regularly in both time and frequency, and the usual interpretation in terms of shock interaction with a circumstellar medium (CSM) formed by a pre-supernova stellar wind describes the observations rather well considering the complexity of the phenomenon. However: 1) The highest frequency measurements at 85-110 GHz at early times (<40 days) are not well fitted by the parameterization which describes the cm wavelength measurements rather well. 2) At mid-cm wavelengths there is often deviation from the fitted radio light curves, particularly near the peak flux density, and considerable shorter term deviations in the declining portion when the emission has become optically thin. 3) At a time ~3100 days after shock breakout, the decline rate of the radio emission steepens from (t+β)β~-0.7 to β~-2.7 without change in the spectral index (ν+αα~-0.81). However, this decline is best described not as a power-law, but as an exponential decay starting at day ~3100 with an e-folding time of ~1100 days. 4) The best overall fit to all of the data is

  4. Radio Emission from Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Weiler, Kurt W.; Panagia, Nino; Sramek, Richard A.; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Stockdale, Christopher J.; Kelley, Matthew T.

    2009-05-03

    Study of radio supernovae over the past 27 years includes more than three dozen detected objects and more than 150 upper limits. From this work it is possible to identify classes of radio properties, demonstrate conformance to and deviations from existing models, estimate the density and structure of the circumstellar material and, by inference, the evolution of the presupernova stellar wind, and reveal the last stages of stellar evolution before explosion. It is also possible to detect ionized hydrogen along the line of sight, to demonstrate binary properties of the presupernova stellar system, and to detect dumpiness of the circumstellar material.

  5. 75 FR 10439 - Cognitive Radio Technologies and Software Defined Radios

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-08

    ... Order 1. On March 17, 2005, the Commission adopted the Cognitive Radio Report and Order, 70 FR 23032... Memorandum Opinion and Order (MO&O), 72 FR 31190, June 6, 2007, which responded to two petitions filed in... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 2 Cognitive Radio Technologies and Software Defined Radios AGENCY:...

  6. e-POP Radio Science Using Amateur Radio Transmissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frissell, N. A.; Perry, G. W.; Miller, E. S.; Shovkoplyas, A.; Moses, M. L.; James, H. G.; Yau, A. W.

    2015-12-01

    A major component of the enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (e-POP) Radio Receiver Instrument (RRI) mission is to utilize artificially generated radio emissions to study High Frequency (HF) radio wave propagation in the ionosphere. In the North American and European sectors, communications between amateur radio operators are a persistent and abundant source source of HF transmissions. We present the results of HF radio wave propagation experiments using amateur radio transmissions as an HF source for e-POP RRI. We detail how a distributed and autonomously operated amateur radio network can be leveraged to study HF radio wave propagation as well as the structuring and dynamics of the ionosphere over a large geographic region. In one case, the sudden disappearance of nearly two-dozen amateur radio HF sources located in the midwestern United States was used to detect a enhancement in foF2 in that same region. We compare our results to those from other more conventional radio instruments and models of the ionosphere to demonstrate the scientific merit of incorporating amateur radio networks for radio science at HF.

  7. Prism beamswitch for radio telescopes.

    PubMed

    Payne, J M; Ulich, B L

    1978-12-01

    A dielectric prism and switching mechanism have been constructed for beamswitching a Cassegrain radio telescope. Spatially extended radio sources may be mapped without significant confusion utilizing the sensitivity and stability inherent in the conventional Dicke radiometer.

  8. A comparative cost analysis of polytrauma and neurosurgery Intensive Care Units at an apex trauma care facility in India

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Parmeshwar; Jithesh, V.; Gupta, Shakti Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Context: Although Intensive Care Units (ICUs) only account for 10% of the hospital beds, they consume nearly 22% of the hospital resources. Few definitive costing studies have been conducted in Indian settings that would help determine appropriate resource allocation. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the cost of intensive care delivery between multispecialty and neurosurgery ICUs at an apex trauma care facility in India. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in a polytrauma and neurosurgery ICU at a 203-bedded Level IV trauma care facility in New Delhi, India, from May 1, 2012 to June 30, 2012. The study was cross-sectional, retrospective, and record-based. Traditional costing was used to arrive at the cost for both direct and indirect cost estimates. The cost centers included in the study were building cost, equipment cost, human resources, materials and supplies, clinical and nonclinical support services, engineering maintenance cost, and biomedical waste management. Statistical Analysis: Statistical analysis was performed by Fisher's two tailed t-test. Results: Total cost/bed/day for the multispecialty ICU was Rs. 14,976.9/- and for the neurosurgery ICU, it was Rs. 14,306.7/-, workforce constituting nearly half of the expenditure in both ICUs. The cost center wise and overall difference in the cost among the ICUs were statistically significant. Conclusions: Quantification of expenditure in running an ICU in a trauma center would assist health-care decision makers in better allocation of resources. Although multispecialty ICUs are more cost-effective, other factors will also play a role in defining the kind of ICU that needs to be designed. PMID:27555693

  9. Intraoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Norman R.; Pigott, Katharine H.; Brew-Graves, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Intra-operative radiotherapy (IORT) as a treatment for breast cancer is a relatively new technique that is designed to be a replacement for whole breast external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in selected women suitable for breast-conserving therapy. This article reviews twelve reasons for the use of the technique, with a particular emphasis on targeted intra-operative radiotherapy (TARGIT) which uses X-rays generated from a portable device within the operating theatre immediately after the breast tumour (and surrounding margin of healthy tissue) has been removed. The delivery of a single fraction of radiotherapy directly to the tumour bed at the time of surgery, with the capability of adding EBRT at a later date if required (risk-adaptive technique) is discussed in light of recent results from a large multinational randomised controlled trial comparing TARGIT with EBRT. The technique avoids irradiation of normal tissues such as skin, heart, lungs, ribs and spine, and has been shown to improve cosmetic outcome when compared with EBRT. Beneficial aspects to both institutional and societal economics are discussed, together with evidence demonstrating excellent patient satisfaction and quality of life. There is a discussion of the published evidence regarding the use of IORT twice in the same breast (for new primary cancers) and in patients who would never be considered for EBRT because of their special circumstances (such as the frail, the elderly, or those with collagen vascular disease). Finally, there is a discussion of the role of the TARGIT Academy in developing and sustaining high standards in the use of the technique. PMID:25083504

  10. Community Radio in Canada.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canadian Broadcasting Corp., Ottawa (Ontario).

    Results are presented of a survey of 20 community radio organizations operating in Canada. For each of the 20 agencies, information is provided relating to: (1) the name and address of the organization; (2) the name and population of the community served; (3) the station's call letters, frequency, and power; (4) the date of the station's license;…

  11. RADIO RANGING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Nieset, R.T.

    1961-05-16

    A radio ranging device is described. It utilizes a super regenerative detector-oscillator in which echoes of transmitted pulses are received in proper phase to reduce noise energy at a selected range and also at multiples of the selected range.

  12. Educational Broadcasting--Radio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahamed, Uvais; Grimmett, George

    This manual is intended for those who must conduct educational radio broadcasting training courses in Asia-Pacific countries without the resources of experienced personnel, as well as for individuals to use in self-learning situations. The selection of material has been influenced by the need to use broadcasting resources effectively in programs…

  13. Radio Channel Simulator (RCSM)

    2007-01-31

    This is a simulation package for making site specific predictions of radio signal strength. The software computes received power at discrete grid points as a function of the transmitter location and propagation environment. It is intended for use with wireless network simulation packages and to support wireless network deployments.

  14. Zelenchukskaya Radio Astronomical Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smolentsev, Sergey; Dyakov, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes information about Zelenchukskaya Radio Astronomical Observatory activities in 2012. Last year a number of changes took place in the observatory to improve some technical characteristics and to upgrade some units to the required status. The report provides an overview of current geodetic VLBI activities and gives an outlook for the future.

  15. Svetloe Radio Astronomical Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smolentsev, Sergey; Rahimov, Ismail

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes information about the Svetloe Radio Astronomical Observatory activities in 2012. Last year, a number of changes took place in the observatory to improve some technical characteristics and to upgrade some units to their required status. The report provides an overview of current geodetic VLBI activities and gives an outlook for the future.

  16. Telling It by Radio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milander, Henry M.

    1975-01-01

    Olympic College purchased eight one-minute advertising spots per day for use seven days a week at a local independent radio station. Ten sample spots are presented. This economical approach was successful in increasing over-all enrollment and the number of FTE students; it also attracted many adults to the college. (DC)

  17. A Radio Station Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geva, Edna

    2002-01-01

    Describes a radio program in an English-as-a-Foreign-Language classroom in Israel. Classrooms of English students listen carefully to daily broadcasts, waiting to solve the brain teaser. Personal messages and catchy music follow the program. The project has encouraged students to use English actively and purposefully. Evaluation of the broadcasts…

  18. Japanese Radio Exercises. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jocelyn

    This unit focuses on Japanese radio exercises which became popular in Japan just after World War II and are still used among students and workers in companies to help raise morale and form group unity. The exercises reflect the general role of exercise in Japanese culture--to serve as a symbol of unity and cooperation among the Japanese, as well…

  19. Torun Radio Astronomy Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Torun Center for Astronomy is located at Piwnice, 15 km north of Torun, Poland. A part of the Faculty of Physics and Astronomy of the Nicolaus Copernicus University, it was created by the union of Torun Radio Astronomy Observatory (TRAO) and the Institute of Astronomy on 1 January 1997....

  20. Impressions of neurology and neurosurgery in the People's Republic of China.

    PubMed

    Tower, D B; Feindel, W

    1980-05-01

    During July, 1979, the authors visited the neurological and neurosurgical services of eight major hospitals and associated medical schools in Peking, Tientsin, and Shanghai, and viewed many of their teaching and research facilities. From these visits and our discussions with the staffs of these units, we came away with the impressions reported here. In the People's Republic of China today there are more than 2,000 neurologists and 1,300 neurosurgeons. At present there are two major clinical centers: the Peking Institute of Neurosurgery, directed by Prof Wang Chung-Cheng and located in the Xuan Wu Hospital affiliated with the Peking First Medical College; and the Shanghai Institute of Neurology, directed by Prof Chang Yuan-Cheng and located in the Hua San Hospital affiliated with the Shanghai First Medical College. In every hospital, patient loads are formidable (e.g., several thousand outpatients weekly), but the variety of clinical problems does not differ from those seen elsewhere in the world. The most common problems are head injuries, brain tumors, cerebrovascular disorders, infections, and epilepsy. Each of the centers is heavily engaged in undergraduate and postgraduate training, and research has been resumed after the major disruptions of the 1966-76 "Cultural Revolution." Research continues on acupuncture, but present emphasis is directed toward pain mechanisms, notably at the Shanghai Institute of Physiology, directed by Prof Feng De-Pei. We were most impressed by this, the principal neurophysiology and neuroscience research center in the country. Clearly, the People's Republic of China has a wealth of clinical material and many competent neurologists and neurosurgeons with stimulating research ideas-characteristics which offer real potentials for collaborative research.

  1. Towards the development of a spring-based continuum robot for neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeongjin; Cheng, Shing Shin; Desai, Jaydev P.

    2015-03-01

    Brain tumor is usually life threatening due to the uncontrolled growth of abnormal cells native to the brain or the spread of tumor cells from outside the central nervous system to the brain. The risks involved in carrying out surgery within such a complex organ can cause severe anxiety in cancer patients. However, neurosurgery, which remains one of the more effective ways of treating brain tumors focused in a confined volume, can have a tremendously increased success rate if the appropriate imaging modality is used for complete tumor removal. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides excellent soft-tissue contrast and is the imaging modality of choice for brain tumor imaging. MRI combined with continuum soft robotics has immense potential to be the revolutionary treatment technique in the field of brain cancer. It eliminates the concern of hand tremor and guarantees a more precise procedure. One of the prototypes of Minimally Invasive Neurosurgical Intracranial Robot (MINIR-II), which can be classified as a continuum soft robot, consists of a snake-like body made of three segments of rapid prototyped plastic springs. It provides improved dexterity with higher degrees of freedom and independent joint control. It is MRI-compatible, allowing surgeons to track and determine the real-time location of the robot relative to the brain tumor target. The robot was manufactured in a single piece using rapid prototyping technology at a low cost, allowing it to disposable after each use. MINIR-II has two DOFs at each segment with both joints controlled by two pairs of MRI-compatible SMA spring actuators. Preliminary motion tests have been carried out using vision-tracking method and the robot was able to move to different positions based on user commands.

  2. Laser range scanning for image-guided neurosurgery: investigation of image-to-physical space registrations.

    PubMed

    Cao, Aize; Thompson, R C; Dumpuri, P; Dawant, B M; Galloway, R L; Ding, S; Miga, M I

    2008-04-01

    In this article a comprehensive set of registration methods is utilized to provide image-to-physical space registration for image-guided neurosurgery in a clinical study. Central to all methods is the use of textured point clouds as provided by laser range scanning technology. The objective is to perform a systematic comparison of registration methods that include both extracranial (skin marker point-based registration (PBR), and face-based surface registration) and intracranial methods (feature PBR, cortical vessel-contour registration, a combined geometry/intensity surface registration method, and a constrained form of that method to improve robustness). The platform facilitates the selection of discrete soft-tissue landmarks that appear on the patient's intraoperative cortical surface and the preoperative gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) image volume, i.e., true corresponding novel targets. In an 11 patient study, data were taken to allow statistical comparison among registration methods within the context of registration error. The results indicate that intraoperative face-based surface registration is statistically equivalent to traditional skin marker registration. The four intracranial registration methods were investigated and the results demonstrated a target registration error of 1.6 +/- 0.5 mm, 1.7 +/- 0.5 mm, 3.9 +/- 3.4 mm, and 2.0 +/- 0.9 mm, for feature PBR, cortical vessel-contour registration, unconstrained geometric/intensity registration, and constrained geometric/intensity registration, respectively. When analyzing the results on a per case basis, the constrained geometric/intensity registration performed best, followed by feature PBR, and finally cortical vessel-contour registration. Interestingly, the best target registration errors are similar to targeting errors reported using bone-implanted markers within the context of rigid targets. The experience in this study as with others is that brain shift can compromise extracranial

  3. The DTI Challenge: Towards Standardized Evaluation of Diffusion Tensor Imaging Tractography for Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Pujol, Sonia; Wells, William; Pierpaoli, Carlo; Brun, Caroline; Gee, James; Cheng, Guang; Vemuri, Baba; Commowick, Olivier; Prima, Sylvain; Stamm, Aymeric; Goubran, Maged; Khan, Ali; Peters, Terry; Neher, Peter; Maier-Hein, Klaus H.; Shi, Yundi; Tristan-Vega, Antonio; Veni, Gopalkrishna; Whitaker, Ross; Styner, Martin; Westin, Carl-Fredrik; Gouttard, Sylvain; Norton, Isaiah; Chauvin, Laurent; Mamata, Hatsuho; Gerig, Guido; Nabavi, Arya; Golby, Alexandra; Kikinis, Ron

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Diffusion tensor imaging tractography reconstruction of white matter pathways can help guide brain tumor resection. However, DTI tracts are complex mathematical objects and the validity of tractography-derived information in clinical settings has yet to be fully established. To address this issue, we initiated the DTI Challenge, an international working group of clinicians and scientists whose goal was to provide standardized evaluation of tractography methods for neurosurgery. The purpose of this empirical study was to evaluate different tractography techniques in the first DTI Challenge workshop. Methods Eight international teams from leading institutions reconstructed the pyramidal tract in four neurosurgical cases presenting with a glioma near the motor cortex. Tractography methods included deterministic, probabilistic, filtered, and global approaches. Standardized evaluation of the tracts consisted in the qualitative review of the pyramidal pathways by a panel of neurosurgeons and DTI experts and the quantitative evaluation of the degree of agreement among methods. Results The evaluation of tractography reconstructions showed a great inter-algorithm variability. Although most methods found projections of the pyramidal tract from the medial portion of the motor strip, only a few algorithms could trace the lateral projections from the hand, face, and tongue area. In addition, the structure of disagreement among methods was similar across hemispheres despite the anatomical distortions caused by pathological tissues. Conclusions The DTI Challenge provides a benchmark for the standardized evaluation of tractography methods on neurosurgical data. This study suggests that there are still limitations to the clinical use of tractography for neurosurgical decision-making. PMID:26259925

  4. The impact of a patient education bundle on neurosurgery patient satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Kliot, Tamara; Zygourakis, Corinna C.; Imershein, Sarah; Lau, Catherine; Kliot, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Background: As reimbursements and hospital/physician performance become ever more reliant on Hospital Consumer Assessment of Health Care Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) and other quality metrics, physicians are increasingly incentivized to improve patient satisfaction. Methods: A faculty and resident team at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Department of Neurological Surgery developed and implemented a Patient Education Bundle. This consisted of two parts: The first was preoperative expectation letters (designed to inform patients of what to expect before, during, and after their hospitalization for a neurosurgical procedure); the second was a trifold brochure with names, photographs, and specialty/training information about the attending surgeons, resident physicians, and nurse practitioners on the neurosurgical service. We assessed patient satisfaction, as measured by HCAHPS scores and a brief survey tailored to our specific intervention, both before and after our Patient Education Bundle intervention. Results: Prior to our intervention, 74.6% of patients responded that the MD always explained information in a way that was easy to understand. After our intervention, 78.7% of patients responded that the MD always explained information in a way that was easy to understand. “Neurosurgery Patient Satisfaction survey” results showed that 83% remembered receiving the preoperative letter; of those received the letter, 93% found the letter helpful; and 100% thought that the letter should be continued. Conclusion: Although effects were modest, we believe that patient education strategies, as modeled in our bundle, can improve patients’ hospital experiences and have a positive impact on physician performance scores and hospital ratings. PMID:26664909

  5. Patient dose estimation from CT scans at the Mexican National Neurology and Neurosurgery Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alva-Sánchez, Héctor; Reynoso-Mejía, Alberto; Casares-Cruz, Katiuzka; Taboada-Barajas, Jesús

    2014-11-01

    In the radiology department of the Mexican National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery, a dedicated institute in Mexico City, on average 19.3 computed tomography (CT) examinations are performed daily on hospitalized patients for neurological disease diagnosis, control scans and follow-up imaging. The purpose of this work was to estimate the effective dose received by hospitalized patients who underwent a diagnostic CT scan using typical effective dose values for all CT types and to obtain the estimated effective dose distributions received by surgical and non-surgical patients. Effective patient doses were estimated from values per study type reported in the applications guide provided by the scanner manufacturer. This retrospective study included all hospitalized patients who underwent a diagnostic CT scan between 1 January 2011 and 31 December 2012. A total of 8777 CT scans were performed in this two-year period. Simple brain scan was the CT type performed the most (74.3%) followed by contrasted brain scan (6.1%) and head angiotomography (5.7%). The average number of CT scans per patient was 2.83; the average effective dose per patient was 7.9 mSv; the mean estimated radiation dose was significantly higher for surgical (9.1 mSv) than non-surgical patients (6.0 mSv). Three percent of the patients had 10 or more brain CT scans and exceeded the organ radiation dose threshold set by the International Commission on Radiological Protection for deterministic effects of the eye-lens. Although radiation patient doses from CT scans were in general relatively low, 187 patients received a high effective dose (>20 mSv) and 3% might develop cataract from cumulative doses to the eye lens.

  6. Patient dose estimation from CT scans at the Mexican National Neurology and Neurosurgery Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Alva-Sánchez, Héctor

    2014-11-07

    In the radiology department of the Mexican National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery, a dedicated institute in Mexico City, on average 19.3 computed tomography (CT) examinations are performed daily on hospitalized patients for neurological disease diagnosis, control scans and follow-up imaging. The purpose of this work was to estimate the effective dose received by hospitalized patients who underwent a diagnostic CT scan using typical effective dose values for all CT types and to obtain the estimated effective dose distributions received by surgical and non-surgical patients. Effective patient doses were estimated from values per study type reported in the applications guide provided by the scanner manufacturer. This retrospective study included all hospitalized patients who underwent a diagnostic CT scan between 1 January 2011 and 31 December 2012. A total of 8777 CT scans were performed in this two-year period. Simple brain scan was the CT type performed the most (74.3%) followed by contrasted brain scan (6.1%) and head angiotomography (5.7%). The average number of CT scans per patient was 2.83; the average effective dose per patient was 7.9 mSv; the mean estimated radiation dose was significantly higher for surgical (9.1 mSv) than non-surgical patients (6.0 mSv). Three percent of the patients had 10 or more brain CT scans and exceeded the organ radiation dose threshold set by the International Commission on Radiological Protection for deterministic effects of the eye-lens. Although radiation patient doses from CT scans were in general relatively low, 187 patients received a high effective dose (>20 mSv) and 3% might develop cataract from cumulative doses to the eye lens.

  7. New technologies in neurosurgery: Effects on the conventional techniques and anaesthesiological considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasano, V. A.; Lombard, G. F.; Urciuoli, R.; Benech, F.; Ponzio, R. M.

    1985-09-01

    New technologies have been recently introduced into neurosurgery: laser sources, ultrasonic aspiration, intraoperative echotomography and intraoperative Doppler flowmeter. The aim of this work, showing the use of these instruments in different neurosurgical operations, is to discuss the effective improvements of the surgical techniques when comparing new and traditional technologies. The laser is able to concentrate high energies in restricted areas allowing a maximum selectivity. Having a superficial destructive effect with associated hemostasis, CO 2 and argon are suitable in dissection maneuvers. Nd:YAG produces a high thermal diffusion, consenting a deeper and extended tissue removal and a considerable reduction of intraoperative blood loss also in vascularized tumors. A promising field of application of the laser is the treatment of cerebral vascular malformations. In arterio-venous malformations the irradiation of the nidus with Nd:YAG produces a rapid obliteration of the pathologic vessels. This technique avoids the isolation of the feeding arteries and reduces the manipulation of the surrounding tissue. In small saccular aneurysms an argon laser is used to produce a shrinkage of the dilatation with consequent occlusion of the malformation. The ultrasonic aspirator is used in the tumoral surgery to obtain a more rapid demolition of the mass by fragmentation and suction. Intraoperative echotomography consents a sharp topographic localization of the lesion, particularly in deeper cerebral areas, providing data on the nature of solid tumors. The intraoperative Doppler flowmeter is useful for identification of the feeding arteries and the shunt of the small deep-seated arterio-venous malformations consenting a dynamic evaluation of the operation. General anaesthesia in neurosurgical procedures is favourably influenced by laser use. Conventional anaesthetic techniques, however, must be modified to avoid the harmful effect of the laser, depending on the movements

  8. Intracranial meningiomas managed at Memfys hospital for neurosurgery in Enugu, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Mezue, Wilfred C; Ohaegbulam, Samuel C; Ndubuisi, Chika C; Chikani, Mark C; Achebe, David S

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The epidemiology and pathology of meningioma in Nigeria are still evolving and little has been published about this tumor in Nigeria, especially in the southeast region. The aim of this paper is to compare the characteristics of intracranial meningioma managed in our center with the pattern reported in the literature worldwide. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of prospectively recorded data of patients managed for intracranial meningioma between January 2002 and December 2010 at a Private neurosurgery Hospital in Enugu, Nigeria. We excluded patients whose histology results were inconclusive. Results: Meningiomas constituted 23.8% of all intracranial tumors seen in the period. The male to female ratio was 1:1.1. The peak age range for males and females were in the fifth and sixth decades, respectively. The most common location is the Olfactory groove in 26.5% of patients followed by convexity in 23.5%. Presentation varied with anatomical location of tumor. Patients with olfactory groove meningioma (OGM) mostly presented late with personality changes and evidence of raised ICP. Tuberculum sellar and sphenoid region tumors presented earlier with visual impairment with or without hormonal abnormalities. Seizures occurred in 30.9% of all patients and in 45% of those with convexity meningiomas. Only 57.4% of the patients were managed surgically and there was no gender difference in this group. WHO grade1 tumors were the most common histological types occurring in 84.6%. One patient had atypical meningioma and two had anaplastic tumors. Conclusion: The pattern of meningioma in our area may have geographical differences in location and histology. Childhood meningioma was rare. PMID:23188985

  9. A low-cost PCI-bus-based ultrasound system for use in image-guided neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Richard, W D; Zar, D M; LaPresto, E L; Steiner, C P

    1999-01-01

    A low-cost PCI-bus-based ultrasound sub-system has been developed and integrated into the image-guided neurosurgery system currently in use at the Cleveland Clinic. Two software applications have been developed that integrate real-time ultrasound images with preoperative MR and CT data sets. By tracking the position of the ultrasound probe during surgery, it is possible to display a real time ultrasound image and the corresponding (preoperative) oblique CT or MR slice. This provides immediate positional feedback to the neurosurgeon during the surgical procedure.

  10. First Experiences in Intensity Modulated Radiation Surgery at the National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery: A Dosimetric Point of View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lárraga-Gutiérrez, José M.; Celis-López, Miguel A.

    2003-09-01

    The National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery in Mexico City has acquired a Novalis® shaped beam radiosurgery unit. The institute is pioneer in the use of new technologies for neuroscience. The Novalis® unit allows the use of conformal beam radiosurgery/therapy and the more advanced modality of conformal therapy: Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT). In the present work we present the first cases of treatments that use the IMRT technique and show its ability to protect organs at risk, such as brainstem and optical vias.

  11. The Nicaragua Radio Mathematics Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Searle, Barbara

    The Radio Mathematics Project was funded by the Agency for International Development to design, implement, and evaluate, in conjunction with personnel of a developing country, a system for teaching primary-grade mathematics by radio. In July 1974, a project in Nicaragua began with a series of radio presentations, each followed by 20 minutes of…

  12. Ham Radio is Mir Magic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Gary

    1997-01-01

    Presents a classroom activity in which students communicated with U.S. and Russian astronauts via ham radio while they were in orbit on the space station Mir. Gives suggestions for other ham radio classroom activities as well as names of organizations, publications, and grant programs that teachers can access to help in bring ham radio into their…

  13. Writing the Instructional Radio Script.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Fossard, Esta

    This guide was developed for script writers on the Radio Language Arts Project, which was designed to develop, implement, and test the effectiveness of an instructional radio system to teach English as a second language at the primary school level in Kenya. The project was planned to produce a radio-based, English language program with…

  14. Adjuvant and Definitive Radiotherapy for Adrenocortical Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sabolch, Aaron; Feng, Mary; Griffith, Kent; Hammer, Gary; Doherty, Gerard; Ben-Josef, Edgar

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of both adjuvant and definitive radiotherapy on local control of adrenocortical carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Outcomes were analyzed from 58 patients with 64 instances of treatment for adrenocortical carcinoma at the University of Michigan's Multidisciplinary Adrenal Cancer Clinic. Thirty-seven of these instances were for primary disease, whereas the remaining 27 were for recurrent disease. Thirty-eight of the treatment regimens involved surgery alone, 10 surgery plus adjuvant radiotherapy, and 16 definitive radiotherapy for unresectable disease. The effects of patient, tumor, and treatment factors were modeled simultaneously using multiple variable Cox proportional hazards regression for associations with local recurrence, distant recurrence, and overall survival. Results: Local failure occurred in 16 of the 38 instances that involved surgery alone, in 2 of the 10 that consisted of surgery plus adjuvant radiotherapy, and in 1 instance of definitive radiotherapy. Lack of radiotherapy use was associated with 4.7 times the risk of local failure compared with treatment regimens that involved radiotherapy (95% confidence interval, 1.2-19.0; p = 0.030). Conclusions: Radiotherapy seems to significantly lower the risk of local recurrence/progression in patients with adrenocortical carcinoma. Adjuvant radiotherapy should be strongly considered after surgical resection.

  15. Collaborative Beamfocusing Radio (COBRA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rode, Jeremy P.; Hsu, Mark J.; Smith, David; Husain, Anis

    2013-05-01

    A Ziva team has recently demonstrated a novel technique called Collaborative Beamfocusing Radios (COBRA) which enables an ad-hoc collection of distributed commercial off-the-shelf software defined radios to coherently align and beamform to a remote radio. COBRA promises to operate even in high multipath and non-line-of-sight environments as well as mobile applications without resorting to computationally expensive closed loop techniques that are currently unable to operate with significant movement. COBRA exploits two key technologies to achieve coherent beamforming. The first is Time Reversal (TR) which compensates for multipath and automatically discovers the optimal spatio-temporal matched filter to enable peak signal gains (up to 20 dB) and diffraction-limited focusing at the intended receiver in NLOS and severe multipath environments. The second is time-aligned buffering which enables TR to synchronize distributed transmitters into a collaborative array. This time alignment algorithm avoids causality violations through the use of reciprocal buffering. Preserving spatio-temporal reciprocity through the TR capture and retransmission process achieves coherent alignment across multiple radios at ~GHz carriers using only standard quartz-oscillators. COBRA has been demonstrated in the lab, aligning two off-the-shelf software defined radios over-the-air to an accuracy of better than 2 degrees of carrier alignment at 450 MHz. The COBRA algorithms are lightweight, with computation in 5 ms on a smartphone class microprocessor. COBRA also has low start-up latency, achieving high accuracy from a cold-start in 30 ms. The COBRA technique opens up a large number of new capabilities in communications, and electronic warfare including selective spatial jamming, geolocation and anti-geolocation.

  16. The LOFAR radio environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offringa, A. R.; de Bruyn, A. G.; Zaroubi, S.; van Diepen, G.; Martinez-Ruby, O.; Labropoulos, P.; Brentjens, M. A.; Ciardi, B.; Daiboo, S.; Harker, G.; Jelić, V.; Kazemi, S.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Mellema, G.; Pandey, V. N.; Pizzo, R. F.; Schaye, J.; Vedantham, H.; Veligatla, V.; Wijnholds, S. J.; Yatawatta, S.; Zarka, P.; Alexov, A.; Anderson, J.; Asgekar, A.; Avruch, M.; Beck, R.; Bell, M.; Bell, M. R.; Bentum, M.; Bernardi, G.; Best, P.; Birzan, L.; Bonafede, A.; Breitling, F.; Broderick, J. W.; Brüggen, M.; Butcher, H.; Conway, J.; de Vos, M.; Dettmar, R. J.; Eisloeffel, J.; Falcke, H.; Fender, R.; Frieswijk, W.; Gerbers, M.; Griessmeier, J. M.; Gunst, A. W.; Hassall, T. E.; Heald, G.; Hessels, J.; Hoeft, M.; Horneffer, A.; Karastergiou, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Koopman, Y.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Kuper, G.; Maat, P.; Mann, G.; McKean, J.; Meulman, H.; Mevius, M.; Mol, J. D.; Nijboer, R.; Noordam, J.; Norden, M.; Paas, H.; Pandey, M.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A.; Rafferty, D.; Rawlings, S.; Reich, W.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Schoenmakers, A. P.; Sluman, J.; Smirnov, O.; Sobey, C.; Stappers, B.; Steinmetz, M.; Swinbank, J.; Tagger, M.; Tang, Y.; Tasse, C.; van Ardenne, A.; van Cappellen, W.; van Duin, A. P.; van Haarlem, M.; van Leeuwen, J.; van Weeren, R. J.; Vermeulen, R.; Vocks, C.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Wise, M.; Wucknitz, O.

    2013-01-01

    Aims: This paper discusses the spectral occupancy for performing radio astronomy with the Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR), with a focus on imaging observations. Methods: We have analysed the radio-frequency interference (RFI) situation in two 24-h surveys with Dutch LOFAR stations, covering 30-78 MHz with low-band antennas and 115-163 MHz with high-band antennas. This is a subset of the full frequency range of LOFAR. The surveys have been observed with a 0.76 kHz/1 s resolution. Results: We measured the RFI occupancy in the low and high frequency sets to be 1.8% and 3.2% respectively. These values are found to be representative values for the LOFAR radio environment. Between day and night, there is no significant difference in the radio environment. We find that lowering the current observational time and frequency resolutions of LOFAR results in a slight loss of flagging accuracy. At LOFAR's nominal resolution of 0.76 kHz and 1 s, the false-positives rate is about 0.5%. This rate increases approximately linearly when decreasing the data frequency resolution. Conclusions: Currently, by using an automated RFI detection strategy, the LOFAR radio environment poses no perceivable problems for sensitive observing. It remains to be seen if this is still true for very deep observations that integrate over tens of nights, but the situation looks promising. Reasons for the low impact of RFI are the high spectral and time resolution of LOFAR; accurate detection methods; strong filters and high receiver linearity; and the proximity of the antennas to the ground. We discuss some strategies that can be used once low-level RFI starts to become apparent. It is important that the frequency range of LOFAR remains free of broadband interference, such as DAB stations and windmills.

  17. The importance of Radio Quiet Zone (RQZ) for radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umar, Roslan; Abidin, Zamri Zainal; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin

    2013-05-01

    Most of radio observatories are located in isolated areas. Since radio sources from the universe is very weak, astronomer need to avoid radio frequency interference (RFI) from active spectrum users and radio noise produced by human made (telecommunication, mobile phone, microwave user and many more. There are many observatories around the world are surrounded by a Radio Quiet Zone (RQZ), which is it was set up using public or state laws. A Radio Quiet Zone normally consists of two areas: an exclusive area in which totally radio emissions are forbidden, with restrictions for residents and business developments, and a larger (radius up to 100 km above) coordination area where the power of radio transmission limits to threshold levels. Geographical Information System (GIS) can be used as a powerful tool in mapping large areas with varying RQZ profiles. In this paper, we report the initial testing of the usage of this system in order to identify the areas were suitable for Radio Quiet Zone. Among the important parameters used to develop the database for our GIS are population density, information on TV and telecommunication (mobile phones) transmitters, road networks (highway), and contour shielding. We will also use other information gathered from on-site RFI level measurements on selected 'best' areas generated by the GIS. The intention is to find the best site for the purpose of establishing first radio quiet zones for radio telescope in Malaysia.

  18. Accurate radio and optical positions for southern radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, Bruce R.; Jauncey, David L.; White, Graeme L.; Nothnagel, Axel; Nicolson, George D.; Reynolds, John E.; Morabito, David D.; Bartel, Norbert

    1992-01-01

    Accurate radio positions with a precision of about 0.01 arcsec are reported for eight compact extragalactic radio sources south of -45-deg declination. The radio positions were determined using VLBI at 8.4 GHz on the 9589 km Tidbinbilla (Australia) to Hartebeesthoek (South Africa) baseline. The sources were selected from the Parkes Catalogue to be strong, flat-spectrum radio sources with bright optical QSO counterparts. Optical positions of the QSOs were also measured from the ESO B Sky Survey plates with respect to stars from the Perth 70 Catalogue, to an accuracy of about 0.19 arcsec rms. These radio and optical positions are as precise as any presently available in the far southern sky. A comparison of the radio and optical positions confirms the estimated optical position errors and shows that there is overall agreement at the 0.1-arcsec level between the radio and Perth 70 optical reference frames in the far south.

  19. High stability radio links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kursinski, E. Robert

    1989-01-01

    Radio telecommunication links are used for communication with deep space probes. These links consist of sinusoidal carrier signals at radio frequencies (RF) modulated with information sent between the spacecraft and the earth. This carrier signal is a very pure and stable sinusoid, typically derived from an atomic frequency standard whose frequency and phase are used to measure the radial velocity of the probe and from this and other data types derive its trajectory. This same observable can be used to search for space-time distortions cased by low frequency (0.1 to 100 MHz) gravitation radiation. How such a system works, what its sensitivity limitations are, and what potential future improvements can be made are discussed.

  20. Thioridazine Sensitizes Esophageal Carcinoma Cell Lines to Radiotherapy-Induced Apoptosis In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongxia; Juan, Li; Xia, Leiming; Wang, Yi; Bao, Yangyi; Sun, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    Background Radiotherapy is one of the primary treatments for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Identification of novel radio-sensitizing agents will improve the therapeutic outcome of radiotherapy. This study aimed to determine the radio-sensitizing effect of the antipsychotic agent thioridazine in ESCC and explored the underlying mechanisms. Material/Methods ECA-109 and TE-1 ESCC cells were treated with thioridazine and radiotherapy alone and in combination. Cell survival was measured by MTT assay. Cell cycle and apoptosis were monitored by flow cytometry. Western blot analysis was used to analyze the expression of phospho-PI3K, phosphor-AKT, phospho-mTOR, Caspase-3, Caspase-9, Bax, Bcl-2, Bal-xl, Bak, and p53. The xenograft mouse model was used to study the in vivo anticancer effect of thioridazine and irradiation. Results Combined treatment with thioridazine and irradiation significantly reduced viability of ESCC cells compared with thioridazine or irradiation treatment alone. Thioridazine and irradiation treatment induced G0/G1 phases cell cycle arrest through down-regulation of CDK4 and cyclinD1. In addition, thioridazine and irradiation treatment induced apoptosis through up-regulation of cleaved capase-3 and 9, as well as an increase in the expression of Bax and Bak and a decrease in the expression of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xl. Furthermore, thioridazine and irradiation treatment inhibited the PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway and up-regulated the expression of p53. In xenograft mice, thioridazine and irradiation reduced ESCC tumor growth. Conclusions Thioridazine sensitizes ESCC cells to radiotherapy. Thioridazine may play a role in ESCC radiation therapy as a promising radiosensitizer. PMID:27453171

  1. Solar radio continuum storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, K.

    1976-01-01

    The paper reviews the current status of research on solar radio continuum emissions from metric to hectometric wave frequencies, emphasizing the role of energetic electrons in the 10-100 keV range in these emissions. It is seen that keV-energy electrons generated in active sunspot groups must be the sources of radio continuum storm emissions for wide frequency bands. These electrons excite plasma oscillations in the medium, which in turn are converted to electromagnetic radiation. The radio noise continuum sources are usually associated with type III burst activity observed above these sources. Although the mechanism for the release of the energetic electrons is not known, it seems they are ejected from storm source regions in association with rapid variation of associated sunspot magnetic fields due to their growth into complex types. To explain some of the observed characteristics, the importance of two-stream instability and the scattering of ambient plasma ions on energetic electron streams is pointed out.

  2. Radiotherapy in patients with connective tissue diseases.

    PubMed

    Giaj-Levra, Niccolò; Sciascia, Savino; Fiorentino, Alba; Fersino, Sergio; Mazzola, Rosario; Ricchetti, Francesco; Roccatello, Dario; Alongi, Filippo

    2016-03-01

    The decision to offer radiotherapy in patients with connective tissue diseases continues to be challenging. Radiotherapy might trigger the onset of connective tissue diseases by increasing the expression of self-antigens, diminishing regulatory T-cell activity, and activating effectors of innate immunity (dendritic cells) through Toll-like receptor-dependent mechanisms, all of which could potentially lead to breaks of immune tolerance. This potential risk has raised some debate among radiation oncologists about whether patients with connective tissue diseases can tolerate radiation as well as people without connective tissue diseases. Because the number of patients with cancer and connective tissue diseases needing radiotherapy will probably increase due to improvements in medical treatment and longer life expectancy, the issue of interactions between radiotherapy and connective tissue diseases needs to be clearer. In this Review, we discuss available data and evidence for patients with connective tissue diseases treated with radiotherapy.

  3. Management of radiotherapy-induced skin reactions.

    PubMed

    Trueman, Ellen

    2015-04-01

    Radiotherapy is a highly effective cancer treatment that not only offers cure but also excellent palliation of disease related symptoms and complications. Although radiotherapy is primarily an outpatient treatment, delivered within specialist centres, a diverse range of health professionals may be involved in the treatment pathway before, during and after treatment. Radiotherapy can, and does, make a significant contribution to improving a patient's wellbeing through effective symptom management. However, treatment-related side-effects do occur, with an acute skin reaction being one of the most common. It is imperative that radiotherapy-induced skin reactions are correctly assessed and appropriately managed in promoting patient comfort, treatment compliance and enhanced quality of life. This article describes how the use of a recognised assessment tool and evidence-based guidelines can facilitate consistent, high-quality care in the management of radiotherapy-induced skin reactions.

  4. Comparison between skin-mounted fiducials and bone-implanted fiducials for image-guided neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rost, Jennifer; Harris, Steven S.; Stefansic, James D.; Sillay, Karl; Galloway, Robert L., Jr.

    2004-05-01

    Point-based registration for image-guided neurosurgery has become the industry standard. While the use of intrinsic points is appealing because of its retrospective nature, affixing extrinsic objects to the head prior to scanning has been demonstrated to provide much more accurate registrations. Points of reference between image space and physical space are called fiducials. The extrinsic objects which generate those points are fiducial markers. The markers can be broken down into two classifications: skin-mounted and bone-implanted. Each has distinct advantages and disadvantages. Skin-mounted fiducials require simply sticking them on the patient in locations suggested by the manufacturer, however, they can move with tractions placed on the skin, fall off and perhaps the most dangerous problem, they can be replaced by the patient. Bone implanted markers being rigidly affixed to the skull do not present such problems. However, a minor surgical intervention (analogous to dental work) must be performed to implant the markers prior to surgery. Therefore marker type and use has become a decision point for image-guided surgery. We have performed a series of experiments in an attempt to better quantify aspects of the two types of markers so that better informed decisions can be made. We have created a phantom composed of a full-size plastic skull [Wards Scientific Supply] with a 500 ml bag of saline placed in the brain cavity. The skull was then sealed. A skin mimicking material, DragonSkinTM [SmoothOn Company] was painted onto the surface and allowed to dry. Skin mounted fiducials [Medtronic-SNT] and bone-implanted markers [Z-Kat]were placed on the phantom. In addition, three additional bone-implanted markers were placed (two on the base of the skull and one in the eye socket for use as targets). The markers were imaged in CT and 4 MRI sequences (T1-weighted, T2 weighted, SPGR, and a functional series.) The markers were also located in physical space using an Optotrak

  5. Workshop on Radio Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, Steve; Gaensler, Bryan

    2012-04-01

    abstract-type="normal">SummaryWe are entering a new era in the study of variable and transient radio sources. This workshop discussed the instruments and the strategies employed to study those sources, how they are identified and classified, how results from different surveys can be compared, and how radio observations tie in with those at other wavelengths. The emphasis was on learning what common ground there is between the plethora of on-going projects, how methods and code can be shared, and how best practices regarding survey strategy could be adopted. The workshop featured the four topics below. Each topic commenced with a fairly brief introductory talk, which then developed into discussion. By way of preparation, participants had been invited to upload and discuss one slide per topic to a wiki ahead of the workshop. 1. Telescopes, instrumentation and survey strategy. New radio facilities and on-going projects (including upgrades) are both studying the variability of the radio sky, and searching for transients. The discussion first centred on the status of those facilities, and on projects with a time-domain focus, both ongoing and planned, before turning to factors driving choices of instrumentation, such as phased array versus single pixel feeds, the field of view, spatial and time resolution, frequency and bandwidth, depth, area, and cadence of the surveys. 2. Detection, pipelines, and classification. The workshop debated (a) the factors that influence decisions to study variability in the (u,v) plane, in images, or in catalogues, (b) whether, and how much, pipeline code could potentially be shared between one project and another, and which software packages are best for different approaches, (c) how data are stored and later accessed, and (d) how transients and variables are defined and classified. 3. Statistics, interpretation, and synthesis. It then discussed how (i) the choice of facility and strategy and (ii) detection and classification schemes

  6. [Prevention of radio-induced cancers].

    PubMed

    Cosset, J-M; Chargari, C; Demoor, C; Giraud, P; Helfre, S; Mornex, F; Mazal, A

    2016-09-01

    The article deals with the prevention of cancers only directly related to therapeutic radiation which are distinguished from "secondary cancer". The consideration of the risk of radiation-induced cancers after radiation therapy, although it is fortunately rare events, has become indispensable today. With a review of the literature, are detailed the various involved parameters. The age of the irradiated patient is one of the main parameters. The impact of the dose is also discussed based on the model used, and based on clinical data. Other parameters defining a radiation treatment are discussed one after the other: field with the example of Hodgkin's disease, the type of radiation and the participation of secondary neutrons, spreading and splitting. All these parameters are discussed according to each organ whose sensitivity is different. The article concludes with a list of recommendations to reduce the risk of radio-induced cancers. Even with the advent of conformal radiotherapy, intensity modulation, the modulated volume arctherapy, and the development of specific machinery for the extra-cranial stereotactic, the radiation therapist must consider this risk and use of reasonable and justified control imaging. Although they constitute a small percentage of cancers that occur secondarily after a first malignant tumor, radiation-induced cancers, can not and must not be concealed or ignored and justify regular monitoring over the long term, precisely adapted on the described parameters. PMID:27523416

  7. Ion-induced nuclear radiotherapy

    DOEpatents

    Horn, Kevin M.; Doyle, Barney L.

    1996-01-01

    Ion-induced Nuclear Radiotherapy (INRT) is a technique for conducting radiosurgery and radiotherapy with a very high degree of control over the spatial extent of the irradiated volume and the delivered dose. Based upon the concept that low energy, ion induced atomic and nuclear reactions can be used to produce highly energetic reaction products at the site of a tumor, the INRT technique is implemented through the use of a conduit-needle or tube which conducts a low energy ion beam to a position above or within the intended treatment area. At the end of the conduit-needle or tube is a specially fabricated target which, only when struck by the ion beam, acts as a source of energetic radiation products. The inherent limitations in the energy, and therefore range, of the resulting reaction products limits the spatial extent of irradiation to a pre-defined volume about the point of reaction. Furthermore, since no damage is done to tissue outside this irradiated volume, the delivered dose may be made arbitrarily large. INRT may be used both as a point-source of radiation at the site of a small tumor, or as a topical bath of radiation to broad areas of diseased tissue.

  8. Ion-induced nuclear radiotherapy

    DOEpatents

    Horn, K.M.; Doyle, B.L.

    1996-08-20

    Ion-induced Nuclear Radiotherapy (INRT) is a technique for conducting radiosurgery and radiotherapy with a very high degree of control over the spatial extent of the irradiated volume and the delivered dose. Based upon the concept that low energy, ion induced atomic and nuclear reactions can be used to produce highly energetic reaction products at the site of a tumor, the INRT technique is implemented through the use of a conduit-needle or tube which conducts a low energy ion beam to a position above or within the intended treatment area. At the end of the conduit-needle or tube is a specially fabricated target which, only when struck by the ion beam, acts as a source of energetic radiation products. The inherent limitations in the energy, and therefore range, of the resulting reaction products limits the spatial extent of irradiation to a pre-defined volume about the point of reaction. Furthermore, since no damage is done to tissue outside this irradiated volume, the delivered dose may be made arbitrarily large. INRT may be used both as a point-source of radiation at the site of a small tumor, or as a topical bath of radiation to broad areas of diseased tissue. 25 figs.

  9. Radio emision from supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubner, G.

    2016-06-01

    The vast majority of supernova remnants (SNRs) in our Galaxy and nearby galaxies have been discovered through radio observations, and only a very small number of the SNRs catalogued in the Milky Way have not been detected in the radio band, or are poorly defined by current radio observations. The study of the radio emission from SNRs is an excellent tool to investigate morphological characteristics, marking the location of shock fronts and contact discontinuities; the presence, orientation and intensity of the magnetic field; the energy spectrum of the emitting particles; and the dynamical consequences of the interaction with the circumstellar and interstellar medium. I will review the present knowledge of different important aspects of radio remnants and their impact on the interstellar gas. Also, new radio studies of the Crab Nebula carried out with the Karl Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA) at 3 GHz and with ALMA at 100 GHz, will be presented.

  10. The study of the relation of DNA repair pathway genes SNPs and the sensitivity to radiotherapy and chemotherapy of NSCLC

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunbo; Nie, Huan; Li, Yiqun; Liu, Guiyou; Wang, Xu; Xing, Shijie; Zhang, Liping; Chen, Xin; Chen, Yue; Li, Yu

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the relation between SNPs in DNA repair pathway-related genes and sensitivity of tumor radio-chemotherapy, 26 SNPs in 20 DNA repair genes were genotyped on 176 patients of NSCLC undertaking radio-chemotherapy treatment. In squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), as the rs2228000, rs2228001 (XPC), rs2273953 (TP73), rs2279744 (MDM2), rs2299939 (PTEN) and rs8178085, rs12334811 (DNA-PKcs) affected the sensitivity to chemotherapy, so did the rs8178085, rs12334811 to radiotherapy. Moreover rs344781, rs2273953 and rs12334811 were related with the survival time of SCC. In general, the “good” genotype GG (rs12334811) showed greater efficacy of radio-chemotherapy and MSF (24 months) on SCC. In adenocarcinoma, as the rs2699887 (PIK3), rs12334811 (DNA-PKcs) influenced the sensitivity to chemotherapy, so did the rs2299939, rs2735343 (PTEN) to radiotherapy. And rs402710, rs80270, rs2279744 and rs2909430 impacted the survival time of the adenocarcinoma patients. Both GG (rs2279744) and AG (rs2909430) showed a shorter survival time (MFS = 6). Additionally, some SNPs such as rs2228000, rs2228001 and rs344781 were found to regulate the expression of DNA repair pathway genes through eQTLs dataset analysis. These results indicate that SNPs in DNA repair pathway genes might regulate the expression and affect the DNA damage repair, and thereby impact the efficacy of radio-chemotherapy and the survival time of NSCLC. PMID:27246533

  11. Locating Radio Noise from Sprites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullekrug, M.; Mezentsev, A.; Watson, R.; Gaffet, S.; Astin, I.; Evans, A.

    2014-12-01

    Sprites are composed of individual streamer discharges (e.g., Pasko, 2010) which split into exponentially growing streamer tips (McHarg et al., 2010). The acceleration of the electrons to a few eV results in the radiation of a small amount of electromagnetic energy. The incoherent superposition of many streamers causes the low frequency radio noise from sprites near ~40 km height (Qin et al., 2012). The presence of this theoretically predicted radiation was recently confirmed by low frequency radio noise measurements during dancing sprites with a very sensitive radio receiver (Fullekrug et al., 2013). To locate the radio noise from sprites in the sky, an interferometric network of low frequency radio receivers was developed (Mezentsev and Fullekrug, JGR, 2013). The key parameter for the interferometric signal processing is the frequency dependent wave propagation velocity of the radio waves within the Earth's atmosphere. This wave propagation velocity is determined by the wave number vector which needs to be inferred from the measurements. Here we adapt and subsequently apply array analyses which have been developed for seismic and infrasound arrays to determine the horizontal wave number vectors of ~20-24 kHz radio waves measured with an array of ten radio receivers distributed over an area of ~1 km × 1 km. It is found that the horizontal slowness of ~20-24 kHz radio waves ranges from ~2.7 ns/m to ~4.1 ns/m depending on the arrival azimuth of the radio wave. For comparison, an electromagnetic wave in vacuum has a slowness of ~3.34 ns/m. A larger slowness indicates an apparent velocity which is smaller than the speed of light and a smaller slowness indicates that the radio wave arrives at the array from an elevation angle. The observed variability of the observed slowness almost certainly results from the distance dependent superposition of the transverse electric and magnetic TEn and TMn radio wave propagation modes.

  12. Origins of Canadian Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covington, A. E.

    1988-08-01

    Radar technology after World War II was rapidly applied to the radio astronomy founded by Jansky and Reber. The first post-war discoveries in various countries from 1945 to 1950 were made with instruments built from surplus parts, and quickly led to the design of specialized equipment. The development in Ottawa at the Laboratories of the National Research Council is outlined, initially for solar radio observations and then for the early galactic observations at the Goth Hill Radio Observatory, near Ottawa.

  13. Decimetric radio dot emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mészárosová, H.; Karlický, M.; Sawant, H. S.; Fernandes, F. C. R.; Cecatto, J. R.; de Andrade, M. C.

    2008-11-01

    Context: We study a rare type of solar radio bursts called decimetric dot emissions. Aims: In the period 1999-2001, 20 events of decimetric dot emissions observed by the Brazilian Solar Spectroscope (BSS) in the frequency range 950-2640 MHz are investigated statistically and compared with radio fine structures of zebras and fibers. Methods: For the study of the spectral characteristics of the dot emissions we use specially developed Interactive Data Language (IDL) software called BSSView and basic statistical methods. Results: We have found that the dm dot emissions, contrary to the fine structures of the type IV bursts (i.e. zebras, fibers, lace bursts, spikes), are not superimposed on any background burst emission. In the radio spectrum, in most cases the dot emissions form chains that appear to be arranged in zebra patterns or fibers. Because some zebras and fibers, especially those observed with high time and high spectral resolutions, also show emission dots (but superimposed on the background burst emission), we compared the spectral parameters of the dot emissions with the dots being the fine structure of zebras and fibers. For both these dots, similar spectral characteristics were found. Some similarities of the dot emissions can be found also with the lace bursts and spikes. For some events the dot emissions show structural evolution from patterns resembling fibers to patterns resembling zebras and vice versa, or they evolve into fully chaotic patterns. Conclusions: For the first time, we present decimetric dot emissions that appear to be arranged in zebra patterns or fibers. We propose that these emissions are generated by the plasma emission mechanism at the locations in the solar atmosphere where the double resonance condition is fulfilled.

  14. Observations of Solar Radio Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paige, Giorla

    2011-05-01

    A low frequency radio telescope has been recently been constructed on the campus of the The College of New Jersey (TCNJ) and has begun conducting observations at 20MHz as part of NASA'a Radio Jove program. This instrument is capable of observations of solar radio emission including strong prompt radio emission associated with solar burst events. We will discuss solar observations conducted with this instrument as well as an effort to conduct coincident observations with the Eight-meter-wavelength Transient Array (ETA) and the Long Wavelength Array (LWA).

  15. Radio Loud AGNs are Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiaberge, Marco; Gilli, Roberto; Lotz, Jennifer M.; Norman, Colin

    2015-06-01

    We measure the merger fraction of Type 2 radio-loud and radio-quiet active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at z\\gt 1 using new samples. The objects have Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images taken with Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) in the IR channel. These samples are compared to the 3CR sample of radio galaxies at z\\gt 1 and to a sample of non-active galaxies. We also consider lower redshift radio galaxies with HST observations and previous generation instruments (NICMOS and WFPC2). The full sample spans an unprecedented range in both redshift and AGN luminosity. We perform statistical tests to determine whether the different samples are differently associated with mergers. We find that all (92%-14%+8%) radio-loud galaxies at z\\gt 1 are associated with recent or ongoing merger events. Among the radio-loud population there is no evidence for any dependence of the merger fraction on either redshift or AGN power. For the matched radio-quiet samples, only 38%-15+16 are merging systems. The merger fraction for the sample of non-active galaxies at z\\gt 1 is indistinguishable from radio-quiet objects. This is strong evidence that mergers are the triggering mechanism for the radio-loud AGN phenomenon and the launching of relativistic jets from supermassive black holes (SMBHs). We speculate that major black hole (BH)-BH mergers play a major role in spinning up the central SMBHs in these objects.

  16. Internet Resources for Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andernach, H.

    A subjective overview of Internet resources for radio-astronomical information is presented. Basic observing techniques and their implications for the interpretation of publicly available radio data are described, followed by a discussion of existing radio surveys, their level of optical identification, and nomenclature of radio sources. Various collections of source catalogues and databases for integrated radio source parameters are reviewed and compared, as well as the web interfaces to interrogate the current and ongoing large-area surveys. Links to radio observatories with archives of raw (uv-) data are presented, as well as services providing images, both of individual objects or extracts (``cutouts'') from large-scale surveys. While the emphasis is on radio continuum data, a brief list of sites providing spectral line data, and atomic or molecular information is included. The major radio telescopes and surveys under construction or planning are outlined. A summary is given of a search for previously unknown optically bright radio sources, as performed by the students as an exercise, using Internet resources only. Over 200 different links are mentioned and were verified, but despite the attempt to make this report up-to-date, it can only provide a snapshot of the situation as of mid-1998.

  17. Solar radio emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, M. V.; Smith, D. F.

    1981-01-01

    Active areas of both observational and theoretical research in which rapid progress is being made are discussed. These include: (1) the dynamic spectrum or frequency versus time plot; (2) physical mechanisms in the development of various types of bursts; (3) microwave type 1, 2, 3, and moving type 4 bursts; (4) bursts caused by trapped electrons; (5) physics of type 3bursts; (6) the physics of type 2 bursts and their related shocks; (7) the physics of both stationary and moving traps and associated type 1 and moving type 4 bursts; and (8) the status of the field of solar radio emission.

  18. RADIO FREQUENCY ATTENUATOR

    DOEpatents

    Giordano, S.

    1963-11-12

    A high peak power level r-f attenuator that is readily and easily insertable along a coaxial cable having an inner conductor and an outer annular conductor without breaking the ends thereof is presented. Spaced first and second flares in the outer conductor face each other with a slidable cylindrical outer conductor portion therebetween. Dielectric means, such as water, contact the cable between the flares to attenuate the radio-frequency energy received thereby. The cylindrical outer conductor portion is slidable to adjust the voltage standing wave ratio to a low level, and one of the flares is slidable to adjust the attenuation level. An integral dielectric container is also provided. (AFC)

  19. Lunar Farside Radio Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccone, Claudio

    2005-03-01

    It is proposed that the Farside of the Moon should be protected legally against man-made radio pollution and uncontrolled exploitation. In fact, only by establishing a radiotelescope on the Farside of the Moon it will finally be possible to cope with the Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) that is now increasingly plaguing all of Radioastronomy, Bioastronomy and Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) Searches done from the surface of the Earth. It is suggested to partition the Farside into 3 sectors, each 60°wide, to ensurethe creation of a future “Lunar Farside Radio Lab” inside crater Daedalus (at 180°E) with our planned Radiotelescope (in practice a Phased Array),complete freedom to exploit the Nearside as well as the four Lagrangian points L1, L3, L4 and L5 of the Earth Moon system by allowing even some International Space Stations to be located there. It is also claimed, however, thatthe “opposite” Lagrangian point L2 should possibly be kept free of spacecrafts that would flood the Farside by the RFI they produce. Realistically, it might be difficult to comply with the latter request in view of the far-future development of a Space Base located there in order to depart towards the Asteroids and the Outer Planets at very reduced fuel consumption. A more reasonable request about any future space station located at the Earth Moon L2 point is thus that this future space station should be shielded to prevent its RFI from reaching the Farside of the Moon.A number of further astrophysical, astronautical and technical issues could just be highlighted in this study and deserve much more elaboration. To mention a few:the precise size of the “Quiet Cone” extending into space above the Farside of the Moon. Also, the experimental measurement of how quiet this Cone actually is by letting a radiometer orbit the Moon (see the web site www.rli.it);the mathematical modelling of the weak ionosphere of the Moon and its possible diffraction effects at very

  20. [Current status and perspectives of radiotherapy for esophageal cancer].

    PubMed

    Wu, S X; Wang, L H

    2016-09-23

    Esophageal cancer is one of the most common cancers in China. More than 80% of esophageal cancer patients are diagnosed at a late stage and are not eligible for surgery. Radiotherapy is one of the most important modalities in esophageal cancer treatment. Here we reviewed the advances in esophageal cancer radiotherapy and radiotherapy-based combined-modality therapy, such as optimization of radiation dose and target volume, application of precise radiotherapy technique and the integration of radiotherapy with chemotherapy and targeted therapy.

  1. Radio frequency needle hyperthermia of normal and cancerous animal tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalhav, Arieh; Ramon, J.; Goldwasser, Benad; Nativ, Ofer; Cherniack, Ramy; Zajdel, Liliana

    1994-12-01

    Capacitative radio frequency (RF) was met with little success when used to treat human cancer. Conductive rf needle hyperthermia (RFNH) is used successfully for human tissue ablation in neurosurgery, cardiology, and recently in urology. RFNH ablates tissue by causing thermal damage limited to the vicinity of the rf needle. We conducted a series of studies to evaluate the effect of RFNH on cancerous and normal tissue. RFNH was applied to normal porcine livers during open surgery. Liver function tests were elevated two days post treatment, then returned to normal. Pigs were sequentially sacrificed. RFNH induced lesions were found to be maximal in size on days 2 - 4 post treatment and later became smaller as liver regenerated. Phase 2 included mice bearing two subcutaneous murine bladder tumors (MBT2). The rf needle was inserted into both tumors of each mouse, but rf current was applied to one tumor only. Energies of 3 to 7.5 watts were applied for 30 seconds to 5 minutes using a 0.02 inch needle. Mice were sacrificed 0, 1, and 3 days after treatment. Necrotic lesions 0.5 - 1.2 cm in diameter were found within the treated tumors. In phase 3, mice bearing a single 8 - 18 mm subcutaneous tumor were treated by RFNH aiming for complete tumor destruction. All control mice died of huge tumors within 31 days. Treated mice were alive with no signs of tumor when sacrificed 60 days after treatment. In phase 3 RFNH is capable of complete tumor eradication with little damage to surrounding normal tissue. It may have clinical applications for percutaneous endoscopic and laparoscopic treatment of tumors.

  2. The Transient Radio Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keane, E. F.

    2010-11-01

    The high time-resolution radio sky represents unexplored astronomical territory where the discovery potential is high. In this thesis I have studied the transient radio sky, focusing on millisecond scales. As such, this work is concerned primarily with neutron stars, the mostpopulous member of the radio transient parameter space. In particular, I have studied the well known radio pulsars and the recently identified group of neutron stars which show erratic radio emission, known as RRATs, which show radio bursts every few minutes to every few hours. When RRATs burst onto the scene in 2006, it was thought that they represented a previously unknown, distinct class of sporadically emitting sources. The difficulty in their identification implies a large underlying population, perhaps larger than the radio pulsars. The first question investigated in this thesis was whether the large projected population of RRATs posed a problem, i.e. could the observed supernova rate account for so many sources. In addition to pulsars and RRATs, the various other known neutron star manifestations were considered, leading to the conclusion that distinct populations would result in a `birthrate problem'. Evolution between the classes could solve this problem -- the RRATs are not a distinct population ofneutron stars.Alternatively, perhaps the large projected population of RRATs is an overestimate. To obtain an improved estimate, the best approach is to find more sources. The Parkes Multi-beam Pulsar Survey, wherein the RRATs were initially identified, offered an opportunity to do just this. Abouthalf of the RRATs showing bursts during the survey were thought to have been missed, due to the deleterious effects of impulsive terrestrial interference signals. To remove these unwanted signals, so that we could identify the previously shrouded RRATs, we developed newinterference mitigation software and processing techniques. Having done this, the survey was completely re-processed, resulting in

  3. The Extragalactic Radio Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A.; Fixsen, D. J.; Levin, S. M.; Limon, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Seiffert, M.; Singal, J.; Villela, T.; Wollack, E.; Wuensche, C. A.

    2011-01-01

    The existence of an isotropic component of the high-latitude radio sky has been recognized for nearly fifty years, but has typically been assumed to be Galactic in origin. We use recent radio observations to test whether the observed high-latitude component could originate within either an extended Galactic halo or a more local "bubble" structure. The lack of significant polarization from the isotropic component, combined with the lack of significant correlation with the Galactic far-infrared emission, rule out an origin within the Galaxy. We conclude that an extragalactic origin is the only viable alternative for the bulk of the isotropic high-latitude emission. The extragalactic component is 2-3 times brighter than local (Galactic) emission towards the Galactic poles and is consistent with a power law in frequency with amplitude T(sub r) = 24.1 plus or minus 2.1 K and spectral index beta = -2.599 plus or minus 0.036 evaluated at reference frequency 310 MHz.

  4. Radio pulsar disk electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, F.C.

    1983-03-01

    We outline the macroscopic physics of a disk close to an isolated, magnetized, rotating neutron star. It seems likely that such systems are formed from time to time in the universe. The neutron star acts as a Faraday disk dynamo, and the disk acts as both a load and a neutral sheet, permitting the polar cap current to return to the neutron star and also splitting a dipolar magnetic field into two monopolar halves. Michel and Dessler have proposed that such systems are radio pulsars. The dominant energy loss is from the stellar wind torque (giving a deceleration index n = 7/3), and the next contribution is dissipation in the ''auroral'' zones, where the current returns to the star in a sheet about 5 cm thick. The latter is comparable to the observed radio luminosities and is in reasonable accord with the data. The disk itself may be a source of visible radiation comparable to that in pulsed radiofrequency emission. As the pulsar ages, the disk expands and narrows into a ring, the plausible consequence of which could be cessation of pulsed emission at periods of a few seconds.

  5. From anesthetic sponge to nonsinking skull perforator, unitary work neurosurgery in the ancient Arabic and Islamic world.

    PubMed

    Najjar, Jalal

    2010-05-01

    During the Middle Ages, the work of Middle Eastern physicians such as Avicenna, Albucasis, and Rhazes was of paramount importance in guarding the knowledge that had been accumulated throughout history, particularly the contributions of Greek and Roman scholars, and it is well known that the Arabic versions of all of the works by Hippocrates and Galen by Islamic and Arabic scholars are the only copies that have survived until now. In addition to preserving this wealth of knowledge, these Middle Eastern scholars made significant contributions of their own to both medicine and neurosurgery. Many points regarding ancient Arabic and Islamic science need to be discussed and clarified, such as cadaver dissections, anatomic studies, neurosurgical practice and instruments, Arabic translations of Hippocratic and other works, and the influence of the Islamic civilization on Western civilization, especially the Renaissance.

  6. Laser Nano-Neurosurgery from Gentle Manipulation to Nano-Incision of Neuronal Cells and Scaffolds: An Advanced Neurotechnology Tool

    PubMed Central

    Soloperto, Alessandro; Palazzolo, Gemma; Tsushima, Hanako; Chieregatti, Evelina; Vassalli, Massimo; Difato, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Current optical approaches are progressing far beyond the scope of monitoring the structure and function of living matter, and they are becoming widely recognized as extremely precise, minimally-invasive, contact-free handling tools. Laser manipulation of living tissues, single cells, or even single-molecules is becoming a well-established methodology, thus founding the onset of new experimental paradigms and research fields. Indeed, a tightly focused pulsed laser source permits complex tasks such as developing engineered bioscaffolds, applying calibrated forces, transfecting, stimulating, or even ablating single cells with subcellular precision, and operating intracellular surgical protocols at the level of single organelles. In the present review, we report the state of the art of laser manipulation in neuroscience, to inspire future applications of light-assisted tools in nano-neurosurgery. PMID:27013962

  7. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses in spine surgery, neurosurgery and orthopedics: guidelines for the surgeon scientist

    PubMed Central

    Mobbs, Ralph J.

    2015-01-01

    The research evidence in the realm of surgery is expanding at a rapid pace, and thus corresponds with an increasing need to critically appraise and synthesize the available literature. Particularly in fields such as spine surgery, neurosurgery and orthopedics which traditionally have little Class I randomized clinical data, reviews are important to pool the available evidence on clinical questions which are otherwise difficult to answer. Whilst systematic reviews and meta-analyses have the potential to provide critical and updated surgical evidence to guide clinical decisions, poorly performed analyses and misinterpretation of such reviews may have a detrimental effect on patient care and outcomes. We present a summary of the critical steps in performing a systematic review and meta-analysis, allowing the surgeon scientist to better interpret and perform their own systematic reviews and meta-analyses. PMID:27683675

  8. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses in spine surgery, neurosurgery and orthopedics: guidelines for the surgeon scientist.

    PubMed

    Phan, Kevin; Mobbs, Ralph J

    2015-12-01

    The research evidence in the realm of surgery is expanding at a rapid pace, and thus corresponds with an increasing need to critically appraise and synthesize the available literature. Particularly in fields such as spine surgery, neurosurgery and orthopedics which traditionally have little Class I randomized clinical data, reviews are important to pool the available evidence on clinical questions which are otherwise difficult to answer. Whilst systematic reviews and meta-analyses have the potential to provide critical and updated surgical evidence to guide clinical decisions, poorly performed analyses and misinterpretation of such reviews may have a detrimental effect on patient care and outcomes. We present a summary of the critical steps in performing a systematic review and meta-analysis, allowing the surgeon scientist to better interpret and perform their own systematic reviews and meta-analyses. PMID:27683675

  9. From anesthetic sponge to nonsinking skull perforator, unitary work neurosurgery in the ancient Arabic and Islamic world.

    PubMed

    Najjar, Jalal

    2010-05-01

    During the Middle Ages, the work of Middle Eastern physicians such as Avicenna, Albucasis, and Rhazes was of paramount importance in guarding the knowledge that had been accumulated throughout history, particularly the contributions of Greek and Roman scholars, and it is well known that the Arabic versions of all of the works by Hippocrates and Galen by Islamic and Arabic scholars are the only copies that have survived until now. In addition to preserving this wealth of knowledge, these Middle Eastern scholars made significant contributions of their own to both medicine and neurosurgery. Many points regarding ancient Arabic and Islamic science need to be discussed and clarified, such as cadaver dissections, anatomic studies, neurosurgical practice and instruments, Arabic translations of Hippocratic and other works, and the influence of the Islamic civilization on Western civilization, especially the Renaissance. PMID:20920948

  10. What is New and Innovative in Emergency Neurosurgery? Emerging Diagnostic Technologies Provide Better Care and Influence Outcome: A Specialist Review

    PubMed Central

    Zisakis, Athanasios K.; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis

    2013-01-01

    The development of emergency medical services and especially neurosurgical emergencies during recent decades has necessitated the development of novel tools. Although the gadgets that the neurosurgeon uses today in emergencies give him important help in diagnosis and treatment, we still need new technology, which has rapidly developed. This review presents the latest diagnostic tools, which offer precious help in everyday emergency neurosurgery practice. New ultrasound devices make the diagnosis of haematomas easier. In stroke, the introduction of noninvasive new gadgets aims to provide better treatment to the patient. Finally, the entire development of computed tomography and progress in radiology have resulted in innovative CT scans and angiographic devices that advance the diagnosis, treatment, and outcome of the patent. The pressure on physicians to be quick and effective and to avoid any misjudgement of the patient has been transferred to the technology, with the emphasis on developing new systems that will provide our patients with a better outcome and quality of life. PMID:24349786

  11. HERO (Health Economics in Radiation Oncology): a pan-European project on radiotherapy resources and needs.

    PubMed

    Lievens, Y; Dunscombe, P; Defourny, N; Gasparotto, C; Borras, J M; Grau, C

    2015-02-01

    increase access to radiotherapy in Europe, the situation has improved considerably since the comparable RadioTherapy for Cancer: QUAnification of Infrastructure and Staffing Needs (QUARTS) study reported in 2005.

  12. HERO (Health Economics in Radiation Oncology): a pan-European project on radiotherapy resources and needs.

    PubMed

    Lievens, Y; Dunscombe, P; Defourny, N; Gasparotto, C; Borras, J M; Grau, C

    2015-02-01

    increase access to radiotherapy in Europe, the situation has improved considerably since the comparable RadioTherapy for Cancer: QUAnification of Infrastructure and Staffing Needs (QUARTS) study reported in 2005. PMID:25467072

  13. [Conformal radiotherapy of brain tumors].

    PubMed

    Haie-Meder, C; Beaudré, A; Breton, C; Biron, B; Cordova, A; Dubray, B; Mazeron, J J

    1999-01-01

    Conformal irradiation of brain tumours is based on the three-dimensional reconstruction of the targeted volumes and at-risk organ images, the three-dimensional calculation of the dose distribution and a treatment device (immobilisation, beam energy, collimation, etc.) adapted to the high precision required by the procedure. Each step requires an appropriate methodology and a quality insurance program. Specific difficulties in brain tumour management are related to GTV and CTV definition depending upon the histological type, the quality of the surgical resection and the medical team. Clinical studies have reported dose escalation trials, mostly in high-grade gliomas and tumours at the base of the skull. Clinical data are now providing a better knowledge of the tolerance of normal tissues. As for small tumours, the implementation of beam intensity modulation is likely to narrow the gap between conformal and stereotaxic radiotherapy. PMID:10572510

  14. [Radiotherapy of benign intracranial tumors].

    PubMed

    Delannes, M; Latorzeff, I; Chand, M E; Huchet, A; Dupin, C; Colin, P

    2016-09-01

    Most of the benign intracranial tumors are meningiomas, vestibular schwannomas, pituitary adenomas, craniopharyngiomas, and glomus tumors. Some of them grow very slowly, and can be observed without specific treatment, especially if they are asymptomatic. Symptomatic or growing tumors are treated by surgery, which is the reference treatment. When surgery is not possible, due to the location of the lesion, or general conditions, radiotherapy can be applied, as it is if there is a postoperative growing residual tumor, or a local relapse. Indications have to be discussed in polydisciplinary meetings, with precise evaluation of the benefit and risks of the treatments. The techniques to be used are the most modern ones, as multimodal imaging and image-guided radiation therapy. Stereotactic treatments, using fractionated or single doses depending on the size or the location of the tumors, are commonly realized, to avoid as much a possible the occurrence of late side effects. PMID:27523417

  15. Clinical Outcomes of Wulingsan Subtraction Decoction Treatment of Postoperative Brain Edema and Fever as a Complication of Glioma Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Wei-rong; Zhang, Feng-e; Diao, Bao-zhong; Zhang, Yue-ying

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the efficacy of Wulingsan subtraction (五苓散加减 WLSS) decoction in the treatment of postoperative brain edema and fever as a complication of glioma neurosurgery. Methods. This retrospective study was conducted at the Department of Neurosurgery of Liaocheng People's Hospital. Patients hospitalized between March 2011 and December 2014 were divided into three groups: Group A received WLSS oral liquid (50 mL), twice a day; Group B received an intravenous infusion of mannitol; and Group C received WLSS combined with mannitol (n = 30 patients per group). All patients were treated for 10 days continuously. Therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by measuring body temperature and indicators of renal function before and 3, 5, and 10 days after treatment. Results. Compared to the other two groups, significantly greater clinical efficacy was observed in the patients treated with mannitol (Group B; P < 0.05), although marked clinical efficacy was also observed over time in patients treated with WLSS (Group A). After 5 days, the quantifiable effects of the WLSS and mannitol combination group (Group C) were substantial (P < 0.05). The renal damage in Group B was more obvious after 5 days and 10 days. Conclusion. Compared with mannitol treatment alone, WLSS combined with mannitol induced a more rapid reduction in body temperature. Our findings suggest that patients should be started on mannitol for 3 days and then switched to WLSS to achieve obvious antipyretic effects and protect renal function. This method of treatment should be considered for clinical applications. PMID:27019661

  16. miR-25 modulates NSCLC cell radio-sensitivity through directly inhibiting BTG2 expression

    SciTech Connect

    He, Zhiwei Liu, Yi Xiao, Bing Qian, Xiaosen

    2015-02-13

    A large proportion of the NSCLC patients were insensitive to radiotherapy, but the exact mechanism is still unclear. This study explored the role of miR-25 in regulating sensitivity of NSCLC cells to ionizing radiation (IR) and its downstream targets. Based on measurement in tumor samples from NSCLC patients, this study found that miR-25 expression is upregulated in both NSCLC and radio-resistant NSCLC patients compared the healthy and radio-sensitive controls. In addition, BTG expression was found negatively correlated with miR-25a expression in the both tissues and cells. By applying luciferase reporter assay, we verified two putative binding sites between miR-25 and BTG2. Therefore, BTG2 is a directly target of miR-25 in NSCLC cancer. By applying loss-and-gain function analysis in NSCLC cell lines, we demonstrated that miR-25-BTG2 axis could directly regulated BTG2 expression and affect radiotherapy sensitivity of NSCLC cells. - Highlights: • miR-25 is upregulated, while BTG2 is downregulated in radioresistant NSCLC patients. • miR-25 modulates sensitivity to radiation induced apoptosis. • miR-25 directly targets BTG2 and suppresses its expression. • miR-25 modulates sensitivity to radiotherapy through inhibiting BTG2 expression.

  17. Frequency Allocation; The Radio Spectrum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Communications Commission, Washington, DC.

    The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) assigns segments of the radio spectrum to categories of users, and specific frequencies within each segment to individual users. Since demand for channel space exceeds supply, the process is complex. The radio spectrum can be compared to a long ruler: the portion from 10-540 kiloHertz has been set aside…

  18. The future for radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breton, Rene P.; Hassall, Tom

    2013-12-01

    THE TRANSIENT UNIVERSE Rene P Breton and Tom Hassall argue that, while radio astronomy has always involved transient phenomena, exploration of this part of the electromagnetic spectrum has been falling behind because of the lack of data. But the advent of a new generation of radio telescopes such as LOFAR, could change that.

  19. Safety and Special Radio Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Communications Commission, Washington, DC.

    Numerous radio stations across the nation perform nonbroadcast services in areas ranging from aviation, forestry protection, and telephone maintenance to amateur and citizen radio. These services can be grouped in four general categories: (1) safety, (2) industry, (3) land transportation, and (4) miscellaneous purposes. This bulletin briefly…

  20. Stabilized radio-frequency quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, H.D.; Fugitt, J.A.; Howard, D.R.

    1982-09-29

    A long-vane stabilized radio frequency resonator for accelerating charged particles and including means defining a radio frequency resonator cavity, a plurality of long vanes mounted in the defining means for dividing the cavity into sections, and means interconnecting opposing ones of the plurality of vanes for stabilizing the resonator.

  1. Space Telecommunications Radio Architecture (STRS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Richard C.

    2006-01-01

    A software defined radio (SDR) architecture used in space-based platforms proposes to standardize certain aspects of radio development such as interface definitions, functional control and execution, and application software and firmware development. NASA has charted a team to develop an open software defined radio hardware and software architecture to support NASA missions and determine the viability of an Agency-wide Standard. A draft concept of the proposed standard has been released and discussed among organizations in the SDR community. Appropriate leveraging of the JTRS SCA, OMG's SWRadio Architecture and other aspects are considered. A standard radio architecture offers potential value by employing common waveform software instantiation, operation, testing and software maintenance. While software defined radios offer greater flexibility, they also poses challenges to the radio development for the space environment in terms of size, mass and power consumption and available technology. An SDR architecture for space must recognize and address the constraints of space flight hardware, and systems along with flight heritage and culture. NASA is actively participating in the development of technology and standards related to software defined radios. As NASA considers a standard radio architecture for space communications, input and coordination from government agencies, the industry, academia, and standards bodies is key to a successful architecture. The unique aspects of space require thorough investigation of relevant terrestrial technologies properly adapted to space. The talk will describe NASA s current effort to investigate SDR applications to space missions and a brief overview of a candidate architecture under consideration for space based platforms.

  2. SETI radio spectrum surveillance system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crow, B.; Lokshin, A.; Marina, M.; Ching, L.

    1985-01-01

    The SETI Radio Spectrum Surveillance System (SRSSS) will provide a data base for assessing the radio frequency interference (RFI) environment for SETI and minimizing RFI disruptions during the search. The system's hardware and software are described and the sensitivity of the system is discussed.

  3. Audiences for Contemporary Radio Formats.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lull, James T.; And Others

    A radio audience survey of 110 sample geographic clusters in the Santa Barbara, California, area served a twofold purpose: the construction of a demographic profile of audience types according to radio format choices, and the identification and analysis of various audience subgroups. A skip interval technique of these geographic clusters resulted…

  4. [Radiotherapy of carcinoma of the salivary glands].

    PubMed

    Servagi-Vernat, S; Tochet, F

    2016-09-01

    Indication, doses, and technique of radiotherapy for salivary glands carcinoma are presented, and the contribution of neutrons and carbon ions. The recommendations for delineation of the target volumes and organs at risk are detailed. PMID:27521038

  5. Imaging Instrumentation and Techniques for Precision Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parodi, Katia; Parodi, Katia; Thieke, Christian; Thieke, Christian

    Over the last decade, several technological advances have considerably improved the achievable precision of dose delivery in radiation therapy. Clinical exploitation of the superior tumor-dose conformality offered by modern radiotherapy techniques like intensity-modulated radiotherapy and ion beam therapy requires morphological and functional assessment of the tumor during the entire therapy chain from treatment planning to beam application and treatment response evaluation. This chapter will address the main rationale and role of imaging in state-of-the-art external beam radiotherapy. Moreover, it will present the status of novel imaging instrumentation and techniques being nowadays introduced in clinical use or still under development for image guidance and, ultimately, dose guidance of precision radiotherapy.

  6. Historical aspects of heavy ion radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Raju, M.R.

    1995-03-01

    This paper presents historical developments of heavy-ion radiotherapy including discussion of HILAC and HIMAC and discussion of cooperation between Japan and the United States, along with personal reflections.

  7. Heavy particle radiotherapy: prospects and pitfalls

    SciTech Connect

    Faju, M.R.

    1980-01-01

    The use of heavy particles in radiotherapy of tumor volumes is examined. Particles considered are protons, helium ions, heavy ions, negative pions, and fast neutrons. Advantages and disadvantages are discussed. (ACR)

  8. [Conformal radiotherapy for vertebral bone metastasis].

    PubMed

    Faivre, J C; Py, J F; Vogin, G; Martinage, G; Salleron, J; Royer, P; Grandgirard, N; Pasquier, D; Thureau, S

    2016-10-01

    Analgesic external beam radiation therapy is a standard of care for patients with uncomplicated painful bone metastases and/or prevention of bone complications. In case of fracture risk, radiation therapy is performed after surgery in a consolidation of an analgesic purpose and stabilizing osteosynthesis. Radiotherapy is mandatory after vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty. Spinal cord compression - the only emergency in radiation therapy - is indicated postoperatively either exclusively for non surgical indication. Analgesic re-irradiation is possible in the case of insufficient response or recurrent pain after radiotherapy. Metabolic radiation, bisphosphonates or denosumab do not dissuade external radiation therapy for pain relief. Systemic oncological treatments can be suspended with a period of wash out given the risk of radiosensitization or recall phenomenon. Better yet, the intensity modulated radiotherapy and stereotactic radiotherapy can be part of a curative strategy for oligometastatic patients and suggest new treatment prospects. PMID:27614498

  9. Efficacy of radiotherapy in optic gliomas.

    PubMed

    Gould, R J; Hilal, S K; Chutorian, A M

    1987-01-01

    Twenty-five children with optic gliomas were evaluated over a seven year period by sequential computed axial tomography in order to determine the efficacy of radiotherapy as a treatment modality. Indices of tumor progression or regression included both size and contrast enhancement characteristics. Twenty of 25 patients followed during this period received radiotherapy. Of these patients, ten had tumor regression, nine were stable, and one was worse. This result contrasts with five untreated patients, four of whom had tumor progression and one who was stable (x2 = 18.37, p less than .001). One of the children with tumor progression later received radiotherapy and demonstrated marked tumor regression. Of the 18 treated patients who could be tested reliably, visual function and/or regression occurred in seven children. None of the untreated patients improved. There were no definite complications of radiotherapy in this small group.

  10. Planetary radio astronomy from Voyager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. K.

    1983-01-01

    The technique of radio astronomy makes it possible for a remote observer to detect the presence of magnetic fields and plasmas in planetary environments. Prior to the flights of the Voyager spacecraft, radio astronomical studies of Jupiter from earth and from earth orbit had correctly predicted the strength and orientation of Jupiter's magnetic field and trapped radiation belts. The Voyager Planetary Radio Astronomy investigations have now provided measurements of the complete spectrum of low frequency radio emissions from both planets. Each Voyager instrument consists of a pair of orthogonal, 10-m, electric monopole antennas which are connected to a step-tuned, superheterodyne receiver operating over the frequency range from 1.2 kHz to 40.5 MHz. The Voyager trajectory provided observations from above both the sunlit and nightside hemispheres of Jupiter. Saturn's nonthermal radio emission has been observed at frequencies as low as 3 kHz and as high as 1.2 MHz.

  11. CONSTRAINING RADIO EMISSION FROM MAGNETARS

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarus, P.; Kaspi, V. M.; Dib, R.; Champion, D. J.; Hessels, J. W. T.

    2012-01-10

    We report on radio observations of five magnetars and two magnetar candidates carried out at 1950 MHz with the Green Bank Telescope in 2006-2007. The data from these observations were searched for periodic emission and bright single pulses. Also, monitoring observations of magnetar 4U 0142+61 following its 2006 X-ray bursts were obtained. No radio emission was detected for any of our targets. The non-detections allow us to place luminosity upper limits of L{sub 1950} {approx}< 1.60 mJy kpc{sup 2} for periodic emission and L{sub 1950,single} {approx}< 7.6 Jy kpc{sup 2} for single pulse emission. These are the most stringent limits yet for the magnetars observed. The resulting luminosity upper limits together with previous results are discussed, as is the importance of further radio observations of radio-loud and radio-quiet magnetars.

  12. Radio outburst of BL Lacertae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buemi, C. S.; Leto, P.; Trigilio, C.; Umana, G.; Giroletti, M.; Orienti, M.; Raiteri, C. M.; Villata, M.; Bach, U.

    2013-04-01

    We report on extremely high radio flux of BL Lacertae at 43 and 8 GHz. Observations at 43 GHz with the 32 m radio telescope in Noto (Italy) revealed a flux density of 10.5 +/- 0.2 Jy on 2013 April 10.65, while observations at 8 GHz with the 32 m radio telescope in Medicina (Italy) detected a flux density of 8.2 +/- 0.7 Jy on April 12.22. These extremely high radio fluxes show that the radio activity likely correlated to the strong optical, near-infrared, and gamma-ray activity of 2011-2012 (see ATels #4028, #4031, #4155, #4271, #4277, #4349, #4565, #4600), and X-ray activity of late 2012 (ATels #4557, #4627), is far to be exhausted.

  13. Radiotherapy in the treatment of vertebral hemangiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Faria, S.L.; Schlupp, W.R.; Chiminazzo, H. Jr.

    1985-02-01

    Symptomatic vertebral hemangiomas are not common. Although radiotherapy has been used as treatment, the data are sparse concerning total dose, fractionation and results. The authors report nine patients with vertebral hemangioma treated with 3000-4000 rad, 200 rad/day, 5 fractions per week, followed from 6 to 62 months. Seventy-seven percent had complete or almost complete disappearance of the symptoms. Radiotherapy schedules are discussed.

  14. Blisters - an unusual effect during radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Höller, U; Schubert, T; Budach, V; Trefzer, U; Beyer, M

    2013-11-01

    The skin reaction to radiation is regularly monitored in order to detect enhanced radiosensitivity of the patient, unexpected interactions (e.g. with drugs) or any inadvertent overdosage. It is important to distinguish secondary disease from radiation reaction to provide adequate treatment and to avoid unnecessary discontinuation of radiotherapy. A case of bullous eruption or blisters during radiotherapy of the breast is presented. Differential diagnoses bullous pemphigoid, pemphigus vulgaris, and bullous impetigo are discussed and treatment described. PMID:24158604

  15. Exploring the Dynamic Radio Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooley, Kunal P.; Hallinan, Gregg; Frail, Dale A.; Myers, Steven T.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Bourke, Stephen; Horesh, Assaf

    2015-01-01

    Most of what is currently known about slow radio transients (supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, tidal disruption events, stellar flares, etc.) has come via radio follow-up of objects identified by synoptic telescopes at optical, X-ray or gamma-ray wavelengths. However, with the ability to capture obscured, unbeamed and magnetically-driven phenomena, radio surveys offer unique discovery strong diagnostic for cosmic transients. For the first time, we are systematically exploring the dynamic radio sky on timescales between one day to several years using multi-epoch large surveys with the Karl G. Jansky Array (VLA). We have carried out surveys in the COSMOS deep field as well as wide fields like Stripe 82. I have developed a unique infrastructure for near-real-time calibration, imaging, transient search, transient vetting, rapid multiwavelength follow-up, and contemporaneous optical surveys to better characterize radio transient phenomena. A large part of my thesis includes the commissioning of a new observing mode at the VLA: On-The-Fly Mosaicking. This mode has significantly improved the survey efficiency of the VLA, and it is a driver for VLASS, the future all-sky survey planned with this telescope. Through our radio surveys we have discovered several fascinating transients that are unique to the radio. These surveys have established the VLA as an efficient transient discovery machine. My thesis has enormous implications for how to design efficient transient surveys for the next generation of radio interferometer facilities like ASKAP, MeerKAT, WSRT/Apertif and LOFAR. My work has also provided answers to key problems such as the rates of transients, demographics of variability of radio sources including AGN, and false-positive foreground for future searches for the radio counterparts of gravitational-wave (GW) sources.

  16. The faint radio sky: radio astronomy becomes mainstream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padovani, Paolo

    2016-09-01

    Radio astronomy has changed. For years it studied relatively rare sources, which emit mostly non-thermal radiation across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, i.e. radio quasars and radio galaxies. Now, it is reaching such faint flux densities that it detects mainly star-forming galaxies and the more common radio-quiet active galactic nuclei. These sources make up the bulk of the extragalactic sky, which has been studied for decades in the infrared, optical, and X-ray bands. I follow the transformation of radio astronomy by reviewing the main components of the radio sky at the bright and faint ends, the issue of their proper classification, their number counts, luminosity functions, and evolution. The overall "big picture" astrophysical implications of these results, and their relevance for a number of hot topics in extragalactic astronomy, are also discussed. The future prospects of the faint radio sky are very bright, as we will soon be flooded with survey data. This review should be useful to all extragalactic astronomers, irrespective of their favourite electromagnetic band(s), and even stellar astronomers might find it somewhat gratifying.

  17. The Radio Language Arts Project: adapting the radio mathematics model.

    PubMed

    Christensen, P R

    1985-01-01

    Kenya's Radio Language Arts Project, directed by the Academy for Educational Development in cooperation with the Kenya Institute of Education in 1980-85, sought to teach English to rural school children in grades 1-3 through use of an intensive, radio-based instructional system. Daily 1/2 hour lessons are broadcast throughout the school year and supported by teachers and print materials. The project further was aimed at testing the feasibility of adaptation of the successful Nicaraguan Radio Math Project to a new subject area. Difficulties were encountered in articulating a language curriculum with the precision required for a media-based instructional system. Also a challenge was defining the acceptable regional standard for pronunciation and grammar; British English was finally selected. An important modification of the Radio Math model concerned the role of the teacher. While Radio Math sought to reduce the teacher's responsibilities during the broadcast, Radio Language Arts teachers played an important instructional role during the English lesson broadcasts by providing translation and checks on work. Evaluations of the Radio language Arts Project suggest significant gains in speaking, listening, and reading skills as well as high levels of satisfaction on the part of parents and teachers.

  18. New challenge of developing combined radio-drug therapy.

    PubMed

    Maingon, Philippe; Govaerts, Anne-Sophie; Rivera, Sofia; Vens, Conchita; Shash, Emad; Grégoire, Vincent

    2014-06-01

    Combined modality treatment can be used to improve control of the local disease at the expense of increased toxicity. Several randomized trials have demonstrated that this combined modality therapy is better than radiotherapy alone or chemotherapy alone in the treatment of locally advanced diseases. Several new targets as well as potential new radio-sensitizers have been identified. To speed-up the process of developing new combined modality treatments, good preclinical models for optimization of the ratio between efficacy and toxicity and a well established methodology within a network of advanced high-tech laboratories and clinical departments devoted to early phase trials, are mandatory. The Synergy of Targeted Agents and Radiation Therapy (STAR) platform of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) is gathering these tools. PMID:25841414

  19. Radio frequency coaxial feedthrough

    DOEpatents

    Owens, Thomas L.

    1989-01-17

    An improved radio frequency coaxial transmission line vacuum feed-through provided based on the use of a half-wavelength annular dielectric pressure barrier disk, or multiple disks comprising an effective half wavelength structure to eliminate reflections from the barrier surfaces. Gas-tight seals are formed about the outer and inner diameter surfaces of the barrier disk using a sealing technique which generates radial forces sufficient to form seals by forcing the conductor walls against the surfaces of the barrier disks in a manner which does not deform the radii of the inner and outer conductors, thereby preventing enhancement of the electric field at the barrier faces which limits voltage and power handling capabilities of a feedthrough.

  20. Division X: Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Ren-Dong; Taylor, Russ; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Chapman, Jessica; Dubner, Gloria; Garrett, Michael; Goss, W. Miller; Torrelles, Jose M.; Hirabayashi, Hisashi; Carilli, Chris; Hills, Richard; Shastri, Prajval

    2010-05-01

    The business meeting of Division X in the IAU 2009GA took place in three sessions during the day of August 6, 2009. The meeting, being well attended, started with the approval for the meeting agenda. Then the triennium reports were made in the first session by the president of Division X, Ren-Dong Nan, and by the chairs of three working groups: “Historic Radio Astronomy WG” by Wayne Orchiston, “Astrophysically Important Lines WG” by Masatoshi Ohishi, and “Global VLBI WG” by Tasso Tzioumis (proxy chair appointed by Steven Tingay). Afterwards, a dozen reports from observatories and worldwide significant projects have been presented in the second session. Business meeting of “Interference Mitigation WG” was located in the third session.

  1. Radio frequency distribution assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culley, K. M.

    The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) Radio Frequency Distribution Assembly (RFDA) is an interface between the Sperry four-channel, fast-switching synthesizer and the EF-111 jamming system antenna ports. The RFDS is a sophisticated, high-speed RF interface designed to convert the banded outputs of the four-channel synthesizer (16 ports) to 36 ports which represent six ordinal directions of arrival (DOA) for the EF-111 jamming system. The RFDS will distribute the RF signals while providing controlled RF amplitudes to simulate the antenna patterns of the EF-111 Electronic Warfare (EW) system. The simulation of the arrival angles which appear between the ordinal directions is performed by controlling the amplitude of the RF signal from the DOA channels. The RFDA is capable of operating over the frequency range of 500MHz to 18GHz, and can rapidly switch between varying frequencies and attenuation levels.

  2. Radiotherapy for Vestibular Schwannomas: A Critical Review

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Erin S.; Suh, John H.

    2011-03-15

    Vestibular schwannomas are slow-growing tumors of the myelin-forming cells that cover cranial nerve VIII. The treatment options for patients with vestibular schwannoma include active observation, surgical management, and radiotherapy. However, the optimal treatment choice remains controversial. We have reviewed the available data and summarized the radiotherapeutic options, including single-session stereotactic radiosurgery, fractionated conventional radiotherapy, fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, and proton beam therapy. The comparisons of the various radiotherapy modalities have been based on single-institution experiences, which have shown excellent tumor control rates of 91-100%. Both stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy have successfully improved cranial nerve V and VII preservation to >95%. The mixed data regarding the ideal hearing preservation therapy, inherent biases in patient selection, and differences in outcome analysis have made the comparison across radiotherapeutic modalities difficult. Early experience using proton therapy for vestibular schwannoma treatment demonstrated local control rates of 84-100% but disappointing hearing preservation rates of 33-42%. Efforts to improve radiotherapy delivery will focus on refined dosimetry with the goal of reducing the dose to the critical structures. As future randomized trials are unlikely, we suggest regimented pre- and post-treatment assessments, including validated evaluations of cranial nerves V, VII, and VIII, and quality of life assessments with long-term prospective follow-up. The results from such trials will enhance the understanding of therapy outcomes and improve our ability to inform patients.

  3. Teaching radio astronomy with Affordable Small Radio Telescope (ASRT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Bhal Chandra

    A simple, easy to build and portable radio telescope, called Affordable Small Radio Telescope (ASRT), has been developed by the Radio Physics Laboratory (RPL), a radio astronomy teaching unit associated with the National Centre for Radio Astrophysics (TIFR) and Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics (IUCAA), which are two premier astronomy institutes in India. ASRT consists of off-the-shelf available Direct to Home television dishes and is easy to assemble. Our design is scalable from simple very low cost telescope to more complex yet moderately costing instrument. ASRT provides a platform for demonstrating radio physics concepts through simple hands-on experiment as well as for carrying out solar monitoring by college/University students. The presentation will highlight the concept of ASRT and the different experiments that can be carried out using it. The solar monitoring observations will be discussed along-with details of methods for calibrating these measurements. The pedagogical usefulness of ASRT in introducing undergraduatephysics students to astrophysics, measurements and analysis methods used in radio astronomy will also be discussed. Use of ASRT in the last three years in the programs of RPL, namely the annual Radio Astronomy Winter School for College students (RAWSC) and Pulsar Observing for Students (POS) is also presented. This year a new program was initiated to form a virtual group of an ASRT community, which will not only share their measurements, but also think of improving the pedagogical usefulness of ASRT by innovative experiments. This initiative is presented with the best practices drawn from our experience in using ASRT as a tool for student training in space sciences. The talk will also point out future ideas in involving a larger body of students in simple radio astronomy experiments with the ASRT, which RPL is likely to nucleate as part of its mandate.

  4. Radiotherapy induced Lewis lung cancer cell apoptosis via inactivating β-catenin mediated by upregulated HOTAIR

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianxiang; Shen, Zhuping; Zheng, Yuanda; Wang, Shengye; Mao, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: HOTAIR, a long intervening non-coding Hox transcript antisense intergenic RNA, negatively regulates transcription on another chromosome and is reported to reprogram chromatin organization and promote tumor progression. Nevertheless, little is known about its roles in the development of radiation therapy of lung cancer. In this study, we established a xenografed model of Lewis lung carcinoma in C57BL/6 mice and investigated the possible involvement of HOTAIR in this radiotherapy. Methods: C57BL/6 mice were subcutaneously transplanted with Lewis lung carcinoma cells and locally irradiated followed by measurement in tumor volume. Levels of HOTAIR and WIF-1 mRNA expression were determined by using Quantitative Real-Time PCR. Levels of WIF-1 and β-catenin were determined by using western blot assay. Cell viability was evaluated by MTT assay. Cell apoptosis was examined by using TUNEL assay. Results: In mice bearing Lewis lung carcinoma tumor, local radiotherapy suppressed tumor growth and it also reduced level of HOTAIR but increased WIF-1 expression. When HOTAIR was overexpressed, radio-sensitivity was reduced. In vitro experiments, irradiation inhibited HOTAIR transportation to the nucleus. However, it was reversed by over-expressed HOTAIR. Cells transfected with pcDNA-HOTAIR or siRNA-HOTAIR resulted in decline or increase in radiosensitivity, which was abrogated by co-tansfected with siRNA-β-catenin. Conclusion: Radiotherapy induced Lewis lung cancer cell apoptosis via inactivating β-catenin mediated by upregulated HOTAIR. PMID:26339352

  5. A Simulation Study of a Radiofrequency Localization System for Tracking Patient Motion in Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ostyn, Mark; Kim, Siyong; Yeo, Woon-Hong

    2016-01-01

    One of the most widely used tools in cancer treatment is external beam radiotherapy. However, the major risk involved in radiotherapy is excess radiation dose to healthy tissue, exacerbated by patient motion. Here, we present a simulation study of a potential radiofrequency (RF) localization system designed to track intrafraction motion (target motion during the radiation treatment). This system includes skin-wearable RF beacons and an external tracking system. We develop an analytical model for direction of arrival measurement with radio frequencies (GHz range) for use in a localization estimate. We use a Monte Carlo simulation to investigate the relationship between a localization estimate and angular resolution of sensors (signal receivers) in a simulated room. The results indicate that the external sensor needs an angular resolution of about 0.03 degrees to achieve millimeter-level localization accuracy in a treatment room. This fundamental study of a novel RF localization system offers the groundwork to design a radiotherapy-compatible patient positioning system for active motion compensation. PMID:27089342

  6. A Simulation Study of a Radiofrequency Localization System for Tracking Patient Motion in Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ostyn, Mark; Kim, Siyong; Yeo, Woon-Hong

    2016-01-01

    One of the most widely used tools in cancer treatment is external beam radiotherapy. However, the major risk involved in radiotherapy is excess radiation dose to healthy tissue, exacerbated by patient motion. Here, we present a simulation study of a potential radiofrequency (RF) localization system designed to track intrafraction motion (target motion during the radiation treatment). This system includes skin-wearable RF beacons and an external tracking system. We develop an analytical model for direction of arrival measurement with radio frequencies (GHz range) for use in a localization estimate. We use a Monte Carlo simulation to investigate the relationship between a localization estimate and angular resolution of sensors (signal receivers) in a simulated room. The results indicate that the external sensor needs an angular resolution of about 0.03 degrees to achieve millimeter-level localization accuracy in a treatment room. This fundamental study of a novel RF localization system offers the groundwork to design a radiotherapy-compatible patient positioning system for active motion compensation. PMID:27089342

  7. The use of low energy, ion induced nuclear reactions for proton radiotherapy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, K.M.; Doyle, B.; Segal, M.N.; Hamm, R.W.; Adler, R.J.; Glatstein, E.

    1995-04-01

    Medical radiotherapy has traditionally relied upon the use of external photon beams and internally implanted radioisotopes as the chief means of irradiating tumors. However, advances in accelerator technology and the exploitation of novel means of producing radiation may provide useful alternatives to some current modes of medical radiation delivery with reduced total dose to surrounding healthy tissue, reduced expense, or increased treatment accessibility. This paper will briefly overview currently established modes of radiation therapy, techniques still considered experimental but in clinical use, innovative concepts under study that may enable new forms of treatment or enhance existing ones. The potential role of low energy, ion-induced nuclear reactions in radiotherapy applications is examined specifically for the 650 keV d({sup 3}He,p){sup 4}He nuclear reaction. This examination will describe the basic physics associated with this reaction`s production of 17.4 MeV protons and the processes used to fabricate the necessary materials used in the technique. Calculations of the delivered radiation dose, heat generation, and required exposure times are presented. Experimental data are also presented validating the dose calculations. The design of small, lower cost ion accelerators, as embodied in `nested`-tandem and radio frequency quadrupole accelerators is examined, as is the potential use of high-output {sup 3}He and deuterium ion sources. Finally, potential clinical applications are discussed in terms of the advantages and disadvantages of this technique with respect to current radiotherapy methods and equipment.

  8. Radio halos in future surveys in the radio continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassano, R.; Brunetti, G.; Norris, R. P.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Trasatti, M.

    2012-12-01

    Aims: Giant radio halos are Mpc-scale synchrotron sources detected in a significant fraction of massive and merging galaxy clusters. The statistical properties of radio halos can be used to discriminate among various models for the origin of non-thermal particles in galaxy clusters. Therefore, theoretical predictions are important as new radio telescopes are about to begin to survey the sky at low and high frequencies with unprecedented sensitivity. Methods: We carry out Monte Carlo simulations to model the formation and evolution of radio halos in a cosmological framework and extend previous calculations based on the hypothesis of turbulent-acceleration. We adopt a phenomenological approach by assuming that radio halos are either generated in turbulent merging clusters, or are purely hadronic sources generated in more relaxed clusters, "off-state" halos. Results: The models predict that the luminosity function of radio halos at high radio luminosities is dominated by the contribution of halos generated in turbulent clusters. The generation of these halos becomes less efficient in less massive systems causing a flattening of the luminosity function at lower radio luminosities, as also pointed out in previous studies. However, we find that potentially this can be more than compensated for by the intervening contribution of "off-state" halos that dominate at lower radio luminosities. We derive the expected number of halos to explore the potential of the EMU+WODAN surveys that will be carried out with ASKAP and Aperitif, respectively, in the near future. By restricting to clusters at redshifts ≤ 0.6, we show that the planned EMU+WODAN surveys at 1.4 GHz have the potential to detect up to about 200 new radio halos, increasing their number by one order of magnitude. A fraction of these sources will be "off-state" halos that should be found at flux level f1.4 ≤ 10 mJy, presently accessible only to deep pointed observations. We also explore the synergy between surveys

  9. Radio studies of extragalactic supernovae.

    PubMed

    Weiler, K W; Sramek, R A; Panagia, N

    1986-03-14

    Some exploding stars (supernovae) are powerful emitters of centimeter radio radiation. Detailed observations have shown that these supernovae quickly become detectable in the radio range, first at shorter wavelengths (higher frequencies) and later at progressively longer and longer wavelengths (lower frequencies). This part of the phenomenon appears to be well explained by a monotonic decrease in the amount of ionized material surrounding the radio-emitting regions as the shock from the explosion travels outward. The radio emission itself is of a nonthermal, synchrotron origin, as is the case in most bright cosmic radio sources. Once the absorption effects become negligible, the radio intensity declines with time until reaching the detection limit of the telescope. Models suggest that the absorbing material originates in a dense wind of matter lost by the supernova progenitor star, or by its companion if it is in a binary system, in the last stages of evolution before the explosion. The synchrotron radio emission can be generated either externally by the shock wave from the explosion propagating through this same high density stellar wind or internally by a rapidly rotating neutron star, which is the collapsed core of the exploded star. Present results appear to favor the former model for at least the first several years after the supernova explosion, although the latter model remains viable.

  10. Essentials of research methods in neurosurgery and allied sciences for research, appraisal and application of scientific information to patient care (Part I).

    PubMed

    Esene, Ignatius N; El-Shehaby, Amr M; Baeesa, Saleh S

    2016-04-01

    Every neurosurgeon ought to be acquainted with the basics of research methods to enhance the comprehension of the research process and critical appraisal procedures of a scientific write-up. This in turn will ensure the appropriate application of scientific knowledge to patient care. Recent publications reveal that a significant proportion of articles published in neurosurgery are mislabeled with dire consequences on the sorting and indexing of evidence. Furthermore, many clinicians report that they feel unqualified to read the medical literature critically hence, it is for this reason that we conducted this review. Herein, we present a simple algorithm to facilitate the comprehension of research methods, as well as elucidate on the anatomy of common study designs in neurosurgery. Illustrative examples are provided when necessary. Understanding research methods and the critical analysis of published reports of clinical investigation is a fundamental skill of the physician to enable the incorporation of new clinical knowledge to practice. PMID:27094519

  11. Management of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Two Important Italian Political Leaders: A Paradigm of Ethical and Technological Evolution of Neurosurgery During the Past Half-Century.

    PubMed

    Longatti, Pierluigi; Giombelli, Ermanno; Pavesi, Giacomo; Carteri, Alessandro; Feletti, Alberto

    2016-08-01

    For a curious and extraordinary coincidence, 5 of the 7 most relevant leaders of the Italian Communist Party (Partito Comunista Italiano, which was established in 1921, has been the biggest Communist Party in Western Countries) suffered a cerebral stroke. Cerebrovascular diseases afflicted also Stalin and Lenin, and a number of Presidents of the United States. We present the stories of 2 important Italian political leaders who shared both the leadership role of the major left Italian Party and the dramatic experience of a subarachnoid hemorrhage. Retracing their medical incidents, separated by 50 years of history, we show how a fatal medical disease has become neurosurgical and successfully cured thanks to the advances of neurosurgery, neuroradiology, and hospital organization. A neurologic disease that was disgraceful 50 years ago has lost any disquieting and embarrassing significance in the present time to the light of evolution of vascular neurosurgery.

  12. Radio emission in Mercury magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela, J.; Reville, V.; Brun, A. S.; Pantellini, F.; Zarka, P.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Active stars possess magnetized wind that has a direct impact on planets that can lead to radio emission. Mercury is a good test case to study the effect of the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) on radio emission driven in the planet magnetosphere. Such studies could be used as proxies to characterize the magnetic field topology and intensity of exoplanets. Aims: The aim of this study is to quantify the radio emission in the Hermean magnetosphere. Methods: We use the magnetohydrodynamic code PLUTO in spherical coordinates with an axisymmetric multipolar expansion for the Hermean magnetic field, to analyze the effect of the IMF orientation and intensity, as well as the hydrodynamic parameters of the solar wind (velocity, density and temperature), on the net power dissipated on the Hermean day and night side. We apply the formalism derived by Zarka et al. (2001, Astrophys. Space Sci., 277, 293), Zarka (2007, Planet. Space Sci., 55, 598) to infer the radio emission level from the net dissipated power. We perform a set of simulations with different hydrodynamic parameters of the solar wind, IMF orientations and intensities, that allow us to calculate the dissipated power distribution and infer the existence of radio emission hot spots on the planet day side, and to calculate the integrated radio emission of the Hermean magnetosphere. Results: The obtained radio emission distribution of dissipated power is determined by the IMF orientation (associated with the reconnection regions in the magnetosphere), although the radio emission strength is dependent on the IMF intensity and solar wind hydro parameters. The calculated total radio emission level is in agreement with the one estimated in Zarka et al. (2001, Astrophys. Space Sci., 277, 293) , between 5 × 105 and 2 × 106 W.

  13. Radio Loud AGNs are Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiaberge, Marco; Gilli, Roberto; Lotz, Jennifer M.; Norman, Colin

    2015-06-01

    We measure the merger fraction of Type 2 radio-loud and radio-quiet active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at z\\gt 1 using new samples. The objects have Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images taken with Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) in the IR channel. These samples are compared to the 3CR sample of radio galaxies at z\\gt 1 and to a sample of non-active galaxies. We also consider lower redshift radio galaxies with HST observations and previous generation instruments (NICMOS and WFPC2). The full sample spans an unprecedented range in both redshift and AGN luminosity. We perform statistical tests to determine whether the different samples are differently associated with mergers. We find that all (92%-14%+8%) radio-loud galaxies at z\\gt 1 are associated with recent or ongoing merger events. Among the radio-loud population there is no evidence for any dependence of the merger fraction on either redshift or AGN power. For the matched radio-quiet samples, only 38%-15+16 are merging systems. The merger fraction for the sample of non-active galaxies at z\\gt 1 is indistinguishable from radio-quiet objects. This is strong evidence that mergers are the triggering mechanism for the radio-loud AGN phenomenon and the launching of relativistic jets from supermassive black holes (SMBHs). We speculate that major black hole (BH)–BH mergers play a major role in spinning up the central SMBHs in these objects.

  14. Adapting radiotherapy to hypoxic tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinen, Eirik; Søvik, Åste; Hristov, Dimitre; Bruland, Øyvind S.; Rune Olsen, Dag

    2006-10-01

    In the current work, the concepts of biologically adapted radiotherapy of hypoxic tumours in a framework encompassing functional tumour imaging, tumour control predictions, inverse treatment planning and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were presented. Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCEMRI) of a spontaneous sarcoma in the nasal region of a dog was employed. The tracer concentration in the tumour was assumed related to the oxygen tension and compared to Eppendorf histograph measurements. Based on the pO2-related images derived from the MR analysis, the tumour was divided into four compartments by a segmentation procedure. DICOM structure sets for IMRT planning could be derived thereof. In order to display the possible advantages of non-uniform tumour doses, dose redistribution among the four tumour compartments was introduced. The dose redistribution was constrained by keeping the average dose to the tumour equal to a conventional target dose. The compartmental doses yielding optimum tumour control probability (TCP) were used as input in an inverse planning system, where the planning basis was the pO2-related tumour images from the MR analysis. Uniform (conventional) and non-uniform IMRT plans were scored both physically and biologically. The consequences of random and systematic errors in the compartmental images were evaluated. The normalized frequency distributions of the tracer concentration and the pO2 Eppendorf measurements were not significantly different. 28% of the tumour had, according to the MR analysis, pO2 values of less than 5 mm Hg. The optimum TCP following a non-uniform dose prescription was about four times higher than that following a uniform dose prescription. The non-uniform IMRT dose distribution resulting from the inverse planning gave a three times higher TCP than that of the uniform distribution. The TCP and the dose-based plan quality depended on IMRT parameters defined in the inverse planning procedure (fields

  15. Recurrent Activity in Radio Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Jamrozy, Marek; Konar, Chiranjib; Machalski, Jerzy; Mack, Karl-Heinz; Saikia, Dhruba; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Stawarz, Lukasz; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Jagiellonian U.

    2007-10-15

    One of the outstanding issues concerning extragalactic radio sources is the total duration of their active phase and the possible existence of duty cycles of their nuclear activity. A duty cycle can be recognized if there is a mechanism which preserves the information of past activity for a sufficiently long time after a new activity has started up. If a new cycle starts before the radio lobes created during a former activity period have faded, we can recognize this by the observations of a young radio source embedded in an old relic structure.

  16. The Helios radio astronomy experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kayser, S.; Stone, R.

    1984-01-01

    Radio bursts traveling between the Sun and the Earth were tracked by radio astronomy experiments on Helios 1 and 2. A relatively short dipole antenna with a well-defined toroidal reception pattern was flown. The antenna spins in the ecliptic at 60.3 rpm and 2 frequencies are measured in each revolution. The signal analysis determines the strength of the signal, the direction of the source in the ecliptic, and the degree of modulation, and estimates source size. The experiments provide three-dimensional direction finding in space. They extend the radio frequency window beyond what is observable on Earth, and offer a long triangulation baseline.

  17. Radiotherapy Treatment Planning for Testicular Seminoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wilder, Richard B.; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Beard, Clair J.

    2012-07-15

    Virtually all patients with Stage I testicular seminoma are cured regardless of postorchiectomy management. For patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy, late toxicity is a major concern. However, toxicity may be limited by radiotherapy techniques that minimize radiation exposure of healthy normal tissues. This article is an evidence-based review that provides radiotherapy treatment planning recommendations for testicular seminoma. The minority of Stage I patients who choose adjuvant treatment over surveillance may be considered for (1) para-aortic irradiation to 20 Gy in 10 fractions, or (2) carboplatin chemotherapy consisting of area under the curve, AUC = 7 Multiplication-Sign 1-2 cycles. Two-dimensional radiotherapy based on bony anatomy is a simple and effective treatment for Stage IIA or IIB testicular seminoma. Centers with expertise in vascular and nodal anatomy may consider use of anteroposterior-posteroanterior fields based on three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy instead. For modified dog-leg fields delivering 20 Gy in 10 fractions, clinical studies support placement of the inferior border at the top of the acetabulum. Clinical and nodal mapping studies support placement of the superior border of all radiotherapy fields at the top of the T12 vertebral body. For Stage IIA and IIB patients, an anteroposterior-posteroanterior boost is then delivered to the adenopathy with a 2-cm margin to the block edge. The boost dose consists of 10 Gy in 5 fractions for Stage IIA and 16 Gy in 8 fractions for Stage IIB. Alternatively, bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin chemotherapy for 3 cycles or etoposide and cisplatin chemotherapy for 4 cycles may be delivered to Stage IIA or IIB patients (e.g., if they have a horseshoe kidney, inflammatory bowel disease, or a history of radiotherapy).

  18. 46 CFR 15.830 - Radio officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radio officers. 15.830 Section 15.830 Shipping COAST... Computations § 15.830 Radio officers. Radio officers are required on certain merchant vessels of the United States. The determination of when a radio officer is required is based on the Federal...

  19. PARTNeR: Radio astromony for students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasco, C.; Vaquerizo, J. A.

    2008-06-01

    PARTNeR stands for Proyecto Academico con el Radiotelescopio de NASA en Robledo (the Academic Project with NASA's radio telescope at Robledo), and allows students to perform radio astronomy observations. High school and university students can access the PARTNeR radio telescope via the internet. The students can operate the antenna from their own school or university and perform radio astronomy observations.

  20. 46 CFR 15.830 - Radio officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radio officers. 15.830 Section 15.830 Shipping COAST... Computations § 15.830 Radio officers. Radio officers are required on certain merchant vessels of the United States. The determination of when a radio officer is required is based on the Federal...

  1. 46 CFR 15.830 - Radio officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radio officers. 15.830 Section 15.830 Shipping COAST... Computations § 15.830 Radio officers. Radio officers are required on certain merchant vessels of the United States. The determination of when a radio officer is required is based on the Federal...

  2. 46 CFR 15.830 - Radio officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radio officers. 15.830 Section 15.830 Shipping COAST... Computations § 15.830 Radio officers. Radio officers are required on certain merchant vessels of the United States. The determination of when a radio officer is required is based on the Federal...

  3. Radio astronomy - The next decade

    SciTech Connect

    Kellermann, K.I. )

    1991-09-01

    Discoveries made over the past several decades by radio astronomers include radio galaxies, quasars, pulsars, gravitational lenses, energetic bursts from the sun and Jupiter, the greenhouse effect on Venus, the rotation of Mercury, giant molecular clouds, violent activity in galactic nuclei, and cosmic background radiation. This paper discusses the development of ever more powerful radio telescopes, which include the VLA operated by NRAO near Socorro (New Mexico); the new NRAO's 100-m Green Bank Telescope being constructed in Green Bank (West Virginia); and the proposed Millimeter Array, which will consist of 40 antennas, each 8-m across, arranged in any of four different ways depending on the size of the region under study. Consideration is also given to methods for increasing the resolving power and image quality of radio telescopes, with special attention given to very-long-baseline interferometry.

  4. Radio: The Other Public Medium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullally, Donald P.

    1980-01-01

    Four problems affecting the growth of public radio are discussed: the inability to pay the salaries to attract the talent required to produce quality programing; programing directed to limited audiences; the use of block programing; and poor promotional campaigns. (JMF)

  5. EVA Radio DRATS 2011 Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swank, Aaron J.; Bakula, Casey J.

    2012-01-01

    In the Fall of 2011, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) participated in the Desert Research and Technology Studies (DRATS) field experiments held near Flagstaff, Arizona. The objective of the DRATS outing is to provide analog mission testing of candidate technologies for space exploration, especially those technologies applicable to human exploration of extra- terrestrial rocky bodies. These activities are performed at locations with similarities to extra-terrestrial conditions. This report describes the Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Dual-Band Radio Communication System which was demonstrated during the 2011 outing. The EVA radio system is designed to transport both voice and telemetry data through a mobile ad hoc wireless network and employs a dual-band radio configuration. Some key characteristics of this system include: 1. Dual-band radio configuration. 2. Intelligent switching between two different capability wireless networks. 3. Self-healing network. 4. Simultaneous data and voice communication.

  6. SETI and International Radio Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyall, F.

    2010-04-01

    The use of radio in SETI is subject to international rules agreed through the International Telecommunication Union. These are summarised. An opportunity for their revision will arise in 2012. Suggestions may be made.

  7. [Hyperbaric oxygen and radiotherapy: From myth to reality].

    PubMed

    Espenel, S; Raffoux, C; Vallard, A; Garcia, M-A; Guy, J-B; Rancoule, C; Ben Mrad, M; Langrand-Escure, J; Trone, J-C; Pigne, G; Diao, P; Magné, N

    2016-07-01

    Worldwide, more than a million people receive each year a curative radiotherapy. While local control and overall survival are steadily increasing, 5 to 15% of patients still develop above grade 2 late toxicities. Late toxicities treatments are complex. Hyperbaric oxygenation was shown to induce revascularization and healing of injured tissues, but indications are still debated. Through a literature review, we summarized the hyperbaric oxygenation indications in radiation-induced late toxicities. We also studied the knowledge and practice of French local radiation therapists. It seems that hyperbaric oxygen therapy can be a conservative treatment of haemorrhagic cystitis and radiation-induced pain, in case of drug therapies failure. Often associated with a significant morbidity and mortality, surgery could be avoided. The risk of complications in case of tooth extraction in irradiated tissues is also reduced. However, the role of hyperbaric oxygenation for mandibular osteoradionecrosis, radiation-induced proctitis, enteritis, lymphoedema, brachial plexopathy, skin and neurological sequelae seems more questionable since studies results are conflicting. Future outcomes of phase III studies are expected to clarify the role of hyperbaric oxygenation in the management of radio-induced toxicities, including for head and necks complications. PMID:27342943

  8. Salivary Gland. Photon beam and particle radiotherapy: Present and future.

    PubMed

    Orlandi, Ester; Iacovelli, Nicola Alessandro; Bonora, Maria; Cavallo, Anna; Fossati, Piero

    2016-09-01

    Salivary gland cancers (SGCs) are rare diseases and their treatment depends upon histology, stage and site of origin. Radical surgery is the mainstay of treatment but radiotherapy (RT) plays a key role in both the postoperative and the inoperable setting, as well as in recurrent disease. In the absence of prospective randomized trials, a wide retrospective literature suggests postoperative RT (PORT) in patients with high risk pathological features. SGCs, and adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) in particular, are known to be radio-resistant tumors and should therefore respond well to particle beam therapy. Recently, excellent outcome has been reported with radical carbon ion RT (CIRT) in particular for ACC. Both modern photon- and hadron-based treatments are effective and are characterized by a favourable toxicity profile. But it is not clear whether one modality is superior to the other for disease control, due to the differences in patients' selection, techniques, fractionation schedules and outcome measurements among clinical experiences. In this paper, we review the role of photon and particle RT for malignant SGCs, discussing the difference between modalities in terms of biological and technical characteristics. RT dose and target volumes for different histologies (ACC versus non-ACC) have also been taken into consideration. PMID:27394087

  9. The Richard C. Schneider Lecture. New dimensions of neurosurgery in the realm of high technology: possibilities, practicalities, realities.

    PubMed

    Apuzzo, M L

    1996-04-01

    Fueled by a buoyant economy, popular attitudes and demands, and parallel progress in transferable technical and biological areas, neurosurgery has enjoyed a remarkable quarter of a century of progress. Developmental trends in the discipline have included the following: 1) a refinement of preoperative definition of the structural substrate, 2) miniaturization of operative corridors, 3) reduction of operative trauma, 4) increased effectiveness at the target site, and 5) incorporation of improved technical adjuvants and physical operative tools into treatment protocols. In particular, the computer has become a formidable ally in diagnostic and surgical events. Trends in technical development indicate that we are entering an exciting era of advanced surgery of the human cerebrum, which is heralded by the following: 1) current developments in areas of imaging, sensors, and visualization; 2) new devices for localization and navigation; 3) new capabilities for action at the target point; and 4) innovative concepts related to advanced operative venues. Imaging has provided structurally based surgical maps, which now are being given the new dimension of function in complex and integrated formats for preoperative planning and intraoperative tactical direction. Cerebral localization and navigation based on these advances promise to provide further refinement to the field of stereotactic neurosurgery, as linked systems are superseded by more flexible nonlinked methodologies in functionally defined volume-oriented navigational databases. Target point action now includes not only ablative capabilities through micro-operative methods and the use of stereotactically directed high-energy forms but also the emergence of restorative capabilities through applications of principles of genetic engineering in the areas of molecular and cellular neurosurgery. Complex, dedicated, and self-contained operative venues will be required to optimize the emergence and development of these

  10. A zero-power radio receiver.

    SciTech Connect

    Brocato, Robert Wesley

    2004-09-01

    This report describes both a general methodology and some specific examples of passive radio receivers. A passive radio receiver uses no direct electrical power but makes sole use of the power available in the radio spectrum. These radio receivers are suitable as low data-rate receivers or passive alerting devices for standard, high power radio receivers. Some zero-power radio architectures exhibit significant improvements in range with the addition of very low power amplifiers or signal processing electronics. These ultra-low power radios are also discussed and compared to the purely zero-power approaches.

  11. Radio emission from supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubner, Gloria; Giacani, Elsa

    2015-09-01

    The explosion of a supernova releases almost instantaneously about 10^{51} ergs of mechanic energy, changing irreversibly the physical and chemical properties of large regions in the galaxies. The stellar ejecta, the nebula resulting from the powerful shock waves, and sometimes a compact stellar remnant, constitute a supernova remnant (SNR). They can radiate their energy across the whole electromagnetic spectrum, but the great majority are radio sources. Almost 70 years after the first detection of radio emission coming from an SNR, great progress has been achieved in the comprehension of their physical characteristics and evolution. We review the present knowledge of different aspects of radio remnants, focusing on sources of the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds, where the SNRs can be spatially resolved. We present a brief overview of theoretical background, analyze morphology and polarization properties, and review and critically discuss different methods applied to determine the radio spectrum and distances. The consequences of the interaction between the SNR shocks and the surrounding medium are examined, including the question of whether SNRs can trigger the formation of new stars. Cases of multispectral comparison are presented. A section is devoted to reviewing recent results of radio SNRs in the Magellanic Clouds, with particular emphasis on the radio properties of SN 1987A, an ideal laboratory to investigate dynamical evolution of an SNR in near real time. The review concludes with a summary of issues on radio SNRs that deserve further study, and analysis of the prospects for future research with the latest-generation radio telescopes.

  12. Radio astronomy. [principles and observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J.; Clark, T.

    1974-01-01

    The origins, generation, detection, and interpretation of radio signals are discussed for signals with an assumed random polarization. After defining the basic parameters, the discussion moves to such topics as synchrotron radiation, plasma effects, changes in the electron energy spectrum in the radiating regions, energy loss to ionization, bremsstrahlung, radio astronomical observations of high-energy particles, emission by energetic particles, observation of supernova remnants and pulsars, galactic background continuum radiation, and others.

  13. Radio astrometry from the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linfield, R. P.

    1992-01-01

    An array of three radio telescopes on the Moon, separated by 100-1000 km, could measure the positions of compact radio sources 50-100 times more accurately than can be done on Earth. These measurements would form an all-sky reference frame of extreme precision (5-10 micro-arcsec) and stability, with applications to the dynamics of the solar system, our galaxy, and nearby galaxies.

  14. [Needs and financing of radiotherapy in France and Europe].

    PubMed

    Defourny, N; Lievens, Y

    2016-10-01

    Access to high-quality and safe radiotherapy is a prerequisite to assure optimal oncology care in a multidisciplinary environment. In view of supporting long-term radiotherapy planning, actual and predicted radiotherapy needs should be put in context of the nowadays' available resources. The present article reviews the existing data on radiotherapy resources and needs, along with the prevailing reimbursement systems in the different European countries, with a specific emphasis on France. It describes potential incentives of different financing systems on clinical practice and highlights how knowledge of the cost of radiotherapy treatments, by indication and technique, is essential to support correct reimbursement, hence access to radiotherapy. It is expected that such data will help national professional and scientific radiotherapy societies across Europe in their negotiations with policy makers, with the ultimate aim to make radiotherapy accessible to all cancer patients who need it, now and in the decades to come.

  15. [Needs and financing of radiotherapy in France and Europe].

    PubMed

    Defourny, N; Lievens, Y

    2016-10-01

    Access to high-quality and safe radiotherapy is a prerequisite to assure optimal oncology care in a multidisciplinary environment. In view of supporting long-term radiotherapy planning, actual and predicted radiotherapy needs should be put in context of the nowadays' available resources. The present article reviews the existing data on radiotherapy resources and needs, along with the prevailing reimbursement systems in the different European countries, with a specific emphasis on France. It describes potential incentives of different financing systems on clinical practice and highlights how knowledge of the cost of radiotherapy treatments, by indication and technique, is essential to support correct reimbursement, hence access to radiotherapy. It is expected that such data will help national professional and scientific radiotherapy societies across Europe in their negotiations with policy makers, with the ultimate aim to make radiotherapy accessible to all cancer patients who need it, now and in the decades to come. PMID:27599682

  16. [Whole Brain Irradiation and Hypo-fractionation Radiotherapy for the Metastases in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer].

    PubMed

    Gu, Xingting; Zhao, Yaqin; Xu, Feng

    2016-04-20

    Up to 40% non-small cell lung cancer patients developed brain metastasis during progression. Multiple brain metastases are common in non-small cell lung cancer. The prognosis of brain metastasis is poor with median survival of less than 1 year. Radio therapy for brain metastases has gradually developed from whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) to various radiation strategies. WBRT, surgery+WBRT, stereotactic radiotherapy+WBRT or WBRT with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB), etc. have better overall survival than those untreated patients. The damage of the cognitive function from WBRT has been realized recently, however, options of radiation strategies for long expected survival patients remain controversial. This paper will discuss different WBRT strategies and treatment side effects of non-small cell lung cancer with brain metastases. PMID:27118651

  17. A systematic review of antiproton radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittner, Martin-Immanuel; Grosu, Anca-Ligia; Wiedenmann, Nicole; Wilkens, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Antiprotons have been proposed as possible particles for radiotherapy; over the past years, the renewed interest in the potential biomedical relevance led to an increased research activity. It is the aim of this review to deliver a comprehensive overview regarding the evidence accumulated so far, analysing the background and depicting the current status of antiprotons in radiotherapy. A literature search has been conducted, including major scientific and commercial databases. All articles and a number of relevant conference abstracts published in the respective field have been included in this systematic review. The physical basis of antiproton radiotherapy is complex; however, the characterisation of the energy deposition profile supports its potential use in radiotherapy. Also the dosimetry improved considerably over the past few years. Regarding the biological properties, data on the effects on cells are presented; however, definite conclusions regarding the relative biological effectiveness cannot be made at the moment and radiobiological evidence of enhanced effectiveness remains scarce. In addition, there is new evidence supporting the potential imaging properties, for example for online dose verification. Clinical settings which might profit from the use of antiprotons have been further tracked. Judging from the evidence available so far, clinical constellations requiring optimal sparing in the entrance region of the beam and re-irradiations might profit most from antiproton radiotherapy. While several open questions remain to be answered, first steps towards a thorough characterisation of this interesting modality have been made.

  18. A systematic review of antiproton radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittner, Martin-Immanuel; Grosu, Anca-Ligia; Wiedenmann, Nicole; Wilkens, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Antiprotons have been proposed as possible particles for radiotherapy; over the past years, the renewed interest in the potential biomedical relevance led to an increased research activity. It is the aim of this review to deliver a comprehensive overview regarding the evidence accumulated so far, analysing the background and depicting the current status of antiprotons in radiotherapy. A literature search has been conducted, including major scientific and commercial databases. All articles and a number of relevant conference abstracts published in the respective field have been included in this systematic review. The physical basis of antiproton radiotherapy is complex; however, the characterisation of the energy deposition profile supports its potential use in radiotherapy. Also the dosimetry improved considerably over the past few years. Regarding the biological properties, data on the effects on cells are presented; however, definite conclusions regarding the relative biological effectiveness cannot be made at the moment and radiobiological evidence of enhanced effectiveness remains scarce. In addition, there is new evidence supporting the potential imaging properties, for example for online dose verification. Clinical settings which might profit from the use of antiprotons have been further tracked. Judging from the evidence available so far, clinical constellations requiring optimal sparing in the entrance region of the beam and re-irradiations might profit most from antiproton radiotherapy. While several open questions remain to be answered, first steps towards a thorough characterisation of this interesting modality have been made.

  19. Mathematical modeling of radio systems and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, Iu. P.; Tsvetnov, V. V.

    Methods for developing mathematical models of radio systems and devices are presented with emphasis on the functional approach to the modeling of radio systems. In particular, attention is given to the formal description of radio systems, computer-aided modeling of radio systems, a classification of methods of radio system modeling, and methods of mathematical description of signals and noise. Specific methods discussed include the carrier method, the complex envelope method, the method of statistical equivalents, and the information parameter method.

  20. [Image-guided radiotherapy and partial delegation to radiotherapy technicians: Clermont-Ferrand experience].

    PubMed

    Loos, G; Moreau, J; Miroir, J; Benhaïm, C; Biau, J; Caillé, C; Bellière, A; Lapeyre, M

    2013-10-01

    The various image-guided radiotherapy techniques raise the question of how to achieve the control of patient positioning before irradiation session and sharing of tasks between radiation oncologists and radiotherapy technicians. We have put in place procedures and operating methods to make a partial delegation of tasks to radiotherapy technicians and secure the process in three situations: control by orthogonal kV imaging (kV-kV) of bony landmarks, control by kV-kV imaging of intraprostatic fiducial goldmarkers and control by cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging for prostate cancer. Significant medical overtime is required to control these three IGRT techniques. Because of their competence in imaging, these daily controls can be delegated to radiotherapy technicians. However, to secure the process, initial training and regular evaluation are essential. The analysis of the comparison of the use of kV/kV on bone structures allowed us to achieve a partial delegation of control to radiotherapy technicians. Controlling the positioning of the prostate through the use and automatic registration of fiducial goldmarkers allows better tracking of the prostate and can be easily delegated to radiotherapy technicians. The analysis of the use of daily cone beam CT for patients treated with intensity modulated irradiation is underway, and a comparison of practices between radiotherapy technicians and radiation oncologists is ongoing to know if a partial delegation of this control is possible. PMID:24011600

  1. A dose comparison of proton radiotherapy and photon radiotherapy for pediatric brain tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. Y.; Cho, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of photon radiotherapy and to compare the dose of treatment planning between proton radiotherapy and 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) for pediatric brain tumor patients. This study was conducted in five pediatric brain tumor patients who underwent craniospinal irradiation treatment from October 2013 to April 2014 in the hospital. The study compared organs at risk (OARs) by assessing the dose distribution of normal tissue from the proton plan and 3D-CRT. Furthermore, this study assessed the treatment plans by looking at the homogeneity index (HI) and conformity index (CI). As a result, the study revealed OARs due to the small volume proton radiotherapy dose distribution in the normal tissue. Also, by comparing HI and CI between the 3D-CRT and proton radiotherapy plan, the study found that the dose of proton radiotherapy plan was homogenized. When conducting 3D-CRT and proton radiotherapy in a dose-volume histogram comparison, the dose of distribution turned out to be low. Consequently, proton radiotherapy is used for protecting the normal tissue, and is used in tumor tissue as a homogenized dose for effective treatment.

  2. Information Content in Radio Waves: Student Investigations in Radio Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, K.; Scaduto, T.

    2013-12-01

    We describe an inquiry-based instructional unit on information content in radio waves, created in the summer of 2013 as part of a MIT Haystack Observatory (Westford, MA) NSF Research Experiences for Teachers (RET) program. This topic is current and highly relevant, addressing science and technical aspects from radio astronomy, geodesy, and atmospheric research areas as well as Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). Projects and activities range from simple classroom demonstrations and group investigations, to long term research projects incorporating data acquisition from both student-built instrumentation as well as online databases. Each of the core lessons is applied to one of the primary research centers at Haystack through an inquiry project that builds on previously developed units through the MIT Haystack RET program. In radio astronomy, students investigate the application of a simple and inexpensive software defined radio chip (RTL-SDR) for use in systems implementing a small and very small radio telescope (SRT and VSRT). Both of these systems allow students to explore fundamental principles of radio waves and interferometry as applied to radio astronomy. In ionospheric research, students track solar storms from the initial coronal mass ejection (using Solar Dynamics Observatory images) to the resulting variability in total electron density concentrations using data from the community standard Madrigal distributed database system maintained by MIT Haystack. Finally, students get to explore very long-baseline interferometry as it is used in geodetic studies by measuring crustal plate displacements over time. Alignment to NextGen standards is provided for each lesson and activity with emphasis on HS-PS4 'Waves and Their Applications in Technologies for Information Transfer'.

  3. The Radio JOVE Project - An Inexpensive Introduction to Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thieman, J. R.; Higgins, C.

    2004-12-01

    The Radio JOVE project began over six years ago as an education-centered program to inspire secondary school students' interest in space science through hands-on radio astronomy. The project was begun on small grants from the Goddard Space Flight Center Director's Discretionary Fund, the Initiative to Develop Education through Astronomy and Space Science (IDEAS) program, and the American Astronomical Society. Students build a radio receiver and antenna kit capable of receiving Jovian, solar, and galactic emissions at a frequency of 20.1 MHz. More than 600 of these kits have been distributed to students and interested observers (ages 10 through adult) in over 30 countries. For those who are not comfortable building their own kit, the Radio JOVE project has made it possible to monitor real-time data and streaming audio online from professional radio telescopes in Florida (http://jupiter.kochi-ct.jp) and Hawaii http://jupiter.wcc.hawaii.edu/newradiojove/main.html). Freely downloadable software called Radio-Skypipe (http://radiosky.com) emulates a chart recorder to monitor ones own radio telescope or the telescopes of other observers worldwide who send out their data over the Internet. Inexpensive spectrographs have been developed for the professional telescopes in Hawaii and Florida and freely downloadable spectrograph display software is available to receive this research-quality data. We believe the amateur network data to be of value to the research community and would like to have students more directly connected to ongoing research projects to enhance their interest in participating. Results of the project and plans for the future will be highlighted.

  4. Low-dose magnetic-field-immune biplanar fluoroscopy for neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, P. A.; Lawson, Michael A.; Wika, Kevin G.; Allison, Stephen W.; Quate, E. G.; Molloy, J. A.; Ritter, Rogers C.; Gilles, George T.

    1991-07-01

    The imaging chain of a bi-planar fluoroscopic system is described for a new neurosurgical technique: the Video Tumor Fighter (VTF). The VTF manipulates a small intracranially implanted magnet, called a thermoseed, by a large external magnetic field gradient. The thermoseed is heated by rf-induction to kill proximal tumor cells. For accurately guiding the seed through the brain, the x-ray tubes are alternately pulsed up to four times per second, each for as much as two hours. Radio-opaque reference markers, attached to the skull, enable the thermoseed's three dimensional position to be determined and then projected onto a displayed MRI brain scan. The imaging approach, similar to systems at the University of Arizona and the Mayo Clinic, includes a 20 cm diameter phosphor screen viewed by a proximity focused microchannel plate image intensifier coupled via fiberoptic taper to a solid state camera. The most important performance specifications are magnetic field immunity and, due to the procedure duration, low dosage per image. A preliminary arrangement designed in the laboratories yielded usable images at approximately 100 (mu) R exposure per frame. In this paper, the results of a series of studies of the effects of magnetic fields on microchannel plate image intensifiers used in the image detection chain are presented.

  5. Implant supported overdenture in the patients with history of radio and chemotherapy for the prostate malignancy.

    PubMed

    Aeran, Himanshu; Nautiyal, Vijay; Kumar, Varun; Uniyal, Shashank

    2015-01-01

    The success of dental implants in patients that have undergone chemo and radiotherapy for a region other than head and neck remain unclear, although some local and systemic factors could be contraindications to dental implant treatment. As there are very few absolute medical contraindications to dental implant treatment, but a number of conditions may increase the risk of treatment failure or complications. The case report describes the successful survival of dental implants placed in maxilla and mandible of a patient who had undergone radio and chemotherapy for prostate cancer. PMID:27390497

  6. Implant supported overdenture in the patients with history of radio and chemotherapy for the prostate malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Aeran, Himanshu; Nautiyal, Vijay; Kumar, Varun; Uniyal, Shashank

    2015-01-01

    The success of dental implants in patients that have undergone chemo and radiotherapy for a region other than head and neck remain unclear, although some local and systemic factors could be contraindications to dental implant treatment. As there are very few absolute medical contraindications to dental implant treatment, but a number of conditions may increase the risk of treatment failure or complications. The case report describes the successful survival of dental implants placed in maxilla and mandible of a patient who had undergone radio and chemotherapy for prostate cancer. PMID:27390497

  7. Time delays in gated radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Wendy L; Becker, Nathan

    2009-07-28

    In gated radiotherapy, the accuracy of treatment delivery is determined by the accuracy with which both the imaging and treatment beams are gated. If the time delays (the time between the target entering/leaving the gated region and the first/last image acquired or treatment beam on/off) for the imaging and treatment systems are in the opposite directions, they may increase the required internal target volume (ITV) margin, above that indicated by the tolerance for either system measured individually. We measured a gating system's time delay on 3 fluoroscopy systems, and 3 linear accelerator treatment beams, using a motion phantom of known geometry, varying gating type (amplitude vs. phase), beam energy, dose rate, and period. The average beam on imaging time delays were -0.04 +/- 0.05 s (amplitude, 1 SD), -0.11 +/- 0.04 s (phase); while the average beam off imaging time delays were -0.18 +/- 0.08 s (amplitude) and -0.15 +/- 0.04 s (phase). The average beam on treatment time delays were 0.09 +/- 0.02 s (amplitude, 1 SD), 0.10 +/- 0.03 s (phase); while the average beam off time delays for treatment beams were 0.08 +/- 0.02 s (amplitude) and 0.07 +/- 0.02 s (phase). The negative value indicates the images were acquired early, and the positive values show the treatment beam was triggered late. We present a technique for calculating the margin necessary to account for time delays and found that the difference between the imaging and treatment time delays required a significant increase in the ITV margin in the direction of tumor motion at the gated level.

  8. Operations experience at the Bevalac radiotherapy facility

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.R.; Criswell, T.L.; Howard, J.; Chu, W.T.; Singh, R.P.; Geller, D.; Nyman, M.

    1981-03-01

    During the first years of Bevalac operation the biomedical effort concentrated on radiobiology work, laying the foundation for patient radiotherapy. A dedicated radiotherapy area was created in 1978, and in 1979 full-scale patient treatment was begun. As of now over 500 treatments with carbon, neon and argon beams have been delivered to about 50 patients, some as boosts from other modalities and some as complete heavy ion treatments. Up to 12 patients per day have been treated in this facility. Continuing efforts in refining techniques and operating procedures are increasing efficiency and accuracy of treatments, and are contributing to the alleviation of scheduling difficulties caused by the unique requirements of radiotherapy with human patients.

  9. ERK/p38 MAPK inhibition reduces radio-resistance to a pulsed proton beam in breast cancer stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Myung-Hwan; Park, Jeong Chan

    2015-10-01

    Recent studies have identified highly tumorigenic cells with stem cell-like characteristics, termed cancer stem cells (CSCs) in human cancers. CSCs are resistant to conventional radiotherapy and chemotherapy owing to their high DNA repair ability and oncogene overexpression. However, the mechanisms regulating CSC radio-resistance, particularly proton beam resistance, remain unclear. We isolated CSCs from the breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, which expressed the characteristic breast CSC membrane protein markers CD44+/CD24-/ low , and irradiated the CSCs with pulsed proton beams. We confirmed that CSCs were resistant to pulsed proton beams and showed that treatment with p38 and ERK inhibitors reduced CSC radio-resistance. Based on these results, BCSC radio-resistance can be reduced during proton beam therapy by co-treatment with ERK1/2 or p38 inhibitors, a novel approach to breast cancer therapy.

  10. Radiotherapy enhances the toxicity of aminoglutethimide

    SciTech Connect

    Vanek, N.; Hortobagyi, G.N.; Buzdar, A.U. )

    1990-01-01

    We report a case of radiotherapy-enhanced aminoglutethimide skin toxicity in a patient with metastatic breast cancer. This patient was started on aminoglutethimide 6 days prior to radiation therapy, for painful bone metastasis. On day 7 of radiation therapy, she developed an extensive erythematous maculopapular rash over her face, trunk, and extremities. The rash was confluent over the radiation ports, both anteriorly and posteriorly. Aminoglutethimide was discontinued until completion of radiotherapy, and the rash resolved. Concomitant irradiation apparently enhanced the skin toxicity of aminoglutethimide or possibly aminoglutethimide had a radiosensitizing role in this patient.

  11. Pelvic radiotherapy and sexual function in women

    PubMed Central

    Froeding, Ligita Paskeviciute

    2015-01-01

    Background During the past decade there has been considerable progress in developing new radiation methods for cancer treatment. Pelvic radiotherapy constitutes the primary or (neo) adjuvant treatment of many pelvic cancers e.g., locally advanced cervical and rectal cancer. There is an increasing focus on late effects and an increasing awareness that patient reported outcomes (PROs) i.e., patient assessment of physical, social, psychological, and sexual functioning provides the most valid information on the effects of cancer treatment. Following cure of cancer allow survivors focus on quality of life (QOL) issues; sexual functioning has proved to be one of the most important aspects of concern in long-term survivors. Methods An updated literature search in PubMed was performed on pelvic radiotherapy and female sexual functioning/dysfunction. Studies on gynaecological, urological and gastrointestinal cancers were included. The focus was on the period from 2010 to 2014, on studies using PROs, on potential randomized controlled trials (RCTs) where female sexual dysfunction (FSD) at least constituted a secondary outcome, and on studies reporting from modern radiotherapy modalities. Results The literature search revealed a few RCTs with FSD evaluated as a PRO and being a secondary outcome measure in endometrial and in rectal cancer patients. Very limited information could be extracted regarding FSD in bladder, vulva, and anal cancer patients. The literature before and after 2010 confirms that pelvic radiotherapy, independent on modality, increases the risk significantly for FSD both compared to data from age-matched healthy control women and compared to data on patients treated by surgery only. There was only very limited data available on modern radiotherapy modalities. These are awaited during the next five years. Several newer studies confirm that health care professionals are still reluctant to discuss treatment induced sexual dysfunction with patients. Conclusions

  12. Rosetta Radio Science Investigations (RSI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pätzold, Martin; Häusler, Bernd; Aksnes, Kaare; Anderson, John D.; Asmar, Sami W.; Barriot, Jean-Pierre; Bird, Michael K.; Boehnhardt, Hermann; Eidel, Werner; Grün, Eberhardt; Ip, Wing H.; Marouf, Essam; Morley, Trevor; Neubauer, Fritz M.; Rickman, Hans; Thomas, Nicolas; Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Wallis, Max K.; Wickramasinghe, N. C.; Mysen, Eirik; Olson, Oystein; Remus, Stefan; Tellmann, Silvia; Andert, Thomas; Carone, Ludmila; Fels, Markus; Stanzel, Christina; Audenrieth-Kersten, Iris; Gahr, Alexander; Müller, Anna-Liane; Stupar, Dusan; Walter, Christina

    2007-02-01

    The Rosetta spacecraft has been successfully launched on 2nd March 2004 to its new target comet 67 P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The science objectives of the Rosetta Radio Science Investigations (RSI) experiment address fundamental aspects of cometary physics such as the mass and bulk density of the nucleus, its gravity field, its interplanetary orbit perturbed by nongravitational forces, its size and shape, its internal structure, the composition and roughness of the nucleus surface, the abundance of large dust grains, the plasma content in the coma and the combined dust and gas mass flux. The masses of two asteroids, Steins and Lutetia, shall be determined during flybys in 2008 and 2010, respectively. Secondary objectives are the radio sounding of the solar corona during the superior conjunctions of the spacecraft with the Sun during the cruise phase. The radio carrier links of the spacecraft Telemetry, Tracking and Command (TT&C) subsystem between the orbiter and the Earth will be used for these investigations. An Ultrastable oscillator (USO) connected to both transponders of the radio subsystem serves as a stable frequency reference source for both radio downlinks at X-band (8.4 GHz) and S-band (2.3 GHz) in the one-way mode. The simultaneous and coherent dual-frequency downlinks via the High Gain Antenna (HGA) permit separation of contributions from the classical Doppler shift and the dispersive media effects caused by the motion of the spacecraft with respect to the Earth and the propagation of the signals through the dispersive media, respectively. The investigation relies on the observation of the phase, amplitude, polarization and propagation times of radio signals transmitted from the spacecraft and received with ground station antennas on Earth. The radio signals are affected by the medium through which the signals propagate (atmospheres, ionospheres, interplanetary medium, solar corona), by the gravitational influence of the planet on the spacecraft and

  13. Optimal landmarks selection and fiducial marker placement for minimal target registration error in image-guided neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamir, Reuben R.; Joskowicz, Leo; Shoshan, Yigal

    2009-02-01

    We describe a new framework and method for the optimal selection of anatomical landmarks and optimal placement of fiducial markers in image-guided neurosurgery. The method allows the surgeon to optimally plan the markers locations on routine diagnostic images before preoperative imaging and to intraoperatively select the fiducial markers and the anatomical landmarks that minimize the Target Registration Error (TRE). The optimal fiducial marker configuration selection is performed by the surgeon on the diagnostic image following the target selection based on a visual Estimated TRE (E-TRE) map. The E-TRE map is automatically updated when the surgeon interactively adds and deletes candidate markers and targets. The method takes the guesswork out of the registration process, provides a reliable localization uncertainty error for navigation, and can reduce the localization error without additional imaging and hardware. Our clinical experiments on five patients who underwent brain surgery with a navigation system show that optimizing one marker location and the anatomical landmarks configuration reduces the average TRE from 4.7mm to 3.2mm, with a maximum improvement of 4mm. The reduction of the target registration error has the potential to support safer and more accurate minimally invasive neurosurgical procedures.

  14. [A new human machine interface in neurosurgery: The Leap Motion(®). Technical note regarding a new touchless interface].

    PubMed

    Di Tommaso, L; Aubry, S; Godard, J; Katranji, H; Pauchot, J

    2016-06-01

    Currently, cross-sectional imaging viewing is used in routine practice whereas the surgical procedure requires physical contact with an interface (mouse or touch-sensitive screen). This type of contact results in a risk of lack of aseptic control and causes loss of time. The recent appearance of devices such as the Leap Motion(®) (Leap Motion society, San Francisco, USA) a sensor which enables to interact with the computer without any physical contact is of major interest in the field of surgery. However, its configuration and ergonomics produce key challenges in order to adapt to the practitioner's requirements, the imaging software as well as the surgical environment. This article aims to suggest an easy configuration of the Leap Motion(®) in neurosurgery on a PC for an optimized utilization with Carestream(®) Vue PACS v11.3.4 (Carestream Health, Inc., Rochester, USA) using a plug-in (to download at: https://drive.google.com/?usp=chrome_app#folders/0B_F4eBeBQc3ybElEeEhqME5DQkU) and a video tutorial (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yVPTgxg-SIk).

  15. Successful Use of Four Factor-Prothrombin Complex Concentrate for Congenital Factor X Deficiency in the Setting of Neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Siddon, Alexa J; Tormey, Christopher A

    2016-08-01

    Congenital factor X deficiency is an extremely rare coagulation disorder that can place patients at risk for spontaneous hemorrhage or excessive bleeding in the setting of trauma or invasive procedures. Given the rarity of this disorder, there is little published guidance on how best to prevent or treat bleeding. Herein, we report a case of a 56-year-old white man with congenital factor X deficiency who was scheduled for major neurosurgery and who was treated perioperatively with 4-factor prothrombin complex concentrate (4F-PCC). Doses of 4F-PCC at 15 U per kg, administered immediately preoperatively and once at 24 hours postoperatively, allowed for successful completion of an anterior cervical discectomy and fusion without excessive bleeding. Moreover, no thromboembolic complications were observed. As such, given the wide availability of 4F-PCC, it may be considered as a first-line therapy and an alternative to fresh frozen plasma for factor X deficiencies, particularly in high-risk operative cases. PMID:27378481

  16. The science of medical decision making: neurosurgery, errors, and personal cognitive strategies for improving quality of care.

    PubMed

    Fargen, Kyle M; Friedman, William A

    2014-01-01

    During the last 2 decades, there has been a shift in the U.S. health care system towards improving the quality of health care provided by enhancing patient safety and reducing medical errors. Unfortunately, surgical complications, patient harm events, and malpractice claims remain common in the field of neurosurgery. Many of these events are potentially avoidable. There are an increasing number of publications in the medical literature in which authors address cognitive errors in diagnosis and treatment and strategies for reducing such errors, but these are for the most part absent in the neurosurgical literature. The purpose of this article is to highlight the complexities of medical decision making to a neurosurgical audience, with the hope of providing insight into the biases that lead us towards error and strategies to overcome our innate cognitive deficiencies. To accomplish this goal, we review the current literature on medical errors and just culture, explain the dual process theory of cognition, identify common cognitive errors affecting neurosurgeons in practice, review cognitive debiasing strategies, and finally provide simple methods that can be easily assimilated into neurosurgical practice to improve clinical decision making.

  17. Evaluation of a Transition to Practice Program for Neurosurgery Residents: Creating a Safe Transition From Resident to Independent Practitioner

    PubMed Central

    Lister, J. Richard; Friedman, William A.; Murad, Gregory J.; Dow, Jamie; Lombard, Gwen J.

    2010-01-01

    Background In 2004, the Department of Neurosurgery at the University of Florida implemented a major curriculum innovation called the Transition to Practice program. This program was established to prepare residents to more safely transition to the role of independent practitioner. Methods A qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the program was conducted after its fifth year using online surveys and interviews. Study participants included Transition to Practice graduates, faculty, and current residents. Results Of the 26 respondents, 89% of faculty and all graduates were very satisfied with the program. Strengths identified included an independent yet mentored broad operative experience, the development of self-confidence, and a real sense of responsibility for patients. Medical billing and coding instruction and career mentoring were areas of the program that required additional attention. Conclusion Overall, this program is meeting the stated objectives and is well received by the graduates and faculty. Based on the results of this evaluation, curricular changes such as instructions in practice management and implementation of a career-mentoring program have occurred. The Transition to Practice program is a unique curricular response to change that other surgical specialties may find useful in addressing the current-day stresses on graduate medical education. PMID:21976085

  18. [A new human machine interface in neurosurgery: The Leap Motion(®). Technical note regarding a new touchless interface].

    PubMed

    Di Tommaso, L; Aubry, S; Godard, J; Katranji, H; Pauchot, J

    2016-06-01

    Currently, cross-sectional imaging viewing is used in routine practice whereas the surgical procedure requires physical contact with an interface (mouse or touch-sensitive screen). This type of contact results in a risk of lack of aseptic control and causes loss of time. The recent appearance of devices such as the Leap Motion(®) (Leap Motion society, San Francisco, USA) a sensor which enables to interact with the computer without any physical contact is of major interest in the field of surgery. However, its configuration and ergonomics produce key challenges in order to adapt to the practitioner's requirements, the imaging software as well as the surgical environment. This article aims to suggest an easy configuration of the Leap Motion(®) in neurosurgery on a PC for an optimized utilization with Carestream(®) Vue PACS v11.3.4 (Carestream Health, Inc., Rochester, USA) using a plug-in (to download at: https://drive.google.com/?usp=chrome_app#folders/0B_F4eBeBQc3ybElEeEhqME5DQkU) and a video tutorial (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yVPTgxg-SIk). PMID:27234915

  19. IA-Regional-Radio - Social Network for Radio Recommendation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziczkowski, Grzegorz; Bougueroua, Lamine; Wegrzyn-Wolska, Katarzyna

    This chapter describes the functions of a system proposed for the music hit recommendation from social network data base. This system carries out the automatic collection, evaluation and rating of music reviewers and the possibility for listeners to rate musical hits and recommendations deduced from auditor's profiles in the form of regional Internet radio. First, the system searches and retrieves probable music reviews from the Internet. Subsequently, the system carries out an evaluation and rating of those reviews. From this list of music hits, the system directly allows notation from our application. Finally, the system automatically creates the record list diffused each day depending on the region, the year season, the day hours and the age of listeners. Our system uses linguistics and statistic methods for classifying music opinions and data mining techniques for recommendation part needed for recorded list creation. The principal task is the creation of popular intelligent radio adaptive on auditor's age and region - IA-Regional-Radio.

  20. Video via radio testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szu, Harold H.; Hsu, Charles C.

    2002-03-01

    to enable us to transmit live video via the SINGARS radio at a narrow bandwidth of 16 K bps.

  1. Radiotherapy in the management of early breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei

    2013-03-15

    Radiotherapy is an indispensible part of the management of all stages of breast cancer. In this article, the common indications for radiotherapy in the management of early breast cancer (stages 0, I, and II) are reviewed, including whole-breast radiotherapy as part of breast-conserving treatment for early invasive breast cancer and pre-invasive disease of ductal carcinoma in situ, post-mastectomy radiotherapy, locoregional radiotherapy, and partial breast irradiation. Key clinical studies that underpin our current practice are discussed briefly.

  2. Peculiar galaxies and radio sources.

    PubMed

    Arp, H

    1966-03-11

    Pairs of radio sources which are separated by from 2 degrees to 6 degrees on the sky have been investigated. In a number of cases peculiar galaxies have been found approximately midway along a line joining the two radio sources. The central peculiar galaxies belong mainly to a certain class in the recently compiled Atlas of Peculiar Galaxies. Among the radio sources so far associated with the peculiar galaxies are at least five known quasars. These quasars are indicated to be not at cosmological distances (that is, red shifts not caused by expansion of the universe) because the central peculiar galaxies are only at distances of 10 to 100 megaparsecs. The absolute magnitudes of these quasars are indicated to be in the range of brightness of normal galaxies and downward. Some of the radio sources which have been found to be associated with peculiar galaxies are galaxies themselves. It is therefore implied that ejection of material took place within or near the parent peculiar galaxies with speeds between 10(2) and 10(4) kilometers per second. After traveling for times of the order of 10(7) to 10(9) years, the luminous matter (galaxies) and radio sources (plasma) have reached their observed separations from the central peculiar galaxy. The large red shifts measured for the quasars would seem to be either (i) gravitational, (ii) collapse velocities of clouds of material falling toward the center of these compact galaxies, or (iii) some as yet unknown cause.

  3. Polarization Imaging of Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonucci, Robert

    1991-07-01

    Spectropolarimetry of the narrow line radio galaxy 3C234 was used to show in 1982 that there is a hidden broad line region occulted by an opaque torus oriented perpendicular to the radio structure axis. Given the luminosity of the reflected light, it follows that 3C234 would be called a quasar if its orientation with respect to the line of sight were different. Since then similar results were found for five Seyfert 2's. If many NLRG's are occulted quasars in the sky plane, several statistical anomalies in the beam model for superluminal motion are understandable. However, further optical spectropolarimetry has been disappointing in this regard, at least partially because of severe dilution of reflected light by starlight, sometimes polarized, from the host galaxies. We can solve this problem by observing in the UV. Furthermore, recent observations of two NLRGs have revealed OFF- NUCLEAR dust clouds reflecting and strongly "bluening" nuclear light in two NLRG's. Such dust clouds, abundant in the merger debris surrounding many luminous radio galaxies, should show up spectacularly in UV polarization images, providing information on the beam pattern and time history of nuclear emission. We request FOC polarization images of a sample of radio galaxies. We will also get for free and with high efficiency total flux images, suitable for studying the nuclei and the anomalous young stellar populations seen in merging radio galaxies from the ground.

  4. Polarization Imaging of Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonucci, Robert

    1996-07-01

    Spectropolarimetry of the narrow line radio galaxy 3C234 was used to show in 1982 that there is a hidden broad line region occulted by an opaque torus oriented perpendicular to the radio structure axis. Given the luminosity of the reflected light, it follows that 3C234 would be called a quasar if its orientation with respect to the line of sight were different. Since then similar results were found for five Seyfert 2's. If many NLRG's are occulted quasars in the sky plane, several statistical anomalies in the beam model for superluminal motion are understandable. However, further optical spectropolarimetry has been disappointing in this regard, at least partially because of severe dilution of reflected light by starlight, sometimes polarized, from the host galaxies. We can solve this problem by observing in the UV. Furthermore, recent observations of two NLRGs have revealed OFF- NUCLEAR dust clouds reflecting and strongly "bluening" nuclear light in two NLRG's. Such dust clouds, abundant in the merger debris surrounding many luminous radio galaxies, should show up spectacularly in UV polarization images, providing information on the beam pattern and time history of nuclear emission. We request FOC polarization images of a sample of radio galaxies. We will also get for free and with high efficiency total flux images, suitable for studying the nuclei and the anomalous young stellar populations seen in merging radio galaxies from the ground.

  5. Radio Astronomical studies of microquasars with RATAN-600 radio telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trushkin, Sergei; Nizhelskij, Nikolaj; Tsybulev, Peter; Bursov, Nikolaj

    Relativistic outflows of accreted matter in the collimated two opposite side jets, ejected from polar regions of accretion disks around black holes or neutron stars in microquasars, are the intensive sources of variable synchrotron radio emission and even TeV energy gamma-ray emission. The ballistic tracks of the clouds (blobs) are directly visible as radio jets in VLA and VLBI maps of SS433, GRS 1915+105, Cyg X-3. The temporal and frequency changes in the measured light curves are a key for deep understanding and a good probe test for physical models of of cosmic jets in mQSO and AGNs. A comparison the radio, optical, X-ray and now high energy gamma-ray intensities allows us to provide detailed studies. We have carried out the long-time monitoring (as a rule 200-250 daily measurements per year) Cyg X-3, GRS1915+10, SS433, Cyg X-1, LSI+61d303, LS5039 with RATAN-600 at 4.8, 7.7, 11.2, 21.7, and 30 GHz during last four years. While Cyg X-3 was in quiet state, we have detected clear radio-X-ray (RATAN-Swift) correlation. We have detected a lot of very bright flares (more than 1.5 Jy at 4.8 GHz) from SS433. In quiet state the radio emission of SS433 is modulated by a half of orbit period near 6.5d, probably being the geometric effect of precessing (164d) and nodding (6.1d) jets. GRS1915+105 have shown the clear correlation of flaring radio emission with X-ray flux from MAXI (Punsly et al., 2014 ApJ, in press). We have detected the enhanced absorption due to the rising hydrogen column density. We continue to study the super-orbital modulation (1666 days) of the flaring radio emission from LSI+61d303. The moments of maxima of the periodically flaring radio emission from it correlated with phase of this super-orbital period. The studies were supported by the grant 12-02-00812 from Russian Foundation of Basic Research.

  6. Clinical development of new drug-radiotherapy combinations.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ricky A; Plummer, Ruth; Stock, Julie K; Greenhalgh, Tessa A; Ataman, Ozlem; Kelly, Stephen; Clay, Robert; Adams, Richard A; Baird, Richard D; Billingham, Lucinda; Brown, Sarah R; Buckland, Sean; Bulbeck, Helen; Chalmers, Anthony J; Clack, Glen; Cranston, Aaron N; Damstrup, Lars; Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Forster, Martin D; Golec, Julian; Hagan, Russell M; Hall, Emma; Hanauske, Axel-R; Harrington, Kevin J; Haswell, Tom; Hawkins, Maria A; Illidge, Tim; Jones, Hazel; Kennedy, Andrew S; McDonald, Fiona; Melcher, Thorsten; O'Connor, James P B; Pollard, John R; Saunders, Mark P; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Smitt, Melanie; Staffurth, John; Stratford, Ian J; Wedge, Stephen R

    2016-10-01

    In countries with the best cancer outcomes, approximately 60% of patients receive radiotherapy as part of their treatment, which is one of the most cost-effective cancer treatments. Notably, around 40% of cancer cures include the use of radiotherapy, either as a single modality or combined with other treatments. Radiotherapy can provide enormous benefit to patients with cancer. In the past decade, significant technical advances, such as image-guided radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, stereotactic radiotherapy, and proton therapy enable higher doses of radiotherapy to be delivered to the tumour with significantly lower doses to normal surrounding tissues. However, apart from the combination of traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy with radiotherapy, little progress has been made in identifying and defining optimal targeted therapy and radiotherapy combinations to improve the efficacy of cancer treatment. The National Cancer Research Institute Clinical and Translational Radiotherapy Research Working Group (CTRad) formed a Joint Working Group with representatives from academia, industry, patient groups and regulatory bodies to address this lack of progress and to publish recommendations for future clinical research. Herein, we highlight the Working Group's consensus recommendations to increase the number of novel drugs being successfully registered in combination with radiotherapy to improve clinical outcomes for patients with cancer. PMID:27245279

  7. Breast Cancer Patients’ Experience of External-Beam Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Schnur, Julie B.; Ouellette, Suzanne C.; Bovbjerg, Dana H.; Montgomery, Guy H.

    2013-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a critical component of treatment for the majority of women with breast cancer, particularly those who receive breast conserving surgery. Although medically beneficial, radiotherapy can take a physical and psychological toll on patients. However, little is known about the specific thoughts and feelings experienced by women undergoing breast cancer radiotherapy. Therefore, the study aim was to use qualitative research methods to develop an understanding of these thoughts and feelings based on 180 diary entries, completed during radiotherapy by 15 women with Stage 0-III breast cancer. Thematic analysis identified four primary participant concerns: (a) a preoccupation with time; (b) fantasies (both optimistic and pessimistic) about life following radiotherapy; (c) the toll their side-effect experience takes on their self-esteem; and (d) feeling mystified by radiotherapy. These themes are consistent with previous literature on illness and identity. These findings have implications for the treatment and care of women undergoing breast cancer radiotherapy. PMID:19380502

  8. An Update on Radio Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Sramek, Richard A.; Weiler, Kurt W.; Montes, Marcos J.; Panagia, Nino

    The radio emission from supernovae (SNe) is nonthermal synchrotron radiation of high brightness temperature, with a ``turn-on'' delay at longer wavelengths, power-law decline after maximum with index beta, and spectral index alpha asymptotically decreasing with time to a final, optically thin value. Radio supernovae (RSNe) are best described by the Chevalier (1982) ``mini-shell'' model, with modifications by Weiler \\etal\\ (1990). RSNe observations provide a valuable probe of the SN circumstellar environment and constraints on progenitor masses. We present a progress report on a number of recent RSNe, as well as on new behavior from RSNe 1979C and 1980K, and on RSNe as potential distance indicators. In particular, we present updated radio light curves for SN 1993J in M81.

  9. Results of radiotherapy for Peyronie's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Niewald, Marcus . E-mail: ramnie@uniklinikum-saarland.de; Wenzlawowicz, Knut v.; Fleckenstein, Jochen; Wisser, Lothar; Derouet, Harry; Ruebe, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively review the results of radiotherapy for Peyronie's disease. Patients and Methods: In the time interval 1983-2000, 154 patients in our clinic were irradiated for Peyronie's disease. Of those, 101 had at least one complete follow-up data set and are the subject of this study. In the majority of patients, penis deviation was between 30 and 50{sup o}, there were one or two indurated foci with a diameter between 5 and 15 mm. Pain was recorded in 48/92 patients. Seventy-two of the 101 patients received radiotherapy with a total dose of 30 Gy, and 25 received 36 Gy in daily fractions of 2.0 Gy. The remaining patients received the following dosage: 34 Gy (1 patient), 38-40 Gy (3 patients). Mean duration of follow-up was 5 years. Results: The best results ever at any time during follow-up were an improvement of deviation in 47%, reduction of number of foci in 32%, reduction of size of foci in 49%, and less induration in 52%. Approximately 50% reported pain relief after radiotherapy. There were 28 patients with mild acute dermatitis and only 4 patients with mild urethritis. There were no long-term side effects. Conclusion: Our results compare well with those of other studies in the literature. In our patient cohort, radiotherapy was an effective therapy option with only very rare and mild side effects.

  10. Radiotherapy reduces sialorrhea in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Neppelberg, E; Haugen, D F; Thorsen, L; Tysnes, O-B

    2007-12-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder. Sialorrhea is a frequent problem in ALS patients with bulbar symptoms, because of progressive weakness of oral, lingual and pharyngeal muscles. This prospective study aimed to investigate the putative effect of palliative single-dose radiotherapy on problematic sialorrhea in patients with ALS. Twenty patients with ALS and problematic drooling were included; 14 were given radiotherapy with a single fraction of 7.5 Grey (Gy). Five patients were treated with botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) injections (20 U) into the parotid glands; two of these were later given radiotherapy. Symptom assessment, clinical examination and measurements of salivary flow (ml/min) were performed before and after treatment (1-2 weeks, 3 months). Salivary secretion was significantly reduced after radiation treatment, with a mean reduction of 60% (1 week) and 51% (2 weeks). Three months post-treatment, 21% reduction of the salivary secretion was observed compared with salivation before treatment. Mean salivary flow was not reduced after BTX-A treatment in five patients. No serious side-effects were observed with either of the two treatment modalities. Single-dose radiotherapy (7.5 Gy) significantly reduces sialorrhea and is an effective and safe palliative treatment in patients with ALS.

  11. Prostate cancer radiotherapy 2002: the way forward.

    PubMed

    Lukka, Himu; Pickles, Tom; Morton, Gerard; Catton, Charles; Souhami, Luis; Warde, Padraig

    2005-02-01

    In November 2000, the GU Radiation Oncologists of Canada had their first meeting, "Controversies in prostate cancer radiotherapy: consensus development". The success of this meeting prompted a second meeting, held in December 2002 to discuss "The Way Forward" in prostate radiotherapy. Radiation oncologists from across Canada were brought together and integrated with key opinion leaders in prostate cancer treatment from throughout North America. The group debated current controversies including: intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), external beam hypofractionation, high dose-rate brachytherapy, and hormone therapy in the management of prostate cancer. The meeting also sought to identify and prioritize clinical trial opportunities and to highlight steps required to achieve these research goals. In summary, advances involving IMRT have enabled the use of higher radiation doses without increasing morbidity. With renewed interest in hypofractionated radiation schedules, the value of hypofractionation using IMRT was discussed and initial results from ongoing clinical trials were presented. The emerging role for high dose-rate brachytherapy in higher risk patients was also discussed. Based on existing preliminary evidence the group expressed enthusiasm for further investigation of the role for brachytherapy in intermediate to high-risk patients. Despite significant advances in radiotherapy, hormone therapy continues to play an important role in prostate cancer treatment for patients with intermediate and high-risk disease. Although evidence supports the effectiveness of hormone therapy, the optimal timing, and duration of hormonal treatment are unclear. Results from ongoing clinical trials will provide insight into these questions and will assist in the design of future clinical trials.

  12. The Role of Radiotherapy in Acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Hannon, Mark J; Barkan, Ariel L; Drake, William M

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy has, historically, played a central role in the management of acromegaly, and the last 30 years have seen substantial improvements in the technology used in the delivery of radiation therapy. More recently, the introduction of highly targeted radiotherapy, or 'radiosurgery', has further increased the therapeutic options available in the management of secretory pituitary tumors. Despite these developments, improvements in primary surgical outcomes, an increase in the range and effectiveness of medical therapy options, and long-term safety concerns have combined to dictate that, although still deployed in selected cases, the use of radiotherapy in the management of acromegaly has declined steadily over the past 2 decades. In this article, we review some of the main studies that have documented the efficacy of pituitary radiotherapy on growth hormone hypersecretion and summarize the data around its potential deleterious effects, including hypopituitarism, cranial nerve damage, and the development of radiation-related intracerebral tumors. We also give practical recommendations to guide its future use in patients with acromegaly, generally, as a third-line intervention after neurosurgical intervention in combination with various medical therapy options.

  13. Miniature EVA Software Defined Radio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pozhidaev, Aleksey

    2012-01-01

    As NASA embarks upon developing the Next-Generation Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) Radio for deep space exploration, the demands on EVA battery life will substantially increase. The number of modes and frequency bands required will continue to grow in order to enable efficient and complex multi-mode operations including communications, navigation, and tracking applications. Whether conducting astronaut excursions, communicating to soldiers, or first responders responding to emergency hazards, NASA has developed an innovative, affordable, miniaturized, power-efficient software defined radio that offers unprecedented power-efficient flexibility. This lightweight, programmable, S-band, multi-service, frequency- agile EVA software defined radio (SDR) supports data, telemetry, voice, and both standard and high-definition video. Features include a modular design, an easily scalable architecture, and the EVA SDR allows for both stationary and mobile battery powered handheld operations. Currently, the radio is equipped with an S-band RF section. However, its scalable architecture can accommodate multiple RF sections simultaneously to cover multiple frequency bands. The EVA SDR also supports multiple network protocols. It currently implements a Hybrid Mesh Network based on the 802.11s open standard protocol. The radio targets RF channel data rates up to 20 Mbps and can be equipped with a real-time operating system (RTOS) that can be switched off for power-aware applications. The EVA SDR's modular design permits implementation of the same hardware at all Network Nodes concept. This approach assures the portability of the same software into any radio in the system. It also brings several benefits to the entire system including reducing system maintenance, system complexity, and development cost.

  14. Radio Relays Improve Wireless Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Signal Hill, California-based XCOM Wireless Inc. developed radio frequency micromachine (RF MEMS) relays with a Phase II Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract through NASA?s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. In order to improve satellite communication systems, XCOM produced wireless RF MEMS relays and tunable capacitors that use metal-to-metal contact and have the potential to outperform most semiconductor technologies while using less power. These relays are used in high-frequency test equipment and instrumentation, where increased speed can mean significant cost savings. Applications now also include mainstream wireless applications and greatly improved tactical radios.

  15. Mobile radio interferometric geodetic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdoran, P. F.; Niell, A. E.; Ong, K. M.; Resch, G. M.; Morabito, D. D.; Claflin, E. S.; Lockhart, T. G.

    1978-01-01

    Operation of the Astronomical Radio Interferometric Earth Surveying (ARIES) in a proof of concept mode is discussed. Accuracy demonstrations over a short baseline, a 180 km baseline, and a 380 km baseline are documented. Use of ARIES in the Sea Slope Experiment of the National Geodetic Survey to study the apparent differences between oceanographic and geodetic leveling determinations of the sea surface along the Pacific Coast is described. Intergration of the NAVSTAR Global Positioning System and a concept called SERIES (Satellite Emission Radio Interferometric Earth Surveying) is briefly reviewed.

  16. Cosmology: Home of a fast radio burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorimer, Duncan

    2016-02-01

    Our understanding of fast radio bursts -- intense pulses of radio waves -- and their use as cosmic probes promises to be transformed now that one burst has been associated with a galaxy of known distance from Earth. See Letter p.453

  17. Stripe-like increase of rCBV beyond the visible border of glioblastomas: site of tumor infiltration growing after neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Blasel, Stella; Franz, Kea; Ackermann, Hanns; Weidauer, Stefan; Zanella, Friedhelm; Hattingen, Elke

    2011-07-01

    We observed a stripe-like pattern of regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) increase in a defined region adjacent to the contrast enhancement (CE) on MRI of glioblastomas (GBM) that we defined as the "striate sign" (SS). We hypothesized that the SS marks infiltration of GBM outside the CE volume transforming into future CE tumor in the follow-up. T2*-weighted dynamic susceptibility-weighted CE (DSC)-MRI, and T1 and T2-weighted images (WI) of 16 patients with GBM were retrospectively evaluated in a baseline MRI performed before neurosurgery. In seven of these patients we also performed a (1)H MR spectroscopic imaging ((1)H MRSI). The regions of interest (ROI) delineating the SS were defined on rCBV maps for each patient. ROIs were overlaid on follow-up T1-WI and T2-WI MRI performed 3, 6, and 9 months after neurosurgery. Size and maximum signal intensity (max SI) of de novo CE within the area of the SS were analyzed. Statistical analysis was performed with the Friedman test (P < 0.05). In 15/16 patients de novo CE completely covered the area of the SS within nine months. Normalized max SI of de-novo CE of the 3, 6, and 9-months follow-up MR examinations were significantly higher than in the baseline MRI (P < 0.001). Normalized choline was increased within the SS in all patients with de novo CE (n = 6). De-novo CE appeared within the SS in all patients (96% of all slices). This implies that the SS might indicate the site of future CE tumor, which represents the area of tumor growth after neurosurgery.

  18. The role of Harvey Cushing and Walter Dandy in the evolution of modern neurosurgery in the Netherlands, illustrated by their correspondence.

    PubMed

    Groen, Rob J M; Koehler, Peter J; Kloet, Alfred

    2013-03-01

    The development of modern neurosurgery in the Netherlands, which took place in the 1920s, was highly influenced by the personal involvement of both Harvey Cushing and Walter Dandy, each in his own way. For the present article, the authors consulted the correspondence (kept at the Cushing/Whitney Medical Library in New Haven and the Alan Mason Chesney Medical Archives in Baltimore) of Cushing and Dandy with their Dutch disciples. The correspondence provides a unique inside view into the minds of both neurosurgical giants. After the neurologist Bernard Brouwer had paved the way for sending the Dutch surgeon Ignaz Oljenick overseas, Cushing personally took the responsibility to train him (1927-1929). On his return to Amsterdam, Oljenick and Brouwer established the first neurosurgical department in the country. Encouraged by Oljenick's favorable results, a number of Dutch general surgeons started asking Cushing for support. Cushing strategically managed and deflected these requests, probably aiming to increase the advantage of Oljenick and Brouwer. However, the University Hospital in Groningen persisted in the plans to establish its own neurosurgical unit and sent Ferdinand Verbeek to the US in 1932. Although staying at Cushing's department initially, Verbeek ultimately applied to Walter Dandy for a position of visiting voluntary assistant, staying until the end of 1934. Verbeek and Dandy became lifelong friends. On his return to Groningen, Verbeek started practicing neurosurgery, isolated in the northern part of the country. He relied on the support of Dandy, with whom he kept up a regular correspondence, discussing cases and seeking advice. Dandy, on his part, used Verbeek as the ambassador in Europe for his operative innovations. At the beginning of World War II, Oljenick had to flee the country, which concluded the direct line with the Cushing school in the Netherlands. After Dandy's death (1946), Verbeek continued practicing neurosurgery following his style and

  19. 14 CFR 105.13 - Radio equipment and use requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) The aircraft is equipped with a functioning two-way radio communication system appropriate to the air... aircraft's radio communications system from the time radio communications are first established between the... radio communications system is or becomes inoperative....

  20. 14 CFR 105.13 - Radio equipment and use requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) The aircraft is equipped with a functioning two-way radio communication system appropriate to the air... aircraft's radio communications system from the time radio communications are first established between the... radio communications system is or becomes inoperative....