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Sample records for rafael baena escudero

  1. GOES-14 Sees Hurricane Paul and Rafael

    NASA Video Gallery

    An animation of satellite observations from Oct. 13-16, 2012, shows Hurricane Paul affecting Baja California, Mexico, and Hurricane Rafael moving toward Bermuda. This visualization was created by t...

  2. Some predictions of Rafael Lorente de Nó 80 years later

    PubMed Central

    Larriva-Sahd, Jorge A.

    2014-01-01

    Rafael Lorente de Nó, the youngest of Santiago Ramón y Cajal disciples, was one of the last Century's more influential researches in neuroscience. This assay highlights two fundamental contributions of Rafael Lorente de Nó to neurobiology: the intrinsic organization of the mammalian cerebral cortex and the basic physiology of the neuron processes. PMID:25520630

  3. Sills of the San Rafael Volcanic Field, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallant, E.; Connor, C.; Connor, L.; Richardson, J. A.; Wetmore, P. H.

    2014-12-01

    Substantial populations, such as Mexico City, Auckland, and Portland, are built within or near monogenetic fields, so it is important to understand both eruption precursors and magma plumbing systems in such areas. Directly observing the plumbing systems of this rarely witnessed eruption style provides valuable insight into the nature of magmatic transport and storage within the shallow crust, as well as the associated monogenetic eruptive processes. Within the San Rafael Desert of Central Utah is an exposed Pliocene complex of approximately 2000 mapped dikes, 12 sills, and 60 conduits eroded to a depth of 800 m below the paleosurface. A combination of airborne LiDAR (ALS), provided by NCALM, and terrestrial LiDAR (TLS) surveys are used to map the dip of 5 major sills within a 35 sq km area. The ALS provides a 1 m aerial resolution of exposed volcanic features and the TLS gives vertical measurements to cm accuracy. From these data we determine that the 5-25 m thick sills in this area dip approximately 1 to 6 degrees. Field observations show that steps in sills and related fabrics indicate flow direction in sills during emplacement and that sills normally propagate down dip in the Entrada sandstone host rock away from apparent feeder dikes and conduits. Some sills have foundered roofs, especially near conduits, suggesting that nearly neutrally buoyant magmas emplaced into sills along bed partings in the Entrada, differentiated, and in some cases flowed back into conduits. By volume, at 800 m depth in the San Rafael, nearly all igneous rock (approximately 90 percent) is located in sills rather than in dikes or conduits. These observations are consistent with geochemical models that suggest differentiation in shallow sills explains geochemical trends observed in single monogenetic volcanoes in some active fields. Deformation associated with sill inflation and deflation may be a significant precursor to eruptive activity in monogenetic volcanic fields.

  4. Space Radar Image of San Rafael Glacier, Chile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A NASA radar instrument has been successfully used to measure some of the fastest moving and most inaccessible glaciers in the world -- in Chile's huge, remote Patagonia ice fields -- demonstrating a technique that could produce more accurate predictions of glacial response to climate change and corresponding sea level changes. This image, produced with interferometric measurements made by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) flown on the Space Shuttle last fall, has provided the first detailed measurements of the mass and motion of the San Rafael Glacier. Very few measurements have been made of the Patagonian ice fields, which are the world's largest mid-latitude ice masses and account for more than 60 percent of the Southern Hemisphere's glacial area outside of Antarctica. These features make the area essential for climatologists attempting to understand the response of glaciers on a global scale to changes in climate, but the region's inaccessibility and inhospitable climate have made it nearly impossible for scientists to study its glacial topography, meteorology and changes over time. Currently, topographic data exist for only a few glaciers while no data exist for the vast interior of the ice fields. Velocity has been measured on only five of the more than 100 glaciers, and the data consist of only a few single-point measurements. The interferometry performed by the SIR-C/X-SAR was used to generate both a digital elevation model of the glaciers and a map of their ice motion on a pixel-per-pixel basis at very high resolution for the first time. The data were acquired from nearly the same position in space on October 9, 10 and 11, 1994, at L-band frequency (24-cm wavelength), vertically transmitted and received polarization, as the Space Shuttle Endeavor flew over several Patagonian outlet glaciers of the San Rafael Laguna. The area shown in these two images is 50 kilometers by 30 kilometers (30 miles by 18 miles) in

  5. Mineral resources of the San Rafael Swell Wilderness Study Areas, including Muddy Creek, Crack Canyon, San Rafael Reef, Mexican Mountain, and Sids Mountain Wilderness Study Areas, Emery County, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Bartsch-Winkler, S.; Dickerson, R.P.; Barton, H.W.; McCafferty, A.E.; Grauch, V.J.S.; Koyuncu, H.; Lee, K.; Duval, J.S. ); Munts, S.R.; Benjamin, D.A.; Close, T.J.; Lipton, D.A.; Neumann, T.R.; Willet, S.L. )

    1990-09-01

    This paper reports on the San Rafael Swell Wilderness Study areas, which includes the Muddy Creek, Crack Canyon, San Rafael Reef, Mexican Mountain, and Sids Mountain Wilderness Study Areas, in Emery County, south-central Utah. Within and near the Crack Canyon Wilderness Study Area are identified subeconomic uranium and vanadium resources. Within the Carmel Formation are inferred subeconomic resources of gypsum in the Muddy Creek, San Rafael Reef, and Sids Mountain Wilderness Study Areas. Other commodities evaluated include geothermal energy, gypsum, limestone, oil and gas, sand and gravel, sandstone, semiprecious gemstones, sulfur petrified wood, and tar sand.

  6. Reconnaissance of the quality of surface water in the San Rafael River basin, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mundorff, J.C.; Thompson, Kendall R.

    1982-01-01

    The water-quality reconnaissance of the San Rafael River basin, Utah, encompassed an area of about 2,300 square miles (5,960 square kilometers). Data were obtained by the U.S. Geological Survey one or more times at 116 sites from June 1977 to September 1978. At 19 other sites visited during the same period, the streams were dry. Precipitation and stream discharge were significantly less than normal during 1977 and ranged from less than to more than normal during 1978. Exposed rocks in the San Rafael River basin range in age from Permian to Holocene. The Carmel Formation of Jurassic age and various members of the Mancos Shale of Cretaceous age are major contributors of dissolved solids to streams in the basin. There are eight major reservoirs having a total usable capacity of 115, 000 acre-feet (142 cubic hectometers); seven are mainly for irrigation supply; one, having a usable capacity of 30,530 acre-feet (38 cubic hectometers), is for power plant water supply. From about April to November, major diversions from Huntington, Cottonwood, and Ferron Creeks nearly deplete the flow downstream; during such periods, downstream flow in these streams and in the San Rafael River is mainly irrigation-return flow and some ground-water seepage. The water at the points of major diversion on Huntington, Cottonwood, and Ferron Creeks is of excellent quality for irrigation; salinity hazard is low to medium, and sodium hazard is low. Dissolved-solids concentrations are less than 500 milligrams per liter. The water at the mouths of Huntington, Cottonwood, and Ferron Creeks has markedly larger dissolved-solids concentrations than does the water upstream from major diversions. The changes in the chemical quality occur in stream reaches that cross a belt of land 10 to 15 miles (16 to 24 kilometers) wide where the Mancos Shale is widely exposed. This also is the area where nearly all the intensive irrigation in the San Rafael River basin is practiced. There are no perennial tributaries

  7. Fish and wildlife to determine endangered status of San Rafael Cactus

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-09-01

    The US Fish and Wildlife Service has proposed to determine the endangered status of the San Rafael Cactus. Although the only known occurrences of the species do not appear to fall within the boundaries of the San Rafael Swell Special Tar Sands Area, nearby combined hydrocarbon leasing could be impacted. There are two known populations of Pediocactus despainii, about 25 miles apart and each containing 2000 to 3000 individuals. Both occur in central Utah (Emery County), mainly in areas administered by the Bureau of Land Management. This rare species is being sought be cactus collectors, one population is heavily impacted by recreational off-road vehicles, and approximately one-half of each population is in areas covered by oil and gas leases and/or mining claims for gypsum. If the species is determined to be endangered, then the Fish and Wildlife Service could define a critical habitat for its preservation.

  8. Geological map and digital database of the San Rafael Mtn. 7.5-minute quadrangle, Santa Barbara County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vedder, John G.; Stanley, Richard G.; Graham, S.E.; Valin, Z.C.

    2001-01-01

    Geologic mapping of the San Rafael Primitive Area (now the San Rafael Wilderness) by Gower and others (1966) and Vedder and others (1967) did not include all of the San Rafael Mtn. quadrangle, and the part that was mapped was done in reconnaissance fashion. To help resolve some of the structural and stratigraphic ambiguities of the earlier mapping and to complete the mapping of the quadrangle, additional field work was done during short intervals in 1980 and 1981 and from 1996 to 1998. Contacts within the belt of Franciscan rocks at the southwestern corner of the quadrangle were generalized from the detailed map by Wahl (1998). Because extensive areas were inaccessible owing to impenetrable chaparral, observations from several helicopter overflights (1965, 1980, 1981) and interpretations from aerial photographs were used as compilation aids. Consequently, some of the depicted contacts and faults are highly inferential, particularly within the Upper Cretaceous rocks throughout the middle part of the quadrangle.

  9. Physical processes of shallow mafic dike emplacement near the San Rafael Swell, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Delaney, P.T.; Gartner, A.E.

    1997-01-01

    Some 200 shonkinite dikes, sills, and breccia bodies on the western Colorado Plateau of south-central Utah were intruded from approximately 3.7 to 4.6 Ma, contemporaneous with mafic volcanism along the nearby plateau margin. Thicknesses of dikes range to about 6 m; the log-normal mean thickness is 85 cm. Despite the excellent exposures of essentially all dikes in strata of the Jurassic San Rafael Group, their number is indeterminate from their outcrop and spacing because they are everywhere greatly segmented. By our grouping of almost 2000 dike segments, most dikes are less than 2 km in outcrop length; the longest is 9 km. Because the San Rafael magmas were primitive and probably ascended directly from the mantle, dike lengths in outcrop are much less than their heights. The present exposures probably lie along the irregular upper peripheries of dikes that lengthen and merge with depth. Orientations of steps on dike contacts record local directions of dike-fracture propagation; about half of the measurements plunge less than 30??, showing that lateral propagation at dike peripheries is as important as the vertical propagation ultimately responsible for ascent. The San Rafael dikes, now exposed after erosion of about 0.5-1.5 km, appear to thicken and shorten upward, probably because near-surface vesiculation enhanced magmatic driving pressures. Propagation likely ceased soon after the first dike segments began to feed nearby sills or vented to initiate small-volume eruptions. Most of the dikes are exposed in clastic strata of the Jurassic San Rafael Group. They probably acquired their strikes, however, while ascending along well-developed joints in massive sandstones of the underlying Glen Canyon Group. Rotation of far-field stresses during the emplacement interval cannot account for disparate strikes of the dikes, which vary through 110??, most lying between north and N25??W. Rather, the two regional horizontal principal stresses were probably nearly equal, and so

  10. Geometry, structure, and concealed lithology of the San Rafael Basin, southeastern Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bultman, Mark W.

    1999-01-01

    The contiguous United States has been well explored for exposed conventional mineral deposits. Therefore, it is likely that many economically viable and strategically significant conventional undiscovered mineral deposits will be found in bedrock concealed beneath basin sediments. Mineral resource assessments must incorporate an understanding of the geometry, structure, and concealed lithology of basins in order to be accurate. This report presents an analysis of the basin geometry and structure of the San Rafael basin in southeastern Arizona. In addition, a new methodology for inferring concealed lithology is presented and applied in the San Rafael basin. Gravity data is used to model the geometry of the basin using recent models of sediment density vs. depth developed in the region. This modeling indicates that the basin has a maximum depth of approximately 1.05 km plus or minus 0.10 km. In the southern portion, the basin can be modeled as an asymmetric graben faulted on the western margin. The northern portion of the basin is structurally more complex and may have high angle faults on the western, northern, and eastern margin. Near-ground closely spaced Earth’s total intensity magnetic field data is used to locate concealed faults within the basin. This data is also used to infer lithology concealed by shallow basin sediments. Airborne Earth’s total intensity magnetic field data is used to help infer concealed lithology in deep portions of the basin. The product of integrating all data and interpretations is a map which presents the geometry of the basin, faults and contacts concealed by basin sediments, and an estimate of the bedrock lithology concealed by basin sediment. Based on basin geometry and concealed lithology, the San Rafael basin has a high potential for concealed mineral deposits on its western and northern margin. In particular, a newly discovered magnetic anomaly in the northern portion of the basin can be modeled as a granitic intrusion with

  11. Analysis of a multisensor image data set of south San Rafael Swell, Utah

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    A Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR-A) image of the southern portion of the San Rafael Swell in Utah has been digitized and registered to coregistered Landsat, Seasat, and HCMM thermal inertia images. The addition of the SIR-A image to the registered data set improves rock type discrimination in both qualitative and quantitative analyses. Sedimentary units can be separated in a combined SIR-A/Seasat image that cannot be seen in either image alone. Discriminant Analyses show that the classification accuracy is improved with addition of the SIR-A image to Landsat images. Classification accuracy is further improved when texture information from the Seasat and SIR-A images is included.

  12. The Changing Geomorphic Template of Native Fish Habitat of the Lower San Rafael River, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortney, S. T.; Dean, D. J.; Schmidt, J. C.

    2010-12-01

    The physical template of the aquatic ecosystem of the lower San Rafael River (UT) changed dramatically during the 20th century. 1938 aerial photographs depict a channel comprised of multiple threads with numerous bars. The river has since been transformed into a single-thread channel with a low width-to-depth ratio. The drastic changes in the channel geometry have resulted in severely degraded habitat conditions. Despite these changes in habitat quality and quantity, roundtail chub, flannelmouth sucker, and bluehead sucker are still found in isolated patches of complex habitat. Three factors are primarily responsible for changes in the channel geomorphology: (1) reduced magnitude and duration of the spring snowmelt flood, (2) dense establishment of tamarisk (Tamarix spp) throughout the alluvial valley, and (3) continued supply of fine sediment from ephemeral tributaries. We determined the degree and rate of geomorphic change by analyzing spatially-rich data extracted from aerial photographs and temporally-rich data recorded at USGS gage 09328500. We evaluated channel morphologic processes by interpreting stratigraphy in floodplain trenches and dated these alluvial deposits using dendro-geomorphic techniques. We correlated the flood record to floodplain deposits, thus determining the role of floods in shaping the present channel. Aerial photography analysis shows that a 10-km reach cumulatively narrowed 62% during a span of 44 years. Between 1949 and 1970, the channel cross-section at USGS gage 09328500 narrowed by 60% and incised its bed approximately 1.2 m. Rating relations since the 1980’s provide corroborative evidence that channel narrowing and reduction in channel capacity continues; today, parts of the channel bed are on bedrock, thereby preventing further incision. Stratigraphy observed in a 40-m long trench demonstrates that the channel has narrowed by oblique and vertical accretion processes. Dendrogeomorphic results elucidate the relative role of

  13. Potential effects of anticipated coal mining on salinity of the Price, San Rafael, and Green Rivers, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindskov, K.L.

    1986-01-01

    The impact of anticipated coal mining in Utah on the salinity of the Price, San Rafael, and Green Rivers is to be addressed in the repermitting of existing mines and permitting of new mines. To determine the potential impacts, mathematical models were developed for the Price and San Rafael River basins. Little impact on the quantity and quality of streamflow is expected for the Price and San Rafael Rivers. The increase in mean monthly flow of the Price River downstream from Scofield Reservoir is projected as 3.5 cu ft/sec, ranging from 1.7% in June to 140% in February. The potential increase in dissolved solids concentration downstream from Scofield Reservoir would range from 10.4% in June and July (from 202 to 223 mg/L) to 97.0% in February (from 202 to 398 mg/L). However, the concentration of the mixture of mine water with the existing flow released from Scofield Reservoir would contain less than 500 mg/L of dissolved solids. At the mouth of the Price River, the potential increase in mean monthly flow is projected as 12.6 cu ft/sec, ranging from 3.7% in May to 37.7% in January. The potential changes in dissolved solids concentration would range from a 20.7% decrease in January (from 3,677 to 2,917 mg/L) to a 1.3% increase in June (from 1,911 to 1,935 mg/L). At the mouth of the San Rafael River , the potential increase in mean monthly flow ranges from 2.9 cu ft/sec in February to 6.7 cu ft/sec in May, with the increase ranging from 0.8% in June to 12.6% in November. The potential changes in dissolved solids concentration would range from a 5.3 % decrease in March (from 2,318 to 2,195 mg/L) to a 0.6% increase in May (from 1,649 to 1,659 mg/L). The anticipated mining in the Price and San Rafael River basins is not expected to cause a detectable change in the quantity and quality of streamflow in the Green River. The projected peak increase in flow resulting from discharge from the mines is less than 0.3% of the average flow in the Green River. (Author 's abstract)

  14. Sequence stratigraphy of the Lower Triassic Sinbad Formation, San Rafael Swell, east-central, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Goodspeed, T.H.; Elrick, M. . Dept. of Earth and Planetary Sciences); Lucas, S.G. )

    1993-04-01

    The Lower Triassic Sinbad Fm (20--30 m thick) in the San Rafael Swell of east-central Utah is high energy carbonate deposits that conformably overlie tidal flat/fluvial channel deposits of the Black Dragon Fm. The Torrey Fm conformably overlies the Sinbad Fm and consists primarily of siliciclastic tidal flat and fluvial deposits. Five facies (in ascending order) are characteristic of the Sinbad Fm: (1) bioturbated calcisiltite with calcite-replaced evaporite nodules and ripple laminations, (2) skeletal-oolitic-intraclastic packstone and grainstone, (3) slightly bioturbated, mechanically laminated, pelletal calcisiltite (5) trough cross-bedded, peloidal to oolitic grainstone, and (5) thin-bedded, skeletal-pelletal-oolitic grainstone with mud to wackestone drapes. Regional facies relationships of the Sinbad Fm indicate initial deepening followed by shallowing. The skeletal-intraclastic packstone and grainstone facies represents maximum flooding. This facies thickens to the northwest and contains an open marine molluscan fauna of ammonites, bivalves, gastropods and scaphopods. The ammonites are indicative of the Tardus Zone of late Smithian age. Deposits above the maximum flooding zone (MFZ) are restricted foreshoal, pelletal calcisiltite, oolitic shoal, and backshoal skeletal-oolitic (with a restricted fauna of molluscs and ostracods) deposits. This shallowing-upward sequence represents the early HST. The Sinbad Fm represents the MFZ and early HST of a 150-m-thick depositional sequence of rocks with the Black Dragon FM representing the TST, and the Torrey Fm representing the late HST.

  15. Pilot study of hemoglobinopathies in newborns of the Rafael Calvo maternity clinic of Cartagena, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Barboza, Miriam; Viola, Maricela; Moneriz, Carlos; Araque, Luz Marina

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The hemoglobinopathies are a heterogeneous group of congenital anemias from Africa, Asia and the Mediterranean. Due to the migration of this population have spread worldwide, especially in Latin America and the Caribbean region, which Cartagena de Indias is included, with a large proportion of people of African descent. The lack of routine programs that include an appropriate methodology for precise identification of those affected and carriers, impossible to know the real behavior of this disease in our country and an early and appropriate to the patients before the disease manifests itself and produce its serious consequences. Objective: To estimate the incidence and describe the epidemiological profile of hemoglobinopathies in newborns Rafael Calvo Maternity Clinic of Cartagena, in the period from January to June 2010. Methods: Prospective descriptive study of a population of 1,729 newborns. Samples were collected cord blood on filter paper. Isoelectric focusing electrophoresis (IEF )was used to separate the haemoglobins. Results: 94.4% (1,633 samples) were normal (hemoglobin FA), 4.5% (78 samples) were heterozygous for haemoglobin S (HbFAS), 1% (17samples) were heterozygous for haemoglobin C (hemoglobin FAC) and 0.1% (1 sample) was double heterozygous SC (hemoglobin FSC). Conclusion: Due to the high incidence of hemoglobinopathies found in this pilot study highlights the importance and necessity of establishing an obligatory neonatal screening in the city of Cartagena, in order to make a timely diagnosis and monitoring of affected and carrier. PMID:24893191

  16. Geochemistry of soils from the San Rafael Valley, Santa Cruz County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Folger, Helen W.; Gray, Floyd

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine whether surficial geochemical methods can be used to identify subsurface mineraldeposits covered by alluvium derived from surrounding areas. The geochemical investigation focused on an anomalous geo-physical magnetic high located in the San Rafael Valley in Santa Cruz County, Arizona. The magnetic high, inferred to be asso-ciated with a buried granite intrusion, occurs beneath Quaternary alluvial and terrace deposits. Soil samples were collected at a depth of 10 to 30 centimeters below land surface along transects that traverse the inferred granite. The samples were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and by the partial-leach Mobile Metal Ion™ method. Principal component and factor analyses showed a strong correlation between the soils and source rocks hosting base-metal replacement deposits in the Harshaw and Patagonia Mining Districts. Factor analysis also indicated areas of high metal concentrations associated with the Meadow Valley Flat. Although no definitive geochemical signature was identified for the inferred granite, concentrations otungsten and iron in the surrounding area were slightly elevated.

  17. Implementation of tsunami disaster prevention measures in the municipality of San Rafael del Sur, Nicaragua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauch, W.; Talavera, E.; Acosta, N.; Sanchez, M.; Mejia, E.

    2007-05-01

    The Nicaraguan Pacific coast presents considerable tsunami risk. On September 1, 1992, a tsunami caused enormous damage in the infrastructure and killed more than 170 people. A pilot project was conducted between 2006 and 2007 in the municipality of San Rafel del Sur, area of Masachapa, The project included multiple topics of tsunami prevention measures and considering the direct participation of the local population, as: -General education on disaster prevention, participative events; -Investigation of awareness level and information needs for different population groups; -Specific educational measures in the schools; -Publication of brochures, calendars, news paper articles, radio programs, TV spots -Development of local tsunami hazard maps, 1:5,000 scale; (based on previous regional tsunami hazard mapping projects and local participation) -Development of a tsunami warning plan; -Improvements of the national tsunami warning system. -Installation of sirens for tsunami warning -Installation of tsunami signs, indicating hazardous areas, evacuation routes, safe places; -Realization of evacuation drills in schools. Based on the experiences gained in Masachapa it is planned to run similar projects in other areas along the Nicaraguan Pacific coast. In the project participated the local municipality and local stakeholders of San Rafael del Sur, Ministry of Education, National Police, Nicaraguan Red Cross, Ministry of Health, Ministry of Tourism, Nicaraguan Geosciences Institute (INETER), National System for Disaster Prevention (SINAPRED), Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC). It was financed by SDC and INETER.

  18. Equatorial origin for Lower Jurassic radiolarian chert in the Franciscan Complex, San Rafael Mountains, southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hagstrum, J.T.; Murchey, B.L.; Bogar, R.S.

    1996-01-01

    Lower Jurassic radiolarian chert sampled at two localities in the San Rafael Mountains of southern California (???20 km north of Santa Barbara) contains four components of remanent magnetization. Components A, B???, and B are inferred to represent uplift, Miocene volcanism, and subduction/accretion overprint magnetizations, respectively. The fourth component (C), isolated between 580?? and 680??C, shows a magnetic polarity stratigraphy and is interpreted as a primary magnetization acquired by the chert during, or soon after, deposition. Both sequences are late Pliensbachian to middle Toarcian in age, and an average paleolatitude calculated from all tilt-corrected C components is 1?? ?? 3?? north or south. This result is consistent with deposition of the cherts beneath the equatorial zone of high biologic productivity and is similar to initial paleolatitudes determined for chert blocks in northern California and Mexico. This result supports our model in which deep-water Franciscan-type cherts were deposited on the Farallon plate as it moved eastward beneath the equatorial productivity high, were accreted to the continental margin at low paleolatitudes, and were subsequently distributed northward by strike-slip faulting associated with movements of the Kula, Farallon, and Pacific plates. Upper Cretaceous turbidites of the Cachuma Formation were sampled at Agua Caliente Canyon to determine a constraining paleolatitude for accretion of the Jurassic chert sequences. These apparently unaltered rocks, however, were found to be completely overprinted by the A component of magnetization. Similar in situ directions and demagnetization behaviors observed in samples of other Upper Cretaceous turbidite sequences in southern and Baja California imply that these rocks might also give unreliable results.

  19. DESCRIPTION OF THE SAN RAFAEL PROGRAM FOR MORE ABLE LEARNERS AS PRESCRIBED IN THE CALIFORNIA ADMINISTRATIVE CODE, ARTICLE 23, SPECIALLY EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS FOR MENTALLY GIFTED MINORS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SHORE, ROBERT E.

    THE SAN RAFAEL MORE ABLE LEARNER CURRICULUM WAS GEARED TO A SELECT GROUP OF ELEMENTARY SCHOOL STUDENTS. IT ATTEMPTED "TO DEEPEN APPRECIATIONS, ATTITUDES, AND UNDERSTANDINGS THROUGH INCREASED KNOWLEDGE OF THE ARTS AND SCIENCES, AND TO DEVELOP PROFICIENCIES AND SKILLS IN SELECTED AREAS IN THE ARTS AND SCIENCES." THE CURRICULUM OFFERED A…

  20. A New Destination for "The Flying Bus"?: The Implications of Orlando-Rican Migration for Luis Rafael Sanchez's "La guagua aerea"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barreneche, Gabriel Ignacio; Lombardi, Jane; Ramos-Flores, Hector

    2012-01-01

    Puerto Rican author Luis Rafael Sanchez's "La guagua aerea" explores the duality, hybridity, and fluidity of US-Puerto Rican identity through the frequent travel of migrants between New York City (the traditional destination city for Puerto Rican migrants) and the island. In recent years, however, the "flying bus" has adopted a…

  1. [Superficial mycoses: casuistry of the Mycology Department of the Instituto Nacional de Higiene "Rafael Rangel", Caracas, Venezuela (2001-2014)].

    PubMed

    Capote, Ana María; Ferrara, Giuseppe; Panizo, María Mercedes; García, Nataly; Alarcón, Víctor; Reviakina, Vera; Dolande, Maribel

    2016-03-01

    The superficial mycoses are very common infectious diseases and therefore are a frequent reason for medical consultation. The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic frequency of superficial mycoses in the Mycology Department of the Instituto Nacional de Higiene "Rafael Rangel" during 14 years (2001-2014). A retrospective cross-sectional study was performed to review the mycological records of patients with presumptive diagnosis of superficial mycosis. Nails, hairs and epidermal scales were the processed samples. The identification of fungi was performed by macro and microscopic observation of colonies and biochemical and physiological tests, as required of the isolated agent. For the investigation of Malassezia spp. only direct examination was performed. Of the 3 228 samples processed, 1 098 (34%) were positive and their distribution according to the etiological agent was: dermatophytes 79.5%; 10.9% yeasts; non-dermatophytes fungi 5.1% and 4.5% Malassezia spp. The most frequently isolated dermatophyte was Trichophyton rubrum Complex (70.1%), followed by T mentagrophytes complex (15.1%), Microsporum canis (9.4%) and Epidermophyton floccosum (4%). The most frequent ringworms Were: Tinea unguium (66.8%), followed by Tineapedis (16.4%) and Tinea capitis (8.1%). Candida parapsilosis complex (37.5%) was the most frequently isolated yeast and Fusarium spp. (53.6%) was the most isolated among non-dermatophyte fungi, followed by Aspergillus spp. (19.6%) and Acremonium spp. (10.7%). The identification of the etiological agent is essential to guide appropriate treatment. This study constitutes an important contribution to the knowledge of the epidemiology of superficial mycoses in our country.

  2. A LiDAR Survey of an Exposed Magma Plumbing System in the San Rafael Desert, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, J. A.; Kinman, S.; Connor, L.; Connor, C.; Wetmore, P. H.

    2013-12-01

    Fields of dozens to hundreds of volcanoes are a common occurrence on Earth and are created due to distributed-style volcanism often referred to as "monogenetic." These volcanic fields represent a significant hazard on both local and regional scales. While it is important to understand the physical states of active volcanic fields, it is difficult or impossible to directly observe active magma emplacement. Because of this, observing an exposed magmatic plumbing system may enable further efforts to describe active volcanic fields. The magmatic plumbing system of a Pliocene-aged monogenetic volcanic field is currently exposed as a sill and dike swarm in the San Rafael Desert of Central Utah. Alkali diabase and shonkinitic sills and dikes in this region intruded into Mesozoic sedimentary units of the Colorado Plateau and now make up the most erosion resistant units, forming mesas, ridges, and small peaks associated with sills, dikes, and plug-like bodies respectively. Diez et al. (Lithosphere, 2009) and Kiyosugi et al. (Geology, 2012) provide evidence that each cylindrical plug-like body represents a conduit that once fed one volcano. The approximate original depth of the currently exposed swarm is estimated to be 0.8 km. Volcanic and sedimentary materials may be discriminated at very high resolution with the use of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR). LiDAR produces a three dimensional point cloud, where each point has an associated return intensity. High resolution, bare earth digital elevation models (DEMs) can be produced after vegetation is identified and removed from the dataset. The return intensity at each point can enable classification as either sedimentary or volcanic rock. A Terrestrial LiDAR Survey (TLS) has been carried out to map a large hill with at least one volcanic conduit at its core. This survey implements a RIEGL VZ-400 3D Laser Scanner, which successfully maps solid objects in line-of-sight and within 600 meters. The laser used has a near

  3. Informant consensus factor and antibacterial activity of the medicinal plants used by the people of San Rafael Coxcatlán, Puebla, México.

    PubMed

    Canales, M; Hernández, T; Caballero, J; Romo de Vivar, A; Avila, G; Duran, A; Lira, R

    2005-03-21

    Using ethnobotanical techniques, the medicinal flora used by the inhabitants of San Rafael Coxcatlán, Puebla was determined. During the field work, two types of interviews were applied (free listing and semi-structured) to 60 informants, who supplied consistent information concerning the use of 46 species of medicinal plants. Further analysis showed 13 categories of different medicinal use. An informant consensus factor was calculated and 16 species were selected due to their utilization in the treatment of diseases of possible bacterial origin. Of these 16 plants, sequential extractions were made with hexane, ethyl acetate and methanol. The obtained extracts were used to assess their antibacterial activity against 14 bacterial strains; 75% of the plants presented antibacterial activity. The medicinal species Jatropha neopauciflora Pax (Euphorbiaceae) and Juliania adstringens (Schldl.) Schldl. (Julianiaceae) were those that showed the biggest activity. Moreover, these species also had the highest informant consensus factor values.

  4. Magnetic properties of the remagnetized Middle-Ordovician limestones of the Ponón Trehué Formation (San Rafael Block, central-western Argentina): Insights into the Permian widespread Sanrafaelic overprint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazzito, Sabrina Y.; Rapalini, Augusto E.

    2016-10-01

    The widespread Sanrafaelic remagnetization reset most of the early Cambrian to mid-Ordovician carbonate platform of the Argentine Precordillera and the calcareous units of the San Rafael Block. We conducted a detailed rock-magnetic study on the Middle-Ordovician limestones of the Ponón Trehué Formation at both limbs of a tight anticline exposed in the San Rafael Block (Mendoza province, central-western Argentina) that are carriers of a syntectonic magnetization of Permian age. We found that the magnetic overprint in the Ponón Trehué Formation is carried by both pyrrhotite and magnetite, with goethite and subordinate haematite likely related to weathering. Hysteresis parameters, frequency dependence of magnetic susceptibility, Cisowski and modified Lowrie-Fuller tests suggest the presence of ultrafine particles of chemical origin. Demagnetization of natural remanent magnetization and of three-axis isothermal remanence confirm pyrrhotite and magnetite as important contributors to the remanence. Both minerals carry the same magnetic syntectonic component suggesting a coeval or nearly coeval remanence acquisition and therefore mineral formation. This and the results of the magnetic fabric analyses indicate an authigenic origin of the magnetic minerals during folding associated with the Sanrafaelic tectonic phase (ca. 280 Ma). Although the chemically active (oxidizing?) fluids expelled from the orogen as it developed in the early Permian is a viable explanation for the Sanrafaelic remagnetization, the role of the nearly coeval magmatism in Precordillera and the San Rafael Block remains to be properly evaluated.

  5. High-resolution geophysical data collected aboard the U.S. Geological Survey research vessel Rafael to supplement existing datasets from Buzzards Bay and Vineyard Sound, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pendleton, Elizabeth A.; Andrews, Brian D.; Danforth, William W.; Foster, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Geophysical and geospatial data were collected in Buzzards Bay, in the shallow-water areas of Vineyard Sound, and in the nearshore areas off the eastern Elizabeth Islands and northern coast of Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts, on the U.S. Geological Survey research vessel Rafael between 2007 and 2011, in a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management. This report describes results of this collaborative effort, which include mapping the geology of the inner shelf zone of the Elizabeth Islands and the sand shoals of Vineyard Sound and studying geologic processes that contribute to the evolution of this area. Data collected during these surveys include: bathymetry, acoustic backscatter, seismic-reflection profiles, sound velocity profiles, and navigation. The long-term goals of this project are (1) to provide high-resolution geophysical data that will support research on the influence of sea-level change and sediment supply on coastal evolution and (2) to inventory subtidal marine habitats and their distribution within the coastal zone of Massachusetts.

  6. Assessment of nonpoint source chemical loading potential to watersheds containing uranium waste dumps associated with uranium exploration and mining, San Rafael Swell, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Freeman, Michael L.; Naftz, David L.; Snyder, Terry; Johnson, Greg

    2008-01-01

    During July and August of 2006, 117 solid-phase samples were collected from abandoned uranium waste dumps, geologic background sites, and adjacent streambeds in the San Rafael Swell, in southeastern Utah. The objective of this sampling program was to assess the nonpoint source chemical loading potential to ephemeral and perennial watersheds from uranium waste dumps on Bureau of Land Management property. Uranium waste dump samples were collected using solid-phase sampling protocols. After collection, solid-phase samples were homogenized and extracted in the laboratory using a field leaching procedure. Filtered (0.45 micron) water samples were obtained from the field leaching procedure and were analyzed for Ag, As, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, U, V, and Zn at the Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry Metals Analysis Laboratory at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah and for Hg at the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory, Denver, Colorado. For the initial ranking of chemical loading potential of suspect uranium waste dumps, leachate analyses were compared with existing aquatic life and drinking-water-quality standards and the ratio of samples that exceeded standards to the total number of samples was determined for each element having a water-quality standard for aquatic life and drinking-water. Approximately 56 percent (48/85) of the leachate samples extracted from uranium waste dumps had one or more chemical constituents that exceeded aquatic life and drinking-water-quality standards. Most of the uranium waste dump sites with elevated trace-element concentrations in leachates were along Reds Canyon Road between Tomsich Butte and Family Butte. Twelve of the uranium waste dump sites with elevated trace-element concentrations in leachates contained three or more constituents that exceeded drinking-water-quality standards. Eighteen of the uranium waste dump sites had three or more constituents that exceeded trace

  7. Sedimentology and reservoir heterogeneity of a valley-fill deposit-A field guide to the Dakota Sandstone of the San Rafael Swell, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirschbaum, Mark A.; Schenk, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    Valley-fill deposits form a significant class of hydrocarbon reservoirs in many basins of the world. Maximizing recovery of fluids from these reservoirs requires an understanding of the scales of fluid-flow heterogeneity present within the valley-fill system. The Upper Cretaceous Dakota Sandstone in the San Rafael Swell, Utah contains well exposed, relatively accessible outcrops that allow a unique view of the external geometry and internal complexity of a set of rocks interpreted to be deposits of an incised valley fill. These units can be traced on outcrop for tens of miles, and individual sandstone bodies are exposed in three dimensions because of modern erosion in side canyons in a semiarid setting and by exhumation of the overlying, easily erodible Mancos Shale. The Dakota consists of two major units: (1) a lower amalgamated sandstone facies dominated by large-scale cross stratification with several individual sandstone bodies ranging in thickness from 8 to 28 feet, ranging in width from 115 to 150 feet, and having lengths as much as 5,000 feet, and (2) an upper facies composed of numerous mud-encased lenticular sandstones, dominated by ripple-scale lamination, in bedsets ranging in thickness from 5 to 12 feet. The lower facies is interpreted to be fluvial, probably of mainly braided stream origin that exhibits multiple incisions amalgamated into a complex sandstone body. The upper facies has lower energy, probably anastomosed channels encased within alluvial and coastal-plain floodplain sediments. The Dakota valley-fill complex has multiple scales of heterogeneity that could affect fluid flow in similar oil and gas subsurface reservoirs. The largest scale heterogeneity is at the formation level, where the valley-fill complex is sealed within overlying and underlying units. Within the valley-fill complex, there are heterogeneities between individual sandstone bodies, and at the smallest scale, internal heterogeneities within the bodies themselves. These

  8. Investigation of the structure and lithology of bedrock concealed by basin fill, using ground-based magnetic-field-profile data acquired in the San Rafael Basin, southeastern Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bultman, Mark W.

    2013-01-01

    Data on the Earth’s total-intensity magnetic field acquired near ground level and at measurement intervals as small as 1 m include information on the spatial distribution of nearsurface magnetic dipoles that in many cases are unique to a specific lithology. Such spatial information is expressed in the texture (physical appearance or characteristics) of the data at scales of hundreds of meters to kilometers. These magnetic textures are characterized by several descriptive statistics, their power spectrum, and their multifractal spectrum. On the basis of a graphical comparison and textural characterization, ground-based magnetic-field profile data can be used to estimate bedrock lithology concealed by as much as 100 m of basin fill in some cases, information that is especially important in assessing and exploring for concealed mineral deposits. I demonstrate that multifractal spectra of ground-based magnetic-field-profile data can be used to differentiate exposed lithologies and that the shape and position of the multifractal spectrum of the ground-based magnetic-field-profile of concealed lithologies can be matched to the upward-continued multifractal spectrum of an exposed lithology to help distinguish the concealed lithology. In addition, ground-based magnetic-field-profile data also detect minute differences in the magnetic susceptibility of rocks over small horizontal and vertical distances and so can be used for precise modeling of bedrock geometry and structure, even when that bedrock is concealed by 100 m or more of nonmagnetic basin fill. Such data contain valuable geologic information on the bedrock concealed by basin fill that may not be so visible in aeromagnetic data, including areas of hydrothermal alteration, faults, and other bedrock structures. Interpretation of these data in the San Rafael Basin, southeastern Arizona, has yielded results for estimating concealed lithologies, concealed structural geology, and a concealed potential mineral

  9. Hispanos en la EPA: Rafael Casanova

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    La diversidad de la fuerza laboral es importante para la Agencia de Protección Ambiental de EE.UU. (EPA, por sus siglas en inglés). Los empleados hispanos de la EPA contribuyen diariamente hacia la protección de la salud y el medio ambiente.

  10. Hispanos en la EPA: Rafael DeLeón

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    La diversidad de la fuerza laboral es importante para la Agencia de Protección Ambiental de EE.UU. (EPA, por sus siglas en inglés). Los empleados hispanos de la EPA contribuyen diariamente hacia la protección de la salud y el medio ambiente.

  11. A concurrent resolution recommending the posthumous award of the Medal of Honor to Sergeant Rafael Peralta.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Feinstein, Dianne [D-CA

    2013-03-19

    03/19/2013 Referred to the Committee on Armed Services. (text of measure as introduced: CR S1955-1956) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  12. Depositional environments and controls of Juncal Formation, southern San Rafael Mountains, California

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, T.J.

    1987-05-01

    The lower to middle Eocene Juncal Formation, north of the Santa Ynez fault in easternmost Santa Barbara County, represents the onset of marine sedimentation following an approximately 20-m.y. hiatus. The Juncal paraconformably overlies the upper Campanian Unnamed sandstone and is gradationally overlain by the middle Eocene Matilija Formation. Access to the Juncal exposures of this area was considerably enhanced by the Wheeler fire of July 1985. Facies analysis of both the vertical and lateral exposures of the Juncal Formation (approx. 1400 m thick) indicate that the Juncal represents coalescing outer-fan depositional lobes. This interpretation is based on the lateral continuity of sandstone beds, presence of thickening-upward cycles, and high-concentration sediment gravity flows, bathyal fauna, and regional associations. Local channelization (to 10 m deep) represents the extension of a mid-fan channel over its associated depositional lobe. Outcrops are subparallel to depositional strike in the eastern part of the study area and form a broad syncline in the western part. Together, these exposures allow documentation of the depositional lobes vertically, laterally, and longitudinally. Outer-fan deposits of the Juncal Formation are part of a progradational basin-filling episode. The Juncal grades upward into the outer- to mid-fan depositions of the lower Matilija Formation. The upper Matilija Formation shoals upward into deltaic facies. This regressive sedimentary sequence was probably initiated by the major sea level fall which occurred near the early/middle Eocene boundary and coincides with the onset of fan sedimentation elsewhere along the California margin. Within the study area, depositional lobe activity was probably governed by either minor fluctuations in relative sea level or channel switching up-system.

  13. Petrology and provenance of Upper Cretaceous Sandstone, southern San Rafael Mountains, Santa Barbara County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Toyne, C.D.

    1987-05-01

    Petrologic analysis of 24 medium to coarse-grained sandstone samples, collected from a 2950-m submarine fan complex of late Campanian-early Maestrichtian age exposed within Mono Creek Canyon, reveal commonly calcite cemented, poorly sorted, subangular biotic arkoses. Framework averages 86.0%. Matrix - primarily detrital quartz, feldspar, and lithic fragments finer than 0.03 mm and mechanically and chemically altered phyllosilicates and labile aphanites - averages 8.9%. Calcite cement averages 4.2%. Porosity averages 0.9%. Gazzi-Dickinson point counts of 400 framework grains per slide yield modal averages of Q/sub 37.7/ F/sub 49.8/ L/sub 12.5/; Qm/sub 27.4/ F/sub 49.8/ Lt/sub 22.8/; Qm/sub 35.6/ P/sub 43.7/ K/sub 20.7/; and Qp/sub 49.4/ Lv/sub 22.1/ Ls/sub 28.5/. P/F averages 0.68, Lv/L averages 0.45, Qp/Q averages 0.27, and detrital phyllosilicate, predominantly biotite, averages 5.7% of total framework. Neither primary nor secondary parameters vary systematically with stratigraphic position. Miscellaneous constituents average 1.3% of framework and include epidote, garnet, amphibole, pyroxene, zircon, and tourmaline as well as carbonaceous blebs, opaque minerals, and unidentifiable lithic fragments. Separate analysis of 100 medium sized quartz grains per slide indicates a mean population of 63.0% non-undulatory monocrystalline quartz, 9.1% undulatory monocrystalline quartz, 10.1% polycrystalline quartz of 2 to 3 crystals, and 17.9% polycrystalline quartz composed of more than 3 crystals. Modal data, plotted upon provenance discrimination diagrams, indicate a plutonic provenance transitional between a dissected magmatic arc and uplifted basement terrane. Paleocurrent data, neglecting possible clockwise rotation, indicate sediment transport from the north.

  14. Rock type discrimination and structural analysis with LANDSAT and Seasat data: San Rafael swell, Utah

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, H. E.; Blom, R.; Abrams, M.; Daily, M.

    1980-01-01

    Satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images is evaluated in terms of its geologic applications. The benchmark to which the SAR images are compared is LANDSAT, used both for structural and lithologic interpretations.

  15. 75 FR 35504 - San Rafael Cattle Company; Habitat Conservation Plan; Santa Cruz County, AZ

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-22

    ...); northern Mexican garter snake (Thamnophis eques megalops) and Huachuca springsnail (Pyrgulopsis thompsoni). The requested ITP also includes two listed plant species: Spiranthes delitescens (Canelo Hills ladies'-tresses) and Lileopsis schaffneriana ssp. recurva (Huachuca water umbel). Although take of listed...

  16. The Influence of Foreign Scripts on the Acquisition of a Second Language Phonological Contrast

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathieu, Lionel

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies in the acquisition of a second language (L2) phonology have revealed that orthography can influence the way in which L2 learners come to establish target-like lexical representations (Escudero et al., 2008, 2014; Escudero and Wanrooij, 2010; Showalter, 2012; Showalter and Hayes-Harb, 2013). Most of these studies, however, involve…

  17. Hamilton AFB, San Rafael, California. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A through F

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1972-11-03

    RETURN TO DTIC.DDA-2 OTIC r0e40. 70A DOCUMENT PROCESSING SIIEFT0C t DATA PROCESSING DIVISION USAFETAC Air Weather Service ( MAC ) RFVISFt I INIIFOR M Sl&A...objection to tinlimited distribution of this report to the public at large, or by DDC to the National Technical Information Servico (NID). Thi technical...ORGTE OTNME USAFETAC/OL-3NoA7 Air Weather Service (MAC) 13 NUMBER OF PAGES Scott AFB IL 62225 ________________ P. 14 MONITORING AGENCY NAE6ADORESS111

  18. 77 FR 35384 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-13

    ..., Application Type: New NVO & OFF License Rafael Castillo dba Castle Forwarding (OFF), 1100 S. Castlegate Avenue, Compton, CA 90221, Officer: Rafael Castillo, Sole Proprietor (Qualifying Individual), Application...

  19. Geologic application of thermal inertia imaging using HCMM data. [Walker Lane, Nevada; San Rafael, Utah; and Death Valley and Pisgah Crater, Lavic Lake Region, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahle, A. B.; Schieldge, J. P.; Abrams, M. J.; Alley, R. E.; Levine, C. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    Three test sites in the western US were selected to discriminate among surface geologic materials on the basis of their thermal properties as determined from HCMM data. Attempts to determine quantitatively accurate thermal inertia values from HCMM digital data met with only partial success due to the effects of sensor miscalibrations, radiative transfer in the atmosphere, and varying meteorology and elevation across a scene. In most instances, apparent thermal inertia was found to be an excellent qualitative representation of true thermal inertia. Computer processing of digital day and night HCMM data allowed construction of geologically useful images. At some test sites, more information was provided by data than LANDSAT data. Soil moisture effects and differences in spectrally dark materials were more effectively displayed using the thermal data.

  20. Notification: Fieldwork Notification Letter to CSB Chairman Rafael Moure-Eraso, Ph.D. - Compliance with the IPERIA (Act) of 2012 during FY2013

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    November 18, 2013. The EPA's OIG is beginning a review of the U.S. Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board’s compliance with the Improper Payments Elimination and Recovery Improvement Act of 2012 during fiscal year 2013.

  1. Evolution of Northeastern Mexico during the early Mesozoic: potential areas for research and exploration José Rafael Barboza-Gudiño

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barboza-Gudiño, R.

    2013-05-01

    The lower Mesozoic succession of central and northeastern Mexico was deposited in a late Paleozoic-early Mesozoic remnant basin, formed at the westernmost culmination of the Ouachita-Marathon geosuture, after closure of the Rheic Ocean. Triassic fluvial deposits of El Alamar Formation (El Alamar River) are distributed in Tamaulipas and Nuevo Leon as remnants of a continental succession deposited close to the western margin of equatorial Pangea, such fluvial systems flowed to the ocean, located to the west and contributed to construction of the so-called Potosí submarine fan (Zacatecas Formation). Petrographic, geochemical, and detrital zircon geochronology studies indicate that both, marine and continental Triassic successions, come from a continental block and partially from a recycled orogen, showing grenvillian (900-1300 Ma) and Pan-African (500-700 Ma) zircon age populations, typical for peri-gondwanan blocks, in addition to zircons from the Permo-Triassic East Mexico arc (240-280 Ma). The absence of detrital zircons from the southwestern North American craton, represent a strong argument against left lateral displacement of Mexico to the southwest during the Jurassic up to their actual position, as proposed by the Mojave-Sonora megashear hypothesis. Towards the end of the Triassic or in earliest Jurassic time, began the subduction along the western margin of Pangea, which causes deformation of the Late Triassic Zacatecas Formation and subsequent magmatism in the continental Jurassic arc known as "Nazas Arc ", whose remnants are now exposed in central- to northeastern Mexico. Wide distributed in northern Mexico occurred also deposition of a red bed succession, overlying or partially interstratified with the Early to Middle Jurassic volcanic rocks of the Nazas Formation. To the west and southwest, such redbeds change transitionally to marine and marginal sedimentary facies which record sedimentation at the ancient paleo-pacific margin of Mexico (La Boca and Huayacocotla formations). The Middle to Upper Jurassic La Joya Formation overlies unconformable all continental and marine-marginal successions and older rocks, and records the transgressive basal deposits of the Gulf series, changing upsection to the evaporites and limestone of the Oxfordian Zuloaga Group. Successive intraoceanic subduction zones to the West sparked magmatic arcs whose accretion in the continental margin produced the consolidation of much of the Mexican territory up to the current Pacific margin. Scattered isolated outcrops from the Early Mesozoic succession in central- and northeastern Mexico allow interpretation of tectonic setting and paleogeography associated to each stratigraphic unit, revealing a strongly different geologic evolution than the previously established models, opening a range of new possibilities and areas of opportunity for mining and fossil fuels exploration. However, most of the Triassic-Jurassic rocks or stratigraphic units in northern Mexico lie under many hundreds of meters of a Cretaceous-Cenozoic cover. Their recognition and preliminary evaluation implies the use of indirect techniques like geophysical methods, before drilling or subsurface mining.

  2. Use of isotopic spike from Tropical Storm to understand water exchange on large scale: study case of Rafael Storm in the Lesser Antilles archipelago, October 2012.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambs, Luc

    2014-05-01

    Aim The tracking of the rainfall from Tropical Storm Raphael of mid October 2012 was used to better understand how the eco-hydrology and the water cycle function in wet areas, such as mangrove growing in salty ponds on a number of tropical islands. Location Guadeloupe and Saint Martin Islands in the Leeward Islands archipelago, Lesser Antilles. Methods Compared to normal tropical rainfall, tropical storms display distinct depleted heavy stable water isotopes which can be used as isotopic spikes to understand these special rainfall inflows. Rainfall, groundwater, river and pond water were sampled before, during and after the storm. Results In Guadeloupe where the tropical storm started, the rainfall isotopic signal reached values of d18O= -9 to -8 o on October 12-14th 2012, whereas the normal range is d18O= -4 to -2 o as measured from 2009 to 2012. It was possible to detect such a depleted signal in the groundwater and in the mangrove forest during the days after the storm event. Main conclusions The use of such natural isotopic spikes provides an opportunity to obtain a dynamic and time reference on a large scale for the study of the hydro-ecosystems and the effects on the impacted tropical islands. A few days after the cyclone, the isotopic spikes were found in river, groundwater and mangrove water pools with values up to d18O= -8.6 o . For the water basins on the windward side, the downhill salty pond water was almost completely renewed. By contrast, only 20 to 50 % of the water in the ponds located on the leeward side was renewed. No specific elevation in the d-excess values was noted, certainly due to the relatively long distance from the eye of the storm (180 to 300 km), which meant that there was no spray water evaporative process.

  3. 9. Historic American Buildings Survey U.S. Land Commission, Clerk Records ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic American Buildings Survey U.S. Land Commission, Clerk Records of Northern California Original: August 1854 Re-photo: April 1938 - Mission San Rafael Archangel, San Rafael, Marin County, CA

  4. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey From Oriana Day Paintings, DeYoung ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey From Oriana Day Paintings, DeYoung Museum, S.F. Original: 1861 - 1885 Re-Photo: February 1940 VIEW FROM SOUTH - Mission San Rafael Archangel, San Rafael, Marin County, CA

  5. 17. INTERIOR VIEW OF WEST TRUSS, SHOWING RAILING, SUSPENSION CABLE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. INTERIOR VIEW OF WEST TRUSS, SHOWING RAILING, SUSPENSION CABLE, CONNECTION BOLTS AND 'U'-COUPLINGS, LOOKING SOUTHWEST - San Rafael Bridge, Spanning San Rafael River near Buckhorn Wash, Castle Dale, Emery County, UT

  6. Processing Nonnative Consonant Clusters in the Classroom: Perception and Production of Phonetic Detail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Lisa; Wilson, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Recent research has shown that speakers are sensitive to non-contrastive phonetic detail present in nonnative speech (e.g. Escudero et al. 2012; Wilson et al. 2014). Difficulties in interpreting and implementing unfamiliar phonetic variation can lead nonnative speakers to modify second language forms by vowel epenthesis and other changes. These…

  7. [A tribute to the memory of the illustrious maestro and academic Dr. Rafael Méndez Martínez, pioneer in the pharmacological studies of digitalis and digitalis glycosides].

    PubMed

    de Micheli Serra, Alfredo; Pastelín Hernández, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Since the end of the XVIII century, digitalis glycosides were employed in heart failure. They were considered initially as diuretics and later as cardiotonic agents or as positive inotropics. At the present time there are varied groups of positive inotropic agents, which have a beneficial action on the failing human myocardium. For example, the beta adrenergics, the phosphodiesterase III inhibitors such as milrinone, or the sensibilizers of myocardial proteins to Ca++ such as levosimendan and omecamtiv mecarbil. However, following the opinion of distinguished cardiologists, in the case of heart failure associated to atrial fibrillation, digitalis cannot be substituted.

  8. A Bayesian Analysis of Scale-Invariant Processes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of Scale-Invariant Processes Jingfeng Wang, Rafael L. Bras, Veronica Nieves Georgia Tech Research Corporation Office of Sponsored Programs...processes Veronica Nieves , Jingfeng Wang, and Rafael L. Bras Citation: AIP Conf. Proc. 1443, 56 (2012); doi: 10.1063/1.3703620 View online: http...http://proceedings.aip.org/about/rights_permissions A Bayesian Analysis of Scale-Invariant Processes Veronica Nieves ∗, Jingfeng Wang† and Rafael L. Bras

  9. Mass Spectrometry to Identify New Biomarkers of Nerve Agent Exposure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    carbaryl by human serum albumin. Arch. Toxicol. 78, 629–634. (15) Sogorb, M. A., Diaz-Alejo, N., Escudero, M. A., and Vilanova, E. (1998...the carbamate carbaryl at in vivo toxicologically relevant concentrations. Arch. Toxicol. 81, 113–119. (18) Schopfer, L. M., Champion, M. M., Tamblyn...diethoxyphosphate adducts with an added mass of +136. The reaction of BChE with Aldicarb, carbofuran, Baygon, carbaryl , aldoxycarb, formetanate, methiocarb

  10. Inverse Kinematics for a Parallel Myoelectric Elbow

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    Inverse Kinematics for a Parallel Myoelectric Elbow A. Z. Escudero, Ja. Álvarez, L. Leija. Center of Research and Advanced Studies of the IPN...replacement above elbow are serial mechanisms driven by a DC motor and they include only one active articulation for the elbow [1]. Parallel mechanisms...are rather scarce [2]. The inverse kinematics model of a 3-degree of freedom parallel prosthetic elbow mechanism is reported. The mathematical

  11. Preliminary Geologic Map of the Big Pine Mountain Quadrangle, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vedder, J.G.; McLean, Hugh; Stanley, R.G.

    1995-01-01

    Reconnaissance geologic mapping of the San Rafael Primitive Area (now the San Rafael Wilderness) by Gower and others (1966) and Vedder an others (1967) showed s number of stratigraphic and structural ambiguities. To help resolve some of those problems, additional field work was done on parts of the Big Pine Moutain quadrangle during short intervals in 1981 and 1984, and 1990-1994.

  12. Metabolic Regulation of Caspase 2 in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    Kurokawa, Yongjun Wang, Seth S. Margolis, Rafael A. Fissore, and Sally Kornbluth Scheduled for publication in Developmental Cell in June, 2009...Manabu Kurokawa1, Yongjun Wang4, Seth S. Margolis1, Rafael A. Fissore3, and Sally Kornbluth1 1Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, Duke

  13. Exploring the Mechanisms of Pathogenesis in Prostate Cancer Involving TMPRSS2-ERG (Or ETV1) Gene Rearrangement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    Esther Baena, PhD; Zhe Li, PhD. Conclusion: We planned to use both a series of mouse models and biochemical approaches to study the mechanisms of...Apr 1, 2006). 9. S. A. Tomlins et al., Science 310, 644 (Oct 28, 2005). 10. J. Wang , Y. Cai, C. Ren, M. Ittmann, Cancer Res 66, 8347 (Sep 1, 2006...Cancer Res 68, 3584 (May 15, 2008). 23. S. Wang et al., Cancer Cell 4, 209 (Sep, 2003). 24. Y. Y. Kisanuki et al., Dev Biol 230, 230 (Feb 15, 2001

  14. Relevance of Riverine Capability for Today’s Portuguese Navy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    Indochina: Riverine and Coastal Forces, 19445-54 (New York, NY: Praeger Publishers, 1991), xi. 2 Luis Baena, Fuzileiros: Factos e FeUos na Guerra de Africa...Crespo, 537-550. 21 Cann, Brown Waters ofAfrica, 46. 22 Jose Alberto Lopes Carvalheira, "Acyao da Marinha em Aguas Interiores (1961-1971)" [Naval...na Guerra de Africa, 1961/1974, vol 2, 108; Jose Moura da Fonseca, "A Marinha no Leste e no Sueste de Angola," Anais do Clube Militar Naval (October

  15. Non-contiguous finished genome sequence of Aminomonas paucivorans type strain (GLU-3T)

    SciTech Connect

    Pitluck, Sam; Yasawong, Montri; Held, Brittany; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Copeland, A; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Chertkov, Olga; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Pukall, Rudiger; Spring, Stefan; Rohde, Manfred; Sikorski, Johannes; Goker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Aminomonas paucivorans Baena et al. 1999 is the type species of the genus Aminomonas, which belongs to the family Synergistaceae. The species is of interest because it is an asaccharolytic chemoorganotrophic bacterium which ferments quite a number of amino acids. This is the first completed genome sequence (with one gap in a rDNA region) of a member of the genus Aminomonas and the third sequence from the family Synergistaceae. The 2,630,120 bp long genome with its 2,433 protein-coding and 61 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  16. 78 FR 68444 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-14

    ... Logistics, Inc. (NVO), 1670 Alvardo Street, Suite 1, San Leandro, CA 94577, Officers: Lilibeth O. Arroyo, President (QI), Rafael H. Arroyo, Vice President, Application Type: New NVO License. Beagle Shipping...

  17. Global Maritime Awareness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    Dale.V.Ferriere@uscg.mil Outreach & Coordination Captain George.McCarthy@uscg.mil Information Technology Captain Rafael Nieves @uscg dhs mil . . . Science & Technology, Including Space Systems & NMATS Guy Thomas george.g.thomas@uscg.mil

  18. Disclosure of investigators' recruitment performance in multicenter clinical trials: a further step for research transparency.

    PubMed

    Dal-Ré, Rafael; Moher, David; Gluud, Christian; Treweek, Shaun; Demotes-Mainard, Jacques; Carné, Xavier

    2011-12-01

    Rafael Dal-Ré and colleagues argue that the recruitment targets and performance of all site investigators in multi-centre clinical trials should be disclosed in trial registration sites before a trial starts, and when it ends.

  19. Populism in Latin America

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-20

    October 17, 2003 - June 6, 2005) and Eduardo Rodríguez Veltzé (June 9, 2005 - January 22, 2006).14 The current President of Ecuador, Rafael Correa ...took him 2 years to rise from instructor to his current position as Ecuadorian President. Before Rafael Correa in Ecuador there were several...Adolfo Rodriguez Saa (December 23 -- 30, 2001), Eduardo Oscar Camaño (December 31, 2001 – January 2, 2002), Eduardo Alberto Duhalde (January 2, 2002 – May

  20. Colombian Army Transformation and the Inflection Point of the Terrorist Groups

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-30

    Processes (Elgin: New Dawn Press, 2005), 318. 11 Gallup Poll, September 2008, Bogota, Colombia. 12 Rafael Pardo Rueda, La Historia de las Guerras...Ibid. 16 Rafael Pardo Rueda, La Historia de las Guerras (The History of Wars) (Bogota: Ediciones B – Grupo Zeta, 2008), 542. 17 El Tiempo (Bogota...Direccion de Derechos Humanos. 28 Juan Carlos Torres, Operacion Jaque: La Verdadera Historia . ( Check Operation: The True History) (Bogota: Editorial

  1. Observation of Wave Energy Evolution in Coastal Areas Using HF Radar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    Observation of Wave Energy Evolution in Coastal Areas Using HF Radar RAFAEL J. RAMOS , HANS C. GRABER, AND BRIAN K. HAUS Applied Marine Physics...and variations resulting from wave–current interaction. Finally, conclusions are drawn in section 5. Corresponding author address: Rafael J. Ramos ...states) showed that Eq. (1) produced adequate estimates for low sea states but significantly overestimated the values in the range Hs . 2.97 m ( Ramos

  2. Complete genome sequence of Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413

    SciTech Connect

    Thiel, Teresa; Pratte, Brenda S.; Zhong, Jinshun; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Copeland, A; Lucas, Susan; Han, Cliff; Pitluck, Sam; Land, Miriam L; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Woyke, Tanja

    2013-01-01

    Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413 is a filamentous, heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium that has served as a model organism, with an extensive literature extending over 40 years. The strain has three distinct nitrogenases that function under different environmental conditions and is capable of photoautotrophic growth in the light and true heterotrophic growth in the dark using fructose as both carbon and energy source. While this strain was first isolated in 1964 in Mississippi and named Ana-baena flos-aquae MSU A-37, it clusters phylogenetically with cyanobacteria of the genus Nostoc. The strain is a moderate thermophile, growing well at approximately 40 C. Here we provide some additional characteristics of the strain, and an analysis of the complete genome sequence.

  3. Complete genome sequence of Aminobacterium colombiense type strain (ALA-1T)

    PubMed Central

    Chertkov, Olga; Sikorski, Johannes; Brambilla, Evelyne; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Detter, John C.; Bruce, David; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Spring, Stefan; Rohde, Manfred; Göker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Aminobacterium colombiense Baena et al. 1999 is the type species of the genus Aminobacterium. This genus is of large interest because of its isolated phylogenetic location in the family Synergistaceae, its strictly anaerobic lifestyle, and its ability to grow by fermentation of a limited range of amino acids but not carbohydrates. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the second completed genome sequence of a member of the family Synergistaceae and the first genome sequence of a member of the genus Aminobacterium. The 1,980,592 bp long genome with its 1,914 protein-coding and 56 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:21304712

  4. L1-Spanish speakers' acquisition of the English /i/-I/ contrast: duration-based perception is not the initial developmental stage.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Geoffrey Stewart

    2008-01-01

    L1-Spanish L2-English listeners' perception of a Canadian-English /bIt//bId/-/bit/-/bid/ continuum was investigated. Results were largely consistent with the developmental stages for L1-Spanish listeners' acquisition of English /i/ and /I/ hypothesized by Escudero (2000): Stage 0, inability to distinguish. Stage 1, duration based. Stage 2, duration and spectral based. Stage 3, L1-English-like primarily spectral based. However, on the basis of the results an additional stage was hypothesized: Stage 1/2, multidimensional-category-goodness-difference assimilation to Spanish /i/, with English vowel tokens perceived as good examples of Spanish /i/ labeled as English /I/ and poor examples labeled as English /i/. It is hypothesized that L1-Spanish listeners' preference for duration cues is not an initial strategy for distinguishing English /i/ and /I/. Rather, it is a secondary developmental stage which emerges from an earlier stage when both spectral and duration cues are used.

  5. Solving Guzman's Problem: "An Other" Narrative of "La Gran Familia Puertorriquena" in Judith Ortiz Cofer's "The Line of the Sun"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldron, John V.

    2009-01-01

    The first half of Judith Ortiz Cofer's novel "The Line of the Sun" (1989) narrates events that take place in the small fictional town of Salud, Puerto Rico, during the 1940s and 50s. In the second part of the novel, starting with chapter six, the readers see how two characters from the first half, Rafael and Ramona, and their young…

  6. 75 FR 58446 - Notice of Issuance of Amendment No. 1 for Special Nuclear Material License No. SNM-1227 [AREVA NP...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-24

    ... CONTACT: Rafael L. Rodriguez, Project Manager, Fuel Manufacturing Branch, Division of Fuel Cycle Safety... fabrication facility in Richland, Washington, that will use supercritical carbon dioxide to extract uranium..., Division of Fuel Cycle Safety and Safeguards, Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards....

  7. Voyvengo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noriega, Chon A.

    2012-01-01

    Born in 1933, Rafael Ferrer has encountered, engaged, and challenged art movements that define the twentieth century, including European surrealism, American post-minimalism, and Latino neo-expressionism. He has worked in sculpture, drawing, and painting, and also with assemblage, collage, actions, and installation. His prolific and wide-ranging…

  8. Chinese Soft Power in Latin America: A Case Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    generation of Latin American populist leaders, such as Hugo Chávez, Rafael Correa , and Evo Morales. During his first trip to Beijing after being...Costa Rican president Oscar Arias, for example, established regular diplomatic relations with the PRC as a necessary part of ensuring the relevance of

  9. Sub-Saharan Africa Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Joaquim Varela Rangel, Joao Manuel Martins, Joao Ernesto dos Santos, Jose Cesar Augusto Joao Ernesto Saraiva de Carvalho, Jose Teixeira de Matos...Moises Justine) Pedro de Castro van Dunem, Paulo Miguel Junior, Roberto Leal Ramos Monteiro Rui Guilherme Cardoso de Matos, Rafael Sapilinha

  10. Sciencepoetry and Language/Culture Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romano, James V.

    1988-01-01

    Examines Rafael Catala's notion of sciencepoetry and an application of modern scientific principles to the teaching of language and culture, the "Lange Process." This interactive language/culture learning process relates target and native languages, culture, and perceptions. (Author/LMO)

  11. Vegetation canopy cover effects on sediment erosion processes in the upper Colorado River Basin mancos shale formation, Price, Utah

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study provides new parameterizations for applying the Rangeland Hydrology and Erosion Model (RHEM) on the highly erosive, rangeland saline soils of the Mancos Shale formation in the Price-San Rafael River Basin in east central Utah. Calibrated hydrologic parameters (Kss and K') values are gener...

  12. Emergence and Influence of the Zapatista Social Netwar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-01

    Clases Populares y las Organizaciones no Gubernamentales,” in Mario B. Monroy (ed.), Pensar Chiapas, Repensar México: Reflexiones de las ONGs Mexicanas...Reygadas Robles Gil, Rafael, “Espacio Civil por la Paz,” in Mario B. Monroy (ed.), Pensar Chiapas, Repensar México: Reflexiones de las ONGs Mexicanas, Mexico

  13. Hispanic Migrations from the Caribbean and Latin America: Implications for Educational Policy, Planning and Practice; Conference Proceedings. ERIC/CUE Urban Diversity Series, Number 65, August 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Urban Education, New York, NY.

    This report includes papers by two educators concerning the education of Hispanics in the United States. Jose Hernandez addresses the issues of Hispanic demographic patterns and migration and the implications of these factors for educational planning and policy. Rafael Valdivieso focuses on the Federal role in Hispanic desegregation, discussing…

  14. Cross-Sectional Comparison of Sleep-Disordered Breathing in Native Peruvian Highlanders and Lowlanders.

    PubMed

    Pham, Luu V; Meinzen, Christopher; Arias, Rafael S; Schwartz, Noah G; Rattner, Adi; Miele, Catherine H; Smith, Philip L; Schneider, Hartmut; Miranda, J Jaime; Gilman, Robert H; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y; Checkley, William; Schwartz, Alan R

    2017-03-01

    Pham, Luu V., Christopher Meinzen, Rafael S. Arias, Noah G. Schwartz, Adi Rattner, Catherine H. Miele, Philip L. Smith, Hartmut Schneider, J. Jaime Miranda, Robert H. Gilman, Vsevolod Y. Polotsky, William Checkley, and Alan R. Schwartz. Cross-sectional comparison of sleep-disordered breathing in native Peruvian highlanders and lowlanders. High Alt Med Biol. 18:11-19, 2017.

  15. English Teachers' Journal (Israel), Number 30.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English Teachers' Journal (Israel), 1984

    1984-01-01

    This journal includes the following articles on teaching English as a second language: "Information for English Teachers"; "Approved Textbooks for the 1984-1985 School Year"; "Oral Bagrut Examinations--Revised Rating Scale" (Rafael Gefen); "Books for Grade Four" (Penny Ur); "Determining the Character of…

  16. Looking Inside Schools of Choice: Eight Portraits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clinchy, Evans

    1986-01-01

    Presents profiles of eight Massachusetts magnet schools: Nathan Hale (Boston); Burncoat Preparatory (Worcester); Rafael Hernandez (Boston); Mill Swan Communications Skill Center (Worcester); Sumner Avenue (Springfield); Arts (Lowell); Graham and Parks Alternative (Cambridge); and City (Lowell). Each profile includes information on school size and…

  17. The MacMagic Program and Its Effects on "English as a Second Language" Students. An Evaluation Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Mi J.

    This report presents a description and evaluation of the MacMagic Program, a computer-facilitated core program in language arts and social studies in its fourth year of operation at Davidson Middle School in San Rafael, California. The program consists of two sixth- and two seventh-grade classrooms that use computers and cooperative learning…

  18. California Freshwater Shrimp Project: An Eco-Action Project with Real Life Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Laurette H.

    The California Freshwater Shrimp Project is an example of a student-initiated, eco-action project. Students, from a fourth grade class in the Ross Valley School District in San Rafael, California, were linked to their community and environment through their work in rehabilitating habitat and educating the public. The paper gives an overview of a…

  19. Federacion de Universidades Privadas de America Central y Panama: Boletin Estadistico (Federation of Private Universities of Central America and Panama: Statistical Bulletin).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serrano, Jorge A.

    This statistical bulletin provides details on the universities belonging to the Federation of Private Universities of Central America and Panama (FUPAC): Central American University, Rafael Landivar University, Saint John's College, University of Santa Maria La Antigua, Jose Simeon Canas University, Doctor Mariano Galvez University, and the…

  20. Response: Heller's "In Praise of Amateurism--A Friendly Critique of Moje's "Call for Change" in Secondary Literacy"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moje, Elizabeth Birr

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the author's response to Rafael Heller's critique of her commentary on foregrounding the disciplines in secondary school literacy teaching and learning. Heller challenges the idea of approaching secondary literacy instruction from a disciplinary perspective by arguing that rather than teach young people the literate practices…

  1. Optimal Pulse Shapes for SHPB Tests on Soft Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    2132 MERRILL ENGINEERING BLDG SALT LAKE CITY UTAH 84112 1 MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIV L N WILLIAMS BOX 9632 MISSISSIPPI STATE MS...M TEGTMEYER C KENNEDY P GILLICH A BREUER L ROACH R SPINK A KULAGA N EBERIUS K RAFAELS RDRL WML H M FERMEN

  2. The Dependability of the General Factor of Intelligence: Why Small, Single-Factor Models Do Not Adequately Represent "g"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Major, Jason T.; Johnson, Wendy; Bouchard, Thomas J., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    Floyd, Shands, Rafael, Bergeron and McGrew (2009) used generalizability theory to test the reliability of general-factor loadings and to compare three different sources of error in them: the test battery size, the test battery composition, the factor-extraction technique, and their interactions. They found that their general-factor loadings were…

  3. A new Gonatocerus (Hymenoptera: Mymaridae) from Argentina, with taxonomic notes and molecular data on the G. tuberculifemur species complex

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new member of the ater species group of Gonatocerus Nees (Mymaridae) is described from the state of Mendoza in Argentina. Specimens of G. deleoni Triapitsyn, Logarzo & Virla sp. n. were first reared in San Rafael from sentinel eggs of the proconiine sharpshooter Tapajosa rubromarginata (Signoret) ...

  4. Proceedings of the 2010 AFMS Medical Research Symposium. Volume 2. Operational and Medical Track: Abstracts and Presentations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-15

    Bariatric Surgery for Morbid Obesity ........................................................... 78  Pilot Study of A Diabetes Prevention Program in A...Medical Research Symposium Volume 2 Operational & Medical 78 Budget Impact Analysis of Bariatric Surgery for Morbid Obesity University of...Washington Rafael Alfonso Obesity is reported to increase mortality, morbidity, and costs. Bariatric surgery remains the most effective treatment for

  5. Maintaining population persistence in the face of an extremely altered hydrograph: implications for three sensitive fishes in a tributary of the Green River, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bottcher, Jared L.

    2009-01-01

    The ability of an organism to disperse to suitable habitats, especially in modified and fragmented systems, determines individual fitness and overall population viability. The bluehead sucker (Catostomus discobolus), flannelmouth sucker (Catostomus latipinnis), and roundtail chub (Gila robusta) are three species native to the upper Colorado River Basin that now occupy only 50% of their historic range. Despite these distributional declines, populations of all three species are present in the San Rafael River, a highly regulated tributary of the Green River, Utah, providing an opportunity for research. Our goal was to determine the timing and extent of movement, habitat preferences, and limiting factors, ultimately to guide effective management and recovery of these three species. In 2007-2008, we sampled fish from 25 systematically selected, 300-m reaches in the lower 64 km of the San Rafael River, spaced to capture the range of species, life-stages, and habitat conditions present. We implanted all target species with a passive integrated transponder (PIT) tag, installed a passive PIT tag antennae, and measured key habitat parameters throughout each reach and at the site of native fish capture. We used random forest modeling to identify and rank the most important abiotic and biotic predictor variables, and reveal potential limiting factors in the San Rafael River. While flannelmouth sucker were relatively evenly distributed within our study area, highest densities of roundtail chub and bluehead sucker occurred in isolated, upstream reaches characterized by complex habitat. In addition, our movement and length-frequency data indicate downstream drift of age-0 roundtail chub, and active upstream movement of adult flannelmouth sucker, both from source populations, providing the lower San Rafael River with colonists. Our random forest analysis highlights the importance of pools, riffles, and distance-to-source populations, suggesting that bluehead sucker and roundtail

  6. Electrophysiological evidence for adult age-related sparing and decrements in emotion perception and attention

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Joshua W.; Khoja, Nadia; Kaut, Kevin P.; Lien, Mei-Ching; Allen, Philip A.

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined adult age differences in processing emotional faces using a psychological refractory period paradigm. We used both behavioral and event-related potential (P1 component) measures. Task 1 was tone discrimination (fuzzy vs. pure tones) and Task 2 was emotional facial discrimination (“happy” vs. “angry” faces). The stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) between the two tasks was 100, 300, and 900 ms. Earlier research observed larger age deficits in emotional facial discrimination for negative (angry) than for positive (happy) faces (Baena et al., 2010). Thus, we predicted that older adults would show decreased attentional efficiency in carrying out dual-task processing on the P1 (a component linked to amygdalar modulation of visual perception; Rotshtein et al., 2010). Both younger and older groups showed significantly higher P1 amplitudes at 100- and 300-ms SOAs than at the 900-ms SOA, and this suggests that both age groups could process Task 2 faces without central attention. Also, younger adults showed significantly higher P1 activations for angry than for happy faces, but older adults showed no difference. These results are consistent with the idea that younger adults exhibited amygdalar modulation of visual perception, but that older adults did not. PMID:22936901

  7. Security Culture in Times of War: How Did the Balkan War Affect the Security Cultures in Germany and United States?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    like to thank Professor Rafael Biermann and Professor Donald Abenheim for their ongoing support and guidance as thesis advisors and for sharing their...relevant to the increasingly shared security culture among actors in the transitional process. The basic insight is this: culture matters in world...security cultures and changed policy choices. The thesis focuses on two components of security cultures, the shared perception of the use of force and

  8. Targeting Discoidin Domain Receptors in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0226 TITLE: Targeting Discoidin Domain Receptors in Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Rafael Fridman...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0226 Targeting Discoidin Domain Receptors in Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15...DDRs in prostate cancer . During the first funding period, we conducted immunohistochemical studies by staining a 200 case Grade/Stage tissue

  9. Design and Measurements of a Hybrid RF-MEMS Reconfigurable Loop Antenna on a Flexible Substrate (PREPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    AFRL-RY-WP-TP-2010-1147 DESIGN AND MEASUREMENTS OF A HYBRID RF-MEMS RECONFIGURABLE LOOP ANTENNA ON A FLEXIBLE SUBSTRATE (PREPRINT) Nelson... Antenna on a Flexible Substrate Nelson Sepulveda(1), Dimitrios E. Anagnostou* (2), Rafael A. Rodriguez-Solis(1), and John L. Ebel(3) (1... antenna was designed, fabricated (on a flexible substrate) and measured. The design concepts and measurement results are presented and discussed

  10. On Bitstream Based Edge Detection Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    IEEE Transactions on, vol. 38, no. 1, pp. xviii– iv, Feb 1992. [5] Rafael C. Gonzalez and Richard E. Woods, Digital Image Processing, Addison-Wesley...Carmona-Poyato, R. Medina- Carnicer, and F. J. Madrid- Cuevas , “Automatic genera- tion of consensus ground truth for the comparison of edge detection techniques,” Image Vision Comput., vol. 26, no. 4, pp. 496–511, 2008.

  11. Hydrology Section Executive Committee minutes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercer, James W.

    The AGU Hydrology Section Executive Committee Meeting was called to order at approximately 4 P.M. on Monday, December 8, 1986 by Marshall Moss. In attendance were George Pinder, Allan Freeze, Jim Mercer, Ron Cummings, Ken Bencala, Jim Wallis, Simon Ince, Jack Stone, Jeff Dozier, Don Nielson, Ivan Johnson, John Wilson, Helen Peters, Jurate Landwehr, Karen Prestegaard, Soroosh Sorooshian, Jery Stedinger, Peter Kitanidis, Rafael Bras, and Waldo Smith.

  12. Crisis Inventory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-08-01

    involved Egypt and Israel on opposing sides, as well as other opposing pairs such as Syria and Israel . The advantage of organ- izing the cases in...West municipalities. An agreement to end the blockade was reached in May 1949. Crisis: Costa Rica- Nicaragua Dates: 12/3/48-1/30/49 Country Pair...Costa Rica- Nicaragua In the midst of domestic political turmoil in Costa Rica, Rafael Calderon - previously a Presidential candidate in Costa Rica

  13. The Dominican Republic-Central American Free Trade Agreement (DR-CAFTA): Understanding the Reasons Why the Dominican Republic (DR) Joined the CAFTA Negotiations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    Academy, 1998 Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF ARTS IN SECURITY STUDIES (WESTERN... Studies 22, no. 2 (May 1990): 350. 4 issues encountered were part of legacy systems that dated as far back as the Gen. Rafael Trujillo Era, which...7 Federal Research Division, Library of Congress, Country Studies : Dominican Republic, http://lcweb2.loc.gov/frd

  14. Handbook for Evaluating Ecological Effects of Pollution at DARCOM Installations. Volume 6. Unexpected Declines in Animal Populations,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    written material to Volume 6 are: Dr. David G. Fairchild, 115 Idylberry Rd., San Rafael, CA 94903 Dr. F. Prescott Ward, U.S. Army Chemical Systems...incident is un- known, the cause will be determined by local and/or independent investigators. 5. Cleanup: If carcasses or spilled material are present...concluded) 2-44 I i _ INDEX T - DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION This department is concerned with spills of oil or hazardous materials and the rescue of

  15. JPRS Report, West Europe

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Rafael Pastor secured the return of Captain Pecina, the Spanish merchant seaman who was arrested in Nigeria for smuggling; he was the...a factor in Peugeot’s sales in Nigeria and the United States; but since they are rela- tively marginal, they will "have very little effect on our...tions. Alain Chevalier, the CEO of the new Louis Vuitton/Moet Hennessy affiliation (champagne, cognac, Christian Dior perfumes, fine leather

  16. 76 FR 70805 - Bureau of Political-Military Affairs; Statutory Debarment Under the Arms Export Control Act and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-15

    ...; Case No. 1:08CR00655-002; May 1986. (7) Isaac Cervantes-Sanchez; February 24, 2011; U.S. District Court... District of Texas; Case No. 1:10CR00742-001; November 1980. (23) Sergio Rafael Lopez-Medina; March 15, 2011.... District Court, Southern District of Texas; Case No. 1:10CR00400-001; July 1990. (36) Juan...

  17. What Have We Learned from the War on Drugs? An Assessment of Mexico’s Counternarcotics Strategy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    Rafael Caro Quintero known as ―Bufallo Ranch.‖116 Camarena ―was kidnapped and murdered in Guadalajara in February 1985 and Bartlett Díaz, the man...MONITORING AGENCY REPORT NUMBER 11. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES The views expressed in this thesis are those of the author and do not reflect the official...Over the course of time, the U.S. and Mexican governments pursued the strategy dictated by Washington to relatively little effect. Now, in the

  18. Proceedings of the 2010 AFMS Medical Research Symposium. Volume 1. Plenary Sessions, Presentation and Poster Abstracts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-15

    Impact Analysis of Bariatric Surgery for Morbid Obesity University of Washington Rafael Alfonso Obesity is reported to increase mortality, morbidity...and costs. Bariatric surgery remains the most effective treatment for long-term weight loss. We developed a payer-based Budget Impact Model (BIM...to assess “Return On Investment (ROI)” for bariatric surgery in obesity compared to non-operative interventions. The purpose of this BIM is to

  19. Using the Maximum Entropy Principle as a Unifying Theory for Characterization and Sampling of Multi-scaling Processes in Hydrometeorology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-25

    a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. a...REPORT Using the Maximum Entropy Principle as a Unifying Theory for Characterization and Sampling of Multi-scaling Processes in Hydrometeorology 14... Theory for Characterization and Sampling of Multi-scaling Processes in Hydrometeorology Rafael L. Bras and Jingfeng Wang 25 February 2010 Activities and

  20. Uranium deposits at Shinarump Mesa and some adjacent areas in the Temple Mountain district, Emery County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wyant, Donald G.

    1953-01-01

    Deposits of uraniferous hydrocarbons are associated with carnotite in the Shinarump conglomerate of Triassic age at Shinarump Mesa and adjacent areas of the Temple Mountain district in the San Rafael Swell of Emery County, Utah. The irregular ore bodies of carnotite-bearing sandstone are genetically related to lenticular uraniferous ore bodies containing disseminated asphaltitic and humic hydrocarbon in permeable sandstones and were localized indirectly by sedimentary controls. Nearly non-uraniferous bitumen commonly permeates the sandstones in the Shinarump conglomerate and the underlying Moekopi formation in the area. The ore deposits at Temple Mountain have been altered locally by hydrothermal solutions, and in other deposits throughout the area carnotite has been transported by ground and surface water. Uraniferous asphaltite is thought to be the non-volatile residue of an original weakly uraniferous crude oil that migrated into the San Rafael anticline; the ore metals concentrated in the asphaltite as the oil was devolatilized and polymerized. Carnotite is thought to have formed from the asphaltite by ground water leaching. It is concluded that additional study of the genesis of the asphaltitic uranium ores in the San Rafael Swell, of the processes by which the hydrocarbons interact and are modified (such as heat, polymerization, and hydrogenation under the influence of alpha-ray bombardment), of petroleum source beds, and of volcanic intrusive rocks of Tertiary age are of fundamental importance in the continuing study of the uranium deposits on the Colorado Plateau.

  1. Comparison of heat balance characteristics at five glaciers in the Southern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Yukari; Naruse, Renji; Satow, Kazuhide; Ishikawa, Nobuyoshi

    1999-10-01

    Ablation characteristics of five glaciers in Patagonia and New Zealand were compared. Investigated glaciers were Tyndall and Moreno in southern Patagonia, Soler and San Rafael in northern Patagonia, and Franz Josef in New Zealand. Micro-meteorological observations were carried out at the glaciers and the heat balance components were estimated. At Franz Josef and Soler glaciers, the sensible heat flux is the largest and the latent heat flux is the second, and they are larger than the net radiation. At San Rafael Glacier, the net radiation is the largest and the latent heat flux is the smallest component, which is similar to Moreno and Tyndall glaciers. Though the latent heat flux is the smallest component at San Rafael Glacier, it is more than twice as large as that at Tyndall Glacier and contributes substantially to ice melting. The ratios of heat balance components were very different among glaciers, but the total heat flux ranged from about 240 to 300 W m -2 showing little difference among glaciers.

  2. More Limitations to Monolingualism: Bilinguals Outperform Monolinguals in Implicit Word Learning

    PubMed Central

    Escudero, Paola; Mulak, Karen E.; Fu, Charlene S. L.; Singh, Leher

    2016-01-01

    To succeed at cross-situational word learning, learners must infer word-object mappings by attending to the statistical co-occurrences of novel objects and labels across multiple encounters. While past studies have investigated this as a learning mechanism for infants and monolingual adults, bilinguals’ cross-situational word learning abilities have yet to be tested. Here, we compared monolinguals’ and bilinguals’ performance on a cross-situational word learning paradigm that featured phonologically distinct word pairs (e.g., BON-DEET) and phonologically similar word pairs that varied by a single consonant or vowel segment (e.g., BON-TON, DEET-DIT, respectively). Both groups learned the novel word-referent mappings, providing evidence that cross-situational word learning is a learning strategy also available to bilingual adults. Furthermore, bilinguals were overall more accurate than monolinguals. This supports that bilingualism fosters a wide range of cognitive advantages that may benefit implicit word learning. Additionally, response patterns to the different trial types revealed a relative difficulty for vowel minimal pairs than consonant minimal pairs, replicating the pattern found in monolinguals by Escudero et al. (2016) in a different English accent. Specifically, all participants failed to learn vowel contrasts differentiated by vowel height. We discuss evidence for this bilingual advantage as a language-specific or general advantage. PMID:27574513

  3. Spanish listeners' perceptual patterns for English /i/ and /I/

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Geoffrey Stewart

    2005-04-01

    Spanish has five monophthongs which differ only in spectral properties. General Canadian English has ten monophthongs which differ in steady-state spectral properties and duration, and many nominal monophthongs have substantial diphthongization. Unlike Spanish, Canadian English also uses duration as a cue to postvocalic obstruent voicing. The present study investigates L1-English and L1-Spanish L2-English listeners perception of a Canadian English /bIt, bit, bId, bid/ continuum varying in steady-state spectral values and duration. Several patterns emerge in the L1-Spanish listeners data, including a contrary pattern in which duration is used in the same direction as L1-English listeners but spectral properties in the opposite direction. With respect to /i/ and /I/ perception, these patterns are generally consistent with the stages of learning proposed by Escudero [Unpublished Masters Thesis, Edinburgh University, 2000]: L1-Spanish listeners cannot initially perceive the difference, next they use duration properties, later they begin to use spectral properties, and finally they have L1-English-like primary use of spectral properties and secondary use of duration. Production data adds additional insight into the relationship of the perceptual patterns to the stages of learning.

  4. Course for undergraduate students: analysis of the retinal image quality of a human eye model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Mar Pérez, Maria; Yebra, Ana; Fernández-Oliveras, Alicia; Ghinea, Razvan; Ionescu, Ana M.; Cardona, Juan C.

    2014-07-01

    In teaching of Vision Physics or Physiological Optics, the knowledge and analysis of the aberration that the human eye presents are of great interest, since this information allows a proper evaluation of the quality of the retinal image. The objective of the present work is that the students acquire the required competencies which will allow them to evaluate the optical quality of the human visual system for emmetropic and ammetropic eye, both with and without the optical compensation. For this purpose, an optical system corresponding to the Navarro-Escudero eye model, which allows calculating and evaluating the aberration of this eye model in different ammetropic conditions, was developed employing the OSLO LT software. The optical quality of the visual system will be assessed through determinations of the third and fifth order aberration coefficients, the impact diagram, wavefront analysis, calculation of the Point Spread Function and the Modulation Transfer Function for ammetropic individuals, with myopia or hyperopia, both with or without the optical compensation. This course is expected to be of great interest for student of Optics and Optometry Sciences, last courses of Physics or medical sciences related with human vision.

  5. Analysis of Motivational Profiles of Satisfaction and Importance of Physical Education in High School Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Granero-Gallegos, Antonio; Baena-Extremera, Antonio; Pérez-Quero, Francisco J.; Ortiz-Camacho, Maria M.; Bracho-Amador, Clara

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the motivational profiles of satisfaction with and importance of physical education in high school students and its relation with gender and the practice of sport. The sample comprised 2002 students aged from 12 to 19 who completed the Sport Motivation Scale (Núñez et al., 2006), the Sport Satisfaction Instrument (Baena-Extremera et al., 2012) and the Importance of Physical Education Scale (Moreno et al., 2009). Descriptive analyzes, correlations between the scales, a cluster analysis for profiles, and a MANOVA were conducted to examine differences by gender. Three clusters (profiles) were identified. The first profile identified was "moderate" motivation (n = 463) and was associated with boys who practice physical activity for less than 3 hours per week. The second profile identified was "low" motivation (n = 545) and was associated mainly with girls who practice physical activity for less than 3 hours per week. And lastly the third profile identified was "high" motivation (n = 910), which was found to be greater in boys who practiced physical exercise for more than 3 hours a week. Key points High school students’ motivation was mainly intrinsic, scoring very low on a motivation and high on satisfaction/fun; equally, these students were task-oriented. There appears to be a positive relationship between intrinsic motivation and task-orientation in high school students. The subject of PE is considered very highly by the students, and hence it obtains high values on satisfaction/fun and is positively associated with the importance given to PE. PMID:24150070

  6. Reconnaissance of uranium and copper deposits in parts of New Mexico, Colorado, Utah, Idaho, and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gott, Garland B.; Erickson, Ralph L.

    1952-01-01

    Because of the common association of uranium and copper in several of the commercial uranium deposits in the Colorado Plateau Province, a reconnaissance was made of several known deposits of copper disseminated through sandstone to determine whether they might be a source of uranium. In order to obtain more information regarding the relationship between copper, uranium and carbonaceous materials, some of the uraniferious asphaltrite deposits in the Shinarump conglomerate along the west flank of the San Rafael Swell were also investigated briefly. During this reconnaissance 18 deposits were examined in New Mexico, eight in Utah, two in Idaho, and one each in Wyoming and Colorado. No uranium deposits of commercial grade are associated with the copper deposits that were examined. The uraniferous asphaltites in the Shinarump conglomerate of Triassic age on the west flank of the San Rafael Swell, however, are promising from the standpoint of commercial uranium production. Spectrographic analyses of crude oil, asphalt, and bituminous shales show a rather consistent suite of trace metals including vanadium, nickel, copper, cobalt, chromium, lead zinc, and molybdenum. The similarity of the metal assemblage, including uranium of the San Rafael Swell asphaltites, to the metal assemblage in crude oil and other bituminous materials suggests that these metals were concentrated in the asphaltites from petroleum. However, the hypothesis that uranium minerals were already present before the hydrocarbons were introduced and that some sort of replacement or uranium minerals by carbon compounds was effected after the petroleum migrated into the uranium deposit should not be disregarded. The widespread association of uranium with asphaltic material suggests that it also may have been concentrated by some agency connected with the formation of petroleum. The problem of the association of uranium and other trace metals with hydrocarbons should be studied further both in the field and in

  7. Magnetotelluric survey to characterize the Sunnyside porphyry copper system in the Patagonia Mountains, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, Brian D.; Sampson, Jay A.

    2010-01-01

    The Sunnyside porphyry copper system is part of the concealed San Rafael Valley porphyry system located in the Patagonia Mountains of Arizona. The U.S. Geological Survey is conducting a series of multidisciplinary studies as part of the Assessment Techniques for Concealed Mineral Resources project. To help characterize the size and resistivity of the mineralized area beneath overburden, a regional east-west magnetotelluric sounding profile was acquired. This is a data release report of the magnetotelluric sounding data collected along the east-west profile; no interpretation of the data is included.

  8. Map showing thermal-alteration indicies in roadless areas and the Santa Lucia Wilderness in the Los Padres National Forest, Southwestern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frederiksen, N.O.

    1985-01-01

    South of the Santa Ynez fault, the TAI's of exposed rocks near the fault are mainly between 2+ and 3– (2+/3–) to 3 and are generally in the early stage of thermal maturity with respect to the possible generation of oil. North of the Santa Ynez fault, the exposed rocks have TAI's mostly of 2 to 2+ and are mainly immature or transitional from immature to mature. However, Jurassic(?) and Lower Cretaceous samples from the central San Rafael Mountains have distinctly higher TAI's, similar to those of rocks south of the Santa Ynez fault.

  9. KSC-05PD-0102

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. In the Remote Manipulator Lab inside the Vehicle Assembly Building, STS-114 Mission Specialist Charles Camarda gets a close look at the 50-foot-long Orbiter Boom Sensor System (OBSS) that will fly on Shuttle Discovery on Return to Flight mission STS-114. Seated is Rafael Rodriguez, an advanced systems technician with United Space Alliance. The OBSS attaches to the end of the Shuttles robotic arm. The system is one of the new safety measures for Return to Flight, equipping the orbiter with cameras and laser systems to inspect the Shuttles Thermal Protection System while in space. The mission launch window is May 12 to June 3, 2005.

  10. Extrasolar Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeg, Hans; Belmonte, Juan Antonio; Aparicio, Antonio

    2012-03-01

    Participants; Preface; Acknowledgements; 1. Extrasolar planet detection methods Laurance R. Doyle; 2. Statistical properties of exoplanets Stéphane Udry; 3. Characterizing extrasolar planets Timothy M. Brown; 4. From clouds to planet systems: formation and evolution of stars and planets Günther Wuchterl; 5. Abundances in stars with extrasolar planetary systems Garik Israelian; 6. Brown dwarfs: the bridge between stars and planets Rafael Rebolo; 7. The perspective: a panorama of the Solar System Agustín Sánchez-Lavega; 8. Habitable planets around the Sun and other stars James F. Kasting; 9. Biomarkers of extrasolar planets and their observability Franck Selsis, Jimmy Paillet and France Allard; Index.

  11. Extrasolar Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeg, Hans; Belmonte, Juan Antonio; Aparicio, Antonio

    2007-10-01

    Participants; Preface; Acknowledgements; 1. Extrasolar planet detection methods Laurance R. Doyle; 2. Statistical properties of exoplanets Stéphane Udry; 3. Characterizing extrasolar planets Timothy M. Brown; 4. From clouds to planet systems: formation and evolution of stars and planets Günther Wuchterl; 5. Abundances in stars with extrasolar planetary systems Garik Israelian; 6. Brown dwarfs: the bridge between stars and planets Rafael Rebolo; 7. The perspective: a panorama of the Solar System Agustín Sánchez-Lavega; 8. Habitable planets around the Sun and other stars James F. Kasting; 9. Biomarkers of extrasolar planets and their observability Franck Selsis, Jimmy Paillet and France Allard; Index.

  12. A Select Bibliography of the United States Navy and the Southeast Asian Conflict 1950 - 1975

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    Rafael, CA: Presidio Press,-1978. Tillman, Barrett. MiG Master: The Stoary of the F-8 Crusader. Annapolis: The Nautical and Avat -n-_Publishing GCo. of...COIN Operations; Inter- view with Captain Charles E. Tucker, USN." Data (Dec 1966): 43ff. "Who’s Managing the Navy’s Limited War Effort? Inter- view with...1969. "Navy Commandos of the Wetlands." Cruiser-Destroyerman. Vol. 12 (Sep 1967): 14ff. Smith, Murray. "SPECOPS:SEALS; interview with Captain Phil H

  13. Audio-magnetotelluric survey to characterize the Sunnyside porphyry copper system in the Patagonia Mountains, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sampson, Jay A.; Rodriguez, Brian D.

    2010-01-01

    The Sunnyside porphyry copper system is part of the concealed San Rafael Valley porphyry system located in the Patagonia Mountains of Arizona. The U.S. Geological Survey is conducting a series of multidisciplinary studies as part of the Assessment Techniques for Concealed Mineral Resources project. To help characterize the size, resistivity, and skin depth of the polarizable mineral deposit concealed beneath thick overburden, a regional east-west audio-magnetotelluric sounding profile was acquired. The purpose of this report is to release the audio-magnetotelluric sounding data collected along that east-west profile. No interpretation of the data is included.

  14. Constant-Round Concurrent Zero Knowledge From Falsifiable Assumptions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    black-box zero knowledge. J. Comput. Syst. Sci., 72(2):321–391, 2006. [Bon03] Dan Boneh , editor. Advances in Cryptology - CRYPTO 2003, 23rd Annual...certificates that are not certified by a higher-level certificate; we refer to these as “ dan - gling” certificates. See Figure 2 for an illustration of the tree...Nao03] Moni Naor. On cryptographic assumptions and challenges. In Boneh [Bon03], pages 96–109. [Pas03a] Rafael Pass. On deniability in the common

  15. Proceeding of the 1999 Particle Accelerator Conference. Volume 4

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Radiation Center, Stoughton, WI, L. Greenler, P. Robl , D. Wahl, Physical Sciences Laboratory, Stoughton, WI Abstract storage ring in 1974 [1]. SURF II...illREFERENCES .2 •[1] R.H.A. Farias , L.C. Jahnel, Liu Lin, D. Macedo, F.S. -6 Rafael, A.R.D. Rodrigues and P.F. Tavares, Orbit .8’ Measurement and...Param=ters. [1] The PBOLab software is available from AccelSoft Inc., San Diego , California, U.S.A., www.ghga.comlaccelsoft. CP LabtMaa. Execote PRO

  16. Foreword--as per verse: the queer in the clinic in the poem.

    PubMed

    Dowling, Sarah

    2013-06-01

    This essay introduces a series of poems by six authors: Rafael Campo, Susan Holbrook, Katie Price, Trish Salah, Qwo-Li Driskill, and Brian Teare. I argue that the poems demonstrate that a queer bioethics, whether literary or medical, must dispense with commonplace assumptions about the ways in which selves, especially queer selves, are represented in language. Instead, poetry's sound-sense and avoidance of language-as-usual can serve as an analogy for modes of approach, analysis, and even recognition that do not receive official sanction; the non-linear modes of reading required by contemporary poetry can serve as methodological models for a queer bioethics.

  17. [Three personages in one old book].

    PubMed

    Lozano-Alcázar, Jaime

    2007-01-01

    It is always of interest, especially for medical practitioners, to learn about the lives of prominent scientists and their contributions to medicine. Briefly, we present here the highlights of three of those persons: Hermann von Helmholtz, one of the greatest minds in physics, physiology, optics, neurology, and developer of the ophthalmoscope, etc., along with two Mexican physicians, Manuel Carmona y Valle, prominent 19th century physician who was named "father" of ophthalmology in Mexico and Rafael Silva y Zayas, one of the brightest ophthalmologists of the first half of the 20th century in our country, eventually brought together, in communion, in one old book.

  18. On the history of medicine in the United States, theory, health insurance, and psychiatry: an interview with Charles Rosenberg.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Charles; Mantovani, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    An interview with Charles Rosenberg conducted by Rafael Mantovani in November 2013 that addressed four topics. It first focused on the way in which Rosenberg perceived trends and directions in historical research on medicine in the United States during the second half of the twentieth century. The second focus was on his experience with other important historians who wrote about public health. Thirdly, he discussed his impressions about the current debate on health policy in his country. Finally, the last part explores some themes related to psychiatry and behavior control that have appeared in a number of his articles.

  19. Hydrology Section Executive Committee Minutes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, A. Ivan

    The Hydrology Section Executive Committee (EC) convened at 8:20 A.M. on May 28, 1985, in Room 311 of the Convention Center in Baltimore, Md. The meeting was chaired by Hydrology Section President R. Allan Freeze. Section President-Elect Marshall Moss kept the minutes in the absence of the Section Secretary Thomas Maddock III. Also in attendance were William Back, Rafael Bras, Stephen Burges, Jerry Cohon, Ron Cummings, David Dawdy, Jacques Delleur, Leonard Konikow, Jurate Landwehr, Fred Molz, Don Nielsen, Joyce Peters, Karen Prestegaard, Tom Schmugge, Waldo Smith, Jery Stedinger, and Eric Wood.

  20. Impact of Duality Violations on Spectral Sum Rule analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catà, Oscar

    2007-02-01

    Recent sum rule analyses on the two-point correlator have led to significant discrepancies in the values found for the OPE condensates, most dramatically in the dimension eight condensate and to a lesser extent in the dimension six one [R. Barate et al., ALEPH Collaboration, Eur. Phys. J. C 4 (1998) 409; K. Ackerstaff et al., OPAL Collaboration, Eur. Phys. J. C 7 (1999) 571, arXiv:hep-ex/9808019; S. Peris, B. Phily and E. de Rafael, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86 (2001) 14, arXiv:hep-ph/0007338; S. Friot, D. Greynat and E. de Rafael, JHEP 0410 (2004) 043, arXiv:hep-ph/0408281; M. Davier, L. Girlanda, A. Hocker and J. Stern, Phys. Rev. D 58 (1998) 096014, arXiv:hep-ph/9802447; B.L. Ioffe and K.N. Zyablyuk, Nucl. Phys. A 687 (2001) 437, arXiv:hep-ph/0010089. K.N. Zyablyuk, Eur. Phys. J. C 38 (2004) 215, arXiv:hep-ph/0404230; J. Bijnens, E. Gamiz and J. Prades, JHEP 0110 (2001) 009, arXiv:hep-ph/0108240; C.A. Dominguez and K. Schilcher, Phys. Lett. B 581 (2004) 193, arXiv:hep-ph/0309285; J. Rojo and J. I. Latorre, JHEP 0401 (2004) 055, arXiv:hep-ph/0401047; V. Cirigliano, E. Golowich and K. Maltman, Phys. Rev. D 68 (2003) 054013, arXiv:hep-ph/0305118; S. Ciulli, C. Sebu, K. Schilcher and H. Spiesberger, Phys. Lett. B 595 (2004) 359, arXiv:hep-ph/0312212. S. Narison, arXiv:hep-ph/0412152]. Precise knowledge of these condensates is of relevance in kaon decays [M. Knecht, S. Peris and E. de Rafael, Phys. Lett. B 457 (1999) 227, arXiv:hep-ph/9812471; J.F. Donoghue and E. Golowich, Phys. Lett. B 478 (2000) 172, arXiv:hep-ph/9911309; M. Knecht, S. Peris and E. de Rafael, Phys. Lett. B 508 (2001) 117, arXiv:hep-ph/0102017] and therefore it seems mandatory to assess the actual impact of what is commonly neglected in spectral sum rules, most prominently the issue of duality violations. We will explicitly compute them in a toy model and show that they are a priori non-negligible.

  1. [The practice of medicine in 1910].

    PubMed

    Viesca-Treviño, Carlo

    2010-01-01

    The aim is to describe the environmental and the practice of the medicine around the 1910, year of the Mexican Revolution. Prominent physicians and theirs contributions are describe. All of them from the Mexican clinical school development by Manuel Carpio and Miguel Jiménez. It is stand out the progress of the Mexican medicine with the incorporation of the European advances into the daily practice. It is also describe the development and contemporary practice of surgery of the Mexican surgery school forced by surgeons like Miguel Muñoz, Francisco Montes de Oca and Rafael Lavista.

  2. Eye Movements and Abducens Motoneuron Behavior During Cholinergically Induced REM Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Marquez-Ruiz, Javier; Escudero, Miguel

    2009-01-01

    Study objectives: The injection of cholinergic drugs in the pons has been largely used to induce REM sleep as a useful model to study different processes during this period. In the present study, microinjections of carbachol in the nucleus reticularis pontis oralis (NRPO) were performed to test the hypothesis that eye movements and the behavior of extraocular motoneurons during induced REM sleep do not differ from those during spontaneous REM sleep. Methods: Six female adult cats were prepared for chronic recording of eye movements (by means of the search-coil technique) and electroencephalography, electromyography, ponto-geniculo-occipital (PGO) waves at the lateral geniculate nucleus, and identified abducens motoneuron activities after microinjections of the cholinergic agonist carbachol into the NRPO. Results: Unilateral microinjections (n = 13) of carbachol in the NRPO induced REM sleep-like periods in which the eyes performed a convergence and downward rotation interrupted by phasic complex rapid eye movements associated to PGO waves. During induced-REM sleep abducens motoneurons lost their tonic activity and eye position codification, but continued codifying eye velocity during the burst of eye movements. Conclusion: The present results show that eye movements and the underlying behavior of abducens motoneurons are very similar to those present during natural REM sleep. Thus, microinjection of carbachol seems to activate the structures responsible for the exclusive oculomotor behavior observed during REM sleep, validating this pharmacological model and enabling a more efficient exploration of phasic and tonic phenomena underlying eye movements during REM sleep. Citation: Marquez-Ruiz J; Escudero M. Eye movements and abducens motoneuron behavior during cholinergically induced REM sleep. SLEEP 2009;32(4):471–481. PMID:19413141

  3. Eye Movements and Abducens Motoneuron Behavior after Cholinergic Activation of the Nucleus Reticularis Pontis Caudalis

    PubMed Central

    Márquez-Ruiz, Javier; Escudero, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: The aim of this work was to characterize eye movements and abducens (ABD) motoneuron behavior after cholinergic activation of the nucleus reticularis pontis caudalis (NRPC). Methods: Six female adult cats were prepared for chronic recording of eye movements (using the scleral search-coil technique), electroencephalography, electromyography, ponto-geniculo-occipital (PGO) waves in the lateral geniculate nucleus, and ABD motoneuron activities after microinjections of the cholinergic agonist carbachol into the NRPC. Results: Unilateral microinjections of carbachol in the NRPC induced tonic and phasic phenomena in the oculomotor system. Tonic effects consisted of ipsiversive rotation to the injected side, convergence, and downward rotation of the eyes. Phasic effects consisted of bursts of rhythmic rapid eye movements directed contralaterally to the injected side along with PGO-like waves in the lateral geniculate and ABD nuclei. Although tonic effects were dependent on the level of drowsiness, phasic effects were always present and appeared along with normal saccades when the animal was vigilant. ABD motoneurons showed phasic activities associated with ABD PGO-like waves during bursts of rapid eye movements, and tonic and phasic activities related to eye position and velocity during alertness. Conclusion The cholinergic activation of the NRPC induces oculomotor phenomena that are somewhat similar to those described during REM sleep. A precise comparison of the dynamics and timing of the eye movements further suggests that a temporal organization of both NRPCs is needed to reproduce the complexity of the oculomotor behavior during REM sleep. Citation: Márquez-Ruiz J; Escudero M. Eye movements and abducens motoneuron behavior after cholinergic activation of the nucleus reticularis pontis caudalis. SLEEP 2010;33(11):1517-1527. PMID:21102994

  4. The Jurassic section along McElmo Canyon in southwestern Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Sullivan, Robert B.

    1997-01-01

    In McElmo Canyon, Jurassic rocks are 1500-1600 ft thick. Lower Jurassic rocks of the Glen Canyon Group include (in ascending order) Wingate Sandstone, Kayenta Formation and Navajo Sandstone. Middle Jurassic rocks are represented by the San Rafael Group, which includes the Entrada Sandstone and overlying Wanakah Formation. Upper Jurassic rocks comprise the Junction Creek Sandstone overlain by the Morrison Formation. The Burro Canyon Formation, generally considered to be Lower Cretaceous, may be Late Jurassic in the McElmo Canyon area and is discussed with the Jurassic. The Upper Triassic Chinle Formation in the subsurface underlies, and the Upper Cretaceous Dakota Sandstone overlies, the Jurassic section. An unconformity is present at the base of the Glen Canyon Group (J-0), at the base of the San Rafael Group (J-2), and at the base of the Junction Creek Sandstone (J-5). Another unconformity of Cretaceous age is at the base of the Dakota Sandstone. Most of the Jurassic rocks consist of fluviatile, lacustrine and eolian deposits. The basal part of the Entrada Sandstone and the Wanakah Formation may be of marginal marine origin.

  5. A proof of the cancellation of the redistribution tidal potential effects on the rotation of an elastic Earth model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baenas, Tomás; Escapa, Alberto; Ferrándiz, Jose Manuel

    2014-05-01

    2010-22039-C02-02, and Universidad de Alicante project GRE11-08. Escapa, A., Getino, J., & Ferrándiz, J. M. 2004, Proc. Journées Sys. Ref., Ed. N. Capitaine, Paris, 70 Ferrándiz, J. M., Baenas, T., & Escapa, A. 2012, Geophys. Res. Abs., 14, EGU2012-6175 Krasinsky, G. A. 1999, Celest. Mech. Dyn. Astron., 75, 39 Lambert, S. & Mathews, P. M. 2006, A&A, 453, 363

  6. The Choiyoi Group from central Argentina: a subalkaline transitional to alkaline association in the craton adjacent to the active margin of the Gondwana continent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llambías, Eduardo J.; Quenardelle, Sonia; Montenegro, Teresita

    2003-08-01

    Permian and Lower Triassic igneous rocks from La Pampa province, central Argentina, are part of the Choiyoi Group, whose extension in Argentina exceeds 500,000 km 2. In La Pampa, the distribution of these outcrops occurs along a NW-SE belt that cuts obliquely across the N-S structures of the Lower Paleozoic rocks. The basement of the Choiyoi Group in western La Pampa consists of Mesoproterozoic to Lower Paleozoic rocks that form part of the exotic Cuyania terrane. In central La Pampa, the basement consists of Lower Paleozoic igneous and metamorphic rocks affected by the Lower Paleozoic Famatinian orogeny. The Choiyoi Group from La Pampa shares features with the Choiyoi Group elsewhere, such as an abundance of mesosilicic to silicic ignimbrites, subvolcanic domes, and granite plutons emplaced at sallow levels. In La Pampa, we recognize two suites: shoshonitic and trachydacitic to rhyolitic. The shoshonite suite is overlain by trachydacites and rhyolites. The plutonic rocks that belong to the cupola of the intrusive bodies are monzogranitic. The most significant difference between the Choiyoi Group from La Pampa and that from the Cordillera Frontal and the San Rafael block is that the San Rafael orogenic phase (Lower Permian) is not obvious in La Pampa. Therefore, we cannot attribute to the Choiyoi Group a postorogenic character, as in the Cordillera Frontal or the San Rafael Block. This difference in the tectonic setting is reflected in the composition of the igneous rocks of La Pampa, in that they generally have a higher alkali content with respect to silica, a weak enrichment in TiO 2, and a depletion in CaO. Both suites are transitional from subalkaline to alkaline series. The shoshonitic suite is rich in clinopyroxene and apatite. Whole-rock compositions have high content of P 2O 5 (0.5-3.9%) and Sr (1320-1890 ppm). Zr is weakly enriched (273-502 ppm), and Nb (29-37 ppm) is depleted. The Th (16-45 ppm) and U (3-14 ppm) content is high. We postulate a crustal

  7. Measurement of Critical Adsorption of Nitrogen near Its Liquid-vapor Critical Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Moses

    2003-01-01

    The density profile of a critical fluid near a solid surface is expected to show an universal shape. This is known as critical adsorption. The measurement of this effect, especially close to the critical point, is often obscured by gravity. We were able to separate the gravitational effect from critical adsorption by using two capacitors, one with a large gap and one with a small gap of approximately 2 m. Within the uncertainty in the measurement, our data, which ranges between 10(exp -3) to 2 x 10(exp -6) in reduced temperatures, is consistent with the predicted power law dependence. This work is carried out in collaboration with Rafael Garcia, Sarah Scheidemantel and Klaus Knorr. It is funded by NASA's office of Biological and Physical Researchunder.

  8. KSC-05PD-0105

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. In the Remote Manipulator Lab inside the Vehicle Assembly Building, STS-114 Mission Specialists Soichi Noguchi (left) and Andrew Thomas (far right) get a close look at about the 50-foot-long Orbiter Boom Sensor System (OBSS) that will fly on Shuttle Discovery on Return to Flight mission STS- 114. Between them is Rafael Rodriguez, an advanced systems technician with United Space Alliance. The OBSS attaches to the end of the Shuttles robotic arm. The system is one of the new safety measures for Return to Flight, equipping the orbiter with cameras and laser systems to inspect the Shuttles Thermal Protection System while in space. The mission launch window is May 12 to June 3, 2005.

  9. KSC-05PD-0108

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. In the Remote Manipulator Lab inside the Vehicle Assembly Building, STS-114 Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas talks with Rafael Rodriguez, an advance systems technician with United Space Alliance, about the 50-foot-long Orbiter Boom Sensor System (OBSS) in front of them. The OBSS will fly on Shuttle Discovery on Return to Flight mission STS-114. The OBSS attaches to the end of the Shuttles robotic arm. The system is one of the new safety measures for Return to Flight, equipping the orbiter with cameras and laser systems to inspect the Shuttles Thermal Protection System while in space. The mission launch window is May 12 to June 3, 2005.

  10. The "Martian" flora: new collections of vascular plants, lichens, fungi, algae, and cyanobacteria from the Mars Desert Research Station, Utah

    PubMed Central

    Freebury, Colin E.; Hamilton, Paul B.; Saarela, Jeffery M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The Mars Desert Research Station is a Mars analog research site located in the desert outside of Hanksville, Utah, U.S.A. Here we present a preliminary checklist of the vascular plant and lichen flora for the station, based on collections made primarily during a two-week simulated Mars mission in November, 2014. Additionally, we present notes on the endolithic chlorophytes and cyanobacteria, and the identification of a fungal genus also based on these collections. Altogether, we recorded 38 vascular plant species from 14 families, 13 lichen species from seven families, six algae taxa including both chlorophytes and cyanobacteria, and one fungal genus from the station and surrounding area. We discuss this floristic diversity in the context of the ecology of the nearby San Rafael Swell and the desert areas of Wayne and Emery counties in southeastern Utah. PMID:27350765

  11. Quartz Microbalance Study of 400-angstrom Thick Films near the lambda Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Moses H. W.

    2003-01-01

    In a recent measurement we observed the thinning of an adsorbed helium film induced by the confinement of critical fluctuations a few millikelvin below the lambda point. A capacitor set-up was used to measure this Casimir effect. In this poster we will present our measurement of an adsorbed helium film of 400 angstroms near the lambda point with a quartz microbalance. For films this thick, we must take into account the non-linear dynamics of the shear waves in the fluid. In spite of the added complications, we were able to confirm the thinning of the film due to the Casimir effect and the onset of the superfluid transition. In addition, we observe a sharp anomaly at the bulk lambda point, most likely related to critical dissipation of the first sound. This work is carried out in collaboration with Rafael Garcia, Stephen Jordon and John Lazzaretti. This work is funded by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research under grant.

  12. High-resolution geophysical data from the sea floor surrounding the Western Elizabeth Islands, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pendleton, Elizabeth A.; Twichell, David C.; Foster, David S.; Worley, Charles R.; Irwin, Barry J.; Danforth, William W.

    2011-01-01

    Geophysical and geospatial data were collected in the nearshore area surrounding the western Elizabeth Islands, Massachusetts on the U.S. Geological Survey research vessel Rafael during September 2010 in a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Massachusetts, Office of Coastal Zone Management. This report describes the results of the short-term goals of this collaborative effort, which were to map the geology of the inner shelf zone of the western Elizabeth Islands and study the geologic processes that have contributed to its evolution. Data collected during the survey include: Bathymetric and sidescan-sonar data, chirp seismic-reflection data , sound velocity profiles, and navigation data. The long-term goals of this project are to provide high-resolution geophysical data that will support research on the influence of sea-level change and sediment supply on coastal evolution and inventory subtidal marine habitat type and distribution within the coastal zone of Massachusetts.

  13. High-resolution swath interferometric data collected within Muskeget Channel, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pendleton, Elizabeth A.; Denny, Jane F.; Danforth, William W.; Baldwin, Wayne E.; Irwin, Barry J.

    2014-01-01

    Swath interferometric bathymetery data were collected within and around Muskeget Channel and along select nearshore areas south and east of Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts. Data were collected aboard the U.S. Geological Survey research vessel Rafael in October and November 2010 in a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. This report describes the data-collection methods and -processing steps and releases the data in geospatial format. These data were collected to support an assessment of the effect on sediment transport that a tidal instream energy conversion facility would have within Muskeget Channel. Baseline bathymetry data were obtained for the Muskeget Channel area, and surveys in select areas were repeated after one month to monitor sediment transport and bedform migration.

  14. Achievements and challenges in structural bioinformatics and computational biophysics

    PubMed Central

    Samish, Ilan; Bourne, Philip E.; Najmanovich, Rafael J.

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: The field of structural bioinformatics and computational biophysics has undergone a revolution in the last 10 years. Developments that are captured annually through the 3DSIG meeting, upon which this article reflects. Results: An increase in the accessible data, computational resources and methodology has resulted in an increase in the size and resolution of studied systems and the complexity of the questions amenable to research. Concomitantly, the parameterization and efficiency of the methods have markedly improved along with their cross-validation with other computational and experimental results. Conclusion: The field exhibits an ever-increasing integration with biochemistry, biophysics and other disciplines. In this article, we discuss recent achievements along with current challenges within the field. Contact: Rafael.Najmanovich@USherbrooke.ca PMID:25488929

  15. Distribution of the Sonora Tiger Salamander (Ambystoma mavortium stebbinsi) in Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hossack, Blake R.; Muths, Erin L.; Rorabaugh, James C.; Lemos Espinal, Julio A.; Sigafus, Brent H.; Chambert, Thierry A; Carreon Arroyo, Gerardo; Hurtado Felix, David; Toyos Martinez, Daniel; Jones, Thomas R

    2016-01-01

    The Sonoran Tiger Salamander (Ambystoma mavortium stebbinsi Lowe, 1954) was listed as federally endangered in the USA in 1997 (USFWS 1997). In the USA, the distribution of A. mavortium stebbinsi is limited to the San Rafael Valley (approximately 567 km2), between the Sierra San Antonio (called the Patagonia Mountains in Arizona) and Huachuca Mountains, and south of the Canelo Hills, Arizona (Fig. 1). The USA listing was triggered by loss of natural wetland habitats, threats from invasive predators, frequent die-offs from disease, introgression with the introduced Barred Tiger Salamander (A. mavortium mavortium), and small range and number of breeding sites that increases susceptibility to stochastic events (USFWS 1997). Small population sizes and limited gene flow have caused inbreeding, which may further reduce population viability and the potential for recovery (Jones et al. 1988; Storfer et al. 2014). 

  16. The "Martian" flora: new collections of vascular plants, lichens, fungi, algae, and cyanobacteria from the Mars Desert Research Station, Utah.

    PubMed

    Sokoloff, Paul C; Freebury, Colin E; Hamilton, Paul B; Saarela, Jeffery M

    2016-01-01

    The Mars Desert Research Station is a Mars analog research site located in the desert outside of Hanksville, Utah, U.S.A. Here we present a preliminary checklist of the vascular plant and lichen flora for the station, based on collections made primarily during a two-week simulated Mars mission in November, 2014. Additionally, we present notes on the endolithic chlorophytes and cyanobacteria, and the identification of a fungal genus also based on these collections. Altogether, we recorded 38 vascular plant species from 14 families, 13 lichen species from seven families, six algae taxa including both chlorophytes and cyanobacteria, and one fungal genus from the station and surrounding area. We discuss this floristic diversity in the context of the ecology of the nearby San Rafael Swell and the desert areas of Wayne and Emery counties in southeastern Utah.

  17. AIDS and its treatments: two doctors' narratives of healing, desire, and belonging.

    PubMed

    Diedrich, Lisa

    2005-01-01

    In this essay, I analyze two memoirs--Rafael Campo's The Poetry of Healing: A Doctor's Education in Empathy, Identity, and Desire and Abraham Verghese's My Own Country: A Doctor's Story of a Town and Its People in the Age of AIDS--which describe the effects of treating HIV/AIDS on each doctor's identity, on his desire for community and belonging, and on his identification and/or disidentification with the medical profession in the United States. My readings of Campo and Verghese revolve around three key terms provided by Campo's subtitle: identity, empathy, and desire. I shift the order of these terms in Campo's subtitle because I want to read identity, empathy, and desire in Campo and Verghese through and along with the theoretical "pragmatics" of Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari.

  18. Deep bore hole instrumentation along San Francisco Bay Bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Bakun, W.; Bowman, J.; Clymer, R.; Foxall, W.; Hipley, P.; Hollfelder, J.; Hutchings, L.; Jarpe, S.; Kasameyer, P.; McEvilly, T.; Mualchin, L.; Palmer, M.

    1998-10-01

    The Bay Bridges down hole network consists of sensors in bore holes that are drilled 100 ft. into bedrock around and in the San Francisco Bay. Between 2 and 8 instruments have been spaced along the Dumbarton, San Mateo, Bay, and San Rafael bridges. The instruments will provide multiple use data that is important to geotechnical, structural engineering, and seismological studies. The holes are between 100 and 1000 ft deep and were drilled by Caltrans. There are twenty- one sensor packages at fifteen sites. Extensive financial support is being contributed by Caltrans, UCB, LBL, LLNL-LDRD, U.C. Campus/Laboratory Collaboration (CLC) program, and USGS. The down hole instrument package contains a three component HS-1 seismometer and three orthogonal Wilcox 73 1 accelerometers, and is capable of recording a micro g from local M = 1.0 earthquakes to 0.5 g strong ground motion form large Bay Area earthquakes.

  19. "The physician as poet" review of: Pereira, Peter Saying the World

    PubMed Central

    Weishaus, Joel

    2006-01-01

    Peter Pereira is a family physician and a poet. I weave excerpts from Dr. Pereira's poems into a brief history of medicine's mythological and historical roots, beginning with the Egyptian god Thoth, and the Greek physician Hippocrates. Along the way, I touch on the European Middle Ages and the Islamic World. Finally, I quote poet-critic T.S. Eliot, who was an early influence on Dr. Pereira's decision to become a poet, and contemporary physician-poets Rafael Campo and William Carlos Williams. I end by placing Dr. Pereira, whose practice is oriented toward immigrant families, in his indigenous Pacific Northwest, arguing that being both physician and poet helps Pereira to live in a world that is both intimately human and naturally impersonal.

  20. [Ecoepidemiology of Ascaris lumbricoides in an endemic area and its relation with blood groups].

    PubMed

    Morales, G A; Pino, L A; Chourio-Lozano, G

    1994-01-01

    185 children 1 to 14 years old living in the suburb of San Rafael (Zulia State, Venezuela) were selected for this study with the following results: Eggs of Ascaris lumbricoides in the stool samples before administration of a drug to the children and the worms recovered after drug, induced expulsion, showed a high aggregation (K = 0.115 and K = 0.122, respectively); the aggregation of the recovered worms was more intense in girls (K = 0.083), than in boys (K = 0.220); among the blood groups, A. lumbricoides resulted highly prevalent (100%) and less overdispersed in group "AB" (K = 1.26; n = 5), while in the other blood groups the spatial aggregation pattern was strongly overdispersed (A = 0.159; B = 0.133 and O = 0.210); individuals of the blood group "B", make the greatest contribution to environmental contamination, because they presented the greatest values for the abundance and a more intense overdispersion.

  1. [Tuberculosis in Mexico: contributions of the Museum of Anatomopathology, 1895-1899].

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Méndez, Santiago; Salinas-Lara, Citlaltepetl; Castañeda-López, Gabriela

    2013-01-01

    In 1895, Rafael Lavista founded the Museum of Anatomopathology at the Hospital de San Andrds in Mexico City, for the purpose of preparing and preserving anatomical pieces useful for the study of different diseases. Porfirio Diaz officially inaugurated the Museum in March 1896, but in June 1899 it was renamed as the Instituto Patológico Nacional. During its four years of activity, a variety of illnesses were studied, including tuberculosis, which spurred great interest among Museum personnel because of its high incidence. This text examines the labors developed at the Museum of Anatomopathology in relation to tuberculosis, discusses the researchers involved, and reviews the articles published in the Museum's journal: Revista quincenal de anatomía patológica.

  2. Cloud cover and UV index estimates in Chile from satellite-derived and ground-based data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damiani, A.; Cordero, R. R.; Cabrera, S.; Laurenza, M.; Rafanelli, C.

    2014-03-01

    Data of Lambertian equivalent reflectivity (LER) in ultraviolet (UV)-A range recorded by Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) series aboard Nimbus 7 and Earth Probe and by Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on EOS Aura have been analyzed over eight Chilean locations spanning from about 18° to 62° S (i.e. including Profesor Julio Escudero station, Antarctic peninsula), covering years 1978-2011. Generally the distribution of the reflectivity is similar for both TOMS datasets. A slightly better agreement has been found for the most southern locations while a small discordance appears for northern locations. The latter could be partly due to actual differences in the cloud cover conditions. On the other hand, OMI LER data differ from TOMS ones in almost all locations. Daily cloud modification factor (CMF) values from ground-based global solar irradiance measurements have been compared with OMI LER-based CMF data. The northernmost and southernmost locations characterized by prevalent clear sky and winter snow conditions, respectively, showed the worse agreement with a correlation coefficient r = 0.63 and 0.71, while other stations showed a better correlation (i.e. r = 0.83 and r = 85). Clear sky ground UV index values for Santiago de Chile have been estimated for years 1979-2011 by means of an empirical reconstruction model based on data recorded by a multichannel radiometer. It allowed computing a ground-based CMF for years 1996-2011 and comparing it with satellite data. Results show that OMI CMF based on gridded cell LER data introduces significant differences with respect to equivalent TOMS CMF. On the contrary, the use of overpass LER data allows to evaluate changes in cloudiness and, by using the model, reconstructing the actual UV index. Nevertheless, LER CMF overestimates actual cloud cover conditions in winter. The trend in reconstructed satellite (ground) based UV index during summer months is + 3.3 ± 0.9% (+ 11.9 ± 2.5%)/decade for years 1979-2011 (1997

  3. Abundância química de simbióticas na direção do bojo galáctico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, G. J. M.; Costa, R. D. D.

    2003-08-01

    O estudo da distribuição de metalicidades de gigantes K no Bojo indica um largo intervalo com valores entre 0.1 a 10 vezes o valor solar. As razões elementais Ca/Fe, Si/Fe, Mg/Fe são típicas de estrelas do halo, apontando para um processo rápido de enriquecimento, via estrelas masssivas (SN's tipo II). No entanto, este cenário não combina com os resultados derivados de nebulosas planetárias do bojo tais como os de Ratag et al. (1992, A&A,255,270), Cuisinier et al.(2000, A&A,353, 543), Escudero e Costa (2001, A&A,380, 300),que obtêm abundâncias análogas às do disco. Neste cenário, o estudo de estrelas simbióticas possibilita uma abordagem particularmente apropriada para o problema das abundâncias químicas de estrelas de massa intermediária em estágios avançados da evoluçao estelar. Apresentamos aqui os resultados da determinacão das abundâncias do grupo do CNO numa extensa amostra de simbióticas do bojo. Aliás, com a disponibilidade de espectros no visível determinamos também abundâncias de Ar, Ne, S e He, fundamentais para analisar os processos de enriquecimento químico ocorridos ao longo da evolução estelar, bem como a evolução química do meio interestelar. Com os espectros UV do satelite IUE obtivemos abundâncias de C, necessárias no estudo da evolução dos sistemas. As relaçoes C/N-O/N mostram que o material nebular é produto do vento da componente gigante e não dos eventos de nova que às vezes acontecem nestes sistemas, como foi mostrado por Nussbaumer et al (1988,A&A,198,179). As abundâncias de Ar, S, Ne e O são compativeis com resultados de fontes no disco e bojo, seguindo o gradiente proposto por muitos autores na literatura a partir de diferentes objetos como cefeidas, nebulosas planetárias e anãs G. (CAPES,FAPESP,CNPq)

  4. Agreement between parents and adolescents on dental fluorosis: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Maria Eneide Leitão de; Teixeira, Ana Karine Macedo; Alencar, Carlos Henrique; Paiva, Saul Martins; Abreu, Mauro Henrique Nogueira Guimarães de

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the prevalence and severity of dental fluorosis and compared the reports from adolescents aged 12 to 18 years with those of their parents regarding the perceptions and concerns arising from this disease. The study was conducted in the cities of Viçosa and Sobral and the District of Rafael Arruda (Sobral), Ceará. A cross-sectional study was conducted from October 2010 to March 2011, with 891 students examined and 780 parents or guardians interviewed. Dental fluorosis was measured using the Dean's Index, and the Child's and Parent's Questionnaire about Teeth Appearance was used to assess the reports from parents and adolescents. A chi-squared test for trends was used to compare the opinions of parents and adolescents about fluorosis, and the agreement was measured using the weighted kappa. For the dichotomous variables, we used the unweighted kappa coefficient. The prevalence of fluorosis was 29.7%, but in the District of Rafael Arruda, evidence of very mild and mild fluorosis was found in 32.5% of the subjects, and moderate and severe fluorosis was found in 28.7%. There was poor agreement between the data reported by the adolescents and their parents or guardians regarding areas of concern and their perceived satisfaction with the appearance and color of their teeth. The prevalence of dental fluorosis was high in one of the communities studied, but the clinical diagnosis of this condition should not necessarily equate with concern and dissatisfaction with aesthetic appearances among teenagers and their parents.

  5. Palinspastic reconstruction of Lower Mesozoic stratigraphic sequences near the latitude of Las Vegas: Implications for the entire Great Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Marzolf, J.E. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    On the Colorado Plateau, lower Mesozoic stratigraphy is subdivided by regional unconformities into the Lower Triassic Moenkopi, Upper Triassic Chinle, Lower and Middle( ) Jurassic Glen Canyon, and Middle Jurassic lower San Rafael tectonosequences. Palinspastic reconstruction for Cenozoic extensional and mesozoic compressional deformations near the latitude of Las Vegas indicates the Moenkopi tectono-sequence constructed a passive-margin-like architecture of modest width overlapping folded. Thrust-faulted, and intruded Permian strata, with state boundaries fixed relative to the Colorado Plateau, comparison of the location of the Early Triassic shelf-slope break near latitude 36[degree] with the palinspastically restored location of the shelf-slope break in southeastern Idaho implies strata of the Moenkopi tectonosequence in the Mesozoic marine province of northwest NV lay in western utah in the Early Triassic. This reconstruction: suggests that the Galconda and Last Chance faults are part of the same thrust system; aligns late Carnian paleovalleys of the chinle tectonosequence on the Colorado Plateau with a coeval northwest-trending paleovalley cut across the Star Pea, and the Norian Cottonwood paleovalley with the coeval Grass Valley delta; defines a narrow, northward deepening back-arc basin in which the Glen Canyon tectonosequence was deposited; aligns east-facing half grabens along the back side of the arc from the Cowhole Mountains to the Clan Alpine Range; projects the volcan-arc/back-arc transition from northwest Arizona to the east side of the Idaho batholith; and predicts the abrupt facies change from silicic volcanics to marine strata of the lower San Rafael sequence lay in western Utah. The paleogeographic was altered in the late Bathonian to Callovian by back-arc extension north of a line extending from Cedar City, UT to Mina, NV. The palinspastic reconstruction implies the Paleozoic was tectonically stacked at the close of the Paleozoic.

  6. Characterizing the Iron Wash fault: A fault line scarp in Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozaci, O.; Ostenaa, D.; Goodman, J.; Zellman, M.; Hoeft, J.; Sowers, J. M.; Retson, T.

    2015-12-01

    The Iron Wash fault (IWF) is an approximately 30 mile-long, NW-SE trending structure, oriented perpendicular to the San Rafael Monocline near Green River in Utah. IWF exhibits well-expressed geomorphic features such as a linear escarpment with consistently north side down displacement. The fault coincides with an abrupt change in San Rafael Monocline dip angle along its eastern margin. The IWF is exposed in incised drainages where Jurassic Navajo sandstone (oldest) and Lower Carmel Formation (old), are juxtaposed against Jurassic Entrada sandstone (younger) and Quaternary alluvium (youngest). To assess the recency of activity of the IWF we performed detailed geomorphic mapping and a paleoseismic trenching investigation. A benched trench was excavated across a Quaternary fluvial terrace remnant across the mapped trace of the IWF. The uppermost gravel units and overlying colluvium are exposed in the trench across the projection of the fault. In addition, we mapped the basal contact of the Quaternary gravel deposit in relation to the adjacent fault exposures in detail to show the geometry of the basal contact near and across the fault. We find no evidence of vertical displacement of these Quaternary gravels. A preliminary U-series date of calcite cementing unfaulted fluvial gravels and OSL dating of a sand lens within the unfaulted fluvial gravels yielded approximately 304,000 years and 78,000 years, respectively. These preliminary results of independent dating methods constrains the timing of last activity of the IWF to greater than 78,000 years before present suggesting that IWF not an active structure. Its distinct geomorphic expression is most likely the result of differential erosion, forming a fault-line scarp.

  7. Distribution of breeding Arizona Grasshopper Sparrow (Ammodramus savannarum ammolegus) in the southwestern United States: Past, present, and future

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruth, Janet M.

    2008-01-01

    The Arizona Grasshopper Sparrow (Ammodramus savannarum ammolegus) breeds in desert grasslands of southeastern Arizona and southwestern New Mexico in the US, and in adjacent parts of northern Sonora and Chihuahua, Mexico. Roads that were surveyed in 1982 and 1987 in Arizona and New Mexico were relocated and roadside survey protocols were repeated in 2004 and 2005 to identify changes in distribution or abundance of the subspecies during the subsequent 17 yr. The Sonoita and San Rafael valleys in Arizona and the Animas Valley in New Mexico remain as primary population centers, supporting the highest mean numbers of singing males per stop, as well as the largest populations of Arizona Grasshopper Sparrows in the US. Mean number of singing males per stop was highest in the San Rafael Valley. Mean number of singing males per survey stop showed an increasing pattern from 1982–1987 and a subsequent decline to the present (2004–2005). Present bird densities are intermediate in value between 1982 and 1987 values. Small populations remain in the Altar, San Pedro, Sulphur Springs, and San Bernardino valleys in Arizona. The valleys evaluated in this and historical surveys represent the areas in which almost all Arizona Grasshopper Sparrows breed in the US; if any additional areas exist, they support peripheral, small, or remnant populations. Although historic, current, and future land use, and current and future threats differ among valleys, the primary factors posing threats to the future of Arizona Grasshopper Sparrow populations appear to be loss and/or degradation of habitat due to exurban development, overgrazing, and the effects of long-term drought.

  8. Lecture Notes and Essays in Astrophysics. II Astrophysics Symposium of the GEA-RSEF.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulla, Ana; Manteiga, Minia

    2006-12-01

    This second volume of "Lecture Notes and Essays in Astrophysics" contains a selection of lectures on a variety of topics that contribute to illustrate the current healthy state of Spanish Astrophysics. The first "lecture notes" review two space projects with a relevant participation from the Spanish Astrophysical community, CoRoT and Cassini-Huygens missions. The present-day knowledge about Titan, the solar system object with a physical environment most similar to that at Earth, is carefully revised in a pleasant lecture by Luisa María Lara, Rafael Rodrigo and José Juan López Moreno. The recent success in the launching and operativity of the CoRoT mission increases even more the interest of the review by Rafael Garrido and Hans J. Deeg illustrating the search for exoplanets by the CoRoT satellite. The potential discovery of Earth-like planets around other stars will need, apart from sophisticated technological development, the design of techniques for identifying the most representative parameters of their atmospheres and surfaces. Manuel Vazquez, P. Montañés Rodríguez and E. Pallé, review the main results of observations and simulations looking at our planet with low or null resolution, in other words, considering the Earth as an exoplanet. Our aim is to offer the specialized public, and particularly to graduate and postgraduate astrophysics students, selected comprehensive reviews on hot topics lectured by expert researchers on the subject ("Lecture Notes"). As in the first volume of the series, this issue is complemented by a set of chapters on more specific topics ("Essays").

  9. Using operational active remote sensing devices to detect Saharan dust advections and evaluate their contribution to the PM10 levels: The EU LIFE+ "DIAPASON" project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobbi, Gian Paolo; Wille, Holger; Sozzi, Roberto; Barnaba, Francesca; Costabile, Francesca; Angelini, Federico; Frey, Steffen; Bolignano, Andrea; Morelli, Matteo

    2013-04-01

    The contribution of Saharan-dust advections to both daily and annual PM average mass concentrations can be significant all over Southern Europe. The Directive 2008/50/EC allows subtraction of PM10 exceedances caused by natural contributions from the statistic used to determine air-quality levels in Europe. To this purpose, the Commission Staff Working Paper 6771/11 (EC, 2011) provides specific Guidelines on methods to quantify and subtract the contribution of these sources in the framework of the Air Quality Directive. For Saharan dust, the EC methodology is largely based on a thorough analysis performed over the Iberian Peninsula (Escudero et al, 2007), although revision of the current methodology is in progress. In line with the EC Guidelines, the DIAPASON project ("Desert-dust Impact on Air quality through model-Predictions and Advanced Sensors ObservatioNs"), funded under the EC LIFE+ program, has been formulated to provide a robust, user-oriented, and demonstrated method to assess the presence of desert dust and evaluate its contribution to PM10 levels at the monitoring sites. To this end, in addition to satellite-based data and model forecasts already included in the EC Guidelines, DIAPASON will take advantage, in both the Project implementation and demonstration phase, of innovative and affordable technologies (partly prototyped within the project itself), namely operational Polarization Lidar-Ceilometers (PLC) capable of detecting and profiling dust clouds from the ground up to 10 km altitude. The PLC prototypes have been already finalized during the initial phase of the Project. Three of them will be networked in relevant air quality monitoring stations located in the Rome metropolitan area (Italy) during the DIAPASON observational phase (one-year long field campaign) starting in March 2013. The Rome region was chosen as the DIAPASON pilot scale area since highly impacted by urban pollution and frequently affected by Saharan dust transport events. In fact

  10. Recent Ice thickness helicopter borne radar surveys in Patagonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, Andres; Zamora, Rodrigo; Andres Uribe, Jose; Oberreuter, Jonathan; Gacitua, Guisella; Rignot, Eric

    2014-05-01

    The Patagonian icefields are the biggest temperate ice bodies in southern hemisphere, which have experienced important areal shrinkage and thinning in recent decades, significantly contributing to sea level rise. The main driving factor behind this retreating condition is recent decade atmospheric warming explaining higher melting rates and equilibrium line altitude upward migration. Ice dynamic is also playing an important role especially in glaciers calving into deep fjords or lakes, type of glaciers that are predominant in the Patagonian icefields. In order to better understand their ice dynamics, several recent works have measured ice velocities using feature tracking and other techniques, however, ice thickness is still barely known. In spite of several on the ground radar measurements successfully detecting several hundred of m of ice thickness at the higher plateaus, this variable remains the great missing part of the equation especially when the thickness is approximately deeper than 600 m or where the glacier surfaces are very crevassed or nearby the Equilibrium line Altitude, where on the ground measurements are logistically constrained. In order to tackle the lack of thickness data, a helicopter borne radar system was used to survey several Patagonian temperate glaciers calving into fjords (Glaciares San Rafael and Jorge Montt) or lakes (Nef, Colonia and Steffen). The radar system is comprised by a hanging bow-tie dipole antenna working at a central frequency of 20 MHz. The antenna is an aluminum structure of 7 x 5 x 1.2 m weighting near 350 kg that is hanging at 20 m below a helicopter, and is connected to the helicopter cabin by an optical fiber cable. At the antenna are installed a 3,200 Volts peak transmitter, a two channel radar receiver, and an integrated GPS registering each trace. The helicopter flying speed was kept at near 40 knots and the antenna was normally hanging at 40 m above the ice. The surveys took place along predefined tracks

  11. Temporal and Spatial Analysis of Monogenetic Volcanic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyosugi, Koji

    Achieving an understanding of the nature of monogenetic volcanic fields depends on identification of the spatial and temporal patterns of volcanism in these fields, and their relationships to structures mapped in the shallow crust and inferred in the deep crust and mantle through interpretation of geochemical, radiometric and geophysical data. We investigate the spatial and temporal distributions of volcanism in the Abu Monogenetic Volcano Group, Southwest Japan. E-W elongated volcano distribution, which is identified by a nonparametric kernel method, is found to be consistent with the spatial extent of P-wave velocity anomalies in the lower crust and upper mantle, supporting the idea that the spatial density map of volcanic vents reflects the geometry of a mantle diapir. Estimated basalt supply to the lower crust is constant. This observation and the spatial distribution of volcanic vents suggest stability of magma productivity and essentially constant two-dimensional size of the source mantle diapir. We mapped conduits, dike segments, and sills in the San Rafael sub-volcanic field, Utah, where the shallowest part of a Pliocene magmatic system is exceptionally well exposed. The distribution of conduits matches the major features of dike distribution, including development of clusters and distribution of outliers. The comparison of San Rafael conduit distribution and the distributions of volcanoes in several recently active volcanic fields supports the use of statistical models, such as nonparametric kernel methods, in probabilistic hazard assessment for distributed volcanism. We developed a new recurrence rate calculation method that uses a Monte Carlo procedure to better reflect and understand the impact of uncertainties of radiometric age determinations on uncertainty of recurrence rate estimates for volcanic activity in the Abu, Yucca Mountain Region, and Izu-Tobu volcanic fields. Results suggest that the recurrence rates of volcanic fields can change by more

  12. Simulation of ground-water flow and solute transport in the Glen Canyon aquifer, East-Central Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Freethey, Geoffrey W.; Stolp, Bernard J.

    2010-01-01

    The extraction of methane from coal beds in the Ferron coal trend in central Utah started in the mid-1980s. Beginning in 1994, water from the extraction process was pressure injected into the Glen Canyon aquifer. The lateral extent of the aquifer that could be affected by injection is about 7,600 square miles. To address regional-scale effects of injection over a decadal time frame, a conceptual model of ground-water movement and transport of dissolved solids was formulated. A numerical model that incorporates aquifer concepts was then constructed and used to simulate injection. The Glen Canyon aquifer within the study area is conceptualized in two parts-an active area of ground-water flow and solute transport that exists between recharge areas in the San Rafael Swell and Desert, Waterpocket Fold, and Henry Mountains and discharge locations along the Muddy, Dirty Devil, San Rafael, and Green Rivers. An area of little or negligible ground-water flow exists north of Price, Utah, and beneath the Wasatch Plateau. Pressurized injection of coal-bed methane production water occurs in this area where dissolved-solids concentrations can be more than 100,000 milligrams per liter. Injection has the potential to increase hydrologic interaction with the active flow area, where dissolved-solids concentrations are generally less than 3,000 milligrams per liter. Pressurized injection of coal-bed methane production water in 1994 initiated a net addition of flow and mass of solutes into the Glen Canyon aquifer. To better understand the regional scale hydrologic interaction between the two areas of the Glen Canyon aquifer, pressurized injection was numerically simulated. Data constraints precluded development of a fully calibrated simulation; instead, an uncalibrated model was constructed that is a plausible representation of the conceptual flow and solute-transport processes. The amount of injected water over the 36-year simulation period is about 25,000 acre-feet. As a result

  13. Structural analysis characterization of permeability pathways across reservoir-seal interface - South-Eastern Utah; Results from integrated sedimentological, structural, and geochemical studies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrie, E. S.; Evans, J. P.; Richey, D.; Flores, S.; Barton, C.; Mozley, P.

    2015-12-01

    Sedimentary rocks in the San Rafael Swell, Utah, were deformed by Laramide compression and subsequent Neogene extension. We evaluate the effect of fault damage zone morphology as a function of structural position, and changes in mechanical stratigraphy on the distribution of secondary minerals across the reservoir-seal pair of the Navajo Sandstone and overlying Carmel Formation. We decipher paleo-fluid migration and examine the effect faults and fractures have on reservoir permeability and efficacy of top seal for a range of geo-engineering applications. Map-scale faults have an increased probability of allowing upward migration of fluids along the fault plane and within the damage zone, potentially bypassing the top seal. Field mapping, mesoscopic structural analyses, petrography, and geochemical observations demonstrate that fault zone thickness increases at structural intersections, fault relay zones, fault-related folds, and fault tips. Higher densities of faults with meters of slip and dense fracture populations are present in relay zones relative to single, discrete faults. Curvature analysis of the San Rafael monocline and fracture density data show that fracture density is highest where curvature is highest in the syncline hinge and near faults. Fractures cross the reservoir-seal interface where fracture density is highest and structural diagensis includes mineralization events and bleaching and calcite and gypsum mineralization. The link between fracture distributions and structural setting implys that transmissive fractures have predictable orientations and density distributions. At the m- to cm- scale, deformation-band faults and joints in the Navajo Sandstone penetrate the reservoir-seal interface and transition into open-mode fractures in the caprock seal. Scanline analysis and petrography of veins provide evidence for subsurface mineralization and fracture reactivation, suggesting that the fractures act as loci for fluid flow through time

  14. Three stages in the Late Paleozoic to Triassic magmatism of southwestern Gondwana, and the relationships with the volcanogenic events in coeval basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Ana María; Llambías, Eduardo J.; Basei, Miguel A. S.; Castro, Carlos E.

    2015-11-01

    The intermediate to acid Choiyoi Magmatic Province is the most conspicuous feature along the Late Paleozic continental margin of southwestern Gondwana, and is generally regarded as the possible source for the widespread ash fall deposits interlayered with sedimentary sequences in the adjacent Gondwana basins. The Choiyoi magmatism is geologically constrained between the early Permian San Rafael orogenic phase and the Triassic extensional Huarpica phase in the region of Argentine Frontal Cordillera, Precordillera and San Rafael Block. In order to better assess the Choiyoi magmatism in Argentine Frontal Cordillera, we obtained 6 new LA-ICPMS U-Pb ages between 278.8 ± 3.4 Ma and 252.5 ± 1.9 Ma from plutonic rocks of the Colangüil Batholith and an associated volcanic rock. The global analysis of age data compiled from Chilean and Argentine Late Paleozoic to Triassic outcrops allows us to identify three stages of magmatism: (1) pre-Choiyoi orogenic magmatism, (2) Choiyoi magmatism (286-247 Ma), and (3) post-Choiyoi magmatism related to extensional tectonics. In the Choiyoi stage is there an eastward shift and expansion of the magmatism to the southeast, covering an extensive region that defines the Choiyoi magmatic province. On the basis of comparison with the ages from volcanogenic levels identified in the coeval Gondwana basins, we propose: (a) The pre-Choiyoi volcanism from the Paganzo basin (320-296 Ma) probably has a local source in addition to the Frontal Cordillera region. (b) The pre-Choiyoi and Choiyoi events identified in the Paraná basin (304-275 Ma) are likely to have their source in the Chilean Precordillera. (c) The early stage of the Choiyoi magmatism found in the Sauce Grande basin (284-281 Ma) may have come from the adjacent Las Matras to Chadileuvú blocks. (d) The pre-Choiyoi and Choiyoi events in the Karoo basins (302-253 Ma) include the longest Choiyoi interval, and as a whole bear the best resemblance to the age records along the Chilean and

  15. The Association of Tourmaline With Cassiterite Ores: Implications for the Genesis of the World's Richest Tin Lode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlynarczyk, M. S.; Williams-Jones, A. E.

    2004-05-01

    The San Rafael deposit in the Eastern Cordillera of the Peruvian Central Andes is the world's richest hydrothermal tin lode, with a total resource of ~1 million tonnes Sn (metal) at an average tin grade of 4.7 wt.%. The mineralization is of the cassiterite-sulfide type and occurs in a vertically extensive vein-breccia system, centered on a shallow-level, Late Oligocene granitoid stock. The tin ores form cassiterite-quartz-chlorite-bearing veins and breccias, hosted by several large fault-jogs at depth in the lode. By contrast, the copper ores, which contain disseminated acicular cassiterite, are localized in the upper part of the system. Both ore types are associated with a very distinctive strong chloritic alteration, which was preceded by intense sericitization, tourmalinization and tourmaline veining. Tourmaline also continued to crystallize during tin mineralization. The early hydrothermal tourmaline is the Mg-rich variety, dravite, which forms tourmaline-quartz veins and tourmaline-quartz microbreccias. This was followed by the appearance of buergerite (a rare, Fe-rich variety of tourmaline) with cassiterite and chlorite, at the transition to the tin ore stage. Fe-rich tourmaline (buergerite ?) is also common as overgrowths on earlier dravite in the strongly chloritized wallrock, adjacent to tin mineralization. These observations corroborate evidence from mass-balance calculations, that the ore-fluid was very iron-rich. Potentially, the most interesting feature of the tourmaline chemistry from the perspective of tin mineralization is the oxidation state of Fe. All tourmaline samples analyzed have Fe3+/Fe2+ ratios that are unusually high for an S-type tin granite. However, tourmaline accompanying tin mineralization has a significantly lower Fe3+/Fe2+ ratio. This suggests that the rich tin ores of San Rafael were produced by a sudden injection of "late", deep-seated, reducing, (presumably magmatic) fluids, strongly enriched in iron, and that cassiterite

  16. Spatial and seasonal variations along the U.S.-Mexico border: An analysis with Landsat Thematic Mapper imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lira Reyes, Gerardo

    1997-12-01

    Research in global ecology has been concerned with the effect of vegetation removal in semi-arid regions including aspects such as plant succession and desertification and its impact on global change, specifically global warming. In addition, conditions along international borders often are presented as discontinuities in terms of vegetation and soil status. To better document these discontinuities in a semi-arid region, a multi-temporal study along the U.S.-Mexico border was conducted with a series of six Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) images acquired over the 1992 growing season. Spatial and temporal variations across the border were analyzed with reflectance data. Spatial data was obtained from three different sampling size areas which included: the Parker Canyon grassland; the San Rafael Valley, a grassland combined with riparian areas and croplands; and the regional area along the Arizona-Sonora border including valleys and mountains, and diverse vegetation communities and soil conditions. These areas consisted of about 106 ha, 5,800 ha, and 738,000 ha, respectively, at each side of the border. Temporal data were obtained from the six TM images which were acquired in days of the year 162, 178, 194, 274, 306, and 322. Four remote sensing applications were considered for comparison studies on both sides of the border. These techniques included: (a) band comparisons, (b) albedo, derived from the discrete sensor band information, (c) vegetation indices, and (d) application of a linear mixing model. When comparing both sides of the border, significant differences were observed in most of the remote sensing techniques applied at the Parker Canyon area. Higher differences were found during the wet season with all of the applied techniques with the exception of albedo. The red band and albedo were the most important discriminants during the dry season. At the intermediate size, San Rafael Valley area, U.S.-Mexico differences followed the same pattern as Parker Canyon

  17. [Perceptions of dental fluorosis and evaluation of agreement between parents and children: validation of a questionnaire].

    PubMed

    Furtado, Gabriela Eugênio de Sousa; Sousa, Maria da Luz Rosário de; Barbosa, Taís de Souza; Wada, Ronaldo Seichi; Martínez-Mier, Esperanza de los Angeles; Almeida, Maria Eneide Leitão de

    2012-08-01

    This study aimed to validate the Child's and Parent's Questionnaire about Teeth Appearance and to evaluate concerns relative to fluorosis among 213 pairs of parents and 12-year-old children from two regions of Brazil. Reliability was assessed by Cronbach's alpha and intraclass correlation coefficient, and construct and criterion validity by Spearman's correlations. Student t-test was used to compare the two regions and to assess parent/child agreement. Internal consistency was acceptable, and test-retest reliability was moderate to excellent. Perception of moderate to severe fluorosis and clinical data were significantly correlated, as were perception of fluorosis and subjects' concerns. Although parents from Rafael Arruda, Ceará State, showed a higher perception of fluorosis, parental concern was greater in Piracicaba, São Paulo State. Parents were more worried and dissatisfied with their children's dental appearance than the children themselves. This version of the questionnaire proved to be valid and reliable for assessing children's and parents' perceptions of dental fluorosis.

  18. Centering Ability of ProTaper Next and WaveOne Classic in J-Shape Simulated Root Canals

    PubMed Central

    Dioguardi, Mario; Cocco, Armando; Giuliani, Michele; Fabiani, Cristiano; D'Alessandro, Alfonso; Ciavarella, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the shaping and centering ability of ProTaper Next (PTN; Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) and WaveOne Classic systems (Dentsply Maillefer) in simulated root canals. Methods. Forty J-shaped canals in resin blocks were assigned to two groups (n = 20 for each group). Photographic method was used to record pre- and postinstrumentation images. After superimposition, centering and shaping ability were recorded at 9 different levels from the apex using the software Autocad 2013 (Autodesk Inc., San Rafael, USA). Results. Shaping procedures with ProTaper Next resulted in a lower amount of resin removed at each reference point level. In addition, the pattern of centering ability improved after the use of ProTaper Next in 8 of 9 measurement points. Conclusions. Within the limitations of this study, shaping procedures with ProTaper Next instruments demonstrated a lower amount of resin removed and a better centering ability than WaveOne Classic system. PMID:28054031

  19. Lahar-hazard zonation for San Miguel volcano, El Salvador

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Major, J.J.; Schilling, S.P.; Pullinger, C.R.; Escobar, C.D.; Chesner, C.A.; Howell, M.M.

    2001-01-01

    San Miguel volcano, also known as Chaparrastique, is one of many volcanoes along the volcanic arc in El Salvador. The volcano, located in the eastern part of the country, rises to an altitude of about 2130 meters and towers above the communities of San Miguel, El Transito, San Rafael Oriente, and San Jorge. In addition to the larger communities that surround the volcano, several smaller communities and coffee plantations are located on or around the flanks of the volcano, and the PanAmerican and coastal highways cross the lowermost northern and southern flanks of the volcano. The population density around San Miguel volcano coupled with the proximity of major transportation routes increases the risk that even small volcano-related events, like landslides or eruptions, may have significant impact on people and infrastructure. San Miguel volcano is one of the most active volcanoes in El Salvador; it has erupted at least 29 times since 1699. Historical eruptions of the volcano consisted mainly of relatively quiescent emplacement of lava flows or minor explosions that generated modest tephra falls (erupted fragments of microscopic ash to meter sized blocks that are dispersed into the atmosphere and fall to the ground). Little is known, however, about prehistoric eruptions of the volcano. Chemical analyses of prehistoric lava flows and thin tephra falls from San Miguel volcano indicate that the volcano is composed dominantly of basalt (rock having silica content

  20. Centering Ability of ProTaper Next and WaveOne Classic in J-Shape Simulated Root Canals.

    PubMed

    Troiano, Giuseppe; Dioguardi, Mario; Cocco, Armando; Giuliani, Michele; Fabiani, Cristiano; D'Alessandro, Alfonso; Ciavarella, Domenico; Lo Muzio, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the shaping and centering ability of ProTaper Next (PTN; Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) and WaveOne Classic systems (Dentsply Maillefer) in simulated root canals. Methods. Forty J-shaped canals in resin blocks were assigned to two groups (n = 20 for each group). Photographic method was used to record pre- and postinstrumentation images. After superimposition, centering and shaping ability were recorded at 9 different levels from the apex using the software Autocad 2013 (Autodesk Inc., San Rafael, USA). Results. Shaping procedures with ProTaper Next resulted in a lower amount of resin removed at each reference point level. In addition, the pattern of centering ability improved after the use of ProTaper Next in 8 of 9 measurement points. Conclusions. Within the limitations of this study, shaping procedures with ProTaper Next instruments demonstrated a lower amount of resin removed and a better centering ability than WaveOne Classic system.

  1. High-resolution geophysical data collected within Red Brook Harbor, Buzzards Bay, Massachusetts, in 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turecek, Aaron M.; Danforth, William W.; Baldwin, Wayne E.; Barnhardt, Walter A.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a high-resolution geophysical survey within Red Brook Harbor, Massachusetts, from September 28 through November 17, 2009. Red Brook Harbor is located on the eastern edge of Buzzards Bay, south of the Cape Cod Canal. The survey area was approximately 7 square kilometers, with depths ranging from 0 to approximately 10 meters. Data were collected aboard the U.S. Geological Survey Research Vessel Rafael. The research vessel was equipped with a 234-kilohertz interferometric sonar system to collect bathymetry and backscatter data, a dual frequency (3.5- and 200-kilohertz) compression high-intensity radar pulse seismic reflection profiler to collect subbottom data, a sound velocity profiler to acquire speed of sound within the water column, and a sea floor sampling device to collect sediment samples, video, and photographs. The survey was part of an ongoing cooperative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management to map the geology of the Massachusetts inner continental shelf. In addition to inclusion within the cooperative geologic mapping effort, these data will be used to assess the shallow-water mapping capability of the geophysical systems deployed for this project, with an emphasis on identifying resolution benchmarks for the interferometric sonar system.

  2. European National Society Cardiovascular Journals: Background, rationale and mission statement of the 'Editors' Club' (Task Force of the European Society of Cardiology).

    PubMed

    Alfonso, F; Ambrosio, G; Pinto, F J; van der Wall, E E

    2008-06-01

    Anesti Kondili MD, Djamaleddine Nibouche MD, Karlen Adamyan MD, Kurt Huber MD, Hugo Ector MD, Izet Masic MD, Rumiana Tarnovska MD, Mario Ivanusa MD, Vladimír Stane k MD, Jørgen Videbaek MD, Mohamed Hamed MD, Alexandras Laucevicius MD, Pirjo Mustonen MD, Jean-Yves Artigou MD, Ariel Cohen MD, Mamanti Rogava MD, Michael Böhm MD, Eckart Fleck MD, Gerd Heusch MD, Rainer Klawki MD, Panos Vardas MD, Christodoulos Stefanadis MD, József Tenczer MD, Massimo Chiariello MD, Aleksandras Laucevicius MD, Joseph Elias MD, Halima Benjelloun MD, Olaf Rødevand MD, Piotr Kul/akowski MD, Edvard Apetrei MD, Victor A. Lusov MD, Rafael G. Oganov MD, Velibor Obradovic MD, Gabriel Kamensky MD, Miran F. Kenda MD, Christer Höglund MD, Thomas F. Lüscher MD, René Lerch MD, Moufid Jokhadar MD, Habib Haouala MD, Vedat Sansoy MD, Valentin Shumakov MD, Adam Timmis MD. (European National Society Cardiovascular Journals Editors, see Appendix for complete affiliations).

  3. Seastacks buried beneath newly reported Lower Miocene sandstone, northern Santa Barbara County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Fritsche, A.E.; Hanna, F.M.

    1985-04-01

    Three large, isolated exposures of a light-gray, coarse-grained, thick-bedded sandstone unit occur in the northern San Rafael Mountains of Santa Barbara County, California. These rocks are moderately fossiliferous and contain Vertipecten bowersi, Amussiopecten vanvlecki, Aequipecten andersoni, Otrea howelli, shark teeth, whale bones, and regular echinoid spines. The fossils indicate that the sandstone unit, although previously reported as upper(.) Miocene, correlates best with the lower Miocene Vaqueros Formation. This unit was deposited in angular unconformity on a Cretaceous, greenish-gray turbidite sequence of interbedded sandstone and shale, and onlaps the unconformity erosion surface from west to east, the unit being thicker in the west and older at its base. The underlying Cretaceous sandstone beds are well indurated, and during the eastward transgression of the early Miocene sea, they resisted wave erosion and stood as seastacks offshore of the advancing coastline, thus creating a very irregular topographic surface upon which the Vaqueros Formation was deposited. Some seastacks were as much as 4 m tall, as indicated by inliers of Cretaceous rock surrounded by 4-m thick sections of the Vaqueros Formation.

  4. Ferron sandstone - stratigraphy and reservoir analogs, East-Central Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, P.B.; Ryer, T.A.; Chidsey, T.C. Jr.

    1996-06-01

    The Ferron Sandstone (Upper Cretaceous) crops out along the west flank of the San Rafael Swell of east-central Utah. Exposures were described on photomosaics to better define the stratigraphy, to enhance facies prediction, and establish rules for reservoir modeling within fluvial-deltaic rocks. Major regressive cycles are recognized as parasequence sets composed of several to many parasequences. Each of the seaward-stepping parasequence sets recognized in the Ferron begins with a rapidly thickening and stratigraphically climbing, wave-modified shoreface. In later stages of progradation, deposition is dominated by river influences. Continued regression of the seaway is recorded in outcrop and shows a complex history of delta lobe progradation, switching, and abandonment. Onlapping and stacking of parasequences creates a collage of potential reservoir sweet spots, baffles, and barriers within a parasequence set. Shoreface and delta-front deposits of the older parasequences are commonly eroded by younger distributary and meanderbelt systems that fed younger parasequences of the parasequence sets. The result is numerous and locally thick channel sandstone bodies incised into shoreface and delta-front deposits. Published studies and recently completed work show that upper shoreface, stream mouth-bar, and channel sandstones constitute the best potential reservoir rocks within the Ferron Sandstone.

  5. Everpresent Λ. II. Structural stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Maqbool; Sorkin, Rafael D.

    2013-03-01

    Ideas from causal set theory lead to a fluctuating, time-dependent cosmological constant of the right order of magnitude to match currently quoted “dark energy” values. Although this effect was predicted some time ago [R. D. Sorkin, in Relativity and Gravitation: Classical and Quantum, Proceedings of the SILARG VII Conference, Cocoyoc, Mexico, 1990, edited by J. C. D’Olivo, E. Nahmad-Achar, M. Rosenbaum, M. P. Ryan, L. F. Urrutia, and F. Zertuche (World Scientific, Singapore, 1991), pp. 150-173; Rafael D. Sorkin, Int. J. Theor. Phys. 36, 2759 (1997).IJTPBM0020-7748], it is only more recently that a more detailed phenomenological model of a fluctuating Λ was introduced and simulated numerically [M. Ahmed, S. Dodelson, P. Greene, and R. D. Sorkin, Phys. Rev. D 69, 103523 (2004).PRVDAQ0556-2821]. In this paper we continue the investigation by studying the sensitivity of the model to some of the ad hoc choices made in setting it up.

  6. Forests of hope: Costa Rica. Restoring hope in the clouds.

    PubMed

    Bowen, L

    1996-01-01

    The rapid population growth in Central America has created pressure on the largest tract of cloud forest spanning the Talamanca Mountains in Costa Rica and Panama. Of immediate concern is restoring hope in the forest and improving the standard of living among local people. Such is the goal of the Amistad Conservation and Development (AMISCONDE) project in the communities of Cerro Punta, Panama, and San Rafael in Costa Rica. Through agriculture, forestry, animal husbandry, environmental education, and community development, AMISCONDE aims to restore the degraded lands in the reserve's buffer zone and improve the income of the people. All the local people, the farmers, women and children have benefited from the project. Some of the activities carried out to meet its objectives include helping the farmers improve the productivity and marketability of their products by teaching them new technologies and giving agricultural credits to farmers, women, and youth groups. In addition, AMISCONDE conducts training courses to address the economic, social and educational needs of women and communities. It is assured that the community and the group will be prepared to continue on their own after the official AMISCONDE office is gone.

  7. Deep Borehole Instrumentation Along San Francisco Bay Bridges - 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchings, L.; Kasameyer, P.; Turpin, C.; Long, L.; Hollfelder, J.; McEvilly, T.; Clymer, R.; Uhrhammer, R.

    2000-03-01

    This is a progress report on the Bay Bridges downhole network. Between 2 and 8 instruments have been spaced along the Dumbarton, San Mateo, Bay, and San Rafael bridges in San Francisco Bay, California. The instruments will provide multiple use data that is important to geotechnical, structural engineering, and seismological studies. The holes are between 100 and 1000 ft deep and were drilled by Caltrans. There are twenty-one sensor packages at fifteen sites. The downhole instrument package contains a three component HS-1 seismometer and three orthogonal Wilcox 731 accelerometers, and is capable of recording a micro g from local M = 1.0 earthquakes to 0.5 g strong ground motion form large Bay Area earthquakes. Preliminary results on phasing across the Bay Bridge, up and down hole wave amplification at Yerba Buena Island, and sensor orientation analysis are presented. Events recorded and located during 1999 are presented. Also, a senior thesis on the deep structure of the San Francisco Bay beneath the Bay Bridge is presented as an addendum.

  8. Comparison of a modified shell vial culture procedure with conventional mouse inoculation for rabies virus isolation.

    PubMed

    Ribas Antúnez, María de los Angeles; Girón, Blanca; Monsalvez, Iraima; Morier, Luis; Acosta, Gretel; Tejero, Yahisel; Cordero, Yanislet; Piedra, Dainelyd

    2013-04-01

    Rabies is a neurotropic disease that is often lethal. The early diagnosis of rabies infection is important and requires methods that allow for the isolation of the virus from animals and humans. The present study compared a modified shell vial (MSV) procedure using 24-well tissue culture plates with the mouse inoculation test (MIT), which is considered the gold standard for rabies virus isolation. Thirty brain samples (25 positive and 5 negative by the fluorescent antibody test) obtained from different animal species at the National Institute of Hygiene Rafael Rangel in Caracas, Venezuela, were studied by the MIT and MSV assays. Nine samples (36%) were positive at 24 h, 10 (40%) were positive at 48 h and six (24%) were positive at 72 h by the MSV assay. With the MIT assay, 76% were positive at six days post inoculation and 12% were positive at 12 and 18 days post inoculation. One sample that was negative according to the MSV assay was positive with MIT on the 12th day. The MSV procedure exhibited a sensitivity of 96.2%, a specificity of 100%, a positive predictive value of 100% and a negative predictive value 80%. This procedure allowed for rapid rabies virus detection. MIT can be employed as an alternative method in laboratories without tissue culture facilities.

  9. Explicit results for the anomalous three point function and non-renormalization theorems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jegerlehner, F.; Tarasov, O. V.

    2006-08-01

    Two-loop corrections for the < VVA > correlator of the singlet axial and vector currents in QCD are calculated in the chiral limit for arbitrary momenta. Explicit calculations confirm the non-renormalization theorems derived recently by Vainshtein [A. Vainshtein, Phys. Lett. B 569 (2003) 187] and Knecht et al. [M. Knecht, S. Peris, M. Perrottet, E. de Rafael, JHEP 0403 (2004) 035]. We find that as in the one-loop case also at two loops the < VVA > correlator has only three independent form-factors instead of four. From the explicit results we observe that the two-loop correction to the correlator is equal to the one-loop result times the constant factor C2 (R)αs / π in the MSbar scheme. This holds for the full correlator, for the anomalous longitudinal as well as for the non-anomalous transversal amplitudes. The finite overall αs dependent constant has to be normalized away by renormalizing the axial current according to Witten's algebraic/geometrical constraint on the anomalous Ward identity [ < VV ∂ A > correlator]. Our observations, together with known facts, suggest that in perturbation theory the < VVA > correlator is proportional to the one-loop term to all orders and that the non-renormalization theorem of the Adler-Bell-Jackiw anomaly carries over to the full correlator.

  10. [The Bilbao declaration: international meeting on the law concerning the human genome project].

    PubMed

    1994-06-01

    The Bilbao statement was the result of a work meeting, held the day before the closing session by a group of representative experts, formed by general chairmen and meeting organizers. The compelled and necessary consent gave rise to the document that was read and communicated to the world's public opinion during the closing act on may 26, 1993. Notwithstanding, the working group considered that the divulged version was provisory and committed to continue the task of re-elaborating the statement. The aim was to complete and improve it, taking the greatest advantage of the important meeting achievements. The document that is next reproduced is the definitive integral version of the Bilbao Statement. The expert group that takes the responsibility of this Statement is Jean Dausset, Nobel Prize of Medicine (1980); Carleton Gajdusek, Nobel Prize of Medicine (1976); Santiago Grisolía president of UNESCO committee for the Genome Project; Michael Kirby, President of the Court of Appeal of the Supreme Court of New South Wales, Australia; Aaron Klug, member of the Constitutional Council, Paris, France; Rafael Mendizábal, Judge of the Constitutional Court, Madrid, Spain; Juan Bautista Pardo, President of the Superior Court of Justice of the Basque Country and Carlos María Romeo Casabona, Director of the Chair of Law and Human Genome of the University of Deusto (Bilbao).

  11. [The university in the development of thoracic surgery in Spain].

    PubMed

    París, Francisco; Balibrea, José Luis

    2005-11-01

    The present article analyzes the figures of the university professors who, from 1911, formed part of one of the basic pillars in the development of "Spanish Thoracic Surgery". At that time, there was a certain amount of infighting between general and specialized surgery, which was resolved by allowing specialization after a period of training in general surgery. Universities should not be denied the great merit of having produced well-trained surgeons with a broad general foundation who would later choose a specialty. The figures of Ricardo Lozano Monzón, Francisco Martín Lagos, José Gascó, Benjamín Narbona, Carlos Carbonell Antolí, Rafael Vara López, Alfonso de la Fuente Chaos and José M. Beltrán de Heredia with their previous training, corresponding precursors and respective schools are described. Their teaching, surgical practice, and scientific activity are also described. A future article based on the contribution of Valencia to the specialty of general thoracic surgery is also outlined.

  12. [Contributions of the medical community to the Mexican revolution].

    PubMed

    de Micheli-Serra, A

    2000-01-01

    Mexican physicians, faithful to their tradition of honor and patriotism, were present in the military and political events of the great Revolution, the began in 1910 and ended triumphantly in 1917. In the first phase, a Madero supporter and opposed to presidential reelection was doctor Francisco Vázquez Gómez, a specialist in otorhinolaryngology, Professor at the National Medical School and past President of our Academy of Medicine. The second phase of this Revolution, characterized by the struggle against the Huerta dictatorship and then by combats among revolutionary factions, also saw the intervention of many physicians and surgeons, such as senator Belisario Domínguez of Chiapas, a victim of dictatorial oppression. Among them were distinguished academicians such as doctors Rafael Silva of Mexico and Francisco Castillo Nájera of Durango. Likewise devoted nurses were in Carranza's group, while medical students enlisted in Zapata's forces. The last phase of the Revolution was dominated by the activities of the Constituent Congress in Querétaro, which promulgated the New Mexican Constitution. Among 223 elected representatives, 20 were physicians and two pharmacists (10%), who had an excellent participation in the different sessions. The new Constitution, sworn and signed on February 5, 1917, added social guarantees to individual guarantees already established by the Constitution of 1857.

  13. [Optimization of the pertussis vaccine production process].

    PubMed

    Germán Santiago, J; Zamora, N; de la Rosa, E; Alba Carrión, C; Padrón, P; Hernández, M; Betancourt, M; Moretti, N

    1995-01-01

    The production of Pertussis Vaccine was reevaluated at the Instituto Nacional de Higiene "Rafael Rangel" in order to optimise it in terms of vaccine yield, potency, specific toxicity and efficiency (cost per doses). Four different processes, using two culture media (Cohen-Wheeler and Fermentación Glutamato Prolina-1) and two types of bioreactors (25 L Fermentador Caracas and a 450 L industrial fermentor) were compared. Runs were started from freeze-dried strains (134 or 509) and continued until the obtention of the maximal yield. It was found that the combination Fermentación Glutamato Prolina-1/industrial fermentor, shortened the process to 40 hours while consistently yielding a vaccine of higher potency (7.91 +/- 2.56 IU/human dose) and lower specific toxicity in a mice bioassay. In addition, the physical aspect of the preparation was rather homogeneous and free of dark aggregates. Most importantly, the biomass yield more than doubled those of the Fermentador Caracas using the two different media and that in the industrial fermentor with the Cohen-Wheeler medium. Therefore, the cost per doses was substantially decreased.

  14. Hydrogen peroxide and central redox theory for aerobic life A tribute to Helmut Sies: Scout, trailblazer and Redox Pioneer

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Dean P.

    2015-01-01

    When Rafael Radi and I wrote about Helmut Sies for the Redox Pioneer series, I was disappointed that the Editor restricted us to the use of “Pioneer” in the title. My view is that Helmut was always ahead of the pioneers: He was a scout discovering paths for exploration and a trailblazer developing strategies and methods for discovery. I have known him for nearly 40 years and greatly enjoyed his collegiality as well as brilliance in scientific scholarship. He made monumental contributions to 20th century physiological chemistry beginning with his first measurement of H2O2 in rat liver. While continuous H2O2 production is dogma today, the concept of H2O2 production in mammalian tissues was largely buried for half a century. He continued this leadership in research on oxidative stress, GSH, selenium, and singlet oxygen, during the timeframe when physiological chemistry and biochemistry transitioned to contemporary 21st century systems biology. His impact has been extensive in medical and health sciences, especially in nutrition, aging, toxicology and cancer. I briefly summarize my interactions with Helmut, stressing our work together on the redox code, a set of principles to link mitochondrial respiration, bioenergetics, H2O2 metabolism, redox signaling and redox proteomics into central redox theory. PMID:27095208

  15. Matrix metalloproteinases - From the cleavage data to the prediction tools and beyond.

    PubMed

    Cieplak, Piotr; Strongin, Alex Y

    2017-03-24

    Understanding the physiological role of any protease requires identification of both its cleavage substrates and their relative cleavage efficacy as compared with other substrates and other proteinases. Our review manuscript is focused on the cleavage preferences of the individual matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and the cleavage similarity and distinction that exist in the human MMP family. The recent in-depth analysis of MMPs by us and many others greatly increased knowledge of the MMP biology and structural-functional relationships among this protease family members. A better knowledge of cleavage preferences of MMPs has led us to the development of the prediction tools that are now capable of the high throughput reliable prediction and ranking the MMP cleavage sites in the peptide sequences in silico. Our software unifies and consolidates volumes of the pre-existing data. Now this prediction-ranking in silico tool is ready to be used by others. The software we developed may facilitate both the identification of the novel proteolytic regulatory pathways and the discovery of the previously uncharacterized substrates of the individual MMPs. Because now the MMP research may be based on the mathematical probability parameters rather than on either random luck or common sense alone, the researchers armed with this novel in silico tool will be better equipped to fine-tune or, at least, to sharply focus their wet chemistry experiments. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Matrix Metalloproteinases edited by Rafael Fridman.

  16. Impacts of relative permeability on CO2 phase behavior, phase distribution, and trapping mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moodie, N.; McPherson, B. J. O. L.; Pan, F.

    2015-12-01

    A critical aspect of geologic carbon storage, a carbon-emissions reduction method under extensive review and testing, is effective multiphase CO2 flow and transport simulation. Relative permeability is a flow parameter particularly critical for accurate forecasting of multiphase behavior of CO2 in the subsurface. The relative per­meability relationship assumed and especially the irreducible saturation of the gas phase greatly impacts predicted CO2 trapping mechanisms and long-term plume migration behavior. A primary goal of this study was to evaluate the impact of relative permeability on efficacy of regional-scale CO2 sequestration models. To accomplish this we built a 2-D vertical cross-section of the San Rafael Swell area of East-central Utah. This model simulated injection of CO2 into a brine aquifer for 30 years. The well was then shut-in and the CO2 plume behavior monitored for another 970 years. We evaluated five different relative permeability relationships to quantify their relative impacts on forecasted flow results of the model, with all other parameters maintained uniform and constant. Results of this analysis suggest that CO2 plume movement and behavior are significantly dependent on the specific relative permeability formulation assigned, including the assumed irreducible saturation values of CO2 and brine. More specifically, different relative permea­bility relationships translate to significant differences in CO2 plume behavior and corresponding trapping mechanisms.

  17. Annual review of energy and the environment. Volume 23

    SciTech Connect

    Socolow, R.H.; Anderson, D.; Harte, J.

    1998-12-31

    Thirteen papers are included in this volume. The titles and authors are: From Physics to Development Strategies by Jose Goldemberg; Rewards and Penalties of Monitoring the Earth by Charles D. Keeling; Science and Nonscience Concerning Human-Caused Climate Warming by J. D. Mahlman; Consumption of Materials in the United States, 1990--1995 by Grecia Matos and Lorie Wagner; Future Technologies for Energy-Efficient Iron and Steel Making by Jeroen de Beer, Ernst Worrell, and Kornelis Blok; The O{sub 2} Balance of the Atmosphere: A Tool for Studying the Fate of Fossil Fuel CO{sub 2} by Michael L. Bender, Mark Battle, and Ralph F. Keeling; Mexican Electric End-Use Efficiency: Experiences to Date by Rafael Friedmann and Claudia Sheinbaum; Drinking Water in Developing Countries by Ashok Gadgil; Engineering-Economic Studies of Energy Technologies to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Opportunities and Challenges by Marilyn A. Brown, Mark D. Levine, Joseph P. Romm, Arthur H. Rosenfeld, and Jonathan G. Koomey; Climate Change Mitigation in the Energy and Forestry Sectors of Developing Countries by Jayant A. Sathaye and N. H. Ravindranath; Toward a Productive Divorce: Separating DOE Cleanups from Transition Assistance by M. Russell; Recycling Metals for the Environment by Iddo K. Wernick and Nickolas J. Themelis; and Environmentally Conscious Chemical Process Design by J. A. Cano-Ruiz and G. J. McRae.

  18. Field trip guide to selected studies of the Southwest Mineral and Environmental Investigations Project in southeastern Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houser, B.B.; Gettings, M.E.; Bultman, M.W.; Gray, Floyd; Caruthers, K.R.; Hirschberg, D.M.

    1999-01-01

    The Southwest Mineral and Environmental Investigations Project is designed to address issues raised by rapid urban development in the basins of the southwestern U.S. These issues require objective geoscientific data that can be used by land managers and stakeholders to develop informed land and water use strategies. The project integrates new and existing geologic, geophysical, and geochemical data, and imagery to provide three-dimensional visualizations of the basins of southeastern Arizona. Emphasis is on developing better knowledge of the aquifer systems of both the basins and the ranges, on acquiring background and baseline information, and on determining the distribution of metals related to mineralization and the fate of these metals in surface and subsurface environments. The products of the project will be used in resolving issues of water quality and quantity, in understanding environmental impacts such as riparian ecosystem maintenace, and in evaluating mineral resources beneath and within the basins. The field trip highlights three topics and areas (figs. 1 and 2): (1) geology and geophysics of the upper San Pedro and upper Santa Cruz basins (M.E. Gettings, M. W. Bultman, and B.B. Houser), (2) geology, geophysics, and mineral resource potential of the San Rafael basin (M.W. Bultman), and (3) hydrology and aqueous geochemistry of the Red Mountain and Sonoita Creek drainage system (Floyd Gray). The trip guide, which begins and ends in Tucson, Arizona, also includes commentary on the cultural and mining history of the area.

  19. The Rise and Development of Physics in Cuba: An Interview with Hugo Pérez Rojas in May 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baracca, Angelo

    Hugo Celso Pérez Rojas was born in 1938, and works as a senior researcher at the Institute of Cybernetics, Mathematics and Physics, at the Ministry of Science and Technology, Cuba. Pérez Rojas is emeritus member of the Academy of Sciences of Cuba, member of the Latin American Academy of Sciences and Fellow TWAS since 1994. He was one of the founders of the School of Physics in the University of Havana in 1962, and moved in 1971 to the Cuban Academy of Sciences. His national awards include the Rafael Maria Mendive and Carlos J. Finlay Medals. He was awarded in 2011 the National Prize in Physics from the Cuban Physical Society. His interests include quantum field theory and its applications to finite temperature problems in high-energy physics and condensed matter. Among these, Pérez Rojas has devoted special attention to quantum electrodynamics in matter and in vacuum in the presence of external fields, phase transitions in electroweak theory, relativistic quantum Hall effect, Bose-Einstein condensation in magnetic fields, and applications of physics to social sciences. He is interviewed here by Angelo Baracca in May 2009.

  20. Rock type discrimination techniques using Landsat and Seasat image data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blom, R.; Abrams, M.; Conrad, C.

    1981-01-01

    Results of a sedimentary rock type discrimination project using Seasat radar and Landsat multispectral image data of the San Rafael Swell, in eastern Utah, are presented, which has the goal of determining the potential contribution of radar image data to Landsat image data for rock type discrimination, particularly when the images are coregistered. The procedure employs several images processing techniques using the Landsat and Seasat data independently, and then both data sets are coregistered. The images are evaluated according to the ease with which contacts can be located and rock units (not just stratigraphically adjacent ones) separated. Results show that of the Landsat images evaluated, the image using a supervised classification scheme is the best for sedimentary rock type discrimination. Of less value, in decreasing order, are color ratio composites, principal components, and the standard color composite. In addition, for rock type discrimination, the black and white Seasat image is less useful than any of the Landsat color images by itself. However, it is found that the incorporation of the surface textural measures made from the Seasat image provides a considerable and worthwhile improvement in rock type discrimination.

  1. Foundations of Space and Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugan, Jeff; Weltman, Amanda; Ellis, George F. R.

    2012-07-01

    1. The problem with quantum gravity Jeff Murugan, Amanda Weltman and George F. R. Eliis; 2. A dialogue on the nature of gravity Thanu Padmanabhan; 3. Effective theories and modifications of gravity Cliff Burgess; 4. The small scale structure of spacetime Steve Carlip; 5. Ultraviolet divergences in supersymmetric theories Kellog Stelle; 6. Cosmological quantum billiards Axel Kleinschmidt and Hermann Nicolai; 7. Progress in RNS string theory and pure spinors Dimitri Polyakov; 8. Recent trends in superstring phenomenology Massimo Bianchi; 9. Emergent spacetime Robert de Mello Koch and Jeff Murugan; 10. Loop quantum gravity Hanno Sahlmann; 11. Loop quantum gravity and cosmology Martin Bojowald; 12. The microscopic dynamics of quantum space as a group field theory Daniele Oriti; 13. Causal dynamical triangulations and the quest for quantum gravity Jan Ambjørn, J. Jurkiewicz and Renate Loll; 14. Proper time is stochastic time in 2D quantum gravity Jan Ambjorn, Renate Loll, Y. Watabiki, W. Westra and S. Zohren; 15. Logic is to the quantum as geometry is to gravity Rafael Sorkin; 16. Causal sets: discreteness without symmetry breaking Joe Henson; 17. The Big Bang, quantum gravity, and black-hole information loss Roger Penrose; Index.

  2. The VENμS super-spectral camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topaz, Jeremy; Tinto, Francesc; Hagolle, Olivier

    2006-09-01

    A 5m GSD satellite camera with 12 narrow spectral bands in the VNIR region is being developed by El-Op, Israel, for a cooperative project between CNES (France; the Israel Space Agency. The satellite, called "VENμS" (Vegetation and Environment monitoring on a New Micro-Satellite) will enable evaluation of the use of high-resolution, high repetitivity, super-spectral imaging data for vegetation and environmental monitoring. The camera will image a limited number of selected sites around the globe with a two-day revisit interval. Highly demanding requirements for signal-to-noise ratio, radiometric accuracy, band-to-band registration and precise location on the ground will ensure the validity of the data. It will also help to define the optimal set of bands and the image processing algorithms of future instruments in the framework of the GMES program. The satellite bus will be built by Israel Aircraft Industries and will also carry an experimental ion propulsion system developed by Rafael, Israel).

  3. NRGsuite: a PyMOL plugin to perform docking simulations in real time using FlexAID

    PubMed Central

    Gaudreault, Francis; Morency, Louis-Philippe; Najmanovich, Rafael J.

    2015-01-01

    Ligand protein docking simulations play a fundamental role in understanding molecular recognition. Herein we introduce the NRGsuite, a PyMOL plugin that permits the detection of surface cavities in proteins, their refinements, calculation of volume and use, individually or jointly, as target binding-sites for docking simulations with FlexAID. The NRGsuite offers the users control over a large number of important parameters in docking simulations including the assignment of flexible side-chains and definition of geometric constraints. Furthermore, the NRGsuite permits the visualization of the docking simulation in real time. The NRGsuite give access to powerful docking simulations that can be used in structure-guided drug design as well as an educational tool. The NRGsuite is implemented in Python and C/C++ with an easy to use package installer. The NRGsuite is available for Windows, Linux and MacOS. Availability and implementation: http://bcb.med.usherbrooke.ca/flexaid. Contact: rafael.najmanovich@usherbroke.ca Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26249810

  4. Fluvial sediments, concretions, evaporates at Hanksville, Utah: An analogue field study for Gale crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orgel, C.; Battler, M.; Foing, B. H.; Van't Woud, H.; Maiwald, V.; Cross, M.; Ono, A.

    2013-09-01

    On 6th August 2012, Curiosity landed in Gale crater, Mars. Initial measurements and pictures showed sedimentary rocks that had been deposited by fluvial activity, e.g., alluvial fan and stream deposits. Such deposits are common in desert environments on Earth. The goal of the ILEWG EuroMoonMars project (February 23rd-March 9th,2013)was to conduct field studies in order to identify and study environments that are analogous to those that Curiosity has studied and will study at Gale crater. Several field campaigns (EuroGeoMars2009 and DOMMEX/ILEWG EuroMoonMars from November 2009 to March 2010) had been conducted at the Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS) [3] near Hanksville, Utah, in the vicinity of the San Rafael swell. The aim of the ILEWG EuroMoonMars 2013 project was to identify terrestrial analog sites for Curiosity exploration. The stratigraphy of the area consists of Jurassic and Cretaceous strat a[5] of which the Summerville Formation, the Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation, and the Dakota Sandstone were studied. Widespread inverted channels on Mars have been identified through orbiter imagery data [6], e.g., at Gale crater. Concretions also appear to be common on Mars and have been found by the Opportunity rover at Meridiani Planum [4] and the Curiosity rover at Yellowknife Bay (Fig. 1).

  5. Summary of oil and gas drilling activities in Utah, 1989-1990

    SciTech Connect

    Laine, M.D. ); Chidsey, T.C. )

    1991-06-01

    A total of 87 exploration and development wells were completed in Utah during 1989 and 76 wells during 1990. Some wildcats were drilled along established trends or structures, but many tested new plays or concepts. Most drilling activity occurred in the Paradox and Uinta basins, resulting in a number of significant wildcat discoveries and field extensions. In the Paradox basin, the search for Pennsylvanian algal mounds in the Desert Creek and Ismay zones continued to be the dominant play. Improved techniques were employed to locate mound facies and porosity zones. Eleven new fields were discovered in the basin during 1989 and 1990. Flow rates as high as 5,000 BOPD were reported from Chuska Energy Company's 1989 discovery, the 1 Sahgzie, in southern San Juan County. A continuing extensive and successful drilling program by that company has increased widespread interest in the region. In the Uinta basin, most exploration was concentrated adjacent to known fields. Other significant activity included (1) tests for Cretaceous coal bed methane; (2) reestablishment of Ferron Formation (Cretaceous) production in the Flat Canyon area, Wasatch plateau; and (3) carbon dioxide exploration, Aquarius plateau. Significant unsuccessful wildcats explored for (1) buried Paleozoic hills; Basin and Range; (2) Dakota Formation (Cretaceous) fluvial sands, southern Moxa arch; (3) Kaibab Formation (Permian) updip porosity pinch-outs and truncations, San Rafael swell; and (4) hydrodynamically trapped oil in the Paleozoic section of the Colorado plateau. A total of 113 development wells were completed in Utah during 1989 and 1990.

  6. Molecular characterization of hepatitis E virus in patients with acute hepatitis in Venezuela.

    PubMed

    García, Cristina Gutiérrez; Sánchez, Doneyla; Villalba, Maria Caridad Montalvo; Pujol, Flor Helene; de Los Ángeles Rodríguez Lay, Licel; Pinto, Belquis; Chacón, Elsa Patricia; Guzmán, Maria Guadalupe

    2012-07-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) causes a common infection in developing countries. HEV infection occurs as outbreaks, as sporadic clinical cases and as large epidemics in endemic areas. The objective of this study was to determine the presence of HEV infection in patients with clinical suspicion of hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection, referred to the Instituto Nacional de Higiene "Rafael Rangel" in Venezuela. Seventy-four sera were tested for anti-HAV and anti-HEV IgM antibodies. HEV-RNA was amplified from anti-HEV IgM positive sera using nested reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for ORF1 (RNA dependent RNA polymerase region) and the amplicons sequenced for phylogenetic analysis. The frequency of anti-HEV IgM was 22/74 (30%) in the samples tested. Dual infection with HAV and HEV was found in 31% (12/39) of anti-HAV IgM positive patients. Viremia was detected in 3/22 (14%) of sera positive for anti-HEV IgM. Two HEV strains were classified as genotype 1 and one as genotype 3, which were closely related to Yam 67 (north of India) and US1 isolates from the USA, respectively. These findings suggest that HEV is an important cause of acute viral hepatitis in Venezuela as a single infection or co-infection with HAV, with high morbidity in children and young adults suggesting that this infection is endemic in Venezuela.

  7. Soil moisture under contrasted atmospheric conditions in Eastern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azorin-Molina, César; Cerdà, Artemi; Vicente-Serrano, Sergio M.

    2014-05-01

    , Intraannual changes, Atmospheric parameters, Eastern Spain Acknowledgements The research projects GL2008-02879/BTE, LEDDRA 243857 and RECARE FP7 project 603498 supported this research. References: Azorin-Molina, C., Connell, B.H., Baena-Calatrava, R. 2009. Sea-breeze convergence zones from AVHRR over the Iberian Mediterranean Area and the Isle of Mallorca, Spain. Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology 48 (10), 2069-2085. Azorin-Molina, C., Vicente-Serrano, S. M., Cerdà, A. 2013. Soil moisture changes in two experimental sites in Eastern Spain. Irrigation versus rainfed orchards under organic farming. EGU, Geophysical Research Abstracts, EGU2013-13286. Bodí, M.B., Mataix-Solera, J., Doerr, S.H. & Cerdà, A. 2011. The wettability of ash from burned vegetation and its relationship to Mediterranean plant species type, burn severity and total organic carbon content. Geoderma, 160, 599-607. 10.1016/j.geoderma.2010.11.009 Cerdà, A. 1995. Soil moisture regime under simulated rainfall in a three years abandoned field in Southeast Spain. Physics and Chemistry of The Earth, 20 (3-4), 271-279. Cerdà, A. 1999. Seasonal and spatial variations in infiltration rates in badland surfaces under Mediterranean climatic conditions. Water Resources Research, 35 (1) 319-328. Cerdà, A. 2002. The effect of season and parent material on water erosion on highly eroded soils in eastern Spain. Journal of Arid Environments, 52, 319-337. García-Fayos, P. García-Ventoso, B. Cerdà, A. 2000. Limitations to Plant establishment on eroded slopes in Southeastern Spain. Journal of Vegetation Science, 11- 77- 86. Ghafoor, A., Murtaza, G., Rehman, M. Z., Saifullah Sabir, M. 2012. Reclamation and salt leaching efficiency for tile drained saline-sodic soil using marginal quality water for irrigating rice and wheat crops. Land Degradation & Development, 23: 1 -9. DOI 10.1002/ldr.1033 Johnston, C. R., Vance, G. F., Ganjegunte, G. K. 2013. Soil properties changes following irrigation with coalbed natural

  8. Radar image San Francisco Bay Area, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The San Francisco Bay Area in California and its surroundings are shown in this radar image from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). On this image, smooth areas, such as the bay, lakes, roads and airport runways appear dark, while areas with buildings and trees appear bright. Downtown San Francisco is at the center and the city of Oakland is at the right across the San Francisco Bay. Some city areas, such as the South of Market district in San Francisco, appear bright due to the alignment of streets and buildings with respect to the incoming radar beam. Three of the bridges spanning the Bay are seen in this image. The Bay Bridge is in the center and extends from the city of San Francisco to Yerba Buena and Treasure Islands, and from there to Oakland. The Golden Gate Bridge is to the left and extends from San Francisco to Sausalito. The Richmond-San Rafael Bridge is in the upper right and extends from San Rafael to Richmond. Angel Island is the large island east of the Golden Gate Bridge, and lies north of the much smaller Alcatraz Island. The Alameda Naval Air Station is seen just below the Bay Bridge at the center of the image. Two major faults bounding the San Francisco-Oakland urban areas are visible on this image. The San Andreas fault, on the San Francisco peninsula, is seen on the left side of the image. The fault trace is the straight feature filled with linear reservoirs, which appear dark. The Hayward fault is the straight feature on the right side of the image between the urban areas and the hillier terrain to the east.

    This radar image was acquired by just one of SRTM's two antennas and, consequently, does not show topographic data, but only the strength of the radar signal reflected from the ground. This signal, known as radar backscatter, provides insight into the nature of the surface, including its roughness, vegetation cover and urbanization. The overall faint striping pattern in the images is a data processing artifact due to the

  9. A cross section of the Los Angeles Area: Seismically active fold and thrust belt, The 1987 Whittier Narrows earthquake, and earthquake hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Thomas L.; Namson, Jay; Yerkes, Robert F.

    1989-07-01

    Retrodeformable cross sections across the Los Angeles area interpret the Pliocene to Quaternary deformation to be a developing basement-involved fold and thrust belt. The fold and thrust belt is seismically active as evidenced by the 1987 Whittier Narrows earthquake (ML = 5.9) and the 1971 San Fernando earthquake (MW = 6.6). The structural geology of the Los Angeles area is dominated by three major compressional uplift trends: (1) the Palos Verdes anticlinorium and western shelf, (2) the Santa Monica Mountains anticlinorium, and (3) the Verdugo Mountains-San Rafael Hills and the San Gabriel Mountains. These trends result from major thrust ramps off a detachment(s) at 10-15 km depth. Thrusts of the Verdugo Mountains-San Rafael Hills and the San Gabriel Mountains reach the surface; the other two uplifts are associated with blind thrusts. Compressional seismicity is concentrated along these thrust ramps. The 1987 Whittier Narrows earthquake probably occurred on the Elysian Park thrust which underlies the Santa Monica Mountains anticlinorium. The thrust interpretation accounts for the geometry of the anticlinorium, the seismological characteristics of the earthquake, and the geometry of coseismic uplift. The earthquake and aftershocks occurred within a structurally complex, narrow zone of Miocene and Pliocene northwest trending faults that cross the anticlinorium at a high angle. These northwest trending faults are interpreted to be reactivated faults now behaving as tears in the Elysian Park thrust and not the result of active right-lateral deformation extending into the Whittier Narrows area. Our analysis suggests the Whittier Narrows earthquake sequence occurred within a structurally weakened zone along the Elysian Park thrust. We also suggest that the Whittier fault is not an important Quaternary structure and may not be seismogenic. The regional cross section is a nonunique solution, and other possible solutions are considered. Multiple solutions arise from the

  10. Preoperative TRAM free flap volume estimation for breast reconstruction in lean patients.

    PubMed

    Minn, Kyung Won; Hong, Ki Yong; Lee, Sang Woo

    2010-04-01

    To obtain pleasing symmetry in breast reconstruction with transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) free flap, a large amount of abdominal flap is elevated and remnant tissue is trimmed in most cases. However, elevation of abundant abdominal flap can cause excessive tension in donor site closure and increase the possibility of hypertrophic scarring especially in lean patients. The TRAM flap was divided into 4 zones in routine manner; the depth and dimension of the 4 zones were obtained using ultrasound and AutoCAD (Autodesk Inc., San Rafael, CA), respectively. The acquired numbers were then multiplied to obtain an estimate of volume of each zone and the each zone volume was added. To confirm the relation between the estimated volume and the actual volume, authors compared intraoperative actual TRAM flap volumes with preoperative estimated volumes in 30 consecutive TRAM free flap breast reconstructions. The estimated volumes and the actual elevated volumes of flap were found to be correlated by regression analysis (r = 0.9258, P < 0.01). According to this result, we could confirm the reliability of the preoperative volume estimation using our method. Afterward, the authors applied this method to 7 lean patients by estimation and revision of the design and obtained symmetric results with minimal donor site morbidity. Preoperative estimation of TRAM flap volume with ultrasound and AutoCAD (Autodesk Inc.) allow the authors to attain the precise volume desired for elevation. This method provides advantages in terms of minimal flap trimming, easier closure of donor sites, reduced scar widening and symmetry, especially in lean patients.

  11. Volcanic Hazards of San Miguel Volcano, El Salvador--Initial Work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar, D.; Chesner, C. A.

    2001-12-01

    San Miguel is a Holocene volcano (2130 m) on the volcanic front that has erupted mafic lavas and tephras in small VEI 2 events numerous times in the past 300 years. The city of San Miguel, El Salvador's second largest city ({ ~}300,000) and the economic center of eastern El Salvador, is built 11 km away on the lowermost northeastern flank of the volcano, 2000 m below its summit. A few large towns are built on the west and southwest flanks including San Jorge, San Rafael Oriente, and El Transito. The Pan American and Coastal highways cross the lowermost northern and southern flanks respectively. Coffee plantations cover a large portion of the northern flank whereas the southern flank is mostly ranch land. Historic lava flows from San Miguel occurred between 1699 and 1884 and were mainly erupted from flank vents. Ash fall associated with historic flank eruptions has been reported up to 20 km from the volcano, and fell on the city of San Miguel in 1931. In 1976, small scale fountaining occurred in the summit crater and produced minor ash fall within a few km of the crater. Recently, small debris flows composed mostly of scoria have caused property damage on the northwestern flank of the volcano. Based on its historic activity and its current seismicity, gas emission and rock alteration, San Miguel is perhaps El Salvador's most likely candidate for hazardous activity. We are beginning a hazard study for San Miguel volcano that includes assessment of the hazards from lava flows, ash falls, pyroclastic flows, debris flows, and debris avalanches. This study is important to El Salvador, where volcanic risk is ubiquitous and poorly quantified. As an initial step we have sampled and analyzed 75 samples of lavas, tephras, and pyroclastic flow deposits from the volcano and its vicinity. These analyses indicate that the exposed portion of the cone consists exclusively of basalts and basaltic andesites.

  12. Extraterrestrials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuckerman, Ben; Hart, Michael H.

    1995-09-01

    1. An explanation for the absence of extraterrestrials on Earth Michael H. Hart; 2. One attempt to find where they are: NASA's high resolution microwave survey Jill Tarter; 3. An examination of claims that extraterrestrial visitors to Earth are being observed Robert Sheaffer; 4. The likelihood of interstellar colonization, and the absence of its evidence Sebastian von Hoerner; 5. Preemption of the galaxy by the first advanced civilization Ronald Bracewell; 6. Stellar evolution: motivation for the mass interstellar migrations Ben Zuckerman; 7. Interstellar propulsion systems Freeman Dyson; 8. Interstellar travel: a review Ian A. Crawford; 9. Settlements in space, and interstellar travel Cliff Singer; 10. Terraforming James Oberg; 11. Estimates of expansion time scales Eric M. Jones; 12. A search for tritium sources in our Solar System may reveal the presence of space-probes from other stellar systems Michael D. Papagiannis; 13. Primordial organic cosmochemistry Cyril Ponnamperuma and Rafael Navarro-Gonzalez; 14. Chance and the origin of life Edward Argyle; 15. The RNA world: life before DNA and protein Gerald F. Joyce; 16. The search for extraterrestrial intelligence Ernst Nayr; 17. Alone in a crowded universe Jared Diamond; 18. Possible forms of life in environments very different from the Earth Robert Shapiro and Gerald Feinberg; 19. Cosmological SETI frequency standards J. Richard Gott, III; 20. Galactic chemical evolution: implications for the existence of habitable planets Virginia Trimble; 21. The frequency of planetary systems in the galaxy Jonathan I. Lunine; 22. Atmospheric evolution, the Drake equation, and DNA: sparse life in an infinite universe Michael H. Hart.

  13. [Ancient urology in the Kingdom of Valencia. Height and declivity].

    PubMed

    López Alcina, E; Pérez Albacete, M; Canovas Ivorra, J A

    2007-03-01

    During the second half of the XVIth century the interest of the clinicians moves towards the venereal ailments and the urethral carnosities (narrowness) to the detriment of the litiasic processes. They are of special relevancy for us, in the period summit of the medical sciences in Valencian lands, Miguel Juan Pascual who in his work "Morborum internorum" (1555) there synthesizes everything known on the syphilis in this epoch, its origin, diagnosis and treatment, Juan Calvo considered one of the best surgeons of the XVIth century and Miguel de Leriza author of the "Tractatus of the way of treating the carnosities and corns of the route of the urine". The baroque was an epoch of general crisis in Spain and in the ancient Kingdom of Valencia, specially clear in fields as the anatomy and the surgery. The serious decadence that suffered during these years the scientific Valencian production turns out to be evident. Not even an alone anatomical text was published in the first half of the XVIIth century, whereas in the surgical area the "Summary of everything about the theoretical and practice of Surgery", of Alonso Romano can be considered deigns of mention. The illustration brought new reformists airs and around the flourishing scientific academies, there congregated the most select of the Valencian intellectuality. Andres Piquer Arrufat is considered to be the maximum figure of the Valencian medicine of this period. Not even after the war of independence and the reign of Fernando VII who died in 1833 when there sit down the bases of the modern urology and the consolidation as speciality at the end of the XIXth. The Valencian principal figures of this period are Miguel Más y Soler, Alejandro Settler and especially Rafael Mollá y Rodrigo.

  14. A numerical simulation of the Catalina Eddy

    SciTech Connect

    Ueyoshi, Kyozo; Roads, J.O.; Alpert, J.

    1991-12-31

    A shallow cyclonic eddy termed the Catalina Eddy has occasionally been observed during summer in the bight of southern California. The Catalina Eddy occurs within {approximately}100 km from the coastal mountains with a depth typically extending up to the marine inversion level of several hundred meters above sea level and a diameter on the order of 100--200 km. The Catalina Eddy is produced by the interaction between the synoptic-scale northerly flow and the formidable topography along the southern California coast. A favorable synoptic situation that enhances the increased low-level climatological northerly flow along the central California coastline is the presence of the prominent east-west pressure gradient between the subtropical East Pacific high and the inland thermal low over California. Increased northerlies impinging on the San Rafael mountains north of Santa Barbara result in enhanced mesoscale lee troughing in the bight and establishment of a narrow ridge alongshore, leading to establishment of cyclonic vorticity in the bight. This paper describes numerical simulations and predictions of a Catalina Eddy event with a high-resolution multi-level limited area model. The model is initialized and forced at the lateral boundaries by the National Meteorological Center`s (NMC) 2.5{degree} {times} 2.5{degree} global objective analysis and also by NMC`s medium range forecast model (MRF) 1--10 day forecasts. In the authors previous effort to simulate mesoscale disturbances such as the Catalina Eddy the integrations were performed up to 1 model-day utilizing the NMC analysis as fixed lateral boundary conditions. In this paper they describe the results of continuous 5- to 7-day simulations of the Catalina Eddy event of 26--30 June 1988 by utilizing time-dependent lateral boundary conditions obtained from NMC`s global objective analysis as well as NMC`s MRF forecasts.

  15. Adverse consequences of immunostimulation.

    PubMed

    Ponce, Rafael

    2008-01-01

    The therapeutic uses of immunostimulatory agents are generally in the treatments of infections or cancer. The traditional example of vaccination is one form of immunostimulation used in the prevention of pathogenic infections or cancer (e.g., human papillomavirus vaccine). Recombinant cytokines are increasingly used to stimulate immune system function. For example, interferon-alpha (IFNalpha) and interleukin (IL)-2 have been used to treat chronic hepatitis C virus infection and metastatic melanoma, respectively. In contrast, monoclonal antibodies are used to target malignant cells for elimination via antibody-dependent cytotoxicity mechanisms or apoptosis, including the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab and the anti-CD56 monoclonal antibody alemtuzumab used in the treatment of B-cell malignancies, and the anti-erb2 receptor antibody trastuzumab used in the treatment of breast cancer. Finally, immunostimulation may develop via modulation of pathways involved in immune system regulation. For example, the anti-CD28 monoclonal antibody TGN1412 was developed as an agonist of regulatory T-cells for treatment of T-cell-mediated chronic inflammatory diseases or leukemias. A panel was convened to discuss potential toxicities associated with immunostimulation. At the Immunotoxicology IV meeting in 2006, a panel, moderated by Dr. Robert House (Dynport Vaccine Co., Frederick, MD), included Drs. Gary Burleson (Burleson Research Technologies, Inc., Raleigh, NC), Kenneth Hastings (US FDA, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research [CDER], Rockville, MD), Barbara Mounho (Amgen, Thousand Oaks, CA), Rafael Ponce (ZymoGenetics, Inc., Seattle, WA), Mark Wing (Huntington Life Sciences, Cambridgeshire, United Kingdom), Lauren Black (Navigators Consulting, Sparks, NV) and Anne Pilaro (US FDA, CDER, Rockville, MD). This paper reviews the major identified toxicities associated with immunostimulation, including the acute phase response, cell and tissue abnormalities/injury, cytokine

  16. Low-BTU gas in the Rocky Mountain region - Colorado, Wyoming, New Mexico, and Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Tremain, C.M. ); Broadhead, R.E. ); Chidsey, T.C. Jr. ); Doelger, M. ); Morgan, C.D. )

    1993-08-01

    There are over 100 reservoirs in Colorado, Wyoming, New Mexico, and Utah that produce or could produce low-BTU (heating value less than 900 BTU/ft[sup 3]) gas. Reservoirs range in age from Devonian to Cretaceous; reservoir lithologies include both carbonates and sandstones. Frequently, the low-BTU gas (CO[sub 2], N[sub 2], and He) is a byproduct of normal hydrocarbon production. CO[sub 2]-rich gas occurs in southwest to east-central Utah, in the southeastern Paradox basin (Utah and Colorado), in the North Park basin (Colorado), in southeast Colorado and northeast New Mexico, and in the Green River and Wind River basins (Wyoming). Five fields produce nearly pure (98%) CO[sub 2]. The 1990 annual CO[sub 2] production from these fields was North and South McCallum (Colorado), 1.7 bcf; McElmo (Colorado), 205 bcf; Sheep Mountain (Colorado), 70.7 bcf; and Bravo Dome (New Mexico), 119.7 bcf. Big Piney-LaBarge (Wyoming) produced 120 bcf of CO[sub 2] (at a concentration of 65%) in 1990. Most of the CO[sub 2] is used in enhanced oil recovery. Nitrogen-rich gas is found in the southern Green River basin (Utah and Wyoming), east flank of the San Rafael uplift (Utah), northern Paradox basin (Utah), Uncompahgre uplift (Utah and Colorado), Douglas Creek arch (Colorado), Hugoton embayment (Colorado), Las Animas arch (Colorado), Permian basin (New Mexico), and Four Corners platform (New Mexico). Helium is sometimes associated with the nitrogen and in concentrations of up to 8% in New Mexico and Colorado, 2.8% in Utah, and 1% in Wyoming.

  17. Holocene sediment accumulation rates in fjords and bays of Chilean Patagonia and the Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellner, J. S.; Anderson, J. B.; Milliken, K.; Fernandez, R.; Michalchuk, B.; Boyd, B.

    2007-12-01

    Beginning in 2005 and ending in May of 2007, we completed a series of four research cruises in the fjords and bays of Chilean Patagonia and the Antarctic Peninsula aimed, in part, at determining the style and rate of Holocene sediment accumulation in a range of glacial settings. Our original hypothesis stated that rates of glacial erosion are a function of sliding speed, and are therefore expected to diminish sharply as basal temperatures drop below the melting point. To test this hypothesis, we measured sediment accumulation in tidewater glacier fjords ranging from fast-moving temperate glaciers in Patagonia to slower moving polar glaciers on the Antarctic Peninsula. Four fjords were surveyed in Patagonia ranging from San Rafael fjord in the Northern Patagonia ice field to Marinelli fjord in Tierra del Fuego. The cruises to the Antarctic Peninsula included two SHALDRIL legs during which drill cores recovered 108 m and 80 m of Holocene sediment in Maxwell Bay, South Shetland Islands, and the Firth of Tay in the northwestern Weddell Sea, respectively. An additional nine fjords across the northern peninsula were surveyed with kasten and jumbo piston cores. To date, we have completed nearly 100 radiocarbon dates from fossil carbonate material, both shells and foraminifera, extracted from the sediment cores obtained in these fjords. Our initial results highlight the complexity of the controls on sediment yields and the extreme variability in sediment accumulation amongst fjords. While climate may be the first order control on glacier erosion rates and sediment transport to bays and fjords, several other factors must significantly influence these processes and may mask the broader signal. Our ongoing work with this newly acquired comprehensive dataset is examining additional controls including drainage basin size, precipitation gradient, altitude of the glaciers, and glacial substrate.

  18. A validation of the fibre orientation and fibre length attrition prediction for long fibre-reinforced thermoplastics

    SciTech Connect

    Hopmann, Ch.; Weber, M.; Haag, J. van; Schöngart, M.

    2015-05-22

    To improve the mechanical performance of polymeric parts, fibre reinforcement has established in industrial applications during the last decades. Next to the widely used Short Fibre-reinforced Thermoplastics (SFT) the use of Long Fibre-reinforced Thermoplastics (LFT) is increasingly growing. Especially for non-polar polymeric matrices like polypropylene (PP), longer fibres can significantly improve the mechanical performance. As with every kind of discontinuous fibre reinforcement the fibre orientations (FO) show a high impact on the mechanical properties. On the contrary to SFT where the local fibre length distribution (FLD) can be often neglected, for LFT the FLD show a high impact on the material’s properties and has to be taken into account in equal measure to the FOD. Recently numerical models are available in commercial filling simulation software and allow predicting both the local FOD and FLD in LFT parts. The aim of this paper is to compare i.) the FOD results and ii) the FLD results from available orientation- and fibre length attrition-models to those obtained from experimental data. The investigations are conducted by the use of different injection moulded specimens made from long glass fibre reinforced PP. In order to determine the FOD, selected part sections are examined by means of Computed Tomographic (CT) analyses. The fully three dimensional measurement of the FOD is then performed by digital image processing using grey scale correlation. The FLD results are also obtained by using digital image processing after a thermal pyrolytic separation of the polymeric matrix from the fibres. Further the FOD and the FLD are predicted by using a reduced strain closure (RSC) as well as an anisotropic rotary diffusion - reduced strain closure model (ARD-RSC) and Phelps-Tucker fibre length attrition model implemented in the commercial filling software Moldflow, Autodesk Inc., San Rafael, CA, USA.

  19. Stratigraphy and structure of the Miners Mountain area, Wayne County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luedke, Robert G.

    1953-01-01

    The Miners Mountain area includes about 85 square miles in Wayne County, south-central Utah. The area is semiarid and characterized by cliffs and deep canyons. Formations range in age from Permian to Upper Jurassic and have an aggregate thickness of about 3,500 feet. Permian formations are the buff Coconino sandstone and the overlying white, limy, shert-containing Kaibab limestone. Unconformably overlying the Kaihab is the lower Triassic Moenkopi formation of reddish-brown and yellow mudstone, siltstone, and sandstone; it contains the Sinbad limestone member (?) in the lower part. Thin, lenticular Shinarump conglomerate unconformably overlies the Moenkopi, but grades upward into the Upper Triassic Chinle formation of variegated mudstone with some interbedded sandstone and limestone lenses. Uncomformably overlying the Chinle are the Wingate sandstone, Kayenta formation, and Navajo sandstone of the Jurassic (?) Glen Canyon group, which consist of red to white sandstone. Only the lower part of the Carmel formation of the Upper Jurassic San Rafael group is exposed in the area; it consists of variegated siltstone, sandstone, limestone, and gypsum. The conspicuous structural feature in the area is the Teasdale anticline which trends northwest, is about 14 miles long, and is asymmetric with a steeper west flank. Bounding the anticline on the northeast and east is the Capitol Reef monocline, the northern part of the Waterpocket Fold. Strata in the area are broken by steeply-dipping normal faults with small displacements, except for the Teasdale fault which has a maximum displacement of over 1,000 feet. Jointing is prominent in some formations. The major orogenic movement in the area is believed to be late Upper Cretaceous to early Tertiary. Epeirogenic uplift occurred intermittently throughout Tertiary and perhaps Quaternary time.

  20. The shakedown.

    PubMed

    Bodrock, Phil

    2005-03-01

    Customer Strategy Solutions, a California-based developer of order-fulfillment systems, is facing a shakedown. Six months after the firm's CEO, Pavlo Zhuk, set up a software development center in Kiev, local bureaucrats say the company hasn't filed all the tax schedules it should have. Moreover, Ukrainian tax officials claim that the company owes the government tax arrears. Zhuk is shocked; he and his colleagues have done everything by the book. This isn't the first time Zhuk has encountered trouble in Ukraine. In the process of getting the development center up and running, a state-owned telecommunications utility had made it difficult for Zhuk to get the phone lines his company needed. Senior telecom manager Vasyl Feodorovych Mylofienko had told Zhuk it would take three years to install the lines in his office-but for a certain price, Mylofienko had added, the lines could be functioning the following week. Even as the picture of rampant bribery and corruption in Ukraine becomes clear, Zhuk still doesn't want to pull out of the country. Of Ukrainian descent, he has dreams of helping to modernize the country. By paying his programmers more than they could make at any local company, he hopes to raise their standard of living so they can afford three meals a day without having to barter, stand in queues for hours, or moonlight. And yet, he isn't sure he can keep compromising his principles for the sake of the greater good. Should Customer Strategy Solutions pay off the Ukrainian tax officials? Commenting on this fictional case study are Alan L. Boeckmann, the chairman and CEO of Fluor Corporation; Rafael Di Tella, a professor at Harvard Business School; Thomas W. Dunfee, the Kolodny Professor of Social Responsibility and a professor of legal studies at Wharton; and Bozidar Djelic, the former finance and economy minister of Serbia.

  1. Legal consequences for torture in children cases: the Gomez Paquiyauri Brothers vs Peru case.

    PubMed

    Tinta, Monica Feria

    2009-01-01

    The Gomez Paquiyauri Brothers case, before the Inter-American Court of Human Rights, was the first international case concerning the protection of children in the context of armed conflict where an international court stated the law concerning the duties of States towards children even in the context of war, and provided for reparations. As such it represents a landmark decision. The case arose from the illegal detention, torture and extrajudicial execution of two minors, Emilio and Rafael Gomez Paquiyauri, at the hands of Peruvian Police in 1991, under the Fujimori Administration at a time when the internal war in Peru was at its peak. Unlike most cases coming to the jurisdiction of the Inter-American Court, the case had been subject to domestic criminal investigations that had led to the convictions of two low ranking policemen. Yet a more subtle pattern of impunity lied at the root of the case. Torture had been denied by the State, and the prosecutions of low ranking policemen had intended to cover up the responsibility of those who ordered a policy of torture and executions (including the existence of secret codes for the torture and elimination of suspects of "terrorism") during the years of the internal armed conflict in Peru. The joint work of legal and medical expertise in the litigation of the case permitted the establishment of the facts and the law, obtaining an award of 740,500 dollars for the victims and a number of measures of reparation including guarantees of non-repetition and satisfaction, such as the naming of a school after the victims.

  2. General hydrogeology of the aquifers of Mesozoic age, Upper Colorado River Basin - excluding the San Juan Basin - Colorado, Utah, Wyoming, and Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Freethey, G.W.; Kimball, B.A.; Wilberg, D.E.; Hood, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    Stratigraphic, hydraulic, and water-level data obtained from water-well and petroleum test-hole records indicate that the Mesozoic rocks in the Upper Colorado River Basin include many potential aquifers. Structural deformation during late Mesozoic and early Cenozoic time caused large parts of the most productive aquifers to be removed by erosion; other parts are deeply buried by younger deposits. Three hydrogeologic units include aquifers. The lower unit consists of the Moenkopi and Chinle Formations. The middle unit consists of the Glen Canyon Group, the San Rafael Group, and the Morrison Formation; all containing sandstone aquifers. The Glen Canyon Group is only partly saturated where it crops out. It may contain from 600 to 1200 million acre-feet of drainable water in storage, but only a fraction is feasibly recoverable. The upper unit consists of two aquifer systems, the Mesaverde and Dakota systems, separated by a confining system, the Mancos Shale. Primary hydraulic-conductivity values are characteristically less than 10 feet per day. Fracturing increases hydraulic conductivity values near land surface; however, the thicker the overburden, the less likely the effect of this secondary permeability factor. The large volume rather than permeability of saturated rock accounts for the favorable water-supply potential of the Mesozoic age formations. . Where the middle hydrogeologic unit occurs near the surface or only at shallow depths it contains fresh to slightly saline water. Where deeply buried it contains water with concentrations of dissolved solids greater than 35,000 milligrams per liter (brine). The Mesaverde Group also contains water of varying quality; however, the sandstone lenses that contain usable water supplies are only locally continuous. Where the formation is deeply buried, it contains brine. 16 refs., 20 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. `Third' Quantization of Vacuum Einstein Gravity and Free Yang-Mills Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raptis, Ioannis

    2007-05-01

    Certain pivotal results from various applications of Abstract Differential Geometry (ADG) to gravity and gauge theories are presently collected and used to argue that we already possess a geometrically (pre)quantized, second quantized and manifestly background spacetime manifold independent vacuum Einstein gravitational field dynamics. The arguments carry also mutatis mutandis to the case of free Yang-Mills theories, since from the ADG-theoretic perspective gravity is regarded as another gauge field theory. The powerful algebraico-categorical, sheaf cohomological conceptual and technical machinery of ADG is then employed, based on the fundamental ADG-theoretic conception of a field as a pair ({mathcal{E}},{mathcal{D}}) consisting of a vector sheaf {mathcal{E}} and an algebraic connection {mathcal{D}} acting categorically as a sheaf morphism on {mathcal{E}}'s local sections, to introduce a ‘universal’, because expressly functorial, field quantization scenario coined third quantization. Although third quantization is fully covariant, on intuitive and heuristic grounds alone it formally appears to follow a canonical route; albeit, in a purely algebraic and, in contradistinction to geometric (pre)quantization and (canonical) second quantization, manifestly background geometrical spacetime manifold independent fashion, as befits ADG. All in all, from the ADG-theoretic vantage, vacuum Einstein gravity and free Yang-Mills theories are regarded as external spacetime manifold unconstrained, third quantized, pure gauge field theories. The paper abounds with philosophical smatterings and speculative remarks about the potential import and significance of our results to current and future Quantum Gravity research. A postscript gives a brief account of this author's personal encounters with Rafael Sorkin and his work.

  4. Naming a phantom – the quest to find the identity of Ulluchu, an unidentified ceremonial plant of the Moche culture in Northern Peru

    PubMed Central

    Bussmann, Rainer W; Sharon, Douglas

    2009-01-01

    The botanical identification of Ulluchu, an iconic fruit frequently depicted in the art of the pre-Columbian Moche culture that flourished from A.D. 100–800 on the Peruvian north coast, has eluded scientists since its documentation in ceramics in the 1930s. Moche fine-line drawings of Ulluchu normally depict seed-pods or seeds floating in the air in sacrificial scenes, associated with runners and messengers or intoxicated priests. It is a grooved, comma-shaped fruit with an enlarged calyx found mainly in fine-line scenes painted on Moche ceramics. The term first appeared without linguistic explanation in the work of pioneer Moche scholar Rafael Larco Hoyle, and the identification of the plant was seen as the largest remaining challenge in current archaebotany at the Peruvian North coast. The name Ulluchu seems to have been coined by Larco. According to his description, the name originated in the Virú River valley, and is supposedly of Mochica origin. However, there is no linguistic evidence that such a term indeed existed in the Mochica or Yunga language. We conclude that Ulluchu can be identified as a group of species of the genus Guarea (Meliaceae) based on morphological characteristics. In addition, the chemical composition of the plant's compounds supports the thesis that it was used in a sacrificial context to improve the extraction of blood from sacrificial victims. We also suggest that a ground preparation of Guarea seeds, when inhaled, may have been used as a hallucinogen. However, more detailed phytochemical research is needed to corroborate the latter hypothesis. PMID:19335907

  5. Large-scale analysis of conserved rare codon clusters suggests an involvement in co-translational molecular recognition events

    PubMed Central

    Chartier, Matthieu; Gaudreault, Francis; Najmanovich, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: An increasing amount of evidence from experimental and computational analysis suggests that rare codon clusters are functionally important for protein activity. Most of the studies on rare codon clusters were performed on a limited number of proteins or protein families. In the present study, we present the Sherlocc program and how it can be used for large scale protein family analysis of evolutionarily conserved rare codon clusters and their relation to protein function and structure. This large-scale analysis was performed using the whole Pfam database covering over 70% of the known protein sequence universe. Our program Sherlocc, detects statistically relevant conserved rare codon clusters and produces a user-friendly HTML output. Results: Statistically significant rare codon clusters were detected in a multitude of Pfam protein families. The most statistically significant rare codon clusters were predominantly identified in N-terminal Pfam families. Many of the longest rare codon clusters are found in membrane-related proteins which are required to interact with other proteins as part of their function, for example in targeting or insertion. We identified some cases where rare codon clusters can play a regulating role in the folding of catalytically important domains. Our results support the existence of a widespread functional role for rare codon clusters across species. Finally, we developed an online filter-based search interface that provides access to Sherlocc results for all Pfam families. Availability: The Sherlocc program and search interface are open access and are available at http://bcb.med.usherbrooke.ca Contact: rafael.najmanovich@usherbrooke.ca Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:22467916

  6. Side-chain rotamer changes upon ligand binding: common, crucial, correlate with entropy and rearrange hydrogen bonding

    PubMed Central

    Gaudreault, Francis; Chartier, Matthieu; Najmanovich, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Protein movements form a continuum from large domain rearrangements (including folding and restructuring) to side-chain rotamer changes and small rearrangements. Understanding side-chain flexibility upon binding is important to understand molecular recognition events and predict ligand binding. Methods: In the present work, we developed a well-curated non-redundant dataset of 188 proteins in pairs of structures in the Apo (unbound) and Holo (bound) forms to study the extent and the factors that guide side-chain rotamer changes upon binding. Results: Our analysis shows that side-chain rotamer changes are widespread with only 10% of binding sites displaying no conformational changes. Overall, at most five rotamer changes account for the observed movements in 90% of the cases. Furthermore, rotamer changes are essential in 32% of flexible binding sites. The different amino acids have a 11-fold difference in their probability to undergo changes. Side-chain flexibility represents an intrinsic property of amino acids as it correlates well with configurational entropy differences. Furthermore, on average b-factors and solvent accessible surface areas can discriminate flexible side-chains in the Apo form. Finally, there is a rearrangement of the hydrogen-bonding network upon binding primarily with a loss of H-bonds with water molecules and a gain of H-bonds with protein residues for flexible residues. Interestingly, only 25% of side chains capable of forming H-bonds do so with the ligand upon binding. In terms of drug design, this last result shows that there is a large number of potential interactions that may be exploited to modulate the specificity and sensitivity of inhibitors. Contact: rafael.najmanovich@usherbrooke.ca PMID:22962462

  7. Spatial distribution and species composition of small pelagic fishes in the Gulf of California.

    PubMed

    Lanz, Edgar; Nevárez-Martínez, Manuel O; López-Martínez, Juana; Dworak, Juan A

    2008-06-01

    Traditional regionalization methods in fisheries based on provinces or major fishing areas, includes large and arbitrary grids in which basic statistics or inferences on distribution or abundance are made. We describe a method for regionalization and analysis of fishing activities for small pelagic fisheries in the Gulf of California based on spatial patterns of landing and catch data in a Geographic Information System (GIS) environment. A fisheries database from logbooks with spatial attributes from October 2002 to June 2007 was analyzed. Landings and catching data were transformed to a Weighted Region Index (WRI) by using fuzzy logic operators. The WRI revealed fishing action centers characterized by areas with the highest WRI values, and a hierarchy for the relative importance of the regions was established. Guaymas, Desemboque de Caborca, Isla Patos, and Bahia San Rafael they were the most prominent ones. An analysis of the relative frequency of species composition showed that the Pacific sardine had an over 80 % abundance in the midriff islands, and remained as the most important in the upper gulf regions, while in the central part of the gulf, relative abundances of Pacific sardine and Northern anchovy were more balanced. Relative abundance of mackerel was significantly larger around Isla Patos than in any other place. Guaymas had the largest relative composition of Northern anchovy and the lowest values for Pacific sardine. Desemboque de Caborca showed the largest homogeneity in species relative composition. It is important to highlight that this results come from in situ data, while the results previously reported come from landing statistics by port. Therefore, the present method acknowledges the spatial differences of species by regions, additional to the traditional time series analysis.

  8. Field data collection of miscellaneous electrical loads in Northern California: Initial results

    SciTech Connect

    Greenblatt, Jeffery B.; Pratt, Stacy; Willem, Henry; Claybaugh, Erin; Desroches, Louis-Benoit; Beraki, Bereket; Nagaraju, Mythri; Price, Sarah K.; Young, Scott J.

    2013-02-25

    This report describes efforts to measure energy use of miscellaneous electrical loads (MELs) in 880 San Francisco Bay Area homes during the summer of 2012. Ten regions were selected for metering: Antioch, Berkeley, Fremont, Livermore, Marin County (San Rafael, Novato, Fairfax, and Mill Valley), Oakland/Emeryville, Pleasanton, Richmond, San Leandro, and Union City. The project focused on three major categories of devices: entertainment (game consoles, set-top boxes, televisions and video players), home office (computers, monitors and network equipment), and kitchen plug-loads (coffee/espresso makers, microwave ovens/toaster ovens/toasters, rice/slow cookers and wine chillers). These categories were important to meter because they either dominated the estimated overall energy use of MELs, are rapidly changing, or there are very little energy consumption data published. A total of 1,176 energy meters and 143 other sensors were deployed, and 90% of these meters and sensors were retrieved. After data cleaning, we obtained 711 valid device energy use measurements, which were used to estimate, for a number of device subcategories, the average time spent in high power, low power and “off” modes, the average energy use in each mode, and the average overall energy use. Consistent with observations made in previous studies, we find on average that information technology (IT) devices (home entertainment and home office equipment) consume more energy (15.0 and 13.0 W, respectively) than non-IT devices (kitchen plug-loads; 4.9 W). Opportunities for energy savings were identified in almost every device category, based on the time spent in various modes and/or the power levels consumed in those modes. Future reports will analyze the collected data in detail by device category and compare results to those obtained from prior studies.

  9. Studies of the mechanics and structure of shallow magmatic plumbing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diez, Mikel

    2008-10-01

    Volcanic activity, and the resultant deposits and structures at the Earth's surface, are the outcome of the inner workings of underground magmatic plumbing systems. These systems, essentially, consist of magma reservoirs which supply magma to the surface through volcanic conduits feeding volcanic eruptions. The mechanics and structure of plumbing systems remain largely unknown due to the obvious challenges involved in inferring volcanic processes occurring underground from observations at the surface. Nevertheless, volcanologists are beginning to gain a deeper understanding of the workings and architecture of magmatic plumbing systems from geophysical observations on active volcanoes, as well as from geological studies of the erosional remnants of ancient volcanic systems. In this work, I explore the relationship between the structure and mechanics of shallow plumbing systems and the volcanic eruptions these systems produce. I attempt to contribute to the understanding of this complex relationship by linking geological and geophysical observations of an eroded basaltic subvolcanic system, and the eruptive and tectonic activity of an active volcano, with mathematical models of magma ascent and stress transfer. The remarkable exposures of the Carmel outcrop intrusions, near the San Rafael swell, southeast Utah, U.S.A., allow detailed geological and geophysical observations of the roots of volcanic conduits that emerge from a subhorizontal magma feeder reservoir. These observations reveal a new mechanism for magma ascent and eruption triggering through gravitational instabilities created from an underlying feeding sill, and shed light on the mechanics of sill emplacement. Geophysical and geological observations of the 1999 and 1992 eruptions of the Cerro Negro volcano, Nicaragua, are used to explore the coupling between changes in the stress field and the triggering of volcanic eruptions, and magma ascent through the shallow crust. Modeling results of stress transfer

  10. Tectonic insight based on anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility and compaction studies in the Sierras Australes thrust and fold belt (southwest Gondwana boundary, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzadún, Guadalupe; Tomezzoli, Renata N.; Cesaretti, Nora N.

    2016-04-01

    The Sierras Australes fold and thrust belt (Buenos Aires Province, Argentina) was in the southwestern Gondwanaland margin during the Paleozoic. The Tunas Formation (Permian) is exposed along the eastern part of it and continues eastward beneath the Claromecó Basin. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) and compaction studies are described and compared with previous paleomagnetic studies with the aim of determining direction and magnitude of the main stresses acting during the sedimentation of the Tunas Formation. The anisotropy ellipsoids are triaxial with oblate or prolate shapes, reflecting different stages of layer parallel shortening during the evolution of the basin. Kmax axes trend NW-SE, parallel to the fold axes, while Kmin move from a horizontal (base) to a vertical orientation at the top of the succession, showing a change from a tectonic to almost a sedimentary fabric. The magnitude of anisotropy and compaction degree decreases toward the top of the succession. The AMS results are consistent with the outcrop structural observations and the compaction and paleomagnetic data. Regional pattern indicates a compression from the SW along this part of Gondwana, with a migration of the orogenic front and attenuation toward the NE in the foreland basin during the Upper Paleozoic. This deformation, locally assigned to the San Rafael noncollisional orogenic phase, is the result of the latitudinal movements toward the Equator of Gondwana (southern plates) and Laurentia (northern plates) during the Permian. This movement is the result of a rearrangement of the microplates that collided with Gondwana during the Late Devonian, to configure Pangea during the Triassic.

  11. Realization of masticatory movement by 3-dimensional simulation of the temporomandibular joint and the masticatory muscles.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Tae; Lee, Jae-Gi; Won, Sung-Yoon; Lee, Sang-Hee; Cha, Jung-Yul; Kim, Hee-Jin

    2013-07-01

    Masticatory muscles are closely involved in mastication, pronunciation, and swallowing, and it is therefore important to study the specific functions and dynamics of the mandibular and masticatory muscles. However, the shortness of muscle fibers and the diversity of movement directions make it difficult to study and simplify the dynamics of mastication. The purpose of this study was to use 3-dimensional (3D) simulation to observe the functions and movements of each of the masticatory muscles and the mandible while chewing. To simulate the masticatory movement, computed tomographic images were taken from a single Korean volunteer (30-year-old man), and skull image data were reconstructed in 3D (Mimics; Materialise, Leuven, Belgium). The 3D-reconstructed masticatory muscles were then attached to the 3D skull model. The masticatory movements were animated using Maya (Autodesk, San Rafael, CA) based on the mandibular motion path. During unilateral chewing, the mandible was found to move laterally toward the functional side by contracting the contralateral lateral pterygoid and ipsilateral temporalis muscles. During the initial mouth opening, only hinge movement was observed at the temporomandibular joint. During this period, the entire mandible rotated approximately 13 degrees toward the bicondylar horizontal plane. Continued movement of the mandible to full mouth opening occurred simultaneously with sliding and hinge movements, and the mandible rotated approximately 17 degrees toward the center of the mandibular ramus. The described approach can yield data for use in face animation and other simulation systems and for elucidating the functional components related to contraction and relaxation of muscles during mastication.

  12. Sedimentological and geophysical studies of clastic reservoir analogs: Methods, applications and developments of ground-penetrating radar for determination of reservoir geometries in near-surface settings. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McMechan, G.A.; Soegaard, K.

    1998-05-25

    An integrated sedimentologic and GPR investigation has been carried out on a fluvial channel sandstone in the mid-Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone at Coyote Basin along the southwestern flank of the San Rafael Uplift in east-central Utah. This near-surface study, which covers a area of 40 {times} 16.5 meters to a depth of 15 meters, integrates detailed stratigraphic data from outcrop sections and facies maps with multi-frequency 3-D GPR surveys. The objectives of this investigation are two-fold: (1) to develop new ground-penetrating radar (GPR) technology for imaging shallow subsurface sandstone bodies, and (2) to construct an empirical three-dimensional sandstone reservoir model suitable for hydrocarbon flow-simulation by imaging near-surface sandstone reservoir analogs with the use of GPR. The sedimentological data base consists of a geologic map of the survey area and a detailed facies map of the cliff face immediately adjacent to the survey area. Five vertical sections were measured along the cliff face adjacent to the survey area. In addition, four wells were cored within the survey area from which logs were recorded. In the sections and well logs primary sedimentary structures were documented along with textural information and permeability data. Gamma-ray profiles were also obtained for all sections and core logs. The sedimentologic and stratigraphic information serves as the basis from which much of the processing and interpretation of the GPR data was made. Three 3-D GPR data sets were collected over the survey area at frequencies of 50 MHZ, 100 MHZ, and 200 MHZ.

  13. [The legacy of Cajal in Mexico].

    PubMed

    Díaz, J L

    Santiago Ramón y Cajal (1854-1934) had achieved a sound school of neurobiology displaying an integrative and anatomo-functional paradigm of study of the Nervous System by integrating diverse morphological, physiological, and clinical sciences during the Second Spanish Republic. Such school flourished in the three locations of the Cajal Institute in Madrid, but was nearly lost during the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939) with the repression of the majority of the collaborators of the recently-extinct master. One part of these mature and capable researchers was able to reach sanctuary in the Americas to continue their research and teaching enterprises. Thanks to the welcoming policy of Mexican president Lázaro Cárdenas several of them developed an extensive work at the National University of Mexico (UNAM) becoming pioneers, founders of research institutions, and venerable teachers of several medical and neurological sciences. Among them are neuropsychiatrist Dionisio Nieto, pathologist Isaac Costero, both pupils of Pío del Río Hortega; physiologist José Puche and pharmacologist Rafael Méndez, both collaborators of Juan Negrín. The work of Dionisio Nieto is especially worthy to remark as beneficiary of the Cajal School since, among many other achievements, he applied the techniques of Del Río Hortega to study the neuropathology of epilepsy and schizophrenia since the 1950's. Besides from his legacy to Mexican psychiatry, Nieto's pupils have extended his neuroanatomical and histological work, such as Alfonso Escobar, or his psycho physiological leads, such as Augusto Fernández-Guardiola. The latter was another Spanish War refugee who before is death in 2004 published a profound testimonial pertaining to the neurosciences of the Spanish exile in Mexico.

  14. Electron microscopy of Staphylococcus aureus cell wall lysis.

    PubMed

    Virgilio, R; González, C; Muñoz, N; Mendoza, S

    1966-05-01

    Virgilio, Rafael (Escuela de Química y Farmacia, Universidad de Chile, Santiago, Chile), C. González, Nubia Muñoz, and Silvia Mendoza. Electron microscopy of Staphylococcus aureus cell wall lysis. J. Bacteriol. 91:2018-2024. 1966.-A crude suspension of Staphylococcus aureus cell walls (strain Cowan III) in buffer solution was shown by electron microscopy to lyse slightly after 16 hr, probably owing to the action of autolysin. The lysis was considerably faster and more intense after the addition of lysozyme. A remarkable reduction in thickness and rigidity of the cell walls, together with the appearance of many irregular protrusions in their outlines, was observed after 2 hr; after 16 hr, there remained only a few recognizable cell wall fragments but many residual particulate remnants. When autolysin was previously inactivated by trypsin, there was a complete inhibition of the lytic action of lysozyme; on the other hand, when autolysin was inactivated by heat and lysozyme was added, a distinct decrease in the thickness of the cell walls was observed, but there was no destruction of the walls. The lytic action of lysozyme, after treatment with hot 5% trichloroacetic acid, gave rise to a marked dissolution of the structure of the cell walls, which became lost against the background, without, however, showing ostensible alteration of wall outlines. From a morphological point of view, the lytic action of autolysin plus lysozyme was quite different from that of trichloroacetic acid plus lysozyme, as shown by electron micrographs, but in both cases it was very intense. This would suggest different mechanisms of action for these agents.

  15. A validation of the fibre orientation and fibre length attrition prediction for long fibre-reinforced thermoplastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopmann, Ch.; Weber, M.; van Haag, J.; Schöngart, M.

    2015-05-01

    To improve the mechanical performance of polymeric parts, fibre reinforcement has established in industrial applications during the last decades. Next to the widely used Short Fibre-reinforced Thermoplastics (SFT) the use of Long Fibre-reinforced Thermoplastics (LFT) is increasingly growing. Especially for non-polar polymeric matrices like polypropylene (PP), longer fibres can significantly improve the mechanical performance. As with every kind of discontinuous fibre reinforcement the fibre orientations (FO) show a high impact on the mechanical properties. On the contrary to SFT where the local fibre length distribution (FLD) can be often neglected, for LFT the FLD show a high impact on the material's properties and has to be taken into account in equal measure to the FOD. Recently numerical models are available in commercial filling simulation software and allow predicting both the local FOD and FLD in LFT parts. The aim of this paper is to compare i.) the FOD results and ii) the FLD results from available orientation- and fibre length attrition-models to those obtained from experimental data. The investigations are conducted by the use of different injection moulded specimens made from long glass fibre reinforced PP. In order to determine the FOD, selected part sections are examined by means of Computed Tomographic (CT) analyses. The fully three dimensional measurement of the FOD is then performed by digital image processing using grey scale correlation. The FLD results are also obtained by using digital image processing after a thermal pyrolytic separation of the polymeric matrix from the fibres. Further the FOD and the FLD are predicted by using a reduced strain closure (RSC) as well as an anisotropic rotary diffusion - reduced strain closure model (ARD-RSC) and Phelps-Tucker fibre length attrition model implemented in the commercial filling software Moldflow, Autodesk Inc., San Rafael, CA, USA.

  16. Seismic microzoning projects and their implementation in Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, M.; Cano, V.; Olbrich, F.; Vallee, M.; Morales, C.; Arreaza, A.; Mendes, K.; Klarica, S.; Alvarez Gomez, J.; Aray, J.; Vielma, J.; Pombo, A.; Diaz, J.; Grupo de trabajo

    2013-05-01

    analysis. Further members of the "Grupo de trabajo: Investigaciones aplicadas a la gestion integral del riesgo en espacios urbanos" are: Oscar Andrés López, Milgreya Cerrada, Rafael Torres, Oscar Ramírez, Elieser Sanzonetti, José Heredia, Jaime Avendaño, Fernando Mazuera, Luis Molina, Alexi Suárez, Víctor Rocabado, Mónica Paolini, Luis Yegres, Leonardo Alvarado, Herbert Rendón, Luz Rodríguez, Jorge González.

  17. Effects of the Laramide Structures on the Regional Distribution of Tight-Gas Sandstone in the Upper Mesaverde Group, Uinta Basin, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitaula, R. P.; Aschoff, J.

    2013-12-01

    Regional-scale sequence stratigraphic correlation, well log analysis, syntectonic unconformity mapping, isopach maps, and depositional environment maps of the upper Mesaverde Group (UMG) in Uinta basin, Utah suggest higher accommodation in northeastern part (Natural Buttes area) and local development of lacustrine facies due to increased subsidence caused by uplift of San Rafael Swell (SRS) in southern and Uinta Uplift in northern parts. Recently discovered lacustrine facies in Natural Buttes area are completely different than the dominant fluvial facies in outcrops along Book Cliffs and could have implications for significant amount of tight-gas sand production from this area. Data used for sequence stratigraphic correlation, isopach maps and depositional environmental maps include > 100 well logs, 20 stratigraphic profiles, 35 sandstone thin sections and 10 outcrop-based gamma ray profiles. Seven 4th order depositional sequences (~0.5 my duration) are identified and correlated within UMG. Correlation was constructed using a combination of fluvial facies and stacking patterns in outcrops, chert-pebble conglomerates and tidally influenced strata. These surfaces were extrapolated into subsurface by matching GR profiles. GR well logs and core log of Natural Buttes area show intervals of coarsening upward patterns suggesting possible lacustrine intervals that might contain high TOC. Locally, younger sequences are completely truncated across SRS whereas older sequences are truncated and thinned toward SRS. The cycles of truncation and thinning represent phases of SRS uplift. Thinning possibly related with the Uinta Uplift is also observed in northwestern part. Paleocurrents are consistent with interpretation of periodic segmentation and deflection of sedimentation. Regional paleocurrents are generally E-NE-directed in Sequences 1-4, and N-directed in Sequences 5-7. From isopach maps and paleocurrent direction it can be interpreted that uplift of SRS changed route of

  18. Brain 'imaging' in the Renaissance.

    PubMed

    Paluzzi, Alessandro; Belli, Antonio; Bain, Peter; Viva, Laura

    2007-12-01

    During the Renaissance, a period of 'rebirth' for humanities and science, new knowledge and speculation began to emerge about the function of the human body, replacing ancient religious and philosophical dogma. The brain must have been a fascinating mystery to a Renaissance artist, but some speculation existed at that time on the function of its parts. Here we show how revived interest in anatomy and life sciences may have influenced the figurative work of Italian and Flemish masters, such as Rafael, Michelangelo and David. We present a historical perspective on the artists and the period in which they lived, their fascination for human anatomy and its symbolic use in their art. Prior to the 16th century, knowledge of the brain was limited and influenced in a dogmatic way by the teachings of Galen(1) who, as we now know, conducted his anatomical studies not on humans but on animals.(2) Nemesus, Bishop of Emesa, in around the year 400 was one of the first to attribute mental faculties to the brain, specifically to the ventricles. He identified two anterior (lateral) ventricles, to which he assigned perception, a middle ventricle responsible for cognition and a posterior ventricle for memory.(2,3) After a long period of stasis in the Middle Ages, Renaissance scholars realized the importance of making direct observations on dissected cadavers. Between 1504 and 1507, Leonardo da Vinci conducted experiments to reveal the anatomy of the ventricular system in the brain. He injected hot wax through a tube thrust into the ventricular cavities of an ox and then scraped the overlying brain off, thus obtaining, in a simple but ingenious way, an accurate cast of the ventricles.(2,4) Leonardo shared the belief promoted by scholarly Christians that the ventricles were the abode of rational soul. We have several examples of hidden symbolism in Renaissance paintings, but the influence of phrenology and this rudimentary knowledge of neuroanatomy on artists of that period is under

  19. Analysis of Geologic CO2 Sequestration at Farnham Dome, Utah, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Han, W.; Morgan, C.; Lu, C.; Esser, R.; Thorne, D.; McPherson, B.

    2008-12-01

    The Farnham Dome in east-central Utah is an elongated, Laramide-age anticline along the northern plunge of the San Rafael uplift and the western edge of the Uinta Basin. We are helping design a proposed field demonstration of commercial-scale geologic CO2 sequestration, including injection of 2.9 million tons of CO2 over four years time. The Farnham Dome pilot site stratigraphy includes a stacked system of saline formations alternating with low-permeability units. Facilitating the potential sequestration demonstration is a natural CO2 reservoir at depth, the Jurassic-age Navajo formation, which contains an estimated 50 million tons of natural CO2. The sequestration test design includes two deep formations suitable for supercritical CO2 injection, the Jurassic-age Wingate sandstone and the Permian-age White Rim sandstone. We developed a site-specific geologic model based on available geophysical well logs and formation tops data for use with numerical simulation. The current geologic model is limited to an area of approximately 6.5x4.5 km2 and 2.5 km thick, which contains 12 stacked formations starting with the White Rim formation at the bottom (>5000 feet bgl) and extending to the Jurassic Curtis formation at the top of the model grid. With the detail of the geologic model, we are able to estimate the Farnham Dome CO2 capacity at approximately 36.5 million tones within a 5 mile radius of a single injection well. Numerical simulation of multiphase, non- isothermal CO2 injection and flow suggest that the injected CO2 plume will not intersect nearby fault zones mapped in previous geologic studies. Our simulations also examine and compare competing roles of different trapping mechanisms, including hydrostratigraphic, residual gas, solubility, and mineralization trapping. Previous studies of soil gas flux at the surface of the fault zones yield no significant evidence of CO2 leakage from the natural reservoir at Farnham Dome, and thus we use these simulations to

  20. Higher-Order Interference in Extensions of Quantum Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ciarán M.; Selby, John H.

    2016-10-01

    Quantum interference, manifest in the two slit experiment, lies at the heart of several quantum computational speed-ups and provides a striking example of a quantum phenomenon with no classical counterpart. An intriguing feature of quantum interference arises in a variant of the standard two slit experiment, in which there are three, rather than two, slits. The interference pattern in this set-up can be written in terms of the two and one slit patterns obtained by blocking one, or more, of the slits. This is in stark contrast with the standard two slit experiment, where the interference pattern cannot be written as a sum of the one slit patterns. This was first noted by Rafael Sorkin, who raised the question of why quantum theory only exhibits irreducible interference in the two slit experiment. One approach to this problem is to compare the predictions of quantum theory to those of operationally-defined `foil' theories, in the hope of determining whether theories that do exhibit higher-order interference suffer from pathological—or at least undesirable—features. In this paper two proposed extensions of quantum theory are considered: the theory of Density Cubes proposed by Dakić, Paterek and Brukner, which has been shown to exhibit irreducible interference in the three slit set-up, and the Quartic Quantum Theory of Życzkowski. The theory of Density Cubes will be shown to provide an advantage over quantum theory in a certain computational task and to posses a well-defined mechanism which leads to the emergence of quantum theory—analogous to the emergence of classical physics from quantum theory via decoherence. Despite this, the axioms used to define Density Cubes will be shown to be insufficient to uniquely characterise the theory. In comparison, Quartic Quantum Theory is a well-defined theory and we demonstrate that it exhibits irreducible interference to all orders. This feature of Życzkowski's theory is argued not to be a genuine phenomenon, but to

  1. Brain ‘imaging’ in the Renaissance

    PubMed Central

    Paluzzi, Alessandro; Belli, Antonio; Bain, Peter; Viva, Laura

    2007-01-01

    During the Renaissance, a period of ‘rebirth’ for humanities and science, new knowledge and speculation began to emerge about the function of the human body, replacing ancient religious and philosophical dogma. The brain must have been a fascinating mystery to a Renaissance artist, but some speculation existed at that time on the function of its parts. Here we show how revived interest in anatomy and life sciences may have influenced the figurative work of Italian and Flemish masters, such as Rafael, Michelangelo and David. We present a historical perspective on the artists and the period in which they lived, their fascination for human anatomy and its symbolic use in their art. Prior to the 16th century, knowledge of the brain was limited and influenced in a dogmatic way by the teachings of Galen1 who, as we now know, conducted his anatomical studies not on humans but on animals.2 Nemesus, Bishop of Emesa, in around the year 400 was one of the first to attribute mental faculties to the brain, specifically to the ventricles. He identified two anterior (lateral) ventricles, to which he assigned perception, a middle ventricle responsible for cognition and a posterior ventricle for memory.2,3 After a long period of stasis in the Middle Ages, Renaissance scholars realized the importance of making direct observations on dissected cadavers. Between 1504 and 1507, Leonardo da Vinci conducted experiments to reveal the anatomy of the ventricular system in the brain. He injected hot wax through a tube thrust into the ventricular cavities of an ox and then scraped the overlying brain off, thus obtaining, in a simple but ingenious way, an accurate cast of the ventricles.2,4 Leonardo shared the belief promoted by scholarly Christians that the ventricles were the abode of rational soul. We have several examples of hidden symbolism in Renaissance paintings, but the influence of phrenology and this rudimentary knowledge of neuroanatomy on artists of that period is under

  2. Sedimentary structures formed under water surface waves: examples from a sediment-laden flash flood observed by remote camer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froude, Melanie; Alexander, Jan; Cole, Paul; Barclay, Jenni

    2014-05-01

    On 13-14 October 2012, Tropical Storm Rafael triggered sediment-laden flash floods in the Belham Valley on Montserrat, West Indies. Rainfall was continuous for ~38 hours and intensity peaked at 48 mm/hr. Flow was strongly unsteady, turbulent with sediment concentrations varying up to hyperconcentrated. Time-lapse images captured at >1 frame per second by remote camera overlooking a surveyed valley section show the development of trains of water surface waves at multiple channel locations during different flow stages. Waves grew and diminished in height and remained stationary or migrated upstream. Trains of waves persisted for <5 minutes, until a single wave broke, sometimes initiating the breaking of adjacent waves within the train. Channel-wide surges (bores) propagating downstream with distinct turbulent flow fronts, were observed at irregular intervals during and up to 7 hours after peak stage. These bores are mechanically similar to breaking front tidal bores and arid flood bores, and resulted in a sudden increase in flow depth and velocity. When a bore front came into close proximity (within ~10 m) upstream of a train of water surface waves, the waves appeared to break simultaneously generating a localised surge of water upstream, that was covered by the bore travelling downstream. Those trains in which waves did not break during the passage of a bore temporarily reduced in height. In both cases, water surface waves reformed immediately after the surge in the same location. Deposits from the event, were examined in <4 m deep trenches ~0.5 km downstream of the remote camera. These contained laterally extensive lenticular and sheet-like units comprised of varying admixtures of sand and gravel that are attributed to antidunes, and associated transitions from upper-stage-plane-beds. Some of the structures are organised within concave upward sequences which contain downflow shifts between foreset and backset laminae; interpreted as trough fills from chute

  3. In AppreciationThe Depth and Breadth of John Bell's Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackiw, Roman; Shimony, Abner

    estimates for the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon (in collaboration with de Rafael). Section 4 concerns accelerations, starting at Harwell with the algebra of strong focusing and the stability of orbits in linear accelerators and synchrotrons. At CERN he continued to contribute to accelerator physics, and with his wife Mary Bell he wrote on electron cooling and Beamstrahlung. A spectacular late achievement in accelerator physics was the demonstration (in collaboration with Leinaas) that the effective black-body radiation seen by an accelerated observer in an electromagnetic vacuum - the ``Unruh effect''- had already been observed experimentally in the partial depolarization of electrons traversing circular orbits.

  4. Detrital and volcanic zircon U-Pb ages from southern Mendoza (Argentina): An insight on the source regions in the northern part of the Neuquén Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naipauer, Maximiliano; Tapia, Felipe; Mescua, José; Farías, Marcelo; Pimentel, Marcio M.; Ramos, Victor A.

    2015-12-01

    The infill of the Neuquén Basin recorded the Meso-Cenozoic geological and tectonic evolution of the southern Central Andes being an excellent site to investigate how the pattern of detrital zircon ages varies trough time. In this work we analyze the U-Pb (LA-MC-ICP-MS) zircon ages from sedimentary and volcanic rocks related to synrift and retroarc stages of the northern part of the Neuquén Basin. These data define the crystallization age of the synrift volcanism at 223 ± 2 Ma (Cerro Negro Andesite) and the maximum depositional age of the original synrift sediments at ca. 204 Ma (El Freno Formation). Two different pulses of rifting could be recognized according to the absolute ages, the oldest developed during the Norian and the younger during the Rhaetian-Sinemurian. The source regions of the El Freno Formation show that the Choiyoi magmatic province was the main source rock of sediment supply. An important amount of detrital zircons with Triassic ages was identified and interpreted as a source area related to the synrift magmatism. The maximum depositional age calculated for the Tordillo Formation in the Atuel-La Valenciana depocenter is at ca. 149 Ma; as well as in other places of the Neuquén Basin, the U-Pb ages calculated in the Late Jurassic Tordillo Formation do not agree with the absolute age of the Kimmeridgian-Tithonian boundary (ca. 152 Ma). The main source region of sediment in the Tordillo Formation was the Andean magmatic arc. Basement regions were also present with age peaks at the Carboniferous, Neoproterozoic, and Mesoproterozoic; these regions were probably located to the east in the San Rafael Block. The pattern of zircon ages summarized for the Late Jurassic Tordillo and Lagunillas formations were interpreted as a record of the magmatic activity during the Triassic and Jurassic in the southern Central Andes. A waning of the magmatism is inferred to have happened during the Triassic. The evident lack of ages observed around ca. 200 Ma suggests

  5. Muscle Activation During Exercise in Severe Acute Hypoxia: Role of Absolute and Relative Intensity

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Peralta, Rafael; Losa-Reyna, José; González-Izal, Miriam; Perez-Suarez, Ismael; Calle-Herrero, Jaime; Izquierdo, Mikel

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Torres-Peralta, Rafael, José Losa-Reyna, Miriam González-Izal, Ismael Perez-Suarez, Jaime Calle-Herrero, Mikel Izquierdo, and José A.L. Calbet. Muscle activation during exercise in severe acute hypoxia: Role of absolute and relative intensity. High Alt Med Biol 15:472–482, 2014.—The aim of this study was to determine the influence of severe acute hypoxia on muscle activation during whole body dynamic exercise. Eleven young men performed four incremental cycle ergometer tests to exhaustion breathing normoxic (FIo2=0.21, two tests) or hypoxic gas (FIo2=0.108, two tests). Surface electromyography (EMG) activities of rectus femoris (RF), vastus medialis (VL), vastus lateralis (VL), and biceps femoris (BF) were recorded. The two normoxic and the two hypoxic tests were averaged to reduce EMG variability. Peak Vo2 was 34% lower in hypoxia than in normoxia (p<0.05). The EMG root mean square (RMS) increased with exercise intensity in all muscles (p<0.05), with greater effect in hypoxia than in normoxia in the RF and VM (p<0.05), and a similar trend in VL (p=0.10). At the same relative intensity, the RMS was greater in normoxia than in hypoxia in RF, VL, and BF (p<0.05), with a similar trend in VM (p=0.08). Median frequency increased with exercise intensity (p<0.05), and was higher in hypoxia than in normoxia in VL (p<0.05). Muscle contraction burst duration increased with exercise intensity in VM and VL (p<0.05), without clear effects of FIo2. No significant FIo2 effects on frequency domain indices were observed when compared at the same relative intensity. In conclusion, muscle activation during whole body exercise increases almost linearly with exercise intensity, following a muscle-specific pattern, which is adjusted depending on the FIo2 and the relative intensity of exercise. Both VL and VM are increasingly involved in power output generation with the increase of intensity and the reduction in FIo2. PMID:25225839

  6. Higher-Order Interference in Extensions of Quantum Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ciarán M.; Selby, John H.

    2017-01-01

    Quantum interference, manifest in the two slit experiment, lies at the heart of several quantum computational speed-ups and provides a striking example of a quantum phenomenon with no classical counterpart. An intriguing feature of quantum interference arises in a variant of the standard two slit experiment, in which there are three, rather than two, slits. The interference pattern in this set-up can be written in terms of the two and one slit patterns obtained by blocking one, or more, of the slits. This is in stark contrast with the standard two slit experiment, where the interference pattern cannot be written as a sum of the one slit patterns. This was first noted by Rafael Sorkin, who raised the question of why quantum theory only exhibits irreducible interference in the two slit experiment. One approach to this problem is to compare the predictions of quantum theory to those of operationally-defined `foil' theories, in the hope of determining whether theories that do exhibit higher-order interference suffer from pathological—or at least undesirable—features. In this paper two proposed extensions of quantum theory are considered: the theory of Density Cubes proposed by Dakić, Paterek and Brukner, which has been shown to exhibit irreducible interference in the three slit set-up, and the Quartic Quantum Theory of Życzkowski. The theory of Density Cubes will be shown to provide an advantage over quantum theory in a certain computational task and to posses a well-defined mechanism which leads to the emergence of quantum theory—analogous to the emergence of classical physics from quantum theory via decoherence. Despite this, the axioms used to define Density Cubes will be shown to be insufficient to uniquely characterise the theory. In comparison, Quartic Quantum Theory is a well-defined theory and we demonstrate that it exhibits irreducible interference to all orders. This feature of Życzkowski's theory is argued not to be a genuine phenomenon, but to

  7. Low-Cost Cold-Gas RCS for the Sloshsat Small Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, S.; Warshavsky, A.; Peretz, A.

    2002-01-01

    Cold gas thrusters usually provide an inexpensive, highly reliable, low-power consuming, non contaminating, and safe auxiliary propulsion means for small spacecraft. A low-cost cold-gas Reaction Control System (RCS) has been designed and developed to provide linear acceleration and rotation control of the SLOSHSAT satellite for liquid-slosh experimentation. This ESA-sponsored mini-spacecraft will be launched by the Space Shuttle and ejected into space from its hitchhiker bay. The RCS was designed and developed according to man rated safety standards, as required by NASA. The RCS comprises four identical spherical carbon/epoxy-wound stainless steel tanks, which store 1.6 kg of nitrogen at 600 bars, corresponding to a maximum rated temperature of 70°C. The relatively high pressure enables economic utilization of the limited space available in small satellites. The tanks are of a "leak before burst" design, which was subjected to a comprehensive finite-element stress analysis. They were developed and tested in accordance with MIL-STD-1522A, with a proof pressure and a minimum burst pressure of 1000 and 1700 bars, respectively. Each tank has an internal volume of 0.97 l, and is equipped with an attached accessories assembly, that includes a pyrovalve and a filter. The RCS was supplied with the tanks prepressurized and sealed to 473 bars (at 20°C). The whole system is pressurized only after the satellite is in its orbit, by activating the tank's pyrovalve. This unique approach enables to supply a sealed RCS system and propellant loading activities are not necessary before launch. Additionally, this approach has safety advantages that were meaningful to meet the NASA safety requirements. The pyrovalve includes a RAFAEL-developed initiator, which complies with MIL-STD-1576, and passed all required testing, including ESD tests with the resistor removed, as demanded by NASA for approval. The pyrovalve is of a "self seal" design, which includes a sealing mechanism, that

  8. Emission of gas and atmospheric dispersion of SO2 during the December 2013 eruption at San Miguel volcano (El Salvador)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salerno, Giuseppe G.; Granieri, Domenico; Liuzzo, Marco; La Spina, Alessandro; Giuffrida, Giovanni B.; Caltabiano, Tommaso; Giudice, Gaetano; Gutierrez, Eduardo; Montalvo, Francisco; Burton, Michael; Papale, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    San Miguel volcano, also known as Chaparrastique, is a basaltic volcano along the Central American Volcanic Arc (CAVA). Volcanism is induced by the convergence of the Cocos Plate underneath the Caribbean Plate, along a 1200-km arc, extending from Guatemala to Costa Rica and parallel to the Central American Trench. The volcano is located in the eastern part of El Salvador, in proximity to the large communities of San Miguel, San Rafael Oriente, and San Jorge. Approximately 70,000 residents, mostly farmers, live around the crater and the city of San Miguel, the second largest city of El Salvador, ten km from the summit, has a population of ~180,000 inhabitants. The Pan-American and Coastal highways cross the north and south flanks of the volcano.San Miguel volcano has produced modest eruptions, with at least 28 VEI 1-2 events between 1699 and 1967 (datafrom Smithsonian Institution http://www.volcano.si.edu/volcano.cfm?vn=343100). It is characterized by visible milddegassing from a summit vent and fumarole field, and by intermittent lava flows and Strombolian activity. Since the last vigorous fire fountaining of 1976, San Miguel has only experienced small steam explosions and gas emissions, minor ash fall and rock avalanches. On 29 December 2013 the volcano erupted producing an eruption that has been classified as VEI 2. While eruptions tend to be low-VEI, the presence of major routes and the dense population in the surrounding of the volcano increases the risk that weak explosions with gas and/or ash emission may pose. In this study, we present the first inventory of SO2, CO2, HCl, and HF emission rates on San Miguel volcano, and an analysis of the hazard from volcanogenic SO2 discharged before, during, and after the December 2013 eruption. SO2 was chosen as it is amongst the most critical volcanogenic pollutants, which may cause acute and chronicle disease to humans. Data were gathered by the geochemical monitoring network managed by the Ministerio de Medio Ambiente

  9. Tracing the CO2 source and migration in natural analogues from different geological contexts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battani, A.; Jean Luc, F.; Philippe, S.; Nadine, E.; Olivier, V.; Elodie, J.

    2009-12-01

    Naturally occurring CO2 fields allow studying long-term fluid-rock interactions, and the processes of CO2 migration, useful for the prediction of CO2 behavior in industrial storage sites. Two different provinces showing both leaking systems (hydrothermal areas) and well confined systems (stable sedimentary basins) have been studied. The first province concerns the French CO2 province of Massif Central (volcanic events, seismic activity, high geothermal gradient) and the stable Valence basin. The other study was devoted to the Basin and Range province, USA, with hydrothermal, high seismic and volcanic activity, a high geothermal gradient (Soda Springs; Idaho, Sevier basin), and the non-hydrothermal stable area of the Colorado plateau (Green River, San Rafael anticline and Springerville). The aim is to link the CO2 sources and its subsurface migration to the geological context. In hydrothermal areas, the mesured helium isotopic ratio (R/Ra) is high (close to the mantle ratio), while the CO2/3He ratios move dramatically towards crustal values. In this context, isotopic and elemental noble gas data show that the gas migrates very fast from depth. In more confined areas (natural CO2 fields), the CO2 shows a more important proportion of radiogenic gases (4He) (crustal helium isotopic ratios) and the associated CO2/3He ratios are in the MORB range, or “mantle derived”. We try to explain the apparent discrepancy between the CO2/3He and the R/Ra values in both areas. As a primary assumption, the source of CO2 could be localized in the extensional zones of high geothermal gradient with important seismicity. We suggest that the pseudotachylites formed by frictional melting associated with each seismic event supply an instantaneous crustal CO2.amount to the initial magmatic CO2. This justifies the coeval increase of the CO2/3He ratios without any significant modification in the helium isotopic ratios (instantaneous, no time for 4He production). Moreover, the contact

  10. Chemical contaminants, health indicators, and reproductive biomarker responses in fish from the Colorado River and its tributaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinck, J.E.; Blazer, V.S.; Denslow, N.D.; Echols, K.R.; Gross, T.S.; May, T.W.; Anderson, P.J.; Coyle, J.J.; Tillitt, D.E.

    2007-01-01

    Common carp (Cyprinus carpio), black bass (Micropterus spp.), and channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) were collected from 14 sites in the Colorado River Basin (CRB) to document spatial trends in accumulative contaminants, health indicators, and reproductive biomarkers. Organochlorine residues, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin-like activity (TCDD-EQ), and elemental contaminants were measured in composite samples of whole fish, grouped by species and gender, from each site. Selenium (Se) and mercury (Hg) concentrations in fish were elevated throughout the CRB, and pesticide concentrations were greatest in fish from agricultural areas in the Lower Colorado River and Gila River. Selenium concentrations exceeded toxicity thresholds for fish (> 1.0????g/g ww) at all CRB sites except the Gila River at Hayden, Arizona. Mercury concentrations were elevated (> 0.1????g/g ww) in fish from the Yampa River at Lay, Colorado; the Green River at Ouray National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Utah and San Rafael, Utah; the San Juan River at Hogback Diversion, New Mexico; and the Colorado River at Gold Bar Canyon, Utah, Needles, California, and Imperial Dam, Arizona. Concentrations of p,p???-DDE were relatively high in fish from the Gila River at Arlington, Arizona (> 1.0????g/g ww) and Phoenix, Arizona (> 0.5????g/g ww). Concentrations of other formerly used pesticides including toxaphene, total chlordanes, and dieldrin were also greatest at these two sites but did not exceed toxicity thresholds. Currently used pesticides such as Dacthal, endosulfan, ??-HCH, and methoxychlor were also greatest in fish from the Gila River downstream of Phoenix. Total polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs; > 0.11????g/g ww) and TCDD-EQs (> 5??pg/g ww) exceeded wildlife guidelines in fish from the Gila River at Phoenix. Hepatic ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activity was also relatively high in carp from the Gila River at Phoenix and in bass from the Green River at Ouray NWR. Fish from some sites showed

  11. Biomonitoring of Environmental Status and Trends (BEST) Program: Environmental contaminants, health indicators, and reproductive biomarkers in fish from the Colorado River basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinck, Jo Ellen; Blazer, Vicki; Denslow, Nancy D.; Gross, Timothy S.; Echols, Kathy R.; Davis, Anne P.; May, Tom W.; Orazio, Carl E.; Coyle, James J.; Tillitt, Donald E.

    2006-01-01

    Seven fish species were collected from 14 sites on rivers in the Colorado River Basin (CDRB) from August to October 2003. Spatial trends in the concentrations of accumulative contaminants were documented and contaminant effects on the fish were assessed. Sites were located on the mainstem of the Colorado River and on the Yampa, Green, Gunnison, San Juan, and Gila Rivers. Common carp (Cyprinus carpio), black bass (Micropterus sp.), and channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) were the targeted species. Fish were field-examined for external and internal anomalies, selected organs were weighed to compute somatic indices, and tissue and fluid samples were preserved for fish health and reproductive biomarker analyses. Composite samples of whole fish, grouped by species and gender, from each site were analyzed for organochlorine and elemental contaminants using performance-based and instrumental methods. 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin-like activity (TCDD-EQ) was measured using the H4IIE rat hepatoma cell bioassay. Selenium (Se) and mercury (Hg) concentrations were elevated throughout the CDRB, and pesticides concentrations were greatest in fish from agricultural areas in the Lower Colorado River and Gila River. Selenium concentrations exceeded toxicity thresholds for fish (>1.0 ?g/g ww) at all sites except from the Gila River at Hayden, Arizona. Mercury concentrations were elevated (>0.1 ?g/g ww) in fish from the Yampa River at Lay, Colorado; the Green River at Ouray National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Utah and San Rafael, Utah; the San Juan River at Hogback Diversion, New Mexico; and the Colorado River at Gold Bar Canyon, Utah, Needles, California, and Imperial Dam, Arizona. Concentrations of p,p'-DDE were relatively high in fish from Arlington, Arizona (>1.0 ?g/g ww) and Phoenix, Arizona (>0.5 ?g/g ww). Concentrations of other banned pesticides including toxaphene, total chlordanes, and dieldrin were also greatest at these two sites but did not exceed toxicity thresholds

  12. Modeling magnetic fields from a DC power cable buried beneath San Francisco Bay based on empirical measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kavet, Robert; Wyman, Megan T.; Klimley, A. Peter; Carretero, Luis

    2016-02-25

    Here, the Trans Bay Cable (TBC) is a ±200-kilovolt (kV), 400 MW 85-km long High Voltage Direct Current (DC) buried transmission line linking Pittsburg, CA with San Francisco, CA (SF) beneath the San Francisco Estuary. The TBC runs parallel to the migratory route of various marine species, including green sturgeon, Chinook salmon, and steelhead trout. In July and August 2014, an extensive series of magnetic field measurements were taken using a pair of submerged Geometrics magnetometers towed behind a survey vessel in four locations in the San Francisco estuary along profiles that cross the cable’s path; these included the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge (BB), the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge (RSR), the Benicia- Martinez Bridge (Ben) and an area in San Pablo Bay (SP) in which a bridge is not present. In this paper, we apply basic formulas that ideally describe the magnetic field from a DC cable summed vectorially with the background geomagnetic field (in the absence of other sources that would perturb the ambient field) to derive characteristics of the cable that are otherwise not immediately observable. Magnetic field profiles from measurements taken along 170 survey lines were inspected visually for evidence of a distinct pattern representing the presence of the cable. Many profiles were dominated by field distortions unrelated to the cable caused by bridge structures or other submerged objects, and the cable’s contribution to the field was not detectable. BB, with 40 of the survey lines, did not yield usable data for these reasons. The unrelated anomalies could be up to 100 times greater than those from the cable. In total, discernible magnetic field profiles measured from 76 survey lines were regressed against the equations, representing eight days of measurement. The modeled field anomalies due to the cable (the difference between the maximum and minimum field along the survey line at the cable crossing) were virtually identical to the measured values. The

  13. Ground penetrating radar data analyzed in frequency and time domain for engineering issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozzoli, Luigi; Giampaolo, Valeria; Votta, Mario; Rizzo, Enzo

    2014-05-01

    spectrum that allows a supplementary help to complete the information extracted in time-domain (dos Santos et al., 2014). The signal processing technique is based on a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) that allows analyzing in frequency domain variations due to presence of anomalous bodies of different materials in the concrete and in the sand. Furthermore the data obtained in situ are compared with data extracted by theoretical simulation of e-m signal propagation built in Reflex-w software. There is a good agreement between simulated data and real data both in frequency domain both in time domain. So we have verified that frequency analysis can be adopted such as a useful tools to increase and complete information achieved in traditional way. Bibliography James S. Mellett (1995). Ground penetrating radar applications in engineering, environmental Management, and geology. Journal of Applied Geophysics. V. 33, Issues 1-3, January 1995, Pages 157-166 Proto, M.; Bavusi, M.; Bernini, R.; Bigagli, L.; Bost, M.; Bourquin, F.; Cottineau, L.-M.; Cuomo, V.; Vecchia, P.D.; Dolce, M.; Dumoulin, J.; Eppelbaum, L.; Fornaro, G.; Gustafsson, M.; Hugenschimdt, J.; Kaspersen, P.; Kim, H.; Lapenna, V.; Leggio, M.; Loperte, A.; Mazzetti, P.; Moroni, C.; Nativi, S.; Nordebo, S.; Pacini, F.; Palombo, A.; Pascucci, S.; Perrone, A.; Pignatti, S.; Ponzo, F.C.; Rizzo, E.; Soldovieri, F.; Taillade, F. Transport Infrastructure Surveillance and Monitoring by Electromagnetic Sensing: The ISTIMES Project. Sensors 2010, 10, 10620-10639 Vinicius Rafael N. dos Santos, Waleed Al-Nuaimy, Jorge Luís Porsani, Nina S. Tomita Hirata, Hamzah S. Alzubi (2014). Spectral analysis of ground penetrating radar signals in concrete, metallic and plastic targets. Journal of Applied Geophysics, V.100, January 2014, Pages 32-43

  14. Seasonal plankton variability in Chilean Patagonia fjords: Carbon flow through the pelagic food web of Aysen Fjord and plankton dynamics in the Moraleda Channel basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, H. E.; Castro, L.; Daneri, G.; Iriarte, J. L.; Silva, N.; Vargas, C. A.; Giesecke, R.; Sánchez, N.

    2011-03-01

    Two research cruises ( CIMAR 13 Fiordos) were conducted in the N-S oriented macrobasin of the Moraleda Channel (42-47°S), which includes the E-W oriented Puyuhuapi Channel and Aysen Fjord, during two contrasting productive seasons: austral winter (27 July-7 August 2007) and spring (2-12 November 2007). These campaigns set out to assess the spatio-temporal variability, defined by the local topography along Moraleda Channel, in the biological, physical, and chemical oceanographic characteristics of different microbasins and to quantify the carbon budget of the pelagic trophic webs of Aysen Fjord. Seasonal carbon fluxes and fjord-system functioning vary widely in our study area. In terms of spatial topography, two constriction sills (Meninea and Elefantes) define three microbasins along Moraleda Channel, herein the (1) north (Guafo-Meninea), (2) central (Meninea-Elefantes), and (3) south (Elefantes-San Rafael Lagoon) microbasins. In winter, nutrient concentrations were high (i.e. nitrate range: 21-14 μM) and primary production was low (153-310 mgC m -2 d -1), suggesting that reduced light radiation depressed the plankton dynamics throughout Moraleda Channel. In spring, primary production followed a conspicuous N-S gradient, which was the highest (5167 mgC m -2 d -1) in the north microbasin and the lowest (742 mgC m -2 d -1) in the south microbasin. The seasonal pattern of the semi-enclosed Puyuhuapi Channel and Aysen Fjord, however, revealed no significant differences in primary production (˜800 mgC m -2 d -1), and vertical fluxes of particulate organic carbon were nearly twice as high in spring as in winter (266 vs. 168 mgC m -2 d -1). At the time-series station (St. 79), the lithogenic fraction dominated the total sedimented matter (seston). The role of euphausiids in the biological carbon pump of the Patagonian fjords was evident, given the predominance of zooplankton fecal material, mostly euphausiid fecal strings (46% of all fecal material), among the

  15. Principal unconformities in Triassic and Jurassic rocks, western interior United States; a preliminary survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pipiringos, G.N.; O'Sullivan, Robert Brett

    1978-01-01

    Piper Formations at their type sections in Montana and the lower parts of the Twin Creek Limestone (including only the Sliderock, Rich, and Boundary Ridge Members) in western Wyoming and of the Carmel Formation in the Colorado Plateau, at their respective type localities, are equivalent, but none of these correlate with any part of the Gypsum Spring Formation of Wyoming. The Curtis Formation at its type locality in the San Rafael Swell, Utah, equals only the lower part of the Curtis Formation of the Uinta Mountains. The upper part of the Curtis in the Uinta Mountains and the Redwater Shale Member of the Sundance Formation of Wyoming and South Dakota are equivalent. Estimates of the length of time in millions of years (m.y.) required for uplift and erosion of an unconformity range from less than 1 to as much as 10 m.y.; the average is about 1.8 m.y. if the extremes in time are excluded. The length of time for burial of the surfaces by transgression ranges from less than 1 to about 10 m.y.; the average is less than 1 m.y. if the extremes in time are disregarded.

  16. Stratigraphy of the Morrison and related formations, Colorado Plateau region, a preliminary report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Craig, Lawrence C.; ,

    1955-01-01

    Three subdivisions of the Jurassic rocks of the Colorado Plateau region are: the Glen Canyon group, mainly eolian and fluvial sedimentary rocks; the San Rafael group, marine and marginal marine sedimentary rocks; and the Morrison formation, fluvial and lacustrine sedimentary rocks. In central and eastern Colorado the Morrison formation has not been differ- entiated into members. In eastern Utah, northeastern Arizona, northwestern New Mexico, and in part of western Colorado, the Morrison may be divided into a lower part and an upper part; each part has two members which are di1Ierentiated on a lithologic basis. Where differentiated, the lower part of the Morrison consists either of the Salt Wash member or the Recapture member or both; these are equivalent in age and inter tongue and intergrade over a broad area in the vicinity of the Four Corners area of New Mexico, Colorado, Arizona, and Utah. The Salt Wash member is present in eastern Utah and parts of western Colorado, north- eastern Arizona, and northwestern New Mexico. It was formed as a large alluvial plain or 'fan' by an aggrading system of braided streams diverging to the north and east from an apex in south-central Utah. The major source area of the Salt Wash was to the southwest of south-central Utah, probably in west-central Arizona and southeastern California. The member was derived mainly from sedimentary rocks. The Salt Wash deposits grade from predomi- nantly coarse texture at the apex of the 'fan' to predominantly flne texture at the margin of the 'fan'. The Salt Wash member has been arbitrarily divided into four facies: a con- glomera tic sandstone facies, a sandstone and mudstone facies, a claystone and lenticular sandstone facies, and a claystone and limestone facies. The Recapture member of the Morrison formation is present in northeastern Arizona, northwestern New Mexico, and small areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado near the Four Corners. It was formed as a large alluvial plain

  17. Modeling Magnetic Fields from a DC Power Cable Buried Beneath San Francisco Bay Based on Empirical Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Kavet, Robert; Wyman, Megan T.; Klimley, A. Peter

    2016-01-01

    The Trans Bay Cable (TBC) is a ±200-kilovolt (kV), 400 MW 85-km long High Voltage Direct Current (DC) buried transmission line linking Pittsburg, CA with San Francisco, CA (SF) beneath the San Francisco Estuary. The TBC runs parallel to the migratory route of various marine species, including green sturgeon, Chinook salmon, and steelhead trout. In July and August 2014, an extensive series of magnetic field measurements were taken using a pair of submerged Geometrics magnetometers towed behind a survey vessel in four locations in the San Francisco estuary along profiles that cross the cable’s path; these included the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge (BB), the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge (RSR), the Benicia-Martinez Bridge (Ben) and an area in San Pablo Bay (SP) in which a bridge is not present. In this paper, we apply basic formulas that ideally describe the magnetic field from a DC cable summed vectorially with the background geomagnetic field (in the absence of other sources that would perturb the ambient field) to derive characteristics of the cable that are otherwise not immediately observable. Magnetic field profiles from measurements taken along 170 survey lines were inspected visually for evidence of a distinct pattern representing the presence of the cable. Many profiles were dominated by field distortions unrelated to the cable caused by bridge structures or other submerged objects, and the cable’s contribution to the field was not detectable. BB, with 40 of the survey lines, did not yield usable data for these reasons. The unrelated anomalies could be up to 100 times greater than those from the cable. In total, discernible magnetic field profiles measured from 76 survey lines were regressed against the equations, representing eight days of measurement. The modeled field anomalies due to the cable (the difference between the maximum and minimum field along the survey line at the cable crossing) were virtually identical to the measured values. The

  18. Chemical contaminants, health indicators, and reproductive biomarker responses in fish from the Colorado River and its tributaries.

    PubMed

    Hinck, Jo Ellen; Blazer, Vicki S; Denslow, Nancy D; Echols, Kathy R; Gross, Timothy S; May, Tom W; Anderson, Patrick J; Coyle, James J; Tillitt, Donald E

    2007-06-01

    Common carp (Cyprinus carpio), black bass (Micropterus spp.), and channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) were collected from 14 sites in the Colorado River Basin (CRB) to document spatial trends in accumulative contaminants, health indicators, and reproductive biomarkers. Organochlorine residues, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin-like activity (TCDD-EQ), and elemental contaminants were measured in composite samples of whole fish, grouped by species and gender, from each site. Selenium (Se) and mercury (Hg) concentrations in fish were elevated throughout the CRB, and pesticide concentrations were greatest in fish from agricultural areas in the Lower Colorado River and Gila River. Selenium concentrations exceeded toxicity thresholds for fish (>1.0 microg/g ww) at all CRB sites except the Gila River at Hayden, Arizona. Mercury concentrations were elevated (>0.1 microg/g ww) in fish from the Yampa River at Lay, Colorado; the Green River at Ouray National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Utah and San Rafael, Utah; the San Juan River at Hogback Diversion, New Mexico; and the Colorado River at Gold Bar Canyon, Utah, Needles, California, and Imperial Dam, Arizona. Concentrations of p,p'-DDE were relatively high in fish from the Gila River at Arlington, Arizona (>1.0 microg/g ww) and Phoenix, Arizona (>0.5 microg/g ww). Concentrations of other formerly used pesticides including toxaphene, total chlordanes, and dieldrin were also greatest at these two sites but did not exceed toxicity thresholds. Currently used pesticides such as Dacthal, endosulfan, gamma-HCH, and methoxychlor were also greatest in fish from the Gila River downstream of Phoenix. Total polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs; >0.11 microg/g ww) and TCDD-EQs (>5 pg/g ww) exceeded wildlife guidelines in fish from the Gila River at Phoenix. Hepatic ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activity was also relatively high in carp from the Gila River at Phoenix and in bass from the Green River at Ouray NWR. Fish from some sites

  19. ASTER Images San Francisco Bay Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This image of the San Francisco Bay region was acquired on March 3, 2000 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters about 50 to 300 feet ), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    Image: This image covers an area 60 kilometers (37 miles) wide and 75 kilometers (47 miles) long in three bands of the reflected visible and infrared wavelength region. The combination of bands portrays vegetation in red, and urban areas in gray. Sediment in the Suisun Bay, San Pablo Bay, San Francisco Bay, and the Pacific Ocean shows up as lighter shades of blue. Along the west coast of the San Francisco Peninsula, strong surf can be seen as a white fringe along the shoreline. A powerful rip tide is visible extending westward from Daly City into the Pacific Ocean. In the lower right corner, the wetlands of the South San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge appear as large dark blue and brown polygons. The high spatial resolution of ASTER allows fine detail to be observed in the scene. The main bridges of the area (San Mateo, San Francisco-Oakland Bay, Golden Gate, Richmond-San Rafael, Benicia-Martinez, and Carquinez) are easily picked out, connecting the different communities in the Bay area. Shadows of the towers along the Bay Bridge can be seen over the adjacent bay water. With enlargement the entire road network can be easily mapped; individual buildings are visible, including the shadows of the high-rises in downtown San Francisco.

    Inset: This enlargement of the San Francisco Airport highlights the high spatial resolution of ASTER. With further enlargement and careful examination, airplanes can be seen at the terminals.

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth

  20. EDITORIAL: Focus on Dark Matter and Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aprile, Elena; Profumo, Stefano

    2009-10-01

    Doetinchem, H Gast, T Kirn and S Schael Axion searches with helioscopes and astrophysical signatures for axion(-like) particles K Zioutas, M Tsagri, Y Semertzidis, T Papaevangelou, T Dafni and V Anastassopoulos The indirect search for dark matter with IceCube Francis Halzen and Dan Hooper DIRECT DARK MATTER SEARCHES:EXPERIMENTS Gaseous dark matter detectors G Sciolla and C J Martoff Search for dark matter with CRESST Rafael F Lang and Wolfgang Seidel DIRECT AND INDIRECT PARTICLE DARK MATTER SEARCHES:THEORY Dark matter annihilation around intermediate mass black holes: an update Gianfranco Bertone, Mattia Fornasa, Marco Taoso and Andrew R Zentner Update on the direct detection of dark matter in MSSM models with non-universal Higgs masses John Ellis, Keith A Olive and Pearl Sandick Dark stars: a new study of the first stars in the Universe Katherine Freese, Peter Bodenheimer, Paolo Gondolo and Douglas Spolyar Determining the mass of dark matter particles with direct detection experiments Chung-Lin Shan The detection of subsolar mass dark matter halos Savvas M Koushiappas Neutrino coherent scattering rates at direct dark matter detectors Louis E Strigari Gamma rays from dark matter annihilation in the central region of the Galaxy Pasquale Dario Serpico and Dan Hooper DARK MATTER MODELS The dark matter interpretation of the 511 keV line Céline Boehm Axions as dark matter particles Leanne D Duffy and Karl van Bibber Sterile neutrinos Alexander Kusenko Dark matter candidates Lars Bergström Minimal dark matter: model and results Marco Cirelli and Alessandro Strumia Shedding light on the dark sector with direct WIMP production Partha Konar, Kyoungchul Kong, Konstantin T Matchev and Maxim Perelstein Axinos as dark matter particles Laura Covi and Jihn E Kim

  1. PREFACE: Special issue: Proceedings of the Joint 19th AIRAPT and 41st EHPRG International Conference on High Pressure Science and Technology (Bordeaux, 7--11 July 2003)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demazeau, Gérard

    2004-04-01

    This volume is the outcome of a three-day meeting held 7-10 August, 2004 in St Adèle, Québec honouring Michael F Thorpe, Foundation Professor of Physics, Chemistry and Biophysics at Arizona State University. Michael Thorpe has made many important contributions to condensed matter physics, broadly defined. From the famous Weaire and Thorpe Hamiltonian in 1971 [1] to rigidity percolation theory [2] and flexibility in proteins [3], he has always provided highly original solutions to difficult problems. He has also demonstrated an uncommon gift for selecting and solving problems of remarkably broad significance (for example, rigidity theory is now a powerful tool in glasses, microelectronics and proteins). Throughout his career, Mike has also made a point of establishing contact with scientists from all disciplines and origins, organizing tens of conferences and maintaining a very active visitor's program both at Michigan State University, where he spent 25 years, and, now, at Arizona State University, where he moved a year ago. It is therefore not surprising that the participants, all with scientific or personal links with Mike, usually both, came from Europe, Asia and North America to celebrate the 60th birthday of an eminent physicist and friend. Reflecting the impact of Mike's work across the traditional scientific boundaries, the meeting included contributions ranging from studies of concrete by Ed Garboczi (NIST), a hybrid VCA/CPA treatment of the Hubbard model presented by Sir Roger Elliott (Oxford) to the assembly process of viral capsids by Brandon Hespenheide (ASU). Especially memorable talks were given by Rafael Barrio (with his photogenic striped imperial fish), Alex Kolobov (presenting impressive scientific results using equally impressive computer graphics), and Dick Zallen, for a remarkably good `roast' of the honoree and work with his daughter (a molecular biologist) on biophysics. The meeting had an unusual warmth befitting the birthday celebration

  2. Modeling magnetic fields from a DC power cable buried beneath San Francisco Bay based on empirical measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Kavet, Robert; Wyman, Megan T.; Klimley, A. Peter; ...

    2016-02-25

    Here, the Trans Bay Cable (TBC) is a ±200-kilovolt (kV), 400 MW 85-km long High Voltage Direct Current (DC) buried transmission line linking Pittsburg, CA with San Francisco, CA (SF) beneath the San Francisco Estuary. The TBC runs parallel to the migratory route of various marine species, including green sturgeon, Chinook salmon, and steelhead trout. In July and August 2014, an extensive series of magnetic field measurements were taken using a pair of submerged Geometrics magnetometers towed behind a survey vessel in four locations in the San Francisco estuary along profiles that cross the cable’s path; these included the Sanmore » Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge (BB), the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge (RSR), the Benicia- Martinez Bridge (Ben) and an area in San Pablo Bay (SP) in which a bridge is not present. In this paper, we apply basic formulas that ideally describe the magnetic field from a DC cable summed vectorially with the background geomagnetic field (in the absence of other sources that would perturb the ambient field) to derive characteristics of the cable that are otherwise not immediately observable. Magnetic field profiles from measurements taken along 170 survey lines were inspected visually for evidence of a distinct pattern representing the presence of the cable. Many profiles were dominated by field distortions unrelated to the cable caused by bridge structures or other submerged objects, and the cable’s contribution to the field was not detectable. BB, with 40 of the survey lines, did not yield usable data for these reasons. The unrelated anomalies could be up to 100 times greater than those from the cable. In total, discernible magnetic field profiles measured from 76 survey lines were regressed against the equations, representing eight days of measurement. The modeled field anomalies due to the cable (the difference between the maximum and minimum field along the survey line at the cable crossing) were virtually identical to the measured

  3. Performance of Zinc Anodes for Cathodic Protection of Reinforced Concrete Bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Covino, Bernard S. Jr.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Russell, James H.; Collins, W. Keith; Laylor, Martin H.; Cryer, Curtis B.

    2002-03-01

    Operation of thermal spray zinc (Zn) anodes for cathodic protection (CP) of reinforced concrete structures was investigated in laboratory and field studies conducted by the Albany Research Center (ARC) in collaboration with the Oregon Department of Transportation. The purposes of the research presented in this report were: evaluate the need for preheating concrete to improve the adhesion of the anode; estimate the service life of thermal spray Zn CP anodes; determine the optimum thickness for Zn CP anodes; characterize the anode-concrete interfacial chemistry; and correlate field and laboratory results. Laboratory studies involved accelerated electrochemical aging of thermal sprayed Zn anodes on concrete slabs, some of which were periodically wetted while others were unwetted. Concrete used in the slabs contained either 1.2 or 3 kg NaCl /m3 (2 or 5 lbs NaCl /yd3) as part of the concrete mix design. The Zn anodes were applied to the slabs using the twin wire arc-spray technique. Half of the slabs were preheated to 120-160 C (250-320 F) to improve the initial Zn anode bond strength and the other half were not. Accelerated aging was done at a current density of 0.032 A/m2 (3 mA/ft2), 15 times that used on Oregon DOT Coastal bridges, i.e, . 0.0022 A/m2 (0.2 mA/ft2) Cores from the Cape Creek Bridge (OR), the Richmond San Rafael Bridge (CA), and the East Camino Underpass (CA) were used to study the anode-concrete interfacial chemistry, to relate the chemistry to electrochemical age at the time of sampling, and to compare the chemistry of the field anodes to the chemistry of anodes from the laboratory studies. Cores from a CALTRANS study of a silane sealant used prior to the application of the Zn anodes and cores with galvanized rebar from the Longbird Bridge (Bermuda) were also studied. Aged laboratory and field anodes were characterized by measuring some or all of the following parameters: thickness, bond strength, anode-concrete interfacial chemistry, bulk chemistry

  4. PREFACE: 21st Latin American Symposium on Solid State Physics (SLAFES XXI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar, J. Albino

    2014-04-01

    Colombia e-mail: dalandinezt@unal.edu.co Professor Laura T Corredor Bohórquez Departamento de Física Universidade Federal de Pernambuco 50670-901 Recife PE Brazil e-mail: ltcorredorb@df.ufpe.br Professor Arkady Shanenko Departamento de Física Universidade Federal de Pernambuco 50670-901 Recife PE Brazil e-mail: arkadyshanenko@df.ufpe.br Professor Renato F Jardim Instituto de Física Universidade de S\\~ao Paulo CP 66318 S\\~ao Paulo SP Brazil e-mail: rjardim@if.usp.br Professor Francois Peeters Department Fysica Universiteit Antwerpen Groneneborgerlann 171 B-2020, Antwerpen Belgium e-mail: francois.peeters@uantwerpen.be Organizing committee ChairmanCarlos Arturo Parra Vargas Proceedings EditorJosé Albino Aguiar Program ChairJairo Roa-Rojas SecretaryAura Janeth Barón González TreasurerArmando Sarmiento Santos Speaker ChairRafael González Hernández Fernando Naranjo Mayorga David A Landínez Téllez Jesús Oswaldo Morán José Sierra Ortega

  5. PREFACE: Strangeness in Quark Matter (SQM2009) Strangeness in Quark Matter (SQM2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraga, Eduardo; Kodama, Takeshi; Padula, Sandra; Takahashi, Jun

    2010-09-01

    by participants who often came from far away. (One presentation by the NA57 Collaboration is not included in these proceedings because it was recently published in this journal (2010 J. Phys. G: Nucl. Part. Phys. 37 045105) and may be accessed online. Other important contributions came from the unsung heroes who supported the organization of the meeting, to whom we would like to express our gratitude, in the name of the local organizing committee. In particular, the assistance from David Chinellato, Bruno Mintz, Philipe Mota, Leticia Palhares and Rafael de Souza is deeply acknowledged. We also wish to thank Cristina Coelho, Ana Lucia Moraes and Zelia Quadros for secretarial work, and the company META Events for administrative help. Last, but not least, we deeply acknowledge the editorial team of Journal of Physics G for their efficient and excellent work. The organization of the event was supported by CNPq, FAPERJ, PRONEX, RENAFAE/CBPF, Banco do Brasil, FAPESP and IOP Publishing.

  6. Measurement of Turbulent Water Vapor Fluxes from Lightweight Unmanned Aircraft Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, R. M.; Ramanathan, V.; Nguyen, H.; Lehmann*, K.

    2010-12-01

    wind tunnel investigations and the outcomes from test flights planned for September 2010 at a marine location are discussed. Acknowledgments We would like to acknowledge the significant contributions to this system made by the late Katrin Lehmann whose life was tragically cut short by a hiking accident. Katrin was responsible for the initial design, construction and programming of the UAS elements, and in doing so laid solid foundations for the system. We are indebted to NOAA, for funding this project through the research grant NOAA NA17RJ1231. Thank you also to Mike Marston of NASA, the BAE systems crew Phillip Corcoran and Rafael Gaytan, and Mike Rizen of UCSD Physics workshop for their mission roles. We would also like to thank NSF for long term support of the C4 UAS Program.

  7. Long-term changes in soil erosion due to forest fires. A rainfall simulation approach in Eastern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdà, Artemi; Keesstra, Saskia; Pereira, Paulo; Matrix-Solera, Jorge; Giménez-Morera, Antonio; Úbeda, Xavier; Francos, Marcos; Alcañiz, Meritxell; Jordán, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    -437. DOI: 10.1071/WF05044 Cerdà, A., Jurgensen, M.F., Bodi, M.B. 2009. Effects of ants on water and soil losses from organically-managed citrus orchards in eastern Spain. Biologia, 64 (3), 527-531. DOI: 10.2478/s11756-009-0114-7 Dlapa P., Bodí M.B., Mataix-Solera J., Cerdà A., Doerr S.H. 2015. Organic matter and wettability characteristics of wildfire ash from Mediterranean conifer forests. Catena, 135, 369-376. DOI: 10.1016/j.catena.2014.06.018 Dlapa, P., Bodí, M.B., Mataix-Solera, J., Cerdà, A., Doerr, S.H. 2013. FT-IR spectroscopy reveals that ash water repellency is highly dependent on ash chemical composition. Catena, 108, 35-43. DOI: 10.1016/j.catena.2012.02.011 Gessesse B., Bewket W., Bräuning A. 2015. Model-Based Characterization and Monitoring of Runoff and Soil Erosion in Response to Land Use/land Cover Changes in the Modjo Watershed, Ethiopia. (2015) Land Degradation and Development, 26 (7), 711-724.. DOI: 10. 1002/ldr. 2276 Hedo J., Lucas-Borja M. E., Wic C., Andrés-Abellán M., De Las Heras J. 2015. Soil microbiological properties and enzymatic activities of long-term post-fire recovery in dry and semiarid Aleppo pine (Pinus halepensis M.) forest stands. Solid Earth, 6 (1), 243-252. DOI: 10. 5194/se-6-243-2015 Hedo de Santiago, J., Lucas-Borja, M.E., Wic-Baena, C., Andrés-Abellán, M., de las Heras, J. 2015. Effects of thinning and induced drought on microbiological soil properties and plant species diversity at dry and semiarid locations. Land Degradation and Development, DOI: 10.1002/ldr.2361 Iserloh, T., Ries, B.J., Cerdà, A., Echeverría, M.T., Fister, W., Geißler, C., Kuhn, N.J., León, F.J., Peters, P., Schindewolf, M., Schmidt, J., Scholten, T., Seeger, M. 2013. Comparative measurements with seven rainfall s simulators on uniform bare fallow land. Zeitschrift fur Geomorphologie, 57 (1 SUPPL. 1), 1-10. DOI: 10.1127/0372-8854/2012/S-00085 Jordán-López, A., Martínez-Zavala, L., Bellinfante, N. 2009. Impact of different parts of unpaved forest

  8. Exoplanets Clue to Sun's Curious Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-11-01

    . "Like our Sun, these stars have been very efficient at destroying the lithium they inherited at birth," says team member Nuno Santos. "Using our unique, large sample, we can also prove that the reason for this lithium reduction is not related to any other property of the star, such as its age." Unlike most other elements lighter than iron, the light nuclei of lithium, beryllium and boron are not produced in significant amounts in stars. Instead, it is thought that lithium, composed of just three protons and four neutrons, was mainly produced just after the Big Bang, 13.7 billion years ago. Most stars will thus have the same amount of lithium, unless this element has been destroyed inside the star. This result also provides the astronomers with a new, cost-effective way to search for planetary systems: by checking the amount of lithium present in a star astronomers can decide which stars are worthy of further significant observing efforts. Now that a link between the presence of planets and curiously low levels of lithium has been established, the physical mechanism behind it has to be investigated. "There are several ways in which a planet can disturb the internal motions of matter in its host star, thereby rearrange the distribution of the various chemical elements and possibly cause the destruction of lithium. It is now up to the theoreticians to figure out which one is the most likely to happen," concludes Mayor. More information This research was presented in a paper that appears in the 12 November 2009 issue of Nature (Enhanced lithium depletion in Sun-like stars with orbiting planets, by G. Israelian et al.). The team is composed of Garik Israelian, Elisa Delgado Mena, Carolina Domínguez Cerdeña, and Rafael Rebolo (Instituto de Astrofisíca de Canarias, La Laguna, Tenerife, Spain), Nuno Santos and Sergio Sousa (Centro de Astrofisica, Universidade de Porto, Portugal), Michel Mayor and Stéphane Udry (Observatoire de Genève, Switzerland), and Sofia Randich (INAF

  9. EDITORIAL: Focus on Quantum Dissipation in Unconventional Environments FOCUS ON QUANTUM DISSIPATION IN UNCONVENTIONAL ENVIRONMENTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grifoni, Milena; Paladino, Elisabetta

    2008-11-01

    'unconventional' questions were still open on the standard harmonic oscillator and spin baths. This includes both fundamental issues, such as the possibility of estimating the specific heat for a free particle in the presence of dissipation, and the development of methods suitable to dealing with long range correlations at zero temperature and with quantum chaotic environments. We believe that the present focus issue on Quantum Dissipation in Unconventional Environments, although certainly not exhaustive, provides an important open-access resource that presents the latest state of the art of research in this field along its different lines. Focus on Quantum Dissipation in Unconventional Environments Contents Dephasing by electron-electron interactions in a ballistic Mach-Zehnder interferometer Clemens Neuenhahn and Florian Marquardt Quantum frustration of dissipation by a spin bath D D Bhaktavatsala Rao, Heiner Kohler and Fernando Sols A random matrix theory of decoherence T Gorin, C Pineda, H Kohler and T H Seligman Dissipative dynamics of a biased qubit coupled to a harmonic oscillator: analytical results beyond the rotating wave approximation Johannes Hausinger and Milena Grifoni Dissipative dynamics of a two-level system resonantly coupled to a harmonic mode Frederico Brito and Amir O Caldeira Spin correlations in spin blockade Rafael Sánchez, Sigmund Kohler and Gloria Platero Landau-Zener tunnelling in dissipative circuit QED David Zueco, Peter Hänggi and Sigmund Kohler Quantum oscillations in the spin-boson model: reduced visibility from non-Markovian effects and initial entanglement F K Wilhelm Dynamics of dissipative coupled spins: decoherence, relaxation and effects of a spin-boson bath P Nägele, G Campagnano and U Weiss Spin chain model for correlated quantum channels Davide Rossini, Vittorio Giovannetti and Simone Montangero Finite quantum dissipation: the challenge of obtaining specific heat Peter Hänggi, Gert-Ludwig Ingold and Peter Talkner Dynamics of large

  10. Estuarine sedimentation, sediment character, and foraminiferal distribution in central San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chin, John L.; Woodrow, Donald L.; McGann, Mary; Wong, Florence L.; Fregoso, Theresa; Jaffe, Bruce E.

    2010-01-01

    dominantly by sand- to coarse sand-sized sediment. Sandy areas also include Raccoon Strait, off Point Tiburon, and on the subtidal Alcatraz, Point Knox, and Presidio Shoals. Drab-colored silty clays are the dominant sediment observed in gravity cores from central bay. Their dominance along the length of the core suggests that silty clays have been deposited consistently over much of this subembayment for the time period covered by the recovered sediments (Woodrow and others, this report). Stratification types include weakly-defined laminae, 1-3 mm thick. Few examples of horizontal lamination in very fine sand or silt were observed. Cross lamination, including ripples, was observed in seven cores. Erosional surfaces were evident in almost every core where x-radiographs were available (they are very difficult to observe visually). Minor cut-and-fill structures also were noted in three cores and inclined strata were observed in three cores. Textural patterns in central bay indicate that silts and clays dominate the shallow water areas and margins of the bay. Sand dominates the tidal channel just east of Angel and Alcatraz Islands and to the west of the islands to the Golden Gate. The pattern of sand-sized sediment, as determined by particle-size analysis, suggests that sand movement is easterly from the west-central part of the bay. A second pattern of sand movement is to the south from the southwestern extremity of San Pablo Bay (boundary approximated by the location of the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge). Age dates for central bay sediment samples were obtained by carbon-14 radiometric age dating. Age dates were determined from shell material that was interpreted to be largely in-place (not transported). Age dates subsequently were reservoir corrected and then converted to calendar years. Sediments sampled from central bay cores range in age from 330 to 4,155 years before present. Foraminiferal distribution in the San Francisco Bay estuary is fairly well

  11. DOE Chair of Excellence in Environmental Disciplines-Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kurunganty, Sastry; Loran, Roberto; Roque-Malherbe, Rolando; Hijazi, Yazan; Nieto, Santander; Gomez, Will A.; Duconge, Jose; Cotto, María del C.; Muniz, Carlos; Diaz, Francisco J.; Neira, Carlos F.; Marquez, Francisco; Del Valle, W.; Thommes, M.

    2014-02-19

    Characterization of low Refractive Index Aerogel Silica for Cherenkov Counters- Dr. Rolando Roque-Malherbe Sub-project PI, Dr. Jose Duconge Sub-project Co-PI, Dr. Santander Nieto Assistant Researcher, Francisco Diaz and Carlos Neira Associate Researchers. The initial aim of this sub-project was changed to the synthesis and characterization of extremely high specific surface area aerogel silica for gas storage. A high specific surface area silica gel that has applications in gas drying, cleaning operation useful in nuclear industry in process was developed. Sub-Project 2: Investigation Study of Magnetic and Electronic Transport Properties at Material Interfaces in Magnetic Multilayer Heterostructure using Gd. – Dr. Yazan Hijazi, Sub-project Co-PI. UT developed the capability and infrastructure to produce high quality thin-film magnetic films and magnetic multilayer structures with fine control over film quality and thickness using sputter deposition capability to perform in-house electric and magnetic characterization of these films. The research experimentally quantified the effect of Gd incorporation within the magnetic multilayer structure and produce magnetic media with exchanged decoupled multilevel magnetic anisotropy. From September 2006 to September 2011 the Massie Chair produced nineteen (19) publications, (including 3 books), five (5) presentations and three (3) international conferences abstracts. A total of fourteen (14) undergraduates and (6) graduate students acquired research experience. Two Ph.D. students presented their dissertations on topics related to nuclear energy and graduated as follows: María Cotto (May 2009) and Eric Calderón (May 2011). Five of the participating undergraduate students graduated: Ramon Polanco (BSME, May 2009), Jason Pérez (BSEE, May 2008), Rafael Colón (BSME, May 2008), Jessenia Marfisi (BS Chemistry, May 2008). Eleven (11) students were sent to National Laboratories (LANL, SNL and LLNL), NNSA and DoE facilities for summer

  12. PREFACE New developments in nanopore research—from fundamentals to applications New developments in nanopore research—from fundamentals to applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Tim; Edel, Joshua B.; Winterhalter, Mathias

    2010-11-01

    refereeing process, and Ms Natalia Goehring for the beautiful cover artwork. Finally, to the readers, we hope you find this special issue a valuable source of information and insight into the field of nanopores. New developments in nanopore research—from fundamentals to applications contents Mathematical modeling and simulation of nanopore blocking by precipitation M-T Wolfram, M Burger and Z S Siwy Protein conducting nanopores Anke Harsman, Vivien Krüger, Philipp Bartsch, Alf Honigmann, Oliver Schmidt, Sanjana Rao, Christof Meisinger and Richard Wagner Electrically sensing protease activity with nanopores Mikiembo Kukwikila and Stefan Howorka Electrical characterization of DNA-functionalized solid state nanopores for bio-sensing V Mussi, P Fanzio, L Repetto, G Firpo, P Scaruffi, S Stigliani, M Menotta, M Magnani, G P Tonini and U Valbusa Automatable lipid bilayer formation and ion channel measurement using sessile droplets J L Poulos, S A Portonovo, H Bang and J J Schmidt Critical assessment of OmpF channel selectivity: merging information from different experimental protocols M L López, E García-Giménez, V M Aguilella and A Alcaraz Chemically modified solid state nanopores for high throughput nanoparticle separation Anmiv S Prabhu, Talukder Zaki N Jubery, Kevin J Freedman, Rafael Mulero, Prashanta Dutta and Min Jun Kim Changes in ion channel geometry resolved to sub-ångström precision via single molecule mass spectrometry Joseph W F Robertson, John J Kasianowicz and Joseph E Reiner Entropic transport of finite size particles W Riefler, G Schmid, P S Burada and P Hänggi Osmotic stress regulates the strength and kinetics of sugar binding to the maltoporin channel Philip A Gurnev, Daniel Harries, V Adrian Parsegian and Sergey M Bezrukov Detection of urea-induced internal denaturation of dsDNA using solid-state nanoporesn Alon Singer, Heiko Kuhn, Maxim Frank-Kamenetskii and Amit Meller Translocation events in a single-walled carbon nanotube Jin He, Hao Liu, Pei Pang

  13. Obituary: Jörn Rossa (1969-2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veras, Dimitri

    2009-12-01

    evolve into ellipticals. Joern then moved to the University of Florida (UF) in 2006 to work as a core team member of the Flamingos 2 Extra-Galactic Survey. This survey aims at deriving the star formation histories, masses and metallicities of star formation galaxies at redshifts between 2.0-2.5 and also at deriving the properties (e.g., black hole masses) of AGN and at studying the optically obscured AGN at intermediate to high redshifts (z > 1.5). Joern was largely responsible for the target selection strategies for both samples (star-forming galaxies and AGN), for coordinating the weekly group meetings, and for designing a web-page for the extragalactic group. He was interested in using the survey to answer several cosmological questions in collaboration with Vicki Sarajedini, Rafael Guzmän, Fred Hamann, Anthony Gonzalez, the Flamingos-2 instrument PI, Stephen Eikenberry (all from UF), and with additional collaborators from the Complutense University of Madrid, Spain. Joern also worked with Vicki Sarajedini on SED fitting of variability-selected AGN in the Chandra Deep Field South. Joern was a very versatile observer, complementing his belief that understanding of the star-formation activity in galaxies can be only achieved through a multi-wavelength study of various galaxy types. In addition to research, Joern had a strong desire to be involved in the logistical aspects of science. At STScI he participated in the support group for the time allocation committee and at UF he was the postdoctoral representative of the space allocation committee. He photographed the UF staff for the departmental webpage and was a designated photographer at a local conference and other events. He also participated in the public Museum nights at UF. He was always eager to provide his feedback on the scientific and practical issues of astronomy and filled in many surveys distributed to the astronomical community. His colleagues and friends could always count on Joern to be extremely

  14. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-08-01

    ; there is an honorarium of 1500 plus expenses.

    Welch Award

    Roger D. Kornberg, a professor of structural biology at the Stanford University School of Medicine, received the 2001 Welch Award for his discovery of the nucleosome and establishing its role in gene regulation; for his discovery of a giant complex of 20 proteins known as the "Mediator", which regulates the transcription process; and for determining the atomic structure of RNA polymerase II. The 300,000 award salutes Kornberg's lifetime contributions to biochemistry.

    NSTA Teacher Awards

    During its 2001 national convention the National Science Teachers Association presented prizes and awards to teachers for their exemplary teaching practices and commitment to quality science education. Many appear below.
    Distinguished Service to Science Education Award
    • JoAnne Vasquez, Science Consultant, Gilbert, AZ
    • Richard F. Duncan, Beaverton Administrative Center, Beaverton, OR
    • Mitchell E. Batoff, New Jersey City University, Jersey City, NJ
    Distinguished Informal Science Education Award
    • Al Stenstrup, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Madison, WI
    Ciba Specialty Chemicals Education Foundation Exemplary Science Teaching Award, High School Level
    • Gerald Friday, Marquette High School, Milwaukee, WI
    Gustav Ohaus Innovations in Science Teaching, High School
    • Mark Stefanski, Marin Academy, San Rafael, CA (first place)
    • James A. Szoka, Clarke County High School, Berryville, VA (second place)
    Gustav Ohaus Innovations in Science Teaching, College
    • William F. McComas, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (first place)
    • Barbara M. Lom, Davidson College, Davidson, NC (second place)

    Courses, Seminars, Meetings, Opportunities

    Proposal Deadlines

    Proposal Deadlines will not appear this month. Readers should consult

  15. News and Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-02-01

    Research Council, 2101 Constitution Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20418, via email at infofell@nas.edu, or at http://fellowships.nas.edu. 1998 Pre-Doctoral Fellows Rafael Alcala, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Chemical Engineering Diego J. Díaz, Cornell University, Analytical Chemistry Kanya Lynn Henderson, Colorado State University, Biochemistry Félix Mario Rivas, State University of New York, Buffalo, Organic Chemistry 1998 Dissertation Fellows Kristala Lanett Jones, Arizona State University, Chemical Engineering 1998 Postdoctoral Fellows Edgardo Tabión Farinas, Yale University, Interdisciplinary Chemistry Data Base of Online Courses TeleEducation NB, a province-wide distributed distance learning network in the Canadian province of New Brunswick, has implemented an international online course database of more than 9,000 courses. The database includes public and private courses at all levels from more than 15 countries and includes only those courses that can be completed fully online. Courses vary from graduate-level engineering offerings to simple "How to" courses. The database provides access to courses and programs leading to accredited degrees, diplomas, and certificates. Professional development and personal interest courses are also included. Students can access course information by browsing subject areas or by searching specific fields. Hotlinks connect students directly to the delivering institutions. In the past year, there has been an exponential rise in the number of courses being offered online, from fewer than 2,000 in January 1998 to more than 10,000 in December 1998. It is expected that there will be more than 40,000 online courses by the year 2000. The TeleCampus Online Course Database provides students with a means of finding information on courses that meet their needs. The database can be accessed from TeleCampus at http://telecampus.edu. Change in the Introductory Chemistry Course, an Online Course An online conference, Proposals for Change in the

  16. The Harsh Destiny of a Planet?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-05-01

    mass of about three times the mass of the Earth. The observational search for Lithium-6 in other stars with planetary systems now continues. In due time, it will permit to better understand the formation and evolution of the newly discovered exoplanets. In particular, it will demonstrate whether the fall of planets into their host stars is a common process or not. More information Further detailed information is available in the research article ("Evidence for planet engulfment by the star HD 82943", by G. Israelian, N.C. Santos, M. Mayor and R. Rebolo), published in the May 10, 2001, issue of the international research journal Nature. Notes [1] The team consists of Garik Israelian and Rafael Rebolo (Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Spain), Nuno C. Santos and Michel Mayor (Geneva Observatory, Switzerland). [2] The nuclei of Lithium-6 ( 6 Li) atoms consist of three protons and three neutrons; those of Lithium-7 ( 7 Li) have three protons and four neutrons. Both isotopes were produced during the Big Bang and in spallation reactions in the interstellar medium. [3] According to the "traditional" view, giant planets like Jupiter would be formed by rapidly accelerating ("runaway") accretion of gas around an initial, icy "planetesimal" with a mass of about 10 Earth masses. An associated prediction was that giant planets would only be found at a distance of at least 750 million kilometres (5 Astronomical Units; or five times the distance between the Earth and the Sun) from their host stars and that their orbits would be circular, like the orbits of the planets in the Solar System. Technical information about the photo PR Photo 17/01 shows the spectrum of the V = 6.5 mag star HD 82943 , as obtained on June 7, 2000, with the UVES spectrograph at the 8.2-m VLT KUEYEN telescope. It is based on three exposures made with Image Slicer 3 in Director's Discretionary Time in Service Mode, and each lasting 120 sec. The spectral resolution is 110,000 and the final S/N-ratio is about