Science.gov

Sample records for radon exposure chambers

  1. Quality assurance for radon exposure chambers at the National Air and Radiation Environmental Laboratory, Montgomery, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Semler, M.O.; Sensintaffar, E.L.

    1993-12-31

    The Office of Radiation and Indoor Air, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), operates six radon exposure chambers in its two laboratories, the National Air and Radiation Environmental Laboratory (NAREL) in Montgomery, Alabama, and the Las Vegas Facility, Las Vegas, Nevada. These radon exposure chambers are used to calibrate and test portable radon measuring instruments, test commercial suppliers of radon measurement services through the Radon Measurement Proficiency Program, and expose passive measurement devices to known radon concentrations as part of a quality assurance plan for federal and state studies measuring indoor radon concentrations. Both laboratories participate in national and international intercomparisons for the measurement of radon and are presently working with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to receive a certificate of traceability for radon measurements. NAREL has developed an estimate of the total error in its calibration of each chamber`s continuous monitors as part of an internal quality assurance program. This paper discusses the continuous monitors and their calibration for the three chambers located in Montgomery, Alabama, as well as the results of the authors intercomparisons and total error analysis.

  2. Exposure chamber

    DOEpatents

    Moss, Owen R.; Briant, James K.

    1983-01-01

    An exposure chamber includes an imperforate casing having a fluid inlet at the top and an outlet at the bottom. A single vertical series of imperforate trays is provided. Each tray is spaced on all sides from the chamber walls. Baffles adjacent some of the trays restrict and direct the flow to give partial flow back and forth across the chambers and downward flow past the lowermost pan adjacent a central plane of the chamber.

  3. [Radon and domestic exposure].

    PubMed

    Melloni, B; Vergnenègre, A; Lagrange, P; Bonnaud, F

    2000-12-01

    Radon is a noble gas derived from the decay of radium, which itself is a decay product of uranium. The decay products of radon can collect electrostatically on dust particles in the air and, if these particles are inhaled and attach to bronchial epithelium, produce a high local radiation dose. Alpha particles can induce DNA double-strand breaks and the development of cancer. A causal relation between lung cancer and radon exposure and its progeny has been demonstrated in epidemiological studies of miners. Radon exposure became a public health issue almost 15 years ago. Most radon exposure occurs indoors, predominantly in the home. There is however, a wide range of radon concentration values in different countries. The highest level occurs in areas with granite and permeable soils. The risk for smoking, the leading cause of lung cancer, is far greater than for radon, the second leading cause. The estimates obtained from case-control studies of indoor radon are very contradictory. Scientific knowledge of effects of low levels of exposure to radon and the role of cigarette smoking, as a combined factor, must be studied. Smoking and radon probably interact in a multiplicative fashion.

  4. Exposure chamber

    DOEpatents

    Moss, Owen R.

    1980-01-01

    A chamber for exposing animals, plants, or materials to air containing gases or aerosols is so constructed that catch pans for animal excrement, for example, serve to aid the uniform distribution of air throughout the chamber instead of constituting obstacles as has been the case in prior animal exposure chambers. The chamber comprises the usual imperforate top, bottom and side walls. Within the chamber, cages and their associated pans are arranged in two columns. The pans are spaced horizontally from the walls of the chamber in all directions. Corresponding pans of the two columns are also spaced horizontally from each other. Preferably the pans of one column are also spaced vertically from corresponding pans of the other column. Air is introduced into the top of the chamber and withdrawn from the bottom. The general flow of air is therefore vertical. The effect of the horizontal pans is based on the fact that a gas flowing past the edge of a flat plate that is perpendicular to the flow forms a wave on the upstream side of the plate. Air flows downwardly between the chamber walls and the outer edges of the pan. It also flows downwardly between the inner edges of the pans of the two columns. It has been found that when the air carries aerosol particles, these particles are substantially uniformly distributed throughout the chamber.

  5. The Japanese Radon and Thoron Reference Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Tokonami, Shinji; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Miyahara, Nobuyuki

    2008-08-07

    Passive detectors used for large-scale and long-term surveys are generally calibrated in a well-controlled environment such as a radon chamber. It has been also pointed out that some of them are sensitive to thoron. Thus it is necessary to check the thoron contribution to the detector response with the proposed or similar test before practical use. The NIRS accommodates radon/aerosol and thoron chambers for quality assurance and quality control of radon measurements. Thus both chambers work so well that they can supply us with the calibration technique and consequently, a good level of knowledge of the radon and thoron issue.

  6. Radon exposures in a Jerusalem public school.

    PubMed Central

    Richter, E D; Neeman, E; Fischer, I; Berdugo, M; Westin, J B; Kleinstern, J; Margaliot, M

    1997-01-01

    In December 1995, ambient radon levels exceeding 10,000 Bq/m3 were measured in a basement shelter workroom of a multilevel East Talpiot, Jerusalem, public elementary school (six grades, 600 students). The measurements were taken after cancers (breast and multiple myeloma) were diagnosed in two workers who spent their workdays in basement rooms. The school was located on a hill that geologic maps show to be rich in phosphate deposits, which are a recognized source for radon gas and its daughter products. Levels exceeding 1000,000 Bq/m3 were measured at the mouth of a pipe in the basement shelter workroom, the major point of radon entry. The school was closed and charcoal and electret ion chamber detectors were used to carry out repeated 5-day measurements in all rooms in the multilevel building over a period of several months. Radon concentrations were generally higher in rooms in the four levels of the building that were below ground level. There were some ground-level rooms in the building in which levels reached up to 1300 Bq/m3. In rooms above ground level, however, peak levels did not exceed 300 Bq/m3. Exposure control based on sealing and positive pressure ventilation was inadequate. These findings suggested that radon diffused from highly contaminated basement and ground-floor rooms to other areas of the building and that sealing off the source may have led to reaccumulation of radon beneath the building. Later, subslab venting of below-ground radon pockets to the outside air was followed by more sustained reductions in indoor radon levels to levels below 75 Bq/m3. Even so, radon accumulated in certain rooms when the building was closed. This sentinel episode called attention to the need for a national radon policy requiring threshold exposure levels for response and control. A uniform nationwide standard for school buildings below 75 Bq/m3 level was suggested after considering prudent avoidance, the controversies over risk assessment of prolonged low

  7. A double chamber system for producing constant radon concentration.

    PubMed

    Haider, B; Peter, J

    1995-01-01

    An experimental arrangement of a radon chamber with an intrinsic constancy of the relative radon concentration is described. The system consists of a reference chamber and an auxiliary storage chamber. The only active device is a timer-controlled pump or valve which feeds radon gas from the storage into the reference chamber. The switching pattern of the timer is extracted from model calculations and theoretically performs an exact compensation of the radon loss by radioactive decay. If the calculations are done in real time and online, every known external event influencing the radon concentration can be compensated. This paper presents a simple timer circuit and a computer code which generates the timer program. The influence of the air flow stability and the leakage of the chambers are discussed. It is planned to apply this theoretical approach to provide a constant radon gas concentration for an actual chamber.

  8. Radon/radon daughter environmental chamber located in the northwest end of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Radon/radon daughter environmental chamber located in the northwest end of building. VIEW LOOKING WEST - Department of Energy, Grand Junction Office, Building No. 32, 2597 B3/4 Road, Grand Junction, Mesa County, CO

  9. Radiological risk of building materials using homemade airtight radon chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Khalid, Norafatin; Majid, Amran Ab.; Yahaya, Redzuwan; Yasir, Muhammad Samudi

    2014-02-12

    Soil based building materials known to contain various amounts of natural radionuclide mainly {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th series and {sup 40}K. In general most individuals spend 80% of their time indoors and the natural radioactivity in building materials is a main source of indoor radiation exposure. The internal exposure due to building materials in dwellings and workplaces is mainly caused by the activity concentrations of short lived {sup 222}Radon and its progenies which arise from the decay of {sup 226}Ra. In this study, the indoor radon concentration emanating from cement brick, red-clay brick, gravel aggregate and Portland cement samples were measured in a homemade airtight radon chamber using continuous radon monitor 1029 model of Sun Nuclear. Radon monitor were left in the chamber for 96 hours with an hour counting time interval. From the result, the indoor radon concentrations for cement brick, red-clay brick, gravel aggregate and Portland cement samples determined were 396 Bq m{sup −3}, 192 Bq m{sup −3}, 176 Bq m{sup −3} and 28 Bq m{sup −3}, respectively. The result indicates that the radon concentration in the studied building materials have more than 100 Bq m{sup −3} i.e. higher than the WHO action level except for Portland cement sample. The calculated annual effective dose for cement brick, red-clay brick, gravel aggregate and Portland cement samples were determined to be 10 mSv y{sup −1}, 4.85 mSv y{sup −1}, 4.44 mSv y{sup −1} and 0.72 mSv y{sup −1}, respectively. This study showed that all the calculated effective doses generated from indoor radon to dwellers or workers were in the range of limit recommended ICRP action levels i.e. 3 - 10 mSv y{sup −1}. As consequences, the radiological risk for the dwellers in terms of fatal lifetime cancer risk per million for cement brick, red-clay brick, gravel aggregate and Portland cement were calculated to be 550, 267, 244 and 40 persons respectively.

  10. The most recent international intercomparisons of radon and thoron monitors with the NIRS radon and thoron chambers.

    PubMed

    Janik, M; Yonehara, H

    2015-06-01

    The fifth international intercomparison for radon and fourth for thoron monitors were conducted at National Institute of Radiological Sciences (Japan) with the radon and thoron chambers. The tests were made under two different exposures to radon and two exposures (in two rounds due to limited space in the thoron chamber) to thoron. In these most recent intercomparisons, two new graphical methods recommended by the ISO standard, Mandel's h statistic and the Youden plot, were implemented to evaluate the consistency between laboratories and within laboratories.The presented data indicated that the performance quality of laboratories for radon measurement as expressed by the percentage difference parameter has been stable since the first international intercomparison for passive monitors carried out in 2007, and it amounted to around 50 for 10 % of the difference from the reference value. The thoron exercise showed that further development and additional studies to improve its measuring methods and reliability are needed.

  11. One cubic metre NIST traceable radon test chamber.

    PubMed

    Kotrappa, P; Stieff, F

    2008-01-01

    With the availability of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Radon Emanation Standard with a content of approximately 5000 Bq of 226Ra, it is possible to build a flow through a practical radon test chamber. A standard glove box with four gloves and a transfer port is used. Air is pumped through a flow integrator, water jar for humidification and NIST source holder, and into the glove box through a manifold. A derived theoretical expression provides the calculated radon concentration inside the chamber. The calculation includes a derived decay correction due to the large volume and low flow rate of the system. Several calibrated continuous radon monitors and passive integrating electret ion chambers tested in the chamber agreed fairly well with the calculated radon concentrations. The chamber is suitable for handling the calibration of several detectors at the same time.

  12. Design and Fabrication of A Modern Radon-Tight Chamber for Radon Concentration Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhalemi, Ahmed; Jaafar, M. S.

    2010-07-01

    A modern radon-tight chamber (RTC) has been designed and fabricated to meet the request and requirements for both the Professional Continuous Radon Monitor (PCRM), and the RAD7 radon detector. The chamber is cubic shaped, made of Perspex with a volume of about 0.125 m3. The RTC was also equipped with a thermometer and a humidity sensor. A pair of gloves was attached on one side of the chamber's lateral opening for operating the PCRM. In addition, a fan was installed to circulate the air, and to distribute the radon gas to ensure homogeneity after the air inside the chamber is evacuated with nitrogen gas. At the end of the monitoring period, the results of the concentration of the radon emanated from a sample placed inside the chamber will then be available in any of three forms: numerical display on the control panel of the radon detector, printed report on the accessory printer, or transferred into a file on a personal computer via the RS-232 Serial port without disturbing the radon concentration inside the chamber. Computer software is provided by the manufacturer for this purpose. The result of analysis was presented in a one-way ANOVA that indicated that the radon concentration means are not difference for the three different positions of the PCRM (P > 0.05). Thus, this RTC can be used to measure the radon concentration and its progeny; in addition, it can be used for research and useful studies on radon exhalation from building materials.

  13. Realization of radioactive equilibrium in the KRISS radon chamber.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mo Sung; Park, Tae Soon; Lee, Jong Man

    2013-11-01

    The maintenance of radioactive equilibrium between radon and its decay products in a radon chamber is necessary to calibrate radon decay product monitors. In this study, the activity concentrations of radon decay products have been measured, and mosquito-repellent incense has been used to produce aerosol particles in the chamber. Filter papers with 8 μm pore size were used to collect aerosol in the chamber. The activity concentrations of radon decay products have been evaluated by the Modified Tsivoglou Method. The correction factors due to the differences in counting time requirements of the Modified Tsivoglou Method and the time delay between consecutive measurements have been determined. Finally, the radioactive equilibrium has been confirmed by applying the Bateman equation.

  14. Radon exposure and oropharyngeal cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Salgado-Espinosa, Tania; Barros-Dios, Juan Miguel; Ruano-Ravina, Alberto

    2015-12-01

    Oropharyngeal cancer is a multifactorial disease. Alcohol and tobacco are the main risk factors. Radon is a human carcinogen linked to lung cancer risk, but its influence in other cancers is not well known. We aim to assess the effect of radon exposure on the risk of oral and pharyngeal cancer through a systematic review of the scientific literature. This review performs a qualitative analysis of the available studies. 13 cohort studies were included, most of them mortality studies, which analysed the relationship between occupational or residential radon exposure with oropharyngeal cancer mortality or incidence. Most of the included studies found no association between radon exposure and oral and pharyngeal cancer. This lack of effect was observed in miners studies and in general population studies. Further research is necessary to quantify if this association really exists and its magnitude, specially performing studies in general population, preferably living in areas with high radon levels.

  15. Potential health effects of indoor radon exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Radford, E P

    1985-01-01

    Radon-222 is a ubiquitous noble gas arising from decay of radium-226 normally present in the earth's crust. Alpha radiation from inhaled short-lived daughters of radon readily irradiates human bronchial epithelium, and there is now good evidence of excess risk of lung cancer in underground miners exposed to higher concentrations. In homes, radon levels are highly variable, showing approximately log-normal distributions and often a small fraction of homes with high concentrations of radon and radon daughters. Factors affecting indoor concentrations include type of bedrock under dwellings, house foundation characteristics, radon dissolved in artesian water, and ventilation and degree of air movement in living spaces. Despite much recent work, exposures to radon daughters by the general public are not well defined. From application of risk assessments in miners to home conditions, it appears that about 25% or more of lung cancers among nonsmokers over the age of 60, and about 5% in smokers, may be attributable to exposure to radon daughters at home. It may be necessary to take remedial action to reduce this hazard in those dwellings with elevated levels of radon, and new construction should take account of this problem. PMID:4085431

  16. Potential health effects of indoor radon exposure.

    PubMed

    Radford, E P

    1985-10-01

    Radon-222 is a ubiquitous noble gas arising from decay of radium-226 normally present in the earth's crust. Alpha radiation from inhaled short-lived daughters of radon readily irradiates human bronchial epithelium, and there is now good evidence of excess risk of lung cancer in underground miners exposed to higher concentrations. In homes, radon levels are highly variable, showing approximately log-normal distributions and often a small fraction of homes with high concentrations of radon and radon daughters. Factors affecting indoor concentrations include type of bedrock under dwellings, house foundation characteristics, radon dissolved in artesian water, and ventilation and degree of air movement in living spaces. Despite much recent work, exposures to radon daughters by the general public are not well defined. From application of risk assessments in miners to home conditions, it appears that about 25% or more of lung cancers among nonsmokers over the age of 60, and about 5% in smokers, may be attributable to exposure to radon daughters at home. It may be necessary to take remedial action to reduce this hazard in those dwellings with elevated levels of radon, and new construction should take account of this problem.

  17. Exposure to unusually high indoor radon levels

    SciTech Connect

    Rasheed, F.N. )

    1993-03-27

    Unusually high indoor radon concentrations were reported in a small village in western Tyrol, Austria. The authors have measured the seasonal course of indoor radon concentrations in 390 houses of this village. 71% of houses in winter and 33% in summer, showed radon values on the ground floor above the Austrian action level of 400 Bq/cm[sup 3]. This proportion results in an unusually high indoor radon exposure of the population. The radon source was an 8,700-year-old rock slide of granite gneiss, the largest of the alpine crystalline rocks. It has a strong emanating power because its rocks are heavily fractured and show a slightly increased uranium content. Previous reports show increased lung cancer mortality, myeloid leukemia, kidney cancer, melanoma, and prostate cancer resulting from indoor radon exposure. However, many studies fail to provide accurate information on indoor radon concentrations, classifying them merely as low, intermediate, and high, or they record only minor increases in indoor radon concentrations. Mortality data for 1970-91 were used to calculate age and sex standardized mortality rates (SMR) for 51 sites of carcinoma. The total population of Tyrol were controls. A significantly higher risk was recorded for lung cancer. The high SMR for lung cancer in female subjects is especially striking. Because the numbers were low for the other cancer sites, these were combined in one group to calculate the SMR. No significant increase in SMR was found for this group.

  18. Radon exhalation rates from building materials using electret ion chamber radon monitors in accumulators.

    PubMed

    Kotrappa, Payasada; Stieff, Frederick

    2009-08-01

    An electret ion chamber (EIC) radon monitor in a sealed accumulator measures the integrated average radon concentration at the end of the accumulation duration. Theoretical equations have been derived to relate such radon concentrations (Bq m(-3) ) to the radon emanation rate (Bq d(-1)) from building materials enclosed in the accumulator. As an illustration, a 4-L sealable glass jar has been used as an accumulator to calculate the radon emanation rate from different granite samples. The radon emanation rate was converted into radon flux (Bq mm(-2) d(-1)) by dividing the emanation rate by surface area of the sample. Fluxes measured on typical, commercially available granites ranged from 20-30 Bq m(-2) d(-1). These results are similar to the results reported in the literature. The lower limit of detection for a 2-d measurement works out to be 7 Bq m(-2) d(-1). Equations derived can also be used for other sealable accumulators and other integrating detectors, such as alpha track detectors.

  19. MEASUREMENT AND REPORTING OF RADON EXPOSURES.

    PubMed

    2012-12-01

    Lung cancer risk caused by the inhalation of radon (222Rn) and its short-lived progeny is related to lung dose, which cannot be directly measured. The only measurable parameters which allow the determination of lung doses are the radon and radon progeny activity concentrations and related size distributions. Although lung cancers are caused by the inhaled short-lived radon progeny and not by the radon gas, it is the radon gas which is commonly measured and not its progeny. Since radon gas measurements are much easier to carry out, require less expensive equipment and are especially suited for long-term measurements, the report focuses on the measurement of the radon gas for specific exposure conditions in homes and workplaces. The first objective of this report is to provide information on how to measure radon, covering measurement techniques of radon in air and water, currently available detection systems, and measurement strategies most appropriate for the desired goal of a measurement campaign. Critical measurement strategy decisions are the selection of the measured radionuclide (i.e., radon gas or radon progeny and related size distributions), choice of the measurement period (i.e., short-term or long-term measurements), the choice of detector and its deployment, the type of measurement (i.e., areal or personal measurements), the survey strategy (i.e., integral or time-resolved measurements), or the strategy to accomplish the specific goal of a survey (i.e., measurements describing the current status or retrospective measurements). The choice of a specific strategy depends on the purpose of the survey, and differs therefore between the demands of a nation-wide indoor radon survey or an epidemiological study.The second objective of this report is how to interpret and report the results of these measurements, the associated uncertainties, and the resulting dosimetric estimates. Care should be taken when reporting and interpreting radon measurements because

  20. Overview of radon, lead and asbestos exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Demers, R. )

    1991-11-01

    Reducing the incidence of diseases caused by exposure to radon, lead and asbestos is a major public health challenge. Radon gas, which usually enters a home through the foundation, can cause lung cancer. Exposure to lead through paint, auto emissions and other sources can cause neurologic deficits, as well as anemia, abnormal vitamin D metabolism, nephropathy, hypertension and reproductive abnormalities. Asbestos, which is used in a vast number of products, is primarily associated with parenchymal asbestosis, pleural fibrosis, mesothelioma and lung cancer. The family physician can play a pivotal role in providing information about hazardous exposure, sources of exposure, epidemiology and disease prevention.29 references.

  1. Evaluation of Gas-filled Ionization Chamber Method for Radon Measurement at Two Reference Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Tokonami, Shinji; Kobayashi, Yosuke; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Yatabe, Yoshinori; Miyahara, Nobuyuki

    2008-08-07

    For quality assurance, gas-filled ionization chamber method was tested at two reference facilities for radon calibration: EML (USA) and PTB (Germany). Consequently, the radon concentrations estimated by the ionization chamber method were in good agreement with the reference radon concentrations provided by EML as well as PTB.

  2. Occupant radon exposure in houses with basements

    SciTech Connect

    Franklin, E.M.; Fuoss, S.

    1995-12-31

    This study compares basement and main-level radon exposure based on bi-level week-long radon measurements, occupancy and activity data collected in normal use during heating and non-heating seasons in a geographically-stratified random sample of about 600 Minnesota homes, in response to critiques of radon measurement protocol. Basement radon (RN1) (M=4.5, SD=4.5) and main level (Rn2)(M=2.9, SD=3.4) correlation was 0.8 (p=.00), including seasonal variation. In a 101-house subsample where Rn1 >=4.0 pCi/L and Rn2 <=3.9 pCi/L, maximum household exposure in basements was 1162 pCiHrs (M=120, Sd=207), main-level 2486 pCiHrs (M-434, SD=421). In same households, persons with most basement-time maxed 100 hrs (M=13,SD=23), persons with most main-level time maxed 160 hrs (M=79, SD=39). Basement activities show two patterns, (1) member used it for personal domain, e.g. sleeping, and (2) household used it for general activities, e.g. TV or children`s play. Basement occupancy justifies measurement of radon in the lowest livable housing level.

  3. 30 CFR 57.5037 - Radon daughter exposure monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Radon daughter exposure monitoring. 57.5037... Radon daughter exposure monitoring. (a) In all mines at least one sample shall be taken in exhaust mine air by a competent person to determine if concentrations of radon daughters are present....

  4. 30 CFR 57.5037 - Radon daughter exposure monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Radon daughter exposure monitoring. 57.5037... Radon daughter exposure monitoring. (a) In all mines at least one sample shall be taken in exhaust mine air by a competent person to determine if concentrations of radon daughters are present....

  5. 30 CFR 57.5037 - Radon daughter exposure monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Radon daughter exposure monitoring. 57.5037... Radon daughter exposure monitoring. (a) In all mines at least one sample shall be taken in exhaust mine air by a competent person to determine if concentrations of radon daughters are present....

  6. 30 CFR 57.5037 - Radon daughter exposure monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Radon daughter exposure monitoring. 57.5037... Radon daughter exposure monitoring. (a) In all mines at least one sample shall be taken in exhaust mine air by a competent person to determine if concentrations of radon daughters are present....

  7. 30 CFR 57.5037 - Radon daughter exposure monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Radon daughter exposure monitoring. 57.5037... Radon daughter exposure monitoring. (a) In all mines at least one sample shall be taken in exhaust mine air by a competent person to determine if concentrations of radon daughters are present....

  8. The Distribution of Exposure to Radon: Effects of Population Mobility

    SciTech Connect

    Gadgil, A.J.; Rein, S.; Nero, A.V.; Wollenberg Jr., H.A.

    1993-01-01

    The distribution of population exposures to radon, rather than the distribution of indoor radon concentrations, determines the fraction of population exposed to exceptionally high risk from radon exposures. Since this fraction at high risk has prompted the development of public policies on radon, it is important to first determine the magnitude of this fraction, and then how it much would decrease with different implementation program options for radon mitigation. This papers presents an approach to determining the distribution of population exposures to radon from public domain data, and illustrates it with application to the state of Minnesota. During this work, we are led to define a radon entry potential index which appears useful in the search for regions with high radon houses.

  9. EVALUATION OF RADON EMANATION FROM SOIL WITH VARYING MOISTURE CONTENT IN A SOIL CHAMBER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes measurements to quantitatively identify the extent to which moisture affects radon emanation and diffusive transport components of a sandy soil radon concentration gradient obtained in the EPA test chamber. The chamber (2X2X4 m long) was constructed to study t...

  10. Avian inhalation exposure chamber

    DOEpatents

    Briant, J.K.; Driver, C.J.

    1992-05-05

    An exposure system is designed for delivering gaseous material ranging in particle size from 0.4 micrometers to 20.0 micrometers uniformly to the heads of experimental animals, primarily birds. The system includes a vertical outer cylinder and a central chimney with animal holding bottles connected to exposure ports on the vertical outer cylinder. 2 figs.

  11. Avian inhalation exposure chamber

    DOEpatents

    Briant, James K.; Driver, Crystal J.

    1992-01-01

    An exposure system for delivering gaseous material ranging in particle size from 0.4 micrometers to 20.0 micrometers uniformly to the heads of experimental animals, primarily birds. The system includes a vertical outer cylinder and a central chimney with animal holding bottles connected to exposure ports on the vertical outer cylinder.

  12. Assessing exposure to granite countertops--Part 2: Radon.

    PubMed

    Allen, Joseph G; Minegishi, Taeko; Myatt, Theodore A; Stewart, James H; McCarthy, John F; Macintosh, David L

    2010-05-01

    Radon gas ((222)Rn) is a natural constituent of the environment and a risk factor for lung cancer that we are exposed to as a result of radioactive decay of radium ((226)Ra) in stone and soil. Granite countertops, in particular, have received recent media attention regarding their potential to emit radon. Radon flux was measured on 39 full slabs of granite from 27 different varieties to evaluate the potential for exposure and examine determinants of radon flux. Flux was measured at up to six pre-selected locations on each slab and also at areas identified as potentially enriched after a full-slab scan using a Geiger-Muller detector. Predicted indoor radon concentrations were estimated from the measured radon flux using the CONTAM indoor air quality model. Whole-slab average emissions ranged from less than limit of detection to 79.4 Bq/m(2)/h (median 3.9 Bq/m(2)/h), similar to the range reported in the literature for convenience samples of small granite pieces. Modeled indoor radon concentrations were less than the average outdoor radon concentration (14.8 Bq/m(3); 0.4 pCi/l) and average indoor radon concentrations (48 Bq/m(3); 1.3 pCi/l) found in the United States. Significant within-slab variability was observed for stones on the higher end of whole slab radon emissions, underscoring the limitations of drawing conclusions from discrete samples.

  13. Residential radon-222 exposure and lung cancer: exposure assessment methodology.

    PubMed

    Field, R W; Steck, D J; Lynch, C F; Brus, C P; Neuberger, J S; Kross, B C

    1996-01-01

    Although occupational epidemiological studies and animal experimentation provide strong evidence that radon-222 (222Rn) progeny exposure causes lung cancer, residential epidemiological studies have not confirmed this association. Past residential epidemiological studies have yielded contradictory findings. Exposure misclassification has seriously compromised the ability of these studies to detect whether an association exists between 222Rn exposure and lung cancer. Misclassification of 222Rn exposure has arisen primarily from: 1) detector measurement error; 2) failure to consider temporal and spatial 222Rn variations within a home; 3) missing data from previously occupied homes that currently are inaccessible; 4) failure to link 222Rn concentrations with subject mobility; and 5) measuring 222Rn gas concentration as a surrogate for 222Rn progeny exposure. This paper examines these methodological dosimetry problems and addresses how we are accounting for them in an ongoing, population-based, case-control study of 222Rn and lung cancer in Iowa.

  14. Residential Radon Exposure and Risk of Lung Cancer in Missouri

    Cancer.gov

    A case-control study of lung cancer and residential radon exposure in which investigators carried out both standard year-long air measurements and CR-39 alpha detector measurements (call surface monitors)

  15. Doses to LiF :Ti, Mg chips encapsulated in plastic extremity rings as a result of radon gas exposure.

    PubMed

    Kearfott, Kimberlee J; Noon, Evan P; Rafique, Muhammad

    2015-06-01

    Previous studies measured the effects of (222)Rn on various thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs). This study quantified the effects of (222)Rn on LiF : Ti,Mg chips encapsulated in plastic extremity rings. For 28 d, one batch of TLDs was left in a chamber with high radon levels, and another batch in a control chamber with normal background radon levels. A few TLDs in each batch were removed from the rings for direct exposure to the ambient air in each chamber. Passive continuous radon monitors (CRMs) recorded the (222)Rn levels. TLDs were processed using a third-party dosimetry company, CRM data were analysed, and the relationship between integrated (222)Rn concentration and TLD response was determined. The batch of TLDs in the experimental chamber showed a weak response to (222)Rn gas, which was in the order of 0.5 nSv Bq(-1) m(3) d(-1).

  16. Measuring radon exhalation rate in two cycles avoiding the effects of back-diffusion and chamber leakage.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yanliang; Xiao, Detao

    2013-10-01

    This paper will present a simple method for measuring the radon exhalation rate from the medium surface in two cycles and also avoiding the effects of back-diffusion and chamber leakage. The method is based on a combination of the "accumulation chamber" technique and a radon monitor. The radon monitor performs the measurement of the radon concentration inside the accumulation chamber, and then the radon exhalation rate can be obtained by simple calculation. For reducing the systematic error and the statistical uncertainty, too short of total measurement time is not appropriate, and the first cycle time should be about 70 % of the total measurement. The radon exhalation rate from the medium surface obtained through this method is in good agreement with the reference value. This simple method can be applied to develop and improve the instruments for measuring radon exhalation rate.

  17. Cancer risks from exposure to radon in homes.

    PubMed Central

    Axelson, O

    1995-01-01

    Exposure to radon and its decay products in mines is a well recognized risk of lung cancer in miners. A large number of epidemiologic studies from various countries are quite consistent in this respect even it the magnitude of the risk differs according to exposure levels. Indoor radon became a concern in the 1970s and about a dozen studies have been conducted since 1979, mainly of the case-control design. From first being of a simple pilot character, the designs have become increasingly sophisticated, especially with regard to exposure assessment. Crude exposure estimates based on type of house, building material and geological features have been supplemented or replaced by quite extensive measurements. Still, exposure assessment remains a difficult and uncertain issue in these studies, most of which indicate a lung cancer risk from indoor radon. Also a recent large scale study has confirmed a lung cancer risk from indoor radon. More recently there are also some studies, mainly of the correlation type, suggesting other cancers also to be related to indoor radon, especially leukemia, kidney cancer, and malignant melanoma, and some other cancers as well. The data are less consistent and much more uncertain than for indoor radon and lung cancer, however; and there is no clear support from studies of miners in this respect. PMID:7614945

  18. Open charcoal chamber method for mass measurements of radon exhalation rate from soil surface.

    PubMed

    Tsapalov, Andrey; Kovler, Konstantin; Miklyaev, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Radon exhalation rate from the soil surface can serve as an important criterion in the evaluation of radon hazard of the land. Recently published international standard ISO 11665-7 (2012) is based on the accumulation of radon gas in a closed container. At the same time since 1998 in Russia, as a part of engineering and environmental studies for the construction, radon flux measurements are made using an open charcoal chamber for a sampling duration of 3-5 h. This method has a well-defined metrological justification and was tested in both favorable and unfavorable conditions. The article describes the characteristics of the method, as well as the means of sampling and measurement of the activity of radon absorbed. The results of the metrological study suggest that regardless of the sampling conditions (weather, the mechanism and rate of radon transport in the soil, soil properties and conditions), uncertainty of method does not exceed 20%, while the combined standard uncertainty of radon exhalation rate measured from the soil surface does not exceed 30%. The results of the daily measurements of radon exhalation rate from the soil surface at the experimental site during one year are reported.

  19. Electret ion chamber radon monitors measure dissolved 222Rn in water.

    PubMed

    Kotrappa, P; Jester, W A

    1993-04-01

    This paper describes a simple and relatively inexpensive method of determining the concentration of dissolved 222Rn in water. The method involves a recently developed electret-passive environmental radon monitor, which uses an electret ion chamber. The procedure consists of sealing a known volume of a carefully collected water sample with one of these monitors in an exposure container and determining the average equilibrium 222Rn gas concentration in the air phase during the exposure time period. This average concentration can then be used to calculate the 222Rn concentration in the original water sample. Identical samples were analyzed both by this new method and by a standard liquid scintillation method, and the results were compared over a wide range of 222Rn concentrations. There was good agreement except that the electret ion chamber method gave results that were consistently lower by about 15%. This bias in the results was attributed to both 222Rn losses during sample handling and possibly to some errors in the assumptions made in the theoretical model. A correction factor is recommended to bring the results of this technique into agreement with the standard method. The procedures are simple and economical and can be easily employed by many primary 222Rn-measuring laboratories currently using these monitors for measuring indoor 222Rn.

  20. Residential radon exposure and lung cancer in Sweden

    SciTech Connect

    Pershagen, G.; Akerblom, G.; Axelson, O.; Clavensjoe, B.D.; Damber, L.; Desai, G.; Enflo, A.; Lagarde, F.; Mellander, H.; Svartengren, M. )

    1994-01-20

    BACKGROUND. Residential radon is the principal source of exposure to ionizing radiation in most countries. To determine the implications for the risk of lung cancer, we performed a nationwide case-control study in Sweden. METHODS. The study included 586 women and 774 men 35 to 74 years of age with lung cancer that was diagnosed between 1980 and 1984. For comparison, 1380 female and 1467 male controls were studied. Radon was measured in 8992 dwellings occupied by the study subjects at some time since 1947. Information on smoking habits and other risk factors for lung cancer was obtained from questionnaires. RESULTS. Radon levels followed a log-normal distribution, with geometric and arithmetic means of 1.6 and 2.9 pCi per liter (60.5 and 106.5 Bq per cubic meter), respectively. The risk of lung cancer increased in relation to both estimated cumulative and time-weighted exposure to radon. In comparison with time-weighted average radon concentrations up to 1.4 pCi per liter (50 Bq per cubic meter), the relative risk was 1.3 (95 percent confidence interval, 1.1 to 1.6) for average radon concentrations of 3.8 to 10.8 pCi per liter (140 to 400 Bq per cubic meter), and it was 1.8 (95 percent confidence interval, 1.1 to 2.9) at concentrations exceeding 10.8 pCi per liter. The estimates of risk were in the same range as those projected from data in miners. The interaction between radon exposure and smoking with regard to lung cancer exceeded additivity and was closer to a multiplicative effect. CONCLUSIONS. Residential exposure to radon is an important cause of lung cancer in the general population. The risks appear consistent with earlier estimates based on data in miners.

  1. A diffusion chamber for passive separated measurements of radon/thoron concentration in dwellings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torabi Nabil, F.; Hosseini Pooya, S. M.; Shamsaie Zafarghandi, M.; Taheri, M.

    2012-12-01

    In this research, a passive diffusion chamber has been developed for separated measurement of radon and thoron. The chamber consists of two volumes which are separated by a fiber glass filter. Two lexan polycarbonate nuclear track detectors (film) are placed inside of the volumes to detect the alpha particles of radon/thorn and/or their progenies. Another lexan polycarbonate detector covered with an optimized thickness of an attenuator is placed outside of the chamber to measure only 212Po which its concentration can be related to that of long-life thoron progeny, 212Pb. The sensitivities have been measured by 2.06 and 0.053 [tracks cm-2(kBq m-3 day)-1] values for radon and thoron respectively inside of the chamber, and 7960 [tracks cm-2(kBq m-3 day)-1] value for thoron outside of the chamber. So the system can be successfully used for separated measurement of an extended range of radon/thoron concentrations in dwellings.

  2. Radon detection in conical diffusion chambers: Monte Carlo calculations and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Rickards, J.; Golzarri, J. I.; Espinosa, G.; Vázquez-López, C.

    2015-07-23

    The operation of radon detection diffusion chambers of truncated conical shape was studied using Monte Carlo calculations. The efficiency was studied for alpha particles generated randomly in the volume of the chamber, and progeny generated randomly on the interior surface, which reach track detectors placed in different positions within the chamber. Incidence angular distributions, incidence energy spectra and path length distributions are calculated. Cases studied include different positions of the detector within the chamber, varying atmospheric pressure, and introducing a cutoff incidence angle and energy.

  3. Radon levels in Romanian caves: an occupational exposure survey.

    PubMed

    Cucoş Dinu, Alexandra; Călugăr, Monica I; Burghele, Bety D; Dumitru, Oana A; Cosma, Constantin; Onac, Bogdan P

    2016-10-01

    A comprehensive radon survey has been carried out in seven caves located in the western half of Romania's most significant karst regions. Touristic and non-touristic caves were investigated with the aim to provide a reliable distribution of their radon levels and evaluate the occupational exposure and associated effective doses. Radon gas concentrations were measured with long-term diffusion-type detectors during two consecutive seasons (warm and cold). All investigated caves exceed the European Union reference level of radon gas at workplaces (300 Bq/m(3)). The radon concentration in these caves ranges between 53 and 2866 Bq/m(3), reflecting particular cave topography, season-related cave ventilation, and complex tectonic and geological settings surrounding each location. Relatively homogeneous high radon levels occur in all investigated touristic caves and in Tăuşoare and Vântului along their main galleries. Except for Muierii, in all the other caves radon levels are higher during the warm season, compared to the cold one. This suggests that natural cave ventilation largely controls the underground accumulation of radon. The results reported here reveal that the occupational exposure in Urşilor, Vadu Crişului, Tăuşoare, Vântului, and Muierii caves needs to be carefully monitored. The effective doses to workers vary between an average of 0.25 and 4.39 mSv/year depending on the measuring season. The highest values were recorded in show caves, ranging from 1.15 to 6.15 mSv/year, well above the European recommended limit, thus posing a potential health hazard upon cave guides, cavers, and scientists.

  4. Radon

    MedlinePlus

    ... Action Plan: A Strategy for Saving Lives . Indoor Air Quality Home Page Frequent Questions about Radon Find Local ... Radon can have a big impact on indoor air quality . Individuals and Families Health Risk of Radon Citizen's ...

  5. Children's Exposure to Radon in Nursery and Primary Schools.

    PubMed

    Branco, Pedro T B S; Nunes, Rafael A O; Alvim-Ferraz, Maria C M; Martins, Fernando G; Sousa, Sofia I V

    2016-03-30

    The literature proves an evident association between indoor radon exposure and lung cancer, even at low doses. This study brings a new approach to the study of children's exposure to radon by aiming to evaluate exposure to indoor radon concentrations in nursery and primary schools from two districts in Portugal (Porto and Bragança), considering different influencing factors (occupation patterns, classroom floor level, year of the buildings' construction and soil composition of the building site), as well as the comparison with IAQ standard values for health protection. Fifteen nursery and primary schools in the Porto and Bragança districts were considered: five nursery schools for infants and twelve for pre-schoolers (seven different buildings), as well as eight primary schools. Radon measurements were performed continuously. The measured concentrations depended on the building occupation, classroom floor level and year of the buildings' construction. Although they were in general within the Portuguese legislation for IAQ, exceedances to international standards were found. These results point out the need of assessing indoor radon concentrations not only in primary schools, but also in nursery schools, never performed in Portugal before this study. It is important to extend the study to other microenvironments like homes, and in time to estimate the annual effective dose and to assess lifetime health risks.

  6. 'Radon Concentration Survey in Inner Rooms from Deputy Chamber and National Congress-Brasilia/DF'

    SciTech Connect

    Nicoli, Ieda Gomes; Cardozo, Katia Maria; Azevedo Gouvea, Vandir de

    2008-08-07

    Radon gas has been monitored in many environments such as rural and urban houses, high natural radioactivity areas and underground mining regions. Nevertheless few data are reported in literature about studies in state buildings. So we get in touch with these buildings managers, where work the Deputy Chamber and the National Congress in Brasilia--DF, in order to obtain radon data in these state buildings, so representative for brazilian people. In order to make a preliminary scanning of radon concentration in these buildings, it was put in selected points, radon nuclear track passive detectors type SSNTD, specifically polycarbonate Lexan, which were exposed for periods from two to five months. Afterwards they were sent to Nuclear Engineering Institute in Rio de Janeiro for analysis of {sup 222}Rn contents. Derived values, whose average value was about 73 Bq/m{sup 3}, were all under maximum permissible limits for radon 200 Bq/m{sup 3}, established by International Comission on Radiological Protection--ICRP 65, for inner environments of houses and state buildings. This work has been coordinated by CNEN Office in Braselia with effective participation of Nuclear Engineering Institute from CNEN--RJ, that has worked since beginning of april 2004, supplying and analysing radon detectors.

  7. Radon exposure and lung cancer risk--Czech cohort study on residential radon.

    PubMed

    Tomásek, L; Kunz, E; Müller, T; Hůlka, J; Heribanová, A; Matzner, J; Placek, V; Burian, I; Holecek, J

    2001-05-14

    Epidemiological evidence of lung cancer risk from radon is based mainly on studies of men employed underground in mines where exposures are relatively high in comparison to indoor exposure. Nevertheless, direct evidence of risk from residential radon is desirable. In 1990, a study was started comprising 12,000 inhabitants of an area with elevated radon concentrations. The mean level in the houses was higher than general mean of the country by a factor of five. In the period 1961-1995, a total of 173 lung cancers were observed. Comparing to nationally expected numbers (E), the observed number (O) of cases is elevated (O/E = 1.11), in contrast to generally low figures for cancers other than lung (O/E = 0.85). Lung cancer risk related to cumulative exposures experienced in the past 5-24 or 5-35 years were both significant. In relation to standard radon progeny concentration 100 Bq/m3, the excess relative risk coefficient was 0.103 (95% CI, 0.039-0.168), the value somewhat lower than findings in other indoor studies.

  8. The Effects of Radon Exposure on Physical and Psychological Health

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-15

    Science of the Total Environment , 45. 459-46. Guimond, R. j...of natural radiation in France. The Science of the Total Environment . 45, 467-474. Roessler, C. E. , Roessler, G. S., & Bolch, W. E. (1983...Results from a survey of indoor radon exposures in the Federal Republic of Germany. The Science of the Total Environment . 45, 307-310.

  9. Determination of radon exhalation from construction materials using VOC emission test chambers.

    PubMed

    Richter, M; Jann, O; Kemski, J; Schneider, U; Krocker, C; Hoffmann, B

    2013-10-01

    The inhalation of (222) Rn (radon) decay products is one of the most important reasons for lung cancer after smoking. Stony building materials are an important source of indoor radon. This article describes the determination of the exhalation rate of stony construction materials by the use of commercially available measuring devices in combination with VOC emission test chambers. Five materials - two types of clay brick, clinker brick, light-weight concrete brick, and honeycomb brick - generally used for wall constructions were used for the experiments. Their contribution to real room concentrations was estimated by applying room model parameters given in ISO 16000-9, RP 112, and AgBB. This knowledge can be relevant, if for instance indoor radon concentration is limited by law. The test set-up used here is well suited for application in test laboratories dealing with VOC emission testing.

  10. The Italian national survey of indoor radon exposure.

    PubMed

    Sciocchetti, G; Scacco, F; Baldassini, P G; Battella, C; Bovi, M; Monte, L

    1985-10-01

    An investigation is being developed by the Comitato Nazionale per la Ricerca e per lo Sviluppo dell'Energia Nucleare e delle Energie Alternative, ENEA, to assess the indoor exposure of the Italian population. The programme, which started in 1982, includes regional and local surveys in all the administrative districts and intensive investigations of factors which influence indoor radon levels. The survey is organized by statistical areas of sampling to obtain representative samples of houses. The definition of the areas takes into account basic parameters e.g. geolithological environments, radon soil gas from underlying soils and rocks, specific activities of local building materials, climatic and seasonal variations, building technology, types of houses and town planning. The collected data may also be used for the compilation of radon risk maps to plan special monitoring and remedial actions if needed. Preliminary results concerning the above items are discussed.

  11. An atmospheric exposure chamber for small animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, R. M.; Weiss, H. S.; Pitt, J. F.; Grimard, M.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to design a long-term environmental exposure chamber for small animals. This chamber is capable of producing hypoxic, normoxic and hyperoxic atmospheres which are closely regulated. The chamber, which is of the recycling type, is fashioned after clear plastic germ-free isolators. Oxygen concentration is set and controlled by a paramagnetic O2 analyzer and a 3-way solenoid valve. In this way either O2 or N2 may be provided to the system by way of negative O2 feedback. Relative humidity is maintained at 40-50 percent by a refrigeration type dryer. Carbon dioxide is absorbed by indicating soda lime. A diaphragm pump continuously circulates chamber gas at a high enough flow rate to prevent buildup of CO2 and humidity. This chamber has been used for numerous studies which involve prolonged exposure of small animals to various O2 concentrations.

  12. Development of cataract and corneal opacity in mice due to radon exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelkawi, S. A.; Abo-Elmagd, M.; Soliman, H. A.

    This work investigates the radiation damage on the eye of albino mice exposed to effective radon doses ranging from 20.92 to 83.68 mSv. These doses were taken over 2-8 weeks using a radon chamber constructed by the National Institute for Standard (Egypt). The guidance on the quality assurance program for radon measurements was followed. Therefore, the estimated doses received by the laboratory animals meet the requirements of national standardE The refractive index(RI) and protein concentration were measured for soluble proteins of both corneas and lenses. In addition, the sodium dodecyle sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDSPAGE) technique was used. The results show increasing of the RI of both cornea and lens proteins and decreasing in total protein concentration of exposed animals. These results were accompanied with changes in the SDSPAGE profile for both cornea and lens. Therefore, radon exposure produces substantial hazards to the cornea and lens of experimental animals and has a crucial role in the development of cataract and corneal opacity.

  13. Exposure to radon and radon progeny in the indoor environment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Socolow, R.H.

    1994-10-01

    This report discusses the work done by the Center for Energy and Environmental Studies at Princeton University as part of the radon research program. It involves radon measurements in various buildings, as well as the use of natural ventilation to mitigate radon levels. The report is divided into four chapters: The use of radon entry rate measurements to understand radon concentration in buildings; Use of natural basement ventilation to control radon in single family dwellings; The effect of natural ventilation on radon and radon progeny levels in houses; and Comparison of natural and forced ventilation for radon mitigation in houses.

  14. Application of thoron interference as a tool for simultaneous measurement of radon and thoron with a pulse ionisation chamber.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, R M; Sumesh, C G; Vinod Kumar, A; Puranik, V D

    2013-07-01

    Pulse ionisation chamber (PIC)-based monitors measuring radioactive gas radon ((222)Rn) without energy discrimination will have interference due to thoron ((220)Rn) present in the atmosphere. A technique has been developed to use this property of interference for simultaneous measurement of radon and thoron gas. These monitors work on the principle of counting of gross alphas emitted from radon and its progeny. A theoretical model has been developed for the variation of thoron sensitivity with respect to the flow rate of gas through the monitor. The thoron sensitivity of the monitor is found to vary with the flow rate of gas through the monitor. Using this sensitivity, the sampling procedure has been developed and verified for simultaneous measurement of radon and thoron. The PIC-measured radon and thoron concentration using this procedure agrees well with those measured by using standard radon and thoron discriminating monitor.

  15. The concept of equivalent radon concentration for practical consideration of indoor exposure to thoron.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Moir, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    To consider the total exposure to indoor radon and thoron, a concept of equivalent radon concentration for thoron is introduced, defined as the radon concentration that delivers the same annual effective dose as that resulting from the thoron concentration. The total indoor exposure to radon and thoron is then the sum of the radon concentration and the equivalent radon concentration for thoron. The total exposure should be compared to the radon guideline value, and if it exceeds the guideline value, appropriate remedial action is required. With this concept, a separate guideline for indoor thoron exposure is not necessary. For homes already tested for radon with radon detectors, Health Canada's recommendation of a 3-month radon test performed during the fall/winter heating season not only ensures a conservative estimate of the annual average radon concentration but also covers well any potentially missing contribution from thoron exposure. In addition, because the thoron concentration is much lower than the radon concentration in most homes in Canada, there is no real need to re-test homes for thoron.

  16. Radon exposure of the skin: I. Biological effects.

    PubMed

    Charles, M W

    2007-09-01

    Radon progeny can plate out on skin and give rise to exposure of the superficial epidermis from alpha emitters Po-218 (7.7 MeV, range approximately 66 microm) and Po-214 (6 MeV, range approximately 44 microm). Dose rates from beta/gamma emitters Pb-214 and Bi-214 are low and only predominate at depths in excess of the alpha range. This paper reviews the evidence for a causal link between exposure from radon and its progeny, and deterministic and stochastic biological effects in human skin. Radiation induced skin effects such as ulceration and dermal atrophy, which require irradiation of the dermis, are ruled out for alpha irradiation from radon progeny because the target cells are considerably deeper than the range of alpha particles. They have not been observed in man or animals. Effects such as erythema and acute epidermal necrosis have been observed in a few cases of very high dose alpha particle exposures in man and after acute high dose exposure in animals from low energy beta radiations with similar depth doses to radon progeny. The required skin surface absorbed doses are in excess of 100 Gy. Such effects would require extremely high levels of radon progeny. They would involve quite exceptional circumstances, way outside the normal range of radon exposures in man. There is no definitive identification of the target cells for skin cancer induction in animals or man. The stem cells in the basal layer which maintain the epidermis are the most plausible contenders for target cells. The majority of these cells are near the end of the range of radon progeny alpha particles, even on the thinnest body sites. The nominal depth of these cells, as recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), is 70 microm. There is evidence however that some irradiation of the hair follicles and/or the deeper dermis, as well as the inter-follicular epidermis, is also necessary for skin cancer induction. Alpha irradiation of rodent skin that is

  17. Radon

    MedlinePlus

    You can't see radon. And you can't smell it or taste it. But it may be a problem in your home. Radon comes from the natural breakdown of uranium in soil, rock, and water. Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer ...

  18. Residential Radon Exposure and Lung Cancer: Evidence of an Inverse Association in Washington State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuberger, John S.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Presents results of a descriptive study of lung cancer death rates compared to county levels of radon in Washington State. Age-specific death rates were computed for white female smokers according to radon exposure. A significant lung cancer excess was found in lowest radon counties. No significant difference was found between the proportion of…

  19. Residential radon exposure and lung cancer: risk in nonsmokers.

    PubMed

    Neuberger, John S; Gesell, Thomas F

    2002-07-01

    Lung cancer is a disease that is almost entirely caused by smoking; hence, it is almost totally preventable. Yet there are a small percentage of cases, perhaps as many as 5 to 15%, where there are other causes. Risk factors identified for this other group include passive smoking, occupational exposure to certain chemicals and ionizing radiation, diet, and family history of cancer. In the United States cigarette smoking is on the decline among adults, occupational exposures are being reduced, and people are being made more aware of appropriate diets. These changes are gradually resulting in a reduced risk for this disease. Lung cancer in the U.S. may, therefore, eventually become largely a disease of the past. It remains important, however, to continue to study the cause(s) of lung cancer in non-smokers, particularly never smokers. Because of our interest in the effects of residential radon exposure on the development of lung cancer in non-smokers, we conducted a critical review of the scientific literature to evaluate this issue in detail. Strict criteria were utilized in selecting studies, which included being published in a peer reviewed journal, including non-smokers in the studied populations, having at least 100 cases, and being of case-control design. A total of 12 individual studies were found that met the criteria, with 10 providing some information on non-smokers. Most of these studies did not find any significant association between radon and lung cancer in non-smokers. Furthermore, data were not presented in sufficient detail for non-smokers in a number of studies. Based on the most recent findings, there is some evidence that radon may contribute to lung cancer risk in current smokers in high residential radon environments. The situation regarding the risk of lung cancer from radon in non-smokers (ex and never) is unclear, possibly because of both the relatively limited sample size of non-smokers and methodological limitations in most of the individual

  20. Radon exposure and lung cancer risk: Czech cohort study.

    PubMed

    Tomásek, L; Placek, V

    1999-12-01

    Epidemiological evidence of lung cancer risk from radon is based mainly on studies of male miners. Recent results of one such study of Czech uranium miners who were restricted to lower exposure rates are reported. Two main factors that generally influence radiogenic risk of cancer, time since exposure and age at exposure, are analyzed. New analyses in the form of a relative risk model confirmed the strong decreasing effect with time since exposure that was observed earlier. In addition, a significant dependence on age at exposure was observed. This pattern of decreasing relative risk with increasing age at irradiation is consistent with observations in A-bomb survivors and irradiated patients. Similar analyses were performed for the two most frequent histological types of bronchogenic carcinoma, epidermoid and small cell. The general pattern of the risk for these two types was found to be similar to that for lung cancer overall. Nevertheless, differences were observed between these two types in the magnitude of the risk coefficients and in the latent period. The effect of radon exposure was found to be stronger but briefer for the small cell type. The effect of smoking was not examined in this study, as such data were not available.

  1. On the calibration of a radon exhalation monitor based on the electrostatic collection method and accumulation chamber.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yanliang; Tokonami, Shinji; Hosoda, Masahiro

    2015-06-01

    The radon exhalation rate can be obtained quickly and easily from the evolution of radon concentration over time in the accumulation chamber. Radon monitoring based on the electrostatic collection method is not interfered with by (220)Rn. In this paper, we propose that the difference between radon and (218)Po concentrations in the measurement cell of this kind of radon exhalation monitor is the main system error, and it changes with time and different effective decay constants. Based on the results of simulation experiments, we propose that the calibration factor obtained from the suitable experiment cannot completely correct the system error, even if it is useful to reduce the measurement error. The better way for reducing measurement error is to use the new measurement model which we have proposed in recent years.

  2. OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE TO RADON IN DIFFERENT KINDS OF NON-URANIUM MINES.

    PubMed

    Fan, D; Zhuo, W; Zhang, Y

    2016-09-01

    For more accurate assessments of the occupational exposure to radon for miners, the individual monitoring was conducted by using an improved passive integrating (222)Rn monitor. A total of 120 miners in 3 different kinds of mines were monitored throughout a year. The results showed that the individual exposure to radon significantly varied with types of mines and work. Compared with the exposure to coal miners, the exposure to copper miners was much higher. Furthermore, it was found that the exposure might be overestimated if the environmental (222)Rn monitored by the passive integrating monitors was used for assessment. The results indicate that the individual monitoring of radon is necessary for an accurate assessment of radon exposure to miners, and radon exposure to non-uranium miners should also be assessed from the viewpoint of radiation protection.

  3. Radon exposure in uranium mining industry vs. exposure in tourist caves.

    PubMed

    Quindós Poncela, L; Fernández Navarro, P; Sainz Fernández, C; Gómez Arozamena, J; Bordonoba Perez, M

    2004-01-01

    There is a fairly general consensus among health physicists and radiation professionals that exposure to radon progeny is the largest and most variable contribution to the population's exposure to natural sources of radiation. However, this exposure is the subject of continuing debate concerning the validity of risk assessment and recommendations on how to act in radon-prone areas. The purpose of this contribution is to situate the radon issue in Spain in two very different settings. The first is a uranium mining industry located in Saelices el Chico (Salamanca), which is under strict control of the Spanish Nuclear Safety Council (CSN). We have measured radon concentrations in different workplaces in this mine over a five-year period. The second setting comprises four tourist caves, three of which are located in the province of Cantabria and the fourth on the Canary Island of Lanzarote. These caves are not subject to any administrative control of radiation exposure. Measured air 222Rn concentrations were used to estimate annual effective doses due to radon inhalation in the two settings, and dose values were found to be from 2 to 10 times lower in the uranium mine than in the tourist caves. These results were analysed in the context of the new European Basic Safety Standards Directive (EU-BSS, 1996).

  4. Radon emanation chamber: High sensitivity measurements for the SuperNEMO experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Soulé, B.; Collaboration: SuperNEMO Collaboration; and others

    2013-08-08

    Radon is a well-known source of background in ββ0ν experiments due to the high Q{sub β} value of one of its daughter nucleus, {sup 214}Bi. The SuperNEMO collaboration requires a maximum radon contamination of 0.1 mBq/m{sup 3} inside its next-generation double beta decay detector. To reach such a low activity, a drastic screening process has been set for the selection of the detector's materials. In addition to a good radiopurity, a low emanation rate is required. To test this parameter, a Radon Emanation Setup is running at CENBG. It consists in a large emanation chamber connected to an electrostatic detector. By measuring large samples and having a low background level, this setup reaches a sensitivity of a few μ Bq. m{sup −2}. d{sup −1} and is able to qualify materials used in the construction of the SuperNEMO detector.

  5. Electret ion chamber-based passive radon-thoron discriminative monitors.

    PubMed

    Kotrappa, P; Steck, D

    2010-10-01

    Electret ion chambers (EICs), commercially available under brand name E-PERM(®), are widely used for measuring indoor and outdoor (222)Rn concentrations in air. These are designed to respond only to (222)Rn and not to (220)Rn by restricting diffusional entry area. Such radon EIC (R EIC) monitors are modified by increasing the entry area to allow (220)Rn, in addition to (222)Rn. Such modified units are called RT EIC. When a set of R and RT EICs are collocated, it is possible to discriminate and measure both radon and thoron concentrations, using appropriate calibration factors (CFs) and algorithms. The EICs come in different volumes, providing different sensitivities. The thoron CFs for 58-, 210- and 960-ml volume R and RT pairs are, respectively, 2.8-, 18.7- and 89-V drop per (kBq m(-3) d ), respectively. These provide much wider sensitivities and ranges compared to alpha track-based passive radon-thoron discriminative monitors.

  6. Rural Parents' Perceptions of Risks Associated with Their Children's Exposure to Radon

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Wade G.; Butter¢eld, Patricia; Larsson, Laura S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To examine the level of awareness of radon issues, correlates of elective testing behaviors, and the accuracy of risk perception for radon exposures among rural residents receiving public health services. Design A cross-sectional design was used in which questionnaire data and household analytic data for radon levels were collected from a nonprobabilistic sample of rural households. Sample Thirty-one rural households with 71 adults and 60 children participated in the study. Primary household respondents were female (100%), Caucasian (97%), and primarily (94%) between 21 and 40 years of age. Measurement Questionnaire data consisted of knowledge and risk perception items about radon and all homes were tested for the presence of radon. Results The prevalence of high airborne radon (defined as ≥ 4pCi/l) was 32%. More than a third of the sample underestimated the seriousness of health effects of radon exposure, 39% disagreed that being around less radon would improve the long-term health of their children, and 52% were unsure whether radon could cause health problems. After adjusting for chance, only 21% of the subjects correctly understood their risk status. Conclusions This study provides preliminary evidence that low-income rural citizens do not understand their risk of radon exposure or the deleterious consequences of exposure. PMID:16961559

  7. Lung Cancer Attributable to Indoor Radon Exposures in Two Radon--Prone Areas, Stei (Romania) and Torrelodones (Spain)

    SciTech Connect

    Dinu, Alexandra; Cosma, Constantin; Vasiliniuc, Stefan; Sainz, Carlos; Poncela, Luis Santiago Quindos

    2009-05-22

    Radon and radon progeny are present indoors, in houses and others dwellings, representing the most important contribution to dose from natural sources of radiation. Most studies have demonstrated an increased risk of lung cancer at high concentration of radon for both smokers and nonsmokers. For medium and low concentrations which are the typical residential radon levels, recent researches have also demonstrated increased risks of lung cancer for people exposed. The work presents a comparative analysis of the radon exposure data in the two radon--prone areas, Stei, Transylvania, (Romania), in the near of old Romanian uranium mines and in the granitic area of Torrelodones town, Sierra de Guadarrama (Spain). One important difference between the two studied areas is related to the houses built using uranium waste as construction material in Stei area. Measurements of indoor radon were performed in 280 dwellings (Romania) and 91 dwellings (Spain) by using nuclear track detectors, CR 39. The highest value measured in Stei area was 2650 Bq{center_dot}m{sup -3}. and 366 Bq{center_dot}m{sup -3} in the Spanish region. The results are compute with the BEIR VI report estimates using the age-duration model at an exposure rate below 2650 Bq{center_dot}m{sup -3}. A total of 233 lung cancer deaths were calculated in the Stei area for a period of 13 years (1994-2006), which is 116.82% higher than observed from the national statistics. In comparison, in Torrelodones area, a number of 276 deaths caused by lung cancer were estimated along a period of 13 years, which is 2.09 times higher than the number observed by authorities. This represents a significantly evidence that elevated risk can strongly be associated with cumulated radon exposure.

  8. Effects of Radon Inhalation on Some Biophysical Properties of Blood in Rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essa, M. F.; Shahin, Fayez M.; Ahmed, Ashour M.; Abdel-Salam, Omar

    2013-03-01

    The major source of human exposure to natural radiation arises from the inhalation of radon (222Rn) gas. Exposure to high concentrations of radon 222Rn and its daughters for long period leads to pathological effects like lung cancer, leukaemia, skin cancer and kidney diseases. The present study was performed on rats to investigate the effect of radon exposure on the absorption spectra of hemoglobin. Measurements have been performed in a radon chamber where rats were exposed to radon for 1, 5 or 7 weeks. The inhalation of radon resulted in decrease in intensity of the absorption bands characterizing the hemoglobin molecular structure with increased radon doses.

  9. Indoor residential radon exposure and risk of childhood acute myeloid leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Steinbuch, M; Weinberg, C R; Buckley, J D; Robison, L L; Sandler, D P

    1999-01-01

    Exposure to radon has been identified as a risk factor for lung cancer in uranium miners, but evidence of adverse health effects due to indoor radon exposure is inconsistent. Ecological studies have suggested a correlation between indoor radon levels and leukaemia incidence. We evaluated the risk associated with indoor residential radon exposure within a larger interview-based case–control study of risk factors for childhood acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). A total of 173 cases and 254 controls met the eligibility criteria, and information was collected through telephone interviews with parents and analysis of alpha-track radon detectors placed in the home for a period of 1 year. No association was observed between radon exposure and risk of AML, with adjusted odds ratios of 1.2 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.7–1.8) for 37–100 Bq m–3 and 1.1 (95% CI 0.6–2.0) for > 100 Bq m–3 compared with < 37 Bq m–3. Although there was an inverse association between radon level and AML risk among children < 2 years at diagnosis, among children ≥2 years, AML risk was increased among those with higher radon exposure. The observed association after age 2 is most likely due to chance. Overall, there was no association between residential radon and risk of childhood AML. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10555766

  10. Lung cancer risk at low radon exposure rates in German uranium miners

    PubMed Central

    Kreuzer, M; Fenske, N; Schnelzer, M; Walsh, L

    2015-01-01

    Background: A determination of the risk of lung cancer at low levels of radon exposure is important for occupational radiation protection. Methods: The risk of death from lung cancer at low radon exposure rates was investigated in the subcohort of 26 766 German uranium miners hired in 1960 or later. Results: A clear association between lung cancer mortality (n=334 deaths) and cumulative exposure to radon in working level months (WLM) was found. The excess relative risk per WLM was 0.013 (95% confidence intervals: 0.007; 0.021). Conclusions: The present findings provide strong evidence for an increased lung cancer risk after long-term exposure to low radon exposure rates among Wismut miners. The results are compatible to those from residential radon studies and miner studies restricted to low levels. PMID:26393888

  11. EPA and Partners Announce National Plan to Prevent Lung Cancer Deaths Due to Radon Exposure

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WASHINGTON - Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), American Lung Association, and other partners are announcing a strategy for preventing 3,200 lung cancer deaths annually by 2020 through radon exposure reduction strategies. Exposur

  12. Protection from radon exposure at home and at work in the directive 2013/59/Euratom.

    PubMed

    Bochicchio, F

    2014-07-01

    In recent years, international organisations involved in radiation protection and public health have produced new guidance, recommendations and requirements aiming better protection from radon exposure. These organisations have often worked in close collaboration in order to facilitate the establishment of harmonised standards. This paper deals with such standards and specifically with the new European Council Directive of 5 December 2013 on basic safety standards for protection against the dangers arising from exposure to ionising radiation (2013/59/Euratom). This new Directive has established a harmonised framework for the protection against ionising radiations, including protection from radon exposure. Requirements for radon in workplace are much more tightening than in previous Directive, and exposures to radon in dwellings are regulated for the first time in a Directive. Radon-related articles of this Directive are presented and discussed in this paper, along with some comparisons with other relevant international standards.

  13. Lung cancer risk due to residential radon exposures: estimation and prevention.

    PubMed

    Truta, L A; Hofmann, W; Cosma, C

    2014-07-01

    Epidemiological studies proved that cumulative exposure to radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer, the world's most common cancer. The objectives of the present study are (i) to analyse lung cancer risk for chronic, low radon exposures based on the transformation frequency-tissue response (TF-TR) model formulated in terms of alpha particle hits in cell nuclei; (ii) to assess the percentage of attributable lung cancers in six areas of Transylvania where the radon concentration was measured and (iii) to point out the most efficient remediation measures tested on a pilot house in Stei, Romania. Simulations performed with the TF-TR model exhibit a linear dose-effect relationship for chronic, residential radon exposures. The fraction of lung cancer cases attributed to radon ranged from 9 to 28% for the investigated areas. Model predictions may represent a useful tool to complement epidemiological studies on lung cancer risk and to establish reasonable radiation protection regulations for human safety.

  14. Comprehensive investigation of radon exposure in Austrian tourist mines and caves.

    PubMed

    Gruber, V; Ringer, W; Gräser, J; Aspek, W; Gschnaller, J

    2014-11-01

    According to Austrian Law, dose assessments in workplaces with potentially enhanced radon exposures are mandatory since 2008, including tourist mines and caves. A pilot study was carried out to evaluate the situation to test the measurement methods and to specify the main parameters controlling the radon concentration in tourist mines and caves. Radon was measured in six mines and three caves for 1 y, along with determining thoron and equilibrium factors and taking into account climatic, geological and site-related effects. The radon concentrations have a seasonal dependence with maximum in summer and minimum in winter, related to natural ventilation. Radon concentrations in the karst caves were quite low, as it was in the salt mine, whereas radon concentrations in copper and silver mines were high. The dose assessment of the employees yielded doses above 6 mSv a(-1) only in the copper mine.

  15. A Systematic Review of Radon Investigations Related to Public Exposure in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Pirsaheb, Meghdad; Najafi, Farid; Khosravi, Touba; Hemati, Lida

    2013-01-01

    Background The main sources of radiation exposure of all living organisms including humans are natural. In fact, radon and its decay products are the cause of 50% of the total dose that is derived from natural sources. Because of the significant health hazards of radon gas, its levels are widely monitored throughout the world. Accordingly, considerable researches have also been carried out in Iran. Objectives The aim of this research is a systematic review of the most recent studies associated with evaluation of radon gas levels in Iran. The main emphasis of this study was on public exposure to radon gas. Materials and Methods The most important route of exposure to such radiation is indoor places. In this investigation measurement of radon in water resources, tap water, indoor places and exhalation of radon from building material, the major sources of indoor radon gas emission, were considered. Results Significantly high levels of radon gas were found mostly in water and residenvial buildings. Conclusions It conclusion with regard to the study of building materials, granite stone and adobe coverings cannot be recommended for construction purposes. PMID:24719680

  16. Calculation of lifetime lung cancer risks associated with radon exposure, based on various models and exposure scenarios.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Nezahat; Muirhead, Colin R; Bochicchio, Francesco; Haylock, Richard G E

    2015-09-01

    The risk of lung cancer mortality up to 75 years of age due to radon exposure has been estimated for both male and female continuing, ex- and never-smokers, based on various radon risk models and exposure scenarios. We used risk models derived from (i) the BEIR VI analysis of cohorts of radon-exposed miners, (ii) cohort and nested case-control analyses of a European cohort of uranium miners and (iii) the joint analysis of European residential radon case-control studies. Estimates of the lifetime lung cancer risk due to radon varied between these models by just over a factor of 2 and risk estimates based on models from analyses of European uranium miners exposed at comparatively low rates and of people exposed to radon in homes were broadly compatible. For a given smoking category, there was not much difference in lifetime lung cancer risk between males and females. The estimated lifetime risk of radon-induced lung cancer for exposure to a concentration of 200 Bq m(-3) was in the range 2.98-6.55% for male continuing smokers and 0.19-0.42% for male never-smokers, depending on the model used and assuming a multiplicative relationship for the joint effect of radon and smoking. Stopping smoking at age 50 years decreases the lifetime risk due to radon by around a half relative to continuing smoking, but the risk for ex-smokers remains about a factor of 5-7 higher than that for never-smokers. Under a sub-multiplicative model for the joint effect of radon and smoking, the lifetime risk of radon-induced lung cancer was still estimated to be substantially higher for continuing smokers than for never smokers. Radon mitigation-used to reduce radon concentrations at homes-can also have a substantial impact on lung cancer risk, even for persons in their 50 s; for each of continuing smokers, ex-smokers and never-smokers, radon mitigation at age 50 would lower the lifetime risk of radon-induced lung cancer by about one-third. To maximise risk reductions, smokers in high-radon

  17. Residential Radon Exposure and Incidence of Childhood Lymphoma in Texas, 1995-2011.

    PubMed

    Peckham, Erin C; Scheurer, Michael E; Danysh, Heather E; Lubega, Joseph; Langlois, Peter H; Lupo, Philip J

    2015-09-25

    There is warranted interest in assessing the association between residential radon exposure and the risk of childhood cancer. We sought to evaluate the association between residential radon exposure and the incidence of childhood lymphoma in Texas. The Texas Cancer Registry (n = 2147) provided case information for the period 1995-2011. Denominator data were obtained from the United States Census. Regional arithmetic mean radon concentrations were obtained from the Texas Indoor Radon Survey and linked to residence at diagnosis. Exposure was assessed categorically: ≤25th percentile (reference), >25th to ≤50th percentile, >50th to ≤75th percentile, and >75th percentile. Negative binomial regression generated adjusted incidence rate ratios (aIRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). We evaluated lymphoma overall and by subtype: Hodgkin (HL; n = 1248), Non-Hodgkin excluding Burkitt (non-BL NHL; n = 658), Burkitt (BL; n = 241), and Diffuse Large B-cell (DLBCL; n = 315). There was no evidence that residential radon exposure was positively associated with lymphoma overall, HL, or BL. Areas with radon concentrations >75th percentile had a marginal increase in DLBCL incidence (aIRR = 1.73, 95% CI: 1.03-2.91). In one of the largest studies of residential radon exposure and the incidence of childhood lymphoma, we found little evidence to suggest a positive or negative association; an observation consistent with previous studies.

  18. Residential Radon Exposure and Incidence of Childhood Lymphoma in Texas, 1995–2011

    PubMed Central

    Peckham, Erin C.; Scheurer, Michael E.; Danysh, Heather E.; Lubega, Joseph; Langlois, Peter H.; Lupo, Philip J.

    2015-01-01

    There is warranted interest in assessing the association between residential radon exposure and the risk of childhood cancer. We sought to evaluate the association between residential radon exposure and the incidence of childhood lymphoma in Texas. The Texas Cancer Registry (n = 2147) provided case information for the period 1995–2011. Denominator data were obtained from the United States Census. Regional arithmetic mean radon concentrations were obtained from the Texas Indoor Radon Survey and linked to residence at diagnosis. Exposure was assessed categorically: ≤25th percentile (reference), >25th to ≤50th percentile, >50th to ≤75th percentile, and >75th percentile. Negative binomial regression generated adjusted incidence rate ratios (aIRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). We evaluated lymphoma overall and by subtype: Hodgkin (HL; n = 1248), Non-Hodgkin excluding Burkitt (non-BL NHL; n = 658), Burkitt (BL; n = 241), and Diffuse Large B-cell (DLBCL; n = 315). There was no evidence that residential radon exposure was positively associated with lymphoma overall, HL, or BL. Areas with radon concentrations >75th percentile had a marginal increase in DLBCL incidence (aIRR = 1.73, 95% CI: 1.03–2.91). In one of the largest studies of residential radon exposure and the incidence of childhood lymphoma, we found little evidence to suggest a positive or negative association; an observation consistent with previous studies. PMID:26404336

  19. Modeling Joint Exposures and Health Outcomes for Cumulative Risk Assessment: the Case of Radon and Smoking

    EPA Science Inventory

    Community-based cumulative risk assessment requires characterization of exposures to multiple chemical and non-chemical stressors, with consideration of how the non-chemical stressors may influence risks from chemical stressors. Residential radon provides an interesting case exam...

  20. Risks of Lung Cancer due to Radon Exposure among the Regions of Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye Ah; Lee, Won Kyung; Lim, Dohee; Park, Su Hyun; Baik, Sun Jung; Kong, Kyoung Ae; Jung-Choi, Kyunghee; Park, Hyesook

    2015-05-01

    Radon is likely the second most common cause of lung cancer after smoking. We estimated the lung cancer risk due to radon using common risk models. Based on national radon survey data, we estimated the population-attributable fraction (PAF) and the number of lung cancer deaths attributable to radon. The exposure-age duration (EAD) and exposure-age concentration (EAC) models were used. The regional average indoor radon concentration was 37.5 95 Bq/m(3). The PAF for lung cancer was 8.3% (European Pooling Study model), 13.5% in males and 20.4% in females by EAD model, and 19.5% in males and 28.2% in females by EAC model. Due to differences in smoking by gender, the PAF of radon-induced lung cancer deaths was higher in females. In the Republic of Korea, the risk of radon is not widely recognized. Thus, information about radon health risks is important and efforts are needed to decrease the associated health problems.

  1. Modeling joint exposures and health outcomes for cumulative risk assessment: the case of radon and smoking.

    PubMed

    Chahine, Teresa; Schultz, Bradley D; Zartarian, Valerie G; Xue, Jianping; Subramanian, S V; Levy, Jonathan I

    2011-09-01

    Community-based cumulative risk assessment requires characterization of exposures to multiple chemical and non-chemical stressors, with consideration of how the non-chemical stressors may influence risks from chemical stressors. Residential radon provides an interesting case example, given its large attributable risk, effect modification due to smoking, and significant variability in radon concentrations and smoking patterns. In spite of this fact, no study to date has estimated geographic and sociodemographic patterns of both radon and smoking in a manner that would allow for inclusion of radon in community-based cumulative risk assessment. In this study, we apply multi-level regression models to explain variability in radon based on housing characteristics and geological variables, and construct a regression model predicting housing characteristics using U.S. Census data. Multi-level regression models of smoking based on predictors common to the housing model allow us to link the exposures. We estimate county-average lifetime lung cancer risks from radon ranging from 0.15 to 1.8 in 100, with high-risk clusters in areas and for subpopulations with high predicted radon and smoking rates. Our findings demonstrate the viability of screening-level assessment to characterize patterns of lung cancer risk from radon, with an approach that can be generalized to multiple chemical and non-chemical stressors.

  2. Attributable mortality to radon exposure in Galicia, Spain. Is it necessary to act in the face of this health problem?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Radon is the second risk factor for lung cancer after tobacco consumption and therefore it is necessary to know the burden of disease due to its exposure. The objective of this study is to estimate radon-attributable lung cancer mortality in Galicia, a high emission area located at the Northwest Spain. Methods A prevalence-based attribution method was applied. Prevalence of tobacco use and radon exposure were obtained from a previously published study of the same area. Attributable mortality was calculated for each of six possible risk categories, based on radon exposure and smoking status. Two scenarios were used, with 37 Bq/m3 and 148 Bq/m3 as the respective radon exposure thresholds. As the observed mortality we used lung cancer mortality for 2001 from the Galician mortality registry. Results Mortality exclusively attributable to radon exposure ranged from 3% to 5% for both exposure thresholds, respectively. Attributable mortality to combined exposure to radon and smoking stood at around 22% for exposures above 148 Bq/m3. Applying the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) action level, radon has a role in 25% of all lung cancers. Conclusions Although the estimates have been derived from a study with a relatively limited sample size, these results highlight the importance of radon exposure as a cause of lung cancer and its effect in terms of disease burden. Radon mitigation activities in the study area must therefore be enforced. PMID:20482770

  3. Residential Radon Exposure and Skin Cancer Incidence in a Prospective Danish Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Bräuner, Elvira Vaclavik; Loft, Steffen; Sørensen, Mette; Jensen, Allan; Andersen, Claus Erik; Ulbak, Kaare; Hertel, Ole; Pedersen, Camilla; Tjønneland, Anne; Krüger Kjær, Susanne; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole

    2015-01-01

    Background Although exposure to UV radiation is the major risk factor for skin cancer, theoretical models suggest that radon exposure can contribute to risk, and this is supported by ecological studies. We sought to confirm or refute an association between long-term exposure to residential radon and the risk for malignant melanoma (MM) and non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) using a prospective cohort design and long-term residential radon exposure. Methods During 1993–1997, we recruited 57,053 Danish persons and collected baseline information. We traced and geocoded all residential addresses of the cohort members and calculated radon concentrations at each address lived in from 1 January 1971 until censor date. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate incidence rate-ratios (IRR) and confidence intervals (CI) for the risk associated with radon exposure for NMSC and MM, and effect modification was assessed. Results Over a mean follow-up of 13.6 years of 51,445 subjects, there were 3,243 cases of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), 317 cases of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and 329 cases of MM. The adjusted IRRs per 100 Bq/m3 increase in residential radon levels for BCC, SCC and MM were 1.14 (95% CI: 1.03, 1.27), 0.90 (95% CI: 0.70, 1.37) and 1.08 (95% CI: 0.77, 1.50), respectively. The association between radon exposure and BCC was stronger among those with higher socio-economic status and those living in apartments at enrollment. Conclusion and Impact Long-term residential radon exposure may contribute to development of basal cell carcinoma of the skin. We cannot exclude confounding from sunlight and cannot conclude on causality, as the relationship was stronger amongst persons living in apartments and non-existent amongst those living in single detached homes. PMID:26274607

  4. Caves, mines and subterranean spaces: hazard and risk from exposure to radon.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crockett, R. G. M.; Gillmore, G. K.

    2009-04-01

    Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas. It is colourless, odourless and chemically inert. The most hazardous isotope is 222Rn. Radon is formed in the natural environment by the radioactive decay of the element uranium (238U) and is a daughter product of daughter product of radium (226Ra). Uranium and radium are found, in differing degrees, in a wide range of rocks, soils (and building materials that are made from these). Radon concentrations in caves, e.g. limestone caves such as the Great Cave of Niah, Borneo, and caves in the Mendips and Peak District in the UK, has been documented and reveal that both (prehistoric) cave-dwellers and other users such as archaeologists are at risk from exposure to radon a naturally occurring radioactive gas. In general, but dependent on cave geometry and ventilation, radon concentration increases with increasing distance from the entrance, implying that the hazard also increases with distance from the entrance. With regard to mines and mining operations, as well as modern extraction of uranium and radium ores, both ores commonly occur alongside other metallic ores, e.g. silver at Schneeberg and Joachimsthal, and tin in Cornwall, and in some instances, waste from earlier metalliferious mining activity has itself been ‘mined' for uranium and/or radium ores. It is not solely the miners and other subterranean workers which are at risk, other workers and local inhabitants are also at risk. Also, that risk is not eliminated by protection against dust/airborne particulates: the risk from inhalation of radon is only reduced by reducing the inhalation of radon, i.e. use of breathing apparatus. Amongst the general population, radon is the second most significant cause of lung cancer behind tobacco smoking. Estimates vary but 6-9% of lung-cancers are attributable to radon and approximately 2% all cancer deaths are attributable to radon. These proportions will increase in higher-radon environments such as caves, mines and mining

  5. Health effects of radon exposure. Report of the Council on Scientific Affairs, American Medical Association

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    The consensus of scientists is that exposure to radon is hazardous, but disagreement exists about the effects of lower radon concentrations. Studies of underground miners have indicated that the risk of lung cancer increases in proportion to the intensity and duration of exposure to radon, and a recent authoritative report (BEIR IV) has concluded that estimates based on those studies are appropriate for estimating risks for occupants of homes. The BEIR IV report concluded that smoking cigarettes increases the risk of lung cancer associated with radon. Average radon levels in US homes range from 0.055 to 0.148 Bq/L (1.5 to 4 pCi/L), depending on the circumstances of measurement. Few studies have investigated health outcomes in occupants of homes with high radon levels. In advising patients about reducing the risks associated with radon, physicians should consider the costs, as well as the benefits, of remedial actions, and they should emphasize that, by far, the best way to avoid lung cancer is to stop smoking.

  6. Radon exposure mediated changes in lung macrophage morphology and function, in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Seed, T.M.; Niiro, G.K.; Kretz, N.D.

    1990-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary macrophages play a key role in the normal physiology of the respiratory system. Potential respiratory dysfunctions due to radon/radon daughter exposure-mediated damage of the macrophage lung cell population has been explored via in vitro technology. In this study, macrophages were isolated from lungs of normal healthy dogs by saline lavage, cultured for varying periods (0-96 h) in the presence or absence of radon gas, and assessed for radon dose-dependent changes in cell morphology and function. The in vitro culture procedure and the cell exposing system allowed for detailed alpha particle dosimetry, in relation to the assessed biological end points; i.e. (1) exposure-dependent changes in macrophage surface topography, (2) capacity to elaborate specific growth factor (CSF) essential for self maintenance, and (3) alterations in cell viability. Highlights of the morphologic assessment indicate that relatively low alpha particle doses arising from protracted radon/radon daughter exposure elicites pronounced topographic alterations of the exposed macrophage's cell surface. 27 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Continuous measurements of bronchial exposure induced by radon decay products during inhalation

    SciTech Connect

    Iwaoka, Kazuki; Tokonami, Shinji; Yonehara, Hidenori; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Doi, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Yosuke; Yatabe, Yoshinori; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Yuji

    2007-09-15

    The deposition of radon decay products is not equal in each of the respiratory regions and as the presence of radon has been linked with an increase in lung cancer risk, it is important to calculate the deposition of radon decay products in each of the respiratory regions. Recently, many studies on the deposition of radon in respiratory regions have been simulated using wire screens. The systems and equipment used in those studies are not suitable for field measurements as their dimensions are relatively massive, nor can they measure continuously. We developed a continuous bronchial dosimeter (CBD) which is suitable for field measurements. It was designed with specifications that allow it to be remain compact. The CBD simulates the deposition of radon decay products in the different respiratory regions by the use of a combination of wire screens. Deposition in the simulated regions of the lung can be continuously estimated in various environments. The ratio of activities deposited in a simulated nasal cavity (N) and tracheobronchial (TB) regions was calculated from the results of simultaneous measurements using CBD-R (reference), CBD-N (nasal), and CBD-TB (tracheobronchial) measurement units. After aerosols were injected into the radon chamber, the ratio of N and TB depositions decreased. This results indicate that the CBD gave a good response to changes in the environment. It was found that the ratio of N and TB deposition also varied with time in each actual environment.

  8. Continuous measurements of bronchial exposure induced by radon decay products during inhalation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwaoka, Kazuki; Tokonami, Shinji; Yonehara, Hidenori; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Doi, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Yosuke; Yatabe, Yoshinori; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Yuji

    2007-09-01

    The deposition of radon decay products is not equal in each of the respiratory regions and as the presence of radon has been linked with an increase in lung cancer risk, it is important to calculate the deposition of radon decay products in each of the respiratory regions. Recently, many studies on the deposition of radon in respiratory regions have been simulated using wire screens. The systems and equipment used in those studies are not suitable for field measurements as their dimensions are relatively massive, nor can they measure continuously. We developed a continuous bronchial dosimeter (CBD) which is suitable for field measurements. It was designed with specifications that allow it to be remain compact. The CBD simulates the deposition of radon decay products in the different respiratory regions by the use of a combination of wire screens. Deposition in the simulated regions of the lung can be continuously estimated in various environments. The ratio of activities deposited in a simulated nasal cavity (N) and tracheobronchial (TB) regions was calculated from the results of simultaneous measurements using CBD-R (reference), CBD-N (nasal), and CBD-TB (tracheobronchial) measurement units. After aerosols were injected into the radon chamber, the ratio of N and TB depositions decreased. This results indicate that the CBD gave a good response to changes in the environment. It was found that the ratio of N and TB deposition also varied with time in each actual environment.

  9. Radon exposure at a radioactive waste storage facility.

    PubMed

    Manocchi, F H; Campos, M P; Dellamano, J C; Silva, G M

    2014-06-01

    The Waste Management Department of Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN) is responsible for the safety management of the waste generated at all internal research centers and that of other waste producers such as industry, medical facilities, and universities in Brazil. These waste materials, after treatment, are placed in an interim storage facility. Among them are (226)Ra needles used in radiotherapy, siliceous cake arising from conversion processes, and several other classes of waste from the nuclear fuel cycle, which contain Ra-226 producing (222)Rn gas daughter.In order to estimate the effective dose for workers due to radon inhalation, the radon concentration at the storage facility has been assessed within this study. Radon measurements have been carried out through the passive method with solid-state nuclear track detectors (CR-39) over a period of nine months, changing detectors every month in order to determine the long-term average levels of indoor radon concentrations. The radon concentration results, covering the period from June 2012 to March 2013, varied from 0.55 ± 0.05 to 5.19 ± 0.45 kBq m(-3). The effective dose due to (222)Rn inhalation was further assessed following ICRP Publication 65.

  10. Meta-analysis of residential exposure to radon gas and lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Pavia, Maria; Bianco, Aida; Pileggi, Claudia; Angelillo, Italo F.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the relation between residential exposure to radon and lung cancer. METHODS: A literature search was performed using Medline and other sources. The quality of studies was assessed. Adjusted odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the risk of lung cancer among categories of levels of exposure to radon were extracted. For each study, a weighted log-linear regression analysis of the adjusted odds ratios was performed according to radon concentration. The random effect model was used to combine values from single studies. Separate meta-analyses were performed on results from studies grouped with similar characteristics or with quality scores above or equal to the median. FINDINGS: Seventeen case-control studies were included in the meta-analysis. Quality scoring for individual studies ranged from 0.45 to 0.77 (median, 0.64). Meta-analysis based on exposure at 150 Bq/m3 gave a pooled odds ratio estimate of 1.24 (95% CI, 1.11-1.38), which indicated a potential effect of residential exposure to radon on the risk of lung cancer. Pooled estimates of fitted odds ratios at several levels of randon exposure were all significantly different from unity--ranging from 1.07 at 50 Bq/m3 to 1.43 at 250 Bq/m3. No remarkable differences from the baseline analysis were found for odds ratios from sensitivity analyses of studies in which > 75% of eligible cases were recruited (1.12, 1.00-1.25) and studies that included only women (1.29, 1.04-1.60). CONCLUSION: Although no definitive conclusions may be drawn, our results suggest a dose-response relation between residential exposure to radon and the risk of lung cancer. They support the need to develop strategies to reduce human exposure to radon. PMID:14758433

  11. Mitigation of three water supplies with high radon exposure to the employees.

    PubMed

    Ringer, W; Simader, M; Bernreiter, M; Kaineder, H

    2008-01-01

    A comprehensive survey to determine the occupational radiation exposure in water supplies and spas was conducted in the federal state of Upper Austria. The study comprises 45 water supplies. The limit for radon exposure of 6 MBq h m(-3) was exceeded by two water supplies (WS 33 and WS 42). In one water supply (WS 29), the level of 2 MBq h m(-3) was exceeded. These water supplies were mitigated. Prior to mitigation the main radon sources were identified. Mitigation measures were: evacuation of the outlet air of the vaporiser by means of a fan, installation of a fan in the exhaust air duct of the compensating reservoir, sealing of drain shafts and mechanical ventilation of the office. In all water supplies, the radon exposure was reduced to below 0.8 MBq h m(-3) at a cost of approx. euro 750 to euro 1000.

  12. Modifiers of exposure--response estimates for lung cancer among miners exposed to radon progeny

    SciTech Connect

    Hornung, R.W.; Deddens, J.; Roscoe, R.

    1995-03-01

    The association between lung cancer and exposure to radon decay products has been well established. Despite agreement on this point, there is still some degree of uncertainty regarding characteristics of the exposure-response relationship. The use of studies of underground miners to estimate lung cancer risks due to residential radon exposure depends upon a better understanding of factors potentially modifying the exposure-response relationship. Given the diversity in study populations regarding smoking status, mining conditions, risk analysis methodology, and referent populations, the risk estimates across studies are quite similar. However, several factors partially contributing to differences in risk estimates are modified by attained age, time since last exposure, exposure rate, and cigarette smoking patterns. There is growing agreement across studies that relative risk decreases with attained age and time since last exposure. Several studies have also found an inverse exposure-rate effect, i.e., low exposure rates for protracted duration of exposure are more hazardous than equivalent cumulative exposures received at higher rates for shorter periods of time. Additionally, the interaction between radon exposure and cigarette smoking appears to be intermediate between additive and multiplicative in a growing number of studies. Quantitative estimates of these modifying factors are given using a new analysis of data from the latest update of the Colorado Plateau uranium miners cohort. 24 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Radon: The Invisible Invader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Leader, 1987

    1987-01-01

    A brief background on indoor radon and the health risks associated with radon exposure, with special emphasis on nonresidential buildings. One school district's experience in radon testing and monitoring is included. (MLF)

  14. Radon Testing in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Robert

    1989-01-01

    Schools may be a significant source of radon exposure for children and staff. Describes radon detection kits and technologies, when to use them, and what action to take given the results of a radon test. (MLF)

  15. Children’s Exposure to Radon in Nursery and Primary Schools

    PubMed Central

    Branco, Pedro T. B. S.; Nunes, Rafael A. O.; Alvim-Ferraz, Maria C. M.; Martins, Fernando G.; Sousa, Sofia I. V.

    2016-01-01

    The literature proves an evident association between indoor radon exposure and lung cancer, even at low doses. This study brings a new approach to the study of children’s exposure to radon by aiming to evaluate exposure to indoor radon concentrations in nursery and primary schools from two districts in Portugal (Porto and Bragança), considering different influencing factors (occupation patterns, classroom floor level, year of the buildings’ construction and soil composition of the building site), as well as the comparison with IAQ standard values for health protection. Fifteen nursery and primary schools in the Porto and Bragança districts were considered: five nursery schools for infants and twelve for pre-schoolers (seven different buildings), as well as eight primary schools. Radon measurements were performed continuously. The measured concentrations depended on the building occupation, classroom floor level and year of the buildings’ construction. Although they were in general within the Portuguese legislation for IAQ, exceedances to international standards were found. These results point out the need of assessing indoor radon concentrations not only in primary schools, but also in nursery schools, never performed in Portugal before this study. It is important to extend the study to other microenvironments like homes, and in time to estimate the annual effective dose and to assess lifetime health risks. PMID:27043596

  16. Thoron detection with an active Radon exposure meter—First results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irlinger, J.; Wielunski, M.; Rühm, W.

    2014-02-01

    For state-of-the-art discrimination of Radon and Thoron several measurement techniques can be used, such as active sampling, electrostatic collection, delayed coincidence method, and alpha-particle-spectroscopy. However, most of the devices available are bulky and show high power consumption, rendering them unfeasible for personal exposition monitoring. Based on a Radon exposure meter previously realized at the Helmholtz Center Munich (HMGU), a new electronic prototype for Radon/Thoron monitoring is currently being developed, which features small size and weight. Operating with pin-diode detectors, the low-power passive-sampling device can be used for continuous concentration measurements, employing alpha-particle-spectroscopy and coincidence event registration to distinguish decays originating either from Radon or Thoron isotopes and their decay products. In open geometry, preliminary calibration measurements suggest that one count per hour is produced by a 11 Bq m-3 Radon atmosphere or by a 15 Bq m-3 Thoron atmosphere. Future efforts will concentrate on measurements in mixed Radon/Thoron atmospheres.

  17. Thoron detection with an active Radon exposure meter—First results

    SciTech Connect

    Irlinger, J. Wielunski, M.; Rühm, W.

    2014-02-15

    For state-of-the-art discrimination of Radon and Thoron several measurement techniques can be used, such as active sampling, electrostatic collection, delayed coincidence method, and alpha-particle-spectroscopy. However, most of the devices available are bulky and show high power consumption, rendering them unfeasible for personal exposition monitoring. Based on a Radon exposure meter previously realized at the Helmholtz Center Munich (HMGU), a new electronic prototype for Radon/Thoron monitoring is currently being developed, which features small size and weight. Operating with pin-diode detectors, the low-power passive-sampling device can be used for continuous concentration measurements, employing alpha-particle-spectroscopy and coincidence event registration to distinguish decays originating either from Radon or Thoron isotopes and their decay products. In open geometry, preliminary calibration measurements suggest that one count per hour is produced by a 11 Bq m{sup −3} Radon atmosphere or by a 15 Bq m{sup −3} Thoron atmosphere. Future efforts will concentrate on measurements in mixed Radon/Thoron atmospheres.

  18. Radon Sources and Associated Risk in Terms of Exposure and Dose

    PubMed Central

    Vogiannis, Efstratios G.; Nikolopoulos, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    Radon concerns the international scientific community from the early twentieth century, initially as radium emanation and nearly the second half of the century as a significant hazard to human health. The initial brilliant period of its use as medicine was followed by a period of intense concern for its health effects. Miners in Europe and later in the U.S were the primary target groups surveyed. Nowadays, there is a concrete evidence that radon and its progeny can cause lung cancer (1). Human activities may create or modify pathways increasing indoor radon concentration compared to outdoor background. These pathways can be controlled by preventive and corrective actions (2). Indoor radon and its short-lived progeny either attached on aerosol particles or free, compose an air mixture that carries a significant energy amount [Potential Alpha-Energy Concentration (PAEC)]. Prior research at that topic focused on the exposure on PAEC and the dose delivered by the human body or tissues. Special mention was made to the case of water workers due to inadequate data. Furthermore, radon risk assessment and relevant legislation for the dose delivered by man from radon and its progeny has been also reviewed. PMID:25601905

  19. Carcinogenic risk coefficients at environmental levels of radon exposures: A microdosimetric approach

    SciTech Connect

    Zaider, M.; Varma, N.

    1996-06-01

    We report a microdosimetric-based evaluation of the effects of domestic exposure to radon. The risk coefficients obtained here are based on the microdosimetry of radon progeny alpha particles, on a function q(y) for in vivo radiogenic neoplasia, and on scaling A-bomb results (epidemiology + microdosimetry) to radon exposure. We do not use miner data, nor do we invoke such notions as quality factors, dose equivalent or equivalent dose. With basal cells as targets our estimated risk coefficients are in good agreement with the miner data, and thus a quality factor of about 20 (as suggested by ICRP 60) is not unreasonable. However, if we take as targets the secretory cells our risk coefficients are twice as large as those reported by BEIR-IV. The main uncertainty in these estimates remains the dosimetric model. 35 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. The Cellular and Molecular Carcinogenic Effects of Radon Exposure: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Aaron; Allen, James; Laney, Robin; Curnow, Alison

    2013-01-01

    Radon-222 is a naturally occurring radioactive gas that is responsible for approximately half of the human annual background radiation exposure globally. Chronic exposure to radon and its decay products is estimated to be the second leading cause of lung cancer behind smoking, and links to other forms of neoplasms have been postulated. Ionizing radiation emitted during the radioactive decay of radon and its progeny can induce a variety of cytogenetic effects that can be biologically damaging and result in an increased risk of carcinogenesis. Suggested effects produced as a result of alpha particle exposure from radon include mutations, chromosome aberrations, generation of reactive oxygen species, modification of the cell cycle, up or down regulation of cytokines and the increased production of proteins associated with cell-cycle regulation and carcinogenesis. A number of potential biomarkers of exposure, including translocations at codon 249 of TP53 in addition to HPRT mutations, have been suggested although, in conclusion, the evidence for such hotspots is insufficient. There is also substantial evidence of bystander effects, which may provide complications when calculating risk estimates as a result of exposure, particularly at low doses where cellular responses often appear to deviate from the linear, no-threshold hypothesis. At low doses, effects may also be dependent on cellular conditions as opposed to dose. The cellular and molecular carcinogenic effects of radon exposure have been observed to be both numerous and complex and the elevated chronic exposure of man may therefore pose a significant public health risk that may extend beyond the association with lung carcinogenesis. PMID:23880854

  1. The cellular and molecular carcinogenic effects of radon exposure: a review.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Aaron; Allen, James; Laney, Robin; Curnow, Alison

    2013-07-05

    Radon-222 is a naturally occurring radioactive gas that is responsible for approximately half of the human annual background radiation exposure globally. Chronic exposure to radon and its decay products is estimated to be the second leading cause of lung cancer behind smoking, and links to other forms of neoplasms have been postulated. Ionizing radiation emitted during the radioactive decay of radon and its progeny can induce a variety of cytogenetic effects that can be biologically damaging and result in an increased risk of carcinogenesis. Suggested effects produced as a result of alpha particle exposure from radon include mutations, chromosome aberrations, generation of reactive oxygen species, modification of the cell cycle, up or down regulation of cytokines and the increased production of proteins associated with cell-cycle regulation and carcinogenesis. A number of potential biomarkers of exposure, including translocations at codon 249 of TP53 in addition to HPRT mutations, have been suggested although, in conclusion, the evidence for such hotspots is insufficient. There is also substantial evidence of bystander effects, which may provide complications when calculating risk estimates as a result of exposure, particularly at low doses where cellular responses often appear to deviate from the linear, no-threshold hypothesis. At low doses, effects may also be dependent on cellular conditions as opposed to dose. The cellular and molecular carcinogenic effects of radon exposure have been observed to be both numerous and complex and the elevated chronic exposure of man may therefore pose a significant public health risk that may extend beyond the association with lung carcinogenesis.

  2. Dose estimation derived from the exposure to radon, thoron and their progeny in the indoor environment

    PubMed Central

    Ramola, R. C.; Prasad, Mukesh; Kandari, Tushar; Pant, Preeti; Bossew, Peter; Mishra, Rosaline; Tokonami, S.

    2016-01-01

    The annual exposure to indoor radon, thoron and their progeny imparts a major contribution to inhalation doses received by the public. In this study, we report results of time integrated passive measurements of indoor radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations that were carried out in Garhwal Himalaya with the aim of investigating significant health risk to the dwellers in the region. The measurements were performed using recently developed LR-115 detector based techniques. The experimentally determined values of radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations were used to estimate total annual inhalation dose and annual effective doses. The equilibrium factors for radon and thoron were also determined from the observed data. The estimated value of total annual inhalation dose was found to be 1.8 ± 0.7 mSv/y. The estimated values of the annual effective dose were found to be 1.2 ± 0.5 mSv/y and 0.5 ± 0.3 mSv/y, respectively. The estimated values of radiation doses suggest no important health risk due to exposure of radon, thoron and progeny in the study area. The contribution of indoor thoron and its progeny to total inhalation dose ranges between 13–52% with mean value of 30%. Thus thoron cannot be neglected when assessing radiation doses. PMID:27499492

  3. Dose estimation derived from the exposure to radon, thoron and their progeny in the indoor environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramola, R. C.; Prasad, Mukesh; Kandari, Tushar; Pant, Preeti; Bossew, Peter; Mishra, Rosaline; Tokonami, S.

    2016-08-01

    The annual exposure to indoor radon, thoron and their progeny imparts a major contribution to inhalation doses received by the public. In this study, we report results of time integrated passive measurements of indoor radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations that were carried out in Garhwal Himalaya with the aim of investigating significant health risk to the dwellers in the region. The measurements were performed using recently developed LR-115 detector based techniques. The experimentally determined values of radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations were used to estimate total annual inhalation dose and annual effective doses. The equilibrium factors for radon and thoron were also determined from the observed data. The estimated value of total annual inhalation dose was found to be 1.8 ± 0.7 mSv/y. The estimated values of the annual effective dose were found to be 1.2 ± 0.5 mSv/y and 0.5 ± 0.3 mSv/y, respectively. The estimated values of radiation doses suggest no important health risk due to exposure of radon, thoron and progeny in the study area. The contribution of indoor thoron and its progeny to total inhalation dose ranges between 13–52% with mean value of 30%. Thus thoron cannot be neglected when assessing radiation doses.

  4. In-vivo measurements of Pb-210 to determine cumulative exposure to radon daughters: A pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Laurer, G.R.; Cohen, N. . Dept. of Environmental Medicine); Stark, A.; Ju, C. . Bureau of Environmental and Occupational Epidemiology)

    1991-05-01

    The objective of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of estimating cumulative exposure of individuals to low concentrations of radon by measuring the amount of Pb-A-10 in their skeletons. This report presents progress to date establishing the validity of an vivo technique to measure skeletal burdens of Pb-210, accumulated from exposure to radon and radon progeny. With the skeletal content of Pb--210 and a model for Pb metabolism, cumulative exposure to radon and its short-lived daughters (radon/daughters) may be calculated for use in deriving a dose-response relationship between lung cancer and exposure to radon/daughters. Data are presented for 29 subjects exposed to above-average'' radon concentrations in their homes, showing the correlation between measured Pb--210 burdens, and measured pCi/l and WLM exposure estimates. Their results are compared to measurements of a population of 24 subject's presumed exposed to average concentrations. Measurements of a Pennsylvania family exposed for a year in a home with an extremely high radon content are also presented. Update of results of an ongoing study of the biological half-time of Pb--210 in man involving measurements, of a retired radiation worker with a 40 year old skeletal burden of Pb-210.

  5. Estimation of past radon exposure to indoor radon from embedded (210)Po in household glass.

    PubMed

    Gusain, G S; Rautela, B S; Ramola, R C

    2012-11-01

    In the present investigation, the surface-deposited polonium activities were measured in houses in the Ukhimath region of Garhwal Himalaya, India. The surface-deposited (210)Po activity concentrations were found to vary from 0.7 to 15.40 Bq m(-2) with an average of 5.95 Bq m(-2). The radon concentration estimated on the basis of (210)Po activity was found to vary from 0.29 to 700 Bq m(-3) with an average value 242 Bq m(-3). The contemporary radon concentration in the area was found to vary from 13 to 181 Bq m(-3) with an average of 46 Bq m(-3). The annual effective dose due to (210)Po activity in houses in the Garhwal Himalaya region was found to vary from 0.61 to 13.33 mSv with an average of 5.15 mSv. Some worldwide studies have shown the relation between the increased risk of lung cancer and smoking habits. Data on smoking have also been collected from the same dwellings. The significance of this work is also discussed in detail from a radiation protection point of view.

  6. ASSESSMENT OF THE EXPOSURE TO AND DOSE FROM RADON DECAY PRODUCTS IN NORMALLY OCCUPIED HOMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of an assessment of the exposure to radon decay products in seven houses in northeastern U.S. and southeastern Canada. n two houses, a single individual smoked cigarettes. ariety of heating and cooking appliances were in the houses. hese studies provided 5...

  7. Estimating the distribution of lifetime cumulative radon exposures for California residents: A brief summary

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, K.S.; Chang, Y.L.; Hayward, S.B.; Gadgil, A.J.; Nero, A.V. Jr.

    1992-04-01

    We have used data on residential radon concentrations in California, together with information on California residents` moving histories and time-activity patterns, to estimate the distribution of lifetime cumulative exposures to radon 222. This distribution was constructed using Monte Carlo techniques to simulate the lifetime occupancy histories -- and associated radon exposures -- of 10,000 California residents. For standard male and female lifespans, the simulation sampled from transition probability matrices representing changes of residence within and between six regions of California, as well as into and out of the other United States, and then sampled from the appropriate regional (or national) distribution of indoor concentrations. The resulting distribution of lifetime cumulative exposures has a significantly narrower relative width than the distribution of California indoor concentrations, with only a small fraction -- less than 0.2% -- of the population having lifetime exposures equivalent to living during their lifetimes in a single home with a radon concentration of 148 Bq/m{sup 3} or more.

  8. Radon exposure of the skin: II. Estimation of the attributable risk for skin cancer incidence.

    PubMed

    Charles, M W

    2007-09-01

    A preceding companion paper has reviewed the various factors which form the chain of assumptions that are necessary to support a suggested link between radon exposure and skin cancer in man. Overall, the balance of evidence was considered to be against a causal link between radon exposure and skin cancer. One factor against causality is evidence, particularly from animal studies, that some exposure of the hair follicles and/or the deeper dermis, as well as the inter-follicular epidermis, is required-beyond the range of naturally occurring alpha particles. On this basis any skin cancer risk due to radon progeny would be due only to beta and gamma components of equivalent dose, which are 10-100 times less than the alpha equivalent dose to the basal layer. Notwithstanding this conclusion against causality, calculations have been carried out of attributable risk (ATR, the proportion of cases occurring in the total population which can be explained by radon exposure) on the conservative basis that the target cells are, as is often assumed, in the basal layer of the epidermis. An excess relative risk figure is used which is based on variance weighting of the data sources. This is 2.5 times lower than the value generally used. A latent period of 20 years and an RBE of 10 are considered more justifiable than the often used values of 10 years and 20 respectively. These assumptions lead to an ATR of approximately 0.7% (0.5-5%) at the nominal UK indoor radon level of 20 Bq m(-3). The range reflects uncertainties in plate-out. Previous higher estimates by various authors have made more pessimistic assumptions. There are some indications that radon progeny plate-out may be elevated out of doors, particularly due to rainfall. Although average UK outdoor radon levels ( approximately 4 Bq m(-3)) are much less than average indoor levels, and outdoor residence time is on average about 10%, this might have the effect of increasing the ATR several-fold. This needs considerable further

  9. Exposure assessment of radon in the drinking water supplies: a descriptive study in Palestine

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Radon gas is considered as a main risk factor for lung cancer and found naturally in rock, soil, and water. The objective of this study was to determine the radon level in the drinking water sources in Nablus city in order to set up a sound policy on water management in Palestine. Methods This was a descriptive study carried out in two phases with a random sampling technique in the second phase. Primarily, samples were taken from 4 wells and 5 springs that supplied Nablus city residents. For each source, 3 samples were taken and each was analyzed in 4 cycles by RAD 7 device manufactured by Durridge Company. Secondly, from the seven regions of the Nablus city, three samples were taken from the residential tap water of each region. Regarding the old city, ten samples were taken. Finally, the mean radon concentration value for each source was calculated. Results The mean (range) concentration of radon in the main sources were 6.9 (1.5-23.4) Becquerel/liter (Bq/L). Separately, springs and wells' means were 4.6 Bq/L and 9.5 Bq/L; respectively. For the residential tap water in the 7 regions, the results of the mean (range) concentration values were found to be 1.0 (0.9-1.3) Bq/L. For the old city, the mean (range) concentration values were 2.3 (0.9-3.9) Bq/L. Conclusions Except for Al-Badan well, radon concentrations in the wells and springs were below the United State Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminated level (U.S EPA MCL). The level was much lower for tap water. Although the concentration of radon in the tap water of old city were below the MCL, it was higher than other regions in the city. Preventive measures and population awareness on radon's exposure are recommended. PMID:22243625

  10. Assessment of the exposure to and dose from radon decay products in normally occupied homes

    SciTech Connect

    Hopke, P.K.; Jensen, B.; Li, C.S.; Montassier, N.; Wasiolek, P.; Cavallo, A.J.; Gatsby, K.; Socolow, R.H.; James, A.C.

    1995-05-01

    The exposure to radon decay products has been assessed in seven homes in the northeastern United States and southeastern Canada. In two of the houses, there was a single individual who smoked cigarettes. There were a variety of heating and cooking appliances among these homes. These studies have provide 565 measurements of the activity-weighted size distributions in these houses. The median value for the equilibrium factor was 0.408 as compared with the previously employed value of 0.50. Using the recently adopted ICRP lung deposition and dosimetry model, the hourly equivalent lung dose rate per unit, radon exposure was estimated for each measured size distribution. Differences between houses with smokers present and absent were noted in the exposure conditions, but the resulting dose rate per unit of radon gas concentration was essentially the same for the two groups. Expressed in terms of ICRP`s unit of effective dose for members of the public, the mean dose rate conversion coefficient with respect to radon gas concentration found in this study was 3.8 nSv h{sup -} Bq{sup -} m{sup -3}. 26 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Estimated risks of radon-induced lung cancer for different exposure profiles based on the new EPA model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing

    2005-04-01

    Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas. When inhaled, radon can cause mutations that lead to lung cancer. Some new epidemiologic studies indicate that indoor radon is a public health problem. The BEIR VI report outlined its preferred two risk models for the combined effects of smoking and exposure to radon progeny, and listed the estimated risk to ever-smokers and never-smokers of both sexes due to lifetime exposure. However, exposures for shorter periods of time are of practical interest since exposure to elevated levels of radon may occur and end at any age. This study aims to produce practical tables of lifetime relative risks for exposures between any two age intervals from 0 to 110, and for various radon concentrations found in homes from 100 to 1,000 Bq m(-3). The calculations are based on the risk model developed recently by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The EPA's risk model is a single model that gives risk values midway between those obtained from the two BEIR VI preferred models. The detailed tables provide a clearer view of the age groups at higher risk and the effect of exposure duration. The results will help radiation protection practitioners to better communicate indoor radon risk to members of the public.

  12. Radon-Induced Health Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muirhead, C. R.

    The following sections are included: * Lung Cancer * Studies of miners * Estimates of lifetime risk associated with indoor radon exposure * Factors that may affect risk estimates * Sex and age at exposure * Joint effect of radon and smoking * Exposure rate * Epidemiological studies of lung cancer and indoor radon exposure * Cancers Other Than Lung * Dosimetry * Epidemiological studies * Studies of miners * Indoor radon exposure * Concluding Remarks * References

  13. Computer program for the sensitivity calculation of a CR-39 detector in a diffusion chamber for radon measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Nikezic, D. Stajic, J. M.; Yu, K. N.

    2014-02-15

    Computer software for calculation of the sensitivity of a CR-39 detector closed in a diffusion chamber to radon is described in this work. The software consists of two programs, both written in the standard Fortran 90 programming language. The physical background and a numerical example are given. Presented software is intended for numerous researches in radon measurement community. Previously published computer programs TRACK-TEST.F90 and TRACK-VISION.F90 [D. Nikezic and K. N. Yu, Comput. Phys. Commun. 174, 160 (2006); D. Nikezic and K. N. Yu, Comput. Phys. Commun. 178, 591 (2008)] are used here as subroutines to calculate the track parameters and to determine whether the track is visible or not, based on the incident angle, impact energy, etching conditions, gray level, and visibility criterion. The results obtained by the software, using five different V functions, were compared with the experimental data found in the literature. Application of two functions in this software reproduced experimental data very well, while other three gave lower sensitivity than experiment.

  14. Computer program for the sensitivity calculation of a CR-39 detector in a diffusion chamber for radon measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikezic, D.; Yu, K. N.; Stajic, J. M.

    2014-02-01

    Computer software for calculation of the sensitivity of a CR-39 detector closed in a diffusion chamber to radon is described in this work. The software consists of two programs, both written in the standard Fortran 90 programming language. The physical background and a numerical example are given. Presented software is intended for numerous researches in radon measurement community. Previously published computer programs TRACK_TEST.F90 and TRACK_VISION.F90 [D. Nikezic and K. N. Yu, Comput. Phys. Commun. 174, 160 (2006); D. Nikezic and K. N. Yu, Comput. Phys. Commun. 178, 591 (2008)] are used here as subroutines to calculate the track parameters and to determine whether the track is visible or not, based on the incident angle, impact energy, etching conditions, gray level, and visibility criterion. The results obtained by the software, using five different V functions, were compared with the experimental data found in the literature. Application of two functions in this software reproduced experimental data very well, while other three gave lower sensitivity than experiment.

  15. Indoor radon.

    PubMed

    Polpong, P; Bovornkitti, S

    1998-01-01

    The naturally radioactive but chemically inert gas, radon, is formed from the radioactive decay of radium which is part of the uranium series. Radon gas, which has a half life of 3.8 days, must escape from soil particles through air-filled pores in order to enter the atmosphere following the decay of radium. The concentration of radon in the atmosphere varies, depending on the place, time, height above the ground and meteorological conditions. It is thus an inescapable source of radiation exposure, both at home and at work. The potential hazards posed by exposure to radiation from indoor radon gas and its daughter products are of great concern worldwide. Noting of an excessive lung cancer risk among several groups of underground miners exposed to radon and its daughter products, studies on radon concentrations in the workplace and in dwellings have been conducted in many countries. The results have shown that the distribution of radon concentrations are approximately lognormal from which population weighted; the arithmetic mean of radon concentration of 40 Bq.m-3 has been adopted worldwide for dwellings and workplaces. The principal methods for reducing a high indoor radon concentration are: reducing the radon supply by reversing the pressure difference between the building and the soil; raising the resistance of the foundations to soil gas entry; removing the radon sources such as water or underlying soil; diluting the concentration by increasing the ventilation rate; and reducing the concentration of radon progeny by filtering and increasing the circulation of indoor air. Buildings which have a radon concentration higher than 200 Bq.m-3 should be investigated by the national authorities concerned; meanwhile, householders should be advised to take simple temporary precautions, such as increasing ventilation, until a permanent remedy can be effected.

  16. Assessment of external gamma exposure and radon levels in a dwelling constructed with phosphogypsum plates.

    PubMed

    Máduar, M F; Campos, M P; Mazzilli, B P; Villaverde, F L

    2011-06-15

    Phosphogypsum, a fertilizer industry by-product, is being worldwide stockpiled, posing environmental concerns. Since this material contains natural radionuclides in significant concentrations, its use as a building material has radiological implications. In order to confirm the feasibility of the use of a new material mainly composed by phosphogypsum, an experimental house was built, having some of its rooms entirely lined with this material. Measurements of samples of phosphogypsum plates from different origins resulted in values of 0.2 to 2.6 for the external radiation index, thus justifying a more detailed investigation. In this paper, the application of a previously developed computational model to forecast external doses indoors is described. A comprehensive radiological evaluation is being performed, including measurement of the external gamma exposure and radon concentrations in one of the rooms of the house. The results show that the annual increment in the effective dose to an inhabitant of the house will remain below the 1 mSv limit for every reasonable scenario. The radon measurements were carried out over a period of 18 months, in order to determine the long-term average levels of the indoor radon concentrations. The results obtained are below 200 Bq m(-3), the recommended investigation level for radon.

  17. Residential radon exposure and risk of incident hematologic malignancies in the Cancer Prevention Study-II Nutrition Cohort.

    PubMed

    Teras, Lauren R; Diver, W Ryan; Turner, Michelle C; Krewski, Daniel; Sahar, Liora; Ward, Elizabeth; Gapstur, Susan M

    2016-07-01

    Dosimetric models show that radon, an established cause of lung cancer, delivers a non-negligible dose of alpha radiation to the bone marrow, as well as to lymphocytes in the tracheobronchial epithelium, and therefore could be related to risk of hematologic cancers. Studies of radon and hematologic cancer risk, however, have produced inconsistent results. To date there is no published prospective, population-based study of residential radon exposure and hematologic malignancy incidence. We used data from the American Cancer Society Cancer Prevention Study-II Nutrition Cohort established in 1992, to examine the association between county-level residential radon exposure and risk of hematologic cancer. The analytic cohort included 140,652 participants (66,572 men, 74,080 women) among which 3019 incident hematologic cancer cases (1711 men, 1308 women) were identified during 19 years of follow-up. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to calculate multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for radon exposure and hematologic cancer risk. Women living in counties with the highest mean radon concentrations (>148Bq/m(3)) had a statistically significant higher risk of hematologic cancer compared to those living in counties with the lowest (<74Bq/m(3)) radon levels (HR=1.63, 95% CI:1.23-2.18), and there was evidence of a dose-response relationship (HRcontinuous=1.38, 95% CI:1.15-1.65 per 100Bq/m(3); p-trend=0.001). There was no association between county-level radon and hematologic cancer risk among men. The findings of this large, prospective study suggest residential radon may be a risk factor for lymphoid malignancies among women. Further study is needed to confirm these findings.

  18. Indoor Radon: The Deadliest Pollutant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, Richard A.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the origin, occurrence, and effects of radon gas. Cites studies which attribute 5,000 to 20,000 deaths per year to radon exposure and the synergistic effect between radon and smoking. Explains ways to reduce risks. (RT)

  19. Radon hazards, geology, and exposure of cave users: a case study and some theoretical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Gillmore, G K; Sperrin, M; Phillips, P; Denman, A

    2000-07-01

    The concerns over the risks to human health from radon in underground caves are poorly documented, unlike in workplace or domestic environments where exposures are relatively well known. In U.K. caves, radon has been identified as occurring at elevated levels; but with the exception of major show caves, its impact and risk to the many groups who use the caves have thus far received inadequate attention. This paper presents a survey performed in a relatively "low-risk" geographical area of the United Kingdom and quantifies the risk of exposure in this cave environment. Radon levels up to 12,552 Bq m(-3) were measured: Such concentrations are very high but are likely to underestimate the levels in many other parts of the cave system, for reasons associated with cave architecture and meteorology. This study confirms previous workers' conclusions that long-term users of deep caves, as opposed to rock shelters, are at risk. Annual doses to certain groups of cave users have been calculated to be as high as 120 mSv, a very high value. The study also demonstrates that there is variation both within and between caves as a result of subtleties of the bedrock geology, fault patterns, and weathering. This paper sets out a theoretical model.

  20. Development of calibration facility for radon and its progenies at NIM (China).

    PubMed

    Liang, J C; Zheng, P H; Yang, Z J; Liu, H R; Zhang, M; Li, Z S; Zhang, L; Guo, Q J

    2015-11-01

    Accurate measurement of radon and its progenies is the basis to control the radon dose and reduce the risk of lung cancer caused. The precise calibration of measuring instrument is an important part of the quality control of measurements of the concentration of radon and radon progenies. To establish Chinese national standards and realise reliable calibrations of measuring instrument for radon and its progenies, a radon chamber with regulation capability of environmental parameters, aerosol and radon concentrations was designed and constructed at National Institute of Metrology (NIM). The chamber has a total volume of ∼20 m(3) including an exposure volume of 12.44 m(3). The radon concentration can be controlled from 12 Bq m(-3) to the maximum of 232 kBq m(-3). The regulation range of temperature, relative humidity and aerosol are 0.66 -44.39°C, 16.4 -95 %RH and 10(2) -10(6) cm(-3), respectively. The main advantages of the NIM radon chamber with respect to maintaining a stable concentration and equilibrium factor of radon progenies in a wide range through automatic regulation and control of radon and aerosol are described.

  1. Risk of lung cancer associated with residential radon exposure in south-west England: a case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Darby, S.; Whitley, E.; Silcocks, P.; Thakrar, B.; Green, M.; Lomas, P.; Miles, J.; Reeves, G.; Fearn, T.; Doll, R.

    1998-01-01

    Studies of underground miners occupationally exposed to radon have consistently demonstrated an increased risk of lung cancer in both smokers and non-smokers. Radon exposure also occurs elsewhere, especially in houses, and estimates based on the findings for miners suggest that residential radon is responsible for about one in 20 lung cancers in the UK, most being caused in combination with smoking. These calculations depend, however, on several assumptions and more direct evidence on the magnitude of the risk is needed. To obtain such evidence, a case-control study was carried out in south-west England in which 982 subjects with lung cancer and 3185 control subjects were interviewed. In addition, radon concentrations were measured at the addresses at which subjects had lived during the 30-year period ending 5 years before the interview. Lung cancer risk was examined in relation to residential radon concentration after taking into account the length of time that subjects had lived at each address and adjusting for age, sex, smoking status, county of residence and social class. The relative risk of lung cancer increased by 0.08 (95% CI -0.03, 0.20) per 100 Bq m(-3) increase in the observed time-weighted residential radon concentration. When the analysis was restricted to the 484 subjects with lung cancer and the 1637 control subjects with radon measurements available for the entire 30-year period of interest, the corresponding increase was somewhat higher at 0.14 per 100 Bq m(-3) (95% CI 0.01, 0.29), although the difference between this group and the remaining subjects was not statistically significant. When the analysis was repeated taking into account uncertainties in the assessment of radon exposure, the estimated increases in relative risk per 100 Bq m(-3) were larger, at 0.12 (95% CI -0.05, 0.33) when all subjects were included and 0.24 (95% CI -0.01, 0.56) when limited to subjects with radon measurements available for all 30 years. These results are consistent

  2. A study of airborne radon levels in Paarl houses (South Africa) and associated source terms, using electret ion chambers and gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, R; Newman, R T; Speelman, W J

    2008-11-01

    Indoor radon ((222)Rn) concentrations were measured in Paarl homes by means of electret ion chambers. The concentrations varied between 28 and 465 Bq m(-3). The average values (Bq m(-3)) found in houses on the west and east side of the Berg River, which bisects Paarl, were 132 (+/-11) and 37 (+/-3), respectively. Radiometric analyses of soils show that the mean (226)Ra activity concentration is three times higher on the west than on the east side of the Berg River.

  3. EPA Urges Home Radon Testing/Protect Your Family from Lung Cancer Caused by Exposure to Radon in Your Home

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WASHINGTON - In recognizing January as National Radon Action Month, EPA encourages Americans around the country to test their homes for this naturally occurring radioactive gas and make 2015 a healthier, safer new year.

  4. Biology Based Lung Cancer Model for Chronic Low Radon Exposures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    TruÅ£ǎ-Popa, Lucia-Adina; Hofmann, Werner; Fakir, Hatim; Cosma, Constantin

    2008-08-01

    Low dose effects of alpha particles at the tissue level are characterized by the interaction of single alpha particles, affecting only a small fraction of the cells within that tissue. Alpha particle intersections of bronchial target cells during a given exposure period were simulated by an initiation-promotion model, formulated in terms of cellular hits within the cycle time of the cell (dose-rate) and then integrated over the whole exposure period (dose). For a given average number of cellular hits during the lifetime of bronchial cells, the actual number of single and multiple hits was selected from a Poisson distribution. While oncogenic transformation is interpreted as the primary initiation step, stimulated mitosis by killing adjacent cells is assumed to be the primary radiological promotion event. Analytical initiation and promotion functions were derived from experimental in vitro data on oncogenic transformation and cellular survival. To investigate the shape of the lung cancer risk function at chronic, low level exposures in more detail, additional biological factors describing the tissue response and operating specifically at low doses were incorporated into the initiation-promotion model. These mechanisms modifying the initial response at the cellular level were: adaptive response, genomic instability, induction of apoptosis by surrounding cells, and detrimental as well as protective bystander mechanisms. To quantify the effects of these mechanisms as functions of dose, analytical functions were derived from the experimental evidence presently available. Predictions of lung cancer risk, including these mechanisms, exhibit a distinct sublinear dose-response relationship at low exposures, particularly for very low exposure rates.

  5. Measurement of Radon, Thoron, Isotopic Uranium and Thorium to Determine Occupational and Environmental Exposure and Risk at Fernald Feed Material Production Center

    SciTech Connect

    Naomi H. Harley, Ph.D.

    2004-07-01

    To develop a new and novel area and personal radon/thoron detector for both radon isotopes to better measure the exposure to low airborne concentrations of these gases at Fernald. These measurements are to be used to determine atmospheric dispersion and exposure to radon and thoron prior to and during retrieval and removal of the 4000 Ci of radium in the two silos at Fernald.

  6. Radon Exposure, IL-6 Promoter Variants, and Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma in Former Uranium Miners

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Shuguang; Thomas, Cynthia L.; Snider, Amanda M.; Picchi, Maria A.; Chen, Wenshu; Willis, Derall G.; Carr, Teara G.; Krzeminski, Jacek; Desai, Dhimant; Shantu, Amin; Lin, Yong; Jacobson, Marty R.; Belinsky, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: High radon exposure is a risk factor for squamous cell carcinoma, a major lung cancer histology observed in former uranium miners. Radon exposure can cause oxidative stress, leading to pulmonary inflammation. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a pro-carcinogenic inflammatory cytokine that plays a pivotal role in lung cancer development. Objectives: We assessed whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the IL6 promoter are associated with lung cancer in former uranium miners with high occupational exposure to radon gas. Methods: Genetic associations were assessed in a case–control study of former uranium miners (242 cases and 336 controls). A replication study was performed using data from the Gene Environment Association Studies (GENEVA) Genome Wide Association Study (GWAS) of Lung Cancer and Smoking. Functional relevance of the SNPs was characterized using in vitro approaches. Results: We found that rs1800797 was associated with squamous cell carcinoma in miners and with a shorter time between the midpoint of the period of substantial exposure and diagnosis among the cases. Furthermore, rs1800797 was also associated with lung cancer among never smokers in the GENEVA dataset. Functional studies identified that the risk allele was associated with increased basal IL-6 mRNA level and greater promoter activity. Furthermore, fibroblasts with the risk allele showed greater induction of IL-6 secretion by hydrogen peroxide or benzo[a]pyrene diolepoxide treatments. Conclusions: An IL6 promoter variant was associated with lung cancer in uranium miners and never smokers in two external study populations. The associations are strongly supported by the functional relevance that the IL6 promoter SNP affects basal expression and carcinogen-induced IL-6 secretion. Citation: Leng S, Thomas CL, Snider AM, Picchi MA, Chen W, Willis DG, Carr TG, Krzeminski J, Desai D, Shantu A, Lin Y, Jacobson MR, Belinsky SA. 2016. Radon exposure, IL-6 promoter variants, and lung squamous

  7. Retrospective Determination of Radon Exposure to Glass Using Liquid Scintillation Counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Rodger Ferguson

    A method is introduced whereby glass samples exposed to known levels of ^{222}Rn are analyzed for ^{210}Pb build-up by liquid scintillation counting. This retrospective radon detector relies on the phenomena of recoil of the decaying nuclide on emission of an alpha -particle into the substrate of the glass. Simple liquid scintillation counting is then used to measure the activity of the ^{210}Pb. The surface of the glass containing the decay products is etched with hydrofluoric acid and then added to a scintillant. The method is useful for exposures up from around 250 PCi.l ^{-1}-years giving a correlation of.97 in a controlled laboratory experiment.

  8. Lung Cancer Attributable to Indoor Radon Exposures in Two Radon—Prone Areas, Ştei (Romania) and Torrelodones (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinu, Alexandra; Cosma, Constantin; Sainz, Carlos; Poncela, Luis Santiago Quindós; Vasiliniuc, Ştefan

    2009-05-01

    Radon and radon progeny are present indoors, in houses and others dwellings, representing the most important contribution to dose from natural sources of radiation. Most studies have demonstrated an increased risk of lung cancer at high concentration of radon for both smokers and nonsmokers. For medium and low concentrations which are the typical residential radon levels, recent researches have also demonstrated increased risks of lung cancer for people exposed. The work presents a comparative analysis of the radon exposure data in the two radon—prone areas, Ştei, Transylvania, (Romania), in the near of old Romanian uranium mines and in the granitic area of Torrelodones town, Sierra de Guadarrama (Spain). One important difference between the two studied areas is related to the houses built using uranium waste as construction material in Ştei area. Measurements of indoor radon were performed in 280 dwellings (Romania) and 91 dwellings (Spain) by using nuclear track detectors, CR 39. The highest value measured in Ştei area was 2650 Bqṡm-3. and 366 Bqṡm-3 in the Spanish region. The results are compute with the BEIR VI report estimates using the age-duration model at an exposure rate below 2650 Bqṡm-3. A total of 233 lung cancer deaths were calculated in the Ştei area for a period of 13 years (1994-2006), which is 116.82% higher than observed from the national statistics. In comparison, in Torrelodones area, a number of 276 deaths caused by lung cancer were estimated along a period of 13 years, which is 2.09 times higher than the number observed by authorities. This represents a significantly evidence that elevated risk can strongly be associated with cumulated radon exposure.

  9. Study of epidemiological risk of lung cancer in Mexico due indoor radon exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ángeles, A.; Espinosa, G.

    2014-07-01

    In this work the lifetime relative risks (LRR) of lung cancer due to exposure to indoor 222Rn on the Mexican population is calculated. Cigarette smoking is the number one risk factor for lung cancer (LC), because that, to calculate the number of cases of LC due to exposure to 222Rn is necessary considers the number of cases of LC for smoking cigarette. The lung cancer mortality rates published by the "Secretaría de Salud" (SSA), the mexican population data published by the "Consejo Nacional de Población" (CONAPO), smoking data in the mexican population, published by the "Comisión Nacional Contra las Adicciones" (CONADIC), the "Organización Panamericana de la Salud" (OPS) and indoor 222Rn concentrations in Mexico published in several recent studies are used. To calculate the lifetime relative risks (LRR) for different segments of the Mexican population, firstly the Excess Relative Risk (ERR) is calculated using the method developed by the BEIR VI committee and subsequently modified by the USEPA and published in the report "EPA Assessment of Risks from Radon in Homes". The excess relative risks were then used to calculate the corresponding lifetime relative risks, again using the method developed by the BEIR VI committee. The lifetime relative risks for Mexican male and female eversmokers and Mexican male and female never-smokers were calculated for radon concentrations spanning the range found in recent studies of indoor radon concentrations in Mexico. The lifetime relative risks of lung cancer induced by lifetime exposure to the mexican average indoor radon concentration were estimated to be 1.44 and 1.40 for never-smokers mexican females and males respectively, and 1.19 and 1.17 for ever-smokers Mexican females and males respectively. The Mexican population LRR values obtained in relation to the USA and Canada LRR published values in ever-smokers for both gender are similar with differences less than 4%, in case of never-smokers in relation with Canada

  10. Efficiency Analysis and Comparison of Different Radon Progeny Measurement Methods

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Radon exposure to the public contributes more than half of all the radiation doses caused by natural radiation; accurate measurement of radon progeny is quite essential for the dose evaluation of radon exposure in environment. For the purpose of establishing a radon progeny standard and controlling measurement quality of commercial devices, it is quite important to analyze the efficiency of different measurement methods and determine which would be the most appropriate for radon progeny measurements. Through theoretical analysis and experimental measurement, some commonly used measurement methods were compared in this study and the development trends of those methods were reviewed. Results show that for radon progeny measurement, the spectroscopic analysis method is better than the gross count method, while least-square calculation methods is better than traditional three-count or five-count method. Multiperiod counting of α plus β spectrum as well as using weighted least-square calculation method might be the best choice for accurate measurement on radon progeny in standard radon chamber when calibrating commercial radon progeny monitors. PMID:24385873

  11. Design and use of an exposure chamber for air pollution studies on microarthropods

    SciTech Connect

    Andre, H.M.

    1982-10-01

    An exposure chamber for studying the effects of air pollution on microarthropods is described. The chamber was tested on a corticolous mite, Humerobates rostrolamellatus Grandjean (Acari: Oribatida). In the absence of pollutants, the overall mortality was about 2.5%.

  12. In-vivo measurements of Pb-210 to determine cumulative exposure to radon daughters: A pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Laurer, G.R.; Cohen, N. . Inst. of Environmental Medicine); Stark, A.; Ju, C. . Bureau of Environmental and Occupational Epidemiology)

    1990-10-01

    The feasibility of measuring Pb-210 in vivo in the skulls of those individuals who have resided in homes with above average levels of radon/radon daughters, has now been successfully demonstrated. These values, when incorporated into metabolic models of Pb-210 in the body including other related physical parameters, can be used for the calculation of a realistic estimate of a resident's cumulative exposure to radon and its' decay products. Data are presented for 26 subjects exposed to higher than average concentrations of radon i.e. ranging from 10 to 120 pCi/l, for various periods of time. Their skeletal Pb-210 burdens are compared to measurement results of a population of individuals presumed to have been exposed to values which are more representative of average levels i.e. <1pCi/1. Results of a study to determine the biological retention of Pb-210 in the human skeleton for use in the metabolic model relating skull burdens of this nuclide to cumulative radon/daughter exposure, are also described. At the present time, our measurements, made over a period of 10 years, of an individual with a significant Pb-210 burden, indicate a biological half-time of approximately 57 years and an effective half-life of 16 years. 4 refs., 11 figs.

  13. Long-term radon concentrations estimated from 210Po embedded in glass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lively, R.S.; Steck, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    Measured surface-alpha activity on glass exposed in radon chambers and houses has a linear correlation to the integrated radon exposure. Experimental results in chambers and houses have been obtained on glass exposed to radon concentrations between 100 Bq m-3 and 9 MBq m-3 for periods of a few days to several years. Theoretical calculations support the experimental results through a model that predicts the fractions of airborne activity that deposit and become embedded or adsorbed. The combination of measured activity and calculated embedded fraction for a given deposition environment can be applied to most indoor areas and produces a better estimate for lifetime radon exposure than estimates based on short-term indoor radon measurements.

  14. In-vivo measurements of Pb-210 to determine cumulative exposure to radon daughters: A pilot study. Final report, 1 March, 1990--May 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Laurer, G.R.; Cohen, N.; Stark, A.; Ju, C.

    1991-05-01

    The objective of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of estimating cumulative exposure of individuals to low concentrations of radon by measuring the amount of Pb-A-10 in their skeletons. This report presents progress to date establishing the validity of an vivo technique to measure skeletal burdens of Pb-210, accumulated from exposure to radon and radon progeny. With the skeletal content of Pb--210 and a model for Pb metabolism, cumulative exposure to radon and its short-lived daughters (radon/daughters) may be calculated for use in deriving a dose-response relationship between lung cancer and exposure to radon/daughters. Data are presented for 29 subjects exposed to ``above-average`` radon concentrations in their homes, showing the correlation between measured Pb--210 burdens, and measured pCi/l and WLM exposure estimates. Their results are compared to measurements of a population of 24 subject`s presumed exposed to average concentrations. Measurements of a Pennsylvania family exposed for a year in a home with an extremely high radon content are also presented. Update of results of an ongoing study of the biological half-time of Pb--210 in man involving measurements, of a retired radiation worker with a 40 year old skeletal burden of Pb-210.

  15. Estimated effective dose rates from radon exposure in workplaces and residences within Los Alamos county in New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Whicker, Jeffrey J; Mcnaughton, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Many millions of office workers are exposed to radon while at work and at home. Though there has been a multitude of studies reporting the measurements of radon concentrations and potential lung and effective doses associated with radon and progeny exposure in homes, similar studies on the concentrations and subsequent effective dose rates in the workplace are lacking. The purposes of this study were to measure radon concentrations in office and residential spaces in the same county and explore the radiation dose implications. Sixty-five track-etch detectors were deployed in office spaces and 47 were deployed in residences, all within Los Alamos County, New Mexico, USA. The sampling periods for these measurements were generally about three months. The measured concentrations were then used to calculate and compare effective dose rates resulting from exposure while at work and at home. Results showed that full-time office workers receive on average about nine times greater exposure at home than while in the office (691 mrem yr{sup -1} versus 78 mrem yr{sup -1}). The estimated effective dose rate for a more homebound person was 896 mrem yr{sup -1}. These effective dose rates are contrasted against the 100 mrem yr{sup -1} threshold for regulation of a 'radiological worker' defined in the Department of Energy regulations occupational exposure and the 10 mrem yr{sup -1} air pathway effective public dose limit regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency.

  16. Symptomatology during hypoxic exposure to flame-retardant chamber atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Knight, D R; Cymerman, A; Devine, J A; Burse, R L; Fulco, C S; Rock, P B; Tappan, D V; Messier, A A; Carhart, H

    1990-01-01

    Hypoxia was studied in 12 men during 63-h exposures to 17 and 13% O2, with the subjects serving as their own controls by repeating the measurements in 21% O2. All test atmospheres were contaminated with 0.9% CO2 to simulate the condition of living aboard submarines. The mean SaO2's were 97-98% in all conditions of 21% O2, 96% in 17% O2 (n.s.), and 92% in 13% O2 (P less than 0.05). The blood concentrations of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate were elevated in 13 and 17% O2 (P less than 0.05). Seventeen percent O2 did not cause significant symptoms of environmental stress; however, 13% O2 caused symptoms of acute mountain sickness in 5 of 12 men. In the last 7 h of exposure to 17% O2, reduction of the barometric pressure to 576 Torr reduced the ambient PO2 to 98 Torr (similar to the PO2 of 13% O2 at normobaric pressure). This induced symptoms of acute mountain sickness in 3 of 11 men. All symptomatology and physiologic changes were reversed during recovery in 21% O2. Monitoring devices indicated the presence of volatile organic contaminants at a mean concentration of 6.1 ppm in the chamber atmosphere. Combustion tests in the occupied chamber showed that flame propagation was retarded by lowering the O2 concentration from 21 to 13-17%. We conclude that men can live comfortably in a normobaric, flame-retardant atmosphere consisting of 17% O2-0.9% CO2-6.1 ppm volatile organic compounds-balance N2.

  17. Prediction of residential radon exposure of the whole Swiss population: comparison of model-based predictions with measurement-based predictions.

    PubMed

    Hauri, D D; Huss, A; Zimmermann, F; Kuehni, C E; Röösli, M

    2013-10-01

    Radon plays an important role for human exposure to natural sources of ionizing radiation. The aim of this article is to compare two approaches to estimate mean radon exposure in the Swiss population: model-based predictions at individual level and measurement-based predictions based on measurements aggregated at municipality level. A nationwide model was used to predict radon levels in each household and for each individual based on the corresponding tectonic unit, building age, building type, soil texture, degree of urbanization, and floor. Measurement-based predictions were carried out within a health impact assessment on residential radon and lung cancer. Mean measured radon levels were corrected for the average floor distribution and weighted with population size of each municipality. Model-based predictions yielded a mean radon exposure of the Swiss population of 84.1 Bq/m(3) . Measurement-based predictions yielded an average exposure of 78 Bq/m(3) . This study demonstrates that the model- and the measurement-based predictions provided similar results. The advantage of the measurement-based approach is its simplicity, which is sufficient for assessing exposure distribution in a population. The model-based approach allows predicting radon levels at specific sites, which is needed in an epidemiological study, and the results do not depend on how the measurement sites have been selected.

  18. Probability of causation for lung cancer after exposure to radon progeny: a comparison of models and data.

    PubMed

    Chmelevsky, D; Barclay, D; Kellerer, A M; Tomasek, L; Kunz, E; Placek, V

    1994-07-01

    The estimates of lung cancer risk due to the exposure to radon decay products are based on different data sets from underground mining and on different mathematical models that are used to fit the data. Diagrams of the excess relative rate per 100 working level months in its dependence on age at exposure and age attained are shown to be a useful tool to elucidate the influence that is due to the choice of the model, and to assess the differences between the data from the major western cohorts and those from the Czech uranium miners. It is seen that the influence of the choice of the model is minor compared to the difference between the data sets. The results are used to derive attributable lifetime risks and probabilities of causation for lung cancer following radon progeny exposures.

  19. A macroscopic and microscopic study of radon exposure using Geant4 and MCNPX to estimate dose rates and DNA damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Akker, Mary Evelyn

    Radon is considered the second-leading cause of lung cancer after smoking. Epidemiological studies have been conducted in miner cohorts as well as general populations to estimate the risks associated with high and low dose exposures. There are problems with extrapolating risk estimates to low dose exposures, mainly that the dose-response curve at low doses is not well understood. Calculated dosimetric quantities give average energy depositions in an organ or a whole body, but morphological features of an individual can affect these values. As opposed to human phantom models, Computed Tomography (CT) scans provide unique, patient-specific geometries that are valuable in modeling the radiological effects of the short-lived radon progeny sources. Monte Carlo particle transport code Geant4 was used with the CT scan data to model radon inhalation in the main bronchial bifurcation. The equivalent dose rates are near the lower bounds of estimates found in the literature, depending on source volume. To complement the macroscopic study, simulations were run in a small tissue volume in Geant4-DNA toolkit. As an expansion of Geant4 meant to simulate direct physical interactions at the cellular level, the particle track structure of the radon progeny alphas can be analyzed to estimate the damage that can occur in sensitive cellular structures like the DNA molecule. These estimates of DNA double strand breaks are lower than those found in Geant4-DNA studies. Further refinements of the microscopic model are at the cutting edge of nanodosimetry research.

  20. In vivo measurements of lead-210 for assessing cumulative radon exposure in uranium miners

    SciTech Connect

    Guilmette, R.A.; Laurer, G.R.; Lambert, W.E.; Gilliland, F.D.

    1995-12-01

    It has long been recognized that a major contributor to the uncertainty in risk analysis of lung cancer in uranium and other hard rock miners is the estimation of total radon progeny exposure of individual miners under study. These uncertainties arise from the fact that only a limited number of measurements of airborne {sup 222}Rn progeny concentrations were made in the mines during the times that the miners were being exposed, and that dosimeters capable of integrating the Rn progeny exposures of the miners did not exist. Historically, the cumulative exposures for individual uranium and other hard rock miners have been calculated by combining the employee`s work history, which may or may not have included time spent at different jobs within the mines and at different locations within the mines, with whatever periodic measurements of Rn and Rn progeny were available. The amount and quality of the measurement data varied enormously from mine to mine and from population to population. Because the quality of the exposure data collected during the period of active mining in the United STates cannot now be altered substantially, significant improvement in individual miner exposure estimates is only likely to be achieved if a new cumulative exposure metric is developed and implemented. The decay chain of Rn includes the production of {sup 210}Pb, which can accumulate in the skeleton in amounts proportional to the intake of Rn progeny. We hypothesize that the in vivo measurement of {sup 210}Pb in the skulls of miners will provide such a metric. In summary, the primary purpose of this pilot study to demonstrate the feasibility of measuring {sup 210}Pb in the heads of former uranium miners has been accomplished.

  1. Laboratory facility to create reference radon + thoron atmosphere under dynamic exposure conditions.

    PubMed

    Pressyanov, D; Mitev, K; Georgiev, S; Dimitrova, I; Kolev, J

    2017-01-01

    Radon ((222)Rn) and thoron ((220)Rn) levels in the environment are typically subject to significant random and systematic variations. Creation in the laboratory of reproducible and controlled exposure conditions close to that in the real environment can be useful for testing (222)Rn and (220)Rn detectors and for research. In this report the design and performance of a novel laboratory facility with such functionality is presented. The facility allows the exposure of detectors under controlled dynamic as well as static activity concentrations of (222)Rn and (220)Rn (pure and mixed) and temperature. The temperature is measured and regulated within -15 °C ÷ +60 °C by a dedicated programmable thermostat. Different reference activity concentrations in the exposure vessel are made by regulating the flow-rate of the air that flushes (222)Rn/(220)Rn activity from the sources towards the exposure vessel. Reference atmospheres that contain (222)Rn, (220)Rn or a specified ratio of the two can be created. Pilot experiments that demonstrate the feasibility of the approach are presented. They include follow-up of a pre-defined temperature profile (in the range -5 °C ÷ +35 °C), test of the correspondence between planned and measured (222)Rn and (220)Rn activity concentrations, follow-up of a pre-defined dynamic profile of (220)Rn concentrations and test of the possibility to create mixed (220)Rn/(222)Rn atmospheres (experimentally checked for ratio of the activity concentrations from 0.27 to 4.5). The results from the experimental tests are in agreement with the values obtained by the developed theoretical model. The proposed approach can be used to plan and create stationary and dynamic reference exposure conditions that are close to the real exposure regimes in the environment.

  2. Indoor radon: deadliest pollutant

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, R.

    1988-04-29

    Radon in individual homes may be the greatest source of radiation that people are exposed to during a lifetime. In areas where radon concentrations in homes are high, people may be exposed to more radiation than were the Russian people living in the vicinity of Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Studies indicate that the radon exposure contributes to 5000 to 20,000 deaths per year from lung cancer and that smoking may have a lethal interaction with the radon exposure. One study found an average annual concentration of radon in living spaces of 1.5 picocuries per liter. 7% of U.S. homes were found to have a radon concentration above the 4 picocuries per liter level set by the Environmental Protection Agency, and 1 - 3% of the homes have levels above 8 picocuries. Some ways are described for changing the air pressure in a house so that air is not constantly drawn from the permeable soil where the radon originates.

  3. Multi-parametric approach towards the assessment of radon and thoron progeny exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Rosaline E-mail: rosaline.mishra@gmail.com; Sapra, B. K.; Mayya, Y. S.

    2014-02-15

    Conventionally, the dosimetry is carried out using radon and thoron gas concentration measurements and doses have been assigned using assumed equilibrium factors for the progeny species, which is inadequate pertaining to the variations in equilibrium factors and possibly due to significant thoron. In fact, since the true exposures depend upon the intricate mechanisms of progeny deposition in the lung, therefore an integrated approach for the assessment of progeny is essential. In this context, the recently developed deposition based progeny concentration measurement techniques (DTPS: Direct Thoron progeny sensors and DRPS: Direct Radon progeny sensors) appear to be best suited for radiological risk assessments both among occupational workers and general study populations. DTPS and DRPS consist of aluminized mylar mounted LR115 type passive detectors, which essentially detects the alpha particles emitted from the deposited progeny atoms on the detector surface. It gives direct measure of progeny activity concentrations in air. DTPS has a lower limit of detection limit of 0.1 Bq/m{sup 3} whereas that for DRPS is 1 Bq/m{sup 3}, hence are perfectly suitable for indoor environments. These DTPS and DRPS can be capped with 200-mesh type wire-screen to measure the coarse fraction of the progeny concentration and the corresponding coarse fraction deposition velocities as well as the time integrated fine fraction. DTPS and DRPS can also be lodged in an integrated sampler wherein the wire-mesh and filter-paper are arranged in an array in flow-mode, to measure the fine and coarse fraction concentration separately and simultaneously. The details are further discussed in the paper.

  4. Experimental setup for radon exposure and first diffusion studies using gamma spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Andreas; van Beek, Patrick; Hellmund, Johannes; Durante, Marco; Schardt, Dieter; Kraft, Gerhard; Fournier, Claudia

    2015-11-01

    In order to measure the uptake and diffusion of 222Rn in biological material, an exposure chamber was constructed where cell cultures, biological tissues and mice can be exposed to 222Rn-activities similar to therapy conditions. After exposure, the material is transferred to a gamma spectrometer and the decay of 214Pb and 214Bi is analyzed. From the time kinetics of these decays the total amount of the initial 222Rn concentration can be calculated. In this paper the design and construction as well as first test measurements are reported.

  5. USACE FUSRAP Maywood Team Develops a Mechanism to Evaluate Residual Radon Exposure Potential at Vicinity Properties Where Remediation of Accessible Contamination has been Completed

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, M.; Walnicki, S.; Hays, D.

    2008-07-01

    The Maywood FUSRAP Team is obligated, under its approved remedy selection decision document, to demonstrate substantive compliance with New Jersey Administrative Code 7:28- 12(a)2, establishing an indoor limit of three Pico-Curies per liter above background for radon-222 (Rn-222). The Maywood Team explores various avenues for dealing with the radon issue and provides an alternative for demonstrating substantive compliance with the radon remediation standard by answering the question: 'In certain conservative situations, can compliance with the radon standard be demonstrated without performing monitoring?' While monitoring may be the most definitive method for demonstrating compliance, a logical argument can be made that when radiological remediation removes the potential source for Rn-222 above background, monitoring is unnecessary. This position is defended through the use of historical physical radon measurements which illustrate that indoor radon was not a pre-remediation problem, and post-remediation soil sampling data which demonstrate that the source of the potentially elevated Rn- 222 levels have been successfully mitigated. Monitoring recommendations are made for situations where insufficient data exists to make definitive determinations or when un-remediated sources affecting habitable structures remain on a given property. Additional information regarding recommended techniques and references for effective monitoring of indoor radon are included in this paper. This paper may benefit teams that have similar regulatory commitments and/or have need to make assessments of radon exposure potential based upon historical monitoring data and available soils concentration data. (authors)

  6. A Pilot Study to Examine Exposure to Residential Radon in Under-Sampled Census Tracts of DeKalb County, Georgia, in 2015

    PubMed Central

    Stauber, Christine E.; Dai, Dajun; Chan, Sydney R.; Diem, Jeremy E.; Weaver, Scott R.; Rothenberg, Richard

    2017-01-01

    While DeKalb County, Georgia, offers free radon screening for all eligible residents, portions of the county remain relatively under-sampled. This pilot study focused on 10% of the census tracts in the county with the lowest proportion of radon testing; most were in southern DeKalb County. In total, 217 households were recruited and homes were tested for indoor radon concentrations on the lowest livable floor over an eight-week period from March–May 2015. Tract-level characteristics were examined to understand the differences in socio-demographic and economic factors between the pilot study area and the rest of the county. The pilot study tracts had a higher proportion of African Americans compared to the rest of DeKalb County (82% versus 47%). Radon was detected above 11.1 Bq/m3 (0.3 pCi/L) in 73% of the indoor samples and 4% of samples were above 148 Bq/m3 (4 pCi/L). Having a basement was the strongest predictive factor for detectable and hazardous levels of radon. Radon screening can identify problems and spur homeowners to remediate but more research should be done to identify why screening rates vary across the county and how that varies with radon levels in homes to reduce radon exposure. PMID:28327511

  7. Attachment of radon progeny to cigarette-smoke aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Biermann, A.H.; Sawyer, S.R.

    1995-05-01

    The daughter products of radon gas are now recognized as a significant contributor to radiation exposure to the general public. It is also suspected that a synergistic effect exists with the combination cigarette smoking and radon exposure. We have conducted an experimental investigation to determine the physical nature of radon progeny interactions with cigarette smoke aerosols. The size distributions of the aerosols are characterized and attachment rates of radon progeny to cigarette-smoke aerosols are determined. Both the mainstream and sidestream portions of the smoke aerosol are investigated. Unattached radon progeny are very mobile and, in the presence of aerosols, readily attach to the particle surfaces. In this study, an aerosol chamber is used to contain the radon gas, progeny and aerosol mixture while allowing the attachment process to occur. The rate of attachment is dependent on the size distribution, or diffusion coefficient, of the radon progeny as well as the aerosol size distribution. The size distribution of the radon daughter products is monitored using a graded-screen diffusion battery. The diffusion battery also enables separation of the unattached radon progeny from those attached to the aerosol particles. Analysis of the radon decay products is accomplished using alpha spectrometry. The aerosols of interest are size fractionated with the aid of a differential mobility analyzer and cascade impactor. The measured attachment rates of progeny to the cigarette smoke are compared to those found in similar experiments using an ambient aerosol. The lowest attachment coefficients observed, {approximately}10{sup {minus}6} cm{sup 3}/s, occurred for the ambient aerosol. The sidestream and mainstream smoke aerosols exhibited higher attachment rates in that order. The results compared favorably with theories describing the coagulation process of aerosols.

  8. Human exposure to indoor radon: a survey in the region of Guarda, Portugal.

    PubMed

    Louro, Alina; Peralta, Luís; Soares, Sandra; Pereira, Alcides; Cunha, Gilda; Belchior, Ana; Ferreira, Luís; Monteiro Gil, Octávia; Louro, Henriqueta; Pinto, Paulo; Rodrigues, António Sebastião; Silva, Maria João; Teles, Pedro

    2013-04-01

    Radon ((222)Rn) is a radioactive gas, abundant in granitic areas, such as the city of Guarda at the northeast of Portugal. This gas is recognised as a carcinogenic agent, being appointed by the World Health Organization as the second leading cause of lung cancer after tobacco smoke. Therefore, the knowledge of radon concentrations inside the houses (where people stay longer) is important from the point of view of radiological protection. The main goal of this study was to assess the radon concentration in an area previously identified with a potentially high level of residential radon. The radon concentration was measured using CR-39 detectors, exposed for a period of 2 months in 185 dwellings in the Guarda region. The radon concentration in studied dwellings, ranged between 75 and 7640 Bq m(-3), with a geometric mean of 640 Bq m(-3) and an arithmetic mean of 1078 Bq m(-3). Based on a local winter-summer radon concentration variation model, these values would correspond to an annual average concentration of 860 Bq m(-3). Several factors contribute to this large dispersion, the main one being the exact location of housing construction in relation to the geochemical nature of the soil and others the predominant building material and ventilation. Based on the obtained results an average annual effective dose of 15 mSv y(-1) is estimated, well above the average previously estimated for Portugal.

  9. Radiological risk assessment of environmental radon

    SciTech Connect

    Khalid, Norafatin; Majid, Amran Ab; Yahaya, Redzuwan; Yasir, Muhammad Samudi

    2013-11-27

    Measurements of radon gas ({sup 222}Rn) in the environmental are important to assess indoor air quality and to study the potential risk to human health. Generally known that exposure to radon is considered the second leading cause of lung cancer after smoking. The environmental radon concentration depends on the {sup 226}Ra concentration, indoor atmosphere, cracking on rocks and building materials. This study was carried out to determine the indoor radon concentration from selected samples of tin tailings (amang) and building materials in an airtight sealed homemade radon chamber. The radiological risk assessment for radon gas was also calculated based on the annual exposure dose, effective dose equivalent, radon exhalation rates and fatal cancer risk. The continuous radon monitor Sun Nuclear model 1029 was used to measure the radon concentration emanates from selected samples for 96 hours. Five types of tin tailings collected from Kampar, Perak and four samples of building materials commonly used in Malaysia dwellings or building constructions were analysed for radon concentration. The indoor radon concentration determined in ilmenite, monazite, struverite, xenotime and zircon samples varies from 219.6 ± 76.8 Bq m{sup −3} to 571.1 ± 251.4 Bq m{sup −3}, 101.0 ± 41.0 Bq m{sup −3} to 245.3 ± 100.2 Bq m{sup −3}, 53.1 ± 7.5 Bq m{sup −3} to 181.8 ± 9.7 Bq m{sup −3}, 256.1 ± 59.3 Bq m{sup −3} to 652.2 ± 222.2 Bq m{sup −3} and 164.5 ± 75.9 Bq m{sup −3} to 653.3 ± 240.0 Bq m{sup −3}, respectively. Whereas, in the building materials, the radon concentration from cement brick, red-clay brick, gravel aggregate and cement showed 396.3 ± 194.3 Bq m{sup −3}, 192.1 ± 75.4 Bq m{sup −3}, 176.1 ± 85.9 Bq m{sup −3} and 28.4 ± 5.7 Bq m{sup −3}, respectively. The radon concentration in tin tailings and building materials were found to be much higher in xenotime and cement brick samples than others. All samples in tin tailings were exceeded the

  10. Radiological risk assessment of environmental radon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalid, Norafatin; Majid, Amran Ab; Yahaya, Redzuwan; Yasir, Muhammad Samudi

    2013-11-01

    Measurements of radon gas (222Rn) in the environmental are important to assess indoor air quality and to study the potential risk to human health. Generally known that exposure to radon is considered the second leading cause of lung cancer after smoking. The environmental radon concentration depends on the 226Ra concentration, indoor atmosphere, cracking on rocks and building materials. This study was carried out to determine the indoor radon concentration from selected samples of tin tailings (amang) and building materials in an airtight sealed homemade radon chamber. The radiological risk assessment for radon gas was also calculated based on the annual exposure dose, effective dose equivalent, radon exhalation rates and fatal cancer risk. The continuous radon monitor Sun Nuclear model 1029 was used to measure the radon concentration emanates from selected samples for 96 hours. Five types of tin tailings collected from Kampar, Perak and four samples of building materials commonly used in Malaysia dwellings or building constructions were analysed for radon concentration. The indoor radon concentration determined in ilmenite, monazite, struverite, xenotime and zircon samples varies from 219.6 ± 76.8 Bq m-3 to 571.1 ± 251.4 Bq m-3, 101.0 ± 41.0 Bq m-3 to 245.3 ± 100.2 Bq m-3, 53.1 ± 7.5 Bq m-3 to 181.8 ± 9.7 Bq m-3, 256.1 ± 59.3 Bq m-3 to 652.2 ± 222.2 Bq m-3 and 164.5 ± 75.9 Bq m-3 to 653.3 ± 240.0 Bq m-3, respectively. Whereas, in the building materials, the radon concentration from cement brick, red-clay brick, gravel aggregate and cement showed 396.3 ± 194.3 Bq m-3, 192.1 ± 75.4 Bq m-3, 176.1 ± 85.9 Bq m-3 and 28.4 ± 5.7 Bq m-3, respectively. The radon concentration in tin tailings and building materials were found to be much higher in xenotime and cement brick samples than others. All samples in tin tailings were exceeded the action level for radon gas of 148 Bq m-3 proposed by EPA except monazite 0.15 kg, struverite 0.15 kg and 0.25 kg. Whereas

  11. Comparison of active and passive methods for radon exhalation from a high-exposure building material.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, A; Mirekhtiary, F

    2013-12-01

    The radon exhalation rates and radon concentrations in granite stones used in Iran were measured by means of a high-resolution high purity Germanium gamma-spectroscopy system (passive method) and an AlphaGUARD model PQ 2000 (active method). For standard rooms (4.0 × 5.0 m area × 2.8 height) where ground and walls have been covered by granite stones, the radon concentration and the radon exhalation rate by two methods were calculated. The activity concentrations of (226)Ra in the selected granite samples ranged from 3.8 to 94.2 Bq kg(-1). The radon exhalation rate from the calculation of the (226)Ra activity concentration was obtained. The radon exhalation rates were 1.31-7.86 Bq m(-2)h(-1). The direction measurements using an AlphaGUARD were from 218 to 1306 Bq m(-3) with a mean of 625 Bq m(-3). Also, the exhalation rates measured by the passive and active methods were compared and the results of this study were the same, with the active method being 22 % higher than the passive method.

  12. alpha-Radiation dose at bronchial bifurcations of smokers from indoor exposure to radon progeny.

    PubMed Central

    Martell, E A

    1983-01-01

    Synergistic interactions of indoor radon progeny with the cigarette smoking process have been evaluated experimentally. Smoking enhances the air concentration of submicron particles and attached radon decay products. Fractionation in burning cigarettes gives rise to the association of radon progeny with large particles in mainstream cigarette smoke, which are selectively deposited in "hot spots" at bronchial bifurcations. Because smoke tars are resistant to dissolution in lung fluid, attached radon progeny undergo substantial radioactive decay at bifurcations before clearance. Radon progeny inhaled during normal breathing between cigarettes make an even larger contribution to the alpha-radiation dose at bifurcations. Progressive chemical and radiation damage to the epithelium at bifurcations gives rise to prolonged retention of insoluble 210Pb-enriched smoke particles produced by tobacco trichome combustion. The high incidence of lung cancer in cigarette smokers is attributed to the cumulative alpha-radiation dose at bifurcations from indoor radon and thoron progeny--218Po, 214Po, 212Po, and 212Bi--plus that from 210Po in 210Pb-enriched smoke particles. It is estimated that a carcinogenic alpha-radiation dose of 80-100 rads (1 rad = 0.01 J/kg = 0.01 Gy) is delivered to approximately equal to 10(7) cells (approximately equal to 10(6) cells at individual bifurcations) of most smokers who die of lung cancer. PMID:6572389

  13. Effects of radon mitigation vs smoking cessation in reducing radon-related risk of lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, D; Warner, K E; Courant, P N

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this paper is to provide smokers with information on the relative benefits of mitigating radon and quitting smoking in reducing radon-related lung cancer risk. METHODS: The standard radon risk model, linked with models characterizing residential radon exposure and patterns of moving to new homes, was used to estimate the risk reduction produced by remediating high-radon homes, quitting smoking, or both. RESULTS: Quitting smoking reduces lung cancer risk from radon more than does reduction of radon exposure itself. CONCLUSIONS: Smokers should understand that, in addition to producing other health benefits, quitting smoking dominates strategies to deal with the problem posed by radon. PMID:9585753

  14. Adult myeloid leukaemia, geology, and domestic exposure to radon and gamma radiation: a case control study in central Italy

    PubMed Central

    Forastiere, F.; Sperati, A.; Cherubini, G.; Miceli, M.; Biggeri, A.; Axelson, O.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether indoor randon or gamma radiation might play a part in myeloid leukaemia as suggested by studies based on crude geographical or geological data for exposure assessment. METHODS: For six months randon and gamma radiation was measured with solid state nuclear track detectors and thermoluminescent dosimeters in dwellings of 44 adult male cases of acute myeloid leukaemia and 211 controls (all subjects deceased). Conditional logistic regression ORs (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were estimated for quartiles of radon and gamma radiation and for municipality and dwelling characteristics. RESULTS: The risk of leukaemia was associated with an increasing urbanisation index (p value for trend = 0.008). An increased OR was found among those living in more modern houses (OR 3.0, 95% CI 1.4 to 6.6). Confirming the findings of a previous study in the same area, geological features bore a positive association with myeloid leukemia, even by adjusting for level of urbanisation. Contrary to expectations from the previous study, however, no association appeared between myeloid leukaemia and radon and gamma radiation; for the highest quartiles of exposure, ORs were 0.56 (95% CI 0.2 to 1.4) and 0.52 (95% CI 0.2 to 1.4), respectively. Considering only subjects who had lived > or = 20 years in the monitored home and adjusting for urbanisation, there was still no effect of exposure to radiation. CONCLUSIONS: In view of the limited numbers, the results do not in general refute a possible risk of myeloid leukaemia from exposure to indoor radon or gamma radiation, but decrease the credibility of such a relation in the area studied and also of other studies suggesting an effect without monitoring indoor radiation. Some other fairly strong determinants have appeared--that is, level of urbanisation and living in modern houses-- that might need further consideration.   PMID:9614394

  15. Estimation of the indoor radon and the annual effective dose from granite samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sola, P.; Srinuttrakul, W.; Kewsuwan, P.

    2015-05-01

    Inhalation of radon and thoron daughters increases the risk of lung cancer. The main sources of indoor radon are building materials. The aim of this research is to estimate the indoor radon and the annual effective dose from the building materials. Eighteen granite samples bought from the markets in Thailand were measured using an ionization chamber (ATMOS 12 DPX) for the radon concentration in air. Radon exhalation rates were calculated from the radon concentration in chamber. The indoor radon from the granite samples ranged from 10.04 to 55.32 Bq·m-2·h-1 with an average value of 20.30 Bq·m-2·h-1 and the annual effective dose ranged from 0.25 to 1.39 mSv·y-1 with an average value of 0.48 mSv·y-1. The results showed that the annual effective doses of three granite samples were higher than the annual exposure limit for the general public (1 mSv·y-1) recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). In addition, the relationship between the colours and radon exhalation rates of granite samples was also explained.

  16. Radon: Is it a problem

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, B.L.; Mettler, F.A.; Harley, N.H. )

    1989-09-01

    Radon gas is a major source of radiation exposure to the general public. Radon-222 is a product of uranium-238, present in varying concentrations in all soils. Radon enters buildings from soil, water, natural gas, and building materials. Its short-lived breakdown products, termed radon daughters, include alpha-emitting solids that can deposit in the lungs. Firm evidence links lung cancer risk in miners with high exposure to radon daughters. The amount of risk associated with the much lower but chronic doses received in buildings is difficult to establish. By some extrapolations, radon daughters may be responsible for a significant number of lung cancer deaths. The existence or extent of synergism with smoking is unresolved. Local conditions can cause high levels of radon in some buildings, and measures that reduce indoor radon are of potential value. 39 references.

  17. Design of an exposure chamber to test samplers used in the evaluation of personal exposure to nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, R.; Izadi, H.; Quémerais, B.

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to design a laboratory size exposure chamber for the testing of samplers used to collect personal exposure samples for nanoparticles. A polyethylene cylindrical container with a diameter of 42 cm and height of 60 cm was used as the testing chamber. The chamber was divided into 2 parts by an aluminium honey comb. Particles generated using a 1 jet Collison nebulizer (BGI) operating at a flow rate of 4L/min were inserted into the chamber via a tube located near to the top of the chamber. A heater was inserted just after the nebulizer to avoid condensation of water in the tubing, and dilution air, running at 10L/min was inserted just after the heater. As particle charge can dramatically affect sampling a particle neutralizer was attached to the generation system so as to neutralize the particles before they enter the chamber. A diffusion dryer was used to remove any water from the air stream prior to enter the chamber. A fan was used to mix and distribute the generated particles. After generation and mixing, the particles passed through the aluminium honeycomb which is essential to eliminate any turbulent or unwanted air flow. Six sampling ports along with a pressure gauge were placed on the walls 15 cm from the bottom of the chamber. The pressure gauge was added to ensure the desired pressure is achieved during sampling. The sampling ports allowed for the connection of five samplers and sampling pumps as well as the connection of an ultrafine particle counter. The exposure chamber was developed to assess various samplers for carbon nanotubes and cellulose nanocrystals. Results showed that the chamber was working properly and that mixing was sufficiently uniform to test samplers.

  18. Comparative survey of outdoor, residential and workplace radon concentrations.

    PubMed

    Barros, Nirmalla; Field, Dan W; Steck, Daniel J; Field, R William

    2015-02-01

    This study investigated radon concentrations in above-ground (i.e. first floor) workplace in Missouri and compared them with above-ground radon concentrations in nearby homes and outdoor locations. This study also examined the potential utility of using home and outdoor radon concentrations to predict the radon concentration at a nearby workplace (e.g. county agencies and schools). Even though workplace radon concentrations were not statistically different from home radon concentrations, the radon concentration at a particular home, or outdoor location, was a poor predictor of the radon concentration at a nearby workplace. Overall, 9.6 and 9.9 % of homes and workplace, respectively, exhibited radon concentrations of ≥148 Bq m(-3). Because of the percentage of workplace with elevated radon concentrations, the results suggest that additional surveys of workplace radon concentrations are needed, especially in areas of high radon potential, to assess the contribution of workplace radon exposure to an individual's overall radon exposure.

  19. The inverse dose-rate effect and the extrapolation of radon risk estimates from exposures of miners to low-level exposures in homes

    SciTech Connect

    Pushkin, J.S. )

    1994-04-01

    This letter is written in response to a paper in which the author discusses the inverse dose-rate dependence of oncogenic transformation by high-LET radiation. The author asserts that, as a consequence, the extrapolation of results from miners exposed to high levels of radon daughters could overestimate the risk due to environmental exposures. By using a model increased cell sensitivity in one part of the cell cycle, the author assumes an inverse dose-rate effect should occur only at high doses, but the author of this letter points out that this does not imply a lower risk per unit dose at low doses. According to this letter, the existence of an inverse dose-rate effect for high-LET radiation provides no grounds for projecting lower lung cancer risks per unit exposure at environmental radon levels than at the higher radon level in mines. Failure to adjust for any inverse dose-rate effect in the studies of miners can only lead to an underestimation of the environmental risk.

  20. Radon: The Silent Danger.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoffel, Jennifer

    1989-01-01

    This article discusses the public health dangers associated with radon exposure in homes and schools. In addition, testing and corrective efforts by federal and state agencies are discussed. A map indicating areas in the U.S. with potentially high radon levels is included. (IAH)

  1. Variation of soil radon concentrations in southern Ontario.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Ly, J; Bergman, L; Wierdsma, J; Klassen, R A

    2008-01-01

    Radon has been identified as the second leading cause of lung cancer after tobacco smoking. Information on indoor radon concentrations is required to assess the lung cancer burden due to radon exposure. However, radon data in highly populated southern Ontario are very limited. Since radon in soil is believed to be the main source of radon in homes, measurements of soil gas radon concentrations can be used to estimate variations in radon potential of indoor environments. This study reports a transect survey of natural background variation in soil radon levels across southern Ontario. The results indicate that radon risk could be high in some areas of southern Ontario.

  2. Invited Article: Radon and thoron intercomparison experiments for integrated monitors at NIRS, Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Janik, M. Ishikawa, T.; Omori, Y.; Kavasi, N.

    2014-02-15

    Inhalation of radon ({sup 222}Rn) and its short-lived decay products and of products of the thoron ({sup 220}Rn) series accounts for more than half of the effective dose from natural radiation sources. At this time, many countries have begun large-scale radon and thoron surveys and many different measurement methods and instruments are used in these studies. Consequently, it is necessary to improve and standardize technical methods of measurements and to verify quality assurance by intercomparisons between laboratories. Four international intercomparisons for passive integrating radon and thoron monitors were conducted at the NIRS (National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Japan). Radon exercises were carried out in the 24.4 m{sup 3} inner volume walk-in radon chamber that has systems to control radon concentration, temperature, and humidity. Moreover, the NIRS thoron chamber with a 150 dm{sup 3} inner volume was utilized to provide three thoron intercomparisons. At present, the NIRS is the only laboratory world-wide that has carried out periodic thoron intercomparison of passive monitors. Fifty laboratories from 26 countries participated in the radon intercomparison, using six types of detectors (charcoal, CR-39, LR 115, polycarbonate film, electret plate, and silicon photodiode). Eighteen laboratories from 12 countries participated in the thoron intercomparisons, using two etch-track types (CR-39 and polycarbonate) detectors. The tests were made under one to three different exposures to radon and thoron. The data presented in this paper indicated that the performance quality of laboratories for radon measurement has been gradually increasing. Results of thoron exercises showed that the quality for thoron measurements still needs further development and additional studies are needed to improve its measuring methods. The present paper provides a summary of all radon and thoron international intercomparisons done at NIRS from 2007 to date and it describes the

  3. Invited Article: Radon and thoron intercomparison experiments for integrated monitors at NIRS, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janik, M.; Ishikawa, T.; Omori, Y.; Kavasi, N.

    2014-02-01

    Inhalation of radon (222Rn) and its short-lived decay products and of products of the thoron (220Rn) series accounts for more than half of the effective dose from natural radiation sources. At this time, many countries have begun large-scale radon and thoron surveys and many different measurement methods and instruments are used in these studies. Consequently, it is necessary to improve and standardize technical methods of measurements and to verify quality assurance by intercomparisons between laboratories. Four international intercomparisons for passive integrating radon and thoron monitors were conducted at the NIRS (National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Japan). Radon exercises were carried out in the 24.4 m3 inner volume walk-in radon chamber that has systems to control radon concentration, temperature, and humidity. Moreover, the NIRS thoron chamber with a 150 dm3 inner volume was utilized to provide three thoron intercomparisons. At present, the NIRS is the only laboratory world-wide that has carried out periodic thoron intercomparison of passive monitors. Fifty laboratories from 26 countries participated in the radon intercomparison, using six types of detectors (charcoal, CR-39, LR 115, polycarbonate film, electret plate, and silicon photodiode). Eighteen laboratories from 12 countries participated in the thoron intercomparisons, using two etch-track types (CR-39 and polycarbonate) detectors. The tests were made under one to three different exposures to radon and thoron. The data presented in this paper indicated that the performance quality of laboratories for radon measurement has been gradually increasing. Results of thoron exercises showed that the quality for thoron measurements still needs further development and additional studies are needed to improve its measuring methods. The present paper provides a summary of all radon and thoron international intercomparisons done at NIRS from 2007 to date and it describes the present status on radon and

  4. Radon Exposure Assessment and Relative Effective Dose Estimation to Inhabitants of Puglia Region, South Italy.

    PubMed

    Quarto, Maria; Pugliese, Mariagabriella; La Verde, Giuseppe; Loffredo, Filomena; Roca, Vincenzo

    2015-11-23

    Indoor radon concentrations were measured in dwellings of the Puglia region in Southern Italy using LR-115 passive detectors. The results show that the radon concentrations varied from 15 ± 2 to 2166 ± 133 Bq/m³ with a geometric mean of 114 Bq/m³ and a geometric standard deviation of 2.3. An analysis on the factors affecting radon concentration such as age of the dwellings, floors, and stories, was performed. The mean effective dose to inhabitants has been calculated and found to be 8.2 mSv/y. Finally, for estimation of cancer risks, the lifetime risk and lung cancer cases per years per million have been calculated.

  5. Laboratory measurements on radon exposure effects on local environmental temperature: Implications for satellite TIR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinelli, Giovanni; Solecki, Andrzej Tomasz; Tchorz-Trzeciakiewicz, Dagmara Eulalia; Piekarz, Magdalena; Karolina Grudzinska, Katarzyna

    Surface latent heat flux (SLHF) is proportional to the heat released by phase changes during solidification, evaporation or melting. Effects of SLHF on the earth's surface could be measured by satellite techniques capable of measuring thermal infrared radiation (TIR). Recent studies have found a possible correlation between SLHF and earthquakes, hence satellite techniques are widely used in research into the possible link between SLHF and earthquakes. Possible fluctuations in SLHF values during seismic periods have been attributed to different causes, such as the expulsion from the ground of greenhouse gases or because of radon. In particular, ionization processes due to radon decay could lead to changes in air temperature. Laboratory experiments have been carried out to highlight the possible role of radon in the thermal environmental conditions of a laboratory-controlled atmospheric volume.

  6. Radon Exposure Assessment and Relative Effective Dose Estimation to Inhabitants of Puglia Region, South Italy

    PubMed Central

    Quarto, Maria; Pugliese, Mariagabriella; La Verde, Giuseppe; Loffredo, Filomena; Roca, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Indoor radon concentrations were measured in dwellings of the Puglia region in Southern Italy using LR-115 passive detectors. The results show that the radon concentrations varied from 15 ± 2 to 2166 ± 133 Bq/m3 with a geometric mean of 114 Bq/m3 and a geometric standard deviation of 2.3. An analysis on the factors affecting radon concentration such as age of the dwellings, floors, and stories, was performed. The mean effective dose to inhabitants has been calculated and found to be 8.2 mSv/y. Finally, for estimation of cancer risks, the lifetime risk and lung cancer cases per years per million have been calculated. PMID:26610543

  7. World History Of Radon Research And Measurement From The Early 1900's To Today

    SciTech Connect

    George, A. C.

    2008-08-07

    In 1900, Dorn discovered the emanation in the uranium series that eventually became the well-known gas {sup 222}Rn. From 1900 through 1908, it was demonstrated that {sup 222}Rn is a radioactive gas found in tap water, highly condensable at low temperatures with a half-life of approximately 3.7 days and can be collected on charcoal by adsorption. Although, radon was discovered in 1900, the effects of prolonged exposure had been suspected and noted 300 years earlier among underground miners who developed lung cancer. During the period from 1924-1932, it was suggested that radon was the cause of high lung cancer incidence. In 1951, researchers at the university of Rochester N.Y. pointed out that the lung cancer health hazard was from the alpha radiation dose delivered by the radon decay products that deposited in the respiratory tract. The findings of the BEIR Committee Report VI, which was based on epidemiological studies in different groups of mines in the 1950's and 1960's and on laboratory studies, showed that from 60,000 miners over 2,600 developed lung cancer where only 750 were expected.Since 1998, the epidemiological study conducted in Iowa US, showed beyond any reasonable doubt that radon decay products cause lung cancer among women who lived at least twenty years in their homes. This paper will cover early radon measurements in soil, building material, ground water and in different air environments such as in the atmosphere, caves spas, underground mines and in residential indoor air environment. Radon measurements were conducted in many areas for diagnostic purposes. Radon was used as natural tracer to study air masses, vertical diffusion, and atmospheric studies, in earthquake prediction, and as a geological indicator for radium and uranium. In the early radon measurements, electroscopes, electrometers and primitive ionization chambers were used for many years. In the 1940's fast pulse ionization chambers replaced total ionization chambers. From the mid

  8. World History Of Radon Research And Measurement From The Early 1900's To Today

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, A. C.

    2008-08-01

    In 1900, Dorn discovered the emanation in the uranium series that eventually became the well-known gas 222Rn. From 1900 through 1908, it was demonstrated that 222Rn is a radioactive gas found in tap water, highly condensable at low temperatures with a half-life of approximately 3.7 days and can be collected on charcoal by adsorption. Although, radon was discovered in 1900, the effects of prolonged exposure had been suspected and noted 300 years earlier among underground miners who developed lung cancer. During the period from 1924-1932, it was suggested that radon was the cause of high lung cancer incidence. In 1951, researchers at the university of Rochester N.Y. pointed out that the lung cancer health hazard was from the alpha radiation dose delivered by the radon decay products that deposited in the respiratory tract. The findings of the BEIR Committee Report VI, which was based on epidemiological studies in different groups of mines in the 1950's and 1960's and on laboratory studies, showed that from 60,000 miners over 2,600 developed lung cancer where only 750 were expected. Since 1998, the epidemiological study conducted in Iowa US, showed beyond any reasonable doubt that radon decay products cause lung cancer among women who lived at least twenty years in their homes. This paper will cover early radon measurements in soil, building material, ground water and in different air environments such as in the atmosphere, caves spas, underground mines and in residential indoor air environment. Radon measurements were conducted in many areas for diagnostic purposes. Radon was used as natural tracer to study air masses, vertical diffusion, and atmospheric studies, in earthquake prediction, and as a geological indicator for radium and uranium. In the early radon measurements, electroscopes, electrometers and primitive ionization chambers were used for many years. In the 1940's fast pulse ionization chambers replaced total ionization chambers. From the mid 1950's

  9. Work to save dose: contrasting effective dose rates from radon exposure in workplaces and residences against the backdrop of public and occupational limits

    SciTech Connect

    Whicker, Jeffrey J; Mcnaughton, Michael W

    2009-01-01

    Office workers are exposed to radon while at work and at home. Though there has been a multitude of studies reporting the measurements of radon concentrations and potential lung and effective doses associated with radon and progeny exposure in homes, similar studies on the concentrations and subsequent effective dose rates in the non-mine workplaces are lacking. Additionally, there are few, if any, comparative analyses of radon exposures at more 'typical' workplace with residential exposures within the same county. The purposes of this study were to measure radon concentrations in office and residential spaces in the same county and explore the radiation dose implications. Sixty-five track-etch detectors were deployed in office spaces and 47 were deployed in residences, all within Los Alamos County, New Mexico, USA. The sampling periods for these measurements were generally about three months. The measured concentrations were used to calculate and compare effective dose rates resulting from exposure while at work and at home. Results showed that full-time office workers receive on average about 8 times greater exposure at home than while in the office (2.3 mSv yr-! versus 0.3 mSv yr-!). The estimated effective dose rate for a more homebound person was about 3 mSv yr-!. Estimating effective doses from background radon exposure in the same county as Los Alamos National Laboratory, with thousands of'radiological workers,' highlights interesting contrasts in radiation protection standards that span public and occupational settings. For example, the effective dose rate from background radon exposure in unregulated office spaces ranged up to 1.1 mSv yr-!, which is similar to the 1 mSv yr-! threshold for regulation ofa 'radiological worker,' as defined in the Department of Energy regulations for occupational exposure. Additionally, the estimated average effective dose total of> 3 mSv yf! from radon background exposure in homes stands in contrast to the 0.1 mSv yr-! air

  10. UTILITY OF SHORT-TERM BASEMENT SCREENING RADON MEASUREMENTS TO PREDICT YEAR-LONG RESIDENTIAL RADON CONCENTRATIONS ON UPPER FLOORS.

    PubMed

    Barros, Nirmalla; Steck, Daniel J; William Field, R

    2016-11-01

    This study investigated temporal and spatial variability between basement radon concentrations (measured for ∼7 d using electret ion chambers) and basement and upper floor radon concentrations (measured for 1 y using alpha track detectors) in 158 residences in Iowa, USA. Utility of short-term measurements to approximate a person's residential radon exposure and effect of housing/occupant factors on predictive ability were evaluated. About 60 % of basement short-term, 60 % of basement year-long and 30 % of upper floor year-long radon measurements were equal to or above the United States Environmental Protection Agency's radon action level of 148 Bq m(-3) Predictive value of a positive short-term test was 44 % given the year-long living space concentration was equal to or above this action level. Findings from this study indicate that cumulative radon-related exposure was more closely approximated by upper floor year-long measurements than short-term or year-long measurements in the basement.

  11. Contribution of radon and radon daughters to respiratory cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Harley, N; Samet, J M; Cross, F T; Hess, T; Muller, J; Thomas, D

    1986-01-01

    This article reviews studies on the contribution of radon and radon daughters to respiratory cancer and proposes recommendations for further research, particularly a national radon survey. The steady-state outdoor radon concentration averages 200 pCi/m3, and indoor levels are about 4 times higher. The primary source of radon in homes is the underlying soil; entry depends on multiple variables and reduced ventilation for energy conservation increases indoor radon levels. Occupational exposures are expressed in units of radon daughter potential energy concentration or working level (WL). Cumulative exposure is the product of the working level and the time exposed. The unit for cumulative exposure is the working level month (WLM). The occupational standard for radon exposure is 4 WLM/year, and 2 WLM/year has been suggested as a guideline for remedial action in homes. Epidemiologic studies show that miners with cumulative radon daughter exposures somewhat below 100 WLM have excess lung cancer mortality. Some 3% to 8% of miners studied have developed lung cancer attributable to radon daughters. All of the underground mining studies show an increased risk of lung cancer with radon daughter exposure. All cell types of lung cancer increased with radon exposure. If radon and smoking act in a multiplicative manner, then the risk for smokers could be 10 times that for nonsmokers. The potential risk of lung cancer appears to be between 1 and 2 per 10,000/WLM, which yields a significant number of lung cancers as some 220 million persons in the United States are exposed on average to 10 to 20 WLM/lifetime. PMID:3830103

  12. Design and construction of a simple, continuous flow sulfur dioxide exposure chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Leetham, J.W.; Ferguson, W.; Dodd, J.L.; Lauenroth, W.K.

    1982-02-01

    For experimental purposes, a reasonably large capacity, low cost, low maintenance chamber was needed to study the long-term (2-4 months) effects of sulfur dioxide on developmental rates of grasshoppers and decomposition rates of plant litter. Internal temperature, humidity, and light controls were not required since the chamber would be used in externally controlled environments. The controlled exposure chamber herein described has proved to be adequate for such studies and satisfied most of the conditions discussed by Heagle and Philbeck. Its utility could be increased by use within an environmentally controlled greenhouse. It is comparatively simple and inexpensive to contruct and maintain.

  13. Calibration system for measuring the radon flux density.

    PubMed

    Onishchenko, A; Zhukovsky, M; Bastrikov, V

    2015-06-01

    The measurement of radon flux from soil surface is the useful tool for the assessment of radon-prone areas and monitoring of radon releases from uranium mining and milling residues. The accumulation chambers with hollow headspace and chambers with activated charcoal are the most used devices for these purposes. Systematic errors of the measurements strongly depend on the geometry of the chamber and diffusion coefficient of the radon in soil. The calibration system for the attestation of devices for radon flux measurements was constructed. The calibration measurements of accumulation chambers and chambers with activated charcoal were conducted. The good agreement between the results of 2D modelling of radon flux and measurements results was observed. It was demonstrated that reliable measurements of radon flux can be obtained by chambers with activated charcoal (equivalent volume ~75 l) or by accumulation chambers with hollow headspace of ~7-10 l and volume/surface ratio (height) of >15 cm.

  14. Radon daughters' concentration in air and exposure of joggers at the university campus of Bangalore, India.

    PubMed

    Ashok, G V; Nagaiah, N; Shiva Prasad, N G

    2008-09-01

    The concentration of radon daughters in outdoor air was measured continuously from January 2006 to December 2006 near the Department of Physics, Bangalore University campus, Bangalore. The concentration was measured by collecting air samples at a height of 1 m above the ground level on a glass micro fibre filter paper with a known air flow rate. The results show that the radon progeny concentration exhibits distinct seasonal and diurnal variations that are predominantly caused by changes in the temperature gradient at the soil-atmosphere interface. The concentration was found to be high from 20.00 to 8.00 hrs, when the turbulence mixing was minimum and low during the rest of the time. In terms of the monthly concentration, January was found to be the highest with September/August being the lowest. The diurnal variations in the concentrations of radon progeny were found to exhibit positive correlation with the relative humidity and anti-correlation with the atmospheric temperature. From the measured concentration, an attempt was made to establish the annual effective dose to the general public of the region and was found to be 0.085 mSv/a. In addition, an attempt was also made for the first time to study the variation of inhalation dose with respect to the physical activity levels. Results show that in the light of both the effect of chemical pollutants and radiation dose due to inhalation of radon daughters, evening jogging is advisable.

  15. Radon in Ingleborough / Clapham Cave, North Yorkshire, UK.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillmore, Gavin

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric radon concentration was measured at Ingleborough Cave, North Yorkshire during the summer of 2004, and the autumn / winter of 2004/5. Significantly, Ingleborough Cave forms part of a larger system which includes the world famous Gaping Gill pothole. This plunges 105 m (334 ft), contains the tallest unbroken waterfall in England and one of the largest known underground chambers in the UK. Measurements were taken to assess the effects of seasonal and spatial variation, elevation and ventilation on radon concentration in Ingleborough. In this study personal dose exposures for three groups of cave user were identified, and the performance of a variety of radon detection systems evaluated. Summer radon concentrations inside the cave peaked at around 7,000 Bq m-3, although average concentrations were less than 5,000 Bq m-3. During the winter measurement period, average concentrations were around 100 Bq m-3, and a winter / summer ration therefore of 47,4. The average annual radon concentration exceeded the legislative limitations for the workplace of 400 Bq m-3 due in part to a failed fan in the ventilation system. When the fan was running we noted an 80% reduction in radon concentrations although reliability of the fan was problematic due to extensive but relatively rare flooding of the cave system. The radon dose experienced by cave workers and guides in this study exceeded the Ionisation Radiation Regulations limit of 5 mSv/annum, and highlighted that for health and safety reasons the ventilation system should be fully operational during the high radon concentration summer months. Keywords: Radon, Cave, Ingleborough, Detection methods

  16. Assessing the level of chromosome aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes in long-term resident children under conditions of high exposure to radon and its decay products.

    PubMed

    Druzhinin, Vladimir G; Sinitsky, Maxim Yu; Larionov, Aleksey V; Volobaev, Valentin P; Minina, Varvara I; Golovina, Tatiana A

    2015-09-01

    In this study, the frequency and spectrum of chromosomal aberrations were analysed in samples of peripheral blood from 372 (mean age = 12.24 ± 2.60 years old) long-term resident children in a boarding school (Tashtagol city, Kemerovo Region, Russian Federation) under conditions of high exposure to radon and its decay products. As a control group, we used blood samples from people living in Zarubino village (Kemerovo Region, Russian Federation). We discovered that the average frequencies of single and double fragments, chromosomal exchanges, total number of aberrations, chromatid type, chromosome type and all types of aberrations were significantly increased in the exposed group. This is evidence of considerable genotoxicity to children living under conditions of high exposure to radon compared to children living under ecological conditions without increased radon radiation.

  17. Radon programmes and health marketing.

    PubMed

    Fojtikova, Ivana; Rovenska, Katerina

    2011-05-01

    Being aware of negative health effects of radon exposure, many countries aim for the reduction of the radon exposure of their population. The Czech radon programme was commenced >20 y ago. Since then experts have gathered a lot of knowledge, necessary legislation has been enacted, tens of thousands of inhabitants have been offered free measurement and subsidy for the mitigation. Despite the effort, the effectiveness of the radon programme seems to be poor. Newly built houses still exhibit elevated radon concentrations and the number of houses mitigated is very low. Is it possible to enhance the effectivity of radon programme while keeping it on a voluntary basis? One possible way is to employ health marketing that draws together traditional marketing theories and science-based strategies to prevention. The potential of using marketing principles in communication and delivery of radon information will be discussed.

  18. Control of indoor radon and radon progeny concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Sextro, R.G.

    1985-05-01

    There are three general categories of techniques for the control of radon and radon progeny concentrations in indoor air - restriction of radon entry, reduction of indoor radon concentrations by ventilation or air cleaning, and removal of airborne radon progeny. The predominant radon entry process in most residences appears to be pressure driven flow of soil gas through cracks or other openings in the basement, slab, or subfloor. Sealing these openings or ventilation of the subslab or subfloor space are methods of reducing radon entry rates. Indoor radon concentrations may be reduced by increased ventilation. The use of charcoal filters for removal of radon gas in the indoor air by adsorption has also been proposed. Concentrations of radon progeny, which are responsible for most of the health risks associated with radon exposures, can be controlled by use of electrostatic or mechanical filtration. Air circulation can also reduce radon progeny concentrations in certain cases. This paper reviews the application and limitations of each of these control measures and discusses recent experimental results.

  19. Chamber Tests with Human Subjects XX. Hypersensitivity to H as Demonstrated by Patch Tests Before and After Chamber Exposure to H Vapor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1946-05-15

    intense erythema 4 a. erythema with edema b. dry scaling of scrotum c. maceration of axillary skin 5 a. vesicle b. numerous pinpoint vesicles c. crusting... skin reaction following exposure to H vapor in the man-chamber are discussed. Eight kodachrone prints, illustrating pertinent features, are included...Reactions for a Given Test Dose - 12 F. Changes in Threshold ------------------ 12 G. Abnormal Skin Reactions Following Chamber Exposures to H Vapor

  20. Radon exposure assessment for underground workers: a case of Seoul Subway Police officers in Korea.

    PubMed

    Song, Myeong Han; Chang, Byung-Uck; Kim, Yongjae; Cho, Kun-Woo

    2011-11-01

    The objective of this study is the systematic and individual assessment of the annual effective dose due to inhaled radon for the Seoul Subway Police officers, Korea. The annual average radon concentrations were found to be in the range of 18.9-114 Bq·m(-3) in their workplaces. The total annual effective doses which may likely to be received on duty were assessed to be in the range of 0.41-1.64 mSv·y(-1). These were well below the recommended action level 10 mSv·y(-1) by ICRP. However, the effective doses were higher than subway station staff in Seoul, Korea.

  1. Radon 222 permeation through different polymers (PVC, EVA, PE and PP) after exposure to gamma radiation or surface treatment by cold plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, D.; Tomasella, E.; Labed, V.; Meunier, C.; Cetier, Ph.; Robé, M. C.; Chambaudet, A.

    1997-08-01

    In order to limit radon emission during the storage of radioactive wastes and to comply with the different regulations in the storage facility, the packaging used for these types of wastes should include intermediate enclosures, such as polymer membranes used as radon barriers. However, the membrane would be subjected to different types of radiation during long periods of storage, it would have to be regularly monitored for damage. The first aim of this study is to check the efficiency and the continuity of such polymer membranes subjected to different accelerated ageing processes by exposure to gamma radiation. PolyVinyl Chloride (PVC) and Ethylene Vinyl Acetate (EVA) membranes were studied after gamma exposures. Thus, we evaluated the effects of the gamma radiations on the radon permeation coefficient, and the degradation of these polymers due to this exposure. The second objective of this study is to evaluate the modifications of the polymer surface by cold plasma. PolyEthylene (PE) and PolyPropylene (PP) membranes were studied. Exposure of a polymer to a plasma creates reactive sites on the polymer's surface. Different modifications in the surface composition (chemical composition, molecular weight, etc.) can be obtained. The advantage of the plasma process is that it acts within seconds and does not produce any noticeable effects on the bulk properties. The obtained results show that this treatment increases the polymer's efficiency as a radon barrier.

  2. Carcinogenesis and low-level ionizing radiation with special reference to lung cancer and exposure to radon daughters

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1982-06-01

    The quantitative estimation of the carcinogenic risk of low-dose, high-LET radiation in the case of exposure to radon daughters and lung-cancer is subject to numerous uncertainties. The greatest of these concerns the parametric values of the dose-response curve. We lack knowledge and an understanding of the dosimetry and the distribution of aggregates of radioactivity that remain localized as hot spots in specific regions of the lungs and the influence on greater or lesser risk of lung cancer per average lung dose than uniformly deposited radiation (NRC76). We have only a limited understanding of the response to exposure to high-LET radiations, such as alpha particles, for which linear risk estimates for low doses are less likely to overestimate the risk, and may, in fact, underestimate the risk (BEIR80). Other uncertainties include the length of the latency period, the RBE for alpha radiation relative to gamma radiation, the period during which the radiation risk is expressed, the risk projection model used - whether absolute or relative - for projecting risk beyond the period of observation, the effect of dose rate and protraction of dose, and the influence of differences in the natural incidence of lung cancer in different populations. In addition, uncertainties are introduced by the biological and life-style risk characteristics of humans, for example, the effect of sex, the effect of age at the time of irradiation and at the time of appearance of the cancer, the influence of length of observation or follow-up of the study populations, and the influence of perhaps the most important confounding bias, cigarette-smoking. The collective influence of these uncertainties is such as to deny great credibility to any estimate of human lung cancer risk and other cancer risk that can be made for low-dose, high-LET radon daughter radiation exposure.

  3. Joint analysis of three European nested case-control studies of lung cancer among radon exposed miners: exposure restricted to below 300 WLM.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Nezahat; Muirhead, Colin R; Tomasek, Ladislav; Kreuzer, Michaela; Laurier, Dominique; Leuraud, Klervi; Schnelzer, Maria; Grosche, Bernd; Placek, Vit; Heribanova, Alena; Timarche, Margot

    2013-03-01

    Analyses of lung cancer risk were carried out using restrictions to nested case-control data on uranium miners in the Czech Republic, France, and Germany. With the data restricted to cumulative exposures below 300 working-level-months (WLM) and adjustment for smoking status, the excess relative risk (ERR) per WLM was 0.0174 (95% CI: 0.009-0.035), compared to the estimate of 0.008 (95% CI: 0.004-0.014) using the unrestricted data. Analysis of both the restricted and unrestricted data showed that time since exposure windows had a major effect; the ERR/WLM was six times higher for more recent exposures (5-24 y) than for more distant exposures (25 y or more). Based on a linear model fitted to data on exposures <300 WLM, the ERR WLM of lung cancer at 30 y after exposure was estimated to be 0.021 (95% CI: 0.011-0.040), and the risks decreased by 47% per decade increase in time since exposure. The results from analyzing the joint effects of radon and smoking were consistent with a sub-multiplicative interaction; the ERR WLM was greater for non-smokers compared with current or ex-smokers, although there was no statistically significant variation in the ERR WLM by smoking status. The patterns of risk with radon exposure from the combined European nested case-control miner analysis were generally consistent with those based on the BEIR VI Exposure-Age-Concentration model. Based on conversions from WLM to time weighted averaged radon concentration (expressed per 100 Bq m), the results from this analysis of miner data were in agreement with those from the joint analysis of the European residential radon studies.

  4. A creeping suspicion about radon

    SciTech Connect

    Alderson, L.

    1994-10-01

    Who would expect an odorless, invisible gas that occurs nearly everywhere on earth to cause such trouble Yet radon, the gas emitted by decay of uranium in the earth's crust, is one of America's most significant environmental risks, according to the EPA, which estimates that residential radon levels lead to approximately 13,600 lung cancer deaths each year. A new National Cancer Institute analysis of multiple studies of miners confirms early estimates, putting the number at 15,000. No other risk comes close, not even environmental tobacco smoke, which is estimates to cause some 3,000 deaths each year. Hot debate surrounds the assessment of risk from radon exposure to Americans via indoor air and water supplies. The primary culprit is not radon gas itself, but its decay products, including polonium-214 and polonium-218, which have long half-lives and emit alpha particles - positively charged particles - and lung cancer when inhaled. Radon seeps into homes from the ground or is present in water supplies. Waterborne radon may be inhaled as radon or its progeny during household use - cooking or showering - or it may be ingested. But the EPA estimates that water sources contribute only about 5% of total airborne radon exposure, leaving indoor air as the worst offender. While the EPA estimates that approximately 200 cancer cases per year result from exposure to radon from public groundwater systems, estimates of annual lung cancer deaths from indoor air radon range from 7,000 to 30,000.

  5. Measurement of potential alpha energy exposure and potential alpha energy concentration and estimating radiation dose of radon in Sari city in the north region of Iran.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Seyed Ali; Nikpour, Behzad

    2014-12-01

    In dwellings in Sari city in the northern region of Iran, the potential alpha energy exposure (PAEE) and potential alpha energy concentration (PAEC) have been measured and the radiation dose due to radon and its progenies has been estimated. In this study, the dosemeters DOSEman and SARAD GmbH (Germany), which are sensitive to alpha particles, were used. The population of the city of Sari is 495,369 people and the density of population is 116.5 people per km(2). A percentage of the total household population of Sari in areas of geographically different samples was selected. The PAEE, PAEC and radon concentration in four different seasons in a year in homes for sampling were measured. The mean PAEE due to indoor radon in homes of four cities in Sari city was estimated to be 28.23 Bq m(-3) and the mean PAEC was estimated to be 27.11 Bq m(-3). Also the mean indoor radon level was found to be 29.95 Bq m(-3). The annual dose equivalent is ∼0.0151 μSv y(-1). Measurement results show that the average PAEE, PAEC and radon concentration are higher in winter than in other seasons. This difference could be due to stillness and lack of air movement indoors in winter.

  6. Chromosomal aberrations suggestive of mutagen-related leukemia after 21 years of therapeutic radon exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Rechavi, G.; Berkowicz, M.; Rosner, E.; Neuman, Y.; Ben-Bassat, I.; Ramot, B. )

    1990-08-01

    A 68-year-old woman with acute myelomonocytic leukemia, who was treated annually for 21 consecutive years by therapeutic low-dose radon gas radiation because of spondyloarthritis, is described. The karyotype of the malignant clone was 45,XX, -17, -18,del(5)(q15q33), +t(17;18)(q11.2q23). In 45% of the metaphases, the modal number was between hyperdiploid to near tetraploid. Double minute chromosomes were demonstrated in 60% of the cells. These chromosomal aberrations are suggestive of mutagen-related leukemia.

  7. Radon testing behavior in a sample of individuals with high home radon screening measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Field, R.W.; Kross, B.C.; Vust, L.J. )

    1993-08-01

    Although radon exposure has been identified as the second leading cause of lung cancer, fewer than 6% of US homeowners test their homes for radon. This report examines participants' follow-up radon testing behavior subsequent to receiving an initial screening radon level greater than 20 pCi/L. Sixty-two participants in the Iowa State-Wide Rural Radon Screening Survey who had radon screening measurements over 20 pCi/L were questioned by phone survey 3 months after receipt of their radon screening result to assess: whether participants were aware of radon's health risk; if participants recalled the radon screening results; how participants perceived the relative health risk of radon and whether participants planned follow-up radon testing. Only 19% of the respondents specifically identified lung cancer as the possible adverse health outcome of high radon exposure, and the majority of participants underestimated the health risks high radon levels pose when compared to cigarettes and x-rays. In addition, less than one third (29%) of the participants actually remembered their radon screening level within 10 pCi/L 3 months after receiving their screening results. Only 53% of the individuals correctly interpreted their screening radon level as being in the high range, and only 39% of the participants planned follow-up radon measurements. Receipt of radon screening test results indicating high radon levels was not an adequate motivational factor in itself to stimulate further radon assessment or mitigation. The findings suggest that free radon screening will not result in a dramatic increase in subsequent homeowner initiated remediation or further recommended radon testing. 13 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  8. Radon Risk and Remediation: A Psychological Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Hevey, David

    2017-01-01

    Although radon exposure in the home increases the risk of lung cancer, this risk can be managed. However, evidence indicates that testing for radon and subsequent home remediation rates are generally low in many countries. The present perspective outlines some key insights from psychological science that might account for sub-optimal radon protection. Psychological aspects of how the health risks posed by radon are perceived and managed are outlined. There is need to consider radon risk perception in terms of the (a) cognitive and emotional responses to radon and (b) social context in which the radon threat occurs. In addition, the nature of the threat itself is integral to the failure for people to act in response to a radon threat. Finally, the challenges arising from defensive processing of radon threat information are outlined.

  9. Predicting indoor radon-222 concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Stowe, M.H.

    1994-12-31

    Radon, a cause of lung cancer among miners, is being investigated as a source of lung cancer in the general population due to long-term low-level exposures in residences. Assessment of cumulative residential radon exposure entails measurements in past residences, some of which no longer exist or are not accessible. Estimates of radon concentrations in these missing homes are necessary for analysis of the radon-lung cancer association. Various approaches have been used by researchers attempting to predict the distribution of radon measurements in homes from specified geological and building characteristics. This study has modelled the set of basement radon measurements of 3788 Connecticut homes with several of these approaches, in addition to a descriptive tree method not previously utilized, and compared their validity on a random subset of homes not used in model construction. Each geographical and geological variable was more predictive of radon concentration than any of the housing characteristics. The single variable which explained the largest fraction of the variability in radon readings was the mean radon concentration for the zipcode area in which the house was located (R{sup 2} = .157). Soil characteristics at individual housing sites were not available for these analyses. They would be expected to increase the predictive power of the models. Multiple regression models, both additive and multiplicative, were not able to explain more than 22% of the variation in radon readings. Variables found to be significant in these models were zipcode mean, residential radon mean of bedrock unit, building age, type of foundation walls, type of water supply, aeroradioactivity reading, and lithology of the bedrock. A site potential index, based upon a classification of the bedrock underlying the house, was a better predictor of indoor radon level than other single geological variables, yet only explained 8% of the radon variability.

  10. Study of the atmospheric chemistry of radon progeny in laboratory and real indoor atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Hopke, P.K.

    1990-01-01

    The chemical and physical behavior of the {sup 218}Po atom immediately following its formation by the alpha decay of radon must be understood if the exposure to radon progeny is to be fully assessed. Two areas of radon progeny behavior will be studied; laboratory studies and studies in actual indoor environments. Laboratory studies include: Measure the neutralization rate of {sup 218}Po{sup +}{sub x} in O{sub 2} at low radon concentrations. Determine the formation rates of {center dot}OH, {center dot}O, or other oxidative radicals formed by the radiolysis of air following radon decay. Examine the formation of particles by the radiolytic oxidation of substances and measure the rate of ion-induced nucleation in the sulfuric acid-water vapor system with and without NH{sub 3} additions using a thermal diffusion cloud chamber. Exposure studies include: Initiate measurements of the activity size distribution in actual homes with occupants present; Initiate a prospective study of the utility of measurement of deposited {sup 210}Pb embedded in glass surfaces as a measure of the long-term, integrated exposure of the population to radon, and acquire the components and begin to develop the methodology to determine the hygroscopicity of the indoor aerosol.

  11. Quantification of Cigarette Smoke Particle Deposition In Vitro Using a Triplicate Quartz Crystal Microbalance Exposure Chamber

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, Jason; Thorne, David; McAughey, John; Dillon, Deborah; Meredith, Clive

    2013-01-01

    There are a variety of smoke exposure systems available to the tobacco industry and respiratory toxicology research groups, each with their own way of diluting/delivering smoke to cell cultures. Thus a simple technique to measure dose in vitro needs to be utilised. Dosimetry—assessment of dose—is a key element in linking the biological effects of smoke generated by various exposure systems. Microbalance technology is presented as a dosimetry tool and a way of measuring whole smoke dose. Described here is a new tool to quantify diluted smoke particulate deposition in vitro. The triplicate quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) chamber measured real-time deposition of smoke at a range of dilutions 1 : 5–1 : 400 (smoke : air). Mass was read in triplicate by 3 identical QCMs installed into one in vitro exposure chamber, each in the location in which a cell culture would be exposed to smoke at the air-liquid interface. This resulted in quantification of deposited particulate matter in the range 0.21–28.00 μg/cm2. Results demonstrated that the QCM could discriminate mass between dilutions and was able to give information of regional deposition where cell cultures would usually be exposed within the chamber. Our aim is to use the QCM to support the preclinical (in vitro) evaluation of tobacco products. PMID:23484139

  12. Assessment of pumped mercury vapour adsorption tubes as passive samplers using a micro-exposure chamber.

    PubMed

    Brown, Richard J C; Burdon, Melia K; Brown, Andrew S; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2012-09-01

    Mercury vapour adsorption tubes manufactured for pumped sampling and analysis have been evaluated for their performance as passive samplers. This has been done by exposing these tubes in a novel micro-exposure chamber. The uptake rates of these tubes have been found to be low (approximately 0.215 ml min(-1)) as compared to bespoke passive samplers for mercury vapour (typically in excess of 50 ml min(-1)). The measured uptake rates were shown to vary significantly between tubes and this was attributed to the variability in the air-sorbent interface and the proportion of the cross sectional area removed by the crimp in the quartz tubes used to secure the sorbent material. As a result of this variability the uptake rate of each tube must be determined using the micro-exposure chamber prior to deployment. Results have shown that the uptake rate determined in the micro-exposure chamber is invariant of concentration, and therefore these uptakes rates may be determined at a high mercury vapour concentration for many tubes at once in less than one hour. The uptake rate of the adsorption tubes under these conditions may be determined with a precision of 5%. Measurements made on a limited field trial in indoor and outdoor ambient air have shown that these tubes give results in acceptable agreement with more traditional pumped sampling methods, although longer sampling periods are required in order to reduce the uncertainty of the measurement, which is currently approximately 30%.

  13. A statistical evaluation of the influence of housing characteristics and geogenic radon potential on indoor radon concentrations in France.

    PubMed

    Demoury, C; Ielsch, G; Hemon, D; Laurent, O; Laurier, D; Clavel, J; Guillevic, J

    2013-12-01

    Radon-222 is a radioactive natural gas produced by the decay of radium-226, known to be the main contributor to natural background radiation exposure. Effective risk management needs to determine the areas in which the density of buildings with high radon levels is likely to be highest. Predicting radon exposure from the location and characteristics of a dwelling could also contribute to epidemiological studies. Beginning in the nineteen-eighties, a national radon survey consisting in more than 10,000 measurements of indoor radon concentrations was conducted in French dwellings by the Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN). Housing characteristics, which may influence radon accumulation in dwellings, were also collected. More recently, the IRSN generated a French geogenic radon potential map based on the interpretation of geological features. The present study analyzed the two datasets to investigate the factors influencing indoor radon concentrations using statistical modeling and to determine the optimum use of the information on geogenic radon potential that showed the best statistical association with indoor radon concentration. The results showed that the variables associated with indoor radon concentrations were geogenic radon potential, building material, year of construction, foundation type, building type and floor level. The model, which included the surrounding geogenic radon potential (i.e. the average geogenic radon potential within a disc of radius 20 km centered on the indoor radon measurement point) and variables describing house-specific factors and lifestyle explained about 20% of the overall variability of the logarithm of radon concentration. The surrounding geogenic radon potential was fairly closely associated with the local average indoor radon concentration. The prevalence of exposure to radon above specific thresholds and the average exposures to radon clearly increased with increasing classes of geogenic radon

  14. First radon measurements and occupational exposure assessments in underground geodynamic laboratory the Polish Academy of Sciences Space Research Centre in Książ Castle (SW Poland).

    PubMed

    Fijałkowska-Lichwa, Lidia; Przylibski, Tadeusz A

    2016-12-01

    The article presents the results of the first radon activity concentration measurements conducted continuously between 17(th) May 2014 and 16(th) May 2015 in the underground geodynamic laboratory of the Polish Academy of Sciences Space Research Centre in Książ. The data were registered with the use of three Polish semiconductor SRDN-3 detectors located the closest (SRDN-3 No. 6) to and the furthest (SRDN-3 No. 3) from the facility entrance, and in the fault zone (SRDN-3 No. 4). The study was conducted to characterize the radon behaviour and check it possibility to use with reference to long- and short-term variations of radon activity concentration observed in sedimentary rocks strongly fractured and intersected by systems of multiple faults, for integrated comparative assessments of changes in local orogen kinetics. The values of radon activity concentration in the underground geodynamic laboratory of the Polish Academy of Sciences (PAN) Space Research Centre in Książ undergo changes of a distinctly seasonal character. The highest values of radon activity concentration are recorded from late spring (May/June) to early autumn (October), and the lowest - from November to April. Radon activity concentrations varied depending on the location of measurement points. Between late spring and autumn they ranged from 800 Bq·m(-3) to 1200 Bq·m(-3), and even 3200 Bq·m(-3) in the fault zone. Between November and April, values of radon activity concentration are lower, ranging from 500 Bq·m(-3) to 1000 Bq·m(-3) and 2700 Bq·m(-3) in the fault zone. The values of radon activity concentration recorded in the studied facility did not undergo short-term changes in either the whole annual measuring cycle or any of its months. Effective doses received by people staying in the underground laboratory range from 0.001 mSv/h to 0.012 mSv/h. The mean annual effective dose, depending on the measurement site, equals 1 or is slightly higher than 10 mSv/year, while the maximum

  15. Inter-comparison of radon detectors for one to four week measurement periods.

    PubMed

    Gunning, G A; Murray, M; Long, S C; Foley, M J; Finch, E C

    2016-03-01

    Seven different types of radon detectors (Atmos 12 dpx, RAD7, RStone, Sun Nuclear 1028, Ramon 2.2, Canary and CR-39) were compared for exposure periods of 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks. The comparison was conducted under two conditions: (a) in a purpose-built radon chamber with an average radon concentration of 2560 Bq m(-3) (b) in a home environment with a radon concentration of 57 Bq m(-3), in both cases measured by the reference detector (Atmos 12 dpx) with a  ±10% uncertainty range. In (a) 5 out of 8 detectors recorded radon concentrations within the Atmos uncertainty range and all detectors recorded within  ±15%; in (b) 3 out of 9 detectors recorded within the Atmos uncertainty range and 6 out of 9 measured within  ±20%, for a 4 week measurement. The results from this study show that radon surveys can be conducted for shorter periods than the recommended 3 months where a rapid indication is needed of whether the radon concentration is above the reference level, such as when assessing the concentration during and after remediation work.

  16. Estimated risk of lung cancer from exposure to radon decay products in U.S. homes: A brief review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nero, Anthony V.

    Recent analyses now permit direct estimation of the risks of lung cancer from radon decay products in U.S. homes. Analysis of data from indoor monitoring in single-family homes yields a tentative frequency distribution of annual-average 222Rn concentrations with an arithmetic mean of 55 Bq m -3 and approximately 2% of homes having 300 Bq m -3 or more. Application of the results of occupational epidemiological studies to indoor exposures, either directly or using recent advances in lung dosimetry, suggests that the average indoor concentration entails a lifetime risk of lung cancer of about 0.4%, contributing about 10% of the total risk of lung cancer. The risk to individuals occupying the homes with 300 Bq m -3 or more for their lifetimes is estimated to exceed 2%, with risks from the homes with thousands of Bq m -3 correspondingly higher, even exceeding the total risk of premature death due to cigarette smoking. Such average and high-level risks greatly exceed ordinarily-considered environmental risks, forcing development of a new perspective on environmental exposures.

  17. STUDY OF RADIATION EXPOSURE DUE TO RADON, THORON AND PROGENY IN THE INDOOR ENVIRONMENT OF YAMUNA AND TONS VALLEYS OF GARHWAL HIMALAYA.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Mukesh; Rawat, Mukesh; Dangwal, Anoop; Prasad, Ganesh; Mishra, Rosaline; Ramola, R C

    2016-10-01

    Long-term measurements of indoor radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations have been carried out in dwellings of Yamuna and Tons Valleys of Uttarkashi, Garhwal Himalaya to investigate the health risk associated with inhalation of radon, thoron and progeny. The experimentally determined values of radon, thoron and progeny concentrations were used to estimate the annual inhalation doses and annual effective doses. The annual inhalation dose has been found to vary from 0.8 to 3.9 mSv y(-1) with an average of 1.8 mSv y(-1) The annual effective dose from the exposure to radon and its progeny in the study area has been found to vary from 0.1 to 2.4 mSv with an average of 1.2±0.6 mSv. Similarly, the annual effective dose due to thoron and its progeny has been found to vary from 0.2 to 1.5 mSv with an average of 0.6±0.4. The measurement techniques and results obtained are discussed in detail.

  18. Recoil-deposited Po-210 in radon dwellings

    SciTech Connect

    Samuelsson, C.

    1990-12-31

    Short-lived decay products of Rn-222 plate out on all surfaces in a house containing radon gas. Following the subsequent alpha decays of the mother nuclei, the daughter products Pb-214 and Pb-210 are superficially and permanently absorbed. Due to its long half-life (22 y) the activity of absorbed Pb-210 accumulates in the surface. The activity of Pb-210, or its decay products, can thus reflect the past randon daughter and plate-out history of a house over several decades. Our results and experience from measurements of Po-210 and Rn-222 in 22 dwellings will be presented. In these studies the Po-210 surface activity of one plane glass sheet per dwelling (window panes were not used) has been determined and compared with the period of exposure times the mean radon concentration measured over a two-month period. Considering the large uncertainty in the integrated radon exposure estimate the surface {sup 210}Po correlates well (r=0.73) with the accumulated radon exposure. The {sup 210}Po activity of the glass samples has been measured non-destructively using an open-flow pulse ionization chamber and this detector has also been successfully applied in field exercises.

  19. The health risk of radon

    SciTech Connect

    Conrath, S.M.; Kolb, L.

    1995-10-01

    Although radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States, second only to cigarette smoking, many members of the public are not aware that radon is one of the most serious environmental cancer risks in the US. Based on extensive data from epidemiological studies of underground miners, radon has been classified as a known human carcinogen. In contrast to most pollutants, the assessment of human risk from radon is based on human occupational exposure data rather than animal data. That radon causes lung cancer has been well established by the scientific community. More is known about radon than most other cancer causing environmental carcinogens. While there are some uncertainties involved when estimating radon risk to the public, it is important to recognize that the risk information is based on human data and that the uncertainties have been addressed in the risk assessment. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimates that the number of annual US lung cancer deaths due to residential radon exposures is approximately 14,000 with an uncertainty range of 7,000 to 30,000. The abundant information on radon health risks that supports EPA`s risk assessment indicates that recommendations for public action by the federal government and other public health organizations constitute prudent public policy.

  20. 2014 ICHLNRRA intercomparison of radon/thoron gas and radon short-lived decay products measuring instruments in the NRPI Prague.

    PubMed

    Jílek, K; Timková, J

    2015-06-01

    During the Eighth International Conference on High Levels of Natural Radiation and Radon Areas held in autumn 2014 at Prague, the third intercomparison of radon/thoron gas and radon short-lived decay products measurement instruments was organised by and held at the Natural Radiation Division of the National Radiation Protection Institute (NRPI; SÚRO v.v.i.) in Prague. The intercomparison was newly focussed also on continuous monitors with active sampling adapters capable to distinguish radon/thoron gas in their mix field.The results of radon gas measurements carried out in the big NRPI radon chamber indicated very well an average deviation of up to 5 % from the reference NRPI value for 80 % of all the exposed instruments. The results of equilibrium equivalent concentration continuous monitors indicated an average deviation of up to 5 % from the reference NRPI value for 40 % of all the exposed instruments and their ~8-10 % shift compared with the NRPI. The results of investigated ambient conditions upon response of exposed continuous monitors indicated influence of aerosol changes upon response of radon monitors with an active air sampling adapters through the filter, only. The exposures of both radon/thoron gas discriminative continuous monitors and passive detectors have been indicated inconsistent results: on one hand, their excellent agreement up to several per cent for both the gases, and on the other hand, systematic unsatisfactory differences up to 40 %. Additional radon/thoron exercises are recommended to improve both the instruments themselves and quality of their operators.

  1. Mutagenicity of radon and radon daughters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, H. H.

    The objective of our research is to investigate the dose-response relationship of the lethal and mutagenic effects of exposure of cells to radon and its decay products. Dose rate dependence and the nature of the DNA lesion will be studied, using the thymidine kinase and HPRT loci to measure mutation frequency. A deficiency in DNA repair is shown to lead to a greater proportion of mutants with intergenic lesions. The cytotoxic effects of radon and its daughters are similar in human TK6 lymphoblasts and mouse L5178Y lymphoblasts, the cell line used in previous experiments. The results of molecular analysis of four spontaneous and 25 X-radiation induced HPRT(-) mutants. Eleven radon-induced HPRT(-) mutants have been isolated, and will be analyzed in a similar fashion.

  2. Development and validation of reverberation-chamber type whole-body exposure system for mobile-phone frequency.

    PubMed

    Jung, K B; Kim, T H; Kim, J L; Doh, H J; Chung, Y C; Choi, J H; Pack, J K

    2008-01-01

    We developed whole-body exposure systems for in-vivo study at cellular (848.5 MHz) and Personal Communication System (PCS, 1,762.5 MHz) frequency, utilizing reverberation chamber. The field uniformities in the test area of the designed chambers were verified by simulation and measurement. In the whole-body exposure environment, Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) distributions inside of mice were calculated using Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) simulation. Key results are presented in this article.

  3. Association of School District Policies for Radon Testing and Radon-Resistant New Construction Practices with Indoor Radon Zones

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Stephanie; Everett Jones, Sherry

    2016-01-01

    Radon is a naturally occurring, colorless, odorless, and tasteless radioactive gas. Without testing, its presence is unknown. Using nationally representative data from the 2012 School Health Policies and Practices Study, we examined whether the prevalence of school district policies for radon testing and for radon-resistant new construction practices varied by district location in relation to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Map of Radon Zones. Among school districts located in counties with high predicted average indoor radon, 42.4% had policies for radon testing and 37.5% had policies for radon-resistant new construction practices. These findings suggest a critical need for improved awareness among policy makers regarding potential radon exposure for both students and school staff. PMID:27983613

  4. Soil radon measurements in the Canadian cities.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Moir, D; MacLellan, K; Leigh, E; Nunez, D; Murphy, S; Ford, K

    2012-08-01

    Radon has been identified as the second leading cause of lung cancer after tobacco smoking. Information on indoor radon concentrations is required to assess the lung cancer burden due to radon exposure. Since radon in soil is believed to be the main source of radon in homes, measurements of soil gas radon concentrations can be used to estimate variations in radon potential of indoor environments. This study reports surveys of natural background variation in soil radon levels in four cities, Montreal, Gatineau, Kingston and the largest Canadian city of Toronto. A total of 212 sites were surveyed. The average soil gas radon concentrations varied significantly from site to site, and ranged from below detection limit to 157 kBq m(-3). For each site, the soil radon potential (SRP) index was determined with the average soil radon concentration and average soil permeability measured. The average SRP indexes are 20±16, 12±11, 8±9 and 12±10 for Montreal, Gatineau, Kingston and Toronto, respectively. The results provide additional data for the validation of an association between indoor and soil radon potentials and for the development of radon potential map of Canada.

  5. γ-H2AX/53BP1/pKAP-1 foci and their linear tracks induced by in vitro exposure to radon and its progeny in human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Defang; Zhang, Yaping; Wang, Jing; Wang, Xufei; Fan, Dunhuang; He, Linfeng; Zhang, Xuxia; Gao, Yun; Li, Qiang; Chen, Honghong

    2016-01-01

    The biodosimetric information is critical for evaluating the human health hazards caused by radon and its progeny. Here, we demonstrated that the formation of phosphorylated histone variant H2AX (γ-H2AX), p53-binding protein 1 (53BP1) and phosphorylated KRAB-associated protein 1 (pKAP-1) foci and their linear tracks in human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HPBLs) in vitro exposed to radon and its progeny were dependent on the cumulative absorbed dose of radon exposure but was unrelated to the concentration of radon. Among them, γ-H2AX foci and its linear tracks were the most sensitive indicators with the lowest estimable cumulative absorbed dose of 1.74 mGy from their linear dose-response curves and sustained for 12 h after termination of radon exposure. In addition, three types of foci showed an overdispersed non-Poisson distribution in HPBLs. The ratios of pKAP-1/γ-H2AX foci co-localization, 53BP1/γ-H2AX foci co-localization and 53BP1/pKAP-1 foci co-localization were significantly increased in HPBLs exposed to radon while they were unrelated to the cumulative dose of radon exposure, suggesting that γ-H2AX, pKAP-1 and 53BP1 play an important role in the repair of heterochromatic double-strand breaks. Altogether, our findings provide an experimental basis for estimating the biological dose of internal α-particle irradiation from radon and its progeny exposure in humans. PMID:27922110

  6. Determination of radon and radium concentrations in drinking water samples around the city of Kutahya.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Latife; Cetinkaya, Hakan; Murat Saç, Müslim; Içhedef, Mutlu

    2013-08-01

    The concentration of radium and radon has been determined in drinking water samples collected from various locations of Kutahya city, Turkey. The water samples are taken from public water sources and tap water, with the collector chamber method used to measure the radon and radium concentration. The radon concentration ranges between 0.1 and 48.6±1.7 Bq l(-1), while the radium concentration varies from a minimum detectable activity of <0.02-0.7±0.2 Bq l(-1) in Kutahya city. In addition to the radon and radium levels, parameters such as pH, conductivity and temperature of the water, humidity, pressure, elevation and the coordinates of the sampling points have also been measured and recorded. The annual effective dose from radon and radium due to typical water usage has been calculated. The resulting contribution to the annual effective dose due to radon ingestion varies between 0.3 and 124.2 μSv y(-1); the contribution to the annual effective dose due to radium ingestion varies between 0 and 143.3 μSv y(-1); the dose contribution to the stomach due to radon ingestion varies between 0.03 and 14.9 μSv y(-1). The dose contribution due to radon inhalation ranges between 0.3 and 122.5 μSv y(-1), assuming a typical transfer of radon in water to the air. For the overwhelming majority of the Kutahya population, it is determined that the average radiation exposure from drinking water is less than 73.6 µSv y(-1).

  7. Radon-contaminated drinking water from private wells: an environmental health assessment examining a rural Colorado mountain community's exposure.

    PubMed

    Cappello, Michael Anthony; Ferraro, Aimee; Mendelsohn, Aaron B; Prehn, Angela Witt

    2013-11-01

    In the study discussed in this article, 27 private drinking water wells located in a rural Colorado mountain community were sampled for radon contamination and compared against (a) the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (U.S. EPA's) proposed maximum contaminant level (MCL), (b) the U.S. EPA proposed alternate maximum contaminate level (AMCL), and (c) the average radon level measured in the local municipal drinking water system. The data from the authors' study found that 100% of the wells within the study population had radon levels in excess of the U.S. EPA MCL, 37% were in excess of the U.S. EPA AMCL, and 100% of wells had radon levels greater than that found in the local municipal drinking water system. Radon contamination in one well was found to be 715 times greater than the U.S. EPA MCL, 54 times greater than the U.S. EPA AMLC, and 36,983 times greater than that found in the local municipal drinking water system. According to the research data and the reviewed literature, the results indicate that this population has a unique and elevated contamination profile and suggest that radon-contaminated drinking water from private wells can present a significant public health concern.

  8. Radon and radon daughter measurements in solar buildings.

    PubMed

    George, A C; Knutson, E O; Franklin, H

    1983-08-01

    Measurements of radon and radon daughters in 11 buildings in five states, using active or passive solar heating, showed no significant excess in concentrations over the levels measured in buildings with conventional heating systems. Radon levels in two buildings using rock storage in their active solar systems exceeded the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's limit of 3 pCi/l. for continuous exposure in uncontrolled areas. In the remainder of the buildings, radon concentrations were found to be at levels considered to be normal. It appears that the slightly elevated indoor radon concentrations result from the local geological formations and from the tightening of the buildings rather than as a result of the solar heating technology.

  9. A study on the correlation between soil radon potential and average indoor radon potential in Canadian cities.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Ford, Ken L

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to indoor radon is identified as the main source of natural radiation exposure to the population. Since radon in homes originates mainly from soil gas radon, it is of public interest to study the correlation between radon in soil and radon indoors in different geographic locations. From 2007 to 2010, a total of 1070 sites were surveyed for soil gas radon and soil permeability. Among the sites surveyed, 430 sites were in 14 cities where indoor radon information is available from residential radon and thoron surveys conducted in recent years. It is observed that indoor radon potential (percentage of homes above 200 Bq m(-3); range from 1.5% to 42%) correlates reasonably well with soil radon potential (SRP: an index proportional to soil gas radon concentration and soil permeability; average SRP ranged from 8 to 26). In five cities where in-situ soil permeability was measured at more than 20 sites, a strong correlation (R(2) = 0.68 for linear regression and R(2) = 0.81 for non-linear regression) was observed between indoor radon potential and soil radon potential. This summary report shows that soil gas radon measurement is a practical and useful predictor of indoor radon potential in a geographic area, and may be useful for making decisions around prioritizing activities to manage population exposure and future land-use planning.

  10. Radon exposure, cigarette smoking, and other mining experience in the beaverlodge uranium miners cohort

    SciTech Connect

    L'Abbe, K.A.; Howe, G.R.; Burch, J.D.; Miller, A.B.; Abbatt, J.; Band, P.; Choi, W.; Du, J.; Feather, J.; Gallagher, R. )

    1991-04-01

    A nested case-control study within the Beaverlodge Uranium Miners Cohort was undertaken to assess any possible contribution of confounding by smoking and other mining experience to the risk estimate derived from the original cohort study. Next of kin have been interviewed for 46 lung cancer cases and 95 controls enrolled in the Beaverlodge Uranium Miners Cohort Study who died between 1950 and 1980. Confounding by cigarette smoking and other mining experience appears unlikely to have contributed to the relative risk coefficient for exposure to Rn decay products derived in the parent study. Data for smoking and exposure to Rn decay products are consistent with a multiplicative model, although considerable caution must be applied to this interpretation.

  11. Researching Radon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucidi, Louis; Mecca, Peter M.

    2001-01-01

    Introduces a project in which students examined the physics, chemistry, and geology of radon and used available technology to measure radon concentrations in their homes. Uses the inquiry process, analytical skills, communication skills, content knowledge, and production of authentic products for student assessment. (YDS)

  12. Assessment of inhalation and ingestion doses from exposure to radon gas using passive and active detecting techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail, A. H.; Jafaar, M. S.

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess an environmental hazard of radon exhalation rate from the samples of soil and drinking water in selected locations in Iraqi Kurdistan, passive (CR-39NTDs) and active (RAD7) detecting techniques has been employed. Long and short term measurements of emitted radon concentrations were estimated for 124 houses. High and lower radon concentration in soil samples was in the cities of Hajyawa and Er. Tyrawa, respectively. Moreover, for drinking water, high and low radon concentration was in the cities of Similan and Kelak, respectively. A comparison between our results with that mentioned in international reports had been done. Average annual dose equivalent to the bronchial epithelium, stomach and whole body in the cities of Kelak and Similan are estimated, and it was varied from 0.04{+-}0.01 mSv to 0.547{+-}0.018 mSv, (2.832{+-}0.22)x10{sup -5} to (11.972{+-}2.09)x10{sup -5} mSv, and (0.056 {+-}0.01) x10{sup -5} to (0.239{+-}0.01)x10{sup -5} mSv, respectively. This indicated that the effects of dissolved radon on the bronchial epithelium are much than on the stomach and whole body. (authors)

  13. Combination of geological data and radon survey results for radon mapping.

    PubMed

    Zhukovsky, Michael; Yarmoshenko, Ilia; Kiselev, Sergey

    2012-10-01

    The typical method of radon mapping usually used in most countries is the presenting of average radon concentrations in dwellings for districts or regions. Sometimes the maps of radon concentrations in the soil or maps of percentage above the reference level also demonstrated. Such approach not always can be used for identification of the regions with high probability of radon exposure above the reference levels where the population density is low. The combination of archive geological data and the results of representative radon survey allow estimating the typical parameters of radon concentration distribution for selected categories of buildings (multi-storey or rural type houses) situated in geological zones with the different radon potential. In this case it is possible to give grounds for the necessary level of radon protection measures in the new buildings constructed in this region. The use of such approach in Ural region of Russia is demonstrated.

  14. An exposure chamber for studies on human perception of DC electric fields and ions

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.H.; Maruvada, P.S. )

    1994-10-01

    Direct current (DC) transmission lines are often used, for technical and economic reasons, as interconnections in modern high voltage power systems, which are essentially of the alternating current (AC) type. Significant differences exist, however, between the field effects produced in the vicinity of AC and DC transmission lines. DC electric fields induce charges, on the surface of a conducting body such as a human being and may therefore be ''perceived'' by humans due to hair stimulation and other sensations experienced by the skin. A human being exposed to the ionized field of a DC transmission line experiences not only surface charges but also the conducted ion currents. A systematic laboratory study has been undertaken by Hydro Quebec to investigate human perception, using well established psycho physical techniques, of DC electric fields and ions. The design, construction and operation of an exposure chamber for this purpose, in the high voltage laboratory of IREQ, are described in this paper.

  15. Accounting for Berkson and Classical Measurement Error in Radon Exposure Using a Bayesian Structural Approach in the Analysis of Lung Cancer Mortality in the French Cohort of Uranium Miners.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Sabine; Rage, Estelle; Laurier, Dominique; Laroche, Pierre; Guihenneuc, Chantal; Ancelet, Sophie

    2017-02-01

    Many occupational cohort studies on underground miners have demonstrated that radon exposure is associated with an increased risk of lung cancer mortality. However, despite the deleterious consequences of exposure measurement error on statistical inference, these analyses traditionally do not account for exposure uncertainty. This might be due to the challenging nature of measurement error resulting from imperfect surrogate measures of radon exposure. Indeed, we are typically faced with exposure uncertainty in a time-varying exposure variable where both the type and the magnitude of error may depend on period of exposure. To address the challenge of accounting for multiplicative and heteroscedastic measurement error that may be of Berkson or classical nature, depending on the year of exposure, we opted for a Bayesian structural approach, which is arguably the most flexible method to account for uncertainty in exposure assessment. We assessed the association between occupational radon exposure and lung cancer mortality in the French cohort of uranium miners and found the impact of uncorrelated multiplicative measurement error to be of marginal importance. However, our findings indicate that the retrospective nature of exposure assessment that occurred in the earliest years of mining of this cohort as well as many other cohorts of underground miners might lead to an attenuation of the exposure-risk relationship. More research is needed to address further uncertainties in the calculation of lung dose, since this step will likely introduce important sources of shared uncertainty.

  16. Methodology issues in risk assessment for radon.

    PubMed Central

    Harley, N H

    1991-01-01

    The alpha dose per unit radon daughter exposure in mines and homes is comparable at about 5 mGy/WLM. This means that excess lung cancer risk determined in follow-up studies of miners should be valid to extrapolating to environmental populations. There are several models currently used for risk projection to estimate lung cancer in the U.S. from indoor radon exposure. The accuracy of the estimates depends upon the quality of the exposure data and the models. Recent miner epidemiology confirms that excess lung cancer risk decreases with time subsequent to cessation of exposure. The most rigorous ecological study, to date, shows a persistent negative relationship between average measured indoor radon in U.S. counties and lung cancer mortality. A model for lung cancer risk is proposed that includes smoking, urbanization, and radon exposure. The model helps to explain the difficulties in observing the direct effects of indoor radon in the environment. PMID:2050058

  17. Nonlinear dose-response relationship between radon exposure and the risk of lung cancer: evidence from a meta-analysis of published observational studies.

    PubMed

    Duan, Peng; Quan, Chao; Hu, Chunhui; Zhang, Jicai; Xie, Fei; Hu, Xiuxue; Yu, Zongtao; Gao, Bo; Liu, Zhixiang; Zheng, Hong; Liu, Changjiang; Wang, Chengmin; Yu, Tingting; Qi, Suqin; Fu, Wenjuan; Kourouma, Ansoumane; Yang, Kedi

    2015-07-01

    Although radon exposure (RE) has been confirmed to increase the risk of lung cancer (LC), questions remain about the shape of the dose-response relationship between RE and the risk of LC. We carried out a dose-response meta-analysis to investigate and quantify the potential dose-response association between residential and occupational exposure to radon and the risk of LC. All cohort and case-control studies published in English and Chinese on Embase, PubMed, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) digital databases through November 2013 were identified systematically. We extracted effect measures (relative risk, odds ratio, standardized mortality ratio, standardized incidence ratio, or standardized rate ratio) from individual studies to generate pooled results using meta-analysis approaches. We derived meta-analytic estimates using random-effects models taking into account the correlation between estimates. Restricted cubic splines and generalized least-squares regression methods were used to model a potential curvilinear relationship and to carry out a dose-response meta-analysis. Stratified analysis, sensitivity analysis, and assessment of bias were performed in our meta-analysis. Sixty publications fulfilling the inclusion criteria for this meta-analysis were finally included. Occupational RE was associated with LC [risk ratio 1.86, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.67-2.09; I²=92.2%; 27 prospective studies], for pooled risk estimate of the: standardized mortality ratio [2.00 (95% CI=1.82-2.32)]; standardized incidence ratio [1.45 (95% CI=1.20-1.74)]; relative risk [2.10 (95% CI=1.64-2.69)]. In a subgroup analysis of uranium miners and residents exposed to occupational uranium, the summary risk was 2.23 (95% CI=1.86-2.68) and 1.23 (95% CI=1.05-1.44). The overall meta-analysis showed evidence of a nonlinear association between RE and the risk of LC (P(nonlinearity)<0.014); in addition, the point value of residential radon also improved the results

  18. Long-term ozone exposure and ozone uptake of grapevines in open-top chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soja, G.; Reichenauer, T. G.; Eid, M.; Soja, A.-M.; Schaber, R.; Gangl, H.

    Ozone uptake of pot-grown grapevines, fruit yield and sugar concentrations in juice were studied over the course of 4 years. In three of the study years, plants were exposed to contrasting ozone levels in open-top chambers. Results showed that juice quality was more sensitive to ozone exposure than grape yield. Ozone-induced reductions in grape yield were best described by the level of ozone exposure in the 2 years prior to harvest, whereas sugar content of juice was mainly affected by current and previous year ozone exposure. Regression models were developed to facilitate quantitative assessments of the effects of ozone on yield and quality. The observed effects on grape yield and on carbohydrate accumulation in fruit were slightly better explained when a threshold of 6 nmol m -2 s -1 was applied to cumulative uptake of ozone (CUO6) compared with AOT40 exposure or other CUO thresholds. Curvilinear regression models were developed which explained up to 75% of variance of the datasets. These models indicate a critical level of 1.1 mmol m -2 ozone (CUO6 from June to September) to protect carbohydrate accumulation in fruit with ozone taken up by the plants over consecutive years. For grape yield the CUO6 threshold was 2.2 mmol m -2 ozone. Exceedance of this threshold would be expected to reduce grape yield and sugar translocation to fruit by 10% with substantial degree of uncertainty (95% confidence interval 1-19%). For individual years, the critical level could be increased to 2.3 mmol m -2 for carbohydrate accumulation and 3.5 mmol m -2 CUO6 for grape yield if the CUO6 of 0 in the subsequent year was not exceeded.

  19. Radon concentration in drinking water and supplementary exposure in Baita-Stei mining area, Bihor county (Romania).

    PubMed

    Moldovan, Mircea; Nita, Dan Constantin; Cucos-Dinu, Alexandra; Dicu, Tiberius; Bican-Brisan, Nicoleta; Cosma, Constantin

    2014-03-01

    The radon concentration was measured in the drinking water of public water supply and private wells located in the mining area of BăiŢa-Ştei, Bihor County, Romania. The measurements were performed using the LUK-VR system based on radon gas measurement with Lucas cell. The results show that the radon concentrations are within the range of 1.9-134.3 kBq m(-3) with an average value of 35.5 kBq m(-3) for well water, 18.5 kBq m(-3) for spring water and 6.9 kBq m(-3) for tap water. Comparing with previous data from the whole of Transylvania, the average value is two times higher, proving this zone to be a radon-prone area. From the results of this study the effective dose to the population is between 4.78 and 338.43 µSv y(-1). These doses are within the recommended limits of the world organisations.

  20. Radon monitoring and hazard prediction in Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elio, Javier; Crowley, Quentin; Scanlon, Ray; Hodgson, Jim; Cooper, Mark; Long, Stephanie

    2016-04-01

    Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas which forms as a decay product from uranium. It is the largest source of natural ionizing radiation affecting the global population. When radon is inhaled, its short-lived decay products can interact with lung tissue leading to DNA damage and development of lung cancer. Ireland has among the highest levels of radon in Europe and eighth highest of an OECD survey of 29 countries. Every year some two hundred and fifty cases of lung cancer in Ireland are linked to radon exposure. This new research project will build upon previous efforts of radon monitoring in Ireland to construct a high-resolution radon hazard map. This will be achieved using recently available high-resolution airborne gamma-ray spectrometry (radiometric) and soil geochemistry data (http://www.tellus.ie/), indoor radon concentrations (http://www.epa.ie/radiation), and new direct measurement of soil radon. In this regard, legacy indoor radon concentrations will be correlated with soil U and Th concentrations and other geogenic data. This is a new approach since the vast majority of countries with a national radon monitoring programme rely on indoor radon measurements, or have a spatially limited dataset of soil radon measurements. Careful attention will be given to areas where an indicative high radon hazard based on geogenic factors does not match high indoor radon concentrations. Where such areas exist, it may imply that some parameter(s) in the predictive model does not match that of the environment. These areas will be subjected to measurement of radon soil gas using a combination of time averaged (passive) and time dependant (active) measurements in order to better understand factors affecting production, transport and accumulation of radon in the natural environment. Such mapping of radon-prone areas will ultimately help to inform when prevention and remediation measures are necessary, reducing the radon exposure of the population. Therefore, given

  1. On the interaction between radon progeny and particles generated by electronic and traditional cigarettes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas Trassierra, C.; Cardellini, F.; Buonanno, G.; De Felice, P.

    2015-04-01

    During their entire lives, people are exposed to the pollutants present in indoor air. Recently, Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems, mainly known as electronic cigarettes, have been widely commercialized: they deliver particles into the lungs of the users but a "second-hand smoke" has yet to be associated to this indoor source. On the other hand, the naturally-occurring radioactive gas, i.e. radon, represents a significant risk for lung cancer, and the cumulative action of these two agents could be worse than the agents separately would. In order to deepen the interaction between radon progeny and second-hand aerosol from different types of cigarettes, a designed experimental study was carried out by generating aerosol from e-cigarette vaping as well as from second-hand traditional smoke inside a walk-in radon chamber at the National Institute of Ionizing Radiation Metrology (INMRI) of Italy. In this chamber, the radon present in air comes naturally from the floor and ambient conditions are controlled. To characterize the sidestream smoke emitted by cigarettes, condensation particle counters and scanning mobility particle sizer were used. Radon concentration in the air was measured through an Alphaguard ionization chamber, whereas the measurement of radon decay product in the air was performed with the Tracelab BWLM Plus-2S Radon daughter Monitor. It was found an increase of the Potential Alpha-Energy Concentration (PAEC) due to the radon decay products attached to aerosol for higher particle number concentrations. This varied from 7.47 ± 0.34 MeV L-1 to 12.6 ± 0.26 MeV L-1 (69%) for the e-cigarette. In the case of traditional cigarette and at the same radon concentration, the increase was from 14.1 ± 0.43 MeV L-1 to 18.6 ± 0.19 MeV L-1 (31%). The equilibrium factor increases, varying from 23.4% ± 1.11% to 29.5% ± 0.26% and from 30.9% ± 1.0% to 38.1 ± 0.88 for the e-cigarette and traditional cigarette, respectively. These growths still continue for long

  2. Comparative survey of outdoor, residential and workplace radon concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Nirmalla; Field, Dan W.; Steck, Daniel J.; Field, R. William

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated radon concentrations in above-ground (i.e. first floor) workplace in Missouri and compared them with above-ground radon concentrations in nearby homes and outdoor locations. This study also examined the potential utility of using home and outdoor radon concentrations to predict the radon concentration at a nearby workplace (e.g. county agencies and schools). Even though workplace radon concentrations were not statistically different from home radon concentrations, the radon concentration at a particular home, or outdoor location, was a poor predictor of the radon concentration at a nearby workplace. Overall, 9.6 and 9.9 % of homes and workplace, respectively, exhibited radon concentrations of ≥148 Bq m−3. Because of the percentage of workplace with elevated radon concentrations, the results suggest that additional surveys of workplace radon concentrations are needed, especially in areas of high radon potential, to assess the contribution of workplace radon exposure to an individual's overall radon exposure. PMID:24936021

  3. Radon potential, geologic formations, and lung cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Ellen J.; Gokun, Yevgeniya; Andrews, William M.; Overfield, Bethany L.; Robertson, Heather; Wiggins, Amanda; Rayens, Mary Kay

    2015-01-01

    Objective Exposure to radon is associated with approximately 10% of U.S. lung cancer cases. Geologic rock units have varying concentrations of uranium, producing fluctuating amounts of radon. This exploratory study examined the spatial and statistical associations between radon values and geological formations to illustrate potential population-level lung cancer risk from radon exposure. Method This was a secondary data analysis of observed radon values collected in 1987 from homes (N = 309) in Kentucky and geologic rock formation data from the Kentucky Geological Survey. Radon value locations were plotted on digital geologic maps using ArcGIS and linked to specific geologic map units. Each map unit represented a package of different types of rock (e.g., limestone and/or shale). Log-transformed radon values and geologic formation categories were compared using one-way analysis of variance. Results Observed radon levels varied significantly by geologic formation category. Of the 14 geologic formation categories in north central Kentucky, four were associated with median radon levels, ranging from 8.10 to 2.75 pCi/L. Conclusion Radon potential maps that account for geologic factors and observed radon values may be superior to using observed radon values only. Knowing radon-prone areas could help target population-based lung cancer prevention interventions given the inequities that exist related to radon. PMID:26844090

  4. A review on mathematical models for estimating indoor radon concentrations.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji Hyun; Kang, Dae Ryong; Kim, Jinheum

    2016-01-01

    Radiation from natural sources is one of causes of the environmental diseases. Radon is the leading environmental cause of lung cancer next to smoking. To investigate the relationship between indoor radon concentrations and lung cancer, researchers must be able to estimate an individual's cumulative level of indoor radon exposure and to do so, one must first be able to assess indoor radon concentrations. In this article, we outline factors affecting indoor radon concentrations and review related mathematical models based on the mass balance equation and the differential equations. Furthermore, we suggest the necessities of applying time-dependent functions for indoor radon concentrations and developing stochastic models.

  5. Assessment and management of residential radon health risks: a report from the health Canada radon workshop.

    PubMed

    Tracy, Bliss L; Krewski, Daniel; Chen, Jing; Zielinski, Jan M; Brand, Kevin P; Meyerhof, Dorothy

    2006-04-01

    Epidemiologic studies of uranium miners and other underground miners have consistently shown miners exposed to high levels of radon to be at increased risk of lung cancer. More recently, concern has arisen about lung cancer risks among people exposed to lower levels of radon in homes. The current Canadian guideline for residential radon exposure was set in 1988 at 800 Bq/m(3). Because of the accumulation of a considerable body of new scientific evidence on radon lung cancer risks since that time, Health Canada sponsored a workshop to review the current state-of-the-science on radon health risks. The specific objectives of the workshop were (1) to collect and assess scientific information relevant to setting national radon policy in Canada, and (2) to gather information on social, political, and operational considerations in setting national policy. The workshop, held on 3-4 March 2004, was attended by 38 invited scientists, regulators, and other stakeholders from Canada and the United States. The presentations on the first day dealt primarily with scientific issues. The combined analysis of North American residential radon and lung cancer studies was reviewed. The analysis confirmed a small but detectable increase in lung cancer risk at residential exposure levels. Current estimates suggest that radon in homes is responsible for approximately 10% of all lung cancer deaths in Canada, making radon the second leading cause of lung cancer after tobacco smoking. This was followed by a perspective from an UNSCEAR (United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation) working group on radon. There were two presentations on occupational exposures to radon and two presentations considered the possibility of radon as a causative factor for cardiovascular disease and for cancer in other organs besides the lung. The possible contribution of environmental tobacco smoke to lung cancers in nonsmokers was also considered. Areas for future research were identified

  6. Geogenic and anthropogenic impacts on indoor radon in the Techa River region.

    PubMed

    Yarmoshenko, I; Malinovsky, G; Vasilyev, A; Onischenko, A; Seleznev, A

    2016-11-15

    Indoor radon concentration was studied in the 14 settlements located near the Techa River, which was contaminated by radioactive wastes in 1950-s. Results of the radon survey were used for analysis of the relationship between the indoor radon and main geologic factors (Pre-Jurassic formations, Quaternary sediments and faults), local geogenic radon potential and anthropogenic factors. Main influencing factors explain 58% of the standard deviation of indoor radon concentration. Association of the air exchange influence over radon concentration with underlying geological media was related to different contributions of geogenic advective and diffusive radon entries. The properties of geological formation to transfer radon gas in interaction with the house can be considered within the radon geogenic potential concept. The study of the radon exposure of the Techa River population can be used to estimate the contribution of natural radon to the overall radiation exposure of the local population during the period of radioactive waste discharges.

  7. Methodology developed to make the Quebec indoor radon potential map.

    PubMed

    Drolet, Jean-Philippe; Martel, Richard; Poulin, Patrick; Dessau, Jean-Claude

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a relevant approach to predict the indoor radon potential based on the combination of the radiogeochemical data and the indoor radon measurements in the Quebec province territory (Canada). The Quebec ministry of health asked for such a map to identify the radon-prone areas to manage the risk for the population related to indoor radon exposure. Three radiogeochemical criteria including (1) equivalent uranium (eU) concentration from airborne surface gamma-ray surveys, (2) uranium concentration measurements in sediments, (3) bedrock and surficial geology were combined with 3082 basement radon concentration measurements to identify the radon-prone areas. It was shown that it is possible to determine thresholds for the three criteria that implied statistically significant different levels of radon potential using Kruskal-Wallis one way analyses of variance by ranks. The three discretized radiogeochemical datasets were combined into a total predicted radon potential that sampled 98% of the studied area. The combination process was also based on Kruskal-Wallis one way ANOVA. Four statistically significant different predicted radon potential levels were created: low, medium, high and very high. Respectively 10 and 13% of the dwellings exceed the Canadian radon guideline of 200 Bq/m(3) in low and medium predicted radon potentials. These proportions rise up to 22 and 45% respectively for high and very high predicted radon potentials. This predictive map of indoor radon potential based on the radiogeochemical data was validated using a map of confirmed radon exposure in homes based on the basement radon measurements. It was shown that the map of predicted radon potential based on the radiogeochemical data was reliable to identify radon-prone areas even in zones where no indoor radon measurement exists.

  8. Test chamber exposure of humans to 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate and isophorone diisocyanate.

    PubMed

    Tinnerberg, H; Skarping, G; Dalene, M; Hagmar, L

    1995-01-01

    An isocyanate generation apparatus was developed and stable isocyanate atmospheres were obtained. At a concentration of 5 micrograms 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) per m3 the precision was found to be 7% (n = 5). Three volunteers were each exposed to three different concentrations of HDI (11.9, 20.5, and 22.1 micrograms/m3) and three concentrations of isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI) (12.1, 17.7, and 50.7 micrograms/m3), in an exposure chamber. The duration of the exposure was 2 h. Urine and blood samples were collected, and hydrolysed under alkaline conditions to the HDI and IPDI corresponding amines, 1,6-hexamethylene diamine (HDA) and isophorone diamine (IPDA), determined as their pentafluoropropionic anhydride amides (HDA-PFPA and IPDA-PFPA). The HDA- and IPDA-PFPA derivatives were analysed using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry with thermospray monitoring negative ions. When working up samples from the exposed persons without hydrolysis, no HDA or IPDA was seen. The average urinary excretion of the corresponding amine was 39% for HDI and 27% for IPDI. An association between the estimated inhaled dose and the total excreted amount was seen. The average urinary elimination half-time for HDA was 2.5 h and for IPDA, 2.8 h. The hydrolysis condition giving the highest yield of HDA and IPDA in urine was found to be hydrolysis with 3 M sodium hydroxide during 4 h. No HDA or IPDA could be found in hydrolysed plasma (< ca 0.1 micrograms/l).

  9. The influence of multiple types of occupational exposure to radon, gamma rays and long-lived radionuclides on mortality risk in the French "post-55" sub-cohort of uranium miners: 1956-1999.

    PubMed

    Vacquier, Blandine; Rage, Estelle; Leuraud, Klervi; Caër-Lorho, Sylvaine; Houot, Jennifer; Acker, Alain; Laurier, Dominique

    2011-12-01

    The adverse health effects of radon on uranium miners, especially on their lungs, are well documented, but few studies have considered the effects of other radiation exposures. This study examined the mortality risks associated with exposure to radon, external γ rays and long-lived radionuclides (LLR) in the French "post-55" sub-cohort, which includes uranium miners first employed between 1956 and 1990 for whom all three types of exposure were assessed individually. Exposure-risk relationships were estimated with linear excess relative risk models and a 5-year lag time. The post-55 sub-cohort includes 3377 miners, contributing 89,405 person-years, followed up through the end of 1999 with a mean follow-up of 26.5 years. Mean cumulative exposure was 17.8 WLM for radon, 54.7 mSv for γ rays, and 1,632 Bq.m(-3).h for LLR. Among the 611 deaths observed, 66 were due to lung cancer. Annual individual exposures were significantly correlated. Increased mortality was observed for lung cancer (SMR = 1.30; 95% CI: 1.01, 1.65) and for brain and central nervous system (CNS) cancer (SMR = 2.00; 95% CI: 1.09, 3.35). Cumulative exposure to radon, γ rays and LLR was associated only with a significant risk of lung cancer. These new results could suggest an association between lung cancer and exposure to γ rays and LLR. They must nonetheless be interpreted with caution because of the correlation between the types of exposure. The calculation of organ doses received by each of these exposures would reduce the collinearity.

  10. Probing the application of Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy for assessment of deposited flux of Radon and Thoron progeny in high exposure conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, R.; Sapra, B. K.; Rout, R. P.; Prajith, R.

    2016-12-01

    Direct measurement of Radon and Thoron progeny in the atmosphere and occupational environments such as Uranium mines, Uranium and Thorium handling facilities has gained importance because of its radiological significance in inhalation dose assessment. In this regard, Radon and Thoron Progeny sensors (DTPS and DRPS) are the only passive solid state nuclear track detector (SSNTD, LR115) based devices which are being extensively used for time integrated direct progeny measurements. An essential component of the analysis is the chemical etching of the detectors, followed by spark counting of tracks and then estimation of the inhalation dose using appropriate calibration factors. Alternatively, the tracks may be counted using image analysis techniques. However, under high exposure conditions, both these methods have inherent limitations and errors arising due to increased frequency of tracks. In the present work, we probe the use of Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) spectroscopy to analyse the deposited fluence of the progeny particulates based on change in transmittance of the nitric group vibrational bands of the LR115. A linear relationship between the transmittance and the deposited fluence was observed, which can be used to estimate the deposited fluence rate and the inhalation dose. This alternative method of analysis will provide a faster and non-destructive technique for inhalation dose assessment, specially for routine large scale measurements.

  11. Radon Measurements in Schools: An Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Radiation Programs.

    Radon-222 is a colorless, odorless, tasteless, radioactive gas that occurs naturally in soil, rocks, underground water, and air. The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and other scientific organizations have identified an increased risk of lung cancer associated with exposure to elevated levels of radon in homes. Schools in many…

  12. Radon detection

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, D.W.; Allander, K.S.; Bounds, J.A.

    1994-01-25

    A detector for atmospheric radon using a long range alpha detector as its sensing element is described. An electrostatic filter removes ions from ambient air, while allowing radon atoms to pass into a decay cavity. Here, radon atoms are allowed to decay, creating air ions. These air ions are drawn by a fan through a second electrostatic filter which can be activated or deactivated, and into the long range alpha detector. With the second electrostatic filter activated, no air ions are allowed to pass, and the signal output from the long range alpha detector consists of only the electronic background. With the second electrostatic filter deactivated, air ions and cosmic rays will be detected. The cosmic ray contribution can be minimized by shielding. 3 figures.

  13. Radon detection

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, Duncan W.; Allander, Krag S.; Bounds, John A.

    1994-01-01

    A detector for atmospheric radon using a long range alpha detector as its sensing element. An electrostatic filter removes ions from ambient air, while allowing radon atoms to pass into a decay cavity. Here, radon atoms are allowed to decay, creating air ions. These air ions are drawn by a fan through a second electrostatic filter which can be activated or deactivated, and into the long range alpha detector. With the second electrostatic filter activated, no air ions are allowed to pass, and the signal output from the long range alpha detector consists of only the electronic background. With the second electrostatic filter deactivated, air ions and cosmic rays will be detected. The cosmic ray contribution can be minimized by shielding.

  14. A reverberation chamber for rodents' exposure to wideband radiofrequency electromagnetic fields with different small-scale fading distributions.

    PubMed

    Li, Congsheng; Yang, Lei; Lu, Bingsong; Xie, Yi; Wu, Tongning

    2016-01-01

    A reverberation chamber (RC) is realized for the rodents' in vivo exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMFs) with various small-scale fading characteristics. Its performance is evaluated to ensure the exposure experiments from 0.85 to 2.60 GHz. By different configurations, line-of-sight and non-line-of-sight exposures can be established. The measured electric field in the RC is analyzed to determine its statistical distribution. We accordingly reconstruct the EMF environment by numerical methods. Simulations are carried to compare the dosimetric variability due to different small-scale fading characteristics. It demonstrates that the surveyed fading distribution will not change the specific absorption rate in the rats. The possibility to reproduce the realistic multi-reflective EMF environment by adjusting the structures of the RC is discussed. It is the first reported in vivo exposure system aiming to provide the EMF exposure with different small-scale fading distributions.

  15. Comparison study and thoron interference test of different radon monitors.

    PubMed

    Sumesh, C G; Kumar, A Vinod; Tripathi, R M; Puranik, V D

    2013-03-01

    A comparison study and thoron interference test for different continuous radon monitors were carried out. The comparison study includes three passive diffusion monitors [one pulse ionisation chamber based-Alpha Guard and two silicon semi-conductor based-Radon Scout Plus (RSP)] and one silicon semi-conductor-based active radon thoron discriminating monitor--RAD 7. Radon emanation standard, supplied by National Institute of Science and Technology, has been utilised for the comparison study to qualify the calibration of the continuous radon monitors. All the instruments showed good agreement with the estimated radon concentration using (226)Ra/(222)Rn emanation standard. It was found that the active radon monitoring system is having a higher initial response towards the transient radon concentration than the passive radon monitors studied. The instruments measuring radon concentration without energy discrimination are likely to have some sensitivity towards the thoron concentration. Thus, thoron interference study was carried out in the above monitors. Nine percent interference in measured radon concentration in the Alpha Guard monitor and 4 % interference in the semi-conductor-based RSP monitors was observed. Study indicates that the interference of thoron in radon monitors depends on the area of diffusion of gas, volume of detection and sensitivity factor.

  16. Computer controlled chamber measurements for clay adherence relevant for potential dioxin exposure through skin.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Alesia; Bursac, Zoran; Johnson, Wayne; Davis, Jasmine

    2012-01-01

    A computer-controlled mechanical chamber was used to control the contact between aluminum sheet samples laden with clay, and cotton sheet samples for the measurement of mass transfer. The contact parameters of pressure (20 to 60 kPa) and time (10 to 70 sec) were varied for 160 multiple experiments of mass soil transfer. Before log transformation the average transfer for 'First Transfer' of clay particles was 34.4 ± 6.3 mg/8.97 cm(2) while that for 'Total Transfer' was 36.1 ± 6.8 mg/8.97 cm(2). Second contact, therefore, resulted in an average transfer of 1.70 ± 0.76 mg/8.97 cm(2). These values are well above adherence values measured for potting soil and sand as reported for previous experiments using the same methodologies. Based on the univariate analysis and the multiple regression analysis we were able to see some effect of parameters on the clay adherence values. The effect of pressure increases was significant for the higher levels of 50 and 60 kPa. In addition, we observed that increases in temperature were significant for 'First Transfer,' and less so for 'Total Transfer'. Past experiments using potting soil and play sand show high adherence values to human cadaver skin over cotton sample; the same scenario would be expected for clay. This data set can be used to improve estimates of dermal exposure to dioxins found in ball clays often used by artisans in the making of pottery.

  17. Radon 222

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Radon 222 ; CASRN 14859 - 67 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effec

  18. On the exhalation rate of radon by man

    SciTech Connect

    Rundo, J.; Markun, F.; Plondke, N.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes some aspects of the exhalation rate of radon by man which may be relevant to its internal dosimetry and, therefore, to possible radiobiological consequences. Prolonged exposure of a person to radon results in a reservoir or radon dissolved in body fat and fluids. If the person then moves to an environment with a lower radon concentration, there is a net exhalation of radon and the initial exhalation rate depends on the radon concentration in the first environment. This is demonstrated for seven persons whose houses contained radon at concentrations varying from 10 Bq m{sup {minus}3} to almost 1000 Bq m{sup {minus}3}. About one hour after leaving the house, the subjects' average exhalation rate of radon, expressed as the equivalent volume of house air per unit time, was 236 mL min{sup {minus}1}. 4 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Radon in Schools

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a critical component of any comprehensive indoor air quality (IAQ) management program, l earn how to manage ... provide feedback, or report a problem. Radon Indoor Air Quality Home Page Radon Home Local Radon Zones and ...

  20. Managing Radon in Schools

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA recommends testing all schools for radon. As part of an effective IAQ management program, schools can take simple steps to test for radon and reduce risks to occupants if high radon levels are found.

  1. AN ALTERNATIVE CALIBRATION OF CR-39 DETECTORS FOR RADON DETECTION BEYOND THE SATURATION LIMIT.

    PubMed

    Franci, Daniele; Aureli, Tommaso; Cardellini, Francesco

    2016-12-01

    Time-integrated measurements of indoor radon levels are commonly carried out using solid-state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs), due to the numerous advantages offered by this radiation detection technique. However, the use of SSNTD also presents some problems that may affect the accuracy of the results. The effect of overlapping tracks often results in the underestimation of the detected track density, which leads to the reduction of the counting efficiency for increasing radon exposure. This article aims to address the effect of overlapping tracks by proposing an alternative calibration technique based on the measurement of the fraction of the detector surface covered by alpha tracks. The method has been tested against a set of Monte Carlo data and then applied to a set of experimental data collected at the radon chamber of the Istituto Nazionale di Metrologia delle Radiazioni Ionizzanti, at the ENEA centre in Casaccia, using CR-39 detectors. It has been proved that the method allows to extend the detectable range of radon exposure far beyond the intrinsic limit imposed by the standard calibration based on the track density.

  2. Study of the atmospheric chemistry of radon progeny in laboratory and real indoor atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Hopke, P.K.

    1992-07-01

    This report describes studies on the chemical and physical behavior of the [sup 218]Po atom immediately following its formation by the alpha decay of radon. Because small changes in size for activity in the sub-10 nm size range result in large changes in the delivered dose per unit exposure, this behavior must be understood if the exposure to radon progeny and its dose to the cells in the respiratory tract are to be fully assessed. The specific tasks of the controlled laboratory studies are to determine the formation rates of [center dot]OH radicals formed by the radiolysis of air following radon decay, to examine the formation of particles by the radiolytic oxidation of substances like SO[sub 2] ethylene, and H[sub 2]S to lower vapor pressure compounds and determine the role of gas phase additives such as H[sub 2]O and NH[sub 3] in determining the particle size, to measure the rate of ion-induced nucleation using a thermal diffusion cloud chamber, and to measure the neutralization rate of [sup 218]Po[sub x][sup +] in O[sub 2] at low radon concentrations. Tasks of the exposure studies in occupied indoor spaces are to initiate measurements of the activity size distributions in actual homes with occupants present so that the variability of the indoor activity size distributions can be assessed with respect to indoor aerosol sources and general lifestyle variations of the occupants, to initiate a prospective study of the utility of measurement of deposited [sup 210]Pb embedded in glass surfaces as a measure of the long-term, integrated exposure of the population to radon, and to develop the methodology to determine the hygroscopicity of the indoor aerosol so that the changes in deposition efficiency of the radioactive indoor aerosol with hygroscopic growth in the respiratory tract can be assessed.

  3. Variation in residential radon levels in new Danish homes.

    PubMed

    Bräuner, E V; Rasmussen, T V; Gunnarsen, L

    2013-08-01

    Radon-222 gas arises from the radioactive decay of radium-226 and has a half-life of 3.8 days. This gas percolates up through soil into buildings, and if it is not evacuated, there can be much higher exposure levels indoors than outdoors, which is where human exposure occurs. Radon exposure is classified as a human carcinogen, and new Danish homes must be constructed to ensure indoor radon levels below 100 Bq/m(3). Our purpose was to assess how well 200 newly constructed single detached homes perform according to building regulations pertaining to radon and identify the association between indoor radon in these homes and municipality, home age, floor area, floor level, basement, and outer wall and roof construction. Median (5-95 percentile) indoor radon levels were 36.8 (9.0-118) Bq/m(3) , but indoor radon exceeded 100 Bq/m(3) in 14 of these new homes. The investigated variables explained nine percent of the variation in indoor radon levels, and although associations were positive, none of these were statistically significant. In this study, radon levels were generally low, but we found that 14 (7%) of the 200 new homes had indoor radon levels over 100 Bq/m(3). More work is needed to determine the determinants of indoor radon.

  4. RADON REDUCTION AND RADON-RESISTANT CONSTRUCTION DEMONSTRATIONS IN NEW YORK - VOLUME 2: APPENDICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Growing concern about health risks associated with exposure to indoor radon, a radioactive gas found in varying amounts in nearly all houses, has underscored the need for dependable radon reduction methods in existing and newly constructed houses. Responding to this need, the U....

  5. Development and management of a radon assessment strategy suitable for underground railway tunnelling projects.

    PubMed

    Purnell, C J; Frommer, G; Chan, K; Auch, A A

    2004-01-01

    The construction of underground tunnels through radon-bearing rock poses a radiation health risk to tunnelling workers from exposure to radon gas and its radioactive decay products. This paper presents the development and practical application of a radon assessment strategy suitable for the measurement of radon in tunnelling work environments in Hong Kong. The assessment strategy was successfully evaluated on a number of underground railway tunnelling projects over a 3 y period. Radon measurements were undertaken using a combination of portable radon measurement equipment and track etch detectors (TEDs) deployed throughout the tunnels. The radon gas monitoring results were used to confirm that ventilation rates were adequate or identified, at an early stage, when further action to reduce radon levels was required. Exposure dose estimates based on the TED results showed that the exposure of tunnel workers to radon did not exceed 3 mSv per annum for the duration of each project.

  6. Radon, Smoking, and Lung Cancer: The Need to Refocus Radon Control Policy

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, David; Philbert, Martin A.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer, and the risk is significantly higher for smokers than for nonsmokers. More than 85% of radon-induced lung cancer deaths are among smokers. The most powerful approach for reducing the public health burden of radon is shaped by 2 overarching principles: public communication efforts that promote residential radon testing and remediation will be the most cost effective if they are primarily directed at current and former smokers; and focusing on smoking prevention and cessation is the optimal strategy for reducing radon-induced lung cancer in terms of both public health gains and economic efficiency. Tobacco control policy is the most promising route to the public health goals of radon control policy. PMID:23327258

  7. Compilation of geogenic radon potential map of Pest County, Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, K. Zs.; Pásztor, L.; Horváth, Á.; Bakacsi, Zs.; Szabó, J.; Szabó, Cs.

    2010-05-01

    222Rn and its effect on the human health have recently received major importance in environmental studies. This natural radioactive gas accounts for about 9% of lung cancer death and about 2% of all deaths from cancer in Europe due to indoor radon concentrations. It moves into the buildings from the natural decay chain of uranium in soils, rocks and building materials. Radon mapping regionalizes the average hazard from radon in a selected area as a radon risk map. Two major methods (concerning the applied radon data) have been used for mapping. One uses indoor radon data whereas the other is based on soil gas radon data. The outputs of the second approach are the geogenic radon potential maps. The principal objective of our work is to take the first step in geogenic radon mapping in Hungary. Soil samples collected in Pest County (Central Region of Hungary) in the frame of a countrywide soil survey (Soil Information and Monitoring System) were studied to have empirical information of the potential radon risk. As the first two steps radium concentration of soil samples, collected at 43 locations sampling soil profiles by genetic horizons from the surface level down to 60-150 cm, were determined using HPGe gamma-spectroscopy technique, as well as measurement of radon exhalation on the soil samples were carried out applying closed radon accumulation chamber coupled with RAD7 radon monitor detector. From these data the exhalation coefficient was calculated, which shows how many percent of the produced radon can come out from the sample. This rate strongly depends on the depth: at circa 100 cm a drastic decrease have been noticed, which is explained by the change in soil texture. The major source of indoor radon is the soil gas radon concentration (Barnet et al., 2005). We estimated this value from the measured radon exhalation and calculated soil porosity and density. The soil gas radon concentration values were categorized after Kemski et al. (2001) and then the

  8. Radon Treatment Controversy

    PubMed Central

    Zdrojewicz, Zygmunt; Strzelczyk, Jadwiga (Jodi)

    2006-01-01

    In spite of long traditions, treatments utilizing radon-rich air or water have not been unequivocally embraced by modern medicine. The objective of this work is to examine factors that contribute to this continuing controversy. While the exact mechanism of radon's effect on human body is not completely understood, recent advances in radiobiology offer new insights into biochemical processes occurring at low-level exposures to ionizing radiation. Medical evidence and patients' testimonials regarding effectiveness of radon spa treatments of various ailments, most notably rheumatoid arthritis are accumulating worldwide. They challenge the premise of the Linear-No-Threshold (LNT) theory that the dose-effect response is the same per unit dose regardless of the total dose. Historically, such inference overshadowed scientific inquiries into the low-dose region and lead to a popular belief that no amount of radiation can be good. Fortunately, the LNT theory, which lacks any scientific basis, did not remain unchallenged. As the reviewed literature suggests, a paradigm shift, reflected in the consideration of hormetic effects at low-doses, is gaining momentum in the scientific community worldwide. The impetus comes from significant evidence of adaptive and stimulatory effects of low-levels of radiation on human immune system. PMID:18648641

  9. The assessment of radon/thoron ratio in Ukraine dwellings

    SciTech Connect

    Geets, V.I.; Varbanets, A.N.; Sorokobatkina, V.D.

    1995-12-31

    The main task of their work was the determination of radon/thoron ratio in air of dwellings for assessing thoron contribution to total individual dose of exposure to radon and thoron. The measurements of equivalent balance concentration (EBC) have been conducted by using radonometer (model 3S, Silena, Italy) for estimating a volume activity of short-lived radionuclides associated with radon/thoron semi-decay. The results obtained show that in the regions contaminated due to the Chernobyl accident depending on regional and residential peculiarities the average EBC value for radon in air of dwellings in 1992--1993 was ranged from 1.0 to 27.5 Bg/m{sup 3}, the EBC value for thoron (radon-220) -- from 0.15 to 8.6 Bq/m{sup 3}; radon/thoron ratio was equal to 1.1--17.4; and total average dose of exposure to radon -- from 0.31 to 2.69 mkZv/year. Their calculations show that a great correlation (correlation factor was recorded to be more that 0.52) between the EBC values for radon and thoron was registered in air of dwellings. In some cases thoron contribution (78.0%) to total individual exposure dose is greater that radon-contribution. Thus, when assessing exposure it is urgent to take into account not only the EBC value for radon but the EBC value for thoron, too.

  10. Identification of Surrogate Measures of Diesel Exhaust Exposure in a Controlled Chamber Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to diesel exhaust (DE) has been associated with acute cardiopulmonary and vascular responses, chronic noncancer health effects, and respiratory cancers in humans. To better understand DE exposures and eventually their related health effects, we established a controlled c...

  11. Radon: implications for the health professional

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, C.A.

    1990-01-01

    Radon is a colorless, odorless gas formed by radioactive decay of radium and uranium, which are naturally present in the earth's crust. When concentrated indoors, this invisible gas becomes a potential health hazard. The Environmental Protection Agency estimates that up to 20,000 lung cancer deaths annually can be attributed to prolonged radon exposure. Radon is an important health issue that should be understood by all health care professionals. This paper discusses some of the important issues regarding radon, such as the incidences of lung cancer believed to be attributable to radon, the high-risk areas in the United States, federal safety guidelines, and public apathy. These issues and their impact on the health care required by professionals, especially nurse practitioners, are discussed.

  12. Air cleaning and radon decay product mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Hopke, P.K.; Li, C.S.; Ramamurthi, M.

    1990-12-31

    We evaluated air cleaning as a means to mitigate risks arising from exposure to indoor radon progeny in several single-family houses in the northeastern United States, using a new, automated, semi-continuous activity-weighted size distribution measurement system. Measurements included radon concentration, condensation nuclei count, and activity-weighted size distribution of radon decay products. Measurements were made with and without the air cleaning system operating. The influence of particles generated by various sources common to normal indoor activities on radon progeny behavior was evaluated. Aerosols were generated by running water in a shower, burning candles, smoking cigarettes, vacuuming, opening doors, and cooking. Both a filtration unit and an electrostatic precipitator were evaluated. Using a room model, the changes in attachment rates, average attachment diameters, and deposition rates of the ``unattached`` fraction with and without the air cleaning systems were calculated. The air cleaner typically reduced the radon progeny concentrations by 50 to 60%.

  13. Development of the primary measurement standard for gaseous radon-222 activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, B C; Lee, K B; Park, T S; Lee, J M; Lee, S H; Oh, P J; Lee, M K; Ahn, J K

    2012-09-01

    The Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS) has developed a primary system for the activity standardization of gaseous radon-222, based on the defined solid angle counting method. The size of adsorbed radon is determined by a Cyclone Storage Phosphor System, and a buffer chamber is introduced between the measurement chamber and the source for the purpose of gas purification. The measured activity of gaseous radon-222 and its associated measurement uncertainty obtained using the system are presented.

  14. Differences in aerosolization of Rift Valley fever virus resulting from choice of inhalation exposure chamber: implications for animal challenge studies

    PubMed Central

    Bethel, Laura M.; Powell, Diana S.; Caroline, Amy L.; Hartman, Amy L.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The aerosol characteristics of Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) were evaluated to achieve reproducible infection of experimental animals with aerosolized RVFV suitable for animal efficacy studies. Spray factor (SF), the ratio between the concentrations of the aerosolized agent to the agent in the aerosol generator, is used to compare performance differences between aerosol exposures. SF indicates the efficiency of the aerosolization process; a higher SF means a lower nebulizer concentration is needed to achieve a desired inhaled dose. Relative humidity levels as well as the duration of the exposure and choice of exposure chamber all impacted RVFV SF. Differences were also noted between actual and predicted minute volumes for different species of nonhuman primates. While NHP from Old World species (Macaca fascicularis, M. mulatta, Chlorocebus aethiops) generally had a lower actual minute volume than predicted, the actual minute volume for marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) was higher than predicted (150% for marmosets compared with an average of 35% for all other species examined). All of these factors (relative humidity, chamber, duration, and minute volume) impact the ability to reliably and reproducibly deliver a specific dose of aerosolized RVFV. The implications of these findings for future pivotal efficacy studies are discussed. PMID:24532259

  15. Optical detection of radon decay in air

    PubMed Central

    Sand, Johan; Ihantola, Sakari; Peräjärvi, Kari; Toivonen, Harri; Toivonen, Juha

    2016-01-01

    An optical radon detection method is presented. Radon decay is directly measured by observing the secondary radiolumines cence light that alpha particles excite in air, and the selectivity of coincident photon detection is further enhanced with online pulse-shape analysis. The sensitivity of a demonstration device was 6.5 cps/Bq/l and the minimum detectable concentration was 12 Bq/m3 with a 1 h integration time. The presented technique paves the way for optical approaches in rapid radon detec tion, and it can be applied beyond radon to the analysis of any alpha-active sample which can be placed in the measurement chamber. PMID:26867800

  16. Optical detection of radon decay in air.

    PubMed

    Sand, Johan; Ihantola, Sakari; Peräjärvi, Kari; Toivonen, Harri; Toivonen, Juha

    2016-02-12

    An optical radon detection method is presented. Radon decay is directly measured by observing the secondary radiolumines cence light that alpha particles excite in air, and the selectivity of coincident photon detection is further enhanced with online pulse-shape analysis. The sensitivity of a demonstration device was 6.5 cps/Bq/l and the minimum detectable concentration was 12 Bq/m(3) with a 1 h integration time. The presented technique paves the way for optical approaches in rapid radon detec tion, and it can be applied beyond radon to the analysis of any alpha-active sample which can be placed in the measurement chamber.

  17. Experimental, statistical, and biological models of radon carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, F.T.

    1991-09-01

    Risk models developed for underground miners have not been consistently validated in studies of populations exposed to indoor radon. Imprecision in risk estimates results principally from differences between exposures in mines as compared to domestic environments and from uncertainties about the interaction between cigarette-smoking and exposure to radon decay products. Uncertainties in extrapolating miner data to domestic exposures can be reduced by means of a broad-based health effects research program that addresses the interrelated issues of exposure, respiratory tract dose, carcinogenesis (molecular/cellular and animal studies, plus developing biological and statistical models), and the relationship of radon to smoking and other copollutant exposures. This article reviews experimental animal data on radon carcinogenesis observed primarily in rats at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Recent experimental and mechanistic carcinogenesis models of exposures to radon, uranium ore dust, and cigarette smoke are presented with statistical analyses of animal data. 20 refs., 1 fig.

  18. Radon exhalation from sub-slab aggregate used in home construction in Canada.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Lauren; Lee, Jaeyoung; Sadi, Baki; Chen, Jing

    2015-06-01

    Exposure to elevated levels of radon in homes has been shown to result in an increased risk of developing lung cancer. The two largest contributors to indoor radon are radon in soil gas, formed from the rocks and soil surrounding the home, and building materials such as aggregate. This study measured the surface radon exhalation rates for 35 aggregate samples collected from producers across Canada. The radon exhalation rates ranged from 2.3 to 479.9 Bq m(-2) d(-1), with a mean of 80.7±112 Bq m(-2) d(-1). Using a simple, conservative analysis, the aggregate contribution to radon concentrations in an unfinished basement was determined. The maximum estimated radon concentration was 32.5±2.7 Bq m(-3), or ~16 % of the Canadian Radon Guideline. It can be concluded that under normal conditions radon exhalation from aggregate contributes very little to the total radon concentration in indoor air.

  19. The role of the implementation of policies for the prevention of exposure to Radon in Brazil—a strategy for controlling the risk of developing lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lino, Aline da Rocha; Abrahão, Carina Meira; Amarante, Marcus Paulo Fernandes; de Sousa Cruz, Marcelo Rocha

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States and other industrialised countries. The most important risk factor is active smoking. However, given the increased incidence of lung cancer in non-smokers, it is necessary to improve knowledge regarding other risk factors. Radon (Rn) is a noble gas and is the most important natural source of human exposure to ionizing radiation. Exposure to high levels of this radioactive gas is related to an increased risk of developing lung cancer. The objective of this work is to highlight the importance of measuring indoor concentration of this gas and identify which steps should be taken for achieving radiological protection. A survey was conducted on the websites of the National Health Surveillance Agency (ANVISA), LAMIN (Mineral Analysis Laboratory), CPRM (Geological Survey of Brazil), Ministry of Health and PubMed. Using the words ‘radon’, ‘lung’, ‘cancer’, and PubMed®, 1,371 results were obtained; when using the words ‘radon’, ‘lung’, ‘cancer’, and with ‘Brazil’ or ‘Brazilians’, only six results were obtained. We emphasise that lung cancer is a major public health problem and the exposure to Rn indoors should be considered as a risk factor for lung cancer in non-smokers. Buildings or houses with high concentrations of Rn should be identified. However, currently in Brazil—a country with great potential for mineral extraction—there are no specific regulated recommendations to control indoor exposure to Rn. PMID:26435745

  20. Study of Natural Radioactivity, Radon Exhalation Rate and Radiation Doses in Coal and Flyash Samples from Thermal Power Plants, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Lalit Mohan; Kumar, Mukesh; Sahoo, B. K.; Sapra, B. K.; Kumar, Rajesh

    Coal is one of the most important source used for electrical power generation. Its combustion part known as fly ash is used in the manufacturing of bricks, sheets, cement, land filling etc. Coal and its by-products have significant amounts of radionuclide's including uranium, thorium which is the ultimate source of the radioactive gas radon and thoron respectively. Radiation hazard from airborne emissions of coal-fired power plants have been cited as possible causes of health in environmental. Assessment of the radiation exposure from coal burning is critically dependent on the concentration of radioactive elements in coal and in the fly ash. In the present study, samples of coal and flyash were collected from Rajghat Power Plant and Badarpur Thermal Power Plant, New Delhi, India. Radon exhalation is important parameter for the estimation of radiation risk from various materials. Solis State Nuclear Track Detector based sealed Can Technique (using LR-115 type II) has been used for measurement radon exhalation rate. Also accumulation chamber based Continuous Radon Monitor and Continuous Thoron Monitor have been used for radon masss exhalation and thoron surface exhalation rate respectively. Natural radioactivity has been measured using a low level NaI(Tl) detector based on gamma ray spectrometry.

  1. Development of a dose-controlled multiculture cell exposure chamber for efficient delivery of airborne and engineered nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asimakopoulou, Akrivi; Daskalos, Emmanouil; Lewinski, Nastassja; Riediker, Michael; Papaioannou, Eleni; Konstandopoulos, Athanasios G.

    2013-04-01

    In order to study the various health influencing parameters related to engineered nanoparticles as well as to soot emitted by Diesel engines, there is an urgent need for appropriate sampling devices and methods for cell exposure studies that simulate the respiratory system and facilitate associated biological and toxicological tests. The objective of the present work was the further advancement of a Multiculture Exposure Chamber (MEC) into a dose-controlled system for efficient delivery of nanoparticles to cells. It was validated with various types of nanoparticles (Diesel engine soot aggregates, engineered nanoparticles for various applications) and with state-of-the-art nanoparticle measurement instrumentation to assess the local deposition of nanoparticles on the cell cultures. The dose of nanoparticles to which cell cultures are being exposed was evaluated in the normal operation of the in vitro cell culture exposure chamber based on measurements of the size specific nanoparticle collection efficiency of a cell free device. The average efficiency in delivering nanoparticles in the MEC was approximately 82%. The nanoparticle deposition was demonstrated by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Analysis and design of the MEC employs Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and true to geometry representations of nanoparticles with the aim to assess the uniformity of nanoparticle deposition among the culture wells. Final testing of the dose-controlled cell exposure system was performed by exposing A549 lung cell cultures to fluorescently labeled nanoparticles. Delivery of aerosolized nanoparticles was demonstrated by visualization of the nanoparticle fluorescence in the cell cultures following exposure. Also monitored was the potential of the aerosolized nanoparticles to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) (e.g. free radicals and peroxides generation), thus expressing the oxidative stress of the cells which can cause extensive cellular damage or damage on DNA.

  2. Radon Risk Communication Strategies: A Regional Story.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Winnie

    2016-01-01

    Risk communication on the health effects of radon encounters many challenges and requires a variety of risk communication strategies and approaches. The concern over radon exposure and its health effects may vary according to people's level of knowledge and receptivity. Homeowners in radon-prone areas are usually more informed and have greater concern over those not living in radon-prone areas. The latter group is often found to be resistant to testing. In British Columbia as well as many other parts of the country, some homes have been lying outside of the radon-prone areas have radon levels above the Canadian guideline, which is the reason Health Canada recommends that all homes should be tested. Over the last five years, the Environment Health Program (EHP) of Health Canada in the British Columbia region has been using a variety of different approaches in their radon risk communications through social media, workshops, webinars, public forums, poster contests, radon distribution maps, public inquiries, tradeshows and conference events, and partnership with different jurisdictions and nongovernmental organizations. The valuable lessons learned from these approaches are discussed in this special report.

  3. A radon progeny deposition model

    SciTech Connect

    Rielage, Keith; Elliott, Steven R; Hime, Andrew; Guiseppe, Vincente E; Westerdale, S.

    2010-12-01

    The next generation low-background detectors operating underground aim for unprecedented low levels of radioactive backgrounds. Although the radioactive decays of airborne radon (particularly {sup 222}Rn) and its subsequent progeny present in an experiment are potential backgrounds, also problematic is the deposition of radon progeny on detector materials. Exposure to radon at any stage of assembly of an experiment can result in surface contamination by progeny supported by the long half life (22 y) of {sup 210}Pb on sensitive locations of a detector. An understanding of the potential surface contamination from deposition will enable requirements of radon-reduced air and clean room environments for the assembly of low background experiments. It is known that there are a number of environmental factors that govern the deposition of progeny onto surfaces. However, existing models have not explored the impact of some environmental factors important for low background experiments. A test stand has been constructed to deposit radon progeny on various surfaces under a controlled environment in order to develop a deposition model. Results from this test stand and the resulting deposition model are presented.

  4. A Radon Progeny Deposition Model

    SciTech Connect

    Guiseppe, V. E.; Elliott, S. R.; Hime, A.; Rielage, K.; Westerdale, S.

    2011-04-27

    The next generation low-background detectors operating underground aim for unprecedented low levels of radioactive backgrounds. Although the radioactive decays of airborne radon (particularly {sup 222}Rn) and its subsequent progeny present in an experiment are potential backgrounds, also problematic is the deposition of radon progeny on detector materials. Exposure to radon at any stage of assembly of an experiment can result in surface contamination by progeny supported by the long half life (22 y) of {sup 210}Pb on sensitive locations of a detector. An understanding of the potential surface contamination from deposition will enable requirements of radon-reduced air and clean room environments for the assembly of low background experiments. It is known that there are a number of environmental factors that govern the deposition of progeny onto surfaces. However, existing models have not explored the impact of some environmental factors important for low background experiments. A test stand has been constructed to deposit radon progeny on various surfaces under a controlled environment in order to develop a deposition model. Results from this test stand and the resulting deposition model are presented.

  5. Canadian population risk of radon induced lung cancer: a re-assessment based on the recent cross-Canada radon survey

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J.; Moir, D.; Whyte, J.

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to indoor radon has been determined to be the second leading cause of lung cancer after tobacco smoking. Canadian population risk of radon induced lung cancer was assessed in 2005 with the radon distribution characteristics determined from a radon survey carried out in the late 1970s in 19 cities. In that survey, a grab sampling method was used to measure radon levels. The observed radon concentration in 14 000 Canadian homes surveyed followed a log–normal distribution with a geometric mean (GM) of 11.2 Bq m–3 and a geometric standard deviation (GSD) of 3.9. Based on the information from that survey, it was estimated that ∼10 % of lung cancers in Canada resulted from indoor radon exposure. To gain a better understanding of radon concentrations in homes across the country, a national residential radon survey was launched in April 2009. In the recent survey, long-term (3 month or longer) indoor radon measurements were made in roughly 14 000 homes in 121 health regions across Canada. The observed radon concentrations follow, as expected, a log–normal distribution with a GM of 41.9 Bq m–3 and a GSD of 2.8. Based on the more accurate radon distribution characteristics obtained from the recent cross-Canada radon survey, a re-assessment of Canadian population risk for radon induced lung cancer was undertaken. The theoretical estimates show that 16 % of lung cancer deaths among Canadians are attributable to indoor radon exposure. These results strongly suggest the ongoing need for the Canadian National Radon Program. In particular, there is a need for a focus on education and awareness by all levels of government, and in partnership with key stakeholders, to encourage Canadians to take action to reduce the risk from indoor radon exposure. PMID:22874897

  6. Application of the can technique and radon gas analyzer for radon exhalation measurements.

    PubMed

    Fazal-ur-Rehman; Al-Jarallah, M I; Musazay, M S; Abu-Jarad, F

    2003-01-01

    A passive "can technique" and an active radon gas analyzer with an emanation container were applied for radon exhalation rate measurements from different construction materials, viz. five marble seven ceramic and 100 granite tiles used in Saudi Arabia. The marble and ceramic tiles did not show detectable radon exhalation using the active radon gas analyzer system. However the granite tiles showed relatively high radon exhalations, indicating a relatively high uranium content. A comparison of the radon exhalation rates measured by the two techniques showed a linear correlation coefficient of 0.57. The radon exhalation rates from the granites varied from 0.02 to 6.58 Bqm(-2)h(-1) with an average of 1.35+/-1.40 Bqm(-2)h(-1). The geometric mean and the geometric standard deviation of the frequency distribution were found to be 0.80 and 3.1, respectively. The track density found on the nuclear track detectors in the can technique exposed to the granites, having high exhalation rates, varied linearly with exposure time with a linear correlation coefficient of 0.99. This experimental finding agrees with the theoretical prediction. The can technique showed sensitivity to low radon exhalation rates from ceramic, marble and some granite over a period of 2 months, which were not detectable by the active radon gas analyzer system. The reproducibility of data with both measuring techniques was found to be within a 7% deviation.

  7. Nanomaterial Containing Wall Paints Can Increase Radon Concentration in Houses Located in Radon Prone Areas

    PubMed Central

    Haghani, M.; Mortazavi, S. M. J.; Faghihi, R.; Mehdizadeh, S.; Moradgholi, J.; Darvish, L.; Fathi-Pour, E.; Ansari, L.; Ghanbar-pour, M. R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Nowadays, extensive technological advancements have made it possible to use nanopaints which show exciting properties. In IR Iran excessive radon levels (up to 3700 Bq m–3) have been reported in homes located in radon prone areas. Over the past decades, concerns have been raised about the risk posed by residential radon exposure. Objective: This study aims at investigating the effect of using nanomaterial containing wall paints on radon concentration in homes. Methods: Two wooden model houses were used in this study. Soil samples from Ramsar high background radiation areas were used for simulating the situation of a typical house in radon-prone areas. Conventional water-soluble wall paint was used for painting the walls of the 1st house model; while the 2nd house model was painted with the same wall paint with montmorillonitenanoclay. Results: Three days after sealing the house models, radon level was measured by using a portable radon survey meter. The mean radon level inside the 1st house model (conventional paint) was 515.3 ± 17.8 Bq/m3 while the mean radon concentration in the 2nd house model (nano-painted house model) was 570.8 ± 18.5 Bq/m3. The difference between these means was statistically significant (P<0.001). Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first investigation on the effect of nano-material containing wall paints on indoor radon concentrations.  It can be concluded that nano-material-containing wall paints should not be used in houses with wooden walls located in radon prone areas. Although the mechanism of this effect is not clearly known, decreased porosity in nano-paints might be a key factor in increasing the radon concentration in homes. PMID:25505754

  8. Optimization of the Timepix chip to measurement of radon, thoron and their progenies.

    PubMed

    Janik, Miroslaw; Ploc, Ondrej; Fiederle, Michael; Procz, Simon; Kavasi, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Radon and thoron as well as their short-lived progenies are decay products of the radium and thorium series decays. They are the most important radionuclide elements with respect to public exposure. To utilize the semiconductor pixel radiation Timepix chip for the measurement of active and real-time alpha particles from radon, thoron and their progenies, it is necessary to check the registration and visualization of the chip. An energy check for radon, thoron and their progenies, as well as for (241)Am and(210)Po sources, was performed using the radon and thoron chambers at NIRS (National Institute of Radiological Sciences). The check found an energy resolution of 200 keV with a 14% efficiency as well as a linear dependency between the channel number (cluster volume) and the energy. The coefficient of determination r(2) of 0.99 for the range of 5 to 9 MeV was calculated. In addition, an offset for specific Timepix configurations between pre-calibration for low energy from 6 to 60 keV, and the actual calibration for alpha particles with energies from 4000 to 9000 keV, was detected.

  9. Carcinogenic and Cocarcinogenic Effects of Radon and Radon Daughters in Rats.

    PubMed Central

    Monchaux, G; Morlier, JP; Morin, M; Chameaud, J; Lafuma, J; Masse, R

    1994-01-01

    It has been previously established that lung cancer could be induced in rats by exposure to radon and radon daughters. Although the oat-cell carcinomas that are common in humans were not found in rats, other histological types of lung carcinomas, especially squamous cell carcinomas and primitive lung adenocarcinomas, were similar to those observed in humans. A dose-effect relationship was established for cumulative doses varying from 25 to 3000 working-level-months (WLM), which was similar for medium and high cumulative doses to that observed in uranium miners. This experimental protocol was also used to study the potential cocarcinogenic effects of other environmental or industrial airborne pollutants such as tobacco smoke, mineral fibers, diesel exhausts, or minerals from metallic mine ores that may act synergistically with radon exposure. In rats exposed to radon and tobacco smoke combined, the incidence of lung cancers was higher by a factor of 2-4 according to the cumulative radon exposure and the duration of tobacco smoke exposure. When mineral fibers were injected intrapleurally, an increased incidence of malignant thoracic tumors was observed in rats exposed to radon and fibers combined, but synergistic effects resulted in additivity. With diesel exhausts or minerals from metallic ores, a slight, nonsignificant increase in the incidence of lung carcinomas was observed compared with rats exposed to radon alone. These results demonstrated that it is possible to establish the potential cocarcinogenic action, showing either multiplicative, additive, or no effect of various environmental or industrial airborne pollutants combined with radon exposure. This radon model is valid for investigating possible interactions between two occupational exposures. Images p64-a Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. PMID:9719670

  10. Simplified modeling for infiltration and radon entry

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, M.H.

    1992-08-01

    Air leakage in the envelopes of residential buildings is the primary mechanism for provided ventilation to those buildings. For radon the same mechanisms that drive the ventilation, drive the radon entry This paper attempts to provide a simplified physical model that can be used to understand the interactions between the building leakage distribution, the forces that drive infiltration and ventilation, and indoor radon concentrations, Combining both ventilation and entry modeling together allows an estimation of Radon concentration and exposure to be made and demonstrates how changes in the envelope or ventilation system would affect it. This paper will develop simplified modeling approaches for estimating both ventilation rate and radon entry rate based on the air tightness of the envelope and the driving forces. These approaches will use conventional leakage values (i.e. effective leakage area ) to quantify the air tightness and include natural and mechanical driving forces. This paper will introduce a simplified parameter, the Radon Leakage Area, that quantifies the resistance to radon entry. To be practical for dwellings, modeling of the occupant exposures to indoor pollutants must be simple to use and not require unreasonable input data. This paper presents the derivation of the simplified physical model, and applies that model to representative situations to explore the tendencies to be expected under different circumstances.

  11. Performance of the first Japanese large-scale facility for radon inhalation experiments with small animals.

    PubMed

    Ishimori, Yuu; Mitsunobu, Fumihiro; Yamaoka, Kiyonori; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Kataoka, Takahiro; Sakoda, Akihiro

    2011-07-01

    A radon test facility for small animals was developed in order to increase the statistical validity of differences of the biological response in various radon environments. This paper illustrates the performances of that facility, the first large-scale facility of its kind in Japan. The facility has a capability to conduct approximately 150 mouse-scale tests at the same time. The apparatus for exposing small animals to radon has six animal chamber groups with five independent cages each. Different radon concentrations in each animal chamber group are available. Because the first target of this study is to examine the in vivo behaviour of radon and its effects, the major functions to control radon and to eliminate thoron were examined experimentally. Additionally, radon progeny concentrations and their particle size distributions in the cages were also examined experimentally to be considered in future projects.

  12. Dosimetry of inhaled radon and thoron progeny

    SciTech Connect

    James, A.C.

    1994-06-01

    This chapter reviews recent developments in modeling doses received by lung tissues, with particular emphasis on application of ICRP`s new dosimetric model of the respiratory tract for extrapolating to other environments the established risks from exposure to radon progeny in underground mines. Factors discussed include: (1) the influence of physical characteristics of radon progeny aerosols on dose per unit exposure, e.g., the unattached fraction, and the activity-size distributions of clustered and attached progeny; (2) the dependence of dose on breathing rate, and on the exposed subject (man, woman or child); (3) the variability of dose per unit exposure in a home when exposure is expressed in terms of potential {alpha} energy or radon gas concentration; (4) the comparative dosimetry of thoron progeny; and (5) the effects of air-cleaning on lung dose. Also discussed is the apparent discrepancy between lung cancer risk estimates derived purely from dosimetry and the lung cancer incidence observed in the epidemiological studies of radon-exposed underground miners. Application of ICRP`s recommended risk factors appears to overestimate radon lung-cancer risk for miners by a factor of three. ``Normalization`` of the calculated effective dose is therefore needed, at least for {alpha} dose from radon and thoron progeny, in order to obtain a realistic estimate of lung cancer risk.

  13. Multagenicity of radon and radon daughters. Final technical report, January 1, 1993--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, H.H.

    1997-06-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate the dose-response relationship with regard to the lethal and mutagenic effects of exposure of cells to radon and its decay products. Dose-rate dependence was studied, as well as the nature of the DNA lesions. The effect of DNA repair on the lethal and mutagenic effects of exposure and on the character of the DNA lesions was investigated by comparing the response of L5178Y strains that differ in their ability to rejoin X radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks. The nature of radon/radon daughter-induced mutational lesions in human lymphoblasts was also investigated.

  14. STUDY OF RADIATION EXPOSURE DUE TO RADON, THORON AND THEIR PROGENY IN THE INDOOR ENVIRONMENT OF RAJPUR REGION OF UTTARAKHAND HIMALAYA.

    PubMed

    Kandari, Tushar; Aswal, Sunita; Prasad, Mukesh; Pant, Preeti; Bourai, A A; Ramola, R C

    2016-10-01

    In the present study, the measurements of indoor radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations have been carried out in the Rajpur region of Uttarakhand, Himalaya, India by using LR-115 solid-state nuclear track detector-based time-integrated techniques. The gas concentrations have been measured by single-entry pin-hole dosemeter technique, while for the progeny concentrations, deposition-based Direct Thoron and Radon Progeny Sensor technique has been used. The radiation doses due to the inhalation of radon, thoron and progeny have also been determined by using obtained concentrations of radon, thoron and their progeny in the study area. The average radon concentration varies from 75 to 123 Bq m(-3) with an overall average of 89 Bq m(-3) The average thoron concentration varies from 29 to 55 Bq m(-3) with an overall average of 38 Bq m(-3) The total annual effective dose received due to radon, thoron and their progeny varies from 2.4 to 4.1 mSv y(-1) with an average of 2.9 mSv y(-1) While the average equilibrium factor for radon and its progeny was found to be 0.39, for thoron and its progeny, it was 0.06.

  15. Contamination of individuals by radon daughters: a preliminary study

    SciTech Connect

    Stebbings, J.H.; Dignam, J.J.

    1988-03-01

    Body radon daughter contamination reflects relative individual respiratory exposures to radon daughters; counts can be related both to household radon levels and to lung cancer risk factors such as sex and tobacco smoking. Radon daughters were counted by gamma spectroscopy from 180 adult residents of eastern Pennsylvania. A seven-position, 35-min scan was conducted in a mobile body counter, generally during afternoon or evening hours. Track-etch detectors for household radon were distributed, and were recovered from 80% of the subjects. Over 75% of the population had environmentally enhanced radon daughter contamination. House radon levels were strongly related, as anticipated, to radon daughter contamination in the 112 subjects for whom both sets of measurements were available (p less than .001); basement measurements were as strongly related to personal contamination as were living area measurements; bedroom measurements were slightly more strongly correlated. Both sex (p less than .02) and cigarette smoking (p less than .01) significantly modified the relationships, after nonlinear adjustment for travel times. Using a logarithmic model, a given house living-area radon level was associated in females with body contamination by radon daughters 2-3 times that in males. Nonsmokers had 2-4 times higher levels of contamination than smokers. Results are for the total of internal and external contamination, these being highly correlated in preliminary experiments. Time usage and activity patterns of the subjects are believed to be important in explaining these findings, and may become important variables in radon risk assessment.

  16. A novel algorithm for quick and continuous tracing the change of radon concentration in environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yanliang; Xiao, Detao

    2011-04-01

    Several measurements of the radon concentration are performed by RAD7 in the University of South China. We find that 30-40 min is needed for RAD7 for tracing the concentration of the standard radon chamber. There are two reasons. The first is that the sufficient time of air cycle is needed for the radon concentration in internal cell of RAD7 equal to that of the environment; and the second is that the sufficient decay time is needed for the 218Po concentration in internal cell of RAD7 equal to that of the radon. We used a zeroth order approximation to describe the evolution of the environment radon concentration, and obtained a novel algorithm for quick and continuous tracing the change of radon concentration. The corrected radon concentration obtained through this method is in good agreement with the reference value. This method can be applied to develop and improve the instruments for tracing the change of radon concentration quickly.

  17. The Impact of Declining Smoking on Radon-Related Lung Cancer in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Alshanqeety, Omar; Warner, Kenneth E.; Lantz, Paula M.; Courant, Paul N.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the effect of current patterns of smoking rates on future radon-related lung cancer. Methods. We combined the model developed by the National Academy of Science's Committee on Health Risks of Exposure to Radon (the BEIR VI committee) for radon risk assessment with a forecasting model of US adult smoking prevalence to estimate proportional decline in radon-related deaths during the present century with and without mitigation of high-radon houses. Results. By 2025, the reduction in radon mortality from smoking reduction (15 percentage points) will surpass the maximum expected reduction from remediation (12 percentage points). Conclusions. Although still a genuine source of public health concern, radon-induced lung cancer is likely to decline substantially, driven by reductions in smoking rates. Smoking decline will reduce radon deaths more that remediation of high-radon houses, a fact that policymakers should consider as they contemplate the future of cancer control. PMID:21228294

  18. Health effects from radon-222 in drinking water in Algiers.

    PubMed

    Amrani, D; Cherouati, D E

    1999-09-01

    As part of a national programme, 222Rn in public water supply systems, private wells and in natural mineral waters has been measured in some locations of Algiers City. Radon concentration was determined by means of a passive method based on the use of electret ion chambers (EIC). The determination of radon concentration in the water samples consisted of sealing a known volume of water in a jar and measuring the airborne radon using an E-PERM (electret-passive environmental radon monitor) device. The radon concentrations in natural mineral waters were found to be the highest of all other water samples. It is found that the mean radon concentration of water samples was lower than the value of 11000 Bq m(-3) (11 Bq l(-1)) reported by the US Environmental Protection Agency. These investigations enabled a first estimate of the corresponding annual effective dose to the stomach and the lungs. It was observed that the annual effective dose resulting from direct consumption of water is far greater than that due to inhalation of radon emanating from tap water. Moreover, it is also shown that the annual effective dose due to inhalation of radon emanating from tap water and flushing water is negligible compared to the total annual dose for indoor radon in Algiers.

  19. Radon: A health problem

    SciTech Connect

    Pucci, J.; Gaston, S.

    1990-01-01

    Nurses can and should function as effective teachers about the potential hazards to health of radon contamination in the home as well as become activists in the development of health care policy on radon.

  20. Controlling the Radon Threat Needn't Be Another Costly Nightmare.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freije, Matthew R.

    1989-01-01

    After a study of 3,000 classrooms in 130 schools in 16 states, the Environmental Protection Agency urged all schools to conduct tests for radon. Explains a 6-step screening test, methods of reducing radon concentrations, and how the risk from radon exposure compares with other risks. (MLF)

  1. Radon and climatic multiparameter analysis: A one-year study on radon dynamics in a house

    SciTech Connect

    Genrich, V.

    1995-12-31

    Radon-reduction in private and public buildings is a current issue. Research has opened our eyes for the enormous fluctuations of the indoor radon level over longer observation periods. For generalizing the behavior radon in a building, care must be taken that the observation period is long enough, to mediate the pronounced climatic changes in the course of a year. The author has started a one-year observations, precisely logging up the radon level in a single family home. Six portable multiparameter-monitors, each equipped with a 0.6 liter PIC-detector (PIC = pulse ionization chamber), have been installed at different locations within the building and outdoors (incl. two soil-gas probes). Besides the radon concentration, in the same instruments the following parameters are logged cotinuously: relative humidity, differential pressure between basement and sub-slab area, soil impendance (indication water saturation) and wind speed on the roof. In the basement, the radon concentration varies between 61 Bq/m{sup 3} and 5408 Bq/m{sup 3} (mean: 1092 Bq/m{sup 3}.) By analyzing these records, the time sequence of the radon concentration can be characterized as a {open_quotes}mixture{close_quotes} of (periodic) circadian variations overlayed with (aperiodic) seasonal fluctuations. In this building, it turns out, that the pressure difference across the base plate is an important factor for radon entry as well as ventilation rate. It can be shown, that the pressure is closely related to the indoor-outdoor temperature difference. This relation was found to be non-linear. Other factors are attributed to the activities of the inhabitants. The paper points out correlations between radon and different climatic parameters mainly by using scatterplots and classical regression methods.

  2. A COMPARISON OF WINTER SHORT-TERM AND ANNUAL AVERAGE RADON MEASUREMENTS IN BASEMENTS OF A RADON-PRONE REGION AND EVALUATION OF FURTHER RADON TESTING INDICATORS

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Nirmalla G.; Steck, Daniel J.; Field, R. William

    2014-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to investigate the temporal variability between basement winter short-term (7 to 10 days) and basement annual radon measurements. Other objectives were to test the short-term measurement’s diagnostic performance at two reference levels and to evaluate its ability to predict annual average basement radon concentrations. Electret ion chamber (short-term) and alpha track (annual) radon measurements were obtained by trained personnel in Iowa residences. Overall, the geometric mean of the short-term radon concentrations (199 Bq m−3) was slightly greater than the geometric mean of the annual radon concentrations (181 Bq m−3). Short-term tests incorrectly predicted that the basement annual radon concentrations would be below 148 Bq m−3 12% of the time and 2% of the time at 74 Bq m−3. The short-term and annual radon concentrations were strongly correlated (r=0.87, p<0.0001). The foundation wall material of the basement was the only significant factor to have an impact on the absolute difference between the short-term and annual measurements. The findings from this study provide evidence of a substantially lower likelihood of obtaining a false negative result from a single short-term test in a region with high indoor radon potential when the reference level is lowered to 74 Bq m−3. PMID:24670901

  3. A comparison of winter short-term and annual average radon measurements in basements of a radon-prone region and evaluation of further radon testing indicators.

    PubMed

    Barros, Nirmalla G; Steck, Daniel J; Field, R William

    2014-05-01

    The primary objective of this study was to investigate the temporal variability between basement winter short-term (7 to 10 d) and basement annual radon measurements. Other objectives were to test the short-term measurement's diagnostic performance at two reference levels and to evaluate its ability to predict annual average basement radon concentrations. Electret ion chamber (short-term) and alpha track (annual) radon measurements were obtained by trained personnel in Iowa residences. Overall, the geometric mean of the short-term radon concentrations (199 Bq m) was slightly greater than the geometric mean of the annual radon concentrations (181 Bq m). Short-term tests correctly predicted annual radon concentrations to be above the 148 Bq m action level 88% of the time and above a 74 Bq m level 98% of the time. The short-term and annual radon concentrations were strongly correlated (r = 0.87, p < 0.0001). The foundation wall material of the basement was the only significant factor to have an impact on the absolute difference between the short-term and annual measurements. The findings from this study provide evidence of a substantially lower likelihood of obtaining a false negative result from a single short-term test in a region with high indoor radon potential when the reference level is lowered to 74 Bq m.

  4. Establishment of Airborne Nanoparticle Exposure Chamber System to Assess Nano TiO2 Induced Mice Lung Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chia-Hua; Li, Jui-Ping; Huang, Nai-Chun; Yang, Chung-Shi; Chen, Jen-Kun

    2011-12-01

    A great many governments have schemed their top priority to support the research and development of emerging nanotechnology, which lead to increasing products containing nanomaterials. However, platforms and protocols to evaluate the safety of nanomaterials are not yet established. We therefore design and fabricate a nanoparticle exposure chamber system (NECS) and try to standardize protocols to assess potential health risk of inhalable nanoparticles. This platform comprises: (1) nano-aerosol generators to produce homogeneous airborne nanoparticles, (2) double isolated container to prevent from unexpected exposure to humans, (3) gas supply system for housing animals or incubating cultured cells, and (4) system for automatic control and airborne nanoparticle analysis. The NECS providing multiple functions includes: (1) a secure environment to handle nanomaterials, (2) real-time measurement for the size and distribution of airborne nanoparticles, (3) SOP of safety evaluation for nanomaterials, and (4) key technology for the development of inhalable pharmaceuticals. We used NECS to mimic occupational environment for exploring potential adverse effects of TiO2 nanoparticles. The adult male ICR mice were exposed to 25nm, well-characterized TiO2 particles for 1 and 4 weeks. More than 90% of the inhaled TiO2 nanoparticles deposit in lung tissue, which tends to be captured by alveolar macrophages. Pulmonary function test does not show significant physiological changes between one and 4 weeks exposure. For plasma biochemistry analysis, there are no obvious inflammation responses after exposure for one and 4 weeks; however, disruption of alveolar septa and increased thickness of alveolar epithelial cells were observed. According to our results, the NECS together with our protocols show comprehensive integration and ideally fit the standard of OECD guildelines-TG403, TG412, TG413; it can be further customized to fulfill diverse demands of industry, government, and third party

  5. Environmental Assessment for moving the Pacific Northwest Laboratory radon generators from Life Sciences Laboratory II, Richland North Area, to Life Sciences Laboratory I, 300 Area, and their continued use in physical and biological research

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, I.C.

    1993-09-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) radon generators are a core resource of the overall U. S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Radon Research Program and are administratively controlled within the ``Radon Hazards in Homes`` project. This project primarily focuses on radon exposures of animals and addresses the major biologic effects and factors influencing risks of indoor radon exposures. For example, the ``Mechanisms of Radon Injury`` and ``In vivo/In vitro Radon-Induced Cellular Damage`` projects specifically address the cytogenetic and DNA damage produced by radon exposure as part of a larger effort to understand radon carcinogenesis. Several other ongoing PNL projects, namely: ``Biological Effectiveness of Radon Alpha Particles: A Microbeam Study of Dose Rate Effects,`` ``Laser Measurements of Pb-210,`` ``Radon Transport Modeling in Soils,`` ``Oncogenes in Radiation Carcinogenesis,`` ``Mutation of DNA Targets,`` ``Dosimetry of Radon Progeny,`` and ``Aerosol Technology Development`` also use the radon exposure facilities in the conduct of their work. While most, but not all, studies in the PNL Radon Research Program are funded through DOE`s Office of Health and Environmental Research, PNL also has ongoing collaborative radon studies with investigators worldwide; many of these use the radon exposure facilities. The purpose of the proposed action is to provide for relocation of the radon generators to a DOE-owned facility and to continue to provide a controlled source of radon-222 for continued use in physical and biological research.

  6. Variations in radon concentration in groundwater of Kumaon Himalaya, India.

    PubMed

    Bourai, A A; Gusain, G S; Rautela, B S; Joshi, V; Prasad, G; Ramola, R C

    2012-11-01

    The radon content in groundwater sources depends on the radium concentration in the rock of the aquifer. Radon was measured in water in many parts of the world, mostly for the risk assessment due to consumption of drinking water. The exposure to radon through drinking water is largely by inhalation and ingestion. Airborne radon can be released during normal household activities and can pose a greater potential health risk than radon ingested with water. Transport of radon through soil and bedrock by water depends mainly on the percolation of water through the pores and along fracture planes of bedrock. In this study, the radon concentration in water from springs and hand pumps of Kumaun Himalaya, India was measured using the radon emanometry technique. Radon concentration was found to vary from 1 to 392 Bq l(-1) with a mean of 50 Bq l(-1) in groundwater in different lithotectonic units. The radon level was found to be higher in the area consisting of granite, quartz porphyry, schist, phyllites and lowest in the area having sedimentary rocks, predominantly dominated by quartzite rocks.

  7. Study of the atmospheric chemistry of radon progeny in laboratory and real indoor atmospheres. Final project report

    SciTech Connect

    Hopke, P.K.

    1996-09-01

    This report completes Clarkson University`s study of the chemical and physical behavior of the {sup 218}Po atom immediately following its formation by the alpha decay of radon. Because small changes in size for activity in the sub-10 nm size range result in large changes in the delivered dose per unit exposure, this behavior must be understood if the exposure to radon progeny and it dose to the cells in the respiratory tract are to be fully assessed. In order to pursue this general goal, two areas of radon progeny behavior are being pursued; laboratory studies under controlled conditions to better understand the fundamental physical and chemical processes that affect the progeny`s atmospheric behavior and studies in actual indoor environments to develop a better assessment of the exposure of the occupants of that space to the size and concentration of the indoor radioactive aerosol. Thus, two sets of specific goals have been established for this project. The specific tasks of the controlled laboratory studies are (1) Determine the formation rates of {circ}OH radicals formed by the radiolysis of air following radon decay; (2) Examine the formation of particles by the radiolytic oxidation of substances like SO{sub 2}, ethylene, and H{sub 2}S to lower vapor pressure compounds and determine the role of gas phase additives such as H{sub 2}O and NH{sub 3} in determining the particle size; (3) Measure the rate of ion-induced nucleation using a thermal diffusion cloud chamber, and (4) Measure the neutralization rate of {sup 218}PoO{sub x}{sup +} in O{sub 2} at low radon concentrations.

  8. Ambient Radon-222 Monitoring in Amargosa Valley, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    L.H. Karr; J.J. Tappen; D. Shafer; K.J. Gray

    2008-06-05

    As part of a program to characterize and baseline selected environmental parameters in the region around the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, ambient radon-222 monitoring was conducted in the rural community of Amargosa Valley, the community closest to the proposed repository site. Passive integrating radon monitors and a continuous radon monitoring instrument were deployed adjacent to the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) (http://www.cemp.dri.edu/index.html) station located in the Amargosa Valley Community Center near the library. The CEMP station provided real-time ambient gamma exposure and meteorological data used to correct the integrated radon measurements as well as verify meteorological data collected by the continuous radon monitoring instrument. Additionally, different types of environmental enclosures that housed the monitors and instrument were used to determine if particular designs influenced the ambient radon measurements.

  9. Carcinogenesis and low-level ionizing radiation with special reference to lung cancer and exposure to radon daughters

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1982-04-01

    Of the important health effects of ionizing radiation, three important late effects - carcinogenesis, teratogenesis and mutagenesis are of greatest concern. This is because any exposure, even at low levels, carries some risk of such deleterious effects. As the dose of radiation increases above very low levels, the risk of health effects increases. Cancer-induction is the most important late somatic effect of low-dose ionizing radiation. Solid cancers, rather than leukemia, are principal late effects in exposed individuals. Tissues vary greatly in their susceptibility to radiation carcinogenesis. The most frequently occurring radiation-induced cancers in man include, in decreasing order of susceptibility: the female breast, the thyroid gland, the blood-forming tissues, the lung, certain organs of the gastrointestinal tract, and the bones. A number of biological and physical factors affect the cancer risk, such as age, sex, life-style, LET, and RBE. Despite uncertainty about low-level radiation risks, regulatory and advisory bodies must set standards for exposure, and individuals need information to be able to make informed judgments for themselves. From the point of view of the policy maker, the overriding concern is the fact that small doses of radiation can cause people to have more cancers than would otherwise be expected. While concern for all radiation effects exists, our human experience is limited to cancer-induction in exposed populations. This discussion is limited to cancer risk estimation and decision-making in relation to the health effects on populations of exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation. Here, low-level radiation will refer to yearly whole-body doses up to 5 rems or 0.05 Sv, or to cumulative doses up to 50 rems or 0.5 Sv from low-LET radiation and from high-LET radiation. (ERB)

  10. The performance of charcoal-based radon detection under time-varying radon conditions: Experimental and theoretical results

    SciTech Connect

    Sextro, R.G.; Lee, D.D.

    1988-10-01

    Radon adsorption by charcoal is a widely used technique for measuring indoor radon concentration, particularly when short-term results are desired. There are several different devices available, ranging from permeable envelopes filled with charcoal and open-face charcoal-filled canisters to devices incorporating diffusion limiting features to reduce losses of radon due to desorption. However, the integration characteristics of these samplers are not well understood, particularly under conditions of highly varying radon concentrations. A model for predicting the response of various types of charcoal based detectors to time-variant radon concentrations has been developed; the model predictions compare well with results from chamber experiments. Both the experimental and theoretical results have also been compared with integrated continuous-sampling measurements. The implications of these comparisons for use of charcoal for screening measurements is discussed. 5 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. The radon indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuelsson, L.

    2005-11-01

    The radon indicator is an efficient instrument for measuring the radon daughter concentrations in a house or dwelling. Physics or environmental science students could build a radon indicator as a student project. Another possibility would be to use a radon indicator in a student investigation of radon levels in different houses. Finally the radon indicator is an excellent device for producing a radioactive source, free of charge, for the study of α-, β- and γ-radiation. The half-life of the activity collected is approximately 40 min. The radon indicator makes use of an electrostatic method by which charged particles are drawn to a small aluminium plate with a high negative voltage (-5 kV), thus creating a strong electric field between the plate and a surrounding copper wire. The radioactivity on the plate is subsequently measured by a GM-counter and the result calculated in Bq m-3. The collecting time is just 5.5 min and therefore the instrument is only suitable for use in a short-time method for indicating the radon concentration. An improved diagram, ground-radon and/or wall-radon in houses, is presented on the basis of the author's measurements recorded with the radon indicator over many years. This diagram is very useful when discussing how to reduce radiation levels in homes.

  12. Geologic controls on radon

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, A.E.; Gundersen, L.C.S.

    1992-01-01

    This text provides a review of recent research on geological controls of [sup 222]Rn concentrations in soil gas in relation to the problem of high indoor radon concentrations in houses. The importance of the subject matter is highlighted in the preface by the observation that the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimates that 15,000 to 25,000 deaths result from radon-induced lung cancer each year in the United States. The text contains 8 Chapters: (1) Geology of radon in the United States; (2) Sensitivity of soil radon to geology and the distribution of radon and uranium in the Hylas Zone Area, Virginia; (3) Geologic and environmental implications of high soil-gas radon concentrations in The Great Valley, Jefferson and Berkeley Counties, West Virginia; (4) Soil radon distribution in glaciated areas: an example from the New Jersey Highlands; (5) Radon in the coastal plain of Texas, Alabama, and New Jersey; (6) Effects of weather and soil characteristics on temporal variations in soil-gas radon concentrations; (7) A theoretical model for the flux of radon from rock to ground water; (8) The influence of season, bedrock, overburden, and house construction on airborne levels of radon in Maine homes. The individual chapters are written by different authors in the form of self-contained research papers, each of which is followed by a comprehensive list of references.

  13. Radon is out

    SciTech Connect

    Harley, J.H.

    1992-12-31

    This paper discusses some facets of outdoor radon. There is only one source of radon - the decay of radium. Radium is everywhere but the bulk is in soil, rock, and ocean sediments. Soil porosity is a prime factor in radon movement. Exhalation from soil is fed by the high concentrations of radon in soil gas. Because the surface soil is losing radon to the atmosphere, soil gas concentration would be expected to increase with depth. There is a wide range of air radon concentrations, with marked seasonal and diurnal variations. Atmospheric stability is certainly a major factor - radon increases during inversions and decreases when the inversion breaks up. In addition, temperature, soil moisture, snow cover, and wind direction all play a part. Different investigators sometimes come to contrary conclusions on the effects of these factors. They are probably all correct - for the conditions in effect at the time - since no simple generalities exist for most factors.

  14. The performance of functional methods for correcting non-Gaussian measurement error within Poisson regression: corrected excess risk of lung cancer mortality in relation to radon exposure among French uranium miners.

    PubMed

    Allodji, Rodrigue S; Thiébaut, Anne C M; Leuraud, Klervi; Rage, Estelle; Henry, Stéphane; Laurier, Dominique; Bénichou, Jacques

    2012-12-30

    A broad variety of methods for measurement error (ME) correction have been developed, but these methods have rarely been applied possibly because their ability to correct ME is poorly understood. We carried out a simulation study to assess the performance of three error-correction methods: two variants of regression calibration (the substitution method and the estimation calibration method) and the simulation extrapolation (SIMEX) method. Features of the simulated cohorts were borrowed from the French Uranium Miners' Cohort in which exposure to radon had been documented from 1946 to 1999. In the absence of ME correction, we observed a severe attenuation of the true effect of radon exposure, with a negative relative bias of the order of 60% on the excess relative risk of lung cancer death. In the main scenario considered, that is, when ME characteristics previously determined as most plausible from the French Uranium Miners' Cohort were used both to generate exposure data and to correct for ME at the analysis stage, all three error-correction methods showed a noticeable but partial reduction of the attenuation bias, with a slight advantage for the SIMEX method. However, the performance of the three correction methods highly depended on the accurate determination of the characteristics of ME. In particular, we encountered severe overestimation in some scenarios with the SIMEX method, and we observed lack of correction with the three methods in some other scenarios. For illustration, we also applied and compared the proposed methods on the real data set from the French Uranium Miners' Cohort study.

  15. Indoor concentration of radon, thoron and their progeny around granite regions in the state of Karnataka, India.

    PubMed

    Sannappa, J; Ningappa, C

    2014-03-01

    An extensive studies on the indoor activity concentrations of thoron, radon and their progeny in the granite region in the state of Karnataka, India, has been carried out since, 2007 in the scope of a lung cancer epidemiological study using solid-state nuclear track detector-based double-chamber dosemeters (LR-115, type II plastic track detector). Seventy-four dwellings of different types were selected for the measurement. The dosemeters containing SSNTD detectors were fixed 2 m above the floor. After an exposure time of 3 months (90 d), films were etched to reveal tracks. From the track density, the concentrations of radon and thoron were evaluated. The value of the indoor concentration of thoron and radon in the study area varies from 16 to 170 Bq m(-3) and 18 to 300 Bq m(-3) with medians of 66 and 82.3 Bq m(-3), respectively, and that of their progeny varies from 1.8 to 24 mWL with a median of 3.6 mWL and 1.6 to 19.6 mWL, respectively. The concentrations of indoor thoron, radon and their progeny and their equivalent effective doses are discussed.

  16. Development and use of a branch exposure chamber to determine the effects of ozone on Pinus ponderosa: Objectives and experimental design

    SciTech Connect

    Houpis, J.L.J.; Surano, K.A.; Cowles, S.

    1988-01-01

    This research will develop a branch exposure chamber (BEC) to determine if the amount of carbon a branch receives from neighboring branches is altered by the presence of a BEC, or is altered by the imposition or exclusion of O/sub 3/, and to examine if the response of mature branches is different.

  17. EML pulse ionization chamber systems for /sup 222/Rn measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Fisenne, I M; Keller, H W

    1985-03-01

    Radon measurements have been performed with pulse ionization chambers at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) for over 35 years. This report describes the evolution of radon measurement systems, with emphasis on the continuous quality control efforts at EML. 38 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Survey of radon and thoron in homes of Indian Himalaya.

    PubMed

    Ramola, Rakesh Chand

    2011-07-01

    Measurements of radon, thoron and their progeny were carried out in some houses from Garhwal and Kumaun Himalayas of India using a LR-115 plastic track detector. The measurements were made in various residential houses of the area at a height of 2.5 m above the ground level using a twin chamber radon dosemeter, which can record the values of radon, thoron and their progeny separately. The concentrations of radon and thoron in these homes were found to vary from 11 to 191 and 1 to 156 Bq m(-3), respectively. The equilibrium factor between radon and progeny varies from 0.02 to 0.90, with an average of 0.26 for the region. The resulting dose rate due to radon, thoron and their decay products was found to vary from 0.02 to 0.84 μSv h(-1) with an arithmetic mean of 0.27 μSv h(-1). A detailed analysis of the distribution of radon, thoron and their decay products inside a house is also reported. The observed dose rates due to radon, thoron and progeny were found somewhat higher but well below the international recommendations.

  19. Overview of current radon and radon daughter research at LBL

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    This report provides a brief summary of radon and radon daughter research at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The radon and radon daughter research program has two broad goals: (1) the study of sources of radon and its subsequent transport into houses, and (2) research on the behavior of radon daughters in indoor environments. Additional research effort is directed to several auxiliary areas, including development of instrumentation and monitoring techniques, studies of indoor air movement, and measurement and control of indoor particulate concentrations.

  20. Atmosphere purification of radon and radon daughter elements

    DOEpatents

    Stein, L.

    1974-01-01

    A method of removing radon and radon daughter elements from an atmosphere containing these elements by passing the atmosphere through a bed of fluorinating compound whereby the radon and radon daughters are oxidized to their respective fluorides is discussed. These fluorides adhere to the fluorinating compound and are thus removed from the atmosphere which may then be recirculated. A method for recovering radon and separating radon from its daughter elements is also described. (Official Gazette)

  1. Radon entry control in new house construction.

    PubMed

    Najafi, F T; Lalwani, L; Li, W G

    1995-07-01

    People exposed to high concentration levels of radon face an increased risk of developing lung cancer. The risk is directly proportional to the length and level of radon exposure. Because of health reasons, it is safer to build new houses with radon mitigation systems installed in slab-on-grade houses. However, the interrelationships between parameters and factors governing radon entry and control are highly complex. A study performed by the University of Florida has examined the effectiveness of different radon entry control approaches. The analysis was based on 47 houses from three research projects conducted by the University of Florida (14 houses), Florida Solar Energy Center (13 houses), and GEOMET Technologies (20 houses). The evaluation of the performance and effectiveness of improved floor slabs, space conditioning, and ventilating systems were analyzed. Statistical analyses of the interrelationship between various parameters were also performed. Study findings such as the important factors in reducing radon entry and the effectiveness of passive construction approach and active subslab depressurization systems are presented in this paper.

  2. Radon levels in underground workplaces: a map of the Italian regions.

    PubMed

    Rossetti, Marta; Esposito, Massimo

    2015-04-01

    The indoor radon exposition is a widely recognised health hazard, so specific laws and regulations have been produced in many countries and so-called radon-risk maps have consequently been produced. In Italy the regulation applies to general workplaces and a national survey was carried out in the 1990s to evaluate the exposure to radon in dwellings. Failing a national coordinated mapping programme, some Italian regions performed a survey to identify radon-prone areas, nevertheless with different methodologies. In this work a national map of the average annual radon concentration levels in underground workplaces, obtained from the results of 8695 annual indoor radon measurements carried out by U-Series laboratory between 2003 and 2010, was presented. Due to underground locations, the mean radon concentration is higher than that from previous map elaborated for dwellings and a significant radon concentration was also found in Regions traditionally considered as low-risk areas.

  3. Preliminary results regarding the first map of residential radon in some regions in Romania.

    PubMed

    Cosma, C; Cucoş Dinu, A; Dicu, T

    2013-07-01

    Radon represents the most important contribution of population exposure to natural ionising radiation. This article presents the first indoor radon map in some regions of Romania based on 883 surveyed buildings in the Ştei-BăiŢa radon-prone region and 864 in other regions of Romania. Indoor radon measurements were performed in the last 10 y by using CR-39 nuclear track detectors exposed for 3-12 months on ground floor levels of dwellings. Excluding the Ştei-BăiŢa radon-prone region, an average indoor radon concentration of 126 Bq m(-3) was calculated for Romanian houses. In the Ştei-BăiŢa radon-prone area, the average indoor concentration was 292 Bq m(-3). About 21 % of the investigated dwellings in the Ştei-BăiŢa radon-prone region exceed the threshold of 400 Bq m(-3), while 5 % of the dwellings in other areas of Romania exceed the same threshold. As expected, indoor radon concentration is not uniformly distributed throughout Romania. The map shows a high variability among surveyed regions, mainly due to the differences in geology. The radon emanation rate is substantially influenced by the soil characteristics, such as the soil permeability and soil gas radon concentration. Since higher permeability enables the increased migration of soil gas and radon from the soil into the building, elevated levels of indoor radon can be expected in more permeable soil environments.

  4. Radon assay and purification techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Simgen, Hardy

    2013-08-08

    Radon is a source of background in many astroparticle physics experiments searching for rare low energy events. In this paper an overview about radon in the field is given including radon detection techniques, radon sources and material screening with respect to radon emanation. Finally, also the problem of long-lived radioactive {sup 222}Rn-daughters and the question of gas purification from radon is addressed.

  5. Radon exhalation from building materials for decorative use.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Rahman, Naureen M; Abu Atiya, Ibrahim

    2010-04-01

    Long-term exposure to radon increases the risk of developing lung cancer. There is considerable public concern about radon exhalation from building materials and the contribution to indoor radon levels. To address this concern, radon exhalation rates were determined for 53 different samples of drywall, tile and granite available on the Canadian market for interior home decoration. The radon exhalation rates ranged from non-detectable to 312 Bq m(-2) d(-1). Slate tiles and granite slabs had relatively higher radon exhalation rates than other decorative materials, such as ceramic or porcelain tiles. The average radon exhalation rates were 30 Bq m(-2) d(-1) for slate tiles and 42 Bq m(-2) d(-1) for granite slabs of various types and origins. Analysis showed that even if an entire floor was covered with a material having a radon exhalation rate of 300 Bq m(-2) d(-1), it would contribute only 18 Bq m(-3) to a tightly sealed house with an air exchange rate of 0.3 per hour. Generally speaking, building materials used in home decoration make no significant contribution to indoor radon for a house with adequate air exchange.

  6. A theoretical investigation of the distribution of indoor radon concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabi, R.; Oufni, L.

    2016-11-01

    Inhalation of radon (222Rn) and its decay products are a major source of natural radiation exposure. It is known from recent surveys in many countries that radon and its progeny contribute significantly to total inhalation dose and it is fairly established that radon when inhaled in large quantity causes lung disorder. In recent times, numerical modelling has become the cost effective replacement of experimental methods for the prediction and visualization of indoor pollutant distribution. The aim of this study is to implement the Finite Volume Method (FVM) for studying the radon distribution indoor. The findings show that the radon concentration which is distributed in a non-homogeneous way in the room is due to the difference in the radon concentration of different sources (wall, floor and ceiling). Moreover, the radon concentration is much larger near walls, and decreases in the middle of the room because of the effect of air velocity. We notice that the simulation results of radon concentration are in agreement with the results of other experimental studies. The annual effective dose of radon in the model room has been also investigated.

  7. Mineral dusts and radon in uranium mines

    SciTech Connect

    Abelson, P.H.

    1991-11-08

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) continues to assert that radon is a major cause of lung cancer in this country. EPA is fostering a radon program that could entail huge financial and emotional costs while yielding negligible benefits to public health. Justification for the program was the occurrence of lung cancer in men exposed to huge amounts of radon, mineral dusts, and other lung irritants in uranium mines on the Colorado Plateau. Lung cancer has been reported in about 356 cigarette smokers and in about 25 nonsmokers. During the era of high radon levels, monitoring was sporadic. Conditions in only a small fraction of the mines were measured, and that on a few separate occasions. Later, cumulative exposure to radon was calculated on the basis of measurements involving only a tiny fraction of the miners. Some were exposed to more than 15,000 pCi/liter of radon and its products. The level in the average home is about 1.5 pCi/liter. In making extrapolations from mine to home, the assumption is made that residents are in their dwellings most of the time and that miners spend only 170 hours a month in the mine. Two major questionable assumptions are involved in extrapolations from high doses of radon in the mines to low doses in homes. One is that no threshold is involved; that is, that humans have no remediation mechanism for {alpha} particle damages. There is evidence to the contrary. The most unrealistic assumption is that heavy exposure to silica has no effect on inducing lung cancer. Many studies have shown that silica dust causes lung cancer in animals. Exposure of human culture cells to silica has resulted in formation of neoplastic tissue. EPA has no solid evidence that exposures to 4 pCi/liter of radon causes lung cancer in either smokers or nonsmokers. Indeed, there is abundant evidence to the contrary in the fact that in states with high levels of radon, inhabitants have less lung cancer than those in states with low levels.

  8. The measurement accuracy of passive radon instruments.

    PubMed

    Beck, T R; Foerster, E; Buchröder, H; Schmidt, V; Döring, J

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyses the data having been gathered from interlaboratory comparisons of passive radon instruments over 10 y with respect to the measurement accuracy. The measurement accuracy is discussed in terms of the systematic and the random measurement error. The analysis shows that the systematic measurement error of the most instruments issued by professional laboratory services can be within a range of ±10 % from the true value. A single radon measurement has an additional random measurement error, which is in the range of up to ±15 % for high exposures to radon (>2000 kBq h m(-3)). The random measurement error increases for lower exposures. The analysis especially applies to instruments with solid-state nuclear track detectors and results in proposing criteria for testing the measurement accuracy. Instruments with electrets and charcoal have also been considered, but the low stock of data enables only a qualitative discussion.

  9. Residential Radon and Brain Tumour Incidence in a Danish Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Bräuner, Elvira V.; Andersen, Zorana J.; Andersen, Claus E.; Pedersen, Camilla; Gravesen, Peter; Ulbak, Kaare; Hertel, Ole; Loft, Steffen; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole

    2013-01-01

    Background Increased brain tumour incidence over recent decades may reflect improved diagnostic methods and clinical practice, but remain unexplained. Although estimated doses are low a relationship between radon and brain tumours may exist. Objective To investigate the long-term effect of exposure to residential radon on the risk of primary brain tumour in a prospective Danish cohort. Methods During 1993–1997 we recruited 57,053 persons. We followed each cohort member for cancer occurrence from enrolment until 31 December 2009, identifying 121 primary brain tumour cases. We traced residential addresses from 1 January 1971 until 31 December 2009 and calculated radon concentrations at each address using information from central databases regarding geology and house construction. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate incidence rate-ratios (IRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the risk of primary brain tumours associated with residential radon exposure with adjustment for age, sex, occupation, fruit and vegetable consumption and traffic-related air pollution. Effect modification by air pollution was assessed. Results Median estimated radon was 40.5 Bq/m3. The adjusted IRR for primary brain tumour associated with each 100 Bq/m3 increment in average residential radon levels was 1.96 (95% CI: 1.07; 3.58) and this was exposure-dependently higher over the four radon exposure quartiles. This association was not modified by air pollution. Conclusions We found significant associations and exposure-response patterns between long-term residential radon exposure radon in a general population and risk of primary brain tumours, adding new knowledge to this field. This finding could be chance and needs to be challenged in future studies. PMID:24066143

  10. Consumer's Guide to Radon Reduction

    MedlinePlus

    ... EPA United States Environmental Protection Agency Search Search Radon Share Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us Consumer's Guide to Radon Reduction: How to Fix Your Home Contains information ...

  11. Study of the atmospheric chemistry of radon progeny in laboratory and real indoor atmospheres. Progress report, July 1, 1992--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Hopke, P.K.

    1992-07-01

    This report describes studies on the chemical and physical behavior of the {sup 218}Po atom immediately following its formation by the alpha decay of radon. Because small changes in size for activity in the sub-10 nm size range result in large changes in the delivered dose per unit exposure, this behavior must be understood if the exposure to radon progeny and its dose to the cells in the respiratory tract are to be fully assessed. The specific tasks of the controlled laboratory studies are to determine the formation rates of {center_dot}OH radicals formed by the radiolysis of air following radon decay, to examine the formation of particles by the radiolytic oxidation of substances like SO{sub 2} ethylene, and H{sub 2}S to lower vapor pressure compounds and determine the role of gas phase additives such as H{sub 2}O and NH{sub 3} in determining the particle size, to measure the rate of ion-induced nucleation using a thermal diffusion cloud chamber, and to measure the neutralization rate of {sup 218}Po{sub x}{sup +} in O{sub 2} at low radon concentrations. Tasks of the exposure studies in occupied indoor spaces are to initiate measurements of the activity size distributions in actual homes with occupants present so that the variability of the indoor activity size distributions can be assessed with respect to indoor aerosol sources and general lifestyle variations of the occupants, to initiate a prospective study of the utility of measurement of deposited {sup 210}Pb embedded in glass surfaces as a measure of the long-term, integrated exposure of the population to radon, and to develop the methodology to determine the hygroscopicity of the indoor aerosol so that the changes in deposition efficiency of the radioactive indoor aerosol with hygroscopic growth in the respiratory tract can be assessed.

  12. The National Radon Action Plan - A Strategy for Saving Lives

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    NRAP Guide-A Strategy for Saving Lives sets out strategies to drive the changes needed to reduce exposure to radon, a naturally occurring, invisible and odorless gas. Partnership headed by ALA with feds and NGOs.

  13. Results of simultaneous radon and thoron measurements in 33 metropolitan areas of Canada.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Bergman, Lauren; Falcomer, Renato; Whyte, Jeff

    2015-02-01

    Radon has been identified as the second leading cause of lung cancer after tobacco smoking. (222)Rn (radon gas) and (220)Rn (thoron gas) are the most common isotopes of radon. In order to assess thoron contribution to indoor radon and thoron exposure, a survey of residential radon and thoron concentrations was initiated in 2012 with ∼4000 homes in the 33 census metropolitan areas of Canada. The survey confirmed that indoor radon and thoron concentrations are not correlated and that thoron concentrations cannot be predicted from widely available radon information. The results showed that thoron contribution to the radiation dose varied from 0.5 to 6% geographically. The study indicated that, on average, thoron contributes ∼3% of the radiation dose due to indoor radon and thoron exposure in Canada. Even though the estimated average thoron concentration of 9 Bq m(-3) (population weighted) in Canada is low, the average radon concentration of 96 Bq m(-3) (population weighted) is more than double the worldwide average indoor radon concentration. It is clear that continued efforts are needed to further reduce the exposure and effectively reduce the number of lung cancers caused by radon.

  14. Results of simultaneous radon and thoron measurements in 33 metropolitan areas of Canada

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing; Bergman, Lauren; Falcomer, Renato; Whyte, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Radon has been identified as the second leading cause of lung cancer after tobacco smoking. 222Rn (radon gas) and 220Rn (thoron gas) are the most common isotopes of radon. In order to assess thoron contribution to indoor radon and thoron exposure, a survey of residential radon and thoron concentrations was initiated in 2012 with ∼4000 homes in the 33 census metropolitan areas of Canada. The survey confirmed that indoor radon and thoron concentrations are not correlated and that thoron concentrations cannot be predicted from widely available radon information. The results showed that thoron contribution to the radiation dose varied from 0.5 to 6 % geographically. The study indicated that, on average, thoron contributes ∼3 % of the radiation dose due to indoor radon and thoron exposure in Canada. Even though the estimated average thoron concentration of 9 Bq m−3 (population weighted) in Canada is low, the average radon concentration of 96 Bq m−3 (population weighted) is more than double the worldwide average indoor radon concentration. It is clear that continued efforts are needed to further reduce the exposure and effectively reduce the number of lung cancers caused by radon. PMID:24748485

  15. The Spanish indoor radon mapping strategy.

    PubMed

    Sainz-Fernandez, C; Fernandez-Villar, A; Fuente-Merino, I; Gutierrez-Villanueva, J L; Martin-Matarranz, J L; Garcia-Talavera, M; Casal-Ordas, S; Quindós-Poncela, L S

    2014-11-01

    Indoor radon mapping still represents a valuable tool for drawing the picture of the exposure of general public due to radon and radon progeny inhalation in a residential context. The information provided by means of a map is useful not only as awareness and strategic element for authorities and policy-makers, but also as a scientific start-up point in the design of epidemiological and other specific studies on exposure to natural radiation. The requirements for a good mapping are related to harmonisation criteria coming from European recommendations, as well as to national/local characteristics and necessities. Around 12,000 indoor radon measurements have been made since the Spanish national radon programme began at the end of the 1980s. A significant proportion of them resulted from the last campaign performed from 2009 to 12. This campaign completed the first version of a map based on a grid 10 × 10 km(2). In this paper, the authors present the main results of a new map together with the criteria adopted to improve the number of measurements and the statistical significance of them.

  16. Portable apparatus for the measurement of environmental radon and thoron

    DOEpatents

    Negro, Vincent C.

    2001-01-01

    The radometer is a portable instrument for the measurement of the concentration of atmospheric radon/thoron in a test area. A constant velocity pump pulls the air from the outside at a constant flow rate. If the air is too moist, some or all of the sample is passed through a desiccant filter prior to encountering an electrostatic filter. The electrostatic filter prevents any charged particles from entering the sampling chamber. Once the sample has entered the chamber, the progeny of the decay of radon/thoron are collected on a detector and measured. The measured data is compiled by a computer and displayed.

  17. Potential for bias in epidemiologic studies that rely on glass-based retrospective assessment of radon

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, C.R.

    1995-11-01

    Retrospective assessment of exposure to radon remains the greatest challenge in epidemiologic efforts to assess lung cancer risk associated with residential exposure. An innovative technique based on measurement of {alpha}-emitting, long-lived daughters embedded by recoil into household glass may one day provide improved radon dosimetry. Particulate air pollution is known, however, to retard the plate-out of radon daughters. This would be expected to result in a differential effect on dosimetry, where the calibration curve relating the actual historical radon exposure to the remaining {alpha}-activity in the glass would be different in historically smoky and nonsmoky environments. The resulting {open_quotes}measurement confounding{close_quotes} can distort inferences about the effect of radon and can also produce spurious evidence for synergism between radon exposure and cigarette smoking. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Mitigating factors on air concentrations of radon emanating from different granite samples

    SciTech Connect

    Qari, T.M.; Mamoon, A.M.; Abdul-Fattah, A.F. )

    1991-11-01

    Continuous exposure to increased air concentrations of radon in living areas is to be avoided according to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and several published reports. Radon concentrations in ambient air are influenced by several factors related to the nature of the radon source itself, environmental conditions, and the presence of mitigating factors, if any. In this study, crushed granite samples of different types, particle diameters, and moisture contents were compared in simplified test systems with regard to radon emanation from the samples. The effects of selected mitigating factors, namely, ventilation and different barriers to diffusion of emanated radon were determined.

  19. Risks from Radon: Reconciling Miner and Residential Epidemiology

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, Douglas B.; Harley, Naomi H.

    2008-08-07

    Everyone is exposed to radon, an inert radioactive gas that occurs naturally and is present everywhere in the atmosphere. The annual dose from radon and its (short-lived) decay products is typically about one-half of the dose received by members of the public from all natural sources of ionizing radiation. Data on exposures and consequent effects have recently been reviewed by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) and the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR). Studies of underground miners provides a well-established basis for estimating risks from occupational exposures to radon and for studying factors that may affect the dose response relationship such as the reduction of risk (coefficients) with increasing time since exposure. Miners' studies previously formed the basis for estimating risks to people exposed to radon at home, with downward extrapolation from exposures in mines to residential levels of radon. Presently, the risk estimates from residential studies are adequate to estimate radon risks in homes. Although there are major uncertainties in extrapolating the risks of exposure to radon from the miner studies to assessing risks in the home, there is remarkably good agreement between the average of risk factors derived from miner studies and those from pooled residential case-control studies. There are now over 20 analytical studies of residential radon and lung cancer. These studies typically assess the relative risk from exposure to radon based on estimates of residential exposure over a period of 25 to 30 years prior to diagnosis of lung cancer. Recent pooled analyses of residential case-control studies support a small but detectable lung cancer risk from residential exposure, and this risk increases with increasing concentrations. The excess relative risk of lung cancer from long-term residential exposure is about the same for both smokers and non-smokers; however, because the

  20. Risks from Radon: Reconciling Miner and Residential Epidemiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, Douglas B.; Harley, Naomi H.

    2008-08-01

    Everyone is exposed to radon, an inert radioactive gas that occurs naturally and is present everywhere in the atmosphere. The annual dose from radon and its (short-lived) decay products is typically about one-half of the dose received by members of the public from all natural sources of ionizing radiation. Data on exposures and consequent effects have recently been reviewed by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) and the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR). Studies of underground miners provides a well-established basis for estimating risks from occupational exposures to radon and for studying factors that may affect the dose response relationship such as the reduction of risk (coefficients) with increasing time since exposure. Miners' studies previously formed the basis for estimating risks to people exposed to radon at home, with downward extrapolation from exposures in mines to residential levels of radon. Presently, the risk estimates from residential studies are adequate to estimate radon risks in homes. Although there are major uncertainties in extrapolating the risks of exposure to radon from the miner studies to assessing risks in the home, there is remarkably good agreement between the average of risk factors derived from miner studies and those from pooled residential case-control studies. There are now over 20 analytical studies of residential radon and lung cancer. These studies typically assess the relative risk from exposure to radon based on estimates of residential exposure over a period of 25 to 30 years prior to diagnosis of lung cancer. Recent pooled analyses of residential case-control studies support a small but detectable lung cancer risk from residential exposure, and this risk increases with increasing concentrations. The excess relative risk of lung cancer from long-term residential exposure is about the same for both smokers and non-smokers; however, because the

  1. Radon gas: Health risks and toxicity. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning health risks and toxicity associated with indoor and outdoor exposure to radon gas. Citations discuss radon sources from tobacco smoke, fossil fuel combustion, phosphate mining, uranium mining, granitic rocks, building materials, and water supplies. Discussed also are risk assessment, regulations, radon gas monitoring, exposure modeling and control, biological pathways, and occupational exposure. Radionuclides in groundwater, and radon analysis and detection, are examined in separate bibliographies. (Contains a minimum of 125 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  2. Radon concentration of waters in Greece and Cyprus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolopoulos, D.; Vogiannis, E.; Louizi, A.

    2009-04-01

    Radon (222Rn) is a radioactive gas generated by the decay of the naturally occurring 238U series. It is considered very important from radiological point of view, since it is the most significant natural source of human radiation exposure (approximately 50% from all natural sources). Radon is present in soil, rocks, building materials and waters. Through diffusion and convection, radon migrates and emanates to the atmosphere. Outdoors, radon concentrates at low levels (in the order of 10 Bq/m3). However indoors, radon accumulates significantly. It is trivial to observe indoor environments with high radon levels (in the order of 400 Bq/m3 or higher). Radon accumulation indoors, depends on the composition of the underlying soil and rock formation, on building materials, meteorological parameters, ventilation, heating and water use. Although soil and building materials are the most significant radon sources, there have been reported elevated radon concentrations in building structures due to entering water. It is the radon concentrations in the entering water, the volume and the way of water usage, separated or in combination, that result in large amounts of radon in indoor air. Moreover, radon is a factor of stomach radiation burden due to water consumption. This burden is estimated by measurements of radon concentrations in waters. Due to the health impact of radon exposure, the reporting team continuously measures radon. This work focused on the radon concentrations exposure due to water consumption and use in Greece and Cyprus. Various locations in Greece and Cyprus were accessed taking into consideration existing natural radioactivity data (mainly radon in water), however under the restriction of the capability of movement. Radon in water was measured by Alpha Guard (Genitron Ltd) via a special unit (Aqua Kit). This unit consists of a vessel used for forced degassing of radon diluted in water samples, a security vessel used for water drop deposition. Vessels and

  3. Alteration in carboxyhemoglobin concentrations during exposure to 9 ppm carbon monoxide for 8 hours at sea level and 2134 m altitude in a hypobaric chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, S.M.; Bedi, J.F. )

    1989-10-01

    Seventeen non-smoking young men served as subjects to determine the alteration in carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) concentrations during exposure to 0 or 9 ppm carbon monoxide for 8 hours (CO) at sea level or an altitude of 2134 meters (7000 feet) in a hypobaric chamber. Nine subjects rested during the exposure and 8 exercised for 10 minutes of each exposure hour at a mean ventilation of 25 L (BTPS). All subjects performed a maximal aerobic capacity test at the completion of their respective exposures. Carboxyhemoglobin concentrations fell in all subjects during their exposures to 0 ppm CO at sea level or 2134 m. During the 8-h exposures to 9 ppm CO, COHb rose linearly from approximately 0.2 percent to 0.7 percent. No significant differences in uptake were found whether the subjects were resting or intermittently exercising during their 8-h exposures. COHb levels attained were similar at both sea level and 2134 m. Maximal aerobic capacity was reduced approximately 7-10 percent consequent to altitude exposure during 0 ppm CO exposures. These values were not altered following exposure for 8 h to 9 ppm CO in either the resting or exercising subjects.

  4. Atmosphere purification of radon and radon daughter elements

    DOEpatents

    Stein, L.

    1973-12-11

    A method for purifying an atmosphere of radon and radon daughter elements which may be contained therein by contacting the atmosphere with a fluorinating solution, whereby the radon and radon daughters are oxidized to their respective fluorides is discussed. The fluorides dissolve in the fluorinating solutlon and are removed from the atmosphere, which may then be recirculated. (Official Gazette)

  5. RADON REDUCTION AND RADON RESISTANT CONSTRUCTION DEMONSTRATIONS IN NEW YORK

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report covers three tasks related to indoor radon: (1) the demonstration of radon reduction techniques in 8 houses in each of two uniquely different radon prone areas of the State of New York; (2) the evaluation and repair of 14 radon mitigation systems in houses mitigated 4 ...

  6. Detailed diesel exhaust characteristics including particle surface area and lung deposited dose for better understanding of health effects in human chamber exposure studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wierzbicka, Aneta; Nilsson, Patrik T.; Rissler, Jenny; Sallsten, Gerd; Xu, Yiyi; Pagels, Joakim H.; Albin, Maria; Österberg, Kai; Strandberg, Bo; Eriksson, Axel; Bohgard, Mats; Bergemalm-Rynell, Kerstin; Gudmundsson, Anders

    2014-04-01

    Several diesel exhaust (DE) characteristics, comprising both particle and gas phase, recognized as important when linking with health effects, are not reported in human chamber exposure studies. In order to understand effects of DE on humans there is a need for better characterization of DE when performing exposure studies. The aim of this study was to determine and quantify detailed DE characteristics during human chamber exposure. Additionally to compare to reported DE properties in conducted human exposures. A wide battery of particle and gas phase measurement techniques have been used to provide detailed DE characteristics including the DE particles (DEP) surface area, fraction and dose deposited in the lungs, chemical composition of both particle and gas phase such as NO, NO2, CO, CO2, volatile organic compounds (including aldehydes, benzene, toluene) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Eyes, nose and throat irritation effects were determined. Exposure conditions with PM1 (<1 μm) mass concentration 280 μg m-3, number concentration 4 × 105 cm-3 and elemental to total carbon fraction of 82% were generated from a diesel vehicle at idling. When estimating the lung deposited dose it was found that using the size dependent effective density (in contrast to assuming unity density) reduced the estimated respiratory dose by 132% by mass. Accounting for agglomerated structure of DEP prevented underestimation of lung deposited dose by surface area by 37% in comparison to assuming spherical particles. Comparison of DE characteristics reported in conducted chamber exposures showed that DE properties vary to a great extent under the same DEP mass concentration and engine load. This highlights the need for detailed and standardized approach for measuring and reporting of DE properties. Eyes irritation effects, most probably caused by aldehydes in the gas phase, as well as nose irritation were observed at exposure levels below current occupational exposure limit

  7. Flow chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Morozov, Victor

    2011-01-18

    A flow chamber having a vacuum chamber and a specimen chamber. The specimen chamber may have an opening through which a fluid may be introduced and an opening through which the fluid may exit. The vacuum chamber may have an opening through which contents of the vacuum chamber may be evacuated. A portion of the flow chamber may be flexible, and a vacuum may be used to hold the components of the flow chamber together.

  8. An historical overview of radon and its progeny: applications and health effects.

    PubMed

    Mc Laughlin, J

    2012-11-01

    Since its discovery by Dorn in 1900, studies of radon and its progeny have contributed to such diverse scientific fields as meteorology, geophysics, mineral exploration and radiation health effects. In addition to terrestrial scientific studies of radon, NASA missions in recent decades have yielded data on the behaviour of radon and its progeny on the Moon and on Mars. Radon has been used therapeutically for ∼100 y in the form of radon seeds for the irradiation of malignant tumours. It is, however, for its negative health effects that radon is better and more justifiably known. The causal role of radon and, in particular, its progeny in the elevated incidence of lung cancer in underground uranium miners was established in the 1950s. It is of historical interest to note that the fatal lung disease of silver miners in Saxony and Bohemia in the 16th century, was undoubtedly lung cancer caused by the high levels of radon in the mines. In recent decades there has been an ever-growing interest in the public health effects of exposure to radon in homes. Extensive radon epidemiological studies both of underground miners and of the general public in recent decades have quantified the lung cancer risks from radon exposure. Radon was classified in 1988 by International Agency for Research on Cancer as a human carcinogen and in 2009 the World Health Organization identified radon as the second cause of lung cancer globally after smoking. Radon control strategies are used by many governments to control and reduce the risk to public health from radon.

  9. Variance of indoor radon concentration: Major influencing factors.

    PubMed

    Yarmoshenko, I; Vasilyev, A; Malinovsky, G; Bossew, P; Žunić, Z S; Onischenko, A; Zhukovsky, M

    2016-01-15

    Variance of radon concentration in dwelling atmosphere is analysed with regard to geogenic and anthropogenic influencing factors. Analysis includes review of 81 national and regional indoor radon surveys with varying sampling pattern, sample size and duration of measurements and detailed consideration of two regional surveys (Sverdlovsk oblast, Russia and Niška Banja, Serbia). The analysis of the geometric standard deviation revealed that main factors influencing the dispersion of indoor radon concentration over the territory are as follows: area of territory, sample size, characteristics of measurements technique, the radon geogenic potential, building construction characteristics and living habits. As shown for Sverdlovsk oblast and Niška Banja town the dispersion as quantified by GSD is reduced by restricting to certain levels of control factors. Application of the developed approach to characterization of the world population radon exposure is discussed.

  10. Requirements relating to radon in the International Basic Safety Standards: information, measurement and national strategies.

    PubMed

    Colgan, P A; Boal, T; Czarwinski, R

    2013-03-01

    The fifth edition of the International Basic Safety Standards (BSS) has recently been established as Part 3 of the General Safety Requirements of the IAEA Safety Standards Series. The BSS applies to all exposure situations and to all categories of exposure. As such, the BSS addresses both occupational exposure due to radon in workplaces and public exposure due to radon in dwellings. In workplaces, exposure due to radon is treated either as a planned exposure situation or as an existing exposure situation, depending on the circumstances. With regard to exposure due to radon in dwellings, the BSS requires that general information on radon, including information on health risks and the synergy with smoking, be made available to the public and other interested parties. Countries are also required to determine whether an action plan for controlling exposure due to radon indoors is necessary, and, if so, to establish and implement such an action plan. Guidance material, covering the establishment of reference levels, national and regional radon surveys, identification of radon prone areas, building codes for new buildings, corrective actions for existing buildings, information campaigns and programme evaluation and effectiveness is currently being developed.

  11. Citizen's Guide to Radon: The Guide to Protecting Yourself and Your Family from Radon

    MedlinePlus

    ... Radon: The Guide to Protecting Yourself and Your Family from Radon Contains basic information about Radon in ... Radon Zones and State Contact Information Individuals and Families Radon Publications Home Buyers and Sellers Builders and ...

  12. The reliability of radon as seismic precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emilian Toader, Victorin; Moldovan, Iren Adelina; Ionescu, Constantin; Marmureanu, Alexandru

    2016-04-01

    Our multidisciplinary network (AeroSolSys) located in Vrancea (Curvature Carpathian Mountains) includes radon concentration monitoring in five stations. We focus on lithosphere and near surface low atmosphere phenomena using real-time information about seismicity, + / - ions, clouds, solar radiation, temperature (air, ground), humidity, atmospheric pressure, wind speed and direction, telluric currents, variations of the local magnetic field, infrasound, variations of the atmospheric electrostatic field, variations in the earth crust with inclinometers, electromagnetic activity, CO2 concentration, ULF radio wave propagation, seismo-acoustic emission, animal behavior. The main purpose is to inform the authorities about risk situation and update hazard scenarios. The radon concentration monitoring is continuously with 1 hour or 3 hours sample rate in locations near to faults in an active seismic zone characterized by intermediate depth earthquakes. Trigger algorithms include standard deviation, mean and derivative methods. We correlate radon concentration measurements with humidity, temperature and atmospheric pressure from the same equipment. In few stations we have meteorological information, too. Sometime the radon concentration has very high variations (maxim 4535 Bq/m3 from 106 Bq/m3) in short time (1 - 2 days) without being accompanied by an important earthquake. Generally the cause is the high humidity that could be generated by tectonic stress. Correlation with seismicity needs information from minimum 6 month in our case. For 10605 hours, 618 earthquakes with maxim magnitude 4.9 R, we have got radon average 38 Bq/m3 and exposure 408111 Bqh/m3 in one station. In two cases we have correlation between seismicity and radon concentration. In other one we recorded high variation because the location was in an area with multiple faults and a river. Radon can be a seismic precursor but only in a multidisciplinary network. The anomalies for short or long period of

  13. LARGE BUILDING RADON MANUAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes information on how bilding systems -- especially the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system -- inclurence radon entry into large buildings and can be used to mitigate radon problems. It addresses the fundamentals of large building HVAC syst...

  14. An updated review of case-control studies of lung cancer and indoor radon-Is indoor radon the risk factor for lung cancer?

    PubMed

    Sheen, Seungsoo; Lee, Keu Sung; Chung, Wou Young; Nam, Saeil; Kang, Dae Ryong

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. Smoking is definitely the most important risk factor for lung cancer. Radon ((222)Rn) is a natural gas produced from radium ((226)Ra) in the decay series of uranium ((238)U). Radon exposure is the second most common cause of lung cancer and the first risk factor for lung cancer in never-smokers. Case-control studies have provided epidemiological evidence of the causative relationship between indoor radon exposure and lung cancer. Twenty-four case-control study papers were found by our search strategy from the PubMed database. Among them, seven studies showed that indoor radon has a statistically significant association with lung cancer. The studies performed in radon-prone areas showed a more positive association between radon and lung cancer. Reviewed papers had inconsistent results on the dose-response relationship between indoor radon and lung cancer risk. Further refined case-control studies will be required to evaluate the relationship between radon and lung cancer. Sufficient study sample size, proper interview methods, valid and precise indoor radon measurement, wide range of indoor radon, and appropriate control of confounders such as smoking status should be considered in further case-control studies.

  15. Measurement of HOx• production rate due to radon decay in air

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Huiling

    1993-08-01

    Radon in indoor air may cause the exposure of the public to excessive radioactivity. Radiolysis of water vapor in indoor air due to radon decay could produce (•OH and HO2 •) that may convert atmospheric constituents to compounds of lower vapor pressure. These lower vapor pressure compounds might then nucleate to form new particles in the indoor atmosphere. Chemical amplification was used to determine HOx• production rate in indoor air caused by radon decay. Average HOx• production rate was found to be (4.31±0.07) x 105 HOx• per Rn decay per second (Bq) 3.4 to 55.0% at 22C. This work provided G(HOx•)-value, 7.86±0.13 No./100 eV in air by directly measuring [HOx•] formed from the radiolysis procedure. This G value implies that HOx• produced by radon decay in air might be formed by multiple processes and may be result of positive ion-molecule reactions, primary radiolysis, and radical reactions. There is no obvious relation between HOx• production rate and relative humidity. A laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) system has been used for •OH production rate measurement; it consists of an excimer laser, a dye laser, a frequency doubler, a gaseous fluorescence chamber, and other optical and electronic parts. This system needs to be improved to eliminate the interferences of light scattering and artificial •OH produced from the photolysis of O3/H2O.

  16. 30 CFR 57.5040 - Exposure records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) The operator shall calculate and record complete individual exposures to concentrations of radon... concentration of airborne radon daughters for each active working area. (2) Where uranium is not mined—the complete individual exposure of all mine personnel working in active working areas with radon...

  17. 30 CFR 57.5040 - Exposure records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) The operator shall calculate and record complete individual exposures to concentrations of radon... concentration of airborne radon daughters for each active working area. (2) Where uranium is not mined—the complete individual exposure of all mine personnel working in active working areas with radon...

  18. 30 CFR 57.5040 - Exposure records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) The operator shall calculate and record complete individual exposures to concentrations of radon... concentration of airborne radon daughters for each active working area. (2) Where uranium is not mined—the complete individual exposure of all mine personnel working in active working areas with radon...

  19. 30 CFR 57.5040 - Exposure records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) The operator shall calculate and record complete individual exposures to concentrations of radon... concentration of airborne radon daughters for each active working area. (2) Where uranium is not mined—the complete individual exposure of all mine personnel working in active working areas with radon...

  20. 30 CFR 57.5040 - Exposure records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) The operator shall calculate and record complete individual exposures to concentrations of radon... concentration of airborne radon daughters for each active working area. (2) Where uranium is not mined—the complete individual exposure of all mine personnel working in active working areas with radon...

  1. Assessment of the multimedia mitigation of radon in New York.

    PubMed

    Kitto, Michael E

    2007-05-01

    Although not yet implemented, the 1996 amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act instructed the states (or local water suppliers) to address radon concentrations in community water systems (CWS). As an alternative to reducing waterborne radon concentrations in the CWS to the maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 11 Bq L(-1), states (or individual CWS) would be permitted to develop a multimedia mitigation (MMM) program, which allowed a greater concentration (148 Bq L(-1)) of waterborne radon in the CWS, if it could be shown that an equivalent health risk reduction could be achieved by reducing indoor radon concentrations. For a MMM program to be acceptable, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency required the health-risk reduction attained through mitigations and radon-resistant new construction (RRNC) to offset the increased health risk due to radon in community water systems above the MCL of 11 Bq L(-1). A quantitative assessment indicates that the reduction in health risk currently achieved in New York State through radon mitigations and RRNC exceeded the increase in risk associated with an alternative MCL of 148 Bq L(-1). The implementation of a MMM program in New York would result in an overall reduction in the health risk associated with exposure to radon.

  2. Simultaneous measurements of indoor radon, radon-thoron progeny and high-resolution gamma spectrometry in Greek dwellings.

    PubMed

    Clouvas, A; Xanthos, S; Antonopoulos-Domis, M

    2006-01-01

    Simultaneous indoor radon, radon-thoron progeny and high-resolution in situ gamma spectrometry measurements, with portable high-purity Ge detector were performed in 26 dwellings of Thessaloniki, the second largest town of Greece, during March 2003-January 2005. The radon gas was measured with an AlphaGUARD ionisation chamber (in each of the 26 dwellings) every 10 min, for a time period between 7 and 10 d. Most of the values of radon gas concentration are between 20 and 30 Bq m(-3), with an arithmetic mean of 34 Bq m(-3). The maximum measured value of radon gas concentration is 516 Bq m(-3). The comparison between the radon gas measurements, performed with AlphaGUARD and short-term electret ionisation chamber, shows very good agreement, taking into account the relative short time period of the measurement and the relative low radon gas concentration. Radon and thoron progeny were measured with a SILENA (model 4s) instrument. From the radon and radon progeny measurements, the equilibrium factor F could be deduced. Most of the measurements of the equilibrium factor are within the range 0.4-0.5. The mean value of the equilibrium factor F is 0.49 +/- 0.10, i.e. close to the typical value of 0.4 adopted by UNSCEAR. The mean equilibrium equivalent thoron concentration measured in the 26 dwellings is EEC(thoron) = 1.38 +/- 0.79 Bq m(-3). The mean equilibrium equivalent thoron to radon ratio concentration, measured in the 26 dwellings, is 0.1 +/- 0.06. The mean total absorbed dose rate in air, owing to gamma radiation, is 58 +/- 12 nGy h(-1). The contribution of the different radionuclides to the total indoor gamma dose rate in air is 38% due to 40K, 36% due to thorium series and 26% due to uranium series. The annual effective dose, due to the different source terms (radon, thoron and external gamma radiation), is 1.05, 0.39 and 0.28 mSv, respectively.

  3. Radon in soil gas in Kosovo.

    PubMed

    Kikaj, Dafina; Jeran, Zvonka; Bahtijari, Meleq; Stegnar, Peter

    2016-11-01

    An assessment of the radiological situation due to exposure to radon and gamma emitting radionuclides was conducted in southern Kosovo. This study deals with sources of radon in soil gas. A long-term study of radon concentrations in the soil gas was carried out using the SSNTDs (CR-39) at 21 different locations in the Sharr-Korabi zone. The detectors were exposed for an extended period of time, including at least three seasonal periods in a year and the sampling locations were chosen with respect to lithology. In order to determine the concentration of the natural radioactive elements (238)U and (226)Ra, as a precursor of (222)Rn, soil samples were collected from each measuring point from a depth of 0.8 m, and measured by gamma spectrometry. The levels (Bq kg(-1)) of naturally occurring radionuclides and levels (kBq m(-3)) of radon in soil gas obtained at a depth 0.8 m of soil were: 21-53 for (226)Ra, 22-160 for (238)U and 0.295-32 for (222)Rn. With respect to lithology, the highest value for (238)U and (226)Ra were found in limestone and the highest value for (222)Rn was found in metamorphic rocks. In addition, the results showed seasonal variations of the measured soil gas radon concentrations with maximum concentration in the spring months.

  4. Procedure for the characterization of radon potential in existing dwellings and to assess the annual average indoor radon concentration.

    PubMed

    Collignan, Bernard; Powaga, Emilie

    2014-11-01

    Risk assessment due to radon exposure indoors is based on annual average indoor radon activity concentration. To assess the radon exposure in a building, measurement is generally performed during at least two months during heating period in order to be representative of the annual average value. This is because radon presence indoors could be very variable during time. This measurement protocol is fairly reliable but may be a limiting in the radon risk management, particularly during a real estate transaction due to the duration of the measurement and the limitation of the measurement period. A previous field study defined a rapid methodology to characterize radon entry in dwellings. The objective of this study was at first, to test this methodology in various dwellings to assess its relevance with a daily test. At second, a ventilation model was used to assess numerically the air renewal of a building, the indoor air quality all along the year and the annual average indoor radon activity concentration, based on local meteorological conditions, some building characteristics and in-situ characterization of indoor pollutant emission laws. Experimental results obtained on thirteen individual dwellings showed that it is generally possible to obtain a representative characterization of radon entry into homes. It was also possible to refine the methodology defined in the previous study. In addition, numerical assessments of annual average indoor radon activity concentration showed generally a good agreement with measured values. These results are encouraging to allow a procedure with a short measurement time to be used to characterize long-term radon potential in dwellings.

  5. Measurement of radon concentration in some water samples belonging to some adjoining areas of Pathankot, Punjab

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Ajay Sharma, Sumit

    2015-08-28

    The study of radon concentration was measured in some areas of Pathankot district, Punjab, India, from the health hazard point of view due to radon. The exposure to radon through drinking water is largely by inhalation and ingestion. RAD 7, an electronic solid state silicon detector (Durridgeco., USA) was used to measure the radon concentration in drinking water samples of the study area. The recorded values of radon concentration in these water samples are below the recommended limit by UNSCEAR and European commission. The recommended limit of radon concentration in water samples is 4 to 40 Bq/l given by UNSCEAR [1] and European commission has recommended the safe limit for radon concentration in water sample is 100 Bq/l [2].

  6. Measurement of radon concentration in some water samples belonging to some adjoining areas of Pathankot, Punjab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ajay; Sharma, Sumit

    2015-08-01

    The study of radon concentration was measured in some areas of Pathankot district, Punjab, India, from the health hazard point of view due to radon. The exposure to radon through drinking water is largely by inhalation and ingestion. RAD 7, an electronic solid state silicon detector (Durridgeco., USA) was used to measure the radon concentration in drinking water samples of the study area. The recorded values of radon concentration in these water samples are below the recommended limit by UNSCEAR and European commission. The recommended limit of radon concentration in water samples is 4 to 40 Bq/l given by UNSCEAR [1] and European commission has recommended the safe limit for radon concentration in water sample is 100 Bq/l [2].

  7. Radon Levels in Nurseries and Primary Schools in Bragança District-Preliminary Assessment.

    PubMed

    Sousa, S I V; Branco, P T B S; Nunes, R A O; Alvim-Ferraz, M C M; Martins, F G

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer has been associated with radon concentration even at low levels such as those found in dwellings. This study aimed to (i) determine radon diurnal variations in three nurseries and one primary school in the Bragança district (north of Portugal) and (ii) compare radon concentrations with legislated standards and assess the legislated procedures. Radon was measured in three nurseries and a primary school in a rural area with nongranite soil. Measurements were performed continuously to examine differences between occupation and nonoccupation periods. Indoor temperature and relative humidity were also measured continuously. A great variability was found in radon concentrations between the microenvironments examined. Radon concentrations surpassed by severalfold the recommended guidelines and thresholds, and excessive levels of health concern were sporadically found (361.5-753.5 Bq m(-3)). Thus, it is of importance to perform a national campaign on radon measurements and to reduce exposure.

  8. An improved silicon PIN diode based portable radon monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashokkumar, P.; Sahoo, B. K.; Topkar, A.; Raman, A.; Babu, D. A. R.; Sharma, D. N.; Mayya, Y. S.

    2013-05-01

    A low budget radon monitor has been developed using silicon PIN diode. Sensitivity factor of this monitor is observed to be relatively high over the other similar monitors. This is achieved by incorporation of a hemispherical mesh in the sampling chamber, thereby accelerating the electro-deposition of charged polonium atoms on the detector surface. Its performance has been tested successfully against reference equipment.

  9. Radon and lung cancer risk: taking stock at the millenium.

    PubMed Central

    Samet, J M; Eradze, G R

    2000-01-01

    Radon is a well-established human carcinogen for which extensive data are available, extending into the range of exposures experienced by the general population. Mounting epidemiologic evidence on radon and lung cancer risk, now available from more than 20 different studies of underground miners and complementary laboratory findings, indicates that risks are linear in exposure without threshold. Radon is also a ubiquitous indoor air pollutant in homes, and risk projections imply that radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer after smoking. Recommended control strategies in the United States and other countries, which include testing of most homes and mitigation of those exceeding guideline levels, have been controversial. Further research is needed, drawing on molecular and cellular approaches and continuing the follow-up of the underground miner cohorts, and scientists should work toward constructing mechanistically based models that combine epidemiologic and experimental data to yield risk estimates with enhanced certainty. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10931781

  10. Radon reduction and radon monitoring in the NEMO experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Nachab, A.

    2007-03-28

    The first data of the NEMO 3 neutrinoless double beta decay experiment have shown that the radon can be a non negligible component of the background. In order to reduce the radon level in the gas mixture, it has been necessary first to cover the NEMO 3 detector with an airtight tent and then to install a radon-free air factory. With the use of sensitive radon detectors, the level of radon at the exit of the factory and inside the tent is continuously controlled. These radon levels are discussed within the NEMO 3 context.

  11. Study of the atmospheric chemistry of radon progeny in laboratory and real indoor atmospheres. Progress report, May 1, 1993--January 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Hopke, P.K.

    1993-01-01

    Progress is reported on the chemical and physical behavior of the {sup 218}Po atom immediately following its formation by the alpha decay of radon. Two areas of radon progeny behavior are being pursued; laboratory studies under controlled conditions to better understand the fundamental physical and chemical processes that affect the progeny`s atmospheric behavior and studies in actual indoor environments to develop a better assessment of the exposure of the occupants of that space to the size and concentration of the indoor radioactive aerosol. The specific tasks addressed were to determine the formation rates of {center_dot}OH radicals formed by the radiolysis of air following radon decay, to examine the formation of particles by the radiolytic oxidation of substances like SO{sub 2}, ethylene, and H{sub 2}S to lower vapor pressure compounds and determine the role of gas phase additives such as H{sub 2}O and NH{sub 3} in determining the particle size, to measure the rate of ion-induced nucleation using a thermal diffusion cloud chamber, and to measure the neutralization rate of {sup 218}PoO{sub x}{sup +} in O{sub 2} at low radon concentrations. Initial measurements were conducted of the activity size distributions in actual homes with occupants present so that the variability of the indoor activity size distributions can be assessed with respect to indoor aerosol sources and general lifestyle variations of the occupants. A prospective study of the utility of measurement of deposited {sup 210}Pb embedded in glass surfaces as a measure of the long-term, integrated exposure of the population to radon are described. Methodology was developed to determine the hygroscopicity of the indoor aerosol so that the changes in deposition efficiency of the radioactive indoor aerosol with hygroscopic growth in the respiratory tract can be assessed.

  12. Radon Optical Processing in Radon Space.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-15

    yields one line through the three-dimensional Fourier transform 1. Radon, J., " Uber die Bestimmung von Funktiontn of the three-dimensional function (3...Alamos, New Mexico , April 11-15. 1983.a 6. W. G. Wee, "Application of projection techniques to image image. Figure 1(a) has approximately 8.0 bits/pixel

  13. Experimental animal studies of radon and cigarette smoke

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, F.T.; Dagle, G.E.; Gies, R.A.; Smith, L.G.; Buschbom, R.L.

    1992-12-31

    Cigarette-smoking is a dominant cause of lung cancer and confounds risk assessment of exposure to radon decay products. Evidence in humans on the interaction between cigarette-smoking and exposure to radon decay products, although limited, indicates a possible synergy. Experimental animal data, in addition to showing synergy, also show a decrease or no change in risk with added cigarette-smoke exposures. This article reviews previous animal data developed at Compagnie Generale des Matieres Nucleaires and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) on mixed exposures to radon and cigarette smoke, and highlights new initiation-promotion-initiation (IPI) studies at PNL that were designed within the framework of a two-mutation carcinogenesis model. Also presented are the PNL exposure system, experimental protocols, dosimetry, and biological data observed to date in IPI animals.

  14. Inhalation exposures due to radon and thoron ((222)Rn and (220)Rn): Do they differ in high and normal background radiation areas in India?

    PubMed

    Mishra, Rosaline; Sapra, B K; Prajith, R; Rout, R P; Jalaluddin, S; Mayya, Y S

    2015-09-01

    In India, High Background Radiation Areas (HBRAs) due to enhanced levels of naturally occurring radionuclides in soil (thorium and, to a lesser extent, uranium), are located along some parts of the coastal tracts viz. the coastal belt of Kerala, Tamilnadu and Odisha. It is conjectured that these deposits will result in higher emissions of radon isotopes ((222)Rn and (220)Rn) and their daughter products as compared to Normal Background Radiation Areas (NBRAs). While the annual external dose rates contributed by gamma radiations in these areas are about 5-10 times higher, the extent of increase in the inhalation dose rates attributable to (222)Rn and (220)Rn and their decay products is not well quantified. Towards this, systematic indoor surveys were conducted wherein simultaneous measurements of time integrated (222)Rn and (220)Rn gas and their decay product concentrations was carried out in around 800 houses in the HBRAs of Kerala and Odisha to estimate the inhalation doses. All gas measurements were carried out using pin-hole cup dosimeters while the progeny measurements were with samplers and systems based on the Direct radon/thoron Progeny sensors (DRPS/DTPS). To corroborate these passive measurements of decay products concentrations, active sampling was also carried out in a few houses. The results of the surveys provide a strong evidence to conclude that the inhalation doses due to (222)Rn and (220)Rn gas and their decay products in these HBRAs are in the same range as observed in the NBRAs in India.

  15. Bakeout Chamber Within Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Daniel M.; Soules, David M.; Barengoltz, Jack B.

    1995-01-01

    Vacuum-bakeout apparatus for decontaminating and measuring outgassing from pieces of equipment constructed by mounting bakeout chamber within conventional vacuum chamber. Upgrade cost effective: fabrication and installation of bakeout chamber simple, installation performed quickly and without major changes in older vacuum chamber, and provides quantitative data on outgassing from pieces of equipment placed in bakeout chamber.

  16. RESIDENTIAL RADON AND BIRTH DEFECTS: A POPULATION-BASED ASSESSMENT

    PubMed Central

    Langlois, Peter H; Lee, MinJae; Lupo, Philip J; Rahbar, Mohammad H; Cortez, Ruben K

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Associations have been reported between maternal radiation exposure and birth defects. No such studies were found on radon. Our objective was to determine if there is an association between living in areas with higher radon levels and birth defects. METHODS The Texas Birth Defects Registry provided data on all birth defects from 1999–2009 from the entire state. Mean radon levels by geologic region came from the Texas Indoor Radon Survey. The association between radon and birth defects was estimated using multilevel mixed effect Poisson regression. RESULTS Birth defects overall were not associated with residential radon levels. Of the 100 other birth defect groups with at least 500 cases, 14 were significantly elevated in areas with high mean radon level in crude analyses, and 9 after adjustment for confounders. Cleft lip with/without cleft palate had an adjusted prevalence ratio (aPR) of 1.16 per 1 picoCurie/liter (pCi/l) increase in exposure to region mean radon, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.08, 1.26. Cystic hygroma / lymphangioma had an aPR of 1.22 per 1 pCi/l increase, 95% CI 1.02, 1.46. Other associations were suggested but not as consistent: three skeletal defects, Down syndrome, other specified anomalies of the brain, and other specified anomalies of the bladder and urethra. CONCLUSIONS In the first study of residential radon and birth defects, we found associations with cleft lip w/wo cleft palate and cystic hygroma / lymphangioma. Other associations were suggested. The ecological nature of this study and multiple comparisons suggest that our results be interpreted with caution. PMID:25846606

  17. Health Risk of Radon

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Control Reports. Top of Page Studies Find Direct Evidence Linking Radon in Homes to Lung Cancer ( ... VI)". This report by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) is the most definitive accumulation of scientific ...

  18. Indoor Radon Measurement in Van

    SciTech Connect

    Kam, E.; Osmanlioglu, A. E.; Celebi, N.; Dogan, I.

    2007-04-23

    In this study, indoor radon concentrations obtained from the radon surveys conducted in the Van. Radon monitoring was performed by applying a passive, time-integrating measuring technique. For this purpose, CR-39 nuclear track detectors were installed in dwellings for 2 months. After the monitoring period, detectors were collected. In order to make the alpha tracks visible, chemical etching was applied to the exposed detectors. Nuclear track numbers and the corresponding indoor radon concentrations were determined. Annual effective dose equivalents and the risk probabilities caused by indoor radon inhalation were calculated, and the found results compared with the indoor radon concentrations' data measured in different provinces of Turkey.

  19. [Optimization of the indoor air conditioning in the places of excessive radon release].

    PubMed

    Malykhin, V M

    1994-01-01

    The experimental modelling covered ventilation and air purification as well as air pollution with radon and such derivatives as polonium-218b, lead-214 and bismuth-214. The modelling was designed for industrial conditions with higher radon release in technologic conversion at enterprises processing uranium. The investigators obtained some information to optimize air processing and to lower the workers exposure to radon and its derivatives.

  20. Validation of an original incubator set-up for the exposure of human astrocyte cells to X-band microwaves in a GTEM-chamber.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Bruzón, R N; Del Moral, A; Pérez-Castejón, C; Llorente, M; Vera, A; Azanza, M J

    2011-09-01

    A current concern about the biological effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF) is increasing with the wide spread use of X-band microwaves (MW, 8-10 GHz range). Gigahertz transverse electromagnetic (GTEM) field flat transmission lines are currently being used for experimental exposure of biological samples to high frequency EMF. Experiments carried out on human cells in culture require optimal growing temperature conditions, i.e. 37 °C, 5% CO2 in a humidified atmosphere. The aim of our work has been: i) to built up an original incubator set-up, the so called GTEM-incubator, for exposure of human cells in culture to MW inside a GTEM-chamber, under optimal growing physical conditions; ii) to make the validation of the GTEM-incubator by growing cell samples inside the non-energized GTEM-chamber (test sample) comparing the results with the ones obtained from cell samples grown inside a standard incubator (control samples). The features for comparison were: cell morphology, expression and distribution of cytoskeleton proteins, genotoxicity, viability and cell cycle progression. Any variation in any of the studied parameters would allow for detecting any possible failure or misconception in our GTEM-incubator working test. The results obtained in control and test incubators showed non-significant differences in the development of both cell populations for any of the studied parameters. Thereby our GTEM-incubator is considered valid for our purposes of human cell exposures to X-band MW.

  1. Wind-induced contaminant transport in near-surface soils with application to radon entry into buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, William Jowett

    1996-05-01

    Indoor air exposures to gaseous contaminants originating in soil can cause large human health risks. To predict and control these exposures, the mechanisms that affect vapor transport in near-surface soils need to be understood. In particular, radon exposure is a concern since average indoor radon concentrations lead to much higher risks than are generally accepted for exposure to other environmental contaminants. This dissertation examines an important component of the indoor radon problem: the impacts of wind on soil-gas and radon transport and entry into buildings. The research includes experimental and modeling studies of wind`s interactions with a building`s superstructure and the resulting soil-gas and radon flows in the surrounding soil. In addition to exploring the effects of steady winds, a novel modeling technique is developed to examine the impacts of fluctuating winds on soil-gas and radon transport.

  2. An assessment of radon in groundwater in New York State

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shaw, Stephen B.; Eckhardt, David A.V.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: A set of 317 samples collected from wells throughout New York State (excluding Long Island) from 2003 through 2008 was used to assess the distribution of radon gas in drinking water. Previous studies have documented high concentrations of radon in groundwater from granitic and metamorphic bedrock, but there have been only limited characterizations of radon in water from sedimentary rock and unconsolidated sand-and-gravel deposits in New York. Approximately 8% of the samples from bedrock wells exceed 89 Bq L-1 (eight times the proposed regulatory limit), but only 2% of samples from sand-and-gravel wells exceed 44 Bq L-1. Specific metamorphic and sedimentary rock formations in New York are associated with the high radon concentrations, indicating that specific areas of New York could be targeted with efforts to reduce the risk of exposure to radon in groundwater. Additionally, radon in groundwater from the sand-and-gravel aquifers was found to be directly correlated to radon in indoor air when assessed by county.

  3. An assessment of radon in groundwater in New York state.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Stephen B; Eckhardt, David A V

    2012-09-01

    A set of 317 samples collected from wells throughout New York State (excluding Long Island) from 2003 through 2008 was used to assess the distribution of radon gas in drinking water. Previous studies have documented high concentrations of radon in groundwater from granitic and metamorphic bedrock, but there have been only limited characterizations of radon in water from sedimentary rock and unconsolidated sand-and-gravel deposits in New York. Approximately 8% of the samples from bedrock wells exceed 89 Bq L (eight times the proposed regulatory limit), but only 2% of samples from sand-and-gravel wells exceed 44 Bq L. Specific metamorphic and sedimentary rock formations in New York are associated with the high radon concentrations, indicating that specific areas of New York could be targeted with efforts to reduce the risk of exposure to radon in groundwater. Additionally, radon in groundwater from the sand-and-gravel aquifers was found to be directly correlated to radon in indoor air when assessed by county.

  4. Surface-deposition and distribution of the radon-decay products indoors.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, G; Tommasino, L

    2015-05-01

    The exposure to radon-decay products is of great concern both in dwellings and workplaces. The model to estimate the lung dose refers to the deposition mechanisms and particle sizes. Unfortunately, most of the dose data available are based on the measurement of radon concentration and the concentration of radon decay products. These combined measurements are widely used in spite of the fact that accurate dose assessments require information on the particle deposition mechanisms and the spatial distribution of radon decay products indoors. Most of the airborne particles and/or radon decay products are deposited onto indoor surfaces, which deposition makes the radon decay products unavailable for inhalation. These deposition processes, if properly known, could be successfully exploited to reduce the exposure to radon decay products. In spite of the importance of the surface deposition of the radon decay products, both for the correct evaluation of the dose and for reducing the exposure; little or no efforts have been made to investigate these deposition processes. Recently, two parallel investigations have been carried out in Rome and at Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) in Mexico City respectively, which address the issue of the surface-deposited radon decay products. Even though these investigations have been carried independently, they complement one another. It is with these considerations in mind that it was decided to report both investigations in the same paper.

  5. The influence of thoron on instruments measuring radon activity concentration.

    PubMed

    Michielsen, N; Bondiguel, S

    2015-11-01

    Thoron, the isotope 220 of radon, is a radionuclide whose concentration may influence the measurement of the activity concentration of (222)Rn in the air. If in the case of continuous and active sampling measuring instruments, using a pump for example, the influence of thoron on radon measurement is obvious and is taken into account in the apparatus, it is often assumed that in the case of a passive sampling, by diffusion through a filter for example, this thoron influence is negligible. This is due to the very short radioactive half-life of thoron, 55.6 s (3.82 d for (222)Rn), and the assumption that the diffusion time of thoron in the detection chamber is long enough beside that of the thoron half-life. The objective of this study is to check whether this assumption is true or not for different kinds of commercial electronic apparatus used to measure radon activity concentration from soil to dwellings. First of all, the devices were calibrated in activity concentration of radon, and then they were exposed to a controlled thoron atmosphere. The experiments concerning the thoron aimed to investigate the sensitivity to thoron in the radon measuring mode of the apparatus. Results of these experiments show that all devices have a very quick answer to thoron atmosphere, even though the sensitivities vary from one instrument to another. Results clearly show that this influence on radon measurement due to the thoron is observed also after the exposition because of the decay of (212)Pb and its progenies. In conclusion, the sensitivity to thoron in the radon measuring mode depends strongly on the type of instruments. The results of the present investigation show that for some apparatus, the influence of thoron cannot be disregarded especially when measuring radon in soil.

  6. Kinetics of the water/air phase transition of radon and its implication on detection of radon-in-water concentrations: practical assessment of different on-site radon extraction methods.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Michael; Paschke, Albrecht; Bednorz, Denise; Bürkin, Walter; Stieglitz, Thomas

    2012-08-21

    The on-site measurement of radon-in-water concentrations relies on extraction of radon from the water followed by its detection by means of a mobile radon-in-air monitor. Many applications of radon as a naturally occurring aquatic tracer require the collection of continuous radon concentration time series, thus necessitating the continuous extraction of radon either from a permanent water stream supplied by a water pump or directly from a water body or a groundwater monitoring well. Essentially, three different types of extraction units are available for this purpose: (i) a flow-through spray chamber, (ii) a flow-through membrane extraction module, and (iii) a submersible (usually coiled) membrane tube. In this paper we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these three methodical approaches with particular focus on their individual response to instantaneously changing radon-in-water concentrations. After a concise introduction into theoretical aspects of water/air phase transition kinetics of radon, experimental results for the three types of extraction units are presented. Quantitative suggestions for optimizing the detection setup by increasing the water/air interface and by reducing the air volume circulating through the degassing unit and radon detector are made. It was shown that the flow-through spray chamber and flow-through membrane perform nearly similarly, whereas the submersible membrane tubing has a significantly larger delay in response to concentration changes. The flow-through spray chamber is most suitable in turbid waters and to applications where high flow rates of the water pump stream can be achieved (e.g., where the power supply is not constrained by field conditions). The flow-through membrane is most suited to radon extraction from clear water and in field conditions where the power supply to a water pump is limited, e.g., from batteries. Finally, the submersible membrane tube is most suitable if radon is to be extracted in situ without

  7. Air radon concentration decrease in a waste water treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Juste, B; Ortiz, J; Verdú, G; Martorell, S

    2015-06-01

    (222)Rn is a naturally occurring gas created from the decay of (226)Ra. The long-term health risk of breathing radon is lung cancer. One particular place where indoor radon concentrations can exceed national guidelines is in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) where treatment processes may contribute to ambient airborne concentrations. The aim of this paper was to study the radon concentration decrease after the application of corrective measures in a Spanish WWTP. According to first measures, air radon concentration exceeded International Commission Radiologica1 Protection (ICRP) normative (recommends intervention between 400 and 1000 Bq m(-3)). Therefore, the WWTP improved mechanical forced ventilation to lower occupational exposure. This measure allowed to increase the administrative controls, since the limitation of workers access to the plant changed from 2 h d(-1) (considering a maximum permissible dose of 20 mSv y(-1) averaged over 5 y) to 7 h d(-1).

  8. National radon programmes and policies: the RADPAR recommendations.

    PubMed

    Bochicchio, F; Hulka, J; Ringer, W; Rovenská, K; Fojtikova, I; Venoso, G; Bradley, E J; Fenton, D; Gruson, M; Arvela, H; Holmgren, O; Quindos, L; McLaughlin, J; Collignan, B; Gray, A; Grosche, B; Jiranek, M; Kalimeri, K; Kephalopoulos, S; Kreuzer, M; Schlesinger, D; Zeeb, H; Bartzis, J

    2014-07-01

    Results from epidemiological studies on lung cancer and radon exposure in dwellings and mines led to a significant revision of recommendations and regulations of international organisations, such as WHO, IAEA, Nordic Countries, European Commission. Within the European project RADPAR, scientists from 18 institutions of 14 European countries worked together for 3 y (2009-12). Among other reports, a comprehensive booklet of recommendations was produced with the aim that they should be useful both for countries with a well-developed radon programme and for countries with little experience on radon issues. In this paper, the main RADPAR recommendations on radon programmes and policies are described and discussed. These recommendations should be very useful in preparing a national action plan, required by the recent Council Directive 2013/59/Euratom.

  9. Synergistic effect of radon and sodium arsenite on DNA damage in HBE cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xing; Sun, Bin; Wang, Xiaojuan; Nie, Jihua; Chen, Zhihai; An, Yan; Tong, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Human epidemiological studies showed that radon and arsenic exposures are major risk factors for lung cancer in Yunnan tin miners. However, biological evidence for this phenomenon is absent. In this study, HBE cells were exposed to different concentrations of sodium arsenite, different radon exposure times, or a combination of these two factors. The results showed a synergistic effect of radon and sodium arsenite in cell cytotoxicity as determined by cell viability. Elevated intracellular ROS levels and increased DNA damage indexed by comet assay and γ-H2AX were detected. Moreover, DNA HR repair in terms of Rad51 declined when the cells were exposed to both radon and sodium arsenite. The synergistic effect of radon and sodium arsenite in HBE cells may be attributed to the enhanced DSBs and inhibited HR pathway upon co-exposure.

  10. The effectiveness of mitigation for reducing radon risk in single-family Minnesota homes.

    PubMed

    Steck, Daniel J

    2012-09-01

    Increased lung cancer incidence has been linked with long-term exposure to elevated residential radon. Experimental studies have shown that soil ventilation can be effective in reducing radon concentrations in single-family homes. Most radon mitigation systems in the U.S. are installed by private contractors. The long-term effectiveness of these systems is not well known, since few state radon programs regulate or independently confirm post-mitigation radon concentrations. The effectiveness of soil ventilation systems in Minnesota was measured for 140 randomly selected clients of six professional mitigators. Homeowners reported pre-mitigation radon screening concentrations that averaged 380 Bq m (10.3 pCi L). Long term post-mitigation radon measurements on the two lowest floors show that, even years after mitigation, 97% of these homes have concentrations below the 150 Bq m U.S. Environmental Protection Agency action level. The average post-mitigation radon in the houses was 30 Bq m, an average observed reduction of >90%. If that reduction was maintained over the lifetime of the 1.2 million Minnesotans who currently reside in single-family homes with living space radon above the EPA action level, approximately 50,000 lives could be extended for nearly two decades by preventing radon-related lung cancers.

  11. Calibration of diffusion barrier charcoal detectors and application to radon sampling in dwellings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, M. E. M.; Sujo, L. C.; Villalba, L.; Peinado, J. S.; Jimenez, A. C.; Baca, A. M.; Gandara, S. D.; Villalobos, M. R.; Miranda, A. L.; Peraza, E. F. H.

    2003-10-01

    Some calibration conditions of diffusion barrier charcoal canister (DBCC) detectors for measuring radon concentration in air were studied. A series of functional expressions and graphs were developed to describe relationship between radon concentration in air and the activity adsorbed in DBCC, when placed in small chambers. A semi-empirical expression for the DBCC calibration was obtained, based on the detector integration time and the adsorption coefficient of radon on activated charcoal. Both, the integration time for 10% of DBCC of the same batch, and the adsorption coefficient of radon for the activated charcoal used in these detectors, were experimentally determined. Using these values as the calibration parameters, a semi-empirical calibration function was used for the interpretation of the radon activities in the detectors used for sampling more than 200 dwellings in the major cities of the state of Chihuahua, Mexico.

  12. Towards a Brazilian radon map: consortium radon Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silva, N C; Bossew, P; Ferreira Filho, A L; Campos, T F C; Pereira, A J S C; Yoshimura, E M; Veiga, L H S; Campos, M P; Rocha, Z; Paschuk, S A; Bonotto, D M

    2014-07-01

    Recently, the idea of generating radon map of Brazil has emerged. First attempts of coordinating radon surveys--carried out by different groups across the country--and initial discussions on how to proceed on a larger scale were made at the First Brazilian Radon Seminary, Natal, September 2012. Conventionally, it is believed that indoor radon is no major problem in Brazil, because the overall benign climate usually allows high ventilation rates. Nevertheless, scattered measurements have shown that moderately high indoor radon concentrations (up to a few hundred Bq m⁻³) do occur regionally. Brazilian geology is very diverse and there are regions where an elevated geogenic radon potential exists or is expected to exist. Therefore, a Brazilian Radon Survey is expected to be a challenge, although it appears an important issue, given the rising concern of the public about the quality of its environment.

  13. Development of a data base on radon in US homes and applications. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.L.

    1991-12-31

    This research led to the development of the compilation of data on radon in homes which is included in this document. This research also contributed to the development of two papers analyzing the results. These are a case control study test and tests of the liner no-threshold theory for lung cancer induced by exposure to radon in residential buildings.

  14. Shelter and indoor air in the twenty-first century: Radon, smoking and lung cancer risks

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1988-04-01

    This document describes the relationship between indoor radon exposure, cigarette smoking, and lung cancer. The author explains the sources of radon, the tissues at risk, the human populations most likely to be affected, and the estimates of lung cancer in the population. 6 refs., 2 tabs. (TEM)

  15. Development of a data base on radon in US homes and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.L.

    1991-01-01

    This research led to the development of the compilation of data on radon in homes which is included in this document. This research also contributed to the development of two papers analyzing the results. These are a case control study test and tests of the liner no-threshold theory for lung cancer induced by exposure to radon in residential buildings.

  16. Residential radon and lung cancer incidence in a Danish cohort

    SciTech Connect

    Braeuner, Elvira V.; Andersen, Claus E.; Sorensen, Mette; Jovanovic Andersen, Zorana; Gravesen, Peter; Ulbak, Kaare; Hertel, Ole; Pedersen, Camilla; Overvad, Kim; Tjonneland, Anne; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole

    2012-10-15

    High-level occupational radon exposure is an established risk factor for lung cancer. We assessed the long-term association between residential radon and lung cancer risk using a prospective Danish cohort using 57,053 persons recruited during 1993-1997. We followed each cohort member for cancer occurrence until 27 June 2006, identifying 589 lung cancer cases. We traced residential addresses from 1 January 1971 until 27 June 2006 and calculated radon at each of these addresses using information from central databases regarding geology and house construction. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for lung cancer risk associated with residential radon exposure with and without adjustment for sex, smoking variables, education, socio-economic status, occupation, body mass index, air pollution and consumption of fruit and alcohol. Potential effect modification by sex, traffic-related air pollution and environmental tobacco smoke was assessed. Median estimated radon was 35.8 Bq/m{sup 3}. The adjusted IRR for lung cancer was 1.04 (95% CI: 0.69-1.56) in association with a 100 Bq/m{sup 3} higher radon concentration and 1.67 (95% CI: 0.69-4.04) among non-smokers. We found no evidence of effect modification. We find a positive association between radon and lung cancer risk consistent with previous studies but the role of chance cannot be excluded as these associations were not statistically significant. Our results provide valuable information at the low-level radon dose range.

  17. Effect of a grounded object on radon measurement using AlphaGUARD.

    PubMed

    Ichitsubo, Hirokazu; Yamada, Yuji

    2004-07-01

    ABSTRACT-: The effects on radon concentration measurement of a grounded object near the opening of a cylindrical ionization chamber were studied using AlphaGUARD. AlphaGUARD comes with a flow measurement adapter that fits on the front of the AlphaGUARD ionization chamber. If the adapter nozzle is grounded, the radon concentration is falsely measured at 0 Bq m. A metal connector for use between the AlphaGUARD and the air duct wall was manufactured in our laboratory. When the connector is grounded, the radon concentration is again falsely measured as 0 Bq m. If the nozzle or connector is ungrounded, the AlphaGUARD measures radon concentration accurately. Health Phys.

  18. [Transient visual deterioration by exposure to cold, phacic anterior chamber lens and forme fruste keratoconus. How can this be explained?].

    PubMed

    Faschinger, E-M; Faschinger, C

    2014-03-01

    This article reports on a 41-year-old male patient with forme fruste keratoconus and intolerance to contact lenses. An iris-supported intraocular lens was inserted in this eye with initially satisfactory results. During wintertime the patient coached a team of biathletes even in very low temperatures and/or windy conditions and after 2-3 h experienced a deterioration of vision in this eye. The contralateral eye with a contact lens never gave any such problems in this cold environment. Several factors might be responsible for this deterioration of vision. A very low outside temperature with or without wind induces evaporation of the tear fluid resulting in a more viscous lipid content than in warm conditions. A thin cornea facilitates faster cooling of the aqueous humor and less warming of the aqueous humor due to a deep anterior chamber where the warming iris is more distant from the cornea and partially covered by the optic and haptic of the implanted lens both of which have low heat transmission and slower exchange of the aqueous humor via the small peripheral iridotomy in comparison to the pupil which is covered by the implanted lens. Populations, such as Inuits and Mongolians who permanently live in cold environments, have developed shallow anterior chambers during evolution which protects the cornea from the cold due to the reduced distance from the warming iris to the cornea. In retrospect the implantation of a refractive lens into the posterior chamber would probably have been the better choice in this particular patient constellation.

  19. The radon EDM apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tardiff, E. R.; Rand, E. T.; Ball, G. C.; Chupp, T. E.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Garrett, P.; Hayden, M. E.; Kierans, C. A.; Lorenzon, W.; Pearson, M. R.; Schaub, C.; Svensson, C. E.

    2014-01-01

    The observation of a permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) at current experimentally accessible levels would provide clear evidence of physics beyond the Standard Model. EDMs violate CP symmetry, making them a possible route to explaining the size of the observed baryon asymmetry in the universe. The Radon EDM Experiment aims to search for an EDM in radon isotopes whose sensitivity to CP-odd interactions is enhanced by octupole-deformed nuclei. A prototype apparatus currently installed in the ISAC hall at TRIUMF includes a gas handling system to move radon from a collection foil to a measurement cell and auxiliary equipment for polarization diagnostics and validation. The features and capabilities of the apparatus are described and an overview of the experimental design for a gamma-ray-anisotropy based EDM measurement is provided.

  20. Radon: a bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Lepman, S.R.; Boegel, M.L.; Hollowell, C.D.

    1981-01-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, with the support of the Department of Energy, has developed a computerized database to manage research information in the area of building ventilation and indoor air quality. This literature survey contains references pertaining to the physical properties of radon and its daughters, instrumentation for their measurement, health effects, surveys and measurements, and regulatory information. The references in the bibliography are sequenced in alphabetical order and abstracts are included when supplied by the author. The objective of this report is to disseminate the bibliographic references compiled at the laboratory relating to radon research portion of the program. Interested database users are encouraged to contact the laboratory to receive instructions for direct database acess. A flyer describing the database is supplied at the end of the bibliography and a brief overview of the Radon Research porgram is given.

  1. Measurement of radon progenies using the Timepix detector.

    PubMed

    Bulanek, Boris; Jilek, Karel; Cermak, Pavel

    2014-07-01

    After an introduction of Timepix detector, results of these detectors with silicon and cadmium telluride detection layer in assessment of activity of short-lived radon decay products are presented. They were collected on an open-face filter by means of one-grab sampling method from the NRPI radon chamber. Activity of short-lived radon decay products was estimated from measured alpha decays of 218,214Po. The results indicate very good agreement between the use of both Timepix detectors and an NRPI reference instrument, continuous monitor Fritra 4. Low-level detection limit for EEC was estimated to be 41 Bq m(-3) for silicon detection layer and 184 Bq m(-3) for CdTe detection layer, respectively.

  2. Radiation Exposure in X-Ray and CT Examinations

    MedlinePlus

    ... the largest source of background radiation comes from radon gas in our homes (about 2 mSv per ... Like other sources of background radiation, exposure to radon varies widely from one part of the country ...

  3. The use of mapped geology as a predictor of radon potential in Norway.

    PubMed

    Watson, Robin J; Smethurst, Mark A; Ganerød, Guri V; Finne, Ingvild; Rudjord, Anne Liv

    2017-01-01

    Radon exposure is considered to cause several hundred fatalities from lung-cancer each year in Norway. A national map identifying areas which are likely to be exposed to elevated radon concentrations would be a useful tool for decision-making authorities, and would be particularly important in areas where only few indoor radon measurements exist. An earlier Norwegian study (Smethurst et al. 2008) produced radon hazard maps by examining the relationship between airborne gamma-ray spectrometry, bedrock and drift geology, and indoor radon. The study was limited to the Oslo region where substantial indoor radon and airborne equivalent uranium datasets were available, and did not attempt to test the statistical significance of relationships, or to quantify the confidence of its predictions. While it can be anticipated that airborne measurements may have useful predictive power for indoor radon, airborne measurement coverage in Norway is at present sparse; to provide national coverage of radon hazard estimates, a good understanding of the relationship between geology and indoor radon is therefore important. In this work we use a new enlarged (n = 34,563) form of the indoor radon dataset with national coverage, and we use it to examine the relationship between geology and indoor radon concentrations. We use this relationship to characterise geological classes by their radon potential, and we produce a national radon hazard map which includes confidence limits on the likelihood of areas having elevated radon concentrations, and which covers the whole of mainland Norway, even areas where little or no indoor radon data are available. We find that bedrock and drift geology classes can account for around 40% of the total observed variation in radon potential. We test geology-based predictions of RP (radon potential) against locally-derived estimates of RP, and produce classification matrices with kappa values in the range 0.37-0.56. Our classifier has high predictive value

  4. Toward a more realistic appraisal of the lung cancer risk from radon: the effects of residential mobility.

    PubMed Central

    Warner, K E; Mendez, D; Courant, P N

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: A consideration of the effects of residential mobility produces much more realistic estimates of typical individuals' radon exposures and mortality risks than those of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). METHODS: A model linking residential mobility, the distribution of radon in US homes, and lung cancer risk is used to simulate lifetime radon exposure, with and without mitigation of high-radon homes, for typical mobile individuals. Radon-related lung cancer mortality risks are then estimated for smokers and never-smokers. RESULTS: Most individuals residing in high-radon homes have equivalent lifelong radon exposures well below those they are currently experiencing. Consequently, actual lung cancer risks are generally well below those implied in the EPA's radon risk charts. For most people who mitigate high-radon homes, risk reduction is modest. CONCLUSIONS: Radon may indeed be responsible for as large a population risk of lung cancer as the EPA estimates. However, caution must be used in interpreting the EPA's risk assessment for individuals; in many cases, mitigation will have little effect on residents' health risks. PMID:8806372

  5. Radon assay for SNO+

    SciTech Connect

    Rumleskie, Janet

    2015-12-31

    The SNO+ experiment will study neutrinos while located 6,800 feet below the surface of the earth at SNOLAB. Though shielded from surface backgrounds, emanation of radon radioisotopes from the surrounding rock leads to back-grounds. The characteristic decay of radon and its daughters allows for an alpha detection technique to count the amount of Rn-222 atoms collected. Traps can collect Rn-222 from various positions and materials, including an assay skid that will collect Rn-222 from the organic liquid scintillator used to detect interactions within SNO+.

  6. Radon assay for SNO+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumleskie, Janet

    2015-12-01

    The SNO+ experiment will study neutrinos while located 6,800 feet below the surface of the earth at SNOLAB. Though shielded from surface backgrounds, emanation of radon radioisotopes from the surrounding rock leads to back-grounds. The characteristic decay of radon and its daughters allows for an alpha detection technique to count the amount of Rn-222 atoms collected. Traps can collect Rn-222 from various positions and materials, including an assay skid that will collect Rn-222 from the organic liquid scintillator used to detect interactions within SNO+.

  7. What Teachers Should Know about Radon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bettis, Clifford; Throckmorton, Carl

    1991-01-01

    Attempts to clear up misunderstandings about radon and outlines information teachers can convey to their students. Includes a brief history of radon, health threats posed by radon, methods to measure radon quantities, homeowner risks and preventative actions, and a glossary of radon terms. (MDH)

  8. Development of a couple of methods for measuring radon exhalation from building materials commonly used in the Iberian Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Miró, C; Andrade, E; Reis, M; Madruga, M J

    2014-07-01

    Radon is considered to be the main contributor to the worldwide population exposure to natural sources of radiation and so a lot of efforts have been made in most countries to assess indoor radon concentrations. Radon exhales from the earth's surface and is part of the radioactive decay series of uranium, which is also present in building materials. In this work, measurements of radon exhalation rates in building materials commonly used in the Iberian Peninsula have been carried out by using two different methods: active and passive techniques. In the first technique, the radon exhalation rate was measured following the radon activity growth as a function of time, by using a continuous radon monitor. The second technique is based on integrated measurements by using solid-state nuclear track detectors and a Spark Counter reading equipment. The results obtained by both measuring methods were found to be consistent.

  9. Radon Monitoring in Army Stand-Alone Housing Units

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-01

    damage lung tissue and lead I to increased risk of developing lang cancer . Your risk of developing lung cancer from exposure to radon depends upon the...of developing lung cancer than exposure to a significantly elevated level for a short time. In general, your risk increases as the level of radon and...000mm 0Mmm *000 OOO 0 0w 0 0 000 -0-0 *4 0 880 mama 0 0000000000 000 000Eca ( el cN) 00 9 ’ qqO .00 1(10 0 -U M w co SEE wSS SEES NSEwESO m v MM O v mm

  10. Preliminary investigation of radon concentration in surface water and drinking water in Shenzhen City, South China.

    PubMed

    Li, Ting; Wang, Nanping; Li, Shijun

    2015-11-01

    A radon survey in surface water and drinking water was conducted using a portable degassing system associated with an ionisation chamber AlphaGUARD (PQ2000) for understanding levels of dissolved radon ((222)Rn) concentration in different types of water sources and risk assessment of radon in drinking water in Shenzhen City (SC) with a population of 10 628 900 in 2013, Guangdong Province of China. The measurements show that arithmetic means ± standard deviations of radon ((222)Rn) concentration are 52.05 ± 6.64, 0.29 ± 0.26, 0.15 ± 0.23 and 0.37 ± 0.42 kBq m(-3) in spring water, surface water, large and small public water supplies, respectively. Only radon concentrations of two water samples collected in mountainous areas are more than 11.10 kBq m(-3), exceeding the limit of radon concentration in drinking water stipulated by the national standard of China (GB5749-2006). The annual effective doses due to radon in drinking water were also calculated. The investigation suggests that there are no risks caused by radon in the drinking water in SC.

  11. Measurement of radon in ground waters of the Western Caucasus for seismological application.

    PubMed

    Nevinsky, I; Tsvetkova, T; Nevinskaya, E

    2015-11-01

    Results of radon ((222)Rn) concentration measurement in ground waters in the Western Caucasus are described. In 2010-2011 each day at 12:00 Moscow winter time (9:00 GMT) sampling in volume of 0.5 l of waters was carried out in two wells at depth of 30 m and 180 m. In 2012 three times per day (7:00, 12:00, 17:00) this sampling was already carried out. Radon from water was extracting by degassing method with use of bubbler. Measurements of alpha activity of gas in scintillation (ZnS) chambers were done. The water radon data with seismic, meteorological and the Sun-Lunar data were compared. The mathematical method of definition of "splashes" in radon data before regional earthquakes is considered. The greatest probability in 72% of the forecast of regional earthquakes for the data from a well of 30 m depth was received. Correlation between meteo and radon data is absent. Correlation of lunar phases and solar activity with radon data is discussed. In July-December, 2012 sampling of water from 15 wells and measurements of radon were carried out. The distance between wells was near 50 km. Changes of radon maps in territory of South Russia during earthquakes are shown.

  12. A Comparative Study of Indoor Radon Contributed by Diffusive and Advective Transport through Intact Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, R. P.; Kumar, Amit

    The present work is aimed that out of diffusive and advective transport which is dominant process for indoor radon entry under normal room conditions. For this purpose the radon diffusion coefficient and permeability of concrete were measured by specially designed experimental set up. The radon diffusion coefficient of concrete was measured by continuous radon monitor. The measured value was (3.78 ± 0.39)×10-8 m2/s and found independent of the radon gas concentration in source chamber. The radon permeability of concrete varied between 1.85×10-17 to 1.36×10-15 m2 for the bulk pressure difference fewer than 20 Pa to 73.3 kPa. From the measured diffusion coefficient and absolute permeability, the radon flux from the concrete surface having concentrations gradient 12-40 kBq/m3 and typical floor thickness 0.1 m was calculated by the application of Fick and Darcy laws. Using the measured flux attributable to diffusive and advective transport, the indoor radon concentration for a typical Indian model room having dimension (5×6×7) m3 was calculated under average room ventilation (0.63 h-1). The results showed that the contribution of diffusive transport through intact concrete is dominant over the advective transport, as expected from the low values of concrete permeability.

  13. Radon in Irish Show Caves - Personal Monitoring Data From 2001-2006

    SciTech Connect

    Currivan, L.; Murray, M.; O'Colmain, M.; Pollard, D.

    2008-08-07

    The European Directive 96/29/EURATOM and its transposition into national legislation demands the application of radiation protection measures if the presence of radon and radon decay products leads to significant increase in exposures of workers. Irish legislation further demands that laboratories carrying out radon measurements operate a high level quality assurance programme. As a result of a reconnaissance survey regular measurements of show cave guides have been made in order to assess exposure to radon in such workplaces and to ascertain that the limits set for radon are not exceeded. In 2000, an action level of 400 Bqm{sup -3}, was established. Doses in the range 0.3-12.0 mSv have been estimated for workers for the period 2001-2006.

  14. Radon in Irish Show Caves—Personal Monitoring Data From 2001-2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currivan, L.; Murray, M.; O'Colmain, M.; Pollard, D.

    2008-08-01

    The European Directive 96/29/EURATOM and its transposition into national legislation demands the application of radiation protection measures if the presence of radon and radon decay products leads to significant increase in exposures of workers. Irish legislation further demands that laboratories carrying out radon measurements operate a high level quality assurance programme. As a result of a reconnaissance survey regular measurements of show cave guides have been made in order to assess exposure to radon in such workplaces and to ascertain that the limits set for radon are not exceeded. In 2000, an action level of 400 Bqm-3, was established. Doses in the range 0.3-12.0 mSv have been estimated for workers for the period 2001-2006.

  15. RESIDENTIAL RADON RESISTANT CONSTRUCTION FEATURE SELECTION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a proposed residential radon resistant construction feature selection system. The features consist of engineered barriers to reduce radon entry and accumulation indoors. The proposed Florida standards require radon resistant features in proportion to regional...

  16. Lung cancer in never-smokers: a case-control study in a radon-prone area (Galicia, Spain).

    PubMed

    Torres-Durán, María; Ruano-Ravina, Alberto; Parente-Lamelas, Isaura; Leiro-Fernández, Virginia; Abal-Arca, José; Montero-Martínez, Carmen; Pena-Álvarez, Carolina; González-Barcala, Francisco Javier; Castro-Añón, Olalla; Golpe-Gómez, Antonio; Martínez, Cristina; Mejuto-Martí, María José; Fernández-Villar, Alberto; Barros-Dios, Juan Miguel

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the effect of residential radon exposure on the risk of lung cancer in never-smokers and to ascertain if environmental tobacco smoke modifies the effect of residential radon. We designed a multicentre hospital-based case-control study in a radon-prone area (Galicia, Spain). All participants were never-smokers. Cases had an anatomopathologically confirmed primary lung cancer and controls were recruited from individuals undergoing minor, non-oncological surgery. Residential radon was measured using alpha track detectors. We included 521 individuals, 192 cases and 329 controls, 21% were males. We observed an odds ratio of 2.42 (95% CI 1.45-4.06) for individuals exposed to ≥200 Bq·m(-3) compared with those exposed to <100 Bq·m(-3). Environmental tobacco smoke exposure at home increased lung cancer risk in individuals with radon exposure>200 Bq·m(-3). Individuals exposed to environmental tobacco smoke and to radon concentrations>200 Bq·m(-3) had higher lung cancer risk than those exposed to lower radon concentrations and exposed to environmental tobacco smoke. Residential radon increases lung cancer risk in never-smokers. An association between residential radon exposure and environmental tobacco smoke on the risk of lung cancer might exist.

  17. Measurement of surface alpha contamination using electret ion chambers.

    PubMed

    Dua, S K; Biswas, S K; Szerszen, P; Boudreaux, J; Ebadian, M A

    1999-06-01

    Electret ion chambers are inexpensive, light-weight, commercially available, passive charge-integrating devices for accurate measurement of different radiations. Performance of electret ion chambers for surface alpha contamination measurement was evaluated. Ion chambers of two types and electrets of three thicknesses were used for the study. Calibration of the electret ion chambers was performed using reference alpha standards of different energies and radioactivities. Effects of various parameters such as chamber dimensions, electret thickness, alpha particle energy, position of alpha source from the chamber centerline, source localized or uniformly distributed, level of alpha contamination, Mylar window covering the chamber, and ambient radon and gamma radiation on the response of the electret ion chambers were determined. Suitable combinations of chambers and electrets to measure surface alpha contamination were determined.

  18. Residential construction code impacts on radon

    SciTech Connect

    Galbraith, S.; Brennan, T.; Osborne, M.C.

    1988-04-01

    The paper discusses residential construction-code impacts on radon. It references existing residential construction codes that pertain to the elements of construction that impact either the ability to seal radon out of houses or the ability to achieve good soil ventilation for radon control. Several inconsistencies in the codes that will impact radon resistant construction are identified. Resolution of these resulting radon issues is necessary before specification-style building codes can be developed to achieve radon-resistant construction.

  19. Domestic and personal determinants of the contamination of individuals by household radon daughters

    SciTech Connect

    Stebbings, J.H.; Kardatzke, D.R.; Toohey, R.E.; Essling, M.E.; Pagnamenta, A.

    1986-01-01

    Radon daughters were counted by gamma spectroscopy from 180 adult residents of eastern Pennsylvania during the winter of 1983-84. Body radon daughter contamination is an index of relative individual respiratory exposures to radon daughters. These can be related to household radon levels, and to personal risk factors such as sex and tobacco smoking. Over 75% of this Pennsylvania population appeared to have environmentally enhanced radon daughter contamination; 59% had counting rates greater than 2 s.d. above background. House radon levels were the major determinants of radon daughters contamination in the 112 subjects for which both sets of measurements were available (p<.001). Both sex (<.02) and cigarette smoking (p<.005) were found to significantly modify that relationship, after nonlinear adjustment for travel times. Using a logarithmic model, for a given radon level body contamination by radon daughters in females was 2-3.5x higher than in males. Nonsmokers had 2-4x higher levels of contamination than smokers. For female nonsmokers relative to male smokers (which in general corresponds to the population of major concern relative to the population from which risk estimates have been derived), the excesses multiply. These results are for total contamination, both internal and external.

  20. Predictors of Indoor Radon Concentrations in Pennsylvania, 1989–2013

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Joan A.; Ogburn, Elizabeth L.; Rasmussen, Sara G.; Irving, Jennifer K.; Pollak, Jonathan; Locke, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Radon is the second-leading cause of lung cancer worldwide. Most indoor exposure occurs by diffusion of soil gas. Radon is also found in well water, natural gas, and ambient air. Pennsylvania has high indoor radon concentrations; buildings are often tested during real estate transactions, with results reported to the Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP). Objectives We evaluated predictors of indoor radon concentrations. Methods Using first-floor and basement indoor radon results reported to the PADEP between 1987 and 2013, we evaluated associations of radon concentrations (natural log transformed) with geology, water source, building characteristics, season, weather, community socioeconomic status, community type, and unconventional natural gas development measures based on drilled and producing wells. Results Primary analysis included 866,735 first measurements by building, with the large majority from homes. The geologic rock layer on which the building sat was strongly associated with radon concentration (e.g., Axemann Formation, median = 365 Bq/m3, IQR = 167–679 vs. Stockton Formation, median = 93 Bq/m3, IQR = 52–178). In adjusted analysis, buildings using well water had 21% higher concentrations (β = 0.191, 95% CI: 0.184, 0.198). Buildings in cities (vs. townships) had lower concentrations (β = –0.323, 95% CI: –0.333, –0.314). When we included multiple tests per building, concentrations declined with repeated measurements over time. Between 2005 and 2013, 7,469 unconventional wells were drilled in Pennsylvania. Basement radon concentrations fluctuated between 1987 and 2003, but began an upward trend from 2004 to 2012 in all county categories (p < 0.001), with higher levels in counties having ≥ 100 drilled wells versus counties with none, and with highest levels in the Reading Prong. Conclusions Geologic unit, well water, community, weather, and unconventional natural gas development were associated with indoor radon

  1. Studies on the reduction of radon plate-out

    SciTech Connect

    Bruemmer, M.; Nakib, M.; Calkins, R.; Cooley, J. Sekula, S.

    2015-08-17

    The decay of common radioactive gases, such as radon, produces stable isotopes by a sequence of daughter particles with varied half-lives. These daughter particles are a significant source of gamma, neutron, and alpha (α) particle backgrounds that can mimic desired signals in dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay experiments. In the LUMINA Laboratory at Southern Methodist University (SMU), studies of radon plate-out onto copper samples are conducted using one of XIA’s first five UltraLo 1800 alpha counters. We present results from investigations into various mitigation approaches. A custom-built copper holder (in either plastic or metal) has been designed and produced to maximize the copper’s exposure to {sup 220}Rn. The {sup 220}Rn source is a collection of camping lantern mantles. We present the current status of control and experimental methods for addressing radon exposure levels.

  2. Evaluation of the intake of radon through skin from thermal water.

    PubMed

    Sakoda, Akihiro; Ishimori, Yuu; Tschiersch, Jochen

    2016-07-01

    The biokinetics of radon in the body has previously been studied with the assumption that its absorption through the skin is negligibly small. This assumption would be acceptable except in specific situations, such as bathing in a radon hot spring where the radon concentration in thermal water is far higher than that in air. The present study focused on such a situation in order to better understand the biokinetics of radon. To mathematically express the entry of radon through the skin into the body, we first modified the latest sophisticated biokinetic model for noble gases. Values of an important parameter for the model-the skin permeability coefficient K (m s(-1))-were derived using data from previous human studies. The analysis of such empirical data, which corresponded to radon concentrations in the air exhaled by subjects during and following bathing in radon-rich thermal water, revealed that the estimated K values had a log-normal distribution. The validity of the K values and the characteristics of the present model are then discussed. Furthermore, the impact of the intake of radon or its progeny via inhalation or skin absorption on radiation dose was also assessed for possible exposure scenarios in a radon hot spring. It was concluded that, depending on the radon concentration in thermal water, there might be situations in which the dose contribution resulting from skin absorption of radon is comparable to that resulting from inhalation of radon and its progeny. This conclusion can also apply to other therapeutic situations (e.g. staying in the pool for a longer period).

  3. Evaluation of the intake of radon through skin from thermal water

    PubMed Central

    Sakoda, Akihiro; Ishimori, Yuu; Tschiersch, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    The biokinetics of radon in the body has previously been studied with the assumption that its absorption through the skin is negligibly small. This assumption would be acceptable except in specific situations, such as bathing in a radon hot spring where the radon concentration in thermal water is far higher than that in air. The present study focused on such a situation in order to better understand the biokinetics of radon. To mathematically express the entry of radon through the skin into the body, we first modified the latest sophisticated biokinetic model for noble gases. Values of an important parameter for the model—the skin permeability coefficient K (m s−1)—were derived using data from previous human studies. The analysis of such empirical data, which corresponded to radon concentrations in the air exhaled by subjects during and following bathing in radon-rich thermal water, revealed that the estimated K values had a log-normal distribution. The validity of the K values and the characteristics of the present model are then discussed. Furthermore, the impact of the intake of radon or its progeny via inhalation or skin absorption on radiation dose was also assessed for possible exposure scenarios in a radon hot spring. It was concluded that, depending on the radon concentration in thermal water, there might be situations in which the dose contribution resulting from skin absorption of radon is comparable to that resulting from inhalation of radon and its progeny. This conclusion can also apply to other therapeutic situations (e.g. staying in the pool for a longer period). PMID:26983980

  4. Radon mapping strategies in Austria.

    PubMed

    Gruber, V; Ringer, W; Wurm, G; Friedmann, H

    2015-11-01

    According to current European and international recommendations (e.g. by IAEA, WHO and European Union), countries shall identify high radon areas. In Austria, this task was initiated already in the early 1990s, which yielded the first Austrian Radon Potential Map. This map is still in use, updated with recent indoor radon data in 2012. The map is based on radon gas measurements in randomly selected dwellings, normalised to a standard situation. To meet the current (legal) requirements, uncertainties in the existing Austrian radon map should be reduced. A new indoor radon survey with a different sampling strategy was started, and possible mapping methods are studied and tested. In this paper, the methodology for the existing map as well as the planned strategies to improve this map is discussed.

  5. Compact anti-radon facility

    SciTech Connect

    Fajt, L.; Kouba, P.; Mamedov, F.; Smolek, K.; Štekl, I.

    2015-08-17

    Suppression of radon background is one of main tasks in ultra-low background experiments. The most promising technique for suppression of radon is its adsorption on charcoal. Within the frame of the NEMO-3 experiment, radon trapping facility (RTF) was installed in Modane underground laboratory in 2004. Based on long-term experience with this facility a new compact transportable anti-radon facility was constructed in cooperation among IEAP CTU, SÚRO and ATEKO company. The device provides 20m{sup 3}/h of purified air (air radon activity at the output ∼10mBq/m{sup 3}). The basic features and preliminary results of anti-radon device testing are presented.

  6. {sup 210}Po as a long-term integrating radon indicator in the indoor environment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    Exposure to radon (Rn-222) decay products in the indoor environment is suspected of being a significant lung cancer agent in many countries. But quantification of the contemporary lung cancer risk (i.e. probability) on an individual basis is not an easy task. Only past exposures are relevant and assessing individual exposures in retrospect is associated with large uncertainties, if possible at all. One way to extend the validity of contemporary measurements to past decades is to measure long-lived decay products of radon, the long-lived radon daughters. After our laboratory had exemplified the correlation between implanted Po-210 and the estimated radon exposures in six different dwellings, the US Department of Energy and the Swedish Radiation Protection Institute granted funds for a one-year study, ``{sup 210}Po as a Long-Term Integrating Radon Indicator in the Indoor Environment.`` In this report the work performed under these two contracts is reported.

  7. An approach to define potential radon emission level maps using indoor radon concentration measurements and radiogeochemical data positive proportion relationships.

    PubMed

    Drolet, Jean-Philippe; Martel, Richard; Poulin, Patrick; Dessau, Jean-Claude; Lavoie, Denis; Parent, Michel; Lévesque, Benoît

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the first step of a new approach to make a map of radonprone areas showing different potential radon emission levels in the Quebec province. This map is a tool intended to assist the Quebec government in identifying populations with a higher risk of indoor radon gas exposure. This map of radon-prone areas used available radiogeochemical information for the province of Quebec: (1) Equivalent uranium (eU) concentration from airborne surface gamma-ray surveys; (2) uranium concentration measurements in sediments; and (3) bedrock and surficial geology. Positive proportion relationships (PPR) between each individual criterion and the 1417 available basement radon concentrations were demonstrated. It was also shown that those criteria were reliable indicators of radon-prone areas. The three criteria were discretized into 3, 2 and 2 statistically significant different classes respectively. For each class, statistical heterogeneity was validated by Kruskal-Wallis one way analyses of variance on ranks. Maps of radon-prone areas were traced down for each criterion. Based on this statistical study and on the maps of radon-prone areas in Quebec, 18% of the dwellings located in areas with an equivalent uranium (eU) concentration from airborne surface gamma-ray surveys under 0.75 ppm showed indoor radon concentrations above 150 Bq/m3. This percentage increases to 33% when eU concentrations are between 0.75 ppm and 1.25 ppm and exceeds 40% when eU concentrations are above 1.25 ppm. A uranium concentration in sediments above 20 ppm showed an indoor radon concentration geometric mean of 215 Bq/m3 with more than 69% of the dwellings exceeding 150 Bq/m3 or more than 50% of dwellings exceeding the Canadian radon guideline of 200 Bq/m3. It is also shown that the radon emission potential is higher where a uranium-rich bedrock unit is not covered by a low permeability (silt/clay) surficial deposit.

  8. Development of a high efficiency personal/environmental radon dosimeter using polycarbonate detectors.

    PubMed

    Taheri, M; Jafarizadeh, M; Baradaran, S; Zainali, Gh

    2006-12-01

    Passive radon dosimeters, based on alpha particle etched track detectors, are widely used for the assessment of radon exposure. These methods are often applied in radon dosimetry for long periods of time. In this research work, we have developed a highly efficient method of personal/environmental radon dosimetry that is based upon the detection of alpha particles from radon daughters, (218)Po and (214)Po, using a polycarbonate detector (PC). The radon daughters are collected on the filter surface by passing a fixed flow of air through it and the PC detector, placed at a specified distance from the filter, is simultaneously exposed to alpha particles. After exposure, the latent tracks on the detector are made to appear by means of an electrochemical etching process; these are proportional to the radon dose. The air flow rate and the detector-filter distance are the major factors that can affect the performance of the dosimeter. The results obtained in our experimental investigations have shown that a distance of 1.5 cm between the detector and the filter, an absorber layer of Al with a thickness of 12 microm and an air flow rate of 4 l min(-1) offer the best design parameters for a high efficiency radon dosimeter. Then, the designed dosimeter was calibrated against different values of radon exposures and the obtained sensitivity was found to be 2.1 (tracks cm(-2)) (kBq h m(-3))(-1). The most important advantages of this method are that it is reliable, fast and convenient when used for radon dose assessment. In this paper, the optimized parameters of the dosimeter structure and its calibration procedure are presented and discussed.

  9. Cigarette use and the estimation of lung cancer attributable to radon in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Lubin, J.H.; Steindorf, K. |

    1995-01-01

    Residential exposure to radioactive radon and its decay products has been estimated to account for 10-12% of all lung cancer deaths in the US. It has been difficult to evaluate fully the impact of cigarette smoking, the most important cause of lung cancer, on this estimate, because factors for patterns of tobacco use have not been included in the risk models, since risk models are derived from studies of underground miners exposed to radon and detailed data on smoking are limited. Lung cancer risk estimates for exposure to radon progeny in smoker and non-smoker populations are obtained by applying the same risk model to each population group, thereby assuming the joint effects of smoking and exposure to radon progeny are multiplicative. However, in miners, joint relative risks (RR) for the two exposures are most consistent with an intermediate relationship between multiplicative and additive, so that the present approach likely results in an overestimate of risk in smokers and an underestimate of risk in nonsmokers. One approach for adjusting risk models to incorporate smoking status is based on the relative magnitude of the effects of radon progeny in smokers and nonsmokers and therefore may not be applicable to non-miner populations if the proportion of smokers and the RR for smoking differ. We show that the modification can be derived explicitly by assuming an arithmetic mixture model for the joint RR for smoking and exposure to radon progeny. In this way, smoking parameters in the population of interest (the proportion of smokers and the RR of smoking) can be used directly to adjust radon progeny risk models and obtain risk estimates that are specific for smokers and nonsmokers. With an intermediate RR relationship for smoking and radon progeny, the attributable percentage of lung cancer deaths from residential radon may be twofold greater in nonsmokers than in smokers. 20 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  10. Indoor radon measurements in the uranium regions of Poli and Lolodorf, Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Saïdou; Abdourahimi; Tchuente Siaka, Y F; Bouba, O

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this work is to carry out indoor radon measurements in the uranium regions of Poli and Lolodorf in which lie the uranium deposits of Kitongo and Lolodorf, prior to their impending exploitation. The indoor radon concentration was measured in 103 and 50 dwellings located respectively in Poli and Lolodorf using E-PERM electret chamber detectors. Indoor radon distributions in Poli and Lolodorf follow the lognormal law. Radon concentrations range respectively in Poli and Lolodorf between 29 and 2240 Bq m(-3) and 24-4390 Bq m(-3) with corresponding median values of 165 Bq m(-3) and 331 Bq m(-3). Corresponding arithmetic and geometric means are respectively 294 Bq m(-3) and 200 Bq m(-3) for the uranium region of Poli, 687 Bq m(-3) and 318 Bq m(-3) for the uranium region of Lolodorf. For the uranium region of Poli, 80% of dwellings have radon concentration above the reference level of 100 Bq m(-3) and 20% of dwellings show a radon concentration above 300 Bq m(-3). For the uranium region of Lolodorf, 80% of dwellings have radon concentration above 100 Bq m(-3) and 50% of dwellings show a radon concentration above 300 Bq m(-3). Thus radon monitoring and mitigation plan are required to better protect people against harmful effects of radon.

  11. Wire chamber

    DOEpatents

    Atac, Muzaffer

    1989-01-01

    A wire chamber or proportional counter device, such as Geiger-Mueller tube or drift chamber, improved with a gas mixture providing a stable drift velocity while eliminating wire aging caused by prior art gas mixtures. The new gas mixture is comprised of equal parts argon and ethane gas and having approximately 0.25% isopropyl alcohol vapor.

  12. Radon emanation fractions from concretes containing fly ash and metakaolin.

    PubMed

    Taylor-Lange, Sarah C; Juenger, Maria C G; Siegel, Jeffrey A

    2014-01-01

    Radon ((222)Rn) and progenies emanate from soil and building components and can create an indoor air quality hazard. In this study, nine concrete constituents, including the supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) fly ash and metakaolin, were used to create eleven different concrete mixtures. We investigated the effect of constituent radium specific activity, radon effective activity and emanation fraction on the concrete emanation fraction and the radon exhalation rate. Given the serious health effects associated with radionuclide exposure, experimental results were coupled with Monte Carlo simulations to demonstrate predictive differences in the indoor radon concentration due to concrete mixture design. The results from this study show that, on average, fly ash constituents possessed radium specific activities ranging from 100 Bq/kg to 200 Bq/kg and emanation fractions ranging from 1.1% to 2.5%. The lowest emitting concrete mixture containing fly ash resulted in a 3.4% reduction in the concrete emanation fraction, owing to the relatively low emanation that exists when fly ash is part of concrete. On average, the metakaolin constituents contained radium specific activities ranging from 67 Bq/kg to 600 Bq/kg and emanation fractions ranging from 8.4% to 15.5%, and changed the total concrete emanation fraction by roughly ±5% relative to control samples. The results from this study suggest that SCMs can reduce indoor radon exposure from concrete, contingent upon SCM radionucleotide content and emanation fraction. Lastly, the experimental results provide SCM-specific concrete emanation fractions for indoor radon exposure modeling.

  13. Comparative dosimetry of radon in mines and homes. Panel of dosimetric assumptions affecting the application of radon risk estimates, Board on Radiation Effects Research, Commission on Life Sciences, National Research Council

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The National Academy study addresses a topic of widespread attention since the discovery in 1984 of a worker found to be contaminated with radon in his home. Scientists have long understood the dangers of exposure to radon and its progeny and have analyzed the effects of exposure of these radionuclides in underground miner populations. However, extensive analyses on effects of radon exposure in the home are only now being performed. This study evaluates available data, describes uncertainties and attempts to translate dosimetric information related mine worker exposure to risk information regarding home radon exposures. The Academy's compilation and evaluation of the data are, as usual, pain-staking and thorough. Their discussions of uncertainties is helpful and careful to describe the boundaries and limitations of their results. The dosimetric model which resulted from their comparative evaluation is clearly presented. Risk assessors concerned about residential exposures to radionuclides will find this study useful.

  14. A generic biokinetic model for noble gases with application to radon

    SciTech Connect

    Leggett, Richard Wayne; Marsh, James; Gregoratto, Demetrio; Blanchardon, Eric

    2013-01-01

    The International Commission for Radiological Protection (ICRP) currently uses a dose conversion coefficient to calculate effective dose per unit exposure to radon and its progeny. The coefficient is derived by dividing the detriment associated with unit exposure to radon, as estimated from epidemiological studies, by the detriment per unit effective dose, as estimated mainly from atomic bomb survivor data and animal studies. In a recent statement the ICRP indicated that future guidance on exposure to radon and its progeny will be developed in the same way as guidance for any other radionuclide. That is, intake of radon and progeny will be limited on the basis of effective dose coefficients derived from biokinetic and dosimetric models. This paper proposes a biokinetic model for systemic (absorbed) radon for use in the calculation of dose coefficients for inhaled or ingested radon. The model is based largely on physical laws governing transfer of a non-reactive and soluble gas between materials. Model predictions are shown to be consistent with results of controlled studies of the fate of internally deposited radon in human subjects.

  15. Implementation of the new international standards in Swiss legislation on radon protection in dwellings.

    PubMed

    Palacios Gruson, Martha; Barazza, Fabio; Murith, Christophe; Ryf, Salome

    2015-04-01

    The current revision of the Swiss Radiological Protection Ordinance aims to bring Swiss legislation in line with new international standards. In future, the control of radon exposure in dwellings will be based on a reference level of 300 Bq m(-3). Since this value is exceeded in >10 % of the buildings so far investigated nationwide, the new strategy requires the development of efficient measures to reduce radon-related health risks at an acceptable cost. The minimisation of radon concentrations in new buildings is therefore of great importance. This can be achieved, for example, through the enforcement of building regulations and the education of construction professionals. With regard to radon mitigation in existing buildings, synergies with the ongoing renewal of the building stock should be exploited. In addition, the dissemination of knowledge about radon and its risks needs to be focused on specific target groups, e.g. notaries, who play an important information role in real estate transactions.

  16. Determination of indoor radon concentrations at the elementary schools of Fatih district in Istanbul

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurt, A.; Yalcin, L. Sahin; Oktem, Y.; Akkus, B.; Bozkurt, E.; Hafizoglu, N.; Ozturk, F. C.; Aytan, O.; Ertoprak, A.

    2016-03-01

    Radon is an odorless, tasteless, colorless noble radioactive gas which is produced within the radioactive decay chain of Uranium. The Radon forms in rocks, diffuses into soil and then escapes into atmosphere. When human exposure to high concentration of radon gas from inside, risk of developing lung cancer is increased. There are many methods to determine 222Rn concentration in the air. In this study, radon concentration of confined air spaces were measured by using LR-115 solid state nuclear track detectors. 509 LR-115 nuclear trace detectors were placed to 25 schools in Fatih District and they effective dose values were calculated. The results of measurements showed that the radon concentration varies between 40-395 Bq/m3. This results compared with Turkey's limits (400 Bq/m3) are low, conversely higher compared with WHO's limits (100 Bq/m3).

  17. Microdosimetry of radon progeny: Application to risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.R.; Hui, T.E.; James, A.C. ); Bond, V.P. )

    1990-01-01

    We developed methods for calculating radiation doses to individual cells and cell nuclei of human bronchial epithelium from radon and progeny for specified levels of exposure, breathing rates, equilibrium factors, unattached fraction of progeny, and other factors that are important in radon dosimetry. If we also know which cells are likely precursors for cancer, and we also know their locations in the respiratory tract, we then may calculate the statistical probability that these cells are irradiated by alpha particles, the number of single alpha-particle hits, and the spectrum of doses delivered as a probability density in specific energy.

  18. Radon emanation from low-grade uranium ore.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Patitapaban; Mishra, Devi Prasad; Panigrahi, Durga Charan; Jha, Vivekanand; Patnaik, R Lokeswara

    2013-12-01

    Estimation of radon emanation in uranium mines is given top priority to minimize the risk of inhalation exposure due to short-lived radon progeny. This paper describes the radon emanation studies conducted in the laboratory as well as inside an operating underground uranium mine at Jaduguda, India. Some of the important parameters, such as grade/(226)Ra activity, moisture content, bulk density, porosity and emanation fraction of ore, governing the migration of radon through the ore were determined. Emanation from the ore samples in terms of emanation rate and emanation fraction was measured in the laboratory under airtight condition in glass jar. The in situ radon emanation rate inside the mine was measured from drill holes made in the ore body. The in situ(222)Rn emanation rate from the mine walls varied in the range of 0.22-51.84 × 10(-3) Bq m(-2) s(-1) with the geometric mean of 8.68 × 10(-3) Bq m(-2) s(-1). A significant positive linear correlation (r = 0.99, p < 0.001) between in situ(222)Rn emanation rate and the ore grade was observed. The emanation fraction of the ore samples, which varied in the range of 0.004-0.089 with mean value of 0.025 ± 0.02, showed poor correlation with ore grade and porosity. Empirical relationships between radon emanation rate and the ore grade/(226)Ra were also established for quick prediction of radon emanation rate from the ore body.

  19. Radon in ground water supplies

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, K.L.; Lee, R.G.

    1989-06-01

    In September 1986, the System Water Quality Department of the American Water Works Service Co. began conducting a radon survey that was designed to determine the levels of radon in American ground water supplies, and to assess the radon removal efficiency of existing treatment processes such as filtration through granular activated carbon (GAC) and various forms of aeration. The survey found that companies in the northeastern part of the country experienced the highest levels of radon in ground water supplies. The highest concentrations were in individual wells in New Hampshire, Maryland, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and California. The analytical results from the occurrence phase of the survey seemed to correlate well with the known geology of the aquifer materials from which samples of ground water were drawn. The highest levels were associated with formations of uranium-bearing granitic rocks. GAC can effectively reduce radon concentrations in drinking water supplies to very low levels. However, the amount of contact time within the carbon bed required to do so would be prohibitive to many water utilities from an operational and economic standpoint. Further, disposal of the spent GAC as a low-level radioactive waste may be required. Aeration is very effective in the removal of radon from drinking water. Packed tower aerators achieved > 95% reduction in radon concentrations and conventional cascading tray aerators achieved > 75% reduction in radon concentrations. 7 refs., 6 tabs.

  20. APPLICATION OF RADON REDUCTION METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The document is intended to aid homeowners and contractors in diagnosing and solving indoor radon problems. It will also be useful to State and Federal regulatory officials and many other persons who provide advice on the selection, design and operation of radon reduction methods...

  1. IONIZATION CHAMBER

    DOEpatents

    Redman, W.C.; Shonka, F.R.

    1958-02-18

    This patent describes a novel ionization chamber which is well suited to measuring the radioactivity of the various portions of a wire as the wire is moved at a uniform speed, in order to produce the neutron flux traverse pattern of a reactor in which the wire was previously exposed to neutron radiation. The ionization chamber of the present invention is characterized by the construction wherein the wire is passed through a tubular, straight electrode and radiation shielding material is disposed along the wire except at an intermediate, narrow area where the second electrode of the chamber is located.

  2. Factors affecting indoor radon concentrations in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Gunby, J A; Darby, S C; Miles, J C; Green, B M; Cox, D R

    1993-01-01

    Data collected in a nationwide study on natural radiation exposure in UK dwellings (Wrixon et al. 1988) were re-analyzed to investigate the effects of rock type and various building and lifestyle characteristics, taken into account simultaneously, on indoor radon concentrations. A multiplicative model which takes into consideration the outdoor radon concentration is used. Indoor radon concentrations were found to be influenced by type of rock underlying the dwelling, double glazing, house type, floor level of rooms in which measurements were taken, window opening habits in the main bedroom, building materials used in the construction of the walls, floor type, and draught proofing. However, these eight factors together account for only 22% of the variation between dwellings. Estimates of the size of the effect associated with each factor are given.

  3. Dual home screening and tailored environmental feedback to reduce radon and secondhand smoke: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Ellen J; Rayens, Mary Kay; Kercsmar, Sarah E; Adkins, Sarah M; Wright, Ashton Potter; Robertson, Heather E; Rinker, Gwendolyn

    2014-01-01

    Combined exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) and radon increases lung cancer risk 10-fold. The authors assessed the feasibility and impact of a brief home screening and environmental feedback intervention to reduce radon and SHS (Freedom from Radon and Smoking in the Home [FRESH]) and measured perceived risk of lung cancer and synergistic risk perception (SHS x radon). Participants (N = 50) received home radon and SHS kits and completed baseline surveys. Test results were shared using an intervention guided by the Teachable Moment Model. Half of the participants completed online surveys two months later. Most (76%) returned the radon test kits; 48% returned SHS kits. Of the returned radon test kits, 26% were >4.0 pCi/L. Of the returned SHS kits, 38% had nicotine > .1 microg/m3. Of those with high radon, more than half had contacted a mitigation specialist or planned contact. Of those with positive air nicotine, 75% had adopted smoke-free homes. A significant increase occurred in perceived risk for lung cancer and synergistic risk perception after FRESH.

  4. Is radon emission in caves causing deletions in satellite DNA sequences of cave-dwelling crickets?

    PubMed

    Allegrucci, Giuliana; Sbordoni, Valerio; Cesaroni, Donatella

    2015-01-01

    The most stable isotope of radon, 222Rn, represents the major source of natural radioactivity in confined environments such as mines, caves and houses. In this study, we explored the possible radon-related effects on the genome of Dolichopoda cave crickets (Orthoptera, Rhaphidophoridae) sampled in caves with different concentrations of radon. We analyzed specimens from ten populations belonging to two genetically closely related species, D. geniculata and D. laetitiae, and explored the possible association between the radioactivity dose and the level of genetic polymorphism in a specific family of satellite DNA (pDo500 satDNA). Radon concentration in the analyzed caves ranged from 221 to 26,000 Bq/m3. Specimens coming from caves with the highest radon concentration showed also the highest variability estimates in both species, and the increased sequence heterogeneity at pDo500 satDNA level can be explained as an effect of the mutation pressure induced by radon in cave. We discovered a specific category of nuclear DNA, the highly repetitive satellite DNA, where the effects of the exposure at high levels of radon-related ionizing radiation are detectable, suggesting that the satDNA sequences might be a valuable tool to disclose harmful effects also in other organisms exposed to high levels of radon concentration.

  5. Is Radon Emission in Caves Causing Deletions in Satellite DNA Sequences of Cave-Dwelling Crickets?

    PubMed Central

    Allegrucci, Giuliana; Sbordoni, Valerio; Cesaroni, Donatella

    2015-01-01

    The most stable isotope of radon, 222Rn, represents the major source of natural radioactivity in confined environments such as mines, caves and houses. In this study, we explored the possible radon-related effects on the genome of Dolichopoda cave crickets (Orthoptera, Rhaphidophoridae) sampled in caves with different concentrations of radon. We analyzed specimens from ten populations belonging to two genetically closely related species, D. geniculata and D. laetitiae, and explored the possible association between the radioactivity dose and the level of genetic polymorphism in a specific family of satellite DNA (pDo500 satDNA). Radon concentration in the analyzed caves ranged from 221 to 26000 Bq/m3. Specimens coming from caves with the highest radon concentration showed also the highest variability estimates in both species, and the increased sequence heterogeneity at pDo500 satDNA level can be explained as an effect of the mutation pressure induced by radon in cave. We discovered a specific category of nuclear DNA, the highly repetitive satellite DNA, where the effects of the exposure at high levels of radon-related ionizing radiation are detectable, suggesting that the satDNA sequences might be a valuable tool to disclose harmful effects also in other organisms exposed to high levels of radon concentration. PMID:25822625

  6. Indoor radon survey in Visegrad countries.

    PubMed

    Műllerová, Monika; Kozak, Krzysztof; Kovács, Tibor; Smetanová, Iveta; Csordás, Anita; Grzadziel, Dominik; Holý, Karol; Mazur, Jadwiga; Moravcsík, Attila; Neznal, Martin; Neznal, Matej

    2016-04-01

    The indoor radon measurements were carried out in 123 residential buildings and 33 schools in Visegrad countries (Slovakia, Hungary and Poland). In 13.2% of rooms radon concentration exceeded 300Bqm(-3), the reference value recommended in the Council Directive 2013/59/EURATOM. Indoor radon in houses shows the typical radon behavior, with a minimum in the summer and a maximum in the winter season, whereas in 32% of schools the maximum indoor radon was reached in the summer months.

  7. A prediction model for assessing residential radon concentration in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Hauri, Dimitri D; Huss, Anke; Zimmermann, Frank; Kuehni, Claudia E; Röösli, Martin

    2012-10-01

    Indoor radon is regularly measured in Switzerland. However, a nationwide model to predict residential radon levels has not been developed. The aim of this study was to develop a prediction model to assess indoor radon concentrations in Switzerland. The model was based on 44,631 measurements from the nationwide Swiss radon database collected between 1994 and 2004. Of these, 80% randomly selected measurements were used for model development and the remaining 20% for an independent model validation. A multivariable log-linear regression model was fitted and relevant predictors selected according to evidence from the literature, the adjusted R², the Akaike's information criterion (AIC), and the Bayesian information criterion (BIC). The prediction model was evaluated by calculating Spearman rank correlation between measured and predicted values. Additionally, the predicted values were categorised into three categories (50th, 50th-90th and 90th percentile) and compared with measured categories using a weighted Kappa statistic. The most relevant predictors for indoor radon levels were tectonic units and year of construction of the building, followed by soil texture, degree of urbanisation, floor of the building where the measurement was taken and housing type (P-values <0.001 for all). Mean predicted radon values (geometric mean) were 66 Bq/m³ (interquartile range 40-111 Bq/m³) in the lowest exposure category, 126 Bq/m³ (69-215 Bq/m³) in the medium category, and 219 Bq/m³ (108-427 Bq/m³) in the highest category. Spearman correlation between predictions and measurements was 0.45 (95%-CI: 0.44; 0.46) for the development dataset and 0.44 (95%-CI: 0.42; 0.46) for the validation dataset. Kappa coefficients were 0.31 for the development and 0.30 for the validation dataset, respectively. The model explained 20% overall variability (adjusted R²). In conclusion, this residential radon prediction model, based on a large number of measurements, was demonstrated to be robust

  8. Radon Dose Determination for Cave Guides in Czech Republic

    SciTech Connect

    Thinova, Lenka; Rovenska, Katerina

    2008-08-07

    According to recommended approach there are six (from total of twelve) open-to-public caves in Czech Republic, reaching near to an effective lung-dose of 6mSv/year. A conservative approach for estimating the potential effective lung-dose in caves (or underground) is based on two season's measurements, using solid state alpha track detector (Kodak in plastic diffusion chamber). The obtained dataset is converted into an annual effective dose, in agreement with the ICRP65 recommendation, using the 'cave factor' 1.5. The value of 'cave factor' which depends on the spectrum of aerosol particles, or on the proportional representation of the unattached/attached ratio (6.5 : 93.5 for residential places, 13.6 : 86.4 for caves due to lower concentration of free aerosols) and on the equilibrium factor. Thus conversion factor is 1.5 times higher in comparison with ICRP 65. Is this correct? Because a more precisely determined dose value would have a significant impact on radon remedies, or on restricting the time workers stay underground, a series of measurement was initiated in 2003 with the aim to specify input data, computation and errors in effective dose assessment in each one of the evaluated caves separately. The enhancement of personal dosimetry for underground work places includes a study of the given questions, from the following points of view in each cave: continual radon measurement; regular measurements of radon and its daughters to estimate the equilibrium factor and the presence of free {sup 218}Po; regular indoor air flow measurements to study the location of the radon supply and its transfer among individual areas of the cave; natural radioactive element content evaluation in subsoil and in water inside/outside, a study of the radon sources in the cave; determination of the free fraction from continual unattached and attached fraction measurement (grid and filter); thoron measurement. Air flow measurements provide very interesting information about the origin

  9. Origin of radon concentration of Csalóka Spring in the Sopron Mountains (West Hungary).

    PubMed

    Freiler, Ágnes; Horváth, Ákos; Török, Kálmán; Földes, Tamás

    2016-01-01

    We examined the Csalóka Spring, which has the highest radon concentration in the Sopron Mountains (West Hungary) (, yearly average of 227 ± 10 Bq L(-1)). The main rock types here are gneiss and micaschist, formed from metamorphism of former granitic and clastic sedimentary rocks respectively. The aim of the study was to find a likely source of the high radon concentration in water. During two periods (2007-2008 and 2012-2013) water samples were taken from the Csalóka Spring to measure its radon concentration (from 153 ± 9 Bq L(-1) to 291 ± 15 Bq L(-1)). Soil and rock samples were taken within a 10-m radius of the spring from debrish and from a deformed gneiss outcrop 500 m away from the spring. The radium activity concentration of the samples (between 24.3 ± 2.9 Bq kg(-1) and 145 ± 6.0 Bq kg(-1)) was measured by gamma-spectroscopy, and the specific radon exhalation was determined using radon-chamber measurements (between 1.32 ± 0.5 Bq kg(-1) and 37.1 ± 2.2 Bq kg(-1)). Based on these results a model calculation was used to determine the maximum potential radon concentration, which the soil or the rock may provide into the water. We showed that the maximum potential radon concentration of these mylonitic gneissic rocks (cpot = 2020 Bq L(-1)) is about eight times higher than the measured radon concentration in the water. However the maximum potential radon concentration for soils are significantly lower (41.3 Bq L(-1)) Based on measurements of radon exhalation and porosity of rock and soil samples we concluded that the source material can be the gneiss rock around the spring rather than the soil there. We determined the average radon concentration and the time dependence of the radon concentration over these years in the spring water. We obtained a strong negative correlation (-0.94 in period of 2007-2008 and -0.91 in 2012-2013) between precipitation and radon concentration.

  10. Comparison of radon doses based on different radon monitoring approaches.

    PubMed

    Vaupotič, Janja; Smrekar, Nataša; Žunić, Zora S

    2017-04-01

    In 43 places (23 schools, 3 kindergartens, 16 offices and one dwelling), indoor radon has been monitored as an intercomparison experiment, using α-scintillation cells (SC - Jožef Stefan Institute, Slovenia), various kinds of solid state nuclear track detectors (KfK - Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany; UFO - National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba, Japan; RET - University College Dublin, Ireland) and active electronic devices (EQF, Sarad, Germany). At the same place, the radon levels and, consequently, the effective doses obtained with different radon devices differed substantially (by a factor of 2 or more), and no regularity was observed as regards which detector would show a higher or lower dose.

  11. Control of respirable particles and radon progeny with portable air cleaners

    SciTech Connect

    Offermann, F.J.; Sextro, R.G.; Fisk, W.J.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Nero, A.V.; Revzan, K.L.; Yater, J.

    1984-02-01

    Eleven portable air cleaning devices have been evaluated for control of indoor concentrations of respirable particles and radon progeny. Following injection of cigarette smoke and radon in a room-size chamber, decay rates for particles and radon progeny concentrations were measured with and without air cleaner operation. Particle concentrations were obtained for total number concentration and for number concentration by particle size. In tests with no air cleaner the natural decay rate for cigarette smoke was observed to be 0.2 hr/sup -1/. Air cleaning rates for particles were found to be negligible for several small panel-filters, a residential ion-generator, and a pair of mixing fans. The electrostatic precipitators and extended surface filters tested had significant particle removal rates, and a HEPA-type filter was the most efficient air cleaner. The evaluation of radon progeny control produced similar results; the air cleaners which were effective in removing particles were also effective in removing radon progeny. At low particle concentrations plateout of the unattached radon progeny is an important removal mechanism. Based on data from these tests, the plateout rate for unattached progeny was found to be 15 hr/sup -1/. The unattached fraction and the overall removal rate due to deposition of attached and unattached nuclides have been estimated for each radon decay product as a function of particle concentration. While air cleaning can be effective in reducing total radon progeny, concentrations of unattached radon progeny can increase with increasing air cleaning. 39 references, 26 figures, 9 tables.

  12. Test of the linear-NO threshold theory of radiation carcinogenesis for inhaled radon decay products

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.L.

    1995-02-01

    Data on lung cancer mortality rates vs. average radon concentration in homes for 1,601 U.S. counties are used to test the linear-no threshold theory. The widely recognized problems with ecological studies, as applied to this work, are addressed extensively. With or without corrections for variations in smoking prevalence, there is a strong tendency for lung cancer rates to decrease with increasing radon exposure, in sharp contrast to the increase expected from the theory. The discrepancy in slope is about 20 standard deviations. It is shown that uncertainties in lung cancer rates, radon exposures, and smoking prevalence are not important and that confounding by 54 socioeconomic factors, by geography, and by altitude and climate can explain only a small fraction of the discrepancy. Effects of known radon-smoking prevalence correlations-rural people have higher radon levels and smoke less than urban people, and smokers are exposed to less radon than non-smokers-are calculated and found to be trivial. In spite of extensive efforts, no potential explanation for the discrepancy other than failure of the linear-no threshold theory for carcinogenesis from inhaled radon decay products could be found. 46 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  13. Predicted indoor radon concentrations from a Monte Carlo simulation of 1,000,000 granite countertop purchases.

    PubMed

    Allen, J G; Zwack, L M; MacIntosh, D L; Minegishi, T; Stewart, J H; McCarthy, J F

    2013-03-01

    Previous research examining radon exposure from granite countertops relied on using a limited number of exposure scenarios. We expanded upon this analysis and determined the probability that installing a granite countertop in a residential home would lead to a meaningful radon exposure by performing a Monte Carlo simulation to obtain a distribution of potential indoor radon concentrations attributable to granite. The Monte Carlo analysis included estimates of the probability that a particular type of granite would be purchased, the radon flux associated with that type, the size of the countertop purchased, the volume of the home where it would be installed and the air exchange rate of that home. One million countertop purchases were simulated and 99.99% of the resulting radon concentrations were lower than the average outdoor radon concentrations in the US (14.8 Bq m(-3); 0.4  pCi l(-1)). The median predicted indoor concentration from granite countertops was 0.06 Bq m(-3) (1.59 × 10(-3) pCi l(-1)), which is over 2000 times lower than the US Environmental Protection Agency's action level for indoor radon (148 Bq m(-3); 4 pCi l(-1)). The results show that there is a low probability of a granite countertop causing elevated levels of radon in a home.

  14. Measurement of radon/thoron exhalation rates and gamma-ray dose rate in granite areas in Japan.

    PubMed

    Prasad, G; Ishikawa, T; Hosoda, M; Sahoo, S K; Kavasi, N; Sorimachi, A; Tokonami, S; Uchida, S

    2012-11-01

    Radon and thoron exhalation rates and gamma-ray dose rate in different places in Hiroshima Prefecture were measured. Exhalation rates were measured using an accumulation chamber method. The radon exhalation rate was found to vary from 3 to 37 mBq m(-2) s(-1), while the thoron exhalation rate ranged from 40 to 3330 mBq m(-2) s(-1). The highest radon exhalation rate (37 mBq m(-2) s(-1)) and gamma-ray dose rate (92 nGy h(-1)) were found in the same city (Kure City). In Kure City, indoor radon and thoron concentrations were previously measured at nine selected houses using a radon-thoron discriminative detector (Raduet). The indoor radon concentrations varied from 16 to 78 Bq m(-3), which was higher than the average value in Japan (15.5 Bq m(-3)). The indoor thoron concentration ranged from ND (not detected: below a detection limit of approximately 10 Bq m(-3)) to 314 Bq m(-3). The results suggest that radon exhalation rate from the ground is an influential factor for indoor radon concentration.

  15. Morphology of respiratory tract lesions in rats exposed to radon progeny

    SciTech Connect

    Dagle, G.E.; Cross, F.T.; Gies, R.A.

    1992-12-31

    We will discuss the morphologic features of lesions in the respiratory tract of rats exposed to radon and radon progeny. Groups of male Wister rats were exposed to from 10 to 1000 working levels (WL) of radon progeny in the presence of less than 1 to about 15 mg m{sup {minus}3} uranium ore dust. Cumulative exposures ranged from 20 to approximately 10,000 working level months (WLM). Higher exposure levels produced radiation pneumonitis characterized by interstitial fibrosis, associated with alveolar epithelial cell hyperplasia and accumulations of alveolar macrophages containing phagocytosed uranium ore dust. Nodular fibrosis and alveolar proteinosis were correlated with deposits of uranium ore dust. Vesicular emphysema also occurred at higher exposure levels. Pulmonary adenomatosis appeared to be a preneoplastic lesion; it was composed of nodular proliferation of bronchioloalveolar epithelium without disruption of the general architecture of the parenchyma. At exposure levels where rats lived longer than 1 y, lung tumors and a few tumors of the nasal cavity developed. The principal lung tumors were pulmonary adenomas, bronchioloalveolar carcinomas, papillary adenocarcinomas, epidermoid carcinomas, and adenosquamous carcinomas. Occasionally, malignant mesotheliomas and sarcomas were also present. The malignant lung tumors were characterized by invasion and occasionally metastasized to regional lymph nodes. Lower exposure rates produced more tumors, generally of different histologic types, and more fatal tumors than higher exposure rates. The similarity to relationships of human radon progeny exposure as far as incidence and types of lung tumors establish the validity of this animal model for studying radon carcinogenesis in humans.

  16. Radon gas: Health risks and toxicity. (Latest citations from the NTIS data base). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the potential health risks associated with indoor and outdoor exposure to radon gas. Included are sources such as cigarette smoke, fossil fuel combustion, phosphate mining, uranium mining, granitic rocks, building materials, and water supplies. Citations include toxicology studies, risk assessment studies, exposure modeling, exposure pathways, physiological effects, and exposure control. Radionuclides in groundwater, and radon analysis and detection, are presented in separate Published Searches. (Contains a minimum of 129 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  17. Uranium mill tailings and radon

    SciTech Connect

    Hanchey, L A

    1981-01-01

    The major health hazard from uranium mill tailings is presumed to be respiratory cancer resulting from the inhalation of radon daughter products. A review of studies on inhalation of radon and its daughters indicates that the hazard from the tailings is extremely small. If the assumptions used in the studies are correct, one or two people per year in the US may develop cancer as a result of radon exhaled from all the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program sites. The remedial action should reduce the hazard from the tailings by a factor of about 100.

  18. Uranium mill tailings and radon

    SciTech Connect

    Hanchey, L A

    1981-04-01

    The major health hazard from uranium mill tailings is presumed to be respiratory cancer resulting from the inhalation of radon daughter products. A review of studies on inhalation of radon and its daughters indicates that the hazard from the tailings is extremely small. If the assumptions used in the studies are correct, one or two people per year in the United States may develop cancer as a result of radon exhaled from all the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action program sites. The remedial action should reduce the hazard from the tailings by a factor of about 100.

  19. Radon in earthquake prediction research.

    PubMed

    Friedmann, H

    2012-04-01

    The observation of anomalies in the radon concentration in soil gas and ground water before earthquakes initiated systematic investigations on earthquake precursor phenomena. The question what is needed for a meaningful earthquake prediction as well as what types of precursory effects can be expected is shortly discussed. The basic ideas of the dilatancy theory are presented which in principle can explain the occurrence of earthquake forerunners. The reasons for radon anomalies in soil gas and in ground water are clarified and a possible classification of radon anomalies is given.

  20. Lung cancer mortality among nonsmoking uranium miners exposed to radon daughters

    SciTech Connect

    Roscoe, R.J.; Steenland, K.; Halperin, W.E.; Beaumont, J.J.; Waxweiler, R.J.

    1989-08-04

    Radon daughters, both in the workplace and in the household, are a continuing cause for concern because of the well-documented association between exposure to radon daughters and lung cancer. To estimate the risk of lung cancer mortality among nonsmokers exposed to varying levels of radon daughters, 516 white men who never smoked cigarettes, pipes, or cigars were selected from the US Public Health Service cohort of Colorado Plateau uranium miners and followed up from 1950 through 1984. Age-specific mortality rates for nonsmokers from a study of US veterans were used for comparison. Fourteen deaths from lung cancer were observed among the nonsmoking miners, while 1.1 deaths were expected, yielding a standardized mortality ratio of 12.7 with 95% confidence limits of 8.0 and 20.1. These results confirm that exposure to radon daughters in the absence of cigarette smoking is a potent carcinogen that should be strictly controlled.

  1. Intercomparison of passive radon-detectors under field conditions in epidemiological studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kreienbrock, L. ); Poffijn, A. ); Tirmarche, M. ); Feider, M. ); Kies, A. ); Darby, S.C. )

    1999-05-01

    The Ardennes and Eifel region is a geologically distinct area covering parts of Germany, Belgium, France, and Luxembourg where enhanced concentrations of radon occur in some houses and other buildings. An international case-control study is being conducted to examine the role of radon in the etiology of lung cancer in this area. The radon detectors used are issued by different laboratories involving a variety of detector types and processes. A series of intercomparisons in houses was therefore conducted under similar conditions of exposure in the field. In most situations the different detectors gave similar results. Nevertheless, in some situations open and closed detectors yielded different results. Therefore, estimates of radon exposure have to be adjusted if results are to be pooled.

  2. A means to make open-face charcoal detectors respond correctly to varying concentration radon fields

    SciTech Connect

    Distenfeld, C.H.

    1995-12-31

    Ronca-Battista and D. Gray 87, outlined the poor response of open-face charcoal detectors to varying concentration radon fields. At worst, for two day exposures with open-face charcoal canisters, their Table 4 indicated a 75% under-response for radon concentrations that were 10 times higher during the first day of two, 10:1. TCS has made similar measurements with open-faced and diffusion barrier detectors in 20:1, 1:20, and 1:1 fields. For the worst case 20:1, measurements indicate TCS two day open-face canisters under respond by 50%, while the Cohen and TCS diffusion barrier devices under responded by about 37%. The reasons for the under response are radon diffusion out of the charcoal due to the forces of lower concentration during the second half of the exposure, and uncompensated radioactive decay of radon gas.

  3. Emanation of radon from household granite.

    PubMed

    Kitto, Michael E; Haines, Douglas K; Arauzo, Hernando Diaz

    2009-04-01

    Emanation of radon (222Rn) from granite used for countertops and mantels was measured with continuous and integrating radon monitors. Each of the 24 granite samples emitted a measurable amount of radon. Of the two analytical methods that utilized electret-based detectors, one measured the flux of radon from the granite surfaces, and the other one measured radon levels in a glass jar containing granite cores. Additional methods that were applied utilized alpha-scintillation cells and a continuous radon monitor. Measured radon flux from the granites ranged from 2 to 310 mBq m-2 s-1, with most granites emitting <20 mBq m-2 s-1. Emanation of radon from granites encapsulated in airtight containers produced equilibrium concentrations ranging from <0.01 to 11 Bq kg-1 when alpha-scintillation cells were used, and from <0.01 to 4.0 Bq kg-1 when the continuous radon monitor was used.

  4. Radon measurement and mitigation activity in Finland.

    PubMed

    Valmari, T; Arvela, H; Reisbacka, H; Holmgren, O

    2014-07-01

    Radon prevention, measurement and mitigation activities have been increasing in Finland during the 2000s. Nowadays, many municipal authorities, especially those located in high-radon areas, require radon prevention measures. This has activated radon measurements. Owners of new houses having radon piping installed under the floor slab are the most active group to measure and reduce the found high-radon values. Their radon awareness is apparently better than on the average, and the existing piping makes it easier and cheaper to reduce the radon levels. Local campaigns involving invitation flyers mailed to the residents have been a cost-effective means to activate measurements of older houses. So far 116,611 dwellings in low-rise residential buildings have been measured. At least 15% of the 16,860 dwellings found to exceed the reference level of 400 Bq m(-3) had their indoor radon level reduced below that.

  5. United role of radon decay products and nano-aerosols in radon dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smerajec, M.; Vaupotič, J.

    2012-04-01

    The major part of human exposure to natural radiation originates from inhalation of radon (Rn) and radon short-lived decay products (RnDP: 218Po, 214Pb, 214Bi and 214Po). RnDP are formed as a result of α-transformation of radon. In the beginning they are positive ions which neutralize and form clusters with air molecules, and later partly attach to background aerosol particles in indoor air. Eventually, they appear as radioactive nano-aerosols with a bimodal size distribution in ranges of 1-10 nm (unattached RnDP) and of 200-800 nm (attached RnDP). When inhaled, they are deposited in the respiratory tract. Deposition is more efficient for smaller particles. Therefore, the fraction (fun) of the unattached RnDP, which appears to be influenced by the number concentration and size distribution of general (background) aerosols in the ambient air, has a crucial role in radon dosimetry. Radon, radon decay products and general aerosols have been monitored simultaneously in the kitchen of a typical rural house under real living conditions, also comprising four human activities generating particular matter: cooking and baking, as two typical activities in kitchen, and cigarette smoking and candle burning. In periods without any human activity, the total number concentration of general aerosol ranged from 1000 to 3000 cm-3,with the geometric mean of particle diameter in the range of 60-68 nm and with 0.1-1 % of particles smaller than 10 nm. Preparation of coffee changed the concentration to 193,000 cm-3, the geometric mean of diameter to 20 nm and fraction of particles smaller than 10 nm to 11 %. The respective changes were for baking cake: 503,000 cm-3, 17 nm and 19 %, for smoking:423,000 cm-3, 83 nm and 0.4 %, and forcandle burning: 945,000 cm-3, 8 nm and 85 %. While, as expected, a reduction of fun was observed during cooking, baking and smoking, when larger particles were emitted, fun did not increase during candle burning with mostly particles smaller than 10 nm

  6. Is environmental radon gas associated with the incidence of neurodegenerative conditions? A retrospective study of multiple sclerosis in radon affected areas in England and Wales.

    PubMed

    Groves-Kirkby, Christopher J; Denman, Antony R; Campbell, Jackie; Crockett, Robin G M; Phillips, Paul S; Rogers, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    To test whether an association exists between radon gas concentration in the home and increased multiple sclerosis (MS) incidence, a retrospective study was undertaken of MS incidence in known areas of raised domestic radon concentration in England and Wales, using The Health Improvement Network (THIN) clinical research database. The study population comprised 20,140,498 person-years of clinical monitoring (males: 10,056,628: 49.93%; females: 10,083,870: 50.07%), representing a mean annual population of 2.5 million individuals. To allow for the possible latency of MS initiation following exposure, data extraction was limited to patients with at least five years registration history with the same GP practice before first diagnosis. Patient records were allocated to one of nine radon concentration bands depending on the average radon level in their postcode sector. MS incidence was analysed by searching for patients with first MS diagnosis over the eight calendar years 2005-2012 inclusive. 1512 new MS cases were diagnosed, 1070 females, 442 males, equivalent to raw incidence rates of 7.51, 10.61 and 4.40 per 10(5) person-years respectively, comparable to previously reported results. Of these new cases, 115 could be allocated to one of the radon bands representing high radon areas. Standardising to the UK 2010 population, excess relative risk (ERR) figures for MS were calculated for each radon band. Linear regression of ERR against mean band radon concentration shows a positive gradient of 0.22 per 100 Bq·m(-3) (R(2) = 0.25, p = 0.0961) when forced through the origin to represent a linear-no-threshold response. The null hypothesis falls inside the 95% confidence interval for the linear fit and therefore this fit is not statistically significant. We conclude that, despite THIN sampling around 5% of the population, insufficient data was available to confirm or refute the hypothesised association between MS incidence and radon concentration.

  7. Natural Exposure versus Chamber Simulation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-01

    ooserved = Fungus not observed Open Site 25 25 25 28 27 25 26 25 FUNGUS JUN JUL OCT NOV DEC JAN MAR APR CURVULARIA X X X X X X x PENICILLIUM X . X X...APR CURVULARIA x PENICILLIUM X X x X X FUSARIUM CLADOSPORIUM X PHOIAA X ASPERGILLUS X CEPHALOSPORIUM X X TRICHODERMA X PESTALOTIA GL TOCLADIUM...NIGROSPORA STEMPHYLIUM ALTERNARIA 0SkuLnk HolIlIow 25 25 25 28 27 25 26 25 FUNGUS JUN JUL OCT NOV DEC JAN MAR APR CUR VULAR IA PENICILLIUM X X X FUSARIUM X

  8. Indoor radon levels in selected hot spring hotels in Guangdong, China.

    PubMed

    Song, Gang; Zhang, Boyou; Wang, Xinming; Gong, Jingping; Chan, Daniel; Bernett, John; Lee, S C

    2005-03-01

    Guangdong is one of the provinces that have most hot springs in China, and many hotels have been set up near hot springs, with spring water introduced into the bath inside each hotel room for hot spring bathing to attract tourists. In the present study, we measured radon in indoor and outdoor air, as well as in hot spring waters, in four hot spring hotels in Guangdong by using NR-667A (III) continuous radon detector. Radon concentrations ranged 53.4-292.5 Bq L(-1) in the hot spring water and 17.2-190.9 Bq m(-3) in outdoor air. Soil gas intrusion, indoor hot spring water use and inefficient ventilation all contributed to the elevated indoor radon levels in the hotel rooms. From the variation of radon levels in closed unoccupied hotel rooms, soil gas intrusion was found to be a very important source of indoor radon in hotel rooms with floors in contact with soils. When there was spring water bathing in the bathes, average radon levels were 10.9-813% higher in the hotel rooms and 13.8-489% higher in bathes compared to their corresponding average levels when there was no spring water use. Spring water use in the hotel rooms had radon transfer coefficients from 1.6x10(-4) to 5.0x10(-3). Radon in some hotel rooms maintained in concentrations much higher than guideline levels might thus have potential health risks to the hotel workers, and technical and management measures should be taken to lower their exposure of radon through inhalation.

  9. Radon entry into buildings: Effects of atmospheric pressure fluctuations and building structural factors

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Allen Lantham

    1996-05-01

    An improved understanding of the factors that control radon entry into buildings is needed in order to reduce the public health risks caused by exposure to indoor radon. This dissertation examines three issues associated with radon entry into buildings: (1) the influence of a subslab gravel layer and the size of the openings between the soil and the building interior on radon entry; (2) the effect of atmospheric pressure fluctuations on radon entry; and (3) the development and validation of mathematical models which simulate radon and soil-gas entry into houses. Experiments were conducted using two experimental basements to examine the influence of a subslab gravel layer on advective radon entry driven by steady indoor-outdoor pressure differences. These basement structures are identical except that in one the floor slab lies directly on native soil whereas in the other the slab lies on a high-permeability gravel layer. The measurements indicate that a high permeability subslab gravel layer increases the advective radon entry rate into the structure by as much as a factor of 30. The magnitude of the enhancement caused by the subslab gravel layer depends on the area of the openings in the structure floor; the smaller the area of these openings the larger the enhancement in the radon entry rate caused by the subslab gravel layer. A three-dimensional, finite-difference model correctly predicts the effect of a subslab gravel layer and open area configuration on advective radon entry driven by steady indoor-outdoor pressure differences; however, the model underpredicts the absolute entry rate into each structure by a factor of 1.5.

  10. Map showing radon potential of rocks and soils in Fairfax County, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Otton, James K.; Schumann, R. Randall; Owen, Douglass E.; Thurman, Nelson; Duval, Joseph S.

    1988-01-01

    Since 1984, indoor radon has gained national attention as a significant health hazard in the United States. Radon is a colorless, odorless, radioactive gas derived from uranium by radioactive decay. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) now projects that 5,000 to 20,000 lung-cancer deaths per year may be attributed to the long-term exposure to indoor radon and its radioactive decay products. Indoor radon has been previously recognized as a health hazard associated with uranium-bearing mill tailings or building materials, but it was not until December 1984 that some natural soils and rocks were found to be sources of indoor radon at levels comparable to those in uranium mines. It is now suspected that elevated indoor radon levels are far more widespread than initially though. The EPA considers 4 picoCuries of radon per liter of air (pCi/L) as the level (in a year-round measurement) at which actions ought to be taken to lower the concentration of indoor radon. All soils and rocks contain measurable amounts of uranium, which generate measurable amounts of radon. Certain soils and rocks, however, have a greater potential to cause indoor radon problems than others because (1) they have a higher uranium content and thus can generate higher levels of radon in soil gas (gas that occupies the pores of the soil), and (2) the permeability of the sol or rack is sufficiently high that radon-bearing soil gas can flow freely and move indoors through the foundation of the structure. This study was designed to demonstrate the correlation between the geologic environment and indoor radon levels and to demonstrate a method of assessment that could be used by other informed workers in areas of their interest. A parallel study by Gundersen and others (1988) of the radon potential of rocks and soils in Montgomery County, Md., used somewhat different methods of assessment because the data available for and assessment of Montgomery County differed.

  11. Comprehensive survey of household radon gas levels and risk factors in southern Alberta

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Fintan K.T.; Zarezadeh, Siavash; Dumais, Colin D.; Dumais, Karin; MacQueen, Renata; Clement, Fiona; Goodarzi, Aaron A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The inhalation of naturally occurring radon (222Rn) gas from indoor air exposes lung tissue to α-particle bombardment, a highly mutagenic form of ionizing radiation that damages DNA and increases the lifetime risk of lung cancer. We analyzed household radon concentrations and risk factors in southern Alberta, including Calgary, the third-largest Canadian metropolis. Methods: A total of 2382 residential homes (2018 in Calgary and 364 in surrounding townships) from an area encompassing 82% of the southern Alberta population were tested for radon, per Health Canada guidelines, for at least 90 days (median 103 d) between 2013 and 2016. Participants also provided home metrics (construction year, build type, foundation type, and floor and room of deployment of the radon detector) via an online survey. Homes that were subsequently remediated were retested to determine the efficacy of radon reduction techniques in the region. Results: The average indoor air radon level was 126 Bq/m3, which equates to an effective absorbed radiation dose of 3.2 mSv/yr. A total of 1135 homes (47.6%) had levels of 100 Bq/m3 or higher, and 295 homes (12.4%) had levels of 200 Bq/m3 or higher; the range was less than 15 Bq/m3 to 3441 Bq/m3. Homes built in 1992 or later had radon levels 31.5% higher, on average, than older homes (mean 142 Bq/m3 v. 108 Bq/m3). For 90 homes with an average radon level of 575 Bq/m3 before mitigation, radon suppression successfully reduced levels to an average of 32.5 Bq/m3. Interpretation: Our findings show that radon exposure is a genuine public health concern in southern Alberta, suggest that modern building practices are associated with increased indoor air radon accumulation, legitimatize efforts to understand the consequences of radon exposure to the public, and suggest that radon testing and mitigation are likely to be impactful cancer prevention strategies.

  12. Ionization chamber

    DOEpatents

    Walenta, Albert H.

    1981-01-01

    An ionization chamber has separate drift and detection regions electrically isolated from each other by a fine wire grid. A relatively weak electric field can be maintained in the drift region when the grid and another electrode in the chamber are connected to a high voltage source. A much stronger electric field can be provided in the detection region by connecting wire electrodes therein to another high voltage source. The detection region can thus be operated in a proportional mode when a suitable gas is contained in the chamber. High resolution output pulse waveforms are provided across a resistor connected to the detection region anode, after ionizing radiation enters the drift region and ionize the gas.

  13. Navy Radon Assessment and Mitigation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Bertini, H.W.; Dudney, C.S.; Wilson, D.L.; Wright, T.

    1990-12-01

    During the reporting period, June, 1 1989, through May 30, 1990, radon detectors were sent to all Department of the Navy installations that contained housing areas, childcare centers, schools, hospitals, bachelor quarters, and brigs. This action was part of the screening phase of the Navy Radon Assessment and Mitigation Program. Because of detector losses, a few facilities will require rescreening. The length of time the detectors are exposed in the buildings is dependent on the time or year they were placed and the time when the doors and windows are normally closed. A 3-month exposure time is sufficient for facilities that placed detectors in building when they would be closed. Otherwise detectors will be exposed for about 1 year. To date, about 9,000 detectors (out of a total of 27,100 detectors sent to the field) have been returned for a determination of exposure levels. About 2,000 detectors have been analyzed and the information sent to the Navel Facilities Engineering Command Headquarters for forwarding to the installations. Except for the additional installations requiring rescreening, the screening effort results should be available this calendar year. The rescreening results should be available by mid-1991. Assessment will start this calendar year based on the results from screening. Initial emphasis will be on housing, child-care centers, schools, and hospitals. 6 refs., 17 figs., 16 tabs.

  14. The history, development and the present status of the radon measurement programme in the United States of America.

    PubMed

    George, A C

    2015-11-01

    The US radon measurement programme began in the late 1950s by the US Public Health Service in Colorado, New Mexico and Utah during the uranium frenzy. After the 1967 Congressional Hearings on the working conditions in uranium mines, the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) was asked to conduct studies in active uranium mines to assess the exposure of the miners on the Colorado Plateau and in New Mexico. From 1967 to 1972, the Health and Safety Laboratory of the US AEC in New York investigated more than 20 uranium mines for radon and radon decay product concentrations and particle size in 4 large uranium mines in New Mexico. In 1970, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was established and took over some of the AEC radon measurement activities. Between 1975 and 1978, the Environmental Measurements Laboratory of the US Department of Energy conducted the first detailed indoor radon survey in the USA. Later in 1984, the very high concentrations of radon found in Pennsylvania homes set the wheels in motion and gave birth to the US Radon Industry. The US EPA expanded its involvement in radon issues and assumed an active role by establishing the National Radon Proficiency Program to evaluate the effectiveness of radon measurement and mitigation methods. In 1998, due to limited resources EPA privatised the radon programme. This paper presents a personal perspective of past events and current status of the US radon programme. It will present an update on radon health effects, the incidence rate of lung cancer in the USA and the number of radon measurements made from 1988 to 2013 using short-term test methods. More than 23 million measurements were made in the last 25 y and as a result more than 1.24 million homes were mitigated successfully. It is estimated that <2 % of the radon measurements performed in the USA are made using long-term testing devices. The number of homes above the US action level of 148 Bq m(-3) (4 pCi l(-1)) may be ∼8.5 million because ∼50

  15. Lung cancer deaths from indoor radon and the cost effectiveness and potential of policies to reduce them

    PubMed Central

    Read, Simon; McGale, Paul; Darby, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine the number of deaths from lung cancer related to radon in the home and to explore the cost effectiveness of alternative policies to control indoor radon and their potential to reduce lung cancer mortality. Design Cost effectiveness analysis. Setting United Kingdom. Data sources Epidemiological data on risks from indoor radon and from smoking, vital statistics on deaths from lung cancer, survey information on effectiveness and costs of radon prevention and remediation. Main outcome measures Estimated number of deaths from lung cancer related to indoor radon, lifetime risks of death from lung cancer before and after various potential interventions to control radon, the cost per quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained from different policies for control of radon, and the potential of those policies to reduce lung cancer mortality. Results The mean radon concentration in UK homes is 21 becquerels per cubic metre (Bq/m3). Each year around 1100 deaths from lung cancer (3.3% of all deaths from lung cancer) are related to radon in the home. Over 85% of these arise from radon concentrations below 100 Bq/m3 and most are caused jointly by radon and active smoking. Current policy requiring basic measures to prevent radon in new homes in selected areas is highly cost effective, and such measures would remain cost effective if extended to the entire UK, with a cost per QALY gained of £11 400 ( €12 200; $16 913). Current policy identifying and remediating existing homes with high radon levels is, however, neither cost effective (cost per QALY gained £36 800) nor effective in reducing lung cancer mortality. Conclusions Policies requiring basic preventive measures against radon in all new homes throughout the UK would be cost effective and could complement existing policies to reduce smoking. Policies involving remedial work on existing homes with high radon levels cannot prevent most radon related deaths, as these are caused by moderate exposure

  16. Risk of Cancer in relation to Natural Radiation, including Radon: Evidence from Epidemiological Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baysson, Hélène; Tirmarche, Margot; Laurier, Dominique

    2008-08-01

    A review of recently published epidemiological studies on populations exposed to natural background ionizing radiation is proposed. The advantages and disadvantages of different types of epidemiological studies as well as the uncertainty linked to multiple exposures are discussed. As radon is the greatest source of natural radiation, particular attention is given to quantification of risk obtained through cohort studies of uranium miners and after joint analysis of case-control studies on lung cancer and residential radon.

  17. Geographical distribution of the annual mean radon concentrations in primary schools of Southern Serbia - application of geostatistical methods.

    PubMed

    Bossew, P; Žunić, Z S; Stojanovska, Z; Tollefsen, T; Carpentieri, C; Veselinović, N; Komatina, S; Vaupotič, J; Simović, R D; Antignani, S; Bochicchio, F

    2014-01-01

    Between 2008 and 2011 a survey of radon ((222)Rn) was performed in schools of several districts of Southern Serbia. Some results have been published previously (Žunić et al., 2010; Carpentieri et al., 2011; Žunić et al., 2013). This article concentrates on the geographical distribution of the measured Rn concentrations. Applying geostatistical methods we generate "school radon maps" of expected concentrations and of estimated probabilities that a concentration threshold is exceeded. The resulting maps show a clearly structured spatial pattern which appears related to the geological background. In particular in areas with vulcanite and granitoid rocks, elevated radon (Rn) concentrations can be expected. The "school radon map" can therefore be considered as proxy to a map of the geogenic radon potential, and allows identification of radon-prone areas, i.e. areas in which higher Rn radon concentrations can be expected for natural reasons. It must be stressed that the "radon hazard", or potential risk, estimated this way, has to be distinguished from the actual radon risk, which is a function of exposure. This in turn may require (depending on the target variable which is supposed to measure risk) considering demographic and sociological reality, i.e. population density, distribution of building styles and living habits.

  18. A Physician's Guide to Radon

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This booklet has been developed for physicians by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in consultation with the American Medical Association (AMA). Its purpose is to enlist physicians in the national effort to inform the American public about radon.

  19. Radon in indoor concentrations and indoor concentrations of metal dust particles in museums and other public buildings.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, G L; Braz, D; de Jesus, E F; Santos, S M; Cardoso, K; Hecht, A A; Dias da Cunha, Moore K

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the public and occupational exposure to radon and metal-bearing particles in museums and public buildings located in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. For this study, four buildings were selected: two historic buildings, which currently house an art gallery and an art museum; and two modern buildings, a chapel and a club. Integrated radon concentration measurements were performed using passive radon detectors with solid state nuclear track detector-type Lexan used as nuclear track detector. Air samplers with a cyclone were used to collect the airborne particle samples that were analyzed by the particle-induced X-ray emission technique. The average unattached-radon concentrations in indoor air in the buildings were above 40 Bq/m(3), with the exception of Building D as measured in 2009. The average radon concentrations in indoor air in the four buildings in 2009 were below the recommended reference level by World Health Organization (100 Bq/m(3)); however, in 2011, the average concentrations of radon in Buildings A and C were above this level, though lower than 300 Bq/m(3). The average concentrations of unattached radon were lower than 148 Bq/m(3) (4pCi/L), the USEPA level recommended to take action to reduce the concentrations of radon in indoor air. The unattached-radon average concentrations were also lower than the value recommended by the European Union for new houses. As the unattached-radon concentrations were below the international level recommended to take action to reduce the radon concentration in air, it was concluded that during the period of sampling, there was low risk to human health due to the inhalation of unattached radon in these four buildings.

  20. Radon Policy in Finland, Achievements and Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Arvela, Hannu; Maekelaeinen, Ilona; Reisbacka, Heikki

    2008-08-07

    Finland is a country of high indoor radon concentrations. Since 1980 the authority regulations, guidance, radon mapping and research work supporting decision making have been developed continuously. Clear regulations directed to citizens and authorities form the basis for radon policy. Active mapping work and measurement ordered by private home owners has resulted in 100.000 houses measured. National indoor radon data base forms a good basis for decision making, communication and research. The number of new houses provided with radon preventive constructions has increased remarkably. New radon campaigns has increased measurement and mitigation activity. Furher increasing of public awareness is the key challenge.

  1. Radiation Protection. Measurement of radioactivity in the environment - Air- radon 222. A proposed ISO standard.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillmore, G.; Woods, M.

    2009-04-01

    Radon isotopes (222, 220, 219) are radioactive gases produced by the disintegration of radium isotopes 226, 224 and 223, which are decay products of uranium238, thorium232 and uranium235 respectively. All are found in the earth's crust. Solid elements, also radioactive, are produced by radon disintegration. Radon is classed as a rare gas in the periodic table of elements, along with helium, argon, neon, krypton and xenon. When disintegrating, radon emits alpha particles and generates solid decay products, which are also radioactive (polonium, bismuth, lead etc.). The potential danger of radon lies in its solid decay products rather than the gas itself. Whether or not they are attached aerosols, radon decay products can be inhaled and deposited in the bronchopulmonary tree to varying depths according to their size. Radon today is considered to be the main source of human exposure to natural radiation. At the international level, radon accounts for 52% of global average exposure to natural radiation. Isotope 222 (48%) is far more significant than isotope 220 (4%), whilst isotope 219 is considered as negligible. Exposure to radon varies considerably from one region to another, depending on factors such as weather conditions, and underlying geology. Activity concentration can therefore vary by a factor of 10 or even a 100 from one period of time to the next and from one area to another. There are many ways of measuring the radon 222 activity concentration and the potential alpha energy concentration of its short-lived decay products. Measuring techniques fall into three categories: - spot measurement methods; continuous measurement; integrated measurement. The proposed ISO (International Organisation for Standardisation) document suggests guidelines for measuring radon222 activity concentration and the potential alpha energy concentration of its short-lived decay products in a free (environment) and confined (buildings) atmosphere. The target date for availability of

  2. Radon diffusion coefficients in soils of varying moisture content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papachristodoulou, C.; Ioannides, K.; Pavlides, S.

    2009-04-01

    Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas that is generated in the Earth's crust and is free to migrate through soil and be released to the atmosphere. Due to its unique properties, soil gas radon has been established as a powerful tracer used for a variety of purposes, such as exploring uranium ores, locating geothermal resources and hydrocarbon deposits, mapping geological faults, predicting seismic activity or volcanic eruptions and testing atmospheric transport models. Much attention has also been given to the radiological health hazard posed by increased radon concentrations in the living and working environment. In order to exploit radon profiles for geophysical purposes and also to predict its entry indoors, it is necessary to study its transport through soils. Among other factors, the importance of soil moisture in such studies has been largely highlighted and it is widely accepted that any measurement of radon transport parameters should be accompanied by a measurement of the soil moisture content. In principle, validation of transport models in the field is encountered by a large number of uncontrollable and varying parameters; laboratory methods are therefore preferred, allowing for experiments to be conducted under well-specified and uniform conditions. In this work, a laboratory technique has been applied for studying the effect of soil moisture content on radon diffusion. A vertical diffusion chamber was employed, in which radon was produced from a 226Ra source, was allowed to diffuse through a soil column and was finally monitored using a silicon surface barrier detector. By solving the steady-state radon diffusion equation, diffusion coefficients (D) were determined for soil samples of varying moisture content (m), from null (m=0) to saturation (m=1). For dry soil, a D value of 4.1×10-7 m2s-1 was determined, which increased moderately by a factor of ~3 for soil with low moisture content, i.e. up to m ~0.2. At higher water fractions, a decrease

  3. Radon gas distribution in natural gas processing facilities and workplace air environment.

    PubMed

    Al-Masri, M S; Shwiekani, R

    2008-04-01

    Evaluation was made of the distribution of radon gas and radiation exposure rates in the four main natural gas treatment facilities in Syria. The results showed that radiation exposure rates at contact of all equipment were within the natural levels (0.09-0.1 microSvh(-1)) except for the reflex pumps where a dose rate value of 3 microSvh(-1) was recorded. Radon concentrations in Syrian natural gas varied between 15.4 Bq m(-3) and 1141 Bq m(-3); natural gas associated with oil production was found to contain higher concentrations than the non-associated natural gas. In addition, radon concentrations were higher in the central processing facilities than the wellheads; these high levels are due to pressurizing and concentrating processes that enhance radon gas and its decay products. Moreover, the lowest 222Rn concentration was in the natural gas fraction used for producing sulfur; a value of 80 Bq m(-3) was observed. On the other hand, maximum radon gas and its decay product concentrations in workplace air environments were found to be relatively high in the gas analysis laboratories; a value of 458 Bq m(-3) was observed. However, all reported levels in the workplaces in the four main stations were below the action level set by IAEA for chronic exposure situations involving radon, which is 1000 Bq m(-3).

  4. Evaluation of indoor aerosol control devices and their effects on radon progeny concentrations. Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Sextro, R.G.; Offermann, F.J.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Nero, A.V.; Revzan, K.L.; Yater, J.

    1984-11-01

    Eleven portable air cleaning devices have been evaluated for control of indoor concentrations of respirable particles, and their concomitant effects on radon progeny concentrations have been investigated. The experiments were conducted in a room-size chamber using cigarette smoke and radon injection from an external source. Of the devices examined the electrostatic precipitators and extended surface filters had significant particle removal rates, while the particle removal rates for several small panel-filters, an ion-generator, and a pair of mixing fans were found to be essentially negligible. The evaluation of radon progeny control produced similar results; the air cleaners which were effective in removing particles were also effective in reducing radon progeny concentrations. At the low particle concentrations, deposition of the unattached radon progeny on room surfaces was found to be a significant removal mechanism. Deposition rates of attached and unattached progeny have been estimated from these data, and were used to calculate the equilibrium factors for total and unattached progeny concentrations as a function of particle concentration. While particle removal reduces total airborne radon progeny concentrations, the relative alpha decay dose to the lungs appears to change very little as the particle concentration decreases due to the greater radiological importance of unattached progeny.

  5. A tentative protocol for measurement of radon availability from the ground

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tanner, A.B.

    1988-01-01

    A procedure is being tested in order to determine its suitability for assessing the intrinsic ability of the ground as a particular site to supply 222Rn to a basement structure to be built on the site. Soil gas is sucked from a borehold probe through an alpha scintillation chamber and flow meter by a pump. The permeability of the soil is calculated from the flow rate and the pressure difference between the atmosphere and the borehold at the intake point. The diffusion coefficient is estimated from the water fraction in the soil pores. The upward migration distance for radon in such soil during one mean life is computed for an arbitrary steady pressure difference. This mean migration distance, multiplied by the measured radon concentration, gives the 'radon availability number'. Measurements at sites of known indoor radon concentration suggest that numbers below 2 kBq ?? m-2 indicate little chance of elevated indoor radon and above 20 kBq ?? m-2 indicate that elevated indoor radon is likely. The range of uncertainty and the point-to-point and seasonal variations to be expected are under investigation.

  6. Radon fluxes measured with the MANOP bottom lander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berelson, W. M.; Buchholtz, M. R.; Hammond, D. E.; Santschi, P. H.

    1987-07-01

    At five Pacific Ocean sites, radon fluxes were determined from water samples collected by the MANOP Lander, from measurements of 222Rn and 226Ra concentrations in Lander-collected box core sediments, and from measurements of excess radon in the water column. At MANOP sites H and M, fluxes (all in atoms m -2 s -1) determined with Lander water samples (2200 and 1540 ± 480) agree within the measurement uncertainty with water column standing crop measurements (2220 ± 450, 2040 ± 470). At MANOP site C, the diffusive flux calculated from measurements of 226Ra in box core sediments (550 ± 20), the integrated deficiency of 222Rn in the sediments (720 ± 90), and the water column standing crop (500 ± 160) are in agreement, but all are about twice as large as the single Lander water measurement of the radon flux (330). At MANOP site S radon fluxes from measurements of Lander water (3000 ± 260) are in agreement with the predicted diffusive flux from site S sediments (2880), and both fluxes are close to the lower end of the range of water column standing crop measurements (3000-5170). In San Clemente Basin, California, the Lander water flux measurements at four different sites vary by a factor of 3 due to variability in the sediment radium distribution, but the average (1030 ± 190) is close to the water column standing crop value (780 ± 230). Because there is excellent agreement between the fluxes measured with Lander water samples and the predicted diffusive fluxes in most cases, diffusion must be the primary process controlling benthic exchange of radon at the sites studied. The agreement between the Lander water flux estimates and the water column standing crop estimates indicates that the MANOP Lander functions as an accurate benthic flux chamber in water depths ranging from 1900 to 4900 m. In San Clemente Basin, surficial sediments are enriched in manganese and radium, due to manganese cycling near the sediment-water interface. Molecular diffusion of radon from

  7. RADON REDUCTION AND RADON-RESISTANT CONSTRUCTION DEMONSTRATIONS IN NEW YORK - VOLUME 1: TECHNICAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of radon reduction and radon-resistant construction demonstrations in New York. The existing house evaluation demonstrated radon mitigation techniques where indoor radon concentrations exceeded 4 pCi/L. Results demonstrated that sealing all accessible fou...

  8. Environmental radon and cancer correlations in Maine.

    PubMed

    Hess, C T; Weiffenbach, C V; Norton, S A

    1983-08-01

    The distribution of 222Rn has been measured in the sixteen counties of Maine, U.S.A. by liquid scintillation counting of water samples from more than two thousand public and private wells. Three hundred and fifty of these wells have been characterized for geology and hydrology. Airborne radon has been measured in seventy houses with grab samples and in eighteen houses for 5-7 days each with continuously recording diffusion-electrostatic radon detectors. Concentrations of radon in water ranged from 20 to 180,000 pCi/l. Granite areas yielded the highest average levels (mean = 22,100 pCi/l.; n = 136), with considerable intra-granite variation. Metasedimentary rocks yielded levels characteristic of the lithology for metamorphic grades ranging from chlorite to andalusite. Sillimanite and higher-grade rocks yielded higher 222Rn levels, probably due to the intrusion of uranium-bearing pegmatites in these terranes. Airborne 222Rn in homes ranged from 0.05 to 210 pCi/l. At the high end of this range, doses will exceed recommended industrial limits. In some homes only a small fraction of the airborne 222Rn was due to the water supply. Average 222Rn levels in domestic water supplies for each of the 16 counties, calculated by areally averaging rock types and their associated 222Rn levels, were found to be significantly correlated with rates for all cancers combined and rates for lung and reproductive cancers in the counties. Although numerous factors other than cancer induction by indoor daughter exposures may be responsible for the observed correlations, these have not been investigated in detail.

  9. A study of Monitoring and Mapping for Radon-Concentration Distribution in Gyeongju - 12201

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Chan Hee; Lee, Jung Min; Jang, So Young; Kim, Shin Jae; Moon, Joo Hyun

    2012-07-01

    Radon is one of the most important contributors to the radiation exposure in humans. This study measured the indoor radon concentrations at the 17 elementary school auditoriums that were sampled from those in the city of Gyeongju, Korea. The reason that an elementary school was selected as a measurement object is that many students and teachers stay for a long time in a day and it's easy to identify the characteristics of the auditorium building such as the essential building. The measurement shows that most of the indoor radon concentrations at the 17 elementary school auditoriums did not exceed 148 Bq/m{sup 3} that is the action level recommended by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. This study measured the indoor radon concentrations at the elementary school auditoriums in Gyeongju. The measurements were analyzed according to the bedrock type and the time intervals per day. In this study, it was found that the indoor radon concentrations over off-duty hours were generally higher that those over on-duty hours, and the indoor radon concentration in the area whose bedrock is volcanic rock was higher than those in the area of the other types of bedrock. As mentioned above, attention has to be paid to an elementary school since many young students and teachers stay for more 6 hours a day at it. Hence, it is necessary to continuously monitor and properly manage the indoor radon concentrations in the elementary schools. (authors)

  10. Risk-Reduction Strategies to Expand Radon Care Planning with Vulnerable Groups

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, Laura S.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States and the leading cause of lung cancer among nonsmokers. Residential radon is the cause of approximately 21,000 U.S. lung cancer deaths each year. Dangerous levels of radon are just as likely to be found in low-rise apartments and townhomes as single-family homes in the same area. The preferred radon mitigation strategy can be expensive and requires structural modifications to the home. The public health nurse (PHN) needs a collection of low-cost alternatives when working with low-income families or families who rent their homes. Method A review of the literature was performed to identify evidence-based methods to reduce radon risk with vulnerable populations. Results Fourteen recommendations for radon risk reduction were categorized into four strategies. Nine additional activities for raising awareness and increasing testing were also included. Discussion The results pair the PHN with practical interventions and the underlying rationale to develop radon careplans with vulnerable families across housing types. The PHN has both the competence and the access to help families reduce their exposure to this potent carcinogen. PMID:24547763

  11. Radon gas: Health risks and toxicity. March 1974-November 1989 (Citations from the NTIS data base). Report for March 1974-November 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning the toxicity and risks associated with indoor and outdoor exposure to radon gas. Sources of radon gas discussed include cigarette smoke, fossil-fuel combustion, phosphate mining, uranium mining, granitic rocks, building materials, and water supplies. Toxicology studies, risk assessment studies, exposure modeling, exposure pathways, physiological effects, and control of exposure are discussed. Radionuclides in ground water, and radon analysis and detection, can be found in separate related bibliographies. (Contains 152 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  12. Lung Cancer Risk from Radon in Marcellus Shale Gas in Northeast U.S. Homes.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Austin L; Griffin, W Michael; Casman, Elizabeth A

    2016-11-01

    The amount of radon in natural gas varies with its source. Little has been published about the radon from shale gas to date, making estimates of its impact on radon-induced lung cancer speculative. We measured radon in natural gas pipelines carrying gas from the Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania and West Virginia. Radon concentrations ranged from 1,520 to 2,750 Bq/m(3) (41-74 pCi/L), and the throughput-weighted average was 1,983 Bq/m(3) (54 pCi/L). Potential radon exposure due to the use of Marcellus Shale gas for cooking and space heating using vent-free heaters or gas ranges in northeastern U.S. homes and apartments was assessed. Though the measured radon concentrations are higher than what has been previously reported, it is unlikely that exposure from natural gas cooking would exceed 1.2 Bq/m(3) (<1% of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's action level). Using worst-case assumptions, we estimate the excess lifetime (70 years) lung cancer risk associated with cooking to be 1.8×10(-4) (interval spanning 95% of simulation results: 8.5×10(-5) , 3.4×10(-4) ). The risk profile for supplemental heating with unvented gas appliances is similar. Individuals using unvented gas appliances to provide primary heating may face lifetime risks as high as 3.9×10(-3) . Under current housing stock and gas consumption assumptions, expected levels of residential radon exposure due to unvented combustion of Marcellus Shale natural gas in the Northeast United States do not result in a detectable change in the lung cancer death rates.

  13. Indoor radon, geogenic radon surrogates and geology - Investigations on their correlation.

    PubMed

    Friedmann, H; Baumgartner, A; Bernreiter, M; Gräser, J; Gruber, V; Kabrt, F; Kaineder, H; Maringer, F J; Ringer, W; Seidel, C; Wurm, G

    2017-01-01

    The indoor radon concentration was measured in most houses in a couple of municipalities in Austria. At the same time the activity concentration of radium in soil, the soil gas radon concentration, the permeability of the ground and the ambient dose equivalent rate were also measured and the geological situations (geological units) were recorded too. From the indoor radon concentration and different house and living parameters a radon potential (Austrian radon potential) was derived which should represent the radon concentration in a standard room. Another radon potential (Neznal radon potential) was calculated from the soil gas radon concentration and the permeability. The aim of the investigation was to correlate all the different variables and to test if the use of surrogate data (e.g. geological information, ambient dose equivalent rate, etc.) can be used to judge the radon risk for an area without performing numerous indoor measurements.

  14. The use of volunteer radon measurements for radon mapping purposes: an examination of sampling bias issues.

    PubMed

    Burke, Orlaith; Murphy, Patrick

    2011-09-01

    National and regional radon surveys are used in many nations to produce maps detailing the spatial variation of indoor radon concentrations. National surveys which are designed to be representative use either a geographically-weighted or a population-weighted sampling scheme. Additionally, many countries collect a large number of data on indoor radon concentrations from volunteers who have chosen to have the indoor radon concentration measured in their own dwellings. This work examines the representativeness of volunteer-based samples in radon measurement and explores the effect of potential volunteer bias on radon mapping results. We also investigate the influence that media attention has on volunteer sampling of indoor radon concentrations. The result of our work indicates that volunteer measurements are biased due to over-sampling of high radon areas. Consequently such volunteer radon measurements should not be used for radon mapping purposes.

  15. Persistence of radon-222 flux during monsoon at a geothermal zone in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Girault, Frédéric; Koirala, Bharat Prasad; Perrier, Frédéric; Richon, Patrick; Rajaure, Sudhir

    2009-11-01

    The Syabru-Bensi hydrothermal zone, Langtang region (Nepal), is characterized by high radon-222 and CO(2) discharge. Seasonal variations of gas fluxes were studied on a reference transect in a newly discovered gas discharge zone. Radon-222 and CO(2) fluxes were measured with the accumulation chamber technique, coupled with the scintillation flask method for radon. In the reference transect, fluxes reach exceptional mean values, as high as 8700+/-1500 gm(-2)d(-1) for CO(2) and 3400+/-100 x 10(-3) Bq m(-2)s(-1) for radon. Gases fluxes were measured in September 2007 during the monsoon and during the dry winter season, in December 2007 to January 2008 and in December 2008 to January 2009. Contrary to expectations, radon and its carrier gas fluxes were similar during both seasons. The integrated flux along this transect was approximately the same for radon, with a small increase of 11+/-4% during the wet season, whereas it was reduced by 38+/-5% during the monsoon for CO(2). In order to account for the persistence of the high gas emissions during monsoon, watering experiments have been performed at selected radon measurement points. After watering, radon flux decreased within 5 min by a factor of 2-7 depending on the point. Subsequently, it returned to its original value, firstly, by an initial partial recovery within 3-4h, followed by a slow relaxation, lasting around 10h and possibly superimposed by diurnal variations. Monsoon, in this part of the Himalayas, proceeds generally by brutal rainfall events separated by two- or three-day lapses. Thus, the recovery ability shown in the watering experiments accounts for the observed long-term persistence of gas discharge. This persistence is an important asset for long-term monitoring, for example to study possible temporal variations associated with stress accumulation and release.

  16. EPA recommends radon testing in January

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    PHILADELPHIA (January 8, 2015) - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has designated January as national Radon Action Month, a perfect time for you to protect your family by testing your home for radon.

  17. Final Federal Radon Action Plan Scorecard

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page provides information and a link to the draft Federal Radon Action Plan. It also contains a Federal Radon Action Plan Scorecard, a tool designed to display the current status of each federal agency commitments and outcomes to date.

  18. Thermo-diffusional radon waves in soils.

    PubMed

    Minkin, Leonid; Shapovalov, Alexander S

    2016-09-15

    A new theoretical framework for diurnal and seasonal oscillations of the concentration of radon in soil and open air is proposed. The theory is based on the existing temperature waves in soils and thermo-diffusional gas flux in porous media. As soil is a non-isothermal porous medium, usually possessing a large fraction of microscopic pores belonging to Knudsen's free molecular field, a thermo-diffusional gas flow in soil has to arise. The radon mass transfer equation in soil for sinusoidal temperature oscillations at the soil-atmosphere boundary is solved, which reveals that radon concentration behaves as a damped harmonic wave. The amplitude of radon concentration oscillations and phase shift between radon concentration oscillations and soil temperature depend on the radon diffusion coefficient in soil, rate of radon production, soil thermal conductivity, average soil temperature, decay constant, and heat of radon transfer. Primarily numerical calculations are presented and comparisons with experimental data are shown.

  19. Study of lung cancer and residential radon in the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Tomásek, L; Müller, T; Kunz, E; Heribanová, A; Matzner, J; Placek, V; Burian, I; Holecek, J

    2001-08-01

    Epidemiological evidence of lung cancer risk from radon is based mainly on studies of men employed underground in mines where exposures are relatively high in comparison to indoor exposure. Risk from residential radon can be estimated from occupational studies. Nevertheless, as such extrapolations depend on a number of assumptions, direct estimation of the risk is needed. The present study of lung cancer mortality was designed as a follow-up of a population (N = 12,004) in a radon prone area of the Czech Republic covering the period 1960-1999. Information on vital status and causes of death were obtained mostly from local authorities and from the national population registry. Exposure estimates were based on one year measurements of radon progeny in most houses of the study area (74%). Exposures outside the area (16%) were based on country radon mapping. Mean concentration of 509 Bq/m3 is higher than the country estimate by a factor of 5. By 1999, a total of 210 lung cancers were observed, somewhat more than the nationally expected number (O/E = 1.10) in comparison to generally low numbers corresponding to cancers other than lung (O/E = 0.81). The excess relative risk per standard radon concentration (100 Bq/m3) was 0.087 (90% CI: 0.017-0.208). This value is consistent with risk coefficients derived in other indoor studies. The present follow-up demonstrated that increased incidence of lung cancer depends linearly on exposure in terms of average radon concentration in the course of previous 5-34 years. Adjustment for smoking did not substantially change this estimate, although the risk coefficient for non-smokers (0.130) was higher in comparison to that for ever smokers (0.069), but not statistically different.

  20. Factors affecting atmospheric radon concentration, human health.

    PubMed

    Tchorz-Trzeciakiewicz, D E; Kłos, M

    2017-04-15

    We studied the influence of terrain, geology and weather condition on radon concentration in the atmosphere and occurrence of radon density currents. The survey was carried out in Kowary (SW Poland) and in the spoil tip formed during uranium mining. The measurements of radon concentration were performed using SSNTD LR-115. The measurements of uranium thorium and potassium content in soil were carried out using gamma ray spectrometer Exploranium RS-230. We noticed that terrain and stability of weather condition had significant impact on atmospheric radon concentration. The seasonal variations of radon concentrations in Kowary differ from those usually registered in temperate climate. Based on our analyses, the increase of radon concentration in winter and spring was caused by inversion occurring in that area during these seasons. The observed seasonal variations of radon concentrations in the spoil tip were consistent with those characteristic for temperate climate (the highest radon concentration registered in spring and summer and the lowest in winter and autumn). The spoil tip is located above 900m a.s.l. and is not cover by grass or trees. These circumstances promoted radon exhalation. The air movement above the spoil tip area is intensive, even in winter time. The average atmospheric radon concentration in the spoil tip was 318Bqm(-3). The performed research did not reveal occurrence of radon density currents and flow of radon from the spoil tip to lower lying areas in Kowary. We noticed interdependence of atmospheric radon concentration measured at the height of 1.5 above the ground and uranium content in soil and no correlation between thorium content and radon concentration. The lung cancer in residents of Kowary which is more common than in Poland can be associated with increased concentrations of radon. The average radon concentration in the atmosphere in Kowary was 79Bq m(-3).

  1. Is Your School Safe from Radon?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Radon is a natural, chemically inert, radioactive gas that can seep to the surface from underground rocks. As many as 20,000 lung cancer deaths in the U.S. each year may be radon-caused. Screening a school for radon is not difficult and may be done on weekends. It's safer for students and staff to test and be sure. (MLH)

  2. Radon Risk Perception and Testing: Sociodemographic Correlates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halpern, Michael T.; Warner, Kenneth E.

    1994-01-01

    Using information from the 1990 National Health Interview Survey, examined beliefs regarding radon and radon-testing activities among different sociodemographic groups. Results suggest relatively superficial knowledge regarding radon, and little testing, within the survey population. Significantly less knowledge was observed among female and…

  3. Radon-hazard potential of Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Black, B.D.; Solomon, B.J. )

    1993-04-01

    Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas formed by decay of uranium, and occurs in nearly all geologic materials. Although radon has been shown to be a significant cause of lung cancer in miners, the health hazard from accumulation of radon gas in buildings has only recently been recognized. Indoor-radon hazards depend on both geologic and non-geologic factors. Although non-geologic factors such as construction type, weather, and lifestyles are difficult to measure, geologic factors such as uranium concentration, soil permeability, and depth to ground water can be quantified. Uranium-enriched geologic materials, such as black shales, marine sandstones, and certain granitic, metamorphic, and volcanic rocks, are generally associated with a high radon-hazard potential. Impermeable soil or shallow ground water impedes radon movement and is generally associated with a low radon-hazard potential. A numerical rating system based on these geologic factors has been developed to map radon-hazard potential in Utah. A statewide map shows that the radon-hazard potential of Utah is generally moderate. Assessments of hazard potential from detailed field investigations correlate well with areas of this map. Central Utah has the highest radon-hazard potential, primarily due to uranium-enriched Tertiary volcanic rocks. The radon-hazard potential of eastern Utah is moderate to high, but is generally restricted by low uranium levels. Western Utah, where valley basins with impermeable soils and shallow ground water are common, has the lowest radon-hazard potential.

  4. RADON GENERATION AND TRANSPORT THROUGH CONCRETE FOUNDATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an examination of radon generation and transport through Florida residential concretes for their contribution to indoor radon concentrations. Radium concentrations in the 11 concretes tested were all <2.5 pCi/g and radon emanation coefficients were all...

  5. Reducing Radon in Schools: A Team Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ligman, Bryan K.; Fisher, Eugene J.

    This document presents the process of radon diagnostics and mitigation in schools to help educators determine the best way to reduce elevated radon levels found in a school. The guidebook is designed to guide school leaders through the process of measuring radon levels, selecting the best mitigation strategy, and directing the efforts of a…

  6. Natural radioactivity, radon exhalation rates and indoor radon concentration of some granite samples used as construction material in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Aykamis, Ahmet S; Turhan, Seref; Aysun Ugur, F; Baykan, Umut N; Kiliç, Ahmet M

    2013-11-01

    It is very important to determine the levels of the natural radioactivity in construction materials and radon exhalation rate from these materials for assessing potential exposure risks for the residents. The present study deals with 22 different granite samples employed as decoration stones in constructions in Turkey. The natural radioactivity in granite samples was measured by gamma-ray spectrometry with an HPGe detector. The activity concentrations of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K were found to be in the range of 10-187, 16-354 and 104-1630 Bq kg(-1), respectively. The radon surface exhalation rate and the radon mass exhalation rate estimated from the measured values of (226)Ra content and material properties varied from 1.3 to 24.8 Bq m(-2) h(-1) with a mean of 10.5±1.5 Bq m(-2) h(-1) and 0.03-0.64 Bq kg(-1) h(-1) with a mean of 0.27±0.04 Bq kg(-1) h(-1), respectively. Radon concentrations in the room caused from granite samples estimated using a mass balance equation varied from 23 to 461 Bq m(-3) with a mean of 196±27 Bq m(-3). Also the gamma index (Iγ), external indoor annual effective dose (Eγ) and annual effective dose due to the indoor radon exposure (ERn) were estimated as the average value of 1.1±0.1, 0.16±0.02 mSv and 5.0±0.7 mSv, respectively, for the granite samples.

  7. Indoor radon and lung cancer in the radium dial workers

    SciTech Connect

    Neuberger, J.S.; Rundo, J.

    1996-12-31

    Internally deposited radium has long been known to have tumorigenic effects in the form of sarcomas of the bone and carcinomas of the paranasal sinuses and mastoid air cells. However, the radium dial workers were also exposed to radiation hazards other than that occurring from ingestion of the radium paint, viz., external gamma radiation and elevated concentrations of airborne radon. The uranium miners were also exposed to high concentrations of radon in the 1950s and later, and numerous cases of lung cancer have occurred in that population. However, unlike the atmosphere in the uranium mines, the air in the dial painting plants was probably rather clean and perhaps not much different from the air in many houses. In view of the current concern over the possibility of lung cancer fin the general population being caused by radon (progeny) in houses, it is important to examine the mortality due to this usually fatal disease in the dial workers and to attempt to relate it to their exposure to radon, to the extent that this is possible.

  8. Factors affecting yearly variations of indoor radon concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Steck, D.J.; Baynes, S.A.

    1996-06-01

    Since indoor radon exposures take place over many years while radon measurement periods are shorter, we are studying the yearly variation of indoor radon concentrations in approximately 100 houses located throughout Minnesota. Most houses were initially measured for one or more years in the late 1980`s and for 5 consecutive years starting in 1990. Two houses have been monitored for 12 y. Each year, two alpha track detectors were placed on the two lowest livable levels. The year-to-year variations averaged about 35% (corrected for instrumental uncertainties) in both basements and first floors. The minimum observed variation was 5% and the maximum was 130%. Some homes have shown substantial variation associated with Structural modifications. While most homes show no obvious systematic trends, a few houses have shown temporal trends that may be associated with aging or climate. We are studying possible correlation between year-to-year radon variation, climatic variables (yearly-average and seasonal such as heating/cooling degree days, precipitation, soil moisture), and structural changes.

  9. Radiation dose due to radon and thoron progeny inhalation in high-level natural radiation areas of Kerala, India.

    PubMed

    Omori, Yasutaka; Tokonami, Shinji; Sahoo, Sarata Kumar; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Hosoda, Masahiro; Kudo, Hiromi; Pornnumpa, Chanis; Nair, Raghu Ram K; Jayalekshmi, Padmavaty Amma; Sebastian, Paul; Akiba, Suminori

    2017-03-20

    In order to evaluate internal exposure to radon and thoron, concentrations for radon, thoron, and thoron progeny were measured for 259 dwellings located in high background radiation areas (HBRAs, outdoor external dose: 3-5 mGy y(-1)) and low background radiation areas (control areas, outdoor external dose: 1 mGy y(-1)) in Karunagappally Taluk, Kerala, India. The measurements were conducted using passive-type radon-thoron detectors and thoron progeny detectors over two six-month measurement periods from June 2010 to June 2011. The results showed no major differences in radon and thoron progeny concentrations between the HBRAs and the control areas. The geometric mean of the annual effective dose due to radon and thoron was calculated as 0.10 and 0.44 mSv, respectively. The doses were small, but not negligible compared with the external dose in the two areas.

  10. Experience from Intercomparison Exercises of Radon Gas Detectors in the Years 1996-2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterweck, Gernot; Schuler, Christoph

    2008-08-01

    Radon gas measuring services in Switzerland must be approved by the Federal Office for Public Health (FOPH). The maintenance of approval includes the obligation to participate in annual intercomparison exercises performed at the radon gas reference laboratory of the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). In eleven intercomparison exercises since 1996 a total of 1,515 radon gas detectors was subjected to radon gas exposures between 300 kBq h m-3 and 2100 kBq h m-3. Preparation and read-out of electret detectors is performed by the measuring services. About one percent of these detectors were observed with false positive results. The quality of results of etched-track detectors is determined by the quality assurance system and calibration of the supplier. In one case, a measuring service lost approval due to quality problems of the detector manufacturer. Double blind tests yielded less good results compared to the detectors of the same measuring service participating officially.

  11. A critical evaluation of the cost-effectiveness of radon protection methods in new homes in a radon affected area of England.

    PubMed

    Coskeran, Thomas; Denman, Antony; Phillips, Paul; Tornberg, Roger

    2009-08-01

    In the UK, building new homes in areas prone to radon gas is currently subject to regulations that require installation of radon-proof membranes. These membranes are not, however, the only way to protect residents of new homes against radon's potential to cause lung cancer. Alternative regulatory regimes can be constructed that would achieve the same end. The purpose of this paper is to examine the cost-effectiveness of four alternative regimes and so determine if building regulations for new homes could be altered to protect residents from the effects of radon more cost-effectively than at present. In addressing this question, the paper also contributes to the wider debate on how best to reduce the effect on public health of exposure to radon. The measure of cost-effectiveness used, cost per quality-adjusted life-year gained, is determined from radon test results obtained in properties in Brixworth, England, UK, a radon Affected Area. Confidence intervals for the cost-effectiveness estimates are also derived using bootstrap techniques. The central estimates of cost-effectiveness range from 2870 pounds per quality-adjusted life-year gained for the most cost-effective of the alternative regimes to 6182 pounds for the current regime. These results suggest that alternative regimes may be more cost-effective in tackling the radon problem. A definitive assessment of the most suitable to adopt will require extensive negotiation between government departments, the construction industry, and other interested parties to ensure acceptance of any new regime. The paper offers suggestions for future research that should help in the process of identifying the key features of a new regulatory approach.

  12. Lung-cancer reduction from smoking cessation and radon remediation: a preliminary cost-analysis in Northamptonshire, UK.

    PubMed

    Groves-Kirkby, C J; Timson, K; Shield, G; Denman, A R; Rogers, S; Phillips, P S

    2011-02-01

    Domestic radon levels in parts of the United Kingdom are sufficiently high as to increase the risk of lung-cancer among residents. Public health campaigns in the county of Northamptonshire, a designated radon Affected Area with 6.3% of homes having average radon levels in excess of the UK Action Level of 200 Bq m(-3), have encouraged householders to test for radon and then, if indicated to be necessary, to carry out remediation in their homes. These campaigns have been only partially successful, since to date only 40% of Northamptonshire houses have been tested, and only 15% of those householders finding raised levels have proceeded to remediate. Those who remediate have been shown to have smaller families, to be older, and to include fewer smokers than the average population, suggesting that current strategies to reduce domestic radon exposure are not reaching those most at risk. During 2004-2005, the NHS Stop-Smoking Services in Northamptonshire assisted 2847 smokers to quit to the 4-week stage, the 15% (435) of these 4-week quitters remaining quitters at 1year forming the subjects of a retrospective study considering whether smoking cessation campaigns contribute significantly to radon risk reduction. Quantitative assessment of the risk of lung-cancer among the study population, from knowledge of the individuals' age, gender, and smoking habits, together with the radon levels in their homes, demonstrates that smoking cessation programmes have significant added value in reducing the incidence of lung-cancer in radon Affected Areas, and contribute a substantially greater health benefit at a lower cost than the alternative strategy of reducing radon levels in the smokers' homes, while they remain smokers. Both radon remediation and smoking cessation programmes are very cost effective in Northamptonshire, with smoking cessation being significantly more cost effective, and these are potentially valuable programmes to drive health improvements through promotion of the

  13. Unusually high indoor radon concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ennemoser, O.; Ambach, W.; Brunner, P.; Schneider, P.; Oberaigner, W.; Purtscheller, F.; Stingl, V.

    Measurements of indoor radon concentrations in the village Umhausen (2600 inhabitants, Ötztal valley, Tyrol, Austria) revealed unusually high indoor radon concentrations up to 274,000 Bq m -3. The medians measured on the basements were 3750 Bq m -3 in winter and 361 Bq m -3 in summer, those on the ground floors were 1180 Bq m -3 and 210 Bq m -3, respectively. Seventy-one per cent of the houses showed basement radon concentrations above the Austrian action level of 400 Bq m -3 in winter, 33% in summer. There are indications that the high radon concentrations are due to a giant rock slide about 8700 years ago. The unusually high radon concentrations in Umhausen coincide with a statistically significant increase in lung cancer mortality. For the period 1970-1991 the age and sex standardized mortality rate is 3.85 (95% confidence interval: 2.9 to 5.1). The control population is the total population of Tyrol (630,000 inhabitants).

  14. Assessment of the effectiveness of radon screening programs in reducing lung cancer mortality.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Fabien; Courchesne, Mathieu; Lévesque, Benoît; Ayotte, Pierre; Leclerc, Jean-Marc; Belles-Isles, Jean-Claude; Prévost, Claude; Dessau, Jean-Claude

    2008-10-01

    The present study was aimed at assessing the health consequences of the presence of radon in Quebec homes and the possible impact of various screening programs on lung cancer mortality. Lung cancer risk due to this radioactive gas was estimated according to the cancer risk model developed by the Sixth Committee on Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations. Objective data on residential radon exposure, population mobility, and tobacco use in the study population were integrated into a Monte-Carlo-type model. Participation rates to radon screening programs were estimated from published data. According to the model used, approximately 10% of deaths due to lung cancer are attributable to residential radon exposure on a yearly basis in Quebec. In the long term, the promotion of a universal screening program would prevent less than one death/year on a province-wide scale (0.8 case; IC 99%: -3.6 to 5.2 cases/year), for an overall reduction of 0.19% in radon-related mortality. Reductions in mortality due to radon by (1) the implementation of a targeted screening program in the region with the highest concentrations, (2) the promotion of screening on a local basis with financial support, or (3) the realization of systematic investigations in primary and secondary schools would increase to 1%, 14%, and 16.4%, respectively, in the each of the populations targeted by these scenarios. Other than the battle against tobacco use, radon screening in public buildings thus currently appears as the most promising screening policy for reducing radon-related lung cancer.

  15. The effects of high ambient radon on thermoluminescence dosimetry readings.

    PubMed

    Harvey, John A; Kearfott, Kimberlee J

    2011-11-01

    The effect of a high level of ambient (222)Rn gas on thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLDs) is examined. Groups of LiF:Mg,Ti and CaF(2):Dy TLDs were exposed to (222)Rn under controlled environmental conditions over ∼7 d using a luminous (226)Ra aircraft dial. LiF:Mg,Ti TLDs were tested bare, and both types were tested mounted in cards used for environmental dosimetry and mounted in cards enclosed in plastic badges. A passive continuous radon monitor was used to measure the (222)Rn level in the small chamber during the experiments. The data were analysed to determine the relationship between the integrated (222)Rn level and the TLD response. Although both LiF:Mg,Ti and CaF(2):Dy TLDs showed a strong response to (222)Rn, the badges prevented measurable radon detection by the TLDs within. The TLDs were not used to directly measure the radon concentration; rather, a correction for its influence was desired.

  16. Indoor radon measurements in Turkey dwellings.

    PubMed

    Celebi, N; Ataksor, B; Taskın, H; Bingoldag, N Albayrak

    2015-12-01

    In this work, indoor radon radioactivity concentration levels have been measured in dwellings of Turkey within the frame of the National Radon Monitoring Programme. The (222)Rn concentrations were measured with time-integrating passive nuclear etched track detectors in 7293 dwellings in 153 residential units of 81 provinces, and the radon map of Turkey was prepared. Indoor radon concentrations were distributed in the range of 1-1400 Bq m(-3). The arithmetic mean of the radon gas concentration was found to be 81 Bq m(-3); the geometric mean was 57 Bq m(-3) with a geometric standard deviation of 2.3.

  17. Correlation of soil radon and permeability with indoor radon potential in Ottawa.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Falcomer, Renato; Bergman, Lauren; Wierdsma, Jessica; Ly, Jim

    2009-08-01

    Soil gas radon and soil gas permeability measurements were conducted at 32 sites across the five most populated communities in the city of Ottawa where indoor radon measurements were available for 167 houses. A soil radon index (SRI) determined from the soil radon concentration and the soil gas permeability was used to characterise radon availability from soil to air. This study demonstrated that the average SRI in a community area correlates with the indoor radon potential (the percentage of homes above 200 Bq m(-3)) in that community. Soil gas radon concentrations together with soil gas permeability measurements can be a useful tool for the prediction of the indoor radon potential in the development of a Canadian radon risk map.

  18. Study of the atmospheric chemistry of radon progeny in laboratory and real indoor atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Hopke, P.K.

    1992-07-01

    This report covers the second year of the 28 month grant current grant to Clarkson University to study the chemical and physical behavior of the polonium 218 atom immediately following its formation by the alpha decay of radon. Because small changes in size for activity result in large changes in the delivered dose per unit exposure, this behavior must be understood if the exposure to radon progeny and it dose to the cells in the respiratory tract are to be fully assessed. Two areas of radon progeny behavior are being pursued; laboratory studies under controlled conditions to better understand the fundamental physical and chemical process that affect the progeny's atmospheric behavior and studies in actual indoor environments to develop a better assessment of the exposure of the occupants of that space to the size and concentration of the indoor radioactive aerosol. This report describes the progress toward achieving these objectives.

  19. Emulsion Chamber Technology Experiment (ECT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, John C.; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki

    1996-01-01

    The experimental objective of Emulsion Chamber Technology (ECT) was to develop space-borne emulsion chamber technology so that cosmic rays and nuclear interactions may subsequently be studied at extremely high energies with long exposures in space. A small emulsion chamber was built and flown on flight STS-62 of the Columbia in March 1994. Analysis of the several hundred layers of radiation-sensitive material has shown excellent post-flight condition and suitability for cosmic ray physics analysis at much longer exposures. Temperature control of the stack was 20 +/-1 C throughout the active control period and no significant deviations of temperature or pressure in the chamber were observed over the entire mission operations period. The unfortunate flight attitude of the orbiter (almost 90% Earth viewing) prevented any significant number of heavy particles (Z greater than or equal to 10) reaching the stack and the inverted flow of shower particles in the calorimeter has not allowed evaluation of absolute primary cosmic ray-detection efficiency nor of the practical time limits of useful exposure of these calorimeters in space to the level of detail originally planned. Nevertheless, analysis of the observed backgrounds and quality of the processed photographic and plastic materials after the flight show that productive exposures of emulsion chambers are feasible in low orbit for periods of up to one year or longer. The engineering approaches taken in the ECT program were proven effective and no major environmental obstacles to prolonged flight are evident.

  20. Automatically processed alpha-track radon monitor

    DOEpatents

    Langner, G.H. Jr.

    1993-01-12

    An automatically processed alpha-track radon monitor is provided which includes a housing having an aperture allowing radon entry, and a filter that excludes the entry of radon daughters into the housing. A flexible track registration material is located within the housing that records alpha-particle emissions from the decay of radon and radon daughters inside the housing. The flexible track registration material is capable of being spliced such that the registration material from a plurality of monitors can be spliced into a single strip to facilitate automatic processing of the registration material from the plurality of monitors. A process for the automatic counting of radon registered by a radon monitor is also provided.